Piratage russe: A qui profite le crime ? (Cui bono: Warning, a Manchurian candidate can hide another)

11 janvier, 2017

chicago-politicsManchurian candidate

citizenfour-movie-posterfifth_estate
like
I don’t think people want a lot of talk about change; I think they want someone with a real record, a doer not a talker. For legislators who don’t want to take a stand, there’s a third way to vote. Not yes, not no, but present, which is kind of like voting maybe. (…) A president can’t vote present; a president can’t pick or choose which challenges he or she will face. Hillary Clinton (Dec. 2007)
Ma propre ville de Chicago a compté parmi les villes à la politique locale la plus corrompue de l’histoire américaine, du népotisme institutionnalisé aux élections douteuses. Barack Obama (Nairobi, Kenya, août 2006)
C’est bon d’être à la maison. (…) Je suis arrivé à Chicago pour la première fois à l’âge de 20 ans, essayant toujours de comprendre qui j’étais; toujours à la recherche d’un but à ma vie. C’est dans les quartiers non loin d’ici que j’ai commencé à travailler avec des groupes religieux dans l’ombre des aciéries fermées. C’est dans ces rues où j’ai été témoin du pouvoir de la foi et de la dignité tranquille des travailleurs face à la lutte et à la perte. C’est là que j’ai appris que le changement ne se produit que lorsque des gens ordinaires s’impliquent, s’engagent et se rassemblent pour le demander.  (…) Si je vous avais dit il y a huit ans que l’Amérique inverserait une grande récession, redémarrerait notre industrie automobile et libérerait la plus longue période de création d’emplois de notre histoire … Si je vous avais dit que nous ouvririons un nouveau chapitre avec le peuple cubain, stopperions le programme nucléaire iranien sans tirer un coup de feu et que nous nous débarrasserions du cerveau du 11 septembre … Si je vous avais dit que nous aurions obtenu l’égalité du mariage et garanti le droit à l’assurance maladie pour 20 millions de nos concitoyens. Vous auriez pensé qu’on visait un peu trop haut. Mais c’est ce que nous avons fait. (…) par presque toutes les mesures, l’Amérique va mieux et est plus forte qu’avant. Dans dix jours, le monde sera témoin d’une caractéristique de notre démocratie: le transfert pacifique du pouvoir d’un président élu librement à un autre. J’ai confié au président élu Trump que mon administration assurerait la transition la plus harmonieuse possible, tout comme le président Bush l’avait fait pour moi. Parce que c’est à nous tous de nous assurer que notre gouvernement peut nous aider à relever les nombreux défis auxquels nous sommes encore confrontés. (…) Oui, nous pouvons le faire. Oui, nous l’avons fait. Barack Hussein Obama (Chicago, 10.01.2017)
As his second marriage to Sexton collapsed in 1998, Sexton filed an order of protection against him, public records show. Hull won’t talk about the divorce in detail, saying only that it was « contentious » and that he and Sexton are friends. The Chicago Tribune (15.02.04)
Though Obama, the son of a Kenyan immigrant, lagged in polls as late as mid-February, he surged to the front of the pack in recent weeks after he began airing television commercials and the black community rallied behind him. He also was the beneficiary of the most inglorious campaign implosion in Illinois political history, when multimillionaire Blair Hull plummeted from front-runner status amid revelations that an ex-wife had alleged in divorce papers that he had physically and verbally abused her. After spending more than $29 million of his own money, Hull, a former securities trader, finished third, garnering about 10 percent of the vote. (…) Obama ascended to front-runner status in early March as Hull’s candidacy went up in flames amid the divorce revelations, as well as Hull’s acknowledgment that he had used cocaine in the 1980s and had been evaluated for alcohol abuse. The Chicago Tribune (17.03.04)
Axelrod is known for operating in this gray area, part idealist, part hired muscle. It is difficult to discuss Axelrod in certain circles in Chicago without the matter of the Blair Hull divorce papers coming up. As the 2004 Senate primary neared, it was clear that it was a contest between two people: the millionaire liberal, Hull, who was leading in the polls, and Obama, who had built an impressive grass-roots campaign. About a month before the vote, The Chicago Tribune revealed, near the bottom of a long profile of Hull, that during a divorce proceeding, Hull’s second wife filed for an order of protection. In the following few days, the matter erupted into a full-fledged scandal that ended up destroying the Hull campaign and handing Obama an easy primary victory. The Tribune reporter who wrote the original piece later acknowledged in print that the Obama camp had  »worked aggressively behind the scenes » to push the story. But there are those in Chicago who believe that Axelrod had an even more significant role — that he leaked the initial story. They note that before signing on with Obama, Axelrod interviewed with Hull. They also point out that Obama’s TV ad campaign started at almost the same time. The NYT (01.04.07)
After an unsuccessful campaign for Congress in 2000, Illinois state Sen. Barack Obama faced serious financial pressure: numerous debts, limited cash and a law practice he had neglected for a year. Help arrived in early 2001 from a significant new legal client — a longtime political supporter. Chicago entrepreneur Robert Blackwell Jr. paid Obama an $8,000-a-month retainer to give legal advice to his growing technology firm, Electronic Knowledge Interchange. It allowed Obama to supplement his $58,000 part-time state Senate salary for over a year with regular payments from Blackwell’s firm that eventually totaled $112,000. A few months after receiving his final payment from EKI, Obama sent a request on state Senate letterhead urging Illinois officials to provide a $50,000 tourism promotion grant to another Blackwell company, Killerspin. Killerspin specializes in table tennis, running tournaments nationwide and selling its own line of equipment and apparel and DVD recordings of the competitions. With support from Obama, other state officials and an Obama aide who went to work part time for Killerspin, the company eventually obtained $320,000 in state grants between 2002 and 2004 to subsidize its tournaments. Obama’s staff said the senator advocated only for the first year’s grant — which ended up being $20,000, not $50,000. The day after Obama wrote his letter urging the awarding of the state funds, Obama’s U.S. Senate campaign received a $1,000 donation from Blackwell. (…) Business relationships between lawmakers and people with government interests are not illegal or uncommon in Illinois or other states with a part-time Legislature, where lawmakers supplement their state salaries with income from the private sector. But Obama portrays himself as a lawmaker dedicated to transparency and sensitive to even the appearance of a conflict of interest. (…) In his book « The Audacity of Hope, » Obama tells how his finances had deteriorated to such a point that his credit card was initially rejected when he tried to rent a car at the 2000 Democratic convention in Los Angeles. He said he had originally planned to dedicate that summer « to catching up on work at the law practice that I’d left unattended during the campaign (a neglect that had left me more or less broke). » Six months later Blackwell hired Obama to serve as general counsel for his tech company, EKI, which had been launched a few years earlier. The monthly retainer paid by EKI was sent to the law firm that Obama was affiliated with at the time, currently known as Miner, Barnhill & Galland, where he worked part time when he wasn’t tending to legislative duties. The business arrived at an especially fortuitous time because, as the law firm’s senior partner, Judson Miner, put it, « it was a very dry period here, » meaning that the ebb and flow of cases left little work for Obama and cash was tight. The entire EKI retainer went to Obama, who was considered « of counsel » to the firm, according to details provided to The Times by the Obama campaign and confirmed by Miner. Blackwell said he had no knowledge of Obama’s finances and hired Obama solely based on his abilities. « His personal financial situation was not and is not my concern, » Blackwell said. « I hired Barack because he is a brilliant person and a lawyer with great insight and judgment. » Obama’s tax returns show that he made no money from his law practice in 2000, the year of his unsuccessful run for a congressional seat. But that changed in 2001, when Obama reported $98,158 income for providing legal services. Of that, $80,000 was from Blackwell’s company. In 2002, the state senator reported $34,491 from legal services and speeches. Of that, $32,000 came from the EKI legal assignment, which ended in April 2002 by mutual agreement, as Obama ceased the practice of law and looked ahead to the possibility of running for the U.S. Senate. (…) Illinois ethics disclosure forms are designed to reveal possible financial conflicts by lawmakers. On disclosure forms for 2001 and 2002, Obama did not specify that EKI provided him with the bulk of the private-sector compensation he received. As was his custom, he attached a multi-page list of all the law firm’s clients, which included EKI among hundreds. Illinois law does not require more specific disclosure. Stanley Brand, a Washington lawyer who counsels members of Congress and others on ethics rules, said he would have advised a lawmaker in Obama’s circumstances to separately disclose such a singularly important client and not simply include it on a list of hundreds of firm clients, even if the law does not explicitly require it. « I would say you should disclose that to protect and insulate yourself against the charge that you are concealing it, » Brand said. LA Times
One lesson, however, has not fully sunk in and awaits final elucidation in the 2012 election: that of the Chicago style of Barack Obama’s politicking. In 2008 few of the true believers accepted that, in his first political race, in 1996, Barack Obama sued successfully to remove his opponents from the ballot. Or that in his race for the US Senate eight years later, sealed divorced records for both his primary- and general-election opponents were mysteriously leaked by unnamed Chicagoans, leading to the implosions of both candidates’ campaigns. Or that Obama was the first presidential candidate in the history of public campaign financing to reject it, or that he was also the largest recipient of cash from Wall Street in general, and from BP and Goldman Sachs in particular. Or that Obama was the first presidential candidate in recent memory not to disclose either undergraduate records or even partial medical. Or that remarks like “typical white person,” the clingers speech, and the spread-the-wealth quip would soon prove to be characteristic rather than anomalous. Few American presidents have dashed so many popular, deeply embedded illusions as has Barack Obama. And for that, we owe him a strange sort of thanks. Victor Davis Hanson
Selon le professeur Dick Simpson, chef du département de science politique de l’université d’Illinois, «c’est à la fin du XIXe siècle et au début du XXe que le système prend racine». L’arrivée de larges populations immigrées peinant à faire leur chemin à Chicago pousse les politiciens à «mobiliser le vote des communautés en échange d’avantages substantiels». Dans les années 1930, le Parti démocrate assoit peu à peu sa domination grâce à cette politique «raciale». Le système va se solidifier sous le règne de Richard J. Daley, grande figure qui régnera sur la ville pendant 21 ans. Aujourd’hui, c’est son fils Richard M. Daley qui est aux affaires depuis 18 ans et qui «perpétue le pouvoir du Parti démocrate à Chicago, en accordant emplois d’État, faveurs et contrats, en échange de soutiens politiques et financiers», raconte John McCormick. «Si on vous donne un permis de construction, vous êtes censés “payer en retour”», explique-t-il. «Cela s’appelle payer pour jouer», résume John Kass, un autre éditorialiste. Les initiés affirment que Rod Blagojevich ne serait jamais devenu gouverneur s’il n’avait croisé le chemin de sa future femme, Patricia Mell, fille de Dick Mell, un conseiller municipal très influent, considéré comme un rouage essentiel de la machine. (…) Dans ce contexte local plus que trouble, Peraica affirme que la montée au firmament d’Obama n’a pu se faire «par miracle».«Il a été aidé par la machine qui l’a adoubé, il est cerné par cette machine qui produit de la corruption et le risque existe qu’elle monte de Chicago vers Washington», va-t-il même jusqu’à prédire. Le conseiller régional républicain cite notamment le nom d’Emil Jones, l’un des piliers du Parti démocrate de l’Illinois, qui a apporté son soutien à Obama lors de son élection au Sénat en 2004. Il évoque aussi les connexions du président élu avec Anthony Rezko, cet homme d’affaires véreux, proche de Blagojevich et condamné pour corruption, qui fut aussi le principal responsable de la levée de fonds privés pour le compte d’Obama pendant sa course au siège de sénateur et qui l’aida à acheter sa maison à Chicago. «La presse a protégé Barack Obama comme un petit bébé. Elle n’a pas sorti les histoires liées à ses liens avec Rezko», s’indigne Peraica, qui cite toutefois un article du Los Angeles Times faisant état d’une affaire de financement d’un tournoi international de ping-pong qui aurait éclaboussé le président élu. (…) Pour la plupart des commentateurs, Barack Obama a su naviguer à travers la politique locale «sans se compromettre. Le Figaro
La condamnation de M. Blagojevich met une fois de plus la lumière sur la scène politique corrompue de l’Etat dont la plus grande ville est Chicago. Cinq des neuf gouverneurs précédents de l’Illinois ont été accusés ou arrêtés pour fraude ou corruption. Le prédécesseur de M. Blagojevich, le républicain George Ryan, purge actuellement une peine de six ans et demi de prison pour fraude et racket. M. Blagojevich, qui devra se présenter à la prison le 16 février et verser des amendes de près de 22 000 dollars, détient le triste record de la peine la plus lourde jamais infligée à un ex-gouverneur de l’Illinois. Ses avocats ont imploré le juge de ne pas chercher à faire un exemple avec leur client, notant que ce dernier n’avait pas amassé d’enrichissement personnel et avait seulement tenté d’obtenir des fonds de campagne ainsi que des postes bien rémunérés. En plein scandale, M. Blagojevich était passé outre aux appels à la démission venus de son propre parti et avait nommé procédé à la nomination d’un sénateur avant d’être destitué. Mais le scandale a porté un coup à la réputation des démocrates dans l’Illinois et c’est un républicain qui a été élu l’an dernier pour occuper l’ancien siège de M. Obama. AFP (08.12.11)
Dès qu’un organisateur entre dans une communauté, il ne vit, rêve, mange, respire et dort qu’une chose, et c’est d’établir la base politique de masse de ce qu’il appelle l’armée. Saul Alinsky (mentor politique d’Obama)
On se retrouve avec deux conclusions: 1) un président très inexpérimenté a découvert que toute la rhétorique de campagne facile et manichéenne de 2008 n’est pas facilement traduisible en gouvernance réelle. 2) Obama est engagé dans une course contre la montre pour imposer de force un ordre du jour plutôt radical et diviseur à un pays de centre-droit avant que celui-ci ne se réveille et que ses sondages atteignent le seuil fatidique des 40%. Autrement dit, il y a deux options possibles: Ou bien le pays bascule plus à gauche en quatre ans qu’il ne l’a fait en cinquante ou Obama entraine dans sa chute le Congrès démocrate et la notion même de gouvernance de gauche responsable, laissant ainsi derrière lui un bilan à la Carter. Victor Davis Hanson
Bientôt, M. Obama aura ses propres La Mecque et Téhéran à traiter, peut-être à Jérusalem et au Caire. Il ferait bien de jeter un œil au bilan de son co-lauréat au prix Nobel de la paix, comme démonstration de la manière dont les motifs les plus purs peuvent entrainer les résultats les plus désastreux. Bret Stephens
C’est ma dernière élection. Après mon élection, j’aurai plus de flexibilité. Obama (à Medvedev, 27.03.12)
Dans le milieu du renseignement, nous dirions que M. Trump a été recruté comme un agent russe qui s’ignore. Michael Morell (ancien directeur de la CIA)
Republicans, independents, swing voters and GOP members of the House and Senate who are staking their reelection campaigns on their support for Trump to be president and commander in chief should thoughtfully reflect on the recent op-ed in The New York Times by former acting CIA Director Michael Morell. The op-ed is titled “I ran the CIA. Now I’m endorsing Hillary Clinton.” Morell, who has spent decades protecting our security in the intelligence business, offered high praise for the Democratic nominee and former secretary of State based on his years of working closely with her in the high councils of government. But Morell went even further than praising and endorsing Clinton. In one of the most extraordinary and unprecedented statements in the history of presidential politics, which powerfully supports the case that every Republican running for office should unequivocally state that they will refuse to vote for Trump or face potentially catastrophic consequences at the polls, Morell wrote: “In the intelligence business, we would say that Mr. Putin had recruited Mr. Trump as an unwitting agent of the Russian Federation.” This brings to mind the novel and motion picture “The Manchurian Candidate,” which about an American who was captured during the Korean War and brainwashed to unwittingly carry out orders to advance the interests of communists against America. I offer no suggestion about Trump’s motives in repeatedly saying things, and advocating positions, that are so destructive to American national security interests, though Trump owes the American people full and immediate disclosure of his tax returns for them to determine what, if any, business interests or debt may exist with Russian or other hostile foreign sources. Whatever Trump’s motivation, Morell is right in suggesting the billionaire nominee is at the least acting as an “unwitting agent” who often advances the interests of foreign actors hostile to America. Most intelligence experts believe the email leaks attacking Hillary Clinton at the time of the Democratic National Convention were originally obtained through espionage by Russian intelligence services engaging in cyberwar against America, and then shared with WikiLeaks by Russian sources engaged in an infowar against America. Do Republicans running for the House and Senate in 2016 want to be aligned with a Russian strongman and his intelligence services engaging in covert action against America for the presumed purpose of electing Putin’s preferred candidate? Do they believe Trump when he says he was only kidding when he publicly supported these espionage practices and called for them to be escalated? Do Republicans running in 2016 believe that America should have a commander in chief who has harshly criticized NATO and stated that if Russia invades the Baltic states, Eastern Europe states such as Poland, or Western Europe he is not committed to defending our allies against this aggression? Do Republicans running in 2016 support a commander in chief who has endorsed Britain’s vote to leave the European Union, appeared to endorse Russia’s annexation of Crimea, and falsely stated that Russia “is not in Ukraine”? (…) I do not question Donald Trump’s patriotism. But for whatever reason Trump advocates policies, again and again, that would help America’s adversaries like Russia and enemies like ISIS and make him, in Morell’s powerful words, “an unwitting agent of the Russian Federation.” In “The Manchurian Candidate,” our enemies sought to influence our politics at the highest level. What troubles a growing number of Republicans in Congress, and so many Republican and Democratic national security leaders, is that in 2016 life imitates art, aided and abetted by what appears to be a Russian covert action designed to elect the next American president. Brent Budowsky
A former senior intelligence officer for a Western country who specialized in Russian counterintelligence tells Mother Jones that in recent months he provided the bureau with memos, based on his recent interactions with Russian sources, contending the Russian government has for years tried to co-opt and assist Trump—and that the FBI requested more information from him. « This is something of huge significance, way above party politics, » the former intelligence officer says. « I think [Trump’s] own party should be aware of this stuff as well. » Does this mean the FBI is investigating whether Russian intelligence has attempted to develop a secret relationship with Trump or cultivate him as an asset? Was the former intelligence officer and his material deemed credible or not? An FBI spokeswoman says, « Normally, we don’t talk about whether we are investigating anything. » But a senior US government official not involved in this case but familiar with the former spy tells Mother Jones that he has been a credible source with a proven record of providing reliable, sensitive, and important information to the US government. In June, the former Western intelligence officer—who spent almost two decades on Russian intelligence matters and who now works with a US firm that gathers information on Russia for corporate clients—was assigned the task of researching Trump’s dealings in Russia and elsewhere, according to the former spy and his associates in this American firm. This was for an opposition research project originally financed by a Republican client critical of the celebrity mogul. (Before the former spy was retained, the project’s financing switched to a client allied with Democrats.) « It started off as a fairly general inquiry, » says the former spook, who asks not to be identified. But when he dug into Trump, he notes, he came across troubling information indicating connections between Trump and the Russian government. According to his sources, he says, « there was an established exchange of information between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin of mutual benefit. » This was, the former spy remarks, « an extraordinary situation. » He regularly consults with US government agencies on Russian matters, and near the start of July on his own initiative—without the permission of the US company that hired him—he sent a report he had written for that firm to a contact at the FBI, according to the former intelligence officer and his American associates, who asked not to be identified. (He declines to identify the FBI contact.) The former spy says he concluded that the information he had collected on Trump was « sufficiently serious » to share with the FBI. Mother Jones has reviewed that report and other memos this former spy wrote. The first memo, based on the former intelligence officer’s conversations with Russian sources, noted, « Russian regime has been cultivating, supporting and assisting TRUMP for at least 5 years. Aim, endorsed by PUTIN, has been to encourage splits and divisions in western alliance. » It maintained that Trump « and his inner circle have accepted a regular flow of intelligence from the Kremlin, including on his Democratic and other political rivals. » It claimed that Russian intelligence had « compromised » Trump during his visits to Moscow and could « blackmail him. » It also reported that Russian intelligence had compiled a dossier on Hillary Clinton based on « bugged conversations she had on various visits to Russia and intercepted phone calls. » The former intelligence officer says the response from the FBI was « shock and horror. » The FBI, after receiving the first memo, did not immediately request additional material, according to the former intelligence officer and his American associates. Yet in August, they say, the FBI asked him for all information in his possession and for him to explain how the material had been gathered and to identify his sources. The former spy forwarded to the bureau several memos—some of which referred to members of Trump’s inner circle. After that point, he continued to share information with the FBI. « It’s quite clear there was or is a pretty substantial inquiry going on, » he says. « This is something of huge significance, way above party politics, » the former intelligence officer comments. « I think [Trump’s] own party should be aware of this stuff as well. » Mother Jones (Oct 31, 2016)
A quelques jours de l’intronisation d’un multimilliardaire de l’immobilier qui a gagné seul contre tous, Hollywood entre en Résistance. Le scud lancé par Meryl Streep en direction de Donald Trump à la soirée des Golden Globes, traduit fidèlement la posture de la grande majorité des stars américaines, depuis le début de la campagne présidentielle. Il suffit d’évoquer notamment les insultes de Robert de Niro, traitant carrément le futur leader des USA de chien et de porc, entre autres amabilités. L’immense interprète qu’est Meryl Streep a dénoncé, sans jamais le nommer, la violence de celui qui se serait moqué d’un journaliste handicapé, version qui, depuis longtemps, a été catégoriquement contestée par Trump, que l’on sait pourtant capable d’excès en tout genre. Mais c’est ici le mot «violence» qui interpelle. Aux Oscars comme au Grammy Awards, dans toutes ces cérémonies où les millionnaires du grand et du petit écran se coagulent et se congratulent dans une autosatisfaction permanente, on n’a jamais entendu une seule vedette dénoncer – à l’exception, évidemment, de l’après 11 septembre 2001 – les attentats de Paris et de Bruxelles, du Texas et de Floride, de Madrid et de Londres, de Jérusalem et d’Ankara, les ethnocides de communautés entières et les mille et une manières de se débarrasser des homosexuels, des femmes et des apostats, dans un certain nombre de pays de l’hémisphère Sud. Pour les étoiles filantes du Camp du Bien, les évidentes vulgarités de Trump sont beaucoup plus insupportables que la manière dont on assaisonne féministes et gays, athées et libres penseurs, à quelques milliers de kilomètres de leurs somptueuses villas super-protégées de Beverly Hills. Cependant, imperceptiblement mais sûrement, quelque chose est en train de changer. Face à la bonne conscience des privilégiés portant leur humanité en sautoir, le plouc chef de chantier Trump, à coups de tweets et de rendez-vous pris à toute vitesse, modifie d’ores et déjà le paysage. Il ne se passe pas de jour sans que telle compagnie automobile annonce qu’elle crée une usine dans le Michigan ; tel fabricant d’ordinateurs relocalise ses ateliers dans le Middle West, et l’un de nos multimilliardaires, Bernard Arnault, vient de s’engager, dans le hall de la Trump Tower, à créer des milliers d’emplois supplémentaires aux Etats-Unis. Et cela, avant même l’investiture officielle du candidat Républicain, sur la victoire duquel, rappelons-le quand même, personne ne pariait un centime il y a moins d’un an. Tout se passe comme si nous assistons à la fin du «soft power» pratiqué, avec l’insuccès que l’on sait, par Barack Obama. La difficulté du temps présent appelle, qu’on le déplore ou que l’on s’en réjouisse, à un volontarisme vigilant et à un réarmement lucide que les princes qui nous gouvernent avaient totalement oubliés, de part et d’autre de l’Atlantique. Si Hollywood pourra continuer à être «peace and love» en toute tranquillité, elle le devra à des hommes et à des femmes qui sauront faire comprendre aux totalitaires et aux intégristes de tous bords, qu’au-delà de telle limite, leur ticket ne sera jamais plus valable. Ironie du sort: ce sera peut-être grâce à Trump que Meryl Streep et les autres pourront pratiquer, en toute sécurité, leur non-violence considérée comme un des beaux-arts. André Bercoff
Our primary targets are those highly oppressive regimes in China, Russia and Central Eurasia, but we also expect to be of assistance to those in the West who wish to reveal illegal or immoral behavior in their own governments and corporations. Julian Assange (2006)
In Russia, there are many vibrant publications, online blogs, and Kremlin critics such as [Alexey] Navalny are part of that spectrum. There are also newspapers like « Novaya Gazeta », in which different parts of society in Moscow are permitted to critique each other and it is tolerated, generally, because it isn’t a big TV channel that might have a mass popular effect, its audience is educated people in Moscow. So my interpretation is that in Russia there are competitors to WikiLeaks, and no WikiLeaks staff speak Russian, so for a strong culture which has its own language, you have to be seen as a local player. WikiLeaks is a predominantly English-speaking organisation with a website predominantly in English. We have published more than 800,000 documents about or referencing Russia and president Putin, so we do have quite a bit of coverage, but the majority of our publications come from Western sources, though not always. For example, we have published more than 2 million documents from Syria, including Bashar al-Assad personally. Sometimes we make a publication about a country and they will see WikiLeaks as a player within that country, like with Timor East and Kenya. The real determinant is how distant that culture is from English. Chinese culture is quite far away ». (…) “Our primary targets are those highly oppressive regimes in China, Russia and Central Eurasia, but we also expect to be of assistance to those in the West who wish to reveal illegal or immoral behavior in their own governments and corporations.(…) We have published some things in Chinese. It is necessary to be seen as a local player and to adapt the language to the local culture« . Julian Assange (2016)
It was not the quantity of Mr. Snowden’s theft but the quality that was most telling. Mr. Snowden’s theft put documents at risk that could reveal the NSA’s Level 3 tool kit—a reference to documents containing the NSA’s most-important sources and methods. Since the agency was created in 1952, Russia and other adversary nations had been trying to penetrate its Level-3 secrets without great success. Yet it was precisely these secrets that Mr. Snowden changed jobs to steal. In an interview in Hong Kong’s South China Morning Post on June 15, 2013, he said he sought to work on a Booz Allen contract at the CIA, even at a cut in pay, because it gave him access to secret lists of computers that the NSA was tapping into around the world. He evidently succeeded. In a 2014 interview with Vanity Fair, Richard Ledgett, the NSA executive who headed the damage-assessment team, described one lengthy document taken by Mr. Snowden that, if it fell into the wrong hands, would provide a “road map” to what targets abroad the NSA was, and was not, covering. It contained the requests made by the 17 U.S. services in the so-called Intelligence Community for NSA interceptions abroad. On June 23, less than two weeks after Mr. Snowden released the video that helped present his narrative, he left Hong Kong and flew to Moscow, where he received protection by the Russian government. In much of the media coverage that followed, the ultimate destination of these stolen secrets was fogged over—if not totally obscured from the public—by the unverified claims that Mr. Snowden was spoon feeding to handpicked journalists. In his narrative, Mr. Snowden always claims that he was a conscientious “whistleblower” who turned over all the stolen NSA material to journalists in Hong Kong. He has insisted he had no intention of defecting to Russia but was on his way to Latin America when he was trapped in Russia by the U.S. government in an attempt to demonize him. The transfer of state secrets from Mr. Snowden to Russia did not occur in a vacuum. The intelligence war did not end with the termination of the Cold War; it shifted to cyberspace. Even if Russia could not match the NSA’s state-of-the-art sensors, computers and productive partnerships with the cipher services of Britain, Israel, Germany and other allies, it could nullify the U.S. agency’s edge by obtaining its sources and methods from even a single contractor with access to Level 3 documents. Russian intelligence uses a single umbrella term to cover anyone who delivers it secret intelligence. Whether a person acted out of idealistic motives, sold information for money or remained clueless of the role he or she played in the transfer of secrets—the provider of secret data is considered an “espionage source.” By any measure, it is a job description that fits Mr. Snowden. Wall Street Journal
Une enquête choc sur l’ancien employé de la NSA soutient qu’Edward Snowden a volé surtout des documents portant sur des secrets militaires et qu’il a collaboré avec le renseignement russe. (…) il prétend que Snowden se serait fait embaucher intentionnellement par la société Booz Allen Hamilton, afin de se retrouver au contact de documents secrets de la NSA. Sous-entendu: il avait l’intention dès le départ d’intercepter des informations critiques. (…) II trouve également louche que l’informaticien se soit enfui avec son larcin seulement six semaines après avoir pris ses fonctions. Par ailleurs, Epstein souligne que la majeure partie des 1,5 million de documents subtilisés ne concernaient pas les pratiques abusives des services de renseignements américains. (…) Mais Snowden aurait en fait surtout récupéré des détails précieux sur l’organisation et les méthodes de la NSA mettant en péril les intérêts et la défense du pays contre le terrorisme et des Etats rivaux. Des informations de niveau 3 encore jamais dérobées par des espions étrangers depuis la guerre froide. C’est en tous cas ce qu’en disent les militaires qui ont examiné le vol de Snowden à la demande du Pentagone. La démonstration est encore plus troublante concernant la façon dont Snowden a trouvé refuge en Russie, même si elle repose souvent sur des sources de seconde main comme des articles de presse et des reportages. Le jeune homme prétend avoir fui Hong-Kong pour rejoindre l’Amérique latine. Mais les Etats-Unis auraient révoqué son passeport, alors qu’il était en plein vol, le contraignant à trouver refuge en Russie. Faux rétorque le journaliste, les Etats-Unis auraient annulé ses papiers alors qu’il se trouvait encore à Hong-Kong. Snowden aurait donc su dès le départ qu’il se rendait en Russie. Etant donné que le jeune homme se retrouvait sans passeport valide, ni visa russe, la compagnie Aeroflot, à bord de laquelle il a voyagé, était forcément complice de sa fuite, avance l’enquêteur. Cette main tendue d’Aeroflot aurait été confirmée par l’avocat de Snowden dès 2013. Mais Epstein va plus loin en affirmant que toute l’opération d’exfiltration a été pilotée par le gouvernement russe avec l’accord de Poutine en personne. Une équipe des opérations spéciales l’aurait même accueilli à l’arrivée de l’avion, tandis que Sarah Harrison, la porte-parole de Wikileaks – site qu’on dit proche des intérêts russes depuis la publication des documents de la Convention démocrate américaine – aurait été dépêchée pour escorter l’analyste jusqu’en Russie et lui acheter de faux billets d’avion pour brouiller les pistes. Enfin, Edward Snowden avait affirmé avoir détruit ses documents en arrivant à Moscou et être resté à distance des services de renseignements russes. Là encore, Epstein prétend le contraire en s’appuyant sur le témoignage direct d’un parlementaire et d’un avocat russe, tous deux proches du Kremlin. Ils affirment que Snowden avait encore en sa possession des données secrètes et qu’elles lui ont servi de monnaie d’échange avec la Russie. Ce qui expliquerait pourquoi des informations ont continué à fuiter après l’arrivée de Snowden à Moscou comme la révélation embarrassante sur le téléphone de la chancelière allemande Angela Merkel qui était surveillé par la NSA. Epstein semble enfin convaincu que Snowden continue de partager ses informations avec la Russie. BFMTV
As a political leader, Obama has been a disaster for his party. Since his inauguration in 2009, roughly 1,100 elected Democrats nationwide have been ousted by Republicans. Democrats lost their majorities in the US House and Senate. They now hold just 18 of the 50 governorships, and only 31 of the nation’s 99 state legislative chambers. After eight years under Obama, the GOP is stronger than at any time since the 1920s, and the outgoing president’s party is in tatters. In almost every respect, Obama leaves behind a trail of failure and disappointment In his rush to pull US troops out of Iraq and Afghanistan, he created a power vacuum into which terror networks expanded and the Taliban revived. Islamic State’s jihadist savagery not only plunged a stabilized Iraq back into shuddering violence, but also inspired scores of lethal terrorist attacks in the West. For months, Obama and his lieutenants insisted that Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad could be induced to « reform, » and pointedly refused to intervene as an uprising against him metastasized into genocidal slaughter. At last Obama vowed to take action if Assad crossed a « red line » by deploying chemical weapons — but when those weapons were used, Obama blinked. The death toll in Syria climbed into the hundreds of thousands, triggering a flood of refugees greater than any the world had seen since the 1940s. (…) Determined to conciliate America’s adversaries, the president indulged dictatorial regimes in Iran, Russia, and Cuba. They in turn exploited his passivity with multiple treacheries — seizing Crimea and destroying Aleppo (Russia), abducting American hostages for ransom and illicitly testing long-range missiles (Iran), and cracking down mercilessly on democratic dissidents (Cuba). For eight years the nation has been led by a president intent on lowering America’s global profile, not projecting military power, and “leading from behind.” The consequences have been stark: a Middle East awash in blood and bombs, US troops re-embroiled in Iraq and Afghanistan, aggressive dictators ascendant, human rights and democracy in retreat, rivers of refugees destabilizing nations across three continents, the rise of neo-fascism in Europe, and the erosion of US credibility to its lowest level since the Carter years. According to Gallup, Obama became the most polarizing president in modern history. Like all presidents, he faced partisan opposition, but Obama worsened things by regularly taking the low road and disparaging his critics’ motives. In his own words, his political strategy was one of ruthless escalation: “If they bring a knife to the fight, we bring a gun.” During his 2012 reelection campaign, Politico reported that “Obama and his top campaign aides have engaged far more frequently in character attacks and personal insults than the Romney campaign.” And when a Republican-led Congress wouldn’t enact legislation he sought, Obama turned to his “pen and phone” strategy of governing by diktat that polarized politics even more. To his credit, Obama acknowledges that he didn’t live up to his promise to reduce the angry rancor of Washington politics. Had he made an effort to do so, perhaps the campaign to succeed him would not have been so mean. And perhaps 60 percent of voters would not feel that their country, after two terms of Obama’s administration, is “on the wrong track”. Jeff Jacoby
Après son départ de la Maison-Blanche, George W. Bush a mis un point d’honneur à ne pas intervenir dans les débats politiques de son pays. Il s’est notamment gardé de critiquer son successeur, se contentant de défendre sa présidence dans des mémoires ou des conférences et de peindre des tableaux naïfs. Barack Obama ne semble pas vouloir suivre cet exemple après le 20 janvier. Il faut dire qu’il n’est pas aussi impopulaire que son prédécesseur au moment de quitter le 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. Bush récoltait alors 24% d’opinions favorables. À 58%, Obama se situe, à la fin de sa présidence, dans une zone de popularité supérieure, en compagnie des Bill Clinton (61%) et Ronald Reagan (63%), selon les données du Pew Research Center. Mais le 44e président doit s’acquitter d’une lourde dette politique. Une dette envers son propre parti. Les démocrates peuvent se targuer d’avoir remporté le vote populaire dans six des sept dernières élections présidentielles. Mais ils ont été décimés au cours de l’ère Obama dans les deux chambres du Congrès et dans les législatures des États américains. On peut parler d’hécatombe : de 2009 à 2016, le Parti démocrate a perdu 1042 sièges de parlementaire ou postes de gouverneur, à Washington et dans les législatures d’État. Après les élections du 8 novembre, les républicains ont désormais la mainmise complète non seulement sur les branches exécutive et législative à Washington, mais également dans la moitié des États américains. Il s’agit d’un des aspects les plus frappants – et douloureux pour les démocrates – de l’héritage d’Obama, qui doit en porter une part de responsabilité importante.Barack Obama pourrait s’écarter d’une autre façon de l’exemple établi par George W. Bush après son départ de la Maison-Blanche. Il pourrait se permettre de critiquer son successeur. Peut-être pas au cours de la première année de Donald Trump à la Maison-Blanche, mais assurément dans les moments où «certaines questions fondamentales de [la] démocratie [américaine]» seront mises en cause, a-t-il précisé lors d’une baladodiffusion récente animée par son ancien conseiller David Axelrod. Richard Hétu
Attention: un candidat mandchourien peut en cacher un autre !

Invalidations systématiques, dès son premier casse électoral de Chicago de 1996  pour les sénatoriales d’état, des candidatures de ses rivaux sur les plus subtils points de procédure (la qualité des signatures) jusqu’à se retrouver seul en lice, déballages forcés,  quatre ans plus tard aux élections sénatoriales fédérales de 2004, des problèmes de couple (un cas apparemment de violence domestique) ou frasques supposées (des soirées dans des club échangistes) de ses adversaires, que ce soit son propre collègue Blair Hull aux primaires ou le Républicain Jack Ryan à la générale de manière à se retrouver sans opposition devant les électeurs, tentative de rebelote, lors des primaires de 2008, contre sa rivale démocrate malheureuse Hillary Clinton, abandon précipité d’un Irak pacifié puis d’une Syrie fragile à l’avatar survitaminé d’Al Qaeda, extension exponentielle à l’échelle de la planète des éliminations ciblées à coup discrets de drones, abandon à l’ennemi d’un transfuge détenteur de la boite à outil même de ses services de renseignement, lâchage dans la nature des terroristes les plus dangereux de Guantanamo, attribution du droit et des moyens d’accès à l’arme nucléaire d’un pays ayant explicitement appelé à l’effacement de la carte d’un de ses voisins, offre de « flexibilité » post-électorale au principal adversaire strratégique de son propre pays, mise au pilori universel et vote d’une résolution délégitimant la présence même de son principal allié au Moyen-Orient sur ses lieux les plus sacrés …

Alors qu’à moins de dix jours de son investiture à la Maison Blanche …

Et que sur fond, après le retrait américain précipité de la région que l’on sait,  d’un Moyen-Orient à feu et à sang …

Et,  entre arrivée massive de prétendus réfugiés et retour annoncé de milliers de terroristes aguerris, d’une Europe plus que jamais fragilisée …

S’accumulent, entre mise au pilori d’Israël et appui explicite de l’hégémonisme iranien, les dossiers et les menaces potentiellement encore plus explosifs …

Et qu’entre accusations de « candidat mandchourien » et avant les révélations annoncées sans la moindre preuve les plus compromettantes

Via nul doute les canaux habituels de celui qui explique tranquillement l’étrange exclusivité américaine de ses révélations par la trop grand liberté de Moscou et la trop grande distance de Pékin …

Se multiplient, entre Maison Blanche, Hollywood et leur claques médiatiques respectives, les doutes sur la légitimité de l’élection …

Du nouveau président que, contre tous les pronostics et les imprécations de leurs élites, se sont choisis les Américains …

Devinez qui du haut d’une des cotes les plus élevées pour un président américain sortant …

Mais du véritable champ de ruines – du jamais-vu depuis la Seconde Guerre mondiale: quelque 1042 sièges de parlementaire ou postes de gouverneur perdus – qu’il laisse à son propre parti …

Est sur le point d’ajouter entre blâme de son prédécesseur au début et de son successeur à la fin …

Un énième hold up parfait à la longue liste de ceux qui l’ont amené là où il est  ?

Les Russes détiendraient des informations compromettantes sur Trump
Philippe Gélie
Le Figaro
11/01/2017

Selon CNN, les responsables du renseignement américain auraient informé Donald Trump dans un rapport confidentiel que les agents du Kremlin sont en possession d’informations personnelles et financières à son sujet susceptibles de le discréditer.

De notre correspondant à Washington,

Lorsqu’ils lui ont présenté vendredi dernier leur rapport confidentiel sur les interférences russes dans la campagne présidentielle, les responsables du renseignement américain auraient informé Donald Trump que les agents du Kremlin possédaient des «informations compromettantes, personnelles et financières» à son sujet, affirme CNN. L’assertion figurerait dans un addendum de deux pages remis parallèlement à Barack Obama.

Cette allégation proviendrait d’un ancien agent du MI6 britannique, jugé crédible en raison de ses «vastes réseaux» de contacts à travers l’Europe. Celui-ci s’en serait ouvert auprès du FBI dès l’été. La police fédérale aurait attendu de vérifier la fiabilité de ses sources pour inclure l’information dans le rapport sur les piratages russes. Les agences américaines n’auraient pas, à ce stade, vérifié la substance de l’addendum de manière indépendante.

Un ex-ambassadeur britannique aurait cependant eu lui aussi accès aux mêmes informations, par d’autres voies. Il les aurait transmises directement au sénateur John McCain, président de la Commission de la défense du Sénat, qui s’en serait ouvert auprès du directeur du FBI, James Comey, cosignataire du rapport.

Une activité informatique suspecte identifiée

CNN affirme également que, selon l’addendum secret, des personnes liées à Donald Trump auraient communiqué régulièrement avec des proches du Kremlin durant la campagne. Des experts du piratage informatique avaient déjà identifié une activité suspecte entre un serveur du groupe Trump et une adresse e-mail russe fonctionnant en circuit fermé.

Pour les responsables du renseignement, le fait que les Russes n’aient pas diffusé les éléments «compromettants» en leur possession confirmerait leur analyse selon laquelle le Kremlin a tenté de favoriser l’élection de Donald Trump au détriment de Hillary Clinton.

Le président élu ne manquera pas d’être interrogé sur ces nouveaux éléments lors de la conférence de presse qu’il doit tenir ce mercredi, la première du genre depuis juillet. Il a jusqu’ici mis en doute ou minimisé la responsabilité de la Russie dans les piratages, soucieux que rien ne puisse entamer la légitimité de sa victoire.

Si elles sont avérées, ces révélations ne manqueront pas de relancer les soupçons sur les raisons du penchant prorusse de Trump. De nombreux démocrates, mais aussi d’importants élus républicains comme John McCain, le soupçonnent à mots couverts d’être une «marionnette» de Moscou. À l’été, Michael Morell, ancien directeur de la CIA, l’avait quasiment accusé dans le New York Times d’être un «candidat mandchourien»: «Dans le milieu du renseignement, nous dirions que M. Trump a été recruté comme un agent russe qui s’ignore».

Voir aussi:

Brent Budowsky: Donald Trump, a real-life Manchurian candidate
Brent Budowsky
The Hill
08/09/16

With Republicans facing the growing prospect of a landslide defeat that could return control of the Senate and potentially the House to Democrats, 50 leading GOP national security figures announced on Monday that they refuse to vote for Donald Trump because they consider him a danger to American national security.

For many months I have written in The Hill that Trump, now the GOP nominee, has a strange and disquieting habit of offering sympathy and praise to foreign dictators who wish America ill. He has favorably tweeted the words of Benito Mussolini, the Italian fascist from darker days. He has had kind words for Kim Jong Il, the mass murdering dictator of North Korea. And the words of mutual praise exchanged between Trump and former KGB officer and Russian strongman Vladimir Putin will someday be legendary in the history of presidential politics.

Republicans, independents, swing voters and GOP members of the House and Senate who are staking their reelection campaigns on their support for Trump to be president and commander in chief should thoughtfully reflect on the recent op-ed in The New York Times by former acting CIA Director Michael Morell. The op-ed is titled “I ran the CIA. Now I’m endorsing Hillary Clinton.” Morell, who has spent decades protecting our security in the intelligence business, offered high praise for the Democratic nominee and former secretary of State based on his years of working closely with her in the high councils of government. But Morell went even further than praising and endorsing Clinton.

In one of the most extraordinary and unprecedented statements in the history of presidential politics, which powerfully supports the case that every Republican running for office should unequivocally state that they will refuse to vote for Trump or face potentially catastrophic consequences at the polls, Morell wrote: “In the intelligence business, we would say that Mr. Putin had recruited Mr. Trump as an unwitting agent of the Russian Federation.”

This brings to mind the novel and motion picture “The Manchurian Candidate,” which about an American who was captured during the Korean War and brainwashed to unwittingly carry out orders to advance the interests of communists against America.

I offer no suggestion about Trump’s motives in repeatedly saying things, and advocating positions, that are so destructive to American national security interests, though Trump owes the American people full and immediate disclosure of his tax returns for them to determine what, if any, business interests or debt may exist with Russian or other hostile foreign sources.

Whatever Trump’s motivation, Morell is right in suggesting the billionaire nominee is at the least acting as an “unwitting agent” who often advances the interests of foreign actors hostile to America.

Most intelligence experts believe the email leaks attacking Hillary Clinton at the time of the Democratic National Convention were originally obtained through espionage by Russian intelligence services engaging in cyberwar against America, and then shared with WikiLeaks by Russian sources engaged in an infowar against America.

Do Republicans running for the House and Senate in 2016 want to be aligned with a Russian strongman and his intelligence services engaging in covert action against America for the presumed purpose of electing Putin’s preferred candidate? Do they believe Trump when he says he was only kidding when he publicly supported these espionage practices and called for them to be escalated?

Do Republicans running in 2016 believe that America should have a commander in chief who has harshly criticized NATO and stated that if Russia invades the Baltic states, Eastern Europe states such as Poland, or Western Europe he is not committed to defending our allies against this aggression?

Do Republicans running in 2016 support a commander in chief who has endorsed Britain’s vote to leave the European Union, appeared to endorse Russia’s annexation of Crimea, and falsely stated that Russia “is not in Ukraine”?

Do Republicans running in 2016 favor a commander in chief who disdains heroic American POWs by saying he prefers troops who were never captured, and says he would order American troops to commit torture in violation of the Geneva Conventions and international law?

Do Republicans running in 2016 favor a president who campaigns for a ban on immigration of Muslims so extreme that a long list of experts, including retired Gen. and former CIA Director David Petraeus, correctly argue it would help ISIS and other terror groups that seek to kill us?

Do Republicans running in 2016 realize that Trump’s proposal to build a wall on our borders similar to the Berlin Wall erected by the Soviets, coupled with his defamation of immigrants as rapists and murderers, would not only alienate Hispanic voters for a generation but provide a major boost to anti-American extremists across Latin America more successfully than any words Fidel Castro could say today?

I do not question Donald Trump’s patriotism. But for whatever reason Trump advocates policies, again and again, that would help America’s adversaries like Russia and enemies like ISIS and make him, in Morell’s powerful words, “an unwitting agent of the Russian Federation.”

In “The Manchurian Candidate,” our enemies sought to influence our politics at the highest level. What troubles a growing number of Republicans in Congress, and so many Republican and Democratic national security leaders, is that in 2016 life imitates art, aided and abetted by what appears to be a Russian covert action designed to elect the next American president.

Budowsky was an aide to former Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Texas) and Rep. Bill Alexander (D-Ark.), then chief deputy majority whip of the House. He holds an LL.M. in international financial law from the London School of Economics

Voir également:

I Ran the C.I.A. Now I’m Endorsing Hillary Clinton

02/01/2017

Une enquête choc sur l’ancien employé de la NSA soutient qu’Edward Snowden a volé surtout des documents portant sur des secrets militaires et qu’il a collaboré avec le renseignement russe.

Voir de même:

La dette d’Obama

Richard Hétu
La Presse
09 janvier 2017

(New York) Après son départ de la Maison-Blanche, George W. Bush a mis un point d’honneur à ne pas intervenir dans les débats politiques de son pays. Il s’est notamment gardé de critiquer son successeur, se contentant de défendre sa présidence dans des mémoires ou des conférences et de peindre des tableaux naïfs.

Barack Obama ne semble pas vouloir suivre cet exemple après le 20 janvier. Il faut dire qu’il n’est pas aussi impopulaire que son prédécesseur au moment de quitter le 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. Bush récoltait alors 24% d’opinions favorables. À 58%, Obama se situe, à la fin de sa présidence, dans une zone de popularité supérieure, en compagnie des Bill Clinton (61%) et Ronald Reagan (63%), selon les données du Pew Research Center.

Mais le 44e président doit s’acquitter d’une lourde dette politique. Une dette envers son propre parti. Les démocrates peuvent se targuer d’avoir remporté le vote populaire dans six des sept dernières élections présidentielles. Mais ils ont été décimés au cours de l’ère Obama dans les deux chambres du Congrès et dans les législatures des États américains.

On peut parler d’hécatombe : de 2009 à 2016, le Parti démocrate a perdu 1042 sièges de parlementaire ou postes de gouverneur, à Washington et dans les législatures d’État. Après les élections du 8 novembre, les républicains ont désormais la mainmise complète non seulement sur les branches exécutive et législative à Washington, mais également dans la moitié des États américains.

Il s’agit d’un des aspects les plus frappants – et douloureux pour les démocrates – de l’héritage d’Obama, qui doit en porter une part de responsabilité importante.

Dès les élections de mi-mandat de 2010

L’hécatombe démocrate a commencé de façon spectaculaire lors des élections de mi-mandat de 2010. Porté par la colère du Tea Party à l’égard de l’Obamacare et des plans de sauvetage des secteurs financier et automobile, le Parti républicain a notamment reconquis la majorité à la Chambre des représentants en réalisant un gain net de 63 sièges, du jamais-vu depuis la Seconde Guerre mondiale.

Aujourd’hui, Obama se reproche de ne pas avoir consacré assez de temps à la promotion de ses politiques. Il pourrait évidemment se demander si ses politiques répondaient vraiment à l’insatisfaction économique de bon nombre d’Américains, qui ont préféré le message de Donald Trump à celui d’Hillary Clinton dans certains États-clés, dont l’Ohio, la Pennsylvanie, le Michigan et le Wisconsin.

D’autres facteurs

Mais l’hécatombe démocrate tient à d’autres facteurs pour lesquels Obama ne peut être blâmé. L’un d’eux résulte de la plus faible participation de l’électorat démocrate – les jeunes et les minorités en particulier – aux élections de mi-mandat. Un autre découle du découpage des circonscriptions électorales qui favorise les républicains. Lors des élections de mi-mandat de 2014, par exemple, ils ont remporté 57% des sièges du Congrès avec 52% des voix.

Et c’est en contribuant à corriger cette situation que Barack Obama veut acquitter une partie de sa dette envers les démocrates. Avant même la victoire de Donald Trump, il avait annoncé son soutien à un nouveau groupe, le National Democratic Redistricting Committee, dont la mission consistera à renverser les gains républicains dans les législatures d’État et à la Chambre des représentants. Le 44e président s’est engagé à participer à des activités de collecte de fonds pour ce groupe et à faire campagne pour des candidats à des postes de gouverneur et de parlementaire à la Chambre des représentants et dans les législatures d’État.

Une priorité

Les élections de 2017 et de 2018 représentent une priorité pour Obama et le nouveau groupe démocrate, qui sera présidé par l’ancien ministre de la Justice Eric Holder. Ces élections éliront les gouverneurs et parlementaires qui approuveront dans chaque État les nouvelles circonscriptions électorales qui seront créées après le recensement américain de 2020. Or, si les démocrates ne parviennent pas à réaliser des gains dans les législatures d’État, ils risquent de continuer à être désavantagés pendant une autre décennie par un redécoupage partisan des circonscriptions électorales.

Barack Obama pourrait s’écarter d’une autre façon de l’exemple établi par George W. Bush après son départ de la Maison-Blanche. Il pourrait se permettre de critiquer son successeur. Peut-être pas au cours de la première année de Donald Trump à la Maison-Blanche, mais assurément dans les moments où «certaines questions fondamentales de [la] démocratie [américaine]» seront mises en cause, a-t-il précisé lors d’une baladodiffusion récente animée par son ancien conseiller David Axelrod.

«Vous savez, a-t-il ajouté, je suis encore un citoyen, et cela comporte des devoirs et des obligations.»

Mais l’acquittement de sa dette envers le Parti démocrate restera sans doute la plus importante de ses obligations au cours des prochaines années.

Voir de plus:

A Veteran Spy Has Given the FBI Information Alleging a Russian Operation to Cultivate Donald Trump

Has the bureau investigated this material?

On Friday, FBI Director James Comey set off a political blast when he informed congressional leaders that the bureau had stumbled across emails that might be pertinent to its completed inquiry into Hillary Clinton’s handling of emails when she was secretary of state. The Clinton campaign and others criticized Comey for intervening in a presidential campaign by breaking with Justice Department tradition and revealing information about an investigation—information that was vague and perhaps ultimately irrelevant—so close to Election Day. On Sunday, Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid upped the ante. He sent Comey a fiery letter saying the FBI chief may have broken the law and pointed to a potentially greater controversy: « In my communications with you and other top officials in the national security community, it has become clear that you possess explosive information about close ties and coordination between Donald Trump, his top advisors, and the Russian government…The public has a right to know this information. »

Reid’s missive set off a burst of speculation on Twitter and elsewhere. What was he referring to regarding the Republican presidential nominee? At the end of August, Reid had written to Comey and demanded an investigation of the « connections between the Russian government and Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, » and in that letter he indirectly referred to Carter Page, an American businessman cited by Trump as one of his foreign policy advisers, who had financial ties to Russia and had recently visited Moscow. Last month, Yahoo News reported that US intelligence officials were probing the links between Page and senior Russian officials. (Page has called accusations against him « garbage. ») On Monday, NBC News reported that the FBI has mounted a preliminary inquiry into the foreign business ties of Paul Manafort, Trump’s former campaign chief. But Reid’s recent note hinted at more than the Page or Manafort affairs. And a former senior intelligence officer for a Western country who specialized in Russian counterintelligence tells Mother Jones that in recent months he provided the bureau with memos, based on his recent interactions with Russian sources, contending the Russian government has for years tried to co-opt and assist Trump—and that the FBI requested more information from him.

« This is something of huge significance, way above party politics, » the former intelligence officer says. « I think [Trump’s] own party should be aware of this stuff as well. »

Does this mean the FBI is investigating whether Russian intelligence has attempted to develop a secret relationship with Trump or cultivate him as an asset? Was the former intelligence officer and his material deemed credible or not? An FBI spokeswoman says, « Normally, we don’t talk about whether we are investigating anything. » But a senior US government official not involved in this case but familiar with the former spy tells Mother Jones that he has been a credible source with a proven record of providing reliable, sensitive, and important information to the US government.

In June, the former Western intelligence officer—who spent almost two decades on Russian intelligence matters and who now works with a US firm that gathers information on Russia for corporate clients—was assigned the task of researching Trump’s dealings in Russia and elsewhere, according to the former spy and his associates in this American firm. This was for an opposition research project originally financed by a Republican client critical of the celebrity mogul. (Before the former spy was retained, the project’s financing switched to a client allied with Democrats.) « It started off as a fairly general inquiry, » says the former spook, who asks not to be identified. But when he dug into Trump, he notes, he came across troubling information indicating connections between Trump and the Russian government. According to his sources, he says, « there was an established exchange of information between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin of mutual benefit. »

This was, the former spy remarks, « an extraordinary situation. » He regularly consults with US government agencies on Russian matters, and near the start of July on his own initiative—without the permission of the US company that hired him—he sent a report he had written for that firm to a contact at the FBI, according to the former intelligence officer and his American associates, who asked not to be identified. (He declines to identify the FBI contact.) The former spy says he concluded that the information he had collected on Trump was « sufficiently serious » to share with the FBI.

Mother Jones has reviewed that report and other memos this former spy wrote. The first memo, based on the former intelligence officer’s conversations with Russian sources, noted, « Russian regime has been cultivating, supporting and assisting TRUMP for at least 5 years. Aim, endorsed by PUTIN, has been to encourage splits and divisions in western alliance. » It maintained that Trump « and his inner circle have accepted a regular flow of intelligence from the Kremlin, including on his Democratic and other political rivals. » It claimed that Russian intelligence had « compromised » Trump during his visits to Moscow and could « blackmail him. » It also reported that Russian intelligence had compiled a dossier on Hillary Clinton based on « bugged conversations she had on various visits to Russia and intercepted phone calls. »

The former intelligence officer says the response from the FBI was « shock and horror. » The FBI, after receiving the first memo, did not immediately request additional material, according to the former intelligence officer and his American associates. Yet in August, they say, the FBI asked him for all information in his possession and for him to explain how the material had been gathered and to identify his sources. The former spy forwarded to the bureau several memos—some of which referred to members of Trump’s inner circle. After that point, he continued to share information with the FBI. « It’s quite clear there was or is a pretty substantial inquiry going on, » he says.

« This is something of huge significance, way above party politics, » the former intelligence officer comments. « I think [Trump’s] own party should be aware of this stuff as well. »

The Trump campaign did not respond to a request for comment regarding the memos. In the past, Trump has declared, « I have nothing to do with Russia. »

The FBI is certainly investigating the hacks attributed to Russia that have hit American political targets, including the Democratic National Committee and John Podesta, the chairman of Clinton’s presidential campaign. But there have been few public signs of whether that probe extends to examining possible contacts between the Russian government and Trump. (In recent weeks, reporters in Washington have pursued anonymous online reports that a computer server related to the Trump Organization engaged in a high level of activity with servers connected to Alfa Bank, the largest private bank in Russia. On Monday, a Slate investigation detailed the pattern of unusual server activity but concluded, « We don’t yet know what this [Trump] server was for, but it deserves further explanation. » In an email to Mother Jones, Hope Hicks, a Trump campaign spokeswoman, maintains, « The Trump Organization is not sending or receiving any communications from this email server. The Trump Organization has no communication or relationship with this entity or any Russian entity. »)

According to several national security experts, there is widespread concern in the US intelligence community that Russian intelligence, via hacks, is aiming to undermine the presidential election—to embarrass the United States and delegitimize its democratic elections. And the hacks appear to have been designed to benefit Trump. In August, Democratic members of the House committee on oversight wrote Comey to ask the FBI to investigate « whether connections between Trump campaign officials and Russian interests may have contributed to these [cyber] attacks in order to interfere with the US. presidential election. » In September, Sen. Dianne Feinstein and Rep. Adam Schiff, the senior Democrats on, respectively, the Senate and House intelligence committees, issued a joint statement accusing Russia of underhanded meddling: « Based on briefings we have received, we have concluded that the Russian intelligence agencies are making a serious and concerted effort to influence the U.S. election. At the least, this effort is intended to sow doubt about the security of our election and may well be intended to influence the outcomes of the election. » The Obama White House has declared Russia the culprit in the hacking capers, expressed outrage, and promised a « proportional » response.

There’s no way to tell whether the FBI has confirmed or debunked any of the allegations contained in the former spy’s memos. But a Russian intelligence attempt to co-opt or cultivate a presidential candidate would mark an even more serious operation than the hacking.

In the letter Reid sent to Comey on Sunday, he pointed out that months ago he had asked the FBI director to release information on Trump’s possible Russia ties. Since then, according to a Reid spokesman, Reid has been briefed several times. The spokesman adds, « He is confident that he knows enough to be extremely alarmed. »

Voir aussi:

Barack Obama’s legacy of failure
Jeff Jacoby
The Boston Globe
January 8, 2017

AS HE PREPARES to move out of the White House, Barack Obama is understandably focused on his legacy and reputation. The president will deliver a farewell address in Chicago on Tuesday; he told his supporters in an e-mail that the speech would « celebrate the ways you’ve changed this country for the better these past eight years, » and previewed his closing argument in a series of tweets hailing « the remarkable progress » for which he hopes to be remembered.

Certainly Obama has his admirers. For years he has enjoyed doting coverage in the mainstream media. Those press ovations will continue, if a spate of new or forthcoming books by journalists is any indication. Moreover, Obama is going out with better-than-average approval ratings for a departing president. So his push to depict his presidency as years of « remarkable progress » is likely to resonate with his true believers.

But there are considerably fewer of those true believers than there used to be. Most Americans long ago got over their crush on Obama , as they repeatedly demonstrated at the polls.

In 2010, two years after electing him president, voters trounced Obama’s party, handing Democrats the biggest midterm losses in 72 years. Obama was reelected in 2012, but by nearly 4 million fewer votes than in his first election, making him the only president ever to win a second term with shrunken margins in both the popular and electoral vote. Two years later, with Obama imploring voters , « [My] policies are on the ballot — every single one of them, » Democrats were clobbered again. And in 2016, as he campaigned hard for Hillary Clinton, Obama was increasingly adamant that his legacy was at stake. « I’m not on this ballot, » he told campaign rallies in a frequent refrain, « but everything we’ve done these last eight years is on the ballot. » The voters heard him out, and once more turned him down.

As a political leader, Obama has been a disaster for his party. Since his inauguration in 2009, roughly 1,100 elected Democrats nationwide have been ousted by Republicans. Democrats lost their majorities in the US House and Senate. They now hold just 18 of the 50 governorships, and only 31 of the nation’s 99 state legislative chambers. After eight years under Obama, the GOP is stronger than at any time since the 1920s, and the outgoing president’s party is in tatters.

When Obama touts the way he « changed this country for the better these past eight years, » the wreckage of the Democratic Party — to say nothing of the election of Donald Trump — presumably isn’t what he has in mind. Yet the Democrats’ repudiation can’t be divorced from the president and policies he embraced. Obama urged Americans to cast their vote as a thumbs-up or thumbs-down on his legacy. That’s what they did.

In almost every respect, Obama leaves behind a trail of failure and disappointment. Consider just some of his works:

The economy . Obama took office during a painful recession and (with Congress’s help) made it even worse. Historically, the deeper a recession, the more robust the recovery that follows, but the economy’s rebound under Obama was the worst in seven decades. Annual GDP growth since the recession ended has averaged a feeble 2.1 percent, by far the puniest economic performance of any president since World War II. Obama spent more public funds on « stimulus » than all previous stimulus programs combined, with wretched, counterproductive results. On his watch, millions of additional Americans fell below the poverty line. The number of food stamp recipients soared. The national debt doubled to an incredible $20 trillion. According to the Pew Research Center, the share of young adults (18- to 34-year-olds) living in their parents’ homes is the highest it has been since the Great Depression — particularly young men , whose employment and earning levels are far lower than they were a generation ago.

In 2008, when Obama was first elected president, 63 percent of Americans considered themselves middle class. Seven years later, only 51 percent still felt the same way. Obama argues energetically that his economic policies have delivered prosperity and employment. Countless Americans disagree — including many who aren’t Republican. « Millions and millions and millions and millions of people look at that pretty picture of America he painted, » said Bill Clinton after Obama extolled the recovery in his last State of the Union speech, « and they cannot find themselves in it to save their lives. »

The president’s endlessly-repeated vow that Obamacare would not force anyone to give up a health plan they liked was PolitiFact’s 2013 « Lie of the Year. »

Health care . The Affordable Care Act should never have been enacted. Survey after survey confirmed that it lacked majority support, and only through hard-knuckled, party-line maneuvering was the wrenching health-care overhaul rammed through Congress. But Obama was certain the measure would win public support, because of three promises he made over and over: that the law would extend health insurance to the 47 million uninsured, that it would significantly reduce health-insurance costs, and that Americans who had health plans or doctors they liked could keep them.

But Obamacare has been a fiasco. At least 27 million Americans are still without health insurance , and many of those who are newly insured have simply been added to the Medicaid rolls. Far from reducing costs, Obamacare sent premiums and deductibles skyrocketing. Insurance companies, having suffered billions of dollars in losses on the Obamacare exchanges, have pulled out from many of them, leaving consumers in much of the country with few or no options. And the administration, it transpired, knew all along that millions of Americans would lose their medical plans once the law took effect. The deception was so egregious that in December 2013, PolitiFact dubbed « If you like your health plan, you can keep it » as its  » Lie of the Year . »

Foreign policy. The 44th president came to office vowing not to repeat the foreign-policy mistakes of his predecessor. His own were exponentially worse.

In his rush to pull US troops out of Iraq and Afghanistan, he created a power vacuum into which terror networks expanded and the Taliban revived . Islamic State’s jihadist savagery not only plunged a stabilized Iraq back into shuddering violence, but also inspired scores of lethal terrorist attacks in the West . For months, Obama and his lieutenants insisted that Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad could be induced to « reform, » and pointedly refused to intervene as an uprising against him metastasized into genocidal slaughter. At last Obama vowed to take action if Assad crossed a « red line » by deploying chemical weapons — but when those weapons were used, Obama blinked. The death toll in Syria climbed into the hundreds of thousands, triggering a flood of refugees greater than any the world had seen since the 1940s.

Determined to conciliate America’s adversaries, the president indulged dictatorial regimes in Iran, Russia, and Cuba. They in turn exploited his passivity with multiple treacheries — seizing Crimea and destroying Aleppo (Russia), abducting American hostages for ransom and illicitly testing long-range missiles (Iran), and cracking down mercilessly on democratic dissidents (Cuba). Meanwhile, American friends and allies — Israel, Ukraine, Poland and the Czech Republic — Obama undermined or betrayed.

Syria’s dictator slaughtered innocent civilians with chemical weapons, crossing a « red line » that President Obama warned he would not tolerate. But he did tolerate it, with devastating results.

For eight years the nation has been led by a president intent on lowering America’s global profile, not projecting military power, and « leading from behind. » The consequences have been stark: a Middle East awash in blood and bombs, US troops re-embroiled in Iraq and Afghanistan, aggressive dictators ascendant, human rights and democracy in retreat, rivers of refugees destabilizing nations across three continents, the rise of neo-fascism in Europe, and the erosion of US credibility to its lowest level since the Carter years.

National unity . As a candidate for president, Obama promised to soothe America’s bitter and divisive politics, and to replace Red State/Blue State animosity with cooperation and bipartisanship. But the healer-in-chief millions of Americans voted for never showed up.

According to Gallup, Obama became the most polarizing president in modern history. Like all presidents, he faced partisan opposition, but Obama worsened things by regularly taking the low road and disparaging his critics’ motives. In his own words, his political strategy was one of ruthless escalation : « If they bring a knife to the fight, we bring a gun. » During his 2012 reelection campaign, Politico reported that « Obama and his top campaign aides have engaged far more frequently in character attacks and personal insults than the Romney campaign. » And when a Republican-led Congress wouldn’t enact legislation he sought, Obama turned to his « pen and phone » strategy of governing by diktat that polarized politics even more.

To his credit, Obama acknowledges that he didn’t live up to his promise to reduce the angry rancor of Washington politics. Had he made an effort to do so, perhaps the campaign to succeed him would not have been so mean. And perhaps 60 percent of voters would not feel that their country, after two terms of Obama’s administration, is  » on the wrong track . »

Obama’s accession in 2008 as the nation’s first elected black president was an achievement that even Republicans and conservatives could cheer . It marked a moment of hope and transformation; it genuinely did change America for the better.

It was also the high point of Obama’s presidency. What followed, alas, was eight long years of disenchantment and incompetence. Our world today is more dangerous, our country more divided, our national mood more toxic. In a few days, Donald Trump will become the 45th president of the United States. Behold the legacy of the 44th.

( Jeff Jacoby is a columnist for The Boston Globe )

Voir de plus:

Transition 2016

About that Explosive Trump Story: Take a Deep Breath

Benjamin Wittes, Susan Hennessey, Quinta Jurecic

Lawfare

January 10, 2017

This afternoon, CNN reported that President Barack Obama and President-Elect Donald Trump had been briefed by the intelligence community on the existence of a cache of memos alleging communication between the Trump campaign and Russian officials and the possession by the Russian government of highly compromising material against Trump. The memos were compiled by a former British intelligence officer on behalf of anti-Trump Republicans and, later, Democrats working against Trump in the general election. According to CNN, the intelligence officer’s previous work is credible, but the veracity of the specific allegations set forth in the document have not yet been confirmed. Notably, Mother Jones journalist David Corn reported the week before the election on similar allegations that Trump had been “cultivated” by Russian intelligence, on the basis of a memos produced by “a former senior intelligence officer for a Western country.” A similar report also appeared in Newsweek.

This cache of memos has been kicking around official Washington for several weeks now. A great many journalists have been feverishly working to document the allegations within it, which are both explosive and quite various: some of them relate to alleged collusion between Trump campaign officials and Russian intelligence, while others relate to personal sexual conduct by Trump himself that supposedly constitutes a rip-roaring KOMPROMAT file.

If you are finding Lawfare useful in these times, please consider making a contribution to support what we do.We have had the document for a couple of weeks and have chosen, as have lots of other publications, not to publish it while the allegations within it remain unproven. In response to CNN’s report, however, Buzzfeed has now released the underlying document itself, which is available here.

Whether or not its release is defensible in light of the CNN story, it is now important to emphasize several points.

First, we have no idea if any of these allegations are true. Yes, they are explosive; they are also entirely unsubstantiated, at least to our knowledge, at this stage. For this reason, even now, we are not going to discuss the specific allegations within the document.

Second, while unproven, the allegations are being taken quite seriously. The President and President-elect do not get briefed on material that the intelligence community does not believe to be at least of some credibility. The individual who generated them is apparently a person whose work intelligence professionals take seriously. And at a personal level, we can attest that we have had a lot of conversations with a lot of different people about the material in this document. While nobody has confirmed any of the allegations, both inside government and in the press, it is clear to us that they are the subject of serious attention.

Third, precisely because it is being taken seriously, it is—despite being unproven and, in public anyway, undiscussed—pervasively affecting the broader discussion of Russian hacking of the election. CNN reported that Senator John McCain personally delivered a copy of the document to FBI Director James Comey on December 9th. Consider McCain’s comments about the gravity of the Russian hacking episode at last week’s Armed Services Committee hearing in light of that fact. Likewise, consider Senator Ron Wyden’s questioning of Comey at today’s Senate Intelligence Committee hearing, in which Wyden pushed the FBI Director to release a declassified assessment before January 20th regarding contact between the Trump campaign and the Russian government. (Comey refused to comment on an ongoing investigation.)

So while people are being delicate about discussing wholly unproven allegations, the document is at the front of everyone’s minds as they ponder the question: Why is Trump so insistent about vindicating Russia from the hacking charges that everyone else seems to accept?

Fourth, it is significant that the document contains highly specific allegations, many of which are the kind of facts it should be possible to prove or disprove. This is a document about meetings that either took place or did not take place, stays in hotels that either happened or didn’t, travel that either happened or did not happen. It should be possible to know whether at least some of these allegations are true or false.

Finally, fifth, it is important to emphasize that this is not a case of the intelligence community leaking sensitive information about an investigative subject out of revenge or any other improper motive. This type of information, referencing sensitive sources and methods and the identities of U.S. persons, is typically treated by the intelligence community with the utmost care. And this material, in fact, does not come from the intelligence community; it comes, rather, from private intelligence documents put together by a company. It is actually not even classified.

All of which is to say to everyone: slow down, and take a deep breath. We shouldn’t assume either that this is simply a “fake news” episode directed at discrediting Trump or that the dam has now broken and the truth is coming out at last. We don’t know what the reality is here, and the better part of valor is not to get ahead ahead of the facts—a matter on which, incidentally, the press deserves a lot of credit.

 Voir de même:

Conférence du 15 janvier 2017: l’esprit de Munich s’invite à Paris !

Dora Marrache
Europe Israël
Déc 28, 2016

« Vous aviez le choix entre le déshonneur et la guerre. Vous avez choisi le déshonneur, et vous aurez la guerre ». (Winston Churchill)

Le 23 décembre, le vote de la Résolution 2334, a permis aux Juifs de découvrir le vrai Obama, celui qui se cache sous des dehors affables. Bien sûr,  on se console en se disant que Donald Trump fera révoquer cette « honteuse » résolution. Mais là rien n’est moins sûr, car il est à craindre qu’il ne réussisse pas à obtenir les 9 voix qui le soutiendront.

Hélas, Obama n’a pas encore assouvi pleinement son désir de vengeance. La Conférence de Paris permettra au gouvernement israélien de découvrir sans doute l’aspect maléfique du premier président noir des États-Unis, mais aussi  celui du président français qui proclame  son amour des Juifs de France, mais enfonce un couteau dans le dos de leurs frères israéliens.

Prévue initialement en mai 2016, cette conférence a été reportée à plusieurs reprises mais,  à moins d’un report fort improbable (après le 20 janvier, Obama n’aura plus aucun pouvoir),  elle aura lieu le 15 janvier 2017, à Paris.

« La ConférenceBottom of Form sur la paix de Paris : une feuille de route cauchemardesque? » écrivait en juin Shimon Samuels, le directeur des Relations internationales du Centre Simon Wiesenthal, et il  en parlait comme d’un autre Munich. En effet, difficile de ne pas penser à la conférence de Munich quand on parle de la conférence de Paris. Les ressemblances sont frappantes, on pourrait même envisager des Accords calqués sur ceux de Munich.

En revanche, si nombreux étaient ceux qui, au lendemain des Accords de Munich,  ont parlé de « la lâcheté de Munich », il est, hélas fort peu probable qu’ils le soient pour parler de « la lâcheté de Paris ».

Aujourd’hui, le dictateur c’est Abbas qui promet la paix et la fin du terrorisme si on lui donne les territoires qu’il convoite afin de pouvoir ensuite s’accaparer tout Israël.  On va donc tenter de les lui livrer sur un plateau d’argent.

But de la conférence de Paris-  La résolution du conflit israélo-palestinien par la création de l’État palestinien.

Un peu comme la conférence de Munich qui fut organisée à la demande de Paris les 29 et 30 septembre 1938 pour régler le problème germano-tchèque, celle de Paris, organisée également à la demande du gouvernement français, a pour objectif de résoudre le conflit israélo-palestinien. Paris, l’allié inconditionnel des « Palestiniens » feint de vouloir instaurer la paix dans cette région du monde,  alors qu’il ne fait qu’obéir aux ordres de Ramallah.

À cette conférence à laquelle 70 pays sont conviés – plus on est de fous, plus on s’amuse- Israël a choisi,  depuis longtemps d’ailleurs,  de ne pas participer.  L’État juif veut des négociations bilatérales, mais Abbas évidemment préfère obtenir ce qu’il désire sans devoir faire la moindre concession. La conférence aura donc lieu en l’absence du principal intéressé, tout comme celle de Munich organisée en l’absence de la Tchécoslovaquie. Mais tandis que la Russie, allié de la Tchécoslovaquie n’avait pas été invitée à Munich,  l’Amérique, allié-traitre de l’État juif, sera à Paris car le gouvernement est assuré de son soutien depuis mai 2016 et le vote du 23 décembre le lui a confirmé.

On peut donc dire d’ores et déjà que, à l’instar de la Tchécoslovaquie qui fut trahie par la France qui lui avait pourtant garanti ses frontières, Israël sera trahi encore une fois par l’Amérique.

Abbas / Hitler  Abbas se frotte déjà les mains : tout comme Hitler a pu obtenir la Tchécoslovaquie sans rien donner en retour, Abbas espère bien obtenir que l’État juif se retire aux lignes du cessez-le-feu de la guerre de 48.

« La feuille de route, nous explique Shimon Samuels, consiste alors en une résolution préparée par la conférence internationale organisée à Paris, qui doit être votée par les quinze États membres du Conseil de sécurité dans les cinquante jours qui précèdent l’intronisation du président Trump, le 20 janvier prochain ». Et il ajoutait : « Si elle n’est pas rejetée par l’habituel veto américain, qui s’applique à chaque fois que les intérêts vitaux d’Israël sont en jeu, cette résolution fera d’Israël un État paria, passible de sanctions ».

On peut maintenant, à la lumière du vote du 23 décembre, assurer qu’elle ne le sera pas. La France peut dormir tranquille, Obama la suivra fidèlement et sera même disposé à aller encore plus loin.  Comme l’État juif ne se soumettra pas au diktat de Abbas, contrairement aux autres pays, l’ONU votera une résolution pour isoler complètement l’État juif en élargissant le boycott à tous les produits israéliens, puis une autre pour  la proclamation unilatérale de l’État « palestinien » (ce qu’avait suggéré Fabius).

Les Accords de Paris

Pourquoi ne pas les imaginer calqués sur les « Accords de Munich »? Ils se liraient alors ainsi :

(LE 15 JANVIER 2016 LES puissances  (à définir) réunies sont convenues des dispositions et conditions suivantes règlementant ladite cession, et des mesures qu’elle comporte. Chacune d’elles, par cet accord, s’engage à accomplir les démarches nécessaires pour en assurer l’exécution :

  1. L’évacuation des territoires occupés commencera le ….
  2. Ils conviennent que l’évacuation des territoires en question devra être achevée le … sans qu’aucune des installations existantes ait été détruite. Le gouvernement d’Israël, la Puissance occupante, aura la responsabilité d’effectuer cette évacuation sans qu’il en résulte aucun dommage aux dites installations.
  3. Les conditions de cette évacuation seront déterminées dans le détail par une commission internationale, composée de représentants de la France, des États-Unis, … de la Palestine et d’Israël, la Puissance occupante.
  4. L’occupation progressive par l’armée de l’Autorité Palestinienne commencera le … Les zones indiquées sur la carte ci-jointe seront occupées par les soldats palestiniens à des dates fixées ultérieurement et dans l’ordre suivant :
  • la zone 1, les …
  • la zone 2, les …
  • la zone 3, les …
  • la zone 4, les  …
  1. La commission internationale mentionnée au paragraphe 3 déterminera les territoires où doit être effectué un plébiscite. (Ce paragraphe n’apparaitra pas puisque de la Cisjordanie rien ne sera laissé aux Juifs)
  2. La fixation finale des frontières sera établie par la commission internationale.
  3. Il existera un droit d’option permettant d’être inclus dans les territoires transférés ou d’en être exclu. (Ce droit n’existera même pas, Abbas exige un territoire judenrein)
  4. Le gouvernement d’Israël, la Puissance occupante,  libèrera, dans un délai de quatre semaines à partir de la conclusion du présent accord, tous les prisonniers palestiniens retenus dans les prisons d’Israël, et ce quels que soient les délits dont ils se sont rendus coupables

Paris, le 15 janvier 2017

Le président de l’Autorité palestinienne
Abou MAZEN

Le président français
François Hollande

Le président des États-Unis
Barak Hussein Obama

Tout cela est bien beau et c’est le rêve de Abbas. Il caresse l’espoir insensé que la communauté internationale réussira à mettre Israël au pied du mur et qu’il réalisera la première étape de son plan diabolique, à savoir obtenir la totalité de l’État juif. Car il faut être lucide: toutes les guerres qui ont été déclenchées contre l’État juif l’ont été dans ce but et, aujourd’hui, près de 70 ans plus tard,  les Arabes n’ont nullement renoncé à l’objectif qu’ils se sont fixé.

Conclusion  Seulement voilà : Israël n’est pas la Tchécoslovaquie, Israël ne capitulera pas comme l’avait fait le gouvernement tchécoslovaque.

Si Abbas et tous ses acolytes s’imaginent qu’Israël se soumettra aux résolutions de l’ONU -ce qui n’est nullement dans ses habitudes- et qu’il va assister au démantèlement de Jérusalem et de la Judée-Samarie en restant les bras croisés, ce qu’ils se gourent! Ce qu’ils se gourent! Après Munich, conscient que le pire était à venir, Daladier en faisant allusion au peuple français qui croyait avoir obtenu la paix, avait murmuré : « Ah les cons s’ils savaient ! ». Après Paris, y aura-t-il au moins quelques chefs d’État qui se feront la même réflexion? J’en doute fort!

