Réfugiés: Attention, une préférence peut en cacher une autre (Refugee madness: Our tradition has never been an unlimited open-door policy)

29 janvier, 2017
byanymeans

open-borders

christians_muslims_convert_die_syria_1
syrian_refugee_graph
no-jews mecca-muslims-only-road-signNous déclarons notre droit sur cette terre, à être des êtres humains, à être respectés en tant qu’êtres humains, à accéder aux droits des êtres humains dans cette société, sur cette terre, en ce jour, et nous comptons le mettre en œuvre par tous les moyens nécessaires. Malcom X (1964)
Ce n’est pas en refusant de mentir que nous abolirons le mensonge : c’est en usant de tous les moyens pour supprimer les classes. (…) Tous les moyens sont bons lorsqu’ils sont efficaces. Jean-Paul Sartre (les mains sales, II, 5, 1963)
L’avenir ne doit pas appartenir à ceux qui calomnient le prophète de l’Islam. Barack Obama (siège de l’ONU, New York, 26.09.12)
Ils ont été horriblement traités. Savez-vous que si vous étiez chrétien en Syrie, il était impossible, ou du moins très difficile d’entrer aux États-Unis ? Si vous étiez un musulman, vous pouviez entrer, mais si vous étiez chrétien, c’était presque impossible et la raison était si injuste, tout le monde était persécuté… Ils ont coupé les têtes de tout le monde, mais plus encore des chrétiens. Et je pensais que c’était très, très injuste. Nous allons donc les aider. Donald Trump
L’amour du prochain est une valeur chrétienne et cela implique de venir en aide aux autres. Je crois que c’est ce qui unit les pays occidentaux. Sigmar Gabriel (ministre allemand des Affaires étrangères)
Obama, franchement il fait partie des gens qui détestent l’Amérique. Il a servi son idéologie mais pas l’Amérique. Je remets en cause son patriotisme et sa dévotion à l’église qu’il fréquentait. Je pense qu’il était en désaccord avec lui-même sur beaucoup de choses. Je pense qu’il était plus musulman dans son cœur que chrétien. Il n’a pas voulu prononcer le terme d’islamisme radical, ça lui écorchait les lèvres. Je pense que dans son cœur, il est musulman, mais on en a terminé avec lui, Dieu merci. Evelyne Joslain
Christians are believed to have constituted about 30% of the Syrian population as recently as the 1920s. Today, they make up about 10% of Syria’s 22 million people. Hundreds of thousands of Christians have been displaced by fighting or left the country. Melkite Greek Catholic Patriarch Gregorios III Laham said last year that more than 1,000 Christians had been killed, entire villages cleared, and dozens of churches and Christian centres damaged or destroyed. Many fear that if President Assad is overthrown, Christians will be targeted and communities destroyed as many were in Iraq after the US-led invasion in 2003. They have also been concerned by the coming to power of Islamist parties in post-revolutionary Egypt and Tunisia. Patriarch Gregorios said the threat to Christianity in Syria had wider implications for the religion’s future in the Middle East because the country had for decades provided a refuge for Christians from neighbouring Lebanon, Iraq and elsewhere. BBC
The Orlando nightclub shooter, the worst mass-casualty gunman in US history, was the son of immigrants from Afghanistan. The San Bernardino shooters were first and second generation immigrants from Pakistan. Nidal Hassan, the Fort Hood killer, was the son of Palestinian immigrants. The Tsarnaev brothers who detonated bombs at the 2013 Boston marathon held Kyrgyz nationality. The would-be 2010 Times Square car bomber was a naturalized immigrant from Pakistan. The ringleader of the Paris attacks of November 2015, about which Donald Trump spoke so much on the campaign trail, was a Belgian national of Moroccan origins. President Trump’s version of a Muslim ban would have protected the United States from none of the above. (…) As ridiculous as was the former Obama position that Islamic terrorism has nothing to do with Islam, the new Trump position that all Muslims are potential terrorists is vastly worse. What Trump has done is to divide and alienate potential allies—and push his opponents to embrace the silliest extremes of the #WelcomeRefugees point of view. By issuing his order on Holocaust Remembrance Day, Trump empowered his opponents to annex the victims of Nazi crimes to their own purposes. The Western world desperately needs a more hardheaded approach to the issue of refugees. It is bound by laws and treaties written after World War II that have been rendered utterly irrelevant by a planet on the move. Tens of millions of people seek to exit the troubled regions of Central America, the Middle East, West Africa, and South Asia for better opportunities in Europe and North America. The relatively small portion of that number who have reached the rich North since 2013 have already up-ended the politics of the United States, the United Kingdom, and the European Union. German chancellor Angela Merkel’s August 2015 order to fling open Germany’s doors is the proximate cause of the de-democratization of Poland since September 2015, of the rise of Marine LePen in France, of the surge in support for Geert Wilders in the Netherlands, and—I would argue—of Britain’s vote to depart the European Union. The surge of border crossers from Central America into the United States in 2014, and Barack Obama’s executive amnesties, likewise strengthened Donald Trump. (…) without the dreamy liberal refusal to recognize the reality of nationhood, the meaning of citizenship, and the differences between cultures, Trump would never have gained the power to issue that order. (…) When liberals insist that only fascists will defend borders, then voters will hire fascists to do the job liberals won’t do. This weekend’s shameful chapter in the history of the United States is a reproach not only to Trump, although it is that too, but to the political culture that enabled him. Angela Merkel and Donald Trump may be temperamental opposites. They are also functional allies. David Frum
Trump isn’t making this up; Obama-administration policy effectively discriminated against persecuted religious-minority Christians from Syria (even while explicitly admitting that ISIS was pursuing a policy of genocide against Syrian Christians), and the response from most of Trump’s liberal critics has been silence (…) Liberals are normally the first people to argue that American policy should give preferential treatment to groups that are oppressed and discriminated against, but because Christians are the dominant religious group here — and the bêtes noires of domestic liberals — there is little liberal interest in accommodating U.S. refugee policy to the reality on the ground in Syria. So long as Obama could outsource religious discrimination against Christian refugees to Jordan and the U.N., his supporters preferred the status quo to admitting that Trump might have a point. On the whole, 2016 was the first time in a decade when the United States let in more Muslim than Christian refugees, 38,901 overall, 75 percent of them from Syria, Somalia, and Iraq, all countries on Trump’s list — and all countries in which the United States has been actively engaged in drone strikes or ground combat over the past year. Obama had been planning to dramatically expand that number, to 110,000, in 2017 — only after he was safely out of office. This brings us to a broader point: The United States in general, and the Obama administration in particular, never had an open-borders policy for all refugees from everywhere, so overwrought rhetoric about Trump ripping down Lady Liberty’s promise means comparing him to an ideal state that never existed. In fact, the Obama administration completely stopped processing refugees from Iraq for six months in 2011 over concerns about terrorist infiltration, a step nearly identical to Trump’s current order, but one that was met with silence and indifference by most of Trump’s current critics. Only two weeks ago, Obama revoked a decades-old “wet foot, dry foot” policy of allowing entry to refugees from Cuba who made it to our shores. His move, intended to signal an easing of tensions with the brutal Communist dictatorship in Havana, has stranded scores of refugees in Mexico and Central America, and Mexico last Friday deported the first 91 of them to Cuba. This, too, has no claim on the conscience of Trump’s liberal critics. After all, Cuban Americans tend to vote Republican. Even more ridiculous and blinkered is the suggestion that there may be something unconstitutional about refusing entry to refugees or discriminating among them on religious or other bases (a reaction that was shared at first by some Republicans, including Mike Pence, when Trump’s plan was announced in December 2015). There are plenty of moral and political arguments on these points, but foreigners have no right under our Constitution to demand entry to the United States or to challenge any reason we might have to refuse them entry, even blatant religious discrimination. Under Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution, Congress’s powers in this area are plenary, and the president’s powers are as broad as the Congress chooses to give him. If liberals are baffled as to why even the invocation of the historically problematic “America First” slogan by Trump is popular with almost two-thirds of the American public, they should look no further than people arguing that foreigners should be treated by the law as if they were American citizens with all the rights and protections we give Americans. Liberals are likewise on both unwise and unpopular ground in sneering at the idea that there might be an increased risk of radical Islamist terrorism resulting from large numbers of Muslims entering the country as refugees or asylees. There have been many such cases in Europe, ranging from terrorists (as in the Brussels attack) posing as refugees to the infiltration of radicals and the radicalization of new entrants. The 9/11 plotters, several of whom overstayed their visas in the U.S. after immigrating from the Middle East to Germany, are part of that picture as well. Here in the U.S., we have had a number of terror attacks carried out by foreign-born Muslims or their children. The Tsarnaev brothers who carried out the Boston Marathon bombing were children of asylees; the Times Square bomber was a Pakistani immigrant; the underwear bomber was from Nigeria; the San Bernardino shooter was the son of Pakistani immigrants; the Chattanooga shooter was from Kuwait; the Fort Hood shooter was the son of Palestinian immigrants. All of this takes place against the backdrop of a global movement of radical Islamist terrorism that kills tens of thousands of people a year in terrorist attacks and injures or kidnaps tens of thousands more. There are plenty of reasons not to indict the entire innocent Muslim population, including those who come as refugees or asylees seeking to escape tyranny and radicalism, for the actions of a comparatively small percentage of radicals. But efforts to salami-slice the problem into something that looks like a minor or improbable outlier, or to compare this to past waves of immigrants, are an insult to the intelligence of the public. The tradeoffs from a more open-borders posture are real, and the reasons for wanting our screening process to be a demanding one are serious. Like it or not, there’s a war going on out there, and many of its foot soldiers are ideological radicals who wear no uniform and live among the people they end up attacking. If your only response to these issues is to cry “This is just xenophobia and bigotry,” you’re either not actually paying attention to the facts or engaging in the same sort of intellectual beggary that leads liberals to refuse to distinguish between legal and illegal immigrants. Andrew Cuomo declared this week, “If there is a move to deport immigrants, I say then start with me” — because his grandparents were immigrants. This is unserious and childish: President Obama deported over 2.5 million people in eight years in office, and I didn’t see Governor Cuomo getting on a boat back to Italy. (…) A more trenchant critique of Trump’s order is that he’s undercutting his own argument by how narrow the order is. Far from a “Muslim ban,” the order applies to only seven of the world’s 50 majority-Muslim countries. Three of those seven (Iran, Syria, and Sudan) are designated by the State Department as state sponsors of terror, but the history of terrorism by Islamist radicals over the past two decades — even state-sponsored terrorism – is dominated by people who are not from countries engaged in officially recognized state-sponsored terrorism. The 9/11 hijackers were predominantly Saudi, and a significant number of other attacks have been planned or carried out by Egyptians, Pakistanis, and people from the various Gulf states. But a number of these countries have more significant business and political ties to the United States (and in some cases to the Trump Organization as well), so it’s more inconvenient to add them to the list. Simply put, there’s no reason to believe that the countries on the list are more likely to send us terrorists than the countries off the list. That said, the seven states selected do include most of the influx of refugees and do present particular logistical problems in vetting the backgrounds of refugees. If Trump’s goal is simply to beef up screening after a brief pause, he’s on firmer ground. (…) But our tradition has never been an unlimited open-door policy, and President Trump’s latest moves are not nearly such a dramatic departure from the Obama administration as Trump’s liberal critics (or even many of his fans) would have you believe. Dan McLaughlin
Experts say another reason for the lack of Christians in the makeup of the refugees is the makeup of the camps. Christians in the main United Nations refugee camp in Jordan are subject to persecution, they say, and so flee the camps, meaning they are not included in the refugees referred to the U.S. by the U.N. “The Christians don’t reside in those camps because it is too dangerous,” Shea said. “They are preyed upon by other residents from the Sunni community, and there is infiltration by ISIS and criminal gangs.” “They are raped, abducted into slavery and they are abducted for ransom. It is extremely dangerous; there is not a single Christian in the Jordanian camps for Syrian refugees,” Shea said. Fox news
Les États-Unis ont accepté 10 801 réfugiés syriens, dont 56 chrétiens. Pas 56 pour cent; 56 au total, sur 10 801. C’est-à-dire la moitié de 1 pour cent. Newsweek

Attention: une préférence peut en cacher une autre !

Alors qu’après l’accident industriel Obama qui a mis avec l’abandon de l’Irak le Moyen-Orient à feu et à sang …

Et sa version Merkel qui a déversé sur l’Europe, avec son lot d’attentats, une véritable invasion musulmane …

Sans compter après l’expulsion des juifs et leur interdiction d’accès dans nombre de pays musulmans, la menace de la disparition de son berceau historique de la totalité de la population chrétienne …

Nos belles âmes n’ont pas, entre deux appels plus ou moins subtils à l’assassinat du nouveau président américain, de mots assez durs …

Pour condamner – même s’il oublie étrangement les fourriers saoudiens et qataris ou pakistanais dudit terrorisme – le moratoire de trois mois de ce dernier …

Sur l’entrée des citoyens de sept pays particulièrement à risque (Syrie, Irak, Iran, Libye, Somalie, Soudan et Yemen) …

Et de quatre mois sur l’accueil de réfugiés de pays en guerre ainsi que la priorité aux réfugiés chrétiens de Syrie …

Devinez combien de chrétiens figuraient dans les quelque 10 000 réfugiés syriens que les Etats-Unis ont accueillis l’an dernier ?

Tollé international après le décret anti-réfugiés de Donald Trump
Les Echos
28/01 / 17

Au lendemain de la signature d’un décret interdisant l’entrée aux Etats-Unis pour les ressortissants de sept pays à majorité musulmane, la communauté internationale a fait part de son indignation.

Les réactions ne se sont pas faites attendre. Au lendemain de la signature d’un décret suspendant l’entrée aux Etats-Unis des réfugiés et des ressortissants de sept pays majoritairement musulmans, la communauté internationale n’a pas dissimulé son indignation.

A commencer par François Hollande qui a exhorté l’Europe à « engager avec fermeté » le dialogue avec le président américain. Le chef de l’Etat français a d’ailleurs fait cette déclaration quelques heures avant son premier entretien téléphonique avec son homologue américain.

Ce samedi soir, à l’occasion d’un appel prévu entre les deux présidents, Hollande en a profité pour rappeler à Trump que « le repli sur soi est une réponse sans issue », a rapporté l’Elysée. Il a par ailleurs invité le président américain au « respect » du principe de « l’accueil des réfugiés ».

L’Allemagne et la France sur la même ligne

Plus tôt dans la journée, les chefs de la diplomatie française et allemande ont aussi exprimé leur inquiétude. « Nous avons des engagements internationaux que nous avons signés. L’accueil des réfugiés qui fuient la guerre, qui fuient l’oppression, ça fait partie de nos devoirs », a martelé Jean-Marc Ayrault.

« L’amour du prochain est une valeur chrétienne et cela implique de venir en aide aux autres. Je crois que c’est ce qui unit les pays occidentaux », a renchérit Sigmar Gabriel, nommé ministre allemand des Affaires étrangères vendredi.

Côté Royaume-Uni, Theresa May a quant à elle refusé de condamner la décision de Donald Trump. « Les Etats-Unis sont responsables de la politique américaine sur les refugiés. Le Royaume-Uni est responsable de la politique britannique sur les réfugiés », a-t-elle répondu. « Nous ne sommes pas d’accord avec ce type d’approche », a néanmoins précisé un porte-parole, indiquant que le gouvernement britannique interviendrait si la mesure venait à avoir un impact sur les citoyens de son pays.

Réactions des principaux concernés

Concerné par le décret, l’Iran a vivement réagi ce samedi. La République islamique « prendra les mesures consulaires, juridiques et politiques appropriées », a expliqué le ministère des Affaires étrangères dans un communiqué, parlant d' »un affront fait ouvertement au monde musulman et à la nation iranienne ».

L’exécutif iranien a aussi déclaré que « tout en respectant le peuple américain et pour défendre les droits de ses citoyens », il a décidé « d’appliquer la réciprocité après la décision insultante des Etats-Unis concernant les ressortissants iraniens et tant que cette mesure n’aura pas été levée. »

Pour l’instant, les autres pays visés par ce décret, à savoir l’Irak, la Libye, la Somalie, le Soudan, la Syrie et le Yémen, n’ont pas réagi publiquement. En revanche, le Premier ministre turc a affirmé que la crise des réfugiés ne serait pas résolue « en érigeant des murs ». La Turquie est le premier pays à subir de plein fouet les conséquences de la guerre civile en Syrie et l’afflux de réfugiés.

Le Canada continuera d’accueillir des réfugiés « indépendamment de leur foi »

Sans commenter directement la décision américaine, le Premier ministre canadien Justin Trudeau a affirmé la volonté de son pays d’accueillir les réfugiés « indépendamment de leur foi ».

Répondant d’autre part à des inquiétudes sur l’impact du décret sur le Canada, le bureau du Premier ministre a affirmé tard dans la soirée avoir reçu des assurances de Washington que les Canadiens possédant la double nationalité des pays visés ne seraient pas affectés par l’interdiction.

Soutien israélien

Le président américain a en revanche été applaudi par le président tchèque Milos Zeman qui s’est félicité de que le président américain « protège son pays » et se soucie « de la sécurité de ses citoyens. Exactement ce que les élites européennes ne font pas », a tweeté son porte-parole.

De même pour le Premier ministre israélien, Benjamin Netanyahu, qui a écrit sur son compte twitter : « Président Trump a raison. J’ai fait construire un mur aux frontières sud d’Israël. Ca a empêché l’immigration illégale. Un vrai succès. Une grande idée. »

Indignation aux Etats-Unis

Sur le sol américain, le décret intitulé « Protéger la nation contre l’entrée de terroristes étrangers aux Etats-Unis » a déjà fait déjà l’objet d’une plainte déposée par plusieurs associations de défense des droits civiques américaines, dont la puissante ACLU, qui veulent le bloquer.

L’opposition démocrate aux Etats-Unis a de son côté dénoncé un décret « cruel » qui sape « nos valeurs fondamentales et nos traditions, menace notre sécurité nationale et démontre une méconnaissance totale de notre strict processus de vérification, le plus minutieux du monde » selon les mots du sénateur démocrate Ben Cardin, membre de la commission des Affaires étrangères du Sénat.

Ces mesures figuraient en bonne place dans le programme du candidat républicain, qui avait un temps envisagé d’interdire à tous les musulmans de se rendre aux Etats-Unis.

Voir aussi:

Trump annonce la suspension du programme d’accueil des réfugiés le 27 janvier 2017 dans les locaux du Pentagone à Washington. © Carlos Barria/Reuters

Donald Trump tient ses promesses de campagne. Cette fois, c’est sur la protection du territoire contre la menace terroriste qu’il a signé deux décrets. L’un interdit l’accès aux citoyens de sept pays arabes, l’autre met en pause l’accueil de réfugiés de pays en guerre.

Les ressortissants de sept pays sont désormais persona non grata aux Etats-Unis. Ainsi en a décidé le nouveau président Donald Trump en fermant temporairement l’accès de son pays aux citoyens de Syrie, de l’Irak, de la Libye, de la Somalie, du Soudan et du Yemen. Objectif affirmé par Donald Trump, «maintenir les terroristes islamistes radicaux hors des Etats-Unis d’Amérique».

Il a annoncé que de nouvelles mesures de contrôle seraient mises sur pied, sans préciser lesquelles. «Nous voulons être sûrs que nous ne laissons pas entrer dans notre pays les mêmes menaces que celles que nos soldats combattent à l’étranger.»
Dans le même temps le président annonce que priorité sera donnée aux réfugiés chrétiens de Syrie.

Washington va également arrêter pendant quatre mois le programme d’accueil des réfugiés de pays en guerre. Pour l’année 2016, l’administration américaine avait admis près de 85.000 réfugiés, dont 10.000 Syriens. Elle s’était donné pour objectif d’accueillir 110.000 réfugiés en 2017, un chiffre ramené à 50.000 par l’administration Trump. Ce programme date de 1980 et n’a été interrompu qu’une fois, après les attentats du 11 septembre 2001.

Réactions indignées
Les murs qui se dressent, les barrières qui se ferment, partout dans le monde, les réactions aux premières mesures de Donald Trump se multiplient.
La plus symbolique est surement celle de la jeune Pakistanaise Malala Yousafzaï, cible des fondamentalistes talibans et prix Nobel de la paix en 2014. Elle a déclaré avoir «le coeur brisé de voir l’Amérique tourner le dos à son fier passé d’accueil de réfugiés et de migrants».

Onze autres prix Nobel et des universitaires renommés ont également lancé une pétition réclamant la reprise de l’accueil des visiteurs des sept pays visés. «Une épreuve injustifiée pour des gens qui sont nos étudiants, nos collègues, nos amis et des membres de notre communauté.»

Deux ONG, l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) et le Haut commissariat de l’Onu pour les réfugiés (HCR), ont appelé Donald Trump à maintenir l’accueil aux Etats-Unis. «Les besoins des réfugiés et des migrants à travers le monde n’ont jamais été aussi grands et le programme américain de réinstallation est l’un des plus importants du monde», écrivent les deux ONG dans un communiqué commun.

Même le fondateur de Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, s’en est indigné sur sa page, rappelant que les Etats-Unis sont un pays de migrants, à commencer par sa famille.

Conséquences
Selon A. Ayoub, directeur juridique du Comité arabo-américain contre les discriminations, les conséquences sont immédiates. Ces mesures frappent notamment des Arabo-Américains dont des proches étaient en route pour une visite aux Etats-Unis. Le regroupement de familles séparées par la guerre va aussi devenir impossible.

Voir également:

Middle East

‘Gross injustice’: Of 10,000 Syrian refugees to the US, 56 are Christian

September 02, 2016

The Obama administration hit its goal this week of admitting 10,000 Syrian refugees — yet only a fraction of a percent are Christians, stoking criticism that officials are not doing enough to address their plight in the Middle East.

Of the 10,801 refugees accepted in fiscal 2016 from the war-torn country, 56 are Christians, or .5 percent.

A total of 10,722 were Muslims, and 17 were Yazidis.

The numbers are disproportionate to the Christian population in Syria, estimated last year by the U.S. government to make up roughly 10 percent of the population. Since the outbreak of civil war in 2011, it is estimated that between 500,000 and 1 million Christians have fled the country, while many have been targeted and slaughtered by the Islamic State.

In March, Secretary of State John Kerry said the U.S. had determined that ISIS has committed genocide against minority religious groups, including Christians and Yazidis.

“In my judgment, Daesh is responsible for genocide against groups in territory under its control, including Yazidis, Christians and Shia Muslims,” Kerry said at the State Department, using an alternative Arabic name for the group.

He also accused ISIS of “crimes against humanity” and « ethnic cleansing. »

Yet, despite the strong words, relatively few from those minority groups have been brought into the United States. A State Department spokesperson told FoxNews.com that religion was only one of many factors used in determining a refugee’s eligibility to enter the United States.

Critics blasted the administration for not making religion a more important factor, as the U.S. government has prioritized religious minorities in the past in other cases.

“It’s disappointingly disproportional,” Matthew Clark, senior counsel at the American Center for Law and Justice (ACLJ), told FoxNews.com. “[The Obama administration has] not prioritized Christians and it appears they have actually deprioritized them, put them back of the line and made them an afterthought.”

“This is de facto discrimination and a gross injustice,” said Nina Shea, director of the Hudson Institute’s Center for Religious Freedom.

Experts say another reason for the lack of Christians in the make-up of the refugees is the make-up of the camps. Christians in the main United Nations refugee camp in Jordan are subject to persecution, they say, and so flee the camps, meaning they are not included in the refugees referred to the U.S. by the U.N.

“The Christians don’t reside in those camps because it is too dangerous,” Shea said. “They are preyed upon by other residents from the Sunni community and there is infiltration by ISIS and criminal gangs.”

“They are raped, abducted into slavery and they are abducted for ransom. It is extremely dangerous, there is not a single Christian in the Jordanian camps for Syrian refugees,” Shea said.

However, Kristin Wright, director of advocacy for Open Doors USA – a group that advocates for Christians living in dangerous areas across the world – told FoxNews.com that another reason is many Christians are choosing to stick it out in Syria, or going instead to urban areas for now.

“Many have fled to urban areas instead of the camps, so they may be living in Beirut instead of living in a broader camp, meaning many are not registering as refugees,” Wright said. “They may still come to the U.S. but may come through another immigration pathway.”

However, others called on the Obama administration, in light of its genocide declaration, to do more to assist Christians, including setting up safe zones in Syria or actively seeking out Christians via the use of contractors to bring them to safety.

In March, Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., introduced legislation that would give special priority to refugees who were members of persecuted religious minorities in Syria.

“We must not only recognize what’s happening as genocide, but also take action to relieve it, » Cotton said.

“The administration did the right thing by recognizing genocide, but by not taking action, it deflates it and makes it so Christians and others are not receiving any help,” Clark said. “So it’s all words and no actions, it’s just lip service on the issue of the genocide.”

This week, the ACLJ filed a lawsuit against the State Department for not responding to Freedom of Information Act requests about what the administration is doing to combat the genocide.

For Shea, the question is not just about helping refugees, but the very survival of Christianity in the 2,000-year community that has existed since the apostolic era of Christianity.

« This Christian community is dying, » she said. « I fear that there will be no Christians left when the dust settles. »

Adam Shaw is a Politics Reporter and occasional Opinion writer for FoxNews.com. He can be reached here or on Twitter: @AdamShawNY.

 Voir encore:
Refugee Madness: Trump Is Wrong, But His Liberal Critics Are Crazy
Dan McLaughlin
January 28, 2017
The anger at his new policy is seriously misplaced.

President Trump has ordered a temporary, 120-day halt to admitting refugees from seven countries, all of them war-torn states with majority-Muslim populations: Iraq, Iran, Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Libya, and Somalia. He has further indicated that, once additional screening provisions are put in place, he wants further refugee admissions from those countries to give priority to Christian refugees over Muslim refugees. Trump’s order is, in characteristic Trump fashion, both ham-handed and underinclusive, and particularly unfair to allies who risked life and limb to help the American war efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan. But it is also not the dangerous and radical departure from U.S. policy that his liberal critics make it out to be. His policy may be terrible public relations for the United States, but it is fairly narrow and well within the recent tradition of immigration actions taken by the Obama administration.

First, let’s put in context what Trump is actually doing. The executive order, on its face, does not discriminate between Muslim and Christian (or Jewish) immigrants, and it is far from being a complete ban on Muslim immigrants or even Muslim refugees. Trump’s own stated reason for giving preference to Christian refugees is also worth quoting:

Trump was asked whether he would prioritize persecuted Christians in the Middle East for admission as refugees, and he replied, “Yes.” “They’ve been horribly treated,” he said. “Do you know if you were a Christian in Syria it was impossible, at least very tough, to get into the United States? If you were a Muslim you could come in, but if you were a Christian it was almost impossible. And the reason that was so unfair — everybody was persecuted, in all fairness — but they were chopping off the heads of everybody, but more so the Christians. And I thought it was very, very unfair. “So we are going to help them.”

Trump isn’t making this up; Obama-administration policy effectively discriminated against persecuted religious-minority Christians from Syria (even while explicitly admitting that ISIS was pursuing a policy of genocide against Syrian Christians), and the response from most of Trump’s liberal critics has been silence:

The United States has accepted 10,801 Syrian refugees, of whom 56 are Christian. Not 56 percent; 56 total, out of 10,801. That is to say, one-half of 1 percent. The BBC says that 10 percent of all Syrians are Christian, which would mean 2.2 million Christians. . . . Experts say [one] reason for the lack of Christians in the makeup of the refugees is the makeup of the camps. Christians in the main United Nations refugee camp in Jordan are subject to persecution, they say, and so flee the camps, meaning they are not included in the refugees referred to the U.S. by the U.N. “The Christians don’t reside in those camps because it is too dangerous,” [Nina Shea, director of the Hudson Institute’s Center for Religious Freedom] said. “They are preyed upon by other residents from the Sunni community, and there is infiltration by ISIS and criminal gangs.” “They are raped, abducted into slavery and they are abducted for ransom. It is extremely dangerous; there is not a single Christian in the Jordanian camps for Syrian refugees,” Shea said.

Liberals are normally the first people to argue that American policy should give preferential treatment to groups that are oppressed and discriminated against, but because Christians are the dominant religious group here — and the bêtes noires of domestic liberals — there is little liberal interest in accommodating U.S. refugee policy to the reality on the ground in Syria. So long as Obama could outsource religious discrimination against Christian refugees to Jordan and the U.N., his supporters preferred the status quo to admitting that Trump might have a point.

On the whole, 2016 was the first time in a decade when the United States let in more Muslim than Christian refugees, 38,901 overall, 75 percent of them from Syria, Somalia, and Iraq, all countries on Trump’s list — and all countries in which the United States has been actively engaged in drone strikes or ground combat over the past year. Obama had been planning to dramatically expand that number, to 110,000, in 2017 — only after he was safely out of office.

This brings us to a broader point: The United States in general, and the Obama administration in particular, never had an open-borders policy for all refugees from everywhere, so overwrought rhetoric about Trump ripping down Lady Liberty’s promise means comparing him to an ideal state that never existed. In fact, the Obama administration completely stopped processing refugees from Iraq for six months in 2011 over concerns about terrorist infiltration, a step nearly identical to Trump’s current order, but one that was met with silence and indifference by most of Trump’s current critics.

Only two weeks ago, Obama revoked a decades-old “wet foot, dry foot” policy of allowing entry to refugees from Cuba who made it to our shores. His move, intended to signal an easing of tensions with the brutal Communist dictatorship in Havana, has stranded scores of refugees in Mexico and Central America, and Mexico last Friday deported the first 91 of them to Cuba. This, too, has no claim on the conscience of Trump’s liberal critics. After all, Cuban Americans tend to vote Republican.

Even more ridiculous and blinkered is the suggestion that there may be something unconstitutional about refusing entry to refugees or discriminating among them on religious or other bases (a reaction that was shared at first by some Republicans, including Mike Pence, when Trump’s plan was announced in December 2015). There are plenty of moral and political arguments on these points, but foreigners have no right under our Constitution to demand entry to the United States or to challenge any reason we might have to refuse them entry, even blatant religious discrimination. Under Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution, Congress’s powers in this area are plenary, and the president’s powers are as broad as the Congress chooses to give him. If liberals are baffled as to why even the invocation of the historically problematic “America First” slogan by Trump is popular with almost two-thirds of the American public, they should look no further than people arguing that foreigners should be treated by the law as if they were American citizens with all the rights and protections we give Americans.

Liberals are likewise on both unwise and unpopular ground in sneering at the idea that there might be an increased risk of radical Islamist terrorism resulting from large numbers of Muslims entering the country as refugees or asylees. There have been many such cases in Europe, ranging from terrorists (as in the Brussels attack) posing as refugees to the infiltration of radicals and the radicalization of new entrants. The 9/11 plotters, several of whom overstayed their visas in the U.S. after immigrating from the Middle East to Germany, are part of that picture as well. Here in the U.S., we have had a number of terror attacks carried out by foreign-born Muslims or their children. The Tsarnaev brothers who carried out the Boston Marathon bombing were children of asylees; the Times Square bomber was a Pakistani immigrant; the underwear bomber was from Nigeria; the San Bernardino shooter was the son of Pakistani immigrants; the Chattanooga shooter was from Kuwait; the Fort Hood shooter was the son of Palestinian immigrants. All of this takes place against the backdrop of a global movement of radical Islamist terrorism that kills tens of thousands of people a year in terrorist attacks and injures or kidnaps tens of thousands more.

There are plenty of reasons not to indict the entire innocent Muslim population, including those who come as refugees or asylees seeking to escape tyranny and radicalism, for the actions of a comparatively small percentage of radicals. But efforts to salami-slice the problem into something that looks like a minor or improbable outlier, or to compare this to past waves of immigrants, are an insult to the intelligence of the public. The tradeoffs from a more open-borders posture are real, and the reasons for wanting our screening process to be a demanding one are serious.

Like it or not, there’s a war going on out there, and many of its foot soldiers are ideological radicals who wear no uniform and live among the people they end up attacking. If your only response to these issues is to cry “This is just xenophobia and bigotry,” you’re either not actually paying attention to the facts or engaging in the same sort of intellectual beggary that leads liberals to refuse to distinguish between legal and illegal immigrants. Andrew Cuomo declared this week, “If there is a move to deport immigrants, I say then start with me” — because his grandparents were immigrants. This is unserious and childish: President Obama deported over 2.5 million people in eight years in office, and I didn’t see Governor Cuomo getting on a boat back to Italy.

Conservatives have long recognized these points — which is another way of saying that a blank check for refugee admissions is no more a core principle of the Right than it is of the Left.

A more trenchant critique of Trump’s order is that he’s undercutting his own argument by how narrow the order is. Far from a “Muslim ban,” the order applies to only seven of the world’s 50 majority-Muslim countries. Three of those seven (Iran, Syria, and Sudan) are designated by the State Department as state sponsors of terror, but the history of terrorism by Islamist radicals over the past two decades — even state-sponsored terrorism – is dominated by people who are not from countries engaged in officially recognized state-sponsored terrorism. The 9/11 hijackers were predominantly Saudi, and a significant number of other attacks have been planned or carried out by Egyptians, Pakistanis, and people from the various Gulf states. But a number of these countries have more significant business and political ties to the United States (and in some cases to the Trump Organization as well), so it’s more inconvenient to add them to the list. Simply put, there’s no reason to believe that the countries on the list are more likely to send us terrorists than the countries off the list.

That said, the seven states selected do include most of the influx of refugees and do present particular logistical problems in vetting the backgrounds of refugees. If Trump’s goal is simply to beef up screening after a brief pause, he’s on firmer ground.

The moral and strategic arguments against Trump’s policy are, however, significant. America’s open-hearted willingness to harbor refugees from around the world has always been a source of our strength, and sometimes an effective tool deployed directly against hostile foreign tyrannies. Today, for example, the chief adversary of Venezuela’s oppressive economic policies is a website run by a man who works at a Home Depot in Alabama, having been granted political asylum here in 2005. And the refugee problem is partly one of our own creation. My own preference for Syrian refugees, many of them military-age males whom Assad is trying to get out of his country, has been to arm them, train them, and send them back, after the tradition of the Polish and French in World War II and the Czechs in World War I. But that requires support that neither Trump nor Obama has been inclined to provide, and you can’t seriously ask individual Syrians to fight a suicidal two-front war against ISIS and the Russian- and Iranian-backed Assad without outside support. So where else can they go?

Also, some people seeking refugee status or asylum may have stronger claims on our gratitude. Consider some of the first people denied entry under the new policy:

The lawyers said that one of the Iraqis detained at Kennedy Airport, Hameed Khalid Darweesh, had worked on behalf of the United States government in Iraq for ten years. The other, Haider Sameer Abdulkhaleq Alshawi, was coming to the United States to join his wife, who had worked for an American contractor, and young son, the lawyers said.

These specific cases may or may not turn out to be as sympathetic as they appear; these are statements made by lawyers filing a class action, who by their own admission haven’t even spoken to their clients. But in a turn of humorous irony that undercut some of the liberal narrative, it turns out that Darweesh told the press that he likes Trump. Trump’s moves are not as dramatic a departure from the Obama administration as his critics would have you believe.

Certainly, we should give stronger consideration to refugee or asylum claims from people who are endangered as a result of their cooperation with the U.S. military. But such consideration can still be extended on a case-by-case basis, as the executive order explicitly permits: “Notwithstanding a suspension pursuant to subsection (c) of this section or pursuant to a Presidential proclamation described in subsection (e) of this section, the Secretaries of State and Homeland Security may, on a case-by-case basis, and when in the national interest, issue visas or other immigration benefits to nationals of countries for which visas and benefits are otherwise blocked.”

Trump also seems to have triggered some unnecessary chaos at the airports and borders around the globe by signing the order without a lot of adequate advance notice to the public or to the people charged with administering the order. That’s characteristic of his early administration’s public-relations amateur hour, and an unnecessary, unforced error. Then again, the core policy is one he broadcast to great fanfare well over a year ago, so this comes as no great shock.

The American tradition of accepting refugees and asylees from around the world, especially from the clutches of our enemies, is a proud one, and it is a sad thing to see that compromised. And while Middle Eastern Christians should be given greater priority in escaping a region where they are particularly persecuted, the next step in this process should not be one that seeks to permanently enshrine a preference for Christians over Muslims generally. But our tradition has never been an unlimited open-door policy, and President Trump’s latest moves are not nearly such a dramatic departure from the Obama administration as Trump’s liberal critics (or even many of his fans) would have you believe. — Dan McLaughlin is an attorney in New York City and an NRO contributing columnist.

Voir enfin:

The Roots of a Counterproductive Immigration Policy
The liberal scorn for nationhood and refusal to adapt immigration policy to changing circumstances enables the rise of extremism in the West.
David Frum
The Atlantic monthly
Jan 28, 2017

The Orlando nightclub shooter, the worst mass-casualty gunman in US history, was the son of immigrants from Afghanistan. The San Bernardino shooters were first and second generation immigrants from Pakistan. Nidal Hassan, the Fort Hood killer, was the son of Palestinian immigrants. The Tsarnaev brothers who detonated bombs at the 2013 Boston marathon held Kyrgyz nationality. The would-be 2010 Times Square car bomber was a naturalized immigrant from Pakistan. The ringleader of the Paris attacks of November 2015, about which Donald Trump spoke so much on the campaign trail, was a Belgian national of Moroccan origins. President Trump’s version of a Muslim ban would have protected the United States from none of the above.

If the goal is to exclude radical Muslims from the United States, the executive order Trump announced on Friday seems a highly ineffective way to achieve it. The Trump White House has incurred all the odium of an anti-Muslim religious test, without any attendant real-world benefit. The measure amounts to symbolic politics at its most stupid and counterproductive. Its most likely practical effect will be to aggravate the political difficulty of dealing directly and speaking without euphemisms about Islamic terrorism. As ridiculous as was the former Obama position that Islamic terrorism has nothing to do with Islam, the new Trump position that all Muslims are potential terrorists is vastly worse.
What Trump has done is to divide and alienate potential allies—and push his opponents to embrace the silliest extremes of the #WelcomeRefugees point of view. By issuing his order on Holocaust Remembrance Day, Trump empowered his opponents to annex the victims of Nazi crimes to their own purposes.

The Western world desperately needs a more hardheaded approach to the issue of refugees. It is bound by laws and treaties written after World War II that have been rendered utterly irrelevant by a planet on the move. Tens of millions of people seek to exit the troubled regions of Central America, the Middle East, West Africa, and South Asia for better opportunities in Europe and North America. The relatively small portion of that number who have reached the rich North since 2013 have already up-ended the politics of the United States, the United Kingdom, and the European Union. German chancellor Angela Merkel’s August 2015 order to fling open Germany’s doors is the proximate cause of the de-democratization of Poland since September 2015, of the rise of Marine LePen in France, of the surge in support for Geert Wilders in the Netherlands, and—I would argue—of Britain’s vote to depart the European Union. The surge of border crossers from Central America into the United States in 2014, and Barack Obama’s executive amnesties, likewise strengthened Donald Trump.

It’s understandable why people in the poor world would seek to relocate. It’s predictable that people in the destination nations would resist. Interpreting these indelible conflicts through the absurdly inapt analogy of German and Austrian Jews literally fleeing for their lives will lead to systematically erroneous conclusions.

We need a new paradigm for a new time. The social trust and social cohesion that characterize an advanced society like the United States are slowly built and vulnerable to erosion. They are eroding. Trump is more the symptom of that erosion than the cause.

Trump’s executive order has unleashed chaos, harmed lawful U.S. residents, and alienated potential friends in the Islamic world. Yet without the dreamy liberal refusal to recognize the reality of nationhood, the meaning of citizenship, and the differences between cultures, Trump would never have gained the power to issue that order.

Liberalism and nationhood grew up together in the 19th century, mutually dependent. In the 21st century, they have grown apart—or more exactly, liberalism has recoiled from nationhood. The result has not been to abolish nationality, but to discredit liberalism.

When liberals insist that only fascists will defend borders, then voters will hire fascists to do the job liberals won’t do. This weekend’s shameful chapter in the history of the United States is a reproach not only to Trump, although it is that too, but to the political culture that enabled him. Angela Merkel and Donald Trump may be temperamental opposites. They are also functional allies.

 

Publicités

Repentance: C’est la faute à Jésus, imbécile ! (Between Mother Teresa and John Wayne: The moral double bind which the West and the world currently face is simply a contemporary manifestation of the tension that for centuries has hounded cultures under biblical influence)

28 mai, 2016
Time1993cherchez-femmehiroshima-pourquoi-le-japon-prefere-quobama-ne-sexcuse-pas-web-tete-021973685430ObamaGreetingsYairGolanHeroPolicemanbatmanvsupermanOn vit la vie en regardant en avant mais on ne peut la comprendre qu’en regardant en arrière. Kierkegaard
Ainsi les derniers seront les premiers, et les premiers seront les derniers. (…) Vous savez que les chefs des nations les tyrannisent, et que les grands les asservissent. Il n’en sera pas de même au milieu de vous. Mais quiconque veut être grand parmi vous, qu’il soit votre serviteur; et quiconque veut être le premier parmi vous, qu’il soit votre esclave. Jésus (Matthieu 20:16-27)
Vous avez appris qu’il a été dit: Tu aimeras ton prochain, et tu haïras ton ennemi. Mais moi, je vous dis: Aimez vos ennemis, bénissez ceux qui vous maudissent, faites du bien à ceux qui vous haïssent, et priez pour ceux qui vous maltraitent et qui vous persécutent, afin que vous soyez fils de votre Père qui est dans les cieux; car il fait lever son soleil sur les méchants et sur les bons, et il fait pleuvoir sur les justes et sur les injustes. Jésus (Matthieu 5: 43-45)
Ne croyez pas que je sois venu apporter la paix sur la terre; je ne suis pas venu apporter la paix, mais l’épée. Car je suis venu mettre la division entre l’homme et son père, entre la fille et sa mère, entre la belle-fille et sa belle-mère; et l’homme aura pour ennemis les gens de sa maison. Jésus (Matthieu 10 : 34-36)
Vous ne réfléchissez pas qu’il est dans votre intérêt qu’un seul homme meure pour le peuple, et que la nation entière ne périsse pas. Caïphe (Jean 11: 50)
Une nation ne se régénère que sur un monceau de cadavres. Saint-Just
L’arbre de la liberté doit être revivifié de temps en temps par le sang des patriotes et des tyrans. Jefferson
Qu’un sang impur abreuve nos sillons! Rouget de Lisle
Ils disent: nous avons mis à mort le Messie, Jésus fils de Marie, l’apôtre de dieu. Non ils ne l’ont point tué, ils ne l’ont point crucifié, un autre individu qui lui ressemblait lui fut substitué, et ceux qui disputaient à son sujet ont été eux-mêmes dans le doute, ils n’ont que des opinions, ils ne l’ont pas vraiment tué. Mais Dieu l’a haussé à lui, Dieu est le puissant, Dieu est le sage. Le Coran (Sourate IV, verset 157-158)
Où est Dieu? cria-t-il, je vais vous le dire! Nous l’avons tué – vous et moi! Nous tous sommes ses meurtriers! Mais comment avons-nous fait cela? Comment avons-nous pu vider la mer? Qui nous a donné l’éponge pour effacer l’horizon tout entier? Dieu est mort! (…) Et c’est nous qui l’avons tué ! (…) Ce que le monde avait possédé jusqu’alors de plus sacré et de plus puissant a perdu son sang sous nos couteaux (…) Quelles solennités expiatoires, quels jeux sacrés nous faudra-t-il inventer? Nietzsche
« Dionysos contre le « crucifié » : la voici bien l’opposition. Ce n’est pas une différence quant au martyr – mais celui-ci a un sens différent. La vie même, son éternelle fécondité, son éternel retour, détermine le tourment, la destruction, la volonté d’anéantir pour Dionysos. Dans l’autre cas, la souffrance, le « crucifié » en tant qu’il est « innocent », sert d’argument contre cette vie, de formulation de sa condamnation. (…) L’individu a été si bien pris au sérieux, si bien posé comme un absolu par le christianisme, qu’on ne pouvait plus le sacrifier : mais l’espèce ne survit que grâce aux sacrifices humains… La véritable philanthropie exige le sacrifice pour le bien de l’espèce – elle est dure, elle oblige à se dominer soi-même, parce qu’elle a besoin du sacrifice humain. Et cette pseudo-humanité qui s’institue christianisme, veut précisément imposer que personne ne soit sacrifié. Nietzsche
Je condamne le christia­nisme, j’élève contre l’Église chrétienne la plus terrible de toutes les accusa­tions, que jamais accusateur ait prononcée. Elle est la plus grande corruption que l’on puisse imaginer, elle a eu la volonté de la dernière corruption possible. L’Église chrétienne n’épargna sur rien sa corruption, elle a fait de toute valeur une non-valeur, de chaque vérité un mensonge, de chaque intégrité une bassesse d’âme (…) L’ « égalité des âmes devant Dieu », cette fausseté, ce prétexte aux rancunes les plus basses, cet explosif de l’idée, qui finit par devenir Révo­lution, idée moderne, principe de dégénérescence de tout l’ordre social — c’est la dynamite chrétienne… (…) Le christianisme a pris parti pour tout ce qui est faible, bas, manqué (…) La pitié entrave en somme la loi de l’évolution qui est celle de la sélection. Elle comprend ce qui est mûr pour la disparition, elle se défend en faveur des déshérités et des condamnés de la vie. Par le nombre et la variété des choses manquées qu’elle retient dans la vie, elle donne à la vie elle-même un aspect sombre et douteux. On a eu le courage d’appeler la pitié une vertu (— dans toute morale noble elle passe pour une faiblesse —) ; on est allé plus loin, on a fait d’elle la vertu, le terrain et l’origine de toutes les vertus. Nietzsche
A l’origine, la guerre n’était qu’une lutte pour les pâturages. Aujourd’hui la guerre n’est qu’une lutte pour les richesses de la nature. En vertu d’une loi inhérente, ces richesses appartiennent à celui qui les conquiert. Les grandes migrations sont parties de l’Est. Avec nous commence le reflux, d’Ouest en Est. C’est en conformité avec les lois de la nature. Par le biais de la lutte, les élites sont constamment renouvelées. La loi de la sélection naturelle justifie cette lutte incessante en permettant la survie des plus aptes. Le christianisme est une rébellion contre la loi naturelle, une protestation contre la nature. Poussé à sa logique extrême, le christianisme signifierait la culture systématique de l’échec humain. Hitler
Jésus a tout fichu par terre. Le Désaxé (Les braves gens ne courent pas les rues, Flannery O’Connor)
Depuis que l’ordre religieux est ébranlé – comme le christianisme le fut sous la Réforme – les vices ne sont pas seuls à se trouver libérés. Certes les vices sont libérés et ils errent à l’aventure et ils font des ravages. Mais les vertus aussi sont libérées et elles errent, plus farouches encore, et elles font des ravages plus terribles encore. Le monde moderne est envahi des veilles vertus chrétiennes devenues folles. Les vertus sont devenues folles pour avoir été isolées les unes des autres, contraintes à errer chacune en sa solitude.  G.K. Chesterton
La Raison sera remplacée par la Révélation. À la place de la Loi rationnelle et des vérités objectives perceptibles par quiconque prendra les mesures nécessaires de discipline intellectuelle, et la même pour tous, la Connaissance dégénérera en une pagaille de visions subjectives (…) Des cosmogonies complètes seront créées à partir d’un quelconque ressentiment personnel refoulé, des épopées entières écrites dans des langues privées, les barbouillages d’écoliers placés plus haut que les plus grands chefs-d’œuvre. L’Idéalisme sera remplacé par Matérialisme. La vie après la mort sera un repas de fête éternelle où tous les invités auront 20 ans … La Justice sera remplacée par la Pitié comme vertu cardinale humaine, et toute crainte de représailles disparaîtra … La Nouvelle Aristocratie sera composée exclusivement d’ermites, clochards et invalides permanents. Le Diamant brut, la Prostituée Phtisique, le bandit qui est bon pour sa mère, la jeune fille épileptique qui a le chic avec les animaux seront les héros et héroïnes du Nouvel Age, quand le général, l’homme d’État, et le philosophe seront devenus la cible de chaque farce et satire. Hérode (Pour le temps présent, oratorio de Noël, W. H. Auden, 1944)
Just over 50 years ago, the poet W.H. Auden achieved what all writers envy: making a prophecy that would come true. It is embedded in a long work called For the Time Being, where Herod muses about the distasteful task of massacring the Innocents. He doesn’t want to, because he is at heart a liberal. But still, he predicts, if that Child is allowed to get away, « Reason will be replaced by Revelation. Instead of Rational Law, objective truths perceptible to any who will undergo the necessary intellectual discipline, Knowledge will degenerate into a riot of subjective visions . . . Whole cosmogonies will be created out of some forgotten personal resentment, complete epics written in private languages, the daubs of schoolchildren ranked above the greatest masterpieces. Idealism will be replaced by Materialism. Life after death will be an eternal dinner party where all the guests are 20 years old . . . Justice will be replaced by Pity as the cardinal human virtue, and all fear of retribution will vanish . . . The New Aristocracy will consist exclusively of hermits, bums and permanent invalids. The Rough Diamond, the Consumptive Whore, the bandit who is good to his mother, the epileptic girl who has a way with animals will be the heroes and heroines of the New Age, when the general, the statesman, and the philosopher have become the butt of every farce and satire. »What Herod saw was America in the late 1980s and early ’90s, right down to that dire phrase « New Age. » (…) Americans are obsessed with the recognition, praise and, when necessary, the manufacture of victims, whose one common feature is that they have been denied parity with that Blond Beast of the sentimental imagination, the heterosexual, middle-class white male. The range of victims available 10 years ago — blacks, Chicanos, Indians, women, homosexuals — has now expanded to include every permutation of the halt, the blind and the short, or, to put it correctly, the vertically challenged. (…) Since our newfound sensitivity decrees that only the victim shall be the hero, the white American male starts bawling for victim status too. (…) European man, once the hero of the conquest of the Americas, now becomes its demon; and the victims, who cannot be brought back to life, are sanctified. On either side of the divide between Euro and native, historians stand ready with tarbrush and gold leaf, and instead of the wicked old stereotypes, we have a whole outfit of equally misleading new ones. Our predecessors made a hero of Christopher Columbus. To Europeans and white Americans in 1892, he was Manifest Destiny in tights, whereas a current PC book like Kirkpatrick Sale’s The Conquest of Paradise makes him more like Hitler in a caravel, landing like a virus among the innocent people of the New World. Robert Hughes (24.06.2001)
La vérité biblique sur le penchant universel à la violence a été tenue à l’écart par un puissant processus de refoulement. (…) La vérité fut reportée sur les juifs, sur Adam et la génération de la fin du monde. (…) La représentation théologique de l’adoucissement de la colère de Dieu par l’acte d’expiation du Fils constituait un compromis entre les assertions du Nouveau Testament sur l’amour divin sans limites et celles sur les fantasmes présents en chacun. (…) Même si la vérité biblique a été de nouveau  obscurcie sur de nombreux points, (…) dénaturée en partie, elle n’a jamais été totalement falsifiée par les Églises. Elle a traversé l’histoire et agit comme un levain. Même l’Aufklärung critique contre le christianisme qui a pris ses armes et les prend toujours en grande partie dans le sombre arsenal de l’histoire de l’Eglise, n’a jamais pu se détacher entièrement de l’inspiration chrétienne véritable, et par des détours embrouillés et compliqués, elle a porté la critique originelle des prophètes dans les domaines sans cesse nouveaux de l’existence humaine. Les critiques d’un Kant, d’un Feuerbach, d’un Marx, d’un Nietzsche et d’un Freud – pour ne prendre que quelques uns parmi les plus importants – se situent dans une dépendance non dite par rapport à l’impulsion prophétique. Raymund Schwager
The gospel revelation gradually destroys the ability to sacralize and valorize violence of any kind, even for Americans in pursuit of the good. (…) At the heart of the cultural world in which we live, and into whose orbit the whole world is being gradually drawn, is a surreal confusion. The impossible Mother Teresa-John Wayne antinomy Times correspondent (Lance) Morrow discerned in America’s humanitarian 1992 Somali operation is simply a contemporary manifestation of the tension that for centuries has hounded those cultures under biblical influence. Gil Bailie
Dans la Bible, c’est la victime qui a le dernier mot et cela nous influence même si nous ne voulons pas rendre à la Bible l’hommage que nous lui devons. René Girard
Je crois que le moment décisif en Occident est l’invention de l’hôpital. Les primitifs s’occupent de leurs propres morts. Ce qu’il y a de caractéristique dans l’hôpital c’est bien le fait de s’occuper de tout le monde. C’est l’hôtel-Dieu donc c’est la charité. Et c’est visiblement une invention du Moyen-Age. René Girard
Notre monde est de plus en plus imprégné par cette vérité évangélique de l’innocence des victimes. L’attention qu’on porte aux victimes a commencé au Moyen Age, avec l’invention de l’hôpital. L’Hôtel-Dieu, comme on disait, accueillait toutes les victimes, indépendamment de leur origine. Les sociétés primitives n’étaient pas inhumaines, mais elles n’avaient d’attention que pour leurs membres. Le monde moderne a inventé la « victime inconnue », comme on dirait aujourd’hui le « soldat inconnu ». Le christianisme peut maintenant continuer à s’étendre même sans la loi, car ses grandes percées intellectuelles et morales, notre souci des victimes et notre attention à ne pas nous fabriquer de boucs émissaires, ont fait de nous des chrétiens qui s’ignorent. René Girard
L’inauguration majestueuse de l’ère « post-chrétienne » est une plaisanterie. Nous sommes dans un ultra-christianisme caricatural qui essaie d’échapper à l’orbite judéo-chrétienne en « radicalisant » le souci des victimes dans un sens antichrétien. (…) Jusqu’au nazisme, le judaïsme était la victime préférentielle de ce système de bouc émissaire. Le christianisme ne venait qu’en second lieu. Depuis l’Holocauste, en revanche, on n’ose plus s’en prendre au judaïsme, et le christianisme est promu au rang de bouc émissaire numéro un. René Girard
Dans la foi musulmane, il y a un aspect simple, brut, pratique qui a facilité sa diffusion et transformé la vie d’un grand nombre de peuples à l’état tribal en les ouvrant au monothéisme juif modifié par le christianisme. Mais il lui manque l’essentiel du christianisme : la croix. Comme le christianisme, l’islam réhabilite la victime innocente, mais il le fait de manière guerrière. La croix, c’est le contraire, c’est la fin des mythes violents et archaïques. René Girard
Tu vois, ce que nous appelons Dieu dépend de notre tribu, Clark Joe, parce que Dieu est tribal; Dieu prend parti! Aucun homme dans le ciel n’est intervenu quand j’étais petit pour me délivrer du poing et des abominations de papa. J’ai compris depuis longtemps que Si Dieu est tout puissant, il ne peut pas être tout bienveillant. Et s’il est tout bienveillant, il ne peut pas être tout puissant. Et toi non plus ! Lex Luthor
Cette sorte de pouvoir est dangereux. (…) Dans une démocratie, le bien est une conversation et non une décision unilatérale. Sénatrice Finch (personnage de Batman contre Superman)
La bonne idée de ce nouveau film des écuries DC Comics, c’est de mettre en opposition deux conceptions de la justice, en leur donnant vie à travers l’affrontement de deux héros mythiques. (…) Superman et Batman ne sont pas des citoyens comme les autres. Ce sont tous les deux des hors-la-loi qui œuvrent pour accomplir le Bien. Néanmoins, leur rapport à la justice n’est pas le même: l’un incarne une loi supérieure, l’autre cherche à échapper à l’intransigeance des règles pour mieux faire corps avec le monde. Le personnage de Superman évoque une justice divine transcendante, ou encore supra-étatique. À plusieurs reprises, le film met en évidence le défaut de cette justice surhumaine, trop parfaite pour notre monde. Superman est un héros kantien, pour qui le devoir ne peut souffrir de compromission. Cette rigidité morale peut alors paradoxalement conduire à une vertu vicieuse, trop sûre d’elle même. On reprochait au philosophe de Königsberg sa morale de cristal, parfaite dans ses intentions mais prête à se briser au contact de la dure réalité. Il en va de même pour Superman et pour sa bonne volonté, qui vient buter sur la brutalité de ses adversaires et sur des dilemmes moraux à la résolution impossible. Le personnage de Batman incarne quant à lui une justice souple, souterraine, infra-étatique et peut-être trop humaine. Le modèle philosophique le plus proche est celui de la morale arétique du philosophe Aristote. Si les règles sont trop rigides, il faut privilégier, à la manière du maçon qui utilise comme règle le fil à plomb qui s’adapte aux contours irréguliers, une vertu plus élastique. Plutôt que d’obéir à des impératifs catégoriques, le justicier est celui qui sait s’adapter et optimiser l’agir au cas particulier. Paradoxalement, cette justice de l’ombre peut aller jusqu’à vouloir braver l‘interdit suprême ; le meurtre; puisque Batman veut en finir avec Superman. (…) De la même façon, le film pose dès le départ, à travers les discours d’une sénatrice, le problème critique du recours au super-héros. Ce dernier déresponsabilise l’homme, court-circuite le débat démocratique et menace par ses super-pouvoirs toute possibilité d’un contre-pouvoir. Les « Watchmen », adaptation plus subtile de l’oeuvre de Alan Moore par le même Zack Snyder posait déjà la question : « Who watches the Watchmen ? » Le Nouvel Obs
Benzema est un grand joueur, Ben Arfa est un grand joueur. Mais Deschamps, il a un nom très français. Peut-être qu’il est le seul en France à avoir un nom vraiment français. Personne dans sa famille n’est mélangé avec quelqu’un, vous savez. Comme les Mormons en Amérique. Eric Cantona
 As often as not in Israel, military leaders and security officials are to the left of the public and their civilian leadership. (…) At a ceremony marking Holocaust Remembrance Day earlier this month, Yair Golan, Israel’s deputy chief of staff, compared trends in Israeli society to Germany in the 1930s. When Mr. Netanyahu rebuked him—correctly—for defaming Israel and cheapening the memory of the Holocaust, Mr. Ya’alon leapt to the general’s defense and told officers that they should feel free to speak their minds in public. Hence his ouster. At stake here is no longer the small question about Sgt. Azariah, where the military establishment is in the right. It’s the greater question of civilian-military relations, where Israel’s military leaders are dead wrong. A security establishment that feels no compunction about publicly telling off its civilian masters is on the road to becoming a law unto itself—the Sparta of Mr. Tyler’s imagination, albeit in the service of leftist goals.(…) It was Israel’s security establishment, led by talented former officers such as Yitzhak Rabin and Ehud Barak, that led Israelis down the bloody cul-de-sac formerly called the peace process. If their views are no longer regarded as sacrosanct, it’s a sign of Israel’s political maturity, not decline. There’s a larger point here, relevant not only to Israel, about the danger those who believe themselves to be virtuous pose to those who merely wish to be free. In the Middle East, the virtuous are often the sheikhs and ayatollahs, exhorting the faithful to murder for the sake of God. In the West, the virtuous are secular elites imposing what Thomas Sowell once called “the vision of the anointed” on the benighted masses. Mr. Lieberman is nobody’s idea of an ideal defense minister. And both he and his boss are wrong when it comes to the shameful case of Sgt. Azariah. But those who believe that Israel must remain a democracy have no choice but to take Mr. Netanyahu’s side. Bret Stephens
La scène est surréaliste. Montrant le contre-champ des images qui ont circulé toute la journée et sur lesquelles ont peut voir un véhicule de police incendié par des casseurs en marge de la manifestation « anti-flic » ce mercredi 18 mai à Paris, la séquence permet de mesurer la violence qui s’est abattue sur ces policiers (…). Avant que le véhicule disparaisse dans les flammes, on peut le voir arriver sur le quai de Valmy, alors que la circulation est perturbée par les manifestants. La patrouille se retrouve donc bloquée, sans issue, constituant une cible de choix pour les casseurs les plus déterminés. Un individu attaque à coups de pieds la vitre côté conducteur, alors que divers projectiles commencent à pleuvoir. Les jeunes encagoulés vont alors ensuite entreprendre de se servir d’objets plus lourds, comme des bornes anti-stationnement, pour attaquer le véhicule. À force de coups répétés, la vitre arrière se brise et l’un d’eux entreprend de jeter un objet enflammé dans l’habitacle, alors toujours occupé par les policiers. Quand le conducteur du véhicule sort, il est pris à partie par un manifestant qui lui assène plusieurs coups de bâtons. L’agent de police garde son calme, esquivant les coups jusqu’à tourner les talons. Huffington Post
Je serais ravi de les rencontrer pour les remercier d’être dans ce pays, et présenter mes excuses auprès d’eux au nom du Parti républicain pour Donald Trump. Bob Bennett
Une chose m’effraie. C’est de relever les processus nauséabonds qui se sont déroulés en Europe en général et plus particulièrement en Allemagne, il y a 70, 80 et 90 ans. Et de voir des signes de cela parmi nous en cette année 2016. La Shoah doit inciter à une réflexion fondamentale sur la façon dont on traite ici et maintenant l’étranger, l’orphelin et la veuve.  Il n’y a rien de plus simple que de haïr l’étranger, rien de plus simple que de susciter les peurs et d’intimider… Yaïr Golan (chef d’état major de l’armée israélienne)
L’ensemble du musée célèbre une forme d’année « zéro » du Japon, passé soudain, en août 1945, du statut d’agresseur brutal de l’Asie à celui de victime. Non loin de là, dans le mémorial pour les victimes de la bombe atomique, construit au début des années 2000 par le gouvernement, quelques lignes expliquent vaguement « qu’à un moment, au XXe siècle, le Japon a pris le chemin de la guerre » et que « le 8 décembre 1941, il a initié les hostilités contre les Etats-Unis, la Grande-Bretagne et d’autres ». Nulle évocation de la colonisation brutale de la région par les troupes nippones au début des années trente. Rien sur les massacres de civils et les viols de masse commis en Chine, à Nankin. Pas une ligne sur le sort des milliers de jeunes femmes asiatiques transformées en esclaves sexuelles pour les soldats nippons dans la région. Aucune mise en perspective permettant aux visiteurs japonais de tenter un travail de mémoire similaire à celui réussi en Allemagne dès la fin du conflit. Les enfants japonais n’ont pas d’équivalent de Dachau à visiter. Beaucoup ont, un temps, espéré que Barack Obama bouleverserait cette lecture, qui a été confortée par des années d’un enseignement et d’une culture populaire expliquant que le pays et son empereur, Hirohito, avaient été entraînés malgré eux par une poignée de leaders militaires brutaux. Le dirigeant allait, par un discours de vérité, forcer le Japon à se regarder dans le miroir. Mais le président américain a déjà annoncé qu’il ne prononcerait pas à Hiroshima les excuses symboliques qui auraient pu contraindre les élites nippones à entamer une introspection sur leur vision biaisée de l’histoire. Le responsable devrait essentiellement se concentrer sur un discours plaidant pour un monde sans armes nucléaires, au grand soulagement du Premier ministre nippon, Shinzo Abe, qui estime que son pays a, de toute façon, suffisamment demandé pardon et fait acte de contrition. (…) S’ils craignent que la venue du président américain à Hiroshima n’incite le Japon à se cloîtrer dans cette amnésie et cette victimisation, les partisans d’un réexamen du passé nippon veulent encore croire que la seule présence de Barack Obama alimentera un débat sur la capacité de Tokyo à entamer une démarche similaire auprès de ses grands voisins asiatiques et de son allié américain. Déjà, mercredi soir, des médias ont embarrassé Shinzo Abe en le questionnant publiquement sur son éventuelle visite du site américain de Pearl Harbor, à Hawaii. Le 7 décembre 1941, cette base américaine fut attaquée par surprise par l’aéronavale japonaise et 2.403 Américains furent tués au cours du raid, qui reste vécu comme un traumatisme aux Etats-Unis. Les médias sud-coréens et chinois vont, eux, défier le Premier ministre japonais d’oser venir dans leur pays déposer des fleurs sur des monuments témoins de l’oppression nippone d’autrefois. A quand une visite de Shinzo Abe à Nankin, demanderont-ils. Jamais, répondra le gouvernement conservateur. En déstabilisant Pékin, qui nourrit sa propagande des trous de mémoire de Tokyo, un tel geste symbolique témoignerait pourtant d’une maturité du Japon plus marquée et lui donnerait une aura nouvelle dans l’ensemble de l’Asie-Pacifique. Yann Rousseau
Formuler des excuses pour un chef d’Etat reste très compliqué, Barack Obama ne serait sans doute pas hostile à l’idée d’exprimer des regrets pour les souffrances infligées, mais d’un point de vue diplomatique, s’excuser revient à ouvrir un débat historique qui n’a jamais existé. Lorsque la guerre s’est terminée, une sorte de compromis a été établi entre les Américains et les Japonais, visant à ne plus évoquer le mal fait dans les deux camps. Guibourg Delamotte
I’m not too proud of Hollywood these days with the immorality that is shown in pictures, and the vulgarity. I just have a feeling that maybe Hollywood needs some outsiders to bring back decency and good taste to some of the pictures that are being made. Ronald Reagan (1989)
An advertent and sustained foreign policy uses a different part of the brain from the one engaged by horrifying images. If Americans had seen the battles of the Wilderness and Cold Harbor on TV screens in 1864, if they had witnessed the meat-grinding carnage of Ulysses Grant’s warmaking, then public opinion would have demanded an end to the Civil War, and the Union might well have split into two countries, one of them farmed by black slaves. (…) The Americans have ventured into Somalia in a sort of surreal confusion, first impersonating Mother Teresa and now John Wayne. it would help to clarify that self-image, for to do so would clarify the mission, and then to recast the rhetoric of the enterprise. Lance Morrow (1993)
It is never too soon to learn to identify yourself as a victim. Such, at least, is the philosophy of today’s college freshman orientation, which has become a crash course in the strange new world of university politics. Within days of arrival on campus, « new students » (the euphemism of choice for « freshmen ») learn the paramount role of gender, race, ethnicity, class and sexual orientation in determining their own and others’ identity. Most important, they are provided with the most critical tool of their college career: the ability to recognize their own victimization. Heather Mac Donald (24.09.1992)
All the patched clothes seen around town recently were not a result of the present recession, nor yet of nostalgia for the Great Depression of the 1930’s, when patching clothes was a necessity. Today’s patches are all about status and style.Christian Francis Roth’s clothes have intricate patch inserts that are part of Mr. Roth’s designs. Patched jeans have been around since the 1960’s. The newer ones are imitating Mr. Roth’s more expensive designs with appliqued patches that don’t cost as much. And not to be confused with those styles are the rap-style patches with fringed — or frayed — edges on denim clothes. New York Times
Bailie livre une sorte d’Apocalypse — « révélation » où il ne s’agit pas tant de montrer la violence que de la dire — de la dire dans des termes irrécusables alors que, précisément, toute l’histoire de l’humanité pourrait se résumer en cette tentative pour taire la violence, pour nier qu’elle fonde toute société, et qu’elle doit être dépassée. Choix de taire ou de dire, choix de sacraliser ou de démasquer pour toujours. Un livre qui (…) révèle avec tant de clarté et de lucidité les « choses cachées » depuis la fondation du monde : il nous révèle dans un aujourd’hui pressant des choix qui nous concernent. Il traque le sens qui se cache au coeur des monstres sacrés ( ! ) de la littérature ou des faits retentissants de notre actualité. Impossible d’échapper à l’interpellation, de ne pas re-considérer toutes ces « choses » et surtout ce sujet — la violence — qui fait tellement partie de notre quotidien qu’on en oublie son vrai visage. (…) un cheminement révélateur pour parcourir des sentiers que nous empruntons : la littérature, la philosophie, la politique, la culture, l’information, bref, tout ce qui fait de nous des membres de cette humanité convoquée pour une lecture violente de notre heure. (…) La Violence révélée propose une analyse de la crise anthropologique, culturelle et historique que traversent les sociétés contemporaires, à la lumière de l’oeuvre de René Girard. Dans La Violence et le sacré, puis Des choses cachées depuis la fondation du monde, Girard avait montré le rôle essentiel de la violence pour les sociétés : un meurtre fondateur est à l’origine de la société. Girard met en évidence la logique victimaire : pour assurer la cohésion, le groupe désigne un bouc émissaire et défoule la violence sur lui — violence qui devient sacrée puisque ritualisée. Le meurtre et le sacrifice rituel renforcent les liens de la communauté qui échappe ainsi au chaos de la violence désorganisée. La violence sur le bouc émissaire a donc une fonction cathartique. Elle reste de la violence mais elle est dépouillée de son effet anarchique et destructeur. Les mythes garderaient mémoire de ce sacrifice mais tairaient la violence faite à la victime en la rationalisant : « le mythe ferme la bouche et les yeux sur certains événements » [p. 50]. Voilà donc le grand « mensonge », relayé par les rituels, des religions archaïques qui sont incapables de découvrir le mécanisme victimaire qui les fonde. Un autre concept girardien fondamental est celui du « désir mimétique ». Les passions (jalousie, envie, convoitise, ressentiment, rivalité, mépris, haine) qui conduisent à des comportements violents trouvent leur origine dans ce désir mimétique. Dans l’acceptation girardienne du terme, le désir représente l’influence que les autres ont sur nous ; le désir, « c’est ce qui arrive aux rapports humains quand il n’y a plus de résolution victimaire, et donc plus de polarisations vraiment unanimes, susceptibles de déclencher cette résolution » [Girard, cité p. 128]. La « mimesis », souvent traduite par « imitation » (ce qui est inexact, ainsi que le souligne Bailie, car ce terme comporte une dimension volontaire alors que ce n’est pas conscient) est cette « propension qu’a l’être humain à succomber à l’influence des désirs positifs, négatifs, flatteurs ou accusateurs exprimés par les autres » [p. 68]. Personne n’échappe à cette logique. D’où l’effet de foule qui exacerbe les comportements mimétiques. La rivalité qui naît de la mimesis — on désire ce que désire l’autre — oblige à résoudre le conflit en le déplaçant sur une victime. Or le Christianisme démonte le schéma sacrificiel en révélant l’innocence de la victime : la Croix révèle et dénonce la violence sacrificielle. Elle met à nu l’unanimité fallacieuse de la foule en proie au mimétisme collectif et la violence contagieuse : la foule, elle, « ne sait pas ce qu’elle fait », pour reprendre les paroles du Christ en croix. Jésus propose une voie hors de la logique des représailles et de la vengeance en invitant à « tendre l’autre joue ». La non-violence révèle à la violence sa propre nature et la désarme. A partir des concepts girardiens, Bailie examine les conséquences de la révélation évangélique pour la société humaine. Il entreprend l’exploration systématique de l’histoire de l’humanité et sa tentative pour sortir du schéma de la violence sacrificielle. Son hypothèse centrale est que « la compassion d’origine biblique pour les victimes paralyse le système du bouc émissaire dont l’humanité dépend depuis toujours pour sa cohésion sociale. Mais la propension des êtres humains à résoudre les tensions sociales aux dépens d’une victime de substitution reste » [p. 75]. Ce que les Ecritures « doivent accomplir, c’est une conversion du coeur de l’homme qui permettra à l’humanité de se passer de la violence organisée sans pour autant s’abîmer dans la violence incontrôlée, dans la violence de l’Apocalypse » [p. 31]. Or qu’en est-il ? La Bible, en proposant la compassion pour les victimes, a permis « l’éclosion de la première contre-culture du monde, que nous appelons la ‘‘culture occidentale’’ » [p. 150]. La Bible, notre « cahier de souvenirs » [p. 214], est une chronique des efforts accomplis par l’homme pour renoncer aux formes primitives de religion et aux rituels sacrificiels, et s’extirper des structures de la violence sacrée. Ainsi, avec Abraham, le sacrifice humain est abandonné ; les commandements de Moise indiquent la voie hors du désir mimétique (« tu ne convoiteras pas » car c’est la convoitise qui mène à la rivalité et la violence). Baillie s’attarde sur le récit biblique car pour lui il contient une valeur anthropologique essentielle ; il permet en effet d’observer « les structures et la dynamique de la vie culturelle et religieuse conventionnelles de l’humanité et d’être témoin de la façon dont ces structures s’effondrent sous le poids d’une révélation incompatible avec elles » [p. 186]. Peut-être peut-on parler de prototype de l’avènement de l’humanité à elle-même. Dans la Bible, la révélation est en cours et l’on peut mesurer les conséquences déstabilisantes sur le peuple de cette révélation. Pas un hasard, donc, que le Christ se soit incarné dans la tradition hébraïque déjà aux prises avec la révélation. (…) Les Evangiles, donc, ont rendu moralement et culturellement problématique le recours au système sacrificiel. Toutefois, « les passions mimétiques qu’il pouvait jadis contrôler ont pris de l’ampleur, jusqu’à provoquer la crise sociale, psychologique et spirituelle que nous connaissons » [p. 131]. L’Occident, en effet, est sorti du schéma de la violence sacrificielle, mais son impossibilité à embrasser le modèle proposé par l’Evangile a pour conséquence la descente dans la violence première. La distinction morale entre « bonne violence » et « mauvaise violence » n’est plus « un impératif catégorique » [p. 81]. Puisque nous vivons dans un monde où la violence a perdu son prestige moral et religieux, « La violence a gagné en puissance destructrice » [p. 70] : elle a perdu «  son pouvoir de fonder la culture et de la restaurer » [p. 72]. L’effondrement de la distinction cruciale entre violence officielle et violence officieuse se révèle par exemple dans le fait que les policiers ne sont plus respectés (Bailie oppose cela à la scène finale de Lord of the Flies où les enfants sont arrêtés dans leur frénésie de violence par la simple vue de l’officier de marine : son « autorité morale » bloque le chaos). Donc, puisque le violence a perdu son aura religieuse, « la fascination que suscite sa contemplation n’entraîne plus le respect pour l’institution sacrée qui en est à l’origine. Au contraire, le spectacle de la violence servira de modèle à des violences du même ordre » [p. 104]. De la violence thérapeutique, on risque fort de passer à une violence gratuite, voire ludique. A l’instar du Christ qui utilise les paraboles pour « révéler les choses cachées depuis la fondation du monde  » [p.  24], Bailie utilise des citations tirées de la presse contemporaine « de façon à montrer quelles formes prend la révélation de la violence dans le monde d’aujourd’hui » [p. 24]. Bailie note plusieurs résurgences du « religieux », dans le culte du nationalisme par exemple. Le nationalisme fournit en effet une forme de transcendance sociale qui renforce le sentiment communautaire, et devient un « ersatz de sacré » [p. 277] qui conduit encore à la violence sur des « boucs émissaires ». Il note aussi comment la rhétorique de la guerre légitime (mythifie même) la violence. Ainsi ce général salvadorien chargé du massacre de femmes et d’enfants en 1981 s’adresse à son armée en ces termes : « Ce que nous avons fait hier et le jour d’avant, ça s’appelle la guerre. C’est ça, la guerre […] Que les choses soient claires, il est hors de question qu’on vous entende gémir et vous lamenter sur ce que vous avez fait […] c’est la guerre, messieurs. C’est ça la guerre » [p. 280]. La philosophie même, pour Bailie, participerait du sacré mais n’en serait peut-être que le simulacre car « elle a érigé des formes de rationalité dont la tâche a été d’empêcher la prise de conscience de la vérité » [p. 271]. D’ou son impasse en tant que vraie transcendance. Dans le combat entre les forces du sacrificiel et de la violence collective, et la « déconstruction à laquelle se livre l’Evangile » [p. 282], qu’en est-il de l’autre protagoniste du combat, celui qui représente la révélation évangélique ? Sa puissance est d’un autre ordre. Bailie la voit à l’oeuvre, par exemple, dans deux moments, le chant d’une victime sur la montagne de la Cruz, et la prière d’un Juif à Buchenwald : « Paix à tous les hommes de mauvaise volonté  ! Qu’il y ait une fin à la vengeance, à l’exigence de châtiments et de représailles » [p. 284]. Et Bailie de conclure : « si nous ne trouvons le repos auprès de Dieu, c’est notre propre inquiétude qui nous servira de transcendance » [p. 284]. Le texte de l’Apocalypse « révèle » ce que les hommes risquent de faire « s’ils continuent, dans un monde désacralisé et sans garde-fou sacrificiel, de tenir pour rien la mise en garde évangélique contre la vengeance » [p. 32]. La seule façon d’éviter que l’Apocalypse ne devienne une réalité est d’accueillir l’impératif évangélique de l’amour. Pour Girard, « l’humanité est confrontée à un choix […] explicite et même parfaitement scientifique entre la destruction totale et le renoncement total à la violence » [p. 32]. A sa suite, Bailie identifie deux alternatives : soit un retour à la violence sacrée dans un contexte religieux non biblique, soit une révolution anthropologique que la révélation chrétienne a générée. Il s’agira donc d’arriver à résister au mal pour en empêcher la propagation : « la seule façon d’éviter la transcendance fictive de la violence et de la contagion sociale est une autre forme de transcendance religieuse au centre de laquelle se trouve un dieu qui a choisi de subir la violence plutôt que de l’exercer » [p. 84]. Marie Liénard

Vous avez dit double contrainte ?

Premier réseau social du monde contraint de s’excuser d’avoir censuré la photo en bikini d’un mannequin clairement obèse, sénateur américain implorant le pardon des musulmans de la planète entière pour la proposition de moratorium migratoire du candidat de son propre parti face à la menace du terrorisme islamiste, président israélien accusé de dérive belliciste face à la folie meurtrière de ses voisins djihadistes par ses propres généraux, policier français astreint à une abnégation quasi-christique face à des militants d’extrême-gauche prêts à l’incinérer vivant, sélectionneur de l’équipe de France de football suspecté de port de nom trop français, superhéros sommés de répondre des conséquences du moindre de leurs  actes…

En ces temps tellement étranges …

Qu’on n’en remarque même plus l’incroyable singularité …

Où le président de la plus grande puissance de la planète se voit à la fois reproché de ne pas s’être excusé pour Hiroshima et Nagasaki …

Et secrètement remercié de n’avoir pas ce faisant impliqué ses hôtes dans  la ronde sans fin des excuses …

Comment ne pas voir …

Avec la véritable et hélas méconnue mise à jour de l’Apocalypse qu’avait faite il y a plus de vingt ans le girardien Gil Bailie (La violence révélée : l’humanité à l’heure du choix) …

Et derrière l’apparemment irrépressible montée du chaos que nous connaissons …

L’influence délétère et bimillénaire de « l’immortelle flétrissure de l’humanité » et de cette « rebellion contre la loi naturelle » qu’avaient si bien repérée Nietzsche et son émule Hitler

A savoir ce maudit christianisme qui avec les conséquences potentiellement apocalyptiques que l’on sait …

Est en train d’imposer bientôt à la planète entière comme l’avait aussi prédit Auden

Son irresponsable et incontrôlable inversion de toutes les hiérarchies et de toutes les valeurs ?

La Violence révélée : l’humanité à l’heure du choix
Gil Bailie
Traduction Claude Chastagner
Castelnau-le-Lez : Climats, 2004.
25 euros, 290 pages + notes, ISBN 2-84158-254-X.

Marie Liénard
Ecole polytechnique

Le titre ne laisse rien présager de la richesse de l’ouvrage. Il semble en effet sacrifier à l’effet d’une mode qui a rendu la thématique de la violence omniprésente. Certes l’avant-propos de René Girard attire l’attention. On garde en mémoire la révolution opérée par La Violence et le sacré (1972) dont les concepts fondateurs — désir mimétique et bouc émissaire — font presque partie du langage courant. Le sous-titre, l’humanité à l’heure du choix, laisse entendre une certaine urgence — et intrigue.

Bailie livre une sorte d’Apocalypse — « révélation » où il ne s’agit pas tant de montrer la violence que de la dire — de la dire dans des termes irrécusables alors que, précisément, toute l’histoire de l’humanité pourrait se résumer en cette tentative pour taire la violence, pour nier qu’elle fonde toute société, et qu’elle doit être dépassée. Choix de taire ou de dire, choix de sacraliser ou de démasquer pour toujours.

Un livre qui bouscule, intellectuellement d’abord. Un livre difficile, comme nous en avertit Girard dans son avant-propos. Difficile, ensuite, en ce qu’il révèle avec tant de clarté et de lucidité les « choses cachées » depuis la fondation du monde : il nous révèle dans un aujourd’hui pressant des choix qui nous concernent. Il traque le sens qui se cache au coeur des monstres sacrés ( ! ) de la littérature ou des faits retentissants de notre actualité. Impossible d’échapper à l’interpellation, de ne pas re-considérer toutes ces « choses » et surtout ce sujet — la violence — qui fait tellement partie de notre quotidien qu’on en oublie son vrai visage.

On ne peut que regretter que ce rendez-vous ne parvienne aux lecteurs non anglophones que neuf ans après la parution du livre aux Etats-Unis sous le titre Violence Unveiled: Humanity at the Crossroads en 1995 (The Crossroad Publishing Company). Par ailleurs, on se plait à imaginer ce que l’auteur aurait à dire — révéler — des récents événements, de l’après 11 septembre en particulier.

Pour moi, donc, un livre incontournable pour quiconque s’intéresse à aujourd’hui — à l’aujourd’hui d’un monde dans lequel nous sommes « embarqués », dirait Pascal. Livre à laisser et à reprendre, sans doute. Mais un cheminement révélateur pour parcourir des sentiers que nous empruntons : la littérature, la philosophie, la politique, la culture, l’information, bref, tout ce qui fait de nous des membres de cette humanité convoquée pour une lecture violente de notre heure.

Le livre contient 14 chapitres suivis de notes (pas de bibliographie). Dans l’avant-propos, René Girard avertit que « La Violence révélée parle de la crise spirituelle que traverse notre époque » [p. 11], et qu’il s’agit d’un « livre magnifique sur le christianisme et sur la culture contemporaire … un superbe ouvrage de critique littéraire » [p. 12]. L’éditeur Frédéric Joly le présente comme un « ouvrage de critique sociale profondément original » [p. 6]. Finalement, seul le lecteur, avec ses convictions et ses intérêts, pourra se situer avec justesse.

La Violence révélée propose une analyse de la crise anthropologique, culturelle et historique que traversent les sociétés contemporaires, à la lumière de l’oeuvre de René Girard. Dans La Violence et le sacré, puis Des choses cachées depuis la fondation du monde, Girard avait montré le rôle essentiel de la violence pour les sociétés : un meurtre fondateur est à l’origine de la société. Girard met en évidence la logique victimaire : pour assurer la cohésion, le groupe désigne un bouc émissaire et défoule la violence sur lui — violence qui devient sacrée puisque ritualisée. Le meurtre et le sacrifice rituel renforcent les liens de la communauté qui échappe ainsi au chaos de la violence désorganisée. La violence sur le bouc émissaire a donc une fonction cathartique. Elle reste de la violence mais elle est dépouillée de son effet anarchique et destructeur. Les mythes garderaient mémoire de ce sacrifice mais tairaient la violence faite à la victime en la rationalisant : « le mythe ferme la bouche et les yeux sur certains événements » [p. 50]. Voilà donc le grand « mensonge », relayé par les rituels, des religions archaïques qui sont incapables de découvrir le mécanisme victimaire qui les fonde.

Un autre concept girardien fondamental est celui du « désir mimétique ». Les passions (jalousie, envie, convoitise, ressentiment, rivalité, mépris, haine) qui conduisent à des comportements violents trouvent leur origine dans ce désir mimétique. Dans l’acceptation girardienne du terme, le désir représente l’influence que les autres ont sur nous ; le désir, « c’est ce qui arrive aux rapports humains quand il n’y a plus de résolution victimaire, et donc plus de polarisations vraiment unanimes, susceptibles de déclencher cette résolution » [Girard, cité p. 128]. La « mimesis », souvent traduite par « imitation » (ce qui est inexact, ainsi que le souligne Bailie, car ce terme comporte une dimension volontaire alors que ce n’est pas conscient) est cette « propension qu’a l’être humain à succomber à l’influence des désirs positifs, négatifs, flatteurs ou accusateurs exprimés par les autres » [p. 68]. Personne n’échappe à cette logique. D’où l’effet de foule qui exacerbe les comportements mimétiques. La rivalité qui naît de la mimesis — on désire ce que désire l’autre — oblige à résoudre le conflit en le déplaçant sur une victime.

Or le Christianisme démonte le schéma sacrificiel en révélant l’innocence de la victime : la Croix révèle et dénonce la violence sacrificielle. Elle met à nu l’unanimité fallacieuse de la foule en proie au mimétisme collectif et la violence contagieuse : la foule, elle, « ne sait pas ce qu’elle fait », pour reprendre les paroles du Christ en croix. Jésus propose une voie hors de la logique des représailles et de la vengeance en invitant à « tendre l’autre joue ». La non-violence révèle à la violence sa propre nature et la désarme.

A partir des concepts girardiens, Bailie examine les conséquences de la révélation évangélique pour la société humaine. Il entreprend l’exploration systématique de l’histoire de l’humanité et sa tentative pour sortir du schéma de la violence sacrificielle. Son hypothèse centrale est que « la compassion d’origine biblique pour les victimes paralyse le système du bouc émissaire dont l’humanité dépend depuis toujours pour sa cohésion sociale. Mais la propension des êtres humains à résoudre les tensions sociales aux dépens d’une victime de substitution reste » [p. 75]. Ce que les Ecritures « doivent accomplir, c’est une conversion du coeur de l’homme qui permettra à l’humanité de se passer de la violence organisée sans pour autant s’abîmer dans la violence incontrôlée, dans la violence de l’Apocalypse » [p. 31]. Or qu’en est-il ?

La Bible, en proposant la compassion pour les victimes, a permis « l’éclosion de la première contre-culture du monde, que nous appelons la ‘‘culture occidentale’’ » [p. 150]. La Bible, notre « cahier de souvenirs » [p. 214], est une chronique des efforts accomplis par l’homme pour renoncer aux formes primitives de religion et aux rituels sacrificiels, et s’extirper des structures de la violence sacrée. Ainsi, avec Abraham, le sacrifice humain est abandonné ; les commandements de Moise indiquent la voie hors du désir mimétique (« tu ne convoiteras pas » car c’est la convoitise qui mène à la rivalité et la violence). Baillie s’attarde sur le récit biblique car pour lui il contient une valeur anthropologique essentielle ; il permet en effet d’observer « les structures et la dynamique de la vie culturelle et religieuse conventionnelles de l’humanité et d’être témoin de la façon dont ces structures s’effondrent sous le poids d’une révélation incompatible avec elles » [p. 186]. Peut-être peut-on parler de prototype de l’avènement de l’humanité à elle-même. Dans la Bible, la révélation est en cours et l’on peut mesurer les conséquences déstabilisantes sur le peuple de cette révélation.

Pas un hasard, donc, que le Christ se soit incarné dans la tradition hébraïque déjà aux prises avec la révélation. Bailie relit le Nouveau Testament en montrant comment le Christ déjoue le mécanisme de victimisation mimétique. Face à la Trinité divine, Bailie décrit une trinité diabolique : « diabolos », « satan », « skandalov » [p. 225]. Il rappelle l’étymologie du diable (celui qui divise), de Satan (celui qui accuse) et de « scandale » (offense, obstacle). Le diabolos sème la discorde en déclenchant les passions mimétiques ; le satan, c’est l’accusateur — celui qui désigne le bouc émissaire ; le scandalov, c’est le piège de l’indignation qui peut engendrer précisément ce qui l’avait provoquée. Or le Christ désamorce en proposant pardon, miséricorde et amour. Bailie propose une lecture extrêmement intéressante du passage de la femme adultère (en particulier du rapport de Jésus à la foule : en l’obligeant à sortir de l’anonymat, il désamorce la contagion violente) ; de la différence entre le ministère de Jean et celui du Christ, de la multiplication des Pains (« Jésus ouvrit leur coeur et, en retour, la foule ouvrit ses sacs » [p.  230]) ; Jésus invite à « sortir du cocon culturel » [p. 238]) ; de Barabbas , le « fils du père » face au Christ, «  le fils du Père » [p. 239]. Le récit évangélique annonce comment passer du logos de la violence au Logos d’amour.

Les Evangiles, donc, ont rendu moralement et culturellement problématique le recours au système sacrificiel. Toutefois, « les passions mimétiques qu’il pouvait jadis contrôler ont pris de l’ampleur, jusqu’à provoquer la crise sociale, psychologique et spirituelle que nous connaissons » [p. 131]. L’Occident, en effet, est sorti du schéma de la violence sacrificielle, mais son impossibilité à embrasser le modèle proposé par l’Evangile a pour conséquence la descente dans la violence première. La distinction morale entre « bonne violence » et « mauvaise violence » n’est plus « un impératif catégorique » [p. 81]. Puisque nous vivons dans un monde où la violence a perdu son prestige moral et religieux, « La violence a gagné en puissance destructrice » [p. 70] : elle a perdu «  son pouvoir de fonder la culture et de la restaurer » [p. 72]. L’effondrement de la distinction cruciale entre violence officielle et violence officieuse se révèle par exemple dans le fait que les policiers ne sont plus respectés (Bailie oppose cela à la scène finale de Lord of the Flies où les enfants sont arrêtés dans leur frénésie de violence par la simple vue de l’officier de marine : son « autorité morale » bloque le chaos). Donc, puisque le violence a perdu son aura religieuse, « la fascination que suscite sa contemplation n’entraîne plus le respect pour l’institution sacrée qui en est à l’origine. Au contraire, le spectacle de la violence servira de modèle à des violences du même ordre » [p. 104]. De la violence thérapeutique, on risque fort de passer à une violence gratuite, voire ludique.

