Histoire: Plus inconnu que le soldat inconnu… le déserteur ! (Dos Passos was right: Book reveals how gangs of AWOL GIs terrorized WWII Paris with a reign of mob-style violence)

23 février, 2017
Glass's study of the very different stories and men grouped together under the label, Deserters

hacksaw-ridgehacksawLife_1
Cela met en lumière ce que cela signifie pour un homme de conviction et de foi de se retrouver dans une situation infernale… et, au milieu de ce cauchemar, cet homme est en mesure d’approfondir sa spiritualité et d’accomplir quelque chose de plus grand. Mel Gibson
Oscars Poll: 60 percent of Americans can’t name one best picture nominee (…) For most of the best picture nominees, Clinton voters were more likely to have seen the various films when compared to Trump voters. The big exception was Hacksaw Ridge, which Trump voters were considerately more likely (27%) than Clinton voters (18%). The Hollywood Reporter
Après les vives polémiques provoquées par La Passion du Christ (2004) puis Apocalypto (2006) (…) Mel Gibson a choisi de mettre en scène Desmond Doss, objecteur de conscience américain, qui tint à aller au front comme infirmier pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale, sans jamais porter d’arme. Les images sanglantes, christiques, cruelles de son film font écho à celles de ses réalisations précédentes. (…) Dans chacun de ses films, Mel Gibson, fervent catholique, explore une figure isolée, prête à soulever les foules, mais aussi à subir les exactions de ses pourfendeurs. Le paroxysme de ce postulat –  la cruauté humaine envers ses semblables – est atteint avec La passion du Christ, où la foule déchaînée s’acharne sans relâche pour faire crucifier Jésus. Le film suscitera une immense controverse autour du réalisateur, accusé de véhiculer un message profondément antisémite, les Juifs étant représentés comme un peuple cruel et déicide. Cette foule haineuse, on la retrouve aussi dans Braveheart (1995) avant le sacrifice de William Wallace, torturé puis tué dans d’atroces souffrances. Dans Tu ne tueras point, le choix de Desmond Doss de ne pas porter d’armes déplaît fortement aux autres soldats qui le prennent pour un lâche, le torturent psychologiquement puis le passent lâchement à tabac en pleine nuit. (…) Tu ne tueras point, met en scène la figure ô combien christique de Desmond Doss, adventiste du septième jour, objecteur de conscience qui sauva 75 de ses camarades pendant la bataille d’Okinawa. Le tout, renforcé par des plans sans ambiguïté : Wallace les bras en croix avant la torture, ou Desmond, filmé allongé sur son brancard, en contre-plongée, les bras ouverts, comme appelé par les cieux. Télérama
“Don’t think I’m sticking up for the Germans,” puts in the lanky young captain in the upper berth, “but…” “To hell with the Germans,” says the broad-shouldered dark lieutenant. “It’s what our boys have been doing that worries me.” The lieutenant has been talking about the traffic in Army property, the leaking of gasoline into the black market in France and Belgium even while the fighting was going on, the way the Army kicks the civilians around, the looting. “Lust, liquor and loot are the soldier’s pay,” interrupts a red-faced major. (…) A tour of the beaten-up cities of Europe six months after victory is a mighty sobering experience for anyone. Europeans. Friend and foe alike, look you accusingly in the face and tell you how bitterly they are disappointed in you as an American. They cite the evolution of the word “liberation.” Before the Normandy landings it meant to be freed from the tyranny of the Nazis. Now it stands in the minds of the civilians for one thing, looting. (…) Never has American prestige in Europe been lower. People never tire of telling you of the ignorance and rowdy-ism of American troops, of out misunderstanding of European conditions. They say that the theft and sale of Army supplies by our troops is the basis of their black market. They blame us for the corruption and disorganization of UNRRA. (…) The Russians came first. The Viennese tell you of the savagery of the Russian armies. They came like the ancient Mongol hordes out of the steppes, with the flimsiest supply. The people in the working-class districts had felt that when the Russians came that they at least would be spared. But not at all. In the working-class districts the tropes were allowed to rape and murder and loot at will. When victims complained, the Russians answered, “You are too well off to be workers. You are bourgeoisie.” When Americans looted they took cameras and valuables but when the Russians looted they took everything. And they raped and killed. From the eastern frontiers a tide of refugees is seeping across Europe bringing a nightmare tale of helpless populations trampled underfoot. When the British and American came the Viennese felt that at last they were in the hands of civilized people. (…) We have swept away Hitlerism, but a great many Europeans feel that the cure has been worse than the disease. John Dos Passos (Life, le 7 janvier 1946)
lls sont venus, ils ont vaincu, ils ont violé… Sale nouvelle, les beaux GI débarqués en 1944 en France se sont comportés comme des barbares. Libération (mars 2006)
Oui, les libérateurs pratiquaient un racisme institutionnalisé et ils condamnèrent à mort des soldats noirs, accusés à tort de viols. En son temps, l’écrivain Louis Guilloux, qui fut l’interprète officiel des Américains en 1944 en Bretagne, assista à certains de ces procès en cour martiale. Durablement marqué, il relata son expérience dans OK, Joe !, un récit sobre, tranchant, qui a la puissance d’un brûlot. Loin du mélo. Télérama (décembre 2009)
Sur fond d’histoire d’amour impossible, Les Amants de l’ombre nous transportent dans une période méconnue de la Seconde Guerre mondiale où l’armée américaine, présentée comme libératrice, n’hésitait pas à condamner à mort des soldats noirs accusés à tort de viol. Métro (dec. 2009)
Soviet and German treatment of deserters, a story of pitiless savagery, is not mentioned here. Glass is concerned only with the British and Americans in the second world war, whose official attitudes to the problem were tortuous. In the first world war, the British shot 304 men for desertion or cowardice, only gradually accepting the notion of « shell-shock ». In the United States, by contrast, President Woodrow Wilson commuted all such death sentences. In the second world war, the British government stood up to generals who wanted to bring back the firing squad (the Labour government in 1930 had abolished the death penalty for desertion). Cunningly, the War Office suggested that restoration might suggest to the enemy that morale in the armed forces was failing. President Roosevelt, on the other hand, was persuaded in 1943 to suspend « limitations of punishment ». In the event, the Americans shot only one deserter, the luckless Private Eddie Slovik, executed in France in January 1945. He was an ex-con who had never even been near the front. Slovik quit when his unit was ordered into action, calculating that a familiar penitentiary cell would be more comfortable than being shot at in a rainy foxhole. His fate was truly unfair, set against the bigger picture. According to Glass, « nearly 50,000 American and 100,000 British soldiers deserted from the armed forces » during the war. Some 80% of these were front-line troops. Almost all « took a powder » (as they said then) in the European theatres of war; there were practically no desertions from US forces in the Pacific, perhaps because there was nowhere to go. By the end of the conflict, London, Paris and Naples, to name only a few European cities, swarmed with heavily-armed Awol servicemen, many of them recruited into gangs robbing and selling army supplies. Units were diverted from combat to guard supply trains, which were being hijacked all over liberated Europe. Paris, where the police fought nightly gun battles with American bandits, seemed to be a new Chicago. The Guardian
Thousands of American soldiers were convicted of desertion during the war, and 49 were sentenced to death. (Most were given years of hard labor.) Only one soldier was actually executed, an unlucky private from Detroit named Eddie Slovik. This was early 1945, at the moment of the Battle of the Bulge. Mr. Glass observes: “It was not the moment for the supreme Allied commander, Gen. Dwight Eisenhower, to be seen to condone desertion.” There were far more desertions in Europe than in the Pacific theater. In the Pacific, there was nowhere to disappear to. “In Europe, the total that fled from the front rarely exceeded 1 percent of manpower,” Mr. Glass writes. “However, it reached alarming proportions among the 10 percent of the men in uniform who actually saw combat.” (…) Too few men did too much of the fighting during World War II, the author writes. Many of them simply cracked at the seams. Poor leadership was often a factor. “High desertion rates in any company, battalion or division pointed to failures of command and logistics for which blame pointed to leaders as much as to the men who deserted,” he says. Mr. Glass adds, “Some soldiers deserted when all the other members of their units had been killed and their own deaths appeared inevitable.” The essential unfairness of so few men seeing the bulk of the combat was undergirded by other facts. Many men never shipped out. Mr. Glass cites a statistic that psychiatrists allowed about 1.75 million men to avoid service for “reasons other than physical.”This special treatment led to bitterness. Mr. Glass quotes a general who wrote, “When, in 1943, it was found that 14 members of the Rice University football team had been rejected for military service, the public was somewhat surprised.”Mr. Glass provides information about desertions in other American wars. During the Civil War, more than 300,000 troops went AWOL from the Union and Confederate armies. He writes, “Mark Twain famously deserted from both sides.” The NYT
In the weeks following liberation from the Nazis, Paris was hit by wave of crime and violence that saw the city compared to Prohibition New York or Chicago. And the cause was the same: American Gangsters. While the Allies fought against Hitler’s forces in Europe, law enforcers fought against the criminals who threatened that victory. Men who had abandoned the ‘greater good’ in favour of self-interest, black-market profits and the lure of the cafes and brothels of Paris: deserters. Highly organised, armed to the teeth and merciless, these deserters used their US uniforms as another tool of their trade along with the vast arrays of stolen weapons, forged passes and hijacked vehicles they had at their disposal. Between June 1944 and April 1945 the US army’s Criminal Investigation Branch (CBI) handled a total of 7,912 cases. Forty per cent involved misappropriation of US supplies. Greater yet was the proportion of crimes of violence – rape, murder, manslaughter and assault which accounted for 44 per cent of the force’s workload. The remaining 12 per cent were crimes such as robbery, housebreaking and riot.Many were afraid. They had reached a point beyond which they could not endure and chosen disgrace over the grave. Some recounted waking, as if from a dream, to find their bodies had led them away from the battelfield. (…)  Others, like Weiss, fought until their faith in their immediate commanders disappeared. Was it a form of madness or a dawning lucidity that led them to desert? Glass does not claim to be able to answer that question to which Weiss himself had devoted his latter years to addressing to no avail. Others still deserted to make money, stealing and selling the military supplies that their comrades at the front needed to survive. Opportunists and crooks, certainly, but not cowards – the life they chose was every bit as violent and bloody as battle. 50,000 American and 100,000 British soldiers deserted during World War II. Yet according to Glass the astounding fact is not that so many men deserted, but that so few did. Only one was executed for it, Eddie Slovik. He was, until that point, by his own assessment the unluckiest man alive.He never fought a battle. He never went on the run as most deserters did. He simply made it clear that he preferred prison to battle.  Of the 49 Americans sentenced to death for desertion during the Second World War he was the only one whose appeal for commutation was rejected. His greatest sin, as Glass tells it, was his timing. His appeal came in January 1945 just as the German counter-offensive, the Battle of the Bulge, was at its peak. Allied forces were near breaking point. It was not, Supreme Allied Commander, General Dwight Eisenhower decided, time to risk seeming to condone desertion. (…) Led by an ex-paratrooper sergeant, raids were planned like military operations. Whitehead himself admitted, ‘we stole trucks, sold whatever they carried, and used the trucks to rob warehouses of the goods in them.’ They used combat tactics, hijacked goods destined for front-line troops. Their crimes even spread into Belgium. They attacked civilians and military targets indiscriminately. His gangland activities gave Whitehead ‘a bigger thrill than battle.’ Quoting from the former soldier’s memoir Glass recounts his boasts: ‘We robbed every café in Paris, in all sectors except our own, while the gendarmes went crazy.’ They robbed crates of cognac and champagne, hijacked jeeps and raided private houses whose bed sheets and radios were ‘easy to fence.’ They stole petrol, cigarettes, liquor and weapons. Within six months Whitehead reckoned his share of the plunder at $100,000. Little wonder that when Victory in Europe was announced on 7 May 1945, Whitehead admitted, ‘That day and night everyone in Paris and the rest of Europe was celebrating, but I just stayed in my apartment thinking about it all.’ (…) Ultimately Whitehead was captured and court martialled. He was dishonourably discharged and spent time in the Delta Disciplinary Training Barracks in the south of France and in federal penitentiaries in New Jersey. Many years later he had that ‘dishonourable discharge,’ turned into a General one on rather disingenuous legal grounds.
En Allemagne, on dresse depuis 1986 des monuments aux déserteurs allemands de la seconde guerre mondiale. En Grande-Bretagne et aux Etats-Unis, personne, jusqu’il y a peu, ne voulait aborder cette thématique historique des déserteurs des armées de la coalition anti-hitlérienne. Charles Glass, ancien correspondant d’ABC pour le Moyen Orient, otage de milices chiites au Liban pendant 67 jours en 1987, vient d’innover en la matière: il a brisé ce tabou de l’histoire contemporaine, en racontant par le menu l’histoire des 50.000 militaires américains et des 100.000 militaires britanniques qui ont déserté leurs unités sur les théâtres d’opération d’Europe et d’Afrique du Nord. Le chiffre de 150.000 hommes est énorme: cela signifie qu’un soldat sur cent a abandonné illégalement son unité. Chez les Américains, constate Glass, les déserteurs ne peuvent pas être considérés comme des lâches ou des tire-au-flanc; il s’agit souvent de soldats qui se sont avérés des combattants exemplaires et courageux, voir des idéalistes qui ont prouvé leur valeur au front. Ils ont flanché pour les motifs que l’on classe dans la catégorie “SNAFU” (“Situation Normal, All Fucked Up”). Il peut s’agir de beaucoup de choses: ces soldats déserteurs avaient été traités bestialement par leurs supérieurs hiérarchiques incompétents, leur ravitaillement n’arrivait pas à temps, les conditions hygiéniques étaient déplorables; aussi le fait que c’était toujours les mêmes unités qui devaient verser leur sang, alors que personne, dans la hiérarchie militaire, n’estimait nécessaire de les relever et d’envoyer des unités fraîches en première ligne. Dans une telle situation, on peut comprendre la lassitude des déserteurs surtout que certaines divisions d’infanterie en France et en Italie ont perdu jusqu’à 75% de leurs effectifs. Pour beaucoup de GI’s appartenant à ces unités lourdement éprouvées, il apparaissait normal de déserter ou de refuser d’obéir aux ordres, même face à l’ennemi. (…) Au cours de l’automne 1944, dans l’US Army en Europe, il y avait chaque mois près de 8500 déserteurs ou de cas d’absentéisme de longue durée, également passibles de lourdes sanctions. La situation était similaire chez les Britanniques: depuis l’offensive de Rommel en Afrique du Nord, le nombre de déserteurs dans les unités envoyées dans cette région a augmenté dans des proportions telles que toutes les prisons militaires du Proche Orient étaient pleines à craquer et que le commandant-en-chef Claude Auchinleck envisageait de rétablir la peine de mort pour désertion, ce qui n’a toutefois pas été accepté pour des motifs de politique intérieure (ndt: ou parce que les Chypriotes grecs et turcs ou les Juifs de Palestine avaient été enrôlés de force et en masse dans la 8ème Armée, contre leur volonté?). Les autorités britanniques ont dès lors été forcées d’entourer tous les camps militaires britanniques d’une triple rangée de barbelés pour réduire le nombre de “fuites”. Le cauchemar du commandement allié et des décideurs politiques de la coalition anti-hitlérienne n’était pas tellement les déserteurs proprement dits, qui plongeaient tout simplement dans la clandestinité et attendaient la fin de la guerre, mais plutôt ceux d’entre eux qui se liguaient en bandes et se donnaient pour activité principale de piller la logistique des alliés et de vendre leur butin au marché noir. La constitution de pareilles bandes a commencé dès le débarquement des troupes anglo-saxonnes en Italie, où les gangs de déserteurs amorcèrent une coopération fructueuse avec la mafia locale. Parmi elles, le “Lane Gang”, dirigé par un simple soldat de 23 ans, Werner Schmeidel, s’est taillé une solide réputation. Ce “gang” a réussi à s’emparer d’une cassette militaire contenant 133.000 dollars en argent liquide. A l’automne 1944, ces attaques perpétrées par les “gangs” a enrayé l’offensive du Général Patton en direction de l’Allemagne: des déserteurs américains et des bandes criminelles françaises avaient attaqué et pillé les véhicules de la logistique amenant vivres et carburants. La situation la plus dramatique s’observait alors dans le Paris “libéré”, où régnait l’anarchie la plus totale: entre août 1944 et avril 1945, la “Criminal Investigation Branch” de l’armée américaine a ouvert 7912 dossiers concernant des délits importants, dont 3098 cas de pillage de biens militaires américains et 3481 cas de viol ou de meurtre (ou d’assassinat). La plupart de ces dossiers concernaient des soldats américains déserteurs. La situation était analogue en Grande-Bretagne où 40.000 soldats britanniques étaient entrés dans la clandestinité et étaient responsables de 90% des délits commis dans le pays. Pour combattre ce fléau, la justice militaire américaine s’est montrée beaucoup plus sévère que son homologue britannique: de juin 1944 à l’automne 1945, 70 soldats américains ont été exécutés pour avoir commis des délits très graves pendant leur période de désertion. La masse énorme des déserteurs “normaux” était internée dans d’immenses camps comme le “Loire Disciplinary Training Center” où séjournait 4500 condamnés. Ceux-ci y étaient systématiquement humiliés et maltraités. Des cas de décès ont été signalés et attestés car des gardiens ont à leur tour été traduits devant des juridictions militaires. En Angleterre, la chasse aux déserteurs s’est terminée en pantalonnade: ainsi, la police militaire britannique a organisé une gigantesque razzia le 14 décembre 1945, baptisée “Operation Dragnet”. Résultat? Quatre arrestations! Alors qu’à Londres seulement, quelque 20.000 déserteurs devaient se cacher. Au début de l’année 1945, l’armée américaine se rend compte que la plupart des déserteurs condamnés avaient été de bons soldats qui, vu le stress auquel ils avaient été soumis pendant de trop longues périodes en zones de combat, auraient dû être envoyés en clinique plutôt qu’en détention. Les psychologues entrent alors en scène, ce qui conduit à une révision de la plupart des jugements qui avaient condamné les soldats à des peines entre 15 ans et la perpétuité. En Grande-Bretagne, il a fallu attendre plus longtemps la réhabilitation des déserteurs malgré la pression de l’opinion publique. Finalement, Churchill a cédé et annoncé une amnistie officielle en février 1953. Wolfgang Kaufmann 

C’est Dos Passos qui avait raison !

Combattants exemplaires et courageux, voire idéalistes qui craquent, bandes de charognards sans scrupule pillant la logistique de vivres et de carburants des Alliés et les revendant au marché noir, violeurs notamment noirs ou assassins …

A la veille d’une cérémonie des Oscars …

Où face à des films nombriliste (La la land) ou très marqués minorités (Hidden figures, Fences) voire minorités/homosexualité (Moonlight) ou étranger (Lion) ou la chronique sociale d’une communauté de marins prolétaires (Manchester by the sea), la science fiction classique (Arrival/Premier contact) ou le néo-western (Hell or high water/Comancheria) …

Emerge notamment du côté des électeurs républicains, avec quand même six nominations, par le réalisateur controversé de la Passion du Christ …

L’étrange ovni (souligné par ailleurs par son titre français tiré tout droit du décalogue) du film de guerre religieux  (Hacksaw ridge/Tu ne tueras point) …

Avec cette histoire vraie mais ô combien christique du seul objecteur de conscience américain à recevoir la médaille d’honneur …

Ce guerrier sans armes qui tout en s’en tenant à sa volonté de ne pas porter d’armes parvint à sauver des dizaines de soldats (ennemis compris !) …

Retour, avec le livre du journaliste-historien Charles Glass d’il y a quatre ans …

Sur ces oubliés des oubliés de notre dernière grande guerre …

A savoir les déserteurs !

Une étude sur les déserteurs des armées alliées pendant la deuxième guerre mondiale
Wolfgang Kaufmann

Snerfies

16 janvier 2014

En Allemagne, on dresse depuis 1986 des monuments aux déserteurs allemands de la seconde guerre mondiale. En Grande-Bretagne et aux Etats-Unis, personne, jusqu’il y a peu, ne voulait aborder cette thématique historique des déserteurs des armées de la coalition anti-hitlérienne. Charles Glass, ancien correspondant d’ABC pour le Moyen Orient, otage de milices chiites au Liban pendant 67 jours en 1987, vient d’innover en la matière: il a brisé ce tabou de l’histoire contemporaine, en racontant par le menu l’histoire des 50.000 militaires américains et des 100.000 militaires britanniques qui ont déserté leurs unités sur les théâtres d’opération d’Europe et d’Afrique du Nord. Le chiffre de 150.000 hommes est énorme: cela signifie qu’un soldat sur cent a abandonné illégalement son unité.

Chez les Américains, constate Glass, les déserteurs ne peuvent pas être considérés comme des lâches ou des tire-au-flanc; il s’agit souvent de soldats qui se sont avérés des combattants exemplaires et courageux, voir des idéalistes qui ont prouvé leur valeur au front. Ils ont flanché pour les motifs que l’on classe dans la catégorie “SNAFU” (“Situation Normal, All Fucked Up”). Il peut s’agir de beaucoup de choses: ces soldats déserteurs avaient été traités bestialement par leurs supérieurs hiérarchiques incompétents, leur ravitaillement n’arrivait pas à temps, les conditions hygiéniques étaient déplorables; aussi le fait que c’était toujours les mêmes unités qui devaient verser leur sang, alors que personne, dans la hiérarchie militaire, n’estimait nécessaire de les relever et d’envoyer des unités fraîches en première ligne.

Dans une telle situation, on peut comprendre la lassitude des déserteurs surtout que certaines divisions d’infanterie en France et en Italie ont perdu jusqu’à 75% de leurs effectifs. Pour beaucoup de GI’s appartenant à ces unités lourdement éprouvées, il apparaissait normal de déserter ou de refuser d’obéir aux ordres, même face à l’ennemi. Parmi les militaires qui ont réfusé d’obéir, il y avait le Lieutenant Albert C. Homcy, de la 36ème division d’infanterie, qui n’a pas agi pour son bien propre mais pour celui de ses subordonnés. Il a comparu devant le conseil de guerre le 19 octobre 1944 à Docelles, qui l’a condamné à 50 ans de travaux forcés parce qu’il avait refusé d’obéir à un ordre qui lui demandait d’armer et d’envoyer à l’assaut contre les blindés allemands des cuisiniers, des boulangers et des ordonnances sans formation militaire aucune.

Au cours de l’automne 1944, dans l’US Army en Europe, il y avait chaque mois près de 8500 déserteurs ou de cas d’absentéisme de longue durée, également passibles de lourdes sanctions. La situation était similaire chez les Britanniques: depuis l’offensive de Rommel en Afrique du Nord, le nombre de déserteurs dans les unités envoyées dans cette région a augmenté dans des proportions telles que toutes les prisons militaires du Proche Orient étaient pleines à craquer et que le commandant-en-chef Claude Auchinleck envisageait de rétablir la peine de mort pour désertion, ce qui n’a toutefois pas été accepté pour des motifs de politique intérieure (ndt: ou parce que les Chypriotes grecs et turcs ou les Juifs de Palestine avaient été enrôlés de force et en masse dans la 8ème Armée, contre leur volonté?). Les autorités britanniques ont dès lors été forcées d’entourer tous les camps militaires britanniques d’une triple rangée de barbelés pour réduire le nombre de “fuites”.

Le cauchemar du commandement allié et des décideurs politiques de la coalition anti-hitlérienne n’était pas tellement les déserteurs proprement dits, qui plongeaient tout simplement dans la clandestinité et attendaient la fin de la guerre, mais plutôt ceux d’entre eux qui se liguaient en bandes et se donnaient pour activité principale de piller la logistique des alliés et de vendre leur butin au marché noir. La constitution de pareilles bandes a commencé dès le débarquement des troupes anglo-saxonnes en Italie, où les gangs de déserteurs amorcèrent une coopération fructueuse avec la mafia locale. Parmi elles, le “Lane Gang”, dirigé par un simple soldat de 23 ans, Werner Schmeidel, s’est taillé une solide réputation. Ce “gang” a réussi à s’emparer d’une cassette militaire contenant 133.000 dollars en argent liquide. A l’automne 1944, ces attaques perpétrées par les “gangs” a enrayé l’offensive du Général Patton en direction de l’Allemagne: des déserteurs américains et des bandes criminelles françaises avaient attaqué et pillé les véhicules de la logistique amenant vivres et carburants.

La situation la plus dramatique s’observait alors dans le Paris “libéré”, où régnait l’anarchie la plus totale: entre août 1944 et avril 1945, la “Criminal Investigation Branch” de l’armée américaine a ouvert 7912 dossiers concernant des délits importants, dont 3098 cas de pillage de biens militaires américains et 3481 cas de viol ou de meurtre (ou d’assassinat). La plupart de ces dossiers concernaient des soldats américains déserteurs. La situation était analogue en Grande-Bretagne où 40.000 soldats britanniques étaient entrés dans la clandestinité et étaient responsables de 90% des délits commis dans le pays. Pour combattre ce fléau, la justice militaire américaine s’est montrée beaucoup plus sévère que son homologue britannique: de juin 1944 à l’automne 1945, 70 soldats américains ont été exécutés pour avoir commis des délits très graves pendant leur période de désertion. La masse énorme des déserteurs “normaux” était internée dans d’immenses camps comme le “Loire Disciplinary Training Center” où séjournait 4500 condamnés. Ceux-ci y étaient systématiquement humiliés et maltraités. Des cas de décès ont été signalés et attestés car des gardiens ont à leur tour été traduits devant des juridictions militaires. En Angleterre, la chasse aux déserteurs s’est terminée en pantalonnade: ainsi, la police militaire britannique a organisé une gigantesque razzia le 14 décembre 1945, baptisée “Operation Dragnet”. Résultat? Quatre arrestations! Alors qu’à Londres seulement, quelque 20.000 déserteurs devaient se cacher.

Au début de l’année 1945, l’armée américaine se rend compte que la plupart des déserteurs condamnés avaient été de bons soldats qui, vu le stress auquel ils avaient été soumis pendant de trop longues périodes en zones de combat, auraient dû être envoyés en clinique plutôt qu’en détention. Les psychologues entrent alors en scène, ce qui conduit à une révision de la plupart des jugements qui avaient condamné les soldats à des peines entre 15 ans et la perpétuité.

En Grande-Bretagne, il a fallu attendre plus longtemps la réhabilitation des déserteurs malgré la pression de l’opinion publique. Finalement, Churchill a cédé et annoncé une amnistie officielle en février 1953.

Wolfgang KAUFMANN.

(article paru dans “Junge Freiheit”, n°49/2013; http://www.jungefreiheit.de ).

Charles GLASS, The Deserters. A hidden history of World War II, Penguin Press, New York, 2013, 380 pages, ill., 20,40 euro.

The untold truth about WWII deserters the US Army tried to hide: New book reveals how gangs of AWOL GIs terrorized WWII Paris with a reign of mob-style violence

In the weeks following liberation from the Nazis, Paris was hit by wave of crime and violence that saw the city compared to Prohibition New York or Chicago.

And the cause was the same: American Gangsters.

While the Allies fought against Hitler’s forces in Europe, law enforcers fought against the criminals who threatened that victory. Men who had abandoned the ‘greater good’ in favour of self-interest, black-market profits and the lure of the cafes and brothels of Paris: deserters.

Glass’s study of the very different stories and men grouped together under the label, Deserters

Highly organised, armed to the teeth and merciless, these deserters used their US uniforms as another tool of their trade along with the vast arrays of stolen weapons, forged passes and hijacked vehicles they had at their disposal.

Between June 1944 and April 1945 the US army’s Criminal Investigation Branch (CBI) handled a total of 7,912 cases. Forty per cent involved misappropriation of US supplies.

Greater yet was the proportion of crimes of violence – rape, murder, manslaughter and assault which accounted for 44 per cent of the force’s workload. The remaining 12 per cent were crimes such as robbery, housebreaking and riot.

Former Chief Middle East correspondent for ABC News, the book’s author Charles Glass had long harboured an interest in the subject. But it was only truly ignited by a chance meeting with Steve Weiss – decorated combat veteran of the US 36th Infantry Division and former deserter.

Glass was giving a talk to publicise his previous book, ‘Americans in Paris: Life and Death under Nazi Occupation’ when the American started asking questions. It was clear, Glass recounts, that the questioner’s knowledge of the French Resistance was more intimate than his own.

Tested beyond endurance: This official US Army photograph taken in Pozzuoli near Naples in August 1944, captured Private First Class Steve Weiss boarding a British landing craft. He is climbing the gangplank on the right-hand side of the photograph. The Deserters, A Hidden History of World War II by Charles Glass

Hero or Coward? Steve Weiss receives the Croix de Guerre in July 1946 yet 2 years earlier the US army jailed him as a deserter

They met for coffee and Weiss asked Glass what he was working on. Glass recalls: ‘I told him it was a book on American and British deserters in the Second World War and asked if he knew anything about it.

‘He answered, « I was a deserter. »‘

This once idealistic boy from Brooklyn who enlisted at 17, had fought on the beachhead at Anzio and through the perilous Ardennes forest, he was one of the very few regular American soldiers to fight with the Resistance in 1944. And he had deserted.

His story was, Glass realised, both secret and emblematic of a group of men, wreathed together under a banner of shame that branded them cowards. Yet the truth was far more complex.

Many were afraid. They had reached a point beyond which they could not endure and chosen disgrace over the grave. Some recounted waking, as if from a dream, to find their bodies had led them away from the battelfield.

Others, like Weiss, fought until their faith in their immediate commanders disappeared. Was it a form of madness or a dawning lucidity that led them to desert? Glass does not claim to be able to answer that question to which Weiss himself had devoted his latter years to addressing to no avail

Others still deserted to make money, stealing and selling the military supplies that their comrades at the front needed to survive. Opportunists and crooks, certainly, but not cowards – the life they chose was every bit as violent and bloody as battle.

50,000 American and 100,000 British soldiers deserted during World War II. Yet according to Glass the astounding fact is not that so many men deserted, but that so few did.

Only one was executed for it, Eddie Slovik. He was, until that point, by his own assessment the unluckiest man alive.

The Unluckiest Man: Eddie Slovik, left, was the only American executed for desertion as his trial fell at a time when General Dwight Eisenhower, right, decided he could not risk appearing lenient on the crime

He never fought a battle. He never went on the run as most deserters did. He simply made it clear that he preferred prison to battle.

Of the 49 Americans sentenced to death for desertion during the Second World War he was the only one whose appeal for commutation was rejected. His greatest sin, as Glass tells it, was his timing.

His appeal came in January 1945 just as the German counter-offensive, the Battle of the Bulge, was at its peak. Allied forces were near breaking point. It was not, Supreme Allied Commander, General Dwight Eisenhower decided, time to risk seeming to condone desertion.

Slovik was shot for his crime on the morning of 31 January 1945.

He was dispatched in the remote French village of Sainte-Marie-aux-Mines and the truth concealed even from his wife, Antoinette.

She was informed that her husband had died in the European Theatre of Operations.

His identity was ultimately revealed in 1954 and twenty years later Martin Sheen played him in the television film, The Execution of Private Slovik.

In it Sheen recites the words Slovik spoke before the firing squad shot him.

‘They’re not shooting me for deserting the United States Army,’ he said.

‘They just need to make an example out of somebody and I’m it because I’m an ex-con.

‘I used to steal things when I was a kid, and that’s what they are shooting me for.

‘They’re shooting me for the bread and chewing gum I stole when I was 12 years old.’

Private Alfred T Whitehead’s was a very different story.

He was a farm boy from Tennessee who rushed to join up to escape a life of brutalising poverty and violence at the hands of his stepfather.

He ended up a gangster tearing through Paris.

Whitehead fought at Normandy and claims to have stormed the beaches on the D-Day landings.

He considered himself a battle-hardened professional soldier and bit by bit the small reserve of mercy that had survived his childhood evaporated in the heat of war.

He had been in continuous combat with them from D-Day to 30th December 1944. He had earned the Silver Star, two Bronze Stars, Combat Infantry Badge and Distinguished Unit Citation.

When he was invalided out to Paris with appendicitis and assumed that he would rejoin his unit, the 2nd Division, on his recovery.

Instead he was sent to the 94th Reinforcement Battalion, a replacement depot in Fontainebleau.

When a young lieutenant presented Whitehead with a First World War vintage rifle for guard duty, he told the officer to take the ‘peashooter’ and ‘shove it up his ass.’

Loyalties Lost: Before deserting Alfred T Whitehead was decorated for bravery he has identified himself as the third soldier on the right, visible in profile, at the front of this D-Day landing craft approaching Normandy 6 June 1944

He demanded the weapons he was used to – a .45 pistol, a Thompson sub-machine gun and a trench knife.

His actual desertion was unspectacular. Whitehead was looking for a drink. The American Service Club refused him entrance because he didn’t have a pass and so he wandered on ‘in search of a bed in a brothel.’

He found one. By morning he was officially AWOL. The next day a waitress in a café took pity on him and added fried eggs and potatoes to his order of soup and bread. When Military Police came in and started asking questions she gave Whitehead the key to her room in a cheap hotel and told him to wait for her there.

From decorated soldier he moved seamlessly into life as a criminal in the Paris underworld.

A chance meeting led to him taking his place as a member of one of the many gangs of ex-soldiers terrorizing Paris.

Led by an ex-paratrooper sergeant, raids were planned like military operations. Whitehead himself admitted, ‘we stole trucks, sold whatever they carried, and used the trucks to rob warehouses of the goods in them.’

They used combat tactics, hijacked goods destined for front-line troops.

Their crimes even spread into Belgium. They attacked civilians and military targets indiscriminately.

His gangland activities gave Whitehead ‘a bigger thrill than battle.’ Quoting from the former soldier’s memoir Glass recounts his boasts: ‘We robbed every café in Paris, in all sectors except our own, while the gendarmes went crazy.’

They robbed crates of cognac and champagne, hijacked jeeps and raided private houses whose bed sheets and radios were ‘easy to fence.’ They stole petrol, cigarettes, liquor and weapons.
Within six months Whitehead reckoned his share of the plunder at $100,000.

Little wonder that when Victory in Europe was announced on 7 May 1945, Whitehead admitted, ‘That day and night everyone in Paris and the rest of Europe was celebrating, but I just stayed in my apartment thinking about it all.’

Because Private Whitehead’s desertion did not end his war – it was a part of it. As it was a part of many soldiers’ wars that has long gone unrecorded.

Ultimately Whitehead was captured and court martialled. He was dishonourably discharged and spent time in the Delta Disciplinary Training Barracks in the south of France and in federal penitentiaries in New Jersey.

Many years later he had that ‘dishonourable discharge,’ turned into a General one on rather disingenuous legal grounds.

In peacetime appearances mattered more to Whitehead than they ever had in war.

Back then, he admitted: ‘I never knew what tomorrow would hold, so I took every day as it came. War does strange things to people, especially their morality.’

Those ‘strange things’ rather than the false extremes of courage and cowardice are the truths set out in this account of the War and its deserters.

The Deserters: A Hidden History of world War II by Charles Glass is published by The Penguin Press, 13 June, Price $27.95. Available on Amazon by clicking here.

Voir également:

Deserter: The Last Untold Story of the Second World War by Charles Glass: review
Nearly 150,000 Allied soldiers deserted during the Second World War – some through fear and some for love. Nicholas Shakespeare uncovers their story, reviewing Deserter by Charles Glass.
The Telegraph
09 Apr 2013

In 1953, Winston Churchill gave an amnesty for wartime deserters as part of the celebrations for the coronation. According to Charles Glass, nearly 100,000 British and 50,000 American soldiers had deserted the armed forces during the Second World War, but only one was executed for this (theoretically) capital offence: a 25-year-old US infantryman who preferred to go to prison than into battle, and was condemned “to death by musketry” in January 1945. His story was finally told, a year after Churchill’s amnesty, in William Bradford Huie’s The Execution of Private Slovik, which remains, according to Glass, “almost the only full-length discussion of the subject”.

Who were the other deserters, why did they desert – and what happened to them? The absence of readily available material is a blood-red rag to a bullish reporter like Glass. Following his masterful study into the activities of his compatriots in Nazi-occupied France, Americans in Paris (2009), Glass has unearthed a shameful and inconvenient cluster of tragedies, which history – unreliably narrated by the victors – has whitened over.

At the opposite end to Pte Slovik was Pte Wayne Powers, an army truck driver from Missouri who absconded for love and was one of a few convicted deserters to get off scot-free. Buried in Glass’s introduction, and casually discarded, is the account of Powers’s elopement with a dark-haired French girl in November 1944. Hiding in her family house near the Belgian border, the couple had five children. For the next 14 years, Powers stayed a wanted man but undetected – until 1958, when a car crashed into the house, and a policeman, taking down details, noticed a face peering through the curtains. Court-martialed, Powers was released after 60,000 letters appealed for clemency; but his haunted gaze in the window is what lingers, and unites him with each deserter: an ever-present fear of capture, “an overshadowing presence that darkened my consciousness”, in the words of John Bain, a 23-year-old British soldier finally run to ground in Leeds.

Neither the conscientious objector Slovik nor the love-struck Powers were emblematic of the vast majority who deserted from the ranks. John Bain, the only British example explored by Glass, is a more satisfying representative. A boxer-poet like Byron, Bain is known today by the cover name that he adopted when on the run, Vernon Scannell (“a name picked from a passport in a brothel”). He had wandered away from his post in Wadi Akarit, trance-like, in “a kind of disgust”, after seeing his friends loot the corpses of their own men. His punishment was consistent both with US Gen George Patton’s remedy for malingerers – in Sicily, Patton famously slapped a shell-shocked soldier – and with US Brig Gen Elliot Cooke’s suspicion of “psychiatricks”.

Bain was imprisoned in Mustafa Barracks near Alexandria, snarled at by officers (“You’re all cowards. You’re all yellow”) and brutalised by guards, not one of whom had been within range “of any missile more dangerous than a flying cork” writes Glass. Captured in Leeds after going awol a third time, Bain told his interrogators that he wished to write poetry. Only then was his condition recognised. “We’ll send him to a psychiatrist. He’s clearly mad.”

Bain, who would go on to write some of the best poetry of the war, observed that “the dramatically heroic role is for the few”. He had left the battlefield to preserve his humanity, his time in the Army “totally destructive of the human qualities I most valued, the qualities of imagination, sensitivity and intelligence”.

With his own skill and sensitivity, Glass recreates the inhuman scenes that pummel the other soldiers he examines. Almost all of them were brave men like Bain. They knew what it was to be bombed by your own side. Slog through minefields littered with bloated, blackened bodies. Sit in foxholes knee-deep in your own excrement. Listen to the rising screams of the wounded. Struggle to obey orders that were impossible to carry out.

All too frequently, as in William Wharton’s memorable novel A Midnight Clear, your own commanders posed the greatest danger. Bain’s captain deserted from the Mareth Line in 1943, only to bob up as a major. Conversely, in the US 36th Division, which boasted the highest number of deserters, Lt Albert Homcy, already singled out for “exceptionally meritorious conduct” in Italy, was sentenced to 50 years of hard labour after he refused to lead untrained men to certain death.

Glass displays an unusual degree of empathy and kinship with these men. It causes him to focus on those he senses to have been misjudged or misdiagnosed, and whose condition cried out for treatment rather than punishment. There is a deficit in his book of more flagrant, less nuanced absconders. With a slight air of duty and disdain, one feels, he tracks the fate of Sgt Al Whitehead from Tennessee, who deserted for reasons of avarice and goes “to live it up” in Paris, where he became part of a GI gang that stole Allied supplies and shot at military policemen. Glass leaves us thirsty for details about these gangsters (also observed in Naples, with exemplary dry comedy, by Norman Lewis) and their British equivalents in Egypt.

Given the author’s knowledge of Paris – “home to deserters from most of the armies of Europe” – the absence of any French, German or Italian examples is also a curious omission. Deserter is unashamedly an Anglo-American story. In its selection of hitherto suppressed voices, it is refreshing and stimulating – history told from the loser’s perspective. But if I have a quibble, it is that the author concentrates too much on too few.

Even so Glass’s principal guide, on whom the narrative depends, is a compelling choice to lead the author’s project of rehabilitation. Pte Steve Weiss, who after the war became (of all things) a psychiatrist, is perhaps not your typical deserter, but if anyone deserves a sympathetic hearing, it is Weiss. Enlisting against his father’s wishes at 18, and determined to play a meaningful part in the war, Weiss joined the French Resistance after being separated from the 36th Division near Valence; for his courage, he would earn the Légion d’honneur. Eventually reunited with his company, he was treated like just another round of ammunition. After one earth tremor too many, he stumbled off into a forest during an artillery barrage. Discovered in a shell-shocked state by American troops, having slept for six days, Weiss was tried before a court-martial that lasted a mere five hours, including one hour for lunch, and condemned to hard labour for life.

His father complained: “This is the thanks he received for giving his all to his country.” Later interviewed by a military psychiatrist in the Loire Disciplinary Training Camp, Weiss was told: “You don’t belong here. You belong in a hospital.” It is altogether fitting that when Glass accompanies 86-year-old Weiss back to Bruyères to look for the courtroom in which the US Army delivered its ludicrous sentence, they cannot find it.

Deserter: The Last Untold Story of the Second World War

by Charles Glass

400pp, Harperpress, t £23 (PLUS £1.35 p&p) Buy now from Telegraph Books (RRP £25, ebook £12.50)

Voir encore:

Deserter: The Untold Story of WWII by Charles Glass – review

The shocking stories of three young men who fled the battlefield leave Neal Ascherson wondering why more soldiers don’t go awol
Neal Ascherson
The Guardian
28 March 2013

Desertion in war is not a mystery. It can have contributory motives – « family problems » at home, hatred of some officer or moral reluctance to kill are among them. But the central motive is the obvious one: to get away from people who are trying to blow your head off or stick a bayonet through you. Common sense, in other words. So the enigma is not why soldiers desert. It is why most of them don’t, even in battle and even in the face of imminent defeat (remember the stubborn Wehrmacht in the second world war). They do not run away, but stand and fight. Why?

That is the most interesting thing in Charles Glass‘s new book. He takes three young men – boys, really – who were drafted into the infantry in the last European war, who fought, deserted, and yet often fought again. Steve Weiss was from a Jewish family in Brooklyn; his father had been wounded and gassed in the first world war. Alfred Whitehead came from the bleakest rural poverty in Tennessee. John Bain was English (and after the war became famous as the poet Vernon Scannell); he was desperate to get away from his sadistic father, another veteran of the trenches.

All three quit their posts for solid and obvious reasons. Two of them deserted several times over. They saw heartbreaking horrors, or were tempted by women, booze and loot in a liberated city, or were shattered by prolonged artillery barrages, or realised – suddenly, and with cold clarity – that they would almost certainly be killed in the next few days.

The common sense of desertion was plain to almost anyone who had actually been under fire. Again and again, Glass’s book tells how these men on the run were fed, sheltered, comforted and transported by soldiers close to the front line. But the further away from the guns they got, entering the reposeful regions of pen-pushing « rear echelons », the more wary, disapproving and uncomprehending their compatriots became. Ultimately they would end up in the hands of the military police, and then in some nightmare « stockade » or military prison where shrieking, muscle-bound monsters who had never been within miles of a mortar « stonk » devoted themselves to breaking their spirit.

Soviet and German treatment of deserters, a story of pitiless savagery, is not mentioned here. Glass is concerned only with the British and Americans in the second world war, whose official attitudes to the problem were tortuous.

In the first world war, the British shot 304 men for desertion or cowardice, only gradually accepting the notion of « shell-shock ». In the United States, by contrast, President Woodrow Wilson commuted all such death sentences. In the second world war, the British government stood up to generals who wanted to bring back the firing squad (the Labour government in 1930 had abolished the death penalty for desertion). Cunningly, the War Office suggested that restoration might suggest to the enemy that morale in the armed forces was failing. President Roosevelt, on the other hand, was persuaded in 1943 to suspend « limitations of punishment ». In the event, the Americans shot only one deserter, the luckless Private Eddie Slovik, executed in France in January 1945. He was an ex-con who had never even been near the front. Slovik quit when his unit was ordered into action, calculating that a familiar penitentiary cell would be more comfortable than being shot at in a rainy foxhole.

His fate was truly unfair, set against the bigger picture. According to Glass, « nearly 50,000 American and 100,000 British soldiers deserted from the armed forces » during the war. Some 80% of these were front-line troops. Almost all « took a powder » (as they said then) in the European theatres of war; there were practically no desertions from US forces in the Pacific, perhaps because there was nowhere to go. By the end of the conflict, London, Paris and Naples, to name only a few European cities, swarmed with heavily-armed Awol servicemen, many of them recruited into gangs robbing and selling army supplies. Units were diverted from combat to guard supply trains, which were being hijacked all over liberated Europe. Paris, where the police fought nightly gun battles with American bandits, seemed to be a new Chicago.

But none of Glass’s three subjects left the front as soon as fighting began. They tried to do their duty for as long as they could. Steve Weiss first encountered battle in Italy, posted to the 36th infantry division near Naples after the Salerno and Anzio landings. He was 18 years old. At Anzio he saw for the first time deserters in a stockade yelling abuse at the army, found that a friend had collapsed with « battle fatigue », and was bombed from the air.

Soon he was fighting his way up Italy with « Charlie Company », facing artillery and snipers by day and night. Once, exhausted, rain-drenched and on his own, he broke down in tears of fatigue and terror and cried out for his mother. Next day he was street-fighting in the ruins of Grosseto. What kept him going? Not ideals about the war. He had seen Naples, now run by the Mafia boss Vito Genovese in cahoots with the Americans, and the notion that Roosevelt’s « Four Freedoms » could matter to starving Italians was a joke. What kept him and the other two going was comradeship: trust in a friend, or in some older and more experienced member of the squad. For Weiss in Italy, it was Corporal Bob Reigle, and later in France, a Captain Binoche in the resistance. For the truculent Alfred Whitehead, who survived Omaha Beach and the murderous battles of the Normandy « Bocage », it was his fellow-Tennessean Paul « Timmiehaw » Turner; staying drunk helped too. For John Bain, with the 51st Highland Division in North Africa and Normandy, it was his foul-mouthed, loyal pal Hughie from Glasgow.

The war was crazy, the army was brainless and callous, but there were these men who would never let you down, and for whose sake you bore the unbearable. When Weiss rejoined his company in the Vosges and found how many comrades were dead, when « Timmiehaw » was killed by a mine near St-Lo and Hughie by a mortar barrage near Caen, the psychic exhaustion all three young men had been suppressing finally kicked in.

Whitehead left to become a gangster in liberated Paris. Weiss and a few mates ran away from the winter battles in the Vosges hills; he did time in a military prison and eventually became a psychiatrist in California. Bain had already deserted once before, in Tunisia, and served a sentence in the appalling Mustafa Barracks « glasshouse » near Alexandria. Badly wounded in Normandy, he deserted again after the war was over because he couldn’t wait to be demobbed, and vanished into London to become poet and boxer Scannell.

Not much of this book, it should be said, is about deserting. Most of it consists of the three men’s own narratives of « their war », published or unpublished, and – because they are the stories of individual human beings who eventually cracked under the strain of hardly imaginable fear and misery – they are wonderful, unforgettable acts of witness, something salvaged from a time already sinking into the black mud of the past. I’ll certainly remember Bain watching his mates rifling the pockets of their own dead, Weiss witnessing the botched hanging of black soldiers for rape, Whitehead hijacking an American supply truck in the middle of the Paris traffic.