Tous sont tellement aveuglés par la haine qu’ils nourrissent à l’égard de l’État juif qu’ils ne sont pas même capables de réaliser qu’ils ont à faire à un adversaire de taille qui se battra avec le même acharnement qu’au cours des guerres que ses ennemis lui ont déclarées. Les Juifs auxquels ils se heurtent n’ont plus rien en commun avec le Juif honteux, celui qui a servi de bouc émissaire pendant les 2000 ans d’exil.  Les Israéliens sont prêts à la guerre pour défendre leur territoire lilliputien. Les « Palestiniens » le sont-ils?

Si à l’issue de cette conférence, la France passe pour l’artisan incontestable de la « paix », si on joue à Paris l’hymne national « palestinien », ne sommes-nous pas en droit de nous demander si la France ne se prépare pas à devenir le plus grand fossoyeur de l’humanité? Il semble bien, hélas,  que tous les pays invités à Paris ont oublié que le passé est garant de l’avenir.

Voir par ailleurs:

Qui a fait élire Trump ? Pas les algorithmes, mais des millions de “tâcherons du clic” sous-payés

Le débat sur les responsabilités médiatiques (et technologiques) de la victoire de Trump ne semble pas épuisé. Moi par contre je m’épuise à expliquer que le problème, ce ne sont pas les algorithmes. D’ailleurs, la candidate “algorithmique” c’était Clinton : elle avait hérité de l’approche big data au ciblage des électeurs qui avait fait gagner Obama en 2012, et sa campagne était apparemment régie par un système de traitement de données personnelles surnommé Ada.

Au contraire, le secret de la victoire du Toupet Parlant (s’il y en a un) a été d’avoir tout misé sur l’exploitation de masses de travailleurs du clic, situés pour la plupart à l’autre bout du monde. Si Hillary Clinton a dépensé 450 millions de dollars, Trump a investi un budget relativement plus modeste (la moitié en fait), en sous-payant des sous-traitants recrutés sur des plateformes d’intermédiation de micro-travail.

Une armée de micro-tâcherons dans des pays en voie de développement

Vous avez peut-être lu la news douce-amère d’une ado de Singapour qui a fini par produire les slides des présentation de Trump. Elle a été recrutée via Fiverr, une plateforme où l’on peut acheter des services de secrétariat, graphisme ou informatique, pour quelques dollars. Ses micro-travailleurs résident en plus de 200 pays, mais les tâches les moins bien rémunérées reviennent principalement à de ressortissants de pays de l’Asie du Sud-Est. L’histoire édifiante de cette jeune singapourienne ne doit pas nous distraire de la vraie nouvelle : Trump a externalisé la préparation de plusieurs supports de campagne à des tacherons numériques recrutés via des plateformes de digital labor, et cela de façon récurrente. L’arme secrète de la victoire de ce candidat raciste, misogyne et connu pour mal payer ses salariés s’avère être l’exploitation de travailleuses mineures asiatiques. Surprenant, non ?

Hrithie, la “tâcheronne numérique” qui a produit les slides de Donal Trump…

Mais certains témoignages de ces micro-travailleurs offshore sont moins édifiants. Vous avez certainement lu l’histoire des “spammeurs de Macédoine”. Trump aurait profité de l’aide opportuniste d’étudiants de milieux modestes d’une petite ville post-industrielle d’un pays ex-socialiste de l’Europe centrale devenus des producteurs de likes et de posts, qui ont généré et partagé les pires messages de haine et de désinformation pour pouvoir profiter d’un vaste marché des clics.

How Teens In The Balkans Are Duping Trump Supporters With Fake News

A qui la faute ? Au modèle d’affaires de Facebook

A qui la faute ? Aux méchants spammeurs ou bien à leur mandataires ? Selon Business Insider, les responsables de la com’ de Trump ont directement acheté presque 60% des followers de sa page Facebook. Ces fans et la vaste majorité de ses likes proviennent de fermes à clic situées aux Philippines, en Malaysie, en Inde, en Afrique du Sud, en Indonesie, en Colombie… et au Mexique. (Avant de vous insurger, sachez que ceci est un classique du fonctionnement actuel de Facebook. Si vous n’êtes pas au fait de la façon dont la plateforme de Zuckerberg limite la circulation de vos posts pour ensuite vous pousser à acheter des likes, cette petite vidéo vous l’explique. Prenez 5 minutes pour finaliser votre instruction.)

Bien sûr, le travail dissimulé du clic concerne tout le monde. Facebook, présenté comme un service gratuit, se révèle aussi être un énorme marché de nos contacts et de notre engagement actif dans la vie de notre réseau. Aujourd’hui, Facebook opère une restriction artificielle de la portée organique des posts partagés par les utilisateurs : vous avez 1000 « amis », par exemple, mais moins de 10% lit vos messages hilarants ou regarde vos photos de chatons. Officiellement, Facebook prétend qu’il s’agit ainsi de limiter les spams. Mais en fait, la plateforme invente un nouveau modèle économique visant à faire payer pour une visibilité plus vaste ce que l’usager partage aujourd’hui via le sponsoring. Ce modèle concerne moins les particuliers que les entreprises ou les hommes politiques à la chevelure improbable qui fondent leur stratégies marketing sur ce réseau social : ces derniers ont en effet intérêt à ce que des centaines de milliers de personnes lisent leurs messages, et ils paieront pour obtenir plus de clics. Or ce système repose sur des « fermes à clics », qui exploitent des travailleurs installés dans des pays émergents ou en voie de développement. Cet énorme marché dévoile l’illusion d’une participation volontaire de l’usager, qui est aujourd’hui écrasée par un système de production de clics fondé sur du travail caché—parce que, littéralement, délocalisé à l’autre bout du monde.

Flux de digital labor entre pays du Sud et pays du Nord

Une étude récente de l’Oxford Internet Institute montre l’existence de flux de travail importants entre le sud et le nord de la planète : les pays du Sud deviennent les producteurs de micro-tâches pour les pays du Nord. Aujourd’hui, les plus grands réalisateurs de micro-taches se trouvent aux Philippines, au Pakistan, en Inde, au Népal, à Hong-Kong, en Ukraine et en Russie, et les plus grands acheteurs de leurs clics se situent aux Etats-Unis, au Canada, en Australie et au Royaume-Uni. Les inégalités classiques Nord/Sud se reproduisent à une échelle planétaire. D’autant qu’il ne s’agit pas d’un phénomène résiduel mais d’un véritable marché du travail : UpWork compte 10 millions d’utilisateurs, Freelancers.com, 18 millions, etc.

Micro-travailleurs d’Asie, et recruteurs en Europe, Australie et Amérique du Nord sur une plateforme de digital labor.

Nouvel “i-sclavagisme” ? Nouvel impérialisme numérique ? Je me suis efforcé d’expliquer que les nouvelles inégalités planétaires relèvent d’une marginalisation des travailleurs qui les expose à devoir accepter les tâches les plus affreuses et les plus moralement indéfendables (comme par exemple aider un candidat à l’idéologie clairement fasciste à remporter les élections). Je l’explique dans une contribution récente sur la structuration du digital labor en tant que phénomène global (attention : le document est en anglais et fait 42 pages).  Que se serait-il passé si les droits de ces travailleurs du clic avaient été protégés, s’ils avaient eu la possibilité de résister au chantage au micro-travail, s’il avaient eu une voix pour protester contre et pour refuser de contribuer aux rêves impériaux d’un homme politique clairement dérangé, suivi par une cour de parasites corrompus ? Reconnaître ce travail invisible du clic, et le doter de méthodes de se protéger, est aussi – et avant tout – un enjeux de citoyenneté globale. Voilà quelques extraits de mon texte

Extrait de “Is There a Global Digital Labor Culture?” (Antonio Casilli, 2016)

Conclusions:
Pour être plus clair : ce ne sont pas ‘les algorithmes’ ni les ‘fake news’, mais la structure actuelle de l’économie du clic et du digital labor global qui ont aidé la victoire de Trump.
Pour être ENCORE plus clair : la montée des fascismes et l’exploitation du digital labor s’entendent comme larrons en foire. Comme je le rappelais dans un billet récent de ce même blog :

L’oppression des citoyens des démocraties occidentales, écrasés par une offre politique constamment revue à la baisse depuis vingt ans, qui in fine a atteint l’alignement à l’extrême droite de tous les partis dans l’éventail constitutionnel, qui ne propose qu’un seul fascisme mais disponible en différents coloris, va de pair avec l’oppression des usagers de technologies numériques, marginalisés, forcés d’accepter une seule offre de sociabilité, centralisée, normalisée, policée, exploitée par le capitalisme des plateformes qui ne proposent qu’une seule modalité de gouvernance opaque et asymétrique, mais disponible via différents applications.

Voir aussi:

Facebook accusé d’avoir fait le jeu de Donald Trump
Le réseau social a réagi aux critiques en annonçant que les sites publiant de fausses informations ne pourront plus monétiser leur audience sur la plate-forme.
Michaël Szadkowski, Damien Leloup et William Audureau
Le Monde
16.11.2016

Moins d’une semaine après l’élection de Donald Trump, Facebook est pris dans ses contradictions. Accusé d’avoir influencé le dénouement du scrutin en laissant des articles mensongers remonter dans les fils d’actualité de ses utilisateurs, le réseau social est en pleine remise en question. Une première mesure a été annoncée dans la nuit de lundi 14 à mardi 15 novembre : les sites publiant de fausses informations ne pourront plus utiliser Facebook Audience Network, l’outil de monétisation publicitaire de la plate-forme, rapporte le Wall Street Journal citant un porte-parole de Facebook. Il s’agit d’une première disposition face à un phénomène d’une ampleur nouvelle.

Google a pris le même jour une mesure similaire. « Nous allons commencer à interdire les publicités sur les contenus trompeurs, de la même manière que nous interdisons les publicités mensongères », a déclaré le groupe à l’AFP.

Selon le PewResearch Center, 44 % des Américains s’informent directement sur le réseau social. Le site BuzzFeed a calculé que 20 % des articles de médias partisans des démocrates étaient mensongers, et 38 % côté républicain. Une fausse information publiée en juillet annonçant le soutien du pape François à Donald Trump a notamment été partagée près d’un million de fois, relate le New York Times. Une situation déplorée par Bobby Goodlatte, ancien ingénieur de Facebook : « Malheureusement, le News Feed [le fil d’actualité de Facebook] est optimisé pour intéresser et générer des réactions. Comme nous l’avons appris avec cette…

Voir également:

Trump team outsourced making presentation slides to S’porean teen via freelancer site Fiverr

The East View Secondary School student, Hrithie Menon, helped create a Prezi presentation targeted at youths that was used as part of Trump’s presidential campaign after his team approached her for her services via Fiverr, a site that aggregates vendors for digital services.

Prezi is an alternative slide-making programme to PowerPoint.

The teen said she didn’t know who Trump was last year as she did not follow US politics.

She was unable to provide more details about the work done as she is bound by a non-disclosure agreement.

She began doing such work when she was in Primary 4. She has been doing freelance work for clients for the past two years.

She charges US$100 a project and has made about US$2,000 in total so far.

The money help pay for her dental braces.

Hrithie said she completed the Trump campaign slides within two hours in one day.

Ironically, during Trump’s campaigning period at a rally in Florida on Sunday, Nov. 6, the then presidential hopeful told his supporters that they are “living through the greatest jobs theft in the history of the world” and in the process, naming Singapore as one of the culprits of stealing American jobs.

He said then that the United States has lost about 70,000 factories since China joined the World Trade Organisation.

He said: “Goodrich Lighting Systems laid off 255 workers and moved their jobs to India. Baxter Health Care laid off 199 workers and moved their jobs to Singapore. It’s getting worse and worse and worse.”

Yes, 320 million people in the United States and no one can make slides.

Voir de même:

Tech-savvy S’porean teen played part in Trump campaign
Toh Ee Ming
November 17, 2016

SINGAPORE — When the request came from American billionaire Donald Trump’s campaign team to help create a Prezi presentation for youth as part of his presidential campaign last August, East View Secondary School student Hrithie Menon treated it as “just another project” to pay for her own dental braces.

Prezi is a presentation tool used as an alternative to traditional slide-making programmes such as PowerPoint. Hrithie, 15, told TODAY that it was one of the “easiest” projects she has had to do, because it was fairly straightforward and she completed it within two hours.

“At that time, I didn’t really know who he was, so I didn’t (think) it was such a big deal,” the Singaporean student said. It was only when she heard news of the United States presidential election that she realised she did “play a part” in the event, even though she admitted that she does not follow US politics.

While she is unable to share too many details because she is bound to a non-disclosure agreement, she said that the slides were shared across various colleges and university campuses in the US aimed at capturing young people’s votes.

Her parents consider Mr Trump, now the US President-elect, Hrithie’s “biggest client” so far.

Her mother, Madam Shenthil Ranie, 44, who works in the media entertainment industry, said: “(I remember) my husband texting me to say, ‘You’ll never know who this new client is’ … It was so hilarious … That was a big moment for us, to think that my daughter’s freelance work could actually get her such a big gig.”

Hrithie, who learnt the skills herself, has done projects for 20 clients in the last two years, such as creating a Prezi on safety guidelines for the United States Polo Association and working with various brands in Spain and Vietnam.

Clients approach her on the website Fiverr — a marketplace for digital services — where they provide her with the content that she turns into a Prezi video. She charges about US$100 (S$140) a project and has earned close to US$2,000 to date.

The digital native uses with ease various software and tools such as Prezi, Adobe After Effects and VideoScribe, and completes these projects typically within a day.

Her interest in such work was sparked when her father first tasked her to create some videos during her school holidays, when she was in Primary 4. She went on to develop some 15 to 20 android apps, including a celebrity-inspired news app about artistes such as One Direction and Selena Gomez. She also used to buy in bulk various accessories or monopods for taking selfies from e-commerce site AliExpress, to sell through her own Instagram account.

Her father, Mr Haridas Menon, 49, founder of the Singapore Internet Marketing Academy, said: “She somehow has the knack of picking up trends, she has her ears to the ground.”

While she excels in the technical area, Hrithie sometimes has to turn to her parents for help when clients are not as clear in their briefs or when she encounters language difficulties. Even so, her parents are amazed at her abilities and resourceful nature.

“When I see her on this path and what she has achieved, it is mind-blowing for me, to think that she’s so young,” her mother said, hoping that schools may nurture students with similar talents to do more digital work or for them to build new products online.

In her spare time, Hrithie is keen on learning how to help businesses tighten their cyber security on WordPress. Cyber security is an area she is looking to study in a polytechnic in future to enhance her skills.

On how others may pick up skills like hers, Hrithie said: “You just have to have the initiative to go and search for (them) on YouTube. Everything is on the Internet.”

Inside Hillary Clinton’s campaign, she was known as Ada. Like the candidate herself, she had a penchant for secrecy and a private server. As blame gets parceled out Wednesday for the Democrat’s stunning loss to Republican President-elect Donald Trump, Ada is likely to get a lot of second-guessing.

Ada is a complex computer algorithm that the campaign was prepared to publicly unveil after the election as its invisible guiding hand. Named for a female 19th-century mathematician — Ada, Countess of Lovelace — the algorithm was said to play a role in virtually every strategic decision Clinton aides made, including where and when to deploy the candidate and her battalion of surrogates and where to air television ads — as well as when it was safe to stay dark.

The campaign’s deployment of other resources — including  county-level campaign offices and the staging of high-profile concerts with stars like Jay Z and Beyoncé — was largely dependent on Ada’s work, as well.

While the Clinton campaign’s reliance on analytics became well known, the particulars of Ada’s work were kept under tight wraps, according to aides. The algorithm operated on a separate computer server than the rest of the Clinton operation as a security precaution, and only a few senior aides were able to access it.

According to aides, a raft of polling numbers, public and private, were fed into the algorithm, as well as ground-level voter data meticulously collected by the campaign. Once early voting began, those numbers were factored in, too.

What Ada did, based on all that data, aides said, was run 400,000 simulations a day of what the race against Trump might look like. A report that was spit out would give campaign manager Robby Mook and others a detailed picture of which battleground states were most likely to tip the race in one direction or another — and guide decisions about where to spend time and deploy resources.

The use of analytics by campaigns was hardly unprecedented. But Clinton aides were convinced their work, which was far more sophisticated than anything employed by President Obama or GOP nominee Mitt Romney in 2012, gave them a big strategic advantage over Trump.

So where did Ada go wrong?

About some things, she was apparently right. Aides say Pennsylvania was pegged as an extremely important state early on, which explains why Clinton was such a frequent visitor and chose to hold her penultimate rally in Philadelphia on Monday night.

But it appears that the importance of other states Clinton would lose — including Michigan and Wisconsin — never became fully apparent or that it was too late once it did.

Clinton made several visits to Michigan during the general election, but it wasn’t until the final days that she, Obama and her husband made such a concerted effort.

As for Wisconsin: Clinton didn’t make any appearances there at all.

Like much of the political establishment Ada appeared to underestimate the power of rural voters in Rust Belt states.

Clearly, there were things neither she nor a human could foresee — like a pair of bombshell letters sent by the FBI about Clinton’s email server. But in coming days and weeks, expect a debate on how heavily campaigns should rely on data, particularly in a year like this one in which so many conventional rules of politics were cast aside.

Voir encore:

Trump spent about half of what Clinton did on his way to the presidency

Jacob Pramuk
9 Nov 2016

Donald Trump threw out campaign spending conventions as he stormed his way to the American presidency.

The businessman racked up 278 electoral votes as of Wednesday morning, versus 228 for Clinton, with three states still not called by NBC News.

Trump did so with thin traditional campaign spending. His chaotic and often divisive campaign drew constant eyeballs, earning him billions of dollars in free media and allowing him to spend comparatively little on television ads and ground operations.

His campaign committee spent about $238.9 million through mid-October, compared with $450.6 million by Clinton’s. That equals about $859,538 spent per Trump electoral vote, versus about $1.97 million spent per Clinton electoral vote.

Those numbers do not include spending from Oct. 20 to Election Day.

While Trump’s campaign increased its spending on television ads in its final election push, it still used the traditional outreach tool much less than Clinton’s did. As of late October, Clinton spent’s campaign spent about $141.7 million on ads, compared with $58.8 million for Trump’s campaign, according to NBC News.

That disparity extended to campaign payrolls. For example, Clinton’s campaign had about 800 people on payroll at the end of August, versus about 130 for Trump’s. Democrats often have larger ground operations than Republicans.

Still, it wasn’t just Clinton who heavily outspent Trump. He shelled out much less money than other recent nominees, as well.

Through mid-October 2012, the campaigns of President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney spent $630.8 million and $360.7 million, respectively.

Obama’s campaign also spent about $593.9 million through mid-October 2008. Sen. John McCain’s 2008 campaign actually spent less than Trump, about $216.8 million through mid-October.

Voir encore:

But the disclosure of the still-classified findings prompted a blistering attack against the intelligence agencies by Mr. Trump, whose transition office said in a statement on Friday night that “these are the same people that said Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction,” adding that the election was over and that it was time to “move on.”

Mr. Trump has split on the issue with many Republicans on the congressional intelligence committees, who have said they were presented with significant evidence, in closed briefings, of a Russian campaign to meddle in the election.

The rift also raises questions about how Mr. Trump will deal with the intelligence agencies he will have to rely on for analysis of China, Russia and the Middle East, as well as for covert drone and cyberactivities.

At this point in a transition, a president-elect is usually delving into intelligence he has never before seen, and learning about C.I.A. and National Security Agency abilities. But Mr. Trump, who has taken intelligence briefings only sporadically, is questioning not only analytic conclusions, but also their underlying facts.

“To have the president-elect of the United States simply reject the fact-based narrative that the intelligence community puts together because it conflicts with his a priori assumptions — wow,” said Michael V. Hayden, who was the director of the N.S.A. and later the C.I.A. under President George W. Bush.

With the partisan emotions on both sides — Mr. Trump’s supporters see a plot to undermine his presidency, and Mrs. Clinton’s supporters see a conspiracy to keep her from the presidency — the result is an environment in which even those basic facts become the basis for dispute.

Mr. Trump’s team lashed out at the agencies after The Washington Post reported that the C.I.A. believed that Russia had intervened to undercut Mrs. Clinton and lift Mr. Trump, and The New York Times reported that Russia had broken into Republican National Committee computer networks just as they had broken into Democratic ones, but had released documents only on the Democrats.

For months, the president-elect has strenuously rejected all assertions that Russia was working to help him, though he did at one point invite Russia to find thousands of Mrs. Clinton’s emails. There is no evidence that the Russian meddling affected the outcome of the election or the legitimacy of the vote, but Mr. Trump and his aides want to shut the door on any such notion, including the idea that Mr. Putin schemed to put him in office.

Instead, Mr. Trump casts the issue as an unknowable mystery. “It could be Russia,” he recently told Time magazine. “And it could be China. And it could be some guy in his home in New Jersey.”

The Republicans who lead the congressional committees overseeing intelligence, the Pentagon and the Department of Homeland Security take the opposite view. They say that Russia was behind the election meddling, but that the scope and intent of the operation need deep investigation, hearings and public reports.

One question they may want to explore is why the intelligence agencies believe that the Republican networks were compromised while the F.B.I., which leads domestic cyberinvestigations, has apparently told Republicans that it has not seen evidence of that breach. Senior officials say the intelligence agencies’ conclusions are not being widely shared, even with law enforcement.

“We cannot allow foreign governments to interfere in our democracy,” Representative Michael McCaul, a Texas Republican who is the chairman of the Homeland Security Committee and was considered by Mr. Trump for secretary of Homeland Security, said at the conservative Heritage Foundation. “When they do, we must respond forcefully, publicly and decisively.”

Receive occasional updates and special offers for The New York Times’s products and services

He has promised hearings, saying the Russian activity was “a call to action,” as has Senator John McCain of Arizona, one of the few senators left from the Cold War era, when the Republican Party made opposition to the Soviet Union — and later deep suspicion of Russia — the centerpiece of its foreign policy.

Representative Peter T. King, Republican of New York and a member of the House Intelligence Committee, said there was little doubt that the Russian government was involved in hacking the Democratic National Committee. “All of the intelligence analysts who looked at it came to the conclusion that the tradecraft was very similar to the Russians,” he said.

Even one of Mr. Trump’s most enthusiastic supporters, Representative Devin Nunes, Republican of California, said on Friday that he had no doubt about Russia’s culpability. His complaint was with the intelligence agencies, which he said had “repeatedly” failed “to anticipate Putin’s hostile actions,” and with the Obama administration’s lack of a punitive response.

Mr. Nunes, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, said that the intelligence agencies had “ignored pleas by numerous Intelligence Committee members to take more forceful action against the Kremlin’s aggression.” He added that the Obama administration had “suddenly awoken to the threat.”

Like many Republicans, Mr. Nunes is threading a needle. His statement puts him in opposition to the position taken by Mr. Trump and his incoming national security adviser, Michael Flynn, who has traveled to Russia as a private citizen for RT, the state-controlled news operation, and attended a dinner with Mr. Putin.

Mr. Nunes’s contention that Mr. Obama was captivated by a desire to “reset” relations with Russia is also notable, because Mr. Trump has said he is trying to do the same — though he is avoiding that term, which was made popular by Mrs. Clinton in her failed effort as secretary of state in 2009.

There are splits both within the intelligence agencies and the congressional committees that oversee them. Officials say the C.I.A. and the N.S.A. have not always shared their findings with the F.B.I., which they often distrust. The question of how vigorously to investigate also has a political tinge: Democrats on the Senate Intelligence Committee, for example, are pushing hard for a broad investigation, while some Republicans are resisting.

Intelligence can also get politicized, of course, and one of the running debates about the disastrously mistaken assessments of Iraq that Mr. Trump often cites is whether the intelligence itself was tainted or whether the Bush White House read it selectively to support its march to war in 2003.

But what is unfolding in the argument over the Russian hacking is more complex, because tracking the origin of cyberattacks is complicated. It is made all the harder by the fact that the C.I.A. and the N.S.A. do not want to reveal human sources or technical abilities, including American software implants in Russian computer networks.

This much is known: In mid-2015, a hacking group long associated with the F.S.B. — the successor to the old Soviet K.G.B. — got inside the Democratic National Committee’s computer systems. The intelligence gathering appeared to be fairly routine, and it was unsurprising: The Chinese, for instance, penetrated Mr. Obama’s and Mr. McCain’s presidential campaign communications in 2008.

In the spring of 2016, a second group of Russian hackers, long associated with the G.R.U., a military intelligence agency, attacked the D.N.C. again, along with the private email accounts of prominent Washington figures like John D. Podesta, the chairman of Mrs. Clinton’s campaign. Those emails were ultimately published — a step the Russians had never taken before in the United States, though the tactic has been used often in former Soviet states and elsewhere in Europe. That moved the issue from espionage to an “information operation” with a political motive.

One person who attended a classified briefing on the intelligence said that the investigators had explained that the malware used in the cyberattack on the D.N.C. matched tools previously used by hackers with proven ties to the Russian government. That sort of “pattern analysis” is common in cyberinvestigations, though it is not conclusive.

But the intelligence agencies had more: They had managed to identify the individuals from the G.R.U. who oversaw the hacking efforts. That may have come from intercepted conversations, spying efforts, or implants in computer systems that allow the tracking of emails and text messages.

In briefings to Mr. Obama and on Capitol Hill, intelligence agencies have said they now believe that what began as an effort to undermine the credibility of American elections morphed over time into a much more targeted effort to harm Mrs. Clinton, whom Mr. Putin has long accused of interfering in Russian parliamentary elections in 2011.

But to hedge their bets before the election, according to the briefings, the Russians also targeted the Republican National Committee, Republican operatives and prominent members of the Republican establishment, like former Secretary of State Colin L. Powell. However, few of those emails have ever surfaced, save for Mr. Powell’s, which were critical of Mrs. Clinton’s campaign for trying to draw him into a defense of her use of a private computer server.

A spokesman for the Republican National Committee, Sean Spicer, disputed the report in The Times that the intelligence community had concluded that the R.N.C. had been hacked.

“The RNC was not ‘hacked,’” he said on Twitter. “The @nytimes was told and chose to ignore.” On Friday night, before The Times published its report, the committee had refused to comment.

Voir de plus:

Piratage imputé à la Russie : Poutine mis en cause, Trump minimise

Le rapport des agences de renseignement affirme que le président russe a influencé la campagne américaine.

Gilles Paris (Washington, correspondant)

 Le Monde

07.01.2017 

Il n’est plus vraiment question d’« un type de 180 kg » vautré sur son lit ni d’« un adolescent de 14 ans », prodiges du piratage informatique. A l’issue d’un briefing avec les responsables de la Direction nationale du renseignement (DNI), du FBI, de la CIA et de l’Agence nationale de sécurité (NSA) américaine, à New York, vendredi 6 janvier, le président élu Donald Trump a semblé faire légèrement machine arrière à propos du vol de données confidentielles du Parti démocrate. Ces données avaient été diffusées pendant la campagne présidentielle, manifestement pour nuire à sa candidate, Hillary Clinton. Le nom du président russe, Vladimir Poutine, figure en bonne place dans le rapport des agences de renseignement rendu public vendredi 6 janvier.

Pendant des semaines, M. Trump a pourtant jeté la suspicion sur les accusations du renseignement américain dirigées vers Moscou dès le 7 octobre, c’est-à-dire un mois avant sa victoire. Séchant ostensiblement les réunions quotidiennes sur la sécurité prévues pour que la future administration soit capable d’assurer ses fonctions dans les meilleures conditions dès son arrivée à la Maison Blanche, M. Trump a multiplié en outre les propos désobligeants vis-à-vis du renseignement, parfois mentionné sur son compte Twitter affublé de guillemets.

Mercredi, au lendemain d’un entretien sur Fox News de Julian Assange, fondateur du site WikiLeaks à l’origine de la publication de ces données, M. Trump avait relayé sans la moindre distance les affirmations selon lesquelles n’importe qui aurait pu accéder aux données du Parti démocrate et qu’elles n’avaient pas été fournies au site par les autorités russes. Le lendemain, au cours d’une audition par la commission des forces armées du Sénat, le directeur du renseignement national, James Clapper, avait jugé que M. Assange n’était pas une source crédible.

Lire aussi :   La transition entre Obama et Trump tourne à la guerre froide

Les républicains également visés

Dans le communiqué publié aussitôt après la fin du briefing de vendredi, M. Trump s’est félicité de sa teneur et a assuré avoir « le plus grand respect » pour les agences de renseignement. Il s’est cependant gardé d’opérer un revirement complet sur la responsabilité de la Russie, mentionnée au même titre que « la Chine, d’autres pays, des groupes extérieurs et des individus » jugés « constamment » à la manœuvre pour « s’introduire » dans les sites « d’institutions gouvernementales, d’entreprises et d’organisations dont le Comité national démocrate », la plus haute instance de ce parti.

A part la volonté de renforcer les moyens de défense américains, M. Trump a surtout voulu retenir du rapport qui lui a été présenté un élément jugé primordial. Il a estimé qu’il prouvait que les piratages n’avaient eu « absolument aucun effet sur l’issue de l’élection ». Renvoyant le Parti démocrate à ses responsabilités, il a ajouté que sa formation avait également été visée mais qu’elle avait bénéficié de meilleures protections.

Cette présentation des faits diffère pourtant de ce qui a été publié, quelques heures après le briefing de M. Trump, par la Direction nationale du renseignement. Le rapport public, qui ne comprend donc pas les éléments restés classifiés, affirme qu’il y a eu des tentatives d’intrusion par « des acteurs russes » dans les données électorales de certains Etats, parallèlement au piratage du Parti démocrate, même s’il reconnaît que ces tentatives « ne concernaient pas le comptage des votes ».

Lire aussi :   La riposte d’Obama envers la Russie pour le piratage de l’élection

Le rapport indique également que des données appartenant au Parti républicain ont également été dérobées par le biais de piratages similaires, mais qu’elles n’ont pas été rendues publiques.

Ces deux points mis à part, le rapport de vingt-cinq pages destiné au public (celui resté classifié en comporte vingt-cinq de plus, selon la presse américaine) est très économe en révélations. Il ne permet pas d’aller beaucoup plus loin, dans le détail, que les informations publiées jusqu’à présent. La mise en cause de la Russie et de l’implication des plus hautes autorités est devenue la position officielle de l’administration dès le 7 octobre. L’information restée confidentielle, évoquée par le Washington Post jeudi, selon laquelle les services de renseignement américains auraient intercepté une conversation de responsables russes analysant la victoire de M. Trump comme « un succès géopolitique » pour la Russie, n’est pas beaucoup plus convaincante.

La différence principale réside dans la mention explicite du président Poutine, comme le véritable architecte de ce projet : « Nous pouvons affirmer que le président russe, Vladimir Poutine, a ordonné une campagne visant à influencer la campagne électorale de 2016. » La motivation de ces interférences, à savoir favoriser la candidature de Donald Trump en visant son adversaire démocrate, avait déjà été évoquée en décembre par le Washington Post, sur la foi de sources anonymes du renseignement. Le rapport est plus explicite : « Poutine a eu de nombreuses expériences positives en travaillant avec des responsables politiques occidentaux dont les intérêts commerciaux les rendaient plus disposés à discuter avec la Russie, comme l’ancien premier ministre italien Silvio Berlusconi et l’ancien chancelier allemand Gerhard Schröder. »

Mise en garde

Comme l’avait précisé M. Clapper au Sénat, le rapport inscrit le piratage du Parti démocrate dans une stratégie plus générale visant « à affaiblir la foi du public dans le processus démocratique américain », « à dénigrer Mme Clinton, et à nuire à sa capacité à être élue et à sa présidence éventuelle ». Ce projet, met en garde le rapport, pourrait être dupliqué pour viser d’autres pays, notamment des alliés des Etats-Unis. L’Allemagne a publiquement mis en cause sur les risques d’interférences russes dans les élections législatives prévues à l’automne.

Moscou a mobilisé, selon le rapport, « les agences gouvernementales » chargées du renseignement. Le principal service russe pour les opérations extérieures, le GRU, est cité comme source indirecte crédible des documents publiés par WikiLeaks. Mais cet effort ne s’est pas limité aux services. Il a également impliqué « des médias officiels russes, des intermédiaires et des usagers rémunérés des réseaux sociaux, des trolls ».

Le rapport met ainsi en cause la couverture de la chaîne officielle Russia Today, au-delà même de la présidentielle. Il pointe notamment la campagne qui lui est prêtée sur les risques pour l’environnement provoqués par le développement de l’extraction du gaz de schiste américain, que le renseignement analyse comme un élément perturbateur pour les intérêts énergétiques russes. Il évoque également la préparation d’un mouvement de contestation sur les réseaux sociaux des résultats de l’élection, alors que la victoire de Mme Clinton était redoutée (#DemocracyRIP). Ce mouvement est resté dans les cartons après sa défaite.

Il est plausible que ce rapport soit enterré dès l’arrivée à la Maison Blanche de M. Trump, qui s’accompagnera en outre d’un renouvellement d’une partie des responsables des services, dont ceux de la CIA et la DNI. Si la partie classifiée est plus convaincante, elle pourrait cependant entretenir l’hostilité traditionnelle d’une partie significative du Parti républicain envers la Russie. Et contrarier une éventuelle tentative de rapprochement de la future administration américaine avec Moscou.

Voir enfin:

National Security

The Unraveling of Julian Assange

Jan 6, 2017

You almost have to feel sorry for Julian Assange. Shut in at the Ecuadorean Embassy in London without access to sunlight, the founder of WikiLeaks is reduced to self-parody these days.

Here is a man dedicated to radical transparency, yet he refuses to go to Sweden despite an arrest warrant in connection with allegations of sexual assault. His organization retweets the president-elect who once called for him to be put to death. He spreads the innuendo that Seth Rich, a Democratic National Committee staffer, was murdered this summer because he was the real source of the e-mails WikiLeaks published in the run-up to November’s election. And now he tells Fox News’s Sean Hannity that it’s the U.S. media that is deeply dishonest.

This is the proper context to evaluate Assange’s claim, repeated by Donald Trump and his supporters, that Russia was not the source for the e-mails of leading Democrats distributed by WikiLeaks.

We all know that the U.S. intelligence community is standing by its judgment that Russia hacked the Democrats’ e-mails and distributed them to influence the election. And while it’s worrisome that Trump would dismiss this judgment out of hand, this also misses the main point. Sometimes the spies get it wrong, like the “slam-dunk” conclusion that Saddam Hussein was concealing Iraqi weapons of mass destruction.

The real issue is Assange. The founder of WikiLeaks has a history of saying paranoid nonsense. This is particularly true of Assange’s view of Hillary Clinton. His delusions have led him to justify the interference in our elections as an act of holding his nemesis accountable to the public.

Bill Keller, the former New York Times executive editor, captured Assange’s penchant for dark fantasy in a 2011 essay that described him casually telling a group of journalists from the Guardian that former Stasi agents were destroying East German archives of the secret police. A German reporter from Der Spiegel, John Goetz, was incredulous. “That’s utter nonsense, he said. Some former Stasi personnel were hired as security guards in the office, but the records were well protected,” Keller recounts him as saying.

In this sense, WikiLeaks’s promotion of the John Grishamesque yarn that Seth Rich was murdered on orders from Hillary Clinton’s network is in keeping with a pattern. Both Rich’s family and the Washington police have dismissed this as a conspiracy theory. That, however, did not stop WikiLeaks from raising a $20,000 reward to find his “real” killers.

Add to this Assange’s approach to Russia. It’s well known that his short-lived talk show, which once aired a respectful interview with the leader of the Lebanese terrorist group Hezbollah, was distributed by Russian state television. WikiLeaks has also never published sensitive documents from Russian government sources comparable to the State Department cables it began publishing in 2010, or the e-mails of leading Democrats last year.

When an Italian journalist asked him last month why WikiLeaks hasn’t published the Kremlin’s secrets, Assange’s answer was telling. “In Russia, there are many vibrant publications, online blogs, and Kremlin critics such as [Alexey] Navalny are part of that spectrum,” he said. “There are also newspapers like Novaya Gazeta, in which different parts of society in Moscow are permitted to critique each other and it is tolerated, generally, because it isn’t a big TV channel that might have a mass popular effect, its audience is educated people in Moscow. So my interpretation is that in Russia there are competitors to WikiLeaks, and no WikiLeaks staff speak Russian, so for a strong culture which has its own language, you have to be seen as a local player.”

This is bizarre for a few reasons. To start, Assange’s description of the press environment in Russia has a curious omission. Why no mention of the journalists and opposition figures who have been killed or forced into exile? Assange gives the impression that the Russian government is just as vulnerable to mass disclosures of its secrets as the U.S. government has been. That’s absurd, even if it’s also true that some oppositional press is tolerated there.

Also WikiLeaks once did have a Russian-speaking associate. His name is Yisrael Shamir, and according to former WikiLeaks staffer James Ball, he worked closely with the organization when it began distributing the State Department cables. Shamir is a supporter of Vladimir Putin.

This is all a pity. A decade ago, when Assange founded WikiLeaks, it was a very different organization. As Raffi Khatchadourian reported in a 2010 New Yorker profile, Assange told potential collaborators in 2006, “Our primary targets are those highly oppressive regimes in China, Russia and Central Eurasia, but we also expect to be of assistance to those in the West who wish to reveal illegal or immoral behavior in their own governments and corporations.”

For a while, WikiLeaks followed this creed. The first document published, but not verified, was an internal memo purporting to show how Somalia’s Islamic Courts Union intended to murder members of the transitional government there. It published the e-mails of University of East Anglia climate scientists discussing manipulation of climate change data. In its early years, WikiLeaks published information damaging to the U.S. as well. But no government or entity or political side appeared to be immune from the organization’s anonymous whistle-blowers.

Today, WikiLeaks’s actions discredit its original mission. Does anyone believe Assange when he darkly implies that he received the DNC e-mails from a whistleblower? Even if you aren’t persuaded that Russia was behind it, there is a preponderance of public evidence that the e-mail account of Hillary Clinton’s campaign chairman John Podesta was hacked, such as the e-mail that asked him to give his password in a phishing scam. Assange himself is not even sticking to his old story: He told Hannity that a 14-year-old could have hacked Podesta’s emails. Good to know.

In short, the founder of a site meant to expose the falsehoods of governments and large institutions has been gaslighting us. Just look at the WikiLeaks statement on the e-mails right before the election. “To withhold the publication of such information until after the election would have been to favour one of the candidates above the public’s right to know,” it said.

That’s precious. WikiLeaks did favor a candidate in the election simply by publishing the e-mails. And the candidate it aided, Donald Trump, is so hostile to the public’s right know that he won’t even release his tax returns. In two weeks, he will be in charge of an intelligence community that asserts with high confidence the e-mails WikiLeaks made public were stolen by Russian government hackers. Assange, of course, denies it, and Trump seems to believe him. Sad!

Voir de plus:

Julian Assange: « Donald? It’s a change anyway »

The interview. The Wikileaks cofounder: « Our source Chelsea Manning tortured in Usa »

Stefania Maurizi

Reppublica

23 decembri 2016

LONDON – When they appeared on the scene for the first time in 2006, few noticed them. And when four years later they hit worldwide media headlines with their publication of over 700,000 secret US government documents, many assumed that Julian Assange and his organisation, WikiLeaks, would be annihilated very shortly.

Since 2010 Assange has lived first under house arrest and then confined to the Ecuadorian embassy in London, where he has been granted asylum by Ecuador. The country’s officials judged  his concerns of being extradited to Sweden and then to the US to be put on trial for the WikiLeaks’ revelations well-grounded.

Repubblica met Julian Assange in the embassy, nicely decorated for the Christmas season. These last ten years have been intense ones for his organisation, but the last two months have been truly hectic: WikiLeaks’ publication of Hillary Clinton’s and US Democrats’ emails hit headlines around the world. The US government hit back, accusing WikiLeaks of having received these materials from Russian cybercriminals with the political agenda of influencing the US elections, a claim some experts question. In the midst of these publications, Ecuador even cut off Julian Assange’s internet connection. Finally, in November, Swedish prosecutors travelled to London to question the WikiLeaks’ founder after six years of judicial paralysis. In a matter of a few weeks, they will be deciding whether to charge or absolve him once and for all. Next February, Ecuador will be holding political elections. If Julian Assange loses asylum, will he be extradited to Sweden and then to the US?

How did it all start? Back in 2006, why did you think a new media organisation was necessary?
« I had watched the Iraq War closely, and in the aftermath of the Iraq War a number of individuals from the security services, including the Australian [ones], came out saying how they had attempted to reveal information before the war began and had been thwarted. People who wanted to be whistleblowers before the Iraq war had not found a channel to get the information out. I felt that this was a general problem and set about to construct the system which could solve this problem in general ».

In a famous interview, you declared that at the beginning you thought that your biggest role would be in China and in some of the former Soviet states and North Africa. Quite the opposite, most of WikiLeaks’ biggest revelations concern the US military-industrial complex, its wars in Afghanistan and in Iraq and its serious human rights violations in the war on terror. These abuses have had a heavy impact in an open and democratic society like the United States and produced ‘dissidents’ like Chelsea Manning willing to expose them. Why aren’t human rights abuses producing the same effects in regimes like China or Russia, and what can be done to democratise information in those countries?

« In Russia, there are many vibrant publications, online blogs, and Kremlin critics such as [Alexey] Navalny are part of that spectrum. There are also newspapers like « Novaya Gazeta », in which different parts of society in Moscow are permitted to critique each other and it is tolerated, generally, because it isn’t a big TV channel that might have a mass popular effect, its audience is educated people in Moscow. So my interpretation is that in Russia there are competitors to WikiLeaks, and no WikiLeaks staff speak Russian, so for a strong culture which has its own language, you have to be seen as a local player. WikiLeaks is a predominantly English-speaking organisation with a website predominantly in English. We have published more than 800,000 documents about or referencing Russia and president Putin, so we do have quite a bit of coverage, but the majority of our publications come from Western sources, though not always. For example, we have published more than 2 million documents from Syria, including Bashar al-Assad personally. Sometimes we make a publication about a country and they will see WikiLeaks as a player within that country, like with Timor East and Kenya. The real determinant is how distant that culture is from English. Chinese culture is quite far away ».

What can be done there?
« We have published some things in Chinese. It is necessary to be seen as a local player and to adapt the language to the local culture ».

There is strict control of the web in China…
« China banned us in 2007, we have worked around that censorship at various times, publishers there were too scared to publish [our documents]. The feeling is mixed within China: they of course like to see the Western critique that a number of our publications enable. China is not a militaristic society, they don’t see they have a comparative advantage in making warfare, so they presumably like general critiques of war, but it is a society that is authority-structured, which is terrified of dissidents, whereas if you compare it to Russia, it too is an increasingly authoritarian society, but one that has a cultural tradition of lionising dissidents ».

Why aren’t the US and UK intelligence agencies leaking to WikiLeaks about their enemies, like Russia or China? They could do it using NGOs or even activists as a cover and they could expose WikiLeaks, if your organisation didn’t publish their documents…
« We publish full information, pristine archives, verifiable. That often makes it inconvenient for propaganda purposes, because for many organisations you see the good and the bad, and that makes the facts revealed harder to spin. If we go back to the Iraq War in 2003, let’s imagine US intelligence tried to leak us some of their internal reports on Iraq. Now we know from US intelligence reports that subsequently came out that there was internal doubt and scepticism about the claim that there were weapons of mass destruction in Iraq. Even though there was intense pressure on the intelligence services at the political level to create reports that supported the rush towards the war, internally their analysts were hedging. The White House, Downing Street, the New York Times, the Washington Post and CNN stripped off those doubts. If WikiLeaks had published those reports, these doubts would have been expressed and the war possibly adverted ».

WikiLeaks published documents on Hillary Clinton and the US Democrats. How do you reply to those who accuse you of having helped to elect Mr. Trump?
« What is the allegation here exactly? We published what the Democratic National Committee, John Podesta, Hillary Clinton’s campaign manager, and Hillary Clinton herself were saying about their own campaign, which the American people read and were very interested to read, and assessed the elements and characters, and then they made a decision. That decision was based on Hillary Clinton’s own words, her campaign manager’s own words. That’s democracy ».

Do you agree with those who say that it was a hit job, because you hit Hillary Clinton when she was most vulnerable, during the final weeks of her campaign?
« No, we have been publishing about Hillary Clinton for many years, because of her position as Secretary of State. We have been publishing her cables since 2010 and her emails also. We are domain experts on Clinton and her post 2008 role in government. This is why it is natural for sources who have information on Hillary Clinton to come to us. They know we will understand its significance ».

So Clinton is gone, has WikiLeaks won?
« We were pleased to see how much of the American public interacted with the material we published. That interaction was on both sides of politics, including those to the left of Hillary Clinton those who supported Bernie Sanders, who were able to see the structure of power within the Democratic National Committee (DNC) and how the Clintons had placed Debbie Wasserman Schultz to head up the DNC and as a result the DNC had tilted the scales of the process against Bernie Sanders ».

What about Donald Trump? What is going to happen?
« If the question is how I personally feel about the situation, I am mixed: Hillary Clinton and the network around her imprisoned one of our alleged sources for 35 years, Chelsea Manning, tortured her according to the United Nations, in order to implicate me personally. According to our publications Hillary Clinton was the chief proponent and the architect of the war against Libya. It is clear that she pursued this war as a staging effort for her Presidential bid. It wasn’t even a war for an ideological purpose. This war ended up producing the refugee crisis in Europe, changing the political colour of Europe, killing more than 40,000 people within a year in Libya, while the arms from Libya went to Mali and other places, boosting or causing civil wars, including the Syrian catastrophe. If someone and their network behave like that, then there are consequences. Internal and external opponents are generated. Now there is a separate question on what Donald Trump means ».

What do you think he means?
« Hillary Clinton’s election would have been a consolidation of power in the existing ruling class of the United States. Donald Trump is not a DC insider, he is part of the wealthy ruling elite of the United States, and he is gathering around him a spectrum of other rich people and several idiosyncratic personalities. They do not by themselves form an existing structure, so it is a weak structure which is displacing and destabilising the pre-existing central power network within DC. It is a new patronage structure which will evolve rapidly, but at the moment its looseness means there are opportunities for change in the United States: change for the worse and change for the better ».

In these ten years of WikiLeaks, you and your organisation have experienced all sorts of attacks. What have you learned from this warfare?
« Power is mostly the illusion of power. The Pentagon demanded we destroy our publications. We kept publishing. Clinton denounced us and said we were an attack on the entire « international community ». We kept publishing. I was put in prison and under house arrest. We kept publishing. We went head to head with the NSA getting Edward Snowden out of Hong Kong, we won and got him asylum. Clinton tried to destroy us and was herself destroyed. Elephants, it seems, can be brought down with string. Perhaps there are no elephants ».

You have spent six years under arrest and confinement, the UN established that you are arbitrarily detained, the UK appealed against the UN decision and lost, so this decision is now final. What is going to happen now?
« That’s all politics, that’s something that people cannot properly understand, unless they been through the legal system themselves in high-profile cases. This decision by the UN in my case is really an historical decision. What is someone to do when they are in a multi-jurisdictional conflict, that is politicised and involves big powers? There is too much pressure for domestic courts to resist, so you need an international court with representation from different countries which are not allied to each other to be able to come to a fair decision. That is what happened in my situation. Sweden and the United Kingdom have refused to implement this decision so far, of course it costs both Sweden and the UK on a diplomatic level and the question is how long they are willing to pay that cost ».

After six years, the Swedish prosecutors questioned you in London, as you had requested from the beginning. What happens if you get charged, extradited to Sweden and then to the United States? Will WikiLeaks survive?
« Yes, we have contingency plans that you have seen in action when my Internet was cut off and while I was in prison before. An organisation like WikiLeaks cannot be structured such that a single person can be a point of failure in the organisation, it makes him or her a target ».

Is the internet still cut off?
« The internet has been returned ».

You’ve declared on more than one occasion that what you really miss after 6 years of arrest and confinement is your family. Your children gave you a present to make you to feel less alone: a kitten. Have you ever reconsidered your choices?
« Yes, of course. Fortunately I’m too busy to think about these things all the time. I know that my family and my children are proud of me, that they benefit in some ways from having a father who knows some parts of the world and has become very good in a fight, but in other ways they suffer ».

One of the first times we met I noticed a book on your table: « The Prince » by Machiavelli. What have you learned about power in 10 years of WikiLeaks?
« My conclusion is that most power structures are deeply incompetent, staffed by people who don’t really believe in their institutions and that most power is the projection of the perception of power. And the more secretively it works, the more incompetent it is, because secrecy breeds incompetence, while openness breeds competence, because one can see and can compare actions and see which one is more competent. To keep up these appearances, institutional heads or political heads such as presidents spend most of the time trying to walk in front of the train and pretending that it is following them, but the direction is set by the tracks and by the engine of the train. Understanding that means that small and committed organisations can outmanoeuvre these institutional dinosaurs, like the State Department, the NSA or the CIA ».

Voir également:

The United States has complained to Russia’s Foreign Ministry over what it says is a bid to smear a diplomat with a fabricated sex tape, the U.S. ambassador in Moscow told ABC television.

Ambassador John Beyrle said a video apparently featuring the diplomat and prostitutes that appeared in the Russian media was « clearly fabricated, » according to a transcript of an interview broadcast late on Wednesday on ABC.

Ties with Moscow sank to a post-Cold War low under the last U.S. administration but President Barack Obama, who met Russian President Dmitry Medvedev in New York on Wednesday, has said he wants to press the « reset » button on the relationship.

« I think there are people here who don’t want the U.S.-Russian relationship to get better. That’s unfortunate, » Beyrle said.

Russia’s Foreign Ministry said it would issue a statement on the case later on Thursday. A spokesman for the U.S. embassy in Moscow said it had nothing to add to Beyrle’s comments on ABC.

Beyrle said that the video, posted last month on the web site of the Komsomolskaya Pravda newspaper, http://www.kp.ru, spliced genuine footage of diplomat Kyle Hatcher in a Moscow hotel room with staged footage of a couple having sex.

« Kyle Hatcher has done nothing wrong, » Beyrle said. « Clearly the video we saw was a montage of lot of different clips, some of which are clearly fabricated, » he told ABC News.

Hatcher works in the embassy’s political section and is responsible for outreach to religious, civil society and human rights organizations.

« There may be some people here who don’t like that job description and would like to discredit him in the eyes of his contacts, » Beyrle said.

« I have full confidence in him and he is going to continue his work here at the embassy. » (Writing by Conor Humphries; Editing by Jon Boyle)

Voir enfin:

Read the full transcript of President Obama’s farewell speech

 LA Times
January 10, 2017

Here is an unedited transcript of President Obama’s prepared remarks during his farewell address in Chicago, as provided by the White House.

It’s good to be home.  My fellow Americans, Michelle and I have been so touched by all the well-wishes we’ve received over the past few weeks.  But tonight it’s my turn to say thanks.  Whether we’ve seen eye-to-eye or rarely agreed at all, my conversations with you, the American people – in living rooms and schools; at farms and on factory floors; at diners and on distant outposts – are what have kept me honest, kept me inspired, and kept me going.  Every day, I learned from you.  You made me a better president, and you made me a better man.

I first came to Chicago when I was in my early 20s, still trying to figure out who I was; still searching for a purpose to my life.  It was in neighborhoods not far from here where I began working with church groups in the shadows of closed steel mills.  It was on these streets where I witnessed the power of faith, and the quiet dignity of working people in the face of struggle and loss.  This is where I learned that change only happens when ordinary people get involved, get engaged, and come together to demand it.

After eight years as your president, I still believe that.  And it’s not just my belief.  It’s the beating heart of our American idea – our bold experiment in self-government.

It’s the conviction that we are all created equal, endowed by our creator with certain unalienable rights, among them life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

It’s the insistence that these rights, while self-evident, have never been self-executing; that we, the people, through the instrument of our democracy, can form a more perfect union.

This is the great gift our Founders gave us.  The freedom to chase our individual dreams through our sweat, toil, and imagination – and the imperative to strive together as well, to achieve a greater good.

For 240 years, our nation’s call to citizenship has given work and purpose to each new generation.  It’s what led patriots to choose republic over tyranny, pioneers to trek west, slaves to brave that makeshift railroad to freedom.  It’s what pulled immigrants and refugees across oceans and the Rio Grande, pushed women to reach for the ballot, powered workers to organize.  It’s why GIs gave their lives at Omaha Beach and Iwo Jima; Iraq and Afghanistan – and why men and women from Selma to Stonewall were prepared to give theirs as well.

So that’s what we mean when we say America is exceptional.  Not that our nation has been flawless from the start, but that we have shown the capacity to change, and make life better for those who follow.

Yes, our progress has been uneven.  The work of democracy has always been hard, contentious and sometimes bloody.  For every two steps forward, it often feels we take one step back.  But the long sweep of America has been defined by forward motion, a constant widening of our founding creed to embrace all, and not just some.

If I had told you eight years ago that America would reverse a great recession, reboot our auto industry, and unleash the longest stretch of job creation in our history…if I had told you that we would open up a new chapter with the Cuban people, shut down Iran’s nuclear weapons program without firing a shot, and take out the mastermind of 9/11…if I had told you that we would win marriage equality, and secure the right to health insurance for another 20 million of our fellow citizens – you might have said our sights were set a little too high.

But that’s what we did.  That’s what you did.  You were the change.  You answered people’s hopes, and because of you, by almost every measure, America is a better, stronger place than it was when we started.

In 10 days, the world will witness a hallmark of our democracy:  the peaceful transfer of power from one freely elected president to the next.  I committed to President-elect Trump that my administration would ensure the smoothest possible transition, just as President Bush did for me.  Because it’s up to all of us to make sure our government can help us meet the many challenges we still face.

We have what we need to do so.  After all, we remain the wealthiest, most powerful, and most respected nation on Earth.  Our youth and drive, our diversity and openness, our boundless capacity for risk and reinvention mean that the future should be ours.

But that potential will be realized only if our democracy works.  Only if our politics reflects the decency of the our people.  Only if all of us, regardless of our party affiliation or particular interest, help restore the sense of common purpose that we so badly need right now.

That’s what I want to focus on tonight – the state of our democracy.

Understand, democracy does not require uniformity.  Our founders quarreled and compromised, and expected us to do the same. But they knew that democracy does require a basic sense of solidarity – the idea that for all our outward differences, we are all in this together; that we rise or fall as one.

There have been moments throughout our history that threatened to rupture that solidarity.  The beginning of this century has been one of those times.  A shrinking world, growing inequality; demographic change and the specter of terrorism – these forces haven’t just tested our security and prosperity, but our democracy as well.  And how we meet these challenges to our democracy will determine our ability to educate our kids, and create good jobs, and protect our homeland.

In other words, it will determine our future.

Our democracy won’t work without a sense that everyone has economic opportunity.  Today, the economy is growing again; wages, incomes, home values, and retirement accounts are rising again; poverty is falling again.  The wealthy are paying a fairer share of taxes even as the stock market shatters records.  The unemployment rate is near a 10-year low.  The uninsured rate has never, ever been lower.  Healthcare costs are rising at the slowest rate in 50 years.  And if anyone can put together a plan that is demonstrably better than the improvements we’ve made to our healthcare system – that covers as many people at less cost – I will publicly support it.

That, after all, is why we serve – to make people’s lives better, not worse.

But for all the real progress we’ve made, we know it’s not enough.  Our economy doesn’t work as well or grow as fast when a few prosper at the expense of a growing middle class.  But stark inequality is also corrosive to our democratic principles.  While the top 1% has amassed a bigger share of wealth and income, too many families, in inner cities and rural counties, have been left behind – the laid-off factory worker; the waitress and healthcare worker who struggle to pay the bills – convinced that the game is fixed against them, that their government only serves the interests of the powerful – a recipe for more cynicism and polarization in our politics.

There are no quick fixes to this long-term trend.  I agree that our trade should be fair and not just free.  But the next wave of economic dislocation won’t come from overseas.  It will come from the relentless pace of automation that makes many good, middle-class jobs obsolete.

And so we must forge a new social compact – to guarantee all our kids the education they need; to give workers the power to unionize for better wages; to update the social safety net to reflect the way we live now and make more reforms to the tax code so corporations and individuals who reap the most from the new economy don’t avoid their obligations to the country that’s made their success possible.  We can argue about how to best achieve these goals.  But we can’t be complacent about the goals themselves.  For if we don’t create opportunity for all people, the disaffection and division that has stalled our progress will only sharpen in years to come.

There’s a second threat to our democracy – one as old as our nation itself.  After my election, there was talk of a post-racial America.  Such a vision, however well-intended, was never realistic.  For race remains a potent and often divisive force in our society.  I’ve lived long enough to know that race relations are better than they were 10, or 20, or 30 years ago – you can see it not just in statistics, but in the attitudes of young Americans across the political spectrum.

But we’re not where we need to be.  All of us have more work to do.  After all, if every economic issue is framed as a struggle between a hard-working white middle class and undeserving minorities, then workers of all shades will be left fighting for scraps while the wealthy withdraw further into their private enclaves.  If we decline to invest in the children of immigrants, just because they don’t look like us, we diminish the prospects of our own children – because those brown kids will represent a larger share of America’s workforce.  And our economy doesn’t have to be a zero-sum game.  Last year, incomes rose for all races, all age groups, for men and for women.

Going forward, we must uphold laws against discrimination – in hiring, in housing, in education and the criminal justice system.  That’s what our Constitution and highest ideals require.  But laws alone won’t be enough.  Hearts must change.  If our democracy is to work in this increasingly diverse nation, each one of us must try to heed the advice of one of the great characters in American fiction, Atticus Finch, who said, “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view…until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.”

For blacks and other minorities, it means tying our own struggles for justice to the challenges that a lot of people in this country face – the refugee, the immigrant, the rural poor, the transgender American, and also the middle-aged white man who from the outside may seem like he’s got all the advantages, but who’s seen his world upended by economic, cultural, and technological change.

For white Americans, it means acknowledging that the effects of slavery and Jim Crow didn’t suddenly vanish in the ‘60s; that when minority groups voice discontent, they’re not just engaging in reverse racism or practicing political correctness; that when they wage peaceful protest, they’re not demanding special treatment, but the equal treatment our Founders promised.

For native-born Americans, it means reminding ourselves that the stereotypes about immigrants today were said, almost word for word, about the Irish, Italians, and Poles.  America wasn’t weakened by the presence of these newcomers; they embraced this nation’s creed, and it was strengthened.

So regardless of the station we occupy; we have to try harder; to start with the premise that each of our fellow citizens loves this country just as much as we do; that they value hard work and family like we do; that their children are just as curious and hopeful and worthy of love as our own.

None of this is easy.  For too many of us, it’s become safer to retreat into our own bubbles, whether in our neighborhoods or college campuses or places of worship or our social media feeds, surrounded by people who look like us and share the same political outlook and never challenge our assumptions.  The rise of naked partisanship, increasing economic and regional stratification, the splintering of our media into a channel for every taste – all this makes this great sorting seem natural, even inevitable.  And increasingly, we become so secure in our bubbles that we accept only information, whether true or not, that fits our opinions, instead of basing our opinions on the evidence that’s out there.

This trend represents a third threat to our democracy.  Politics is a battle of ideas; in the course of a healthy debate, we’ll prioritize different goals, and the different means of reaching them.  But without some common baseline of facts; without a willingness to admit new information, and concede that your opponent is making a fair point, and that science and reason matter, we’ll keep talking past each other, making common ground and compromise impossible.

Isn’t that part of what makes politics so dispiriting?  How can elected officials rage about deficits when we propose to spend money on preschool for kids, but not when we’re cutting taxes for corporations?  How do we excuse ethical lapses in our own party, but pounce when the other party does the same thing?  It’s not just dishonest, this selective sorting of the facts; it’s self-defeating.  Because as my mother used to tell me, reality has a way of catching up with you.

Take the challenge of climate change.  In just eight years, we’ve halved our dependence on foreign oil, doubled our renewable energy, and led the world to an agreement that has the promise to save this planet.  But without bolder action, our children won’t have time to debate the existence of climate change; they’ll be busy dealing with its effects: environmental disasters, economic disruptions, and waves of climate refugees seeking sanctuary.

Now, we can and should argue about the best approach to the problem.  But to simply deny the problem not only betrays future generations; it betrays the essential spirit of innovation and practical problem-solving that guided our Founders.

It’s that spirit, born of the Enlightenment, that made us an economic powerhouse – the spirit that took flight at Kitty Hawk and Cape Canaveral; the spirit that that cures disease and put a computer in every pocket.

It’s that spirit – a faith in reason, and enterprise, and the primacy of right over might, that allowed us to resist the lure of fascism and tyranny during the Great Depression, and build a post-World War II order with other democracies, an order based not just on military power or national affiliations but on principles – the rule of law, human rights, freedoms of religion, speech, assembly, and an independent press.

That order is now being challenged – first by violent fanatics who claim to speak for Islam; more recently by autocrats in foreign capitals who see free markets, open democracies, and civil society itself as a threat to their power.  The peril each poses to our democracy is more far-reaching than a car bomb or a missile.  It represents the fear of change; the fear of people who look or speak or pray differently; a contempt for the rule of law that holds leaders accountable; an intolerance of dissent and free thought; a belief that the sword or the gun or the bomb or propaganda machine is the ultimate arbiter of what’s true and what’s right.

Because of the extraordinary courage of our men and women in uniform, and the intelligence officers, law enforcement, and diplomats who support them, no foreign terrorist organization has successfully planned and executed an attack on our homeland these past eight years; and although Boston and Orlando remind us of how dangerous radicalization can be, our law enforcement agencies are more effective and vigilant than ever.  We’ve taken out tens of thousands of terrorists – including Osama bin Laden.  The global coalition we’re leading against ISIL has taken out their leaders, and taken away about half their territory.  ISIL will be destroyed, and no one who threatens America will ever be safe.  To all who serve, it has been the honor of my lifetime to be your Commander-in-Chief.

But protecting our way of life requires more than our military.  Democracy can buckle when we give in to fear.  So just as we, as citizens, must remain vigilant against external aggression, we must guard against a weakening of the values that make us who we are.  That’s why, for the past eight years, I’ve worked to put the fight against terrorism on a firm legal footing.  That’s why we’ve ended torture, worked to close Gitmo, and reform our laws governing surveillance to protect privacy and civil liberties.  That’s why I reject discrimination against Muslim Americans.  That’s why we cannot withdraw from global fights – to expand democracy, and human rights, women’s rights, and LGBT rights – no matter how imperfect our efforts, no matter how expedient ignoring such values may seem.  For the fight against extremism and intolerance and sectarianism are of a piece with the fight against authoritarianism and nationalist aggression.  If the scope of freedom and respect for the rule of law shrinks around the world, the likelihood of war within and between nations increases, and our own freedoms will eventually be threatened.

So let’s be vigilant, but not afraid.  ISIL will try to kill innocent people.  But they cannot defeat America unless we betray our Constitution and our principles in the fight.  Rivals like Russia or China cannot match our influence around the world – unless we give up what we stand for, and turn ourselves into just another big country that bullies smaller neighbors.

Which brings me to my final point – our democracy is threatened whenever we take it for granted.  All of us, regardless of party, should throw ourselves into the task of rebuilding our democratic institutions.  When voting rates are some of the lowest among advanced democracies, we should make it easier, not harder, to vote.  When trust in our institutions is low, we should reduce the corrosive influence of money in our politics, and insist on the principles of transparency and ethics in public service.  When Congress is dysfunctional, we should draw our districts to encourage politicians to cater to common sense and not rigid extremes.

And all of this depends on our participation; on each of us accepting the responsibility of citizenship, regardless of which way the pendulum of power swings.

Our Constitution is a remarkable, beautiful gift.  But it’s really just a piece of parchment.  It has no power on its own.  We, the people, give it power – with our participation, and the choices we make.  Whether or not we stand up for our freedoms.  Whether or not we respect and enforce the rule of law.  America is no fragile thing.  But the gains of our long journey to freedom are not assured.

In his own farewell address, George Washington wrote that self-government is the underpinning of our safety, prosperity, and liberty, but “from different causes and from different quarters much pains will be taken…to weaken in your minds the conviction of this truth;” that we should preserve it with “jealous anxiety;” that we should reject “the first dawning of every attempt to alienate any portion of our country from the rest or to enfeeble the sacred ties” that make us one.

We weaken those ties when we allow our political dialogue to become so corrosive that people of good character are turned off from public service; so coarse with rancor that Americans with whom we disagree are not just misguided, but somehow malevolent.  We weaken those ties when we define some of us as more American than others; when we write off the whole system as inevitably corrupt, and blame the leaders we elect without examining our own role in electing them.

It falls to each of us to be those anxious, jealous guardians of our democracy; to embrace the joyous task we’ve been given to continually try to improve this great nation of ours.  Because for all our outward differences, we all share the same proud title:  Citizen.

Ultimately, that’s what our democracy demands.  It needs you.  Not just when there’s an election, not just when your own narrow interest is at stake, but over the full span of a lifetime.  If you’re tired of arguing with strangers on the Internet, try to talk with one in real life.  If something needs fixing, lace up your shoes and do some organizing.  If you’re disappointed by your elected officials, grab a clipboard, get some signatures, and run for office yourself.  Show up.  Dive in.  Persevere.  Sometimes you’ll win.  Sometimes you’ll lose.  Presuming a reservoir of goodness in others can be a risk, and there will be times when the process disappoints you.  But for those of us fortunate enough to have been a part of this work, to see it up close, let me tell you, it can energize and inspire.  And more often than not, your faith in America – and in Americans – will be confirmed.

Mine sure has been.  Over the course of these eight years, I’ve seen the hopeful faces of young graduates and our newest military officers.  I’ve mourned with grieving families searching for answers, and found grace in a Charleston church.  I’ve seen our scientists help a paralyzed man regain his sense of touch, and our wounded warriors walk again.  I’ve seen our doctors and volunteers rebuild after earthquakes and stop pandemics in their tracks.  I’ve seen the youngest of children remind us of our obligations to care for refugees, to work in peace, and above all to look out for each other.

That faith I placed all those years ago, not far from here, in the power of ordinary Americans to bring about change – that faith has been rewarded in ways I couldn’t possibly have imagined.  I hope yours has, too.  Some of you here tonight or watching at home were there with us in 2004, in 2008, in 2012 – and maybe you still can’t believe we pulled this whole thing off.

You’re not the only ones.  Michelle – for the past 25 years, you’ve been not only my wife and mother of my children, but my best friend.  You took on a role you didn’t ask for and made it your own with grace and grit and style and good humor.  You made the White House a place that belongs to everybody.  And a new generation sets its sights higher because it has you as a role model.  You’ve made me proud.  You’ve made the country proud.

Malia and Sasha, under the strangest of circumstances, you have become two amazing young women, smart and beautiful, but more importantly, kind and thoughtful and full of passion.  You wore the burden of years in the spotlight so easily.  Of all that I’ve done in my life, I’m most proud to be your dad.

To Joe Biden, the scrappy kid from Scranton who became Delaware’s favorite son:  You were the first choice I made as a nominee, and the best.  Not just because you have been a great vice president, but because in the bargain, I gained a brother.  We love you and Jill like family, and your friendship has been one of the great joys of our life.

To my remarkable staff:  For eight years – and for some of you, a whole lot more – I’ve drawn from your energy, and tried to reflect back what you displayed every day: heart, and character, and idealism.  I’ve watched you grow up, get married, have kids, and start incredible new journeys of your own.  Even when times got tough and frustrating, you never let Washington get the better of you.  The only thing that makes me prouder than all the good we’ve done is the thought of all the remarkable things you’ll achieve from here.

And to all of you out there – every organizer who moved to an unfamiliar town and kind family who welcomed them in, every volunteer who knocked on doors, every young person who cast a ballot for the first time, every American who lived and breathed the hard work of change – you are the best supporters and organizers anyone could hope for, and I will forever be grateful.  Because, yes, you changed the world.

That’s why I leave this stage tonight even more optimistic about this country than I was when we started.  Because I know our work has not only helped so many Americans; it has inspired so many Americans – especially so many young people out there – to believe you can make a difference; to hitch your wagon to something bigger than yourselves.  This generation coming up – unselfish, altruistic, creative, patriotic – I’ve seen you in every corner of the country.  You believe in a fair, just, inclusive America; you know that constant change has been America’s hallmark, something not to fear but to embrace, and you are willing to carry this hard work of democracy forward.  You’ll soon outnumber any of us, and I believe as a result that the future is in good hands.

My fellow Americans, it has been the honor of my life to serve you.  I won’t stop; in fact, I will be right there with you, as a citizen, for all my days that remain.  For now, whether you’re young or young at heart, I do have one final ask of you as your president – the same thing I asked when you took a chance on me eight years ago.

I am asking you to believe.  Not in my ability to bring about change – but in yours.

I am asking you to hold fast to that faith written into our founding documents; that idea whispered by slaves and abolitionists; that spirit sung by immigrants and homesteaders and those who marched for justice; that creed reaffirmed by those who planted flags from foreign battlefields to the surface of the moon; a creed at the core of every American whose story is not yet written:

Yes We Can.

Yes We Did.

Yes We Can.

Thank you.  God bless you.  And may God continue to bless the United States of America.


Primaire de la droite: Attention, une campagne dégueulasse peut en cacher une autre ! (In France’s deeply ingrained statist culture, guess who is denounced as an ultra-liberal and medieval reactionary Thatcherite !)