A l’instar du Christ qui utilise les paraboles pour « révéler les choses cachées depuis la fondation du monde  » [p.  24], Bailie utilise des citations tirées de la presse contemporaine « de façon à montrer quelles formes prend la révélation de la violence dans le monde d’aujourd’hui » [p. 24]. Bailie note plusieurs résurgences du « religieux », dans le culte du nationalisme par exemple. Le nationalisme fournit en effet une forme de transcendance sociale qui renforce le sentiment communautaire, et devient un « ersatz de sacré » [p. 277] qui conduit encore à la violence sur des « boucs émissaires ». Il note aussi comment la rhétorique de la guerre légitime (mythifie même) la violence. Ainsi ce général salvadorien chargé du massacre de femmes et d’enfants en 1981 s’adresse à son armée en ces termes : « Ce que nous avons fait hier et le jour d’avant, ça s’appelle la guerre. C’est ça, la guerre […] Que les choses soient claires, il est hors de question qu’on vous entende gémir et vous lamenter sur ce que vous avez fait […] c’est la guerre, messieurs. C’est ça la guerre » [p. 280]. La philosophie même, pour Bailie, participerait du sacré mais n’en serait peut-être que le simulacre car « elle a érigé des formes de rationalité dont la tâche a été d’empêcher la prise de conscience de la vérité » [p. 271]. D’ou son impasse en tant que vraie transcendance.

Dans le combat entre les forces du sacrificiel et de la violence collective, et la « déconstruction à laquelle se livre l’Evangile » [p. 282], qu’en est-il de l’autre protagoniste du combat, celui qui représente la révélation évangélique ? Sa puissance est d’un autre ordre. Bailie la voit à l’oeuvre, par exemple, dans deux moments, le chant d’une victime sur la montagne de la Cruz, et la prière d’un Juif à Buchenwald : « Paix à tous les hommes de mauvaise volonté  ! Qu’il y ait une fin à la vengeance, à l’exigence de châtiments et de représailles » [p. 284].

Et Bailie de conclure : « si nous ne trouvons le repos auprès de Dieu, c’est notre propre inquiétude qui nous servira de transcendance » [p. 284]. Le texte de l’Apocalypse « révèle » ce que les hommes risquent de faire « s’ils continuent, dans un monde désacralisé et sans garde-fou sacrificiel, de tenir pour rien la mise en garde évangélique contre la vengeance » [p. 32]. La seule façon d’éviter que l’Apocalypse ne devienne une réalité est d’accueillir l’impératif évangélique de l’amour. Pour Girard, « l’humanité est confrontée à un choix […] explicite et même parfaitement scientifique entre la destruction totale et le renoncement total à la violence » [p. 32]. A sa suite, Bailie identifie deux alternatives : soit un retour à la violence sacrée dans un contexte religieux non biblique, soit une révolution anthropologique que la révélation chrétienne a générée. Il s’agira donc d’arriver à résister au mal pour en empêcher la propagation : « la seule façon d’éviter la transcendance fictive de la violence et de la contagion sociale est une autre forme de transcendance religieuse au centre de laquelle se trouve un dieu qui a choisi de subir la violence plutôt que de l’exercer » [p. 84].

Bailie est amené, au cours de son exposé, à traiter de plusieurs phénomènes contemporains. Son analyse offre ainsi un éclairage stimulant sur la place de la superstition et de ses nouvelles formes dans nos sociétés (il rejoindrait en cela des remarques de Carl Sagan dans A Candle in the Dark par exemple), ou le culte des stars et autres célébrités télévisuelles. La lecture qu’il fait de l’intervention en Somalie [pp. 33-36] — et de la réaction du public américain aux victimes somaliennes puis américaines  — éclaire, indirectement, la situation iraquienne ; l’opinion publique américaine, après s’être enthousiasmée pour « free the Iraki people », a fait preuve du même retournement. La décision du gouvernement américain de ne pas montrer les images que Michael Moore montrera dans son film ne relève pas seulement de la censure ou du balisage du journalisme de guerre, ou même d’une « politique du mensonge », comme le suggèrerait l’analyse de Baillie. Par ailleurs, son hypothèse peut arriver à rendre compte du choc moral ressenti au cours d’une exécution publique, même si on sait que la victime est coupable, à cause de « l’innocence structurelle » de la victime isolée [p. 100]. Enfin son analyse de la portée mythique de la rhétorique de la guerre invite à reconsidérer la « War on Terror » et les discours qui se rattachent aux interventions militaires. Lynn Spigel suggère ainsi dans American Quarterly de juin 2004 : « Whatever one thinks about Bush’s speech, it is clear that the image of suffering female victims was a powerful emotional ploy through which he connected his own war plan to a sense of moral righteousness and virtue » [« Entertainment Wars », p. 248].

D’autre part, à l’heure où la référence religieuse dans la Constitution européenne a donné l’occasion de réfléchir à ce qui fondait l’Occident, le livre de Bailie offre quelques pistes de réflexion. Dans un autre registre, les questions soulevées par la définition girardienne du désir nous interpellent au moment où l’on parle d’individualisme et de développement personnel (et du coaching qui y est associé). D’autre part, en mettant à nu les désordres engendrés par le désir mimétique et ses corollaires (envie et ambition par exemple) Bailie jette un éclairage pertinent sur la logique de la performance et de la compétitivité de nos sociétés : on mesure déjà le potentiel destructeur de cette dynamique dans un contexte économique où le profit est devenu le seul impératif catégorique.

Enfin, l’ouvrage propose des remarques intéressantes — même si elles sont un peu rapides — pour considérer le rapport entre sexualité et violence [p. 206] ; question au coeur, entre autres, du débat sur la pornographie et son évolution vers des contenus très violents.

Dans son avant-propos, Girard introduit le livre en indiquant qu’il s’agit « d’une pièce essentielle d’un combat intellectuel et spirituel aux conséquences capitales pour notre avenir » [p.  11]. Comme tout combat, il est animé, parfois emporté dans la logique de sa propre légitimité. Cette passion amène par moments l’auteur à des redites : maladresse ? geste pédagogique envers un lecteur qu’il risque de perdre, ou qui risque de se perdre ? volonté de convaincre ? En tout cas, signe d’une pensée « au travail », selon son expression.

Dans les remerciements, Bailie mentionne sa rencontre avec Howard Thurman qui lui aurait dit : « Ne te demande pas ce dont le monde a besoin. Demande-toi ce qui te fait vivre et te fait agir, parce que ce dont le monde a besoin, c’est de gens vivants » [p. 15]. La lecture de ce livre nous invite à être des « gens vivants » — vivants dans le choix à faire entre la fascination et le dégoût, ou l’accueil d’une révélation qui nous dévoile la violence pour la dévisager et faire entendre son cri sans chercher à la faire taire. Ainsi, enfin, nous saurons ce que nous faisons…

Voir aussi:

The Fraying Of America
Robert Hughes
Time

June 24, 2001

Just over 50 years ago, the poet W.H. Auden achieved what all writers envy: making a prophecy that would come true. It is embedded in a long work called For the Time Being, where Herod muses about the distasteful task of massacring the Innocents. He doesn’t want to, because he is at heart a liberal. But still, he predicts, if that Child is allowed to get away, « Reason will be replaced by Revelation. Instead of Rational Law, objective truths perceptible to any who will undergo the necessary intellectual discipline, Knowledge will degenerate into a riot of subjective visions . . . Whole cosmogonies will be created out of some forgotten personal resentment, complete epics written in private languages, the daubs of schoolchildren ranked above the greatest masterpieces. Idealism will be replaced by Materialism. Life after death will be an eternal dinner party where all the guests are 20 years old . . . Justice will be replaced by Pity as the cardinal human virtue, and all fear of retribution will vanish . . . The New Aristocracy will consist exclusively of hermits, bums and permanent invalids. The Rough Diamond, the Consumptive Whore, the bandit who is good to his mother, the epileptic girl who has a way with animals will be the heroes and heroines of the New Age, when the general, the statesman, and the philosopher have become the butt of every farce and satire. »What Herod saw was America in the late 1980s and early ’90s, right down to that dire phrase « New Age. » A society obsessed with therapies and filled with distrust of formal politics, skeptical of authority and prey to superstition, its political language corroded by fake pity and euphemism. A nation like late Rome in its long imperial reach, in the corruption and verbosity of its senators, in its reliance on sacred geese (those feathered ancestors of our own pollsters and spin doctors) and in its submission to senile, deified Emperors controlled by astrologers and extravagant wives. A culture that has replaced gladiatorial games, as a means of pacifying the mob, with high-tech wars on television that cause immense slaughter and yet leave the Mesopotamian satraps in full power over their wretched subjects.

Mainly it is women who object, for due to the prevalence of their mystery- religions, the men are off in the woods, affirming their manhood by sniffing one another’s armpits and listening to third-rate poets rant about the moist, hairy satyr that lives inside each one of them. Meanwhile, artists vacillate between a largely self-indulgent expressiveness and a mainly impotent politicization, and the contest between education and TV — between argument and persuasion by spectacle — has been won by TV, a medium now more debased in America than ever before, and more abjectly self-censoring than anywhere in Europe.

The fundamental temper of America tends toward an existential ideal that can probably never be reached but can never be discarded: equal rights to variety, to construct your life as you see fit, to choose your traveling companions. It has always been a heterogeneous country, and its cohesion, whatever cohesion it has, can only be based on mutual respect. There never was a core America in which everyone looked the same, spoke the same language, worshipped the same gods and believed the same things.

America is a construction of mind, not of race or inherited class or ancestral territory. It is a creed born of immigration, of the jostling of scores of tribes that become American to the extent to which they can negotiate accommodations with one another. These negotiations succeed unevenly and often fail: you need only to glance at the history of racial relations to know that. The melting pot never melted. But American mutuality lives in recognition of difference. The fact remains that America is a collective act of the imagination whose making never ends, and once that sense of collectivity and mutual respect is broken, the possibilities of American-ness begin to unravel.

If they are fraying now, it is at least in part due to the prevalence of demagogues who wish to claim that there is only one path to virtuous American- ness: paleoconservatives like Jesse Helms and Pat Robertson who think this country has one single ethic, neoconservatives who rail against a bogey called multiculturalism — as though this culture was ever anything but multi! — and pushers of political correctness who would like to see grievance elevated into automatic sanctity.

BIG DADDY IS TO BLAME

Americans are obsessed with the recognition, praise and, when necessary, the manufacture of victims, whose one common feature is that they have been denied parity with that Blond Beast of the sentimental imagination, the heterosexual, middle-class white male. The range of victims available 10 years ago — blacks, Chicanos, Indians, women, homosexuals — has now expanded to include every permutation of the halt, the blind and the short, or, to put it correctly, the vertically challenged.

Forty years ago, one of the epic processes in the assertion of human rights started unfolding in the U.S.: the civil rights movement. But today, after more than a decade of government that did its best to ignore the issues of race when it was not trying to roll back the gains of the ’60s, the usual American response to inequality is to rename it, in the hope that it will go away. We want to create a sort of linguistic Lourdes, where evil and misfortune are dispelled by a dip in the waters of euphemism. Does the cripple rise from his wheelchair, or feel better about being stuck in it, because someone back in the early days of the Reagan Administration decided that, for official purposes, he was « physically challenged »?

Because the arts confront the sensitive citizen with the difference between good artists, mediocre ones and absolute duffers, and since there are always more of the last two than the first, the arts too must be politicized; so we cobble up critical systems to show that although we know what we mean by the quality of the environment, the idea of quality in aesthetic experience is little more than a paternalist fiction designed to make life hard for black, female and gay artists.

Since our newfound sensitivity decrees that only the victim shall be the hero, the white American male starts bawling for victim status too. Hence the rise of cult therapies teaching that we are all the victims of our parents, that whatever our folly, venality or outright thuggishness, we are not to be blamed for it, since we come from « dysfunctional families. » The ether is jammed with confessional shows in which a parade of citizens and their role models, from LaToya Jackson to Roseanne Arnold, rise to denounce the sins of their parents. The cult of the abused Inner Child has a very important use in modern America: it tells you that nothing is your fault, that personal grievance transcends political utterance.

The all-pervasive claim to victimhood tops off America’s long-cherished culture of therapeutics. Thus we create a juvenile culture of complaint in / which Big Daddy is always to blame and the expansion of rights goes on without the other half of citizenship: attachment to duties and obligations. We are seeing a public recoil from formal politics, from the active, reasoned exercise of citizenship. It comes because we don’t trust anyone. It is part of the cafard the ’80s induced: Wall Street robbery, the savings and loan scandal, the wholesale plunder of the economy, an orgy released by Reaganomics that went on for years with hardly a peep from Congress — events whose numbers were so huge as to be beyond the comprehension of most people.

Single-issue politics were needed when they came, because they forced Washington to deal with, or at least look at, great matters of civic concern that it had scanted: first the civil rights movement, and then the environment, women’s reproductive rights, health legislation, the educational crisis. But now they too face dilution by a trivialized sense of civic responsibility. What are your politics? Oh, I’m antismoking. And yours? Why, I’m starting an action committee to have the suffix -man removed from every word in every book in the Library of Congress. And yours, sir? Well, God told me to chain myself to a fire hydrant until we put a fetus on the Supreme Court.

In the past 15 years the American right has had a complete, almost unopposed success in labeling as left-wing ordinary agendas and desires that, in a saner polity, would be seen as ideologically neutral, an extension of rights implied in the Constitution. American feminism has a large repressive fringe, self- caricaturing and often abysmally trivial, like the academic thought police who recently managed to get a reproduction of Goya’s Naked Maja removed from a classroom at Pennsylvania State University; it has its loonies who regard all sex with men, even with consent, as a politicized form of rape. But does this in any way devalue the immense shared desire of millions of American women to claim the right of equality to men, to be free from sexual harassment in the workplace, to be accorded the reproductive rights to be individuals first and mothers second?

The ’80s brought the retreat and virtual disappearance of the American left as a political, as distinct from a cultural, force. It went back into the monastery — that is, to academe — and also extruded out into the art world, where it remains even more marginal and impotent. Meanwhile, a considerable and very well-subsidized industry arose, hunting the lefty academic or artist in his or her retreat. Republican attack politics turned on culture, and suddenly both academe and the arts were full of potential Willie Hortons. The lowbrow form of this was the ire of figures like Senator Helms and the Rev. Donald Wildmon directed against National Endowment subventions for art shows they thought blasphemous and obscene, or the trumpetings from folk like David Horowitz about how PBS should be demolished because it’s a pinko-liberal-anti- Israel bureaucracy.

THE BATTLES ON CAMPUS

The middle-to-highbrow form of the assault is the ongoing frenzy about political correctness, whose object is to create the belief, or illusion, that a new and sinister McCarthyism, this time of the left, has taken over American universities and is bringing free thought to a stop. This is flatly absurd. The comparison to McCarthyism could be made only by people who either don’t know or don’t wish to remember what the Senator from Wisconsin and his pals actually did to academe in the ’50s: the firings of tenured profs in mid- career, the inquisitions by the House Committee on Un-American Activities on the content of libraries and courses, the campus loyalty oaths, the whole sordid atmosphere of persecution, betrayal and paranoia. The number of conservative academics fired by the lefty thought police, by contrast, is zero. There has been heckling. There have been baseless accusations of racism. And certainly there is no shortage of the zealots, authoritarians and scramblers who view PC as a shrewd career move or as a vent for their own frustrations.

In cultural matters we can hardly claim to have a left and a right anymore. Instead we have something more akin to two puritan sects, one masquerading as conservative, the other posing as revolutionary but using academic complaint as a way of evading engagement in the real world. Sect A borrows the techniques of Republican attack politics to show that if Sect B has its way, the study of Milton and Titian will be replaced by indoctrination programs in the works of obscure Third World authors and West Coast Chicano subway muralists, and the pillars of learning will forthwith collapse. Meanwhile, Sect B is so stuck in the complaint mode that it can’t mount a satisfactory defense, since it has burned most of its bridges to the culture at large.

In the late ’80s, while American academics were emptily theorizing that language and the thinking subject were dead, the longing for freedom and . humanistic culture was demolishing European tyranny. Of course, if the Chinese students had read their Foucault, they would have known that repression is inscribed in all language, their own included, and so they could have saved themselves the trouble of facing the tanks in Tiananmen Square. But did Vaclav Havel and his fellow playwrights free Czechoslovakia by quoting Derrida or Lyotard on the inscrutability of texts? Assuredly not: they did it by placing their faith in the transforming power of thought — by putting their shoulders to the immense wheel of the word. The world changes more deeply, widely, thrillingly than at any moment since 1917, perhaps since 1848, and the American academic left keeps fretting about how phallocentricity is inscribed in Dickens’ portrayal of Little Nell.

The obsessive subject of our increasingly sterile confrontation between the two PCs — the politically and the patriotically correct — is something clumsily called multiculturalism. America is a place filled with diversity, unsettled histories, images impinging on one another and spawning unexpected shapes. Its polyphony of voices, its constant eddying of claims to identity, is one of the things that make America America. The gigantic, riven, hybridizing, multiracial republic each year receives a major share of the world’s emigration, legal or illegal.

To put the argument for multiculturalism in merely practical terms of self- interest: though elites are never going to go away, the composition of those elites is not necessarily static. The future of American ones, in a globalized economy without a cold war, will rest with people who can think and act with informed grace across ethnic, cultural, linguistic lines. And the first step in becoming such a person lies in acknowledging that we are not one big world family, or ever likely to be; that the differences among races, nations, cultures and their various histories are at least as profound and as durable as the similarities; that these differences are not divagations from a European norm but structures eminently worth knowing about for their own sake. In the world that is coming, if you can’t navigate difference, you’ve had it.

Thus if multiculturalism is about learning to see through borders, one can be all in favor of it. But you do not have to listen to the arguments very long before realizing that, in quite a few people’s minds, multiculturalism is about something else. Their version means cultural separatism within the larger whole of America. They want to Balkanize culture.

THE AUTHORITY OF THE PAST

This reflects the sense of disappointment and frustration with formal politics, which has caused many people to look to the arts as a field of power, since they have power nowhere else. Thus the arts become an arena for complaint about rights. The result is a gravely distorted notion of the political capacity of the arts, just at the moment when — because of the pervasiveness of mass media — they have reached their nadir of real political effect.

One example is the inconclusive debate over « the canon, » that oppressive Big Bertha whose muzzle is trained over the battlements of Western Civ at the black, the gay and the female. The canon, we’re told, is a list of books by dead Europeans — Shakespeare and Dante and Tolstoy and Stendhal and John Donne and T.S. Eliot . . . you know, them, the pale, patriarchal penis people. Those who complain about the canon think it creates readers who will never read anything else. What they don’t want to admit, at least not publicly, is that most American students don’t read much anyway and quite a few, left to their own devices, would not read at all. Their moronic national baby-sitter, the TV set, took care of that. Before long, Americans will think of the time when people sat at home and read books for their own sake, discursively and sometimes even aloud to one another, as a lost era — the way we now see rural quilting bees in the 1870s.

The quarrel over the canon reflects the sturdy assumption that works of art are, or ought to be, therapeutic. Imbibe the Republic or Phaedo at 19, and you will be one kind of person; study Jane Eyre or Mrs. Dalloway, and you will be another. For in the literary zero-sum game of canon-talk, if you read X, it means that you don’t read Y. This is a simple fancy.

So is the distrust of the dead, as in « dead white male. » Some books are deeper, wider, fuller than others, and more necessary to an understanding of our culture and ourselves. They remain so long after their authors are dead. Those who parrot slogans like « dead white male » might reflect that, in writing, death is relative: Lord Rochester is as dead as Sappho, but not so moribund as Bret Easton Ellis or Andrea Dworkin. Statistically, most authors are dead, but some continue to speak to us with a vividness and urgency that few of the living can rival. And the more we read, the more writers we find who do so, which is why the canon is not a fortress but a permeable membrane.

The sense of quality, of style, of measure, is not an imposition bearing on literature from the domain of class, race or gender. All writers or artists carry in their mind an invisible tribunal of the dead, whose appointment is an imaginative act and not merely a browbeaten response to some notion of authority. This tribunal sits in judgment on their work. They intuit their standards from it. From its verdict there is no appeal. None of the contemporary tricks — not the fetishization of the personal, not the attempt to shift the aesthetic into the political, not the exhausted fictions of avant-gardism — will make it go away. If the tribunal weren’t there, every first draft would be a final manuscript. You can’t fool Mother Culture.

That is why one rejects the renewed attempt to judge writing in terms of its presumed social virtue. Through it, we enter a Marxist never-never land, where all the most retrograde phantoms of Literature as Instrument of Social Utility are trotted forth. Thus the Columbia History of the American Novel declares Harriet Beecher Stowe a better novelist than Herman Melville because she was « socially constructive » and because Uncle Tom’s Cabin helped rouse Americans against slavery, whereas the captain of the Pequod was a symbol of laissez-faire capitalism with a bad attitude toward whales.

With the same argument you can claim that an artist like William Gropper, who drew those stirring cartoons of fat capitalists in top hats for the New Masses 60 years ago, may have something over an artist like Edward Hopper, who didn’t care a plugged nickel for community and was always painting figures in lonely rooms in such a way that you can’t be sure whether he was criticizing alienation or affirming the virtues of solitude.

REWRITING HISTORY

It’s in the area of history that PC has scored its largest successes. The reading of history is never static. There is no such thing as the last word. And who could doubt that there is still much to revise in the story of the European conquest of North and South America that historians inherited? Its basic scheme was imperial: the epic advance of civilization against barbarism; the conquistador bringing the cross and the sword; the red man shrinking back before the cavalry and the railroad. Manifest Destiny. The notion that all historians propagated this triumphalist myth uncritically is quite false; you have only to read Parkman or Prescott to realize that. But after it left the histories and sank deep into popular culture, it became a potent myth of justification for plunder, murder and enslavement.

So now, in reaction to it, comes the manufacture of its opposite myth. European man, once the hero of the conquest of the Americas, now becomes its demon; and the victims, who cannot be brought back to life, are sanctified. On either side of the divide between Euro and native, historians stand ready with tarbrush and gold leaf, and instead of the wicked old stereotypes, we have a whole outfit of equally misleading new ones. Our predecessors made a hero of Christopher Columbus. To Europeans and white Americans in 1892, he was Manifest Destiny in tights, whereas a current PC book like Kirkpatrick Sale’s The Conquest of Paradise makes him more like Hitler in a caravel, landing like a virus among the innocent people of the New World.

The need for absolute goodies and absolute baddies runs deep in us, but it drags history into propaganda and denies the humanity of the dead: their sins, their virtues, their failures. To preserve complexity, and not flatten it under the weight of anachronistic moralizing, is part of the historian’s task.

You cannot remake the past in the name of affirmative action. But you can find narratives that haven’t been written, histories of people and groups that have been distorted or ignored, and refresh history by bringing them in. That is why, in the past 25 years, so much of the vitality of written history has come from the left. When you read the work of the black Caribbean historian C.L.R. James, you see a part of the world break its long silence: a silence not of its own choosing but imposed on it by earlier imperialist writers. You do not have to be a Marxist to appreciate the truth of Eric Hobsbawm’s claim that the most widely recognized achievement of radical history « has been to win a place for the history of ordinary people, common men and women. » In America this work necessarily includes the histories of its minorities, which tend to break down complacent nationalist readings of the American past.

By the same token, great changes have taken place in the versions of American history taught to schoolchildren. The past 10 years have brought enormous and hard-won gains in accuracy, proportion and sensitivity in the textbook treatment of American minorities, whether Asian, Native, black or ^ Hispanic. But this is not enough for some extremists, who take the view that only blacks can write the history of slavery, only Indians that of pre- European America, and so forth.

That is the object of a bizarre document called the Portland African- American Baseline Essays, which has never been published as a book but, in photocopied form, is radically changing the curriculums of school systems all over the country. Written by an undistinguished group of scholars, these essays on history, social studies, math, language and arts and science are meant to be a charter of Afrocentrist history for young black Americans. They have had little scrutiny in the mainstream press. But they are popular with bureaucrats like Thomas Sobol, the education commissioner in New York State — people who are scared of alienating black voters or can’t stand up to thugs like City College professor Leonard Jeffries. Their implications for American education are large, and mostly bad.

WAS CLEOPATRA BLACK?

The Afrocentrist claim can be summarized quite easily. It says the history of the cultural relations between Africa and Europe is bunk — a prop for the fiction of white European supremacy. Paleohistorians agree that intelligent human life began in the Rift Valley of Africa. The Afrocentrist goes further: the African was the cultural father of us all. European culture derives from Egypt, and Egypt is part of Africa, linked to its heart by the artery of the Nile. Egyptian civilization begins in sub-Saharan Africa, in Ethiopia and the Sudan.

Hence, argued the founding father of Afrocentrist history, the late Senegalese writer Cheikh Anta Diop, whatever is Egyptian is African, part of the lost black achievement; Imhotep, the genius who invented the pyramid as a monumental form in the 3rd millennium B.C., was black, and so were Euclid and Cleopatra in Alexandria 28 dynasties later. Blacks in Egypt invented hieroglyphics, and monumental stone sculpture, and the pillared temple, and the cult of the Pharaonic sun king. The habit of European and American historians of treating the ancient Egyptians as other than black is a racist plot to conceal the achievements of black Africa.

No plausible evidence exists for these claims of Egyptian negritude, though it is true that the racism of traditional historians when dealing with the cultures of Africa has been appalling. Most of them refused to believe African societies had a history that was worth telling. Here is Arnold Toynbee in A Study of History: « When we classify mankind by color, the only one of the primary races . . . which has not made a single creative contribution to any of our 21 civilizations is the black race. »

No black person — indeed, no modern historian of any race — could read such bland dismissals without disgust. The question is, How to correct the record? Only by more knowledge. Toynbee was writing more than 50 years ago, but in the past 20 years, immense strides have been made in the historical scholarship of both Africa and African America. But the upwelling of research, the growth of Black Studies programs, and all that goes with the long-needed expansion of the field seem fated to be plagued by movements like Afrocentrism, just as there are always cranks nattering about flying saucers on the edges of Mesoamerican archaeology.

To plow through the literature of Afrocentrism is to enter a world of claims about technological innovation so absurd that they lie beyond satire, like those made for Soviet science in Stalin’s time. Afrocentrists have at one time or another claimed that Egyptians, alias Africans, invented the wet-cell battery by observing electric eels in the Nile; and that late in the 1st millennium B.C., they took to flying around in gliders. (This news is based not on the discovery of an aircraft in an Egyptian tomb but on a silhouette wooden votive sculpture of the god Horus, a falcon, that a passing English businessman mistook some decades ago for a model airplane.) Some also claim that Tanzanians 1,500 years ago were smelting steel with semiconductor technology. There is nothing to prove these tales, but nothing to disprove them either — a common condition of things that didn’t happen.

THE REAL MULTICULTURALISM

Nowhere are the weaknesses and propagandistic nature of Afrocentrism more visible than in its version of slave history. Afrocentrists wish to invent a sort of remedial history in which the entire blame for the invention and practice of black slavery is laid at the door of Europeans. This is profoundly unhistorical, but it’s getting locked in popular consciousness through the new curriculums.

It is true that slavery had been written into the basis of the classical world. Periclean Athens was a slave state, and so was Augustan Rome. Most of their slaves were Caucasian. The word slave meant a person of Slavic origin. By the 13th century slavery spread to other Caucasian peoples. But the African % slave trade as such, the black traffic, was an Arab invention, developed by traders with the enthusiastic collaboration of black African ones, institutionalized with the most unrelenting brutality, centuries before the white man appeared on the African continent, and continuing long after the slave market in North America was finally crushed.

Naturally this is a problem for Afrocentrists, especially when you consider the recent heritage of Black Muslim ideas that many of them espouse. Nothing in the writings of the Prophet forbids slavery, which is why it became such an Arab-dominated business. And the slave traffic could not have existed without the wholehearted cooperation of African tribal states, built on the supply of captives generated by their relentless wars. The image promulgated by pop- history fictions like Roots — white slavers bursting with cutlass and musket into the settled lives of peaceful African villages — is very far from the historical truth. A marketing system had been in place for centuries, and its supply was controlled by Africans. Nor did it simply vanish with Abolition. Slave markets, supplying the Arab emirates, were still operating in Djibouti in the 1950s; and since 1960, the slave trade has flourished in Mauritania and the Sudan. There are still reports of chattel slavery in northern Nigeria, Rwanda and Niger.

But here we come up against a cardinal rule of the PC attitude to oppression studies. Whatever a white European male historian or witness has to say must be suspect; the utterances of an oppressed person or group deserve instant credence, even if they’re the merest assertion. The claims of the victim do have to be heard, because they may cast new light on history. But they have to pass exactly the same tests as anyone else’s or debate fails and truth suffers. The PC cover for this is the idea that all statements about history are expressions of power: history is written only by the winners, and truth is political and unknowable.

The word self-esteem has become one of the obstructive shibboleths of education. Why do black children need Afrocentrist education? Because, its promoters say, it will create self-esteem. The children live in a world of media and institutions whose images and values are created mainly by whites. The white tradition is to denigrate blacks. Hence blacks must have models that show them that they matter. Do you want your children to love themselves? Then change the curriculum. Feed them racist claptrap a la Leonard Jeffries, about . how your intelligence is a function of the amount of melanin in your skin, and how Africans were sun people, open and cooperative, whereas Europeans were ice people, skulking pallidly in caves.

It is not hard to see why these claims for purely remedial history are intensifying today. They are symbolic. Nationalism always wants to have myths to prop itself up; and the newer the nationalism, the more ancient its claims. The invention of tradition, as Eric Hobsbawm has shown in detail, was one of the cultural industries of 19th century Europe. But the desire for self-esteem does not justify every lie and exaggeration and therapeutic slanting of evidence that can be claimed to alleviate it. The separatism it fosters turns what ought to be a recognition of cultural diversity, or real multiculturalism, tolerant on both sides, into a pernicious symbolic program. Separatism is the opposite of diversity.

The idea that European culture is oppressive in and of itself is a fallacy that can survive only among the fanatical and the ignorant. The moral and intellectual conviction that inspired Toussaint-Louverture to focus the rage of the Haitian slaves and lead them to freedom in 1791 came from his reading of Rousseau and Mirabeau. When thousands of voteless, propertyless workers the length and breadth of England met in their reading groups in the 1820s to discuss republican ideas and discover the significance of Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, they were seeking to unite themselves by taking back the meanings of a dominant culture from custodians who didn’t live up to them.

Americans can still take courage from their example. Cultural separatism within this republic is more a fad than a serious proposal; it is not likely to hold. If it did, it would be a disaster for those it claims to help: the young, the poor and the black. Self-esteem comes from doing things well, from discovering how to tell a truth from a lie and from finding out what unites us as well as what separates us. The posturing of the politically correct is no more a guide to such matters than the opinions of Simon Legree.

Voir également:

Welcome, Freshman! Oppressor or Oppressed?

Heather Mac Donald

The Wall Street Journal

Sep. 29, 1992

It is never too soon to learn to identify yourself as a victim. Such, at least, is the philosophy of today’s college freshman orientation, which has become a crash course in the strange new world of university politics. Within days of arrival on campus, « new students » (the euphemism of choice for « freshmen ») learn the paramount role of gender, race, ethnicity, class and sexual orientation in determining their own and others’ identity. Most important, they are provided with the most critical tool of their college career: the ability to recognize their own victimization.

An informal survey shows that two themes predominate at freshmen orientation programs – oppression and difference — foreshadowing the leitmotifs of the coming four years. Orientations present a picture of college life in which bias lurks around every corner. This year, for example, the University of California at Berkeley changed the focus of its freshman orientation from « stereotyping » to « racism, homophobia, status-ism, sexism, and age-ism. » According to Michele Frasier, assistant director of the new student program at Berkeley, the program organizers « wanted to talk more specifically about specific issues the students will face ». The objective of the emphasis on discrimination is « to make students aware [of the] issues they need to think about, so they’re not surprised when they face them. »

Various Forms of ‘Isms’

Dartmouth’s assistant dean of freshmen, Tony Tillman, offered no less bleak a vision of the academic community. A mandatory program for freshmen, « Social Issues, » presented skits on « the issues first year students face, » which he defined as « the various forms of ‘isms’: sexism, racism, classism, etc. » If the content of the skits overlapped, such overlap was, according to Mr. Tillman, unavoidable. The experience of discrimination cannot be compartmentalized: « It’s not as if today, I have a racist experience, tomorrow, a sexist [one] . In any one day, one may be up against several issues. Some issues of sexism have a racist foundation, and vice versa. »

The point of the program (and, indeed, of much of the subsequent education at Dartmouth and other schools) is to « try to weave a common thread » through these various instances of oppression. If one can’t fit oneself into the victim role, however, today’s freshmen orientation offers an alternative: One can acknowledge oneself as the oppressor. Columbia University brought in a historian from the National Museum of American History in Washington to perform, in effect, an ideological delousing of the students. Her mission, as she said in her speech, was to help students recognize their own beliefs that foster inequality. By describing the stereotypes in American society that support racism and prejudice, she hoped to give students a chance to « re-evaluate [and] learn new things. »

Learning to see yourself as a victim is closely tied to seeing yourself as different. At Columbia, freshmen heard three of their classmates read essays on what being different–gay, black and Asian American – had meant in their lives. According to assistant dean Michael Fenlon, « the goal is to initiate an awareness of difference and the implications of difference for the Columbia community. And this is not a one-shot program. We expect it will continue through their four years here, not just in the classrooms, but in the residence halls, on the playing fields, and in every aspect of student life. »

« Faces of Community, » a program organized by Stanford’s « multicultural educator, » presented freshmen with a panel of students and staff who each embodied some officially recognized difference. James Wu, orientation coordinator of Stanford’s Residential Education program, says that the « Faces » program « gives students a sense that everyone’s different. » At Bowdoin, the assistant to the president for multicultural programs hosted a brown-bag lunch for freshmen entitled « Defining Diversity: Your Role in Racial-Consciousness Raising, Cultural Differences, and Cross-Cultural Social Enhancers. » Oberlin shows its new students a performance piece on « differences in race, ethnicity, sexuality, gender, and culture, » and follows up with separate orientation programs for Asian-Americans, blacks, Latinos, and gay, lesbian and bisexual students.

The presupposition behind the contemporary freshman initiation is the need for political re-education. Columbia’s assistant dean for freshmen, Kathryn Balmer, explained that « you can’t bring all these people together and say, ‘Now be one big happy community,’ without some sort of training…. It isn’t an ideal world, so we need to do some education. » That students have somehow managed for years to form a college community in the absence of such « education » has apparently escaped administrative attention.

Stanford’s outgoing multicultural educator, Greg Ricks, revealed the dimensions of the task: « White students need help to understand what it means to be white in a multicultural community. We have spent a lot of money and a lot of time trying to help students of color, and women students, and gay and disabled students to figure out what it means for them. But for the white heterosexual male who feels disconnected and marginalized by multiculturalism, we’ve got to do a lot of work here. »

* * *

Obsessive Emphasis on Difference If all this sounds more appropriate for a war-crimes trial than for the first year of college, the incoming student can at least look forward to one unexpected area of freedom at Duke. According to President Brodie, « gender » is a « preference » that should be respected. Anyone who feels oppressed by their chromosomes can apparently simply « prefer » to be of the opposite sex. »

Today’s freshman orientations, prelude to the education to come, raise one of the great unexplained mysteries of our time: how the obsessive emphasis on « difference » and victimization will lead to a more unified, harmonious culture. Students who have been taught from day one to identify themselves and their peers with one or another oppressed or oppressing group are already replicating those group divisions in their intellectual and social lives.

* * *

Ms. Mac Donald is a lawyer living in New York.

Voir encore:

Hiroshima : pourquoi le Japon préfère qu’Obama ne s’excuse pas

Barack Obama a choisi de ne pas prononcer d’excuses, au grand soulagement de Shinzo Abe et des élites japonaises, tant cette tragédie occulte encore aujourd’hui le vrai rôle du Japon pendant la guerre.
Yann Rousseau
Les Echos

Au Japon, c’est la saison des voyages scolaires. Jeudi, à la veille de la visite historique de Barack Obama, premier président américain en exercice à venir dans la ville martyre, des milliers d’élèves de primaire et de secondaire se pressaient dans les allées du musée de la Paix d’Hiroshima pour tenter d’appréhender le drame.

Ils ont vu les statues de cire, à taille réelle, représentant des enfants brûlés vifs dans les trois secondes qui ont suivi l’explosion, le 6 août 1945, de la bombe atomique « Little Boy » au-dessus de la ville. Plus loin, des restes de peau et d’ongles prélevés par une mère sur le cadavre de son fils. Et des images atroces, en noir et blanc, de corps irradiés. Dans le dernier couloir, ils ont signé un livret appelant la communauté internationale à renoncer aux armes nucléaires. Enfin, ils sont ressortis effarés par la violence et l’inhumanité du drame qu’a vécu leur nation il y a soixante et onze ans. A aucun moment, ils n’auront été exposés aux causes du drame.

L’ensemble du musée célèbre une forme d’année « zéro » du Japon, passé soudain, en août 1945, du statut d’agresseur brutal de l’Asie à celui de victime. Non loin de là, dans le mémorial pour les victimes de la bombe atomique, construit au début des années 2000 par le gouvernement, quelques lignes expliquent vaguement « qu’à un moment, au XXe siècle, le Japon a pris le chemin de la guerre » et que « le 8 décembre 1941, il a initié les hostilités contre les Etats-Unis, la Grande-Bretagne et d’autres ».

Pas d’excuses, pas d’introspection

Nulle évocation de la colonisation brutale de la région par les troupes nippones au début des années trente. Rien sur les massacres de civils et les viols de masse commis en Chine, à Nankin. Pas une ligne sur le sort des milliers de jeunes femmes asiatiques transformées en esclaves sexuelles pour les soldats nippons dans la région. Aucune mise en perspective permettant aux visiteurs japonais de tenter un travail de mémoire similaire à celui réussi en Allemagne dès la fin du conflit. Les enfants japonais n’ont pas d’équivalent de Dachau à visiter.

Beaucoup ont, un temps, espéré que Barack Obama bouleverserait cette lecture, qui a été confortée par des années d’un enseignement et d’une culture populaire expliquant que le pays et son empereur, Hirohito, avaient été entraînés malgré eux par une poignée de leaders militaires brutaux. Le dirigeant allait, par un discours de vérité, forcer le Japon à se regarder dans le miroir. Mais le président américain a déjà annoncé qu’il ne prononcerait pas à Hiroshima les excuses symboliques qui auraient pu contraindre les élites nippones à entamer une introspection sur leur vision biaisée de l’histoire. Le responsable devrait essentiellement se concentrer sur un discours plaidant pour un monde sans armes nucléaires, au grand soulagement du Premier ministre nippon, Shinzo Abe, qui estime que son pays a, de toute façon, suffisamment demandé pardon et fait acte de contrition.

Il est vrai que plusieurs responsables politiques japonais ont, au fil des décennies, formulé des excuses fortes pour les exactions commises par l’armée impériale avant et pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Mais autant de dirigeants ont fait douter, ces dernières années, de la sincérité de ces regrets. Plusieurs membres de l’actuel gouvernement ont eux aussi flirté avec un révisionnisme malsain. Des ministres proches de la droite nationaliste continuent aussi de se rendre plusieurs fois par an au sanctuaire shinto de Yasukuni, à Tokyo, considéré à Pékin et Séoul comme le symbole odieux du passé militariste du Japon. Ils y honorent les 2,5 millions de morts pour le Japon dans les derniers grands conflits, mais aussi 14 criminels de guerre condamnés pour leurs exactions dans la région lors de la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Et l’exécutif n’émet jamais de communiqué clarifiant sa position sur ces visites controversées.

Amnésie et victimisation

S’ils craignent que la venue du président américain à Hiroshima n’incite le Japon à se cloîtrer dans cette amnésie et cette victimisation, les partisans d’un réexamen du passé nippon veulent encore croire que la seule présence de Barack Obama alimentera un débat sur la capacité de Tokyo à entamer une démarche similaire auprès de ses grands voisins asiatiques et de son allié américain. Déjà, mercredi soir, des médias ont embarrassé Shinzo Abe en le questionnant publiquement sur son éventuelle visite du site américain de Pearl Harbor, à Hawaii. Le 7 décembre 1941, cette base américaine fut attaquée par surprise par l’aéronavale japonaise et 2.403 Américains furent tués au cours du raid, qui reste vécu comme un traumatisme aux Etats-Unis.

Les médias sud-coréens et chinois vont, eux, défier le Premier ministre japonais d’oser venir dans leur pays déposer des fleurs sur des monuments témoins de l’oppression nippone d’autrefois. A quand une visite de Shinzo Abe à Nankin, demanderont-ils. Jamais, répondra le gouvernement conservateur. En déstabilisant Pékin, qui nourrit sa propagande des trous de mémoire de Tokyo, un tel geste symbolique témoignerait pourtant d’une maturité du Japon plus marquée et lui donnerait une aura nouvelle dans l’ensemble de l’Asie-Pacifique.

Voir de plus:

Hiroshima : Obama a-t-il tort de ne pas s’excuser pour la bombe atomique ?
Metronews
23-05-2016

POLITIQUE – A quatre jours de sa visite à Hiroshima, le président américain a prévenu qu’il ne s’excuserait pas pour le mal causé par le bombardement de la ville à l’arme atomique en 1945. Guibourg Delamotte, maître de conférences en sciences politiques au département Japon à Inalco, nous explique les raisons de ce refus.

Barack Obama a-t-il raison de ne pas s’excuser pour Hiroshima ?

Barack Obama se rendra à Hiroshima ce vendredi à l’issue d’un sommet des chefs d’Etat et de gouvernement du G7 organisé à Ise-Shima, dans le centre du Japon. Il sera le premier président américain en exercice à mettre les pieds dans la ville ravagée par l’attaque nucléaire américaine du 6 août 1945. Ce matin-là, à 8h15, un bombardier américain, l’Enola Gay, larguait au-dessus d’Hiroshima la première bombe atomique de l’histoire, tuant 75 000 personnes d’un coup.

Aussi symbolique soit aujourd’hui le geste de Barack Obama, il n’en reste pas moins refréné. Le chef d’Etat a en effet prévenu dans une déclaration à la chaîne japonaise NHK qu’il ne présenterait pas d’excuses. « Non, car je pense qu’il est important de reconnaître qu’en pleine guerre, les dirigeants doivent prendre toutes sortes de décisions ». Et de poursuivre : »C’est le rôle des historiens de poser des questions et de les examiner mais je sais, ayant moi-même été à ce poste depuis sept ans et demi, que tout dirigeant prend des décisions très difficiles, en particulier en temps de guerre ».

►Les Japonais aussi disposaient d’un « outil nucléaire »

De nombreux historiens ont pourtant établi, au fil des décennies, que la bombe atomique n’avait pas joué de rôle majeur pour gagner la Seconde guerre mondiale, le Japon ayant à l’époque, déjà décidé de capituler. Qu’en est-il vraiment ?

Contacté par metronews, Guibourg Delamotte, maître de conférences en sciences politiques au département Japon à Inalco, rappelle que les Japonais disaient également disposer « d’un outil nucléaire » à cette époque. D’autre part, « les effets de la bombe nucléaire sur la santé n’étaient pas encore connus. Les Américains eux-mêmes sous-estimaient les risques et restaient à quelques centaines de mètres des essais réalisés dans le désert, avec pour seule protection des lunettes de soleil ».

►Pourquoi Barack Obama ne s’excuse-t-il pas ?

« Formuler des excuses pour un chef d’Etat reste très compliqué », explique Guibourg Delamotte. « Barack Obama ne serait sans doute pas hostile à l’idée d’exprimer des regrets pour les souffrances infligées, mais d’un point de vue diplomatique, s’excuser revient à ouvrir un débat historique qui n’a jamais existé. Lorsque la guerre s’est terminée, une sorte de compromis a été établi entre les Américains et les Japonais, visant à ne plus évoquer le mal fait dans les deux camps ». Les Américains laissaient les Japonais tranquilles, en échange de quoi ces derniers ne demandaient pas d’excuses.

►A-t-il tort de ne pas le faire ?

Selon une enquête réalisée par l’agence japonaise Kyodo, 78,3%  des 115 survivants des attaques atomiques d’Hiroshima et de Nagasaki ne demandent pas d’excuses. « La visite du président américain constitue un geste de réconciliation symbolique et une reconnaissance du mal fait aux Japonais par les Américains », estime la spécialiste. Et de conclure : « Ne pas s’excuser est une sage décision diplomatique ».

Voir également:

Obama à Hiroshima : si, si, les USA s’excusent parfois, du bout des lèvres
Le président américain l’a annoncé : il ne s’excusera pas pour Hiroshima. Les Américains n’aiment pas la repentance. Cela leur est pourtant arrivé de présenter des excuses, tardivement et sans publicité.
Pascal Riché
Nouvel Obs

23 mai 2016

La visite d’un président américain à Hiroshima, le 27 mai prochain, est une première historique. Mais Barack Obama n’ira pas plus loin : il ne s’excusera pas au nom des Etats-Unis. Il l’a déclaré à la télévision japonaise NHK, en expliquant que dans le brouillard de la guerre, les leaders prenaient des décisions très difficiles.
Les Américains détestent l’exercice des excuses, cela n’entre pas dans le cadre dessiné par leurs ambitions universalistes : la grande puissance modèle, gardienne des valeurs démocratiques et humanistes, ne peut avoir commis de crimes. S’excuser n’est jamais neutre pour l’identité d’un pays : c’est une entaille portée à la narration qu’on essaye d’imposer.

Il est toutefois arrivé aux Etats-Unis, à quelques rares reprises, de présenter des excuses d’Etat. La plupart du temps à reculons et sans tambour ni trompette.

1. Le massacre des indiens

Il a fallu attendre avril 2009 pour qu’un début de repentance soit officiellement exprimé. Et encore : ces excuses n’ont pas été claironnées, elles n’ont pas été clamées lors d’une cérémonie devant les chefs des tribus indiennes réunies sur la colline du Capitole. Elles ont été camouflées dans un recoin des 67 pages de la loi portant sur le budget de la Défense pour 2010.

Les médias n’ont même pas été invités à assister à la signature, par Barack Obama le 19 décembre 2009, de cette résolution par laquelle le peuple américain s’excuse des « violences » et des « mauvais traitements » subies par les peuples natifs. Une repentance en catimini.

2. L’esclavage

Il aura fallu attendre 143 ans après l’abolition de l’esclavage pour que les Etats-Unis formulent des excuses. Mais sans grande publicité, sans signature présidentielle et en deux temps. En 2008, avant l’élection présidentielle qui a porté Obama à la Maison Blanche, la chambre des représentants a voté une première résolution ; puis, après l’investiture d’Obama, le Sénat a a son tour voté un texte allant dans le même sens.

Les deux n’ont pas été fusionnés et le président n’a pas eu à les signer. Ces textes n’ont donc, pour reprendre une comparaison faite par The Atlantic,  « pas plus de poids que des résolutions félicitant l’équipe victorieuse du Super Bowl ».

Auparavant, Bill Clinton avait exprimé pour la première fois des « regrets » et George W. Bush, à Gorée, avait qualifié l’esclavage « d’un des plus grands crime de l’histoire« , mais sans aller plus loin.

3. Les camps d’internement de Japonais

En 1988, le Congrès a voté une résolution pour présenter des excuses concernant les rafles de japonais après Pearl Harbour en 1942. Toutes les familles japonaises ou d’origine japonaise, devenues subitement suspectes, avaient été jetées dans des camps d’internement sans autre forme de procès. La majorité des parlementaires républicains a voté contre cette résolution qui déplore une « injustice fondamentale », présente des « excuses au nom du peuple américain » et prévoit une indemnisation pour les survivants et descendants des victimes. Mais la très grande majorité des démocrates a voté pour et Ronald Reagan l’a signée le 10 août, en s’en félicitant malgré les réserves de son camp : « Je pense que c’est une belle journée ».

4. les recherches sur la syphilis

Un médecin prélève du sang sur des « cobayes » à Tuskegee (Archives nationales)

Ces excuses aussi sont passées par un discours présidentiel. Bill Clinton, en 1997 a demandé pardon pour l’étude Tuskegee sur la syphilis. Un monstrueux programme de recherche sur l’évolution de la maladie, engagé dans les années 30 et se poursuivant sur plusieurs décennies, qui passait par des expérimentations sur des métayers noirs d’Alabama atteints de la maladie. On leur refusait tout traitement comme la pénicilline, tout en leur faisant croire qu’ils étaient soignés. Le scandale a fini par éclater dans les années 1970 mais il a fallu encore attendre 20 ans avant d’obtenir des excuses de la Maison Blanche :

« Le peuple américain est désolé, pour les pertes, pour les années de souffrance. Vous n’aviez rien fait de mal, vous avez été gravement victimes d’une mauvaise action. Je présente des excuses et je suis désolé qu’elles aient mis tant de temps à venir ».

Par ailleurs, en octobre 2010, Barack Obama s’est excusé publiquement, auprès du peuple du Guatemala, pour les recherches sur la syphilis pratiquées dans les années 1940 sur 1.500 citoyens de ce pays. Ces cobayes avaient été sciemment infectés par le virus de la Syphilis afin d’étudier l’efficacité de la pénicilline.

5. Les coups d’Etat et les coups tordus à l’étranger

Sur ces sujets là, très sensibles, les Etats-Unis sont très avares de repentance. En 1993, Bill Clinton s’est excusé, au nom des Etats-Unis, pour le coup d’Etat à Hawai en 1893. La reine Lili’uokalani, suspectée de vouloir prendre trop d’indépendance vis-à-vis des occidentaux, avait été déposée à la suite d’un débarquement américain.

Bill Clinton signe les excuses américaines pour avoir organisé un coup d’Etat en 1893 à Hawai (Willima J.Clinton Library)

Mais c’est une exception à la règle. Les Etats-Unis ne se sont jamais excusé d’avoir aidé les dictatures en Amérique latine dans les années 70. Du bout des lèvres, le 24 mars 2016, à Buenos Aires, devant la liste des noms des victimes de la dictature militaire gravés sur le mur du Parc de la Mémoire, Barack Obama a admis que les Etats-Unis « avaient tardé à défendre les droits de l’homme en Argentine et dans d’autres pays ». De même, on attend toujours les excuses américaines pour avoir soutenu l’apartheid en Afrique du Sud, envoyé du napalm au Vietnam. Ou lâché des bombes atomiques sur Hiroshima et Nagasaki.

Mais des excuses vis-à-vis d’un autre pays sont des opérations qui se discutent à deux, et celui qui « coince » n’est pas toujours celui auquel on pense. En 2011, il était déjà question d’une visite d’Obama à Hiroshima et d’excuses publiques. Mais comme on peut le lire dans un télégramme diplomatique dévoilé par Wikileaks, le gouvernement japonais a alors nettement repoussé l’idée, qui risquait notamment selon lui de renforcer dans son opinion publique le camp des antinucléaires.

Voir de plus:

Dying GOP Senator spends his last days apologizing to Muslims for Trump

This story epitomizes how hysterical and thoughtless the public discourse is nowadays. Trump is presented by the late Bob Bennett and the Daily Beast as an “Islamophobe” — someone with an irrational hatred of or fear of Islam and Muslims. In reality, he hasn’t said anything about Islam at all except that clearly there is a “problem,” and there obviously is. He has called for a temporary moratorium on Muslim immigration as an attempt to stop Islamic jihadis from entering the country. Did Bennett address that problem? Not from the looks of this story. Did Bennett propose an alternative method for keeping jihadis out of the country? No, and neither have any of the others who have likened Trump to Hitler for suggesting this. We are apparently just supposed to allow Muslims into the country without question, and accept that there will be jihad mass murder attacks in the U.S., because the alternative — appearing “racist,” even though Islam is not a race — is far worse. Death before political incorrectness.

“Dying GOP Senator Apologizes to Muslims for Donald Trump,” by Tim Mak, Daily Beast, May 18, 2016:

Bob Bennett spent his last days letting Muslims know how sorry he was that an Islamophobe had become his party’s all-but-certain nominee.

Former GOP senator Bob Bennett lay partially paralyzed in his bed on the fourth floor of the George Washington University Hospital. He was dying.

Not 48 hours had passed since a stroke had complicated his yearlong fight against pancreatic cancer. The cancer had begun to spread again, necessitating further chemotherapy. The stroke had dealt a further blow that threatened to finish him off.

Between the hectic helter-skelter of nurses, doctors, and well wishes from a long-cultivated community of friends and former aides, Bennett faced a quiet moment with his son Jim and his wife Joyce.

It was not a moment for self-pity.

Instead, with a slight slurring in his words, Bennett drew them close to express a dying wish: “Are there any Muslims in the hospital?” he asked.

“I’d love to go up to every single one of them to thank them for being in this country, and apologize to them on behalf of the Republican Party for Donald Trump,” Bennett told his wife and son, both of whom relayed this story to The Daily Beast.

The rise of Donald Trump had appalled the three-term Utah senator, a Republican who fell victim to the tea-party wave of the 2010 midterms. His vote for the Troubled Asset Relief Program, or TARP, had alienated many conservative activists in his state, who chose lawyer Mike Lee as the GOP nominee for Senate instead.

But as Bennett reflected on his life and legacy in mid-April, following the stroke, he wasn’t focused on the race that ended his political career. Instead, he brought up the issue of Muslims in America—over and over again.

He mentioned it briefly in a hospital interview with the Deseret News, a Utah news outlet. “There’s a lot of Muslims here in this area. I’m glad they’re here,” the former senator told the newspaper in April, describing them as “wonderful.”

“In the last days of his life this was an issue that was pressing in his mind… disgust for Donald Trump’s xenophobia,” Jim Bennett said. “At the end of his life he was preoccupied with getting things done that he had felt was left undone.”

Trump’s proposal to ban Muslim immigrants from America had outraged the former senator, his wife Joyce said, triggering his instincts to do what he could on a personal level. They ultimately did not canvass the hospital, but Bennett had already made an effort in his last months of life.

As they traveled from Washington to Utah for Christmas break, Bennett approached a woman wearing a hijab in the airport.

“He would go to people with the hijab [on] and tell them he was glad they were in America, and they were welcome here,” his wife said. “He wanted to apologize on behalf of the Republican Party.”

“He was astonished and aghast that Donald Trump had the staying power that he had… He had absolutely no respect for Donald Trump, and I think got angry and frustrated when it became clear that the party wasn’t going to steer clear of Trumpism,” his son relayed.

Bennett’s Mormon faith also played into his beliefs on Trump and Muslims: the billionaire’s proposal to ban Muslims prompted the LDS Church to issue a statement in support of religious freedom, quoting its founder saying he would “die in defending the rights… of any denomination who may be unpopular and too weak to defend themselves.”

“That was something my father felt very keenly—recognizing the parallel between the Mormon experience and the Muslim experience. [He] wanted to see these people treated with kindness, and not ostracized,” Jim Bennett said….

He died Wednesday, May 4.

Voir de même:

Israël : des généraux de Tsahal se mettent le pays à dos

En comparant l’atmosphère en Israël à celle de l’Allemagne des années 1930, le chef d’état-major de l’armée a mis en colère le gouvernement et l’opinion.

Danièle Kriegel

 Le Point
09/05/2016

PHOTO. Facebook s’excuse pour avoir censuré l’image d’un mannequin grande taille

24/05/2016
RÉSEAUX SOCIAUX – Facebook a dû faire machine arrière après avoir interdit la photographie d’un mannequin aux formes généreuses en bikini dans une publicité australienne destinée à promouvoir l’image positive du corps, jugeant que le corps en question était montré sous un jour « indésirable« . Le réseau social a ensuite présenté ses excuses aux organisateurs expliquant avoir mal jaugé la publicité.

Facebook avait, dans un premier temps, bloqué la publicité de l’association de Melbourne « Cherchez la femme » pour un événement baptisé « graisse et féminisme », disant que la photo contrevenait à ses règlements.

Une publicité qui ne répondait pas « à leurs critères »

Lorsque les organisateurs se sont inquiétés de la décision, Facebook a expliqué que la publicité ne répondait pas à leurs critères en matière de santé et de fitness car « l’image dépeint un corps ou des parties du corps d’une manière indésirable ». « Les publicités de ce type ne sont pas permises car elles entraînent chez ceux qui les voient une mauvaise image d’eux-mêmes », écrit Facebook à l’une des organisatrices de l’événement Jessamy Gleeson, qui a publié sur internet une capture d’écran de la lettre.

Mme Gleeson s’est dit abasourdie que Facebook « ne sache apparemment pas que des rondes, des femmes qui se décrivent comme grosses, peuvent se sentir très bien dans leur peau ». Elle a appelé les internautes à « crier fort contre quiconque tenterait de nous dire que certains corps sont plus désirables que d’autres ».

« Facebook n’a pas tenu compte du fait que notre événement va aborder l’image corporelle positive, qui peut concerner tous les types de corps, mais dans notre cas en l’occurrence les gros corps », ajoute-t-elle.

Voir aussi:
T’as vu ?

Pour Facebook, un mannequin grande taille ne peut pas être une icône de pub

WEB Facebook a bloqué la promotion d’un message en raison d’une photo jugée «inopportune»…

Le message en question était censé promouvoir un panel de discussion nommé « Le féminisme et les gros ». Plutôt raccord, donc. Mais Facebook a considéré que la pub montrait le corps « de manière inopportune ». Il a donc bloqué la diffusion du message auprès d’un large public, ce que permet le réseau social contre rémunération, sans pour autant le supprimer. « Les publicités ne doivent pas faire la promotion d’un état de santé ou d’un poids parfait ou à l’inverse non désirable », justifie ainsi l’entreprise dans un message à l’adresse de Cherchez la Femme. Avant de préciser : « Les pubs comme celle-ci ne sont pas admises parce qu’elles mettent les spectateurs mal à l’aise. »

Une réponse trollissime

De quoi faire « enrager » le groupe australien, contacté par The Telegraph. D’autant que Facebook lui conseille d’utiliser à la place une image « d’une activité pertinente [au regard du sujet], comme la course ou le vélo ». « Facebook ignore le fait que notre événement consiste à discuter du corps… et conclut que nous mettons les femmes mal à l’aise en postant la photo d’un mannequin grande taille », soupire un porte-parole de Cherchez la Femme.

Prenant le réseau social au mot, le groupe a changé la photo de son post promotionnel. Sur sa nouvelle image, un vélo… chevauché par une femme ronde.

Voir encore:

Le fonc­tion­naire âgé de 29 ans a fait preuve d’un sang-froid incroyable alors que sa vie était en danger. Les inter­nautes lui rendent hommage.

 Luca Andreolli

VSD

19 mai 2016

Hier, une mani­fes­ta­tion assez inédite s’est tenue à Paris. Les syndi­cats de police ont appelé les repré­sen­tants des forces de l’ordre à dénon­cer la « haine anti-flics » qui semble se répandre dans les diffé­rents cortèges orga­ni­sés contre la loi Travail depuis des semaines. Cette contre-offen­sive poli­cière fait direc­te­ment écho au slogan « Tout le monde déteste la police », crié à tue-tête par les mani­fes­tants les plus véhé­ments. L’idée était ainsi d’ap­pe­ler « au soutien de la popu­la­tion » et à la condam­na­tion des groupes orga­ni­sés de « casseurs » qui sévissent dans les rues de France. Ce coup de commu­ni­ca­tion bien orches­tré a été renforcé par la viru­lence de jeunes mani­fes­tants, qui ont, quant à eux, tenu à se réunir en marge du rassem­ble­ment poli­cier, malgré les inter­dic­tions formu­lées par la préfec­ture.

Et une fois de plus, la situa­tion a dégé­néré. Preuve de la gravité des faits commis, une enquête a même été ouverte pour « tenta­tive d’ho­mi­cide volon­taire » suite à l’at­taque d’une voiture de police, qui a débou­ché sur l’inter­pel­la­tion de cinq personnes. La scène a déjà fait le tour du monde et choqué l’opi­nion publique. Elle a été filmée par une caméra embarquée, offrant un point de vue simi­laire à celui des assaillants. La séquence a été postée sur Youtube et a été vision­née plus de 245 000 fois. Elle a donné lieu à de nombreuses réuti­li­sa­tions, notam­ment sur Twit­ter, où des inter­nautes ont isolé quelques courts passages pour en faire des GIF ou des Vine, c’est-à-dire des vidéos de quelques secondes.

Dans ce flot de conte­nus très expli­cites, on découvre une violence inouïe. Une voiture de poli­ciers se retrouve isolée dans une rue proche de la place de la Répu­blique, où déboulent des dizaines de mani­fes­tants hostiles. Beau­coup sont masqués par des écharpes ou des cagoules. Les insultes pleuvent et les coups sur la carlingue commencent à défer­ler. À l’in­té­rieur, les deux fonc­tion­naires (un homme et une femme) sont en très fâcheuse posture. Mais ils ne peuvent rien faire, étant bloqués par la file de voitures qui les précèdent. Soudain, un casseur assène un violent coup de pied dans la vitre du conduc­teur, qui explose en mille morceaux. Un autre se préci­pite pour s’en prendre direc­te­ment au poli­cier coincé à l’in­té­rieur. Puis, c’est au tour de la plage arrière d’être prise d’as­saut.

Plusieurs projec­tiles sont utili­sés pour malme­ner les forces de l’ordre, notam­ment des bornes anti-station­ne­ment. Un objet incen­diaire est fina­le­ment balancé à l’in­té­rieur du véhi­cule, qui commence à prendre feu. Le conduc­teur semble alors char­ger son arme, avant de sortir pour sauver sa peau. On découvre une carrure impo­sante se déga­ger de ce brasier. Mais pas las d’har­ce­ler les poli­ciers, un casseur se présente avec un long bâton pour frap­per de nouveau le fonc­tion­naire. Celui-ci ne se démonte pas pour autant. Il somme son agres­seur de s’ar­rê­ter. Ce dernier, décon­te­nancé par le gaba­rit de son oppo­sant, semble esquis­ser un geste de recul, mais tente malgré tout d’as­sé­ner d’autres coups. Le poli­cier choi­sit de parer chaque tenta­tive, sans attaquer, en se conten­tant simple­ment d’avan­cer de quelques pas pour dissua­der le casseur de conti­nuer. Il est fina­le­ment secouru par des collègues et s’échappe calme­ment et sans se retour­ner, lais­sant la voiture s’em­bra­ser derrière lui.

Une preuve de courage et un sang-froid unani­me­ment salués depuis par de nombreux Twit­tos, qui ont notam­ment utilisé le mot dièse #KungFuFigh­ting. Quant au « héros » du jour, peu d’in­for­ma­tions sur lui ont filtré. Le préfet de Paris, Bernard Cadot, a simple­ment précisé que le poli­cier de 29 ans était un adjoint de sécu­rité, membre de « la brigade du péri­phé­rique », et que l’agres­sion dont il a été victime s’est produite en rentrant d’in­ter­ven­tion. Même s’il a échappé au pire et ne souffre que de bles­sures super­fi­cielles, il a néan­moins passé la nuit en obser­va­tion à l’hô­pi­tal Bégin de Saint-Mandé. Le ministre de l’In­té­rieur, Bernard Caze­neuve, lui a d’ailleurs visite pour « louer son courage abso­lu­ment formi­dable, comme la plupart des poli­ciers qui sont mobi­li­sés dans la période ».

Voir aussi:

Equipe de France : Cantona accuse Deschamps d’être trop français
Valeurs actuelles
26 Mai 2016

Accusations. L’ancien joueur de l’équipe de France, Eric Cantona, a attaqué violemment le sélectionneur des Bleus Didier Deschamps. Il lui reproche un nom « très français » et une famille qui n’est « pas mélangée, comme les Mormons ». Il l’accuse de n’avoir pas convoqué dans le groupe les attaquants Karim Benzema et Hatem Ben Arfa en raison de leurs origines.

Eric Cantona n’a pas sa langue dans sa poche, même quand il s’agit de jeter des accusations pour le moins étranges. Dans une interview au Guardian, l’ancienne star de Manchester United s’en est pris à Didier Deschamps, le sélectionneur de l’équipe de France : « Benzema est un grand joueur, Ben Arfa est un grand joueur. Mais Deschamps, il a un nom très français. Peut-être qu’il est le seul en France à avoir un nom vraiment français. Personne dans sa famille n’est mélangé avec quelqu’un, vous savez. Comme les Mormons en Amérique. Je ne suis pas surpris qu’il ait utilisé la situation de Benzema pour ne pas le prendre. Surtout après que Valls ait dit qu’il ne devrait pas jouer pour la France. Ben Arfa est peut-être le meilleur joueur en France aujourd’hui, mais il a des origines. Je suis autorisé à m’interroger à propos de ça ».
Des propos à peine surprenants pour l’ancien joueur de l’équipe de France, habitué des sorties hasardeuses et investi dans la lutte contre le racisme. Plus tard dans l’interview, il en a rajouté lorsqu’on lui a demandé si les choix de Didier Deschamps étaient racistes : « Peut-être non, peut-être oui. Pourquoi pas ? Une chose est sûre, Benzema et Ben Arfa sont deux des meilleurs joueurs français et ne seront pas à l’Euro. Et pour sûr, Benzema et Ben Arfa ont des origines nord-africaines. Donc le débat est ouvert ».

En équipe de France, d’autres excellents joueurs
Eric Cantona fait preuve de mauvaise foi dans ses propos. Si Karim Benzema n’est pas sélectionné malgré son excellent niveau, c’est en raison de son implication dans un chantage à la sextape à l’encontre de l’un de ses anciens coéquipiers en bleu, Mathieu Valbuena. L’attaquant du Real Madrid, s’il n’est plus sous contrôle judiciaire, reste mis en examen dans cette affaire. Quant à Hatem Ben Arfa, il sort effectivement d’une saison brillante avec son club de Nice. Mais la concurrence en attaque est très rude chez les Bleus. Affirmer que ces deux joueurs sont les meilleurs joueurs français est discutable. Antoine Griezmann joue par exemple la finale de la Ligue des champions samedi prochain, et a pris une place de leader dans l’une des meilleures équipes d’Europe, l’Atletico Madrid. On peut également citer des joueurs comme Paul Pogba ou Blaise Matuidi, deux joueurs français très cotés qui participeront à l’Euro.

Voir enfin:

Je condamne le christia­nisme
Friedrich Nietzsche

L’Antréchrist

(1895)

Je termine ici et je prononce mon jugement. Je condamne le christia­nisme, j’élève contre l’Église chrétienne la plus terrible de toutes les accusa­tions, que jamais accusateur ait prononcée. Elle est la plus grande corruption que l’on puisse imaginer, elle a eu la volonté de la dernière corruption possible. L’Église chrétienne n’épargna sur rien sa corruption, elle a fait de toute valeur une non-valeur, de chaque vérité un mensonge, de chaque intégrité une bassesse d’âme.

Qu’on ose encore me parler de ses bienfaits « humanitaires ». Supprimer une misère était contraire à sa plus profonde utilité, elle vécut de misères, elle créa des misères pour s’éterniser… Le ver du péché par exemple : une misère dont l’Église seulement enrichit l’huma­nité ! — L’ « égalité des âmes devant Dieu », cette fausseté, ce prétexte aux rancunes les plus basses, cet explosif de l’idée, qui finit par devenir Révo­lution, idée moderne, principe de dégénérescence de tout l’ordre social — c’est la dynamite chrétienne… les bienfaits « humanitaires » du christia­nisme ! Faire de l’humanitas une contradiction, un art de pollution, une aversion, un mépris de tous les instincts bons et droits ! Cela serait pour moi des bienfaits du christianisme ! — Le parasitisme, seule pratique de l’Église, buvant, avec son idéal d’anémie et de sainteté, le sang, l’amour, l’espoir en la vie ; l’au-delà, négation de toute réalité ; la croix, signe de ralliement pour la conspiration la plus souterraine qu’il y ait jamais eue, — conspiration contre la santé, la beauté, la droiture, la bravoure, l’esprit, la beauté d’âme, contre la vie elle-même…

Je veux inscrire à tous les murs cette accusation éternelle contre le chris­tianisme, partout où il y a des murs, — j’ai des lettres qui rendent voyants même les aveugles… J’appelle le christianisme l’unique grande calamité, l’unique grande perversion intérieure, l’unique grand instinct de haine qui ne trouve pas de moyen assez venimeux, assez clandestin, assez souterrain, assez petit — je l’appelle l’unique et l’immortelle flétrissure de l’humanité…


Scoop du siècle: un leader mondial célèbre le christianisme et il n’est pas américain ! (Shallow, clichéd Easter message: David Cameron spills the beans on the universality of Judeo-Christian values and pays for it)