Memorable, too, is the astonishing Psychology for the Fighting Man, a work of startling empathy and humanity, produced in 1943 and distributed to American forces. Glass posts extracts at the outset of each chapter. « Giving up is nature’s way of protecting the organism against too much pain. » Or « There are a few men in every army who know no fear – just a few. But these men are not normal. » Statements of the obvious? Maybe. But in the madness of war, the right to state the obvious becomes worth fighting for.

Neal Ascherson’s Black Sea is published by Vintage.

Voir de plus:

Stories about cowardice can be as gripping as those about courage. One tells us about who we’d like to be; the other tells us about who we fear we are.

Nearly 50,000 American and 100,000 British soldiers deserted from the armed forces during World War II. (The British were in the war much longer.) Some fell into the arms of French or Italian women. Some became black-market pirates. Many more simply broke under the strain of battle.

These men’s stories have rarely been told. During the war, newspapers largely abstained from writing about desertions. The topic was bad for morale and could be exploited by the enemy. In more recent decades the subject has been essentially taboo, as if to broach it would dent the halo around the Greatest Generation.

Gen. George S. Patton wanted to shoot the men, whom he considered “cowards.” Other commanders were more humane. “They recognized that the mind — subject to the daily threat of death, the concussion of aerial bombardment and high-velocity artillery, the fear of land mines and booby traps, malnutrition, appalling hygiene and lack of sleep — suffered wounds as real as the body’s,” Mr. Glass writes. “Providing shattered men with counseling, hot food, clean clothes and rest was more likely to restore them to duty than threatening them with a firing squad.”

Thousands of American soldiers were convicted of desertion during the war, and 49 were sentenced to death. (Most were given years of hard labor.) Only one soldier was actually executed, an unlucky private from Detroit named Eddie Slovik. This was early 1945, at the moment of the Battle of the Bulge. Mr. Glass observes: “It was not the moment for the supreme Allied commander, Gen. Dwight Eisenhower, to be seen to condone desertion.”

There were far more desertions in Europe than in the Pacific theater. In the Pacific, there was nowhere to disappear to. “In Europe, the total that fled from the front rarely exceeded 1 percent of manpower,” Mr. Glass writes. “However, it reached alarming proportions among the 10 percent of the men in uniform who actually saw combat.”

It is among this book’s central contentions that “few deserters were cowards.” Mr. Glass also observes, “Those who showed the greatest sympathy to deserters were other front-line soldiers.”

Too few men did too much of the fighting during World War II, the author writes. Many of them simply cracked at the seams. Poor leadership was often a factor. “High desertion rates in any company, battalion or division pointed to failures of command and logistics for which blame pointed to leaders as much as to the men who deserted,” he says.

Mr. Glass adds, “Some soldiers deserted when all the other members of their units had been killed and their own deaths appeared inevitable.”

The essential unfairness of so few men seeing the bulk of the combat was undergirded by other facts. Many men never shipped out. Mr. Glass cites a statistic that psychiatrists allowed about 1.75 million men to avoid service for “reasons other than physical.”This special treatment led to bitterness. Mr. Glass quotes a general who wrote, “When, in 1943, it was found that 14 members of the Rice University football team had been rejected for military service, the public was somewhat surprised.”Mr. Glass provides information about desertions in other American wars. During the Civil War, more than 300,000 troops went AWOL from the Union and Confederate armies. He writes, “Mark Twain famously deserted from both sides.” Nearly all of the information I have provided about “The Deserters” thus far comes from its excellent introduction. The rest of the book is not nearly so provocative or rending.

Mr. Glass abandons his textured overview of his topic to focus almost exclusively on three individual soldiers, men who respectively abandoned their posts in France, Italy and Africa.

One was a young man from Brooklyn who fought valiantly with the 36th Infantry Division in Italy and France before coming unglued. Another is the English poet Vernon Scannell, who suffered in Mustafa Barracks, the grim prison camp in Egypt. The third was a Tennessee farm boy who fought bravely with the 2nd Infantry Division before deserting and becoming a criminal in post-liberation Paris.

These men’s stories are not uninteresting, but Mr. Glass tells them at numbing length in bare, reportorial prose that rarely picks up much resonance. On the rare occasions the author reaches for figurative language, he takes a pratfall: “Combat exhaustion was etched into each face as sharp as a bullet hole.”The lives and times of Mr. Glass’s three soldiers slide by slowly, as if you were scanning microfilm. We lose sight of this book’s larger topic for many pages at a time. The men’s stories provide limited points of view. From the author we long for more synthesis and sweep and argument and psychological depth.

Terminology changes. Before we had post-traumatic stress disorder we had battle fatigue, and before that, in World War I, there was shell shock. In her lovely book “Soldier’s Heart: Reading Literature Through Peace and War at West Point” (2007), Elizabeth D. Samet reminds us that “soldier’s heart” was another and quite resonant term for much the same thing.

At its best, “The Deserters” has much to say about soldier’s hearts. It underscores the truth of the following observation, made by a World War II infantry captain named Charles B. MacDonald: “It is always an enriching experience to write about the American soldier in adversity no less than in glittering triumph.”

THE DESERTERS

A Hidden History of World War II

By Charles Glass

Illustrated. 380 pages. The Penguin Press. $27.95.

Voir encore:
“Tu ne tueras point“ : violence, religion et sacrifice chez Mel Gibson

Dans son dernier film, le réalisateur poursuit une œuvre où les héros se débattent dans une vallée de sang et de larmes. Pour tenter de saisir la spiritualité du Christ.

En 1995, dans Braveheart, Mel Gibson se mettait en scène sous les traits et les peintures de guerre de William Wallace. Soumis à la torture à la fin du film, le héros du peuple écossais rendait l’âme en hurlant : « Liberté ! » Pouvait-on se douter que ce dénouement aussi sanglant qu’exalté placerait toute la carrière du réalisateur – jusqu’à Tu ne tueras point aujourd’hui – sous le signe du sacrifice ?

Le lien avec La Passion du Christ (2004) et Apocalypto (2006) semble évident, le premier sur la crucifixion de Jésus, le second sur les sacrifices humains au crépuscule de la civilisation maya. Les deux sont des hécatombes. Pas de sacrifice, chez Gibson, sans tripes ni hémoglobine. Si cette vision a été critiquée pour son simplisme, elle n’en témoigne pas moins d’une conviction de réalisateur : montrer dans le détail la réalité charnelle de la passion du Christ aide à en saisir la dimension spirituelle. Gibson semble friand de ce paradoxe catholique voulant que le salut puisse passer par le spectacle ou le récit de la déchéance. Ce qu’il illustrera d’ailleurs jusque dans sa vie privée par ses frasques et sa traversée du désert après 2006 : problèmes d’alcool, violence, propos antisémites…

L’histoire de Tu ne tueras point (Hacksaw Ridge en VO) ne dépareille pas dans ce tableau : pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale, un objecteur de conscience qui s’est engagé comme infirmier dans l’armée américaine, se retrouve propulsé dans la boucherie de la bataille d’Okinawa. Le champ de bataille que le héros Desmond Doss foule du pied est littéralement tapissé de corps déchiquetés. À un moment du film, un blessé se cache dans la terre pour échapper à la vigilance de ses ennemis, offrant la vision saisissante d’une terre humanisée et, inversement, d’une humanité rabaissée à sa seule condition terrestre. Mais à ces corps rampants répond à la fin du film un plan sur le corps suspendu de Doss, sur fond de nuages radieux. Le héros de Gibson est un saint, c’est-à-dire un trait d’union entre la terre et le ciel. Une idée qui pourra être diversement prise au sérieux, mais dont l’évidence esthétique ne peut que frapper ici.

Gibson semble friand de ce paradoxe catholique voulant que le salut puisse passer par le spectacle ou le récit de la déchéance.

De Braveheart à Tu ne tueras point, l’idée de sacrifice permet à Mel Gibson de faire le pont entre plusieurs idées contradictoires. Le rapport entre la force et la justice, par exemple : tous les héros gibsonniens, victimes d’une injustice initiale, s’interrogent en retour sur l’usage de leur puissance. L’Écossais, après avoir fédéré la rébellion, donne sa mort en exemple. L’Amérindien capturé par des guerriers mayas devient un héros parce qu’il doit sauver sa famille. Et bien sûr Jésus, pourtant le plus puissant de tous, laisse s’abattre sur lui une violence inouïe. Au-delà même de la question de la foi, ces personnages se distinguent par leur capacité à tracer leur propre chemin dans des vallées de sang et de larmes.

Rien d’étonnant, dans ce contexte, à ce que Gibson s’intéresse cette fois-ci à un objecteur de conscience. La représentation de la violence dans le film pose évidemment un certain nombre de problèmes, qui sont intéressants dans la mesure où ils répondent aux questions que se pose Doss sur la guerre. La position de ce dernier est compliquée : adventiste, il ne veut pas toucher à une arme mais veut bien aller au combat. Il y a très vite un écart entre la radicalité de sa position et la casuistique qu’elle finit par impliquer. Ne pourrait-on pas considérer qu’en se battant au côté des soldats, il contribue tout de même à tuer ?

Il y a une ambiguïté équivalente dans la manière dont Gibson représente le déchaînement de la puissance de feu des Américains. C’est comme si le sacrifice de Doss (faire la guerre, mais avant tout pour sauver ses camarades blessés) était augmenté et sublimé par la vision de l’enfer même qu’il est censé avoir refusé. Toujours ce rapport contourné de Gibson à la force, que l’on retrouve chez un autre des personnages du film : le père de Desmond Doss, un pacifiste paradoxalement violent et tourmenté par la vision des boyaux de ses amis morts au combat lors de la Première Guerre mondiale.

Au-delà même de la question de la foi, les personnages de Mel Gibson se distinguent par leur capacité à tracer leur propre chemin dans des vallées de sang et de larmes.

Le sacrifice est enfin, pour Mel Gibson, une sorte de pivot entre les religions païennes et la religion chrétienne, qu’il aime mettre en regard. Apocalypto racontait la fin de la civilisation maya et la manière dont un sacrifice héroïque pouvait prendre le pas sur les sacrifices humains. En toute logique, la fin ouvrait sur l’arrivée des colons chrétiens. Dans Tu ne tueras point, la confrontation avec l’altérité religieuse, tournant à nouveau autour du sacrifice, vient de l’affrontement avec les Japonais, qui ont des kamikazes en guise de héros. La scène de hara kiri d’un général japonais, typiquement gibsonnienne, est une sorte de version négative du sacrifice de Doss.

Tu ne tueras point est à bien des égards un film naïf – ne serait-ce que dans son portrait d’un héroïsme conciliant gaiement la guerre à l’objection de conscience –, mais il l’est de manière audacieuse. La simplicité est un trait de personnalité de Doss, qui est présenté de la même manière étrange que les personnages d’Apocalypto, sans abuser des ficelles canoniques de l’identification. Ce côté très entier du personnage est à l’image d’un film qui va jusqu’au bout de son système : au bord du ridicule sans jamais y basculer totalement, portant la violence jusqu’au grotesque et l’héroïsme jusqu’à la sainteté.

Passé par plusieurs années de purgatoire à Hollywood, essentiellement en raison de ses dérapages personnels, Mel Gibson a-t-il choisi à dessein ce sujet ? Difficile de ne pas se poser la question, tant c’est au cœur des visions infernales et des pulsions bellicistes que le cinéaste semble vouloir ménager pour ses héros – et pour lui-même ? – un horizon pacifique.

Voir enfin:
THOU SHALL NOT KILL
He was devoutly Christian, a member of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, and was unusually, unfashionably (even for America, even for the 1940s) tenacious in his beliefs. Unable to reconcile his adherence to the commandment “Thou shalt not kill” with a role as a soldier, but nonetheless patriotic, he was classed as a conscientious objector and joined the army as a medic. Unlike many other medics, he also refused to carry any form of knife or gun, determined that, no matter what situation he found himself in, he would not take the life of another human being. Instead, Doss’s heroism took another form: he is remembered today for the number of lives he saved.
Original estimates places the number of lives saved at 100: Doss (both modest and rigorously honest) later insisted that “it couldn’t have been more than 50”, and the 75 figure was agreed as a compromise.
In some ways, Doss himself – a man who combined staunch religious faith with patriotism and outstanding bravery – feels like the perfect movie subject for both the traditional American heartlands and for Gibson himself, who is Catholic and often described as an ultra-conservative. But Doss’s story is also a very human one, with a much wider importance and appeal.
Whether or not the film will really restore Gibson to awards-ceremony respectability and acclaim remains to be seen – but it looks as if one of America’s most unlikely heroes may have finally received a fitting cinematic tribute.
Desmond Doss was born in Lynchburg, Virginia, son of William Thomas Doss, a carpenter, and Bertha E. (Oliver) Doss. Enlisting voluntarily in April 1942, Doss refused to kill an enemy soldier or carry a weapon (pistol) into combat because of his personal beliefs as a Seventh-day Adventist. He consequently became a medic, and while serving in the Pacific theatre of World War II, he saved the lives of numerous comrades, while at the same time adhering to his religious convictions. Doss was wounded three times during the war, and shortly before leaving the Army, he was diagnosed with tuberculosis, which cost him a lung. Discharged from the Army in 1946, he spent five years undergoing medical treatment for his injuries and illness….

First date: Vous avez dit culte de la personnalité ? (Spot the error: Obama hasn’t even left office, but in supposedly racist America the hagiography has definitely begun)

26 septembre, 2016
soutsidewithyou
obamaplaquekisssugarshack

barryobamaindonesianfilmU.S. President Barack Obama speaks during the dedication of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, U.S., September 24, 2016. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

C’est ça, l’Ouest, monsieur le sénateur:  quand la légende devient réalité, c’est la légende qu’il faut publier. Maxwell Scott  (journaliste dans ‘L’Homme qui tua Liberty Valance’, John Ford, 1962)
We real cool. We Left school. We Lurk late. We Strike straight. We Sing sin. We Thin gin. We Jazz June. We Die soon. Gwendolyn Brooks (1959)
Murders in the U.S. jumped by 10.8% in 2015, according to figures released Monday by the Federal Bureau of Investigation—a sharp increase that could fuel concerns that the nation’s two-decade trend of falling crime rates may be ending. The figures had been expected to show an increase, after preliminary data released earlier this year indicated violent crime and murders were rising. But the double-digit increase in murders dwarfed any in the past 20 years, eclipsing the 3.7% increase in 2005, the year in which the biggest increase occurred before now. In 2014, the FBI recorded violent crime narrowly falling, by 0.2%. In 2015, the number of violent crimes rose 3.9% though the number of property crimes dropped 2.6%, the FBI said. Richard Rosenfeld, a criminologist at the University of Missouri-St.Louis, said a key driver of the murder spike may be an increasing distrust of police in major cities where controversial officer shootings have led to protests. “This rise is concentrated in certain large cities where police-community tensions have been notable,’’ said Mr. Rosenfeld, citing Cleveland, Baltimore, and St. Louis as examples. The rise in killings is not spread evenly around America, he noted, but is rather centered on big cities with large African-American populations. (…) Mr. Rosenfeld said the FBI data suggests the increase in murder may be caused by some version of the “Ferguson effect’’—a term often used by law-enforcement officials to describe what they see as the negative effects of the recent anti-police protests. The killing by a police officer of an unarmed black 18-year-old in Ferguson, Mo., in 2014 led to protests there and around the country. Some law-enforcement officials, including FBI Director James Comey, have argued that since then, some officers may be more reluctant to get out of their patrol cars and engage in the kind of difficult work that reduces street crime, out of fear they may be videotaped and criticized publicly. Mr. Rosenfeld suggested a different dynamic may be at play, though stemming from the same tensions. Members of minority and poor communities may be more reluctant to talk to police and help them solve crimes in cities where officers are viewed as untrustworthy and threatening, he said, particularly where there have been recent controversial killings by police officers. (…) John Pfaff, a professor at Fordham Law School, said the numbers are concerning but that it is too early to draw any definite conclusions from the data, noting that the murder rate in 2015 was still lower than in 2009. “It’s not a giant rollback of things. 2015 is the third-safest year for violent crime since 1970,’’ Mr. Pfaff said. “The last time we saw a jump like this was 1989 to 1990, and that was a much more broad increase in crime.’’ WSJ
Tout ce qu’on sait, c’est qu’on en sait  très peu sur Barack Obama et que ce qu’on sait est très différent de ce qui est allégué. Tous les présidents ont leurs mythographies, mais ils ont également un bilan et des experts  qui peuvent  distinguer les faits  de la fiction. Dans le cas d’Obama, on ne nous a nous jamais donné tous les faits et il y avait peu de gens dans la presse intéressés à les trouver. Comme le dit Maxwell Scott dans L’homme qui a tué Liberty Valance, ‘quand la légende devient fait, c’est la légende qu’il faut imprimer’.  Victor Davis Hanson
Apart from other unprecedented aspects of his rise, it is a geographical truth that no politician in American history has traveled farther than Barack Obama to be within reach of the White House. He was born and spent most of his formative years on Oahu, in distance the most removed population center on the planet, some 2,390 miles from California, farther from a major landmass than anywhere but Easter Island. In the westward impulse of American settlement, his birthplace was the last frontier, an outpost with its own time zone, the 50th of the United States, admitted to the union only two years before Obama came along. Those who come from islands are inevitably shaped by the experience. For Obama, the experience was all contradiction and contrast. As the son of a white woman and a black man, he grew up as a multiracial kid, a « hapa, » « half-and-half » in the local lexicon, in one of the most multiracial places in the world, with no majority group. There were native Hawaiians, Japanese, Filipinos, Samoans, Okinawans, Chinese and Portuguese, along with Anglos, commonly known as haole (pronounced howl-lee), and a smaller population of blacks, traditionally centered at the U.S. military installations. But diversity does not automatically translate into social comfort: Hawaii has its own difficult history of racial and cultural stratification, and young Obama struggled to find his place even in that many-hued milieu. He had to leave the island to find himself as a black man, eventually rooting in Chicago, the antipode of remote Honolulu, deep in the fold of the mainland, and there setting out on the path that led toward politics. Yet life circles back in strange ways, and in essence it is the promise of the place he left behind — the notion if not the reality of Hawaii, what some call the spirit of aloha, the transracial if not post-racial message — that has made his rise possible. Hawaii and Chicago are the two main threads weaving through the cloth of Barack Obama’s life. Each involves more than geography. Hawaii is about the forces that shaped him, and Chicago is about how he reshaped himself. Chicago is about the critical choices he made as an adult: how he learned to survive in the rough-and-tumble of law and politics, how he figured out the secrets of power in a world defined by it, and how he resolved his inner conflicts and refined the subtle, coolly ambitious persona now on view in the presidential election. Hawaii comes first. It is what lies beneath, what makes Chicago possible and understandable. (…) « Dreams From My Father » is as imprecise as it is insightful about Obama’s early life. Obama offers unusually perceptive and subtle observations of himself and the people around him. Yet, as he readily acknowledged, he rearranged the chronology for his literary purposes and presented a cast of characters made up of composites and pseudonyms. This was to protect people’s privacy, he said. Only a select few were not granted that protection, for the obvious reason that he could not blur their identities — his relatives. (…) Keith and Tony Peterson (…) wondered why Obama focused so much on a friend he called Ray, who in fact was Keith Kukagawa. Kukagawa was black and Japanese, and the Petersons did not even think of him as black. Yet in the book, Obama used him as the voice of black anger and angst, the provocateur of hip, vulgar, get-real dialogues. (…) Sixteen years later, Barry was no more, replaced by Barack, who had not only left the island but had gone to two Ivy League schools, Columbia undergrad and Harvard Law, and written a book about his life. He was into his Chicago phase, reshaping himself for his political future … David Maraniss
Nous ne sommes pas un fardeau pour l’Amérique, une tache sur l’Amérique, un objet de honte ou de pitié pour l’Amérique. Nous sommes l’Amérique ! Barack Hussein Obama
Ce n’est pas un musée du crime ou de la culpabilité, c’est un lieu qui raconte le voyage d’un peuple et l’histoire d’une nation. Il n’y a pas de réponses simples à des questions complexes». Lonnie Bunch
Abraham Lincoln was long dead when John Ford polished the presidential halo in the 1939 film “Young Mr. Lincoln.” Mr. Obama hasn’t even left office, but the cinematic hagiography has begun. The NYT
As this primary season has gone along, a strange sensation has come over me: I miss Barack Obama. Now, obviously I disagree with a lot of Obama’s policy decisions. I’ve been disappointed by aspects of his presidency. I hope the next presidency is a philosophic departure. But over the course of this campaign it feels as if there’s been a decline in behavioral standards across the board. Many of the traits of character and leadership that Obama possesses, and that maybe we have taken too much for granted, have suddenly gone missing or are in short supply. The first and most important of these is basic integrity. The Obama administration has been remarkably scandal-free. Think of the way Iran-contra or the Lewinsky scandals swallowed years from Reagan and Clinton. (…) Second, a sense of basic humanity. Donald Trump has spent much of this campaign vowing to block Muslim immigration. You can only say that if you treat Muslim Americans as an abstraction. President Obama, meanwhile, went to a mosque, looked into people’s eyes and gave a wonderful speech reasserting their place as Americans. He’s exuded this basic care and respect for the dignity of others time and time again. (…)  Third, a soundness in his decision-making process. (…) Take health care. (…) President Obama may have been too cautious, especially in the Middle East, but at least he’s able to grasp the reality of the situation. Fourth, grace under pressure. (…) I happen to think overconfidence is one of Obama’s great flaws. But a president has to maintain equipoise under enormous pressure. Obama has done that, especially amid the financial crisis. (…) Fifth, a resilient sense of optimism. To hear Sanders or Trump, Cruz and Ben Carson campaign is to wallow in the pornography of pessimism, to conclude that this country is on the verge of complete collapse. That’s simply not true. We have problems, but they are less serious than those faced by just about any other nation on earth. People are motivated to make wise choices more by hope and opportunity than by fear, cynicism, hatred and despair. Unlike many current candidates, Obama has not appealed to those passions. No, Obama has not been temperamentally perfect. Too often he’s been disdainful, aloof, resentful and insular. But there is a tone of ugliness creeping across the world, as democracies retreat, as tribalism mounts, as suspiciousness and authoritarianism take center stage. Obama radiates an ethos of integrity, humanity, good manners and elegance that I’m beginning to miss, and that I suspect we will all miss a bit, regardless of who replaces him. David Brooks
Le rituel du soir de Barack Obama n’est un secret pour personne : le président des États-Unis est un couche-tard. Ces quelques heures de solitude, entre la fin du dîner et l’heure de dormir, vers 1 heure du matin, sont celles où il réfléchit et se retrouve seul avec lui-même. De menus détails sur sa vie qui sont connus du public depuis plusieurs années.  Alors pourquoi les raconter à nouveau ? pourrait-on demander au New York Times, et son enquête intitulée « Obama après la tombée de la nuit ». Parce que les lecteurs apprécient visiblement ces quelques images de l’intimité d’un président qui quittera bientôt la Maison Blanche. Deux jours après sa publication, l’article est toujours dans le top 10 des plus lus sur le site. Barack Obama a toujours été un pro du storytelling. Tout, dans l’image qu’il donne de lui-même, est précisément contrôlé, y compris les moments de décontraction. Pete Souza, le photographe officiel de la Maison Blanche, en est le meilleur témoin et le meilleur outil. Le professionnel met en avant l’image d’un président plus décontracté, en marge du protocole officiel, proche des enfants, jouant allongé par terre avec un bébé tenu à bout de bras ou autorisant un jeune garçon à lui toucher les cheveux « pour savoir s’ils sont comme les siens ». Dans cet article, c’est encore une fois l’image d’un homme décontracté, mais aussi plus sage et solitaire qu’à l’ordinaire, qui est travaillée. Et d’abord par l’introduction qui compare les habitudes nocturnes de Barack Obama à celle de ses prédécesseurs. « Le président George W. Bush, un lève-tôt, était au lit à dix heures. Le président Bill Clinton se couchait tard comme M. Obama, mais il consacrait du temps à de longues conversations à bâtons rompus avec ses amis et ses alliés politiques. » Là où Bill Clinton appréciait la compagnie jusqu’à tard dans la nuit, Barack Obama choisit la solitude réflexive. Pour enfoncer le clou, l’article cite alors l’historien Doris Kearns Goodwin : « C’est quelqu’un qui est bien seul avec lui-même. » (…) L’huile qui fait tourner les rouages d’un storytelling réussi, ce sont les anecdotes, inoffensives ou amusantes. Ici, on découvre celle des sept amandes que Barack Obama mange le soir. Les amandes montrent que le président a une hygiène de vie impeccable, qu’il n’a besoin de boissons excitantes ou sucrées pour tenir le coup. Et en même temps, le chiffre précis a quelque chose d’insolite, qui donne l’image de quelqu’un d’un peu crispé, qui veut tout contrôler. Mais pas trop. (…) Le portrait de Barack Obama, une fois la nuit tombée, soigne également l’image d’un bourreau de travail, perfectionniste et attaché aux détails. (…) Dans le même temps, il faut entretenir l’image de « Mister Cool » et continuer à travailler sur celle du père de famille. Barack Obama ne fait pas que travailler dans son bureau. Il se tient au courant des résultats sportifs sur ESPN et joue à Words With Friends, un dérivé du Scrabble sur iPad. Le « rituel du coucher » n’a plus vraiment de raison d’être maintenant que ses filles Malia et Sasha ont 18 et 15 ans, mais il reste la « movie night », la soirée cinéma de la famille, tous les vendredis soirs dans le « Family Theater », une salle de projection privée de 40 places. Avec le petit détail qui change tout : Barack et Michelle apprécient les séries ultra-populaires Breaking Bad ou Game of Thrones. Le procédé est efficace, et l’impression générale qui se dégage est celle d’un homme réfléchi, calme, solitaire. Le Monde
George W. Bush avait signé en 2003 la loi créant le Musée national de l’Histoire et de la Culture Afro-Américaines, mais c’est au premier président noir du pays qu’est revenu le privilège de l’inaugurer ce samedi. Outre Barack et Michelle Obama, George W. et Laura Bush les élus du Congrès et les juges de la Cour suprême, quelque 20.000 personnes se sont rassemblées en milieu de journée sur le Mall de Washington, la grande esplanade faisant face au Capitole, au nombre desquelles tout ce que le pays compte de célébrités noires. Oprah Winfrey, qui a donné 20 millions de dollars, a eu droit à une place d’honneur. (…) Au-dessus de lui, le bâtiment de six étages, dessiné par l’architecte britannique d’origine tanzanienne David Adjaye, se dresse comme une couronne africaine de bronze face au Washington Monument (l’obélisque érigé en hommage au premier président des Etats-Unis), à l’endroit même où, il y a deux siècles, se tenait un marché aux esclaves. Son matériau, inspirée des textiles d’Afrique de l’Ouest, laisse passer la lumière et rougeoie au soleil couchant, créant une impression massive de l’extérieur et aérienne de l’intérieur. Il a fallu treize ans et 540 millions de dollars pour bâtir le dix-neuvième musée de la Smithsonian Institution et y rassembler plus de 35.000 témoignages de l’histoire des Afro-Américains, dont aucun aspect n’est occulté: ni la traite des esclaves, ni la ségrégation, ni la lutte pour les droits civiques, ni les réussites contemporaines, du sport au hip-hop et à la politique. La présidence de Barack Obama y est documentée dans l’un des 27 espaces d’exposition, non loin de la Cadillac de Chuck Berry ou des chaussures de piste de Jessie Owens. Mais le visiteur est d’abord invité à passer devant les chaînes, les fouets, les huttes misérables des esclaves, les photos de dos lacérés ou de lynchages (3437 Noirs pendus entre 1882 et 1851), ou encore le cercueil d’Emmett Till, tué à l’âge de 14 ans dans le Mississippi pour avoir sifflé une femme blanche en 1955. «Ce n’est pas un musée du crime ou de la culpabilité, insiste son directeur, Lonnie Bunch, c’est un lieu qui raconte le voyage d’un peuple et l’histoire d’une nation. Il n’y a pas de réponses simples à des questions complexes». Au moment où les marches de la communauté noire se répandent dans le pays pour protester contre les violences policières, Barack Obama a invité Donald Trump à visiter le Musée de l’Histoire et de la Culture Afro-Américaine. Le candidat républicain à sa succession a déclaré que les Noirs vivaient aujourd’hui «dans les pires conditions qu’ils aient jamais connues». Dans une interview vendredi à la chaîne ABC, le président a répliqué: «Je crois qu’un enfant de 8 ans est au courant que l’esclavage n’était pas très bon pour les Noirs et que l’ère Jim Crow (les lois ségrégationnistes, Ndlr) n’était pas très bonne pour les Noirs». Au moment où les marches de la communauté noire se répandent dans le pays pour protester contre les violences policières, Barack Obama a invité Donald Trump à visiter le Musée de l’Histoire et de la Culture Afro-Américaine. Le candidat républicain à sa succession a déclaré que les Noirs vivaient aujourd’hui «dans les pires conditions qu’ils aient jamais connues». Dans une interview vendredi à la chaîne ABC, le président a répliqué: «Je crois qu’un enfant de 8 ans est au courant que l’esclavage n’était pas très bon pour les Noirs et que l’ère Jim Crow (les lois ségrégationnistes, Ndlr) n’était pas très bonne pour les Noirs». Le Figaro
A young Jack Kennedy leads his shipwrecked crew to safety on a deserted island, dragging an injured sailor as he swims. A middle-aged FDR is struck down by polio, then fights to recover his ability to walk in order to step back onto the political stage. An up-and-coming Abraham Lincoln, new to the legal profession, stops a lynch mob from killing two young men suspected of murder, then successfully defends them in court. A young Barack Obama, interning at a corporate law firm, convinces his supervisor to go on a date. They kiss. One of these things is not like the others. The vast majority of presidential movies focus on presidents being presidents, sitting at the head of state, living arguably the most consequential moments of their lives. A man with the power and responsibility of the highest office in the country is instantly interesting, whether that’s JFK with the Cuban missile crisis, Lincoln on the eve of the Civil War, Nixon authorizing break-ins at the Watergate, or that famous speech President Bill Pullman gives toward the end of Independence Day. It’s easy for a president to get turned into a figure of high drama, a hero or villain of our national narrative.But when a film dips into a president’s pre-presidential years, there’s more than just a good story going on. In fact, only a handful of presidential films have ignored a president’s years in the Oval Office entirely: PT-109 (the JFK war movie), Sunrise at Campobello (FDR’s recovery drama), Young Mr. Lincoln (on Lincoln’s… yes, younger years), and now Southside With You, the new movie about Barack and Michelle Obama’s first date in Chicago in 1991.  Iwan Morgan, editor of Presidents in the Movies and professor of U.S. Studies and American History at University College London, explained over email that both JFK’s and FDR’s early biopics “deal with pre-presidential triumph over adversity to emphasize their suitability to lead in office, rather than celebrating their leadership in office.” Morgan added that John Ford, director of Young Mr. Lincoln, “focuses on the pre-heroic Lincoln to explore his formative influences and preparation for greatness.” The whole point of making a presidential prequel is to show the pattern of the POTUS-to-be. So what does Southside with You show us? The film follows the Obamas through a fictionalized version of their famous first date, whose end is already memorialized by a plaque in front of a Hyde Park Baskin-Robbins — inscribed with this quote from a 2007 O, The Oprah Magazine interview with Barack: “On our first date, I treated her to the finest ice cream Baskin-Robbins had to offer, our dinner table doubling as the curb. I kissed her, and it tasted like chocolate.”However sweet the ending, the day didn’t begin as a date, at least in Southside’s telling. Barack is a broke summer associate at a corporate law firm; Michelle, his supervisor. He knows she thinks dating within the office is a bad look (and it is), so he asks her out to a community activist meeting at the Gardens — a housing project on Chicago’s South Side — and he fudges the timing a little so they’ll have an opportunity to hang beforehand. They take a trip to the Art Institute of Chicago, where Barack recites the Gwendolyn Brooks poem “We Real Cool” from memory in front of an Ernie Barnes painting, then meander around a public park, trading political opinions and biographical details. (…) Within the context of the rom-com, this makes for sweet (if somewhat boring) viewing. A first date is all about potential, but we know how this particular love story ends. The Obamas are paragons of the modern married couple; Barack’s promise as a potential partner paid off. But (…) in spite of itself, this plays right to the most persistent criticisms of the Obama presidency, and to the greatest fears of his supporters: that Obama never moved beyond his perceived potential from the 2008 election, and was never able to deliver much more than a solid speech. Dargis called the film a “cinematic hagiography” in the Times, but to borrow another Christian term of art, it’s closer to a piece of apologetics. Instead of a miracle story of a hero’s precocious powers, it presents an argument against his critics, a character study by way of excuse. In Southside, the young Obama doesn’t demonstrate his future leadership ability as much as his ability to convince you of his future leadership ability. Which is, ironically, what many of his strongest critics say about his presidency. That it was — and remained, throughout his eight years in office — about possibility. Southside tells us that, if it wasn’t for the system, Obama could have accomplished more, and despite it all, did an admirable job of keeping his head up. It urges us to believe what we already know: that he’s a cool guy in private, even if he keeps calling for drone strikes and deporting more people  — that’s just playing to the white couple at the movie theater, the conservative crowd. It argues, ice cream cone in hand, that Obama would have made a truly great president, if he had just been given the chance. Sam Dean
The writer and director Richard Tanne’s first feature, “Southside with You,” which will be released next Friday, is an opening act of superb audacity, a self-imposed challenge so mighty that it might seem, on paper, to be a stunt. It’s a drama about Barack Obama and Michelle Robinson’s first date, in Chicago, in the summer of 1989. It stars Parker Sawyers as the twenty-eight-year-old Barack, a Harvard Law student and summer associate at a Chicago law firm, and Tika Sumpter (who also co-produced the film) as the twenty-five-year-old Michelle, a Harvard Law graduate and a second-year associate at the same firm. The results don’t resemble a stunt; far from it. “Southside with You,” running a brisk hour and twenty minutes, is a fully realized, intricately imagined, warmhearted, sharp-witted, and perceptive drama, one that sticks close to its protagonists while resonating quietly but grandly with the sweep of a historical epic. Tanne tells the story of the First Couple’s first date with a tightly constrained time frame—one day’s and evening’s worth of action—that begins with the protagonists preparing for their rendezvous and ends with them back at their homes. In between, Tanne pulls off a near-miracle, conveying these historic figures’ depth and complexity of character without making them grandiose. The dialogue is freewheeling and intimate, ranging through subjects far from the matters at hand, suggesting enormous intellect and enormous promise without seeming cut-and-pasted from speeches or memoirs. The film exudes Tanne’s own sense of calm excitement, nearly a documentarian’s serendipitous thrill at being present to catch on-camera a secret miracle of mighty historical import. Movies about public figures—ones whose appearance, diction, and gestures are deeply ingrained in the minds of most likely viewers—must confront the Scylla of impersonation and the Charybdis of unfaithfulness. Tanne’s extraordinary actors thread that strait nimbly, delivering performances that exist on their own but feel true to the characters, that spin with dialectical delight and embody the ardors, ambitions, and uncertainties that even the most able and aware young adults must face. (…) Tanne achieves something that few other directors—whether of independent or Hollywood or art-house films—ever do: he creates characters with an ample sense of memory, who fully inhabit their life prior to their time onscreen, and who have a wide range of cultural references and surging ideas that leap spontaneously into their conversation. A scene in which Michelle and Barack visit an exhibit of Afrocentric art—he discusses the importance of the painter Ernie Barnes to the sitcom “Good Times,” and together they recall Gwendolyn Brooks’s poem “We Real Cool”—has an effortless grace that reflects an unusual cinematic depth of lived experience. The centerpiece of the film is a splendid bit of romantic and principled performance art on the part of Barack. He plans the non-date date around a community meeting in a mainly black neighborhood that Michelle—who did pro-bono work at Harvard and who admits to frustration with her trademark-law work at the firm—is eager to attend. There, Barack, who had been active with the organization before heading to Harvard, is received like a prodigal son. The subject of the meeting is the legislature’s refusal to build a much-needed community center; frustration among the attendees mounts, until Barack addresses them and offers some brilliant practical suggestions to overcome the opposition. At the meeting, he displays, above all, his gifts for public speaking and, even more, for empathy. He reveals, to the community group but also to Michelle, a preternatural genius at grasping interests and motives, at seeking common cause, and at recognizing—and acting upon—the human factor. There, Barack also displays a personal philosophy of practical politics that’s tied to his larger reflections on American history and political theory. The intellectual passion that Tanne builds into the scene, and that Sawyers delivers with nuanced fervor, is all the more striking and exquisite for its subtle positioning as a device of romantic seduction. Michelle’s sense of principled responsibility and groundedness, her worldly maturity and practical insight, is matched by Barack’s ardent but callow, mighty but still-unfocussed energies. The movie’s ring of authenticity carried me through from start to finish without inviting my speculations as to the historical veracity of the events. Curiosity eventually kicked in, though; most accounts of the first date suggest that its general contours involved Michelle’s reluctance to date a colleague who was also a subordinate, the visit to the Art Institute, a walk, a drink, and a viewing of the recently released film “Do the Right Thing.” The community meeting is usually described as occurring at another occasion, yet it fits into the first date with a verisimilitude as well as an emotional impact that justify the dramatization. As for their viewing of Spike Lee’s movie, the scene that Tanne derives from it is a minor masterwork of ironic psychology and mother wit. It’s too good to spoil; suffice it to say that the scene is set against the backdrop of controversy that greeted Lee’s film at the time of its release, with some critics—white critics—fearing that the climactic act of violence (meaning not the police killing of Radio Raheem but Mookie’s throwing a garbage can through the window of Sal’s Pizzeria and leading his neighbors to ransack the venue) would incite riots. “Southside with You” is the sort of movie that, say, Richard Linklater’s three “Before” movies aren’t—an intimate story that has a reach far greater than its scale, that has stakes and substance extending beyond the couple’s immediate fortunes. There’s a noble historical precedent for Tanne’s film. If the modern cinema was inspired by Roberto Rossellini’s “Voyage to Italy,” from 1954—which taught a handful of ambitious young French critics that all they needed to make a movie was two actors and a car, that they could make a low-budget and small-scale production that would be rich in cinematic ideas and romantic passion alike—then “Southside with You” is an exemplary work of cinematic modernity. Rossellini, a cinematic philosopher, ranges far through history and politics to ground a couple’s intimate disasters in the deep currents of modern life. Tanne does this, too, and goes one step further; his inspiration is reminiscent of the advice that the nineteen-year-old critic Jean-Luc Godard gave to his cinematic elders, “unhappy filmmakers of France who lack scenarios.” Godard advised them to make films about “the tax system,” about the writer and Nazi collaborator Philippe Henriot, about the Resistance activist Danielle Casanova. Tanne picks a great subject of contemporary history and politics—indeed, one of the very greatest—and approaches it without the pomp and bombast of ostensibly important, message-mongering Oscarizables. He realizes Barack Obama and Michelle Robinson onscreen with the same meticulous, thoughtful, inventive imagination that other directors might bring to figures of legend, people they know, or their own lives. “Southside with You” is a virtuosic realization of history on the wing, of the lives of others incarnated as firsthand experience. To tell this story is a nearly impossible challenge, and Tanne meets it at its high level. The New Yorker
Like “Before Sunrise,” a film which invites comparison, “Southside with You” is a two-hander that’s top-heavy with dialogue, walking and a knowing sense of location. Unlike that film, however, we already know the ending before the lights go down in the theater. So, writer/director Richard Tanne replaces the suspenseful pull of “will they or won’t they?” with an equally compelling and understated character study that humanizes his larger-than-life public figures. Tanne reminds us that, before ascending to the most powerful office in the world, Barack and Michelle were just two regular people who started out somewhere much smaller. This down-to-earth approach works surprisingly well because “Southside with You” never loses sight of the primary tenet of a great romantic comedy: All you need is two people whom the audience wants to see get together—then you put them together. So many entries in this genre fail miserably because the filmmakers feel compelled to overcomplicate matters with useless subplots and extraneous characters; they mistake cacophony for complexity. “Southside with You” builds its emotional richness by coasting on the charisma of its two leads as they carefully navigate each other’s personality quirks and life stories. We may be ahead of them in terms of knowing the outcome, but we’re simultaneously learning the details. “Southside with You” is at once a love song to the city of Chicago and its denizens, an unmistakably Black romance and a gentle, universal comedy. It is unapologetic about all three of these elements, and interweaves them in such a subtle fashion that they become more pronounced only upon later reflection. The Chicago affection manifests itself not only in a scene where, in front of a small group of community activists welcoming back their favorite son, Barack demonstrates a rough version of the speechmaking ability that will later become his trademark, but also when Barack takes Michelle to an art gallery. He points out that the Ernie Barnes paintings they’re viewing were used on the Chicago-set sitcom “Good Times.” Then the duo recite Chicago native Gwendolyn Brooks’ poem about the pool players at the Golden Shovel, « We Real Cool. » Even the beloved founder of this site, Roger Ebert, gets a shout-out for championing “Do the Right Thing, » the movie Barack and Michelle attend in the closing hours of their date. Though its depiction of romance is recognizable to anyone who has ever gone on a successful first date, “Southside with You” also takes time to address the concerns Michelle has with dating her co-worker, especially since she’s his superior and the only Black woman in the office. The optics of this pairing worries her in ways that hint at the corporate sexism that existed back in 1989, and continues in some fashion today. Her concern is that her superiors might think she threw herself at the only other Black employee which, based on my own personal workplace experience, I found completely relatable. This plotline has traction, culminating in a fictional though very effective climactic scene between Barack, Michelle and their boss. It’s a bit overdramatic, but the payoff is a lovely ice cream-based reconciliation that may do for Baskin-Robbins what Beyoncé’s “Formation” did for Red Lobster. Odie Henderson
Such hagiography of our chief executives is not unheard of, but it’s also less common than you might think. The complicated portraits of presidents painted by Oliver Stone in Nixon (1995) and W. (2008)—sympathetic, to a point, but unsparing and occasionally unfair—are far more interesting than the offering to Obama’s cult of personality that Southside With You represents. John Ford’s Young Mr. Lincoln (1939) and Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln (2012) are perhaps the two most impressive examples of pure homage to the presidency. Young Mr. Lincoln in particular is a deft piece of filmmaking—as the booklet that comes with the Criterion Collection’s edition of the film notes, the legendary Soviet director Sergei Eisenstein once wrote that if he could lay claim to any American film, it would have been this one—which culminates in as powerful a sequence as any in film history. Honest Abe (Henry Fonda) has defended two brothers from a wrongful murder charge—first saving them from a lynch mob and then proving their innocence in court—and seen the grateful family off. A friend asks if he wants to come back to town. “No, I think I might go on a piece. Maybe to the top of that hill,” Lincoln replies, striding off into the sunset. As he crests the ridge and as the Battle Hymn of the Republic plays, the sky cracks and rain pours forth. He pushes on, into the rain, the lightning, the thunder. It’s a storm Lincoln will have to face alone, a storm similar to the one the nation faced when the film was produced in 1939. It’s not a subtle image, particularly, but it does hold up through the decades, a simple and powerful picture of a man with the weight of a nation on his shoulders. In its own way, the closing moments of Southside With You are also affecting. Barack Obama sits in a chair, smoking a cigarette, a book on his lap. He smiles, thinking of himself and his date. The storm clouds gather again—mass murder in Syria; a destabilized Middle East; a resurgent China and Russia—but you wouldn’t know it from the placid look on the future chief executive’s face. He is detached, concerned with his own affairs, his own place in the world. If that’s the impression Tanne was going for, well, to quote another president: Mission Accomplished. Free Beacon
In a highly effective move, the will they/won’t they drama of Southside with You climaxes with an incident that very much did happen in real life—kinda. Hitting the movies to check out Spike Lee’s controversial new joint Do The Right Thing, the pair find themselves face to face with Michelle’s nightmare: a senior white partner from their law firm, who’s also come to check out the movie. Like Southside’s brief mention of Obama’s white girlfriend at Columbia, the name of the real partner is changed onscreen. “Avery” and his wife Laura were really lawyer Newton Minow and his wife Jo, who ran into the future Mr. and Mrs. Obama at the movies. (…) Unfortunately, the film uses him for its own dramatic purposes: to play up the racial and cultural frictions that theoretically gave Barack and Michelle common ground as two of the only African-Americans at the office, and to justify Movie Michelle’s fears that the older white men of Sidley Austin might lose respect for her as an attorney in her own right if she started dating Barack. Those racially-charged frustrations, portrayed purposefully onscreen by Sumpter, have not been expressed much by the real Michelle and Barack in interviews about their romance. Daily Beast
Pas un soupçon d’intérêt historique (ou autre), tant cette romance cui-cui/cucul baigne dans l’eau de rose. Voici
Après avoir longtemps hésité, Michelle Robinson, associée dans un cabinet juridique, accepte finalement une invitation à sortir de Barack Obama, le stagiaire prometteur engagé pour l’été. Comme la jeune femme ne souhaite pas que leur soirée ressemble à un rendez-vous amoureux traditionnel, il décide d’emmener sa supérieure se promener dans différents endroits du Chicago de la fin des années 1980. Il espère profiter de ces moments informels pour apprendre à mieux la connaître. Durant leur balade, ils visitent l’institut d’art de la ville, où ils évoquent ensemble leur amour pour la poésie de Gwendolyn Brooks ou pour la peinture d’Ernie Barnes. Télérama
Un jour de 1989, une avocate, Michelle, se fait inviter par un stagiaire prénommé Barack… On espère que le premier rendez-vous du futur président des Etats-Unis avec son épouse a été moins ennuyeux et moins pompeux que celui de leurs personnages sur l’écran. On en est même sûr. Sinon, ils se seraient quittés le soir même pour ne plus jamais se revoir…  Pierre Murat
La machine hagiographique hollywoodienne n’a pas attendu le terme du second mandat de Barack Obama pour embaumer le 44e président des Etats-Unis dans sa propre légende. Pour cela, First Date n’emprunte pas les voies traditionnelles du biopic (biographie filmée), mais d’une comédie romantique se déroulant sur une seule journée : celle de 1989 où la future « First Lady » Michelle, alors jeune avocate à Chicago, tombe amoureuse du stagiaire de sa firme, l’humble, pondéré, clairvoyant, attentionné, plébiscité et prometteur Barack. Constitué d’une longue conversation entre les deux personnages, au gré des endroits qu’ils visitent, le film insiste sur leur élégance simple, leur aisance naturelle et la perfection de leur pedigree. Comme dans beaucoup de fictions américaines, la séduction se passe un peu comme un entretien d’embauche, où il s’agit moins de décocher les flèches de Cupidon que de cocher les cases d’un CV imaginaire rempli de bienséance et de respectabilité. Les dialogues en profitent pour énumérer les états de service, éléments biographiques et souvenirs officiels des personnages, en somme tout ce qu’il faut savoir des locataires de la Maison Blanche, à la façon d’une notice Wikipédia. Le tout est enrobé par la mise en scène dans un environnement lisse, soyeux, confortable, soigneusement aseptisé par les lumières douces et les couleurs pastel d’un climat ensoleillé. Les scènes se suivent sans remous : l’une au musée pour nous montrer que Barack est cultivé, l’autre dans sa paroisse de quartier pour prouver sa dévotion à la communauté et ses talents d’orateur, une autre encore au cinéma, devant Do the Right Thing, de Spike Lee, pour marquer son acuité de conscience. (…) Les armes émollientes de la comédie romantique contribuent à déréaliser ces figures politiques, pour en faire de petites marionnettes telles qu’en rêverait une parfaite midinette. Ce qui en dit long sur la manière dont on considère l’électeur démocrate dans les officines du cinéma indépendant. Le Monde
Déjà ? Cinq mois avant leur départ de la Maison Blanche, Michelle et Barack Obama sont les héros d’un biopic qui retrace leur rencontre et leur histoire d’amour. (…) Un autre film, Barry, sur les années new-yorkaises du futur président, alors étudiant à l’université Columbia, sera présenté à la mi-septembre au Festival de Toronto (Ontario, Canada). Sans attendre que l’Amérique tourne la page avec l’élection présidentielle du 8 novembre, la légende cinématographique des Obama se construit déjà. L’histoire de la rencontre entre Barack et Michelle à Chicago (Illinois) est connue. Elle a été racontée par les intéressés eux-mêmes. C’était l’été 1989, en pleine canicule. Michelle Robinson, 25 ans, était avocate associée au cabinet juridique Sidley Austin, un début de carrière brillant pour cette fille d’employé municipal du « South Side », le quartier noir de la ville. Le stagiaire qui venait de lui être assigné pour l’été portait ce drôle de nom, Barack Obama. A 28 ans, il arrivait comme elle de la prestigieuse faculté de droit de Harvard. Michelle était assez sceptique – et caustique – sur les hommes. Dans un cabinet uniformément blanc, elle n’allait pas compromettre sa position en sortant avec le premier stagiaire venu. Barack a dû déployer tout son charme et quelques ruses pour la conquérir. (…) Dans le film, le récit est fidèle à la réalité, à quelques raccourcis près : c’est plus tard, et non le premier jour, que Barack a emmené sa « boss » à la réunion communautaire où il lui a fait la démonstration de ses talents politiques. Mais c’est effectivement devant le glacier Baskin-Robbins de Hyde Park qu’a été échangé ce jour-là le premier baiser (« Je l’ai embrassée et ça avait un goût de chocolat », a-t-il raconté à l’animatrice Oprah Winfrey). Depuis 2012, dans la cité de l’Illinois, une plaque commémore le « first kiss » au coin de Dorchester Avenue et de la 53e Rue. Du jamais vu dans la classe politique. (…) Pour les Noirs, qui ont peu de role models (« figures modèles ») dans les représentations cinématographiques, la vision d’un couple uni et d’une famille « ordinaire » est une bénédiction. Tika Sumpter arrive à peine à l’épaule de « Barack », alors que la First Lady mesure 1,80 m. Mais le film est un hommage à un couple qui a réussi à faire entrer toute la gamme du « cool » à la Maison Blanche. (…) Avec le Barry de Vikram Gandhi, ce sont les années pré-Michelle que les spectateurs vont pouvoir découvrir. 1981, une année torturée. Barack (Devon Terrell), qui se fait encore appeler Barry, est à la recherche d’une famille et d’une identité. Sa girlfriend de l’époque est une Blanche, Genevieve Cook (jouée par Anya Taylor-Joy), la fille d’un diplomate australien. Leur relation est compliquée par les incompréhensions raciales… Aujourd’hui, le président américain a encore cinq mois devant lui ; la date de passation de pouvoir est fixée au 20 janvier par la Constitution. Il y aura un dernier sommet du G20 en Asie, un dernier discours aux Nations unies (ONU), une dernière dinde graciée pour Thanksgiving. Mais la nostalgie a déjà envahi l’Amérique. Obama n’a jamais été aussi populaire. Depuis février, il dépasse les 50 % d’opinions favorables, ce qui ne lui était plus arrivé depuis l’hiver 2013. Le Monde magazine

Cherchez l’erreur !