23 novembre, 2016
 fillonthatcher ali-juppe2
collectivite
fillon-not-a-chancejuppe-deja-gagneQu’est-ce que c’est, dégueulasse ? Patricia
Quand j’ai lu le livre de Houellebecq, quelques jours après les assassinats à Charlie Hebdo, il m’a semblé que ses intuitions sur la vie politique française étaient tout à fait correctes. Les élites françaises donnent souvent l’impression qu’elles seraient moins perturbées par un parti islamiste au pouvoir que par le Front national. La lecture du travail de Christophe Guilluy sur ces questions a aiguisé ma réflexion sur la politique européenne. Guilluy se demande pourquoi la classe moyenne est en déclin à Paris comme dans la plupart des grandes villes européennes et il répond: parce que les villes européennes n’ont pas vraiment besoin d’une classe moyenne. Les emplois occupés auparavant par les classes moyennes et populaires, principalement dans le secteur manufacturier, sont maintenant plus rentablement pourvus en Chine. Ce dont les grandes villes européennes ont besoin, c’est d’équipements et de services pour les categories aisées qui y vivent. Ces services sont aujourd’hui fournis par des immigrés. Les classes supérieures et les nouveaux arrivants s’accomodent plutôt bien de la mondialisation. Ils ont donc une certaine affinité, ils sont complices d’une certaine manière. Voilà ce que Houellebecq a vu. Les populistes européens ne parviennent pas toujours à développer une explication logique à leur perception de l’immigration comme origine principale de leurs maux, mais leurs points de vues ne sont pas non plus totalement absurdes. (…) ce qui se passe est un phénomène profond, anthropologique. Une culture – l’islam – qui apparaît, quels que soient ses défauts, comme jeune, dynamique, optimiste et surtout centrée sur la famille entre en conflit avec la culture que l’Europe a adoptée depuis la seconde guerre mondiale, celle de la «société ouverte» comme Charles Michel et Angela Merkel se sont empressés de la qualifier après les attentats du 22 Mars. En raison même de son postulat individualiste, cette culture est timide, confuse, et, surtout, hostile aux familles. Tel est le problème fondamental: l’Islam est plus jeune, plus fort et fait preuve d’une vitalité évidente. (…) Pierre Manent (…) a raison de dire que, comme pure question sociologique, l’Islam est désormais un fait en France. Manent est aussi extrêmement fin sur les failles de la laïcité comme moyen d’assimiler les musulmans, laïcité qui fut construite autour d’un problème très spécifique et bâtie comme un ensemble de dispositions destinées à démanteler les institutions par lesquelles l’Église catholique influençait la politique française il y a un siècle. Au fil du temps les arguments d’origine se sont transformés en simples slogans. La France invoque aujourd’hui, pour faire entrer les musulmans dans la communauté nationale, des règles destinées à expulser les catholiques de la vie politique. Il faut aussi se rappeler que Manent a fait sa proposition avant les attentats de novembre dernier. De plus, sa volonté d’offrir des accomodements à la religion musulmane était assortie d’une insistance à ce que l’Islam rejette les influences étrangères, ce qui à mon sens ne se fera pas. D’abord parce que ces attentats ayant eu lieu, la France paraîtrait faible et non pas généreuse, en proposant un tel accord. Et aussi parce que tant que l’immigration se poursuivra, favorisant un établissement inéluctable de l’islam en France, les instances musulmanes peuvent estimer qu’elles n’ont aucun intérêt à transiger. (…) L’Europe ne va pas disparaître. Il y a quelque chose d’immortel en elle. Mais elle sera diminuée. Je ne pense pas que l’on puisse en accuser l’Europe des Lumières, qui n’ a jamais été une menace fondamentale pour la continuité de l’Europe. La menace tient pour l’essentiel à cet objectif plus recent de «société ouverte» dont le principe moteur est de vider la société de toute métaphysique, héritée ou antérieure (ce qui soulève la question, très complexe, de de la tendance du capitalisme à s’ériger lui-même en métaphysique). A certains égards, on comprend pourquoi des gens préfèrent cette société ouverte au christianisme culturel qu’elle remplace. Mais dans l’optique de la survie, elle se montre cependant nettement inférieure. Christopher Caldwell
Il n’y en aura que deux, Juppé et Sarkozy. Fillon n’a aucune chance. Non parce qu’il n’a pas de qualités, il en a sans doute; ni un mauvais programme, il a le programme le plus explicite; non parce qu’il n’a pas de densité personnelle … Mais son rôle est tenu par Juppé. C’est-à-dire pourquoi voter Fillon alors qu’il y a Juppé ? il n’y aurait pas Juppé, je dirais, oui, sans doute que Fillon est le mieux placé pour disputer à Sarkozy l’investiture. Mais il se trouve qu’il y a Juppé. François Hollande
Le masque d’Alain Juppé va tomber tôt ou tard quand les Français s’apercevront qu’il est le même qu’en 1986, le même qu’en 1995. À savoir, un homme pas très sympathique qui veut administrer au pays une potion libérale. François Hollande
C’est un Corrézien qui avait succédé en 1995 à François Mitterrand. Je veux croire qu’en 2012, ce sera aussi un autre Corrézien qui reprendra le fil du changement. François Hollande
Chirac, c’est l’empathie avec les gens, avec le peuple, c’est la capacité d’écoute. C’est un peu l’exemple que je cherche à suivre». (…) Je veux poursuivre l’œuvre de Jacques Chirac. Alain Juppé
Je relis les magnifiques pages des Mémoires d’Outre-Tombe que Chateaubriand consacre à l’épopée napoléonienne. Alain Juppé (16/10/2016)
Nous devons (…) gagner pour sortir la France du marasme où elle stagne aujourd’hui. (…) La première condition sera de rassembler dès le premier tour les forces de la droite et du centre autour d’un candidat capable d’affronter le Front national d’un côté et le PS ou ce qui en tiendra lieu de l’autre. Si nous nous divisons, l’issue du premier tour devient incertaine et les conséquences sur le deuxième tour imprévisibles. Alain Juppé (20/08/2014)
Est-ce vraiment un revenu universel ? Est-ce que tout le monde va le toucher, de Madame Bettencourt (…) à la vendeuse de Prisunic. Alain Juppé
Je vais mettre toute la gomme ! Alain Juppé
J’ai la pêche et avec vous, j’ai la super pêche ! Alain Juppé
Je suis baptisé, je m’appelle Alain Marie, je n’ai pas changé de religion. Alain Juppé
Je suis candidat pour porter un projet de rupture et de progrès autour d’une ambition : faire de la France la première puissance européenne en dix ans. François Fillon
Quand ma maman allait à la messe, elle portait un foulard. Alain Juppé
J’aurais aimé qu’un certain nombre de mes compétiteurs condamnent cette campagne ignominieuse, je le répète. Mais lorsque la calomnie se cache derrière l’anonymat, la bonne foi est impuissante et je vous demande de vous battre contre ces messages parce qu’ils ont fait des dégâts.  Et j’ai des témoignages précis, dans les queues au moment du bureau de vote la semaine dernière, de personnes qui parfois ont changé leur vote parce qu’elles avaient été impressionnées par cette campagne dégueulasse, je n’hésite pas à le dire ! Alain Juppé
Il y a un discours privé et un discours public très différents l’un de l’autre. Il n’assume pas et il omet. Il faut qu’il clarifie les choses. Évoquer la Manif pour tous comme si elle était infréquentable, quand il nous a reçus, tout à fait à l’écoute, en acceptant des pistes de travail communes, notamment sur la question de la filiation et de l’adoption, et de l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant, je trouve ça étonnant. J’ai rencontré tous les candidats à la primaire (de la droite). Le dernier, c’était Juppé. Est-il purement électoraliste ? (…) S’il traite François Fillon de traditionaliste pour sa proximité avec la Manif pour tous, le lien est exactement le même avec lui. Ludivine de la Rochère (Manif pour tous)
 Il y a beaucoup à dire sur les naïvetés d’Alain Juppé en matière de lutte contre l’intégrisme, catholique ou musulman. On a raison de s’inquiéter de sa complicité, ancienne, avec l’imam de Bordeaux. Tareq Oubrou a beau passer pour un modéré sur toutes les antennes, il n’a jamais renié son appartenance à l’UOIF, ni ses maîtres à penser, et joue les entremetteurs entre les islamistes et l’extrême droite. Pas vraiment un atout contre la radicalisation. Caroline Fourest
Suppression des 35 heures et de l’ISF, coupes dans la fonction publique, détricotage des lois Taubira, rétablissement de la double peine… Le programme ultraconservateur et ultralibéral de François Fillon. Libération
Journée des dupes. Beaucoup d’électeurs ont voulu écarter un ancien président à leurs yeux trop à droite. Impuissants devant la mobilisation de la droite profonde, ils héritent d’un candidat encore plus réac. C’est ainsi que le Schtroumpf grognon du conservatisme se retrouve en impétrant probable. «Avec Carla, c’est du sérieux», disait le premier. Avec Fillon, c’est du lugubre. Bonjour tristesse… La droitisation de la droite a trouvé son chevalier à la triste figure. C’est vrai en matière économique et sociale, tant François Fillon en rajoute dans la rupture libérale, décidé à démolir une bonne part de l’héritage de la Libération et du Conseil national de la Résistance. Etrange apostasie pour cet ancien gaulliste social, émule de Philippe Séguin, qui se pose désormais en homme de fer de la révolution conservatrice à la française. Aligner la France sur l’orthodoxie du laissez-faire : le bon Philippe doit se retourner dans sa tombe. On comprend le rôle tenu par les intellectuels du déclin qui occupent depuis deux décennies les studios pour vouer aux gémonies la «pensée unique» sociale-démocrate et le «droit-de-l’hommisme» candide : ouvrir la voie au meilleur économiste de la Sarthe, émule de Milton Friedman et de Vladimir Poutine. Nous avions l’Etat-providence ; nous aurons la providence sans l’Etat. C’est encore plus net dans le domaine sociétal, où ce chrétien enraciné a passé une alliance avec les illuminés de la «manif pour tous». Il y a désormais en France un catholicisme politique, activiste et agressif, qui fait pendant à l’islam politique. Le révérend père Fillon s’en fait le prêcheur mélancolique. D’ici à ce qu’il devienne une sorte de Tariq Ramadan des sacristies, il n’y a qu’un pas. Avant de retourner à leurs querelles de boutique rose ou rouge, les progressistes doivent y réfléchir à deux fois. Sinon, la messe est dite. Libération
François Fillon est triplement coupable d’être de droite, d’être croyant et, pour parachever le mauvais goût, d’avoir été soutenu par le mouvement catholique Sens commun. (…) Tous les coups bas sont permis, y compris en provenance des alliés politiques. Alain Juppé, chassé de son piédestal de grand favori consensuel, ne se prive pas de patauger dans les mesquineries boueuses de ce terrain glissant, jusqu’à faire passer son rival pour un affreux réac. Il l’accuse même d’avoir bénéficié des voies de la fachosphère, comme s’il y pouvait quelque chose. Que ne ferait-on pour draguer le camp d’en face. De celui qui fut lui-même Premier ministre il y a plus de vingt ans, on attendait une hauteur de vue qu’on n’espérait plus de la part de Nicolas Sarkozy. Erreur. Le second a ravalé la rancœur de la défaite derrière un discours digne, responsable et, osons le mot, élégant, appelant à voter Fillon ; tandis que le premier s’est cramponné à ses avidités électorales et ratisse tous azimuts. Aurait-il dû se retirer de la course? Dans l’absolu, c’eût été l’attitude la plus respectable: faire bloc autour du vainqueur. (…) Ce deuxième tour aura toutefois l’avantage de permettre à François Fillon de clarifier son projet et de court-circuiter les critiques de la gauche et du FN qui ne manqueront pas de pleuvoir durant la campagne de 2017. La tactique usée jusqu’à la corde est déjà perceptible. Le débat sera déplacé vers le registre de l’affect: Fillon deviendra l’émissaire du Malin qui veut anéantir le modèle social français et le service public, en supprimant 500 000 postes de fonctionnaires. Manuel Valls fourbit ses armes, au cas où. Sait-on jamais. Il dénonce des «solutions ultralibérales et conservatrices» qui déboucheront sur «moins de gendarmes, moins de profs, moins de police». Comme si la fonction publique à la sauce socialiste, totalement désorganisée par les 35 heures, avait gagné en efficacité. Ultralibéral, Fillon? Non, libéral. L’économiste Marc de Scitivaux voit dans ses objectifs une «remise à niveau» consistant à accomplir «avec vingt ans de retard tout ce que les autres pays ont fait». 40 milliards de baisse de charges pour les entreprises, ses 10 milliards d’allègements sociaux et fiscaux pour les ménages et ses 100 milliards de réduction des dépenses publiques sur cinq ans: la méthode Fillon se veut le défibrillateur qui réanimera un Hexagone réduit à l’état végétatif par les Trente Frileuses d’une gouvernance bureaucratique. Sa France sera «celle de l’initiative contre celle des circulaires». Il joue franc-jeu: les deux premières années, à l’issue desquelles s’opérera le retournement, seront difficiles – elles devraient en outre coûter 1,5 % de PIB, prévient Emmanuel Lechypre. Le redressement sera effectif au bout du quinquennat et fera de la France la première nation de l’Europe au terme d’une décennie, annonce le candidat en meeting près de Lyon. Ambitieux, flamboyant. Et irréaliste, tancent ses opposants, conditionnés dans l’idée qu’il est urgent de ne rien faire ou si peu. Eloïse Lenesley
Mr. Fillon (…) says France “for 40 years hasn’t understood that it is private firms that create jobs—not the state.” His solution is to reverse the balance of power between state and citizens. He proposes cutting €100 billion ($105.92 billion) in public spending over five years, reducing government expenditure as a share of gross domestic product to less than 50% from 57% (the comparable figure is 44% in Germany and 38% in the U.S.). He proposes to abolish the 35-hour workweek and a wealth tax that are the bane of job creators in France. Mr. Fillon also wants to cut €40 billion in corporate taxes and “social fees” and €10 billion in personal taxes. And he calls for a €12 billion expansion in defense and security spending in response to Europe’s perilous security climate. Many of Mr. Fillon’s economic plans track those of Mr. Juppé, who also has been a longtime critic of the French welfare state. Where the two men mainly differ is on foreign policy. Mr. Juppé is more of a traditional Atlanticist, while Mr. Fillon seems to have a fondness for Russia’s Vladimir Putin and says he favors Bashar Assad in Syria’s civil war. He also indulges the French tendency to disparage the U.S. on foreign and trade policy, and he rails against a European free-trade agreement with America. These columns endorse ideas, not candidates, and we’ve long been disappointed in center-right French politicians promising economic reforms but never delivering. Still, if Sunday’s primary says anything, it’s that France’s center-right voters are eager for a leader who will deliver a smaller government and faster growth, not another subsidy to a favored constituency. That’s progress. WSJ
Alors que la France devrait baisser le nombre de fonctionnaires pour diminuer son déficit et ses dépenses publiques, leur nombre augmente. Nous avons le plus grand pourcentage (24 %) de fonctionnaires (avec statut) par rapport à la population active de tous les pays membres de l’OCDE (en moyenne, 15 %). En France, il y a 90 fonctionnaires pour 1000 habitants alors qu’il y en a seulement 50 pour 1000 en Allemagne ! L’explication est simple : nous sommes incapables de créer des emplois et nous continuons à augmenter la taille de l’Etat et des collectivités locales. Et nous avons perdu le contrôle. (…) Il existe des difficultés car dans de nombreux pays les fonctionnaires ne bénéficient plus d’un statut comme en France. Plus d’emploi à vie, ni de privilèges. Prenons un exemple. Dans le tableau de l’OCDE, en Suède, la proportion de fonctionnaires par rapport à la population active serait encore plus élevée qu’en France (27 % contre 24 %). Or, en Suède, il n’y a plus de statut, ni d’emploi à vie. Ces fonctionnaires sont employés comme dans le privé et peuvent être licenciés. (…)  La France reste pratiquement le seul pays à ne pas avoir touché au statut ! (…)  Partout, le nombre de fonctionnaires baisse et on transfère au privé des missions de l’Etat. Le Canada et la Suède l’ont fait dans les années 1990, l’Allemagne au début des années 2000. En Grande-Bretagne par exemple, depuis 2010 et l’arrivée au gouvernement des conservateurs, le secteur public a vu entre 500 000 et 600 000 emplois publics supprimés. Entre 2009 et décembre 2012, sous Obama, le nombre de fonctionnaires territoriaux a connu une chute spectaculaire aux Etats-Unis : – 560 000 (- 4%). Sur (presque) la même période (2009-déc. 2011), le nombre de fonctionnaires des collectivités locales françaises a augmenté de… 70 000 personnes (+ 4%). Au total, plus de 720 000 postes de fonctionnaires ont été supprimés aux Etats-Unis depuis 2009. D’autres pays comme l’Irlande, le Portugal, l’Espagne ou même la Grèce ont drastiquement baissé le nombre de fonctionnaires. L’Irlande  a réduit leurs salaires jusqu’à 20% tandis que l’Espagne est allé jusqu’à 15% et, comme le Portugal, a choisi de remplacer seulement 1 fonctionnaire sur 10 ! Contrairement à la France, ces Etats qui ont décidé de tailler dans le vif montrent – Grande-Bretagne, Etats-Unis et Irlande en tête – affichent de vrais signes de reprise économique. (…) La sécurité sociale et l’Education sont les secteurs avec la plus grande bureaucratie. C’est là qu’on pourrait économiser plusieurs milliards en coupant dans les effectifs. Mais tout cela ne peut être réalisé que grâce à des réformes structurelles : ouverture à la concurrence du secteur de la santé, privatisation des écoles… C’est ce qui a été fait aux Pays-Bas, en Allemagne, en Suède ou en Suisse. Mais ce n’est pas la voie empruntée par le gouvernement socialiste… (…) J’ai déjà écrit sur Météo-France qu’il faudrait fermer car depuis Internet, la météo est fournie par de nombreux organismes beaucoup moins chers. Mais on peut s’attaquer à de plus grands organismes qui coûtent encore plus cher : la Banque de France par exemple, où les frais de personnel sont 2 fois plus élevés que ceux de la Bundesbank (4000 employés de plus !),  les salaires, 24 % de plus qu’à la Bundesbank et le coût des retraites, 300 Millions d’euros de plus. (…)  Dans les années 1990, la Suède, le Canada ou les Pays-Bas ont fait des coupes drastiques dans leurs dépenses et ont diminué le nombre de fonctionnaires. Des ministères ont eu leur budget divisé par deux et les postes de fonctionnaires par trois ou quatre. Le statut des fonctionnaires a même été supprimé, en Suède par exemple, et certaines administrations sont devenues des organismes mi-publics, mi-privé. Il faut noter aussi que ces réformes ont été menées par des gouvernements de centre-gauche ou de gauche comme en Suède ou au Canada, pays terriblement étatisés et au bord de la faillite au début des années 1980. Au Canada, on a adopté à l’époque la règle suivante : 7 dollars d’économies pour 1 dollar d’impôts nouveaux (en France, le chiffre est plus qu’inversé aujourd’hui : 20 euros d’impôts nouveaux pour 1 euro d’économie). Dans ces pays, les fonctionnaires n’ont pas été mis à la porte du jour au lendemain. On a privilégié les retraites anticipées avec des primes au départ. Mais, en même temps, les nouveaux venus perdaient tous les avantages de leurs prédécesseurs : plus de statut, ni de privilèges. C’est un bon exemple pour la France. Nicolas Lecaussin
La France est en effet l’un cinq des pays de l’OCDE où la part des employés publics (ce qui est plus large encore car il faut inclure de nombreux emplois qui ne sont pas fonctionnaires) dans le total des personnes employées est la plus forte. Cela s’explique certainement par une tradition d’interventionnisme public très fort en France depuis la fin de Seconde guerre mondiale. L’augmentation continue de la dépense publique est allée de pair avec des recrutements massifs, qui représentent environ un quart de la dépense publique (c’est à dire de l’Etat, des collectivités locales et de la Sécurité sociale). Les rémunérations des seuls fonctionnaires représentent 13% du PIB et un tiers du budget de l’Etat. Or un fonctionnaire représente une dépense rigide de très long terme : le contribuable doit payer son salaire et sa retraite. Le poids de l’emploi public s’explique également, comme le montre la note de l’INSEE, par la multiplication des échelons administratifs : départements, régions, communes, intercommunalités … à chaque niveau cela suppose des agents (pour la sécurité, l’entretien, le secrétariat, le suivi des dossiers). (…) Dans les autres pays de l’Union européenne, la tendance n’est pas vraiment à la hausse de l’emploi public, faute de moyens. En Grande-Bretagne par exemple, le Gouvernement avait annoncé dès 2010 la suppression de 500 000 postes de fonctionnaires… La question qui se pose réellement est celle de l’efficacité de ce poids des fonctionnaires. D’un point de vue économique, elle n’est pas évidente. Les fonctionnaires ont plus de vacances (INSEE), partent à la retraite plus tôt (DREES) et sont en moyenne mieux payés (INSEE). Est-ce justifié par une efficacité claire pour la collectivité ? Plus largement, le poids des fonctionnaires dans l’économie entretient les connivences et le copinage, ce qui nuit à la performance économique et à l’équité sociale. Au-delà, ce poids des fonctionnaires pose des questions démocratiques. Ils sont surreprésentés à l’Assemblée Nationale et leur engagement dans la vie politique pose clairement des conflits d’intérêts : comment comprendre qu’un magistrat administratif, qui doit juger en toute impartialité, affiche des préférences politiques. (…) L’Etat a eu tendance, ces dernières années, à baisser le nombre de ses fonctionnaires, alors que les collectivités locales ont fait exploser tous les plafonds. En ce sens, la rationalisation du nombre d’échelons administratifs, comme l’a proposé Manuel Valls, est une bonne chose. Pour autant, il faut aller plus loin et se poser la question de l’efficacité de la dépense publique. Le Président Hollande, jusqu’à maintenant, a fait le choix de partir du principe que la quantité d’agents publics était une réponse pertinente : c’est ce qu’il fait par exemple avec le dogme des « 60 000 postes » dans l’Education nationale. Or, ce n’est absolument pas évident. En Grande-Bretagne, David Cameron a tenu le discours suivant en matière d’éducation : gardons la dépense publique, pour autant qu’elle soit efficace ; pour cela, l’Etat pourra se tourner vers des partenaires privés pour fournir les services scolaires. En l’occurrence, il a fait appel aux parents, qui ont créé leurs propres écoles. La France doit faire une révolution mentale. Même Terra Nova a défendu l’idée qu’on peut très bien avoir un service public rendu par une entreprise privée et des salariés privés. Ce qui importe, c’est la qualité du service rendu à l’usager, pas la nature du contrat de l’agent qui le fournit ni la nature juridique (publique ou privée) du prestataire. Erwan Le Noan
La dépense publique n’a (…) pas reculé en valeur en France depuis 1960, date des premières statistiques de l’Insee dans ce domaine. En revanche, il est possible de réduire le poids relatif de l’Etat dans l’économie. La Suède ou le Canada ont enregistré des succès en la matière au début des années 1990. « Mais ces pays ont dû effectuer des arbitrages. Ils ont choisi que telle ou telle fonction ne dépendrait plus de l’Etat mais relèverait désormais de la sphère privée « , selon Olivier Chemla, économiste à l’Association française des entreprises privées (Afep). En clair, la politique du rabot ne peut suffire à faire maigrir l’Etat. Dans leur ouvrage « Changer de modèle » paru l’an passé, les économistes Philippe Aghion, Gilbert Cette et Elie Cohen calculaient que, entre 1995 et 2012, les pays rhénans (Allemagne, Belgique et Pays-Bas) avaient réduit la part des dépenses publiques dans le PIB de 7 points, à 48,8 %. Sur la même période, celle des pays scandinaves (Suède, Danemark et Finlande) a reculé de 6 points, à 56 %. En Suède, la part des prestations sociales dans le PIB est passée de 22,2 % en 1994 à 18,5 % en 1997. Le nombre de fonctionnaires est passé de 400.000 à 250.000 entre 1993 et 2000. Les réformes sont donc douloureuses. Elles interviennent à chaque fois après une crise et après qu’un nouveau gouvernement a été mis en place, notent les trois auteurs. Seulement, à chaque fois aussi, les politiques sont coordonnées : la couronne suédoise et le dollar canadien se sont beaucoup dépréciés au moment où les réformes ont été entreprises, afin de relancer l’activité. L’Allemagne aussi, qualifiée d’« homme malade de l’Europe » au début des années 2000, a profité de la bonne santé économique de ses partenaires commerciaux pour entamer ses réformes… pour finir en excédent budgétaire cette année. Toute la difficulté de la politique économique réside entre une rigueur nécessaire pour les finances publiques sans pour autant casser l’activité. Ce qui signifie une coordination entre la politique budgétaire et la politique monétaire, dont l’absence dans la zone euro n’a pas cessé d’être critiquée par Mario Draghi, le président de la Banque centrale européenne. Comme le disait l’économiste John Maynard Keynes, « les périodes d’expansion, et non pas de récession, sont les bonnes pour l’austérité « . (…) Dans la zone euro, outre l’Allemagne, le seul grand pays à avoir réellement réussi à faire baisser l’importance de ses dépenses publiques est l’Espagne, au prix d’un effort drastique. Les Echos
Notre pays est probablement le seul parmi les membres les plus riches de l’OCDE à ne pas avoir touché au nombre de fonctionnaires et à leurs privilèges. Et pourtant, plus de 23 % de la population active travaille pour l’Etat et les collectivités locales contre 14 % en moyenne dans les pays de l’OCDE. Nous avons 90 fonctionnaires pour 1 000 habitants contre 50 pour 1 000 en Allemagne. Notre Etat dépense en moyenne 135 Mds d’euros de plus par an que l’Etat allemand. Et, d’après les calculs de Jean-Philippe Delsol, 14.5 millions de Français vivent, directement ou indirectement, de l’argent public. Il y a donc urgence à faire de vraies réformes. D’autant plus que tout le monde l’a fait ou est en train de le faire. Un Rapport (Economic Policy Reforms 2014) de l’OCDE qui vient de sortir (février 2014) montre que pratiquement tous les pays membres (à l’exception de plusieurs émergents) ont mis en place depuis le début de la crise de 2008 des réformes structurelles importantes. Parmi ceux qui ont agi le plus figurent aussi les plus touchés par la crise : l’Irlande, l’Espagne, le Portugal ou bien la Grèce. L’Irlande par exemple a été l’un des pays les plus touchés par la crise de 2008. Les dépenses publiques et le chômage ont explosé, par l’effet direct de l’écroulement du secteur immobilier et des faillites bancaires. Fin 2010, l’économie du pays était à l’agonie, dont la dette et les déficits récurrents le prédestinaient à un avenir toujours plus morose. Dès 2011, le Fonds monétaire international et l’Union européenne venaient à son secours et débloquaient 85 Md€ d’aides financières, soit plus de la moitié de son PIB. Dès 2010, l’Irlande décide de réduire sont budget de 10 Md€, soit 7 % du PIB (l’Irlande est d’ailleurs championne d’Europe de la baisse des dépenses publiques). Par comparaison, c’est l’équivalent d’une réduction de la dépense publique de l’ordre de 120 Md€ en France ! Pour y parvenir, l’Irlande sabre dans les services publics, et réduit de 20 % les traitements de ses fonctionnaires, ainsi que les pensions de retraites. De plus, l’Irlande décide de ne pas céder au chantage de l’Union européenne et de garder son taux d’IS (Impôt sur les sociétés) à 12.5 %. Cet entêtement a porté ses fruits : Il y a trois ans, le marché de l’emploi détruisait 7 000 emplois par mois. Aujourd’hui, on assiste à une création nette mensuelle de 5 000 postes. En Espagne, pour économiser 50 Mds d’euros sur trois ans, le Premier ministre de l’époque, Zapatero a annoncé en 2010 une réduction en moyenne de 5 % des salaires des fonctionnaires (le gouvernement s’appliquera une réduction de 15%), le renouvellement d’un seul fonctionnaire sur 10 partant à la retraite et la baisse de l’investissement public de 6 Mds d’euros en 2010 et en 2011. En 2012, le nouveau chef du gouvernement espagnol, Mariano Rajoy, décide de frapper fort en baissant drastiquement les dépenses publiques. Les budgets des ministères espagnols sont réduits de 17 % en moyenne et les salaires des fonctionnaires restent gelés. On prévoit aussi la suppression de la plupart des niches fiscales et une amnistie fiscale pour lutter contre l’économie au noir qui représenterait environ 20 % du PIB. Les communautés autonomes sont aussi obligées de baisser leurs dépenses afin d’arriver à l’équilibre budgétaire. Le Portugal a baissé le nombre de fonctionnaires et leurs salaires (jusqu’à 20 % de réduction sur la fiche de paye). Même la Grèce l’a fait : 150 000 postes de fonctionnaires supprimés entre 2011 et 2014, soit 20 % du total ! En Grande-Bretagne on ne parle que du chiffre de 700.000. C’est le nombre de fonctionnaires que le gouvernement anglais a programmé de supprimer entre 2011 et 2017 : 100.000 par an. Par comparaison, la France a supprimé, au titre de la politique de non remplacement d’un fonctionnaire sur deux, seulement 31 600 en 2011. Trois fois moins qu’en Grande-Bretagne qui a – déjà – beaucoup moins de fonctionnaires que la France : 4 millions contre 6 millions… Depuis 2010, et l’arrivée au gouvernement des conservateurs, le secteur public a vu entre 500 000 et 600 000 emplois publics supprimés (et cela continue) là où le secteur privé a créé 1,4 millions. La Grande-Bretagne ne fait pas aussi bien que les Etats-Unis (1 emploi public supprimé et 5 emplois créés dans le privé) mais elle se situe nettement au-dessus de la France : 2.8 emplois créés dans le privé pour 1 emploi supprimé dans le public entre 2010 et 2013. Aux Etats-Unis donc, sous Obama, entre 2010 et début 2013, on a supprimé 1.2 millions d’emplois dans le secteur public ! Plus de 400 000 postes de fonctionnaire centraux ont été supprimés et aussi plus de 700 000 postes de fonctionnaires territoriaux. A titre de comparaison, sur la même période (2010-2013), le nombre d’agents publics a augmenté de 13 000 en France (surtout au niveau local) et on a compté 41 000 emplois privés détruits tandis que l’Amérique en créait 5.2 millions ! Toutes ces réformes ont été provoquées par la crise de 2008 mais aussi par les exemples canadien et suédois. Ces pays ont déjà diminué le poids de l’Etat dès le début des années 1990. Et cela s’est vu car les deux pays ont plutôt été épargnés par la crise comme l’Allemagne qui a aussi réformé durant les années Gerhart Schroeder. Une comparaison mérite l’attention. Le Canada a supprimé environ 23 % de sa fonction publique en trois ans (entre 1992 et 1995). Si la France faisait la même réforme et dans les mêmes proportions, 1.3 millions de fonctionnaires français devraient quitter leurs postes ! Mais les réformes ont concerné aussi la fiscalité. (…) Il y a deux ans, la Grande-Bretagne avait annoncé une baisse de l’impôt sur les sociétés de 28 à 24 %. Mais le gouvernement de David Cameron veut aller encore plus loin et annonce une baisse jusqu’à 22 % d’ici 2015. Moins 6 points en 3 ans seulement. En janvier 2013, l’impôt sur les sociétés a baissé de 26.3 à 22 % en Suède. Une baisse sensible, qui suit l’exemple d’autres pays comme l’Allemagne (de 30 à 26 %). La Finlande l’a fait aussi (de 28 à 26 %). Et le Danemark : son taux d’impôt sur les sociétés passera d’ici 2016 de 25 à 22 %. Tous les pays ont d’ailleurs compris qu’il faut soulager les entreprises sauf… la France. Dans le classement des taux d’imposition sur les sociétés, la France est championne européenne avec un taux à plus de 36 %. L’IREF a même montré que parmi les membres de l’OCDE, c’est en Norvège que l’IS génère le plus de rentrées fiscales (11 % du PIB). Et pourtant, le taux de l’IS se situe à 24 %, plus de 10 points de moins que l’IS français (36 %) qui ne fait rentrer que… 2.5 % du PIB. Voici d’autres exemples : au Luxembourg, le taux d’IS est à 17.1 % mais les recettes générées représentent 5 % du PIB, le double de ce qu’elles génèrent en France. En Grande-Bretagne, c’est 3 % du PIB pour un IS à 26,7 %. En Belgique, c’est 3 % du PIB pour un IS à 17 %. Faut-il encore rappeler le 12,5 % de l’Irlande qui avec 2,6 % du PIB rapporte davantage que ce que nous vaut le taux français, trois fois supérieur ! IREF
La Suède a supprimé le statut de fonctionnaire. Il y en a encore, mais sans la garantie de l’emploi. Elle a licencié 20% des effectifs. Une cure deux fois plus sévère que celle proposée par François Fillon dans son programme. Elle l’a fait en dix ans dans les années 90. Au Royaume-Uni, ce sont 15% des effectifs des fonctionnaires qui ont été supprimés par David Cameron de 2010 à 2014, notamment dans la police, la défense et les transports. Au Canada, ce sont plus de 20% des fonctionnaires qui ont été licenciés en seulement trois ans dans les années 2000. Chaque ministère a dû couper dans ses budgets et là encore privatisation des chemins de fer et des aéroports. Conséquences, des dysfonctionnements dans les urgences à cause des fermetures d’hôpitaux au Canada. Au Royaume-Uni, le nombre d’élèves par classe a augmenté. La dette a néanmoins été divisée par deux en dix ans au Canada. Jean-Paul Chapel
Le refrain de « l’ultra-libéralisme » est en effet entonné dans tous les médias de gauche et par Manuel Valls lui-même à l’encontre de François Fillon. Notons d’abord la connotation doublement polémique de ce terme dans notre culture politique : « ultra » renvoie aux aristocrates réactionnaires de la Restauration qui, selon le mot de Talleyrand, n’avaient « rien appris, ni rien oublié ». Quant à « libéral », on sait qu’il est chez nous l’équivalent de « loi de la jungle » de « droit du plus fort » et d’ »anti-social ». François Hollande vient ainsi de tweeter que le « libéralisme, c’est la liberté des uns contre celle des autres ». Notre tradition étatiste et égalitariste nous a fait largement oublié que le libéralisme est d’abord une philosophie de la liberté qui a inspiré notamment la Déclaration des droits de l’homme, l’instruction publique et l’émancipation féminine. Autrement dit, personne n’est plus « anti-ultra » que les libéraux ! La dénonciation de « l’ultra-libéralisme » est donc, en même temps qu’une double charge polémique, un double contre-sens historique et idéologique. A quoi s’ajoute que, de Montesquieu à Revel en passant par Tocqueville, Bastiat, Alain et Aron, la France est très riche de cette pensée libérale.  Mais nos lycéens et même nos étudiants n’ont pas le droit de le savoir… Dans votre question, il y a le mot « remise en ordre » : de fait la volonté d’ordre est plus typique de l’horizon politique de la droite conservatrice que de celle du libéralisme qui croit davantage à l’ordre spontané du marché, sous réserve d’une régulation juridique de l’Etat, ce que l’on oublie toujours. Quant au sérieux budgétaire, il n’a rien de libéral en soi : tout dépend des circonstances. Poincaré, Rueff, Barre ou Bérégovoy y croyaient parce qu’ils constataient l’impasse de la gabegie budgétaire. Il est vrai que la chose s’est un peu perdue depuis les années 2000. Allons plus loin : en bon libéral, je m’interroge sur les motivations de tant commentateurs qui hurlent au loup (c’est-à-dire à « l’ultra-libéralisme ») devant le programme de F. Fillon. Et je constate que ces hurlements viennent des innombrables rentiers de l’Etat qui s’inquiètent naturellement de la perspective d’une baisse des dépenses publiques et défendent non moins naturellement leurs intérêts : fonctionnaires, syndicats, classe politique, audiovisuel public et une bonne partie de la presse…Pour certains, comme Libération, c’est une question de survie : on comprend leur violence anti-Fillon. Cette hostilité de « l’establishment d’Etat » va rendre la tâche très difficile à ce dernier, dès cette semaine et plus encore lors de la campagne présidentielle, s’il franchit les primaires. (…) François Fillon l’a dit lui-même : son libéralisme n’est pas un « choix idéologique » mais un « constat » : l’excès des charges pesant sur les entreprises et sur le travail est l’une des causes majeures du déclin français. Le taux de prélèvements obligatoires est passé de 30 à 45% du PIB depuis 1960. Il n’y nulle contradiction dans son nouveau positionnement qui est simplement lié à l’évolution des choses et notamment du niveau de la dépense publique. J’observe que les commentaires de la plupart des médias présentent ce programme comme « dur », « violent ». Mais pour qui ? Certainement pas pour les entreprises qui vont connaître une baisse sans précédent de leurs charges sociales et fiscales (40 milliards), ni pour les familles des classe moyennes ; ni pour les millions de chômeurs qui sont évincés d’un marché du travail hyper-rigide ; ni pour les commerçants et indépendants dont le régime fiscal et social sera aligné sur le statut d’autoentrepreneur . Demandez-leur s’ils redoutent davantage « l’ultralibéralisme » supposé de Fillon ou la spoliation actuelle du RSI ? Curieusement, on ne parle jamais de ces catégories fort nombreuses lorsqu’on aborde l’impact des « mesures Fillon » sur les uns ou les autres… Pour le reste, le parcours de F. Fillon est celui d’un gaulliste social. Son programme vise à mettre en place des coopérations renforcées en Europe, nullement un Etat supranational. De plus, son indulgence pour Poutine ne traduit pas, c’est le moins qu’on puisse dire, un penchant libéral. Pas plus que ces positions dans le domaine sociétal. François Fillon est donc non pas un libéral mais un PRAGMATIQUE en matière économique, un conservateur en matière sociétale (mais non un réactionnaire puisqu’il ne reviendra ni sur le mariage pour tous ni sur l’avortement) et un champion de « l’intérêt national » sur le plan extérieur. En somme, la parfaite définition d’un gaulliste qui raisonne et agit, comme disait le Général, « les choses étant ce qu’elles sont ». Avec un léger penchant russophile, comme de Gaulle lui-même au demeurant. (…) On mesure ici le non-libéralisme de Fillon qui ne croit pas aux vertus du libre-échange. Celui-ci n’est pas un « dogme » mais une démonstration économique que l’on doit à Ricardo et un constat des résultats positifs de l’intégration économique européenne sur notre pouvoir d’achat ou de la mondialisation en matière de baisse spectaculaire de la pauvreté (ce que les Français ignorent). F. Fillon se méfie de la mondialisation, même s’il ne propose pas -pragmatisme là encore oblige- de « démondialisation ». Il s’oppose au TAFTA, comme… Trump, qui n’est pas non plus un libéral. La bonne position aurait été de défendre bec et ongles les intérêts français et européens – ce que l’on n’a pas assez fait avec la Chine – mais non de renoncer dès à présent au TAFTA. Le risque de surenchère protectionniste est réel et devrait nous alerter quand on connaît les précédents, tant au XIXème siècle que dans les années 30. L’un dans l’autre, Génération libre n’avait mis que 12/20 à Fillon en matière de libéralisme. Il est vrai qu’avec cette note il arrivait quand même en deuxième position derrière NKM. Ce qui en dit long sur le libéralisme de nos hommes politiques, droite comprise… Christophe de Voogd
La droite française depuis plus de 20 ans est beaucoup plus à gauche et antilibérale que les droites classiques européennes, et même que certaines gauches sociales-démocrates (Blair et même Schroeder plus libéraux que Chirac, etc.). Et dans ce contexte franchouillard, oui, Fillon est libéral. Mais le fait que Gorbatchev était plus libéral que Brejnev et beaucoup plus libéral que Staline n’en faisait pas pour autant un authentique libéral. C’est l’histoire du borgne aux pays des aveugles : Fillon est un poil plus libéral que l’archétype des énarques (Juppé), que l’idéal-type des énarques (Le Maire) et que le prince des interventionnistes (Sarkozy). Mais il ne faut pas avoir peur du ridicule pour le comparer à Margareth Thatcher. Cette dernière avait un programme, des troupes, du courage. On est aussi assez loin de Jacques Rueff. A moins que Fillon nous étonne sur le tard, c’est plus un « budgétariste » et éventuellement un réformateur qu’un libéral. Il est plus proche de Juppé que de Madelin (regardez sur son site internet le chapitre « créer des géants européens du numérique », par exemple, on est bien loin de la Sillicon Valley, idem sur la culture, le logement, l’agriculture, etc.). Ce sera un bon administrateur, il a un track record de cinq ans en la matière, pas un libéral, là il n’y a guère que la privatisation de France Telecom à son actif. Mais dans l’opinion cela suffira peut-être : après cinq années de hollandisme, n’importe quelle présidence même centriste apparaîtra comme très libérale.  (…) Séguiniste à 18 ans (mais pas après, faut pas déconner…), je suis sans doute mal placé pour critiquer le sombre passé politique du futur président. Il y a tout de même des passés plus troubles que celui là (Chirac ancien communiste pas vraiment repenti, Jospin ancien trotsko pas vraiment repenti, Mitterrand ancien pétainiste pas vraiment repenti, etc.). Ce n’est certes pas le parcours d’un pur libéral, mais c’est logique puisqu’un libéral intransigeant ne rassemblerait pas 44% des voix dans une primaire de la droite en France. Il faudra juger sur les actes, et ce n’est certainement pas en promettant de monter la TVA que Fillon deviendra le grand président libéral de notre pays socialiste. (…) En déclarant qu’il ne considère pas « le libre-échange comme l’alpha et l’oméga de la pensée économique », Fillon joue un jeu dangereux. Cela s’accompagne comme toujours de la petite musique traditionnelle selon laquelle « les USA, eux, savent défendre leurs intérêts », musique idiote dans la mesure où : a) ce n’est pas parce que les autres se tirent une balle dans le pied qu’il faut impérativement en faire autant, b) on fait mine ainsi de penser que nous avons les marges de manœuvre d’un pays cinq fois plus peuplé, six fois plus riche et cinquante fois plus libre monétairement,  c) ce sont souvent les mêmes qui dénoncent le néoprotectionnisme américain et qui soulignent dans le même temps leur activisme dans les instances libre-échangistes globales et/ou l’amplitude de leurs déficits commerciaux ; comprenne qui pourra. (…) Toujours, bien entendu, pour protéger les plus démunis, alors que ce sont les rentiers qui demandent et qui obtiennent des protections. Mais Fillon, comme Hollande ou Merkel, sait surfer sur ce qui marche et éviter les combats impopulaires, et il se trouve que le TAFTA n’est pas en odeur de sainteté par les temps qui courent. Pas sûr qu’il ait lu Bastiat, comme Ronald Reagan. Pas sûr par conséquent qu’il reste très « libéral » entre 2017 et 2022 si les vents de l’opinion deviennent (comme c’est probable) trop défavorables à cette orientation, a fortiori s’il veut rassembler sa famille puis donner quelques gages à la gauche après une victoire au 2e tour contre Le Pen. Mathieu Mucherie

Vous avez dit dégueulasse ?

Alors qu’au lendemain d’un premier tour d’une primaire qui, fidèle au scénario inauguré par le référendum du Brexit et la présidentielle américaine, a bousculé tous les pronostics

Le lecteur exalté des Mémoires d’Outre-Tombe et héritier chiraquien revendiqué qui peine, entre « Prisunic », « gomme » et « super pêche », à faire oublier ses vénérables 71 ans

Dénonce, tout en jouant sur tous les tableaux, la « France nostalgique de l’ordre ancien » prétendument personnifiée par son adversaire …

Mais aussi, pour sa notoire complaisance avec l’islam politique, la « campagne dégueulasse » et « ignominieuse » dont il est l’objet de la part de sites d’extrême-droite …

Pendant que l’ancien banquier d’affaires et ministre d’un gouvernement socialiste ne nous sort rien de moins que la « Révolution » …

Comment ne pas voir …

Avec le site Atlantico

La véritable campagne de désinformation de nos dûment stipendiés médias …

Face au prétendu, Libération et sa couverture de Fillon Thatcherisé dixit, « programme ultraconservateur et ultralibéral » et « Tariq Ramadan des sacristies » …

D’un  candidat ancien séguiniste et anti-TAFTA que l’actuel président n’arrivait même pas à distinguer d’Alain Juppé lui-même ?

Comme les côtés autant surréalistes que révélateurs d’un tel débat …

Dans un pays qui alors qu’après le Canada et la Suède dans les années 90 la plupart des pays occidentaux ont réduit drastiquement leur fonction publique …

Continue à employer quelque 5,5 millions de fonctionnaires soit un Français sur cinq (24 % de la population active contre 15 % en moyenne pour l’OCDE) ?

Pourquoi François Fillon n’est pas l’ultra-libéral que veulent voir ses opposants de tous bords
Si l’accusation d’ultra-libéral revient souvent dans la bouche des opposants à François Fillon, le parcours politique du candidat LR à la primaire de la droite et ses prises de position sur certains sujets majeurs sont pourtant loin de coller avec la pensée « ultra-libérale »

Atlantico

22 novembre 2016

Atlantico : En termes de vision économique, François Fillon est souvent taxé d’ultra-libéral par une partie de ses opposants. Est-ce vraiment un « procès » qu’on peut lui faire ? Le sérieux budgétaire et la volonté de remise en ordre qu’il incarne sont-ils vraiment une marque « d’ultra-libéralisme » ?

Christophe de Voogd : Le refrain de « l’ultra-libéralisme » est en effet entonné dans tous les médias de gauche et par Manuel Valls lui-même à l’encontre de François Fillon. Notons d’abord la connotation doublement polémique de ce terme dans notre culture politique : « ultra » renvoie aux aristocrates réactionnaires de la Restauration qui, selon le mot de Talleyrand, n’avaient « rien appris, ni rien oublié ». Quant à « libéral », on sait qu’il est chez nous l’équivalent de « loi de la jungle » de « droit du plus fort » et d’ »anti-social ». François Hollande vient ainsi de tweeter que le « libéralisme, c’est la liberté des uns contre celle des autres ». Notre tradition étatiste et égalitariste nous a fait largement oublié que le libéralisme est d’abord une philosophie de la liberté qui a inspiré notamment la Déclaration des droits de l’homme, l’instruction publique et l’émancipation féminine. Autrement dit, personne n’est plus « anti-ultra » que les libéraux ! La dénonciation de « l’ultra-libéralisme » est donc, en même temps qu’une double charge polémique, un double contre-sens historique et idéologique. A quoi s’ajoute que, de Montesquieu à Revel en passant par Tocqueville, Bastiat, Alain et Aron, la France est très riche de cette pensée libérale.  Mais nos lycéens et même nos étudiants n’ont pas le droit de le savoir…

Dans votre question, il y a le mot « remise en ordre » : de fait la volonté d’ordre est plus typique de l’horizon politique de la droite conservatrice que de celle du libéralisme qui croit davantage à l’ordre spontané du marché, sous réserve d’une régulation juridique de l’Etat, ce que l’on oublie toujours. Quant au sérieux budgétaire, il n’a rien de libéral en soi : tout dépend des circonstances. Poincaré, Rueff, Barre ou Bérégovoy y croyaient parce qu’ils constataient l’impasse de la gabegie budgétaire. Il est vrai que la chose s’est un peu perdue depuis les années 2000.

Allons plus loin : en bon libéral, je m’interroge sur les motivations de tant commentateurs qui hurlent au loup (c’est-à-dire à « l’ultra-libéralisme ») devant le programme de F. Fillon. Et je constate que ces hurlements viennent des innombrables rentiers de l’Etat qui s’inquiètent naturellement de la perspective d’une baisse des dépenses publiques et défendent non moins naturellement leurs intérêts : fonctionnaires, syndicats, classe politique, audiovisuel public et une bonne partie de la presse…Pour certains, comme Libération, c’est une question de survie : on comprend leur violence anti-Fillon. Cette hostilité de « l’establishment d’Etat » va rendre la tâche très difficile à ce dernier, dès cette semaine et plus encore lors de la campagne présidentielle, s’il franchit les primaires.

Mathieu Mucherie : La droite française depuis plus de 20 ans est beaucoup plus à gauche et antilibérale que les droites classiques européennes, et même que certaines gauches sociales-démocrates (Blair et même Schroeder plus libéraux que Chirac, etc.). Et dans ce contexte franchouillard, oui, Fillon est libéral. Mais le fait que Gorbatchev était plus libéral que Brejnev et beaucoup plus libéral que Staline n’en faisait pas pour autant un authentique libéral. C’est l’histoire du borgne aux pays des aveugles : Fillon est un poil plus libéral que l’archétype des énarques (Juppé), que l’idéal-type des énarques (Le Maire) et que le prince des interventionnistes (Sarkozy). Mais il ne faut pas avoir peur du ridicule pour le comparer à Margareth Thatcher. Cette dernière avait un programme, des troupes, du courage. On est aussi assez loin de Jacques Rueff.

A moins que Fillon nous étonne sur le tard, c’est plus un « budgétariste » et éventuellement un réformateur qu’un libéral. Il est plus proche de Juppé que de Madelin (regardez sur son site internet le chapitre « créer des géants européens du numérique », par exemple, on est bien loin de la Sillicon Valley, idem sur la culture, le logement, l’agriculture, etc.). Ce sera un bon administrateur, il a un track record de cinq ans en la matière, pas un libéral, là il n’y a guère que la privatisation de France Telecom à son actif. Mais dans l’opinion cela suffira peut-être : après cinq années de hollandisme, n’importe quelle présidence même centriste apparaîtra comme très libérale.

Le parcours politique de François Fillon (opposition au traité de Maastricht, filiation séguiniste…) est-il vraiment en accord avec ce que l’on pourrait attendre d’un « ultra-libéral » ?

Mathieu Mucherie : La plupart des authentiques libéraux ont trouvé que le traité de Maastricht était un carcan incompatible avec les libertés à long terme et avec l’efficience économique à tous les horizons ; surtout l’idée de taux de changes nominaux fixes « pour l’éternité » avec en plus une gestion de la monnaie par une banque centrale indépendante (indépendante des autres sphères, autant dire un État dans l’État). Ce n’est pas une histoire de droite ou de gauche : quand des gens aussi éloignés que Paul Krugman, Milton Friedman ou Martin Feldstein arrivent grosso modo à la même conclusion, on peut se douter que l’édifice construit par nos élites européennes n’est peut-être pas très libéral, quelle que soit la définition que l’on donne à ce terme. Les pays les plus libéraux (Angleterre, Suisse…) ne s’y sont pas trompés.

Séguiniste à 18 ans (mais pas après, faut pas déconner…), je suis sans doute mal placé pour critiquer le sombre passé politique du futur président. Il y a tout de même des passés plus troubles que celui là (Chirac ancien communiste pas vraiment repenti, Jospin ancien trotsko pas vraiment repenti, Mitterrand ancien pétainiste pas vraiment repenti, etc.). Ce n’est certes pas le parcours d’un pur libéral, mais c’est logique puisqu’un libéral intransigeant ne rassemblerait pas 44% des voix dans une primaire de la droite en France. Il faudra juger sur les actes, et ce n’est certainement pas en promettant de monter la TVA que Fillon deviendra le grand président libéral de notre pays socialiste.

Christophe de Voogd : François Fillon l’a dit lui-même : son libéralisme n’est pas un « choix idéologique » mais un « constat » : l’excès des charges pesant sur les entreprises et sur le travail est l’une des causes majeures du déclin français. Le taux de prélèvements obligatoires est passé de 30 à 45% du PIB depuis 1960. Il n’y nulle contradiction dans son nouveau positionnement qui est simplement lié à l’évolution des choses et notamment du niveau de la dépense publique. J’observe que les commentaires de la plupart des médias présentent ce programme comme « dur », « violent ». Mais pour qui ? Certainement pas pour les entreprises qui vont connaître une baisse sans précédent de leurs charges sociales et fiscales (40 milliards), ni pour les familles des classe moyennes ; ni pour les millions de chômeurs qui sont évincés d’un marché du travail hyper-rigide ; ni pour les commerçants et indépendants dont le régime fiscal et social sera aligné sur le statut d’autoentrepreneur . Demandez-leur s’ils redoutent davantage « l’ultralibéralisme » supposé de Fillon ou la spoliation actuelle du RSI ? Curieusement, on ne parle jamais de ces catégories fort nombreuses lorsqu’on aborde l’impact des « mesures Fillon » sur les uns ou les autres…

Pour le reste, le parcours de F. Fillon est celui d’un gaulliste social. Son programme vise à mettre en place des coopérations renforcées en Europe, nullement un Etat supranational. De plus, son indulgence pour Poutine ne traduit pas, c’est le moins qu’on puisse dire, un penchant libéral. Pas plus que ces positions dans le domaine sociétal.

François Fillon est donc non pas un libéral mais un PRAGMATIQUE en matière économique, un conservateur en matière sociétale (mais non un réactionnaire puisqu’il ne reviendra ni sur le mariage pour tous ni sur l’avortement) et un champion de « l’intérêt national » sur le plan extérieur. En somme, la parfaite définition d’un gaulliste qui raisonne et agit, comme disait le Général, « les choses étant ce qu’elles sont ». Avec un léger penchant russophile, comme de Gaulle lui-même au demeurant.

En quoi la position de François Fillon sur le libre-échange, et notamment le controversé traité TAFTA, s’inscrit-elle en faux avec la pensée des économistes et politiques « ultra-libéraux » ?

Christophe de Voogd : Après tout ce qui précède, vous admettrez que j’écarte ce mot « d’ultralibéral » ! On mesure ici le non-libéralisme de Fillon qui ne croit pas aux vertus du libre-échange. Celui-ci n’est pas un « dogme » mais une démonstration économique que l’on doit à Ricardo et un constat des résultats positifs de l’intégration économique européenne sur notre pouvoir d’achat ou de la mondialisation en matière de baisse spectaculaire de la pauvreté (ce que les Français ignorent). F. Fillon se méfie de la mondialisation, même s’il ne propose pas -pragmatisme là encore oblige- de « démondialisation ». Il s’oppose au TAFTA, comme… Trump, qui n’est pas non plus un libéral. La bonne position aurait été de défendre bec et ongles les intérêts français et européens – ce que l’on n’a pas assez fait avec la Chine – mais non de renoncer dès à présent au TAFTA. Le risque de surenchère protectionniste est réel et devrait nous alerter quand on connaît les précédents, tant au XIXème siècle que dans les années 30.

L’un dans l’autre, Génération libre n’avait mis que 12/20 à Fillon en matière de libéralisme. Il est vrai qu’avec cette note il arrivait quand même en deuxième position derrière NKM. Ce qui en dit long sur le libéralisme de nos hommes politiques, droite comprise…

Mathieu Mucherie : En déclarant qu’il ne considère pas « le libre-échange comme l’alpha et l’oméga de la pensée économique », Fillon joue un jeu dangereux. Cela s’accompagne comme toujours de la petite musique traditionnelle selon laquelle « les USA, eux, savent défendre leurs intérêts », musique idiote dans la mesure où :

a) ce n’est pas parce que les autres se tirent une balle dans le pied qu’il faut impérativement en faire autant,
b) on fait mine ainsi de penser que nous avons les marges de manœuvre d’un pays cinq fois plus peuplé, six fois plus riche et cinquante fois plus libre monétairement,
c) ce sont souvent les mêmes qui dénoncent le néoprotectionnisme américain et qui soulignent dans le même temps leur activisme dans les instances libre-échangistes globales et/ou l’amplitude de leurs déficits commerciaux ; comprenne qui pourra.

En vérité, le meilleur test consiste à demander : êtes-vous favorable, partout et tout le temps, au désarmement douanier le plus total et le plus unilatéral ? un non-économiste cherchera toujours à négocier sur ce point, à tergiverser, à éluder ou à inventer des contre-exemples historiques ou théoriques, tous foireux (dans le best of, l’argument des droits de douane américains élevés au XIXe siècle, qui se garde bien de préciser où en étaient la fiscalité et la réglementation aux USA à l’époque, sans parler de la mobilité des hommes et des capitaux). Toujours, bien entendu, pour protéger les plus démunis, alors que ce sont les rentiers qui demandent et qui obtiennent des protections. Mais Fillon, comme Hollande ou Merkel, sait surfer sur ce qui marche et éviter les combats impopulaires, et il se trouve que le TAFTA n’est pas en odeur de sainteté par les temps qui courent. Pas sûr qu’il ait lu Bastiat, comme Ronald Reagan. Pas sûr par conséquent qu’il reste très « libéral » entre 2017 et 2022 si les vents de l’opinion deviennent (comme c’est probable) trop défavorables à cette orientation, a fortiori s’il veut rassembler sa famille puis donner quelques gages à la gauche après une victoire au 2e tour contre Le Pen.

Voir aussi:

Primaire
Qui veut la peau d’«Ali Juppé» ?
Laure Equy et Dominique Albertini

Libération

22 novembre 2016

Cible d’une campagne grotesque mais efficace sur sa supposée complaisance envers l’islam politique, le challenger de Fillon à la primaire de droite s’est résolu à contre-attaquer.

«Cette histoire de mosquée, ça le met dans une colère noire», soufflent ses conseillers depuis le début de la campagne. Depuis des mois, Alain Juppé a les sites et twittos d’extrême droite aux basques. Un harcèlement viral parti de sa ville de Bordeaux et qui a pris, avec la primaire, une dimension nationale. S’il a longtemps laissé courir, le candidat dénonce désormais avec force une «campagne de caniveau», «ignominieuse», «des attaques franchement dégueulasses». C’est que – son équipe et lui en sont convaincus – ces caricatures et intox relayées sur les réseaux sociaux et via des chaînes de mails ont fait dimanche de sérieux dégâts dans les urnes.

Quelle forme prend la cabale ?
A l’origine de cette campagne de diffamation, l’extrême droite et une partie de la droite dite «classique» – mais désormais alignée sur le FN en matière identitaire. Sur Internet, des représentants de ces milieux ne désignent plus le maire de Bordeaux que par le surnom d’«Ali Juppé», l’accusant de compromissions avec les franges les plus rétrogrades de l’islam.

Parce qu’il permet l’anonymat et la circulation virale de ces attaques, Internet est devenu le terrain privilégié de ce procès en islamophilie. C’est la «fachosphère» qui est à l’œuvre : un ensemble confus et mouvant de blogueurs, d’utilisateurs des réseaux sociaux ou de commentateurs des sites d’information, dont l’islamophobie est l’un des combats fédérateurs. Au sein de cette nébuleuse décentralisée, on partage avec enthousiasme les rumeurs les plus fantaisistes, mais aussi les productions les plus «réussies», notamment les images. Telle cette caricature d’un Juppé léchant la babouche de Tariq Ramadan, ou ce photomontage le représentant barbu et vêtu d’un kamis musulman.

De manière moins visible, ces attaques ont aussi atterri dans les boîtes mails de nombreux électeurs, via des «chaînes de messages» que chaque récepteur est invité à partager avec ses contacts. «Il s’agit d’un procédé de diffusion dont l’audience n’est pas quantifiable, contrairement aux réseaux sociaux, explique Jonathan Chibois, chercheur en anthropologie politique. C’est très souterrain. Ces chaînes de mails fonctionnent toutefois très bien chez ceux qui n’utilisent pas Twitter ou Facebook, notamment les personnes âgées. Quand on vit à la campagne, on s’en aperçoit bien. Même lorsque ces récits ne sont pas pris au sérieux, ils installent une ambiance, en jouant sur l’adage populaire « il n’y a pas de fumée sans feu ».»

Cette campagne a même trouvé un relais chez Jean-Frédéric Poisson, candidat à la primaire, qui a repris le couplet, évoquant une proximité entre Juppé et «des organisations directement liées aux Frères musulmans». Idem pour l’hebdo très droitier Valeurs actuelles, qui a décrit un Juppé «aux petits soins avec les Frères musulmans».

D’où viennent ces accusations ?
C’est un projet de «centre culturel et cultuel musulman», lancé au milieu des années 2000 par la Fédération musulmane de la Gironde (FMG), qui a enflammé la fachosphère. Censé répondre aux besoins des musulmans locaux, le bâtiment doit réunir une salle de prière, une bibliothèque, un restaurant ou encore une salle d’exposition. Le maire de Bordeaux n’est pas opposé au projet : «Nous sommes en discussion avec la communauté musulmane, indique-t-il en 2008. Nous avons d’excellentes relations avec ses principaux leaders. J’ai déjà indiqué qu’un terrain leur serait proposé.»

Cette ouverture vaut à Juppé d’être ciblé par l’extrême droite. En 2009, des militants du mouvement Génération identitaire occupent le toit d’un parking bordelais et y suspendent une banderole proclamant : «Ce maire commence à poser un vrai problème». Le Front national local ne tarde pas à embrayer, accusant faussement la municipalité de vouloir financer la construction de la mosquée. Et un site à la dénomination apparemment neutre, «Infos Bordeaux» – en réalité relais d’opinion pour l’extrême droite – agite depuis des années le spectre d’une «mosquée-cathédrale».

Aujourd’hui, pourtant, la «grande mosquée de Bordeaux» n’est pas sortie de terre. Selon la première adjointe, Virginie Calmels, Alain Juppé aurait exigé que le projet ne reçoive pas de financement étranger et aucun permis de construire n’a été déposé.

L’offensive contre l’édile bordelais s’était intensifiée pendant la campagne municipale de 2014 puis aux dernières régionales contre Virginie Calmels. Un tract du FN, titré «Non au centre islamique à Bordeaux», accusait la candidate (LR) pour la région Nouvelle Aquitaine et Alain Juppé de préparer «une islamisation de Bordeaux» et de vouloir financer le projet «d’un coût de 22 millions d’euros en grande partie avec l’argent des contribuables». Calmels a porté plainte pour diffamation, sans succès.

Ce n’est pas tout : c’est aussi sur ses liens avec l’imam bordelais Tareq Oubrou qu’Alain Juppé est attaqué par l’extrême droite. Probable recteur du futur lieu de culte, si celui-ci existe un jour, Obrou est membre de l’Union des organisations islamiques de France (l’UOIF), vitrine française des Frères musulmans. L’homme entretient de cordiales relations avec le maire de Bordeaux. Il n’en fallait pas plus pour que ce dernier soit accusé de connivence avec le fondamentalisme musulman – voire d’antisémitisme. «Tareq Oubrou serait-il le Premier ministre d’Ali Juppé ?» questionnait en juillet le site xénophobe et anti-islam Riposte laïque, accusant l’imam de vouloir «imposer la charia en Europe et en France». Tareq Obrou a par le passé défendu une stricte orthodoxie religieuse. Mais il promeut aujourd’hui une conception libérale de l’islam, affirmant par exemple qu’«une musulmane qui ne se couvre pas les cheveux est aussi musulmane que celle qui se couvre», ou laissant femmes et hommes prier ensemble dans sa mosquée. Peu importe pour les détracteurs de l’imam (et du maire de Bordeaux), convaincus que ce dernier dissimulerait ses vraies convictions.

Quel impact sur la campagne ?
Alors que l’ex-Premier ministre a fait le pari d’assumer son objectif de «l’identité heureuse», cette offensive visant à le faire passer pour un faible à l’égard des islamistes a pu troubler certains électeurs, «des esprits mal informés», dixit Juppé. Qu’importe si le candidat prône l’expulsion des imams radicaux ou l’obligation du prêche en français, la puissance de la charge rend parfois inaudible les déclarations du candidat et les éléments de programme.

«Cela a été un bruit de fond qui a parasité toute la campagne», soupire Aurore Bergé, responsable de la campagne numérique de Juppé, qui reconnaît la difficulté de mettre sur pied une riposte : «C’est très compliqué d’établir la bonne stratégie. On peut tenter d’opposer des arguments mais clairement, ces attaques ne parlent pas à la rationalité des gens.» Poursuivre pour diffamation ? Selon elle, beaucoup de ces comptes Twitter sont hébergés à l’étranger. Et n’est-ce pas risquer d’amplifier l’écho de leurs allégations ? Interpellés régulièrement, Juppé et son entourage ont dénoncé cette «propagande sur les réseaux sociaux», notamment au JT de TF1 en juin, mais ont préféré ne pas faire mousser leurs détracteurs. «On a considéré qu’il valait mieux traiter par le mépris car le truc est tellement invraisemblable», explique un membre de son équipe. Après avoir subi le même dénigrement en 2014, «il a été élu au premier tour à 61 %. Juppé s’est dit que les Bordelais savaient que tout cela était complètement diffamatoire, rappelle sa première adjointe, Virginie Calmels. Mais le problème est qu’on a changé d’échelle.» Pour Aurore Bergé, il faudra, si Juppé devient dimanche le candidat de la droite à la présidentielle, «trouver des modes d’action pour déconstruire la parole d’extrême droite, et pas seulement des gentils Tumblr. Même si on doit sourcer, être rigoureux sur les contenus qu’on produit».

Depuis quelques jours, et particulièrement après le premier tour, Juppé hausse le ton. Dans l’Express, il va jusqu’à souligner son pedigree catholique : «Je suis baptisé, je m’appelle Alain Marie, je n’ai pas changé de religion.» Lundi sur France 2, il concédait que «la bonne foi est souvent impuissante contre la calomnie, surtout quand elle est anonyme». Mais il s’en prend aussi à ses concurrents, remarquant mardi matin sur Europe 1 qu’aucun «n’a condamné» cette campagne contre lui. Son équipe observe d’ailleurs que des militants sarkozystes ou fillonistes n’ont pas manqué de faire tourner ces intox sur les réseaux sociaux.

Et ces attaques ne devraient pas disparaître d’ici à dimanche. «Pour contrer le vote musulman, votons Fillon en masse !» exhorte le site Riposte laïque, où l’on présente Juppé comme «le plus islamo-collabo, le plus francophobe, le plus immigrationniste» des candidats de la primaire. Jusqu’alors épargné, Fillon, désormais favori, devrait toutefois être ciblé à son tour. Depuis lundi, remontent sur Twitter des photos de lui inaugurant en 2010 la mosquée d’Argenteuil (Val-d’Oise). Un autre site islamophobe entend épingler «ces membres de l’équipe Fillon qui collaborent avec des mosquées en mairie».

Voir également:

Juppé «observe» des «soutiens d’extrême droite» pour Fillon
Libération/AFP

22 novembre 2016

Alain Juppé a observé mardi que «depuis quelques jours les soutiens d’extrême droite arrivent en force» en faveur de François Fillon, son adversaire au second tour de la primaire de la droite.

Evoquant lors d’un meeting à Toulouse «la reconstitution de l’équipe 2007-2012», M. Juppé a dit : «J’observe que depuis quelques jours d’ailleurs les soutiens de l’extrême droite arrivent en force pour cette équipe».

Interrogée, son équipe a cité les noms de Jacques Bompard et de Carl Lang, ancien secrétaire général du FN et président du Parti de la France, qui a souhaité dimanche «confirmer au deuxième tour le rejet d’Alain Juppé». Mais M. Lang a précisé à l’AFP qu’il n’entendait pas voter dimanche.

Une autre groupe d’extrême droite, Riposte laïque, a lancé un appel contre le maire de Bordeaux mardi: «pour contrer le vote musulman, votons Fillon en masse!».

Alain Juppé a lancé pour sa part: «Moi je suis soutenu par une grande partie de LR, par l’UDI, le MoDem, le rassemblement qui nous a toujours permis de gagner».

«François Fillon a reçu le soutien de Nicolas Sarkozy, ce qui reconstitue l’équipe de 2007-2012», a-t-il ajouté.

«Il paraît que François Fillon a été choqué que je lui demande de clarifier sa position sur l’IVG – c’était quand même nécessaire puisqu’il y a quelque temps il écrivait dans un livre que c’était un droit fondamental de la femme, avant de changer d’avis puis de donner un sentiment personnel et de dire qu’il ne changerait rien à la législation actuelle».

«Et je vous le dis, je ne renoncerai pas à poser d’autres questions», a-t-il lancé. «L’IVG est un droit fondamental, durement acquis par les femmes», a-t-il ajouté.

François Fillon s’est indigné mardi que son concurrent lui demande de «clarifier» sa position.

Alain Juppé s’est par ailleurs ému face aux «attaques personnelles ignominieuses» émanant des réseaux sociaux le baptisant «Ali Juppé, grand mufti de Bordeaux» et aux calomnies sur le «salafisme et l’antisémitisme». Le maire de Bordeaux s’était déjà insurgé à plusieurs reprises contre ces calommnies.

«Ca a fait des dégâts, j’ai des témoignages précis dans des queues de personnes qui parfois ont changé leur vote parce qu’ils ont été impressionnés par cette campagne dégueulasse!», s’est-il emporté. «J’aurais aimé que certains de mes compétiteurs condamnent cette campagne ignominieuse», a-t-il lancé.

Alain Juppé, arrivé près de 16 points derrière François Fillon au premier tour alors qu’il était le favori du scrutin, a de nouveau pointé «la brutalité» du programme «mal étudié» qui n’a «pas de sens» de son adversaire. «On ne supprimera pas 500.000 fonctionnaires en 5 ans», a-t-il dit. «Cela ne se fera pas», a-t-il assuré, opposant au contraire la «crédibilité» de son programme.

«J’ai dans mon conseil municipal un représentant de +Sens Commun+ (mouvement hostile au mariage pour tous qui soutient Fillon), qui appartient à ma majorité, parce que je l’ai embarqué dans ma liste – voyez que je suis ouvert d’esprit- eh bien chaque fois qu’il y a une subvention — pas souvent, de temps en temps — qui va à une association d’homosexuels eh bien il refuse de voter», a-t-il expliqué. «Ce n’est pas ma conception de la société», a-t-il déclaré.

Jean-François Copé, qui a rallié le maire de Bordeaux, a loué son «sang froid» ainsi que son «courage». Nathalie Kosciusko-Morizet avait également fait le déplacement, ralliée «pas par calcul» mais «pas par hasard». «Je me suis battue et je continuerai à le faire contre les conservatismes de droite et de gauche et aujourd’hui, c’est toi, Alain, qui portes la tête de ce combat», a-t-elle lancé.

Voir encore:

Sacristie

Laurent Joffrin
Libération
21 novembre 2016 
Édito

Journée des dupes. Beaucoup d’électeurs ont voulu écarter un ancien président à leurs yeux trop à droite. Impuissants devant la mobilisation de la droite profonde, ils héritent d’un candidat encore plus réac. C’est ainsi que le Schtroumpf grognon du conservatisme se retrouve en impétrant probable. «Avec Carla, c’est du sérieux», disait le premier. Avec Fillon, c’est du lugubre. Bonjour tristesse… La droitisation de la droite a trouvé son chevalier à la triste figure. C’est vrai en matière économique et sociale, tant François Fillon en rajoute dans la rupture libérale, décidé à démolir une bonne part de l’héritage de la Libération et du Conseil national de la Résistance. Etrange apostasie pour cet ancien gaulliste social, émule de Philippe Séguin, qui se pose désormais en homme de fer de la révolution conservatrice à la française. Aligner la France sur l’orthodoxie du laissez-faire : le bon Philippe doit se retourner dans sa tombe. On comprend le rôle tenu par les intellectuels du déclin qui occupent depuis deux décennies les studios pour vouer aux gémonies la «pensée unique» sociale-démocrate et le «droit-de-l’hommisme» candide : ouvrir la voie au meilleur économiste de la Sarthe, émule de Milton Friedman et de Vladimir Poutine. Nous avions l’Etat-providence ; nous aurons la providence sans l’Etat. C’est encore plus net dans le domaine sociétal, où ce chrétien enraciné a passé une alliance avec les illuminés de la «manif pour tous». Il y a désormais en France un catholicisme politique, activiste et agressif, qui fait pendant à l’islam politique. Le révérend père Fillon s’en fait le prêcheur mélancolique. D’ici à ce qu’il devienne une sorte de Tariq Ramadan des sacristies, il n’y a qu’un pas. Avant de retourner à leurs querelles de boutique rose ou rouge, les progressistes doivent y réfléchir à deux fois. Sinon, la messe est dite.

Voir de plus:

Alain Juppé: « La vision de François Fillon me paraît tournée vers le passé »
Presidentielle 2017
Propos recueillis par Corinne Lhaïk

Libération

22/11/2016

Alain Juppé revient dans une longue interview à L’Express sur son programme et sa vision de la France alors qu’il est confronté à François Fillon, très en avance dans les sondages, pour le second tour de la primaire à droite.
Vous décrivez une différence de degré avec vous, pas de nature…

Il y a une différence de nature quand, moi, je veux une France moderne, ouverte sur l’avenir. Sa vision me paraît beaucoup plus traditionaliste et tournée vers le passé. Sur les questions sociales, sur l’évolution des moeurs, la prise en compte de deux enjeux fondamentaux – l’égalité entre les femmes et les hommes ou la conception d’une nouvelle croissance pour sauver la planète du réchauffement climatique -, il s’est peu exprimé.

Vos positions sur des sujets de société peuvent susciter l’incompréhension de certains électeurs de droite. Que leur dites-vous?

Je leur ai toujours dit que je respectais leurs convictions. Je suis moi-même catholique, contrairement à l’ignominieuse campagne développée par je ne sais qui et qui me présente comme converti à l’islam et complaisant vis-à-vis de l’islamisme. Cette campagne de caniveau a fait des dégâts sur certains esprits mal informés. Je suis catholique, je suis baptisé, je m’appelle Alain Marie, je n’ai pas changé de religion et je comprends parfaitement le point de vue de mes coreligionnaires catholiques. Certains sont plus intégristes, moi, je me reconnais davantage dans la vision du pape François.

Voir de même:

La victoire de François Fillon au premier tour de la primaire de la droite, dimanche, a surpris jusqu’à l’Elysée, où le président n’avait pas vu venir la défaite de Nicolas Sarkozy.

Europe 1

21 novembre 2016

Un résultat sans appel qui a surpris tout le monde. Personne n’avait imaginé une telle avance pour François Fillon au premier tour de la primaire de la droite, dimanche soir. Encore moins le président de la République. François Hollande n’avait pas non plus vu venir la défaite de Nicolas Sarkozy. Dans cette soirée électorale, le chef de l’Etat a perdu son ennemi préféré et il n’a surtout plus grand-chose à quoi se raccrocher. Explications.

Hollande ne l’avait pas vu venir. Chez les proches du président, c’est l’abattement en fin de soirée. « Regardez Fillon, glisse l’un de ses proches, il était dans les choux à la rentrée. Ça prouve que rien ne se passe jamais comme prévu ». L’analyse peut paraître ironique quand on sait que le président ne prédisait pas du tout ce résultat il y a encore quelques mois. « Fillon n’a aucune chance », prophétisait-il à Gérard Davet et Fabrice Lhomme, dans le fameux livre d’entretiens Un président ne devrait pas dire ça (éditions Stock).

Fillon, le plus réactionnaire pour Hollande. Dimanche soir, devant sa télévision, dans ses appartements privés de l’Elysée, le chef de l’Etat a échangé frénétiquement par SMS avec ses conseillers, ses amis. Le message est désormais clair : François Fillon est le plus libéral, le plus réactionnaire, selon François Hollande. Face à cet adversaire, il peut encore incarner la défense du modèle social.

Personne ne veut d’un remake de 2012. Mais une partie de la gauche fait déjà une toute autre lecture du scrutin, persuadée que le résultat de dimanche montre surtout une chose : personne ne veut d’un remake de 2012. Un député proche de Manuel Valls sort déjà les crocs : « Hollande n’aura pas son match retour avec Sarkozy, c’est un signe de plus qu’il faut laisser la place ».

Voir aussi:

Hollande pense que « le masque de Juppé va tomber »

En petit comité, le chef de l’État explique que la popularité d’Alain Juppé explosera à la lumière de la primaire, quand « le masque va tomber ».