5 avril, 2016

OBunny
batmanvsuperman
Tu aimeras ton prochain comme toi-même. Lévitique 19: 18
N’avez-vous jamais lu dans les Écritures: La pierre qu’ont rejetée ceux qui bâtissaient est devenue la principale de l’angle. Jésus (Psaume 118: 22/Matthieu 21: 42)
Soyez fils de votre Père qui est dans les cieux; car il fait lever son soleil sur les méchants et sur les bons, et il fait pleuvoir sur les justes et sur les injustes. Jésus (Matthieu 5: 45)
Si quelqu’un ne veut pas travailler, qu’il ne mange pas non plus. Paul (2 Thessaloniciens 3: 10)
L’Europe n’est rien de substantiel. L’envers de cette vacuité substantielle est une tolérance, une ouverture radicale. Ulrich Beck
L’Europe meurt de sa lâcheté et de sa faiblesse morales, de son incapacité à se défendre et de l’ornière morale évidente dont elle ne peut s’extraire depuis Auschwitz. Imre Kertész (L’Ultime auberge)
La basse continue de la morale humaniste, celle qui existe chez Bach avec des accords parfaits, des tonalité en mi majeur ou en sol majeur, une culture fermée où chaque mot signifiait ce qu’il voulait dire et seulement cela, voilà ce qui a disparu avec Auschwitz et le totalitarisme. Comme Arnold Schoenberg [1874-1951, qui a révolutionné le langage musical en renonçant au système tonal de sept notes] l’a fait pour la musique, j’ai découvert, avec mon écriture, une « prose atonale », qui illustre la fin du consensus et de la culture humaniste, celle qui valait à l’époque de Bach et ensuite. Dans Etre sans destin, j’ai renversé le Bildungsroman, le roman de formation allemand. On peut dire que mes livres sont des récits de la « dé-formation ». (…) Cette recrudescence de l’antisémitisme, qui est un phénomène mondial, je la trouve bien entendu effarante. Avant même les attaques terroristes de janvier à Paris, j’avais fait la remarque que l’Europe était en train de mourir de sa lâcheté et de sa faiblesse morale, de son incapacité à se protéger et de l’ornière morale évidente dont elle ne pouvait s’extraire après Auschwitz. La démocratie reste impuissante à se défendre, et insensible devant la menace qui la guette. Et le risque est grand de voir les gardes-frontières qui entreprennent de défendre l’Europe contre la barbarie montante, les décapitations, la « tyrannie orientale », devenir à leur tour des fascistes. Que va devenir l’humanité dans ces conditions ? Auschwitz n’a pas été un accident de l’Histoire, et beaucoup de signes montrent que sa répétition est possible. Imre Kertész
Tu vois, ce que nous appelons Dieu dépend de notre tribu, Clark Joe, parce que Dieu est tribal; Dieu prend parti! Aucun homme dans le ciel n’est intervenu quand j’étais petit pour me délivrer du poing et des abominations de papa. J’ai compris depuis longtemps que Si Dieu est tout puissant, il ne peut pas être tout bienveillant. Et s’il est tout bienveillant, il ne peut pas être tout puissant. Et toi non plus ! Lex Luthor
Cette sorte de pouvoir est dangereux. (…) Dans une démocratie, le bien est une conversation et non une décision unilatérale. Sénatrice Finch (personnage de Batman contre Superman)
La bonne idée de ce nouveau film des écuries DC Comics, c’est de mettre en opposition deux conceptions de la justice, en leur donnant vie à travers l’affrontement de deux héros mythiques. (…) Superman et Batman ne sont pas des citoyens comme les autres. Ce sont tous les deux des hors-la-loi qui œuvrent pour accomplir le Bien. Néanmoins, leur rapport à la justice n’est pas le même: l’un incarne une loi supérieure, l’autre cherche à échapper à l’intransigeance des règles pour mieux faire corps avec le monde. Le personnage de Superman évoque une justice divine transcendante, ou encore supra-étatique. À plusieurs reprises, le film met en évidence le défaut de cette justice surhumaine, trop parfaite pour notre monde. Superman est un héros kantien, pour qui le devoir ne peut souffrir de compromission. Cette rigidité morale peut alors paradoxalement conduire à une vertu vicieuse, trop sûre d’elle même. On reprochait au philosophe de Königsberg sa morale de cristal, parfaite dans ses intentions mais prête à se briser au contact de la dure réalité. Il en va de même pour Superman et pour sa bonne volonté, qui vient buter sur la brutalité de ses adversaires et sur des dilemmes moraux à la résolution impossible. Le personnage de Batman incarne quant à lui une justice souple, souterraine, infra-étatique et peut-être trop humaine. Le modèle philosophique le plus proche est celui de la morale arétique du philosophe Aristote. Si les règles sont trop rigides, il faut privilégier, à la manière du maçon qui utilise comme règle le fil à plomb qui s’adapte aux contours irréguliers, une vertu plus élastique. Plutôt que d’obéir à des impératifs catégoriques, le justicier est celui qui sait s’adapter et optimiser l’agir au cas particulier. Paradoxalement, cette justice de l’ombre peut aller jusqu’à vouloir braver l‘interdit suprême ; le meurtre; puisque Batman veut en finir avec Superman. (…) De la même façon, le film pose dès le départ, à travers les discours d’une sénatrice, le problème critique du recours au super-héros. Ce dernier déresponsabilise l’homme, court-circuite le débat démocratique et menace par ses super-pouvoirs toute possibilité d’un contre-pouvoir. Les « Watchmen », adaptation plus subtile de l’oeuvre de Alan Moore par le même Zack Snyder posait déjà la question : « Who watches the Watchmen ? » Le Nouvel Obs
“Batman v. Superman” may lack the social commentary of “The Dark Knight” trilogy or bold iconoclasm of “V for Vendetta,” but it does have an ideology – namely, its distrust of power. To Batman and many residents of both Metropolis and Gotham, Superman is a self-appointed overlord whose complete unaccountability makes him an existential threat to humanity, regardless of his claims that he only wants to help. Indeed, the film opens by revisiting the controversial Metropolis fight from “Man of Steel,” one that many critics noted would have resulted in hundreds of thousands of civilian casualties, showing how the stupendous loss of life (and Superman’s callous disregard for it) motivates Batman’s hatred. Of course, in Superman’s eyes, Batman is nothing more than a vigilante, someone whose ability to operate above the law speaks not to his superior moral qualities but rather the corruption of a police department that refuses to prosecute him. And when we see Bruce Wayne branding criminals with the Bat logo, it’s hard to disagree with Superman’s assessment. Coming from a movie in which one character declares that “on this earth, every act is a political act,” it’s obvious that these political messages were included by design. Regardless of their political affiliation, director Zack Snyder and screenwriters David S. Goyer and Chris Terrio have created an operatic superhero film that abhors the real-world consequences which would ensue if superheroes actually existed. In the “Batman v. Superman” paradigm, it doesn’t matter that those wielding the power think of themselves as virtuous – whether sent from above with a divine destiny or crawling the streets to protect the innocent – because “in a democracy, good is a conversation, not a unilateral decision” (to quote the movie’s idealistic United States Senator played by Holly Hunter). This isn’t to say that “Batman v. Superman” is a masterpiece of political commentary, or even that its message is always presented effectively. Aside from shots of anti-Superman protesters carrying protest signs modeled after the anti-Mexican rhetoric that contaminates our discourse today, there isn’t much of an exploration of xenophobia vis-à-vis Superman’s origin story (a missed opportunity in any ostensibly politicized Superman parable). There are similarly fleeting references to drone strikes and civil liberties violations, all dutifully ticked off as vestiges of a security state run amok before quickly forgotten. The movie does include commendably strong female characters like Lois Lane and Wonder Woman, but they receive such insufficient attention that they barely make an impact (a shortcoming more likely attributable to its cluttered narrative than outright sexism). At the same time, there is actually something very intelligent, even subversive, about a superhero film that is so brazen in challenging the political legitimacy of those who would-be superheroes. It is the central conflict that drives the narrative and keeps the audience engaged in the on-screen action, even if the flat characters make it hard to invest on a deeper level. This isn’t a movie that simply includes those elements to make itself seem more profound; without that political subtext, the film barely exists at all. While it remains to be seen whether this political message will give “Batman v. Superman” the same timelessness as other blockbuster political parables from the superhero genre (again, think “V for Vendetta” or “The Dark Knight”), I suspect it goes a long way toward explaining why many audiences are connecting with it. For better or worse, the movie uses two well-known contemporary mythologies – that of the Batman and Superman characters – to ask provocative questions about whether we can trust concentrations of great power. Critics may deride these attempts as incoherent or simplistic, but if John and Jane Q. Public are intrigued by them, then perhaps we should hesitate before dismissing them outright. After all, any movie that tries to make its audience smarter isn’t completely devoid of merit. When cultural historians look back on cinema circa 2016, they will likely marvel at our growing ambivalence toward the superhero characters who have become so popular over the past couple decades. Later this year “Batman v. Superman” will be joined by “Captain America: Civil War,” another movie in which two iconic superheroes feud over ideological differences about concentrations of power (this time Captain America and Iron Man). There is a mass catharsis at play here, a phenomenon in which the anxieties toward demagogues and potential demagogues – liberals and conservatives can fill in their own blanks here with the names of their least-favorite politicians – is being reflected back to us on the silver screen. This, politically speaking, may be the most important takeaway from “Batman v. Superman.” It may be a good movie, a bad movie, or anything in between, but it is without question an important film today, and a quintessential product of the America we inhabit. Matthew Rozsa
Superman vs. Batman … accomplishes its lofty goal to approach Superman (Henry Cavill) from a more mythological discourse, with Christian symbolism coming to the forefront. Those who saw « Man of Steel » are undoubtedly familiar with these sorts of Christian references, especially given that film’s use of the Holy Trinity. That symbolism is even more overt in « Batman v Superman, » or should we call it « The Passion of Superman »? The godly hero is venerated throughout the film. His morality is also called into question. At one point he essentially decimates an entire village in order to rescue Lois Lane (Amy Adams) in the middle of the desert. But this scorn is often countered by images of his redemption, as when Superman saves a girl from a burning building and gets mobbed by a group of people all stretching out to touch him. Jesus — I mean Superman — even goes on trial in front of Congress so that the world can get a better idea of where he stands. Is he on Earth to dominate mankind? Or is he there to collaborate with humanity? Of course, like Christ, there are those that fear Superman, including Bruce Wayne (Ben Affleck). (…) Likely because he heard for two years how oblivious Superman seemed in « Man of Steel » about killing millions of people during his fight with General Zod (Michael Shannon), Snyder decided to then show audiences this same destruction from a different viewpoint, using overt 9/11 references. While Snyder’s attempts to acknowledge the carnage in a way his previous film didn’t, the rewrite does not in reveal how Superman feels about anything. More to the point, despite seeing the mayhem, Bruce Wayne’s alter ego Batman seems to have no sympathy for killing other characters during the various chase or action sequences he takes on. (…) Jesse Eisenberg’s Lex Luthor is often used to bring the Messianic imagery to the forefront – he ceaselessly refers to Superman as an analogy for God. Even his hatred of Superman is rooted in that analogy. Jewish Rabbi Elie Wiesel was faced with the horrors of the Holocaust, and his theology was utterly transformed by it. Wiesel came to the belief that, in the face of Auschwitz, God must be either all-loving or all-powerful – He could not be both. Lex Luthor has come to a similar view; and, where Wiesel was comfortable with the distinction, Luthor is angry. Conflating Superman with God, his desire is to reveal either the limits of Superman’s character, or of his power. In the film, there’s a fascinatingly spiritual scene in which Superman has been tempted away from the path of interaction with the world. Curiously enough, this time round it is his own mother who has tried to tell him to let go – « You don’t owe the world anything, » she tells him. Superman heads off to a mountain (again, a spiritual place in the Bible), and has a spiritual encounter with his deceased father, Jonathan, that prepares him for what is to come. (…) Luthor uses Kryptonian technology to create Doomsday, and it’s notable that doing so requires his blood – again, a Biblical notion (Leviticus 17: 11, « For the life of a creature is in the blood »). Philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche famously argued that man created God in his own image. Batman V Superman neatly inverts this postmodern trope, with, instead, man creating the devil in response to God’s presence. The battle between Doomsday and the DC superheroes culminates in a brutal conflict that goes so far as the boundaries of the atmosphere! Ultimately, Superman and Doomsday strike each other with fatal blows, in a scene that seems analogous to the first Biblical prophecy of what the Cross would achieve, in Genesis 3: 15: « He will crush your head, and you will strike his heel. » In this first prophecy, the decisive battle between the Son of Man (a title Jesus claimed for himself) and the Devil would involve both striking powerful blows against the other. The Devil, in Genesis spoken of as a serpent, will strike Jesus on the heel – infecting him with venom, and thus taking his life. Jesus, meanwhile, will crush the Devil’s head as he dies. True to this form, Superman and Doomsday literally impale one another, both dying. Tellingly, as Lois weeps (analogous to many images of Jesus’ mother weeping over his body), the camera pans out to reveal wooden rubble in the shape of Crosses. It’s also no coincidence that this film was released on Good Friday, when Christians celebrate the death of Jesus! (…) Sometimes crucifixions were a long and messy affair, and the Romans tried to hurry them up. As Jesus hung upon the Cross, the Roman soldiers moved between the three men hanging on the Crosses, and broke the legs of the two thieves – so they would hang, and asphyxiate. They believed that Jesus was already dead, though, and pierced his side with a spear. The Bible is very specific to describing a flow of « blood and water », which indicates that the spear had penetrated the lung – and it was filled, proving Jesus was truly dead. In roughly the same way, the crucial weapon in this film is a Kryptonite spear, fashioned by Batman, and ultimately used against Doomsday. As Doomsday dies, the creature’s right arm – taking on the form of a spear – pierces Superman’s chest, also killing him. It’s not a coincidence, even though the symbolism breaks apart when you look too deeply at this one. Is there anyone who believes Superman will stay dead? The funeral processions – complete with the famous religious tune Amazing Grace – and the mourning masses are eerily reminiscent of the Bible’s descriptions. Just as with Jesus, Superman is left in the grave – and the final scenes hint that he’s not quite dead yet… This, of course, was based off the famous Death of Superman event – and yes, Superman came back pretty quickly … Latin Post
Every other scene is a murky allusion to classical mythology or baroque religious art. But that’s categorically all they are: the film regularly defies common sense and logic in order to cue up the next cod-transfiguration or pietà. When Lois Lane (Amy Adams) hurls that kryptonite spear into the water, she does it for no apparent reason other than the fact it looks, like, totally cool – and accordingly, she and Superman are fishing it back out again five minutes later. The heavy religious symbolism of Man of Steel now looks relatively restrained: Superman himself has gone Full Christ Metaphor, and his life is an endless cycle of rescuing people (mainly Lois) and pulling expressions of pained benificence. Cavill has almost nothing to do apart from look chiseled, which makes a depressing kind of sense, given the film seems to view his character as a living statue. Batman V Superman launches into its myth-making immediately and humourlessly, setting the tone for everything that follows. Under the opening credits we get a refresher course in Bruce Wayne’s childhood trauma: yet again, we see the shooting of his parents (this time outside a cinema showing Excalibur and The Mark of Zorro) and his subsequent tumble down a bat-infested shaft. It’s staged with sadistic elegance – there’s a skin-prickling shot of the mugger’s pistol hitching up Bruce’s mother’s string of pearls – although there are only so many slow-motion aerial shots of coffins and black umbrellas a man can come up with, and much of it smacks of similar passages in Snyder’s earlier films, Sucker Punch and Watchmen. It also turns out to be the only substantial insight we get into who Bruce Wayne actually is, or what drives him, in the film’s entire two-and-a-half-hour running time. Giving Affleck’s Batman the physique of a concrete pillar makes aesthetic sense, but did he need the personality of one too? One more thing about Bruce: he loathes Superman, because of his city-razing antics at the end of Man of Steel, which toppled Wayne Tower with hundreds of employees inside it. Here, Snyder gives us a street-level recap, transparently invoking 9/11 in every shot. (Later, the film works the terrorism angle even harder: Superman’s actions prove to be the catalyst for a suicide bomb attack on US soil.) In short, Batman has grounds for vengeance. But it’s Lex Luthor who has the appetite. After hauling a clump of glowing green kryptonite from the Indian Ocean, the young technology mogul devises a ‘silver bullet’ that could bring Superman to heel. Eisenberg gives a catastrophic performance here, all itchy and spasmodic, and built on mumbled rants about Copernicus and Nietzsche … The Telegraph
Notre monde est de plus en plus imprégné par cette vérité évangélique de l’innocence des victimes. L’attention qu’on porte aux victimes a commencé au Moyen Age, avec l’invention de l’hôpital. L’Hôtel-Dieu, comme on disait, accueillait toutes les victimes, indépendamment de leur origine. Les sociétés primitives n’étaient pas inhumaines, mais elles n’avaient d’attention que pour leurs membres. Le monde moderne a inventé la « victime inconnue », comme on dirait aujourd’hui le « soldat inconnu ». Le christianisme peut maintenant continuer à s’étendre même sans la loi, car ses grandes percées intellectuelles et morales, notre souci des victimes et notre attention à ne pas nous fabriquer de boucs émissaires, ont fait de nous des chrétiens qui s’ignorent. René Girard
Les mondes anciens étaient comparables entre eux, le nôtre est vraiment unique. Sa supériorité dans tous les domaines est tellement écrasante, tellement évidente que, paradoxalement, il est interdit d’en faire état. René Girard
Les pays européens qui ont transformé la Méditerranée en un cimetière de migrants partagent la responsabilité de chaque réfugié mort. Erdogan
Alors que la Turquie accueille trois millions (de migrants), ceux qui sont incapables de faire de la place à une poignée de réfugiés et qui, au coeur de l’Europe, maintiennent des innocents dans des conditions honteuses, doivent d’abord regarder chez eux. Erdogan (2016)
Les racines de l’Europe sont autant musulmanes que chrétiennes. Jacques Chirac
Nous l’avons été, mais nous ne sommes plus une nation chrétienne, du moins, pas seulement. Nous sommes aussi une nation juive, une nation musulmane, une nation bouddhiste, une nation hindoue, une nation d’athées. Barack Hussein Obama (2006)
Whatever we once were, we are no longer just a Christian nation; we are also a Jewish nation, a Muslim nation, a Buddhist nation, a Hindu nation, and a nation of nonbelievers. And even if we did have only Christians in our midst, if we expelled every non-Christian from the United States of America, whose Christianity would we teach in the schools? Would we go with James Dobson’s, or Al Sharpton’s? Which passages of Scripture should guide our public policy? Should we go with Leviticus, which suggests slavery is ok and that eating shellfish is abomination? How about Deuteronomy, which suggests stoning your child if he strays from the faith? Or should we just stick to the Sermon on the Mount – a passage that is so radical that it’s doubtful that our own Defense Department would survive its application? So before we get carried away, let’s read our bibles. Folks haven’t been reading their bibles. This brings me to my second point. Democracy demands that the religiously motivated translate their concerns into universal, rather than religion-specific, values. It requires that their proposals be subject to argument, and amenable to reason. I may be opposed to abortion for religious reasons, but if I seek to pass a law banning the practice, I cannot simply point to the teachings of my church or evoke God’s will. I have to explain why abortion violates some principle that is accessible to people of all faiths, including those with no faith at all. Now this is going to be difficult for some who believe in the inerrancy of the Bible, as many evangelicals do. But in a pluralistic democracy, we have no choice. Politics depends on our ability to persuade each other of common aims based on a common reality. It involves the compromise, the art of what’s possible. At some fundamental level, religion does not allow for compromise. It’s the art of the impossible. If God has spoken, then followers are expected to live up to God’s edicts, regardless of the consequences. To base one’s life on such uncompromising commitments may be sublime, but to base our policy making on such commitments would be a dangerous thing. And if you doubt that, let me give you an example. We all know the story of Abraham and Isaac. Abraham is ordered by God to offer up his only son, and without argument, he takes Isaac to the mountaintop, binds him to an altar, and raises his knife, prepared to act as God has commanded. Of course, in the end God sends down an angel to intercede at the very last minute, and Abraham passes God’s test of devotion. But it’s fair to say that if any of us leaving this church saw Abraham on a roof of a building raising his knife, we would, at the very least, call the police and expect the Department of Children and Family Services to take Isaac away from Abraham. We would do so because we do not hear what Abraham hears, do not see what Abraham sees, true as those experiences may be. So the best we can do is act in accordance with those things that we all see, and that we all hear, be it common laws or basic reason. Finally, any reconciliation between faith and democratic pluralism requires some sense of proportion. This goes for both sides. Even those who claim the Bible’s inerrancy make distinctions between Scriptural edicts, sensing that some passages – the Ten Commandments, say, or a belief in Christ’s divinity – are central to Christian faith, while others are more culturally specific and may be modified to accommodate modern life. The American people intuitively understand this, which is why the majority of Catholics practice birth control and some of those opposed to gay marriage nevertheless are opposed to a Constitutional amendment to ban it. Religious leadership need not accept such wisdom in counseling their flocks, but they should recognize this wisdom in their politics. But a sense of proportion should also guide those who police the boundaries between church and state. Not every mention of God in public is a breach to the wall of separation – context matters. It is doubtful that children reciting the Pledge of Allegiance feel oppressed or brainwashed as a consequence of muttering the phrase « under God. » I didn’t. Having voluntary student prayer groups use school property to meet should not be a threat, any more than its use by the High School Republicans should threaten Democrats. And one can envision certain faith-based programs – targeting ex-offenders or substance abusers – that offer a uniquely powerful way of solving problems. Barack Hussein Obama (2006)
Nous savons que notre héritage multiple est une force, pas une faiblesse. Nous sommes un pays de chrétiens et de musulmans, de juifs et d’hindous, et d’athées. Nous avons été formés par chaque langue et civilisation, venues de tous les coins de la Terre. Et parce que nous avons goûté à l’amertume d’une guerre de Sécession et de la ségrégation (raciale), et émergé de ce chapitre plus forts et plus unis, nous ne pouvons pas nous empêcher de croire que les vieilles haines vont un jour disparaître, que les frontières tribales vont se dissoudre, que pendant que le monde devient plus petit, notre humanité commune doit se révéler, et que les Etats-Unis doivent jouer leur rôle en donnant l’élan d’une nouvelle ère de paix. Au monde musulman: nous voulons trouver une nouvelle approche, fondée sur l’intérêt et le respect mutuels. A ceux parmi les dirigeants du monde qui cherchent à semer la guerre, ou faire reposer la faute des maux de leur société sur l’Occident, sachez que vos peuples vous jugeront sur ce que vous pouvez construire, pas détruire. Barack Hussein Obama (2009)
Nous exprimerons notre appréciation profonde de la foi musulmane qui a tant fait au long des siècles pour améliorer le monde, y compris mon propre pays. Barack Hussein Obama (Ankara, avril 2009)
Les Etats-Unis et le monde occidental doivent apprendre à mieux connaître l’islam. D’ailleurs, si l’on compte le nombre d’Américains musulmans, on voit que les Etats-Unis sont l’un des plus grands pays musulmans de la planète. Barack Hussein Obama (entretien pour Canal +, le 2 juin 2009)
Salamm aleïkoum (…) Comme le dit le Saint Coran, « Crains Dieu et dis toujours la vérité ». (…) Je suis chrétien, mais mon père était issu d’une famille kényane qui compte des générations de musulmans. Enfant, j’ai passé plusieurs années en Indonésie où j’ai entendu l’appel à la prière (azan) à l’aube et au crépuscule. Jeune homme, j’ai travaillé dans des quartiers de Chicago où j’ai côtoyé beaucoup de gens qui trouvaient la dignité et la paix dans leur foi musulmane. Barack Hussein Obama (Prêche du Caire)
L’avenir ne doit pas appartenir à ceux qui calomnient le prophète de l’Islam. Barack Obama (siège de l’ONU, New York, 26.09.12)
Nous montons sur nos grands chevaux mais souvenons-nous que pendant les croisades et l’inquisition, des actes terribles ont été commis au nom du Christ. Dans notre pays, nous avons eu l’esclavage, trop souvent justifié par le Christ. Barack Hussein Obama
Humanity has been grappling with these questions throughout human history.  And lest we get on our high horse and think this is unique to some other place, remember that during the Crusades and the Inquisition, people committed terrible deeds in the name of Christ.  In our home country, slavery and Jim Crow all too often was justified in the name of Christ. (…) And so, as people of faith, we are summoned to push back against those who try to distort our religion — any religion — for their own nihilistic ends. Barack Hussein Obama (2015)
As a Christian, I am supposed to love. And I have to say that sometimes when I listen to less than loving expressions by Christians, I get concerned. But that’s a topic for another day. (…) For me, the celebration of Easter puts our earthly concerns into perspective. With humility and with awe, we give thanks to the extraordinary sacrifice of Jesus Christ, our Saviour. We reflect on the brutal pain that he suffered, the scorn that He absorbed, the sins that he bore, this extraordinary gift of salvation that he gave to us. And we try, as best we can, to comprehend the darkness that He endured so that we might receive God’s light. And yet, even as we grapple with the sheer enormity of Jesus’s sacrifice, on Easter we can’t lose sight of the fact that the story didn’t end on Friday. The story keeps on going. On Sunday comes the glorious Resurrection of our Saviour. Barack Hussein Obama (2015)
This is a little bittersweet — my final Easter Prayer Breakfast as President.   (…) Now, as Joe said, in light of recent events, this gathering takes on more meaning.  Around the world, we have seen horrific acts of terrorism, most recently Brussels, as well as what happened in Pakistan — innocent families, mostly women and children, Christians and Muslims.  And so our prayers are with the victims, their families, the survivors of these cowardly attacks.  And as Joe mentioned, these attacks can foment fear and division.  They can tempt us to cast out the stranger, strike out against those who don’t look like us, or pray exactly as we do.  And they can lead us to turn our backs on those who are most in need of help and refuge.  That’s the intent of the terrorists, is to weaken our faith, to weaken our best impulses, our better angels. And Pastor preached on this this weekend, and I know all of you did, too, as I suspect, or in your own quiet ways were reminded if Easter means anything, it’s that you don’t have to be afraid.  We drown out darkness with light, and we heal hatred with love, and we hold on to hope.  And we think about all that Jesus suffered and sacrificed on our behalf — scorned, abandoned shunned, nail-scarred hands bearing the injustice of his death and carrying the sins of the world. And it’s difficult to fathom the full meaning of that act.  Scripture tells us, “For God so loved the world that He gave His only Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have eternal life.”  Because of God’s love, we can proclaim “Christ is risen!”  Because of God’s love, we have been given this gift of salvation.  Because of Him, our hope is not misplaced, and we don’t have to be afraid. And as Christians have said through the years, “We are Easter people, and Alleluia is our song!”  We are Easter people, people of hope and not fear.  Now, this is not a static hope.  This is a living and breathing hope.  It’s not a gift we simply receive, but one we must give to others, a gift to carry forth.  I was struck last week by an image of Pope Francis washing feet of refugees — different faiths, different countries.  And what a powerful reminder of our obligations if, in fact, we’re not afraid, and if, in fact, we hope, and if, in fact, we believe.  That is something that we have to give.  His Holiness said this Easter Sunday, God “enables us to see with His eyes of love and compassion those who hunger and thirst, strangers and prisoners, the marginalized and the outcast, the victims of oppression and violence.”  To do justice, to love kindness –- that’s what all of you collectively are involved in in your own ways each and every day. Feeding the hungry.  Healing the sick.  Teaching our children.  Housing the homeless.  Welcoming immigrants and refugees.  And in that way, you are teaching all of us what it means when it comes to true discipleship.  It’s not just words.  It’s not just getting dressed and looking good on Sunday.  But it’s service, particularly for the least of these. And whether fighting the scourge of poverty or joining with us to work on criminal justice reform and giving people a second chance in life, you have been on the front lines of delivering God’s message of love and compassion and mercy for His children.  And I have to say that over the last seven years, I could not have been prouder to work with you.  We have built partnerships that have transcended partisan affiliation, that have transcended individual congregations and even faiths, to form a community that’s bound by our shared ideals and rooted in our common humanity.  And that community I believe will endure beyond the end of my presidency, because it’s a living thing that all of you are involved with all around this country and all around the world. And our faith changes us.  I know it’s changed me.  It renews in us a sense of possibility.  It allows us to believe that although we are all sinners, and that at time we will falter, there’s always the possibility of redemption.  Every once in a while, we might get something right, we might do some good; that there’s the presence of grace, and that we, in some small way, can be worthy of this magnificent love that God has bestowed on us. Barack Hussein Obama (2016)
L’Angleterre est encore un pays chrétien (…) la foi chrétienne joue un rôle dans ce pays (…) les valeurs de la foi chrétienne sont les valeurs sur lesquelles notre pays est construit et nous devrions tous être fiers de dire “ceci est un pays chrétien” (..) Mais elles ne sont pas l’apanage d’une foi ou d’une religion particulière. Elles sont quelque chose en quoi chacun croit dans notre pays. Après tout, tel est le cœur du message chrétien et le principe autour duquel est construite la célébration de Pâques : Pâques, c’est d’abord et avant tout se souvenir de l’importance du changement, de la responsabilité et de faire ce qui est juste pour nos enfants. (…) Quand nous voyons, en 2015, des chrétiens être persécutés pour leur foi dans d’autres parties du monde, nous devons nous affirmer et tenir debout avec ceux qui pratiquent leur foi avec courage. (…) C’est le grand combat qui nous attend. Nos frères et soeurs musulmans veulent notre aide. Nous devons nous étendre et les aider dans la bataille contre l’extrémisme. Nous devons construire des communautés plus fortes et plus résistantes. Nous devons nous assurer que ceux qui dérivent vers l’extrémisme soient tirés en arrière. David Cameron (2015)
Across Britain, Christians don’t just talk about ‘loving thy neighbour’, they live it out… in faith schools, in prisons, in community groups. And it’s for all these reasons that we should feel proud to say, ‘This is a Christian country.’ Yes, we are a nation that embraces, welcomes and accepts all faiths and none but we are still a Christian country. And as a Christian country, our responsibilities don’t end there. We have a duty to speak out about the persecution of Christians around the world too. It is truly shocking to know that in 2015 there are still Christians being threatened, tortured, even killed, because of their faith from Egypt to Nigeria, Libya to North Korea. Across the Middle East, Christians have been hounded out of their homes, forced to flee from village to village, many of them forced to renounce their faith or be brutally murdered. To all those brave Christians in Iraq and Syria who are practising their faith, or sheltering others, we must say, ‘We stand with you’. David Cameron (Dec. 2015)
The message of Easter is a message of hope for millions of Christians in our country and all around the world. We see that hope every day in the many faith-inspired projects that help the homeless, that get people into work, that help keep families together and offer loving homes to children who need them. We see it in the compassion of church leaders and volunteers who visit our hospitals, care homes and hospices – and those who comfort the bereaved. And we see that hope in the aid workers and volunteers who so often risk their own lives to save the lives of others in war-torn regions across the world. These are values we treasure. They are Christian values and they should give us the confidence to say yes, we are a Christian country and we are proud of it. David Cameron (Mar. 2016)
Au coeur de toutes ces actions de gentillesse et de courage, il y a les valeurs et les croyances qui ont fait de notre pays ce qu’il est. Des valeurs de responsabilité, de travail, de charité, de compassion, la fierté de travailler pour le bien commun et d’honorer les obligations sociales que nous avons les uns pour les autres, pour nos familles, pour nos communautés. Nous chérissons ces valeurs. Ce sont des valeurs chrétiennes. Elles doivent nous donner la force de dire : Oui, nous sommes un pays chrétien, et nous en sommes fiers. David Cameron (Mar. 2016)
Le christianisme de Mr Cameron est une tentative de ne choquer personne et que, en tant que tel, il insulte à la fois les chrétiens et les non-chrétiens. Sa liste vague et cotonneuse de vertus – la compassion, le travail, la responsabilité – n’a rien de spécialement chrétien. Le christianisme de Mr Cameron est une tentative de ne choquer personne ; en tant que tel, il insulte à la fois les chrétiens et les non-chrétiens. The Guardian (2015)
That is what we mark today as we celebrate the birth of God’s only son, Jesus Christ – the Prince of Peace. As a Christian country, we must remember what his birth represents: peace, mercy, goodwill and, above all, hope. I believe that we should also reflect on the fact that it is because of these important religious roots and Christian values that Britain has been such a successful home to people of all faiths and none. David Cameron (Dec. 24, 2015)
We look to political leaders for leadership, not theology, and this kind of language reveals him to be less than statesmanlike. David Cameron needs to appreciate that he isn’t a leader of Christians, he’s the prime minister of a diverse, multi-faith, and increasingly non-religious nation. Stephen Evans (National Secular Society, Dec. 2015)
Voilà un chef de gouvernement qui a fait adopter ces derniers mois plusieurs mesures en contradiction directe avec la vision chrétienne de l’homme – le mariage entre personnes de même sexe est légal depuis le 29 mars 2014. Un homme qui est à la tête d’un pays où l’on détruit 170 000 embryons par an, où les agences d’adoption catholiques ont dû fermer les unes après les autres, et où les sages-femmes qui refusent de pratiquer l’avortement sont sanctionnées par la justice. Or, dans ce message dont on peut voir la vidéo par exemple sur le site du Telegraph, il rappelle que l’Angleterre est, « encore un pays chrétien », que « la foi chrétienne joue un rôle dans ce pays », et que « les valeurs de la foi chrétienne sont les valeurs sur lesquelles notre pays est construit » et que « nous devrions tous être fiers de dire “ceci est un pays chrétien” ». À la différence de ses prédécesseurs, Cameron ne répugne pas à évoquer le caractère chrétien de la Grande-Bretagne. Bien sûr, ce message de Pâques est donné un mois avant les élections générales. Il s’inscrit dans une série de messages bienvenus (et généralement bien tournés) de tous les politiques anglais sans exception, qui ont salué les chrétiens à l’occasion de Pâques. Tout le monde s’est fendu d’un (bref) message pascal. Même le libéral Nick Clegg (« athée », mais dont les enfants sont « élevés dans la foi catholique de leur mère »). Même le souverainiste Nigel Farage (qui se définit comme « un anglican apostat ») a tweeté un courtois « Joyeuses Pâques, passez une journée agréable et reposante ». Tous les politiques anglais ont sans exception dénoncé au quart de tour la tragédie des chrétiens persécutés en général, et l’attaque de l’université de Garissa, au Kenya anglophone en particulier – la moindre des choses, après la sévère dénonciation des Pilate de notre temps par le pape François.  Mais il n’est pas sûr que, en voulant donner plus qu’un tweet et en se fendant d’un message de Pâques en bonne et due forme, Cameron ait marqué des points auprès des croyants. Tous les commentateurs ont remarqué le côté lénifiant d’un message – si consensuel qu’il en devenait gênant et peu accordé aux drames de l’heure. Et, en effet, pourquoi se donner la peine de saluer les « valeurs chrétiennes » si c’est pour dire précisément « qu’elles ne sont pas l’apanage d’une foi ou d’une religion particulière » ? Il poursuit : « Elles sont quelque chose en quoi chacun croit dans notre pays. Après tout, tel est le cœur du message chrétien et le principe autour duquel est construite la célébration de Pâques : Pâques, c’est d’abord et avant tout se souvenir de l’importance du changement, de la responsabilité et de faire ce qui est juste pour nos enfants ». Face à cet aimable gloubi-boulga, la presse britannique (qui visiblement connaît encore un peu de catéchisme) a donné au Premier ministre une volée de bois vert. (…) Mais même si c’est un raté de com’ (en cela, tout à fait comparable avec celui – quoique bien plus piteux à vrai dire – de la RATP sur les chrétiens d’Orient), ce message prouve que, décidément, la foi chrétienne est bien dans l’air du temps. Du coup, les politiques se doivent de bien réfléchir avant de se lancer sur ce terrain. Et parfois, ils sont capables de faire un sans-faute. Ainsi nul n’a moqué la reine Élisabeth lorsqu’elle évoquait (dans le royal message de Noël dernier) avec une grande simplicité « Jésus, une ancre dans ma vie ». Un témoignage public, à la fois pudique et sans complexe, que la souveraine britannique a donné à son peuple. Famille chrétienne (2015)
Pour nous autres Français, affligés de voir le mot « chrétien » banni un temps des couloirs de métro et de façon plus pérenne, du lexique présidentiel, cette phrase de David Cameron mériterait nos applaudissements. Outre-Manche, la presse lui a tapé sur les doigts. Il faut dire que la fin du message de Pâques du Premier ministre est indigeste (tout comme certaines réformes, en premier lieu la légalisation du « mariage » homosexuel) : « [Les valeurs chrétiennes] ne sont pas l’apanage d’une foi ou d’une religion particulière. Elles sont quelque chose en quoi chacun croit dans notre pays. Après tout, tel est le cœur du message chrétien et le principe autour duquel est construite la célébration de Pâques : Pâques, c’est d’abord et avant tout se souvenir de l’importance du changement, de la responsabilité et de faire ce qui est juste pour nos enfants ». Comme le remarque Jean-Claude Bésida, les journalistes britanniques ont par conséquent révisé leur catéchisme. Et réclamé des convictions, au lieu de ce gloubi-boulga consensuel destiné à ne déplaire à personne à un mois des élections générales. Salon beige
That’s the thing about America: constitutional separation of Church and state prevents prayers being said in schools and stops the president himself sending out Christmas cards with the word “Christmas” on them. Yet the politician who doesn’t energetically declare his or her Christian faith can expect to be shunned by voters. Whereas in Britain, politicians don’t do God. Paradoxically, in the country where seats in the (albeit unelected) legislature are reserved for leaders of the established Christian Church, religion is seen as a very private and personal affair. Its intrusion into the political domain is seen as very … well, unBritish. So by declaring (not for the first time) in his Easter message that Britain is “a Christian country”, the Prime Minister was either being brave or reckless. Whenever public figures are invited to define Christian values as applied to an entire nation, the homespun answers given are invariably along the lines of charity, loyalty, generosity, honesty, compassion, etc. Yet Christianity was never intended (originally, anyway) to be a comforting faith; it was, and remains, a challenging and deeply uncomfortable philosophy. Every Sunday-school pupil is familiar with the traditional figure of “meek and mild” Jesus, the man dressed all in white who suffered all children to come to Him; who only ever got angry with the money-changers in the Temple; who never said a bad word about gay people and was virtually vegetarian (until he threw a whole herd of pigs off a cliff to save a demon-possessed man). The passage from the Gospel of Matthew where Jesus declared “do not suppose that I have come to bring peace to the earth. I did not come to bring peace, but a sword”, is just one glimpse of a radical faith quite different from the image of old maids cycling to Evensong through the mist. Early Christians were persecuted not because of their love for their fellow citizens, or for their tolerance or charity, but because they challenged the status quo. They said things that made others, including the authorities, feel deeply uncomfortable. (…) Yet all those qualities which Cameron claims describe Christian Britain – responsibility, hard work and compassion – can be just as easily applied to the followers of almost any religion (or, indeed, of none). So labelling us as “Christian” is meaningless. (…) Given that the Prime Minister is not going to take a stand with the church and its core beliefs against those who would oppose and denigrate them, however, why is he raising the standard in the first place? To gain a reputation as a “man of faith”, thereby gaining the respect of followers of all faiths? Perhaps. Today, throughout the world, Christians are being persecuted and killed for their beliefs – not for their tolerance or compassion – and now would be a good time for politicians to speak out. If you’re not prepared to do that, if you want to limit your expression of faith to the inside of a Hallmark greetings card, maybe you should say nothing at all. The Easter story is inspiring and profound. The lesson the Bible teaches about the resurrection is not that good people go to Heaven and that we should all be nice to one another; it is that Jesus’s sacrifice and return from the dead gives hope to anyone who chooses to believe in him. If that’s an uncomfortable message, then spiritually it’s probably the right one. (…) But it’s not what Cameron is driving at. His message may have been broadcast during Easter weekend, but it was no more Christian than any other party political broadcast. Given that he is the secular head of a secular government, that is as it should be. Alastair Campbell once announced that the politicians he served “don’t do God”. The traps are too wide and the advantages too few. In Christian Britain, when politicians do decide to give God the glory, they are best advised to do so in private. The Telegraph

Cachez ces valeurs judéo-chrétiennes que je ne saurai voir !

Dans ce monde étrange tellement « imprégné du souci évangélique des victimes » qu’il a « fait de nous des chrétiens qui s’ignorent » …

Passant leur temps, sous les coups de la barbarie islamique revenue, en minutes de silence, vigiles et bougies quasi-ininterrompus …

Où nos superhéros mêmes, dans un film sorti comme par hasard un Vendredi saint et où le héros se sacrifie à la fin, se voient désormais sommés de répondre des conséquences de leurs actes …

Pendant qu’entre deux pas de dance avec les dictateurs, nos nouveaux messies n’ont jamais de mots assez durs pour dénoncer les manquements passés de notre héritage chrétien ou (jusqu’à caviarder des déclarations de dirigeants étrangers ?) vanter les mérites supposés des autres religions et notamment de celle du Prophète …

Ou entre légions d’honneur, rançons de milliards d’euros et burkha chic sur fond d’épuration ethnique de ce qui peut rester de juif ou de chrétien du prétendu Monde musulman, récompenser les coupeurs de tête de Riyad ou les maitres chanteurs d’Ankara …

Comment ne pas s’étonner au lendemain d’un nouveau message de Pâques d’un premier ministre britannique …

Qui désavouant nos Chirac et Obama du moment et, pour électoralisme et gnangnanisme cette fois, sous la volée de bois vert de sa propre presse …

Comme de l’indifférence habituelle de la nôtre de ce côté-ci de la Manche et de l’enthousiasme attendu d’une certaine presse outre-atlantique

Ose rappeler, appelant même ses compatriotes à dénoncer les actuelles persécutions de leurs coreligionnaires dans le monde …

Tout en en oubliant certes au passage son Lévitique …

La vérité désormais universelle desdites valeurs (judéo)chrétiennes ?

David Cameron : « Oui, nous sommes un pays chrétien et nous en sommes fiers. »
Info chrétienne
28 mars 2016

Suite aux différentes attaques terroristes, David Cameron, Premier Ministre anglais, rappelle dans son discours de Pâques à Downing Street, que l’Angleterre est un pays chrétien. Il explique que ça ne doit pas être une honte, ni une invitation à rabaisser les autres croyances. Il souhaite que son message pour Pâques soit « un message d’espoir pour des millions de chrétiens en Angleterre et dans le monde entier. »

Barack Obama, alors sénateur en 2006, avait lui exprimé une toute autre opinion à l’égard des Etats-Unis : « Nous l’avons été, mais nous ne sommes plus une nation chrétienne, du moins, pas seulement. Nous sommes aussi une nation juive, une nation musulmane, une nation bouddhiste, une nation hindoue, une nation d’athées. »

Le Premier Ministre anglais rappelle les différentes actions sociales menées par les chrétiens dans son pays :

« Au coeur de toutes ces actions de gentillesse et de courage, il y a les valeurs et les croyances qui ont fait de notre pays ce qu’il est. Des valeurs de responsabilité, de travail, de charité, de compassion, la fierté de travailler pour le bien commun et d’honorer les obligations sociales que nous avons les uns pour les autres, pour nos familles, pour nos communautés. Nous chérissons ces valeurs. Ce sont des valeurs chrétiennes. Elles doivent nous donner la force de dire : Oui, nous sommes un pays chrétien, et nous en sommes fiers. «
Puis il pense aux chrétiens persécutés :

» Quand nous voyons, en 2016, des chrétiens être persécutés pour leur foi dans d’autres parties du monde, nous devons nous affirmer et tenir debout avec ceux qui pratiquent leur foi avec courage. »
David Cameron invite les leaders chrétiens dans un combat : aider « leurs frères et soeurs musulmans » à lutter contre l’extrémisme.

» C’est le grand combat qui nous attend. Nos frères et soeurs musulmans veulent notre aide. Nous devons nous étendre et les aider dans la bataille contre l’extrémisme. Nous devons construire des communautés plus fortes et plus résistantes. Nous devons nous assurer que ceux qui dérivent vers l’extrémisme soient tirés en arrière. »
Cameron le rappelle : « Il y a une place pour la foi. »

Voir aussi:

David Cameron invoque l’identité chrétienne de son pays pour la défense des chrétiens persécutés
Christophe Chaland
La Croix
07/04/2015

« La Grande Bretagne est un pays chrétien », a affirmé le premier ministre britannique David Cameron dans son message de Pâques, dimanche 5 avril, ajoutant : « En tant que chrétiens, notre responsabilité nous engage à dénoncer la persécution des chrétiens dans le monde ».

Dans un message vidéo de moins de trois minutes, le premier ministre a loué comme il l’avait fait en 2014 l’engagement des chrétiens : « Les chrétiens en Grande Bretagne ne disent pas seulement d’aimer son prochain, ils le mettent en pratique, dans des écoles confessionnelles, dans les prisons, dans des communautés locales, et pour toutes ces raisons, nous pouvons être fiers de dire : “Ce pays est chrétien.” »

Élections
« Nous sommes un pays qui inclut, accueille et accepte toutes les religions ainsi que les athées, mais nous sommes toujours une nation chrétienne », a précisé le chef du gouvernement britannique à un mois des élections générales par lesquelles le pays se dotera d’un nouveau parlement.

David Cameron a rappelé que son gouvernement avait contribué à hauteur de « dizaines de millions de livres » à la restauration du patrimoine chrétien du pays, étendant « la responsabilité » de cette « nation chrétienne » à la défense des chrétiens persécutés dans le monde : « Il est vraiment choquant de savoir qu’en 2015, des chrétiens sont toujours menacés, torturés et même tués en raison de leur foi, de l’Égypte au Nigeria, à la Libye et à la Corée du Nord. »

« Au Moyen-Orient, les chrétiens ont été chassés de leurs maisons, contraints à fuir de village en village, beaucoup d’entre eux ayant dû renier leur foi ou être assassinés » a poursuivi le premier ministre conservateur. « À tous ces chrétiens courageux d’Irak et de Syrie, nous devons dire : nous sommes avec vous. » « Durant le mois qui vient, nous devons continuer de parler d’une seule voix pour la liberté de religion », a-t-il ajouté.

Polémique
En 2014, le message pascal de David Cameron avait déclenché une polémique sur la possibilité de parler de la Grande Bretagne comme d’une nation chrétienne. L’Église anglicane, par ailleurs, ne se prive pas de critiquer à l’occasion la politique sociale du gouvernement.

Dans la presse britannique, des critiques n’ont pas manqué cette année encore, The Guardian remarquant dans un éditorial qu’aucune des « bonnes actions » imputées aux chrétiens par le premier ministre n’était spécifique de la religion chrétienne et dénonçant « une pêche aux votes ».

Christophe Chaland

Voir également:

David Cameron et son curieux message de Pâques
Jean-Claude Bésida

Famille chrétienne

08/04/2015

Alors que le Premier ministre britannique ne brille pas par sa foi, son message de Pâques insiste sur l’héritage chrétien de la Grande-Bretagne. Un exercice de communication à un mois des élections qui se révèle finalement assez raté – trop de consensus et d’édulcoration. Mais qui, par défaut, prouve que la foi chrétienne est dans l’air du temps.
En ces temps où le pape François est le leader le plus populaire de la planète, où la guerre déclarée aux chrétiens d’Orient réussit à faire bouger une RATP laïque et gleedenisée, quelque chose est peut-être en train de changer. Le christianisme – la foi chrétienne – redevient un peu à la mode. En tout cas, elle n’est plus tout à fait quelque chose de totalement ringard et déphasé. Est-il in d’être chrétien ?

C’est la question qu’on peut se poser face au message de Pâques qu’a donné le Premier ministre britannique, David Cameron à Premier Christianity Magazine.

« Nous devrions tous être fiers de dire “ceci est un pays chrétien” »

Voilà un chef de gouvernement qui a fait adopter ces derniers mois plusieurs mesures en contradiction directe avec la vision chrétienne de l’homme – le mariage entre personnes de même sexe est légal depuis le 29 mars 2014. Un homme qui est à la tête d’un pays où l’on détruit 170 000 embryons par an, où les agences d’adoption catholiques ont dû fermer les unes après les autres, et où les sages-femmes qui refusent de pratiquer l’avortement sont sanctionnées par la justice.

Or, dans ce message dont on peut voir la vidéo par exemple sur le site du Telegraph, il rappelle que l’Angleterre est, « encore un pays chrétien », que « la foi chrétienne joue un rôle dans ce pays », et que « les valeurs de la foi chrétienne sont les valeurs sur lesquelles notre pays est construit » et que « nous devrions tous être fiers de dire “ceci est un pays chrétien” ». À la différence de ses prédécesseurs, Cameron ne répugne pas à évoquer le caractère chrétien de la Grande-Bretagne.

Bien sûr, ce message de Pâques est donné un mois avant les élections générales. Il s’inscrit dans une série de messages bienvenus (et généralement bien tournés) de tous les politiques anglais sans exception, qui ont salué les chrétiens à l’occasion de Pâques. Tout le monde s’est fendu d’un (bref) message pascal. Même le libéral Nick Clegg (« athée », mais dont les enfants sont « élevés dans la foi catholique de leur mère »). Même le souverainiste Nigel Farage (qui se définit comme « un anglican apostat ») a tweeté un courtois « Joyeuses Pâques, passez une journée agréable et reposante ».

Un aimable gloubi-boulga qui a valu au Premier ministre une volée de bois vert

Tous les politiques anglais ont sans exception dénoncé au quart de tour la tragédie des chrétiens persécutés en général, et l’attaque de l’université de Garissa, au Kenya anglophone en particulier – la moindre des choses, après la sévère dénonciation des Pilate de notre temps par le pape François.

Mais il n’est pas sûr que, en voulant donner plus qu’un tweet et en se fendant d’un message de Pâques en bonne et due forme, Cameron ait marqué des points auprès des croyants. Tous les commentateurs ont remarqué le côté lénifiant d’un message – si consensuel qu’il en devenait gênant et peu accordé aux drames de l’heure. Et, en effet, pourquoi se donner la peine de saluer les « valeurs chrétiennes » si c’est pour dire précisément « qu’elles ne sont pas l’apanage d’une foi ou d’une religion particulière » ? Il poursuit : « Elles sont quelque chose en quoi chacun croit dans notre pays. Après tout, tel est le cœur du message chrétien et le principe autour duquel est construite la célébration de Pâques : Pâques, c’est d’abord et avant tout se souvenir de l’importance du changement, de la responsabilité et de faire ce qui est juste pour nos enfants ».

Face à cet aimable gloubi-boulga, la presse britannique (qui visiblement connaît encore un peu de catéchisme) a donné au Premier ministre une volée de bois vert. L’éditorialiste du Spectator regrette que David Cameron ait donné une version « curieusement édulcorée de ce qu’est la foi chrétienne » : « En général, on considère que le cœur du message chrétien est qu’un homme, appelé le Fils de Dieu, a été mis à mort sur une croix et est ressuscité des morts ».

Le Guardian répond carrément que « le christianisme de Mr Cameron est une tentative de ne choquer personne et que, en tant que tel, il insulte à la fois les chrétiens et les non-chrétiens. Sa liste vague et cotonneuse de vertus – la compassion, le travail, la responsabilité – n’a rien de spécialement chrétien».

Le christianisme de Mr Cameron est une tentative de ne choquer personne ; en tant que tel, il insulte à la fois les chrétiens et les non-chrétiens.

Le Guardian
Quant à l’hebdomadaire Catholic Herald, il retient une seule chose : « Cameron a honte de se dire chrétien » : « L’ironie est que le Premier ministres a essayé très fort de donner l’impression qu’il n’avait pas peur de se dire chrétien. Le problème, c’est qu’il a surtout montré qu’il était terrorisé à l’idée d’être identifié comme tel. Il a bien le droit de croire ce qu’il veut et il devrait s’y tenir plutôt que d’essayer, avec un cynisme maladroit, de séduire les électeurs chrétiens pour les élections du 7 mai ». Bref, pour le principal hebdo catholique britannique, Cameron s’est pris les pieds dans le tapis.

Un raté de com’ qui prouve cependant que la foi chrétienne est dans l’air du temps

Mais même si c’est un raté de com’ (en cela, tout à fait comparable avec celui – quoique bien plus piteux à vrai dire – de la RATP sur les chrétiens d’Orient), ce message prouve que, décidément, la foi chrétienne est bien dans l’air du temps. Du coup, les politiques se doivent de bien réfléchir avant de se lancer sur ce terrain.

Et parfois, ils sont capables de faire un sans-faute. Ainsi nul n’a moqué la reine Élisabeth lorsqu’elle évoquait (dans le royal message de Noël dernier) avec une grande simplicité « Jésus, une ancre dans ma vie ». Un témoignage public, à la fois pudique et sans complexe, que la souveraine britannique a donné à son peuple.

Voir de même:

Le curieux message de Pâques de David Cameron
Le Salon Beige
08 avril 2015

« Nous devrions tous être fiers de dire “ceci est un pays chrétien” »
Pour nous autres Français, affligés de voir le mot « chrétien » banni un temps des couloirs de métro et de façon plus pérenne, du lexique présidentiel, cette phrase de David Cameron mériterait nos applaudissements. Outre-Manche, la presse lui a tapé sur les doigts. Il faut dire que la fin du message de Pâques du Premier ministre est indigeste (tout comme certaines réformes, en premier lieu la légalisation du « mariage » homosexuel) :
« [Les valeurs chrétiennes] ne sont pas l’apanage d’une foi ou d’une religion particulière. Elles sont quelque chose en quoi chacun croit dans notre pays. Après tout, tel est le cœur du message chrétien et le principe autour duquel est construite la célébration de Pâques : Pâques, c’est d’abord et avant tout se souvenir de l’importance du changement, de la responsabilité et de faire ce qui est juste pour nos enfants ».

Comme le remarque Jean-Claude Bésida, les journalistes britanniques ont par conséquent révisé leur catéchisme. Et réclamé des convictions, au lieu de ce gloubi-boulga consensuel destiné à ne déplaire à personne à un mois des élections générales. Et de conclure :

nul n’a moqué la reine Élisabeth lorsqu’elle évoquait (dans le royal message de Noël dernier) avec une grande simplicité « Jésus, une ancre dans ma vie ». Un témoignage public, à la fois pudique et sans complexe, que la souveraine britannique a donné à son peuple. »

Voir encore:

David Cameron’s shallow, clichéd Easter message shows why politicians really shouldn’t do God 
Tom Harris
The Telegraph

28 March 2016

Ted Cruz gets it. When the US Senator was declared the winner of the Iowa caucus in February, his first words to his adoring fans were: “To God be the glory!” And he meant it.

That’s the thing about America: constitutional separation of Church and state prevents prayers being said in schools and stops the president himself sending out Christmas cards with the word “Christmas” on them. Yet the politician who doesn’t energetically declare his or her Christian faith can expect to be shunned by voters.

Whereas in Britain, politicians don’t do God. Paradoxically, in the country where seats in the (albeit unelected) legislature are reserved for leaders of the established Christian Church, religion is seen as a very private and personal affair. Its intrusion into the political domain is seen as very … well, unBritish.

So by declaring (not for the first time) in his Easter message that Britain is “a Christian country”, the Prime Minister was either being brave or reckless.
David Cameron says Britain must ‘proudly’ defend its Christian values in the face of Islamic extremists Play! 01:23
Whenever public figures are invited to define Christian values as applied to an entire nation, the homespun answers given are invariably along the lines of charity, loyalty, generosity, honesty, compassion, etc. Yet Christianity was never intended (originally, anyway) to be a comforting faith; it was, and remains, a challenging and deeply uncomfortable philosophy.

Every Sunday-school pupil is familiar with the traditional figure of “meek and mild” Jesus, the man dressed all in white who suffered all children to come to Him; who only ever got angry with the money-changers in the Temple; who never said a bad word about gay people and was virtually vegetarian (until he threw a whole herd of pigs off a cliff to save a demon-possessed man).

The passage from the Gospel of Matthew where Jesus declared “do not suppose that I have come to bring peace to the earth. I did not come to bring peace, but a sword”, is just one glimpse of a radical faith quite different from the image of old maids cycling to Evensong through the mist. Early Christians were persecuted not because of their love for their fellow citizens, or for their tolerance or charity, but because they challenged the status quo. They said things that made others, including the authorities, feel deeply uncomfortable.

Most importantly of all, they declared that there was only one true faith, that followers of other faiths were wrong, misguided and were going to Hell unless they changed their minds about which God to worship. In modern, secular Britain, that message is actually well understood by adherents of faiths other than Christianity. Other major religions reserve no place in their afterlife for those who foolishly ignore the teachings of their own sacred texts. That is not an eccentric thing for a religion to do, it is its unique selling point.
Paul Owens, left, leads a prayer over Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz at Fresh Start Church on Sunday, March 20, 2016 in Peoria, Arizona
Yet all those qualities which Cameron claims describe Christian Britain – responsibility, hard work and compassion – can be just as easily applied to the followers of almost any religion (or, indeed, of none). So labelling us as “Christian” is meaningless. We are certainly a Christian country if by that term you mean a country whose culture and heritage are based on a centuries-long tradition of Western, state-approved Christianity. But I’m not convinced that’s what Cameron meant.

Given that the Prime Minister is not going to take a stand with the church and its core beliefs against those who would oppose and denigrate them, however, why is he raising the standard in the first place? To gain a reputation as a “man of faith”, thereby gaining the respect of followers of all faiths? Perhaps.

Today, throughout the world, Christians are being persecuted and killed for their beliefs – not for their tolerance or compassion – and now would be a good time for politicians to speak out.

If you’re not prepared to do that, if you want to limit your expression of faith to the inside of a Hallmark greetings card, maybe you should say nothing at all.

The Easter story is inspiring and profound. The lesson the Bible teaches about the resurrection is not that good people go to Heaven and that we should all be nice to one another; it is that Jesus’s sacrifice and return from the dead gives hope to anyone who chooses to believe in him. If that’s an uncomfortable message, then spiritually it’s probably the right one. Certainly, Senator Cruz would need no persuasion on the issue.

But it’s not what Cameron is driving at. His message may have been broadcast during Easter weekend, but it was no more Christian than any other party political broadcast. Given that he is the secular head of a secular government, that is as it should be.

Alastair Campbell once announced that the politicians he served “don’t do God”. The traps are too wide and the advantages too few. In Christian Britain, when politicians do decide to give God the glory, they are best advised to do so in private.

Voir de plus:

David Cameron’s Easter and Christmas messages are all really similar
Have you ever noticed the Prime Minister’s annual holiday messages are all basically the same?

Mikey Smith

The Mirror

27 Mar 2016

David Cameron called on people of all faiths and none to remember Britain’s Christian values, today, in his annual Easter message.

He paid tribute to British volunteers and servicemen and women doing work abroad and reminded us that as we tuck into our seasonal treats, that some Christians across the world are fleeing persecution.

And he made solemn reference to tragic events unfolding in the news in recent weeks.

Wait. Hang on.

That was his Christmas message.

Come to think of it, it’s also a pretty good description of his Christmas 2014 message. And his Easter message from a couple of years back…

That’s weird…

Happy Easter from robo-Cameron

Observant viewers – ones that can get past the fact that the Prime Minister looks a bit like a semi-intelligent cyborg replica of David Cameron in his 2016 Easter message video – might have noticed some similarities between today’s speech…and almost every other seasonal address he’s made to the nation.

Whereas the Queen usually picks a different theme for her Christmas speeches, Mr Cameron’s are startlingly uniform.

It’s almost as if there’s a formula for it. He plays all the same notes – but like Eric Morecambe playing the piano – not necessarily in the same order.

We took a look back at David Cameron ‘s previous holiday messages to work out the formula for the perfect Prime Ministerial holiday message.

1. Reference a recent event

Mr Cameron usually makes reference to a recent event

Usually tragic

Easter 2016

« And when terrorists try to destroy our way of life as they have tried to do again so despicably in Brussels this week – we must stand together and show that we will never be cowed by terror. »

Christmas 2015

« Millions of families are spending this winter in refugee camps or makeshift shelters across Syria and the Middle East, driven from their homes by Daesh and Assad. »

Christmas 2014

« NHS doctors, nurses and other British volunteers will be in Ebola-affected countries, working selflessly to help stop this terrible disease from spreading further. »

Easter 2014

« And we saw that same spirit during the terrible storms that struck Britain earlier this year. »

Christmas 2013

« 2013 was a significant year for the Christian faith – a year that welcomed The Most Reverend Justin Welby as the new Archbishop of Canterbury and saw His Holiness Pope Francis elected to lead the Roman Catholic Church. »

Easter 2013

« This year’s Holy Week and Easter celebrations follow an extraordinary few days for Christians; not only with the enthronement of Justin Welby as our new Archbishop of Canterbury, but also with the election of Pope Francis in Rome. »

Christmas 2012

« We cheered our Queen to the rafters with the Jubilee, showed the world what we’re made of by staging the most spectacular Olympic and Paralympic Games ever and – let’s not forget – punched way about our weight in the medal table. »

2. Pay tribute to our brave servicemen and women and/or health/aid workers serving at home and abroad

Getty
He almost always talks about our boys

Easter 2016

« And we see that hope in the aid workers and volunteers who so often risk their own lives to save the lives of others in war-torn regions across the world. »

Christmas 2015

« We must pay tribute to the thousands of doctors, nurses, carers and volunteers who give up their Christmas to help the vulnerable – and to those who are spending this season even further from home. Right now, our brave armed forces are doing their duty, around the world: in the skies of Iraq and Syria… »

Christmas 2014

« On Christmas Day thousands of men and women in our armed forces will be far from home protecting people and entire communities from the threat of terrorism and disease. »

Christmas 2013

« With peace in mind, I would like to say thank you to our brave service women and men who are helping bring peace here and around the world; to their families who cannot be with them; and to all the dedicated men and women in the emergency and caring services who are working hard to support those in need this Christmas. »

Easter 2013

« That legacy lives on in so many Christian charities and churches both at home and abroad. Whether they are meeting the needs of the poor, helping people in trouble, or providing spiritual guidance and support to those in need, faith institutions perform an incredible role to the benefit of our society. »

Christmas 2012

« With that in mind, I would like to pay particular tribute to our brave service men and women who are overseas helping bring safety and security to all of us at home; their families who cannot be with them over the holidays; and to all the dedicated men and women in the emergency services who are working hard to support those in need. »

This is almost word for word what he said in 2013

3. Declare solidarity with persecuted Christians

He’s been worried about persecuted Christians for a number of years

Easter 2016

 » When we see Christians today in 2016 being persecuted for their beliefs in other parts of the world – we must speak out and stand with those who bravely practice their faith. »

Christmas 2015

« Christians from Africa to Asia will go to church on Christmas morning full of joy, but many in fear of persecution. »

Easter 2015

« It is truly shocking that in 2015, there are still christians being threatened, tortured, even killed because of their faith.

« From Egypt to Nigeria, Libya to North Korea. Across the Middle East, Christians have been hounded out of their homes, forced to flee from village to village. Many of them forced to renounce their faith or brutally murdered. To all those brave Christians in Iraq or Syria who are practicing their faith, or sheltering others, we must say « we stand with you. » »

Christmas 2014

« And as we celebrate Easter, let’s also think of those who are unable to do so, the Christians around the world who are ostracised, abused – even murdered – simply for the faith they follow. Religious freedom is an absolute, fundamental human right. »

4. Remind people that British values are Christian values

We are a Christian country, after all

Easter 2016

« And as we celebrate Easter, let’s also think of those who are unable to do so, the Christians around the world who are ostracised, abused – even murdered – simply for the faith they follow. Religious freedom is an absolute, fundamental human right. »

Christmas 2015

« As a Christian country, we must remember what his birth represents: peace, mercy, goodwill and, above all, hope. I believe that we should also reflect on the fact that it is because of these important religious roots and Christian values that Britain has been such a successful home to people of all faiths and none. »

Easter 2015

« Across Britain, Christians don’t just talk loving thy neighbour they live it out in faith schools and prisons and community groups and it’s for all these reasons that we should feel proud to say this is a Christian country. »

Christmas 2014

« Among the joyous celebrations we will reflect on those very Christian values of giving, sharing and taking care of others. This Christmas I think we can be very proud as a country at how we honour these values through helping those in need at home and around the world. »

Easter 2012

« The New Testament tells us so much about the character of Jesus; a man of incomparable compassion, generosity, grace, humility and love. These are the values that Jesus embraced, and I believe these are values people of any faith, or no faith, can also share in, and admire. It is values like these that make our country what it is – a place which is tolerant, generous and caring. »

Easter 2011

« Easter reminds us all to follow our conscience and ask not what we are entitled to, but what we can do for others. It teaches us about charity, compassion, responsibility, and forgiveness. »

5. Remind people that even if they’re not Christian, these values still apply to them.

Try and include a riff on the phrase « people of all faiths and of none »

Easter 2016

« But they are also values that speak to everyone in Britain – to people of every faith and none. »

Christmas 2015

« I believe that we should also reflect on the fact that it is because of these important religious roots and Christian values that Britain has been such a successful home to people of all faiths and none. »

Easter 2015

« Yes we’re a nation that embraces and accepts all faiths and none. »

Christmas 2014

Thousands of churches – whether in the smallest village or biggest city – will hold open their doors and welcome people of faith and none to give thanks and celebrate together. »

Easter 2014

« So as we approach this festival I’d like to wish everyone, Christians and non-Christians, a very happy Easter. »

Easter 2012

« These are the values that Jesus embraced, and I believe these are values people of any faith, or no faith, can also share in, and admire. »

Easter 2011

« No matter what faiths we follow, these are values which speak to us all. »

Voir par ailleurs:

The central theme of this leader’s two-minute-and-25-second address was that his nation is “a Christian country.”

So who offered the inspirational message?

British Prime Minister David Cameron.

“Easter is a time for Christians to celebrate the ultimate triumph of life over death in the resurrection of Jesus,” Cameron began. “And for all of us, it’s a time to reflect on the part that Christianity plays in our national life.”

“The church is not just a collection of beautiful, old buildings; it is a living, active force doing great works right across our country,” he continued, noting how the church helps the homeless, the addicted, the suffering and the grieving.

“Across Britain, Christians don’t just talk about ‘loving thy neighbor’, they live it out in faith schools, in prisons, in community groups,” Cameron noted. “And it’s for all these reasons that we should feel proud to say, ‘This is a Christian country.’ Yes, we’re a nation that embraces, welcomes and accepts all faiths and none, but we are still a Christian country.”

Cameron also urged his fellow citizens to speak out about the persecution of Christians around the world.

Voir aussi:

Obama concerned about ‘less-than-loving expressions by Christians’
Brian Hughes

The Washington Examiner

4/7/15

President Obama used an Easter breakfast at the White House Tuesday to call out what he viewed as unbecoming comments by fellow members of the Christian community.

« On Easter, I do reflect on the fact that as a Christian, I’m supposed to love, and I have to say that sometimes when I listen to less-than-loving expressions by Christians, I get concerned, » the president said to a gathering of Christian leaders. « But that’s a topic for another day. »

Obama appeared to go off script in that exchange. He did not allude to whom he was referring.

Obama said the Easter holiday reminded him that even in the White House, some of life’s problems are trivial compared to the « extraordinary sacrifice of Jesus Christ. »

« For me, the celebration of Easter puts our earthly concerns into perspective, » Obama said. « With humility and with awe we give thanks to the extraordinary sacrifice of Jesus Christ, our savior, and reflect on the brutal pain that he suffered, the scorn that he absorbed, the sins that he bore, this extraordinary gift of salvation that he gave to us. »

The president has ignited controversy in the past with his remarks on religion. Earlier this year, Obama drew a comparison between Islamic extremism and the Christian crusades.

« And lest we get on our high horse and think this is unique to some other place, remember that during the Crusades and the Inquisition, people committed terrible deeds in the name of Christ, » he said at the National Prayer Breakfast.

Obama kept his remarks lighter on Tuesday.

Noting that his daughters were now visiting colleges, Obama said simply, « I need prayer. »

Voir encore:

On Easter, UK’s Cameron Speaks Up for Persecuted Christians, Obama Tells Christians to be Less Hateful

In a world where Western leaders and politicians regularly distance themselves from their Christian heritage, preferring to tout “multiculturalism,” United Kingdom Prime Minister David Cameron’s Easter message is refreshing.

Among other things, Cameron (see video below) made it a point to say “that we should feel proud to say, ‘This is a Christian country.’ Yes, we’re a nation that embraces, welcomes and accepts all faiths and none, but we are still a Christian country.”

In this context, the Islamic Umma – where non-Muslims are not “welcomed” or “accepted” — comes to mind: whereas the West, thanks to its Christian heritage, developed in a way as to be open and tolerant of others, the Islamic world has and likely will not.

 

In fact, Cameron also urged his fellow citizens to speak out about the persecution of Christians:

We have a duty to speak out about the persecution of Christians around the world too.  It is truly shocking that in 2015 there are still Christians being threatened, tortured, even killed because of their faith.  From Egypt to Nigeria, Libya to North Korea.  Across the Middle East Christians have been hounded out of their homes, forced to flee from village to village; many of them forced to renounce their faith or brutally murdered.  To all those brave Christians in Iraq and Syria who practice their faith or shelter others, we will say, “We stand with you.”

Meanwhile, U.S. President Obama—who is on record saying “we are no longer a Christian nation” and, unlike Cameron, never notes the Islamic identity of murderers or the Christian identity of their victims and ignored a recent UN session on Christian persecution—had this to say at the Easter Prayer Breakfast:  “On Easter, I do reflect on the fact that as a Christian, I am supposed to love.  And I have to say that sometimes when I listen to less than loving expressions by Christians, I get concerned.”

This is in keeping with his earlier statements calling on Americans in general Christians in particular to be nonjudgmental of Islamic terrorism.

In other words, those Christians who are critical and speak up against injustices, in this case, Muslim persecution of Christians, need to shut up and be doormats that allow anything and everything.  Such is “tolerance.”  Christians are being persecuted?  That’s okay, turn the other cheek, seems to be the American president’s message at a time when Christians, as Cameron noted, are being slaughtered all throughout the Islamic world.

Voir de plus:

Obama v Cameron: Who really loves Jesus?
Lucinda Borkett-Jones
Christian Today
08 April 2015

Ok, ok I know we’re not meant to judge the hearts of men, but my social media feeds are full of it. Americans are heralding the British Prime Minister for doing what their own leader has seemingly failed to do – standing up for the place of Christianity in our nation.

President Obama’s Passover and Easter message on Saturday certainly didn’t go down well, seen as an interfaith mash-up that was generally felt to appeal to everyone and speak to no-one. And his second Easter message, at yesterday’s Easter Prayer Breakfast, has also faced criticism from Christians because he included an aside about the un-loving way in which Christians sometimes approach him.

Perhaps this is a classic case of things being greener on the other side. But let’s stop for a moment and look at what they actually said.

David Cameron’s Easter message was not thanking God for Christ’s sacrifice, it was thanksgiving to God (perhaps) for Christians’ sacrifice – for the love, support and selflessness of church communities, the Big Society by any other name.

« Easter is a time for Christians to celebrate the ultimate triumph of life over death in the resurrection of Jesus. And for all of us, it’s a time to reflect on the part that Christianity plays in our national life, » the prime minister said.

« The church is not just a collection of beautiful, old buildings; it is a living, active force doing great works right across our country. When people are homeless, the church is there with hot meals and shelter. When people are addicted or in debt, when people are suffering or grieving, the church is there. »

There’s nothing wrong with that. I think it’s great that he’s paused to reflect at Easter on the fact that it’s a Christian festival, which, amid all the Easter egg hunting, can get a bit confused. I haven’t forgotten the privilege of living in a nation where he’s allowed to do that. And I’m really glad that he used the opportunity to speak about the plight of those persecuted for their faith.

But pointing out that at this time of year Christians celebrate the resurrection isn’t exactly mind blowing. And he didn’t say Jesus or the Word of God is a living, active force in the nation, he said the Church was living and active. That’s great, but it is God’s power at work in and through us – isn’t it?

I also can’t help but feel that there was an ulterior motive in what Cameron said. It strikes me that this was a prime opportunity to appeal to Christians (who we know are a politically engaged bunch), and make the most of being the only leader of the major parties with an acknowledged Christian faith.

Cameron said: « I know from the most difficult times in my own life that the kindness of the church can be a huge comfort. » The cynic in me wants to say that again while it is wonderful that he has known the love of the Church, the most important thing would be to know the love of God.

It’s not quite on a par with the Queen’s annual reminder of the love of Christ in the Christmas message, that’s all I’m saying – and even she has stepped it up a notch in recent years. In 2013 Christians got rather excited when, after the usual survey of the year in the royal calendar, she essentially started preaching the gospel to an audience of millions watching slumped on the sofa after lunch.

The Queen said: « For Christians, as for all people of faith, reflection, meditation and prayer help us to renew ourselves in God’s love, as we strive daily to become better people. The Christmas message shows us that this love is for everyone. There is no one beyond its reach. »

By comparison, although the President’s Passover and Easter message didn’t quite hit the mark, he did say that he would spend Easter Sunday « reflecting on the sacrifice of God’s only son, who endured agony on the cross so that we could live together with him ». Admittedly, he did then focus on the hope of the Easter season; a hope shared by all Americans who believe that « with common effort and shared sacrifice, our brighter future is just around the bend. »

But, far more unreasonably, Obama is facing a fair amount of flak again today for questioning whether everything Christians say is particularly Christ-like. He called on Christians to follow Christ’s example and said in an aside: « As a Christian, I am supposed to love. And I have to say that sometimes when I listen to less than loving expressions by Christians, I get concerned. But that’s a topic for another day. »

But what he said about Easter was clearly far more personal, far more about Christ than anything Cameron said: « For me, the celebration of Easter puts our earthly concerns into perspective. With humility and with awe, we give thanks to the extraordinary sacrifice of Jesus Christ, our Saviour. We reflect on the brutal pain that he suffered, the scorn that He absorbed, the sins that he bore, this extraordinary gift of salvation that he gave to us. And we try, as best we can, to comprehend the darkness that He endured so that we might receive God’s light.

« And yet, even as we grapple with the sheer enormity of Jesus’s sacrifice, on Easter we can’t lose sight of the fact that the story didn’t end on Friday. The story keeps on going. On Sunday comes the glorious Resurrection of our Saviour. »

Admittedly, he was speaking to a Christian audience, and so the emphasis was somewhat different, but these things are not confined to the audience in the room.

Now I don’t want to step into a party political debate here, though that’s hard to avoid. But one isn’t an angel and the other isn’t an animal. They are both politicians, and both seem to have some form of Christian faith – how much is anyone’s guess. And so dear friends over the pond, it isn’t so green over here. Make the most of what you have and pray for leaders of all colours to know the love of God.

David Cameron’s Easter Message to Christians
In an exclusive piece for Premier Christianity magazine this Easter, Prime Minister David Cameron speaks up on the significance of the Christian faith.
In a few days’ time, millions of people across Britain will be celebrating Easter. Just as I’ve done for the last five years, I’ll be making my belief in the importance of Christianity absolutely clear. As Prime Minister, I’m in no doubt about the matter: the values of the Christian faith are the values on which our nation was built.

I’m an unapologetic supporter of the role of faith in this country

Of course I know not everyone agrees. Many understandably feel that in this seemingly secular society, talking about faith isolates those who have no faith. Others argue that celebrating Easter somehow marginalises other religions. But I’m an unapologetic supporter of the role of faith in this country. And for me, the key point is this: the values of Easter and the Christian religion – compassion, forgiveness, kindness, hard work and responsibility – are values that we can all celebrate and share.

Personal, not just political

I think about this as a person not just a politician. I’m hardly a model church-going, God-fearing Christian. Like so many others, I’m a bit hazy on the finer points of our faith. But even so, in the toughest of times, my faith has helped me move on and drive forward. It also gives me a gentle reminder every once in a while about what really matters and how to be a better person, father and citizen.

In the toughest of times, my faith has helped me move on and drive forward

As Prime Minister, too, I’m a big believer in the power of faith to forge a better society. And that belief boils down to two things.

First, the Christian message is the bedrock of a good society. Whether or not we’re members of the Church of England, ‘Love thy neighbour’ is a doctrine we can all apply to our lives – at school, at work, at home and with our families. A sense of compassion is the centre piece of a good community.

Second, and more specifically: faith is a massive inspiration for millions of people to go out and make a positive difference. Across the country, we have tens of thousands of fantastic faith-based charities. Every day they’re performing minor miracles in local communities. As Prime Minister, I’ve worked hard to stand up for these charities and give them more power and support. If my party continues in government, it’s our ambition to do even more.

No magic wand

It’s that impulse to act which is particularly important. One of the myths we often hear at election time is the idea that governments have all the answers. It’s been the cry of every party and politician down the years: ‘put us into power and we’ll solve all your problems.’ But when I think of the truly great social changes that have helped our nation, they weren’t led or started by big governments. They were driven by individuals and activists, great businesses and charities – everyday people working to do the right thing.

The Christian message is the bedrock of a good society

One of the biggest things I’ve tried to do as Prime Minister is banish this notion that being in government means you can somehow wave a magic wand and solve all the world’s problems. Instead, it’s about taking the right decisions, and showing the right judgment and leadership, based on clear values and beliefs.

Leading the economy

The biggest area where leadership has been needed over the last five years is in our economy. We came into office at a time of exceptional pressure on the national finances. I am proud that despite the pressure on public spending, we made clear choices to help the poorest paid and most vulnerable in society. In the UK, we have increased NHS spending, despite the overriding need to deal with the deficit. We also raised the threshold of income tax to lift the poorest paid out of income tax altogether. If we came back into government, my party would lift the threshold again.

More fundamentally, the core of our recovery programme – dealing with the deficit to restore confidence in our economy – is based on enduring ideas and principles: hard work, fair play, rewarding people for doing the right thing, and securing a better future for our children.

Guided by conscience

I know that some disagree with those policies – including a number within the Church of England. But I would urge those individuals not to dismiss the people who proposed those policies as devoid of morality – or assume those policies are somehow amoral themselves. As Winston Churchill said after the death of his opponent, Neville Chamberlain, in the end we are all guided by the lights of our own reason. ‘The only guide to a man is his own conscience; the only shield to his memory is the rectitude and sincerity of his actions.’

Across the country, we have tens of thousands of fantastic faith-based charities

From standing up for faith schools to backing those who’ve fought foreign tyranny, helping parents and celebrating families, calling for more adoption of orphaned infants, bringing in a new bill to outlaw the appalling practice of modern slavery, and putting the protection of international development spending into law, this government has consistently taken decisions which are based on fundamental principles and beliefs.

I don’t just speak for myself, but for everyone who is part of my cabinet, when I say that the individuals I have worked with are driven not just by the daily demands of politics, but also by a commitment to making a positive difference. Just because some people have disagreed with our policies, does not mean those policies are missing in moral content.

Lift people up rather than count people out

So I end my argument with this: I hope everyone can share in the belief of trying to lift people up rather than count people out. Those values and principles are not the exclusive preserve of one faith or religion. They are something I hope everyone in our country believes.

That after all is the heart of the Christian message. It’s the principle around which the Easter celebration is built. Easter is all about remembering the importance of change, responsibility, and doing the right thing for the good of our children. And today, that message matters more than ever.

David Cameron, Prime Minister and leader of the Conservative Party

Voir aussi:

The Guardian view on Easter: David Cameron’s wonky cross
Jesus’s big and disruptive idea was that the value of humans has nothing to do with their usefulness. Cameron’s sanitised list of Christian virtues would leave Jesus scratching his head
The Guardian
2 April 2015

David Cameron, fishing for votes, has told an evangelical radio audience that he believes that the message of Easter involves “hard work and responsibility”. So what does he think really happened at the crucifixion? Who were the criminals nailed up on each side of Jesus? Skivers being sanctioned because they had missed their appointments at the job centre? Mr Cameron’s Christianity, as it is displayed in this interview, attempts to offend no one, and the result is an insult to Christianity and to all non-Christians as well.

It’s an insult to non-believers because the vague and fluffy list of virtues – kindness, compassion, and forgiveness as well as hard work and responsibility – have nothing distinctively Christian about them. He might as well have said that he gets his two legs from God. But it is insulting to Christians for exactly the same reason. The point of the Easter story, and especially of the crucifixion, is that none of these virtues is enough to save us. It is absolutely not a story of virtue rewarded and vice punished, but one of virtue scourged and jeered through the streets, abandoned by its friends and tortured in public to death.

Jesus did not really preach hard work, responsibility, or family values. He told his followers to consider the lilies of the field, to have no thought for the morrow, and to leave their father and mother to follow him. He came not to bring peace, but revolt. The Easter story makes even democracy look like an instrument of evil. It is the crowd who demand that Jesus be crucified and Pilate who goes along with them.

What Christianity brought into the world wasn’t compassion, kindness, decency, hard work, or any of the other respectable virtues, real and necessary though they are. It was the extraordinary idea that people have worth in themselves, regardless of their usefulness to others, regardless even of their moral qualities. That is what is meant by the Christian talk of being saved by grace rather than works, and by the Christian assertion that God loves everyone, the malformed, the poor, the disabled and even the foreigner.

The idea that humans are valuable just for being human is, many would say, absurd. We assert it in the face of all the facts of history, and arguably even of biology. This idea entered the world with Christianity, and scandalised both Romans and Greeks, but it is now the common currency of western humanism, and of human rights. It underpinned the building of the welfare state, and its maintenance over the years by millions of people of all faiths and none.

It is also an idea that Mr Cameron’s government has defined itself against. The assaults on social security, on migrants, and even on the teaching of the humanities, are all underpinned by a belief that the essential metric of human worth is their utility, and in practice their usefulness to the rich in particular, because it is the marketplace that provides the only final judgment. There are many Christians in this country who are quite content with that. Surveys show that ordinary Christians are consistently to the right of their clergy on many questions: the clergy runs food banks while the pews are full of people muttering against scroungers who believe that poverty is the fault of the poor.

But the activists have for the most part a much more critical attitude, and it is their activism which has led party leaders to be interviewed by Premier magazine. Even the smallest of the mainline churches have memberships larger than that of the political parties. The Church of England alone has twice as many people in church every Sunday as pay their subscriptions to all the political parties put together. There are at least five million active Christians in England today, and they represent a pool of committed and energetic voters that no party can ignore. They won’t all vote as a bloc, but within the existing blocs they will put in more effort, and perhaps more money, than any other group.

Hence David Cameron’s discovery of his own spiritual side. This newspaper can’t condemn him for that. We can only wish he did it more thoroughly and more often. If he were a better Christian, he might believe in, and he should fear, a judge beyond the market. For the rest of us, this election offers an opportunity to judge both him and his party.

Voir encore:

Obama’s 2006 Speech on Faith and Politics
Following is the text of Barack Obama’s keynote at the Call to Renewal’s Building a Covenant for a New America conference in Washington, D.C., in 2006.

The NYT

June 28, 2006

Good morning. I appreciate the opportunity to speak here at the Call to Renewal’s Building a Covenant for a New America conference. I’ve had the opportunity to take a look at your Covenant for a New America. It is filled with outstanding policies and prescriptions for much of what ails this country. So I’d like to congratulate you all on the thoughtful presentations you’ve given so far about poverty and justice in America, and for putting fire under the feet of the political leadership here in Washington.

But today I’d like to talk about the connection between religion and politics and perhaps offer some thoughts about how we can sort through some of the often bitter arguments that we’ve been seeing over the last several years.

I do so because, as you all know, we can affirm the importance of poverty in the Bible; and we can raise up and pass out this Covenant for a New America. We can talk to the press, and we can discuss the religious call to address poverty and environmental stewardship all we want, but it won’t have an impact unless we tackle head-on the mutual suspicion that sometimes exists between religious America and secular America.

I want to give you an example that I think illustrates this fact. As some of you know, during the 2004 U.S. Senate General Election I ran against a gentleman named Alan Keyes. Mr. Keyes is well-versed in the Jerry Falwell-Pat Robertson style of rhetoric that often labels progressives as both immoral and godless.

Indeed, Mr. Keyes announced towards the end of the campaign that, « Jesus Christ would not vote for Barack Obama. Christ would not vote for Barack Obama because Barack Obama has behaved in a way that it is inconceivable for Christ to have behaved. »

Jesus Christ would not vote for Barack Obama.

Now, I was urged by some of my liberal supporters not to take this statement seriously, to essentially ignore it. To them, Mr. Keyes was an extremist, and his arguments not worth entertaining. And since at the time, I was up 40 points in the polls, it probably wasn’t a bad piece of strategic advice.

But what they didn’t understand, however, was that I had to take Mr. Keyes seriously, for he claimed to speak for my religion, and my God. He claimed knowledge of certain truths.

Mr. Obama says he’s a Christian, he was saying, and yet he supports a lifestyle that the Bible calls an abomination.

Mr. Obama says he’s a Christian, but supports the destruction of innocent and sacred life.

And so what would my supporters have me say? How should I respond? Should I say that a literalist reading of the Bible was folly? Should I say that Mr. Keyes, who is a Roman Catholic, should ignore the teachings of the Pope?

Unwilling to go there, I answered with what has come to be the typically liberal response in such debates – namely, I said that we live in a pluralistic society, that I can’t impose my own religious views on another, that I was running to be the U.S. Senator of Illinois and not the Minister of Illinois.

But Mr. Keyes’s implicit accusation that I was not a true Christian nagged at me, and I was also aware that my answer did not adequately address the role my faith has in guiding my own values and my own beliefs.

Now, my dilemma was by no means unique. In a way, it reflected the broader debate we’ve been having in this country for the last thirty years over the role of religion in politics.

For some time now, there has been plenty of talk among pundits and pollsters that the political divide in this country has fallen sharply along religious lines. Indeed, the single biggest « gap » in party affiliation among white Americans today is not between men and women, or those who reside in so-called Red States and those who reside in Blue, but between those who attend church regularly and those who don’t.

Conservative leaders have been all too happy to exploit this gap, consistently reminding evangelical Christians that Democrats disrespect their values and dislike their Church, while suggesting to the rest of the country that religious Americans care only about issues like abortion and gay marriage; school prayer and intelligent design.

Democrats, for the most part, have taken the bait. At best, we may try to avoid the conversation about religious values altogether, fearful of offending anyone and claiming that – regardless of our personal beliefs – constitutional principles tie our hands. At worst, there are some liberals who dismiss religion in the public square as inherently irrational or intolerant, insisting on a caricature of religious Americans that paints them as fanatical, or thinking that the very word « Christian » describes one’s political opponents, not people of faith.

Now, such strategies of avoidance may work for progressives when our opponent is Alan Keyes. But over the long haul, I think we make a mistake when we fail to acknowledge the power of faith in people’s lives — in the lives of the American people — and I think it’s time that we join a serious debate about how to reconcile faith with our modern, pluralistic democracy.

And if we’re going to do that then we first need to understand that Americans are a religious people. 90 percent of us believe in God, 70 percent affiliate themselves with an organized religion, 38 percent call themselves committed Christians, and substantially more people in America believe in angels than they do in evolution.

This religious tendency is not simply the result of successful marketing by skilled preachers or the draw of popular mega-churches. In fact, it speaks to a hunger that’s deeper than that – a hunger that goes beyond any particular issue or cause.

Each day, it seems, thousands of Americans are going about their daily rounds – dropping off the kids at school, driving to the office, flying to a business meeting, shopping at the mall, trying to stay on their diets – and they’re coming to the realization that something is missing. They are deciding that their work, their possessions, their diversions, their sheer busyness, is not enough.

They want a sense of purpose, a narrative arc to their lives. They’re looking to relieve a chronic loneliness, a feeling supported by a recent study that shows Americans have fewer close friends and confidants than ever before. And so they need an assurance that somebody out there cares about them, is listening to them – that they are not just destined to travel down that long highway towards nothingness.

And I speak with some experience on this matter. I was not raised in a particularly religious household, as undoubtedly many in the audience were. My father, who returned to Kenya when I was just two, was born Muslim but as an adult became an atheist. My mother, whose parents were non-practicing Baptists and Methodists, was probably one of the most spiritual and kindest people I’ve ever known, but grew up with a healthy skepticism of organized religion herself. As a consequence, so did I.

It wasn’t until after college, when I went to Chicago to work as a community organizer for a group of Christian churches, that I confronted my own spiritual dilemma.

I was working with churches, and the Christians who I worked with recognized themselves in me. They saw that I knew their Book and that I shared their values and sang their songs. But they sensed that a part of me that remained removed, detached, that I was an observer in their midst.

And in time, I came to realize that something was missing as well — that without a vessel for my beliefs, without a commitment to a particular community of faith, at some level I would always remain apart, and alone.

And if it weren’t for the particular attributes of the historically black church, I may have accepted this fate. But as the months passed in Chicago, I found myself drawn – not just to work with the church, but to be in the church.

For one thing, I believed and still believe in the power of the African-American religious tradition to spur social change, a power made real by some of the leaders here today. Because of its past, the black church understands in an intimate way the Biblical call to feed the hungry and cloth the naked and challenge powers and principalities. And in its historical struggles for freedom and the rights of man, I was able to see faith as more than just a comfort to the weary or a hedge against death, but rather as an active, palpable agent in the world. As a source of hope.

And perhaps it was out of this intimate knowledge of hardship — the grounding of faith in struggle — that the church offered me a second insight, one that I think is important to emphasize today.

Faith doesn’t mean that you don’t have doubts.

You need to come to church in the first place precisely because you are first of this world, not apart from it. You need to embrace Christ precisely because you have sins to wash away – because you are human and need an ally in this difficult journey.

It was because of these newfound understandings that I was finally able to walk down the aisle of Trinity United Church of Christ on 95th Street in the Southside of Chicago one day and affirm my Christian faith. It came about as a choice, and not an epiphany. I didn’t fall out in church. The questions I had didn’t magically disappear. But kneeling beneath that cross on the South Side, I felt that I heard God’s spirit beckoning me. I submitted myself to His will, and dedicated myself to discovering His truth.

That’s a path that has been shared by millions upon millions of Americans – evangelicals, Catholics, Protestants, Jews and Muslims alike; some since birth, others at certain turning points in their lives. It is not something they set apart from the rest of their beliefs and values. In fact, it is often what drives their beliefs and their values.

And that is why that, if we truly hope to speak to people where they’re at – to communicate our hopes and values in a way that’s relevant to their own – then as progressives, we cannot abandon the field of religious discourse.

Because when we ignore the debate about what it means to be a good Christian or Muslim or Jew; when we discuss religion only in the negative sense of where or how it should not be practiced, rather than in the positive sense of what it tells us about our obligations towards one another; when we shy away from religious venues and religious broadcasts because we assume that we will be unwelcome – others will fill the vacuum, those with the most insular views of faith, or those who cynically use religion to justify partisan ends.

In other words, if we don’t reach out to evangelical Christians and other religious Americans and tell them what we stand for, then the Jerry Falwells and Pat Robertsons and Alan Keyeses will continue to hold sway.

More fundamentally, the discomfort of some progressives with any hint of religion has often prevented us from effectively addressing issues in moral terms. Some of the problem here is rhetorical – if we scrub language of all religious content, we forfeit the imagery and terminology through which millions of Americans understand both their personal morality and social justice. Imagine Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address without reference to « the judgments of the Lord. » Or King’s I Have a Dream speech without references to « all of God’s children. » Their summoning of a higher truth helped inspire what had seemed impossible, and move the nation to embrace a common destiny.

Our failure as progressives to tap into the moral underpinnings of the nation is not just rhetorical, though. Our fear of getting « preachy » may also lead us to discount the role that values and culture play in some of our most urgent social problems.

After all, the problems of poverty and racism, the uninsured and the unemployed, are not simply technical problems in search of the perfect ten point plan. They are rooted in both societal indifference and individual callousness – in the imperfections of man.

Solving these problems will require changes in government policy, but it will also require changes in hearts and a change in minds. I believe in keeping guns out of our inner cities, and that our leaders must say so in the face of the gun manufacturers’ lobby – but I also believe that when a gang-banger shoots indiscriminately into a crowd because he feels somebody disrespected him, we’ve got a moral problem. There’s a hole in that young man’s heart – a hole that the government alone cannot fix.

I believe in vigorous enforcement of our non-discrimination laws. But I also believe that a transformation of conscience and a genuine commitment to diversity on the part of the nation’s CEOs could bring about quicker results than a battalion of lawyers. They have more lawyers than us anyway.

I think that we should put more of our tax dollars into educating poor girls and boys. I think that the work that Marian Wright Edelman has done all her life is absolutely how we should prioritize our resources in the wealthiest nation on earth. I also think that we should give them the information about contraception that can prevent unwanted pregnancies, lower abortion rates, and help assure that that every child is loved and cherished.

But, you know, my Bible tells me that if we train a child in the way he should go, when he is old he will not turn from it. So I think faith and guidance can help fortify a young woman’s sense of self, a young man’s sense of responsibility, and a sense of reverence that all young people should have for the act of sexual intimacy.

I am not suggesting that every progressive suddenly latch on to religious terminology – that can be dangerous. Nothing is more transparent than inauthentic expressions of faith. As Jim has mentioned, some politicians come and clap — off rhythm — to the choir. We don’t need that.

In fact, because I do not believe that religious people have a monopoly on morality, I would rather have someone who is grounded in morality and ethics, and who is also secular, affirm their morality and ethics and values without pretending that they’re something they’re not. They don’t need to do that. None of us need to do that.

But what I am suggesting is this – secularists are wrong when they ask believers to leave their religion at the door before entering into the public square. Frederick Douglas, Abraham Lincoln, Williams Jennings Bryant, Dorothy Day, Martin Luther King – indeed, the majority of great reformers in American history – were not only motivated by faith, but repeatedly used religious language to argue for their cause. So to say that men and women should not inject their « personal morality » into public policy debates is a practical absurdity. Our law is by definition a codification of morality, much of it grounded in the Judeo-Christian tradition.

Moreover, if we progressives shed some of these biases, we might recognize some overlapping values that both religious and secular people share when it comes to the moral and material direction of our country. We might recognize that the call to sacrifice on behalf of the next generation, the need to think in terms of « thou » and not just « I, » resonates in religious congregations all across the country. And we might realize that we have the ability to reach out to the evangelical community and engage millions of religious Americans in the larger project of American renewal.

Some of this is already beginning to happen. Pastors, friends of mine like Rick Warren and T.D. Jakes are wielding their enormous influences to confront AIDS, Third World debt relief, and the genocide in Darfur. Religious thinkers and activists like our good friend Jim Wallis and Tony Campolo are lifting up the Biblical injunction to help the poor as a means of mobilizing Christians against budget cuts to social programs and growing inequality.

And by the way, we need Christians on Capitol Hill, Jews on Capitol Hill and Muslims on Capitol Hill talking about the estate tax. When you’ve got an estate tax debate that proposes a trillion dollars being taken out of social programs to go to a handful of folks who don’t need and weren’t even asking for it, you know that we need an injection of morality in our political debate.

Across the country, individual churches like my own and your own are sponsoring day care programs, building senior centers, helping ex-offenders reclaim their lives, and rebuilding our gulf coast in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

So the question is, how do we build on these still-tentative partnerships between religious and secular people of good will? It’s going to take more work, a lot more work than we’ve done so far. The tensions and the suspicions on each side of the religious divide will have to be squarely addressed. And each side will need to accept some ground rules for collaboration.

While I’ve already laid out some of the work that progressive leaders need to do, I want to talk a little bit about what conservative leaders need to do — some truths they need to acknowledge.

For one, they need to understand the critical role that the separation of church and state has played in preserving not only our democracy, but the robustness of our religious practice. Folks tend to forget that during our founding, it wasn’t the atheists or the civil libertarians who were the most effective champions of the First Amendment. It was the persecuted minorities, it was Baptists like John Leland who didn’t want the established churches to impose their views on folks who were getting happy out in the fields and teaching the scripture to slaves. It was the forbearers of the evangelicals who were the most adamant about not mingling government with religious, because they did not want state-sponsored religion hindering their ability to practice their faith as they understood it.

Moreover, given the increasing diversity of America’s population, the dangers of sectarianism have never been greater. Whatever we once were, we are no longer just a Christian nation; we are also a Jewish nation, a Muslim nation, a Buddhist nation, a Hindu nation, and a nation of nonbelievers.

And even if we did have only Christians in our midst, if we expelled every non-Christian from the United States of America, whose Christianity would we teach in the schools? Would we go with James Dobson’s, or Al Sharpton’s? Which passages of Scripture should guide our public policy? Should we go with Leviticus, which suggests slavery is ok and that eating shellfish is abomination? How about Deuteronomy, which suggests stoning your child if he strays from the faith? Or should we just stick to the Sermon on the Mount – a passage that is so radical that it’s doubtful that our own Defense Department would survive its application? So before we get carried away, let’s read our bibles. Folks haven’t been reading their bibles.

This brings me to my second point. Democracy demands that the religiously motivated translate their concerns into universal, rather than religion-specific, values. It requires that their proposals be subject to argument, and amenable to reason. I may be opposed to abortion for religious reasons, but if I seek to pass a law banning the practice, I cannot simply point to the teachings of my church or evoke God’s will. I have to explain why abortion violates some principle that is accessible to people of all faiths, including those with no faith at all.

Now this is going to be difficult for some who believe in the inerrancy of the Bible, as many evangelicals do. But in a pluralistic democracy, we have no choice. Politics depends on our ability to persuade each other of common aims based on a common reality. It involves the compromise, the art of what’s possible. At some fundamental level, religion does not allow for compromise. It’s the art of the impossible. If God has spoken, then followers are expected to live up to God’s edicts, regardless of the consequences. To base one’s life on such uncompromising commitments may be sublime, but to base our policy making on such commitments would be a dangerous thing. And if you doubt that, let me give you an example.

We all know the story of Abraham and Isaac. Abraham is ordered by God to offer up his only son, and without argument, he takes Isaac to the mountaintop, binds him to an altar, and raises his knife, prepared to act as God has commanded.

Of course, in the end God sends down an angel to intercede at the very last minute, and Abraham passes God’s test of devotion.

But it’s fair to say that if any of us leaving this church saw Abraham on a roof of a building raising his knife, we would, at the very least, call the police and expect the Department of Children and Family Services to take Isaac away from Abraham. We would do so because we do not hear what Abraham hears, do not see what Abraham sees, true as those experiences may be. So the best we can do is act in accordance with those things that we all see, and that we all hear, be it common laws or basic reason.

Finally, any reconciliation between faith and democratic pluralism requires some sense of proportion.

This goes for both sides.

Even those who claim the Bible’s inerrancy make distinctions between Scriptural edicts, sensing that some passages – the Ten Commandments, say, or a belief in Christ’s divinity – are central to Christian faith, while others are more culturally specific and may be modified to accommodate modern life.

The American people intuitively understand this, which is why the majority of Catholics practice birth control and some of those opposed to gay marriage nevertheless are opposed to a Constitutional amendment to ban it. Religious leadership need not accept such wisdom in counseling their flocks, but they should recognize this wisdom in their politics.

But a sense of proportion should also guide those who police the boundaries between church and state. Not every mention of God in public is a breach to the wall of separation – context matters. It is doubtful that children reciting the Pledge of Allegiance feel oppressed or brainwashed as a consequence of muttering the phrase « under God. » I didn’t. Having voluntary student prayer groups use school property to meet should not be a threat, any more than its use by the High School Republicans should threaten Democrats. And one can envision certain faith-based programs – targeting ex-offenders or substance abusers – that offer a uniquely powerful way of solving problems.

So we all have some work to do here. But I am hopeful that we can bridge the gaps that exist and overcome the prejudices each of us bring to this debate. And I have faith that millions of believing Americans want that to happen. No matter how religious they may or may not be, people are tired of seeing faith used as a tool of attack. They don’t want faith used to belittle or to divide. They’re tired of hearing folks deliver more screed than sermon. Because in the end, that’s not how they think about faith in their own lives.

So let me end with just one other interaction I had during my campaign. A few days after I won the Democratic nomination in my U.S. Senate race, I received an email from a doctor at the University of Chicago Medical School that said the following:

« Congratulations on your overwhelming and inspiring primary win. I was happy to vote for you, and I will tell you that I am seriously considering voting for you in the general election. I write to express my concerns that may, in the end, prevent me from supporting you. » The doctor described himself as a Christian who understood his commitments to be « totalizing. » His faith led him to a strong opposition to abortion and gay marriage, although he said that his faith also led him to question the idolatry of the free market and quick resort to militarism that seemed to characterize much of the Republican agenda.

But the reason the doctor was considering not voting for me was not simply my position on abortion. Rather, he had read an entry that my campaign had posted on my Web site, which suggested that I would fight « right-wing ideologues who want to take away a woman’s right to choose. » The doctor went on to write:

« I sense that you have a strong sense of justice…and I also sense that you are a fair minded person with a high regard for reason…Whatever your convictions, if you truly believe that those who oppose abortion are all ideologues driven by perverse desires to inflict suffering on women, then you, in my judgment, are not fair-minded….You know that we enter times that are fraught with possibilities for good and for harm, times when we are struggling to make sense of a common polity in the context of plurality, when we are unsure of what grounds we have for making any claims that involve others…I do not ask at this point that you oppose abortion, only that you speak about this issue in fair-minded words. »

Fair-minded words.

So I looked at my Web site and found the offending words. In fairness to them, my staff had written them using standard Democratic boilerplate language to summarize my pro-choice position during the Democratic primary, at a time when some of my opponents were questioning my commitment to protect Roe v. Wade.

Re-reading the doctor’s letter, though, I felt a pang of shame. It is people like him who are looking for a deeper, fuller conversation about religion in this country. They may not change their positions, but they are willing to listen and learn from those who are willing to speak in fair-minded words. Those who know of the central and awesome place that God holds in the lives of so many, and who refuse to treat faith as simply another political issue with which to score points.

So I wrote back to the doctor, and I thanked him for his advice. The next day, I circulated the email to my staff and changed the language on my website to state in clear but simple terms my pro-choice position. And that night, before I went to bed, I said a prayer of my own – a prayer that I might extend the same presumption of good faith to others that the doctor had extended to me.

And that night, before I went to bed I said a prayer of my own. It’s a prayer I think I share with a lot of Americans. A hope that we can live with one another in a way that reconciles the beliefs of each with the good of all. It’s a prayer worth praying, and a conversation worth having in this country in the months and years to come. Thank you.

Voir également:

Remarks by the President and the Vice President at Easter Prayer Breakfast

/…/

THE PRESIDENT:  Thank you.  (Applause.)  Thank you so much.  Thank you.  Please, everybody have a seat.  Well, good morning, everybody.

AUDIENCE:  Good morning!

THE PRESIDENT:  Welcome to the White House.  It is so good to be with you again.  We had to change up the format a little bit because I think I’ve got 30 world leaders for dinner tomorrow — (laughter) — in an effort to constrain the threat of nuclear materials getting into the wrong hand.  So it’s a good cause — (laughter) — but when you have folks over — I’m sure all of you have the same experience — you’ve got to clean up — (laughter) — do a little vacuuming, make sure that — you know.  (Laughter.)  Well, to those of you who have kids, make sure that they didn’t do something when you weren’t looking that the guests will discover.  (Laughter.)  Some vegetables they didn’t want to eat.  (Laughter.)

So we’re not at our usual round table of fellowship, but the spirit is still here.  And I know that I speak for all of you in feeling lucky that we’ve had such an extraordinary Vice President in Joe Biden — (applause) — whose faith has been tested time and time again, and has been able to find God in places that sometimes, for a lot of us, is hard to see.  So I’m blessed to have him as a friend as well as a colleague.

This is a little bittersweet — my final Easter Prayer Breakfast as President.  So I want to begin by thanking all of you for all your prayers over the year — I know they have kept us going.  It has meant so much to me.  It’s meant so much to my family.  I want to thank you most of all for the incredible ministries that you’re doing all around the country, because we’ve had a chance to work together and partner with you, and we have seen the good works — the deeds, and not just words — that so many of you have carried out.

And since 2010, this has become a cherished tradition.  I know all of you have had a very busy Holy Week, and the week leading up to Holy Week, and the week before that.  (Laughter.)  And I had a wonderful Easter morning at the Alfred Street Baptist Church — and I want to thank Pastor Wesley for his leadership.  Pastor, outstanding sermon.  (Applause.)

He was telling a few stories of his youth, talking about going to the club.  (Laughter.)  I’m just saying.  (Laughter.)  And since he’s also from Chicago, I knew the club he was talking about.  (Laughter.)  But it all led to a celebration of the Resurrection, I want to be clear.  (Laughter.)  It started with the club, but it ended up with the Resurrection.  (Laughter.)

And his outstanding and handsome young sons are with him here.  And so we want to thank him for an outstanding service.

Here at the White House, we have not had to work as hard as all of you, but we did have to deal with the Easter Egg Roll.  (Laughter.)  Imagine thousands and thousands of children hopped up on sugar — (laughter) — running around your backyard, surrounded by mascots and muppets and Shaquille O’Neal.  (Laughter.)  For 12 hours.  (Laughter.)  That was my Easter Weekend.  (Laughter.)  So we set aside this morning to come together in prayer, and reflection, and quiet.  (Laughter.)

Now, as Joe said, in light of recent events, this gathering takes on more meaning.  Around the world, we have seen horrific acts of terrorism, most recently Brussels, as well as what happened in Pakistan — innocent families, mostly women and children, Christians and Muslims.  And so our prayers are with the victims, their families, the survivors of these cowardly attacks.

And as Joe mentioned, these attacks can foment fear and division.  They can tempt us to cast out the stranger, strike out against those who don’t look like us, or pray exactly as we do.  And they can lead us to turn our backs on those who are most in need of help and refuge.  That’s the intent of the terrorists, is to weaken our faith, to weaken our best impulses, our better angels.

And Pastor preached on this this weekend, and I know all of you did, too, as I suspect, or in your own quiet ways were reminded if Easter means anything, it’s that you don’t have to be afraid.  We drown out darkness with light, and we heal hatred with love, and we hold on to hope.  And we think about all that Jesus suffered and sacrificed on our behalf — scorned, abandoned shunned, nail-scarred hands bearing the injustice of his death and carrying the sins of the world.

And it’s difficult to fathom the full meaning of that act.  Scripture tells us, “For God so loved the world that He gave His only Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have eternal life.”  Because of God’s love, we can proclaim “Christ is risen!”  Because of God’s love, we have been given this gift of salvation.  Because of Him, our hope is not misplaced, and we don’t have to be afraid.

And as Christians have said through the years, “We are Easter people, and Alleluia is our song!”  We are Easter people, people of hope and not fear.

Now, this is not a static hope.  This is a living and breathing hope.  It’s not a gift we simply receive, but one we must give to others, a gift to carry forth.  I was struck last week by an image of Pope Francis washing feet of refugees — different faiths, different countries.  And what a powerful reminder of our obligations if, in fact, we’re not afraid, and if, in fact, we hope, and if, in fact, we believe.  That is something that we have to give.

His Holiness said this Easter Sunday, God “enables us to see with His eyes of love and compassion those who hunger and thirst, strangers and prisoners, the marginalized and the outcast, the victims of oppression and violence.”

To do justice, to love kindness –- that’s what all of you collectively are involved in in your own ways each and every day. Feeding the hungry.  Healing the sick.  Teaching our children.  Housing the homeless.  Welcoming immigrants and refugees.  And in that way, you are teaching all of us what it means when it comes to true discipleship.  It’s not just words.  It’s not just getting dressed and looking good on Sunday.  But it’s service, particularly for the least of these.

And whether fighting the scourge of poverty or joining with us to work on criminal justice reform and giving people a second chance in life, you have been on the front lines of delivering God’s message of love and compassion and mercy for His children.

And I have to say that over the last seven years, I could not have been prouder to work with you.  We have built partnerships that have transcended partisan affiliation, that have transcended individual congregations and even faiths, to form a community that’s bound by our shared ideals and rooted in our common humanity.  And that community I believe will endure beyond the end of my presidency, because it’s a living thing that all of you are involved with all around this country and all around the world.

And our faith changes us.  I know it’s changed me.  It renews in us a sense of possibility.  It allows us to believe that although we are all sinners, and that at time we will falter, there’s always the possibility of redemption.  Every once in a while, we might get something right, we might do some good; that there’s the presence of grace, and that we, in some small way, can be worthy of this magnificent love that God has bestowed on us.

You remind me all of that each and every day.  And you have just been incredible friends and partners, and I could not be prouder to know all of you.  I thank you for sharing in this fellowship.  I pray that our time together will strengthen our souls and fortify our faith and renew our spirit.  That we will continue to build a nation and a world that is worthy of His many blessings.

And I want to remind you all that after a good chunk of sleep when I get out of here, I’m going to be right out there with you doing some work.  (Laughter.)  So you’re not rid of me yet, even after we’re done with the presidency.  But I am going to take three, four months where I just sleep.  (Laughter.)  And I hope you all don’t mind that.