Plaque commémorant le « first kiss » présidentiel,  sortie de pas moins – sans compter une comédie sur son enfance indonésienne – de deux films de Hollywood six mois avant la fin du deuxième mandat du président, articles du New York Times célébrant le coucher présidentiel ou se lamentant de son départ, sondages pour une fin de 2e mandat stratosphériques …

A l’heure où, si l’on en croit nos petits écrans et nos unes de journaux, certaines rues américaines, victimes du racisme policier sont à feu et à sang …

Et que comme pour l’élimination de Ben Laden, c’est au messie noir de la Maison Blanche que revient le mérite de l’ouverture du musée des horreurs du racisme américain dont le président Bush avait signé l’ordre de construction en 2003 …

Comment ne pas être émerveillé …

Entre les panégyriques de Hollywood et les dithyrambes du New Yort Times ou de Youtube …

Alors que suite à l’indécision ou aux décisions catastrophiques voire à l’aveuglement du soi-disant chef du Monde libre face à la menace islamiste …

Le Moyen-Orient comme certaines de nos rues à l’occasion sont elles réellement à feu et à sang …

De l’incroyable capacité de storytelling du premier président américain noir et plus rapide prix Nobel de l’histoire

Comme de la non moins incroyable capacité d‘aveuglement volontaire de ceux qui sont censés nous informer ?

« First Date » : quand Michelle rencontre Barack

Mathieu Macheret

Le Monde

30.08.2016

L’avis du « Monde » – on peut éviter

La machine hagiographique hollywoodienne n’a pas attendu le terme du second mandat de Barack Obama pour embaumer le 44e président des Etats-Unis dans sa propre légende. Pour cela, First Date n’emprunte pas les voies traditionnelles du biopic (biographie filmée), mais d’une comédie romantique se déroulant sur une seule journée : celle de 1989 où la future « First Lady » Michelle, alors jeune avocate à Chicago, tombe amoureuse du stagiaire de sa firme, l’humble, pondéré, clairvoyant, attentionné, plébiscité et prometteur Barack.

Comme dans beaucoup de fictions américaines, la séduction se passe un peu comme un entretien d’embauche

Constitué d’une longue conversation entre les deux personnages, au gré des endroits qu’ils visitent, le film insiste sur leur élégance simple, leur aisance naturelle et la perfection de leur pedigree. Comme dans beaucoup de fictions américaines, la séduction se passe un peu comme un entretien d’embauche, où il s’agit moins de décocher les flèches de Cupidon que de cocher les cases d’un CV imaginaire rempli de bienséance et de respectabilité. Les dialogues en profitent pour énumérer les états de service, éléments biographiques et souvenirs officiels des personnages, en somme tout ce qu’il faut savoir des locataires de la Maison Blanche, à la façon d’une notice Wikipédia.

Un environnement aseptisé

Le tout est enrobé par la mise en scène dans un environnement lisse, soyeux, confortable, soigneusement aseptisé par les lumières douces et les couleurs pastel d’un climat ensoleillé. Les scènes se suivent sans remous : l’une au musée pour nous montrer que Barack est cultivé, l’autre dans sa paroisse de quartier pour prouver sa dévotion à la communauté et ses talents d’orateur, une autre encore au cinéma, devant Do the Right Thing, de Spike Lee, pour marquer son acuité de conscience.

En fait, tout se passe comme si c’était moins Michelle qu’il devait séduire, que le spectateur. Les armes émollientes de la comédie romantique contribuent à déréaliser ces figures politiques, pour en faire de petites marionnettes telles qu’en rêverait une parfaite midinette. Ce qui en dit long sur la manière dont on considère l’électeur démocrate dans les officines du cinéma indépendant.

Film américain de Richard Tanne avec Parker Sawyers, Tika Sumpter, Vanessa Bell Calloway, Phillip Edward Van Lear (1 h 21).

Voir également:

Les Obama, vrais héros de cinéma

Corine Lesnes (San Francisco, correspondante)

M le magazine du Monde

26.08.2016

« First Date » relate la rencontre, en 1989, entre Michelle Robinson, avocate à Chicago, et son stagiaire Barack Obama.

Déjà ? Cinq mois avant leur départ de la Maison Blanche, Michelle et Barack Obama sont les héros d’un biopic qui retrace leur rencontre et leur histoire d’amour. Sorti le 26 août aux Etats-Unis, Southside with You est attendu sur les écrans français le 31 août sous le titre de First Date (« premier rendez-vous »).

Un autre film, Barry, sur les années new-yorkaises du futur président, alors étudiant à l’université Columbia, sera présenté à la mi-septembre au Festival de Toronto (Ontario, Canada). Sans attendre que l’Amérique tourne la page avec l’élection présidentielle du 8 novembre, la légende cinématographique des Obama se construit déjà.

L’histoire de la rencontre entre Barack et Michelle à Chicago (Illinois) est connue. Elle a été racontée par les intéressés eux-mêmes. C’était l’été 1989, en pleine canicule. Michelle Robinson, 25 ans, était avocate associée au cabinet juridique Sidley Austin, un début de carrière brillant pour cette fille d’employé municipal du « South Side », le quartier noir de la ville. Le stagiaire qui venait de lui être assigné pour l’été portait ce drôle de nom, Barack Obama.

Comment séduire la sceptique Michelle

A 28 ans, il arrivait comme elle de la prestigieuse faculté de droit de Harvard. Michelle était assez sceptique – et caustique – sur les hommes. Dans un cabinet uniformément blanc, elle n’allait pas compromettre sa position en sortant avec le premier stagiaire venu. Barack a dû déployer tout son charme et quelques ruses pour la conquérir.

« Ce n’est pas un rendez-vous amoureux », ne cessait de répéter Michelle à propos de leur premier après-midi ensemble (visite à l’Art Institute de Chicago et film de Spike Lee). Dans le film, le récit est fidèle à la réalité, à quelques raccourcis près : c’est plus tard, et non le premier jour, que Barack a emmené sa « boss » à la réunion communautaire où il lui a fait la démonstration de ses talents politiques.

Mais c’est effectivement devant le glacier Baskin-Robbins de Hyde Park qu’a été échangé ce jour-là le premier baiser (« Je l’ai embrassée et ça avait un goût de chocolat », a-t-il raconté à l’animatrice Oprah Winfrey). Depuis 2012, dans la cité de l’Illinois, une plaque commémore le « first kiss » au coin de Dorchester Avenue et de la 53e Rue.

Une famille modèle pour la communauté noire

Du jamais vu dans la classe politique. Il est vrai que, dans l’univers très « House of Cards » de Washington, les Obama détonnent. Après sept ans d’exercice du pouvoir, ils ont réussi à échapper aux scandales et ils continuent à afficher une image de complicité. Pour les Noirs, qui ont peu de role models (« figures modèles ») dans les représentations cinématographiques, la vision d’un couple uni et d’une famille « ordinaire » est une bénédiction.

Réalisé par Richard Tanne en dix-sept jours, avec un budget modeste, et produit par le chanteur et compositeur John Legend, un ami des Obama, Southside with You a emballé le Festival de Sundance (Utah) au début de l’année. Pourtant, les deux acteurs – Parker Sawyers, un quasi-inconnu, dans le rôle du futur président et Tika Sumpter (ex- « Gossip Girl »), dans celui de la brillante avocate – n’ont pas le swag (la classe) de Barack et Michelle Obama.

Ni même l’allure. Tika Sumpter arrive à peine à l’épaule de « Barack », alors que la First Lady mesure 1,80 m. Mais le film est un hommage à un couple qui a réussi à faire entrer toute la gamme du « cool » à la Maison Blanche. « On sait où ils sont arrivés, commente John Legend. C’est génial de voir où ils ont commencé. »

Regain d’amour pour le président sortant

Avec le Barry de Vikram Gandhi, ce sont les années pré-Michelle que les spectateurs vont pouvoir découvrir. 1981, une année torturée. Barack (Devon Terrell), qui se fait encore appeler Barry, est à la recherche d’une famille et d’une identité. Sa girlfriend de l’époque est une Blanche, Genevieve Cook (jouée par Anya Taylor-Joy), la fille d’un diplomate australien. Leur relation est compliquée par les incompréhensions raciales…

Aujourd’hui, le président américain a encore cinq mois devant lui ; la date de passation de pouvoir est fixée au 20 janvier par la Constitution. Il y aura un dernier sommet du G20 en Asie, un dernier discours aux Nations unies (ONU), une dernière dinde graciée pour Thanksgiving. Mais la nostalgie a déjà envahi l’Amérique. Obama n’a jamais été aussi populaire.

Depuis février, il dépasse les 50 % d’opinions favorables, ce qui ne lui était plus arrivé depuis l’hiver 2013. « Obama me manque », écrivait au début des primaires le chroniqueur républicain David Brooks dans le New York Times.

L’intéressé en joue lui-même. Lors du dernier dîner des correspondants à la Maison Blanche, début mai, il a été introduit sur la chanson phare de la comédie musicale Pitch Perfect : « Je vous manquerai quand je serai parti. »

Voir encore:

Movies

Review: In an Obama Biopic, the Audacity of Hagiography?

Southside With You

  • Directed by Richard Tanne
  • Biography, Drama, Romance
  • PG-13
  • 1h 24m

“Something else is pulling at me,” the gangly young man with the jug ears says. “I wonder if I can write books or hold a position of influence in civil rights,” he adds. “Politics?” the pretty young woman asks. He shrugs. “Maybe.”

At that point in the romantic idyll “Southside With You,” these two conversationalists are well into one of those intimate walk-and-talks future lovers sometimes share, the kind in which day turns into night and night sometimes turns into the next day (and the day after that). As they amble through one Chicago neighborhood after another — pausing here, driving there — they also meander down their memory lanes. He’s from Hawaii and Indonesia. She’s from Chicago, the South Side. He’s going to Harvard Law. She’s been there, done that, and is now practicing law. You see where this is going.

Sweet, slight and thuddingly sincere, “Southside With You” is a fictional re-creation of Barack and Michelle Obama’s first date. It’s a curious conceit for a movie less because as dates go this one is pretty low key but because the writer-director Richard Tanne mistakes faithfulness for truthfulness. He’s obviously interested in the Obamas, but he’s so cautious and worshipful that there’s nothing here to discover, only characters to admire. Every so often, you catch a glimpse of two people seeing each other as if for the first time; mostly, though, the movie just sets a course for the White House. “You definitely have a knack for making speeches,” Michelle says. Yes he does (can).

The story opens with Michelle (Tika Sumpter) talking about Barack (Parker Sawyers) to her parents (“Barack o-what-a?” says dad), while he tells his grandmother about Michelle. She’s his adviser at the firm where he’s a summer associate. Barack digs her; Michelle thinks their dating would be inappropriate. Still, he perseveres with gentle confidence, chipping away at her defenses with searching disquisitions, a park-bench lunch and a visit to an art show, where this stealth-seducer recites lines from Gwendolyn Brooks’s short poem “We Real Cool,” an ominous, disconcerting pre-mortem of some young men shooting pool that closes with the words “We die soon.”

Like Michelle and Barack’s journey through Chicago, the poem raises a cluster of ideas — literary, political, philosophical — about Barack, suggesting where he’s at and where he’s going. Mr. Tanne has clearly made a close study of his real-life inspirations, yet his movie is soon hostage to the couple’s history. His characters feel on loan and, despite his actors, eventually make for dull company because too many lines and details serve the great-man-to-be story rather than the romance. At the art show, when Barack explains that the painter Ernie Barnes did the canvases featured in the sitcom “Good Times,” it isn’t just a guy trying to impress a date; it’s a setup for another big moment.

Ms. Sumpter’s enunciation has a near-metonymic precision suggestive of Mrs. Obama’s, while Mr. Sawyers’s gestural looseness, playful smile and lanky saunter will be familiar. Mr. Sawyers has the better, more satisfying role, partly because of who he plays, though also because Barack is more complex and vulnerable. He is the one with the thorny father issues who is trying to win over the girl (the audience, the nation). He’s hard to resist even if, by the time he takes Michelle to a community meeting in a housing project — where the aspirations of the family in “Good Times” meet their real-world counterpart — his words sound like footnotes in a political biography.

Mr. Obama wrote one such book, “The Audacity of Hope,” in which he describes this first date in a scene that’s echoed in the movie. “I asked if I could kiss her,” Mr. Obama writes, before cutting loose his smooth operator: “It tasted of chocolate.” It’s no surprise that Mr. Obama is a better writer than Mr. Tanne and has a stronger sense of drama. But it’s too bad that while Mr. Obama’s story about his date has tension, a moral and politics, Mr. Tanne’s has plaster saints. Abraham Lincoln was long dead when John Ford polished the presidential halo in the 1939 film “Young Mr. Lincoln.” Mr. Obama hasn’t even left office, but the cinematic hagiography has begun.

“Southside With You” is rated PG-13 (Parents strongly cautioned) for cigarette smoking. Running time: 1 hour 24 minutes.

Voir aussi:

‘Southside With You’ Review

Hagiographic retelling of Obama’s first date likely to disappoint those uninitiated into his cult of personality

Free Beacon
September 2, 2016

The pivotal moment in Southside With You amounts to a center-left cinematic version of John Galt’s Speech.

Barack Obama (Parker Sawyers) strides to the pulpit of a rundown inner-city church and launches into a clunky but heartfelt riff on the nature of American society—that we can only make progress when we come together and work for the greater good. Though mercifully shorter than John Galt’s stem-winder near the end of Atlas Shrugged, Obama’s speech is also staged poorly: The camera lingers on our hero, static, shot slightly from below to give him a majestic visage. When we cut away, it’s often to Michelle (Tika Sumpter), who is seen smiling in the audience, overcome by the great man’s words, Dagny Taggart gazing at the man who would jumpstart the motor of the world.

“You definitely have a knack for making speeches,” she says, a cringe-inducing summation of Obama’s political talents.

Like Galt’s rambling ode to the Makers-Not-Takers Class, Obama’s vision of a world that works best when compromise is prized bears little relation to the world we’ve seen for the last few years.

The rest of the film is less annoyingly, but rarely more artfully, put together. It’s a lot of shot/reverse shot and slow walk-and-talks, with Barack and Michelle’s faces all-too-often draped in shadows. Oddly, the movie often works better when Michelle and Barack are not on screen together, as in the early going when the two of them discuss the evening’s events with their respective families.

There’s an interesting film to be made about Obama’s relation to his father, but director Richard Tanne doesn’t make much use of this fertile territory. He’s more interested in resurrecting the idea of hope and change, as embodied by the young couple in love, than he is in examining why the former has been lost and the latter has failed. As the New York Times’ Manohla Dargis—no indignant reactionary offended by this mediocre offering’s praise to the heavens, she—put it, “Mr. Obama hasn’t even left office, but the cinematic hagiography has begun.”

Such hagiography of our chief executives is not unheard of, but it’s also less common than you might think. The complicated portraits of presidents painted by Oliver Stone in Nixon (1995) and W. (2008)—sympathetic, to a point, but unsparing and occasionally unfair—are far more interesting than the offering to Obama’s cult of personality that Southside With You represents.

John Ford’s Young Mr. Lincoln (1939) and Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln (2012) are perhaps the two most impressive examples of pure homage to the presidency. Young Mr. Lincoln in particular is a deft piece of filmmaking—as the booklet that comes with the Criterion Collection’s edition of the film notes, the legendary Soviet director Sergei Eisenstein once wrote that if he could lay claim to any American film, it would have been this one—which culminates in as powerful a sequence as any in film history.

Honest Abe (Henry Fonda) has defended two brothers from a wrongful murder charge—first saving them from a lynch mob and then proving their innocence in court—and seen the grateful family off. A friend asks if he wants to come back to town. “No, I think I might go on a piece. Maybe to the top of that hill,” Lincoln replies, striding off into the sunset. As he crests the ridge and as the Battle Hymn of the Republic plays, the sky cracks and rain pours forth. He pushes on, into the rain, the lightning, the thunder. It’s a storm Lincoln will have to face alone, a storm similar to the one the nation faced when the film was produced in 1939.

It’s not a subtle image, particularly, but it does hold up through the decades, a simple and powerful picture of a man with the weight of a nation on his shoulders. In its own way, the closing moments of Southside With You are also affecting. Barack Obama sits in a chair, smoking a cigarette, a book on his lap. He smiles, thinking of himself and his date. The storm clouds gather again—mass murder in Syria; a destabilized Middle East; a resurgent China and Russia—but you wouldn’t know it from the placid look on the future chief executive’s face. He is detached, concerned with his own affairs, his own place in the world.

If that’s the impression Tanne was going for, well, to quote another president: Mission Accomplished.

Voir encore:

Barack Obama: The Rom-Com President

What ‘Southside With You’ says about President Obama’s legacy

Sam Dean

MEL

Aug 31 2016

A young Jack Kennedy leads his shipwrecked crew to safety on a deserted island, dragging an injured sailor as he swims. A middle-aged FDR is struck down by polio, then fights to recover his ability to walk in order to step back onto the political stage. An up-and-coming Abraham Lincoln, new to the legal profession, stops a lynch mob from killing two young men suspected of murder, then successfully defends them in court. A young Barack Obama, interning at a corporate law firm, convinces his supervisor to go on a date. They kiss.

One of these things is not like the others.

The vast majority of presidential movies focus on presidents being presidents, sitting at the head of state, living arguably the most consequential moments of their lives. A man with the power and responsibility of the highest office in the country is instantly interesting, whether that’s JFK with the Cuban missile crisis, Lincoln on the eve of the Civil War, Nixon authorizing break-ins at the Watergate, or that famous speech President Bill Pullman gives toward the end of Independence Day. It’s easy for a president to get turned into a figure of high drama, a hero or villain of our national narrative.

But when a film dips into a president’s pre-presidential years, there’s more than just a good story going on. In fact, only a handful of presidential films have ignored a president’s years in the Oval Office entirely: PT-109 (the JFK war movie), Sunrise at Campobello (FDR’s recovery drama), Young Mr. Lincoln (on Lincoln’s… yes, younger years), and now Southside With You, the new movie about Barack and Michelle Obama’s first date in Chicago in 1991.

Iwan Morgan, editor of Presidents in the Movies and professor of U.S. Studies and American History at University College London, explained over email that both JFK’s and FDR’s early biopics “deal with pre-presidential triumph over adversity to emphasize their suitability to lead in office, rather than celebrating their leadership in office.” Morgan added that John Ford, director of Young Mr. Lincoln, “focuses on the pre-heroic Lincoln to explore his formative influences and preparation for greatness.” The whole point of making a presidential prequel is to show the pattern of the POTUS-to-be.

So what does Southside with You show us? The film follows the Obamas through a fictionalized version of their famous first date, whose end is already memorialized by a plaque in front of a Hyde Park Baskin-Robbins — inscribed with this quote from a 2007 O, The Oprah Magazine interview with Barack: “On our first date, I treated her to the finest ice cream Baskin-Robbins had to offer, our dinner table doubling as the curb. I kissed her, and it tasted like chocolate.”

However sweet the ending, the day didn’t begin as a date, at least in Southside’s telling. Barack is a broke summer associate at a corporate law firm; Michelle, his supervisor. He knows she thinks dating within the office is a bad look (and it is), so he asks her out to a community activist meeting at the Gardens — a housing project on Chicago’s South Side — and he fudges the timing a little so they’ll have an opportunity to hang beforehand. They take a trip to the Art Institute of Chicago, where Barack recites the Gwendolyn Brooks poem “We Real Cool” from memory in front of an Ernie Barnes painting, then meander around a public park, trading political opinions and biographical details.

Barack (Parker Sawyers) and Michelle (Tika Sumpter) mostly speak in expository monologues; their back-and-forth has all the zip and timing of an exchange between animatronics in the Hall of Presidents. It’s less like Before Sunset, the movie’s obvious walk-and-talk precedent, and more like an extended video-game cut scene — even something about the cinematography feels expectant, like something is always about to happen, but never does.

The future POTUS and FLOTUS head to a bar, where Michelle finally agrees to call their day together a “date,” and then they go see Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing (another movie that takes place in one day, though the similarities end right about there). Walking out, the couple runs into a higher-up from the law firm and his wife.

This presents a double danger: First, Michelle’s main reason for not wanting to date within the office (and especially not wanting to date the only other black person in the office) was to avoid office gossip, and the undermining that comes with being anything less than professional; second, they ask the young black couple if they could explain the famous final scene of Do The Right Thing, in which the main character, Mookie (played by Spike Lee), throws a trash can through the window of the pizzeria where he works.

Mookie threw the trash can to save the life of the pizzeria owner and divert the crowd’s anger toward the restaurant itself, Barack explains, clearly catering to the older white couple. But once they walk away, he assures Michelle that he was just playing to his audience—Mookie threw the trash can because he was angry. Then: the ice cream, and the kiss.

Within the context of the rom-com, this makes for sweet (if somewhat boring) viewing. A first date is all about potential, but we know how this particular love story ends. The Obamas are paragons of the modern married couple; Barack’s promise as a potential partner paid off. But, as Manohla Dargis pointed out in her review in The New York Times, it’s clear throughout Southside that Michelle is meant to be a stand-in for the audience, for the Obama voter, for the nation at large — Barack didn’t just want Michelle, he wanted you.

So what about his promise as a president? Besides getting Michelle to go on a date with him in the first place, two moments where young Barack seemingly takes action are at the meeting in the Gardens and, belatedly, after Do the Right Thing. In the first, he gives a speech about not being discouraged by a fractious and adversarial political system, counseling patience. In the second, he gives a palatable answer to an older, conservative white audience, saving his real charm (and real insight) for Michelle. Now that’s politics.

Perhaps this would all be more touching if we knew that these tactics had made for a rip-roaring two terms as president. Instead, and in spite of itself, this plays right to the most persistent criticisms of the Obama presidency, and to the greatest fears of his supporters: that Obama never moved beyond his perceived potential from the 2008 election, and was never able to deliver much more than a solid speech.

Dargis called the film a “cinematic hagiography” in the Times, but to borrow another Christian term of art, it’s closer to a piece of apologetics. Instead of a miracle story of a hero’s precocious powers, it presents an argument against his critics, a character study by way of excuse. In Southside, the young Obama doesn’t demonstrate his future leadership ability as much as his ability to convince you of his future leadership ability. Which is, ironically, what many of his strongest critics say about his presidency. That it was — and remained, throughout his eight years in office — about possibility.

Southside tells us that, if it wasn’t for the system, Obama could have accomplished more, and despite it all, did an admirable job of keeping his head up. It urges us to believe what we already know: that he’s a cool guy in private, even if he keeps calling for drone strikes and deporting more people  — that’s just playing to the white couple at the movie theater, the conservative crowd. It argues, ice cream cone in hand, that Obama would have made a truly great president, if he had just been given the chance.

Voir de même:

Roger Ebert
August 26, 2016 

As Michelle Robinson (Tika Sumpter) gets dressed in her home on the South Side of Chicago, her mother (Vanessa Bell Calloway) playfully teases her about the amount of effort Michelle is putting into her appearance. “I thought this wasn’t a date,” she chides. Michelle insists it isn’t. “You know I like to look nice when I go out,” she says. When her father joins his wife in ribbing their daughter, Michelle digs in her heels about this being a “non-date”. But it’s clear the lady doth protest too much. In her mind, there’s no way she’s falling for the smooth-talking co-worker who invited her to a community event. She’s seen this type of brother before, and she thinks she’s immune to his brand of charm.

Soon, the brother in question, Barack Obama (Parker Sawyers), picks up Miss Robinson. Our first glimpse of him, backed by Janet Jackson’s deliriously catchy 1989 hit “Miss You Much, » is a master class of not allowing one’s meager means to interfere with one’s confidence level. Barack smokes with the preternaturally efficient coolness of Bette Davis, yet drives a car built for Fred Flintstone. The large hole in the passenger side floor of his raggedy vehicle will not diminish his swagger nor derail his plan. Using the community event as a jumping-off point, he intends to gently push this non-date into the date category.

So begins the romantic comedy « Southside with You, » a mostly-true account of the first date between our current President and the First Lady.Southside with you

Like “Before Sunrise,” a film which invites comparison, “Southside with You” is a two-hander that’s top-heavy with dialogue, walking and a knowing sense of location. Unlike that film, however, we already know the ending before the lights go down in the theater. So, writer/director Richard Tanne replaces the suspenseful pull of “will they or won’t they?” with an equally compelling and understated character study that humanizes his larger-than-life public figures. Tanne reminds us that, before ascending to the most powerful office in the world, Barack and Michelle were just two regular people who started out somewhere much smaller.

This down-to-earth approach works surprisingly well because “Southside with You” never loses sight of the primary tenet of a great romantic comedy: All you need is two people whom the audience wants to see get together—then you put them together. So many entries in this genre fail miserably because the filmmakers feel compelled to overcomplicate matters with useless subplots and extraneous characters; they mistake cacophony for complexity. “Southside with You” builds its emotional richness by coasting on the charisma of its two leads as they carefully navigate each other’s personality quirks and life stories. We may be ahead of them in terms of knowing the outcome, but we’re simultaneously learning the details.

“Southside with You” is at once a love song to the city of Chicago and its denizens, an unmistakably Black romance and a gentle, universal comedy. It is unapologetic about all three of these elements, and interweaves them in such a subtle fashion that they become more pronounced only upon later reflection. The Chicago affection manifests itself not only in a scene where, in front of a small group of community activists welcoming back their favorite son, Barack demonstrates a rough version of the speechmaking ability that will later become his trademark, but also when Barack takes Michelle to an art gallery. He points out that the Ernie Barnes paintings they’re viewing were used on the Chicago-set sitcom “Good Times.” Then the duo recite Chicago native Gwendolyn Brooks’ poem about the pool players at the Golden Shovel, « We Real Cool. » Even the beloved founder of this site, Roger Ebert, gets a shout-out for championing “Do the Right Thing, » the movie Barack and Michelle attend in the closing hours of their date.

Though its depiction of romance is recognizable to anyone who has ever gone on a successful first date, “Southside with You” also takes time to address the concerns Michelle has with dating her co-worker, especially since she’s his superior and the only Black woman in the office. The optics of this pairing worries her in ways that hint at the corporate sexism that existed back in 1989, and continues in some fashion today. Her concern is that her superiors might think she threw herself at the only other Black employee which, based on my own personal workplace experience, I found completely relatable. This plotline has traction, culminating in a fictional though very effective climactic scene between Barack, Michelle and their boss. It’s a bit overdramatic, but the payoff is a lovely ice cream-based reconciliation that may do for Baskin-Robbins what Beyoncé’s “Formation” did for Red Lobster.

Heady topics aside, “Southside with You” is often hilarious and never loses its old-fashioned sweetness. Sumpter’s take on Michelle is a tad more on-point than Sawyers’ Barack, but he compensates by exuding the same bemused self-assurance as his real-life counterpart. The two leads are both excellent, but this is really Michelle’s show. Sumpter relishes throwing those “you think you’re cute” looks that poke sharp, though loving holes in all forms of braggadocio, and Sawyers fills them with surprising vulnerability. The two manage to create a beautiful tribute to enduring love in just under 90 minutes, making “Southside with You” an irresistibly romantic and rousing success.

Voir aussi:

Movies
Tika Sumpter on Playing the Future First Lady, Michelle Obama

Robert Ito

The New York Times

Aug. 18, 2016

WEST HOLLYWOOD, Calif. — Tika Sumpter knew the screenplay was something special. It was, at its core, a romance, with two charming leads slowly falling for each other over the course of a single Chicago day. They speak passionately — at some points, angrily — about moral courage and racial politics and the struggles of staying true to oneself. They take sides on “Good Times” versus “The Brady Bunch,” ice cream versus pie. They quote the poet Gwendolyn Brooks (“We Real Cool”) from memory, while sizing up Ernie Barnes’s painting “Sugar Shack.” They watch “Do the Right Thing.”

It didn’t hurt that the two characters were Barack Obama and Michelle Robinson, in a fictionalized account of their first date, in 1989, when Spike Lee’s film was in theaters and Janet Jackson’s “Miss You Much” was in the air.

“I loved that it was an origin story about the two most famous people in the world right now, and about how they fell in love,” Ms. Sumpter said. “You don’t see a lot of black leads in love stories, and you definitely don’t see a lot of walk and talks with black people.”

In “Southside With You,” which opens Aug. 26, Ms. Sumpter plays the first lady-to-be at 25, a corporate lawyer who is also an adviser to a young man named Barack Obama (Parker Sawyers), an up-and-coming, Harvard-educated summer associate. The film received rave reviews when it had its premiere at Sundance, where it was one of the festival’s breakouts, in large part because of Ms. Sumpter’s performance. But “Southside With You” may not have been made if Ms. Sumpter hadn’t also pitched in as one of three producers.

As much as Ms. Sumpter coveted the meaty role of Michelle Robinson, once she secured the part, reality set in. “At first it was overwhelming,” she admitted. “I’ve never been to Harvard, I’ve never been to Princeton. I didn’t even finish school because I couldn’t afford it. But once I stripped away that ‘Michelle Obama,’ I was able to take it back to that girl from the South Side.”

The actress was here at the London Hotel on a recent morning, holding forth on the challenges of playing the young Ms. Robinson. Dressed in a black sundress and high heels, Ms. Sumpter, 36, would occasionally and animatedly slip into Mrs. Obama’s distinctive speech patterns to describe a scene or illustrate a point. “You feel like she’s talking just to you,” she said. “And she enunciates everything, to show that she really means what she says.”

Born Euphemia LatiQue Sumpter in Queens, the actress was the fourth child of six. Her mother was a corrections officer at Rikers Island; her father died when she was 13. “My mom said I was quiet and observant,” she said. “I always wanted to impress her, so I’d always clean the house.” In school, she was on the cheerleading squad, ran for student council, befriended skinheads and “the preppy girls,” spoke up for the bullied. “I was that girl in high school,” she said.

Ms. Sumpter caught the acting bug in grade school while watching episodes of “The Cosby Show” and “A Different World.” “I was like, I want to be in that box,” she said. “I don’t know how I’m going to get in there, but I want to do that.” At 16, after her family moved to Long Island, she would take the train into Manhattan, paying for acting classes with money she earned working the concession stand at a local movie theater. “I’d go to open calls and be totally wrong for everything,” she remembered. “My hair would not be right.”
Continue reading the main story

At 20, she booked a commercial for Curve perfume. “They probably still sell it at Rite Aid,” she said with a laugh. It was her first gig, and it was filmed in Times Square, and she couldn’t have been happier.

In 2005, Ms. Sumpter secured a regular role on “One Life to Live.” She’s been working steadily ever since, on television (“Gossip Girl,” “The Haves and the Have Nots”) and films (“Get On Up,” “Ride Along 2”).

In 2015, she saw an early synopsis of “Southside With You” by Richard Tanne. “I was like, please write this script,” she said. “I would call him every few weeks, ‘Are you writing it, are you writing it?’”

Even if she didn’t get the part, she told him, she wanted to be a producer on the film, to ensure that it got made. Before long, the first-time producer was doing everything from finding financing and locating extras to pitching studios and helping cast Barack.

“I don’t think she necessarily expected to be the lead producer alongside me,” said Mr. Tanne, who also directed the film. “But I was a first-time filmmaker, and people wanted to maybe impose their own vision on the film. She kind of naturally sprung into action to safeguard what the movie needed to be.”

The details of that storied first date — the stop at the art museum, their first kiss over a cone of Baskin-Robbins — have been recounted in biographies and articles about the first family. Mrs. Obama told David Mendell, author of “Obama: From Promise to Power,” that “I had dated a lot of brothers who had this kind of reputation coming in, so I figured he was one of those smooth brothers who could talk straight and impress people.”

In the film, Ms. Sumpter goes from wary to icy to “maybe this guy isn’t so bad” and back again, as Michelle is initially repelled by some of Barack’s moves (his insistence that this “not a date” actually is) before warming to others (his deep knowledge of African-American art, his gift for lighting up a crowd). “We talked about the levels of guard she might have up at any given time,” Mr. Tanne remembered. “We had three levels, almost like a DEFCON system.”

To prepare the actress worked with a vocal coach to master Mrs. Obama’s speech patterns, and watched videos to see how she walked and carried herself. “Once we started rehearsing,” said Mr. Sawyers, “I was like, oh, that’s it! She nailed it.”

In one scene, Michelle talks about the racism she encountered at Princeton and Harvard — some subtle, some less so — and how, even at her current firm, she has to navigate between “Planet Black and Planet White.” Ms. Sumpter admitted that there were parallels in her own field. “You see the differences in the way certain movies are treated,” she said. “But once you come to terms with that, you have to go, O.K., I’m not going to allow that to hold me back. Which is what I love about Michelle. She never allowed the color of her skin and all the things she was up against to keep her from breaking through.”

A lot of that confidence came from Mrs. Obama’s family, just as it did for Ms. Sumpter, who is expecting her own daughter this fall. “Because of my mom, I never felt less than,” she said, looking back on her early days trying to make it in the business. “I never came into this world thinking, I’m a brown-skinned girl going to Hollywood. I was always like, I’m talented and I’m beautiful and I’m smart. Why wouldn’t you want me?”

Voir de plus:

Roger Ebert
August 26, 2016 

As Michelle Robinson (Tika Sumpter) gets dressed in her home on the South Side of Chicago, her mother (Vanessa Bell Calloway) playfully teases her about the amount of effort Michelle is putting into her appearance. “I thought this wasn’t a date,” she chides. Michelle insists it isn’t. “You know I like to look nice when I go out,” she says. When her father joins his wife in ribbing their daughter, Michelle digs in her heels about this being a “non-date”. But it’s clear the lady doth protest too much. In her mind, there’s no way she’s falling for the smooth-talking co-worker who invited her to a community event. She’s seen this type of brother before, and she thinks she’s immune to his brand of charm.

Soon, the brother in question, Barack Obama (Parker Sawyers), picks up Miss Robinson. Our first glimpse of him, backed by Janet Jackson’s deliriously catchy 1989 hit “Miss You Much, » is a master class of not allowing one’s meager means to interfere with one’s confidence level. Barack smokes with the preternaturally efficient coolness of Bette Davis, yet drives a car built for Fred Flintstone. The large hole in the passenger side floor of his raggedy vehicle will not diminish his swagger nor derail his plan. Using the community event as a jumping-off point, he intends to gently push this non-date into the date category.

So begins the romantic comedy « Southside with You, » a mostly-true account of the first date between our current President and the First Lady. Like “Before Sunrise,” a film which invites comparison, “Southside with You” is a two-hander that’s top-heavy with dialogue, walking and a knowing sense of location. Unlike that film, however, we already know the ending before the lights go down in the theater. So, writer/director Richard Tanne replaces the suspenseful pull of “will they or won’t they?” with an equally compelling and understated character study that humanizes his larger-than-life public figures. Tanne reminds us that, before ascending to the most powerful office in the world, Barack and Michelle were just two regular people who started out somewhere much smaller.

This down-to-earth approach works surprisingly well because “Southside with You” never loses sight of the primary tenet of a great romantic comedy: All you need is two people whom the audience wants to see get together—then you put them together. So many entries in this genre fail miserably because the filmmakers feel compelled to overcomplicate matters with useless subplots and extraneous characters; they mistake cacophony for complexity. “Southside with You” builds its emotional richness by coasting on the charisma of its two leads as they carefully navigate each other’s personality quirks and life stories. We may be ahead of them in terms of knowing the outcome, but we’re simultaneously learning the details.

“Southside with You” is at once a love song to the city of Chicago and its denizens, an unmistakably Black romance and a gentle, universal comedy. It is unapologetic about all three of these elements, and interweaves them in such a subtle fashion that they become more pronounced only upon later reflection. The Chicago affection manifests itself not only in a scene where, in front of a small group of community activists welcoming back their favorite son, Barack demonstrates a rough version of the speechmaking ability that will later become his trademark, but also when Barack takes Michelle to an art gallery. He points out that the Ernie Barnes paintings they’re viewing were used on the Chicago-set sitcom “Good Times.” Then the duo recite Chicago native Gwendolyn Brooks’ poem about the pool players at the Golden Shovel, « We Real Cool. » Even the beloved founder of this site, Roger Ebert, gets a shout-out for championing “Do the Right Thing, » the movie Barack and Michelle attend in the closing hours of their date.

Though its depiction of romance is recognizable to anyone who has ever gone on a successful first date, “Southside with You” also takes time to address the concerns Michelle has with dating her co-worker, especially since she’s his superior and the only Black woman in the office. The optics of this pairing worries her in ways that hint at the corporate sexism that existed back in 1989, and continues in some fashion today. Her concern is that her superiors might think she threw herself at the only other Black employee which, based on my own personal workplace experience, I found completely relatable. This plotline has traction, culminating in a fictional though very effective climactic scene between Barack, Michelle and their boss. It’s a bit overdramatic, but the payoff is a lovely ice cream-based reconciliation that may do for Baskin-Robbins what Beyoncé’s “Formation” did for Red Lobster.

Heady topics aside, “Southside with You” is often hilarious and never loses its old-fashioned sweetness. Sumpter’s take on Michelle is a tad more on-point than Sawyers’ Barack, but he compensates by exuding the same bemused self-assurance as his real-life counterpart. The two leads are both excellent, but this is really Michelle’s show. Sumpter relishes throwing those “you think you’re cute” looks that poke sharp, though loving holes in all forms of braggadocio, and Sawyers fills them with surprising vulnerability. The two manage to create a beautiful tribute to enduring love in just under 90 minutes, making “Southside with You” an irresistibly romantic and rousing success.

Voir par ailleurs:

Barack Obama, le « storytelling » jusqu’au bout de la nuit

Le Monde

05.07.2016

Le rituel du soir de Barack Obama n’est un secret pour personne : le président des États-Unis est un couche-tard. Ces quelques heures de solitude, entre la fin du dîner et l’heure de dormir, vers 1 heure du matin, sont celles où il réfléchit et se retrouve seul avec lui-même. De menus détails sur sa vie qui sont connus du public depuis plusieurs années.

Alors pourquoi les raconter à nouveau ? pourrait-on demander au New York Times, et son enquête intitulée « Obama après la tombée de la nuit ». Parce que les lecteurs apprécient visiblement ces quelques images de l’intimité d’un président qui quittera bientôt la Maison Blanche. Deux jours après sa publication, l’article est toujours dans le top 10 des plus lus sur le site.

Barack Obama a toujours été un pro du storytelling. Tout, dans l’image qu’il donne de lui-même, est précisément contrôlé, y compris les moments de décontraction. Pete Souza, le photographe officiel de la Maison Blanche, en est le meilleur témoin et le meilleur outil. Le professionnel met en avant l’image d’un président plus décontracté, en marge du protocole officiel, proche des enfants, jouant allongé par terre avec un bébé tenu à bout de bras ou autorisant un jeune garçon à lui toucher les cheveux « pour savoir s’ils sont comme les siens ».

Dans cet article, c’est encore une fois l’image d’un homme décontracté, mais aussi plus sage et solitaire qu’à l’ordinaire, qui est travaillée. Et d’abord par l’introduction qui compare les habitudes nocturnes de Barack Obama à celle de ses prédécesseurs.

« Le président George W. Bush, un lève-tôt, était au lit à dix heures. Le président Bill Clinton se couchait tard comme M. Obama, mais il consacrait du temps à de longues conversations à bâtons rompus avec ses amis et ses alliés politiques. »

Là où Bill Clinton appréciait la compagnie jusqu’à tard dans la nuit, Barack Obama choisit la solitude réflexive. Pour enfoncer le clou, l’article cite alors l’historien Doris Kearns Goodwin : « C’est quelqu’un qui est bien seul avec lui-même. »

« Il y a quelque chose de spécial, la nuit. C’est plus étroit, la nuit. Cela lui laisse le temps de penser. »

« C’est plus étroit, la nuit »

L’huile qui fait tourner les rouages d’un storytelling réussi, ce sont les anecdotes, inoffensives ou amusantes. Ici, on découvre celle des sept amandes que Barack Obama mange le soir. Les amandes montrent que le président a une hygiène de vie impeccable, qu’il n’a besoin de boissons excitantes ou sucrées pour tenir le coup. Et en même temps, le chiffre précis a quelque chose d’insolite, qui donne l’image de quelqu’un d’un peu crispé, qui veut tout contrôler. Mais pas trop. « C’était devenu une blague entre Michelle et moi », raconte Sam Kass, le chef cuisinier personnel de la famille entre 2009 et 2014. « Ni six, ni huit, toujours sept amandes. »

Le portrait de Barack Obama, une fois la nuit tombée, soigne également l’image d’un bourreau de travail, perfectionniste et attaché aux détails. Cody Keenan, qui supervise l’écriture des discours à la Maison Blanche, raconte qu’il est parfois rappelé le soir pour revenir travailler. Les nuits les plus longues sont celles où Obama a décidé de retravailler ses discours. Cody Keenan comprend :

Une image de « Mister Cool »

Dans le même temps, il faut entretenir l’image de « Mister Cool » et continuer à travailler sur celle du père de famille. Barack Obama ne fait pas que travailler dans son bureau. Il se tient au courant des résultats sportifs sur ESPN et joue à Words With Friends, un dérivé du Scrabble sur iPad.

Le « rituel du coucher » n’a plus vraiment de raison d’être maintenant que ses filles Malia et Sasha ont 18 et 15 ans, mais il reste la « movie night », la soirée cinéma de la famille, tous les vendredis soirs dans le « Family Theater », une salle de projection privée de 40 places. Avec le petit détail qui change tout : Barack et Michelle apprécient les séries ultra-populaires Breaking Bad ou Game of Thrones.

Le procédé est efficace, et l’impression générale qui se dégage est celle d’un homme réfléchi, calme, solitaire. Dans les commentaires qui accompagnent l’article, les lecteurs se livrent à leurs propres analyses : seul un grand solitaire comme Barack peut incarner la fonction présidentielle, car « sa motivation dans la vie va au-delà du besoin narcissique d’obtenir des confirmations de sa grandeur ».

« J’ai bien plus confiance en quelqu’un qui a cette discipline et cette concentration que pour les extravertis qui candidatent habituellement à ces postes », dit un autre, sans donner de noms.

Voir enfin:

I Miss Barack Obama

As this primary season has gone along, a strange sensation has come over me: I miss Barack Obama. Now, obviously I disagree with a lot of Obama’s policy decisions. I’ve been disappointed by aspects of his presidency. I hope the next presidency is a philosophic departure.

But over the course of this campaign it feels as if there’s been a decline in behavioral standards across the board. Many of the traits of character and leadership that Obama possesses, and that maybe we have taken too much for granted, have suddenly gone missing or are in short supply.

The first and most important of these is basic integrity. The Obama administration has been remarkably scandal-free. Think of the way Iran-contra or the Lewinsky scandals swallowed years from Reagan and Clinton.

We’ve had very little of that from Obama. He and his staff have generally behaved with basic rectitude. Hillary Clinton is constantly having to hold these defensive press conferences when she’s trying to explain away some vaguely shady shortcut she’s taken, or decision she has made, but Obama has not had to do that.

He and his wife have not only displayed superior integrity themselves, they have mostly attracted and hired people with high personal standards. There are all sorts of unsightly characters floating around politics, including in the Clinton camp and in Gov. Chris Christie’s administration. This sort has been blocked from team Obama.