Emmanuel Berretta

Le Point
09/03/2016

Présidentielle américaine: Vous avez dit effet Bradley ? (Revenge of the clingers and deplorables: a win so big even Nate Silver missed it)

9 novembre, 2016

reagan-landslide
2016electoral-map
collegebradley

Tim Youngblood of Dahlonega, Ga. waits for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump to arrive for a rally at the Fox Theater, Wednesday, June 15, 2016, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

obama-bitter
ivyleaguebitter
La prédiction est un art bien difficile, surtout en ce qui concerne l’avenir. Niels Bohr
Soudain, Norman se sentit fier. Tout s’imposait à lui, avec force. Il était fier. Dans ce monde imparfait, les citoyens souverains de la première et de la plus grande Démocratie Electronique avaient, par l’intermédiaire de Norman Muller (par lui), exercé une fois de plus leur libre et inaliénable droit de vote. Le Votant (Isaac Asimov, 1955)
Vous allez dans certaines petites villes de Pennsylvanie où, comme ans beaucoup de petites villes du Middle West, les emplois ont disparu depuis maintenant 25 ans et n’ont été remplacés par rien d’autre (…) Et il n’est pas surprenant qu’ils deviennent pleins d’amertume, qu’ils s’accrochent aux armes à feu ou à la religion, ou à leur antipathie pour ceux qui ne sont pas comme eux, ou encore à un sentiment d’hostilité envers les immigrants. Barack Obama (2008)
Pour généraliser, en gros, vous pouvez placer la moitié des partisans de Trump dans ce que j’appelle le panier des pitoyables. Les racistes, sexistes, homophobes, xénophobes, islamophobes. A vous de choisir. Hillary Clinton
I continue to believe Mr. Trump will not be president. And the reason is that I have a lot of faith in the American people. Being president is a serious job. It’s not hosting a talk show, or a reality show. The American people are pretty sensible, and I think they’ll make a sensible choice in the end. It’s not promotion, it’s not marketing. It’s hard. And a lot of people count on us getting it right. Barack Hussein Obama (Feb. 2016)
Comme je l’ai dit depuis le début, notre campagne n’en était pas simplement une, mais plutôt un grand mouvement incroyable, composé de millions d’hommes et de femmes qui travaillent dur, qui aiment leur pays, et qui veulent un avenir plus prospère et plus radieux pour eux-mêmes et leur famille. C’est un mouvement composé d’Américains de toutes races, de toutes religions, de toutes origines, qui veulent et attendent que le gouvernement serve le peuple. Ce gouvernement servira le peuple. J’ai passé toute ma vie dans le monde des affaires et j’ai observé le potentiel des projets et des personnes partout dans le monde. Aujourd’hui, c’est ce que je veux faire pour notre pays. Il y a un potentiel énorme, je connais bien notre pays, il y a potentiel incroyable, ce sera magnifique. Chaque Américain aura l’opportunité de vivre pleinement son potentiel. Ces hommes et ces femmes oubliés de notre pays, ces personnes ne seront plus oubliées. Donald Trump
Je suis désolé d’être le porteur de mauvaises nouvelles, mais je crois avoir été assez clair l’été dernier lorsque j’ai affirmé que Donald Trump serait le candidat républicain à la présidence des États-Unis. Cette fois, j’ai des nouvelles encore pires à vous annoncer: Donald J. Trump va remporter l’élection du mois de novembre. Ce clown à temps partiel et sociopathe à temps plein va devenir notre prochain président. (…) Jamais de toute ma vie n’ai-je autant voulu me tromper. (…) Voici 5 raisons pour lesquelles Trump va gagner : 1. Le poids électoral du Midwest, ou le Brexit de la Ceinture de rouille 2. Le dernier tour de piste des Hommes blancs en colère 3. Hillary est un problème en elle-même 4. Les partisans désabusés de Bernie Sanders 5. L’effet Jesse Ventura. Michael Moore
The phenomenon of voters telling pollsters what they think they want to hear, however, actually has a name: the Bradley Effect, a well-studied political phenomenon. In 1982, poll after poll showed Tom Bradley, Los Angeles’ first black mayor and a Democrat, with a solid lead over George Deukmejian, a white Republican, in the California gubernatorial race. Instead, Bradley narrowly lost to Deukmejian, a stunning upset that led experts to wonder how the polls got it wrong. Pollsters, and some political scientists, later concluded that voters didn’t want to say they were voting against Bradley, who would have been the nation’s first popularly-elected African-American governor, because they didn’t want to appear to be racist. (…) In December, a Morning Consult poll examined whether Trump supporters were more likely to say they supported him in online polls than in polls conducted by live questioners. Their finding was surprising: « Trump performs about six percentage points better online than via live telephone interviewing, » according to the study. At the same time, « his advantage online is driven by adults with higher levels of education, » the study says, countering data showing Trump’s bedrock support comes from voters without college degrees. « Importantly, the differences between online and live telephone [surveys] persist even when examining only highly engaged, likely voters. » But Galston says while the study examines « a legitimate question, » the methodology is unclear, and « it’s really important to compare apples to apples. You need to be sure that the online community has the same demographic profile » as phone polling. « It may also be the case that people who are online and willing to participate in that study are already, in effect, a self-selected sample » of pro-Trump voters, Galston says. (…) Ultimately, Trump’s claim « is more of a way to try to explain poor polling numbers. Trump is losing at the moment and he’s trying to explain it off, » Skelley says. « This doesn’t really hold up under scrutiny. » US News & world report (July 2016)
Ever since the ascendency of their “war room,” the Clinton-inspired Left has attacked the integrity and morality of all Republican presidential candidates: McCain was rendered a near-senile coot, confused about the extent of his wife’s wealth and the number of their estates. No finer man ran for president than Mitt Romney. And by November 2012 when he lost, he had been reduced to a bullying hazer in his teen-age years, a vulture capitalist, a heartless plutocrat who was rude to his garbage man, tortured dogs, had an elevator in his house, and provided horses and stables to his aristocratic wife. All were either lies or exaggerations or irrelevant and all insidiously cemented the picture of the gentlemanly Romney as a preppie, out-of-touch, old white-guy snob, and gratuitously cruel to the less fortunate. Trump was certainly more vulgar than either McCain or Romney, but what voters he lost owing to his crass candor he may well have gained back through his slash-and-burn, take-no-prisoners willingness to fight back against the liberal smear machine. We can envision what Marco Rubio, Jeb Bush, or Ted Cruz would look like after six months of “going high” from the Clinton-campaign treatment. It is a mistake to believe that any other candidate would have better dealt with the Clinton-Podesta hit teams; all we can assume is that most would have suffered far more nobly than Trump. It would be wonderful if a Republican candidate ran with Romney’s personal integrity, Rubio’s charisma, Walker’s hands-on experience, Cruz’s commitment to constitutional conservatism, and Trump’s energy, animal cunning, and ferocity, but unfortunately such multifaceted candidates are rare. Victor Davis Hanson
What I was hearing was this general sense of being on the short end of the stick. Rural people felt like they’re not getting their fair share. (…)  First, people felt that they were not getting their fair share of decision-making power. For example, people would say: All the decisions are made in Madison and Milwaukee and nobody’s listening to us. Nobody’s paying attention, nobody’s coming out here and asking us what we think. Decisions are made in the cities, and we have to abide by them. Second, people would complain that they weren’t getting their fair share of stuff, that they weren’t getting their fair share of public resources. That often came up in perceptions of taxation. People had this sense that all the money is sucked in by Madison, but never spent on places like theirs. And third, people felt that they weren’t getting respect. They would say: The real kicker is that people in the city don’t understand us. They don’t understand what rural life is like, what’s important to us and what challenges that we’re facing. They think we’re a bunch of redneck racists. So it’s all three of these things — the power, the money, the respect. People are feeling like they’re not getting their fair share of any of that. (…)  It’s been this slow burn. Resentment is like that. It builds and builds and builds until something happens. Some confluence of things makes people notice: I am so pissed off. I am really the victim of injustice here. (…) Then, I also think that having our first African American president is part of the mix, too. (…) when the health-care debate ramped up, once he was in office and became very, very partisan, I think people took partisan sides. (…) It’s not just resentment toward people of color. It’s resentment toward elites, city people. (…) Of course [some of this resentment] is about race, but it’s also very much about the actual lived conditions that people are experiencing. We do need to pay attention to both. As the work that you did on mortality rates shows, it’s not just about dollars. People are experiencing a decline in prosperity, and that’s real. The other really important element here is people’s perceptions. Surveys show that it may not actually be the case that Trump supporters themselves are doing less well — but they live in places where it’s reasonable for them to conclude that people like them are struggling. Support for Trump is rooted in reality in some respects — in people’s actual economic struggles, and the actual increases in mortality. But it’s the perceptions that people have about their reality are the key driving force here. (…) One of the key stories in our political culture has been the American Dream — the sense that if you work hard, you will get ahead. (…) But here’s where having Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump running alongside one another for a while was so interesting. I think the support for Sanders represented a different interpretation of the problem. For Sanders supporters, the problem is not that other population groups are getting more than their fair share, but that the government isn’t doing enough to intervene here and right a ship that’s headed in the wrong direction. (…) There is definitely some misinformation, some misunderstandings. But we all do that thing of encountering information and interpreting it in a way that supports our own predispositions. Recent studies in political science have shown that it’s actually those of us who think of ourselves as the most politically sophisticated, the most educated, who do it more than others. So I really resist this characterization of Trump supporters as ignorant. There’s just more and more of a recognition that politics for people is not — and this is going to sound awful, but — it’s not about facts and policies. It’s so much about identities, people forming ideas about the kind of person they are and the kind of people others are. Who am I for, and who am I against? Policy is part of that, but policy is not the driver of these judgments. There are assessments of, is this someone like me? Is this someone who gets someone like me? (…) All of us, even well-educated, politically sophisticated people interpret facts through our own perspectives, our sense of what who we are, our own identities. I don’t think that what you do is give people more information. Because they are going to interpret it through the perspectives they already have. People are only going to absorb facts when they’re communicated from a source that they respect, from a source who they perceive has respect for people like them. And so whenever a liberal calls out Trump supporters as ignorant or fooled or misinformed, that does absolutely nothing to convey the facts that the liberal is trying to convey. Katherine Cramer
Ce qui est nouveau, c’est d’abord que la bourgeoisie a le visage de l’ouverture et de la bienveillance. Elle a trouvé un truc génial : plutôt que de parler de « loi du marché », elle dit « société ouverte », « ouverture à l’Autre » et liberté de choisir… Les Rougon-Macquart sont déguisés en hipsters. Ils sont tous très cools, ils aiment l’Autre. Mieux : ils ne cessent de critiquer le système, « la finance », les « paradis fiscaux ». On appelle cela la rebellocratie. C’est un discours imparable : on ne peut pas s’opposer à des gens bienveillants et ouverts aux autres ! Mais derrière cette posture, il y a le brouillage de classes, et la fin de la classe moyenne. La classe moyenne telle qu’on l’a connue, celle des Trente Glorieuses, qui a profité de l’intégration économique, d’une ascension sociale conjuguée à une intégration politique et culturelle, n’existe plus même si, pour des raisons politiques, culturelles et anthropologiques, on continue de la faire vivre par le discours et les représentations. (…)  C’est aussi une conséquence de la non-intégration économique. Aujourd’hui, quand on regarde les chiffres – notamment le dernier rapport sur les inégalités territoriales publié en juillet dernier –, on constate une hyper-concentration de l’emploi dans les grands centres urbains et une désertification de ce même emploi partout ailleurs. Et cette tendance ne cesse de s’accélérer ! Or, face à cette situation, ce même rapport préconise seulement de continuer vers encore plus de métropolisation et de mondialisation pour permettre un peu de redistribution. Aujourd’hui, et c’est une grande nouveauté, il y a une majorité qui, sans être « pauvre » ni faire les poubelles, n’est plus intégrée à la machine économique et ne vit plus là où se crée la richesse. Notre système économique nécessite essentiellement des cadres et n’a donc plus besoin de ces millions d’ouvriers, d’employés et de paysans. La mondialisation aboutit à une division internationale du travail : cadres, ingénieurs et bac+5 dans les pays du Nord, ouvriers, contremaîtres et employés là où le coût du travail est moindre. La mondialisation s’est donc faite sur le dos des anciennes classes moyennes, sans qu’on le leur dise ! Ces catégories sociales sont éjectées du marché du travail et éloignées des poumons économiques. Cependant, cette« France périphérique » représente quand même 60 % de la population. (…) Ce phénomène présent en France, en Europe et aux États-Unis a des répercussions politiques : les scores du FN se gonflent à mesure que la classe moyenne décroît car il est aujourd’hui le parti de ces « superflus invisibles » déclassés de l’ancienne classe moyenne. (…) Face à eux, et sans eux, dans les quinze plus grandes aires urbaines, le système marche parfaitement. Le marché de l’emploi y est désormais polarisé. Dans les grandes métropoles il faut d’une part beaucoup de cadres, de travailleurs très qualifiés, et de l’autre des immigrés pour les emplois subalternes dans le BTP, la restauration ou le ménage. Ainsi les immigrés permettent-ils à la nouvelle bourgeoisie de maintenir son niveau de vie en ayant une nounou et des restaurants pas trop chers. (…) Il n’y a aucun complot mais le fait, logique, que la classe supérieure soutient un système dont elle bénéficie – c’est ça, la « main invisible du marché» ! Et aujourd’hui, elle a un nom plus sympathique : la « société ouverte ». Mais je ne pense pas qu’aux bobos. Globalement, on trouve dans les métropoles tous ceux qui profitent de la mondialisation, qu’ils votent Mélenchon ou Juppé ! D’ailleurs, la gauche votera Juppé. C’est pour cela que je ne parle ni de gauche, ni de droite, ni d’élites, mais de « la France d’en haut », de tous ceux qui bénéficient peu ou prou du système et y sont intégrés, ainsi que des gens aux statuts protégés : les cadres de la fonction publique ou les retraités aisés. Tout ce monde fait un bloc d’environ 30 ou 35 %, qui vit là où la richesse se crée. Et c’est la raison pour laquelle le système tient si bien. (…) La France périphérique connaît une phase de sédentarisation. Aujourd’hui, la majorité des Français vivent dans le département où ils sont nés, dans les territoires de la France périphérique il s’agit de plus de 60 % de la population. C’est pourquoi quand une usine ferme – comme Alstom à Belfort –, une espèce de rage désespérée s’empare des habitants. Les gens deviennent dingues parce qu’ils savent que pour eux « il n’y a pas d’alternative » ! Le discours libéral répond : « Il n’y a qu’à bouger ! » Mais pour aller où ? Vous allez vendre votre baraque et déménager à Paris ou à Bordeaux quand vous êtes licencié par ArcelorMittal ou par les abattoirs Gad ? Avec quel argent ? Des logiques foncières, sociales, culturelles et économiques se superposent pour rendre cette mobilité quasi impossible. Et on le voit : autrefois, les vieux restaient ou revenaient au village pour leur retraite. Aujourd’hui, la pyramide des âges de la France périphérique se normalise. Jeunes, actifs, retraités, tous sont logés à la même enseigne. La mobilité pour tous est un mythe. Les jeunes qui bougent, vont dans les métropoles et à l’étranger sont en majorité issus des couches supérieures. Pour les autres ce sera la sédentarisation. Autrefois, les emplois publics permettaient de maintenir un semblant d’équilibre économique et proposaient quelques débouchés aux populations. Seulement, en plus de la mondialisation et donc de la désindustrialisation, ces territoires ont subi la retraite de l’État. (…) Aujourd’hui, ce parc privé « social de fait » s’est gentrifié et accueille des catégories supérieures. Quant au parc social, il est devenu la piste d’atterrissage des flux migratoires. Si l’on regarde la carte de l’immigration, la dynamique principale se situe dans le Grand Ouest, et ce n’est pas dans les villages que les immigrés s’installent, mais dans les quartiers de logements sociaux de Rennes, de Brest ou de Nantes. (…) In fine, il y a aussi un rejet du multiculturalisme. Les gens n’ont pas envie d’aller vivre dans les derniers territoires des grandes villes ouverts aux catégories populaires : les banlieues et les quartiers à logements sociaux qui accueillent et concentrent les flux migratoires. (…) En  réalité,  [mixité  sociale » et « mixité  ethnique »] vont  rarement  ensemble.  En  région   parisienne,  on  peut  avoir  un  peu  de  mixité  sociale   sans mixité ethnique. La famille maghrébine en phase  d’ascension sociale achète un pavillon à proximité des  cités.  Par  ailleurs,  les  logiques  séparatistes  se  poursuivent  et  aujourd’hui  les  ouvriers,  les  cadres  de  la   fonction  publique  et  les  membres  de  la  petite  bourgeoisie  maghrébine  en  ascension  sociale  évitent  les   quartiers où se concentre l’immigration africaine.  Ça me fait penser à la phrase de Valls sur l’apartheid.  Il  devait  penser  à  Évry,  où  le  quartier  des  Pyramides   s’est  complètement  ethnicisé  :  là  où  vivaient  hier  des   Blancs et des Maghrébins, ne restent plus aujourd’hui  que des gens issus de l’immigration subsaharienne. En  réalité, tout le monde – le petit Blanc, le bobo comme  le Maghrébin en phase d’ascension sociale – souhaite  éviter  le  collège  pourri  du  coin  et  contourne  la  carte   scolaire. On est tous pareils, seul le discours change…  (…) À  catégories  égales,  la  mobilité  sociale  est  plus  forte   dans les grandes métropoles. C’est normal : c’est là que  se  concentrent  les  emplois.  Contrairement  aux  zones   rurales, où l’accès au marché de l’emploi et à l’enseignement  supérieur  est  difficile,  les  aires  métropolitaines   offrent   des   opportunités   y   compris   aux   catégories    modestes. Or ces catégories, compte tenu de la recomposition  démographique,  sont  aujourd’hui  issues  de   l’immigration. Cela explique l’intégration économique  et  sociale  d’une  partie  de  cette  population.  Évidemment,  l’ascension  sociale  reste  minoritaire  mais  c’est   une constante des milieux populaires depuis toujours :  quand on naît  « en bas » , on meurt  « en bas » .  (…) les   classes   populaires   immigrées   bénéficient    simplement  d’un  atout  :  celui  de  vivre   «  là  où  ça  se   passe  » .  Il  ne  s’agit  pas  d’un  privilège  résultant  d’une   politique  volontariste.  Tout  ça  s’est  fait  lentement.  Il   y  a  des  logiques  démographiques,  foncières  et  économiques.  Il  faut  avoir  à  l’esprit  que  la  France  périphérique  n’est  pas  100  %  blanche,  elle  comporte  aussi  des   immigrés, et puis il y a également les DOM-TOM, territoires ultrapériphériques !    (..) Notre  erreur  est  d’avoir  pensé  qu’on  pouvait  appliquer   le   modèle   mondialisé   économique   sans   obtenir   ses    effets  sociétaux,  c’est-à-dire  le  multiculturalisme  et  une   forme  de  communautarisme.  La  prétention  française,   c’était  de  dire  :   «  Nous,  gros  malins  de  Français,  allons   faire  la  mondialisation  républicaine  !  »   Il  faut  constater  que  nous  sommes  devenus  une  société  américaine   comme les autres. La laïcité et l’assimilation sont mortes  de  facto.  Il  suffit  d’écouter  les  élèves  d’un  collège  pour   s’en convaincre : ils parlent de Noirs, de Blancs, d’Arabes.  La société multiculturelle mondialisée génère partout les  mêmes tensions et paranoïas identitaires, nous sommes  banalement dans ce schéma en France. Dans ce contexte,  la question du rapport entre minorité et majorité est en  permanence  posée,  quelle  que  soit  l’origine.  Quand  ils   deviennent  minoritaires,  les  Maghrébins  eux-mêmes   quittent les cités qui concentrent l’immigration subsaharienne. Sauf que comme en France il n’y a officiellement  ni religion ni race, on ne peut pas en parler… Ceux qui  osent le faire, comme Michèle Tribalat, le paient cher.  (…)  La  création  de  zones  piétonnières  fait  augmenter les prix du foncier. Et les aménagements écolos des  villes correspondent, de fait, à des embourgeoisements.  Tous  ces  dispositifs  amènent  un  renchérissement  du   foncier  et  davantage  de  gentrification.  Pour  baisser   les prix ? Il faut moins de standing. Or la pression est  forte  :  à  Paris,  plus  de  40  %  de  la  population  active   est composée de cadres. C’est énorme ! Même le XX e arrondissement est devenu une commune bourgeoise.  Et  puis  l’embourgeoisement  est  un  rouleau  compresseur.  On  avait  pensé  que  certaines  zones  resteraient   populaires,  comme  la  Seine-et-Marne,  mais  ce  n’est   pas le cas. Ce système reproduit le modèle du marché  mondialisé,  c’est-à-dire  qu’il  se  sépare  des  gens  dont   on n’a pas besoin pour faire tourner l’économie.  (…) La  politique  municipale  de  Bordeaux  est  la  même   que  celle  de  Lyon  ou  de  Paris.  Il  y  a  une  logique  qui   est celle de la bourgeoisie mondialisée, qu’elle soit de  droite ou de gauche. Elle est libérale-libertaire, tantôt  plus libertaire (gauche), tantôt plus libérale (droite)…  (…) L’un des codes fondamentaux de la nouvelle bourgeoisie  est  l’ouverture.  Si  on  lâche  ce  principe,  on  est   presque  en  phase  de  déclassement.  Le  vote  populiste,   c’est  celui  des  gens  qui  ne  sont  plus  dans  le  système,   les  « ratés » , et personne, dans le milieu bobo, n’a envie  d’avoir  l’image  d’un  loser.  Le  discours  d’ouverture  de   la supériorité morale du bourgeois est presque un signe  extérieur  de  richesse.  C’est  un  attribut  d’intégration.   Aux yeux de la classe dominante, un homme tolérant est  quelqu’un qui a fondamentalement compris le monde. (…) Mais plus personne ne l’écoute ! Quand on regarde catégorie après catégorie, c’est un processus de désaffiliation  qui  s’enchaîne  et  se  reproduit,  incluant  notamment  le   divorce des banlieues avec la gauche. Le magistère de la  France d’en haut est terminé ! Électoralement, on le voit  déjà avec la montée de l’abstention et du vote FN. Le FN  existe  uniquement  parce  qu’il  est  capable  de  capter  ce   qui  vient  d’en  bas,  pas  parce  qu’il  influence  le  bas.  Ce   sont les gens qui influencent le discours du FN, et pas le  contraire ! Ce n’est pas le discours du FN qui imprègne  l’atmosphère  !  Le  Pen  père  n’était  pas  ouvriériste,  ce   sont les ouvriers qui sont allés vers lui. Le FN s’est mis  à parler du rural parce qu’il a observé des cartes électorales…  les  campagnes  sont  un  désert  politique  rempli   de Français dans l’attente d’une nouvelle offre. Bref, ce  système ne peut pas perdurer. (…) Si l’on regarde le dernier sondage Ipsos réalisé  dans  22  pays,  on  y  découvre  que  seulement  11  %  des   Français (dont beaucoup d’immigrés !) considèrent que  l’immigration est positive pour le pays. C’est marrant,  les  journalistes  sont  90  %  à  penser  le  contraire.  En   vérité, il n’y a plus de débat sur l’immigration : tout le  monde est d’accord sauf des gens qui nous mentent… (…)  Les   ministres   et   gouvernements    successifs  sont  pris  dans  la  même   contradiction  :  ils  ont  choisi  un   modèle économique qui crée de la  richesse,  mais  qui  n’est  pas  socialement   durable,   qui   ne   fait   pas    société.  Ils  n’ont  de  fait  aucune   solution,   si   ce   n’est   de   gérer   le   court terme en faisant de la redistribution.  La  dernière  idée  dans   ce  sens  est  le  revenu  universel,  ce   qui  fait  penser  qu’on  a  définitivement  renoncé  à  tout  espoir  d’un   développement  économique  de  la   France périphérique. Christophe Guilluy
Experts et commentateurs se sont, dans leur grande majorité, mis le doigt dans l’œil parce qu’ils pensent à l’intérieur du système. À Paris comme à Washington, on reste persuadé qu’un «outsider» n’a aucune chance face aux appareils des partis, des lobbies et des machines électorales. Que ce soit dans notre monarchie républicaine ou dans leur hiérarchie de Grands Électeurs, si l’on n’est pas un familier du sérail, on n’existe pas. Tout le dédain et la condescendance envers Trump, qui n’était jusqu’ici connu que par ses gratte-ciel et son émission de téléréalité, pouvaient donc s’afficher envers cette grosse brute qui ne sait pas rester à sa place. On connaît la suite. (…) Trump est l’un des premiers à avoir compris et utilisé la désintermédiation. Ce n’est pas vraiment l’ubérisation de la politique, mais ça y ressemble quelque peu. Quand je l’ai interrogé sur le mouvement qu’il suscitait dans la population américaine, il m’a répondu: Twitter, Facebook et Instagram. Avec ses 15 millions d’abonnés, il dispose d’une force de frappe avec laquelle il dialogue sans aucun intermédiaire. Il y a trente ans, il écrivait qu’aucun politique ne pouvait se passer d’un quotidien comme le New York Times. Aujourd’hui, il affirme que les réseaux sociaux sont beaucoup plus efficaces – et beaucoup moins onéreux – que la possession de ce journal. (…) Là-bas comme ici, l’avenir n’est plus ce qu’il était, la classe moyenne se désosse, la précarité est toujours prégnante, les attentats terroristes ne sont plus, depuis un certain 11 septembre, des images lointaines vues sur petit ou grand écran. (…) Et la fureur s’explique par le décalage entre la ritournelle de «Nous sommes la plus grande puissance et le plus beau pays du monde» et le «Je n’arrive pas à finir le mois et payer les études de mes enfants et l’assurance médicale de mes parents». Sans parler de l’écart toujours plus abyssal entre riches et modestes. (…) Il existe, depuis quelques années, un étonnant rapprochement entre les problématiques européennes et américaines. Qui aurait pu penser, dans ce pays d’accueil traditionnel, que l’immigration provoquerait une telle hostilité chez certains, qui peut permettre à Trump de percer dans les sondages en proclamant sa volonté de construire un grand mur? Il y a certes des points communs avec Marine Le Pen, y compris dans la nécessité de relocaliser, de rebâtir des frontières et de proclamer la grandeur de son pays. Mais évidemment, Trump a d’autres moyens que la présidente du Front National… De plus, répétons-le, c’est d’abord un pragmatique et un négociateur. Je ne crois pas que ce soit les qualités les plus apparentes de Marine Le Pen… (…) Son programme économique le situe beaucoup plus à gauche que les caciques Républicains et les néo-conservateurs proches d’Hillary Clinton qui le haïssent, parce que lui croit, dans certains domaines, à l’intervention de l’État et aux limites nécessaires du laisser-faire, laisser-aller. (…) Il ne ménage personne et peut aller beaucoup plus loin que Marine Le Pen, tout simplement parce qu’il n’a jamais eu à régler le problème du père fondateur et encore moins à porter le fardeau d’une étiquette tout de même controversée. Sa marque à lui, ce n’est pas la politique, mais le bâtiment et la réussite. Ça change pas mal de choses. (…) il trouve insupportable que des villes comme Paris et Bruxelles, qu’il adore et a visitées maintes fois, deviennent des camps retranchés où l’on n’est même pas capable de répliquer à un massacre comme celui du Bataclan. On peut être vent debout contre le port d’arme, mais, dit-il, s’il y avait eu des vigiles armés boulevard Voltaire, il n’y aurait pas eu autant de victimes. Pour lui, un pays qui ne sait pas se défendre est un pays en danger de mort. (…) Il s’entendra assez bien avec Poutine pour le partage des zones d’influence, et même pour une collaboration active contre Daesh et autres menaces, mais, comme il le répète sur tous les tons, l’Amérique de Trump ne défendra que les pays qui paieront pour leur protection. Ça fait un peu Al Capone, mais ça a le mérite de la clarté. Si l’Europe n’a pas les moyens de protéger son identité, son mode de vie, ses valeurs et sa culture, alors, personne ne le fera à sa place. En résumé, pour Trump, la politique est une chose trop grave pour la laisser aux politiciens professionnels, et la liberté un état trop fragile pour la confier aux pacifistes de tout poil. André Bercoff
La grande difficulté, avec Donald Trump, c’est qu’on est à la fois face à une caricature et face à un phénomène bien plus complexe. Une caricature d’abord, car tout chez lui, semble magnifié. L’appétit de pouvoir, l’ego, la grossièreté des manières, les obsessions, les tweets épidermiques, l’étalage voyant de son succès sur toutes les tours qu’il a construites et qui portent son nom. Donald Trump joue en réalité à merveille de son côté caricatural, il simplifie les choses, provoque, indigne, et cela marche parce que notre monde du 21e siècle se gargarise de ces simplifications outrancières, à l’heure de l’information immédiate et fragmentée. La machine médiatique est comme un ventre qui a toujours besoin de nouveaux scandales et Donald, le commercial, le sait mieux que personne, parce qu’il a créé et animé une émission de téléréalité pendant des années. Il sait que la politique américaine actuelle est un grand cirque, où celui qui crie le plus fort a souvent raison parce que c’est lui qui «fait le buzz». En même temps, ne voir que la caricature qu’il projette serait rater le phénomène Trump et l’histoire stupéfiante de son succès électoral. Derrière l’image télévisuelle simplificatrice, se cache un homme intelligent, rusé et avisé, qui a géré un empire de milliards de dollars et employé des dizaines de milliers de personnes. Ce n’est pas rien! Selon plusieurs proches du milliardaire que j’ai interrogés, Trump réfléchit de plus à une candidature présidentielle depuis des années, et il a su capter, au-delà de l’air du temps, la colère profonde qui traversait l’Amérique, puis l’exprimer et la chevaucher. Grâce à ses instincts politiques exceptionnels, il a vu ce que personne d’autre – à part peut-être le démocrate Bernie Sanders – n’avait su voir: le gigantesque ras le bol d’un pays en quête de protection contre les effets déstabilisants de la globalisation, de l’immigration massive et du terrorisme islamique; sa peur du déclin aussi. En ce sens, Donald Trump s’est dressé contre le modèle dominant plébiscité par les élites et a changé la nature du débat de la présidentielle. Il a remis à l’ordre du jour l’idée de protection du pays, en prétendant au rôle de shérif aux larges épaules face aux dangers d’un monde instable et dangereux. Cela révèle au minimum une personnalité sacrément indépendante, un côté indomptable qui explique sans doute l’admiration de ses partisans…Ils ont l’impression que cet homme explosif ne se laissera impressionner par rien ni personne. Beaucoup des gens qui le connaissent affirment d’ailleurs que Donald Trump a plusieurs visages: le personnage public, flashy, égotiste, excessif, qui ne veut jamais avouer ses faiblesses parce qu’il doit «vendre» sa marchandise, perpétuer le mythe, et un personnage privé plus nuancé, plus modéré et plus pragmatique, qui sait écouter les autres et ne choisit pas toujours l’option la plus extrême…Toute la difficulté et tout le mystère, pour l’observateur est de s’y retrouver entre ces différents Trump. C’est loin d’être facile, surtout dans le contexte de quasi hystérie qui règne dans l’élite médiatique et politique américaine, tout entière liguée contre lui. Il est parfois très difficile de discerner ce qui relève de l’analyse pertinente ou de la posture de combat anti-Trump. (…) à de rares exceptions près, les commentateurs n’ont pas vu venir le phénomène Trump, parce qu’il était «en dehors des clous», impensable selon leurs propres «grilles de lecture». Trop scandaleux et trop extrême, pensaient-ils. Il a fait exploser tant de codes en attaquant ses adversaires au dessous de la ceinture et s’emparant de sujets largement tabous, qu’ils ont cru que «le grossier personnage» ne durerait pas! Ils se sont dit que quelqu’un qui se contredisait autant ou disait autant de contre vérités, finirait par en subir les conséquences. Bref, ils ont vu en lui soit un clown soit un fasciste – sans réaliser que toutes les inexactitudes ou dérapages de Trump lui seraient pardonnés comme autant de péchés véniels, parce qu’il ose dire haut et fort ce que son électorat considère comme une vérité fondamentale: à savoir que l’Amérique doit faire respecter ses frontières parce qu’un pays sans frontières n’est plus un pays. Plus profondément, je pense que les élites des deux côtes ont raté le phénomène Trump (et le phénomène Sanders), parce qu’elles sont de plus en plus coupées du peuple et de ses préoccupations, qu’elles vivent entre elles, se cooptent entre elles, s’enrichissent entre elles, et défendent une version «du progrès» très post-moderne, détachée des préoccupations de nombreux Américains. Soyons clairs, si Trump est à bien des égards exaspérant et inquiétant, il y a néanmoins quelque chose de pourri et d’endogame dans le royaume de Washington. Le peuple se sent hors jeu. (…) Ce statut de milliardaire du peuple est crédible parce qu’il ne s’est jamais senti membre de l’élite bien née, dont il aime se moquer en la taxant «d’élite du sperme chanceux». Cette dernière ne l’a d’ailleurs jamais vraiment accepté, lui le parvenu de Queens, venu de la banlieue, qui aime tout ce qui brille. Il ne faut pas oublier en revanche que Donald a grandi sur les chantiers de construction, où il accompagnait son père déjà tout petit, ce qui l’a mis au contact des classes populaires. Il parle exactement comme eux! Quand je me promenais à travers l’Amérique à la rencontre de ses électeurs, c’est toujours ce dont ils s’étonnaient. Ils disaient: «Donald parle comme nous, pense comme nous, est comme nous». Le fait qu’il soit riche, n’est pas un obstacle parce qu’on est en Amérique, pas en France. Les Américains aiment la richesse et le succès. (…) L’un des atouts de Trump, pour ses partisans, c’est qu’il est politiquement incorrect dans un pays qui l’est devenu à l’excès. Sur l’islam radical (qu’Obama ne voulait même pas nommer comme une menace!), sur les maux de l’immigration illégale et maints autres sujets. Ses fans se disent notamment exaspérés par le tour pris par certains débats, comme celui sur les toilettes «neutres» que l’administration actuelle veut établir au nom du droit des «personnes au genre fluide» à «ne pas être offensés». Ils apprécient que Donald veuille rétablir l’expression de Joyeux Noël, de plus en plus bannie au profit de l’expression Joyeuses fêtes, au motif qu’il ne faut pas risquer de blesser certaines minorités religieuses non chrétiennes…Ils se demandent pourquoi les salles de classe des universités, lieu où la liberté d’expression est supposée sacro-sainte, sont désormais surveillées par une «police de la pensée» étudiante orwellienne, prête à demander des comptes aux professeurs chaque fois qu’un élève s’estime «offensé» dans son identité…Les fans de Trump sont exaspérés d’avoir vu le nom du club de football américain «Red Skins» soudainement banni du vocabulaire de plusieurs journaux, dont le Washington Post, (et remplacé par le mot R…avec trois points de suspension), au motif que certaines tribus indiennes jugeaient l’appellation raciste et insultante. (Le débat, qui avait mobilisé le Congrès, et l’administration Obama, a finalement été enterré après de longs mois, quand une enquête a révélé que l’écrasante majorité des tribus indiennes aimait finalement ce nom…). Dans ce contexte, Trump a été jugé«rafraîchissant» par ses soutiens, presque libérateur. (…) Pour moi, le phénomène Trump est la rencontre d’un homme hors normes et d’un mouvement de rébellion populaire profond, qui dépasse de loin sa propre personne. C’est une lame de fond, anti globalisation et anti immigration illégale, qui traverse en réalité tout l’Occident. Trump surfe sur la même vague que les politiques britanniques qui ont soutenu le Brexit, ou que Marine Le Pen en France. La différence, c’est que Trump est une version américaine du phénomène, avec tout ce que cela implique de pragmatisme et d’attachement au capitalisme. (…) Trump n’est pas un idéologue. Il a longtemps été démocrate avant d’être républicain et il transgresse les frontières politiques classiques des partis. Favorable à une forme de protectionnisme et une remise en cause des accords de commerce qui sont défavorables à son pays, il est à gauche sur les questions de libre échange, mais aussi sur la protection sociale des plus pauvres, qu’il veut renforcer, et sur les questions de société, sur lesquelles il affiche une vision libérale de New Yorkais, certainement pas un credo conservateur clair. De ce point de vue là, il est post reaganien. Mais Donald Trump est clairement à droite sur la question de l’immigration illégale et des frontières, et celle des impôts. Au fond, c’est à la fois un marchand et un nationaliste, qui se voit comme un pragmatique, dont le but sera de faire «des bons deals» pour son pays. Il n’est pas là pour changer le monde, contrairement à Obama. Ce qu’il veut, c’est remettre l’Amérique au premier plan, la protéger. Son instinct de politique étrangère est clairement du côté des réalistes et des prudents, car Trump juge que les Etats-Unis se sont laissé entrainer dans des aventures qui les ont affaiblis et n’ont pas réglé les crises. Il ne veut plus d’une Amérique jouant les gendarmes du monde. Mais vu sa tendance aux volte face et vu ce qu’il dit sur le rôle que devrait jouer l’Amérique pour venir à bout de la menace de l’islam radical, comme elle l’a fait avec le nazisme et le communisme, Donald Trump pourrait fort bien changer d’avis, et revenir à un credo plus interventionniste avec le temps. Ses instincts sont au repli, mais il reste largement imprévisible. (…) De nombreuses questions se posent sur son caractère, ses foucades, son narcissisme et sa capacité à se contrôler, si importante chez le président de la première puissance du monde! Je ne suis pas pour autant convaincue par l’image de «Hitler», fasciste et raciste, qui lui a été accolée par la presse américaine. Hitler avait écrit Mein Kamp. Donald Trump, lui, a écrit «L ‘art du deal» et avait envisagé juste après la publication de ce premier livre, de se présenter à la présidence en prenant sur son ticket la vedette de télévision afro-américaine démocrate Oprah Winfrey, un élément qui ne colle pas avec l’image d’un raciste anti femmes! Ses enfants et nombre de ses collaborateurs affirment qu’il ne discrimine pas les gens en fonction de leur sexe ou de la couleur de leur peau, mais en fonction de leurs mérites, et que c’est pour cette même raison qu’il est capable de s’en prendre aux représentants du sexe faible ou des minorités avec une grande brutalité verbale, ne voyant pas la nécessité de prendre des gants. Les questions les plus lourdes concernant Trump, sont selon moi plutôt liées à la manière dont il réagirait, s’il ne parvenait pas à tenir ses promesses, une fois à la Maison-Blanche. Tout président américain est confronté à la complexité de l’exercice du pouvoir dans un système démocratique extrêmement contraignant. Cet homme d’affaires habitué à diriger un empire immobilier pyramidal, dont il est le seul maître à bord, tenterait-il de contourner le système pour arriver à ses fins et prouver au peuple qu’il est bien le meilleur, en agissant dans une zone grise, avec l’aide des personnages sulfureux qui l’ont accompagné dans ses affaires? Et comment se comporterait-il avec ses adversaires politiques ou les représentants de la presse, vu la brutalité et l’acharnement dont il fait preuve envers ceux qui se mettent sur sa route? Hériterait-on d’un Berlusconi ou d’un Nixon puissance 1000? Autre interrogation, vu la fascination qu’exerce sur lui le régime autoritaire de Vladimir Poutine: serait-il prêt à sacrifier le droit international et l’indépendance de certains alliés européens, pour trouver un accord avec le patron du Kremlin sur les sujets lui tenant à cœur, notamment en Syrie? Bref, pourrait-il accepter une forme de Yalta bis, et remettre en cause le rôle de l’Amérique dans la défense de l’ordre libéral et démocratique de l’Occident et du monde depuis 1945? Autant de questions cruciales auxquelles Donald Trump a pour l’instant répondu avec plus de désinvolture que de clarté. Laure Mandeville
Après les référendums de 2005 (France et Pays-Bas) et le Brexit (2016), voici une nouvelle surprise avec l’élection de Donald Trump par une franche majorité d’Américains. À chaque fois, le suffrage universel a eu raison des médias, des sondeurs et de leurs commanditaires. On peut au moins se réjouir de cette vitalité démocratique. (…) C’est en partie en raison du libre-échange et du primat de la finance que les électeurs américains ont voté pour Donald Trump : il a su capter leur colère sourde, tout comme d’ailleurs le candidat démocrate Bernie Sanders, rival malheureux d’Hillary Clinton.  L’autre motif qui a conduit à la victoire de Trump et à l’élimination de Sanders tient à l’exaspération d’une majorité de citoyens face aux tromperies de l’utopie « multiculturaliste » et de la société « ouverte ». À preuve le vote de l’Iowa en faveur de Donald Trump : dans cet État plutôt prospère, avec un faible taux de chômage, c’est évidemment l’enjeu multiculturaliste qui a fait basculer les électeurs. En effet, l’élection en 2008 d’un président noir (pas un Afro-Américain mais un métis, fils d’une blanche du Kansas et d’un Kényan) n’a pas empêché le retour à de nouvelles formes de ségrégation raciale. C’est ainsi que la candidate démocrate Hillary Clinton a tenté de jouer la carte « racialiste » en cajolant les électeurs afro-américains et latinos. Mais sans doute s’est-elle trompée dans son évaluation du vote latino : beaucoup d’Étasuniens latino-américains aspirent à leur intégration dans la classe moyenne et ne se sentent guère solidaires des Afro-Américains. Le même phénomène s’observe en Europe de l’Ouest, sous l’effet d’un emballement migratoire sans précédent dans l’Histoire. Les nouveaux arrivants font bloc avec leur « communauté » dans les quartiers et les écoles : Africains de la zone équatoriale, Sahéliens, Maghrébins, Turcs, Orientaux, Chinois etc. Il compromettent ce faisant l’intégration des immigrants plus anciennement installés. À quoi les classes dirigeantes répondent par des propos hors-contexte sur le « vivre-ensemble » et l’occultation de la mémoire. La chancelière Angela Merkel et même le pape François ont perçu les dangers de cette politique dans leurs dernières déclarations, en novembre 2016. Quant aux élus français, qui ont abandonné leur souveraineté à Bruxelles et Berlin et se tiennent désormais à la remorque des puissants, ils feraient bien de prendre à leur tour la mesure de l’exaspération populaire face au néolibéralisme financier, au multiculturalisme et à l’emballement migratoire. Ils se doivent de nommer et analyser ces phénomènes sans faux-semblants, et de préconiser des solutions respectueuses de la démocratie. Hérodote
Make no mistake about it: this election is Barack Obama’s legacy. He pushed hard for Hillary Clinton in the end because he understood that as such. And it was all for naught. No celebrity, no sports star, and no current president with a strong approval rating was enough to drag Hillary Clinton over the finish line. (…) Last night Jamelle Bouie and Van Jones voiced something I expect we will hear from many of Obama’s firmest supporters in the coming weeks – the idea that Trump represents a “whitelash” against eight years of Obama. But this dramatically oversimplifies the case, particularly if as it seems at the moment Trump won more minority votes than Mitt Romney in 2012. In fact, as Nate Cohn notes, Clinton failed in areas of the country where Obama’s support had been strongest among white Americans.   She failed to keep pace with Obama in the Rust Belt states that he won repeatedly. Her vaunted GOTV machine failed to attract the votes of young people, of union members, and of minorities to the degree necessary to win. And meanwhile, Trump’s utter lack of a campaign was more than made up for by the emotional dedication of his supporters. This was about more than just race – it was a sustained rejection of the country’s ruling class. But expect the media to try to make it about two things: race, and about Hillary Clinton’s lousy campaign. (…) The majority of political reporters never seemed to get outside their bubble. They spoke to anti-Trump conservatives, and printed anti-Trump views from conservatives, but rarely would even publish the sorts of views I and others have been sounding for months about the real and rational gripes of Trump voters. Many in the media preferred the caricature to the real thing. If you are a member of the media who does not know anyone who was pro-Trump, who has no Trump voters among your family or friends, realize how thick your bubble is. Change this. Don’t stick to the old sources, who clearly didn’t know what was going on – add new ones, who offer the perspective from the ground. (…) What is clear is this: Donald Trump is the man Americans have chosen as their vehicle for the dramatic change they demand from Washington. They have utterly rejected the change offered in the eight year Barack Obama agenda as wholly insufficient. And they have given Trump the rare gift of a united government in order to make those changes happen. They have tossed aside the assumptions of an elite class of gatekeepers and commentators whose opinions they disrespect and disavow. And they have sent a message to Washington that nothing less than wholesale change will satisfy them, including a change in the fundamental character of the commander in chief. Ben Domenech
Since the 1960s, when America finally became fully accountable for its past, deference toward all groups with any claim to past or present victimization became mandatory. The Great Society and the War on Poverty were some of the first truly deferential policies. Since then deference has become an almost universal marker of simple human decency that asserts one’s innocence of the American past. (…)  Since the ’60s the Democratic Party, and liberalism generally, have thrived on the power of deference. When Hillary Clinton speaks of a “basket of deplorables,“ she follows with a basket of isms and phobias—racism, sexism, homophobia, xenophobia and Islamaphobia. Each ism and phobia is an opportunity for her to show deference toward a victimized group and to cast herself as America’s redeemer. And, by implication, conservatism is bereft of deference. (…) And they have been fairly successful in this so that many conservatives are at least a little embarrassed to “come out” as it were. Conservatism is an insurgent point of view, while liberalism is mainstream. And this is oppressive for conservatives because it puts them in the position of being a bit embarrassed by who they really are and what they really believe. Deference has been codified in American life as political correctness. And political correctness functions like a despotic regime. It is an oppressiveness that spreads its edicts further and further into the crevices of everyday life. We resent it, yet for the most part we at least tolerate its demands. (…) And into all this steps Mr. Trump, a fundamentally limited man but a man with overwhelming charisma, a man impossible to ignore. The moment he entered the presidential contest America’s long simmering culture war rose to full boil. Mr. Trump was a non-deferential candidate. He seemed at odds with every code of decency. He invoked every possible stigma, and screechingly argued against them all. He did much of the dirty work that millions of Americans wanted to do but lacked the platform to do. Thus Mr. Trump’s extraordinary charisma has been far more about what he represents than what he might actually do as the president. He stands to alter the culture of deference itself. After all, the problem with deference is that it is never more than superficial. We are polite. We don’t offend. But we don’t ever transform people either. Out of deference we refuse to ask those we seek to help to be primarily responsible for their own advancement. Yet only this level of responsibility transforms people, no matter past or even present injustice. Some 3,000 shootings in Chicago this year alone is the result of deference camouflaging a lapse of personal responsibility with empty claims of systemic racism. As a society we are so captive to our historical shame that we thoughtlessly rush to deference simply to relieve the pressure. And yet every deferential gesture—the war on poverty, affirmative action, ObamaCare, every kind of “diversity” scheme—only weakens those who still suffer the legacy of our shameful history. Deference is now the great enemy of those toward whom it gushes compassion. Societies, like individuals, have intuitions. Donald Trump is an intuition. At least on the level of symbol, maybe he would push back against the hegemony of deference—if not as a liberator then possibly as a reformer. Possibly he could lift the word responsibility out of its somnambulant stigmatization as a judgmental and bigoted request to make of people. This, added to a fundamental respect for the capacity of people to lift themselves up, could go a long way toward a fairer and better America. Shelby Steele
For the past six months, one big question has loomed over the 2016 election: Is the candidacy of Donald J. Trump an amusing bit of reality TV or a terrifying and dangerous challenge to the country’s political system? At first, Trump’s popularity was easy to dismiss. It was nothing more than a phase, the result of Trump’s celebrity status and his talent for provocation. His antics made it hard to look away, but it was easy to convince yourself that Trump mania would never lead to anything serious, like the Republican nomination. It was especially easy to come to that conclusion if you were reading FiveThirtyEight, the statistics-driven news website founded by Nate Silver. Since the beginning of Trump’s campaign last June, the election guru and his colleagues have been consistently bearish on Trump’s chances. Silver, who made his name by using cold hard math to call 49 out of 50 states in the 2008 general election and all 50 in 2012, has served as a reassuring voice in the midst of Trump’s shocking rise. For those of us who didn’t want to believe we lived in a country where Donald Trump could be president, Silver’s steady, level-headed certainty felt just as soothing as his unwavering confidence in Barack Obama’s triumph over Mitt Romney four years ago. What exactly has Silver been saying? In September, he told CNN’s Anderson Cooper that Trump had a roughly 5-percent chance of beating his GOP rivals. In November, he explained that Trump’s national following was about as negligible as the share of Americans who believe the Apollo moon landing was faked. On Twitter, he compared Trump to the band Nickelback, which he described as being “[d]isliked by most, super popular with a few.” In a post titled “Why Donald Trump Isn’t A Real Candidate, In One Chart,” Silver’s colleague Harry Enten wrote that Trump had a better chance of “playing in the NBA Finals” than winning the Republican nomination. Multiple times over the past six months, Silver has reminded his readers that four years ago, daffy fly-by-nighters like Herman Cain and Michele Bachmann led the GOP field at various points. Trump’s poll numbers, he wrote, would drop just like theirs had. In one August post, “Donald Trump’s Six Stages of Doom,” Silver actually laid out a schedule for the candidate’s inevitable collapse. (…) It’s clear, now, that Silver and his fellow analysts at FiveThirtyEight underestimated Trump. Silver himself recently admitted as much, writing in a blog post published last week that he’d been too skeptical about Trump’s chances.  (…)  Maybe, like many people who have watched Trump’s rise with increasing horror, Silver latched onto a narrative that justified rejecting the Apprentice star’s achievements, identifying them as symptoms of a media bubble rather than a reflection of real popular sentiment. If that’s the case, Silver turns out to have a good bit in common with the pundits that he and his unemotional, numbers-driven worldview were supposed to render obsolete. Faced with uncertainty, Silver chose to go all in on an outcome that felt right, one that meshed with his preexisting beliefs about how the world is supposed to work. (…)Missing the significance of Trumpism is a different kind of failure than, say, calling the 2012 election for Mitt Romney. It also might be a more damning one. Botching your general election forecast by a couple of percentage points suggests a flawed mathematical formula. Actively denying the reality of Trump’s success suggests Silver may never have been capable of explaining the world in a way so many believed he could in 2008 and 2012, when he was telling them how likely it was that Obama would become, and remain, the president. Leon Neyfakh (Jan. 2016)
Mr Silver predicted, with an absurdly precise 71.4% chance, that Mrs Clinton would take 302 electoral votes and beat Mr Trump by 3.6% in the popular vote. He was wildly incorrect. (As of the writing of this article, Mr Trump will win 306 electoral votes but will lose the popular vote by merely 0.2%.) Even worse, Mr Silver got several key states wrong: He predicted that Clinton would win Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, and Florida. In reality, Trump swept all of them. Alex Berezow
It was a big polling miss in the worst possible race. On the eve of America’s presidential election, national surveys gave Hillary Clinton a lead of around four percentage points, which betting markets and statistical models translated into a probability of victory ranging from 70% to 99%. That wound up misfiring modestly: according to the forecast from New York Times’s Upshot, Mrs Clinton is still likely to win the popular vote, by more than a full percentage point. But at the state level, the errors were extreme. The polling average in Wisconsin gave her a lead of more than five points; she is expected to lose it by two and a half. It gave Mr Trump a relatively narrow two-point edge in Ohio; he ran away with the state by more than eight. He trailed in Michigan and Pennsylvania by four, and looks likely to take both by about a point. How did it all go wrong? Every survey result is made up of a combination of two variables: the demographic composition of the electorate, and how each group is expected to vote. Because some groups—say, young Hispanic men—are far less likely to respond than others (old white women, for example), pollsters typically weight the answers they receive to match their projections of what the electorate will look like. Polling errors can stem either from getting an unrepresentative sample of respondents within each group, or from incorrectly predicting how many of each type of voter will show up. The electoral map leaves no doubt as to how Mr Trump won. In states where white voters tend to be well-educated, such as Colorado and Virginia, the polls pegged the final results perfectly. Conversely, in northern states that have lots of whites without a college degree, Mr Trump blew his polls away—including ones he is still expected to lose, but by a far smaller margin than expected, such as Minnesota. The simplest explanation for this would be that these voters preferred him by an even larger margin than pollsters foresaw—the so-called “shy Trump” phenomenon, in which people might be wary of admitting they supported him. Pre-election polls gave little evidence for this phenomenon: they showed him with a massive 30-point lead among this group. But remarkably, even that figure wound up understating Mr Trump’s appeal to them: the national exit poll put him 39 points ahead. Given that such voters make up 58% of the eligible population in Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio and Pennsylvania—though a smaller share of those who actually turn out—this nine-point miss among them accounts for a large chunk of the overall error. It is also likely that less-educated whites, who historically have had a low propensity to vote, turned out in greater numbers than pollsters predicted. The Economist
Election polling is harder than other forms of survey research, because you must assess two things at once. Not only do you have to find out who people say they will support, you also have to estimate their likelihood of actually turning up to vote. So Trump may have been right in claiming that he’d created a new movement of people who had previously shunned political engagement. If so, pollsters who relied on prior voting behavior to predict who would turn out this time would have systematically underestimated Trump’s support. Problems with likely voter modeling could also mean that the pollsters overestimated the extent to which the “Obama coalition” of black, Latino, and younger voters would turn out for Clinton.(…) “Shy Trumpers,” who were embarrassed to admit their support for the GOP candidate, quietly delivered their verdict in the polling booths. This theory first emerged in the run-up to the Republican primaries, as pollsters noticed that Trump was doing better in online polls than in those conducted over the phone. The idea was that some of Trump’s supporters were embarrassed to admit their choice to a real person. The idea gained traction when a polling experiment run last December by Morning Consult seemed to confirm that the effect was real. In the match-up against Clinton, however, Trump’s advantage in online polls mostly evaporated. And when Morning Consult ran a poll with Politico in late October to specifically probe for the effect, it seemed to operate only among college-educated voters. “Overall, it didn’t look like it massively shifted the race,” Morning Consult’s Cartwright said. (…) Trump’s anti-establishment supporters believed the polls were rigged, and so they refused to answer the phone or respond to online surveys. For pollsters, this is a much darker possibility. The idea that the polls were rigged became a popular refrain among Trump’s supporters. So maybe these people simply refused to participate in polls, either on the phone or online. If so, all of the pollsters may have been systematically blind to many of the disaffected, mostly white voters who drove Trump to victory, especially in the Rust Belt states of the Midwest. “People who don’t like the government often perceive the polls as being part of the government,” said Johnson of the University of Illinois, who believes this is the most plausible explanation for the pollsters’ miss. BuzzFeed
L’effet Bradley (en anglais Bradley effect) (…) est le nom donné aux États-Unis au décalage souvent observé entre les sondages électoraux et les résultats des élections américaines quand un candidat blanc est opposé à un candidat non blanc (noir, hispanique, latino, asiatique ou océanien). Le nom du phénomène vient de Tom Bradley, un Afro-Américain qui perdit l’élection de 1982 au poste de gouverneur de Californie, à la surprise générale, alors qu’il était largement en tête dans tous les sondages. L’effet Bradley reflète une tendance de la part des votants, noirs aussi bien que blancs, à dire aux sondeurs qu’ils sont indécis ou qu’ils vont probablement voter pour le candidat noir ou issu de la minorité ethnique mais qui, le jour de l’élection, votent pour son opposant blanc. Une des théories pour expliquer l’effet Bradley est que certains électeurs donnent une réponse fausse lors des sondages, de peur qu’en déclarant leur réelle préférence, ils ne prêtent le flanc à la critique d’une motivation raciale de leur vote. Cet effet est similaire à celui d’une personne refusant de discuter de son choix électoral. Si la personne déclare qu’elle est indécise, elle peut ainsi éviter d’être forcée à entrer dans une discussion politique avec une personne partisane. La réticence à donner une réponse exacte s’étend parfois jusqu’aux sondages dits de sortie de bureau de vote. La façon dont les sondeurs conduisent l’interview peut être un déterminant dans la réponse du sondé. Wikipedia
Silicon Valley these days is a very intolerant place for people who do not hold so called ‘socially liberal’ ideas. In Silicon Valley, because of the high prevalence of highly smart people, there is a general stereotype that voting Republican is for dummies. So many people see considering supporting Republican candidates, particularly Donald Trump, anathema to the whole Silicon Valley ethos that values smarts and merit. A couple of friends thought that me supporting Trump made me unworthy of being part of the Silicon Valley tribe and stopped talking to me. At the end of the day, we choose our politics the way we choose our lovers and our friends — not so much out a rational analysis, but based on impressions and our own personal backgrounds. My main reason for supporting Trump is that I basically agree with the notion that unless the trend is stopped, our country is going to hell … The Silicon Valley elite is highly hypocritical on this matter. One of the reasons, I assume, they don’t like Trump is because on this area, as in many others, he is calling a spade a spade. I believe Trump is right in this case. … supporting Trump only offers [an] upside. Electing Hillary Clinton would keep the status quo. If Trump wins, there’s a whole set of new possibilities that would emerge for the nation. Even if it remains socially liberal, it would be good for it if the president were to be a Republican so that the Valley could recover a little bit of its rebel spirit (that was the case during the Bush years for instance). I believe that the increased relevance in national politics of companies like Google (whose Chairman [Eric] Schmidt has been very cozy with the Obama administration) and Apple (at the center of several political disputes) has been bad for the Valley. A Trump presidency would allow the Valley to focus on what it does best: dreaming and building the technology of the future, leaving politics for DC types. Silicon valley software engineer
Many people are saying to maybe their friends while they’re having a sip of Chardonnay in Washington or Boston, ‘Oh, I would never vote for him, he’s so – not politically correct,’ or whatever, but then they’re going to go and vote for him. Because he’s saying things that they would like to say, but they’re not politically courageous enough to say it and I think that’s the real question in this election. Trump is kind of a combination of the gun referendum, because he’s an emotional energy source for people who want to make sure that they’re voicing their concerns about all these issues – immigration, et cetera – but then I think there’s this other piece. They don’t find it to be correct or acceptable to a lot of their friends, but when push comes to shove, they’re going to vote for him. Gregory Payne (Emerson College)
Donald Trump performs consistently better in online polling where a human being is not talking to another human being about what he or she may do in the election. It’s because it’s become socially desirable, if you’re a college educated person in the United States of America, to say that you’re against Donald Trump. Kellyanne Conway (Trump campaign manager)
They’ll go ahead and vote for that candidate in the privacy of a [voting] booth But they won’t admit to voting for that candidate to somebody who’s calling them for a poll. Joe Bafumi (Dartmouth College)
Trump’s advantage in online polls compared with live telephone polling is eight or nine percentage points among likely voters. Kyle A. Dropp
It’s easier to express potentially ‘unacceptable’ responses on a screen than it is to give them to a person. Kathy Frankovic
This may be due to social desirability bias — people are more willing to express support for this privately than when asked by someone else. Douglas Rivers
In a May 2015 report, Pew Research analyzed the differences between results derived from telephone polling and those from online Internet polling. Pew determined that the biggest differences in answers elicited via these two survey modes were on questions in which social desirability bias — that is, “the desire of respondents to avoid embarrassment and project a favorable image to others” — played a role. In a detailed analysis of phone versus online polling in Republican primaries, Kyle A. Dropp, the executive director of polling and data science at Morning Consult, writes: Trump’s advantage in online polls compared with live telephone polling is eight or nine percentage points among likely voters. This difference, Dropp notes, is driven largely by more educated voters — those who would be most concerned with “social desirability.” These findings suggest that Trump will head into the general election with support from voters who are reluctant to admit their preferences to a live person in a phone survey, but who may well be inclined to cast a ballot for Trump on Election Day. The NYT (May 2016)
Les analystes politiques, les sondeurs et les journalistes ont donné à penser que la victoire d’Hillary Clinton était assurée avant l’élection. En cela, c’est une surprise, car la sphère médiatique n’imaginait pas la victoire du candidat républicain. Elle a eu tort. Si elle avait su observer la société américaine et entendre son malaise, elle n’aurait jamais exclu la possibilité d’une élection de Trump. Pour cette raison, ce n’est pas une surprise. (…) Sans doute, ils ont rejeté Donald Trump car ils le trouvaient – et c’est le cas – démagogue, populiste et vulgaire. Je n’ai d’ailleurs jamais vu une élection américaine avec un tel parti pris médiatique. Même le très réputé hebdomadaire britannique « The Economist » a fait un clin d’oeil à Hillary Clinton. Je pense que la stigmatisation sans précédent de Donald Trump par les médias a favorisé chez les électeurs américains la dissimulation de leur intention de vote auprès des instituts de sondage. En clair, un certain nombre de votants n’a pas osé admettre qu’il soutenait le candidat américain. Ce phénomène est classique en politique. Souvenez du 21 avril 2002 et de la qualification surprise de Jean-Marie Le Pen, leader du Front national, au second tour de l’élection présidentielle française. (…) A travers l’élection de Trump, certains Américains ont exprimé leur colère. Une partie de l’Amérique ne trouve pas ses gains dans la globalisation. Cette Amérique-là ne parvient pas à retrouver son niveau de vie d’avant la crise des subprimes, elle a le sentiment d’être abandonnée. Ce sentiment était particulièrement perceptible chez les ouvriers, qui voient l’industrie s’effilocher. Ne se sentant pas assez considérés, ils ont davantage choisi Donald Trump qu’Hillary Clinton. (…) Cette formule [victoire du peuple américain contre l’establishment] est très exagérée. Oui, une partie des électeurs de Donald Trump ont voté contre Washington et ses élites. Oui, certains Américains souffrent d’un mépris de classe, en particulier dans l’Amérique profonde. Mais dire que le peuple s’est tourné vers Trump est inexact. Le candidat républicain et la candidate démocrate sont au coude à coude en termes de suffrages exprimés [à 15 heures, 47,5% pour Trump et 47,6% pour Clinton , NDLR]. Au passage, nous avons affaire à deux candidats richissimes. Si ma mémoire est bonne, Donald Trump, pseudo-candidat du peuple, n’est pas issu de la classe ouvrière… (…) L’arrivée au pouvoir de dirigeants populistes s’explique avant tout par des spécificités locales. Après, il y a des effets communs. De nouvelles puissances émergent. Les gens se sentent décentrés. Il y a une surabondance d’innovations technologiques et scientifiques. Une partie de la société se sent déclassée. L’immigration accélère les mécanismes de recomposition culturelle. Aux Etats-Unis, les Blancs anglo-saxons deviennent minoritaires. Ceci induit une réaction exprimée en votant pour un candidat populiste : Donald Trump. (…) Une chose est certaine : l’élection de Trump, mais aussi le Brexit, vont peser sur le langage et le lexique employés par une partie des prétendants à la présidentielle française. Des acteurs politiques, de droite comme de gauche, seront tentés de durcir leur discours. Mais ce climat chauffé à blanc devrait avant tout profiter à Marine Le Pen, la candidate du Front national. Personne ne fait mieux qu’elle dans ce registre. Dominique Reynié

Attention: un fiasco peut en cacher un autre !

Au lendemain de la victoire aussi reaganesque qu’inattendue du candidat républicain Donald Trump …

Et partant, à une ou deux exceptions près, d’un des plus grands fiascos de l’histoire sondagière

Comment, comme le rappelle le politologue Dominique Reynié, ne pas voir …

Derrière cette revanche des « clingers » et « deplorables » si longtemps méprisés par un establishment prêt pour se maintenir en place à tous les coups tordus  …

Et à l’instar du récent référendum du Brexit outre-manche comme de la qualification surprise du candidat frontiste au deuxième tour en France en 2002 …

La part du fameux effet Bradley

A  savoir la tendance de certains électeurs …

Face à la démonisation généralisée – véritable terrorisme intellectuel – de leurs candidats par les médias et l’opinion en général …

A la dissimulation de leur intention de vote auprès des instituts de sondage ?

Dominique Reynié : «L’élection de Trump n’est pas une surprise»

Kevin Badeau
Les Echos
09/11/2016

LE CERCLE/INTERVIEW – Pour Dominique Reynié, directeur général de la Fondapol, les médias n’ont pas su entendre le malaise de la population américaine.

Donald Trump a été élu Président des Etats-Unis, est-ce vraiment une surprise ?

Les analystes politiques, les sondeurs et les journalistes ont donné à penser que la victoire d’Hillary Clinton était assurée avant l’élection. En cela, c’est une surprise, car la sphère médiatique n’imaginait pas la victoire du candidat républicain. Elle a eu tort. Si elle avait su observer la société américaine et entendre son malaise, elle n’aurait jamais exclu la possibilité d’une élection de Trump. Pour cette raison, ce n’est pas une surprise.

Pourquoi les médias n’ont-ils rien vu venir ?

Sans doute, ils ont rejeté Donald Trump car ils le trouvaient – et c’est le cas – démagogue, populiste et vulgaire. Je n’ai d’ailleurs jamais vu une élection américaine avec un tel parti pris médiatique. Même le très réputé hebdomadaire britannique « The Economist » a fait un clin d’oeil à Hillary Clinton.

Je pense que la stigmatisation sans précédent de Donald Trump par les médias a favorisé chez les électeurs américains la dissimulation de leur intention de vote auprès des instituts de sondage. En clair, un certain nombre de votants n’a pas osé admettre qu’il soutenait le candidat américain. Ce phénomène est classique en politique. Souvenez du 21 avril 2002 et de la qualification surprise de Jean-Marie Le Pen, leader du Front national, au second tour de l’élection présidentielle française.

L’élection de Donald Trump traduit-elle le refus de la mondialisation par les Américains ?

A travers l’élection de Trump, certains Américains ont exprimé leur colère. Une partie de l’Amérique ne trouve pas ses gains dans la globalisation. Cette Amérique-là ne parvient pas à retrouver son niveau de vie d’avant la crise des subprimes, elle a le sentiment d’être abandonnée. Ce sentiment était particulièrement perceptible chez les ouvriers, qui voient l’industrie s’effilocher. Ne se sentant pas assez considérés, ils ont davantage choisi Donald Trump qu’Hillary Clinton.

Est-ce une victoire du peuple américain contre l’establishment, comme on l’entend parfois ?

Cette formule est très exagérée. Oui, une partie des électeurs de Donald Trump ont voté contre Washington et ses élites. Oui, certains Américains souffrent d’un mépris de classe, en particulier dans l’Amérique profonde. Mais dire que le peuple s’est tourné vers Trump est inexact. Le candidat républicain et la candidate démocrate sont au coude à coude en termes de suffrages exprimés [à 15 heures, 47,5% pour Trump et 47,6% pour Clinton , NDLR]. Au passage, nous avons affaire à deux candidats richissimes. Si ma mémoire est bonne, Donald Trump, pseudo-candidat du peuple, n’est pas issu de la classe ouvrière…

Victor Orban en Hongrie, Andrzej Duda en Pologne, Trump aux Etats-Unis, pourquoi une telle vague populiste dans le monde occidental ?

L’arrivée au pouvoir de dirigeants populistes s’explique avant tout par des spécificités locales. Après, il y a des effets communs. De nouvelles puissances émergent. Les gens se sentent décentrés. Il y a une surabondance d’innovations technologiques et scientifiques. Une partie de la société se sent déclassée. L’immigration accélère les mécanismes de recomposition culturelle. Aux Etats-Unis, les Blancs anglo-saxons deviennent minoritaires. Ceci induit une réaction exprimée en votant pour un candidat populiste : Donald Trump.

L’élection de Trump est-elle une excellente nouvelle pour Marine Le Pen ?

Une chose est certaine : l’élection de Trump, mais aussi le Brexit, vont peser sur le langage et le lexique employés par une partie des prétendants à la présidentielle française. Des acteurs politiques, de droite comme de gauche, seront tentés de durcir leur discours. Mais ce climat chauffé à blanc devrait avant tout profiter à Marine Le Pen, la candidate du Front national. Personne ne fait mieux qu’elle dans ce registre.
Propos recueillis par Kévin Badeau

Voir aussi:

Bill Berkovitz

Truthout

03 October 2016 

Just before Election Day in November 1982, according to most polls, Tom Bradley, the first African American mayor of Los Angeles, appeared poised to become governor of California. Despite leading in the polls, Bradley lost the election to Republican George Deukmejian. Instead of becoming the first African American governor of California, Bradley became the namesake of something called The Bradley Effect.

The Bradley Effect — also known as The Wilder Effect — proposed that voters that said they would vote for the African American candidate were either too embarrassed, or ashamed for fear of being labeled racist, to admit to pollsters that they wouldn’t vote for a Black man as Governor.

According to Ballotpedia, “A related concept is social desirability bias, which describes the tendency of individuals to ‘report inaccurately on sensitive topics in order to present themselves in the best possible light.’ According to New York University professor Patrick Egan, ‘Anyone who studies survey research will tell you one of the biggest problems we encounter is this notion of social desirability bias.’ Some researchers and pollsters theorize that a number of white voters may give inaccurate polling responses for fear that, by stating their true preference, they will open themselves to criticism of racial motivation.”

While most of the above appear to apply particularly to elections where African Americans are facing off again white candidates, this year’s presidential election may contain some of those same dynamics. Some pundits are claiming that a Bradley Effect-like situation might be in play with voters who support Donald Trump, but are un-willing to admit it to pollsters.

Ever since the Bradley-Wilson contest, the notion of a Bradley Effect has been raised fairly frequently. In this presidential race, it may be worth posing two countervailing questions: Are independent voters – not the hardcore who support Trump regardless of what he says or does – reluctant to admit they are going to vote for him, yet when they arrive at the polling places they will vote for him?

Or, might it be possible some voters that have declared support for Trump will, in the sanctity of the voting booth, vote for Hillary Clinton, thereby reflecting an inversion of The Bradley Effect?

In late August, Emerson College Professor Gregory Payne told Breitbart News that he sees the same Bradley Effect taking place amongst Trump voters. In 1982, Payne said: “People, when you’d ask them if they were going to vote, oftentimes they would say they were going to vote for Bradley or a Black candidate so they felt socially acceptable. Then when they went behind the curtain, they decided that they didn’t really want to vote for Bradley.”

“I think with Trump, what you have is you have the opposite,” Payne, who wrote speeches for Bradley and also wrote Tom Bradley: The Impossible Dream, said. “Many people are saying to maybe their friends while they’re having a sip of Chardonnay in Washington or Boston, ‘Oh, I would never vote for him, he’s so – not politically correct,’ or whatever, but then they’re going to go and vote for him. Because he’s saying things that they would like to say, but they’re not politically courageous enough to say it and I think that’s the real question in this election.”

“Trump is kind of a combination of the gun referendum, because he’s an emotional energy source for people who want to make sure that they’re voicing their concerns about all these issues – immigration, et cetera – but then I think there’s this other piece. They don’t find it to be correct or acceptable to a lot of their friends, but when push comes to shove, they’re going to vote for him.”

In May, The New York Times’ Thomas B. Edsall interviewed Kyle A. Dropp, the executive director of polling for Morning Consult: “Trump’s advantage in online polls compared with live telephone polling is eight or nine percentage points among likely voters. This difference, Dropp notes, is driven largely by more educated voters — those who would be most concerned with “social desirability.” These findings suggest that Trump will head into the general election with support from voters who are reluctant to admit their preferences to a live person in a phone survey, but who may well be inclined to cast a ballot for Trump on Election Day.”

Some of this might explain why after the first debate, Trump’s online unscientific poll numbers as to who won the debate far outpace his numbers done by accredited polling companies.

Trump campaign manager Kellyanne Conway has called Team Trump’s efforts the « Undercover Trump Voter » project. « Donald Trump performs consistently better in online polling where a human being is not talking to another human being about what he or she may do in the election. It’s because it’s become socially desirable, if you’re a college educated person in the United States of America, to say that you’re against Donald Trump. »

“They’ll go ahead and vote for that candidate in the privacy of a [voting] booth,” says Dartmouth College political science professor Joe Bafumi. “But they won’t admit to voting for that candidate to somebody who’s calling them for a poll.”

 Voir également:

Chris Keall

BNR

November 7, 2016

Is Donald Trump’s support being underestimated by pollsters?

Two factors indicate it’s possible.

1. The Brexit effect
UKIP leader Nigel Farage says lots of people who don’t usually vote will cast a ballot for Mr Trump, mirroring the so-called « Brexit effect » in the UK that caught pollsters off guard.

There’s a possibility this is happening. As I type, just over 40 million early votes have been cast [UPDATE: the final early voting tally was 47 million].

Early votes have been coming in at around 1.5 million to 2 million a day, so it would take quite a last-minute surge to beat the 46 million early votes in 2012 (of a total 128 million).

Yet in some key areas, earlier voting has been heavier. Exhibit A is that battleground-of-battlegrounds, Florida, where early voting closes today NZT (most states will keep early voting open).

Figures post this morning show 6.1 million early votes cast, compared to 4.7 million in 2012.

So the Brexit effect could be in play.

Against this, the Clinton campaign has a far larger get-out-the-vote field operation, and surveys indicate that Hispanic voters are turning out in greater numbers than 2012 — unlikely to be a positive for Mr Trump.

And in key swings states, including Nevada, registered Democrat turnout is up over 2012. But the lingering question is: Are they staying loyal? How many white working class supporters are crossing over, a la the blue-collar « Reagan Democrats » in 1984?

2. The Bradley effect
In the 1982 race for Governor of California, black candidate Tom Bradley (a Democrat), enjoyed a lead in the polls but lost to white Republican George Deukmejian.

Poll historians call this the « Bradley effect. » Some people lied and told pollsters they would support Mr Bradley because they did not want to appear racist.

Variations on this theme include the « Shy Tory » effect in the UK in 1992 when some people were too sheepish to tell pollsters they would vote for the Conservative Party as led by the unfashionable John Major (his party was behind in the polls, but won). And the « Wilder » effect 1989, where polls showed Democrat candidate Douglas Wilder comfortably on track to become Virgina’s first black governor — but ultimately he only won his race against his white Republican rival by a razor-thin margin.

Are some Trump supporters also too sheepish to declare their support?

This cycle, due to the spiralling cost of trying to reach people by live phone as due to so many ditching landlines, around half the polls are online (with online panels weighted to match census data).

Pundits say voters are more likely to express their true preference with an online form rather than when they talk to a human pollster.

Morning Consult, which has been conducting a tracking poll for Politico, decided to test the « Shy Trump voter » hypothesis by conducting phone and online interviews with a sample of 2075 likely voters (read its full report here).

The test found there is a « social desirability » effect, which is quite marked among higher income and college educated voters (blue = Clinton, red = Trump).

But once voters across the board are factored in, the « Shy Trump voter » effect is a lot smaller; around 2%:

Politico deems that 2% too small to influence the race … but bear in mind we’re now talking about a race where Clinton has a margin of two points or under according to the latest poll-of-poll surveys.

Some real-life evidence runs against it. Some online surveys, such as that conducted by IPSOS/Reuters, which has Clinton in the lead by four points as of this morning, are actually more bullish for the Democrat that some live phone surveys, such as the one conducted by the Trump-friendly Fox News, which as of today actually shows a tighter race with more people avowing support for Trump to put him within 2 points of the lead.

You could also argue for some degree of a « Shy Clinton supporter » effect, given the Democrat’s flat campaign and various baggage.

But overall, the 2% « Shy Trumper » effect vs a 2% Clinton lead, and a possible « Brexit » effect boosting Trump’s vote mean this election is too close to call.

The Democrat’s best hope remains that the race comes down to the state-by-state electoral college vote, where she maintains a narrow lead in a couple of key battlegrounds that make it tricky for Trump to get to the magic 270 needed to take the Whitehouse (Politico has a good summary here). But even in her so-called « firewall » states, Clinton’s lead is still close to the margin of error.

Nigel Farage might be deeply unloveable, but his Brexit poll theory proved correct — unlike polling guru Nate Silver at FiveThirtyEight, who called it wrong.

The Trump Effect

Is Trump down in polls because voters are too embarrassed to admit they are voting for him?

Joseph P. Williams

US News & world report

July 1, 2016

During the Republican presidential primaries, Donald Trump frequently bragged about polls showing him leading the pack of GOP contenders, declaring himself the people’s choice. Now that his poll numbers have plunged since he locked up the nomination, Trump insists voters are still with him: a silent majority too embarrassed to tell it to the pollsters.

« People say ‘I’m not going to say who I’m voting for' » when pollsters call, Trump said, in his signature broken syntax, at a rally earlier this month. « Don’t be embarrassed, I’m not going to say who I’m voting for and then they get it and I do much better. It’s, like, an amazing effect. »

Call it the Trump Effect: the notion that voters won’t admit they support him, because it’s distasteful to back a populist celebrity billionaire who’s unafraid to offend immigrants, women and minorities. There’s some evidence to support the theory, including a recent analysis that shows Trump’s support increases by about six points in online surveys, compared with surveys conducted over the phone.

Coupled with recent face-plants by pollsters at home and abroad – including erroneous numbers on President Barack Obama’s re-election, the Scottish independence referendum and the United Kingdom’s Brexit vote – polling skeptics and Trump supporters have room to embrace the theory.

« What happens is the elites, the establishment all pile on. The average citizen will not tell pollsters the truth, » Newt Gingrich, a Trump surrogate, said Tuesday morning on Fox News. « You get much better results for Trump for example in a computerized online poll than a telephone poll because people don’t want to tell the pollster something they think is not socially acceptable. »

While not dismissing the possibility outright, however, political analysts doubt that Trump, running about five points behind presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton in polling averages, is poised to surge past her on the strength of voters too embarrassed to say they support him.

« Intuitively, it makes a lot of sense, » says William Galston, a senior fellow and political analyst at the Brookings Institution. Trump, he said, could be supported by « people who are not as bold as Donald Trump to say in public what [others think] is politically incorrect. It might make them more reticent » to admit they’re on his side.

Still, « as is the case with many other things, it’s possible. But I know of no evidence that directly supports it, » Galston says. « The evidence I’ve reviewed is far from enough to move the possible to the probable. I’m not there yet. »

Geoffrey Skelley, a political analyst at the University of Virginia’s Center for Politics, concurs, dismissing the possibility of « social desirability bias » skewing the numbers against the GOP’s presidential nominee.

« Trump is claiming it to be the case, but there’s really no evidence for it, » he says.

The phenomenon of voters telling pollsters what they think they want to hear, however, actually has a name: the Bradley Effect, a well-studied political phenomenon.

In 1982, poll after poll showed Tom Bradley, Los Angeles’ first black mayor and a Democrat, with a solid lead over George Deukmejian, a white Republican, in the California gubernatorial race. Instead, Bradley narrowly lost to Deukmejian, a stunning upset that led experts to wonder how the polls got it wrong.

Pollsters, and some political scientists, later concluded that voters didn’t want to say they were voting against Bradley, who would have been the nation’s first popularly-elected African-American governor, because they didn’t want to appear to be racist.

Trump has begun to allude to Bradley at rallies and in interviews (« He was supposed to win by 10 points, and he lost by 5 or something, » Trump said) – and he says polls improperly include too many Democrats and are conducted by news outlets that are biased against him.

In December, a Morning Consult poll examined whether Trump supporters were more likely to say they supported him in online polls than in polls conducted by live questioners. Their finding was surprising: « Trump performs about six percentage points better online than via live telephone interviewing, » according to the study.

At the same time, « his advantage online is driven by adults with higher levels of education, » the study says, countering data showing Trump’s bedrock support comes from voters without college degrees. « Importantly, the differences between online and live telephone [surveys] persist even when examining only highly engaged, likely voters. »

But Galston says while the study examines « a legitimate question, » the methodology is unclear, and « it’s really important to compare apples to apples. You need to be sure that the online community has the same demographic profile » as phone polling.

« It may also be the case that people who are online and willing to participate in that study are already, in effect, a self-selected sample » of pro-Trump voters, Galston says.

Nevertheless, « what prompts the question is obvious: We’ve probably never had a political candidate quite like Donald Trump, » Galston says. « An unusual candidate is likely to spark lots and lots of unusual questions. The American people, at least in my lifetime, have never been presented with such a choice. »

« It’s logically possible for a reverse Bradley Effect to be happening, » he says, « but that doesn’t mean that it is happening. »

Skelly says math and logic also work against Trump’s claim of a reverse Bradley Effect.

« In a fair number of the early states and caucuses, Trump underperformed his poll numbers. Not until Wisconsin did he start routinely outperforming them, » Skelley says. « Also, kind of anecdotally, have you met a Trump supporter who isn’t vocally for Trump? Every Trump supporter I’ve talked to is happy to tell me they’re a Trump supporter. »

Still, if more reticent ones are engaging in social desirability, the poll numbers probably wouldn’t move enough to have a dramatic impact on Trump’s race with Clinton if they come out of the closet on Election Day, Skelley says.

« I guess if there were something to this it would have to be at the margins, » he says. « Studies have shown Obama’s race may have cost him a couple of points, but nothing compared to what happened to Tom Bradley in that race. Trump may lose a couple of points, if it were actually a thing. But I can’t imagine it would be very substantial. »

Although the U.S. Census « almost always finds more people who say they voted than actually voted, » Skelley says, « I think when it comes to asking people who they’re planning to vote for, in this day and age, I don’t think those type of people who will respond if asked. »

Ultimately, Trump’s claim « is more of a way to try to explain poor polling numbers. Trump is losing at the moment and he’s trying to explain it off, » Skelley says. « This doesn’t really hold up under scrutiny. »

‘Lots of contempt’: What it’s like to be a secret Trump fan in Silicon Valley
Biz Carson
Business Insider
Jul. 15, 2016

Jake is like many people working in Silicon Valley.

The software engineer works for a big tech company, went to a top-tier university, and loves doing innovative work.

But one thing makes him very different: He supports Donald Trump.

In Silicon Valley — which prides itself on open-mindedness, a system of meritocracy, and a thirst for innovation — Jake’s support of Trump is more than just outside the mainstream. It’s a dangerous liability.

Since he’s told people of his support, friends who he thought were close have stopped talking to him. His coworkers shirk the subject. What used to be personal relationships at work are now only professional conversations, he says.

Now Jake tries to keep his Trump support a secret. Despite supporting the candidate both financially and in person, Jake believes his entire career could be at risk if his name were publicly linked to Trump. Business Insider agreed to interview him over email on conditions of anonymity and that we change his first name in the story.

Jake points often to Brendan Eich, a millionaire and creator of the Mozilla browser, who had to step down after his financial support of Prop 8, a California measure aimed at blocking same-sex marriage, came to light a couple of years ago. And unlike Eich, Jake says he doesn’t have the millions or the untouchable public stature of Peter Thiel to be out as a Trump supporter.

The sense of risk was driven home on Thursday, when 140 Silicon Valley bigwigs, including Apple cofounder Steve Wozniak and « Shark Tank » judge Chris Sacca, came together to decry Trump in an open letter. Y Combinator President Sam Altman has compared Trump to Hitler.

« Silicon Valley these days is a very intolerant place for people who do not hold so called ‘socially liberal’ ideas, » Jake says.

The experience of the former Mozilla creator is « exhibit A of the lack of tolerance in Silicon Valley for certain ideas, ideas which [by the way] were mainstream in American society until very recently or that, in fact, ideas that continue to be divisive today, » Jake says.

No one knows how many other « Jake »s are in Silicon Valley. But his existence there shows the power of Trump’s appeal in some of the most unlikely places.

Bloomberg called a Trump supporter in tech’s cradle « rarer than unicorns » — although in Santa Clara County, home to the likes of Google and Apple, 49,771 people voted for him in the primary. Like Jake, there are others who opt for secrecy and silence over the potential repercussions.

Here is the story of one Trump supporter’s existence in Silicon Valley’s politically hostile environment.

Unworthy of the tech tribe

Jake didn’t say much at first when his colleagues at work would make jokes about Trump — after all, he initially thought Trump’s campaign was a joke. His first donation was meant as a « middle finger » to the Washington establishment.

Eventually, though, he began to see Trump as a serious candidate, and he soon revealed to his team that he was in Trump’s camp. His colleagues « couldn’t believe it, » and he said there was « lots of contempt, even from people who are right of center. »

« In Silicon Valley, because of the high prevalence of highly smart people, there is a general stereotype that voting Republican is for dummies, » he says. « So many people see considering supporting Republican candidates, particularly Donald Trump, anathema to the whole Silicon Valley ethos that values smarts and merit. »

He’s talked about his positions more with coworkers and feels as if he’s earned respect back from some, although no one has come to team Trump with him. But the collegial work atmosphere is now tense and stilted.

« The relationship with those who were more upset is different. Now it is strictly professional, whereas before we talked more about personal stuff, » he says.

Peter Thiel, a Silicon Valley billionaire who cofounded PayPal, is a delegate for Trump and speaking at the Republican National Convention. Tristan Fewings/Getty Images

Some of his friends have demonized him and stopped talking to him entirely.

« A couple of friends thought that me supporting Trump made me unworthy of being part of the Silicon Valley tribe and stopped talking to me, » Jake says. « Honestly, I couldn’t care less. This says more about them than about me. »

Even with the thinly veiled malice toward Trump by members of the tech elite, Jake has no plans to leave his job or his career. For the most part, he’s found tech employees have an indifference towards politics.

« The main reason I stay in Silicon Valley is that I love my work and doing innovative stuff. I am willing to put up with the rest. And, as I said, most people are not very ideological, so the situation is not that bad, » he said. « It is mostly the motivated few that I am concerned about that could go the extra mile to do to me what was done to Brendan Eich. »

True believer

Why does an educated, well-compensated Silicon Valley engineer support the man who is such a pariah among his Silicon Valley peers?

Brendan Eich resigned from Mozilla after backlash from his financial support for Prop 8 in California. Brave

Like many Trump supporters, Jake believes the country is in trouble, saddled with too much debt, not enough good jobs, and a political system that benefits the wealthy and the elite. In his view, it’s the very rich who have benefited from the Obama economy, including the banks that were bailed out after the financial crisis.

Jake has historically voted Republican, although he skipped the last two elections, and he describes his political views as closer to Libertarian. Government is a « necessary evil, but evil nonetheless, » he says. He’s socially conservative on some issues (particularly abortion) and is against same-sex marriage for utilitarian reasons, but fine with civil unions.

After months of studying Trump’s message, Jake says that he found himself to be a true believer.

« At the end of the day, we choose our politics the way we choose our lovers and our friends — not so much out a rational analysis, but based on impressions and our own personal backgrounds. My main reason for supporting Trump is that I basically agree with the notion that unless the trend is stopped, our country is going to hell, » Jake says.

The ‘sideshow’

Of course, much of the backlash against Trump in Silicon Valley is due to the candidate’s comments, considered by many to be xenophobic and racist, about immigrants, Muslims, and Mexicans.

Jake says he doesn’t agree with Trump on many of those points, but Jake doesn’t really take them seriously either, describing them as a « sideshow. »

On Trump’s proposed ban on Muslims? Jake thinks Trump’s perceived extremist remarks wouldn’t be backed up with actions.

« I do not agree with a blanket ban (and personally I think he never meant it), but I do agree with the notion of increasing the scrutiny of people who come from high-risk countries or zones, » he says.

Donald Trump. Sara D. Davis/Getty Images

Nor does he expect Trump to build his famous wall on the US-Mexico border and evict millions from the country. « He might complete the fence that already exists and probably make it stronger, but I have no doubt that Trump is a smart guy who won’t be deporting massively millions of people, » he says.

Jake says he is sympathetic to the idea of making it easier for highly qualified immigrants to stay legally in the US, and even finding a solution for the problem of illegal immigration that doesn’t involve deportation. But he also believes many companies abuse the H-1B program that allows skilled foreigners to come work in the US, bringing in not only highly qualified engineers, but also barely qualified service contractors to staff their data centers.

« The Silicon Valley elite is highly hypocritical on this matter. One of the reasons, I assume, they don’t like Trump is because on this area, as in many others, he is calling a spade a spade. I believe Trump is right in this case, » Jake says.

Help Silicon Valley do what it does best

From his position, « supporting Trump only offers [an] upside. » Electing Hillary Clinton would keep the status quo, he says. If Trump wins, there’s a whole set of new possibilities that would emerge for the nation.

While most tech leaders predict doom and gloom during a Trump presidency, Jake sees the opposite for Silicon Valley: a return to the contrarian spirit that has fueled it in the past.

« Even if it remains socially liberal, it would be good for it if the president were to be a Republican so that the Valley could recover a little bit of its rebel spirit (that was the case during the Bush years for instance). I believe that the increased relevance in national politics of companies like Google (whose Chairman [Eric] Schmidt has been very cozy with the Obama administration) and Apple (at the center of several political disputes) has been bad for the Valley, » he says. « A Trump presidency would allow the Valley to focus on what it does best: dreaming and building the technology of the future, leaving politics for DC types. »

Voir également:

How Many People Support Trump but Don’t Want to Admit It?

Does he share our values and our principles on limited government, the proper role of the executive, adherence to the Constitution?

