Sommet d’Helsinki: Attention, une faute peut en cacher une autre ! (Leftist witch hunt: Guess who forced Trump into the impossible choice of kowtowing to Putin or to the delegitimization of his own election ?)

19 juillet, 2018

Sur toutes ces questions, mais particulièrement la défense antimissiles, on peut trouver une solution, mais il doit me laisser une marge de manœuvre. Sur toutes ces questions, mais particulièrement la défense antimissiles, on peut trouver une solution, mais il doit me laisser une marge de manœuvre. (…) C’est ma dernière élection. Après mon élection, j’aurai plus de flexibilité. Barack Obama (27.03.2012)
Je n’ai jamais vu de ma vie, ou dans l’histoire politique moderne, un candidat à la présidentielle chercher à discréditer les élections et le processus électoral avant que le vote n’ait lieu. C’est sans précédent et ce n’est basé sur aucun fait. Si quand les choses tournent mal pour vous et que vous commencez à perdre, vous rejetez le blâme sur autrui, alors vous n’avez pas ce qu’il faut pour faire ce boulot. (…) Mais le point important sur lequel je veux insister ici, c’est qu’il n’y a pas de personne sérieuse qui pourrait suggérer que vous pourriez même manipuler les élections américaines, en partie parce qu’elles sont très décentralisées et que le nombre de votes est important. Il n’y a aucune preuve que cela s’est déjà produit par le passé ou qu’il y a des cas où cela se produira cette fois-ci. Et donc je conseillerais à M. Trump d’arrêter de pleurnicher et d’essayer de défendre ses opinions pour obtenir des suffrages. Barack Obama (18.10. 2016)
Il n’y a jamais eu collusion, l’élection, je l’ai gagnée haut la main. Cette enquête russe nous empêche de coopérer, alors qu’il y a tant à faire. Donald Trump
The probe is a disaster for our country. I think it’s kept us apart. It’s kept us separated. There was no collusion at all. Everybody knows it. People are being brought out to the fore, so far that I know virtually none of it related to the campaign. And they are going to have to try really hard to find somebody that did relate to the campaign. It was a clean campaign. (…) I do have a relationship with him. And I think that he’s done a very brilliant and amazing job. Really, a lot of people would say, he has put himself at the forefront of the world as a leader. Donald Trump
First of all, he said there was no collusion whatsoever. I guess he said he said as strongly as you can say it. (…) I think it’s a shame, we are talking about nuclear proliferation. We’re talking about Syria and humanitarian aid, we’re talking about all these different things, and we get questions on the witch hunt. And I don’t think the people out in the country buy it. But the reporters like to give it a shot. I thought that President Putin was very, very strong. (…) And at the end of this meeting, I think we really came to a lot of good conclusions, a really good conclusion for Israel. Something very strong.(…) in Syria, we are getting very close. I think it’s becoming a humanitarian situation, and a lot of people are going to move back to Syria from Turkey and from Jordan and from different places, they’re going to move back, less so from Europe. But they will be moving back from lots of different places. So I really think we are not far apart on Syria. I do think that on Iran, he probably would have liked to keep the deal in place because that’s good for Russia. You know, they do business with — it’s good for a lot of the countries that do business with Iran, but it’s not good for this country and it’s ultimately not good for the world. And if you look at what is happening, is falling apart, they have rights in all their cities. The inflation is rampant and going through the roof, and not that you want to hurt anybody, but that regime, we will let the people know that we are behind them 100 percent. But they are having big protests all over the country, probably as big as they have ever had before. And that all happens since I terminated that deal. (…) And he also said he wants to be very helpful with North Korea. We are doing well with North Korea. We have time. There is no rush. You know, it’s been going on for many years, but we are doing very well. As you know, we got our hostages back. There’s been no testing. There’s been no nuclear explosion, which we would have known about immediately. There’s been no rockets going over Japan. No missiles going over Japan. And that’s now been nine months, and the relationship is very good. You saw the nice letter he wrote. (…) I think it was great today, but I think it was really bad five hours ago. I think we really had a potential problem. I think with two nuclear nations. Ninety percent of the nuclear power in the world between these two nations, and we’ve had a phony witch hunt deal drive us apart. (…) You have to understand, you take a look, you look at all these people, I mean, some were hackers, some of them. Then again, you know, these are 14 people and they have 12 people. These aren’t 12 people involve in the campaign. Then you have many other people. Some told a lie. You look at Flynn, it’s a shame. But the FBI didn’t think he was lying. With Paul Manafort, who clearly is a nice man. You look at what’s going on with him. It’s like Al Capone. Donald Trump
I’ll begin by stating that I have full faith and support for America’s great intelligence agencies. Always have. And I have felt very strongly that, while Russia’s actions had no impact at all on the outcome of the election, let me be totally clear in saying that — and I’ve said this many times — I accept our intelligence community’s conclusion that Russia’s meddling in the 2016 election took place. Could be other people also; there’s a lot of people out there. There was no collusion at all. And people have seen that, and they’ve seen that strongly. The House has already come out very strongly on that. A lot of people have come out strongly on that. (…)  Now (…) I got a transcript. I reviewed it. I actually went out and reviewed a clip of an answer that I gave, and I realized that there is need for some clarification. It should have been obvious — I thought it would be obvious — but I would like to clarify, just in case it wasn’t. In a key sentence in my remarks, I said the word « would » instead of « wouldn’t. » The sentence should have been: I don’t see any reason why I wouldn’t — or why it wouldn’t be Russia. So just to repeat it, I said the word « would » instead of « wouldn’t. » And the sentence should have been — and I thought it would be maybe a little bit unclear on the transcript or unclear on the actual video — the sentence should have been: I don’t see any reason why it wouldn’t be Russia. Sort of a double negative. (…) I have, on numerous occasions, noted our intelligence findings that Russians attempted to interfere in our elections. Unlike previous administrations, my administration has and will continue to move aggressively to repeal any efforts — and repel — we will stop it, we will repel it — any efforts to interfere in our elections. (…) As you know, President Obama was given information just prior to the election — last election, 2016 — and they decided not to do anything about it. The reason they decided that was pretty obvious to all: They thought Hillary Clinton was going to win the election, and they didn’t think it was a big deal. When I won the election, they thought it was a very big deal. And all of the sudden they went into action, but it was a little bit late. So he was given that in sharp contrast to the way it should be. And President Obama, along with Brennan and Clapper and the whole group that you see on television now — probably getting paid a lot of money by your networks — they knew about Russia’s attempt to interfere in the election in September, and they totally buried it. And as I said, they buried it because they thought that Hillary Clinton was going to win. (…) Yesterday, we made significant progress toward addressing some of the worst conflicts on Earth. So when I met with President Putin for about two and a half hours, we talked about numerous things. (…) President Putin and I addressed the range of issues, starting with the civil war in Syria and the need for humanitarian aid and help for people in Syria. We also spoke of Iran and the need to halt their nuclear ambitions and the destabilizing activities taking place in Iran. As most of you know, we ended the Iran deal, which was one of the worst deals anyone could imagine. And that’s had a major impact on Iran. And it’s substantially weakened Iran. And we hope that, at some point, Iran will call us and we’ll maybe make a new deal, or we maybe won’t. But Iran is not the same country that it was five months ago, that I can tell you. They’re no longer looking so much to the Mediterranean and the entire Middle East. They’ve got some big problems that they can solve, probably much easier if they deal with us. (…) We discussed Israel and the security of Israel. And President Putin is very much involved now with us in a discussion with Bibi Netanyahu on working something out with surrounding Syria and — Syria, and specifically with regards to the security and long-term security of Israel. A major topic of discussion was North Korea and the need for it to remove its nuclear weapons. Russia has assured us of its support. President Putin said he agrees with me 100 percent, and they’ll do whatever they have to do to try and make it happen. Donald Trump

Today is about how we can strengthen America’s economy even more. And we think the best place to start is with America’s middle-class families and our small businesses. So today, we’re here to talk to you about making permanent this tax relief — one, so they can continue to grow; two, so we can add a million and a half new jobs; and three, we can protect them against a future Washington trying to steal back those hard-earned dollars that you and the Republican Congress has given them.J’ai relu le texte de mes déclarations et je me suis aperçu qu’il manquait une négation. Je voulais dire: «Je ne vois pas de raison pour que la Russie ne l’ait pas fait» (interférer dans l’élection, NDLR). Je pense que ceci clarifie la question. J’ai une foi et une confiance entières en nos formidables agences de renseignement. J’accepte leurs conclusions selon lesquelles des interventions de la Russie ont eu lieu. Nous agirons avec force pour repousser et stopper toute (nouvelle) interférence dans nos élections. Cette ingérence de Moscou «n’a eu aucun impact» sur le résultat du scrutin qu’il a remporté.
Donald Trump
Many on the left, they want you to believe this alleged interference is shocking, unprecedented turn of events, but we all know that Russian election meddling is not new at all. Now, remember, ahead of the 2016 presidential election cycle. In 2014, the House Intel Committee chairman, Devin Nunes, he issued a very stern warning about Putin’s belligerent actions and attempts to denigrate the United States and, by the way, yes, impact our 2016 election. And we also know, you can go way back to 2008, we know that Russia hacked into both the McCain campaign and even the presidential campaign of Barack Obama himself. And despite this, in 2016, when Hillary Clinton appeared to have a firm lead in the polls — oh, just before the election, it was President Obama who laughed off any notion that American elections could possibly be tampered with. How wrong he was. (…) That’s when he thought Hillary was going to win. Now that Trump is president, after nearly a decade of playing down Russian interference and its impact on our elections, the left is in total freak out mode, trying desperately to connect Russian hacking to the Trump presidency. This is a total left-wing conspiracy, a fantasy. This is the witch hunt. Every single report, every investigation into our election shows absolutely no votes were changed, none were altered in the 2016 election. Not a single vote. And by the way, it’s important to point out every major country in the world engages in election interference. As Senator Rand Paul put it, we all do it, and this includes the Clinton campaign. In fact, if you’re looking for Russian interference, look no further than Hillary Clinton and the DNC in 2016. They actually paid, oh, yes, through a law firm that they funnel money, Fusion GPS. Yes, then they got a foreign entity, foreign spy by the name of Christopher Steele, he put together phony opposition research, and now the infamous dossier, which has been debunked, filled with lies, Russian lies, Russian propaganda, and all paid for by Hillary Clinton and the Democratic Party to manipulate you, the American people in the lead up to the 2016 election. Nobody in the media seems to care about Obama’s attempt at interference in the last Israeli election against our number one ally in the Middle East, Israel, and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. And by all accounts, today’s meeting, always productive and very important. As we all know, there are a lot of serious issues between the U.S. and Russia, but predictably, even before this meeting took place, yes, the destroy Trump, hate Trump media, they were already, hoping and predicting failure. You see, success for Donald Trump is bad for their agenda, especially in the lead up to the 2018 midterm elections. (…) Former CIA director, you know the guy that was a former communist turned CNN paid hack, John Brennan, he actually tweeted out: Donald Trump’s press conference performance in Helsinki rises to and exceeds the threshold of high crimes and misdemeanors. It was nothing short of treasonous. Not only were his comments imbecilic, he is wholly in the pocket of Putin. Republican patriots, where are you? John, let’s address you for a second here. What have you done on Obama’s watch to prevent Russian meddling? What role did you play in all of this?  (…) As you can see, it was all a predetermined outcome. It didn’t matter what happened at today’s meeting. Your mainstream media just blind hatred for President Trump and they long predetermined that anything the president does is terrible. It’s devastating, apocalyptic. And at this point, they are just a broken record. (…) Look at the economy. Look at the progress in North Korea. And while the left always acts like the sky is literally falling because Donald Trump actually wants to discuss safety and security with nuclear weapons, nuclear proliferation, Syria, Iran, a lot of other important issues, including interference. By the way, meeting with Putin is that bad, we all know the truth. U.S. diplomacy is in good hands, despite what they have told you. The president has never been afraid to walk away from a bad deal, never been afraid to call out foreign leaders, and hold all of them accountable. As we saw, he was critical of the British government’s execution of Brexit. And, by the way, he rightfully called out many of our allies in NATO. Why? They are not paying their fair share for their own national defense, even criticizing the German Chancellor Angela Merkel, and her country’s lucrative energy deals Vladimir Putin’s Russia, which creates a dangerous dependency on Russia and energy, which is the lifeblood of their economy. After all, if the West is so worried about Russia, well, why would they be willing to give him billions and billions of dollars to make Russia rich again? Instead, the president is now rightly pushing Germany to kill its oil and gas deals with Russia and get their energy from us in that the United States, which would also mean millions of high-paying career jobs for Americans. Now, this move would not only benefit the United States, it would also absolutely wreck Russia’s economy. Now, Putin should be very concerned about that possibility, as it would literally destroy Russia’s economy and probably destroy him politically. (…) And now, the president has been even more forceful with our enemies. Look at North Korea, little rocket man, fire and fury. Our button works, yours doesn’t, and it’s bigger. Now, despite what the media predicted, there is real progress on the Korean peninsula, because the president’s peace through strength strategy is working. It always works. Appeasement doesn’t work. Bribing dictators doesn’t work. Now, there hasn’t been a single rocket fired in months, American hostages, thank God, they have come home. One nuclear site in fact has been dismantled and shuttered, and the process continues to this day. And this is something else that the mainstream media will never tell you. President Trump has been incredibly tough on Russia. This is something they won’t report under his administration, the U.S. issued sanctions against roughly 200 individuals and entities related to Russia. Other stinging economic sanctions against Russia have also increased, and U.S. forces on the ground in Syria inflicted heavy casualties on even Russian soldiers during a skirmish earlier this year, an enormous embarrassment for Vladimir Putin. And the United States has been busy arming Ukraine with lethal weapon systems, but the media, they are not going to focus on any of this. Instead, it’s Russia, Russia, Russia, collusion, collusion, collusion. If they are not talking about Stormy, it’s all the time. It’s 24/7. Now, with this is a backdrop, the president moves forward with his very important diplomacy and as a leader of the free world, President Trump, he must meet with the leaders of Russia, China, North Korea, and others (…) And specifically, Russia must stop coordinating with the Iranian regime. They must stop supporting President Assad in Syria. And yes, they need to stop, yes, meddling in anybody’s elections and be held accountable for their actions. Now, the years of weak and feckless leadership under Obama are now over. No more cargo planes full of cash, and as President Trump frequently says, a good relationship with Putin and Russia, when you’re not trying to bribe them, it is very positive thing for the country. However, under President Trump, any hostile or aggressive action by Putin’s regime will be and should be met with strength, not appeasement, not bribery, not cash, not kissing the rings of dictators. And while the mainstream media and left, as they peddle their conspiracy theories, well, the administration is now putting forth some truth and some precedent and some facts. And by the way, Reagan proved it to all of us. Peace through strength works. Diplomacy is important. Trust but verify. Sean Hannity
Let me go back, because everybody in the media is so focused on this. In 2014, in « The Washington times, » Devin Nunes said with certainty that Russia would try to impact the 2016 elections. Barack Obama in the month before the 2016 elections, and I will read and I will quote , « No serious person out there would suggest that somehow you can even rig America’s elections, no evidence that it has happened in the past, which is not true, and number two, or that it could happen in this election, and I invite Mr. Trump to stop whining and to go out there and try to get votes. » He said that two weeks before the election. Sean Hannity
L’un des premiers producteurs d’aluminium du monde, le russe Rusal, s’est retrouvé gravement fragilisé ce lundi par les nouvelles sanctions décrétées par les Etats-Unis contre des oligarques russes et leurs entreprises, qui risquent de porter un nouveau coup à l’économie russe. (…) Confronté à un vent de panique boursière généralisé sur les marchés russes, le gouvernement russe a dû monter au créneau pour assurer qu’il soutiendrait les entreprises visées par ce nouveau train de mesures punitives, qui constituent une escalade d’une violence inattendue dans la confrontation entre Moscou et Washington. Au total, ces sanctions, censées punir Moscou notamment pour ses « attaques » « les démocraties occidentales », ciblent 38 personnes et entreprises qui ne peuvent plus faire affaire avec des Américains, notamment sept Russes désignés comme des « oligarques » proches du Kremlin par l’administration de Donald Trump, présents dans des dizaines de sociétés en Russie comme à l’étranger. Le Dauphiné Libéré (09.04.2018)
How did Trump luck out by getting such hopeless geebos for opponents? It can’t just be chance. At every turn, these dummies choose to lock themselves into the most implausible and indefensible positions imaginable, then push all their chips into the center of the table. It’s almost supernatural – maybe Trump won the intervention of some ancient demon by heading over to the offices of the Weekly Standard and snatching away one of its Never Trump scribblers to use as a virgin sacrifice. How did this guy win, and in doing so crush the avatar of the establishment, the smartest woman in the world, Felonia Milhous von Pantsuit? One of his secrets to success is really no secret at all. It is to embrace the obvious. Unlike our exhausted establishment, Trump rarely holds to bizarre, indefensible positions. You would think that would be an instinctive thing for politicians of both parties – “I know! I’ll adopt stands on issues that won’t make my constituents ask ‘What the hell is wrong with you?’” – but it isn’t. Instead, the establishment has somehow talked itself into taking positions that are so clearly ridiculous that Normals scratch their heads, baffled at what they are being told by their betters via the lapdog liberal media. Look at NATO. The entire foreign policy establishment is scandalized that Trump says he expects the Europeans to cover their fair share of the NATO nut. Now a normal American is going to think “Yeah, I think they ought to pay their share of their own defense. Sounds reasonable.” But the establishment collectively wets itself – “HE’S DESTROYING THIS ESSENTIAL ALLIANCE BY ASKING THE PEOPLE BENEFITING FROM IT MOST TO ACTUALLY PARTICIPATE IN IT!” And the Normals (many of whom, like me, actually served in NATO) wonder, “Well, if it’s so essential, why aren’t the allies eager to pay for it?” And the establishment responds, “SHUT UP, RUSSIAN STOOGE! ASKING THE ALLIES TO MAKE NATO MORE EFFECTIVE BY PAYING WHAT THEY PROMISED, WHICH IS STILL A FRACTION OF WHAT THE U.S. PAYS, IS PLAYING RIGHT INTO PUTIN’S HANDS. ALSO, THE EMOLUMENTS CLAUSE SOMEHOW.” Here’s a test. Leave DC or New York, drive a few hours out to America, find a random guy on the street and ask, “Hey, don’t you think it’s awful that Trump wants our allies to increase their contributions to their own defense to just about half of what the U.S. pays?” You can safely assume he’ll respond, “Wait, why only half?” The Normal/Elite disconnect was also in full effect regarding the new SCOTUS dude. The establishment decided it’s going to bork Brett by pointing out that he bought baseball tickets and apparently liked beer in college, like there’s not a significant portion of Americans who wouldn’t be thrilled to have their next justice be nicknamed “Kegmaster K.” And what’s the new fussiness about alcohol, or are they upset because he quaffs brewskis (RUSSIANS!) instead of guzzling chardonnay? The Dems weren’t so picky about partying in 2016 when Stumbles McMyTurn was staggering all over the map. Well, not in Wisconsin. Then the establishment attacked Brett’s family for looking like a normal family instead of a traveling freak show. The Kavanaugh kids didn’t have nose rings or teen tatts, and they presumably know which bathroom to use. This, to the establishment, is unforgiveable. To Normal Americans, this constant social warfare against people who don’t want to be sketchy mutants is just more inspiration for more militancy. The Democrats have also decided that they want to go into November on the platform of abolishing ICE and opening the borders to future Democrat voters from festering Third World hellholes. Perhaps they didn’t read the polls, but Normal Americans – the ones not appearing on CNN, working for Soros-funded agitator collectives, or in college squandering their dads’ money on degrees in Oppression Studies – actually like borders. If Trump’s brain trust gathered together in his palatial Mar-a-Lago estate to concoct a scheme to get the Democrat Party to adopt the most tone-deaf possible platform, they could not have drafted one better than what the Democrats have created for themselves. The Dems ought to be required to report everything they have done lately to the Federal Elections Commission as an in-kind donation to the Republicans in 2018. And then there is the Mueller/ FBI/Collusion/Treason charade, which has normal people asking, “Is that still a thing?” Yeah, kind of, though it becomes less thingy every day as it becomes obvious that Sad Bassett Hound Mueller and the Conflict-of-Interest Crew’s got no-thing. The establishment is convinced that Peter Strzok came out of that hearing not looking like a guy who probably has a sex dungeon in his basement. But he totally looked like he has a sex dungeon in his basement, thereby launching a thousand memes of him leering, smirking, and generally channeling Paul Lynde. One of the secrets of Trump’s success is having really, really stupid enemies, enemies who are so tone-deaf and out-of-touch that they simply cannot adopt commonsense positions that resonate among normal Americans. The establishment instead insists on telling Americans that up is down, black is white, and girls can have penises. Nope. No wonder the Normals have gotten militant, and no wonder a leader like Donald Trump came along with the vision to exploit the opening the establishment left for an outsider to rise and prevail by embracing the obvious. Kurt Sclichter
Trump being Trump, he is unable to separate (a) the way Russia’s perfidy has been exploited by his political opponents to attack him (i.e., the unsuccessful attempt to delegitimize his presidency) from (b) Russia’s perfidy itself, as an attack on the United States. No matter how angry this president may be at the Democrats and the media, the significance to any president of Russia’s influence operation must be that it succeeded beyond Putin’s wildest dreams. Whether you’re a Democrat invested in the narrative that Russia’s shenanigans cost Hillary Clinton the presidency, or a Republican in denial that Putin sought to boost Trump at Clinton’s expense, the reality is that Putin was undoubtedly trying to sow discord in our body politic. That interpretation of events is something any president should be able to rally most of the country behind. The provocation warrants a determined response that bleeds Putin, the very opposite of kowtowing to the despot on the world stage. Now, let’s put to the side the recent cyber-espionage and other influence operations directed at our country. It has been only four months since Putin’s regime attempted to murder former double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter, Yulia, in the British city of Salisbury. It has been only a few days since a British couple fell into a coma after exposure to the same Soviet-era nerve agent (Novichok) used on the Skripals. The second incident happened just seven miles from the first, strongly suggesting that Putin’s regime is guilty of depraved indifference to the dangers its targeted assassinations on Western soil — the territory of our closest ally — pose to innocent bystanders. In 2006, the Putin regime similarly murdered a former Russian spy, Alexander Litvinenko, in London, poisoning his tea with radioactive polonium. Meanwhile, reporting that is based mainly on the account of a former KGB agent (who defected to the West and has been warned he is a target) indicates that Putin’s operatives are working off a hit list of eight people (including Sergei Skirpal) who reside in the West. Putin’s annexation of Crimea was just the most notorious of his recent adventures in territorial aggression. He has effectively annexed the Georgian regions of Abkhazia and South Ossetia, and the separatist war he is puppeteering in eastern Ukraine still rages in this its fifth year. He is casting a menacing eye at the Baltics. This, even as Russia props up the monstrous Assad regime in Syria and allies with Iran, the jihadist regime best known for sponsoring anti-American terrorism around the world. And just five months ago, at a major speech touting improved weapons capabilities, Putin spiced up the demonstration with a video diagramming a hypothetical nuclear missile attack on . . . yes . . . Florida. There is no doubt that we have to deal with this monster. Realpolitik adherents may even be right that there is potential for cooperation with Russia in areas of mutual interest (at least provided that the dealing is done with eyes open about Putin’s core anti-Americanism). But there is no reason why we need to deal with Russia in a forum at which the U.S. president stands there and pretends that a brutal autocrat, who has become incalculably rich by looting his crumbling country, is a statesman promoting peace and better relations. I would say that no matter who was president. In the case of President Trump specifically, for all his “you’re fired” bravado and reports of mercurial outbursts at some subordinates, he does not like unpleasant face-to-face confrontations. He may unload at a rally, but face to face, the president’s m.o. is to defuse confrontation with unctuous banter — an easy solution for someone who seems not to believe that anything he says in the moment will bind him in the future. This, inevitably, leads to foolish and sometimes reprehensible assertions (e.g., saying, in apparent defense of Putin, “There are a lot of killers. What? You think our country’s so innocent?”). The president appears to subscribe to the Swamp school of thought that negotiations are good for their own sake — though he conflates what is good for him (promoting his image as a master deal-maker) with what is good for the country (negotiations often aren’t). This is another iteration of the president’s tendency to personalize things, particularly relations between governments. That trait puts him at a distinct disadvantage with someone like Putin, who knows well the uses of flattery and grievance.
Donald Trump avait déjà tenu de tels propos et indiqué ses doutes sur le rapport des renseignements concluant à l’ingérence de la Russie dans l’élection, au premier semestre 2017. Mais ce qui était peu prévisible, c’est qu’il a remis en cause le travail des renseignements américains devant Vladimir Poutine, et en terre étrangère. Cela montre qu’il a franchi un seuil, une étape. (…) Cela choque les Républicains qui ne peuvent désormais plus ignorer la position de Donald Trump, qui a dit devant des caméras, et face à Vladimir Poutine, qu’il fait davantage confiance au président russe qu’à la justice et la police de son pays. Or, le parti des Républicains est le parti de la loi et de l’ordre. Pour eux, voir un président des Etats-Unis faire moins confiance aux institutions qu’à un dirigeant étranger, cela pose un énorme problème. D’autant plus qu’avant l’élection de Trump, les Républicains étaient en opposition avec la Russie de Poutine. Leurs critiques reflètent aussi ce malaise. (…) au-delà des protestations verbales symboliques, il ne devrait rien se passer concrètement, pour trois raisons. D’abord, Trump est aujourd’hui bien plus proche de l’électorat républicain que ne le sont les élus du parti au Congrès (élus en 2012, 2014 et 2016). La preuve, c’est que selon l’institut de sondages américain Gallup, en 2014 22 % des sympathisants républicains sondés jugeait la Russie comme étant une amie ou un allié, mais ils sont 40 % aujourd’hui. L’électorat républicain, sans doute sous l’effet de Trump, s’est radouci envers la Russie. Deuxièmement, que pourraient faire les Républicains ? Les institutions américaines permettent au président des Etats-Unis de faire à peu près ce qu’il veut en politique étrangère. Un impeachment ou une motion de censure sont hautement improbables. D’autant que les élus sont en pleine campagne électorale des mid-terms, ils n’ont pas d’intérêt à aller contre le président. Enfin, il faut se souvenir que les Républicains ont passé un pacte faustien avec Trump. La plupart des élus y sont allés avec des pincettes, en se bouchant le nez, mais Trump leur a apporté la Maison Blanche, de manière inespérée, et il a exécuté l’agenda économique et social des conservateurs : baisse d’impôts, nomination de deux juges conservateurs à la Cour suprême… Cela vaut bien un Helsinki. (…) Trump n’a jamais fait mystère de sa volonté d’un « reboot », un redémarrage dans les échanges avec la Russie. Sauf qu’à Helsinki on a plutôt vu une soumission, une vassalisation du président américain. Pour Poutine, dont le pays est sous le coup de fortes sanctions à la fois américaines et européennes, c’est une victoire diplomatique et symbolique importante. C’est tout de même très étrange, pour un président dont l’entourage est sous le coup d’enquêtes fédérales pour une collusion avec la Russie, de donner autant de gages éventuels de quelque chose de trouble dans son lien avec Poutine. (…) Par ailleurs, sur le fond, les deux dirigeants n’ont pas annoncé grand-chose à l’issue de leur tête à tête de 2 heures et de leur entretien avec leurs conseillers d’une heure. Ils ont relancé l’idée d’un groupe commun de cybersécurité, mais c’est tout. En dépit de cette volonté affichée d’un nouveau départ, comme avec la Corée du Nord d’ailleurs, il n’y a aucune matière pour l’instant. Le seul dossier sur lequel ils ont insisté, c’est le désarmement nucléaire et la lutte contre la prolifération nucléaire. Mais Poutine a réitéré à Helsinki son soutien à l’Iran, à l’encontre de la position de Trump. Corentin Sellin
Les excuses ne sont pas le fort de Donald Trump. Il a été nourri par ses mentors – feus son père, Fred, et l’avocat maccarthyste Roy Cohn – dans la conviction qu’elles ne sont qu’un aveu de faiblesse. Depuis, il s’y tient: ne jamais reconnaître une erreur, ne jamais battre en retraite. Il faut donc que la tempête ait été puissante pour que le président américain ait effectué mardi un repli tactique. À Helsinki, la veille, il avait accordé plus de crédit aux protestations d’innocence de Vladimir Poutine qu’aux accusations étayées de ses services de renseignements à propos des interférences russes dans la campagne de 2016. Il était parfaitement satisfait de sa prestation, confirme un collaborateur à la Maison-Blanche, jusqu’à ce qu’il prenne la mesure des reproches quasi universels en regardant la télévision à bord d’Air Force One durant le vol de retour. Même Fox News, qui l’applaudit en tout, jugeait «une clarification nécessaire». Même Newt Gingrich, l’ancien speaker de la Chambre, qui a écrit deux livres en deux ans pour donner du sens au trumpisme, l’appelait à «corriger immédiatement la plus grave erreur de sa présidence». Trump s’est donc plié à cet exercice déplaisant, à sa manière. Il a formulé le démenti le moins vraisemblable qu’on puisse trouver, afin que ses supporteurs ne soient pas dupes. «Je voulais dire: je ne vois aucune raison pour laquelle ce ne serait PAS la Russie», a déclaré le président. (…) «Cette excuse défie toute crédibilité, estime Jonathan Lemire, le correspondant de l’Associated Press dont la question avait provoqué le dérapage. Pour admettre que sa langue ait fourché dans cette phrase, il faudrait ignorer tout le reste de sa conférence de presse» avec le président russe. (…) Bien peu, chez ses partisans comme parmi ses adversaires, ont pris cette mise au point pour argent comptant. Car Donald Trump l’a lue ostensiblement devant les caméras avec le ton mécanique de quelqu’un qui accomplit une formalité, et en s’écartant deux fois du script préparé par ses collaborateurs. D’abord pour s’exclamer: «Il n’y a pas eu de collusion du tout!», une phrase qu’il avait rajoutée à la main. Ensuite pour atténuer le démenti tout juste formulé: «J’accepte la conclusion de notre communauté du renseignement selon laquelle l’interférence de la Russie dans l’élection de 2016 a eu lieu. Ce pourrait aussi être d’autres gens ; des tas de gens un peu partout.» (…) «Trump a mis au point une méthode d’excuses composée à parts égales de retraite et de réaffirmation», analyse Marc Fisher dans le Washington Post, pointant «le changement de ton quand il exprime ses véritables sentiments». Selon lui, on assiste au même «processus» que l’été dernier lors des incidents racistes de Charlottesville: «Insulte, excuses réticentes, signal clair qu’il croit vraiment ce qu’il avait dit au départ, répétition.» De fait, le correctif de mardi ne vise pas à clore la polémique, il lui offre seulement la protection d’avoir dit une chose et son contraire. Maintenant qu’il a rempli cette «obligation formelle», le chef de la Maison-Blanche peut continuer à asséner sa version des faits. Le Figaro
Sous les yeux d’un Poutine buvant visiblement du petit-lait, Donald Trump lâche une réponse surréaliste ce lundi au palais présidentiel d’Helsinki où il donne une conférence de presse avec son homologue russe, au terme de leur sommet bilatéral de quelques heures, face à une salle pleine à craquer de journalistes. Du jamais-vu. Le reporter de l’agence AP vient tout juste de lui demander qui il croit, concernant l’existence d’une immixtion russe dans la campagne présidentielle de 2016. Ses propres services qui affirment unanimes qu’il y a eu une attaque russe massive pour orienter le cours de l’élection? Ou Poutine qui dément absolument? À la stupéfaction générale des journalistes, Donald Trump ne veut pas trancher. «J’ai confiance dans les deux. Je fais confiance à mes services, mais la dénégation de Vladimir Poutine a été très forte et très puissante», déclare-t-il. Ce faisant, il assène un coup terrible aux services de renseignement de son propre pays, au vu et su de la planète entière. C’est une manière de dire qu’il est si soupçonneux à l’encontre de l’enquête russe qu’il pencherait presque pour «la vérité» que Poutine entend imposer. «Ce que j’aimerais savoir, c’est où sont passés les serveurs?» (du Parti démocrate, qui ont été hackés par la Russie, NDLR), s’interroge Trump. Il insiste: «Et où sont passés les 33.000 e-mails de Hillary Clinton, ce n’est pas en Russie qu’ils se seraient perdus!» Pour le président américain, «il n’y a jamais eu collusion, l’élection, je l’ai gagnée haut la main», sans l’aide de personne. «Cette enquête russe nous empêche de coopérer, alors qu’il y a tant à faire», dit Trump. Sur l’estrade, où les deux hommes sont côte à côte, Poutine jubile, comme s’il assistait à un spectacle qui ne semble pas le concerner mais dont il se délecte néanmoins. Événement sans précédent dans l’histoire des deux pays, Trump ouvre un boulevard à son homologue qui a toujours défendu une forme de relativisme, destiné à démontrer que les institutions démocratiques des États-Unis ne sont pas plus fiables que la parole du président russe. C’est une technique éprouvée. (…) Avant la séance de questions, la conférence de presse avait pourtant plutôt bien commencé, les deux hommes mettant l’accent sur la nécessité de reconstruire une relation «très détériorée» sur une base pragmatique. «Notre relation n’a jamais été aussi mauvaise mais depuis quatre heures, cela a changé», avait déclaré Donald Trump, visiblement satisfait, mais plutôt sérieux et contenu. Lisant ses fiches d’un ton neutre, Vladimir Poutine, lui, avait énuméré une longue liste de sujets sur lesquels Washington et Moscou pourraient coopérer, de l’établissement d’un cessez-le-feu entre Israël et la Syrie sur le plateau du Golan jusqu’au désarmement bilatéral entre les deux plus grandes puissances nucléaires, en passant par la dénucléarisation de la péninsule nord-coréenne. Cerise sur le gâteau, le chef du Kremlin a aussi proposé de prolonger l’accord de livraison de gaz qui unit son pays à l’Ukraine et qui doit expirer à la fin de cette année. Une initiative susceptible d’apaiser à la fois Washington et l’Union européenne. Mais très vite, la relation russo-américaine a été rattrapée par ses vieux démons, ceux de l’ingérence russe dans le scrutin présidentiel de 2016. Toutes les inquiétudes que les observateurs américains et européens nourrissaient vis-à-vis de l’ambiguïté de Trump sur la Russie, et de sa capacité à être manipulé par l’ex-espion du KGB Vladimir Poutine, ont soudain trouvé confirmation. Ce lundi soir, des réactions indignées commençaient à fuser depuis Washington. Le Figaro
De retour d’Helsinki, le président américain s’est employé mardi à éteindre la tempête politique provoquée par ses propos tenus la veille, dans lesquels il désavouait ses propres services secrets. Au milieu des critiques suscitées par son attitude devant Poutine à Helsinki, Donald Trump, de retour mardi à Washington DC, a profité d’une réunion à la Maison-Blanche avec des élus pour se dédire: «J’ai relu le texte de mes déclarations et je me suis aperçu qu’il manquait une négation. Je voulais dire: «Je ne vois pas de raison pour que la Russie ne l’ait pas fait» (interférer dans l’élection, NDLR). Je pense que ceci clarifie la question. J’ai une foi et une confiance entières en nos formidables agences de renseignement. J’accepte leurs conclusions selon lesquelles des interventions de la Russie ont eu lieu. Nous agirons avec force pour repousser et stopper toute (nouvelle) interférence dans nos élections.» Cette ingérence de Moscou «n’a eu aucun impact» sur le résultat du scrutin qu’il a remporté, a toutefois tenu à souligner le milliardaire républicain. Difficile de se contredire plus explicitement, une démarche en soi remarquable de la part d’un président allergique à admettre le moindre tort. Mais les accusations touchaient un nerf sensible, jetant sur lui le soupçon infamant de faiblesse, ou pire, de trahison. «J’ai vu les renseignements russes manipuler beaucoup de gens dans ma carrière, mais je n’aurais jamais cru que le président des États-Unis serait l’un d’eux», avait ainsi déclaré Will Hurd, un ancien de la CIA élu républicain du Texas. Le Washington Post dénonçait «la collusion, à la vue de tous», entre Trump et Poutine. Le New York Times l’accusait de «s’être couché aux pieds» du président russe, par «mollesse» et «obséquiosité». Même le conservateur Wall Street Journal avait dénoncé son «empressement» auprès du chef du Kremlin comme «un embarras national». Le Figaro
Dans le flot de réactions inquiètes qui fusent, trois explications du «mystère d’Helsinki» émergent. La première, revendiquée à demi-mot par nombre de leaders démocrates et même républicains, est une explication carrément complotiste. Elle présuppose que Donald Trump a été «ferré» depuis longtemps par les services secrets russes et que ces derniers auraient finalement fini par le propulser au sommet du pouvoir américain, au terme d’une magnifique opération de déstabilisation. Une variante de cette hypothèse est que Trump a été compromis lors de son voyage russe de 2013 et que Moscou «le tient». Deuxième hypothèse, sans doute plus crédible: celle de l’obsession de la légitimité chez un président en divorce total avec le système politique qu’il est censé présider. Parce qu’il a le sentiment que toute la machine d’État – ce fameux État profond qu’il déteste – est contre lui et que son élection est constamment en question, Trump semble incapable d’accepter l’idée qu’une immixtion russe ait pu faciliter sa victoire. Son insécurité est telle qu’il préfère croire aux «contes» politiques de Poutine plutôt que de reconnaître les conclusions de ses services sur les attaques russes contre la démocratie américaine. Un scénario qui aurait été facilité par son ego surdimensionné, face à un ancien espion du KGB ultra-expérimenté. À ces versions peut s’en ajouter une troisième. Celle d’un plan de Trump en direction de la Russie, pour la rallier à l’Amérique, sur des dossiers clé comme la en dépit des divergences idéologiques et des conseils quasi unanimes des experts (que Trump a toujours méprisés). Ce mardi, plusieurs observateurs russes évoquaient une telle hypothèse, soulignant que la première partie de la conférence de presse avait fait apparaître certains thèmes de coopération potentiels, notamment le soutien à Israël (contre l’Iran?). «Je suis prêt à prendre un risque politique pour promouvoir la paix, plutôt que de sacrifier la paix à la politique», a d’ailleurs dit Trump pendant la conférence de presse, phrase qui a été noyée dans le scandale de la question de l’immixtion. Laure Mandeville
NATO’s problems predated Trump and in many ways come back to Germany, whose example most other NATO nations ultimately tend to follow. The threat to both the EU and NATO is not Trump’s America, but a country that is currently insisting on an artificially low euro for mercantile purposes and that is at odds with its southern Mediterranean partners over financial liabilities, with its Eastern European neighbors over illegal immigration, with the United Kingdom over the conditions of Brexit, and with the U.S. over a paltry investment in military readiness of 1.3 percent of GDP while it’s piling up the largest account surplus in the world, at over $260 billion, and a $65 billion trade surplus with the U.S. Germany, a majority of whose tanks and fighters are thought not to be battle-ready, cannot expect an American-subsidized united NATO front against the threat of Vladimir Putin if it is now cutting a natural-gas agreement with Russia that undermines the Baltic States and Ukraine — countries that Putin is increasingly targeting. The gas deal will not only empower Putin; it will make Germany dependent on Russian energy — an untenable situation. Merkel can package all that in mellifluous diplomatic-speak, and Trump can rail about it in crude polemics, but the facts remain facts, and they are of Merkel’s making, not Trump’s. The same themes hold true regarding attitudes toward Putin, who (again) predated Trump and his press conference in Helsinki, where the president gave to the press an unfortunate apology-tour/Cairo-speech–like performance, reminiscent of past disastrous meetings with or assessments of Russian leaders by American presidents, such as FDR on Stalin: “I just have a hunch that Stalin is not that kind of man. Harry [Hopkins] says he’s not and that he doesn’t want anything but security for his country, and I think if I give him everything I possibly can and ask for nothing in return, noblesse oblige, he won’t try to annex anything and will work with me for a world of democracy and peace.” Or Kennedy’s blown summit with Khrushchev in Geneva: “He beat the hell out of me. It was the worst thing in my life. He savaged me.” Or Reagan’s weird offer to share American SDI technology and research with Gorbachev or, without much consultation with his advisers, to eliminate all ballistic missiles at Reykjavik. Trump confused trying to forge a realist détente with some sort of bizarre empathy for Putin, whose actions have been hostile and bellicose to the U.S. and based on perceptions of past American weakness. But again, Trump did not create an empowered Putin — and he has done more than any other president so far to check Putin’s ambitions. Putin in 2016 continued longstanding Russian cyberattacks and election interference because of past impunity (Obama belatedly told Putin to “cut it out” only in September 2016). He swallowed Crimea and parts of eastern Ukraine after the famous Hillary-managed “reset” — a surreal Chamberlain-like policy in which we simultaneously appeased Putin in fact while in rhetoric lecturing him about his classroom cut-up antics and macho style. Had Trump been overheard on a hot mic in Helsinki promising more flexibility with Putin on missile defense after our midterm elections, in expectation for electorally advantageous election-cycle quid pro quo good behavior from the Russians, we’d probably see articles of impeachment introduced on charges of Russian collusion. And yet the comparison would be even worse than that. After all, America kept Obama’s 2011 promise “to Vladimir,” in that we really did give up on creating credible missile defenses in Eastern Europe, breaking pledges made by a previous administration — music to Vladimir Putin’s ears. It would be preferable if Trump’s rhetoric reinforced his solid actions, which in relation to Putin’s aggression consist of wisely keeping or increasing tough sanctions, accelerating U.S. oil production, decimating Russian mercenaries in Syria, and arming Ukrainian resistance. But then again, Trump has not quite told us that he has looked into Putin’s eyes and seen a straightforward and trustworthy soul. Nor in desperation did he invite Putin into the Middle East after a Russian hiatus of nearly 40 years to prove to the world that Bashar al-Assad had eliminated his WMD trove — which Assad subsequently continued to use at his pleasure. There is currently no scandal over uranium sales to Russia, and the secretary of state’s spouse has not been discovered to have recently pocketed $500,000 to speak in Moscow. In a perfect world, we would like to see carefully chosen words enhancing effective muscular action. Instead, in the immediate past, we heard sober and judicious rhetoric ad nauseam, coupled with abject appeasement and widely perceived dangerous weakness. Now we have ill-timed bombast that sometimes mars positive achievement. Neither is desirable. But the latter is far preferable to the former. Victor Davis Hanson
We are in dangerous times. Amid the hysteria over the Russian summit, the Mueller collusion probe, nonstop unsupported allegations and rumors, the Strzok and Page testimonies, the ongoing congressional investigations into improper CIA and FBI behavior, and a completely unhinged media, there is a growing crisis of rising tensions between two superpowers that together possess a combined arsenal of 3,000 instantly deployable nuclear weapons and another 10,000 in storage. That latter existential fact apparently has been forgotten in all the recriminations. So it is time for all parties to deescalate and step back a bit. Trump understandably wants to avoid progressive charges that he is obstructing Robert Mueller’s ostensible investigation of Russian collusion, and he also wants some sort of détente with Russia. Mueller has likely indicted Russians, timed on the eve of the summit, in part on the assumption that they would more or less not personally defend themselves and never appear on U.S. soil. Add that all up, and Trump apparently has discussed with Putin an idea of allowing Mueller’s investigators to visit Russia to interview those they have indicted. But in the quid pro quo world of big-power rivalry, Putin, of course, wants reciprocity — the right also to interview American citizens or residents (among them a former U.S. ambassador to Russia) whom he believes have transgressed against Russia. Trump needs to squash Putin’s ridiculous “parity” request immediately. Mueller would learn little or nothing from interviewing his targets on Russian soil — and likely never imagined that he would or could. On the other hand, given recent Russian attacks on critics abroad, Moscow’s interviewing any Russian antagonist anywhere is not necessarily a safe or sane enterprise. And being indicted under the laws of a constitutional republic is hardly synonymous with earning the suspicion of the Russian autocracy. Most importantly, the idea that a former U.S. ambassador to Russia, Professor Michael McFaul — long after the expiration of his government tenure — would submit to Russian questioning is absurd. Of course, it would also undermine the entire sanctity of American ambassadorial service. So, Putin’s offer, to the extent we know the details of it, will soon upon examination be seen as patently unhinged. In refusal, Trump has a good opportunity to remind the world why all American critics of the Putin government — and especially of his own government as well — are uniquely free and protected to voice any notion they wish. Victor Davis Hanson
AP reporter John Lemire placed Trump in an impossible position. Noting that Putin denied meddling in the 2016 elections and the intelligence community insists that Russia meddled, he asked Trump, “Who do you believe?” If Trump had said that he believed his intelligence community and gave no credence to Putin’s denial, he would have humiliated Putin and destroyed any prospect of cooperative relations.Trump tried to strike a balance. He spoke respectfully of both Putin’s denials and the US intelligence community’s accusation. It wasn’t a particularly coherent position. It was a clumsy attempt to preserve the agreements he and Putin reached during their meeting. And it was blindingly obviously not treason. In fact, Trump’s response to Lemire, and his overall conduct at the press conference, did not convey weakness at all. Certainly he was far more assertive of US interests than Obama was in his dealings with Russia. In Obama’s first summit with Putin in July 2009, Obama sat meekly as Putin delivered an hour-long lecture about how US-Russian relations had gone down the drain. As Daniel Greenfield noted at Frontpage magazine Tuesday, in succeeding years, Obama capitulated to Putin on anti-missile defense systems in Poland and the Czech Republic, on Ukraine, Georgia and Crimea. Obama gave Putin free rein in Syria and supported Russia’s alliance with Iran on its nuclear program and its efforts to save the Assad regime. He permitted Russian entities linked to the Kremlin to purchase a quarter of American uranium. And of course, Obama made no effort to end Russian meddling in the 2016 elections. Trump in contrast has stiffened US sanctions against Russian entities. He has withdrawn from Obama’s nuclear deal with Iran. He has agreed to sell Patriot missiles to Poland. And he has placed tariffs on Russian exports to the US. So if Trump is Putin’s agent, what was Obama? (…) The Democrats and their allies in the media use the accusation that Trump is an agent of Russia as an elections strategy. Midterm elections are consistently marked with low voter turnout. So both parties devote most of their energies to rallying their base and motivating their most committed members to vote. (…) But (…) the problem with playing domestic politics on the international scene is that doing so has real consequences for international security and for US national interests.(…)  for instance (…) Europe is economically dependent on trade with the US and strategically dependent on NATO. So why are the Europeans so open about their hatred of Trump and their rejection of his trade policies, his policy towards Iran and his insistence that they pay their fair share for their own defense? (…) The answer of course is that they got a green light to adopt openly anti-American policies from the forces in the US that have devoted their energies since Trump’s election nearly two years ago to delegitimizing his victory and his presidency. Those calling Trump a traitor empowered the Europeans to defy the US on every issue. Trump’s opponents’ unsubstantiated allegation that his campaign colluded with Russia during the 2016 elections has constrained Trump’s ability to perform his duties.(…) Time will tell if we just averted war. But what we did learn is that Israel’s position in a war with Iran is stronger than it could have been if the two leaders hadn’t met in Helsinki. (…) Trump’s opponents’ obsession with bringing him down has caused great harm to his presidency and to America’s position worldwide. It is a testament to Trump’s commitment to the US and its allies that he met with Putin this week. And the success of their meeting is something that all who care about global security and preventing a devastating war in the Middle East should be grateful for. Caroline Glick

C’est bien la chasse aux sorcières et la conspiration gauchiste, imbécile !

A l’heure où au lendemain d’un aussi calamiteux qu’énigmatique sommet du président américain avec son homologue russe …

Qui nous a valu un surréaliste – mais depuis doublement désavoué – numéro de génuflexion de Donald Trump devant un Poutine empoisonneur des peuples et maitre reconnu des fausses équivalences morales

Comme, entre les références à – excusez du peu ! – Pearl Harbor, la Nuit de cristal et le 11/9, un tout aussi invraisemblable déluge des plus délirantes critiques de la part de ses adversaires politiques ou médiatiques …

Qui rappelle …

Mis à part le chroniqueur de Fox news Sean Hannity, l’historien militaire américain Victor Davis Hanson ou la célèbre éditorialiste du Jerusalem Post Caroline Glick

Qui il y à peine six ans ces mêmes belles âmes n’avaient rien trouvé à redire lorsque le président Obama avait fait part à Poutine, sur un micro resté ouvert, de sa « flexibilité » possible après sa réélection …

Que deux semaines avant l’élection présidentielle de 2016 le même Obama rappelait au candidat Trump « l’impossibilité de manipuler les élections » américaines du fait de leur caractère « décentralisé » et du « nombre de bulletins » …

Et qu’enfin, contrairement à l‘Administration précédente et entre sanctions et actions militaires ou dénonciations de mauvais traités, il y a longtemps qu’il n’y avait pas eu un gouvernement américain aussi intransigeant avec la Russie et ses affidés ?

Et dès lors comment qualifier …

Pour expliquer un comportement aussi mystérieux et schizophrénique de la part du président américain …

Les agissements d’une gauche américaine qui n’ayant toujours pas digéré sa défaite de 2016 …

Court-circuite totalement, via ses chiens de garde médiatiques, les réelles avancées dudit sommet notamment concernant la sécurité d’Israël face à l’aventurisme militaire iranien …

Et place délibérément son président à nouveau devant un choix impossible

A savoir celui cette fois-ci de la génuflexion devant Poutine ..

Contre ses propres services qui n’avaient alors rien fait …

Ou sous prétexte d’une influence russe qui, hostilité anti-démocrate oblige après huit ans d’administration Obama, ne pouvait avoir qu’un effet marginal ou anecdotique …

L’assentiment à la délégitimation de sa propre élection ?

Le voyage européen de Trump, un «carnage» et une énigme
Laure Mandeville
Le Figaro
17/07/2018

DÉCRYPTAGE – Durant son périple de cinq jours sur le Vieux continent, le président américain a mis l’Otan en ébullition tout en amorçant un redémarrage des relations russo-américaines, quitte à provoquer le désarroi américain et occidental.

Le voyage avait commencé par une volée de bois de vert administrée à ses alliés de l’Otan et de l’Union européenne. Il s’est fini par une «génuflexion» devant le président Poutine à Helsinki et un désaveu de son propre pays, exprimé à la face du monde entier. «Un carnage diplomatique», a pour sa part écrit l’éditorialiste du Financial Times Edward Luce, qui affirme que le contraste entre la brutalité utilisée face aux Européens et le soutien inconditionnel apporté à Poutine (malgré l’annexion de la Crimée, l’invasion rampante de l’Ukraine, l’attaque au poison Novitchok contre l’ex-espion Skripal, les mensonges répétés sur la frappe d’un missile russe contre un avion de ligne néerlandais et, pour finir, les tentatives de déstabilisation des élections) a jeté «l’Occident dans une crise existentielle».

«Le résultat du voyage de cinq jours de M. Trump, est un Otan en ébullition et un redémarrage réel des relations russo-américaines, entièrement en faveur de M. Poutine», constate-t-il.

Difficile d’être en désaccord avec l’analyse. Mais reste une lourde énigme. Pourquoi Donald Trump a-t-il pris le risque de susciter un séisme américain et occidental, en prenant fait et cause pour Vladimir Poutine sur la question de l’immixtion russe dans la campagne présidentielle, allant jusqu’à dénigrer ses propres services de renseignements en sa présence?

Quand on revient sur le fil des événements, la séquence «occidentale» du voyage d’Europe est finalement assez compréhensible. Face à l’Otan, l’ancien homme d’affaires s’est comporté en accord avec ses priorités de toujours, à savoir qu’il lui fallait absolument arracher à ses alliés ce que ses prédécesseurs avaient toujours échoué à obtenir, faute, selon lui, de ténacité: un rééquilibrage du budget de la défense de l’Alliance qui allégerait le fardeau américain. «Il faut que ça change, l’état des lieux est injuste pour l’Amérique», n’a-t-il cessé de tonner, avant de parler de l’Otan comme d’un «facteur d’unification formidable». Tout dans cette partie était du Trump classique. Les «coups de poing» sur la table, la capacité à hurler le matin puis à apaiser le jeu le soir. Tout ne visait qu’un but: obtenir un changement favorable à l’intérêt de «L’Amérique d’abord».

Séquence russe

Le problème de la mystérieuse et scandaleuse séquence russe qui a suivi à Helsinki est que, en désavouant son pays, Trump a semblé oublier qu’il était le président des États-Unis. «À la fin de la semaine, “L’Amérique d’abord” s’est mise à ressembler incroyablement à “La Russie d’abord”», a résumé d’un tweet l’expert Richard Haas. À travers toute la classe politique américaine, les accusations de «trahison» et de «faiblesse» se sont multipliées. Interrogé sur le fait de savoir si on pouvait comparer le comportement de Trump avec Poutine à celui de Roosevelt face à Staline à Yalta, l’historien Robert Dallek semblait perplexe: «Roosevelt était face aux dures réalités de la sortie de la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Nous n’avons pas d’idée claire mais juste des hypothèses sur la question de savoir pourquoi Trump semble être à un tel degré dans la poche de Vladimir Poutine», a-t-il répondu.

Dans le flot de réactions inquiètes qui fusent, trois explications du «mystère d’Helsinki» émergent. La première, revendiquée à demi-mot par nombre de leaders démocrates et même républicains, est une explication carrément complotiste. Elle présuppose que Donald Trump a été «ferré» depuis longtemps par les services secrets russes et que ces derniers auraient finalement fini par le propulser au sommet du pouvoir américain, au terme d’une magnifique opération de déstabilisation. Une variante de cette hypothèse est que Trump a été compromis lors de son voyage russe de 2013 et que Moscou «le tient».

L’obsession de la légitimité

Deuxième hypothèse, sans doute plus crédible: celle de l’obsession de la légitimité chez un président en divorce total avec le système politique qu’il est censé présider. Parce qu’il a le sentiment que toute la machine d’État – ce fameux État profond qu’il déteste – est contre lui et que son élection est constamment en question, Trump semble incapable d’accepter l’idée qu’une immixtion russe ait pu faciliter sa victoire. Son insécurité est telle qu’il préfère croire aux «contes» politiques de Poutine plutôt que de reconnaître les conclusions de ses services sur les attaques russes contre la démocratie américaine. Un scénario qui aurait été facilité par son ego surdimensionné, face à un ancien espion du KGB ultra-expérimenté.

À ces versions peut s’en ajouter une troisième. Celle d’un plan de Trump en direction de la Russie, pour la rallier à l’Amérique, sur des dossiers clé comme la Corée, la Chine ou l’Iran, en dépit des divergences idéologiques et des conseils quasi unanimes des experts (que Trump a toujours méprisés). Ce mardi, plusieurs observateurs russes évoquaient une telle hypothèse, soulignant que la première partie de la conférence de presse avait fait apparaître certains thèmes de coopération potentiels, notamment le soutien à Israël (contre l’Iran?). «Je suis prêt à prendre un risque politique pour promouvoir la paix, plutôt que de sacrifier la paix à la politique», a d’ailleurs dit Trump pendant la conférence de presse, phrase qui a été noyée dans le scandale de la question de l’immixtion.

Les deux heures de conversation en tête à tête entre les deux hommes ont-elles pu déboucher sur un accord stratégique secret, que Trump a jugé suffisamment important pour faire front avec Poutine, sur la question de l’immixtion dans la campagne américaine? «On avait l’impression qu’ils étaient alliés face aux journalistes», a noté un observateur russe. Le résultat immédiat de ce plan, s’il existe, sera sans doute à l’opposé de ce que voulait Trump. Un désarroi américain et occidental qui devrait susciter une levée de boucliers contre Poutine. «Je crains la réponse qui va venir Washington», a noté l’éditorialiste du Moskovski Komsomolets, appelant à ne pas crier victoire.

Voir aussi:

Trump prend parti pour Poutine, contre ses propres services
Laure Mandeville et Pierre Avril
Le Figaro
16/07/2018

VIDÉO – À Helsinki, le président des Etats-Unis a obstinément refusé de condamner Moscou pour l’ingérence dans la campagne présidentielle américaine.

À Helsinki

Sous les yeux d’un Poutine buvant visiblement du petit-lait, Donald Trump lâche une réponse surréaliste ce lundi au palais présidentiel d’Helsinki où il donne une conférence de presse avec son homologue russe, au terme de leur sommet bilatéral de quelques heures, face à une salle pleine à craquer de journalistes. Du jamais-vu. Le reporter de l’agence AP vient tout juste de lui demander qui il croit, concernant l’existence d’une immixtion russe dans la campagne présidentielle de 2016. Ses propres services qui affirment unanimes qu’il y a eu une attaque russe massive pour orienter le cours de l’élection? Ou Poutine qui dément absolument? À la stupéfaction générale des journalistes, Donald Trump ne veut pas trancher. «J’ai confiance dans les deux. Je fais confiance à mes services, mais la dénégation de Vladimir Poutine a été très forte et très puissante», déclare-t-il.

Ce faisant, il assène un coup terrible aux services de renseignement de son propre pays, au vu et su de la planète entière. C’est une manière de dire qu’il est si soupçonneux à l’encontre de l’enquête russe qu’il pencherait presque pour «la vérité» que Poutine entend imposer. «Ce que j’aimerais savoir, c’est où sont passés les serveurs?» (du Parti démocrate, qui ont été hackés par la Russie, NDLR), s’interroge Trump. Il insiste: «Et où sont passés les 33.000 e-mails de Hillary Clinton, ce n’est pas en Russie qu’ils se seraient perdus!» Pour le président américain, «il n’y a jamais eu collusion, l’élection, je l’ai gagnée haut la main», sans l’aide de personne. «Cette enquête russe nous empêche de coopérer, alors qu’il y a tant à faire», dit Trump.

Poutine jubile

Sur l’estrade, où les deux hommes sont côte à côte, Poutine jubile, comme s’il assistait à un spectacle qui ne semble pas le concerner mais dont il se délecte néanmoins. Événement sans précédent dans l’histoire des deux pays, Trump ouvre un boulevard à son homologue qui a toujours défendu une forme de relativisme, destiné à démontrer que les institutions démocratiques des États-Unis ne sont pas plus fiables que la parole du président russe. C’est une technique éprouvée.

«Moi aussi j’ai travaillé dans les services de renseignement, lance le chef du Kremlin au journaliste américain. Mais la Russie est un pays démocratique. Les États-Unis aussi non? Si l’on veut tirer un bilan définitif de cette affaire, cela doit être réglé non pas par un service de renseignement mais par la justice.» Au reporter qui le presse de dire s’il est intervenu dans le processus électoral américain, il répond seulement: «Je voulais que Trump gagne parce qu’il voulait normaliser les relations russo-américaines… Mais laissez tomber cette histoire d’ingérence, c’est une absurdité totale!… La Russie ne s’est jamais ingérée dans un processus électoral et ne le fera jamais.»

Vladimir Poutine a été piqué par la question d’un journaliste de Reuters qui évoquait la possibilité d’une extradition des douze agents russes suspectés par le procureur Robert Mueller d’avoir piraté le compte du serveur démocrate. «Nous y sommes prêts à condition que cette coopération soit réciproque», a rétorqué le chef du Kremlin, laissant entendre que les États-Unis devaient eux aussi poursuivre les espions américains opérant sur le sol russe.

Avant la séance de questions, la conférence de presse avait pourtant plutôt bien commencé, les deux hommes mettant l’accent sur la nécessité de reconstruire une relation «très détériorée» sur une base pragmatique. «Notre relation n’a jamais été aussi mauvaise mais depuis quatre heures, cela a changé», avait déclaré Donald Trump, visiblement satisfait, mais plutôt sérieux et contenu.

Lisant ses fiches d’un ton neutre, Vladimir Poutine, lui, avait énuméré une longue liste de sujets sur lesquels Washington et Moscou pourraient coopérer, de l’établissement d’un cessez-le-feu entre Israël et la Syrie sur le plateau du Golan jusqu’au désarmement bilatéral entre les deux plus grandes puissances nucléaires, en passant par la dénucléarisation de la péninsule nord-coréenne.

Cerise sur le gâteau, le chef du Kremlin a aussi proposé de prolonger l’accord de livraison de gaz qui unit son pays à l’Ukraine et qui doit expirer à la fin de cette année. Une initiative susceptible d’apaiser à la fois Washington et l’Union européenne. Mais très vite, la relation russo-américaine a été rattrapée par ses vieux démons, ceux de l’ingérence russe dans le scrutin présidentiel de 2016. Toutes les inquiétudes que les observateurs américains et européens nourrissaient vis-à-vis de l’ambiguïté de Trump sur la Russie, et de sa capacité à être manipulé par l’ex-espion du KGB Vladimir Poutine, ont soudain trouvé confirmation.

«Un signe de faiblesse»

Ce lundi soir, des réactions indignées commençaient à fuser depuis Washington. «La Maison-Blanche est maintenant confrontée à une seule, sinistre question: qu’est-ce qui peut bien pousser Donald Trump à mettre les intérêts de la Russie au-dessus de ceux des États-Unis», a écrit le chef de l’opposition démocrate au Sénat, Chuck Schumer, sur Twitter après la conférence de presse commune des deux dirigeants à Helsinki, parlant de propos «irréfléchis, dangereux et faibles».

«Le président Trump a raté une occasion de tenir la Russie clairement responsable pour son ingérence dans les élections de 2016 et de lancer un avertissement ferme au sujet des prochains scrutins», a regretté le sénateur républicain Lindsey Graham. «Cette réponse du président Trump sera considérée par la Russie comme un signe de faiblesse», a ajouté cet élu souvent en phase avec le milliardaire républicain. «C’est une honte», a dénoncé pour sa part l’ancien sénateur d’Arizona Jeff Flake, dans l’opposition républicaine à Trump. «Je n’aurais jamais pensé voir un jour notre président américain se tenir à côté du président russe et mettre en cause les États-Unis pour l’agression russe.»

Voir également:

Après avoir rencontré Poutine à Helsinki, Trump est-il «un faible» ou «un traître» ?
Philippe Gélie
Le Figaro
17/07/2018

Le chef de la Maison-Blanche a fait l’unanimité contre lui aux États-Unis en se désolidarisant de ses services de renseignement devant le président russe.

De notre correspondant à Washington,

Donald Trump est parvenu à faire quasiment l’unanimité contre lui avec sa prestation à Helsinki face à Vladimir Poutine. «Lamentable», «surréaliste», «répugnant», «horrible», «antipatriotique», «une honte nationale»… Un déluge de commentaires négatifs venus de la droite comme de la gauche. Même Fox News a eu des états d’âme, c’est dire.

Si l’empressement de Trump auprès de Poutine lui a valu son lot de reproches, c’est surtout l’échange avec Jonathan Lemire de l’Associated Press qui a marqué les esprits. «Le président russe nie avoir interféré dans l’élection de 2016, toutes les agences de renseignement américaines concluent l’inverse: qui croyez-vous?» À question simple, réponse alambiquée. «Où sont les serveurs (informatiques du Parti démocrate, NDLR)?», s’est lancé Trump, avant de donner son sentiment: «Le président Poutine dit que ce n’est pas la Russie. Je ne vois pas de raison pour que ce soit elle

Le directeur du renseignement national, Dan Coats, nommé par Trump, a jugé bon de publier une mise au point immédiate, apparemment sans l’avoir fait valider par la Maison-Blanche: «Nous avons été clairs dans notre évaluation des interférences russes dans l’élection de 2016 et de leurs efforts persistants, généralisés, de saper notre démocratie. Nous continuerons à fournir du renseignement objectif et sans fard en appui de notre sécurité nationale.»

Le «Charlottesville» de la politique étrangère?

«Extraordinaire», s’est exclamé le New York Times, pour qui cet épisode est «l’équivalent de Charlottesville en politique étrangère», une référence aux événements racistes de l’été dernier où Donald Trump avait vu «des gens bien des deux côtés». Cette fois, «il a jeté aux orties toute notion conventionnelle sur la façon dont un président doit se comporter à l’étranger. Au lieu de défendre l’Amérique contre ceux qui la menacent, il attaque ses propres concitoyens et institutions tout en applaudissant le chef d’une puissance hostile.»

Le site du Washington Post affichait lundi soir une pleine page de chroniques aux titres incendiaires: «Trump remplace la fierté nationale par la vanité personnelle», «C’est un fan de Poutine, un jour nous saurons pourquoi»… Même le Wall Street Journal, habituellement mesuré dans ses critiques, s’est fendu d’un éditorial sévère, titré: «La doctrine ‘Trump d’abord’». Estimant que son «empressement» au côté du président russe fut «un embarras national», il l’accuse «d’avoir projeté de la faiblesse.»

Plus que les adjectifs désobligeants, c’est ce soupçon qui risque de toucher un point sensible chez Trump. La plupart des interrogations suscitées par le sommet d’Helsinki oscillent entre deux infamies: est-il un faible ou un traître?

Les démocrates confortés dans leur thèse

Le représentant républicain du Texas Will Hurd, un ancien agent de la CIA, déclare sur CNN: «J’ai vu les renseignements russes manipuler beaucoup de gens dans ma carrière. Je n’aurais jamais cru que le président des États-Unis serait l’un d’eux.» John O’Brennan, ancien directeur de la CIA sous Barack Obama, ose tweeter le mot: la conférence de presse de Trump «n’était rien moins que de la trahison.» Nancy Pelosi, chef des démocrates à la Chambre, embraye: «Cela prouve que les Russes ont quelque chose sur le président, personnellement, financièrement ou politiquement.»

Dans les rangs républicains, John McCain est le plus sévère, comme d’habitude, l’accusant «d’avoir été non seulement incapable, mais de n’avoir pas voulu se dresser contre Poutine» et d’avoir fait «le choix conscient de défendre un tyran.» Lindsey Graham déplore «une occasion manquée» qui sera «perçue comme de la faiblesse» et recommande de vérifier si un système d’écoute n’a pas été dissimulé dans le ballon de foot offert par Poutine à Trump! Côté démocrate, le sénateur Chuck Schumer reproche lui aussi au président d’être «inconséquent, dangereux et faible.»

Ari Fleisher, ancien porte-parole de George W. Bush et supporteur de Trump, avoue son désarroi sur Twitter: «Je continue à croire qu’il n’y a pas eu de collusion entre sa campagne et la Russie, mais quand Trump accepte les arguments de Poutine aussi facilement et naïvement, je peux comprendre pourquoi les démocrates pensent que Poutine doit avoir quelque chose sur lui.»

Une rencontre programmée avec les élus du Congrès

Sur Fox News, Bret Baier a qualifié la performance présidentielle de «surréaliste» et Neil Cavuto de «répugnante», un ton inédit sur cette antenne. Il ne s’est guère trouvé que Sean Hannity, confident et inconditionnel du président, pour le défendre dans son émission lundi soir: c’est la «chasse aux sorcières», la «conspiration gauchiste» qui est «dégoûtante», a-t-il martelé, avant de diffuser l’interview que lui avait accordée Trump juste après le sommet. On n’y a rien appris de plus, mais le journaliste a fait de son mieux, saluant d’emblée la réponse «très forte» du chef de la Maison-Blanche sur «les serveurs démocrates».

Durant le vol du retour, Donald Trump a tweeté à bord d’Air Force One: «J’ai une grande confiance dans mes responsables du renseignement. Toutefois, pour construire un meilleur avenir, nous ne pouvons pas nous focaliser sur le passé. Les deux plus grandes puissances nucléaires doivent s’entendre!» Une rencontre avec les élus du Congrès a été ajoutée à son agenda ce mardi pour tenter d’apaiser leurs inquiétudes.

Voir de même:

Trump se dédit et accuse la Russie d’ingérence dans la présidentielle de 2016
Philippe Gélie
Le Figaro
17/07/2018

De retour d’Helsinki, le président américain s’est employé mardi à éteindre la tempête politique provoquée par ses propos tenus la veille, dans lesquels il désavouait ses propres services secrets.

Au milieu des critiques suscitées par son attitude devant Poutine à Helsinki, Donald Trump, de retour mardi à Washington DC, a profité d’une réunion à la Maison-Blanche avec des élus pour se dédire: «J’ai relu le texte de mes déclarations et je me suis aperçu qu’il manquait une négation. Je voulais dire: «Je ne vois pas de raison pour que la Russie ne l’ait pas fait» (interférer dans l’élection, NDLR). Je pense que ceci clarifie la question. J’ai une foi et une confiance entières en nos formidables agences de renseignement. J’accepte leurs conclusions selon lesquelles des interventions de la Russie ont eu lieu. Nous agirons avec force pour repousser et stopper toute (nouvelle) interférence dans nos élections.» Cette ingérence de Moscou «n’a eu aucun impact» sur le résultat du scrutin qu’il a remporté, a toutefois tenu à souligner le milliardaire républicain.

Difficile de se contredire plus explicitement, une démarche en soi remarquable de la part d’un président allergique à admettre le moindre tort. Mais les accusations touchaient un nerf sensible, jetant sur lui le soupçon infamant de faiblesse, ou pire, de trahison. «J’ai vu les renseignements russes manipuler beaucoup de gens dans ma carrière, mais je n’aurais jamais cru que le président des États-Unis serait l’un d’eux», avait ainsi déclaré Will Hurd, un ancien de la CIA élu républicain du Texas. Le Washington Post dénonçait «la collusion, à la vue de tous», entre Trump et Poutine. Le New York Times l’accusait de «s’être couché aux pieds» du président russe, par «mollesse» et «obséquiosité». Même le conservateur Wall Street Journal avait dénoncé son «empressement» auprès du chef du Kremlin comme «un embarras national».

Stupéfaction générale

Lundi, les dénégations du 45e président des États-Unis sur la question brûlante de l’ingérence russe dans la campagne 2016, attestée de façon unanime par les enquêteurs du FBI et les agences américaines du renseignement, avaient provoqué la stupéfaction générale. Interrogé lors d’une conférence de presse commune avec le président Vladimir Poutine à Helsinki sur la question d’une ingérence russe dans la présidentielle américaine, Trump avait affirmé que cette information lui avait été fournie par le chef de la CIA, mais qu’il n’avait aucune raison de la croire. «J’ai le président Poutine qui vient de dire que ce n’était pas la Russie (…) Et je ne vois pas pourquoi cela le serait», avait lancé Donald Trump, laissant entendre qu’il était plus sensible aux dénégations du dirigeant russe qu’aux conclusions de ses propres services.

Lors de son vol de retour de la capitale finlandaise, le président américain n’avait pu que constater les conséquences de ses égards vis-à-vis de son homologue russe, se retrouvant vertement critiqué jusque par des ténors du parti républicain. Donald Trump doit réaliser que «la Russie n’est pas notre alliée», a ainsi lancé le chef de file des républicains au Congrès, Paul Ryan. Le sénateur républicain John McCain a quant à lui dénoncé «un des pires moments de l’histoire de la présidence américaine».

Voir de plus:

Les zigzags diplomatiques de Trump sèment le trouble
Philippe Gélie
Le Figaro
18/07/2018

VIDÉOS – Les changements de pied du président américain sur l’attitude à adopter face à la Russie suscitent l’incompréhension en Europe et aux États-Unis.

De notre correspondant à Washington

Les excuses ne sont pas le fort de Donald Trump. Il a été nourri par ses mentors – feus son père, Fred, et l’avocat maccarthyste Roy Cohn – dans la conviction qu’elles ne sont qu’un aveu de faiblesse. Depuis, il s’y tient: ne jamais reconnaître une erreur, ne jamais battre en retraite.

Il faut donc que la tempête ait été puissante pour que le président américain ait effectué mardi un repli tactique. À Helsinki, la veille, il avait accordé plus de crédit aux protestations d’innocence de Vladimir Poutine qu’aux accusations étayées de ses services de renseignements à propos des interférences russes dans la campagne de 2016. Il était parfaitement satisfait de sa prestation, confirme un collaborateur à la Maison-Blanche, jusqu’à ce qu’il prenne la mesure des reproches quasi universels en regardant la télévision à bord d’Air Force One durant le vol de retour. Même Fox News, qui l’applaudit en tout, jugeait «une clarification nécessaire». Même Newt Gingrich, l’ancien speaker de la Chambre, qui a écrit deux livres en deux ans pour donner du sens au trumpisme (1), l’appelait à «corriger immédiatement la plus grave erreur de sa présidence».

Trump s’est donc plié à cet exercice déplaisant, à sa manière. Il a formulé le démenti le moins vraisemblable qu’on puisse trouver, afin que ses supporteurs ne soient pas dupes. «Je voulais dire: je ne vois aucune raison pour laquelle ce ne serait PAS la Russie», a déclaré le président. «On se demande bien qui a pensé à ça, mais peu importe», ironisait mercredi le Wall Street Journal dans son éditorial. «Cette excuse défie toute crédibilité, estime Jonathan Lemire, le correspondant de l’Associated Press dont la question avait provoqué le dérapage. Pour admettre que sa langue ait fourché dans cette phrase, il faudrait ignorer tout le reste de sa conférence de presse» avec le président russe. Même en lui faisant crédit de rectifier le tir, «cette déclaration a été faite avec 24 heures de retard et au mauvais endroit», a déclaré le sénateur démocrate Chuck Schumer.

«Obligation formelle»
Bien peu, chez ses partisans comme parmi ses adversaires, ont pris cette mise au point pour argent comptant. Car Donald Trump l’a lue ostensiblement devant les caméras avec le ton mécanique de quelqu’un qui accomplit une formalité, et en s’écartant deux fois du script préparé par ses collaborateurs. D’abord pour s’exclamer: «Il n’y a pas eu de collusion du tout!», une phrase qu’il avait rajoutée à la main. Ensuite pour atténuer le démenti tout juste formulé: «J’accepte la conclusion de notre communauté du renseignement selon laquelle l’interférence de la Russie dans l’élection de 2016 a eu lieu. Ce pourrait aussi être d’autres gens ; des tas de gens un peu partout.» Pour faire bonne mesure, il avait biffé de sa plume une phrase l’engageant à «amener toute personne impliquée devant la justice», une promesse qu’il n’a pas faite.

«Trump a mis au point une méthode d’excuses composée à parts égales de retraite et de réaffirmation», analyse Marc Fisher dans le Washington Post, pointant «le changement de ton quand il exprime ses véritables sentiments». Selon lui, on assiste au même «processus» que l’été dernier lors des incidents racistes de Charlottesville: «Insulte, excuses réticentes, signal clair qu’il croit vraiment ce qu’il avait dit au départ, répétition.» De fait, le correctif de mardi ne vise pas à clore la polémique, il lui offre seulement la protection d’avoir dit une chose et son contraire. Maintenant qu’il a rempli cette «obligation formelle», le chef de la Maison-Blanche peut continuer à asséner sa version des faits: «Tellement de gens au sommet du renseignement ont adoré ma performance à la conférence de presse d’Helsinki», a-t-il tweeté mercredi. Et: «Si la réunion de l’Otan a été un triomphe reconnu […], la rencontre avec la Russie pourrait se révéler être, sur le long terme, un succès encore plus grand.»

Les supporteurs du président l’approuvent quoi qu’il fasse et, lorsqu’ils ont des doutes, se convainquent qu’«il est plus dur en privé» ou qu’«il a un plan» ou qu’il concocte en secret «un mégadeal». Mais les responsables républicains semblent de moins en moins enclins à cette crédulité.

Tandis que le Wall Street Journalappelle le Congrès à «endiguer Poutine – et Trump», les élus envisagent d’adopter de nouvelles sanctions contre le Kremlin, voire d’inscrire la Russie sur la liste des États sponsors du terrorisme. Les démocrates demandent aussi à auditionner tous les participants au sommet d’Helsinki, ce que le secrétaire d’État, Mike Pompeo, fera mercredi prochain devant le Sénat.

(1) Understanding Trump , 2017, et Trump’s America , 2018.

Voir encore:

Sommet d’Helsinki: «On a vu une soumission, une vassalisation de Trump» face à Poutine
INTERVIEW Le spécialiste des Etats-Unis Corentin Sellin revient pour « 20 Minutes » sur l’attitude de Donald Trump lors de sa rencontre avec Vladimir Poutine…
Propos recueillis par Laure Cometti
20 minutes
17/07/18

Les propos de Donald Trump sur l’éventuelle ingérence russe lors de l’élection présidentielle de 2016 ont provoqué un coup de tonnerre outre-Atlantique. Lors de sa rencontre avec Vladimir Poutine à Helsinki, le président américain a indiqué croire davantage aux dénégations de son homologue russe  qu’aux rapports établis par les services de renseignements de son pays.

Ces déclarations faites lors d’une conférence de presse commune ont suscité de très virulentes critiques, même au sein de l’entourage du président des Etats-Unis. 20 Minutes revient sur cette séquence diplomatique et politique avec Corentin Sellin, agrégé d’histoire, professeur en classe préparatoire et spécialiste des Etats-Unis*.

Les propos de Donald Trump sur l’ingérence russe dans l’élection de 2016 sont-ils si nouveaux ?

Ils étaient prévisibles car Donald Trump avait déjà tenu de tels propos et indiqué ses doutes sur le rapport des renseignements concluant à l’ingérence de la Russie dans l’élection, au premier semestre 2017. Mais ce qui était peu prévisible, c’est qu’il a remis en cause le travail des renseignements américains devant Vladimir Poutine, et en terre étrangère. Cela montre qu’il a franchi un seuil, une étape.

Pourquoi cette prise de position du président américain choque autant aux Etats-Unis, même ses alliés Républicains ?

Cela choque les Républicains qui ne peuvent désormais plus ignorer la position de Donald Trump, qui a dit devant des caméras, et face à Vladimir Poutine, qu’il fait davantage confiance au président russe qu’à la justice et la police de son pays. Or, le parti des Républicains est le parti de la loi et de l’ordre. Pour eux, voir un président des Etats-Unis faire moins confiance aux institutions qu’à un dirigeant étranger, cela pose un énorme problème. D’autant plus qu’avant l’élection de Trump, les Républicains étaient en opposition avec la Russie de Poutine. Leurs critiques reflètent aussi ce malaise.

Ce tollé suscité par Trump chez les Républicains peut-il lui coûter quelque chose politiquement ?

Non, au-delà des protestations verbales symboliques, il ne devrait rien se passer concrètement, pour trois raisons. D’abord, Trump est aujourd’hui bien plus proche de l’électorat républicain que ne le sont les élus du parti au Congrès (élus en 2012, 2014 et 2016). La preuve, c’est que selon l’institut de sondages américain Gallup, en 2014 22 % des sympathisants républicains sondés jugeait la Russie comme étant une amie ou un allié, mais ils sont 40 % aujourd’hui. L’électorat républicain, sans doute sous l’effet de Trump, s’est radouci envers la Russie.

Deuxièmement, que pourraient faire les Républicains ? Les institutions américaines permettent au président des Etats-Unis de faire à peu près ce qu’il veut en politique étrangère. Un impeachment ou une motion de censure sont hautement improbables. D’autant que les élus sont en pleine campagne électorale des mid-terms, ils n’ont pas d’intérêt à aller contre le président.

Enfin, il faut se souvenir que les Républicains ont passé un pacte faustien avec Trump. La plupart des élus y sont allés avec des pincettes, en se bouchant le nez, mais Trump leur a apporté la Maison Blanche, de manière inespérée, et il a exécuté l’agenda économique et social des conservateurs : baisse d’impôts, nomination de deux juges conservateurs à la Cour suprême… Cela vaut bien un Helsinki.

Ce sommet marque-t-il un tournant dans les relations entre Washington et Moscou ?

Trump n’a jamais fait mystère de sa volonté d’un « reboot », un redémarrage dans les échanges avec la Russie. Sauf qu’à Helsinki on a plutôt vu une soumission, une vassalisation du président américain. Pour Poutine, dont le pays est sous le coup de fortes sanctions à la fois américaines et européennes, c’est une victoire diplomatique et symbolique importante.

C’est tout de même très étrange, pour un président dont l’entourage est sous le coup d’enquêtes fédérales pour une collusion avec la Russie, de donner autant de gages éventuels de quelque chose de trouble dans son lien avec Poutine. Selon le Washington Post, il y a aussi un problème interne à la Maison Blanche, car Trump n’a pas suivi les recommandations de ses conseillers.

Par ailleurs, sur le fond, les deux dirigeants n’ont pas annoncé grand-chose à l’issue de leur tête à tête de 2 heures et de leur entretien avec leurs conseillers d’une heure. Ils ont relancé l’idée d’un groupe commun de cybersécurité, mais c’est tout. En dépit de cette volonté affichée d’un nouveau départ, comme avec la Corée du Nord d’ailleurs, il n’y a aucune matière pour l’instant. Le seul dossier sur lequel ils ont insisté, c’est le désarmement nucléaire et la lutte contre la prolifération nucléaire. Mais Poutine a réitéré à Helsinki son soutien à l’Iran, à l’encontre de la position de Trump.

* Coauteur de Les Etats-Unis et le monde de la doctrine de Monroe à la création de l’ONU : (1823-1945) (Ed. Atlande).

Voir aussi:

Who is betraying America?
So far, unlike Obama’s foreign policy by this point in his presidency, none of Trump’s exchanges have brought disaster on America or its allies.
Caroline B. Glick
The Jerusalem Post
07/20/2018

Did US President Donald Trump commit treason in Helsinki when he met Monday with Russian President Vladimir Putin? Should he be impeached?

That is what his opponents claim. Former president Barack Obama’s CIA director John Brennan accused Trump of treason outright.
Brennan tweeted, “Donald Trump’s press conference performance in Helsinki [with Putin] rises to and exceeds the threshold of ‘high crimes and misdemeanors.’ It was nothing short of treasonous.”

Fellow senior Obama administration officials, including former FBI director James Comey, former defense secretary Ashton Carter, and former deputy attorney general Sally Yates parroted Brennan’s accusation.

Almost the entire US media joined them in condemning Trump for treason.

Democratic leaders have led their own charge. Democratic Congressman Steve Cohen from Tennessee insinuated the US military should overthrow the president, tweeting, “Where are our military folks? The Commander-in-Chief is in the hands of our enemy!”

Senate minority leader Charles Schumer said that Trump is controlled by Russia. And Trump’s Republican opponents led by senators Jeff Flake and John McCain attacked him as well.

Trump allegedly committed treason when he refused to reject Putin’s denial of Russian interference in the US elections in 2016 and was diffident in relation to the US intelligence community’s determination that Russia did interfere in the elections.

Trump walked back his statement from Helsinki at a press appearance at the White House Tuesday. But it is still difficult to understand what all the hullaballoo about the initial statement was about.

AP reporter John Lemire placed Trump in an impossible position. Noting that Putin denied meddling in the 2016 elections and the intelligence community insists that Russia meddled, he asked Trump, “Who do you believe?”

If Trump had said that he believed his intelligence community and gave no credence to Putin’s denial, he would have humiliated Putin and destroyed any prospect of cooperative relations.

Trump tried to strike a balance. He spoke respectfully of both Putin’s denials and the US intelligence community’s accusation. It wasn’t a particularly coherent position. It was a clumsy attempt to preserve the agreements he and Putin reached during their meeting.

And it was blindingly obviously not treason.

In fact, Trump’s response to Lemire, and his overall conduct at the press conference, did not convey weakness at all. Certainly he was far more assertive of US interests than Obama was in his dealings with Russia.

In Obama’s first summit with Putin in July 2009, Obama sat meekly as Putin delivered an hour-long lecture about how US-Russian relations had gone down the drain.