Second, a sense of basic humanity. Donald Trump has spent much of this campaign vowing to block Muslim immigration. You can only say that if you treat Muslim Americans as an abstraction. President Obama, meanwhile, went to a mosque, looked into people’s eyes and gave a wonderful speech reasserting their place as Americans.

He’s exuded this basic care and respect for the dignity of others time and time again. Let’s put it this way: Imagine if Barack and Michelle Obama joined the board of a charity you’re involved in. You’d be happy to have such people in your community. Could you say that comfortably about Ted Cruz? The quality of a president’s humanity flows out in the unexpected but important moments.

Third, a soundness in his decision-making process. Over the years I have spoken to many members of this administration who were disappointed that the president didn’t take their advice. But those disappointed staffers almost always felt that their views had been considered in depth.

Obama’s basic approach is to promote his values as much as he can within the limits of the situation. Bernie Sanders, by contrast, has been so blinded by his values that the reality of the situation does not seem to penetrate his mind.

Take health care. Passing Obamacare was a mighty lift that led to two gigantic midterm election defeats. As Megan McArdle pointed out in her Bloomberg View column, Obamacare took coverage away from only a small minority of Americans. Sanderscare would take employer coverage away from tens of millions of satisfied customers, destroy the health insurance business and levy massive new tax hikes. This is epic social disruption.

To think you could pass Sanderscare through a polarized Washington and in a country deeply suspicious of government is to live in intellectual fairyland. President Obama may have been too cautious, especially in the Middle East, but at least he’s able to grasp the reality of the situation.

Fourth, grace under pressure. I happen to find it charming that Marco Rubio gets nervous on the big occasions — that he grabs for the bottle of water, breaks out in a sweat and went robotic in the last debate. It shows Rubio is a normal person. And I happen to think overconfidence is one of Obama’s great flaws. But a president has to maintain equipoise under enormous pressure. Obama has done that, especially amid the financial crisis. After Saturday night, this is now an open question about Rubio.

Fifth, a resilient sense of optimism. To hear Sanders or Trump, Cruz and Ben Carson campaign is to wallow in the pornography of pessimism, to conclude that this country is on the verge of complete collapse. That’s simply not true. We have problems, but they are less serious than those faced by just about any other nation on earth.

People are motivated to make wise choices more by hope and opportunity than by fear, cynicism, hatred and despair. Unlike many current candidates, Obama has not appealed to those passions.

No, Obama has not been temperamentally perfect. Too often he’s been disdainful, aloof, resentful and insular. But there is a tone of ugliness creeping across the world, as democracies retreat, as tribalism mounts, as suspiciousness and authoritarianism take center stage.

Obama radiates an ethos of integrity, humanity, good manners and elegance that I’m beginning to miss, and that I suspect we will all miss a bit, regardless of who replaces him.

Voir aussi:

The Authentic Joy of “Southside with You”

The writer and director Richard Tanne’s first feature, “Southside with You,” which will be released next Friday, is an opening act of superb audacity, a self-imposed challenge so mighty that it might seem, on paper, to be a stunt. It’s a drama about Barack Obama and Michelle Robinson’s first date, in Chicago, in the summer of 1989. It stars Parker Sawyers as the twenty-eight-year-old Barack, a Harvard Law student and summer associate at a Chicago law firm, and Tika Sumpter (who also co-produced the film) as the twenty-five-year-old Michelle, a Harvard Law graduate and a second-year associate at the same firm. The results don’t resemble a stunt; far from it. “Southside with You,” running a brisk hour and twenty minutes, is a fully realized, intricately imagined, warmhearted, sharp-witted, and perceptive drama, one that sticks close to its protagonists while resonating quietly but grandly with the sweep of a historical epic.

Tanne tells the story of the First Couple’s first date with a tightly constrained time frame—one day’s and evening’s worth of action—that begins with the protagonists preparing for their rendezvous and ends with them back at their homes. In between, Tanne pulls off a near-miracle, conveying these historic figures’ depth and complexity of character without making them grandiose. The dialogue is freewheeling and intimate, ranging through subjects far from the matters at hand, suggesting enormous intellect and enormous promise without seeming cut-and-pasted from speeches or memoirs. The film exudes Tanne’s own sense of calm excitement, nearly a documentarian’s serendipitous thrill at being present to catch on-camera a secret miracle of mighty historical import.

Movies about public figures—ones whose appearance, diction, and gestures are deeply ingrained in the minds of most likely viewers—must confront the Scylla of impersonation and the Charybdis of unfaithfulness. Tanne’s extraordinary actors thread that strait nimbly, delivering performances that exist on their own but feel true to the characters, that spin with dialectical delight and embody the ardors, ambitions, and uncertainties that even the most able and aware young adults must face.

The movie’s first dramatic uncertainty is whether Michelle and Barack’s meeting is even a date. Talking to her parents before his arrival, she denies that it is; talking with him on the street soon after he picks her up in his beat-up car, she not only denies that it is but also demands that it not be one. Michelle explains that, as a black woman with mainly white male co-workers, the perception arising from her dating a black summer associate—especially one whose nominal adviser she is—would be perceived negatively by higher-ups at the firm. But Barack, smooth-talking, brashly funny, and calmly determined, makes no bones about his intentions, even as he apparently defers to her insistence.

The easygoing yet rapid-fire dialogue—and the actors’ controlled yet passionate delivery of it, as they get to know each other, size each other up, and make each other aware of their motives and doubts—evokes the pregnant power of the occasion. Yet the couple’s depth of character emerges all the more vividly through Tanne’s alert directorial impressionism, a sensitivity to the actors’ probing glances that provides a sort of visual matrix for the actors’ inner life. It comes through in small but memorable touches, as when young Barack, smoking a cigarette in his rattling car, sprays some air freshener before pulling up to Michelle’s house. When she gets in, she sniffs the chemical blend; as the car pulls away, she glances down at a hole in the floor of the car, through which she sees the asphalt below. That flickering subjectivity suffuses and sustains the action, lends images to the characters, states of mind and moods to their ideas.

Tanne achieves something that few other directors—whether of independent or Hollywood or art-house films—ever do: he creates characters with an ample sense of memory, who fully inhabit their life prior to their time onscreen, and who have a wide range of cultural references and surging ideas that leap spontaneously into their conversation. A scene in which Michelle and Barack visit an exhibit of Afrocentric art—he discusses the importance of the painter Ernie Barnes to the sitcom “Good Times,” and together they recall Gwendolyn Brooks’s poem “We Real Cool”—has an effortless grace that reflects an unusual cinematic depth of lived experience.

The centerpiece of the film is a splendid bit of romantic and principled performance art on the part of Barack. He plans the non-date date around a community meeting in a mainly black neighborhood that Michelle—who did pro-bono work at Harvard and who admits to frustration with her trademark-law work at the firm—is eager to attend. There, Barack, who had been active with the organization before heading to Harvard, is received like a prodigal son. The subject of the meeting is the legislature’s refusal to build a much-needed community center; frustration among the attendees mounts, until Barack addresses them and offers some brilliant practical suggestions to overcome the opposition. At the meeting, he displays, above all, his gifts for public speaking and, even more, for empathy. He reveals, to the community group but also to Michelle, a preternatural genius at grasping interests and motives, at seeking common cause, and at recognizing—and acting upon—the human factor. There, Barack also displays a personal philosophy of practical politics that’s tied to his larger reflections on American history and political theory. The intellectual passion that Tanne builds into the scene, and that Sawyers delivers with nuanced fervor, is all the more striking and exquisite for its subtle positioning as a device of romantic seduction.

 

Michelle’s sense of principled responsibility and groundedness, her worldly maturity and practical insight, is matched by Barack’s ardent but callow, mighty but still-unfocussed energies. The movie’s ring of authenticity carried me through from start to finish without inviting my speculations as to the historical veracity of the events. Curiosity eventually kicked in, though; most accounts of the first date suggest that its general contours involved Michelle’s reluctance to date a colleague who was also a subordinate, the visit to the Art Institute, a walk, a drink, and a viewing of the recently released film “Do the Right Thing.” The community meeting is usually described as occurring at another occasion, yet it fits into the first date with a verisimilitude as well as an emotional impact that justify the dramatization.

As for their viewing of Spike Lee’s movie, the scene that Tanne derives from it is a minor masterwork of ironic psychology and mother wit. It’s too good to spoil; suffice it to say that the scene is set against the backdrop of controversy that greeted Lee’s film at the time of its release, with some critics—white critics—fearing that the climactic act of violence (meaning not the police killing of Radio Raheem but Mookie’s throwing a garbage can through the window of Sal’s Pizzeria and leading his neighbors to ransack the venue) would incite riots.

“Southside with You” is the sort of movie that, say, Richard Linklater’s three “Before” movies aren’t—an intimate story that has a reach far greater than its scale, that has stakes and substance extending beyond the couple’s immediate fortunes. There’s a noble historical precedent for Tanne’s film. If the modern cinema was inspired by Roberto Rossellini’s “Voyage to Italy,” from 1954—which taught a handful of ambitious young French critics that all they needed to make a movie was two actors and a car, that they could make a low-budget and small-scale production that would be rich in cinematic ideas and romantic passion alike—then “Southside with You” is an exemplary work of cinematic modernity. Rossellini, a cinematic philosopher, ranges far through history and politics to ground a couple’s intimate disasters in the deep currents of modern life.

Tanne does this, too, and goes one step further; his inspiration is reminiscent of the advice that the nineteen-year-old critic Jean-Luc Godard gave to his cinematic elders, “unhappy filmmakers of France who lack scenarios.” Godard advised them to make films about “the tax system,” about the writer and Nazi collaborator Philippe Henriot, about the Resistance activist Danielle Casanova. Tanne picks a great subject of contemporary history and politics—indeed, one of the very greatest—and approaches it without the pomp and bombast of ostensibly important, message-mongering Oscarizables. He realizes Barack Obama and Michelle Robinson onscreen with the same meticulous, thoughtful, inventive imagination that other directors might bring to figures of legend, people they know, or their own lives. “Southside with You” is a virtuosic realization of history on the wing, of the lives of others incarnated as firsthand experience. To tell this story is a nearly impossible challenge, and Tanne meets it at its high level.

Voir enfin:

Politics
Obama After Dark: The Precious Hours Alone

Michael D. Shear

The New York Times

July 2, 2016

WASHINGTON — “Are you up?”

The emails arrive late, often after 1 a.m., tapped out on a secure BlackBerry from an email address known only to a few. The weary recipients know that once again, the boss has not yet gone to bed.

The late-night interruptions from President Obama might be sharply worded questions about memos he has read. Sometimes they are taunts because the recipient’s sports team just lost.

Last month it was a 12:30 a.m. email to Benjamin J. Rhodes, the deputy national security adviser, and Denis R. McDonough, the White House chief of staff, telling them he had finished reworking a speechwriter’s draft of presidential remarks for later that morning. Mr. Obama had spent three hours scrawling in longhand on a yellow legal pad an angry condemnation of Donald J. Trump’s response to the attack in Orlando, Fla., and told his aides they could pick up his rewrite at the White House usher’s office when they came in for work.

Mr. Obama calls himself a “night guy,” and as president, he has come to consider the long, solitary hours after dark as essential as his time in the Oval Office. Almost every night that he is in the White House, Mr. Obama has dinner at 6:30 with his wife and daughters and then withdraws to the Treaty Room, his private office down the hall from his bedroom on the second floor of the White House residence.

There, his closest aides say, he spends four or five hours largely by himself.

He works on speeches. He reads the stack of briefing papers delivered at 8 p.m. by the staff secretary. He reads 10 letters from Americans chosen each day by his staff. “How can we allow private citizens to buy automatic weapons? They are weapons of war,” Liz O’Connor, a Connecticut middle school teacher, wrote in a letter Mr. Obama read on the night of June 13.

The president also watches ESPN, reads novels or plays Words With Friends on his iPad.

Michelle Obama occasionally pops in, but she goes to bed before the president, who is up so late he barely gets five hours of sleep a night. For Mr. Obama, the time alone has become more important.

“Everybody carves out their time to get their thoughts together. There is no doubt that window is his window,” said Rahm Emanuel, Mr. Obama’s first chief of staff. “You can’t block out a half-hour and try to do it during the day. It’s too much incoming. That’s the place where it can all be put aside and you can focus.”

President George W. Bush, an early riser, was in bed by 10. President Bill Clinton was up late like Mr. Obama, but he spent the time in lengthy, freewheeling phone conversations with friends and political allies, forcing aides to scan the White House phone logs in the mornings to keep track of whom the president might have called the night before.

“A lot of times, for some of our presidential leaders, the energy they need comes from contact with other people,” said the historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, who has had dinner with Mr. Obama several times in the past seven and a half years. “He seems to be somebody who is at home with himself.”
‘Insane Amount of Paper’

When Mr. Obama first arrived at the White House, his after-dinner routine started around 7:15 p.m. in the game room, on the third floor of the residence. There, on an old Brunswick pool table, Mr. Obama and Sam Kass, then the Obama family’s personal chef, would spend 45 minutes playing eight-ball.

Mr. Kass saw pool as a chance for Mr. Obama to decompress after intense days in the Oval Office, and the two kept a running score. “He’s a bit ahead,” said Mr. Kass, who left the White House at the end of 2014.

In those days, the president followed the billiards game with bedtime routines with his daughters. These days, now that both are teenagers, Mr. Obama heads directly to the Treaty Room, named for the many historical documents that have been signed in it, including the peace protocol that ended the Spanish-American War in 1898.

“The sports channel is on,” Mr. Emanuel said, recalling the ubiquitous images on the room’s large flat-screen television. “Sports in the background, with the volume down.”

By 8 p.m., the usher’s office delivers the president’s leather-bound daily briefing book — a large binder accompanied by a tall stack of folders with memos and documents from across the government, all demanding the president’s attention. “An insane amount of paper,” Mr. Kass said.

Mr. Obama often reads through it in a leather swivel chair at his tablelike desk, under a portrait of President Ulysses S. Grant. Windows on each side of Grant look out on the brightly lit Washington Monument and the Jefferson Memorial.

Other nights, the president settles in on the sofa under the 1976 “Butterfly” by Susan Rothenberg, a 6-foot-by-7-foot canvas of burnt sienna and black slashes that evokes a galloping horse.

“He is thoroughly predictable in having gone through every piece of paper that he gets,” said Tom Donilon, Mr. Obama’s national security adviser from 2010 to 2013. “You’ll come in in the morning, it will be there: questions, notes, decisions.”
Photo
Mr. Obama often works on speeches late into the night, like the one he gave in Selma, Ala., on the 50th anniversary of “Bloody Sunday.” Here, people listened to his speech last year. Credit Doug Mills/The New York Times
Seven Almonds

To stay awake, the president does not turn to caffeine. He rarely drinks coffee or tea, and more often has a bottle of water next to him than a soda. His friends say his only snack at night is seven lightly salted almonds.

“Michelle and I would always joke: Not six. Not eight,” Mr. Kass said. “Always seven almonds.”

The demands of the president’s day job sometimes intrude. A photo taken in 2011 shows Mr. Obama in the Treaty Room with Mr. McDonough, at that time the deputy national security adviser, and John O. Brennan, then Mr. Obama’s counterterrorism chief and now the director of the C.I.A., after placing a call to Prime Minister Naoto Kan of Japan shortly after Japan was hit by a devastating magnitude 9.0 earthquake. “The call was made near midnight,” the photo caption says.

But most often, Mr. Obama’s time in the Treaty Room is his own.

“I’ll probably read briefing papers or do paperwork or write stuff until about 11:30 p.m., and then I usually have about a half-hour to read before I go to bed, about midnight, 12:30 a.m., sometimes a little later,” Mr. Obama told Jon Meacham, the editor in chief of Newsweek, in 2009.

In 2014, Mr. Obama told Kelly Ripa and Michael Strahan of ABC’s “Live With Kelly and Michael” that he stayed up even later — “until like 2 o’clock at night, reading briefings and doing work” — and added that he woke up “at a pretty reasonable hour, usually around 7.”
‘Can You Come Back?’

Mr. Obama’s longest nights — the ones that stretch well into the early morning — usually involve speeches.

One night last June, Cody Keenan, the president’s chief speechwriter, had just returned home from work at 9 p.m. and ordered pizza when he heard from the president: “Can you come back tonight?”

Mr. Keenan met the president in the usher’s office on the first floor of the residence, where the two worked until nearly 11 p.m. on the president’s eulogy for nine African-Americans fatally shot during Bible study at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C.

Three months earlier, Mr. Keenan had had to return to the White House when the president summoned him — at midnight — to go over changes to a speech Mr. Obama was to deliver in Selma, Ala., on the 50th anniversary of “Bloody Sunday,” when protesters were brutally beaten by the police on the Edmund Pettus Bridge.

“There’s something about the night,” Mr. Keenan said, reflecting on his boss’s use of the time. “It’s smaller. It lets you think.”

In 2009, Jon Favreau, Mr. Keenan’s predecessor, gave the president a draft of his Nobel Prize acceptance speech the night before they were scheduled to leave for the ceremony in Oslo. Mr. Obama stayed up until 4 a.m. revising the speech, and handed Mr. Favreau 11 handwritten pages later that morning.

On the plane to Norway, Mr. Obama, Mr. Favreau and two other aides pulled another near-all-nighter as they continued to work on the speech. Once Mr. Obama had delivered it, he called the exhausted Mr. Favreau at his hotel.

“He said, ‘Hey, I think that turned out O.K.,’” Mr. Favreau recalled. “I said, ‘Yes.’ And he said, ‘Let’s never do that again.’”
Some Time for Play

Not everything that goes on in the Treaty Room is work.

In addition to playing Words With Friends, a Scrabble-like online game, on his iPad, Mr. Obama turns up the sound on the television for big sports games.

“If he’s watching a game, he will send a message. ‘Duke should have won that game,’ or whatever,” said Reggie Love, a former Duke basketball player who was Mr. Obama’s personal aide for the first three years of his presidency.

The president also uses the time to catch up on the news, skimming The New York Times, The Washington Post and The Wall Street Journal on his iPad or watching cable. Mr. Love recalls getting an email after 1 a.m. after Mr. Obama saw a television report about students whose “bucket list” included meeting the president. Why had he not met them, the president asked Mr. Love.

“‘Someone decided it wasn’t a good idea,’ I said,” Mr. Love recalled. “He said, ‘Well, I’m the president and I think it’s a good idea.’”

Mr. Obama and his wife are also fans of cable dramas like “Boardwalk Empire,” “Game of Thrones” and “Breaking Bad.” On Friday nights — movie night at the White House — Mr. Obama and his family are often in the Family Theater, a 40-seat screening room on the first floor of the East Wing, watching first-run films they have chosen and had delivered from the Motion Picture Association of America.

There is time, too, for fantasy about what life would be like outside the White House. Mr. Emanuel, who is now the mayor of Chicago but remains close to the president, said he and Mr. Obama once imagined moving to Hawaii to open a T-shirt shack that sold only one size (medium) and one color (white). Their dream was that they would no longer have to make decisions.

During difficult White House meetings when no good decision seemed possible, Mr. Emanuel would sometimes turn to Mr. Obama and say, “White.” Mr. Obama would in turn say, “Medium.”

Now Mr. Obama, who has six months left of solitary late nights in the Treaty Room, seems to be looking toward the end. Once he is out of the White House, he said in March at an Easter prayer breakfast in the State Dining Room, “I am going to take three, four months where I just sleep.”

Barack Obama inaugure le Musée afro-américain de Washington
Philippe Gélie
Le Figaro
24/09/2016

VIDÉO – Le président conseille à Donald Trump de « visiter » le nouvel édifice, qui raconte l’esclavage et la discrimination mais aussi les succès des Noirs américains.

De notre correspondant à Washington

George W. Bush avait signé en 2003 la loi créant le Musée national de l’Histoire et de la Culture Afro-Américaines, mais c’est au premier président noir du pays qu’est revenu le privilège de l’inaugurer ce samedi.

Outre Barack et Michelle Obama, George W. et Laura Bush les élus du Congrès et les juges de la Cour suprême, quelque 20.000 personnes se sont rassemblées en milieu de journée sur le Mall de Washington, la grande esplanade faisant face au Capitole, au nombre desquelles tout ce que le pays compte de célébrités noires. Oprah Winfrey, qui a donné 20 millions de dollars, a eu droit à une place d’honneur.

Dans un discours où son émotion a affleuré, le président Obama a célébré «une part essentielle de l’histoire américaine, parfois laissée de côté. Une grande nation ne se cache pas la vérité. La vérité nous renforce, nous fortifie. Comprendre d’où nous venons est un acte de patriotisme.» Parlant au nom des Afro-Américains, il a ajouté: «Nous ne sommes pas un fardeau pour l’Amérique, une tache sur l’Amérique, un objet de honte ou de pitié pour l’Amérique. Nous sommes l’Amérique!»

Au-dessus de lui, le bâtiment de six étages, dessiné par l’architecte britannique d’origine tanzanienne David Adjaye, se dresse comme une couronne africaine de bronze face au Washington Monument (l’obélisque érigé en hommage au premier président des Etats-Unis), à l’endroit même où, il y a deux siècles, se tenait un marché aux esclaves. Son matériau, inspirée des textiles d’Afrique de l’Ouest, laisse passer la lumière et rougeoie au soleil couchant, créant une impression massive de l’extérieur et aérienne de l’intérieur.

Obama a invité Trump

Il a fallu treize ans et 540 millions de dollars pour bâtir le dix-neuvième musée de la Smithsonian Institution et y rassembler plus de 35.000 témoignages de l’histoire des Afro-Américains, dont aucun aspect n’est occulté: ni la traite des esclaves, ni la ségrégation, ni la lutte pour les droits civiques, ni les réussites contemporaines, du sport au hip-hop et à la politique. La présidence de Barack Obama y est documentée dans l’un des 27 espaces d’exposition, non loin de la Cadillac de Chuck Berry ou des chaussures de piste de Jessie Owens.

Mais le visiteur est d’abord invité à passer devant les chaînes, les fouets, les huttes misérables des esclaves, les photos de dos lacérés ou de lynchages (3437 Noirs pendus entre 1882 et 1851), ou encore le cercueil d’Emmett Till, tué à l’âge de 14 ans dans le Mississippi pour avoir sifflé une femme blanche en 1955. «Ce n’est pas un musée du crime ou de la culpabilité, insiste son directeur, Lonnie Bunch, c’est un lieu qui raconte le voyage d’un peuple et l’histoire d’une nation. Il n’y a pas de réponses simples à des questions complexes».

Au moment où les marches de la communauté noire se répandent dans le pays pour protester contre les violences policières, Barack Obama a invité Donald Trump à visiter le Musée de l’Histoire et de la Culture Afro-Américaine. Le candidat républicain à sa succession a déclaré que les Noirs vivaient aujourd’hui «dans les pires conditions qu’ils aient jamais connues». Dans une interview vendredi à la chaîne ABC, le président a répliqué: «Je crois qu’un enfant de 8 ans est au courant que l’esclavage n’était pas très bon pour les Noirs et que l’ère Jim Crow (les lois ségrégationnistes, Ndlr) n’était pas très bonne pour les Noirs».

Voir enfin:

U.S. Murders Increased 10.8% in 2015
The figures, released by the FBI, could stoke worries that the trend of falling crime rates may be ending
Devlin Barrett
The Wall Street Journal

Sept. 26, 2016

WASHINGTON—Murders in the U.S. jumped by 10.8% in 2015, according to figures released Monday by the Federal Bureau of Investigation—a sharp increase that could fuel concerns that the nation’s two-decade trend of falling crime rates may be ending.

The figures had been expected to show an increase, after preliminary data released earlier this year indicated violent crime and murders were rising. But the double-digit increase in murders dwarfed any in the past 20 years, eclipsing the 3.7% increase in 2005, the year in which the biggest increase occurred before now.

In 2014, the FBI recorded violent crime narrowly falling, by 0.2%. In 2015, the number of violent crimes rose 3.9% though the number of property crimes dropped 2.6%, the FBI said.

Richard Rosenfeld, a criminologist at the University of Missouri-St.Louis, said a key driver of the murder spike may be an increasing distrust of police in major cities where controversial officer shootings have led to protests.

“This rise is concentrated in certain large cities where police-community tensions have been notable,’’ said Mr. Rosenfeld, citing Cleveland, Baltimore, and St. Louis as examples. The rise in killings is not spread evenly around America, he noted, but is rather centered on big cities with large African-American populations.

In all, there were 15,696 instances of murder and non-negligence manslaughter in the U.S. last year, the FBI said.

Early figures for 2016 indicate murders may still be rising. While Baltimore and Washington, D.C., are seeing their murder numbers fall back down so far this year, Chicago has seen a tremendous spike, to 316 homicides in the first half of 2016 compared with 211 in the first half of 2015. Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel delivered an emotional speech on crime last Thursday, and Chicago police officials have announced an increase of nearly 1,000 officers over two years.

A report by the Major Cities Chiefs Association found that for the first half of this year, murders rose in 29 of the nation’s biggest cities while they fell in 22 others.

Mr. Rosenfeld said the FBI data suggests the increase in murder may be caused by some version of the “Ferguson effect’’—a term often used by law-enforcement officials to describe what they see as the negative effects of the recent anti-police protests.

The killing by a police officer of an unarmed black 18-year-old in Ferguson, Mo., in 2014 led to protests there and around the country. Some law-enforcement officials, including FBI Director James Comey, have argued that since then, some officers may be more reluctant to get out of their patrol cars and engage in the kind of difficult work that reduces street crime, out of fear they may be videotaped and criticized publicly.

Mr. Rosenfeld suggested a different dynamic may be at play, though stemming from the same tensions. Members of minority and poor communities may be more reluctant to talk to police and help them solve crimes in cities where officers are viewed as untrustworthy and threatening, he said, particularly where there have been recent controversial killings by police officers.

The crime rise in such a short period of time eliminates possible causes like economic struggles or changing demographics, Mr. Rosenfeld said.

“What has happened in the course of the last year or two is attention to police-community relations and controversies over police use of deadly force, especially involving unarmed African-Americans,” he said.

Beyond that, the new figures show a growing racial disparity in who gets killed in America.

Nationally, the murder of black Americans outpaces that of whites—7,039 African-Americans were killed last year, compared with 5,854 whites, according to the data. The races of the remaining victims is unknown because not all police departments report it. That is in a nation where 13% of Americans identify solely as African-American and 77% identify solely as white.

In 2014, 698 more blacks were killed than whites, according to the FBI. In 2015, 1,185 more blacks were killed than whites, according to the data.

The number and percentage of killings involving guns also increased. In 2014, 67.9% of murders were committed with guns, compared to 71.5% in 2015, the FBI said. Guns have long been used in about two-thirds of the killings in America, data show.

Attorney General Loretta Lynch, in a speech Monday, said the report shows “we still have so much work to do. But the report also reminds us of the progress that we are making. It shows that in many communities, crime has remained stable or even decreased from historic lows reported in 2014.”

The new figures are certain to fuel the ongoing debate about what causes crime to rise and what should be done to reverse that.

John Pfaff, a professor at Fordham Law School, said the numbers are concerning but that it is too early to draw any definite conclusions from the data, noting that the murder rate in 2015 was still lower than in 2009.

“It’s not a giant rollback of things. 2015 is the third-safest year for violent crime since 1970,’’ Mr. Pfaff said. “The last time we saw a jump like this was 1989 to 1990, and that was a much more broad increase in crime.’’

Still, the new figures could further dampen efforts in Congress to pass laws cutting prison sentences for nonviolent offenders or others. Mr. Pfaff cautioned that the political impact of the data could be disproportionate to their actual significance.

“The politics of crime are very asymmetric,” he said. “We overreact to bad news and underreact to good news.’’

FBI Director James Comey, in releasing the figures, called for “more transparency and accountability in law enforcement.”

Mr. Comey said the FBI has been working to get better crime statistics, and to get them quicker, because the agency has been criticized for the length of time it has taken to process crime figures it receives from states.


Meurtre d’Ilan Halimi/10e: Arrêtez de nous embêter avec ce fait divers (Tortured and assassinated in France because he was Jewish: Ten years on, France still can’t seem to come to grips with its antisemitism)