So with that, I would like to invite Reverend Doctor Derrick Harkins for our opening prayer.  (Applause.)

Voir aussi:

Imre Kertesz : « Auschwitz n’a pas été un accident de l’Histoire »
Propos recueillis par Nicolas Weill

Le Monde

27.01.2015

Imre Kertesz, Prix Nobel de littérature (2002), a été déporté lors de la mise en œuvre de l’extermination des juifs de Hongrie, après l’occupation de ce pays par l’armée allemande en 1944. Envoyé d’abord à Auschwitz, en Pologne, puis à Buchenwald et dans le camp satellite de Zeitz, en Allemagne, il survit à la guerre et retourne dans son pays en voie de stalinisation, où il deviendra journaliste, traducteur et auteur. L’essentiel de son œuvre s’attache à transmettre cette expérience de la déportation et de la Shoah, dont il estime que, bien loin d’être le monopole des survivants, elle doit être à la fois une expérience humaine et universelle.

Dans « Kaddish pour l’enfant qui ne naîtra pas » (Actes Sud, 1995), vous dites qu’à une « certaine température, les mots perdent leur consistance », deviennent« liquides ». N’y a-t-il pas là un pessimisme fondamental, l’idée qu’il serait finalement impossible de mettre Auschwitz en mots  ?

Je suis étonné d’avoir écrit cela ! Tout le monde dit que je suis pessimiste, pourtant je me suis contenté, depuis très longtemps, de raconter ce que j’ai vécu. Etre sans destin (Actes Sud, 1998) est un récit de ma déportation, construit à partir de mon expérience personnelle. Mais quiconque a connu l’horreur d’Auschwitz a dû réécrire sa biographie et est devenu différent de ce qu’il était avant d’y être allé. Comprendre comment on est parvenu à détruire en si peu de temps physiquement et moralement six millions de juifs, quelle est la technique qui a été employée pour exterminer une telle masse de gens, voilà ce qui m’a toujours intéressé. Dans Etre sans destin, que j’ai mis treize années à écrire, j’ai choisi d’adopter le point de vue d’un enfant qui est le héros du récit, du roman ; parce que, dans les camps de concentration comme dans la dictature, on rabaisse l’homme à un niveau enfantin. Tout, même ce qui ne l’est pas, y devient « naturel ». Jusqu’à aujourd’hui, je me suis appliqué à étudier la façon dont s’élabore la langue de toutes les dictatures.

De cette expérience des camps, quel est l’« acquis » négatif qui vous paraît le principal à transmettre aujourd’hui et demain ?

L’adaptation. Pour moi, les vingt premières minutes de l’arrivée au camp sont les plus importantes. Tout se joue dans ces vingt minutes-là. C’est cela qu’il faut décrire avec les plus grands détails. Beaucoup de survivants ont préféré oublier leur processus d’entrée dans cet univers – or, là en est la leçon la plus importante. Sous la dictature de Matyas Rakosi [1892-1971, premier dirigeant de la Hongrie communiste à l’époque stalinienne], j’ai pu aussi observer ce processus à l’œuvre, surprendre les gens en train de changer, de devenir autres… J’ai rédigé Etre sans destin sous le régime de Janos Kadar [1912-1989, dirigea la Hongrie après la répression du soulèvement de 1956]. A cette époque, en 1964, le titre de l’ouvrage d’Hannah Arendt, Eichmann à Jérusalem. Rapport sur la banalité du mal – le titre résonnait juste pour moi, avant même que je puisse accéder à son contenu, ce qui, à l’époque, était fort difficile –, m’avait beaucoup stimulé, tant je me sentais sur la même longueur d’onde que cette expression.

Et quel sens prend pour vous cette notion de « banalité du mal » ?

Mon souci principal, encore une fois, est d’analyser la manière dont les gens sombrent dans le totalitarisme. J’ai ainsi rencontré beaucoup d’individus soupçonnés d’avoir été des dénonciateurs sous le régime soviétique. Eux, bien sûr, niaient l’avoir été. Disons plutôt qu’ils ne se souvenaient pas de cette période de leur vie. Cette même attitude, je l’avais remarquée après la libération de Buchenwald par les Américains. Le général Patton a exigé que les civils allemands de Weimar viennent visiter le camp : ces derniers devaient voir de leurs yeux ce que l’on y avait commis en leur nom. C’était le 11 avril 1945, le soleil brillait, j’étais encore là, assis à côté des baraques, et j’ai vu un groupe ­conduit par les Américains arriver à un baraquement où gisaient des malades atteints du typhus. Les Allemands poussaient des cris d’horreur et d’effroi. Huit années durant, ces gens s’étaient pourtant habitués à avoir dans leur voisinage des détenus à qui il arrivait de traverser la ville au vu et au su de tous. Cette horreur, ils l’avaient vue passer, mais sans savoir.

Qu’est-ce qui a irrémédiablement changé avec Auschwitz ?

La basse continue de la morale humaniste, celle qui existe chez Bach avec des accords parfaits, des tonalité en mi majeur ou en sol majeur, une culture fermée où chaque mot signifiait ce qu’il voulait dire et seulement cela, voilà ce qui a disparu avec Auschwitz et le totalitarisme. Comme Arnold Schoenberg [1874-1951, qui a révolutionné le langage musical en renonçant au système tonal de sept notes] l’a fait pour la musique, j’ai découvert, avec mon écriture, une « prose atonale », qui illustre la fin du consensus et de la culture humaniste, celle qui valait à l’époque de Bach et ensuite. Dans Etre sans destin, j’ai renversé le Bildungsroman, le roman de formation allemand. On peut dire que mes livres sont des récits de la « dé-formation ».

Vous avez parlé, dans un recueil d’essais, de « L’Holocauste comme culture »(Actes Sud, 2009). Que vous inspire la renaissance de l’antisémitisme en Europe ? N’y voyez-vous pas comme l’annonce d’un échec de cette « culture d’Auschwitz », devenue si centrale, notamment après la chute du communisme ?

Cette recrudescence de l’antisémitisme, qui est un phénomène mondial, je la trouve bien entendu effarante. Avant même les attaques terroristes de janvier à Paris, j’avais fait la remarque que l’Europe était en train de mourir de sa lâcheté et de sa faiblesse morale, de son incapacité à se protéger et de l’ornière morale évidente dont elle ne pouvait s’extraire après Auschwitz. La démocratie reste impuissante à se défendre, et insensible devant la menace qui la guette. Et le risque est grand de voir les gardes-frontières qui entreprennent de défendre l’Europe contre la barbarie montante, les décapitations, la « tyrannie orientale », devenir à leur tour des fascistes. Que va devenir l’humanité dans ces conditions ? Auschwitz n’a pas été un accident de l’Histoire, et beaucoup de signes montrent que sa répétition est possible.

Dans « L’Ultime Auberge »(Actes Sud, 318 p., 22,80 euros), vous affirmez également que le « juif d’Europe », le juif assimilé, est « un vestige ». Pourquoi ?

Tout dépend de ce que l’on entend par judaïsme. J’ai fait ma bar-mitsva et me souviens qu’à cette occasion on m’avait offert une montre en or, que les gendarmes hongrois m’ont confisquée lorsque j’ai été arrêté et déporté. Est-on juif par naissance ou bien parce que l’on a été élevé dans cette tradition ? Je suis un Européen, j’ai été éduqué en Europe et je n’ai pas beaucoup de notions de la tradition juive. J’ai lu peu de philosophes juifs et ne suis pas citoyen d’Israël… Selon moi, il y a trois façons de percevoir le judaïsme européen après l’Holocauste : celle de Primo Levi, qui le regarde selon le point de vue d’avant Auschwitz, celui de la bourgeoisie assimilée ; celui de l’écrivain polonais Tadeusz Borowski [1922-1951, survivant d’Auschwitz et de Dachau], qui décrit Auschwitz ; et la troisième, la mienne, qui souhaite s’occuper des conséquences d’Auschwitz. En tout cas, je me sens juif quand on persécute les juifs.

A la différence d’autres survivants de la Shoah, vous avez conservé une relation ­intime à la langue et à la culture allemandes, que vous parlez et traduisez en hongrois. Au point d’être allé vivre une dizaine d’années à Berlin, d’où vous êtes revenu récemment pour vous réinstaller à Budapest. Pourquoi ?

Je ne crois nullement que chaque Allemand porte le nazisme dans ses gènes, et je suis sur ce point en désaccord avec l’historien américain Daniel Goldhagen [auteur des Bourreaux volontaires d’Hitler (Seuil, 1997),pour qui il aurait existé un « antisémitisme exterminateur » spécifique à l’Allemagne]. Ma relation à la langue allemande a quant à elle été déterminée par le fait qu’à l’époque de la dictature Rakosi il était impossible de trouver en Hongrie de la littérature correcte. Je me suis procuré des œuvres de Thomas Mann, et c’est grâce à la littérature allemande que j’ai réussi à me préserver de cette propagande réaliste soviétique. Nietzsche était considéré comme une lecture interdite pendant la période communiste, et je me suis mis à traduire La Naissance de la tragédie en hongrois à la fin de la période Kadar. Juste après la guerre, alors que j’étais un apprenti journaliste, je suis allé à l’Opéra. La Walkyrie était au programme. J’avais 19 ou 20 ans. A cette époque, on ne pouvait rien savoir de Wagner, et je n’avais pas la moindre idée de ce que je voyais sur scène, aucun livret n’était disponible. Et pourtant, cette représentation a déterminé ma vie.

Pensez-vous que dans l’ex-Europe ­communiste la mémoire d’Auschwitz joue le même rôle qu’à l’ouest du continent ?

Mon expérience d’Auschwitz est singulière et n’est guère comprise en Hongrie. C’est seulement maintenant qu’on commence à prendre quelques distances dans ce pays avec l’idée que dans ce camp il y a eu une « guerre germano-juive » ! En Europe occidentale, le travail sur l’Holocauste est certes plus avancé. Mais même les soixante-huitards allemands qui demandaient à leurs parents ce qu’ils avaient fait pendant la guerre n’ont pas obtenu de réponse à leur question. Il a manqué une génération.

Dans « Dossier K. » (Actes Sud, 2008), vous parlez de votre découverte de Kant. Y a-t-il une philosophie possible après Auschwitz ?

Un jour, je suis parti en vacances avec ma première femme près du lac Balaton. A cause d’une pluie incessante, on ne pouvait ni se baigner ni aller à la plage. Tout ce qu’on pouvait faire, c’était se mettre sur une terrasse et lire. C’est alors que j’ai jeté un coup d’œil sur La Critique de la faculté de juger, et je n’ai pas pu reposer le livre. Cela a eu un effet incroyable sur moi, même si je ne pratique pas du tout la philosophie, et surtout pas en tant que discipline. Mais cette lecture m’a marqué. Ce que Kant m’a enseigné, c’est que le sujet, le moi, est au centre. Marx oppose le monde, la matière au moi. Dans un pays dont la philosophie officielle était le marxisme, la centralité du moi était une énormité. L’idée d’un monde extérieur absolument indépendant de moi ne m’a jamais plu. Je n’ai rien lu d’autre de Kant, et tout ce que j’en sais est dans cette œuvre. Il m’a enseigné que je suis, que rien n’est indépendant du moi, car si je meurs, le monde meurt avec moi.

(Traduit du hongrois par Natalia Zaremba-Huzvai)

Parcours
9 novembre 1929 : Imre Kertesz naît dans une famille juive de Budapest.
1944 : à 15 ans, il est arrêté et déporté à Auschwitz, puis dans le camp de travail de Zeitz. Il est libéré par les Américains à Buchenwald. Il retourne à Budapest où il devient journaliste, auteur de comédie, traducteur, et un écrivain au style ironique.
1975 : parution en hongrois du récit de sa déportation Etre sans destin. La plupart de ses œuvres sont axées autour de la Shoah.
2002 : prix Nobel de littérature. Installation à Berlin jusqu’en 2013, avant de retourner à Budapest après la maladie de Parkinson qui le frappe.

En savoir plus sur http://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2015/01/27/auschwitz-n-a-pas-ete-un-accident-de-l-histoire_4564126_3210.html#RHPdsPDLOXx3gsae.99

Voir enfin:

« Batman vs Superman » : c’est Aristote contre Kant (en plus désespérant)
Simon Merle
Philosophie supra-héroïque

Le Nouvel Obs

02-04-2016

LE PLUS. Prenez Batman et Superman dans le dernier film de Zach Snyder, où les deux super-héros s’opposent. Prenez maintenant deux philosophes célébrissimes pour leurs réflexions autour de la morale et de la justice : Artistote et Kant. Quels sont leurs points communs ? Qui gagne à la fin ? Les explications de Simon Merle, auteur de « Super-héros et philo » (Bréal).
Édité par Henri Rouillier

La bonne idée de ce nouveau film des écuries DC Comics, c’est de mettre en opposition deux conceptions de la justice, en leur donnant vie à travers l’affrontement de deux héros mythiques. Mais le sérieux du propos, à la fois force et faiblesse d’une œuvre qui exclue la distanciation de l’humour, est-il assumé jusqu’au bout ?

Superman et Batman ne sont pas des citoyens comme les autres. Ce sont tous les deux des hors-la-loi qui œuvrent pour accomplir le Bien. Néanmoins, leur rapport à la justice n’est pas le même: l’un incarne une loi supérieure, l’autre cherche à échapper à l’intransigeance des règles pour mieux faire corps avec le monde.

Superman, un justicier inflexible

Le personnage de Superman évoque une justice divine transcendante, ou encore supra-étatique. À plusieurs reprises, le film met en évidence le défaut de cette justice surhumaine, trop parfaite pour notre monde. Superman est un héros kantien, pour qui le devoir ne peut souffrir de compromission. Cette rigidité morale peut alors paradoxalement conduire à une vertu vicieuse, trop sûre d’elle même.

On reprochait au philosophe de Königsberg sa morale de cristal, parfaite dans ses intentions mais prête à se briser au contact de la dure réalité. Il en va de même pour Superman et pour sa bonne volonté, qui vient buter sur la brutalité de ses adversaires et sur des dilemmes moraux à la résolution impossible.

Batman, un justicier de l’ombre

Le personnage de Batman incarne quant à lui une justice souple, souterraine, infra-étatique et peut-être trop humaine. Le modèle philosophique le plus proche est celui de la morale arétique du philosophe Aristote. Si les règles sont trop rigides, il faut privilégier, à la manière du maçon qui utilise comme règle le fil à plomb qui s’adapte aux contours irréguliers, une vertu plus élastique.

Plutôt que d’obéir à des impératifs catégoriques, le justicier est celui qui sait s’adapter et optimiser l’agir au cas particulier. Paradoxalement, cette justice de l’ombre peut aller jusqu’à vouloir braver l‘interdit suprême ; le meurtre; puisque Batman veut en finir avec Superman.

L’affrontement n’aura pas lieu

Il est bien dommage que la deuxième partie du film brouille la distinction entre ces deux conceptions du bien, et que l’alliance occasionnelle des deux héros la rende finalement inopérante. De la même façon, le film pose dès le départ, à travers les discours d’une sénatrice, le problème critique du recours au super-héros.

Ce dernier déresponsabilise l’homme, court-circuite le débat démocratique et menace par ses super-pouvoirs toute possibilité d’un contre-pouvoir. Les « Watchmen », adaptation plus subtile de l’oeuvre de Alan Moore par le même Zack Snyder posait déjà la question : « Who watches the Watchmen ? » La dernière moitié de son nouveau film est bien moins interrogative, et elle semble même légitimer l’inflation annoncée du recours au super-héroïsme dans de futurs « League Of Justice ». On peut regretter que le combat des idées n’ait pas eu lieu, en cédant trop rapidement sa place au trop classique combat des poings.

Simon Merle, auteur de « Super-héros et Philo » (Bréal, 2012)


Centenaire des Pâques sanglantes: Soutenue par ses courageux alliés en Europe (Nothing but our own red blood and a little help from our gallant allies from Europe: Looking back at a hundred years of the same old Easter Rising thing)

28 mars, 2016

The Ruins of O’Connell Street (Edmond Delgrenne, 1916)

ICAproclamation

Some very German looking ‘Irish Patriots’ (Washington Herald, 1 May 1916)IRAVictims

J’aime la piété et non les sacrifices, et la connaissance de Dieu plus que les holocaustes. Osée 6: 6-7
Tu n’as voulu ni sacrifice ni oblation… Donc j’ai dit: Voici, je viens. Psaume 40: 7-8
L’arbre de la liberté doit être revivifié de temps en temps par le sang des patriotes et des tyrans. Jefferson
Une nation ne se régénère que sur un  monceau de cadavres. Saint-Just
Qu’un sang impur abreuve nos sillons! Air connu
It’s the same old thing since 1916 … The Cranberries (1994)
Nous ne servons ni le Roi, ni le Kaiser, mais l’Irlande. Banderole de la Maison des syndicats
Vous dites que nous devrions calmer la terre jusqu’à ce que l’Allemagne soit vaincue Mais qui peut dire cela quand Pearse est sourd et muet ? Y a-t-il un raisonnement qui puisse valoir le pouce osseux de MacDonagh ? Yeats (Seize hommes morts)
Il n’y a que notre sang rouge qui puisse faire s’épanouir le rosier. Yeats (Le Rosier)
Etait-ce une mort inutile après tout ? Un sacrifice trop long Peut faire d’un cœur une pierre. Oh ! quand cela pourra-t-il suffire ? C’est le rôle du Ciel, notre rôle De murmurer nom après nom Comme une mère nomme son enfant Quand le sommeil est venu enfin, Sur des membres qui ont couru violemment. (…) Etait-ce une mort inutile après tout ? Car l’Angleterre peut garder la foi En tout ce qui est fait et dit. (…) Je le note en vers – McDonagh et MacBride Et Connolly et Pearse Maintenant et dans les jours à venir, Partout où le vert est défraîchi. Ils ont changé, changé complètement ; Une beauté terrible est née.(…) Je le note en vers – McDonagh et MacBride Et Connolly et Pearse Maintenant et dans les jours à venir, Partout où le vert est défraîchi. Ils ont changé, changé complètement ; Une beauté terrible est née. Yeats (Pâques 1916)
IRLANDAIS ET IRLANDAISES : Au nom de Dieu et des générations disparues desquelles elle a reçu ses vieilles traditions nationales, l’Irlande, à travers nous, appelle ses enfants à se rallier à son étendard et à frapper pour sa libération. Après avoir organisé et entraîné ses hommes dans son organisation révolutionnaire secrète, la Fraternité Républicaine Irlandaise, et ses organisations armées, les Volontaires Irlandais et l’Armée des Citoyens Irlandais, après avoir patiemment perfectionné sa discipline, et attendu fermement le moment opportun pour se révéler, elle saisit l’instant où, soutenue par ses enfants exilés en Amérique et ses courageux alliés en Europe, mais en comptant avant tout sur sa propre force, elle frappe avec la certitude de vaincre. Nous proclamons le droit du peuple d’Irlande à la propriété de l’Irlande, et au contrôle sans entraves de sa destinée; le droit à être souverain et uni. La longue usurpation de ce droit par un peuple et un gouvernement étranger ne l’a pas supprimé, ce droit ne peut disparaître que par la destruction du peuple irlandais. A chaque génération, les Irlandais ont affirmé leur droit à la liberté et à la souveraineté nationale ; six fois durant les trois derniers siècles ils l’ont affirmé par les armes.  En nous appuyant sur ce droit fondamental et en l’affirmant de nouveau  par les armes à la face du monde, nous proclamons la République Irlandaise, Etat souverain et indépendant, et nous engageons nos vies et celles de nos compagnons d’armes à la cause de sa liberté, de son bien-être, et de sa fierté parmi les nations. La République d’Irlande est en droit d’attendre, et d’ailleurs elle le requiert, l’allégeance de tous les Irlandais et Irlandaises. La République garantit la liberté religieuse et civile, des droits égaux et les mêmes opportunités pour tous les citoyens. Elle proclame sa volonté de construire le bonheur et la prospérité de la nation entière et de ses composantes. Elle chérit tous les enfants de la nation de façon égale, sans égard pour les différences entretenues soigneusement par un gouvernement étranger qui les a divisés par le passé entre minorité et majorité. En attendant que nos armes trouvent le moment opportun pour établir une structure nationale permanente, représentative de tous les Irlandais et élue par tous les hommes et toutes les femmes, le Gouvernement Provisoire, désormais constitué, administrera les affaires civiles et militaires de la République pour le compte du peuple. Nous mettons la cause de la République Irlandaise sous la protection de Dieu Tout-Puissant. Nous appelons sa bénédiction sur nos armes, et nous prions pour qu’aucun de ceux qui servent cette cause ne la déshonore par couardise, inhumanité ou avidité. En cette heure suprême, la nation irlandaise doit, par sa valeur, sa discipline, et l’acceptation par ses enfants du sacrifice pour le bien commun, prouver qu’elle est digne de la destinée auguste à laquelle elle est appelée. Proclamation irlandaise (1916)
Les opinions des adversaires de l’autodétermination aboutissent à cette conclusion que la viabilité des petites nations opprimées par l’impérialisme est d’ores et déjà épuisée, qu’elles ne peuvent jouer aucun rôle contre l’impérialisme, qu’on n’aboutirait à rien en soutenant leurs aspirations purement nationales, etc. L’expérience de la guerre impérialiste de 1914-1916 dément concrètement ce genre de conclusions. La guerre a été une époque de crise pour les nations d’Europe occidentale et pour tout l’impérialisme. Toute crise rejette ce qui est conventionnel, arrache les voiles extérieurs, balaie ce qui a fait son temps, met à nu des forces et des ressorts plus profonds. Qu’a-t-elle révélé du point de vue du mouvement des nations opprimées ? Dans les colonies, plusieurs tentatives d’insurrection que les nations oppressives se sont évidemment efforcées, avec l’aide de la censure de guerre, de camoufler par tous les moyens. On sait, néanmoins, que les anglais ont sauvagement écrasé à Singapour une muti- nerie de leurs troupes hindoues; qu’il y a eu des tentatives d’insurrection dans l’Annam français et au Cameroun allemand; qu’en Europe, il y a eu une insurrection en Irlande, et que les Anglais « épris de liberté », qui n’avaient pas osé étendre aux Irlandais le service militaire obligatoire, y ont rétabli la paix par des exécutions; et que, d’autre part, le gouvernement autri- chien a condamné à mort les députés de la Diète tchèque « pour trahison » et fait passer par les armes, pour le même « crime », des régiments tchèques entiers. (…) Le mouvement national irlandais, qui a derrière lui des siècles d’existence, qui est passé par différentes étapes et combinaisons d’in- térêts de classe, s’est traduit, notamment, par un congrès national irlandais de masse, tenu en Amérique (Vorwärts du 20 mars 1916), lequel s’est prononcé en faveur de l’indépendance de l’Irlande; il s’est traduit par des batailles de rue auxquelles prirent part une partie de la petite bourgeoisie des villes,ainsi qu’une partie des ouvriers, après un long effort de propagande au sein des masses, après des manifestations, des interdictions de journaux, etc. Quiconque qualifie de putsch pareille insurrection est, ou bien le pire des réactionnaires, ou bien un doctrinaire absolument incapable de se représenter la révolution sociale comme un phénomène vivant. (…) N’est-il pas clair que, sous ce rapport moins que sous tous les autres, on n’a pas le droit d’opposer l’Europe aux colonies ? La lutte des nations opprimées en Europe, capable d’en arriver à des insurrections et à des combats de rues, à la violation de la discipline de fer de l’armée et à l’état de siège, « aggravera la crise révolutionnaire en Europe » infiniment plus qu’un soulèvement de bien plus grande envergure dans une colonie lointaine. A force égale, le coup porté au pouvoir de la bour- geoisie impérialiste anglaise par l’insurrection en Irlande a une importance politique cent fois plus grande que s’il avait été porté en Asie ou en Afrique. (…) Dans la guerre actuelle, les états-majors généraux s’attachent minutieusement à tirer profit de chaque mouvement national ou révolutionnaire qui éclate dans le camp adverse : les Allemands, du soulèvement irlandais; les Français, du mouvement des Tchèques, etc. Et, de leur point de vue, ils ont parfaitement raison. On ne peut se comporter sérieusement à l’égard d’une guerre sérieuse si l’on ne profite pas de la moindre faiblesse de l’ennemi, si l’on ne se saisit pas de la moindre chance, d’autant plus que l’on ne peut savoir à l’avance à quel moment précis et avec quelle force précise « sautera » ici ou là tel ou tel dépôt de poudre. Nous serions de piètres révolutionnaires, si, dans la grande guerre libératrice du prolétariat pour le socialisme, nous ne savions pas tirer profit de tout mouvement populaire dirigé contre tel ou tel fléau de l’impérialisme, afin d’aggraver et d’approfondir la crise. Si nous nous mettions, d’une part, à déclarer et répéter sur tous les tons que nous sommes « contre » toute oppression nationale, et, d’autre part, à qualifier de « putsch » l’insurrection héroïque de la partie la plus active et la plus éclairée de certaines classes d’une nation opprimée contre ses oppresseurs, nous nous ravalerions à un niveau de stupidité égal à celui des kautskistes. Le malheur des irlandais est qu’ils se sont insurgés dans un moment inopportun, alors que l’insurrection du prolétariat européen n’était pas encore mûre. Lénine
As a second boy died today from wounds from a bombing in Warrington on Saturday, there were signs of a growing public backlash against the Irish Republican Army, which seems to attack more and more ordinary civilians. For some time now bombs or bomb scares have become a feature of life in England, and people appear to accept them with resigned fatalism. But widespread anger and revulsion have been touched off by the two bombs that went off in metal trash baskets in a crowded shopping area Saturday afternoon in Warrington, a town on the Mersey River 16 miles east of Liverpool. Fifty-six people were wounded, many of them seriously, and a 3-year-old boy, Jonathan Ball, who was being taken shopping to buy a Mother’s Day present, was killed. Another boy, Tim Parry, a 12-year-old with a mischievous grin, ran from the first explosion straight into the second. (…) The Warrington bombing touched a particular nerve because the victims were so young and also because it seemed to have been carried out in a way almost calculated to cause harm to ordinary people. In recent years, I.R.A. bombs have been placed in public places. In a relatively new tactic, the terrorists often plant two bombs at once, so people running from one are sometimes struck by the other. « The I.R.A. goes through phases on the targeting of civilians, » said Frank Brenchley, chairman of the Research Institute for the Study of Conflict and Terrorism, a private research agency. Casualties have also been increased lately because the warnings telephoned in by the I.R.A. often are late or have incomplete or misleading information, the authorities say. This is denied by the I.R.A. In the Warrington case, the authorities said the warning was telephoned in to an emergency help line, saying only that a bomb had been placed outside a Boots pharmacy. The police searched a Boots pharmacy in Liverpool, but the bomb went off near a Boots pharmacy in Warrington, 16 miles away. In a statement acknowledging the act, the I.R.A. said it « profoundly » regretted the death and injuries but charged that the responsibility « lies squarely at the door of those in the British authorities who deliberately failed to act on precise and adequate warnings. »  (…) In a rare public demonstration of feeling against the Irish Republican Army, thousands of Irish men and women gathered in downtown Dublin today to express sorrow and revulsion over the deaths of two children in Warrington, England. Thousands waited in line to sign a condolence book outside the Post Office, where the Irish rebellion against British power began in 1916. The NYT
Depuis cent ans, l’insurrection républicaine irlandaise donne lieu à diverses interprétations plus ou moins malveillantes : du sacrifice sanglant au putsch raté en passant par une escarmouche inutile. Or, ce soulèvement armé en pleine guerre mondiale, ne prend sa signification que si on l’englobe dans une période révolutionnaire en Irlande (1912 à 1923), et dans la situation internationale d’alors. Bien peu de personnes à l’époque comprirent que les premiers coups de feu qui résonnèrent à Dublin le 24 avril 1916, sonnaient en fait le glas de l’empire britannique.  La presse de l’époque ne note qu’une tentative de sédition ratée, qui plus est, fomentée par l’Allemagne. Or cet événement s’inscrit dans un contexte très ancien. (…) L’aile modérée des Irish Volunteers par la voix du député John Redmond se joignit à l’Union sacrée pour engager les Irlandais aux cotés du gouvernement anglais dans ce qui promettait d’être une guerre pour le  droit des nations à disposer d’elles-mêmes. A l’opposé la minorité des Volunteers influencée par l’I.R.B. refusa ce soutien et les partisans de l’I.C.A. posèrent cette bannière sur le bâtiment de la maison des syndycats : “Nous ne servons ni le Roi, ni le Kaiser mais l’Irlande”.  Tous espéraient alors que “les difficultés de l’Angleterre seraient l’opportunité de l’Irlande” et espéraient tirer avantage de cette situation pour faire avancer la cause nationale irlandaise.  Ils avaient d’autant moins de scrupules que dès la declaration de la guerre et la promesse de Home Rule reportée, la Grande Bretagne incorporait la milice “rebelle” UVF en bloc au sein de l’armée britannique dans la 36e division d’Ulster tandis qu’elle éparpillait les Irish Volunteers dans tous les regiments, et leur interdisait tout signe distinctif. (…) L’agitation contre la conscription obligatoire rencontre un certain écho en Irlande dès 1915. Les même évènements secouèrent la région de Glasgow où son ami républicain socialiste écossais John MacLean militait contre la guerre et la conscription, où dès 1915, le Comité des Travailleurs de la Clyde mèna une agitation sociale et politique, tout semblait alors indiquer qu’il était concevable, dans les conditions présentes, de transformer la guerre impérialiste en révolution nationale et socialiste. C’est bien dans cette optique qu’il mit en place des entrainements militaires conjoints entre l’ICA et les Irish Volunteers, qu’il prit contact avec le conseil militaire de l’IRB au sein duquel il fut coopté en janvier 1916 en vue du soulèvement prévu pour Pâques. Parmi les préparatifs, la mission de Roger Casement, un Irlandais protestant qui avait rejoint la cause républicaine, était d’importance. Bien qu’il n’eût pas réussi à créer une brigade irlandaise parmi ses compatriotes prisonniers dans les camps allemands, il avait réussi à obtenir un considérable chargement d’armes et de munitions pour la rébellion. Mais, alors qu’il rejoignait l’Irlande à bord d’un sous marin allemand il fut capturé le 21 avril. Le bateau convoyant l’armement ayant en vain attendu sa venue dans la baie de Tralee se saborda alors qu’il était encerclé par la marine britannique (en fait ce bateau, selon les ordres de l’IRB, n’aurait du approcher des côtes irlandaises qu’après le début de l’insurrection). Le 22 avril un dirigeant des Irish Volunteers, Eoin MacNeill,  opposé au soulèvement, annule par voix de presse toutes les manœuvres prévues   pour Pâques semant alors la confusion dans les rangs républicains. La date du soulèvement fut néanmoins maintenue et le lundi 24 avril les volontaires et l’ICA réunis désormais au sein de l’Armée Républicaine Irlandaise (I.R.A.) prirent position en divers points de Dublin. La République fut proclamée devant la Grande Poste qui devint le quartier général du gouvernement provisoire tandis que divers détachements prirent position dans une dizaine d’autres points stratégiques. Outre les contre ordres de Mac Neill qui privèrent les insurgés d’au moins 1000 combattants, certains échecs, comme celui qui  entrava la prise de contrôle du « Château » (l’administration centrale britannique)  ou le central téléphonique fragilisèrent dès le départ l’entreprise. Au delà de la capitale hormis Galway, Ashbourne (comté de Meath) et Enniscorthy  il y eut peu de combats significatifs. Mais, un peu partout, les Volontaires se réunirent et se mirent en marche, sans se battre,  y compris dans le Nord. La réaction britannique fut extrêmement violente : l’utilisation de l’artillerie en plein centre de Dublin réduit en champs de ruines visait autant à en finir rapidement qu’à terroriser la population.  Le samedi 29 avril « afin d’arrêter le massacre d’une population sans défense » Patrick Pearse et le gouvernement provisoire se rendirent sans condition et ordonnaient de déposer les armes. En fait, à part le quartier général de la Grande Poste, tous les autres édifices restèrent aux mains de l’IRA. L’exemple des volontaires (tous très jeunes) regroupés au sein du Mendicity Institute et qui bloquèrent l’armée anglaise pendant plus de trois jours, occasionnant de lourds revers aux britanniques, sans pour autant subir de perte équivalente, est un des exemples qui démontre que l’affaire n’avait pas été envisagé à la légère et que l’insurrection avait de réelles capacités militaires. La « semaine sanglante » coûta la vie à 116 soldats britanniques, 16 policiers et 318 « rebelles » ou civiles. Il y eut plus de 2000 blessés dans la population. La répression fut  immédiate. Plus de 3000 hommes et 79 femmes furent arrêtés, 1480 ensuite internés dans des camps en Angleterre et au Pays de Galles. 90 peines de mort furent prononcées, 15 seront exécutées dont les sept signataires de la proclamation d’indépendance. La légende se construisit aussitôt autour des dernières minutes des fusillés (Plunket qui se maria quelques heures avant son exécution, Connolly blessé et fusillé sur une chaise…) le poète Yeats exprimera si bien cet instant où tout bascule : (…) Tout est changé, totalement changé Une terrible beauté est née. Au delà du retournement de l’opinion publique en faveur des insurgés, suite aux représailles, les questionnements ou les anathèmes fleurissent. Si les condamnations des sociaux démocrates englués dans l’Union sacrée ne furent pas une surprise il est intéressant de noter qu’un des commentaires les plus lucides fut écrit en Suisse par Lénine.  Dans un texte célèbre, il note tout ce que la guerre a « révélé du point de vue du mouvement des nations opprimées », il évoque  les mutineries et les révoltes à Singapour, en Annam et au Cameroun qui démontrent « que des foyers d’insurrections nationales, surgies en liaison avec la crise de l’impérialisme, se sont allumés à la fois dans les colonies et en Europe » Il replace donc, fort justement, Pâques 1916 dans le contexte international de « crise de l’impérialisme » dont le conflit mondial est l’illustration éclatante.  Il fustige ceux qui (y compris à gauche) qualifient l’insurrection de « putsch petit bourgeois» comme faisant preuve d’un  « doctrinarisme et d’un pédantisme monstrueux ». Après avoir rappelé « les siècles d’existence » et le caractère « de masse du mouvement national irlandais » il note qu’au coté de la petite bourgeoisie urbaine « un partie des ouvriers » avait participé au combat. « Quiconque qualifie de putsch pareille insurrection est, ou bien le pire des réactionnaires, ou bien un doctrinaire absolument incapable de se représenter la révolution sociale comme un phénomène vivant.  La lutte des nations opprimées en Europe, capable d’en arriver à des insurrections et à des combats de rues, à la violation de la discipline de fer de l’armée et à l’état de siège, « aggravera la crise révolutionnaire en Europe » infiniment plus qu’un soulèvement de bien plus grande envergure dans une colonie lointaine. A force égale, le coup porté au pouvoir de la bourgeoisie impérialiste anglaise par l’insurrection en Irlande a une importance politique cent fois plus grande que s’il avait été porté en Asie ou en Afrique. » Et de conclure que « le malheur des irlandais est qu’ils se sont insurgés dans un moment inopportun, alors que l’insurrection du prolétariat européen n’était pas encore mûre ». (…) En Irlande la mythologie mise en place autour de l’insurrection de Pâques 1916 gomma toute référence au contexte international. Les tenants du « sacrifice consenti pour réveiller la nation » (avec le message sous-jacent que ce n’était plus un exemple à suivre) n’entendaient courir le risque de se hasarder à réveiller la question sociale en parlant d’anti-impérialisme. Au lendemain de la défaite et alors que l’opinion publique prenait fait et cause pour les révolutionnaires exécutés, ce fut le parti Sinn Fein, qui n’avait eut aucune responsabilité dans le soulèvement, qui remporta les élections en 1918 et devient le symbole de la lute pour l ‘indépendance. Dominique Foulon
Though many people do not know it, the reference in the 1916 Proclamation to « gallant allies in Europe » was an acknowledgement of German assistance to the Irish rebels. In making their stand in Easter Week 1916, a number of leading Irish rebels believed that if Germany won World War One then Irish freedom would be guaranteed by the post-war peace conference. Many of the guns used by Irish nationalists during Easter Week 1916 originated in Germany and had been smuggled into Howth in north Dublin and Kilcoole in County Wicklow during the summer of 1914. The guns had been purchased by Erskine Childers, the father of a future President of Ireland, from the Hamburg-based munitions firm of Moritz Magnus der Jungere. The guns were not sophisticated in terms of the advances that had been made in modern weaponry. Many of these guns actually dated from the Franco-Prussian War in 1870-1, but they were still in good working order. From the outbreak of World War One in 1914, advanced Irish nationalists sought direct assistance for their rebellion plans from the Imperial Government in Germany. With the tacit approval of the German Government, Sir Roger Casement had sought to persuade captured Irishmen in the British Army, who were being held in German prisoner of war camps, to join an Irish Brigade and return to Ireland to fight for Irish freedom. In spring 1915, Casement was joined in Berlin by Joseph Mary Plunkett, a poet, a member of the IRB Military Council and subsequently a signatory of the 1916 Proclamation. Casement and Plunkett met with representatives of the German General Staff. Plunkett confided in the German Government that revolutionary plans were afoot in Ireland. Bethmann Hollweg, the German Chancellor, pledged to deliver arms and ammunition for an Irish uprising against British rule. Ultimately, the German Government declined Irish requests to land German troops in Ireland, but they sent a single shipment of arms consisting of 20,000 rifles, 10 machine guns and 1,000,000 rounds of ammunition. The German arms shipment was of suspect quality and mostly comprised of weapons captured from the Russians on the Eastern Front. Nevertheless, this quantity of weaponry would have significantly boosted the chances of the poorly armed Irish rebels if this arms cargo had actually made it safely ashore. Captain Karl Spindler, a native of Königswinter, near Cologne, and an officer of the Imperial German Navy, was entrusted with the secret mission of delivering the arms shipment to Ireland in time for the planned Easter Rebellion in April 1916. On 9th April 1916, Spindler set out from the Baltic port of Lubeck on board a German ship, the Libau, which was disguised as a neutral Norwegian freighter and renamed the Aud. Two days later, Casement set sail for Ireland from Wilhelmshaven, aboard the German submarine U19 with the intention to rendezvous with the Aud in County Kerry. After a difficult journey and having survived a serious storm, the Aud arrived in Tralee Bay on 20th April 1916. However, poor communications and an unexpected car accident, in which Irish Volunteers who were to meet Casement ended up being drowned, meant that no-one was present to meet the German ship. After a long wait in Tralee Bay, Spindler reluctantly turned his ship around to sail away. Unbeknown to him, his movements were being monitored by the British Navy, who had tracked the Aud on its journey. Earlier in the war, British Navy Intelligence had cracked the German codes so the British Navy was aware of the Aud and its cargo almost from the moment it left port. The Aud was intercepted by Bluebell, a British destroyer, and commanded to sail to Queenstown (Cobh). Though captured, Spindler and his colleagues were not prepared to hand their arms cargo over to the British. After a number of failed manoeuvres to escape, the German sailors ultimately scuttled their own ship using pre-set charges of explosives. Meanwhile, Casement, who had landed from the German U-Boat on Banna Strand, was captured on Good Friday, 21st April 1916. When Eoin MacNeill, the head of the Irish Volunteers, learned that Casement had been captured and the German arms were lost, he issued an order countermanding the Rising, which had been planned for Easter Sunday. Ultimately, the Rising would break out the following day, Easter Monday, 1916. Early on Tuesday morning of Easter Week, German battle cruisers, under the command of Rear Admiral Friedrich Bödicker, shelled the English coastal towns of Lowestoft and Yarmouth. Meanwhile, a German zeppelin raid took place on Essex and Kent. The purpose of these German military actions was to try to divert British attention away from Ireland in order to give the rebellion a chance to take hold. The rebellion lasted only six days. It involved not much more than 1,200 rebels and its leaders knew they had little chance of winning against a far superior number of British troops. One of the rebel leaders, James Connolly, admitted to his comrades as fighting commenced that « we are going out to be slaughtered. » (…) In 1966, as part of the official state commemoration to mark the 50th anniversary of the Easter Rising, surviving members of the crew of the Aud and the U19, including Captain Raimund Weisbach, Walter Augustin, Otto Walter, Hans Dunker and Ferderic Schmidt, visited Ireland as distinguished guests of the Irish Government. The retired German sailors travelled to Kerry to witness the laying of the foundation stone of the Casement Memorial at Banna Strand. In 2016, little mention has been made of the role that German naval officers played in the Easter Rising, but their bravery deserves to be remembered. The Munich eye

Attention: un sacrifice peut en cacher un autre !

Pourparlers avec l’Allemagne, tentative de création de brigade de prisonniers irlandais dans les camps allemands, livraison allemande d’armes et de munitions, envoyé nationaliste rapatrié par sous marin allemand, raid de Zeppelins et bombardements navals allemands de diversion sur les côtes britanniques …

En ce Lundi de Pâques et lendemain d’un énième massacre de la religion de paix de ceux qui osent encore célèbrer le sacrifice et la résurrection du Christ …

Et en ce centenaire de l’Insurrection de Pâques et véritable acte de naissance tant de l’indépendance irlandaise que de l’IRA et de ses véritables actes de barbarie dont notamment la mort – avec doubles bombes pour maximiser les pertes entre une pharmacie et un McDonalds le jour de la fête des mères – de deux enfants dans la banlieue de Liverpool en mars 1993 et dénoncée par un fameux tube du groupe The Cranberries …

Qui rappelle que véritable appel à la trahison, après celui dix ans plus tôt de la guerre des Boers qui avait même vu les indépendantistes irlandais prendre contact avec le deuxième bureau français impatient de venger Fachoda, au moment où leurs compatriotes se battaient au coude à coude avec les Anglais sur le sol français …

La « révolution des poètes » qui fit, en ces cinq jours de la Semaine sainte sous prétexte du report – guerre oblige – du statut déjà voté d’autonomie (Home Rule), des centaines de victimes majoritairement civiles …

Ne rencontra en fait sur le moment, entre deux scènes de pillage, que les insultes et les sarcasmes de la population locale …

Et que sans les martyrs que leur fournit juste après la féroce répression des troupes britanniques, n’aurait jamais dépassé le stade de la véritable opération suicide qu’elle était vraiment, saluée d’ailleurs comme il se doit par Lénine lui-même depuis son exil genevois …

Ou plus précisément de l’opération de diversion de ces fameux « courageux alliés en Europe » auquels rend hommage la célèbre Proclamation de la république irlandaise

A savoir, comme le rappelait indirectement la légendaire banderole de la Maison des syndicats de Dublin et sans parler de l’Empire Austro-hongrois ou des Turcs, ceux de l’Allemagne du Kaiser ?

Germany and the Easter Rising
The Munich eye

In Ireland, this Easter hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets to celebrate the centenary of a seminal event that led to Irish independence.

The Easter Rebellion of 1916 dramatically altered the course of Irish history. Immediately prior to this event, Ireland was an integral part of the United Kingdom and only a small minority of its people supported full independence.

The Rising and, more particularly, the heavy-handed and botched British response to the rebellion had a transformative effect. Thousands of Irish people were interned without trial and the main leaders of the Rising were summarily executed. This provoked a rapid sea-change in Irish attitudes.

In the most famous poetic lines written about the rebellion, William Butler Yeats observed « all changed, changed utterly: A terrible beauty is born. » The sacrifice of a small number of Irish separatists in 1916 was the touchstone which set in train a popularly supported national struggle for independence.

On Easter Sunday 2016, as the centre-piece of the largest military parade ever held in Ireland, the President of Ireland, Michael D. Higgins, laid a wreath at the front of Dublin’s General Post Office in memory of those who had fought for Irish freedom one hundred years previously.

The General Post Office was the headquarters of the rebel Irish forces during the Rising and it was at this location that Patrick Pearse read the Proclamation of the Irish Republic.

Though many people do not know it, the reference in the 1916 Proclamation to « gallant allies in Europe » was an acknowledgement of German assistance to the Irish rebels.

In making their stand in Easter Week 1916, a number of leading Irish rebels believed that if Germany won World War One then Irish freedom would be guaranteed by the post-war peace conference.

Many of the guns used by Irish nationalists during Easter Week 1916 originated in Germany and had been smuggled into Howth in north Dublin and Kilcoole in County Wicklow during the summer of 1914. The guns had been purchased by Erskine Childers, the father of a future President of Ireland, from the Hamburg-based munitions firm of Moritz Magnus der Jungere. The guns were not sophisticated in terms of the advances that had been made in modern weaponry. Many of these guns actually dated from the Franco-Prussian War in 1870-1, but they were still in good working order.

From the outbreak of World War One in 1914, advanced Irish nationalists sought direct assistance for their rebellion plans from the Imperial Government in Germany. With the tacit approval of the German Government, Sir Roger Casement had sought to persuade captured Irishmen in the British Army, who were being held in German prisoner of war camps, to join an Irish Brigade and return to Ireland to fight for Irish freedom.

In spring 1915, Casement was joined in Berlin by Joseph Mary Plunkett, a poet, a member of the IRB Military Council and subsequently a signatory of the 1916 Proclamation. Casement and Plunkett met with representatives of the German General Staff. Plunkett confided in the German Government that revolutionary plans were afoot in Ireland. Bethmann Hollweg, the German Chancellor, pledged to deliver arms and ammunition for an Irish uprising against British rule.

Ultimately, the German Government declined Irish requests to land German troops in Ireland, but they sent a single shipment of arms consisting of 20,000 rifles, 10 machine guns and 1,000,000 rounds of ammunition. The German arms shipment was of suspect quality and mostly comprised of weapons captured from the Russians on the Eastern Front. Nevertheless, this quantity of weaponry would have significantly boosted the chances of the poorly armed Irish rebels if this arms cargo had actually made it safely ashore.

Captain Karl Spindler, a native of Königswinter, near Cologne, and an officer of the Imperial German Navy, was entrusted with the secret mission of delivering the arms shipment to Ireland in time for the planned Easter Rebellion in April 1916. On 9th April 1916, Spindler set out from the Baltic port of Lubeck on board a German ship, the Libau, which was disguised as a neutral Norwegian freighter and renamed the Aud. Two days later, Casement set sail for Ireland from Wilhelmshaven, aboard the German submarine U19 with the intention to rendezvous with the Aud in County Kerry.

After a difficult journey and having survived a serious storm, the Aud arrived in Tralee Bay on 20th April 1916. However, poor communications and an unexpected car accident, in which Irish Volunteers who were to meet Casement ended up being drowned, meant that no-one was present to meet the German ship.

After a long wait in Tralee Bay, Spindler reluctantly turned his ship around to sail away. Unbeknown to him, his movements were being monitored by the British Navy, who had tracked the Aud on its journey. Earlier in the war, British Navy Intelligence had cracked the German codes so the British Navy was aware of the Aud and its cargo almost from the moment it left port.

The Aud was intercepted by Bluebell, a British destroyer, and commanded to sail to Queenstown (Cobh). Though captured, Spindler and his colleagues were not prepared to hand their arms cargo over to the British. After a number of failed manoeuvres to escape, the German sailors ultimately scuttled their own ship using pre-set charges of explosives.

Meanwhile, Casement, who had landed from the German U-Boat on Banna Strand, was captured on Good Friday, 21st April 1916. When Eoin MacNeill, the head of the Irish Volunteers, learned that Casement had been captured and the German arms were lost, he issued an order countermanding the Rising, which had been planned for Easter Sunday. Ultimately, the Rising would break out the following day, Easter Monday, 1916.

Early on Tuesday morning of Easter Week, German battle cruisers, under the command of Rear Admiral Friedrich Bödicker, shelled the English coastal towns of Lowestoft and Yarmouth. Meanwhile, a German zeppelin raid took place on Essex and Kent. The purpose of these German military actions was to try to divert British attention away from Ireland in order to give the rebellion a chance to take hold.

The rebellion lasted only six days. It involved not much more than 1,200 rebels and its leaders knew they had little chance of winning against a far superior number of British troops. One of the rebel leaders, James Connolly, admitted to his comrades as fighting commenced that « we are going out to be slaughtered. » Connolly’s fate was to be executed by a British military firing squad, while strapped to a chair and unable to stand because of wounds he had sustained in the Rising.

Sir Roger Casement was hanged in Pentonville Prison, London, in August 1916.

Captain Karl Spindler was interned as a prisoner of war in Donington Hall in Leicestershire. He was released as part of a prisoner exchange towards the end of World War One. He subsequently wrote a best-selling book about his Irish adventure.

In 1931, to mark the 15th anniversary of the Easter Rising, Spindler undertook a lecture tour of the United States. He was enthusiastically greeted by Irish-Americans in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Chicago, Detroit and Boston. Spindler died in Bismark, North Dakota, in 1951.

In 1966, as part of the official state commemoration to mark the 50th anniversary of the Easter Rising, surviving members of the crew of the Aud and the U19, including Captain Raimund Weisbach, Walter Augustin, Otto Walter, Hans Dunker and Ferderic Schmidt, visited Ireland as distinguished guests of the Irish Government. The retired German sailors travelled to Kerry to witness the laying of the foundation stone of the Casement Memorial at Banna Strand.

In 2016, little mention has been made of the role that German naval officers played in the Easter Rising, but their bravery deserves to be remembered.

Voir aussi:

Historical reality of 1916 leaders
Martin Mansergh

The Irish Examiner

July 14, 2014

While the words on the banner hung in front of Liberty Hall (‘We serve neither King nor Kaiser but Ireland’) still resonate a century on, representing the values of a patriotic anti-imperialist neutrality, they mask an historical reality that was a good deal more complex than is generally allowed (Letters, July 4).

While James Connolly regarded the Great War, as it was called then, as barbaric, and would have wished the labour movement across Europe to have refused to participate, he also took the view that the war having started he wished the British Empire to be beaten, and that, if forced to choose between the two, the German Empire was ‘a homogeneous Empire of self-governing peoples’ (Poland, German South-West Africa?) and contained ‘in germ more of the possibilities of freedom and civilisation’.

The reality is that the leaders of 1916 were neither neutral nor anti-imperialist. They were anti-British imperialism. The Proclamation referred to ‘our gallant allies in Europe’, which were principally Imperial Germany and the Austro-Hungarian Empire, which incidentally was Arthur Griffith’s and the early Sinn Féin’s model for Irish independence. Undoubtedly, German support for Irish revolution turned out to be a mirage, apart from the guns landed at Howth and Kilcoole in the summer of 1914, which were a fraction of those landed at Larne for the unionists, but it was enough to facilitate the rising. Even after that, as Michael Collins told the American journalist Hayden Talbot in 1922, in his estimation, the Rising and the subsequent national revival ‘were all inseparable from the thought and hope of a German victory’, on which they were counting to gain a place at the peace table.

Certainly, one can be sceptical about the notion that the First World War was started for the sake of small nations, such as Serbia and Belgium, but the fate of Catholic Belgium was the issue that had greatest impact on recruitment in Ireland in the early months of the war. In terms of war outcomes, four defeated empires collapsed, others were weakened, and about a third of the countries that now make up the European Union directly or indirectly gained their freedom, including Ireland. France, which would have lost the war but for the British Expeditionary Force which included thousands of Irishmen, regained Alsace-Lorraine, taken from them in 1871. The principle of national self-determination enunciated in 1917 by President Woodrow Wilson, however imperfect and difficult to apply, has led in the longer run to close to 200 members of the United Nations.

One can certainly argue that Ireland’s freedom came about not just because of the Rising and the struggle for independence, but also because it fitted into the new international order created by the Allied victory. Most people, and all main political parties, now accept that it is right to commemorate Irishmen who gave their lives in World War I, but perhaps we could accept that their sacrifice also contributed to the freedom we enjoy today, acknowledging that people can serve their country honourably in different ways.

Perhaps, post the Good Friday Agreement, we should welcome the fact that we have been able to move beyond any desire to rekindle conflict on this island or between these islands, and adapt Pearse’s eloquent ideal to read: ‘Ireland at peace shall never be unfree’.

Martin Mansergh

Friarsfield House

Tipperary

Voir également:

Our Gallant Allies?
Pat Walsh

2015-08-02
The Easter Proclamation which Padraig Pearse read from the steps of the GPO at Easter 1916 is the founding document of the Irish Republic. It makes specific reference to “our gallant allies in Europe.” Who else could these “gallant allies” be but the Germans and Turks?

The founding fathers of what was to become the independent Irish State quite deliberately chose to mention “our gallant allies” even in the teeth of British propaganda about the behaviour of these allies. All during 1915 and early 1916 Ireland had been bombarded with this propaganda about the “evil Hun” and “merciless Turk” and yet Pearse chose to associate the emerging Irish Nation with its “gallant allies” in Germany and the Ottoman Empire. It was a quite deliberate decision, presumably in order to prevent the volunteering of Irish cannon-fodder, procured through the British propaganda used by the Redmondite recruiting sergeants.

During 1915 and 1916 Lord Bryce, the Belfast born Liberal, made highly-reported speeches in Parliament and helped document and publicise official reports about German and Ottoman atrocities. The leaders of 1916 not only ignored these but attacked them as British lies against “our gallant allies”.

Sir Roger Casement, Bryce’s former colleague in investigating atrocities in South America, took a very hostile view of Bryce’s war work in his article ‘The Far Extended Baleful Power of the Lie’, published in Continental Times, 3.11.1915. Casement condemned Bryce for selling himself as a hireling propagandist. According to Casement, Lord Bryce, had presided over a government body “directed to one end only”:

“the blackening of the character of those with whom England was at war… given out to  the world of neutral peoples as the pronouncement of an impartial court seeking only to discover and reveal the truth.”

Casement particularly criticised Bryce’s methods of reporting atrocities. He noted that in relation to the reporting of Belgian atrocities in the Congo he had investigated these reports “on the spot at some little pain and danger to myself” whilst Bryce had “inspected with a very long telescope.”

Casement continued with a point that is very relevant to any estimation of the validity of the Blue Book:

“I have investigated more bona fide atrocities at close hand than possibly any other living man. But unlike Lord Bryce, I investigated them on the spot, from the lips of those who had suffered, in the very places where the very crimes were perpetuated, where the evidence could be sifted and the accusation brought by the victim could be rebutted by the accused; and in each case my finding was confirmed by the Courts of Justice of the very States whose citizens I had indicted.”

Casement added: “It is only necessary to turn to James Bryce the historian to convict James Bryce the partisan…”

Casement wrote the above about Bryce’s work on the German atrocities but the criticism stands equally against his companion work directed at the Ottomans. Sir Roger was incapable of commenting directly on the Blue Book since he had been hanged by the British in 1916 as a traitor, for doing in Ireland what Bryce and other British Liberals had supported the Armenian revolutionaries in doing within the Ottoman Empire. Casement had followed through on the principles of small nations on which the war was supposedly being fought by Britain and advertised by Lord Bryce. But Casement was found to be a traitor whilst the Armenians and others who went into insurrection were lauded as patriots in Liberal England. T.P. O’Connor, the Redmondite MP, for instance, appeared on a platform in Westminster during June 1919 with General Andranik , the butcher of thousands of Kurds in eastern Anatolia. (Andranik had led the Armenian forces around Erzerum with General Dro, who later fought for Hitler with a Nazi Armenian Legion)

The present writer made it his business to read a lot of Irish newspapers produced between 1900 and 1924 in order to understand the development of Redmondism and the Republican counter-attack against it. What was found was much anti-Turkish propaganda produced by Redmondism and much pro-Turkish sentiment generated in opposition by Irish Republicans. In the book Britain’s Great War on Turkey – an Irish perspective what was found was republished in extensive extracts to demonstrate that Irish Republicans, and particularly Anti-Treaty ones, were fully behind Mustapha Kemal Ataturk and his war of liberation against the British, French, and Italian Imperialists and their Greek and Armenian catspaws.

In the Redmondite hold-out of West Belfast there was continued credence given to British war-propaganda about the massacres of Armenians and Greeks. The Irish News and other Devlinite publications continued to keep the Imperial faith to get Irishmen into British uniform as the rest of Ireland sloughed it off and broke free of the British sphere of influence. But then, even the Irish News, under pressure of what was done to the Northern Catholics who had kept the faith with Joe Devlin and Britain until the end, began to have second thoughts, when they were awarded ‘Northern Ireland’ as their reward for loyalty.

In October 1922 the Irish Independent published a British account of alleged Turkish atrocities in Smyrna (now Ismir). It was immediately attacked by Sinn Fein.

The context of the Sinn Fein counter-attack (reproduced below) on behalf of the Turks was the Greek evacuation of Anatolia after the defeat of their invading army, which had been encouraged by Lloyd George to enforce the Treaty of Sevres on the Turks. Smyrna was burnt and many died.

The reply to the British allegations comes from O. Grattan Esmonde, Sinn Fein’s most famous diplomat who had held the record for being expelled from more countries in the world than any one else (by the British, who held these countries at the time.) Esmonde was the son of Sir Thomas Esmonde who had briefly left the Irish Party in 1906 to stand for Griiffith’s Sinn Fein. The son went with the Treatyites in the Treaty split and was later elected in 1923 as a Cumann na nGaedheal TD for Wexford and was returned in the 1927 election. He was re-elected at the 1932 and 1933 elections.

In the statement he dismisses allegations that the Turks had massacred Greeks and Armenians as British propaganda and puts the Irish Republican forces and Mustafa Kemal (Ataturk) forces together as brothers in arms, fighting British Imperialism:

“I cannot refrain from expressing my astonishment at your leading-article of to-day, and the prominence you are giving to virulent English propaganda directed against the Turkish army, who are on the point of freeing their native land from the invader… We, who have suffered more than any other nation in the world from English propaganda, have no right to accept it when directed against another nation which for four years has been fighting for its life, and whose leaders have in public and in private expressed their sympathy and admiration for Ireland. I notice to-day that the Armenian Archbishop, who was massacred last week, has turned up safely in Greece. The same fate awaits at least ninety-per cent of the 120,000 Christians, slaughtered by Reuter’s news-agency this morning! It is more than probable that at least three zeros have been added inadvertently to the correct number of the victims… The new Turkish army and the Turkish National leaders are clean fighters, and the same type of men as those who have carried through the evolution in this country.” (O. Grattan Esmonde, Sinn Fein diplomat writing to the Irish Independent, from the Catholic Bulletin October 1922)

The political and military assault launched by Britain on neutral Greece and the devastating effect this ultimately had on the Greek people across the Balkans and Asia Minor is almost completely forgotten about these days. The Greek King Constantine and his government tried to remain neutral in the World War but Britain was determined to enlist as many neutrals as possible in their Great War. So they made offers to the Greek Prime Minister, Venizélos, of territory in Anatolia which he found to hard to resist.

The Greek King, however, under the constitution had the final say on matters of war and he attempted to defend his neutrality policy against the British. Constantine was then deposed by the actions of the British Army at Salonika, through a starvation blockade by the Royal Navy and a seizure of the harvest by Allied troops. This had the result of a widespread famine in the neutral nation – and this under the guise of ‘the war for small nations!’

With the Royal Navy’s guns trained on Athens the King was forced to abdicate with a gun to his head.

These events led to the Greek tragedy in Anatolia because the puppet government under Venizélos, installed in Athens through Allied bayonets, was enlisted as a catspaw to bring the Turks to heal after the Armistice at Mudros. This was because Lloyd George had demobilised his army before he could impose the punitive Treaty of Sevres on the Turks. Britain was also highly in debt to the U.S. after its Great War on Germany and the Ottomans had proved so costly. So others were needed to enforce the partition of Turkey whilst England concentrated on absorbing Palestine and Mesopotamia/Iraq into the Empire.

The Greeks were presented with the town of Smyrna first and then, encouraged by Lloyd George, advanced across Anatolia toward where the Turkish democracy had re-established itself, at Ankara, after it had been suppressed in Constantinople. Ataturk had seen that Constantinople was open to the guns of the Royal Navy, as Athens was and he established a new capital inland in a small town.

Britain was using the Greeks and their desire for a new Byzantium (the Megali or Big Idea) in Anatolia to get Ataturk and the Turkish national forces to submit to the Treaty of Sèvres, and the destruction of not only the Ottoman State but Turkey itself.

But the Greek Army perished on the burning sands of Anatolia after being skillfully maneuvered into a position by Ataturk in which their lines were stretched. And the two or three thousand year old Greek population of Asia Minor fled on boats from Smyrna, with the remnants of their Army after Britain had withdrawn its support, because the Greek democracy had reasserted its will to have back its King.

Esmonde’s statement on behalf of Sinn Fein is interesting in referring to the links between the Irish Independence movement and its gallant ally, Turkey.

There was an early contact between the independent Irish Parliament (the Dáil) and the Grand National Assembly of Turkey, established by Mustafa Kemal at Ankara. This contact was made through the Dáil’s ‘Message to the Free Nations of the World’ delivered to the revolutionary Grand National Assembly at Ankara, on a date following 10 August 1921. The Dáil, in its first act of foreign affairs, sent out this message to the other free nations of the world (including Turkey) declaring the existence of an independent Irish Government. It was read out, in Irish, to the Dáil by J.J.O’Kelly, the editor of The Catholic Bulletin in January 1919.

The Catholic Bulletin which published Esmonde’s letter and which was run by De Valera’s teacher and friend, Fr. Timothy Corcoran, drew attention to the many parallels between the experience of Ireland and Turkey between 1919 and 1923. Turkey had agreed to an armistice (ceasefire) at Mudros in October 1918. But that armistice was turned into a surrender when British and French Imperial forces entered Constantinople and occupied it soon after. Turkey found its parliament closed down and its representatives arrested or forced ‘on the run’, at the same time as England meted out similar treatment to the Irish democracy. Then a punitive treaty (The Treaty of Sevres, August 1920) was imposed on the Turks at the point of a gun, sharing out the Ottoman possessions amongst the Entente Powers. Along with that, Turkey itself was partitioned into spheres of influence, with the Greek Army being used to enforce the settlement in Anatolia, in exchange for its irredentist claims in Asia Minor.

The Turks, under the skillful leadership of Mustapha Kemal (Ataturk), decided not to lie down and resisted the imposed Treaty of Sevres. The Greek catspaw was pushed out of Turkey and their Imperialist sponsors forced back to the conference table at Lausanne, after the British humiliation at Chanak.

In February 1923, at the conference in Lausanne, the Turkish delegation refused to be brow-beaten by Lord Curzon and his tactics, reminiscent of the Anglo-Irish negotiations, when the Irish plenipotentiaries were strong-armed into signing a dictat under the threat of “immediate and terrible war.” The Turks stonewalled. When Curzon told the Turks that “the train was waiting at the station,” and it was a case of take it or leave it, the Turks left the offer and Curzon left on his train, never to return. Terms much more advantageous to the Turks were signed by Sir Horace Rumbold six months later, and the Turkish Republic came into being – a free and independent state.

At the Lausanne negotiations the Turks, when confronted with the accusation that they had massacred Christians, replied “what about the Irish, you British hypocrites!” The British from there found their moral card was trumped and discarded it, getting down to the real business. They had no care for the destruction of the centuries old Christian communities that their War on the Ottoman Empire had produced. They saw that Turkey had emerged under a strong leader and they were prepared to do business, as England always was.

The Catholic Bulletin publicised Atatürk’s great achievement in defeating the British Empire and saw it as an inspiration to other countries in the world resisting the great powers. It was particularly impressed with the Turkish negotiating skill at Lausanne and contrasted it to the Irish failure in negotiating with the British in the Anglo-Irish treaty of 1921 that had left the country part of the British Empire. The Turks had successfully achieved independence and ‘The Catholic Bulletin’ described Ataturk as the ‘man of the year’ and one of the few causes for optimism in the world.

Sinn Fein in 1920 were in no doubt that what is now called “the Armenian Genocide” by new Sinn Fein was a construction of British propaganda. Esmonde’s statement was issued a number of years after the Bryce Report of 1916 which was the centrepiece of this. But new Sinn Fein seems to have departed the traditional Republican position. An article in An Phoblacht in April 2015 calling for the “Armenian Genocide” to be recognised did not even mention Britain! That really must be a first for Sinn Fein – not blaming Britain!

There are, in fact no judicial or historical grounds for what is termed the “Armenian Genocide”. It is merely an emotional assertion. No International Court has ever found for such a thing and historians are extremely divided over the issue. It is mindlessly repeated that “most historians” agree on the “Genocide” label being applied. But when has this assertion ever been quantified? And if such an exercise is ever completed how meaningless it will be. This “majority” is, if it actually exists, made up of those from the Anglosphere, predominantly from the Armenian diaspora, and some career-minded Westerners, with a few guilty Turks thrown in (the Roy Fosters and Trinity College Workshops of Turkey, like Taner Aksam). The vast majority of historians are actually “denialists” (on the terms of the lobby) because they do not use the word.

The campaign for recognition of an “Armenian Genocide” is, in fact, a political one, begun quite lately. It is an attempt to muster legislators together to pronounce on a historical and legal issue when they have no competence to do so.

If “Genocide” is just a question of the deaths of a large numbers of people then it is hard to explain why new Sinn Fein is not pursuing the Irish Famine (for which the Ottoman Sultan provided the only international assistance) as an international case against the British Government, or indeed the Cromwellian settlement? One of the leading judicial advocates of an “Armenian Genocide” the famous Mr. Geoffrey Robertson QC has written a book on his great hero, John Cooke – who was he may not realise, Cromwell’s judicial legitimiser of what he did in Ireland!

A new Sinn Fein spokesman says: “If we do not accept what happened in the past we cannot learn from the mistakes and move on. Collectively we must ensure that we oppose the manipulation of history…”

What manipulation of history, one might ask? Surely that is what is being suggested in demanding that a word that didn’t exist in legal form at the time of an event be applied retrospectively to events within a complex historical context by people who do not have competence to make such judgments.

Sinn Fein in 1920 knew that the Turks were no dupes of Imperialism. The Turks know the danger of pleading guilty to such a charge with regard to their self-respect and standing in the world. They are battle-hardened, having engaged in a monumental fight for survival between 1914 and 1922 that not only created their nation, but also ensured its very existence. They were invaded by all the Imperialist powers, with only the Bolsheviks as allies, and with Greek and Armenian armies massacring within their territory.

The new Sinn Fein has done a marvellous job of resurgence on behalf of the Northern Catholics, improving the community’s standing and self-respect to a position nobody would have thought possible in 1969. The present writer will always recognise the achievement of that transformation, having lived through it.

But West Belfast was the storm-centre of Redmondite Hibernianism in the days of Joe Devlin, the most Imperial part of Ireland by a long chalk. And it was saturated with British War propaganda. When a famous pamphlet was produced to highlight the plight of Belfast Catholics in the new construction of ‘Northern Ireland’ Fr. Hassan of St. Mary’s compared the Unionists to Turks and the Catholics to Armenians.

Sinn Fein participation in Great War Remembrance can be justified as part of the necessary reconciliation of the Unionist community that the Peace strategy involves. But perhaps it has been forgotten what the bits of the “Foggy Dew” about “Suvla Side and Sud-el-bar” were supposed to teach about being an Irish Republican!

The new Sinn Fein has been a product, to a very great extent, of the unusual events of half a century ago in the Six Counties. 1969 was Year Zero. That, and the subsequent war and its transition to a peace settlement against substantial and multi-layered opposition, has given it a tremendous ability within the confines of the political situation it operates. It achieved out of brilliant improvisation, drawing from its experience of life in the Six Counties as its stock of knowledge. And it really had to imagine it was something it really wasn’t to carry through its war to a functional peace settlement. And in such a situation too much thinking about its past may have actually proved detrimental to the carving out of a different future.

But that is no longer enough, if greater things are to be done.

Sinn Fein has now made itself a competitor for state power in the 26 Counties. That brings upon it different responsibilities. If it attains that power will it be able to exercise it with reference to the traditional Republican position? Will it be able to exercise the responsibility that this entails, which goes far beyond sloganeering and politicking?

If Sinn Fein persists with its belief in an “Armenian Genocide” surely it should delete the offending phrase in the Proclamation of 1916, or perhaps change it from “our gallant allies” to “our genocidal allies”. That would be logical. But it would be very problematic for next years centenary commemoration.

Voir encore:

Au delà du mythe : l’insurrection irlandaise de Pâques 1916
Dominique Foulon

Mediapart

20 mars 2016

Depuis cent ans, l’insurrection républicaine irlandaise donne lieu à diverses interprétations plus ou moins malveillantes : du sacrifice sanglant au putsch raté en passant par une escarmouche inutile. Or, ce soulèvement armé en pleine guerre mondiale, ne prend sa signification que si on l’englobe dans une période révolutionnaire en Irlande (1912 à 1923), et dans la situation internationale d’alors.

Bien peu de personnes à l’époque comprirent que les premiers coups de feu qui résonnèrent à Dublin le 24 avril 1916, sonnaient en fait le glas de l’empire britannique.  La presse de l’époque ne note qu’une tentative de sédition ratée, qui plus est, fomentée par l’Allemagne. Or cet événement s’inscrit dans un contexte très ancien.

Un pays colonisé

Depuis plusieurs siècles, l’Irlande sauvagement conquise et colonisée par son voisin anglais tente de retrouver son indépendance. Soulèvements armés et luttes politiques alternent selon les époques, sans plus de succès l’un que l’autre.  Si depuis 1798 (1) et tout au long du 19e siècle, le recours régulier à la lutte armée échoue, la lutte parlementaire des députés irlandais à Westminster aboutit à un projet d’autonomie interne dans le cadre du Royaume Uni : le Home Rule. En effet, l’obstruction systématique du parlement de Westminster par les députés irlandais, sous la direction de Charles Parnell,  poussa le premier ministre libéral Gladstone à adhérer à ce vieux projet d’Isaac Butt. Celui-ci un conservateur protestant, s’était rallié à l’idée qu’un parlement irlandais était la meilleur solution pour régler au mieux les affaires domestiques irlandaises.(2)  Ce projet fut violemment combattu par les Conservateurs et une partie du Parti libéral, qui en recevant le soutien de l’Ulster Loyalist Anti Repeal Union leur donna l’idée de jouer la carte orangiste, c’est à dire se servir du loyalisme nord irlandais pour contrer leur adversaires.

En effet, la conquête de l’Irlande avait conduit à un développement différencié dans la province d’Ulster.

Dans la plus grande partie de l’île, une fois la conquête finie, la plupart des terres furent acquises par des aventuriers qui n’en attendaient qu’un profit immédiat, pressurant la paysannerie autant que possible, et la laissant dans un état de misère noire tant de fois décrite par tous les voyageurs au XIXe siècle.  L’Ulster fut la dernière partie de l’île à être (durement) conquise. Pour s’assurer de sa pacification définitive, la couronne anglaise eut recours à l’établissement de plantations. Sur les terres d’où avaient été expulsés les Irlandais, des fermiers  anglais ou écossais s’établissaient en colonies de peuplement afin de consolider la conquête et éviter toute nouvelle insurrection dans cette région. Or les propriétaires terriens ne pouvaient soumettre cette nouvelle paysannerie à une exploitation identique à celles des indigènes du Sud sous peine de voir le projet colonial échouer. Des garanties et des avantages octroyés aux fermiers connus comme « la coutume d’Ulster » permit une relative prospérité et le développement d’activités annexes comme la culture et le tissage du lin. Cela servit de base à la fin des guerres napoléoniennes, à l’industrie du lin qui connut une immense prospérité. Belfast avec ses dizaines d’immenses filatures, était connue comme la Linenopolis de l’Irlande.   La ville connut aussi un   essor industriel fantastique à partir de 1850 avec la création de chantiers navals et des industries annexes. Un développement unique en Irlande qui était le prolongement des  grands centres industriels d’Angleterre et d’Ecosse, parfaitement intégré au marché britannique.

Dans le reste de l’Irlande les industries naissantes se trouvaient en concurrence avec celles de Grande Bretagne, et donc envisageaient l’autonomie dans le cadre de l’Empire  ( Home Rule) comme un moyen de se protéger par le biais de taxes diverses d’importation.

Une révolte conservatrice

Au delà des aspects économiques, la physionomie politique irlandaise était toujours tributaire de la colonisation, bien que cette dernière fut déjà ancienne. Dans le Nord-Est de l’île, les opposants au Home Rule surent profiter de l’existence d’un courant fondamentaliste protestant et conservateur dont l’Ordre d’Orange (3)  était l’expression publique la plus achevée, pour mobiliser le « peuple protestant », ceux dont les ancêtres avaient colonisé la région. En comparant le Home Rule au Rome Rule c’est à dire en utilisant la peur de perdre les libertés religieuses dans un état catholique, en amalgamant l’appartenance religieuse au débat politique, ils réussirent à entretenir et développer le sectarisme religieux et communautaire.  Bien qu’il ne manquât pas de voix dissonantes en son sein pour contester l’hégémonie unioniste, cette dernière réussit à créer un mouvement de masse qui ne cessa de grandir au fil des temps. Le premier projet de Home Rule datait de 1886, le second de 1893, et en 1912 le troisième projet, bien que repoussé par la chambre des Lords, était simplement retardé de deux ans, le veto de cette institution monarchique n’étant plus absolu. L’imminence du « danger » conduisit les tenants de l’Union à d’immenses rassemblements et à organiser de véritables milices armées pour s’opposer au Home Rule. L ‘Ulster Volunteers Force regroupa 100 000 hommes et femmes bénéficiant, à partir de 1914, d’un armement moderne en provenance d’Allemagne. Outre le soutien des Tories anglais, cette sédition reçue aussi celui de la caste des officiers britanniques en Irlande, qui menacèrent de démissionner en masse plutôt que de devoir marcher contre l’UVF si on le leur demandait.

Le réveil républicain

Ces évènements eurent forcément un retentissement dans le reste du pays. Les nationalistes formèrent en réponse au grand jour, en 1913, une autre milice : les Irish Volunteers. Créée au départ sur l’initiative de l‘IRB (4), les constitutionalistes du Parti Irlandais adhérèrent en masse à cette organisation qu’ils contrôlèrent ensuite largement. Toutefois, contrairement à l’UVF, ils ne bénéficièrent pas de la mansuétude de certains militaires en juillet 1914, pour recevoir leur armement,  lui aussi en provenance d’Allemagne. A cela vint se joindre l’Irish Citizen Army du syndicaliste révolutionnaire James Connolly, formée depuis peu à partir des groupes d’auto-défense ouvrier qui  avaient été créés lors de la grande grève de Dublin en 1913 pour faire face aux attaques policières et à celles des jaunes.

Cette grève de 6 mois (et le lock-out qui suivit) avait été soutenue par une partie de l’intelligentsia dublinoise : Patrick Pearse, chantre du renouveau celtique, la comtesse  Markievicz, militante suffragette socialiste, fondatrice des Na Fianna Éireann (scouts nationalistes irlandais)  ainsi que le poète Yeats. La question sociale, malgré la défaite de la grève, s’invitait aux cotés de la question nationale sur la scène politique. Cet épisode permit aussi de constater qu’une partie du mouvement nationaliste (le Sinn Fein d’Arthur Griffith en particulier) était hostile au mouvement ouvrier.

Dès 1913, les Unionistes proposèrent que la province d’Ulster soit tenue à l’écart du Home Rule : refus des nationalistes et du gouvernement britannique. En mai 1914, le gouvernement proposa que la province soit pour une durée de 6 ans, autorisée à rester en dehors : refus des unionistes. La situation semblait bloquée et la guerre civile imminente. Le 4 août la Grande Bretagne déclarait la guerre à l’Allemagne. Le 18 septembre le gouvernement instaurait le Home Rule en Irlande, mais suspendait son application à la fin des hostilités.

Première guerre mondiale

L’aile modérée des Irish Volunteers par la voix du député John Redmond se joignit à l’Union sacrée pour engager les Irlandais aux cotés du gouvernement anglais dans ce qui promettait d’être une guerre pour le  droit des nations à disposer d’elles-mêmes. A l’opposé la minorité des Volunteers influencée par l’I.R.B. refusa ce soutien et les partisans de l’I.C.A. posèrent cette bannière sur le bâtiment de la maison des syndycats : “Nous ne servons ni le Roi, ni le Kaiser mais l’Irlande”.  Tous espéraient alors que “les difficultés de l’Angleterre seraient l’opportunité de l’Irlande” et espéraient tirer avantage de cette situation pour faire avancer la cause nationale irlandaise.  Ils avaient d’autant moins de scrupules que dès la declaration de la guerre et la promesse de Home Rule reportée, la Grande Bretagne incorporait la milice “rebelle” UVF en bloc au sein de l’armée britannique dans la 36e division d’Ulster. (5) tandis qu’elle éparpillait les Irish Volunteers dans tous les regiments, et leur interdisait tout signe distinctif.  Quant à Edward Carson qui avait pris la tête de la sédition unioniste, qui n’avait pas hésité à rechercher le soutien de l’Allemagne et poussé l’Irlande au bord de la guerre civile, il était nommé en 1915 Attorney général de l’Angleterre, avant de rejoindre le cabinet de guerre comme premier Lord de l’Amirauté.

Pour James Connolly, la partition prévisible de l’Irlande ne pouvait amener que deux regimes conservateurs dans chaque partie de l’île, et compromettre alors toute avancée sociale dans l’ensemble du pays. C’est autant en militant internationaliste que nationaliste qu’il envisagea alors une insurrection. L’agitation contre la conscription obligatoire rencontre un certain écho en Irlande dès 1915. Les même évènements secouèrent la région de Glasgow où son ami républicain socialiste écossais John MacLean militait contre la guerre et la conscription, où dès 1915, le Comité des Travailleurs de la Clyde mèna une agitation sociale et politique, tout semblait alors indiquer qu’il était concevable, dans les conditions présentes, de transformer la guerre impérialiste en révolution nationale et socialiste. C’est bien dans cette optique qu’il mit en place des entrainements militaires conjoints entre l’ICA et les Irish Volunteers, qu’il prit contact avec le conseil militaire de l’IRB au sein duquel il fut coopté en janvier 1916 en vue du soulèvement prévu pour Pâques.

Vers l’insurrection

Parmi les préparatifs, la mission de Roger Casement, un Irlandais protestant qui avait rejoint la cause républicaine, était d’importance. Bien qu’il n’eût pas réussi à créer une brigade irlandaise parmi ses compatriotes prisonniers dans les camps allemands, il avait réussi à obtenir un considérable chargement d’armes et de munitions pour la rébellion. Mais, alors qu’il rejoignait l’Irlande à bord d’un sous marin allemand il fut capturé le 21 avril. Le bateau convoyant l’armement ayant en vain attendu sa venue dans la baie de Tralee se saborda alors qu’il était encerclé par la marine britannique (en fait ce bateau, selon les ordres de l’IRB, n’aurait du approcher des côtes irlandaises qu’après le début de l’insurrection). Le 22 avril un dirigeant des Irish Volunteers, Eoin MacNeill,  opposé au soulèvement, annule par voix de presse toutes les manœuvres prévues   pour Pâques semant alors la confusion dans les rangs républicains. La date du soulèvement fut néanmoins maintenue et le lundi 24 avril les volontaires et l’ICA réunis désormais au sein de l’Armée Républicaine Irlandaise (I.R.A.) prirent position en divers points de Dublin. La République fut proclamée devant la Grande Poste qui devint le quartier général du gouvernement provisoire tandis que divers détachements prirent position dans une dizaine d’autres points stratégiques. Outre les contre ordres de Mac Neill qui privèrent les insurgés d’au moins 1000 combattants, certains échecs, comme celui qui  entrava la prise de contrôle du « Château » (l’administration centrale britannique)  ou le central téléphonique fragilisèrent dès le départ l’entreprise. Au delà de la capitale hormis Galway, Ashbourne (comté de Meath) et Enniscorthy  il y eut peu de combats significatifs. Mais, un peu partout, les Volontaires se réunirent et se mirent en marche, sans se battre,  y compris dans le Nord. La réaction britannique fut extrêmement violente : l’utilisation de l’artillerie en plein centre de Dublin réduit en champs de ruines visait autant à en finir rapidement qu’à terroriser la population.  Le samedi 29 avril « afin d’arrêter le massacre d’une population sans défense » Patrick Pearse et le gouvernement provisoire se rendirent sans condition et ordonnaient de déposer les armes. En fait, à part le quartier général de la Grande Poste, tous les autres édifices restèrent aux mains de l’IRA. L’exemple des volontaires (tous très jeunes) regroupés au sein du Mendicity Institute et qui bloquèrent l’armée anglaise pendant plus de trois jours, occasionnant de lourds revers aux britanniques, sans pour autant subir de perte équivalente, est un des exemples qui démontre que l’affaire n’avait pas été envisagé à la légère et que l’insurrection avait de réelles capacités militaires. La « semaine sanglante » coûta la vie à 116 soldats britanniques, 16 policiers et 318 « rebelles » ou civiles. Il y eut plus de 2000 blessés dans la population.

La répression fut  immédiate. Plus de 3000 hommes et 79 femmes furent arrêtés, 1480 ensuite internés dans des camps en Angleterre et au Pays de Galles. 90 peines de mort furent prononcées, 15 seront exécutées dont les sept signataires de la proclamation d’indépendance. La légende se construisit aussitôt autour des dernières minutes des fusillés (Plunket qui se maria quelques heures avant son exécution, Connolly blessé et fusillé sur une chaise…) le poète Yeats exprimera si bien cet instant où tout bascule :

Je l’écris en faisant rimer

Les noms de

Mac Donagh et Mac bride

Et Connolly et Pearse

Maintenant et dans les jours à venir

Partout où le vert sera arboré

Tout est changé, totalement changé

Une terrible beauté est née (6)

Quelle analyse de l’insurrection ?

Au delà du retournement de l’opinion publique en faveur des insurgés, suite aux représailles, les questionnements ou les anathèmes fleurissent. Si les condamnations des sociaux démocrates englués dans l’Union sacrée ne furent pas une surprise il est intéressant de noter qu’un des commentaires les plus lucides fut écrit en Suisse par Lénine.  Dans un texte célèbre, il note tout ce que la guerre a « révélé du point de vue du mouvement des nations opprimées », il évoque  les mutineries et les révoltes à Singapour, en Annam et au Cameroun qui démontrent « que des foyers d’insurrections nationales, surgies en liaison avec la crise de l’impérialisme, se sont allumés à la fois dans les colonies et en Europe » Il replace donc, fort justement, Pâques 1916 dans le contexte international de « crise de l’impérialisme » dont le conflit mondial est l’illustration éclatante.  Il fustige ceux qui (y compris à gauche) qualifient l’insurrection de « putsch petit bourgeois» comme faisant preuve d’un  « doctrinarisme et d’un pédantisme monstrueux ». Après avoir rappelé « les siècles d’existence » et le caractère « de masse du mouvement national irlandais » il note qu’au coté de la petite bourgeoisie urbaine « un partie des ouvriers » avait participé au combat. « Quiconque qualifie de putsch pareille insurrection est, ou bien le pire des réactionnaires, ou bien un doctrinaire absolument incapable de se représenter la révolution sociale comme un phénomène vivant.  La lutte des nations opprimées en Europe, capable d’en arriver à des insurrections et à des combats de rues, à la violation de la discipline de fer de l’armée et à l’état de siège, « aggravera la crise révolutionnaire en Europe » infiniment plus qu’un soulèvement de bien plus grande envergure dans une colonie lointaine. A force égale, le coup porté au pouvoir de la bourgeoisie impérialiste anglaise par l’insurrection en Irlande a une importance politique cent fois plus grande que s’il avait été porté en Asie ou en Afrique. » Et de conclure que « le malheur des irlandais est qu’ils se sont insurgés dans un moment inopportun, alors que l’insurrection du prolétariat européen n’était pas encore mûre ». (7) Il ne s’agit pas de citer Lénine comme un oracle, mais de noter que dans son analyse, à chaud, il situe  clairement la rébellion irlandaise comme une « lutte anti-impérialiste » du point de vue de la lutte des classes internationale et de la révolution mondiale. Il n’est pas inutile de rappeler, qu’à l’époque, il finit la rédaction de « L’impérialisme, stade suprême du capitalisme ».

C’est ce qui sera à nouveau souligné lors du second congrès de la 3e internationale en juillet/août 1920, où la question irlandaise fut discutée dans le cadre de la question coloniale et des mouvements d’émancipation des pays opprimés (en présence de deux irlandais dont Roddy Connolly le fils de James Connolly).(8)

En Irlande la mythologie mise en place autour de l’insurrection de Pâques 1916 gomma toute référence au contexte international. Les tenants du « sacrifice consenti pour réveiller la nation » (avec le message sous-jacent que ce n’était plus un exemple à suivre) n’entendaient courir le risque de se hasarder à réveiller la question sociale en parlant d’anti-impérialisme. Au lendemain de la défaite et alors que l’opinion publique prenait fait et cause pour les révolutionnaires exécutés, ce fut le parti Sinn Fein, qui n’avait eut aucune responsabilité dans le soulèvement, qui remporta les élections en 1918 et devient le symbole de la lute pour l ‘indépendance. Le parti parlementaire irlandais, déconsidéré, ne joua plus de rôle important dans le nouveau processus politique qui s’amorçait. Toutefois sa capacité de nuisance se révéla redoutable, quelques années plus tard, quand plusieurs de ses membres rejoignirent les partisans de la partition du pays et appuyèrent leur démarche contre-révolutionnaire.

Il a été aussi beaucoup question de la mauvaise stratégie militaire des insurgés. Le fait de maintenir l’insurrection malgré les évènements contraires, reposait sur le fait que les autorités britanniques au courant des préparatifs auraient, de toute façon procédé, à une répression massive. Car initier une rébellion, en temps de guerre, avec le soutien et la coopération de l’ennemi ne laissait que peu de chances aux promoteurs du projet. La prise de différents points stratégiques dans la ville ainsi que des principales routes et les tenir se concevait dans le dessein d’attendre les colonnes d’insurgés censées converger vers Dublin. Il fallut l’envoi de 20 000 soldats pour mater la rébellion et la férocité des combats avec l’usage intensif de l’artillerie dans le centre très peuplé de la capitale indique à la fois un mépris colonial pour les indigènes en révolte et la volonté d’en finir au plus vite dans la crainte que la rébellion ne s’étende. Quoiqu’il en fut, certains historiens indiquent que « cette aventure » fut « la plus sérieuse brèche dans les remparts de l’empire britannique depuis la défaite de Yorktown en 1781 » face aux insurgés américains. (9)

(1)          En 1798 la création du mouvement des Irlandais Unis influencé par la Révolution française de 1789 tente un soulèvement armé avec l’appui (tardif) du gouvernement français. Créé, en particulier par des Presbytériens, ce mouvement est à la base du   républicanisme irlandais.

(2)          (2) Le parlement irlandais avait été aboli en 1800 et suivit de l’Acte d’Union (entre la Grande Bretagne et l’Irlande.)

(3)          Confrérie politico-religieuse à caractère maçonnique dont la profession de foi se base sur la défense de la religion réformée, le souvenir de la Glorieuse Révolution de 1689 et le maintien de l’Irlande du Nord au sein du Royaume Uni. Son nom est en référence au roi Guillaume d’Orange vainqueur du roi catholique Jacques II en1690.

(4)          Irish Republican Brotherhood : Fraternité Irlandaise Républicaine, société secrète nationaliste et révolutonnaire, héritière du mouvement Fénian du 19e siècle

(5)          La 36e division d’Ulster sera massacrée lors de la bataille de la Somme en juillet 1916

(6)          Il existe plusieurs versions de la traduction du poème de Yeats « A terrible beauty »

(7)          Le texte de Lénine publié en juillet 1916 se trouve sur le site http://www.marxists.org

(8)          Les cahiers du Cermtri n° 127 Irlande : le mouvement national, le mouvement ouvrier et l’Internationale communiste 1913-1941

(9)          P. Brandon cité par Kieran Allen : The 1916  rising : myth. And reality in   Irish marxist review vol 4 number 17

Sources :

Irish marxist review vol 4 number 17,  2015 (téléchargeable en ligne)

James Connolly de Roger Faligot Édition Terre de Brume,  1997

Pour Dieu et l’Ulster : Histoire des Protestants d’Irlande du Nord

de Dominique FoulonÉdition Terre de Brume 1997

Voir aussi:

100 Years of ‘Easter 1916’

Malcolm Jones

The Daily Beast

03.27.16

A century ago, Irish rebels set out on the long road to independence with a fumbled armed insurrection against the occupying British. It took a poet to explain it all.
The Easter Rising, the 1916 armed insurrection that hindsight tells us was the opening act in the successful Irish fight for independence from Great Britain, was by almost any measure a catastrophe.

It did not, at the time, look like the beginning of anything. The conspirators who planned it did not plan well, nor did what plans they laid turn out the way they hoped. Hundreds of people died needlessly.

It would have been almost impossible at the time to predict that the Easter Rising was a turning point in Irish history, that the events of that bloody week would set in motion a chain of events that would ultimately result in Ireland’s independence. Historians and partisans still argue over the efficacy of the revolt and its execution. But Ireland being Ireland, a land that bred some of the finest writing of the last century, it is not surprising that the finest summation of that event comes from a poet, William Butler Yeats, whose ambivalent and mysterious “Easter, 1916” is not only one of the most powerful poems ever written but a splendid snapshot of his nation’s confusion over what had transpired in the revolt and the concurrent understanding that something momentous, a profound game change, had just happened.