As the speaker of the Republican-dominated House, Ryan could have posed a harder question: Do Republican voters “share our values and our principles”?

The answer to this question, based at least on the 10.7 million votes cast for Trump in Republican primaries and caucuses so far, is “no.”

But that’s not all. There is also strong evidence that most traditional public opinion surveys inadvertently hide a segment of Trump’s supporters. Many voters are reluctant to admit to a live interviewer that they back a candidate who has adopted such divisive positions.

An aggregation by RealClearPolitics of 10 recent telephone polls gives Clinton a nine-point lead over Trump. In contrast, the combined results for the YouGov and Morning Consult polls, which rely on online surveys, place Clinton’s lead at four points.

Why is this important? Because an online survey, whatever other flaws it might have, resembles an anonymous voting booth far more than what you tell a pollster does.

In a May 2015 report, Pew Research analyzed the differences between results derived from telephone polling and those from online Internet polling. Pew determined that the biggest differences in answers elicited via these two survey modes were on questions in which social desirability bias — that is, “the desire of respondents to avoid embarrassment and project a favorable image to others” — played a role.

In a detailed analysis of phone versus online polling in Republican primaries, Kyle A. Dropp, the executive director of polling and data science at Morning Consult, writes:

Trump’s advantage in online polls compared with live telephone polling is eight or nine percentage points among likely voters.

This difference, Dropp notes, is driven largely by more educated voters — those who would be most concerned with “social desirability.”

These findings suggest that Trump will head into the general election with support from voters who are reluctant to admit their preferences to a live person in a phone survey, but who may well be inclined to cast a ballot for Trump on Election Day.

Conflicting online and phone poll findings in response to Trump’s call on Dec. 7, 2015 — five days after two terrorists killed 14 people in San Bernardino, Calif. — for a “total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States until our country’s representatives can figure out what is going on” demonstrate the difficulty gauging Trump’s strength.

Phone-based surveys in December by the Washington Post/ABC News, CBS News and NBC/Wall Street Journal found strong majorities — 57 to 60 percent — of Americans opposed to the proposal.

At the same time, YouGov, operating online, found substantial and growing support for Trump’s proposal, with a plurality, 45-41, in support. When YouGov repeated the question on March 24-25 — just after the terrorist attacks in Brussels — support had grown to 51-40.

This December-to-March shift was strongest among independent voters, who increased their support from 42-37 in favor of the ban to 62-37 in favor. Similarly, a March 29 Morning Consult online poll found majority support for the ban, 50-38, with voters who identified themselves as independents favoring Trump’s plan 49-36.

I asked a number of experts about the disparity between online and phone polls. All of them — Alan Abramowitz, John Sides, Michael Tesler and Lynn Vavreck, political scientists who specialize in the analysis of poll data — agreed that in the case of highly contentious issues, respondents can be more willing to express their real views anonymously, to a computer rather than to a human.

Kathy Frankovic, the former CBS polling director who now works for YouGov, told me that “it’s easier to express potentially ‘unacceptable’ responses on a screen than it is to give them to a person.” Douglas Rivers, a political scientist at Stanford and the chief scientist for YouGov, agreed, noting in an email that stronger support in online polls for a ban on Muslims

may be due to social desirability bias — people are more willing to express support for this privately than when asked by someone else.

Needless to say, Trump has expressed confrontational views on a number of fronts. He claims that as president he will impose harsh tariffs on imports from China, suspend Muslim immigration, deport 11 million immigrants and build an $8 billion wall that Mexico will pay for.

Taken together, these positions have provided a foundation for the strong correlation between support for Trump and white ethnocentrism and white racial resentment.

One method of ranking whites on ethnocentrism is to measure the degree to which they believe Caucasians are more trustworthy, intelligent, industrious and less violent than African-Americans, Hispanics and other minorities. These are the kinds of questions that prompt certain respondents in phone surveys to mask their views and provide socially acceptable answers instead.

The accompanying chart, which uses data provided to The Times by Marc Hetherington and Drew Engelhardt, political scientists at Vanderbilt, shows that white Republicans are the most ethnocentric of all voters, but also that there are substantial numbers of ethnocentric white Democrats and white independents..

This suggests that Trump could potentially find significant levels of support not only among Republican voters, but also among white Democrats and independents.

Now that Trump appears to have the Republican nomination in hand, the question becomes: Can he capitalize on racial resentment among Democrats and independents in the general election?

Perhaps not surprisingly, Hetherington and Engelhardt found that racial resentment follows a similar pattern to the expression of white ethnocentrism. It is highest among Republicans, but it is also present among Democrats and independents. The second chart derived from their data shows that in rankings of racial resentment, more than half of white Republicans, 58 percent, fall into the top four most resentful categories.

What should prove worrisome for Democrats is that 42 percent of white independents also fall into the four most resentful categories, as do 22 percent of white Democrats.

Even polls using traditional phone survey methods find notable support for issues high on Trump’s agenda. You can see this, for example, in attitudes toward the Chinese, Muslims and Mexicans — all of whom Trump has demonized.

Anger toward China appears to offer fertile ground for Trump in the general election. In its 2015 American Values Survey, the Public Religion Research Institute asked how responsible China is for American “economic problems.” Solid majorities of Democrats (70 percent), independents (72 percent) and Republicans (80 percent) said China is “very” or “somewhat” responsible.

Or take another Trump theme: Islam. The P.R.R.I. values survey asked whether they agreed or disagreed with the statement “the values of Islam are at odds with American values and way of life.” Among all voters, 56 percent said that they agreed. Republican were strongest at 76 percent, but independents came in at 57 percent, with Democrats trailing at a still robust 43 percent.

The Polling Report, an aggregation of public opinion surveys, presents data on immigration from multiple sources. On a basic question — what should happen to the 11 million undocumented men, women and children now living within the borders of the United States — most traditional surveys show strong support for finding ways to legalize the status of those who have not committed crimes and have paid taxes.

A March 2016 Pew study found, for example, that voters preferred allowing undocumented immigrants to stay in the United States over attempting to deport them by 74-25. It also found that a majority said immigrants strengthen the country (as opposed to adding a burden), 57-35. These are not good numbers for Trump.

But poll results (irrespective of whether questions are posed online or by phone) can change quite a bit depending on their exact wording, the specific issues addressed and even the placement of a query in a series of questions.

For example, a September 2015 Pew survey asked a related but different set of questions about immigrants that produced results more favorable to Trump’s prospects. Voters reported (50-28) that they believe that immigrants damage the economy (as opposed to making it better), with a fifth saying that immigrants don’t have much effect. Voters also reported that they think that immigrants make crime worse rather than better (50-7), with 41 percent saying that they don’t have much effect.

There are a few conclusions to be drawn.

First, the way Trump has positioned himself outside of the traditional boundaries of politics will make it unusually difficult to gauge public support for him and for many of his positions.

Second, the allegiance of many white Democrats and independents is difficult to predict — cross-pressured as they are by the conflict between unsavory Trump positions they are drawn to and conscience or compunction. The ambivalence of many Republicans toward Trump as their party’s brazenly defiant nominee will further compound the volatility of the electorate.

Finally, the simple fact that Trump has beaten the odds so far means that it is not beyond the realm of possibility that he could beat them again. If he does take the White House, much, if not all, of his margin of victory will come from voters too ashamed to acknowledge publicly how they intend to cast their vote.

Voir encore:

Why are people afraid to admit they voted Conservative?

Ed West
Catholic Herald
8 May 2015

About one in eight Tories won’t even admit their support to pollsters

Alas, the tragicomic spectacle of the British Labour leader Ed Miliband going eyeball to eyeball with Vladimir Putin now belongs in a very niche sub-genre of “what if” history books.

I wonder if Miliband was surprised by the exit polls in yesterday’s general election. I certainly was, being all prepared for the “ajockalypse” and an Ed Miliband-Nicola Sturgeon government.

Despite Miliband being tipped by most pundits, last night was a disaster for Labour, both in England and Scotland, where they have as many seats as the Tories. It’s been a while since that happened.

The biggest losers, however, were the pollsters, who all had Labour and the Conservatives neck and neck, when in fact there was a six-point gap.

Why did the opinion polls get it so spectacularly wrong, worse even than in the 1992 general election?

Margaret Thatcher wrote about the phenomenon of shy Tories back in 1979. It’s the very nature of small-C conservatives that they’re wary of tribal displays. In contrast, proclaiming socialism is a good way of expressing what some call “virtue signalling”.

Part of the reason for this shyness, it has to be said, is that people don’t like other people shouting “Tory scum” at them or vandalising their cars. Such violence, which has also been known to happen to Republicans in America, is the extreme end of a more general hostility towards conservatism.

My six-year-old daughter, who happens to share the same name as our new Labour MP (she was confused that lots of people were displaying her name in their windows), asked the other day why, if there are two main parties, no one had the blue Conservative party banner outside their front door.

Although where I live is barren territory for the Tories, in American terms rather like Vermont, even in my part of town one in six vote Tory. Probably twice that number would if the Liberal Democrats were not the main anti-Labour opposition. Yet out of hundreds of placards displayed outside people’s home, not a single person dared to admit voting Conservative.

And being a conservative, both big and small-C, has become so socially unacceptable that about one in eight Conservative voters routinely lie about it even when they are guaranteed anonymity by polling companies, let alone on Facebook.

Conservative causes generally tend to suffer from their supporters being “shy” about expressing views they know to be unfashionable or unpopular, but which they feel to be right.

David Quinn is making the same point about the Irish same-sex marriage referendum, which may well also surprise the pollsters.

It doesn’t help that socially liberal people tend to have a higher status in society. They are richer, more successful and more socially sophisticated – and it’s human instinct to defer on these subjects.

The general election obviously represents a great result for the Conservatives, but in the longer term Tories may want to ask what it means for their future if being a supporter has become something to hide.

Voir de même:

Voices
‘Did they keep quiet after the election?’: 5 ways to identify a ‘shy Tory’

Because Conservatives don’t all come in red trousers…
Jamie Campbell
The Independent
11 May 2015

If there was one major revelation of this mad election, it’s that Conservatives don’t all come in red trousers dripping in fox blood carrying polo mallets.

2015 saw the rise of the Secret Tory, Conservatives who, whether it be because they’re genuinely embarrassed about their views or fearful of the scorn of liberal friends, keep schtum about voting blue.

Picking them out isn’t as easy as spotting the corners of broadsheet Telegraph poking out from a Guardian Berliner but here are a few tips that might just help you identify this muted majority:

Disclaimer: Instructions are not watertight. Liberals may well also play tennis.

Did they keep quiet after the election? Such was the pummelling that Labour and the Lib Dems took last week, apathy’s been off the menu for the liberals of the UK. It feels a bit like a football match where the losers are inconsolable whilst the winners are too sheepish to celebrate. No tears? Probably Tory.What sports do they play? This isn’t to say that if someone goes down to Clapham Common every weekend for a game of rugger with Hugo, Digby and Xander they definitely won’t go to anti-fox hunting protests and love Polly Toynbee, but it’s probably a good sign. Golf, cricket and even an innocent game of tennis can be clues of the furtive Tory.

Donald Trump, une surprise ? Pas vraiment

Joseph Savès

Hérodote
9 novembre 2016

Après les référendums de 2005 (France et Pays-Bas) et le Brexit (2016), voici une nouvelle surprise avec l’élection de Donald Trump par une franche majorité d’Américains. À chaque fois, le suffrage universel a eu raison des médias, des sondeurs et de leurs commanditaires (*). On peut au moins se réjouir de cette vitalité démocratique.

Les lecteurs et Amis d’Herodote.net peuvent heureusement se féliciter d’avoir accès à des analyses plus fines, parce que fondées sur les enseignements de l’Histoire.

Le 23 octobre 2016, nous avons titré notre lettre sur des élections pleines de surprises aux États-Unis et évoqué un précédent largement ignoré : l’élection du candidat « populiste » et « anti-système » Andrew Jackson, en 1828.

Par bien des aspects de sa personnalité, il n’était pas sans ressembler au nouveau président des États-Unis. Et lui aussi avait été rejeté par les instances de son parti et honni par les élites de la côte Est.

Ce 3 novembre 2016, à la lumière de l’Histoire, nous avons aussi rappelé ce qu’est le libre-échange prôné par ces mêmes élites comme par les fonctionnaires de Bruxelles et les élites françaises : une utopie aussi folle que le communisme soviétique.

C’est en partie en raison du libre-échange (*) et du primat de la finance que les électeurs américains ont voté pour Donald Trump : il a su capter leur colère sourde, tout comme d’ailleurs le candidat démocrate Bernie Sanders, rival malheureux d’Hillary Clinton (*).

L’autre motif qui a conduit à la victoire de Trump et à l’élimination de Sanders tient à l’exaspération d’une majorité de citoyens face aux tromperies de l’utopie « multiculturaliste » et de la société « ouverte ».

À preuve le vote de l’Iowa en faveur de Donald Trump : dans cet État plutôt prospère, avec un faible taux de chômage, c’est évidemment l’enjeu multiculturaliste qui a fait basculer les électeurs.

En effet, l’élection en 2008 d’un président noir (pas un Afro-Américain mais un métis, fils d’une blanche du Kansas et d’un Kényan) n’a pas empêché le retour à de nouvelles formes de ségrégation raciale. C’est ainsi que la candidate démocrate Hillary Clinton a tenté de jouer la carte « racialiste » en cajolant les électeurs afro-américains et latinos. Mais sans doute s’est-elle trompée dans son évaluation du vote latino : beaucoup d’Étasuniens latino-américains aspirent à leur intégration dans la classe moyenne et ne se sentent guère solidaires des Afro-Américains.

Le même phénomène s’observe en Europe de l’Ouest, sous l’effet d’un emballement migratoire sans précédent dans l’Histoire. Les nouveaux arrivants font bloc avec leur « communauté » dans les quartiers et les écoles : Africains de la zone équatoriale, Sahéliens, Maghrébins, Turcs, Orientaux, Chinois etc. Il compromettent ce faisant l’intégration des immigrants plus anciennement installés (*). À quoi les classes dirigeantes répondent par des propos hors-contexte sur le « vivre-ensemble » et l’occultation de la mémoire.

La chancelière Angela Merkel et même le pape François ont perçu les dangers de cette politique dans leurs dernières déclarations, en novembre 2016. Quant aux élus français, qui ont abandonné leur souveraineté à Bruxelles et Berlin et se tiennent désormais à la remorque des puissants, ils feraient bien de prendre à leur tour la mesure de l’exaspération populaire face au néolibéralisme financier, au multiculturalisme et à l’emballement migratoire. Ils se doivent de nommer et analyser ces phénomènes sans faux-semblants, et de préconiser des solutions respectueuses de la démocratie.

Voir encore:

Trump, Clinton and the Culture of Deference

Political correctness functions like a despotic regime. We resent it but we tolerate it.

Shelby Steele
The Wall Street Journal

In the broader American culture—the mainstream media, the world of the arts and entertainment, the high-tech world, and the entire enterprise of public and private education—conservatism suffers a decided ill repute. Why?

The answer begins in a certain fact of American life. As the late writer William Styron once put it, slavery was “the great transforming circumstance of American history.” Slavery, and also the diminishment of women and all minorities, was especially tragic because America was otherwise the most enlightened nation in the world. Here, in this instance of profound hypocrisy, began the idea of America as a victimizing nation. And then came the inevitable corollary: the nation’s moral indebtedness to its former victims: blacks especially but all other put-upon peoples as well.

This indebtedness became a cultural imperative, what Styron might call a “transforming circumstance.” Today America must honor this indebtedness or lose much of its moral authority and legitimacy as a democracy. America must show itself redeemed of its oppressive past.

How to do this? In a word: deference. Since the 1960s, when America finally became fully accountable for its past, deference toward all groups with any claim to past or present victimization became mandatory. The Great Society and the War on Poverty were some of the first truly deferential policies. Since then deference has become an almost universal marker of simple human decency that asserts one’s innocence of the American past. Deference is, above all else, an apology.

One thing this means is that deference toward victimization has evolved into a means to power. As deference acknowledges America’s indebtedness, it seems to redeem the nation and to validate its exceptional status in the world. This brings real power—the kind of power that puts people into office and that gives a special shine to commercial ventures it attaches to.

Since the ’60s the Democratic Party, and liberalism generally, have thrived on the power of deference. When Hillary Clinton speaks of a “basket of deplorables,“ she follows with a basket of isms and phobias—racism, sexism, homophobia, xenophobia and Islamaphobia. Each ism and phobia is an opportunity for her to show deference toward a victimized group and to cast herself as America’s redeemer. And, by implication, conservatism is bereft of deference. Donald Trump supporters are cast as small grudging people, as haters who blindly love America and long for its exclusionary past. Against this she is the very archetype of American redemption. The term “progressive” is code for redemption from a hate-driven America.

So deference is a power to muscle with. And it works by stigmatization, by threatening to label people as regressive bigots. Mrs. Clinton, Democrats and liberals generally practice combat by stigma. And they have been fairly successful in this so that many conservatives are at least a little embarrassed to “come out” as it were. Conservatism is an insurgent point of view, while liberalism is mainstream. And this is oppressive for conservatives because it puts them in the position of being a bit embarrassed by who they really are and what they really believe.

Deference has been codified in American life as political correctness. And political correctness functions like a despotic regime. It is an oppressiveness that spreads its edicts further and further into the crevices of everyday life. We resent it, yet for the most part we at least tolerate its demands. But it means that we live in a society that is ever willing to cast judgment on us, to shame us in the name of a politics we don’t really believe in. It means our decency requires a degree of self-betrayal.

And into all this steps Mr. Trump, a fundamentally limited man but a man with overwhelming charisma, a man impossible to ignore. The moment he entered the presidential contest America’s long simmering culture war rose to full boil. Mr. Trump was a non-deferential candidate. He seemed at odds with every code of decency. He invoked every possible stigma, and screechingly argued against them all. He did much of the dirty work that millions of Americans wanted to do but lacked the platform to do.

Thus Mr. Trump’s extraordinary charisma has been far more about what he represents than what he might actually do as the president. He stands to alter the culture of deference itself. After all, the problem with deference is that it is never more than superficial. We are polite. We don’t offend. But we don’t ever transform people either. Out of deference we refuse to ask those we seek to help to be primarily responsible for their own advancement. Yet only this level of responsibility transforms people, no matter past or even present injustice. Some 3,000 shootings in Chicago this year alone is the result of deference camouflaging a lapse of personal responsibility with empty claims of systemic racism.

As a society we are so captive to our historical shame that we thoughtlessly rush to deference simply to relieve the pressure. And yet every deferential gesture—the war on poverty, affirmative action, ObamaCare, every kind of “diversity” scheme—only weakens those who still suffer the legacy of our shameful history. Deference is now the great enemy of those toward whom it gushes compassion.

Societies, like individuals, have intuitions. Donald Trump is an intuition. At least on the level of symbol, maybe he would push back against the hegemony of deference—if not as a liberator then possibly as a reformer. Possibly he could lift the word responsibility out of its somnambulant stigmatization as a judgmental and bigoted request to make of people. This, added to a fundamental respect for the capacity of people to lift themselves up, could go a long way toward a fairer and better America.

Mr. Steele, a senior fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution, is the author of “Shame: How America’s Past Sins Have Polarized Our Country” (Basic Books, 2015).

Voir de plus:

Donald Trump is the man Americans have chosen as their vehicle for the dramatic change they demand from Washington.
 The Federalist
Ben Domenech

It is not breaking the protocols of green room conversations, I think, to say that a certain prominent pollster arrived last night at CBS headquarters in New York City declaring firmly that Hillary Clinton would win by five points, the GOP would lose the Senate, and that it would not be close. I believe he said as much on Twitter. I was more skeptical. Having heard the exit polling myself, and knowing as we all do that Trump voters are less eager to talk to these youngsters with their clipboards, I had already warned The Federalist’s staff to not anticipate an early call. As the night wore on, it became abundantly clear that the exits had dramatically underestimated the support for Donald Trump in key states. And then it became clear that they had overestimated support for Clinton in several key states. And then, at some point, it became clear that this would not be a Bush-Gore close loss at all – that she was sinking to the point that her performance was comparable to Michael Dukakis. And then everyone started to lose their minds.

The strongest thought in my head as the night wore on, and Wisconsin and Pennsylvania remained uncalled despite a clear advantage for Donald Trump, was: what on earth must the conversation be like in that room with Barack and Michelle Obama, watching the returns, followed by that magnanimous speech. Make no mistake about it: this election is Barack Obama’s legacy. He pushed hard for Hillary Clinton in the end because he understood that as such. And it was all for naught. No celebrity, no sports star, and no current president with a strong approval rating was enough to drag Hillary Clinton over the finish line. What did Obama say? What epithets did he utter? And on what did he blame the result? Schadenfreude has always been part of the case for Trump, and it is particularly sharp when it comes to the feelings of the current chief executive.

Last night Jamelle Bouie and Van Jones voiced something I expect we will hear from many of Obama’s firmest supporters in the coming weeks – the idea that Trump represents a “whitelash” against eight years of Obama. But this dramatically oversimplifies the case, particularly if as it seems at the moment Trump won more minority votes than Mitt Romney in 2012. In fact, as Nate Cohn notes, Clinton failed in areas of the country where Obama’s support had been strongest among white Americans.   She failed to keep pace with Obama in the Rust Belt states that he won repeatedly. Her vaunted GOTV machine failed to attract the votes of young people, of union members, and of minorities to the degree necessary to win. And meanwhile, Trump’s utter lack of a campaign was more than made up for by the emotional dedication of his supporters. This was about more than just race – it was a sustained rejection of the country’s ruling class. But expect the media to try to make it about two things: race, and about Hillary Clinton’s lousy campaign. Ah, look, they’re doing it already.

The big winners from last night, beyond Donald Trump: Reince Priebus, who gets to keep his job; The Heritage Foundation, which bit the bullet and worked with Trump’s transition team on numerous points; Nate Silver, who got pounded by the left for a month for his poll skepticism only to be proven correct; TV networks who sold ads; Republican pragmatists who backed Trump while criticizing his excesses; Republican Senators who won back their majority while keeping Trump at arm’s length; Peter Thiel; pro-lifers and federalists, who will likely get two Supreme Court seats; Breitbart and Laura Ingraham and the pro-Trump factions of cable television, who were to the hilt defenders of Trump; Claremonsters; and civil libertarians, who probably will get to work with liberals again, which they love.

The big losers, beyond the Clinton family and Barack Obama: The Democratic Party, which now looks like a leaderless husk of what was once a coalition sure of its demographic destiny; the true NeverTrumpers who hoped Trump would lose big; John Podesta and the Clinton team; TV networks who garnered a new degree of hate from a frustrated electorate; James Comey, who will get it from both sides; old media conservatives who didn’t just reject but dismissed Trump and the phenomenon as mere celebrity worship; conservatives in the foreign policy space who explicitly backed her; any consultants who specialize in expensive GOTV efforts; the GOP autopsy; Bill Weld, who pretended to be a libertarian to try and get Hillary Clinton elected; and Joe Biden, who everyone will look back to as being able to beat Trump handily had he run.

A word about the overall failure of the media this cycle: it will be very interesting to see which reporters learn from this, and which ones double down on their ignorance. The majority of political reporters never seemed to get outside their bubble. They spoke to anti-Trump conservatives, and printed anti-Trump views from conservatives, but rarely would even publish the sorts of views I and others have been sounding for months about the real and rational gripes of Trump voters. Many in the media preferred the caricature to the real thing. If you are a member of the media who does not know anyone who was pro-Trump, who has no Trump voters among your family or friends, realize how thick your bubble is. Change this. Don’t stick to the old sources, who clearly didn’t know what was going on – add new ones, who offer the perspective from the ground.

 On The Federalist Radio Hour over the past several months, we’ve tried to analyze things from the perspective of the likeliest polling result – which has pretty consistently been a Hillary Clinton victory. Had the polls gone steadily in the other direction, we would’ve spent more time on the possibility of a Trump victory. The challenge in analyzing that result is Trump’s unpredictability as a chief executive. He has destroyed the GOP as we knew it and remade it as a more nationalist and populist coalition, in favor of a great deal of ideas that ring of Keynesian spending (the first agenda item mentioned in his victory speech was rebuilding infrastructure). How does he adapt to working with Mitch McConnell and Paul Ryan, assuming he even wants to do that? To whom does he listen, given that he has ignored so many of his own advisors on so many areas of policy? These are things that are inherently impossible to predict for a man who has had three campaign managers in a year’s time.

What is clear is this: Donald Trump is the man Americans have chosen as their vehicle for the dramatic change they demand from Washington. They have utterly rejected the change offered in the eight year Barack Obama agenda as wholly insufficient. And they have given Trump the rare gift of a united government in order to make those changes happen. They have tossed aside the assumptions of an elite class of gatekeepers and commentators whose opinions they disrespect and disavow. And they have sent a message to Washington that nothing less than wholesale change will satisfy them, including a change in the fundamental character of the commander in chief.

As a believer in constitutional limited government, this is an electoral result I find hopeful for more reason than one. Trump is not a believer in that, but there are those around him who do. More importantly, his attitude and character are so abrasive to the sentiments of the American elites that it almost has to result in a reassertion of the powers of other branches of government, particularly the Congress. This would be a very good thing, not just for the next four years, but for a generation that has seen the executive office expanded without any pause. It may take a change agent like Trump to necessitate a return to the limitations the Constitution demands.

So we’re doing this, America. President Donald Trump. It will be a crazy ride for the next four years. Let’s see what comes next.

Ben Domenech is the publisher of The Federalist. Sign up for a free trial of his daily newsletter, The Transom.
Voir aussi:
Politics
Who’s winning, who’s losing, and why.
How Nate Silver Missed Donald Trump

The election guru said Trump had no shot. Where did he go wrong?

For the past six months, one big question has loomed over the 2016 election: Is the candidacy of Donald J. Trump an amusing bit of reality TV or a terrifying and dangerous challenge to the country’s political system? At first, Trump’s popularity was easy to dismiss. It was nothing more than a phase, the result of Trump’s celebrity status and his talent for provocation. His antics made it hard to look away, but it was easy to convince yourself that Trump mania would never lead to anything serious, like the Republican nomination.

It was especially easy to come to that conclusion if you were reading FiveThirtyEight, the statistics-driven news website founded by Nate Silver. Since the beginning of Trump’s campaign last June, the election guru and his colleagues have been consistently bearish on Trump’s chances. Silver, who made his name by using cold hard math to call 49 out of 50 states in the 2008 general election and all 50 in 2012, has served as a reassuring voice in the midst of Trump’s shocking rise. For those of us who didn’t want to believe we lived in a country where Donald Trump could be president, Silver’s steady, level-headed certainty felt just as soothing as his unwavering confidence in Barack Obama’s triumph over Mitt Romney four years ago.

What exactly has Silver been saying? In September, he told CNN’s Anderson Cooper that Trump had a roughly 5-percent chance of beating his GOP rivals. In November, he explained that Trump’s national following was about as negligible as the share of Americans who believe the Apollo moon landing was faked. On Twitter, he compared Trump to the band Nickelback, which he described as being “[d]isliked by most, super popular with a few.” In a post titled “Why Donald Trump Isn’t A Real Candidate, In One Chart,” Silver’s colleague Harry Enten wrote that Trump had a better chance of “playing in the NBA Finals” than winning the Republican nomination.

Multiple times over the past six months, Silver has reminded his readers that four years ago, daffy fly-by-nighters like Herman Cain and Michele Bachmann led the GOP field at various points. Trump’s poll numbers, he wrote, would drop just like theirs had. In one August post, “Donald Trump’s Six Stages of Doom,” Silver actually laid out a schedule for the candidate’s inevitable collapse.

That collapse is running late. Here we are, a few days from the Iowa caucus, and Trump’s poll numbers haven’t gone down at all. The latest data suggest that he leads his closest rival, Ted Cruz, by about 5 points in Iowa and almost 20 points in New Hampshire. He has also recently become the top GOP contender according to the betting market Betfair. Meanwhile, members of the so-called GOP establishment, who previously expressed open contempt for Trump, now seem to be warming to him. On Jan. 16, the Washington Post quoted the former finance chairman for Mitt Romney’s 2012 campaign saying there was a “growing feeling” among many in the GOP that Trump “may be the guy.” Bob Dole praised Trump in the New York Times as a dealmaker who has the “right personality” to do business with Congress. Orrin Hatch, the most senior Republican in the Senate, told CNN he was “coming around” on Trump.

It’s clear, now, that Silver and his fellow analysts at FiveThirtyEight underestimated Trump. Silver himself recently admitted as much, writing in a blog post published last week that he’d been too skeptical about Trump’s chances. “Things are lining up better for Trump than I would have imagined,” he wrote, adding that “[i]f, like me, you expected” the show to have been over by now, “you have to revisit your assumptions.”

Everyone makes mistakes—even Nate Silver. It’s also entirely possible that the Trump collapse is still to come and that as soon as we see the actual voting process play out, the hollowness of his popularity will reveal itself. Still, Silver is right that his assumptions are worth revisiting. Maybe the Trump phenomenon is so unprecedented that no statistical model could have foreseen it. Or maybe it took a candidate as unique as Donald Trump to reveal the flaws and limitations of Silver’s prediction machine.

* * *

To understand how Silver got Trump wrong, it helps to understand what exactly he was skeptical about, and why. A look at his campaign coverage reveals that two basic beliefs guided Silver’s thinking.

The first centered on the polls showing Trump miles ahead of his rivals. These polls have been plentiful, and they have been consistent. To pick two more or less at random, CNN showed Trump’s support in Iowa grow from 22 percent in August to 37 percent this past week. According to national polls conducted by CBS and the New York Times, he has gone from polling at 24 percent nationally in August to 36 percent earlier this month.

None of this has impressed Silver. No matter what the polls said, as he wrote on FiveThirtyEight week after week, it was important to remember they were fundamentally unreliable and not at all indicative of how primary voters would ultimately cast their ballots. This has always been true of pre-primary polls, Silver argued, in part because primary voters have historically waited until the last minute to decide whom to support and in part because the people answering questions from pollsters are not necessarily the ones who will end up actually voting.

Anything Silver says about polling carries weight. Polls are his bread and butter—the raw materials he filters through his proprietary model to predict the outcomes of elections. His expertise on which polls to ignore, which ones to trust, and how much to trust them is central to his political wisdom. The early national polls showing Trump in the lead, Silver wrote, were basically worthless. As he put it in a post titled “Donald Trump Is Winning The Polls—and Losing the Nomination,” they not only “lack empirical power to predict the nomination” but “describe a fiction.”

Silver thought that it was foolish of reporters and columnists to act like Trump’s numbers were significant. The fact that pundits insisted on investing them with so much importance proved they were motivated more by the demands of the news cycle than by a commitment to truth—a tendency Silver has always taken pride in avoiding.

The problem, Silver believed, wasn’t just that the media legitimized polls that didn’t deserve people’s attention. It was worse than that: By talking about Trump’s poll numbers like they mattered, the media risked distorting future polls, thereby reinforcing the false narrative of Trump’s dominance. “Some voters may be coughing up Trump’s name in polls because he’s the only candidate they’ve been hearing about,” Silver wrote in December, noting that the media has given Trump’s campaign “more coverage than literally all the other Republicans combined.”

Silver’s error, in retrospect, was to conflate his doubts about the polls with his doubts about Trump’s viability as a candidate. In other words, it’s perfectly possible for Silver to have been correct in saying the early polls did not constitute proof of a massive Trump lead, while also being wrong about the likelihood that Trump would become the nominee. This mistake is illustrated most clearly in that post headlined “Donald Trump’s Six Stages of Doom,” in which Silver asserted that “Trump’s campaign will fail by one means or another” before ticking off a bunch of reasons to be suspicious of the early polls that showed him in the lead. While the post made brief mention of Trump’s “poor organization in caucus states, poor understanding of delegate rules,” and his lack of “support from superdelegates,” it didn’t offer much on why Silver found it so unlikely that lots and lots of people would vote for him.

This brings us to the second basic belief guiding Silver’s skepticism about Trump mania. Polls aside, the history of modern American politics made it clear to him that a “Trump-like candidate” could never win the nomination.

What is a “Trump-like candidate”? Under Silver’s definition, it’s someone who has low favorability ratings and, more important, is hated by party leaders. Citing a theory laid out in The Party Decides—an influential work of political science which says that primary candidates don’t win without the support of the party establishment—Silver has argued that Trump was an almost certain loser. Even if Trump managed to survive until the Republican National Convention, Silver wrote, “the Republican Party would go to extraordinary lengths to avoid nominating him.”

The race has not played out that way. Indications in December that GOP leaders were either powerless against Trump or unwilling to go after him struck Silver as “perplexing”—precisely the emotion you would expect from a quantitatively inclined thinker confronted with a reality that hasn’t conformed to his calculations. In a chat with colleagues published on FiveThirtyEight, Silver discussed possible reasons why GOP leaders had not been more aggressive in snuffing out Trump earlier, when he might have been an easier target. “From the get-go, they haven’t seemed to have any plan at all for how to deal with Trump,” he wrote.

What’s crucial to note here is that Silver’s confidence about how the GOP would respond to Trump was never really based on any statistical calculations. Rather, in repeatedly citing The Party Decides, he was relying on a theory about how political parties work—one that’s been embraced by some of the very same pundits that Silver has defined himself against. And while it’s true that The Party Decides was an empirical work based on historical data, the notion that GOP leaders would find a way to kill Trump’s campaign is, on some level, premised on a belief that the individual actors who control the Republican Party would all act as rationally as Nate Silver would if he were in their shoes. When news reports came out this month that influential Republican donors were starting to think Trump wouldn’t be such a bad candidate, Silver wrote, with some exasperation, “the donor class is probably wrong.”

Maybe what happened here is that Silver was the one sober guy in a room full of drunks, powerless to stop irrational party leaders from taking unreliable polling data seriously. Even if you believe that establishment figures are only giving Trump a look because they despise his closest rival, Ted Cruz, it’s undeniable that their thinking is being informed by Trump’s numbers. The fact that Silver thinks those numbers are silly doesn’t matter. They were consequential, and now that the Iowa caucus is one week away, those consequences are becoming more and more serious.

Why was Silver so confident that the “party decides” theory would hold? One reason, surely, is that it always had in the past—if you want a recent example, think back to the mavericks of the 2012 GOP contest, who were squashed like bugs until party favorite Romney was the last man standing. But it also seems possible that Silver believed the GOP would stop Trump for a simpler reason: It was what he wanted to happen.

Silver did not respond to multiple requests for comment for this story, so the best I can do is venture a guess. Maybe, like many people who have watched Trump’s rise with increasing horror, Silver latched onto a narrative that justified rejecting the Apprentice star’s achievements, identifying them as symptoms of a media bubble rather than a reflection of real popular sentiment. If that’s the case, Silver turns out to have a good bit in common with the pundits that he and his unemotional, numbers-driven worldview were supposed to render obsolete. Faced with uncertainty, Silver chose to go all in on an outcome that felt right, one that meshed with his preexisting beliefs about how the world is supposed to work.

* * *

There is another, more narrow explanation for why Trump eluded Silver. As effective as the FiveThirtyEight approach was when applied to Obama vs. McCain and Obama vs. Romney, perhaps it just doesn’t work nearly as well when applied to primaries. If Silver’s system depends largely on interpreting poll numbers, how reliable can that system be if the pre–Iowa and New Hampshire polls are basically worthless? Garbage in, garbage out.

“I think figuring out what’s going on in a primary is more of an art than a science,” says Steve Kornacki, a political analyst at MSNBC who has been covering presidential campaigns since 2002. “There’s just so much more volatility, coming from so many different levels in a primary. And there’s a lot more art involved in figuring out what’s going on than there is in a general election, especially in an era when 80 percent of the country knows whether they’re team blue or team red and which way they vote.”

Of course, Silver knows this, and he has taken certain steps to compensate for it. In a 2,800-word blog post laying out FiveThirtyEight’s methodology for forecasting primaries, he explained how he and his team use state and national polls alongside party leader endorsements. He also left room for the possibility that FiveThirtyEight’s prediction “might be totally wrong.” “Forecasting primaries and caucuses is challenging, much more so than general elections,” Silver wrote, adding that “an unusual candidate like Donald Trump tends to have especially uncertain forecasts.”

Where does all that uncertainty leave FiveThirtyEight? In the months leading up to Iowa and New Hampshire, frequent Silver critic Matt Bruenig told me the FiveThirtyEight founder is “in a situation where the only thing he’s really capable of doing—the thing that he’s exceptional at—is not really available to him, so he ends up doing what normal reporters do.” Bruenig added: “It just makes him like everyone else. … Anyone can read The Party Decides and be like, ‘Oh yeah, this is what social science says will happen.’ ”

(It may not be entirely true that this GOP primary was a hopeless exercise for data journalists. Though early polls may not be the most solid data points, it’s possible that FiveThirtyEight could have done a better job interpreting them: As Kornacki points out, Silver’s insistence on comparing Trump to Joe Lieberman and Rudy Giuliani—candidates with high name recognition who led in primary polls before imploding—failed to consider that both Lieberman and Giuliani led their respective races very early, while Trump has built his lead more gradually. RealClearPolitics, which averages multiple polls, shows Trump starting at just 6 percent last July.)

In Silver’s defense, he has occasionally given voice to self-doubt. He concluded a Jan. 6 chat with FiveThirtyEight staff by saying, “Yeah, the pundits are probably full of shit, but there’s a chance we’re full of shit too, so let’s wait and see what happens.” For the most part, though, Silver his proclaimed his skepticism about Trump loudly, repeatedly, and unequivocally. His predictions of Trump’s collapse—at an event at the 92nd Street Y in September he literally told the audience to “calm down” about his supposed march to the nomination—have not betrayed much caution or uncertainty.

As irrational as it seems for a quantitative analyst to comment so confidently on something he knows he can’t reliably predict, it’s also not all that surprising. Silver has a website to run, after all, and that means covering Trump—and making predictions about him—whether the necessary data is available or not.

The theory that Donald Trump was a real threat to the status quo was a perfect target for Silver and his colleagues. Throughout 2015 and into 2016, they set out to prove that this media sensation was being amplified by a credulous, mathematically illiterate press corps. A Trump implosion would be a classic Silver victory, one that would demonstrate the superiority of rational, data-driven analysis over the chatter of insiders and vague notions of “momentum.”

Instead, the rise of Trump might have demonstrated the limits of Silver’s powers. As Dave Weigel wrote in the Washington Post recently, Trump’s enormous popularity—a tidal wave of support that Silver has said will soon abate—has been the story of the campaign. In his piece, Weigel argued that it wasn’t the first time a primary bid turned out to signal a major shift in the political winds, from the campaign of George Wallace in 1964, which Weigel said represented “a historic moment in the politics of backlash,” to that of Pat Robertson in 1988, which “cemented the influence of the religious right in Republican electoral politics.” While none of those candidates won their party’s nomination, it would have been irresponsible for the media to ignore the significance of their campaigns, as Silver has encouraged his audience, and the press, to do with Trump.

While it’s true that “the rise of Trump” may not end with Trump becoming the nominee, it has revealed, or perhaps even caused, a profound shift in the nation’s political climate. As Kornacki put it to me, “It took Donald Trump saying all this stuff”—floating the idea of denying Muslims entry into the United States, for instance—“to reveal there was a massive constituency for it.”

Missing the significance of Trumpism is a different kind of failure than, say, calling the 2012 election for Mitt Romney. It also might be a more damning one. Botching your general election forecast by a couple of percentage points suggests a flawed mathematical formula. Actively denying the reality of Trump’s success suggests Silver may never have been capable of explaining the world in a way so many believed he could in 2008 and 2012, when he was telling them how likely it was that Obama would become, and remain, the president.

“This is an extraordinary, unusual, utterly bizarre election year, in which events that have never happened before are happening,” says Blake Zeff, the editor of the political news site Cafe and a former campaign aide to Obama and Hillary Clinton. “That’s a nightmare scenario for a projection model that is predicated on historical trends.” While Zeff cautioned it was premature to pillory Silver for missing out on Trumpism, the point stands: What was true yesterday is not necessarily true today, and that’s a problem for Silver and his team of prognosticators.

In 2008, Silver emerged as a new kind of journalist. His data-driven approach to political analysis was a necessary corrective to a media herd that too often relied on gut feelings and received wisdom. So long as punditry continues to exist, thinkers like Silver will remain essential. But the rise of FiveThirtyEight hasn’t changed the fundamental purpose of journalism: to pay attention as the world changes and to try to understand what’s driving that change.

You could argue Silver never promised he was capable of doing those things—that all he ever intended to do was predict the future, not explain it. But Trump’s campaign, which is forcing Americans to ask themselves how such a hateful, boorish candidate could capture the imagination of so many of their fellow citizens, makes it clear that truly revelatory analysis must tell us “why,” not just “what.” If only Nate Silver could give us both.

Voir également:

Le professeur qui a prédit la victoire de Trump fustige les sondages

Alexander Panetta
La Presse Canadienne
09 novembre 2016

Ses amitiés ont été mises à l’épreuve, ses méthodes contestées, mais au bout du compte, il a encore eu raison. Allan Lichtman a désormais prédit avec succès les résultats de neuf élections présidentielles consécutives – incluant la victoire de Donald Trump – grâce à un modèle qu’il a créé.

M. Lichtman est très critique des sondages et des journalistes politiques qui s’en inspirent, et affirme que son questionnaire en 13 parties est beaucoup plus probant dans ses prédictions que les cartes numérisées des batailles par État.

Le professeur d’histoire à l’American University à Washington a tout de même dit, mercredi, qu’il ne tirait aucune satisfaction à avoir eu raison sur la victoire du controversé républicain Donald Trump.

M. Lichtman estime que les analystes électoraux errent en étudiant une campagne comme une série de zones de combat – le nord en opposition au sud de la Floride, l’ouest par rapport à l’est de la Pennsylvanie, etc. Il préfère voir tout cela comme un jeu de dominos, les morceaux s’abattant les uns sur les autres.

Le professeur a dit croire que les campagnes américaines étaient l’affaire d’élans insufflés à un candidat ou à l’autre.

Au début des années 1980, un collègue et lui-même ont examiné les résultats électoraux depuis la guerre civile et ont repéré des tendances. Ils ont établi 13 affirmations vraies ou fausses, et déterminé que si la réponse à six d’entre elles ou plus était «fausse», le parti au pouvoir allait subir la défaite. Parmi ces affirmations figurent «l’économie n’est pas en récession»; «il n’y a pas de course véritable pour l’investiture du parti au pouvoir»; «le parti a remporté des sièges au cours des deux précédents demi-mandats» et «le candidat est charismatique ou un héros national».

La méthode a porté ses fruits chaque fois depuis 1984.

Cette fois, le sixième et ultime domino s’est abattu sur Hillary Clinton durant les primaires – en ayant une concurrence étonnamment forte de la part du sénateur Bernie Sanders.

M. Lichtman a rapidement prédit une victoire de M. Trump dans des entrevues, et s’est attiré la foudre de certains.

«Pas de courriels haineux. Mais une tonne de critiques», a dit le professeur âgé de 69 ans, qui avait déjà brigué un siège démocrate au Sénat dans le Maryland.

«Je crois que j’ai perdu tous mes amis démocrates, à tout le moins pour un certain moment. J’ai subi beaucoup de pressions pour changer ma prédiction», a-t-il confié.

Trump is headed for a win, says professor who has predicted 30 years of presidential outcomes correctly
Peter W. Stevenson
The Washington Post
September 23, 2016

Allan Lichtman, a distinguished professor of history at American University, created his « 13 Keys to the White House » more than 30 years ago—and he’s ready to predict who will win in 2016. (Peter Stevenson/The Washington Post)

Update: The Fix caught up with Lichtman again on Oct. 28. Here’s his latest prediction.

Nobody knows for certain who will win on Nov. 8 — but one man is pretty sure: Professor Allan Lichtman, who has correctly predicted the winner of the popular vote in every presidential election since 1984.

When we sat down in May, he explained how he comes to a decision. Lichtman’s prediction isn’t based on horse-race polls, shifting demographics or his own political opinions. Rather, he uses a system of true/false statements he calls the « Keys to the White House » to determine his predicted winner.

And this year, he says, Donald Trump is the favorite to win.

The keys, which are explained in depth in Lichtman’s book “Predicting the Next President: The Keys to the White House 2016” are:

  1. Party Mandate: After the midterm elections, the incumbent party holds more seats in the U.S. House of Representatives than after the previous midterm elections.
  2. Contest: There is no serious contest for the incumbent party nomination.
  3. Incumbency: The incumbent party candidate is the sitting president.
  4. Third party: There is no significant third party or independent campaign.
  5. Short-term economy: The economy is not in recession during the election campaign.
  6. Long-term economy: Real per capita economic growth during the term equals or exceeds mean growth during the previous two terms.
  7. Policy change: The incumbent administration effects major changes in national policy.
  8. Social unrest: There is no sustained social unrest during the term.
  9. Scandal: The incumbent administration is untainted by major scandal.
  10. Foreign/military failure: The incumbent administration suffers no major failure in foreign or military affairs.
  11. Foreign/military success: The incumbent administration achieves a major success in foreign or military affairs.
  12. Incumbent charisma: The incumbent party candidate is charismatic or a national hero.
  13. Challenger charisma: The challenging party candidate is not charismatic or a national hero.

Lichtman, a distinguished professor of history at American University, sat down with The Fix this week to reveal who he thinks will win in November and why 2016 was the most difficult election to predict yet. Our conversation has been lightly edited for length and clarity.

THE FIX: Can you tell me about the keys, and how you use them to evaluate the election from the point where — I assume it’s very murky a year or two out, and they start to crystallize over the course of the election.

LICHTMAN: « The Keys to the White House » is a historically based prediction system. I derived the system by looking at every American presidential election from 1860 to 1980, and have since used the system to correctly predict the outcomes of all eight American presidential elections from 1984 to 2012.

The keys are 13 true/false questions, where an answer of « true » always favors the reelection of the party holding the White House, in this case the Democrats. And the keys are phrased to reflect the basic theory that elections are primarily judgments on the performance of the party holding the White House. And if six or more of the 13 keys are false — that is, they go against the party in power — they lose. If fewer than six are false, the party in power gets four more years.

So people who hear just the surface-level argument there might say, well, President Obama has a 58 percent approval rating, doesn’t that mean the Democrats are a shoo-in? Why is that wrong?

It absolutely does not mean the Democrats are a shoo-in. First of all, one of my keys is whether or not the sitting president is running for reelection, and right away, they are down that key. Another one of my keys is whether or not the candidate of the White House party is, like Obama was in 2008, charismatic. Hillary Clinton doesn’t fit the bill.

The keys have nothing to do with presidential approval polls or horse-race polls, with one exception, and that is to assess the possibility of a significant third-party campaign.

What about Donald Trump on the other side? He’s not affiliated with the sitting party, but has his campaign been an enigma in terms of your ability to assess this election?

Donald Trump has made this the most difficult election to assess since 1984. We have never before seen a candidate like Donald Trump, and Donald Trump may well break patterns of history that have held since 1860.

We’ve never before seen a candidate who’s spent his life enriching himself at the expense of others. He’s the first candidate in our history to be a serial fabricator, making up things as he goes along. Even when he tells the truth, such as, « Barack Obama really was born in the U.S., » he adds two lines, that Hillary Clinton started the birther movement, and that he finished it, even though when Barack Obama put out his birth certificate, he didn’t believe it. We’ve never had a candidate before who not just once, but twice in a thinly disguised way, has incited violence against an opponent. We’ve never had a candidate before who’s invited a hostile foreign power to meddle in American elections. We’ve never had a candidate before who’s threatened to start a war by blowing ships out of the water in the Persian Gulf if they come too close to us. We’ve never had a candidate before who has embraced as a role model a murderous, hostile foreign dictator. Given all of these exceptions that Donald Trump represents, he may well shatter patterns of history that have held for more than 150 years, lose this election even if the historical circumstances favor it.

We’re a little bit less than seven weeks out from the election today. Who do you predict will win in November?

Based on the 13 keys, it would predict a Donald Trump victory. Remember, six keys and you’re out, and right now the Democrats are out — for sure — five keys.

Key 1 is the party mandate — how well they did in the midterms. They got crushed.

Key number 3 is, the sitting president is not running.

Key number 7, no major policy change in Obama’s second term like the Affordable Care Act.

Key number 11, no major smashing foreign policy success.

And Key number 12, Hillary Clinton is not a Franklin Roosevelt.

One more key and the Democrats are down, and we have the Gary Johnson Key. One of my keys would be that the party in power gets a « false » if a third-party candidate is anticipated to get 5 percent of the vote or more. In his highest polling, Gary Johnson is at about 12 to 14 percent. My rule is that you cut it in half. That would mean that he gets six to seven, and that would be the sixth and final key against the Democrats.

So very, very narrowly, the keys point to a Trump victory. But I would say, more to the point, they point to a generic Republican victory, because I believe that given the unprecedented nature of the Trump candidacy and Trump himself, he could defy all odds and lose even though the verdict of history is in his favor. So this would also suggest, you know, the possibility this election could go either way. Nobody should be complacent, no matter who you’re for, you gotta get out and vote.

Do you think the fact that Trump is not a traditional Republican — certainly not an establishment Republican, from a rhetorical or policy perspective — contributes to that uncertainty over where he fits in with the standard methodology for evaluating the Keys?

I think the fact that he’s a bit of a maverick, and nobody knows where he stands on policy, because he’s constantly shifting. I defy anyone to say what his immigration policy is, what his policy is on banning Muslims, or whoever, from entering the United States, that’s certainly a factor. But it’s more his history in Trump University, the Trump Institute, his bankruptcies, the charitable foundation, of enriching himself at the expense of others, and all of the lies and dangerous things he’s said in this campaign, that could make him a precedent-shattering candidate.

It’s interesting, I don’t use the polls, as I’ve just explained, but the polls have very recently tightened. Clinton is less ahead than she was before, but it’s not because Trump is rising, it’s because Clinton is falling. He’s still around 39 percent in the polls. You can’t win if you can’t crack 40 percent.

As people realize the choice is not Gary Johnson, the only choice is between Trump and Clinton, those Gary Johnson supporters may move away from Johnson and toward Clinton, particularly those millennials. And, you know, I’ve seen this movie before. My first vote was in 1968, when I was the equivalent of a millennial, and lots of my friends, very liberal, wouldn’t vote for Hubert Humphrey because he was part of the Democratic establishment, and guess what? They elected Richard Nixon.

And, of course, as I have said for over 30 years, predictions are not endorsements. My prediction is based off a scientific system. It does not necessarily represent, in any way, shape or form, an Allan Lichtman or American University endorsement of any candidate. And of course, as a successful forecaster, I’ve predicted in almost equal measure both Republican and Democratic victories.

Voir également:

Wonkblog
A new theory for why Trump voters are so angry — that actually makes sense
Jeff Guo
The Washington Post
November 8, 2016

Regardless of who wins on Election Day, we will spend the next few years trying to unpack what the heck just happened. We know that Donald Trump voters are angry, and we know that they are fed up. By now, there have been so many attempts to explain Trumpism that the genre has become a target of parody.

But if you’re wondering about the widening fissure between red and blue America, why politics these days have become so fraught and so emotional, Kathy Cramer is one of the best people to ask. For the better part of the past decade, the political science professor has been crisscrossing Wisconsin trying to get inside the minds of rural voters.

Well before President Obama or the tea party, well before the rise of Trump sent reporters scrambling into the heartland looking for answers, Cramer was hanging out in dairy barns and diners and gas stations, sitting with her tape recorder taking notes. Her research seeks to understand how the people of small towns make sense of politics — why they feel the way they feel, why they vote the way they vote.

There’s been great thirst this election cycle for insight into the psychology of Trump voters. J.D. Vance’s memoir “Hillbilly Elegy” offers a narrative about broken families and social decay. “There is a lack of agency here — a feeling that you have little control over your life and a willingness to blame everyone but yourself,” he writes. Sociologist Arlie Hochschild tells a tale of perceived betrayal. According to her research, white voters feel the American Dream is drifting out of reach for them, and they are angry because they believe minorities and immigrants have butted in line.

Cramer’s recent book, “The Politics of Resentment,” offers a third perspective. Through her repeated interviews with the people of rural Wisconsin, she shows how politics have increasingly become a matter of personal identity. Just about all of her subjects felt a deep sense of bitterness toward elites and city dwellers; just about all of them felt tread on, disrespected and cheated out of what they felt they deserved.

Cramer argues that this “rural consciousness” is key to understanding which political arguments ring true to her subjects. For instance, she says, most rural Wisconsinites supported the tea party’s quest to shrink government not out of any belief in the virtues of small government but because they did not trust the government to help “people like them.”

“Support for less government among lower-income people is often derided as the opinions of people who have been duped,” she writes. However, she continues: “Listening in on these conversations, it is hard to conclude that the people I studied believe what they do because they have been hoodwinked. Their views are rooted in identities and values, as well as in economic perceptions; and these things are all intertwined.”

Rural voters, of course, are not precisely the same as Trump voters, but Cramer’s book offers an important way to think about politics in the era of Trump. Many have pointed out that American politics have become increasingly tribal; Cramer takes that idea a step further, showing how these tribal identities shape our perspectives on reality.

It will not be enough, in the coming months, to say that Trump voters were simply angry. Cramer shows that there are nuances to political rage. To understand Trump’s success, she argues, we have to understand how he tapped into people’s sense of self.

Recently, Cramer chatted with us about Trump and the future of white identity politics.

(As you’ll notice, Cramer has spent so much time with rural Wisconsinites that she often slips, subconsciously, into their voice. We’ve tagged those segments in italics. The interview has also been edited for clarity and length.)

For people who haven’t read your book yet, can you explain a little bit what you discovered after spending so many years interviewing people in rural Wisconsin?

Cramer: To be honest, it took me many months — I went to these 27 communities several times — before I realized that there was a pattern in all these places. What I was hearing was this general sense of being on the short end of the stick. Rural people felt like they’re not getting their fair share.

That feeling is primarily composed of three things. First, people felt that they were not getting their fair share of decision-making power. For example, people would say: All the decisions are made in Madison and Milwaukee and nobody’s listening to us. Nobody’s paying attention, nobody’s coming out here and asking us what we think. Decisions are made in the cities, and we have to abide by them.

Second, people would complain that they weren’t getting their fair share of stuff, that they weren’t getting their fair share of public resourcesThat often came up in perceptions of taxation. People had this sense that all the money is sucked in by Madison, but never spent on places like theirs.

And third, people felt that they weren’t getting respect. They would say: The real kicker is that people in the city don’t understand us. They don’t understand what rural life is like, what’s important to us and what challenges that we’re facing. They think we’re a bunch of redneck racists.

So it’s all three of these things — the power, the money, the respect. People are feeling like they’re not getting their fair share of any of that.

Was there a sense that anything had changed recently? That anything occurred to harden this sentiment? Why does the resentment seem so much worse now?

Cramer: These sentiments are not new. When I first heard them in 2007, they had been building for a long time — decades.

Look at all the graphs showing how economic inequality has been increasing for decades. Many of the stories that people would tell about the trajectories of their own lives map onto those graphs, which show that since the mid-’70s, something has increasingly been going wrong.

It’s just been harder and harder for the vast majority of people to make ends meet. So I think that’s part of this story. It’s been this slow burn.

Resentment is like that. It builds and builds and builds until something happens. Some confluence of things makes people notice: I am so pissed off. I am really the victim of injustice here.

So what do you think set it all off?

Cramer: The Great Recession didn’t help. Though, as I describe in the book, people weren’t talking about it in the ways I expected them to. People were like,Whatever, we’ve been in a recession for decades. What’s the big deal?

Part of it is that the Republican Party over the years has honed its arguments to tap into this resentment. They’re saying: “You’re right, you’re not getting your fair share, and the problem is that it’s all going to the government. So let’s roll government back.”

So there’s a little bit of an elite-driven effect here, where people are told: “You are right to be upset. You are right to notice this injustice.”

Then, I also think that having our first African American president is part of the mix, too. Now, many of the people that I spent time with were very intrigued by Barack Obama. I think that his race, in a way, signaled to people that this was different kind of candidate. They were keeping an open mind about him. Maybe this person is going to be different.

But then when the health-care debate ramped up, once he was in office and became very, very partisan, I think people took partisan sides. And truth be told, I think many people saw the election of an African American to the presidency as a threat. They were thinking: Wow something is going on in our nation and it’s really unfamiliar, and what does that mean for people like me?

I think in the end his presence has added to the anxieties people have about where this country is headed.

One of the endless debates among the chattering class on Twitter is whether Trump is mostly a phenomenon related to racial resentment, or whether Trump support is rooted in deeper economic anxieties. And a lot of times, the debate is framed like it has to be one or the other — but I think your book offers an interesting way to connect these ideas.

Cramer: What I heard from my conversations is that, in these three elements of resentment — I’m not getting my fair share of power, stuff or respect — there’s race and economics intertwined in each of those ideas.

When people are talking about those people in the city getting an “unfair share,” there’s certainly a racial component to that. But they’re also talking about people like me [a white, female professor]. They’re asking questions like, how often do I teach, what am I doing driving around the state Wisconsin when I’m supposed to be working full time in Madison, like, what kind of a job is that, right?

It’s not just resentment toward people of color. It’s resentment toward elites, city people.

And maybe the best way to explain how these things are intertwined is through noticing how much conceptions of hard work and deservingness matter for the way these resentments matter to politics.

We know that when people think about their support for policies, a lot of the time what they’re doing is thinking about whether the recipients of these policies are deserving. Those calculations are often intertwined with notions of hard work, because in the American political culture, we tend to equate hard work with deservingness.

And a lot of racial stereotypes carry this notion of laziness, so when people are making these judgments about who’s working hard, oftentimes people of color don’t fare well in those judgments. But it’s not just people of color. People are like: Are you sitting behind a desk all day? Well that’s not hard work. Hard work is someone like me — I’m a logger, I get up at 4:30 and break my back. For my entire life that’s what I’m doing. I’m wearing my body out in the process of earning a living.

In my mind, through resentment and these notions of deservingness, that’s where you can see how economic anxiety and racial anxiety are intertwined.

The reason the “Trumpism = racism” argument doesn’t ring true for me is that, well, you can’t eat racism. You can’t make a living off of racism. I don’t dispute that the surveys show there’s a lot of racial resentment among Trump voters, but often the argument just ends there. “They’re racist.” It seems like a very blinkered way to look at this issue.

Cramer: It’s absolutely racist to think that black people don’t work as hard as white people. So what? We write off a huge chunk of the population as racist and therefore their concerns aren’t worth attending to?

How do we ever address racial injustice with that limited understanding?

Of course [some of this resentment] is about race, but it’s also very much about the actual lived conditions that people are experiencing. We do need to pay attention to both. As the work that you did on mortality rates shows, it’s not just about dollars. People are experiencing a decline in prosperity, and that’s real.

The other really important element here is people’s perceptions. Surveys show that it may not actually be the case that Trump supporters themselves are doing less well — but they live in places where it’s reasonable for them to conclude that people like them are struggling.

Support for Trump is rooted in reality in some respects — in people’s actual economic struggles, and the actual increases in mortality. But it’s the perceptionsthat people have about their reality are the key driving force here. That’s been a really important lesson from this election.

I want to get into this idea of deservingness. As I was reading your book it really struck me that the people you talked to, they really have a strong sense of what they deserve, and what they think they ought to have. Where does that come from?

Cramer: Part of where that comes from is just the overarching story that we tell ourselves in the U.S. One of the key stories in our political culture has been the American Dream — the sense that if you work hard, you will get ahead.

Well, holy cow, the people I encountered seem to me to be working extremely hard. I’m with them when they’re getting their coffee before they start their workday at 5:30 a.m. I can see the fatigue in their eyes. And I think the notion that they are not getting what they deserve, it comes from them feeling like they’re struggling. They feel like they’re doing what they were told they needed to do to get ahead. And somehow it’s not enough.

Oftentimes in some of these smaller communities, people are in the occupations their parents were in, they’re farmers and loggers. They say, it used to be the case that my dad could do this job and retire at a relatively decent age, and make a decent wage. We had a pretty good quality of life, the community was thriving. Now I’m doing what he did, but my life is really much more difficult.

I’m doing what I was told I should do in order to be a good American and get ahead, but I’m not getting what I was told I would get.

The hollowing out of the middle class has been happening for everyone, not just for white people. But it seems that this phenomenon is only driving some voters into supporting Trump. One theme of your book is how we can take the same reality, the same facts, but interpret them through different frames of mind and come to such different conclusions.

Cramer: It’s not inevitable that people should assume that the decline in their quality of life is the fault of other population groups. In my book I talk about rural folks resenting people in the city. In the presidential campaign, Trump is very clear about saying: You’re right, you’re not getting your fair share, and look at these other groups of people who are getting more than their fair share. Immigrants. Muslims. Uppity women.

But here’s where having Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump running alongside one another for a while was so interesting. I think the support for Sanders represented a different interpretation of the problem. For Sanders supporters, the problem is not that other population groups are getting more than their fair share, but that the government isn’t doing enough to intervene here and right a ship that’s headed in the wrong direction.

One of the really interesting parts of your book is where you discuss how rural people seem to hate government and want to shrink it, even though government provides them with a lot of benefits. It raises the Thomas Frank question — on some level, are people just being fooled or deluded?

Cramer: There is definitely some misinformation, some misunderstandings. But we all do that thing of encountering information and interpreting it in a way that supports our own predispositions. Recent studies in political science have shown that it’s actually those of us who think of ourselves as the most politically sophisticated, the most educated, who do it more than others.

So I really resist this characterization of Trump supporters as ignorant.

There’s just more and more of a recognition that politics for people is not — and this is going to sound awful, but — it’s not about facts and policies. It’s so much about identities, people forming ideas about the kind of person they are and the kind of people others are. Who am I for, and who am I against?

Policy is part of that, but policy is not the driver of these judgments. There are assessments of, is this someone like me? Is this someone who gets someone like me?

I think all too often, we put our energies into figuring out where people stand on particular policies. I think putting energy into trying to understand the way they view the world and their place in it — that gets us so much further toward understanding how they’re going to vote, or which candidates are going to be appealing to them.

All of us, even well-educated, politically sophisticated people interpret facts through our own perspectives, our sense of what who we are, our own identities.

I don’t think that what you do is give people more information. Because they are going to interpret it through the perspectives they already have. People are only going to absorb facts when they’re communicated from a source that they respect, from a source who they perceive has respect for people like them.

And so whenever a liberal calls out Trump supporters as ignorant or fooled or misinformed, that does absolutely nothing to convey the facts that the liberal is trying to convey.

If, hypothetically, we see a Clinton victory on Tuesday, a lot of people have suggested that she should go out and have a listening tour. What would be her best strategy to reach out to people?

Cramer: The very best strategy would be for Donald Trump, if he were to lose the presidential election, to say, “We need to come together as a country, and we need to be nice to each other.”

That’s not going to happen.

As for the next best approach … well I’m trying to be mindful of what is realistic. It’s not a great strategy for someone from the outside to say, “Look, we really do care about you.” The level of resentment is so high.

People for months now have been told they’re absolutely right to be angry at the federal government, and they should absolutely not trust this woman, she’s a liar and a cheat, and heaven forbid if she becomes president of the United States. Our political leaders have to model for us what it’s like to disagree, but also to not lose basic faith in the system. Unless our national leaders do that, I don’t think we should expect people to.

Maybe it would be good to end on this idea of listening. There was thisrecent interview with Arlie Hochschild where someone asked her how we could empathize with Trump supporters. This was ridiculed by some liberals on Twitter. They were like, “Why should we try to have this deep, nuanced understanding of people who are chanting JEW-S-A at Trump rallies?” It was this really violent reaction, and it got me thinking about your book.

Cramer: One of the very sad aspects of resentment is that it breeds more of itself. Now you have liberals saying, “There is no justification for these points of view, and why would I ever show respect for these points of view by spending time and listening to them?”

Thank God I was as naive as I was when I started. If I knew then what I know now about the level of resentment people have toward urban, professional elite women, would I walk into a gas station at 5:30 in the morning and say, “Hi! I’m Kathy from the University of Madison”?

I’d be scared to death after this presidential campaign! But thankfully I wasn’t aware of these views. So what happened to me is that, within three minutes, people knew I was a professor at UW-Madison, and they gave me an earful about the many ways in which that riled them up — and then we kept talking.

And then I would go back for a second visit, a third visit, a fourth, fifth and sixth. And we liked each other. Even at the end of my first visit, they would say, “You know, you’re the first professor from Madison I’ve ever met, and you’re actually kind of normal.” And we’d laugh. We got to know each other as human beings.

That’s partly about listening, and that’s partly about spending time with people from a different walk of life, from a different perspective. There’s nothing like it. You can’t achieve it through online communication. You can’t achieve it through having good intentions. It’s the act of being with other people that establishes the sense we actually are all in this together.

As Pollyannaish as that sounds, I really do believe it.

Voir encore:

Hillary Clinton prévenue à l’avance de questions des débats lors des primaires démocrates

Hillary Clinton a reçu en avance des questions qui lui ont été posées lors de débats de la primaire démocrate, révèlent des emails publiés lundi par WikiLeaks, qui confirment des accusations lancées par Donald Trump.

De nouveaux emails publiés lundi par WikiLeaks embarrassent la campagne Clinton. Ils démontrent qu’Hillary Clinton avait reçu en avance des questions qui allaient lui être posés lors des débats de la primaire démocrate.

« Une des questions qui sera posée à HRC proviendra d’une femme qui a une éruption cutanée »

Un des emails rendus publics est particulièrement parlant : rédigé par l’actuelle présidente intérimaire du Parti démocrate, Donna Brazile, il est adressé à John Podesta, président de la campagne de Mme Clinton et Jennifer Palmieri, directrice de la communication de la candidate.

Le message est daté du 5 mars, veille d’un débat qui s’est déroulé dans la ville septentrionale de Flint, devenue symbole des injustices sociales aux Etats-Unis en raison de son réseau d’eau gravement contaminé au plomb. « Une des questions qui sera posée à HRC (Hillary Rodham Clinton, NDLR) proviendra d’une femme qui a une éruption cutanée », avertit Donna Brazile, qui officiait alors comme commentatrice sur la chaîne CNN.

« Sa famille a été empoisonnée au plomb et elle demandera ce qu’Hillary pourrait faire pour les gens de Flint si elle devient présidente », précise Donna Brazile. Au débat le lendemain, Hillary Clinton avait en effet été interrogée par une femme qui avait dénoncé les problèmes cutanés de sa famille, même si les termes de la question énoncée étaient sensiblement différents.

« De temps en temps j’obtiens les questions à l’avance »

Dans un message du 12 mars, veille d’un débat organisé par CNN, Donna Brazile promet à Jennifer Palmieri d’en « envoyer quelques-unes supplémentaires », en faisant très vraisemblablement référence à des questions de débat.

Enfin, dans un autre email récemment révélé, Donna Brazile avait écrit : « De temps en temps j’obtiens les questions à l’avance ». Dans ce même message, la stratège du Parti démocrate sous-entendait que Hillary Clinton se verrait poser une question sur la peine de mort.

Après ces révélations, CNN a affirmé lundi que Donna Brazile avait donné sa démission de la chaîne. « Merci CNN. Honorée d’avoir été une politologue et commentatrice démocrate sur votre chaîne », a tweeté lundi Donna Brazile.

Cela confirme des accusations lancées par Donald Trump

Depuis des semaines le candidat républicain à la présidentielle, Donald Trump, répète que sa rivale a été avantagée dans la campagne de la primaire démocrate face à son principal concurrent Bernie Sanders, notamment en bénéficiant à l’avance des questions des débats. Donald Trump n’a pas présenté de preuves à l’appui de ses affirmations mais les faits lui ont ici donné raison.

Les emails rendus publics par WikiLeaks ont été piratés sur le compte de John Podesta, par des hackers proches du pouvoir russe, selon les services de renseignement américains. Le Parti démocrate n’a pas confirmé ni infirmé leur authenticité.

Voir enfin:

Le racisme reste un non-dit dans la course à la présidentielle

Selon un sondage récent, Barack Obama pourrait perdre six points de pourcentage le jour de l’élection présidentielle du fait de sa couleur. Le prix du préjugé racial pour le candidat qui s’est pourtant toujours gardé d’apparaître comme le champion de la minorité noire.

L’Obs
06 octobre 2008

Cela relève du non-dit et peu d’Américains l’avoueront en votant le 4 novembre mais le racisme reste, lundi 6 octobre, un préjugé latent dans cette élection historique qui pourrait porter au pouvoir le premier président noir des Etats-Unis, Barack Obama.
Le candidat démocrate à la Maison Blanche s’est toujours présenté comme celui de tous les Américains. Il s’est gardé d’apparaître comme le champion de la minorité noire mais s’est affirmé fier de sa double identité, lui, né d’un père kényan et d’une mère blanche du Kansas.« Les racistes nieront »

« Le racisme est un thème que notre pays ne peut se permettre d’ignorer. C’est une impasse qui nous bloque depuis des années », avait lancé au printemps le sénateur de 47 ans.
Selon un sondage récent de l’université de Stanford, Barack Obama pourrait perdre six points de pourcentage le jour de l’élection présidentielle du fait de sa couleur. Le prix du préjugé racial.
« La race est un facteur pour ceux qui voteront pour ou contre Barack Obama », explique Gary Weaver, professeur à l’American University et directeur de l’Institut de gestion des relations interculturelles.
« Certains Blancs ne voteront jamais pour un Noir. Mais il est peu probable qu’ils l’admettront publiquement. Ils pourront le faire lors d’un sondage anonyme », explique-t-il à l’AFP.
« Les racistes nieront le plus souvent qu’ils sont influencés dans leur vote par la race car c’est inacceptable socialement. Mais, dans l’isoloir, ils voteront vraisemblablement contre Obama », poursuit Gary Weaver.

Pas un obstacle mais une question centrale

Les Américains appellent ce phénomène « l’effet Bradley », du nom d’un ancien maire noir de Los Angeles Tom Bradley, battu à l’élection de gouverneur de Californie alors que tous les sondages le donnaient gagnant.
« La race peut être un obstacle mais ce n’est pas une question primordiale pour beaucoup d’Américains. Elle reste néanmoins centrale pour quelques-uns, en particulier les ruraux blancs des Etats du sud », observe Paul Herrnson, professeur à l’université du Maryland (est).
« Beaucoup de racistes ne voteront tout simplement pas, le 4 novembre. Certains voteront pour McCain », le candidat républicain, estime Gary Weaver, universitaire blanc, marié à une Noire il y a 38 ans, quand des Etats interdisaient encore les unions mixtes.
« Plus de 90% des Noirs devraient voter Obama, ainsi qu’une majorité des Hispaniques et une proportion énorme des jeunes. Ces trois catégories d’électeurs devraient contrebalancer ceux qui ne voteront jamais pour un candidat noir », souligne-t-il.
« Très peu d’Américains admettent qu’ils sont racistes, si ce n’est quelques milliers de Néo-Nazis, ou de membres du Ku Klux Klan, qui ne sont plus que 1.000 à 2.000 dans le Sud. L’Américain moyen ne l’avouera jamais », assure Gary Weaver.

Pas de problèmes chez les jeunes

« Il y a une évolution parmi les jeunes, eux n’ont pas de problème à fréquenter ceux qui sont différents », se réjouit Bryan Monroe, rédacteur en chef adjoint d’Ebony, le plus ancien magazine noir américain.
« Le plus grand fossé se trouve entre les personnes âgées blanches et les jeunes. Si les jeunes votent, ils décideront de cette élection », renchérit M. Weaver.
« Ils ont grandi après la lutte pour les droits civiques, ont appris à l’école que l’Amérique était censée être multiculturelle, plurielle, égalitaire. Pour eux, Obama est le représentant de cette société-là », relève-t-il.
Les Noirs ne représentent plus que 13% de la population américaine (40 millions), derrière les Hispaniques (42 millions).
Concentrée dans les Etats du Nord industriel et au sud de la Virginie, la communauté noire urbaine vit le plus souvent séparée des Blancs, dans des quartiers ghettoïsés.
Les inégalités sociales sont frappantes. Dans les prisons, il y a six fois plus de Noirs que de Blancs. Un Noir sur 15 est un détenu.
Et si les préjugés racistes reculent, ils n’ont pas disparu. Ainsi, sur le campus d’une université de l’Oregon, une effigie de Barack Obama vient d’être retrouvée, pendue à un arbre. (avec AFP)


Présidentielle américaine: Les raisons de la colère (What if Michael Moore’s prediction turned out to be true ?)