13 février, 2016

GaucheFinkieilan – Spotlightquotes
Quiconque reçoit en mon nom un petit enfant comme celui-ci, me reçoit moi-même. Mais, si quelqu’un scandalisait un de ces petits qui croient en moi, il vaudrait mieux pour lui qu’on suspendît à son cou une meule de moulin, et qu’on le jetât au fond de la mer. Jésus (Matthieu 18: 6)
Ilan Jacques Halimi, torturé et assassiné en France parce qu’il était juif à l’âge de 23 ans. Pierre tombale d’Ilan Halimi à Jérusalem
S’il faut un village pour élever un gamin, il faut aussi un village pour en abuser un. Avocat arménien du film Spolight)
When you’re a poor kid from a poor family, religion counts for a lot. And when a priest pays attention to you it’s a big deal. He asks you to collect the hymnals or take out the trash, you feel special. It’s like God asking for help. And maybe it’s a little weird when he tells you a dirty joke but now you got a secret together so you go along. Then he shows you a porno mag, and you go along. And you go along, and you go along, until one day he asks you to jerk him off or give him a blow job. And so you go along with that too. Because you feel trapped. Because he has groomed you. How do you say no to God, right?  Phil Saviano (activiste dans Spotlight)
Tout le monde sait grosso modo ce qu’est un «bouc émissaire»: c’est une personne sur laquelle on fait retomber les torts des autres. Le bouc émissaire (synonyme approximatif: souffre-douleur) est un individu innocent sur lequel va s’acharner un groupe social pour s’exonérer de sa propre faute ou masquer son échec. Souvent faible ou dans l’incapacité de se rebeller, la victime endosse sans protester la responsabilité collective qu’on lui impute, acceptant comme on dit de «porter le chapeau». Il y dans l’Histoire des boucs émissaires célèbres. Dreyfus par exemple a joué ce rôle dans l’Affaire à laquelle il a été mêlé de force: on a fait rejaillir sur sa seule personne toute la haine qu’on éprouvait pour le peuple juif: c’était le «coupable idéal»… Ainsi le bouc émissaire est une «victime expiatoire», une personne qui paye pour toutes les autres: l’injustice étant à la base de cette élection/désignation, on ne souhaite à personne d’être pris pour le bouc émissaire d’un groupe social, quel qu’il soit (peuple, ethnie, entreprise, école, équipe, famille, secte). René Girard
Le peuple juif, ballotté d’expulsion en expulsion, est bien placé, certes, pour mettre les mythes en question et repérer plus vite que tant d’autres peuples les phénomènes victimaires dont il est souvent la victime. Il fait preuve d’une perspicacité exceptionnelle au sujet des foules persécutrices et de leur tendance à se polariser contre les étrangers, les isolés, les infirmes, les éclopés de toutes sortes. Cet avantage chèrement payé ne diminue en rien l’universalité de la vérité publique, il ne nous permet pas de tenir cette vérité pour relative. René Girard
Le judaïque et le chrétien passent pour trop obsédés (…) par les persécutions pour ne pas entretenir avec elles un rapport trouble qui suggère leur culpabilité. Pour appréhender le malentendu dans son énormité, il faut le transposer dans une affaire de victime injustement condamnée, une affaire si bien éclaircie désormais qu’elle exclut tout malentendu. À l’époque où le capitaine Dreyfus, condamné pour un crime qu’il n’avait pas commis, purgeait sa peine à l’autre bout du monde, d’un côté il y avait les « antidreyfusards » extrêmement nombreux et parfaitement sereins et satisfaits car ils tenaient leur victime collective et se félicitaient de la voir justement châtiée. De l’autre côté il y avait les défenseurs de Dreyfus, très peu nombreux d’abord et qui passèrent longtemps pour des traîtres patentés ou, au mieux, pour des mécontents professionnels, de véritables obsédés, toujours occupés à remâcher toutes sortes de griefs et de soupçons dont personne autour d’eux ne voyait le bien-fondé. On cherchait dans la morbidité personnelle ou dans les préjugés politiques la raison du comportement dreyfusard. En réalité, l’antidreyfusisme était un véritable mythe, une accusation fausse universellement confondue avec la vérité, entretenue par une contagion mimétique si surexcitée par le préjugé antisémite qu’aucun fait pendant des années ne parvint à l’ébranler. Ceux qui célèbrent l’« innocence » des mythes, leur joie de vivre, leur bonne santé et qui opposent tout cela au soupçon maladif de la Bible et des Évangiles commettent la même erreur, je pense, que ceux qui optaient hier pour l’antidreyfusisme contre le dreyfusisme. C’est bien ce que proclamait à l’époque un écrivain nommé Charles Péguy. Si les dreyfusards n’avaient pas combattu pour imposer leur point de vue, s’ils n’avaient pas souffert, au moins certains d’entre eux, pour la vérité, s’ils avaient admis, comme on le fait de nos jours, que le fait même de croire en une vérité absolue est le vrai péché contre l’esprit, Dreyfus n’aurait jamais été réhabilité, le mensonge aurait triomphé. Si on admire les mythes qui ne voient de victimes nulle part, et si on condamne la Bible et les Évangiles parce qu’au contraire ils en voient partout, on renouvelle l’illusion de ceux qui, à l’époque héroïque de l’Affaire, refusaient d’envisager la possibilité d’une erreur judiciaire. Les dreyfusards ont fait triompher à grand-peine une vérité aussi absolue, intransigeante et dogmatique que celle de Joseph dans son opposition à la violence mythologique. René Girard
Pour comprendre la question du bouc émissaire, il faut la comparer avec celle des boucs émissaires modernes. Ceux-ci sont très faciles à identifier, parce que notre société tout entière les a reconnus. Je pense, en particulier, à l’affaire Dreyfus. Dans ce dernier exemple, on a affaire à un véritable mythe, au sens où je l’entends, parce qu’il y a une victime innocente qui est condamnée par tout le monde, et d’une certaine manière transformée en personnage mythique. Le colonel Picquart et les premiers individus qui se sont élevés contre cette condamnation ont dû souffrir comme Dreyfus lui-même, être en quelque sorte martyrs, parce qu’ils se sont opposés non seulement à toutes les autorités, mais à une opinion publique qui était refermée mimétiquement sur elle-même. La vérité a néanmoins triomphé. Si dans cinq mille ans on retrouve les textes de l’affaire Dreyfus en vrac, les savants les étudieront ; si, ne sachant plus le français, ils se mettent à travailler statistiquement sur ces textes, ils y trouveront cent mille choses, toutes différentes, et en tireront des conclusions déconstructrices et très modernes, constatant qu’il y a des milliers d’interprétations de l’affaire Dreyfus et jugeant qu’elles se valent toutes, qu’elles ne sont ni vraies ni fausses. Ce ne sera pas vrai : en réalité, il n’y a que deux interprétations qui comptent, celle qui déclare la victime innocente et celle qui la dit coupable. La première est absolument vraie, et on ne peut pas la relativiser. La seconde est absolument fausse, et on ne peut pas relativiser sa fausseté. C’est ce qu’il faut dire aux étudiants à qui on apprend, aujourd’hui, que la vérité n’existe pas. René Girard
L’affaire des abus sexuels commis à Rotherham sur au moins 1 400 enfants est particulièrement choquante par son ampleur, mais aussi du fait de l’inaction des autorités. En cause : leur peur d’être accusées de racisme et leur tendance à dissimuler leurs défaillances. (…) Selon l’ancienne inspectrice des affaires sociales, au moins 1 400 enfants ont été victimes d’exploitation sexuelle entre 1997 et 2013. Nombre d’entre eux ont subi des viols à répétition de la part des membres de bandes dont les agissements étaient connus ou auraient dû l’être. Les enfants qui résistaient étaient battus. Ceux qui osaient parler était traités avec mépris par les adultes censés les protéger. (…) Personne à la mairie, dit-on, n’a osé dénoncer les bandes majoritairement asiatiques qui ont commis ces violences, de crainte d’être accusé de racisme. Force est de reconnaître que le racisme, même inconscient (tout comme le sexisme et l’homophobie), est aujourd’hui montré du doigt dans les services publics. Au point que beaucoup préfèrent fermer les yeux sur des viols d’enfants plutôt que de prendre le risque de subir ce type d’accusations. The Spectator
Spotlight is a fantastic film about the importance of “outsiders”, institutional corruption, thorough investigative journalism, and the dire consequences of inaction. Spotlight begins with the Boston Globe receiving a new Editor In Chief, Marty Baron, an awkward outsider (he’s Jewish, and not from Boston) who is viewed with suspicion by the staff. Marty tasks the Spotlight team to investigate a case of a Catholic priest who is allegedly a serial molester. The story snowballs gradually from there. Almost immediately the Spotlight team is hit with resistance within the Globe about their investigative methods and sources. The Catholic Church, an incredibly powerful institution in the city of Boston, uses all its might to dissuade Spotlight from continuing their research, but they steadfastly continue to investigate these allegations. The Catholic Church itself is portrayed in the film as a powerful, resourceful, and dangerous institution.  The Church has control and/or influence with nearly every major institution in the city of Boston. The “small-town” inclusiveness of the city only further allows the Church to abuse and misuse its power, while vigorously opposing or discrediting anyone who attempts to speak out. The Church even indirectly benefits from the shame of the victims and the parish pressuring them to keep silent. Mitchell Garabedian, an Armenian lawyer (another vital outsider standing against the Church) representing dozens of alleged victims, posits, “The Church thinks in centuries Mr. Rezendes, do you really think your paper has the resources to take this on?” As the Spotlight team traverses across the city of Boston in search of the truth, a church is often looming in the background, as if watching their every move. This is the behemoth the Spotlight team must defeat. (…) Their triumph reveals the corruption and gross negligence of not only the Catholic Church, but other powerful Boston institutions. Their efforts come at a high personal price as the investigation is emotionally draining on the reporters, all of whom were raised catholic. Each have their faith shattered by the investigation and are haunted by the results. Keaton’s reaction, in particular, toward the end of the film is utterly devastating. Its conclusion is as satisfying as it is tragic. It took two outsiders, one an Armenian lawyer, and the other a Jewish editor to get the ball rolling for the Spotlight team. Garabedian in particular is critical to their success and he illuminates the issue with a scathing indictment of Boston’s corruption, “If it takes a village to raise a child, it takes a village to abuse one.” (…) The final numbers revealed at the end will undoubtedly horrify you and leave you feeling depressed and angry. Why was this allowed to go on so long? Why did it take so long to uncover it? For Spotlight the answer is simple, no one wanted to look.  Steve Baqqi
The movie makes the case that it takes an outsider—like Baron, a Jewish editor new to a Catholic town, or the Armenian attorney (Stanley Tucci) making sure these cases actually go to trial—to enact change in a city as insular as Boston. A.A. Dowd
Spotlight (…) tells the story behind the story—how the paper uncovered the Catholic Church’s cover-up of a scandal that was hiding in plain sight, indeed, in the Globe’s own archives. Most films about journalism are cringe-worthy. Not this one. The film vividly documents what reporters do at their best. A story usually begins with a question. Something doesn’t make sense. Reporters begin with a premise and then gather facts that support or contradict their hypothesis. The best journalists follow those facts without “fear or favor,” as the New York Times, my former employer, likes to put it. Spotlight’s reporters slowly build their case with each new lurid revelation. Nothing comes easily. The film also lays bare the Catholic Church’s hold on Boston politics and the city’s deeply ingrained anti-Semitism and its xenophobic disdain for “outsiders.” It reveals the political and financial pressures imposed on the Globe and its investigative team by the Church and its powerful friends in a heavily Catholic city as the Globe’s Spotlight team starts to uncover the truth about decades of horrifying abuse, and the inadequacy of their own beliefs and assumptions. The Globe’s four-person team soon discovers, for instance, that its initial theory that pedophile priests are an anomaly—a few “rotten apples,” as the Church’s representatives and supporters repeatedly assure them—is wrong. Clips from the paper’s own “morgue,” where earlier stories yellowing with age are stored, show that the Globe had run a few modest stories years earlier about a priest accused of molesting several children. But the paper failed to follow up. The editors assumed, or wanted to believe, that this abuse was an isolated incident. Subsequent tips to reporters and editors were ignored. Spotlight’s reporters find that crucial documents have disappeared from court house files. This is Boston, after all, and Cardinal Bernard Law, then the head of the diocese, has friends everywhere. The team discovers that child abuse at the hands of God’s self-appointed disciples is no secret. In fact, it is widely known among Boston’s politicians, prosecutors, and other powerful parishioners who knew or suspected the prevalence of sexual crimes committed by priests against children but chose not to speak out. Their fear of spiritual and social excommunication allowed the abuse to fester. It takes a village to raise a child, observes Mitchell Garabedian, an irascible lawyer skillfully played by Stanley Tucci, who represents many of Boston’s child victims. And it takes the silence of a village to perpetuate such abuse. The film bravely acknowledges that the Globe itself was among those powerful institutions that did all too little for far too long. The Globe, having been purchased by the New York Times in 1993, beset by layoffs and declining subscribers and revenue, was focused on other news before it finally confronted the horrifying truth that it had declined to pursue for decades, while the number of shattered lives mounted. The decision to pursue the inquiry was made by the Globe’s chief editor, Martin Baron, who was a newcomer to Boston and who now heads the Washington Post. Brilliantly depicted by Liev Schreiber, Baron is a Florida native and not one of those Irish-American journalists who have most recently staffed the paper. Socially awkward, intellectually aloof, unmarried, uninterested in tickets to Red Sox games, Baron lacks the “people skills” that are crucial to advancement in most professional bureaucracies. He was the first Jew to head the paper. “So the new editor of the Boston Globe is an unmarried man of the Jewish faith who hates baseball?” Jim Sullivan, a lawyer who has represented priests, asks Walter “Robby” Robinson, editor of the Spotlight series, who is portrayed by Michael Keaton, an actor’s actor.(…) Baron’s outsider status, his Jewishness, is a natural target. Baron is not one of us, says Peter Conley (Paul Guilfoyle), who does the Church’s bidding. He reminds Robby over a drink at the Fairmont Hotel’s Oak Bar that people need the church, now more than ever. While neither the Church nor Cardinal Law (Len Cariou) who heads it in Boston is perfect, Conley acknowledges, why would the Globe risk destroying the faith of thousands of readers over a “few bad apples”? But neither Robby, who is deeply grounded in Boston, nor Baron, who has no familial stake in the community, is cowed. Conley tries driving a wedge between them. Baron is an outsider just “trying to make his mark,” he warns Robby. “He’ll be here for a few years and move on. Just like he did in New York and Miami,” he says. “Where you gonna go?” Baron is not the film’s only outsider. The most passionate member of the Spotlight team, Michael Rezendes (Mark Ruffalo), may hail from east Boston, but his family is Portuguese. Garabedian, the lawyer who has represented 86 local victims and one of Mark’s sources—is an Armenian. In a bar, they talk obliquely about how city insiders pressure outsiders to conform.(…) For decades, the victims’ stories cried out for public exposure. The Globe’s Spotlight team provided it. This understated, remarkable film documents that achievement. Tablet
J’ai trouvé fascinant de voir comment ce type, Marty Baron, qui vient de Miami, propose dès son premier jour au Boston Globe d’enquêter sur une possible tentative de l’Église catholique d’étouffer un scandale. C’était très audacieux de sa part. En outre, l’affaire Spotlight permettait de rendre un hommage appuyé à la tradition des grands reportages de la presse écrite. Ce qui m’inquiète énormément, c’est qu’il reste très peu de journalistes d’investigation aujourd’hui par rapport à il y a une quinzaine d’années. Grâce à ce film, je me suis dit qu’on allait pouvoir montrer l’impact du travail de fond de journalistes d’investigation aguerris. Qu’y a-t-il de plus important que le sort de nos enfants ? J’ai grandi dans le catholicisme, si bien que je connais bien l’institution, et que j’ai du respect et de l’admiration pour elle. Dans ce film, il ne s’agit pas d’éreinter l’Église, mais de se poser la question de savoir comment un tel phénomène peut se produire. L’Église s’est rendue coupable – et continue de le faire dans une certaine mesure – de violence institutionnelle, non seulement en comptant des violeurs d’enfants dans ses rangs, mais en étouffant leurs crimes. Comment ces actes épouvantables ont-ils pu être perpétrés pendant des décennies sans que quiconque ne proteste ? Tom McCarthy
That moment was probably the one moment where we took something that was not [precisely true] and we felt like we had the right to include it. To me, this is where the movie gets really compelling, because it certainly isn’t black and white. I think it raises the specter of just good reporters going after a bad institution, into more of a question of societal deference and complicity toward institutional or individual power. Intellectually, Josh and I really started to engage on a whole new level when we started to tap into that. Tom McCarthy (scénariste et réalisateur)
Robby, to my mind, is a hero. The whole, Why didn’t the paper get this earlier? — we sort of put that on Robby in the movie, because Robby is a symbol for us, the Everyman. In a lot of ways, he is our way in to the movie, and we wanted to turn it back on the viewer. Because to me, this is a collective failure, and it’s a question for all of us: Why didn’t we get this earlier? It’s noble in how he takes the blame for it, how he falls on his sword. I think we found that incredibly heroic, because that also was the interaction we had with him. Josh Singer (co-scénariste)
We’re reporters and we stumble around the dark a lot. We start out pretty damn ignorant, and we don’t even know how to ask the right questions until we sort of dig around for awhile. And the film shows that. The film shows that it’s sort of a two steps forward one step back approach. And by doing it that way, by having us uncover [our initial oversight], Tom makes it possible for a pretty large audience to confront something that they might otherwise avert their eyes to. Walter Robinson
The act is a terrible act, and the consequence is a terrible consequence, and there are a lot of folk who have suffered a great deal of pain and anguish. And that’s a source of profound pain and anguish for me and should be for the whole church. Any time that I made a decision, it was based upon a judgment that with the treatment that had been afforded and with the ongoing treatment and counseling that would be provided, that this person would not be [a] harm to others. I think we’ve come to appreciate and understand that whatever the assessment might be, the nature of some activity is such that it’s best that the person not be in a parish assignment. Cardinal Bernard Law (Nov 2, 2001)
Spotlight ignores the simple fact that years ago, Church officials acted time after time on the advice of trained « expert » psychologists from around the country when dealing with abusive priests. Secular psychologists played a major role in the entire Catholic Church abuse scandal, as these doctors repeatedly insisted to Church leaders that abusive priests were fit to return to ministry after receiving « treatment » under their care. Indeed, one of the leading psychologists in the country recommended to the Archdiocese of Boston in both 1989 and 1990 that – despite the notorious John Geoghan’s two-decade record of abuse – it was both « reasonable and therapeutic » to return Geoghan to active pastoral ministry including work « with children. » And it is not as if the Boston Globe could plead ignorance to the fact that the Church had for years been sending abusive priests to therapy and then returning them to ministry on the advice of prominent and credentialed doctors. As we reported earlier this year, back in 1992 – a full decade before the Globe unleashed its reporters against the Church – the Globe itself was enthusiastically promoting in its pages the psychological treatment of sex offenders, including priests – as « highly effective » and « dramatic. » The Globe knew that the Church’s practice of sending abusive priests off to treatment was not just some diabolical attempt to deflect responsibility and cover-up wrongdoing, but a genuine attempt to treat aberrant priests that was based on the best secular scientific advice of the day. Yet a mere ten years later, in 2002, the Globe acted in mock horror that the Church had employed such treatments. It bludgeoned the Church for doing in 1992 exactly what the Globe itself said it should be doing. The hypocrisy of the Globe is simply off the charts. And the issue of the Church’s use of these psychologists was not a surprise to the Globe when it actually interviewed Cardinal Bernard Law in November 2001, only two months before the Globe’s historic coverage: Reflecting on the most difficult issue of his tenure in Boston, Law said he is pained over the harm caused to Catholic youngsters and their families by clergy sexual misconduct, but that he always tried to prevent such abuse. The Media report
One of the film’s most important twists — one that even eluded the Globe — fell into the filmmakers’ laps by accident. [The following contains SPOILERS.] In Spotlight, which the pair co-wrote and McCarthy directed, the dramatic weight of the film is epitomized by a line from the crusading attorney played by Stanley Tucci: “If it takes a village to raise a child, it takes a village to abuse one.” The film asks the difficult question: Was everyone, including the media, too deferential to the Church while crimes were happening in their backyards? Late in the film, Robinson pressures one of his sources, a lawyer named Eric MacLeish (Billy Crudup), for information, and the slick attorney throws it back in his face: “I already sent you a list of names… years ago!” he says to Robinson and Pfeiffer. “I had 20 priests in Boston alone, but I couldn’t go after them without the press, so I sent you guys a list of names… and you buried it!” Except that exchange never actually happened. Nor did the scene where Pfeiffer searches the archives and brings the clipping of the December 1993 story to Robinson, proving MacLeish correct: it ran on B42 and didn’t include any of the priests’ names. And a later scene, where Robinson admits to his colleagues that he had been the Metro editor back in ‘93, accepting his role in not catching the story sooner, didn’t happen either. In reality, these sequences played out during the screenwriting process — when MacLeish told Singer and McCarthy. Though they already knew the main beats of the story they wanted to tell, they met with the Boston attorney — who’d represented numerous plaintiffs in complaints against the Church in the early 1990s — if only to help with casting. But not long into their chat, MacLeish dropped the bomb. “It was a little bit like the moment that’s in the movie: You had 20 priests’ [names] in Boston?” says Singer. “My reaction was quite similar to Rachel and Michael’s in that scene: That can’t possibly be true. Tom and I sort of looked at each other but didn’t say anything. But to double-check, I went back to the archives, and this article popped up, buried on page B42 [on the Metro section]. I was flabbergasted. I called Tom as soon as I got the article and said, ‘What do we do?’” They emailed Robinson the story, not knowing what to expect. Robinson responded quickly. “He owned up to it,” says Singer. “He had just taken over Metro and didn’t remember the story but, ‘This was on my watch and clearly we should’ve followed up on it.’ When we went to write the scene in the movie, we based it a lot on what Robby said there.” In the film, Keaton accepts his share of responsibility and asks his team, “Why didn’t we get it sooner?” And in real life, Robinson doesn’t dodge. “It happened on my watch and I’ll go to confession on it,” says Robinson, who recently returned to the Globe as an editor at large. “Like any journalist who’s been around this long, I’ve made my share of mistakes. But I have no memory of it. And if we’d found it in 2001, I don’t know if I would’ve had a memory of it then either. Looking at it from this vantage point 22 years later, I just have to scratch my head and wonder what happened. Should it have been played more prominently? In hindsight, based upon on what we later learned, yes, obviously.” For Singer and McCarthy, the revelation was a dramatic gift, even if they had to utilize some artistic license. “That moment was probably the one moment where we took something that was not [precisely true] and we felt like we had the right to include it,” says McCarthy. “To me, this is where the movie gets really compelling, because it certainly isn’t black and white. I think it raises the specter of just good reporters going after a bad institution, into more of a question of societal deference and complicity toward institutional or individual power. Intellectually, Josh and I really started to engage on a whole new level when we started to tap into that.” Because McCarthy and Singer had concluded from their research that the Globe was probably guilty of sins of omission, if not commission, when it came to its coverage of the Church in the early 1990s. (…) But if there was some editorial restraint, it was reflected by public opinion. “For the most part, [stories about clergy sex abuse were greeted with] disbelief,” says James Franklin, the Globe’s former religion reporter who wrote the December 1993 story that MacLeish cites in the film. “It was regarded as something extraordinary, as something obscene. There was always a suspicion that guys like me, guys like us, were sniping unfairly.” Matchan encountered the same resistance. “After I finished that magazine story, I thought, there’s so much more to say about this. I wanted to write a book about it,” she says. “So I contacted an agent, and she loved the idea. And I wrote a book proposal, she sent it out to a lot of publishing houses, and she got back these letters that just said, ‘This is a great proposal but nobody would ever read a book about sexual abuse by the clergy.’ That was the thinking in those days.” “Every archdiocese is in a city with a major paper — everybody missed this,” says Robinson. “Who can imagine that such an iconic institution could be responsible for causing such a devastating impact on the lives of thousands of children and covering it up? It’s almost beyond belief.” Even with the 1993 hiccups, it’s essential to note that the Boston Globe was the first to crack a scandal that reached far beyond Boston. As has been revealed in subsequent investigations around the world, Boston was not unique, and the Church has been forced to shell out billions in settlements to the victims of clergy sex abuse in other states and countries. “Robby, to my mind, is a hero,” says Singer. “The whole, Why didn’t the paper get this earlier? — we sort of put that on Robby in the movie, because Robby is a symbol for us, the Everyman. In a lot of ways, he is our way in to the movie, and we wanted to turn it back on the viewer. Because to me, this is a collective failure, and it’s a question for all of us: Why didn’t we get this earlier? It’s noble in how he takes the blame for it, how he falls on his sword. I think we found that incredibly heroic, because that also was the interaction we had with him.”  Robinson has been front and center in the film’s promotion, in part because the film captures his profession at its best, at a time in 2015 when most newspapers and media outlets are slashing staff and eliminating investigative reporting. “We’re reporters and we stumble around the dark a lot,” he says. “We start out pretty damn ignorant, and we don’t even know how to ask the right questions until we sort of dig around for awhile. And the film shows that. The film shows that it’s sort of a two steps forward one step back approach. And by doing it that way, by having us uncover [our initial oversight], Tom makes it possible for a pretty large audience to confront something that they might otherwise avert their eyes to.” Entertainment weekly
The monolithic power of the Catholic Church (until 2002) over civic, religious, and spiritual affairs in the city of Boston is chilling. It extended even into the Boston Globe where employees (many of whom were Catholic) simply knew you don’t take on the Catholic Church. They are even trained to believe that when the Catholic Church dismisses claims, they can’t possibly be true. It took an outside editor from New York to press the issue. (…) The kicker is that all the evidence was hiding in plain sight. Much is made of the fact that B.C. High (a Catholic Jesuit boys high school that some of the reporters themselves attended, maintained an infamous priest-coach molester on staff) is directly across the street from the Boston Globe building. Ironically, both the Catholic Church in Boston and the Boston Globe were at the height of their influence at the beginning of the new millennium, while a third character–the internet–is just becoming a serious player. (…) Very self-effacingly — and I would say unnecessarily and misplaced — the film blames The Globe itself in a big way for not reporting the story years earlier when lawyers and victims provided plenty of damning information that went ignored. Whatever culpability The Globe bears, they more than made up for it by compiling overwhelming, carefully-researched evidence that wouldn’t be just another isolated story that would get buried. “The Church” and Cardinal Law are distant, cold, uncaring shadows. The abusing priests are sick and distorted men — almost excused. The names Geoghan, Shanley and Talbot (among others) will conjure up ugly memories for all who lived at the heart of this nightmare or on its peripheries. (…) The faces and voices of the victims are given three-dimensional reality and the major focus. Even the heroic, crusading lawyer, Mitchell Garabedian — who insisted on bringing victims’ cases to the courts to expose the Church’s wrongdoing — is modestly underplayed. (…) Part of the initial incredulity of sectors of the public and the average Catholic in the pew to the Globe’s scoop was due to the Globe’s notorious anti-Catholicism since its very inception in 1872 (not unlike most of the old Boston WASP establishment). And many just didn’t believe that so many heinous crimes of this nature could have been so well hidden for so long. If it were true, surely we would have known? Surely we would have heard some rumors and gossip? Whoever did know something was silenced with hush money, or gave up when crushed by the power of the Church’s legal and “moral authority” arsenal and sway. But it didn’t take long for the undeniable, verifiable veracity of the charges to grip the city and the world. (…) There is precious little aftermath in the film, as it wraps up on the day the first big story is released (there were a total of 600 stories run relentlessly about the scandal for at least a year afterward in the Globe). A few words of Epilogue are given, and then we are left with a gaping wound of sadness. (…) Cardinal Law (…) in reality (…) was a magnetic, charismatic personality who had actually been a media favorite when he first came to Boston. (…) The one priest molester we see being interviewed begins to say that he was raped, but the thought was not continued. (The rest of that statistic is that it was discovered that some priests who molested children were molested by priests themselves when they were children. They grew up, become priests and continued the cycle.) (…) It’s just raw evil on display. Perhaps this is the best way for this particular film to handle this grave matter. Sexual abuse destroys hope. No soothing, reassuring sugar-coating or “Hollywood ending” in this film.(…) God is pretty much absent from the film. The one tragically poignant mention of God is from a male victim, now an adult, who says: “You don’t say no to God” (meaning when a priest propositioned him at twelve years old, the only right answer was “yes”). Again, perhaps this was the best way to handle “God” in this story that had nothing to do with a good God, and everything to do with bad men. The Church, although divinely instituted by Christ and guided by the Holy Spirit, is still human and sinful because of the free will of her members — even those who hold the authority. Thankfully, the sacraments and everything we need still operates through these men, regardless of their personal holiness. (…) “Spotlight” is an important film to see, even if you kept up and delved into these dark waters — as I did — when they first hit the shore. The restrained even-handedness of the storytelling is remarkable and will prevent it from being a “controversial” film. There’s a lot of dialogue in the film, but it’s never tedious. The narrative and the horror is in the information itself each time more is unearthed. Why should you see this film? To honor the victims, first of all, and second of all to understand how corruption — of any sort — works, in order to be vigilant and oppose it. NEVER AGAIN. Has ANY good come of all this sorrow? The suffering of the children, teens and their families has not been totally in vain. There is now a much greater awareness of the sexual abuse of minors all over the world, and new laws have been created to protect young people where there were none. (…) This problem is centuries old It’s not celibacy that is the problem, but a culture of secrecy brought about by a culture of absolute power absolute power corrupts absolutely (…) pedophiles automatically gravitate to wherever they have trusted access to children (seminaries, schools, sports teams, law enforcement, etc.) (…) anyone who reported behavior was threatened (get kicked out of seminary themselves, lose a job/position)silence=loyalty silence/playing the game=perks, advancement (…) it was keeping up appearances (bishops knew they could quash “problems,” abusers knew they would never get in trouble and would always be shielded: the perfect set-up) (…) toward the middle of the 20th century, psychiatrists and psychologists got involved (assessments, “treatment”) and kept giving the green light to put the priest back in ministry (bishops blindly “obeyed”) it wasn’t known that pedophilia is not “curable” (but it’s also not rocket science to see that a man abusing over and over and over and over again needs to be stopped, removed permanently) (…) the clergy sex abuse problems will continue unless there is courageous breaking with mentalities, cultures, habits, patterns, and cycles the presence of women in all (non-ordained) positions at all levels and places of Church life will help mitigate undisciplined male power (and male lack of empathy and sympathy) (…) child safety is everyone’s job, not just those in positions of authority. (…) Men do NOT want to be Superman or the Lone Ranger. They do NOT want to break ranks. Men are HORRIBLE at whistle-blowing. They are all about BAND OF BROTHERS. And this can be a good thing! Men are stronger together. They have each other’s backs. They can provide for and protect hearth and home better TOGETHER. The problem lies when they BAND TOGETHER FOR EVIL. To hide each other’s sins. To give each other a pass for their sins. Look the other way. Code of silence. Complete corruption. Whole cities run on this notion. But it doesn’t have to be that way. MEN NEED TO BAND TOGETHER FOR THE GOOD. Positive peer pressure. And call each other out when they need calling out. And always, always BAND TOGETHER FOR THE GOOD, NOT EVIL. Sr. Helena Burns
“If it takes a village to raise a child, it takes a village to abuse one,” is how one character here summarises the issues. This high-minded, well-intentioned movie, co-written and directed by Tom McCarthy, is about the Boston Globe’s investigative reporting team Spotlight, and its Pulitzer-winning campaign in 2001 to uncover widespread, systemic child abuse by Catholic priests in Massachusetts. The film shows that in the close-knit, clubbably loyal and very Catholic city of Boston, no one had any great interest in breaking the queasy, shame-ridden silence that made the church’s culture of abuse possible, and even tentatively suggests that the Globe itself was one of the Boston institutions affected. The paper had evidence of abuse 10 years before the campaign began, but somehow contrived to downplay and bury the story, and it took a new editor, both non-Boston and Jewish, to get things started. (…) What is interesting about this movie is that it reminds you that the “bad apple” theory of child abuse by priests was widely accepted until relatively recently. The team are stunned at the realisation that what they are working on is not like, say, a corruption case where there are more public officials on the take than they at first thought. It is a mass psychological dysfunction hidden in plain sight, which has stretched back decades or even centuries and will, unchecked, do precisely the same in the future. What McCarthy is saying in Spotlight is that threats never needed to be made. A word here, a drink there, a frown and a look on the golf course or at the charity ball, this was all that was needed to enforce a silence surrounding a transgression that most of the community could hardly believe existed anyway. It’s certainly a relevant issue in our unhappy, post-Yewtree times. The Guardian
L’étonnante enquête des quatre journalistes enquêteurs révèle ainsi l’incroyable développement tentaculaire d’un complot systémique sidérant. Boston est l’une des villes flambeaux du catholicisme, une institution puissante et totalement implanter dans l’ensemble de la ville et plus largement dans l’ensemble des États-Unis — comme le révèle le générique final du film listant les nombreuses villes américaines concernées par ce même scandale. Les méandres de cette affaire scandaleuse s’étendent donc à travers toutes les différentes sphères de la société de Boston, du système judiciaire au système éducatif. Et c’est aux journalistes de Spotlight de suivre ce jeu de pistes complexe pour dénouer l’effroyable vérité de l’affaire, résumée en ces mots par l’éditeur en chef du Boston Globe : « If it takes a village to raise a child, it takes a village to abuse one » (« s’il faut un village pour élever un enfant, il faut un village pour en maltraiter un »). L’accaparante complexité de l’affaire s’impose naturellement comme le sujet principal du film et éclipse toutes autres pistes narratives possibles : la vie privée des protagonistes, leur parcours émotionnel,  le doute conspirationniste, la crise du journalisme face à Internet et les nouvelles technologies 2.0, ou bien même l’impact historique et médiatique du 11 septembre… (…) Les cinéastes offrent ainsi au spectateur une compréhension plus juste et précise des tenants et aboutissants d’un complot effroyable, à l’échelle d’une société toute entière — et pas seulement à l’échelle américaine puisque de nombreuses villes en France et dans le monde sont citées à la fin du film. (…) Et même si de nombreux enjeux sont effleurés à travers le film — qu’ils soient moraux, sociaux, émotionnels, ou même spirituels —, une seule chose compte au final : l’implacable exposition de la vérité. Bulles de culture
Tout est vrai. L’enquête, publiée en 2001 par des journalistes du Boston Globe. Et le scandale qu’elle révéla. Durant des décennies, l’Eglise catholique locale a étouffé les abus sexuels perpétrés par des prêtres sur des enfants, et a systématiquement soustrait les coupables à la justice. Un phénomène à grande échelle : au moins un millier de victimes, rien que dans la région. Et une politique du silence qui s’étend bien ­au-delà du Massachusetts… « Spotlight » est le nom de l’équipe de journalistes qui, au bout de longs mois d’efforts, en dépit de toutes les pressions, a révélé la vérité. Ce qui lui a valu le prix Pulitzer. Le film est dopé à la même adrénaline, à la même ténacité citoyenne que son modèle évident, Les Hommes du Président, d’Alan J. Pakula, déjà basé sur un scoop historique, la révélation du scandale du Watergate par le Washington Post. Tout y est : l’effervescence en salle de rédaction, les impasses et les coups de théâtre, les résistances, les informateurs-clés. Manches retroussées, téléphone collé à l’oreille, les comédiens multiplient les morceaux de bravoure, les scènes électrisantes. Ils rivalisent d’aisance et de charisme en incarnant des figures diverses et passionnantes : Michael Keaton, vétéran de l’info, aux prises avec son propre milieu de grands bourgeois catholiques ; Liev Schreiber, rédac chef taiseux et déterminé ; Rachel McAdams, l’enquêtrice dont l’écoute et la délicatesse permettent toutes les confidences. Sans oublier Marc Ruffalo : en limier pugnace et impertinent, à la fois concentré et intense, il trouve l’un de ses plus beaux rôles. Subtils, ambigus — humains, en quelque sorte —, ces personnages ne sont pas des preux chevaliers au service du quatrième pouvoir. Ce sont des bosseurs. Le réalisateur Tom McCarthy (The Visitor, The Station Agent) a choisi, avant tout, de filmer leur travail, dans son aspect le plus quotidien et le plus endurant : une formidable mécanique de petits détails, de bouts de papier, de porte-à-porte et de méthodes différentes — l’un force les barrages, l’autre cultive ses relations. Cet hommage réaliste et vibrant à tous les chasseurs de vérité vient d’obtenir six nominations aux Oscars. Télérama
« Nous avions un projet d’attentat contre le Bataclan parce que les propriétaires sont juifs. » Cette phrase, glaçante au regard de la prise d’otages et du carnage qui aurait fait ce vendredi « une centaine de morts », selon des sources policières, a été prononcée dans les bureaux de la DCRI, en février 2011. Les services français interrogeaient alors des membres de « Jaish al-Islam », l’Armée de l’islam, soupçonnés de l’attentat qui a coûté la vie à une étudiante française au Caire en février 2009. Ils planifiaient un attentat en France et avaient donc pris pour cible la célèbre salle de spectacle parisienne. En 2007 et en 2008, le Bataclan avait déjà été sous la menace de groupes plus ou moins radicaux. En cause : la tenue régulière de conférences ou de galas d’organisations juives, notamment le « Magav », une unité de garde-frontières dépendant de la police d’Israël. En décembre 2008, alors qu’une opération de l’armée israélienne a lieu dans la bande de Gaza, les menaces autour du Bataclan se font plus précises. Sur le Web, une vidéo montrant un groupe d’une dizaine de jeunes, le visage masqué par des keffiehs, qui menacent les responsables du Bataclan à propos de l’organisation du gala annuel du Magav. À l’époque, Le Parisien y consacre un article sans que cette poignée de militants soit véritablement identifiée. Dans la foulée, ce meeting annuel sera reporté. (…) la presse israélienne rappelait que le groupe de rock Eagles of Death qui se produisait ce vendredi 13 au soir avait effectué une tournée en Israël. Le groupe avait alors dû faire face à plusieurs appels au boycott, ce qui ne les avait pas empêchés de s’y produire. Le Point
LES PRÉJUGÉS ANTISÉMITES SONT LARGEMENT RÉPANDUS AU SEIN DE LA POPULATION MUSULMANE, PLUS QUE CHEZ L’ENSEMBLE DES FRANÇAIS 51% des musulmans se déclarent d’accord avec au moins 5 des 8 stéréotypes testés 90% considèrent que les juifs sont très soudés entre eux » 74% que « les juifs ont beaucoup de pouvoir » 66% qu’« ils sont plus riches que la moyenne des Français » 67% qu’« ils sont trop présents dans les médias » 62% qu’« ils sont plus attachés à Israël qu’à la France » 26% qu’« ils sont plus intelligents que la moyenne » 29% qu’« ils ne sont pas vraiment des Français comme les autres » Sondage IPSOS-JDD
You are our first ambassadors. Be the ones who lead others, even the reticent, those who might not want to see the film,” Arcady told a crowd at the Paris preview for 24 Days. “Even those who say, ‘Oh la la, Ilan Halimi, that’s a fait divers [a petty news item], stop bothering us with that.’ And seeing the film you will understand that it is not a petty news item. And those who still think that today, they are the ones who really needed to be persuaded to come see the film. Alexandre Arcady
Dix ans plus tard, nous continuons à éprouver un remords collectif, celui d’avoir hésité à désigner par son nom la haine antisémite . (…) Derrière ce crime il y avait l’antisémitisme et la haine de l’autre. Le supplice d’Ilan Halimi annonçait à sa manière une série de gestes assassins : il annonçait les tueries de Mohamed Merah en 2012, la fusillade du musée juif de Bruxelles en 201 ou encore le drame de l’Hyper Cacher l’an dernier. Bernard Cazeneuve (ministre de l’Intérieur)
Malheureusement, les faits m’ont donné raison. Quand on aborde de façon critique la politique du gouvernement israélien ou encore les prises de position des intellectuels et institutions communautaires en France sur la question du conflit israélo-palestinien, on se met forcément un peu en danger. Il y a deux risques. Le premier est d’être accusé d’antisémitisme plus ou moins assumé. Cela a été le cas. J’ai été attaqué de façon scandaleuse par un journaliste, Frédéric Haziza, et par Julien Dray, dont on peut par ailleurs s’étonner qu’il soit encore élu au conseil régional d’Île-de-France au vu de l’ensemble de son œuvre et par rapport au désir de moralité qui semble gouverner dans les hautes sphères. Ceci étant, après cette polémique odieuse m’accusant de nier la dimension antisémite du meurtre d’Ilan Halimi, une pétition a été lancée et a recueilli plusieurs milliers de signatures sur le thème « Stop à la chasse aux sorcières ». Lorsque je regarde la liste des signataires et leur réputation morale, je suis réconforté. Le second risque, c’est le black-out. Les médias dans leur grande majorité n’ont pas voulu parler du livre et de ses thèses. La tentation chez beaucoup de mes collègues chercheurs et de nombreux journalistes consiste à considérer que ça divise l’opinion ou qu’il n’y a que des coups à prendre et qu’il est donc plus prudent de ne pas aborder ce sujet. Mais, en attendant, le débat continue, et parfois, de façon plus malsaine. D’ailleurs, je suis pris entre deux écueils, les ultras pro-israéliens m’accusent d’antisémitisme. Et lorsque, dans des débats un peu chauds, je m’élève contre l’utilisation du terme « entité sioniste » pour parler de l’État d’Israël, que je refuse la vision d’une presse contrôlée par les juifs ou que je dénonce Dieudonné, d’autres m’accusent d’être payé par les juifs. Il y a donc là un enjeu essentiel pour notre débat démocratique. Combattre l’antisémitisme mais refuser le chantage consistant à faire un amalgame entre critique politique du gouvernement israélien et antisémitisme. (…) Le discours des institutions juives ou des intellectuels communautaires, pour ne pas dire communautaristes, répète en boucle que l’antisémitisme est très fort en France, qu’il y a une « montée » de ce phénomène, et que la menace antisémite est plus importante et virulente que les autres formes de racisme. Il faudrait alors plus se mobiliser contre cette forme de racisme. Et, en annexe, ne pas critiquer le gouvernement israélien car cela alimenterait l’antisémitisme. Pour une grande partie de la population qui vit de nombreuses discriminations au quotidien, les Noirs et les Arabes, ce discours est vécu de façon assez douloureuse. Ils ont l’impression qu’on sous-estime les discriminations dont ils sont victimes et que certains doivent être plus protégés que d’autres. Il y a alors danger. Les études et les faits montrent que l’antisémitisme, même s’il n’a pas disparu, est nettement moins fort qu’il y a une ou deux générations en France. En même temps, chaque année au dîner du Crif, le président parle d’une montée de l’antisémitisme. En fait, le grand revirement est que l’antisémitisme est moins fort mais le soutien à Israël dans la population française l’est également. (…) La défense inconditionnelle de l’État d’Israël des institutions juives, quelle que soit son action ou sa politique, très rapidement reliée à la lutte contre l’antisémitisme contribue à faire peur aux juifs français. Cela vient poser une barrière entre juifs et non-juifs autour de cet enjeu du soutien à Israël. Cela est très dangereux. On voit, par exemple, sur quelles bases le Crif a décidé de ne plus inviter le Parti communiste à son dîner annuel. Que l’on me montre la moindre déclaration d’un dirigeant communiste qui verse dans l’antisémitisme. Par contre, on reproche aux communistes leur solidarité avec la cause palestinienne. Le Crif privilégie ainsi son soutien à Israël au détriment du combat contre l’antisémitisme. Tout en se disant en faveur d’un règlement pacifique, les institutions et les intellectuels communautaires pilonnent systématiquement ceux qui sont tout autant pour la paix mais qui estiment que le blocage de la situation provient plus de l’occupant que de l’occupé. Les institutions juives mettent en avant la lutte contre l’antisémitisme pour tétaniser toute expression politique contraire ou critique à l’égard du gouvernement israélien. Elle est directement taxée soit d’antisémitisme, soit de le nourrir en important le conflit du Proche-Orient. Cet argument est pour le moins paradoxal puisque ce sont les mêmes qui, sans cesse, appellent les juifs de France à démontrer une solidarité infaillible au gouvernement israélien. Ils sont donc très largement responsables de ce faux lien. (…) Il y a eu Mohamed Merah qui a tué des enfants parce qu’ils étaient juifs. Nous ne sommes pas à l’abri d’un tel acte terroriste qui, par définition, est incontrôlable et on ne peut pas nier l’existence d’un tel risque. Il y a eu aussi l’affaire Ilan Halimi, même si plus complexe, qui a une dimension antisémite mais qui ne peut pas se résumer uniquement à un acte antisémite. Mais, il n’y a pas de recrudescence d’agressions ou d’injures. Les actes antisémites, bien sûr toujours trop nombreux, représentent un nombre faible face à l’ensemble des actes violents répertoriés, dans la rue, à l’école, en milieu hospitalier, etc. Je donne à ce sujet des chiffres très précis. Nous vivons dans une société violente. Et puis, surtout, il y a beaucoup d’agressions racistes qui touchent d’autres catégories de populations. Les actes antimusulmans ou anti-Noirs sont très nombreux alors qu’ils ne semblent pas faire autant l’objet d’une vigoureuse dénonciation des médias ou des pouvoirs publics. Cela est largement ressenti. Les médias et les élus de la République font très souvent du « deux poids, deux mesures », aggravent un mal qu’ils disent vouloir combattre. (…) Je cite plusieurs exemples d’agressions d’autres communautés, pas seulement arabes, de faits graves pas ou peu médiatisés. Cela au final se retourne contre les juifs français car cela crée un sentiment d’être traité différemment. Il ne faut pas ignorer l’existence d’une nouvelle forme d’antisémitisme en banlieue aujourd’hui. Cela est dû plus à une forme de jalousie sociétale qu’à une haine raciale. Il y a le sentiment que l’on en fait plus pour les uns que pour les autres. Par ailleurs, le Crif joue à la fois un rôle de repoussoir et de modèle. Beaucoup de musulmans y voient la bonne méthode pour se faire entendre des pouvoirs publics et veulent faire pareil. Le risque est de se retrouver communauté contre communauté. Faire ce constat, ce n’est pas vouloir dresser les uns contre les autres. Je réclame au contraire l’égalité de traitement. La République doit considérer tous ses enfants de la même façon. Quels que soient l’histoire et les drames vécus précédemment, il n’y a pas de raison que certains soient plus protégés que les autres. Je remarque toutefois que l’on parle beaucoup plus des dégradations de mosquée, des agressions et des injures islamophobes. Une prise de conscience est en train de s’opérer dans les médias certainement liée à la pression populaire et aux réseaux sociaux. Pascal Boniface (mai 2004)
L’antisémitisme, répandu parmi les jeunes musulmans en Europe, possède des caractéristiques spécifiques qui le distinguent de la haine des Juifs présente au sein de la population générale, dans les sociétés qui les environnent. Pourtant, il existe aussi des points communs. De nombreuses affirmations passe-partout, concernant l’origine de l’antisémitisme musulman en Europe, sont sans fondement. Il n’existe, notamment, aucune preuve que cette attitude haineuse soit fortement influencée par la discrimination que les jeunes musulmans subissent dans les sociétés occidentales. (…) J’ai mené 117 entretiens auprès de jeunes musulmans, dont la moyenne d’âge était de 19 ans, à Paris, Berlin et Londres. La majorité a fait part de certains sentiments antisémites, avec plus ou moins de virulence. Ils expriment ouvertement leurs points de vue négatifs envers les Juifs. C’est souvent dit avec agressivité et parfois, ces prises de positions incluent des intentions de commettre des actes antisémites. (…) Beaucoup de jeunes auprès desquels j’ai enquêté, ont exprimé des stéréotypes antisémites « traditionnels ». Les théories de la Conspiration et les stéréotypes qui associent les Juifs à l’argent sont les plus fréquents. Les Juifs sont souvent réputés comme riches et avares. Ils ont aussi fréquemment perçus comme formant une même entité ayant, parce que Juifs, un intérêt commun malfaisant. Ces stéréotypes archétypaux renforcent une image négative et potentiellement menaçante « des Juifs », dans la mentalité de ces jeunes. (…) Habituellement, ils ne différencient absolument pas les Juifs des Israéliens. Ils utilisent leur perception du conflit au Moyen-Orient comme une justification de leur attitude globalement hostile envers les Juifs, y compris, bien sûr, envers les Juifs allemands, français et britanniques. Ils proclament souvent que les Juifs ont volé les terres des Arabes Palestiniens ou, alternativement, des Musulmans. C’est une assertion essentielle, pour eux, qui leur suffit à délégitimer l’Etat d’Israël, en tant que tel. L’expression « Les Juifs tuent des enfants » est aussi fréquemment entendue. C’est un argument qui sert de clé de voûte pour renforcer leur opinion qu’Israël est fondamentalement malfaisant. Puisqu’ils ne font aucune distinction entre les Israéliens et les Juifs en général, cela devient une preuve supplémentaire du « caractère foncièrement cruel » des Juifs. Et c’est aussi ce qui les rend particulièrement émotifs. (…) L’hypothèse d’une hostilité générale, et même éternelle entre les Musulmans (ou Arabes) et les Juifs est très répandue. C’est souvent exprimé dans des déclarations telles que : « Les Musulmans et les Juifs sont ennemis », ou, par conséquent : « Les Arabes détestent les Juifs ». Cela rend très difficile, pour des jeunes qui s’identifient fortement comme Musulmans ou Arabes, de prendre leurs distances à l’encontre d’une telle vision. (…) Nous savons que l’antisémitisme n’est jamais rationnel. Pourtant, certains jeunes musulmans n’essaient même pas de justifier leur attitude. Pour eux, si quelqu’un est Juif, c’est une raison suffisante pour qu’il suscite leur répugnance. Des déclarations formulées par les enquêtés, il ressort que les attitudes négatives envers les Juifs sont la norme au sein de leur environnement social. Il est effrayant de constater qu’un grand nombre d’entre eux expriment le désir d’attaquer physiquement les Juifs, lorsqu’ils en rencontrent dans leurs quartiers. (…) Certains d’entre eux racontent les actes antisémites commis dans leur environnement, et dont les auteurs n’ont jamais été pris. Plusieurs interviewés approuvent ces agressions. Parfaitement au courant du fait que d’autres, issus de leur milieu d’origine sociale, religieuse et ethnique, s’en prennent à des Juifs, ne font pas l’objet d’arrestation et n’ont pas clairement été condamnés, ne fait que renforcer la normalisation de la violence contre les Juifs dans leurs cercles de relations ». (…) Les différences entre les enquêtés des trois pays, concernant leurs points de vue antisémites, restent, de façon surprenante, extrêmement ténues. On perçoit quelques divergences dans leur argumentation. Les Musulmans allemands mentionnent que les Juifs contrôlent les médias et les manipulent dans l’unique but de dissimuler les supposées « atrocités » d’Israël. En France, les interviewés disent souvent que les Juifs jouent un rôle prédominant dans les médias nationaux et la télévision. Au Royaume-Uni, ils mentionnent principalement l’influence des Juifs dans les programmations américaines, aussi bien que dans l’industrie cinématographique qui provient des Etats-Unis. (…) Des non-Musulmans emploient, également, le mot “Juif” de façon péjorative, en Allemagne et en France. En Grande-Bretagne, ce phénomène est, généralement, moins perceptible, parmi les sondés musulmans, notamment. Certains jeunes musulmans affirment que c’est faux de prétendre que les Juifs auraient une vie meilleure en France que les Musulmans. Il est possible que cela découle du fait que les Juifs de France sont souvent plus visibles que ceux d’Allemagne et de Grande-Bretagne et, en outre, que de nombreux Juifs de France sont aussi des immigrés d’Afrique du Nord, ce qui alimentee un certain sentiment de concurrence à leur égard. (…) En Allemagne, certains individus interrogés emploient souvent des arguments particuliers qu’ils ont empruntés à la société dans son ensemble, tels que les remboursements et restitutions compensatrices, supposées trop élevées, versées à Israël, du fait de la Shoah. Un autre argument fréquemment proposé, auquel ils croient, est que les Juifs, à la lumière de la Shoah, « devraient être des gens bien meilleurs que les autres, alors qu’Israël incarnerait exactement l’inverse. (…) Pourtant, il existe, aussi, heureusement, de jeunes musulmans qui prennent leurs distances avec l’antisémitisme. Cela arrive, même s’ils ont d’abord été largement influencés par des points de vue antisémites, de la part de leurs amis, de leur famille et des médias. Cela prouve, une fois encore, qu’on ne devrait pas généraliser , dès qu’il s’agit de telle ou telle population ». (…) L’antisémitisme peut encore être renforcé [chez eux] en se référant à une attitude générale négative, portée par la communauté musulmane envers les Juifs. Les références au Coran ou aux Hadiths peuvent être utilisées avec, pour implication que D.ieu lui-même serait d’accord avec ce point de vue. Pourtant, on ne doit pas se laisser induire en erreur par la conclusion de sens commun, que l’antisémitisme musulman est le produit exclusif de la haine d’Israël, ou de l’antisémitisme occidental « classique », ou encore des enseignements de l’Islam, ou de leur identité musulmane. La réalité est bien plus complexe. Günther Jikeli
Juif et donc riche. C’est ainsi que les bourreaux d’Ilan Halimi ont justifié les vingt-quatre jours de torture qu’ils ont fait subir au jeune homme. Dix ans après la découverte de son corps, il reste pour sept Français sur dix le « symbole de ce à quoi peuvent conduire les préjugés sur les juifs », nous apprend une étude de l’Ifop* pour SOS Racisme et l’Union des étudiants juifs (UEJF) que nous dévoilons en exclusivité. Cette « affaire », dont 61 % des sondés disent qu’elle les a « beaucoup » touchés, n’a pourtant pas permis d’anéantir les stéréotypes dont elle a été l’emblème. L’étude démontre en effet qu’au-delà d’Internet où des torrents de haine antijuive se déversent, les préjugés antisémites ont la dent dure. 32 % estiment que les juifs se servent dans « leur propre intérêt » de leur statut de victime du nazisme, de même que de nombreux sondés admettent pour vraie l’idée de juifs plus riches que la moyenne (31 %), avec par exemple trop de pouvoir dans les médias (25 %). Le Parisien
*Le 13 février 2006, Ilan Halimi est retrouvé nu, bâillonné et menotté le long d’une voie ferrée de la banlieue parisienne. Vivant. Ou plutôt agonisant. Il mourra dans l’ambulance qui l’emmène vers l’hôpital. Cheveux tondus, traces de brûlures, plaies par arme blanche… son corps témoigne des sévices qu’il a subis pendant près de trois semaines dans la cave d’une barre HLM de la cité de Pierre-Plate où il a été séquestré par ceux qui seront surnommés le « gang des barbares » au cours de leur procès. Vingt-sept personnes seront poursuivies. A leur tête : Youssouf Fofana, le « cerveau » de la bande. C’est lui qui recrute les « geôliers » et « l’appât ». Lui aussi qui cible Ilan Halimi, qu’il choisit parce qu’il est « juif donc riche », selon ses préjugés antisémites, espérant extorquer une rançon à sa famille. Condamné en 2009 à la perpétuité avec vingt-deux ans de sûreté, Fofana a ajouté trois ans à sa peine en 2014, pour avoir agressé des surveillants de la prison de Condé-sur-Sarthe. Emma, elle, a été condamnée à neuf ans de prison. Elle est celle qui, le 21 janvier 2006, a attiré sa victime dans la cave qui lui servira de geôle et de lieu de torture. En janvier 2012, elle a retrouvé la liberté après six années passées en prison. Le Monde
Nous n’oublions rien de ceux qui ont commis l’irréparable, de ceux qui ont encouragé et ceux qui se sont tus. Porte-parole du collectif Haverim
Le discours des institutions juives ou des intellectuels communautaires, pour ne pas dire communautaristes, répète en boucle que l’antisémitisme est très fort en France, qu’il y a une « montée » de ce phénomène, et que la menace antisémite est plus importante et virulente que les autres formes de racisme. Il faudrait alors plus se mobiliser contre cette forme de racisme. Et, en annexe, ne pas critiquer le gouvernement israélien car cela alimenterait l’antisémitisme. Pour une grande partie de la population qui vit de nombreuses discriminations au quotidien, les Noirs et les Arabes, ce discours est vécu de façon assez douloureuse. Ils ont l’impression qu’on sous-estime les discriminations dont ils sont victimes et que certains doivent être plus protégés que d’autres. Il y a alors danger. Les études et les faits montrent que l’antisémitisme, même s’il n’a pas disparu, est nettement moins fort qu’il y a une ou deux générations en France. En même temps, chaque année au dîner du Crif, le président parle d’une montée de l’antisémitisme. En fait, le grand revirement est que l’antisémitisme est moins fort mais le soutien à Israël dans la population française l’est également. Pascal Boniface
J’ai, à titre personnel, un inconfort philosophique avec la place [que ce débat] a pris, parce que je pense qu’on ne traite pas le mal en l’expulsant de la communauté nationale. Le mal est partout. Déchoir de la nationalité est une solution dans un certain cas, et je vais y revenir, mais à la fin des fins, la responsabilité des gouvernants est de prévenir et de punir implacablement le mal et les actes terroristes. C’est cela notre devoir dans la communauté national. Emmanuel Macron
Je comprends et je respecte profondément les réflexions et les réactions sur ce sujet. Il faut répondre à trois exigences  : la protection des Français, le respect de l’engagement pris par le président de la République – l’autorité de l’Etat en dépend – et la cohésion nationale. C’est une mesure symboliquement importante  : elle donne un sens à ce que c’est que d’appartenir à la communauté nationale. (…) Je suis ministre de la République, donc pleinement solidaire de la politique gouvernementale. Emmanuel Macron
En interrogeant la pertinence du débat autour de la déchéance de nationalité, Emmanuel Macron acte le débat qui l’oppose à Manuel Valls sur l’identité de la gauche au pouvoir, et le refus de l’avènement d’une « gauche Finkielkraut ». Peut-on « recadrer » celui qui dit que « le mal est partout »? La réalité s’impose, et même un Premier ministre de la Ve République n’y peut rien. Quoi qu’il prétende. Quoi qu’il décrète. En cela, la sortie d’Emmanuel Macron en plein débat sur le projet de révision constitutionnelle fait date. Elle ne relève pas seulement de la petite polémique politique comme les aiment les commentateurs old school, les grands lecteurs du temps court, formés au culte de la petite phrase, mais bien au-delà en ce que d’un coup, elle synthétise le grand débat de la gauche contemporaine. (…) Le message est adressé à Manuel Valls, et à travers lui à une certaine idée de la gauche en mutation. Emmanuel Macron refuse la finkielkrautisation de la gauche, ou pire encore, sa zemmourisation. Il lance un appel à la raison, à la compréhension, à la refondation autour des valeurs qui fondent la gauche. Macron refuse l’avènement de la gauche Finkielkraut qui s’affichait en Une du Point la semaine passée. (…) Du point de vue de l’ancien élève de Paul Ricoeur, cela signifie qu’il faut comprendre pourquoi le mal nait. Aller aux racines. Comprendre non pour excuser, mais pour combattre. Là encore, l’invitation à incliner en faveur de l’action, toujours féconde, plutôt qu’à la réaction, toujours stérile, est patente. (..) il faut bien se garder de réduire l’affrontement Macron/Valls à la seule dimension de leurs personnes. Derrière ce choc, se profile l’affrontement des deux gauches modernes appelées à incarner l’avenir. L’enjeu n’est pas anodin. Ou bien la gauche se contente de s’adapter à l’air du temps que commande l’apparent succès des valeurs réactionnaires, portées par les bardes du déclinisme, et alors Manuel Valls est fondé à s’en aller écouter le discours d’Alain Finkielkraut lors de sa cérémonie de réception à l’Académie française, le tout en saluant ce « grand philosophe ». Si l’on en demeure là, cette défaite de la pensée de gauche lui promettrait, en cas de déroute en 2017, une longue cure d’opposition. Ou bien la gauche, nécessairement convertie à l’économie libérale, s’efforce de demeurer fidèle à l’héritage de Jaurès, Blum, Mendès France et Mitterrand, et elle continue de vouloir penser le monde, et toutes les formes de Mal qui le hantent, pour mieux le transformer. « Finkielkrautétiser » la gauche, ce serait acter que la guerre culturelle a été perdue. Macron questionne parce qu’il pense que c’est ainsi que la gauche en politique trouvera les réponses en elle, sans céder à la droitisation de l’époque. Cela peut heurter. Bousculer. Déranger. Confronter le temps politique du temps court au temps long. « En ce qui concerne les choses humaines, ne pas s’indigner mais comprendre. » Macron est un spinoziste en politique. Et c’est une démarche qui à la mérite d’être authentiquement de gauche. Et moderne. Et refondatrice pour un socialisme qui parait avoir arrêté de penser le monde depuis vingt ans. (…) Comme Macron le disait lui-même, dans le 1, en juillet dernier: « L’exigence du quotidien qui va avec la politique, c’est d’accepter le geste imparfait », et d’ajouter: « On bascule dans le temps politique en acceptant l’imperfection du moment ». Accepter l’imperfection, la comprendre, y compris pour comprendre le Mal et mieux le combattre. Macron est un bien-pensant, et il est moderne, il est donc la preuve que la gauche Finkielkraut n’a pas encore gagné. Bruno Roger-Petit
A large part of the Jewish community is convinced that the anti-Semitic dimension of Ilan Halimi’s murder has not been mentioned enough, while another large part of public opinion thinks this affair has been overexposed because of its anti-Semitic dimension and many parents ask themselves: ‘Would they have talked about this if the victim had been my son?’ Pascal Boniface (2014)
In January 2006, just weeks after riots had set aflame the troubled banlieues and housing projects throughout the country, a single horrific killing exposed an icy violence that was in its way even more shocking. Ilan Halimi, 23, was kidnapped by the self-styled “Gang of Barbarians” and tortured to death because he was Jewish and they thought his family or other Jews would pay for his freedom. And when 24 Days director Arcady describes Ilan Halimi as the first person murdered for being Jewish in France since the Second World War, it is lost on no one that he was not the last. During Mohamed Merah’s al Qaeda-inspired killing spree in 2012, the motorcycle-riding gunman slaughtered three children and a rabbi outside a Jewish school in Toulouse. Ruth Halimi (…) pleads with cops who keep insisting her son’s kidnapping is purely financially motivated and ignore the anti-Semitic undertones. “Why are you afraid of the truth?!” she cries, convinced the intent is more sinister and her son’s fate is sealed. The detectives are shown telling her that refusal to pay ultimately will protect her son because he’ll be valued as a bargaining chip. Hot on the heels of the November 2005 banlieue riots, tensions remained high. And a spectacularly embarrassing false alarm not long before that had clouded the authorities’ judgment. In the summer of 2004, a young woman told police she had been attacked by six young black and Arab men on a suburban Paris commuter train. She claimed the muggers tore her clothes and markered swastikas onto her bare stomach, cut a lock of her hair, and toppled her baby’s stroller. In a nation still riven with guilt over its WWII persecution of Jews, the incident sparked a swift political response from then-President Jacques Chirac. But days later the young woman recanted, eventually explaining she was just vying for her parents’ attention. In the event, the Gang of Barbarians eluded the 400 police officers assigned to the case until it was too late. Two dozen men and women would be convicted for their varying degrees of involvement. The gang’s 25-year-old ringleader, Youssouf Fofana, the French-born son of Ivorian immigrants, was captured on the run in Abidjan 10 days after he had stabbed Halimi, doused him with a flammable substance, set him alight, and left him for dead. The new film’s theatrical release goes some way toward repairing what many saw as an injustice. Both the 2009 trial and a 2010 appeal were held behind closed doors because some of the accused were minors at the time of the events. Halimi’s family and anti-racism groups had pled for public trials, citing their educational value. But one observer suggests the renewed media interest in Halimi’s case could itself spur resentment. In a new book on what he sees as France’s unhealthy tendency to internalize the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Pascal Boniface argues that anti-Semitism has in fact declined radically in France over recent decades. The director of France’s Institute of International and Strategic Relations suggests Jewish community leaders and the media risk a sort of public fatigue by interpreting anti-Semitic acts out of that context and out of proportion to crimes against other groups. He spotlights the Halimi case as an example of anti-Semitism overexposed to a counterproductive degree. The Daily Beast
“Don’t you see?” I plead with the police. “They contacted a rabbi because he’s a Jew. Don’t you recognize that this is an anti-Semitic act?” But the authorities will have none of it. (…) Ilan’s situation, we later learn, has taken a turn for the worse. The concierge of the building notifies the kidnappers that they will have to vacate the apartment. He has orders to paint it for the next tenant. Fofana returns to France from the Ivory Coast especially to transport Ilan somewhere else. Covered in a blanket, he is carried on the kidnappers’ shoulders to a nearby cellar. It is colder in there than in the flat. He is under the watch of ten guards between the ages of 17 and 23, most of them converts to Islam. They were promised the whole thing would take three days and they’d make some quick money. “I wanted to buy myself new clothes,” said one gang member during his interrogation. Now, they are annoyed. Ten days have passed and they are still stuck with Ilan, who bears the brunt of their frustration. They kick him and burn him with cigarettes, each one inventing a different kind of torture. “Even an animal isn’t treated that way,” the police later say. By now the police know that the man in charge is using a different Internet café each time. Four hundred men are mobilized to catch the perpetrator. To me, it is abundantly clear that this is an anti-Semitic act and that I should shout out the truth and alert the press. But I do what the police tell me. Around this time the local police stop a black man on the streets of Paris whose name is Youssouf Fofana. They have no idea about the kidnapping because it is all being handled secretly. They return his papers to him. How he must have laughed! How powerful he must have felt! (…) The owner of a cyber café alerts the police: the black man in the hood and gloves they are looking for has come back. The police recruit a nearby squad without giving them too many details other than that they must immediately go and arrest a black man at 9 Rue Poirier de Narcay. They have no idea how dangerous he is or how much is at stake. The six policemen rush off together, discretion—the most important factor in this operation—thrown to the wind. They are searching for Number 9 but there’s no address on the shop, only on a nearby building. Fofana, sitting at the window, has ample time to notice them and flee. By the time they realize their mistake Fofana is long gone. They chase him but it’s too late. Why wasn’t the situation explained to them properly? Why couldn’t road blocks have been set up to prevent Fofana’s escape? Why wasn’t his picture put in the newspapers? And why didn’t the police compare his image to the one that was already in their files for the past 13 years, for a host of infractions? (…) On February 13, at five o’clock in the morning, Ilan was first shaven, like six million other Jews, and flung into the forest by his torturers. He managed to take the mask off his eyes, and as Fofana later reported, look them straight in the eye. I am a human being, his eyes told them. He received a few knife stabs for that. Then, like many of the six million before him he was set on fire and burned alive, having been sprayed with a flammable substance. Then his tormentors left. When he was found guilty Fofana declared, “I killed a Jew, and for that I will go to Paradise.” It was raining that morning; Ilan managed to roll down on the leaves towards the highway. A black woman, a secretary like me, saw him lying by the side of the road, stopped her car and called the police. She accompanied him in the ambulance and did not leave his side. He was still alive in the ambulance but died on the way to the hospital. (…) “I have boxes and boxes of transcripts from the trial. When I started reading them I felt like throwing myself out the window. They enumerate in painstaking detail what they did to my child just to amuse themselves. When Fofana was asked in prison if he had a message for me he said, ‘Tell her that her son fought well.’ It was probably meant as a compliment in his twisted mind.” (…) “words are sometimes worse than weapons,” (…) “The popular French comedian, Dieudonné [which means ‘gift of God’], whose supposed humor drips with anti-Semitism and is enjoyed by millions of Frenchmen, has said things like, ‘The Germans should have finished the job in 1945.’ It’s words like these that incite violence and inspire incidents like Toulouse.” (…) I didn’t want him to lie in the same soil on which he was murdered. I wanted him to be buried in Israel immediately, but my children said they needed him close by so they could visit him every day. I also knew that one day Fofana will be released from prison, and I don’t want him to be able to come and spit on my son’s grave.” Ruth Halimi

Attention: un lynchage peut en cacher un autre !