As Daniel Greenfield noted at Frontpage magazine Tuesday, in succeeding years, Obama capitulated to Putin on anti-missile defense systems in Poland and the Czech Republic, on Ukraine, Georgia and Crimea. Obama gave Putin free rein in Syria and supported Russia’s alliance with Iran on its nuclear program and its efforts to save the Assad regime. He permitted Russian entities linked to the Kremlin to purchase a quarter of American uranium. And of course, Obama made no effort to end Russian meddling in the 2016 elections.

TRUMP IN contrast has stiffened US sanctions against Russian entities. He has withdrawn from Obama’s nuclear deal with Iran. He has agreed to sell Patriot missiles to Poland. And he has placed tariffs on Russian exports to the US.

So if Trump is Putin’s agent, what was Obama?

Given the nature of Trump’s record, and the context in which he made his comments about Russian meddling in the 2016 elections, the question isn’t whether he did anything wrong. The question is why are his opponents accusing him of treason for behaving as one would expect a president to behave? What is going on?

The answer to that is clear enough. Brennan signaled it explicitly when he tweeted that Trump’s statements “exceed the threshold of ‘high crimes and misdemeanors.’” The unhinged allegations of treason are supposed to form the basis of impeachment hearings.

The Democrats and their allies in the media use the accusation that Trump is an agent of Russia as an elections strategy. Midterm elections are consistently marked with low voter turnout. So both parties devote most of their energies to rallying their base and motivating their most committed members to vote.

To objective observers, the allegation that Trump betrayed the United States by equivocating in response to a rude question about Russian election interference is ridiculous on its face. But Democratic election strategists have obviously concluded that it is catnip for the Democratic faithful. For them it serves as a dog whistle.

The promise of impeachment for votes is too radical to serve as an official campaign strategy. For the purpose of attracting swing voters and not scaring moderate Democrats away from the party and the polls, Democratic leaders Nancy Pelosi and Steny Hoyer say they have no interest in impeaching Trump. Impeachment talk, they insist, is a mere distraction.

But by embracing Brennan’s claim of treason, Pelosi, Hoyer, Schumer and other top Democrats are winking and nodding to the progressive radicals now rising in their party. They are telling the Linda Sarsours and Cynthia Nixons of the party that they will impeach Trump if they win control of the House of Representatives.

The problem with playing domestic politics on the international scene is that doing so has real consequences for international security and for US national interests.

Consider, for instance, Europe’s treatment of Trump.

Europe is economically dependent on trade with the US and strategically dependent on NATO. So why are the Europeans so open about their hatred of Trump and their rejection of his trade policies, his policy towards Iran and his insistence that they pay their fair share for their own defense?

Why did EU Council President Donald Tusk attack Trump with such contempt and condescension in Brussels? Tusk, who chairs the meetings of EU leaders, is effectively the EU president. And the day before last week’s NATO conference he chided Trump for criticizing Europe’s low defense spending.

“America,” he said with a voice dripping with contempt, “appreciate your allies. After all you don’t have that many.”

That of course, was news to the countries of Asia, Africa, Latin America, Europe and the Middle East that depend on America and work diligently to develop and maintain strong ties to Washington.

Leaving aside the ridiculousness of his remarks, where did Tusk get the idea that it is reasonable to speak so scornfully to an American president?

Where did EU’s foreign policy commissioner Federica Mogherini get the idea that it is okay for her to work urgently and openly to undermine legally constituted US sanctions against Iran for its illicit nuclear weapons program?

The answer of course is that they got a green light to adopt openly anti-American policies from the forces in the US that have devoted their energies since Trump’s election nearly two years ago to delegitimizing his victory and his presidency. Those calling Trump a traitor empowered the Europeans to defy the US on every issue.

Trump’s opponents’ unsubstantiated allegation that his campaign colluded with Russia during the 2016 elections has constrained Trump’s ability to perform his duties.

Consider his relations with Putin.

If there is anything to criticize about Trump’s summit with Putin it is that it came too late. It should have happened a year ago. That it happened this week speaks not to Trump’s eagerness to meet Putin but to the urgency of the hour.

After securing control over the Deraa province along Syria’s border with Jordan last week, the Assad regime, supported by Iranian regime forces, Hezbollah forces and Shiite militia forces began its campaign to restore regime control over the Quneitra province along the Syrian border with Israel.

As Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu and all government and military officials have stated clearly and consistently for years, Israel cannot accept Iranian presence in Syria. If Iran does not remove its forces from Syria generally and from southern Syria specifically, there will be war imminently between Israel, Iran and its Hezbollah, Shiite militia and Syrian regime allies.

Israel prefers to fight that war sooner rather than later to prevent Iran and its allies from entrenching their positions in Syria and make victory more difficult. So, in the interest of preventing such a war, Trump had no choice but to bite the political bullet and sit down to discuss Syria face to face with Putin to try to come up with a deal that would see Russia push Iran and Hezbollah out of Syria.

From what the two leaders said at their joint press conference it’s hard to know what was agreed to. But Netanyahu’s jubilant response indicates that some deal was reached.

Certainly their statements were strong, unequivocal signals to Iran. When Trump said, “The United States will not allow Iran to benefit from our successful campaign against ISIS,” he signaled strongly that US forces in eastern Syria will support Israel in a war against Iran and its allied forces in Syria just as it fought with the Kurds and its other allies in Syria against ISIS.

When Putin endorsed Israel’s position that the 1974 Syrian-Israeli disengagement agreement must be implemented along the border, he told the Iranians that in any Iranian-Israeli war in Syria, Putin will not side with Iran.

Time will tell if we just averted war. But what we did learn is that Israel’s position in a war with Iran is stronger than it could have been if the two leaders hadn’t met in Helsinki.

And this is exceedingly important.

Trump is being condemned for adopting a conciliatory tone towards Putin while employing a combative tone towards the Europeans and particularly Germany at the NATO summit. This criticism ignores how Trump operates in the international arena.

Trump views his exchanges with foreign leaders as separate engagements. He has goals he wishes to advance with China; with North Korea; with Russia; with Canada; with Mexico; with Europe; with Britain; with US Arab allies. In each separate engagement, Trump employs a combination of carrots and sticks. In each engagement he adopts a distinct manner that he believes advances his goals.

So far, unlike Obama’s foreign policy by this point in his presidency, none of Trump’s exchanges have brought disaster on America or its allies. To the contrary, America and its allies have much greater strategic maneuver room across a wide spectrum of threats and joint adversaries than they had when Obama left office.

Trump’s opponents’ obsession with bringing him down has caused great harm to his presidency and to America’s position worldwide. It is a testament to Trump’s commitment to the US and its allies that he met with Putin this week. And the success of their meeting is something that all who care about global security and preventing a devastating war in the Middle East should be grateful for.

Voir également:

Peter Beinart’s Amnesia
NATO’s problems, Putin’s aggression, and American passivity predate Trump, who had my vote in 2016 — a vote I don’t regret.
Victor Davis Hanson
National Review
July 17, 2018

Peter Beinart has posted a trademark incoherent rant, this time against Rich Lowry and me over our supposed laxity in criticizing Trumpian over-the-top rhetoric on NATO.

At various times, I have faulted Germany for much of NATO’s problems; I was delighted that we got out of the Iran deal and happier still that we pulled out of the empty Paris climate-change accord; and I agree that NAFTA needs changes. All that apparently for Beinart constitutes support for Trump’s sin of saying that the U.S. has “no obligation to meet America’s past commitments to other countries.”

Last time I looked, the Paris climate accord and the Iran deal (and its stealth “side” deals) were pushed through as quasi-executive orders and never submitted to Congress as treaties — largely because the Obama administration understood that both deals would have been summarily rejected and lacked support from most of Congress and also the American people, owing to the deal’s inherent flaws.

The U.S. may soon come closer to meeting carbon-emission-reduction goals than most of the signatories of the Paris farce. Following the Iran pullout, Iranians now seem more inclined to protest their theocratic government. They are confident in voicing their dissent in a way we have not seen since we ignored Iranian protesters during the Green Revolution of 2009. Incidents of Iranian harassment of U.S. ships in the Persian Gulf this year have mysteriously declined to almost zero.

The architects of NAFTA who in 1993 promised normalization and parity in North America through free trade and porous borders apparently did not envision something like the Andrés Manuel López Obrador presidency, which seems to think it exercises sovereignty over U.S. immigration policy, a cumulative influx of some 20 million foreign nationals illegally crossing the southern border over the last three decades, a current $71 billion Mexican trade surplus, $30 billion in remittances sent annually out of the U.S. to Mexico, record numbers of assassinations, and a nearly failed state as cartels virtually run affairs in some areas of Mexico. After all that, asking for clarifications of and likely modification to NAFTA is hardly breaking American commitments.

Beinart believes that, by giving some credence to Trump’s art-of-the-deal bombast about NATO, I therefore have excused Trump’s existential threats to the alliance. Beinart needs to take a deep breath and examine carefully whether Trump’s rhetoric about the vast majority of NATO’s members’ reluctance to meet their past promises undermines the alliance more than what the members themselves have actually done.

So far, Trump has upped U.S. defense spending and by extension its contribution to NATO’s military readiness, and he has gained some traction in getting members to pay what they pledged after the utter failure of past presidential jawboning (Obama rebuked “free-riders”). The real crisis in NATO is not U.S. capability or willpower, but whether a Dutch or Belgian youth would, could, or should march off to Erdogan’s Turkey should Ankara invoke Article V in a dispute with Israel, the Kurds, or Iraq, or whether governments such as those in Spain or Italy would really keep commitments and order their troops to Estonia if Russian troops swarmed in.

So NATO’s problems predated Trump and in many ways come back to Germany, whose example most other NATO nations ultimately tend to follow. The threat to both the EU and NATO is not Trump’s America, but a country that is currently insisting on an artificially low euro for mercantile purposes and that is at odds with its southern Mediterranean partners over financial liabilities, with its Eastern European neighbors over illegal immigration, with the United Kingdom over the conditions of Brexit, and with the U.S. over a paltry investment in military readiness of 1.3 percent of GDP while it’s piling up the largest account surplus in the world, at over $260 billion, and a $65 billion trade surplus with the U.S.

Germany, a majority of whose tanks and fighters are thought not to be battle-ready, cannot expect an American-subsidized united NATO front against the threat of Vladimir Putin if it is now cutting a natural-gas agreement with Russia that undermines the Baltic States and Ukraine — countries that Putin is increasingly targeting. The gas deal will not only empower Putin; it will make Germany dependent on Russian energy — an untenable situation.

Merkel can package all that in mellifluous diplomatic-speak, and Trump can rail about it in crude polemics, but the facts remain facts, and they are of Merkel’s making, not Trump’s.

The same themes hold true regarding attitudes toward Putin, who (again) predated Trump and his press conference in Helsinki, where the president gave to the press an unfortunate apology-tour/Cairo-speech–like performance, reminiscent of past disastrous meetings with or assessments of Russian leaders by American presidents, such as FDR on Stalin: “I just have a hunch that Stalin is not that kind of man. Harry [Hopkins] says he’s not and that he doesn’t want anything but security for his country, and I think if I give him everything I possibly can and ask for nothing in return, noblesse oblige, he won’t try to annex anything and will work with me for a world of democracy and peace.” Or Kennedy’s blown summit with Khrushchev in Geneva: “He beat the hell out of me. It was the worst thing in my life. He savaged me.” Or Reagan’s weird offer to share American SDI technology and research with Gorbachev or, without much consultation with his advisers, to eliminate all ballistic missiles at Reykjavik.

Trump confused trying to forge a realist détente with some sort of bizarre empathy for Putin, whose actions have been hostile and bellicose to the U.S. and based on perceptions of past American weakness. But again, Trump did not create an empowered Putin — and he has done more than any other president so far to check Putin’s ambitions.

Putin in 2016 continued longstanding Russian cyberattacks and election interference because of past impunity (Obama belatedly told Putin to “cut it out” only in September 2016). He swallowed Crimea and parts of eastern Ukraine after the famous Hillary-managed “reset” — a surreal Chamberlain-like policy in which we simultaneously appeased Putin in fact while in rhetoric lecturing him about his classroom cut-up antics and macho style.

Had Trump been overheard on a hot mic in Helsinki promising more flexibility with Putin on missile defense after our midterm elections, in expectation for electorally advantageous election-cycle quid pro quo good behavior from the Russians, we’d probably see articles of impeachment introduced on charges of Russian collusion. And yet the comparison would be even worse than that. After all, America kept Obama’s 2011 promise “to Vladimir,” in that we really did give up on creating credible missile defenses in Eastern Europe, breaking pledges made by a previous administration — music to Vladimir Putin’s ears.

It would be preferable if Trump’s rhetoric reinforced his solid actions, which in relation to Putin’s aggression consist of wisely keeping or increasing tough sanctions, accelerating U.S. oil production, decimating Russian mercenaries in Syria, and arming Ukrainian resistance. But then again, Trump has not quite told us that he has looked into Putin’s eyes and seen a straightforward and trustworthy soul. Nor in desperation did he invite Putin into the Middle East after a Russian hiatus of nearly 40 years to prove to the world that Bashar al-Assad had eliminated his WMD trove — which Assad subsequently continued to use at his pleasure. There is currently no scandal over uranium sales to Russia, and the secretary of state’s spouse has not been discovered to have recently pocketed $500,000 to speak in Moscow.

In a perfect world, we would like to see carefully chosen words enhancing effective muscular action. Instead, in the immediate past, we heard sober and judicious rhetoric ad nauseam, coupled with abject appeasement and widely perceived dangerous weakness. Now we have ill-timed bombast that sometimes mars positive achievement.

Neither is desirable. But the latter is far preferable to the former.

Finally, Beinart ends by mistakenly suggesting that in 2016 I weighed in with “count us out” Republicans along with the other National Review authors. And he now suggests that I have flipped back to Trump: “Now, it appears, Lowry and Hanson want back in.”

But here, too, he is mistaken. I never participated in the “Against Trump” NR issue and never counted myself “out” during the November 2016 election, so how could I beg to be let back in?

Rather, like about half the country and 90 percent of the Republican party, I (as a deplorable) saw the choice in 2016 as a rather easy one between the latest iteration of Hillary Clinton and her known progressive agenda and Trump’s proposed antithesis to the ongoing Obama project of fundamental transformation.

And so far, nothing since November 2016 has convinced me otherwise.

Voir de même:

Putin’s False Equivalency
Victor Davis Hanson
National Review
July 19, 2018

We are in dangerous times. Amid the hysteria over the Russian summit, the Mueller collusion probe, nonstop unsupported allegations and rumors, the Strzok and Page testimonies, the ongoing congressional investigations into improper CIA and FBI behavior, and a completely unhinged media, there is a growing crisis of rising tensions between two superpowers that together possess a combined arsenal of 3,000 instantly deployable nuclear weapons and another 10,000 in storage. That latter existential fact apparently has been forgotten in all the recriminations. So it is time for all parties to deescalate and step back a bit.

Trump understandably wants to avoid progressive charges that he is obstructing Robert Mueller’s ostensible investigation of Russian collusion, and he also wants some sort of détente with Russia. Mueller has likely indicted Russians, timed on the eve of the summit, in part on the assumption that they would more or less not personally defend themselves and never appear on U.S. soil.

Add that all up, and Trump apparently has discussed with Putin an idea of allowing Mueller’s investigators to visit Russia to interview those they have indicted.

But in the quid pro quo world of big-power rivalry, Putin, of course, wants reciprocity — the right also to interview American citizens or residents (among them a former U.S. ambassador to Russia) whom he believes have transgressed against Russia.

Trump needs to squash Putin’s ridiculous “parity” request immediately. Mueller would learn little or nothing from interviewing his targets on Russian soil — and likely never imagined that he would or could.

On the other hand, given recent Russian attacks on critics abroad, Moscow’s interviewing any Russian antagonist anywhere is not necessarily a safe or sane enterprise. And being indicted under the laws of a constitutional republic is hardly synonymous with earning the suspicion of the Russian autocracy.

Most importantly, the idea that a former U.S. ambassador to Russia, Professor Michael McFaul — long after the expiration of his government tenure — would submit to Russian questioning is absurd. Of course, it would also undermine the entire sanctity of American ambassadorial service.

McFaul, a colleague at the Hoover Institution, who would probably disagree with most of my views, years ago was targeted as an enemy by Vladimir Putin and more recently has been sharply critical of the Trump administration. But, of course, he is a widely admired patriot, a scholar, and voices his candid views, like all of us, under the assumption of free speech and absolute protection under the Constitution. As an ambassador, he was also accorded diplomatic immunity as insurance that his implementation of then U.S. policy would not earn him retaliation from Moscow, both then or now. McFaul is wise enough not to voluntarily submit to be questioned by Russian operatives, and the U.S. government must never suggest that he should.

So, Putin’s offer, to the extent we know the details of it, will soon upon examination be seen as patently unhinged. In refusal, Trump has a good opportunity to remind the world why all American critics of the Putin government — and especially of his own government as well — are uniquely free and protected to voice any notion they wish.

No, the President Did Not Need to Meet with Putin
Andrew C. McCarthy
National Review
July 17, 2018

The United States should have contacts with Russia, but the president should not be holding summit meetings with a despot.Prior to President Trump’s dismal performance at Monday’s meeting with Russian despot Vladimir Putin, I expressed bafflement over his longstanding insistence that we need to have good relations with Moscow. This has never made sense to me. We have often done quite well, thank you very much, while having a strained modus vivendi with Moscow, even when it was the seat of a much more important power than today’s Russia.

It is not possible to have good relations with a thug regime unless one is willing to overlook and effectively ratify its thug behavior. Yet the widely perceived “need” to have good relations with Russia leads seamlessly to a second wrongheaded notion: It was appropriate, indeed essential, for the two leaders to meet at a ceremonial summit.

There is no need, nor is it desirable, for the president of the United States to give the dictator of the Kremlin the kind of prestigious spectacle Putin got in Helsinki. When I’ve made this point, as recently as Monday night in a panel on The Story, Martha MacCallum’s Fox News program, I’ve gotten pushback that, I respectfully suggest, misses the point.

The counterargument, premised on the fact that it is important for the United States and Russia to have dialogue, maintains that this dialogue must be conducted at the chief-executive-to-chief-executive level. There is, after all, a long history of such meetings, tracing back to FDR’s recognition of the Soviet Union in 1933 (only after, I would note, years of antagonistic relations following the October Revolution).

To be clear, I did not and do not take the position that the United States should not have contacts with Russia in areas of mutual concern, or that it should not defuse tensions lest they escalate into unnecessary confrontations between the world’s two dominant nuclear powers. But these communications channels have long existed. They range from diplomatic, military, intelligence, and even law-enforcement contacts all the way up to occasional phone calls between the heads of state, and even the odd sidelines conferral between leaders at this or that multilateral conference.

The question, to the contrary, is whether the president of the United States should hold summit-style meetings with the Russian despot, complete with the pride, pomp, and circumstance of a glorious press conference, at which the two stand before the world as if they were amiable peers, trying their best to address the world’s problems.

We are no longer in the era of the Second World War, or even the Cold War. We are not in a ferocious global conflict in which a grudging alliance with Stalin’s Soviet Union makes sense (especially when the Russians are taking the vast majority of the casualties). Nor are we in a bipolar global order in which we are rivaled by a tyrannical Soviet empire. Modern Russia is a fading country. Yes, it has a worrisome nuclear stockpile, strong armed forces, and highly capable intelligence services; but these assets can scarcely obscure Russia’s declining population, pervasive societal dysfunction (high levels of drunkenness, disease, and unemployment), low life expectancy, and third-rate economy. Putin’s regime — more like a marriage of rulers and organized crime than a principled system of government — must terrorize its people to maintain its grip on power.

We don’t need summit meetings between our head of state and theirs. Even during the Cold War, when it could rightly be argued that we had to deal with our ubiquitous geopolitical foe, such meetings did not happen very often. For example, in the decade-plus between President Kennedy’s Vienna meeting with Khrushchev and President Nixon’s trip to Moscow, there appears to have been just one meeting (between LBJ and Alexei Kosygin in 1967). Contact was also sparse in the decade between the end of the Nixon–Ford term and Reagan’s first meeting with Gorbachev in 1985 (after which the meetings became more frequent as the Soviet Union declined and collapsed). Many of these meetings are memorable precisely because they were unusual events. Whether the top-level U.S.–U.S.S.R. meetings succeeded or not, they were arguably worth having because there was something potentially highly beneficial in them for us.

That is not true of top-level meetings with Putin’s Russia. We could have them or not have them and nothing would change for the better — in fact, as yesterday shows, things are more apt to change for the worse. Putin should be made to earn his meeting with America’s president by good behavior.

Whether you’re a Democrat invested in the narrative that Russia’s shenanigans cost Hillary Clinton the presidency, or a Republican in denial that Putin sought to boost Trump at Clinton’s expense, the reality is that Putin was undoubtedly trying to sow discord in our body politic.

Let’s consider the background circumstances of Monday’s meeting.

There is, of course, the cyber-espionage attack on the election. Trump being Trump, he is unable to separate (a) the way Russia’s perfidy has been exploited by his political opponents to attack him (i.e., the unsuccessful attempt to delegitimize his presidency) from (b) Russia’s perfidy itself, as an attack on the United States. No matter how angry this president may be at the Democrats and the media, the significance to any president of Russia’s influence operation must be that it succeeded beyond Putin’s wildest dreams.

Whether you’re a Democrat invested in the narrative that Russia’s shenanigans cost Hillary Clinton the presidency, or a Republican in denial that Putin sought to boost Trump at Clinton’s expense, the reality is that Putin was undoubtedly trying to sow discord in our body politic. That interpretation of events is something any president should be able to rally most of the country behind. The provocation warrants a determined response that bleeds Putin, the very opposite of kowtowing to the despot on the world stage.

Now, let’s put to the side the recent cyber-espionage and other influence operations directed at our country. It has been only four months since Putin’s regime attempted to murder former double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter, Yulia, in the British city of Salisbury. It has been only a few days since a British couple fell into a coma after exposure to the same Soviet-era nerve agent (Novichok) used on the Skripals. The second incident happened just seven miles from the first, strongly suggesting that Putin’s regime is guilty of depraved indifference to the dangers its targeted assassinations on Western soil — the territory of our closest ally — pose to innocent bystanders. In 2006, the Putin regime similarly murdered a former Russian spy, Alexander Litvinenko, in London, poisoning his tea with radioactive polonium. Meanwhile, reporting that is based mainly on the account of a former KGB agent (who defected to the West and has been warned he is a target) indicates that Putin’s operatives are working off a hit list of eight people (including Sergei Skirpal) who reside in the West.

Putin’s annexation of Crimea was just the most notorious of his recent adventures in territorial aggression. He has effectively annexed the Georgian regions of Abkhazia and South Ossetia, and the separatist war he is puppeteering in eastern Ukraine still rages in this its fifth year. He is casting a menacing eye at the Baltics. This, even as Russia props up the monstrous Assad regime in Syria and allies with Iran, the jihadist regime best known for sponsoring anti-American terrorism around the world.

He may unload at a rally, but face to face, the president’s m.o. is to defuse confrontation with unctuous banter — an easy solution for someone who seems not to believe that anything he says in the moment will bind him in the future.

And just five months ago, at a major speech touting improved weapons capabilities, Putin spiced up the demonstration with a video diagramming a hypothetical nuclear missile attack on . . . yes . . . Florida.

There is no doubt that we have to deal with this monster. Realpolitik adherents may even be right that there is potential for cooperation with Russia in areas of mutual interest (at least provided that the dealing is done with eyes open about Putin’s core anti-Americanism). But there is no reason why we need to deal with Russia in a forum at which the U.S. president stands there and pretends that a brutal autocrat, who has become incalculably rich by looting his crumbling country, is a statesman promoting peace and better relations.

I would say that no matter who was president. In the case of President Trump specifically, for all his “you’re fired” bravado and reports of mercurial outbursts at some subordinates, he does not like unpleasant face-to-face confrontations. He may unload at a rally, but face to face, the president’s m.o. is to defuse confrontation with unctuous banter — an easy solution for someone who seems not to believe that anything he says in the moment will bind him in the future. This, inevitably, leads to foolish and sometimes reprehensible assertions (e.g., saying, in apparent defense of Putin, “There are a lot of killers. What? You think our country’s so innocent?”).

The president appears to subscribe to the Swamp school of thought that negotiations are good for their own sake — though he conflates what is good for him (promoting his image as a master deal-maker) with what is good for the country (negotiations often aren’t). This is another iteration of the president’s tendency to personalize things, particularly relations between governments. That trait puts him at a distinct disadvantage with someone like Putin, who knows well the uses of flattery and grievance.

Summit meetings with brutal dictators do not well serve the president. More important, they do not well serve the nation.

Voir de plus:

The Likeliest Explanation for Trump’s Helsinki Fiasco
Jonah Goldberg
National review
July 18, 2018

Character, not collusion, best explains the president’s bizarre deference to Vladimir Putin.Last week, I wrote that the best way to think about a Trump Doctrine is as nothing more than Trumpism on the international stage. By Trumpism, I do not mean a coherent ideological program, but a psychological phenomenon, or simply the manifestation of his character.

On Monday, we literally saw President Trump on an international stage, in Helsinki, and he seemed hell-bent on proving me right.

During a joint news appearance with Russian president Vladimir Putin, Trump demonstrated that, when put to the test, he cannot see any issue through a prism other than his grievances and ego.

In a performance that should elicit some resignations from his administration, the president sided with Russia over America’s national-security community, including Dan Coats, the Trump-appointed director of national intelligence.

Days ago, Coats issued a blistering warning that not only had Russia meddled in our election — undisputed by almost everyone save the president himself — but it is preparing to do so again. But when asked about Russian interference in Helsinki, Trump replied, “All I can do is ask the question. My people came to me, Dan Coats came to me and some others. They said they think it’s Russia. I have President Putin. He just said it’s not Russia. I will say this. I don’t see any reason why it would be [Russia]. . . . I have confidence in both parties.”

Separately, when asked about the frosty relations between the two countries, Trump said, “I hold both countries responsible. . . . I think we’re all to blame. . . . I do feel that we have both made some mistakes.”

Even if Russia hadn’t meddled in the election at all, Trump would still admire Putin because Trump admires men like Putin — which is why he’s praised numerous other dictators and strongmen.

Amid these and other appalling statements, Trump made it clear that he can only understand the investigation into Russian interference as an attempt to rob him of credit for his electoral victory, and thus to delegitimize his presidency.

For most people with a grasp of the facts — supporters and critics alike — the question of Russian interference and the question of Russian collusion with the Trump campaign are separate. Russia did interfere in the election, full stop. Whether there was collusion is still an open question, even if many Trump supporters have made up their minds about it. Whether Russian interference, or collusion, got Trump over the finish line is ultimately unknowable, though I think it’s very unlikely.

But for Trump these distinctions are meaningless. Even when his own Department of Justice indicts twelve Russian intelligence agents, the salient issue for Trump in Helsinki is that “they admit these are not people involved in the campaign.” All you need to know is: We ran a brilliant campaign, and that’s why I’m president.

The great parlor game in Washington (and beyond) is to theorize why Trump is so incapable of speaking ill of Putin and so determined to make apologies for Russia.

Among the self-styled “resistance,” the answer takes several sometimes overlapping, sometimes contradictory forms. One theory is that the Russians have “kompromat” — that is, embarrassing or incriminating intelligence on Trump. Another is that he is a willing asset of the Russians — “Agent Orange” — with whom he colluded to win the presidency.

These theories can’t be wholly dismissed, even if some overheated versions get way ahead of the available facts. But their real shortcoming is that they are less plausible than the Aesopian explanation: This is who Trump is. Even if Russia hadn’t meddled in the election at all, Trump would still admire Putin because Trump admires men like Putin — which is why he’s praised numerous other dictators and strongmen.

The president’s steadfast commitment to a number of policies — animosity toward NATO, infatuation with protectionism, an Obama-esque obsession with eliminating nuclear weapons, and his determination that a “good relationship” with Russia should be a policy goal rather than a means to one — may have some ideological underpinning. (These policies all seem to be rooted in intellectual fads of the 1980s.)

But Trump’s stubborn refusal to listen to his own advisers in the matter of the Russia investigation likely stems from his inability to admit that his instincts are ever wrong. As always, Trump’s character trumps all.

Voir encore:

Sanctions américaines : le géant russe Rusal dégringole de 50 % en bourse
Les nouvelles sanctions décrétées par les Etats-Unis contre des oligarques russes et leurs entreprises ont fait l’effet d’un coup de tonnerre ce lundi.
Le Dauphiné libéré
09.04.2018

L’un des premiers producteurs d’aluminium du monde, le russe Rusal, s’est retrouvé gravement fragilisé ce lundi par les nouvelles sanctions décrétées par les Etats-Unis contre des oligarques russes et leurs entreprises, qui risquent de porter un nouveau coup à l’économie russe.

À la Bourse de Hong Kong, où ce géant est coté, l’action de Rusal a perdu 50 % de sa valeur, soit plus de 3,5 milliards d’euros partis en fumée. Le groupe a prévenu que les sanctions « pourraient aboutir à un défaut technique sur certaines obligations du groupe », affirmant évaluer « l’impact de tels défauts techniques sur sa position financière ».

Au delà de l’entreprise, qui joue un rôle majeur sur les marchés des matières premières, le prix de l’aluminium a connu sa plus forte hausse en trois ans sur la Bourse des métaux de Londres, le LME, la tonne prenant 3,55 %.

À Moscou, le marchés boursiers, pourtant habitués à de réguliers durcissements des sanctions occidentales depuis 2014, ont réagi violemment, chutant ce lundi de près de 10 %, tandis que le rouble revenait à ses plus bas niveau depuis plusieurs mois.

38 personnes et entreprises visées par les sanctions

Confronté à un vent de panique boursière généralisé sur les marchés russes, le gouvernement russe a dû monter au créneau pour assurer qu’il soutiendrait les entreprises visées par ce nouveau train de mesures punitives, qui constituent une escalade d’une violence inattendue dans la confrontation entre Moscou et Washington.

Au total, ces sanctions, censées punir Moscou notamment pour ses « attaques » « les démocraties occidentales », ciblent 38 personnes et entreprises qui ne peuvent plus faire affaire avec des Américains, notamment sept Russes désignés comme des « oligarques » proches du Kremlin par l’administration de Donald Trump, présents dans des dizaines de sociétés en Russie comme à l’étranger.

Parmi ces multimilliardaires figure Oleg Deripaska et les actifs sous son contrôle : les holdings Basic Element et En+ mais aussi Rusal, l’un des premiers producteurs mondiaux d’aluminium, dont il représente environ 7% de la production mondiale d’aluminium, au risque de déstabiliser tout ce secteur à l’échelle de la planète.

Oleg Deripaska, 50 ans et déjà proche du clan de Boris Eltsine dans les années 1990, a déclaré que son inclusion dans la liste était « désagréable mais anticipée » : « Les raisons de me mettre sur la liste des sanctions sont complètement dépourvues de fondements, ridicules, et simplement absurdes ».

Sa holding En+, également en chute libre à la bourse de Londres, a été « suspendue temporairement » par l’autorité financière. Elle avait débuté en fanfare sa cotation à Londres en novembre 2017, première société russe à s’y introduire depuis les sanctions de 2014.

« Il est très probable que l’impact soit défavorable aux activités et aux perspectives du groupe », a déclaré En+ dans un communiqué ce lundi. « Le groupe a l’intention de continuer à remplir ses engagements tout en recherchant des solutions (…) pour gérer l’impact des sanctions »

Moscou entend riposter

Moscou ayant promis une réponse « dure » dès vendredi, elle pourrait entraîner une nouvelle surenchère. « Cette histoire est scandaleuse au vu de l’illégalité (de ces sanctions), au vu de la violation de toutes les normes », a déclaré aux journalistes le porte-parole du Kremlin, Dmitri Peskov.

Le Premier ministre Dmitri Medvedev a demandé à ses adjoints de lui préparer des propositions concrètes pour soutenir les entreprises sanctionnées.

« Les sanctions américaines pourraient se traduire en une perturbation de l’offre mondiale, notamment aux Etats-Unis », ont expliqué les analystes de Commerzbank.

Voir par ailleurs:

Trump: Witch hunt drove a phony wedge between US, Russia
Fox news
July 16, 2018

President Trump addresses nuclear proliferation, European Union and media attacks. On ‘Hannity,’ the president calls Strzok a ‘disgrace’ to the country and FBI.

This is a rush transcript from « Hannity, » July 16, 2018. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

SEAN HANNITY, HOST: And this is a Fox News alert.

It is 9:00 p.m. in New York City and our nation’s capital, 6:00 p.m. on the West Coast. It is 4:00 a.m. in Helsinki, Finland. And earlier today, President Trump, he went face to face with the Russian president, Vladimir Putin.

Now, this is their third in person meeting, but their first official summit. All topics were on the table and appeared to be a no-holds-barred open, productive, adult discussion on many of the issues between our two countries.

I sat down for an interview with the president right after he met with Vladimir Putin. We’re going to play that for you in just a moment.

But first, a lot to get to, so sit tight for our breaking news — Helsinki addition — opening monologue.

(MUSIC)

HANNITY: All right. President Trump is just not slowing down, and some people in the media, on the left, they are having a very hard time dealing with the fact that he moved so fast. As I like to call it, it’s kind of moving at the speed of Trump. Now, this was the president’s 21st visit to a foreign country in just 18 months. And after today’s one-on-one meeting with Vladimir Putin, the two leaders held a joint press conference.

Let’s take a look.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: I’m here today to continue the proud tradition of bold American diplomacy. From the earliest days of our republic, American leaders have understood that diplomacy and engagement is preferable to conflict and hostility. Nothing would be easier politically than to refuse to meet, to refuse to engage, but that would not accomplish anything.

As president, I cannot make decisions on foreign policy in a futile effort to appease artisan critics or the media or Democrats who want to do nothing but resist and obstruct.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

HANNITY: Now, big leaders, they also addressed the big elephant in the room, and that was election interference. Let’s watch this.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

TRUMP: The probe is a disaster for our country. I think it’s kept us apart. It’s kept us separated. There was no collusion at all. Everybody knows it. People are being brought out to the fore, so far that I know virtually none of it related to the campaign. And they are going to have to try really hard to find somebody that did relate to the campaign. It was a clean campaign.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

HANNITY: Now, of course, this meeting comes just days after the Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein announced the indictments of 12 Russian agents who were accused of hacking the DNC and the Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta, even though the DNC, they have refused to turn over their hack server to the FBI.

When will they turn that over? Where is that server?

Now, President Trump weighed in on this very issue during this joint presser. Let’s take a look at this.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

TRUMP: Let me just say, we have two thoughts. We have groups that are wondering why the FBI never took the server. Why haven’t they taken the server? Why would was the FBI told to lead the office of the Democratic National Committee?

I really believe that this will probably go on for a while, but I don’t think it can go on without finding out what happened to the server. What happened to the servers of the Pakistani gentlemen that worked on the DNC? Where are those servers? They are missing. Where are they?

What happened to Hillary Clinton’s emails? Thirty-three thousand emails gone. Just gone to.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

HANNITY: Exactly. What happened to all of those things?

And tonight, many on the left, they want you to believe this alleged interference is shocking, unprecedented turn of events, but we all know that Russian election meddling is not new at all. Now, remember, ahead of the 2016 presidential election cycle.

In 2014, the House Intel Committee chairman, Devin Nunes, he issued a very stern warning about Putin’s belligerent actions and attempts to denigrate the United States and, by the way, yes, impact our 2016 election. And we also know, you can go way back to 2008, we know that Russia hacked into both the McCain campaign and even the presidential campaign of Barack Obama himself.

And despite this, in 2016, when Hillary Clinton appeared to have a firm lead in the polls — oh, just before the election, it was President Obama who laughed off any notion that American elections could possibly be tampered with. How wrong he was. You may remember this.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BARACK OBAMA, FORMER PRESIDENT: There is no serious person out there who would suggest somehow that you could even rig America’s elections. There’s no evidence that that has happened in the past or that there are instances in which that will happen this time.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

HANNITY: Interesting. That’s when he thought Hillary was going to win.

Now that Trump is president, after nearly a decade of playing down Russian interference and its impact on our elections, the left is in total freak out mode, trying desperately to connect Russian hacking to the Trump presidency.

This is a total left-wing conspiracy, a fantasy. This is the witch hunt. Every single report, every investigation into our election shows absolutely no votes were changed, none were altered in the 2016 election. Not a single vote.

And by the way, it’s important to point out every major country in the world engages in election interference. As Senator Rand Paul put it, we all do it, and this includes the Clinton campaign.

In fact, if you’re looking for Russian interference, look no further than Hillary Clinton and the DNC in 2016. They actually paid, oh, yes, through a law firm that they funnel money, Fusion GPS. Yes, then they got a foreign entity, foreign spy by the name of Christopher Steele, he put together phony opposition research, and now the infamous dossier, which has been debunked, filled with lies, Russian lies, Russian propaganda, and all paid for by Hillary Clinton and the Democratic Party to manipulate you, the American people in the lead up to the 2016 election.

Nobody in the media seems to care about Obama’s attempt at interference in the last Israeli election against our number one ally in the Middle East, Israel, and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

And by all accounts, today’s meeting, always productive and very important. As we all know, there are a lot of serious issues between the U.S. and Russia, but predictably, even before this meeting took place, yes, the destroy Trump, hate Trump media, they were already, hoping and predicting failure. You see, success for Donald Trump is bad for their agenda, especially in the lead up to the 2018 midterm elections.

Take a look.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIPS)

ANDREA MITCHELL, MSNBC: We have never had a summit with the KGB spy master, someone who has, you know, completely studied and examined Donald Trump, and a president who spends the weekend golfing and has not been preparing.

JAKE TAPPER, CNN: What do you think is going through Putin’s mind? And how is he likely to be interpreting President Trump’s behavior?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: He’s delighted. He’s absolutely delighted. He wants to throw the United States off balance, and he wants to divide the United States with its allies. Mission almost accomplished.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE, CBS: This does not seem like a president who is really going there to really hold Putin accountable.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE, NBC: I just don’t see how we can expect anything to come out of this and why Donald Trump is forcing the issue so much.

(END VIDEO CLIPS)

HANNITY: And it gets even worse. Take a look at this despicable cartoon, yes, published by so-called paper of record, The New York Times Opinion Page on Twitter early this morning.

Take a look.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

HOST: Do you have a relationship with a Vladimir Putin?

TRUMP: I do have a relationship with him. And I think that he’s done a very brilliant and amazing job. Really, a lot of people would say, he has put himself at the forefront of the world as a leader.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

HANNITY: Now, that’s your corrupt mainstream media, pretty disgusting.

Now naturally, the anti-Trump hatred, the hysteria continued after today’s meeting. Look at this. Former CIA director, you know the guy that was a former communist turned CNN paid hack, John Brennan, he actually tweeted out: Donald Trump’s press conference performance in Helsinki rises to and exceeds the threshold of high crimes and misdemeanors. It was nothing short of treasonous. Not only were his comments imbecilic, he is wholly in the pocket of Putin. Republican patriots, where are you?

John, let’s address you for a second here. What have you done on Obama’s watch to prevent Russian meddling? What role did you play in all of this?

Now, you had just undermined this country, and frankly, you should be ashamed. Let’s take a look at this corruption.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIPS)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE, MSNBC: We are under attack from Russia. If they were physical missiles, like during the Cuban missile crisis, Americans would be in the streets and protesting, and asking the president to protect us. These are invisible missiles.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE, MSNBC: It’s time for Americans to be out on the streets and it to speak up about the democracy that we hold dear, and what we expect of the president of the United States.

ANDERSON COOPER, CNN: You have been watching the most disgraceful performances by an American president at a summit in front of a Russian leader joint that I have ever seen.

(END VIDEO CLIPS)

Voir enfin:

TRANSCRIPT: Trump backtracks on Russia comments

CNN

July 17, 2018

(CNN)President Donald Trump, facing an onslaught of bipartisan fury over his glowing remarks about Vladimir Putin, said more than 24 hours afterward that he had misspoken during his news conference with the autocratic Russian leader.

Here are Trump’s full remarks, in which he said « there is some need for clarification » about his comments on Russian interference in the 2016 election, as released by the White House:
THE PRESIDENT: Thank you, everybody. Yesterday, I returned from a trip from Europe where I met with leaders from across the region to seek a more peaceful future for the United States. We’re working very hard with our allies, and all over the world we’re working. We’re going to have peace. That’s what we want; that’s what we’re going to have. I say peace through strength.
I have helped the NATO Alliance greatly by increasing defense contributions from our NATO Allies by over $44 billion. And Secretary Stoltenberg was fantastic. As you know, he reported that they’ve never had an increase like this in their history, and NATO was actually going down as opposed to going up. And I increased it by my meeting last year — $44 billion. And this year will be over — it will be hundreds of billions of dollars over the coming years.
And I think there’s great unity with NATO. There’s a lot of very positive things happening. There’s a great spirit that we didn’t have before, and there’s a lot of money that they’re putting up. They weren’t paying their bills on time, and now they’re doing that. And I want to just say thank you very much to Secretary Stoltenberg. He really has been terrific. So we had a tremendous success.
I also had meetings with Prime Minister May on the range of issues concerning our special relationship, and that’s between the United Kingdom and ourselves. We met with the Queen, who is absolutely a terrific person, where she reviewed her Honor Guard for the first time in 70 years, they tell me. We walked in front of the Honor Guard, and that was very inspiring to see and be with her. And I think the relationship, I can truly say, is a good one. But she was very, very inspiring indeed.
Most recently, I returned from Helsinki, Finland, and I was going to give a news conference over the next couple of days about the tremendous success. Because as successful as NATO was, I think this was our most successful visit. And that had to do, as you know, with Russia.
I met with Russian President Vladimir Putin in an attempt to tackle some of the most pressing issues facing humanity. We have never been in a worse relationship with Russia than we are as of a few days ago, and I think that’s gotten substantially better. And I think it has the possibility of getting much better. And I used to talk about this during the campaign. Getting along with Russia would be a good thing. Getting along with China would be a good thing. Not a bad thing; a good thing. In fact, a very good thing.
We’re nuclear powers — great nuclear powers. Russia and us have 90 percent of the nuclear weapons. So I’ve always felt getting along is a positive thing, and not just for that reason.
I entered the meeting with the firm conviction that diplomacy and engagement is better than hostility and conflict. And I feel that with everybody. We have 29 members in NATO, as an example, and I have great relationships — or at least very good relationships — with everybody.
The press covered it quite inaccurately. They said I insulted people. Well, if asking for people to pay up money that they are supposed to pay is insulting, maybe I did. But I can tell you, when I left, everybody was thrilled. And that’s the way this was, too.
My meeting with President Putin was really interesting in so many different ways because we haven’t had relationships with Russia for a long time, and we started. Let me begin by saying that, once again, the full faith and support for America’s intelligence agencies — I have a full faith in our intelligence agencies.
Whoops, they just turned off the light. That must be the intelligence agents. (Laughter.) There it goes. Okay. You guys okay? Good. (Laughter.) That was strange. But that’s okay.
So I’ll begin by stating that I have full faith and support for America’s great intelligence agencies. Always have. And I have felt very strongly that, while Russia’s actions had no impact at all on the outcome of the election, let me be totally clear in saying that — and I’ve said this many times — I accept our intelligence community’s conclusion that Russia’s meddling in the 2016 election took place. Could be other people also; there’s a lot of people out there.
There was no collusion at all. And people have seen that, and they’ve seen that strongly. The House has already come out very strongly on that. A lot of people have come out strongly on that.
I thought that I made myself very clear by having just reviewed the transcript. Now, I have to say, I came back, and I said, « What is going on? What’s the big deal? » So I got a transcript. I reviewed it. I actually went out and reviewed a clip of an answer that I gave, and I realized that there is need for some clarification.
It should have been obvious — I thought it would be obvious — but I would like to clarify, just in case it wasn’t. In a key sentence in my remarks, I said the word « would » instead of « wouldn’t. » The sentence should have been: I don’t see any reason why I wouldn’t — or why it wouldn’t be Russia. So just to repeat it, I said the word « would » instead of « wouldn’t. » And the sentence should have been — and I thought it would be maybe a little bit unclear on the transcript or unclear on the actual video — the sentence should have been: I don’t see any reason why it wouldn’t be Russia. Sort of a double negative.
So you can put that in, and I think that probably clarifies things pretty good by itself.
I have, on numerous occasions, noted our intelligence findings that Russians attempted to interfere in our elections. Unlike previous administrations, my administration has and will continue to move aggressively to repeal any efforts — and repel — we will stop it, we will repel it — any efforts to interfere in our elections. We’re doing everything in our power to prevent Russian interference in 2018.
And we have a lot of power. As you know, President Obama was given information just prior to the election — last election, 2016 — and they decided not to do anything about it. The reason they decided that was pretty obvious to all: They thought Hillary Clinton was going to win the election, and they didn’t think it was a big deal.
When I won the election, they thought it was a very big deal. And all of the sudden they went into action, but it was a little bit late. So he was given that in sharp contrast to the way it should be. And President Obama, along with Brennan and Clapper and the whole group that you see on television now — probably getting paid a lot of money by your networks — they knew about Russia’s attempt to interfere in the election in September, and they totally buried it. And as I said, they buried it because they thought that Hillary Clinton was going to win. It turned out it didn’t happen that way.
By contrast, my administration has taken a very firm stance — it’s a very firm stance — on a strong action. We’re going to take strong action to secure our election systems and the process. Furthermore, as has been stated — and we’ve stated it previously and on many occasions: No collusion.
Yesterday, we made significant progress toward addressing some of the worst conflicts on Earth. So when I met with President Putin for about two and a half hours, we talked about numerous things. And among those things are the problems that you see in the Middle East, where they’re much involved, we’re very much involved. I entered the negotiations with President Putin from a position of tremendous strength. Our economy is booming. And our military is being funded $700 billion this year; $716 billion next year.
It will be more powerful as a military than we’ve ever had before. President Putin and I addressed the range of issues, starting with the civil war in Syria and the need for humanitarian aid and help for people in Syria.
We also spoke of Iran and the need to halt their nuclear ambitions and the destabilizing activities taking place in Iran. As most of you know, we ended the Iran deal, which was one of the worst deals anyone could imagine. And that’s had a major impact on Iran. And it’s substantially weakened Iran. And we hope that, at some point, Iran will call us and we’ll maybe make a new deal, or we maybe won’t.
But Iran is not the same country that it was five months ago, that I can tell you. They’re no longer looking so much to the Mediterranean and the entire Middle East. They’ve got some big problems that they can solve, probably much easier if they deal with us. So we’ll see what happens. But we did discuss Iran.
We discussed Israel and the security of Israel. And President Putin is very much involved now with us in a discussion with Bibi Netanyahu on working something out with surrounding Syria and — Syria, and specifically with regards to the security and long-term security of Israel.
A major topic of discussion was North Korea and the need for it to remove its nuclear weapons. Russia has assured us of its support. President Putin said he agrees with me 100 percent, and they’ll do whatever they have to do to try and make it happen.
Discussions are ongoing and they’re going very, very well. We have no rush for speed. The sanctions are remaining. The hostages are back. There have been no tests. There have been no rockets going up for a period of nine months. And I think the relationships are very good. So we’ll see how that goes.
We have no time limit. We have no speed limit. We have — we’re just going through the process. But the relationships are very good. President Putin is going to be involved in the sense that he is with us. He would like to see that happen.
Perhaps the most important issue we discussed at our meeting prior to the press conference was the reduction of nuclear weapons throughout the world. The United States and Russia have 90 percent, as I said, and we could have a big impact. But nuclear weapons is, I think, the greatest threat of our world today.
And they’re a great nuclear power. We’re a great nuclear power. We have to do something about nuclear. And so that was a matter that we discussed actually in great detail, and President Putin agrees with me.
The matters we discussed are profound in their importance and have the potential to save millions of lives. I understand the many disagreements between our countries, but I also understand the dialogue and the — when you think about it, dialogue with Russia or dialogue with other countries. But dialogue with Russia, in this case, where we’ve had such poor relationships for so many years, dialogue is a very important thing and it’s a very good thing.
So if we get along with them, great. If we don’t get along with them, then, well, we won’t get along with them. But I think we have a very good chance of having some very positive things.
I thought that the meeting that I had with President Putin was really strong. I think that they were willing to do things that, frankly, I wasn’t sure whether or not they would be willing to do. And we’ll be having future meetings and we’ll see whether or not that comes to fruition. But we had a very, very good meeting.
So I just wanted to clear up, I have the strongest respect for our intelligence agencies headed by my people. We have great people, whether it’s Gina or Dan Coats, or any of them. I mean, we have tremendous people, tremendous talent within the agencies. I think they’re being guided properly. And we all want the same thing; we want success for our country.
So with that, we’re going to start a meeting now on tax reductions. We’re going to be putting in a bill. Kevin Brady is with us, and I might ask Kevin just to say a couple of words about that, and then we’ll get back on to a private meeting. But, Kevin, could you maybe give just a brief discussion about what we’ll be talking about?
REPRESENTATIVE BRADY: Yes, sir. Mr. President, thank you for having members of the Ways and Means Committee here today. You know, peace through strength is foreign policy that works. And it works best when America has a strong economy and a strong military. Under your leadership, House and Senate Republicans are delivering on both of them.
Today is about how we can strengthen America’s economy even more. And we think the best place to start is with America’s middle-class families and our small businesses. So today, we’re here to talk to you about making permanent this tax relief — one, so they can continue to grow; two, so we can add a million and a half new jobs; and three, we can protect them against a future Washington trying to steal back those hard-earned dollars that you and the Republican Congress has given them.
So thank you very much for having us here today.
THE PRESIDENT: And the time of submittal, what would you think that would be, Kevin?
REPRESENTATIVE BRADY: So we anticipate to the House voting on this in September and the Senate setting a timetable as well.
THE PRESIDENT: Good. Well, that’s great.
Thank you very much everybody. Thank you very much. Thank you.
Q Did you talk about reducing sanctions with Mr. Putin? Did you talk about — did you talk about rolling back sanctions?
THE PRESIDENT: We’re not lifting sanctions. What?
Q The Russians sanctions will remain. Is that what you meant?
THE PRESIDENT: Yeah, everything is remaining. We’re not lifting sanctions.
Q Are you going to increase sanctions on Russia, sir?
THE PRESIDENT: Not lifting sanctions. No.
Publicités

Société: Comme une bande d’anthropophages chez qui une blessure faite à un blanc a réveillé le goût du sang (From François Fillon to David Hamilton, the same fashion the populace banishes or acclaims its kings)

4 février, 2018

Presque aucun des fidèles ne se retenait de s’esclaffer, et ils avaient l’air d’une bande d’anthropophages chez qui une blessure faite à un blanc a réveillé le goût du sang. Car l’instinct d’imitation et l’absence de courage gouvernent les sociétés comme les foules. Et tout le monde rit de quelqu’un dont on voit se moquer, quitte à le vénérer dix ans plus tard dans un cercle où il est admiré. C’est de la même façon que le peuple chasse ou acclame les rois. Marcel Proust
Saniette (Monsieur): Homme foncièrement bon et simple, d’une grande timidité, il recherche le contact humain mais fait souvent preuve de maladresse. Il fréquente assidûment le salon des Verdurin qui se disent être ses amis, en fait, il est leur souffre-douleur ainsi que celui de la « petite bande ». Parfois la cruauté des convives à son égard atteint des sommets surprenants. Les Verdurin sont heureux d’avoir tous les soirs à leur table un bouc émissaire mais pour que Saniette n’abandonne pas définitivement leur salon, ils alternent savamment méchanceté et paroles aimables. Lorsque, encouragé par l’acquiescement des convives, M Verdurin devient par trop cruel et grossier envers le falot Saniette, sa femme intervient pour le tempérer, non pas par bonté d’âme mais tout simplement pour que Saniette ne quitte pas le salon. Mais les remissions sont de courte durée et les attaques reprennent de plus belle. Malgré les humiliations, Saniette retourne fidèlement chez ses bourreaux comme un chien battu retourne chez son maître (est-ce un hasard si le nom de « Saniette » est l’anagramme de « Sainteté » ?). Proust, ses personnages
Jewish religious law holds that the child of a Jewish mother is a Jew, but Proust never considered himself one, and neither did his friends. Still, his parentage occasionally presented difficulties. Once, as a young man, he stood silent and unresponsive when a revered mentor, Comte Robert de Montesquiou-Fezensac, delivered an anti-Semitic tirade in the company of friends and then asked Proust for his opinion on the 1894 conviction of Captain Alfred Dreyfus, a Jew, who had been tried for treason on the charge of selling military secrets to the Germans. The next day, Proust wrote to Montesquiou that he had not said anything because, although he himself was Catholic like his father and brother, his mother was Jewish: “I am sure you understand that this is reason enough for me to refrain from such discussions.” Whether Proust’s private frankness made up for his public reticence is a vexing question, and all the more so because he went on to confide that he was “not free to have the ideas I might otherwise have on the subject.” Proust’s tacit fear, in other words, was that if he defended the Jews he would be taken for a Jew, and what he wanted above all was to be thought of as a Christian gentleman. He even seemed to leave open the possibility that Montesquiou might be right: that only filial piety forbade him from thinking as Montesquiou did. (…) Proust was only as forthright as his social cowardice—his fear of sacrificing his respectability—would allow. He was to find his courage when events made it easier to be courageous. By 1898, more and more people had become convinced that Dreyfus had been railroaded, and an uproar ensued that was to shake French society for years. The salon of Mme. Genevieve Straus (the widow of the composer Georges Bizet), where Proust had been a habitue for several years, turned into a Dreyfusard hotbed. Old friends of the anti-Dreyfus persuasion, including the painter Edgar Degas, stalked off and never came back. Drawing strength from those around him, Proust now joined in the growing drumbeat for a retrial that was led by the novelist Emile Zola. He was even to boast that he was the first of the Dreyfusards, because he secured the signature of his literary hero Anatole France on a petition. Still, when an anti-Semitic newspaper numbered him among the “young Jews” who defied decency and right thinking, Proust, who at first thought to correct the paper’s misapprehension, decided to keep quiet, lest he draw any more attention to himself. He must have known that, in the eyes of anti-Dreyfusards, his political affiliations only served to confirm the sad fact of his birth. If the Dreyfus affair exposed the moral cretinism that extended into the upper echelons of French society, this hardly deterred Proust from wanting a place in that world. His social career had begun during his last year of high school, when, thanks to the mothers of some of his school friends, he gained admission to certain exclusive Parisian salons. His chum Jacques Bizet, whom he had tried to seduce, without success, made it up to him by serving as his ticket to the beau monde. At the salon of Mme. Straus, young Bizet’s mother, Proust became acquainted with artistic and aristocratic grandees like the composer Gabriel Fauré, the writer Guy de Maupassant, the actress Sarah Bernhardt, and Princesse Mathilde, the niece of Napoleon I. In time he became a regular at Princesse Mathilde’s as well, where the old-line nobility rubbed shoulders with arrivistes, and distinguished Jews mingled with those who detested them. (The writer Léon Daudet, to whom Proust would dedicate a volume of his novel, confided to his diary after one party: “The imperial dwelling was infested with Jews and Jewesses.”) Another hostess conquered by the high-flying young Proust was Mme. Madeleine Lemaire, renowned for her musical gatherings. It was she who introduced him to Montesquiou-Fezensac, the aristocratic poet whose opinions on Jews Proust was willing to overlook for the sake of the Count’s artistic and social cachet. And there was something else: Montesquiou was boldly aboveboard about his homosexuality, at a time when, as Carter writes, “few Frenchmen dared, if they cared for their reputation and social standing, to display amorous affection for another man.” This frankness earned Proust’s regard—although he was, of course, ambivalent about going public on the issue of his own sexual nature. (…) Normality, decency, goodness are, in short, the rarest of commodities in Proust’s world. Nor does their scarcity make them prized, except in the eyes of Marcel and a few other uncharacteristic souls. Instead, decency is seen by most as a social handicap; the Verdurins’ circle of bourgeois snobs, for example, barely tolerates a stammering, clumsy paleographer named Saniette. Monsieur Verdurin’s mockery of Saniette’s speech impediment makes “the faithful burst out laughing, looking like a group of cannibals in whom the sight of a wounded white man has aroused the thirst for blood.” And nowhere is this savage tribalism more marked than in the antipathy that those who consider themselves true Frenchmen feel for Jews. Anti-Semitism is everywhere in Proust’s novel. Perhaps the most repellent instance occurs when the madam of a cheap brothel Marcel is visiting touts the exotic richness of the prostitute Rachel’s flesh: “And with an inane affectation of excitement which she hoped would prove contagious, and which ended in a hoarse gurgle, almost of sensual satisfaction: ‘Think of that, my boy, a Jewess! Wouldn’t that be thrilling? Rrrr!’ ” Those in the highest reaches of society share the sentiments of the lowest. Thus, Charlus is given to maniacal explosions of loathing for Jews, while the Prince de Guermantes, Swann tells Marcel, hates Jews so much that, when a wing of his castle caught fire, he let it burn to the ground rather than send for fire extinguishers to the house next door, which happened to be the Rothschilds’. Swann is himself one of the rare Jews allowed entrance to the highest society, which leads to the outrage of the Duc de Guermantes when Swann, who had always impressed him as a Jew of the right sort, “an honorable Jew,” turns out to be an outspoken Dreyfusard. As in its sentiments toward Jews, so in every other way, the social world in Proust is revealed as a “realm of nullity.” Any glimmer of moral discrimination, let alone of true understanding, shines like a beacon; for the most part, darkness prevails. In the famous closing scene of The Guermantes Way, the duke and duchess, on their way to a dinner party, are bidding good evening to Swann and Marcel. The duchess inquires whether Swann will join them on a trip to Italy ten months hence; Swann replies that he is mortally ill and will be dead by then. The duchess does not know how to respond: “placed for the first time in her life between two duties as incompatible as getting into her carriage to go out to dinner and showing compassion for a man who was about to die, she could find nothing in the code of conventions that indicated the right line to follow.” With his “instinctive politeness,” Swann senses the duchess’s discomfort and says he must not detain them: “he knew that for other people their own social obligations took precedence over the death of a friend.” And yet, although the duke and duchess do not have a moment to spare to comfort their dying friend, they nevertheless do delay their departure while the duchess, who is wearing black shoes with her red dress, changes at her husband’s insistence into a more suitable pair of red shoes. This portrait of gross moral insensibility in the face of death is comedy of manners at its most scathing, perhaps even overdone: the duke complains that his wife is dead-tired, and that he is dying of hunger. The indignant Marcel rewards the stupidity of these preposterous creatures with unforgettable strokes of cold fury. Marcel’s triumph is that he does find a way to bear it, indeed to overcome it. In Time Regained, after spending years in a sanatorium, he is on his way to a party hosted by the Duchesse de Guermantes. The previous day he had experienced what he thought was his final disillusionment with the life of literature, but as he enters the courtyard of the Guermantes mansion a revelatory sensation changes his life. A car nearly hits him, and when he steps back out of its way he places his foot on a paving stone that is slightly lower than the one next to it; this unevenness underfoot fills him with an inexplicable and extraordinary joy. Rocking back and forth on the irregular pavement, Marcel remembers standing on two uneven stones in the baptistery of St. Mark’s in Venice, and all the various sensations associated with that particular moment come flooding back. Similar marvels await him when he enters the Guermantes house and, twice more, involuntary memories overwhelm him in their glory. He is supremely happy, but cannot at first explain it. Why should this sudden efflorescence of memory have “given me a joy which . . . sufficed, without any other proof, to make death a matter of indifference”? He concludes that such episodes of transfiguring lucidity, for as long as they last, annihilate time, and are the most that a living man will know of eternity. (…) At last Marcel has penetrated the real world, and sees what he is supposed to do with his new knowledge: to write the book that one is reading. The awareness of time’s passing spurs him to get down to the serious work that will offer him life’s supreme pleasure: illuminating the nature of timelessness. “How happy would he be, I thought, the man who had the power to write such a book! What a task awaited him!” (…) His vision of human solitude in the face of death reminds one of Edvard Munch’s great and dreadful painting Grief, in which a roomful of people are arrayed around the bed of a dead woman: no one touches or even looks at anyone else; each is locked in his own impenetrable sorrow, mourning by himself and, one suspects, for himself. But unlike Munch, Proust does admit the possibility of consolation, even of redemption. The writer Bergotte dies while sitting in a museum and looking at a patch of yellow wall in a painting by his beloved Vermeer. This devotional attitude moves Marcel to think of “a different world, a world based on kindness, scrupulousness, self-sacrifice, a world entirely different from this one and which we leave in order to be born on this earth, before perhaps returning there. . . . So that the idea that Bergotte was not permanently dead is by no means improbable.” It is this spiritual capaciousness that Saul Bellow’s Mr. Sammler has in mind when he speaks of In Search of Lost Time as “a high-ceilinged masterpiece.” (…) A lifetime of hard suffering went into this masterpiece, and, for better and for worse, it is humanity in its heartache and failure that enjoys pride of place. Algis Valiunas
Le règne du roi n’est que l’entracte prolongé d’un rituel sacrificiel violent. Gil Bailie
Parfois, la durée du règne [du nouveau roi] est fixée dès le départ: les rois de Djonkon (…) régnaient sept ans à l’origine. Chez les Bambaras, le nouveau roi déterminait traditionnellement lui-même la longueur de son propre règne. On lui passait au cou une bande de coton, dont deux hommes tiraient les extrémités en sens contraire pendant qu’il extrayait d’une calebasse autant de cailloux qu’il pouvait en tenir. Ces derniers indiquaient le nombre d’années de son règne, à l’expiration desquelles on l’étranglait. (…) Le roi paraissait rarement en public. Son pied nu ne devait jamais toucher le sol, car les les récoltes en eussent été desséchées; il ne devait rien ramasser sur la terre non plus. S’il venait à tomber de cheval, on le mettait autrefois à mort. Personne n’avait le droit de dire qu’il était malade; s’il contractait une maladie grave, on l’étranglait en grand secret. . . . On croyait qu’il contrôlait la pluie et les vents. Une succession de sécheresses et de mauvaises récoltes trahissait une relâchement  de sa force et on l’étranglait en secret la nuit. Elias Canetti
Le roi ne règne qu’en vertu de sa mort future; il n’est rien d’autre qu’une victime en instance de sacrifice, un condamné à mort qui attend son exécution. (…) Prévoyante, la ville d’Athènes entretenait à ses frais un certain nombre de malheureux […]. En cas de besoin, c’est-à-dire quand une calamité s’abattait ou menaçait de s’abattre sur la ville, épidémie, famine, invasion étrangère, dissensions intérieures, il y avait toujours un pharmakos à la disposition de la collectivité. […] On promenait le pharmakos un peu partout, afin de drainer les impuretés et de les rassembler sur sa tête ; après quoi on chassait ou on tuait le pharmakos dans une cérémonie à laquelle toute la populace prenait part. […] D’une part, on […] [voyait] en lui un personnage lamentable, méprisable et même coupable ; il […] [était] en butte à toutes sortes de moqueries, d’insultes et bien sûr de violences ; on […] [l’entourait], d’autre part, d’une vénération quasi-religieuse ; il […] [jouait] le rôle principal dans une espèce de culte.  René Girard
Le roi a une fonction réelle et c’est la fonction de toute victime sacrificielle. Il est une machine à convertir la violence stérile et contagieuse en valeurs culturelles positives. René Girard
Pour qu’il y ait cette unanimité dans les deux sens, un mimétisme de foule doit chaque fois jouer. Les membres de la communauté s’influencent réciproquement, ils s’imitent les uns les autres dans l’adulation fanatique puis dans l’hostilité plus fanatique encore. René Girard
Il arrive que les victimes d’une foule soient tout à fait aléatoires ; il arrive aussi qu’elles ne le soient pas. Il arrive même que les crimes dont on les accuse soient réels, mais ce ne sont pas eux, même dans ce cas-là, qui joue le premier rôle dans le choix des persécuteurs, c’est l’appartenance des victimes à certaines catégories particulièrement exposées à la persécution. (…) il existe donc des traits universels de sélection victimaire (…) à côté des critères culturels et religieux, il y en a de purement physiques. La maladie, la folie, les difformités génétiques, les mutilations accidentelles et même les infirmités en général tendent à polariser les persécuteurs. (…) l’infirmité s’inscrit dans un ensemble indissociable du signe victimaire et dans certains groupes — à l’internat scolaire par exemple — tout individu qui éprouve des difficultés d’adaptation, l’étranger, le provincial, l’orphelin, le fils de famille, le fauché, ou, tout simplement, le dernier arrivé, est plus ou moins interchangeables avec l’infirme. (…) lorsqu’un groupe humain a pris l’habitude de choisir ses victimes dans une certaine catégorie sociale, ethnique, religieuse, il tend à lui attribuer les infirmités ou les difformités qui renforceraient la polarisation victimaire si elles étaient réelles. (…) à la marginalité des miséreux, ou marginalité  du dehors, il faut en ajouter une seconde, la marginalité du dedans, celle des riches et du dedans. Le monarque et sa cour font parfois songer à l’oeil d’un ouragan. Cette double marginalité suggère une organisation tourbillonnante. En temps normal, certes, les riches et les puissants jouissent de toutes sortes de protections et de privilèges qui font défaut aux déshérités. Mais ce ne sont pas les circonstances normales qui nous concernent ici, ce sont les périodes de crise. Le moindre regard sur l’histoire universelle révèle que les risques de mort violente aux mains d’une foule déchaînée sont statistiquement plus élevés pour les privilégiés que pour toute autre catégorie. A la limite ce sont toutes les qualités extrêmes qui attirent, de temps en temps, les foudres collectives, pas seulement les extrêmes de la richesse et de la pauvreté, mais également ceux du succès et de l’échec, de la beauté et de la laideur, du vice de la vertu, du pouvoir de séduire et du pouvoir de déplaire ; c’est la faiblesse des femmes, des enfants et des vieillards, mais c’est aussi la force des plus forts qui devient faiblesse devant le nombre (…) La reine appartient à plusieurs catégories victimaires préférentielles; elle n’est pas seulement reine mais étrangère. Son origine autrichienne revient sans cesse dans les accusations populaires. Le tribunal qui la condamne est très fortement influencé par la foule parisienne. Notre premier stéréotype est également présent: on retrouve dans la révolution tous les traits caractéristiques des grandes crises qui favorisent les persécutions collectives. (…) Je ne prétends pas que cette façon de penser doive se substituer partout à nos idées sur la Révolution française. Elle n’en éclaire pas moins d’un jour intéressant une accusation souvent passée sous silence mais qui figure explicitement au procès de la reine, celui d’avoir commis un inceste avec son fils. René Girard
Nous sommes une société qui, tous les cinquante ans ou presque, est prise d’une sorte de paroxysme de vertu – une orgie d’auto-purification à travers laquelle le mal d’une forme ou d’une autre doit être chassé. De la chasse aux sorcières de Salem aux chasses aux communistes de l’ère McCarthy à la violente fixation actuelle sur la maltraitance des enfants, on retrouve le même fil conducteur d’hystérie morale. Après la période du maccarthisme, les gens demandaient : mais comment cela a-t-il pu arriver ? Comment la présomption d’innocence a-t-elle pu être abandonnée aussi systématiquement ? Comment de grandes et puissantes institutions ont-elles pu accepté que des enquêteurs du Congrès aient fait si peu de cas des libertés civiles – tout cela au nom d’une guerre contre les communistes ? Comment était-il possible de croire que des subversifs se cachaient derrière chaque porte de bibliothèque, dans chaque station de radio, que chaque acteur de troisième zone qui avait appartenu à la mauvaise organisation politique constituait une menace pour la sécurité de la nation ? Dans quelques décennies peut-être les gens ne manqueront pas de se poser les mêmes questions sur notre époque actuelle; une époque où les accusations de sévices les plus improbables trouvent des oreilles bienveillantes; une époque où il suffit d’être accusé par des sources anonymes pour être jeté en pâture à la justice; une époque où la chasse à ceux qui maltraitent les enfants est devenu une pathologie nationale. Dorothy Rabinowitz
La participation médiocre, les conditions de cette victoire dans le contexte du «Fillongate», puis face à un adversaire «repoussoir», dans sa fonction d’épouvantail traditionnel de la politique française, donnent à cette élection un goût d’inachevé. Les Français ont-ils jamais été en situation de «choisir»? Tandis que la France «d’en haut» célèbre son sauveur providentiel sur les plateaux de télévision, une vague de perplexité déferle sur la majorité silencieuse. Que va-t-il en sortir? Par-delà l’euphorie médiatique d’un jour, le personnage de M. Macron porte en lui un potentiel de rejet, de moquerie et de haine insoupçonnable. Son style «jeunesse dorée», son passé d’énarque, d’inspecteur des finances, de banquier, d’ancien conseiller de François Hollande, occultés le temps d’une élection, en font la cible potentielle d’un hallucinant lynchage collectif, une victime expiatoire en puissance des frustrations, souffrances et déceptions du pays. Quant à la «France d’en haut», médiatique, journalistique, chacun sait à quelle vitesse le vent tourne et sa propension à brûler ce qu’elle a adoré. Jamais une présidence n’a vu le jour sous des auspices aussi incertains. Cette élection, produit du chaos, de l’effondrement des partis, d’une vertigineuse crise de confiance, signe-t-elle le début d’une renaissance ou une étape supplémentaire dans la décomposition et la poussée de violence? En vérité, M. Macron n’a aucun intérêt à obtenir, avec «En marche», une majorité absolue à l’Assemblée qui ferait de lui un nouvel «hyperprésident» censé détenir la quintessence du pouvoir. Sa meilleure chance de réussir son mandat est de se garder des sirènes de «l’hyperprésidence» qui mène tout droit au statut de «coupable idéal» des malheurs du pays, à l’image de tous ses prédécesseurs. De la part du président Macron, la vraie nouveauté serait dans la redécouverte d’une présidence modeste, axée sur l’international, centrée sur l’essentiel et le partage des responsabilités avec un puissant gouvernement réformiste et une Assemblée souveraine, conformément à la lettre – jamais respectée – de la Constitution de 1958. Maxime Tandonnet (07.05.2017)
La violente polémique qui secoue la candidature de François Fillon à l’élection présidentielle n’a rien d’une surprise. Il fallait s’y attendre. La vie politique française n’a jamais supporté les têtes qui dépassent, les personnalités qui prennent l’ascendant. Dans l’histoire, les hommes d’État visionnaires, ceux qui ont eu raison avant tout le monde, ont été descendus en flammes et leur image est restée maudite des décennies ou des siècles après leur mort (…) Dans mon livre les Parias de la République(Perrin, 2017), j’ai raconté la descente aux enfers de ces parias qui furent aussi de grands hommes d’État, et une femme Premier ministre, leur diabolisation qui les poursuit jusqu’aux yeux de la postérité. Cet ouvrage annonce aussi la généralisation et la banalisation de la figure du paria dans la vie politique contemporaine. La médiatisation, Internet et la puissance des réseaux sociaux, les exigences de transparence, la défiance face à l’autorité et surtout, la personnalisation du pouvoir à outrance, transforme tout homme ou femme incarnant de pouvoir en bouc émissaire des frustrations et des angoisses d’une époque. Qui ne se souvient à quel point Nicolas Sarkozy fut traîné dans la boue de 2007 à 2012? Dans un tout autre genre, François Hollande a aussi connu, à la tête de l’État, le vertige de l’humiliation. La diabolisation des hommes politiques s’accélère: non seulement Sarkozy, puis Hollande, mais aussi Alain Juppé et Manuel Valls viennent de chuter. L’hécatombe est désormais inarrêtable… Sans aucun doute, le tour viendra d’Emmanuel Macron, et sa chute sera aussi subite et aussi violente que son ascension fondée sur la sublimation d’une image. (…) Oui, il fallait s’attendre, tôt ou tard, à la lapidation de François Fillon. Le prétexte de l’emploi de son épouse à ses côtés est ambigu. Le recrutement de proches par des responsables politiques est une vieille – et mauvaise – habitude française. Alexandre Millerand , Vincent Auriol, François Mitterrand employaient leur fils à l’Elysée et Jacques Chirac sa fille. Combien de ministres ont recruté un proche dans leurs cabinets? Combien de fils et de fille «de» ont hérité de la position politique de leur père? 20% des parlementaires emploient un membre de leur famille. L’un des plus hauts responsables actuels de la République a l’habitude de salarier sa femme auprès de lui. Tout cela est bien connu. À l’évidence, cette pratique n’est pas à l’honneur de notre République. Mais tout le monde s’en est jusqu’à présent accommodé, hypocritement, sans poser de question. Personne ne s’est interrogé sur la nature et l’effectivité des tâches accomplies par le conjoint ou le parent. Et voici que soudain, le dossier est opportunément rouvert, contre François Fillon. (…) L’homme se prête particulièrement à une diabolisation. Son caractère à la fois discret et volontariste a tout pour exaspérer un microcosme politico-médiatique plus enclin à idolâtrer le clinquant stérile et l’impuissance bavarde. La ligne de défense de François Fillon transparaît dans son discours du 29 janvier. Il s’apprête à endosser le rôle de paria, comptant sur un retournement en sa faveur. En témoigne la présence de Pénélope à ses côtés. Sa parole, conservatrice et libérale, semble avoir été façonnée pour exacerber les haines des idéologues de la table rase: «On me décrit comme le représentant d’une France traditionnelle. Mais celui qui n’a pas de racines marche dans le vide. Je ne renie rien de ce qu’on m’a transmis, rien de ce qui m’a fait, pas plus ma foi personnelle que mes engagements politiques». Peut-il réussir? In fine, le résultat des élections de 2017 dépendra du corps électoral: emprise de l’émotionnel ou choix d’un destin collectif? Mais au-delà, une grande leçon de ces événements devrait s’imposer: l’urgence de refonder la vie politique française, sur une base moins personnalisée et plus collective, tournée vers le débat d’idées et non plus l’émotion – entre haine et idolâtrie – autour de personnages publics. Maxime Tandonnet (30.01.2017)
Un homme d’État doit concilier trois qualités: une vision de l’histoire, le sens du bien commun et le courage personnel. Ils sont très peu nombreux à avoir durablement émergé dans l’histoire politique française. En effet, en raison de leur supériorité, ils sont rapidement pris en chasse par le marais et réduits au silence avant d’être lapidés. Le véritable homme d’État est un paria en puissance. Le Général de Gaulle fut un paria tout à fait particulier, un paria qui a réussi. Il faut se souvenir de la manière dont il fut traité dans les années 1950 et 1960. Il était en permanence insulté, qualifié de réactionnaire et de fasciste. Dans Le Coup d’État permanent, François Mitterrand utilise à son propos les mots de «caudillo, duce, führer…». C’est un comble pour le chef de la résistance française au nazisme… S’il fut un paria qui a réussi, c’est en raison de sa place hors norme dans l’histoire, auteur de l’appel du 18 juin 1940 et de la décolonisation. Mais dès lors, il n’est plus vraiment un paria au sens de la définition que j’en donne, son image à la postérité étant largement positive et consensuelle. (…) la lecture des livres de René Girard, notamment La violence et le sacré et Les choses cachées depuis la fondation du monde m’a inspiré l’idée de cet ouvrage sur les parias de la République. Sa grille de lecture peut s’appliquer à l’histoire politique française: la quête d’un bouc émissaire, victime expiatoire de la violence collective, et son lynchage par lequel la société politique retrouve son unité. Le cas d’Édith Cresson est intéressant à cet égard. Quand on lit la presse de l’époque, quand on replonge dans les actualités du début des années 1990, la violence, la férocité de son lynchage nous apparaissent comme sidérantes. On a beaucoup parlé de ses maladresses, provocations et fautes de communication qui furent réelles. Mais l’acharnement contre elle, les insultes, la caricature, la diffamation contre une femme Premier ministre qui prenait une place convoitée par des hommes, a atteint des proportions vertigineuses. On en a oublié des aspects positifs de sa politique: le rejet des 35 heures, la promotion de l’apprentissage, des privatisations et de la politique industrielle, la volonté de maîtriser les frontières. Elle fut vraiment une femme lynchée. Et sur ce sacrifice, les politiques de son camp ont tenté de se refaire une cohésion. Sans succès. Encore aujourd’hui, je constate à quel point elle fut haïe. Des personnalités de droite ou de gauche m’ont vivement reproché de tenter de la «réhabiliter» parmi mes parias! De fait, je ne cherche pas à la réhabiliter et ne cache rien de ses erreurs, mais je mets le doigt sur un épisode qui n’est pas à l’honneur de la classe politique française. La violence est certes inhérente à la république dès lors que la république suppose une concurrence pour les postes, les mandats, les honneurs. Cette violence devrait être tempérée par la morale, le sens de l’honneur, du respect des autres, par les valeurs au sens du duc de Broglie. Elle ne l’a pas été à l’égard d’Édith Cresson. Elle l’est de moins en moins aujourd’hui, comme en témoigne la multiplication des lynchages politico-médiatiques à tout propos. (…) Nicolas Sarkozy a fait l’objet d’un lynchage permanent et violent pendant son quinquennat: insultes au jour le jour, calomnies et les aspects positifs du bilan de son action ont été étrangement passés sous silence. Pourtant, il me semble trop tôt pour lui appliquer le qualificatif de paria au sens où je l’entends dans mon ouvrage, supposant un bannissement qui se poursuit dans l’histoire. Comment sera-t-il jugé dans vingt ans? Qui peut le dire? Souvenons-nous de Mitterrand et de Chirac. Leur fin de règne fut pathétique, pitoyable. Qui s’en souvient encore? La mémoire contemporaine est tellement courte… Aujourd’hui, ils sont plutôt encensés et n’ont rien de parias… (…) [François Fillon] a le profil d’un bouc émissaire, sans aucun doute, faute de pouvoir parler de paria à ce stade. D’ici à l’élection présidentielle et par la suite, s’il l’emporte, il sera inévitablement maltraité et son tempérament à la fois réservé et volontaire ne peut qu’exciter la hargne envers lui. Il faut noter que François Hollande, quoi qu’on en pense, n’a pas été épargné par le monde médiatique et la presse qu’il croyait tout acquise à sa cause… C’est une vraie question que je me pose: le président de la République, qui incarnait du temps du général de Gaulle et de Pompidou, le prestige, l’autorité, la grandeur nationale, est-il en train de devenir le bouc émissaire naturel d’un pays en crise de confiance? Ultramédiatisé, il incarne à lui tout seul le pouvoir politique dans la conscience collective. Mais ne disposant pas d’une baguette magique pour régler les difficultés des Français, apaiser leurs inquiétudes, il devient responsable malgré lui de tous les maux de la création. Je pense qu’il faut refonder notre vision du pouvoir politique, lui donner une connotation moins personnelle et individualiste. Le temps est venu de redécouvrir les vertus d’une politique davantage axée sur l’engagement collectif, le partage de la responsabilité, entre le chef de l’État, le Premier ministre, la majorité, la nation, au service du bien commun. Maxime Tandonnet (13.01.2017)
«J’avais ourdi le complot» raconte l’avocat Robert Bourgi dans l’émission de BFM, intitulée «Qui a tué François Fillon?» Son témoignage nous remémore le fond des ténèbres atteintes par la politique française il y a tout juste un an. (…) Aujourd’hui, la mode est à l’optimisme. Le discours dominant dans les médias et la presse sublime la recomposition de la classe politique et son rajeunissement. Le nouveau monde aurait définitivement enterré l’ancien. Les événements de l’hiver 2017 semblent être à des années-lumière. La France a le plus jeune président de son histoire. Un grand balayage a entraîné le renouvellement du visage des députés et des ministres. La croissance est au rendez-vous, et «France is back», la France est de retour. Et si tout cela n’était qu’illusion? Et si les causes profondes du Fillongate de 2017, la pire catastrophe démocratique de l’histoire contemporaine, bien loin de se résorber, n’avaient jamais été aussi vivaces sous le couvercle du brouhaha quotidien? Le déclin de la culture et de l’intelligence politiques est au centre du grand malaise, touchant en premier lieu les élites dirigeantes et médiatiques. (…) Où a-t-on vu, depuis la déflagration de 2017, le moindre essai de réflexion sur un régime politique évidemment à bout de souffle, fondé sur l’idolâtrie narcissique, la démagogie, la dissimulation, l’impuissance publique, la frime inefficace, la fuite devant la réalité et le sens de l’intérêt général au profit de l’image? Nulle part! Cette réflexion est comme interdite, étouffée par le carcan d’un abêtissement collectif. (…) La cassure entre le peuple et la classe dirigeante, comme le souligne le nouveau sondage CEVIPOF 2018 sur la confiance des Français, n’a jamais été aussi profonde: comme les années précédentes, 77 % des Français ont une image négative de la politique qui leur inspire de la méfiance (39 %), du dégoût (25 %), de l’ennui (9 %), de la peur (3%). Loin de l’effervescence joyeuse de la «France d’en haut», la fracture démocratique, ce mal qui ronge le pays, ne cesse de s’aggraver. L’obsession élyséenne, quintessence de la dérive mégalomaniaque de la politique française au détriment du bien commun de la Nation, et les guerres d’ego qui ont conduit les Républicains à cette hallucinante déflagration de 2017, vont-elles enfin cesser? En effet, la chute du FN et du PS, les tâtonnements de LREM, pourraient ouvrir un nouvel espace aux Républicains. Ont-ils enfin décidé de se mettre au service du pays et non d’eux-mêmes? Tout laisse penser que non. La révolte des barons contre M. Wauquiez donne le sentiment que rien n’a changé à cet égard. (…) Le récit de M. Bourgi sur BFM est purement anecdotique. Il est l’arbre qui cache la forêt. La politique française connaît une vertigineuse crise du sens dont le séisme de 2017 fut la première manifestation. D’autres viendront, plus terribles encore. Aujourd’hui, rien n’a changé. Le mélange de nihilisme et de fureur narcissique, sur les ruines de l’intelligence politique, n’en finit pas de détruire la démocratie. Vous avez aimé 2017? Vous allez adorer 2022! Maxime Tandonnet
J’apprends non sans stupéfaction que Flavie Flament, dans l’émission « Philosophie » d’Arte, que chacun peut consulter, se réjouit, trente ans après, de la stratégie qu’elle a mise en œuvre pour devenir « le bourreau de son bourreau », stratégie qui lui a permis de se « reconstruire ». Elle parle d’Hamilton comme d’un monstre de lâcheté, mort de manière vulgaire et sans panache, le visage couvert d’un sac en plastique, car il ne supportait pas de voir son image. On a rarement été plus loin dans l’ignominie. (…) Cette sordide histoire m’a rappelé celle de Valérie Solanas, intellectuelle féministe radicale, qui appelait dans son Scum Manifeste à châtrer les hommes et qui tenta d’abattre Andy Warhol et deux de ses compagnons. Elle passera trois ans en prison, soutenue par les féministes américaines (le National Organization for Women) qui voyait en elle la championne la plus remarquable des droits des femmes. Lou Reed, lui, chanta: « Je crois bien que j’aurais appuyé sur l’interrupteur de la chaise électrique moi-même. » Sans recourir à de telles extrémités, on s’interrogera légitimement – Houellebecq l’avait fait à l’époque – sur la haine des sexes et la férocité du désir de vengeance de femmes sans doute humiliées et blessées à un âge où elles idéalisaient encore les rapports amoureux. Mais quoi qu’ait subi Flavie Flament de la part de David Hamilton, ce qui n’est pas prouvé, sa jouissance à l’annonce de son suicide et la stratégie à long terme mise pour y parvenir, me laisse pour le moins songeur. Je me garderai bien de me scandaliser, ne sachant ce qui relève d’une obsession pathologique ou d’un désir immodéré de rester sous les feux de la rampe en un temps où ce genre de dénonciation vous valorise plus qu’il n’inspire le dégoût. Faut-il vraiment, comme le suggère Madame Taubira, que les hommes apprennent ce qu’est l’humiliation ? Auquel cas je ne saurai leur conseiller meilleure maîtresse que Flavie Flament. Roland Jaccard
Tout au long de la campagne, les affaires ont contribué à envoyer par le fond les chances de succès de l’ancien Premier ministre. Ces révélations poursuivaient-elles un calcul politique ou personnel? Qui a tué François Fillon? Voilà les questions posées par une équipe de BFMTV dans un documentaire exceptionnel diffusé ce lundi soir sur notre antenne. A la croisée des regards, les journalistes du Canard enchaîné, bien sûr, qui ont dévoilé peu à peu les vicissitudes présumées du clan Fillon. Devant nos caméras, Hervé Liffran et Isabelle Barré l’assurent: leur travail ne doit rien à une « taupe » à droite, ni à une quelconque aide extérieure. C’est naturellement qu’après le premier tour de la primaire, ils se sont penchés sur les déclarations de patrimoine et de revenus du couple, puis ont découvert, intrigués, que Penelope Fillon avait travaillé pour La Revue des deux mondes, mais aussi et surtout comme collaboratrice parlementaire de son mari et du suppléant de celui-ci pendant huit ans, dans la plus grande discrétion. Naturellement que les montants perçus pour une activité peu évidente (100.000 euros brut entre mai 2012 et décembre 2013 pour la revue et 500.000 euros brut perçus auprès du Palais-Bourbon) les ont intéressés. « Pas de Dark Vador, pas de force obscure », sourit aujourd’hui Isabelle Barré. Pourtant le 24 janvier à 18 heures, lorsque le compte Twitter du Canard enchaîné jette son pavé dans la mare, les principales figures de la droite, alors réunies autour d’une galette des rois dans les locaux de campagne de leur candidat, sont persuadées qu’il s’agit là d’un acte de malveillance, peut-être venu de l’intérieur. Parmi les figures entretenant une inimitié notoire avec François Fillon, les noms de Jean-François Copé et Rachida Dati courent sur les lèvres. Tous deux écartent toujours ces allégations. « Si on devait mettre en cause tous ceux à qui François Fillon a fait du mal, la liste serait longue », ajoute l’ancien ministre du Budget. La piste d’un « cabinet noir » élyséen, lancée par François Fillon lui-même, ne mènera pas plus loin. De toute façon, les revenus des Fillon ne sont pas un secret pour tout le monde: à l’Assemblée nationale, 95 personnes ont accès aux fiches de paie des collaborateurs dans le cadre de leur travail. S’il est difficile de savoir d’où sont partis les premiers coups, nombreux sont ceux à avoir cherché à achever François Fillon. Dès fin janvier, c’est François Bayrou qui cherche un « plan B » à la droite et au centre. Début février, le président du Sénat, Gérard Larcher, veut mettre un terme à l’équipée, après avoir appris que les enfants de François Fillon avaient aussi été rémunérés par la Haute assemblée durant le mandat sénatorial de leur père. Peu à peu, les leaders de la droite prennent leurs distances. (…) Pendant toute cette période, Nicolas Sarkozy, vaincu à la primaire, joue un jeu trouble. Comme nous le raconte Rachida Dati, tout le monde ne cesse de l’appeler: Xavier Bertrand, François Bertrand, Laurent Wauquiez. Tous veulent qu’il pousse François Fillon à l’abandon. « A la faveur de chacun d’entre eux… Tout le monde voulait y aller! » s’amuse l’ancienne Garde des Sceaux. BFM
L’homme qui a offert des costumes à François Fillon, Robert Bourgi, s’est vanté chez Jean-Jacques Bourdin, avec une faconde que n’auraient pas reniée «Les Tontons flingueurs», d’avoir «ourdi un complot» contre le candidat pour peser dans sa chute. Invité chez Jean-Jacques Bourdin sur RMC ce 29 janvier, Robert Bourgi, proche de Nicolas Sarkozy et des cercles du pouvoir, a fait de nouvelles révélations sardoniques sur son ancien «ami» François Fillon. L’homme de loi a reconnu avoir monté un complot contre l’ancien Premier ministre de Nicolas Sarkozy, avec l’intention de «le niquer» pendant la campagne présidentielle. Sa ruse : lui offrir des costumes hors de prix. Le jour de la diffusion du documentaire «Qui a tué François Fillon ?» sur BFM TV, Robert Bourgi est venu livrer les dessous de son «complot». Il donne le ton en jetant d’emblée à Jean-Jacques Bourdin : «Votre service de sécurité m’a enlevé ma boîte à outils. J’avais la sulfateuse, le marteau et les clous pour le cercueil pour Monsieur Fillon mais pour vous, j’ai quelque chose.» Et l’homme de dégainer un mètre de couturière, pour prendre les mesures de l’animateur. «Ce sera pas Arny’s, ce sera Petit Bateau», rit-il, très content de sa blague. Il déroule alors l’historique qui le fait apparaître comme un intriguant, avide de relations de pouvoir, éclairant d’un jour nouveau les réseaux d’influence et alliances impitoyables autour des têtes de l’UMP, devenue les Républicains en 2015. L’avocat d’origine libano-sénégalaise Robert Bourgi, figure de la Françafrique, a toujours courtisé les puissants : Jacques Chirac, Omar Bongo, Laurent Gbagbo et surtout son «ami» Nicolas Sarkozy. Il explique avoir fréquenté régulièrement François Fillon pendant son mandat de Premier ministre. (…) Mais Robert Bourgi s’est retourné contre l’ancien Premier ministre lorsque deux journalistes lui ont livré un scoop signé François Hollande durant la campagne de la primaire. Le duo confie à l’avocat : «Ton ami Fillon a demandé la peau de ton ami Sarko.» L’ancien chef du gouvernement avait demandé que la justice accélère concernant les affaires dans lesquelles était impliqué l’ancien chef d’Etat. Dès lors, Robert Bourgi se métamorphose en nettoyeur des couloirs feutrés des cabinets ministériels. (…) Il décide alors de fomenter un complot, selon ses propres termes, contre le Sarthois en exploitant ses faiblesses. (…) Robert Bourgi ne souhaitait pas parler chiffon mais tentait d’influencer François Fillon sur le choix de ses lieutenants. Il souhaitait le voir s’entourer «de compagnons de Nicolas Sarkozy» qui voulaient le «servir», en lui conseillant de les inclure dans son «comité politique». Aucun retour. Et c’est en homme vexé de ne pas arriver à faire aboutir ses petites manœuvres qu’il se plaint : «Il m’a humilié.» Russia Today
Je lui ai dit : « Nicolas, il n’ira jamais à l’Elysée » […] parce que je vais le niquer, j’avais ourdi le complot […] à cause du comportement de Fillon à mon endroit qui n’était pas correct. Je savais exactement que j’allais payer ces costumes par chèque et que j’allais appeler mon ami Valdiguié au JDD, lui montrer le chèque. Quand on a fait campagne sur les vertus morales, la difficulté des Français à joindre les deux bouts, je me suis dit : « C’est quelque chose qui va le tuer ». Robert Bourgi
François Fillon, j’ai décidé de le tuer pour diverses raisons. D’abord parce qu’il a violé toutes les règles de l’amitié avec moi. J’ai toujours été correct avec lui, […] j’ai toujours défendu la position de Fillon auprès de Nicolas dans le but de les réunir un jour ou l’autre. […] Il passait son temps à démolir Nicolas Sarkozy. Il l’a toujours détesté, il a toujours eu les mots les plus inélégants à son égard. A chaque fois je lui disais : « François, tu n’as pas le droit de parler de Nicolas comme ça » […] François Fillon m’avait promis d’être un peu plus loyal à l’endroit de Nicolas Sarkozy, il n’a jamais tenu parole. Robert Bourgi
En fait, je fais au mois de janvier, une conférence sur Bourreaux et victimes. Et on se rend compte qu’à un moment donné, la victime peut devenir aussi quelque part – c’est pour ça que je parlais de stratégie – le bourreau de son bourreau en retournant effectivement ça. Et je pense que c’est là-dessus qu’on se reconstruit. (…) Et la façon dont il est mort m’a vraiment interrogée. Il est mort avec un sac en plastique sur la tête. (…) Il est mort d’une façon vulgaire. (…) Il avait pas de panache.  Certains mettent en scène leur mort (…) Je me suis consolée quelque part en me disant qu’il s’était regardé. Quand on se met un sac en plastique de supermarché  sur la tête et qu’on disparait de cette façon là dans un petit appartement du boulevard de Montparnasse, il y a quand même (…) quelque chose de fou. Flavie Flamant
Au lieu de lui tirer une balle, vous lui envoyez un missile. Raphael Enthoven

Attention: une curée peut en cacher une autre !