9 octobre, 2016
trump1trump2
https://i0.wp.com/allnewspipeline.com/images/Bubbassexualantics.png
bercoff
Toutes les stratégies que les intellectuels et les artistes produisent contre les « bourgeois » tendent inévitablement, en dehors de toute intention expresse et en vertu même de la structure de l’espace dans lequel elles s’engendrent, à être à double effet et dirigées indistinctement contre toutes les formes de soumission aux intérêts matériels, populaires aussi bien que bourgeoises. Bourdieu
Il est tellement stupide. C’est un minable, un chien, un porc, un escroc, un artiste de merde, un roquet qui ne sait pas de quoi il parle, qui ne travaille pas ses sujets, qui se fiche de tout, qui pense qu’il joue avec les gens, qui ne paie pas ses impôts. C’est un abruti. Colin Powell l’a dit mieux que tout le monde : c’est un désastre national. Il est une honte pour ce pays. Cela me met tellement en colère que ce pays soit arrivé au point de mettre cet idiot, ce crétin, là où il est aujourd’hui. Il dit qu’il aimerait donner un coup de poing à des gens ? Eh bien, moi j’aimerais bien lui mettre un coup de poing dans la tronche. Est-ce que c’est le genre de personne que nous voulons comme président ? Je ne crois pas. Ce qui me préoccupe, c’est la direction que prend ce pays et je suis très très inquiet au sujet de la mauvaise direction dans laquelle nous pourrions aller avec quelqu’un comme Donald Trump. Si vous vous intéressez à votre futur, votez. Robert De Niro (2016)
Ce n’est pas un témoin de circonstance, explique un avocat du dossier. Monsieur De Niro n’est pas le quidam qui passe par hasard sur le lieu d’une infraction et à qui on demande de venir raconter ce qu’il a vu. Il est au coeur du dossier.» L’artiste est en effet l’un des clients présumés d’un réseau de prostitution qu’auraient mis sur pied le photographe de charme Jean-Pierre Bourgeois et une ex-mannequin suédoise, Anika Brumarck. La filière a été dénoncée par un informateur anonyme de la BRP en octobre 1996. Elle fonctionnait depuis 1994, comme l’établira rapidement l’information judiciaire, confiée au juge N’Guyen le 24 octobre 1996. Anika Brumarck gérait les opérations depuis son appartement du XVIe arrondissement parisien. Usant de sa profession de photographe, Bourgeois se serait occupé de recruter les jeunes filles, alléchées par des propositions de petits rôles au cinéma ou de modèle photo pour des campagnes publicitaires. «Il a un vrai don pour repérer des proies faciles», assure un enquêteur, qui évoque avec dégoût l’exploitation de ce «sous-prolétariat d’aspirantes à une carrière de figurantes». Catalogue. Etudiantes sans le sou, vendeuses de fast-food, filles de la Ddass se laissent attirer dans l’appartement de Bourgeois, pour une première séance de photos nues, au Polaroïd. Ces clichés sont la base du catalogue qui sera proposé aux «clients». Il comporte sept ou huit noms de prostituées professionnelles haut de gamme, et une quarantaine d’autres, non professionnelles. Ensuite, selon les témoignages de plusieurs filles, Bourgeois propose aux modèles de leur raser une partie du sexe, pour des raisons «esthétiques». Opération généralement suivi d’un rapport sexuel. A ce stade, certaines candidates se rebiffent. Quelques-unes portent plainte pour viol et tentative de viol. D’autres passent le cap, afin de préserver leurs chances de décrocher un contrat, sans savoir qu’elles vont se retrouver dans un réseau de prostitution. Et une partie de celles-ci, confrontées à la réalité de leur premier client, iront également se confier à la justice. Les accusations de violences sexuelles sont d’ailleurs si nombreuses dans ce dossier que le parquet de Paris a décidé de le couper en deux. Le juge N’Guyen instruit donc en parallèle le proxénétisme aggravé et les viols et tentatives liées au réseau, pour lequel il dispose d’une multitude de plaintes de gamines, à l’encontre des instigateurs comme de certains clients. Bourgeois se serait essentiellement occupé de la clientèle moyen-orientale, grâce notamment à ses relations avec Nazihabdulatif Al-Ladki, secrétaire du neveu du roi d’Arabie Saoudite. Bourgeois, Brumarck et Al-Ladki sont actuellement incarcérés à Fleury-Mérogis. La partie américaine aurait été l’affaire du Polonais Wojtek Fibak, ex-tennisman de renom et ex-entraîneur de Lendl et de Leconte. C’est notamment lui qui aurait présenté Bourgeois à De Niro et qui aurait assuré le développement de la clientèle américaine, tout en recrutant de son côté quelques candidates. Pas toutes consentantes, apparemment, puisque Fibak fait lui aussi l’objet d’une mise en examen pour «agression sexuelle et tentative de viol». La déposition de De Niro était nécessaire afin d’établir les faits de proxénétisme. Car l’artiste reconnaît avoir eu des relations sexuelles avec au moins deux jeunes femmes qui lui auraient été présentées par Bourgeois. «Dans ce cas très précis, explique un avocat de la partie civile, c’est le client qui induit le proxénétisme.» Habituellement, le client s’adresse à une fille, la paie et s’en va. Aux policiers de démontrer que le souteneur présumé reçoit une partie des sommes et qu’il vit aux crochets de la belle. «Là, c’est l’inverse, poursuit l’avocat. Le client est d’abord au contact de l’intermédiaire. Le proxénétisme est établi d’emblée. Et le juge était sans doute très intéressé par le carnet d’adresses et les agendas de l’artiste, qui auraient pu révéler d’autres contacts. Libération (1998)
Critics have claimed that corner-clearing and other forms of so-called broken-windows policing are invidiously intended to “control African-American and poor communities,” in the words of Columbia law professor Bernard Harcourt. This critique of public-order enforcement ignores a fundamental truth: It’s the people who live in high-crime areas who petition for “corner-clearing.” The police are simply obeying their will. And when the police back off of such order-maintenance strategies under the accusation of racism, it is the law-abiding poor who pay the price. (…) A 54-year-old grandmother (…) understands something that eludes the activists and academics: Out of street disorder grows more serious crime. (…) After the Freddie Gray riots in April 2016, the Baltimore police virtually stopped enforcing drug laws and other low-level offenses. Shootings spiked, along with loitering and other street disorder. (…) This observed support for public-order enforcement is backed up by polling data. In a Quinnipiac poll from 2015, slightly more black than white voters in New York City said they want the police to “actively issue summonses or make arrests” in their neighborhood for quality-of-life offenses: 61 percent of black voters wanted such summons and arrests, with 33 percent opposed, versus 59 percent of white voters in support, with 37 percent opposed. The wider public is clueless about the social breakdown in high-crime areas and its effect on street life. The drive-by shootings, the open-air drug-dealing, and the volatility and brutality of those large groups of uncontrolled kids are largely unknown outside of inner-city areas. Ideally, informal social controls, above all the family, preserve public order. But when the family disintegrates, the police are the second-best solution for protecting the law-abiding. (That family disintegration now frequently takes the form of the chaos that social scientists refer to as “multi-partner fertility,” in which females have children by several different males and males have children by several different females, dashing hopes for any straightforward reuniting of biological mothers and fathers.) This year in Chicago alone, through August 30, 12 people have been shot a day, for a tally of 2,870 shooting victims, 490 of them killed. (By contrast, the police shot 17 people through August 30, or 0.6 percent of the total.) The reason for this mayhem is that cops have backed off of public-order enforcement. Pedestrian stops are down 90 percent. (…) “Police legitimacy” is a hot topic among academic critics of the police these days. Those critics have never answered the question: What should the police do when their constituents beg them to maintain order? Should the cops ignore them? There would be no surer way to lose legitimacy in the eyes of the people who need them most. Heather Mac Donald
A Chicago police officer who was savagely beaten at a car accident scene this week did not draw her gun on her attacker — even though she feared for her life — because she was afraid of the media attention that would come if she shot him, the city’s police chief said Thursday. Chicago Police Department Superintendent Eddie Johnson said the officer, a 17-year veteran of the force, knew she should shoot the attacker but hesitated because “she didn’t want her family or the department to go through the scrutiny the next day on the national news,” the Chicago Tribune reported. Johnson’s remarks, which came at an awards ceremony for police and firefighters, underscore a point law enforcement officers and some political leaders have pressed repeatedly as crime has risen in Chicago and other major cities: that police are reluctant to use force or act aggressively because they worry about negative media attention that will follow. The issue has become known as the Ferguson effect, named after the St. Louis suburb where a police officer shot and killed an unarmed black teenager in August 2014. The shooting set off protests and riots that summer and eventually gave way to a fevered national debate over race and policing. Many law enforcement officers have said that the intense focus on policing in the time since has put them on the defensive and hindered their work. Criminologists are generally skeptical of the Ferguson effect, many arguing that there simply isn’t enough evidence to definitively link spikes in crime to police acting with increased restraint. President Obama and Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch have also said not enough data exists to draw a clear connection. In Chicago, which has experienced record numbers of homicides this year, Mayor Rahm Emanuel has blamed the surge in violent crime on officers balking during confrontations, saying they have become “fetal” because they don’t want to be prosecuted or fired for their actions. The Washington Post
Deux voitures de police chargées de surveiller une caméra de vidéosurveillance victime de plusieurs attaques à la voiture-bélier ces dernières semaines, ont été prises à partie par de nombreux assaillants, armés de cocktails Molotov ce samedi à Viry-Châtillon (Essonne). L’attaque s’est déroulée dans la difficile cité de la Grande Borne, à cheval entre Grigny et Viry-Châtillon. Deux policiers ont été grièvement brûlés et transportés en urgence à l’hôpital. Le Parisien
D’après Guilluy, cette France périphérique, qui regroupe les anciens prolos et la classe moyenne plus ou moins déclassée ou en voie de l’être, représente 60 % de la population. Et la nouveauté de l’époque, dit-il, c’est que l’économie mondialisée, celle qui est concentrée dans les grandes métropoles, fonctionne parfaitement sans elle. Le signifiant France est en quelque sorte le dernier fil qui la relie à l’Histoire. Tenue à l’écart des grands mouvements économiques, dénoncée comme une entrave à la glorieuse marche du Progrès, menacée de devenir culturellement minoritaire, elle voit de surcroît ceux qui la gouvernent s’attacher à détruire ce à quoi elle tient. Alors elle pense, comme Zemmour, que son identité est menacée de disparition et se bat, dos au mur, pour la défendre. Elisabeth Lévy
 This was locker room banter, a private conversation that took place many years ago. Bill Clinton has said far worse to me on the golf course—not even close. I apologise if anyone was offended. Donald Trump
Obviously I’m embarrassed and ashamed. It’s no excuse, but this happened 11 years ago — I was younger, less mature, and acted foolishly in playing along. Billy Bush
I think what we’ve been hearing last Friday night is actually pretty predictable. The Clinton campaign had to change the conversation because she had a lot of really bad news this week. And so this 11-year-old bad boy locker room talk, this is how she wanted to do it. She’s trying to tell the media what she wants them to focus on; the questions she wants Anderson Cooper and the people in the room to ask her on Sunday night. Michelle Bachmann
The sanctimony from many on the left this weekend over Trump’s disgusting comments would be more credible if there had been any such condemnation of Bill Clinton during Gennifer-gate, Paula-gate, Monica-gate, or I-am-sure-there-were-others-gate. We have enjoyed a nearly two-decade marathon of disgust and horror from the Left, from their major pundits in media, from the top elected officials, from the Democratic brass, and from the rank-and-file Democrats who vote and work and live in this country — not disgust and horror at the acts of a serial adulterer or intern-violator — heavens no! Rather, shock and horror at the “sex-obsessed Ken Starr,” as Clinton aide, Paul Begala, so deliciously put it. The sexual obsession was with the man investigating the perjury about the sex, not the man having all of the sex. And why the crazy gymnastics to defend a serial sexual-harasser disbarred for his iniquities? Well, because he was a center-left liberal Democrat, of course. Ergo, “His personal life has nothing to do with anything.” Has the response from these exact same people (not same type of people, but I mean actual same people) been similar with the Trumpian personal conduct? Not quite. Reading their Twitter feeds has felt like my own personal devotion. If I didn’t know better I would guess that overnight every one of these people converted to a strict form of Christianity — and then took a vow of celibacy the next day. The horror at what Trump said and did is not really the issue, as much as the strain on believability their posture now creates. Cigars and interns should be enough to generate a little moral outrage for those who now find Trump’s behavior so lewd and appalling. Daniel L. Bahnsen
Un très vieil enregistrement de Donald Trump d’il y a 10 ans, alors qu’il était invité à participer à une émission de variétés et qu’il ne savait pas que son micro était allumé, vient « miraculeusement » de faire surface, où il parle de ses prouesses avec les femmes dans les termes qu’on utilise dans les salles de garde. Les médias se sont jetés sur cet enregistrement pour assassiner Trump et c’est logique : ils font tout pour que Donald Trump ne soit pas élu. Des politiciens ont déclaré que ces mots disqualifient Donald Trump pour la Maison-Blanche, oubliant que Bill Clinton a été à ce poste tout en se rendant coupable non pas de mots, mais d’agissements sexuels répréhensibles. Donald Trump vient de présenter des excuses publiques pour les propos qu’il a tenus il y a 10 ans. Elles ne seront pas publiées. Les médias feront comme si elles n’existent pas  (…) Oui, les médias se sont jetés sur les propos déplacés de Donald Trump et ont étouffé les propos scandaleux de Clinton. Quelle est la valeur de leurs leçons de morale, quand ils restent silencieux concernant la débauche de Bill Clinton — et je ne parle pas ici de Monica Lewinsky ? (…)  Vous avez tous connaissance maintenant — ou vous allez bientôt l’apprendre — de l’existence de cet enregistrement où Donald Trump dit, entre autres, « Je suis automatiquement attiré par les belles femmes, c’est comme un aimant… quand vous êtes une star, elles vous laissent faire… vous pouvez tout leur faire. » Mais avez-vous jamais entendu ces mêmes médias rapporter que Bill Clinton a violé Juanita Broaddrick non pas une, mais deux fois, en 1978 alors qu’il était procureur général de l’Arkansas ? Et qu’il l’a harcelée pendant encore 6 mois pour tenter de la rencontrer de nouveau ? Avez-vous entendu parler de Paula Jones, ex-fonctionnaire de l’Arkansas, qui a poursuivi Bill Clinton en justice pour harcèlement sexuel, qui a donné lieu à une compensation de 850 000 dollars, et provoqué la destitution de Clinton la Chambre des représentants, bien avant son impeachment de la présidence dans l’affaire Lewinsky ? Kathleen Willey ? Les médias parlent-ils de Kathleen Willey, cette assistante-bénévole à la Maison-Blanche qui a révélé avoir été sexuellement abusée par le Président Bill Clinton le 29 novembre 1993, durant son premier terme, soit deux ans avant sa relation sexuelle avec Monica Lewinsky ? Eileen Wellstone, violée par Clinton après une rencontre dans un pub d’Oxford University en 1969, Carolyn Moffet, secrétaire juridique à Little Rock en 1979, qui a réussi à fuir de la chambre d’hôtel où le gouverneur Clinton l’avait attirée pour lui demander des faveurs sexuelles, Elizabeth Ward Gracen, Miss Arkansas en 1982, qui a accusé Clinton de la forcer à avoir des rapports sexuels avec elle juste après la compétition pour Miss Arkansas, Becky Brown, la nounou de Chelsea, la fille des Clinton, qu’il a tenté d’attirer dans une chambre pour avoir des relations sexuelles avec elle, Helen Dowdy, la femme d’un cousin d’Hillary, qui a accusé Bill Clinton, en 1986, d’attouchements sexuels  lors d’un mariage. Cristy Zercher, hôtesse de l’air lors de la campagne de Clinton de 1991-1992, qui a déclaré à Star magazine avoir été victime des attouchements sexuels de Clinton pendant 40 minutes dans le jet de la campagne sans pouvoir se défendre… Ont-ils rué dans les brancards ? Non. Vous ont-ils informé ? Pas plus. Ont-ils dénoncé le comportement de Hillary Clinton en ses occasions ? Encore moins. Pourquoi ? Parce que les journalistes permettent qu’un homme de leur camp viole des femmes, les agresse sexuellement, forcent une stagiaire à faire des pipes au président dans le bureau ovale, mais ils sont scandalisés qu’un homme de droite prononce des mots sexuellement déplacés. Jean-Patrick Grumberg
Vous allez dans certaines petites villes de Pennsylvanie où, comme dans beaucoup de petites villes du Middle West, les emplois ont disparu depuis maintenant 25 ans et n’ont été remplacés par rien d’autre (…) Et il n’est pas surprenant qu’ils deviennent pleins d’amertume, qu’ils s’accrochent aux armes à feu ou à la religion, ou à leur antipathie pour ceux qui ne sont pas comme eux, ou encore à un sentiment d’hostilité envers les immigrants. Barack Hussein Obama
Part of the reason that our politics seems so tough right now, and facts and science and argument does not seem to be winning the day all the time, is because we’re hard-wired not to always think clearly when we’re scared. Barack Hussein Obama
Pour généraliser, en gros, vous pouvez placer la moitié des partisans de Trump dans ce que j’appelle le panier des pitoyables. Les racistes, sexistes, homophobes, xénophobes, islamophobes. A vous de choisir. Hillary Clinton
Je suis désolé d’être le porteur de mauvaises nouvelles, mais je crois avoir été assez clair l’été dernier lorsque j’ai affirmé que Donald Trump serait le candidat républicain à la présidence des États-Unis. Cette fois, j’ai des nouvelles encore pires à vous annoncer: Donald J. Trump va remporter l’élection du mois de novembre. Ce clown à temps partiel et sociopathe à temps plein va devenir notre prochain président. (…) Jamais de toute ma vie n’ai-je autant voulu me tromper. (…) Voici 5 raisons pour lesquelles Trump va gagner : 1. Le poids électoral du Midwest, ou le Brexit de la Ceinture de rouille 2. Le dernier tour de piste des Hommes blancs en colère 3. Hillary est un problème en elle-même 4. Les partisans désabusés de Bernie Sanders 5. L’effet Jesse Ventura. Michael Moore
Michael Moore se fait l’avocat du diable, il endosse également un costume prophétique, au sens propre mais sécularisé, puisqu’il met en garde son peuple et l’appelle à se repentir et marcher à nouveau dans le droit chemin. On répète depuis un an que Trump n’a aucune chance: il ne va pas durer, sa candidature va faire long feu, il ne va pas passer le Super Tuesday, il ne va pas rester en tête, il va y avoir une convention contestée et il n’aura pas l’investiture. On voit l’acuité de ces prédictions aujourd’hui. Cette stratégie de la peur a pour fonction de mobiliser contre Trump, mais on voit bien que Clinton n’existe que pour faire barrage. Moore utilise donc une autre tactique: il présente la victoire de Trump non plus comme fortement improbable car irrationnelle mais au contraire comme une quasi-certitude. Le titre anglais de son texte est «Why Trump will win», pourquoi il va gagner. On ne se demande plus s’il va gagner, il s’agit désormais d’en expliquer les raisons. Ce fait accompli a pour fonction de surprendre, d’attirer l’attention du lecteur-cliqueur, en lui faisant peur. Cette stratégie de la peur a pour fonction de mobiliser contre Trump, d’abord, et indirectement en faveur d’Hillary Clinton, mais on voit bien que Clinton n’existe que pour faire barrage à Trump. (…) La victoire du Brexit, qui a surpris bien des analystes, renforce le message de Moore: c’est arrivé là-bas, ça peut arriver ici – ça va arriver ici, sauf si vous m’écoutez… (…) attirer l’attention sur les Etats de la Rust Belt est pertinent. Ce sont des Etats que l’on a laissés pour morts, économiquement et politiquement, à partir des années 1980. Ils étaient en perte de vitesse et on n’avait d’yeux que pour la Sun Belt. Certes la Floride a été décisive en 2000 mais en 2012, la victoire d’Obama a été proclamée avant même que l’on connaisse le résultat en Floride. En 2004, la victoire de Bush s’est décidée dans l’Ohio, qui passe pour l’Etat clé par excellence. Son calcul est un peu simpliste: il a manqué 64 grands électeurs à Mitt Romney et les quatre Etats de la Rust Belt qu’il mentionne (Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio et Pennsylvanie) totalisent justement 64 grands électeurs. (…) il faut envisager l’élection au niveau local, pas national. Et les enjeux régionaux de la Rust Belt reviennent sur le devant de la scène. Reste à voir s’ils seront déterminants d’ici novembre et s’ils suffiront à dépasser les autres questions. (…) La longévité de Trump dans cette élection en dit long sur le niveau d’exaspération des électeurs américains envers leur classe politique. Trump est le symptôme plutôt que le mal: il montre à quel point le rejet est fort, notamment côté républicain. Cette longévité de Trump me semble d’abord et avant tout traduire l’exaspération d’une partie de l’électorat avec «Washington», le jusqu’au-boutisme, l’inefficacité, le carriérisme coupé des intérêts des électeurs, la suspicion que les élus travaillent davantage pour les lobbies que pour les électeurs. Ils saluent plus la transgression symbolique d’un ordre moral qu’ils récusent que la clownerie en tant que telle. Les électeurs utilisent Trump comme vecteur d’une revanche symbolique sur le politiquement correct. Trump n’est pas tant perçu par ses partisans comme un clown que comme un rebelle: celui qui va mettre un coup de pied dans la fourmilière, celui qui va s’affranchir du politiquement correct qui, selon eux, a installé une chape de plomb discursive notamment sur les «non minorités» (où l’on retrouve les hommes blancs hétérosexuels). Ils saluent plus la transgression symbolique d’un ordre moral qu’ils récusent (mis en place par les composantes de la coalition démocrate) que la clownerie en tant que telle. Evidemment il y a un côté «poli-tainment», «show business» dans lequel Trump excelle: il fait de la campagne une sorte de gigantesque série de télé réalité. Mais ils utilisent Trump surtout comme vecteur d’une forme de revanche symbolique sur le politiquement correct. (…) la clé de l’élection sera la mobilisation des électeurs en nombre. Les proportions de tel ou tel groupe que nous donnent les sondages sont une indication assez trompeuse. Il ne s’agit pas de savoir si tel ou tel candidat emporte tel groupe – y est majoritaire – mais combien d’électeurs il ou elle arrive à déplacer le jour J. Moore a raison de rappeler que c’est surtout dans l’électorat démocrate qu’on trouve les électeurs les plus vulnérables, ceux qui ont le plus de difficultés logistiques à voter, ceux à qui les Etats tenus par les Républicains imposent la présentation de pièces d’identité qu’ils n’ont pas forcément et qui, du coup, les découragent. De ce fait, beaucoup d’électeurs démocrates potentiels (noirs et hispaniques) font défaut, ce qui peut faire basculer un Etat-clé. Ces derniers jours, un certain nombre de lois dans ce sens ont été invalidées car exagérément restrictives, ou carrément racistes dans leur logique. C’est un des enjeux de la campagne. Mais il y en a d’autres: en amont il faut aller voir les gens, faire du porte à porte et les persuader de voter alors qu’ils n’en ont pas forcément l’habitude. (….) Autre enjeu, ceux qui n’ont pas de difficulté logistique pour voter, qui n’ont pas deux emplois dans la journée et qui ne sont pas des minorités: les jeunes blancs. Il y a deux profils: les jeunes votent peu dans l’ensemble, ce sont donc des voix perdues pour les démocrates. Et il y a les jeunes pro-Sanders, qui étaient très hostiles à Clinton. Lauric Henneton (Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines)
Il est vrai qu’il existe actuellement, dans chaque parti, un schisme entre les défenseurs de l’«establishment» et un courant populiste. La principale différence, c’est que chez les républicains, ce sont les populistes qui ont gagné, alors que les démocrates ont fini par adouber un candidat de l’ «establishment». Cette situation est pour le moins paradoxal, étant donné que ce sont les démocrates qui se considèrent traditionnellement comme le parti des petits gens, de l’Américain moyen. (…) Femmes, Afro-Américains, Hispaniques, diplômés – voilà les groupes qui soutiennent Clinton, souvent massivement (autour de 76% des Hispaniques, par exemple). Trump, par contre, est essentiellement le candidat d’un électorat blanc, populaire et masculin. On parle beaucoup aux États-Unis du déclin de cette population longtemps dominant. Mais pour le moment, l’électorat populaire blanc demeure assez important, représentant, par exemple, 44% de ceux qui ont voté en 2012. La question est de savoir si une coalition hétéroclite et multiculturelle qui annonce l’avenir se révélera plus puissante que le ressentiment blanc qui s’exprime à travers Trump. (…) Il s’agit d’un effet «apprenti sorcier»: depuis des décennies, au moins depuis Nixon, la stratégie électorale républicaine consiste à attiser les craintes et les rancœurs d’un électorat blanc et populaire, insistant en particulier sur les questions culturelles sur lesquelles ils divergent avec la gauche: la religion, l’avortement, le droit de s’armer, le patriotisme. Cette population s’estime souvent menacée par l’immigration et la discrimination positive en faveur des minorités. Mais les républicains ont toujours su récolter les voix de cet électorat tout en défendant une politique économique libérale favorisée par le monde des affaires et de la finance, axé sur le libre-échange ainsi que la réduction de la fiscalité et des dépenses sociales. Au point que certains se demandent si l’électorat populaire républicain a vraiment profité des politiques économiques qu’il a rendues possibles. Trump représente, si vous voulez, l’émancipation de cet électorat populaire républicain vis-à-vis d’un «establishment» plus libéral (au sens européen) que proprement conservateur. Si Trump a compris au moins une chose, c’est qu’il y avait une demande pour un candidat aux valeurs conservatrices (même si Trump ne satisfait lui-même cette critère que grâce à une hypocrisie plus ou moins tolérée), mais dont la politique économique serait «souverainiste» et nationaliste. L’«establishment» républicain ne maitrise ainsi plus les angoisses d’un électorat qu’il a longtemps cherché à encourager. Le ton agressif et provocateur du discours du Trump ne sort pas non plus de nulle part: il prend le relais des contestataires du Tea Party, des républicains au Congrès qui ont mené une obstruction systématique contre la politique du Président Obama, etc. (…) Trump et Sanders se sont fait chacun le champion des Américains qui pâtissent de la mondialisation et des politiques économiques libre-échangistes poursuivies depuis des années. Mais la ressemblance s’arrête là. En fait, il est difficile d’imaginer deux lignes politiques plus éloignées l’un de l’autre. Trump est l’incarnation de la corruption de la vie politique par les grandes fortunes contre lequel Sanders et ses supporteurs s’insurgent. Si Sanders dénonce, comme Trump, des traités de libre-échange comme étant peu favorables aux ouvriers, il demande pourtant la régularisation des «sans papiers» (moyennant une réforme du système actuel d’immigration), alors que le discours de Trump est franchement xénophobe: déportation des «sans papiers», interdiction provisoire des Musulmans du territoire national, construction d’un mur le long de la frontière mexicaine. On est donc bien loin d’un véritable rapprochement idéologique. (…) Ces mouvements, me semblent-ils, reposent sur deux craintes: une angoisse vis-à-vis de la mondialisation, et des doutes sur l’état de santé de la démocratie. Ses craintes sont souvent liées, la mondialisation et la montée des inégalités étant suspects de mettre à mal la démocratie. Ce qu’on appelle le «déficit démocratique» dans l’Union européenne est devenu un souci plus général. Toutefois il y a des points de discordes majeures à l’intérieur de ces mouvements «anti-systèmes», comme on le voit entre Trump et Sanders, dans les débats autour du Brexit, ou dans les antilibéraux de droite et de gauche en France. Certains, comme Trump et certains partisans du Brexit, rejettent la mondialisation en prônant un repli national, au point d’assumer une certaine xénophobie comme une conséquence logique du protectionnisme. D’autres, comme Sanders ou même Nuit Debout, veulent limiter le libre-échange et le flux des capitaux tout en favorisant les flux migratoires, du moins par la régularisation des «sans-papiers». Pour le moment, c’est plutôt les premiers qui semblent avoir le vent en poupe. (…) Contrairement à ce qu’on a pu penser il y a encore quelques mois, oui, il est tout à fait possible que Trump remporte le scrutin du 8 novembre. Mais la campagne fortement clivante qu’il mène, ainsi que l’histoire électorale récente suggèrent que pour Trump, la voie menant vers la Maison-Blanche reste très étroite. Ces propos qui plaisent à un électoral blanc populaire lui font perdre des voix chez les diplômés. D’autre part, dans les élections américaines, il faut remporter des Etats: pour le moment, Trump n’a jamais eu de solides longueurs d’avances dans les «swing states» (état balançoires) tels que la Floride, l’Ohio, ou la Pennsylvanie, qu’il lui faudra gagner impérativement pour faire mieux que Mitt Romney en 2012. Candidat improviste, Trump n’a pas, comme son rival, sollicité des fonds de la campagne de façon méthodique, et a donc un déficit financier important vis-à-vis des démocrates. Bien sûr, très peu de gens ont cru que Trump arriverait à ce point. Mais pour être élu président, il lui faudra continuer à surmonter les obstacles considérables qui se profilent devant lui. Michael C. Behrent (Appalachian State University, Caroline du Nord)
Experts et commentateurs se sont, dans leur grande majorité, mis le doigt dans l’œil parce qu’ils pensent à l’intérieur du système. À Paris comme à Washington, on reste persuadé qu’un «outsider» n’a aucune chance face aux appareils des partis, des lobbies et des machines électorales. Que ce soit dans notre monarchie républicaine ou dans leur hiérarchie de Grands Électeurs, si l’on n’est pas un familier du sérail, on n’existe pas. Tout le dédain et la condescendance envers Trump, qui n’était jusqu’ici connu que par ses gratte-ciel et son émission de téléréalité, pouvaient donc s’afficher envers cette grosse brute qui ne sait pas rester à sa place. On connaît la suite. (…) Trump est l’un des premiers à avoir compris et utilisé la désintermédiation. Ce n’est pas vraiment l’ubérisation de la politique, mais ça y ressemble quelque peu. Quand je l’ai interrogé sur le mouvement qu’il suscitait dans la population américaine, il m’a répondu: Twitter, Facebook et Instagram. Avec ses 15 millions d’abonnés, il dispose d’une force de frappe avec laquelle il dialogue sans aucun intermédiaire. Il y a trente ans, il écrivait qu’aucun politique ne pouvait se passer d’un quotidien comme le New York Times. Aujourd’hui, il affirme que les réseaux sociaux sont beaucoup plus efficaces – et beaucoup moins onéreux – que la possession de ce journal. (…) Là-bas comme ici, l’avenir n’est plus ce qu’il était, la classe moyenne se désosse, la précarité est toujours prégnante, les attentats terroristes ne sont plus, depuis un certain 11 septembre, des images lointaines vues sur petit ou grand écran. (…) Et la fureur s’explique par le décalage entre la ritournelle de «Nous sommes la plus grande puissance et le plus beau pays du monde» et le «Je n’arrive pas à finir le mois et payer les études de mes enfants et l’assurance médicale de mes parents». Sans parler de l’écart toujours plus abyssal entre riches et modestes. (…) Il existe, depuis quelques années, un étonnant rapprochement entre les problématiques européennes et américaines. Qui aurait pu penser, dans ce pays d’accueil traditionnel, que l’immigration provoquerait une telle hostilité chez certains, qui peut permettre à Trump de percer dans les sondages en proclamant sa volonté de construire un grand mur? Il y a certes des points communs avec Marine Le Pen, y compris dans la nécessité de relocaliser, de rebâtir des frontières et de proclamer la grandeur de son pays. Mais évidemment, Trump a d’autres moyens que la présidente du Front National… De plus, répétons-le, c’est d’abord un pragmatique et un négociateur. Je ne crois pas que ce soit les qualités les plus apparentes de Marine Le Pen… (…) Son programme économique le situe beaucoup plus à gauche que les caciques Républicains et les néo-conservateurs proches d’Hillary Clinton qui le haïssent, parce que lui croit, dans certains domaines, à l’intervention de l’État et aux limites nécessaires du laisser-faire, laisser-aller. (…) Il ne ménage personne et peut aller beaucoup plus loin que Marine Le Pen, tout simplement parce qu’il n’a jamais eu à régler le problème du père fondateur et encore moins à porter le fardeau d’une étiquette tout de même controversée. Sa marque à lui, ce n’est pas la politique, mais le bâtiment et la réussite. Ça change pas mal de choses. (…) il trouve insupportable que des villes comme Paris et Bruxelles, qu’il adore et a visitées maintes fois, deviennent des camps retranchés où l’on n’est même pas capable de répliquer à un massacre comme celui du Bataclan. On peut être vent debout contre le port d’arme, mais, dit-il, s’il y avait eu des vigiles armés boulevard Voltaire, il n’y aurait pas eu autant de victimes. Pour lui, un pays qui ne sait pas se défendre est un pays en danger de mort. (…) Il s’entendra assez bien avec Poutine pour le partage des zones d’influence, et même pour une collaboration active contre Daesh et autres menaces, mais, comme il le répète sur tous les tons, l’Amérique de Trump ne défendra que les pays qui paieront pour leur protection. Ça fait un peu Al Capone, mais ça a le mérite de la clarté. Si l’Europe n’a pas les moyens de protéger son identité, son mode de vie, ses valeurs et sa culture, alors, personne ne le fera à sa place. En résumé, pour Trump, la politique est une chose trop grave pour la laisser aux politiciens professionnels, et la liberté un état trop fragile pour la confier aux pacifistes de tout poil. André Bercoff
La grande difficulté, avec Donald Trump, c’est qu’on est à la fois face à une caricature et face à un phénomène bien plus complexe. Une caricature d’abord, car tout chez lui, semble magnifié. L’appétit de pouvoir, l’ego, la grossièreté des manières, les obsessions, les tweets épidermiques, l’étalage voyant de son succès sur toutes les tours qu’il a construites et qui portent son nom. Donald Trump joue en réalité à merveille de son côté caricatural, il simplifie les choses, provoque, indigne, et cela marche parce que notre monde du 21e siècle se gargarise de ces simplifications outrancières, à l’heure de l’information immédiate et fragmentée. La machine médiatique est comme un ventre qui a toujours besoin de nouveaux scandales et Donald, le commercial, le sait mieux que personne, parce qu’il a créé et animé une émission de téléréalité pendant des années. Il sait que la politique américaine actuelle est un grand cirque, où celui qui crie le plus fort a souvent raison parce que c’est lui qui «fait le buzz». En même temps, ne voir que la caricature qu’il projette serait rater le phénomène Trump et l’histoire stupéfiante de son succès électoral. Derrière l’image télévisuelle simplificatrice, se cache un homme intelligent, rusé et avisé, qui a géré un empire de milliards de dollars et employé des dizaines de milliers de personnes. Ce n’est pas rien! Selon plusieurs proches du milliardaire que j’ai interrogés, Trump réfléchit de plus à une candidature présidentielle depuis des années, et il a su capter, au-delà de l’air du temps, la colère profonde qui traversait l’Amérique, puis l’exprimer et la chevaucher. Grâce à ses instincts politiques exceptionnels, il a vu ce que personne d’autre – à part peut-être le démocrate Bernie Sanders – n’avait su voir: le gigantesque ras le bol d’un pays en quête de protection contre les effets déstabilisants de la globalisation, de l’immigration massive et du terrorisme islamique; sa peur du déclin aussi. En ce sens, Donald Trump s’est dressé contre le modèle dominant plébiscité par les élites et a changé la nature du débat de la présidentielle. Il a remis à l’ordre du jour l’idée de protection du pays, en prétendant au rôle de shérif aux larges épaules face aux dangers d’un monde instable et dangereux. Cela révèle au minimum une personnalité sacrément indépendante, un côté indomptable qui explique sans doute l’admiration de ses partisans…Ils ont l’impression que cet homme explosif ne se laissera impressionner par rien ni personne. Beaucoup des gens qui le connaissent affirment d’ailleurs que Donald Trump a plusieurs visages: le personnage public, flashy, égotiste, excessif, qui ne veut jamais avouer ses faiblesses parce qu’il doit «vendre» sa marchandise, perpétuer le mythe, et un personnage privé plus nuancé, plus modéré et plus pragmatique, qui sait écouter les autres et ne choisit pas toujours l’option la plus extrême…Toute la difficulté et tout le mystère, pour l’observateur est de s’y retrouver entre ces différents Trump. C’est loin d’être facile, surtout dans le contexte de quasi hystérie qui règne dans l’élite médiatique et politique américaine, tout entière liguée contre lui. Il est parfois très difficile de discerner ce qui relève de l’analyse pertinente ou de la posture de combat anti-Trump. (…) à de rares exceptions près, les commentateurs n’ont pas vu venir le phénomène Trump, parce qu’il était «en dehors des clous», impensable selon leurs propres «grilles de lecture». Trop scandaleux et trop extrême, pensaient-ils. Il a fait exploser tant de codes en attaquant ses adversaires au dessous de la ceinture et s’emparant de sujets largement tabous, qu’ils ont cru que «le grossier personnage» ne durerait pas! Ils se sont dit que quelqu’un qui se contredisait autant ou disait autant de contre vérités, finirait par en subir les conséquences. Bref, ils ont vu en lui soit un clown soit un fasciste – sans réaliser que toutes les inexactitudes ou dérapages de Trump lui seraient pardonnés comme autant de péchés véniels, parce qu’il ose dire haut et fort ce que son électorat considère comme une vérité fondamentale: à savoir que l’Amérique doit faire respecter ses frontières parce qu’un pays sans frontières n’est plus un pays. Plus profondément, je pense que les élites des deux côtes ont raté le phénomène Trump (et le phénomène Sanders), parce qu’elles sont de plus en plus coupées du peuple et de ses préoccupations, qu’elles vivent entre elles, se cooptent entre elles, s’enrichissent entre elles, et défendent une version «du progrès» très post-moderne, détachée des préoccupations de nombreux Américains. Soyons clairs, si Trump est à bien des égards exaspérant et inquiétant, il y a néanmoins quelque chose de pourri et d’endogame dans le royaume de Washington. Le peuple se sent hors jeu. (…) Ce statut de milliardaire du peuple est crédible parce qu’il ne s’est jamais senti membre de l’élite bien née, dont il aime se moquer en la taxant «d’élite du sperme chanceux». Cette dernière ne l’a d’ailleurs jamais vraiment accepté, lui le parvenu de Queens, venu de la banlieue, qui aime tout ce qui brille. Il ne faut pas oublier en revanche que Donald a grandi sur les chantiers de construction, où il accompagnait son père déjà tout petit, ce qui l’a mis au contact des classes populaires. Il parle exactement comme eux! Quand je me promenais à travers l’Amérique à la rencontre de ses électeurs, c’est toujours ce dont ils s’étonnaient. Ils disaient: «Donald parle comme nous, pense comme nous, est comme nous». Le fait qu’il soit riche, n’est pas un obstacle parce qu’on est en Amérique, pas en France. Les Américains aiment la richesse et le succès. (…) L’un des atouts de Trump, pour ses partisans, c’est qu’il est politiquement incorrect dans un pays qui l’est devenu à l’excès. Sur l’islam radical (qu’Obama ne voulait même pas nommer comme une menace!), sur les maux de l’immigration illégale et maints autres sujets. Ses fans se disent notamment exaspérés par le tour pris par certains débats, comme celui sur les toilettes «neutres» que l’administration actuelle veut établir au nom du droit des «personnes au genre fluide» à «ne pas être offensés». Ils apprécient que Donald veuille rétablir l’expression de Joyeux Noël, de plus en plus bannie au profit de l’expression Joyeuses fêtes, au motif qu’il ne faut pas risquer de blesser certaines minorités religieuses non chrétiennes…Ils se demandent pourquoi les salles de classe des universités, lieu où la liberté d’expression est supposée sacro-sainte, sont désormais surveillées par une «police de la pensée» étudiante orwellienne, prête à demander des comptes aux professeurs chaque fois qu’un élève s’estime «offensé» dans son identité…Les fans de Trump sont exaspérés d’avoir vu le nom du club de football américain «Red Skins» soudainement banni du vocabulaire de plusieurs journaux, dont le Washington Post, (et remplacé par le mot R…avec trois points de suspension), au motif que certaines tribus indiennes jugeaient l’appellation raciste et insultante. (Le débat, qui avait mobilisé le Congrès, et l’administration Obama, a finalement été enterré après de longs mois, quand une enquête a révélé que l’écrasante majorité des tribus indiennes aimait finalement ce nom…). Dans ce contexte, Trump a été jugé«rafraîchissant» par ses soutiens, presque libérateur. (…) Pour moi, le phénomène Trump est la rencontre d’un homme hors normes et d’un mouvement de rébellion populaire profond, qui dépasse de loin sa propre personne. C’est une lame de fond, anti globalisation et anti immigration illégale, qui traverse en réalité tout l’Occident. Trump surfe sur la même vague que les politiques britanniques qui ont soutenu le Brexit, ou que Marine Le Pen en France. La différence, c’est que Trump est une version américaine du phénomène, avec tout ce que cela implique de pragmatisme et d’attachement au capitalisme. (…) Trump n’est pas un idéologue. Il a longtemps été démocrate avant d’être républicain et il transgresse les frontières politiques classiques des partis. Favorable à une forme de protectionnisme et une remise en cause des accords de commerce qui sont défavorables à son pays, il est à gauche sur les questions de libre échange, mais aussi sur la protection sociale des plus pauvres, qu’il veut renforcer, et sur les questions de société, sur lesquelles il affiche une vision libérale de New Yorkais, certainement pas un credo conservateur clair. De ce point de vue là, il est post reaganien. Mais Donald Trump est clairement à droite sur la question de l’immigration illégale et des frontières, et celle des impôts. Au fond, c’est à la fois un marchand et un nationaliste, qui se voit comme un pragmatique, dont le but sera de faire «des bons deals» pour son pays. Il n’est pas là pour changer le monde, contrairement à Obama. Ce qu’il veut, c’est remettre l’Amérique au premier plan, la protéger. Son instinct de politique étrangère est clairement du côté des réalistes et des prudents, car Trump juge que les Etats-Unis se sont laissé entrainer dans des aventures qui les ont affaiblis et n’ont pas réglé les crises. Il ne veut plus d’une Amérique jouant les gendarmes du monde. Mais vu sa tendance aux volte face et vu ce qu’il dit sur le rôle que devrait jouer l’Amérique pour venir à bout de la menace de l’islam radical, comme elle l’a fait avec le nazisme et le communisme, Donald Trump pourrait fort bien changer d’avis, et revenir à un credo plus interventionniste avec le temps. Ses instincts sont au repli, mais il reste largement imprévisible. (…) De nombreuses questions se posent sur son caractère, ses foucades, son narcissisme et sa capacité à se contrôler, si importante chez le président de la première puissance du monde! Je ne suis pas pour autant convaincue par l’image de «Hitler», fasciste et raciste, qui lui a été accolée par la presse américaine. Hitler avait écrit Mein Kamp. Donald Trump, lui, a écrit «L ‘art du deal» et avait envisagé juste après la publication de ce premier livre, de se présenter à la présidence en prenant sur son ticket la vedette de télévision afro-américaine démocrate Oprah Winfrey, un élément qui ne colle pas avec l’image d’un raciste anti femmes! Ses enfants et nombre de ses collaborateurs affirment qu’il ne discrimine pas les gens en fonction de leur sexe ou de la couleur de leur peau, mais en fonction de leurs mérites, et que c’est pour cette même raison qu’il est capable de s’en prendre aux représentants du sexe faible ou des minorités avec une grande brutalité verbale, ne voyant pas la nécessité de prendre des gants. Les questions les plus lourdes concernant Trump, sont selon moi plutôt liées à la manière dont il réagirait, s’il ne parvenait pas à tenir ses promesses, une fois à la Maison-Blanche. Tout président américain est confronté à la complexité de l’exercice du pouvoir dans un système démocratique extrêmement contraignant. Cet homme d’affaires habitué à diriger un empire immobilier pyramidal, dont il est le seul maître à bord, tenterait-il de contourner le système pour arriver à ses fins et prouver au peuple qu’il est bien le meilleur, en agissant dans une zone grise, avec l’aide des personnages sulfureux qui l’ont accompagné dans ses affaires? Et comment se comporterait-il avec ses adversaires politiques ou les représentants de la presse, vu la brutalité et l’acharnement dont il fait preuve envers ceux qui se mettent sur sa route? Hériterait-on d’un Berlusconi ou d’un Nixon puissance 1000? Autre interrogation, vu la fascination qu’exerce sur lui le régime autoritaire de Vladimir Poutine: serait-il prêt à sacrifier le droit international et l’indépendance de certains alliés européens, pour trouver un accord avec le patron du Kremlin sur les sujets lui tenant à cœur, notamment en Syrie? Bref, pourrait-il accepter une forme de Yalta bis, et remettre en cause le rôle de l’Amérique dans la défense de l’ordre libéral et démocratique de l’Occident et du monde depuis 1945? Autant de questions cruciales auxquelles Donald Trump a pour l’instant répondu avec plus de désinvolture que de clarté. Laure Mandeville

Mépris de la classe ouvrière blanche par des élites toujours plus déconnectées du réel, réformes sociétales – entre mariage et toilettes pour tous – proprement délirantes, casseroles de la candidate démocrate, déception des jeunes soutiens de Bernie Sanders,  effet Jesse Ventura …

Et si pour une fois le bouffon de gauche Michael Moore avait raison ?

Alors qu’avec la dernière ligne droite de la présidentielle, s’accumulent les coups bas à l’encontre des conversations et du comportement de corps de garde – depuis longtemps connus mais cette fois sortis par rien de moins et bien involontairement qu’un cousin des frères Bush – du seul candidat républicain face à une candidate dont l’ancien président de mari n’a pas exactement de leçon à donner dans le domaine …

(A quand,  pour le bannissement final de ce nouvel avatar de l’Oedipe des tragédies grecques de nos classes de lycée, la sortie d’accusations d’inceste, de parricide ou de déclenchement de la peste?)

Pendant que des deux côtés de l’Atlantique, c’est la sécurité des plus démunis que l’on sacrifie lorsque l’on abandonne des quartiers entiers à la pire des racailles

Comment ne pas voir avec la correpondante du Figaro Laure Mandeville et les rares commentateurs – le bouffon gauchiste Michael Moore compris – qui s’en donnent la peine …

Et quelque soit l’issue du scrutin et le côté de l’Atlantique …

La vague de colère et son envers de saut dans l’inconnu qu’incarne le candidat au nom prédestiné (Trump, comme on le sait, désigne en anglais l’atout qui surcoupe toutes les autres cartes) …

Contre la « digue du statu quo », de l’aveuglement volontaire et du politiquement correct « défendue bec et ongles par les élites » ?

Laure Mandeville : «Le débat Trump/Clinton peut être un show Shakespeare trash»
Vincent Tremolet de Villers
Le Figaro
07/10/2016

FIGAROVOX/GRAND ENTRETIEN – A l’occasion de la publication de «Qui est vraiment Donald Trump?», Laure Mandeville a accordé un entretien fleuve au FigaroVox. La journaliste décrit un homme complexe, moins caricatural que l’image qu’il renvoie.

Grand reporter au Figaro, Laure Mandeville est chef du bureau Amérique depuis 2009. Elle suit le candidat républicain depuis le début de la campagne et vient de publier Qui est vraiment Donald Trump?aux éditions des Équateurs.

FIGAROVOX. La vidéo tout juste sortie montrant Donald Trump en 2005 en train de proférer des propos obscènes sur la manière dont il a tenté de séduire une femme mariée, peut-elle le discréditer définitivement?

-Laure MANDEVILLE. -Cette vidéo d’ une incroyable vulgarité est dévastatrice pour Donald Trump à la veille d’un deuxième débat crucial, dans la dernière ligne droite de la campagne. Elle ouvre un boulevard à l’équipe Clinton pour enfoncer le clou sur le sexisme du candidat républicain et ses manières grossières. La publication de cette vidéo filmée en privé à l’insu du candidat en 2005 , dont le timing n’est certainement pas un hasard, a d’ailleurs envoyé une onde de choc dans le parti républicain. (Il est intéressant de noter qu’il s’agit du cousin de Jeb Bush, Bill Bush, ce qui ressemble fort à une vengeance de la famille Bush contre Trump). Le Speaker Ryan, qui devait se produire avec Donald Trump dans un meeting pour la première fois, a annulé l’événement et vertement condamné les propos de Trump, se disant choqué et troublé. Plusieurs élus de droite l’appellent à la démission. Le politologue Larry Sabato parle d’un coup de couteau dans le cœur de Trump à la veille du débat. Est-ce pour autant la fin? Pas sûr. Donald Trump s’est excusé platement pour avoir prononcé ces paroles insultantes pour les femmes et sous entendu qu’Hillary n’avait pas de leçon à lui donner, vu le comportement de son mari dans le passé. Il est probable que ses fans, qui connaissent depuis longtemps ses faiblesses d’alpha mâle prompt à un comportement de corps de garde, ne l’abandonneront pas à ce stade. Mais la question est de savoir si les hésitants jugeront que cette affaire est la goutte d’eau qui fait déborder le vase. Tout dépendra sans doute du comportement de Donald Trump pendant le débat. D’après les informations que j’ai pu obtenir à Washington auprès de certains conseillers du milliardaire, son entourage lui conseillerait de renouveler platement ses excuses pendant le débat, et de rappeler que ces conversations de vestiaire pour hommes, se sont produites à une époque où il n’était pas un politique. Ils lui auraient conseillé de ne pas se laisser aller à des attaques sur Bill au dessous de la ceinture, jeu auquel il pourrait se retrouver très vite perdant, mais montrer qu’il veut parler des sujets essentiels, et poursuivre sa conversation avec le peuple américain sur le changement qu’il entend incarner. Bien sûr, Hillary tentera sans doute de le pousser à la faute, car sa propre campagne est bâtie autour de l’idée que Trump est inapte à la présidence. Nous verrons s’il se laisse piéger, comme il l’a fait pendant le premier débat. Ce qui est sûr est que l’incident va sûrement pousser des dizaines de millions d’Américains à se remettre devant leurs postes de télévision dimanche, pour un show susceptible d’être du Shakespeare version trash.

Vous consacrez un livre* à Donald Trump que vous suivez pour Le Figaro depuis le début de la campagne. A vous lire, on a l’impression qu’un Trump médiatique (mèche de cheveux, vulgarité etc…) cache un Donald Trump plus complexe. Est-ce le cas?

La grande difficulté, avec Donald Trump, c’est qu’on est à la fois face à une caricature et face à un phénomène bien plus complexe. Une caricature d’abord, car tout chez lui, semble magnifié. L’appétit de pouvoir, l’ego, la grossièreté des manières, les obsessions, les tweets épidermiques, l’étalage voyant de son succès sur toutes les tours qu’il a construites et qui portent son nom. Donald Trump joue en réalité à merveille de son côté caricatural, il simplifie les choses, provoque, indigne, et cela marche parce que notre monde du 21e siècle se gargarise de ces simplifications outrancières, à l’heure de l’information immédiate et fragmentée. La machine médiatique est comme un ventre qui a toujours besoin de nouveaux scandales et Donald, le commercial, le sait mieux que personne, parce qu’il a créé et animé une émission de téléréalité pendant des années. Il sait que la politique américaine actuelle est un grand cirque, où celui qui crie le plus fort a souvent raison parce que c’est lui qui «fait le buzz».

En même temps, ne voir que la caricature qu’il projette serait rater le phénomène Trump et l’histoire stupéfiante de son succès électoral. Derrière l’image télévisuelle simplificatrice, se cache un homme intelligent, rusé et avisé, qui a géré un empire de milliards de dollars et employé des dizaines de milliers de personnes. Ce n’est pas rien! Selon plusieurs proches du milliardaire que j’ai interrogés, Trump réfléchit de plus à une candidature présidentielle depuis des années, et il a su capter, au-delà de l’air du temps, la colère profonde qui traversait l’Amérique, puis l’exprimer et la chevaucher. Grâce à ses instincts politiques exceptionnels, il a vu ce que personne d’autre – à part peut-être le démocrate Bernie Sanders – n’avait su voir: le gigantesque ras le bol d’un pays en quête de protection contre les effets déstabilisants de la globalisation, de l’immigration massive et du terrorisme islamique; sa peur du déclin aussi. En ce sens, Donald Trump s’est dressé contre le modèle dominant plébiscité par les élites et a changé la nature du débat de la présidentielle. Il a remis à l’ordre du jour l’idée de protection du pays, en prétendant au rôle de shérif aux larges épaules face aux dangers d’un monde instable et dangereux.

Cela révèle au minimum une personnalité sacrément indépendante, un côté indomptable qui explique sans doute l’admiration de ses partisans…Ils ont l’impression que cet homme explosif ne se laissera impressionner par rien ni personne. Beaucoup des gens qui le connaissent affirment d’ailleurs que Donald Trump a plusieurs visages: le personnage public, flashy, égotiste, excessif, qui ne veut jamais avouer ses faiblesses parce qu’il doit «vendre» sa marchandise, perpétuer le mythe, et un personnage privé plus nuancé, plus modéré et plus pragmatique, qui sait écouter les autres et ne choisit pas toujours l’option la plus extrême…Toute la difficulté et tout le mystère, pour l’observateur est de s’y retrouver entre ces différents Trump. C’est loin d’être facile, surtout dans le contexte de quasi hystérie qui règne dans l’élite médiatique et politique américaine, tout entière liguée contre lui. Il est parfois très difficile de discerner ce qui relève de l’analyse pertinente ou de la posture de combat anti-Trump. Dans le livre, je parle d’une expérience schizophrénique, tant le fossé est grand entre la perception des partisans de Trump et celle de ses adversaires. Au fond, Trump reste largement insaisissable, malgré les millions d’articles qui lui sont consacrés.

En quoi son enfance et la figure de son père éclairent-elles son parcours?

Donald Trump a plusieurs fois raconté qu’il n’avait pas fondamentalement changé depuis le cours préparatoire. C’est dire si l’enfance compte pour cerner sa turbulente personnalité! Il a toujours été un leader, mais aussi un rebelle, une forte tête, qui bombardait ses instituteurs de gommes et tirait les cheveux des filles même si c’était un bon élève. A l’école élémentaire, le coin réservé au piquet, avait même été baptisé de ses initiales, DT, parce qu’il y séjournait souvent! A l’âge de 13 ans, son père décide même de l’envoyer à l’Académie militaire de New York pour le dresser, parce que, inspiré par West Side story, Donald a été pris en train de fomenter une descente avec sa bande dans Manhattan, avec des lames de rasoir!

Cela vous donne une idée du profil psychologique du père Fred Trump, un homme intransigeant et autoritaire, qui a eu une influence décisive dans la formation de la personnalité de son fils. Fred s’était fait à la force du poignet, en amassant un capital de plusieurs millions de dollars grâce à la construction d’immeubles d’habitation pour les classes populaires à Brooklyn, et il a clairement fait de Donald son héritier, brisant et déshéritant en revanche le fils aîné, Fred Junior, un être charmeur, mais moins trempé et plus dilettante, qui avait eu le malheur de préférer être pilote de ligne que promoteur, et a fini par mourir d’alcoolisme. Cela a beaucoup marqué Donald qui a décidé qu’il ne se laisserait jamais dominer et ne montrerait jamais ses faiblesses contrairement à son frère. Fred Trump a élevé ses enfants dans la richesse – la famille vivait dans une grande maison à colonnades dans le quartier de Queens – mais aussi dans une éthique de dur labeur et de discipline, pas comme des gosses de riches, un modèle que Donald a d’ailleurs reproduit avec ses enfants. L’homme d’affaires raconte souvent que son paternel l‘a formé à «la survie», en lui recommandant d’«être un tueur» pour réussir.

On découvre en vous lisant qu’il existe depuis longtemps dans l’univers américain (succès de ses livres, téléréalité). Ses fans d’hier sont -ils ses électeurs d’aujourd’hui?

Les Américains connaissent Trump depuis le milieu des années 80, date à laquelle il a commencé à publier ses ouvrages à succès, tirés à des millions d’exemplaires, c’est-à-dire depuis 30 ans! «Le Donald» est un familier pour eux. Savez-vous qu’à la fin des années 80, il fait déjà la couverture de Time Magazine comme l’homme le plus sexy d’Amérique? A la même époque, il est cité dans des sondages comme l’une des personnes les plus populaires du pays, aux côtés des présidents toujours vivants, et du pape! Si on ajoute à cela, le gigantesque succès qu’il va avoir avec son émission de téléréalité L’Apprenti, qui à son zénith, a rassemblé près de 30 millions de téléspectateurs, on comprend l’énorme avantage de notoriété dont bénéficiait Trump sur la ligne de départ de la primaire républicaine.

Tout au long de la campagne des primaires, beaucoup de commentateurs ont annoncé sa victoire comme impossible: comment expliquer cette erreur de jugement?

C’est vrai qu’à de rares exceptions près, les commentateurs n’ont pas vu venir le phénomène Trump, parce qu’il était «en dehors des clous», impensable selon leurs propres «grilles de lecture». Trop scandaleux et trop extrême, pensaient-ils. Il a fait exploser tant de codes en attaquant ses adversaires au dessous de la ceinture et s’emparant de sujets largement tabous, qu’ils ont cru que «le grossier personnage» ne durerait pas! Ils se sont dit que quelqu’un qui se contredisait autant ou disait autant de contre vérités, finirait par en subir les conséquences. Bref, ils ont vu en lui soit un clown soit un fasciste – sans réaliser que toutes les inexactitudes ou dérapages de Trump lui seraient pardonnés comme autant de péchés véniels, parce qu’il ose dire haut et fort ce que son électorat considère comme une vérité fondamentale: à savoir que l’Amérique doit faire respecter ses frontières parce qu’un pays sans frontières n’est plus un pays. Plus profondément, je pense que les élites des deux côtes ont raté le phénomène Trump (et le phénomène Sanders), parce qu’elles sont de plus en plus coupées du peuple et de ses préoccupations, qu’elles vivent entre elles, se cooptent entre elles, s’enrichissent entre elles, et défendent une version «du progrès» très post-moderne, détachée des préoccupations de nombreux Américains. Soyons clairs, si Trump est à bien des égards exaspérant et inquiétant, il y a néanmoins quelque chose de pourri et d’endogame dans le royaume de Washington. Le peuple se sent hors jeu.

Trump est l’homme du peuple contre les élites mais il vit comme un milliardaire. Comment parvient-il à dépasser cette contradiction criante?

C’est une vraie contradiction car Trump a profité abondamment du système qu’il dénonce. Il réussit à dépasser cette contradiction, parce qu’il ne le cache pas, au contraire: il fait de cette connaissance du système une force, en disant qu’il connaît si bien la manière dont les lobbys achètent les politiques qu’il est le seul à pouvoir à remédier à la chose. C’est évidemment un curieux argument, loin d’être totalement convaincant. Il me rappelle ce que faisaient certains oligarques russes, à l’époque Eltsine, quand ils se lançaient en politique et qu’ils disaient que personne ne pourrait les acheter puisqu’ils étaient riches! On a vu ce que cela a donné…Si les gens sont convaincus, c’est que Donald Trump sait connecter avec eux, leur faire comprendre qu’il est de leur côté. Ce statut de milliardaire du peuple est crédible parce qu’il ne s’est jamais senti membre de l’élite bien née, dont il aime se moquer en la taxant «d’élite du sperme chanceux». Cette dernière ne l’a d’ailleurs jamais vraiment accepté, lui le parvenu de Queens, venu de la banlieue, qui aime tout ce qui brille. Il ne faut pas oublier en revanche que Donald a grandi sur les chantiers de construction, où il accompagnait son père déjà tout petit, ce qui l’a mis au contact des classes populaires. Il parle exactement comme eux! Quand je me promenais à travers l’Amérique à la rencontre de ses électeurs, c’est toujours ce dont ils s’étonnaient. Ils disaient: «Donald parle comme nous, pense comme nous, est comme nous». Le fait qu’il soit riche, n’est pas un obstacle parce qu’on est en Amérique, pas en France. Les Américains aiment la richesse et le succès.

Alain Finkielkraut explique que Donald Trump est la Némésis (déesse de la vengeance) du politiquement correct? Le durcissement, notamment à l’université, du politiquement correct est-il la cause indirecte du succès de Trump?

Alain Finkelkraut a raison. L’un des atouts de Trump, pour ses partisans, c’est qu’il est politiquement incorrect dans un pays qui l’est devenu à l’excès. Sur l’islam radical (qu’Obama ne voulait même pas nommer comme une menace!), sur les maux de l’immigration illégale et maints autres sujets. Ses fans se disent notamment exaspérés par le tour pris par certains débats, comme celui sur les toilettes «neutres» que l’administration actuelle veut établir au nom du droit des «personnes au genre fluide» à «ne pas être offensés». Ils apprécient que Donald veuille rétablir l’expression de Joyeux Noël, de plus en plus bannie au profit de l’expression Joyeuses fêtes, au motif qu’il ne faut pas risquer de blesser certaines minorités religieuses non chrétiennes…Ils se demandent pourquoi les salles de classe des universités, lieu où la liberté d’expression est supposée sacro-sainte, sont désormais surveillées par une «police de la pensée» étudiante orwellienne, prête à demander des comptes aux professeurs chaque fois qu’un élève s’estime «offensé» dans son identité…Les fans de Trump sont exaspérés d’avoir vu le nom du club de football américain «Red Skins» soudainement banni du vocabulaire de plusieurs journaux, dont le Washington Post, (et remplacé par le mot R…avec trois points de suspension), au motif que certaines tribus indiennes jugeaient l’appellation raciste et insultante. (Le débat, qui avait mobilisé le Congrès, et l’administration Obama, a finalement été enterré après de longs mois, quand une enquête a révélé que l’écrasante majorité des tribus indiennes aimait finalement ce nom…). Dans ce contexte, Trump a été jugé«rafraîchissant» par ses soutiens, presque libérateur.

Le bouleversement qu’il incarne est-il, selon vous, circonstanciel et le fait de sa personnalité fantasque ou Trump cristallise-t-il un moment de basculement de l’histoire américaine?

Pour moi, le phénomène Trump est la rencontre d’un homme hors normes et d’un mouvement de rébellion populaire profond, qui dépasse de loin sa propre personne. C’est une lame de fond, anti globalisation et anti immigration illégale, qui traverse en réalité tout l’Occident. Trump surfe sur la même vague que les politiques britanniques qui ont soutenu le Brexit, ou que Marine Le Pen en France. La différence, c’est que Trump est une version américaine du phénomène, avec tout ce que cela implique de pragmatisme et d’attachement au capitalisme.

Sa ligne politique est-elle attrape-tout ou fondée sur une véritable vision politique?

Trump n’est pas un idéologue. Il a longtemps été démocrate avant d’être républicain et il transgresse les frontières politiques classiques des partis. Favorable à une forme de protectionnisme et une remise en cause des accords de commerce qui sont défavorables à son pays, il est à gauche sur les questions de libre échange, mais aussi sur la protection sociale des plus pauvres, qu’il veut renforcer, et sur les questions de société, sur lesquelles il affiche une vision libérale de New Yorkais, certainement pas un credo conservateur clair. De ce point de vue là, il est post reaganien. Mais Donald Trump est clairement à droite sur la question de l’immigration illégale et des frontières, et celle des impôts. Au fond, c’est à la fois un marchand et un nationaliste, qui se voit comme un pragmatique, dont le but sera de faire «des bons deals» pour son pays. Il n’est pas là pour changer le monde, contrairement à Obama. Ce qu’il veut, c’est remettre l’Amérique au premier plan, la protéger. Son instinct de politique étrangère est clairement du côté des réalistes et des prudents, car Trump juge que les Etats-Unis se sont laissé entrainer dans des aventures qui les ont affaiblis et n’ont pas réglé les crises. Il ne veut plus d’une Amérique jouant les gendarmes du monde. Mais vu sa tendance aux volte face et vu ce qu’il dit sur le rôle que devrait jouer l’Amérique pour venir à bout de la menace de l’islam radical, comme elle l’a fait avec le nazisme et le communisme, Donald Trump pourrait fort bien changer d’avis, et revenir à un credo plus interventionniste avec le temps. Ses instincts sont au repli, mais il reste largement imprévisible.

Faut il avoir peur de Donald Trump?

La question est évidemment légitime, vu la personnalité volcanique du personnage et certaines de ses prises de position, notamment en politique étrangère. De nombreuses questions se posent sur son caractère, ses foucades, son narcissisme et sa capacité à se contrôler, si importante chez le président de la première puissance du monde! Je ne suis pas pour autant convaincue par l’image de «Hitler», fasciste et raciste, qui lui a été accolée par la presse américaine. Hitler avait écrit Mein Kamp. Donald Trump, lui, a écrit «L ‘art du deal» et avait envisagé juste après la publication de ce premier livre, de se présenter à la présidence en prenant sur son ticket la vedette de télévision afro-américaine démocrate Oprah Winfrey, un élément qui ne colle pas avec l’image d’un raciste anti femmes! Ses enfants et nombre de ses collaborateurs affirment qu’il ne discrimine pas les gens en fonction de leur sexe ou de la couleur de leur peau, mais en fonction de leurs mérites, et que c’est pour cette même raison qu’il est capable de s’en prendre aux représentants du sexe faible ou des minorités avec une grande brutalité verbale, ne voyant pas la nécessité de prendre des gants.

Les questions les plus lourdes concernant Trump, sont selon moi plutôt liées à la manière dont il réagirait, s’il ne parvenait pas à tenir ses promesses, une fois à la Maison-Blanche. Tout président américain est confronté à la complexité de l’exercice du pouvoir dans un système démocratique extrêmement contraignant. Cet homme d’affaires habitué à diriger un empire immobilier pyramidal, dont il est le seul maître à bord, tenterait-il de contourner le système pour arriver à ses fins et prouver au peuple qu’il est bien le meilleur, en agissant dans une zone grise, avec l’aide des personnages sulfureux qui l’ont accompagné dans ses affaires? Et comment se comporterait-il avec ses adversaires politiques ou les représentants de la presse, vu la brutalité et l’acharnement dont il fait preuve envers ceux qui se mettent sur sa route? Hériterait-on d’un Berlusconi ou d’un Nixon puissance 1000? Autre interrogation, vu la fascination qu’exerce sur lui le régime autoritaire de Vladimir Poutine: serait-il prêt à sacrifier le droit international et l’indépendance de certains alliés européens, pour trouver un accord avec le patron du Kremlin sur les sujets lui tenant à cœur, notamment en Syrie? Bref, pourrait-il accepter une forme de Yalta bis, et remettre en cause le rôle de l’Amérique dans la défense de l’ordre libéral et démocratique de l’Occident et du monde depuis 1945? Autant de questions cruciales auxquelles Donald Trump a pour l’instant répondu avec plus de désinvolture que de clarté.

Trump peut-il emporter l’élection?

Donald Trump peut toujours gagner cette élection, même si les derniers jours lui ont été très défavorables. Malgré une semaine calamiteuse, les sondages restent proches et l’issue pleine d’un lourd suspense selon moi. J’utilise souvent l’image de la vague et de la digue. La vague, c’est Trump, l’homme de l’année parce qu’il est véritablement celui a défini cette élection, qu’il soit élu ou non d’ailleurs. Hillary elle, représente la digue du statu quo, défendue bec et ongles par les élites. La vague de colère sera-t-elle suffisamment puissante pour passer la digue? C’est toute la question. Comme l’a écrit l’excellente éditorialiste du Wall Street Journal Peggy Noonan, la réponse à cette interrogation dépendra de la force relative de deux sentiments: la colère éprouvée par le pays à l’endroit du système et des élites. Et la peur de l’inconnue que représente Trump. La colère aura-t-elle raison de la peur, ou vice versa?

Voir aussi:

André Bercoff : « Donald Trump le pragmatique peut devenir président des États-Unis »
Alexandre Devecchio
Le Figaro
08/09/2016

FIGAROVOX/ENTRETIEN – Donald Trump remonte face à Hillary Clinton dans les sondages. André Bercoff, qui l’a rencontré il y a quelques mois à New York et qui publie un livre à son sujet, analyse le succès inattendu du candidat d’une Amérique en colère.

André Bercoff est journaliste et écrivain. Il vient de faire paraître Donald Trump, les raisons de la colère chez First.

FIGAROVOX. – Beaucoup d’observateurs ont enterré Donald Trump dans cette campagne américaine. Pourtant, les derniers sondages indiquent qu’il réduit l’écart avec son adversaire Hillary Clinton. Certains d’entre eux le donnent même devant. Donald Trump peut-il devenir président des États-Unis?

André BERCOFF. – Oui, il le peut. Pas de quartiers, évidemment, dans ce combat entre la Vorace et le Coriace. En dépit de l’hostilité des Démocrates, du rejet de la part des minorités et de la véritable haine que lui porte l’establishment Républicain, Trump peut profiter des casseroles accrochées à la traine d’Hillary Clinton qui semblent se multiplier de jour en jour. En tout cas, le scrutin sera beaucoup plus serré qu’il n’y paraissait il y a encore un mois.

À quoi, selon vous, ressemblerait une présidence Trump?

Je pense qu’il gérerait les USA peu ou prou, comme il gère son empire immobilier, avec une différence de taille: il ne s’agit plus de défendre à tout prix les intérêts de la marque Trump, mais ceux des États-Unis, ce qui nécessite un changement de paradigme. L’homme d’affaires délocalise pour le profit ; le président relocalise pour la patrie. Le négociateur cherche le meilleur deal pour son entreprise, y compris l’art et la manière de s’abriter dans les paradis fiscaux. Le chef de l’État, lui, taxera lourdement les sociétés qui réfugient leurs avoirs sous des cieux très cléments. Ne jamais oublier que Trump est beaucoup plus pragmatique qu’idéologue. Je le raconte dans mon livre: il défendra l’Amérique comme il défendait sa marque, bec et ongles, par tous les moyens.

Personne ne pariait un dollar sur la victoire de Trump à la primaire. Comment les observateurs ont-ils pu se tromper à ce point?

Quand je suis allé le voir à New York il y a quelques mois, tous mes interlocuteurs, en France comme en Amérique, me conseillaient de publier très vite l’entretien, car le personnage allait disparaître dès le premier scrutin des primaires. Les commentaires affluaient tous dans le même sens: il fait ça pour sa pub ; un petit tour et puis s’en va ; c’est un gros plouc, milliardaire peut-être, mais inintéressant au possible ; il est inculte, il ne comprend rien à la politique, ne connaît rien aux affaires du monde, il ne pense qu’à sa pub, à son image et à faire parler de lui. Experts et commentateurs se sont, dans leur grande majorité, mis le doigt dans l’œil parce qu’ils pensent à l’intérieur du système. À Paris comme à Washington, on reste persuadé qu’un «outsider» n’a aucune chance face aux appareils des partis, des lobbies et des machines électorales. Que ce soit dans notre monarchie républicaine ou dans leur hiérarchie de Grands Électeurs, si l’on n’est pas un familier du sérail, on n’existe pas. Tout le dédain et la condescendance envers Trump, qui n’était jusqu’ici connu que par ses gratte-ciel et son émission de téléréalité, pouvaient donc s’afficher envers cette grosse brute qui ne sait pas rester à sa place. On connaît la suite. L’expertise, comme la prévision, sont des sciences molles.

Quel rôle ont joué les réseaux sociaux dans cette campagne?

Trump est l’un des premiers à avoir compris et utilisé la désintermédiation. Ce n’est pas vraiment l’ubérisation de la politique, mais ça y ressemble quelque peu. Quand je l’ai interrogé sur le mouvement qu’il suscitait dans la population américaine, il m’a répondu: Twitter, Facebook et Instagram. Avec ses 15 millions d’abonnés, il dispose d’une force de frappe avec laquelle il dialogue sans aucun intermédiaire. Il y a trente ans, il écrivait qu’aucun politique ne pouvait se passer d’un quotidien comme le New York Times. Aujourd’hui, il affirme que les réseaux sociaux sont beaucoup plus efficaces – et beaucoup moins onéreux – que la possession de ce journal.

Est-ce une mauvaise nouvelle pour les journalistes?

C’est en tout cas une très vive incitation à changer la pratique journalistique. Contrairement à ceux qui proclament avec légèreté et simplisme, la fin du métier d’informer, on aura de plus en plus besoin de trier, hiérarchiser, et surtout de vérifier et de mettre en perspective. En revanche, l’on pourra de plus en plus difficilement cacher la francisque de Mitterrand ou le magot de Cahuzac, et qu’on le déplore ou pas, avec Wikileaks et autres révélations, il faudra dorénavant compter avec les millions de lanceurs d’alertes qui feront, pour le meilleur et pour le pire, œuvre d’information, à tous les niveaux. Le monde n’est pas devenu peuplé de milliards de journalistes, mais les journalistes doivent tenir compte de ce peuple qui clique et qui poste.

Votre livre s’intitule Donald Trump, les raisons de la colère. Les Américains sont-ils en colère?

Ils le sont. Là-bas comme ici, l’avenir n’est plus ce qu’il était, la classe moyenne se désosse, la précarité est toujours prégnante, les attentats terroristes ne sont plus, depuis un certain 11 septembre, des images lointaines vues sur petit ou grand écran. Pearl Harbour est désormais dans leurs murs: c’est du moins ce qu’ils ressentent. Et la fureur s’explique par le décalage entre la ritournelle de «Nous sommes la plus grande puissance et le plus beau pays du monde» et le «Je n’arrive pas à finir le mois et payer les études de mes enfants et l’assurance médicale de mes parents». Sans parler de l’écart toujours plus abyssal entre riches et modestes.

Trump est-il le candidat de l’Amérique périphérique? Peut-on le comparer à Marine Le Pen?

Il existe, depuis quelques années, un étonnant rapprochement entre les problématiques européennes et américaines. Qui aurait pu penser, dans ce pays d’accueil traditionnel, que l’immigration provoquerait une telle hostilité chez certains, qui peut permettre à Trump de percer dans les sondages en proclamant sa volonté de construire un grand mur? Il y a certes des points communs avec Marine Le Pen, y compris dans la nécessité de relocaliser, de rebâtir des frontières et de proclamer la grandeur de son pays. Mais évidemment, Trump a d’autres moyens que la présidente du Front National… De plus, répétons-le, c’est d’abord un pragmatique et un négociateur. Je ne crois pas que ce soit les qualités les plus apparentes de Marine Le Pen…

Comme elle, il dépasse le clivage droite/gauche…

Absolument. Son programme économique le situe beaucoup plus à gauche que les caciques Républicains et les néo-conservateurs proches d’Hillary Clinton qui le haïssent, parce que lui croit, dans certains domaines, à l’intervention de l’État et aux limites nécessaires du laisser-faire, laisser-aller.

N’est-il pas finalement beaucoup plus politiquement incorrect que Marine Le Pen?

Pour l’Amérique, certainement. Il ne ménage personne et peut aller beaucoup plus loin que Marine Le Pen, tout simplement parce qu’il n’a jamais eu à régler le problème du père fondateur et encore moins à porter le fardeau d’une étiquette tout de même controversée. Sa marque à lui, ce n’est pas la politique, mais le bâtiment et la réussite. Ça change pas mal de choses.

«La France n’est plus la France», martèle Trump. Pourquoi?

Ici aussi, pas de malentendu. L’on a interprété cette phrase comme une attaque contre notre pays. C’est le contraire. Il me l’a dit et je le raconte plus amplement dans mon livre: il trouve insupportable que des villes comme Paris et Bruxelles, qu’il adore et a visitées maintes fois, deviennent des camps retranchés où l’on n’est même pas capable de répliquer à un massacre comme celui du Bataclan. On peut être vent debout contre le port d’arme, mais, dit-il, s’il y avait eu des vigiles armés boulevard Voltaire, il n’y aurait pas eu autant de victimes. Pour lui, un pays qui ne sait pas se défendre est un pays en danger de mort.

Son élection serait-elle une bonne nouvelle pour la France et pour l’Europe?

Difficile à dire. Il s’entendra assez bien avec Poutine pour le partage des zones d’influence, et même pour une collaboration active contre Daesh et autres menaces, mais, comme il le répète sur tous les tons, l’Amérique de Trump ne défendra que les pays qui paieront pour leur protection. Ça fait un peu Al Capone, mais ça a le mérite de la clarté. Si l’Europe n’a pas les moyens de protéger son identité, son mode de vie, ses valeurs et sa culture, alors, personne ne le fera à sa place. En résumé, pour Trump, la politique est une chose trop grave pour la laisser aux politiciens professionnels, et la liberté un état trop fragile pour la confier aux pacifistes de tout poil.

Voir également:

Donald Trump peut tout à fait l’emporter le 8 novembre prochain
Alexis Feertchak
Le Figaro
28/07/2016

FIGAROVOX/ENTRETIEN/VIDÉOS – Hillary Clinton est de plus en plus considérée comme la candidate du système, notamment financier, estime Michael C. Behrent. Selon l’historien américain, face à elle, la route est étroite pour Donald Trump, mais il pourrait tout à fait l’emporter.

Docteur de la New York University, Michael C. Behrent est professeur d’Histoire à la Appalachian State University de Boone en Caroline du Nord.

FIGAROVOX. – La convention démocrate qui s’est conclue ce jeudi s’est ouverte un jour après la démission de la présidente du Parti, accusée d’avoir favorisé la candidature d’Hillary Clinton. Comment le Parti démocrate aborde-t-il ce moment crucial de la nomination officielle de sa candidate?

Michael C. Behrent. – Je crois que, pour beaucoup de démocrates, c’est un moment d’appréhension gêné, qu’ils essaient de cacher comme ils peuvent. Le contexte politique leur est pourtant très favorable: avec Hillary Clinton, la première femme à obtenir l’investiture d’un grand parti, ils ont une candidate historique ; leurs caisses de campagne débordent largement celles des républicains ; ils sont le parti sortant dans un contexte économique plutôt favorable. Et pourtant, malgré ces atouts, Hillary Clinton devance Donald Trump de peu dans sondages ; cette semaine, en dépit du caractère rocambolesque de la récente convention républicaine,

Le scandale des emails a été réglé de manière plutôt rapide avec la démission de la présidente de l’instance dirigeante du Parti démocrate, Debbie Wasserman Schultz. Mais l’affaire ne fait que confirmer toutes les réticences de l’opinion publique à l’égard de Clinton: qu’elle est la candidate des intérêts financiers, qu’elle incarne l’ «establishment» contre le peuple, qu’elle préfère magouiller en coulisse que d’obtenir l’assentiment populaire. C’est peut-être injuste, mais l’épisode confirme ces impressions.

On parle souvent des divisions du Parti républicain, accentuées par la candidature de Donald Trump. Le Parti démocrate n’est-il pas aussi divisé? Bernie Sanders le «socialiste» ne va-t-il durablement laisser sa marque idéologique?

L’enthousiasme qu’a suscité Sanders ne s’explique pas par un engouement soudain de la part des Américains pour le socialisme. Ce que Sanders a réussi à faire, c’est de rappeler aux Américains leur passé social-démocrate, ou du moins ce qu’avait accompli, disons entre les années 1940 et 1970, l’Etat-providence américain. Par exemple, les Américains qui ont fait leurs études dans des universités publiques au cours des années 1960 – comme Sanders lui-même – n’ont dû payer que des sommes modiques. Pourquoi un tel système est désormais considéré comme impossible? C’est sur ce genre de question qu’a insisté Sanders, et cela explique l’enthousiasme qu’il a suscité chez les jeunes (qui, entre autres galères, assument souvent des dettes colossales pour financer leurs études).

Surtout, Sanders a su insister sur un constat que les Américains sont nombreux à trouver juste: les inégalités économiques montent, et la démocratie s’en trouve de ce fait corrompue. À cet égard, Sanders est plus «pikettiste» que socialiste au sens classique. S’il a raison, ce n’est pas en effectuant une petite inflexion à gauche que les partisans de Clinton vont satisfaire l’électorat de Sanders: comme le montre le scandale des emails, le Parti démocrate courtise inlassablement les Américains les plus riches, au point que la campagne ressemble à une vaste opération de trafic d’influence. Le scandale confirme, à pleins d’égards, l’analyse et le rejet du système actuel dont Sanders s’est fait le porteur.

Il est vrai qu’il existe actuellement, dans chaque parti, un schisme entre les défenseurs de l’«establishment» et un courant populiste. La principale différence, c’est que chez les républicains, ce sont les populistes qui ont gagné, alors que les démocrates ont fini par adouber un candidat de l’ «establishment». Cette situation est pour le moins paradoxal, étant donné que ce sont les démocrates qui se considèrent traditionnellement comme le parti des petits gens, de l’Américain moyen.

Hillary Clinton demeure très impopulaire. Qu’est-ce qui pourrait la sauver sinon le rejet que beaucoup d’Américains portent aussi à Donald Trump?

Le fait qu’elle est soutenue par une large coalition de couches démographiques, alors que Trump mise essentiellement sur une seule. Femmes, Afro-Américains, Hispaniques, diplômés – voilà les groupes qui soutiennent Clinton, souvent massivement (autour de 76% des Hispaniques, par exemple). Trump, par contre, est essentiellement le candidat d’un électorat blanc, populaire et masculin. On parle beaucoup aux États-Unis du déclin de cette population longtemps dominant. Mais pour le moment, l’électorat populaire blanc demeure assez important, représentant, par exemple, 44% de ceux qui ont voté en 2012. La question est de savoir si une coalition hétéroclite et multiculturelle qui annonce l’avenir se révélera plus puissante que le ressentiment blanc qui s’exprime à travers Trump.

Donald Trump a déjà été désigné officiellement par son parti. Comment expliquez-vous le succès de cet outsider des primaires républicaines?

Il s’agit d’un effet «apprenti sorcier»: depuis des décennies, au moins depuis Nixon, la stratégie électorale républicaine consiste à attiser les craintes et les rancœurs d’un électorat blanc et populaire, insistant en particulier sur les questions culturelles sur lesquelles ils divergent avec la gauche: la religion, l’avortement, le droit de s’armer, le patriotisme. Cette population s’estime souvent menacée par l’immigration et la discrimination positive en faveur des minorités. Mais les républicains ont toujours su récolter les voix de cet électorat tout en défendant une politique économique libérale favorisée par le monde des affaires et de la finance, axé sur le libre-échange ainsi que la réduction de la fiscalité et des dépenses sociales. Au point que certains se demandent si l’électorat populaire républicain a vraiment profité des politiques économiques qu’il a rendues possibles.

Trump représente, si vous voulez, l’émancipation de cet électorat populaire républicain vis-à-vis d’un «establishment» plus libéral (au sens européen) que proprement conservateur. Si Trump a compris au moins une chose, c’est qu’il y avait une demande pour un candidat aux valeurs conservatrices (même si Trump ne satisfait lui-même cette critère que grâce à une hypocrisie plus ou moins tolérée), mais dont la politique économique serait «souverainiste» et nationaliste. L’«establishment» républicain ne maitrise ainsi plus les angoisses d’un électorat qu’il a longtemps cherché à encourager. Le ton agressif et provocateur du discours du Trump ne sort pas non plus de nulle part: il prend le relais des contestataires du Tea Party, des républicains au Congrès qui ont mené une obstruction systématique contre la politique du Président Obama, etc.

Avec un certain isolationnisme et une critique parfois vive du libre-échangisme, Bernie Sanders et Donald Trump ne partagent-ils pas paradoxalement certaines positions idéologiques?

En effet, Trump et Sanders se sont fait chacun le champion des Américains qui pâtissent de la mondialisation et des politiques économiques libre-échangistes poursuivies depuis des années. Mais la ressemblance s’arrête là.