When the six-day revolt was over, smothered by fierce British retaliation that left more than 400 people dead—most of them civilians—as well as thousands wounded and the city of Dublin shelled and burned, every aspect of the revolt bore the stench of failure.

A lot of that failure was the fault of the conspirators. They failed to capture key positions in the city of Dublin, including city hall and the docks and railway stations. So when the British sent troops to quell the revolt, they had little trouble entering Dublin, where most of the fighting took place. For that matter, confusion was general all over Ireland.

Worse, the conspirators failed to warn their countrymen about what was happening, so that once the fighting started, some of the fiercest opposition came from the Irish themselves, and not only from the six, largely Protestant counties in the North that would eventually make up what is now Northern Ireland. Many Dubliners, for instance, were confused and baffled by the revolt in their streets, and either actively opposed the insurrectionists or simply refused to help them.

Things might have turned out very differently in the long run had the British settled for merely restoring peace and exploiting that lack of consensus on the part of the Irish. Instead, they savagely put down the revolt and then sent some 90 conspirators to face the firing squad in a matter of days. The reprisals, coupled with the hard line the British took going forward, fueled the opposition and, more important, solidified it. Factions coalesced behind Sinn Fein, the militant group that would spearhead the fight for independence, and the table was set for the civil war that eight years later resulted in the Irish Free State and ultimately in the republic of Ireland in 1937.

The Irish lost in the Easter rebellion, but the English lost Ireland.

Yeats was 50 years old at the time, a prominent poet still known mostly as one of the leaders of the Irish renaissance, a movement that extolled the native traditions and folklore of the country. Like his collaborators, the playwright John Millington Synge and Lady Augusta Gregory, Yeats was a cultural revolutionary, but he was not particularly political and disparaged violence as a means of creating an Irish republic. But at the time of the Easter rebellion, he was in the process of changing as a poet, influenced both by literary modernism and the events in his own country. Going forward, he was guided as much by what he saw in the street outside his door as he was by the past, and what he wrote from then on would secure his reputation as arguably the finest poet of the 20th century.

The amazing thing about this transformation is that it did not make the poet more didactic. Yeats was never a preacher. Rather, it made him more subtle, more open to ambiguity. But ambiguity in Yeats’s hands was neither wishy washy nor vague. He might be oblique, but he was never opaque.

In “Easter, 1916,” written in the months that followed the failed uprising, he would express perfectly the confusion and awe with which he and the citizens of his country were consumed.
“We make out of the quarrel with others, rhetoric, but of the quarrel with ourselves, poetry,” he once said, and no poem of his illustrates that sentiment better than “Easter, 1916.” It begins in everydayness: “I have met them at close of day / Coming with vivid faces / From counter or desk among / Eighteenth-century houses. / I have passed with a nod of the head / Or polite meaningless words, / Or have lingered awhile and said / Polite meaningless words, / And thought before I had done / Of a mocking tale or a gibe / To please a companion / Around the fire at the club, / Being certain that they and I / But lived where motley is worn: / All changed, changed utterly: / A terrible beauty is born.”

This is the plainest of the poem’s four verses, but even here, the quotidian is upended and placed in the past tense. That foolish, almost clownish reality (“where motley is worn”) is seen, as it were, in the rear-view mirror. Something has happened, something both terrible and beautiful, and there is no going back.

The rest of the poem proceeds in similar fashion, with people and realities changing like clouds (“Minute by minute they change”), and each part, fractal fashion, reflects the whole of the poem. Even a man he despised he now sees in a different light, less than a hero perhaps but more than a cad.

In the end Yeats is still not sure whether the price paid was worth it (“Was it needless death after all?”). But on one point he does not dither: The men and women he writes about changed history, and in turn they too were changed, as Yeats was, by what happened in that bloody week a century ago.

The easy explanation for all this is to say that the Easter Rising politicized Yeats, and to the extent that it drew him into more complete engagement with his time and his country, that is true. But to stop there does a disservice to the confusion and mystery he has witnessed and set down with such clarity in his poem. For “Easter, 1916” is not only complex and mysterious, it is about complexity and mystery, about beauties that are terrible. Events, especially cataclysmic events, he tells us, are not easily parsed, and we do them and ourselves an injustice to pretend otherwise. All we can do, the poem reminds us, is to confront conflicting realities and reconcile them as best we can. No poet, not even Yeats himself, ever said it better than in “Easter, 1916.”

Rage at I.R.A. Grows in England As Second Boy Dies From a Bomb
John Darnton
The New York Times
March 26, 1993

LONDON, March 25— As a second boy died today from wounds from a bombing in Warrington on Saturday, there were signs of a growing public backlash against the Irish Republican Army, which seems to attack more and more ordinary civilians.

For some time now bombs or bomb scares have become a feature of life in England, and people appear to accept them with resigned fatalism. But widespread anger and revulsion have been touched off by the two bombs that went off in metal trash baskets in a crowded shopping area Saturday afternoon in Warrington, a town on the Mersey River 16 miles east of Liverpool.

Fifty-six people were wounded, many of them seriously, and a 3-year-old boy, Jonathan Ball, who was being taken shopping to buy a Mother’s Day present, was killed. Another boy, Tim Parry, a 12-year-old with a mischievous grin, ran from the first explosion straight into the second.

For days, as he lingered between life and death, the country followed the reports on his failing condition. Finally, after a brain scan showed little activity, the life-support system was disconnected, and he died at 11:20 A.M. Feeling of Loss

With composure his father, Colin Parry, described the boy’s last moments. Then, when he was asked if he felt anger toward the I.R.A., he fought to hold back tears and said no — all he felt was loss: « We produced a bloody good kid. He was a fine lad. He had his moments; he could be a cheeky impudent little pup. But he was a great kid. The I.R.A., I’ve really got no words for them at all. »

At the same time, four Catholic workmen were killed today in Northern Ireland in an ambush by Protestant paramilitaries in the northern coast town of Castlerock and another Protestant was killed in Belfast.

So far this year, outlawed gangs of loyalist assassins have killed 23 people in Northern Ireland, 17 of them civilians. The gangs warned at the beginning of the year that they would step up their attacks. Touching a Nerve

The Warrington bombing touched a particular nerve because the victims were so young and also because it seemed to have been carried out in a way almost calculated to cause harm to ordinary people.

In recent years, I.R.A. bombs have been placed in public places. In a relatively new tactic, the terrorists often plant two bombs at once, so people running from one are sometimes struck by the other.

« The I.R.A. goes through phases on the targeting of civilians, » said Frank Brenchley, chairman of the Research Institute for the Study of Conflict and Terrorism, a private research agency.

Casualties have also been increased lately because the warnings telephoned in by the I.R.A. often are late or have incomplete or misleading information, the authorities say. This is denied by the I.R.A.

In the Warrington case, the authorities said the warning was telephoned in to an emergency help line, saying only that a bomb had been placed outside a Boots pharmacy. The police searched a Boots pharmacy in Liverpool, but the bomb went off near a Boots pharmacy in Warrington, 16 miles away.

In a statement acknowledging the act, the I.R.A. said it « profoundly » regretted the death and injuries but charged that the responsibility « lies squarely at the door of those in the British authorities who deliberately failed to act on precise and adequate warnings. » ——————– Sorrow in Dublin

DUBLIN, March 25 (Special to The New York Times) — In a rare public demonstration of feeling against the Irish Republican Army, thousands of Irish men and women gathered in downtown Dublin today to express sorrow and revulsion over the deaths of two children in Warrington, England.

Thousands waited in line to sign a condolence book outside the Post Office, where the Irish rebellion against British power began in 1916.

At St. Stephen’s Green, in the fashionable heart of the capital, thousands laid bouquets and wreaths, teddy bears and Snoopys with messages of sorrow and apology around their necks, that are to be taken to Warrington for the boys’ funerals.

Voir enfin:

Chronique de la quinzaine, histoire politique
Charles Benoist
Revue des Deux Mondes
14 mai 1916

Comme la note du Président Wilson au gouvernement impérial allemand réclamait une réponse immédiate, on pouvait croire qu’il ne se passerait pas quinze jours sans que cette réponse fût arrêtée, envoyée, connue dans le détail ; et comme la réponse réclamée consistait uniquement dans le choix entre les deux propositions de la plus simple des alternatives, oui ou non, il semblait qu’il ne fallût pas tant d’allées et venues, tant de consultations, tant d’audiences solennelles, pour n’arriver qu’à tant de car, de si, de mais, et de peut-être. Mais c’était à la fois méconnaître l’esprit et ignorer la situation de l’Allemagne, portée par l’un à ergoter sans bonne foi et obligée par l’autre à tâcher de s’esquiver sans fausse honte. En attendant qu’il fût prêt à ne dire aux États-Unis ni oui, ni non, et que sa presse, docile jusque dans la colère, eût épuisé sur eux le trésor de ses séductions et l’arsenal de ses menaces, l’Empire qui, hier, se croyait déjà le maître du monde, montait contre le plus détesté de ses ennemis, contre l’Angleterre, un triple coup, et le manquait. Pas de doute possible sur l’origine : le coup a bien été monté par l’Allemagne contre l’Angleterre. Tous les faits, ici, sont publics, évidens, incontestables. Par la concordance de ces trois attaques, deux de vive force, maritime et aérienne, une en traîtrise, l’insurrection d’Irlande, la politique prussienne a mis sous son œuvre sa signature, qui est un curieux mélange d’astuce, d’impudence et de niaiserie. Le lundi soir, 24 avril, un raid de zeppelins, le trente-troisième ou le trente-quatrième de la série, mais qu’on eût dit plus méthodique que les autres, fouillait la côte anglaise, comme s’il se fût agi, on en a fait l’observation, de « reconnaître la route entre Helgoland et Lowestoft. » Presque en même temps, ou aussitôt après, une escadre allemande, composée de vaisseaux rapides, croiseurs et contre-torpilleurs, apparaissait, courait le long de cette partie de la côte britannique, de Lowestoft à Yarmouth, lâchait quelques coups de canon, puis, accrochée par les forces, médiocres, de la défense locale, s’échappait et montrait sa légèreté en filant au bout de vingt minutes de combat, dans la crainte d’une plus mauvaise rencontre et d’un pire destin. Presque en même temps encore, voici le mélodrame ou le roman-feuilleton. La scène se passe à Tralee-Bay , sur la côte Sud-Ouest d’Irlande. On voit rôder un sous-marin, qui a l’air d’escorter un second navire. Ce second navire, pour inspirer plus de confiance, louvoie tranquillement sous une honnête et candide figure de caboteur hollandais. Ils avancent tout doucement, à petite vapeur, le corsaire au pas du marchand, comme des gens qui ne porteraient vraiment que des harengs dans leurs barils. Là-haut, en pleine mer du Nord, une patrouille anglaise les a « arraisonnés, » leur a demandé leurs papiers ; ils en ont présenté de si parfaitement en règle qu’ils ont été invités à passer, avec un salut. Le capitaine n’a pas fini d’en rire, lorsque, ayant brusquement piqué au Sud, il arrive en vue de la verte Erin. Soudain, un coup de semonce, « par le travers de l’avant du hollandais. » C’est d’autant plus sérieux qu’il va être procédé à la visite du bâtiment suspect. Il faut avouer que le bâtiment n’est pas hollandais, mais allemand ; que ses vingt hommes d’équipage sont allemands; que ses officiers sont allemands; que sa cargaison, — 20 000 fusils de guerre, des mitrailleuses et des munitions, — est allemande; bref, que ses desseins sont allemands. Tandis qu’ayant reçu l’ordre de suivre jusqu’au port de Queenstown la vedette qui l’a capturé, le faux hollandais, auquel on ne saurait du moins refuser le courage, arbore enfin son drapeau et bravement essaie de se couler, on rattrape deux hommes qui s’enfuyaient dans un canot pliant, et dont l’un ne tarde pas à confesser qu’il est sir Roger (Jasement. Dès son début, l’équipée tourne court : Feringhea a parlé ! Nous n’avons point l’intention d’entreprendre une longue biographie de sir Roger Casement : ce n’était hier qu’un intrigant, mêlé à des affaires louches, traînant en pays étranger les titres qu’il avait emportés du sien, et le reste de crédit que lui avaient laissé ses anciennes fonctions ; c’est maintenant quelque chose de plus, ou quelque chose de moins ; il réglera son compte avec le lord-chief justice, et le règlement sera sans doute sévère, puisque lui, il n’a pas même, dans son crime, cette dernière excuse d’être Allemand. Au surplus, l’aventure de sir Roger ne serait qu’un épisode sans intérêt, si elle n’avait servi à découvrir, dirigeant le complot et tirant les ficelles, la main de l’Allemagne. Trois jours auparavant, le vendredi avril, le bruit avait été répandu à Amsterdam, pour être, de là, répandu à Londres, que sir Roger Casement ,venait d’être arrêté et emprisonné en Allemagne. Arrêté et jeté en prison, pourquoi? Pour lui permettre de s’embarquer, en toute sûreté, à Kiel, ce même Vendredi-Saint, qui devait lui porter malheur. C’était, comme on le devine, le fin alibi, le plus fin qu’ait été capable d’inventer la police allemande; et c’est un paraphe ajouté à la signature de ce beau travail. Mais, dans les plans de l’Allemagne, sir Roger Casement n’était qu’un instrument; l’incursion des croiseurs et le raid des zeppelins n’étaient que des diversions ; sa machine infernale à triple détente ne manquerait pas de semer la révolution en Irlande, la panique en Angleterre, la prudence aux États-Unis. De fait, le lundi de Pâques, 2-4 avril, le lundi des zeppelins et des croiseurs, pendant que, fidèle aux chères habitudes, tout le Dublin officiel était aux courses, éclatait un mouvement d’une violence foudroyante, qui dépassait l’émeute, et d’un coup allait aux extrêmes, à la séparation d’avec la Grande-Bretagne, à la proclamation de la République irlandaise, au comble des désirs profonds et passionnés de l’Allemagne. En un instant, les insurgés se sont emparés de l’hôtel des postes, des deux gares du chemin de fer, du. Palais de justice, de nombre d’édifices publics et privés ; d’autres se sont enfermés dans la Bourse du travail, dans Liberty-Hall ; ils ont, auparavant, dressé des barricades et coupé les communications, si bien que les fonctionnaires, absens de la ville pour les fêtes, ont du mal à y rentrer. Dans les comtés, sur quelques points, des troubles se dessinent ; à Atheney, à Galway, en deux ou trois centres encore. Peut-on dire que c’est une surprise, et que rien n’avait permis de prévoir la rébellion ? Lord Middleton a affirmé le contraire, le lord-lieutenant ou vice-roi d’Irlande, lord Wimborne, l’a reconnu, et le secrétaire d’État pour l’Irlande, M. Birrell, ne l’a point nié. Il semble, en effet, que, depuis le commencement de l’année, les signes se soient multipliés. Le 5 février notamment, et le 17 mars, jour de la Saint-Patrick, à Dublin et à Cork, plusieurs centaines de « volontaires irlandais, » 1 600 ici, et là 1 100, paradent et défilent, armés, pour les deux tiers, de fusils, « du reste hétéroclites ; » ils font, de carrefour en carrefour, « une sorte de répétition de petite guerre. » Perquisitions et saisies d’armes, de munitions ou de manifestes, le 14 mars à Cork, le 22 et le 24 à Dublin; le 27 mars, ordre d’expulsion contre trois organisateurs delà fédération des volontaires, antérieurement arrêtés; le 16 mars, à Tullamore, le 31 à Dublin, meetings et conflits avec la police. Arrive le mois d’avril. Le i, à la conférence irlando-américaine de Londres, un ancien fenian, John Devey, presse les Irlando-Américains de lever un fonds de 1 million de dollars pour organiser une révolte en Irlande ; le 10, arrestation à Dublin de deux individus qui transportaient dans une automobile des fusils et des munitions ; le 23, à Currahane Strand, saisie d’un bateau submersible contenant une cargaison d’armes et de munitions. Sauf le petit courant de la surveillance quotidienne en temps calme, les autorités paraissent n’avoir opposé à tous ces préparatifs que leur flegme : en cela, il y a eu faillite partielle, défaillance de la fonction gouvernementale. Qui ne sait le prix auquel de tels abandons se paient? Meurtres, incendies, destructions, répressions, fusillades, déportations; au total, directement ou indirectement, des milliers de victimes. Après une semaine de lutte, l’insurrection est partout domptée, elle expire ; laissons-en aux journaux le récit circonstancié: ce qui nous intéresse, c’est beaucoup moins ce qu’elle a fait, et comment elle l’a fait, que pourquoi elle l’a fait ; autrement dit, c’est ce qu’elle a voulu être, c’est ce qu’on aurait voulu qu’elle fût. Et l’important, par-dessus l’intéressant, est d’identifier avec certitude, de personnifier ce vague, fugace et impersonnel « On. » Deux élémens se sont associés visiblement pour bouleverser l’île, s’ils l’avaient pu, et le deuxième est tout moderne : celui qui a établi, comme d’instinct, son quartier général à Liberty-Hall, à la Bourse du travail. C’est ce qu’on pourrait nommer l’élément, non pas proprement socialiste, mais syndicaliste, recruté parmi les ouvriers, en particulier des transports, et obéissant à James Gonnolly, naguère lieutenant de Jim Larkin, comme lui éminent « gréviculteur. » Mais le premier élément est connu, pour ainsi dire, de toute éternité, dans la suite séculaire et ininterrompue des agitations de l’Irlande. Il se qualifie maintenant de Sin-Fein, qualifie ses adeptes de Sinn-Feiners, ce qui assure-t-on, veut dire : « Nous-mêmes, » en gaélique. Ce serait donc le parti de l’autonomie, de l’indépendance, de la souveraineté irlandaise. — Fraction insignifiante de la nation, notait M. Louis Paul-Dubois dès 1907, et qui n’en est ni la plus éclairée, ni la plus recommandable ; exaltés, déclassés, rêveurs, gamins, mauvais sujets.

— Mais que les Sinn-Feiners soient ce qu’ils veulent ou ce qu’ils peuvent être, M. Jules de Lasteyrie, en 1865 et 1867, M. John Lemoinne, en 1848, ne s’exprimaient pas différemment, dans la Revue, sur le compte des « Fenians » ou de « la Jeune Irlande. » Les mots mêmes, les noms mêmes décèlent et étalent la parenté. Quel que soit le sens du gaélique Sin-Fein, les Sinn-Feiners rappellent les Fenians, qu’on rattachait, il y a cinquante ans, aux Feini, le plus méridional des trois peuples primitifs qui habitaient Erin ; et quant à ces Feini, on les faisait descendre ni plus ni moins que d’un certain Fenius,roi de Phénicie, qui aurait été le Francus de l’Irlande, le héros troyen que toute nation un peu fière se doit d’inscrire en tête de sa généalogie. Pour nous en tenir à une filiation plus certaine, les Sinn-Feiners se relient aux Fenians, qui continuaient la Jeune-Irlande, laquelle perpétuait les Irlandais-Unis, les Enfans-Blancs , les Enfansdu-Chêne, les Enfans-de-1’Acier, les Pieds-Blancs, les Pieds-Noirs. Le but ou l’objectif est le même. L’autre jour, Connolly, « commandant militaire des forces républicaines de Dublin, » grimpé sur le toit d’un tramway, harangua la foule en ces termes : « Concitoyens !

Nous avons conquis l’Irlande et occupé le siège du gouvernement.

Tous les Irlandais ont le devoir de nous aider, et en leur nom je proclame la République d’Irlande. » Aussitôt, symbolique ment, une grande affiche où flamboyait, en énormes caractères rouges : « Proclamation de la République irlandaise, » fut étendue, comme un drap, barrant le trottoir. La nouvelle République, — the Jrish Republic, — a son journal : Irish War News; il publie le communiqué du « général G. H. Pearse, commandant suprême de l’armée et président du Gouvernement provisoire, » qui vaut d’être conservé par curiosité : « La République irlandaise, disait le Bulletin, a été proclamée le lundi de Pâques, 24 avril, à midi. Simultanément, la division de Dublin de l’armée républicaine, y compris les volontaires irlandais de la milice citoyenne, occupait les positions dominantes de la cité. La bannière républicaine flotte sur le palais delà poste. » Mais combien de fois depuis la Révolution française, et même depuis la Révolution d’Amérique, cet étendard n’avait-il pas été déployé, combien de fois la République irlandaise proclamée ! Toujours en vain ; cette fois plus vainement que jamais.

Les personnages sont lés mêmes, c’est-à-dire que d’autres hommes, affublés des mêmes oripeaux, jouent le même rôle. Par génération spontanée, « les généraux » foisonnent. « On appelait général quiconque portait un revolver. » C’est un phénomène universellement constaté aux heures d’anarchie : le pavé des villes devient d’une fécondité incroyable ; il y pousse à vue d’oeil des chefs improvisés. Leur cas n’est pas exempt de quelque cabotinage : plus d’un prend son parti de monter plus tard sur l’échafaud, s’il monte d’abord sur le théâtre. La « Comtesse verte, » au moment de se rendre, l’autre jour, baisa dévotement la crosse de son browning.

Aussi le Crown security bill a-t-il jadis supprimé l’échafaud, et atténué en simple « félonie » la haute trahison. « 11 y aura, disait le solicitor général, un grand avantage à convertir la trahison en simple félonie, parce qu’il y a des gens qui commettent des crimes uniquement pour faire parler d’eux. C’est pour cela qu’on se jette du haut de la colonne. » Ce qu’on nous a conté des meneurs du Sin-Fein n’engage pas à corriger la rigueur de ce jugement.

Les procédés, les moyens sont les mêmes. Ce sont ceux de la guerre révolutionnaire, de la guerre de rue, qui n’exclut pas les plus abominables. L’autre semaine, Dublin a revu les flammes de cet enfer jaillir du soupirail et de la fenêtre. Le pétroleur, ou lapétroleuse, est, depuis longtemps, de toutes les Communes. Chacun, homme ou femme, récite sa théorie, son catéchisme du parfait insurgé : « bloquer les troupes dans leurs casernes, couvrir la ville de barricades, couper les chemins de fer. » La leçon de nos Journées parisiennes n’est pas perdue. L’organe de John Mitchell, Y United Irishman, a baptisé ces gentillesses : « Plan d’opérations à la mode française, French fashion. »

La conduite de l’affaire et sa fin sont les mêmes. On ne s’est pas plus caché, cette fois-ci, des autorités constituées que ne s’en cachaient les « confédérés » d’autrefois, lorsqu’ils avaient l’audace d’écrire « à Son Excellence le comte de Clarendon, espion général de Sa Majesté et suborneur général en Irlande » : « Il n’y a point de jour fixé pour la prise du château. Vous le saurez aussitôt que nous. Vous le fixerez vous-même. » Pareillement, ou parallèlement, les autorités d’autrefois ne s’en inquiétaient pas plus que ne se sont émues celles d’hier, au moins tant qu’elles n’eurent devant elles que des meetings et des revues : « Le gouvernement anglais assistait à ces ’grandes démonstrations verbales avec la plus désolante impassibilité. » Mais soudain des clubs remplacèrent ces grands meetings que dédaigneusement Wellington avait traités de « farces. » L’agitation irlandaise, de type oratoire et procédurier, telle que l’avait menée Daniel O’Connell, en maître et presque en roi, qui avait eu sa liste civile et à qui il n’avait manqué que la couronne, retournait à la conspiration de type classique. L’Irlande revenait à son vice invétéré, à sa vieille pratique des sociétés secrètes ; très peu secrètes, puisque les clubistes, par compagnies de vingt ou trente hommes, défilaient devant O’Brien, dans un champ près de Cork, sous le regard placide du lord-lieutenant. Alors, comme à présent, « les jeunes gens des clubs passaient leurs journées dans les tirs à la carabine ou à faire l’exercice avec la pique ;  des convois d’armes, achetées en Angleterre même, arrivaient librement en Irlande. » La révolution préparait son règne par la terreur et désignait ouvertement dans chaque district ses futurs otages, qu’elle marquait, ses marked men. La seule différence entre autrefois et aujourd’hui, c’est qu’autrefois le gouvernement anglais s’éveilla, suspendit Yhabeas corpus, proclama la loi martiale, l’état de siège, et que lord Lansdowne et lord John Russell firent ainsi avorter le mouvement en le devançant; ce que M. Birrell et lord Wimborne n’ont pas fait l’autre jour, par une confiance excessive qu’ils vont racheter dans la retraite.

Le mouvement des Sinn-Feiners s’est déroulé exactement comme le mouvement des Fenians, et dans les mêmes lieux, quoique, cette fois, à cause des circonstances, il ait revêtu plus de gravité. La nuit du mardi 5 au mercredi 6 mars 1867, comme le lundi de Pâques 1916 à midi, le soulèvement avait été simultané à Dublin et dans les environs, à Drogheda, à Cork, dans quelques parties du Limerick, dans la partie du Tipperary au Nord des Galtees, et au Sud des mêmes montagnes, entre^le Black- Water et le Lee. Quarante postes de police avaient été attaqués sur cette étendue de soixante-dix lieues de longueur, de vingt ou trente lieues de largeur, sans qu’aucun poste de plus de cinq hommes eût été pris, sans qu’aucun rassemblement eût attendu l’approche d’une troupe quelconque. « Neuf chefs armés chacun d’un revolver se sont laissé mettre des menottes et ont pu être traînés en prison par quatre hommes de police. » Axiome à l’usage des constables et de la yeomanry : « Il est acquis qu’un soldat de police vaut cinquante fenians ; quatre hommes de police en ont battu deux cents ; quinze hommes de police en ont battu deux mille. » Le fenian, « prêt au martyre, » très excitable, enthousiaste, avait couru, pieds nus et tête nue, au rendez-vous dans la bruyère ; puis, le premier feu tombé, il s’était soumis. Cette fois, la résistance a été plus dure, mais également inutile : le bilan se liquide par des centaines de morts, auxquelles s’ajoutera une douzaine d’exécutions. Jamais les insurrections irlandaises n’ont tenu; et c’est peut-être ce qui, pour une part, explique l’optimisme serein du gouvernement britannique :il ne prend pas la peine de prévenir des désordres qu’il a si peu de peine à réprimer.

Les mobiles non plus, les têtes, les cœurs, les âmes n’ont pas changé. Pour les plus désintéressés, les plus sincères, les idéalistes, c’est toujours : « L’Irlande l’Irlande; l’Irlande à elle seule, avec tout ce qu’elle possède, depuis le gazon jusqu’au firmament. » Une poignée de républicains à l’antique peut bien rêver aussi d’une Irlande républicaine. Des socialistes ouvriers ou agraires peuvent bien construire en esprit une société irlandaise régénérée et heureuse après tant de siècles de misère. Mais, plus bas, il y a les autres. Comme en tout temps et en tout pays, il y a les pêcheurs en eau trouble. Il y a les affamés de notoriété et de pouvoir. Il y a les amateurs de bruit et de panache, ceux qui abritent des appétits derrière des systèmes, ceux qui tirent, surtout en l’air, des coups de pistolet. Il y a les fanatiques, les hypnotisés, les faiseurs, les dupes. Il y a ceux qui se dévouent, ceux qui s’inclinent, ceux qui se donnent, ceux qui se prêtent, et ceux qui se vendent. Il y a ceux qui travaillent pour la gloire, ceux qui travaillent pour la patrie, et ceux qui travaillent pour l’étranger. Les insurgés de la dernière semaine d’avril ont travaillé pour l’étranger, et pour quel étranger! pour le roi de Prusse. Cette révolte de l’Irlande n’a point du tout été irlandaise, mais allemande; elle n’a gardé d’irlandais que la forme; c’est un métal, un plomb allemand coulé dans le moule des révolutions irlandaises; la tentative de guerre civile n’était qu’un acte ou qu’une scène de la grande guerre européenne. Aucune question vraiment irlandaise n’était posée, ni même aucune espèce de question. Cela nous met à l’aise pour la condamner, sans étouffer l’écho que n’ont cessé d’éveiller chez nous, comme en Angleterre même, les justes plaintes de l’Irlande. Et cela nous fournit une occasion de faire deux réflexions : l’une, que, chaque fois que l’Irlande, par une campagne « pacifique et légale, » fût-elle de celles qu’on a définies « pacifiques, c’est-à-dire jusqu’à la dernière extrémité en deçà de la guerre ; légales, c’est-à-dire jusqu’à la dernière limite en deçà de la loi, » a été amenée à portée d’accomplir son vœu, des forcenés ou des insensés sont venus tout compromettre. Ainsi, contre O’ConnelI, s’était formée la Jeune Irlande, et contre M. John Redmond se dresse le Sin-Fein. L’autre réflexion, plus essentielle encore, c’est que, chaque fois que l’Angleterre a été engagée dans une guerre extérieure, ses ennemis se sont efforcés de déchaîner une révolte et d’opérer un débarquement en Irlande, sans que jamais aucun de ces projets ait abouti. L’Allemagne avait sous les yeux nos exemples de 1796 et de 1798; longtemps avant les nôtres, celui de l’Espagne; et le sien propre, l’expérience, qui date de plusieurs siècles, de Martin Schwartz, avec 2 000 lansquenets, allant à Dublin aider au couronnement du prétendant national Lambert Simnel, traversant le canal d’Irlande, et finalement déconfit à la bataille de Stoke-on-Trent. Tout entière à sa haine, elle n’a pas entendu l’avertissement.

La main de l’Allemagne, répétons-le, traîne partout en cette tragicomédie. Elle s’est glissée, depuis des années, dans l’université, dans les municipalités de Dublin et de Cork, avec les professeurs allemands de philologie celtique, Zimmer et Kuno Meyer. Dès le premier jour de l’insurrection, elle a tenu la plume qui a écrit la proclamation de James Connolly. C’est elle qui a rédigé, dans le premier numéro du journal Irish War News, le long article qui a pour titre : Si les Allemands conquièrent V Angleterre. C’est elle qui lance effrontément des dépêches de ce genre : « Verdun est tombé aux mains des Allemands; la Hollande a déclaré la guerre à l’Angleterre et la flotte britannique a perdu dix-huit bâtimens en un combat dans la mer du Nord ; » pendant exact à la pancarte exposée en face des tranchées anglaises sur l’Yser et annonçant un désastre britannique en Irlande. C’est elle qui promet l’appui de la « chevaleresque « et « victorieuse » Allemagne, car quelle autre main qu’une main allemande aurait pu, sans se dessécher, accoler à ce nom ces deux épithètes?

Elle est là, la main allemande, et elle y tricote, et elle y tripote,

comme elle tricote et tripote dans l’Afrique australe, aux États-Unis, dans les Indes néerlandaises. Le véritable sens de la Weltpolitik, n’est-ce pas : l’Allemagne partout, et se croyant chez soi chez les autres, avide de chasser les autres de chez eux? En Irlande, on ne peut pas dire qu’elle n’ait pas obtenu de résultat, bien que ce ne soit pas celui qu’elle cherchait. Elle a fait apparaître l’unité, l’unanimité de l’Empire britannique dans la guerre soutenue et à soutenir contre elle. Elle a donné l’argument décisif en faveur du service militaire obligatoire. Et, par là, si elle n’a pas fait de révolution en Irlande, elle a contribué, malgré elle, à en faire une en Angleterre. Elle a tacitement avoué que l’infiltration allemande crée ou entretient, à l’intérieur de chaque État, une constante et croissante menace, dans le moment même où elle est, vis-à-vis delà plus puissante des Puissances neutres, dans une position infiniment délicate. C’est le 4 mai seulement que le gouvernement allemand a remis sa prétendue réponse à la note américaine qui lui avait été signifiée le 20 avril. De ce document gratté et regratté, pendant quatorze jours, par des civils, des marins et des militaires, on n’est pas sûr encore d’avoir un texte authentique. Il en existe plusieurs variantes. II y en a, s’il est permis de s’exprimer ainsi, pour l’usage interne et pour l’usage externe, pour l’opinion allemande et pour le dehors. Il y a la version adoucie des radiotélégrammes et la version renforcée de l’Agence Wolff. La presse allemande, la plus savamment orchestrée 478 REVUE DES DEUX MONDES.

du monde, où chaque journal est chargé de tenir sa partie et joue sous le bâton du chef, les a, par surcroît, embrouillées de son mieux, enveloppées de fumée et de tapage. L’Allemagne manie ses gazettes comme elle manœuvre son artillerie lourde; elle s’en sert pour retourner le terrain, pour étourdir et pour affoler l’adversaire. Dans la dissertation signée de M. de Jagow, on distingue, à la loupe, les traces de deux tendances et les manières de cinq ou six collaborateurs. Non seulement le gouvernement impérial s’y montre préoccupé de faire deux visages : un visage farouche, inflexible, pour l’Allemagne même, un visage moins repoussant pour les États-Unis; mais on l’y sent déchiré, écartelé par des sentimens opposés, rage et crainte, peur et fureur, qui le tirent, comme des chevaux emportés, de contradiction en contradiction. La bouche gronde ou raille, l’œil appelle, et le tout fait un singulier mélange. C’est de la résignation poudrée d’impertinence, de la provocation avec « mille pardons, » le pour et le contre, le oui et le non en quatre cents lignes. « Devine si tu peux, et choisis si tu l’oses. » Si le Président Wilson aime les énigmes, il a eu de quoi s’exercer.

La « réponse » allemande commence par admettre ce que la chancellerie avait jusqu’ici contesté, avec dessins et croquis annexés : la possibilité que le navire mentionné dans la note du 20 avril comme ayant été torpillé par un sous-marin allemand soit effectivement le Sussex. C’est que l’enquête est là, et qu’elle est telle que, sur ce point, toutes les issues sont fermées. Mais, pour Berlin, ce n’est qu’un point de fait, un point de détail, un menu point, que le gouvernement impérial se refuse ’à laisser généraliser. Il n’accepte pas que les États-Unis le posent « comme un exemple des méthodes de destruction délibérée et sans discernement de navires de toutes provenances et de toute destination par les commandans de sous-marins allemands. » On lui fait injure : « Par égard pour les intérêts des neutres, » et au risque de procurer un avantage à ses ennemis, l’Allemagne adonné des ordres pour que la guerre sous-marine fût menée « selon les règles du droit international, qui s’appliquent à la visite, à la perquisition et à la destruction des navires de commerce. » Elle ne les « donnera » pas, elle les « adonnés. » Certes, il peut se produire des erreurs, qui peuvent produire des accidens. Mais qu’y faire ? Il faut être indulgent aux faiblesses humaines, et même inhumaines. « Certaines tolérances doivent être accordées dans la conduite de la guerre navale, contre un ennemi qui recourt à toutes sortes de ruses, qu’elles soient licites ou ne le soient pas. »

qui est des principes sacrés de l’humanité, — des principes, entendons-le bien, — l’Allemagne y attache autant de prix que personne. Tout le mal vient de l’Angleterre, et les États-Unis eux-mêmes ne sont pas sans reproche. Si les États-Unis avaient écouté l’Allemagne, ils auraient pu « réduire au minimum pour les voyageurs et les biens américains les dangers inhérens à la guerre navale. » Ils n’avaient qu’à obliger l’Angleterre, puisque l’Allemagne n’est pas maîtresse de la mer, à renoncer au blocus, à lui livrer le passage, à neutraliser complètement la mer. Ils n’avaient qu’à empêcher l’Angleterre « d’affamer des millions de femmes et d’enfans allemands dans le dessein avoué de contraindre à la capitulation les armées victorieuses des Puissances centrales. » L’indulgence, la partialité, l’injustice des États-Unis ont aggravé, par conséquent, « cette guerre cruelle et sanglante. » Il ne manquerait plus que, par leur faute encore, elle fût « élargie et prolongée ! » Cet horrible souci empoisonne la conscience de la triomphante Allemagne. Parce qu’elle est triomphante, rien ne lui interdit d’être généreuse. Et voici, peut-être, la phrase pour laquelle tout le reste est écrit : «Le gouvernement allemand, conscient de la force de l’Allemagne, a annoncé, deux fois dans l’espace des quelques derniers mois, qu’il était prêt à faire la paix sur une base qui sauvegardât les intérêts vitaux de l’Allemagne. » Ah! si les États-Unis le voulaient! Si le Président comprenait!… C’est là, bien plus que sa conclusion qui n’est pas une conclusion, ce qui mérite de subsister de cette réponse qui n’en est pas une. L’Allemagne s’abstiendra si… Elle donnera des instructions, pourvu que… Ergotage et verbiage, du vent. Mais écoutez ce cri, cet aveu, ou ce soupir : la paix! Diplomatiquement, la soi-disant réponse allemande n’est qu’un mémoire de procureur; psychologiquement, elle est une révélation. L’Allemagne et son Empereur sont pleins de précipices. A la lecture d’un si lourd et perfide, plat et cauteleux factum, M. Woodrow Wilson aurait eu le droit de réfléchir, et même d’hésiter. Quatre partis lui étaient offerts : céder, rompre, discuter, attendre. Les « gros malins » de la Wilhelmstrasse l’invitaient à une conversation, avec la Grande-Bretagne en tiers. En somme, ce qu’ils lui demandaient, c’était de renvoyer à l’Angleterre, comme à sa véritable adresse, la note des États-Unis au gouvernement impérial ; d’être auprès d’elle leur interprète, leur commissionnaire ; de renverser l’échelle des valeurs morales et de placer sur le même degré, de frapper de la même réprobation la guerre maritime conforme au droit et l’assassinat contraire à tout droit. Ils se flattaient de le pousser ainsi à se faire ou l’instigateur d’une querelle inique ou le médiateur d’une paix impossible. Impossible, même s’il fût entré dans le jeu: de quelque respect que soit entouré et de quelque crédit que jouisse le Président des États-Unis, il y a des choses qui dépendent de M. Wilson et des choses qui ne dépendent pas de lui. Il ne peut, à lui seul, sur la prière de l’Empereur, décréter une paix que personne ne veut, tant qu’elle se présente comme la paix allemande, tant que l’Allemagne n’a pas appris que vivre, ce n’est point manger autrui. Rien n’est (quelquefois, du moins) plus habile que l’honnêteté. La droiture de M. « Wilson l’a sauvé. Il a empoigné les deux branches du piège allemand, et il les a brisées entre ses doigts. Il prend l’Allemagne à son serment, attache à sa parole plus de prix qu’elle-même» met à l’impératif ce qu’elle amis au conditionnel. C’est convenu, c’est juré : les sous-marins allemands ne s’attaqueront plus aux neutres» épargneront, ménageront les non-combattans ; l’Allemagne fera ce qu’elle doit faire, quoi que fasse tel ou tel autre gouvernement belbgérant, et sans qu’elle ait à considérer ce que les États-Unis font ou ne font pas à l’égard de tel ou tel gouvernement : ils demeurent libres d’agir comme il leur convient, c’est l’Allemagne qui ne l’est pas de se conduire comme il lui plaît. « Sa responsabilité est personnelle, elle n’est pas conjointe, elle est absolue et non relative. » Nous voilà sortis de l’équivoque. M. Wilson a paré, il est gardé, il voit venir. Qu’est-ce qui vient? Ou nous n’avons jamais été aussi près de la rupture, ou l’Allemagne n’a jamais subi une si complète humiliation. Son attitude va donner la mesure de son usure. Regardons bien le dynamomètre.

Charles Benoist.

Le Directeur-Gérant,

René Doumic

Voir enfin:

Le deuxième bureau et les républicains irlandais, 1900-1904 : contacts, invasion et déception
Jérôme Aan de Wiel
p. 74-85

Introduction
1  Andrew (C.) & Dilks (D.) (eds.), The Missing Dimension: Government and Intelligence Communities in (…)
1En 1984, le professeur Christopher Andrew, spécialiste de l’histoire des services secrets britanniques, fit la remarque suivante : « Le renseignement a été décrit par Sir Alexander Cadogan, un éminent diplomate, comme étant « la dimension quasi-manquante dans l’histoire de la diplomatie ». Cette même dimension est aussi quasi-manquante dans l’histoire politique et militaire. Fréquemment, les historiens ont tendance soit à ne tenir aucun compte du renseignement, soit à le traiter comme quantité négligeable. (…) Les historiens  inclinent à prêter trop attention aux preuves qui survivent et ne tiennent pas assez compte de ce qui n’a pas survécu. Le renseignement est devenu la « dimension quasi-manquante » en tout premier lieu parce que ses traces écrites sont si difficiles à obtenir. » 1 L’affirmation du professeur Andrew est particulièrement pertinente pour le sujet que l’on propose de traiter ici : les relations entre le deuxième bureau et les républicains irlandais entre 1900 et 1904, ou grosso-modo durant la guerre des Boers en Afrique du Sud.

2Un livre britannique, paru en 2001, traitant de l’impact international qu’eut la guerre des Boers sur les grandes puissances de l’époque, ne mentionne pas une seule fois, selon l’index, le nom de l’Irlande ce qui est bien surprenant dans la mesure où les nationalistes et séparatistes irlandais soutenaient ouvertement les Boers contre les Britanniques. Dans le chapitre consacré à la France, on lit que Théophile Delcassé,  ministre des Affaires étrangères, estimait que cette guerre devait cesser 2. Mais, était-ce bien le cas ? Ou bien est-ce que Delcassé représentait les vues de tous les membres du gouvernement français ? C’est ainsi que les archives du Service historique de la Défense au château de Vincennes révèlent que le deuxième bureau, le service de renseignement militaire français, avait eu des contacts avec des républicains irlandais dans le but, semblerait-il, d’envahir ou de libérer l’Irlande afin d’encercler la Grande-Bretagne dont les soldats se trouvaient dans la lointaine Afrique du Sud. Dans un premier temps, ces contacts et plans de débarquement et d’invasion seront étudiés. Dans un second temps, il sera montré comment le service de renseignement britannique réagit face aux menaces françaises et comment l’Allemagne prit la place de la France au sein du mouvement républicain irlandais. Puis, en guise de conclusion l’on répondra à la question de savoir si l’invasion de l’Irlande avait été sérieusement envisagée par la France ou alors si ces plans ne constituaient en fait que des exercices militaires théoriques ou des opérations de reconnaissance de routine.

3Avant d’évoquer ces contacts entre le deuxième bureau et les républicains irlandais, partisans d’une séparation totale entre l’Irlande et la Grande-Bretagne, un bref rappel de la situation internationale est nécessaire. Les relations entre la France et la Grande-Bretagne étaient tendues. En 1898, eut lieu la crise de Fachoda dans la vallée du Nil lorsque l’expédition coloniale britannique sous le commandement du général Herbert Kitchener se heurta à la mission française du commandant Jean-Baptiste Marchand. Les Français durent se retirer et, bien qu’il ne soit pas certain que l’incident aurait pu mener à la guerre entre les deux pays, la presse nationale parla d’humiliation pour la France 3. Puis, la guerre des Boers éclata en Afrique du Sud. L’opinion publique française soutenait largement les Boers. Survint alors l’affaire Dreyfus et de l’autre côté de la Manche, l’opinion publique britannique était largement anti-française à tel point que l’ambassade de France à Londres dut être protégée et que les Français dans les rues étaient insultés 4. En Irlande, les Français étaient en bien meilleure posture. À cette époque, le Parti nationaliste irlandais luttait âprement pour l’obtention du Home Rule, l’autonomie, soutenu en cela par les nationalistes, en leur très grande majorité des catholiques, et s’opposant aux unionistes, en leur très grande majorité des protestants fiers de leur identité britannique. Les nationalistes prirent fait et cause pour les Boers. Il y avait des comités de soutien partout dans le pays. Le Quai d’Orsay, par exemple, reçut du comité du Transvaal de la ville de Cork une lettre adressée à « la grande République française », l’informant que bien que l’Irlande fût « cruellement persécutée », elle était toujours « du côté de la justice et de l’humanité » 5. L’ambassadeur de France rapporta que les députés nationalistes irlandais au parlement de Westminster à Londres se moquaient ouvertement des défaites britanniques en Afrique du Sud 6. Dans ces conditions, il n’était pas bien étonnant que l’attaché militaire français à Londres, le colonel Dupontovice de Heussey, suggéra à l’ambassadeur, Alphonse de Courcel, de financer secrètement les activités des nationalistes irlandais. Il écrivit : « Pourquoi ne pas essayer de contrecarrer les projets et plans de l’Angleterre en lui suscitant des embarras intérieurs ? » 7

4C’est exactement ce que fit le Quai d’Orsay. En effet, en 1899, Paul Cambon, le nouvel ambassadeur, reçut la visite « d’une personnalité importante du Parti nationaliste » dont il ne mentionna pas le nom. Le politicien était venu remercier Cambon de l’aide de la France et des sommes d’argent furent mentionnées. Puis, il proposa un plan d’alliance entre les États-Unis, où résidaient des millions d’Américains d’origine irlandaise, la France et l’Irlande. Le plan était bien sûr dirigé contre la Grande-Bretagne qui cherchait à ce moment-là à se rapprocher de l’Allemagne. Cambon envoya un rapport sur son entretien à Théophile Delcassé, le ministre des Affaires étrangères 8. On ne sait pas comment Cambon réagit à cette offre d’alliance. On ignore également la réaction de Delcassé. Mais dans son cas, on peut se livrer à la science de la conjecture sans trop prendre de risques. Il est très peu probable que Delcassé donna l’ordre à Cambon de s’intéresser de près à l’offre des nationalistes irlandais. En effet, le ministre des Affaires étrangères avait pris conscience du danger d’un éventuel rapprochement entre la Grande-Bretagne et les pays de la Triple Alliance (Allemagne, Autriche-Hongrie, Italie) 9, ce qui encerclerait la France. Selon lui, il était temps de négocier avec les Britanniques même si, pendant un cours instant, ces derniers semblaient effectivement vouloir opérer un rapprochement avec l’Allemagne. De plus, la France avait conclu une alliance militaire avec la Russie en 1892 dirigée contre l’Allemagne mais il était loin d’être sûr que ces deux pays pouvaient se mesurer à une alliance anglo-allemande 10. Delcassé était conscient de cette situation et, petit à petit, il commença à tourner les yeux vers la Grande-Bretagne comme une alliée potentielle, Fachoda ou pas. Au Quai d’Orsay, les nationalistes irlandais étaient mis sur liste d’attente pour ainsi dire.

5Cependant, contrairement aux diplomates, certains militaires français n’étaient pas prêts à envisager une entente ou une alliance avec la Grande-Bretagne. Pour eux, l’Irlande nationaliste restait toujours le meilleur moyen de déstabiliser les Britanniques. L’humiliation de Fachoda n’avait pas été oubliée, l’opinion publique française était belliqueuse, bref, le moment semblait idéal pour préparer une attaque contre la Grande-Bretagne dont l’armée s’enlisait en Afrique du Sud. Outre-Manche, la population ne comprenait pas pourquoi une armée de 450 000 hommes (sur une période de trois ans) n’arrivait pas à battre des bandes de Boers. Comme le gros des troupes était à l’étranger, l’opinion publique commença à croire que le pays était sans défense. Des rumeurs alarmistes concernant des invasions circulèrent rapidement. Les Britanniques pensaient que la France et la Russie seraient les envahisseurs 11. Bien qu’on puisse parler de psychose collective, les peurs du public n’étaient pas entièrement sans fondement et les rumeurs d’invasion française en Irlande ne circulaient pas seulement à Londres.

6À Paris, elles furent entendues par le comte Georg Münster zu Dernburg, l’ambassadeur d’Allemagne. Il envoya sans tarder un rapport au prince Bernhard von Bülow, le ministre des Affaires étrangères à Berlin. Bülow fut suffisamment intrigué pour demander l’opinion de son ambassadeur à Londres, le comte Paul von Hatzfeldt. Hatzfeldt ne fut pas alarmé et écarta de suite cette possibilité, estimant qu’elle n’était pas du tout réaliste 12. Il avait tort. La France avait un consul à Dublin mais pas d’attaché militaire. Pourtant les archives militaires à Vincennes révèlent que les Français envoyèrent une équipe de renseignement militaire en Irlande afin d’examiner plusieurs endroits de débarquement. De manière régulière, ces espions firent parvenir des rapports extrêmement détaillés au deuxième bureau à Paris. Ils contenaient des esquisses des défenses côtières britanniques, des cartes régionales, des études de topographie, des commentaires sur la qualité des routes, des analyses des activités de divers groupes nationalistes et unionistes, des analyses de l’opinion publique nationaliste et des estimations sur la qualité et la quantité des troupes britanniques stationnées en Irlande. Une de ces missions militaires dura une année entière 13. Les noms des officiers français et de leurs contacts irlandais ne furent jamais mentionnés. Néanmoins, des annotations et des tampons sur les documents prouvent que ces rapports furent envoyés au président de la République et à plusieurs ministres. La guerre des Boers suscita donc de nombreuses missions de reconnaissance en Irlande entre 1900 et 1904, leur but étant d’évaluer les possibilités d’invasion avec l’aide de républicains irlandais. La « libération » du pays par les troupes françaises conduirait à l’encerclement de la Grande-Bretagne. Ce fut un plan déjà envisagé lors des rebellions irlandaises avec l’appui de la France révolutionnaire en 1796 et 1798 14, excepté que cette fois-ci les Français pouvaient dépendre de leur propre service de renseignement et non pas des rapports d’indépendantistes irlandais.

7Les deux premiers rapports qui furent envoyés à Paris en 1901 étaient des estimations concernant les forces politiques en présence. Le deuxième bureau s’était intéressé de près à trois organisations nationalistes. Tout d’abord, il y avait le Cumman na nGaedheal, un groupement séparatiste qui ne croyait pas au Home Rule. Selon les agents français, le Cumman na nGaedheal enseignait aux habitants dans les campagnes de se tourner vers la France pour se débarrasser des Britanniques. L’organisation comptait 15 000 hommes. Puis, il y avait la ligue Gaélique dont le but était surtout le rétablissement de l’usage de la langue gaélique dans le pays. Bien que la ligue n’eût pas de but politique à proprement parler, les Français s’étaient aperçus que d’autres organisations nationalistes essayaient de la contrôler, ce qui était tout à fait exact. La ligue comptait à peu près dix mille membres. Finalement, il y avait aussi l’United Irish League, une organisation essentiellement agraire dont le but était de s’opposer aux grands propriétaires terriens anglo-irlandais et aussi d’obtenir le Home Rule. La ligue comptait 10 000 hommes et était en faveur des Boers en Afrique du Sud. Cependant, les agents français étaient d’avis qu’elle était trop britannique malgré tout, mais qu’on pouvait habilement la changer en une organisation vraiment séparatiste 15. Bien entendu, les agents du deuxième bureau s’étaient rendus compte que les Irlandais étaient non seulement divisés entre nationalistes modérés et nationalistes extrémistes, mais aussi entre nationalistes et unionistes.

8Les Français signalèrent dans leurs rapports l’existence de l’ordre d’Orange qui représentait « le parti anglais en Irlande ». Bien que l’ordre comptât le chiffre impressionnant de 50 000 hommes dans ses rangs, les Français furent loin d’être impressionnés. Selon les agents, la majorité d’entre eux étaient des ouvriers brutaux et violents de Belfast. Pour terminer, une estimation des troupes qui s’opposeraient à l’armée française avait été faite. La milice irlandaise disposait de 30 000 hommes mais le deuxième bureau estima que 15 000 à 20 000 d’entre eux pouvaient être retirés aux Anglais « dans les trois mois suivant le commencement des hostilités » 16. Le mot « hostilités » est frappant car il suggère que les espions étaient en fait en train de préparer le terrain. Cette impression allait être confirmée au fil des rapports, comme il va être montré. Selon les agents, ces 15 000 à 20 000 hommes étaient des nationalistes et beaucoup d’entre eux soutenaient les Boers. Ils s’étaient engagés dans la milice pro-britannique soit à cause de raisons financières, soit parce qu’ils avaient été soûlés par des sergents-recruteurs. Le deuxième bureau avait repéré les régiments pro-britanniques : les 3e, 4e, 5e et 6e bataillons des Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, les 3e, 4e, 5e et 6e bataillons des Royal Irish Rifles et les 3e, 4e et 5e bataillons des Irish Fusiliers 17. Mais, si les Irlandais étaient divisés entre eux, les Français l’étaient aussi. Théophile Delcassé dirigeait la politique étrangère au Quai d’Orsay et il s’efforçait de maintenir l’alliance franco-russe, de détacher l’Italie de l’Allemagne et de l’Autriche-Hongrie et d’opérer un rapprochement avec la Grande-Bretagne. Cette tâche était fort difficile dans la mesure où il servit dans cinq gouvernements différents entre 1898 et 1905 18. Néanmoins, il réussit à renforcer l’alliance militaire avec la Russie et simultanément à apaiser les tensions avec la Grande-Bretagne.

9Il y avait aussi un courant pro-britannique en France, et en Grande-Bretagne certains politiciens tels Joseph Chamberlain commencèrent à évoquer la possibilité d’une entente cordiale avec la France. Quelques traités entre les deux pays furent signés, notamment concernant l’Afrique. C’était le début du « système Delcassé » 19. Pourtant, certains au sein du gouvernement à Paris n’étaient pas en faveur d’un rapprochement avec les Britanniques car l’humiliation de Fachoda n’avait pas été oubliée 20. En fait, il n’y avait pas d’unité d’opinion, ce qui constitue une faiblesse importante pour l’élaboration d’une politique étrangère cohérente. De plus, il pouvait être extrêmement dangereux d’exprimer son opinion lors du conseil des ministres car durant une discussion particulièrement houleuse, le ministre de la Guerre tenta d’étrangler le ministre de la Marine 21 ! Il apparait que les Britanniques n’avaient pas trop à se soucier des Français mais plutôt des Allemands et de leur nouvelle flotte. Cependant, était-ce bien le cas ?
Invasion

10L’année 1902 semblait de bonne augure pour le deuxième bureau. La guerre en Afrique du Sud perdurait bien qu’il fût clair que les Boers ne vaincraient pas les Britanniques malgré les revers humiliants de ces derniers. Le 17 mars 1902, l’attaché militaire français à Londres envoya un rapport encourageant au gouvernement et au deuxième bureau à Paris. Il commença par dire que le roi Édouard VII, le nouveau monarque britannique, avait décidé d’annuler sa visite en Irlande, exaspéré par le fait que les trois quarts des paysans et presque tous les Irlando-Américains soutenaient ouvertement les Boers. Son rapport précisa que la situation dans le pays était extrêmement tendue. L’attaché militaire se demanda si la question irlandaise pouvait avoir des répercussions internationales sur l’Europe tôt ou tard. Sa réponse à sa propre question était « oui et non ». D’un côté, c’était « oui » car il pensait que la stratégie des séparatistes irlandais était d’encourager les Boers à persévérer dans leur lutte, le but étant d’épuiser les Britanniques. Si des troubles éclataient en Asie Centrale, en Afghanistan et en Perse où les Britanniques et les Russes étaient opposés, l’armée britannique serait, selon lui, dans une position désespérée. D’un autre côté, c’était « non » car il pensait qu’il y avait certains facteurs qui empêcheraient une rébellion à grande échelle d’avoir lieu en Irlande, rébellion qui aurait inéluctablement conduit à la défaite de la Grande-Bretagne sur la scène internationale. Il nomma deux facteurs importants : le manque d’argent et le manque d’armes parmi les républicains 22. Dans l’ensemble, le rapport de l’attaché militaire était une évaluation réaliste de la situation, évaluation qui incitait plutôt à la prudence. Un mois plus tard, en avril 1902, Paris reçut un autre rapport sur l’Irlande et les nouvelles étaient bonnes. En effet, le 3e bataillon du régiment des Munster Fusiliers était revenu d’Afrique du Sud. Ce bataillon était généralement plus connu sous le nom de South Cork Militia (la milice du sud de Cork).

11Lorsque le bataillon arriva à la caserne de la petite ville portuaire de Kinsale, il fut dissout car le régiment des Munster Fusiliers n’avait pas été exemplaire en Afrique du Sud. Selon l’agent français qui avait réussi à obtenir cette information, les soldats irlandais n’avaient jamais été envoyés au front et avaient été maintenus dans leur caserne pour faire des corvées sous la surveillance de détachements anglais 23. Peu de temps après, en septembre 1902, les agents du deuxième bureau à Dublin se virent remettre par des républicains un rapport très précis pour un débarquement français en Irlande. Il serait beaucoup trop long de l’évoquer en détail mais il est clair que les auteurs de ce plan de dix pages avaient minutieusement étudié les conditions sociales, politiques et militaires dans le pays. Selon eux, le meilleur endroit pour débarquer était la côte sud, plus précisément près des villes de Kinsale et Cork. Un premier débarquement d’une petite force aurait pour but de se diriger immédiatement vers l’ouest afin de créer un mouvement de diversion. Les stratèges escomptaient que l’armée britannique allait naturellement suivre les Français et leurs alliés irlandais dans cette direction. Un deuxième débarquement de 60 000 hommes, pas moins, aurait lieu peu de temps après, toujours à Kinsale et ses environs. Cette armée se dirigerait alors tout droit sur Dublin.

12Le plan donnait aussi les principaux objectifs à atteindre et une estimation des forces britanniques 24. Tout cela semblait être faisable en théorie, mais deux remarques viennent à l’esprit. Premièrement, il n’est pas évident que le port de Kinsale fût en mesure d’accueillir une armée de la taille envisagée et tout son matériel. N’oublions pas non plus le nombre de bateaux nécessaires pour une telle opération. Deuxièmement, les républicains n’avaient fait aucune mention de la Royal Navy. Peut-être pensaient-ils que c’était à l’amirauté française de régler ce détail ? Détail fort préoccupant du reste ! Il est vrai, bien sûr, que la marine française avait réussi à éviter la Royal Navy à deux reprises en 1796 et en 1798. Cependant, la Royal Navy du début du vingtième siècle, était-elle aussi puissante qu’on ne le prétendait ? La réponse semble être non. En effet, en 1889, après des manœuvres navales, la Royal Navy avait conclu qu’elle n’était pas en mesure de protéger efficacement la marine marchande britannique, essentielle à la survie du pays, contre une attaque de la flotte française. Ceci préoccupa les chefs du renseignement naval. Mais, il y avait pire. Douze ans plus tard, en 1901, les choses n’avaient pas évolué. L’amiral Lord Walter Kerr, chef de l’amirauté, ne voyait pas l’intérêt de faire des manœuvres navales afin de se préparer contre une éventuelle attaque allemande cette fois-ci. Il dit : « Ce n’est pas la peine de s’interroger sur ce qui pourrait se passer dans un avenir incertain ! » 25 L’avenir était effectivement incertain car en 1901 ce n’était pas du côté de la mer du Nord qu’il fallait regarder mais du côté de la Manche… Les choses n’allèrent vraiment pas en s’arrangeant car la stratégie de la Royal Navy demeurait remarquablement vague en cas de guerre, ce dont se plaignirent certains officiers. Lorsqu’en 1904, Sir John Fisher remplaça Kerr à l’amirauté, rien ne changea car la stratégie de Fisher se résuma par sa maxime préférée : « Frappez les premiers, frappez fort, et frappez partout. » 26 Si le renseignement militaire français avait été au courant de la situation de la Royal Navy, cela aurait pu encourager certains esprits à Paris de venger l’humiliation de Fachoda. Qu’en était-il de la défense de l’Irlande ? La situation peut être très succinctement résumée en un seul mot : désastreuse.

13Avant 1890, il n’y avait pas souvent de manœuvres militaires. En 1892, après quelques manœuvres, le général Garnet Wolseley écrivit au duc de Cambridge que l’artillerie avait perdu de nombreux canons à cause d’erreurs tactiques. Quant à l’infanterie, elle était éparpillée à travers tout le pays et ne savait quoi faire. La conclusion du général était que les officiers supérieurs avaient besoin de prendre des cours de stratégie ! 27 Autrement dit, en cas d’invasion, l’armée britannique ne ferait pas le poids. Une dizaine d’années plus tard, on en était toujours au même point. En 1901, le duc de Connaught, nouveau commandant en chef des armées britanniques en Irlande, écrivit au Lord Roberts : « Il y a, comme vous le savez, un manque très important en hommes en Irlande en ce moment précis et ceci est en soi un grand encouragement pour les ennemis de l’Angleterre. » 28 Sur ce, Connaught quitta son commandement pour un voyage en Inde de quatre mois… Pour finir, il y avait aussi pour le commandement britannique la question brûlante de savoir si on pouvait faire confiance aux troupes irlandaises dans l’armée en cas de guerre. Ceci préoccupa les généraux anglais jusqu’au début de la Première Guerre mondiale en 1914 29. Le deuxième bureau s’était rendu compte de ce problème 30.

14Quoi qu’il en soit, le deuxième bureau n’avait pas attendu le plan de débarquement des républicains irlandais comme le démontre un rapport rédigé en octobre 1902. En effet, durant l’été, les Français avaient étudié les meilleurs endroits possibles pour un débarquement dans le sud de l’Irlande. En fait, ils étaient plus ou moins arrivés aux mêmes conclusions que les républicains. Mais ils avaient repéré quatre points de débarquement : Ballycotton Bay, Courtmacsherry Bay, Kinsale Harbour et Oyster Haven. Ils envisagèrent un seul débarquement massif ou alors, au contraire, plusieurs débarquements simultanés, très probablement pour éviter un engorgement d’hommes et de matériel au même endroit. Ils soulignèrent que si Dublin était l’objectif final, Ballycotton Bay serait le meilleur endroit dans la mesure où des routes très proches menaient à Fermoy, Lismore et finalement à la capitale. Si la ville de Cork était l’objectif principal, alors pas seulement Ballycotton Bay mais aussi Courtmacsherry et Kinsale seraient les meilleures options 31. Il y avait encore un autre facteur très encourageant. Le nombre de soldats irlandais servant dans l’armée britannique était en forte baisse. En janvier 1900, il s’élevait à 37 316 hommes. En avril 1902, il avait baissé jusqu’à 16 837 hommes. Les Français avancèrent comme explication à cette baisse spectaculaire notamment l’influence de l’association Inghinidhe na hEireann, les filles de l’Irlande, fondée par les républicaines Maud Gonne et la comtesse Constance Markievicz. L’association soutenait le séparatisme et boycottait tout Irlandais qui s’enrôlait dans l’armée britannique 32. Il y avait aussi un autre facteur que les Français n’avaient pas mentionné : la peur de l’armée. Durant la guerre en Afrique du Sud, de nombreux jeunes décidèrent d’émigrer, convaincus que la conscription serait bientôt imposée afin de remplacer les pertes britanniques 33. Finalement, le rapport donna une précision des plus intéressantes : « Pour revenir à l’appui réel que trouverait un corps de débarquement dans le pays, je dois noter cette réponse qui nous a été faite chaque fois que, bien à l’abri sous une nationalité d’emprunt, nous interrogions une notabilité nationaliste quelconque sur les chances d’un débarquement franco-russe en Irlande : « si l’envahisseur veut être suivi, qu’il donne de suite aux Irlandais un uniforme, un armement, une organisation militaire et des cadres, même étrangers, l’on aura d’excellents soldats ».» 34

15Les Russes en Irlande… Était-ce une possibilité ? Il ne faut pas oublier qu’à cette époque il y avait des tensions entre la Grande-Bretagne et la Russie concernant l’Afghanistan, la Perse et le Tibet 35. Les Russes n’étaient pas les amis des Britanniques. Une coopération franco-russe en Irlande n’était alors pas si improbable que ça d’autant plus qu’en février 1901, Paul Cambon, à sa plus grande surprise, avait été informé par Théophile Delcassé que le « chef d’état-major [français] était à Petersbourg pour élaborer des plans de défense, non seulement contre l’Allemagne mais contre l’Angleterre » 36. Il est vrai qu’en juillet 1900, le général Pendezec, le chef d’état-major, s’était rendu en Russie pour s’entretenir avec son homologue russe, le général Sakharov. Pendezec avait suggéré le plan suivant : si la France était attaquée par la Grande-Bretagne, alors la Russie enverrait 300 000 hommes en Afghanistan afin de menacer la frontière de l’Inde, le joyau de l’Empire britannique ; si la Russie était attaquée, alors la France concentrerait 150 000 hommes sur sa côte du nord-ouest afin de menacer le sud de l’Angleterre. Les Russes avaient été d’accord 37. Mais en pleine guerre des Boers, l’on est en droit de se demander si ces plans n’étaient pas plutôt de nature offensive car on voit mal la Grande-Bretagne attaquer la France ou la Russie à ce moment-là. Par ailleurs, ce ne serait pas la première fois que la Russie impériale montrerait son intérêt vis-à-vis de l’Irlande. En effet, en 1885, William O’Brien, membre du Parti nationaliste, avait été sondé par un émissaire russe à Londres. L’émissaire voulait obtenir l’approbation de Charles Stewart Parnell, alors chef du parti, pour « une flotte russe de volontaires » afin de transporter 5 000 Irlando-Américains en Irlande et déclencher un soulèvement. Parnell n’avait pas été intéressé et avait répondu à O’Brien : « Le Russe échappera peut-être à la potence – mais pas toi ni moi. ».

16Certains Russes furent impliqués dans d’autres contacts avec les républicains irlandais, notamment aux États-Unis 38. Mais, les services secrets britanniques étaient au courant des relations occultes entre les Français, les Russes et les Irlandais. Comme nous l’avons vu, l’opinion publique française était largement en faveur des Boers. Des comités de soutien virent le jour comme, par exemple, le comité français des Républiques sud-africaines dans lequel étaient impliqués certains membres de l’Action française, tel Lucien Millevoye, journaliste ultra-nationaliste 39. Il n’était alors pas bien étonnant que des républicains irlandais vivaient à Paris et étaient actifs dans des cercles pro-Boers. Maud Gonne était l’une d’entre eux. Elle éditait également un bulletin nationaliste appelé L’Irlande Libre et était la maîtresse de Millevoye avant d’épouser le très républicain John MacBride, qui avait organisé une brigade de volontaires irlandais pour soutenir les Boers. La branche spéciale de la police irlandaise pro-britannique savait que MacBride et Gonne « travaillaient à Paris dans le but d’obtenir la permission du gouvernement français d’établir une brigade irlandaise dans cette ville » 40. Au début, Millevoye n’était pas particulièrement impressionné par les républicains. En 1896, il avait déclaré à Maud Gonne : « Tes révolutionnaires irlandais ne sont qu’un groupe de farceurs. » 41 Peut-être, mais c’était en 1896. Maintenant, il y avait une guerre en cours en Afrique du Sud. De leur côté, les Britanniques ne prirent aucun risque. La branche spéciale rapporta à Londres que Maud Gonne était parmi les « conspirateurs les plus dangereux » et qu’on devait la prendre en filature.

17Le ministère aux Affaires irlandaises ordonna au commandant Gosselin de la branche spéciale de trouver qui étaient les associés et correspondants de Gonne à Paris et ailleurs sur le continent, et également de trouver d’où venait l’argent pour financer ses activités. Gosselin alla voir Sir John Ardagh du renseignement militaire britannique qui lui confia qu’il avait un indicateur auprès de Gonne. Gosselin remarqua qu’il ne croyait pas que les gouvernements français et russe finançaient les républicains irlandais. Mais Ardagh n’en était pas si sûr et répondit : « Oui, cela est parfaitement exact en ce qui concerne le gouvernement russe, le Tsar et son Ministre des Finances, mais vous devez garder à l’esprit qu’il y a plusieurs fonds pour les services secrets russes et qu’ils agissent tous de manière indépendante. Par exemple, le département militaire peut parfaitement faire des dépenses sans que le Tsar ne le sache. » 42 Lors de la conversation, Gosselin apporta une précision intéressante. Il dit qu’un homme appelé Raffalovich de l’ambassade russe à Paris avait « une sœur qui était mariée avec un agitateur irlandais bien connu ». Ardagh répondit qu’il le savait et dit : « Oui, je connais bien cet homme – un juif polonais et un ennemi juré de l’Angleterre. » 43 L’agitateur en question n’était personne d’autre que William O’Brien, l’ancien bras droit de Parnell qui avait été contacté par cet émissaire russe à Londres en 1885. Sa femme était Sophie Raffalovich qui l’avait aidé financièrement dans ses campagnes politiques en faveur du Home Rule.

18Cependant, les plans établis par les républicains irlandais et le deuxième bureau avaient un point faible commun : ils n’évoquaient pas l’aide que devrait apporter, bien évidemment, la marine française. Or, il n’y avait pas vraiment de stratégie commune entre la marine et l’armée en France. Les navires n’étaient pas des plus modernes et de plus, comme pour la Royal Navy, la Marine nationale souffrait de désorganisation. Le ministère de la Marine ne disposait même pas d’un état-major pour étudier des plans de guerre. Il faudra attendre 1902 pour que cela soit le cas. En fait, pour la période qui nous concerne, la marine était en phase de restructuration 44. Les archives du département marine du Service historique de la Défense à Vincennes ne contiennent pas de plan de soutien aux plans du deuxième bureau.Malheureusement pour ces militaires et politiciens français qui brûlaient d’impatience de prendre leur revanche sur la Perfide Albion après Fachoda, le roi Édouard VII décida de tendre la main à l’amitié à la France.
Déception

19Le 1er mai 1903 fut le commencement d’un bouleversement dans les relations internationales en Europe qui frappa de plein fouet l’Irlande nationaliste. Le roi d’Angleterre, Édouard VII, arriva en France pour une visite d’ État. Juste avant son arrivée, l’ambassadeur d’Allemagne à Paris écrivit au prince von Bülow, maintenant chancelier à Berlin : « Plus se rapproche la visite du Roi Édouard, plus les journaux français s’opposent au rapprochement [franco-britannique]. » 45 À première vue, cela semblait bien être le cas car le roi se fit copieusement conspuer et siffler par la foule parisienne qui scanda : « Vive Marchand ! », « Vive les Boers ! ». Mais Édouard VII avait un sens inné de la diplomatie et était un expert en ce que l’on appelle aujourd’hui les relations publiques. Il réussit à changer un climat de franche hostilité en un climat de franche amitié et admiration. « Vive le Roi ! », crièrent les Parisiens à son départ… Le rapprochement franco-britannique était en phase de réalisation, créant la consternation en Allemagne. Quelles furent les raisons de ce changement en relations internationales ? Brièvement, Londres appréhendait la nouvelle politique navale de l’empereur Guillaume II et son amiral Alfred von Tirpitz, capable de menacer directement la Grande-Bretagne et son empire. Petit à petit, l’opinion publique britannique devenait de plus en plus germanophobe. Ceci pava la voie pour l’Entente Cordiale, qui fut signée par la France et la Grande-Bretagne le 8 avril 1904.

20Cette Entente n’était pas à proprement parler une alliance militaire mais il était évident que les deux pays allaient coopérer. Pour les républicains irlandais, ce fut un sérieux revers. Il leur fallait maintenant trouver une autre puissance étrangère susceptible de les aider. Cette puissance allait être l’Allemagne. En 1909, le journal irlandais Kilkenny People rapporta que John MacBride espérait que si les Allemands envahissaient la Grande-Bretagne, ils enverraient aussi 100 000 fusils et de l’artillerie en Irlande pour la libération du pays 46. Cette collaboration entre les républicains et les Allemands allait aboutir au soulèvement de Pâques à Dublin en avril 1916.

21Un incident mineur mais en fait très représentatif du changement d’attitude des Français vis-à-vis des nationalistes et républicains irlandais eut lieu à Fontenoy en Belgique, un endroit extrêmement symbolique de l’amitié franco-irlandaise. C’était ici qu’en 1745 le maréchal de Saxe à la tête de l’armée française vainquit les troupes des alliés anglais, autrichiens et néerlandais sous le commandement du duc de Cumberland. La victoire française n’eut lieu qu’à la fin de la bataille lorsque les régiments d’exilés irlandais au service du roi Louis XV chargèrent les Anglais. Depuis lors, Fontenoy était devenu un haut lieu de la culture nationaliste irlandaise et il y avait des commémorations tous les ans avec la participation d’Irlandais mais aussi de Français. Mais depuis la signature de l’Entente Cordiale, Fontenoy était soudainement devenu un embarras diplomatique pour Paris. Le 3 août 1907, le consul de France à Tournai envoya un rapport sur la commémoration annuelle à l’ambassadeur le comte d’Ormesson à Bruxelles. Il souligna que des nationalistes avaient l’intention d’inaugurer un monument dédié à la bataille et aux soldats irlandais tombés. Il s’agissait d’une croix celtique que l’on voit toujours aujourd’hui au centre du village. Il rappela à l’ambassadeur qu’André Géraud du Quai d’Orsay, spécialiste des affaires irlandaises, avait conseillé aux citoyens français de ne plus participer aux cérémonies de Fontenoy. Il écrivit : « C’était à l’époque de la visite du Roi d’Angleterre en France, en vue de l’Entente Cordiale, et la réserve de M. Géraud paraît [?] avoir d’autant mieux inspiré qu’en fait la manifestation fut une démonstration essentiellement anglophobe. » Quelques jours plus tard, d’Ormesson répondit que les consignes de Géraud devaient être maintenues 47. Les nationalistes irlandais eux-mêmes, d’ailleurs, avaient remarqué ce changement d’attitude chez les autorités françaises. Anatole Le Braz, écrivain breton, s’était rendu en Irlande en avril-mai 1905 et avait pu constater l’importance du souvenir de la bataille de Fontenoy dans les milieux nationalistes. Il rapporta l’anecdote suivante. Apparemment, le maire de Dublin avait invité le consul de France à assister à une commémoration de la bataille. Gêné, le consul répondit qu’il ne pouvait accepter de peur d’offenser la Grande-Bretagne, ce à quoi, le maire répliqua : « Oui, si l’Angleterre vous avait invité à assister à la commémoration de Waterloo, vous y seriez allé… » 48

Conclusion
22Finalement, il convient de répondre à la question suivante : en fin de compte, est-ce que ces plans de débarquement et d’invasion de l’Irlande étaient sérieux ou alors faisaient-ils partie d’opérations de reconnaissance menées régulièrement par le deuxième bureau ou constituaient-ils des exercices militaires théoriques ? Il y a des indices. En ce qui concerne les militaires français, ils perdirent tout intérêt dans les républicains irlandais immédiatement après la signature de l’Entente Cordiale en 1904. Ceci est très clair dans les archives militaires à Vincennes comme le montre le manque soudain de papiers concernant l’Irlande. En effet, il n’y a plus de document intéressant jusqu’en 1912 environ, année à partir de laquelle on semble se diriger vers une guerre civile entre paramilitaires nationalistes et unionistes à cause du Home Rule. En outre, il semble peu probable que des agents français se soient donné tant de peine dans leurs missions en Irlande pour de simples missions de reconnaissance ou d’exercices théoriques. De plus, des enquêtes concernant la possible réaction du peuple irlandais à un débarquement franco-russe incitent à penser qu’une invasion était sérieusement étudiée. Tout ceci peut constituer la preuve que certains militaires et politiciens français avaient bel et bien flirté avec l’idée d’attaquer la Grande-Bretagne pendant la guerre des Boers. L’occasion était trop belle de porter le coup de grâce à un rival colonial puissant et d’essuyer l’affront de Fachoda. Mais, du côté français, les documents semblent manquer pour étayer cette thèse de manière qui ne laisse aucun doute. Peut-être n’ont-ils jamais existés d’ailleurs.

23Comme l’a dit le baron Hermann Speck von Sternburg, l’ambassadeur d’Allemagne à Washington au début du XXe siècle qui était en contact avec des groupements républicains irlando-américains : « [Il y a des renseignements] dont il vaut mieux parler plutôt que d’écrire. » 49 Pas de preuve absolue alors ? Peut-être pas du côté français, mais qu’en est-il du côté britannique ? C’est ainsi que les archives nationales à Londres contiennent un document extrêmement révélateur. Le commandant Gosselin de la branche spéciale avait réussi à infiltrer le Clan na Gael, une organisation républicaine irlandaise aux États-Unis. En décembre 1900, un de ses agents avait assisté à une réunion secrète à laquelle participait John MacBride qui venait d’arriver d’Afrique du Sud en passant par Paris. Voici ce que l’agent britannique rapporta : « Dans son discours aux divers camps [du Clan na Gael] rassemblés dans des réunions secrètes, McBride [sic] fit allusion aux sentiments de la France et mentionna que récemment il avait été présenté au ministre principal [sic] du gouvernement à Paris par un député bien connu. La question que lui posa le ministre était ce que les Irlandais seraient prêts à faire dans, par exemple, six mois, ou alors quand ce pays [la France] aurait recours à eux. C’est ça, continua McBride [sic] que je suis venu vous demander ici pour que je puisse montrer au ministre ce que nous pouvons faire. » 50
24Le « député bien connu » dont parla MacBride fut probablement Lucien Millevoye. Quant au « ministre principal », terme ambigu, MacBride semble avoir fait allusion au président du Conseil, dans ce cas-ci, vu la date, René Waldeck-Rousseau. Certes, il apparait peu crédible qu’un ultranationaliste de droite comme Millevoye, si cela avait été lui, ait eu des relations occultes, pour ainsi dire, avec Waldeck-Rousseau, un politicien de gauche. Seulement voilà, le document de la branche spéciale cadre tout à fait dans la logique des choses et complémente ceux du deuxième bureau trouvés aux archives militaires à Vincennes. N’oublions pas non plus que l’ambassade d’Allemagne à Paris avait eu vent de l’affaire. Il s’agit donc bien de la « dimension quasi-manquante » dont parle à très juste titre le professeur Christopher Andrew.

Notes
1  Andrew (C.) & Dilks (D.) (eds.), The Missing Dimension: Government and Intelligence Communities in the Twentieth Century, London, Macmillan, 1984, p. 1-2.

2  Venier (Pascal), “French foreign policy and the Boer War” in Keith Wilson (ed.), The International Impact of the Boer War, Chesham, Acumen, 2001, p. 65-78.

3  Bell (P.M.H.), France and Britain, 1900-1940 ; entente and estrangement, London, Longman, 1996, p. 9-10.

4  Villate (Laurent), La République des diplomates ; Paul et Jules Cambon, 1843-1935, Paris, Science Infuse, 2003, p. 216 et 213.

5  AMAE, correspondance politique et commerciale 1897-1918, nouvelle série, Transvaal-Orange, no 11, consulat de France à Dublin au Quai d’Orsay, 18 novembre 1899.

6  Ibid., vol. 22, Paul Cambon à Théophile Delcassé, le 11 mars 1902.

7  Guillen (Pierre), L’expansion, 1881-1898, Paris, Imprimerie nationale, 1985, p. 283.

8  AMAE, Grande-Bretagne, politique intérieure, question d’Irlande, 1897-1914, vol. 4, p. 47, Paul Cambon à Théophile Delcassé, le 10 juin 1899.

9  Villate, La République des diplomates, p. 217.

10  Bell, France and Britain, 1900-1914, p. 14-15.

11  Andrew (Christopher), Secret Service; the making of the British intelligence community, London, Heinemann, 1985, p. 34.

12  Hünseler (Wolfgang), Das Deutsche Kaiserreich und die Irische Frage, 1900-1914, Frankfurt am Main, Peter Lang, 1978, p. 119 et note de bas de page no2, p. 119.

13  SHD/DAT, 7 N 1230, attachés militaires, chemise 6, rapport du 30 septembre 1903.

14  Murphy (John A.) (ed.), The French are in the Bay: the expedition to Bantry Bay, 1796, Cork, 1997.

15  SHD/DAT, 7 N 1230, attachés militaires, chemise 3, rapports des 15 octobre 1901 et 20 novembre 1901.

16  SHD/DAT, 7 N 1230, attachés militaires, rapport du 20 novembre 1901.

17  SHD/DAT, 7 N 1230, attachés militaires, rapports des 15 octobre 1901 et 20 novembre 1901.

18  Bell, France and Britain, 1900-1914, p. 24.

19  Allain (Jean-Claude), « L’affirmation internationale à l’épreuve des crises (1898-1914) », Jean-Claude Allain (et al.), Histoire de la diplomatie française, Paris, Perrin, 2005, p. 686, p. 688, p. 696-697 et p. 701.

20  Milza (Pierre), Les relations internationales de 1871 à 1914, Paris, Armand Colin, 2003, p. 118.

21  Kiesling (Eugenia C.), “France”, in Richard F. Hamilton & Holger H. Herwig (eds.), The Origins of World War I, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2003, p. 260-262 & footnote 150 p. 262.

22  SHD/DAT, 7 N 1230, attachés militaires, chemise 5, rapport du 17 mars 1902.

23  SHD/DAT, 7 N 1230, attachés militaires, rapport du 18 avril 1902.

24  SHD/DAT, 7 N 1230, attachés militaires, rapport du 20 septembre 1902.

25  Gooch (John), “The weary titan: Strategy and policy in Great Britain, 1890-1918”, Williamson Murray, MacGregor Knox, Alvin Bernstein (eds.), The Making of strategy; Rulers, states and war, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1994, p.  285-286.

26  Ibid., p.   286.

27  Muenger (Elizabeth A.), The British military dilemma in Ireland; occupation politics, 1886-1914, Lawrence, University Press of Kansas, 1991, p. 24.

28  Ibid., p. 112.

29  Ibid., problème traité à travers cet ouvrage.

30  SHD/DAT, 7 N 1230, attachés militaires, chemise 3, rapport du 20 novembre 1901 et chemise 7, rapport du 18 avril 1902 ; 7 N 1231, chemise 5, rapport du 2 mars 1902.

31  SHD/DAT, 7 N 1230-1231, attachés militaires, chemise 3, rapport du 27 octobre 1902.

32  Idem.

33  Maume (Patrick), The Long Gestation; Irish Nationalist Life 1891-1918, Dublin, Gill and Macmillan, 1999, p.28.

34  SHD/DAT, 7 N 1231, attachés militaires, chemise 5, rapport du 27 octobre 1902.

35  Milza, Les relations internationales de1871 à 1914, p. 123.

36  Villate, La république des diplomates, p. 197-198.

37  Allain, « L’affirmation internationale à l’épreuve des crises (1898-1914) », p. 691.

38  Campbell (Christy), Fenian Fire. The British Government Plot to Assassinate Queen Victoria, London, Harper Collins, 2003, p. 159.

39  Lugan (Bernard), La Guerre des Boers, 1899-1902, Paris, Perrin, 1998, p. 224-252.

40  National Archives (Dublin), “Chief Secretary’s Office, Crime Branch Special 1899-1920”, no 23489/S, rapports des 03/12/1900 & 14/09/1900.

41  McCracken (Donal P.), MacBride’s brigade; Irish Commandos in the Anglo-Boer War, Dublin, Four Courts Press, 1999, p. 78.

42  Public Record Office (Londres maintenant appelé National Archives) ; CO904/202/166A, Maud Gonne’s file, rapports des 30 octobre 1900, 14 novembre 1900, 20 novembre 1900 et résumé non-daté des activités de Maud Gonne, p. 131.

43  Ibid.

44  Doise (Jean) et Vaïsse (Maurice), Diplomatie et outil militaire, Paris, Imprimerie nationale, 1987, p. 120-126.

45  Guiffan (Jean), Histoire de l’anglophobie en France, Rennes, Terre de Brume, 2004, p. 156-157.

46  Hünseler, Das Deutsche Kaiserreich und die Irische Frage, 1900-1914, p. 124-125.

47  AMAE, Grande-Bretagne, politique intérieure, question d’Irlande, 1897-1914, vol. 4, Bossuet à d’Ormesson, le 3 août 1907 et Quai d’Orsay à Bossuet, le 10 août 1907.

48  Le Braz (Anatole), Voyage en Irlande, au Pays de Galles et en Angleterre, Rennes, Terre de Brume, 1999, p. 147-148. L’auteur remercie le professeur Jean Guiffan pour cette précision.

49  Morris (Edmund), “A matter of extreme urgency: Theodore Roosevelt, WilhelmII, and the Venezuela Crisis of1902 – United States-Germany conflict over alleged German expansionistic efforts in Latin America”, The Naval War College Review, spring  2002, http://www.findarticles.com (consulté le 4octobre2004).

50  Public Record Office (National Archives, Londres), CO904/208/258, dossier MacBride, rapport du commandant Gosselin, le 2  janvier  1901, concernant la réunion du Clan na Gael du 16  décembre  1900.

Jérôme Aan de Wiel
Docteur en histoire, il est actuellement professeur associé au département d’histoire à l’université de Cork en Irlande. Il a notamment publié : The Catholic Church in Ireland, 1914-1918: War and Politics (Dublin : Irish Academic Press, 2003) et The Irish Factor, 1899-1919; Ireland’s strategic and diplomatic importance for foreign powers (Dublin: Irish Academic Press, 2008).