A l’heure où, forts de leur coup, BFM et France 5 nous balancent en boucle …

Leur publireportage sur le « niquage » du candidat Fillon il y a un an par un porte-flingue de Nicolas Sarkozy …

Mais où, fortes du nombre désormais de leur côté et avec la complicité active de prétendus philosophes sur des prétendues chaines culturelles, certaines femmes se laissent emporter par la plus primaire des vindictes anti-hommes

Comment avec Maxime Tandonnet …

Qui, après avoir un moment conseillé l’ancien président Sarkozy, avait écrit des pages éloquentes sur la bouc-émissarisation de la politique française …

Ne pas repenser à la si pertinente définition proustienne du fonctionnement fondamental de nos sociétés comme de nos foules …

Qui « gouvernées par l’instinct d’imitation et l’absence de courage » …

Se muent pour « chasser ou acclamer ses rois » …

En « bande d’anthropophages chez qui une blessure faite à un blanc a réveillé le goût du sang » ?

Derrière Bourgi, la déliquescence de la politique française
Maxime Tandonnet
Le Figaro
31/01/2018

FIGAROVOX/TRIBUNE – Après la diffusion d’un reportage de BFM en début de semaine, on voudrait croire que c’est bien Robert Bourgi qui a «tué François Fillon». Il n’en est rien, selon Maxime Tandonnet : l’assassin court toujours, et il n’a pas fini de faire des victimes. Il s’agit de la crise du sens que traverse la politique française.


Ancien conseiller de Nicolas Sarkozy, haut-fonctionnaire, Maxime Tandonnet décrypte chaque semaine l’exercice de l’État pour le FigaroVox. Il a écrit Les parias de la République (éd. Perrin, 2017).


«J’avais ourdi le complot» raconte l’avocat Robert Bourgi dans l’émission de BFM, intitulée «Qui a tué François Fillon?» Son témoignage nous remémore le fond des ténèbres atteintes par la politique française il y a tout juste un an. Qu’est-ce que la politique? En principe, le débat d’idées, le choix d’un projet en vue de bâtir un destin commun et de régler le mieux possible les défis du présent et de l’avenir. Ces révélations donnent un nouvel aperçu du pire de la vie publique, un cocktail de batailles d’ego, de rancœurs, de vengeances personnelles qui anéantit toute idée de bien commun et d’intérêt général.

Aujourd’hui, la mode est à l’optimisme. Le discours dominant dans les médias et la presse sublime la recomposition de la classe politique et son rajeunissement. Le nouveau monde aurait définitivement enterré l’ancien. Les événements de l’hiver 2017 semblent être à des années-lumière. La France a le plus jeune président de son histoire. Un grand balayage a entraîné le renouvellement du visage des députés et des ministres. La croissance est au rendez-vous, et «France is back», la France est de retour.

Et si tout cela n’était qu’illusion? Et si les causes profondes du Fillongate de 2017, la pire catastrophe démocratique de l’histoire contemporaine, bien loin de se résorber, n’avaient jamais été aussi vivaces sous le couvercle du brouhaha quotidien?

Le déclin de la culture et de l’intelligence politiques est au centre du grand malaise, touchant en premier lieu les élites dirigeantes et médiatiques. Toute la vie politico-médiatique se ramène désormais à des effets de personnalisation narcissique au détriment des convictions. La Nation doit voter pour l’image d’un individu, les sensations qu’il inspire, une image parfaitement volatile, conditionnée par les soubresauts des émotions collectives, au fil de l’actualité et du matraquage médiatique. Dès lors s’efface la notion de choix de société sur les grands sujets du moment: l’école, l’industrie, la dette, l’immigration, le chômage, l’autorité de l’État, la sécurité, la refondation de l’Europe…

Où a-t-on vu, depuis la déflagration de 2017, le moindre essai de réflexion sur un régime politique évidemment à bout de souffle, fondé sur l’idolâtrie narcissique, la démagogie, la dissimulation, l’impuissance publique, la frime inefficace, la fuite devant la réalité et le sens de l’intérêt général au profit de l’image? Nulle part! Cette réflexion est comme interdite, étouffée par le carcan d’un abêtissement collectif.

«Renouvellement», disiez-vous? La cassure entre le peuple et la classe dirigeante, comme le souligne le nouveau sondage CEVIPOF 2018 sur la confiance des Français, n’a jamais été aussi profonde: comme les années précédentes, 77 % des Français ont une image négative de la politique qui leur inspire de la méfiance (39 %), du dégoût (25 %), de l’ennui (9 %), de la peur (3%). Loin de l’effervescence joyeuse de la «France d’en haut», la fracture démocratique, ce mal qui ronge le pays, ne cesse de s’aggraver.

L’obsession élyséenne, quintessence de la dérive mégalomaniaque de la politique française au détriment du bien commun de la Nation, et les guerres d’ego qui ont conduit les Républicains à cette hallucinante déflagration de 2017, vont-elles enfin cesser? En effet, la chute du FN et du PS, les tâtonnements de LREM, pourraient ouvrir un nouvel espace aux Républicains. Ont-ils enfin décidé de se mettre au service du pays et non d’eux-mêmes? Tout laisse penser que non. La révolte des barons contre M. Wauquiez donne le sentiment que rien n’a changé à cet égard. Summum de l’absurdité et de l’obsession élyséenne: plutôt que de se pencher sur les raisons profondes de la crise politique française, certains, songeant uniquement à leur destin personnel, ramènent déjà la question des «primaires» de 2022, sans la moindre considération pour leur faillite en 2016-2017!

Le récit de M. Bourgi sur BFM est purement anecdotique. Il est l’arbre qui cache la forêt. La politique française connaît une vertigineuse crise du sens dont le séisme de 2017 fut la première manifestation. D’autres viendront, plus terribles encore. Aujourd’hui, rien n’a changé. Le mélange de nihilisme et de fureur narcissique, sur les ruines de l’intelligence politique, n’en finit pas de détruire la démocratie. Vous avez aimé 2017? Vous allez adorer 2022!

Voir aussi:

David Hamilton: Flament glose…
Roland Jaccard

Causeur

3 février 2018

J’aimais bien David Hamilton de quelques années mon aîné, que je croisais parfois boulevard Montparnasse. Ses photos avaient bercé mon adolescence. Et personne n’y voyait rien d’obscène. Les plus grands artistes avaient travaillé avec lui et même Alain Robbe-Grillet avait signé un livre : Rêves de jeunes filles avec Hamilton dont la notoriété s’étendait au monde entier. Il y régnait un érotisme doux, presque chaste, qui n’offusquait personne. Ses films, en revanche, passaient inaperçus : le photographe avait éclipsé le cinéaste dont on retiendra néanmoins Laura ou les ombres de l’été avec Dawn Dunlap actrice à laquelle Olivier Mathieu a rendu un bel hommage dans Le Portrait de Dawn Dunlap.

Je savais par un ami commun que la situation de David Hamilton était devenue précaire et que certaines rétrospectives de son œuvre avaient été annulées après des accusations de pédophilie : sans doute portait-il aux très jeunes filles un amour immodéré. Mais jamais la justice, en dépit de deux plaintes, ne l’avait jugé coupable. Et voici que trente années plus tard, une présentatrice de télévision, Flavie Flament, un de ses anciens modèles le prend pour cible dans un médiocre roman intitulé : La Consolation. Le nom de Hamilton sent alors le soufre, tout comme ceux de Weinstein, d’Allen, de Polanski, de Balthus et de tant d’autres.

Devenir « le bourreau de son bourreau »
Sans doute lassé par une époque où la délation et la vulgarité commandent l’esprit du temps, David Hamilton se donne la mort dans des circonstances encore mal élucidées. On le trouve étouffé dans la nuit du 25 novembre 2016 « avec un sac plastique sur la tête » et la porte ouverte de son appartement. Certains pensent qu’il aurait pu être assassiné. Je crois surtout qu’il était dégoûté par un monde où il n’avait plus sa place et qu’il en a tiré la conclusion logique.

Mais j’apprends non sans stupéfaction que Flavie Flament, dans l’émission « Philosophie » d’Arte, que chacun peut consulter, se réjouit, trente ans après, de la stratégie qu’elle a mise en œuvre pour devenir « le bourreau de son bourreau », stratégie qui lui a permis de se « reconstruire ».

Elle parle d’Hamilton comme d’un monstre de lâcheté, mort de manière vulgaire et sans panache, le visage couvert d’un sac en plastique, car il ne supportait pas de voir son image. On a rarement été plus loin dans l’ignominie. Et, au passage, tous ceux qui ont eu recours au sac plastique pour se suicider apprécieront… s’ils en ont encore l’occasion.

Au mauvais souvenir de Lou Reed
Cette sordide histoire m’a rappelé celle de Valérie Solanas, intellectuelle féministe radicale, qui appelait dans son Scum Manifeste à châtrer les hommes et qui tenta d’abattre Andy Warhol et deux de ses compagnons. Elle passera trois ans en prison, soutenue par les féministes américaines (le National Organization for Women) qui voyait en elle la championne la plus remarquable des droits des femmes. Lou Reed, lui, chanta: « Je crois bien que j’aurais appuyé sur l’interrupteur de la chaise électrique moi-même. »

Sans recourir à de telles extrémités, on s’interrogera légitimement – Houellebecq l’avait fait à l’époque – sur la haine des sexes et la férocité du désir de vengeance de femmes sans doute humiliées et blessées à un âge où elles idéalisaient encore les rapports amoureux. Mais quoi qu’ait subi Flavie Flament de la part de David Hamilton, ce qui n’est pas prouvé, sa jouissance à l’annonce de son suicide et la stratégie à long terme mise pour y parvenir, me laisse pour le moins songeur. Je me garderai bien de me scandaliser, ne sachant ce qui relève d’une obsession pathologique ou d’un désir immodéré de rester sous les feux de la rampe en un temps où ce genre de dénonciation vous valorise plus qu’il n’inspire le dégoût. Faut-il vraiment, comme le suggère Madame Taubira, que les hommes apprennent ce qu’est l’humiliation ? Auquel cas je ne saurai leur conseiller meilleure maîtresse que Flavie Flament.

Voir également:

DOCUMENTAIRE – Qui a tué François Fillon? L’enquête de BFMTV

BFM

29/01/2018

D’affaire en affaire, de coup de théâtre en coup de théâtre, les espoirs de la droite et de son candidat à la présidentielle, François Fillon, se sont évaporés pendant la campagne. Un mystère demeure: quelqu’un voulait-il la peau de François Fillon? C’est la question que s’est posée une équipe de BFMTV dans un documentaire exceptionnel diffusé ce lundi soir à 22h40 sur notre antenne.

La campagne présidentielle s’est éloignée depuis longtemps et, avec elle, ses illusions perdues, mais François et Penelope Fillon sont toujours mis en examen pour détournement de fonds publics. L’enquête doit être bouclée au cours de cette année 2018.

« Pas de Dark Vador »
S’ils sont sous le coup de cette procédure judiciaire, c’est en raison d’une affaire qui a éclaté au grand jour il y a un an: les soupçons d’emplois fictifs visant Penelope Fillon, l’épouse de celui qui était le candidat de la droite au scrutin suprême. Tout au long de la campagne, les affaires ont contribué à envoyer par le fond les chances de succès de l’ancien Premier ministre. Ces révélations poursuivaient-elles un calcul politique ou personnel? Qui a tué François Fillon? Voilà les questions posées par une équipe de BFMTV dans un documentaire exceptionnel diffusé ce lundi soir sur notre antenne.

A la croisée des regards, les journalistes du Canard enchaîné, bien sûr, qui ont dévoilé peu à peu les vicissitudes présumées du clan Fillon. Devant nos caméras, Hervé Liffran et Isabelle Barré l’assurent: leur travail ne doit rien à une « taupe » à droite, ni à une quelconque aide extérieure. C’est naturellement qu’après le premier tour de la primaire, ils se sont penchés sur les déclarations de patrimoine et de revenus du couple, puis ont découvert, intrigués, que Penelope Fillon avait travaillé pour La Revue des deux mondes, mais aussi et surtout comme collaboratrice parlementaire de son mari et du suppléant de celui-ci pendant huit ans, dans la plus grande discrétion. Naturellement que les montants perçus pour une activité peu évidente (100.000 euros brut entre mai 2012 et décembre 2013 pour la revue et 500.000 euros brut perçus auprès du Palais-Bourbon) les ont intéressés. « Pas de Dark Vador, pas de force obscure », sourit aujourd’hui Isabelle Barré.

Des fiches de paie accessibles à 95 personnes
Pourtant le 24 janvier à 18 heures, lorsque le compte Twitter du Canard enchaîné jette son pavé dans la mare, les principales figures de la droite, alors réunies autour d’une galette des rois dans les locaux de campagne de leur candidat, sont persuadées qu’il s’agit là d’un acte de malveillance, peut-être venu de l’intérieur. Parmi les figures entretenant une inimitié notoire avec François Fillon, les noms de Jean-François Copé et Rachida Dati courent sur les lèvres. Tous deux écartent toujours ces allégations. « Si on devait mettre en cause tous ceux à qui François Fillon a fait du mal, la liste serait longue », ajoute l’ancien ministre du Budget.

La piste d’un « cabinet noir » élyséen, lancée par François Fillon lui-même, ne mènera pas plus loin. De toute façon, les revenus des Fillon ne sont pas un secret pour tout le monde: à l’Assemblée nationale, 95 personnes ont accès aux fiches de paie des collaborateurs dans le cadre de leur travail.

Qui veut débrancher la candidature de François Fillon?
S’il est difficile de savoir d’où sont partis les premiers coups, nombreux sont ceux à avoir cherché à achever François Fillon. Dès fin janvier, c’est François Bayrou qui cherche un « plan B » à la droite et au centre. Début février, le président du Sénat, Gérard Larcher, veut mettre un terme à l’équipée, après avoir appris que les enfants de François Fillon avaient aussi été rémunérés par la Haute assemblée durant le mandat sénatorial de leur père.

Peu à peu, les leaders de la droite prennent leurs distances. François Fillon lui-même ne se rend pas service, en affirmant à la télévision qu’il renoncera s’il venait à être mis en examen. Or, quand cette mise en examen lui est notifiée le 28 février par une convocation judiciaire que lui annonce Patrick Stefanini, son directeur de campagne, François Fillon ne renonce pas à faire campagne. Et le meeting du Trocadéro, lors de la matinée pluvieuse du 5 mars à Paris, lui servira de tremplin vers le mur du premier tour du 23 avril.

Pendant toute cette période, Nicolas Sarkozy, vaincu à la primaire, joue un jeu trouble. Comme nous le raconte Rachida Dati, tout le monde ne cesse de l’appeler: Xavier Bertrand, François Bertrand, Laurent Wauquiez. Tous veulent qu’il pousse François Fillon à l’abandon. « A la faveur de chacun d’entre eux… Tout le monde voulait y aller! » s’amuse l’ancienne Garde des Sceaux. Alain Juppé l’appelle aussi, mais tombe sur le répondeur de l’ancien président de la République, à ce moment-là tranquillement installé au parc des Princes devant un match du Paris-Saint-Germain. Devant le peu de cohésion de son camp, et l’obstination de François Fillon, le maire de Bordeaux jette lui aussi l’éponge.

Voir de même:

«Je vais le niquer» : les révélations truculentes de Robert Bourgi, le «tueur» de Fillon

L’homme qui a offert des costumes à François Fillon, Robert Bourgi, s’est vanté chez Jean-Jacques Bourdin, avec une faconde que n’auraient pas reniée «Les Tontons flingueurs», d’avoir «ourdi un complot» contre le candidat pour peser dans sa chute.

Invité chez Jean-Jacques Bourdin sur RMC ce 29 janvier, Robert Bourgi, proche de Nicolas Sarkozy et des cercles du pouvoir, a fait de nouvelles révélations sardoniques sur son ancien «ami» François Fillon. L’homme de loi a reconnu avoir monté un complot contre l’ancien Premier ministre de Nicolas Sarkozy, avec l’intention de «le niquer» pendant la campagne présidentielle. Sa ruse : lui offrir des costumes hors de prix.

Le jour de la diffusion du documentaire «Qui a tué François Fillon ?» sur BFM TV, Robert Bourgi est venu livrer les dessous de son «complot». Il donne le ton en jetant d’emblée à Jean-Jacques Bourdin : «Votre service de sécurité m’a enlevé ma boîte à outils. J’avais la sulfateuse, le marteau et les clous pour le cercueil pour Monsieur Fillon mais pour vous, j’ai quelque chose.» Et l’homme de dégainer un mètre de couturière, pour prendre les mesures de l’animateur. «Ce sera pas Arny’s, ce sera Petit Bateau», rit-il, très content de sa blague.

Il déroule alors l’historique qui le fait apparaître comme un intriguant, avide de relations de pouvoir, éclairant d’un jour nouveau les réseaux d’influence et alliances impitoyables autour des têtes de l’UMP, devenue les Républicains en 2015.

L’avocat d’origine libano-sénégalaise Robert Bourgi, figure de la Françafrique, a toujours courtisé les puissants : Jacques Chirac, Omar Bongo, Laurent Gbagbo et surtout son «ami» Nicolas Sarkozy. Il explique avoir fréquenté régulièrement François Fillon pendant son mandat de Premier ministre. L’homme de loi révèle que le Sarthois souhaitait savoir ce que Nicolas Sarkozy pensait de lui.

Mais Robert Bourgi s’est retourné contre l’ancien Premier ministre lorsque deux journalistes lui ont livré un scoop signé François Hollande durant la campagne de la primaire. Le duo confie à l’avocat : «Ton ami Fillon a demandé la peau de ton ami Sarko.» L’ancien chef du gouvernement avait demandé que la justice accélère concernant les affaires dans lesquelles était impliqué l’ancien chef d’Etat.

Une haine nourrie envers François Fillon pour défendre Nicolas Sarkozy

Dès lors, Robert Bourgi se métamorphose en nettoyeur des couloirs feutrés des cabinets ministériels.

«François Fillon, j’ai décidé de le tuer pour diverses raisons. D’abord parce qu’il a violé toutes les règles de l’amitié avec moi. J’ai toujours été correct avec lui, […] j’ai toujours défendu la position de Fillon auprès de Nicolas dans le but de les réunir un jour ou l’autre. […] Il passait son temps à démolir Nicolas Sarkozy», explique-t-il. Et Robert Bourgi ne plaisante pas avec le sujet. «Il l’a toujours détesté, il a toujours eu les mots les plus inélégants à son égard. A chaque fois je lui disais : « François, tu n’as pas le droit de parler de Nicolas comme ça » […] François Fillon m’avait promis d’être un peu plus loyal à l’endroit de Nicolas Sarkozy, il n’a jamais tenu parole», déplore l’avocat.

J’avais déjà conçu le projet que j’ai réalisé de niquer François Fillon

Il décide alors de fomenter un complot, selon ses propres termes, contre le Sarthois en exploitant ses faiblesses. «J’avais déjà conçu le projet que j’ai réalisé de niquer François Fillon, c’est mieux que tuer», explique-t-il en toute décontraction. «Je savais que l’homme avait des relations étranges avec l’argent parce que nous avions beaucoup parlé, François Fillon et moi», avoue-t-il.

Au cours d’un petit déjeuner au Ritz, Robert Bourgi piège François Fillon. «Je lui dis : « Comme je te sens amoureux de belles choses je vais t’offrir trois costumes pour ta campagne« », raconte-t-il. Le candidat LR accepte sur le champ, mais Robert Bourgi ne règle pas les complets, laissant passer quatre mois jusqu’en février 2017. Pendant ce temps, il dit avoir envoyé de nombreux textos à l’élu de la Sarthe, qui n’a jamais répondu.

Les petites manœuvres de Robert Bourgi pour placer d’anciens proches de Sarkozy

Robert Bourgi ne souhaitait pas parler chiffon mais tentait d’influencer François Fillon sur le choix de ses lieutenants. Il souhaitait le voir s’entourer «de compagnons de Nicolas Sarkozy» qui voulaient le «servir», en lui conseillant de les inclure dans son «comité politique». Aucun retour. Et c’est en homme vexé de ne pas arriver à faire aboutir ses petites manœuvres qu’il se plaint : «Il m’a humilié.»

J’avais ourdi le complot

Alors que François Fillon est en lice pour le second tour de la primaire de la droite, Nicolas Sarkozy confie à l’avocat lors d’un rendez-vous : «Tu as suivi les sondages, ils sont favorables à Fillon. Tu sais, il va droit à l’Elysée.» «Je lui ai dit : « Nicolas, il n’ira jamais à l’Elysée » […] parce que je vais le niquer, j’avais ourdi le complot […] à cause du comportement de Fillon à mon endroit qui n’était pas correct. Je savais exactement que j’allais payer ces costumes par chèque et que j’allais appeler mon ami Valdiguié [rédacteur en chef] au JDD, lui montrer le chèque. Quand on a fait campagne sur les vertus morales, la difficulté des Français à joindre les deux bouts, je me suis dit : « C’est quelque chose qui va le tuer »», justifie l’avocat.

 Ne t’inquiète pas ma fille, je me vengerai

Puis l’affaire s’emballe, en écho avec les soupçons d’emplois fictifs visant sa femme Pénélope Fillon. Sur le plateau du même Jean-Jacques Bourdin, François Fillon qualifie l’avocat d’«homme âgé qui n’a plus aucune espèce de responsabilité». La fille de Robert Bourgi l’appelle en larmes pour l’en informer. L’avocat piqué au vif, toujours aussi à l’aise avec son rôle de porte-flingue, conclut son entreprise de démolition : «Je lui ai dit : « Ne t’inquiète pas ma fille, je me vengerai »». Mission accomplie.

Voir par ailleurs:

Proust’s Way

Love, death, society, art, time, timelessness–and (perhaps) the greatest novelist of the 20th century.

Among the great modern artists, some seem to possess a boundless vitality, a spiritual extravagance that, even in the face of life’s hot suffering, causes them to profess their gratitude for the very fact of existence and to pour forth their praise of nobility, goodness, beauty, fortitude, love. Goethe, Beethoven, Victor Hugo, and Tolstoy are perhaps the foremost such figures.

Admirers of Wagner might place him, too, among the life-enhancers; yet he could write, at the age of thirty-nine, “I lead an indescribably worthless life . . . [F]or me, enjoyment, love are imaginary, not experienced.” Flaubert, who consecrated himself to a prose so beautiful that no real life could touch it, found himself exclaiming with envy at the sight of a bourgeois family enjoying a picnic, “They have it right.” In bitterness of heart, Kafka let loose with “I am made of literature,” meaning he was unfit for life.

And then there is the case of Marcel Proust (1871-1922), whose 3,000-page novels À la recherche du temps perdu (In Search of Lost Time) outshines the masterworks of Wagner, Flaubert, and Kafka but whose life makes theirs look unattainably bold and merry by comparison. Proust may have been the greatest novelist of the 20th century, but he is almost singlehandedly responsible for turning the term “exquisite sensibility” into a jeer. Everyone knows about the madeleine that Proust’s narrator, Marcel, dunks in his tea, triggering a monumental reflux of childhood memories; the asthma that hounded Proust to an early death; the silent, cork-lined room that he rarely left. Speaking to William F. Buckley, Jr. at the height of the cold war, a prominent European intellectual upheld the honor of European manhood by declaring, “We’re not all a bunch of little Prousts over there.”

Sickly, homosexual, addicted to the social whirl, the real-life Proust seemed, to his contemporaries, irreparably frivolous, terminally brittle. Everyone recognized his brilliance, but no one thought he would forge anything lasting out of it. An 1893 portrait by Jacques-Emile Blanche, who was to make his reputation by painting artistic eminences, depicts Proust as a ludicrous dandy in wing collar and cravat. His forehead has a greenish cast, like a week-old bruise, while the rest of his face is waxen. The flower on his lapel, which picks up his facial coloring, bears a disturbing resemblance to an out-sized malign insect. The eyes, though large and alert, do not reveal anything remarkable behind them. There is nothing to indicate that this young man might be more than a fop smitten with his own elegance. The only hint of otherworldliness is in the morbid tints of his face, which suggest that life is already beginning to prove too much for him and that his days are numbered.

To be sure, modern art has made room for, has even become the preserve of, wayward and misshapen souls. In 1918, with his masterpiece largely finished, Proust himself wrote that contemporary reality yielded its subtlest favors to the debauched and the incurable, and (referring to certain 19th-century artists) that “an unknown part of the mind or an additional nuance of affection was bursting with all the drunkenness of a Musset or a Verlaine, with all the perversions of a Baudelaire or a Rimbaud, even a Wagner, with the epilepsy of a Flaubert.” Suffering has its perquisites, and Proust took them for everything he could.

Yet he was also to prove himself a titan. Two identically titled new biographies help us see how, from unprepossessing beginnings, he did it. Both William C. Carter’s Marcel Proust: A Life1 and Jean-Yves Tadié’s Marcel Proust: A Life2 provide moving and cogent accounts of a life that ultimately had a single raison d’être.

The two books differ somewhat in approach. Carter, a professor of French at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, is more considerate to the American reader, deftly filling in the social and political background of Proust’s life and work—as in the case of the Dreyfus affair, which figures so prominently in Proust’s novel. Tadié, who teaches at the Sorbonne in Paris and is widely acknowledged as the world’s leading authority on Proust, takes it for granted that his reader knows things that most Americans do not. His book, which appeared in France in 1996 and which Carter cites repeatedly and respectfully, is the superior work of scholarship, but it is studded with impedimenta that sometimes make for tough going. (Tadié will record who wrote a review in a certain newspaper on a given day, for instance, but not what the review said, or set down the guest lists for parties that Proust attended, without a clue as to who these people were.) Still, there is much that Tadié knows that one is grateful to have between the covers of a book, and taken together Carter and Tadié constitute a treasure trove.

_____________

Marcel Proust was the son of Adrien Proust, an eminent Parisian doctor, and his wife, born Jeanne Weil. The father was Catholic and the mother Jewish. Although she herself refused to convert, Jeanne agreed that their children would be raised as Catholics. As it happened, however, neither parent practiced his faith and, once Marcel had made his first communion, his church-going days were pretty much over.

Jewish religious law holds that the child of a Jewish mother is a Jew, but Proust never considered himself one, and neither did his friends. Still, his parentage occasionally presented difficulties. Once, as a young man, he stood silent and unresponsive when a revered mentor, Comte Robert de Montesquiou-Fezensac, delivered an anti-Semitic tirade in the company of friends and then asked Proust for his opinion on the 1894 conviction of Captain Alfred Dreyfus, a Jew, who had been tried for treason on the charge of selling military secrets to the Germans. The next day, Proust wrote to Montesquiou that he had not said anything because, although he himself was Catholic like his father and brother, his mother was Jewish: “I am sure you understand that this is reason enough for me to refrain from such discussions.”

Whether Proust’s private frankness made up for his public reticence is a vexing question, and all the more so because he went on to confide that he was “not free to have the ideas I might otherwise have on the subject.” Proust’s tacit fear, in other words, was that if he defended the Jews he would be taken for a Jew, and what he wanted above all was to be thought of as a Christian gentleman. He even seemed to leave open the possibility that Montesquiou might be right: that only filial piety forbade him from thinking as Montesquiou did. In Carter’s view, “Proust stated his position and his independence, but he might have been less ambiguous about the ethical implications of racist remarks.” Carter is too kind. Proust was only as forthright as his social cowardice—his fear of sacrificing his respectability—would allow.

He was to find his courage when events made it easier to be courageous. By 1898, more and more people had become convinced that Dreyfus had been railroaded, and an uproar ensued that was to shake French society for years. The salon of Mme. Genevieve Straus (the widow of the composer Georges Bizet), where Proust had been a habitue for several years, turned into a Dreyfusard hotbed. Old friends of the anti-Dreyfus persuasion, including the painter Edgar Degas, stalked off and never came back. Drawing strength from those around him, Proust now joined in the growing drumbeat for a retrial that was led by the novelist Emile Zola. He was even to boast that he was the first of the Dreyfusards, because he secured the signature of his literary hero Anatole France on a petition. Still, when an anti-Semitic newspaper numbered him among the “young Jews” who defied decency and right thinking, Proust, who at first thought to correct the paper’s misapprehension, decided to keep quiet, lest he draw any more attention to himself. He must have known that, in the eyes of anti-Dreyfusards, his political affiliations only served to confirm the sad fact of his birth.

_____________

If the Dreyfus affair exposed the moral cretinism that extended into the upper echelons of French society, this hardly deterred Proust from wanting a place in that world. His social career had begun during his last year of high school, when, thanks to the mothers of some of his school friends, he gained admission to certain exclusive Parisian salons. His chum Jacques Bizet, whom he had tried to seduce, without success, made it up to him by serving as his ticket to the beau monde. At the salon of Mme. Straus, young Bizet’s mother, Proust became acquainted with artistic and aristocratic grandees like the composer Gabriel Fauré, the writer Guy de Maupassant, the actress Sarah Bernhardt, and Princesse Mathilde, the niece of Napoleon I. In time he became a regular at Princesse Mathilde’s as well, where the old-line nobility rubbed shoulders with arrivistes, and distinguished Jews mingled with those who detested them. (The writer Léon Daudet, to whom Proust would dedicate a volume of his novel, confided to his diary after one party: “The imperial dwelling was infested with Jews and Jewesses.”)

Another hostess conquered by the high-flying young Proust was Mme. Madeleine Lemaire, renowned for her musical gatherings. It was she who introduced him to Montesquiou-Fezensac, the aristocratic poet whose opinions on Jews Proust was willing to overlook for the sake of the Count’s artistic and social cachet. And there was something else: Montesquiou was boldly aboveboard about his homosexuality, at a time when, as Carter writes, “few Frenchmen dared, if they cared for their reputation and social standing, to display amorous affection for another man.” This frankness earned Proust’s regard—although he was, of course, ambivalent about going public on the issue of his own sexual nature.

Not that it was any secret to those who knew him. In high school, Proust had laid elaborate sexual siege to friends, writing them letters fraught with passion. When his disposition became apparent to his father, in the name of decency the agitated Dr. Proust slipped the boy ten francs and sent him off to a (female) prostitute; the mission wound up a fiasco when Proust broke a chamber pot and spoiled the romance of the moment.

Such happiness as Proust had from love was not made to last. Probably his first consummated affair was with the composer Reynaldo Hahn, whom he met at Mme. Lemaire’s when he was twenty-two and Hahn nineteen. Raw nerves and ceaseless importunity characterized Proust’s love for Hahn, who quickly tired of his friend’s demanding antics. But it was really Proust who fell out of love first, as he fell in love with the stripling Lucien Daudet, son of the novelist Alphonse Daudet and brother of the venomous Leon. Proust would even fight a duel with a journalist, himself homosexual, who hinted salaciously in print that his friendship with Lucien was not quite respectable; both duelists fired and missed.

Proust had good reason to keep his intimate proclivities under wraps. But biographers have their job to do, and Carter and Tadié leave little unsaid. Both record his favored mode of sexual recreation: going to a homosexual brothel and masturbating while watching as the man he had hired masturbated in front of him. If this procedure failed of its effect, the obliging prostitute would bring in a pair of hungry rats and loose them on each other, a spectacle that would invariably afford Proust the needed relief. (For this information we have the testimony both of one such prostitute and of the writer André Gide, in whom Proust confided.)

To the innocent observer, Proust’s sexual preferences may well appear about as demented as such things get; but normality of any kind was never Proust’s strong suit. Abysmal health plagued him his life long, and he cultivated the perpetual invalid’s peculiarities. Wracked by asthma, he spent six hours a day burning eucalyptus powders and inhaling the fumes. He needed veronal and opium and morphine to sleep, caffeine to revive him and also to help his asthma. The huge doses he took of caffeine brought on angina; the sedatives and painkillers destroyed his ability to register temperature, so that on sweltering days he would wear a heavy coat. A year’s supply of medications cost him the equivalent of $20,000 in today’s money. (His parents left him an inheritance of some $4.6 million, so the expenses were not insupportable.)

_____________

From his early twenties, Proust kept vampire’s hours, sleeping during the day and venturing abroad only under cover of darkness. As he grew older and sicker, he ventured out less and less. His cork-lined room became his refuge. Illness, he wrote to a friend, had made it necessary for him “to do without nearly everything and to replace people by their images and life by thought.” He subscribed to a device called the theatrophone, over which he could hear live operatic and dramatic performances without leaving his bed. He hired the best string quartet in Paris to play just for him in the middle of the night. In his latter days, he subsisted largely on ice cream and iced beer, ordered from the Ritz.

And through the worst of his misery, when it was almost impossible to eat, sleep, or breathe, he worked. From his youth he had wanted to be a writer, but the full seriousness of his vocation did not impress itself upon him until he was well into his thirties. His first book, Plaisirs et Jours (Pleasures and Days), a collection of stories, poems, and pastiches, had appeared when he was twenty-three and was generally dismissed as a fussy curiosity. Fuming at the critics’ condescension, Proust set to work on a vast autobiographical novel, Jean Santeuil, which he abandoned after five years and a thousand pages. He translated a volume of John Ruskin, the English art and social critic; produced essays of his own on such artists as Watteau, Chardin, Rembrandt, Moreau, and Monet; and worked abortively on another novel that converged with a study of the literary critic Sainte-Beuve.

His painful failures made for an invaluable apprenticeship. Though the record is hazy, it was perhaps in 1908 that Proust conceived the work for which he would be known; by the next year, the novel was well tinder way. Carter says that by 1916 or soon thereafter, Proust “gave his book its ultimate shape if not its final dimensions,” but his tugging and worrying at the manuscript would continue to his final days. À la recherche du temps perdu appeared in eight volumes, published between 1913 and 1927, the last four posthumously. The titles of the constituent parts are Du côté de chez Swann (Swann’s Way), À l’ombre des jeunes filles en fleur (In the Shade of the Young Girls in Flower), Le côté de Guermantes (The Guermantes Way), Sodome et Gomorrhe (Sodom and Gomorrah), La prisonnière (The Captive), Albertine disparue (Albertine Gone), and Le temps retrouvé (Time Regained).3

_____________

Proust’s novel takes as its great themes the illusions and disappointments of love, friendship, and society (in the limited sense of that word), and the joyous satisfactions of art. The book opens with the narrator’s reminiscence—his name is Marcel, although one has to read over 2,000 pages to find that out—of lying in bed as a boy and waiting for his mother’s good-night kiss; proceeds to a recollection of youthful days in the countrified Parisian suburb of Combray; then goes back to a time before Marcel was born and portrays the agonizing love of Monsieur Swann, an old friend of the family, for the courtesan Odette de Crécy.

Most of the rest of the book has to do with Marcel’s being in love, seeing others in love, and going to parties. His first romance, physically quite innocent but emotionally flaying, is with the Swanns’ daughter, Gilberte. (Unlike his creator, Marcel is heterosexual.) Next comes Albertine, whom Marcel singles out from a fascinating crowd of rowdy girls in the seaside resort of Balbec; this love is not innocent and is even more destructive. Meanwhile Marcel becomes friendly with the Duchesse de Guermantes, who embodies a social grandeur that sets him dreaming; gets to know the novelist Bergotte and the painter Elstir, who provide lessons in what art can and cannot do; mixes with the Verdurins, a couple of distasteful bourgeois climbers, and their circle of fools; and is courted in a most unnerving fashion by the Baron de Charlus, lord prince of the sodomites. Interleaved throughout are meditations and conversations on actual and imagined works of art, ladies’ fashions, etymology, military strategy, homosexuality, anti-Semitism, social transformations, time, and timelessness.

For most of the novel, finally, Marcel is a writer manqué, an aspirant who lacks the understanding to conceive a novel and the will to see it through. The book then records the process by which he becomes the writer who has written the extraordinary work one is reading. “And thus,” he concludes, “my whole life up to the present day might and yet might not have been summed up under the title: A Vocation.”

What does that “vocation” reveal? No other writer/narrator has attended with such extravagant care to the surface of things: the grace or ungainliness of a gesture, the historical associations of a great name, the import of a gravely formal bow in response to a friendly greeting, the radiance of a distinguished smile or shirtfront, party talk that goes on for miles. Yet, although the charms of love, friendship, and society present a brilliant and beguiling surface, they never please Marcel for long. Real life is to be found elsewhere, and only the rare soul manages to find it.

For Marcel, there is no desire more imperious than the desire to know. It is the motive force of his life and of his relentless pursuit of what he calls reality. The words “real” and “reality” must recur a thousand times in this novel, being signposts—like “virtue” for Machiavelli, “happiness” for Tolstoy, or “good” for Hemingway—that lead the reader to the heart of its unfolding significance. But to disclose the reality at life’s core requires one to experience illusion, in all its manifold and obdurate guises, and this experience is Marcel’s meat and drink.

Nowhere in Proust’s world are illusion’s guises harder to penetrate than when it comes to sex and love. The Proustian lover typically ascribes to the object of his desire all manner of enchanting virtues, which generally have no basis in fact, and then torments himself with a plague of suspected vices, which as a rule prove only too real. Every conceivable infidelity must be envisioned in gross detail, since as long as one is in love one can never assure oneself of the reality of the beloved’s heart. This ignorance is torture—but knowledge brings an end to love itself. Even carnal knowledge is no knowledge at all, only an initiation into the pangs of uncertainty.

In the early stages of Swann’s love for Odette, he believes he knows her better than anyone else does; the rumors he has heard that she is an elegant whore who has been kept by a number of men cannot be true, for she is incomparably sensitive and kind and good. In time he finds out otherwise. But even when Swann falls out of love, he cannot be indifferent to Odette unless he continues to possess her; his only recourse is to marry this woman whom he knows to be a slut.

Marcel emulates Swann in his need—ruinous to a lover, exceedingly useful to an aspiring writer—to know everything about the woman he loves, especially the worst. Albertine’s fishy answers to some pointed questions about a sexually charged encounter she has had with Gilberte (Swann’s daughter and Marcel’s first love) set the young man’s mental wheels turning. Once the lever is tripped and the questions begin, there is no stopping them. Jealous obsession is a perpetual-motion machine; it will quit its savage taunting only when love is smashed to pieces, and maybe not even then.

As it happens—as it always happens in Proust—Marcel’s worst imaginings turn out to be true: tireless researches and numberless rounds of cat and mouse confirm that Albertine is a lesbian. When she leaves him and is killed in a riding accident, Marcel is grief-stricken; but in due course his tender memories give way to renewed jealousy, a jealousy “stamped with the character, at once tormenting and solemn, of puzzles left forever insoluble by the death of the one person who could have explained them.”

_____________

Then there is the case of the Baron de Charlus, who chats with the young man at a party and invites him up to his place afterward. This nobleman, whom Marcel has heard spoken of as the lover of Mme. Swann, is a caricature of virility, swaggering like a preening cock and proclaiming his disgust with the effeminacy of modern youth. He intimates to Marcel that he might be interested in taking him under his protection and bestowing upon him the untold benefits of his exalted position, his peerless taste, his unrivaled knowledge of the world. But when they next meet, Charlus is outraged at the young man’s ignorance, presumption, and cloddishness. Their friendship is finished before it ever really gets started.

The next sighting clarifies matters: Marcel spies Charlus in the courtyard of the Guermantes mansion—Charlus belongs to that venerable family—evidently bemused by the look of a tailor named Jupien who has a shop there. After a wordless mating dance, the two men withdraw to Jupien’s shop, where they have at it with vociferous gusto. The noise they make—Marcel can hear but cannot see them—sounds as though one might be slitting the other’s throat, so close are the groans of pleasure to those of pain. Once the indispensable facts are known, everything else falls into place. Charlus is in love with an ideal manliness because he is, in the crucial respect, a woman.

The long meditation on homosexuality that follows this episode is often taken to be Proust’s definitive word on the subject. Some passages are certainly heartfelt and magniloquent: “a race upon which a curse is laid and which must live in falsehood and perjury because it knows that its desire, that which constitutes life’s dearest pleasure, is held to be punishable, shameful, an inadmissible thing.” Marcel is even capable of attributing to sexual collisions like Charlus’s and Jupien’s a kind of sublime necessity:

[T]his Romeo and this Juliet may believe with good reason that their love is not a momentary whim but a true predestination, determined by the harmonies of their temperaments, and not only by their own personal temperaments but by those of their ancestors, by their most distant strains of heredity, so much so that the fellow creature who is conjoined with them has belonged to them from before their birth, has attracted them by a force comparable to that which governs the worlds on which we spent our former lives.

But as Marcel comes to know more and more about Charlus, his frothy enthusiasm turns to disgust and horror. At the funeral of Charlus’s wife, whom Charlus has spoken of as the most noble and beautiful person he had ever known, the Baron tries to pick up an altar boy. When World War I depletes the supply of eligible men, he takes to molesting children. He bankrolls a male brothel, of which Jupien becomes the innkeeper. There Marcel, who has wandered in innocently one night, sees Charlus chained to a bed and beaten with a whip studded with nails, afterward protesting to Jupien that his torturer was not “sufficiently brutal.” When Charlus leaves, Jupien boasts to Marcel that his establishment has the toniest, most cultivated clientele. Marcel replies that it is “worse than a madhouse, since the mad fancies of the lunatics who inhabit it are played out as actual, visible drama—it is a veritable pandemonium.”

_____________

Normality, decency, goodness are, in short, the rarest of commodities in Proust’s world. Nor does their scarcity make them prized, except in the eyes of Marcel and a few other uncharacteristic souls. Instead, decency is seen by most as a social handicap; the Verdurins’ circle of bourgeois snobs, for example, barely tolerates a stammering, clumsy paleographer named Saniette. Monsieur Verdurin’s mockery of Saniette’s speech impediment makes “the faithful burst out laughing, looking like a group of cannibals in whom the sight of a wounded white man has aroused the thirst for blood.” And nowhere is this savage tribalism more marked than in the antipathy that those who consider themselves true Frenchmen feel for Jews.

Anti-Semitism is everywhere in Proust’s novel. Perhaps the most repellent instance occurs when the madam of a cheap brothel Marcel is visiting touts the exotic richness of the prostitute Rachel’s flesh: “And with an inane affectation of excitement which she hoped would prove contagious, and which ended in a hoarse gurgle, almost of sensual satisfaction: ‘Think of that, my boy, a Jewess! Wouldn’t that be thrilling? Rrrr!’ ”

Those in the highest reaches of society share the sentiments of the lowest. Thus, Charlus is given to maniacal explosions of loathing for Jews, while the Prince de Guermantes, Swann tells Marcel, hates Jews so much that, when a wing of his castle caught fire, he let it burn to the ground rather than send for fire extinguishers to the house next door, which happened to be the Rothschilds’. Swann is himself one of the rare Jews allowed entrance to the highest society, which leads to the outrage of the Duc de Guermantes when Swann, who had always impressed him as a Jew of the right sort, “an honorable Jew,” turns out to be an outspoken Dreyfusard.

As in its sentiments toward Jews, so in every other way, the social world in Proust is revealed as a “realm of nullity.” Any glimmer of moral discrimination, let alone of true understanding, shines like a beacon; for the most part, darkness prevails. In the famous closing scene of The Guermantes Way, the duke and duchess, on their way to a dinner party, are bidding good evening to Swann and Marcel. The duchess inquires whether Swann will join them on a trip to Italy ten months hence; Swann replies that he is mortally ill and will be dead by then. The duchess does not know how to respond: “placed for the first time in her life between two duties as incompatible as getting into her carriage to go out to dinner and showing compassion for a man who was about to die, she could find nothing in the code of conventions that indicated the right line to follow.”

With his “instinctive politeness,” Swann senses the duchess’s discomfort and says he must not detain them: “he knew that for other people their own social obligations took precedence over the death of a friend.” And yet, although the duke and duchess do not have a moment to spare to comfort their dying friend, they nevertheless do delay their departure while the duchess, who is wearing black shoes with her red dress, changes at her husband’s insistence into a more suitable pair of red shoes.

This portrait of gross moral insensibility in the face of death is comedy of manners at its most scathing, perhaps even overdone: the duke complains that his wife is dead-tired, and that he is dying of hunger. The indignant Marcel rewards the stupidity of these preposterous creatures with unforgettable strokes of cold fury. On another distressing occasion, a doctor preoccupied with his social calendar pronounces casually that Marcel’s grandmother is dying, and Marcel observes, “Each of us is indeed alone.” One has friends and lovers and family, one mixes in the best society, but finally one has no intimates. Death comes for us strictly one by one—a thought hardly to be borne.

_____________

Marcel’s triumph is that he does find a way to bear it, indeed to overcome it. In Time Regained, after spending years in a sanatorium, he is on his way to a party hosted by the Duchesse de Guermantes. The previous day he had experienced what he thought was his final disillusionment with the life of literature, but as he enters the courtyard of the Guermantes mansion a revelatory sensation changes his life. A car nearly hits him, and when he steps back out of its way he places his foot on a paving stone that is slightly lower than the one next to it; this unevenness underfoot fills him with an inexplicable and extraordinary joy.

Rocking back and forth on the irregular pavement, Marcel remembers standing on two uneven stones in the baptistery of St. Mark’s in Venice, and all the various sensations associated with that particular moment come flooding back. Similar marvels await him when he enters the Guermantes house and, twice more, involuntary memories overwhelm him in their glory. He is supremely happy, but cannot at first explain it. Why should this sudden efflorescence of memory have “given me a joy which . . . sufficed, without any other proof, to make death a matter of indifference”? He concludes that such episodes of transfiguring lucidity, for as long as they last, annihilate time, and are the most that a living man will know of eternity.

But just when he believes himself certain of the ultimate reality of timelessness, he is reminded sharply that time, too, is undeniably real. The party to which he is presently admitted strikes him, at first, as a masquerade, where everyone has been made up to look old. But the truth is that everyone looks old because everyone is old. Marcel has been away a long time, and time has done its work. Withered, sagging, shuffling, sputtering, wheezing, this assemblage of geezers and crones is the sad remnant of a company once distinguished for its beauty and vigor.

At last Marcel has penetrated the real world, and sees what he is supposed to do with his new knowledge: to write the book that one is reading. The awareness of time’s passing spurs him to get down to the serious work that will offer him life’s supreme pleasure: illuminating the nature of timelessness. “How happy would he be, I thought, the man who had the power to write such a book! What a task awaited him!”

_____________

Love, death, society, art: Proust takes on the great themes. Does he do them justice?

Love as Proust writes about it is love as he experienced it: a neediness so desperate no possible response can satisfy it, a relentless harrying demand for complete possession, intensified by the perversity or promiscuity or unavailability of the beloved. What Proust knows of love he knows as almost no one else does. On jealousy—and the hatred and self-hatred it causes—he is an indisputable authority, who has perhaps only Shakespeare for a rival. But about love itself, Shakespeare knows a great deal else, while Proust has the specialist’s habit of going on about his subject as though it were the only thing deserving attention. The effect is of moral lopsidedness and incompletion, as though Tolstoy had devoted the whole of Anna Karenina to Anna and Vronsky’s wretched adultery without the counterweight of Levin and Kitty’s triumphant love; such a novel could still be a great one, but something vital would be missing.

Complicating this picture of Proustian love is Marcel’s attitude toward homosexuality. Although Proust enjoys cult status among homosexuals, the treatment of homosexuality in his great novel is, as we have seen, anything but purely admiring. André Gide, outspoken champion of homosexual freedom, chastised Proust, though only in private, for the disservice he did the cause: by taking an “impartial point of view,” Gide said, Proust had “branded this subject with a red-hot iron that serves conventional morality far more effectively than the most emphatic moral treatises.” (And Gide was commenting only on Sodom and Gomorrah; he had yet to read the brothel scene, which takes place in Time Regained.)

Gide later relented of his severity, after a conversation with Proust left him with the realization “that what we find ignoble, derisive, or disgusting [in his book] does not seem to him so repulsive.” But can it really be that Proust intended the reader to see Marcel’s revulsion at the scene in the male brothel as wrong, or as some sort of moral defect? Admittedly, there are passages (like the one quoted earlier) in which Marcel rises to an overt defense of homosexuality; and a rhetorical ploy he favors is to compare the plight of homosexuals to that of the Jews. Yet although Marcel may claim that the two conditions are morally comparable, he shows otherwise. If there is an unsavory Jew or two in the novel—the social-climbing writer Bloch, for instance—their peccadilloes do not approach the patent monstrosities of Charlus.

While Proust spends countless pages of fevered analysis on love, death gets only a few brief passages—but they are extraordinary. Marcel’s most exacting criticism of society is that its forms do not accommodate the fact of mortality: the overriding concern with propriety turns the heart to stone, and the death of a friend or relative only gets in the way of those who go on living. His vision of human solitude in the face of death reminds one of Edvard Munch’s great and dreadful painting Grief, in which a roomful of people are arrayed around the bed of a dead woman: no one touches or even looks at anyone else; each is locked in his own impenetrable sorrow, mourning by himself and, one suspects, for himself.

But unlike Munch, Proust does admit the possibility of consolation, even of redemption. The writer Bergotte dies while sitting in a museum and looking at a patch of yellow wall in a painting by his beloved Vermeer. This devotional attitude moves Marcel to think of “a different world, a world based on kindness, scrupulousness, self-sacrifice, a world entirely different from this one and which we leave in order to be born on this earth, before perhaps returning there. . . . So that the idea that Bergotte was not permanently dead is by no means improbable.” It is this spiritual capaciousness that Saul Bellow’s Mr. Sammler has in mind when he speaks of In Search of Lost Time as “a high-ceilinged masterpiece.”

_____________

In the end, of course, there is only one sort of life that Proust believes to be worth living: the life of the artist. Neither bourgeois respectability nor aristocratic gaiety possesses any lasting hold on Marcel; both represent the unreal world he finds his way out of, and are of interest only insofar as they give him something to write about. But more towering artists than Proust have rendered ordinary lives with an imaginative sympathy that makes such lives extraordinary. Indeed, this imaginative sympathy, this sense that life holds out the possibility of fulfillment and happiness even for people who do not happen to be artists, is what makes both Goethe and Tolstoy greater writers than Proust.

As for those masters—Flaubert, Joyce, Wallace Stevens—who claim that art is the best thing life has to offer, none of them delivers so grandly as Proust. But here another irony needs to be registered. For what lives most memorably in his novel is not the “real” world of Marcel’s highest aspirations but the “unreal” world, the world of thumbscrew love and puddinghead society; the timeless reality Marcel evokes seems dim indeed beside Charlus’s bed of pain or the duchess’s red shoes. A lifetime of hard suffering went into this masterpiece, and, for better and for worse, it is humanity in its heartache and failure that enjoys pride of place.

Whether Proust found the joy in the writing of his novel that Marcel professes to know is a question. The writing certainly took everything he had. His devoted housekeeper Céleste Albaret recalled that one night in the spring of 1922 Proust summoned her and declared, “I have important news. Tonight, I wrote the word ‘end.’ Now I can die.” He did everything that he had it in him to do. That is a claim few can make.

_____________

1 Yale University Press, 960 pp., $35.00.

2 Translated by Evan Cameron. Viking, 934 pp., $45.00.

3 The first English translation of the novel (1922-1931), by C.K. Scott-Moncrieff, is justly renowned; F. Scott Fitzgerald called it “a masterpiece in itself.” Revised by Terence Kilmartin (1982), it is still available under the title Remembrance of Things Past, and this is the translation I will be referring to (Vintage paperback). D.J. Enright’s further revision of this version bears the more accurate title In Search of Lost Time (Modern Library). Penguin Books promises yet another translation due out next year.


Hillbilly elegy: Attention, une relégation sociale peut en cacher une autre ! (It’s the culture, stupid !)