En fait, il est difficile d’imaginer deux lignes politiques plus éloignées l’un de l’autre. Trump est l’incarnation de la corruption de la vie politique par les grandes fortunes contre lequel Sanders et ses supporteurs s’insurgent. Si Sanders dénonce, comme Trump, des traités de libre-échange comme étant peu favorables aux ouvriers, il demande pourtant la régularisation des «sans papiers» (moyennant une réforme du système actuel d’immigration), alors que le discours de Trump est franchement xénophobe: déportation des «sans papiers», interdiction provisoire des Musulmans du territoire national, construction d’un mur le long de la frontière mexicaine. On est donc bien loin d’un véritable rapprochement idéologique.

Les candidatures «anti-système», très diverses sur le fond, progressent aussi partout en Europe, étiquetées souvent sous la catégorie de «populisme». Que pensez-vous de ce mouvement qui concerne l’Occident dans son ensemble?

Ces mouvements, me semblent-ils, reposent sur deux craintes: une angoisse vis-à-vis de la mondialisation, et des doutes sur l’état de santé de la démocratie. Ses craintes sont souvent liées, la mondialisation et la montée des inégalités étant suspects de mettre à mal la démocratie. Ce qu’on appelle le «déficit démocratique» dans l’Union européenne est devenu un souci plus général.

Toutefois il y a des points de discordes majeures à l’intérieur de ces mouvements «anti-systèmes», comme on le voit entre Trump et Sanders, dans les débats autour du Brexit, ou dans les antilibéraux de droite et de gauche en France. Certains, comme Trump et certains partisans du Brexit, rejettent la mondialisation en prônant un repli national, au point d’assumer une certaine xénophobie comme une conséquence logique du protectionnisme. D’autres, comme Sanders ou même Nuit Debout, veulent limiter le libre-échange et le flux des capitaux tout en favorisant les flux migratoires, du moins par la régularisation des «sans-papiers». Pour le moment, c’est plutôt les premiers qui semblent avoir le vent en poupe.

Imaginez-vous que Donald Trump puisse finalement triompher d’Hillary Clinton?

Contrairement à ce qu’on a pu penser il y a encore quelques mois, oui, il est tout à fait possible que Trump remporte le scrutin du 8 novembre. Mais la campagne fortement clivante qu’il mène, ainsi que l’histoire électoral récente suggèrent que pour Trump, la voie menant vers la Maison-Blanche reste très étroite. Ces propos qui plaisent à un électoral blanc populaire lui font perdre des voix chez les diplômés. D’autre part, dans les élections américaines, il faut remporter des Etats: pour le moment, Trump n’a jamais eu de solides longueurs d’avances dans les «swing states» (état balançoires) tels que la Floride, l’Ohio, ou la Pennsylvanie, qu’il lui faudra gagner impérativement pour faire mieux que Mitt Romney en 2012. Candidat improviste, Trump n’a pas, comme son rival, sollicité des fonds de la campagne de façon méthodique, et a donc un déficit financier important vis-à-vis des démocrates. Bien sûr, très peu de gens ont cru que Trump arriverait à ce point. Mais pour être élu président, il lui faudra continuer à surmonter les obstacles considérables qui se profilent devant lui.

Voir encore:

Michael Moore a-t-il raison de prédire la victoire de Donald Trump ?
Alexis Feertchak
Le Figaro
05/08/2016

FIGAROVOX/ENTRETIEN – Le réalisateur Michael Moore a annoncé la victoire prochaine de son pire adversaire, Donald Trump. Pour Lauric Henneton, certains arguments de Moore sont à prendre au sérieux, notamment celui de la colère des électeurs du Midwest désindustrialisé.

Lauric Henneton est maître de conférences à l’Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, au sein de l’Institut d’Etudes culturelles et internationales. Son dernier livre Histoire religieuse des Etats-Unis a été publié en 2012 chez Flammarion.

FIGAROVOX. – Dans une tribune tonitruante, le réalisateur Michael Moore, marqué très à gauche sur l’échiquier politique américain, annonce que Donald Trump, «ce clown à temps partiel et sociopathe à temps plein», deviendra président des Etats-Unis en novembre prochain. De façon générale, Michael Moore est-il un analyste politique sérieux?

Lauric HENNETON. – A défaut d’être un analyste politique professionnel, Michael Moore est un observateur avisé mais doublé d’un militant. Un observateur engagé en d’autres termes, alors que l’analyste politique est censé rester neutre et clinique dans son analyse – en théorie… Plutôt que la finesse de l’analyse, ici, c’est surtout sur la fonction du texte qu’il faut s’interroger. Michael Moore se fait l’avocat du diable, il endosse également un costume prophétique, au sens propre mais sécularisé, puisqu’il met en garde son peuple et l’appelle à se repentir et marcher à nouveau dans le droit chemin. On répète depuis un an que Trump n’a aucune chance: il ne va pas durer, sa candidature va faire long feu, il ne va pas passer le Super Tuesday, il ne va pas rester en tête, il va y avoir une convention contestée et il n’aura pas l’investiture. On voit l’acuité de ces prédictions aujourd’hui.

Cette stratégie de la peur a pour fonction de mobiliser contre Trump, mais on voit bien que Clinton n’existe que pour faire barrage.
Moore utilise donc une autre tactique: il présente la victoire de Trump non plus comme fortement improbable car irrationnelle mais au contraire comme une quasi-certitude. Le titre anglais de son texte est «Why Trump will win», pourquoi il va gagner. On ne se demande plus s’il va gagner, il s’agit désormais d’en expliquer les raisons. Ce fait accompli a pour fonction de surprendre, d’attirer l’attention du lecteur-cliqueur, en lui faisant peur. Cette stratégie de la peur a pour fonction de mobiliser contre Trump, d’abord, et indirectement en faveur d’Hillary Clinton, mais on voit bien que Clinton n’existe que pour faire barrage à Trump.

Quant à savoir si cette stratégie discursive sera payante, c’est une autre question. Il est probable que le texte soit essentiellement lu par des gens qui n’ont pas besoin de ce message pour être contre Trump. Combien d’Américains vont changer d’avis et ne pas voter Trump après avoir lu ce texte? Pas sûr que ce soit assez pour avoir un impact sur l’élection.

Auteur d’un documentaire sur les usines General Motors de Flint, ville dont il est originaire, Michael Moore connaît probablement mieux qu’Hillary Clinton l’Amérique désindustrialisée du Midwest. Son argument est fort: cette région traditionnellement proche du Parti démocrate pourrait basculer vers Trump par rejet du libre-échangisme, ce que Moore appelle le «Brexit du Midwest». Que penser de cet argument?

Le terme de Brexit est très discutable puisqu’il n’y a rien à quitter (exit) et que l’on parle d’un pays où la guerre civile, il y a 150 ans, a fait plus de 600 000 morts. S’il y a eu un Brexit en histoire américaine c’est celui des Etats du Sud en 1861. A moins de considérer la Révolution américaine comme une forme de Brexit. Ici le terme n’a de sens que du fait de la sociologie électorale et de l’actualité du Brexit, ce qu’on pourrait appeler la revanche des perdants. La victoire du Brexit, qui a surpris bien des analystes, renforce le message de Moore: c’est arrivé là-bas, ça peut arriver ici – ça va arriver ici, sauf si vous m’écoutez…

Attirer l’attention sur les Etats de la Rust Belt est pertinent. Ce sont des Etats que l’on a laissés pour morts à partir des années 1980. Ils étaient en perte de vitesse et on n’avait d’yeux que pour la Sun Belt.
Le terme de Brexit a donc une pertinence assez limitée. En revanche, attirer l’attention sur les Etats de la Rust Belt est pertinent. Ce sont des Etats que l’on a laissés pour morts, économiquement et politiquement, à partir des années 1980. Ils étaient en perte de vitesse et on n’avait d’yeux que pour la Sun Belt. Certes la Floride a été décisive en 2000 mais en 2012, la victoire d’Obama a été proclamée avant même que l’on connaisse le résultat en Floride. En 2004, la victoire de Bush s’est décidée dans l’Ohio, qui passe pour l’Etat clé par excellence.

Son calcul est un peu simpliste: il a manqué 64 grands électeurs à Mitt Romney et les quatre Etats de la Rust Belt qu’il mentionne (Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio et Pennsylvanie) totalisent justement 64 grands électeurs. En réalité, dans certaines configurations précises, Trump peut se permettre de perdre le Wisconsin par exemple, ainsi que la Virginie, la Floride, le Nevada et le Colorado (où il y a beaucoup d’Hispaniques), mais il faut impérativement qu’il l’emporte dans le Michigan, l’Ohio et la Pennsylvanie, en plus de l’Arizona (et ses Hispaniques), en Caroline du Nord, dans le New Hampshire, notamment. Il n’a pas le droit à l’erreur: si, dans cette configuration, il perdait le petit New Hampshire et ses 4 grands électeurs, il perdrait l’élection. Evidemment, s’il perd en plus le Michigan ou la Pennsylvanie, sa défaite serait plus lourde. Mais voilà, il faut envisager l’élection au niveau local, pas national. Et les enjeux régionaux de la Rust Belt reviennent sur le devant de la scène. Reste à voir s’ils seront déterminants d’ici novembre et s’ils suffiront à dépasser les autres questions.

Michael Moore explique que les électeurs voteront précisément pour Trump parce qu’il est un clown, ce qu’il appelle l’effet Jesse Ventura, du nom d’un ancien lutteur élu à la surprise générale gouverneur du Minnesota. L’appétence pour les clowneries est-elle sérieuse?

La longévité de Trump dans cette élection en dit long sur le niveau d’exaspération des électeurs américains envers leur classe politique. Trump est le symptôme plutôt que le mal: il montre à quel point le rejet est fort, notamment côté républicain. Cette longévité de Trump me semble d’abord et avant tout traduire l’exaspération d’une partie de l’électorat avec «Washington», le jusqu’au-boutisme, l’inefficacité, le carriérisme coupé des intérêts des électeurs, la suspicion que les élus travaillent davantage pour les lobbies que pour les électeurs.

Ils saluent plus la transgression symbolique d’un ordre moral qu’ils récusent que la clownerie en tant que telle. Les électeurs utilisent Trump comme vecteur d’une revanche symbolique sur le politiquement correct.
Trump n’est pas tant perçu par ses partisans comme un clown que comme un rebelle: celui qui va mettre un coup de pied dans la fourmilière, celui qui va s’affranchir du politiquement correct qui, selon eux, a installé une chape de plomb discursive notamment sur les «non minorités» (où l’on retrouve les hommes blancs hétérosexuels). Ils saluent plus la transgression symbolique d’un ordre moral qu’ils récusent (mis en place par les composantes de la coalition démocrate) que la clownerie en tant que telle. Evidemment il y a un côté «poli-tainment», «show business» dans lequel Trump excelle: il fait de la campagne une sorte de gigantesque série de télé réalité. Mais ils utilisent Trump surtout comme vecteur d’une forme de revanche symbolique sur le politiquement correct.

Michael Moore relève aussi l’impopularité d’Hillary Clinton qui pourrait lui coûter les voix des classes populaires, des jeunes et des partisans de Bernie Sanders. Ces derniers voteront-ils pour une ex-Secrétaire d’Etat qui a soutenu la guerre en Irak puis en Libye tout en ayant le soutien de l’establishment financier?

Je le répète depuis des mois: la clé de l’élection sera la mobilisation des électeurs en nombre. Les proportions de tel ou tel groupe que nous donnent les sondages sont une indication assez trompeuse. Il ne s’agit pas de savoir si tel ou tel candidat emporte tel groupe – y est majoritaire – mais combien d’électeurs il ou elle arrive à déplacer le jour J. Moore a raison de rappeler que c’est surtout dans l’électorat démocrate qu’on trouve les électeurs les plus vulnérables, ceux qui ont le plus de difficultés logistiques à voter, ceux à qui les Etats tenus par les Républicains imposent la présentation de pièces d’identité qu’ils n’ont pas forcément et qui, du coup, les découragent. De ce fait, beaucoup d’électeurs démocrates potentiels (noirs et hispaniques) font défaut, ce qui peut faire basculer un Etat-clé. Ces derniers jours, un certain nombre de lois dans ce sens ont été invalidées car exagérément restrictives, ou carrément racistes dans leur logique. C’est un des enjeux de la campagne.

La clé de l’élection sera la mobilisation des électeurs en nombre. Les proportions de tel ou tel groupe que nous donnent les sondages sont une indication assez trompeuse.
Mais il y en a d’autres: en amont il faut aller voir les gens, faire du porte à porte et les persuader de voter alors qu’ils n’en ont pas forcément l’habitude. Pourquoi voter pour Hillary Clinton? D’abord pour faire barrage à Trump: Trump mobilise malgré lui et contre lui chez les Hispaniques mais aussi chez les musulmans, particulièrement peu politisés jusqu’ici et nombreux … dans le Michigan, dont il était question plus haut. Si la victoire dans le Michigan ne tient qu’à quelques milliers de voix et qu’elles sont apportées par des électeurs nouvellement inscrits parce qu’ils voulaient faire barrage à Trump, on serait dans un scénario presque hollywoodien.

Autre enjeu, ceux qui n’ont pas de difficulté logistique pour voter, qui n’ont pas deux emplois dans la journée et qui ne sont pas des minorités: les jeunes blancs. Il y a deux profils: les jeunes votent peu dans l’ensemble, ce sont donc des voix perdues pour les démocrates. Et il y a les jeunes pro-Sanders, qui étaient très hostiles à Clinton. Beaucoup se sont beaucoup investis, émotionnellement, comme des convertis. Ils ont encore du mal à digérer la défaite de leur champion, qu’ils ont hué quand il a appelé à se rallier à Clinton lors de la convention démocrate. On a récemment estimé à 10% les irréductibles qui ont voté Sanders et ne voteront pas Clinton, sous aucun prétexte. Si cela peut sembler insignifiant, ce seront peut-être les quelques milliers de voix qui feront défaut à Clinton dans un Etat-clé. C’est peu probable, mais cela reste un scénario mathématiquement possible, tant l’électorat démocrate est composé de groupes incertains en termes de mobilisation.

Voir enfin:

Cinq raisons pour lesquelles Trump va gagner
Michael Moore Oscar and Emmy-winning Director

The Huffington Post

26/07/2016

Chers amis, chères amies,

Je suis désolé d’être le porteur de mauvaises nouvelles, mais je crois avoir été assez clair l’été dernier lorsque j’ai affirmé que Donald Trump serait le candidat républicain à la présidence des États-Unis. Cette fois, j’ai des nouvelles encore pires à vous annoncer: Donald J. Trump va remporter l’élection du mois de novembre.

Ce clown à temps partiel et sociopathe à temps plein va devenir notre prochain président. Le président Trump. Allez, dites-le tous en chœur, car il faudra bien vous y habituer au cours des quatre prochaines années: « PRÉSIDENT TRUMP! »

Jamais de toute ma vie n’ai-je autant voulu me tromper.

Je vous observe attentivement en ce moment. Vous agitez la tête en disant: « Non Mike, ça n’arrivera pas! ». Malheureusement, vous vivez dans une bulle. Ou plutôt dans une grande caisse de résonance capable de vous convaincre, vous et vos amis, que les Américains n’éliront pas cet idiot de Trump. Vous alternez entre la consternation et la tentation de tourner au ridicule son plus récent commentaire, lorsque ce n’est pas son attitude narcissique.

Par la suite, vous écoutez Hillary et envisagez la possibilité que nous ayons pour la première fois une femme à la présidence. Une personne respectée à travers le monde, qui aime les enfants et poursuivra les politiques entreprises par Obama. Après tout, n’est-ce pas ce que nous voulons? La même chose pour quatre ans de plus?

 Il est temps de sortir de votre bulle pour faire face à la réalité. Vous aurez beau vous consoler avec des statistiques (77 % de l’électorat est composé de femmes, de personnes de couleur et d’adultes de moins de 35 ans, et Trump ne remportera la majorité d’aucun de ces groupes), ou faire appel à la logique (les gens ne peuvent en aucun cas voter pour un bouffon qui va à l’encontre de leurs propres intérêts), ça ne restera qu’un moyen de vous protéger d’un traumatisme. C’est comme lorsque vous entendez un bruit d’arme à feu et pensez qu’un pneu a éclaté ou que quelqu’un joue avec des pétards. Ce comportement me rappelle aussi les premières manchettes publiées le 11 septembre, annonçant qu’un petit avion a heurté accidentellement le World Trade Center.

« Des millions de gens seront tentés de devenir marionnettistes et de choisir Trump dans le seul but de brouiller les cartes et voir ce qui arrivera. »

Nous avons besoin de nouvelles encourageantes parce que le monde actuel est un tas de merde, parce qu’il est pénible de survivre d’un chèque de paie à l’autre, et parce que notre quota de mauvaises nouvelles est atteint. C’est la raison pour laquelle notre état mental passe au neutre lorsqu’une nouvelle menace fait son apparition.

C’est la raison pour laquelle les personnes renversées par un camion à Nice ont passé les dernières secondes de leur vie à tenter d’alerter son conducteur: « Attention, il y a des gens sur le trottoir! »

Eh bien, mes amis, la situation n’a rien d’un accident. Si vous croyez encore qu’Hillary Clinton va vaincre Trump avec des faits et des arguments logiques, c’est que vous avez complètement manqué la dernière année, durant laquelle 16 candidats républicains ont utilisé cette méthode (et plusieurs autres méthodes moins civilisées) dans 56 élections primaires sans réussir à arrêter le mastodonte. Le même scénario est en voie de se répéter l’automne prochain. La seule manière de trouver une solution à ce problème est d’admettre qu’il existe en premier lieu.

Comprenez-moi bien, j’entretiens de grands espoirs pour ce pays. Des choses ont changé pour le mieux. La gauche a remporté les grandes batailles culturelles. Les gais et lesbiennes peuvent se marier. La majorité des Américains expriment un point de vue libéral dans presque tous les sondages. Les femmes méritent l’égalité salariale? Positif. L’avortement doit être permis? Positif. Il faut des lois environnementales plus sévères? Positif. Un meilleur contrôle des armes à feu? Positif. Légaliser la marijuana? Positif. Le socialiste qui a remporté l’investiture démocrate dans 22 États cette année est une autre preuve que notre société s’est profondément transformée. À mon avis, il n’y a aucun doute qu’Hillary remporterait l’élection haut la main si les jeunes pouvaient voter avec leur console X-box ou Playstation.

Hélas, ce n’est pas comme ça que notre système fonctionne. Les gens doivent quitter leur domicile et faire la file pour voter. S’ils habitent dans un quartier pauvre à dominante noire ou hispanique, la file sera plus longue et tout sera fait pour les empêcher de déposer leur bulletin dans l’urne. Avec pour résultat que le taux de participation dépasse rarement 50 % dans la plupart des élections. Tout le problème est là. Au mois de novembre, qui pourra compter sur les électeurs les plus motivés et inspirés? Qui pourra compter sur des sympathisants en liesse, capables de se lever à 5 heures du matin pour s’assurer que tous les Tom, Dick et Harry (et Bob, et Joe, et Billy Bob et Billy Joe) ont bel et bien voté? Vous connaissez déjà la réponse. Ne vous méprenez pas: aucune campagne publicitaire en faveur d’Hillary, aucune phrase-choc dans un débat télévisé et aucune défection des électeurs libertariens ne pourra arrêter le train en marche.

Voici 5 raisons pour lesquelles Trump va gagner :

1. Le poids électoral du Midwest, ou le Brexit de la Ceinture de rouille

Je crois que Trump va porter une attention particulière aux États « bleus » de la région des Grands Lacs, c’est-à-dire le Michigan, l’Ohio, la Pennsylvanie et le Wisconsin. Ces quatre États traditionnellement démocrates ont chacun élu un gouverneur républicain depuis 2010, et seule la Pennsylvanie a opté pour un démocrate depuis ce temps. Lors de l’élection primaire du mois de mars, plus de résidents du Michigan se sont déplacés pour choisir un candidat républicain (1,32 million) qu’un candidat démocrate (1,19 million).

Dans les plus récents sondages, Trump devance Clinton en Pennsylvanie. Et comment se fait-il qu’il soit à égalité avec Clinton en Ohio, après tant d’extravagances et de déclarations à l’emporte-pièce? C’est sans doute parce qu’il a affirmé (avec raison) qu’Hillary a contribué à détruire la base industrielle de la région en appuyant l’ALÉNA. Trump ne manquera pas d’exploiter ce filon, puisque Clinton appuie également le PTP et de nombreuses autres mesures qui ont provoqué la ruine de ces quatre États.

Durant la primaire du Michigan, Trump a posé devant une usine de Ford et menacé d’imposer un tarif douanier de 35 % sur toutes les voitures fabriquées au Mexique dans le cas où Ford y déménagerait ses activités. Ce discours a plu aux électeurs de la classe ouvrière. Et lorsque Trump a menacé de contraindre Apple à fabriquer ses iPhone aux États-Unis plutôt qu’en Chine, leur cœur a basculé et Trump a remporté une victoire qui aurait dû échoir au gouverneur de l’Ohio John Kasich.

L’arc qui va de Green Bay à Pittsburgh est l’équivalent du centre de l’Angleterre. Ce paysage déprimant d’usines en décrépitude et de villes en sursis est peuplé de travailleurs et de chômeurs qui faisaient autrefois partie de la classe moyenne. Aigris et en colère, ces gens se sont fait duper par la théorie des effets de retombées de l’ère Reagan. Ils ont ensuite été abandonnés par les politiciens démocrates qui, malgré leurs beaux discours, fricotent avec des lobbyistes de Goldman Sachs prêts à leur écrire un beau gros chèque.

Voilà donc comment le scénario du Brexit est en train de se reproduire. Le charlatan Elmer Gantry se pose en Boris Johnson, faisant tout pour convaincre les masses que l’heure de la revanche a sonné. L’outsider va faire un grand ménage! Vous n’avez pas besoin de l’aimer ni d’être d’accord avec lui, car il sera le cocktail molotov que vous tirerez au beau milieu de tous ces bâtards qui vous ont escroqué! Vous devez envoyer un message clair, et Trump sera votre messager!

Passons maintenant aux calculs mathématiques. En 2012, Mitt Romney a perdu l’élection présidentielle par une marge de 64 voix du Collège électoral. Or, la personne qui remportera le scrutin populaire au Michigan, en Ohio, en Pennsylvanie et au Wisconsin récoltera exactement 64 voix. Outre les États traditionnellement républicains, qui s’étendent de l’Idaho à la Géorgie, tout ce dont Trump aura besoin pour se hisser au sommet ce sont les quatre États du Rust Belt. Oubliez la Floride, le Colorado ou la Virginie. Il n’en a même pas besoin.

« Cela dit, notre plus grand problème n’est pas Trump mais bien Hillary. Elle est très impopulaire. Près de 70 % des électeurs la considèrent comme malhonnête ou peu fiable. »

2. Le dernier tour de piste des Hommes blancs en colère

Nos 240 ans de domination masculine risquent de se terminer. Une femme risque de prendre le pouvoir! Comment en est-on arrivés là, sous notre propre règne? Nous avons ignoré de trop nombreux avertissements. Ce traître féministe qu’était Richard Nixon nous a imposé le Titre IX, qui interdit toute discrimination sur la base du genre dans les programmes éducatifs publics. Les filles se sont mises à pratiquer des sports. Nous les avons laissées piloter des avions de ligne et puis, sans crier gare, Beyoncé a envahi le terrain du Super Bowl avec son armée de femmes noires afin de décréter la fin de notre règne!

Cette incursion dans l’esprit des mâles blancs en danger évoque leur crainte du changement. Ce monstre, cette « féminazie » qui – comme le disait si bien Trump – « saigne des yeux et de partout où elle peut saigner » a réussi à s’imposer. Après avoir passé huit ans à nous faire donner des ordres par un homme noir, il faudrait maintenant qu’une femme nous mène par le bout du nez? Et après? Il y aura un couple gai à la Maison-Blanche pour les huit années suivantes? Des transgenres? Vous voyez bien où tout cela mène. Bientôt, les animaux auront les mêmes droits que les humains et le pays sera dirigé par un hamster. Assez, c’est assez!

3. Hillary est un problème en elle-même

Pouvons-nous parler en toute franchise? En premier lieu, je dois avouer que j’aime bien Hillary Clinton. Je crois qu’elle est la cible de critiques non méritées. Mais après son vote en faveur de la guerre en Irak, j’ai promis de ne plus jamais voter pour elle. Je suis contraint de briser cette promesse aujourd’hui pour éviter qu’un proto-fasciste ne devienne notre commandant en chef. Je crois malheureusement qu’Hillary Clinton va nous entraîner dans d’autres aventures militaires, car elle est un « faucon » perché à droite d’Obama. Mais peut-on confier le bouton de nos bombes nucléaires à Trump le psychopathe? Poser la question, c’est y répondre.

Cela dit, notre plus grand problème n’est pas Trump mais bien Hillary. Elle est très impopulaire. Près de 70 % des électeurs la considèrent comme malhonnête ou peu fiable. Elle représente la vieille manière de faire de la politique, c’est-à-dire l’art de raconter n’importe quoi pour se faire élire, sans égard à quelque principe que ce soit. Elle a lutté contre le mariage gay à une certaine époque, pour maintenant célébrer elle-même de tels mariages. Ses plus farouches détractrices sont les jeunes femmes. C’est injuste, dans la mesure où Hillary et d’autres politiciennes de sa génération ont dû lutter pour que les filles d’aujourd’hui ne soient plus encouragées à se taire et rester à la maison par les Barbara Bush de ce monde. Mais que voulez-vous, les jeunes n’aiment pas Hillary.

Pas une journée ne passe sans que des milléniaux me disent qu’ils ne l’appuieront pas. Je conviens qu’aucun démocrate ou indépendant ne sera enthousiaste à l’idée de voter pour elle le 8 novembre. La vague suscitée par l’élection d’Obama et la candidature de Sanders ne reviendra pas. Mais au final, l’élection repose sur les gens qui sortent de chez eux pour aller voter, et Trump dispose d’un net avantage à cet effet.

« Les jeunes n’ont aucune tolérance pour les discours qui sonnent faux. Dans leur esprit, revenir aux années Bush-Clinton est un peu l’équivalent d’utiliser MySpace et d’avoir un téléphone cellulaire gros comme le bras. »

4. Les partisans désabusés de Bernie Sanders

Ne vous inquiétez pas des partisans de Sanders qui ne voteront pas pour Hillary Clinton. Le fait est que nous serons nombreux à voter pour elle! Les sondages indiquent que les partisans de Sanders qui prévoient de voter pour Hillary sont déjà plus nombreux que les partisans d’Hillary ayant reporté leur vote sur Obama en 2008. Le problème n’est pas là. Si une alarme doit sonner, c’est à cause du « vote déprimé ». En d’autres termes, le partisan moyen de Sanders qui fait l’effort d’aller voter ne fera pas l’effort de convaincre cinq autres personnes d’en faire de même. Il ne fera pas 10 heures de bénévolat chaque mois, et n’expliquera pas sur un ton enjoué pourquoi il votera pour Hillary.

Les jeunes n’ont aucune tolérance pour les discours qui sonnent faux. Dans leur esprit, revenir aux années Bush-Clinton est un peu l’équivalent d’utiliser MySpace et d’avoir un téléphone cellulaire gros comme le bras.

Les jeunes ne voteront pas davantage pour Trump. Certains voteront pour un candidat indépendant, mais la plupart choisiront tout simplement de rester à la maison. Hillary doit leur donner une bonne raison de bouger. Malheureusement, je ne crois pas que son choix de colistier soit de nature à convaincre les milléniaux. Un ticket de deux femmes aurait été beaucoup plus audacieux qu’un gars blanc, âgé, centriste et sans saveur. Mais Hillary a misé sur la prudence, et ce n’est qu’un exemple parmi d’autres de sa capacité à s’aliéner les jeunes.

5. L’effet Jesse Ventura

Pour conclure, ne sous-estimez pas la capacité des gens à se conduire comme des anarchistes malicieux lorsqu’ils se retrouvent seuls dans l’isoloir. Dans notre société, l’isoloir est l’un des derniers endroits dépourvus de caméras de sécurité, de micros, d’enfants, d’épouse, de patron et de policiers! Vous pouvez y rester aussi longtemps que vous le souhaitez, et personne ne peut vous obliger à y faire quoi que ce soit.

Vous pouvez choisir un parti politique, ou écrire Mickey Mouse et Donald Duck sur votre bulletin de vote. C’est pour cette raison que des millions d’Américains en colère seront tentés de voter pour Trump. Ils ne le feront pas parce qu’ils apprécient le personnage ou adhèrent à ses idées, mais tout simplement parce qu’ils le peuvent. Des millions de gens seront tentés de devenir marionnettistes et de choisir Trump dans le seul but de brouiller les cartes et voir ce qui arrivera.

Vous souvenez-vous de 1998, année où un lutteur professionnel est devenu gouverneur du Minnesota? Le Minnesota est l’un des États les plus intelligents du pays, et ses citoyens ont un sens de l’humour assez particulier. Ils n’ont pas élu Jesse Ventura parce qu’ils étaient stupides et croyaient que cet homme était un intellectuel destiné aux plus hautes fonctions politiques. Ils l’ont fait parce qu’ils le pouvaient. Élire Ventura a été leur manière de se moquer d’un système malade. La même chose risque de se produire avec Trump.

Un homme m’a interpellé la semaine dernière, lorsque je rentrais à l’hôtel après avoir participé à une émission spéciale de Bill Maher diffusée sur HBO à l’occasion de la convention républicaine: « Mike, nous devons voter pour Trump. Nous DEVONS faire bouger les choses! » C’était là l’essentiel de sa réflexion.

Faire bouger les choses. Le président Trump sera l’homme de la situation, et une grande partie de l’électorat souhaite être aux premières loges pour assister au spectacle.

La semaine prochaine, je vous parlerai du talon d’Achille de Donald Trump et des stratégies que nous pouvons employer pour lui faire perdre l’élection.

Cordialement,

Michael Moore

Ce billet de blog a initialement été publié sur The Huffington Post et traduit de l’anglais par Pierre-Etienne Paradis.

Voir par ailleurs:

‘Ferguson effect’? Savagely beaten cop didn’t draw gun for fear of media uproar, says Chicago police chief
Derek Hawkins

The Washington Post

October 7 2016

A Chicago police officer who was savagely beaten at a car accident scene this week did not draw her gun on her attacker — even though she feared for her life — because she was afraid of the media attention that would come if she shot him, the city’s police chief said Thursday.

Chicago Police Department Superintendent Eddie Johnson said the officer, a 17-year veteran of the force, knew she should shoot the attacker but hesitated because “she didn’t want her family or the department to go through the scrutiny the next day on the national news,” the Chicago Tribune reported.

Johnson’s remarks, which came at an awards ceremony for police and firefighters, underscore a point law enforcement officers and some political leaders have pressed repeatedly as crime has risen in Chicago and other major cities: that police are reluctant to use force or act aggressively because they worry about negative media attention that will follow.

The issue has become known as the Ferguson effect, named after the St. Louis suburb where a police officer shot and killed an unarmed black teenager in August 2014. The shooting set off protests and riots that summer and eventually gave way to a fevered national debate over race and policing. Many law enforcement officers have said that the intense focus on policing in the time since has put them on the defensive and hindered their work.

Criminologists are generally skeptical of the Ferguson effect, many arguing that there simply isn’t enough evidence to definitively link spikes in crime to police acting with increased restraint. President Obama and Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch have also said not enough data exists to draw a clear connection.

In Chicago, which has experienced record numbers of homicides this year, Mayor Rahm Emanuel has blamed the surge in violent crime on officers balking during confrontations, saying they have become “fetal” because they don’t want to be prosecuted or fired for their actions.
Chicago, America’s murder capital

Superintendent Johnson stopped short of saying the attack on the officer was an example of the Ferguson effect in action, but said being under a magnifying glass has caused his police to “second-guess” themselves.

According to Johnson, the 43-year-old officer, who has not been identified, was responding to a car crash Wednesday when a 28-year-old man who was involved in the accident struck her in the face, then repeatedly smashed her head against the pavement until she passed out. He said the attack went on for several minutes and that two others officers were injured as they tried to pull the suspect away, the Chicago Sun-Times reported. The suspect was on PCP, he said, and was finally subdued after officers Tasered and pepper sprayed him.

Johnson said he visited the officer in the hospital, where she told him why she did not draw her service weapon during the attack.

“She looked at me and said she thought she was going to die,” he told the audience at the awards ceremony. “And she knew that she should shoot this guy. But she chose not to because she didn’t want her family or the department to have to go through the scrutiny the next day on national news.”

“This officer could [have] lost her life last night,” Johnson continued. “We have to change the narrative of law enforcement across this country.”

The head of Chicago’s police union, the largest in the country, said the incident showed just how concerned officers are about becoming the center of a public spectacle if they use force. Police “don’t want to become the next YouTube video,” he told the Tribune.

But a Chicago civil rights lawyer said that police bore some responsibility for the tension between police and the communities they serve. Decades of abuse by the police department had eroded the public’s trust, attorney Jon Loevy told the Tribune.

“Any fair-minded person acknowledges that police have a very difficult and dangerous job, and this sounds like a very unfortunate situation,” he said. “The hope is that the department and the community can work to repair some of the lost trust so that officers won’t always feel so second-guessed.”

Voir enfin:

Jean-Patrick Grumberg
Dreuz
8 octobre 2016

Un très vieil enregistrement de Donald Trump d’il y a 10 ans, alors qu’il était invité à participer à une émission de variétés et qu’il ne savait pas que son micro était allumé, vient « miraculeusement » de faire surface, où il parle de ses prouesses avec les femmes dans les termes qu’on utilise dans les salles de garde.

Les médias se sont jetés sur cet enregistrement pour assassiner Trump et c’est logique : ils font tout pour que Donald Trump ne soit pas élu.

Des politiciens ont déclaré que ces mots disqualifient Donald Trump pour la Maison-Blanche, oubliant que Bill Clinton a été à ce poste tout en se rendant coupable non pas de mots, mais d’agissements sexuels répréhensibles.

Donald Trump vient de présenter des excuses publiques pour les propos qu’il a tenus il y a 10 ans. Elles ne seront pas publiées. Les médias feront comme si elles n’existent pas :

Here is my statement. pic.twitter.com/WAZiGoQqMQ

Oui, les médias se sont jetés sur les propos déplacés de Donald Trump et ont étouffé les propos scandaleux de Clinton.

Quelle est la valeur de leurs leçons de morale, quand ils restent silencieux concernant la débauche de Bill Clinton — et je ne parle pas ici de Monica Lewinsky ?

Que valent leurs simulacres quand ils cachent les campagnes de diffamation montées par Hillary Clinton pour traîner dans la boue et détruire la réputation des femmes sexuellement agressées par son mari, elle qui se dit la championne de la cause des femmes ?

  • Vous avez tous connaissance maintenant — ou vous allez bientôt l’apprendre — de l’existence de cet enregistrement où Donald Trump dit, entre autres, « Je suis automatiquement attiré par les belles femmes, c’est comme un aimant… quand vous êtes une star, elles vous laissent faire… vous pouvez tout leur faire. »
  • Mais avez-vous jamais entendu ces mêmes médias rapporter que Bill Clinton a violé Juanita Broaddrick non pas une, mais deux fois, en 1978 alors qu’il était procureur général de l’Arkansas ? Et qu’il l’a harcelée pendant encore 6 mois pour tenter de la rencontrer de nouveau ?
  • Avez-vous entendu parler de Paula Jones, ex-fonctionnaire de l’Arkansas, qui a poursuivi Bill Clinton en justice pour harcèlement sexuel, qui a donné lieu à une compensation de 850 000 dollars, et provoqué la destitution de Clinton la Chambre des représentants, bien avant son impeachment de la présidence dans l’affaire Lewinsky ?
  • Kathleen Willey ? Les médias parlent-ils de Kathleen Willey, cette assistante-bénévole à la Maison-Blanche qui a révélé avoir été sexuellement abusée par le Président Bill Clinton le 29 novembre 1993, durant son premier terme, soit deux ans avant sa relation sexuelle avec Monica Lewinsky ?
  • Eileen Wellstone, violée par Clinton après une rencontre dans un pub d’Oxford University en 1969,
  • Carolyn Moffet, secrétaire juridique à Little Rock en 1979, qui a réussi à fuir de la chambre d’hôtel où le gouverneur Clinton l’avait attirée pour lui demander des faveurs sexuelles,
  • Elizabeth Ward Gracen, Miss Arkansas en 1982, qui a accusé Clinton de la forcer à avoir des rapports sexuels avec elle juste après la compétition pour Miss Arkansas,
  • Becky Brown, la nounou de Chelsea, la fille des Clinton, qu’il a tenté d’attirer dans une chambre pour avoir des relations sexuelles avec elle,
  • Helen Dowdy, la femme d’un cousin d’Hillary, qui a accusé Bill Clinton, en 1986, d’attouchements sexuels  lors d’un mariage.
  • Cristy Zercher, hôtesse de l’air lors de la campagne de Clinton de 1991-1992, qui a déclaré à Star magazine avoir été victime des attouchements sexuels de Clinton pendant 40 minutes dans le jet de la campagne sans pouvoir se défendre…

Ont-ils rué dans les brancards ? Non. Vous ont-ils informé ? Pas plus. Ont-ils dénoncé le comportement de Hillary Clinton en ses occasions ? Encore moins.

Pourquoi ? Parce que les journalistes permettent qu’un homme de leur camp viole des femmes, les agresse sexuellement, forcent une stagiaire à faire des pipes au président dans le bureau ovale, mais ils sont scandalisés qu’un homme de droite prononce des mots sexuellement déplacés.

Voilà de quoi est fait le monde médiatique en décomposition.

C’est à vous et à vous seul de réagir et d’en tirer les conséquences. C’est à vous de prendre les bonnes décisions concernant ce double standard que les médias, dans leur dépravation morale, tentent de vous imposer — sur tous les sujets.

Voir enfin:

La longue plainte de Robert De Niro n’en finit pas de résonner.

Depuis trois semaines, la star américaine se livre à une véritable attaque en règle contre «la France des droits de l’homme», sa justice en général et le juge d’instruction parisien Frédéric N’Guyen en particulier. Lequel juge a osé mettre la star en garde à vue, le 10 février, afin de l’entendre à titre de témoin dans une affaire de proxénétisme international. Imprudemment soutenus dans leur croisade par le microcosme artistico-médiatique, l’artiste et ses alliés multiplient les déclarations incendiaires dénonçant la «chasse aux sorcières», le pouvoir «déplorable» accordé aux juges, la «sale besogne» d’un magistrat «narcissique», avide de «publicité». Au point que, vendredi, le Syndicat de la magistrature a fini par demander à la ministre de la Justice, Elisabeth Guigou, «d’assurer publiquement sa protection» au juge Frédéric N’Guyen, «qui fait l’objet, sans pouvoir y répondre, d’attaques personnalisées proprement inacceptables».

Injures

Pourtant, le sieur De Niro a bien bénéficié d’un traitement judiciaire particulier. Mais plutôt en sa faveur. C’est du moins ce qu’avouent en sourdine les enquêteurs, face à la multiplication des entorses aux règles judiciaires qui ont émaillé l’interpellation du célèbre témoin.

Ainsi, le mardi 10 février, lorsque les sept hommes de la Brigade de répression du proxénétisme (BRP), accompagnés d’une interprète assermentée, se présentent à l’hôtel Bristol, rue du Faubourg-Saint-Honoré, à Paris, De Niro refuse obstinément de leur ouvrir la porte de la suite numéro 450 qu’il occupe. Lorsqu’ils peuvent enfin pénétrer dans l’appartement, ouvert par un membre du personnel de l’hôtel, ils essuient sans broncher et pendant de longues minutes les bordées d’injures de l’artiste, visiblement très énervé. Ils laissent même Robert De Niro téléphoner à son avocat, Me Georges Kiejman, avant de recevoir l’ordre de quitter les lieux. Il n’existe qu’un précédent célèbre. C’était en juin 1996, lorsque les policiers accompagnant le juge Halphen s’étaient vu intimer l’ordre par leur hiérarchie de ne pas assister le magistrat lors de sa perquisition au domicile du maire de Paris, Jean Tiberi. Pour avoir couvert cette irrégularité, le patron de la police judiciaire, Olivier Foll, avait été privé pendant six mois de son habilitation de police judiciaire par la chambre d’accusation.

Au coeur du dossier

Au Bristol, les choses rentreront dans l’ordre vers 10 h 45, après l’arrivée d’un des patrons de la BRP muni d’une nouvelle commission rogatoire du juge. Robert De Niro consent alors à suivre les policiers, mais ni la fouille à corps, ni la perquisition de l’appartement, pourtant notifiées, ne seront exécutées. Alors même que ces deux exigences justifient le mode opératoire adopté. En effet, s’il s’était agi d’entendre De Niro à titre de témoin, une simple convocation aurait suffi. «Mais ce n’est pas un témoin de circonstance, explique un avocat du dossier. Monsieur De Niro n’est pas le quidam qui passe par hasard sur le lieu d’une infraction et à qui on demande de venir raconter ce qu’il a vu. Il est au coeur du dossier.» L’artiste est en effet l’un des clients présumés d’un réseau de prostitution qu’auraient mis sur pied le photographe de charme Jean-Pierre Bourgeois et une ex-mannequin suédoise, Anika Brumarck. La filière a été dénoncée par un informateur anonyme de la BRP en octobre 1996. Elle fonctionnait depuis 1994, comme l’établira rapidement l’information judiciaire, confiée au juge N’Guyen le 24 octobre 1996. Anika Brumarck gérait les opérations depuis son appartement du XVIe arrondissement parisien. Usant de sa profession de photographe, Bourgeois se serait occupé de recruter les jeunes filles, alléchées par des propositions de petits rôles au cinéma ou de modèle photo pour des campagnes publicitaires. «Il a un vrai don pour repérer des proies faciles», assure un enquêteur, qui évoque avec dégoût l’exploitation de ce «sous-prolétariat d’aspirantes à une carrière de figurantes». Catalogue. Etudiantes sans le sou, vendeuses de fast-food, filles de la Ddass se laissent attirer dans l’appartement de Bourgeois, pour une première séance de photos nues, au Polaroïd. Ces clichés sont la base du catalogue qui sera proposé aux «clients». Il comporte sept ou huit noms de prostituées professionnelles haut de gamme, et une quarantaine d’autres, non professionnelles. Ensuite, selon les témoignages de plusieurs filles, Bourgeois propose aux modèles de leur raser une partie du sexe, pour des raisons «esthétiques». Opération généralement suivi d’un rapport sexuel. A ce stade, certaines candidates se rebiffent. Quelques-unes portent plainte pour viol et tentative de viol. D’autres passent le cap, afin de préserver leurs chances de décrocher un contrat, sans savoir qu’elles vont se retrouver dans un réseau de prostitution. Et une partie de celles-ci, confrontées à la réalité de leur premier client, iront également se confier à la justice. Les accusations de violences sexuelles sont d’ailleurs si nombreuses dans ce dossier que le parquet de Paris a décidé de le couper en deux. Le juge N’Guyen instruit donc en parallèle le proxénétisme aggravé et les viols et tentatives liées au réseau, pour lequel il dispose d’une multitude de plaintes de gamines, à l’encontre des instigateurs comme de certains clients.

Branche américaine

Bourgeois se serait essentiellement occupé de la clientèle moyen-orientale, grâce notamment à ses relations avec Nazihabdulatif Al-Ladki, secrétaire du neveu du roi d’Arabie Saoudite. Bourgeois, Brumarck et Al-Ladki sont actuellement incarcérés à Fleury-Mérogis. La partie américaine aurait été l’affaire du Polonais Wojtek Fibak, ex-tennisman de renom et ex-entraîneur de Lendl et de Leconte. C’est notamment lui qui aurait présenté Bourgeois à De Niro et qui aurait assuré le développement de la clientèle américaine, tout en recrutant de son côté quelques candidates. Pas toutes consentantes, apparemment, puisque Fibak fait lui aussi l’objet d’une mise en examen pour «agression sexuelle et tentative de viol». Carnet d’adresses. La déposition de De Niro était nécessaire afin d’établir les faits de proxénétisme. Car l’artiste reconnaît avoir eu des relations sexuelles avec au moins deux jeunes femmes qui lui auraient été présentées par Bourgeois. «Dans ce cas très précis, explique un avocat de la partie civile, c’est le client qui induit le proxénétisme.» Habituellement, le client s’adresse à une fille, la paie et s’en va. Aux policiers de démontrer que le souteneur présumé reçoit une partie des sommes et qu’il vit aux crochets de la belle. «Là, c’est l’inverse, poursuit l’avocat. Le client est d’abord au contact de l’intermédiaire. Le proxénétisme est établi d’emblée. Et le juge était sans doute très intéressé par le carnet d’adresses et les agendas de l’artiste, qui auraient pu révéler d’autres contacts. Il lui fallait donc ordonner une perquisition, ce qui excluait le recours à la convocation ordinaire.»

Lors de son audition par le juge, Robert De Niro a longuement répondu aux questions. Ces informations, Frédéric N’Guyen les attendait depuis le 14 novembre 1997, date de la délivrance de sa première commission rogatoire visant l’acteur. Trois longs mois avant que les enquêteurs ne se décident. Le 6 février, ils se présentent au Bristol une heure après le départ de De Niro, retourné aux Etats-Unis pour quelques jours. Pas de chance. D’autant que ce ratage est accompagné d’une première fuite bien préparée vers la presse, qui évente l’opération. Fuite réitérée lors de l’interpellation de l’acteur, qui se retrouvera face à une meute d’objectifs et de caméras à sa sortie du palais de justice, vers 21 heures.

Offensive médiatique

A partir de ce moment, les choses tournent au vinaigre pour le juge N’Guyen. Le soir même de l’audition de De Niro, Me Kiejman dépose une plainte contre le magistrat pour «violation du secret de l’instruction» et «entrave à la liberté d’aller et venir». Après quelques jours de répit, l’offensive repart du Festival cinématographique de Berlin, passe par les pages du Monde, qui publie une longue interview de De Niro, et s’étale sur Canal +, lorsque Guillaume Durand invite la star dans Nulle part ailleurs. En fait, on apprend, grâce au Canard enchaîné, que Durand a reçu De Niro chez lui quelques jours avant. Et que, lors de cette petite sauterie organisée pour l’anniversaire de l’animateur télé, Elisabeth Guigou, ministre de la Justice, invitée elle aussi, s’est entretenue une demi-heure en tête à tête avec l’acteur, comme en convient le cabinet de la ministre. Sans compter une mystérieuse visite nocturne au bureau du juge, constatée par les gendarmes du palais de justice le 17 février. Show business. «Il y a une réelle tentative de déstabiliser le juge et de plomber le dossier, estime un avocat du côté des parties civiles. Et De Niro n’est qu’un prétexte dans cette opération.» Il pourrait dissimuler une tentative de sauvetage du producteur de cinéma Alain Sarde. Client présumé du réseau, Sarde est accusé de viol et de tentative de viol par deux jeunes femmes que lui aurait présentées Bourgeois. Sarde, qui nie les faits, est défendu par Georges Kiejman. Comme De Niro. Sarde bénéficie du soutien de grands noms du show business. Dont une partie de ceux qui défendent De Niro. Le patron de Canal +, Pierre Lescure, a adressé au juge une attestation de moralité en faveur d’Alain Sarde. Canal +, qui contrôle la société de production les Films Alain Sarde-Canal +, assure la défense de De Niro, via les interventions de Kiejman et de l’acteur sur son antenne. Effets du hasard, ou scénario bien écrit?


Brexit: Attention, une folie peut en cacher une autre ! (Spot the error: When the international standard for breaking up a country is less demanding than a vote on the drinking age or than the rules for a couple seeking a divorce)