Héritage Obama: Nous avions un messie à la Maison Blanche et nous ne le savions pas (Misunderstood Messiah: Far from the skeptic of American messianism that many see in him, Obama is animated by an overwhelming faith in the unstoppable power of American ideals)

18 janvier, 2016
  St MLK
ObamaMessiah
SecondComing
O'sHalo
O'sCrusade
SurrenderGI'sFarsi-IslandobamaangelNe croyez pas que je sois venu apporter la paix sur la terre; je ne suis pas venu apporter la paix, mais l’épée. Car je suis venu mettre la division entre l’homme et son père, entre la fille et sa mère, entre la belle-fille et sa belle-mère; et l’homme aura pour ennemis les gens de sa maison. Jésus (Matthieu 10 : 34-36)
Le monde moderne n’est pas mauvais : à certains égards, il est bien trop bon. Il est rempli de vertus féroces et gâchées. Lorsqu’un dispositif religieux est brisé (comme le fut le christianisme pendant la Réforme), ce ne sont pas seulement les vices qui sont libérés. Les vices sont en effet libérés, et ils errent de par le monde en faisant des ravages ; mais les vertus le sont aussi, et elles errent plus férocement encore en faisant des ravages plus terribles. Le monde moderne est saturé des vieilles vertus chrétiennes virant à la folie.  G.K. Chesterton
We are powerful enough to be able to test these propositions without putting ourselves at risk. And that’s the thing … people don’t seem to understand. You take a country like Cuba. For us to test the possibility that engagement leads to a better outcome for the Cuban people, there aren’t that many risks for us. It’s a tiny little country. It’s not one that threatens our core security interests, and so [there’s no reason not] to test the proposition. And if it turns out that it doesn’t lead to better outcomes, we can adjust our policies. The same is true with respect to Iran, a larger country, a dangerous country, one that has engaged in activities that resulted in the death of U.S. citizens, but the truth of the matter is: Iran’s defense budget is $30 billion. Our defense budget is closer to $600 billion. Iran understands that they cannot fight us. … You asked about an Obama doctrine. The doctrine is: We will engage, but we preserve all our capabilities.” The notion that Iran is undeterrable — “it’s simply not the case,” he added. “And so for us to say, ‘Let’s try’ — understanding that we’re preserving all our options, that we’re not naïve — but if in fact we can resolve these issues diplomatically, we are more likely to be safe, more likely to be secure, in a better position to protect our allies, and who knows? Iran may change. If it doesn’t, our deterrence capabilities, our military superiority stays in place. … We’re not relinquishing our capacity to defend ourselves or our allies. In that situation, why wouldn’t we test it? Barack Hussein Obama
It’s the dreamers — no matter how humble or poor or seemingly powerless — that are able to change the course of human events. We saw it in South Africa, where citizens stood up to the scourge of apartheid. We saw it in Europe, where Poles marched in Solidarity to help bring down the Iron Curtain. In Argentina, where mothers of the disappeared spoke out against the Dirty War. It’s the story of my country, where citizens worked to abolish slavery, and establish women’s rights and workers’ rights, and rights for gays and lesbians. It’s not to say that my country is perfect — we are not. And that’s the point. We always have to have citizens who are willing to question and push our government, and identify injustice. We have to wrestle with our own challenges — from issues of race to policing to inequality. But what makes me most proud about the extraordinary example of the United States is not that we’re perfect, but that we struggle with it, and we have this open space in which society can continually try to make us a more perfect union. (…) As the United States begins a new chapter in our relationship with Cuba, we hope it will create an environment that improves the lives of the Cuban people -– not because it’s imposed by us, the United States, but through the talent and ingenuity and aspirations, and the conversation among Cubans from all walks of life so they can decide what the best course is for their prosperity. As we move toward the process of normalization, we’ll have our differences, government to government, with Cuba on many issues — just as we differ at times with other nations within the Americas; just as we differ with our closest allies. There’s nothing wrong with that. (…) And whether it’s crackdowns on free expression in Russia or China, or restrictions on freedom of association and assembly in Egypt, or prison camps run by the North Korean regime — human rights and fundamental freedoms are still at risk around the world. And when that happens, we believe we have a moral obligation to speak out. (…) As you work for change, the United States will stand up alongside you every step of the way. We are respectful of the difference among our countries. The days in which our agenda in this hemisphere so often presumed that the United States could meddle with impunity, those days are past. (…) We have a debt to pay, because the voices of ordinary people have made us better. That’s a debt that I want to make sure we repay in this hemisphere and around the world. (…) God bless you. Barack Hussein Obama (Sommet des Amériques, Panama city, April 10, 2015)
Nous vivons dans une époque de changement extraordinaire – le changement qui est le remodelage de la façon dont nous vivons, la façon dont nous travaillons, notre planète et de notre place dans le monde. Il est le changement qui promet d’étonnantes percées médicales, mais aussi des perturbations économiques qui grèvent les familles de travailleurs. Cela promet l’éducation des filles dans les villages les plus reculés, mais aussi relie des terroristes qui fomentent séparés par un océan de distance. Il est le changement qui peut élargir l’occasion, ou élargir les inégalités. Et que cela nous plaise ou non, le rythme de ce changement ne fera que s’accélérer. L’Amérique s’est faite par le biais de grands changements avant – la guerre et la dépression, l’afflux d’immigrants, les travailleurs qui luttent pour un accord équitable, et les mouvements pour les droits civiques. Chaque fois, il y a eu ceux qui nous disaient de craindre l’avenir; qui prétendaient que nous ne pourrions freiner le changement, promettant de restaurer la gloire passée si nous venons de quelque groupe ou une idée qui menaçait l’Amérique sous contrôle. Et à chaque fois, nous avons surmonté ces craintes. Nous ne sommes pas, selon les mots de Lincoln, à adhérer aux « dogmes du passé calme. » Au lieu de cela nous avons pensé de nouveau, et de nouveau agi. Nous avons fait le travail de changement pour nous, étendant toujours la promesse de l’Amérique vers l’extérieur, à la prochaine frontière, à de plus en plus de gens. Et parce que nous l’avons fait – parce que nous avons vu des opportunités là où d’autres ne voyaient que péril – nous sommes sortis plus forts et mieux qu’avant. Ce qui était vrai, alors peut être vrai aujourd’hui. Nos atouts uniques en tant que nation – notre optimisme et notre éthique de travail, notre esprit de découverte et d’innovation, notre diversité et de l’engagement à la règle de droit – ces choses nous donnent tout ce dont nous avons besoin pour assurer la prospérité et la sécurité pour les générations à venir. En fait, il est cet esprit qui a fait le progrès de ces sept dernières années possible. Il est comment nous avons récupéré de la pire crise économique depuis des générations. Il est comment nous avons réformé notre système de soins de santé, et réinventé notre secteur de l’énergie; comment nous avons livré plus de soins et les avantages pour nos troupes et les anciens combattants, et comment nous avons obtenu la liberté dans tous les états d’épouser la personne que nous aimons. Mais ces progrès ne sont pas inévitables. Il est le résultat de choix que nous faisons ensemble. Et nous sommes confrontés à ces choix en ce moment. Allons-nous répondre aux changements de notre temps avec la peur, le repli sur soi en tant que nation, et en nous tournant les uns contre les autres en tant que peuple ? Ou allons-nous affronter l’avenir avec confiance dans ce que nous sommes, ce que nous représentons, et les choses incroyables que nous pouvons faire ensemble ? Donc, nous allons parler de l’avenir, et de quatre grandes questions que nous avons en tant que pays à répondre – peu importe qui sera le prochain président, ou qui contrôlera le prochain Congrès. Tout d’abord, comment pouvons-nous donner à chacun une chance équitable de l’occasion et de la sécurité dans cette nouvelle économie ? Deuxièmement, comment pouvons-nous mettre la technologie pour nous, et non contre nous – surtout quand cela concerne la résolution de problèmes urgents comme le changement climatique? Troisièmement, comment pouvons-nous garder l’Amérique en sécurité et conduire le monde sans en devenir le policier ? (…) Il y a soixante ans, quand les Russes nous ont battus dans l’espace, nous ne niions pas que Spoutnik était là-haut. Nous ne disputions pas sur la science, ou aller à réduire notre budget de recherche et développement. Nous avons construit un programme spatial presque du jour au lendemain, et douze ans plus tard, nous marchions sur la lune. Cet esprit de découverte est dans notre ADN. Nous sommes Thomas Edison et Carver les frères Wright et George Washington. Nous sommes Grace Hopper et Katherine Johnson et Sally Ride. Nous sommes tous les immigrants et entrepreneurs de Boston à Austin à la Silicon Valley dans la course à façonner un monde meilleur. Et au cours des sept dernières années, nous avons nourri cet esprit. (…) Je vous ai dit plus tôt tous les discours sur le déclin économique de l’Amérique est de l’air chaud politique. Eh bien, il en est pareil de toute la rhétorique d’entendre dire que nos ennemis deviennent plus forts et que l’Amérique est en train de devenir plus faible. Les Etats-Unis d’Amérique sont la nation la plus puissante de la Terre. Point final. Ce n’ est même pas proche. Nous dépensons plus sur nos militaires que les huit pays suivants combinés. Nos troupes sont la force de combat la plus belle dans l’histoire du monde. Aucune nation n’ose nous défier ou nos alliés attaquer parce qu’ils savent que ce serait leurn perte. Les enquêtes montrent notre position dans le monde est plus élevée que lorsque je fus élu à ce poste, et quand il vient à chaque question internationale importante, les gens du monde ne regardent pas Pékin ou Moscou  – ils nous appellent. Comme quelqu’un qui commence chaque journée par un briefing sur le renseignement, je sais que cela est un moment dangereux. Mais cela ne cause de la puissance américaine diminution ou une superpuissance imminente. Dans le monde d’aujourd’hui, nous sommes moins menacés par les empires du mal et plus par les Etats défaillants. Le Moyen-Orient passe par une transformation qui va se jouer pour une génération, enracinée dans les conflits qui remontent à des millénaires. Les difficultés économiques soufflent d’une économie chinoise en transition. Même que leurs contrats de l’économie, la Russie verse des ressources pour soutenir l’Ukraine et la Syrie – Unis qu’ils voient glisser hors de leur orbite. Et le système international que nous avons construit après la Seconde Guerre mondiale a maintenant du mal à suivre le rythme de cette nouvelle réalité. Il est à nous pour aider à refaire ce système. Et cela signifie que nous devons établir des priorités. La priorité numéro un est de protéger le peuple américain et aller après les réseaux terroristes. Les deux d’Al-Qaïda et maintenant ISIL posent une menace directe pour notre peuple, parce que dans le monde d’aujourd’hui, même une poignée de terroristes qui ne donnent aucune valeur à la vie humaine, y compris leur propre vie, peut faire beaucoup de dégâts. Ils utilisent l’Internet pour empoisonner l’esprit des individus à l’intérieur de notre pays; ils sapent nos alliés. Mais comme nous nous concentrons sur la destruction ISIL, over-the-top on affirme que cela est la troisième guerre mondiale qui vient jouer dans leurs mains. Messes de combattants à l’arrière de camionnettes et âmes tordues traçage dans des appartements ou des garages posent un énorme danger pour les civils et doivent être arrêtés. Mais ils ne menacent pas notre existence nationale. Voilà ce que l’histoire ISIL veut dire; Voilà le genre de propagande qu’ils utilisent pour recruter. Nous ne devons pas les faire augmenter pour montrer que nous sommes sérieux, et nous ne devons repousser nos alliés essentiels dans ce combat en faisant l’écho  du mensonge que ISIL est représentant d’une des plus grandes religions du monde. Nous avons juste besoin de les appeler ce qu’ils sont – des tueurs et des fanatiques qui doivent être extirpés, traqués et détruits. (…) Nous ne pouvons pas essayer de prendre le relais et de reconstruire tous les pays qui tombent dans la crise. Cela ne se veut pas le leadership; qui est une recette pour un bourbier, déversant du sang américain et le trésor qui nous affaiblit finalement. C’ est la leçon du Vietnam, de l’Irak – et nous devrions avoir appris par l’entreprise. Heureusement, il y a une approche plus intelligente, une stratégie patiente et disciplinée qui utilise tous les éléments de notre puissance nationale. Elle dit que l’Amérique agira toujours, seule si nécessaire, pour protéger notre peuple et nos alliés; mais sur des questions d’intérêt mondial, nous mobiliserons le monde pour travailler avec nous, et s’assurer que les autres pays fassent leur part. Voilà notre approche de conflits comme la Syrie, où nous travaillons en partenariat avec les forces locales et conduisant efforts internationaux pour aider cette société brisée à poursuivre une paix durable. Voilà pourquoi nous avons construit une coalition mondiale, avec des sanctions et la diplomatie de principe, pour empêcher un Iran nucléaire. A l’heure où nous parlons, l’Iran a réduit son programme nucléaire, expédié ses stocks d’uranium, et le monde a évité une autre guerre. (…) Voilà la force. Voilà le leadership. Et ce genre de leadership dépend de la puissance de notre exemple. (…) Voilà pourquoi nous devons rejeter toute politique qui vise les personnes en raison de la race ou de la religion. Ce ne sont pas une question de politiquement correct. Il est une question de comprendre ce qui nous rend forts. Le monde nous respecte pas seulement pour notre arsenal; il nous respecte pour notre diversité et notre ouverture et de la façon dont nous respectons toutes les religions. Sa Sainteté, François, dit ce corps de l’endroit même je me tiens ce soir que « d’imiter la haine et la violence des tyrans et des meurtriers est le meilleur moyen de prendre leur place. » Quand les politiciens insultent les musulmans, quand une mosquée est vandalisée, ou un enfant victime d’intimidation, qui ne nous rend pas plus sûr. Cela ne la raconte comme il est. Il est tout simplement faux. Il nous diminue dans les yeux du monde. Il rend plus difficile à atteindre nos objectifs. Et il trahit qui nous sommes en tant que pays. (…) Ce ne sera pas facile. Notre modèle de démocratie est difficile. Mais je peux vous promettre que dans un an à partir de maintenant, quand je ne tiens plus ce bureau, je serai là avec vous en tant que citoyen – inspiré par ces voix de l’équité et de la vision, de courage et de bonne humeur et de gentillesse qui ont aidé l’Amérique voyager si loin. Voix qui nous aident à nous voyons pas en premier lieu comme noir ou blanc ou asiatique ou latino, non pas comme gay ou hétéro, immigrant ou natifs; pas tant que démocrates ou républicains, mais en tant que premier Américains, liés par une croyance commune. La Voix du Dr King aurait cru avoir le dernier mot – voix de la vérité désarmée et l’amour inconditionnel. Ils sont là, ces voix. Ils ne reçoivent pas beaucoup d’attention, ils ne sollicitent pas, mais ils sont en train de faire le travail ce pays a besoin de faire. (…) Voilà l’Amérique que je connais. Voilà le pays que nous aimons. Lucide. Grand coeur. Optimiste que la vérité désarmée et l’amour inconditionnel auront le dernier mot. Voilà ce qui me rend si optimiste sur notre avenir. À cause de toi. Je crois en toi. Voilà pourquoi je suis ici convaincu que l’état de notre Union est forte. Merci, que Dieu vous bénisse, et que Dieu bénisse les Etats-Unis d’Amérique. Barack Hussein Obama
C’est un bon jour parce qu’une nouvelle fois nous voyons ce qu’il est possible de faire grâce à une diplomatie américaine forte. Ces choses nous rappellent ce que nous pouvons obtenir quand nous agissons avec force et sagesse. Barack Hussein Obama
Since the end of the Second World War, no country has been able to arrest American military personnel. I saw the weakness, cowardice, and fear of American soldiers myself. Despite having all of the weapons and equipment, they surrendered themselves with the first action of the guardians of Islam. American forces receive the best training and have the most advanced weapons in the world. But they did not have the power to confront the Guard due to weakness of faith and belief. We gave all of the weapons and equipment to American forces according to an Islamic manner. They formally apologized to the Islamic Republic. Be certain that with the blood of martyrs, the revolution advances. No one can inflict the smallest insult upon our Islamic country. Ahmad Dolabi (IRGC commander)
This incident was a quiet yet an important battle, since it took place off the Saudi coast, targeted an American force, and triggered American [responses expressing] hope [that Iran would not hurt the sailors], which were akin to apologizing to Iran. Washington did not threaten war or raise its voice… (…) The Revolutionary Guards, which are in charge of defending the Gulf, are known to ‘see but not be seen’ – a term coined by the head of their navy, General Ali Fadavi. This means that they watch [the goings on] in the Gulf without being noticed by anyone, and in an emergency, they suddenly appear. (…) The Revolutionary Guards possibly wanted to send a message to all, that if Iran feels that its interests and security are at stake, it will be willing to enter any conflict, even with the U.S…. [Furthermore,] dealing with Washington in this way ensures that smaller [countries] understand that Tehran will never hesitate to respond to any violation of its sovereignty, and that the rules of the game have changed, and therefore certain [elements] should recognize the limits of their power. Lebanese daily Al-Akhbar (close to Hizbullah)
When Iran’s Revolutionary Guards seized two American naval craft in the Gulf on Tuesday evening [January 13, 2016], with ten American sailors on board, it was not the sailors who were the important point, but the fact that the Revolutionary Guards effectively kidnapped U.S. President Barak Obama [himself only] a few hours before he was to deliver his final State of the Union address, towards the end of his second term in office. The crisis of the American sailors [detained by] Iran ended [just] a few hours after their arrest, but it was Obama’s speech that was hijacked, since the Iranians deprived Obama of the opportunity to appear as the strong man who had forced Iran to capitulate on the nuclear dossier. The sailors’ arrest deprived Obama of the chance to boast of the legitimacy of the nuclear agreement and to tell America, which is divided on the Iranian issue, as is the entire world, that Iran has changed and will once again become an active member of the international community, [a country] that renounces violence and respects international treaties and agreements. Some may say that the Iranians’ conduct was foolish, and this is true – but so was placing faith in the Iranian regime! (…) Hence, the arrest of the Iranian sailors [right] before Obama’s address exposed the weakness of the American president and sparked doubts even in those who defend his foreign policy, especially [his policy] towards Iran’s [behavior] in our region. Embarrassment was apparent even among the White House staff, as manifest in leaks and excuses conveyed by Obama’s staff to the U.S. media during the sailors’ detention. The biggest embarrassment was over Obama’s handling of the incident… and [the question of] whether or not he would refer to it in his pre-prepared speech. So what we witnessed was not so much the abduction of the sailors but the abduction of the American president himself. His ransom was the missed opportunity to present himself as a strong president enjoying the legitimacy of achieving the nuclear agreement with Iran. (…) With the premeditated intent to abuse the American president and to present his weakness to all, the Revolutionary Guards arrested the American sailors, and in fact kidnapped Obama himself, [just] days before the expected implementation of the nuclear agreement they will not submit and that Obama is too weak to boast of victory over them. Likewise, the Revolutionary Guards seek to tell anyone, in Iran and outside it, that their hand is still uppermost in Tehran, despite everything that has happened to Iran recently, after the wild attack on the Saudi Embassy in Iran and Tehran’s apology to the [UN] Security Council for this. Additionally, the IRGC’s action [i.e. detaining the sailors] is a response that embarrasses the propaganda of the Iranian president [Rohani] and his men – particularly the wily foreign minister [Zarif] and others – who claim that they want peace and openness, as they market lies and corrupt accusations against Saudi Arabia. (…) Obama’s predicament is not manifested only in his kidnapping, but [also] in that he wants to take a neutral stand vis-à-vis the recent Iranian hostility against Saudi Arabia and the entire region. But he himself became a victim of Iran when [Iran] kidnapped him [just] before his final State of the Union address, and wrecked his opportunity to present himself as an accomplished hero when [his accomplishments] are in fact not yet completed. Tareq Al-Homayed (former editor of the London-based Saudi daily Al-Sharq Al-Awsat)
L’activisme intensif de Barack Obama résulte d’une part du sentiment d’un « non- accompli » sur la scène interne – celle sur laquelle il pensait agir dès la crise financière – et d’autre part, il a compris que constitutionnellement le président n’a pas beaucoup de marge de manœuvre interne. Elu pour son charisme, il pensait, pouvoir gouverner grâce à celui-ci. Ce n’est pourtant pas possible car le Congrès est en place pour une durée plus longue que la présidence et a beaucoup plus de pouvoir sur les affaires internes. Comme beaucoup de présidents qui font leur deuxième mandat aux Etats-Unis, il se penche donc sur la politique étrangère car c’est le seul domaine dans lequel il peut agir. Mais surtout, il pense à son héritage politique : il faut qu’Obama représente quelque chose. A-t-il finalement réussi à convaincre ? Auprès d’une grande partie du public américain, la réponse est négative. Son bilan international se résume en une énorme déception du peu de travail accompli pendant six ans alors qu’il apprenait les rouages du pouvoir. Il a finalement réussi à s’imposer sur ces derniers mois : les dossiers les plus importants ne seront pas le retrait de l’Afghanistan et de l’Irak, ce seront les accords sur le nucléaire iranien et les politiques contre le changement climatique sur lesquels il suit la France, pour le meilleur. (…) Ce modèle multilatéraliste a très difficilement pris racine pendant les mandats d’Obama et survivra aussi très difficilement. Les décideurs américains ne s’intéressent pas à la conception des Etats-Unis dans un monde multipolaire, ils cherchent à réactiver la suprématie américaine. On accuse Obama de manque de cohérence mais il y a, de fait, fait une « Doctrine Obama ». Il l’a très bien exposée dans son discours à l’académie militaire de West Point en mai 2014 mais l’establishment à Washington D.C. et plus largement dans le pays n’a ni compris ni accepté la nécessité pour les Etats-Unis de se positionner correctement dans un monde multipolaire dans lequel ils ne sont pas la puissance prédominante. Nicholas Dungan 
All jawboning by ‪#‎Kerry‬ and other numbskulls aside, this photo will forever represent the disaster that was ‪#‎Obama‬ James Woods5:53 PM – 13 Jan 2016
President Obama (…) believes history follows some predetermined course, as if things always get better on their own. Obama often praises those he pronounces to be on the “right side of history.” He also chastises others for being on the “wrong side of history” — as if evil is vanished and the good thrives on autopilot. When in 2009 millions of Iranians took to the streets to protest the thuggish theocracy, they wanted immediate U.S. support. Instead, Obama belatedly offered them banalities suggesting that in the end, they would end up “on the right side of history.” Iranian reformers may indeed end up there, but it will not be because of some righteous inanimate force of history, or the prognostications of Barack Obama. Obama often parrots Martin Luther King Jr.’s phrase about the arc of the moral universe bending toward justice. But King used that metaphor as an incentive to act, not as reassurance that matters will follow an inevitably positive course. Another of Obama’s historical refrains is his frequent sermon about behavior that doesn’t belong in the 21st century. At various times he has lectured that the barbarous aggression of Vladimir Putin or the Islamic State has no place in our century and will “ultimately fail” — as if we are all now sophisticates of an age that has at last transcended retrograde brutality and savagery. In Obama’s hazy sense of the end of history, things always must get better in the manner that updated models of iPhones and iPads are glitzier than the last. In fact, history is morally cyclical. Even technological progress is ethically neutral. It is a way either to bring more good things to more people or to facilitate evil all that much more quickly and effectively. In the viciously modern 20th century — when more lives may have been lost to war than in all prior centuries combined — some 6 million Jews were put to death through high technology in a way well beyond the savagery of Attila the Hun or Tamerlane. Beheading in the Islamic world is as common in the 21st century as it was in the eighth century — and as it will probably be in the 22nd. The carnage of the Somme and Dresden trumped anything that the Greeks, Romans, Franks, Turks, or Venetians could have imagined. (…) What explains Obama’s confusion? A lack of knowledge of basic history explains a lot. (…) Obama once praised the city of Cordoba as part of a proud Islamic tradition of tolerance during the brutal Spanish Inquisition — forgetting that by the beginning of the Inquisition an almost exclusively Christian Cordoba had few Muslims left. (…) A Pollyannaish belief in historical predetermination seems to substitute for action. If Obama believes that evil should be absent in the 21st century, or that the arc of the moral universe must always bend toward justice, or that being on the wrong side of history has consequences, then he may think inanimate forces can take care of things as we need merely watch. In truth, history is messier. Unfortunately, only force will stop seventh-century monsters like the Islamic State from killing thousands more innocents. Obama may think that reminding Putin that he is now in the 21st century will so embarrass the dictator that he will back off from Ukraine. But the brutish Putin may think that not being labeled a 21st-century civilized sophisticate is a compliment. In 1935, French foreign minister Pierre Laval warned Joseph Stalin that the Pope would admonish him to go easy on Catholics — as if such moral lectures worked in the supposedly civilized 20th century. Stalin quickly disabused Laval of that naiveté. “The Pope?” Stalin asked, “How many divisions has he got?” There is little evidence that human nature has changed over the centuries, despite massive government efforts to make us think and act nicer. What drives Putin, Boko Haram, or ISIS are the same age-old passions, fears, and sense of honor that over the centuries also moved Genghis Khan, the Sudanese Mahdists, and the Barbary pirates. Obama’s naive belief in predetermined history — especially when his facts are often wrong — is a poor substitute for concrete moral action. Victor Davis Hanson
Barack Obama is the Dr. Frankenstein of the supposed Trump monster. If a charismatic, Ivy League-educated, landmark president who entered office with unprecedented goodwill and both houses of Congress on his side could manage to wreck the Democratic Party while turning off 52 percent of the country, then many voters feel that a billionaire New York dealmaker could hardly do worse. If Obama had ruled from the center, dealt with the debt, addressed radical Islamic terrorism, dropped the politically correct euphemisms and pushed tax and entitlement reform rather than Obamacare, Trump might have little traction. A boring Hillary Clinton and a staid Jeb Bush would most likely be replaying the 1992 election between Bill Clinton and George H.W. Bush — with Trump as a watered-down version of third-party outsider Ross Perot. But America is in much worse shape than in 1992. And Obama has proved a far more divisive and incompetent president than George H.W. Bush. Little is more loathed by a majority of Americans than sanctimonious PC gobbledygook and its disciples in the media. And Trump claims to be PC’s symbolic antithesis. Making Machiavellian Mexico pay for a border fence or ejecting rude and interrupting Univision anchor Jorge Ramos from a press conference is no more absurd than allowing more than 300 sanctuary cities to ignore federal law by sheltering undocumented immigrants. Putting a hold on the immigration of Middle Eastern refugees is no more illiberal than welcoming into American communities tens of thousands of unvetted foreign nationals from terrorist-ridden Syria. In terms of messaging, is Trump’s crude bombast any more radical than Obama’s teleprompted scripts? Trump’s ridiculous view of Russian President Vladimir Putin as a sort of « Art of the Deal » geostrategic partner is no more silly than Obama insulting Putin as Russia gobbles up former Soviet republics with impunity. Obama callously dubbed his own grandmother a « typical white person, » introduced the nation to the racist and anti-Semitic rantings of the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, and petulantly wrote off small-town Pennsylvanians as near-Neanderthal « clingers. » Did Obama lower the bar for Trump’s disparagements? Certainly, Obama peddled a slogan, « hope and change, » that was as empty as Trump’s « make America great again. » (…) How does the establishment derail an out-of-control train for whom there are no gaffes, who has no fear of The New York Times, who offers no apologies for speaking what much of the country thinks — and who apparently needs neither money from Republicans nor politically correct approval from Democrats? Victor Davis Hanson
President Obama has a habit of asserting strategic nonsense with such certainty that it is at times embarrassing and frightening. Nowhere is that more evident than in his rhetoric about the Middle East. (…) in July 2015, Obama claimed that the now growing ISIS threat could not be addressed through force of arms, assuring the world that “Ideologies are not defeated with guns, they are defeated by better ideas.” Such a generic assertion seems historically preposterous. The defeat of German Nazism, Italian fascism, and Japanese militarism was not accomplished by Anglo-American rhetoric on freedom. What stopped the growth of Soviet-style global communism during the Cold War were both armed interventions such as the Korean War and real threats to use force such as during the Berlin Airlift and Cuban Missile Crisis— along with Ronald Reagan’s resoluteness backed by a military buildup that restored credible Western military deterrence. In contrast, Obama apparently believes that strategic threats are not checked with tough diplomacy backed by military alliances, balances of power, and military deterrence, much less by speaking softly and carrying a big stick. Rather, crises are resolved by ironing out mostly Western-inspired misunderstandings and going back on heat-of-the moment, ad hoc issued deadlines, red lines, and step-over lines, whether to the Iranian theocracy, Vladimir Putin, or Bashar Assad. Sometimes the administration’s faith in Western social progressivism is offered to persuade an Iran or Cuba that they have missed the arc of Westernized history—and must get back on the right side of the past by loosening the reins of their respective police states. Obama believes that engagement with Iran in non-proliferation talks—which have so far given up on prior Western insistences on third-party, out of the country enrichment, on-site inspections, and kick-back sanctions—will inevitably ensure that Iran becomes “a successful regional power.” That higher profile of the theocracy apparently is a good thing for the Middle East and our allies like Israel and the Gulf states.  (…) In his February 2, 2015 outline of anti-ISIS strategy—itself an update of an earlier September 2014 strategic précis—Obama again insisted that “one of the best antidotes to the hateful ideologies that try to recruit and radicalize people to violent extremism is our own example as diverse and tolerant societies that welcome the contributions of all people, including people of all faiths.” The idea, a naïve one, is that because we welcome mosques on our diverse and tolerant soil, ISIS will take note and welcome Christian churches. One of Obama’s former State Department advisors, Georgetown law professor Rosa Brooks, recently amplified that reductionist confidence in the curative power of Western progressivism. She urged Americans to tweet ISIS, which, like Iran, habitually executes homosexuals. Brooks hoped that Americans would pass on stories about and photos of the Supreme Court’s recent embrace of gay marriage: “Do you want to fight the Islamic State and the forces of Islamic extremist terrorism? I’ll tell you the best way to send a message to those masked gunmen in Iraq and Syria and to everyone else who gains power by sowing violence and fear. Just keep posting that second set of images [photos of American gays and their supporters celebrating the Supreme Court decision]. Post them on Facebook and Twitter and Reddit and in comments all over the Internet. Send them to your friends and your family. Send them to your pen pal in France and your old roommate in Tunisia. Send them to strangers.” Such zesty confidence in the redemptive power of Western moral superiority recalls First Lady Michelle Obama’s efforts to persusade the murderous Boko Haram to return kidnapped Nigerian preteen girls. Ms. Obama appealed to Boko Haram on the basis of shared empathy and universal parental instincts. (“In these girls, Barack and I see our own daughters. We see their hopes, their dreams and we can only imagine the anguish their parents are feeling right now.”) Ms. Obama then fortified her message with a photo of her holding up a sign with the hash-tag #BringBackOurGirls. Vladimir Putin’s Russia has added Crimea and Eastern Ukraine to his earlier acquisitions in Georgia. He is most likely eyeing the Baltic States next. China is creating new strategic realities in the Pacific, in which Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and the Philippines will eventually either be forced to acquiesce or to seek their own nuclear deterrent. The Middle East has imploded. Much of North Africa is becoming a Mogadishu-like wasteland. The assorted theocrats, terrorists, dictators, and tribalists express little fear of or respect for the U.S. They believe that the Obama administration does not know much nor cares about foreign affairs. They may be right in their cynicism. A president who does not consider chlorine gas a chemical weapon could conceivably believe that the Americans once liberated Auschwitz, that the Austrians speak an Austrian language, and that the Falklands are known in Latin America as the Maldives. Both friends and enemies assume that what Obama or his administration says today will be either rendered irrelevant or denied tomorrow. Iraq at one point was trumpeted by Vice President Joe Biden as the administration’s probable “greatest achievement.” Obama declared that Iraq was a “stable and self-reliant” country in no need of American peacekeepers after 2011. Yanking all Americans out of Iraq in 2011 was solely a short-term political decision designed as a 2012 reelection talking point. The American departure had nothing to do with a disinterested assessment of the long-term security of the still shaky Iraqi consensual government. When Senator Obama damned the invasion of Iraq in 2003; when he claimed in 2004 that he had no policy differences with the Bush administration on Iraq; when he declared in 2007 that the surge would fail; when he said in 2008 as a presidential candidate that he wanted all U.S. troops brought home; when he opined as President in 2011 that the country was stable and self-reliant; when he assured the world in 2014 that it was not threatened by ISIS; and when in 2015 he sent troops back into an imploding Iraq—all of these decisions hinged on perceived public opinion, not empirical assessments of the state of Iraq itself. The near destruction of Iraq and the rise of ISIS were the logical dividends of a decade of politicized ambiguity. After six years, even non-Americans have caught on that the more Obama flip-flops on Iraq, deprecates an enemy, or ignores Syrian redlines, the less likely American arms will ever be used and assurances honored. The world is going to become an even scarier place in the next two years. The problem is not just that our enemies do not believe our President, but rather that they no longer even listen to him. Victor Davis Hanson
President Obama has deep-sixed the ‘realism’ that marked the first two years of his approach to the Middle East.  He has returned to the foreign policy of George W. Bush. The United States is no longer, the President told us in words he could have borrowed from his predecessor, a status quo power in the Middle East.  The realist course of cooperating with oppressive regimes in a quest for international calm is a dead end.  It breeds toxic resentment against the United States; it stores up fuel for an inevitable conflagration when the oppressors weaken; it stokes anti-Israel resentment when hatred of Israel becomes the only form of political activism open to ordinary people; it strengthens the hold of extremist religion and strangles the growth of liberal forces. More, he attacked Iran.  All that talk about avoiding polarization with Iran is gone.  Instead, President Obama singled out Iran as an oppressive, tyrannical regime supporting terror and running an “illicit nuclear program” as well. He also followed Bush in attacking some US allies, calling on Bahrain and Yemen to make changes.  It was a speech that enraged almost every powerful actor in the Middle East and put America out on a limb.  Like Bush, Obama is willing to confront some of America’s closest allies (the Saudis, who back the crackdown in Bahrain).  Like Bush, he hailed Iraq as an example of democracy and pluralism that can play a vital role in the transformation of the region. Like Bush, he proposes to work with opposition groups in friendly countries. His policy on Israel-Palestine is also looking Bushesque.  Like Bush, he wants a sovereign but demilitarized Palestinian state.  Like Bush, he believes that the 1967 lines with minor and mutually agreed changes should be the basis for the permanent boundaries between the two countries — and like Bush he set Jerusalem and the refugees to one side. Walter Russell Mead
President Obama’s approach to Iran, the lynchpin of his Middle Eastern strategy, is a classic example of Jeffersonian statecraft through which Obama hopes to stabilize and ultimately democratize the Middle East while reducing America’s profile in the region. By achieving a nuclear agreement and reopening Iran’s economy to the world, Obama hopes to reduce the chances for war (and the need for close American alliances with difficult allies like Israel and Saudi Arabia) while accelerating the democratic transition of a modernizing Iran by integrating that country into international markets. The original ‘grand design’ of the Obama global strategy was loosely modeled on the Nixon/Kissinger foreign policy: a mix of détente, withdrawal and engagement. Where Nixon and Kissinger pursued détente with the Soviet Union, withdrawal from Indochina and outreach to China, Obama proposed détente with Russia, Sunni Islam, and Iran; withdrawal from Iraq; and the ‘pivot to Asia’ as a new kind of American engagement in Asia. (…) The most important open question remains the fate of President Obama’s outreach to Iran. The nuclear agreement, slated to go into effect the same week as the State of the Union address, was the most important diplomatic agreement reached under President Obama and remains highly controversial in the United States. The controversy is less over the specific terms of the agreement than about whether détente with Iran can be achieved on terms that reduce rather than exacerbate the chaotic situation in the Middle East as a whole. The logic of President Obama’s Iran and Russia policies, for example, strongly suggests an ultimate American acquiescence in the continued presence of the Assad government in Damascus as part of an overall political settlement in Syria. For President Obama, acquiescing in a de facto Iranian sphere of influence extending from Basra in southern Iraq to Beirut, even if Iran and Russia remain aligned, can potentially be seen as the first step in stabilizing the Middle East while reducing America’s profile there. (…) Ultimately, the future of President Obama’s Iran policy will be decided by events on the ground. Traditional American allies in the region, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Israel and now increasingly Turkey are pushing against the outreach to Iran; the President remains committed to his policy but as President Obama approaches the end of his term, both in Iran and elsewhere policymakers will increasingly discount him as a factor in future American policy and it is impossible to predict how the regional environment will evolve. Jihadi violence is another wild card. Sensational attacks, like the one in Paris, or ‘lone wolf’ attacks like the one in San Bernardino are deeply unsettling to American public opinion. The President is committed to the argument that overreaction leads to counterproductive policy decisions; he has so far failed to bring the public with him. If the pace and/or the intensity of such attacks increases during 2016, the impact on public opinion and even on the election could be decisive, with major consequences for the President’s legacy. Many observers at home and abroad misunderstand President Obama’s foreign policy, seeing him as skeptical of American claims to a unique global role. On the contrary, President Obama’s Jeffersionian minimalism is animated by an overwhelming faith in the unstoppable power of American ideals. Iran in particular, the President believes, is moving America’s way. The young, educated population of the Islamic Republic will push the country irresistibly toward some kind of accommodation with western ideas in ways that the less advanced Gulf monarchies cannot hope to emulate. The President has repeatedly declared that the tide of history will carry everyone to liberal democratic shores. He dismisses challenges to American power as mere short-term concerns; Putin, the mullahs and the terrorists are incapable of reversing the march of history or of destabilizing the world system. The next President is unlikely to be as optimistic; what that means for American foreign policy remains to be seen. Walter Russell Mead

Attention: un messianisme peut en cacher un autre !

« Connaître la sécurité et de diriger le monde sans devenir son policier », « faire en sorte que notre vie politique reflète le meilleur en nous », « puissance de notre exemple », « amour inconditionnel », références appuyées au Pape et à Martin Luther King …

En cette Journée Martin Luther King

Et au lendemain du dernier discours de l’Etat de l’union, véritable testament politique avancé d’une semaine pour ne pas être parasité par le début de la campagne électorale pour sa succession, d’un président américain qui après le cowboy messianiste Bush aura soulevé presque autant d’espoirs que de déceptions

Prononcé, ironie de l’histoire, au moment même de l’incroyable humiliation de soldats américains par un Iran qui venait d’obtenir la levée de sanctions économiques et le débloquage de dizaines de millliards de dollars de ses avoirs bancaires …

Pendant qu’entre diatribes anti-femmes, anti-immigrés et anti-musulmanes, son possible successeur et maitre du politiquement incorrect mutliplie les occasions de se faire détester

Comment ne pas voir, dans la pose quasi-christique des ces soldats agenouillés et implorant la merci de leurs ennemis si bien repérée par l’acteur américain James Woods, l’image qui résume le mieux la présidence et la doctrine Obama ?

A savoir, de la part de celui qui avait passé 20 ans à écouter les sermons de feu du révérend Jeremiah Wright puis abandonné en quelques mois et avec les conséquences que l’on sait jusque dans nos rues européennes l’Irak à ses démons djiahdistes et avalé entre ses occasionnels coups de mentons bellicistes et ses drones toutes les couleuvres et provocations d’un Iran recherchant ostensiblement à se doter de l’arme nucléaire …

La folle conviction, comme le rappelle aussi le politologue américain Walter Russell Mead, d’être dans le sens de l’histoire et le pari fou de la victoire à terme de l’exemplarité américaine ?

Mais peut-être aussi, comme l’avait annoncé le Christ lui-même, non la venue de la paix mais de l’épée dans le monde ?

Assessing Obama’s foreign policy
Walter Russell Mead
ISPI
13 January, 2016

President Obama’s final State of the Union address comes at a time when, for the first time in his administration, the public believes that the nation’s most serious problems involve foreign policy rather than domestic issues, the majority disapproves of the President’s handling of foreign affairs, and 73 percent say they want the next President to take a “different approach” to foreign policy. President Obama, for his part, remains deeply committed to his approach to foreign affairs, is determined to continue on his current course through the end of his mandate, and wants a new kind of foreign policy to be part of the political legacy of his administration.

This will be an uphill battle. Even Hillary Clinton, the President’s former Secretary of State, has moved to distance herself from some of the President’s signature policies. (She would have been more interventionist in Syria, more patient with Israel, less forthcoming with Russia.) As for the Republicans, Senator Rand Paul was the candidate whose foreign policy views most resemble those of the President, and in large part because of the changes in public sentiment that the President is struggling with, Senator Paul has now been relegated to the second, insignificant tier of Republican hopefuls and dropped from the principal debates.

President Obama and Senator Paul both stand within the Jeffersonian tradition of American foreign policy. This school of thought believes that the principles of the American Revolution fare best when American foreign policy is least active. To actively seek America’s Manifest Destiny through the expansion of America’s global role, Jeffersonians believe, exposes the United States to foreign hostility, endangers civil liberties at home, and entangles the United States with untrustworthy powers who are fundamentally hostile to American ideals. America can best change the world, Jeffersonians believe, by cultivating its own garden and setting an example of democratic prosperity that others will emulate.

President Obama’s approach to Iran, the lynchpin of his Middle Eastern strategy, is a classic example of Jeffersonian statecraft through which Obama hopes to stabilize and ultimately democratize the Middle East while reducing America’s profile in the region. By achieving a nuclear agreement and reopening Iran’s economy to the world, Obama hopes to reduce the chances for war (and the need for close American alliances with difficult allies like Israel and Saudi Arabia) while accelerating the democratic transition of a modernizing Iran by integrating that country into international markets.

The original ‘grand design’ of the Obama global strategy was loosely modeled on the Nixon/Kissinger foreign policy: a mix of détente, withdrawal and engagement. Where Nixon and Kissinger pursued détente with the Soviet Union, withdrawal from Indochina and outreach to China, Obama proposed détente with Russia, Sunni Islam, and Iran; withdrawal from Iraq; and the ‘pivot to Asia’ as a new kind of American engagement in Asia.

Parts of the Obama policy are less controversial than others. In particular, the pursuit of closer ties with Asian nations concerned about a rising China is likely to remain a feature in American foreign policy no matter who occupies the White House in January of next year. Other elements of his foreign strategy are generally considered to have failed. The next White House, Democratic or Republican, is likely to take a harder line with Moscow and to take a hard and skeptical look at the President’s counterterrorism strategy.

The most important open question remains the fate of President Obama’s outreach to Iran. The nuclear agreement, slated to go into effect the same week as the State of the Union address, was the most important diplomatic agreement reached under President Obama and remains highly controversial in the United States. The controversy is less over the specific terms of the agreement than about whether détente with Iran can be achieved on terms that reduce rather than exacerbate the chaotic situation in the Middle East as a whole. The logic of President Obama’s Iran and Russia policies, for example, strongly suggests an ultimate American acquiescence in the continued presence of the Assad government in Damascus as part of an overall political settlement in Syria. For President Obama, acquiescing in a de facto Iranian sphere of influence extending from Basra in southern Iraq to Beirut, even if Iran and Russia remain aligned, can potentially be seen as the first step in stabilizing the Middle East while reducing America’s profile there. It is not at all clear that any of the current contenders for the presidency, Hillary Clinton not excluded, would agree with that assessment.

Ultimately, the future of President Obama’s Iran policy will be decided by events on the ground. Traditional American allies in the region, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Israel and now increasingly Turkey are pushing against the outreach to Iran; the President remains committed to his policy but as President Obama approaches the end of his term, both in Iran and elsewhere policymakers will increasingly discount him as a factor in future American policy and it is impossible to predict how the regional environment will evolve.

Jihadi violence is another wild card. Sensational attacks, like the one in Paris, or ‘lone wolf’ attacks like the one in San Bernardino are deeply unsettling to American public opinion. The President is committed to the argument that overreaction leads to counterproductive policy decisions; he has so far failed to bring the public with him. If the pace and/or the intensity of such attacks increases during 2016, the impact on public opinion and even on the election could be decisive, with major consequences for the President’s legacy.

Many observers at home and abroad misunderstand President Obama’s foreign policy, seeing him as skeptical of American claims to a unique global role. On the contrary, President Obama’s Jeffersionian minimalism is animated by an overwhelming faith in the unstoppable power of American ideals. Iran in particular, the President believes, is moving America’s way. The young, educated population of the Islamic Republic will push the country irresistibly toward some kind of accommodation with western ideas in ways that the less advanced Gulf monarchies cannot hope to emulate. The President has repeatedly declared that the tide of history will carry everyone to liberal democratic shores. He dismisses challenges to American power as mere short-term concerns; Putin, the mullahs and the terrorists are incapable of reversing the march of history or of destabilizing the world system.

The next President is unlikely to be as optimistic; what that means for American foreign policy remains to be seen.

Walter Russell Mead is the Distinguished Scholar in American Strategy and Statesmanship at the Hudson Institute, the James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and Humanities at Bard College, and Editor-at-Large of The American Interest.

Voir aussi:

Obama’s Hazy Sense of History
For the president, belief in historical predetermination substitutes for action.
Victor Davis Hanson
National Review On line
August 28, 2014
President Obama doesn’t know much about history.
In his therapeutic 2009 Cairo speech, Obama outlined all sorts of Islamic intellectual and technological pedigrees, several of which were undeserved. He exaggerated Muslim contributions to printing and medicine, for example, and was flat-out wrong about the catalysts for the European Renaissance and Enlightenment.
He also believes history follows some predetermined course, as if things always get better on their own. Obama often praises those he pronounces to be on the “right side of history.” He also chastises others for being on the “wrong side of history” — as if evil is vanished and the good thrives on autopilot.
When in 2009 millions of Iranians took to the streets to protest the thuggish theocracy, they wanted immediate U.S. support. Instead, Obama belatedly offered them banalities suggesting that in the end, they would end up “on the right side of history.” Iranian reformers may indeed end up there, but it will not be because of some righteous inanimate force of history, or the prognostications of Barack Obama.
Obama often parrots Martin Luther King Jr.’s phrase about the arc of the moral universe bending toward justice. But King used that metaphor as an incentive to act, not as reassurance that matters will follow an inevitably positive course.
Another of Obama’s historical refrains is his frequent sermon about behavior that doesn’t belong in the 21st century. At various times he has lectured that the barbarous aggression of Vladimir Putin or the Islamic State has no place in our century and will “ultimately fail” — as if we are all now sophisticates of an age that has at last transcended retrograde brutality and savagery.
In Obama’s hazy sense of the end of history, things always must get better in the manner that updated models of iPhones and iPads are glitzier than the last. In fact, history is morally cyclical. Even technological progress is ethically neutral. It is a way either to bring more good things to more people or to facilitate evil all that much more quickly and effectively.
In the viciously modern 20th century — when more lives may have been lost to war than in all prior centuries combined — some 6 million Jews were put to death through high technology in a way well beyond the savagery of Attila the Hun or Tamerlane. Beheading in the Islamic world is as common in the 21st century as it was in the eighth century — and as it will probably be in the 22nd. The carnage of the Somme and Dresden trumped anything that the Greeks, Romans, Franks, Turks, or Venetians could have imagined.
What explains Obama’s confusion?
A lack of knowledge of basic history explains a lot. Obama or his speechwriters have often seemed confused about the liberation of Auschwitz, “Polish death camps,” the political history of Texas, or the linguistic relationship between Austria and Germany. Obama reassured us during the Bowe Bergdahl affair that George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Franklin Roosevelt all similarly got American prisoners back when their wars ended — except that none of them were in office when the Revolutionary War, Civil War, or World War II officially ended.
Contrary to Obama’s assertion, President Rutherford B. Hayes never dismissed the potential of the telephone. Obama once praised the city of Cordoba as part of a proud Islamic tradition of tolerance during the brutal Spanish Inquisition — forgetting that by the beginning of the Inquisition an almost exclusively Christian Cordoba had few Muslims left.
A Pollyannaish belief in historical predetermination seems to substitute for action. If Obama believes that evil should be absent in the 21st century, or that the arc of the moral universe must always bend toward justice, or that being on the wrong side of history has consequences, then he may think inanimate forces can take care of things as we need merely watch. In truth, history is messier. Unfortunately, only force will stop seventh-century monsters like the Islamic State from killing thousands more innocents. Obama may think that reminding Putin that he is now in the 21st century will so embarrass the dictator that he will back off from Ukraine. But the brutish Putin may think that not being labeled a 21st-century civilized sophisticate is a compliment.
In 1935, French foreign minister Pierre Laval warned Joseph Stalin that the Pope would admonish him to go easy on Catholics — as if such moral lectures worked in the supposedly civilized 20th century. Stalin quickly disabused Laval of that naiveté. “The Pope?” Stalin asked, “How many divisions has he got?”
There is little evidence that human nature has changed over the centuries, despite massive government efforts to make us think and act nicer. What drives Putin, Boko Haram, or ISIS are the same age-old passions, fears, and sense of honor that over the centuries also moved Genghis Khan, the Sudanese Mahdists, and the Barbary pirates. Obama’s naive belief in predetermined history — especially when his facts are often wrong — is a poor substitute for concrete moral action.

— Victor Davis Hanson is a classicist and historian at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and the author, most recently, of The Savior Generals.

Voir également:

Obama’s failings among reasons for Trump’s rise
Victor Davis Hanson

San Jose Mercury news

01/13/2016

Three truths fuel Donald Trump.

One, Barack Obama is the Dr. Frankenstein of the supposed Trump monster.

If a charismatic, Ivy League-educated, landmark president who entered office with unprecedented goodwill and both houses of Congress on his side could manage to wreck the Democratic Party while turning off 52 percent of the country, then many voters feel that a billionaire New York dealmaker could hardly do worse.

If Obama had ruled from the center, dealt with the debt, addressed radical Islamic terrorism, dropped the politically correct euphemisms and pushed tax and entitlement reform rather than Obamacare, Trump might have little traction. A boring Hillary Clinton and a staid Jeb Bush would most likely be replaying the 1992 election between Bill Clinton and George H.W. Bush — with Trump as a watered-down version of third-party outsider Ross Perot.

But America is in much worse shape than in 1992. And Obama has proved a far more divisive and incompetent president than George H.W. Bush.

Little is more loathed by a majority of Americans than sanctimonious PC gobbledygook and its disciples in the media. And Trump claims to be PC’s symbolic antithesis.

Making Machiavellian Mexico pay for a border fence or ejecting rude and interrupting Univision anchor Jorge Ramos from a press conference is no more absurd than allowing more than 300 sanctuary cities to ignore federal law by sheltering undocumented immigrants. Putting a hold on the immigration of Middle Eastern refugees is no more illiberal than welcoming into American communities tens of thousands of unvetted foreign nationals from terrorist-ridden Syria.

In terms of messaging, is Trump’s crude bombast any more radical than Obama’s teleprompted scripts?

Trump’s ridiculous view of Russian President Vladimir Putin as a sort of « Art of the Deal » geostrategic partner is no more silly than Obama insulting Putin as Russia gobbles up former Soviet republics with impunity.

Obama callously dubbed his own grandmother a « typical white person, » introduced the nation to the racist and anti-Semitic rantings of the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, and petulantly wrote off small-town Pennsylvanians as near-Neanderthal « clingers. » Did Obama lower the bar for Trump’s disparagements?

Certainly, Obama peddled a slogan, « hope and change, » that was as empty as Trump’s « make America great again. »

Two, the Republican establishment also jolted Trump to life.

Trump supporters apparently don’t believe that Chamber of Commerce, Wall Street or Republican Party grandees offer many antidotes to Obamaism.

Three, Trump is a nihilist, but he is a canny nihilist unlike any we have seen in recent campaigns.

In about a day, Trump wrecked Hillary Clinton’s planned « war on women » talking points that had helped to win the election for Obama in 2012. « If Hillary thinks she can unleash her husband, with his terrible record of women abuse, while playing the women’s card on me, she’s wrong, » Trump declared recently.

Street fighter Trump has an uncanny ability to spot these apparent contradictions. Trump’s unkind « low-energy » label of Jeb Bush stuck.

Politicians really do pander in shameless fashion to big-money donors. Who better than Trump to know that? He claims he used to lavish cash on lots of them. Trump does not play by any political rules because he has always made up or bought his own rules.

How does the establishment derail an out-of-control train for whom there are no gaffes, who has no fear of The New York Times, who offers no apologies for speaking what much of the country thinks — and who apparently needs neither money from Republicans nor politically correct approval from Democrats?

Voir encore:

Obama’s Dangerous Rhetoric
Victor Davis Hanson
Hoover

July 22, 2015

President Obama has a habit of asserting strategic nonsense with such certainty that it is at times embarrassing and frightening. Nowhere is that more evident than in his rhetoric about the Middle East.

Not long ago, Obama reassured the world that, despite evidence of the use of chemical weapons in Syria, “Chlorine itself is not listed as a chemical weapon.” What could he have meant by that? Obama apparently was referring to the focus on Sarin gas by the Organization for Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, the UN watchdog agency that was supposed to monitor Obama’s Syria red line warnings against further gas attacks. To reassure the public that the United States would not consider chlorine gas a violation of its own red line about chemical weapons use in Syria—and, therefore, to assure the public that his administration would not intervene militarily in Syria—Obama said:  “Chlorine itself, historically, has not been listed as a chemical weapon.”

Nothing could be further from the truth. Chlorine was the father of poison gas, the first chemical agent used in World War I—and it was used to lethal effect by the Germans at the battle of Ypres in April 1915. Subsequently, it was mixed and upgraded with phosgene gas to make an even deadlier brew and employed frequently throughout the war—most infamously at the Battle of the Somme.

The president was clearly bothered that he had boxed himself into a rhetorical corner and might have had to order air strikes against the defiant Assad regime—lest he appear wavering in carrying out his earlier threats. One way out of that dilemma would be to deny that chorine constituted a serious weapon used to kill soldiers and civilians. Another would simply be to claim that he had never issued such a red line to Bashar al-Assad at all. That refuge is exactly what Obama fell back upon at press conference on September 4, 2013: “I didn’t set a red line. The world set a red line.”

Here is what the president had earlier stated on August 20, 2012, in threatening Assad: “We have been very clear to the Assad regime, but also to other players on the ground, that a red line for us is we start seeing a whole bunch of chemical weapons moving around or being utilized. That would change my calculus. That would change my equation.”

The use of the presidential pronouns “we” and “my” are synonymous with the voice of his administration. Indeed, Obama had doubled down on his 2012 red line with the clarification that, “When I said that the use of chemical weapons would be a game-changer, that wasn’t unique to—that wasn’t a position unique to the United States and it shouldn’t have been a surprise.”

In the summer of 2014, Obama had dismissed the emergence of ISIS with colorful language about its inability to project terrorism much beyond its local Iraqi embryo: “I think the analogy we use around here sometimes, and I think is accurate, is if a JV team puts on Lakers uniforms, that doesn’t make them Kobe Bryant. I think there is a distinction between the capacity and reach of a bin Laden and a network that is actively planning major terrorist plots against the homeland versus jihadists who are engaged in various local power struggles and disputes, often sectarian.”

ISIS, remember, had already conducted terrorist operations across the Mediterranean. Both organized and lone-wolf terrorists, with claims of ISIS ties or inspiration, would go on to attack Westerners from France to Texas.

Obama compounded his obfuscations by later claiming to Meet the Press anchor Chuck Todd that he had never said such a thing at all about ISIS—an assertion that was deemed false by even the liberal fact-checking organization PolitiFact. More recently, in July 2015, Obama claimed that the now growing ISIS threat could not be addressed through force of arms, assuring the world that “Ideologies are not defeated with guns, they are defeated by better ideas.”

Such a generic assertion seems historically preposterous. The defeat of German Nazism, Italian fascism, and Japanese militarism was not accomplished by Anglo-American rhetoric on freedom. What stopped the growth of Soviet-style global communism during the Cold War were both armed interventions such as the Korean War and real threats to use force such as during the Berlin Airlift and Cuban Missile Crisis— along with Ronald Reagan’s resoluteness backed by a military buildup that restored credible Western military deterrence.

In contrast, Obama apparently believes that strategic threats are not checked with tough diplomacy backed by military alliances, balances of power, and military deterrence, much less by speaking softly and carrying a big stick. Rather, crises are resolved by ironing out mostly Western-inspired misunderstandings and going back on heat-of-the moment, ad hoc issued deadlines, red lines, and step-over lines, whether to the Iranian theocracy, Vladimir Putin, or Bashar Assad.

Sometimes the administration’s faith in Western social progressivism is offered to persuade an Iran or Cuba that they have missed the arc of Westernized history—and must get back on the right side of the past by loosening the reins of their respective police states. Obama believes that engagement with Iran in non-proliferation talks—which have so far given up on prior Western insistences on third-party, out of the country enrichment, on-site inspections, and kick-back sanctions—will inevitably ensure that Iran becomes “a successful regional power.” That higher profile of the theocracy apparently is a good thing for the Middle East and our allies like Israel and the Gulf states.

In his well-publicized Cairo speech of June 2009, Obama declared that Islam had a hand in prompting the Western Renaissance and Enlightenment, as well as offering other underappreciated gifts to the West, from medicine to navigation. Obama’s tutorial was offered to remind the Muslim Brotherhood members in his audience that the West really does owe much to the Muslim World—and thus by inference should expect reciprocal consideration in the current war on terror.

In his February 2, 2015 outline of anti-ISIS strategy—itself an update of an earlier September 2014 strategic précis—Obama again insisted that “one of the best antidotes to the hateful ideologies that try to recruit and radicalize people to violent extremism is our own example as diverse and tolerant societies that welcome the contributions of all people, including people of all faiths.” The idea, a naïve one, is that because we welcome mosques on our diverse and tolerant soil, ISIS will take note and welcome Christian churches.

One of Obama’s former State Department advisors, Georgetown law professor Rosa Brooks, recently amplified that reductionist confidence in the curative power of Western progressivism. She urged Americans to tweet ISIS, which, like Iran, habitually executes homosexuals. Brooks hoped that Americans would pass on stories about and photos of the Supreme Court’s recent embrace of gay marriage: “Do you want to fight the Islamic State and the forces of Islamic extremist terrorism? I’ll tell you the best way to send a message to those masked gunmen in Iraq and Syria and to everyone else who gains power by sowing violence and fear. Just keep posting that second set of images [photos of American gays and their supporters celebrating the Supreme Court decision]. Post them on Facebook and Twitter and Reddit and in comments all over the Internet. Send them to your friends and your family. Send them to your pen pal in France and your old roommate in Tunisia. Send them to strangers.”

Such zesty confidence in the redemptive power of Western moral superiority recalls First Lady Michelle Obama’s efforts to persusade the murderous Boko Haram to return kidnapped Nigerian preteen girls. Ms. Obama appealed to Boko Haram on the basis of shared empathy and universal parental instincts. (“In these girls, Barack and I see our own daughters. We see their hopes, their dreams and we can only imagine the anguish their parents are feeling right now.”) Ms. Obama then fortified her message with a photo of her holding up a sign with the hash-tag #BringBackOurGirls.

Vladimir Putin’s Russia has added Crimea and Eastern Ukraine to his earlier acquisitions in Georgia. He is most likely eyeing the Baltic States next. China is creating new strategic realities in the Pacific, in which Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and the Philippines will eventually either be forced to acquiesce or to seek their own nuclear deterrent. The Middle East has imploded. Much of North Africa is becoming a Mogadishu-like wasteland.

The assorted theocrats, terrorists, dictators, and tribalists express little fear of or respect for the U.S. They believe that the Obama administration does not know much nor cares about foreign affairs. They may be right in their cynicism. A president who does not consider chlorine gas a chemical weapon could conceivably believe that the Americans once liberated Auschwitz, that the Austrians speak an Austrian language, and that the Falklands are known in Latin America as the Maldives.

Both friends and enemies assume that what Obama or his administration says today will be either rendered irrelevant or denied tomorrow. Iraq at one point was trumpeted by Vice President Joe Biden as the administration’s probable “greatest achievement.” Obama declared that Iraq was a “stable and self-reliant” country in no need of American peacekeepers after 2011.

Yanking all Americans out of Iraq in 2011 was solely a short-term political decision designed as a 2012 reelection talking point. The American departure had nothing to do with a disinterested assessment of the long-term security of the still shaky Iraqi consensual government. When Senator Obama damned the invasion of Iraq in 2003; when he claimed in 2004 that he had no policy differences with the Bush administration on Iraq; when he declared in 2007 that the surge would fail; when he said in 2008 as a presidential candidate that he wanted all U.S. troops brought home; when he opined as President in 2011 that the country was stable and self-reliant; when he assured the world in 2014 that it was not threatened by ISIS; and when in 2015 he sent troops back into an imploding Iraq—all of these decisions hinged on perceived public opinion, not empirical assessments of the state of Iraq itself. The near destruction of Iraq and the rise of ISIS were the logical dividends of a decade of politicized ambiguity.

After six years, even non-Americans have caught on that the more Obama flip-flops on Iraq, deprecates an enemy, or ignores Syrian redlines, the less likely American arms will ever be used and assurances honored.

The world is going to become an even scarier place in the next two years. The problem is not just that our enemies do not believe our President, but rather that they no longer even listen to him.

Voir de plus:

Moyen-Orient

Vidéo : images de l’arrestation des marins américains en Iran
FRANCE 24
13/01/2016

La télévision iranienne a diffusé les images de l’arrestation des 10 marins américains qui s’étaient égarés dans les eaux territoriales iraniennes. Ils ont depuis repris leur route.
Mains sur la tête, agenouillés et ne pouvant plus bouger, les marins des deux navires américains arraisonnés mardi au large des côtes iranienne ont été filmés par la télévision du pays (IRNN) et les images diffusées mercredi sur les réseaux sociaux.

Neuf hommes et une femme avaient été interceptés mardi alors qu’ils étaient entrés de « deux kilomètres à l’intérieur des eaux territoriales iraniennes », selon l’agence Fars, proche des Gardiens de la révolution. Ils avaient été emmenés sur l’île Farsi située dans la partie nord du Golfe.

Les 10 marins américains, arrêtés à la suite d’une panne de leur système de navigation qui les a amenés dans les eaux territoriales de l’Iran, « ont été libérés » après avoir présenté leurs excuses. Les autorités iraniennes se sont assurées que leur action n’était pas « intentionnelle ».

Voir également:

Iran: ‘American Sailors Started Crying After Arrest’
IRGC Official: ‘I saw the weakness, cowardice, and fear of American soldiers myself’
Adam Kredo
Washington Beacon
January 16, 2016

A senior Iranian military commander in charge of the country’s Revolutionary Guard Corps claimed that the 10 U.S. sailors who were recently captured and subsequently released by the Islamic Republic “started crying after [their] arrest,” according to Persian language comments made during military celebrations this weekend.

Hossein Salami, deputy commander of the IRGC, which is responsible for boarding the U.S. ships and arresting the sailors, claimed in recent remarks, the “American sailors started crying after arrest, but the kindness of our Guard made them feel calm.”

Hossein went on to brag that the incident provides definitive evidence of the Iranian military’s supremacy in the region.

“Since the end of the Second World War, no country has been able to arrest American military personnel,” the commander said, according to an independent translation of his Persian-language remarks made Friday during a “martyrs’ commemoration ceremony” in Isfahan.

Since the capture and release of the U.S. sailors this week, critics of the Obama administration’s handling of the situation have expressed embarrassment at State Department’s move to profusely thank Iran, despite its release of photos depicting the sailors on their knees with their hands held over their heads.

Iranian state television additionally published video purporting to show one of the detained soldiers apologizing to Iran.

Meanwhile, during Friday prayers in Iran, a commander of the IRGC unit that detained the U.S. boats and claimed that the American military cowered when faced down by Iranian troops.

“I saw the weakness, cowardice, and fear of American soldiers myself. Despite having all of the weapons and equipment, they surrendered themselves with the first action of the guardians of Islam,” Ahmad Dolabi, an IRGC commander, said in Persian-language remarks at a prayer service in Iran’s Bushehr providence.

“American forces receive the best training and have the most advanced weapons in the world,” he added. “But they did not have the power to confront the Guard due to weakness of faith and belief.”

Dolabi emphasized that the Obama administration formally apologized over the incident, a claim that senior White House official continue to dispute.

“We gave all of the weapons and equipment to American forces according to an Islamic manner. They formally apologized to the Islamic Republic,” Dolabi said. “Be certain that with the blood of martyrs, the revolution advances. No one can inflict the smallest insult upon our Islamic country.”

Voir encore:

Administration Obama : un héritage qui s’inscrira sur le long terme ?
Interview
Nicholas Dungan
9 septembre 2015

Comment expliquer l’activisme intensif de Barack Obama sur les crises et les accords internationaux ces derniers mois ? A-t-il finalement réussi à convaincre en politique étrangère ? Quelle est votre analyse de son bilan international ?

L’activisme intensif de Barack Obama résulte d’une part du sentiment d’un « non- accompli » sur la scène interne – celle sur laquelle il pensait agir dès la crise financière – et d’autre part, il a compris que constitutionnellement le président n’a pas beaucoup de marge de manœuvre interne. Elu pour son charisme, il pensait, pouvoir gouverner grâce à celui-ci. Ce n’est pourtant pas possible car le Congrès est en place pour une durée plus longue que la présidence et a beaucoup plus de pouvoir sur les affaires internes. Comme beaucoup de présidents qui font leur deuxième mandat aux Etats-Unis, il se penche donc sur la politique étrangère car c’est le seul domaine dans lequel il peut agir. Mais surtout, il pense à son héritage politique : il faut qu’Obama représente quelque chose. A-t-il finalement réussi à convaincre ? Auprès d’une grande partie du public américain, la réponse est négative.
Son bilan international se résume en une énorme déception du peu de travail accompli pendant six ans alors qu’il apprenait les rouages du pouvoir. Il a finalement réussi à s’imposer sur ces derniers mois : les dossiers les plus importants ne seront pas le retrait de l’Afghanistan et de l’Irak, ce seront les accords sur le nucléaire iranien et les politiques contre le changement climatique sur lesquels il suit la France, pour le meilleur.

Obama a voulu inscrire les Etats-Unis dans un monde multipolaire. Pensez- vous que ce modèle, à l’opposé de l’ère Bush, survivra à l’administration Obama ?

Ce modèle multilatéraliste a très difficilement pris racine pendant les mandats d’Obama et survivra aussi très difficilement. Les décideurs américains ne s’intéressent pas à la conception des Etats-Unis dans un monde multipolaire, ils cherchent à réactiver la suprématie américaine. On accuse Obama de manque de cohérence mais il y a, de fait, fait une « Doctrine Obama ». Il l’a très bien exposée dans son discours à l’académie militaire de West Point en mai 2014 mais l’establishment à Washington D.C. et plus largement dans le pays n’a ni compris ni accepté la nécessité pour les Etats-Unis de se positionner correctement dans un monde multipolaire dans lequel ils ne sont pas la puissance prédominante.

Concernant les primaires démocrates et républicaines qui auront lieu en 2016, quels grands thèmes de la politique étrangère américaine pourraient mettre les candidats au défi ?

Ce seront les grands thèmes de l’administration Obama : les accords sur le nucléaire iranien et la lutte contre le changement climatique. La droite aux Etats-Unis ne pardonnera pas : le républicain Donald Trump tentera de démontrer qu’il faut rejeter ces politiques multilatérales pour « make America great again ». Les autres républicains auront beaucoup de mal, par exemple Jeb Bush, s’il arrive à survivre jusqu’à la nomination républicaine, à contrer cette position extrêmement dure de Donald Trump.
Et bien sûr, la question de l’immigration, à cheval entre politique interne et étrangère, sera à l’ordre du jour : la problématique des sans-papiers, des naturalisations des enfants nés aux Etats-Unis d’immigrés illégaux, etc. A l’heure actuelle, le droit du sol est encore strictement appliqué aux Etats-Unis mais Donald Trump déclare vouloir changer cette accession à la nationalité américaine, en tout cas pour ces catégories de migrants illégaux.

Voir également:

Sept phrases à retenir du dernier discours sur l’état de l’Union de Barack Obama
Dans un discours résolument optimiste, le président des Etats-Unis a exhorté l’Amérique à ne pas céder à la peur.
Francetv info avec AFP
13/01/2016

Barack Obama a prononcé, mardi 12 janvier, son ultime discours sur l’état de l’Union. Ce rendez-vous traditionnel était pour le 44e président des Etats-Unis la dernière occasion de s’adresser aux Américains en prime time, avant que Washington et le reste du pays ne braquent tous leurs projecteurs sur les primaires démocrates et républicaines, qui débutent le 1er février dans l’Iowa.

Dans un discours résolument optimiste, le président a exhorté l’Amérique à ne pas céder à la peur, face aux turbulences économiques comme à la menace du groupe Etat islamique qu’il a appelé à ne pas surestimer. Déterminé à marquer le contraste avec les républicains qui espèrent lui succéder à la Maison Blanche en 2017, le président démocrate, très à l’aise, enjoué, a invité ses concitoyens à accompagner les « extraordinaires changements » en cours. Retour sur ses principales déclarations en sept phrases-clés.

« Les Etats-Unis ont l’économie la plus forte, la plus durable du monde »
Barack Obama a battu en brèche les déclarations alarmistes du milliardaire Donald Trump, candidat à la primaire républicaine. Parler du déclin de l’économie américaine est « une fiction politique ». « Laissez-moi commencer avec l’économie et un fait basique : les Etats-Unis d’Amérique, à l’heure actuelle, ont l’économie la plus forte, la plus durable du monde, a lancé le président américain. Tous ceux qui affirment que l’économie américaine est en déclin, ce n’est que de la fiction. Mais ce qui est vrai, et c’est la raison pour laquelle beaucoup d’Américains sont inquiets, c’est que l’économie change profondément, des changements qui ont démarré longtemps avant la grande récession qui nous a frappés. »

« L’Etat islamique ne représente pas une menace existentielle pour notre nation »
A l’attention de ses adversaires, Barack Obama a mis en garde contre les déclarations excessives sur l’Etat islamique selon lesquelles le monde serait engagé dans « la troisième guerre mondiale ». « Elles font le jeu » des jihadistes, a-t-il averti. « Des masses de combattants à l’arrière de pick-ups et des esprits torturés complotant dans des appartements ou des garages posent un énorme danger pour les civils et doivent être arrêtés. Mais ils ne représentent pas une menace existentielle pour notre nation, a-t-il martelé. Nous devons simplement les désigner pour ce qu’ils sont, des tueurs et des fanatiques qui doivent être éradiqués, pourchassés et détruits. »

Sûr de son effet, il a précisé : « Si vous doutez de la détermination de l’Amérique, ou de la mienne, pour que justice soit faite, demandez à Oussama Ben Laden ! » Avant d’ajouter : « Le monde va se tourner vers nous pour aider à résoudre ces problèmes, et notre réponse doit être plus que des mots durs ou des appels à couvrir de bombes des civils. Cela peut marcher pour des slogans chocs à la télé, mais cela ne passera pas sur la scène mondiale. »

Changement climatique : si vous voulez le nier, « vous allez vous sentir assez seuls »
Autre avertissement à ses adversaires républicains : il est vain de nier le réchauffement de la planète sous l’effet des émissions de carbone. « Si quelqu’un veut encore nier la science autour du changement climatique, allez-y, a-t-il prévenu. Mais vous allez vous sentir assez seuls, parce que vous allez devoir débattre avec nos militaires, avec la plupart des patrons américains, avec la majorité des Américains, avec presque toute la communauté scientifique et avec 200 pays à travers le monde qui sont d’accord pour dire que c’est un problème et qui entendent le régler. »

D’autant que ce changement peut être une opportunité : « Même si la planète n’était pas en jeu, même si 2014 n’avait pas été l’année la plus chaude jamais enregistrée, jusqu’à ce que 2015 s’avère encore plus chaude, pourquoi voudrions-nous laisser passer la chance pour les entreprises américaines de produire et de vendre l’énergie du futur ? » a questionné Barack Obama.

Immigration :  « A chaque fois, nous avons vaincu ces peurs »
Même chose sur l’immigration : évoquant les bouleversements profonds qui ont touché les Etats-Unis au cours de l’histoire, il a appelé à garder le cap : « A chaque fois, certains nous disaient d’avoir peur de l’avenir. (…) A chaque fois, nous avons vaincu ces peurs. » Début décembre, la Maison Blanche avait dénoncé les propos « cyniques » et « destructeurs » de Donald Trump après sa proposition visant, sur fond de craintes d’attentats jihadistes, à interdire temporairement l’entrée des Etats-Unis aux musulmans.

« J’annonce un nouvel effort national » contre le cancer
Le président américain a annoncé une grande offensive pour « éradiquer » le cancer aux Etats-Unis. Une mission confiée à son vice-président Joe Biden, dont le fils est mort d’un cancer au cerveau.

« L’an dernier, le vice-président Biden avait dit que l’Amérique pourrait soigner le cancer comme elle a su conquérir la Lune. Le mois dernier, il a travaillé avec le Congrès pour donner aux scientifiques de l’Institut national de la santé les ressources les plus importantes qu’ils aient eues depuis plus de dix ans. Ce soir, j’annonce un nouvel effort national pour faire ce qu’il faut, a-t-il déclaré solennellement. Pour ceux qui nous sont chers et que nous avons perdus, pour les familles que nous pouvons encore sauver, faisons de l’Amérique le pays qui éradique le cancer une fois pour toutes. »

« Je continuerai à m’efforcer de fermer la prison de Guantanamo, tract de recrutement pour nos ennemis »
Le président a enfin replacé au premier plan une ancienne promesse de campagne sur laquelle il a jusqu’ici échoué : fermer la prison de Guantanamo, ouverte après les attentats du 11 septembre 2001. « Elle coûte cher, elle est inutile, et elle n’est qu’un tract de recrutement pour nos ennemis », a-t-il lancé, sous des applaudissements nourris.

Cuba : « Levez l’embargo ! »
Mettant en avant le chemin parcouru depuis l’annonce il y a un an du rapprochement avec Cuba, Barack Obama a une nouvelle fois appelé le Congrès à lever l’embargo économique américain. « Cinquante ans passés à isoler Cuba n’ont pas réussi à promouvoir la démocratie et nous ont fait reculer en Amérique latine. Vous voulez renforcer notre leadership et notre crédibilité sur le continent ? Admettez que la guerre froide est finie. Levez l’embargo ! »

Voir encore:
Obama Embraces His Inner Bush
Walter Russell Mead
The American interest
May 19, 2011

President Obama’s speech to State Department employees today was billed as a major address on recasting American foreign policy in the Middle East.
It lived up to its billing. President Obama has deep-sixed the ‘realism’ that marked the first two years of his approach to the Middle East. He has returned to the foreign policy of George W. Bush. [I’m not sure of either contention] [but he has returned to Bush lite] [and Bush lite was very much Clinton who was very much Bush 41] [and US foreign policy is mostly continuity with incremental change and very little dramatic change] [and that’s just the way it is] [*]
The United States is no longer, the President told us in words he could have borrowed from his predecessor, a status quo power in the Middle East. The realist course of cooperating with oppressive regimes in a quest for international calm is a dead end. It breeds toxic resentment against the United States; it stores up fuel for an inevitable conflagration when the oppressors weaken; it stokes anti-Israel resentment when hatred of Israel becomes the only form of political activism open to ordinary people; it strengthens the hold of extremist religion and strangles the growth of liberal forces. [again, did we hear and read different speeches?] [or is this just the gas that is punditry?] [*]
More, he attacked Iran. All that talk about avoiding polarization with Iran is gone. Instead, President Obama singled out Iran as an oppressive, tyrannical regime supporting terror and running an “illicit nuclear program” as well.
He also followed Bush in attacking some US allies, calling on Bahrain and Yemen to make changes. It was a speech that enraged almost every powerful actor in the Middle East and put America out on a limb. Like Bush, Obama is willing to confront some of America’s closest allies [?] [*] (the Saudis, who back the crackdown in Bahrain). Like Bush, he hailed Iraq as an example of democracy and pluralism that can play a vital role in the transformation of the region. Like Bush, he proposes to work with opposition groups in friendly countries. [he pointedly avoided mentioning the Saudis] [*]
His policy on Israel-Palestine is also looking Bushesque. Like Bush, he wants a sovereign but demilitarized Palestinian state. Like Bush, he believes that the 1967 lines with minor and mutually agreed changes should be the basis for the permanent boundaries between the two countries — and like Bush he set Jerusalem and the refugees to one side. [yes] [*]
The President is nailing his colors to the mast of the Anglo-American revolutionary tradition. Open societies, open economies, religious freedom, minority rights: these are revolutionary ideas in much of the world. Americans have often been globally isolated as we stand for the rights of ordinary people (like immigrant African chambermaids in New York hotels) against the privilege of elites. [perhaps true but they have long been the stuff of U.S. mythology and therefore implicitly in US foreign policy] [take a look at Truman’s two models! Ours and theirs] [*] A faith in the capacity of the common woman and the common man to make good decisions (and in their right to make those decisions even if they are sometimes wrong) is the basis of America’s political faith; President Obama proclaimed today that this needs to be the basis of our policy in the Middle East.
In Power, Terror, Peace, and War, I wrote that the Bush administration had articulated a post 9/11 national strategy for the United States that was not only right, it was inescapable. But the Bush administration’s tactical errors and profoundly wrongheaded public diplomacy undermined support for those policies at home and abroad. [they made a hash of Iraq, to be sure] [I’m not sure there was any other option once in?] [*]
President Obama has long hesitated between the idea that Bush had the wrong strategy and the idea that the strategy was sound but that the tactics and presentation was poor. He seems now to have come down firmly on the side of the core elements of the Bush strategy. This frankly is more or less where I thought he would end up; American interests, American values and the state of the region don’t actually leave us that many alternatives.
The question President Obama — and we — now face is whether he can advance this strategy more effectively than President Bush did. I very much hope so, but the obstacles are high. [*] President Obama offended and annoyed virtually every important leader in the Middle East during his short speech. Some of the objectives he outlined (in particular, for successful economic development in Egypt) are horribly difficult to achieve. [any time a president says anything, he offends many of the leaders of the Middle East] [*] Our open enemies and many of our so-called ‘friends’ in the region will be working to foil our plans. One of the President’s assets, his relative popularity in the Arab world, is in free-fall as the latest Pew Survey reveals.
President Bush was and President Obama is, I believe, right to proclaim that history, even in the Middle East, is on America’s side. But history doesn’t always move on America’s timetable.

Voir de même:

Iran. Une nouvelle ère s’ouvre après la levée des sanctions économiques
Courrier international
17/01/2016

L’accord sur le nucléaire entre l’Iran et les puissances occidentales est entré en vigueur samedi après d’ultimes négociations à Vienne. Les sanctions économiques sur l’Iran sont désormais levées. Premier signe de réchauffement : Washington et Téhéran ont chacun libéré des prisonniers.

Une étape décisive a été franchie samedi 16 janvier dans la réconciliation entre l’Iran, les Etats-Unis et les puissances occidentales. “En fin de journée, après une gesticulation diplomatique empreinte de dramaturgie, écrit le New York Times, les Etats-Unis et les nations européennes ont levé les sanctions financières et sur le pétrole à l’encontre de l’Iran et débloqué quelque 100 milliards de dollars d’avoirs gelés [91 milliards d’euros]”.

Après l’accord historique sur le nucléaire signé le 14 juillet 2015 entre l’Iran et les chefs de la diplomatie américaine et européenne, par lequel Téhéran s’est engagé à limiter ses capacités nucléaires à un usage civil, il fallait encore attendre le verdict des inspecteurs de l’Agence internationale de l’énergie atomique (AIEA) sur “les promesses de l’Iran de démanteler de larges parts de son programme nucléaire”, explique le New York Times.

C’est donc chose faite, rapporte le quotidien iranien anglophone Tehran Times , qui annonce que “l’accord entre formellement en vigueur ce samedi”.

Cité par le journal, le président iranien Hassan Rouhani a déclaré en termes solennels que “les Iraniens ont fait un geste amical en direction du monde, laissant les inimitiés de côté, ainsi que les suspicions et les complots et ouvrant un nouveau chapitre des relations de l’Iran avec le monde”.

Signe de bonne volonté générale, dans la journée de samedi, annonce la presse américaine, le président Obama a libéré sept prisonniers iraniens tandis que l’Iran libérait de son côté quatre Américains dont le journaliste du Washington Post Jason Rezaian. Ce correspondant, qui possède la double nationalité américaine et iranienne, était en poste à Téhéran depuis 2012 pour le journal, rappelle le Washington Post qui accueille la nouvelle avec le titre “Enfin libre !”.

Les prisonniers, enjeu de la dispute
Jason Rezaian a été arrêté avec son épouse Yeganeh Salehi Rezaian le 22 juillet 2014, explique le Washington Post, “supposément en raison de ses ‘conspirations’ pour améliorer les relations des Etats-Unis avec l’Iran, ce que le chef suprême Ali Khameini s’était promis d’empêcher”. Malgré ces libérations de prisonniers en Iran, le quotidien demeure manifestement très réservé sur “le changement de cap de l’Iran” et inquiet “quant à ses transgressions du droit international”.

De leur côté, note le New York Times, les sept Iraniens libérés par les Etats-Unis étaient emprisonnés “pour violation des sanctions” économiques contre l’Iran. Le quotidien observe que cet échange de prisonniers “a effacé l’une des grandes causes d’irritation entre les deux parties”. L’administration Obama a prudemment devancé les critiques des opposants – républicains – à ces tractations souligne le journal. “Il a expliqué qu’il s’agissait d’une décision propice à renforcer le climat diplomatique qui s’est développé au cours des négociations sur le nucléaire”.

Au demeurant, les Iraniens “avaient soumis une liste bien plus longue de prisonniers à libérer”, poursuit le New York Times. De son côté, Téhéran n’a donné aucune indication aux Américains sur l’un de leurs ressortissants Robert A.Levinson, un agent du FBI à la retraite, “disparu” en 2007 en Iran.

Un grand marché qui s’ouvre
Sur le plan économique, l’accord sur le nucléaire qui entre en vigueur est vécu comme une excellente nouvelle pour toutes les parties. “La levée des sanctions est un tournant pour notre économie”, a souligné le président Hassan Rouhani dans un discours cité par Tehran Times.
A Munich, la Süddeutsche Zeitung rappelle que les sanctions économiques contre l’Iran ont aussi pénalisé les pays européens privés de pétrole et de gaz iranien depuis 2012. “Les importations ont alors chuté de 112 milliards de dollars à 42 milliards entre 2011 et 2013”, écrit le quotidien allemand.
La levée des sanctions profitera aussi “ à de nombreuses entreprises occidentales qui voient ainsi s’ouvrir un marché de 78 millions d’habitants”, conclut le journal.

Tout le monde ne se réjouit pas pour autant. En Algérie par exemple, le quotidien El Watan s’inquiète du retour du pétrole iranien sur le marché alors que les cours du pétrole sont déjà au plus bas, autour des 30 dollars le baril. Va-t-on “vers un baril à 20 dollars ?” titre le quotidien d’Alger. “Ce qui est certaitn pour bon nombre d’observateurs, c’est que l’excédent de pétrole stocké en Iran recherchera un débouché dès la levée des sanctions”, introduisant ainsi une nouvelle concurrence entre pays exportateurs dont l’Algérie fait partie.

Voir de plus:

Donald Trump : pourquoi l’Amérique adore le détester
Métro news
14-09-2015
ETATS UNIS – Le magnat de l’immobilier, qui participe mercredi au second débat pour la primaire républicaine, est le grand favori des sondages. Une ascension surprenante pour un candidat habitué aux polémiques en tous genres. La preuve par cinq.

Parmi les 17 candidats encore en lice, l’homme qui valait 4 milliards de dollars est en effet en tête des sondages.

Sa candidature devait être un feu de paille. Las, trois mois après son lancement dans la course à l’investiture républicaine, Donald Trump continue de faire cavalier seul. Parmi les 17 candidats encore en lice, l’homme qui valait 4 milliards de dollars est en effet en tête des sondages :  Il recueille 32% des intentions de vote dans un nouveau sondage CNN, publié la semaine dernière. Une ascension faite à coup de grosses polémiques et de petites phrases, comme en témoignent les morceaux choisis suivants.

► Le racisme
Dès l’annonce de sa candidature, Donald Trump a stigmatisé les immigrés illégaux arrivant du Mexique, estimant que certains »sont des gens biens » mais que »la plupart sont des criminels et des violeurs. » Les communautés noire ou juive ne sont pas en reste, comme en témoigne cette anecdote rapportée par un ancien associé dans un livre : « Des Noirs qui comptent mon argent ? Je déteste ça. Les seules personnes que je veux voir compter mon argent sont des petits hommes portant la kippa tous les jours. »

► La misogynie
Jamais avare d’un commentaire salace sur Twitter, Donald Trump s’en est déjà pris à Hillary Clinton : « Comment peut-elle satisfaire son pays si elle ne satisfait pas son mari ? ». Même tonalité à l’égard de la patronne du Huffington Post, Arian na Huffington : « Elle est laide, aussi bien à l’intérieur qu’à l’extérieur. Je comprends tout à fait que son ex-mari l’ait quittée pour un homme : il a pris la bonne décision. »

► La méchanceté gratuite
En 2008, le candidat républicain John McCain s’incline face à Barack Obama. Est-ce la raison pour laquelle Donal Trump osera s’en prendre à ce vétéran du Vietnam ? « Il n’est pas un héros. Il est un héros de guerre parce qu’il a été capturé. J’aime les gens qui n’ont pas été capturés. » Plus récemment, c’est au tour de  Rick Perry, ex-gouverneur du Texas, de faire les frais du milliardaire : « Il met des lunettes pour faire croire qu’il est intelligent, mais ça ne marche pas. »

► L’art du raccourci
Simple manque de culture ou bêtise profonde ? Donald Trump se fait régulièrement épingler durant ses interviews pour son incapacité à répondre à des questions évidentes quand on postule au poste de patron de la plus grande puissance du monde. Dernier exemple en date vendredi, sur une radio américaine : questionné sur l’importance de connaître la différence entre le Hamas et le Hezbollah, deux groupes qui menacent Israël, il a répondu : « Ce le sera quand ce sera approprié ». L’an passé, il soutient mordicus que les vaccins sont responsables de l’autisme : « Plus d’injections massives. Les petits enfants ne sont pas des chevaux. »

► Un ego surdimensionné
« Le festival du narcissisme de Donal Trump ». En juin dernier, le Washington Post s’est amusé à compiler les citations auto promotionnelles du candidat. Garanties sans trucages : « Je ferais le meilleur président des Etats-Unis jamais créé par Dieu », « Personne ne serait aussi efficace contre Daech que moi. Personne », « Je donne beaucoup d’argent à des œuvres caritatives et d’autres associations. Au fond, je pense être une bonne personne. » Rien que ça.

Voir de même:

Robert Levinson ne fait pas partie des prisonniers libérés par l’Iran
i24news
Publié: 17/01/201

Robert Levinson, 68 ans, a disparu en 2007 dans l’île iranienne de Kish

Téhéran nie toute implication officielle dans sa disparition survenue il y a neuf ans
Le Juif américain Robert Levinson n’a pas été inclus dans l’échange de prisonniers avec l’Iran, a rapporté dimanche le quotidien Haaretz.

L’ Iran a libéré samedi cinq Américains, détenus dans ses prisons, dont quatre dans le cadre d’un échange de prisonniers qui incluait la libération de Jason Rezaian, un journaliste du Washington Post arrêté sur des accusations d’espionnage depuis 2014.

Levinson, 68 ans, originaire de Coral Springs, une ville située dans le sud-est de la Floride, a disparu depuis près de neuf ans.

CNN a cité la famille de Levinson exprimant son bonheur pour les autres familles, mais a déclaré être « dévastée » qu’il ne fasse pas partie des personnes libérées.

Sa famille a reconnu ces dernières années que Levinson, père de sept enfants, avait travaillé pour la CIA dans une opération secrète au moment de sa disparition dans l’île iranienne de Kish.

Levinson est un détective privé et ancien agent du FBI. Pendant des années, il a été rapporté qu’il travaillait en tant que détective privé quand il a disparu.
En 2013, le Washington Post et l’Associated Press ont révélé qu’il travaillait alors pour la CIA et était rémunéré par elle pour des missions, a rappelé le Times of Israel. Selon les mêmes sources, il se serait rendu sur place pour rencontrer un informateur en Iran, dans le but de récupérer des informations sur le programme nucléaire iranien.

« Bob Levinson n’était pas un employé du gouvernement américain quand il a disparu en Iran », avait affirmé le porte-parole de la Maison Blanche, en 2013.

L’Iran nie toute implication officielle dans sa disparition et le Washington Post, a cité un responsable américain anonyme déclarant que dans le cadre de l’accord d’échange, l’Iran « s’engageait à continuer à coopérer avec les Etats-Unis pour déterminer la localisation de Robert Levinson ».

Voir enfin:

Obama son ultime discours sur l’état de l’union (SOTU, 2016)

Monsieur le Président, Monsieur le Vice-président, les membres du Congrès, mes compatriotes américains :
Ce soir marque la huitième année, je suis venu ici pour rendre compte de l’état de l’Union. Et pour cette dernière, je vais essayer de faire court. Je sais que certains d’entre vous sont impatients de revenir à Iowa.

Je comprends également que parce qu’elle est une saison d’élection, les attentes pour ce que nous allons atteindre cette année sont faibles. Pourtant, Monsieur le Président, je vous remercie de l’approche constructive que vous et les autres dirigeants ont pris à la fin de l’année dernière à adopter un budget et de faire des réductions d’impôt permanentes pour les familles qui travaillent. Donc, je l’espère, nous pouvons travailler ensemble cette année sur les priorités bipartites comme la réforme de la justice pénale, et aider les gens qui luttent contre l’abus de médicaments. Nous venons peut surprendre à nouveau les cyniques.
Mais ce soir, je veux aller simple sur la liste traditionnelle des propositions pour l’année à venir. Ne vous inquiétez pas, j’en ai beaucoup, d’aider les élèves à apprendre  à écrire du code informatique de personnaliser les traitements médicaux pour les patients. Et je vais continuer à pousser pour des progrès sur le travail qui reste à faire. La réparation d’un système d’immigration cassé. Protéger nos enfants contre la violence armée. L’égalité de rémunération pour un travail égal, les congés payés, augmentation du salaire minimum. Toutes ces choses ont encore de l’importance pour les familles qui travaillent dur; elles sont toujours la bonne chose à faire; et je ne vais pas laisser tomber jusqu’à ce qu’elles se fassent.

Mais pour ma dernière allocution à cette chambre, je ne veux pas seulement parler de la prochaine année. Je veux me concentrer sur les cinq prochaines années, dix ans, et au-delà.
Je veux me concentrer sur notre avenir.
Nous vivons dans une époque de changement extraordinaire – le changement qui est le remodelage de la façon dont nous vivons, la façon dont nous travaillons, notre planète et de notre place dans le monde. Il est le changement qui promet d’étonnantes percées médicales, mais aussi des perturbations économiques qui grèvent les familles de travailleurs. Cela promet l’éducation des filles dans les villages les plus reculés, mais aussi relie des terroristes qui fomentent séparés par un océan de distance. Il est le changement qui peut élargir l’occasion, ou élargir les inégalités. Et que cela nous plaise ou non, le rythme de ce changement ne fera que s’accélérer.
L’Amérique s’est faite par le biais de grands changements avant – la guerre et  la dépression, l’afflux d’immigrants, les travailleurs qui luttent pour un accord équitable, et les mouvements pour les droits civiques. Chaque fois, il y a eu ceux qui nous disaient de craindre l’avenir; qui prétendaient que nous ne pourrions freiner le changement, promettant de restaurer la gloire passée si nous venons de quelque groupe ou une idée qui menaçait l’Amérique sous contrôle. Et à chaque fois, nous avons surmonté ces craintes. Nous ne sommes pas, selon les mots de Lincoln, à adhérer aux « dogmes du passé calme. » Au lieu de cela nous avons pensé de nouveau, et de nouveau agi. Nous avons fait le travail de changement pour nous, étendant toujours la promesse de l’Amérique vers l’extérieur, à la prochaine frontière, à de plus en plus de gens. Et parce que nous l’avons fait – parce que nous avons vu des opportunités là où d’autres ne voyaient que péril – nous sommes sortis plus forts et mieux qu’avant.
Ce qui était vrai, alors peut être vrai aujourd’hui. Nos atouts uniques en tant que nation – notre optimisme et notre éthique de travail, notre esprit de découverte et d’innovation, notre diversité et de l’engagement à la règle de droit – ces choses nous donnent tout ce dont nous avons besoin pour assurer la prospérité et la sécurité pour les générations à venir.
En fait, il est cet esprit qui a fait le progrès de ces sept dernières années possible. Il est comment nous avons récupéré de la pire crise économique depuis des générations. Il est comment nous avons réformé notre système de soins de santé, et réinventé notre secteur de l’énergie; comment nous avons livré plus de soins et les avantages pour nos troupes et les anciens combattants, et comment nous avons obtenu la liberté dans tous les états d’épouser la personne que nous aimons.
Mais ces progrès ne sont pas inévitables. Il est le résultat de choix que nous faisons ensemble. Et nous sommes confrontés à ces choix en ce moment. Allons-nous répondre aux changements de notre temps avec la peur, le repli sur soi en tant que nation, et en nous tournant les uns contre les autres en tant que peuple ? Ou allons-nous affronter l’avenir avec confiance dans ce que nous sommes, ce que nous représentons, et les choses incroyables que nous pouvons faire ensemble ?
Donc, nous allons parler de l’avenir, et de quatre grandes questions que nous avons en tant que pays à répondre – peu importe qui sera le prochain président, ou qui contrôlera le prochain Congrès.
Tout d’abord, comment pouvons-nous donner à chacun une chance équitable de l’occasion et de la sécurité dans cette nouvelle économie ?
Deuxièmement, comment pouvons-nous mettre la technologie pour nous, et non contre nous – surtout quand cela concerne la résolution de problèmes urgents comme le changement climatique?
Troisièmement, comment pouvons-nous garder l’Amérique en sécurité et conduire le monde sans en devenir le policier ?
Et enfin, comment pouvons-nous faire que nos politiques reflètent ce qui est meilleur en nous, et non pas ce qui est pire ?
Permettez-moi de commencer par l’économie, et un fait de base : les États-Unis d’Amérique, en ce moment, a la plus forte économie, la plus durable dans le monde. Nous sommes au milieu de la plus longue série de la création d’emplois par le secteur privé dans l’histoire. Plus de 14 millions de nouveaux emplois; les deux plus fortes années de croissance de l’emploi depuis les années 90; un taux de chômage réduit de moitié. Notre industrie automobile a juste eu sa meilleure année. Le secteur manufacturier a créé près de 900 000 nouveaux emplois au cours des six dernières années. Et nous avons fait tout cela tout en réduisant nos déficits de près des trois quarts.