17 septembre, 2017

Aux États-Unis, les plus opulents citoyens ont bien soin de ne point s’isoler du peuple ; au contraire, ils s’en rapprochent sans cesse, ils l’écoutent volontiers et lui parlent tous les jours. Alexis de Tocqueville
Toutes les stratégies que les intellectuels et les artistes produisent contre les « bourgeois » tendent inévitablement, en dehors de toute intention expresse et en vertu même de la structure de l’espace dans lequel elles s’engendrent, à être à double effet et dirigées indistinctement contre toutes les formes de soumission aux intérêts matériels, populaires aussi bien que bourgeoises.  Bourdieu
If you’re not working, over time you’re much more likely to develop attitudes and orientations and behavior patterns that are associated with casual or infrequent work. And then when you open up opportunities for people, you notice that these attitudes, orientations, habits and styles also change. William Julius Wilson
Crime, family dissolution, welfare, and low levels of social organization are fundamentally a consequence of the disappearance of work. William Julius Wilson
Racism should be viewed as an intervening variable. You give me a set of conditions and I can produce racism in any society. You give me a different set of conditions and I can reduce racism. You give me a situation where there are a sufficient number of social resources so people don’t have to compete for those resources, and I will show you a society where racism is held in check. If we could create the conditions that make racism difficult, or discourage it, then there would be less stress and less need for affirmative action programs. One of those conditions would be an economic policy that would create tight labor markets over long periods of time. Now does that mean that affirmative action is here only temporarily? I think the ultimate goal should be to remove it. William Julius Wilson
On brode beaucoup sur la non intégration des jeunes de banlieue. En réalité, ils sont totalement intégrés culturellement. Leur culture, comme le rap, sert de référence à toute la jeunesse. Ils sont bien sûr confrontés à de nombreux problèmes mais sont dans une logique d’intégration culturelle à la société monde. Les jeunes ruraux, dont les loisirs se résument souvent à la bagnole, le foot et l’alcool, vivent dans une marginalité culturelle. En feignant de croire que l’immigration ne participe pas à la déstructuration des plus modestes (Français ou immigrés), la gauche accentue la fracture qui la sépare des catégories populaires. Fracture d’autant plus forte qu’une partie de la gauche continue d’associer cette France précarisée qui demande à être protégée de la mondialisation et de l’immigration à la « France raciste ». Dans le même temps, presque malgré elle, la gauche est de plus en plus plébiscitée par une « autre France », celle des grands centres urbains les plus actifs, les plus riches et les mieux intégrés à l’économie-monde ; sur ces territoires où se retrouvent les extrêmes de l’éventail social (du bobo à l’immigré), la mondialisation est une bénédiction. Christophe Guilluy
La focalisation sur le « problème des banlieues » fait oublier un fait majeur : 61 % de la population française vit aujourd’hui hors des grandes agglomérations. Les classes populaires se concentrent dorénavant dans les espaces périphériques : villes petites et moyennes, certains espaces périurbains et la France rurale. En outre, les banlieues sensibles ne sont nullement « abandonnées » par l’État. Comme l’a établi le sociologue Dominique Lorrain, les investissements publics dans le quartier des Hautes Noues à Villiers-sur-Marne (Val-de-Marne) sont mille fois supérieurs à ceux consentis en faveur d’un quartier modeste de la périphérie de Verdun (Meuse), qui n’a jamais attiré l’attention des médias. Pourtant, le revenu moyen par habitant de ce quartier de Villiers-sur-Marne est de 20 % supérieur à celui de Verdun. Bien sûr, c’est un exemple extrême. Il reste que, à l’échelle de la France, 85 % des ménages pauvres (qui gagnent moins de 993 € par mois, soit moins de 60 % du salaire médian, NDLR) ne vivent pas dans les quartiers « sensibles ». Si l’on retient le critère du PIB, la Seine-Saint-Denis est plus aisée que la Meuse ou l’Ariège. Le 93 n’est pas un espace de relégation, mais le cœur de l’aire parisienne. (…)  En se désindustrialisant, les grandes villes ont besoin de beaucoup moins d’employés et d’ouvriers mais de davantage de cadres. C’est ce qu’on appelle la gentrification des grandes villes, symbolisée par la figure du fameux « bobo », partisan de l’ouverture dans tous les domaines. Confrontées à la flambée des prix dans le parc privé, les catégories populaires, pour leur part, cherchent des logements en dehors des grandes agglomérations. En outre, l’immobilier social, dernier parc accessible aux catégories populaires de ces métropoles, s’est spécialisé dans l’accueil des populations immigrées. Les catégories populaires d’origine européenne et qui sont éligibles au parc social s’efforcent d’éviter les quartiers où les HLM sont nombreux. Elles préfèrent déménager en grande banlieue, dans les petites villes ou les zones rurales pour accéder à la propriété et acquérir un pavillon. On assiste ainsi à l’émergence de « villes monde » très inégalitaires où se concentrent à la fois cadres et catégories populaires issues de l’immigration récente. Ce phénomène n’est pas limité à Paris. Il se constate dans toutes les agglomérations de France (Lyon, Bordeaux, Nantes, Lille, Grenoble), hormis Marseille. (…) On a du mal à formuler certains faits en France. Dans le vocabulaire de la politique de la ville, « classes moyennes » signifie en réalité « population d’origine européenne ». Or les HLM ne font plus coexister ces deux populations. L’immigration récente, pour l’essentiel familiale, s’est concentrée dans les quartiers de logements sociaux des grandes agglomérations, notamment les moins valorisés. Les derniers rapports de l’observatoire national des zones urbaines sensibles (ZUS) montrent qu’aujourd’hui 52 % des habitants des ZUS sont immigrés, chiffre qui atteint 64 % en Île-de-France. Cette spécialisation tend à se renforcer. La fin de la mixité dans les HLM n’est pas imputable aux bailleurs sociaux, qui font souvent beaucoup d’efforts. Mais on ne peut pas forcer des personnes qui ne le souhaitent pas à vivre ensemble. L’étalement urbain se poursuit parce que les habitants veulent se séparer, même si ça les fragilise économiquement. Par ailleurs, dans les territoires où se côtoient populations d’origine européenne et populations d’immigration extra-européenne, la fin du modèle assimilationniste suscite beaucoup d’inquiétudes. L’autre ne devient plus soi. Une société multiculturelle émerge. Minorités et majorités sont désormais relatives. (…)  ces personnes habitent là où on produit les deux tiers du PIB du pays et où se crée l’essentiel des emplois, c’est-à-dire dans les métropoles. Une petite bourgeoisie issue de l’immigration maghrébine et africaine est ainsi apparue. Dans les ZUS, il existe une vraie mobilité géographique et sociale : les gens arrivent et partent. Ces quartiers servent de sas entre le Nord et le Sud. Ce constat ruine l’image misérabiliste d’une banlieue ghetto où seraient parqués des habitants condamnés à la pauvreté. À bien des égards, la politique de la ville est donc un grand succès. Les seuls phénomènes actuels d’ascension sociale dans les milieux populaires se constatent dans les catégories immigrées des métropoles. Cadres ou immigrés, tous les habitants des grandes agglomérations tirent bénéfice d’y vivre – chacun à leur échelle. En Grande-Bretagne, en 2013, le secrétaire d’État chargé des Universités et de la Science de l’époque, David Willetts, s’est même déclaré favorable à une politique de discrimination positive en faveur des jeunes hommes blancs de la « working class » car leur taux d’accès à l’université s’est effondré et est inférieur à celui des enfants d’immigrés. (…) Le problème social et politique majeur de la France, c’est que, pour la première fois depuis la révolution industrielle, la majeure partie des catégories populaires ne vit plus là où se crée la richesse. Au XIXe siècle, lors de la révolution industrielle, on a fait venir les paysans dans les grandes villes pour travailler en usine. Aujourd’hui, on les fait repartir à la « campagne ». C’est un retour en arrière de deux siècles. Le projet économique du pays, tourné vers la mondialisation, n’a plus besoin des catégories populaires, en quelque sorte. (…) L’absence d’intégration économique des catégories modestes explique le paradoxe français : un pays qui redistribue beaucoup de ses richesses mais dont une majorité d’habitants considèrent à juste titre qu’ils sont de plus en plus fragiles et déclassés. (…) Les catégories populaires qui vivent dans ces territoires sont d’autant plus attachées à leur environnement local qu’elles sont, en quelque sorte, assignées à résidence. Elles réagissent en portant une grande attention à ce que j’appelle le «village» : sa maison, son quartier, son territoire, son identité culturelle, qui représentent un capital social. La contre-société s’affirme aussi dans le domaine des valeurs. La France périphérique est attachée à l’ordre républicain, réservée envers les réformes de société et critique sur l’assistanat. L’accusation de «populisme» ne l’émeut guère. Elle ne supporte plus aucune forme de tutorat – ni politique, ni intellectuel – de la part de ceux qui se croient «éclairés». (…) Il devient très difficile de fédérer et de satisfaire tous les électorats à la fois. Dans un monde parfait, il faudrait pouvoir combiner le libéralisme économique et culturel dans les agglomérations et le protectionnisme, le refus du multiculturalisme et l’attachement aux valeurs traditionnelles dans la France périphérique. Mais c’est utopique. C’est pourquoi ces deux France décrivent les nouvelles fractures politiques, présentes et à venir. Christophe Guilluy
Parler de relégation sociale n’a pas grand sens quand on est à dix minutes du métro et au coeur d’un marché de l’emploi gigantesque. Christophe Guilluy
J’ai suivi cette campagne avec un sentiment de malaise franchement (…) qui s’est peu à peu transformé en honte.  (…) Malaise parce que la deuxième France, dont vous parlez, la France qui est périphérique, qui hésite entre Marine Le Pen et rien,  je me suis rendu compte que je ne la comprenais pas, que je ne la voyais pas, que j’avais perdu le contact. Et ça, quand on veut écrire des romans, je trouve que c’est une faute professionnelle assez lourde.  (….) Parce que je ne la vois plus, je fais partie de l’élite mondialisée, maintenant. (…) Et pourtant, je viens de cette France. (…) Elle habite pas dans les mêmes quartiers que moi. Elle habite pas à Paris. A Paris, Le Pen n’existe pas. Elle habite dans des zones périphériques décrites par Christophe Guilluy. Des zones mal connues. (…) Mais le fait est que j’ai perdu le contact. (…) Non, je la comprends pas suffisamment, je veux dire, je pourrais pas écrire dessus. C’est ça qui me gêne, c’est pour ça que suis mal à l’aise. (…) Non, je suis pas dans la même situation. Moi, je ne crois pas au vote idéologique, je crois au vote de classe. Bien que le mot est démodé. Il y a une classe qui vote Le Pen, une classe qui vote Macron, une classe qui vote Fillon. Facilement identifiables et on le voit tout de suite. Et que je le veuille ou non, je fais partie de la France qui vote Macron. Parce que je suis trop riche pour voter Le Pen ou Mélenchon. Et parce que je suis pas un hériter, donc je suis pas la classe qui vote Fillon. (…) Ce qui est apparu et qui est très surprenant – alors, ça, c’est vraiment un phénomène imprévu – c’est un véritable parti confessionnel, précisément catholique. Dans tout ce que j’ai suivi – et, je vous dis, j’ai tout suivi  – Jean-Frédéric Poisson était quand même le plus étonnant. (…) Une espèce d’impavidité et une défense des valeurs catholiques qui est inhabituelle pour un parti politique. (….) Ca m’a interloqué parce que je croyais le catholicisme mourant. (…) [Macron] L’axe de sa  campagne, j’ai l’impression que c’est une espèce de thérapie de groupe pour convertir les Français à l’optimisme. Michel Houellebecq
Marine Le Pen aurait pu être la porte-parole du parti de l’inquiétude, elle aurait pu faire venir sur le plateau l’humeur de cette partie du pays qui voit sa disparition programmée et s’en désole. Elle aurait pu évoquer le séparatisme islamiste et l’immense tâche qui nous attend consistant à convaincre des dizaines, peut-être des centaines, de milliers de jeunes Français de l’excellence de leur pays, de ses arts, ses armes et ses lois. Or, du début à la fin, elle a paru retourner à son adversaire le procès en légitimité dont elle est sans cesse l’objet. Incapable de lui concéder le moindre point, autant que de lui opposer une véritable vision, elle a ânonné des mots-clefs comme « UOIF » et « banquier », croyant sans doute que cela suffirait à faire pleuvoir les votes, ce qui laisse penser qu’elle tient ses électeurs en piètre estime. Les insinuations sur l’argent de son adversaire, sa façon de dire à demi-mot au téléspectateur « si vous êtes dans la mouise, c’est parce que lui et ses amis se goinfrent », m’ont rappelé les heures sombres de l’affaire Fillon, quand des journalistes répétaient en boucle le même appel au ressentiment. L’autre France, celle qui n’a pas envie de l’avenir mondialisé et multiculti qu’on lui promet, mérite mieux que ce populisme ras des pâquerettes. (…) On n’est pas obligé, cependant, de hurler avec les bisounours. Quoi que répètent fiévreusement ceux qui adorent voler au secours des victoires, un faux pas, même de taille, ne suffit pas à faire de Marine Le Pen quelqu’un d’infréquentable. À la différence de l’intégralité de mes confrères qui se frottent les mains sur l’air de « je vous l’avais bien dit ! », je ne suis pas sûre qu’elle ait « montré son vrai visage ». L’ayant interviewée à plusieurs reprises, nous avons eu avec elles des engueulades homériques : jamais je ne l’ai vue, dans ces circonstances, faire preuve de la mauvaise foi fielleuse qu’elle a opposée à son adversaire – et je ne lui avais jamais vu, même sur un plateau, ce masque sarcastique. Avait-elle en quelque sorte intégré sa propre illégitimité, a-t-elle été mal conseillée par son cher Florian Philippot ou était-elle décidément très mal préparée à la fonction qu’elle briguait ? Toujours est-il qu’elle a raté son rendez-vous avec le peuple français. (…) Il faudra bien résoudre un jour ce petit problème de logique : il existe chez nous un parti que les tribunaux ne peuvent pas interdire, qui a le droit de se présenter aux élections, mais les électeurs n’ont pas le droit de voter pour lui et ses dirigeants n’ont pas le droit de gagner. Ce qui, on en conviendra, est assez pratique pour ceux qui l’affrontent en duel. On me dit qu’il respecte le cadre de la République, mais pas ses fameuses valeurs. Sauf que, pardon, qui est arbitre des valeurs, Le Monde, les Inrocks, Jacques Attali ? N’est-ce pas une façon bien commode d’exclure de la compétition ceux qui vous déplaisent ? Je ne me résous pas à vivre dans un monde où il y a une seule politique possible, un seul vote raisonnable et un seul point de vue acceptable. (…) Post Scriptum : je viens d’entendre un bout de la chronique de François Morel, l’un des papes du comico-conformisme sur France Inter. Il comparait – ou assimilait je ne sais – Marine Le Pen à une primate: Taubira, c’était dégueulasse; mais pour une Le Pen, c’est normal. Digne conclusion de la quinzaine de la haine (et de l’antifascisme nigaud) que nous a offerte la radio publique. Elisabeth Lévy
The paradox of France is that it is desperate for reform — and desperate not to be reformed. It wants the benefits of a job-producing competitive economy but fears relinquishing a job-protecting uncompetitive one. A Macron presidency will have to devote its intellectual and rhetorical energies to explaining that it can be one or the other, but not both. I don’t want to close this column without allowing for the awful chance that Le Pen might win. That would be a moral tragedy for France and a probable disaster for Europe. But it would also be a reminder that chronic economic stagnation inevitably begets nationalist furies. In the United States, a complacent left acquits itself too easily of its role in paving the way to the Trump presidency. Many of Le Pen’s supporters might be bigots, but their case against the self-satisfaction, self-dealing, moral preening and economic incompetence of the French ruling classes is nearly impeccable. Bret Stephens
Nous qui vivons dans les régions côtières des villes bleues, nous lisons plus de livres et nous allons plus souvent au théâtre que ceux qui vivent au fin fond du pays. Nous sommes à la fois plus sophistiqués et plus cosmopolites – parlez-nous de nos voyages scolaires en Chine et en Provence ou, par exemple, de notre intérêt pour le bouddhisme. Mais par pitié, ne nous demandez pas à quoi ressemble la vie dans l’Amérique rouge. Nous n’en savons rien. Nous ne savons pas qui sont Tim LaHaye et Jerry B. Jenkins. […] Nous ne savons pas ce que peut bien dire James Dobson dans son émission de radio écoutée par des millions d’auditeurs. Nous ne savons rien de Reba et Travis. […] Nous sommes très peu nombreux à savoir ce qu’il se passe à Branson dans le Missouri, même si cette ville reçoit quelque sept millions de touristes par an; pas plus que nous ne pouvons nommer ne serait-ce que cinq pilotes de stock-car. […] Nous ne savons pas tirer au fusil ni même en nettoyer un, ni reconnaître le grade d’un officier rien qu’à son insigne. Quant à savoir à quoi ressemble une graine de soja poussée dans un champ… David Brooks
Vous allez dans certaines petites villes de Pennsylvanie où, comme ans beaucoup de petites villes du Middle West, les emplois ont disparu depuis maintenant 25 ans et n’ont été remplacés par rien d’autre (…) Et il n’est pas surprenant qu’ils deviennent pleins d’amertume, qu’ils s’accrochent aux armes à feu ou à la religion, ou à leur antipathie pour ceux qui ne sont pas comme eux, ou encore à un sentiment d’hostilité envers les immigrants. Barack Hussein Obama (2008)
Pour généraliser, en gros, vous pouvez placer la moitié des partisans de Trump dans ce que j’appelle le panier des pitoyables. Les racistes, sexistes, homophobes, xénophobes, islamophobes. A vous de choisir. Hillary Clinton
America is coming apart. For most of our nation’s history, whatever the inequality in wealth between the richest and poorest citizens, we maintained a cultural equality known nowhere else in the world—for whites, anyway. (…) But t’s not true anymore, and it has been progressively less true since the 1960s. People are starting to notice the great divide. The tea party sees the aloofness in a political elite that thinks it knows best and orders the rest of America to fall in line. The Occupy movement sees it in an economic elite that lives in mansions and flies on private jets. Each is right about an aspect of the problem, but that problem is more pervasive than either political or economic inequality. What we now face is a problem of cultural inequality. When Americans used to brag about « the American way of life »—a phrase still in common use in 1960—they were talking about a civic culture that swept an extremely large proportion of Americans of all classes into its embrace. It was a culture encompassing shared experiences of daily life and shared assumptions about central American values involving marriage, honesty, hard work and religiosity. Over the past 50 years, that common civic culture has unraveled. We have developed a new upper class with advanced educations, often obtained at elite schools, sharing tastes and preferences that set them apart from mainstream America. At the same time, we have developed a new lower class, characterized not by poverty but by withdrawal from America’s core cultural institutions. (…) Why have these new lower and upper classes emerged? For explaining the formation of the new lower class, the easy explanations from the left don’t withstand scrutiny. It’s not that white working class males can no longer make a « family wage » that enables them to marry. The average male employed in a working-class occupation earned as much in 2010 as he did in 1960. It’s not that a bad job market led discouraged men to drop out of the labor force. Labor-force dropout increased just as fast during the boom years of the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s as it did during bad years. (…) As I’ve argued in much of my previous work, I think that the reforms of the 1960s jump-started the deterioration. Changes in social policy during the 1960s made it economically more feasible to have a child without having a husband if you were a woman or to get along without a job if you were a man; safer to commit crimes without suffering consequences; and easier to let the government deal with problems in your community that you and your neighbors formerly had to take care of. But, for practical purposes, understanding why the new lower class got started isn’t especially important. Once the deterioration was under way, a self-reinforcing loop took hold as traditionally powerful social norms broke down. Because the process has become self-reinforcing, repealing the reforms of the 1960s (something that’s not going to happen) would change the trends slowly at best. Meanwhile, the formation of the new upper class has been driven by forces that are nobody’s fault and resist manipulation. The economic value of brains in the marketplace will continue to increase no matter what, and the most successful of each generation will tend to marry each other no matter what. As a result, the most successful Americans will continue to trend toward consolidation and isolation as a class. Changes in marginal tax rates on the wealthy won’t make a difference. Increasing scholarships for working-class children won’t make a difference. The only thing that can make a difference is the recognition among Americans of all classes that a problem of cultural inequality exists and that something has to be done about it. That « something » has nothing to do with new government programs or regulations. Public policy has certainly affected the culture, unfortunately, but unintended consequences have been as grimly inevitable for conservative social engineering as for liberal social engineering. The « something » that I have in mind has to be defined in terms of individual American families acting in their own interests and the interests of their children. Doing that in Fishtown requires support from outside. There remains a core of civic virtue and involvement in working-class America that could make headway against its problems if the people who are trying to do the right things get the reinforcement they need—not in the form of government assistance, but in validation of the values and standards they continue to uphold. The best thing that the new upper class can do to provide that reinforcement is to drop its condescending « nonjudgmentalism. » Married, educated people who work hard and conscientiously raise their kids shouldn’t hesitate to voice their disapproval of those who defy these norms. When it comes to marriage and the work ethic, the new upper class must start preaching what it practices. Charles Murray
Murray, the W.H. Brady Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, contends that before the 1960s, Americans of all classes participated in a traditional common culture of civic and social engagement that valued marriage, industriousness, honesty and religiosity — credited as « American exceptionalism » by Alexis de Tocqueville in his 19th century classic « Democracy in America. » Today, that culture persists among highly educated elites, winners in globalization’s economic redistribution, but those vigorous virtues are dissolving among globalization’s losers, the 21st century working class. Increased demographic segregation means that the elites who run the nation know little about the ominous cultural breakdown creeping up the socioeconomic ladder. Murray describes a new, highly educated upper class of the most successful 5% of professionals and managers who direct the nation’s major institutions. Most reside in high-income, socially homogeneous « super ZIP Codes » near urban power centers. Exclusivity is self-reinforcing: Elites socialize primarily with and marry one another (« homogamy »), ensuring their children’s future dominance based on genetic intelligence, other inherited talents and a high-achievement culture nourished by access to elite educational institutions. To emphasize that the new cultural divide is largely based on class, not race/ethnicity, Murray confines core sections of « Coming Apart » to comparing socio-cultural differences among middle-aged whites (age 30-49) in two communities: upper-middle-class Belmont, Mass., and working-class Fishtown, Pa. (Murray builds somewhat « fictionalized » versions of these communities through statistically adjusted models that control for age, race, income and occupation to heighten the contrasts between them.) Belmont represents perhaps 20% of the total U.S. population; Fishtown, about 30%. Murray reveals alarming levels of social isolation and disengagement among Fishtown’s working-class whites. By the early 2000s, only 48% were married, down from 84% in 1960; children living in households with both biological parents fell from 96% to 37%; the number of disabled quintupled from 2% to 10%; arrest rates for violent crime quadrupled from 125 to 592 per 100,000 people; and the percent attending church only once a year nearly doubled from 35% to 59%. In 2008, almost 12% of prime-age males with a high school diploma were « not in the labor force » — quadruple the percentage from the all-time low of 3% in 1968. The well-educated, upper-middle-class whites in Murray’s Belmont model fare far better: 83% are married; 84% of children reside in two-biological-parent homes; less than 1% are on disability, though nearly 40% attend church only once a year. Nearly all adult males are in the workforce. The primary problem with « Coming Apart » is that Murray’s focus on a cultural divide among whites obscures something else: The destruction of values, economic sectors and entire occupational classes by automation and outsourcing. And don’t forget the massive movements of cheap legal and illegal immigrant labor: This factor sets up a classic conflict, the ethnically split labor market, in which you find unionized working-class whites pitted against minority newcomers who are willing to work for less (sometimes « off the books » and under abysmal conditions). Frederick Lynch
Experts have warned for years now that our rates of geographic mobility have fallen to troubling lows. Given that some areas have unemployment rates around 2 percent and others many times that, this lack of movement may mean joblessness for those who could otherwise work. But from the community’s perspective, mobility can be a problem. The economist Matthew Kahn has shown that in Appalachia, for instance, the highly skilled are much likelier to leave not just their hometowns but also the region as a whole. This is the classic “brain drain” problem: Those who are able to leave very often do. The brain drain also encourages a uniquely modern form of cultural detachment. Eventually, the young people who’ve moved out marry — typically to partners with similar economic prospects. They raise children in increasingly segregated neighborhoods, giving rise to something the conservative scholar Charles Murray calls “super ZIPs.” These super ZIPs are veritable bastions of opportunity and optimism, places where divorce and joblessness are rare. As one of my college professors recently told me about higher education, “The sociological role we play is to suck talent out of small towns and redistribute it to big cities.” There have always been regional and class inequalities in our society, but the data tells us that we’re living through a unique period of segregation. This has consequences beyond the purely material. Jesse Sussell and James A. Thomson of the RAND Corporation argue that this geographic sorting has heightened the polarization that now animates politics. This polarization reflects itself not just in our voting patterns, but also in our political culture: Not long before the election, a friend forwarded me a conspiracy theory about Bill and Hillary Clinton’s involvement in a pedophilia ring and asked me whether it was true. It’s easy to dismiss these questions as the ramblings of “fake news” consumers. But the more difficult truth is that people naturally trust the people they know — their friend sharing a story on Facebook — more than strangers who work for faraway institutions. And when we’re surrounded by polarized, ideologically homogeneous crowds, whether online or off, it becomes easier to believe bizarre things about them. This problem runs in both directions: I’ve heard ugly words uttered about “flyover country” and some of its inhabitants from well-educated, generally well-meaning people. I’ve long worried whether I’ve become a part of this problem. For two years, I’d lived in Silicon Valley, surrounded by other highly educated transplants with seemingly perfect lives. It’s jarring to live in a world where every person feels his life will only get better when you came from a world where many rightfully believe that things have become worse. And I’ve suspected that this optimism blinds many in Silicon Valley to the real struggles in other parts of the country. So I decided to move home, to Ohio. (…) we often frame civic responsibility in terms of government taxes and transfer payments, so that our society’s least fortunate families are able to provide basic necessities. But this focus can miss something important: that what many communities need most is not just financial support, but talent and energy and committed citizens to build viable businesses and other civic institutions. Of course, not every town can or should be saved. Many people should leave struggling places in search of economic opportunity, and many of them won’t be able to return. Some people will move back to their hometowns; others, like me, will move back to their home state. The calculation will undoubtedly differ for each person, as it should. But those of us who are lucky enough to choose where we live would do well to ask ourselves, as part of that calculation, whether the choices we make for ourselves are necessarily the best for our home communities — and for the country. J. D. Vance
“ Hillbilly Elegy ” is a very important book and it also resonated with me in a very personal way because I also experienced the problems of rural poverty. I grew up in a small town in Western Pennsylvania. My father was a coal miner. He worked in these coal mines of Western Pennsylvania and occasionally he worked in steel mills in Western Pennsylvania. He died at the age of 39, with a lung disease. Left my mother with six kids and I was the oldest at 12 years of age. My father had a 10th grade education, my mother had a 10th grade education. My mother who lived to the ripe old age of 94, raised us by cleaning house occasionally. Initially we were on relief. We call it welfare now. She got off welfare and supported us by cleaning house; and what I distinctly remember about growing up in rural poverty is hunger. (…) Now, given my family background, black person, black family in rural poverty; as one of my colleagues at Harvard told me, the odds that I would end up at Harvard as a University professor and capital U on University, are very nearly zero. Like J.D. I’m an outlier. An outlier in — Malcolm Gladwell says in his book “ Outlier, The Study of Success. ” We are both outliers; but it’s interesting that J.D. never talks about holding himself up by his own bootstraps, and that’s something that I reject. I don’t refer to myself that way, because both J.D. and I, were in the right places at the right times, and we had significant individuals who were there to rescue us from poverty and enabled us to escape. We are the outliers being at the right place at the right time, and when I think about your question, that’s one thing I think about; how lucky I was. I had some significant individuals who helped me escape poverty. (…) ointing out some differences that I have with J.D. It’s really kind of a matter of emphasis. Not that we differ, it’s just a matter of emphasis. First of all, we both agree that too many liberal social scientists focus on social structure and ignore cultural conditions. You know, they talk about poverty, joblessness and discrimination, but they also don’t talk about some of the cultural conditions, that grow out of these situations, in response to these situations. Too many conservatives focus on cultural forces and ignore structural factors. Now J.D. has made the same point in “ Hillbilly Elegy ” and you also have made the same point in some subsequent interviews talking about the book. Now where we disagree and this relates back to your question, Camille, is in the interpretation of these cultural factors. J.D. places a lot of emphasis on agency. That people even in the most impoverished circumstances have choices that can either improve or exacerbate their situation, their predicaments. And I also think that a gency is important and should not be ignored, even in situations where individuals confront overwhelming structural impediments. But what J.D., and I’d like to hear your response to this J.D., wha t you don’t make explicit or emphasize enough from my point of view, is that agency is also constrained by these structural factors, even among people who you know, make positive choices to improve their lives, there are still constraints and I maintain th at the part of your book where you talking about agency, really cries out for a deeper interrogation. A deeper interrogation of how personal a gency is expanded or inhibited by the circumstance that the poor or working classes confront, including you know, their interactions and families, social networks , and institutions, in these distressed communities. In other words, what I’m trying to suggest is that personal agency is recursively associated with the structural forces within which it operates. And here you know, it’s sort of insightful to talk about intermediaries and insightful to talk about people who aid, who help you in making choices, and you do that well in the book. But here’s the point, given the American belief system on poverty and welfare in which Americans as you point out Camille, place far greater emphasis on personal shortcomings as opposed to structural barriers and especially when you’re talking about the behavior of African Americans. I believe that explanations that focus — don’t get me wrong, you don’t even talk about African Americans in the sense, I’m talking about people out there in the general public. Given this focus on personal shortcomings as opposed to structural barriers in a common for outcomes, I believe that explanations that focus on agency are likely to overshadow explanations that focus on structural impediments. Some people read a book, but they’re not that sophisticated, the take away will be those personal factors and you know, I would have liked to have seen you sort of try to put things in context you know. Talk about the constraints that people have. Now this relates to the second point I want to make. In addition, to feeling that they have little control over themselves, that is lack of agency. You point out that the individuals in these hillbilly communities tend to blame themselves — I’m sorry, blame everyone but themselves, and the term you used to explain this phenomenon is cognitive dissonance, when our beliefs are not consistent with our behaviors. And I agree, and many people often do tend to blame others and not themselves, but I think that when we talk about cognitive dissonance, we also have to recognize that individuals in these communities do indeed have some complaints, some justifiable complaints, including complaints about industries that have pulled off stakes and relocated to cheaper labor areas overseas and in the process, have devastated communities like Middletown, Ohio. Including complaints about automation replacing the jobs of cashiers and parking lot attendants. Including the complaints that government and corporate actions have undermined unions and therefore led to a decrease in the wages or workers in Middletown. (…) And let me also point out, here’s where we really do agree. We both agree that there are cultural practices within families and so on and in communities that reinforce problems created by the structural barriers. (…) Practiced behaviors that perpetuate poverty and disadvantage. So, this we agree. Too often liberals ignore the role of these cultural forces in perpetuating or reinforcing conditions associated with poverty or concentrated (inaudible). (…) even in extreme property, my mother kept telling me, you’re going to college. And my Aunt Janice also reinforced — my Aunt Janice was the first person in my extended family who got a college education, and I used to go to New York to visit her during the summer months, and I said you know, I want to be like Aunt Janice, you know? (…) you really see this when you look at neighborhoods. Neighborhoods in which an overwhelming majority of the population are poor, but employed are entirely different from neighborhoods in which people are poor but jobless. Jobless neighborhoods trigger all kinds of problems. Crime, drug addiction, gang behavior, violence. And one of the things that I had focused on when I wrote my book, When Work Disappears is what happens to intercity neighborhoods that experience increasing levels of joblessness. And we did some research in Chicago and it was really you know, sad, talking to some of the mothers who were just fearful about allowing their children to go outside because the neighborhood was so incredibly dangerous. And I remember talking with one woman and she says — who was obese and she says you know, I went to the doctor he said that I should go out and exercise. Can you imagine jogging in this neighborhood? Because the joblessness had created problems among young people who were trying to make ends meet and they’re involved in crime and drugs and so on. So, I would say that if you want to focus on improving neighborhoods, the first thing that I would do would try to increase or enhance employment opportunities. (…) I don’t know if the conditions have changed that much, since I wrote The Truly Disadvantaged. The one big difference is that I think there’s increasing technology and automation that has created problems for a lot of low skilled workers. You know, I mentioned automation replacing jobs that cashiers held, and parking lot attendants held. So, you have a combination not only of the relocation of industries overseas, that I talked about in The Truly Disadvantaged; but now you have increasing automation and technology replacing jobs, and this worries me because I think that people who have poor education are going to be in difficult situations increasingly down the road. You look at intercity schools, not only schools in intercities, but in many other neighborhoods, and kids are not being properly educated. So, they’re not being prepared for the changes that are occurring in the economy. I remember one social scientist saying that it’s as if — talking about the black population. It’s as if racism and racial discrimination put black people in their place only to watch increasing technology and automation destroy that place. So, the one significant difference from the time I wrote The Truly Disadvantaged in 1987, is the growing problems created by increasing technology for the poor.(…) it seems that poor whites right now are more pessimistic than any group, and the question is why. I was sort of impressed with your analysis of the white working class in the age of Trump. You know, you pointed out that when Barack Obama became president there were a lot of people in your community who were really struggling and who believe that the modern American meritocracy did not seem to apply to them. These people were not doing well, and then you have this black president who’s a successful product of meritocracy who has raised the hope of African Americans and he represented every positive thing that these working-class folks that you write about did not possess or lacked. And Trump emerged as candidate who sort of spoke to these people. What is interesting is that if you look at the Pew Research polls, recent Pew Research polls, I think you pointed this out in your book, the working-class whites right now are more pessimistic than any other group about their economic future and their children’s future. Now is that pessimism justified? I think they’re overly pessimistic. I still maintain that to be black, poor and jobless is worse than being white, poor and jobless, okay? But, for some reason, the white poor is more pessimistic. Now I think with respect to the black poor and working class has kind of an Obama effect you know. I think that may wear off and then blacks will become even more equally as pessimistic as whites in a few years. (this reminds me of your points J.D., reminds me of a paper that Robert Sampson, a colleague at Harvard and I wrote in 1995 entitled Toward a Theory of Race, Crime and Urban Inequality. A paper that has become a classic actually in the field of criminology because it’s generated dozens of research studies. Our basic thesis we were addressing you know, race and violent crime, is that racial disparities and violent crime are attributable in large part to the persistent structural disadvantages that are disproportionately concentrated in African American urban communities. Nonetheless, we argue that the ultimate cause of crime were similar for both whites and blacks, and we pose a central question. In American cities, it is possible to reproduce in white communities the structural circumstances under which many blacks live. You know, the whites haven’t fully experienced the structural reality that blacks have experienced does not negate the power of our theory because we argue had whites been exposed to the same structural conditions as blacks then white communities would behave – – the crime rate would be in the predicted direction. And then we had an epiphany. What about the rural white communities that you talk about. Where you’re not only talking about joblessness, you’re not only talking about poverty, but you’re also talking about family structure. So, here in Appalachia, you could reproduce some of the conditions that exist in intercity neighborhoods and therefore it would be good to test our theory in these areas because we’d be looking at the family structure. The rates of single parent families. We’d be looking at joblessness, we’d be loo king at poverty. So, we need to move beyond the urban areas and see if we can look at communities that come close to approximating or even worse in some cases, and some intercity neighborhoods. (…) Mark Lilla and a number of other post-election analysts observed that as you point out that the Democrats should not make the same mistake that they made in the last election, namely an attempt to mobilize people of color, women, immigrants and the LGBT community with identity politics. They tended to ignore the problems of poor white Americans. I was watching the Democratic convention with my wife on a cruise to Alaska, and one concern I had was there did not seem to be any representatives on the stage representing poor white America. I could just see some of these poor whites saying they don’t care about us. They’ve got all these blacks, they’ve got immigrants, they’ve got (inaudible), but you don’t have any of us on the stage. Maybe I’m overstating the point, but I was concerned about that. Now one notable exception, critics like Mark Lilla point out was Bernie Sanders. Bernie Sanders had a progressive and unifying populous economic message in the Democratic primaries. A message that resonated with a significant segment of the white lower-class population. Lower class, working class populations. Bernie Sanders was not the Democratic nominee and Donald Trump was able to, as we all know, capture notable support from these populations with a divisive not unifying populous message. I agree with Mark Lilla that we don’t want to make the same mistake again. We’ve go to reach out to all groups. We’ve got to start to focus on coalition politics. We have to develop a sense of interdependence where groups come to recognize that they can’t accomplish goals without the support of other groups. We have to frame issues differently. We can’t go the same route. We can’t give up on the white working class. (…) Addressing the question of increase in economic segregation. People don’t realize that racial segregation is on the decline, while economic segregation is a segregation of families by income is on the increase. William Julius Wilson
I’m a bit of a fan boy of William Julius Wilson as I wrote Hillbilly Elegy, so it was real exciting to be able to get him to sign this book.  (…) Culture (…) is a really, really, difficult and amorphous concept to define, and one of the things that I was trying to do with “ Hillbilly Elegy ” is try to in some ways draw the discussion away from this structure versus personal responsibility narrative and convince us to look at culture as a third and I think very important variable. I often think that the way that conservatives, and I’m a conservative, talk about culture is in some ways an excuse to end the conversation instead of starting a much more important conversation. It’s look at their bad culture, look at their deficient culture, we can’t do anything to help them; instead of trying to understand culture as this much bigger social and institutional force that really is important that some cases can come from problems related to poverty and some cases can come from a host of different factors that are difficult to understand. So, here’s what I mean by that. One of the most important I think cultural problems that I talk about is the prevalence of family and stability and family trauma in some of the communities that I write about; and I take it as a given that that trauma and that instability is really bad, that it has really negative downstream effects on whether children are able to get an education, whether their able to enter the workforce, whether they’re  able to raise and maintain successful families themselves. I think it’s tempting to sort of look at the problems of family instability and families like mine and say there’s a structural problem if only people had access to better economic opportunities, they wouldn’t have this problem. I think that’s partially true, but also consequently partially false. I think there’s a tendency on the right to look at that and say these parents need to take better care of their families and of their children, and unless they do it, there’s nothing that we can do. And I think again, that is maybe partially true, but it’s also very significantly false. What I’m trying to point to in this concept of culture, is we know that when children grow up in very unstable families that it has important cognitive effects, we know that it has important psychological effects, and unless we understand the problem of family instability and trauma, not just as a structural problem, or problem with personal responsibility, but as a long-term problem, in some cases inherited from multiple generations back, then we’re not going to be able to appreciate what’s really going on in some of these families and why family instability and trauma is so durable and so difficult to actually solve. So, I tend to think of culture as in some ways, this way to sum all of the things that are neither structural nor individual. What is it that’s going on in people’s environments good and bad that make it difficult for them to climb out of poverty. What are the things that they inherit. It’s not just from their own families, but from multiple generations back. Behaviors, expectations, environmental attitudes that make it really hard for them to succeed and do well. That’s the concept of culture that I think is most important, and also frankly that I think is missing a little bit from our political conversation when we talk about these questions of poverty, we’re really comfortable talking about personal responsibility, we’re really comfortable talking about structural problems. We don’t often talk about culture in this way that I’m trying to talk about it, in “ Hillbilly Elegy. ” (…) the second point that I wanted to make (…) is this question of Agency and whether I overemphasize the role of Agency. I think that for me, this is a really tough line to tow because I’m sort of writing about these problems you know, having in my personal memory, I’m not that far removed from a lot of them. I know that myself, one of the biggest problems that I faced was that I really did start to give up on myself early in high school, and I think that’s a really significant problem. At the same time, I understand and recognize the problem that Bill mentions which is that we have this tendency to sort of overemphasize Personal Agency and to proverbially blame the victim for a lot of these problems. So, what I was trying to do with this discussion of Personal Agency in the book, and I may have failed, but this is the effort, this is what I’m really trying to accomplish. Is that the first instance, I do think that it’s important for kids like me in circumstances like mine, to pick up the book and to have at least some reinforcement of the Agency that they have. I do think that’s a significant problem from the prospective of kids who grew up in communities like mine. The second thing that I’m trying to do, is talk about Personal Agency, not jus t from the prospective of individual poor people, but from the entire community that surrounds them. So, one of the things that I talk about is as religious communities in these areas, do they have the, as I say in the book, toughness to build Churches that encourage more social engagement as opposed to more social disaffection. I think that’s a question of Personal Agency, not from the perspective of the impoverished kid, but from a religious leader and community leaders that exist in their neighborhood. So, I think that sense of Personal Agency is really important. One of the worries that I have, is that when we talk about the problems of impoverished kids and this is especially true amongst sort of my generation, so this is — I’m a tail end of t he millennials here, is that we tend to think about helping people, 10 million people at a time a very superficial level, and one of the calls to action that I make in the book with this — by pointing out to Personal Agency is the idea that it can be really impactful to make a difference in 10 lives at a very deep level at the community level. And I think that sometimes is missing from these conversations. And then, the final point that I’ll make is that there’s a difference between recognizing the importance of Personal Agency and I think ignoring the role of structural factors in some of these problems, right? So, the example that I used to highlight this in the book is this question of addiction. So, there’s some interesting research that suggests that people who believe inherently that their addiction is a disease, show slightly less proclivity to actually fight that addiction and overcome that addiction. So, that creates sort of a catch 22, because we know there are biological components to addiction. We know that there are these sorts of structural non-personal decision-making drivers of addiction, and yet, if you totally buy in to the non-individual choice explanation for addiction, you show less of a proclivity to fight it. So, I think that there is this really tough under current to some of our discussions on these issues, where as a society we want to simultaneously recognize the barriers that people face, but also encourage them not to play a terrible hand in a terrible way, and that’s what I’m trying to do with this discussion of Personal Agency. The final point that I’ll make on that, is that the person who towed that line better than anyone I’ve ever known was my Grandma, my Ma’ma who I think is in some ways the hero of the book. She always told me. Look J.D., like is unfair for us, but don’t be like those people who think the deck is hopelessly stacked against them. I think that’s a sentiment that you hear far too infrequently among America’s elites. This simultaneous recognition that life is unfair for a lot of poor Americans, but that we still have to emphasize the role of individual agency in spite of that unfairness and I think that’s again a difficult balancing act. I may not have struck that balancing act perfectly in the book, but that was the intention. (…) the first thing is definitely you know, going back to my grandma. I think if anybody had a reason for pessimism and cynicism about the future, it was her. It’s sort of difficult to imagine a woman who had lived a more difficult life and yet ma’ma had this constant optimism about the future, in the sense that we had to do better because that was just the way that America worked. I mean I think that she was this woman who had this deep and abiding faith in the American dream in a way that is obviously disappearing And in fact, as I wrote about in the book, was I started to see disappearing even you know, when I was a young kid in my early 20’s. So, I think that my grandma was a huge part of that. I also think that the Marine Corp was a really huge part of that, and this is sort of a transformational experience that I write about in the book. The military is this really remarkable institution. It brings people from diverse backgrounds together, gets them on the same team. Gets them marching proverbially and literally towards the same goal, and for a kid who had grown up in a community that was starting to lose faith in that American dream, I think that the military was a really useful way to, as I say in the book, teach a certain amount of willfulness as opposed to despair and hopelessness. So, I think that was a really critical piece of it. (…) On the other hand, one thing I really worried about and one thing that I increasingly worried about as I actually did research for the book, is this idea of faith and religion, not just as something that people believe in, but as an actual positive institutional and social role player in their lives. And one of the things you do see, that this is something that Charles Murray’s written about, is that you see the institutions of faith declining in some of these lower income communities faster than you do in middle and upper income communities. I don’t think you have to be a person of faith to think that that’s worrisome. I think you can just read a paper by Jonathan Gruber that talks about all of these really positive social impacts of being a regular participatory Church member. So, you know, I think I was lucky in that sense, but a lot of folks, and when I look at the community right now, it worries me a little bit that you don’t see these robust social institutions in the same way that you certainly did 30, 40 years ago, and even when I was growing up in Middletown. The last point that I’ll make about that, is that (…) these trends often take half a century or more to really reveal themselves and I do sometimes see signs of resilience in some of these communities that I sort of didn’t fully anticipate and didn’t expect when the book was published. So, one of the things I’ve started to realize for example is when we talk about the decline of institutional faith, even though I continue to worry about that, one of the institutions that’s actually picked up the slack are groups like Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous. They almost have this faith effect. It brings people together. There’s even a sort of liturgical element to some of these meetings that I find really, really fascinating and interesting. So, people try to find and replace community when it’s lost but you know, clearly, they haven’t at least as of yet, replaced it even remotely to the degree that it has been lost which is why I think you see some of the issues that we do. (…) on this question of identity politics, I think that what worries me is that a lot — it’s not a recognition that there are disadvantaged non-white groups that need some help or there needs to be some closing of the gap you know. When I talk to folks back home, very conservative people, they’re actually pretty open-minded if you talk about the problems that exist in the black ghetto because of problems of concentrated poverty and the fact that the black ghetto was in some ways created by housing policy. It was the choice of black Americans. It was in some ways created by housing policy. I find actually a lot of openness when I talk to friends and family about that. What I find no openness about is when somebody who they don’t know, and who they think judges them, points at them and says you need to apologize for your white privilege. So, I think that in some ways making these questions of disadvantage zero sum, is really toxic, but I think that’s one way that the Democrats really lost the white working class in the 2016 election. The second piece that occurs to me, and this applies across the political spectrum, is that what we’re trying to do in the United States, it’s very easy to be cynical about American politics, but we’re rying to build a multi-racial, multi-ethnic, multi-religious nation, not just a conglomeration, an actual nation of people from all of these different tribes and unify them around a common creed. I think that’s really delicate. It’s basically never been done success fully over a long period in human history and I think it requires a certain amount of rhetorical finesse that we don’t see from many of our politicians on either side these days and that really, really worries me. (…) my general worry with the college education in the book at large is sort of two things. So, the first is that, I think we’ve constructed a society effectively in which a college education is now the only pathway to the middle class, and I think that’s a real failure on our part. It’s not something you see in every country, and I don’t think it necessarily has to be the case here. There are other ways to get post-secondary education and I absolutely think that we have to make that easier, and I really see this as sort of the defining policy challenge of the next 10 years is to create more of those pathways; because the second born on this is that college is a really, really culturally terrifying place for a lot of working class people. We can try to make it less culturally terrifying, we can try to make for the elites of our universities a little bit more welcoming to folks like me, and this is something that I wrote about in the book, really feeling like a true outsider at Yale for the first time, in an educational institution. I think that we also have to acknowledge that part of the reason that people feel like cultural outsiders is for reasons that aren’t necessarily going to be easy to fix, and if we don’t create more pathways for these folks, we shouldn’t be surprised that a lot of them aren’t going to take the one pathway that’s there, that effectively runs through a culturally alien institution.  (…) in certain areas, especially in Ohio, Kentucky, West Virginia and so forth. I think the biggest under reported problem for the baby boomers is the fact that they are taking care of children that they didn’t necessarily anticipate taking care of because of the opioid crisis. This is the biggest dr iver of elder poverty in the State of Ohio, is that you have entire families that have been transplanted from one generation to the next. They were planning for retirement based on one social security income, and now all of a sudden, they have two, three additional mouths to feed. I think my concern for the baby boom generation is especially those folks of course because it’s not just bad for them, it’s bad for these children who are all of a sudden thrown into poverty because of the opioid addition of that middle generation of the parents, of the kids and the sons and daughters of the grandkids. And then the very last question, culture, I think of as a way to understand the sum of the environmental impacts that you can’t necessarily define as structural rights, so the effects of family instability and trauma that exists in people, the effects of social capital and social networks in people’s lives, You know, all of these things I think add up to a broad set of variables that can either promote upward mobility or inhibit upward mobility; and again I think we very often talk about job opportunities and educational opportunities, we very often talk about individual responsibility and Personal Agency. We very rarely I think talk about those middle layers and those institutional factors that in a lot of ways are the real drivers of this problem. (…) on the inequality and concentration wealth, the top thing, I’ll say this one area where I actually think conservative senator Mike Leaf from Utah has had some really, really, interesting ideas. One of the tax reform proposals Senator Leaf has advocated for is actually setting the capital taxation rate at the same rate as the ordinary income rate. Because that’s what’s really driving this difference, right. It’s not ordinary income earners. It’s not salaried professionals. Those Richard Reeve says that’s a problem. It’s primarily actually that folks in the global economy, especially the ultra-elite, folks in the global economy have achieved some sort of economic lift off from the rest of the country and I think that in light of that, it doesn’t make a ton of sense that we continue to have the taxation policy that we do. Frankly, that’s one of the reasons why I am sort of so conflicted about President Trump because I think in some ways instinctively at least the President recognizes this, but we’ll see what actually happens with tax reform over the next few months. The question about job competition is absolutely correct. You can’t just have a better educated workforce but hold the number of workers constant. At the same time, I do think there’s a bit of a chicken and egg problem here right because you know, while the skills gap is overplayed and while it violates all of these rules of Econ 101, one of the things you hear pretty consistently from folks who would l ike to expand, would like to hire more, would like to produce more, is that there are real labor force constraints, especially in what might be called non-cognitive skills, right; and this is a thing that you hear a lot. In my home state if you really want to hire more, and you really want to produce more, and sell more, then the problem is the opioid epidemic has effectively thinned the pool of people who were even able to work. So, I do think that productivity is really important, but I also think that we tend to think of these things in too mathematical and sort of hyper-rational ways, but part of the reason productivity is held back, is because we have real problems in the labor market, and if you fix one, you could help another, and they may create a virtuous cycle. J.D. Vance
It is immoral because it perpetuates a lie: that the white working class that finds itself attracted to Trump has been victimized by outside forces. It hasn’t. The white middle class may like the idea of Trump as a giant pulsing humanoid middle finger held up in the face of the Cathedral, they may sing hymns to Trump the destroyer and whisper darkly about “globalists” and — odious, stupid term — “the Establishment,” but nobody did this to them. They failed themselves. If you spend time in hardscrabble, white upstate New York, or eastern Kentucky, or my own native West Texas, and you take an honest look at the welfare dependency, the drug and alcohol addiction, the family anarchy — which is to say, the whelping of human children with all the respect and wisdom of a stray dog — you will come to an awful realization. It wasn’t Beijing. It wasn’t even Washington, as bad as Washington can be. It wasn’t immigrants from Mexico, excessive and problematic as our current immigration levels are. It wasn’t any of that. Nothing happened to them. There wasn’t some awful disaster. There wasn’t a war or a famine or a plague or a foreign occupation. Even the economic changes of the past few decades do very little to explain the dysfunction and negligence — and the incomprehensible malice — of poor white America. So the gypsum business in Garbutt ain’t what it used to be. There is more to life in the 21st century than wallboard and cheap sentimentality about how the Man closed the factories down. The truth about these dysfunctional, downscale communities is that they deserve to die. Economically, they are negative assets. Morally, they are indefensible. Forget all your cheap theatrical Bruce Springsteen crap. Forget your sanctimony about struggling Rust Belt factory towns and your conspiracy theories about the wily Orientals stealing our jobs. Forget your goddamned gypsum, and, if he has a problem with that, forget Ed Burke, too. The white American underclass is in thrall to a vicious, selfish culture whose main products are misery and used heroin needles. Donald Trump’s speeches make them feel good. So does OxyContin. What they need isn’t analgesics, literal or political. They need real opportunity, which means that they need real change, which means that they need U-Haul. Williamson
This book is about (…) what goes on in the lives of real people when the industrial economy goes south. It’s about reacting to bad circumstances in the worst way possible. It’s about a culture that increasingly encourages social decay instead of counteracting it. The problems that I saw at the tile warehouse run far deeper than macroeconomic trends and policy. too many young men immune to hard work. Good jobs impossible to fill for any length of time. And a young man [one of Vance’s co-workers] with every reason to work — a wife-to-be to support and a baby on the way — carelessly tossing aside a good job with excellent health insurance. More troublingly, when it was all over, he thought something had been done to him. There is a lack of agency here — a feeling that you have little control over your life and a willingness to blame everyone but yourself. This is distinct from the larger economic landscape of modern America. (…) People talk about hard work all the time in places like Middletown [where Vance grew up]. You can walk through a town where 30 percent of the young men work fewer than twenty hours a week and find not a single person aware of his own laziness. (…) I learned little else about what masculinity required of me other than drinking beer and screaming at a woman when she screamed at you. In the end, the only lesson that took was that you can’t depend on people. “I learned that men will disappear at the drop of a hat,” Lindsay [his half-sister] once said. “They don’t care about their kids; they don’t provide; they just disappear, and it’s not that hard to make them go.” (…) Dad’s church offered something desperately needed by people like me. For alcoholics, it gave them a community of support and a sense that they weren’t fighting addiction alone. For expectant mothers, it offered a free home with job training and parenting classes. When someone needed a job, church friends could either provide one or make introductions. When Dad faced financial troubles, his church banded together and purchased a used car for the family. In the broken world I saw around me — and for the people struggling in that world — religion offered tangible assistance to keep the faithful on track. (…) Why didn’t our neighbor leave that abusive man? Why did she spend her money on drugs? Why couldn’t she see that her behavior was destroying her daughter? Why were all of these things happening not just to our neighbor but to my mom? It would be years before I learned that no single book, or expert, or field could fully explain the problems of hillbillies in modern America. Our elegy is a sociological one, yes, but it is also about psychology and community and culture and faith. During my junior year of high school, our neighbor Pattie called her landlord to report a leaky roof. The landlord arrived and found Pattie topless, stoned, and unconscious on her living room couch. Upstairs the bathtub was overflowing — hence, the leaking roof. Pattie had apparently drawn herself a bath, taken a few prescription painkillers, and passed out. The top floor of her home and many of her family’s possessions were ruined. This is the reality of our community. It’s about a naked druggie destroying what little of value exists in her life. It’s about children who lose their toys and clothes to a mother’s addiction. This was my world: a world of truly irrational behavior. We spend our way into the poorhouse. We buy giant TVs and iPads. Our children wear nice clothes thanks to high-interest credit cards and payday loans. We purchase homes we don’t need, refinance them for more spending money, and declare bankruptcy, often leaving them full of garbage in our wake. Thrift is inimical to our being. We spend to pretend that we’re upper class. And when the dust clears — when bankruptcy hits or a family member bails us out of our stupidity — there’s nothing left over. Nothing for the kids’ college tuition, no investment to grow our wealth, no rainy-day fund if someone loses her job. We know we shouldn’t spend like this. Sometimes we beat ourselves up over it, but we do it anyway. (…) Our homes are a chaotic mess. We scream and yell at each other like we’re spectators at a football game. At least one member of the family uses drugs — sometimes the father, sometimes both. At especially stressful times, we’ll hit and punch each other, all in front of the rest of the family, including young children; much of the time, the neighbors hear what’s happening. A bad day is when the neighbors call the police to stop the drama. Our kids go to foster care but never stay for long. We apologize to our kids. The kids believe we’re really sorry, and we are. But then we act just as mean a few days later. (…) I once ran into an old acquaintance at a Middletown bar who told me that he had recently quit his job because he was sick of waking up early I later saw him complaining on Facebook about the “Obama economy” and how it had affected his life. I don’t doubt that the Obama economy has affected many, but this man is assuredly not among them. His status in life is directly attributable to the choices he’s made, and his life will improve only through better decisions. But for him to make better choices, he needs to live in an environment that forces him to ask tough questions about himself. There is a cultural movement in the white working class to blame problems on society or the government, and that movement gains adherents by the day. (…) The wealthy and the powerful aren’t just wealthy and powerful; they follow a different set of norms and mores. … It was at this meal, on the first of five grueling days of [law school job] interviews, that I began to understand that I was seeing the inner workings of a system that lay hidden to most of my kind. … That week of interviews showed me that successful people are playing an entirely different game. (…) I believe we hillbillies are the toughest goddamned people on this earth. … But are we tough enough to do what needs to be done to help a kid like Brian? Are we tough enough to build a church that forces kids like me to engage with the world rather than withdraw from it? Are we tough enough to look ourselves in the mirror and admit that our conduct harms our children? Public policy can help, but there is no government that can fix these problems for us. These problems were not created by governments or corporations or anyone else. We created them, and only we can fix them. (…) I believe we hillbillies are the toughest god—-ed people on this earth. But are we tough enough to look ourselves in the mirror and admit that our conduct harms our children? Public policy can help, but there is no government that can fix these problems for us. . . . I don’t know what the answer is precisely, but I know it starts when we stop blaming Obama or Bush or faceless companies and ask ourselves what we can do to make things better.” J.D. Vance
This is the heart of Hillbilly Elegy: how hillbilly white culture fails its children, and how the greatest disadvantages it imparts to its youth are the life of violence and chaos in which they are raised, and the closely related problem of a lack of moral agency. Young Vance was on a road to ruin until certain people — including the US Marine Corps — showed him that his choices mattered, and that he had a lot more control over his fate than he thought. Vance talks about how, in his youth, there was a lot of hardscrabble poverty among his people, but nothing like today, dominated by the devastation of drug addiction. Everything we are accustomed to hearing about black inner city social dysfunction is fully present among these white hillbillies, as Vance documents in great detail. He writes that “hillbillies learn from an early age to deal with uncomfortable truths by avoiding them, or by pretending better truths exist. This tendency might make for psychological resilience, but it also makes it hard for Appalachians to look at themselves honestly.” (…) Vance talks about the hillbilly habit of stigmatizing people who leave the hollers as “too big for your britches” — meaning that you got above yourself. It doesn’t matter that they may have left to find work, and that they’re living a fairly poor life not too far away, in Ohio. The point is, they left, and that is a hard sin to forgive. What, we weren’t good enough for you?  This is the white-people version of “acting white,” if you follow me: the same stigma and shame that poor black people deploy against other poor black people who want to better themselves with education and so on. (…) Vance plainly loves his people, and because he loves them, he tells hard truths about them. He talks about how cultural fatalism destroys initiative. When hillbillies run up against adversity, they tend to assume that they can’t do anything about it. To the hillbilly mind, people who “make it” are either born to wealth, or were born with uncanny talent, winning the genetic lottery. The connection between self-discipline and hard work, and success, is invisible to them. (…) Vance was born into a world of chaos. It takes concentration to follow the trail of family connections. Women give birth out of wedlock, having children by different men. Marriages rarely last, and informal partnerings are more common. Vance has half-siblings by his mom’s different husbands (she has had five to date). In his generation, Vance says, grandparents are often having to raise their grandchildren, because those grandparents, however impoverished and messy their own lives may be, offer a more stable alternative than the incredible instability of the kids’ parents (or more likely, parent). (…) This is what happens in inner-city black culture, as has been exhaustively documented. But these are rural and small-town white people. This dysfunction is not color-based, but cultural. I could not do justice here to describe the violence, emotional and physical, that characterizes everyday life in Vance’s childhood culture, and the instability in people’s outer lives and inner lives. To read in such detail what life is like as a child formed by communities like that is to gain a sense of why it is so difficult to escape from the malign gravity of that way of life. You can’t imagine that life could be any different. Religion among the hillbillies is not much help. Vance says that hillbillies love to talk about Jesus, but they don’t go to church, and Christianity doesn’t seem to have much effect at all on their behavior. Vance’s biological father is an exception. He belonged to a strict fundamentalist church, one that helped him beat his alcoholism and gave him the severe structure he needed to keep his life from going off track. (…) Vance says the best thing about life in his dad’s house was how boring it was. It was predictable. It was a respite from the constant chaos. On the other hand, the religion most hillbillies espouse is a rusticated form of Moralistic Therapeutic Deism. God seems to exist only as a guarantor of ultimate order, and ultimate justice; Jesus is there to assuage one’s pain. Except for those who commit to churchgoing — and believe it or not, this is one of the least churched parts of the US — Christianity is a ghost. (…) One of the most important contributions Vance makes to our understanding of American poverty is how little public policy can affect the cultural habits that keep people poor. He talks about education policy, saying that the elite discussion of how to help schools focuses entirely on reforming institutions. “As a teacher at my old high school told me recently, ‘They want us to be shepherds to these kids. But no one wants to talk about the fact that many of them are raised by wolves.” (…) Vance says his people lie to themselves about the reality of their condition, and their own personal responsibility for their degradation. He says that not all working-class white hillbillies are like this. There are those who work hard, stay faithful, and are self-reliant — people like Mamaw and Papaw. Their kids stand a good chance of making it; in fact, Vance says friends of his who grew up like this are doing pretty well for themselves. Unfortunately, most of the people in Vance’s neighborhood were like his mom: “consumerist, isolated, angry, distrustful.” (…) As I said earlier, the two things that saved Vance were going to live full time with his Mamaw (therefore getting out of the insanity of his mom’s home), and later, going into the US Marine Corps. I’ve already written at too much length about Vance’s story, so I won’t belabor this much longer. Suffice it to say that as imperfect as she was, Mamaw gave young Vance the stability he needed to start succeeding in school. And she wouldn’t let him slack off on his studies. She taught him the value of hard work, and of moral agency. The Marine Corps remade J.D. Vance. It pulverized his inner hillbilly fatalism, and gave him a sense that he had control over his life, and that his choices mattered.  (…) Anyway, Vance talks about how the contemporary hillbilly mindset renders them unfit for participation in life outside their own ghetto. They don’t trust anybody, and are willing to believe outlandish conspiracy theories, particularly if those theories absolve them from responsibility. Hence the enormous popularity of Donald Trump among the white working class. Here’s a guy who will believe and say anything, and who blames Mexicans, Chinese, and Muslims for America’s problems. The elites hate him, so he’s made the right enemies, as far as the white working class is concerned. And his “Make America Great Again” slogan speaks to the deep patriotism that Vance says is virtually a religion among hillbillies. (…) The sense of inner order and discipline Vance learned in the Marine Corps allowed his natural intelligence to blossom. The poor hillbilly kid with the druggie mom ends up at Yale Law School. He says he felt like an outsider there, but it was a serious education in more than the law (…) What he’s talking about is social capital, and how critically important it is to success. Poor white kids don’t have it (neither do poor black or Hispanic kids). You’re never going to teach a kid from the trailer park or the housing project the secrets of the upper middle class, but you can give them what kids like me had: a basic understanding of work, discipline, confidence, good manners, and an eagerness to learn. A big part of the problem for his people, says Vance, is the shocking degree of family instability among the American poor. “Chaos begets chaos. Instability begets instability. Welcome to family life for the American hillbilly.” (…) The worst problems of his culture, the things that held kids like him back, are not things a government program can fix. For example, as a child, his culture taught him that doing well in school made you a “sissy.” Vance says the home is the source of the worst of these problems. There simply is not a policy fix for families and family systems that have collapsed. (…) Voting for Trump is not going to fix these problems. For the black community, protesting against police brutality on the streets is not going to fix their most pressing problems. It’s not that the problems Trump points to aren’t real, and it’s not that police brutality, especially towards minorities, isn’t a problem. It’s that these serve as distractions from the core realities that keep poor white and black people down. A missionary to inner-city Dallas once told me that the greatest obstacle the black and Latino kids he helped out had was their rock-solid conviction that nothing could change for them, and that people who succeeded got that way because they were born white, or rich, or just got lucky. Until these things are honestly and effectively addressed by families, communities, and their institutions, nothing will change. (…) If white lives matter — and they do, because all lives matter — then sentimentality and more government programs aren’t going to rescue these poor people. Vance puts it more delicately than Williamson, but getting a U-Haul and getting away from other poor people — or at least finding some way to get their kids out of there, to a place where people aren’t so fatalistic, lazy, and paranoid — is their best hope. And that is surely true no matter what your race. Rod Dreher
I believe, and so does J.D., that government really does have a meaningful role to play in ameliorating the problems of the poor. But there will never be a government program capable of compensating for the loss of stable family structures, the loss of community, the loss of a sense of moral agency, and the loss of a sense of meaning in the lives of the poor. The solution, insofar as there is a “solution,” is not an either-or (that is, either culture or government), but a both-and. (…) The loss of industrial jobs plays a big role in the catastrophe. J.D. Vance acknowledges that plainly in his book. But it’s not the whole story. The wounds are partly self-inflicted. The working class, he argues, has lost its sense of agency and taste for hard work. In one illuminating anecdote, he writes about his summer job at the local tile factory, lugging 60-pound pallets around. It paid $13 an hour with good benefits and opportunities for advancement. A full-time employee could earn a salary well above the poverty line. That should have made the gig an easy sell. Yet the factory’s owner had trouble filling jobs. During Vance’s summer stint, three people left, including a man he calls Bob, a 19-year-old with a pregnant girlfriend. Bob was chronically late to work, when he showed up at all. He frequently took 45-minute bathroom breaks. Still, when he got fired, he raged against the managers who did it, refusing to acknowledge the impact of his own bad choices. “He thought something had been done to him,” Vance writes. “There is a lack of agency here — a feeling that you have little control over your life and a willingness to blame everyone but yourself.” (…)  JDV openly credits his Mamaw and the Marine Corps with making him the man he is today. He does not claim he got there entirely on his own, by bootstrapping it. The American conservative
A harrowing portrait of the plight of the white working class J. D. Vance’s new book Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and a Culture in Crisis couldn’t have been better timed. For the past year, as Donald Trump has defied political gravity to seize the Republican nomination and transform American politics, those who are repelled by Trump have been accused of insensitivity to the concerns of the white working class. For Trump skeptics, this charge seems to come from left field, and I use that term advisedly. By declaring that a particular class and race has been “ignored” or “neglected,” the Right (or better “right”) has taken a momentous step in the Left’s direction. With the ease of a thrown switch, people once considered conservative have embraced the kind of interest-group politics they only yesterday rejected as a matter of principle. It was the Democrats who urged specific payoffs, er, policies to aid this or that constituency. Conservatives wanted government to withdraw from the redistribution and favor-conferring business to the greatest possible degree. If this was imperfectly achieved, it was still the goal — because it was just. Using government to benefit some groups comes at the expense of all. While not inevitably corrupt, the whole transactional nature of the business does easily tend toward corruption. Conservatives and Republicans understood, or seemed to, that in many cases, when government confers a benefit on one party, say sugar producers, in the form of a tariff on imported sugar, there’s a problem of concentrated benefits (sugar producers get a windfall) and dispersed costs (everyone pays more for sugar, but only a bit more, so they never complain). In the realm of race, sex, and class, the pandering to groups goes beyond bad economics and government waste — and even beyond the injustice of fleecing those who work to support those who choose not to — and into the dangerous territory of pitting Americans against one another. Democrats have mastered the art of sowing discord to reap votes. Powered by Now they have company in the Trumpites. Like Democrats who encourage their target constituencies to nurse grievances against “greedy” corporations, banks, Republicans, and government for their problems, Trump now encourages his voters to blame Mexicans, the Chinese, a “rigged system,” or stupid leaders for theirs. The problems of the white working class should concern every public-spirited American not because they’ve been forgotten or taken for granted — even those terms strike a false note for me — but because they are fellow Americans. How would one adjust public policy to benefit the white working class and not blacks, Hispanics, and others? How would that work? And who would shamelessly support policies based on tribal or regional loyalties and not the general welfare? As someone who has written — perhaps to the point of dull repetition — about the necessity for Republicans to focus less on entrepreneurs (as important as they are) and more on wage earners; as someone who has stressed the need for family-focused tax reform; as someone who has advocated education innovations that would reach beyond the traditional college customers and make education and training easier to obtain for struggling Americans; as someone who trumpeted the Reformicon proposals developed by a group of conservative intellectuals affiliated with the American Enterprise Institute and the Ethics and Public Policy Center; and finally, as someone who has shouted herself hoarse about the key role that family disintegration plays in many of our most pressing national problems, I cannot quite believe that I stand accused of indifference to the white working class. I said that Hillbilly Elegy could not have been better timed, and yes, that’s in part because it paints a picture of Americans who are certainly a key Trump constituency. Though the name Donald Trump is never mentioned, there is no doubt in the reader’s mind that the people who populate this book would be enthusiastic Trumpites. But the book is far deeper than an explanation of the Trump phenomenon (which it doesn’t, by the way, claim to be). It’s a harrowing portrait of much that has gone wrong in America over the past two generations. It’s Charles Murray’s “Fishtown” told in the first person. The community into which Vance was born — working-class whites from Kentucky (though transplanted to Ohio) — is more given over to drug abuse, welfare dependency, indifference to work, and utter hopelessness than statistics can fully convey. Vance’s mother was an addict who discarded husbands and boyfriends like Dixie cups, dragging her two children through endless screaming matches, bone-chilling threats, thrown plates and worse violence, and dizzying disorder. Every lapse was followed by abject apologies — and then the pattern repeated. His father gave him up for adoption (though that story is complicated), and social services would have removed him from his family entirely if he had not lied to a judge to avoid being parted from his grandmother, who provided the only stable presence in his life. Vance writes of his family and friends: “Nearly every person you will read about is deeply flawed. Some have tried to murder other people, and a few were successful. Some have abused their children, physically or emotionally.” His grandmother, the most vivid character in his tale (and, despite everything, a heroine) is as foul-mouthed as Tony Soprano and nearly as dangerous. She was the sort of woman who threatened to shoot strangers who placed a foot on her porch and meant it. Vance was battered and bruised by this rough start, but a combination of intellectual gifts — after a stint in the Marines he sailed through Ohio State in two years and then graduated from Yale Law — and the steady love of his grandparents helped him to leapfrog into America’s elite. This book is a memoir but also contains the sharp and unsentimental insights of a born sociologist. As André Malraux said to Whittaker Chambers under very different circumstances in 1952: “You have not come back from Hell with empty hands.” The troubles Vance depicts among the white working class, or at least that portion he calls “hillbillies,” are quite familiar to those who’ve followed the pathologies of the black poor, or Native Americans living on reservations. Disorganized family lives, multiple romantic partners, domestic violence and abuse, loose attachment to work, and drug and alcohol abuse. Children suffer from “Mountain Dew” mouth — severe tooth decay and loss because parents give their children, sometimes even infants with bottles, sugary sodas and fail to teach proper dental hygiene. “People talk about hard work all the time in places like Middletown [Ohio],” Vance writes. “You can walk through a town where 30 percent of the young men work fewer than 20 hours a week and find not a single person aware of his own laziness.” He worked in a floor-tile warehouse and witnessed the sort of shirking that is commonplace. One guy, I’ll call him Bob, joined the tile warehouse just a few months before I did. Bob was 19 with a pregnant girlfriend. The manager kindly offered the girlfriend a clerical position answering phones. Both of them were terrible workers. The girlfriend missed about every third day of work and never gave advance notice. Though warned to change her habits repeatedly, the girlfriend lasted no more than a few months. Bob missed work about once a week, and he was chronically late. On top of that, he often took three or four daily bathroom breaks, each over half an hour. . . . Eventually, Bob . . . was fired. When it happened, he lashed out at his manager: ‘How could you do this to me? Don’t you know I’ve a pregnant girlfriend?’ And he was not alone. . . . A young man with every reason to work . . . carelessly tossing aside a good job with excellent health insurance. More troublingly, when it was all over, he thought something had been done to him. The addiction, domestic violence, poverty, and ill health that plague these communities might be salved to some degree by active and vibrant churches. But as Vance notes, the attachment to church, like the attachment to work, is severely frayed. People say they are Christians. They even tell pollsters they attend church weekly. But “in the middle of the Bible belt, active church attendance is actually quite low.” After years of alcoholism, Vance’s biological father did join a serious church, and while Vance was skeptical about the church’s theology, he notes that membership did transform his father from a wastrel into a responsible father and husband to his new family. Teenaged Vance did a stint as a check-out clerk at a supermarket and kept his social-scientist eye peeled: I also learned how people gamed the welfare system. They’d buy two dozen packs of soda with food stamps and then sell them at a discount for cash. They’d ring up their orders separately, buying food with the food stamps, and beer, wine, and cigarettes with cash. They’d regularly go through the checkout line speaking on their cell phones. I could never understand why our lives felt like a struggle while those living off of government largesse enjoyed trinkets that I only dreamed about. . . . Perhaps if the schools were better, they would offer children from struggling families the leg up they so desperately need? Vance is unconvinced. The schools he attended were adequate, if not good, he recalls. But there were many times in his early life when his home was so chaotic — when he was kept awake all night by terrifying fights between his mother and her latest live-in boyfriend, for example — that he could not concentrate in school at all. For a while, he and his older sister lived by themselves while his mother underwent a stint in rehab. They concealed this embarrassing situation as best they could. But they were children. Alone. A teacher at his Ohio high school summed up the expectations imposed on teachers this way: “They want us to be shepherds to these kids. But no one wants to talk about the fact that many of them are raised by wolves.” Hillbilly Elegy is an honest look at the dysfunction that afflicts too many working-class Americans. But despite the foregoing, it isn’t an indictment. Vance loves his family and admires some of its strengths. Among these are fierce patriotism, loyalty, and toughness. But even regarding patriotism (his grandmother’s “two gods” were Jesus Christ and the United States of America), this former Marine strikes a melancholy note. His family and community have lost their heroes. We loved the military but had no George S. Patton figure in the modern army. . . . The space program, long a source of pride, had gone the way of the dodo, and with it the celebrity astronauts. Nothing united us with the core fabric of American society. Conspiracy theories abound in Appalachia. People do not believe anything the press reports: “We can’t trust the evening news. We can’t trust our politicians. Our universities, the gateway to a better life, are rigged against us. We can’t get jobs.” Conspiracy theories abound in Appalachia. Sound familiar? The white working class has followed the black underclass and Native Americans not just into family disintegration, addiction, and other pathologies, but also perhaps into the most important self-sabotage of all, the crippling delusion that they cannot improve their lot by their own effort. This is where the rise of Trump becomes both understandable and deeply destructive. He ratifies every conspiracy theory in circulation and adds news ones. He encourages the tribal grievances of the white working class and promises that salvation will come — not through their own agency and sensible government reforms — but only through his head-knocking leadership. He calls this greatness, but it’s the exact reverse. A great people does not turn to a strongman. The American character has been corrupted by multiple generations of government dependency and the loss of bourgeois virtues like self-control, delayed gratification, family stability, thrift, and industriousness. Vance has risen out of chaos to the heights of stability, success, and happiness. He is fundamentally optimistic about the chances for the nation to do the same. Whether his optimism is justified or not is unknowable, but his brilliant book is a signal flashing danger. Mona Charen
To further quell their culpability and show that the American Dream still functions as advertised, conservatives are fond of trotting out success stories — people who prove that pulling one’s self up by one’s bootstraps is still a possibility and, by extension, that those who don’t succeed must own their shortcomings. Lately, the right has found nobody more useful, both during the presidential election and after, than their modern-day Horatio Alger spokesperson, J. D. Vance, whose bestselling book “Hillbilly Elegy” chronicled his journey from Appalachia to the hallowed halls of the Ivy League, while championing the hard work necessary to overcome the pitfalls of poverty. Traditionally this would’ve been a Fox News kind of book — the network featured an excerpt on their site that focused on Vance’s introduction to “elite culture” during his time at Yale — but Vance’s glorified self-help tome was also forwarded by networks and pundits desperate to understand the Donald Trump phenomenon, and the author was essentially transformed into Privileged America’s Sherpa into the ravages of Post-Recession U.S.A. Trumpeted as a glimpse into an America elites have neglected for years, I first read “Hillbilly Elegy” with hope. I’d been told this might be the book that finally shed light on problems that’d been killing my family for generations. I’d watched my grandparents and parents, all of them factory workers, suffer backbreaking labor and then be virtually forgotten by the political establishment until the GOP needed their vote and stoked their social and racial anxieties to turn them into political pawns. In the beginning, I felt a kinship to Vance. His dysfunctional childhood looked a lot like my own. There was substance abuse. Knockdown, drag-out fights. A feeling that people just couldn’t get ahead no matter what they did. And then the narrative took a turn. Due to references he downplays, not to mention his middle-class grandmother’s shielding and encouragement, Vance was able to lift himself out of the despair of impoverishment and escaped to Yale and eventually Silicon Valley, where he was able to look back on his upbringing with a new perspective. (…) The thesis at the heart of “Hillbilly Elegy” is that anybody who isn’t able to escape the working class is essentially at fault. Sure, there’s a culture of fatalism and “learned helplessness,” but the onus falls on the individual. (…) Oh, the working class and their aversion to difficulty. If only they, like Vance, could take the challenge head on and rise above their circumstances. If only they, like Vance, weren’t so worried about material things like iPhones or the “giant TVs and iPads” the author says his people buy for themselves instead of saving for the future. This generalization is not the only problematic oversimplification in Vance’s book — he totally discounts the role racism played in the white working class’s opposition to President Obama and says, instead, it was because Obama dressed well, was a good father, and because Michelle Obama advocated eating healthy food — but it would be hard to understate what role Vance has played in reinvigorating the conservative bootstraps narrative for a new generation and, thus, emboldening Republican ideology. To Vance’s credit, he has been critical of Donald Trump, calling the working class’s support of the billionaire a result of a “false sense of purpose,” but Vance’s portrait of poor Americans is alarmingly in lockstep with the philosophy of Republicans who are shamefully using Trump’s presidency to forward their own agenda of economic warfare. (…) The message is loud and clear: Help is on the way, but only to those who “deserve” it. And how does one deserve it? By working hard. And the only metric to show that one has worked sufficiently hard enough is to look at their income, at how successful they are, because, in Vance’s and the Republican’s America, the only one to blame if you’re not wealthy is yourself. Never mind how legislation like this healthcare bill, cuts in education funding, continued decreases in after-school and school lunch programs, not to mention a lack of access to mental health care or career counseling, disadvantages the poor. Jared Yates Sexton (Assistant Professor of Creative Writing)
Hillbilly Elégie, qui vient de paraître aux éditions Globe traduit de l’anglais (américain) (…) est l’un des best-sellers de l’année aux Etats-Unis et son adaptation cinématographique est déjà en cours de tournage sous la direction de Ron Howard. Rien que ça ! Ensuite, c’est un livre hors du commun, qui a été salué avec un bel ensemble par la presse intellectuelle américaine, tant du côté conservateur que du côté libéral. On a beaucoup écrit qu’il constituait, en effet, l’une des clefs de cet événement tellement improbable : l’élection à la présidence des Etats-Unis « du Donald ». Ce n’est pourtant pas un essai politique. Il a été écrit avant que « le Donald » ne soit désigné comme candidat par les primaires républicaines. Et cependant, oui, il donne les clefs d’un facteur décisif ayant entraîné la victoire de Trump : le basculement de son côté de ces petits blancs, électeurs des Etats ravagés par le démantèlement des vieilles industries : Michigan, Pennsylvanie, Wisconsin, Ohio, ce qui reste de la Rust Belt, la ceinture de rouille. Rappelons que Trump a bénéficié massivement du « vote blanc ». Il est majoritaire dans cet électorat, même chez les femmes, alors qu’il affrontait, lui, le macho sans vergogne, la première candidate à la présidence de l’histoire des Etats-Unis. Mais ce qui est révélateur, c’est que Trump a obtenu ses meilleurs scores, chez les blancs qui n’ont pas fait d’études universitaires : 72 %, pour les hommes et 62 % chez les femmes. (…) Hillbilly Elégie est impressionnant parce que c’est un livre d’une rare honnêteté intellectuelle, alors qu’il est écrit depuis l’autre côté de la rive : son auteur, J.D. Vance s’est extrait de son milieu d’origine. Il a cessé d’être un hillbilly – autrement dit un crétin des collines, un plouc, un péquenaud – le vrai sens du mot hillbilly. Par un heureux concours de circonstances (son dressage chez les Marines) et grâce à une volonté de fer et une puissance de travail très américaines, il a intégré l’une des universités les plus prestigieuses du pays, Yale, et il est diplômé dans l’un des départements les plus prestigieux de cette université, son Ecole de droit. Né dans la classe ouvrière, il donc a rejoint les rangs de la grande bourgeoisie en devenant un avocat d’affaires renommé. (…) C’est un livre âpre, lucide, sans complaisance, écrit par un homme qui est, certes, passé de l’autre côté de la barrière des classes, mais qui garde une grande tendresse pour sa « communauté » d’origine. Et il se conclut par une série de recommandations sur la meilleure manière de remédier à la misère, tant matérielle que morale, où les siens se sont enfoncés. A travers son témoignage personnel, il nous livre une véritable enquête sur cette réalité sociale peu connue : le déclin de l’ancienne classe ouvrière blanche américaine. Son livre est d’un grand intérêt pour quiconque s’intéresse aux Etats-Unis ; mais il comporte aussi des leçons pour tous les pays anciennement industrialisés qui ont vu, comme le nôtre, fermer les usines et se désertifier certains territoires. Et d’abord son nom, Vance : il le porte par hasard. C’est celui de son géniteur, un chrétien évangéliste du Sud, alcoolique repenti, avec qui il n’a jamais eu le moindre contact avant son adolescence. Sa mère, en effet, est allée, durant toute sa vie d’homme en homme et de drogue en drogue. Comme beaucoup d’enfants de ce milieu, il a été traumatisé par la succession de ses « beaux-pères » de six mois ou d’un an. En quête d’un modèle masculin auquel s’identifier, il est passé de l’un à l’autre. Et l’instabilité à la fois géographique et affective de sa jeunesse en a fait un être angoissé. Première leçon de Hillbilly Elégie : être né dans une famille stable dont les membres adultes ne se hurlent pas après tous les soirs en se jetant à la figure tout ce qui leur tombe sous la main est un atout formidable pour réussir dans la vie…. La vraie famille de J.D., c’étaient ses grands-parents, d’authentiques hillbillies, eux, venus de leur Kentucky natal dans les années 1950 pour travailler dans l’Ohio voisin, où il y avait des mines et des aciéries. Mais Papaw et Mamaw (c’est comme ça qu’on dit Papy et Mamie chez les hillbillies) n’ont jamais oublié leur Kentucky natal, cette région des Appalaches connue pour la beauté de ses paysages… et l’arriération de ses habitants. Délivrance, le film de John Boorman, se passe, on s’en souvient, dans une région des Appalaches et donne de ses habitants une image assez peu flatteuse. Papaw et Mamaw, qui ne voyageaient jamais sans une arme à feu dans leur voiture, ont emporté dans leur Ohio d’adoption leur culture « hillbilly » des collines du Kentucky. Une culture que partageaient beaucoup de familles ouvrières originaires des Appalaches et qui imprègnent encore aujourd’hui les mentalités de leurs descendants. Papaw, ouvrier dans la grande aciérie locale et mécanicien apprécié, était un partisan du Parti démocrate, « le parti qui – je cite – défendait les travailleurs ». On était démocrate parce qu’on était ouvrier. Et c’est précisément cela qui a changé. Brice Couturier
En juin 2016, en pleine campagne présidentielle américaine, paraissait Hillbilly Elegy, un récit autobiographique signé d’un illustre inconnu. Il y racontait son enfance dans la « Rust Belt », cette large région industrielle du nord-est des Etats-Unis, touchée de plein fouet par les crises successives. Quelques semaines plus tard, un long entretien publié sur le site The American Conservative propulsait J.D. Vance au rang de phénomène : l’auteur y défendait la candidature de Trump, qui avait, selon lui, « le mérite d’essayer » de s’adresser aux Blancs les plus pauvres, d’en appeler à leur « fierté » et de vilipender cette « élite » honnie, incarnée par Barack Obama et par Hillary Clinton. Le discours frontal et brutal de la droite, la condescendance embarrassée de la gauche… Dans ce récit à la première personne, publié cette semaine en France (éditions Globe), l’écrivain pointait du doigt ce qui amènerait Donald Trump au pouvoir. (…) Hillbilly Elegy est une plongée dans ses racines, son enfance, son ascension sociale. Vance est né et a grandi entre le Kentucky et l’Ohio, dans cette région des Appalaches dont on entend régulièrement parler tantôt comme le siège de la pire épidémie d’addiction aux opiacés qu’ait connue le pays ces dernières années, tantôt comme cette zone dévastée par le chômage lié à la fermeture des mines de charbon. Vance, lui, s’en est tiré : après un passage dans les Marines, il a quitté son patelin pour partir étudier, d’abord à l’université d’Etat de l’Ohio, puis à la très réputée Yale, dans le Connecticut. A force de volonté, et avec le soutien d’une grand-mère exceptionnelle qui a pallié jusqu’à sa mort les manquements de ses parents (un père « qu’[il] connaissai [t] à peine » et une mère qu’il aurait « préféré ne pas connaître », écrit-il), Vance a réussi ce que peu parviennent à accomplir : il a changé de classe sociale. Il est, écrit-il, un « émigré culturel », qui affirme cependant être resté, au fond de lui, un « hillbilly », un Américain « qui [se] reconnaî [t] dans les millions de Blancs d’origine irlando-écossaise de la classe ouvrière américaine qui n’ont pas de diplôme universitaire ». Se réappropriant au passage ce terme popularisé pendant la grande dépression pour qualifier les migrants économiques venus de la campagne, et devenu depuis franchement péjoratif. Hillbilly Elegy se lit comme un document sur la pauvreté blanche en Amérique. Vance y décrit de l’intérieur une communauté qui vit d’aides alimentaires tout en se plaignant d’un Etat incompétent, passe « plus de temps à parler de travail qu’à travailler réellement », apprend à ses enfants « la valeur de la loyauté, de l’honneur, ainsi qu’à être dur au mal », mais persiste à confondre, chez ses petits, « intelligence et savoir », faisant passer pour idiots des gamins éduqués de manière inefficace. Parce qu’il parle des siens, le jeune homme dresse un constat très rude, dénonce la « fainéantise » de ses anciens semblables tout en appelant le monde politique à « juger moins et [à] comprendre plus ». En mars dernier, dans un éditorial du New York Times intitulé « Pourquoi je rentre chez moi », Vance annonçait sa décision de quitter la Californie pour retourner dans les Appalaches, où il a créé une association de lutte contre la conduite addictive aux opiacés et a participé, au cours des derniers mois, à de nombreux meetings du Parti républicain.M le magazine du Monde

Attention: une relégation sociale peut en cacher une autre ! (It’s the culture, stupid !)

« Amers, accros des armes et de la religion » (Obama), « pitoyables « Hillary Clinton), « sans-dents » (Hollande), « fainéants » (Macron) …

Quatre mois après l’élection volée que l’on sait …

Qui a vu suite à l’assassinat médiatico-politique du candidat de l’alternance …

Et au fourvoiement et auto-sabordement – jusqu’à en oublier son texte – de la candidate des victimes de l’immigration sauvage et de l’insécurité culturelle …

L’élection par défaut d’un candidat qui au-delà de sa réelle volonté de réformer une France jusqu’ici irréformable …

Ne prend même plus la peine, à l’instar de ses prédécesseurs américains ou français, de cacher son mépris pour les « gens qui ne sont rien » et autres « illettrés » ou « fainéants »  …

Et en ces temps où après la passion que l’on sait pour les immigrés et en gommant du coup toute la dimension délictuelle, nos belles âmes n’ont que le mot « migrant » à la bouche …

Comment ne pas voir …

Alors que sort la traduction française du livre de « l’auteur américain qui avait vu venir Trump » (Hillbilly elegy, J.D. Vance) …

Et après la revanche de ces véritables « immigrés de l’intérieur » …

Qui aux Etats-Unis ont largement contribué à la victoire de Trump

Celle qui pourrait bien venir

De tous ceux qui au-delà des cas extrêmes de familles déstructurées, de fatalisme social et d’addictions aux opiacés de la Rust belt américaine dont parle Vance …

Mais à l’instar des vraies victimes de la mondialisation de la « France périphérique » évoqués par le géographe Christophe Guilly …

Ne se résignent pas, face au rouleau compresseur de la prétendue « modernité » et du « progrès », à la disparition programmée de leur culture nationale ?

J.D. Vance, l’auteur américain qui avait vu venir Trump

Publié pendant la campagne présidentielle, « Hillbilly Elegy » est devenu un best-seller. J.D. Vance, 33 ans, y raconte cette Amérique blanche et pauvre dont il est issu. Et qui a porté Trump au pouvoir.

M le magazine du Monde

Clémentine Goldszal

04.09.2017

En juin 2016, en pleine campagne présidentielle américaine, paraissait Hillbilly Elegy, un récit autobiographique signé d’un illustre inconnu. Il y racontait son enfance dans la « Rust Belt », cette large région industrielle du nord-est des Etats-Unis, touchée de plein fouet par les crises successives. Quelques semaines plus tard, un long entretien publié sur le site The American Conservative propulsait J.D. Vance au rang de phénomène : l’auteur y défendait la candidature de Trump, qui avait, selon lui, « le mérite d’essayer » de s’adresser aux Blancs les plus pauvres, d’en appeler à leur « fierté » et de vilipender cette « élite » honnie, incarnée par Barack Obama et par Hillary Clinton.

Le discours frontal et brutal de la droite, la condescendance embarrassée de la gauche… Dans ce récit à la première personne, publié cette semaine en France (éditions Globe), l’écrivain pointait du doigt ce qui amènerait Donald Trump au pouvoir. En août 2016, Hillbilly Elegy entrait dans la liste des meilleures ventes du New York Times (il y figure encore aujourd’hui). Cinq mois plus tard, au lendemain de l’élection, les ventes faisaient un nouveau bond. Sous le choc, les progressistes américains cherchaient à comprendreceux qui avaient porté Trump au pouvoir : traditionnellement démocrates, les Etats de la Rust Belt avaient cette fois-ci largement soutenu le candidat républicain.

L’histoire d’une ascension sociale

J.D. Vance a 33 ans, le visage rond, la raie sur le côté, les yeux bleus. Il s’exprime bien, et son livre est remarquablement écrit. Pas de la grande littérature, mais un ton sans détour, qui lui permet d’exprimer avec une grande clarté sa pensée complexe. Il est marié – à une jeune femme rencontrée durant ses études de droit à Yale – et, à la sortie de son livre, vivait encore à San Francisco, où il gagnait très bien sa vie dans la finance.

Hillbilly Elegy est une plongée dans ses racines, son enfance, son ascension sociale. Vance est né et a grandi entre le Kentucky et l’Ohio, dans cette région des Appalaches dont on entend régulièrement parler tantôt comme le siège de la pire épidémie d’addiction aux opiacés qu’ait connue le pays ces dernières années, tantôt comme cette zone dévastée par le chômage lié à la fermeture des mines de charbon.

J.D. Vance parle de « la classe ouvrière américaine oubliée »

Vance, lui, s’en est tiré : après un passage dans les Marines, il a quitté son patelin pour partir étudier, d’abord à l’université d’Etat de l’Ohio, puis à la très réputée Yale, dans le Connecticut. A force de volonté, et avec le soutien d’une grand-mère exceptionnelle qui a pallié jusqu’à sa mort les manquements de ses parents (un père « qu’[il] connaissai [t] à peine » et une mère qu’il aurait « préféré ne pas connaître », écrit-il), Vance a réussi ce que peu parviennent à accomplir : il a changé de classe sociale.

Il est, écrit-il, un « émigré culturel », qui affirme cependant être resté, au fond de lui, un « hillbilly », un Américain « qui [se] reconnaî [t] dans les millions de Blancs d’origine irlando-écossaise de la classe ouvrière américaine qui n’ont pas de diplôme universitaire ». Se réappropriant au passage ce terme popularisé pendant la grande dépression pour qualifier les migrants économiques venus de la campagne, et devenu depuis franchement péjoratif.

Hillbilly Elegy se lit comme un document sur la pauvreté blanche en Amérique. Vance y décrit de l’intérieur une communauté qui vit d’aides alimentaires tout en se plaignant d’un Etat incompétent, passe « plus de temps à parler de travail qu’à travailler réellement », apprend à ses enfants « la valeur de la loyauté, de l’honneur, ainsi qu’à être dur au mal », mais persiste à confondre, chez ses petits, « intelligence et savoir », faisant passer pour idiots des gamins éduqués de manière inefficace. Parce qu’il parle des siens, le jeune homme dresse un constat très rude, dénonce la « fainéantise » de ses anciens semblables tout en appelant le monde politique à « juger moins et [à] comprendre plus ».

Une parole conservatrice audible

En mars dernier, dans un éditorial du New York Times intitulé « Pourquoi je rentre chez moi », Vance annonçait sa décision de quitter la Californie pour retourner dans les Appalaches, où il a créé une association de lutte contre la conduite addictive aux opiacés et a participé, au cours des derniers mois, à de nombreux meetings du Parti républicain.

Depuis le printemps, les ténors du parti ont d’ailleurs multiplié les appels du pied pour le convaincre de se présenter aux élections sénatoriales, qui se tiendront en novembre. Son nom est devenu familier des lecteurs de la presse quotidienne, son visage apparaît souvent à la télévision (il est devenu éditorialiste pour CNN, en janvier, et signe régulièrement dans les colonnes du New York Times). Plus d’un million d’exemplaires de son livre ont déjà été écoulés, et les droits ont été vendus à plus d’une dizaine de pays.

Les médias semblent avoir trouvé en J.D. Vance une parole conservatrice audible, reçue comme l’émanation articulée de la rage confusément exprimée par les Blancs les plus pauvres d’Amérique. En mai dernier, Bill Gates recommandait même sur son blog la lecture d’Hillbilly Elegy, affirmant y avoir trouvé « des informations nouvelles sur les facteurs culturels et familiaux qui contribuent à la pauvreté ».

 Voir aussi:

La grande colère des petits Blancs américains

Brice Coutourier
France Culture
15/09/2017

Voir de même:

Why I’m Moving Home

COLUMBUS, Ohio — In recent months, I’ve frequently found myself in places hit hard by manufacturing job losses, speaking to people affected in various ways. Sometimes, the conversation turns to the conflict people feel between the love of their home and the desire to leave in search of better work.

It’s a conflict I know well: I left my home state, Ohio, for the Marine Corps when I was 19. And while I’ve returned home for months or even years at a time, job opportunities often pull me away.

Experts have warned for years now that our rates of geographic mobility have fallen to troubling lows. Given that some areas have unemployment rates around 2 percent and others many times that, this lack of movement may mean joblessness for those who could otherwise work.

But from the community’s perspective, mobility can be a problem. The economist Matthew Kahn has shown that in Appalachia, for instance, the highly skilled are much likelier to leave not just their hometowns but also the region as a whole. This is the classic “brain drain” problem: Those who are able to leave very often do.

The brain drain also encourages a uniquely modern form of cultural detachment. Eventually, the young people who’ve moved out marry — typically to partners with similar economic prospects. They raise children in increasingly segregated neighborhoods, giving rise to something the conservative scholar Charles Murray calls “super ZIPs.” These super ZIPs are veritable bastions of opportunity and optimism, places where divorce and joblessness are rare.

As one of my college professors recently told me about higher education, “The sociological role we play is to suck talent out of small towns and redistribute it to big cities.” There have always been regional and class inequalities in our society, but the data tells us that we’re living through a unique period of segregation.

This has consequences beyond the purely material. Jesse Sussell and James A. Thomson of the RAND Corporation argue that this geographic sorting has heightened the polarization that now animates politics. This polarization reflects itself not just in our voting patterns, but also in our political culture: Not long before the election, a friend forwarded me a conspiracy theory about Bill and Hillary Clinton’s involvement in a pedophilia ring and asked me whether it was true.

It’s easy to dismiss these questions as the ramblings of “fake news” consumers. But the more difficult truth is that people naturally trust the people they know — their friend sharing a story on Facebook — more than strangers who work for faraway institutions. And when we’re surrounded by polarized, ideologically homogeneous crowds, whether online or off, it becomes easier to believe bizarre things about them. This problem runs in both directions: I’ve heard ugly words uttered about “flyover country” and some of its inhabitants from well-educated, generally well-meaning people.

I’ve long worried whether I’ve become a part of this problem. For two years, I’d lived in Silicon Valley, surrounded by other highly educated transplants with seemingly perfect lives. It’s jarring to live in a world where every person feels his life will only get better when you came from a world where many rightfully believe that things have become worse. And I’ve suspected that this optimism blinds many in Silicon Valley to the real struggles in other parts of the country. So I decided to move home, to Ohio.

It wasn’t an easy choice. I scaled back my commitments to a job I love because of the relocation. My wife and I worry about the quality of local public schools, and whether she (a San Diego native) could stand the unpredictable weather.

But there were practical reasons to move: I’m founding an organization to combat Ohio’s opioid epidemic. We chose Columbus because I travel a lot, and I need to be centrally located in the state and close to an airport. And the truth is that not every motivation is rational: Part of me loves Ohio simply because it’s home.

I recently asked a friend, Ami Vitori Kimener, how she thought about her own return home. A Georgetown graduate, Ami left a successful career in Washington to start new businesses in Middletown, Ohio. Middletown is in some ways a classic Midwestern city: Once thriving, it was hit hard by the decline of the region’s manufacturing base in recent decades. But the town is showing early signs of revitalization, thanks in part to the efforts of those like Ami.

Talking with Ami, I realized that we often frame civic responsibility in terms of government taxes and transfer payments, so that our society’s least fortunate families are able to provide basic necessities. But this focus can miss something important: that what many communities need most is not just financial support, but talent and energy and committed citizens to build viable businesses and other civic institutions.

Of course, not every town can or should be saved. Many people should leave struggling places in search of economic opportunity, and many of them won’t be able to return. Some people will move back to their hometowns; others, like me, will move back to their home state. The calculation will undoubtedly differ for each person, as it should. But those of us who are lucky enough to choose where we live would do well to ask ourselves, as part of that calculation, whether the choices we make for ourselves are necessarily the best for our home communities — and for the country.

 Voir encore:

Hillbilly America: Do White Lives Matter?

Yesterday I read J.D. Vance’s new book Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and a Culture In Crisis. Well, “read” is not quite the word. I devoured the thing in a single gulp. If you want to understand America in 2016, Hillbilly Elegy is a must-read. I will be thinking about this book for a long, long time. Here are my impressions.

The book is an autobiographical account by a lawyer (Yale Law School graduate) and sometime conservative writer who grew up in a poor and chaotic Appalachian household. He’s a hillbilly, in other words, and is not ashamed of the term. Vance reflects on his childhood, and how he escaped the miserable fate (broken families, drugs, etc) of so many white working class and poor people around whom he grew up. And he draws conclusions from it, conclusions that may be hard for some people to take. But Vance has earned the right to make those judgments. This was his life. He speaks with authority that has been extremely hard won.

Forgive the rambling nature of this post. I’m still trying to process this extraordinary book.

Vance’s people come from Kentucky and southern Ohio, a deeply depressed region filled with hard-bitten but proud Scots-Irish folks. He begins by talking about how, as a young man, he got a job working in a warehouse, doing hard work for extra money. He writes about how even though the work was physically demanding, the pay wasn’t bad, and it came with benefits. Yet the warehouse struggled to keep people employed. Vance says his book is about macroeconomic trends — outsourcing jobs overseas — but not only that:

But this book is about something else: what goes on in the lives of real people when the industrial economy goes south. It’s about reacting to bad circumstances in the worst way possible. It’s about a culture that increasingly encourages social decay instead of counteracting it. The problems that I saw at the tile warehouse run far deeper than macroeconomic trends and policy. too many young men immune to hard work. Good jobs impossible to fill for any length of time. And a young man [one of Vance’s co-workers] with every reason to work — a wife-to-be to support and a baby on the way — carelessly tossing aside a good job with excellent health insurance. More troublingly, when it was all over, he thought something had been done to him. There is a lack of agency here — a feeling that you have little control over your life and a willingness to blame everyone but yourself. This is distinct from the larger economic landscape of modern America.

This is the heart of Hillbilly Elegy: how hillbilly white culture fails its children, and how the greatest disadvantages it imparts to its youth are the life of violence and chaos in which they are raised, and the closely related problem of a lack of moral agency. Young Vance was on a road to ruin until certain people — including the US Marine Corps — showed him that his choices mattered, and that he had a lot more control over his fate than he thought.

Vance talks about how, in his youth, there was a lot of hardscrabble poverty among his people, but nothing like today, dominated by the devastation of drug addiction. Everything we are accustomed to hearing about black inner city social dysfunction is fully present among these white hillbillies, as Vance documents in great detail. He writes that “hillbillies learn from an early age to deal with uncomfortable truths by avoiding them, or by pretending better truths exist. This tendency might make for psychological resilience, but it also makes it hard for Appalachians to look at themselves honestly.”

This was one of many points at which Vance’s experience converged somewhat with mine. My people are not hillbillies per se, but I come from working-class Southern country white people. Many of the cultural traits Vance describes are present in a more diluted way in my own family. That fierce pride, a pride that would rather see everything go to hell than admit error. This, I think, has something to do with why Southern Protestant Christianity has traditionally been more Stoic than Christian. Real Christianity has as its heart humility. That’s not a characteristic Scots-Irish people hold dear.

Vance talks about the hillbilly habit of stigmatizing people who leave the hollers as “too big for your britches” — meaning that you got above yourself. It doesn’t matter that they may have left to find work, and that they’re living a fairly poor life not too far away, in Ohio. The point is, they left, and that is a hard sin to forgive. What, we weren’t good enough for you?

This is the white-people version of “acting white,” if you follow me: the same stigma and shame that poor black people deploy against other poor black people who want to better themselves with education and so on.

The most important figure in Vance’s life is his Mamaw (pron. “MAM-maw”), Bonnie Vance, a kind of hillbilly Catherine the Great. She was a phenomenally tough woman. She knew how to use a gun, she had a staggeringly foul mouth, she smoked menthols and stood ready to fight at the drop of a hat. And she saved Vance’s life.

Vance plainly loves his people, and because he loves them, he tells hard truths about them. He talks about how cultural fatalism destroys initiative. When hillbillies run up against adversity, they tend to assume that they can’t do anything about it. To the hillbilly mind, people who “make it” are either born to wealth, or were born with uncanny talent, winning the genetic lottery. The connection between self-discipline and hard work, and success, is invisible to them. Vance:

People talk about hard work all the time in places like Middletown [where Vance grew up]. You can walk through a town where 30 percent of the young men work fewer than twenty hours a week and find not a single person aware of his own laziness.

Vance was born into a world of chaos. It takes concentration to follow the trail of family connections. Women give birth out of wedlock, having children by different men. Marriages rarely last, and informal partnerings are more common. Vance has half-siblings by his mom’s different husbands (she has had five to date). In his generation, Vance says, grandparents are often having to raise their grandchildren, because those grandparents, however impoverished and messy their own lives may be, offer a more stable alternative than the incredible instability of the kids’ parents (or more likely, parent).

Vance scarcely knew his biological father until he was a bit older, and lived with his mom and her rotating cast of boyfriends and husbands. Here’s Vance on models of manhood:

I learned little else about what masculinity required of me other than drinking beer and screaming at a woman when she screamed at you. In the end, the only lesson that took was that you can’t depend on people. “I learned that men will disappear at the drop of a hat,” Lindsay [his half-sister] once said. “They don’t care about their kids; they don’t provide; they just disappear, and it’s not that hard to make them go.”

This is what happens in inner-city black culture, as has been exhaustively documented. But these are rural and small-town white people. This dysfunction is not color-based, but cultural.

I could not do justice here to describe the violence, emotional and physical, that characterizes everyday life in Vance’s childhood culture, and the instability in people’s outer lives and inner lives. To read in such detail what life is like as a child formed by communities like that is to gain a sense of why it is so difficult to escape from the malign gravity of that way of life. You can’t imagine that life could be any different.

Religion among the hillbillies is not much help. Vance says that hillbillies love to talk about Jesus, but they don’t go to church, and Christianity doesn’t seem to have much effect at all on their behavior. Vance’s biological father is an exception. He belonged to a strict fundamentalist church, one that helped him beat his alcoholism and gave him the severe structure he needed to keep his life from going off track. Vance:

Dad’s church offered something desperately needed by people like me. For alcoholics, it gave them a community of support and a sense that they weren’t fighting addiction alone. For expectant mothers, it offered a free home with job training and parenting classes. When someone needed a job, church friends could either provide one or make introductions. When Dad faced financial troubles, his church banded together and purchased a used car for the family. In the broken world I saw around me — and for the people struggling in that world — religion offered tangible assistance to keep the faithful on track.

Vance says the best thing about life in his dad’s house was how boring it was. It was predictable. It was a respite from the constant chaos.

On the other hand, the religion most hillbillies espouse is a rusticated form of Moralistic Therapeutic Deism. God seems to exist only as a guarantor of ultimate order, and ultimate justice; Jesus is there to assuage one’s pain. Except for those who commit to churchgoing — and believe it or not, this is one of the least churched parts of the US — Christianity is a ghost.

About Vance’s father’s fundamentalism, I got more details about what this blog’s reader Turmarion, who lives in Appalachia, keeps telling me about that region’s fundamentalism. Even though I live in the rural Deep South, this form of Christianity is alien to me. When he went to live with his dad for a time as an adolescent (if I have my chronology correct), Vance was exposed for the first time to church. He appreciated very much the structure, but noticed that the spirituality on offer was fear-based and paranoid. “[T]he deeper I immersed myself in evangelical theology, the more I felt compelled to mistrust many sectors of society. Evolution and the Big Bang became ideologies to confront, not theories to understand … In my new church … I heard more about the gay lobby and the war on Christmas than about any particular character trait that a Christian should aspire to have.”

This was yet another reminder of why so many Evangelicals react strongly against the Benedict Option. As I often say, I have no experience of this extreme siege mentality in Christianity. In fact, my experience is entirely the opposite. I believe that some Christians coming out of fundamentalism may react so strongly against their miserable, unhappy background that they don’t appreciate the extent to which there really are people and forces out to “get” them. When you have lived almost all your Christian life among highly assimilated Christians who generally don’t pay attention to these things, their complacency can drive you crazy. But Vance helps me to understand how someone who grew up in its opposite would find even the slightest hint of siege Christianity to be anathema.

One of the most important contributions Vance makes to our understanding of American poverty is how little public policy can affect the cultural habits that keep people poor. He talks about education policy, saying that the elite discussion of how to help schools focuses entirely on reforming institutions. “As a teacher at my old high school told me recently, ‘They want us to be shepherds to these kids. But no one wants to talk about the fact that many of them are raised by wolves.”