Alors qu’il aura fallu dix ans et pas moins de trois tueries de masse, pour que le gouvernement français reconnaisse enfin son long aveuglement …

Sur la nature antisémite du sauvage assassinat du jeune juif Ilan Halimi par une bande de jeunes de la banlieue de Bagneux se faisant appeler « gang des barbares » sous la direction d’un franco-ivoirien mais avec la complicité plus ou moins active de tout un voisinage

Et qu’après avoir pendant des années, sans parler de la désinformation constante et systématique comme des emballements périodiques de nos médias, laissé crier dans nos rues mort aux juifs ou appels au boycott ou à la stigmatisation d’Israël …

Nos belles âmes continuent à nier l’évidente montée, pourtant confirmée par une récente étude, de l’antisémitisme et notamment de l’antisémitisme des populations d’origine musulmane en France …

Comment ne pas voir, de la part des mêmes beaux esprits, la nouvelle dénonciation de la prétendue finkielkrautisation de la société comme un énième lynchage d’un membre, lui aussi, de ce peuple qui depuis 3 000 ans prétend empêcher le monde de tourner en rond ?

Et ne pas être frappé à la lueur des analyses du regretté René Girard

Comme du vibrant « hommage aux chasseurs de vérité« , à l’initiative là aussi de deux « outsiders » (un rédacteur en chef juif et un avocat arménien), sorti tout récemment sur nos écrans, face à la longue complicité des autorités catholiques américaines mais aussi de toute une ville, psys laïcs compris, sur les abus sexuels de ses prêtres contre des centaines d’enfants …

Par la dimension ô combien collective que semblent invariablement prendre ce genre d’affaires …

Et par cette longue omerta et ces sempiternelles accusations de trahison ou d’obsession du complot qu’avaient eux aussi dû surmonter il y a plus d’une siècle …

Surtout quand ils étaient eux-mêmes juifs, protestants ou d’origine étrangère (Zola) les défenseurs de la vérité…

D’un certain capitaine Dreyfus ?

Dix ans après son assassinat, Bernard Cazeneuve rend hommage à Ilan Halimi
Le Monde.fr avec AFP

Lucie Soullier

13.02.2016

Ilan Halimi. Ce nom résonne depuis dix ans comme le symbole de l’horreur de l’antisémitisme en France. Mort parce que juif. Assassiné parce que juif. Torturé parce que juif. Une douleur inscrite jusque sur sa tombe, à Jérusalem :

« Ilan Jacques Halimi, torturé et assassiné en France parce qu’il était juif à l’âge de 23 ans. »
Bernard Cazeneuve, le ministre de l’intérieur, s’est rendu samedi 13 février à Bagneux pour lui rendre hommage lors d’une cérémonie qui a rassemblé le grand rabbin de France Haïm Korsia, le président du Consistoire central israélite de France, Joël Mergui, ainsi que de nombreux élus. Une cérémonie pour ne pas oublier ce que le jeune homme a enduré dans cette cité des Hauts-de-Seine, vingt-quatre jours durant.

« Dix ans plus tard, nous continuons à éprouver un remords collectif, celui d’avoir hésité à désigner par son nom la haine antisémite », a déclaré le ministre dans un auditorium de la ville après s’être recueilli dans le parc attenant, devant une stèle à la mémoire du jeune homme. Le drame, a estimé M. Cazeneuve devant environ 150 personnes, « annonçait à sa manière une série de gestes assassins » : les tueries de Mohamed Merah en 2012, la fusillade du musée juif de Bruxelles en 2014, le drame de l’Hyper Cacher l’an dernier. Mais aussi « la diffusion rampante » de l’antisémitisme, du racisme, du « mépris » et de la « haine de l’autre ». Et, « à sa manière, les attentats » de novembre.

« Gang des barbares »
Le 13 février 2006, Ilan Halimi est retrouvé nu, bâillonné et menotté le long d’une voie ferrée de la banlieue parisienne. Vivant. Ou plutôt agonisant. Il mourra dans l’ambulance qui l’emmène vers l’hôpital.

Cheveux tondus, traces de brûlures, plaies par arme blanche… son corps témoigne des sévices qu’il a subis pendant près de trois semaines dans la cave d’une barre HLM de la cité de Pierre-Plate où il a été séquestré par ceux qui seront surnommés le « gang des barbares » au cours de leur procès. Vingt-sept personnes seront poursuivies.

Lire le récit des geôliers lors du procès de 2006

A leur tête : Youssouf Fofana, le « cerveau » de la bande. C’est lui qui recrute les « geôliers » et « l’appât ». Lui aussi qui cible Ilan Halimi, qu’il choisit parce qu’il est « juif donc riche », selon ses préjugés antisémites, espérant extorquer une rançon à sa famille. Condamné en 2009 à la perpétuité avec vingt-deux ans de sûreté, Fofana a ajouté trois ans à sa peine en 2014, pour avoir agressé des surveillants de la prison de Condé-sur-Sarthe.

Emma, elle, a été condamnée à neuf ans de prison. Elle est celle qui, le 21 janvier 2006, a attiré sa victime dans la cave qui lui servira de geôle et de lieu de torture. En janvier 2012, elle a retrouvé la liberté après six années passées en prison. Elle n’avait alors que 23 ans. Le même âge qu’Ilan Halimi, lorsqu’elle l’a guidé à sa mort.

Hommages
Dix ans après, dans le jardin qui porte son nom, dans le 12e arrondissement de Paris où le jeune homme résidait, des centaines de personnes se sont rassemblées jeudi 11 février, à l’appel du collectif Haverim. En présence des sœurs de la victime, des textes « selon ses goûts » ont été lus, extraits de Si c’est un homme, de Primo Levi, La vie est belle, de Roberto Benigni, ou encore L’être ou pas, de Jean-Claude Grumberg.

Le porte-parole du collectif tenait à ce que ce rassemblement soit un « hymne à la vie ». Mais il voulait également rappeler que, dix ans après, personne n’a oublié.

« Nous n’oublions rien de ceux qui ont commis l’irréparable, de ceux qui ont encouragé et ceux qui se sont tus. »

Voir de même:

Déchéance de nationalité: Macron défie Valls et la « gauche Finkielkraut »
Bruno Roger-Petit
Challenges

10-02-2016

En interrogeant la pertinence du débat autour de la déchéance de nationalité, Emmanuel Macron acte le débat qui l’oppose à Manuel Valls sur l’identité de la gauche au pouvoir, et le refus de l’avènement d’une « gauche Finkielkraut ».

Peut-on « recadrer » celui qui dit que « le mal est partout »? La réalité s’impose, et même un Premier ministre de la Ve République n’y peut rien. Quoi qu’il prétende. Quoi qu’il décrète. En cela, la sortie d’Emmanuel Macron en plein débat sur le projet de révision constitutionnelle fait date. Elle ne relève pas seulement de la petite polémique politique comme les aiment les commentateurs old school, les grands lecteurs du temps court, formés au culte de la petite phrase, mais bien au-delà en ce que d’un coup, elle synthétise le grand débat de la gauche contemporaine.

Il faut donc lire et relire ce que dit Emmanuel Macron du grand débat du moment autour de la question de la déchéance de nationalité appliquée aux auteurs de crimes et délits terroristes portant atteinte aux intérêts de la Nation. Le ministre de l’Economie n’est pas dans la posture de l’instant. Ni dans le buzz. Ni dans la polémique destinée à nourrir une actualité réduite aux soubresauts des réseaux sociaux.

Donc, devant la Fondation France-Israël, Emmanuel Macron a livré le fond de sa pensée: « J’ai, à titre personnel, un inconfort philosophique avec la place [que ce débat] a pris, parce que je pense qu’on ne traite pas le mal en l’expulsant de la communauté nationale. Le mal est partout. Déchoir de la nationalité est une solution dans un certain cas, et je vais y revenir, mais à la fin des fins, la responsabilité des gouvernants est de prévenir et de punir implacablement le mal et les actes terroristes. C’est cela notre devoir dans la communauté nationale ».

Le message est adressé à Manuel Valls, et à travers lui à une certaine idée de la gauche en mutation. Emmanuel Macron refuse la finkielkrautisation de la gauche, ou pire encore, sa zemmourisation. Il lance un appel à la raison, à la compréhension, à la refondation autour des valeurs qui fondent la gauche. Macron refuse l’avènement de la gauche Finkielkraut qui s’affichait en Une du Point la semaine passée.

En premier lieu, Macron affirme que la gauche de gouvernement, confrontée au terrorisme, ne peut apporter pour seul réponse qu’un exorcisme vain. « On ne traite pas le mal en l’expulsant de la communauté nationale », dit-il. Comment ne pas reconnaitre qu’il s’agit là d’une évidence? Expulser les terroristes qui font la guerre à la France et aux Français est une décision symbolique, apparemment réparatrice, mais elle ne prévient pas l’apparition du mal. La décision peut procurer une forme d’apaisement de l’opinion, un temps, mais elle n’est pas la réponse ultime au Mal. C’est un exorcisme politique, teinté de juridisme, dont la portée symbolique emporte sa propre limite. Implicitement, Emmanuel Macron indique que le Mal nait du Mal, et qu’il convient de l’intégrer dans la représentation que l’on est amené à se faire, au pouvoir, de ce qu’est l’état de la société d’aujourd’hui.

Ne pas être otage de l’air du temps
Le ministre appelle la gauche à ne pas être réaction, mais action. Ne pas être otage de l’air du temps, qui commande, à travers les figures médiatiques de l’époque, les Finkielkraut et les Zemmour, au rejet qui engendre le rejet, qui lui-même engendre encore le rejet. L’exorcisme que représente la déchéance de nationalité est sans doute nécessaire, en certains cas, mais il ne saurait être suffisant. Pour Macron, la déchéance de nationalité est un moyen, mais en doit être en aucun cas une fin.

Il faut inverser la charge de la preuve. C’est Emmanuel Macron qui recadre ce que devrait être l’action de la gauche de gouvernement, et c’est en ce sens que les vallsistes, qui promettent au ministre de l’Economie un sort peu enviable, se trompent en pensant le recadrer en jouant les Capitan de comédie dans la salle des quatre colonnes de l’Assemblée nationale. On ne recadre pas celui qui cadre la Vérité.

« A la fin des fins, la responsabilité des gouvernants est de prévenir et de punir implacablement le mal et les actes terroristes », affirme Macron, second temps de son appel à en revenir aux valeurs de la gauche. Puisque l’exorcisme est insuffisant, il faut agir afin d’enrayer, contenir, anéantir le Mal avant même qu’il n’apparaisse.

Du point de vue de l’ancien élève de Paul Ricoeur, cela signifie qu’il faut comprendre pourquoi le mal nait. Aller aux racines. Comprendre non pour excuser, mais pour combattre. Là encore, l’invitation à incliner en faveur de l’action, toujours féconde, plutôt qu’à la réaction, toujours stérile, est patente.

En creux, une fois de plus, Macron s’oppose à Manuel Valls. Son appréhension des choses du Mal s’oppose à celle du Premier ministre qui disait il y a encore quelques semaines, au sujet des terroristes qui s’en prennent à la France et qui sont pour certains, ses enfants: « Pour ces ennemis qui s’en prennent à leurs compatriotes, qui déchirent ce contrat qui nous unit, il ne peut y avoir aucune explication qui vaille, car expliquer, c’est déjà vouloir un peu excuser. » Macron affirme l’exact contraire, surtout quand il énonce que le Mal est partout.

Le Mal, ce n’est pas seulement les terroristes, ce peut être aussi ceux qui, sous prétexte de le combattre, peuvent l’instrumentaliser dans le dessein de servir leur cause, tout aussi malsaine et nuisible. Comprendre, c’est aussi combattre signifie Macron, afin de mieux « prévenir et punir implacablement le mal et les actes terroristes ». Là où Valls se contente de punir, action, Macron ajoute qu’il faut prévenir, soient Action et réaction.

De ce qui précède, deux leçons peuvent être tirées.

L’affrontement de 2 gauches modernes
D’abord, Emmanuel Macron est bien plus à gauche que ce que le conformisme médiatique ambiant entretient. Sans aucun doute faut-il reconsidérer ce que le microcosme a édicté sur son compte à son sujet.

En outre, il faut bien se garder de réduire l’affrontement Macron/Valls à la seule dimension de leurs personnes. Derrière ce choc, se profile l’affrontement des deux gauches modernes appelées à incarner l’avenir. L’enjeu n’est pas anodin. Ou bien la gauche se contente de s’adapter à l’air du temps que commande l’apparent succès des valeurs réactionnaires, portées par les bardes du déclinisme, et alors Manuel Valls est fondé à s’en aller écouter le discours d’Alain Finkielkraut lors de sa cérémonie de réception à l’Académie française, le tout en saluant ce « grand philosophe ». Si l’on en demeure là, cette défaite de la pensée de gauche lui promettrait, en cas de déroute en 2017, une longue cure d’opposition.

Ou bien la gauche, nécessairement convertie à l’économie libérale, s’efforce de demeurer fidèle à l’héritage de Jaurès, Blum, Mendès France et Mitterrand, et elle continue de vouloir penser le monde, et toutes les formes de Mal qui le hantent, pour mieux le transformer.

« Finkielkrautétiser » la gauche, ce serait acter que la guerre culturelle a été perdue.

Macron questionne parce qu’il pense que c’est ainsi que la gauche en politique trouvera les réponses en elle, sans céder à la droitisation de l’époque. Cela peut heurter. Bousculer. Déranger. Confronter le temps politique du temps court au temps long.

« En ce qui concerne les choses humaines, ne pas s’indigner mais comprendre. » Macron est un spinoziste en politique. Et c’est une démarche qui à la mérite d’être authentiquement de gauche. Et moderne. Et refondatrice pour un socialisme qui parait avoir arrêté de penser le monde depuis vingt ans. Commentant le propos de Macron, un proche de Manuel Valls aurait promis de  « couper les couilles de ce petit con ». Est-ce bien digne de l’expression d’une pensée conforme à l’héritage socialiste?

Comme Macron le disait lui-même, dans le 1, en juillet dernier: « L’exigence du quotidien qui va avec la politique, c’est d’accepter le geste imparfait », et d’ajouter: « On bascule dans le temps politique en acceptant l’imperfection du moment ». Accepter l’imperfection, la comprendre, y compris pour comprendre le Mal et mieux le combattre. Macron est un bien-pensant, et il est moderne, il est donc la preuve que la gauche Finkielkraut n’a pas encore gagné.
Horror Story
04.28.14 11:45 AM ET
A Horror Story of True-Life Anti-Semitism in France
In 24 Days, opening this week in Paris, filmmaker Alexandre Arcady sets out to expose the motives and the meaning behind a savage crime.
It was a ghastly tragedy that rattled a nation and became a byword for anti-Semitism in France. In January 2006, just weeks after riots had set aflame the troubled banlieues and housing projects throughout the country, a single horrific killing exposed an icy violence that was in its way even more shocking. Ilan Halimi, 23, was kidnapped by the self-styled “Gang of Barbarians” and tortured to death because he was Jewish and they thought his family or other Jews would pay for his freedom.
Now eight years on, the story is coming to cinemas in France. Alexandre Arcady’s 24 Days: The Truth About the Ilan Halimi Affair opens Wednesday, the first of two French feature films on the case due out in 2014. And in a nation where Europe’s largest Jewish community is still reeling from the recent fight to censor a notorious comedian spewing anti-Semitic hate, it is bound to touch a nerve.
Indeed, in the wake of the controversy over the dubious humorist Dieudonné M’bala M’bala, which saw his stage shows banned in several French cities in January, the Jewish community has expressed concern that anti-Semitic acts, which were down 31 percent in France last year, could rise.

And when 24 Days director Arcady describes Ilan Halimi as the first person murdered for being Jewish in France since the Second World War, it is lost on no one that he was not the last. During Mohamed Merah’s al Qaeda-inspired killing spree in 2012, the motorcycle-riding gunman slaughtered three children and a rabbi outside a Jewish school in Toulouse.
The beginning of the end for Ilan Halimi came on a Friday night in January 2006. He had left his mother’s Paris home after a Shabbat meal to meet a girl at a café. A femme fatale in the truest sense, “Emma”—recruited as bait for Halimi—had first flirted with the affable mobile-phone salesman that very day in the shop where he worked on the Boulevard Voltaire.
She would lure him to a Paris suburb where the gang waited in ambush. They beat him, bound him and stashed him away in an apartment building in the projects. Halimi was held for 24 days, his eyes and face plastered in duct tape, first in a vacant flat, then in a basement boiler room with the building superintendent’s complicity.
When Halimi’s jailers tired of helping their captive relieve himself, they stopped feeding him. He was found barely alive in the woods near a commuter train line, still tied up, naked, and badly burned. He died before the ambulance reached the hospital.
Arcady’s 24 Days tells the story from the perspective of Halimi’s mother, Ruth, based on her 2009 memoir. Savage violence goes largely unseen in the film. Instead, audiences sink into the family’s nightmare: the oppressive barrage of rambling, invective-laced phone calls demanding ransom—more than 600 calls over the course of Halimi’s captivity.
Despite a last act every French viewer will know in advance, the film moves along like a thriller. It catalogues a massive but doomed police investigation through its agonizing near-misses and mistaken hunches.

Ruth Halimi (Zabou Breitman) pleads with cops who keep insisting her son’s kidnapping is purely financially motivated and ignore the anti-Semitic undertones. “Why are you afraid of the truth?!” she cries, convinced the intent is more sinister and her son’s fate is sealed. The detectives are shown telling her that refusal to pay ultimately will protect her son because he’ll be valued as a bargaining chip. Inside a Paris preview screening, a loud “Ha!” could be heard from a pair of audience members at the detectives’ onscreen naiveté.
In fairness, Arcady has put this misapprehension in context. Hot on the heels of the November 2005 banlieue riots, tensions remained high. And a spectacularly embarrassing false alarm not long before that had clouded the authorities’ judgment.
In the summer of 2004, a young woman told police she had been attacked by six young black and Arab men on a suburban Paris commuter train. She claimed the muggers tore her clothes and markered swastikas onto her bare stomach, cut a lock of her hair, and toppled her baby’s stroller. In a nation still riven with guilt over its WWII persecution of Jews, the incident sparked a swift political response from then-President Jacques Chirac. But days later the young woman recanted, eventually explaining she was just vying for her parents’ attention. (That case, too, became the subject of a feature film in 2009, The Girl on the Train, with Emilie Dequenne and Catherine Deneuve.)
In fact, the extent to which Halimi’s motley assailants acted out of anti-Semitism would remain a point of contention long after his body was found.
In the event, the Gang of Barbarians eluded the 400 police officers assigned to the case until it was too late. Two dozen men and women would be convicted for their varying degrees of involvement. The gang’s 25-year-old ringleader, Youssouf Fofana, the French-born son of Ivorian immigrants, was captured on the run in Abidjan 10 days after he had stabbed Halimi, doused him with a flammable substance, set him alight, and left him for dead.

In 2009, Fofana was convicted of murder, acts of torture and barbarity, with anti-Semitism an aggravating circumstance. He is serving life in prison with no possibility for parole for 22 years. (He has since been sentenced to several additional years for new crimes including attacking prison personnel and posting videos to YouTube spewing anti-Semitic hate and praising al Qaeda from his cell.)

The comedian Dieudonné was recently acquitted of disseminating a video in which he is shown deriding a “Jewish lobby” and calling for Fofana’s release from prison. A Paris court ruled it could not be proven that Dieudonné personally released the video in April 2010. It did not pronounce on the video’s content.
Prime Minister Manuel Valls, while still interior minister last October, visited the set of 24 Days during a scene filmed near the Sainte-Geneviève-des-Bois train station, where Halimi was found. In February, fresh from his very public showdown with Dieudonné, Valls told the Representative Council of Jewish Institutions in France at a dinner in Toulouse that he had seen the finished film. “If we do not stop these words that kill and that tear apart our society, there will be other Ilan Halimis,” he warned. President François Hollande held a private screening of 24 Days this month at the Elysée Palace.
The new film’s theatrical release goes some way toward repairing what many saw as an injustice. Both the 2009 trial and a 2010 appeal were held behind closed doors because some of the accused were minors at the time of the events. Halimi’s family and anti-racism groups had pled for public trials, citing their educational value.

A second film by director Richard Berry based on Morgan Sportès’s prizewinning novel Tout, Tout de Suite focuses on the assailants and is expected in September.
But one observer suggests the renewed media interest in Halimi’s case could itself spur resentment. In a new book on what he sees as France’s unhealthy tendency to internalize the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Pascal Boniface argues that anti-Semitism has in fact declined radically in France over recent decades. The director of France’s Institute of International and Strategic Relations suggests Jewish community leaders and the media risk a sort of public fatigue by interpreting anti-Semitic acts out of that context and out of proportion to crimes against other groups. He spotlights the Halimi case as an example of anti-Semitism overexposed to a counterproductive degree.
“We can wager in advance that the films’ release will benefit from media hype,” writes Boniface. “Will they find an audience beyond their community circles? That’s less sure. … A large part of the Jewish community is convinced that the anti-Semitic dimension of Ilan Halimi’s murder has not been mentioned enough, while another large part of public opinion thinks this affair has been overexposed because of its anti-Semitic dimension and many [non-Jewish] parents ask themselves: ‘Would they have talked about this if the victim had been my son?’”
One French journalist, Frédéric Haziza, author of a new book that deems Dieudonné a fascist guru, struck out at Boniface’s take on the Halimi case, calling him a “sorcerer’s apprentice of hate” and an anti-Semitism denier. In turn, a wide palette of French notables responded in Boniface’s defense with a petition rejecting a “climate of McCarthyism” that has collected more than 5,000 signatures. Suffice it to say, eight years after the Halimi atrocity, the case still inflames opinion.
“You are our first ambassadors. Be the ones who lead others, even the reticent, those who might not want to see the film,” Arcady told a crowd at the Paris preview for 24 Days. “Even those who say, ‘Oh la la, Ilan Halimi, that’s a fait divers [a petty news item], stop bothering us with that.’ And seeing the film you will understand that it is not a petty news item. And those who still think that today, they are the ones who really needed to be persuaded to come see the film.”
It opens in France on Wednesday.

Voir aussi:

The Shocking Murder of Ilan Halimi
In 2006 a young Parisian Jew was kidnapped and brutally murdered because he was Jewish. French authorities initially refused to believe it was a hate crime.
by Deborah Freund
Facebook126TwitterEmailMore76
This article originally appeared in Ami Magazine.

Little did Ilan Halimi know that day that the customer walking into the cellphone store where he worked as a salesman would be the agent of his death. The young woman looked around at the merchandise, asked questions and engaged him in friendly conversation. They hit it off so well that before leaving, she asked Ilan for his phone number.

The next evening Ilan received a call from his new acquaintance, inviting him out for a drink. Only 23 years old, Ilan had no suspicions. He was ambushed by a gang of thugs, held prisoner in an apartment in the Bagneux neighborhood of Paris for 24 days and tortured until they finally abandoned him in a forest. When Ilan was found, he had burns over 80% of his body. He was the first French Jew murdered after WWII simply because he was Jewish.

His mother, Ruth Halimi, agreed to meet me in the recently-dubbed Ilan Halimi Gardens, a pocket-sized oasis of green on a busy street in the 12th arrondissement.

A small woman, she has dark eyes set in a determined, pale face. “This is where Ilan used to play as a child,” she says. “I come here often.”

Her voice is melodious, the kind of voice associated more with a mother singing a lullaby than with an outspoken firebrand courageously confronting the French people about the poison brewing in their midst.

“I’m a woman who naturally shies away from crowds and doesn’t like being in limelight. But the Almighty said no, I have a different plan for you, and He gave me an extra measure of courage to be able to speak out in public. I’ve spoken in Washington, Brussels, Paris and Israel, with a strength I didn’t know I possessed.”

I ask her to tell me about her son.

“Ilan was my only son. He had a smile that lit up his face. The house became alive the minute he stepped into it. Ilan loved people deeply. He was curious and outgoing. He was such a star at his bar mitzvah…

“Ilan’s father and I parted when Ilan was two years old,” she continues. “As a consequence, he always tried to be the man of the house. I raised him and my two daughters single-handedly, with little financial means but with love in abundance. I often wonder if that’s why he was so trustful of people. Ilan profoundly believed that people are good, and he was killed for it.

“Helping other people came naturally to him. His first job was in a real estate office. One day a poor Muslim woman came in looking for an apartment. She was having great difficulty finding one. Ilan did some research and found her a flat. Two days later she returned in despair. When the French landlord had seen her Muslim name on the lease he had refused to sign it. Ilan picked up the phone and gave him a piece of his mind, accusing him of racism. The man signed the contract. When Ilan was murdered…”

Her voice trails, her energy sapped. “I found an envelope in my mailbox containing a 100 euro note. It was from the Muslim woman. ‘Madame,’ it said. ‘How can I even begin to express my feelings of horror at what happened to your son?’”

“Please,” I steel myself before asking. “Can you walk me through what happened?”

January 20, 2006
It’s a regular Friday, and I’m on my way home from work. Passing by a store I see a pair of shoes in a style that I know Ilan would like, with a buckle. I stop to purchase them. They are final sale, neither exchangeable nor refundable. I then do some shopping for our Shabbat meal. Even though I am not Orthodox, the Shabbat meal is something I will not give up for any price. It’s the only time of the week we get to all sit peacefully around a beautifully set table. When I reach our building I glance up to see if Ilan is at the window. He usually looks out for me and runs down the stairs to help me bring up the packages. Ilan sings the Kiddush. My children were bought up in the Jewish tradition and know all the Jewish prayers. After we wash, Ilan cuts the challah and distributes it. We wish each other Shabbat Shalom. Dinner is over by 9:00 p.m.

A while later I hear Ilan answering the telephone in his room. I will later learn that that was the fateful call from his new acquaintance inviting him out. I see him putting on his windbreaker. I don’t like it when he goes out on Shabbat and he knows it. “Don’t be angry, Maman,” he says, an apologetic smile playing on his lips. As if having a premonition that this would be the last time I would ever see him, I try to keep him from leaving. “You didn’t try on your new shoes,” I remind him. He gives me a hug. “Tomorrow,” he says, and clatters down the stairs.

The shoes are still lying untouched in their box.

January 21
The nightmare starts the following day when we realize that Ilan hasn’t come home. None of his friends have heard from him either. I’m reading a story to Noa, my granddaughter, when I hear my daughters’ piercing screams in the next room. They’re looking at a photo of Ilan on the computer screen that has just been sent by email. My son’s face is covered with black tape, and there’s a pistol pointed at his temple. “We are holding Ilan,” the email reads. “We are demanding 450,000 euros for his release.”

“You have 20 minutes to bring the money. If you contact the police, we will kill him.”
A phone call ensues. A young man speaking French with a heavy African accent says, “You have 20 minutes to bring the money. If you contact the police, we will kill him.” My two daughters, each holding one of my hands, drag me down the stairs to the police station. Didier, Ilan’s father, is already there, having received the same phone call.

The police try to figure out why Ilan was targeted. None of us can pay the sum of 450,000 euros. I’m a secretary. Ilan earns 1,200 euro a month. His father doesn’t have any money either. Our profile certainly doesn’t mark us as a target for kidnappers. The police search our house and confiscate Ilan’s computer. Again and again they imply that Ilan was involved in drugs. Again and again I vigorously deny it. I know my son. They are sullying his name. Must I fight the police as well as his abductors?

“Don’t give in to them,” the police warn us. “If you play by their rules, they will only increase their demands.” It is important, they explain, to keep up a steady dialogue with the kidnappers to give the authorities time to unravel his whereabouts. For Ilan’s own safety, they insist, his disappearance must be kept secret.

January 22
The next morning there’s another phone call, a request for 100,000 euros followed by a string of curses and insults. It sounds like the ranting of a lunatic. The police decide that I’m too emotional and cannot be counted on to control myself over the phone. From now on Didier, Ilan’s father, will be the only one answering their calls. But Didier doesn’t have much self-control either, so every word he utters to the madman will henceforth be directed by two professional negotiators and a criminal psychologist. “You have to be strong,” she says to him. “Do not lose your temper.” I feel powerless. I’ve raised three children on my own. Why am I now so helpless? What am I doing in the hands of these men?

January 23
A new email: “Tomorrow at 11:00 a.m. you are to assemble ten people, each of whom has a valid ID and a laptop computer with WiFi.” They want to do a money transfer over the Internet, and they need ten people because the maximum amount that can be transferred is 10,000 euro per person. The police realize that there will be no movie-style exchange of an attaché case filled with money for the hostage’s release. They instruct us to email them back that we simply don’t have that much money. We do as they say. We have no choice but to trust their decision.

January 24
A profile of the kidnapper gradually emerges: He is an African man calling from the Ivory Coast who speaks a primitive French slang. The police are convinced that they are dealing with an experienced, organized band. They have no idea that the kidnapper is really a 26-year-old male of African descent who was born in France. Indeed, Youssouf Fofana, a petty criminal with an extensive record, has already served time for armed robbery, theft and resisting arrest. In fact, his face has often been featured on wanted posters. Who could fathom that it was only a single madman vacationing in the Ivory Coast in anticipation of the expected ransom, while his makeshift gang guarded their prisoner?

We sit around the phone, not daring to move, afraid to miss a call. We are getting 40 phone calls a day—680 in total. Each day we are subjected to abusive diatribes and threats, but never a clear proposition.

Five other men have previously been approached, the investigators inform us, by different youngsters. None of them took the bait, except for one whose screams caught the attention of a neighbor who alerted the police. He was found on the front steps of a building with 86 bruises on his body.

Each of the five men was Jewish.

“Can’t you see what’s really going on?” I beg the police. “Ilan has been kidnapped because he’s a Jew.
A new phone call, this time with only a repetition of Arabic chants. A Muslim police officer confirms that these are recitations from the Koran.

The next call is in French: “We want a down payment of 50,000 euros.” Didier repeats what the psychologist whispers to him: “I don’t have the money.”

“Then get it from the Jewish community,” the man answers before the receiver is slammed down.

“Can’t you see what’s really going on?” I beg the police. “Ilan has been kidnapped because he’s a Jew. It’s the typical anti-Semitic approach: Jews are rich and clannish. They’ll cough up the money because they stick to each other.”

A new knot has formed in my stomach. If my son has been kidnapped because he’s a Jew, he will never be released so easily.

“Promise me that you will bring him home!” I beg the two policemen sleeping in my living room. “Madame,” they assure me, “we are doing everything in our power.” I know they are. But the last kidnapping in France was in 1978, when the Baron Empain was abducted and eventually liberated by his captors. Unlike countries where kidnappings are frequent, the French have little experience with such matters. “Don’t worry,” they tell me. “Kidnappers kidnap to get someone thing out of it, not to kill their victims.”

Today Didier got two dozen more phone calls demanding the ransom. The man on the line is clearly nervous. The police suspect that Ilan is dead and want to see a photo as proof that he’s still alive. They also hope to catch the kidnapper posting the picture in a cyber café, where there are security cameras. The photo finally arrives: it’s Ilan, with a long cut on his cheek. The page is adorned with colorful balloons; they are having fun. It is zero degrees outside. We later learn that Ilan was lying on the floor of an unheated apartment during this time, “tied like a mummy,” as one of the gang members described it, his face completely covered with tape except for a hole to insert a straw. He is barely kept nourished; just enough so he won’t die. They are also keeping him silent, hitting him when he groans. He’s being held in an 11-story building, in an apartment that has been vacant since January 16. The concierge has received 1,500 euros for his silence. In exchange, the gang may use the empty flat until it is rented out. None of the neighbors report their comings and goings. No one hears anything.

It isn’t far from where I live.

January 25
More phone calls. Fofana insists on a money transfer. The police do not give in. Didier is instructed to stop answering the phone. “We want to force the kidnappers to alter their demands.” Fourteen phone calls go unanswered. Violent insults are left on the answering machine. We stand there listening, helpless. The psychologist congratulates Didier each time he doesn’t pick up the receiver. She uses her skills to manipulate the kidnappers, but also to manage Didier as she sees fit.

My daughters, Deborah and Eve, resolve to spread the word about Ilan’s kidnapping in the hope that media attention will somehow help. The police think differently. They are firm: We are to tell people that Ilan is fine and merely on vacation. I am to return to work. Everything must seem as normal as possible. I do as I am instructed. I go back to work and discuss the weather. I put on a pleasant face, as I am told that Ilan’s life depends on it. I think of other people who have disappeared, their photos on the walls of every post office and in every window. Why can’t the same be done for Ilan ? Why am I obeying the police rather than following the dictates of my heart?

January 28
This time Fofana’s tone is urgent: “I want to release Ilan,” he says. “Let’s negotiate an agreement.” An email follows: “I cannot control my people anymore. They are going to harm him. You must respond quickly.”

Again the police order Didier not to answer the phone. They are convinced that our silence will force Fofana to agree to an exchange. The result is an entire night of incessant phone messages on his machine, warning him that they’re going to dump Ilan in the forest. The police refuse to budge.

Shabbat arrives. Without Ilan. Every night I have the same dream, of heavy stone doors being closed in my face. All I have left is prayer. I pray that the young woman who lured Ilan to his captors will have a change of heart and lead the police to him. I pray to have news of my son. I am petrified that they will act on their threat but the phone has stopped ringing. The two policemen in my house have become like family. They eat with us, accompany me to the supermarket. For long hours I speak to them about Ilan. How happy I was when he was born after two daughters.

January 29
Rabbi Thierry Zinni in Paris receives three messages from the kidnappers. We do not know each other but he is Jewish; that is enough for them. “A Jew has been kidnapped,” the message says, and directs him to where he will find a video tape. The rabbi takes it seriously and immediately contacts the police.

“They contacted a rabbi because he’s a Jew. Don’t you recognize that this is an anti-Semitic act?”
Ilan’s voice is on the tape; it is very feeble. From the photos I know that his eyes and face are taped. “I am Jewish,” he says. “Please, please help me. Maman,” he breaks into a sob. “Help me! Do not abandon me.” To hear my son beg for his life is beyond suffering. Then I hear a thump and Ilan groans; he has been hit.

“Don’t you see?” I plead with the police. “They contacted a rabbi because he’s a Jew. Don’t you recognize that this is an anti-Semitic act?” But the authorities will have none of it.

January 30
Ilan’s situation, we later learn, has taken a turn for the worse. The concierge of the building notifies the kidnappers that they will have to vacate the apartment. He has orders to paint it for the next tenant. Fofana returns to France from the Ivory Coast especially to transport Ilan somewhere else. Covered in a blanket, he is carried on the kidnappers’ shoulders to a nearby cellar. It is colder in there than in the flat. He is under the watch of ten guards between the ages of 17 and 23, most of them converts to Islam. They were promised the whole thing would take three days and they’d make some quick money. “I wanted to buy myself new clothes,” said one gang member during his interrogation. Now, they are annoyed. Ten days have passed and they are still stuck with Ilan, who bears the brunt of their frustration. They kick him and burn him with cigarettes, each one inventing a different kind of torture. “Even an animal isn’t treated that way,” the police later say.

By now the police know that the man in charge is using a different Internet café each time. Four hundred men are mobilized to catch the perpetrator. To me, it is abundantly clear that this is an anti-Semitic act and that I should shout out the truth and alert the press. But I do what the police tell me.

Around this time the local police stop a black man on the streets of Paris whose name is Youssouf Fofana. They have no idea about the kidnapping because it is all being handled secretly. They return his papers to him. How he must have laughed! How powerful he must have felt!

February 2
The owner of a cyber café alerts the police: the black man in the hood and gloves they are looking for has come back. The police recruit a nearby squad without giving them too many details other than that they must immediately go and arrest a black man at 9 Rue Poirier de Narcay. They have no idea how dangerous he is or how much is at stake. The six policemen rush off together, discretion—the most important factor in this operation—thrown to the wind. They are searching for Number 9 but there’s no address on the shop, only on a nearby building. Fofana, sitting at the window, has ample time to notice them and flee. By the time they realize their mistake Fofana is long gone. They chase him but it’s too late. Why wasn’t the situation explained to them properly? Why couldn’t road blocks have been set up to prevent Fofana’s escape? Why wasn’t his picture put in the newspapers? And why didn’t the police compare his image to the one that was already in their files for the past 13 years, for a host of infractions?

These are questions with which I torment myself daily.

February 6
After three days without any communication the emails begin again. The police decide to pay the ransom. One hundred thousand euros are photographed and put into an attaché case that is given to Didier. The whole area where the meeting will take place is under surveillance. But the encounter doesn’t take place as planned; the kidnappers fail to show up. Instead, they call Didier and give him another address in Chatelet, a 30-minute ride away. When he arrives there, with the police discreetly observing the proceedings, he receives a new directive: “Send 5,000 euros via Union Transfer now and take a train to Brussels.” This time he has had enough and hangs up the phone.

Seventeen days have now passed without any results. We are totally drained and at our wits’ end. A new stream of phone calls is directed to the police. They don’t answer.

Then the phone calls stop.

February 13
That night I feel a strong force hurl my bed against the wall and I wake up. “Something happened to Ilan! I’m sure of it!” I tell the policemen in my living room. Of course, they think it’s only the ranting of a hysterical woman. It was five a.m. They say that a mother knows. I checked it out later. On February 13, at five o’clock in the morning, Ilan was first shaven, like six million other Jews, and flung into the forest by his torturers. He managed to take the mask off his eyes, and as Fofana later reported, look them straight in the eye. I am a human being, his eyes told them. He received a few knife stabs for that. Then, like many of the six million before him he was set on fire and burned alive, having been sprayed with a flammable substance. Then his tormentors left.

When he was found guilty Fofana declared, “I killed a Jew, and for that I will go to Paradise.”
It was raining that morning; Ilan managed to roll down on the leaves towards the highway. A black woman, a secretary like me, saw him lying by the side of the road, stopped her car and called the police. She accompanied him in the ambulance and did not leave his side. He was still alive in the ambulance but died on the way to the hospital. I console myself that my son died hearing a soothing voice.

When he was found guilty Fofana declared, “I killed a Jew, and for that I will go to Paradise.” The police publicly admit to the press that it was an anti-Semitic crime.
“Why did you write your book, 24 Days, which chronicles Ilan’s kidnapping?” I want to know. “How did you have the courage to immerse yourself in what must have been such unbearable pain?”

“I couldn’t allow his murder to evaporate, to simply disappear like yesterday’s news,” she explains. “The idea was intolerable. I had to leave a permanent testament to my son.

Ilan’s funeral

“Of course it was very difficult,” she continues. “I have boxes and boxes of transcripts from the trial. When I started reading them I felt like throwing myself out the window. They enumerate in painstaking detail what they did to my child just to amuse themselves. When Fofana was asked in prison if he had a message for me he said, ‘Tell her that her son fought well.’ It was probably meant as a compliment in his twisted mind.”

“The murder of Ilan Halimi has been publicly declared an act of anti-Semitism. When you speak in public, what is your message to the French people?” I ask.

“I tell them that words are sometimes worse than weapons,” she replies. “The popular French comedian, Dieudonné [which means ‘gift of God’], whose supposed humor drips with anti-Semitism and is enjoyed by millions of Frenchmen, has said things like, ‘The Germans should have finished the job in 1945.’ It’s words like these that incite violence and inspire incidents like Toulouse.”

“Have you ever considered leaving France?” I inquire.

“Yes. My youngest daughter made aliyah and is happy in Israel. She is urging me to join her. But at the moment, with the pension I have, I cannot afford it. I also have grandchildren here to whom I am very attached. But I do not plan on remaining here forever. One day when my daughter in Israel marries and has a family, I too shall leave.”

“Why did you have Ilan’s remains reinterred in Israel?”

“Because I didn’t want him to lie in the same soil on which he was murdered. I wanted him to be buried in Israel immediately, but my children said they needed him close by so they could visit him every day. I also knew that one day Fofana will be released from prison, and I don’t want him to be able to come and spit on my son’s grave.”

This article originally appeared in Ami Magazine.

Voir encore:

Emmanuel Macron : « Il y a du mal à l’intérieur de notre société »
Propos recueillis par Arnaud Leparmentier, Cédric Pietralunga et Thomas Wieder

Le Monde

06.01.2016

Dans un entretien au Monde, le ministre de l’économie Emmanuel Macron explique qu’il faut « donner plus de place à ceux qui sont en dehors du système et de sortir de l’entre-soi ».

Après le 13 novembre, vous avez dit, ce que Manuel Valls n’a pas apprécié, que la France avait « une part de responsabilité » dans le « terreau » qui a enfanté le terrorisme…

Quand j’ai dit ça, ce n’était ni pour justifier ni pour excuser, mais parce que je pense qu’il faut tenir un discours adulte à nos concitoyens. Il y a bien sûr une menace terroriste extérieure, mais il y a des terroristes français et donc du mal à l’intérieur de notre société. Notre responsabilité, c’est de protéger et de punir de manière implacable, d’avoir une politique sécuritaire très forte, mais c’est aussi de prévenir et regarder cette réalité en face.

Ce «  néototalitarisme terroriste  » qui prospère aux confins de l’islamisme religieux, pourquoi pénètre-t-il nos sociétés  ? Une forme d’anomie s’est installée au cœur de celle-ci, une anomie qui procède d’une perte de repères chez des individus qui n’ont plus de perspectives familiales, professionnelles… Attention, je ne dis pas que c’est parce qu’on n’a pas de diplôme qu’on devient djihadiste   : il y a bien sûr une part de trajectoire individuelle. Mais il y a aussi une part de responsabilité collective et, après ce que nous avons vécu en  2015, nous devons aussi répondre à ce désespoir-là. Pour moi, la clé de la recomposition politique est là, dans le fait de donner plus de place à ceux qui sont en dehors du système et de sortir de l’entre-soi.

Faut-il une forme d’unité nationale ?

Ce que nos concitoyens veulent, c’est un discours de vérité et des politiques courageuses. Il ne faut pas penser qu’on peut atteindre cela par des combinaisons. Si c’est la condition pour mener des politiques neuves et répondre aux difficultés de notre pays, cela peut se concevoir. Mais si c’est une finalité en soi, ce sera un nouvel artifice. Nous n’avons pas un système parlementaire qui conduise à des grandes coalitions comme en Allemagne mais un système présidentiel qui fait que les grandes coalitions se conduisent au moment de l’échéance présidentielle.

François Hollande doit-il construire une grande coalition pour 2017 sur le thème de la France unie ?

Ce n’est pas mon rôle de le dire. Beaucoup l’ont tenté. Même Nicolas Sarkozy en 2007 à travers certaines nominations. Est-ce que cela a eu un impact ? La France est un peuple politique beaucoup plus intelligent que les élites ne le pensent. L’unité nationale doit venir d’un choix populaire, d’une mobilisation des énergies davantage que d’une combinaison d’appareils.

Quelle est votre position sur la déchéance de nationalité ?

Je comprends et je respecte profondément les réflexions et les réactions sur ce sujet. Il faut répondre à trois exigences  : la protection des Français, le respect de l’engagement pris par le président de la République – l’autorité de l’Etat en dépend – et la cohésion nationale. C’est une mesure symboliquement importante  : elle donne un sens à ce que c’est que d’appartenir à la communauté nationale.

Vous voteriez cette mesure ?

Je suis ministre de la République, donc pleinement solidaire de la politique gouvernementale.

Voir de plus:

Entretien avec Pascal Boniface

Entretien réalisé par 
Pierre Chaillan
L’Humanité
16 Mai, 2014

Spécialiste de géopolitique, président de l’Institut de relations internationales et stratégiques (Iris), Pascal Boniface lance un véritable débat arguant que « La République doit considérer tous ses enfants de la même façon »

En publiant 
 »la France malade du conflit israélo-palestinien », Pascal Boniface affirme ses craintes de voir s’ériger des barrières séparant différentes communautés dans notre pays rejoignent sa compréhension de l’Europe et du monde.

Dans la France malade du conflit israélo-palestinien (1), vous vous interrogez sur le fait de revenir sur cette question. Pourquoi?

Pascal Boniface. Malheureusement, les faits m’ont donné raison. Quand on aborde de façon critique la politique du gouvernement israélien ou encore les prises de position des intellectuels et institutions communautaires en France sur la question du conflit israélo-palestinien, on se met forcément un peu en danger. Il y a deux risques. Le premier est d’être accusé d’antisémitisme plus ou moins assumé. Cela a été le cas. J’ai été attaqué de façon scandaleuse par un journaliste, Frédéric Haziza, et par Julien Dray, dont on peut par ailleurs s’étonner qu’il soit encore élu au conseil régional d’Île-de-France au vu de l’ensemble de son œuvre et par rapport au désir de moralité qui semble gouverner dans les hautes sphères. Ceci étant, après cette polémique odieuse m’accusant de nier la dimension antisémite du meurtre d’Ilan Halimi, une pétition a été lancée et a recueilli plusieurs milliers de signatures sur le thème « Stop à la chasse aux sorcières » (2). Lorsque je regarde la liste des signataires et leur réputation morale, je suis réconforté. Le second risque, c’est le black-out. Les médias dans leur grande majorité n’ont pas voulu parler du livre et de ses thèses. La tentation chez beaucoup de mes collègues chercheurs et de nombreux journalistes consiste à considérer que ça divise l’opinion ou qu’il n’y a que des coups à prendre et qu’il est donc plus prudent de ne pas aborder ce sujet. Mais, en attendant, le débat continue, et parfois, de façon plus malsaine. D’ailleurs, je suis pris entre deux écueils, les ultras pro-israéliens m’accusent d’antisémitisme. Et lorsque, dans des débats un peu chauds, je m’élève contre l’utilisation du terme « entité sioniste » pour parler de l’État d’Israël, que je refuse la vision d’une presse contrôlée par les juifs ou que je dénonce Dieudonné, d’autres m’accusent d’être payé par les juifs. Il y a donc là un enjeu essentiel pour notre débat démocratique. Combattre l’antisémitisme mais refuser le chantage consistant à faire un amalgame entre critique politique du gouvernement israélien et antisémitisme.