Toute personne affirmant que l’économie américaine est en déclin colporte une fiction. Ce qui est vrai – et la raison pour laquelle beaucoup d’Américains se sentent anxieux – est que l’économie a changé de manière profonde, changements qui ont commencé bien avant la Grande Récession et ne l’ont pas laissée en place. Aujourd’hui, la technologie ne remplace pas simplement des emplois sur la ligne d’assemblage, mais tout emploi où le travail peut être automatisé. Les entreprises dans une économie mondiale peuvent localiser n’importe où, et faire face à une concurrence accrue. En conséquence, les travailleurs ont moins de levier pour une relance. Les entreprises ont moins de loyauté à leurs communautés. Et de plus en plus de richesses et de revenus sont concentrées au sommet.
Toutes ces tendances ont pressé les travailleurs, même quand ils ont un emploi; même lorsque l’économie est en croissance. Il est rendu plus difficile pour une famille travailleuse de se sortir de la pauvreté, plus difficile pour les jeunes de commencer leur carrière, et plus difficile pour les travailleurs de prendre leur retraite quand ils veulent. Et même si aucune de ces tendances n’est unique en Amérique, elles n’ offensent pas notre conviction typiquement américaine que tout le monde qui travaille dur devrait avoir une chance équitable.
Pour les sept dernières années, notre objectif a été de plus en plus une économie qui fonctionne mieux pour tout le monde. Nous avons fait des progrès. Mais nous devons en faire plus. Et malgré tous les arguments politiques que nous avons eus ces dernières années, il y a certains domaines où les Américains s’accordent dans l’ensemble.
Nous convenons que la réelle opportunité exige que chaque Américain puisse obtenir l’éducation et la formation dont il a besoin pour décrocher un emploi bien rémunéré. La réforme bipartisane de No Child Left Behind a été un début important, et ensemble, nous avons augmenté l’éducation de la petite enfance, levé le taux de diplome du secondaire à de nouveaux sommets, et stimulé les diplômés dans des domaines tels que l’ingénierie. Dans les prochaines années, nous devons nous appuyer sur ces progrès, en fournissant Pre-K pour tous, offrant à chaque élève les mains sur les classes d’informatique et de mathématiques faisant de ses élèves  prêts à l’emploi le jour J, et nous devons recruter et soutenir une plus grande quantité d’enseignants pour nos enfants.

Et nous devons faire l’université abordable pour tous les Américains. Parce qu’aucun étudiant travailleur ne doit être coincé dans le rouge. Nous avons déjà réduit les paiements de prêts aux étudiants de dix pour cent du revenu de l’emprunteur. Maintenant, nous sommes effectivement arrivés à réduire le coût de collège. Fournir deux années de collège communautaire à aucun coût pour chaque étudiant responsable est l’une des meilleures façons de faire cela, et je vais continuer à me battre pour obtenir cela en commençant cette année.
Bien sûr, une bonne éducation n’est pas tout ce dont nous avons besoin dans cette nouvelle économie. Nous devons aussi les avantages et les protections qui fournissent une mesure de sécurité de base. Après tout, il n’y a pas beaucoup de dire que certaines des seules personnes en Amérique qui vont travailler le même travail, au même endroit, avec un package de santé et de retraite, pendant 30 ans, sont assis dans cette chambre. Pour tous les autres, en particulier les gens dans la quarantaine et la cinquantaine, l’épargne pour la retraite ou rebondissant d’une perte d’emploi c’est beaucoup plus difficile. Aux Américains de comprendre qu’à un certain moment de leur carrière, ils peuvent avoir à se rééquiper et se recycler. Mais ils ne doivent pas perdre ce qu’ils ont déjà travaillé si dur à construire.
Voilà pourquoi la sécurité sociale et l’assurance-maladie sont plus importants que jamais; nous ne devrions pas les affaiblir, nous devrions les renforcer. Et pour les Américains à court de retraite, les prestations de base devraient être tout aussi mobiles que tout le reste aujourd’hui. Voilà ce que l’Affordable Care Act représente. Il s’agit de combler les lacunes dans les soins par l’employeur de sorte que lorsque nous perdons un emploi ou si on retourne à l’école, de démarrer cette nouvelle activité, nous aurons encore la couverture. Près de dix-huit millions ont acquis la couverture jusqu’ici. L’inflation des soins de santé  a ralenti. Et nos entreprises ont créé des emplois chaque mois depuis que c’est devenu loi.

Maintenant, je devine que nous ne serons pas d’accord sur les soins de santé de sitôt. Mais il devrait y avoir d’autres façons pour les deux parties d’améliorer la sécurité économique. Dites un travailleur perd son emploi américain – nous ne devrions pas faire en sorte qu’il puisse obtenir l’assurance-chômage; nous devons nous assurer que le programme l’encourage à se recycler pour une entreprise qui est prête à l’embaucher. Si ce nouvel emploi ne paie pas autant, il devrait y avoir un système d’assurance de salaire en place de sorte qu’il peut encore payer ses factures. Et même s’il va d’un emploi à un autre, il devrait encore être en mesure d’épargner pour la retraite et de prendre ses économies avec lui. Voilà la façon dont nous faisons au mieux, travail pour tout le monde la nouvelle économie.
Je sais aussi le Président Ryan a parlé de son intérêt dans la lutte contre la pauvreté. L’Amérique c’est de donner un coup de main à tous prêts à travailler , et je serais heureux d’une discussion sérieuse sur les stratégies que nous pouvons tous à appuyer, comme l’expansion des réductions d’impôt pour les travailleurs à faible revenu sans enfants.
Mais il y a d’autres domaines où il a été plus difficile de trouver un accord au cours des sept dernières années – à savoir quel rôle le gouvernement devrait jouer pour assurer le système pas truqué en faveur des sociétés les plus riches et les plus grands. Et ici, le peuple américain a un choix à faire.
Je crois à un secteur privé florissant l’élément vital de notre économie. Je pense qu’il y a des règlements désuets qui ont besoin d’être changés, et il y a la paperasserie qui doit être coupée. Mais après des années de bénéfices des sociétés records, les familles de travailleurs n’auront pas obtenu plus de chances ou de grands chèques de paie en laissant de grandes banques ou des fonds de gros de pétrole ou de hedge funds qui font leurs propres règles au détriment de tout le monde; ou en permettant que des attaques sur la négociation collective restent sans réponse. Les bénéficiaires de bons d’alimentation n’ont pas causé la crise financière; l’imprudence de Wall Street l’a fait. Les immigrants ne sont pas la raison de la hausse des salaires ; ces décisions sont prises dans les conseils d’administration qui mettent trop souvent des résultats trimestriels plus que rendements à long terme. Il est sûr que ce n’est pas la famille moyenne qui regarde ce soir qui évite de payer des impôts à travers des comptes offshore. Dans cette nouvelle économie, les travailleurs et les start-ups et les petites entreprises ont besoin de plus d’une voix, pas moins. Les règles devraient travailler pour eux. Et cette année, je prévois de lever les nombreuses entreprises qui ont compris que faire le droit par leurs travailleurs finit par être bon pour leurs actionnaires,  leurs clients et leurs collectivités, de sorte que nous pouvons diffuser ces meilleures pratiques à travers l’Amérique.
En fait, beaucoup de nos meilleures entreprises citoyennes sont aussi nos plus créatives. Cela nous amène à la deuxième grande question que nous devons répondre en tant que pays : comment pouvons-nous raviver cet esprit d’innovation pour répondre à nos plus grands défis ?
Il y a soixante ans, quand les Russes nous ont battus dans l’espace, nous ne niions pas que Spoutnik était là-haut. Nous ne disputions pas sur la science, ou aller à réduire notre budget de recherche et développement. Nous avons construit un programme spatial presque toute la nuit, et douze ans plus tard, nous marchions sur la lune.
Cet esprit de découverte est dans notre ADN. Nous sommes Thomas Edison et Carver les frères Wright et George Washington. Nous sommes Grace Hopper et Katherine Johnson et Sally Ride. Nous sommes tous les immigrants et entrepreneurs de Boston à Austin à la Silicon Valley dans la course à façonner un monde meilleur. Et au cours des sept dernières années, nous avons nourri cet esprit.
Nous avons protégé un internet ouvert, et pris de nouvelles mesures audacieuses pour obtenir plus d’étudiants et les Américains à faible revenu en ligne. Nous avons lancé des  centres de fabrication de la prochaine génération, et des outils en ligne qui donnent à un entrepreneur tout ce qu’il ou elle a besoin pour démarrer une entreprise en une seule journée.
Mais nous pouvons faire beaucoup plus. L’année dernière, le vice-président Biden a déclaré que, avec une nouvelle moonshot, l’Amérique ne peut guérir le cancer. Le mois dernier, il a travaillé avec le Congrès pour donner des scientifiques des National Institutes of Health des ressources les plus fortes qu’ils aient eues depuis plus d’une décennie. Ce soir, je vais annoncer une nouvelle initiative nationale pour le faire. Et parce qu’il est allé au charbon pour nous tous, sur tant de questions au cours des quarante dernières années, je suis en train de mettre Joe en charge du contrôle de la mission. Pour les proches, nous avons tous perdu, pour la famille, nous pouvons encore sauver, nous allons faire de l’Amérique le pays qui guérit le cancer une fois pour toutes.
La recherche médicale est critique. Nous avons besoin du même niveau d’engagement en matière de développement de sources d’énergie propre.
Regardez, si quelqu’un veut encore contester la science dans le changement climatique, … Vous serez assez solitaire, parce que vous serez à vous débatter contre nos militaires, la plupart de l’Amérique des chefs d’entreprise, la majorité du peuple américain, la quasi-totalité de la communauté scientifique, et 200 pays à travers le monde qui sont d’accord que c’est un problème et qui tentent de le résoudre.

Mais même si la planète n’était pas en jeu; même si 2014 n’avait pas été l’année la plus chaude enregistrée – jusqu’en 2015 avérée encore plus chaud – pourquoi voudrions-nous laisser passer la chance pour les entreprises américaines de produire et vendre l’énergie de l’avenir?
Il y a sept ans, nous avons fait le plus gros investissement dans l’énergie propre dans notre histoire. Voici les résultats. Dans les champs de l’Iowa au Texas, l’énergie éolienne est maintenant moins chère que sale, puissance conventionnelle. Sur les toits de l’Arizona à New York, l’énergie solaire aide des Américains à sauver des dizaines de millions  de dollars par an sur leurs factures d’énergie, et emploie plus d’Américains que le charbon – dans des emplois qui paient mieux que la moyenne. Nous prenons des mesures pour donner aux propriétaires la liberté de produire et de conserver leur propre énergie – quelque chose écologiste et Tea Partiers se sont associés pour soutenir. Pendant ce temps, nous avons réduit nos importations de pétrole étranger de près de soixante pour cent, et réduirt la pollution de carbone de plus que tout autre pays sur Terre.
l’essence à moins de deux dollars par gallon c’est pas mal non plus.

Maintenant, nous devons accélérer la transition loin de l’énergie sale. Plutôt que de subventionner le passé, nous devons investir dans l’avenir – en particulier dans les communautés qui dépendent des combustibles fossiles. Voilà pourquoi je vais pousser à changer la façon dont nous gérons nos ressources de pétrole et de charbon, afin qu’ils reflètent mieux les coûts qu’ils imposent aux contribuables et de notre planète. De cette façon, nous avons mis de l’argent dans ces communautés et de mettre des dizaines de milliers d’Américains à travailler à la construction d’un système de transport du 21e siècle.
Rien de tout cela ne se produira du jour au lendemain, et oui, il ya beaucoup d’intérêts bien établis qui veulent protéger le statu quo. Mais les emplois, nous allons créer, l’argent que nous allons économiser, et la planète nous allons préserver – voilà le genre d’avenir à nos enfants et petits-enfants méritent.
Le changement climatique est l’une des nombreuses questions où notre sécurité est liée au reste du monde. Et voilà pourquoi la troisième grande question que nous devons répondre est de savoir comment garder l’Amérique sûre et forte sans que ni nous isoler ou d’essayer de nation-construction partout il ya un problème.
Je vous ai dit plus tôt tous les discours sur le déclin économique de l’Amérique est de l’air chaud politique. Eh bien, il en est pareil de toute la rhétorique d’entendre parler que nos ennemis deviennent plus forts et que l’Amérique est en train de devenir plus faible. Les Etats-Unis d’Amérique est la nation la plus puissante de la Terre. Point final. Ce n’ est même pas proche. Nous dépensons plus sur nos militaires que les huit pays suivants combinés. Nos troupes sont la force de combat la plus belle dans l’histoire du monde. Aucune nation n’ose nous défier ou nos alliés attaquer parce qu’ils savent que le chemin est vers la ruine. Les enquêtes montrent notre position dans le monde est plus élevée que lorsque je fus élu à ce poste, et quand il vient à chaque question internationale importante, les gens du monde ne regardent pas à Pékin ou Moscou  – ils nous appellent.
Comme quelqu’un qui commence chaque journée par un briefing sur le renseignement, je sais que cela est un moment dangereux. Mais cela ne cause de la puissance américaine diminution ou une superpuissance imminente. Dans le monde d’aujourd’hui, nous sommes moins menacés par les empires du mal et plus par les Etats défaillants. Le Moyen-Orient passe par une transformation qui va se jouer pour une génération, enracinée dans les conflits qui remontent à des millénaires. Les difficultés économiques soufflent d’une économie chinoise en transition. Même que leurs contrats de l’économie, la Russie verse des ressources pour soutenir l’Ukraine et la Syrie – Unis qu’ils voient glisser hors de leur orbite. Et le système international que nous avons construit après la Seconde Guerre mondiale a maintenant du mal à suivre le rythme de cette nouvelle réalité.
Il est à nous pour aider à refaire ce système. Et cela signifie que nous devons établir des priorités.
La priorité numéro un est de protéger le peuple américain et aller après les réseaux terroristes. Les deux d’Al-Qaïda et maintenant ISIL posent une menace directe pour notre peuple, parce que dans le monde d’aujourd’hui, même une poignée de terroristes qui ne donnent aucune valeur à la vie humaine, y compris leur propre vie, peut faire beaucoup de dégâts. Ils utilisent l’Internet pour empoisonner l’esprit des individus à l’intérieur de notre pays; ils sapent nos alliés.
Mais comme nous nous concentrons sur la destruction ISIL, over-the-top on affirme que cela est la troisième guerre mondiale qui vient jouer dans leurs mains. Messes de combattants à l’arrière de camionnettes et âmes tordues traçage dans des appartements ou des garages posent un énorme danger pour les civils et doivent être arrêtés. Mais ils ne menacent pas notre existence nationale. Voilà ce que l’histoire ISIL veut dire; Voilà le genre de propagande qu’ils utilisent pour recruter. Nous ne devons pas les faire augmenter pour montrer que nous sommes sérieux, et nous ne devons repousser nos alliés essentiels dans ce combat en faisant l’écho  du mensonge que ISIL est représentant d’une des plus grandes religions du monde. Nous avons juste besoin de les appeler ce qu’ils sont – des tueurs et des fanatiques qui doivent être extirpés, traqués et détruits.
Voilà exactement ce que nous faisons. Pendant plus d’un an, l’Amérique a mené une coalition de plus de 60 pays pour couper le financement de ISIL, perturber leurs parcelles, arrêter le flux de combattants terroristes et éradiquer leur idéologie vicieuse. Avec près de 10 000 frappes aériennes, nous prenons leur leadership, leur pétrole, leurs camps d’entraînement, et leurs armes. Nous formons, l’armement, et de soutenir les forces qui vont régulièrement récupéer ses territoires en Irak et la Syrie.
Si ce Congrès est sérieux au sujet de gagner cette guerre, et veut envoyer un message à nos troupes et au monde, vous devriez enfin autoriser l’usage de la force militaire contre ISIL. Prenez un vote. Mais le peuple américain doit savoir que, avec ou sans action du Congrès, ISIL va apprendre les mêmes leçons que les terroristes avant eux. Si vous doutez de l’engagement de l’Amérique – ou du mien – de voir que justice soit faite, demander à Oussama ben Laden. Demandez au chef d’Al-Qaïda au Yémen, qui a été pris l’an dernier, ou l’auteur des attaques de Benghazi, qui se trouve dans une cellule de prison. Quand vous venez après les Américains, nous allons après vous. Cela peut prendre du temps, mais nous avons la mémoire longue, et notre portée n’a pas de limite.
Notre politique étrangère doit être axée sur la menace de ISIL et al-Qaïda, mais elle ne peut pas s’arrêter là. Car même sans ISIL, l’instabilité continuera pendant des décennies dans de nombreuses parties du monde – dans le Moyen-Orient, en Afghanistan et au Pakistan, dans certaines parties de l’Amérique centrale, en Afrique et en Asie. Certains de ces endroits peuvent devenir des refuges pour les nouveaux réseaux terroristes; d’autres seront victimes de conflit ethnique, ou la faim, nourrir la prochaine vague de réfugiés. Le monde se tournent vers nous pour aider à résoudre ces problèmes, et notre réponse doit être plus que de parler dur ou des appels aux civils tapis de bombes. Cela peut fonctionner comme une morsure sonore du téléviseur, mais il ne passe pas de rassemblement sur la scène mondiale.

Nous ne pouvons pas essayer de prendre le relais et de reconstruire tous les pays qui tombent dans la crise. Cela ne se veut pas le leadership; qui est une recette pour un bourbier, déversant du sang américain et le trésor qui nous affaiblit finalement. C’ est la leçon du Vietnam, de l’Irak – et nous devrions avoir appris par l’entreprise.
Heureusement, il y a une approche plus intelligente, une stratégie patiente et disciplinée qui utilise tous les éléments de notre puissance nationale. Il dit l’Amérique agira toujours, seule si nécessaire, pour protéger notre peuple et nos alliés; mais sur des questions d’intérêt mondial, nous allons mobiliser le monde pour travailler avec nous, et assurez-vous que les autres pays tirent leur propre poids.
Voilà notre approche de conflits comme la Syrie, où nous travaillons en partenariat avec les forces locales et conduisant efforts internationaux pour aider cette société brisée à poursuivre une paix durable.
Voilà pourquoi nous avons construit une coalition mondiale, avec des sanctions et la diplomatie de principe, pour empêcher un Iran nucléaire. Alors que nous parlons, l’Iran a roulé en arrière de son programme nucléaire, expédié ses stocks d’uranium, et le monde a évité une autre guerre.
Voilà comment nous nous sommes arrêtés la propagation du virus Ebola en Afrique de l’Ouest. Notre armée, nos médecins et nos travailleurs de développement mis en place la plate-forme qui a permis à d’autres pays à se joindre à éradiquer cette épidémie.
Voilà comment nous avons noué un partenariat Trans-Pacifique à ouvrir les marchés, protéger les travailleurs et l’environnement, et de faire progresser le leadership américain en Asie. Il coupe 18.000 taxes sur les produits Made in America, et prend en charge plus de bons emplois. Avec PPT, la Chine ne définit pas les règles dans cette région, ce que nous faisons. Vous voulez montrer notre force dans ce siècle ? Approuver cet accord. Donnez-nous les outils pour le faire respecter.
Cinquante ans d’isolement de Cuba ont échoué à promouvoir la démocratie, nous mettant de retour en Amérique latine. Voilà pourquoi nous avons rétabli des relations diplomatiques, a ouvert la porte de voyager et de commerce, et nous sommes positionnés pour améliorer la vie du peuple cubain. Vous souhaitez consolider notre leadership et la crédibilité dans l’hémisphère ? Reconnaître que la guerre froide est terminée. Levez l’embargo.
Le leadership américain dans le 21e siècle n’est pas un choix entre ignorer le reste du monde – sauf quand nous tuons les terroristes; ou l’occupation et la reconstruction de ce que la société se délite. Leadership signifie une application judicieuse de la puissance militaire, et de rallier le monde derrière les causes qui sont droites. Cela signifie voir notre aide à l’étranger dans le cadre de notre sécurité nationale, pas la charité. Lorsque nous menons près de 200 nations à l’accord le plus ambitieux de l’histoire à lutter contre le changement climatique – qui aide les pays vulnérables, mais il protège aussi nos enfants. Lorsque nous aidons l’Ukraine à défendre sa démocratie, ou la Colombie à résoudre une guerre longue de plusieurs décennies, qui renforce l’ordre international nous dépendons. Lorsque nous aidons les pays africains à nourrir leur population et de soins pour les malades, qui empêche la prochaine pandémie d’atteindre nos côtes. En ce moment, nous sommes sur la bonne voie pour mettre fin au fléau du VIH / sida, et nous avons la capacité d’accomplir la même chose avec le paludisme – quelque chose que je vais poussais ce Congrès pour financer cette année.
Voilà la force. Voilà leadership. Et ce genre de leadership dépend de la puissance de notre exemple. Voilà pourquoi je vais continuer à travailler pour fermer la prison de Guantanamo: il est coûteux, il est inutile, et il ne sert que d’une brochure de recrutement pour nos ennemis.
Voilà pourquoi nous devons rejeter toute politique qui vise les personnes en raison de la race ou de la religion. Ce ne sont pas une question de rectitude politique. Il est une question de comprendre ce qui nous rend forts. Le monde nous respecte pas seulement pour notre arsenal; il nous respecte pour notre diversité et notre ouverture et de la façon dont nous respectons toutes les religions. Sa Sainteté, François, dit ce corps de l’endroit même je me tiens ce soir que « d’imiter la haine et la violence des tyrans et des meurtriers est le meilleur moyen de prendre leur place. » Quand les politiciens insulte les musulmans, quand une mosquée est vandalisée, ou un enfant victime d’intimidation, qui ne nous rend pas plus sûr. Cela ne la raconte comme il est. Il est tout simplement faux. Il nous diminue dans les yeux du monde. Il rend plus difficile à atteindre nos objectifs. Et il trahit qui nous sommes en tant que pays.
« Nous le peuple. »
Notre Constitution commence par ces trois mots simples, des mots que nous avons appris à reconnaître signifient toutes les personnes, pas seulement certains; mots qui insistent pour que nous ascension et la chute ensemble. Cela me amène à la quatrième, et peut-être la chose la plus importante que je veux dire ce soir.
L’avenir que nous voulons – possibilités et la sécurité pour nos familles; une progression du niveau de vie et, une planète pacifique durable pour nos enfants – tout ce qui est à notre portée. Mais il ne se produira que si nous travaillons ensemble. Il ne se produira que si nous pouvons avoir des débats constructifs, rationnels.
Il ne se produira que si nous fixons notre politique.
Une meilleure politique ne signifie pas que nous avons d’accord sur tout. Ceci est un grand pays, avec différentes régions et les attitudes et les intérêts. Voilà une de nos forces, aussi. Nos fondateurs distribués pouvoir entre les Etats et les branches du gouvernement, et nous attend pour faire valoir, tout comme ils l’ont fait, au cours de la taille et la forme du gouvernement, sur le commerce et les relations étrangères, sur le sens de la liberté et les impératifs de sécurité.
Mais la démocratie exige obligations de base de la confiance entre ses citoyens. Il ne fonctionne pas si nous pensons que les gens qui sont en désaccord avec nous sont tous motivés par la malveillance, ou que nos adversaires politiques sont antipatriotiques. Démocratie enraye sans volonté de compromis; ou quand même des faits fondamentaux sont contestés, et nous écoutent qu’à ceux qui sont d’accord avec nous. Notre vie publique flétrit lorsque seules les voix les plus extrêmes attirer l’attention. La plupart de tous, la démocratie tombe en panne lorsque la personne moyenne se sent leur voix n’a pas d’importance; que le système est truqué en faveur de la riche ou puissant ou un certain intérêt étroit.
Trop nombreux Américains se sentent de cette façon en ce moment. Il est l’un des quelques regrets de ma présidence – que la rancœur et de méfiance entre les parties a empiré au lieu de mieux. Il ne fait aucun doute un président avec les dons de Lincoln ou Roosevelt pourrait avoir mieux comblé le fossé, et je vous garantis que je vais continuer à essayer de mieux tant que je tiens ce bureau.
Mais, mes chers compatriotes, ce ne peut pas être ma tâche – ou tout président de – seul. Il ya un tas de gens dans cette enceinte qui aimeraient voir plus de coopération, un débat plus élevée à Washington, mais se sentent piégés par les exigences de se faire élire. Je sais; vous me l’avez dit. Et si nous voulons une meilleure politique, il ne suffit pas de simplement changer un député ou d’un sénateur ou même un président; nous devons changer le système afin de refléter nos meilleures mêmes.
Nous devons mettre fin à la pratique du dessin nos districts du Congrès afin que les politiciens peuvent choisir leurs électeurs, et non l’inverse. Nous devons réduire l’influence de l’argent dans notre politique, de sorte que d’une poignée de familles et intérêts cachés ne peut pas financer nos élections – et si notre approche actuelle de financement de la campagne ne peut pas passer rassemblement devant les tribunaux, nous avons besoin de travailler ensemble de trouver une vraie solution. Nous devons rendre le vote plus facile, pas plus dur, et le moderniser pour la façon dont nous vivons aujourd’hui. Et au cours de cette année, je me propose de parcourir le pays pour promouvoir des réformes qui le font.
Mais je ne peux pas faire ces choses sur mon propre. Des changements dans notre processus politique – dans non seulement qui est élu, mais la façon dont ils sont élus – qui ne se produira que lorsque les Américains l’exigent. Il dépendra de vous. Voilà ce qui signifiait par un gouvernement de, par et pour le peuple.
Qu’est-ce que je demande est difficile. Il est plus facile d’être cynique; à accepter que le changement est impossible, et la politique est sans espoir, et de croire que nos voix et les actions ne comptent pas. Mais si nous abandonnons maintenant, alors que nous abandonnons un avenir meilleur. Ceux qui ont de l’argent et le pouvoir aura un plus grand contrôle sur les décisions qui pourraient envoyer un jeune soldat à la guerre, ou permettre à un autre désastre économique, ou reculer l’égalité des droits et des droits de vote que des générations d’Américains ont combattu, même morts, à sécuriser. Comme la frustration grandit, il y aura des voix qui nous exhortent à se replier en tribus, bouc émissaire concitoyens qui ne nous ressemblent pas, ou de prier comme nous, ou voter comme nous le faisons, ou de partager le même fond.
Nous ne pouvons pas aller dans cette voie. Il ne livrera pas l’économie que nous voulons, ou la sécurité que nous voulons, mais la plupart de tous, il contredit tout ce qui fait l’envie du monde.
Donc, mon compagnon Américains, tout ce que vous pouvez croire, si vous préférez un parti ou d’aucun parti, notre avenir collectif dépend de votre volonté de respecter vos obligations en tant que citoyen. Voter. Pour parler. Pour se lever pour d’autres, en particulier les faibles, en particulier les plus vulnérables, sachant que chacun de nous est ici seulement parce que quelqu’un, quelque part, se leva pour nous. Pour rester actif dans notre vie publique de sorte qu’il reflète la bonté et de la décence et d’optimisme que je vois dans le peuple américain chaque jour.
Ce ne sera pas facile. Notre marque de la démocratie est difficile. Mais je peux vous promettre que dans un an à partir de maintenant, quand je ne tiens plus ce bureau, je serai là avec vous en tant que citoyen – inspiré par ces voix de l’équité et de la vision, de courage et de bonne humeur et de gentillesse qui ont aidé l’Amérique voyager si loin. Voix qui nous aident à nous voyons pas en premier lieu comme noir ou blanc ou asiatique ou latino, non pas comme gay ou hétéro, immigrant ou nées; pas tant que démocrates ou républicains, mais en tant que premier Américains, liés par une croyance commune. La Voix du Dr King aurait cru avoir le dernier mot – voix de la vérité désarmée et l’amour inconditionnel.
Ils sont là, ces voix. Ils ne reçoivent pas beaucoup d’attention, ils ne sollicitent pas, mais ils sont en train de faire le travail ce pays a besoin de faire.
Je les vois partout où je voyage dans cet incroyable pays qu’est le nôtre. Je te vois. Je sais que vous êtes là. Vous êtes la raison pour laquelle je dois tels incroyable confiance en notre avenir. Parce que je vois votre calme, la citoyenneté solide tout le temps.
Je le vois dans le travailleur sur la ligne d’assemblage qui a réussi quarts de travail supplémentaires pour garder son entreprise ouverte, et le patron qui lui verse des salaires plus élevés pour le garder à bord.
Je le vois dans le Rêveur qui reste jusqu’à la fin pour terminer son projet de science, et l’enseignant qui vient au début parce qu’il sait qu’elle pourrait un jour guérir une maladie.
Je le vois dans l’américain qui a servi son temps, et rêve de partir sur – et le propriétaire de l’entreprise qui lui donne une deuxième chance. Le manifestant déterminé à prouver que les questions de justice, et le jeune flic marchant le rythme, traiter tout le monde avec respect, faire le brave, le travail calme de nous protéger.
Je le vois dans le soldat qui donne presque tout pour sauver ses frères, l’infirmière qui tend à lui ’til il peut courir un marathon, et la communauté qui aligne pour l’encourager.
Il est le fils qui trouve le courage de sortir de qui il est, et le père dont l’amour pour ce fils l’emporte sur tout ce qu’il a été enseigné.
Je le vois dans la femme âgée qui va attendre en ligne pour jeter son vote tant qu’elle doit; le nouveau citoyen qui lui jette pour la première fois; les bénévoles dans les urnes qui croient que chaque vote doit compter, parce que chacun d’entre eux de différentes manières savent combien ce droit précieux vaut.
Voilà l’Amérique que je connais. Voilà le pays que nous aimons. Lucide. Grand coeur. Optimiste que la vérité désarmée et l’amour inconditionnel auront le dernier mot. Voilà ce qui me rend si optimiste sur notre avenir. À cause de toi. Je crois en toi. Voilà pourquoi je suis ici convaincu que l’état de notre Union est forte.
Merci, que Dieu vous bénisse, et que Dieu bénisse les Etats-Unis d’Amérique.


René Girard: L’Angleterre victorienne vaut donc les sociétés archaïques (Only in America: René is, like Tocqueville, a great French thinker who could yet nowhere exist but in the United States)

5 novembre, 2015
GirardPassion

Nul n’est prophète en son pays. Jésus

Écris donc les choses que tu as vues, et celles qui sont, et celles qui doivent arriver après elles. Jean (Apocalypse 1: 19)
Que signifie donc ce qui est écrit: La pierre qu’ont rejetée ceux qui bâtissaient est devenue la principale de l’angle? Jésus (Luc 20: 17)
Soyez fils de votre Père qui est dans les cieux (qui) fait lever son soleil sur les méchants et sur les bons et (…) pleuvoir sur les justes et sur les injustes. Jésus (Matthieu 5: 45)
Il n’y a pas en littérature de beaux sujets d’art et (…) Yvetot donc vaut Constantinople. Gustave Flaubert
I’ve said this for years: The best analogy for what René represents in anthropology and sociology is Heinrich Schliemann, who took Homer under his arm and discovered Troy. René had the same blind faith that the literary text held the literal truth. Like Schliemann, his major discovery was excoriated for using the wrong methods. Academic disciplines are more committed to methodology than truth. Robert Pogue Harrison (Stanford)
René would never have experienced such a career in France. Such a free work could indeed only appear in America. That is why René is, like Tocqueville, a great French thinker and a great French moralist who could yet nowhere exist but in the United States. René ‘discovered America’ in every sense of the word: He made the United States his second country, he made there fundamental discoveries, he is a pure ‘product’ of the Franco-American relationship, he finally revealed the face of an universal – and not an imperial – America. Benoît Chantre
Il était mondialement reconnu mais ne le fut jamais vraiment en France – même s’il était membre de l’Académie Française. Il était trop archaïque pour les modernes, trop littéraire pour les philosophes, pas assez à la mode pour l’intelligentsia dominante et même trop chrétien pour un grand nombre – y compris certaines instances catholiques. S’il est reconnu (l’est et le sera de plus en plus), il l’a été contre l’époque, contre les pensées dominantes, contre les institutions en place, contre les médias. En France, il fut un marginal, un intellectuel qualifié «d’original» pour mieux le laisser en dehors de l’université quand, en elle, le règne des structures et du marxisme écrasait tout le reste. Pour avoir fait toute sa carrière universitaire aux Etats-Unis, à Stanford en particulier ; pour ne s’être rangé sous le drapeau d’aucunes des modes intellectuelles germanopratines, qu’elle soit structuraliste, sartrienne, foucaldienne, maoïste, deleuzienne ou autres ; Pour s’être intéressé, trente ans avant Régis Debray, au «fait religieux» quand il était encore classé dans l’enfer de la superstition ; pour avoir osé se dire «chrétien» – crime de lèse modernité – ce qui, aux yeux de nos maîtres à penser (et donc à excommunier), lui retirait toute légitimité scientifique ; pour n’avoir pas, ou peu, de relais en France (même s’il était devenu, sur le tard, membre de l’Académie française) alors qu’il est traduit en plus de vingt-cinq langues ; Pour toutes ces raisons et bien d’autres, René Girard fut à part dans le paysage intellectuel hexagonal. Damien Le Guay
Nous qui faisions les malins avec notre tradition, nous qui moquions la ringardise de nos pères, découvrions en lisant Girard que ce vieux livre poussiéreux, la Bible, était encore à lire. Qu’elle nous comprenait infiniment mieux que nous ne la comprenions. Ce que Girard nous a donné à lire, ce n’est rien moins que le monde commun des classiques de la France catholique, de l’Europe chrétienne, celui dont nous avions hérité mais que nous laissions lui aussi prendre la poussière dans un coin du bazar mondialisé. Nous pouvions grâce à lui nous plonger dans les livres de nos pères et y trouver une merveilleuse intelligence du monde. Avec lui, nous nous découvrions tout uniment fils de nos pères, français et catholiques. Car ce que nous apprend René Girard, c’est que nous ne sommes pas nés de la dernière pluie, que nous avons pour vivre et exister besoin du désir des autres, que nous ne sommes pas ces être libres et sans attaches que les catastrophes du XXe siècle auraient fait de nous. « C’est un garçon sans importance collective, c’est tout juste un individu. » Cette phrase de Céline qui m’a longtemps trotté dans la tête adolescent était tout un programme. Elle plaisait beaucoup à Sartre qui l’a mise en exergue de La Nausée. Elle donnait à la foule des pékins moyens dans mon genre une image très avantageuse d’eux-mêmes, au moment de l’effondrement des grands récits. Nous n’appartenions à rien ni à personne. Nous étions seulement nous-mêmes, libres et incréés. La lecture attentive de Girard balaye ces prétentions infantiles, qui pourtant structurent encore la psyché de l’Occident. Non, nous ne sommes pas à nous-mêmes nos propres pères. Non, nous ne sommes pas libres et possesseurs de nos désirs. Comme le dit l’Eglise depuis toujours, nous naissons esclaves de nos péchés, de notre désir dit Girard, et seul le Dieu de nos pères peut nous en libérer.  Prouver cette vérité constitue toute l’ambition intellectuelle de Girard, une vérité bien particulière puisqu’elle appartient à la fois à l’ordre de la science et à celui de la spiritualité. (…) Or, pour avoir raison aujourd’hui, pour gagner la compétition médiatique, il faut s’affirmer victime de la violence du monde, de l’Etat, du groupe. « Le monde moderne est plein de vertus chrétiennes devenues folles » disait Chesterton, un auteur selon le goût de René Girard. À quelques heureuses exceptions près, l’université s’est pendant longtemps gardée de se pencher sérieusement sur l’œuvre d’un penseur que son catholicisme de mieux en mieux assumé rendait de plus en plus hérétique. Cependant, à court de concept opératoire pour penser le réel, la sociologie a aujourd’hui recours jusqu’à la nausée (qui lui vient facilement) au concept du bouc émissaire pour expliquer à peu près tout et son contraire : la façon dont on traite la religion musulmane et la condition féminine en Occident par exemple. Typiquement, le girardien sans christianisme, cet oxymoron  qui prolifère aujourd’hui, s’efforce de découvrir la violence, les boucs émissaires et le ressentiment partout, sauf là où cela ferait vraiment une différence, la seule différence qui tienne, c’est-à-dire en lui-même. C’est ainsi que les bien-pensants passent leur temps à dénoncer le racisme dégoutant du bas-peuple de France sans paraître voir le racisme de classe dont ils font preuve à cette occasion.  Ce girardisme sans christianisme est le pire des contresens d’un monde qui pourtant n’en est pas avare : le monde post-moderne est plein de concepts girardiens devenus fous. Emmanuel Dubois de Prisque
Il n’y a que l’Occident chrétien qui ait jamais trouvé la perspective et ce réalisme photographique dont on dit tant de mal: c’est également lui qui a inventé les caméras. Jamais les autres univers n’ont découvert ça. Un chercheur qui travaille dans ce domaine me faisait remarquer que, dans le trompe l’oeil occidental, tous les objets sont déformés d’après les mêmes principes par rapport à la lumière et à l’espace: c’est l’équivalent pictural du Dieu qui fait briller son soleil et tomber sa pluie sur les justes comme sur les injustes. On cesse de représenter en grand les gens importants socialement et en petit les autres. C’est l’égalité absolue dans la perception. René Girard
Aujourd’hui on repère les boucs émissaires dans l’Angleterre victorienne et on ne les repère plus dans les sociétés archaïques. C’est défendu. René Girard
Les mondes anciens étaient comparables entre eux, le nôtre est vraiment unique. Sa supériorité dans tous les domaines est tellement écrasante, tellement évidente que, paradoxalement, il est interdit d’en faire état. René Girard
On apprend aux enfants qu’on a cessé de chasser les sorcières parce que la science s’est imposée aux hommes. Alors que c’est le contraire: la science s’est imposée aux hommes parce que, pour des raisons morales, religieuses, on a cessé de chasser les sorcières. René Girard
Notre monde est de plus en plus imprégné par cette vérité évangélique de l’innocence des victimes. L’attention qu’on porte aux victimes a commencé au Moyen Age, avec l’invention de l’hôpital. L’Hôtel-Dieu, comme on disait, accueillait toutes les victimes, indépendamment de leur origine. Les sociétés primitives n’étaient pas inhumaines, mais elles n’avaient d’attention que pour leurs membres. Le monde moderne a inventé la “victime inconnue”, comme on dirait aujourd’hui le “soldat inconnu”. Le christianisme peut maintenant continuer à s’étendre même sans la loi, car ses grandes percées intellectuelles et morales, notre souci des victimes et notre attention à ne pas nous fabriquer de boucs émissaires, ont fait de nous des chrétiens qui s’ignorent. René Girard
Je crois que les intellectuels sont même fréquemment moins clairvoyants que la foule car leur désir de se distinguer les pousse à se précipiter vers l’absurdité à la mode alors que l’individu moyen devine le plus souvent, mais pas toujours, que la mode déteste le bon sens. (…)  dans notre univers médiatique, chacun se choisit un rôle dans une pièce de théâtre écrite par quelqu’un d’autre. Cette pièce tient l’affiche pendant un certain temps et tous les jours chacun la rejoue consciencieusement dans la presse, à la télévision et dans les conversations mondaines. Et puis, un beau jour, en très peu de temps, on passe à autre chose de tout aussi stéréotypé, car mimétique toujours. Le répertoire change souvent, en somme, mais il y a toujours un répertoire. (…) Il y a une dissidence qui est pur esprit de contradiction, un désir mimétique redoublé et inversé, mais il y a aussi une dissidence réelle, héroïque et proprement géniale, devant laquelle il convient de s’incliner. Pensez à la «dissidence» d’Antigone dans la pièce de Sophocle, par exemple! Je ne prétends pas expliquer Soljénitsyne par le désir mimétique. (…) Notre univers mental nous paraît constitué essentiellement de valeurs positives auxquelles nous adhérons librement, parce qu’elles sont justes, raisonnables, vraies. L’envers de tout cela au sein des cultures les plus diverses repose sur l’expulsion de certaines victimes et l’exécration des «valeurs» qui leur sont associées. Les valeurs positives sont l’envers de cette exécration. Dans la mesure où cette exécration «structure» notre vision du monde, elle joue donc elle aussi un rôle très important. (…) Il est bien évident que nos descendants, en regardant notre époque, y repèreront un même type d’uniformité, de conformisme et d’aveuglement que nous découvrons dans les époques passées. Bien des choses qui nous paraissent aujourd’hui comme des évidences indubitables leur paraîtront proches de la superstition collective. A mes yeux, la «conversion» consiste justement à prendre conscience de cela. A s’arracher à ces adhérences inconscientes. C’est d’ailleurs un premier pas vers la modestie… René Girard
Dans tout l’Occident, d’ailleurs, la confusion systématique entre le message chrétien et l’institution cléricale persiste en dépit de tout ce qui devrait la faire cesser. Depuis le XVIIe siècle, l’Eglise catholique a perdu non seulement tout ce qu’il lui restait de pouvoir temporel mais la plupart de ses fidèles, et aussi son clergé, qui, en dehors d’exceptions remarquables, est au-dessous de zéro, aux Etats-Unis notamment, pourri de contestations puériles, ivre de conformisme antireligieux. Les anticatholiques militants ne semblent rien voir de tout cela. Ils sont plus croyants, au fond, que leurs adversaires et ils voient plus loin qu’eux, peut-être. Ils voient que l’effondrement de toutes les utopies antichrétiennes, plus la montée de l’islam, plus tous les bouleversements à venir, va forcément, dans un avenir proche, transformer de fond en comble notre vision du christianisme. (…) Ce qui est sûr, c’est qu’en exilant le religieux dans une espèce de ghetto, comme notre conception de la laïcité tend à le faire, on s’interdit de comprendre. On appauvrit tout à la fois la religion et la recherche non religieuse. René Girard
Je suis personnellement convaincu que les écrivains occidentaux majeurs, qu’ils soient ou non chrétiens, des tragiques grecs à Dante, de Shakespeare à Cervantès ou Pascal et jusqu’aux grands romanciers et poètes de notre époque, sont plus pertinents pour comprendre le drame de la modernité que tous nos philosophes et tous nos savants. René Girard
On n’arrive plus à faire la différence entre le terrorisme révolutionnaire et le fou qui tire dans la foule. L’humanité se prépare à entrer dans l’insensé complet. C’est peut-être nécessaire. Le terrorisme oblige l’homme occidental à mesurer le chemin parcouru depuis deux mille ans. Certaines formes de violence nous apparaissent aujourd’hui intolérables. On n’accepterait plus Samson secouant les piliers du Temple et périr en tuant tout le monde avec lui. Notre contradiction fondamentale, c’est que nous sommes les bénéficiaires du christianisme dans notre rapport à la violence et que nous l’avons abandonné sans comprendre que nous étions ses tributaires. René Girard
People are against my theory, because it is at the same time an avant-garde and a Christian theory. The avant-garde people are anti-Christian, and many of the Christians are anti-avant-garde. Even the Christians have been very distrustful of me. René Girard
Theories are expendable. They should be criticized. When people tell me my work is too systematic, I say, ‘I make it as systematic as possible for you to be able to prove it wrong. René Girard
Pour restituer à la crucifixion sa puissance de scandale, il suffit de la filmer telle quelle, sans rien y ajouter, sans rien en retrancher. Mel Gibson a-t-il réalisé ce programme jusqu’au bout? Pas complètement sans doute, mais il en a fait suffisamment pour épouvanter tous les conformismes. (…) Les récits de la Passion contiennent plus de détails concrets que toutes les œuvres savantes de l’époque. Ils représentent un premier pas en avant vers le toujours plus de réalisme qui définit le dynamisme essentiel de notre culture dans ses époques de grande vitalité. Le premier moteur du réalisme, c’est le désir de nourrir la méditation religieuse qui est essentiellement une méditation sur la Passion du Christ. En enseignant le mépris du réalisme et du réel lui-même, l’esthétique moderne a complètement faussé l’interprétation de l’art occidental. Elle a inventé, entre l’esthétique d’un côté, le technique et le scientifique de l’autre, une séparation qui n’a commencé à exister qu’avec le modernisme, lequel n’est peut-être qu’une appellation flatteuse de notre décadence. La volonté de faire vrai, de peindre les choses comme si on y était a toujours triomphé auparavant et, pendant des siècles, elle a produit des chefs-d’oeuvre dont Gibson dit qu’il s’est inspiré. Il mentionne lui-même, me dit-on, le Caravage. Il faut songer aussi à certains Christ romans, aux crucifixions espagnoles, à un Jérôme Bosch, à tous les Christ aux outrages… (…) Pour comprendre ce qu’a voulu faire Mel Gibson, il me semble qu’il faut se libérer de tous les snobismes modernistes et postmodernistes et envisager le cinéma comme un prolongement et un dépassement du grand réalisme littéraire et pictural. (…)  Dans la tragédie grecque, il était interdit de représenter la mort du héros directement, on écoutait un messager qui racontait ce qui venait de se passer. Au cinéma, il n’est plus possible d’éluder l’essentiel. Court-circuiter la flagellation ou la mise en croix, par exemple, ce serait reculer devant l’épreuve décisive. Il faut représenter ces choses épouvantables «comme si on y était». Faut-il s’indigner si le résultat ne ressemble guère à un tableau préraphaélite? (..)  D’où vient ce formidable pouvoir évocateur qu’a sur la plupart des hommes toute représentation de la Passion fidèle au texte évangélique? Il y a tout un versant anthropologique de la description évangélique, je pense, qui n’est ni spécifiquement juif, ni spécifiquement romain, ni même spécifiquement chrétien et c’est la dimension collective de l’événement, c’est ce qui fait de lui, essentiellement, un phénomène de foule. (…) D’un point de vue anthropologique, la Passion n’a rien de spécifiquement juif. C’est un phénomène de foule qui obéit aux mêmes lois que tous les phénomènes de foule. Une observation attentive en repère l’équivalent un peu partout dans les nombreux mythes fondateurs qui racontent la naissance des religions archaïques et antiques. Presque toutes les religions, je pense, s’enracinent dans des violences collectives analogues à celles que décrivent ou suggèrent non seulement les Evangiles et le Livre de Job mais aussi les chants du Serviteur souffrant dans le deuxième Isaïe, ainsi que de nombreux psaumes. Les chrétiens et les juifs pieux, bien à tort, ont toujours refusé de réfléchir à ces ressemblances entre leurs livres sacrés et les mythes. Une comparaison attentive révèle que, au-delà de ces ressemblances et grâce à elles on peut repérer entre le mythique d’un côté et, de l’autre, le judaïque et le chrétien une différence à la fois ténue et gigantesque qui rend le judéo-chrétien incomparable sous le rapport de la vérité la plus objective. A la différence des mythes qui adoptent systématiquement le point de vue de la foule contre la victime, parce qu’ils sont conçus et racontés par les lyncheurs, et ils tiennent toujours, par conséquent, la victime pour coupable (l’incroyable combinaison de parricide et d’inceste dont Œdipe est accusé, par exemple), nos Écritures à nous tous, les grands textes bibliques et chrétiens innocentent les victimes des mouvements de foules, et c’est bien ce que font les Évangiles dans le cas de Jésus. (…) Il y a deux grandes attitudes à mon avis dans l’histoire humaine, il y a celle de la mythologie qui s’efforce de dissimuler la violence, car, en dernière analyse, c’est sur la violence injuste que les communautés humaines reposent. (…) Cette attitude est trop universelle pour être condamnée. C’est l’attitude d’ailleurs des plus grands philosophes grecs et en particulier de Platon, qui condamne Homère et tous les poètes parce qu’ils se permettent de décrire dans leurs oeuvres les violences attribuées par les mythes aux dieux de la cité. Le grand philosophe voit dans cette audacieuse révélation une source de désordre, un péril majeur pour toute la société. Cette attitude est certainement l’attitude religieuse la plus répandue, la plus normale, la plus naturelle à l’homme et, de nos jours, elle est plus universelle que jamais, car les croyants modernisés, aussi bien les chrétiens que les juifs, l’ont au moins partiellement adoptée. L’autre attitude est beaucoup plus rare et elle est même unique au monde. Elle est réservée tout entière aux grands moments de l’inspiration biblique et chrétienne. Elle consiste non pas à pudiquement dissimuler mais, au contraire, à révéler la violence dans toute son injustice et son mensonge, partout où il est possible de la repérer. C’est l’attitude du Livre de Job et c’est l’attitude des Evangiles. C’est la plus audacieuse des deux et, à mon avis, c’est la plus grande. C’est l’attitude qui nous a permis de découvrir l’innocence de la plupart des victimes que même les hommes les plus religieux, au cours de leur histoire, n’ont jamais cessé de massacrer et de persécuter. C’est là qu’est l’inspiration commune au judaïsme et au christianisme, et c’est la clef, il faut l’espérer, de leur réconciliation future. C’est la tendance héroïque à mettre la vérité au-dessus même de l’ordre social. C’est à cette aventure-là, il me semble, que le film de Mel Gibson s’efforce d’être fidèle. René Girard

La Passion selon René

Au lendemain de la mort, au vénérable âge de 91 ans,  de l’anthropologue franco-américain de la violence René Girard …

Nouveau Tocqueville lui aussi longtemps ignoré dans son pays natal …

Mais introducteur dans son pays d’adoption de la « peste » du structuralisme et de la fameuse French theory dont il ne cessera de se démarquer …

Et en cette première journée nationale contre le harcèlement à l’école

Confirmant la prise de conscience par nos sociétés de l’importance, dès l’enfance, des phénomènes de bouc émissaire analysés par Girard …

Alors qu’avec le rejet coup sur coup de la marijuana récréationnelle, des droits transgenres et des sanctuaires pour immigrés clandestins ainsi que l’élection d’un gouverneur anti-« mariage pour tous » dans un certain nombre d’états américains, la fin catastrophique des années Obama pourrait bien voir le reflux de ces idées chrétiennes devenues folles que nos prétendus progressistes avaient cru pouvoir définitivement imposer à l’Occident tout entier …

Quel meilleur hommage que cette magistrale défense  …

 Que republie aujourd’hui Le Figaro à qui il l’avait alors livrée  …

Du réalisme, à travers le film honni de Mel Gibson, tant dans l’art que dans la recherche qu’il avait défendu toute sa vie ?

Lui qui, contre le structuralisme et le postmodernisme déréalisants des sciences humaines, avaient toujours insisté …

Pour accorder le même regard dans la lignée des grands peintres et des grands écrivains

Tant à l’Angleterre victorienne qu’aux sociétés archaïques …

Et tant aux grands mythes grecs qu’aux grands textes bibliques

Pour finir par y découvrir comme moteur même de cette attitude aussi singulière que révolutionnaire …

Le scandale suprême de la supériorité de la révélation judéo-chrétienne ?

La Passion du Christ vue par René Girard
René Girard
Le Figaro

05/11/2015

FIGAROVOX/DOCUMENT – Le philosophe et professeur René Girard est mort ce 4 novembre. Lors de la sortie de La Passion du Christ en 2004, il avait écrit pour Le Figaro un texte fleuve en défense du film de Mel Gibson. Archives.

Philosophe français ayant enseigné 45 ans aux États-Unis, René Girard a vu le film de Mel Gibson pour Le Figaro Magazine. Il salue le travail du cinéaste pour inscrire la Passion du Christ dans une tradition esthétique et théologique.

Une violence au service de la foi

Bien avant la sortie de son film aux Etats-Unis, Mel Gibson avait organisé pour les sommités journalistiques et religieuses des projections privées. S’il comptait s’assurer ainsi la bienveillance des gens en place, il a mal calculé son coup, ou peut-être a-t-il fait preuve, au contraire, d’un machiavélisme supérieur.

Les commentaires ont tout de suite suivi et, loin de louer le film ou même de rassurer le public, ce ne furent partout que vitupérations affolées et cris d’alarme angoissés au sujet des violences antisémites qui risquaient de se produire à la sortie des cinémas. Même le New Yorker, si fier de l’humour serein dont, en principe, il ne se départ jamais, a complètement perdu son sang-froid et très sérieusement accusé le film d’être plus semblable à la propagande nazie que toute autre production cinématographique depuis la Seconde Guerre mondiale.

Rien ne justifie ces accusations. Pour Mel Gibson, la mort du Christ est l’oeuvre de tous les hommes, à commencer par Gibson lui-même. Lorsque son film s’écarte un peu des sources évangéliques, ce qui arrive rarement, ce n’est pas pour noircir les Juifs mais pour souligner la pitié que Jésus inspire à certains d’entre eux, à un Simon de Cyrène par exemple, dont le rôle est augmenté, ou à une Véronique, la femme qui, selon une tradition ancienne, a offert à Jésus, pendant la montée au Golgotha, un linge sur lequel se sont imprimés les traits de son visage.

Plus les choses se calment, plus il devient clair, rétrospectivement, que ce film a déclenché dans les médias les plus influents du monde une véritable crise de nerfs qui a plus ou moins contaminé par la suite l’univers entier.

Plus les choses se calment, plus il devient clair, rétrospectivement, que ce film a déclenché dans les médias les plus influents du monde une véritable crise de nerfs qui a plus ou moins contaminé par la suite l’univers entier. Le public n’avait rien à voir à l’affaire puisqu’il n’avait pas vu le film. Il se demandait avec curiosité, forcément, ce qu’il pouvait bien y avoir dans cette Passion pour semer la panique dans un milieu pas facile en principe à effaroucher. La suite était facile à prévoir: au lieu des deux mille six cents écrans initialement prévus, ils furent plus de quatre mille à projeter The Passion of the Christ à partir du mercredi des Cendres, jour choisi, de toute évidence, pour son symbolisme pénitentiel.

Dès la sortie du film, la thèse de l’antisémitisme a perdu du terrain mais les adversaires du film se sont regroupés autour d’un second grief, la violence excessive qui, à les en croire, caractériserait ce film. Cette violence est grande, indubitablement, mais elle n’excède pas, il me semble, celle de bien d’autres films que les adversaires de Mel Gibson ne songent pas à dénoncer. Cette Passion a bouleversé, très provisoirement sans doute, l’échiquier des réactions médiatiques au sujet de la violence dans les spectacles. Tous ceux qui, d’habitude, s’accommodent très bien de celle-ci ou voient même dans ses progrès constants autant de victoires de la liberté sur la tyrannie, voilà qu’ils la dénoncent dans le film de Gibson avec une véhémence extraordinaire. Tous ceux qui, au contraire, se font d’habitude un devoir de dénoncer la violence, sans obtenir jamais le moindre résultat, non seulement tolèrent ce même film mais fréquemment ils le vénèrent.

Jamais on n’avait filmé avec un tel réalisme

Pour justifier leur attitude, les opposants empruntent à leurs adversaires habituels tous les arguments qui leur paraissent excessifs et même ridicules dans la bouche de ces derniers. Ils redoutent que cette Passion ne «désensibilise» les jeunes, ne fasse d’eux de véritables drogués de la violence, incapables d’apprécier les vrais raffinements de notre culture. On traite Mel Gibson de «pornographe» de la violence, alors qu’en réalité il est un des très rares metteurs en scène à ne pas systématiquement mêler de l’érotisme à la violence.

Certains critiques poussent l’imitation de leurs adversaires si loin qu’ils mêlent le religieux à leurs diatribes. Ils reprochent à ce film son «impiété», ils vont jusqu’à l’accuser, tenez-vous bien, d’être «blasphématoire».

Cette Passion a provoqué, en somme, entre des adversaires qui se renvoient depuis toujours les mêmes arguments, un étonnant chassé-croisé. Cette double palinodie se déroule avec un naturel si parfait que l’ensemble a toute l’apparence d’un ballet classique, d’autant plus élégant qu’il n’a pas la moindre conscience de lui-même.

Quelle est la force invisible mais souveraine qui manipule tous ces critiques sans qu’ils s’en aperçoivent? A mon avis, c’est la Passion elle-même. Si vous m’objectez qu’on a filmé celle-ci bien des fois dans le passé sans jamais provoquer ni l’indignation formidable ni l’admiration, aussi formidable sans doute mais plus secrète, qui déferlent aujourd’hui sur nous, je vous répondrai que jamais encore on n’avait filmé la Passion avec le réalisme implacable de Gibson.

C’est la saccharine hollywoodienne d’abord qui a dominé le cinéma religieux, avec des Jésus aux cheveux si blonds et aux yeux si bleus qu’il n’était pas question de les livrer aux outrages de la soldatesque romaine. Ces dernières années, il y a eu des Passions plus réalistes, mais moins efficaces encore, car agrémentées de fausses audaces postmodernistes, sexuelles de préférence, sur lesquelles les metteurs en scène comptaient pour pimenter un peu les Evangiles jugés par eux insuffisamment scandaleux. Ils ne voyaient pas qu’en sacrifiant à l’académisme de «la révolte» ils affadissaient la Passion, ils la banalisaient.

Pour restituer à la crucifixion sa puissance de scandale, il suffit de la filmer telle quelle, sans rien y ajouter, sans rien en retrancher. Mel Gibson a-t-il réalisé ce programme jusqu’au bout? Pas complètement sans doute, mais il en a fait suffisamment pour épouvanter tous les conformismes.

Le principal argument contre ce que je viens de dire consiste à accuser le film d’infidélité à l’esprit des Evangiles. Il est vrai que les Evangiles se contentent d’énumérer toutes les violences que subit le Christ, sans jamais les décrire de façon détaillée, sans jamais faire voir la Passion «comme si on y était».

Tirer de la nudité et de la rapidité du texte évangélique un argument contre le réalisme de Mel Gibson, c’est escamoter l’histoire. C’est ne pas voir que, au premier siècle de notre ère, la description réaliste au sens moderne ne pouvait pas être pratiquée, car elle n’était pas encore inventée.
C’est parfaitement exact, mais tirer de la nudité et de la rapidité du texte évangélique un argument contre le réalisme de Mel Gibson, c’est escamoter l’histoire. C’est ne pas voir que, au premier siècle de notre ère, la description réaliste au sens moderne ne pouvait pas être pratiquée, car elle n’était pas encore inventée. L’impulsion première dans le développement du réalisme occidental vient très probablement de la Passion. Les Évangiles n’ont pas délibérément rejeté une possibilité qui n’existait pas à leur époque. Il est clair que, loin de fuir le réalisme, ils le recherchent, mais les ressources font défaut. Les récits de la Passion contiennent plus de détails concrets que toutes les œuvres savantes de l’époque. Ils représentent un premier pas en avant vers le toujours plus de réalisme qui définit le dynamisme essentiel de notre culture dans ses époques de grande vitalité. Le premier moteur du réalisme, c’est le désir de nourrir la méditation religieuse qui est essentiellement une méditation sur la Passion du Christ.

En enseignant le mépris du réalisme et du réel lui-même, l’esthétique moderne a complètement faussé l’interprétation de l’art occidental.
En enseignant le mépris du réalisme et du réel lui-même, l’esthétique moderne a complètement faussé l’interprétation de l’art occidental. Elle a inventé, entre l’esthétique d’un côté, le technique et le scientifique de l’autre, une séparation qui n’a commencé à exister qu’avec le modernisme, lequel n’est peut-être qu’une appellation flatteuse de notre décadence. La volonté de faire vrai, de peindre les choses comme si on y était a toujours triomphé auparavant et, pendant des siècles, elle a produit des chefs-d’oeuvre dont Gibson dit qu’il s’est inspiré. Il mentionne lui-même, me dit-on, le Caravage. Il faut songer aussi à certains Christ romans, aux crucifixions espagnoles, à un Jérôme Bosch, à tous les Christ aux outrages…

Loin de mépriser la science et la technique, la grande peinture de la Renaissance et des siècles modernes met toutes les inventions nouvelles au service de sa volonté de réalisme. Loin de rejeter la perspective, le trompe-l’oeil, on accueille tout cela avec passion. Qu’on songe au Christ mort de Mantegna…

Pour comprendre ce qu’a voulu faire Mel Gibson, il me semble qu’il faut se libérer de tous les snobismes modernistes et postmodernistes et envisager le cinéma comme un prolongement et un dépassement du grand réalisme littéraire et pictural. Si les techniques contemporaines passent souvent pour incapables de transmettre l’émotion religieuse, c’est parce que jamais encore de grands artistes ne les ont transfigurées. Leur invention a coïncidé avec le premier effondrement de la spiritualité chrétienne depuis le début du christianisme.

Si les artistes de la Renaissance avaient disposé du cinéma, croit-on vraiment qu’ils l’auraient dédaigné? C’est avec la tradition réaliste que Mel Gibson s’efforce de renouer. L’aventure tentée par lui consiste à utiliser à fond les ressources incomparables de la technique la plus réaliste qui fût jamais, le cinéma. Les risques sont à la mesure de l’ambition qui caractérise cette entreprise, inhabituelle aujourd’hui, mais fréquente dans le passé.

Si l’on entend réellement filmer la Passion et la crucifixion, il est bien évident qu’on ne peut pas se contenter de mentionner en quelques phrases les supplices subis par le Christ. Il faut les représenter. Dans la tragédie grecque, il était interdit de représenter la mort du héros directement, on écoutait un messager qui racontait ce qui venait de se passer. Au cinéma, il n’est plus possible d’éluder l’essentiel. Court-circuiter la flagellation ou la mise en croix, par exemple, ce serait reculer devant l’épreuve décisive. Il faut représenter ces choses épouvantables «comme si on y était». Faut-il s’indigner si le résultat ne ressemble guère à un tableau préraphaélite?

Au-delà d’un certain nombre de coups, la flagellation romaine, c’était la mort certaine, un mode d’exécution comme les autres, en somme, au même titre que la crucifixion. Mel Gibson rappelle cela dans son film. La violence de sa flagellation est d’autant plus insoutenable qu’elle est admirablement filmée, ainsi que tout le reste de l’oeuvre d’ailleurs.

Mel Gibson se situe dans une certaine tradition mystique face à la Passion: «Quelle goutte de sang as-tu versée pour moi?», etc. Il se fait un devoir de se représenter les souffrances du Christ aussi précisément que possible, pas du tout pour cultiver l’esprit de vengeance contre les Juifs ou les Romains, mais pour méditer sur notre propre culpabilité.

Cette attitude n’est pas la seule possible, bien sûr, face à la Passion. Et il y aura certainement un mauvais autant qu’un bon usage de son film, mais on ne peut pas condamner l’entreprise a priori, on ne peut pas l’accuser les yeux fermés de faire de la Passion autre chose qu’elle n’est. Jamais personne, dans l’histoire du christianisme, n’avait encore essayé de représenter la Passion telle que réellement elle a dû se dérouler.

Dans la salle où j’ai vu ce film, sa projection était précédée de trois ou quatre coming attractions remplies d’une violence littéralement imbécile, ricanante, pétrie d’insinuations sado-masochistes, dépourvue de tout intérêt non seulement religieux mais aussi narratif, esthétique ou simplement humain. Comment ceux qui consomment quotidiennement ces abominations, qui les commentent, qui en parlent à leurs amis, peuvent-ils s’indigner du film de Mel Gibson? Voilà qui dépasse mon entendement.

Comment pourrait-on exagérer les souffrances d’un homme qui doit subir, l’un après l’autre, les deux supplices les plus terribles inventés par la cruauté romaine ?
Il faut donc commencer par absoudre le film du reproche absurde «d’aller trop loin», «d’exagérer à plaisir les souffrances du Christ». Comment pourrait-on exagérer les souffrances d’un homme qui doit subir, l’un après l’autre, les deux supplices les plus terribles inventés par la cruauté romaine?

Une fois reconnue la légitimité globale de l’entreprise, il est permis de regretter que Mel Gibson soit allé plus loin dans la violence que le texte évangélique ne l’exige. Il fait commencer les brutalités contre Jésus tout de suite après son arrestation, ce que les Evangiles ne suggèrent pas. Ne serait-ce que pour priver ses critiques d’un argument spécieux, le metteur en scène aurait mieux fait, je pense, de s’en tenir à l’indispensable. L’effet global serait tout aussi puissant et le film ne prêterait pas le flanc au reproche assez hypocrite de flatter le goût contemporain pour la violence.

D’où vient ce formidable pouvoir évocateur qu’a sur la plupart des hommes toute représentation de la Passion fidèle au texte évangélique? Il y a tout un versant anthropologique de la description évangélique, je pense, qui n’est ni spécifiquement juif, ni spécifiquement romain, ni même spécifiquement chrétien et c’est la dimension collective de l’événement, c’est ce qui fait de lui, essentiellement, un phénomène de foule.

La foule qui fait un triomphe à Jésus ce dimanche-là est celle-là même qui hurlera à la mort cinq jours plus tard. Mel Gibson a raison, je pense, de souligner le revirement de cette foule, l’inconstance cruelle des foules, leur étrange versatilité.
Une des choses que le Pilate de Mel Gibson dit à la foule ne figure pas dans les Evangiles mais me paraît fidèle à leur esprit: «Il y a cinq jours, vous désiriez faire de cet homme votre roi et maintenant vous voulez le tuer.» C’est une allusion à l’accueil triomphal fait à Jésus le dimanche précédent, le dimanche dit des Rameaux dans le calendrier liturgique. La foule qui fait un triomphe à Jésus ce dimanche-là est celle-là même qui hurlera à la mort cinq jours plus tard. Mel Gibson a raison, je pense, de souligner le revirement de cette foule, l’inconstance cruelle des foules, leur étrange versatilité. Toutes les foules du monde passent aisément d’un extrême à l’autre, de l’adulation passionnée à la détestation, à la destruction frénétique d’un seul et même individu. Il y a d’ailleurs un grand texte de la Bible qui ressemble beaucoup plus à la Passion évangélique qu’on ne le perçoit d’habitude, et c’est le Livre de Job. Après avoir été le chef de son peuple pendant de nombreuses années, Job est brutalement rejeté par ce même peuple qui le menace de mort par l’intermédiaire de trois porte-parole toujours désignés, assez cocassement, comme «les amis de Job».

Le propre d’une foule agitée, affolée, c’est de ne pas se calmer avant d’avoir assouvi son appétit de violence sur une victime dont l’identité le plus souvent ne lui importe guère. C’est ce que sait fort bien Pilate qui, en sa qualité d’administrateur, a de l’expérience en la matière. Le procurateur propose à la foule, pour commencer, de faire crucifier Barrabas à la place de Jésus. Devant l’échec de cette première manoeuvre très classique, à laquelle il recourt visiblement trop tard, Pilate fait flageller Jésus dans l’espoir de satisfaire aux moindres frais, si l’on peut dire, l’appétit de violence qui caractérise essentiellement ce type de foule.

Si Pilate procède ainsi, ce n’est pas parce qu’il est plus humain que les Juifs, ce n’est pas forcément non plus à cause de son épouse. L’explication la plus vraisemblable, c’est que, pour être bien noté à Rome qui se flatte de faire régner partout la pax romana, un fonctionnaire romain préférera toujours une exécution légale à une exécution imposée par la multitude.

D’un point de vue anthropologique, la Passion n’a rien de spécifiquement juif. C’est un phénomène de foule qui obéit aux mêmes lois que tous les phénomènes de foule. Une observation attentive en repère l’équivalent un peu partout dans les nombreux mythes fondateurs qui racontent la naissance des religions archaïques et antiques.

Presque toutes les religions, je pense, s’enracinent dans des violences collectives analogues.
Presque toutes les religions, je pense, s’enracinent dans des violences collectives analogues à celles que décrivent ou suggèrent non seulement les Evangiles et le Livre de Job mais aussi les chants du Serviteur souffrant dans le deuxième Isaïe, ainsi que de nombreux psaumes. Les chrétiens et les juifs pieux, bien à tort, ont toujours refusé de réfléchir à ces ressemblances entre leurs livres sacrés et les mythes. Une comparaison attentive révèle que, au-delà de ces ressemblances et grâce à elles on peut repérer entre le mythique d’un côté et, de l’autre, le judaïque et le chrétien une différence à la fois ténue et gigantesque qui rend le judéo-chrétien incomparable sous le rapport de la vérité la plus objective. A la différence des mythes qui adoptent systématiquement le point de vue de la foule contre la victime, parce qu’ils sont conçus et racontés par les lyncheurs, et ils tiennent toujours, par conséquent, la victime pour coupable (l’incroyable combinaison de parricide et d’inceste dont Œdipe est accusé, par exemple), nos Écritures à nous tous, les grands textes bibliques et chrétiens innocentent les victimes des mouvements de foules, et c’est bien ce que font les Évangiles dans le cas de Jésus. C’est ce que montre Mel Gibson.

Tandis que mythes répètent sans fin l’illusion meurtrière des foules persécutrices, toujours analogues à celles de la Passion, parce que cette illusion apaise la communauté et lui fournit l’idole autour de laquelle elle se rassemble, les plus grands textes bibliques, et finalement les Évangiles, révèlent le caractère essentiellement trompeur et criminel des phénomènes de foule sur lesquels reposent les mythologies du monde entier.

Il y a deux grandes attitudes à mon avis dans l’histoire humaine, il y a celle de la mythologie qui s’efforce de dissimuler la violence, car, en dernière analyse, c’est sur la violence injuste que les communautés humaines reposent. Et c’est ce que nous faisons tous si nous nous abandonnons à notre instinct. Nous essayons de recouvrir du manteau de Noé la nudité de la violence humaine. Et nous marchons à reculons s’il le faut, pour ne pas nous exposer, en regardant de trop près la violence, à sa puissance contagieuse.

Cette attitude est trop universelle pour être condamnée. C’est l’attitude d’ailleurs des plus grands philosophes grecs et en particulier de Platon, qui condamne Homère et tous les poètes parce qu’ils se permettent de décrire dans leurs oeuvres les violences attribuées par les mythes aux dieux de la cité. Le grand philosophe voit dans cette audacieuse révélation une source de désordre, un péril majeur pour toute la société.

Cette attitude est certainement l’attitude religieuse la plus répandue, la plus normale, la plus naturelle à l’homme et, de nos jours, elle est plus universelle que jamais, car les croyants modernisés, aussi bien les chrétiens que les juifs, l’ont au moins partiellement adoptée.

L’autre attitude est beaucoup plus rare et elle est même unique au monde. Elle est réservée tout entière aux grands moments de l’inspiration biblique et chrétienne. Elle consiste non pas à pudiquement dissimuler mais, au contraire, à révéler la violence dans toute son injustice et son mensonge, partout où il est possible de la repérer. C’est l’attitude du Livre de Job et c’est l’attitude des Evangiles. C’est la plus audacieuse des deux et, à mon avis, c’est la plus grande. C’est l’attitude qui nous a permis de découvrir l’innocence de la plupart des victimes que même les hommes les plus religieux, au cours de leur histoire, n’ont jamais cessé de massacrer et de persécuter. C’est là qu’est l’inspiration commune au judaïsme et au christianisme, et c’est la clef, il faut l’espérer, de leur réconciliation future. C’est la tendance héroïque à mettre la vérité au-dessus même de l’ordre social. C’est à cette aventure-là, il me semble, que le film de Mel Gibson s’efforce d’être fidèle.

Voir aussi:

Mort de l’académicien René Girard
Sebastien Lapaque
Le Figaro
05/11/2015

Penseur franc-tireur et lecteur universel, le philosophe s’est éteint mercredi à l’âge de 91  ans aux États-Unis a annoncé l’Université de Stanford. Il y a longtemps enseigné.

Il concevait son œuvre comme une participation active à un combat intellectuel et spirituel essentiel pour notre avenir. Observateur attentif du monde, il lui arrivait d’être très inquiet. Mais il ne lui déplaisait pas de voir scintiller dans les brasiers du siècle quelques lueurs d’apocalypse. Il se souvenait de l’exhortation de Jean à Patmos: «Écris donc ce que tu as vu, ce qui est et ce qui doit arriver ensuite.» L’inspiration évangélique du titre d’un nombre important de ses livres – Des choses cachées depuis la fondation du monde, Quand ces choses commenceront, Je vois Satan tomber comme l’éclair… – marque bien où était son cœur. Penseur franc-tireur et lecteur universel, René Girard assumait le scandale de croire à la vérité révélée du christianisme dans un siècle voué au doute et à la déconstruction.

Il avait cependant des Évangiles une lecture toute à lui. Pendant près de trente ans, il s’est employé à démontrer que ces récits de la vie de Jésus étaient une théorie de l’homme avant d’être une théorie de Dieu. Quand ses contemporains cherchaient la vérité sur l’origine des institutions humaines chez Marx et Freud, il la trouvait dans les Écritures, lues avec Le Rouge et le Noir, Madame Bovary, Don Quichotte, Les Frères Karamazov, Le Général Dourakine et À la recherche du temps perdu. Par là, il a imposé une herméneutique nouvelle. Une des singularités de son esprit est d’avoir toujours refusé le divorce du savoir et de la littérature. En plein triomphe des sciences humaines, René Girard répétait qu’après les Évangiles, les textes les plus éclairants sur notre culture n’étaient ni philosophiques, ni psychologiques, ni sociologiques, mais littéraires. «Je suis personnellement convaincu, expliquait-il, que les écrivains occidentaux majeurs, qu’ils soient ou non chrétiens, des tragiques grecs à Dante, de Shakespeare à Cervantès ou Pascal et jusqu’aux grands romanciers et poètes de notre époque, sont plus pertinents pour comprendre le drame de la modernité que tous nos philosophes et tous nos savants.»

«Je suis personnellement convaincu que les écrivains occidentaux majeurs, qu’ils soient ou non chrétiens… sont plus pertinents pour comprendre le drame de la modernité que tous nos philosophes et tous nos savants»
Longtemps dédaigné par un clergé intellectuel acquis au structuralisme, à la linguistique et au formalisme, ignoré par l’institution universitaire française, peu connu du grand public, élu à l’Académie française à 80 ans passés, René Girard s’était très tôt fait connaître aux États-Unis. Né à Avignon le jour de Noël 1923, élève à l’École des chartes de 1943 à 1947, où il a passé un diplôme d’archiviste-paléographe, il avait 23 ans lorsqu’il traversa l’Atlantique. Il a alors enseigné la littérature française à l’université d’Indiana, où il a obtenu son doctorat d’histoire, avant de rejoindre l’université John Hopkins de Baltimore, puis la fameuse université de Stanford, en 1974, où il a dirigé le département de langue, littérature et civilisation françaises jusqu’à la fin de sa carrière. Il a souvent expliqué que cet exil dans l’Université américaine, où les chercheurs se voient réserver un cadre et des conditions de travail exceptionnels, a été la chance de sa vie.

Il était admiré et méprisé pour la même raison: avoir eu la prétention de proposer une théorie générale de l’agir et du désir au moment où toute intelligence du monde de portée universelle était frappée de suspicion. Glissant de la critique littéraire à l’anthropologie, René Girard a décortiqué le mécanisme du désir mimétique tel qu’il était mis en scène dans les textes qu’il étudiait et montré qu’il était inhérent à la condition humaine. Par la suite, il a bouleversé la conception que l’on se faisait de la violence et imposé une défense anthropologique du christianisme, ultime scandale d’une pensée qui s’est épanouie livre après livre au long de cinq décennies. Parmi ses ouvrages devenus des classiques, retenons Mensonge romantique et vérité romanesque (1961),La Violence et le Sacré (1972), Critique dans un souterrain (1976), Le Bouc émissaire (1982), Shakespeare: les feux de l’envie (1990).

Anthropologue révolutionnaire, intellectuel au parcours singulier, catholique romain assez peu en phase avec la pastorale de son temps, René Girard n’a jamais été revendiqué par l’institution ecclésiale, comme le fut par exemple Jacques Maritain, familier de la Cour de Rome. Peut-être parce que sa pensée, comme celle de tout vrai penseur chrétien – Érasme, Pascal, Kierkegaard -, sentait un peu le fagot. Persuadé que la vocation des critiques littéraires est de maintenir le sens et la fonction religieuse du langage, René Girard a souvent défendu la nécessité du scandale pour la pensée, un mot qu’on rencontre plus souvent dans le grec des Évangiles que le mot péché. Le skandalon, c’est le piège qui fait trébucher. Mais, parce qu’il nous tient et retient, cet obstacle nous permet d’avancer. Ainsi celui de la Croix, point nodal de toute la réflexion sur la condition humaine de René Girard, matière et mobile d’une grande partie de ses livres. Selon lui, c’est grâce au Christ que le bouc émissaire a cessé d’être coupable et que les origines de la violence ont enfin été révélées. Par là, la Croix nous a délivré des religions archaïques. En rendant tout sacrifice absurde, Jésus s’impose comme un anti-Œdipe. Son histoire est un «retournement de mythe» qui montre que la victime dit la vérité et que c’est la persécution qui porte le mensonge. Dans les histoires précédentes, c’était déjà vrai, mais ce n’était pas dit, les dieux paraissant déchaînés contre les victimes.

Spectateur curieux du nihilisme contemporain et de ses manifestations, René Girard regardait la montée de la violence dans le monde à la fois avec effroi et avec beaucoup d’intérêt. «On n’arrive plus à faire la différence entre le terrorisme révolutionnaire et le fou qui tire dans la foule, nous confiait-il voici quelques années. L’humanité se prépare à entrer dans l’insensé complet. C’est peut-être nécessaire. Le terrorisme oblige l’homme occidental à mesurer le chemin parcouru depuis deux mille ans. Certaines formes de violence nous apparaissent aujourd’hui intolérables. On n’accepterait plus Samson secouant les piliers du Temple et périr en tuant tout le monde avec lui. Notre contradiction fondamentale, c’est que nous sommes les bénéficiaires du christianisme dans notre rapport à la violence et que nous l’avons abandonné sans comprendre que nous étions ses tributaires.»

Bibliographie
1961Mensonge romantique et vérité romanesque
1963Dostoïevski: du double à l’unité
1972La Violence et le sacré
1976Critique dans un souterrain
1978Des choses cachées depuis la fondation du monde
1982Le Bouc émissaire
1985La Route antique des hommes pervers
1990Shakespeare: les feux de l’envie
1994Quand ces choses commenceront…
1999Je vois Satan tomber comme l’éclair
2001Celui par qui le scandale arrive
2002La Voix méconnue du réel
2003Le Sacrifice
2004Les Origines de la culture
2006Vérité ou foi faible. Dialogue sur christianisme et relativisme
2007Dieu, une invention?
De la violence à la divinité
Achever Clausewitz
2008Anorexie et désir mimétique
2009Christianisme et modernité
2010La Conversion de l’art
2011Géométries du désir
Sanglantes origines

Voir aussi:

Religion, désir, violence : pourquoi il faut lire René Girard

Damien Le Guay

Le Figaro
05/11/2015

FIGAROVOX/ANALYSE -Damien Le Gay explique pourquoi le philosophe et académicien compte et comptera de plus en plus.


Damien Le Guay, philosophe, président du comité national d’éthique du funéraire, membre du comité scientifique de la SFAP, enseignant à l’espace éthique de l’AP-HP, vient de faire paraitre un livre sur ces questions: Le fin mot de la vie – contre le mal mourir en France, aux éditions du CERF.


Depuis le début des années 1960, sa place intellectuelle fut singulière et sa pensée originale. C’est pourquoi son œuvre, pour avoir été rejeté pendant longtemps, restera comme l’une des plus importante de l’époque. Il était mondialement reconnu mais ne le fut jamais vraiment en France – même s’il était membre de l’Académie Française. Il était trop archaïque pour les modernes, trop littéraire pour les philosophes, pas assez à la mode pour l’intelligentsia dominante et même trop chrétien pour un grand nombre – y compris certaines instances catholiques. S’il est reconnu (l’est et le sera de plus en plus), il l’a été contre l’époque, contre les pensées dominantes, contre les institutions en place, contre les médias. En France, il fut un marginal, un intellectuel qualifié «d’original» pour mieux le laisser en dehors de l’université quand, en elle, le règne des structures et du marxisme écrasait tout le reste. Et pourtant, il compte et comptera de plus en plus.

Pour avoir fait toute sa carrière universitaire aux Etats-Unis, à Stanford en particulier ; pour ne s’être rangé sous le drapeau d’aucunes des modes intellectuelles germanopratines, qu’elle soit structuraliste, sartrienne, foucaldienne, maoïste, deleuzienne ou autres ; Pour s’être intéressé, trente ans avant Régis Debray, au «fait religieux» quand il était encore classé dans l’enfer de la superstition ; pour avoir osé se dire «chrétien» – crime de lèse modernité – ce qui, aux yeux de nos maîtres à penser (et donc à excommunier), lui retirait toute légitimité scientifique ; pour n’avoir pas, ou peu, de relais en France (même s’il était devenu, sur le tard, membre de l’Académie française) alors qu’il est traduit en plus de vingt-cinq langues ; Pour toutes ces raisons et bien d’autres, René Girard fut à part dans le paysage intellectuel hexagonal.

En 1961, avec Mensonge romantique et vérité romanesque, Il s’intéresse à la littérature pour ce qu’elle dit de l’homme ; En 1972, avec La violence et le sacré, il décortique les mécanismes religieux pour mieux comprendre la violence ; En 1978, avec Des choses cachées depuis la fondation du monde, il considère le christianisme comme une sorte de «sur-religion» qui vient abolir les autres, les rendant inefficaces et presque obsolètes. Sa pensée s’inscrit mal dans une lignée clairement définie. Pour être ailleurs, certains la mettent nulle part. Voilà qui est plus commode pour ronronner entre soi! Anthropologue Il critique l’anthropologie quand, avec Lévi-Strauss, elle condamne le sacrifice en le dépouillant de toute signification ; critique littéraire, il rejette ceux qui, comme Georges Poulet, pensent que la littérature, devenue un monde en soi, ne se réfère qu’a elle seule, n’a rien à révéler des vérités humaines radicales – comme le mimétisme ; chrétien, il critique les catholiques trop immergés dans le monde et peu conscients des enjeux de l’Apocalypse.

René Girard, un Durkheim pascalien…

Alors qui est-il? D’où sort-il? Sorte de guelfe chez les gibelins et de gibelin chez les guelfes, selon la posture d’un Erasme, soucieux de ne rien céder à personne, il était à la fois disciple de Durkheim et s’inscrit dans la lignée de Pascal. Posture intenable s’il en est. Dans le camp des religieux il est trop durkheimien ; dans le camp des sociologues, trop religieux. Et quand il est question de ces «maîtres du soupçon» qui depuis la fin du XIX ème siècle, tendent à renvoyer l’homme vers des forces qui, en coulisse, le domineraient, comme s’il était marionnette plutôt qu’acteur, René Girard, lui aussi, se réclame de cette tradition qui disqualifie l’autonomie moderne. Il ne met pas en exergue des forces sociales, des pulsions inconscientes ou des généalogies insoupçonnées, mais, dans un même effet de déplacement, une rivalité mimétique au fondement de tout. L’individu n’est jamais seul. La conscience s’acquiert non par la raison mais le désir.

Alors il est un Durkheim pascalien – ce qui équivaut à un oxymore intellectuel. Unique membre de cette singulière catégorie, il retient de l’auteur des Formes élémentaires de la vie religieuse, une approche qui fait de la religion un effet de coagulation sociale et une manière collective de réguler la violence. De Pascal il garde le souci d’une apologie chrétienne pleine de raison. «Tous mes livres», dit-il «sont des apologies plus ou moins explicites du christianisme.» Le Christ, première victime innocente, qui dit son innocence à la face du monde, dénude, par-là même, tous les mécanismes du religieux archaïque. Alors, aujourd’hui, nous ne pouvons qu’être chrétiens, même si le christianisme n’a pas été pleinement reçu. René Girard en appelle à une «éthique nouvelle» qui ne peut naître, selon lui, «qu’au sein du mimétisme libéré – libéré par le christianisme».

Qu’il soit du coté de Durkheim ou de celui de Pascal, il privilégie l’analyse et délaisse les a priori idéologiques. Ni rationalisme ni fidéisme. Il faut dire qu’aujourd’hui la situation est inédite. La violence est déchaînée. Plus rien ne la tient. Le religieux ne fait plus son office. Tenir les deux termes de l’équation: à la fois l’analyse du religieux, selon les méthodes durkheimiennes et l’horizon chrétien, dans la lignée d’un prophétisme pascalien. C’est ce que fit René Girard, laissant, dans son sillage, beaucoup de mécontentements, d’incompréhensions, d’incertitudes et de points d’interrogations.

Comment sortir de la nature violente de l’homme?

René Girard, lui, insiste sur une histoire par nature tragique et une violence en dehors de toute maîtrise. Contrairement aux «modernes» qui pensent pouvoir contrôler les réactions en chaîne de la violence, comme on contrôle une fusion nucléaire, il met l’accent sur un processus qui finit par ne plus être tenu. Il échappe à tout le monde. Telle fut la leçon du siècle passé: cette «montée aux extrêmes», selon la formule de Clausewitz, stratège prussien mort en 1831 auquel il confronte sa pensée dans Achever Clausewitz (2007), ne conduit pas, après coup, à la réconciliation des hommes entre eux. Cette formule d’une «montée» de la violence lui parait pertinente. René Girard, lui, sorte d’écologiste de la violence, met l’accent sur un processus d’imitation qui oppose les hommes entre eux. Tout débute par la rivalité. Cette rivalité appelle en retour la vengeance et la vengeance le meurtre et le meurtre la vengeance. L’humanité entre ainsi dans un cercle sans fin. Notons que pour lui la violence vient toujours répondre à une offense – que cette offense soit réelle, imaginaire ou symbolique. La violence est une réponse. Elle n’est pas première. La rivalité, elle, est première. Le désir de ce que l’autre possède est à l’origine de tout. Le violent, lui, est d’abord un offensé. Du moins le croit-il. Toute vengeance est une revanche. Un retour. Un second temps. Une réponse.

Comment alors briser ce cercle, interrompre ce jeu à l’infini de renvoi? Seul, nous dit René Girard, le religieux, par l’instauration du sacrifice, rompt cette circularité de la vengeance et du meurtre. De toute évidence le sacrifice archaïque est arbitraire. La victime est chargée de «tous les péchés du monde». Son meurtre réconcilie la communauté avec les puissances divine et surtout avec elle-même. Dans toutes les sociétés, fussent-elles des plus primitives, on retrouve ce mécanisme du «bouc émissaire». Il permet d’évacuer la violence, d’apaiser les consciences et de mettre un terme, provisoire, aux rivalités en cascade. D’une certaine façon le sacrifice brise le miroir des rivalités. Elles ne se voient plus, ne se répondent plus l’une l’autre. La réconciliation s’opère donc sur le dos d’un autre. Ce meurtre fondateur, instaure des rites qui eux-mêmes font naître les institutions. Et c’est ainsi que naît la culture et toutes les institutions qui la mettent en forme.

La nouveauté chrétienne…

Or, le christianisme, dans un souci de vérité, retire à l’homme ses «béquilles sacrificielles» en reconnaissant la pleine et entière innocence de la victime. Le Christ, dit et reconnu innocent, n’endosse plus la culpabilité sociale bien commode pour justifier des sacrifices. «Le religieux» dit rené Girard «invente le sacrifice ; le christianisme l’en prive». Cette privation est un pari éthique, une invitation à sortir du cycle de la violence par le haut (les Béatitudes). Et si les hommes s’accordaient entre eux au diapason de la bienveillance! Telle est le sens de l’invitation chrétienne.

L’avantage des intuitions creusées et explorées de bien des manières, comme celle de René Girard autour des rivalités mimétiques, est qu’elles prennent le risque de devenir obsessionnelles. Au début, il rêvait d’un savoir sur la violence qui, une fois connu, permettrait de la maîtriser. Cette prétention l’a quitté. La réconciliation des hommes entre eux, conçue, au début, comme quasiment automatique est devenue, au fil des années, incertaine pour ne pas dire problématique. Reste une certitude: le religieux empêche la société de se détruire. Certitude d’autant plus vitale que nous assistons à une montée planétaire de la violence religieuse avec le risque d’une déflagration totale. Sur ce versant-là de nos inquiétudes qui se profilent à l’horizon, René Girard peut nous aider à avancer. Il reste un appui sérieux pour nous éviter de mourir. Mourir par cet actuel jeu de miroir à l’infini des rivalités mimétiques – autre nom de la démocratie-égalitariste. Mourir par ce retour au fondamentalisme religieux, loin de l’intelligence des textes et de la compréhension du vrai mécanisme de la violence.