He continues:

Why didn’t our neighbor leave that abusive man? Why did she spend her money on drugs? Why couldn’t she see that her behavior was destroying her daughter? Why were all of these things happening not just to our neighbor but to my mom? It would be years before I learned that no single book, or expert, or field could fully explain the problems of hillbillies in modern America. Our elegy is a sociological one, yes, but it is also about psychology and community and culture and faith. During my junior year of high school, our neighbor Pattie called her landlord to report a leaky roof. The landlord arrived and found Pattie topless, stoned, and unconscious on her living room couch. Upstairs the bathtub was overflowing — hence, the leaking roof. Pattie had apparently drawn herself a bath, taken a few prescription painkillers, and passed out. The top floor of her home and many of her family’s possessions were ruined. This is the reality of our community. It’s about a naked druggie destroying what little of value exists in her life. It’s about children who lose their toys and clothes to a mother’s addiction.

This was my world: a world of truly irrational behavior. We spend our way into the poorhouse. We buy giant TVs and iPads. Our children wear nice clothes thanks to high-interest credit cards and payday loans. We purchase homes we don’t need, refinance them for more spending money, and declare bankruptcy, often leaving them full of garbage in our wake. Thrift is inimical to our being. We spend to pretend that we’re upper class. And when the dust clears — when bankruptcy hits or a family member bails us out of our stupidity — there’s nothing left over. Nothing for the kids’ college tuition, no investment to grow our wealth, no rainy-day fund if someone loses her job. We know we shouldn’t spend like this. Sometimes we beat ourselves up over it, but we do it anyway.

More:

Our homes are a chaotic mess. We scream and yell at each other like we’re spectators at a football game. At least one member of the family uses drugs — sometimes the father, sometimes both. At especially stressful times, we’ll hit and punch each other, all in front of the rest of the family, including young children; much of the time, the neighbors hear what’s happening. A bad day is when the neighbors call the police to stop the drama. Our kids go to foster care but never stay for long. We apologize to our kids. The kids believe we’re really sorry, and we are. But then we act just as mean a few days later.

And on and on. Vance says his people lie to themselves about the reality of their condition, and their own personal responsibility for their degradation. He says that not all working-class white hillbillies are like this. There are those who work hard, stay faithful, and are self-reliant — people like Mamaw and Papaw. Their kids stand a good chance of making it; in fact, Vance says friends of his who grew up like this are doing pretty well for themselves. Unfortunately, most of the people in Vance’s neighborhood were like his mom: “consumerist, isolated, angry, distrustful.”

As I said earlier, the two things that saved Vance were going to live full time with his Mamaw (therefore getting out of the insanity of his mom’s home), and later, going into the US Marine Corps. I’ve already written at too much length about Vance’s story, so I won’t belabor this much longer. Suffice it to say that as imperfect as she was, Mamaw gave young Vance the stability he needed to start succeeding in school. And she wouldn’t let him slack off on his studies. She taught him the value of hard work, and of moral agency.

The Marine Corps remade J.D. Vance. It pulverized his inner hillbilly fatalism, and gave him a sense that he had control over his life, and that his choices mattered. This was news to him. Reading this was a revelation to me. I was raised by parents who grew up poor, but who taught my sister and me from the very start that we were responsible for ourselves. Hard work, self-respect, and self-discipline were at the core of my dad’s ethic, for sure. There was no more despicable person in my dad’s way of seeing the world than the sumbitch who won’t work. I doubt that I’ve ever known a man more willing to do hard physical labor than my father was. Knowing what he came from, and knowing how any progress he made came from the sweat of his brow and self-discipline on spending, he had no tolerance for people who were lazy and blamed everybody else for their problems. This is true whether they were poor, middle class, or rich (but especially if they were rich).

Anyway, Vance talks about how the contemporary hillbilly mindset renders them unfit for participation in life outside their own ghetto. They don’t trust anybody, and are willing to believe outlandish conspiracy theories, particularly if those theories absolve them from responsibility.

I once ran into an old acquaintance at a Middletown bar who told me that he had recently quit his job because he was sick of waking up early I later saw him complaining on Facebook about the “Obama economy” and how it had affected his life. I don’t doubt that the Obama economy has affected many, but this man is assuredly not among them. His status in life is directly attributable to the choices he’s made, and his life will improve only through better decisions. But for him to make better choices, he needs to live in an environment that forces him to ask tough questions about himself. There is a cultural movement in the white working class to blame problems on society or the government, and that movement gains adherents by the day.

Hence the enormous popularity of Donald Trump among the white working class. Here’s a guy who will believe and say anything, and who blames Mexicans, Chinese, and Muslims for America’s problems. The elites hate him, so he’s made the right enemies, as far as the white working class is concerned. And his “Make America Great Again” slogan speaks to the deep patriotism that Vance says is virtually a religion among hillbillies.

Trump doesn’t come up in Vance’s narrative, but in truth, he’s all over it. Vance is telling his personal story, not analyzing US politics and culture broadly. It’s also true, however, that the GOP elites set themselves up for their current disaster, by listening to theories that absolved themselves of any responsibility for problems in this country from immigration and free trade (Trump is not all wrong about this).

The sense of inner order and discipline Vance learned in the Marine Corps allowed his natural intelligence to blossom. The poor hillbilly kid with the druggie mom ends up at Yale Law School. He says he felt like an outsider there, but it was a serious education in more than the law:

The wealthy and the powerful aren’t just wealthy and powerful; they follow a different set of norms and mores. … It was at this meal, on the first of five grueling days of [law school job] interviews, that I began to understand that I was seeing the inner workings of a system that lay hidden to most of my kind. … That week of interviews showed me that successful people are playing an entirely different game.

What he’s talking about is social capital, and how critically important it is to success. Poor white kids don’t have it (neither do poor black or Hispanic kids). You’re never going to teach a kid from the trailer park or the housing project the secrets of the upper middle class, but you can give them what kids like me had: a basic understanding of work, discipline, confidence, good manners, and an eagerness to learn. A big part of the problem for his people, says Vance, is the shocking degree of family instability among the American poor. “Chaos begets chaos. Instability begets instability. Welcome to family life for the American hillbilly.”

Vance is admirably humble about how the only reason he got out was because key people along the way helped him climb out of the hole his culture dug for him. When Vance talks about how to fix these problems, he strikes a strong skeptical note. The worst problems of his culture, the things that held kids like him back, are not things a government program can fix. For example, as a child, his culture taught him that doing well in school made you a “sissy.” Vance says the home is the source of the worst of these problems. There simply is not a policy fix for families and family systems that have collapsed.

I believe we hillbillies are the toughest goddamned people on this earth. … But are we tough enough to do what needs to be done to help a kid like Brian? Are we tough enough to build a church that forces kids like me to engage with the world rather than withdraw from it? Are we tough enough to look ourselves in the mirror and admit that our conduct harms our children? Public policy can help, but there is no government that can fix these problems for us. These problems were not created by governments or corporations or anyone else. We created them, and only we can fix them.

Voting for Trump is not going to fix these problems. For the black community, protesting against police brutality on the streets is not going to fix their most pressing problems. It’s not that the problems Trump points to aren’t real, and it’s not that police brutality, especially towards minorities, isn’t a problem. It’s that these serve as distractions from the core realities that keep poor white and black people down. A missionary to inner-city Dallas once told me that the greatest obstacle the black and Latino kids he helped out had was their rock-solid conviction that nothing could change for them, and that people who succeeded got that way because they were born white, or rich, or just got lucky.

Until these things are honestly and effectively addressed by families, communities, and their institutions, nothing will change.

Is there a black J.D. Vance? I wonder. I mean, I know there are African-Americans who have done what he has done. But are there any who will write about it? Clarence Thomas did, in his autobiography. Who else? Anybody know?

Vance’s book sends me back to Kevin D. Williamson’s stunning National Review piece on “The White Ghetto” — Appalachia, he means. This is the world J.D. Vance came out of, though he saw more good in it that Williams does in his journalistic tour. It also brings to mind Williamson’s highly controversial piece earlier this year (behind subscription paywall; David French excerpts the hottest part here) in which he said:

It is immoral because it perpetuates a lie: that the white working class that finds itself attracted to Trump has been victimized by outside forces. It hasn’t. The white middle class may like the idea of Trump as a giant pulsing humanoid middle finger held up in the face of the Cathedral, they may sing hymns to Trump the destroyer and whisper darkly about “globalists” and — odious, stupid term — “the Establishment,” but nobody did this to them. They failed themselves.

If you spend time in hardscrabble, white upstate New York, or eastern Kentucky, or my own native West Texas, and you take an honest look at the welfare dependency, the drug and alcohol addiction, the family anarchy — which is to say, the whelping of human children with all the respect and wisdom of a stray dog — you will come to an awful realization. It wasn’t Beijing. It wasn’t even Washington, as bad as Washington can be. It wasn’t immigrants from Mexico, excessive and problematic as our current immigration levels are. It wasn’t any of that. Nothing happened to them. There wasn’t some awful disaster. There wasn’t a war or a famine or a plague or a foreign occupation. Even the economic changes of the past few decades do very little to explain the dysfunction and negligence — and the incomprehensible malice — of poor white America. So the gypsum business in Garbutt ain’t what it used to be. There is more to life in the 21st century than wallboard and cheap sentimentality about how the Man closed the factories down. The truth about these dysfunctional, downscale communities is that they deserve to die.

Economically, they are negative assets. Morally, they are indefensible. Forget all your cheap theatrical Bruce Springsteen crap. Forget your sanctimony about struggling Rust Belt factory towns and your conspiracy theories about the wily Orientals stealing our jobs. Forget your goddamned gypsum, and, if he has a problem with that, forget Ed Burke, too. The white American underclass is in thrall to a vicious, selfish culture whose main products are misery and used heroin needles. Donald Trump’s speeches make them feel good. So does OxyContin. What they need isn’t analgesics, literal or political. They need real opportunity, which means that they need real change, which means that they need U-Haul.

I criticized Williamson at the time for his harshness. I still wouldn’t have put it the way he did, but reading Vance gives me reason to reconsider my earlier judgment. Vance writes from a much more loving and appreciative place than Williamson did (though I believe Williamson came from a similar rough background), but he affirms many of the same truths. If white lives matter — and they do, because all lives matter — then sentimentality and more government programs aren’t going to rescue these poor people. Vance puts it more delicately than Williamson, but getting a U-Haul and getting away from other poor people — or at least finding some way to get their kids out of there, to a place where people aren’t so fatalistic, lazy, and paranoid — is their best hope. And that is surely true no matter what your race.

The book is called Hillbilly Elegy, and I can’t recommend it to you strongly enough. It offers no easy answers. But it does tell the truth. I thank reader Surly Temple for giving it to me.

UPDATE: Hello Browser readers. Glad to see traffic from one of my favorite websites. If you found this piece interesting, I strongly encourage you to take a look at the subsequent interview I did with J.D. Vance about the book. I posted it last Friday, and it has gone viral. This past weekend was a record-setting one for TAC; Vance’s interview was so popular it crashed our server. Take a look at the piece and you’ll understand why. This extraordinary young writer is tapping into something very, very deep in American life right now. I’ve been getting plenty of e-mails from liberals saying how much they appreciated the piece, because Vance tells difficult truths that both liberals and conservatives need to hear.

Voir aussi:

Why Liberals Love ‘Hillbilly Elegy’

My friend Matt Sitman tweets:

Yes, but the more interesting question, at least to me, is why so many liberals like it — or at least why they are writing to me in droves saying how the interview J.D. Vance did with me deeply resonated with them, and inspired them to buy the book. (By the way, that interview was published two weeks ago today, and it’s still drawing so much web traffic to this site that our servers are struggling to handle it.) I’ll give you a sample below of the kind of correspondence I’m getting (with a couple of tweaks to protect privacy). There’s lots of it just like these below:

Mr. Dreher, this article was fantastic.

I grew up in rural Alabama, proudly declared myself “politically somewhere to the right of Attila the Hun”, and enlisted when I was 17. I had a difficult time getting out at 23 years old, several states away from my family, with a grownup’s bills to pay but an MOS that didn’t match the career I was suited for or needed as a civilian. I spent the next several years desperately poor but “self-sufficient” – as far as I knew, anyway.

In reality, of course, I had zero understanding of how taxes work. I saw about a 28% bite taken out of my paycheck, and didn’t understand that FICA/SS didn’t ultimately go to anybody but me, myself, and I, and that I wasn’t actually paying any income tax. I also had heard of but didn’t really understand or care about things like “every federal tax dollar that leaves SC has three federal tax dollars pass by it coming in.”

Truth be told, I wasn’t just unaware, I actively disbelieved that I wasn’t “self sufficient” at all, and I naively thought that I was paying for the “welfare” that the tiny, tiny portion of the population “poorer than me” was getting. I was also completely unaware that I was “desperately poor” at all. I was making $6/hr and I thought I was middle class! I knew people who made $10/hr, and I thought they were on the low end of upper class!
Eventually I made a real career for myself, started my own business, and spent less time scratching and kicking and fighting just to stay alive. The more time and resources I had, the more I learned about how the world, and politics, worked, and the more progressive I became. I am not, today, someone who would normally read articles from a site called “American Conservative”.

But I read yours, and I’m glad I did. What you and J.D. Vance had to say in that article are exactly what I want to hear from the conservative wing of American politics. Speaking candidly, I’m unlikely to be a “conservative” again – I’m a progressive, and likely to stay that way. But what you and Vance said was thoughtful, and reasonable, and – like I try to very publicly be myself, having “been there and done that” – understanding of the realities of the working poor. It’s the real and sensible ballast that even the best of real and sensible balloons (if you’ll permit the analogy between conservative and progressive, and we can both agree to handwave away the fact that the current DNC is neither as real or as sensible as it should be) needs.

That’s probably way too much to slog through, but seriously: thank you.

Another one:

I thoroughly enjoyed this article! The conversation is not one that I have witnessed anyone else having. It is so easy to dismiss people as racist without ever considering from where their views and positions are derived. I am certainly going to read Hillbilly Elegy and look forward to reading more of your articles, By the way I am black, liberal, I most often vote Democrat and I don’t like Trump (for Reasons too high in number to state). I enjoy intelligent conversation and debate and have learned to carefully listen to and understand those who I may disagree with, so I might be educated fully on the issue not just entrenched in my beliefs.

Thank you for a refreshing read in a sea partisan sludge.

Another one, this from a reader who mistakenly believed that J.D. Vance’s experiences were mine. Still, his letter is fascinating:

I wandered in on this article today… and couldn’t stop reading. I’m Californian, a progressive and a Sanders supporter, a former Nader supporter, a former UAW organizer, currently a medical
devices engineer in [state], and have a Ph.D. in engineering. I grew up in a town 5 miles north of the Mexican border in south San Diego, and grew up among Mexican immigrants, many of whom were undocumented… they were my neighbors, my friends, my elders. I myself am an immigrant, came here as a kid with my parents, who were liberals who wanted something better than that right-wing dictatorship in [another country].

But I did grow up around the poverty line. My parents fought hard to stay out of welfare, to stay together, and to teach us the value of work. At 43, I have always worked since I was 14, and have always associated these traits with working-class liberal values… and was quite surprised many election cycles ago to hear silver-spooned class enemies in the GOP pick that up. What did these bastards know about real work? But it also pains me to see the elites, especially the East Coast elites, take over the Democratic Party.

I’m sorry to hear about your experiences at Yale Law. And I’m glad that I didn’t go to a private school, or a school in the East Coast. After moving to [my current state] 3 years ago I’ve found that liberals “out east” (east of the Sierra Nevadas) seem to come from privilege, are more dogmatic, disconnected from the working class, and can be super competitive and vindictive. I even remember starting out as an undergrad and scholarship kid at UC San Diego, how I felt the sting of class. I felt disconnected culturally from the liberals. It wasn’t until friends from high school began shipping back from Desert Storm all crazy and screwed up that I found common cause with these liberals.

As with the folks of Appalachia (I was a member of the Southern Baptist Church… it was a big military town), the defense of our neighborhoods was also paramount to us. What south San Diegans were seeing during the 90s was an entire generation deployed to guard oil fields in Iraq while the princelings of Kuwait lived it up in night clubs, and folks in Sacramento setting up laws that attack immigrants as a cheap shot to get elected. Everything was fine at the border until these demagogues (Republicans in this case) started showing up in our town in staged photo-ops.

Trump does have that appeal of at least pretending to listen to the
broken and forgotten. But just as we were about to forget the vengeance we swore against those who hurt our town, Trump comes by and reopens all the wounds, reminding us that while we might hold some conservative values, Republicans will always see us as sub-human.

I do think dialog and empathy are something of a short supply in
American politics today. The neoliberal policies and unfair trade pacts supported by both parties have been crushing our respective beloved hometowns. And we have a lot more in common than what these entrenched political entities say that we do. I’ve read “Rivethead” and “Deer Hunting with Jesus” and felt this familiarity. I will look for your book.

And here’s another one:

I just wanted to write and tell you that I was fascinated by your interview with the author JD Vance, and I speak as a socialist, agnostic, gay white male who’s never voted Republican in all his years! As a lifelong resident of the suburbs of Houston, Texas, it’s long occurred to me how insulated I am from the struggles of poor and working-class folks today; however my family started out poor, with my parents divorcing when I was six. Luckily our mother was strong enough to help us make it out of the hole by excelling in her profession as a nurse. I remember her telling me that in the days when my sister and I were very young, for Christmas she’d spend $20 on each of us at the dollar store, and she always hoped that we enjoyed our presents. That made me love my mom so much more, and I realized how lucky we’d been to have her, given how things might have turned out. In Houston as you probably know there is a staggering number of people of every imaginable type, and my school years were spent among kids from every walk of life, of every ethnicity and persuasion you can imagine. As an outsider myself, being gay and openly agnostic in an environment where neither was considered acceptable (high school was in the late 90s), I can identify with the feeling of seeming hopelessness, isolation, and fear for the future that Mr Vance describes, though certainly on a different level and for different reasons. I also feel a greater understanding now of the appeal of Trump to certain strata within our society…along with a renewed sense of how dangerous he really is to all of us (not to mention the rest of the world)! I would like to feel as hopeful for the future as Mr Vance seems to, but I’m afraid that until November (though hopefully not after!) I’ll be suffering a case of non-stop indigestion. Maybe we could all use a touch of that hillbilly idealism in our lives.

Anyway, that’s enough rambling out of me. Cheers for an excellent interview, and congratulations for gaining a new reader of the blue persuasion!

I could go on and on. I’m getting so many e-mails like these above that I can’t begin to respond to them all. I’m passing every one of them on to J.D. Vance, though. Interestingly, if I’ve received a single e-mail from a conservative about the interview, I can’t remember it.

I’m genuinely surprised and grateful for all these generous e-mails, and I’m sure J.D. is too. What I find so hopeful about it is that someone has finally found a voice with which to talk substantively about an important economic and cultural issue, but without antagonizing the other side. JDV identifies as a conservative, but his story challenges right-wing free-market pieties. And I’ve gotten plenty of e-mails from liberals who either come from poverty or who work with poor people for a living, who praise JDV’s points about the poor needing to understand that whatever structural problems they face, they retain moral agency.

What do you think, readers? Do you think the runaway success of Hillbilly Elegy, and the powerfully positive response from liberals to a book about class written by a conservative, bodes well for the possibility of constructive engagement around issues of class and poverty? To be sure, I’ve received a handful of letters from angry liberal readers who reject the idea that there’s anything wrong with poor and working class white people that government action can’t solve. I believe, and so does J.D., that government really does have a meaningful role to play in ameliorating the problems of the poor. But there will never be a government program capable of compensating for the loss of stable family structures, the loss of community, the loss of a sense of moral agency, and the loss of a sense of meaning in the lives of the poor. The solution, insofar as there is a “solution,” is not an either-or (that is, either culture or government), but a both-and. From a Washington Post review of the book:

The wounds are partly self-inflicted. The working class, he argues, has lost its sense of agency and taste for hard work. In one illuminating anecdote, he writes about his summer job at the local tile factory, lugging 60-pound pallets around. It paid $13 an hour with good benefits and opportunities for advancement. A full-time employee could earn a salary well above the poverty line.

That should have made the gig an easy sell. Yet the factory’s owner had trouble filling jobs. During Vance’s summer stint, three people left, including a man he calls Bob, a 19-year-old with a pregnant girlfriend. Bob was chronically late to work, when he showed up at all. He frequently took 45-minute bathroom breaks. Still, when he got fired, he raged against the managers who did it, refusing to acknowledge the impact of his own bad choices.

“He thought something had been done to him,” Vance writes. “There is a lack of agency here — a feeling that you have little control over your life and a willingness to blame everyone but yourself.”

Perhaps Vance’s key to success is a simple one: that he just powered through his difficulties instead of giving up or blaming someone else.

“I believe we hillbillies are the toughest god—-ed people on this earth,” he concludes. “But are we tough enough to look ourselves in the mirror and admit that our conduct harms our children? Public policy can help, but there is no government that can fix these problems for us. . . . I don’t know what the answer is precisely, but I know it starts when we stop blaming Obama or Bush or faceless companies and ask ourselves what we can do to make things better.”

The loss of industrial jobs plays a big role in the catastrophe. J.D. Vance acknowledges that plainly in his book. But it’s not the whole story. Anybody who comes to Hillbilly Elegy thinking that it’s going to tell a story that affirms the pre-conceived beliefs of mainstream conservatives or liberals is going to be surprised and challenged — in a good way.

By the way, the viral nature of the TAC interview with J.D. Vance has pushed Hillbilly Elegy onto the bestseller list (more details of which will be available shortly). It’s No. 4 on Amazon’s own list as of this morning. They can barely keep enough in stock. It really is that good, folks. All this success could not have happened to a nicer man. Credit for this spark goes to reader Surly Temple, who gave me my copy of Hillbilly Elegy.

UPDATE: A reader writes to point out:

The Washington Post review you quote states, Perhaps Vance’s key to success is a simple one: that he just powered through his difficulties instead of giving up or blaming someone else.” I think that misses the point of the book. J.D. fully acknowledges the importance of his Mamaw, Marine Corps drill instructors, and wife in changing his outcomes.

My takeaway from the book is that we can help these communities and people, but not from a distance. It takes unconditional, sacrificial love.

He’s right about that, and I shouldn’t have posted that WaPo review without commenting. JDV openly credits his Mamaw and the Marine Corps with making him the man he is today. He does not claim he got there entirely on his own, by bootstrapping it.

Voir également:

RACE, CLASS, AND CULTURE: A CONVERSATION WITH WILLIAM JULIUS WILSON AND J.D. VANCE
THE BROOKINGS INSTITUTION
Washington, D.C.
Tuesday, September 5, 2017

MS. BUSETTE: Thanks Richard. I’m indebted to Richard who had the foresight to invite Bill and J.D. for this conversation well before I arrived at Brookings (…) Today we’re going to be covering some very timely and sensitive topics. Topics that explore who we are as Americans and why we are still struggling with entrenched poverty increasing in equality and the tragic waste of significant human potential; some 30 years after Bill Wilson first published his watershed book, “ The Truly Disadvantaged. ” As we begin this conversation, I want our audience to understand the personal experiences you both bring to your perspectives on poor Americans. Bill and J.D., I’d like each of you to share with us a personal experience from your childhood that had a profound impact on you and your perspectives on poverty, and Bill I’m going to ask you to go first.

MR. WILSON: Thank you. So, in answer to that challenging question, I should point out first of all that “ Hillbilly Elegy ” is a very important book and it also resonated with me in a very personal way because I also experienced the problems of rural poverty. I grew up in a small town in Western Pennsylvania. My father was a coal miner. He worked in these coal mines of Western Pennsylvania and oc casionally he worked in steel mills in Western Pennsylvania. He died at the age of 39, with a lung disease. Left my mother with six kids and I was the oldest at 12 years of age. My father had a 10 th grade education, my mother had a 10 th grade education. My mother who lived to the ripe old age of 94, raised us by cleaning house occasionally. Initially we were on r elief. We call it w elfare now. She got off w elfare and supported us by cleaning house; and what I distinctly remember about growing up in ru ral poverty is hunger. You know, I reviewed a book in the New York Times, Kathy Edin and Luke Shaefer’s book, “ Two Dollars a Day, Living on Almost Nothing in America. ” That book really captured my experiences, and I distinctly remember the times when we went hungry because my mother did not have any money and it was during the winter time and sometimes she had to use her own creativity in coming up with food because she couldn’t draw from the garden.

Now, given my family background, black person, black family in rural poverty; as one of my colleagues at Harvard told me, the odds that I would end up at Harvard as a University p rofessor and capital U on University, are very nearly zero. Like J.D. I’m an outlier. An outlier in — Malcolm Gladwell says in his book “ Outlier, The Study of Success. ” We are both outliers; but it’s interesting that J.D. never talks about holding himself up by his own bootstraps, and that’s something that I reject. I don’t refer to myself that way, because both J.D. and I, were in the right places at the right times, and we had significant individuals who were there to rescue us from poverty and enabled us to escape. We are the outliers being at the right place at the right time, and when I think about your question, that’s one thing I think about; how lucky I was. I had some significant individuals who helped me escape poverty.

MS. BUSETTE: Thank you Bill. J.D.?

MR. VANCE: Well first, thanks Camille, thanks Richard for hosting this. It’s really wonderful to be here and I’m a bit of a fan boy of William Julius Wilson as I wrote Hillbilly Elegy, so it was real exciting to be able to get him to sign this book. I think that the story that stands out to me is, and there’s a bit of a background here which is that you know, I was six or seven years old, and I remember my mom who was trying to get some sort of certification to become a nurse; and eventually after a couple of years, I remember being old enough that she sort of had to test how to draw blood on me, and that was sort of something I volunteered for because I thought it was really cool, because I was a weird kid; and I remember that eventually she made it and she was able to work as a nurse for a couple of years, and this just so happened to overlap with a period w here she was married to a truck driver. A guy who hadn’t graduated from high school, but was able to drive a truck and so you think about those two incomes together, there was this period where I felt like we had genuinely made it where we had this financial stability that was pretty remarkable given the history of my family. And I think the way that it fell apart so quickly and the way that even in the midst of that financial security, life was so chaotic and so unstable and eventually when that very precarious middle – class lifestyle fell apart economically, all of the instability that existed in our home sort of came crashing down upon us; and so, it felt like after this two-year period, we were in an even worse situation than we were going into it. I think you know, one of the things that taught me, and one of the ways I think it influenced the way that I think about poverty and inequality and upward mobility, is that the problems that a lot of poor families face aren’t purely income related. That some of the lessons that you learn, some of the things that you acquire when you are really struggling, they follow you even when you’re not struggling in a purely material sense. And then when a material sense returns, it can make all of those non-material things that much worse off, and I think that way of understanding these problems has really influenced the way that I think about a lot of the problems that I write about in the book.

MS. BUSETTE: Great, thank you very much. Thank you both very much. You know I want to talk a little bit about the place of poverty in the American narrative. And that narrative is complicated. In a recent survey conducted by The American Enterprise Institute and the Los Angeles Times, white Americans linked poverty with laziness and lack of ambition, and when we think of the welfare reform debates from the 1990’s, there were ungenerous terms used to describe the poor. The National Opinion Research Center also released a survey that shows that over the last two d ecades, there has never been such a bigger divide between white Republicans and white Democrats when it comes to the views of the intelligence and work ethic of African Americans. More generally, Americans think of poverty as an individual failure, and i ts opposite financial success is the result of hard work and smarts. I want each of you to reflect on these narratives of poverty and give us your perspective. Bill, I’m going to start with you.

MR. WILSON: Okay, that’s a very challenging question and I ‘m going to try to answer it by also pointing out some differences that I have with J.D. It’s really kind of a matter of emphasis. Not that we differ, it’s just a matter of emphasis. First of all, we both agree that too many liberal social scientists focus on social structure and ignore cultural conditions. You know, they talk about poverty, joblessness and discrimination, but they also don’t talk about some of the cultural conditions, that grow out of these situations, in response to these situations. Too many conservatives focus on cultural forces and ignore structural factors. Now J.D. has made the same point in “ Hillbilly Elegy ” and you also have made the same point in some subsequent interviews talking about the book. Now where we disagree and this relates back to your question, Camille, is in the interpretation of these cultural factors. J.D. places a lot of emphasis on agency. That people even in the most impoverished circumstances have choices that can either improve or exacerbate their situation, their predicaments. And I also think that a gency is important and should not be ignored, even in situations where individuals confront overwhelming structural impediments. But what J.D., and I’d like to hear your response to this J.D., wha t you don’t make explicit or emphasize enough from my point of view, is that agency is also constrained by these structural factors, even among people who you know, make positive choices to improve their lives, there are still constraints and I maintain th at the part of your book where you talking about agency, really cries out for a deeper interrogation. A deeper interrogation of how personal a gency is expanded or inhibited by the circumstance that the poor or working classes confront, including you know, their interactions and families, social networks , and institutions, in these distressed communities. In other words, what I’m trying to suggest is that personal agency is recursively associated with the structural forces within which it operates. And here you know, it’s sort of insightful to talk about intermediaries and insightful to talk about people who aid, who help you in making choices, and you do that well in the book. But here’s the point, given the American belief system on poverty and welfare in which Americans as you point out Camille, place far greater emphasis on personal shortcomings as opposed to structural barriers and especially when you’re talking about the behavior of African Americans. I believe that explanations that focus — don’t get me wrong, you don’t even talk about African Americans in the sense, I’m talking about people out there in the general public. Given this focus on personal shortcomings as opposed to structural barriers in a common for outcomes, I believe that explanations that focus on agency are likely to overshadow explanations that focus on structural impediments. Some people read a book, but they’re not that sophisticated, the take away will be those personal factors and you know, I would have liked to have seen you sort of try to put things in context you know. Talk about the constraints that people have. Now this relates to the second point I want to make. In addition, to feeling that they have little control over themselves, that is lack of agency. You point out that the individuals in these hillbilly communities tend to blame themselves — I’m sorry, blame everyone but themselves, and the term you used to explain this phenomenon is cognitive dissonance, when our beliefs are not consistent with our behaviors. And I agree, and many people often do tend to blame others and not themselves, but I think that when we talk about cognitive dissonance, we also have to recognize that individuals in these communities do indeed have some complaints, some justifiable complaints, including complaints about industries that have pulled off stakes and relocated to cheaper labor areas overseas and in the process, have devastated communities like Middletown, Ohio. Including complaints about automation replacing the jobs of cashiers and parking lot attendants. Including the complaints that government and corporate actions have undermined unions and therefore led to a decrease in the wages or workers in Middletown. You know, I just , I’m sorry, I’m going on too far, I’ll let you respond.

MS. BUSETTE: That was interesting. Now, here’s your chance.

MR. VANCE: Sure. So, I’ll make two broad points. One hopefully more responsive to your initial question, second more responsive to Bill’s concerns. So, first this point about culture, which is a really, really, difficult and amorphous concept to define, and one of the things that I was trying to do with “ Hillbilly Elegy ” is try to in some ways draw the discussion away from this structure versus personal responsibility narrative and convince us to look at culture as a third and I think very important variable. I often think that the way that conservatives, and I’m a conservative, talk about culture is in some ways an excuse to end the conversation instead of starti ng a much more important conversation. It’s look at their bad culture, look at their deficient culture, we can’t do anything to help them; instead of trying to understand culture as this much bigger social and institutional force that really is important that some cases can come from problems related to poverty and some cases can come from a host of different factors that are difficult to understand. So, here’s what I mean by that. One of the most important I think cultural problems that I talk about is the prevalence of family and stability and family trauma in some of the communities that I write about; and I take it as a given that that trauma and that instability is really bad, that it has really negative downstream effects on whether children are able to get an education, whether their able to enter the workforce, whether their able to raise and maintain successful families themselves. I think it’s tempting to sort of look at the problems of family instability and families like mine and say the re’s a structural problem if only people had access to better economic opportunities, they wouldn’t have this problem. I think that’s partially true, but also consequently partially false. I think there’s a tendency on the right to look at that and say these parents need to take better care of their families and of their children, and unless they do it, there’s nothing that we can do. And I think again, that is maybe partially true, but it’s also very significantly false. What I’m trying to point to in this concept of culture, is we know that when children grow up in very unstable families that it has important cognitive effects, we know that it has important psychological effects, and unless we understand the problem of family instability and trauma, not just as a structural problem, or problem with personal responsibility, but as a long – term problem, in some cases inherited from multiple generations back, then we’re not going to be able to appreciate what’s really going on in some of these families a nd why family instability and trauma is so durable and so difficult to actually solve. So, I tend to think of culture as in some ways, this way to sum all of the things that are neither structural nor individual. What is it that’s going on in people’s environments good and bad that make it difficult for them to climb out of poverty. What are the things that they inherit. It’s not just from their own families, but from multiple generations back. Behaviors, expectations, environmental attitudes that mak e is really hard for them to succeed and do well. That’s the concept of culture that I think is most important, and also frankly that I think is missing a little bit from our political conversation when we talk about these questions of poverty, we’re real ly comfortable talking about personal responsibility, we’re really comfortable talking about structural problems. We don’t often talk about culture in this way that I’m trying to talk about it, in “ Hillbilly Elegy. ”

MR. WILSON: Can I just —

MR. VANCE : Sure.

MR. WILSON: No, go ahead J.D.

MR. VANCE: (laughing)

MR. WILSON: No, no, I agree. It’s a matter of emphasis, that’s all I’m saying.

MR. VANCE: So this, yeah.

MR. WILSON: And let me also point out, here’s where we really do agree. We both agree that there are cultural practices within families and so on and in communities that reinforce problems created by the structural barriers.

MR. VANCE: Absolutely.

MR. WILSON: Reinforce. Practiced behaviors that perpetuate poverty and disadvantage. So, this we agree. Too often liberals ignore the role of these cultural forces in perpetuating or reinforcing conditions associated with poverty or concentrated (inaudible).

MS. BUSETTE: So —

MR. VANCE: Absolutely. So, the second point that I wanted to make, and I’ll try to be brief is this question of Agency and whether I overemphasize the role of Agency. I think that for me, this is a really tough line to tow because I’m sort of writing about these problems you know, having in my personal memory, I’m not that far removed from a lot of them. I know that myself, one of the biggest problems that I faced was that I really did start to give up on myself early in high school, and I think that’s a really significant problem. At the same time, I understand and recognize the problem that Bill mentions which is that we have this tendency to sort of overemphasize Personal Agency and to proverbially blame the victim for a lot of these problems. So, what I was trying to do with this discussion of Personal Agency in the book, and I may have failed, but this is the effort, this is what I’m really trying to accomplish. Is that the first instance, I do think that it’s important for kids like me in circumstances like mine, to pick up the book and to have at least some reinforcement of the Agency that they have. I do think that’s a significant problem from the prospective of kids who grew up in communities like mine. The second thing that I’m trying to do, is talk about Personal Agency, not jus t from the prospective of individual poor people, but from the entire community that surrounds them. So, one of the things that I talk about is as religious communities in these areas, do they have the, as I say in the book, toughness to build Churches that encourage more social engagement as opposed to more social disaffection. I think that’s a question of Personal Agency, not from the perspective of the impoverished kid, but from a religious leader and community leaders that exist in their neighborho od. So, I think that sense of Personal Agency is really important. One of the worries that I have, is that when we talk about the problems of impoverished kids and this is especially true amongst sort of my generation, so this is — I’m a tail end of t he millennials here, is that we tend to think about helping people, 10 million people at a time a very superficial level, and one of the calls to action that I make in the book with this — by pointing out to Personal Agency is the idea that it can be real ly impactful to make a difference in 10 lives at a very deep level at the community level. And I think that sometimes is missing from these conversations. And then, the final point that I’ll make is that there’s a difference between recognizing the impo rtance of Personal Agency and I think ignoring the role of structural factors in some of these problems, right? So, the example that I used to highlight this in the book is this question of addiction. So, there’s some interesting research that suggests t hat people who believe inherently that their addiction is a disease, show slightly less proclivity to actually fight that addiction and overcome that addiction. So, that creates sort of a catch 22, because we know there are biological components to add iction. We know that there are these sorts of structural non – personal decision – making drivers of addiction, and yet, if you totally buy in to the non – individual choice explanation for addiction, you show less of a proclivity to fight it. So, I think that there is this really tough under current to some of our discussions on these issues, where as a society we want to simultaneously recognize the barriers that people face, but also encourage them not to play a terrible hand in a terrible way, and that’s wh at I’m trying to do with this discussion of Personal Agency. The final point that I’ll make on that, is that the person who towed that line better than anyone I’ve ever known was my Grandma, my Ma’ma who I think is in some ways the hero of the book. She always told me. Look J.D., like is unfair for us, but don’t be like those people who think the deck is hopelessly stacked against them. I think that’s a sentiment that you hear far too infrequently among America’s elites. This simultaneous recogniti on that life is unfair for a lot of poor Americans, but that we still have to emphasize the role of individual agency in spite of that unfairness and I think that’s again a difficult balancing act. I may not have struck that balancing act perfectly in the book, but that was the intention.

MS. BUSETTE: Thank you.

MR. WILSON: Camille, do you mind if I follow – up because I mean this is an interesting conversation and you just raised a point there about optimism which I think is very, very important. Because you know, one point that resonated with me in your book is that you pointed out, I think it was 2010 – 2011, by the way, I read your book twice you know so (laughter) that’s how I remembered it, and I enjoyed it both times. I’m going to say —

MR. VANCE: That’s good.

MR. WILSON: — it’s a great book. You pointed out that in 2010 or 2011, you were overwhelmingly hopeful about the future, and that for the first time in your life, you felt like an outsider in Middletown, Ohio. And what made you feel like an alien as you put it, was your optimism. And I think that that’s the key. People who have some hope for the future behave differently. And I think that if there were some way to generate hope and optimism among people in Appalachia, or among the Appalachian transplants, you would see a change in their behavior, and this argument applies not only to those in distress rural communities, but also distressed urban communities. And I think immediately of the Harlem Children Zone. The kids who are lucky enough to be a part of — I assume all of you know about the Harlem Children’s Zone. The kids who are lucky enough to be a part of the Harlem Children’s Zone, are kids who develop in the process a hopeful feeling. A feeling that they have a future, and therefore they’re not going to do anything to jeopardize that future. You became optimistic. What factors led you to develop that optimism?

MR. VANCE: Yeah, that’s a good question. I might ask you the same question when I’m done answering —

MR. WILSON: Right.

MR. VANCE: — but you know, the first thing is definitely you know, going back to my grandma. I think if anybody had a reason for pessimism and cynicism about the future, it was her. It’s sort of difficult to imagine a woman who had lived a more difficult life and yet ma’ma had this constant optimism about the future, in the sense that we had to do better because that was just the way that America worked. I mean I think that she was this woman who had this deep and abiding faith in the American dream in a way that is obviously disappearing And in fact, as I wrote about in the book, was I started to see disappearing even you know, when I was a young kid in my early 20’s. So, I think that my grandma was a huge part of that. I also think that the Marine Corp was a really huge part of that, and this is sort of a transformational experience that I write about in the book. The military is this really remarkable institution. It brings people from diverse backgrounds together, gets them on the same team. Gets them marching proverbially and literally towards the same goal, and for a kid who had grown up in a community that was starting to lose faith in that American dream, I think that the military was a really useful way to, as I say in the book, teach a certain amount of willfulness as opposed to despair and hopelessness. So, I think that was a really critical piece of it. You know, at some level, in some cases I think it’s impossible to reconstruct that in the past. I knew that I was a really hopeless and in some cases detached kid early in high school. I knew that by 2010, I was feeling really optimistic about the future and I do sometimes wonder how easy it is to reconstruct what took me from point A to point B, but those two factors are my best guess.

MS. BUSETTE: Did you want to answer his question.

MR. WILSON: You know, even in extreme property, my mother kept telling me, you’re going to college. And my Aunt Janice also reinforced — my Aunt Janice was the first person in my extended family who got a college education, and I used to go to New York to visit her during the summer months, and I said you know, I want to be like Aunt Janice, you know?

MR. VANCE: Sure.

MR. WILSON: Key people in our lives —

MR. VANCE: Absolutely.

MR. WILSON: We are the outliers J.D.

MR. VANCE: Yep.

MR. WILSON: And Malcom Gladwell since.

MS. BUSETTE: Thank you both for that interchange. I think that was incredibly interesting and very illuminating. I want to go back to something you mentioned J.D., which is this question of culture. You know Bill, I know that the term cultural poverty has a very divisive history and still conjures up very vitriolic debates today. But Bill, you have over an extraordinary career, created meaningful distinctions about poverty and within that jargon of poverty and you’ve also situated jobless poverty in particular within changes in the economy. Could you tell us what the experiential differences are between jobless poverty and the employed poor?

MR. WILSON: Well you really see this when you look at neighborhoods. Neighborhoods in which an overwhelming majority of the population are poor, but employed is entirely different from neighborhoods in which people are poor but jobless. Jobless neighborhoods trigger all kinds of problems. Crime, drug addiction, gang behavior, violence. And one of the things that I had focused on when I wrote my book, When Work Disappears is what happens to intercity neighborhoods that experience increasing le vels of joblessness. And we did some research in Chicago and it was really you know, sad, talking to some of the mothers who were just fearful about allowing their children to go outside because the neighborhood was so incredibly dangerous. And I remember talking with one woman and she says — who was obese and she says you know, I went to the doctor he said that I should go out and exercise. Can you imagine jogging in this neighborhood? Because the joblessness had created problems among young people who were trying to make ends meet and they’re involved in crime and drugs and so on. So, I would say that if you want to focus on improving neighborhoods, the first thing that I would do would try to increase or enhance employment opportunities.

MS. BUSETTE: Great, thank you.

MR. WILSON: I have another story. This just reminds me. I was talking with a mother, young mother. Actually, she’s young now from my point of view, middle 30’s and her son had just been shot in the neighborhood, killed. Str ay bullet from a gang fight. She said her son was not a member of the gang, that’s one of the reasons why she was so fearful, so concerned about keeping her children indoors. She said you know Mr. Wilson, no one cared that my son died. His death was not reported in any of the newspapers. It wasn’t reported on the radio, TV. No one cared Mr. Wilson that my son died. And I just keep thinking about these families who live in these dangerous jobless neighborhoods and what they have to endure.

MS. BUSETTE: Thank you. One of the things that comes out clearly from your work Bill, and from your book J.D., is the erosion of social networks and social capital. J.D., your book is really an extended love letter to your grandparents who raised you. Can you tell us a little bit about how the social connections that they had were important to their resilience they showed as parents, as your parents?

MR. VANCE: Sure. So, my grandparents lived in, I think grew up in a little town that had much more robust communities than the town that I grew up in. And so, a lot of the relationships they developed, my grandfather was a 35-year union welder, at Armco. Later, A.K. Steel. My grandmother was a little bit more socially isolated than my grandfather but still had built up a network of friends over that time, and you know, going back to Bill’s point about having diverse networks of people who actually give you a sense of what’s possible and what’s out there, that was really, really, powerful for me, right. So, you know, of my grandparents three kids, one obviously is my mom, but my uncle and aunt were doing pretty well when I was a young kid, and so that gave me this sense of what’s out there, what’s possible. That’s really powerful. My grandfather had a number of friends most of whom were working class like him, but some of whom you know, owned the local businesses or owned local stores or mechanic shops, things like that. So that also gave me the sense of what was possible. And I think ultimately though I went to the Marine Corps and then off to college. I also think the obvious implication is that some of those social networks and connections would have had really powerful economic benefits if I had eventually tried to rely on them. I think that what was so wonderful about my grandparent’s social networks is that they were intact enough for me to still have relied upon them. On the other hand, one thing I really worried about and one thing that I increasingly worried about as I actually did research for the book, is this idea of faith and religion, not just as something that people believe in, but as an actual positive institutional and social role player in their lives. And one of the things you do see, that this is something that Charles Murray’s written about, is that you see the institutions of faith declining in some of these lower income communities faster than you do in middle and upper income communities. I don’t think you have to be a person of faith to think that that’s worrisome. I think you can just read a paper by Jonathan Gruber that talks about all of these really positive social impacts of being a regular participatory Church member. So, you know, I think I was lucky in that sense, but a lot of folks, and when I look at the community right now, it worries me a little bit that you don’t see these robust social institutions in the same way that you certainly did 30, 40 years ago, and even when I was growing up in Middletown. The last point that I’ll make about that, is that (…) these trends often take half a century or more to really reveal themselves and I do sometimes see signs of resilience in some of these communities that I sort of didn’t fully anticipate and didn’t expect when the book was published. So, one of the things I’ve started to realize for example is when we talk about the decline of institutional faith, even though I continue to worry about that, one of the institutions that’s actually picked up the slack are groups like Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous. They almost have this faith effect. It brings people together. There’s even a sort of liturgical element to some of these meetings that I find really, really fascinating and interesting. So, people try to find and replace community when it’s lost but you know, clearly, they haven’t at least as of yet, replaced it even remotely to the degree that it has been lost which is why I think you see some of the issues that we do.

MS. BUSETTE: Alright, thank you. Bill, I know you have something to say on that —

MR. WILSON: Sure.

MS. BUSETTE: — but I wanted to kind of position the question in a slightly different way than I did for J.D. The economy certainly became significantly since you first penned The Truly Disadvantaged. And what, from your perspective, what effects have those changes had on social organization and poverty?

MR. WILSON: Well, I don’t know if the conditions have changed that much, since I wrote The Truly Disadvantaged. The one big difference is that I think there’s increasing technology and automation that has created problems for a lot of low skilled workers. You know, I mentioned automation replacing jobs that cashiers held, and parking lot attendants held. So, you have a combination not only of the relocation of industries overseas, that I talked about in The Truly Disadvantaged; but now you have increasing automation and technology replacing jobs, and this worries me because I think that people who have poor education are going to be in difficult situations increasingly down the road. You look at intercity schools, not only schools in intercities, but in many other neighborhoods, and kids are not being properly educated. So, they’re not being prepared for the changes that are occurring in the economy. I remember one social scientist saying that it’s as if — talking about the black population. It’s as if racism and racial discrimination put black people in their place only to watch increasing technology and automation destroy that place. So, the one significant difference from the time I wrote The Truly Disadvantaged in 1987, is the growing problems created by increasing technology for the poor.

MR. VANCE: Bill, could I ask a question —

MR. WILSON: Sure.

MR. VANCE: — because this is something I was you know, looking through your book on my Kendall earlier today, and I kept on coming back to this question, and I’m curious what you think. Which is if the civil rights movement had happened in the early 20th century as opposed to the mid-20th century, do you think that black Americans would be more caught up than they are right now? In other words, do you think that it happened, the civil rights advancements happened at a time when technology was just really starting to hammer the economies that they relied on, and if it happened in an area where there weren’t quite the same premiums on human capital, that maybe they could have caught up a little bit better than they have over the past 50 years?

MR. WILSON: So what you’re saying is that if civil rights movement had happened at this time?

MR. VANCE: Sorry, the early 20th century?

MR. WILSON: Oh, the early 20th century

MR. VANCE: Yeah, that’s right.

MR. WILSON: Right.

MR. VANCE: So, if it had happened when we were just transitioning from the proverbial farm to the factory, do you think it would have had a significant difference?

MR. WILSON: I’m not sure.

MR. VANCE: Right, what else can you say.

MR. WILSON: What do you think?

MR. VANCE: — reading The Truly Disadvantaged today, I was thinking maybe the answer is yes, because part of what happened, with the civil rights movement is that the economy was rapidly changing just to some of these legal structures were you know, as black Americans were freed from some of these legal structures. And I do wonder if the economy — it was in some ways as these legal changes were happening in a very positive way, the economy hit black Americans super hard, and I wonder if those legal structures would have fallen at a time when the economy wasn’t changing so rapidly. Maybe things would be a little bit different today?

MR. WILSON: This reminds me of the point that Bayard Rustin raised in the early 1960’s. He said, you know, it’s great to outlaw discrimination and prejudice, but it’s also important to recognize that if you have a referee in the ring, and you say there will be no discrimination, but one fighter has had all of the training and the other fighter has not, which fighter is going to come out ahead? And so, he says much more emphasis has now got to be placed on dealing with these basic economic problems and he told Martin Luther King, Jr. he said look, he says what good is it to be allowed to eat in a restaurant if you can’t afford a hamburger; so, we’re going to have to address some of these fundamental economic problems —

MR. VANCE: Sure.

MR. WILSON: — that are devastating the community. So that reinforces your point too.

MS. BUSETTE: That is a perfect segue to a set of questions that I want to ask you both. It’s about the question of Race in America. We know that racism and discrimination have a long history in the U.S., and that the effects of that history are still experienced by individuals on a daily basis today. When those experiences are aggregated, we can see large mobility, wealth and income gaps between white Americans and African Americans. We are also hearing, and reading and seeing about the culture of the sphere, the opioid epidemic and the disability culture in rural and Rust belt America. So, I’m going to ask a sensitive question. Are there differences between being black, jobless and poor, and being white jobless and poor? And if so, what are they and why? Bill, I’m going to give you the honor of tackling that first (laughter).

MR. WILSON: You know, that’s a very interesting question because I was just — you know J.D. you wrote in your book about the problems of poor whites and it seems that poor whites right now are more pessimistic than any group, and the question is why. I was sort of impressed with your analysis of the white working class and the age of Trump. You know, you pointed out that when Barack Obama became president there were a lot of people in your community who were really struggling and who believe that the modern American meritocracy did not seem to apply to them. These people were not doing well, and then you have this black president who’s a successful product of meritocracy who has raised the hope of African Americans and he represented every positive thing that these working-class folks that you write about did not possess or lacked. And Trump emerged as candidate who sort of spoke to these people. What is interesting is that if you look at the Pew Research Polls, recent Pew Research polls, I think you pointed this out in your book, the working – class whites right now are more pessimistic than any other group about their economic future and their children’s future. Now is that pessimism justified? I think they’re overly pessimistic. I still maintain that to be black, poor and jobless is worse than being white, poor and jobless, okay? But, for some reason, the white poor is more pessimistic. Now I think with respect to the black poor and working class has kind of an Obama effect you kn ow. I think that may wear off and then blacks will become even more equally as pessimistic as whites in a few years.

MR. VANCE: I’d really like for you to run those numbers right now, and see if the rates among pessimism among working class blacks are changed or inverted relative to where they were a couple of years ago. You know, people ask me what I see as the similarities between working class blacks and working-class whites, and what the differences are, and whenever they ask me what the differences are I always say, talk to Bill Wilson, he’s a lot smarter about this stuff than I am. But the thing that jumps out to me most when I think about the differences, is that housing policy, especially housing policy back in the 50’s and 60’s affects modern day black Americans much more than it does modern day white Americans. Especially the working and non-working poor. What I mean by that is that I think that you know, partially because of research that Bill has done and partially for research that a lot of other folks have done. Concentrated poverty is really bad. It’s worse than just being poor. To be sort of socially isolated in these islands of all the other poor people and I think that’s a much more common experience among black Americans because of the residuals effects of housing policy in the 50’s and 60’s, so I think that to me, if I was going to pick one single factor, that was driving the continued difference, I would probably say housing policy. The sort of question of how to you know, is it better or worse to be working-class or sort of poor, jobless and white, versus poor, jobless and black. I think all things being equal certainly poor jobless and black is sort of worse off if you look at wealth numbers, if you look at income numbers, that’s still the case. I do worry a little bit that we don’t have the vocabulary to really talk about the full measure of disadvantage in the country right now. What I mean by that is that we’re pretty comfortable talking about class, we’re pretty comfortable talking about gender, we’re reasonably comfortable talking about race, but when we talk about things like single parent families, family trauma, concentrated poverty. All of these things that would go into what I would call the disadvantage bucket or the privileged bucket, it’s not those three factors, it’s probably two dozen or three dozen factors. We’re really bad about talking about everything except for race, class and gender. And I think that’s one way that the conversation has really broken down, especially in the past few years.

MS. BUSETTE: Alright, thank you.

MR. WILSON: So, this reminds me of your points J.D., reminds me of a paper that Robert Sampson, a colleague at Harvard and I wrote in 1995 entitled Toward a Theory of Race, Crime and Urban Inequality. A paper that has become a classic actually in the field of criminology because it’s generated dozens of research studies. Our basic thesis we were addressing you know, race and violent crime, is that racial disparities and violent crime are attributable in large part to the persistent structural disadvantages that are disproportionately concentrated in African American urban communities. Nonetheless, we argue that the ultimate cause of crime were similar for both whites and blacks, and we pose a central question. In American cities, it is possible to reproduce in white communities the structural circumstances under which many blacks live. You know, the whites haven’t fully experienced the structural reality that blacks have experienced does not negate the power of our theory because we argue had whites been exposed to the same structural conditions as blacks then white communities would behave – – the crime rate would be in the predicted direction. And then we had an epiphany. What about the rural white communities that you talk about. Where you’re not only talking about joblessness, you’re not only talking about poverty, but you’re also talking about family structure. So, here in Appalachia, you could reproduce some of the conditions that exist in intercity neighborhoods and therefore it would be good to test our theory in these areas because we’d be looking at the family structure. The rates of single parent families. We’d be looking at joblessness, we’d be loo king at poverty. So, we need to move beyond the urban areas and see if we can look at communities that come close to approximating or even worse in some cases, and some intercity neighborhoods. This reminds me, I was reading an interview, excellent interview. Remember I wrote to you that first time I read this interview, it was before I even read Hillbilly Elegy and I went and read the book after reading this interview; or maybe it was in Hillbilly Elegy where you refer to the research of the economist Raj Chetty who did some path breaking research on concentrated poverty, single parent families and mobility.

MR. VANCE: Yep.

MR. WILSON: And the reports in the newspapers focused on concentrated poverty and then talk about rates of single parent families which he also emphasized, you see.

MR. VANCE: Yep.

MR. WILSON: But if you want to capture both, it might be good to focus on rural areas like the ones you wrote about, and see if some of the same factors are reproduced that I read about in The Truly Disadvantaged.

MS. BUSETTE: Oh there’s no second book for you (laughter). So, my colleague Richard Reeves has recently published a piece that demonstrated that there’s a century economic mobility gap between black and white men. So, in a sense, the historically lower rates of upward mobility have delayed the economic ascent of black men by a century. Should we be concerned?

MR. WILSON: Could you repeat that?

MS. BUSETTE: Yeah. The historically lower rates of upward mobility have delayed for black men, have delayed the economic ascent of black men by a century compared to white men. So, the question is, should we be concerned, and do we need differentiated sets of policies to address black economic mobility and on the other hand, white economic mobility?

J.D., I’m going to give that to you first (laughter).

MR. WILSON: You should have sent these questions to us ahead of time (laughter) —

MS. BUSETTE: No, no.

MR. WILSON: — so we could have thought —

MS. BUSETTE: That’s the fun (laughter). Yeah, no fun in that.

MR. VANCE: Well, I think you asked two questions. The first was should we be concerned. My answer to that is yes, and I’ll let Bill take the second question (laughter). So, you know, this question of should we have differentiated policies. I think it depends on what we mean by differentiated right. So, to take Bill’s — something he said earlier, this question of technological change and the way that it’s impacting these communities, I think that requires us to fundamentally rethink the way that we approach higher education. That’s been my persistent frustration, thinking about policy over the past couple of years. Is we have this rapidly changing economy. We haven’t changed our institutions or even our institutional thinking to match up to that rapidly changing economy. But if you’re focused on sort of correcting those gaps or if you’re just basically focused on giving help to the people who need it, then you’re going to have a differentiated application of help because black Americans need it, you know, maybe on average more than white Americans. If we talk about sort of the negative effects for example of concentrated poverty, this is something that I really worry about, and back to Raj Chetty, a different paper that he published show that there are these really interesting positive effects of the Moving to Opportunity Study. But my guess is that concentrated poverty equally hurts black and white Americans, it’s just that black Americans experience it more. So, there’s going to be a differentiated effect if you try to rectify that problem, but not because you say we’re going to try to help black people more than white people, just because you’re going to say, I want to help the problem of concentrated poverty and because they’re suffering from it more. That effect will at least be differentiated. But I don’t know, I haven’t thought about sort of whether you should go into it sort of before the fact and try to apply these things differently. My guess is that that’s probably politically not a great idea, and may not be necessary from a moral perspective either, but I’m curious as to what Bill thinks.

MR. WILSON: I agree. Certainly, in this day and age it’s not a good idea. But, if you ask me, what am I most concerned about right now in addressing problems of poverty and so on. I’m concerned about jobs. Although I wouldn’t phrase it this way, I wouldn’t say that we need public sector jobs for black males, I would say we need public sector jobs for people who live in concentrated poverty and that would apply to white males, not only males, but females as well. As well as blacks. But which group would benefit disproportionately from a public sector’s jobs program. It would be black males, because black males have these high prison records; and therefore because of their prison records, many of them find it extremely difficult because of the incarceration rates, many of them find it extremely difficult to find jobs in the private sector. Therefore, at least as a temporary as opposed to a permanent solution, I would like to see public sector job creation for those who have difficulty finding employment in the private sector. When I speak of public sector jobs, I mean the type of jobs provided by the WPA during the Great Depression. Jobs that would improve the infrastructure in our communities, including the under-funded National Park Service, state and local park districts. I just feel that public sector jobs are very, very important particularly for black adults who have been stigmatized by prison records and who thus find it virtually impossible to find jobs in the private sector. Now, saying that. I’m on to no illusion that these programs and a program like public sector job program would garner widespread support in the current political climate, but I feel that we have to start thinking seriously, about what should be done when we have a more favorable political climate, and when people from both parties are willing to consider seriously policies that could make a difference.

MS. BUSETTE: We have time for one more question, and I’m going to start, J.D., with you. So, in a paper by Richard Reeves and another colleague of mine, Eleanor Krouse, that was released today, the evidence is that rural areas with the best rates of upward mobility are the ones with the highest rates of out migration, especially among young people. Should we just accept that some communities are essentially dying, and focus our efforts on helping people move on to other places with more opportunity, or should we be trying to turnaround these blighted areas?

MR. VANCE: That is a really tough one. So, I’m going to try to judicially split the baby here and I’ll probably fail but — (laughter). When I think about should we try to fix these blighted areas, I think that it depends on how we define area, right? Because my concern with some of these out-migration arguments is that we say, if you can’t find a good job in West Virginia, you should move to San Francisco, California, and they’re two concerns with that. The first is that try to convince somebody that they could afford a place in San Francisco, California when it’s a two-bedroom apartment costs you $4,500 a month. So, I think that again, going back to housing policy, that really makes this out migration pretty difficult. The second thing is that you really do — I think we have to understand there’s a difference between out migration from let’s say Eastern Kentucky to Southwestern Ohio verses Eastern Kentucky to San Diego, California, because the former allows you to preserve some important social contacts and social connections. It is cheaper to move there, it’s less culturally intimidating to move there. I mean I cannot imagine what my grandparents would have said if you would have told them in the 1940’s that they had to move to modern day San Francisco. It really would have been, you need to move to an entirely different country. Maybe an entirely different planet. And I think that’s important. So, the way that I think about this problem is that we have to accept that while out migration has to be a part of the solution, we can’t just say every single person in Breathitt County Kentucky has to leave, and Breathitt County Kentucky gets to close up shop. But if we can regionally develop big cities like Lexington, like Pittsburgh, like Columbus, Ohio, that obviously has downstream effects and that allows you to have out migration to places that isn’t so culturally foreign and enables people to maintain those social connections even as they move to areas with higher employment; and oh, by the way, still play a positive role in the communities back home. I think that’s the way that I approach that particular problem.

MS. BUSETTE: Alright, thank you.

MR. WILSON: You know my colleague at Harvard, Robert Sampson and former student Patrick Sharkey who is at NYU have argued for durable investments in disadvantaged neighborhoods to counter the persistent disinvestments in such neighborhoods, and I was wondering if you use that argument and focus on Appalachia for example, what would investments look like? And I’m going to put this question to you J.D., if you’re talking about investments in these communities, would it include such things as hospitals, clinics, road construction, shopping centers, daycare centers, these kinds of things. Would that be helpful? Would those things be helpful?

MR. VANCE: Yes, so I think it would definitely be helpful. One of the concerns I have with what we’ve seen with regional economic development is that it very often happens through the avenue of let me provide you tax credit so that you can open up new retail, right? I don’t think that’s especially durable economic development, right. I mean, I think we have to think of local economies as sort of a pyramid. You need real industries, manufacturing, then you have retail on top of it, but you can’t really rebuild some of these economic centers with just retail. There is actually an interesting bill that’s moving through Congress right now, that would in some ways place long-term capital investment at parity with short-term capital investment like tax credits. That would allow things like Venture Capital investment and much bigger longer – term patient capital to invest in some of these areas and create you know, more durable jobs in more durable sectors. But I also think, and my thinking honestly has probably changed in the past few years, though maybe change isn’t the right word, as I start to think about this a little bit more seriously. When I look at you know, some of the work David Autor has done about the China Shock and the way that it’s impacted some of these areas. I do think that we’ve been so caught up in thinking about long term well-being as purely as a function of consumption, that we haven’t thought about the fact that if you pay three cents less for a widget at Walmart, but half of your community just lost its job, your purchasing power is slightly greater, but your community has lost something really significant. I think that’s been missing from our conversations about economics in jobs, especially on the right, but I really think across the spectrum we focus too little on bringing good durable, high paying work into some of these areas. And consequently, if you look at just a policy across the board, we’ve congratulated ourselves, because purchasing power, even among the low income has gone up, not recognizing the purchasing power that comes from a government transfer is a lot different from purchasing power that comes from a good job.

MS. BUSETTE: Great. Thank you both very much. We are now going to take questions from the audience. So, (inaudible) from Brookings. So, I’d like everybody to be able to say who they are and the organization they’re coming from, and then ask your question please. Thank you. And I’ll take a couple of these. I’ll take yours first and then we’ll take a few more.

SPEAKER: First thing I want to do is thank both of you for such a thoughtful conversation. I mean Camille asked you really tough provocative questions, so it was a great conversation. I think I want to add to the provocative question list here. We haven’t talked much about our politics going forward and how they may play out in terms of things that you both might be in favor of. Bill, you say you’re for a public jobs program, but obviously that’s politically going to be extremely difficult to convince much of the public including many of the so-called white working class that J.D. has been studying. They don’t like government programs. They don’t like handouts. They want I think, as I read it, the literature, including your book, they want real jobs, not government jobs. In fact, they really dislike a lot that they see in first line government workers. With that background and thinking about you know, where does our politics go from here, I happened to have read this weekend, a new small essay by Mark Lilla who is arguing quite controversially that the Democratic party needs to put less emphasis on identity politics. That means staying away presumably from racial divides and culture and all of that. And, do you have any thoughts about generally how we bring the country back together again politically and specifically this notion that maybe the Democratic party is losing the white working-class by putting too much emphasis on immigrants, minorities, women etcetera?

MS. BUSETTE: I’ll let you Gabby — I’ll let you gather your thoughts there.

MR. WILSON: I’ll take a shot —

MS. BUSETTE: Wow, a brave man.

MR. VANCE: I hope that there’s vodka in this (laughter).

MR. WILSON: So you know, I blurbed Mark Lilla’s book.

SPEAKER: Oh, did you? That’s right, I remember.

MR. WILSON: I blurbed it. What’s the title of the book ?

SPEAKER: The Once in a Future Liberal.

SPEAKER: That’s right.

MR. WILSON: The Once in a Future Liberal. Yeah, I blurbed the book. You know, Mark Lilla and a number of other post-election analysts observed that as you point out that the Democrats should not make the same mistake that they made in the last election, namely an attempt to mobilize people of color, women, immigrants and the LGBT community with identity politics. They tended to ignore the problems of poor white Americans. I was watching the Democratic convention with my wife on a cruise to Alaska, and one concern I had was there did not seem to be any representatives on the stage representing poor white America. I could just see some of these poor whites saying they don’t care about us. They’ve got all these blacks, they’ve got immigrants, they’ve got (inaudible), but you don’t have any of us on the stage. Maybe I’m overstating the point, but I was concerned about that. Now one notable exception, critics like Mark Lilla point out was Bernie Sanders. Bernie Sanders had a progressive and unifying populous economic message in the Democratic primaries. A message that resonated with a significant segment of the white lower-class population. Lower class, working class populations. Bernie Sanders was not the Democratic nominee and Donald Trump was able to, as we all know, capture notable support from these populations with a divisive not unifying populous message. I agree with Mark Lilla that we don’t want to make the same mistake again. We’ve go to reach out to all groups. We’ve got to start to focus on coalition politics. We have to develop a sense of interdependence where groups come to recognize that they can’t accomplish goals without the support of other groups. We have to frame issues differently. We can’t go the same route. We can’t give up on the white working class.

MS. BUSETTE: Okay, J.D., did you want to tackle that or —

MR. VANCE: Yeah, sure I’ll —

MS. BUSETTE: — shall we go for other questions?

MR. VANCE: — I can briefly answer. I mean as a Republican who is deeply worried about the American right, this gives me a great chance to rift on the other side. So, just a couple of thoughts as you ask the question and as Bill was responding. The first is that on this question of identity politics, I think that what worries me is that a lot — it’s not a recognition that there are disadvantaged non-white groups that need some help or there needs to be some closing of the gap you know. When I talk to folks back home, very conservative people, they’re actually pretty open-minded if you talk about the problems that exist in the black ghetto because of problems of concentrated poverty and the fact that the black ghetto was in some ways created by housing policy. It was the choice of black Americans. It was in some ways created by housing policy. I find actually a lot of openness when I talk to friends and family about that. What I find no openness about is when somebody who they don’t know, and who they think judges them, points at them and says you need to apologize for your white privilege. So, I think that in some ways making these questions of disadvantage zero sum, is really toxic, but I think that’s one way that the Democrats really lost the white working class in the 2016 election. The second piece that occurs to me, and this applies across the political spectrum, is that what we’re trying to do in the United States, it’s very easy to be cynical about American politics, but we’re rying to build a multi-racial, multi-ethnic, multi-religious nation, not just a conglomeration, an actual nation of people from all of these different tribes and unify them around a common creed. I think that’s really delicate. It’s basically never been done success fully over a long period in human history and I think it requires a certain amount of rhetorical finesse that we don’t see from many of our politicians on either side these days and that really, really worries me.

MS. BUSETTE: Okay, thank you both. I ‘m going to take three other questions and then we can answer them. So, this gentleman here, young lady here with her hand up, and then I’ll take yeah, the person right in the back there. Okay, yeah, on this side first.

SPEAKER: Thank you very much. I’ve known Bill Wilson for years, I’ve known J.D. over the telephone (overlapping conversations) all over town.

MR. VANCE: A fellow Middletonian.

SPEAKER: Yes, I tried to catch you at the book fair on Saturday. The line, for those of you who weren ‘t there, stretched all the way out of the DC Convention Center and down (inaudible) Avenue. I’ve never seen anything like it since the Beatles came to town (laughter). But anyway, yes, I’m a fellow middie, and from class of 65, so I went there before you were born. We just had our 50th anniversary reunion here a couple of years ago. I’m delighted by your book. Folks ask me if I ever thought of writing a memoir, and I said my life was too dull, my (inaudible) was too quiet. When I grew up we were an all-American city. You may have read that in your history books. Back in the 50’s we were one of the all-American cities in America. A few years ago, Forbes chose Middletown as one of 10 fastest dying cities in America. This tells you what’s happened over time. So, I have a lot of things I’d love to inject, but I’m just going to ask one question. As you know I’ve talked before about when I came out of Middletown High in 65 I was able to work at the steel mill at Armco, and make enough money to pay my tuition at Ohio University, go Bobcats. For tuition in 1965 at Ohio U was $770. With room and board $1,240. It wasn’t hard for me, the son of a mother who was a cook and a father who was a factory worker to move up to the middle class, thanks to Ohio’s excellent higher education system. Years later of course you went to the Marines to get a scholarship to go to Ohio State —

MR. VANCE: True.

SPEAKER: — and so it was possible, but it certainly is tougher now to go from working class Middletown, we don’t have the steel mill jobs in the summer anymore. The five paper mills that we used to have are all gone. All the industries up and down I – 75, all the way to Detroit, General Motors, Frigidaire, GM, Delco Battery, Huffy Bicycle, National Cash Register, and I could go on and on and on, but what Bill Wilson writes about in the you know they’ve gone overseas or other types of chains have gone on. We were talking about automation back in the 50’s, and the 60’s and of course we see what has happened, and it’s still happening. But my question really is we haven’t talked much about those front row kids like yourself there who had a chance to go to college and found a way there. That route has gotten tougher. Do you think we need to do something to make it easier to get higher education? Some schooling beyond high school?

MS. BUSETTE: Okay great, thank you. This woman here with the red sweater. Please, thank you.

MS. RISER : Thank you gentleman, it’s extremely challenging —

MS. BUSETTE: Can you say your name please.

MS. RISER: I will say my name. It’s Mindy Riser and I have worked and continued to with a number of NGO’s across the world concerned with social justice. My question is about a segment of the American population, you haven’t talked about, and that is the aging baby boomers who come in all colors, shapes and sizes. Some of these folks will have social security, which isn’t very much, some will not at all. We’ve talked about the challenges of jobs. What is going to happen to these people, some of whom will not get jobs and will rely on diminishing social security and that is not exactly assured anymore either. So, I’d like you to address that part of the population whose future does not look all that bright.

MS. BUSETTE: Great, thank you. And then we have one way in the back there. She has her hand up. Thank you

MS. LEO: Hi, my name is Chin Leo and I’m a correspondent from China’s Nu Hahn News Agency. Actually, I have two questions for J.D. One is that you mentioned about (inaudible) which could be the third important element from the personal structural agencies to have those poverties. So, I just wanted to maybe categorize say more about this (inaudible) so what it could include. Because when I just read about your book, first I thought it maybe something related to the peace treaty of American, like those people who used to work in the hill. The mountain or the farmers, but it turns out, maybe there is something more or different from that, so can you just say more about it. And second question is about the globalization. I think both of the speakers just mentioned that the process of globalization just, the country being so large to the poverty or just make it a faster pace, for those working class in America no matter white or black to become obvious problem. So, do you think what could be the solution for this or is it really necessary just like President Trump said that anti-globalization could be one of the solutions or a necessary one. Thank you.

MS. BUSETTE: Thank you. So, we have a question on ways to make it easier to get a higher education, what about job opportunities for aging baby boomers and then a special set just for you, where you can you know, if you’d like to, maybe go into a little more about what you meant by culture, and then for both of you if you want to discussion globalization and its effect on poverty in the U.S.

MR. WILSON: Well I just — to answer your question very quickly, forget the political climate, but I’d like to see us increase the Pell Grants to make it possible for folks who don’t have much income, increase the Pell Grants.

MS. BUSETTE: Okay great. J.D., do you want to address any of these?

MR. VANCE: Yes, so my general worry with the college education in the book at large is sort of two things. So, the first is that, I think we’ve constructed a society effectively in which a college education is now the only pathway to the middle class, and I think that’s a real failure on our part. It’s not something you see in every country, and I don’t think it necessarily has to be the case here. There are other ways to get post-secondary education and I absolutely think that we have to make that easier, and I really see this as sort of the defining policy challenge of the next 10 years is to create more of those pathways; because the second born on this is that college is a really, really culturally terrifying place for a lot of working class people. We can try to make it less culturally terrifying, we can try to make for the elites of our universities a little bit more welcoming to folks like me, and this is something that I wrote about in the book, really feeling like a true outsider at Yale for the first time, in an educational institution. I think that we also have to acknowledge that part of the reason that people feel like cultural outsiders is for reasons that aren’t necessarily going to be easy to fix, and if we don’t create more pathways for these folks, we shouldn’t be surprised that a lot of them aren’t going to take the one pathway that’s there, that effectively runs through a culturally alien institution.

MS. BUSETTE: Thank you. Other questions.

MR. WILSON: Yeah, we have to —

MR. VANCE: Oh yeah sorry. There’s a couple of others so yeah, on the baby boomer question I’ll try to be very quick but I don’t necessarily have a fantastic answer to this, but let me add one thought that I had while you were asking that question, which is that in certain areas, especially in Ohio, Kentucky, West Virginia and so forth. I think the biggest under reported problem for the baby boomers is the fact that they are taking care of children that they didn’t necessarily anticipate taking care of because of the opioid crisis. This is the biggest dr iver of elder poverty in the State of Ohio, is that you have entire families that have been transplanted from one generation to the next. They were planning for retirement based on one social security income, and now all of a sudden, they have two, three additional mouths to feed. I think my concern for the baby boom generation is especially those folks of course because it’s not just bad for them, it’s bad for these children who are all of a sudden thrown into poverty because of the opioid addition of that middle generation of the parents, of the kids and the sons and daughters of the grandkids. And then the very last question, culture, I think of as a way to understand the sum of the environmental impacts that you can’t necessarily define as structural rights, so the effects of family instability and trauma that exists in people, the effects of social capital and social networks in people’s lives, You know, all of these things I think add up to a broad set of variables that can either promote upward mobility or inhibit upward mobility; and again I think we very often talk about job opportunities and educational opportunities, we very often talk about individual responsibility and Personal Agency. We very rarely I think talk about those middle layers and those institutional factors that in a lot of ways are the real drivers of this problem.

MR. WILSON: I just want to add just one point. I think that this is too radical to seriously consider right now, but at some point, I think we’re going to hav e to think about it, and that is to give cash assistance to reduce the tax rate for those who are experiencing compounded deprivation. At some point, we’re going to be faced with a problem. We’re going to have to rescue people and some economists are talking about the negative income tax and so on, but it’s something that we’re going to have to be thinking about.

MS. BUSETTE: Great. Thank you. I’m going to take three more. This gentleman here, this lady here. Ignacio?

MR. AARON: I’m Henry Aaron Brookings. My question is for J.D. Vance, I’ve heard in your comments what strikes me as a genuine and heartfelt sympathy for the economic and social circumstances, not only of blue whites in Appalachia, but also for the concentrated poverty in urban areas. You have a genuine sympathy for both. You also stated that you come to this concern as a conservative and as a Republican. Now, in looking at the current political environment, which is I think where we need to start rather that our aspirations for a different environment, we would really like it in the future. Starting from the current economic environment, I note that we’ve spent all of 2017 on a political debate which now seems, from my standpoint mercifully to be coming to an end about doing away with The Affordable Care Act. We are about to have a month long high stakes debate about the child health insurance program which President Trump’s budget proposes significantly to cut. We are confronting the possibility of a major fight over the national debt cap which at least some elements in Congress would like to use as a pressure tool to reduce the size and scope of the federal government. We are debating whether to reform entitlement programs and notably disability insurance, which if one looks at a map of where disability benefits are most received, looks like the map for your book actually. Kentucky, Arkansas, Alabama, Mississippi, Ohio, Pennsylvania. My question is, as a conservative Republican, how do you reconcile the concern you’ve expressed with the apparent agenda from those with whom you identify politically.

MS. BUSETTE: Okay, so we’re going to take two more questions (laughter) in this round. This lady right here and then Ignacio.

MS. DANIELS: Hello, my name is Samara Robard Daniels, I actually married into an Appalachian family myself, so I’ve had a close look at the situation myself. I’m wondering if you had to sort of envision of not being a political leader, but maybe a more philosophical substantive role model, what qualities aside from the typical like you know, honesty and so forth. I mean what would be the sort of gestalt of that leader that would perhaps you know, mobilize. I mean that can happen, but because of the technological age, we don’t have that sort of, you know, more renaissance minded philosophical temperament is not sort of percolating and I’m wondering if you had to envision it, what would be a role model, and similarly for you, what do you see? What would be the gestalt of that leader?

MS. BUSET TE: Alright, thank you. Ignacio?

MR. PESO: Hello, thank you the three of you for the discussion, it was very fascinating.

MS. BUSETTE: Can you say your name?

MR. PESO: My name is Ignacio Peso and my question actually starts with an article I read in the New York Times a few days ago. Maybe it was two days ago. It’s about like the role of private firms also. It was a comparison between the job conditions and years ago, with a lady from Kodak who was able to rise and get an opportune job, get an education, and then in the end the same private firm rising to her position, and right now janitor in Apple, right. I think in this conversation we talk a lot about like the power of stories and how they convey mobilities and talk about like more structural aspects. I was wondering, what is your opinion about like how — what’s the role of private firms in this discussion, and what sort of policies can you envision regarding that. Thank you.

MS. BUSETTE: Okay, thank you. So, we have a question about reconciling your concerns with concentrated poverty with the served agenda of the GOP. A question around what do role models who are sort of embodying you know an un-way out sort of; and when we think about the poverty debate what do those people look like. And then what’s the role of private firms in economic mobility for poor and low-income Americans.

MR. WILSON: Could you repeat the second question?

MS. BUSETTE: What does a leader look like who could possibly lead us towards a set of solutions when we think about poverty in the US ?

MR. VANCE: I guess I’ll start because the question about I think the GOP is directed specifically at me. The first thing that I’ll say about that is that I agree with many of the conservative critiques that are levied sort of against some Democratic policy. I very rarely, at least if we’re defining Republican policies or what comes out of Congress, I very rarely agree with Republican Congress about how to answer those critiques. The way that I broadly look at this philosophically is that there is a distinction and an important one between libertarianism and conservatism. So, I will partially try to answer your question about outsourcing. I think that for example on this question of labor unions, I think that the sort of classic libertarian answer to this question which is really dominant on the right for the past 30 years, is that effectively for a whole host of reasons, labor unions are anti-competitive, they’re bad for non – members and they’re bad for actual firms. Consequently, for cartel reasons, they’re sort of bad from a public policies perspective. I think a better conservative answer to the fact that we’ve gone from 35 percent private labor participation to 6 percent private labor participation, is to recognize that labor unions can be economically destructive to recognize that labor unions as Burke would say, could also be incredibly important social institutions that play a positive role in communities, and so the question is not how do we destroy labor unions, but it’s how do we reform labor unions so they actually work in the 21st century and I think that would answer partially your question about outsourcing. There’s a really fascinating article by Oren Cass of the Manhattan Institute of Conservative Think Tank about how we might reform labor unions so that they actually accomplish something economically important, so that they can rebuild themselves and increase private participation, but I think that’s a conservative idea. Has it come from a Republican Congress? No, it has not. Have I been a constant critic of Republican domestic policy for the past five years, because I think we’re not thinking about these issues; absolutely. The flip side of it, is that I think that much of what I see on the left is or at least sometimes thinks that these cultural problems that I write about and care about, are invisible and don’t actually exist. Now, does that mean that sort of very thoughtful left of center think tank fellows don’t care about these problems? Does that mean that Bill Wilson doesn’t think about these problems? No, but I certainly think that the Democratic party in some ways thinks that these questions of culture and long-term multi-generational environmental effects are sort of inv isible to a lot of their policy making. So, I agree with the conservative critique there and I think the conservatives have to offer some alternative vision which we have failed to do, for not just the past five years, but maybe for a little bit longer than that. So, you know my view of my role in this ecosystem is to try to take us from criticizing a lot of what’s been done in the past that’s wrong, and a lot of those criticisms I agree with, to actually doing something that’s different. But I do think, the last point I’ll make about this, the fundamental hell that we have to get over. The fundamental problem that conservatives have to accept is that sometimes you have to spend money to solve social problems. Not always does that mean that government is always the answer. Certainly, it doesn’t, but I think this sort of baseline constant refusal to accept that sometimes you have to spend money is at the core of our real problem, and if we can get past that, I actually think there might be some good ideas coming out of the right and hopefully I can be a part of that.

MR. WILSON: Let me address the question about the ideal leader. The leader (inaudible) move us forward. For me, a role model would be one who would use the bully pulpit to reinforce and promote the principle of equality of life chances. The philosopher James Fiscan coined the notion principle of equality of live chances, and according to this principle if we can predict with a high degree of accuracy, where individuals end up in the competition for preferred positions, merely by knowing, their race, class, gender and family background, then the conditions under which their motivations and talents have developed must be utterly unfair. Supporters of this principle believe that a person should not be able to enter a hospital ward of healthy newborn babies and predict with considerable accuracy where they will end up in life, simply by knowing their race, class, gender, family background, or the ecological areas where their parents reside. I repeat, for me, a rural ideal role model would be one who would use the bully pulpit to reinforce and promote the principle of equality of live chances.

MS. BUSETTE: Great. Thank you both. We’re going to take a few more questions. The gentleman in the back. The gentleman with the glasses and next to him the gentleman with the orange shirt.

MR. RAWLINS: Quincy Rawlins with the Institute for Educational Leadership here in Washington D.C. You’ve addressed this tangentially, but I wonder, it seems that this may be overly simplistic, by the flip side of extreme poverty seems to be extreme concentration of wealth. Not only in this country but obviously across the world, and I wonder if we can address any of the problems that you guys have talked about without directly addressing the concentration of wealth, and the fact that many corporations and super rich in this country are not paying their fair share of taxes in my view.

MS. BUSETTE: So, we have the gentleman in the glasses and the suit here, next to the gentleman with the orange T – shirt.

MR. COLLENBERG: Hi, Richard Collenberg with the Century Foundation. You both have talked about the effects of concentrated poverty, and I’m wondering what you would advocate in terms of public policy, and I’ll throw out one idea that Bill and I have talked about a little bit. You know, in 1968, 50 years ago, we saw the passage of the Fair Housing Act and since then, racial segregation has declined to a similarity index of 79 to 59. So, a hundred would be pure segregation, zero would be perfectly integrated. Meanwhile we’ve seen an increase in economic segregation, and I’m wondering what you all would think about an Economic Fair Housing Act that would go after the issue of concentrated poverty by addressing the discrimination that goes on in terms of exclusionary zoning, where certain neighborhoods are basically off limits for working class people because of apartment buildings or townhouses aren’t allowed to be built there.

MS. BUSETTE: Thank you.

MR. ASHANAGA: Michael Ashanaga Trans Union. Mr. Vance, you’ve put forward several different roads out of poverty. You know, better education, cultural change, job training, cheaper colleges I guess. But the problem is I see that that does not create jobs. That just creates competition for jobs, so at the end of the day, even if everyone is well educated, wouldn’t there still be a lot of poverty?

MS. BUSETTE: Okay, so we have our question on the concentration of wealth in the U.S., a question about an economic fair housing kind of policy to address concentrated poverty, and then finally, whether the policy prescriptions around creating a better and more educated — more skilled and education workforce actually addresses the true cause of poverty.

MR. WILSON: Let me just say that addressing the problem of concentration of wealth and inequality, that is a major problem that we have to confront. I would say yes, we have to deal with that problem. That has to be high on our agenda, on the public agenda. That’s all I want to say about that, because we could go on and on talking about that. Addressing the question of increase in economic segregation. People don’t realize that racial segregation is on the decline, while economic segregation is a segregation of families by income is on the increase. So yes, I would support your proposal of dealing with exclusivity zoning. Say a little bit more about that. I mean, you just probably said I’ll bet piece on that so we (laughter).

MR. COLLENBERG: Well the basic notion is that you know, here we had some success through a legal policy The Fair Housing Act where we’ve seen this decline in racial segregation, and yet what replaced kind of the old racial zoning from the 1920’s has been economic zoning, and so, it seems to me, that just as it should be shameful to exclude people from entire neighborhoods based on race, it ought to be as concerning to us in our culture and in our policy to have laws that in essence are excluding people based on class. In Montgomery County Maryland where I live, there is an alternative to that policy. It’s called Inclusionary Zoning, where the notion was that if people are good enough to, you know, take care of resident’s kids, if they’re able to teach the children, if they’re able to take care of the lawns, they ought to be good enough to live in these communities as well.