Est-ce au point de tirer la sonnette d’alarme sur l’état de la société française ?

Pascal Boniface. Oui. Il y a un décalage extrêmement fort entre les élites politiques et médiatiques très prudentes et l’opinion de la rue vindicative sur la question. La prudence et 
la pusillanimité des uns, pour ne pas dire l’absence de courage, conduisent d’une certaine manière à l’extrémisme des autres. La société française perd des deux côtés. Il faut vraiment aborder cette question, en parler très ouvertement et franchement. Plus on en discutera de manière sereine et de façon ouverte et plus on évitera les dérives.

Vous mettez en garde contre le communautarisme. À quoi faites-vous allusion ?

Pascal Boniface. Le discours des institutions juives ou des intellectuels communautaires, pour ne pas dire communautaristes, répète en boucle que l’antisémitisme est très fort en France, qu’il y a une « montée » de ce phénomène, et que la menace antisémite est plus importante et virulente que les autres formes de racisme. Il faudrait alors plus se mobiliser contre cette forme de racisme. Et, en annexe, ne pas critiquer le gouvernement israélien car cela alimenterait l’antisémitisme. Pour une grande partie de la population qui vit de nombreuses discriminations au quotidien, les Noirs et les Arabes, ce discours est vécu de façon assez douloureuse. Ils ont l’impression qu’on sous-estime les discriminations dont ils sont victimes et que certains doivent être plus protégés que d’autres. Il y a alors danger. Les études et les faits montrent que l’antisémitisme, même s’il n’a pas disparu, est nettement moins fort qu’il y a une ou deux générations en France. En même temps, chaque année au dîner du Crif, le président parle d’une montée de l’antisémitisme. En fait, le grand revirement est que l’antisémitisme est moins fort mais le soutien à Israël dans la population française l’est également.

Vous regrettez une instrumentalisation de la lutte contre l’antisémitisme à des fins géopolitiques. Comment cela se traduit-il ?

Pascal Boniface. La défense inconditionnelle de l’État d’Israël des institutions juives, quelle que soit son action ou sa politique, très rapidement reliée à la lutte contre l’antisémitisme contribue à faire peur aux juifs français. Cela vient poser une barrière entre juifs et non-juifs autour de cet enjeu du soutien à Israël. Cela est très dangereux. On voit, par exemple, sur quelles bases le Crif a décidé de ne plus inviter le Parti communiste à son dîner annuel. Que l’on me montre la moindre déclaration d’un dirigeant communiste qui verse dans l’antisémitisme. Par contre, on reproche aux communistes leur solidarité avec la cause palestinienne. Le Crif privilégie ainsi son soutien à Israël au détriment du combat contre l’antisémitisme. Tout en se disant en faveur d’un règlement pacifique, les institutions et les intellectuels communautaires pilonnent systématiquement ceux qui sont tout autant pour la paix mais qui estiment que le blocage de la situation provient plus de l’occupant que de l’occupé. Les institutions juives mettent en avant la lutte contre l’antisémitisme pour tétaniser toute expression politique contraire ou critique à l’égard du gouvernement israélien. Elle est directement taxée soit d’antisémitisme, soit de le nourrir en important le conflit du Proche-Orient. Cet argument est pour le moins paradoxal puisque ce sont les mêmes qui, sans cesse, appellent les juifs de France à démontrer une solidarité infaillible au gouvernement israélien. Ils sont donc très largement responsables de ce faux lien.

Pourtant n’assiste-t-on pas à une recrudescence des actes antisémites les plus violents ?

Pascal Boniface. Il y a eu Mohamed Merah qui a tué des enfants parce qu’ils étaient juifs. Nous ne sommes pas à l’abri d’un tel acte terroriste qui, par définition, est incontrôlable et on ne peut pas nier l’existence d’un tel risque. Il y a eu aussi l’affaire Ilan Halimi, même si plus complexe, qui a une dimension antisémite mais qui ne peut pas se résumer uniquement à un acte antisémite. Mais, il n’y a pas de recrudescence d’agressions ou d’injures. Les actes antisémites, bien sûr toujours trop nombreux, représentent un nombre faible face à l’ensemble des actes violents répertoriés, dans la rue, à l’école, en milieu hospitalier, etc. Je donne à ce sujet des chiffres très précis. Nous vivons dans une société violente. Et puis, surtout, il y a beaucoup d’agressions racistes qui touchent d’autres catégories de populations. Les actes antimusulmans ou anti-Noirs sont très nombreux alors qu’ils ne semblent pas faire autant l’objet d’une vigoureuse dénonciation des médias ou des pouvoirs publics. Cela est largement ressenti. Les médias et les élus de la République font très souvent du « deux poids, deux mesures », aggravent un mal qu’ils disent vouloir combattre.

Faut-il y voir un péril pour la République ?

Pascal Boniface. Je cite plusieurs exemples d’agressions d’autres communautés, pas seulement arabes, de faits graves pas ou peu médiatisés. Cela au final se retourne contre les juifs français car cela crée un sentiment d’être traité différemment. Il ne faut pas ignorer l’existence d’une nouvelle forme d’antisémitisme en banlieue aujourd’hui. Cela est dû plus à une forme de jalousie sociétale qu’à une haine raciale. Il y a le sentiment que l’on en fait plus pour les uns que pour les autres. Par ailleurs, le Crif joue à la fois un rôle de repoussoir et de modèle. Beaucoup de musulmans y voient la bonne méthode pour se faire entendre des pouvoirs publics et veulent faire pareil. Le risque est de se retrouver communauté contre communauté. Faire ce constat, ce n’est pas vouloir dresser les uns contre les autres. Je réclame au contraire l’égalité de traitement. La République doit considérer tous ses enfants de la même façon. Quels que soient l’histoire et les drames vécus précédemment, il n’y a pas de raison que certains soient plus protégés que les autres. Je remarque toutefois que l’on parle beaucoup plus des dégradations de mosquée, des agressions et des injures islamophobes. Une prise de conscience est en train de s’opérer dans les médias certainement liée à la pression populaire et aux réseaux sociaux.

Vous présidez l’Iris et êtes de ce fait attentif à l’actualité du monde. À quelques jours des élections européennes et au regard de l’actualité ukrainienne, quel est l’enjeu stratégique pour l’UE ?

Pascal Boniface. Les élections vont être probablement marquées par un fort taux d’abstention 
et par des débats qui portent plus sur la politique intérieure de chaque pays que sur l’Europe. Il y a cet effet de ciseau entre un Parlement européen qui est de plus en plus important en termes de pouvoir et de détermination de politiques européennes et des citoyens français qui croient de moins en moins en l’Europe et dans sa capacité 
à impulser une direction. L’exemple de l’Ukraine montre qu’il y a encore un appétit d’Europe en dehors des frontières de l’Union européenne et une fatigue à l’intérieur. Pourquoi ? Parce que les choses sont mal présentées. Est-ce l’UE qui impose des règles d’austérité injustes ? Le système de santé est malmené en Grèce afin de faire des économies demandées par l’UE. Mais c’est bien le gouvernement grec qui décide de ne pas imposer l’Église orthodoxe ou les armateurs et de faire peser l’effort sur les citoyens. La décision est nationale. Sur la crise ukrainienne, l’Europe a réussi une médiation extrêmement positive entre le gouvernement 
et l’opposition ukrainienne en parvenant à l’accord du 21 février. Cet accord n’a pas ensuite été respecté et l’Europe n’en a pas tenu compte. S’il avait été mis 
en œuvre, il aurait pourtant évité la crise survenue. L’Europe n’a pas suffisamment confiance dans ses capacités d’acteur global et n’a pas conscience du poids qu’elle représente.

Jusqu’à se retrouver maintenant à la remorque de la position américaine ?

Pascal Boniface. Oui, clairement. Elle n’a pas suivi les États-Unis sur la nature des sanctions mais l’impulsion première a été donnée par les Américains et s’est appuyée sur leurs plus fidèles alliés en Europe. En réalité, le tournant a été manqué 
il y a deux décennies lorsque la fin du monde bipolaire n’a pas été gérée de façon satisfaisante. Gorbatchev a fait des efforts extraordinaires pour construire un monde nouveau en permettant aux Nations unies de jouer pleinement leur rôle. 
De leur côté, les Américains ont parlé eux d’un nouvel ordre mondial en se félicitant d’avoir gagné la guerre froide. Ils ont privilégié la tentative 
de la construction d’un monde unipolaire sur la possibilité de construire un monde basé sur la sécurité collective bâtie sur l’effort de tous. Du coup, on n’a toujours pas reconstruit un nouvel ordre mondial.

Votre grille de lecture de la société et du monde semble suivre une même logique ?

Pascal Boniface. Vous avez parfaitement raison. Il y a une matrice commune : respecter les autres, prendre le point de vue de l’autre en considération et surtout éviter d’humilier les autres car c’est une source première de violence et de rejet. Il s’agit de respecter les individus à l’échelle de la société ou les peuples au niveau mondial. L’information circule tellement aujourd’hui que l’on ne peut pas baser une relation sur le mépris et la négation de l’autre. C’est non seulement moralement indéfendable, mais c’est politiquement dangereux.

Des questions stratégiques à la géopolitique du sport. 
Pascal Boniface a écrit une cinquantaine d’ouvrages, alternant essais et livres pédagogiques sur les questions stratégiques, traitant de la politique extérieure de la France, des questions nucléaires, de la sécurité européenne, 
du conflit du Proche-Orient et de ses répercussions sur la société française et sur les rapports de forces internationaux, ainsi que du rôle du sport dans les questions internationales. Son dernier ouvrage, Géopolitique du sport, vient 
de paraître aux éditions Armand Colin.

1) Éditios Salvador. 222 pages. 19,5 euros

(2)

Voir par ailleurs:

Perceptions et attentes de la population juive : le rapport à l’autre et aux minorités
31 Janvier 2016

Le dispositif d’enquête dont les principaux enseignements sont présentés ci-après a été conduit par l’Institut Ipsos à la demande de la Fondation du Judaïsme Français. Ce dispositif d’études s’articule autour de trois volets.
Document associé :

[COMPLEMENT] Afin de mieux appréhender les résultats d’une étude approfondie et comportant de nombreux volets, nous mettons à votre disposition l’analyse de l’ensemble des données par Chantal Bordes (CNRS), Dominique Schnapper (EHESS), Brice Teinturier (IPSOS), Etienne Mercier (IPSOS).

Note de synthèse longuepdf 1.15 MB
Le premier volet concerne l’ensemble de la population française : nous avons interrogé 1005 personnes constituant un échantillon représentatif de la population française âgée de 18 ans et plus (méthode des quotas). L’enquête a été réalisée par internet du 15 au 24 juillet 2014.

Le second concerne les personnes se considérant comme juives : après avoir réalisé 45 entretiens qualitatifs d’environ 2h auprès de juifs (45) dont des responsables communautaires (15) en région parisienne, à Toulouse et Strasbourg, Ipsos a réalisé une étude quantitative auprès de 313 personnes.
Il n’existe pas de définition satisfaisante de qui est juif et qui ne l’est pas. Il n’existe pas non plus de statistiques permettant d’appliquer des quotas. La méthode utilisée a été celle de l’autodéfinition par les personnes elles-mêmes. Est juif celui ou celle qui se considère comme tel. A partir de plusieurs dizaines de milliers de panélistes interrogés, on a ainsi pu extraire un échantillon de 313 personnes se déclarant comme juif ou juive, auquel le questionnaire a été administré du 24 février au 8 juin 2015. Cette méthode a l’avantage de limiter les biais que l’on rencontre lors de recrutement « dans la rue » ou à proximité de lieux de culte

Le troisième concerne les personnes se considérant comme musulmanes. Pour les mêmes raisons, il a été procédé exactement de la même façon que pour les répondants juifs. Un échantillon de 500 personnes se déclarant musulman/musulmane extrait de notre Acces Panel a ainsi été interrogé du 24 février au 9 mars 2015.

LES FRANÇAIS PESSIMISTES EN CE QUI CONCERNE LE FUTUR DU PAYS ET LEUR PROPRE AVENIR

Pour comprendre la force de la crise de confiance généralisée, il convient de garder à l’esprit qu’elle s’est aussi individualisée. De ce point de vue, il n’y a pas un pessimisme collectif et un optimisme individuel mais un pessimisme collectif massif qui se double d’un pessimisme individuel important.

79% sont aujourd’hui persuadés que la France est en déclin
61% déclarent qu’en pensant à leur avenir, celui-ci leur apparaît « bouché »

UNE CRISE DE CONFIANCE GÉNÉRALISÉE QUI S’EXPRIME PAR DES CRITIQUES FORTES À L’ÉGARD DE « L’AUTRE »

Ce pessimisme s’accompagne d’une relation de défiance à l’égard d’autrui (les immigrés, les chômeurs).

66% des Français estiment que « Dans la vie, on ne peut pas faire confiance à la plupart des gens »
54% des Français considèrent que « L’immigration n’est pas une source d’enrichissement pour la France »,
53% qu’on « en fait plus pour aider les immigrés que les Français »
39% affirment que ce n’est pas « la pauvreté qui est la principale cause d’insécurité, c’est l’immigration ».
49% que « les chômeurs ne font pas de réels efforts pour trouver du travail »
30% estiment qu’« une réaction raciste peut se justifier ».

UN REPLI SUR SOI, LE SENTIMENT FRÉQUENT D’ASSISTER À UN CHOC DES RELIGIONS ET D’ÊTRE DEVENUS MINORITAIRES

Ces opinions s’inscrivent dans un climat de forte défiance vis-à-vis des religions et de leur capacité à coexister entre elles.

53% estiment que « l’intégrisme religieux est un phénomène développé en France »
44% estiment qu’« en France les différentes religions coexistent plutôt bien entre elles »
23% disent avoir même assisté à des comportements agressifs ou à des violences liées à la religion et que les victimes de ces agressions étaient majoritairement de leur propre confession
Les Français estiment en moyenne que 31% de la population globale est musulmane et considèrent même que les catholiques sont aujourd’hui minoritaires (seulement 49% de la population d’ensemble).
Les mesures en faveur des minorités religieuses sont presque toutes rejetées, surtout quand elles touchent à l’école, symbole fort de la laïcité : 63% sont opposés à « la mise en place de menus spécifiques dans les cantines scolaires pour les élèves de confession juive et musulmane », 71% sont défavorables à « la mise en place de dérogations permettant aux élèves de s’absenter les jours de fêtes religieuses non prévus dans le calendrier » et 74% sont contre « la possibilité pour des mères portant le voile d’accompagner leurs enfants lors des sorties scolaires ».
En revanche, 53% sont favorables « à la construction de mosquées pour que les personnes de confession musulmane puissent exercer leur culte plus facilement ».

DES MÉCANISMES TRÈS VARIABLES DE TOLÉRANCE ET D’INTOLÉRANCE : LES JUIFS SONT TRÈS MAJORITAIREMENT PERÇUS COMME BIEN INTÉGRÉS, CONTRAIREMENT AUX ROMS, AUX MUSULMANS ET AUX MAGHRÉBINS

Si l’on sait que les périodes de crise favorisent les sentiments d’hostilité à l’égard des minorités, des étrangers, en un mot des « autres », les réactions à l’égard des différents groupes montrent que les sentiments d’hostilité ne portent pas en priorité sur les juifs mais sur les Roms, les musulmans et les Maghrébins :

80% des Français considèrent que la grande majorité des Roms est mal intégrée
Seuls 29% des Français estiment que la majorité des personnes de confession musulmane est bien intégrée, 44% pensent qu’une moitié est bien intégrée, l’autre non et 27% considèrent que la majorité d’entre eux est mal intégrée).
89% des Français qui pensent que les musulmans sont mal intégrés estiment que « c’est parce qu’ils se sont repliés sur eux-mêmes et qu’ils refusent de s’ouvrir sur la société » contre 11% qui estiment que « c’est la société qui a poussé ces personnes à se replier sur elles-mêmes en les rejetant »)

LES PRÉJUGÉS ANTISÉMITES SONT FORTEMENT RÉPANDUS AU SEIN DE LA POPULATION FRANÇAISE ET TRANSCENDENT TOUS LES CRITÈRES SOCIODÉMOGRAPHIQUES ET POLITIQUES

Indéniablement, la diffusion des stéréotypes antisémites est forte au sein de la population française.

91% considèrent que « les juifs sont très soudés entre eux »
56% que « les juifs ont beaucoup de pouvoir »
56% qu’« ils sont plus riches que la moyenne des Français »
53% qu’« ils sont plus attachés à Israël qu’à la France »
41% qu’ «ils sont trop présents dans les médias »
25% qu’ «ils sont plus intelligents que la moyenne »
24% qu’ «ils ne sont pas vraiment des Français comme les autres »
13% qu’  « il y a un peu trop de juifs en France »
Au total, c’est plus du tiers de la population (36%) qui se dit d’accord avec au moins 5 des 8 stéréotypes testés.

Les ouvriers sont légèrement plus nombreux à être dans la catégorie de ceux qui se disent d’accord avec au moins 5 stéréotypes (42%), mais les professions intermédiaires (28%) et les cadres (32%) sont également très présents. De même, si les titulaires d’un diplôme inférieur au bac sont plus nombreux que les autres à se dire d’accord avec au moins 5 des stéréotypes testés (46%), c’est aussi le cas de 32% des bacheliers, de 23% des titulaires d’une licence/maîtrise et de 35% des diplômés d’une grande école ou d’un doctorat.

LES PRÉJUGÉS ANTISÉMITES SONT LARGEMENT RÉPANDUS AU SEIN DE LA POPULATION MUSULMANE, PLUS QUE CHEZ L’ENSEMBLE DES FRANÇAIS

51% des musulmans se déclarent d’accord avec au moins 5 des 8 stéréotypes testés

90% considèrent que les juifs sont très soudés entre eux »
74% que « les juifs ont beaucoup de pouvoir »
66% qu’« ils sont plus riches que la moyenne des Français »
67% qu’« ils sont trop présents dans les médias »
62% qu’« ils sont plus attachés à Israël qu’à la France »
26% qu’« ils sont plus intelligents que la moyenne »
29% qu’« ils ne sont pas vraiment des Français comme les autres »

UN ANTISÉMITISME PERÇU PAR LES JUIFS COMME ÉTANT EN FORTE PROGRESSION ET QUI EST DEVENU LEUR PRINCIPALE PRÉOCCUPATION…

La perception de leur situation en tant que juif a profondément évolué au cours des dernières années : la crainte de la montée de l’antisémitisme a laissé la place chez bon nombre d’entre eux à une angoisse réactivée régulièrement par les actes terroristes et les tueries qui se sont succédé.

92% des juifs estiment que l’antisémitisme a augmenté (dont 67% disent « beaucoup »)
Ils considèrent que l’antisémitisme progresse d’abord et avant tout chez les musulmans (91% dont 61% estiment qu’il s’est « beaucoup » renforcé ces 5 dernières années) mais ont aussi le sentiment que la situation se détériore au sein de la population française dans son ensemble (77% pensent qu’il a augmenté au global).
L’antisémitisme (67%), le terrorisme (50%), et l’intégrisme religieux sont les principales craintes des juifs, loin devant le chômage (23%), ou le pouvoir d’achat (27%) à rebours de la population française dont ce sont les principales préoccupations.

…AUQUEL S’AJOUTE UN SENTIMENT D’INSÉCURITÉ VÉCU « PERSONNELLEMENT »

L’idée que les juifs ne sont plus en sécurité sur le territoire français s’est largement diffusée, y compris auprès des responsables communautaires. Dans le même temps, les juifs ont le sentiment d’assister à une libération de la parole antisémite concomitante à un sentiment d’insécurité vécu personnellement.

45% disent avoir subi personnellement des remarques ou des insultes antisémites au cours de l’année parce qu’ils étaient juifs et 71% ont un ou plusieurs proches qui en aurait aussi été victime.
31% disent avoir un proche qui a été agressé physiquement au cours de l’année parce qu’il était juif
76% des juifs interrogés considèrent qu’il est difficile d’être juif aujourd’hui en France.
Plus de 6 juifs sur 10 éprouvent des craintes importantes pour leur sécurité (69%) et pour la possibilité d’exercer leur religion sereinement (63%)
45%  ont tendance à faire attention à ne pas montrer qu’ils sont juifs

DES CONDAMNATIONS JUGÉES INSUFFISANTES, UNE ATTENTE TRÈS FORTE DE PRISE DE PAROLE DE LA PART DES POLITIQUES

Dans ce contexte, les juifs interviewés se montrent de moins en moins rassurés par la solidité des remparts traditionnels à l’antisémitisme (la République, les intellectuels, les représentants communautaire juifs et musulmans, la société dans son ensemble).

Face à l’ensemble des actes terroristes et des exactions commises à l’encontre de juifs, il semble qu’il y ait au sein de la conscience des interviewés un premier « crime originel », celui d’Ilan Halimi. La très grande majorité des juifs considèrent que la plupart des acteurs de la société ont insuffisamment réagi :

Les musulmans et le Front National d’abord (respectivement 83% et 80% des interviewés considèrent qu’ils ne l’ont pas fait assez) mais aussi la gauche française et notamment EELV (77%), le Front de Gauche (77%) et le PS (62%).
L’UMP est moins critiquée même si plus d’un juif sur deux considère que sa réaction n’a pas été à la hauteur (53%). Au-delà, c’est aussi l’ensemble de la société française qui est critiquée pour l’insuffisance de sa réaction (69%).
Le gouvernement et le président de la République d’une part, les médias de l’autre, sont les seuls acteurs à être considérés par une courte majorité de juifs comme ayant suffisamment réagi (respectivement 54% et 52%).
Les réactions du gouvernement et du Président de la République sont presque toujours perçues comme celles qui ont été les plus fortes. C’est plus spécifiquement le cas pour la tuerie de l’hyper-casher (87% des juifs estiment que les réactions ont été suffisantes), celle de Toulouse (71%) et, comme l’a montré l’enquête qualitative, les propos tenus par Dieudonné et Alain Soral. La parole politique, lorsqu’elle est prise, est donc repérée et s’avère fondamentale…

… tout comme l’absence de condamnation forte lors d’évènements antisémites. C’est notamment le cas lors de la tuerie du musée juif de Bruxelles, où 51% seulement des juifs considèrent que l’exécutif a « suffisamment réagi », et plus encore lors des manifestations anti-israéliennes de juillet 2014 dans les rue de Paris durant lesquelles des commerces tenus par des juifs ont été vandalisés et des manifestants ont crié « Mort aux juifs ! » : 36% seulement des juifs estiment que le Gouvernement a alors suffisamment réagi.

DES RÉFLEXIONS TRÈS AVANCÉES SUR UN POSSIBLE DÉPART HORS DE FRANCE POUR UN JUIF SUR QUATRE

Face à un niveau d’angoisse et d’anxiété très élevé chez beaucoup de juifs, le départ devient plus qu’une tentation. Pour près d’un quart des juifs, c’est désormais une option.

61% estiment que les juifs sont plus en sécurité en Israël qu’en France (contre 37% qui disent en France).
54% des juifs envisagent un départ vers Israël ou vers un autre pays.
26% disent qu’il s’agit d’une option qu’ils étudient sérieusement.
Pour ceux qui « envisagent » ce départ, c’est d’abord à cause de « l’accumulation des attentats et des meurtres dont ont été victimes un certain nombre de juifs » (67%). Mais aussi en raison de « la progression de l’islamisme radical au sein d’une partie de la population musulmane » (56%), de « l’absence de réaction de la société française face à l’antisémitisme » (31%) et de la persistance des stéréotypes antisémites (29%) devant la libération de la parole antisémite (24%).

[Mise à jour du 3/02/2016] Nous avons supprimé le logo « EHESS » (Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales), c’est en effet comme conseillère scientifique et spécialiste de ces questions, que Dominique Schnapper (Directrice d’études à l’EHESS) est intervenue sur cette étude.

Voir de même:

Dix ans après la mort d’Ilan Halimi, un sondage que nous révélons montre que les préjugés antijuifs demeurent.

Le Parisien

12 février 2016

Les préjugés restent tenaces

Juif et donc riche. C’est ainsi que les bourreaux d’Ilan Halimi ont justifié les vingt-quatre jours de torture qu’ils ont fait subir au jeune homme. Dix ans après la découverte de son corps, il reste pour sept Français sur dix le « symbole de ce à quoi peuvent conduire les préjugés sur les juifs », nous apprend une étude de l’Ifop* pour SOS Racisme et l’Union des étudiants juifs (UEJF) que nous dévoilons en exclusivité. Cette « affaire », dont 61 % des sondés disent qu’elle les a « beaucoup » touchés, n’a pourtant pas permis d’anéantir les stéréotypes dont elle a été l’emblème. L’étude démontre en effet qu’au-delà d’Internet où des torrents de haine antijuive se déversent, les préjugés antisémites ont la dent dure.

32 % estiment que les juifs se servent dans « leur propre intérêt » de leur statut de victime du nazisme, de même que de nombreux sondés admettent pour vraie l’idée de juifs plus riches que la moyenne (31 %), avec par exemple trop de pouvoir dans les médias (25 %). « Le préjugé devient un véritable problème quand il engendre une violence envers l’autre ou un rejet de celui-ci, commente Dominique Sopo, le président de SOS Racisme. Ce qui est inquiétant est que notre sondage révèle que contrairement aux idées reçues les préjugés antisémites ne concernent pas que les jeunes. Ils prennent même de l’ampleur chez les plus de 25 ans. » « Nous sommes dans la situation paradoxale où les Français disent ressentir de l’empathie pour les juifs alors que 40 % des actes racistes concernent ce 1 % de la population, rappelle Sacha Reingewirtz, le président de l’UEJF. L’affaire Ilan Halimi montre que le travail de pédagogie, d’enseignement et de transmission doit être amplifié. Déconstruire les préjugés sur les Juifs, les musulmans, les homos… est la seule manière de pouvoir coexister. » * Etude menée en ligne du 3 au 5 février auprès de 1 468 personnes

Voir aussi:

Spotlight (2015)
Steve Baqqi

Epsilon reviews

December 28, 2015

The sexual abuse scandal in the Boston Catholic Church rocked much of the world when it was revealed by The Boston Globe in 2002. Spotlight dramatizes how the investigative team exposed this scandal. The term “spotlight” refers to the team of reporters at the Boston Globe who investigates an issue or topic in depth for months, thereby shining a “spotlight” on the previously unknown. This Spotlight team was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for their efforts depicted in the film. Spotlight is a fantastic film about the importance of “outsiders”, institutional corruption, thorough investigative journalism, and the dire consequences of inaction.

Spotlight begins with the Boston Globe receiving a new Editor In Chief, Marty Baron, an awkward outsider (he’s Jewish, and not from Boston) who is viewed with suspicion by the staff. Marty tasks the Spotlight team to investigate a case of a Catholic priest who is allegedly a serial molester. The story snowballs gradually from there. Almost immediately the Spotlight team is hit with resistance within the Globe about their investigative methods and sources. The Catholic Church, an incredibly powerful institution in the city of Boston, uses all its might to dissuade Spotlight from continuing their research, but they steadfastly continue to investigate these allegations.

The Catholic Church itself is portrayed in the film as a powerful, resourceful, and dangerous institution.  The Church has control and/or influence with nearly every major institution in the city of Boston. The “small-town” inclusiveness of the city only further allows the Church to abuse and misuse its power, while vigorously opposing or discrediting anyone who attempts to speak out. The Church even indirectly benefits from the shame of the victims and the parish pressuring them to keep silent. Mitchell Garabedian, an Armenian Lawyer (another vital outsider standing against the Church) representing dozens of alleged victims, posits, “The Church thinks in centuries Mr. Rezendes, do you really think your paper has the resources to take this on?” As the Spotlight team traverses across the city of Boston in search of the truth, a church is often looming in the background, as if watching their every move. This is the behemoth the Spotlight team must defeat.

Spotlight is directed and edited with an unpretentious simplicity that allows us to focus on the team and their investigative efforts. This simplicity is what gives the film’s raw look into the massive corruption a lasting impact. Furthermore, the film’s muted palette, and haunting ambient theme, gives a serious and somber backdrop to its grave subject matter. The Spotlight team of Mike Rezendes (Mark Ruffalo), Walter ‘Robby’ Robinson (Michael Keaton), Sacha Pfeiffer (Rachel McAdams), and Matt Carroll (Brian d’Arcy James) are hardworking, driven reporters. Their investigative reporting is never dull as they uncover an astonishing amount of facts and disturbing details. Their triumph reveals the corruption and gross negligence of not only the Catholic Church, but other powerful Boston institutions. Their efforts come at a high personal price as the investigation is emotionally draining on the reporters, all of whom were raised catholic. Each have their faith shattered by the investigation and are haunted by the results. Keaton’s reaction, in particular, toward the end of the film is utterly devastating. Its conclusion is as satisfying as it is tragic.

It took two outsiders, one an Armenian lawyer, and the other a Jewish editor to get the ball rolling for the Spotlight team. Garabedian in particular is critical to their success and he illuminates the issue with a scathing indictment of Boston’s corruption, “If it takes a village to raise a child, it takes a village to abuse one.” Black Mass could learn a lot from Spotlight in how to depict institutional corruption in Boston. The final numbers revealed at the end will undoubtedly horrify you and leave you feeling depressed and angry. Why was this allowed to go on so long? Why did it take so long to uncover it? For Spotlight the answer is simple, no one wanted to look.

TLDR: A deeply depressing and unsettling film about marrow deep corruption in the city of Boston and the investigation that brought the Catholic Church’s sexual abuse scandal to light-4/5 Stars

Voir encore:

Spotlight

Jesse Cataldo

Slant

November 2, 2015

Boston may be a major American city, but as described in Tom McCarthy’s Spotlight, it’s still a small town at heart. With a populace that skews nearly 50 percent Catholic, the conventions of this metaphorical village are organized under the jurisdiction of the church, which provides the clearest point of connection for immigrants old and new. Such insularity fosters tight-knit communities and deep ancestral roots, but it has its downsides, specifically regarding the exclusion of outsiders, as one Armenian character notes to another of Portuguese extraction. Even more insidiously, this environment encourages a private approach to community housekeeping, assuring that problems will be handled internally, and secrets will remain underground.

Based on the events leading up to the 2001 sex abuse scandal that rocked the Roman Catholic Church, Spotlight patiently charts the gradual development from rumors and whispers to a full-blown revelation of years of astonishing exploitation. As the film imagines, it’s the singular character of the town, particularly its reliance on the moral authority of religious officials, that allowed dozens of pedophiles to remain at work, with the diocese shuffling them around the city once their crimes came to light, lying to parishioners, and offering scads of hush money. The task of revealing this rotten system falls to The Boston Globe, itself already in crisis, what with the arrival of Marty Baron (Liev Schrieber) as executive editor, appearing to herald greater control by the paper’s parent corporation with a salvo of buyouts and layoffs.

A Jewish transplant from Florida, backed by the big-city pedigree of The New York Times, Baron is a classic interloper, a singularly focused workaholic unburdened by the constraints of social niceties, who doesn’t play golf or know the catechism. This makes him the perfect person to spearhead the exposé, which seems to strike at the heart of everything the city holds dear.

His motives are contrasted against the more sensitive demands of Walter Robinson (Michael Keaton), whose award-winning Spotlight team, charged with the production of lengthy investigative pieces, handles the burden of the journalistic work. A native son with a strong local pedigree, Robinson has to weigh the needs of his community against the ethical demands of a journalist, while making similar decisions for his reporters, namely the dangerously obsessive Michael Rezendes (Mark Ruffalo) and the blandly proficient Sacha Pfeiffer (Rachel McAdams), each of whom seems poised to suffer serious emotional damage from the production and fallout of the articles.

Spotlight entertains such weighty concerns while also spinning a masterfully paced potboiler. A familiar tale of scrappy underdogs taking on a secretive institution, it complicates that dynamic by having its protagonists operating under the auspices of a monolithic corporation, which many Bostonites are concerned intends to strip away the distinctiveness of their hometown paper, all while nosily digging into local matters and airing dirty laundry.

It devotes too much time delivering information to establish a convincing visual foundation for its account.
This is a complex film about moving past clannish parochial designations, one which ends up assigning the burden of guilt upon an entire populace for looking the other way, none of them quite aware of the scale of the problem they were avoiding. In tackling this mass culpability, the film also confronts the degradation of individuality which also occurs as communities stretch past their traditional limits and out into the ethereal fabric of the internet, as city papers become assets of global conglomerates, and local flavor turns into a surface characteristic rather than an essential quality of a place.

But the biggest downside to this approach is that, burdened with the telling of this expansive story, the film devotes too much time delivering information to establish a convincing visual foundation for its account, aside from a few ominous shots of church structures literally looming over everything. Full of reserved tracking shots and walk-and-talk exposition dumps, Spotlight seems submissively constructed around the contours of its voluminous dialogue, a feat of informational cinema that’s equally thrilling and overwhelming.

McCarthy has yet to emerge as a director with any noticeable style. With Spotlight, he pulls off his biggest and most consistently conceived production yet, but the lack of a personal imprint leaves the film feeling a bit too much like a modern companion to All the President’s Men, though one that doesn’t match that film’s sharp stylistic sense or its aura of era-defining importance. Achieving the latter would be a tall task, but Pakula’s classic managed to match its timely narrative with an equally virtuosic lens for telling its story. By modeling its structure so closely after the format of its predecessor, Spotlight only draws closer attention to its lack of scope and ambition.

For a film so concerned with portraying the special character of a city, its unique workings, rites, and rituals, Spotlight never conveys much local color beyond some respectably rendered accents, and a specifically intense level of Catholic influence, what with the church inextricably ingrained in the very fabric of the town. In this atmosphere, the individual characters, specifically the reporters embroiled in the investigation, feel less like fully conceived humans than personifications of different narrative concerns, each tasked with a specific type of reaction to the mounting chain of shocking disclosures.

In a final postscript that plays like a bit of caustic black humor, the film lists off a compilation of communities that experienced their own molestation scandals in the wake of Boston’s reckoning, information which occupies several title cards and encompasses untold thousands of horrible incidents. This one city, as it turns out, wasn’t so unique after all.

Voir de même:

Catholic Movie Reviews: Spotlight
Sr. Helena Burns, FSP
R
MPAA Rating

Life Teen Rating
Is It Cool?: Excellence in Filmmaking
“Spotlight” is the recounting of the “Spotlight” team of intrepid investigative reporters at the Boston Globe who broke the Catholic Church’s clergy sex abuse story in January 2002 — mainly concerning the Archdiocese of Boston.

This is a story that had to be told, and the filmmakers have done a capable and responsible job.

For starters, this is not a Church-bashing film even though it easily could have been. It’s an accurate, stark, almost understated presentation. It’s rated “R” simply and appropriately for subject matter. Just enough of the horrific details of cases are disclosed in the film, the rest is hinted at discreetly.

NOT ENTERTAINMENT
“Spotlight” is not a pseudo-documentary, nor is it juicy, sensational, exploitative entertainment. It is what I would call an “information film.” The acting, too, is muted: none of the big name actors shine. The excellent cast seem to be humbly striving only to serve the story.

Is it hard to watch? Yes, of course. The tone is somber, dreary and somewhat suffocating — as it should be. The monolithic power of the Catholic Church (until 2002) over civic, religious, and spiritual affairs in the city of Boston is chilling. It extended even into the Boston Globe where employees (many of whom were Catholic) simply knew you don’t take on the Catholic Church. They are even trained to believe that when the Catholic Church dismisses claims, they can’t possibly be true. It took an outside editor from New York to press the issue.

What’s it Saying?: Message of the Movie
MAGNITUDE
The timeline unfolds without much fanfare. Little by little, the magnitude of the number of priests, victims, and the span of years and cover-ups becomes clearer. Since we, the audience, presumably know the sordid story and outcome, there are few surprises and no real highs, lows or even serious crisis points.

The kicker is that all the evidence was hiding in plain sight. Much is made of the fact that B.C. High (a Catholic Jesuit boys high school that some of the reporters themselves attended, maintained an infamous priest-coach molester on staff) is directly across the street from the Boston Globe building.

Ironically, both the Catholic Church in Boston and the Boston Globe were at the height of their influence at the beginning of the new millennium, while a third character–the internet–is just becoming a serious player.

WHO’S TO BLAME?
Very self-effacingly — and I would say unnecessarily and misplaced — the film blames The Globe itself in a big way for not reporting the story years earlier when lawyers and victims provided plenty of damning information that went ignored. Whatever culpability The Globe bears, they more than made up for it by compiling overwhelming, carefully-researched evidence that wouldn’t be just another isolated story that would get buried. “The Church” and Cardinal Law are distant, cold, uncaring shadows. The abusing priests are sick and distorted men — almost excused. The names Geoghan, Shanley and Talbot (among others) will conjure up ugly memories for all who lived at the heart of this nightmare or on its peripheries.

FOCUS ON THE VICTIMS
The faces and voices of the victims are given three-dimensional reality and the major focus. Even the heroic, crusading lawyer, Mitchell Garabedian — who insisted on bringing victims’ cases to the courts to expose the Church’s wrongdoing — is modestly underplayed.

DENIAL
Part of the initial incredulity of sectors of the public and the average Catholic in the pew to the Globe’s scoop was due to the Globe’s notorious anti-Catholicism since its very inception in 1872 (not unlike most of the old Boston WASP establishment). And many just didn’t believe that so many heinous crimes of this nature could have been so well hidden for so long. If it were true, surely we would have known? Surely we would have heard some rumors and gossip? Whoever did know something was silenced with hush money, or gave up when crushed by the power of the Church’s legal and “moral authority” arsenal and sway. But it didn’t take long for the undeniable, verifiable veracity of the charges to grip the city and the world.

NO AFTERMATH
There is precious little aftermath in the film, as it wraps up on the day the first big story is released (there were a total of 600 stories run relentlessly about the scandal for at least a year afterward in the Globe). A few words of Epilogue are given, and then we are left with a gaping wound of sadness.

THREE FLAWS
As I see it, three minor drawbacks to the film are:

1) They got Cardinal Law a bit wrong. They made him a much older man (he was only 68 in 2001) with a hint of an Irish accent (Wha?). They made him a rather flat — although bold — stereotypical bureaucratic figure, when in reality he was a magnetic, charismatic personality who had actually been a media favorite when he first came to Boston.

2) The feeble, brief explanations given for the (unfettered) abuse were screaming to be explored and were even contradictory.

“Celibacy is the issue. It creates a culture of secrecy.” Really?? So if one attempts to practice (priestly) celibacy they have a good chance of being/becoming a depraved, predatory pedophile? And how are celibacy and secrecy related? This makes no sense. And sadly, most sex abusers of children? Married men.
Another reason given is that some of the priests were “psycho-sexually stunted at the level of a 12-year-old” — which may be very true, but that does not make one an automatic repeat child molester. The one priest molester we see being interviewed begins to say that he was raped, but the thought was not continued. (The rest of that statistic is that it was discovered that some priests who molested children were molested by priests themselves when they were children. They grew up, become priests and continued the cycle.)

3) I would like to have seen some rage in the film. Some of the rage that I felt and still feel in the pit of my stomach. Perhaps the filmmakers are leaving that up to us, the audience.

The Good, The Bad, The Ugly: Morality in the Movie
NO HOPE
There does not seem to be any hope put forth in this film. Not about healing for victims or reform for the Church. But maybe that was not a part of the film’s scope. Maybe there is no way to find the silver lining here. There is also hardly any insight into the root causes of this terrible state of affairs. It’s just raw evil on display. Perhaps this is the best way for this particular film to handle this grave matter. Sexual abuse destroys hope. No soothing, reassuring sugar-coating or “Hollywood ending” in this film.

THERE IS HOPE
But of course, there is hope. Although sexual abuse (and spiritual-sexual abuse) takes a deep, deep toll, and a certain proportion of the victims tragically committed suicide, emotional healing is always a possibility.

NO GOD
There is hardly any mention of God in this film. No angry questioning of “Why did God allow this?!” or “Where was God?!” or “How could purported men of God do this?” or “This has destroyed my faith in God!” There is only mention of “devout Catholics” and those who “go to church” or “don’t go to church.” There didn’t even need to be a distinction made between a good God and bad men who represent God (and are doing a terrible job at it) because God is pretty much absent from the film. The one tragically poignant mention of God is from a male victim, now an adult, who says: “You don’t say no to God” (meaning when a priest propositioned him at twelve years old, the only right answer was “yes”). Again, perhaps this was the best way to handle “God” in this story that had nothing to do with a good God, and everything to do with bad men.

The Church, although divinely instituted by Christ and guided by the Holy Spirit, is still human and sinful because of the free will of her members — even those who hold the authority. Thankfully, the sacraments and everything we need still operates through these men, regardless of their personal holiness.

SEE THIS IMPORTANT FILM
“Spotlight” is an important film to see, even if you kept up and delved into these dark waters — as I did — when they first hit the shore. The restrained even-handedness of the storytelling is remarkable and will prevent it from being a “controversial” film. There’s a lot of dialogue in the film, but it’s never tedious. The narrative and the horror is in the information itself each time more is unearthed.

Why should you see this film? To honor the victims, first of all, and second of all to understand how corruption — of any sort — works, in order to be vigilant and oppose it. NEVER AGAIN.

Has ANY good come of all this sorrow? The suffering of the children, teens and their families has not been totally in vain. There is now a much greater awareness of the sexual abuse of minors all over the world, and new laws have been created to protect young people where there were none.

OTHER STUFF:

SO WHAT ARE THE REAL ROOTS / REASONS / CAUSES FOR THIS HORRIFYING TRAVESTY?

This problem is centuries old
It’s not celibacy that is the problem, but a culture of secrecy brought about by a culture of absolute power
absolute power corrupts absolutely
abuse of power is not an inevitability, it’s a choice
unbridled male chauvinistic power is insensitive to women, children and the vulnerable
pedophiles automatically gravitate to wherever they have trusted access to children (seminaries, schools, sports teams, law enforcement, etc.)
seminaries did not do good screening of candidates
anyone who reported behavior was threatened (get kicked out of seminary themselves, lose a job/position)silence=loyalty
silence/playing the game=perks, advancement
it was a numbers game (to have lots of priests)
it was keeping up appearances (bishops knew they could quash “problems,” abusers knew they would never get in trouble and would always be shielded: the perfect set-up)
it was keeping up appearances (“not on my watch”)
toward the middle of the 20th century, psychiatrists and psychologists got involved (assessments, “treatment”) and kept giving the green light to put the priest back in ministry (bishops blindly “obeyed”)
it wasn’t known that pedophilia is not “curable” (but it’s also not rocket science to see that a man abusing over and over and over and over again needs to be stopped, removed permanently)
gross blindness and ignorant cluelessness what sexual abuse does to a child/teen
careerism, clericalism, wrong priorities
evil and sin
SOLUTIONS?

the clergy sex abuse problems will continue unless there is courageous breaking with mentalities, cultures, habits, patterns, and cycles
the presence of women in all (non-ordained) positions at all levels and places of Church life will help mitigate undisciplined male power (and male lack of empathy and sympathy)
following preventative and protective protocols for child safety immediately and unilaterally
child safety is everyone’s job, not just those in positions of authority
stringent screening/dismissals at seminary level
thorough training in human sexuality for seminarians (including THEOLOGY OF THE BODY)
a deep prayer life, spiritual direction in seminary
priestly spirituality
normal, healthy relationships with laypeople, families, women of God
priestly fraternity, camaraderie, seminary follow-up, oversight by and relationship with bishop
bishop accountability (Pope Francis is putting this in place)
availability: doing ministry where needed (while maintaining healthful lifestyle, self-care and avoiding burnout)
pouring oneself out as a spiritual father (love and zeal for the Bride [the Church] and the world) conquers loneliness

That’s Right. I Said It: Reviewer Comments
When the shocking news broke, it was the only time in my life — since my conversion at 15 — that I wanted to leave the Catholic Church and run screaming to the hills. A close friend even accused me: “You’re a nun–you knew!” But I didn’t. Nobody knew. Or very, very few people knew. I agonized for months over it. I couldn’t understand. I thought priests and bishops were the good guys! I thought they wanted to protect and help people! I just couldn’t figure it out. And then — through my study of Theology of the Body — I got a powerful insight: Men do NOT want to be Superman or the Lone Ranger. They do NOT want to break ranks. Men are HORRIBLE at whistle-blowing. They are all about BAND OF BROTHERS. And this can be a good thing! Men are stronger together. They have each other’s backs. They can provide for and protect hearth and home better TOGETHER. The problem lies when they BAND TOGETHER FOR EVIL. To hide each other’s sins. To give each other a pass for their sins. Look the other way. Code of silence. Complete corruption. Whole cities run on this notion. But it doesn’t have to be that way. MEN NEED TO BAND TOGETHER FOR THE GOOD. Positive peer pressure. And call each other out when they need calling out. So, guys? Join some good guy thing to do charitable works together, pray together or just hang out together. Do your secret handshakes. Knock yourselves out. Live by the “10 Commandments of Chivalry“ (except the “have no mercy on the infidel” part). And always, always BAND TOGETHER FOR THE GOOD, NOT EVIL.

Voir également:

Spotlight (2015), au cœur d’un complot
Emilio M.

Bulles de culture

2016-01-24

Spotlight de Tom McCarthy nous plonge dans les méandres d’un effroyable complot, autant véridique qu’inadmissible. Pour mener l’enquête, un casting de marque, avec en tête Michael Keaton, Mark Ruffalo, Rachel McAdams et Liev Schrieber. Un hommage efficace à l’un des derniers fleurons du journalisme d’investigation d’une époque révolue. Spotlight est un coup de cœur de Bulles de Culture !

Synopsis :
Été 2001. À peine nommé rédacteur en chef du Boston Globe, Marty Baron (Liev Schreiber) missionne les journalistes d’investigation de l’équipe Spotlight, dirigée par Walter “Robby” Robinson (Michael Keaton), pour enquêter sur un curé accusé de pédophilie. L’affaire est grave puisque le prêtre aurait violé des dizaines de jeunes paroissiens en l’espace de trente ans…

Dans les règles du genre

Spotlight est un pur film de journalisme d’investigation, dans la lignée directe du cultissime Les hommes du Président d’Alan J. Pakula. Tout comme son prédécesseur, Spotlight reconstitue avec fidélité une enquête journalistique bien réelle mettant à jour un complot d’une ampleur effroyable.

Pour y parvenir, le film respecte les codes du genre et privilégie l’authenticité. L’image du chef opérateur Masanobu Takayanagi — qui s’est prêté au même style d’exercice sur le film True Story (2015) Rupert Goold — favorise une simplicité esthétique naturaliste.

Une sobriété qui va de pair avec la mise en scène discrète de Tom McCarthy et qui apporte en plus une fluidité esthétique dans son découpage et ses mouvements de caméra invisible, le tout au service de la narration. Un effort bien nécessaire du fait de la complexité de l’intrigue et des nombreuses pistes qu’elle explore.