27 juin, 2016
PopulationExchangeBrexitBrexitToonSi vous admettez qu’un homme revêtu de la toute-puissance peut en abuser contre ses adversaires, pourquoi n’admettez-vous pas la même chose pour une majorité? (…) Le pouvoir de tout faire, que je refuse à un seul de mes semblables, je ne l’accorderai jamais à plusieurs. Tocqueville
La vérité ne se décide pas au vote majoritaire. Doug Gwyn
Le problème d’un suicide politique, c’est qu’on le regrette pendant le restant de ses jours. Churchill
Les principes républicains n’exigent point qu’on se laisse emporter au moindre vent des passions populaires ni qu’on se hâte d’obéir à toutes les impulsions momentanées que la multitude peut recevoir par la main artificieuse des hommes qui flattent ses préjugés pour trahir ses intérêts. Le peuple ne veut, le plus ordinairement, qu’arriver au bien public, cela est vrai ; mais il se trompe souvent en le cherchant […]. Lorsque les vrais intérêts du peuple sont contraires à ses désirs, le devoir de tous ceux qu’il a préposés à la garde de ses intérêts est de combattre l’erreur dont il est momentanément la victime afin de lui donner le temps de se reconnaître et d’envisager les choses de sang-froid. Et il est arrivé plus d’une fois qu’un peuple, sauvé ainsi des fatales conséquences de ses propres erreurs, s’est plu à élever des monuments de reconnaissance aux hommes qui avaient eu le magnanime courage de s’exposer à lui déplaire pour le servir. Alexander Hamilton (1788)
Si les membres s’étaient engagés publiquement dès le début, ils auraient ensuite supposé que la cohérence exigeait d’eux de maintenir leurs opinions, alors que, grâce au secret des discussions, nul ne se sent obligé de conserver ses opinions s’il n’est plus convaincu de leur pertinence et de leur vérité, et chacun peut céder à la force des arguments. James Madison
Si le public était exclu, il serait toujours amené à supposer que la vérité n’a pas été rapportée, ou qu’une partie était supprimée, et que beaucoup de choses se sont passées dont il n’a pas connaissance. Jeremy Bentham (1791)
Pourquoi le besoin de cohérence serait-il un facteur contraignant dans un débat public ? On peut imaginer deux raisons, l’une relative aux sujets de la décision à prendre et l’autre relative aux observateurs du débat. D’une part, lorsqu’une proposition a été lancée de manière publique, elle devient  facilement irréversible si ceux qui vont en profiter sont capables d’en empêcher le retrait. D’autre part, le besoin de cohérence peut être l’effet conjoint de la présence des observateurs et de la vanité de l’orateur. Abandonner une opinion qu’on a d’abord crue vraie implique qu’on s’est trompé, ce qui crée le sentiment déplaisant de dissonance cognitive. Il est donc normal qu’on hésite à abandonner une opinion, même si elle a été adoptée de manière passive plutôt qu’ active. Je conclus sur ce point que Madison eut tort s’il voulait affirmer, ce qui n’est pas évident, que dans le huis clos il n’ y a aucune force qui s’oppose à l’ argumentation. Même si la pression du public et la vanité devant l’audience ne jouent pas, le désir de l’ applaudissement du public interne garde toute sa force. Il convient de soulever une deuxième objection, plus importante celle-ci, à l’éloge que fait Ma dison du huis clos : le huis clos comporte une tendance à déplacer les échanges vers le terrain de la négociation , et à remplacer le souci du b ien commun par le souci du bien privé ou de l’intérêt du groupe. Par exemple, à Philadelphie, il y a eu un marchandage ouvert concernant l’esclavage, qui fut finalement accepté par les États du Nord sous la menace des États esclavagistes de quitter la Convention. De même, la décision d’accorder à chaque État deux sièges au Sénat fut le résultat de la menace des petits États de se retirer. On peut soulever enfin une troisième objection à l’analyse de Madison, laquelle semble sur un point précis manquer de sincérité – fait curieux dans un texte qui se veut l’éloge de cette vertu même. Son analyse ne suffit pas, en effet, à expliquer l’extrême épaisseur du voile qui fut tiré sur les débats et les votes, qui ne furent rendus publics qu’avec un retard de plusieurs décennies. Il existe de bonnes raisons de croire que les constituants américains ont voulu garder le secret sinon permanent, du moins durable, afin de ne pas avoir à craindre que la postérité n’exploite leurs désaccords, peut-être pour jeter un doute sur la légitimité du document. Nous savons que beaucoup de votes à la Convention furent extrêmement serrés. Jon Elster
Les assemblées constituantes restent, malgré tout, des objets privilégiés dans la mesure où elles mettent en scène l’argumentation et la négociation sous leur aspect le plus percutant. D’une part, les questions qui doivent y être tranchées n’ont rien à voir avec la politique à la petite semaine, égoiste et routinière. Mais, parce que ces assemblées doivent établir un cadre juridique pour un avenir indéfini, elles sont soumises à une très forte exigence d’impartialité dans l’argumentation. D’autre part, les constitutions sont souvent rédigées en période de crise, ce qui requiert des mesures extraordinaires, voire spectaculaires. Ainsi, à Philadelphie, de nombreux états menacent de quitter l’Union s’ils n’obtiennent pas gain de cause sur certaines questions bien précises, comme le maintien de l’esclavage ou la représentation proportionnelle de tous les États au Sénat. (La première menace a réussi ; la seconde a échoué.) A Paris, dans un premier temps, les délibérations de l’assemblée se déroulent sous la menace des troupes royales et, ultérieurement, sous les pressions de la foule. (Cette dernière menace fut efficace ; la première pas.) (…) je voudrais maintenant aller plus loin dans cette optique, en proposant quelques hypothèses à propos de l’effet global de l’argumentation et de la négociation à huis-clos et en public. Par « effet global », j’entends un critère qui tient compte de l’efficacité et de l’équité (et qu’on ne me demande surtout pas comment elles s’associent, ni au prix de quel compromis). J’affirme alors que, selon ce critère, et pour un mode de communication donné, les huis-clos sont toujours préférables à la publicité des débats ; et, pour un contexte donné, l’argumentation est toujours préférable à la négociation. En gros, l’argumentation est préférable à la négociation en raison de la force civilisatrice de l’hypocrisie. Et le huis-clos est préférable à la publicité des débats parce qu’il laisse moins de place à l’engagement préalable et à la surenchère. (…) A la Convention, les séances se déroulent à huis-clos et les délibérations sont soumises à la loi du secret, que tout le monde respecte. Dès lors, il est peu probable que des constituants s’enferment prématurément dans une position. Et donc, les occasions d’exploiter ce genre de situation à des fins stratégiques sont rares, elles aussi. Il existe pourtant une astuce. Celle-ci consiste à faire en sorte que la Convention s’imagine, lors de certaines séances, en train de siéger en « comité général » (Committee of the Whole). Cette astuce permet de procéder à des votes préliminaires qui ne lient les représentants à aucune décision prématurée. A l’Assemblée Constituante, les débats sont non seulement publics, mais également constamment interrompus par l’assistance. Initialement, il avait été envisagé que l’Assemblée se réunisse deux jours par semaine, et travaille en sous-commissions le reste du temps. Pourtant, les modérés et les patriotes n’étaient pas du tout du même avis à propos de cette façon de procéder. Pour Mounier, le leader des modérés, les commissions encourageaient « la froide raison et l’expérience », en protégeant leurs membres de tout ce qui pouvait attiser leur vanité et leur crainte de la désapprobation (…). Pour le patriote Bouche (…), les commissions tendent à affaiblir la ferveur révolutionnaire. Il préfère les grandes Assemblées, « où les âmes se fortifient, s’électrisent et où les noms, les rangs et les distinctions n’ont aucune importance. » Suite à sa proposition, il est décidé que l’Assemblée se réunira en séance plénière le matin, et en commissions l’après-midi. Rapidement, il n’y a plus que des séances plénières. L’importance de ce changement, qui marque le début de la fin aux yeux des modérés, est très bien comprise, à l’époque (…). Il est renforcé par l’introduction du vote nominatif. Cette procédure permet aux membres de l’Assemblée et au public d’identifier ceux qui s’opposent aux mesures radicales, et de faire circuler dans tout Paris la liste de leurs noms. La qualité des débats de la Convention Fédérale est souvent très élevée. Les débats y sont remarquables car ils contiennent peu de jargon et se fondent sur l’argumentation rationnelle. A l’Assemblée Constituante, au contraire, ils débordent de rhétorique, de démagogie et de surenchère. En même temps, la Convention est un lieu où l’on négocie âprement, notamment lors des débats opposant les États esclavagistes aux États commerciaux (…). Les représentants des États du Sud ne cherchent pas vraiment à affirmer que l’esclavage est moralement acceptable, si l’on excepte la remarque boiteuse de Charles Pinkney. Pour lui, « si l’esclavage est un mal, il est justifié par l’exemple du monde entier » (…). Au lieu de cela, ils expriment simplement leur opinion à l’aide de deux leviers : d’une part, en menaçant de quitter l’Union ; d’autre part, en attirant l’attention sur le fait qu’une Constitution défavorable aux États esclavagistes risquerait de ne pas être ratifiée. Si les débats s’étaient déroulés en public, ils auraient pu être forcés de mettre des gants. Jon Elster
Une autre question abordée pour éclairer le phénomène du vote est celle des votes sophistiqués (ou stratégiques) et des votes insincères. Il convient de distinguer ces deux catégories puisqu’à la différence d’un vote insincère, un vote sophistiqué n’est pas induit par la publicité de la procédure. Un vote insincère est un vote qui va à l’encontre des préférences sincères de l’ agent qui sait que son vote est observé, et qui est motivé soit par un espoir de gain soit par une crainte de sanctions. Dans le dernier cas, on préfère l’option A à l’option B, mais on vote pour B puisqu’un vote pour A aurait entraîné des sanctions de la part des observateurs du vote, que ceux-ci soient d’ autres votants ou des non votants intéressés. Dans le cas typique du vote sophistiqué, un votant fausse l’expression de ses préférences afin de rendre plus probable la victoire d’un candidat, d’un parti ou d’une proposition qu’il préfère à une alternative qui aurait plus de chances de gagner s’il votait selon ses préférences sincères. Concernant le vote insincère, on peut remarquer que lorsque le vote est public, il s’exerce souvent une pression sociale très forte sur l’individu pour voter dans le sens de la majorité. Quand le vote non seulement est public, mais se fait par appel nominal, cette pression s’en trouve renforcée. À la Constituante par exemple, il arriva souvent qu’une majorité évidente lors du vote par assis et levé se transforma en une minorité lorsqu’on demanda l’appel nominal. (…) Premièrement, les actions d’individus qui sont caractérisées par une fausse sophistication risquent de se retourner contre elles-mêmes. Deuxièmement, des individus vraiment sophistiqués risquent de ne pas être capables de déterminer leur choix optimal. La première conclusion relève de l’irrationalité des individus. Un agent qui base ses choix sur l’hypothèse qu’autrui est moins rationnel que lui-même est, par ce fait même, irrationnel. La deuxième conclusion relève de l’indétermination de la théorie du choix rationnel. Il existe en effet de nombreuses situations, notamment dans un contexte stratégique, dans lesquelles cette théorie est incapable de prescrire et de prédire des actions précises. J ’étudie ensuite une autre modalité du vote, la question du scrutin secret par rapport au vote public. Je cherche à déterminer, pour des contextes divers, les effets de l’une et de l’autre fa çon de voter. La question est intimement liée à celle du débat public par rapport au huis clos. Une première opposition est frappante : la Convention de Philadelphie s’est déroulée totalement à huis clos alors que les sessions plénières de la Convention européenne étaient publiques. Il n’est toutefois pas certain que cette différence ait été décisive.Tout d’abord, les effets du huis clos ne sont pas univoques. D’un côté, comme l’a souligné Madison à Philadelphie, il peut faciliter la « délibération » : « Si les membres s’étaient engagés publiquement dès le début, ils auraient ensuite supposé que la cohérence exigeait d’eux de maintenir leurs opinions alors que, grâce au secret des discussions, nul ne se sent obligé de conserver ses opinions s’il n’est plus convaincu de leur pertinence et de leur vérité, et chacun peut céder à la force des arguments ». D’un autre côté, l’expérience des conférences intergouvernementales tend à montrer que le huis clos peut aussi aller de pair avec la « négociation ». Il est plus facile d’exprimer et de défendre des « intérêts égoïstes » derrière des portes closes qu’au sein d’une assemblée qui se veut délibérative. Selon J. Elster, la publicité des débats incite à préférer le registre de l’argumentation, quand il s’agit d’exprimer ses intérêts. Ce simple « usage stratégique de l’argumentation » contribuerait alors à rapprocher les points de vue en présence. En outre, il existait au sein de la Convention des groupes restreints qui travaillaient à huis clos, au premier rang desquels on trouve le Praesidium, mais aussi certains groupes de travail, certaines réunions de « composantes » ou de groupes politiques. L’argumentation à huis clos, le meilleur arrangement possible selon J. Elster, a pu intervenir dans certains cercles de la Convention. C’est par exemple au sein d’une réunion du groupe PPE que le Suédois Sören Lekberg a reconnu avoir « changé d’avis » au vu des arguments développés par d’autres conventionnels concernant la nouvelle « clause de retrait » de l’Union. Le seul fait que nous ayons pu y assister montre toutefois que le huis clos n’était pas total et laisse penser que c’est l’aspect informel de ces réunions qui a joué le rôle le plus décisif. (…) La comparaison entre le déroulement des Conventions de Bruxelles et Philadelphie aide à cerner la nature de la construction européenne. L’hétérogénéité de la Convention européenne, la diversité de ses acteurs et de leurs identités apparaît plus nettement. En particulier, la Convention a mêlé, aux représentants des gouvernements, des parlementaires nationaux, jusque-là exclus de la phase d’élaboration des textes fondateurs européens, et des représentants de pays candidats, bientôt membres de l’Union. Dans ces conditions, la seule existence d’un texte unique adopté par consensus peut être considérée comme un « miracle » – pour reprendre le terme si souvent employé à propos de la Convention de Philadelphie, d’autant que les avancées qu’il comporte en termes d’extension de la majorité qualifiée, de démocratisation ou de clarification du système européen sont essentielles. Un seul texte remplace tous les traités existants, il en présente de façon beaucoup plus explicite les objectifs, les valeurs ainsi que la répartition des compétences entre l’Union et les États membres. Sans quelques moments « délibératifs », il aurait été difficile d’atteindre un tel résultat. Même si ces moments ne sont pas toujours aisés à repérer, la comparaison entre Bruxelles et Philadelphie confirme que l’existence de groupes de travail et de réunions restreintes (par institution d’origine, par groupe politique…) a favorisé la délibération. Ce « miracle » d’un compromis entre des intérêts divergents ne paraît cependant pas si éloigné de celui qui se produit quotidiennement dans le cadre de la construction européenne. Cela conduit à s’interroger sur le mot de « Constitution ». Il va en effet de pair avec l’idée de rupture, à l’œuvre à Philadelphie mais pas à Bruxelles. Dans le second cas, il semble qu’une logique de « petits pas » continue à prévaloir. Le projet de traité constitutionnel permet certains pas en avant. D’autres restent à accomplir, notamment pour écarter plus largement la procédure de l’unanimité. Il est compréhensible que nombre de conventionnels aient voulu associer le terme, fondateur, de « Constitution » – qui est de surcroît parlant pour les citoyens européens– à leur œuvre. Mais ne risque-t-il pas d’induire ces derniers en erreur en sous-entendant qu’il s’agit d’un texte intangible, dont les limites seraient dès lors vivement ressenties ? L’extrême diversité des acteurs européens, des États et des peuples n’implique-t-elle pas finalement que les Européens doivent sans cesse confronter leurs visions afin de les « ré-accorder », ycompris au niveau du contrat fondateur ? Ne conviendrait-il pas alors de préférer la notion de « pacte constitutionnel » ou même d’« accord constitutionnel », qui évoquent davantage l’idée d’une adhésion et d’un compromis sans cesse renouvelés ? La nécessité de disposer d’une clause de révision assouplie n’en serait alors que plus cruciale. Florence Deloche-Gaudez
À la suite de la Convention sur l’avenir de l’Europe, un traité établissant une constitution pour l’Europe fut signé. Celui-ci devait être soumis à référendum dans dix États membres, cependant, il ne s’est effectivement déroulé que dans quatre d’entre eux. Le premier référendum organisé fut le référendum espagnol, le 20 février 2005. Avec 41,8 % de participation, 76,6 % des Espagnols votèrent en faveur du traité. Le 29 mai 2005 s’est déroulé le référendum français. Avec 69 % de participation, le traité fut rejeté par 55 % des électeurs. Le 1er juin 2005, avec 63,3 % de participation, 61,5 % des Néerlandais votèrent contre le traité lors du référendum. Le référendum luxembourgeois fut organisé le 10 juillet 2005. Avec 90,44 % de participation, le traité fut approuvé par 56,5 % des votants. D’autres États membres envisageaient de recourir au référendum pour ratifier le traité : la République tchèque, l’Irlande, la Pologne, le Portugal, le Royaume-Uni, et le Danemark. (…) Un seul État membre, l’Irlande, a organisé un référendum pour ratifier le traité de Lisbonne. Le référendum irlandais sur le traité de Lisbonne eut lieu le 12 juin 2008. 53,2 % des votants s’exprimèrent contre la ratification du traité. À la suite de ce vote, la Commission européenne a déclaré que le traité n’obligerait pas l’Irlande à changer de position quant à l’existence d’un commissaire permanent par État (s’opposant à l’idée de rotation alors introduite), à la neutralité militaire et à l’avortement. Les Irlandais votèrent à nouveau le 2 octobre 2009. Avec un taux de participation de 59 %, les Irlandais acceptèrent la ratification du traité à 67,1 % des votants. Des critiques ont été émises quant à la décision de faire voter une nouvelle fois les Irlandais sur la base de quelques déclarations. La principale opposition dans l’Union européenne provenait du Parti pour l’indépendance du Royaume-Uni (UKIP) qui considérait que le choix de la population irlandaise lors du premier vote avait été ignoré et qu’ils avaient été forcés de revoter. Le parti ajoute que les concessions faites à l’Irlande sur certaines dispositions du traité de Lisbonne « n’ont aucune existence légale ». Certains considèrent que l’Irlande a obtenu des garanties sur le fait que certaines problématiques, telle que l’avortement, ne sera pas affecté par le traité de Lisbonne et qu’ainsi le peuple irlandais pouvait voter en gardant les concessions faites en tête, et qu’étant donné que tous les autres États membres avaient approuvé le traité, il n’était pas déraisonnable de demander à un seul pays de reconsidérer son rejet. Wikipedia
Le « traité établissant une Constitution pour l’Europe » devait être ratifié par chacun des États signataires pour entrer en vigueur, mais il a été rejeté par les électeurs français et néerlandais lors des référendums du 29 mai et du 1er juin 2005. Bien que les autres Etats membres aient ratifié le texte, la situation de blocage était évidente et le projet de Constitution a été abandonné. A la différence du précédent traité, le texte adopté à Lisbonne est un traité international classique. Le mot « constitution », tout comme les symboles de l’Union (drapeau, hymne, devise…) ne sont donc pas mentionnés. En outre, le texte introduit pour la première fois la possibilité pour un Etat membre de quitter l’Union dans des conditions à négocier avec ses partenaires. Des similitudes sont cependant présentes entre les deux traités. Selon Valéry Giscard d’Estaing, père du projet de constitution européenne, le nouveau traité en reprend intégralement les propositions institutionnelles, tout en les présentant dans un ordre différent. Pour le Sénat français, « le traité de Lisbonne reprend en règle générale le contenu du traité constitutionnel, même s’il le fait sous une forme complètement différente ». Même si le contenu des deux traités n’est pas identique, Marine Le Pen aurait donc raison de dire que le projet de Constitution européenne, rejeté en 2005, a été – en partie – proposé à nouveau en 2008. En effet, le nouveau texte prend en considération les exigences de réformes institutionnelles avancées en 2005, cependant avec un autre ton. Et c’est justement la forme qui marque la différence entre ces deux traités. Après les référendums de 2005, le mot « constitution » est définitivement abandonné et le processus d’intégration européenne est arrêté pendant trois ans. En outre, la possibilité de quitter l’Union est introduite dans le traité : cela n’a pas été le cas pendant les 50 premières années de l’intégration européenne. L’UE s’éloigne donc du rêve fédéraliste de ses fondateurs : la voix des Français et des Néerlandais a donc été écoutée. Toute l’Europe
The central weakness of the Obama Administration has been its repeatedly demonstrated lack of strategic insight: an inability to differentiate between the important and the trivial, the symbolic and the substantive, the necessary and the optional, the truly dangerous and the inconsequential. It is also bad at understanding linkages: the ways that problems and policies in one set of issues or in one region of the world impact American options, prestige and effectiveness in others. Now, too late, when the house is in on fire, the Administration is realizing that the Atlantic system is in deep trouble and that Brexit is a major challenge to U.S. interests. So now when success is more difficult and the range of possible outcomes is less appealing, the U.S. is going to commit to the issue and dive in. But that won’t change a reality that the press does its best to tiptoe past: rarely has a presidency seen so many things go so badly for the U.S. in foreign policy. Obama’s track record is not looking good: at the end of his watch, the Middle East, Europe, and East Asia are all in worse shape than when he entered office, relations with Russia and China are both worse, there are more refugees, more terrorists and more dangerous terrorist organizations. Walter Russell Mead
The vote, and weakening of the West that it heralds, will diminish President Obama’s foreign policy legacy. American policy toward Europe under his leadership has been an abject failure. His most obvious failure, and one that historians will view severely, is his failure to prevent the meltdown of Syria. The millions of desperate refugees fleeing for their lives are much more than a humanitarian disaster; they are a political disaster, and the strain of coping with the refugee flow on top of Europe’s other problems stoked suspicion and fear across the continent and greatly strengthened the power of the Leave campaign in the UK. But beyond the horrors of Syria, Obama has done less for Europe than any American president since the 1930s. The American response to the euro crisis and its long and bitter aftermath was both shortsighted and feeble. To the extent it did anything, the Obama irritated the Germans by critiquing their handling of the crisis while disappointing the debtor countries by an absence of effective support. The United States had great interests at stake when it came to Cameron’s negotiations with the EU; from all one can tell, President Obama spent more time playing golf during those negotiations than he did working to prevent a damaging split between some of our most important partners and allies. Smart American diplomacy would have worked intensely and unremittingly to get a deal between London and its partners that the British people would support, but despite the President’s breathtaking self-confidence, smart diplomacy is not actually part of his skill set. One hopes that even at this late date the Obama Administration will realize that the future of the UK-EU association is of almost infinitely greater importance to American national interests than launching yet another poorly conceived peace offensive in the Middle East. American diplomats and Treasury officials need to be working hard to generate ways to minimize the damage of this decision to the West. The British people have the right to choose whether or not to remain in the European Union, and while there will be some in Europe who want to punish them for this choice, the American interest in this matter is clear. We want a strong Britain, a strong Europe, good relations on both sides of the Channel and a trading system that doesn’t put new bureaucratic obstacles in the path of American exports or investment. We do not want bitterness and friction over the break to throw sand in the gears of western political and security cooperation in an increasingly dangerous world. We do not want Europe’s divisions to become Putin’s opportunities. We want Europe to be united, and we want Britain to be Great. At the same time, the U.S. government needs to do something else that the current administration has unaccountably failed to do over the last seven years: develop a strategy to help save the EU. The European Union is in trouble; the world’s most audacious experiment in international relations is looking both fragile and sclerotic. The British aren’t the only Europeans who think Brussels is a disaster, and the chance that a post-Brexit EU will continue to weaken and fragment is dangerously high. Refugee flows from the Middle East and North Africa are bound to continue. There are few signs of real economic revival in the south. The torpid bureaucracies and dysfunctional political organizations of Brussels can’t deliver real solutions to Europe’s problems, but European nation states have given so many of their powers to the EU that in many cases they lack the ability to act when Brussels fails. Walter Russell Mead
C’est au nom de la liberté, bien entendu, mais aussi au nom de l’« amour, de la fidélité, du dévouement » et de la nécessité de « ne pas condamner des personnes à la solitude » que la Cour suprême des Etats-Unis a finalement validé le mariage entre personnes de même sexe. Tels furent en tout cas les mots employés au terme de cette longue décision rédigée par le Juge Kennedy au nom de la Cour. (…) Le mariage gay est entré dans le droit américain non par la loi, librement débattue et votée au niveau de chaque Etat, mais par la jurisprudence de la plus haute juridiction du pays, laquelle s’impose à tous les Etats américains. Mais c’est une décision politique. Eminemment politique à l’instar de celle qui valida l’Obamacare, sécurité sociale à l’américaine, reforme phare du Président Obama, à une petite voix près. On se souviendra en effet que cette Cour a ceci de particulier qu’elle prétend être totalement transparente. Elle est composée de neuf juges, savants juristes, et rend ses décisions à la suite d’un vote. Point de bulletins secrets dans cette enceinte ; les votants sont connus. A se fier à sa composition, la Cour n’aurait jamais dû valider le mariage homosexuel : cinq juges conservateurs, quatre progressistes. Cinq a priori hostiles, quatre a priori favorables. Mais le sort en a décidé autrement ; le juge Kennedy, le plus modéré des conservateurs, fit bloc avec les progressistes, basculant ainsi la majorité en faveur de ces derniers. C’est un deuxième coup dur pour les conservateurs de la Cour en quelques mois : l’Obamacare bénéficia également de ce même coup du sort ; à l’époque ce fut le président, le Juge John Roberts, qui permit aux progressistes de l’emporter et de valider le système. (…) La spécificité de l’évènement est que ce sont des juges qui, forçant l’interprétation d’une Constitution qui ne dit rien du mariage homosexuel, ont estimé que cette union découlait ou résultait de la notion de « liberté ». C’est un « putch judiciaire » selon l’emblématique juge Antonin Scalia, le doyen de la Cour. Un pays qui permet à un « comité de neuf juges non-élus » de modifier le droit sur une question qui relève du législateur et non du pouvoir judiciaire, ne mérite pas d’être considéré comme une « démocratie ». Mais l’autre basculement désormais acté, c’est celui d’une argumentation dont le centre de gravité s’est déplacé de la raison vers l’émotion, de la ratio vers l’affectus. La Cour Suprême des Etats-Unis s’est en cela bien inscrite dans une tendance incontestable au sein de la quasi-totalité des juridictions occidentales. L’idée même de raisonnement perd du terrain : énième avatar de la civilisation de l’individu, les juges éprouvent de plus en plus de mal à apprécier les arguments en dehors de la chaleur des émotions. Cette décision fait en effet la part belle à la médiatisation des revendications individualistes, rejouées depuis plusieurs mois sur le modèle de la « lutte pour les droits civiques ». Ainsi la Cour n’hésite pas à comparer les lois traditionnelles du mariage à celles qui, à une autre époque, furent discriminatoires à l’égard des afro-américains et des femmes. (…) La Maison Blanche s’est instantanément baignée des couleurs de l’arc-en-ciel, symbole de la « gaypride ». Les réseaux sociaux ont été inondés de ces mêmes couleurs en soutien à ce qui est maintenant connu sous le nom de la cause gay. (…) Comme le relève un autre juge de la Cour ayant voté contre cette décision, il est fort dommage que cela se fasse au détriment du droit et de la Constitution des Etats-Unis d’Amérique. Yohann Rimokh
Dans les référendums, il y a le modèle constitutionnel français : le vote populaire est une forme supérieure de la loi, et donc la proclamation du résultat définit l’état du droit. Pour le vote du Brexit, le 23 juin, c’est bien différent car ce référendum n’était que consultatif. C’est un fait politique, et important : on voit les secousses sismiques de ce vote. Donc, une force politique que personne ne peut ignorer, et personne à ce jour ne peut savoir jusqu’où elle ira, mais sur le plan juridique, c’est zéro. Le droit se tient au Parlement. (…) Cameron ne peut en aucun cas notifier l’engagement de la procédure de l’article 50 lors du sommet européen qui va s’ouvrir ce mardi 28… parce que c’est juridiquement impossible. Le référendum n’étant que consultatif, son gouvernement doit obtenir un vote des Communes, seul le Parlement étant décisionnaire. Et, et c’est tout le problème, il n’y a aucune majorité Brexit au Parlement britannique. Majorité pour le Remain à plus de 70%. Question : les élus vont-ils voter contre leurs convictions, abandonnant la souveraineté parlementaire ? Ce pour suivre un référendum consultatif, qui a été nerveux et ambigu, fondé sur le mensonge et la xénophobie ? Je ne suis pas parlementaire britannique, mais je vois l’affaire bien mal partie. Par ailleurs, il faudra également que le Parlement se prononce sur le type d’accord qui va suivre, pour mandater le gouvernement. Or, cette question n’a jamais été évoquée lors du référendum. Aussi, une voix logique serait la dissolution des Communes, pour de nouvelles élections législatives avec un vaste débat sur (1) le principe du départ, et (2) ce qu’il faut pour en remplacement. Il se dégagerait alors une majorité qui aurait un mandat populaire net. Gilles Devers
Si j’étais législateur, je proposerais tout simplement la disparition du mot et du concept de “mariage” dans un code civil et laïque. Le “mariage”, valeur religieuse, sacrale, hétérosexuelle – avec voeu de procréation, de fidélité éternelle, etc. -, c’est une concession de l’Etat laïque à l’Eglise chrétienne – en particulier dans son monogamisme qui n’est ni juif (il ne fut imposé aux juifs par les Européens qu’au siècle dernier et ne constituait pas une obligation il y a quelques générations au Maghreb juif) ni, cela on le sait bien, musulman. En supprimant le mot et le concept de “mariage”, cette équivoque ou cette hypocrisie religieuse et sacrale, qui n’a aucune place dans une constitution laïque, on les remplacerait par une “union civile” contractuelle, une sorte de pacs généralisé, amélioré, raffiné, souple et ajusté entre des partenaires de sexe ou de nombre non imposé.(…) C’est une utopie mais je prends date. Jacques Derrida
C’est le sens de l’histoire (…) Pour la première fois en Occident, des hommes et des femmes homosexuels prétendent se passer de l’acte sexuel pour fonder une famille. Ils transgressent un ordre procréatif qui a reposé, depuis 2000 ans, sur le principe de la différence sexuelle. Evelyne Roudinesco
La vie prive parfois un enfant de père ou de mère par accident, mais ce n’est pas à la loi d’organiser cette privation. Cela transforme les enfants en champ d’expérience car il n’existe pas d’études sérieuses sur le devenir des enfants des familles homoparentales. Jean-Pierre Winter
Nul ne doute des capacités pédagogiques et de l’amour que des homosexuels sont à même de mettre au service d’enfants dont ils auraient la charge, ni ne prétend que les familles dites « traditionnelles » seraient a priori plus compétentes pour éduquer des enfants. Mais il s’agit de réfléchir au fait qu’élever un enfant ne suffit pas à l’inscrire dans une parenté. L’enjeu est celui des lois de la filiation pour tous. Comme psychanalystes nous ne sommes que trop avertis des conséquences anxiogènes à long terme des bricolages généalogiques commis au nom de la protection d’intérêts narcissiques, religieux, économiques ou autres. Jusqu’à présent ces manipulations, souvent secrètes, pouvaient être entendues comme des accidents historiques, des conséquences de troubles psychologiques, des effets d’aliénation, etc. Mais voilà que l’« accident » devrait devenir la loi. Voilà que François Hollande veut organiser légalement des arrangements qui priveraient a priori certains enfants de leur père ou de leur mère. Et il nous faudrait croire, simplement parce qu’on nous l’affirme, que cela serait sans effets préjudiciables alors que nous pouvons constater jour après jour la souffrance et l’angoisse de ceux que la vie s’est chargée de confronter à de tels manques. Certains, à droite comme à gauche, semblent convaincus qu’un enfant se portera bien du moment qu’il est aimé. Le grand mot amour est lâché ! Cet argument est dangereux. Il est culpabilisant pour tous les parents qui ont chéri leur enfant et qui néanmoins l’ont vu dériver et s’acharner contre eux dans la colère ou la haine. Au reste, qui peut dire avec certitude la différence entre amour et allégation d’amour ? (…) Il nous faudra du temps pour constater empiriquement ce que nous savons déjà. Mais dans l’intervalle combien d’enfants auront été l’objet d’une véritable emprise purement expérimentale ? Il faudra plusieurs générations pour apprécier les conséquences de telles modifications dans le système de la filiation surtout si par voie de conséquence logique on en vient, comme en Argentine récemment, à effacer purement et simplement la différence des sexes en laissant à chacun le droit de déclarer le genre qui lui sied par simple déclaration. Pour ma part, si je ne vois pas de véritables objections à ce que des enfants soient adoptés par des couples quels qu’ils soient à condition qu’ils se sachent issus d’un homme et d’une femme, même abandonniques, j’ai les plus grands doutes sur les effets des procréations faisant appel à des tiers voués à disparaître de l’histoire d’un sujet d’emblée dépossédé d’une moitié de sa filiation avec le consentement de la loi. Il y aurait lieu avant de légiférer à la hache de signifier clairement que « l’humanité est sexuée et que c’est ainsi qu’elle se reproduit », comme le disait la sociologue Irène Théry en 1998, se demandant pourquoi nous en venions à nier ce fait. Jean-Pierre Winter
Les jeunes Suédois ne sont pas autorisés à voter avant 18 ans, ne peuvent pas acheter d’alcool avant 20 ans, toutefois un projet est en cours pour autoriser les enfants à déposer une demande de changement juridique de genre dès 12 ans. Bien que les Suédois soient choqués par la mutilation génitale subie par de nombreuses filles immigrées, le gouvernement suédois semble vouloir légiférer sur une autre sorte de mutilation génitale des enfants : les opérations de changement de sexe ou, pour utiliser un terme plus politiquement correct,  le « gender reassignment surgery » (GRS), la chirurgie de réaffectation sexuelle. Les Observateurs
On peut parler aujourd’hui d’invasion arabe. C’est un fait social. Combien d’invasions l’Europe a connu tout au long de son histoire ! Elle a toujours su se surmonter elle-même, aller de l’avant pour se trouver ensuite comme agrandie par l’échange entre les cultures. Pape François
Nous laissons derrière nous un Etat souverain, stable, autosuffisant, avec une gouvernement représentatif qui a été élu par son peuple. Nous bâtissons un nouveau partenariat entre nos pays. Et nous terminons une guerre non avec une bataille filnale, mais avec une dernière marche du retour. C’est une réussite extraordinaire, qui a pris presque neuf ans. Et aujourd’hui nous nous souvenons de tout ce que vous avez fait pour le rendre possible. (…) Dur travail et sacrifice. Ces mots décrivent à peine le prix de cette guerre, et le courage des hommes et des femmes qui l’ont menée. Nous ne connaissons que trop bien le prix élevé de cette guerre. Plus d’1,5 million d’Américains ont servi en Irak. Plus de 30.000 Américains ont été blessés, et ce sont seulement les blessés dont les blessures sont visibles. Près de 4.500 Américains ont perdu la vie, dont 202 héros tombés au champ d’honneur venus d’ici, Fort Bragg. (…) Les dirigeants et les historiens continueront à analyser les leçons stratégiques de l’Irak. Et nos commandants prendront en compte des leçons durement apprises lors de campagnes militaires à l’avenir. Mais la leçon la plus importante que vous nous apprenez n’est pas une leçon en stratégie militaire, c’est une leçon sur le caractère de notre pays, car malgré toutes les difficultés auxquelles notre pays fait face, vous nous rappelez que rien n’est impossible pour les Américains lorsqu’ils sont solidaires. Barack Hussein Obama (14.12.11)
Il y a un manuel de stratégie à Washington que les présidents sont censés utiliser. (…) Et le manuel de stratégie prescrit des réponses aux différents événements, et ces réponses ont tendance à être des réponses militarisées. (…) Au milieu d’un défi international comme la Syrie, vous êtes jugé sévèrement si vous ne suivez pas le manuel de stratégie, même s’il y a de bonnes raisons. (…) Je suis très fier de ce moment.  Le poids écrasant de la sagesse conventionnelle et la machinerie de notre appareil de sécurité nationale était allés assez loin. La perception était que ma crédibilité était en jeu, que la crédibilité de l’Amérique était en jeu. Et donc pour moi d’appuyer sur le bouton arrêt à ce moment-là, je le savais, me coûterait cher politiquement. Le fait que je pouvais me débarrasser des pressions immédiates et réfléchir sur ce qui  était dans l’intérêt de l’Amérique, non seulement à l’égard de la Syrie, mais aussi à l’égard de notre démocratie, a été une décision très difficile – et je crois que finalement, ce fut la bonne décision à prendre. (…) Je suppose que vous pourriez me qualifier de réaliste qui croit que nous ne pouvons pas soulager toute la misère du monde. Barack Hussein Obama
Il est tout à fait légitime pour le peuple américain d’être profondément préoccupé quand vous avez un tas de fanatiques vicieux et violents qui décapitent les gens ou qui tirent au hasard dans un tas de gens dans une épicerie à Paris. Barack Hussein Obama
Des douzaines d’innocents ont été massacrés, nous soutenons le peuple d’Orlando. L’enquête débute seulement mais il s’agit bien d’un acte de terreur et de haine. Je viens d’avoir une réunion avec le FBI, toutes les ressources du gouvernement fédéral seront mises à disposition. On ne connaît pas les motivations de cet homme, mais il s’agissait d’un homme rempli de haine, nous allons essayer de savoir pourquoi et comment cela s’est passé. Barack Hussein Obama
Nous sommes contre l’incitation … Il y a une semaine, un certain nombre de rabbins en Israël ont tenu des propos clairs, demandant à leur gouvernement d’empoisonner l’eau pour tuer les Palestiniens. N’est-ce pas de l’incitation? N’est-ce de la pure incitation à l’assassinat en masse du peuple palestinien? Mahmoud Abbas (Bruxelles)
Mr. Abbas’s remarks were not included in the official Arabic transcript issued by his office, and his advisers and spokesmen were not available for comment on Thursday night. But the claims also appeared on the website of the Palestinian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Rumors that Jews had poisoned wells and other sources of water arose in the 14th century as the bubonic plague raged across much of Europe. The rumors led to the destruction of scores of Jewish communities. In Basel, Switzerland, and Strasbourg, France, hundreds of Jews were burned alive. NYT
The Brexit debate has become a global spectator sport, which suggests that something very important must be at stake. Yet, unlike issues such as migration, the euro crisis and Ukraine, it lacks real significance: under no circumstances will Britain leave Europe, regardless of the result of the referendum on June 23. It is instead a long kabuki drama in which politicians, not least Eurosceptics, advocate policies they would never actually implement. Kabuki — the ancient Japanese theatre art in which actors employ masks, make-up and illusions — is a common Washington metaphor for stylised but meaningless posturing. (…) The illusory nature of Brexit was evident at the start. Politicians do not call EU referendums because they are genuinely dissatisfied with Europe. They do so to extricate themselves from domestic political jams. So in 2013 David Cameron, a moderate pro-European, introduced a referendum as the most expedient domestic political gambit to silence pesky Eurosceptics in his own party. (…) The Remain camp seems likely to prevail since the opposition, business, foreign investors and most educated commentators all back the government. In referendums, more­over, undecided voters tend to favour the status quo — a tendency reinforced by uncertainty about exactly what Britain would do after Brexit. Still, critics are correct that Mr Cameron is playing with fire. Referendums are unpredictable, especially when issues such as migration and terrorism are in the mix. (…) Yet Britain looks unlikely to exit Europe even if its citizens voted to do so. Instead, the government would probably do just what EU members — Denmark, France, Ireland and the Netherlands — have always done after such votes. It would negotiate a new agreement, nearly identical to the old one, disguise it in opaque language and ratify it. The public, essentially ignorant about Europe, always goes along. In contemplating this possibility, leading Eurosceptics have shown themselves to be the craftiest political illusionists of all. Now that Brexit appears within their grasp, they are backing away from it. What they really seek is domestic political power. (…) Finally, what if Messrs Cameron and Johnson and other politicians lose control of domestic politics, or if other EU leaders tire of Eurosceptic obstreperousness and toss the Brits out? Even in this worst-case scenario, Britain would not really leave Europe. (…) Europe is real because globalisation means every day more British people rely on the EU to secure and stabilise trade, investment, travel, litigation, national security and political values. So the same politicians who lead a majority of Britons down the path to leave Europe would have to lead them back up again the next day to save their own political skins. Even politicians who have mastered the kabuki arts of mask and illusion must sooner or later face reality. Andrew Moravcsik (Princeton)
If Boris Johnson looked downbeat yesterday, that is because he realises that he has lost. Perhaps many Brexiters do not realise it yet, but they have actually lost, and it is all down to one man: David Cameron. With one fell swoop yesterday at 9:15 am, Cameron effectively annulled the referendum result, and simultaneously destroyed the political careers of Boris Johnson, Michael Gove and leading Brexiters who cost him so much anguish, not to mention his premiership. How? Throughout the campaign, Cameron had repeatedly said that a vote for leave would lead to triggering Article 50 straight away. Whether implicitly or explicitly, the image was clear: he would be giving that notice under Article 50 the morning after a vote to leave. Whether that was scaremongering or not is a bit moot now but, in the midst of the sentimental nautical references of his speech yesterday, he quietly abandoned that position and handed the responsibility over to his successor. And as the day wore on, the enormity of that step started to sink in: the markets, Sterling, Scotland, the Irish border, the Gibraltar border, the frontier at Calais, the need to continue compliance with all EU regulations for a free market, re-issuing passports, Brits abroad, EU citizens in Britain, the mountain of legistlation to be torn up and rewritten … the list grew and grew. The referendum result is not binding. It is advisory. Parliament is not bound to commit itself in that same direction. The Conservative party election that Cameron triggered will now have one question looming over it: will you, if elected as party leader, trigger the notice under Article 50? Who will want to have the responsibility of all those ramifications and consequences on his/her head and shoulders? Boris Johnson knew this yesterday, when he emerged subdued from his home and was even more subdued at the press conference. He has been out-maneouvered and check-mated. If he runs for leadership of the party, and then fails to follow through on triggering Article 50, then he is finished. If he does not run and effectively abandons the field, then he is finished. If he runs, wins and pulls the UK out of the EU, then it will all be over – Scotland will break away, there will be upheaval in Ireland, a recession … broken trade agreements. Then he is also finished. Boris Johnson knows all of this. When he acts like the dumb blond it is just that: an act. The Brexit leaders now have a result that they cannot use. For them, leadership of the Tory party has become a poison chalice. When Boris Johnson said there was no need to trigger Article 50 straight away, what he really meant to say was « never ». When Michael Gove went on and on about « informal negotiations » … why? why not the formal ones straight away? … he also meant not triggering the formal departure. They both know what a formal demarche would mean: an irreversible step that neither of them is prepared to take. All that remains is for someone to have the guts to stand up and say that Brexit is unachievable in reality without an enormous amount of pain and destruction, that cannot be borne. And David Cameron has put the onus of making that statement on the heads of the people who led the Brexit campaign. Teebs
Attention, problème de traduction : les Britanniques ont certes voté pour le « Brexit », mais cette expression ne signifie pas qu’ils vont quitter l’Union européenne (UE) et encore moins l’Europe. Il suffit d’observer les tergiversations du premier ministre, David Cameron, qui souhaite laisser à son successeur le soin d’exercer l’article 50 des traités européens, ce fameux article qui entraîne le compte à rebours de deux ans pour sortir de plein droit de l’UE. Déjà, Albion joue la montre. Elle va devoir négocier simultanément son divorce et son remariage, sous une forme à inventer, avec les Européens. (…) Tout devrait se résumer in fine à deux questions : combien Londres devra-t-il payer pour rester dans l’UE sans y appartenir juridiquement et à quelles réunions communautaires les représentants de Sa Majesté participeront-ils, avec le titre d’observateur forcément très actif. A la fin de l’histoire, les peuples risquent de se retrouver fort marris d’un « Brexit » peut-être plus formel que réel. En revanche, les électeurs britanniques ont accompli, jeudi 23 juin, un acte majeur : ils ont rejeté l’Europe politique. Ils n’ont pas répudié l’Europe libérale qu’ils ont façonnée, mais l’embryon de fédération européenne à laquelle, paradoxalement, ils ne participent pas : l’euro, Schengen et l’Europe de la justice. Tels les cheminots français qui prétendaient faire la grève par procuration pour les salariés du privé en 1995, les Britanniques ont voté à la place des peuples continentaux privés de ce droit. De ce côté de la Manche, la présidente du Front national (FN), Marine Le Pen, l’a bien compris, qui a immédiatement exigé un référendum en France sur l’appartenance à l’UE. Ce désamour européen a gagné tout le continent. Au pouvoir en Hongrie, en Pologne et en Slovaquie, il est aux portes des Pays-Bas, de la France, voire de l’Italie. (…) Non, le drame européen n’est pas technocratique et ne s’appelle pas Bruxelles. Il est anthropologique. L’Europe se meurt, faute d’identité et de projet. Elle avait prospéré – laborieusement, rappelons-le – dans la seconde moitié du XXe siècle sur le rejet de la guerre, mobilisée face à l’Union soviétique (URSS) et protégée par les Américains. Les années de la mondialisation heureuse et un élargissement sans fin (1989-2007) ont affadi ce projet, qui s’est retrouvé bien désarmé lorsqu’ont surgi de nouveaux défis. Ces défis sont civilisationnels, incarnés par la menace de l’organisation Etat islamique (EI) ; démographiques avec l’Afrique, dont la population – 1,2 milliard d’habitants – va doubler d’ici à 2050 et dont il va falloir accompagner le développement pour contenir la pression migratoire ; économiques avec la concurrence de la Chine et des économies émergentes. Le problème, c’est que les populations estiment que la réponse à apporter n’est pas nécessairement européenne. Parce que la dynamique communautaire n’est plus gagnante à l’intérieur des Etats – les populations rurales, ouvrières et employées se sentent délaissées, vulnérables et décrochées des élites urbaines mondialisées –, mais aussi entre pays européens. C’est flagrant en économie. Le Royaume-Uni croit avoir trouvé la martingale en devenant la première place financière mondiale, l’Allemagne en équipant la planète de machines-outils, tandis que les pays du sud de l’UE sont les perdants objectifs de l’euro. Le défi de l’immigration est encore plus compliqué entre les pays de l’Est (Hongrie, Pologne), qui entendent conserver leur uniformité ethnique et catholique, et ceux de l’Ouest qui gèrent mal leur multiculturalisme sur fond de peur de l’islamisme et s’effraient du dumping social porté, selon eux, par l’immigration. (…) Dans ce contexte, les populations les plus faibles choisissent le repli identitaire. Arnaud Leparmentier
La classe dirigeante européenne en est là par rapport à l’Europe. La plupart de nos dirigeants (la tribune de BHL en offre une illustration caricaturale) continuent à tenir les eurosceptiques pour de dangereux fauteurs de guerre et à croire que le ciel des marchés va tomber sur la tête des souverainistes. (…) Ce qui a rendu cette utopie enviable et a incité plusieurs générations de dirigeants à l’imposer sur la réalité des États nations européens, c’est un double refus ou plutôt une double conjuration. D’abord, le conjuration du péril brun incarné par les crimes perpétrés par le nazisme. Ensuite, la conjuration du péril rouge incarné par les affres du communisme. L’Union européenne est un édifice juridique, institutionnel, politique et économique destiné à protéger les peuples et les États qui la composent contre ces deux périls. En ce sens, le projet européen n’est porté par aucune idéologie positive et encore moins par une volonté de puissance. La consécration du bon plaisir individuel (le droit des minorités est son extension) comme norme suprême à laquelle nous invite la jurisprudence de la CEDH s’accompagne d’une déligitimation de toute certitude susceptible de s’imposer l’individu donc de toute idéologie. Le projet européen est également antinomique de toute volonté de puissance. L’Europe, c’est un effort titanesque pour s’attacher les uns aux autres afin de ne plus rien vouloir, ni pouvoir ensemble. L’UE, c’est un club d’ex-alcooliques qui cassent leurs verres et leurs bouteilles, détruisent leurs tire-bouchons afin d’être certains qu’ils ne toucheront plus jamais une goutte d’alcool.Plus jamais ça: plus de raison d’État, plus d’armée, plus de budget, plus d’impôt, plus de démocratie directe, plus de frontière, plus d’assimilation des migrants: une monnaie au service des marchés et le multiculturalisme et l’armée américaine pour tous. (…) Le besoin de délimiter l’État comme volonté de puissance, de brider la souveraineté nationale comme expression de la volonté populaire, de délier légitimité politique et culturelle (un État multi culturel et post-national qui ne ferait plus la guerre et dans laquelle les migrants garderaient leur culture d’origine) n’avait aucune raison de séduire le peuple anglais. Londres n’est jamais entrés dan l’Euro, ni dans Schengen et n’a jamais accepté que les lois sont faites ailleurs qu’aux Communes. (…) L’Allemagne est militairement et démocratiquement traumatisés et perçoit l’immigrant comme un rédempteur, elle est prête à accélérer. Pour des raison qui leurs sont propre, les Luxembourgeois et les Belges n’ont pas grand chose à sacrifier en sacrifiant leur souveraineté. Le nationalisme italien a été moins ébranlé par le fascisme que le chauvinisme allemand mais n’est pas sorti indemne de son exaltation par Mussolini. C’est aussi un État nation récent et donc fragile qui n’hésitera pas à se dissoudre. La fécondité de ces peuples décline rapidement et de manière inexorable (les politiques natalistes ayant été fortement délégitimés par les pratiques des régimes totalitaires dans ce domaine). Si la loi de l’hystérèse se vérifie, l’Allemagne, l’Autriche, la Roumanie et les anciens pays de l’axe resteront longtemps arc-boutés sur un projet de dépassement de l’État nation et de la volonté populaire par l’Europe. Le projet européen perdurera. Il y aura une vaste confédération helvétique à échelle continentale, maison de retraite historique pour peuples fatigués, pacifistes et bien décidés à gérer et leur rente économique et leur déclin démographique. Rappelons que la France gagne 500 000 habitants chaque année tandis que l’Allemagne en perd 500 0000. (…) L’Europe a alors pu s’imposer comme une sorte de piscine purificatrice éliminant les souillures historiques. Le Frexit ne surviendra que lorsque la vérité sur cette époque s’imposera. Guillaume Bigot
As a shocked world reacted to England’s unexpected exit from the European Union, Palestinian President Abbas delivered a speech to the European Parliament. Abbas, now in the 11th year of his four-year term, accused Israel of becoming a fascist country. Then he updated a vicious medieval anti-Semitic canard by charging that (non-existent) rabbis are urging Jews to poison the Palestinian water supply. The response by representatives of the 28 European nations whose own histories are littered with the terrible consequences of such anti-Semitic blood libels? A thunderous 30-second standing ovation. So forgive us if while everyone else analyzes the economic impact of the UK exit, and pundits parse the generational and social divide of British voters, we dare to ask a parochial question: is a weakened EU good or bad for the Jews? First, there is the geopolitical calculus of a triple pincer movement to consider: Russian President Vladimir Putin’s troublemaking from the East, the massive migrant-refugee influx into Europe from the South, and now the UK’s secession from the West with unforeseen implications for global economies and politics. For Israel, the EU’s global dilemma is a mixed bag. On the one hand, it could, at least temporarily, derail the EU’s intense pressuring of Israel to accept – even sans direct negotiations with the Palestinians – a one-sided French peace initiative, imposing indefensible borders on the Jewish state. On the other hand, as leading Israeli corporations and Israel’s stock market are already recognizing, new problems for the EU economic engine are also a threat to the Jewish state’s economic ties with its leading trading partner. But the scope of the current crisis is also very much the result of the internal moral and political failure of the EU’s own transnational elites and political leadership to confront its homegrown problems. These problems have also impacted on many of Europe’s 1.4 million Jews. (…) European elites over-centralized power in Brussels by practicing what amounts to “taxation without representation,” and – after instituting open borders across the continent – failed to come up with coherent strategies to deal with burgeoning terrorism and wave after wave of Middle East migrants. Suddenly, calls by (mostly) far-right voices to “take back control of their country,” “restore national sovereignty” and “reestablish national borders” began to resonate in the mainstream of not only the UK, but also Germany, the Netherlands, Scandinavia and France. With Germany’s Chancellor Angel Merkel as the prime example, EU political leaders have so far failed to deal with legitimate citizen concerns that democracy itself is threatened by the uncontrolled influx of people from the Middle East and Africa who are not being assimilated into the basic values and institutions of Western societies. To date, the primary beneficiaries of this political failure are the extreme nationalist parties (…) Many are the proud bearers of xenophobic, populist platforms that include whitewashing or minimizing the crimes of the Nazi era. Jews rightfully fearful of the anti-Semitism among old and new Muslim neighbors in Europe can take little solace in the specter of a fragmented continent led by movements whose member rail against Muslims but also despise Jews. (…) We can only hope and pray that European captains of industry, politicians, media and NGOs take the UK vote as a wake-up call for them all. For if they fail to actually address the economic and social crises with real solutions, it won’t only be the Jews of Europe who will be searching for the nearest exit. Rabbi Abraham Cooper  and Dr. Harold Brackman (Simon Wiesenthal Center)
Un référendum réduit la complexité à une absurde simplicité. Le fouillis de la coopération internationale et de la souveraineté partagée représenté par l’adhésion de la Grande-Bretagne à l’Union européenne a été calomnié par une série d’allégations et de promesses mensongères. On a promis aux Britanniques qu’il n’y aurait pas de prix économique à payer pour quitter l’UE, ni aucune perte pour tous les secteurs de sa société qui ont bénéficié de l’Europe. On a promis aux électeurs un accord commercial avantageux avec l’Europe (le plus grand marché de la Grande-Bretagne), une immigration plus faible et plus d’argent pour le National Health Service (le système de sécurité sociale britannique), ainsi que d’autres biens et services publics précieux. Par-dessus tout, on a promis que la Grande-Bretagne retrouverait son « mojo », la vitalité créatrice nécessaire pour faire sensation. (…) Avec le Brexit, nous venons d’assister à l’arrivée du populisme à la Donald Trump en Grande-Bretagne. De toute évidence, il existe une hostilité généralisée, submergée par un tsunami de bile populiste, à l’égard de quiconque est considéré comme un membre de « l’establishment ». Les militants du Brexit, comme le Secrétaire à la Justice Michael Gove, ont rejeté tous les experts  dans le cadre d’un complot égoïste des nantis contre les démunis. Les conseils du Gouverneur de la Banque d’Angleterre, de l’Archevêque de Canterbury ou du Président des États-Unis, n’auront finalement compté pour rien. Tous ont été décrits comme des représentants d’un autre monde, sans rapport avec la vie des britanniques ordinaires. (…) La campagne référendaire a relancé la politique nationaliste, qui porte toujours sur la race, l’immigration et les complots. Une tâche que nous partageons tous dans le camp pro-européen consiste à essayer de contenir les forces qui ont déchainé le Brexit et à affirmer les valeurs qui nous ont valu tant d’amis et d’admirateurs à travers le monde par le passé. Tout cela a commencé dans les années 1940, avec Winston Churchill et sa vision de l’Europe. La façon dont cela va se terminer peut être décrite par l’un des aphorismes les plus célèbres de Churchill : « Le problème d’un suicide politique, c’est qu’on le regrette pendant le restant de ses jours. » En fait, de nombreux électeurs du « Leave » ne seront peut-être plus là pour le regretter. Mais les jeunes Britanniques, qui ont voté massivement pour continuer à faire partie de l’Europe, vont presque à coup sûr le regretter. Chris Patten
Partout en Europe, pas moins de 47 partis de révolte viennent mettre la politique sans dessus dessous. (…) Bien que ces partis de révolte présentent des racines différentes, ils ont bel et bien une chose en commun : ils s’efforcent tous de bouleverser ce consensus de politique étrangère qui définit l’Europe depuis des dizaines d’années. Eurosceptiques, opposés à l’OTAN, ils entendent verrouiller leurs frontières et mettre un terme au libre-échange. Ces partis viennent modifier le visage de la politique, remplaçant les traditionnelles querelles gauche-droite par des disputes dans le cadre desquelles leur propre nativisme irascible s’oppose au cosmopolitisme des élites qu’ils méprisent. L’arme privilégiée par ces partis n’est autre que le référendum, grâce auquel ils mobilisent un soutien populaire autour de leurs objectifs. D’après le Conseil européen des relations internationales, pas moins de 32 référendums sont aujourd’hui demandés dans 18 pays de la zone euro. (…) Le plan de relocalisation des réfugiés adopté par l’UE se révèle particulièrement créateur de divisions. (…) Le fait de restituer le pouvoir aux masses, via une démocratie directe, constitue sans doute la proposition la plus révolutionnaire de ces partis. Celle-ci reflète en effet la compréhension des frustrations qui suscitent une vague mondiale de protestations populaires depuis quelques années – contestations qui, au sein du monde arabe, ont déclenché des révolutions bien réelles. C’est ce même esprit de révolte qui a conduit par exemple les Espagnols, les Grecs et les New-Yorkais à envahir les rues – avec des revendications bien entendu différentes – qui alimentent le soutien en faveur de ces nouveaux référendums, et des partis insurgés qui poussent dans cette direction. Il y a là un cauchemar non seulement pour les partis dominants, mais également pour la gouvernance démocratique elle-même. Comme l’a démontré l’expérience de la Californie en matière de référendum, l’opinion publique a bien souvent tendance à voter en faveur de mesures contradictoires – moins d’impôts mais davantage d’aides sociales, ou encore préservation de l’environnement mais baisse du prix des carburants. Seulement voilà, cette tendance représente une difficulté exponentielle pour l’UE, la dynamique actuelle venant en effet bouleverser les fondements mêmes de l’Union. N’oublions pas que l’UE constitue l’expression ultime de la démocratie représentative. Il s’agit d’une entité éclairée, qui a pour vocation centrale un certain nombre de valeurs libérales telles que les droits de l’individu, la protection des minorités, ou encore l’économie de marché. Malheureusement, les couches de représentation sur lesquelles repose l’UE ont créé l’impression qu’une lointaine élite se chargeait de tout gérer, totalement déconnectée des citoyens ordinaires. Ceci fournit une cible idéale aux partis nationalistes, dans le cadre de leurs campagnes anti-UE. Ajoutez à cela l’instrumentalisation des peurs autour de questions telles que l’immigration ou le commerce, et la capacité de ces partis à attirer des électeurs frustrés ou inquiets se trouve renforcée. Deux visions de l’Europe s’opposent désormais : celle d’une Europe diplomatique, et celle d’une Europe des masses. L’Europe diplomatique, incarnée par le père fondateur de l’UE Jean Monnet, est parvenue à extraire certaines questions sensibles hors de la sphère politique populaire, et à les réduire à des problématiques techniques solubles, gérées par des diplomates au moyen de compromis bureaucratiques convenus en coulisses. L’Europe des masses, notamment représentée par le Parti pour l’indépendance du Royaume-Uni, qui a activement contribué au Brexit, s’inscrit précisément à l’opposé de l’Europe de Jean Monnet, puisqu’elle s’intéresse à des compromis tels que le TTIP, ou encore l’accord d’association avec l’Ukraine, pour ensuite politiser intentionnellement ces compromis. Là où l’Europe diplomatique s’efforce de promouvoir la réconciliation, l’Europe des masses conduit à une polarisation. Et tandis que la diplomatie vise une issue gagnant-gagnant, la démocratie directe constitue un jeu à somme nulle. La diplomatie cherche à faire baisser la température, là où le paradigme des masses ne fait que l’augmenter. Les diplomates peuvent travailler ensemble et s’entendre, tandis que le référendum constitue un exercice binaire et fixe, qui exclut la marge de manœuvre, la créativité et les compromis nécessaires à la résolution des problèmes politiques. La solidarité est impossible au sein d’une Europe gouvernée par les masses. (…) Il suffit en effet de se remémorer la période antérieure à l’UE pour réaliser combien cette trajectoire peut se révéler dangereuse. Mark Leonard
La véritable folie du vote britannique sur une sortie hors de l’Union européenne réside moins dans le fait que les dirigeants britanniques se soient risqués à demander à leur peuple de peser le pour et le contre entre appartenance à l’UE et pressions migratoires liées à ce statut de membre, que dans le fait que la barre ait été placée incroyablement bas en termes de scrutin, le oui au Brexit n’ayant en effet exigé qu’une majorité simple. Compte tenu d’un taux de participation de 70 %, la campagne du Leave l’a ainsi emporté grâce au soutien de seulement 36 % des électeurs. La démocratie, ce n’est pas cela. Ce vote revient à jouer à la roulette russe au sein même d’un régime politique moderne. Une décision empreinte d’énormes conséquences – au-delà même de ce qu’il peut arriver lorsque la Constitution d’un pays se trouve modifiée (texte qui bien entendu n’existe pas au Royaume-Uni) – vient d’être prise sans que ne soient intervenus de garde-fous appropriés. (…) Est-il nécessaire qu’une majorité au Parlement approuve le Brexit ? Apparemment non. Le peuple britannique avait-il réellement connaissance du sujet du vote ? Absolument pas. Personne n’a en effet la moindre idée des conséquences du Brexit, que ce soit pour le Royaume-Uni ou pour le système commercial mondial, ni de son impact sur la stabilité politique du pays. (…) Certes, nous autres citoyens de l’Occident avons la chance de vivre une époque de paix : l’évolution des circonstances et des priorités peut être gérée au travers du processus démocratique plutôt que par la guerre civile ou à l’étranger. Mais quel genre de processus juste et démocratique peut aboutir à des décisions aussi irréversibles, et aussi déterminantes à l’échelle de toute une nation ? Une majorité de 52 % est-elle réellement suffisante pour décider un beau matin de tout plaquer ? En termes de permanence et de conviction des choix, la plupart de nos sociétés érigent davantage de barrières sur le chemin d’un couple qui souhaite divorcer que sur celui du gouvernement du Premier ministre David Cameron lorsque la question n’est autre que la sortie de l’UE.  (…) Le fait de considérer que n’importe quelle décision convenue à n’importe quel moment via la règle de la majorité serait nécessairement « démocratique » revient à pervertir cette notion. Les démocraties modernes disposent de systèmes évolués qui font intervenir des garde-fous afin de préserver les intérêts des minorités, et d’éviter que ne soient prises des décisions malavisées, aux conséquences désastreuses. Plus la décision en question est conséquente et permanente, plus les barrières sont élevées. C’est la raison pour laquelle une révision constitutionnelle, par exemple, requiert généralement de satisfaire à des obstacles bien plus importants que dans le cas de la simple promulgation de lois budgétaires. Il semble pourtant que la norme internationale actuelle régissant la rupture d’un pays auprès d’autres États soit désormais moins exigeante que le vote d’un texte sur l’abaissement de l’âge légal pour la consommation d’alcool. (…) la plupart des pays exigent en pratique une « supermajorité » lorsqu’une décision s’avère déterminante à l’échelle d’une nation, et non une simple majorité de 51 %. Il n’existe certes pas de chiffre universel, de type 60 %, mais le principe général veut qu’au minimum la majorité en question soit manifestement stable. Un pays ne devrait pas pouvoir procéder à des changements fondamentaux et irréversibles sur la base d’une majorité acquise sur le fil du rasoir et susceptible de ne l’emporter qu’au cours d’une brève fenêtre d’élan émotif. Depuis l’Antiquité, les philosophes s’efforcent de concevoir des systèmes visant à équilibrer la puissance de la règle majoritaire avec la nécessité de veiller à ce que les toutes les parties informées puissent peser d’un poids plus conséquent en cas de décisions critiques, sans parler de la nécessité que soient entendues les voix de la minorité. Kenneth Rogoff

Attention, une folie peut en cacher une autre !

Suicide collectif, roulette russe, surenchère de démagogie …

Au lendemain du fiasco électoral qui voit un Etat entier abandonner du jour au lendemain le fruit de décennies de longues et patientes négociations et, après le carnage de deux guerres mondiales, une période de paix et une prospérité jusque là sans précédent …

Faisant fi, entre le huis-clos de la Convention de Philadelphie (qui ne put certes empêcher le maintien de l’esclavage) et l’emballement finalement totalitaire de la Révolution française mais aussi plus récemment des réfrendums sur la Constitution européenne ou les ratés que l’on sait des élections américaine ou française de 2000 et 2002, de l’expérience de siècles de réflexion sur la prise de décision politique (la fameuse « force civilisatrice de l’hypocrisie« ) …

Pendant qu’en une Europe qui vient d’ovationner une accusation de crime rituel du président de l’Autorité palestinienne digne des heures les plus sombres de notre moyen-âge …

Et qui compte pas moins de 47 partis de révolte prêts à tout pour l’abattre et pas moins de 32 demandes de référendums dans 18 pays différents …

Gagnants comme perdants poussent l’aveuglement jusqu’à y voir une victoire de la démocratie  …

Comment ne pas voir, avec l’économiste américain Kenneth Rogoff, la folie d’un système de décision …

Pourtant consultatif dans le cas précis et jusqu’ici, quand jugé irrecevable, « refaisable » (Irlande) ou partiellement « ignorable » (France, Pays-Bas) …

Où engager l’avenir de toute une population et de générations entières se révèle disposer de moins de garde-fous et de barrières …

Que le vote d’un texte sur l’abaissement de l’âge légal pour la consommation d’alcool ou le divorce du premier couple venu ?

Mais comment ne pas voir aussi …

Derrière et motivant la première …

L’autre folie d’un autre système de décision …

Où de l’imposition du « mariage et de l’adoption pour tous » à l’appel suicidaire à une véritable invasion migratoire …

Et sans compter,  de l’Irak à la Syrie, l’abandon au chaos djihadiste de territoires dont la libération avait coûté ou pouvait coûter si cher …

La parole ou le vote d’une poignée d’apprentis sorciers politiques, judiciaires ou religieux

Peut engager jusqu’aux fondements culturels ou anthropologiques de générations entières ?

Le fiasco démocratique du Royaume-Uni
Kenneth Rogoff

Project syndicate

Jun 24, 2016

CAMBRIDGE – La véritable folie du vote britannique sur une sortie hors de l’Union européenne réside moins dans le fait que les dirigeants britanniques se soient risqués à demander à leur peuple de peser le pour et le contre entre appartenance à l’UE et pressions migratoires liées à ce statut de membre, que dans le fait que la barre ait été placée incroyablement bas en termes de scrutin, le oui au Brexit n’ayant en effet exigé qu’une majorité simple. Compte tenu d’un taux de participation de 70 %, la campagne du Leave l’a ainsi emporté grâce au soutien de seulement 36 % des électeurs.

La démocratie, ce n’est pas cela. Ce vote revient à jouer à la roulette russe au sein même d’un régime politique moderne. Une décision empreinte d’énormes conséquences – au-delà même de ce qu’il peut arriver lorsque la Constitution d’un pays se trouve modifiée (texte qui bien entendu n’existe pas au Royaume-Uni) – vient d’être prise sans que ne soient intervenus de garde-fous appropriés.

A-t-il été prévu que le vote ait à nouveau lieu dans un délai d’un an, pour plus de certitude ? Non. Est-il nécessaire qu’une majorité au Parlement approuve le Brexit ? Apparemment non. Le peuple britannique avait-il réellement connaissance du sujet du vote ? Absolument pas. Personne n’a en effet la moindre idée des conséquences du Brexit, que ce soit pour le Royaume-Uni ou pour le système commercial mondial, ni de son impact sur la stabilité politique du pays. Et j’ai bien peur que le tableau s’annonce pour le moins déplaisant.

Certes, nous autres citoyens de l’Occident avons la chance de vivre une époque de paix : l’évolution des circonstances et des priorités peut être gérée au travers du processus démocratique plutôt que par la guerre civile ou à l’étranger. Mais quel genre de processus juste et démocratique peut aboutir à des décisions aussi irréversibles, et aussi déterminantes à l’échelle de toute une nation ? Une majorité de 52 % est-elle réellement suffisante pour décider un beau matin de tout plaquer ?

En termes de permanence et de conviction des choix, la plupart de nos sociétés érigent davantage de barrières sur le chemin d’un couple qui souhaite divorcer que sur celui du gouvernement du Premier ministre David Cameron lorsque la question n’est autre que la sortie de l’UE. Les partisans du Brexit n’ont pas inventé ce jeu de la roulette russe, tant les précédents existent, notamment dans le cas de l’Écosse en 2014, ou du Québec en 1995. Seulement voilà, jusqu’à présent, le barillet du revolver ne s’était jamais arrêté sur la cartouche. Maintenant que c’est chose faite, l’heure est venue de repenser les règles du jeu.

Le fait de considérer que n’importe quelle décision convenue à n’importe quel moment via la règle de la majorité serait nécessairement « démocratique » revient à pervertir cette notion. Les démocraties modernes disposent de systèmes évolués qui font intervenir des garde-fous afin de préserver les intérêts des minorités, et d’éviter que ne soient prises des décisions malavisées, aux conséquences désastreuses. Plus la décision en question est conséquente et permanente, plus les barrières sont élevées.

C’est la raison pour laquelle une révision constitutionnelle, par exemple, requiert généralement de satisfaire à des obstacles bien plus importants que dans le cas de la simple promulgation de lois budgétaires. Il semble pourtant que la norme internationale actuelle régissant la rupture d’un pays auprès d’autres États soit désormais moins exigeante que le vote d’un texte sur l’abaissement de l’âge légal pour la consommation d’alcool.

L’Europe étant désormais confrontée au risque d’une vague de nouveaux votes de rupture, la question urgente consiste à déterminer s’il existerait une meilleure manière de procéder à de telles décisions. J’ai personnellement interrogé plusieurs experts majeurs en sciences politiques sur la question de savoir s’il existe ou nom un consensus académique en la matière ; malheureusement, la réponse est rapide et négative.

Une chose est sûre, bien que la décision sur le Brexit puisse avoir semblé simple dans le cadre du scrutin, nul ne sait en vérité ce qu’il peut advenir à la suite d’un tel vote de sortie. Ce que nous savons en revanche, c’est que la plupart des pays exigent en pratique une « supermajorité » lorsqu’une décision s’avère déterminante à l’échelle d’une nation, et non une simple majorité de 51 %. Il n’existe certes pas de chiffre universel, de type 60 %, mais le principe général veut qu’au minimum la majorité en question soit manifestement stable. Un pays ne devrait pas pouvoir procéder à des changements fondamentaux et irréversibles sur la base d’une majorité acquise sur le fil du rasoir et susceptible de ne l’emporter qu’au cours d’une brève fenêtre d’élan émotif. Même s’il est possible que l’économie du Royaume-Uni ne plonge pas dans une récession pure et simple à l’issue de ce vote (le déclin de la livre sterling étant susceptible d’amortir le choc initial), il y a de fortes chances que le désordre économique et politique provoqué suscite chez ceux qui ont voté en faveur du Leave une sorte de « remord de l’acheteur ».

Depuis l’Antiquité, les philosophes s’efforcent de concevoir des systèmes visant à équilibrer la puissance de la règle majoritaire avec la nécessité de veiller à ce que les toutes les parties informées puissent peser d’un poids plus conséquent en cas de décisions critiques, sans parler de la nécessité que soient entendues les voix de la minorité. À l’époque des assemblées organisées à Sparte dans la Grèce antique, les votes étaient exprimés par acclamation. Les citoyens donnaient ainsi plus ou moins de voix afin de refléter l’intensité de leurs préférences, tandis qu’un magistrat président y prêtait une oreille attentive et se prononçait ensuite sur l’issue du vote. La procédure était certes imparfaite, mais pas forcément moins judicieuse que celle à laquelle nous venons d’assister au Royaume-Uni.

À certains égards, Athènes, cité homologue de Sparte, a pour sa part appliqué le plus parfait exemple historique de démocratie. Les voix de chaque individu, issu de n’importe quelle catégorie de citoyens, pesaient d’un poids équivalent (même si seuls les hommes étaient concernés). Cependant, à l’issue de plusieurs décisions catastrophiques dans le domaine de la guerre, les Athéniens considérèrent nécessaire de conférer davantage de pouvoir à des organes indépendants.

Qu’aurait dû faire le Royaume-Uni s’il avait effectivement été nécessaire de poser la question de son appartenance à l’UE (nécessité qui en réalité n’existait pas) ? De toute évidence, les freins à toute décision en la matière auraient dû être beaucoup plus conséquents ; le Brexit aurait par exemple pu nécessiter deux consultations populaires, espacées d’au moins deux ans, et suivies d’un vote de la Chambre des communes à 60 %. Si la volonté d’un Brexit avait malgré cela persisté, nous aurions au moins su qu’il ne s’agissait pas uniquement de la photographie ponctuelle d’un fragment de la population.

Le vote britannique plonge désormais l’Europe dans la tourmente. Beaucoup de choses dépendront de la manière dont le monde réagit, et de la capacité du gouvernement britannique à gérer sa propre reconstruction. Il est néanmoins important que nous fassions non seulement le bilan de l’issue du référendum, mais également celui du processus de vote. Toute démarche visant à redéfinir un accord de longue date portant sur les frontières d’un État devrait exiger bien plus qu’une majorité simple, exprimée dans le cadre d’un seul et unique vote. Nous venons tout juste de constater à quel point l’actuelle norme internationale consistant à employer la règle de la majorité simple peut constituer une recette désastreuse.

Traduit de l’anglais par Martin Morel

Voir aussi:

L’avènement de la démocratie des masses en Europe

Mark Leonard

Project syndicate

Jun 25, 2016

LONDRES – Même s’il va nous falloir du temps pour encaisser le choc suscité par le vote britannique en faveur d’une sortie de l’Union européenne, il incombe dès à présent aux dirigeants européens de s’armer de courage face aux possibles événements à venir. En effet, le Brexit pourrait bien constituer une sorte de secousse sismique préalable à un véritable raz-de-marée de référendums en Europe au cours des prochaines années.

Partout en Europe, pas moins de 47 partis de révolte viennent mettre la politique sans dessus dessous. Ces mouvements influencent de plus en plus l’agenda politique, et le façonnent selon leurs propres intérêts – gagnant au passage en puissance. Dans un tiers des États membres de l’UE, les partis de ce type sont présents au sein des coalitions gouvernementales, leur succès croissant conduisant les partis dominants à adopter certaines de leurs positions.

Bien que ces partis de révolte présentent des racines différentes, ils ont bel et bien une chose en commun : ils s’efforcent tous de bouleverser ce consensus de politique étrangère qui définit l’Europe depuis des dizaines d’années. Eurosceptiques, opposés à l’OTAN, ils entendent verrouiller leurs frontières et mettre un terme au libre-échange. Ces partis viennent modifier le visage de la politique, remplaçant les traditionnelles querelles gauche-droite par des disputes dans le cadre desquelles leur propre nativisme irascible s’oppose au cosmopolitisme des élites qu’ils méprisent.

L’arme privilégiée par ces partis n’est autre que le référendum, grâce auquel ils mobilisent un soutien populaire autour de leurs objectifs. D’après le Conseil européen des relations internationales, pas moins de 32 référendums sont aujourd’hui demandés dans 18 pays de la zone euro. À l’instar du Parti populaire danois, certains entendent suivre l’exemple du Royaume-Uni, en organisant un vote sur la question de l’appartenance à l’UE. D’autres souhaitent s’extraire de la zone euro, faire obstacle au Partenariat transatlantique de commerce et d’investissement (TTIP) envisagé avec les États-Unis, ou encore limiter la mobilité de la main-d’œuvre.

Le plan de relocalisation des réfugiés adopté par l’UE se révèle particulièrement créateur de divisions. Le Premier ministre hongrois Viktor Orbán a en effet déclaré qu’il entendait organiser un référendum autour des quotas proposés. Le parti polonais d’opposition Kukiz’15 procède également à la collecte de signatures en vue d’organiser son propre référendum sur cette même question.

Le fait de restituer le pouvoir aux masses, via une démocratie directe, constitue sans doute la proposition la plus révolutionnaire de ces partis. Celle-ci reflète en effet la compréhension des frustrations qui suscitent une vague mondiale de protestations populaires depuis quelques années – contestations qui, au sein du monde arabe, ont déclenché des révolutions bien réelles. C’est ce même esprit de révolte qui a conduit par exemple les Espagnols, les Grecs et les New-Yorkais à envahir les rues – avec des revendications bien entendu différentes – qui alimentent le soutien en faveur de ces nouveaux référendums, et des partis insurgés qui poussent dans cette direction.

Il y a là un cauchemar non seulement pour les partis dominants, mais également pour la gouvernance démocratique elle-même. Comme l’a démontré l’expérience de la Californie en matière de référendum, l’opinion publique a bien souvent tendance à voter en faveur de mesures contradictoires – moins d’impôts mais davantage d’aides sociales, ou encore préservation de l’environnement mais baisse du prix des carburants.

Seulement voilà, cette tendance représente une difficulté exponentielle pour l’UE, la dynamique actuelle venant en effet bouleverser les fondements mêmes de l’Union. N’oublions pas que l’UE constitue l’expression ultime de la démocratie représentative. Il s’agit d’une entité éclairée, qui a pour vocation centrale un certain nombre de valeurs libérales telles que les droits de l’individu, la protection des minorités, ou encore l’économie de marché.

Malheureusement, les couches de représentation sur lesquelles repose l’UE ont créé l’impression qu’une lointaine élite se chargeait de tout gérer, totalement déconnectée des citoyens ordinaires. Ceci fournit une cible idéale aux partis nationalistes, dans le cadre de leurs campagnes anti-UE. Ajoutez à cela l’instrumentalisation des peurs autour de questions telles que l’immigration ou le commerce, et la capacité de ces partis à attirer des électeurs frustrés ou inquiets se trouve renforcée.

Deux visions de l’Europe s’opposent désormais : celle d’une Europe diplomatique, et celle d’une Europe des masses. L’Europe diplomatique, incarnée par le père fondateur de l’UE Jean Monnet, est parvenue à extraire certaines questions sensibles hors de la sphère politique populaire, et à les réduire à des problématiques techniques solubles, gérées par des diplomates au moyen de compromis bureaucratiques convenus en coulisses. L’Europe des masses, notamment représentée par le Parti pour l’indépendance du Royaume-Uni, qui a activement contribué au Brexit, s’inscrit précisément à l’opposé de l’Europe de Jean Monnet, puisqu’elle s’intéresse à des compromis tels que le TTIP, ou encore l’accord d’association avec l’Ukraine, pour ensuite politiser intentionnellement ces compromis.

Là où l’Europe diplomatique s’efforce de promouvoir la réconciliation, l’Europe des masses conduit à une polarisation. Et tandis que la diplomatie vise une issue gagnant-gagnant, la démocratie directe constitue un jeu à somme nulle. La diplomatie cherche à faire baisser la température, là où le paradigme des masses ne fait que l’augmenter. Les diplomates peuvent travailler ensemble et s’entendre, tandis que le référendum constitue un exercice binaire et fixe, qui exclut la marge de manœuvre, la créativité et les compromis nécessaires à la résolution des problèmes politiques. La solidarité est impossible au sein d’une Europe gouvernée par les masses.

Cet éloignement de l’Europe par rapport à la diplomatie a débuté il y a une dizaine d’années, lorsque le Traité établissant une Constitution pour l’Europe a été rejeté par un référendum populaire en France et aux Pays-Bas. Il est possible que cet événement ait dorénavant interdit à l’UE tout exercice d’élaboration de traités, de sorte que l’espoir d’une intégration future pourrait bien être anéanti.

Mais au lendemain du Brexit, l’avenir de l’intégration européenne ne constitue pas la préoccupation première de l’Europe. Celle-ci doit désormais faire face aux forces croissantes qui mettent à mal l’intégration jusqu’ici accomplie, et qui s’efforcent de pousser l’Europe vers l’arrière. Il suffit en effet de se remémorer la période antérieure à l’UE pour réaliser combien cette trajectoire peut se révéler dangereuse.

En cette nouvelle ère de « vétocratie » européenne, cette diplomatie qui avait sous-tendu la création et la vision d’avenir du projet européen ne peut plus fonctionner, ce qui fait de l’UE une entité ingouvernable. Maintenant que les eurosceptiques sont parvenus à leurs fins au Royaume-Uni, cette vétocratie est vouée à devenir plus puissante que jamais. Il faut s’attendre à ce que les votes directs organisés autour de questions telles que les règles commerciales ou la politique d’immigration viennent dévaster la démocratie représentative en Europe, de la même manière que les votes directs sur l’appartenance à l’Union menacent d’anéantir l’UE elle-même.

Dans l’un des romans du prix Nobel José Saramago, la péninsule ibérique se détache du continent européen et part à la dérive. À l’heure où un véritable tsunami de consultations populaires menace le continent, il pourrait bien s’agir d’une métaphore annonciatrice.

Traduit de l’anglais par Martin Morel

Voir également:

Une tragédie britannique en un acte

Chris Patten

Project syndicate

Jun 25, 2016

OXFORD – Jeudi soir restera comme une date importante pour ceux qui ont fait campagne pour quitter l’Union européenne et pour tourner le dos de la Grande-Bretagne au XXIème siècle. Je peux au moins leur accorder cela. Comme l’a écrit Cicéron : « Ôcombien misérable et malheureux fut ce jour-là ! »

La décision de quitter l’Union européenne va dominer la vie nationale britannique pendant la prochaine décennie, si ce n’est plus. On peut discuter de l’ampleur précise du choc économique, à court et à long terme, mais il est difficile d’imaginer des circonstances dans lesquelles le Royaume-Uni ne va pas s’appauvrir et perdre de son importance au plan mondial. Une grande partie de ceux qui ont été encouragés à voter prétendument pour leur « indépendance » trouveront que, loin de gagner leur liberté, ils ont perdu leur emploi.

Pourquoi est-ce donc arrivé ?

Tout d’abord, un référendum réduit la complexité à une absurde simplicité. Le fouillis de la coopération internationale et de la souveraineté partagée représenté par l’adhésion de la Grande-Bretagne à l’Union européenne a été calomnié par une série d’allégations et de promesses mensongères. On a promis aux Britanniques qu’il n’y aurait pas de prix économique à payer pour quitter l’UE, ni aucune perte pour tous les secteurs de sa société qui ont bénéficié de l’Europe. On a promis aux électeurs un accord commercial avantageux avec l’Europe (le plus grand marché de la Grande-Bretagne), une immigration plus faible et plus d’argent pour le National Health Service (le système de sécurité sociale britannique), ainsi que d’autres biens et services publics précieux. Par-dessus tout, on a promis que la Grande-Bretagne retrouverait son « mojo », la vitalité créatrice nécessaire pour faire sensation.

Une des horreurs à venir sera la déception croissante des partisans du Leave (quitter l’UE), une fois que tous ces mensonges seront découverts. On a promis aux électeurs qu’ils allaient pouvoir « récupérer leur pays. » Je ne pense pas que le véritable résultat de tout cela va leur plaire.

Une deuxième raison de la catastrophe est la fragmentation des deux principaux partis politiques de la Grande-Bretagne. Depuis des années, le sentiment anti-européen a miné l’autorité des dirigeants conservateurs. En outre, toute notion de discipline et de loyauté envers le parti s’est effondrée il y a quelques années, avec la réduction du nombre de membres du parti conservateur. Le pire est ce qui est arrivé au sein du Parti travailliste, dont les sympathisants traditionnels ont donné l’impulsion aux grands votes du Leave dans de nombreux domaines de la classe ouvrière.

Avec le Brexit, nous venons d’assister à l’arrivée du populisme à la Donald Trump en Grande-Bretagne. De toute évidence, il existe une hostilité généralisée, submergée par un tsunami de bile populiste, à l’égard de quiconque est considéré comme un membre de « l’establishment ». Les militants du Brexit, comme le Secrétaire à la Justice Michael Gove, ont rejeté tous les experts  dans le cadre d’un complot égoïste des nantis contre les démunis. Les conseils du Gouverneur de la Banque d’Angleterre, de l’Archevêque de Canterbury ou du Président des États-Unis, n’auront finalement compté pour rien. Tous ont été décrits comme des représentants d’un autre monde, sans rapport avec la vie des britanniques ordinaires.

Ceci nous amène vers une troisième raison du vote pro-Brexit : les inégalités sociales croissantes qui ont contribué à une révolte contre ce qui a été perçu comme une élite métropolitaine. La vieille Angleterre industrielle, dans des villes comme Sunderland et Manchester, a voté contre les citoyens plus aisés de Londres. La mondialisation, selon ces électeurs, bénéficie à ceux d’en haut (qui n’ont aucun problème à travailler avec le reste du monde), au détriment de tous les autres.

Au-delà de ces raisons, le fait que pendant des années presque personne n’ait vigoureusement défendu l’adhésion britannique à l’UE n’a rien fait pour arranger les choses. Cela a créé un vide, ce qui a permis à l’illusion et à la tromperie d’effacer les avantages de la coopération européenne et de promouvoir l’idée selon laquelle les Britanniques étaient devenus les esclaves de Bruxelles. Les électeurs pro-Brexit ont été abreuvés d’une conception absurde de la souveraineté, ce qui leur a permis de choisir une pantomime d’indépendance, plutôt que l’intérêt national.

Mais les plaintes et les grincements de dents sont bien inutiles à présent. Dans des circonstances sinistres, les parties concernées doivent honorablement essayer d’assurer la meilleure voie possible pour le Royaume-Uni. On espère que les partisans du Brexit ont eu au moins à moitié raison, aussi difficile que cela puisse paraître. En tout cas, il faut tirer le meilleur parti de cette nouvelle donne.

Pourtant trois défis viennent immédiatement à l’esprit.

Tout d’abord, à présent que David Cameron a clairement fait savoir qu’il allait démissionner, l’aile droite du Parti conservateur et certains de ses membres les plus acerbes vont dominer le nouveau gouvernement. Cameron n’a pas eu le choix. Il ne pouvait pas aller à Bruxelles au nom de collègues qui l’ont poignardé dans le dos, pour négocier un projet qu’il ne soutient pas. Si son successeur est un leader du Brexit, la Grande-Bretagne peut s’attendre à être dirigée par quelqu’un qui a passé les dix dernières semaines à proférer des mensonges.

Ensuite, les liens qui font l’unité du Royaume-Uni (en particulier pour l’Écosse et l’Irlande du Nord, qui ont voté pour rester en Europe), seront soumis à rude épreuve. J’espère que la révolte du Brexit ne conduira pas inévitablement à un vote d’éclatement du Royaume-Uni, mais ce résultat est effectivement une possibilité.

Enfin, la Grande-Bretagne devra commencer à négocier sa sortie très bientôt. Il est difficile de voir comment elle pourra finalement se retrouver dans une meilleure relation avec l’UE, comparée à celle dont elle jouissait jusqu’à présent. Tous les Britanniques auront du pain sur la planche pour convaincre leurs amis dans le monde entier qu’ils n’ont pas choisi de partir sur un coup de tête.

La campagne référendaire a relancé la politique nationaliste, qui porte toujours sur la race, l’immigration et les complots. Une tâche que nous partageons tous dans le camp pro-européen consiste à essayer de contenir les forces qui ont déchainé le Brexit et à affirmer les valeurs qui nous ont valu tant d’amis et d’admirateurs à travers le monde par le passé.

Tout cela a commencé dans les années 1940, avec Winston Churchill et sa vision de l’Europe. La façon dont cela va se terminer peut être décrite par l’un des aphorismes les plus célèbres de Churchill : « Le problème d’un suicide politique, c’est qu’on le regrette pendant le restant de ses jours. »

En fait, de nombreux électeurs du « Leave » ne seront peut-être plus là pour le regretter. Mais les jeunes Britanniques, qui ont voté massivement pour continuer à faire partie de l’Europe, vont presque à coup sûr le regretter.

Voir encore:

Brexit: So is it ‘good for the Jews’?
Rabbi Abraham Cooper and Dr. Harold Brackman

As a shocked world reacted to England’s unexpected exit from the European Union, Palestinian President Abbas delivered a speech to the European Parliament.

Abbas, now in the 11th year of his four-year term, accused Israel of becoming a fascist country.

Then he updated a vicious medieval anti-Semitic canard by charging that (non-existent) rabbis are urging Jews to poison the Palestinian water supply.

The response by representatives of the 28 European nations whose own histories are littered with the terrible consequences of such anti-Semitic blood libels? A thunderous 30-second standing ovation.

So forgive us if while everyone else analyzes the economic impact of the UK exit, and pundits parse the generational and social divide of British voters, we dare to ask a parochial question: is a weakened EU good or bad for the Jews? First, there is the geopolitical calculus of a triple pincer movement to consider: Russian President Vladimir Putin’s troublemaking from the East, the massive migrant-refugee influx into Europe from the South, and now the UK’s secession from the West with unforeseen implications for global economies and politics.

For Israel, the EU’s global dilemma is a mixed bag. On the one hand, it could, at least temporarily, derail the EU’s intense pressuring of Israel to accept – even sans direct negotiations with the Palestinians – a one-sided French peace initiative, imposing indefensible borders on the Jewish state. On the other hand, as leading Israeli corporations and Israel’s stock market are already recognizing, new problems for the EU economic engine are also a threat to the Jewish state’s economic ties with its leading trading partner.

But the scope of the current crisis is also very much the result of the internal moral and political failure of the EU’s own transnational elites and political leadership to confront its homegrown problems. These problems have also impacted on many of Europe’s 1.4 million Jews.

It’s been 25 years since the Berlin Wall came down. This means the EU had an entire generation to deliver on the promises of creating a new Europe that would continue and extend the progress made since World War II by instituting a common currency and encouraging economic integration, free movement between member countries, while promoting mutual respect among the free citizens of the new United States of Europe.

Instead, European elites over-centralized power in Brussels by practicing what amounts to “taxation without representation,” and – after instituting open borders across the continent – failed to come up with coherent strategies to deal with burgeoning terrorism and wave after wave of Middle East migrants. Suddenly, calls by (mostly) far-right voices to “take back control of their country,” “restore national sovereignty” and “reestablish national borders” began to resonate in the mainstream of not only the UK, but also Germany, the Netherlands, Scandinavia and France. With Germany’s Chancellor Angel Merkel as the prime example, EU political leaders have so far failed to deal with legitimate citizen concerns that democracy itself is threatened by the uncontrolled influx of people from the Middle East and Africa who are not being assimilated into the basic values and institutions of Western societies.

To date, the primary beneficiaries of this political failure are the extreme nationalist parties – Le Pen’s National Front in France, Geert Wilders’ Dutch Party for Freedom, Austria’s Freedom Party, and Fidesz and Jobbik in Hungary among them – that are now mainstream political and social actors on their nations’ social power grids. Many are the proud bearers of xenophobic, populist platforms that include whitewashing or minimizing the crimes of the Nazi era. Jews rightfully fearful of the anti-Semitism among old and new Muslim neighbors in Europe can take little solace in the specter of a fragmented continent led by movements whose member rail against Muslims but also despise Jews.

We began with President Abbas’ morning-after-Brexit blood libel speech before a perfidious European Parliament. His libel and the applause it received still reverberate despite Abbas’ subsequent retraction.

For the episode highlights the lack of moral accountability infecting EU elites ensconced in the ivory towers of Brussels’ bureaucratic headquarters.

We can only hope and pray that European captains of industry, politicians, media and NGOs take the UK vote as a wake-up call for them all. For if they fail to actually address the economic and social crises with real solutions, it won’t only be the Jews of Europe who will be searching for the nearest exit.

Rabbi Abraham Cooper is associate dean of the Simon Wiesenthal Center and Museum of Tolerance. Dr. Harold Brackman, a historian, is a consultant to the Simon Wiesenthal Center.

Voir de même:

Mahmoud Abbas
Israël
Conflit israélo-palestinien
Moyen-Orient

Abbas accuse les rabbins de vouloir empoisonner les puits palestiniens, Israël crie à la calomnie
S’exprimant devant le Parlement européen jeudi 23 juin, le président palestinien Mahmoud Abbas a déclaré que des rabbins avaient demandé au gouvernement d’empoisonner l’eau des puits pour tuer des Palestiniens.
Thierry Charlier, AFP

FRANCE 24

23/06/2016
Israël accuse Mahmoud Abbas d’avoir calomnié les juifs. Le président palestinien a déclaré devant le Parlement européen que certains rabbins avaient appelé à empoisonner l’eau des puits pour tuer des Palestiniens.
S’exprimant devant le Parlement européen jeudi 23 juin, le président palestinien Mahmoud Abbas a affirmé que récemment, « un certain nombre de rabbins en Israël ont tenu des propos clairs, demandant à leur gouvernement d’empoisonner l’eau pour tuer les Palestiniens ». De la calomnie contre les juifs, selon Israël.

« Abou Mazen a montré son vrai visage à Bruxelles », a déclaré dans un communiqué le bureau du Premier ministre israélien Benjamin Netanyahou, utilisant le nom de guerre de Mahmoud Abbas.

Sans citer de sources à ces accusations, Mahmoud Abbas a également ajouté que cet appel entrait dans le cadre d’attaques qualifiées par lui d’incitation à la violence contre les Palestiniens.

Confusion autour d’une éventuelle rencontre entre présidents palestinien et israélien

Dans le même temps, le président du Parlement européen Martin Schulz n’a pas réussi à organiser comme il le souhaitait une rencontre entre Mahmoud Abbas et le président israélien Reuven Rivlin, qui se trouvait également à Bruxelles jeudi.

Martin Schulz a indiqué à l’AFP qu' »il n’y a pas eu de rencontre en raison d’une incompatibilité d’agendas ». Mais Reuven Rivlin a pour sa part rejeté la responsabilité de l’échec de cette tentative de rencontre sur le président palestinien.

« Personnellement, je trouve cela étrange que le président Abbas (…) refuse toujours de rencontrer des dirigeants israéliens et se tourne toujours vers la communauté internationale pour trouver de l’aide », a-t-il lancé, en faisant allusion à l’initiative française de conférence de paix internationale, à laquelle s’oppose fermement Israël.

De son côté, le porte-parole de Mahmoud Abbas, Nabil Abou Roudeina, a démenti que toute rencontre ait été prévue.

Selon le bureau de Benjamin Netanyahou, ce qui s’est passé à Bruxelles contredit la volonté affichée de Mahmoud Abbas de négocier la paix avec Israël. « La personne qui refuse de rencontrer le président (israélien) et énonce des calomnies devant le Parlement européen ment lorsqu’il prétend que sa main est tendue pour faire la paix », selon le communiqué.

Avec AFP

Voir par ailleurs:

UE, une Constitution à petits pas
Florence Deloche-Gaudez
Libération
3 juillet 2003

Après les critiques suscitées par la négociation du traité de Nice, les chefs d’Etat et de gouvernement de l’Union européenne ont décidé de recourir à une autre méthode, celle de la Convention, et envisagé d’adopter un nouveau texte fondateur, une Constitution. Depuis février 2002, cette Convention a réuni, sous la présidence de Valéry Giscard d’Estaing, des représentants non seulement des gouvernements mais aussi des Parlements nationaux (des Etats membres comme des pays candidats), du Parlement européen et de la Commission européenne. En dépit des positions défensives qu’y ont prises certains gouvernements, les conventionnels ont réussi à adopter par consensus un texte unique, présenté au Conseil européen de Thessalonique comme un «projet de traité instituant une Constitution pour l’Europe». Cette dernière remplacerait les traités existants.

Le terme de «Constitution» reflète l’ambition du projet. Il s’agit d’apporter des réponses à deux défis majeurs de la construction européenne : comment faire fonctionner une Union qui va passer de quinze à vingt-cinq membres ? Comment renforcer la légitimité du système européen auprès de ses citoyens ?

Parmi les principaux acquis du projet, citons le développement de la règle majoritaire, une certaine clarification du système européen et le surcroît de pouvoir donné aux citoyens.

S’agissant, tout d’abord, de l’efficacité de l’Union, davantage de décisions seront prises à la majorité. Cela sera, en particulier, le cas au sein de «l’espace de liberté, de sécurité et de justice» (politiques en matière d’immigration, d’asile…). Dans une Europe élargie, comprenant vingt-cinq Etats membres, il sera en effet très difficile, voire impossible, de décider à l’unanimité. Elle offre certes à chaque gouvernement national l’agrément de pouvoir bloquer une mesure qui le contrarie. Elle entrave pour la même raison la prise de décisions communes et limite par conséquent la capacité d’agir en commun. Au contraire, dans le cas de décisions adoptées à la majorité, chaque Etat, parce qu’il risque d’être mis en minorité, est incité à être constructif, à convaincre et à accepter d’inévitables compromis.

Pour renforcer la légitimité de l’Union européenne, les conventionnels ont voulu rédiger un texte plus clair, rendre le système européen plus transparent et plus intelligible. En ce sens, leur projet s’apparente bien à une Constitution. Aux différents traités suc cède un texte unique. Il vise à préciser la répartition des compétences entre l’Union et ses Etats membres. Y est incluse la Charte des droits fondamentaux. Les «lois européennes» vont enfin cesser de s’appeler «règlements». Sauf exceptions, elles seront adoptées selon la procédure unique de la codécision, rebaptisée opportunément «procédure législative». Cette dernière fait intervenir le Parlement européen, élu par les citoyens, et le Conseil législatif et des affaires générales, où sont représentés les Etats. Leurs débats seront publics.

Le projet de Constitution est donc plus accessible que les traités actuels. Il n’est pas pour autant simple. Le texte est long. Les négociations qui ont prévalu dans la dernière phase de la Convention ont contribué à en réduire la lisibilité. Les clauses temporaires sont nombreuses. La nouvelle définition, plus claire, de la majorité qualifiée (une majorité d’Etats représentant 60 % de la population) pourrait ainsi ne s’appliquer qu’en 2012. Les piliers ont disparu mais des procédures particulières subsistent.

Ce constat confirme que la simplification du système européen ne peut constituer le seul moyen d’accroître la légitimité de l’Union. Donner plus de pouvoir aux citoyens est une autre voie à emprunter pour réduire la distance qui existe entre ce niveau de gouvernement et les Européens. A cet égard, l’actuel projet de Constitution comprend deux dispositions clés. En premier lieu, sans l’assurer, il ouvre la voie à la désignation indirecte du président de la Commission par les citoyens via les élections européennes. Certes, c’est le Conseil européen qui continuera à proposer un candidat à cette fonction, au Parlement européen ensuite de l’approuver (ou de le rejeter). Mais à l’avenir les chefs d’Etat et de gouvernement devront faire des propositions qui tiennent compte «des élections au Parlement européen», et ce dernier se prononcera à une majorité simple. Le groupe politique majori taire au Parlement pourrait donc voir son candidat l’emporter. Si les partis politiques indiquaient, avant les élections, le nom de leur candidat, les électeurs auraient alors la possibilité, en votant, de peser sur le choix du président de la Commission. Ils détiendraient ainsi un pouvoir qui leur fait défaut au niveau européen : celui de «changer d’équipe».

Deuxième disposition susceptible de donner aux Européens plus de «prises» sur le système : l’introduction d’un droit d’initiative citoyenne. La démocratie directe est peu présente au niveau européen. Il est appréciable qu’un million de citoyens issus de différents Etats membres puissent demander à la Commission de faire des propositions sur une question déterminée.

Le projet de Constitution comprend en revanche deux limites non négligeables : la solution retenue pour la composition de la Commission n’apparaît pas totalement satisfaisante ; les décisions prises à l’unanimité sont encore trop nombreuses.

La Commission est une institution cruciale puisqu’elle détient le pouvoir d’initier les lois et qu’elle est chargée de l’intérêt commun. Le projet de Constitution prévoit qu’à partir de 2009, seulement quinze commissaires auront un droit de vote. A ceux-ci s’ajouteront des commissaires sans droit de vote, «venus de tous les autres Etats membres». Les uns et les autres «tourneraient» selon un système de rotation qui reste à éclaircir. Il s’agit d’un compromis entre deux points de vue : d’une part, celui qui voudrait que seule une Commission restreinte, au sein de laquelle pourrait régner une véritable collégialité, soit en mesure de remplir efficacement son rôle ; d’autre part, celui qui privilégie la présence d’un ressortissant de chaque Etat membre, au motif que la légitimité des décisions de la Commission exige aussi que chaque voix puisse se faire entendre. Mais même ce compromis est controversé : si la rotation est véritablement égalitaire, en excluant régulièrement du collège des ressortissants de «grands» Etats membres, ne risque-t-on pas d’affaiblir l’autorité de la Commission ?

Finalement, pourquoi vouloir à tout prix fixer un nombre précis de commissaires ? Pourquoi ne pas laisser le président de la Commission choisir ses commissaires comme un Premier ministre le ferait ?

Deuxième limite du projet de Constitution : il est encore des domaines où l’unanimité, paralysante, prévaut. Parce que le texte reste un «traité» qui doit être ensuite avalisé par une conférence intergouvernementale où les gouvernements disposent chacun d’un droit de veto, ces derniers sont parvenus, dès la Convention, à soustraire certaines politiques du champ de la majorité. Le représentant britannique a certainement été le plus actif : il n’a eu de cesse de répéter que le Royaume-Uni ne pouvait renoncer à son droit de veto dans le domaine de la politique étrangère, de la politique sociale ou fiscale… Le problème est que pratiquement chaque Etat a son domaine sensible. La France refuse que les accords commerciaux relatifs aux services culturels et audiovisuels soient conclus à la majorité ; les Allemands sont revenus sur certaines avancées en matière sociale ; pour les Irlandais, la fiscalité ne peut relever de procédures majoritaires…

Pire, la Constitution instituée par le traité ne pourra être révisée qu’à une double unanimité (au Conseil européen et au moment des ratifications nationales). Il sera donc très difficile de l’améliorer. Selon certains, une telle clause de révision interdit même l’appellation de «Constitution». Cela revient à maintenir une logique de négociation diplomatique, au lieu d’accepter celle d’une démocratie dans laquelle les décisions se prennent à la majorité, même à une majorité très élevée. Si la minorité ne veut pas se soumettre, elle peut se démettre via la nouvelle clause de retrait.

Toujours au sujet des «dispositions finales», de nombreux conventionnels ont appelé à faire ratifier l’actuel projet de traité par référendum (un référendum éventuellement consultatif dans les Etats où une telle procédure n’est pas prévue). Il est vrai que cela serait cohérent avec le projet d’instituer une Constitution. Les traités offraient déjà la possibilité d’édicter une norme supérieure aux droits nationaux. Qui dit Constitution devrait aussi dire légitimation du pouvoir politique européen par les citoyens, et non plus seulement par les Etats.

En définitive, alors que le terme de «Constitution» pouvait accréditer l’idée d’un changement radical, on reste plutôt dans une logique de «petits pas». Le projet élaboré par la Convention et transmis aux chefs d’Etat et de gouvernement offre la possibilité d’accomplir certains pas en avant. Mais il présente aussi des limites, auxquelles il faudra remédier à l’avenir. La Convention doit encore se réunir en juillet pour finaliser les parties sur les politiques de l’Union et les dispositions finales (entrée en vigueur du traité instituant la Constitution, révision de la future Constitution). Les conventionnels sauront-ils profiter de cette dernière occasion pour préserver l’avenir et proposer des dispositions dignes d’une «Constitution» ?.

On insiste depuis longtemps sur la nécessité d’imposer la publicité des débats lorsque le sujet débattu est susceptible d’engager les intérêts privés des membres du comité ou de l’ assemblée. La publicité est le meilleur antiseptique (Bentham) ou le meilleur désinfectant (Brandeis). Cependant, la publicité des débats n’élimine pas les motivations intéressées, seulement leur expression publique. Il existe toujours un moyen pour un acteur de trouver une justification respectable à un désir égoïste. Ainsi, il semblerait que l’effet de la publicité des débats soit simplement de forcer les motiva tions intéressées à emprunter le langage du désintéressement, sans que rien ne change sur le fond. Le pro blème est d’autant plus aigu qu’à la multiplicité des justifications s’ajoute celle des scénarios causaux plausibles dont un orateur peut se servir pour démontrer la convergence de son intérêt particulier et de l’intérêt général. Heureusement, ces deux degrés de liberté dans le choix du raisonnement justificatif ont leur contrepartie dans deux contraintes qui pèsent sur l’orateur. D’abord il y a une contrainte de cohérence : une fois que l’agent a adopté un certain principe normatif ou une certaine théorie causale, il ne peut pas les abandonner quand bien même ils ne lui permettent plus de satisfaire ses désirs. Ensuite, il y a ce qu’on peut appeler une contrainte d’imperfection, due à ce qu’il ne faut pas que l a coïncidence entre la motivation professée et le désir soit trop criante. Afin de cacher ses vraies motivations, il faut souvent, dans une certaine mesure, aller contre ses désirs. La contrainte de cohérence et la contrainte d’imperfection ont produit ce qu’on peut appeler la force civilisatrice de l’hypocrisie. Il ne s’agit pas d’une loi générale, mais d’une tendance plus ou moins susceptible de se réaliser selon les situations. Cependant, même si la publicité peut être désirable pour limiter le rôle des intérêts dans les débats, à supposer bien sûr que le vote soit également public, elle tend souvent à stimuler les passions , dont notamment l’amour-propre. Passons maintenant au vote. Il convient de distinguer non seulement le scrutin secret et le vote public, mais également ce qu’on pourrait appeler le vote public non-observé. C ’est l’idée de Bentha m, selon la quelle les votes devaient se faire en public mais de manière simultanée de sorte que personne, avant de voter, ne puisse observer comment votent les autres membres. En même temps, chacun sait que les autres sauront par la suite comment il a voté. Ainsi, on pourra éviter, ou du moins réduire, la portée du conformisme aussi bien que de l’hypocrisie. L ’effet anti-hypocrite de la publicité consiste dans l’élimination de l’option de parler pour une option pour ensuite voter contre. Elle a aussi l’effet de rendre possible l’écha nge des votes, effet dont il est difficile de dire en général s’il est ou non souh aitab le. L ’effet anti-hypocrite de la publicité est évidemment très différent de la force civilisatrice de l’hypocrisie produite, elle aussi, par la publicité. Le premier effet dépend de l’opprobre associé au fait de parler pour et voter contre une proposition donnée. Il est très important, dans toute décision collective, d’éviter le conformisme. Le vote majoritaire risque de ne pas produire les effets désirables affirmés dans le théorème du jury de Condorcet si les opinions ou les votes se sont formés par conformisme. En ce qui concerne le conformisme du vote induit p a r l’observation du vote d’ autrui, on peut s’en prévenir par le vote public et non observé. Il est plus difficile de réduire, par des moy ens institutionnels, le risque du conformisme des opinions. Par conformisme j’entends l’ adoption sincère – non hy pocrite – d’une opinion pour des raisons non cognitives, que ce soit par déférence à l’ autorité d’un autre membre ou par la crainte de se trouver dans une position minoritaire inconfortable. Il convient de distinguer le conformisme de la tendance, tout à fait rationnelle, à prêter une attention particulière aux opinions d’ autres membres avec plus d’expérience. Or puisque autorité et expérience vont souvent ensemble, il peut être difficile de démêler leurs rôles respectifs dans la formation des opinions. Même quand on ne fait attention aux opinions d’autrui que pour leur valeur cognitive, on peut tomber dans l’erreur par le phénomène de cascades informationnelles ou argumentatives. Dans une certaine mesure, on peut s’en prévenir en s’appuyant non seulement sur les conclusions auxquelles sont arrivés les autres, mais également sur les prémisses qui en constituent la base. Lorsqu’on considère les propriétés normatives des diverses formes de vote à la majorité ou à l’unanimité, on s’ aperçoit qu’elles dépendent, comme c’est le c a s pour les autres variables sur lesquelles je me suis penché, du contexte. Ainsi, dans une assemblée législative, la demande de l’unanimité donnerait normalement un privilège injustifiable au statu quo. Le cas principal, le liberum veto polonais, montre bien les conséquences absurdes et néfastes d’un tel système. Quant aux majorités qualifiées, leur justification se trouve dans certains cas dans le désir de stabilité, par exemple pour éviter des révisions trop fréquentes des constitutions. On observe aussi ce qu’on peut a ppeler des majorités qualifiées indirectes. Le bicaméralisme en offre un exemple. Sauf dans les cas très rares où la chambre haute et la chambre basse sont élues par des procédures identiques, le principe que toute loi doit être adoptée à la majorité simple dans chaque chambre équivaut