MR. WILSON: That’s why I wanted to give you the floor Rick (laughter).

MS. BUSETTE: Thank you very much. So, J.D., did you want to address any of these questions around concentrated poverty, the Economic Fair Housing kind of Act —

MR. VANCE: Sure.

MS. BUSETTE: — and creating a better skilled and you know, more education workforce, but whether or not that addresses the true cause of poverty in the US.

MR. VANCE: So, on the inequality and concentration wealth, the top thing, I’ll say this one area where I actually think conservative senator Mike Leaf from Utah has had some really, really, interesting ideas. One of the tax reform proposals Senator Leaf has advocated for is actually setting the capital taxation rate at the same rate as the ordinary income rate. Because that’s what’s really driving this difference, right. It’s not ordinary income earners. It’s not salaried professionals. Those Richard Reeve says that’s a problem. It’s primarily actually that folks in the global economy, especially the ultra-elite, folks in the global economy have achieved some sort of economic lift off from the rest of the country and I think that in light of that, it doesn’t make a ton of sense that we continue to have the taxation policy that we do. Frankly, that’s one of the reasons why I am sort of so conflicted about President Trump because I think in some ways instinctively at least the President recognizes this, but we’ll see what actually happens with tax reform over the next few months. The question about job competition is absolutely correct. You can’t just have a better educated workforce but hold the number of workers constant. At the same time, I do think there’s a bit of a chicken and egg problem here right because you know, while the skills gap is overplayed and while it violates all of these rules of Econ 101, one of the things you hear pretty consistently from folks who would l ike to expand, would like to hire more, would like to produce more, is that there are real labor force constraints, especially in what might be called non-cognitive skills, right; and this is a thing that you hear a lot. In my home state if you really want to hire more, and you really want to produce more, and sell more, then the problem is the opioid epidemic has effectively thinned the pool of people who were even able to work. So, I do think that productivity is really important, but I also think that we tend to think of these things in too mathematical and sort of hyper-rational ways, but part of the reason productivity is held back, is because we have real problems in the labor market, and if you fix one, you could help another, and they may create a virtuous cycle.

MS. BUSETTE: Thank you both …

Voir encore:

What Hillbilly Elegy Reveals About Trump and America

Mona Charen

July 28, 2016

A harrowing portrait of the plight of the white working class J. D. Vance’s new book Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and a Culture in Crisis couldn’t have been better timed. For the past year, as Donald Trump has defied political gravity to seize the Republican nomination and transform American politics, those who are repelled by Trump have been accused of insensitivity to the concerns of the white working class. For Trump skeptics, this charge seems to come from left field, and I use that term advisedly. By declaring that a particular class and race has been “ignored” or “neglected,” the Right (or better “right”) has taken a momentous step in the Left’s direction. With the ease of a thrown switch, people once considered conservative have embraced the kind of interest-group politics they only yesterday rejected as a matter of principle. It was the Democrats who urged specific payoffs, er, policies to aid this or that constituency. Conservatives wanted government to withdraw from the redistribution and favor-conferring business to the greatest possible degree. If this was imperfectly achieved, it was still the goal — because it was just. Using government to benefit some groups comes at the expense of all. While not inevitably corrupt, the whole transactional nature of the business does easily tend toward corruption.

Conservatives and Republicans understood, or seemed to, that in many cases, when government confers a benefit on one party, say sugar producers, in the form of a tariff on imported sugar, there’s a problem of concentrated benefits (sugar producers get a windfall) and dispersed costs (everyone pays more for sugar, but only a bit more, so they never complain). In the realm of race, sex, and class, the pandering to groups goes beyond bad economics and government waste — and even beyond the injustice of fleecing those who work to support those who choose not to — and into the dangerous territory of pitting Americans against one another. Democrats have mastered the art of sowing discord to reap votes. Powered by Now they have company in the Trumpites.

Like Democrats who encourage their target constituencies to nurse grievances against “greedy” corporations, banks, Republicans, and government for their problems, Trump now encourages his voters to blame Mexicans, the Chinese, a “rigged system,” or stupid leaders for theirs. The problems of the white working class should concern every public-spirited American not because they’ve been forgotten or taken for granted — even those terms strike a false note for me — but because they are fellow Americans. How would one adjust public policy to benefit the white working class and not blacks, Hispanics, and others? How would that work? And who would shamelessly support policies based on tribal or regional loyalties and not the general welfare?

As someone who has written — perhaps to the point of dull repetition — about the necessity for Republicans to focus less on entrepreneurs (as important as they are) and more on wage earners; as someone who has stressed the need for family-focused tax reform; as someone who has advocated education innovations that would reach beyond the traditional college customers and make education and training easier to obtain for struggling Americans; as someone who trumpeted the Reformicon proposals developed by a group of conservative intellectuals affiliated with the American Enterprise Institute and the Ethics and Public Policy Center; and finally, as someone who has shouted herself hoarse about the key role that family disintegration plays in many of our most pressing national problems, I cannot quite believe that I stand accused of indifference to the white working class.

I said that Hillbilly Elegy could not have been better timed, and yes, that’s in part because it paints a picture of Americans who are certainly a key Trump constituency. Though the name Donald Trump is never mentioned, there is no doubt in the reader’s mind that the people who populate this book would be enthusiastic Trumpites. But the book is far deeper than an explanation of the Trump phenomenon (which it doesn’t, by the way, claim to be). It’s a harrowing portrait of much that has gone wrong in America over the past two generations. It’s Charles Murray’s “Fishtown” told in the first person. The community into which Vance was born — working-class whites from Kentucky (though transplanted to Ohio) — is more given over to drug abuse, welfare dependency, indifference to work, and utter hopelessness than statistics can fully convey. Vance’s mother was an addict who discarded husbands and boyfriends like Dixie cups, dragging her two children through endless screaming matches, bone-chilling threats, thrown plates and worse violence, and dizzying disorder. Every lapse was followed by abject apologies — and then the pattern repeated. His father gave him up for adoption (though that story is complicated), and social services would have removed him from his family entirely if he had not lied to a judge to avoid being parted from his grandmother, who provided the only stable presence in his life.

Vance writes of his family and friends: “Nearly every person you will read about is deeply flawed. Some have tried to murder other people, and a few were successful. Some have abused their children, physically or emotionally.” His grandmother, the most vivid character in his tale (and, despite everything, a heroine) is as foul-mouthed as Tony Soprano and nearly as dangerous. She was the sort of woman who threatened to shoot strangers who placed a foot on her porch and meant it. Vance was battered and bruised by this rough start, but a combination of intellectual gifts — after a stint in the Marines he sailed through Ohio State in two years and then graduated from Yale Law — and the steady love of his grandparents helped him to leapfrog into America’s elite.

This book is a memoir but also contains the sharp and unsentimental insights of a born sociologist. As André Malraux said to Whittaker Chambers under very different circumstances in 1952: “You have not come back from Hell with empty hands.” The troubles Vance depicts among the white working class, or at least that portion he calls “hillbillies,” are quite familiar to those who’ve followed the pathologies of the black poor, or Native Americans living on reservations. Disorganized family lives, multiple romantic partners, domestic violence and abuse, loose attachment to work, and drug and alcohol abuse. Children suffer from “Mountain Dew” mouth — severe tooth decay and loss because parents give their children, sometimes even infants with bottles, sugary sodas and fail to teach proper dental hygiene.

“People talk about hard work all the time in places like Middletown [Ohio],” Vance writes. “You can walk through a town where 30 percent of the young men work fewer than 20 hours a week and find not a single person aware of his own laziness.” He worked in a floor-tile warehouse and witnessed the sort of shirking that is commonplace. One guy, I’ll call him Bob, joined the tile warehouse just a few months before I did. Bob was 19 with a pregnant girlfriend. The manager kindly offered the girlfriend a clerical position answering phones. Both of them were terrible workers. The girlfriend missed about every third day of work and never gave advance notice. Though warned to change her habits repeatedly, the girlfriend lasted no more than a few months. Bob missed work about once a week, and he was chronically late. On top of that, he often took three or four daily bathroom breaks, each over half an hour. . . . Eventually, Bob . . . was fired. When it happened, he lashed out at his manager: ‘How could you do this to me? Don’t you know I’ve a pregnant girlfriend?’ And he was not alone. . . . A young man with every reason to work . . . carelessly tossing aside a good job with excellent health insurance. More troublingly, when it was all over, he thought something had been done to him. The addiction, domestic violence, poverty, and ill health that plague these communities might be salved to some degree by active and vibrant churches.

But as Vance notes, the attachment to church, like the attachment to work, is severely frayed. People say they are Christians. They even tell pollsters they attend church weekly. But “in the middle of the Bible belt, active church attendance is actually quite low.” After years of alcoholism, Vance’s biological father did join a serious church, and while Vance was skeptical about the church’s theology, he notes that membership did transform his father from a wastrel into a responsible father and husband to his new family. Teenaged Vance did a stint as a check-out clerk at a supermarket and kept his social-scientist eye peeled: I also learned how people gamed the welfare system. They’d buy two dozen packs of soda with food stamps and then sell them at a discount for cash. They’d ring up their orders separately, buying food with the food stamps, and beer, wine, and cigarettes with cash. They’d regularly go through the checkout line speaking on their cell phones. I could never understand why our lives felt like a struggle while those living off of government largesse enjoyed trinkets that I only dreamed about. . . . Perhaps if the schools were better, they would offer children from struggling families the leg up they so desperately need?

Vance is unconvinced. The schools he attended were adequate, if not good, he recalls. But there were many times in his early life when his home was so chaotic — when he was kept awake all night by terrifying fights between his mother and her latest live-in boyfriend, for example — that he could not concentrate in school at all. For a while, he and his older sister lived by themselves while his mother underwent a stint in rehab. They concealed this embarrassing situation as best they could. But they were children. Alone. A teacher at his Ohio high school summed up the expectations imposed on teachers this way: “They want us to be shepherds to these kids. But no one wants to talk about the fact that many of them are raised by wolves.”

Hillbilly Elegy is an honest look at the dysfunction that afflicts too many working-class Americans. But despite the foregoing, it isn’t an indictment. Vance loves his family and admires some of its strengths. Among these are fierce patriotism, loyalty, and toughness. But even regarding patriotism (his grandmother’s “two gods” were Jesus Christ and the United States of America), this former Marine strikes a melancholy note. His family and community have lost their heroes. We loved the military but had no George S. Patton figure in the modern army. . . . The space program, long a source of pride, had gone the way of the dodo, and with it the celebrity astronauts. Nothing united us with the core fabric of American society. Conspiracy theories abound in Appalachia. People do not believe anything the press reports: “We can’t trust the evening news. We can’t trust our politicians. Our universities, the gateway to a better life, are rigged against us. We can’t get jobs.”

Conspiracy theories abound in Appalachia. Sound familiar? The white working class has followed the black underclass and Native Americans not just into family disintegration, addiction, and other pathologies, but also perhaps into the most important self-sabotage of all, the crippling delusion that they cannot improve their lot by their own effort. This is where the rise of Trump becomes both understandable and deeply destructive. He ratifies every conspiracy theory in circulation and adds new ones. He encourages the tribal grievances of the white working class and promises that salvation will come — not through their own agency and sensible government reforms — but only through his head-knocking leadership. He calls this greatness, but it’s the exact reverse. A great people does not turn to a strongman.

The American character has been corrupted by multiple generations of government dependency and the loss of bourgeois virtues like self-control, delayed gratification, family stability, thrift, and industriousness. Vance has risen out of chaos to the heights of stability, success, and happiness. He is fundamentally optimistic about the chances for the nation to do the same. Whether his optimism is justified or not is unknowable, but his brilliant book is a signal flashing danger.

— Mona Charen is a senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center.

Voir enfin:

Hillbilly sellout: The politics of J. D. Vance’s “Hillbilly Elegy” are already being used to gut the working poor

Conservatives and the media treated Vance’s memoir like « Poor People for Dummies. » Watch his damaging rhetoric work

When Republican Representative Jason Chaffetz took to the airwaves Tuesday to defend his party’s flailing Affordable Care Act replacement plan, he told CNN, “Americans have choices … so, maybe, rather than getting that new iPhone that they just love, and they want to go spend hundreds of dollars on that, maybe they should invest in their own healthcare.” Pushback was swift as many were quick to point out the Congressman was equating a $700 phone to healthcare costs that can often spiral into six figures, but some were equally shocked by the callousness of his remarks.

Was Chaffetz insinuating that the poor would rather spend money on frivolous things than their own self-care?

To people like myself, who grew up poor, this criticism is certainly nothing new. In conversations with Republicans about the challenges facing my working-class family, I’ve gotten used to being asked how many TVs my parents own, or what kind of cars they drive. At the heart of those questions is a lurking assumption that Chaffetz brought into the light: Maybe the poor deserve their lot in life.

This philosophy, while absurd on its face, effectively cripples any momentum toward helping suffering populations and is an old favorite of the Republican Party. It’s the same reasoning that led Ronald Reagan to decry “welfare queens” and Fox News to continually criticize people on assistance for buying shrimp, soft drinks, “junk food,” and crab legs. It gives those disinclined to part with their own money an excuse not to feel guilty about their own greed.

To further quell their culpability and show that the American Dream still functions as advertised, conservatives are fond of trotting out success stories — people who prove that pulling one’s self up by one’s bootstraps is still a possibility and, by extension, that those who don’t succeed must own their shortcomings. Lately, the right has found nobody more useful, both during the presidential election and after, than their modern-day Horatio Alger spokesperson, J. D. Vance, whose bestselling book “Hillbilly Elegy” chronicled his journey from Appalachia to the hallowed halls of the Ivy League, while championing the hard work necessary to overcome the pitfalls of poverty.
Report Advertisement

Traditionally this would’ve been a Fox News kind of book — the network featured an excerpt on their site that focused on Vance’s introduction to “elite culture” during his time at Yale — but Vance’s glorified self-help tome was also forwarded by networks and pundits desperate to understand the Donald Trump phenomenon, and the author was essentially transformed into Privileged America’s Sherpa into the ravages of Post-Recession U.S.A.

Trumpeted as a glimpse into an America elites have neglected for years, I first read “Hillbilly Elegy” with hope. I’d been told this might be the book that finally shed light on problems that’d been killing my family for generations. I’d watched my grandparents and parents, all of them factory workers, suffer backbreaking labor and then be virtually forgotten by the political establishment until the GOP needed their vote and stoked their social and racial anxieties to turn them into political pawns.

In the beginning, I felt a kinship to Vance. His dysfunctional childhood looked a lot like my own. There was substance abuse. Knockdown, drag-out fights. A feeling that people just couldn’t get ahead no matter what they did.

And then the narrative took a turn.

Due to references he downplays, not to mention his middle-class grandmother’s shielding and encouragement, Vance was able to lift himself out of the despair of impoverishment and escaped to Yale and eventually Silicon Valley, where he was able to look back on his upbringing with a new perspective.

“Whenever people ask me what I’d most like to change about the white working class,” he writes, “I say, ‘the feeling that our choices don’t matter.’”

The thesis at the heart of “Hillbilly Elegy” is that anybody who isn’t able to escape the working class is essentially at fault. Sure, there’s a culture of fatalism and “learned helplessness,” but the onus falls on the individual.

As Vance writes: “I’ve seen far too many people awash in genuine desire to change only to lose their mettle when they realized just how difficult change actually is.”

Oh, the working class and their aversion to difficulty.

If only they, like Vance, could take the challenge head on and rise above their circumstances. If only they, like Vance, weren’t so worried about material things like iPhones or the “giant TVs and iPads” the author says his people buy for themselves instead of saving for the future.

This generalization is not the only problematic oversimplification in Vance’s book — he totally discounts the role racism played in the white working class’s opposition to President Obama and says, instead, it was because Obama dressed well, was a good father, and because Michelle Obama advocated eating healthy food — but it would be hard to understate what role Vance has played in reinvigorating the conservative bootstraps narrative for a new generation and, thus, emboldening Republican ideology.

To Vance’s credit, he has been critical of Donald Trump, calling the working class’s support of the billionaire a result of a “false sense of purpose,” but Vance’s portrait of poor Americans is alarmingly in lockstep with the philosophy of Republicans who are shamefully using Trump’s presidency to forward their own agenda of economic warfare. Certainly Jason Chaffetz’s comments are fueled by the same low opinion of the poor as Vance’s, as is Speaker of the House Paul Ryan’s legislative agenda, which is focused on disabling the social safety net.

Though Vance’s name doesn’t appear in the Republican ACA replacement bill, the philosophy at the heart of it is certainly in tune. While the proposed bill would cost millions of Americans their access to care — Vance himself tweeted a link Tuesday to a Forbes article that stated as much while lauding the legislation — it makes sure to benefit the wealthy, gives a tax break to insurance CEOs and moves the focus of health care in America to an age-based model instead of income.

The message is loud and clear: Help is on the way, but only to those who “deserve” it.

And how does one deserve it?

By working hard. And the only metric to show that one has worked sufficiently hard enough is to look at their income, at how successful they are, because, in Vance’s and the Republican’s America, the only one to blame if you’re not wealthy is yourself. Never mind how legislation like this healthcare bill, cuts in education funding, continued decreases in after-school and school lunch programs, not to mention a lack of access to mental health care or career counseling, disadvantages the poor.

Of the problems facing working-class America, Vance writes in “Hillbilly Elegy,” “There is no government that can fix these problems for us.”

And, at least partially, one has to agree.

There is no government that can fix these problems, or at least, no government we have now.

Jared Yates Sexton is an Assistant Professor of Creative Writing. His campaign book « The People Are Going To Rise Like The Waters Upon Your Shore » is out now from Counterpoint Press.

Voir enfin:

J.D. Vance, the False Prophet of Blue America

The bestselling author of « Hillbilly Elegy » has emerged as the liberal media’s favorite white trash–splainer. But he is offering all the wrong lessons.

J.D. Vance is the man of the hour, maybe the year. His memoir Hillbilly Elegy is a New York Times bestseller, acclaimed for its colorful and at times moving account of life in a dysfunctional clan of eastern Kentucky natives. It has received positive reviews across the board, with the Times calling it “a compassionate, discerning sociological analysis of the white underclass.” In the rise of Donald Trump, it has become a kind of Rosetta Stone for blue America to interpret that most mysterious of species: the economically precarious white voter.

Vance’s influence has been everywhere this campaign season, shaping our conception of what motivates these voters. And it is already playing a role in how liberals are responding to Donald Trump’s victory in the presidential election, which was accomplished in part by a defection of downscale whites from the Democratic Party. Appalachia overwhelmingly voted for Trump, and Vance has since emerged as one of the media’s favorite Trump explainers. The problem is that he is a flawed guide to this world, and there is a danger that Democrats are learning all the wrong lessons from the election.

Elegy is little more than a list of myths about welfare queens repackaged as a primer on the white working class. Vance’s central argument is that hillbillies themselves are to blame for their troubles. “Our religion has changed,” he laments, to a version “heavy on emotional rhetoric” and “light on the kind of social support” that he needed as a child. He also faults “a peculiar crisis of masculinity.” This brave new world, in sore need of that old time religion and manly men, is apparently to blame for everything from his mother’s drug addiction to the region’s economic crisis.

“We spend our way to the poorhouse,” he writes. “We buy giant TVs and iPads. Our children wear nice clothes thanks to high-interest credit cards and payday loans. We purchase homes we don’t need, refinance them for more spending money, and declare bankruptcy, often leaving them full of garbage in our wake. Thrift is inimical to our being.”

And he isn’t interested in government solutions. All hillbillies need to do is work hard, maybe do a stint in the military, and they can end up at Yale Law School like he did. “Public policy can help,” he writes, “but there is no government that can fix these problems for us … it starts when we stop blaming Obama or Bush or faceless companies and ask ourselves what we can do to make things better.”

Set aside the anti-government bromides that could have been ripped from a random page of National Review, where Vance is a regular contributor. There is a more sinister thesis at work here, one that dovetails with many liberal views of Appalachia and its problems. Vance assures readers that an emphasis on Appalachia’s economic insecurity is “incomplete” without a critical examination of its culture. His great takeaway from life in America’s underclass is: Pull up those bootstraps. Don’t question elites. Don’t ask if they erred by granting people mortgages and lines of credit they couldn’t afford to repay. Don’t call it what it is—corporate deception—or admit that it plunged this country into one of the worst economic crises it’s ever experienced.

No wonder Peter Thiel, the almost comically evil Silicon Valley libertarian, endorsed the book. (Vance also works for Thiel’s Mithril Capital Management.) The question is why so many liberals are doing the same.


In many ways, I should appreciate Elegy. I grew up poor on the border of southwest Virginia and east Tennessee. My parents are the sort of god-fearing hard workers that conservatives like Vance fetishize. I attended an out-of-state Christian college thanks to scholarships, and had to raise money to even buy a plane ticket to attend grad school. My rare genetic disease didn’t get diagnosed until I was 21 because I lacked consistent access to health care. I’m one of the few members of my high school class who earned a bachelor’s degree, one of the fewer still who earned a master’s degree, and one of maybe three or four who left the area for good.

But unlike Vance, I look at my home and see a region abandoned by the government elected to serve it. My public high school didn’t have enough textbooks and half our science lab equipment didn’t work. Some of my classmates did not have enough to eat; others wore the same clothes every day. Sometimes this happened because their addict parents spent money on drugs. But the state was no help here either. Its solution to our opioid epidemic has been incarceration, not rehabilitation. Addicts with additional psychiatric conditions are particularly vulnerable. There aren’t enough beds in psychiatric hospitals to serve the region—the same reason Virginia State Sen. Creigh Deeds (D) nearly died at the hands of his mentally ill son in 2013.

And then there is welfare. In Elegy, Vance complains about hillbillies who he believes purchased cellphones with welfare funds. But data makes it clear that our current welfare system is too limited to lift depressed regions out of poverty.

Kathryn Edin and H. Luke Shaefer reported earlier this year that the number of families surviving on $2 a day grew by 130 percent between 1996 and 2011. Blacks and Latinos are still disproportionately more likely to live under the poverty line, but predominately white Appalachia hasn’t been spared the scourge either. And while Obamacare has significantly reduced the number of uninsured Americans, its premiums are still often expensive and are set to rise. Organizations like Remote Access Medical (RAM) have been forced to make up the difference: Back home, people start lining up at 4 a.m. for a chance to access RAM’s free healthcare clinics. From 2007 to 2011, the lifespans of eastern Kentucky women declined by 13 months even as they rose for women in the rest of the country.

According to the Economic Innovation Group, my home congressional district—Virginia’s Ninth—is one of the poorest in the country. Fifty-one percent of adults are unemployed; 19 percent lack a high school diploma. EIG estimates that fully half of its 722,810 residents are in economic distress.

As I noted in Scalawag earlier this year, the Ninth is not an outlier for the region. On EIG’s interactive map, central Appalachia is a sea of distress. If you are born where I grew up, you have to travel hundreds of miles to find a prosperous America. How do you get off the dole when there’s not enough work to go around? Frequently, you don’t. Until you lose your benefits entirely: The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program (TANF), passed by Bill Clinton and supported by Hillary Clinton, boots parents off welfare if they’re out of work.


At various points in this election cycle, liberal journalists have sounded quite a bit like Vance. “‘Economic anxiety’ as a campaign issue has always been a red herring,” Kevin Drum declared in Mother Jones. “If you want to get to the root of this white anxiety, you have to go to its roots. It’s cultural, not economic.”

At Vox, Dylan Matthews argued that while Trump voters deserved to be taken seriously, most were actually fairly well-off, with a median household income of $72,000. The influence of economic anxiety, he concluded, had been exaggerated.

Neither Drum or Matthews accounted for regional disparities in white poverty rates, and they failed to anticipate how those disparities would impact the election. Trump supporters were wealthier than Clinton supporters overall, but Trump’s victories in battleground states like Wisconsin, Michigan, and Ohio correlated to high foreclosure rates. In Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and Michigan, Trump outperformed Mitt Romney with the white working class and flipped certain strategic counties red.

But Matthews was right in at least one sense: Trump Country has always been bigger than Appalachia and the white working class itself. You just wouldn’t know this from reading the news.

In March, Trump won nearly 70 percent of the Republican primary vote in Virginia’s Buchanan County. At the time, it was his widest margin of victory, and no one seemed surprised that this deeply conservative and impoverished pocket in southwest Virginia’s coal country handed him such decisive success. And no one seemed to realize Buchanan County had once been a Democratic stronghold.

A glossy Wall Street Journal package labeled it “The Place That Wants Donald Trump The Most” and promised readers that understanding Buchanan County was key to understanding the “source” of Trump’s popularity. The Financial Times profiled a local young man who fled this dystopia for the University of Virginia; it titled the piece “The Boy Who Escaped Trump Country.” And then there was Bloomberg View: “Coal County is Desperate for Donald Trump.” (The same piece said the county seat, Grundy, “looks as if it fell into a crevice and got stuck.”)

And then Staten Island went to the polls. A full 82 percent of Staten Island Republicans voted to give Trump the party’s nomination, wresting the title of Trumpiest County away from Buchanan. The two locations have little in common aside from Trump. Staten Island, population 472,621, is New York City’s wealthiest borough. Its median household income is $70,295, a figure not far off from the figure Matthews cites as the median income of the average Trump supporter. Buchanan County, population 23,597, has a median household income of $27,328 and the highest unemployment rate in Virginia. Staten Island, then, tracks closer to the Trumpist norm, but it received a fraction of the coverage.

No one wrote escape narratives about Staten Island. Few plumbed the psyches of suburban Trumpists. And no one examined why Democratic Buchanan County had become Republican. Instead, the media class fixated on the spectacle of white trash Appalachia, with Vance as its representative-in-exile.


“A preoccupation with penalizing poor whites reveals an uneasy tension between what Americans are taught to think the country promises—the dream of upward mobility—and the less appealing truth that class barriers almost invariably make that dream unobtainable,” Nancy Isenberg wrote in the preface to her book White Trash. If the system worked for you, you’re not likely to blame it for the plight of poor whites. Far easier instead to believe that poor whites are poor because they deserve to be.

But now we see the consequences of this class blindness. The media and the establishment figures who run the Democratic Party both had a responsibility to properly identify and indict the system’s failures. They abdicated that responsibility. Donald Trump took it up—if not always in the form of policy, then in his burn-it-all-down posture.

No analysis of Trumpism is complete without a reckoning of its white supremacy and misogyny. Appalachia is, like so many other places, a deeply racist and sexist place. It is not a coincidence that Trumpist bastions, from Buchanan County to Staten Island, are predominately white, or that Trump rode a tide of xenophobia to power. Economic hardship isn’t unique to white members of the working class, either. Blacks, Latinos, and Natives occupy a far more precarious economic position overall. White supremacy is indeed the overarching theme of Trumpism.

But that doesn’t mean we should repeat the establishment failures of this election cycle and minimize the influence of economic precarity. Trump is a racist and a sexist, but his victory is not due only to racism or sexism any more than it is due only to classism: He still won white women and a number of counties that had voted for Obama twice. This is not a simple story, and it never really has been.

We don’t need to normalize Trumpism or empathize with white supremacy to reach these voters. They weren’t destined to vote for Trump; many were Democratic voters. They aren’t destined to stay loyal to him in the future. To win them back, we must address their material concerns, and we can do that without coddling their prejudices. After all, America’s most famous progressive populist—Bernie Sanders—won many of the counties Clinton lost to Trump.

There’s danger ahead if Democrats don’t act quickly. The Traditionalist Worker’s Party has already announced plans for an outreach push in greater Appalachia. The American Nazi Party promoted “free health care for the white working class” in literature it distributed in Missoula, Montana, last Friday. If Democrats have any hope of establishing themselves as the populist alternative to Trump, they can’t allow American Nazis to fall to their left on health care for any population.

By electing Trump, my community has condemned itself to further suffering. The lines for RAM will get longer. Our schools will get poorer and our children hungrier. It will be one catastrophic tragedy out of the many a Trump presidency will generate. So yes, be angry with the white working class’s political choices. I certainly am; home will never feel like home again.

But don’t emulate Vance in your rage. Give the white working class the progressive populism it needs to survive, and invest in the areas the Democratic Party has neglected. Remember that bootstraps are for people with boots. And elegies are no use to the living.


Tombeau des Patriarches: Vous avez dit orwellien ? (Between truthful lies and respectable murder, what first casualty of war ?)

12 juillet, 2017
firstmonument
https://i2.wp.com/s1.lprs1.fr/images/2017/03/23/6790170_361d2da0-0fd7-11e7-9596-a5ef1fbae542-1.jpghttps://i0.wp.com/www.francesoir.fr/sites/francesoir/files/images/36446d584304ecac68fc1702bb62d35214a98a6a_field_image_rdv_dossier.jpghttps://i0.wp.com/s1.lprs1.fr/images/2017/04/24/6885261_a92068b2-28f0-11e7-9cf1-79a722e2680f-1.jpghttps://i2.wp.com/www.contre-info.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/sondage.jpg https://www.les-crises.fr/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/1er-tour-2017-2.jpgMalheur à vous, scribes et pharisiens hypocrites! parce que vous ressemblez à des sépulcres blanchis, qui paraissent beaux au dehors, et qui, au dedans, sont pleins d’ossements de morts et de toute espèce d’impuretés. Jésus
Le tombeau, ce n’est jamais que le premier monument humain à s’élever autour de la victime émissaire, la première couche des significations, la plus élémentaire, la plus fondamentale, la première couche des significations, la plus élémentaire, la plus fondamentale. Pas de culture sans tombeau, pas de tombeau sans culture. A la limite, le tombeau est le premier et seul symbole culturel. René Girard
On ne veut pas savoir que l’humanité entière est fondée sur l’escamotage mythique de sa propre violence, toujours projetée sur de nouvelles victimes. Toutes les cultures, toutes les religions, s’édifient autour de ce fondement qu’elles dissimulent, de la même façon que le tombeau s’édifie autour du mort qu’il dissimule. Le meurtre appelle le tombeau et le tombeau n’est que le prolongement et la perpétuation du meurtre. La religion- tombeau n’est rien d’autre que le devenir invisible de son propre fondement, de son unique raison d’être. Autrement dit, l’homme tue pour ne pas savoir qu’il tue. (…) Les hommes tuent pour mentir aux autres et se mentir à eux-mêmes au sujet de la violence et de la mort. René Girard
Le monde moderne n’est pas mauvais : à certains égards, il est bien trop bon. Il est rempli de vertus féroces et gâchées. Lorsqu’un dispositif religieux est brisé (comme le fut le christianisme pendant la Réforme), ce ne sont pas seulement les vices qui sont libérés. Les vices sont en effet libérés, et ils errent de par le monde en faisant des ravages ; mais les vertus le sont aussi, et elles errent plus férocement encore en faisant des ravages plus terribles. Le monde moderne est saturé des vieilles vertus chrétiennes virant à la folie.  G.K. Chesterton
La première victime d’une guerre, c’est toujours la vérité. Eschyle
Comme une réponse, les trois slogans inscrits sur la façade blanche du ministère de la Vérité lui revinrent à l’esprit. La guerre, c’est la paix. La liberté, c’est l’esclavage. L’ignorance, c’est la force. 1984 (George Orwell)
La liberté, c’est la liberté de dire que deux et deux font quatre. Lorsque cela est accordé, le reste suit. George Orwell (1984)
Les intellectuels sont portés au totalitarisme bien plus que les gens ordinaires. George Orwell
Le langage politique est destiné à rendre vraisemblables les mensonges, respectables les meurtres, et à donner l’apparence de la solidité à ce qui n’est que vent. George Orwell
Parler de liberté n’a de sens qu’à condition que ce soit la liberté de dire aux gens ce qu’ils n’ont pas envie d’entendre. George Orwell
Une autre décision délirante de l’Unesco. Cette fois-ci, ils ont estimé que le tombeau des Patriarches à Hébron est un site palestinien, ce qui veut dire non juif, et que c’est un site en danger. Pas un site juif ? Qui est enterré là ? Abraham, Isaac et Jacob. Sarah, Rebecca, et Léa. Nos pères et nos mères (bibliques). Benjamin Netanyahou
Au nom du gouvernement du Canada, nous souhaitons présenter nos excuses à Omar Khadr pour tout rôle que les représentants canadiens pourraient avoir joué relativement à l’épreuve qu’il a subie à l’étranger ainsi que tout tort en résultant. Ralph Goodale et Chrystia Freeland
Ça n’a rien à voir avec ce que Khadr a fait, ou non. Lorsque le gouvernement viole les droits d’un Canadien, nous finissons tous par payer. La Charte protège tous les Canadiens, chacun d’entre nous, même quand c’est inconfortable. Justin Trudeau
Même si je vais devoir quitter mon poste, je ne compromettrai pas le salaire d’un martyr (Shahid) où d’un prisonnier, car je suis le président de l’ensemble du peuple palestinien, y compris les prisonniers, les martyrs, les blessés, les expulsés et les déracinés. Mahmoud Abbas
Je sais votre engagement constant en faveur de la non-violence. Emmanuel Macron
Voulez-vous devenir une vedette dans la presse algérienne arabophone? C’est facile. Prêchez la haine des Juifs […]. Je suis un rescapé de l’école algérienne. On m’y a enseigné à détester les Juifs. Hitler y était un héros. Des professeurs en faisaient l’éloge. Après le Coran, Mein Kampf et Les Protocoles des sages de Sion sont les livres les plus lus dans le monde musulman.  Karim Akouche
Après le mois sacré, les imams sont épuisés et doivent se reposer. Ils n’ont que le mois de juillet ou d’août pour le faire. Ce moment est très mal choisi pour la marche. Fathallah Abdessalam (conseiller islamique de prison belge)
65 % des Français estiment ainsi qu’« il y a trop d’étrangers en France », soit un niveau identique à 2016 et pratiquement constant depuis 2014. Sur ce point au moins, le clivage entre droites et gauches conserve toute sa pertinence : si 95 % des sympathisants du Front national partagent cette opinion, ils sont presque aussi nombreux chez ceux du parti Les Républicains (83 %, + 7 points en un an) ; à l’inverse, ce jugement est minoritaire chez les partisans de La France insoumise (30 %), du PS (46 %) et d’En marche ! (46 %). De même, les clivages sociaux restent un discriminant très net : 77 % des ouvriers jugent qu’il y a trop d’étrangers en France, contre 66 % des employés, 57 % des professions intermédiaires et 46 % des cadres. Dans des proportions quasiment identiques, 60 % des Français déclarent que, « aujourd’hui, on ne se sent plus chez soi comme avant ». Enfin, 61 % des personnes interrogées estiment que, « d’une manière générale, les immigrés ne font pas d’efforts pour s’intégrer en France », même si une majorité (54 %) admet que cette intégration est difficile pour un immigré. L’évolution du regard porté sur l’islam est tout aussi négative. Seulement 40 % des Français considèrent que la manière dont la religion musulmane est pratiquée en France est compatible avec les valeurs de la société française. Ce jugement était encore plus minoritaire en 2013 et 2014 (26 % et 37 %), mais, de manière contre-intuitive, il avait fortement progressé (47 %) au lendemain des attentats djihadistes de Paris en janvier 2015. Depuis, il s’est donc à nouveau dégradé. Le Monde
“Comme des millions de gens à travers le globe ces dernières années, les deux auteurs ont attaqué le colonialisme et le système capitaliste et impérialiste. Comme beaucoup d’entre nous, ils dénoncent une idéologie toujours très en vogue : le racisme, sous ses formes les plus courantes mais aussi les plus décomplexées”, expliquaient-ils, en exigeant l’abandon des poursuites engagées à la suite d’une plainte de l’Agrif. (…) Renaud, Saïdou et Saïd Bouamama ont choisi d’assumer leur “devoir d’insolence” afin d’interpeller et de faire entendre des opinions qui ont peu droit de cité au sein des grands canaux de diffusion médiatique.” Pétition signée par Danièle Obono (porte-parole de JL Mélenchon)
Faisons du défi migratoire une réussite pour la France. Anne Hidalgo
Aucun principe de droit international n’oblige les Français déjà surendettés, à hauteur de plus de 2000 milliards, à financer par leurs impôts et leurs cotisations sociales des soins gratuits pour tous les immigrés illégaux présents sur notre sol… en 2016, l’octroi du statut de demandeur d’asile est devenu un moyen couramment utilisé par des autorités dépassées pour vider les camps de migrants, à Paris bien sûr, mais aussi par exemple, à Calais, dans la fameuse «jungle» qui, avant son démantèlement, comptait environ 14 000 «habitants». Ces derniers, essentiellement des migrants économiques, ont été qualifiés de réfugiés politiques dans l’unique but de pouvoir les transférer vers d’autres centres, dénommés CAO ou CADA en province. De telles méthodes relèvent d’une stratégie digne du mythe de Sisyphe: plus ils sont vidés, plus ils se remplissent à nouveau… Pierre Lellouche
Madame Hidalgo prétend vouloir améliorer l’intégration des nouveaux migrants. Ses amis n’ont pas réussi en deux décennies à intégrer des populations culturellement et socialement plus aisément intégrables. À aucun moment Anne Hidalgo n’a eu le mauvais goût d’évoquer la question de l’islam. Madame Hidalgo n’aurait pas songé à demander aux riches monarques du golfe, à commencer par celui du Qatar, à qui elle tresse régulièrement des couronnes, de faire preuve de générosité à l’égard de leurs frères de langue, de culture et de religion. Madame le maire n’est pas très franche. Dans sa proposition, elle feint de séparer les réfugiés éligibles au droit d’asile et les migrants économiques soumis au droit commun. Elle fait semblant de ne pas savoir que ces derniers pour leur immense majorité ne sont pas raccompagnés et que dès lors qu’ils sont déboutés , ils se fondent dans la clandestinité la plus publique du monde. (…) À la vérité, c’est bien parce que les responsables français démissionnaires n’ont pas eu la volonté et l’intelligence de faire respecter les lois de la république souveraine sur le contrôle des flux migratoires , et ont maintenu illégalement sur le sol national des personnes non désirées, que la France ne peut plus se permettre d’accueillir des gens qui mériteraient parfois davantage de l’être. Qui veut faire l’ange fait la bête. Mais le premier Français, n’aura pas démérité non plus à ce concours de la soumission auquel il semble aussi avoir soumissionné. C’est ainsi que cette semaine encore, le président algérien a, de nouveau, réclamé avec insistance de la France qu’elle se soumette et fasse repentance . Cela tourne à la manie. La maladie chronique macronienne du ressentiment ressassé de l’Algérie faillie. À comparer avec l’ouverture d’esprit marocaine. En effet, Monsieur Bouteflika a des circonstances atténuantes. Son homologue français lui aura tendu la verge pour fouetter la France. On se souvient de ses propos sur cette colonisation française coupable de crimes contre l’humanité. Je n’ai pas noté que Monsieur Macron, le 5 juillet dernier, ait cru devoir commémorer le massacre d’Oran de 1962 et le classer dans la même catégorie juridique de droit pénal international. Il est vrai que ce ne sont que 2000 Français qui furent sauvagement assassinés après pourtant que l’indépendance ait été accordée. (…) Au demeurant, Monsieur Macron a depuis récidivé: accueillant cette semaine son homologue palestinien Abbou Abbas, il a trouvé subtil de déclarer: «l’absence d’horizon politique nourrit le désespoir et l’extrémisme» . Ce qui est la manière ordinaire un peu surfaite d’excuser le terrorisme. À dire le vrai, le président français, paraît-il moderne, n’a cessé de trouver de fausses causes sociales éculées à ce terrorisme islamiste qui massacre les Français depuis deux années. Gilles-William Goldnadel
L’indifférence apparente des Français à la situation peut sembler étrange, s’assimiler à du déni, à la volonté de ne pas voir. Elle peut aussi se comprendre comme une stratégie de survie analogue à ce qui se passe depuis de nombreuses années en Israël. Les terroristes et leurs alliés wahabites, salafistes ou frères musulmans espéraient non seulement semer la mort mais tétaniser les populations, tarir les foules dans les salles de spectacle, les restaurants, nous contraindre à vivre comme dans ces pays obscurantistes dont ils se réclament. Or c’est l’inverse : les Français continuent à vivre presque comme d’habitude, ils sortent, vont au café, partent en vacances, acceptent de se soumettre à des procédures de sécurité renforcées. (…) Depuis les attentats de 1995, chacun de nous devient malgré soi une sorte d’agent de sécurité : entrer dans une rame de métro nous contraint à regard circulaire pour détecter un suspect éventuel. Un colis abandonné nous effraie. Dans une salle de cinéma ou de musique, nous calculons la distance qui nous sépare de la sortie en cas d’attaques surprises. Nous nous mettons à la place d’un djihadiste éventuel pour déjouer ses plans. (…) Pour comprendre ce scandaleux silence [concernant le meurtre de Sarah Halimi], il faut partir d’un constat fait par un certain nombre de nos têtes pensantes de gauche et d’extrême gauche : l’antisémitisme, ça suffit. C’est une vieille rengaine qu’on ne veut plus entendre. Il faut s’attaquer maintenant au vrai racisme, l’islamophobie qui touche nos amis musulmans. Bref, comme le disent beaucoup, le musulman en 2017 est le Juif des années 30, 40. On oublie au passage que l’antisémitisme ne s’est jamais adressé à la religion juive en tant que telle mais au peuple juif coupable d’exister et qu’enfin dans les années 40 il n’y avait pas d’extrémistes juifs qui lançaient des bombes dans les gares ou les lieux de culte, allaient égorger les prêtres dans leurs églises. Juste une remarque statistique : depuis Ilan Halimi, kidnappé et torturé par le Gang des Barbares jusqu’à Mohammed Mehra, l’Hyper casher de Vincennes et Sarah Halimi, pas moins de dix Français juifs ont été tués ces dernières années parce que juifs par des extrémistes de l’islam. Cela n’empêche pas les radicaux du Coran de se plaindre de l’islamophobie officielle de l’Etat français. Ce serait à hurler de rire si ça n’était pas tragique ! Dans la doxa officielle de la gauche, seule l’extrême droite souffre d’antisémitisme. Que le monde arabo musulman soit, pour une large part, rongé par la haine des Juifs, ces inférieurs devenus des égaux, est impensable pour eux. (…) Soutenir les Indigènes de la République en 2017, ce Ku Klux Klan islamiste, antisémite et fascisant est pour le moins problématique. Beaucoup à gauche pensent que les anciens dominés ou colonisés ne peuvent être racistes puisqu’ils ont été eux-mêmes opprimés. C’est d’une naïveté confondante. Il y a même ce que j’avais appelé il y a dix ans “un racisme de l’antiracisme” où les nouvelles discriminations à l’égard des Juifs, des Blancs, des Européens s’expriment au nom d’un antiracisme farouche. Le suprématisme noir ou arabe n’est pas moins odieux que le suprématisme blanc dont ils ne sont que le simple décalque. Les déclarations de Madame Obono relèvent d’une stratégie de la provocation que le Front de gauche partage avec le Front national, ce qui est normal puisque ce sont des frères ennemis mais jumeaux. Lancer une polémique, c’est chercher la réprobation pour se poser en victimes. Multiplier les transgressions va constituer la ligne politique de ceux qui s’appellent “Les insoumis”, nom assez cocasse quand on connaît l’ancien notable socialiste, le paria pépère qui est à leur tête et dont le patrimoine déclaré se monte à 1 135 000 euros, somme coquette pour un ennemi des riches. Pascal Bruckner
Le sujet n’a pas été abordé pendant la campagne présidentielle, pas davantage que les enjeux, plus larges, du «commun», de ce que c’est aujourd’hui qu’être Français, des frontières du pays, de notre «identité nationale». Et que cette occultation n’a pas fait disparaître cet enjeu fondamental pour nos concitoyens, contrairement à ce qu’ont voulu croire certains observateurs ou certains responsables politiques. (…) il y a la crainte d’aborder des enjeux tels que l’immigration ou la place de la religion dans la société par exemple. Crainte de «faire le jeu du FN» dans le langage politique de ces 20 dernières années suivant un syllogisme impeccable: le FN est le seul parti qui parle de l’immigration dans le débat public, le FN explique que «l’immigration est une menace pour l’identité nationale», donc parler de l’immigration, c’est dire que «l’immigration est une menace pour l’identité nationale»! La seule forme acceptable d’aborder le sujet étant de «lutter contre le FN» en expliquant que «l’immigration est une chance pour la France» et non une menace. Ce qui interdit tout débat raisonnable et raisonné sur le sujet. Enfin, les partis et responsables politiques qui avaient prévu d’aborder la question ont été éliminés ou dans l’incapacité concrète de le faire: songeons ici à Manuel Valls et François Fillon. Et notons que le FN lui-même n’a pas joué son rôle pendant la campagne, en mettant de côté cette thématique de campagne pour se concentrer sur le souverainisme économique, notamment avec la proposition de sortie de l’euro. Tout ceci a déséquilibré le jeu politique et la campagne, et n’a pas réussi au FN d’ailleurs qui s’est coupé d’une partie de son électorat potentiel. (…) L’opinion majoritairement négative de l’islam de la part de nos compatriotes vient de l’accumulation de plusieurs éléments. Le premier, ce sont les attentats depuis le début 2015, à la fois sur le sol national et de manière plus générale. Les terroristes qui tuent au nom de l’islam comme la guerre en Syrie et en Irak ou les actions des groupes djihadistes en Afrique font de l’ensemble de l’islam une religion plus inquiétante que les autres. Même si nos compatriotes font la part des choses et distinguent bien malgré ce climat islamisme et islam. On n’a pas constaté une multiplication des actes antimusulmans depuis 2015 et les musulmans tués dans des attaques terroristes depuis cette date l’ont été par les islamistes. Un deuxième élément, qui date d’avant les attentats et s’enracine plus profondément dans la société, tient à la visibilité plus marquée de l’islam dans le paysage social et politique français, comme ailleurs en Europe. En raison essentiellement de la radicalisation religieuse (pratiques alimentaires et vestimentaires, prières, fêtes, ramadan…) d’une partie des musulmans qui vivent dans les sociétés européennes – l’enquête réalisée par l’Institut Montaigne l’avait bien montré. Enfin, troisième élément de crispation, de nombreuses controverses de nature très différentes mais toutes concernant la pratique visible de l’islam ont défrayé la chronique ces dernières années, faisant l’objet de manipulations politiques tant de la part de ceux qui veulent mettre en accusation l’islam, que d’islamistes ou de partisans de l’islam politique qui les transforment en combat pour leur cause. On peut citer la question des menus dans les cantines, celle du fait religieux en entreprise, le port du voile ou celui du burkini, la question des prières de rue, celle de la présence de partis islamistes lors des élections, les controverses sur le harcèlement et les agressions sexuelles de femmes lors d’événements ou dans des quartiers où sont concentrées des populations musulmanes, etc. (…) Aujourd’hui, cette défiance s’étend à de multiples sujets, notamment aux enjeux sur l’identité commune et à l’immigration. Et, de ce point de vue, l’occultation de ces enjeux à laquelle on a pu assister pendant ces derniers mois, pendant la campagne dont cela aurait dû être un des points essentiels, est une très mauvaise nouvelle. Cela va encore renforcer cette défiance aux yeux de nos concitoyens car non seulement les responsables politiques ne peuvent ou ne veulent plus agir sur l’économie mais en plus ils tournent la tête dès lors qu’il s’agit d’immigration ou de définition d’une identité commune pour le pays et ses citoyens. Laurent Bouvet
Une partie du pays a eu le sentiment que la campagne avait été détournée de son sens et accaparée, à dessein, par les «affaires» que l’on sait, la presse étant devenue en la matière moins un contre-pouvoir qu’un anti-pouvoir, selon le mot de Marcel Gauchet. Cette nouvelle force politique pêche par sa représentativité dérisoire, doublée d’un illusoire renouvellement sociologique, quand 75 % des candidats d’En marche appartiennent à la catégorie «cadres et professions intellectuelles supérieures». Le seul véritable renouvellement est générationnel, avec l’arrivée au pouvoir d’une tranche d’âge plus jeune évinçant les derniers tenants du «baby boom». Pour une «disparue», la lutte de classe se porte bien. Pour autant, elle a rarement été aussi occultée. Car cette victoire, c’est d’abord celle de l’entre-soi d’une bourgeoisie qui ne s’assume pas comme telle et se réfugie dans la posture morale (le fameux chantage au fascisme devenu, comme le dit Christophe Guilluy, une «arme de classe» contre les milieux populaires). Fracture sociale, fracture territoriale, fracture culturelle, désarroi identitaire, les questions qui nourrissent l’angoisse française ont été laissées de côté pour les mêmes raisons que l’antisémitisme, dit «nouveau», demeure indicible. C’est là qu’il faut voir l’une des causes de la dépression collective du pays, quand la majorité sent son destin confisqué par une oligarchie de naissance, de diplôme et d’argent. Une sorte de haut clergé médiatique, universitaire, technocratique et culturellement hors sol. Toutefois, le plus frappant demeure à mes yeux la façon dont le gauchisme culturel s’est fait l’allié d’une bourgeoisie financière qui a prôné l’homme sans racines, le nomade réduit à sa fonction de producteur et de consommateur. Un capitalisme financier mondialisé qui a besoin de frontières ouvertes mais dont ni lui ni les siens, toutefois, retranchés dans leur entre-soi, ne vivront les conséquences. (…) Dans un autre ordre d’idées, peut-on déconnecter la constante progression du taux d’abstention et l’évolution de notre société vers une forme d’anomie, de repli sur soi et d’individualisme triste? Comme si l’exaltation ressassée du «vivre-ensemble» disait précisément le contraire. Cette évolution, elle non plus, n’est pas sans lien à ce retournement du clivage de classe qui voit une partie de la gauche morale s’engouffrer dans un ethos méprisant à l’endroit des classes populaires, qu’elle relègue dans le domaine de la «beauferie» méchante des «Dupont Lajoie». Certains analystes ont déjà lumineusement montré (je pense à Julliard, Le Goff, Michéa, Guilluy, Bouvet et quelques autres), comment le mouvement social avait été progressivement abandonné par une gauche focalisée sur la transformation des mœurs. (…) Par le refus de la guerre qu’on nous fait dès lors que nous avons décidé qu’il n’y avait plus de guerre («Vous n’aurez pas ma haine» ) en oubliant, selon le mot de Julien Freund, que «c’est l’ennemi qui vous désigne». En privilégiant cette doxa habitée par le souci grégaire du «progrès» et le permanent désir d’«être de gauche», ce souci dont Charles Péguy disait qu’on ne mesurera jamais assez combien il nous a fait commettre de lâchetés. (…) Le magistère médiatico-universitaire de cette bourgeoisie morale (Jean-Claude Michéa parlait récemment dans la Revue des deux mondes, (avril 2017) d’une «représentation néocoloniale des classes populaires […] par les élites universitaires postmodernes», affadit les joutes intellectuelles. Chacun sait qu’il lui faudra rester dans les limites étroites de la doxa dite de l’«ouverture à l’Autre». De là une censure intérieure qui empêche nos doutes d’affleurer à la conscience et qui relègue les faits derrière les croyances. «Une grande quantité d’intelligence peut être investie dans l’ignorance lorsque le besoin d’illusion est profond», notait jadis l’écrivain américain Saul Bellow. (…) La chape de plomb qui pèse sur l’expression publique détourne le sens des mots pour nous faire entrer dans un univers orwellien où le blanc c’est le noir et la vérité le mensonge. (…) il s’agit aussi, et en partie, d’un antijudaïsme d’importation. Que l’on songe simplement au Maghreb, où il constitue un fond culturel ancien et antérieur à l’histoire coloniale. L’anthropologie culturelle permet le décryptage du soubassement symbolique de toute culture, la mise en lumière d’un imaginaire qui sous-tend une représentation du monde. (…) Mais, pour la doxa d’un antiracisme dévoyé, l’analyse culturelle ne serait qu’un racisme déguisé.En juillet 2016, Abdelghani Merah (le frère de Mohamed) confiait à la journaliste Isabelle Kersimon que lorsque le corps de Mohamed fut rendu à la famille, les voisins étaient venus en visite de deuil féliciter ses parents, regrettant seulement, disaient-ils, que Mohamed «n’ait pas tué plus d’enfants juifs»(sic). Cet antisémitisme est au mieux entouré de mythologies, au pire nié. Il serait, par exemple, corrélé à un faible niveau d’études alors qu’il demeure souvent élevé en dépit d’un haut niveau scolaire. On en fait, à tort, l’apanage de l’islamisme seul. Or, la Tunisie de Ben Ali, longtemps présentée comme un modèle d’«ouverture à l’autre», cultivait discrètement son antisémitisme sous couvert d’antisionisme (cfNotre ami Ben Ali, de Beau et Turquoi, Editions La Découverte). Et que dire de la Syrie de Bachar el-Assad, à la fois violemment anti-islamiste et antisémite, à l’image d’ailleurs du régime des généraux algériens? Ou, en France, de l’attitude pour le moins ambiguë des Indigènes de la République sur le sujet comme celle de ces autres groupuscules qui, sans lien direct à l’islamisme, racialisent le débat social et redonnent vie au racisme sous couvert de «déconstruction postcoloniale»? (…) Les universitaires et intellectuels signataires font dans l’indigénisme comme leurs prédécesseurs faisaient jadis dans l’ouvriérisme. Même mimétisme, même renoncement à la raison, même morgue au secours d’une logorrhée intellectuelle prétentieuse (c’est le parti de l’intelligence, à l’opposé des simplismes et des clichés de la «fachosphère»). Un discours qui fait fi de toute réalité, à l’instar du discours ouvriériste du PCF des années 1950, expliquant posément la «paupérisation de la classe ouvrière». De cette «parole raciste qui revendique l’apartheid», comme l’écrit le Comité laïcité république à propos de Houria Bouteldja, les auteurs de cette tribune en défense parlent sans ciller à son propos de «son attachement au Maghreb […] relié aux Juifs qui y vivaient, dont l’absence désormais créait un vide impossible à combler».Une absence, ajoutent-ils, qui rend l’auteur «inconsolable». Cette forme postcoloniale de la bêtise, entée par la culpabilité compassionnelle, donne raison à George Orwell, qui estimait que les intellectuels étaient ceux qui, demain, offriraient la plus faible résistance au totalitarisme, trop occupés à admirer la force qui les écrasera. Et à préférer leur vision du monde à la réalité qui désenchante. Nous y sommes. (…) L’islam radical use du droit pour imposer le silence. Cela, on le savait déjà. Mais mon procès a mis en évidence une autre force d’intimidation, celle de cette «gauche morale» qui voit dans tout contradicteur un ennemi contre lequel aucun procédé ne saurait être jugé indigne. Pas même l’appel au licenciement, comme dans mon cas. Un ordre moral qui traque les mauvaises pensées et les sentiments indignes, qui joue sur la mauvaise conscience et la culpabilité pour clouer au pilori. Et exigera (comme la Licra à mon endroit) repentance et «excuses publiques», à l’instar d’une cérémonie d’exorcisme comme dans une «chasse aux sorcières» du XVIIe siècle. (…)  En se montrant incapable de voir le danger qui vise les Juifs, une partie de l’opinion française se refuse à voir le danger qui la menace en propre. Georges Bensoussan

Attention: un tombeau peut en cacher un autre !

Président palestinien au mandat expiré depuis huit ans et financier revendiqué du terrorisme salué par son homologue français pour son « engagement en faveur de la non-violence »; terroriste notoire se voyant gratifié pour cause de détention d’excuses officielles et d’une dizaine de millions de dollars de compensation financière; pétition de la première lycéenne venue contre le racisme de Victor Hugo; associations humanitaires apportant leur soutien explicite à l’un des pires trafics d’êtres humains de l’histoire; ministres de la République française soutenant, entre deux frasques ou démissions pour affaires de corruption, le droit à « niquer » la France ou célébrant, via l’écriture anonyme de romans érotiques l’encanaillement des bourgeoises dans les  » banlieues chaudes »occultation du thème de l’immigration et du terrorisme islamique tout au long d’une campagne ayant abouti, via un véritable hold up et l’élimination ou la stigmatisation des principaux candidats de l’opposition à l’élection d’un président n’ayant recueilli que 17% des inscrits au premier tour, alors que le sujet est censé être une importante préoccupation des Français et qu’on en est à la 34e évacuation en deux ans de quelque 2 800 migrants clandestins en plein Paris, installation dans la quasi-indifférence générale depuis plus d’un an de quasi-favelas de gitans le long d’une route nationale à la sortie de Paris; dénonciation ou censure de ceux qui osent nommer, sur fond d’israélisation toujours plus grande, le nouvel antisémitisme d’origine musulmane ou d’extrême-gauche, marche d’imams européens contre le terrorisme peinant, pour cause de fatigue post-ramadan et malgré pourtant un bilan récent de quelque centaines de victimes, à réunir les participants; peuple américain contraint, après les huit années de l’accident industriel Obama, de se choisir un président américain issu du monde de l’immobilier et de la télé-réalité (monde du catch compris où le bougre a littéralement risqué sa peau sans répétitions !); informations sur la véritable cabale des services secrets comme des médias contre ledit président américain disponibles que sur le seul site d’un des plus grands complotistes de l’histoire

A l’heure où un  tombeau de 4 000 ans entouré d’une enceinte de 2 000 ans …

Se voit magiquement transmué après l’an dernier un Temple lui aussi bimillénaire …

En propriété d’une religion d’à peine 1 100 ans …

Comment ne pas repenser

Vieille comme le monde dans ce nouveau tombeau du politiquement correct …

A cette propension humaine dont parlaient Eschyle comme Orwell ou Girard …

A toujours ensevelir comme première victime de la violence et de la guerre…

La simple vérité ?

Georges Bensoussan : «Nous entrons dans un univers orwellien où la vérité c’est le mensonge»

Alexandre Devecchio
Le Figaro

07/07/2017

ENTRETIEN – L’auteur des Territoires perdus de la République (Fayard) et d’Une France soumise (Albin Michel) revisite la campagne présidentielle. Fracture sociale, fracture territoriale, fracture culturelle, désarroi identitaire : pour l’historien, les questions qui nourrissent l’angoisse française ont été laissées de côté.

En 2002, Georges Bensoussan publiait Les Territoires perdus de la République, un recueil de témoignages d’enseignants de banlieue qui faisait apparaître l’antisémitisme, la francophobie et le calvaire des femmes dans les quartiers dits sensibles.«Un livre qui faisait exploser le mur du déni de la réalité française», se souvient Alain Finkielkraut, l’un des rares défenseurs de l’ouvrage à l’époque.

Une France soumise, paru cette année, montrait que ces quinze dernières années tout s’était aggravé. L’élection présidentielle devait répondre à ce malaise. Mais, pour Georges Bensoussan, il n’en a rien été. Un voile a été jeté sur les questions qui fâchent. Un symbole de cet aveuglement? Le meurtre de Sarah Halimi, défenestrée durant la campagne aux cris d’«Allah Akbar» sans qu’aucun grand média ne s’en fasse l’écho. Une chape de plomb médiatique, intellectuelle et politique qui, selon l’historien, évoque de plus en plus l’univers du célèbre roman de George Orwell, 1984.
Selon un sondage du JDD paru cette semaine, le recul de l’islam radical est l’attente prioritaire des Français (61 %), loin devant les retraites (43 %), l’école (36 %), l’emploi (36 %) ou le pouvoir d’achat (30 %). D’après une autre étude, 65 % des sondés considèrent qu’«il y a trop d’étrangers en France» et 74 % que l’islam souhaite «imposer son mode de fonctionnement aux autres».

LE FIGARO. – Des résultats en décalage avec les priorités affichées par le nouveau pouvoir: moralisation de la vie politique, loi travail, construction européenne… Les grands enjeux de notre époque ont- ils été abordés durant la campagne présidentielle?

Georges BENSOUSSAN. – Une partie du pays a eu le sentiment que la campagne avait été détournée de son sens et accaparée, à dessein, par les «affaires» que l’on sait, la presse étant devenue en la matière moins un contre-pouvoir qu’un anti-pouvoir, selon le mot de Marcel Gauchet. Cette nouvelle force politique pêche par sa représentativité dérisoire, doublée d’un illusoire renouvellement sociologique, quand 75 % des candidats d’En marche appartiennent à la catégorie «cadres et professions intellectuelles supérieures». Le seul véritable renouvellement est générationnel, avec l’arrivée au pouvoir d’une tranche d’âge plus jeune évinçant les derniers tenants du «baby boom».

Fracture sociale, fracture territoriale, fracture culturelle, désarroi identitaire, les questions qui nourissent l’angoisse française ont été laissées de côté
Pour une «disparue», la lutte de classe se porte bien. Pour autant, elle a rarement été aussi occultée. Car cette victoire, c’est d’abord celle de l’entre-soi d’une bourgeoisie qui ne s’assume pas comme telle et se réfugie dans la posture morale (le fameux chantage au fascisme devenu, comme le dit Christophe Guilluy, une «arme de classe» contre les milieux populaires). Fracture sociale, fracture territoriale, fracture culturelle, désarroi identitaire, les questions qui nourrissent l’angoisse française ont été laissées de côté pour les mêmes raisons que l’antisémitisme, dit «nouveau», demeure indicible.
C’est là qu’il faut voir l’une des causes de la dépression collective du pays, quand la majorité sent son destin confisqué par une oligarchie de naissance, de diplôme et d’argent. Une sorte de haut clergé médiatique, universitaire, technocratique et culturellement hors sol.
Toutefois, le plus frappant demeure à mes yeux la façon dont le gauchisme culturel s’est fait l’allié d’une bourgeoisie financière qui a prôné l’homme sans racines, le nomade réduit à sa fonction de producteur et de consommateur. Un capitalisme financier mondialisé qui a besoin de frontières ouvertes mais dont ni lui ni les siens, toutefois, retranchés dans leur entre-soi, ne vivront les conséquences.

Ce gauchisme culturel est moins l’«idiot utile» de l’islamisme que celui de ce capitalisme déshumanisé qui, en faisant de l’intégration démocratique à la nation un impensé, empêche d’analyser l’affrontement qui agite souterrainement notre société. De surcroît, l’avenir de la nation France n’est pas sans lien à la démographie des mondes voisins quand la machine à assimiler, comme c’est le cas aujourd’hui, fonctionne moins bien.

Dans un autre ordre d’idées, peut-on déconnecter la constante progression du taux d’abstention et l’évolution de notre société vers une forme d’anomie, de repli sur soi et d’individualisme triste? Comme si l’exaltation ressassée du «vivre-ensemble» disait précisément le contraire. Cette évolution, elle non plus, n’est pas sans lien à ce retournement du clivage de classe qui voit une partie de la gauche morale s’engouffrer dans un ethos méprisant à l’endroit des classes populaires, qu’elle relègue dans le domaine de la «beauferie» méchante des «Dupont Lajoie».Certains analystes ont déjà lumineusement montré (je pense à Julliard, Le Goff, Michéa, Guilluy, Bouvet et quelques autres), comment le mouvement social avait été progressivement abandonné par une gauche focalisée sur la transformation des mœurs.

La France que vous décrivez semble au bord de l’explosion. Dès lors, comment expliquez-vous le déni persistant d’une partie des élites?

Par le refus de la guerre qu’on nous fait dès lors que nous avons décidé qu’il n’y avait plus de guerre («Vous n’aurez pas ma haine» ) en oubliant, selon le mot de Julien Freund, que «c’est l’ennemi qui vous désigne». En privilégiant cette doxa habitée par le souci grégaire du «progrès» et le permanent désir d’«être de gauche», ce souci dont Charles Péguy disait qu’on ne mesurera jamais assez combien il nous a fait commettre de lâchetés. Enfin, en éprouvant, c’est normal, toutes les difficultés du monde à reconnaître qu’on s’est trompé, parfois même tout au long d’une vie. Comment oublier à cet égard les communistes effondrés de 1956?
Quant à ceux qui jouent un rôle actif dans le maquillage de la réalité, ils ont, eux, prioritairement le souci de maintenir une position sociale privilégiée. La perpétuation de la doxa est inséparable de cet ordre social dont ils sont les bénéficiaires et qui leur vaut reconnaissance, considération et avantages matériels.
Le magistère médiatico-universitaire de cette bourgeoisie morale (Jean-Claude Michéa parlait récemment dans la Revue des deux mondes, (avril 2017) d’une «représentation néocoloniale des classes populaires […] par les élites universitaires postmodernes», affadit les joutes intellectuelles. Chacun sait qu’il lui faudra rester dans les limites étroites de la doxa dite de l’«ouverture à l’Autre». De là une censure intérieure qui empêche nos doutes d’affleurer à la conscience et qui relègue les faits derrière les croyances. «Une grande quantité d’intelligence peut être investie dans l’ignorance lorsque le besoin d’illusion est profond», notait jadis l’écrivain américain Saul Bellow.

Avec 16 autres intellectuels, dont Alain Finkielkraut, Jacques Julliard, Elisabeth Badinter, Michel Onfray ou encore Marcel Gauchet, vous avez signé une tribune pour que la vérité soit dite sur le meurtre de Sarah Halimi. Cette affaire est-elle un symptôme de ce déni que vous dénoncez?

La chape de plomb qui pèse sur l’expression publique détourne le sens des mots pour nous faire entrer dans un univers orwellien où le blanc c’est le noir et la vérité le mensonge. Nous avons signé cette tribune pour tenter de sortir cette affaire du silence qui l’entourait, comme celui qui avait accueilli, en 2002, la publication des Territoires perdus de la République.

C’était il y a quinze ans et vous alertiez déjà sur la montée d’un antisémitisme dit «nouveau»…

Faut-il parler d’un «antisémitisme nouveau»? Je ne le crois pas. Non seulement parce que les premiers signes en avaient été détectés dès la fin des années 1980. Mais plus encore parce qu’il s’agit aussi, et en partie, d’un antijudaïsme d’importation. Que l’on songe simplement au Maghreb, où il constitue un fond culturel ancien et antérieur à l’histoire coloniale. L’anthropologie culturelle permet le décryptage du soubassement symbolique de toute culture, la mise en lumière d’un imaginaire qui sous-tend une représentation du monde.

Mais, pour la doxa d’un antiracisme dévoyé, l’analyse culturelle ne serait qu’un racisme déguisé. En septembre 2016, le dramaturge algérien Karim Akouche déclarait: «Voulez-vous devenir une vedette dans la presse algérienne arabophone? C’est facile. Prêchez la haine des Juifs […]. Je suis un rescapé de l’école algérienne. On m’y a enseigné à détester les Juifs. Hitler y était un héros. Des professeurs en faisaient l’éloge. Après le Coran, Mein Kampf et Les Protocoles des sages de Sion sont les livres les plus lus dans le monde musulman.» En juillet 2016, Abdelghani Merah (le frère de Mohamed) confiait à la journaliste Isabelle Kersimon que lorsque le corps de Mohamed fut rendu à la famille, les voisins étaient venus en visite de deuil féliciter ses parents, regrettant seulement, disaient-ils, que Mohamed «n’ait pas tué plus d’enfants juifs»(sic).

Cet antisémitisme est au mieux entouré de mythologies, au pire nié. Il serait, par exemple, corrélé à un faible niveau d’études alors qu’il demeure souvent élevé en dépit d’un haut niveau scolaire. On en fait, à tort, l’apanage de l’islamisme seul. Or, la Tunisie de Ben Ali, longtemps présentée comme un modèle d’«ouverture à l’autre», cultivait discrètement son antisémitisme sous couvert d’antisionisme (cfNotre ami Ben Ali, de Beau et Turquoi, Editions La Découverte). Et que dire de la Syrie de Bachar el-Assad, à la fois violemment anti-islamiste et antisémite, à l’image d’ailleurs du régime des généraux algériens? Ou, en France, de l’attitude pour le moins ambiguë des Indigènes de la République sur le sujet comme celle de ces autres groupuscules qui, sans lien direct à l’islamisme, racialisent le débat social et redonnent vie au racisme sous couvert de «déconstruction postcoloniale»?

Justement, le 19 juin dernier, un collectif d’intellectuels a publié dans Le Monde un texte de soutien à Houria Bouteldja, la chef de file des Indigènes de la République.

Que penser de l’évolution sociétale d’une partie des élites françaises quand le même quotidien donne la parole aux détracteurs de Kamel Daoud, aux apologistes d’Houria Bouteldja et offre une tribune à Marwan Muhammad, du Collectif contre l’islamophobie en France (CCIF), qualifié par ailleurs de «porte-parole combatif des musulmans»?

Les universitaires et intellectuels signataires font dans l’indigénisme comme leurs prédécesseurs faisaient jadis dans l’ouvriérisme. Même mimétisme, même renoncement à la raison, même morgue au secours d’une logorrhée intellectuelle prétentieuse (c’est le parti de l’intelligence, à l’opposé des simplismes et des clichés de la «fachosphère»). Un discours qui fait fi de toute réalité, à l’instar du discours ouvriériste du PCF des années 1950, expliquant posément la «paupérisation de la classe ouvrière». De cette «parole raciste qui revendique l’apartheid», comme l’écrit le Comité laïcité république à propos de Houria Bouteldja, les auteurs de cette tribune en défense parlent sans ciller à son propos de «son attachement au Maghreb […] relié aux Juifs qui y vivaient, dont l’absence désormais créait un vide impossible à combler».Une absence, ajoutent-ils, qui rend l’auteur «inconsolable». Cette forme postcoloniale de la bêtise, entée par la culpabilité compassionnelle, donne raison à George Orwell, qui estimait que les intellectuels étaient ceux qui, demain, offriraient la plus faible résistance au totalitarisme, trop occupés à admirer la force qui les écrasera. Et à préférer leur vision du monde à la réalité qui désenchante. Nous y sommes.

Vous vous êtes retrouvé sur le banc des accusés pour avoir dénoncé l’antisémitisme des banlieues dans l’émission «Répliques» sur France Culture. Il a suffi d’un signalement du CCIF pour que le parquet décide de vous poursuivre cinq mois après les faits. Contre toute attente, SOS-Racisme, la LDH, le Mrap mais aussi la Licra s’étaient associés aux poursuites.

En dépit de la relaxe prononcée le 7 mars dernier, et brillamment prononcée même, le mal est fait: ce procès n’aurait jamais dû se tenir. Car, pour le CCIF, l’objectif est atteint: intimider et faire taire. Après mon affaire, comme après celle de tant d’autres, on peut parier que la volonté de parler ira s’atténuant.

A-t-on remarqué d’ailleurs que, depuis l’attentat de Charlie Hebdo, on n’a plus vu une seule caricature du Prophète dans la presse occidentale?

L’islam radical use du droit pour imposer le silence. Cela, on le savait déjà. Mais mon procès a mis en évidence une autre force d’intimidation, celle de cette «gauche morale» qui voit dans tout contradicteur un ennemi contre lequel aucun procédé ne saurait être jugé indigne. Pas même l’appel au licenciement, comme dans mon cas. Un ordre moral qui traque les mauvaises pensées et les sentiments indignes, qui joue sur la mauvaise conscience et la culpabilité pour clouer au pilori. Et exigera (comme la Licra à mon endroit) repentance et «excuses publiques», à l’instar d’une cérémonie d’exorcisme comme dans une «chasse aux sorcières» du XVIIe siècle.

Comment entendre la disproportion entre l’avalanche de condamnations qui m’a submergé et les mots que j’avais employés au micro de France Culture?

J’étais entré de plain-pied, je crois, dans le domaine d’un non-dit massif, celui d’un antisémitisme qui, en filigrane, pose la question de l’intégration et de l’assimilation. Voire, en arrière-plan, celle du rejet de la France. En se montrant incapable de voir le danger qui vise les Juifs, une partie de l’opinion française se refuse à voir le danger qui la menace en propre.

Une France soumise. Les voix du refus,collectif dirigé par Georges Bensoussan. Albin Michel, 672 p., 24,90 €. Préface d’Elisabeth Badinter

Voir aussi:

http://www.valeursactuelles.com/societe/pour-la-doxa-officielle-le-seul-antisemitisme-est-dextreme-droite-86190

“Pour la doxa officielle, le seul antisémitisme est d’extrême-droite”
Interview. Terrorisme, communautarisme, délires antiracistes : le philosophe et essayiste Pascal Bruckner décrypte les dernières polémiques et ce qu’elles disent de la société française.

Mickaël Fonton
Valeurs actuellles

10 juillet 2017

Le 19 juin dernier, une agression terroriste se produisait sur les Champs-Elysées. L’opinion s’en est trouvée agitée quelques heures, puis la vie a repris son cours. Alors qu’approche la commémoration de l’attentat du 14 juillet à Nice, croyez-vous que les Français aient pris la mesure exacte de la menace qui pèse sur le pays ?
L’indifférence apparente des Français à la situation peut sembler étrange, s’assimiler à du déni, à la volonté de ne pas voir. Elle peut aussi se comprendre comme une stratégie de survie analogue à ce qui se passe depuis de nombreuses années en Israël. Les terroristes et leurs alliés wahabites, salafistes ou frères musulmans espéraient non seulement semer la mort mais tétaniser les populations, tarir les foules dans les salles de spectacle, les restaurants, nous contraindre à vivre comme dans ces pays obscurantistes dont ils se réclament. Or c’est l’inverse : les Français continuent à vivre presque comme d’habitude, ils sortent, vont au café, partent en vacances, acceptent de se soumettre à des procédures de sécurité renforcées.

La présence de policiers armés les rassure. Mais la peur reste latente. Depuis les attentats de 1995, chacun de nous devient malgré soi une sorte d’agent de sécurité : entrer dans une rame de métro nous contraint à regard circulaire pour détecter un suspect éventuel. Un colis abandonné nous effraie. Dans une salle de cinéma ou de musique, nous calculons la distance qui nous sépare de la sortie en cas d’attaques surprises. Nous nous mettons à la place d’un djihadiste éventuel pour déjouer ses plans. Nous sommes devenus malgré nous la victime et le tueur. Nous sommes bien en guerre civile larvée mais avec un sang- froid étonnant dont ne font preuve ni les Nord-américains ni les Britanniques.
Sur le même sujet
Arte diffusera finalement le documentaire sur l’antisémitisme musulman

Comment expliquez-vous le silence médiatique qui a entouré le meurtre de Sarah Halimi ? Indifférence, lassitude, volonté de ne pas “faire le jeu” de tel ou tel parti à l’approche de la présidentielle ?
Pour comprendre ce scandaleux silence, il faut partir d’un constat fait par un certain nombre de nos têtes pensantes de gauche et d’extrême gauche : l’antisémitisme, ça suffit. C’est une vieille rengaine qu’on ne veut plus entendre. Il faut s’attaquer maintenant au vrai racisme, l’islamophobie qui touche nos amis musulmans. Bref, comme le disent beaucoup, le musulman en 2017 est le Juif des années 30, 40. On oublie au passage que l’antisémitisme ne s’est jamais adressé à la religion juive en tant que telle mais au peuple juif coupable d’exister et qu’enfin dans les années 40 il n’y avait pas d’extrémistes juifs qui lançaient des bombes dans les gares ou les lieux de culte, allaient égorger les prêtres dans leurs églises.

Juste une remarque statistique : depuis Ilan Halimi, kidnappé et torturé par le Gang des Barbares jusqu’à Mohammed Mehra, l’Hyper casher de Vincennes et Sarah Halimi, pas moins de dix Français juifs ont été tués ces dernières années parce que juifs par des extrémistes de l’islam. Cela n’empêche pas les radicaux du Coran de se plaindre de l’islamophobie officielle de l’Etat français. Ce serait à hurler de rire si ça n’était pas tragique ! Dans la doxa officielle de la gauche, seule l’extrême droite souffre d’antisémitisme. Que le monde arabo musulman soit, pour une large part, rongé par la haine des Juifs, ces inférieurs devenus des égaux, est impensable pour eux.

Que vous inspire la polémique autour de Danièle Obono, députée de la France insoumise qui réitère son soutien à des personnes qui insultent la France ?
Soutenir les Indigènes de la République en 2017, ce Ku Klux Klan islamiste, antisémite et fascisant est pour le moins problématique. Beaucoup à gauche pensent que les anciens dominés ou colonisés ne peuvent être racistes puisqu’ils ont été eux-mêmes opprimés. C’est d’une naïveté confondante. Il y a même ce que j’avais appelé il y a dix ans “un racisme de l’antiracisme” où les nouvelles discriminations à l’égard des Juifs, des Blancs, des Européens s’expriment au nom d’un antiracisme farouche. Le suprématisme noir ou arabe n’est pas moins odieux que le suprématisme blanc dont ils ne sont que le simple décalque. Les déclarations de Madame Obono relèvent d’une stratégie de la provocation que le Front de gauche partage avec le Front national, ce qui est normal puisque ce sont des frères ennemis mais jumeaux. Lancer une polémique, c’est chercher la réprobation pour se poser en victimes. Multiplier les transgressions va constituer la ligne politique de ceux qui s’appellent “Les insoumis”, nom assez cocasse quand on connaît l’ancien notable socialiste, le paria pépère qui est à leur tête et dont le patrimoine déclaré se monte à 1 135 000 euros, somme coquette pour un ennemi des riches.

Gilles-William Goldnadel : « Anne Hidalgo et les migrants, la grande hypocrisie »

  • Gilles William Goldnadel
  • Le Figaro
  • 10/07/2017

FIGAROVOX/CHRONIQUE – Dans sa chronique, l’avocat Gilles-William Goldnadel dénonce la mauvaise gestion d’Anne Hidalgo de l’afflux de migrants vers la capitale. Pour elle, en proposant une loi sur le sujet, la maire de Paris montre sa volonté de rejeter la responsabilité de cette catastrophe humaine et sécuritaire sur l’État.


Gilles-William Goldnadel est avocat et écrivain. Il est président de l’association France-Israël. Toutes les semaines, il décrypte l’actualité pour FigaroVox.


Je soumets cette question: y aurait-il une manière de concours de soumission entre la première magistrate de Paris et le premier magistrat de France? À celui ou celle qui aurait la soumission la plus soumise?

Ainsi, cette semaine, Madame Hidalgo a-t-elle proposé une loi sur les migrants qu’on ne lui demandait pas et pour laquelle on ne lui connaît aucune compétence particulière.

C’est le moins que l’on puisse écrire. En réalité, un esprit chagrin soupçonnerait l’édile municipal, dépassé par des événements migratoires dans sa ville qu’elle aura pourtant accueillis extatiquement, de vouloir faire porter le chapeau aux autres villes et à l’État.

Les responsables socialistes comme elle ont bien raison de ne pas être complexés. Personne ne leur a demandé raison d’une irresponsabilité qui aura accouché d’une catastrophe démographique et sécuritaire dont on ne perçoit pas encore toute la gravité. Dans un monde normal, ils devraient raser les murs, mais dans le monde virtuel ils peuvent se permettre de construire sur la comète des ponts suspendus. L’idéologie esthétique qui les porte et supporte considère la réalité comme une obscénité.

Et les arguments les plus gênants comme des grossièretés. C’est ainsi, que faire remarquer que toutes les belles âmes, les artistes généreux (pardon pour le pléonasme), les citoyens aériens du monde, prêts à accueillir l’humanité entière sans accueillir un seul enfant dans mille mètres au carré, relève d’une insupportable vulgarité.

Madame Hidalgo s’exclame: «faisons du défi migratoire une réussite pour la France» sur le même ton assuré que ses amis chantaient il y a 20 ans: «L’immigration, une chance pour la France». Décidément, ils ne manquent pas d’air.

Madame Hidalgo prétend vouloir améliorer l’intégration des nouveaux migrants. Ses amis n’ont pas réussi en deux décennies à intégrer des populations culturellement et socialement plus aisément intégrables. À aucun moment Anne Hidalgo n’a eu le mauvais goût d’évoquer la question de l’islam.

Madame Hidalgo n’aurait pas songé à demander aux riches monarques du golfe, à commencer par celui du Qatar, à qui elle tresse régulièrement des couronnes, de faire preuve de générosité à l’égard de leurs frères de langue, de culture et de religion.

Madame le maire n’est pas très franche. Dans sa proposition, elle feint de séparer les réfugiés éligibles au droit d’asile et les migrants économiques soumis au droit commun. Elle fait semblant de ne pas savoir que ces derniers pour leur immense majorité ne sont pas raccompagnés et que dès lors qu’ils sont déboutés , ils se fondent dans la clandestinité la plus publique du monde.

Comme l’écrit Pierre Lellouche dans Une guerre sans fin (Cerf) que je recommande: «Aucun principe de droit international n’oblige les Français déjà surendettés, à hauteur de plus de 2000 milliards, à financer par leurs impôts et leurs cotisations sociales des soins gratuits pour tous les immigrés illégaux présents sur notre sol… en 2016, l’octroi du statut de demandeur d’asile est devenu un moyen couramment utilisé par des autorités dépassées pour vider les camps de migrants, à Paris bien sûr, mais aussi par exemple, à Calais, dans la fameuse «jungle» qui, avant son démantèlement, comptait environ 14 000 «habitants». Ces derniers, essentiellement des migrants économiques, ont été qualifiés de réfugiés politiques dans l’unique but de pouvoir les transférer vers d’autres centres, dénommés CAO ou CADA en province. De telles méthodes relèvent d’une stratégie digne du mythe de Sisyphe: plus ils sont vidés, plus ils se remplissent à nouveau…»

Surtout, Madame Hidalgo n’est pas très courageuse: elle n’ose pas dire le fond de sa pensée: Que l’on ne saurait sans déchoir dire «Non» à l’Autre , «ici c’est chez moi, ce n’est pas chez toi».

J’ai moi-même posé la question, au micro de RMC, à son adjoint chargé du logement, le communiste Iann Brossat: «Oui ou non, faut-il expulser les déboutés du droit d’asile? Réponse du collaborateur: «non bien sûr».

Madame Hidalgo n’a pas le courage de dire le fond de sa pensée soumise .

À la vérité, c’est bien parce que les responsables français démissionnaires n’ont pas eu la volonté et l’intelligence de faire respecter les lois de la république souveraine sur le contrôle des flux migratoires , et ont maintenu illégalement sur le sol national des personnes non désirées, que la France ne peut plus se permettre d’accueillir des gens qui mériteraient parfois davantage de l’être. Qui veut faire l’ange fait la bête.

Mais le premier Français, n’aura pas démérité non plus à ce concours de la soumission auquel il semble aussi avoir soumissionné.

C’est ainsi que cette semaine encore, le président algérien a, de nouveau, réclamé avec insistance de la France qu’elle se soumette et fasse repentance .

Cela tourne à la manie. La maladie chronique macronienne du ressentiment ressassé de l’Algérie faillie. À comparer avec l’ouverture d’esprit marocaine.

En effet, Monsieur Bouteflika a des circonstances atténuantes. Son homologue français lui aura tendu la verge pour fouetter la France. On se souvient de ses propos sur cette colonisation française coupable de crimes contre l’humanité.

Je n’ai pas noté que Monsieur Macron, le 5 juillet dernier, ait cru devoir commémorer le massacre d’Oran de 1962 et le classer dans la même catégorie juridique de droit pénal international. Il est vrai que ce ne sont que 2000 Français qui furent sauvagement assassinés après pourtant que l’indépendance ait été accordée.