Voir encore:

Hommage à René Girard
Une pensée profonde exposée aux malentendus
François Hien
Causeur
05 novembre 2015

René Girard est mort hier, à 91 ans. Nous sommes nombreux à avoir l’impression d’avoir perdu un être proche. Pour ma part, et malgré son grand âge, il m’a fallu sa mort pour que je prenne conscience que j’avais toujours pensé le rencontrer un jour. Le contraire me semblait inconcevable.

René Girard a signé une des œuvres les plus profondes de notre époque, dans une langue constamment limpide. Cette œuvre protéiforme déploie une intuition unique, grâce à laquelle elle retrace l’entièreté de l’histoire de l’homme. Je vais essayer de résumer ici en termes simples l’histoire de l’humanité selon Girard.

De nombreux mammifères, nous apprend l’éthologie, ont un comportement mimétique. Ce mimétisme est d’appropriation, c’est-à-dire qu’un individu va désirer l’objet qu’un autre désire, par imitation. Evidemment, cette convergence sur un même objet crée un conflit, que le monde animal résout par l’instauration de « systèmes de dominance » : l’individu qui a remporté le conflit gagne une position de domination qui n’est pas transmissible. C’est donc improprement qu’on parle de « sociétés animales ».

Il nous faut supposer qu’à une époque très éloignée, une certaine catégorie de mammifères n’a pas su engendrer ces sociétés de dominance, et est restée dans l’instabilité de la violence. Or, les individus  n’imitent  pas  seulement  le  désir  de  leur  voisin,  ils  imitent  aussi  sa  violence.  Ces ralliements mimétiques à la violence du voisin convergent comme une série de ruisseaux qui se mêlent et se transforment en un puissant torrent ; la violence intestine va devenir unanime, et un seul individu en sera la victime.

À ce stade, cet individu n’est rien d’autre que la cible malchanceuse d’un mécanisme aveugle. Or, il se trouve que sa mise à mort va calmer, pour un temps, les violences. Les hommes disposent alors d’un calme relatif à la faveur duquel ils commencent à inventer trois institutions, pour éviter le retour de la violence : les interdits, les rituels, et les mythes. Les interdits sont autant de moyens d’éviter les convergences de désir ; les rituels rejouent une partie de la crise mimétique et s’achèvent par un sacrifice, la répétition rituelle du meurtre fondateur ; et les mythes sont des interprétations, du  point  de  vue  des  persécuteurs,  de  cette  violence  fondatrice.  Voilà  pourquoi  les  divinités archaïques sont toujours ambivalentes, à la fois bonnes et mauvaises : les hommes leur assimilent la violence  intestine,  mais  également  sa  résolution  sacrificielle.  La  divinité  n’est  qu’une  fausse transcendance, une manière qu’ont trouvé les hommes de projeter leur violence hors d’eux. C’est la raison pour laquelle on a dit de la théorie girardienne qu’elle était «  la première vraie théorie athée du sacrifice ».

Les systèmes culturels sont des systèmes de différences qui empêchent la convergence des désirs sur les mêmes objets. Là où les rapports de force suffisent à produire cet effet dans le monde animal, les humains ont  besoin  de déployer  des systèmes  d’autant plus  complexes qu’ils  sont cumulatifs. Le mécanisme victimaire fait accéder les hommes au symbolisme, et leur permet de transmettre  l’ordre  différencié.  Ces  sociétés  se  complexifient,  certaines  inventent  des  formes d’organisation politique, des échanges économiques.

Mais ces institutions ne fonctionnent qu’en maintenant dans la méconnaissance les hommes qui en bénéficient. Par principe, la victime émissaire (ou la longue série de victimes émissaire qui a progressivement affiné l’institution) fait écran à la violence de tous. Or cette méconnaissance, si elle est nécessaire au bon fonctionnement des ordres culturels, peut aussi leur être fatale. Peu à peu, le souvenir de la violence se perd. Certains interdits sont moins respectés, des éléments essentiels du rituel disparaissent. Les désirs convergent à nouveau sur les mêmes objets, et c’est le retour de l’indifférenciation violente : les frères s’affrontent en doubles mimétiques, chacun croyant réagir à la violence de l’autre. Les hiérarchies ne tiennent plus, les liens familiaux se dissolvent : c’est la crise mimétique, que si souvent les mythes figurent sous le nom de « peste » – cette maladie de la contagion fatale et de l’indifférencié.

Comme  les  fois  précédentes,  il  faut  bien  trouver  un  coupable  à  ces  « pestes ».  Les mécanismes victimaires se remettent en place, la victime émissaire est mise à mort, la paix revient, les différences affluent de nouveau ; de nouveaux interdits sont générés par la crise  ; un nouveau mythe en garde une trace déformée.

Voilà selon Girard le modèle, ici schématisé, de la genèse des cultures humaines et de leur fonctionnement cyclique. Une société est un système de différences mécaniquement générées par des  crises  sacrificielles.  Elle  est  intégralement  fille  du  religieux.  Le  religieux,  c’est  cette transcendance de la violence que les hommes ont besoin de poser hors de soi tout autant qu’ils ont besoin de s’en protéger. Le religieux procède à ce double miracle, sans qu’il y ait besoin que quiconque l’ait conçu : il protège de la violence, et il sacralise cette violence, il la rend étrangère aux hommes, il leur fait croire qu’ils n’y étaient pour rien. Ce n’est qu’au prix de cette méconnaissance que les hommes peuvent vivre entre eux et se doter de règles positives. Mais cette méconnaissance est en elle-même dangereuse puisqu’elle camoufle le danger véritable, la violence intestine, qui finit invariablement par revenir.

Cette histoire de l’humanité nous serait insaisissable si nous n’étions pas nous-mêmes sortis du cycle  décrit  ci-dessus.  Etre  encore  dans  ce  cycle,  c’est  être  situé  quelque  part  dans  la méconnaissance évolutive qui enveloppe le mécanisme sacrificiel. Notre sortie du cycle, Girard l’attribue au judéo-chrétien. Le  Christ,  lui,  n’est  rien  d’autre  qu’une  victime  émissaire consentante qui refuse absolument de répondre à la violence, et qui révèle par sa Passion ce qui était jusqu’alors  resté  dissimulé :  que  les  victimes  immolées  par  les  foules  sacrificielles  étaient innocentes de ce dont on les accusait.

La révélation évangélique peut être source de violence plus encore que de paix. Car à des hommes incapables de se réconcilier, elle a retiré les « béquilles sacrificielles » qui les protégeaient de leur propre violence. L’Apocalypse prédit par les Ecritures n’est pas celle d’un Dieu vengeur déchaîné contre nous : ce n’est que le fruit de notre propre violence, montée aux extrêmes. Et René Girard de s’étonner qu’en une époque où il est devenu concevable, et même probable, que l’homme finisse par détruire l’homme, personne n’aille regarder la pertinence des textes apocalyptiques, leur validité anthropologique.

Nous avons toujours le réflexe de créer des boucs émissaires (notre société contemporaine est saturée de ces mécanismes), mais la sacralisation ne prend pas – et notre civilisation ne se clôt plus sur le dos de ses victimes. Nous sommes condamnés à avancer vers un paroxysme de violence réciproque et planétaire – ou bien, nous suggère Girard, à devenir enfin «  chrétiens », c’est-à-dire à imiter le Christ : refuser radicalement l’engrenage de la violence, quitte à y laisser sa vie.

Dans tous les livres que Girard a publiés, du premier au dernier, il ne raconte jamais autre chose que cette longue histoire, qui prend l’humanité à son origine et qui prédit sa fin. Girard moque souvent le besoin qu’à la psychanalyse d’engendrer pulsions et instincts à tout va pour expliquer des phénomènes qu’elle est incapable d’unifier. « Freud n’en est plus à un instinct près » dit-il. De ce point de vue, Girard est particulièrement économe mais n’écrase pas le divers  : il prétend qu’à partir du mimétisme seul, on peut redéployer toutes les manifestations humaines, ses institutions, son art, sa violence…

Pour finir, je voudrais dire un mot des implications pour le lecteur d’une telle théorie. Devenir « girardien », ce n’est pas appartenir à une secte ; ce n’est pas tenir pour vrai tout ce que Girard a écrit ; c’est d’abord se laisser aller à une «  conversion » qui n’est pas d’ordre religieux, mais qui est un bouleversement du regard sur soi, une critique personnelle de son propre désir.

Pour comprendre à quel point la théorie de Girard est vraie, il faut avoir cheminé à rebours de son désir, non pas pour atteindre un illusoire « moi » authentique, mais au contraire pour aboutir à l’inexistence de ce moi, toujours déjà agi par des « désirs selon l’autre ». La théorie mimétique est un dévoilement progressif dont le lecteur n’est jamais absent de ce qui se dévoile à lui. Elle menace l’existence du sujet que je croyais être. Elle s’attaque à ce que je croyais le plus original chez moi.

Il n’est pas un lecteur de Girard, même le plus convaincu, qui ne se soit dit à la lecture de Mensonge romantique et vérité romanesque : « Il a raison, tout ça est vrai. Heureusement que pour ma part j’y échappe en partie. » Il serait suicidaire de ne se lire soi-même qu’avec les lunettes girardiennes ; on a besoin de croire un minimum aux raisons que notre désir se donne ; ces raisons constituent toujours une résistance en nous à la théorie mimétique, plus ou moins grande selon les individus. Il ne s’agit pas de s’en défendre, mais de le savoir. La lecture de Girard nous impose donc un double processus de révélation : on se rend compte d’abord que notre propre désir obéit aux lois décelées par Girard ; et dans un second temps, on se rend compte qu’on a feint l’adhésion totale à ses thèses, et qu’il reste en nous un moi « néo-romantique » qui ne se croit pas concerné par ces lois. Ainsi, la découverte de Girard doit nous interdire, in fine, le surplomb de celui qui aurait compris, contre tous ceux qui seraient encore des croyants naïfs en l’autonomie de leur désir.

Les théories modernes, fussent-elles particulièrement humiliantes pour le sujet, tournent en avant-garde parce qu’un petit noyau de fidèles s’enorgueillit d’avoir le courage intellectuel de les tenir pour vraies. Par nature, il ne peut en être de même avec René Girard : construire une avant-garde autour de ses théories, ce serait reconstituer la distinction de valeur entre «  moi » et « les autres » dont sa lecture devrait nous avoir guéris. Nous n’avons pas d’autre choix que d’entrer en dissidence de notre propre désir, et de n’en tirer aucun profit social qui nous replongerait dans les postures dont Girard nous aide à nous affranchir.

Bien entendu, cela n’empêche pas d’éminents girardiens de se prévaloir de ses thèses contre tous  les  imbéciles  qui  n’y  comprennent  rien.  Girard  n’est  pas  à  l’abri  des  malentendus.  Sa bonhommie et sa gentillesse, vantées par tous ceux qui l’ont côtoyé, auraient sans doute pardonné même ces contresens moraux. « Ils ne savent pas ce qu’ils font ».

René Girard est mort à Stanford, à 91 ans. Nous sommes nombreux à pleurer ce cher professeur.

Voir aussi:

Le génie du girardisme
Il faut lire René Girard
Basile de Koch
Causeur
13 janvier 2008

Je ne pense pas que “toutes les religions se valent”, contrairement à l’opinion professée par 62% de mes camarades catholiques pratiquants (sondage La Croix, 11-11-07). Sinon je laisserais tomber aussi sec le catholicisme, et peut-être même sa pratique.

Au contraire je suis intimement touché, non par la grâce hélas, mais par la beauté de ma religion à moi, la seule qui repose tout entière sur l’Amour. Le coup du Créateur qui va jusqu’à se faire homme par amour pour sa créature (et pour lui montrer qu’elle-même peut “faire le chemin à l’envers”, comme disait le poète), c’est dans la Bible et nulle part ailleurs !

Le génie du christianisme, c’est d’avoir transmis aux hommes vaille que vaille depuis 2000 ans cette Bonne Nouvelle : si ça se trouve, Dieu tout-puissant nous aime inconditionnellement depuis toujours et pour toujours ; Il l’aurait notamment prouvé dans les années 30 de notre ère, à l’occasion d’une apparition mouvementée en Judée-Galilée.

Le génie du girardisme, c’est de mettre en lumière le message christique comme l’unique et évident remède aux maux dont souffre la race humaine depuis la Genèse, c’est-à-dire depuis toujours, et dont notre époque risque désormais de crever, grâce aux progrès des sciences et des techniques.

J’ai mis longtemps à comprendre René Girard. Il répondait brillamment, dans un langage philosophique et néanmoins sensé, à des questions que je ne me posais pas (sur le mimétisme, le désir, la violence…) Et puis j’ai fini par comprendre que mes “questions métaphysiques” manquaient de précision – et aussitôt j’ai commencé d’apprécier les réponses de René. Il faut dire aussi que ce mec ne fait rien comme tout le monde. Y a qu’à voir comment il définit son métier : “anthropologue de la violence et des religions”, je vous demande un peu ! Qu’est-ce que c’est que cette improbable glace à deux boules ? Serait-ce à dire que toute violence vient du religieux, comme l’ânonne avec succès un vulgaire Onfray ? Non, cent fois non : Girard est un philosophe chrétien, c’est-à-dire l’inverse exact d’Onfray.

Au commencement était le “désir mimétique”, nous dit René Girard. Et d’opposer le besoin, réel et parfois vital, au désir, “essentiellement social (…) et dépourvu de tout fondement dans la réalité”. Alors, je vous vois venir : cette critique du désir ne serait-elle pas une vulgaire démarcation de l’infinie sagesse bouddhiste ? Eh bien pas du tout, si je puis me permettre ! Le christianisme ne nous propose pas de choisir entre le désir et le Néant (rebaptisé “Nirvana”), mais entre le désir et l’Amour, source de vie éternelle.

Il est cocasse, à propos du désir mimétique, de voir notre anthropologue mettre dans le même sac Don Quichotte et Madame Bovary. “Individualistes”, ces personnages ? Tu parles ! Don Quichotte se rêve en “chevalier errant”… comme tous les Espagnols de qualité en ce début de XVIIe siècle décadent. Quant à Emma, c’est la lecture de romans qui instille en elle l’envie mimétique d’être une « Parisienne » comme ses héroïnes. Au moins Quichotte et Emma ont-ils l’excuse d’être eux-mêmes des personnages de fiction – ce qui n’est malheureusement pas le cas de tout le monde.

Proust, par exemple, n’est pas un héros de roman, c’est le contraire : un écrivain. Même que son premier roman Jean Santeuil (découvert, par bonheur, seulement en 1956) était plat et creux à la fois. Explication de l’anthropologue, qui décidément se fait critique littéraire quand il veut : Marcel n’a pas encore pigé l’idée qui fera tout le charme de sa Recherche. Le désir est toujours extérieur, inaccessible ; on court après lui et, quand on croit enfin le saisir, il est bientôt rattrapé par la réalité qui le tue aussitôt : “Ce n’était que cela…”

“Le désir dure trois semaines”, confiait l’an dernier Carla Bruni, favorite de notre président depuis maintenant neuf semaines et demi. “L’amour dure trois ans”, prêche en écho le beigbederologue Beigbeder. Mais ces intéressantes considérations sont faussées par une fâcheuse confusion de vocabulaire. L’amour au sens girardien, et d’ailleurs chrétien du terme, n’a rien à voir avec le désir. On peut jouer tant qu’on veut au cache-cache des désirs mimétiques croisés, et même appeler ça “amour” ; mais comme dit l’ami René, “comprendre et être compris, c’est quand même plus solide” !

Voir également:

René Girard, l’éclaireur

Victimes partout, chrétiens nulle part?

Emmanuel Dubois de Prisque

Causeur

6 novembre 2015

 

René Girard, qui n’était ni philosophe, ni anthropologue, ni critique littéraire, est mort le 4 novembre 2015 à Stanford, Californie, à l’âge de 91 ans. René Noël Théophile Girard, dont le père, esprit libre, conservateur du palais des Papes, se prénommait Joseph, et la mère, catholique pratiquante, se prénommait Marie, est né le 25 décembre 1923 à Avignon. Parti de France après la guerre et ses études à l’école des Chartes, il est devenu aux Etats-Unis  un universitaire sans chapelle. Il s’est converti au catholicisme de son enfance peu avant la quarantaine, sous l’effet de ses lectures.

À le lire, je connais plus d’un post-moderne autoproclamé, à commencer par moi, dont la vie a été bouleversée. Nous qui faisions les malins avec notre tradition, nous qui moquions la ringardise de nos pères, découvrions en lisant Girard que ce vieux livre poussiéreux, la Bible, était encore à lire. Qu’elle nous comprenait infiniment mieux que nous ne la comprenions. Ce que Girard nous a donné à lire, ce n’est rien moins que le monde commun des classiques de la France catholique, de l’Europe chrétienne, celui dont nous avions hérité mais que nous laissions lui aussi prendre la poussière dans un coin du bazar mondialisé. Nous pouvions grâce à lui nous plonger dans les livres de nos pères et y trouver une merveilleuse intelligence du monde. Avec lui, nous nous découvrions tout uniment fils de nos pères, français et catholiques. Car ce que nous apprend René Girard, c’est que nous ne sommes pas nés de la dernière pluie, que nous avons pour vivre et exister besoin du désir des autres, que nous ne sommes pas ces être libres et sans attaches que les catastrophes du XXe siècle auraient fait de nous.

« C’est un garçon sans importance collective, c’est tout juste un individu. » Cette phrase de Céline qui m’a longtemps trotté dans la tête adolescent était tout un programme. Elle plaisait beaucoup à Sartre qui l’a mise en exergue de La Nausée. Elle donnait à la foule des pékins moyens dans mon genre une image très avantageuse d’eux-mêmes, au moment de l’effondrement des grands récits. Nous n’appartenions à rien ni à personne. Nous étions seulement nous-mêmes, libres et incréés. La lecture attentive de Girard balaye ces prétentions infantiles, qui pourtant structurent encore la psyché de l’Occident. Non, nous ne sommes pas à nous-mêmes nos propres pères. Non, nous ne sommes pas libres et possesseurs de nos désirs. Comme le dit l’Eglise depuis toujours, nous naissons esclaves de nos péchés, de notre désir dit Girard, et seul le Dieu de nos pères peut nous en libérer.  Prouver cette vérité constitue toute l’ambition intellectuelle de Girard, une vérité bien particulière puisqu’elle appartient à la fois à l’ordre de la science et à celui de la spiritualité.

J’ai eu la chance de rencontrer Girard et de discuter à deux reprises assez longuement avec lui. Il aimait à s’amuser des malentendus provoqués par son œuvre.  Il racontait qu’à la fin de ses conférences, des lecteurs enthousiastes venaient le voir pour lui confier qu’il avait vu juste, que les boucs émissaires existaient, qu’ils étaient effectivement le socle de la vie commune, et que d’ailleurs lui, René Girard, avait la chance d’en avoir un en face de lui.  Ce qu’il percevait ainsi, c’était la naissance de cette concurrence victimaire qu’une mauvaise compréhension de son œuvre contribuait à exacerber. Pour René Girard, comprendre son œuvre ou se convertir au christianisme (ce qui fut pour moi une seule et même chose) impliquait de se découvrir non pas victime, mais pécheur.

Or, pour avoir raison aujourd’hui, pour gagner la compétition médiatique, il faut s’affirmer victime de la violence du monde, de l’Etat, du groupe. « Le monde moderne est plein de vertus chrétiennes devenues folles » disait Chesterton, un auteur selon le goût de René Girard. À quelques heureuses exceptions près, l’université s’est pendant longtemps gardée de se pencher sérieusement sur l’œuvre d’un penseur que son catholicisme de mieux en mieux assumé rendait de plus en plus hérétique. Cependant, à court de concept opératoire pour penser le réel, la sociologie a aujourd’hui recours jusqu’à la nausée (qui lui vient facilement) au concept du bouc émissaire pour expliquer à peu près tout et son contraire : la façon dont on traite la religion musulmane et la condition féminine en Occident par exemple.

Typiquement, le girardien sans christianisme, cet oxymoron  qui prolifère aujourd’hui, s’efforce de découvrir la violence, les boucs émissaires et le ressentiment partout, sauf là où cela ferait vraiment une différence, la seule différence qui tienne, c’est-à-dire en lui-même. C’est ainsi que les bien-pensants passent leur temps à dénoncer le racisme dégoutant du bas-peuple de France sans paraître voir le racisme de classe dont ils font preuve à cette occasion.  Ce girardisme sans christianisme est le pire des contresens d’un monde qui pourtant n’en est pas avare : le monde post-moderne est plein de concepts girardiens devenus fous.

Voir de même:

Mort de René Girard, anthropologue et théoricien de la « violence mimétique »
Jean Birnbaum

Le Monde

05.11.2015

L’anthropologue René Girard est mort mercredi 4 novembre, à Stanford, aux Etats-Unis. Il avait 91 ans. Fondateur de la « théorie mimétique », ce franc-tireur de la scène intellectuelle avait bâti une œuvre originale, qui conjugue réflexion savante et prédication chrétienne. Ses livres, commentés aux quatre coins du monde, forment les étapes d’une vaste enquête sur le désir humain et sur la violence sacrificielle où toute société, selon Girard, trouve son origine inavouable.

« Le renommé professeur français de Stanford, l’un des quarante Immortels de la prestigieuse Académie française, est décédé à son domicile de Stanford mercredi des suites d’une longue maladie », a indiqué l’université californienne où il a longtemps enseigné.
Né le 25 décembre 1923, à Avignon, René Noël Théophile grandit dans une famille de la petite bourgeoisie intellectuelle. Son père, radical-socialiste et anticlérical, est conservateur de la bibliothèque et du musée d’Avignon, puis du Palais des papes. Sa mère, elle, est une catholique tendance Maurras, passionnée de musique et de littérature. Le soir, elle lit du Mauriac ou des romans italiens à ses cinq enfants. La famille ne roule pas sur l’or, elle est préoccupée par la crise, la montée des périls. Plutôt heureuse, l’enfance de René Girard n’en est donc pas moins marquée par l’angoisse.

Quand on lui demandait quel était son premier souvenir politique, il répondait sans hésiter : les manifestations ligueuses du 6 février 1934. « J’ai grandi dans une famille de bourgeois décatis, qui avait été appauvrie par les fameux emprunts russes au lendemain de la première guerre mondiale, nous avait-il confié lors d’un entretien réalisé en 2007. Nous faisions partie des gens qui comprenaient que tout était en train de foutre le camp. Nous avions une conscience profonde du danger nazi et de la guerre qui venait. Enfant, j’ai toujours été un peu poltron, chahuteur mais pas batailleur. Dans la cour de récréation, je me tenais avec les petits, j’avais peur des grands brutaux. Et j’enviais les élèves du collège jésuite qui partaient skier sur le mont Ventoux… »

Longue aventure américaine
Après des études agitées (il est même renvoyé du lycée pour mauvaise conduite), le jeune Girard finit par obtenir son bac. En 1940, il se rend à Lyon dans l’idée de préparer Normale-Sup. Mais les conditions matérielles sont trop pénibles, et il décide de rentrer à Avignon. Son père lui suggère alors d’entrer à l’Ecole des chartes. Il y est admis et connaît à Paris des moments difficiles, entre solitude et ennui. Peu emballé par la perspective de plonger pour longtemps dans les archives médiévales, il accepte une offre pour devenir assistant de français aux Etats-Unis. C’est le début d’une aventure américaine qui ne prendra fin qu’avec sa mort, la trajectoire académique de Girard se déroulant essentiellement outre-Atlantique.

Vient alors le premier déclic : chargé d’enseigner la littérature française à ses étudiants, il commente devant eux les livres qui ont marqué sa jeunesse, Cervantès, Dostoïevski ou Proust. Puis, comparant les textes, il se met à repérer des résonances, rapprochant par exemple la vanité chez Stendhal et le snobisme chez Flaubert ou Proust. Emerge ainsi ce qui sera le grand projet de sa vie : retracer le destin du désir humain à travers les grandes œuvres littéraires.

De la littérature à l’anthropologie religieuse
En 1957, Girard intègre l’université Johns-Hopkins, à Baltimore. C’est là que s’opérera le second glissement décisif : de l’histoire à la littérature, et de la littérature à l’anthropologie religieuse. « Tout ce que je dis m’a été donné d’un seul coup. C’était en 1959, je travaillais sur le rapport de l’expérience religieuse et de l’écriture romanesque. Je me suis dit : c’est là qu’est ta voie, tu dois devenir une espèce de défenseur du christianisme », confiait Girard au Monde, en 1999.

A cette époque, il amasse les notes pour nourrir le livre qui restera l’un de ses essais les plus connus, et qui fait encore référence aujourd’hui : Mensonge romantique et vérité romanesque (1961). Il y expose pour la première fois le cadre de sa théorie mimétique. Bien qu’elle engage des enjeux profonds et extrêmement complexes, il est d’autant plus permis d’exposer cette théorie en quelques mots que Girard lui-même la présentait non comme un système conceptuel, mais comme la description de simples rapports humains. Résumons donc. Pour comprendre le fonctionnement de nos sociétés, il faut partir du désir humain et de sa nature profondément pathologique. Le désir est une maladie, chacun désire toujours ce que désire autrui, voilà le ressort principal de tout conflit. De cette concurrence « rivalitaire » naît le cycle de la fureur et de la vengeance. Ce cycle n’est résolu que par le sacrifice d’un « bouc émissaire », comme en ont témoigné à travers l’histoire des épisodes aussi divers que le viol de Lucrèce, l’affaire Dreyfus ou les procès de Moscou.

Prédicateur chrétien
C’est ici qu’intervient une distinction fondamentale aux yeux de Girard : « La divergence insurmontable entre les religions archaïques et le judéo-chrétien. » Pour bien saisir ce qui les différencie, il faut commencer par repérer leur élément commun : à première vue, dans un cas comme dans l’autre, on a affaire au récit d’une crise qui se résout par un lynchage transfiguré en épiphanie. Mais là où les religions archaïques, tout comme les modernes chasses aux sorcières, accablent le bouc émissaire dont le sacrifice permet à la foule de se réconcilier, le christianisme, lui, proclame haut et fort l’innocence de la victime. Contre ceux qui réduisent la Passion du Christ à un mythe parmi d’autres, Girard affirme la singularité irréductible et la vérité scandaleuse de la révélation chrétienne. Non seulement celle-ci rompt la logique infernale de la violence mimétique, mais elle dévoile le sanglant substrat de toute culture humaine : le lynchage qui apaise la foule et ressoude la communauté.

Girard, longtemps sceptique, a donc peu à peu endossé les habits du prédicateur chrétien, avec l’enthousiasme et la pugnacité d’un exégète converti par les textes. De livre en livre, et de La Violence et le sacré (1972) jusqu’à Je vois Satan tomber comme l’éclair (1999), il exalte la force subversive des Evangiles.

Un engagement religieux critiqué
Cet engagement religieux a souvent été pointé par ses détracteurs, pour lesquels sa prose relève plus de l’apologétique chrétienne que des sciences humaines. A ceux-là, l’anthropologue répondait que les Evangiles étaient la véritable science de l’homme… « Oui, c’est une espèce d’apologétique chrétienne que j’écris, mais elle est bougrement bien ficelée », ironisait, dans un rire espiègle, celui qui ne manquait jamais ni de culot ni d’humour.

Adoptant une écriture de plus en plus pamphlétaire, voire prophétique, il était convaincu de porter une vérité que personne ne voulait voir et qui pourtant crevait les yeux. Pour lui, la théorie mimétique permettait d’éclairer non seulement la construction du désir humain et la généalogie des mythes, mais aussi la violence présente, l’infinie spirale du ressentiment et de la colère, bref l’apocalypse qui vient. « Aujourd’hui, il n’y a pas besoin d’être religieux pour sentir que le monde est dans une incertitude totale », prévenait, un index pointé vers le ciel, celui qui avait interprété les attentats du 11-Septembre comme la manifestation d’un mimétisme désormais globalisé.

Il y a ici un autre aspect souvent relevé par les critiques de Girard : sa prétention à avoir réponse à tout, à tout expliquer, depuis les sacrifices aztèques jusqu’aux attentats islamistes en passant par le snobisme proustien. « Don’t you think you are spreading yourself a bit thin ? » [« tu ne penses pas que tu t’étales un peu trop ? »], lui demandaient déjà ses collègues américains, poliment, dans les années 1960… « Je n’arrive pas à éviter de donner cette impression d’arrogance », admettait-il, narquois, un demi-siècle plus tard.

Relatif isolement
Ajoutez à cela le fait que Girard se réclamait du « bon sens » populaire contre les abstractions universitaires, et vous comprendrez pourquoi ses textes ont souvent reçu un accueil glacial dans le monde académique. Les anthropologues, en particulier, n’ont guère souhaité se pencher sur ses hypothèses, hormis lors d’une rencontre internationale qui eut lieu en 1983 en Californie, non loin de Stanford, l’université où Girard enseigna de 1980 jusqu’à la fin de ses jours.

Confrontant son modèle conceptuel à leurs enquêtes de terrain, quelques chercheurs français ont aussi accepté de discuter les thèses de Girard. A chaque fois, l’enjeu de cette confrontation s’est concentré sur une question : les sacrifices rituels propres aux sociétés traditionnelles relèvent-ils vraiment du lynchage victimaire ? Et, même quand c’est le cas, peut-on échafauder une théorie de la religion, voire un discours universel sur l’origine de la culture humaine, en se fondant sur ces pratiques archaïques ?

Cordiale ou frontale, cette discussion revenait toujours à souligner le relatif isolement, mais aussi la place singulière, de René Girard dans le champ intellectuel. Ayant fait des Etats-Unis sa patrie d’adoption, cet autodidacte jetait un regard perplexe sur la pensée française, et notamment sur le structuralisme et la déconstruction. Mêlant sans cesse littérature, psychanalyse et théologie, cet esprit libre ne respectait guère les cadres de la spécialisation universitaire. Animé d’une puissante conviction chrétienne, cet homme de foi ne craignait pas d’affirmer que sa démarche évangélique valait méthode scientifique. Se réclamant de l’anthropologie, ce provocateur-né brossait la discipline à rebrousse-poil en optant pour une réaffirmation tranquille de la supériorité culturelle occidentale. Pour Girard, en effet, qui prétend découvrir l’universelle origine de la civilisation, on doit d’abord admettre la prééminence morale et culturelle du christianisme.

« Vous n’êtes pas obligés de me croire », lançait René Girard à ceux que son pari laissait perplexes. Du reste, il aimait exhiber ses propres doutes, comme s’il était traversé par une vérité à prendre ou à laisser, et dont lui-même devait encore prendre toute la mesure. Rythmant ses phrases de formules du type « si j’ai raison… », confiant ses incertitudes à l’égard du plan qu’il avait choisi pour tel ou tel livre, il séduisait les plus réticents par la virtuosité éclairante de son rapport aux textes. Exégète à la curiosité sans limites, il opposait à la férocité du monde moderne, à l’accélération du pire, la virtuosité tranquille d’un lecteur qui n’aura jamais cessé de servir les Ecritures.

Voir encore:

René Girard, dernier désir
Robert Maggiori
Libération
5 novembre 2015

L’inventeur de la théorie mimétique et penseur d’une anthropologie fondée sur l’exclusion-sacralisation du bouc émissaire s’est éteint mercredi.

Membre de l’Académie française, René Girard n’a pourtant pas trouvé place dans l’université française : dans l’immédiat après-guerre, il émigre aux Etats Unis, obtient son doctorat en histoire à l’université d’Indiana, puis enseigne la littérature comparée à la Johns Hopkins University de Baltimore (il organise là un célèbre colloque sur «le Langage de la critique et les sciences de l’homme» auquel participent Roland Barthes, Jacques Lacan et Jacques Derrida, qui fait découvrir le structuralisme aux Américains) et, jusqu’à sa retraite en 1995, à Stanford – où, professeur de langue, littérature et civilisation françaises, il côtoie Michel Serres et Jean-Pierre Dupuy.

Né le jour de Noël 1923 à Avignon, élève de l’Ecole des chartes, il est mort mercredi à Stanford, Californie, à l’âge de 91 ans. C’était une forte personnalité, tenace, parfois bourrue, qui a creusé son sillon avec l’énergie des solitaires, et entre mille difficultés, car le retentissement international de ses théories – dont certains des concepts, notamment celui de «bouc émissaire», sont quasiment tombés dans la grammaire commune des sciences humaines et même le langage commun – n’a jamais fait disparaître les violentes critiques, les incompréhensions, les rejets, encore accrus par le fait que Girard, traditionaliste, a toujours refusé les crédos postmodernes, marxistes, déconstructivistes, structuralistes, psychanalytiques…

Porté par une profonde foi religieuse, fin interprète du mystère de la Passion du Christ, il a bâti une œuvre considérable, qui se déploie de la littérature à l’anthropologie, de l’ethnologie à la théologie, à la psychologie, la sociologie, la philosophie de la religion et la philosophie tout court. Les linéaments de toute sa pensée sont déjà contenus dans son premier ouvrage, Mensonge romantique et vérité romanesque (1961) dans lequel, à partir de l’étude très novatrice des grands romans occidentaux (Stendhal, Cervantes, Flaubert, Proust, Dostoïevski…), il forge la théorie du «désir mimétique» – l’homme ne désire que selon le désir de l’autre –, qui aura un écho considérable à mesure qu’il l’appliquera à des domaines extérieurs à la littérature.

Etre désirant
La nature humaine a en son fond la mimesis : au sens où les actions des hommes sont toujours entreprises parce qu’ils les voient réalisées par un «modèle». L’homme est par excellence un être désirant, qui nourrit son désir du désir de l’autre et adopte ainsi coutumes, modes, façons d’être, pensées, actions en adaptant les coutumes, les modes, les façons d’être de ceux qui sont «autour» de lui. La différence entre l’animal et l’homme n’est pas dans l’intelligence ou quoi que ce soit d’autre, mais dans le fait que le premier a des appétits, qui le clouent à l’instinct, alors que le second a des désirs, qui l’incitent d’abord à observer puis à imiter. C’est ce principe mimétique qui guide les «mouvements» des individus dans la société. De là la violence généralisée, car le conflit apparaît dès qu’il y a «triangle», c’est-à-dire dès que le désir porte sur un «objet» qui est déjà l’objet du désir d’un autre.

Naissent ainsi l’envie, la jalousie, la haine, la vengeance. La vengeance ne cesse de s’alimenter de la haine des «rivaux», et implique toute la communauté, menaçant ainsi les fondements de l’ordre social. Seul le sacrifice d’une victime innocente, qu’une «différence» (réelle ou créée) distingue de tous les autres, pourra apaiser les haines et guérir la communauté. C’est la théorie du «bouc émissaire», qui a rendu René Girard célèbre. En focalisant son attention sur l’aspect le plus énigmatique du sacré, l’auteur de la Violence et le sacré (1972) montre en effet – on peut en avoir une illustration dans le film de Peter Fleischmann, Scènes de chasse en Bavière, où un jeune homme, soupçonné d’être homosexuel, devient l’objet d’une véritable chasse à l’homme de la part de tous les habitants du village – que l’immolation d’une victime sacrificielle, attestée dans presque toutes les traditions religieuses et la littérature mythologique, sert à apaiser la «guerre de tous contre tous» dont Thomas Hobbes avait fait le centre de sa philosophie.

Lorsqu’une communauté est sur le point de s’autodétruire par des affrontements intestins, des «guerres civiles», elle trouve moyen de se «sauver» si elle trouve un bouc émissaire (on peut penser à la «chasse aux sorcières», à n’importe qu’elle époque, sous toutes latitudes, et quelle que soit la «sorcière»), sur lequel décharger la violence : bouc émissaire à qui est ensuite attribuée une valeur sacrée, précisément parce qu’il ramène la paix et permet de recoudre le lien social. Souvent, les mythes et les rites ont occulté l’innocence de la victime, mais, selon Girard, la révélation biblique, culminant avec les récits évangéliques de la Passion du Christ, l’a au contraire révélée, de sorte que le christianisme ne peut être considéré comme une simple «variante» des mythes païens (d’où la violente critique que Girard fait de la Généalogie de la morale de Nietzsche, de la conception «dionysiaque» célébrée par le philosophe allemand, et de l’assimilation entre le Christ et les diverses incarnations païennes du dieu-victime).

Faits et événements réels
Dans l’optique girardienne, il s’agissait assurément de proposer un «autre discours» anthropologique, qui se démarquât (et montrât la fausseté) de ceux qui étaient devenus dominants, grâce, évidemment, à l’œuvre de Levi-Strauss (et, d’un autre côté, de Freud). Ne pensant pas du tout qu’on puisse rendre raison de la «pensée sauvage» en s’attachant aux mythes, entendus comme «création poétique» ou «narration» coupée du réel, René Girard enracine son anthropologie dans des faits et des événements réellement arrivés, comme des épisodes de lynchage ou de sacrifices rituels dont la victime est ensuite sacralisée mais qui se fondent toujours, d’abord, sur des accusations absurdes, comme celles de diffuser la peste, de rendre impure la nourriture ou d’empoisonner les eaux.

La théorie mimétique et l’anthropologie fondée sur l’exclusion-sacralisation du bouc émissaire, sont les deux paradigmes que Girard applique à de nombreux champs du savoir, et qui lui permettent de définir un schéma herméneutique capable d’expliquer une foule de phénomènes, sociaux, politiques, littéraires, religieux. Son travail, autrement dit, visait à la constitution d’une anthropologie générale, rationnelle, visant à une explication globale des comportements humains. C’est sans doute pourquoi il a suscité tant d’enthousiasmes et attiré tant de critiques. On ne saurait ici pas même citer toutes les thématiques qu’il a traitées, ni les auteurs avec lesquels il a critiquement dialogué. Ce qui est sûr, c’est que René Girard a toujours maintenu droite la barre de son navire, malgré les vents contraires, et, à l’époque de l’hyper-spécialisation contemporaine, a eu l’audace de formuler une «pensée unitaire» qui a fait l’objet de mille commentaires dans le monde entier, parce que vraiment suggestive, et dont l’ambition était de mettre à nu les racines de la culture humaine. «La vérité est extrêmement rare sur cette terre. Il y a même raison de penser qu’elle soit tout à fait absente.» Ce qui n’a pas été suffisant pour dissuader René Girard de la chercher toute sa vie.

Voir de plus:

René Girard, l’homme qui nous aidait à penser la violence et le sacré
Henri Tincq

Slate

05.11.2015

Mort à l’âge de 91 ans, il n’avait cessé de s’interroger sur la façon dont la religion devient violente, ou est instrumentalisée au nom de la violence.

Mort le 4 novembre à Stanford (Etats-Unis) à l’âge de 91 ans, le philosophe et anthropologue français René Girard, membre de l’Académie française, est sans doute le penseur qui a le mieux mis à jour le lien entre la violence et le sacré.

C’est en développant (après Aristote) sa thèse sur le «désir mimétique» qui anime tout homme que René Girard a été conduit à s’interroger sur la violence. En effet, si le «désir mimétique» –celui de possèder à son tour ce que l’autre possède– permet à l’homme d’accroître ses facultés d’apprentissage, il accroît aussi sa propre violence et provoque la plupart des conflits d’appropriation. La notion de «rivalité mimétique» permet d’éclairer non seulement la construction du désir humain et la généalogie des mythes, mais aussi la spirale du ressentiment et de la colère, en un mot la violence du monde.

Découlant de cette première thèse, la deuxième théorie de René Girard –qu’il expose dans son célèbre ouvrage La violence et le sacré (1972)– est celle du «mécanisme victimaire», selon lui à l’origine de toute forme de religieux archaïque et extrémiste. A son paroxysme, la violence se fixe toujours sur une «victime arbitraire», qui fait contre elle l’unanimité du groupe. L’élimination du «bouc émissaire» devient alors un impératif collectif. C’est elle qui exorcise et fait retomber la violence du groupe. La «victime émissaire» devient «sacrée», c’est-à-dire porteuse de ce pouvoir de déchaîner la crise comme de ramener la paix.

René Girard découvre ainsi la genèse du «religieux archaïque»; du sacrifice rituel comme répétition de l’événement originaire; du mythe comme récit de cet événement; des interdits fixés à l’accès des objets à l’origine des «rivalités» qui ont dégénéré dans cette crise. Cette élaboration religieuse se fait au long de la répétition de crises mimétiques, dont la résolution n’apporte la paix que de façon temporaire. Pour l’anthopologue, l’élaboration des rites et des interdits constituait une sorte de «savoir empirique» sur la violence.

Comment les religions sont devenues extrémistes

Ces deux thèses liées sur la «rivalité mimétique» et le «mécanisme émissaire» ont conduit René Girard –qui a toujours affiché sa foi chrétienne malgré les critiques d’une partie de la communauté scientifique– à s’interroger sur l’origine et le devenir des religions, jusqu’à leurs formes extrémistes d’aujourd’hui. Pour lui, à la naissance des religions, il existe aussi une «rivalité mimétique» autour d’un même «capital symbolique», fondé sur les trois «piliers» que sont le monothéisme, la fonction prophétique et la Révélation.

Pendant des siècles, ce capital symbolique avait été monopolisé par l’Ancien Testament biblique et par le message de Jésus de Nazareth. Mais au septième siècle surgissait le prophète Mahomet et un troisième acteur –l’islam– affirmant que ce qui avait été transmis par les précédents prophètes n’était pas complet, que leur message avait été altéré. Cette rivalité a engendré de la violence entre les «peuples du Livre» dès les premiers temps de l’islam. Au point qu’aujourd’hui encore, on dit que les monothéismes sont porteurs d’une violence structurelle: ils ont fait naître une notion de «vérité» unique, exclusive de toute articulation concurrente.

René Girard va interpréter les attentats du 11 septembre 2001 comme la manifestation d’un «mimétisme» désormais globalisé. Il déclare, dans une interview au Monde en novembre 2001, que le terrorisme islamique s’explique par la volonté «de rallier et mobiliser tout un tiers-monde de frustrés et de victimes dans des rapports de rivalité mimétique avec l’Occident». Pour lui, les «ennemis» de l’Occident font des Etats-Unis «le modèle mimétique de leurs aspirations, au besoin en le tuant». Il a cette formule:

«Le terrorisme est suscité par un désir exacerbé de convergence et de ressemblance avec l’Occident. L’islam fournit le ciment qu’on trouvait autrefois dans le marxisme. Son rapport mystique avec la mort nous le rend le plus mystérieux encore.»
Double rapport
Les rapports entre la violence et le sacré vont poursuivre le philosophe jusqu’à la fin de sa vie. On se souvient que le nom de Dieu porté à l’absolu pour combler des frustrations sociales, politiques, identitaires ou pour justifier un projet totalitaire est responsable d’une partie des plus grands crimes. La Torah, l’Evangile et le Coran ont été le prétexte à nombre de pogroms, de croisades et d’Inquisitions.

Autrement dit, le sacré suscite et engendre de la violence. Fondé ou non sur une transcendance divine, il constitue un mode de représentation de l’univers qui échappe à l’emprise de l’homme, exige sa soumission totale, définit des prescriptions et des interdits. C’est le sacré qui, en dernière instance, donne à l’homme son identité, le conduit à «sacrifier» sa propre vie ou celle des autres. Dans tous les mythes religieux, babyloniens ou autres, les divinités du bien et de l’ordre s’arrachent toujours, dans une lutte violente, au chaos, au mal et à la mort.

Les panthéons des religions monothéistes sont remplis de dieux de la guerre
Mais si le sacré produit de la violence, le processus fonctionne aussi en sens inverse. La violence produit du sacré. L’homme utilise, ou même construit le sacré, pour justifier, légitimer, réguler sa propre violence. Les «guerres saintes» n’ont d’autre but que de mobiliser les ressources du sacré pour une prétendue noble cause: Gott mit uns («Dieu est avec nous»), écrivaient les soldats nazis sur leur ceinturon, alors que l’idéologie nazie était fondamentalement athée.  Cela a toujours existé, quelles que soient les civilisations et les époques. Les panthéons des religions monothéistes sont remplis de dieux de la guerre.

Après René Girard, la question reste ainsi posée: est-ce que ce sont les religions qui sèment les germes de discorde et de violence, par des vérités transformées en dogmatismes? Ou est-ce que ce sont les hommes qui se réclament d’elles et qui se fabriquent leur propre image de Dieu, qui prennent prétexte de tout, y compris du nom divin, pour justifier leur propre violence et fanatisme?

Voir aussi:

L’académicien René Girard est mort à 91 ans
Le philosophe chrétien est décédé mercredi 4 novembre, à Stanford aux États-Unis, à l’âge de 91 ans.
La Croix (avec AFP)
5/11/15

Le philosophe René Girard en novembre 1990. Ce spécialiste des religions et du phénomène de violence est décédé mercredi 4 novembre à 91 ans .

« Le nouveau Darwin des sciences humaines », s’est éteint mercredi 4 novembre, à l’âge de 91 ans. « Le renommé professeur français de Stanford, l’un des 40 immortels de la prestigieuse Académie française, est décédé à son domicile de Stanford mercredi des suites d’une longue maladie », a indiqué l’université américaine dans un communiqué.

René Girard, philosophe et académicien, théoricien du « désir mimétique », était reconnu pour ses livres qui « ont offert une vision audacieuse et vaste de la nature, de l’histoire et de la destinée humaine », poursuit l’université, où il a longtemps dirigé le département de langue, littérature et civilisation française. Archiviste-paléographe de formation, René Girard était installé aux États-Unis depuis 1947.

L’Académie française, une reconnaissance
Traduites dans de nombreuses langues et très reconnues aux États-Unis, ses œuvres sont assez mal connues du grand public français. C’est pourquoi sa nomination au fauteuil numéro 37 de l’Académie française, en 2005, était une véritable reconnaissance pour l’intellectuel.

« Je peux dire sans exagération que, pendant un demi-siècle, la seule institution française qui m’ait persuadé que je n’étais pas oublié en France, dans mon propre pays, en tant que chercheur et en tant que penseur, c’est l’Académie française », avait-il expliqué ce jour-là dans son discours devant les Immortels. Le penseur chrétien succédait alors au Père dominicain Ambroise-Marie Carré.

Une œuvre autour des religions
Né un soir de Noël 1923 à Avignon, René Girard a d’abord consacré sa carrière à l’étude des religions dans les sociétés humaines et aux logiques de mimétisme qui aboutissent à la violence. Selon l’anthropologue, tous les récits sacrés ont en commun un meurtre fondateur. Ce constat servit de base à son livre La Violence et le Sacré en 1972. René Girard s’intéressa également au rôle du bouc émissaire dans les groupes.

Pour René Girard, seul le christianisme – à la lecture de l’Évangile – est capable de mettre à nu le mécanisme victimaire qui fonde les religions, à la différence des croyances archaïques, et permet de dépasser les logiques de mimétisme à l’origine de toutes les violences.

Ses textes ont provoqué engouement ou critique, les uns lui reprochant son analyse trop anthropologique, les autres de dresser par son travail une apologie croyante du christianisme.

Voir également:

Entretien
René Girard : “Si l’Histoire a vraiment un sens, alors ce sens est redoutable”
Propos recueillis par Xavier Lacavalerie
Publié le 05/01/2008. Mis à jour le 05/11/2015

DisparitionRené Girard, l’anthropologue des désirs et de la violence n’est plus
EntretienDavid Graeber, anthropologue : “Nous pourrions être déjà sortis du capitalisme sans nous en rendre compte”
Portrait René Girard, l’essence du sacrifice

L’anthropologue René Girard est mort mercredi 4 novembre, à Stanford, aux Etats-Unis. Nous l’avions rencontré en 2008 : poursuivant sa réflexion sur la violence et le sacré, relisant Clausewitz, le théoricien de la guerre, il nous expliquait que selon lui, nous vivions en pleine apocalypse. En attendant de revenir sur sa carrière et son oeuvre, voici cet entretien tel qu’il avait été publié dans “Télérama”.

Critique littéraire, fasciné par l’étude des religions dans les sociétés archaïques, le chartiste et historien René Girard (né à Avignon en 1923) se livre depuis 1961 à une activité qui l’a longtemps fait passer pour un doux rêveur, un peu marginal et farfelu. A l’époque où tous les intellectuels français se passionnaient pour le politique, le structuralisme ou la psychanalyse, il effectuait tranquillement une relecture anthropologique des Evangiles et de toute la tradition prophétique juive. Pas seulement en tant que croyant, mais comme scientifique, avec l’ambition de réaliser, selon son propre aveu, « l’équivalent ethnologique de L’Origine des espèces ». Quelques ouvrages clés – La Violence et le Sacré (1972), Des choses cachées depuis la fondation du monde (1978), Le Bouc émissaire (1982), Celui par qui le scandale arrive (2001) – témoignent de la singularité de ce parcours et de l’originalité de son apport à l’histoire de la pensée et de l’anthropologie. Longtemps « exilé » aux Etats-Unis, où il a enseigné à l’université de Stanford (Californie), René Girard a entraîné dans son sillage nombre d’admirateurs et d’élèves, et a reçu une tardive consécration hexagonale en étant élu à l’Académie française (1). Il vient de publier un livre d’entretiens assez inattendu, consacré à… Clausewitz, le théoricien de la guerre, sur lequel, en son temps, Raymond Aron avait écrit un essai brillantissime (2), mais forcément daté, oblitéré par les enjeux de la guerre froide entre les Etats-Unis et le monde communiste. Explications et rencontre avec un franc-tireur de la pensée.

On pourrait dire que le point de départ de toute votre oeuvre réside dans ce que vous appelez le « désir mimétique » et dans la violence, que vous mettez au fondement même de toute organisation sociale…
Toute l’histoire – et le malheur ! – de l’humanité commence en effet par la rivalité mimétique. A savoir : je veux ce que l’autre désire ; l’autre souhaite sûrement ce que je possède. Tout désir n’est que le désir d’un autre pris pour modèle. Lorsque cette rivalité mimétique entre deux personnes se met en place, elle a tendance à gagner rapidement tout le groupe, par contagion, et la violence se déchaîne. Cette violence, il faut bien la réguler. Elle se focalise alors sur un individu, sur une victime désignée, un bouc émissaire, quelqu’un de coupable, forcément coupable. Son lynchage collectif a pour fonction de rétablir la paix dans la communauté, jusqu’aux prochaines tensions. Le désir mimétique est donc à la fois un mal absolu – puisqu’il déchaîne la violence – et un remède – puisqu’il régule les sociétés et réconcilie les hommes entre eux, autour de la figure du bouc émissaire. Dans la ritualisation de cette violence inaugurale s’enracine le fonctionnement de toutes les sociétés et les religions archaïques. Puis vint le christianisme. Là, n’en déplaise aux anthropologues et aux théologiens qui ont trop souvent vu dans la figure du Christ un bouc émissaire comme tous les autres, il se passe quand même quelque chose de radicalement différent. La personne lynchée n’est pas une victime qui se sait coupable. Au contraire, elle revendique son innocence et rachète le monde par sa passion.

A vos yeux, il s’agit donc d’une rupture essentielle ?
Oui, définitive même. Mais la Passion a dévoilé une fois pour toutes l’origine sacrificielle de l’Humanité en nous confrontant à ce qui était caché depuis la fondation du monde : la réalité crue de la violence et la nécessité du sacrifice d’un innocent. Elle a défait le sacré en révélant sa violence fondamentale, même si le Christ a confirmé la part de divin que toutes les religions portent en elles. Le christianisme n’apparaît pas seulement comme une autre religion, comme une religion de plus, qui a su libérer la violence ou la sainteté : elle proclame, de fait, la fin des boucs émissaires, donc la fin de toutes les religions possibles. Moment historique décisif, qui consacre la naissance d’une civilisation privée de sacrifices humains, mais qui génère aussi sa propre contradiction et un scepticisme généralisé. Le religieux est complètement démystifié – ce qui pourrait être une bonne chose, dans l’absolu, mais se révèle en réalité une vraie catastrophe, car les êtres humains ne sont pas préparés à cette terrible épreuve : les rites qui les avaient lentement éduqués, qui les avaient empêchés de s’autodétruire, il faut dorénavant s’en passer, maintenant que les victimes innocentes ne peuvent plus être immolées. Et l’homme, pour son malheur, n’a rien de rechange.

Dans ces conditions, à quoi aboutissent les inévitables tensions, au sein des sociétés humaines ?
A la violence généralisée et aux guerres. J’ai retrouvé chez le baron Carl von Clausewitz (1780-1831), auteur d’un célèbre traité au titre spartiate mais éloquent, De la guerre (3), une reformulation étonnante de cette « rivalité mimétique », quand il définit la guerre comme une « montée aux extrêmes ». On peut analyser cette expression comme une incapacité de la politique à contenir l’accroissement mimétique, c’est-à-dire réciproque, de la violence. Longtemps, les innombrables lecteurs et commentateurs de ce texte (3), Raymond Aron en tête, se sont aveuglés sur une autre célèbre formule : « La guerre, c’est la continuation de la politique par d’autres moyens. » Elle tendrait à affirmer que la guerre est une étape, un moment exceptionnel, qui a forcément une fin et une solution politique, alors que c’est exactement l’inverse : le politique est constamment débordé par le déchaînement de la violence. Et cette violence se développe et s’intensifie, jusqu’à son paroxysme, chacune des parties opposées renchérissant en permanence sur l’autre, avec encore plus de vigueur et de détermination.

Qui était ce fameux baron von Clausewitz ?
Un militaire, un général prussien. A l’âge de 12 ans, il a assisté à l’incroyable bataille de Valmy (le 20 septembre 1792), au cours de laquelle une armée de volontaires français, mal habillés, mal armés et sous-équipés, a battu la formidable armée de métier prussienne commandée par le duc de Brunswick. Quelques années plus tard, il se retrouve à la bataille d’Iéna (14 octobre 1806) et subit la plus humiliante et la plus rapide des défaites imposées par l’armée napoléonienne à ses ennemis. Et savez-vous ce qu’il fait ? Contrairement à la plupart des généraux prussiens battus qui se rangent au côté de leur vainqueur, il choisit l’exil. Il rejoint l’armée russe du maréchal Koutouzov et la coalition, afin de continuer à combattre les armées de Napoléon, cet ennemi qui l’agace tant, mais qui le fascine. L’armée prussienne ne lui pardonnera d’ailleurs jamais d’avoir eu raison, à peu près seul contre tous, mais le conservera quand même dans ses rangs. Clausewitz en gardera longtemps une certaine amertume et une profonde mélancolie. Il passera le reste de son existence à rédiger son fameux traité, De la guerre, qui restera inachevé et sera publié un an après sa mort, en 1832, par les soins de sa femme.
Dans ce traité posthume se profile tout le drame du monde moderne, la période où les guerres européennes se sont exaspérées, particulièrement entre la France et ce qui allait devenir l’Allemagne, de la bataille d’Iéna à l’écrasement des nazis en 1945 : un siècle et demi d’affrontements et d’escalades, tissé de victoires, de défaites et d’esprit de revanche. Si cette rivalité, et cette montée aux extrêmes, n’avait pas fait des millions et des millions de morts, elle aurait vraiment un aspect presque comique. Car les Prussiens parlent des Français exactement comme les Français parlent des Prussiens. Ils disent que nous sommes un peuple de guerriers par excellence, dignes héritiers des légions romaines ; que notre langue manque d’harmonie et qu’elle est faite pour donner des ordres ou aboyer des commandements. Toujours le mimétisme…

Vous prétendez « achever Clausewitz », pour reprendre le titre de votre ouvrage. « Achever », comme on tue un ennemi ? Ou comme on termine un livre ?
D’un certain côté, Clausewitz a fait oeuvre de visionnaire. Il a parfaitement compris que, dans cette montée aux extrêmes, il fallait tenir compte des outils de la violence et du rôle prépondérant qu’allaient jouer les moyens technologiques auxquels il pouvait penser. Mais il ne pouvait pas prévoir l’invention des armes modernes de destruction massive, ni la prolifération des engins nucléaires, l’espionnage par satellite ou la communication généralisée en temps réel. On dirait que la montée aux extrêmes ne lui a pas assez fait peur pour qu’il puisse envisager le pire.
« Achever Clausewitz », c’est à la fois reconnaître en quoi son travail a été prémonitoire, mais aussi pousser son raisonnement jusqu’au bout. Car, fort des campagnes et des expéditions de Napoléon, Clausewitz a eu des intuitions très fortes. Il a, par exemple, compris l’importance que pouvait revêtir la guérilla – il fait naturellement référence aux affrontements entre les Espagnols et l’armée de Napoléon – et l’utilité de ce harcèlement permanent, capable de tenir en échec les armées classiques, aussi puissantes soient-elles. Il a également défendu l’idée que, dans un conflit, c’était finalement toujours le défenseur qui avait le dernier mot, et qu’il y avait toujours une Berezina pour mettre un point final à tous les Austerlitz triomphants. Voyez combien la suite lui a donné raison.

Mais sa vision était forcément limitée…
Effectivement, il ne pouvait pas prévoir le déchaînement de la violence généralisée au niveau de la planète. Car c’est là que nous en sommes arrivés, après deux conflits mondiaux, deux bombardements atomiques, plusieurs génocides et sans doute la fin des guerres « classiques », armée identifiable contre armée identifiée, au profit d’une violence en apparence plus sporadique, mais autrement plus dévastatrice. Prenez le génocide perpétré par les Khmers rouges ou les massacres inter-ethniques au Rwanda : 800 000 personnes exécutées à la machette en quelques semaines ! On revient d’un coup plusieurs milliers d’années en arrière, peut-être à l’époque de l’affrontement entre l’homme de Neandertal et l’homme de Cro-Magnon, dont on n’est même pas sûr qu’il se soit produit, mais qui a vu, dans tous les cas, l’éradication complète d’un groupe de population… Sauf qu’au Rwanda cela a pris beaucoup moins de temps.

Et puis il y a la question du terrorisme…
Oui, le terrorisme est, en quelque sorte, une métastase de la guerre. Mais ce qui me paraît le plus flagrant dans cette affaire, ce n’est pas ce que l’on souligne généralement. Il ne s’agit pas simplement d’un affrontement entre deux religions, entre musulmans radicaux d’un côté et protestants fondamentalistes de l’autre. Encore moins d’un choix de civilisations qui seraient opposées. Ce qui me frappe plutôt, c’est la diffusion de ce terrorisme. Partout, au Moyen-Orient, en Asie et en Asie du Sud-Est, il existe de petits groupes, des voisins, des communautés, qui se dressent les unes contre les autres, pour des raisons complexes, liées à l’économie, au mode de vie, autant qu’aux différences religieuses. Bien sûr, l’acte fondateur et symbolique des attentats du 11 septembre 2001, à New York, a frappé tous les esprits. Vivant moi-même aux Etats-Unis, j’ai pu voir les effets ravageurs de ce terrorisme, désormais perçu comme une menace sans fin, sans visage, frappant à l’aveugle, à laquelle les républicains n’ont pu apporter aucune parade efficace, uniquement parce qu’ils cherchent obscurément à rester dans le monde d’hier, où l’on pense qu’il faut simplement écraser son ennemi, « l’axe du Mal ».

Au regard de cette évolution, on s’aperçoit que la vision de Clausewitz était prémonitoire.
Clausewitz a eu l’intuition fulgurante du cours accéléré de l’Histoire. Mais il l’a aussitôt dissimulée pour essayer de donner à son traité un ton technique, froid et savant. C’est un homme rationnel, héritier des Lumières, comme d’ailleurs tous ses commentateurs ultérieurs, freinés dans leurs analyses et retenus par leur époque, leur sagesse, leur esprit raisonnable, leur optimisme. Mais il faut regarder la réalité en face. Achever l’interprétation de ce traité, De la guerre, c’est lui donner son sens religieux et sa véritable dimension d’apocalypse. C’est en effet dans les textes apocalyptiques, dans les Evangiles synoptiques de Matthieu, Marc et Luc et dans les Epîtres de Paul, qu’est décrit ce que nous vivons, aujourd’hui, nous qui savons être la première civilisation susceptible de s’autodétruire de façon absolue et de disparaître. La parole divine a beau se faire entendre – et avec quelle force ! -, les hommes persistent avec acharnement à ne pas vouloir reconnaître le mécanisme de leur violence et s’accrochent frénétiquement à leurs fausses différences, à leurs erreurs et à leurs aveuglements. Cette violence extrême est, aujourd’hui, déchaînée à l’échelle de la planète entière, provoquant ce que les textes bibliques avaient annoncé il y a plus de deux mille ans, même s’ils n’avait pas forcément une valeur prédicative : une confusion générale, les dégâts de la nature mêlés aux catastrophes engendrées par la folie humaine. Une sorte de chaos universel. Si l’Histoire a vraiment un sens, alors ce sens est redoutable…

C’est totalement désespérant…
L’esprit humain, libéré des contraintes sacrificielles, a inventé les sciences, les techniques, tout le meilleur – et le pire ! – de la culture. Notre civilisation est la plus créative et la plus puissante qui fût jamais, mais aussi la plus fragile et la plus menacée. Mais, pour reprendre les vers de Hölderlin, « Aux lieux du péril croît/Aussi ce qui sauve »…

A LIRE
Achever Clausewitz, entretiens avec Benoît Chantre, éd. Carnets Nord, 364 p., 22 EUR.

(1) Lire son discours de réception du 15 décembre 2005 (publié sous le titre Le Tragique et la Pitié, éd. du Pommier, 2007), non pour l’éloge que fait René Girard, selon la coutume, du révérend père Carré, auquel il succède, mais pour la flamboyante réponse de Michel Serres, exposant avec chaleur et clarté tout le système girardien.

(2) Penser la guerre, Clausewitz, éd. Gallimard, 1976, 2 vol. Lire également Sur Clausewitz (1987, rééd. éd. Complexe, 2005).

(3) Ce traité est universellement considéré comme LA grande théorie de la guerre moderne. Il est même cité en référence par un général de l’armée américaine en opération en Afghanistan dans le dernier film de Robert Redford, Lions et Agneaux, une histoire d’apocalypse en marche…

Voir encore:

Réné Girard en débat

Deux ouvrages témoignent des échanges et débats provoqués par les théories de René Girardsur la violence et le sacrifice

Elodie Maurot
La Croix

23/2/11

SANGLANTES ORIGINES René Girard Flammarion , 394 pages , 23 € 

Jusqu’à aujourd’hui, les théories de René Girard sur la violence et le phénomène du bouc émissaire ont fait débat. Les uns louant une oeuvre quasi prophétique, dévoilant les mécanismes inconscients à l’oeuvre dans la société. Les autres dénonçant une vision trop générale, voire idéologique, donnant au judéo-christianisme un rôle majeur, celui d’avoir révélé le mécanisme du sacrifice et d’en avoir détruit l’efficacité.

Les deux ouvrages qui viennent d’être publiés offrent l’occasion de prendre le pouls de ce débat qui se joua essentiellement à l’extérieur de nos frontières. Les échanges dont ils témoignent faisaient suite à la publication de La Violence et le Sacré, en 1972, dans lequel René Girard exposait les grandes lignes de sa thèse : l’universalité du « désir mimétique » qui pousse les hommes à désirer les mêmes objets et à entrer en rivalité, la violence engendrée par cette concurrence, le choix de boucs émissaires permettant de reconstituer le groupe.

Sanglantes origines montre que le monde universitaire américain fut loin d’acquiescer univoquement à ces propositions. Aux États-Unis comme en France, beaucoup d’universitaires restèrent méfiants vis-à-vis d’une oeuvre se jouant des frontières entre disciplines, mêlant anthropologie, psychologie, philosophie, voire théologie. Les entretiens qui eurent lieu en Californie à l’automne 1983, entre René Girard et divers confrères (Walter Burkert, historien du rite ; Jonathan Smith, historien des religions ; Renato Rosaldo, ethnologue) témoignent de ces débats contradictoires, toutefois régulés par une éthique de la discussion exemplaire.

Le noeud du désaccord apparaît essentiellement lié au statut de la théorie girardienne. Sans faire mystère de ses convictions chrétiennes, Girard a toujours revendiqué un point de vue strictement scientifique, regardant les phénomènes religieux comme une classe particulière de phénomènes naturels. Cette lecture générale, quasi darwinienne, viendra heurter l’empirisme de ces adversaires, qui lui reprochent d’ignorer le terrain et d’accorder trop d’importance aux représentations et aux textes.

La discussion devait aussi se tenir sur un autre versant, avec les théologiens. La publication en français de l’ouvrage du jésuite suisse Raymund Schwager (1935-2004) offre un bel exemple de la réception des travaux de Girard dans le milieu théologique. De manière précoce, Schwager accepta son hypothèse clé : la vérité du christianisme est reliée à la question de la violence. Depuis la figure du serviteur souffrant chez Isaïe jusqu’à la mise à mort du Christ, le théologien trace le dévoilement progressif d’une logique de violence.

Pourquoi cette démystification ne fut-elle pas prise en compte plus tôt par les Églises ? Pourquoi celles-ci eurent-elles recours à la violence contre l’enseignement de leurs Écritures, notamment envers les juifs ? Telle est la question qui taraude Schwager. « La vérité biblique sur le penchant universel à la violence a été tenue à l’écart par un puissant processus de refoulement », constate-t-il.

La vérité biblique sur la violence, « obscurcie sur de nombreux points, (……) dénaturée en partie », n’a pourtant « jamais été totalement falsifiée par les Églises », juge-t-il. « Elle a traversé l’histoire et agi comme un levain », puis fut indirectement reprise par les Lumières. D’où cet hommage de Schwager à la modernité et aux « maîtres du soupçon » : « Les critiques d’un Kant, d’un Feuerbach, d’un Marx, d’un Nietzsche et d’un Freud se situent dans une dépendance non dite par rapport à l’impulsion prophétique. »

Selon lui, c’est donc dans un dialogue avec les philosophes de la modernité que le christianisme peut retrouver son coeur ardent, la non-violence.

Lire aussi « Avons-nous besoin d’un bouc émissaire ? » de Raymond Schwager.

Voir de même:

Que valent nos valeurs? Interview: René Girard
La Croix
13/12/02

Le temps s’est remis à la philosophie
La Croix s’est interrogée sur les valeurs, en se demandant notamment, dans la suite du 11 septembre, s’il existe des valeurs universelles. Quelle serait votre réponse à une telle interrogation ?

René Girard : Le mot me gêne parce que, lorsqu’on dit « valeur », on parle de quelque chose de purement conceptuel que nous reconnaissons. Or, nous avons nombre de valeurs que nous ne sommes pas capables de formuler, mais qui comptent énormément pour nous, dont certaines sont dues à un état de la société assez récent. Par exemple, les valeurs égalitaires, très fortes en France, ne seraient pour beaucoup de gens pas reconnues comme des valeurs, mais comme des données irréductibles de l’existence humaine. Pour répondre sur le 11 septembre, je constate que le terrorisme est regardé par beaucoup comme une fatalité, comme une manière de lutter contre d’autres valeurs que les siennes. Cela me donne à penser que les « valeurs universelles » sont bien compromises.

_ En quoi la valeur d’égalité peut elle, justement, être reliée à la violence qui a éclaté le 11 septembre ?

_ Nous vivons dans un monde très égalitaire et concurrentiel à la fois où chacun aspire au même type de réussite. L’existence démocratique est très difficile. Et il est évident que nous vivons dans un univers où il y a des gagnants et des perdants, un univers plein de ressentiment, d’humiliation. Si vous lisez les déclarations de Ben Laden, vous observez qu’il met les nations et les individus sur le même plan. Dans une déclaration, il se réfère à Hiroshima : il est dans ce globalisme moderne et il pose des revendications au niveau planétaire. Par conséquent, c’est vraiment un homme moderne, influencé par les valeurs occidentales. Car il n’y a plus que les valeurs occidentales, le reste c’est du folklore.

_ Pourtant, Al-Qaeda utilise un mode d’action suicidaire inconnu en Occident…

_ Le phénomène est effectivement inédit en Occident et donc peu compréhensible. Il peut malgré tout se lier à ce que Nietzsche appelle le « ressentiment », ce que Dostoïevski appelle aussi le « souterrain ». L’une des qualités majeures du ressentiment, c’est que l’on préfère perdre soi-même pourvu que l’autre perde. Chez le kamikaze, cela est poussé à l’extrême. Pourtant, l’islam, ce n’est pas cela. Nous sommes donc dans l’exceptionnel.

_ On aurait pu penser qu’au lendemain du 11 septembre, les Etats-Unis s’interrogeraient sur ce qui avait suscité une telle haine à leur égard. Cela a-t-il été le cas ?

_ Si des terroristes avaient fait sauter la tour Eiffel, est-ce que cela aurait provoqué ce genre d’examen de conscience ? Je ne le crois pas. En Amérique comme en France, il y a une confiance morale en soi imperturbable et totale. Aujourd’hui, nous sommes dans des attitudes extrêmement tranchées, des réactions vitales en somme. L’Américain du Middle West dit : « Je me défends quand on m’attaque. » Ce qu’il faut dire aux Américains, ce n’est pas : « Vous êtes des sauvages », mais plutôt : « Vous êtes peut-être en train de commettre la plus grande erreur stratégique qui soit. » Il y a un discours impérial qui n’avait jamais été tenu aux Etats-Unis et qui y est tenu maintenant, notamment dans le milieu intellectuel gravitant autour du président Bush. Beaucoup d’Américains pensent pourtant qu’il n’y a pas d’empire américain possible. La comparaison que l’on fait parfois avec l’Empire romain est d’ailleurs très fausse. A l’époque de l’Empire romain, les populations concernées vivaient à l’état tribal. Alors, être protégé par l’Empire romain ou par un autre…

_ L’Occident s’est-il trompé pour en arriver à être si déconcerté aujourd’hui ?

_ Rappelons-nous les dernières pages de La Légende des siècles de Victor Hugo : l’aviation qui apporte la paix au monde. On nous a refait le coup récemment en nous disant que c’était les ordinateurs qui avaient battu les Soviétiques et le communisme. Devant Ben Laden, c’est tout le contraire qui se produit : nous nous trouvons face à des gens qui s’installent en Amérique, qui deviennent assez Américains pour fonctionner dans cet univers et qui tout à coup se jettent avec des avions sur les tours. La technologie se retourne contre l’Amérique, qui avait tellement cru en la bonté de l’homme !

_ Le message chrétien pourrait-il être redécouvert dans un tel contexte ?

_ Le monde ne serait pas ce qu’il est aujourd’hui sans le christianisme. Mais beaucoup de gens ne savent pas ce qu’ils doivent au judéo-christianisme, à la Bible, sur le plan des valeurs. Nous avons trahi le christianisme en l’utilisant à des fins matérialistes, consuméristes. Dès que l’on parle de la violence, il se trouve des gens pour s’insurger : « Et le religieux, qui nous promettait la paix universelle, qu’a-t-il fait pour nous ? » Je leur réponds que les Evangiles ne promettent pas la paix universelle. Le christianisme, c’est : « Je ne suis pas venu apporter la paix, mais le glaive. » Vous prenez le christianisme comme un gadget permettant de repousser la violence chez le voisin. Vous vous imaginez que l’on peut se servir du christianisme comme d’un instrument politique au niveau le plus bas, que l’on peut l’asservir. Mais le christianisme dit des vérités sur l’homme. Loin d’être usé, il pourrait revenir comme une espèce de coup de tonnerre. Les gens n’ont pas envie d’être rassurés. Ils veulent que les chrétiens leur apportent du sens et de la signification. Ce que ne peut fournir le tout économique.

_ Dans ce tableau très sombre, quelle issue proposez-vous ?

_ Elle est dans le partage : des matières premières, de la recherche, des ressources médicales… C’est ce qui nous sauverait peut-être, y compris sur le plan économique. Souvenons-nous du plan Marshall, qui a réussi à tous les niveaux. Globalement, je m’inquiète du manque de sérieux, du manque d’unité des gouvernants, de leur inconscience de la situation psychologique extraordinaire dans laquelle le monde se trouve. Ce n’est pas nouveau. J’ai vécu depuis 1937 dans un monde en désarroi. Mais on ne se rend pas compte que la période qui a suivi la guerre, de Khrouchtchev à aujourd’hui, nous a rendus plus complaisants envers nous-mêmes.

_ On vous a cru d’abord « oiseau de malheur », parce que votre pensée s’élaborait autour du thème de la violence. Votre oeuvre est aujourd’hui relue sous un autre jour. Qu’en pensez-vous ?

_ Ce que je disais n’a pas été pris au sérieux parce que, durant ces cinquante dernières années, la philosophie a évacué la violence. La philosophie et la théologie ont présenté les textes eschatologiques et apocalyptiques un peu comme une bonne farce. Mais ce n’est pas cela du tout ! Leur présence dans les Evangiles pose de sérieux problèmes. Lorsque les hommes sont privés du garde-fou sacrificiel, ils peuvent se réconcilier _ c’est ce que le christianisme appelle Royaume de Dieu. Ce Royaume de Dieu, pour l’obtenir, il ne suffit pas de renoncer à l’initiative de la violence : ce que prône l’Evangile, c’est le renoncement universel à la violence. Voilà une valeur qui pourrait être universelle, et qui ne l’est pas encore !

Recueilli par Laurent d’ERSU et Robert MIGLIORINI

La brillante carrière d’un expatrié

Né en 1923 à Avignon, René Girard a choisi, au sortir de la guerre, de s’expatrier aux Etats-Unis. Il était diplômé de l’école des Chartes, à la Sorbonne. Il y avait acquis le goût de l’érudition et l’art du déchiffrement des textes. Installé d’abord, en 1947, à l’université d’Indiana où il enseigne alors le français, il rejoint finalement, en 1974, la renommée Stanford University en Californie. Il y dirige à partir de 1981 le département de langue, littérature et civilisation françaises. Il n’enseigne plus depuis 1996 et poursuit la publication d’ouvrages, vivant entre Paris et les Etats-Unis. Il est notamment l’auteur de l’essai La Violence et le sacré (1972) et des Choses cachées depuis la fondation du monde (1978). Dans cette oeuvre qui suscite des réactions passionnelles, René Girard développe la thèse du conflit mimétique, explication globale du conflit dans nos sociétés fondée sur l’analyse du rôle central du bouc émissaire. Il vient de publier, toujours chez Grasset, une sélection de textes jusqu’ici seulement disponibles en anglais, La Voix méconnue du réel (318 p., 20 E).

Sagesses

« Pour voir face à face, dans son universalité et son imprégnation de toutes choses, l’esprit de Vérité, il faut être en mesure d’aimer comme soi-même la plus chétive des créatures. Et qui aspire à cela ne peut se permettre de s’exclure d’aucun domaine où se manifeste la vie. C’est pourquoi mon dévouement à la Vérité m’a entraîné dans le champ de la politique ; et je puis dire sans la moindre hésitation, mais aussi en toute humilité, que ceux-là n’entendent rien à la religion, qui prétendent que la religion n’a rien de commun avec la politique. »

(Gandhi, Autobiographie)

MIGLIORINI Robert

Voir par ailleurs:

Ben Laden, un an après
Un essai girardien de Bruno de Cessole
Causeur

Jérome Leroy

06 mai 2012

Un an après sa mort, il est peut-être temps d’essayer de comprendre le sens du phénomène Ben Laden, d’interroger celui qui reste la figure la plus accomplie du Négatif en ce début de XXIème siècle : celle de Ben Laden. On pourra utilement se tourner vers le livre de Bruno de Cessole Ben Laden, le bouc émissaire idéal (La Différence), écrivain et critique à Valeurs Actuelles. Après tout, ce sont les écrivains qui durent, contrairement aux spécialistes qui se démodent au gré des événements. C’est l’écrivain qui discerne, presque malgré lui, comme une plaque sensible, ce qui fait la ligne de force d’une époque, ses zones névralgiques cachées et douloureuses, ses glissements tectoniques et occultes.

Atlantistes fascinés par le choc des civilisations, européens accrochés à des vestiges de grandeur ou altermondialistes en mal de nouvelles grilles de lecture, abandonnez tout espoir à l’orée de Ben Laden, le bouc émissaire idéal ! Ce livre commencera par vous renvoyer dos à dos : « Au fanatisme mortifère des « fous d’Allah », à leur mépris de la vie et de la mort, à leur attirance pour le sacrifice et l’holocauste, nous ne pouvons opposer que le mol oreiller de notre scepticisme, l’obscénité de notre matérialisme consumériste, et la fragilité d’un modèle économico-politique, qui depuis la crise américaine de 2008 et la crise de la zone euro de 2011, prend l’eau de toute part et ne fait plus rêver. »
Avec celui qui, un certain 11 septembre 2001, nous fit rentrer dans l’Histoire aussi vite que Fukuyama avait voulu nous en faire sortir après la chute du Mur de Berlin, Bruno de Cessole veut cerner ce qui s’est joué et se jouera encore longtemps dans la cartographie bouleversée de nos imaginaires.

Le cœur du raisonnement de Cessole, la ligne de force entêtante et mélancolique de son essai, c’est que rien ne s’est terminé avec l’opération militaire des Seals, le 1er mai 2011, quand Ben Laden fut exécuté dans sa résidence d’Abottabad, à quelques centaines de mètres du Saint-Cyr Pakistanais, avant que sa dépouille ne soit immergée en mer d’Oman. Cette opération nocturne minutieusement décrite par l’auteur, ressemblait davantage à une cérémonie d’exorcisme qu’à une action de commando, comme s’il s’était agi de répondre symboliquement par l’obscurité d’un refoulement définitif à la surexposition pixélisée des Twin Towers s’effondrant sur elles-mêmes dans un cauchemar d’une horrible et insoutenable perfection plastique.

Mais on ne refoule pas le réel et Ben Laden a d’une certaine manière gagné la guerre qu’il avait déclenchée : « Peut-on considérer comme une flagrante défaite stratégique le formidable chaos irakien, le réveil des affrontements entre chiites et sunnites, la prolifération des terroristes islamistes dans un pays où Al-Qaïda n’était pas implanté auparavant ; la fragilité du régime corrompu de Karzaï ; la dégradation des relations américaines avec le Pakistan, et les innombrables bavures commises par les Américains depuis leur entrée en guerre, sources d’un ressentiment durable, sinon inexpiable dans le monde musulman. »

Plus grave encore, pour ce lecteur attentif de René Girard qu’est Cessole, Ben Laden a remporté des batailles symboliques sur plusieurs plans. Nous avons voulu tricher avec lui, en faire un bouc émissaire idéal, fabriqué à la demande, si commode pour réaffirmer notre propre cohésion vacillante. Mais voilà que la créature nous échappe, que Ben Laden devient le rival mimétique par excellence, réintroduit la violence archaïque jusque dans notre vocabulaire, comme Bush partant en « croisade » contre l’ « axe du mal », et qu’il nous force à désirer en lui à la fois ce qui nous manque et ce qui nous tue.

Ben Laden aurait pu être notre salut paradoxal, conclut Cessole en pessimiste bernanosien; mais il n’est que la preuve ultime de notre fascination nihiliste pour notre propre fin.

Voir enfin:

Une campagne contre le harcèlement scolaire hérisse les profs
Mattea Battaglia

Le Monde

03.11.2015

La ministre de l’éducation nationale se serait sans doute volontiers passé de cette polémique. Najat Vallaud-Belkacem se voit sommée de retirer la vidéo de sa campagne contre le harcèlement à l’école, qui suscite un tollé chez les syndicats d’enseignants.

Le petit film, déjà mis en ligne par le ministère, doit aussi être diffusé au cinéma et à la télévision à compter de jeudi 5 novembre, jour de la première journée nationale « Non au harcèlement ».
L’exaspération des professeurs dépasse, largement, les clivages habituels : du SGEN-CFDT, syndicat dit réformateur, au SNALC, habituellement présenté comme « de droite » (même s’il le récuse), en passant par la Société des agrégés ou l’organisation des inspecteurs SNPI-FSU, tous y sont allés de leur critique contre un clip qui, à leurs yeux, rend l’enseignant, présenté au mieux comme inattentif, au pire comme harcelant, directement responsable du harcèlement scolaire. Un phénomène qui touche 700 000 élèves chaque année, de source ministérielle.

« Une vidéo caricaturale et méprisante »
Ce sujet grave « ne peut être réduit à une enseignante, le nez collé au tableau, qui ne se soucierait pas des élèves et notamment de ceux victimes de gestes et de paroles humiliantes pendant la classe », a réagi lundi le principal syndicat d’instituteurs, le SNUipp-FSU, qui dénonce une vidéo « caricaturale et méprisante pour les enseignants et pour les élèves victimes ». (…) Avec les fonds dégagés pour financer ce clip, le ministère aurait été bien mieux avisé de diffuser dans les écoles des ressources pédagogiques existantes et les vidéos de qualité réalisées par les élèves eux-mêmes ». Qu’importe si, en l’occurrence, les fonds en question sont… nuls : « Nous n’avons pas déboursé un seul euro pour ce clip réalisé en partenariat avec Walt Disney », fait-on valoir dans l’entourage de Mme Vallaud-Belkacem. Mais dans le climat d’inquiétude, voire de net désenchantement, de la communauté éducative face aux réformes promises pour 2016 (collège, programmes), ce « couac » dans la communication ministérielle passe mal.

D’après le ministère de l’éducation, le clip d’une minute « est d’abord censé interpeller les écoliers de 7 à 11 ans, car c’est dès le plus jeune âge que débute le harcèlement ». Coproduit par la journaliste Mélissa Theuriau, qui aurait elle-même été victime de harcèlement au collège, le petit film montre un petit garçon aux cheveux roux, Baptiste, qui, en plein cours, se voit la cible des quolibets et boulettes de papier lancés par ses camarades.

Une campagne plus vaste
A l’origine de l’indignation des syndicats, les neuf secondes au cours desquelles son enseignante, les yeux rivés au tableau, semble ignorer la détresse de l’enfant harcelé, auquel elle tourne le dos avant de l’interpeller : « Baptiste, t’es avec nous ? ». Le « happy end » – une petite camarade vient en aide à Baptiste, lui enjoignant d’« en parler » pour que « ça cesse » – n’atténue guère l’impression d’une mise en scène peu nuancée.

Si la vidéo fait mouche du côté des enfants, comme on veut le croire au cabinet de la ministre, le moins qu’on puisse dire est qu’elle a manqué sa cible côté enseignants. Et risque d’occulter, aux yeux de l’opinion publique, le contenu plus vaste de la campagne contre le harcèlement présentée le 29 octobre par Najat Vallaud-Belkacem. Parmi les mesures annoncées, figure entre autres, l’ouverture d’un numéro vert (le 30 20) et l’objectif de former au cours des dix-huit prochains mois pas moins de 300 000 enseignants et personnels de direction sur la question.

Mélissa Theuriau défend son clip
Mélissa Theuriau, coproductrice du petit film, s’est expliquée au micro d’Europe 1 : « Je montre une institutrice qui a le dos tourné, comme tous les professeurs et les instituteurs qui font un cours à des enfants, et qui ne voit pas dans son dos une situation d’isolement, une petite situation qui est en train de s’installer et qui arrive tous les jours dans toutes les salles de classe de ce pays et des autres pays. »

La journaliste assure que son but était de ne pas faire un clip qui s’adresse aux adultes ou aux professeurs, mais bel et bien aux enfants. « Si tous les instituteurs étaient alertes et réactifs à cette problématique de l’isolement, on n’aurait pas besoin de former, de détecter le harcèlement, on n’aurait pas 700 000 enfants par an en souffrance », a-t-elle poursuivi.

Voir de même:

René Girard, penseur chrétien

Brice Couturier

France Culture

06.11.2015

La pensée de René Girard est absolument essentielle pour comprendre le monde dans lequel nous vivons, en ce début du XXI° siècle. Pourquoi ? Parce qu’elle tourne autour de la question de la violence dans son rapport avec la religion. Y a-t-il question plus actuelle ? Le bouc-émissaire se conclut sur une méditation sur la prophétie « L’heure vient même où qui vous tuera estimera rendre un culte à Dieu. » On ne saurait être plus contemporain, vous en conviendrez…

Pour connaître la pensée de René Girard, rien de mieux que de se reporter au résumé très pratique qu’il en donne lui-même dans l’Introduction de 2007 à la réédition, par Grasset, de ses œuvres majeures. Il s’agit d’un recueil intitulé De la violence à la divinité. On y voit, en effet, sa pensée s’y constituer dans sa cohérence, faire système.

Mensonge romantique et vérité romanesque pose le concept de base de cette pensée : celui désir médiatisé, de désir mimétique : le désir le plus violent est celui qui poursuit ce que possède l’être auquel nous nous identifions. Il est la conséquence de la rivalité mimétique. Celle-ci mêle étrangement haine et vénération, aspiration à la ressemblance et à l’élimination. De manière générale, nous sommes attirés par ce qui attire les autres et non par les objets de convoitise pour eux-mêmes. Le « mensonge romantique », c’est le refus de reconnaître l’existence de ce tiers – l’autre, les autres dans l’émergence du désir.

La concurrence, qu’elle soit « mimétique » ou non, est à l’origine, dit Girard, de « mille choses utiles ». On n’invente, on n’innove que dans l’espoir de précéder un autre inventeur, un autre innovateur. Comment dompter la compétition, saine en soi, mais qui peut à tout moment s’emballer et déboucher sur la violence ?

C’est ici qu’intervient, avec La violence et le sacré, la figure du bouc-émissaire. « On ne peut tromper la violence que dans la mesure où on ne la prive pas de tout exutoire, où on lui fournit quelque chose à se mettre sous la dent », écrit Girard. L’unanimité du groupe, menacée par la rivalité mimétique, se fait sur le dos d’une victime expiatoire ; souvent, dit Girard, un étranger en visite. Sa mise à mort collective permet à la communauté de se ressouder.

Par la suite, cette victime pourra bien être divinisée, dans la mesure où l’on aura pris conscience du rôle, bien involontaire, de « sauveur de la communauté » qu’elle a été amenée à jouer. Mais sur le moment, elle est désignée comme coupable. Et la communauté massacreuse comme innocente. Telle serait l’origine des religions archaïques, dont leurs mythes livrent la clé, à travers le sacrifice rituel, répétition, symbolique ou non, de la mise à mort originelle.

Girard était chrétien. Non pas par héritage et tradition. Mais parce que christianisme lui est apparu comme la conséquence logique de son cheminement intellectuel. Si Jésus est, en effet, présenté comme un nouveau bouc-émissaire, le récit qui rapporte son supplice (les Evangiles) prend fait et cause pour la victime. Là réside la nouveauté. C’est ce que développe le bouc émissaire. Ce qui était caché devient manifeste au moment même où le Dieu nouveau cesse d’exiger le sacrifice et même l’empêche – c’est la signification de l’intervention d’un ange, arrêtant le sacrifice d’Isaac par Abraham.

René Girard était un inclassable. Il travaillait sur les textes littéraires, comme sur les récits des ethnologues et lisait la Bible et les Evangiles autant en théologien qu’en mythologue.

L’intelligentsia française a toujours eu du mal à digérer cet intellectuel, mondialement connu, mais qui présentait le défaut de n’être ni marxiste dans les années 60, ni structuraliste dans les années 70, ni déconstructiviste dans les années 90, ni keynésien aujourd’hui… En outre, il prenait très au sérieux la religion à une époque où elle était donnée comme en voie d’extinction…

On sait à présent comment les choses ont tourné. Comme le rappelle Damien Le Gay dans son excellent article du FigaroVox d’hier, l’Université, en France, n’en a pas voulu. Il ne fallait pas compter sur les média pour le comprendre, tant sa théorie est étrangère à leur doxa. Je signale l’article d’Olivier Rey, dans Le Figaro de ce matin, qui met le doigt sur le problème central posé par cette pensée, ce qu’il appelle « une boucle assumée » : prétendre comprendre le christianisme à la lumière de ce qu’on croit en avoir découvert. Dieu sait quel usage le Parti des Média va bien pouvoir faire de sa dépouille…

La mort de René Girard, penseur de la violence
Jean-Claude Guillebaud
Le Nouvel Obs

13-08-2010

Mis à jour le 05-11-2015

Le philosophe et académicien français René Girard est décédé mercredi à l’âge de 91 ans aux Etats-Unis. C’est l’Université de Stanford, en Californie, où il a longtemps dirigé le département de langue, littérature et civilisation française, qui l’a annoncé
Si son œuvre a été largement traduite pour l’étranger, elle reste mal connue du grand public en France
Désir mimétique, mythologie sacrificielle et enseignement évangélique : en 2010, Jean-Claude Guillebaud présentait dans «le Nouvel Observateur» le message du plus américain de nos grands esprits.

Le théoricien du « désir mimétique »
Nous sommes quelques-uns à tenir René Girard pour l’un des trois ou quatre principaux penseurs de ce temps. Longtemps professeur à l’université de Stanford en Californie, René Girard – académicien depuis 2005 – vit aux Etats-Unis depuis 1947. Ce philosophe, historien des religions et spécialiste de littérature française, né en 1923 à Avignon, a gagné de cette vie «ailleurs» un statut éditorial singulier.

Il ne fut pas mêlé aux querelles de l’après-guerre, ni