On serait injuste de penser que cette saillie un peu obscène n’aurait que des raisons bassement électoralistes. Je crains malheureusement que Jupiter ne soit sincère. Enfant de ce siècle névrotiquement culpabilisant , il a dans ses bagages tout un tas d’ustensiles usagés qui auront servi à tourmenter les Français depuis 30 ans et à inoculer dans les quartiers le bacille mortel de la détestation pathologique de l’autochtone.

Au demeurant, Monsieur Macron a depuis récidivé: accueillant cette semaine son homologue palestinien Abbou Abbas, il a trouvé subtil de déclarer: «l’absence d’horizon politique nourrit le désespoir et l’extrémisme» . Ce qui est la manière ordinaire un peu surfaite d’excuser le terrorisme.

À dire le vrai, le président français, paraît-il moderne, n’a cessé de trouver de fausses causes sociales éculées à ce terrorisme islamiste qui massacre les Français depuis deux années.

Pour vaincre l’islamisme radical, il préfère à présent soumettre le thermomètre.

C’est à se demander si la pensée complexe de Jupiter n’est pas un peu simpliste.

1er juillet 2017 

Le journaliste James O’Keffe (photo) réalise depuis plusieurs années des vidéos en caméra cachée. Il y filme les commentaires, voire les aveux, de personnalités politiques sur les scandales du moment. Proche de Breibart et du président Trump, il vient de réaliser trois vidéos sur le traitement par CNN des possibles ingérences russes dans la campagne présidentielle états-unienne.

La première partie, diffusée le 26 juin 2017, montre un producteur-en-chef de CNN, John Bonifield, responsable de séquences non-politiques, affirmer que les accusations de collusion entre la Russie et l’équipe Trump ne sont que « des conneries » diffusées « pour l’audience ».

La seconde partie, diffusée le 28 juin, montre le présentateur de CNN Anthony Van Jones (ancien collaborateur de Barack Obama licencié de la Maison-Blanche pour avoir publiquement mis en cause la version officielle des attentats du 11-Septembre) affirmant que cette histoire d’ingérence russe est une nullité.

La troisième partie, diffusée le 30 juin, montre le producteur associé de CNN, Jimmy Carr, déclarer que le président Donald Trump est un malade mental et que ses électeurs sont stupides comme de la merde.

CNN a accusé le Project Veritas de James O’Keefe d’avoir sorti ces déclarations de leur contexte plus général. Ses collaborateurs ont tenté de minimiser leurs propos enregistrés. Cependant, la porte-parole de la Maison-Blanche, Sarah Sanders, a souligné le caractère scandaleux de ces déclarations et appelé tous les États-uniens à voir ces vidéos et à en juger par eux-mêmes.

L’enquête de CNN sur la possible ingérence russe est devenue l’obsession de la chaîne. Elle l’a abordée plus de 1 500 fois au cours des deux derniers mois. Personne n’a à ce jour le moindre début de commencement de preuve pour étayer l’accusation de la chaîne d’information contre Moscou.

Voir également:

10 juillet 2017

La majorité républicaine de la Commission sénatoriale de la Sécurité de la patrie et des Affaires gouvernementales dénonce les conséquences désastreuses des fuites actuelles de l’Administration.

Ce phénomène, qui était très rare sous les présidences George Bush Jr. et Barack Obama, s’est soudain développé contre la présidence Donald Trump causant des dommages irréversibles à la Sécurité nationale.

Au cours des 126 premiers jours de la présidence Trump, 125 informations classifiées ont été illégalement transmises à 18 organes de presse (principalement CNN). Soit environ une par jour, c’est-à-dire 7 fois plus que durant la période équivalente des 4 précédents mandats. La majorité de ces fuites concernait l’enquête sur de possibles ingérences russes durant la campagne électorale présidentielle.

Le président de la Commission, Ron Johnson (Rep, Wisconsin) (photo) a saisi l’Attorney General, Jeff Sessions.

L’existence de ces fuites répétées laisse penser à un complot au sein de la haute administration dont 98% des fonctionnaires ont voté Clinton contre Trump.

Voir de plus:

10 juillet 2017

L’ex-directeur du FBI, James Comey, dont le témoignage devant le Congrès devait permettre de confondre le président Trump pour haute trahison au profit de la Russie, est désormais lui-même mis en cause.

James Comey avait indiqué par deux fois lors de son audition qu’il remettait au Congrès ses notes personnelles sur ses relations avec le président. Or, selon les parlementaires qui ont pu consulter ces neuf documents, ceux-ci contiennent des informations classifiées.

Dès lors se pose la question de savoir comment l’ex-directeur du FBI a pu violer son habilitation secret-défense et faire figurer des secrets d’État dans des notes personnelles, ou si ces notes sont des documents officiels qu’il aurait volés.

Comey’s private memos on Trump conversations contained classified material”, John Solomon, The Hill, July 9, 2017.

Voir encore:

En s’arrogeant le titre de « 4ème Pouvoir », la presse états-unienne s’est placée à égalité avec les trois Pouvoirs démocratiques, bien qu’elle soit dénuée de légitimité populaire. Elle mène une vaste campagne, à la fois chez elle et à l’étranger, pour dénigrer le président Trump et provoquer sa destitution ; une campagne qui a débuté le soir de son élection, c’est-à-dire bien avant son arrivée à la Maison-Blanche. Elle remporte un vif succès parmi l’électorat démocrate et dans les États alliés, dont la population est persuadée que le président des États-Unis est dérangé. Mais les électeurs de Donald Trump tiennent bon et il parvient efficacement à lutter contre la pauvreté.

Damas (Syrie)

4 juillet 2017

+
JPEG - 30.7 ko

La campagne de presse internationale visant à déstabiliser le président Trump se poursuit. La machine à médire, mise en place par David Brock durant la période de transition [1], souligne autant qu’elle le peut le caractère emporté et souvent grossier des Tweets présidentiels. L’Entente des médias, mise en place par la mystérieuse ONG First Draft [2], répète à l’envie que la Justice enquête sur les liens entre l’équipe de campagne du président et les sombres complots attribués au Kremlin.

Une étude du professeur Thomas E. Patterson de l’Harvard Kennedy School a montré que la presse US, britannique et allemande, a cité trois fois plus Donald Trump que les présidents précédents. Et que, au cours des 100 premiers jours de sa présidence, 80% des articles lui étaient clairement défavorables [3].

Durant la campagne du FBI [4] visant à contraindre le président Nixon à la démission, la presse états-unienne s’était attribuée le qualificatif de « 4ème Pouvoir », signifiant par là que leurs propriétaires avaient plus de légitimité que le Peuple. Loin de céder à la pression, Donald Trump, conscient du danger que représente l’alliance des médias et des 98% de hauts fonctionnaires qui ont voté contre lui, déclara « la guerre à la presse », lors de son discours du 22 janvier 2017, une semaine après son intronisation. Tandis que son conseiller spécial, Steve Bannon, déclarait au New York Times que, de fait, la presse était devenue « le nouveau parti d’opposition ».

Quoi qu’il en soit, les électeurs du président ne lui ont pas retiré leur confiance.

Rappelons ici comment cette affaire a débuté. C’était durant la période de transition, c’est-à-dire avant l’investiture de Donald Trump. Une ONG, Propaganda or Not ?, lança l’idée que la Russie avait imaginé des canulars durant la campagne présidentielle de manière à couler Hillary Clinton et à faire élire Donald Trump. À l’époque, nous avions souligné les liens de cette mystérieuse ONG avec Madeleine Albright et Zbigniew Brzeziński [5]. L’accusation, longuement reprise par le Washington Post, dénonçait une liste d’agents du Kremlin, dont le Réseau Voltaire. Cependant à ce jour, rien, absolument rien, n’est venu étayer cette thèse du complot russe.

Chacun a pu constater que les arguments utilisés contre Donald Trump ne sont pas uniquement ceux que l’on manie habituellement dans le combat politique, mais qu’ils ressortent clairement de la propagande de guerre [6].

La palme de la mauvaise foi revient à CNN qui traite cette affaire de manière obsessionnelle. La chaîne a été contrainte de présenter ses excuses à la suite d’un reportage accusant un des proches de Trump, le banquier Anthony Scaramucci, d’être indirectement payé par Moscou. Cette imputation étant inventée et Scaramucci étant suffisamment riche pour poursuivre la chaîne en justice, CNN présenta ses excuses et les trois journalistes de sa cellule d’enquête « démissionnèrent ».
Puis, le Project Veritas du journaliste James O’Keefe publia trois séquences vidéos tournées en caméra cachée [7]. Dans la première, l’on voit un superviseur de la chaîne rire dans un ascenseur en déclarant que ces accusations de collusion du président avec la Russie ne sont que « des conneries » diffusées « pour l’audience ». Dans la seconde, un présentateur vedette et ancien conseiller d’Obama affirme que ce sont des « nullités ». Tandis que dans la troisième, un producteur déclare que Donald Trump est un malade mental et que ses électeurs sont « stupides comme de la merde » (sic).
En réponse, le président posta une vidéo-montage réalisée à partir d’images, non pas extraites d’un western, mais datant de ses responsabilités à la Fédération états-unienne de catch, la WWE. On peut le voir mimer casser la figure de son ami Vince McMahon (l’époux de sa Secrétaire aux petites entreprises) dont le visage a été recouvert du logo de CNN. Le tout se termine avec un logo altéré de CNN en Fraud News Network, c’est-à-dire le Réseau escroc d’information.

Outre que cet événement montre qu’aux États-Unis le président n’a pas l’exclusivité de la grossièreté, il atteste que CNN —qui a abordé la question de l’ingérence russe plus de 1 500 fois en deux mois— ne fait pas de journalisme et se moque de la vérité. On le savait depuis longtemps pour ses sujets de politique internationale, on le découvre pour ceux de politique intérieure.

Bien que ce soit beaucoup moins significatif, une nouvelle polémique oppose les présentateurs de l’émission matinale de MSNBC, Morning Joe, au président. Ceux-ci le critiquent vertement depuis des mois. Il se trouve que Joe Scarborough est un ancien avocat et parlementaire de Floride qui lutte contre le droit à l’avortement et pour la dissolution des ministères « inutiles » que sont ceux du Commerce, de l’Éducation, de l’Énergie et du Logement. Au contraire, sa partenaire (au sens propre et figuré) Mika Brzeziński est une simple lectrice de prompteur qui soutenait Bernie Sanders. Dans un Tweet, le président les a insulté en parlant de « Joe le psychopathe » et de « Mika au petit quotient intellectuel ». Personne ne doute que ces qualificatifs ne sont pas loin de la vérité, mais les formuler de cette manière vise uniquement à blesser l’amour-propre des journalistes. Quoi qu’il en soit, les deux présentateurs rédigèrent une tribune libre dans le Washington Post pour mettre en doute la santé mentale du président.

Mika Brzeziński est la fille de Zbigniew Brzeziński, un des tireurs de ficelles de Propaganda or not ?, décédé il y a un mois.

La grossièreté des Tweets présidentiels n’a rien à voir avec de la folie. Dwight Eisenhower et surtout Richard Nixon étaient bien plus obscènes que lui, ils n’en furent pas moins de grands présidents.

De même leur caractère impulsif ne signifie pas que le président le soit. En réalité, sur chaque sujet, Donald Trump réagit immédiatement par des Tweets agressifs. Puis, il lance des idées dans tous les sens, n’hésitant pas à se contredire d’une déclaration à l’autre, et observe attentivement les réactions qu’elles suscitent. Enfin, s’étant forgé une opinion personnelle, il rencontre la partie opposée et trouve généralement un accord avec elle.

Donald Trump n’a certes pas la bonne éducation puritaine de Barack Obama ou d’Hillary Clinton, mais la rudesse du Nouveau Monde. Tout au long de sa campagne électorale, il n’a cessé de se présenter comme le nettoyeur des innombrables malhonnêtetés que cette bonne éducation permet de masquer à Washington. Il se trouve que c’est lui et non pas Madame Clinton que les États-uniens ont porté à la Maison-Blanche.

Bien sûr, on peut prendre au sérieux les déclarations polémiques du président, en trouver une choquante et ignorer celles qui disent le contraire. On ne doit pas confondre le style Trump avec sa politique. On doit au contraire examiner précisément ses décisions et leurs conséquences.

Par exemple, on a pris son décret visant à ne pas laisser entrer aux États-Unis des étrangers dont le secrétariat d’État n’a pas la possibilité de vérifier l’identité.

On a observé que la population des sept pays dont il limitait l’accès des ressortissants aux États-Unis est majoritairement musulmane. On a relié ce constat avec des déclarations du président lors de sa campagne électorale. Enfin, on a construit le mythe d’un Trump raciste. On a mis en scène des procès pour faire annuler le « décret islamophobe », jusqu’à ce que la Cour suprême confirme sa légalité. On a alors tourné la page en affirmant que la Cour s’était prononcée sur une seconde mouture du décret comportant divers assouplissements. C’est exact, sauf que ces assouplissement figuraient déjà dans la première mouture sous une autre rédaction.

Arrivant à la Maison-Blanche, Donald Trump n’a pas privé les États-uniens de leur assurance santé, ni déclaré la Troisième Guerre mondiale. Au contraire, il a ouvert de nombreux secteurs économiques qui avaient été étouffés au bénéfice de multinationales. En outre, on assiste à un reflux des groupes terroristes en Irak, en Syrie et au Liban, et à une baisse palpable de la tension dans l’ensemble du Moyen-Orient élargi, sauf au Yémen.

Jusqu’où ira cet affrontement entre la Maison-Blanche et les médias, entre Donald Trump et certaines puissances d’argent ?

[1] « Le dispositif Clinton pour discréditer Donald Trump », par Thierry Meyssan, Al-Watan (Syrie) , Réseau Voltaire, 28 février 2017.

[2] « Le nouvel Ordre Médiatique Mondial », par Thierry Meyssan, Réseau Voltaire, 7 mars 2017.

[3] « News Coverage of Donald Trump’s First 100 Days », Thomas E. Patterson, Harvard Kennedy School, May 18, 2017.

[4] On apprit trente ans plus tard que la mystérieuse « Gorge profonde » qui alimenta le scandale du Watergate n’était autre que W. Mark Felt, l’ancien adjoint de J. Edgard Hoover et lui-même numéro 2 du Bureau fédéral.

[5] « La campagne de l’Otan contre la liberté d’expression », par Thierry Meyssan, Réseau Voltaire, 5 décembre 2016.

[6] « Contre Donald Trump : la propagande de guerre », par Thierry Meyssan, Réseau Voltaire, 7 février 2017.

[7] « Project Veritas dévoile une campagne de mensonges de CNN », Réseau Voltaire, 1er juillet 2017.

Voir enfin:

The Definitive History Of That Time Donald Trump Took A Stone Cold Stunner

A decade ago, Trump literally tussled with a wrestling champ. The people who were there are still shocked he did it.

Photo illustration: Damon Dahlen/HuffPost; Photos: Getty/Reuters

Stone Cold Steve Austin was waiting calmly in the bowels of Detroit’s Ford Field when a frantic Vince McMahon turned the corner.

WrestleMania 23’s signature event was just minutes away. Austin and McMahon would soon bound into the stadium, where they’d be greeted by fireworks, their respective theme songs and 80,000 people pumped for “The Battle of the Billionaires,” a match between two wrestlers fighting on behalf of McMahon and real estate mogul Donald Trump.

McMahon, the founder and most prominent face of World Wrestling Entertainment, had spent months before the April 1, 2007, event putting the storyline in place. Trump, then known primarily as the bombastic host of “The Apprentice,” had appeared on a handful of WWE broadcasts to sell the idea that his two-decade friendship with McMahon had collapsed into a bitter “feud.” They had spent hours rehearsing a match with many moving parts: two professional wrestlers in the ring, two camera-thirsty characters outside it, and in the middle, former champ Stone Cold serving as the referee.

The selling point of The Battle of the Billionaires was the wager that Trump and McMahon had placed on its outcome a month earlier during “Monday Night Raw,” WWE’s signature prime time show. Both Trump and McMahon took great pride in their precious coifs, and so the winner of the match, they decided, would shave the loser’s head bald right there in the middle of the ring.

But now, at the last possible moment, McMahon wanted to add another wrinkle.

“Hey, Steve,” McMahon said, just out of Trump’s earshot. “I’m gonna see if I can get Donald to take the Stone Cold stunner.”

Austin’s signature move, a headlock takedown fueled by Stone Cold’s habit of chugging cheap American beer in the ring, was already part of the plan for the match. But Trump wasn’t the intended target.

Austin and McMahon approached Trump and pitched the idea.

“I briefly explained how the stunner works,” Austin said. “I’m gonna kick him in the stomach ― not very hard ― then I’m gonna put his head on my shoulder, and we’re gonna drop down. That’s the move. No rehearsal, [decided] right in the dressing room, 15 minutes before we’re gonna go out in front of 80,000 people.”

Trump’s handler was appalled, Austin said. Trump wasn’t a performer or even a natural athlete. Now, the baddest dude in wrestling, a former Division I college football defensive end with tree trunks for biceps, wanted to drop him with his signature move? With no time to even rehearse it? That seemed … dangerous.

“He tried to talk Donald out of it a million ways,” Austin said.

But Trump, without hesitation, agreed to do it.

The man who became the 45th president of the United States in January has a history with Vince McMahon and WWE that dates back more than two decades, to when his Trump Plaza hotel in Atlantic City hosted WrestleManias IV and V in 1988 and 1989. The relationship has continued into Trump’s presidency. On Tuesday, the Senate confirmed the nomination of Linda McMahon ― Vince’s wife, who helped co-found WWE and served as its president and chief executive for 12 years ― to head the Small Business Administration.

After Trump launched his presidential campaign with an escalator entrance straight out of the wrestling playbook, journalists began pointing to his two-decade WWE career to help explain his political appeal. WWE, in one telling, was where Trump first discovered populism. According to another theory, wrestling was where he learned to be a heel ― a villainous performer loved by just enough people to rise to the top, despite antics that make many people hate him.

To those who were present, though, The Battle of the Billionaires is more an outrageous moment in wrestling history than an explanation of anything that happened next. No one in the ring that night thought Trump would one day be president. But now that he is, they look back and laugh about the time the future commander-in-chief ended up on the wrong side of a Stone Cold stunner.

Jamie McCarthy/WireImage via Getty Images
Donald Trump, Stone Cold Steve Austin and Vince McMahon spent months promoting The Battle of the Billionaires.

‘To Get To The Crescendo, You’ve Got To Go On A Journey’

Professional wrestling is, at its core, a soap opera and a reality TV spectacle, and its best storylines follow the contours of both: A hero squares off with a heel as the masses hang on their fates.

The Battle of the Billionaires was the same tale, played out on wrestling’s biggest stage. WrestleMania is WWE’s annual mega-event. It commands the company’s largest pay-per-view audiences and biggest crowds. At WrestleMania, WWE’s stars compete in high-stakes matches ― including the WWE Championship ― and wrap up loose ends on stories developed during weekly broadcasts of “Monday Night Raw” and special events over the previous year. Even before Trump, WrestleMania had played host to a number of celebrity interlopers, including boxer Mike Tyson and NFL linebacker Lawrence Taylor.

Building a story ― and, for Trump, a character ― fit for that stage required months of work that started with Trump’s initial appearance on “Monday Night Raw” in January 2007. He would show up on “Raw” at least two more times over the next two months, with each appearance raising the stakes of his feud with McMahon and setting up their battle at WrestleMania on April 1.

“The Battle of the Billionaires, and all the hyperbole, was the crescendo,” said Jim Ross, the longtime voice of WWE television commentary. “But to get to the crescendo, you’ve got to go on a journey and tell an episodic story. That’s what we did with Donald.”

Creating a feud between Trump and McMahon, and getting wrestling fans to take Trump’s side, wasn’t actually a huge challenge. McMahon “was the big-shot boss lording over everybody,” said Jerry “The King” Lawler, a former wrestler and Ross’ sidekick in commentary. It was a role McMahon had long embraced: He was the dictator wrestling fans loved to hate.

Leon Halip/WireImage via Getty Images
Bobby Lashley, Trump’s wrestler in the match, was a rising star who’d go on to challenge for the WWE championship after The Battle of the Billionaires.

Trump was never going to pull off the sort of character that McMahon’s most popular foes had developed. He wasn’t Austin’s beer-chugging, south Texas everyman. And vain and cocky as he might be, he never possessed the sexy swagger that made Shawn Michaels one of the greatest in-ring performers in pro wrestling history.

But rain money on people’s heads, and they’ll probably love you no matter who you are. So that’s what Trump did.

Trump’s first appearance on “Monday Night Raw” came during an episode that centered on McMahon, who was throwing himself the sort of self-celebratory event that even The Donald might find overly brash. As McMahon showered the crowd with insults and they serenaded him with boos, Trump’s face appeared on the jumbotron and money began to fall from the sky.

“Look up at the ceiling, Vince,” Trump said as fans grasped at the falling cash. “Now that’s the way you show appreciation. Learn from it.”

In true Trump fashion, the money wasn’t actually his. It was McMahon’s. But the fans didn’t know that.

The folks with slightly fatter wallets than they’d had moments before loved the contrast between the two rich guys. One was the pompous tyrant. The other might have been even wealthier and just as prone to outlandish behavior, but Trump was positioned as the magnanimous billionaire, the one who understood what they wanted.

“That went over pretty well, as you can imagine, dropping money from the sky,” said Scott Beekman, a wrestling historian and author. “Trump was the good guy, and he got over because of how hated McMahon was. Vince McMahon played a fantastic evil boss and was absolutely hated by everyone. So anyone who stood up to McMahon at that point was going to get over well.”

The wrestlers that each billionaire chose to fight for them also bolstered the narrative. Umaga, McMahon’s representative, was an emerging heel who had gone undefeated for most of 2006. “A 400-pound carnivore,” as Ross described him on TV, he was a mountainous Samoan whose face bore war paint and who barely spoke except to scream at the crowd.

Trump’s guy, on the other hand, was Bobby Lashley, a former Army sergeant who might have been cut straight from a granite slab. Lashley was the good-looking, classically trained college wrestler, the reigning champion of ECW (a lower-level WWE property). Even his cue-ball head seemed to have muscles.

Another selling point for the match: the wrestler who won would likely emerge as a top contender to challenge for the WWE title.

Then McMahon added another twist ― as if the match needed it. He enlisted Austin, a multi-time champion who had retired in 2003, as a guest referee.

“It sounded like an easy gig, sounded like a fun gig,” Austin said. “It didn’t take a whole lot of convincing. The scope of Donald Trump … would bring a lot of eyeballs. A chance to do business with a high-profile guy like that sounded like a real fun deal.”

The minute Austin signed up, Trump should have known that despite his “good guy” posture, he, too, was in trouble. When Stone Cold entered the ring at “Raw” to promote the match, he introduced himself to The Donald with a stern warning.

“You piss me off,” Austin said, “I’ll open up an $8 billion can of whoop ass and serve it to ya, and that’s all I got to say about that.”

‘We Thought We Were Shittin’ The Bed’

The opening lines of the O’Jays’ 1973 hit “For the Love of Money” ― also the theme song for Trump’s “Celebrity Apprentice” ― rang out of Ford Field’s loudspeakers a few minutes after Trump and Austin’s impromptu meeting backstage. It was time for Trump to make his way to the ring.

“Money, money, money, money, money,” the speakers blared. Trump emerged. The crowd erupted, and cash, even more than had fallen during his previous appearances, cascaded from the ceiling like victory confetti.

“There was a ton of money that had been dropped during Donald Trump’s entrance,” said Haz Ali, who, under the name Armando Estrada, served as Umaga’s handler. “There was about $20, $25,000 that they’d dropped. … Every denomination ― 1s, 5s, 10s, 20s.”

Lashley appeared next, bounding into the ring without the help of the stairs the others had needed.

For months, McMahon and Trump had sold the story of this match. Now, as Umaga and Lashley stood face to face in the ring, it was time to deliver.

The match started fairly routinely, perhaps even a bit slowly.

“I’m seeing it the same as anyone else who’s watching it,” said Ross, the commentator, who regularly skipped rehearsals to ensure matches would surprise him. “The entire arena was emotionally invested in the storyline. Once they got hooked in it months earlier, now they want the payout.”

On the TV broadcast, it’s obvious that the crowd was hanging on every twist, eager to see which of the two billionaires would lose his hair and how Austin ― famous for intervening in matches and now at the dead center of this one ― might shape it.

But Ford Field, an NFL stadium, is massive compared to the arenas that had hosted previous WrestleManias. Even with 80,000 people packed in, it was difficult to read the crowd from inside the ring.

“Me and Vince keep looking back and forth at each other like, ‘Man, this match is not successful because the crowd is not reacting,’” Austin recalled. “We thought we were shittin’ the bed.”

Trump, for all his usual braggadocio, wasn’t helping.

From outside the ring, McMahon ― a professional performer if there ever was one ― was selling even the most minor details of the match. He was haranguing Austin, instructing Umaga and engaging the crowd all at once. Trump was stiff. His repeated cries of “Kick his ass, Bobby!” and “Come on, Bobby!” came across as stale and unconvincing.

“It’s very robotic, it’s very forced, and there’s no genuine emotion behind it,” said Ali, who had been power-slammed by Lashley early in the match and was watching from the dressing room. “He was just doing it to do it. Hearing him say, ‘Come on, Bobby!’ over and over again ― it didn’t seem like he cared whether Bobby won or lost. That’s the perspective of a former wrestler and entertainer.”

‘He Punched Me As Hard As He Could’

The match turned when Vince’s son, Shane McMahon, entered the fray. Shane and Umaga ganged up on Austin, knocking the guest ref from the ring. Then they turned their attention to Lashley, slamming his head with a metal trash can as he lay on the ground opposite Trump ― whose golden mane, it seemed, might soon be lying on the floor next to his wrestler.

But just as Umaga prepared to finish Lashley off, Austin rebounded, dragging Shane McMahon from the ring and slamming him into a set of metal stairs. Trump ― who moments before had offered only a wooden “What’s going on here?” ― sprang into action.

Out of nowhere, Trump clotheslined Vince McMahon to the ground and then sat on top of him, wailing away at his skull.

“[Ross] and I were sitting right there about four feet from where Vince landed,” Lawler said. “The back of Vince’s head hit the corner of the ring so hard that I thought he was gonna be knocked out for a week.”

Professional wrestling is fake. Trump’s punches weren’t.

Hours before the match, WWE officials had roped the participants into one final walk-through. Vince McMahon was busy handling the production preparations and didn’t attend. So when it came time to rehearse Trump’s attack on WWE’s top man, Ali stood in for McMahon.

Ali gave Trump instructions on how to hit him on the head to avoid actual injury. Because it was just a rehearsal, he figured Trump would go easy. He figured wrong.

“He proceeds to punch me in the top of the head as if he was hammering a nail in the wall. He punched me as hard as he could,” Ali said. “His knuckle caught me on the top of my head, and the next thing I know, I’ve got an egg-sized welt on the top of my head. He hit me as hard as he could, one, two, three. I was like, ‘Holy shit, this guy.’”

“He actually hit Vince, too,” Ali said. “Which made it even funnier. That’s how Vince would want it.”

Back in the ring, Austin ducked under a punch from Umaga and then made him the match’s first victim of a Stone Cold stunner. Umaga stumbled toward the center of the ring, where Lashley floored him with a move called a running spear. Lashley pinned Umaga, Austin counted him out, Trump declared victory, and McMahon began to cry as he ran his fingers through hair that would soon be gone.

“I don’t think Donald’s hair was ever truly in jeopardy,” Lawler said.

Bill Pugliano/Getty Images
Even as he was shaving McMahon’s head, Trump knew that he’d soon join the list of the match’s losers.

‘It May Be One Of The Uglier Stone Cold Stunners In History’

Moments after the match ended, before he raised Trump and Lashley’s arms in victory, Austin handed out his second stunner of the night to Shane McMahon. Vince McMahon tried to escape the same fate. But Lashley chased him down, threw him over his shoulder and hauled McMahon back to the ring, where he, too, faced the stunner.

Trump’s reaction in this moment was a little disappointing. He offered only the most rigid of celebrations, his feet nailed to the floor as his knees flexed and his arms flailed in excitement. It’s as if he knew his joy would be short-lived. He, too, would end up the one thing he never wants to be: a loser.

“Woo!” Trump yelled, before clapping in McMahon’s face while Austin and Lashley strapped their boss into a barber’s chair. “How ya doin’, man, how ya doin’?” he asked, taunting McMahon with a pair of clippers. Then he and Lashley shaved the WWE chairman bald.

As a suitably humiliated McMahon left the ring, Austin launched his typical celebration, raising his outstretched hands in a call for beers that someone ringside was supposed to toss his way. Trump is a famous teetotaler, but Austin shoved a beer can into his hand anyway.

“I didn’t know that Donald Trump didn’t drink,” Austin said. “I didn’t know that back then.”

It didn’t matter. For veteran wrestling fans, the beers were a sign that Stone Cold had a final treat to deliver.

“I threw beer to everybody I got in the ring with,” he said. “Here’s the bait, and it’s the hook as well. Long as I get him holding those beers, everybody knows that anybody who … takes one of my beers is gonna get stunned.”

As McMahon trudged away, Austin climbed to the top rope, saluted the crowd and dumped the full contents of a can into his mouth. Then he hopped down ― and blew the roof off Ford Field.

He turned, kicked Trump in the stomach and stunned him to the floor.

“Austin stunned The Donald!” Ross screamed.

Trump failed to fully execute the move. He didn’t quite get his chin all the way to Austin’s shoulder; then he halfway pulled out of the move before falling to his knees and lying flat on his back.

“It may be one of the uglier Stone Cold stunners in history,” Ross said.

“He’s not a natural-born athlete,” Austin said. “I just remember the stunner didn’t come off as smooth as it would have had he been one of the guys. But we never rehearsed it. He didn’t even know what it was. Vince botched half the ones I gave him [and] Vince is a great athlete. So that’s no knock on Donald Trump.”

And despite Trump’s less-than-stellar wrestling and acting in the ring, those who were close to the action at WrestleMania 23 were impressed by his willingness to even take the stunner.

“We put him in some very unique positions that a lot of people ― big-name actors in Hollywood ― wouldn’t do because they didn’t want to risk looking bad,” Ross said. “He had the balls to do it.”

George Napolitano/FilmMagic via Getty Images
Trump didn’t sell the Stone Cold stunner all that well, but at least, commentator Jim Ross said, “he had the balls to do it.”

‘You Could Argue That Nothing In Wrestling Has Any Meaning’

For almost a decade, the stunning of Donald Trump remained a relic of WWE lore, a moment rehashed occasionally by diehard wrestling fans but forgotten otherwise.

WWE’s ratings tumbled later in 2007, amid congressional scrutiny of steroid use and wrestler deaths. That June, wrestler Chris Benoit murdered his wife and son and then killed himself. He was 40 years old.

Edward Smith Fatu, the wrestler known as Umaga, died from a heart attack in 2009. He was 36.

Lashley, who did not respond to interview requests, left WWE in 2008 after a failed pursuit of the WWE title and an injury that sidelined him for months. He is now a mixed martial arts fighter and the champion of Total Nonstop Action Wrestling.

In 2009, Trump returned to “Monday Night Raw” with a proposal to buy it from McMahon, promising fans that he would run the first Trump-owned episode without commercials. WWE and the USA Network, which broadcast “Raw,” even sent out a press release announcing the sale. When WWE’s stock price plummeted, it was forced to admit that the whole thing was a publicity ploy. The faux sale raised questions about whether everyone involved had violated federal law, but the Securities and Exchange Commission apparently had better things to investigate.

Trump was inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame in 2013, over a chorus of boos from the fans at Madison Square Garden. The Battle of the Billionaires was, at the time, WWE’s highest-grossing pay-per-view broadcast, drawing 1.2 million pay-per-view buys and $24.3 million in global revenue, according to WWE’s estimates. It’s also the most notorious of Trump’s interactions with the company. But that’s about all the significance it really holds.

“You could argue that nothing in wrestling has any meaning,” said Beekman, the historian. The feud between Trump and McMahon “was an angle, and it was a successful angle, and then they moved on to the next one.”

Vince and Linda McMahon together donated $7.5 million to super PACs that backed Trump’s winning presidential campaign. Linda McMahon had earlier spent nearly $100 million on two failed efforts, in 2010 and 2012, to get herself elected to the U.S. Senate. In December, Trump nominated her to head the Small Business Administration, a Cabinet-level job potentially at odds with the methods she and her husband had used to build WWE into a wrestling empire ― but one to which she was easily confirmed. (Neither the McMahons nor the president chose to comment on the president’s WWE career.)

Linda McMahon once took a Stone Cold stunner, too, so Steve Austin is responsible for stunning at least two top Trump administration officials. But he has doled out thousands of those in his career, and until he was reminded, he didn’t even remember what year he had laid Trump out.

“I’ve stunned a couple members of the Cabinet,” Austin said. “But I don’t think about it like that. It was so long ago. I don’t know Donald Trump. We did business together, we shook hands, and I appreciated him taking that. But I don’t sit here in my house, rubbing my hands together thinking, ‘Aw, man, I was the only guy that ever stunned a United States president.’”

“Yeah, it’s pretty cool,” Stone Cold said. “But it was part of what I did. To me, hey, man, it’s just another day at the office.”


Affaire Fillon: On l’a bien niqué (As corruption allegations spread to another member of Macron’s team, shady suit donor and Sarkozy close friend confirms how he delivered the final blow to Fillon with the help of the media)

28 juin, 2017
https://s1-ssl.dmcdn.net/MmRw/320x240-cbP.jpg
Presque aucun des fidèles ne se retenait de s’esclaffer, et ils avaient l’air d’une bande d’anthropophages chez qui une blessure faite à un blanc a réveillé le goût du sang. Car l’instinct d’imitation et l’absence de courage gouvernent les sociétés comme les foules. Et tout le monde rit de quelqu’un dont on voit se moquer, quitte à le vénérer dix ans plus tard dans un cercle où il est admiré. C’est de la même façon que le peuple chasse ou acclame les rois. Marcel Proust
Au fond, je n’ai jamais cru en Fillon. (…) C’est Sarko que j’aime. C’est un bandit mais je l’aime. Il est comme moi : un affectif, un métèque. D’ailleurs, je ne l’ai jamais trahi, je lui racontais tout de mes discussions avec Fillon. (…) J’ai appuyé sur la gâchette. (…) À la fin, il m’a dit “T’as vu Robert : On l’a bien niqué.”  Robert Bourgi
Ce n’est qu’au prix de beaucoup d’hypocrisie que l’on se voile la face sur la collusion entre certains juges et les médias. Les premiers livrent aux seconds des informations couvertes par le secret professionnel, ils reçoivent en contrepartie un soutien tactique de leur action par une promotion médiatique compréhensive de leur démarche. Il ne s’agit rien de moins que d’une instrumentalisation réciproque avec les dangers que cela comporte, chacun pouvant finalement être dupe de l’autre, et le citoyen des deux. Jean-Claude Magendie
L’habit ne fait pas le moine. Que @francoisfillon soit transparent sur ses frais, ses collaborateurs et Force Républicaine ! Rachida Dati (09.07.2014)
Si Fillon donne sa circo à NKM, ce sera la guerre, et, faites gaffe, j’ai des munitions, je vais lui pourrir sa campagne. Rachida Dati (18.01.2017)
Ceux qui ne respectent pas les lois de la République ne devraient pas pouvoir se présenter devant les électeurs. Il ne sert à rien de parler d’autorité quand on n’est pas soi-même irréprochable. Qui imagine le général de Gaulle mis en examen ? François Fillon (28.08.2016)
De nous, les Français attendent transparence et intégrité : pour rétablir ordre et confiance, l’exemple doit venir d’en haut. François Fillon (18.09.2016)
Lorsque j’ai été élue au Parlement européen en 2009, le MoDem avait exigé de moi qu’un de mes assistants parlementaires travaille au siège parisien. J’ai refusé en indiquant que cela me paraissait d’une part contraire aux règles européennes, et d’autre part illégal. Le MoDem n’a pas osé insister mais mes collègues ont été contraints de satisfaire à cette exigence. Corinne Lepage (2004)
Est-il normal qu’un parlementaire embauche un membre de sa famille ? C’est parfaitement légal en France, parfaitement illégal au niveau européen et c’est du reste la raison pour laquelle Marine Le Pen a rencontré des difficultés pour l’emploi de son compagnon Monsieur Alliot. C’est légal, est-ce éthique ? Le sujet dépasse bien évidemment François Fillon puisqu’il concernerait le cinquième des membres du Parlement. Pour autant, il semble bien que les Français n’acceptent plus cette forme de népotisme. Mais il est évident que François Fillon n’est pas dans un cas particulier même s’il était quelque peu choquant de l’entendre dire que le parlementaire faisait ce qu’il voulait de l’enveloppe qui lui était remise dans la mesure où il s’agit quand même de fonds publics. Il n’est probablement pas contestable que Pénélope Fillon ait soutenu son mari dans sa carrière politique. Pour autant, était-ce un travail d’attaché parlementaire et ce travail a-t-il été différent lorsque elle était rémunérée et lorsqu’elle ne l’était pas. Deux autres questions se posent : quel type de travail a-t-il été fait durant la période où Madame Fillon a été employée par le suppléant de son mari ; quel a été le travail fait pour la revue des deux mondes en dehors des deux notes de lecture dont il a été fait état. C’est à toutes ces questions qu’il faudra répondre très rapidement pour évacuer ou non la question juridique. Il n’en reste pas moins que les affirmations de Madame Fillon elle-même, les contradictions entre les déclarations de François Fillon et celles de ses soutiens dont Bernard Accoyer sur la présence de Madame Fillon au Parlement, les pressions qui auraient été exercées sur Christine Kelly qui doit être entendue aujourd’hui par les enquêteurs laissent une impression désagréable. Au-delà, c’est tout un mode de fonctionnement du monde politique qui est interpellé. Corinne Lepage (27.01.2017)
Je vois les incroyables conséquences de toutes ces affaires. La première, c’est que, évidemment, lorsque vous vous présentez avec un programme très dur devant les gens, en leur demandant des sacrifices et des efforts et qu’il se découvre que pour vous-même, vous n’avez pas les mêmes règles, les mêmes disciplines ou les mêmes exigences, ça rend extrêmement difficile ce programme. Ça, c’est la première chose. (…) Et puis, deuxième chose, il y a une idée que je combattrai sans cesse avec indignation, cette idée qu’on essaie de faire passer, c’est que tout le monde fait la même chose. Et je veux dire que ce n’est pas vrai ! Je veux dire qu’il y a en France des élus qui respectent les règles, des gens qui trouvent normal d’avoir la discipline élémentaire d’être simplement dans une démarche de bonne foi, et je trouve scandaleux et même infâme qu’on essaie de faire croire que tout le monde ferait la même chose. François Bayrou (26.02.2017)
J’ai accompagné François Fillon au Trocadéro car je pensais qu’il abandonnait. François Baroin
François pensait que c’était un bon moyen d’accompagner Fillon vers la sortie. Il estimait que plus on taperait sur Fillon, plus on le braquerait, c’est pour ça qu’il était là au Trocadéro ! Proche de François Baroin
En dépit d’une présentation arrangée et orientée à dessein, il n’est fait état de strictement aucune forme d’illégalité dans cet article. Par conséquent, il n’y a rien à commenter. Seule la loi doit primer, l’État de droit, rien que l’État de droit, pas un pseudo ordre moral. Proche de Richard Ferrand
Muriel Penicaud n’a pas contesté l’irrégularité (…) Maintenant il y a une enquête. Cette enquête doit permettre d’y voir clair. Je vous invite à attendre les résultats de l’enquête avant de montrer du doigt tel ou tel qui serait en responsabilité.  Et je vous invite même à ne pas chercher à affaiblir tel ou tel (…) parce que vous avez raison, nous sommes dans un moment important pour la ministre du Travail. Christophe Castaner (porte-parole du gouvernement Philippe)
Garrido et Corbière vivent-ils indûment dans un HLM ? Les accusations portées à l’encontre du couple sont inexactes mais la défense de Raquel Garrido l’est également. Car de fait, ils vivent bien dans un HLM, depuis peu, même si ce n’était pas le cas au départ. (…) Le nouvel appartement, dans l’extrême est parisien, est un F4 d’un peu plus de 80 mètres carrés dans lequel le couple vit désormais avec trois enfants. Lors de l’emménagement en 2003, l’appartement est un logement «à loyer libre». Au début des années 2000, le parc immobilier des bailleurs sociaux parisiens compte environ 50 000 de ces logements particuliers. Pour y entrer, aucun plafond de ressource, ni de plafonnement des loyers similaire aux seuils en vigueur pour les HLM. Du coup, ces appartements sont en dessous des prix du marché, mais au-dessus des loyers HLM. Actuellement, le couple paye 1 230 euros (955 hors charges) pour 84 mètres carrés. En décembre 2007, Jean-Paul Bolufer, le directeur de cabinet de Christine Boutin (alors ministre du Logement), est épinglé pour son appartement, dans le Ve arrondissement de Paris, de 190 mètres carrés pour 1 200 euros par mois, soit à peine 6,30 euros du mètre carré. Il s’agit évidemment… d’un logement à loyer libre, loué par la même RIVP. Plusieurs élus sont dans la même situation. La municipalité socialiste de Paris demande alors aux ministres et parlementaires concernés de rendre leurs logements sociaux et annonce sa volonté de «reconventionner» ces logements, c’est-à-dire de les reverser au parc HLM. L’objectif : «créer» du logement social à moindres frais et «moraliser» le parc social. Ce que Raquel Garrido ne précise pas, c’est que l’immeuble où se situe l’appartement du couple fait partie de ceux qui ont été reconventionnés, nous indique une source de la RIVP. Plus précisément, le logement est depuis 2016 un prêt locatif à usage social (PLUS), le plus commun des HLM. Il s’agit de la catégorie intermédiaire, entre les PLAI (prêt locatif aidé d’intégration), correspondant aux logements dits «très sociaux», et les PLS (prêt locatif social), sorte de HLM «de luxe». (…) Ce qui signifie que si le couple de porte-parole n’a pas intégré de logement social en 2003, il vit bien dans un HLM depuis environ un an, contrairement à ce qu’a affirmé Raquel Garrido. (…) le couple jouit aujourd’hui d’un loyer très en deçà des prix du marché, sans pour autant que leur situation n’apparaisse choquante à la RIVP. Celle-ci a en effet la possibilité de faire jouer l’article 17-2 de la loi du 6 juillet 1989 pour augmenter un loyer, si celui-ci est manifestement sous-estimé au regard des prix du marché. C’est l’extrêmité à laquelle la régie est arrivée concernant Jean-Pierre Chevènement : alors sénateur, il occupait un de leurs logements sociaux, un «bel appartement de 120 mètres carrés dans le quartier du Panthéon, pour 1 519 euros mensuels, un loyer qui s’élèverait dans le privé à 3 500 euros», comme nous l’écrivions en 2011. Compte tenu de son patrimoine immobilier par ailleurs important, la RIVP avait fait jouer l’article 17-2 et révisé son loyer à la hausse. Le fait que Garrido et Corbière ne soient pas visés par une telle démarche de la RIVP montre donc que leur situation, pour être avantageuse, n’est en rien comparable à celle de l’ancien maire de Belfort. Libération
C’est compliqué de trouver en deux semaines, mais oui, je vais habiter dans ma circonscription. Est-ce que ça aura lieu dans trois, quatre ou cinq mois, je ne peux pas vous dire. Je ne sais pas si ce sera à Bagnolet ou à Montreuil, je ne sais pas si je vais acheter ou louer, et je je dois aussi négocier avec mes trois enfants… Mais je tiendrai parole. Alexis Corbière
Ce fut une très fructueuse opération pour chacun, une sorte de hold-up républicain dont le gras butin permit de rétribuer généreusement chacun des complices. (…) Ensuite, il ne faut pas perdre de vue que la majorité macronienne, hors abstention, votes blancs et nuls, suffrages d’opposition et désormais votes modémistes est en réalité très faible dans le pays. Le soufflé En marche ne s’est pas pour le moment transformé en meringue solide et ce n’est pas la relation ambiguë qu’entretiennent Macron et son Premier ministre, Philippe, qui facilitera ce travail de densification. (…) Le divorce Macron-Bayrou n’est donc pas la fin d’un marché de dupes mais la manifestation d’une rapide clarification. Le problème est qu’on ne sait pas ce qu’elle clarifie vraiment, le macronisme étant l’expression d’un pouvoir personnel purement opportuniste, prêt à s’adapter sans souci de formes à toutes les circonstances, s’appuyant sur des élus ayant tous trahi leurs formations d’origine. Quand la réalité est volatile, l’extrême souplesse est un atout qui peut tourner à la confusion. Dans cette sarabande, Bayrou, désormais à nouveau dans l’opposition, va pouvoir retrouver son goût inné pour cette dernière. Ivan Rioufol
L’affaire Richard Ferrand, sortie par Le Canard Enchaîné dans son édition du 24 mai, aurait pu être révélée par l’AFP. Des journalistes de l’Agence étaient en effet en possession des informations, mais la rédaction en chef France n’a pas jugé le sujet digne d’intérêt. Qu’un possible scoop sur une affaire politico-financière impliquant le numéro deux du nouveau parti au pouvoir ne soit pas jugé intéressant, voilà qui est troublant. Surtout après les affaires Fillon et Le Roux qui ont émaillé la campagne présidentielle, et alors que le nouveau président Emmanuel Macron affirme vouloir moraliser la vie politique. Généralement, un média met les bouchées doubles pour enquêter sur ce type d’informations quand elles se présentent. Pas à l’AFP, où les courriels de journalistes adressés à la rédaction-en-chef France soit sont restés sans réponse, soit ont reçu une réponse peu encourageante. Faute d’avoir pu donner l’affaire Ferrand en premier, ces mêmes journalistes de l’AFP ont eu la possibilité de sortir un nouveau scoop deux jours après l’article du Canard : le témoignage exclusif de l’avocat qui était au coeur de la vente de l’immeuble litigieux des Mutuelles de Bretagne en 2010-11. Mais avant même qu’une dépêche ait été écrite, la rédaction en chef France a refusé le sujet. C’était pourtant la première fois qu’une source impliquée dans le dossier confirmait les informations du Canard et pointait la possibilité d’une infraction pénale de M. Ferrand. L’AFP se contentera, quelques jours plus tard, de mentionner d’une phrase le témoignage de l’avocat interviewé par Le Parisien. Ce même témoignage qui conduira à l’ouverture d’une enquête par le parquet de Brest…. Ce n’est pas tout : avant l’affaire Ferrand, le 17 mai, juste après la nomination du nouveau gouvernement, une dépêche annonce que François Bayrou, nouveau garde des Sceaux, devra lui-même faire face à des juges, dès le 19 mai, après son renvoi en correctionnelle pour diffamation. Mais la dépêche n’a pas été diffusée, la rédaction en chef France trouvant son intérêt « trop limité ». Deux jours plus tard, l’info sera en bonne place dans les médias nationaux. L’AFP décidera alors de la reprendre ! Interrogée jeudi par les syndicats lors de la réunion mensuelle des délégués du personnel, la direction de l’information de l’AFP s’est montrée incapable de justifier de manière argumentée les choix de sa rédaction en chef. Tout cela fait beaucoup d’infos sensibles étouffées en quelques jours. Pour ceux qui ont travaillé sur le dossier, il y a de quoi être écoeuré et découragé. L’Agence France Presse, l’une des trois grandes agences d’informations mondiales, dont le statut rappelle l’indépendance, a-t-elle peur de diffuser des informations sensibles quand celles-ci risquent de nuire au nouveau pouvoir politique élu ? Le SNJ-CGT appelle la direction et la rédaction en chef de l’AFP à s’expliquer sur le traitement incompréhensible de l’affaire Ferrand. SNJ-CGT AFP
Richard Ferrand est à nouveau visé par des révélations du Canard enchaîné. Contrairement à ce qu’il affirmait quand François Fillon était sous le feu des critiques, le député et nouveau patron de la République en marche à l’Assemblée nationale estime qu’il ne doit pas subir le tempo du tribunal médiatique… Il n’envisage donc aucune démission. L’hebdomadaire satirique évoque pourtant cette semaine les faveurs accordées par l’ancien socialiste à sa compagne, Sandrine Doucen. En 2000, elle est embauchée aux Mutuelles de Bretagne, dont il est alors le patron. Elle devient, à 25 ans et encore étudiante en droit, directrice du personnel. Elle complète aussi ses revenus par un “petit job” au château de Trévarez, un domaine qui appartient au département du Finistère. Il est géré par un comité d’animation, lui-même présidé par le conseiller général… Ferrand. En 2004, elle quitte son emploi aux mutuelles de Bretagne, ayant terminé ses études pour devenir avocat. Elle a, pendant ce laps de temps, touché 80 000 euros. “Financée par les mutualistes et les contribuables locaux”… Valeurs actuelles
Je n’ai pas énoncé que la destitution de Bachar al-Assad était un préalable à tout. Car personne ne m’a présenté son successeur légitime ! Mes lignes sont claires. Un : la lutte absolue contre tous les groupes terroristes. Ce sont eux, nos ennemis. […] Nous avons besoin de la coopération de tous pour les éradiquer, en particulier de la Russie. Deux : la stabilité de la Syrie, car je ne veux pas d’un État failli. L’utilisation d’armes chimiques donnera lieu à des répliques, y compris de la France seule. Emmanuel Macron
Un jour, je parlerai, mais c’est trop tôt. J’ai envie de savoir d’où c’est venu et comment ça s’est passé. François Fillon
François Fillon (…) reste taraudé par cette unique question : qui a déclenché, voire orchestré les affaires qui ont ruiné son image, puis ses chances? Pour lui, c’est certain, quelqu’un « a guidé la main » de ses accusateurs… Dans sa tête tournent et retournent trois hypothèses : « Le pouvoir ; quelqu’un de mon camp ; un autre personnage extérieur à la politique [dont il ne veut pas dire le nom]. (…) Tout a commencé par un tête à tête dans un restaurant parisien. François Fillon et Anne Méaux, dirigeante de l’agence de communication Image 7, dînent au calme pour préparer la primaire. Anne Méaux, qui s’apprête à superviser la com de la campagne, dit avoir « posé la question franchement » : « François, est-ce qu’il y a des choses que je dois savoir? » L’interrogation est abrupte, bien dans le style de cette femme d’affaires coriace et avisée, experte en gestion de crise, toujours l’air mal réveillé et le portable jamais très loin de l’oreille, dont la réputation est de parler cash à ses clients, les grands patrons comme les politiques. Ce qu’elle demande ce soir-là, c’est si François Fillon a des casseroles. Comme un dernier check avant le décollage. Elle n’a pas oublié la réponse : « Sans la moindre hésitation, il m’a dit : ‘Non Anne, il n’y a rien.’ » Avec le recul de la défaite et l’avalanche des révélations qui ont piégé son champion, Anne Méaux reste persuadée qu’il était sincère : « Fillon est quelqu’un d’honnête. » (…) « François a voulu gagner du temps, il misait sur le fait que l’affaire n’allait pas prendre », raconte un membre de l’équipe, persuadé qu’il aurait fallu au contraire s’excuser au plus vite, voire promettre de rembourser pour tenter de tuer l’affaire dans l’œuf… Anne Méaux, en déplacement, assure n’avoir appris les accusations contre Penelope Fillon que ce soir-là. De retour le lendemain, elle va s’investir à fond dans la gestion de crise de la campagne. (…) Elle assure avoir été interloquée en entendant le candidat promettre qu’il renoncerait en cas de mise en examen. « C’était une improvisation totale, dit-elle. En sortant, je lui demandé pourquoi il avait dit cela. Il m’a simplement répondu : ‘Mais Anne, parce que je ne serai jamais mis en examen.’ » À sa décharge, la plupart des avocats discrètement consultés pronostiquaient alors que Fillon était à l’abri de toute poursuite… Au QG aussi, dans le bureau du directeur de campagne, le staff est stupéfait. Seul Stefanini, devant sa télé, trouve l’improvisation géniale. « Plus personne n’osera le mettre en examen maintenant! » prédit-il à chaud. Mais le « Penelopegate » est désormais un feuilleton judiciaire. « C’est vite devenu une campagne impossible », se souvient Thierry Solère. Les sondages plongent. À chaque déplacement, le candidat est attendu par des militants de gauche armés de casseroles. « J’ai vu François avoir peur physiquement », raconte un élu. « On a multiplié des visites sécurisées, se rappelle un membre de l’équipe. En février, l’agenda s’est vidé. » Au fil des semaines, les avocats du couple Fillon, Antonin Lévy et Pierre Cornut-Gentille, comprennent que l’affaire ne sera pas classée. Le 17 février dans Le Figaro, le candidat martèle qu’il ira « jusqu’à la victoire » quoi qu’il arrive, signe qu’il n’exclut plus une mise en examen. Plus qu’un revirement, une volte-face. Le bateau tangue. La campagne s’enfonce. « Il fallait déminer un truc par jour, y compris mille choses fausses, peste Anne Méaux. On m’a appelée pour savoir si j’avais prêté 50.000 euros à Fillon! » Le candidat, lui, semble sur un chemin de croix. « François tenait bon, mais il était anéanti par ce qu’il faisait vivre à sa famille, se remémore la conseillère. Je l’ai vu avoir envie de tout arrêter à plusieurs reprises, pour que leur cauchemar à eux s’arrête. Dans ces moments de doute, il disait : si je lâche, je suis lâche. » D’où l’idée de recaler la stratégie de com : « On a insisté sur son courage, cela pouvait devenir une force. » (…) « Tous les éléments de l’affaire judiciaire étaient sur la table, on s’était expliqué sur tout, martèle Anne Méaux. On allait pouvoir reparler du programme, le plus dur était derrière nous. Mais le dimanche suivant, il y a eu les costumes… » Elle refuse d’entrer dans les détails de cette matinée, où elle fut interrogée sur le chèque de 13.000 euros signé le 20 février par un « ami donateur » pour offrir deux costumes sur mesure à François Fillon. A-t-elle cru, sur le moment, à une nouvelle « fake news »? Probable. Elle appelle aussitôt Fillon qui, contre toute attente, confirme l’épisode et lui révèle le nom du donateur : Robert Bourgi, l’intrigant avocat des réseaux franco-africains. (…) avec la révélation sur les costumes, elle s’est mise à douter à son tour de la suite – même si elle dit avoir cru jusqu’au bout à un miracle dans les urnes. « Son score de 20%, c’est quand même mieux que celui de Chirac en 2002, plaide-t-elle à présent. C’était jouable. » « Aujourd’hui encore, je ne sais pas ce qu’il fallait faire », confie François Fillon. Le perdant de mai a regardé les législatives de juin « de l’extérieur, en spectateur ». Il assure avoir « tourné la page ». Il continue de jongler à l’infini avec ses « trois hypothèses » et espère bien connaître un jour le nom de celui qui, en lançant le « Penelopegate », l’a empêché de devenir président. JDD
Ce fut le coup de grâce, comme le pensent les proches du candidat déchu. « Les costumes nous ont tués », dit sa communicante Anne Méaux quelques jours après le premier tour de l’élection présidentielle. Sans eux, la campagne eut sans doute été différente ; Fillon commençait à surmonter le « Penelopegate » quand, le 11 mars, Le Journal du dimanche a révélé l’existence de ces mystérieux cadeaux à plus de 40 000 euros. « Qui a payé les costumes de François Fillon ? » titrait alors le journal sans révéler l’identité du bienfaiteur. Il a fallu quatre jours à peine pour que Robert Bourgi, 72 ans, « Bob » pour les intimes, entre en scène. Son nom est sorti dans la presse, toujours associé aux mêmes termes – « Françafrique », « porteur de valises », « intermédiaire sulfureux » – tel un secret d’initiés, sans que l’on sache qui est réellement cet homme. Personne n’a cherché à comprendre quels liens réels l’unissent à François Fillon. Comment ce sphinx enrichi sous le soleil des Bongo, ce « bourricot », comme il s’appelle lui-même, roi de la diplomatie parallèle adoubé par Sarkozy, a-t-il pu approcher de si près le candidat de la droite ? (…) Fillon prend le large, Bob se sent méprisé. Alors il dégaine. Et il l’avoue aujourd’hui sans gêne, lové dans son cashmere bleu ciel : « J’ai appuyé sur la gâchette. » Samedi 11 mars 2017, Anne Méaux appelle François Fillon sur son portable. « Est-ce qu’il y a quelqu’un qui t’a offert des costumes ? Un mec un peu bizarre, paraît-il… » Le JDD, sous la plume de Laurent Valdiguié, s’apprête à sortir l’affaire le lendemain, sans révéler le nom de l’avocat, à sa demande. « Merde… Bourgi », lâche Fillon. Sa communicante est effondrée, le « Penelopegate » n’était donc qu’un zakouski. (…) deux costumes ont été payés par chèque pour un montant de 13 000 euros. Étrange… D’habitude, il règle en liquide. Le nom de Bourgi circule dans les rédactions – de nombreux journalistes connaissent ses largesses. L’avocat leur susurrait d’ailleurs depuis quelques semaines : « Quand même, ce Fillon, il est gourmand, il a des goûts de luxe… » Un premier Tweet évoque son nom avant que Le Monde confirme. (…) Puis, après avoir annoncé sa décision de rendre les costumes, Fillon le traite sur BFM d’« homme âgé qui n’a plus aucune espèce de responsabilité ». « Tu m’as traité de vieux ? Là, tu as franchi la ligne jaune, gronde Bob au téléphone. Tu n’aurais pas dû, tu as fait pleurer ma petite Clémence. Je ne te le pardonnerai jamais. » Le supplice chinois n’en finit pas, alors que le premier tour de la présidentielle approche. Sur RTL et Mediapart, Bourgi cogne encore, prétendant que Fillon n’a pas rendu les costumes. (…) Quelques jours après la défaite de François Fillon au pre mier tour, Robert Bourgi va déjeuner rue de Miromesnil, dans les bureaux de Nicolas Sarkozy. (…) Bourgi le salue puis tombe dans les bras de Sarkozy. Ils ont mille choses à se dire ; la droite est à terre, la gauche en miettes, un jeune de 39 ans va entrer à l’Élysée, voilà de quoi réfléchir à l’avenir. (…) À la fin, il m’a dit “T’as vu Robert : On l’a bien niqué.” » Bob a ri puis il est reparti, le cœur un peu lourd. Si Fillon l’avait écouté, pense-t-il ; s’il l’avait surtout bien traité, l’histoire aurait peut-être été différente. Sur le chemin, une nouvelle fois, Bourgi a essayé d’appeler l’ami auquel il voulait du bien. Sophie des Déserts

Vous avez dit collusion ?

Alors qu’avec la démission de déjà quatre ministres en trois jours dont celui de la Justice

Et la reprise, une fois l’élection passée, du feuilleton des affaires concernant une nouvelle ministre

Que – l’on croit rêver – le porte-parole vient d’enjoindre la presse de ménager

Pendant que du côté de l’opposition républicaine et entre deux passages au camp de l’adversaire, le dézingage a repris de plus belle contre leur ancien candidat …

Et que l’on apprend, sur fond d’obamisation rampante d’une présidence de plus en plus versaillaise et désormais pro-russe

Comment l’AFP étouffe les informations gênantes pour le nouveau pouvoir …

Que leurs homologues américains inventent …

Comment ne pas voir…

Avec le peu d’intérêt qu’a soulevé le long portrait, pourtant particulièrement révélateur, que vient de consacrer Vanity Fair  à Robert Bourgi  …

La confirmation, via l’assassinat politique du seul véritable adversaire de l’actuel président  puis le classique barrrage au FN, du hold up électoral que l’on vient de vivre …

Où, dépité du rôle de conseiller Afrique espéré après l’échec à la primaire de son ami Sarkozy puis la soudaine prise de distance de son vainqueur Fillon …

L’ancien et sulfureux avocat de la Françafrique avait …

Avec l’affaire des costumes et la complicité active des médias et des juges comme de ses prétendus amis

Porté le coup de grâce au candidat de la droite et du centre …

Qui sûr de son bon droit avait certes bien imprudemment lancé les hostilités

Mais commençait justement à surmonter le « Penelopegate » ?

My tailor is rich
Robert Bourgi a offert au candidat des Républicains les fameux costumes qui ont précipité sa chute. Puis il est retourné en coulisses. Qui est cet étrange bienfaiteur ? À quel jeu joue-t-il ? A-t-il agi dans l’ombre de son vieil ami Nicolas Sarkozy ?
Sophie des Déserts l’a écouté et mené l’enquête pour démêler l’écheveau de sa vérité.
Sophie des Déserts
Vanity Fair
Juillet 2017

L’ami Fillon ne répond plus. Ces premiers jours de mai, il a encore tenté de le joindre mais rien, toujours cette messagerie pénible au bout du fil et le muguet fané dans son bureau parisien de l’avenue Pierre-I er -de-Serbie. « François est aux abonnés absents, se désole Robert Bourgi en cet après-midi pluvieux. Il a disparu, personne ne sait où il est. » La voix se traîne, onctueuse dans un parfum d’encens « rapporté de La Mecque », précise-t-il, soucieux des détails. Café serré, verbe délié, il suggère le tutoiement. L’air est un peu lourd dans cette pièce sans lumière chargée d’un demi-siècle de souvenirs : statues, bibelots, grigris d’Afrique et peintures d’Orient, photos des enfants et des présidents sur la cheminée – Jacques Chirac en bras de chemise vintage avec Bernadette, Nicolas Sarkozy tout sourire. Bourgi s’enfonce dans son fauteuil, poupon repu prêt à faire la sieste. Ses doigts caressent le tissu de sa veste. « C’est du Arnys, note-t-il, lèvres joueuses. Tout… même mes chaussettes. » Bourgi répète à l’envi le nom de l’enseigne luxueuse désormais célèbre jusque dans les campagnes françaises, la griffe des fameux costumes qu’il a offerts à François Fillon.

Ce fut le coup de grâce, comme le pensent les proches du candidat déchu. « Les costumes nous ont tués », dit sa communicante Anne Méaux quelques jours après le premier tour de l’élection présidentielle. Sans eux, la campagne eut sans doute été différente ; Fillon commençait à surmonter le « Penelopegate » quand, le 11 mars, Le Journal du dimanche a révélé l’existence de ces mystérieux cadeaux à plus de 40 000 euros. « Qui a payé les costumes de François Fillon ? » titrait alors le journal sans révéler l’identité du bienfaiteur. Il a fallu quatre jours à peine pour que Robert Bourgi, 72 ans, « Bob » pour les intimes, entre en scène. Son nom est sorti dans la presse, toujours associé aux mêmes termes – « Françafrique », « porteur de valises », « intermédiaire sulfureux » – tel un secret d’initiés, sans que l’on sache qui est réellement cet homme. Personne n’a cherché à comprendre quels liens réels l’unissent à François Fillon. Comment ce sphinx enrichi sous le soleil des Bongo, ce « bourricot », comme il s’appelle lui-même, roi de la diplomatie parallèle adoubé par Sarkozy, a-t-il pu approcher de si près le candidat de la droite ?

« Toi, tu ne connais pas Robert Bourgi », m’a-t-il dit d’un rire gourmand lors de notre première rencontre. Il y en aura cinq autres, dans ce bureau où son épouse avocate, Catherine, passait quelquefois une tête timide avant de se faire rabrouer. Il faut écouter longuement Bourgi pour comprendre, digérer toutes ces anecdotes romanesques qu’il balance sans filet, tenter de les recouper et aussi interroger ceux, nombreux, qui ont croisé sa route sinueuse – diplomates, journalistes, politiques. L’un d’entre eux m’a soufflé un soir : « Méfiez-vous, Robert Bourgi, c’est de la nitroglycérine. »

Il a charmé Fillon au volant d’une Aston Martin. Ce printemps 2008, Bob fait chanter le moteur V12 biturbo de son bolide dans la cour de Matignon. Le premier ministre vient l’accueillir : « Décidément, tu ne te refuses rien… » Berluti aux pieds, Bourgi soulève le capot, s’incline fièrement. Qu’il est heureux de ce déjeuner de retrouvailles. « Sacré François », il n’a pas tellement changé depuis leur rencontre en 1980 : toujours ce petit côté province, un peu envieux, un peu raide. Bourgi retrouve le « beau garçon timide » qu’il était, jeune attaché parlementaire au côté de son député, Joël Le Theule, l’élu de la Sarthe devenu ministre de la défense. À l’époque, Bourgi aussi se tenait bien sage dans l’ombre de Jacques Foccart. « Le Doyen », comme il l’appelait, grand manitou de la Françafrique, l’introduisait alors dans les cercles du pouvoir, par fidélité à son père, Mahmoud Bourgi, un riche commerçant libanais chiite installé au Sénégal qui fut l’un de ses correspondants.

Robert, né Hassan avant d’être francisé par les bonnes sœurs de Dakar comme son frère jumeau, décédé si vite, a fait des études de droit, une thèse remarquée sur « De Gaulle et l’Afrique noire ». En ce début des années 1980, Foccart le présentait alors aux dirigeants français et africains, dont Omar Bongo, le président de ce Gabon rempli de pétrole et d’uranium, si stratégique pour la France et si prodigue pour le RPR (le Rassemblement pour la République, dissous dans l’UMP en 2002, lui-même rebaptisé Les Républicains en 2015). C’était le bon vieux temps. Bourgi se pose depuis toujours en héritier du Doyen. Tant pis si son maître ne lui a donné aucun rôle officiel (hormis un poste de conseiller en 1986 au ministère de la coopération), ni même quelques lignes dans ses Mémoires. Tant pis si Bourgi, devenu avocat en 1992, a finalement surtout servi les potentats africains, Omar Bongo, bien sûr, son généreux « Papa » qui l’a couvert d’or durant trente ans, mais aussi Denis Sassou-Nguesso (président du Congo), Abdoulaye Wade (Sénégal), Blaise Compaoré (Burkina Faso), Laurent Gbagbo (Côte d’Ivoire)… Dieu sait qu’il a fallu œuvrer pour les contenter tous, gérer les commissions, les fonds secrets, les opposants, les journalistes, les maîtresses, les enfants cachés… Mais enfin, de là à prétendre servir la France, en fils autoproclamé de Foccart ! Bourgi ne craint rien puisque le vieux gaulliste n’a pas eu de descendance. Et puis quand Parkinson a rongé le Doyen, quand il n’y avait plus personne, Bob, lui, était là. Il débarquait avec son grand rire et ses boîtes de caviar Beluga. Les dernières confidences, les vrais, jure-t-il, ont été pour lui.

Devant Fillon, en ce printemps 2008, Bourgi se souvient : « Foccart t’aimait beaucoup, il disait que tu irais loin… Il avait donc raison. Moi- même, je suis impressionné par ta vaste connaissance du monde, de l’Orient, de l’Afrique. » Il sait y faire. C’est son métier, depuis trois décennies, en français, en arabe, en wolof, sur les deux rives de la Méditerranée, Bob murmure à l’oreille des puissants.

Sa question revient toujours : « Alors, comment ça va avec Sarko ? » demande Bourgi quand il voit Fillon. Le premier ministre souffre, il l’avoue ; il se plaint du mépris du président de la République, de son ingérence, de Guéant qui occupe l’espace médiatique. Bob compatit, propose de plaider sa cause. Il est proche de « Nicolas ». Fillon le sait sans imaginer à quel point. Bourgi a rallié Sarkozy dès 2005, après avoir tant « aimé », selon ses propres termes, son meilleur ennemi, Dominique de Villepin. À l’époque, cela s’est fait sans bruit. Bourgi racontera plus tard s’être senti méprisé par le premier ministre de Chirac, qui l’écartait à l’ap – proche de la présidentielle. Blessure, coup de poignard, comme un étrange avant-goût de l’histoire Fillon… Difficile de savoir ce qui s’est vraiment passé dans ces années. Avec Bob, la vérité est souvent complexe. « En réalité, Robert Bourgi a changé de cheval quand il a réalisé que Villepin, malmené à Matignon après le CPE [contrat première embauche], était grillé, affirme Michel de Bonnecorse, ancien conseiller Afrique de Chi – rac. Alors, il est parti avec armes et bagages chez Sarkozy. » Sa proximité avec les chefs d’État africains fut alors aussi précieuse que sa connaissance intime de Villepin.

« Sarko a compris qu’il valait mieux avoir Bob avec lui, pas seulement parce qu’il a une bonne capacité de nuisance et quelques facilités à rapporter des valises de billets… » glisse un proche des deux hommes. Deux ans avant la présidentielle de 2007, Bourgi a intégré le premier cercle des donateurs de Nicolas Sarkozy et fêté son investiture par l’UMP au côté de la fille d’Omar Bongo et de son ministre des finances. Il est à l’Élysée, au premier rang, le jour de la passation de pouvoir. Et quelques mois plus tard, « Nicolas » lui remet la légion d’honneur. Gloire à Bourgi, devant un parterre de hauts dignitaires africains, sa femme Catherine, leurs grands enfants et la petite dernière, Clémence, née d’un amour foudroyant dont il parle à tous avec émotion. « Cher Robert, tu sais que la passion tourmente, le taquine Sarkozy en louant son infatigable combat pour les relations franco-africaines. Cette distinction, porte-la. Porte-la pour moi et pour la France. » Bourgi ne s’en prive pas, la médaille marque tous ses costumes. Les hommes du quai d’Orsay et de la DGSE peuvent bien continuer d’écrire sur lui des notes appelant à la prudence, il s’en moque.

« Robert Bourgi s’est véritablement épanoui en Sarkozie, rappelle le journaliste Antoine Glaser, co- auteur de l’excellent Sarko en Afrique (Plon, 2008). Soudain, il ne passait plus par les petites portes, il agissait désormais au grand jour. » Tout lui est permis : garer sa Maserati dans la cour de l’Élysée, couvrir de parfums et de chocolats les secrétaires, narguer la cellule diplomatique, manœuvrer avec Claude Guéant au Bristol, imposer une rencontre avec Gbagbo et même demander la tête du secrétaire d’État à la coopération, Jean-Marie Bockel. Requête d’Omar Bongo, plaide Bourgi en mars 2008. Apparemment, le vieux président gabonais n’en pouvait plus d’entendre un sous-ministre promettre la fin « de la Françafrique moribonde ». Sarkozy renvoie Bockel. Le soir même, dans un palace, Bourgi sable le champagne avec le nouveau secrétaire d’État, Alain Joyandet, qu’il passe à Bongo par téléphone. Cadeau pour « Papa » qui, du temps de sa splendeur, faisait défiler les politiques français dans sa suite du Meurice, avec quelques petites offrandes. Bourgi suggère aussi à Joyandet d’aller s’incliner à Libreville, au bras de Claude Guéant ; lui précède le convoi, comme il le fait toujours, dans un avion privé avec une journaliste de Canal +. Alain Joyandet ne conteste pas cet épisode. Claude Guéant peine à retenir un sourire en se remémorant ce moment. « Bourgi a de la ressource et de l’orgueil aussi, derrière son côté bateleur, analyse-t-il, mine radieuse dans ses bureaux de l’avenue George-V. On ne peut pas toujours se contenter des canaux officiels, vous savez… Il m’a toujours été très utile, par ses analyses, sa connaissance charnelle de l’Afrique. »

L’affaire Bockel a été gérée en dehors de Matignon. Une fois encore, Fillon a regardé passer les trains. Bob s’en désole lors de leurs déjeuners : « Je sais, Nicolas te traite injustement. Il veut toute la lumière. Moi, je sens que tu as endossé le costume du premier ministre, tu prends de l’épaisseur. » À mesure que le quin quennat avance, les mots de Bourgi deviennent plus doux encore. Son influence fléchit avec la mort de Bongo, le départ de Guéant à Beauvau, l’arrivée de Juppé au quai d’Orsay. Bourgi a besoin d’appui pour rester dans le jeu. Fillon le voit de plus en plus souvent. À Matignon, certains conseillers s’en inquiètent. L’un d’eux se souvient lui avoir demandé : « Comment peux-tu être copain avec cette canaille de Bourgi ? » Le premier ministre s’est agacé : « Pourquoi dis-tu ça ? C’est mon ami, il est sympa, c’est un type fiable et une mine de renseignements. »

Une vieille connaissance de Sablé-sur-Sarthe, le journaliste Pierre Péan avec qui Fillon discute régulièrement, l’utilise d’ailleurs comme informateur. Grâce à Bourgi, il a révélé l’affairisme de Kouchner et ses fameux rapports sur le système de santé gabonais grassement payés par Bongo (Le Monde selon K., Fayard 2009). Bob le nourrit pour un autre ouvrage au titre prometteur : La République des mallettes. Blagues coquines au Fouquet’s S eptembre 2011, Bourgi a frappé. Seul, avant même la sortie du livre. Il lâche la bombe dans Le JDD – déjà – avec cette citation en « une » : « J’ai vu Chirac et Villepin compter les billets. » L’interview est signée Laurent Valdiguié, le journaliste qui lancera l’affaire des costumes. Bob se fait plaisir et raconte tout, comme dans un « SAS » : les noms de code utilisés pour communiquer (« Mamadou » pour Villepin, « Chambrier » pour lui) ; les djembés dans lesquels circulaient les billets de Blaise Compaoré avant la campagne de 2002 ; les valises de cash expédiées par Mobutu, Bongo, Wade…

Le système a pris fin avec Sarkozy, insiste l’avocat. Selon lui, une dizaine de millions de dollars auraient ainsi été remis à Villepin, sans compter les cadeaux, masques africains, manuscrits, buste napoléonien… Bourgi n’a pas de preuve, les faits sont prescrits, Mobutu et Bongo, morts. Wade menace de porter plainte. Mais il ne le fait pas, Villepin non plus, étrangement (seul Jean-Marie Le Pen, cité ultérieurement dans la liste des bénéficiaires, a attaqué Bourgi en diffamation et gagné). Pourquoi ? L’ancien premier ministre de Chirac a fini par me répondre, entre deux avions, indigné que ce silence judiciaire puisse être interprété comme un aveu. Il ne veut pas être cité, surtout ne pas rallumer les vieilles histoires, mais il a toujours pensé que « Robert » avait été téléguidé par le camp Sarkozy pour tuer sa candidature à la présidentielle de 2012. On rap – porte cette hypothèse à Bourgi mi-mai, devant quelques chouquettes. « Tout ça n’est pas entièrement faux… » soupire-t-il. Puis, après quelques bouffées de cigare : « À l’époque, j’ai quand même fait la “une” du Monde, souviens-toi du titre : “Les déclarations qui ont fait trembler la République”. »

Après ça, Robert Bourgi a décidé d’écrire ses Mémoires. Il a du temps, la Hollandie l’a écarté du pouvoir ; ses tentatives d’approche du nouveau président par quelques déjeuners – avec le secrétaire d’État chargé de la francophonie, Jean-Marie Le Guen, notamment – sont restées vaines. En 2013, Bourgi réunit alors ses souvenirs et quelques documents soigneusement cachés en Corse, la terre de sa femme, et à Beyrouth. Devant la vierge en bois du XVIII e siècle, cadeau de Foccart, le Coran à portée de main, il se confesse à Laurent Valdiguié. Un contrat d’éditeur est signé chez Robert Laffont, plus de 400 pages alléchantes dans lesquelles il raconte les petits arrangements de la classe politique, en incluant quelques amis sarkozystes. Il dit alors qu’il veut se laver, apaiser sa conscience. Son épouse est heureuse : elle le croit rangé des voitures. Qu’elle est douce, la vie loin du pouvoir.

François Fillon aussi souffle, il répond vite quand Bob l’appelle. Les deux amis vont déjeuner dans leurs luxueuses cantines, au Flandrin, au George-V, au Ritz ou au Fouquet’s, « sur la terrasse, pour regarder passer les filles », précise Bourgi. Fillon n’embraie pas sur ses blagues coquines, Villepin et Sarko étaient plus drôles. Mais au fil du temps, tout de même, le Sarthois se déride. Il aime la bouffe, les bons vins, surtout le Saint-Julien. Il sait apprécier les jolies choses. Les vestes forestières de Robert lui ont tapé dans l’œil. « Tiens, remarque Fillon. Ça vient de chez Arnys », belle maison mais devenue si chère. Depuis le rachat de la marque par Bernard Arnault, le président de LVMH, on ne lui fait plus de prix, il n’a plus les moyens. Son manoir de Beaucé lui coûte en entretien. Heureusement, il a quelques amis généreux qui l’invitent en vacances, Marc Ladreit de Lacharrière dans son chalet au ski, le patron de Ferrari à Capri. Il aura besoin de mécènes : Fillon se prépare pour l’Élysée. Il s’y voit, persuadé que Sarkozy va bientôt sombrer dans les affaires judiciaires. Comme toujours, la conversation glisse sur l’ancien président. « Que dit, que fait Nicolas ? » demande Fillon. Les spéculations durent des heures.

Bob jubile, il est encore au cœur des batailles de la droite, il va pouvoir raconter ça aux chefs d’États africains, redorer son blason, prouver son inoxydable influence et la monnayer. L’avocat souffle à Fillon ce qu’il veut entendre. Vraiment, oui, il a l’étoffe d’un président. Maintenant, il faut aller chercher des voix en Afrique, il l’aidera. Puis il faut se lâcher un peu, accepter les selfies avec les gens. « Vas-y, souris, va serrer des pinces, pousse-t-il Fillon au cours d’un de leurs dé jeuners. Pareil, avec les journalistes, mettre de l’huile. » Bourgi propose de lui en présenter, il les fréquente depuis si longtemps. L’avocat se targue même d’être le témoin du dernier mariage de l’ancien patron du Canard enchaîné, Claude Angeli. « Enfin, tout Paris connaît Bourgi, tonne-t-il. Je suis à ton service. » Les preuves de l’amitié sont là. Bourgi prend son téléphone, appelle quelques journalistes influents : « Fillon gagne à être connu, tu sais… Viens donc déjeuner avec nous au Véfour. » Évidemment, comme toujours, c’est lui qui régale, en cash. Le Libanais a le geste large.

À Noël 2014, un samedi matin, il re – joint « François » au Fouquet’s – le moral est faible, sa mère va mal. Bourgi le prend dans ses bras et file en Maserati chez Arnys. « Une tenue anglaise pour M. Fillon », commande-t-il au vendeur qu’il connaît bien. Allez, 5 180 euros, c’est pour lui peu de chose, il a bien offert quelques cravates Hermès à Guéant et des bottes cavalières de la même marque à une ancienne ministre. C’est ainsi en Afrique, on « cadotte », dans un mélange de calcul et de générosité sincère. L’ami François, touché, le remercie chaleureusement. « Il était si triste ce jour-là, se souvient l’avocat. J’ai voulu lui montrer mon affection. Sarko, il a tout ! Fillon, c’est facile de lui faire plaisir. » Fin août 2015, la Bentley de Bourgi file vers la Sarthe. Son chauffeur l’a déjà conduit plusieurs fois au grand hôtel de Solesmes pour déjeuner avec Fillon. Une bonne bouteille entre hommes et il repartait, sans se montrer. « Secret de deux, secret de Dieu ; Secret de trois, secret de tous », lui a appris Foccart. Une fois, une seule, il est venu accompagné de Macky Sall, le président du Sénégal qui eut droit, après les agapes, à une visite privée de l’abbaye de Solesmes.

Mais ce 26 août 2015, Bourgi apparaît en public au grand meeting de rentrée de Fillon, au milieu des militants. Il prétend que Sarkozy l’a appelé aussitôt, ivre de rage. « Je conserve mon estime et mon affection à Nicolas, indique-t-il alors, docte, au JDD. Mais ses dernières déclarations sur l’islam et l’immigration ne passent pas. »

Supplice chinois et menaces de mort

Quel jeu joue Robert Bourgi ? Ce 23 janvier 2016, il s’envole pour Bordeaux. Alain Juppé, alors favori des sondages, signe son dernier livre à la librairie Mollat. L’avocat en achète une pile pour Clémence, sa fille chérie qui brille dans une hypokhâgne de la ville. Il l’envoie au feu demander des autographes : « Je crois que vous connaissez mon père », ose-t-elle. La scène m’a été confirmée par des proches du maire de Bordeaux. Bourgi attend au fond de la salle. Il le sait : Alain Juppé ne l’apprécie guère ; il lui en veut d’avoir sali son nom, raconté partout qu’il l’avait emmené en tournée au Gabon et au Sénégal après sa condamnation en 2004. Depuis, c’est terminé. Ministre des affaires étrangères, il l’a même écarté d’un voyage officiel, pour la prestation de serment du président ivoirien Alassane Ouattara à Yamoussoukro. Là, tout de même, il le salue. Aussitôt Bourgi manifeste son envie de le revoir. « Écrivez-moi à mon QG », élude poliment Juppé. Bob a pris sa plume, s’excusant des « turpitudes du passé ». C’est sa grande formule, celle qu’il a aussi servie à Chirac et Villepin pour se faire pardonner après les révélations des mallettes. L’ancien professeur de droit écrit dans une belle langue nourrie de références à Saint-Exupéry et Malraux. Mais Juppé ne répond pas. « Pourquoi un tel mépris ? » s’interroge-t-il aujourd’hui encore.

Fillon, lui, tergiverse sur tout et ne décolle pas dans les sondages. Pas terrible pour les affaires, de miser sur le mauvais cheval… Finalement, en avril 2016, sur le site du Figaro, Bourgi « affirme haut et fort que [son] candidat s’appelle Nicolas Sar-kozy ». Un matin, on l’interroge sur ses revirements successifs. Il gémit, l’œil colère derrière les lunettes. « Oh mais elle m’embête, celle-là ! » Puis, soudain les mots jaillissent d’un trait, du fond du coffre. « Au fond, je n’ai jamais cru en Fillon. Tu comprends ma grande ? Tu me suis ? C’est Sarko que j’aime. C’est un bandit mais je l’aime. Il est comme moi : un affectif, un métèque. D’ailleurs, je ne l’ai jamais trahi, je lui racontais tout de mes discussions avec Fillon. » On écarquille les yeux, avant de se remémorer les propos de Claude Guéant entendus quelques jours plus tôt. « Bourgi est un fidèle, disait-il. Le lien avec Nicolas n’a jamais été rompu.»

Au lendemain de sa victoire à la primaire, Fillon reçoit un nouveau coup de fil de la maison Arnys : « Vous avez reçu en cadeau deux costumes. » Un vendeur passe à son appartement parisien lui présenter des liasses de tissus afin qu’il choisisse. Ses mensurations sont déjà enregistrées à la boutique. Le candidat des Républicains découvre alors le petit mot de félicitations de Bourgi. Fillon le remercie, d’un simple smiley. Mais Bob, lui, veut voir Fillon, trinquer autour d’un bon cassoulet, parler enfin sérieusement de son rôle de conseiller, de ce think tank sur l’Afrique qu’ils ont déjà évoqué. Il pense pouvoir revenir dans la course, effacer ces petits mois d’infidélité au nom de tous les bons moments passés ensemble. « Désolé. Suis sous l’eau », textote Fillon. L’Élysée est désormais à sa portée. Il ne peut plus jouer avec le feu, ignorer les mises en garde contre Bourgi, les messages envoyés par des diplomates à son directeur de campagne, Patrick Stefanini. Le député Bernard Debré se souvient d’une discussion particulièrement franche en dé cembre 2016 : « Je l’ai dit à François : “Si tu veux que je m’occupe de l’Afrique, je ne veux pas de Bourgi dans les pattes. Ce type est dangereux.” »

Fillon prend le large, Bob se sent méprisé. Alors il dégaine. Et il l’avoue aujourd’hui sans gêne, lové dans son cashmere bleu ciel : « J’ai appuyé sur la gâchette. » Samedi 11 mars 2017, Anne Méaux appelle François Fillon sur son portable. « Est-ce qu’il y a quelqu’un qui t’a offert des costumes ? Un mec un peu bizarre, paraît-il… » Le JDD, sous la plume de Laurent Valdiguié, s’apprête à sortir l’affaire le lendemain, sans révéler le nom de l’avocat, à sa demande. « Merde… Bourgi », lâche Fillon. Sa communicante est effondrée, le « Penelopegate » n’était donc qu’un zakouski. Fillon tente aussitôt de joindre Bob sur son portable. Attablé en famille au Bristol, il laisse sonner. Puis, après trois appels, finit par décrocher. « Fillon est paniqué, se souvient-il. Il me dit “Robert, ça va sortir demain. Ne dis rien, les journalistes vont te piéger. Laisse moins monter au créneau.” » L’avocat répond qu’il ne pourra ni nier, ni mentir : deux costumes ont été payés par chèque pour un montant de 13 000 euros. Étrange… D’habitude, il règle en liquide. Le nom de Bourgi circule dans les rédactions – de nombreux journalistes connaissent ses largesses. L’avocat leur susurrait d’ailleurs depuis quelques semaines : « Quand même, ce Fillon, il est gourmand, il a des goûts de luxe… » Un premier Tweet évoque son nom avant que Le Monde confirme. Bourgi fuit les caméras et s’envole pour le Liban de ses parents. Devant la télé d’un palace de Beyrouth, il mesure le respect que Fillon lui porte. « Un ami », entend-il dans sa bouche, sur France 2. Coup de fil immédiat de Bourgi le remerciant. Puis, après avoir annoncé sa décision de rendre les costumes, Fillon le traite sur BFM d’« homme âgé qui n’a plus aucune espèce de responsabilité ». « Tu m’as traité de vieux ? Là, tu as franchi la ligne jaune, gronde Bob au téléphone. Tu n’aurais pas dû, tu as fait pleurer ma petite Clémence. Je ne te le pardonnerai jamais. » Le supplice chinois n’en finit pas, alors que le premier tour de la présidentielle approche. Sur RTL et Mediapart, Bourgi cogne encore, prétendant que Fillon n’a pas rendu les costumes. L’avocat triomphe sur les ondes mais dans la rue, un retraité l’accuse de mener la droite au naufrage. Des menaces de mort lui parviennent au bureau. Son épouse le supplie de se calmer. « J’ai bien tenté, murmure-t-elle un matin, entre deux portes. Il était déchaîné. » Quelques jours après la défaite de François Fillon au pre mier tour, Robert Bourgi va déjeuner rue de Miromesnil, dans les bureaux de Nicolas Sarkozy. Comme toujours, il a des bal lotins de La Maison du chocolat dans les mains, et un petit flacon d’Habit rouge de Guerlain au fond de sa poche pour se parfumer en route. Comme toujours, il arrive en avance pour voir qui le précède. Ce jour-là, c’est Tony Estanguet qui porte la candidature de Paris aux prochains Jeux olympiques. Bourgi le salue puis tombe dans les bras de Sarkozy. Ils ont mille choses à se dire ; la droite est à terre, la gauche en miettes, un jeune de 39 ans va entrer à l’Élysée, voilà de quoi réfléchir à l’avenir. Bob annonce qu’il a finalement renoncé à publier ses Mémoires : « Trop dangereux, dit-il. Ce sera pour les Archives nationales après ma mort. » Sarkozy, qui a eu le privi- lège de lire quelques passages, salue la décision de son ami et le félicite pour ses récentes prestations à la radio. Le ton est chaleureux, la table excellente. Bourgi se régale : « Sarko n’a touché ni au vin ni à la tarte au citron, se souvient-il. Mais il était en grande forme. À la fin, il m’a dit “T’as vu Robert : On l’a bien niqué.” » Bob a ri puis il est reparti, le cœur un peu lourd. Si Fillon l’avait écouté, pense-t-il ; s’il l’avait surtout bien traité, l’histoire aurait peut-être été différente. Sur le chemin, une nouvelle fois, Bourgi a essayé d’appeler l’ami auquel il voulait du bien.

Voir aussi:

Penelopegate : dans les coulisses de la campagne de François Fillon

JDD

17 juin 2017

CONFIDENCES – « J’ai envie de savoir d’où c’est venu », indique François Fillon, qui continue à chercher la main qui aurait guidé ses accusateurs. Dimanche, le JDD raconte, de l’intérieur, toutes les coulisses de la campagne du candidat LR.

Depuis le 23 avril, il se tait. Muré dans son échec. « Un jour, je parlerai, mais c’est trop tôt », glisse François Fillon au JDD, la voix comme encore cassée par sa défaite. Puis il se reprend. « J’ai envie de savoir d’où c’est venu et comment ça s’est passé. » Il reste taraudé par cette unique question : qui a déclenché, voire orchestré les affaires qui ont ruiné son image, puis ses chances? Pour lui, c’est certain, quelqu’un « a guidé la main » de ses accusateurs… Dans sa tête tournent et retournent trois hypothèses : « Le pouvoir ; quelqu’un de mon camp ; un autre personnage extérieur à la politique [dont il ne veut pas dire le nom]. »

La façon dont lui a répondu aux soupçons et conduit sa campagne pendant la tourmente? « Honnêtement, je ne suis pas là-dessus, répond-il. Je suis tourné vers l’avenir. Et puis seul le résultat compte : si j’avais gagné, on aurait dit que j’avais tout bien géré ; comme j’ai perdu, on dit qu’on a tout fait mal. » Si c’était à refaire? « C’est tellement difficile de répondre à cette question », souffle-t-il. Et pourtant…

« François nous a menti, à tous, tout le temps »

Tout a commencé par un tête à tête dans un restaurant parisien. François Fillon et Anne Méaux, dirigeante de l’agence de communication Image 7, dînent au calme pour préparer la primaire. Anne Méaux, qui s’apprête à superviser la com de la campagne, dit avoir « posé la question franchement » : « François, est-ce qu’il y a des choses que je dois savoir? » L’interrogation est abrupte, bien dans le style de cette femme d’affaires coriace et avisée, experte en gestion de crise, toujours l’air mal réveillé et le portable jamais très loin de l’oreille, dont la réputation est de parler cash à ses clients, les grands patrons comme les politiques. Ce qu’elle demande ce soir-là, c’est si François Fillon a des casseroles. Comme un dernier check avant le décollage. Elle n’a pas oublié la réponse : « Sans la moindre hésitation, il m’a dit : ‘Non Anne, il n’y a rien.' »

Avec le recul de la défaite et l’avalanche des révélations qui ont piégé son champion, Anne Méaux reste persuadée qu’il était sincère : « Fillon est quelqu’un d’honnête. » Sincère peut-être, mais surtout secret, insondable. Y compris pour ses proches. « Il nous a menti, à tous, tout le temps », tranche le député Thierry Solère, qui fut le porte-parole du candidat. Une formule sèche qui résume la douloureuse épreuve que fut, pour ceux qui y ont participé, cette campagne au bord de la crise de nerfs.

Le diable a semé son premier détail un mardi. Ce 24 janvier, alors que les rotatives du Canard enchaîné impriment l’épisode 1 de ce qui va devenir le « Penelopegate », au QG de François Fillon, un immeuble froid et vitré de la rue de Vaugirard, on tire les rois. La droite ne le sait pas encore, mais elle vit ses dernières minutes de paix. Dans la galette, la fève est un chat noir. « C’était un très mauvais présage, se souvient Thierry Solère. On a ri un peu jaune, et juste après on a découvert Le Canard. » Dans l’ascenseur qui le conduit ensuite au 5e étage du QG, pour une réunion d’urgence dans le bureau du candidat, son téléphone crépite, mais il laisse sonner.

Le visage de François Fillon est sombre. « Encore un peu plus que d’habitude, se rappelle un participant. Impossible de savoir depuis quand il était au courant. » Sa garde rapprochée ignorait tout de l’affaire. Tout le monde est sonné. « Le Canard m’avait interrogé sur mes revenus et j’avais répondu, mais pas sur ma femme ; moi aussi, j’ai tout découvert ce soir-là », assure Fillon. Rien n’avait donc été anticipé pour préparer une réaction. D’autant que, lorsque ceux qui vont devoir mener la campagne avec lui le questionnent – « Y a-t-il d’autres sujets dont nous devrions parler? » – l’ancien Premier ministre oppose le même laconisme.

Cette réunion de crise est la première d’une longue série. François Fillon déteste ces moments bruyants où chacun s’exprime dans un mélange de fièvre et de confusion. « François a horreur de prendre une décision à chaud et en public », se désole un de ses anciens compagnons. Le candidat doit pourtant trancher : faut-il contre-attaquer, annoncer une plainte contre Le Canard enchaîné? « D’entrée, il a écarté cette idée, en disant qu’il ne voulait pas mêler la justice à la campagne », se souvient Thierry Solère. Dans la pièce, cette décision surprend tout le monde. Le porte-parole rédige un bref communiqué. « François a voulu gagner du temps, il misait sur le fait que l’affaire n’allait pas prendre », raconte un membre de l’équipe, persuadé qu’il aurait fallu au contraire s’excuser au plus vite, voire promettre de rembourser pour tenter de tuer l’affaire dans l’œuf… Anne Méaux, en déplacement, assure n’avoir appris les accusations contre Penelope Fillon que ce soir-là. De retour le lendemain, elle va s’investir à fond dans la gestion de crise de la campagne.

Anne Méaux : « Je ne suis peut-être pas Einstein, mais moi aussi, j’ai vu tout de suite que cet argument était désastreux »

Elle qui s’était juré de ne plus faire de politique (« Je n’aime pas ce milieu », dit-elle) a replongé pendant la primaire parce qu’elle « aimait les idées de Fillon ». Quand le scandale éclate, elle forme avec Patrick Stefanini, le directeur de campagne, un drôle de tandem autour du candidat : elle, ancienne collaboratrice de Giscard, militante d’extrême droite dans sa jeunesse, au parler rude mais qui vouvoie Fillon ; lui, ancien préfet chiraquien austère et discret, qui tutoie le candidat mais ne s’énerve jamais en public. Deux droites, deux mondes, deux styles. Tout les oppose mais ils ont gagné ensemble la primaire. Sur le front judiciaire, ce duo yin et yang va voler en éclats…

Le matin de la parution du Canard, François Fillon est en déplacement à Bordeaux. Pour sa défense, il dénonce la « misogynie » de l’article accusateur. « C’est du Méaux!, croit savoir un proche de Stefanini. Au QG, on est tombé des nues. » La conseillère enrage : « Je n’y suis strictement pour rien. Je ne suis peut-être pas Einstein, mais moi aussi, j’ai vu tout de suite que cet argument était désastreux. » Les premières tensions apparaissent et l’affaire s’emballe.

Deuxième réunion de crise, le jeudi 26 janvier dans le bureau de François Fillon. Ordre du jour : préparer son interview au 20 Heures de TF1, où il doit s’expliquer devant les Français. Thierry Solère, Patrick Stefanini, Sébastien Lecornu, directeur adjoint de la campagne planchent en attendant le candidat. Bruno Retailleau, chef des fillonistes au Sénat, les rejoint. Dans un silence lugubre, il leur annonce qu’outre sa femme, « François a également fait travailler deux de ses enfants ». « La présidence du Sénat a eu l’idée de regarder et on a découvert les deux contrats », explique Retailleau. Tous les présents se dévisagent, bouche bée. Lecornu, jeune président du conseil départemental de l’Eure (il est né en 1986) et proche de Bruno Le Maire, brise la glace : « Si ce soir François ne prend pas les devants et n’évoque pas lui-même le salaire de ses enfants, ce sera un mensonge par omission, puis un parjure, puis un feuilleton, puis la mort. »

L’hypothèse de la défaite, celle du chat noir, fait surface. À cet instant, François Fillon pousse la porte du bureau. « Il faisait la moue, relatera Lecornu. Il nous a écoutés silencieusement, puis il est parti à la télé sans que l’on sache ce qu’il avait décidé. » Anne Méaux est avec le candidat à TF1. « Bien sûr qu’il fallait anticiper, concède-t-elle. Ceux qui me connaissent savent bien que je suis pour la transparence, pour tout dire tout de suite. » À l’antenne, face à Gilles Bouleau, Fillon évoque de lui-même ses enfants. Mais en prétendant qu’il les a fait travailler pour lui au Sénat parce qu’ils étaient avocats – en réalité, ils étaient encore étudiants. Pour Anne Méaux, « François a été excellent ce soir-là… à une phrase près. » Elle assure avoir été interloquée en entendant le candidat promettre qu’il renoncerait en cas de mise en examen. « C’était une improvisation totale, dit-elle. En sortant, je lui demandé pourquoi il avait dit cela. Il m’a simplement répondu : ‘Mais Anne, parce que je ne serai jamais mis en examen.' » À sa décharge, la plupart des avocats discrètement consultés pronostiquaient alors que Fillon était à l’abri de toute poursuite…

« J’ai vu François avoir peur physiquement »

Au QG aussi, dans le bureau du directeur de campagne, le staff est stupéfait. Seul Stefanini, devant sa télé, trouve l’improvisation géniale. « Plus personne n’osera le mettre en examen maintenant! » prédit-il à chaud. Mais le « Penelopegate » est désormais un feuilleton judiciaire. « C’est vite devenu une campagne impossible », se souvient Thierry Solère. Les sondages plongent. À chaque déplacement, le candidat est attendu par des militants de gauche armés de casseroles. « J’ai vu François avoir peur physiquement », raconte un élu. « On a multiplié des visites sécurisées, se rappelle un membre de l’équipe. En février, l’agenda s’est vidé. »

Avec l’affaire, un nouveau personnage a fait son apparition : Penelope Fillon. Anne Méaux est chargée de l’assister, de la soutenir. Elle la décrit comme « une femme admirable, un peu timide, qui déteste les mondanités ». Les Français découvrent cette Galloise effacée aux cheveux courts lors du meeting parisien du 29 janvier, bouquet de fleurs dans les mains mais aux lèvres, un sourire fané. Si l’image est soigneusement calculée, la bande-son reste muette. « Bien sûr, il aurait fallu qu’elle prenne la parole plus tôt, admet Anne Méaux. C’était prévu au lendemain du meeting, cependant quand les avocats ont appris que les Fillon étaient convoqués, ils ont préféré qu’elle réserve ses explications à la police. » Ensuite, le candidat s’est envolé pour faire campagne à La Réunion. « Penelope ne voulait pas s’exprimer en son absence, c’est ce qui fait qu’on a trop traîné », précise Anne Méaux. Début février, France 2 déniche une ancienne interview, où Penelope Fillon expliquait n’avoir jamais travaillé pour son mari. Encore un jour sombre…

Je l’ai vu avoir envie de tout arrêter à plusieurs reprises, pour que leur cauchemar à eux s’arrête

Au fil des semaines, les avocats du couple Fillon, Antonin Lévy et Pierre Cornut-Gentille, comprennent que l’affaire ne sera pas classée. Le 17 février dans Le Figaro, le candidat martèle qu’il ira « jusqu’à la victoire » quoi qu’il arrive, signe qu’il n’exclut plus une mise en examen. Plus qu’un revirement, une volte-face. Le bateau tangue. La campagne s’enfonce. « Il fallait déminer un truc par jour, y compris mille choses fausses, peste Anne Méaux. On m’a appelée pour savoir si j’avais prêté 50.000 euros à Fillon! » Le candidat, lui, semble sur un chemin de croix. « François tenait bon, mais il était anéanti par ce qu’il faisait vivre à sa famille, se remémore la conseillère. Je l’ai vu avoir envie de tout arrêter à plusieurs reprises, pour que leur cauchemar à eux s’arrête. Dans ces moments de doute, il disait : si je lâche, je suis lâche. » D’où l’idée de recaler la stratégie de com : « On a insisté sur son courage, cela pouvait devenir une force. » Sans mesurer que parmi les chefs de la droite, ce courage commence à être perçu comme de l’entêtement.

Mardi 28 février, sur le coup de midi, le juge Serge Tournaire envoie un mail à Antonin Lévy. « À 16 heures dans mon bureau », ordonne le magistrat. L’avocat est à Washington, il prend le premier vol pour Paris. Son confrère Pierre Cornut-Gentille fonce au pôle financier, où il apprend de la bouche du magistrat que l’avis de mise en examen est parti. Nouvelle réunion de crise au QG dans la soirée. Comment rendre la nouvelle publique sans donner l’impression de subir ? Anne Méaux, jusque-là favorable aux conférences de presse (« des face-à-face physiques », dit-elle), prône « une banalisation de l’annonce », le lendemain matin, au Salon de l’agriculture, où le candidat est attendu. Fillon choisit l’option inverse : il annule sa visite et convoque les journalistes le lendemain, après avoir vu les ténors de la droite.

« Tu crois que je devrais renoncer? »

À l’issue de la réunion, Patrick Stefanini quitte un François Fillon « touché ». Pour le directeur de campagne, l’hypothèse du retrait prend du poids. « Je vais réfléchir, en parler avec ma femme », lui dit le candidat en partant. Cette nuit-là, l’ancien Premier ministre est décidé de ne rien lâcher à personne, y compris aux fidèles qui attendront en vain, le lendemain matin, à l’entrée du Salon porte de Versailles. « Il y avait trop de risque de fuites », justifie Anne Méaux, critiquant d’une formule crue bien à elle ces « politiques qui parlent sous eux ».

Le 1er mars à 8h10 tombe le communiqué qui annonce l’annulation de sa visite porte de Versailles, sans autre précision. Au même moment, Fillon appelle Stefanini depuis sa voiture. « Tu crois que je devrais renoncer? » interroge-t-il pour la première fois. « Oui », répond sobrement Stefanini. Le candidat ne dévoile rien de ses intentions. Quelque chose vient de se briser entre eux. « Ce matin-là, Anne Méaux et Bruno Retailleau ont pris le contrôle, décode un proche de Stefanini. Ils se sont installés au secrétariat et ils ont classé dans l’ordre ceux qui pourraient rentrer dans le bureau de Fillon. » Quand Bruno Le Maire arrive au QG, il n’est pas au courant de la mise en examen. « Retailleau refusait qu’on lui dise! Stefanini a pris sur lui de lui annoncer », raconte un témoin de la scène. Xavier Bertrand est introduit dans le bureau du candidat. « En ne demandant pas à Fillon de partir ce matin-là, Bertrand a eu un rôle déterminant », expliquera Stefanini à ses proches. Dans l’équipe, tout le monde se renvoie la faute. Seuls Gérard Larcher et Bernard Accoyer, le président du Sénat en exercice et l’ex-président de l’Assemblée, plaident droit dans les yeux pour l’abandon (même s’ils s’en défendront après-coup). « À partir de là, on a vu défiler les fillonistes de deuxième zone, se souvient un témoin. Ils étaient mobilisés pour regonfler Fillon à bloc. » Solère, partisan du retrait, affirme avoir été empêché de voir celui dont il était censé être le porte-parole.

Ébranlé, le candidat s’accroche encore. « Jusqu’au meeting du Trocadéro [le dimanche suivant], toutes les options sont restées ouvertes », confie Anne Méaux. Solère démissionne. Lecornu s’en va. Les juppéistes jettent l’éponge. Stefanini renonce à son tour. Quand le JDD.fr dévoile sa lettre de démission, le QG est le théâtre d’une scène surréaliste : pendant que Fillon est en ligne avec l’AFP pour affirmer que Stefanini reste à son côté, le même Stefanini indique sur une autre ligne à un autre journaliste de l’agence qu’il s’en va. Une équipe B va entrer en piste. « Dès la fin de matinée, on a vu arriver au QG des gens de Sens commun », se souvient un des démissionnaires.

C’est cette deuxième équipe qui organise le meeting du Trocadéro. Ce dimanche matin, 5 mars, Penelope Fillon parle pour la première fois, dans le JDD. « Oui, j’ai vraiment travaillé pour mon mari », jure l’épouse du candidat. L’entretien, décidé le vendredi soir, n’annonce en rien un retrait. Au contraire, il prouve que le clan a formé le carré, quand les juppéistes et les sarkozystes n’en finissent pas de se diviser. Plus la droite est fracturée, plus Fillon croit en ses chances. « Tous les éléments de l’affaire judiciaire étaient sur la table, on s’était expliqué sur tout, martèle Anne Méaux. On allait pouvoir reparler du programme, le plus dur était derrière nous. Mais le dimanche suivant, il y a eu les costumes… » Elle refuse d’entrer dans les détails de cette matinée, où elle fut interrogée sur le chèque de 13.000 euros signé le 20 février par un « ami donateur » pour offrir deux costumes sur mesure à François Fillon. A-t-elle cru, sur le moment, à une nouvelle « fake news »? Probable. Elle appelle aussitôt Fillon qui, contre toute attente, confirme l’épisode et lui révèle le nom du donateur : Robert Bourgi, l’intrigant avocat des réseaux franco-africains. « Dans cette histoire, j’aurai tout appris au fur et à mesure », analyse Anne Méaux, spectatrice aux premières loges du mystère Fillon – une énigme personnelle et psychologique bien plus que judiciaire.

« Avec les costumes de Bourgi, Anne a été vraiment soufflée, certifie un ami de la communicante. Fillon l’a bien senti, à tel point qu’il lui a demandé si elle aussi, elle allait le lâcher. » Anne Méaux ne confirme pas ce propos. « Ce n’est pas mon genre de lâcher les gens », avance-t-elle pour toute réponse. Cependant, avec la révélation sur les costumes, elle s’est mise à douter à son tour de la suite – même si elle dit avoir cru jusqu’au bout à un miracle dans les urnes. « Son score de 20%, c’est quand même mieux que celui de Chirac en 2002, plaide-t-elle à présent. C’était jouable. » Nombreux sont ceux, dans l’entourage du candidat, qui pensent au contraire que cette obstination était une folie.

« Aujourd’hui encore, je ne sais pas ce qu’il fallait faire », confie François Fillon. Le perdant de mai a regardé les législatives de juin « de l’extérieur, en spectateur ». Il assure avoir « tourné la page ». Il continue de jongler à l’infini avec ses « trois hypothèses » et espère bien connaître un jour le nom de celui qui, en lançant le « Penelopegate », l’a empêché de devenir président. Comme si d’autres responsabilités primaient sur la sienne dans son échec. Comme si ce n’était pas lui, tout simplement, le chat noir de la droite.

Voir également:

Richard Ferrand à nouveau épinglé par «le Canard enchaîné»

POLEMIQUE « En dépit d’une présentation arrangée et orientée à dessein, il n’est fait état de strictement aucune forme d’illégalité dans cet article », a réagi l’entourage du député…

20 Minutes avec AFP

 27/06/17

Les ennuis continuent pour Richard Ferrand. Le Canard enchaîné a de nouveau épinglé, dans son édition à paraître mercredi, le député de La République en marche (LREM) qu’il présente comme un « militant du mutualisme familial » en énumérant plusieurs faveurs que l’élu aurait accordées à sa compagne.

Sandrine Doucen a été dès 2000, embauchée aux Mutuelles de Bretagne, dirigées à l’époque par celui qui est devenu samedi le patron des députés de La République en marche, affirme l’hebdomadaire.

De nombreuses « faveurs » accordées à sa compagne

Alors âgée de 25 ans et étudiante en droit, Sandrine Doucen aurait été embauchée en tant que directrice du personnel. La même année, elle a complété ses revenus par un « petit job » au château de Trévarez, un domaine appartenant au département du Finistère et géré par un comité d’animation présidé par le conseiller général Ferrand, poursuit l’hebdomadaire.

Sandrine Doucen continuera d’être salariée par les Mutuelles de Bretagne jusqu’à sa prestation de serment d’avocat en septembre 2004, soutient Le Canard enchaîné, pour qui la « bienheureuse étudiante aura bénéficié d’une sorte de bourse de 80.000 euros, financée par les mutualistes et les contribuables locaux ».

« Il n’y a rien à commenter », défend l’entourage de Ferrand

« En dépit d’une présentation arrangée et orientée à dessein, il n’est fait état de strictement aucune forme d’illégalité dans cet article », a-t-on réagi mardi dans l’entourage de Richard Ferrand. « Par conséquent, il n’y a rien à commenter. Seule la loi doit primer, l’État de droit, rien que l’État de droit, pas un pseudo ordre moral », a ajouté l’entourage de ce proche d’Emmanuel Macron. Sollicité par l’AFP, Richard Ferrand n’était pas joignable dans l’immédiat.

Fin mai, Le Canard enchaîné avait déjà révélé qu’en 2011, les Mutuelles de Bretagne, dont Richard Ferrand était le directeur général, avaient choisi de louer un local à une société immobilière appartenant à sa compagne. Cette opération lui aurait permis de se doter « sans bourse délier, d’un patrimoine immobilier d’une valeur actuelle nette de 500.000 euros », selon l’hebdomadaire. Visé par une enquête préliminaire ouverte par le parquet de Brest dans le cadre de cette affaire, Richard Ferrand n’est resté qu’un mois à la tête de son ministère de la Cohésion des territoires. Samedi, il a été élu président du groupe des députés LREM à l’Assemblée nationale.

Voir de même:

Macron à Las Vegas : révélations sur les arrangements de Muriel Pénicaud

La ministre du Travail, ex-directrice générale de Business France, est inquiétée par une enquête préliminaire pour favoritisme au sujet de la French Tech Night, une fête chapeautée par le cabinet d’Emmanuel Macron, alors ministre, à Las Vegas, en janvier 2016. «Libération» révèle des dysfonctionnements en cascade dans l’organisation de cette soirée, qui ont été en partie cachés.

Ismaël Halissat

Libération

27 juin 2017

Muriel Pénicaud joue gros ce mercredi. Dans la matinée, la ministre du Travail présente en Conseil des ministres son projet de loi d’habilitation pour réformer le code du travail par ordonnances. Et livre, l’après-midi, le résultat des premières concertations avec les partenaires sociaux, des discussions qui avaient été émaillées par plusieurs fuites de documents dans la presse révélant les pistes de l’exécutif.

Quasiment inconnue du grand public avant d’être nommée, Muriel Pénicaud a dirigé pendant trois ans Business France, un établissement public chargé de la promotion des entreprises françaises à l’international. La ministre du Travail a déjà passé un premier remaniement gouvernemental sans encombre alors que quatre de ses collègues ont été contraints de céder leur place, pour cause de possibles démêlés avec la justice. Elle pourrait pourtant rapidement être rattrapée par l’enquête préliminaire ouverte en mars par le parquet de Paris qui vise Business France pour délit de favoritisme, complicité et recel.

L’organisme est suspecté de s’être affranchi de la procédure d’appel d’offres en confiant à l’agence de communi­cation Havas, sans aucun cadre juridique, une grande partie des prestations relatives à ­l’organisation d’une soirée à la gloire des start-up françaises (et du ­ministre de l’Economie, ­Emmanuel Macron), à Las Vegas en janvier 2016. Le tout pour 382 000 euros (avant renégociation). Or plusieurs documents ­exclusifs que s’est procurés Libé­ration mettent à mal la communication de l’exécutif concernant la ­gestion de l’affaire par Muriel Pénicaud et l’implication du cabinet du ministre Macron dans l’organisation de l’événement.

Grand-messe

Las Vegas, 6 janvier 2016. Dans la salle de réception du luxueux hôtel The Linq, Muriel Pénicaud, alors ­directrice générale de Business France, applaudit Emmanuel Macron. Au premier rang, à ses côtés, le patron du Medef, Pierre Gattaz, est tout sourire. Cette soirée baptisée French Tech Night se tient dans le cadre du Consumer Electronics Show (CES), un salon américain consacré à l’innovation technologique.

Plusieurs centaines d’entrepreneurs et de journalistes sont venus écouter le ministre de l’Economie avant d’échanger autour d’un fastueux banquet. Dix collaborateurs d’Havas, chargés par Business France de la quasi-totalité des prestations, sont présents pour assurer le bon déroulement du show. A trois mois du lancement de son parti et à dix mois de sa candidature à l’élection présidentielle, Emmanuel Macron fait vibrer la salle. Barbe de trois jours, chemise ouverte, et pin’s à la veste, le ministre est ovationné par un parterre ravi. Les comptes rendus des journalistes sont dithy­rambiques et les premiers sous-entendus d’une possible ambition présidentielle sont distillés.

L’opération de communication est une parfaite réussite. Et pourtant, tout s’est préparé dans une urgence exceptionnelle pour l’organisation de ce genre de grand-messe, qui a obligé Business France à une sortie de route. ­Consulté par Libération, un rapport confidentiel rendu six mois après la soirée par le cabinet d’audit d’EY (ex-Ernst & Young) conclut que si Business France s’était plié à une procédure d’appel d’offres (obligatoire à partir de 207 000 euros), «il n’aurait pas été possible d’organiser la soirée dans le délai imparti. La procédure formalisée nécessite un délai de 52 à 77 jours. […] La sélection des prestataires n’aurait été effective que début janvier». Soit exactement au moment où la soirée devait se tenir. Bien trop tard. Le rapport d’EY permet d’établir une première ­chronologie des événements. En septembre 2015, une note rédigée à l’issue d’une réunion organisée par Business France évoque le CES. A cette époque, les responsabilités de chacun des ­acteurs ne sont pas encore établies. C’est seulement en novembre que Business France prend directement en charge l’organisation de cet événement, qui avait été organisé l’année précédente par le Medef.

Comment et pourquoi Havas a-t-il récupéré le contrat de la French Tech Night ? Les rapports consultés par Libération ne le disent pas. Les échanges de mails de Fabienne ­Bothy-Chesneau, qui pilote l’organisation en tant que directrice exécutive en charge de la communication et de la promotion à Business France, permettent simplement de trouver la trace d’une première réunion avec Havas le 3 décembre. Puis d’une seconde le 16 décembre, destinée à «présenter le dispositif qui sera mis en place par Havas». Le rapport de l’Inspection générale des finances (IGF), demandé fin 2016 par Michel Sapin sur l’organisation de la French Tech Night et dont plusieurs passages ont déjà été révélés par le Canard enchaîné, relève que «les prestations ont été effectuées sans bon de commande, ni devis validé, ni contrat signé, ni constatation du service fait». Les fonctionnaires insistent : «Les différentes étapes de la commande publique ont été largement ignorées ou contournées.» Dans l’urgence, le rôle d’Havas, au départ limité aux relations presse et à la communication, va ­rapidement s’étendre à la partie événementielle.

Hôtel «trop kitsch»

Quel rôle a joué le cabinet d’Emmanuel Macron dans cette succession de dysfonctionnements ? Dans le protocole transactionnel entre l’agence de communication et Business France, postérieur à l’événement, l’implication de l’entourage du ministre est subtilement reconnue. Ce document justifie le choix de confier des prestations à Havas «en considération de l’ampleur donnée à l’événement notamment par le cabinet du ministre des Finances (environ 500 personnes conviées) et de la date qui approchait». Des échanges de mails retranscrits dans l’audit d’EY ne laissent par ailleurs aucun doute sur l’implication du cabinet du ministre de l’Economie. Une attitude qui agace d’ailleurs Fabienne Bothy-Chesneau qui tente, d’après l’audit d’EY, «d’éviter que les autres parties prenantes dictent au prestataire Havas des choix non arbitrés» par son service. Dans un mail du 16 décembre, la directrice de la communication de Business France essaie de recadrer Christophe Pelletier, qui dirige l’équipe d’Havas missionnée pour organiser l’événement : «C’est Business France qui décide et nous sommes aimables et associons la mission French Tech [rattachée au ministère de l’Economie, ndlr] ainsi que le cab. Pas l’inverse.»

Le cabinet d’Emmanuel Macron s’immisce jusque dans le choix de l’hôtel : dans un mail du 3 décembre, le conseiller économique de l’ambassade de France aux Etats-Unis informe ­Bothy-Chesneau que le cabinet d’Emmanuel Macron préfère l’établissement The Linq, finalement retenu, au détriment d’un autre qu’il juge «trop kitsch». «Nous comprenons que la définition exacte des besoins a pu être en partie déterminée par des personnes extérieures à Business France, en particulier le cabinet du ministre de l’Economie», tranche même l’audit d’EY. Pourtant lorsque l’affaire est rendue publique en mars, en pleine campagne présidentielle, Muriel Pénicaud dégaine un communiqué pour couvrir Macron : «Le ministre et son cabinet n’interviennent pas dans les procédures d’appel d’offres, et donc dans la relation contractuelle entre Business France et Havas.»

Perquisitions

Côté judiciaire, l’enquête débute tout juste et les éventuelles implications pénales ne sont pas encore établies, selon une source ­proche du dossier. L’audit d’EY commandé par Muriel Pénicaud ­retient principalement la responsabilité de Fabienne Bothy-Chesneau, en première ligne à Business France pour l’organisation de l’événement et qui a quitté l’organisme en février 2016. Contactée par Libération, elle n’a pas souhaité livrer sa version des faits. Concernant le prestataire, l’IGF relève «qu’Havas n’a jamais manifesté d’inquiétude ou de réticence liées au non-respect de ces ­règles au long du processus de ­commande». «L’agence était déjà engagée avec Business France dans le cadre d’un autre ­appel d’offres, c’est pour ça que l’on a répondu à cette demande sans s’interroger sur le cadre légal», répond-on chez Havas. Le 20 juin, les policiers de l’office anticorruption (Oclciff) ont mené des perquisitions au siège du groupe Havas et dans les locaux de Business France dans le cadre de l’enquête préliminaire ouverte en mars.

Muriel Pénicaud pourrait-elle être poursuivie en tant que directrice générale de Business France ? Plusieurs cadres de l’établissement public interrogés par Libération estiment que l’actuelle ministre du Travail a difficilement pu passer à côté du pilotage d’un événement aussi important. D’ailleurs, à la lumière des documents consultés par Libération, son implication est manifeste à plusieurs titres. D’abord, elle a validé un premier versement de Business France, pourtant réalisé de façon irrégulière, en décembre 2015. A peine un mois avant la soirée, l’agence doit régler à toute vitesse un acompte de 30 000 euros à l’hôtel où se tient la réception. Mais l’établissement n’accepte pas de virement et les cartes de ­Business France ne peuvent pas dépasser un plafond de paiement de 7 000 euros. La carte bleue personnelle du directeur financier de Business France est alors utilisée pour régler l’acompte. Pénicaud valide ce contournement des règles. Le service achat de l’agence découvrira le contrat avec l’hôtel seulement une semaine après. Un deuxième versement d’un montant équivalent est également approuvé en janvier par la directrice générale, peu de temps après la réception.

«Pas d’autre choix»

Mais le plus compromettant sur le plan politique pour l’actuelle ministre est ailleurs. La semaine dernière, Christophe Castaner, le porte-parole du gouvernement, usait de beaucoup d’énergie pour la couvrir en affirmant ne pas être «inquiet» des conséquences de cette affaire : «Muriel Pénicaud a provoqué immédiatement un audit, puis une inspection générale.» Les documents consultés par Libération permettent de remettre en cause cette version de l’histoire vendue par l’exécutif. Muriel Pénicaud, qui refusé de répondre à nos questions en invoquant un agenda trop chargé, a, en réalité, donné l’impression de vouloir enterrer l’affaire.

Début février 2016, la responsable du service des achats reçoit ­une demande de refacturation ­d’Havas de 248 925 dollars (environ 220 000 euros) et alerte la directrice générale. «A ce moment-là, ­Pénicaud n’avait pas vraiment d’autre choix que de déclencher un audit», commente un haut fonctionnaire de Bercy. Par la suite, la désormais ­ministre du Travail n’informera pas avant la fin de l’année 2016 les instances internes de contrôle et les ministères de tutelle : Bercy et le Quai d’Orsay. Pourtant en juin, le comité d’audit de l’organisme s’était réuni. «La direction de Business France a fait le choix de ne pas l’informer lors de cette réunion de l’audit externe qui avait été demandé à EY, qui à cette date était presque finalisé», note l’IGF.

Daté du 28 juillet, le rapport alarmiste d’EY va dormir dans le placard de Muriel Pénicaud pendant encore quelques mois. Et le 5 décembre 2016, la directrice soumet à un nouveau comité d’audit, qui a la charge de préparer le conseil d’administration qui doit se tenir dix jours plus tard, un simple résumé du rapport d’EY ainsi qu’un protocole transactionnel déjà signé par Havas. Ce qui est contraire aux règles habituelles. Le contrôleur économique et financier de Business France, qui siège au comité d’audit, découvre à cette occasion la situation et refuse alors de signer la transaction, puis alerte les ministères de tutelle. C’est Michel Sapin, succédant au ministère de l’Economie à Emmanuel Macron après sa démission, qui saisit alors l’IGF pour établir un rapport. Et regrette dans sa lettre de mission cette absence d’information de la future ministre.

L’affaire en dates

Novembre 2015. Business France prend en charge l’organisation de la soirée French Tech Night prévue à Las Vegas en janvier

Décembre 2015. La quasi-totalité des prestations est confiée à Havas, sans procédure d’appel d’offres. Le cabinet de Macron participe activement à l’organisation. Un premier paiement irrégulier est validé dans l’urgence par Muriel Pénicaud.

6 janvier 2016. Malgré ces conditions d’organisation, la soirée a lieu.

Février 2016. Après une alerte interne, Pénicaud commande un audit.

Juillet 2016. L’audit alarmiste est remis à Pénicaud mais elle ne prévient ni les organes internes de contrôle ni ses ministères de tutelle.

5 décembre 2016. Pénicaud tente de faire passer le protocole transactionnel avec Havas lors d’un comité, fournissant une simple synthèse de la situation. Le contrôleur économique et financier avertit alors les ministères de tutelle.

21 décembre 2016. Michel Sapin, nouveau ministre de l’Economie, saisit l’IGF.

28 février 2017. Le rapport de l’IGF reprend largement les observations de l’audit et son auteur fait un signalement au parquet pour une suspicion de délit de favoritisme.

8 mars 2017. Le Canard enchaîné publie des extraits du rapport de l’IGF.

13 mars 2017. Ouverture d’une enquête préliminaire pour favoritisme, complicité et recel.

20 juin 2017. Perquisition au siège d’Havas et de Business France.

Voir encore:

Quand l’AFP étouffe des informations gênantes pour le nouveau pouvoir

COMMUNIQUÉ DU SNJ-CGT DE L’AFP

L’affaire Richard Ferrand, sortie par Le Canard Enchaîné dans son édition du 24 mai, aurait pu être révélée par l’AFP. Des journalistes de l’Agence étaient en effet en possession des informations, mais la rédaction en chef France n’a pas jugé le sujet digne d’intérêt.

Qu’un possible scoop sur une affaire politico-financière impliquant le numéro deux du nouveau parti au pouvoir ne soit pas jugé intéressant, voilà qui est troublant. Surtout après les affaires Fillon et Le Roux qui ont émaillé la campagne présidentielle, et alors que le nouveau président Emmanuel Macron affirme vouloir moraliser la vie politique.

Généralement, un média met les bouchées doubles pour enquêter sur ce type d’informations quand elles se présentent. Pas à l’AFP, où les courriels de journalistes adressés à la rédaction-en-chef France soit sont restés sans réponse, soit ont reçu une réponse peu encourageante.

Faute d’avoir pu donner l’affaire Ferrand en premier, ces mêmes journalistes de l’AFP ont eu la possibilité de sortir un nouveau scoop deux jours après l’article du Canard : le témoignage exclusif de l’avocat qui était au coeur de la vente de l’immeuble litigieux des Mutuelles de Bretagne en 2010-11. Mais avant même qu’une dépêche ait été écrite, la rédaction en chef France a refusé le sujet. C’était pourtant la première fois qu’une source impliquée dans le dossier confirmait les informations du Canard et pointait la possibilité d’une infraction pénale de M. Ferrand.

L’AFP se contentera, quelques jours plus tard, de mentionner d’une phrase le témoignage de l’avocat interviewé par Le Parisien. Ce même témoignage qui conduira à l’ouverture d’une enquête par le parquet de Brest….

INTÉRÊT « TROP LIMITÉ »

Ce n’est pas tout : avant l’affaire Ferrand, le 17 mai, juste après la nomination du nouveau gouvernement, une dépêche annonce que François Bayrou, nouveau garde des Sceaux, devra lui-même faire face à des juges, dès le 19 mai, après son renvoi en correctionnelle pour diffamation. Mais la dépêche n’a pas été diffusée, la rédaction en chef France trouvant son intérêt « trop limité ». Deux jours plus tard, l’info sera en bonne place dans les médias nationaux. L’AFP décidera alors de la reprendre !

Interrogée jeudi par les syndicats lors de la réunion mensuelle des délégués du personnel, la direction de l’information de l’AFP s’est montrée incapable de justifier de manière argumentée les choix de sa rédaction en chef.

Tout cela fait beaucoup d’infos sensibles étouffées en quelques jours. Pour ceux qui ont travaillé sur le dossier, il y a de quoi être écoeuré et découragé. L’Agence France Presse, l’une des trois grandes agences d’informations mondiales, dont le statut rappelle l’indépendance, a-t-elle peur de diffuser des informations sensibles quand celles-ci risquent de nuire au nouveau pouvoir politique élu ?

Le SNJ-CGT appelle la direction et la rédaction en chef de l’AFP à s’expliquer sur le traitement incompréhensible de l’affaire Ferrand.

Le SNJ-CGT rappelle que l’AFP est et doit rester indépendante, que ses journalistes doivent pouvoir enquêter librement et publier toute information même si elle est gênante pour tout type de pouvoir, en particulier le pouvoir politique.

Le SNJ-CGT, Paris le 20 juin 2017

Voir de plus:

Bayrou, ou le moralisme pour les Nuls

Ce n’est plus de la tartufferie, mais de la guignolade. Il est hilarant d’observer les donneurs de leçons de morale, François Bayrou en tête, recevoir en boomerang les conseils qu’ils entendaient prescrire aux autres. La démission, ce mercredi, du ministre de la Justice, porteur de la loi rebaptisée entre temps « rétablissement de la confiance dans l’action publique », vient après celle de Marielle de Sarnez, ministre des Affaires européennes, et de Sylvie Goulard, ministre des Armées, qui avait pris courageusement les devants dès mardi. Ces trois ministres issus du MoDem ont à répondre de soupçons sur le financement d’assistants parlementaires européens. Jusqu’alors, seul le FN était accusé de telles pratiques. Dès 2014, Corinne Lepage avait pourtant dévoilé les arrangements douteux tolérés par le parti présidé par Bayrou. Pour sa part, Richard Ferrand, qui s’était illustré dans ses attaques féroces contre la moralité du candidat François Fillon, a été exfiltré par le chef de l’Etat lui-même pour être placé à la tête des députés de La République en marche. Sarnez devrait semblablement prendre la tête du groupe MoDem (42 élus) à l’Assemblée. Cet épisode croquignolesque, qui entache le sérieux du macronisme, a une allure de fable sur la sagesse. Le moralisme pour les Nuls est le degré zéro de la politique quand celle-ci n’a rien d’autre à dire.

Le camp du Bien, qui avait repris des joues ces derniers temps au contact de la Macronie, mérite toutes les moqueries de l’arroseur arrosé. Les Intouchables, qui s’auto-promeuvent exemplaires depuis des décennies, font partie des impostures qui fleurissent dans cette république des faux gentils. J’en avais dénoncé les tares en 2004 dans un essai, qui mériterait depuis le rajout de nombreux autres chapitres. Mardi, dans Le Figaro, l’universitaire Anne-Marie Le Pourhiet s’étonnait à son tour que ce projet de loi prétendument audacieux de Bayrou n’avait pas jugé utile, par exemple, « d’imposer la publication des noms, des fonctions, et des montants des donateurs français et étrangers aux partis comme aux candidats, afin que les citoyens sachent envers qui nos gouvernants sont redevables ». J’avais moi-même déploré en mai, ici, que Macron ne dise rien de son réseau d’amis banquiers, responsables du Cac 40, créateurs de start-up, hommes d’influence qui ont financé sa campagne jusqu’à 15 millions d’euros. En fait, comme le démontre Le Pourhiet, la moralisation de la vie politique n’est qu’un vulgaire « plan « com » populiste ». Une bulle, parmi d’autres bulles qui forment la constellation cheap de la Macronie. Celle-ci vient d’éclater. A qui le tour ?

Voir enfin:

Désintox
Les porte-parole de La France insoumise occupent-ils indûment un HLM ?
Valentin Graff

Libération

19 mai 2017

Régulièrement accusés d’occuper un logement social sans y être éligibles, Alexis Corbière et Raquel Garrido se sont défendus… quitte à déformer la vérité. Désintox fait le point, une bonne fois pour toutes.

Les porte-parole de La France insoumise occupent-ils indûment un HLM ?
INTOX. Avec la campagne des législatives, les vieux dossiers sont de sortie. Le couple de porte-parole de La France insoumise, Alexis Corbière (candidat à Montreuil) et Raquel Garrido, se voit de nouveau reprocher d’occuper un logement social de Paris. Une affaire qui traîne depuis des années.

«On fait croire qu’on défend les pauvres mais on a pris leur logement social. On gagne plus de 4 000 euros par mois mais on vous emmerde : c’est légal. Votez pour Corbière et Garrido, des Insoumis sans moralité !» dénonce un tweet largement partagé et illustré d’une photographie de Paris Match montrant le couple dans son appartement. Une coalition hétéroclite, composée d’internautes proches de l’extrême droite et du mouvement En marche, accompagnés d’un sénateur UDI, relaie la réquisition à l’aide du mot-clé #rendsl’appart. Certains évoquent, en guise de circonstance aggravante, un «HLM de luxe».

Confrontée à ces accusations, Raquel Garrido a pris la peine de répondre à ses détracteurs, niant que le couple gagne 4 000 euros mensuels et habite un HLM.

L’accusation est ancienne. Son origine remonte à un article du Monde publié en juin 2011 : on y apprenait qu’Alexis Corbière, alors premier adjoint de la maire PS du XIIe arrondissement de Paris, louait un logement de la régie immobilière de la ville de Paris (RIVP), l’un des quatre bailleurs sociaux de la capitale. En novembre de la même année, le site d’extrême droite Riposte laïque s’émeut de la nouvelle.

Fin 2012, lors d’une prestation remarquée de Corbière face à un militant du Bloc identitaire sur la chaîne Numéro 23, la fachosphère fait son œuvre et déniche l’information : Pierre Sautarel, l’animateur du site réactionnaire Fdesouche, moque «Alexis Corbière, l’ami du peuple qui vit dans un HLM alors qu’il est au-dessus du seuil». Il est imité par Damien Rieu, alors militant de Génération identitaire, qui prendra la tête de la communication de la ville de Beaucaire conquise par le FN en 2014.

Fin 2013, Mediapart révèle que cinq adjoints à la mairie de Paris sont dans la même situation. Anne Hidalgo, alors candidate à la succession de Bertrand Delanoë, annonce qu’elle demandera aux conseillers de Paris de renoncer à leurs logements sociaux. Cela vaut à Alexis Corbière d’être à nouveau cité dans un article du Monde, avec à la clé de nouveaux tweets indignés.

En 2014, suite à une altercation, le député PS Alexis Bachelay demande à Raquel Garrido, compagne d’Alexis Corbière, de «laisser [son] logement social à quelqu’un qui en a vraiment  besoin». L’avocate rétorque simplement : «Que savez-vous de mes revenus ?», laissant penser que ceux-ci pourraient lui permettre de prétendre légitimement à un logement social.

DÉSINTOX. Alors, Garrido et Corbière vivent-ils indûment dans un HLM ? Les accusations portées à l’encontre du couple sont inexactes mais la défense de Raquel Garrido l’est également. Car de fait, ils vivent bien dans un HLM, depuis peu, même si ce n’était pas le cas au départ. Explications.

Raquel Garrido, contactée par Désintox, explique la chronologie des faits : en 2000, Alexis Corbière et elle entrent dans le parc locatif de la RIVP. En 2003, après une deuxième naissance dans la famille, ils échangent leur appartement au sein de la RIVP et emménagent dans leur logement actuel, dans le XIIe arrondissement de Paris, où Alexis Corbière est à l’époque adjoint à la mairie. C’est la ville de Paris qui attribue ces logements, étant l’unique réservataire des logements à «loyer libre», contrairement aux HLM répartis à parts égales entre la commune, la préfecture et le 1% logement.

Le nouvel appartement, dans l’extrême est parisien, est un F4 d’un peu plus de 80 mètres carrés dans lequel le couple vit désormais avec trois enfants. Lors de l’emménagement en 2003, l’appartement est un logement «à loyer libre». Au début des années 2000, le parc immobilier des bailleurs sociaux parisiens compte environ 50 000 de ces logements particuliers. Pour y entrer, aucun plafond de ressource, ni de plafonnement des loyers similaire aux seuils en vigueur pour les HLM. Du coup, ces appartements sont en dessous des prix du marché, mais au-dessus des loyers HLM. Actuellement, le couple paye 1 230 euros (955 hors charges) pour 84 mètres carrés.

En décembre 2007, Jean-Paul Bolufer, le directeur de cabinet de Christine Boutin (alors ministre du Logement), est épinglé pour son appartement, dans le Ve arrondissement de Paris, de 190 mètres carrés pour 1 200 euros par mois, soit à peine 6,30 euros du mètre carré. Il s’agit évidemment… d’un logement à loyer libre, loué par la même RIVP. Plusieurs élus sont dans la même situation. La municipalité socialiste de Paris demande alors aux ministres et parlementaires concernés de rendre leurs logements sociaux et annonce sa volonté de «reconventionner» ces logements, c’est-à-dire de les reverser au parc HLM. L’objectif : «créer» du logement social à moindres frais et «moraliser» le parc social.

Ce que Raquel Garrido ne précise pas, c’est que l’immeuble où se situe l’appartement du couple fait partie de ceux qui ont été reconventionnés, nous indique une source de la RIVP. Plus précisément, le logement est depuis 2016 un prêt locatif à usage social (PLUS), le plus commun des HLM. Il s’agit de la catégorie intermédiaire, entre les PLAI (prêt locatif aidé d’intégration), correspondant aux logements dits «très sociaux», et les PLS (prêt locatif social), sorte de HLM «de luxe». Ce logement n’est donc pas «de luxe», contrairement à ce que dénonçaient plusieurs internautes.

Raquel Garrido et Alexis Corbière vivent bien dans un HLM depuis un an
Ce qui signifie que si le couple de porte-parole n’a pas intégré de logement social en 2003, il vit bien dans un HLM depuis environ un an, contrairement à ce qu’a affirmé Raquel Garrido.

Corbière et Garrido occupent-ils leur HLM indûment ? En aucun cas, d’un point de vue légal. Les deux porte-parole ont investi l’appartement à un moment où il n’y avait pas de conditions de ressources. Auraient-ils dû le quitter en 2016 lors du «reconventionnement» ? En aucun cas non plus.

Reste une question : le couple, en vivant dans un HLM, prend-il la place de personnes en ayant plus besoin ? Rien n’indique que leurs revenus excèdent le plafond de ressources correspondant au nouveau statut de leur logement, fixé à 64 417 euros annuels pour un foyer de 5 personnes en 2017. Raquel Garrido affirme que ce n’est pas le cas. Alexis Corbière n’est plus élu depuis 2014 et a repris un poste à plein temps dans un lycée professionnel, tandis que Raquel Garrido est avocate depuis 2011 avec «des bonnes et des mauvaises années». Elle assure n’avoir jamais été rémunérée pour ses activités politiques.

Quoi qu’il en soit, les occupants, quels que soient leurs revenus, ne pourront être délogés. Deux cas de figure se posent en cas de reconventionnement : si les occupants du logement ont des revenus inférieurs au plafond de ressources correspondant au nouveau régime HLM de l’immeuble, leur loyer peut être revu à la baisse. Dans le cas contraire, avec des revenus supérieurs au plafond, ils peuvent demeurer sur place avec loyer inchangé.

En théorie, et à condition que leurs revenus soient inférieurs au plafond, le couple pourrait donc même bénéficier… d’une révision à la baisse de son loyer. Pour cela, Garrido et Corbière devraient d’abord changer de bail, une formalité administrative qu’il leur revient d’effectuer ou non. Ils restent en attendant liés par le bail d’origine, une situation qui peut être prolongée indéfiniment. A ce jour, Raquel Garrido explique n’avoir encore effectué aucune démarche de changement de bail.

Seule certitude : le couple jouit aujourd’hui d’un loyer très en deçà des prix du marché, sans pour autant que leur situation n’apparaisse choquante à la RIVP. Celle-ci a en effet la possibilité de faire jouer l’article 17-2 de la loi du 6 juillet 1989 pour augmenter un loyer, si celui-ci est manifestement sous-estimé au regard des prix du marché. C’est l’extrêmité à laquelle la régie est arrivée concernant Jean-Pierre Chevènement : alors sénateur, il occupait un de leurs logements sociaux, un «bel appartement de 120 mètres carrés dans le quartier du Panthéon, pour 1 519 euros mensuels, un loyer qui s’élèverait dans le privé à 3 500 euros», comme nous l’écrivions en 2011. Compte tenu de son patrimoine immobilier par ailleurs important, la RIVP avait fait jouer l’article 17-2 et révisé son loyer à la hausse. Le fait que Garrido et Corbière ne soient pas visés par une telle démarche de la RIVP montre donc que leur situation, pour être avantageuse, n’est en rien comparable à celle de l’ancien maire de Belfort


Législatives: Après le hold up, le syndrome de Stockholm électoral ! (After a legislative election with a record abstention rate, France’s clingers and deplorables are still waiting for their Trump)

20 juin, 2017
Stockholm syndrome coming soon osmonster
TrumpRevolution
Les voleurs nous protègent contre la police. Otages du Crédit Suédois de Stockholm (le 23 août 1973)
La ministre des Armées Sylvie Goulard fait savoir ce mardi 20 juin qu’elle renonce à figurer dans le nouveau gouvernement qu’Emmanuel Macron a chargé Edouard Philippe de former. Elle est citée dans l’affaire des soupçons d’emplois fictifs au MoDem, tout comme ses collègues François Bayrou et Marielle de Sarnez. (…) Cette annonce intervient au lendemain du départ d’un autre ministre, Richard Ferrand. Lui aussi a des démêlés avec la justice : une enquête préliminaire a été ouverte par le parquet de Brest sur l’opération immobilière qui a profité à sa compagne lorsqu’il était patron des Mutuelles de Bretagne. Le désormais ex-ministre de la Cohésion des territoires va briguer la présidence du groupe La République en marche à l’Assemblée nationale. (…) Le président de la République a-t-il entrepris, dans le cadre de ce remaniement, de vider son gouvernement de tous les ministres touchés par des affaires ? L’annonce publique de Sylvie Goulard, inhabituelle dans son genre puisqu’elle avait été démissionnée lundi avec tout le gouvernement, met en tout cas ses collègues François Bayrou et Marielle de Sarnez dans une situation délicate : comment les maintenir à leurs postes de ministres alors qu’ils sont dans la même situation qu’elle ? Marianne
Une ministre qui démissionne, une alliée entendue par la justice, des perquisitions en cours : le climat des affaires vient assombrir l’après législatives des vainqueurs de dimanche. (…) Exfiltré lundi du gouvernement, Richard Ferrand va briguer la présidence du groupe LREM à l’Assemblée nationale. Une façon pour Emmanuel Macron d’éloigner du gouvernement son ministre de la Cohésion des territoires alors qu’il est visé par une enquête préliminaire pour une opération immobilière. (…) Le parti de François Bayrou est soupçonné d’avoir utilisé pour ses propres activités en France plusieurs assistants de députés européens, payés par Bruxelles. (…) la ministre des Armées Sylvie Goulard a annoncé dans la matinée qu’elle quittait le navire. (…) Ex-députée européenne Modem, son nom est cité dans l’enquête sur les assistants parlementaires européens. (…) Au même moment, Corinne Lepage, ancienne eurodéputée du Modem, était entendue comme témoin pour la même affaire. En 2014, dans son livre les Mains propres, l’ex-ministre écrivait : «Lorsque j’ai été élue au Parlement européen en 2009, le Modem avait exigé de moi qu’un de mes assistants parlementaires travaille au siège parisien. J’ai refusé en indiquant que cela me paraissait d’une part contraire aux règles européennes et d’autre part illégal. Le Modem n’a pas osé insister mais mes collègues ont été contraints de satisfaire cette exigence. Ainsi, durant cinq ans, la secrétaire particulière de François Bayrou a été payée… par l’enveloppe d’assistance parlementaire de Marielle de Sarnez, sur fonds européen». Passé plutôt inaperçu à la sortie du livre, l’extrait a largement circulé sur les réseaux sociaux pendant la campagne présidentielle. C’est pour une autre enquête que des perquisitions ont été menées, également ce mardi matin, au siège du groupe publicitaire Havas et de l’agence nationale Business France. Les enquêteurs se penchent ici sur l’organisation d’un déplacement en janvier 2016 à Las Vegas d’Emmanuel Macron, alors ministre de l’Economie. Il y a rencontré des patrons français. Une opération «montée dans l’urgence, à la demande expresse du cabinet du ministre, […] confiée au géant Havas par Business France sans qu’aucun appel d’offres ait été lancé», avait avancé le Canard enchaîné en mars cette année. Une enquête préliminaire pour favoritisme, complicité et recel de favoritisme a été ouverte par le parquet de Paris. Signalons en passant que Business France était, à l’époque, dirigé par l’actuelle ministre du Travail Muriel Pénicaud. Libération
En réalité, la bulle macroniste des origines n’est jamais très loin. Cette fois, elle fait enfler une majorité absolue de députés La République en marche (359 sièges avec le Modem) qui ne repose que sur un socle électoral restreint. Ne pas se fier à l’effet d’optique : la France reste fracturée comme jamais. Et bien des nerfs sont à vif chez ceux qui refusent d’avaler l’élixir euphorisant du Docteur Macron, aux effets secondaires addictifs. En fait, une crise de l’intelligence politique se dissimule derrière la crise de la démocratie. Si une majorité d’électeurs ne votent plus, en dépit de la pléthore de candidats à ces législatives, c’est que ceux-ci n’ont rien à dire d’intéressant. J’ai entendu distraitement François Baroin (LR), hier soir, réciter d’un ton morne et las un vague programme dont la fiscalité semblait être le seul point de discorde avec la majorité. Alors que la crise identitaire est largement plus préoccupante que le PIB, le sirop du Docteur Macron a réussi à faire croire, y compris à la droite somnolente et au FN, que l’économique était au coeur de tout. Manuel Valls, seul socialiste à avoir mis les problèmes identitaires (communautarisme, islam radical, etc.) au centre de ses préoccupations, est à cause de cela la cible de violences verbales de la part de l’islamo-gauchisme. Hier soir, sa courte victoire dans l’Essonne (139 voix) a été contestée par Farida Amrani, candidate de la France insoumise. Julien Dray (PS) a dénoncé hier « une violente campagne communautariste aux relents antisémites menée contre Valls ». Alors qu’une nouvelle vague d’immigration se presse aux portes de l’Europe et que l’islam politique ne cesse d’attiser la guerre civile (ce lundi matin, la mosquée londonienne de Finsbury Park a été la cible d’un attentat contre des musulmans), la classe politique française discute du sexe des anges, comme à Byzance la veille de sa chute. Macron a-t-il quelque chose à dire sur ces sujets ? Ivan Rioufol
Les 51% d’abstention du premier tour sont un événement considérable. Il s’agit du premier revers politique d’importance pour Emmanuel Macron depuis son élection. À partir du 11 juin, il est beaucoup plus difficile de parler d’élan populaire en faveur du nouveau pouvoir, puisque les candidats LREM et leurs alliés ont, de fait, recueilli 1,3 million de voix de moins que leur leader au premier tour de la présidentielle. À ce niveau, on peut parler de refus de participer, d’insubordination civique. Il ne s’agit pas à ce stade de dire que cette abstention est une protestation, et pas davantage un consentement. Elle traduit cependant l’inadéquation bien perçue par les citoyens de notre mécanique électorale. Non seulement le résultat de la présidentielle conditionne celui des législatives depuis l’instauration du quinquennat mais cette fois-ci, exactement comme en 2002, les choses étaient réglées dès le soir du premier tour. Jacques Chirac, du haut de ses 19,9% de suffrages exprimés, n’avaient pas eu à faire la moindre concession politique à ses concurrents pour triompher au second tour, puis pour obtenir, avec 365 députés élus, une majorité très large pour l’UMP nouvellement créée. Emmanuel Macron aura fait beaucoup plus d’efforts, avec la constitution d’un gouvernement alliant ministres de gauche, du centre, et de la droite. L’absence de possibilité d’une majorité alternative face à lui, du fait de la quadripartition de l’opposition, aura convaincu la moitié des électeurs de l’inutilité de se déplacer. Sans le savoir, ni forcément le vouloir, ces abstentionnistes ont creusé une mine profonde sous l’édifice du nouveau pouvoir. (…) Après le vote de classe du premier tour, nous observons en effet une abstention de classe. Ce qui permet d’ailleurs à certains de dire que les différences sociologiques entre les différents électorats se sont estompées lors des législatives. Certes, mais précisément parce que ce scrutin s’est déroulé non seulement hors sol, car la dimension locale a particulièrement peu compté dans le vote, mais surtout hors peuple. Ainsi, 66% des ouvriers et 61% des employés se sont abstenus, au lieu de 45% des cadres. La jeunesse, si présente dans l’image projetée par le mouvement En Marche!, est en fait restée sur le bord du chemin: 64% des moins de 35 ans se sont abstenus (et encore ce chiffre est minoré par l’importance de la non-inscription parmi eux), au lieu de 35% des plus de 60 ans. Dès lors, les commentaires sur la relative homogénéisation sociologique du vote entre les différents électorats aux législatives sont sans objet. Si l’on s’en tient aux suffrages exprimés, il en manquait plus de treize millions le 12 juin par rapport au 23 avril. Ce qui s’est traduit par un corps électoral effectif totalement distordu par rapport au corps électoral théorique. Donc, oui, les législatives confirment et amplifient l’enseignement de la présidentielle. Entre les Macron-compatibles et les autres, il n’y a pas qu’une différence d’opinions, mais aussi un profond fossé social. (…) On savait que la promotion de la parité et de la diversité pouvait parfaitement s’accommoder d’une aggravation des inégalités sociales, voire en être le paravent. L’offre électorale de ces élections aura été une illustration éloquente de ce phénomène, décrit et expliqué par le chercheur américain Walter Benn Michaels. Nous touchons également à la notion de «société civile». On utilise parfois ce mot comme synonyme d’un «pays réel» qui serait masqué par l’État et le personnel politique. En fait, dans le cadre d’un système représentatif, c’est la politique, et donc les partis, qui permettent parfois la promotion d’élus issus des catégories populaires. Sinon on retombe sans s’en apercevoir, et sans parfois le vouloir, dans un recrutement élitaire. Une entreprise ne se résume pas à sa direction, ni le monde des indépendants aux fondateurs de start-ups. Il est piquant de voir le côté 19e siècle de la situation. On a une participation qui rappelle les grandes heures du suffrage censitaire, et une assemblée qui évoque un peu, mutatis mutandis, les assemblées de notables. Il ne manque même pas les Saint-Simoniens. (…) Il convient de s’affranchir des termes porteurs de connotations politiques ou morales, et d’essayer de trouver une manière correcte de nommer le réel. C’est pourquoi l’opposition «peuple» – «élites» ne convient pas, le premier terme étant trop englobant, et le second trop restrictif. Même la notion de «bloc bourgeois» n’est pas simple, car elle tend à assimiler des millions de Français qui le soutiennent à une condition sociale qui n’est pas la leur. À l’inverse, selon moi, le «bloc élitaire» désigne tous ceux qui appartiennent aux élites sociales, ceux bien plus nombreux qui aspirent à en être, et enfin les personnes qui considèrent que l’obéissance aux élites est aussi légitime que naturelle. C’est donc, j’en suis conscient, à la fois une situation objective et une inclination subjective. C’est d’ailleurs pour cela que l’on parle de «blocs» sociaux. Non parce qu’ils sont composés d’une substance homogène, mais parce qu’ils constituent l’agrégation de milieux différents, et cependant solidaires. Un bloc social a vocation à exercer le pouvoir à son profit et au nom de l’intérêt général. En tant que tel, il n’est cependant qu’une construction historique, et peut se désagréger. L’extraordinaire réussite de Macron est d’être devenu l’incarnation de ce bloc élitaire, dont la constitution sur les ruines du clivage gauche-droite avait cependant débuté des années avant l’annonce de sa candidature. (…) La réunification des élites de gauche et de droite, sur un fond de convergence idéologique et d’homogénéité sociale, est pour le moment une réussite éclatante. On sent même, dans certains milieux aisés, une forme d’euphorie. On se croirait le 14 juillet 1790. C’est la Fête de la Fédération de la bourgeoisie contemporaine. La force propulsive d’En Marche! lui permet d’être au second tour aussi bien aux législatives qu’à la présidentielle, et ensuite son triomphe est mécanique. L’existence du bloc élitaire renvoie cependant à un problème, celui de l’affaiblissement des forces dites de gouvernement. C’est bien parce que Nicolas Sarkozy d’abord, François Hollande ensuite, ont échoué à réformer le pays autant qu’ils le souhaitaient, les deux acceptant à peu près le cadre de l’Union européenne et les exigences des marchés financiers, qu’il y a eu la dynamique En Marche! Autrement dit, l’épopée macronienne se fonde d’abord sur la volonté de donner aux réformes de structure de notre société une base politique et sociale suffisante. Si l’on considère le score du premier tour de la présidentielle et des législatives en nombre de voix, rapporté à l’ensemble du corps électoral, ce projet n’est pas encore totalement achevé. C’est là où l’on redécouvre, derrière les discours sur la société civile, l’importance du pouvoir de l’État. Le contrôle de celui-ci, exercé par des personnalités qui en maîtrisent parfaitement les rouages, tranche la question. (…) Face au bloc élitaire, qui agrège dans sa représentation politique le parti du Président mais aussi le Modem, les UMP dits «constructifs» et les PS dits «compatibles», le bloc populaire demeure virtuel. Face à la politique prônée par Emmanuel Macron et Édouard Philippe, il n’y a pas un «Front du refus», mais un «archipel du refus». C’est là un déséquilibre stratégique majeur. On en voit les effets au second tour des législatives, où dans chaque circonscription, le candidat qui affronte celui de LREM est issu le plus souvent d’une des quatre forces d’opposition, sans alliance possible, et avec en conséquence de très mauvais reports de voix. Cette situation est durable. Elle constitue une chance historique pour l’achèvement des réformes libérales annoncées. Dans la mesure où l’opposition au nouveau pouvoir prendra nécessairement une forme aussi sociale que politique, la position de la France Insoumise est assez favorable, tandis que le Front national sera handicapé par ses ambiguïtés idéologiques sur le libéralisme économique. La situation de l’UMP est certes moins grave que celle du PS, mais leur espérance commune d’une reconstitution du clivage gauche-droite pourrait bien être durablement déçue. Cet ordre politique n’a pas seulement été affaibli, il a été remplacé. Jérome Sainte-Marie
57,36 % d’abstention pour le second tour des élections législatives. Un record. Une catastrophe démocratique. 18 millions de Français ont voté ; 28 se sont abstenus. Les non-votants ont gagné quoi? Le droit pendant cinq ans de n’être pas représentés, de se taire et de n’avoir pas de porte-parole. S’agit-il là d’un consentement par défaut, (selon le principe du «qui ne dit mot consent»), ou d’une «grève générale civique» – selon l’expression de Jean-Luc Mélenchon? Un peu des deux. Mais surtout, un abstentionniste, au sens propre, est celui qui ne veut pas tenir la République et se retient de participer à ses procédures. Lui qui se sent socialement dans le fossé, il se met sur le bas-côté de la république. À côté de la République En Marche il y a l’immense parti de la République en panne. À côté des Français mobiles, les Français immobiles. Entre les citoyens à l’aise ici et ailleurs, les citoyens mal-à-l’aise là où ils sont. Les premiers s’expatrient souvent, les seconds ne peuvent pas déménager. Ces républicains de l’extérieur, trop exclus pour ne pas s’exclure de la République, devraient être le premier défi d’Emmanuel Macron. Son immense victoire législative repose sur un socle électoral très étroit. Là est le paradoxe de cette majorité sans partage: peu d’électeurs, beaucoup de députés. Trop peu d’électeurs pour trop de députés. Il faut dire que depuis des mois, les médias ont escamoté les demandes politiques des Français au profit de la dénonciation morale de la «classe politique». L’affaire Pénélope, les costumes, les assistants parlementaires, l’argent public. Un tribunal médiatique examinait jusqu’à l’écœurement le comportement personnel des politiques dans une sorte de surdité vis-à-vis des aspirations réelles des Français. Les solutions pour «moraliser» les politiques semblaient avoir plus importance que celles contre le chômage. Le besoin de renouvellement et de changer de tête a fini par s’imposer au détriment de l’examen scrupuleux des vrais problèmes. C’est comme si, dans un hôpital, on s’interrogeait sur les conflits d’intérêts des médecins sans rien dire des traitements contre les maladies. L’abstention est un désaveu qui touche tout à la fois les politiques et les médias. Ils vivent ensemble depuis trop longtemps, dans une sorte d’endogamie belliqueuse, au point de ne plus porter les préoccupations des Français qui, en retour, les prennent en grippe. Au mépris du peuple répond la haine contre ceux d’en haut – les politiques et les journalistes. Les Français n’y croient plus, se sentent exclus de la République. A-t-elle encore besoin d’eux? Non, pensent ceux qui ne votent plus. Elle fonctionne trop en vase clos. Et ce sentiment d’une oligarchie hors-sol, hors-peuple, qui ne règle rien et parle avant tout à elle-même d’elle-même pour mieux constater sa faillite morale, corrode tout. Tout et surtout l’indispensable adhésion de tous à la République, la fragile confiance dans «la chose commune». La couche d’ozone démocratique qui protège la France contre ses ressentiments infinis et une potentielle guerre civile se fragilise de plus en plus. N’oublions jamais que les institutions de notre pays ne sont rien sans la certitude qu’elles nous représentent tous. Les procédures sont formelles si elles n’expriment pas une confiance partagée. La démocratie des esprits précède celle du Parlement. La nation est un «plébiscite de tous les jours» disait Renan. Une abstention majoritaire est aussi une abstention vis-à-vis de la nation conçue comme une croyance invisible mais vitale. Chaque bulletin de vote, en réalité, en comporte deux. Le premier adhère à la République et fait d’une fiction politique une évidence partagée. Le second est pour un candidat en particulier. C’est pour ne plus vouloir adhérer à la République, la valider, que les Français ne votent plus pour un candidat. Ne faut-il pas, toute affaire cessante, réfléchir à ce désaveu massif? Faut-il rendre le vote obligatoire, introduire une dose de proportionnelle, reconnaître le vote blanc, considérer qu’une élection ne pourra pas être valide que si elle se fait avec un certain pourcentage des électeurs inscrits? Faut-il avoir, tirés au sort, des députés qui seraient «des représentants des Français abstentionnistes»? Je ne sais. Cette réflexion est urgente. Si elle est mise sous les tapis dorés du palais Bourbon, à l’amertume s’ajoutera la haine et à la haine le rejet du sentiment d’être ensemble responsable d’une même nation. Il ne faudrait pas qu’un abstentionnisme de sécession républicaine renforce la partition des cœurs, des territoires et des esprits qui est déjà à l’œuvre chez beaucoup de nos concitoyens. Si l’on ajoute à cela le terrorisme franco-français, «les territoires perdus de la république», la montée des conflictualités intercommunautaires, la déshérence de la «France périphérique», les crises identitaires, les immenses malaises culturels, il nous faut soigner le corps électoral, panser ses blessures pour lui redonner une nouvelle vigueur démocratique d’adhésion nationale. Le corps électoral est squelettique. Il souffre d’anorexie démocratique. Un régime de grosseur est indispensable. Les députés fraîchement élus ont si peu d’électeurs qu’ils devraient tous, avec modestie et honte presque, considérer les 4/5 eme des Français qui n’ont pas voté pour eux. Comment être député de tous les Français, quand seulement 22 % d’entre eux ont donné une majorité à chacun? S’ils sont députés de plein droit, comment assumer cette charge sans arrogance, sans dédain pour les sans-votes qui sont des sans-dents de la République. Les députés macronistes devraient lutter contre une double tentation. Premièrement: être député de leurs seuls électeurs en oubliant le camp adverse et surtout les abstentionnistes. Que faire de cet électorat en déshérence, de ces Français orphelins d’une solution politique? Que faire des abstentionnistes qui considèrent (si on entend leurs motivations) que les élections «ne changeront rien à rien» et qu’ils ne retrouvent pas leurs motivations dans les programmes électoraux? Cette république, disent-ils, n’est pas la leur. Les politiques parlent mais n’écoutent pas. Ils promettent sans tenir promesse. Ils veulent nous faire croire qu’ils peuvent lutter contre les cancers sociaux de notre société (les ravages du chômage, de la pauvreté et de la désintégration sociale) mais n’y parviennent pas. Quant aux ministres, ils se servent et ne servent pas. Alors, de renoncements en résignations, les électeurs finissent par décrocher de la société, de tout espoir possible et aussi de la politique. At last, les abstentionnistes intériorisent l’impuissance des politiques. S’ils ne se lèvent pas pour nous, pourquoi se déplacer pour eux. S’ils n’y peuvent rien, nous ne pouvons rien pour eux. L’abstention à ceci d’inquiétante que toutes les offres sont rejetées, toutes mise à distance, toutes jugées inutiles et vaines. Elle met en évidence un divorce entre le peuple désabusé et la politique. Un abstentionniste est un abstinent de l’ivresse démocratique. Il fait une cure de désintoxication politique. Dès lors, le nouveau président devrait être jugé, comme le précédent, sur «l’inversion de la courbe du chômage» mais aussi sur «l’inversion de la courbe de l’abstention». Comment réformer en profondeur, affronter les défis immenses de la France, faire face aux défis du terrorisme sans répondre aux demandes informulées de la France abstentionniste pour en réduire l’importance? Seconde tentation: celle de Terra Nova. Ce think-tank avait, autrefois, théorisé le remplacement du «peuple de gauche», celui des ouvriers et de la classe moyenne, par un ensemble de minorités qui, ensemble, en tiendraient lieu. D’une certaine façon, le vote Macron réalise cette substitution. Car l’abstention pour les législatives déforme considérablement la sociologie du corps électoral. Il surreprésente les classes favorisées, éduquées, urbaines, intégrées au détriment de la «France périphérique». 2/3 des plus de 65 ans votent quand 2/3 des moins de 35 ans s’abstiennent. Abstention massive des ouvriers et des employés (plus de 65%) alors qu’elle est de 45 % pour les cadres. Abstention massive en Seine-Saint-Denis. Ceux qui votent ont des places à défendre, des avoirs à protéger. Ils sont insérés quand ceux qui s’abstiennent ont des places à obtenir, des droits à faire prévaloir et qu’ils sont en marge du système. La tentation du macronisme est d’oublier la France périphérique (60% de la population) et de tout miser sur la France centrale, la France active, urbaine et dynamique. Le paradoxe de cette tentation est qu’elle est favorisée par ceux-là mêmes qui en sont les victimes. Les abstentionnistes sont doublement victimes: victimes de la mondialisation qui se fait à leur détriment ; victimes de leur propre absence d’implication électorale qui rend leur souffrance presque inaudible. Ils souffrent plus que les autres, souffrent en silence et ne prennent pas le pouvoir par les urnes alors même qu’ils sont majoritaires. Qualifions ce paradoxe de «syndrome de Stockholm électoral»: ils sont pris en otage par la France centrale qui tend à les oublier et plutôt que de renverser la table dans les urnes, ils ont intériorisé cette position d’otage et en viennent, par leur abstention, à défendre le système qui les oppresse. Le succès politique du parti macroniste repose sur cet immense parti des abstentionnistes. Le premier entre en foule au palais Bourbon. Le second ne sonne plus à la porte du Parlement. Le premier est au centre de la vie politique. Le second en reste loin. Mais le triomphe du premier est la conséquence d’une sorte de vote censitaire favorisé, sans le savoir, par les abstentionnistes. Il n’y aurait pas de députés macronistes sans les abstentionnistes. Cependant, loin d’un cynisme politique qui viserait à maintenir cette situation pour profiter de toutes ses ambiguïtés, si rien n’est fait, en profondeur, pour changer la donne et réconcilier les élites et le peuple, alors, la boutade de Chesterton n’en sera pas une: «rien n’échoue comme le succès». Car qui sait ce que pourraient voter des abstentionnistes humiliés? Il faut se méfier des géants endormis par dégoût. Quand ils se réveillent, il est possible qu’ils soient insensibles à la raison. Le ressentiment populaire cultivé sciemment par le système contre le peuple peut enfanter des monstres. Là sont les défis d’Emmanuel Macron pour les années à venir. Damien Le Guay

Scrutin hors sol, hors peuple, consentement par défaut, « grève générale civique », parti de la République en panne, Français immobiles, citoyens mal-à-l’aise, républicains de l’extérieur, oligarchie hors-sol, hors-peuple, désaveu massif, sécession républicaine, partition des cœurs, des territoires et des esprits,  terrorisme franco-français, «territoires perdus de la république», montée des conflictualités intercommunautaires, déshérence de la «France périphérique», crises identitaires, malaises culturels,  sans-votes, sans-dents de la République, électorat en déshérence, orphelins d’une solution politique, «syndrome de Stockholm électoral » …

Attention: un syndrome de Stockholm peut en cacher un autre !

A l’heure où après un nouvel et hélas aussi tragique que vain avertissement

Nos amis britanniques après leurs homologues canadiens semblent repartis pour un tour …

A noyer dans les flots de bonnes paroles, bougies et ours en peluche …

La colère qui monte entre deux attaques terroristes …

Contre le déni du réel et le parti pris tout stockholmien pour nos propres bourreaux …

Qui sert actuellement de politique à un Monde libre dévoré par ses propres enfants

Pendant que pour les mêmes victimes quasiment quotidiennes mais israéliennes, aucune Tour Eiffel ne s’éteindra jamais …

Et qu’à l’occasion d’un énième attentat déjoué en France, l’on découvre un fiché S qui vient tranquillement de se voir renouveler son permis de port d’arme …

Comment …

Au lendemain, après l’élection sans candidats que l’on sait, d’une véritable élection sans peuple …

Où les législatives ressemblent de plus en plus furieusement à des européennes

(28 millions contre 18 millions qui ont voté, plus de 57% dont 66% des ouvriers et 61% des employés,  64% des moins de 35 ans se sont abstenus sans compter la non-inscription, plus de treize millions d’électeurs de moins entre le 12 juin et le 23 avril)

Où ceux-là mêmes (pas moins de cinq ministres, dont le ministre de la Justice lui-même !) qui doivent leur élection à la prétendue moralisation de la politique sont au centre des mêmes affaires qu’ils avaient dénoncées chez leurs adversaires …

Où si avec la réunification des élites de gauche et de droite, le pays pourrait enfin avoir la base politique et sociale suffisante pour enfin achever les réformes d’un marché du travail où les travailleurs sont si bien protégés qu’aucun travailleur ne peut y entrer …

L’on retrouve en fait derrière le paravent de la parité et de la diversité, le plus élitiste des recrutements politiques …

Et à l’instar de la stratégie obamienne reprise par le think tank socialiste Terra Nova, le remplacement du peuple de gauche traditionnel des ouvriers et de la classe moyenne par l’arc en ciel des minorités du jour (minorités ethniques et sexuelles) …

Ne pas repenser …

A 2002 et à ses  19,9%  de Chirac se transmutant magiquement face à l’épouvantail Le Pen en score africain de 82% …

Comme aux dix ans d’immobilisme dont on paie encore aujourd’hui le prix …

Mais surtout à l’image de la situation américaine qui nous sert bien souvent de modèle inconscient …

A ce « monstre » qu’est en train de préparer à leur pays la morgue des bobos du nouveau Dr. Frankenstein français …

Ou plus précisément après les défections successives de Sarkozy et du FN …

Et sur fond de péril grandissant de la menace islamique …

A ce Trump français qu’attend depuis si longtemps une France de plus en plus marginalisée ?

L’abstention massive ou le syndrome de Stockolm démocratique
Damien Le Guay
19/06/2017

FIGAROVOX/TRIBUNE – Avec un taux d’abstention à 57,4%, le second tour des législatives sonne comme un avertissement pour l’ensemble des dirigeants politiques. Damien le Guay décrypte l’ampleur de ce phénomène et prévient les dangers d’un tel rejet.

57,36 % d’abstention pour le second tour des élections législatives. Un record. Une catastrophe démocratique. 18 millions de Français ont voté ; 28 se sont abstenus. Les non-votants ont gagné quoi? Le droit pendant cinq ans de n’être pas représentés, de se taire et de n’avoir pas de porte-parole. S’agit-il là d’un consentement par défaut, (selon le principe du «qui ne dit mot consent»), ou d’une «grève générale civique» – selon l’expression de Jean-Luc Mélenchon? Un peu des deux. Mais surtout, un abstentionniste, au sens propre, est celui qui ne veut pas tenir la République et se retient de participer à ses procédures. Lui qui se sent socialement dans le fossé, il se met sur le bas-côté de la république. À côté de la République En Marche il y a un l’immense parti de la République en panne. À côté des Français mobiles, les Français immobiles. Entre les citoyens à l’aise ici et ailleurs, les citoyens mal-à-l’aise là où ils sont. Les premiers s’expatrient souvent, les seconds ne peuvent pas déménager. Ces républicains de l’extérieur, trop exclus pour ne pas s’exclure de la République, devraient être le premier défi d’Emmanuel Macron. Son immense victoire législative repose sur un socle électoral très étroit. Là est le paradoxe de cette majorité sans partage: peu d’électeurs, beaucoup de députés. Trop peu d’électeurs pour trop de députés.

Il faut dire que depuis des mois, les médias ont escamoté les demandes politiques des Français au profit de la dénonciation morale de la «classe politique». L’affaire Pénélope, les costumes, les assistants parlementaires, l’argent public. Un tribunal médiatique examinait jusqu’à l’écœurement le comportement personnel des politiques dans une sorte de surdité vis-à-vis des aspirations réelles des Français. Les solutions pour «moraliser» les politiques semblaient avoir plus importantes que celles contre le chômage. Le besoin de renouvellement et de changer de tête a fini par s’imposer au détriment de l’examen scrupuleux des vrais problèmes. C’est comme si, dans un hôpital, on s’interrogeait sur les conflits d’intérêts des médecins sans rien dire des traitements contre les maladies. L’abstention est un désaveu qui touche tout à la fois les politiques et les médias. Ils vivent ensemble depuis trop longtemps, dans une sorte d’endogamie belliqueuse, au point de ne plus porter les préoccupations des Français qui, en retour, les prennent en grippe. Au mépris du peuple répond la haine contre ceux d’en haut – les politiques et les journalistes. Les Français n’y croient plus, se sentent exclus de la République. A-t-elle encor