Il en va de même pour la musique de Spotlight, composé par l’incontournable Howard Shore. Omniprésente tout au long du film, la partition du célèbre compositeur est éminemment cinématographique, tout en restant subtile et discrète. La musique renforce ainsi la fluidité de la narration et apporte avec élégance une cohésion supplémentaire au récit.

L’imposant casting hollywoodien apporte enfin la dernière touche d’authenticité au film, avec Michael Keaton et Mark Ruffalo en tête. Les deux acteurs ont en effet collaboré étroitement avec les deux journalistes qu’ils interprètent dans le film, Walter Robinson et Michael Rezendes — qui seront d’ailleurs les premiers bluffés par la prestation des acteurs, troublante de réalisme.

Tous ses efforts mis en œuvre au service des différents aspects du film servent au final un seul but bien précis : rapporter avec véracité et clarté le développement effarant d’une enquête historique sans précédent.

Une enquête fascinante

Lorsque l’équipe de Spotlight débute son enquête, un seul prêtre pédophile est concerné. Et ce qui interpelle les journalistes du Boston Globe, c’est le fait que le prêtre en question ait pu récidiver impunément en changeant de paroisse au fil des ans. Mais à mesure que l’enquête avance, l’affaire va rapidement prendre des proportions hallucinantes pour finir par mettre à jour pas moins de 87 prêtres pédophiles rien que dans la région de Boston.

L’étonnante enquête des quatre journalistes enquêteurs révèle ainsi l’incroyable développement tentaculaire d’un complot systémique sidérant. Boston est l’une des villes flambeaux du catholicisme, une institution puissante et totalement implanter dans l’ensemble de la ville et plus largement dans l’ensemble des États-Unis — comme le révèle le générique final du film listant les nombreuses villes américaines concernées par ce même scandale.

Les méandres de cette affaire scandaleuse s’étendent donc à travers toutes les différentes sphères de la société de Boston, du système judiciaire au système éducatif. Et c’est aux journalistes de Spotlight de suivre ce jeu de pistes complexe pour dénouer l’effroyable vérité de l’affaire, résumée en ces mots par l’éditeur en chef du Boston Globe : « If it takes a village to raise a child, it takes a village to abuse one » (« s’il faut un village pour élever un enfant, il faut un village pour en maltraiter un »).

L’implacable exposition de la vérité

L’accaparante complexité de l’affaire s’impose naturellement comme le sujet principal du film et éclipse toutes autres pistes narratives possibles : la vie privée des protagonistes, leur parcours émotionnel,  le doute conspirationniste, la crise du journalisme face à Internet et les nouvelles technologies 2.0, ou bien même l’impact historique et médiatique du 11 septembre… Tant de thèmes pertinents et parallèles au récit qui ne sont qu’effleurés par le scénario, entièrement focalisé sur l’enquête.

On pourrait regretter ce manque de profondeur, mais Tom McCarthy et son co-scénariste Josh Singer (À la maison blanche, Le cinquième pouvoir) sont bien conscients des limites du format long-métrage. En gardant l’investigation journalistique comme fil narratif exclusif de Spotlight, ils permettent le récit limpide de cette enquête obsédante et tentaculaire.

Les cinéastes offrent ainsi au spectateur une compréhension plus juste et précise des tenants et aboutissants d’un complot effroyable, à l’échelle d’une société toute entière — et pas seulement à l’échelle américaine puisque de nombreuses villes en France et dans le monde sont citées à la fin du film.

Spotlight s’évertue à coller à la réalité de l’enquête et des faits avec une sobre éloquence cinématographique. Une efficacité mise au service de la narration qui submerge le spectateur dans les différentes sphères sociales de Boston, mais sans jamais se perdre dans l’enquête qui avance avec limpidité du début à la fin.

Et même si de nombreux enjeux sont effleurés à travers le film — qu’ils soient moraux, sociaux, émotionnels, ou même spirituels —, une seule chose compte au final : l’implacable exposition de la vérité.

Voir encore:

Fact Checker: More Ways That ‘Spotlight’ Got It Wrong [w/ Addendum, 12/5/15]
TheMediaReport.com

November 30, 2015
Shining the light on ‘Spotlight’
In addition to the instances we have already reported, here are some other ways that the Hollywood movie Spotlight has misled the public about the sex abuse scandal in Boston:

1. A key scene in the film features the Globe’s Walter Robinson threatening Boston Church-suing lawyer Roderick MacLeish to cooperate with the paper’s investigation. MacLeish wrote in a Facebook post that in truth the event « never occurred » and, in fact, he « welcomed » the meeting with Robinson.

2. Another scene features the Globe’s Sacha Pfeiffer claiming that abuse victims « have to sign confidentiality agreements to get monetary settlements, » implying that the Church forced these agreements upon victims. In truth, as we have reported before, it was the other way around. Embarrassed by what had happened to them, it was the victims who sought secrecy from the Church.

3. In another scene, Robinson asks MacLeish if he ever followed up with the cases he settled to ensure that abusive priests were taken out of ministry. MacLeish’s uncomfortable silence to Robinson’s question implies that he didn’t. In fact, it was MacLeish himself who told the Globe back in December 1993 that the Archdiocese had removed 20 accused priests from active ministry. (In addition, MacLeish at the time « credited the Catholic Archdiocese of Boston with taking prompt action on the accusations. »)

4. The film portrays Globe staffer Steve Kurkjian as being dismissive of the Globe’s pursuit of the Church abuse story. In fact, Kurkjian did some of the reporting on the Spotlight Team investigation. So reckless is this portrayal that even the Globe’s own Kevin Cullen has now written, « Kurkjian, a journalistic icon, is owed an apology. »

5. The film portrays a meeting in 2001 about abuse at Boston College High School between Globe staffers and administrators as being confrontational in nature. In truth, not only did the meeting not take place until 2002, it was indeed cordial. Even the Globe itself at the time praised the high school’s swift and transparent handling of its crisis in an opinion article.

6. The film features a scene with the Globe’s Spotlight Team acting astonished when learning about a report issued to bishops in 1985 that had foreseen the scope of the abuse crisis. In truth, the paper already wrote about the report back in 1990 and 1991, and the report itself was the subject of a front-page article in the Globe in July 1992.

[ADDENDUM, 12/5/15:]

7. Hollywood entertainment magazine Entertainment Weekly exposes at least three more fictitious scenes! Check it out:

« Late in the film, [Globe columnist Walter] Robinson pressures one of his sources, a lawyer named Eric MacLeish (Billy Crudup), for information, and the slick attorney throws it back in his face: ‘I already sent you a list of names … years ago!’ he says to Robinson and [the Globe’s Sacha] Pfeiffer. ‘I had 20 priests in Boston alone, but I couldn’t go after them without the press, so I sent you guys a list of names … and you buried it!’

« Except that exchange never actually happened. Nor did the scene where Pfeiffer searches the archives and brings the clipping of the December 1993 story to Robinson, proving MacLeish correct: it ran on B42 and didn’t include any of the priests’ names. And a later scene, where Robinson admits to his colleagues that he had been the Metro editor back in ’93, accepting his role in not catching the story sooner, didn’t happen either. »

Voir également:

Movies

Spotlight players confront the clue that became the movie’s key twist
Co-writers Josh Singer and Tom McCarthy stumbled upon the overlooked ’93 ‘Globe’ report

Jeff Labrecque

EW

November 23 2015

Josh Singer and Tom McCarthy weren’t necessarily digging for a scoop while researching the 2002 Boston Globe exposé of the Catholic Church sex-abuse scandal for the screenplay that would become Spotlight. After all, they were already standing on the shoulders of giants – the Globe’s Spotlight team of investigative journalists had won the Pulitzer Prize for their series of articles that revealed how the Boston archdiocese, led by Cardinal Bernard Law, had shielded predator priests for more than three decades, shuffling them to different parishes when they molested children and shelling out millions to victims in confidential settlements.

Not only had the Globe published an official book documenting the Spotlight team’s findings, Betrayal, but all their articles, including the more than 600 stories published in 2002 — leading to Law’s resignation — were available online. Plus, the screenwriters had access to many of the Globe’s key people, including those depicted in the film: Walter “Robby” Robinson (Michael Keaton), Mike Rezendes (Mark Ruffalo), Sacha Pfeiffer (Rachel McAdams), Matt Carroll (Brian d’Arcy James), Ben Bradlee Jr. (John Slattery), and Marty Baron (Liev Schreiber).

But one of the film’s most important twists — one that even eluded the Globe — fell into the filmmakers’ laps by accident. [The following contains SPOILERS.] In Spotlight, which the pair co-wrote and McCarthy directed, the dramatic weight of the film is epitomized by a line from the crusading attorney played by Stanley Tucci: “If it takes a village to raise a child, it takes a village to abuse one.” The film asks the difficult question: Was everyone, including the media, too deferential to the Church while crimes were happening in their backyards?

Late in the film, Robinson pressures one of his sources, a lawyer named Eric MacLeish (Billy Crudup), for information, and the slick attorney throws it back in his face: “I already sent you a list of names… years ago!” he says to Robinson and Pfeiffer. “I had 20 priests in Boston alone, but I couldn’t go after them without the press, so I sent you guys a list of names… and you buried it!”

Except that exchange never actually happened. Nor did the scene where Pfeiffer searches the archives and brings the clipping of the December 1993 story to Robinson, proving MacLeish correct: it ran on B42 and didn’t include any of the priests’ names. And a later scene, where Robinson admits to his colleagues that he had been the Metro editor back in ‘93, accepting his role in not catching the story sooner, didn’t happen either.

In reality, these sequences played out during the screenwriting process — when MacLeish told Singer and McCarthy. Though they already knew the main beats of the story they wanted to tell, they met with the Boston attorney — who’d represented numerous plaintiffs in complaints against the Church in the early 1990s — if only to help with casting. But not long into their chat, MacLeish dropped the bomb. “It was a little bit like the moment that’s in the movie: You had 20 priests’ [names] in Boston?” says Singer. “My reaction was quite similar to Rachel and Michael’s in that scene: That can’t possibly be true. Tom and I sort of looked at each other but didn’t say anything. But to double-check, I went back to the archives, and this article popped up, buried on page B42 [on the Metro section]. I was flabbergasted. I called Tom as soon as I got the article and said, ‘What do we do?’”

They emailed Robinson the story, not knowing what to expect. Robinson responded quickly. “He owned up to it,” says Singer. “He had just taken over Metro and didn’t remember the story but, ‘This was on my watch and clearly we should’ve followed up on it.’ When we went to write the scene in the movie, we based it a lot on what Robby said there.”

In the film, Keaton accepts his share of responsibility and asks his team, “Why didn’t we get it sooner?” And in real life, Robinson doesn’t dodge. “It happened on my watch and I’ll go to confession on it,” says Robinson, who recently returned to the Globe as an editor at large. “Like any journalist who’s been around this long, I’ve made my share of mistakes. But I have no memory of it. And if we’d found it in 2001, I don’t know if I would’ve had a memory of it then either. Looking at it from this vantage point 22 years later, I just have to scratch my head and wonder what happened. Should it have been played more prominently? In hindsight, based upon on what we later learned, yes, obviously.”

For Singer and McCarthy, the revelation was a dramatic gift, even if they had to utilize some artistic license. “That moment was probably the one moment where we took something that was not [precisely true] and we felt like we had the right to include it,” says McCarthy. “To me, this is where the movie gets really compelling, because it certainly isn’t black and white. I think it raises the specter of just good reporters going after a bad institution, into more of a question of societal deference and complicity toward institutional or individual power. Intellectually, Josh and I really started to engage on a whole new level when we started to tap into that.”

Because McCarthy and Singer had concluded from their research that the Globe was probably guilty of sins of omission, if not commission, when it came to its coverage of the Church in the early 1990s. The December 1993 story plays a pivotal role in the film, but the filmmakers were already paddling in that general direction. In fact, before MacLeish spilled his secret, the film was more focused on an August 1993 article than ran in the Globe’s Sunday magazine.

Back then, Boston was riveted by the case against Rev. James Porter, who was ultimately sentenced to 18-20 years for abusing dozens of children in multiple parishes. Though Porter had worked in the Fall River archdiocese, south of Boston, Cardinal Law became a loud critic of the media’s coverage, and in particular, what was being printed by the Globe. In May 1993, Law lashed out, saying, “The papers like to focus on the faults of a few. … We deplore that. The good and dedicated people who serve the church deserve better than what they have been getting day in and day out in the media. … We call down God’s power on our business leaders, and political leaders and community leaders. By all means we call down God’s power on the media, particularly the Globe.” In a coincidence that even Hollywood wouldn’t dare make up, one of the Globe’s top editors broke his leg and almost died the very next week.

But even if Law didn’t have a direct channel to God, he was the most powerful Catholic in the United States, with access to the White House and absolute credibility with his constituency of Roman Catholics – who made up 53 percent of the Globe’s readership and were not eager to believe that its Church may be responsible for protecting degenerate clerics. Ande Zellman edited the Sunday magazine story, written by Linda Matchan, and the reaction to their story at the Globe was immediate — as Schreiber’s Marty Baron would say, “from the top-down.”

“It certainly created a lot of waves internally,” Zellman says. “I think there was a level of institutional courtesy towards the Church. The coverage after that was scarce.”

But if there was some editorial restraint, it was reflected by public opinion. “For the most part, [stories about clergy sex abuse were greeted with] disbelief,” says James Franklin, the Globe’s former religion reporter who wrote the December 1993 story that MacLeish cites in the film. “It was regarded as something extraordinary, as something obscene. There was always a suspicion that guys like me, guys like us, were sniping unfairly.”

Matchan encountered the same resistance. “After I finished that magazine story, I thought, there’s so much more to say about this. I wanted to write a book about it,” she says. “So I contacted an agent, and she loved the idea. And I wrote a book proposal, she sent it out to a lot of publishing houses, and she got back these letters that just said, ‘This is a great proposal but nobody would ever read a book about sexual abuse by the clergy.’ That was the thinking in those days.”

“Every archdiocese is in a city with a major paper — everybody missed this,” says Robinson. “Who can imagine that such an iconic institution could be responsible for causing such a devastating impact on the lives of thousands of children and covering it up? It’s almost beyond belief.”

Even with the 1993 hiccups, it’s essential to note that the Boston Globe was the first to crack a scandal that reached far beyond Boston. As has been revealed in subsequent investigations around the world, Boston was not unique, and the Church has been forced to shell out billions in settlements to the victims of clergy sex abuse in other states and countries. “Robby, to my mind, is a hero,” says Singer. “The whole, Why didn’t the paper get this earlier? — we sort of put that on Robby in the movie, because Robby is a symbol for us, the Everyman. In a lot of ways, he is our way in to the movie, and we wanted to turn it back on the viewer. Because to me, this is a collective failure, and it’s a question for all of us: Why didn’t we get this earlier? It’s noble in how he takes the blame for it, how he falls on his sword. I think we found that incredibly heroic, because that also was the interaction we had with him.”

Robinson has been front and center in the film’s promotion, in part because the film captures his profession at its best, at a time in 2015 when most newspapers and media outlets are slashing staff and eliminating investigative reporting. “We’re reporters and we stumble around the dark a lot,” he says. “We start out pretty damn ignorant, and we don’t even know how to ask the right questions until we sort of dig around for awhile. And the film shows that. The film shows that it’s sort of a two steps forward one step back approach. And by doing it that way, by having us uncover [our initial oversight], Tom makes it possible for a pretty large audience to confront something that they might otherwise avert their eyes to.”

Voir de plus:

‘Spotlight’ Neglects to Mention the Boston Globe’s Own Long History of Rank Hypocrisy on the Issue of the Sexual Abuse of Minors
TheMediaReport.com

November 30, 2015
Shining the light on ‘Spotlight’
While the Hollywood movie Spotlight portrays editors and writers at the Boston Globe wringing their hands over the potential story of abuse by Catholic priests, the film conveniently neglects to mention the Globe’s own long history of looking the other way when it comes to the issue of sex abuse of minors in other institutions.

In fact, the Globe even has a long history of supporting advocates of child sex.

The Globe’s long history which Spotlight forgot

To take but just a few of the many examples, and as we have chronicled here, the Globe has previously:

given a high-profile platform to the co-founder of the North American Man/Boy Love Association (NAMBLA), which promotes sex with children;
routinely celebrated entertainment celebrities who have committed child abuse crimes, including Roman Polanski, Peter Yarrow, and Paula Poundstone;
once endorsed a Congressman for reelection even after he admitted to repeatedly plying booze and having sex with a high-school-aged page;
repeatedly touted a « sexologist » who spoke favorably of incest between fathers and daughters;
repeatedly ignored or mitigated rampant sex abuse and cover-ups in Boston Public Schools (1, 2, 3, 4);
and more.

Between its incessant hypocrisy and its long history of anti-Catholicism, one could fill a book. And indeed that book is Sins of the Press: The Untold Story of The Boston Globe’s Reporting on Sex Abuse in the Catholic Church by TheMediaReport.com’s own Dave Pierre.

Sins of the Press chronicles many more instances of the Globe’s hypocrisy when it comes to the sexual abuse of children.

Voir de même:

‘Cardinal Law Knew of Abuse and Did Nothing’? Actually, Cardinal Law Did Exactly As He Was Told To Do By Psychologists
November 30, 2015 By TheMediaReport.com
Shining the light on ‘Spotlight’
A mantra running throughout the movie Spotlight is that Cardinal Law and the Catholic Church « did nothing » when confronted with knowledge of abusive priests.

However, as is frequently the case with Hollywood, the truth is an entirely different matter.

Hollywood vs. the truth

Spotlight ignores the simple fact that years ago, Church officials acted time after time on the advice of trained « expert » psychologists from around the country when dealing with abusive priests. Secular psychologists played a major role in the entire Catholic Church abuse scandal, as these doctors repeatedly insisted to Church leaders that abusive priests were fit to return to ministry after receiving « treatment » under their care.

Indeed, one of the leading psychologists in the country recommended to the Archdiocese of Boston in both 1989 and 1990 that – despite the notorious John Geoghan’s two-decade record of abuse – it was both « reasonable and therapeutic » to return Geoghan to active pastoral ministry including work « with children. »

And it is not as if the Boston Globe could plead ignorance to the fact that the Church had for years been sending abusive priests to therapy and then returning them to ministry on the advice of prominent and credentialed doctors. As we reported earlier this year, back in 1992 – a full decade before the Globe unleashed its reporters against the Church – the Globe itself was enthusiastically promoting in its pages the psychological treatment of sex offenders, including priests – as « highly effective » and « dramatic. »

The Globe knew that the Church’s practice of sending abusive priests off to treatment was not just some diabolical attempt to deflect responsibility and cover-up wrongdoing, but a genuine attempt to treat aberrant priests that was based on the best secular scientific advice of the day.

The Globe’s feigned outrage

Yet a mere ten years later, in 2002, the Globe acted in mock horror that the Church had employed such treatments. It bludgeoned the Church for doing in 1992 exactly what the Globe itself said it should be doing. The hypocrisy of the Globe is simply off the charts.

And the issue of the Church’s use of these psychologists was not a surprise to the Globe when it actually interviewed Cardinal Bernard Law in November 2001, only two months before the Globe’s historic coverage:

Reflecting on the most difficult issue of his tenure in Boston, Law said he is pained over the harm caused to Catholic youngsters and their families by clergy sexual misconduct, but that he always tried to prevent such abuse.

« The act is a terrible act, and the consequence is a terrible consequence, and there are a lot of folk who have suffered a great deal of pain and anguish. And that’s a source of profound pain and anguish for me and should be for the whole church, » he said.

« Any time that I made a decision, it was based upon a judgment that with the treatment that had been afforded and with the ongoing treatment and counseling that would be provided, that this person would not be [a] harm to others. »

Law said the current policy, which bars child-abusers from ever having a job that involves contact with children, is good, but that he wished he knew when he started that pedophilia is essentially incurable.

« I think we’ve come to appreciate and understand that whatever the assessment might be, the nature of some activity is such that it’s best that the person not be in a parish assignment, » he said.

Not that we’re surprised, but the fact that the Church relied on the best psychologists of the day in deciding what to do with abusive priests was completely left out of Spotlight. Instead, the film repeatedly falsely claims that Cardinal Law « did nothing » or « did shit. »

But now you know the truth.

Voir encore:

Spotlight review – Catholic church child abuse film decently tells an awful story
3 / 5 stars
Mark Ruffalo, Michael Keaton and Rachel McAdams star as Boston Globe reporters investigating accusations against priests in Tom McCarthy’s worthy, well-intentioned journalism drama

‘Never hits the heights of passion but capably and decently tells an important story’ … Michael Keaton and Mark Ruffalo in Spotlight
Peter Bradshaw

The Guardian

3 September 2015

“If it takes a village to raise a child, it takes a village to abuse one,” is how one character here summarises the issues. This high-minded, well-intentioned movie, co-written and directed by Tom McCarthy, is about the Boston Globe’s investigative reporting team Spotlight, and its Pulitzer-winning campaign in 2001 to uncover widespread, systemic child abuse by Catholic priests in Massachusetts.

The film shows that in the close-knit, clubbably loyal and very Catholic city of Boston, no one had any great interest in breaking the queasy, shame-ridden silence that made the church’s culture of abuse possible, and even tentatively suggests that the Globe itself was one of the Boston institutions affected. The paper had evidence of abuse 10 years before the campaign began, but somehow contrived to downplay and bury the story, and it took a new editor, both non-Boston and Jewish, to get things started.

Spotlight has a few inevitable journo cliches: male reporters are dishevelled mavericks who don’t need to keep the same hours as everyone else, doing a fair bit of shouting and desk-thumping. There is much cheeky machismo on the subjects of poker and sports, and they somehow never need to do the boring grind of sitting down and writing stuff on computers. But this is a movie that is honourably concerned to avoid sensationalism and to avoid the bad taste involved in implying that journalists, and not the child abuse survivors, are the really important people here. So there is something cautious, even occasionally plodding, in its dramatic pace.

We keep hearing about how the church is going to come after reporters who dare to challenge its authority – but this never really happens, and there is none of the paranoia of a picture like Alan J Pakula’s All the President’s Men (1976) or Michael Mann’s The Insider (1999). Yet McCarthy keeps the narrative motor running, and there are some very good scenes, chiefly the extraordinary moment when Rachel McAdams’s reporter doorsteps a smilingly hospitable retired priest and asks him, flat-out, if he has ever molested a child. The resulting scene had me on the edge of my seat.

Mark Ruffalo is chief reporter Michael Rezendes; McAdams is his colleague Sacha Pfeiffer. Michael Keaton plays the careworn and distracted Spotlight editor Robby Robinson – an interesting comparison with his performance as the journalist nearing breakdown in Ron Howard’s The Paper (1994) – and John Slattery plays the section chief Ben Bradlee Jr, son of the great man himself, although Watergate is not mentioned. Liev Schreiber plays the new broom editor Marty Baron who quietly insists on the investigation from day one.

Soon, the team discover that the smoothie lawyer Eric MacLeish (Billy Crudup) who has been handling victim cases until now has effectively been part of the cover-up, managing a system whereby cases are settled privately and complainants silently bought off with cash payments, of which MacLeigh takes his cut. Rezendes approaches another lawyer, testy advocate Mitch Garabedian (Stanley Tucci), who has been doggedly working for a serious action to be contested in open court.

There are smoking-gun documents proving that church high-ups knew all about the problem and covered it up, Mitch says, but these documents are legally sealed and the Spotlight team must find a way of putting them on the record. Their problems are made even worse when 9/11 comes along, putting every other story in the shade and allowing the Catholic cardinal to make morale-boosting public statements calling for calm and courage.

What is interesting about this movie is that it reminds you that the “bad apple” theory of child abuse by priests was widely accepted until relatively recently. The team are stunned at the realisation that what they are working on is not like, say, a corruption case where there are more public officials on the take than they at first thought. It is a mass psychological dysfunction hidden in plain sight, which has stretched back decades or even centuries and will, unchecked, do precisely the same in the future.

What McCarthy is saying in Spotlight is that threats never needed to be made. A word here, a drink there, a frown and a look on the golf course or at the charity ball, this was all that was needed to enforce a silence surrounding a transgression that most of the community could hardly believe existed anyway. It’s certainly a relevant issue in our unhappy, post-Yewtree times. Spotlight never hits the heights of passion, but capably and decently tells an important story.

Voir aussi:

Film
‘Spotlight’ Shows a Community at Its Worst, and Journalism at Its Best
The vivid new feature film starring Michael Keaton dramatizes the Boston Globe’s real-life uncovering of sex abuse by Catholic priests

Judith Miller

Tablet

November 5, 2015

Spotlight is powerful docudrama about how the Boston Globe’s investigative team, known as “spotlight,” exposed priests in the Boston Catholic diocese who had sexually abused Boston children for decades. Written by Thomas McCarthy and Josh Singer, directed by McCarthy, and exquisitely acted, the film tells the story behind the story—how the paper uncovered the Catholic Church’s cover-up of a scandal that was hiding in plain sight, indeed, in the Globe’s own archives.

Most films about journalism are cringe-worthy. Not this one. The film vividly documents what reporters do at their best. A story usually begins with a question. Something doesn’t make sense. Reporters begin with a premise and then gather facts that support or contradict their hypothesis. The best journalists follow those facts without “fear or favor,” as the New York Times, my former employer, likes to put it. Spotlight’s reporters slowly build their case with each new lurid revelation. Nothing comes easily.

The film also lays bare the Catholic Church’s hold on Boston politics and the city’s deeply ingrained anti-Semitism and its xenophobic disdain for “outsiders.” It reveals the political and financial pressures imposed on the Globe and its investigative team by the Church and its powerful friends in a heavily Catholic city as the Globe’s Spotlight team starts to uncover the truth about decades of horrifying abuse, and the inadequacy of their own beliefs and assumptions.

The Globe’s four-person team soon discovers, for instance, that its initial theory that pedophile priests are an anomaly—a few “rotten apples,” as the Church’s representatives and supporters repeatedly assure them—is wrong. Clips from the paper’s own “morgue,” where earlier stories yellowing with age are stored, show that the Globe had run a few modest stories years earlier about a priest accused of molesting several children. But the paper failed to follow up. The editors assumed, or wanted to believe, that this abuse was an isolated incident. Subsequent tips to reporters and editors were ignored. Spotlight’s reporters find that crucial documents have disappeared from court house files. This is Boston, after all, and Cardinal Bernard Law, then the head of the diocese, has friends everywhere.

The team discovers that child abuse at the hands of God’s self-appointed disciples is no secret. In fact, it is widely known among Boston’s politicians, prosecutors, and other powerful parishioners who knew or suspected the prevalence of sexual crimes committed by priests against children but chose not to speak out. Their fear of spiritual and social excommunication allowed the abuse to fester. It takes a village to raise a child, observes Mitchell Garabedian, an irascible lawyer skillfully played by Stanley Tucci, who represents many of Boston’s child victims. And it takes the silence of a village to perpetuate such abuse.

The film bravely acknowledges that the Globe itself was among those powerful institutions that did all too little for far too long. The Globe, having been purchased by the New York Times in 1993, beset by layoffs and declining subscribers and revenue, was focused on other news before it finally confronted the horrifying truth that it had declined to pursue for decades, while the number of shattered lives mounted.

***

The decision to pursue the inquiry was made by the Globe’s chief editor, Martin Baron, who was a newcomer to Boston and who now heads the Washington Post. Brilliantly depicted by Liev Schreiber, Baron is a Florida native and not one of those Irish-American journalists who have most recently staffed the paper. Socially awkward, intellectually aloof, unmarried, uninterested in tickets to Red Sox games, Baron lacks the “people skills” that are crucial to advancement in most professional bureaucracies. He was the first Jew to head the paper. “So the new editor of the Boston Globe is an unmarried man of the Jewish faith who hates baseball?” Jim Sullivan, a lawyer who has represented priests, asks Walter “Robby” Robinson, editor of the Spotlight series, who is portrayed by Michael Keaton, an actor’s actor.

When Baron suggests using the Freedom of Information Act to unseal documents related to the victims’ law suits, Richard Gilman, the paper’s understated, Brooks Brothers-clad publisher, is alarmed. “You want to sue the Catholic Church?” he asks. Baron persists, even when Gilman reminds him that the Church “will fight us hard on this” and that 52 percent of the Globe’s subscribers are Catholic.

When it becomes clear that Robby intends to publish Spotlight’s shocking findings, prominent Bostonians and friends try to persuade him and other senior Globe editors to kill the series. Baron’s outsider status, his Jewishness, is a natural target. Baron is not one of us, says Peter Conley (Paul Guilfoyle), who does the Church’s bidding. He reminds Robby over a drink at the Fairmont Hotel’s Oak Bar that people need the church, now more than ever. While neither the Church nor Cardinal Law (Len Cariou) who heads it in Boston is perfect, Conley acknowledges, why would the Globe risk destroying the faith of thousands of readers over a “few bad apples”? But neither Robby, who is deeply grounded in Boston, nor Baron, who has no familial stake in the community, is cowed. Conley tries driving a wedge between them. Baron is an outsider just “trying to make his mark,” he warns Robby. “He’ll be here for a few years and move on. Just like he did in New York and Miami,” he says. “Where you gonna go?”

Baron is not the film’s only outsider. The most passionate member of the Spotlight team, Michael Rezendes (Mark Ruffalo), may hail from east Boston, but his family is Portuguese. Garabedian, the lawyer who has represented 86 local victims and one of Mark’s sources—is an Armenian. In a bar, they talk obliquely about how city insiders pressure outsiders to conform. Over time, Rezendes understands that Garabedian’s gruffness and hostility are partly the result of having watched the Church hide its priests’ crimes with the connivance of the city’s leading institutions for far too long. Garabedian knows what it means to battle Boston’s powerbrokers. He initially doubts that Rezendes will pursue the story.

As the Globe reporters slowly, methodically uncover the depressing scale of the abuse, pressure not to publish grows. As the team finds dozens of cases that have been quietly settled between victims and the Church, the Spotlight reporters jettison their premise that the Vatican was simply trying to deal compassionately with a few fallen priests. The story expands. So does the team, from four to eight reporters. Baron wants them to expose not only the horrific sexual crimes of the priests, most of whom have been moved to other parishes where they continue molesting children, or to treatment centers on “sick leave,” but the Catholic Church’s role in effectively condoning the abuses.

Proving the Church’s complicity, however, turns out to be even more complex and time-consuming. For a while, a far more all-consuming story—the Sept. 11 attacks on New York and Washington in which many Bostonians died—demand the team’s attention.

***

Spotlight is a process movie. In less-gifted hands, it would risk being dull, or worse, a romanticized version of journalism’s ostensible nobility. But this movie is unlike Truth, the newly released film about the bungled CBS broadcast shortly before the 2004 presidential election aiming to show that former President George W. Bush got preferential treatment to enter the National Guard to avoid the draft and was AWOL during much of his service. Starring Robert Redford as Dan Rather, and Cate Blanchett as Mary Mapes, his talented, long-time producer, the film is based on Mapes’ book and portrays her and three others who were fired by CBS, and Dan Rather, who was prematurely retired as CBS’s anchor, as martyrs to the truth and the victims of evil corporate forces in search of White House favors. But the memos upon which Mapes and her team relied could not be authenticated, and the source who produced them changed his account of how he had obtained them after the broadcast aired, which is every reporter’s and producer’s worst nightmare. But the film downplays the team’s mistakes. Not surprisingly, CBS—which took cinematic heat in 1999 for The Insider, a powerful film about the network’s suppression of a whistle-blower’s claims about tobacco and cancer until the information had been reported elsewhere—has blasted Truth as fiction and declined to run ads for the film on its network.

Under Tom McCarthy’s wise direction, Spotlight suffers from no such hype or false notes. There is no stirring, melodramatic sound track, no confrontations or emotional “gotcha” confessions by priests, no actual scenes of sexual molestation. There are no meetings in dark, underground garages as in All the President’s Men, the highly praised 1976 film about Bob Woodward’s and Carl Bernstein’s dogged exposure of the Watergate scandal in the Washington Post that toppled President Richard Nixon. Spotlight faithfully portrays the painstaking work of investigative reporters who corroborate tips, hunches, and weigh the accounts of often flawed or self-serving sources.

Some of the script’s most powerful moments are the victims’ accounts of their sexual and psychological torment. At first, the reporters question why victims of such abuse call themselves “survivors.” One such victim-turned-advocate, a twitchy, prematurely aging activist named Phil Saviano (played by Neal Huff), explains to the reporters that priests often target vulnerable kids from poor backgrounds. Sexual abuse by priests, he says, robs children not just of their innocence, but their faith. “When you’re a poor kid from a poor family, religion counts for a lot,” he tells Robby and his reporter Sacha Pfeiffer, (Rachel McAdams). “And when a priest pays attention to you it’s a big deal. He asks you to collect the hymnals or take out the trash, you feel special. It’s like God asking for help. And maybe it’s a little weird when he tells you a dirty joke but now you got a secret together so you go along. Then he shows you a porno mag, and you go along. And you go along, and you go along, until one day he asks you to jerk him off or give him a blow job. And so you go along with that too. Because you feel trapped. Because he has groomed you. How do you say no to God, right?”

Spotlight’s understated hero, investigative chief “Robby” Robinson, is a lapsed Catholic. So are many of the team’s other reporters. Some are afraid to tell their families the target of their investigation. Doors are often slammed shut on them. Their calls to sources start early and end late; some of their marriages dissolve. They battle editors over whether and when to publish what they know. Waiting too long risks being beaten on the story; publishing too soon risks reducing their impact by enabling the Church to pick apart or discredit the specific examples of abuse the team has identified and documented. What Baron wants to describe, and Robby senses he is right, is not just a pattern of pedophilia among the faith’s spiritual guardians, but the Church’s role in hiding its priests’ crimes and therefore in perpetuating the damage. He seeks to indict the Church as a criminal system. But his determination to hold out for the bigger story with greater impact infuriates Michael Rezendes, who argues for disclosing what the team knows as soon as the information is confirmed and thus stop the abuse. Robby’s and Marty Baron’s wiser instincts prevail, but this is not an easy call.

Spotlight’s exhaustive investigation ultimately disclosed allegations of sexual abuse of children, male and female alike, by some 249 priests and brothers within the Boston Archdiocese alone. The reporters identified more than 1,000 survivors. In late 2002, Cardinal Law resigned his post in Boston. He was reassigned to the Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore in Rome, among the Church’s most prestigious posts.

For decades, the victims’ stories cried out for public exposure. The Globe’s Spotlight team provided it. This understated, remarkable film documents that achievement.

Voir enfin:

13 janvier 2015 – Discours
Discours du Premier ministre à l’Assemblée nationale en hommage aux victimes des attentats
« Il y a quelque chose qui nous a tous renforcé, après ces évènements, et après les marches de cette fin de semaine. Je crois que nous le sentons tous, c’est plus que jamais la fierté d’être français. Ne l’oublions jamais ! »

Monsieur le Président,
Mesdames, messieurs les ministres,
Madame, Messieurs les présidents de groupe,
Mesdames, messieurs les députés.

Monsieur le Président, vous l’avez dit, ainsi que chacun des orateurs, avec force et sobriété, en trois jours, oui en trois jours 17 vies ont été emportées par la barbarie.

Les terroristes ont tué, assassiné des journalistes, des policiers, des Français juifs, des salariés. Les terroristes ont tué des personnes connues ou des anonymes, dans leur diversité d’origine, d’opinion et de croyance. Et c’est toute la communauté nationale que l’on a touchée. Oui, c’est la France qu’on a touché au cœur.

Les soutiens, la solidarité, venus du monde entier, de la presse, partout, des citoyens qui ont manifesté dans de nombreuses capitales, des chefs d’Etat et de gouvernements, tous ces soutiens ne s’y sont pas trompés ; c’est bien l’esprit de la France, sa lumière, son message universel que l’on a voulu abattre. Mais la France est debout. Elle est là, elle est toujours présente.

A la suite des obsèques de ce matin à Jérusalem, de la cérémonie éprouvante, belle, patriotique, à la Préfecture de Police de Paris, en présence du chef de l’Etat, à quelques heures ou de jours d’obsèques pour chacune des victimes, dans l’intimité familiale, je veux, comme chacun d’entre vous, rendre, à nouveau, l’hommage de la Nation à toutes les victimes. Et la Marseillaise, tout à l’heure, qui a éclaté, dans cet hémicycle, était aussi une magnifique réponse, un magnifique message aux blessés, aux familles qui sont dans une peine immense, inconsolable, à leurs proches, à leurs confrères, je veux dire à mon tour une nouvelle fois notre compassion et notre soutien.

Le Président de la République l’a dit ce matin avec des mots forts, personnels : « la France se tient et se tiendra à leurs côtés ».

Dans l’épreuve, vous l’avez rappelé, notre peuple s’est rassemblé, dès mercredi. Il a marché partout dans la dignité, la fraternité, pour crier son attachement à la liberté, et pour dire un « non » implacable au terrorisme, à l’intolérance, à l’antisémitisme, au racisme. Et aussi au fond, à toute forme de résignation et d’indifférence.

Ces rassemblements, vous le soulignez monsieur le président de l’Assemblée, sont la plus belle des réponses. Dimanche, avec les chefs d’Etat et de gouvernement étrangers, avec l’ancien président de la République, avec les anciens Premiers ministres, avec les responsables politiques et les forces vives de ce pays, avec le peuple français, nous avons dit – et avec quelle force – notre unité. Et Paris était la capitale universelle de la liberté et de la tolérance.

Le peuple Français, une fois encore, a été à la hauteur de son histoire. Mais, c’est aussi, pour nous tous sur ces bancs, vous l’avez dit, un message de très grande responsabilité. Etre à la hauteur de la situation est une exigence immense. Nous devons aux Français d’être vigilants quant aux mots que nous employons et à l’image que nous donnons. Bien sûr la démocratie, que l’on a voulu abattre, ce sont les débats, les confrontations. Ils sont nécessaires, indispensables à sa vitalité, et ils reprendront, c’est normal.

Loin de moi l’idée de déposer, après ces événements, la moindre chape de plomb sur notre débat démocratique, et vous ne le permettrez pas, de toute façon. Mais, mais nous devons être capables, collectivement, de garder les yeux rivés sur l’intérêt général, et d’être à la hauteur, dans une situation qui est déjà difficile, sur le plan économique, parce que notre pays aussi est fracturé depuis longtemps, parce qu’il y a eu des événements graves, on les oublie aujourd’hui, même s’ils n’avaient pas de lien entre eux, qui ont frappé les esprits à la fin de l’année, à Joué-Lès-Tours, à Dijon et à Nantes. Nous devons être à la hauteur de l’attente, de l’exigence du message des Français.

Je veux, Mesdames et Messieurs les députés, en notre nom à tous, saluer – et le mot est faible – le très grand professionnalisme, l’abnégation, la bravoure de toutes nos forces de l’ordre – policiers, gendarmes, unités d’élite.

En trois jours, les forces de sécurité, souvent au péril de leur vie, ont mené un travail remarquable d’investigation, sous l’autorité du parquet antiterroriste, traquant les individus recherchés, travaillant sur les filières, interrogeant les entourages, afin de mettre hors d’état de nuire, le plus vite possible, ces trois terroristes.

Monsieur le ministre de l’Intérieur, cher Bernard CAZENEUVE, je veux vous remercier aussi. Vous avez non seulement trouvé les mots justes, mais j’ai pu le voir à chaque heure, vous étiez concentré sur cet objectif.

Autour du Président de la République, avec vous aussi madame la garde des Sceaux, nous avons été pleinement mobilisés pour faire face à ces moments si difficiles pour la patrie. Et pour prendre les décisions graves qui s’imposaient.

Mesdames, Messieurs les députés, à aucun moment nous ne devons baisser la garde. Et je veux dire, avec gravité, à la représentation nationale et à travers vous à nos concitoyens, que non seulement la menace globale est toujours présente, mais que, liés aux actes de la semaine dernière, des risques sérieux et très élevés demeurent : ceux liés à d’éventuels complices, ou encore ceux émanant de réseaux, de donneurs d’ordres du terrorisme international, de cyberattaques. Les menaces perpétrées à l’encontre de la France en sont malheureusement la preuve.

Je vous dois cette vérité, et nous devons cette vérité aux Français. Pour y faire face, partout sur le territoire, des militaires, des gendarmes, des policiers sont mobilisés. Les renforts de soldats affectés, en tout, près de 10. 000 – et je vous en remercie monsieur le ministre de la Défense -, et c’est sans précédent, permettent un niveau d’engagement massif, plus de 122 000 personnels assurent la protection permanente des points sensibles et de l’espace public. Les renforts militaires serviront et servent en priorité à la protection des écoles confessionnelles juives, des synagogues, et de mosquées.

Madame, Messieurs les présidents, après le temps de l’émotion et du recueillement – et il n’est pas fini – vient le temps de la lucidité et de l’action.

Sommes-nous en guerre ? La question a, en réalité peu d’importance, car les terroristes djihadistes en nous frappant trois jours consécutifs y ont apporté, une nouvelle fois, la plus cruelle des réponses.

Avec détermination, avec sang–froid, la République va apporter la plus forte des réponses au terrorisme, la fermeté implacable dans le respect de ce que nous sommes, un Etat de droit.

Le gouvernement vient devant vous avec la volonté d’écouter et d’examiner toutes les réponses possibles, techniques, règlementaires, législatives, budgétaires, monsieur le président JACOB. A une situation exceptionnelle doivent répondre des mesures exceptionnelles. Mais je le dis aussi avec la même force : jamais des mesures d’exception qui dérogeraient aux principes du droit et des valeurs.

La meilleure des réponses au terrorisme qui veut précisément briser ce que nous sommes, c’est-à-dire une grande démocratie, c’est le droit, c’est la démocratie, c’est la liberté et c’est le peuple français.

A cette menace terroriste, la République apporte et apportera des réponses sur son sol national. Elle en apportera aussi là où les groupes terroristes s’organisent pour nous attaquer, pour nous menacer, nos intérêts comme nos concitoyens.

C’est pour cela que le Président de la République a décidé d’engager nos forces au Mali, un 11 janvier. Le 11 janvier 2013, jour où d’ailleurs tombait notre premier soldat dans ce conflit, Damien BOITEUX. Et d’ailleurs la même nuit, monsieur le ministre de la Défense, trois membres de nos services tombaient en Somalie.

Le président de la République a décidé cet engagement pour venir en aide à un pays ami, le Mali, menacé de désintégration par des groupes terroristes ; le Mali, pays musulman.

Le président de la République a décidé de renforcer notre présence aux côtés de nos alliés africains avec l’opération Barkhane. C’est un gros effort qu’assume la France, au nom notamment de l’Europe et de ses intérêts stratégiques. Un effort coûteux. La solidarité de l’Europe elle doit être dans la rue, elle doit être aussi dans les budgets à nos côtés. Un effort impérieux. Et quelle belle image de voir dimanche dernier, coude à coude le chef de l’Etat, des chefs de gouvernement, le président de la République et le Président malien, Ibrahim Boubacar KEÏTA. Là aussi c’était la meilleure des réponses pour dire que nous ne menons pas une guerre de religion, mais que nous menons, oui, un combat pour la tolérance, la laïcité, la démocratie, la liberté et les Etats souverains, ce que les peuples doivent se choisir.

Oui, nous nous battons ensemble et nous continuons de nous battre sans relâche.

C’est cette même volonté, curieuse concordance liée au calendrier, que nous exprimerons tout à l’heure en votant le prolongement de l’engagement de nos forces en Irak. C’est là aussi notre riposte claire et ferme, je m’exprimerai ici même dans un instant, le ministre des Affaires étrangères le fera au Sénat. C’est là aussi notre riposte contre le terrorisme, et nous devons avoir pour nos soldats engagés, sur les théâtres d’opération extérieurs, à des milliers de kilomètres d’ici, un profond respect et une grande gratitude.

La menace est aussi intérieure. Je l’ai également rappelé souvent à cette tribune.

Et face à la tragédie qui vient de se dérouler, s’interroger est toujours légitime et nécessaire. Nous devons apporter des réponses aux victimes, à leurs familles, aux parlementaires, aux Français. Il faut le faire avec détermination, sérénité, sans jamais céder à la précipitation. Et je ferai mienne la formule du président LEROUX : « il n’y a pas de leçon à donner, il n’y a que des leçons à tirer ».

Le Parlement a déjà voté deux lois anti terroristes encore il y a quelques semaines à une très large majorité, les décrets d’application sont en cours de publication. Le Parlement s’est déjà saisi des questions relatives aux filières djihadistes.

Ici-même, à l’Assemblée nationale, le 3 décembre dernier, vous avez créé une commission d’enquête sur la surveillance des filières et des individus djihadistes. Le président, Monsieur Éric CIOTTI, travaille étroitement avec le rapporteur, Monsieur Patrick MENNUCCI.

Au Sénat, depuis le mois d’octobre, il existe une commission d’enquête sur l’organisation et les moyens de la lutte contre les réseaux djihadistes en France et en Europe. Plusieurs membres du gouvernement ont déjà été auditionnés. Les travaux doivent se poursuivre et je sais que le ministre de l’Intérieur est particulièrement attentif à ces travaux. Il a d’ailleurs déjà rencontré hier les groupes et les parlementaires qui travaillent sur ces questions.

Le gouvernement, monsieur le président de l’Assemblée nationale, Madame, Messieurs les présidents de groupe, est à la disposition du Parlement. Sur tous ces sujets, ou sur d’autres que nous avons déjà examinés, et je pense à la question épineuse particulièrement complexe, mais qu’il faut traiter encore avec plus de détermination, qui est celle des trafics d’armes dans nos quartiers.

Je tiens à saluer, là aussi, le travail de nos services de renseignement : DGSI, DGSE, Service du renseignement territorial. A saluer aussi la justice antiterroriste. La tâche de ces femmes, de ces hommes est par essence discrète et immensément délicate. Ils font face à un défi sans précèdent, à un phénomène protéiforme, mouvant qui se dissimule aussi ; et parce qu’ils savent travailler ensemble ils obtiennent des résultats.

A cinq reprises, en deux ans, ils ont permis de neutraliser des groupes terroristes susceptibles de passer à l’acte.

En France, comme dans l’ensemble des pays européens, les personnes qui se reconnaissent dans le djihadisme international ont fortement augmenté en 2014. Dès l’examen de la loi antiterroriste, en décembre 2012, j’ai dit qu’il y avait en France des dizaines de MERAH potentiels. Le temps a confirmé, dramatiquement et implacablement, ce diagnostic.

Sans renforcement très significatif des moyens humains et matériels, les services de renseignement intérieur pourraient se trouver débordés. On dépasse désormais 1 250 individus pour les seules filières irako-syriennes. Sans jamais négliger les autres théâtres d’opération, les autres menaces, celles des autres groupes terroristes au Sahel, au Yémen, dans la corne de l’Afrique, et dans la zone afghano-pakistanaise.

Nous affecterons donc les moyens nécessaires pour tenir compte de cette nouvelle donne. En matière de sécurité, les moyens humains sont en effet essentiels. Nous l’avons mis en pratique depuis 2012. En 2013, sur la base des enseignements des tueries de Montauban et de Toulouse et des propositions formulées par la mission URVOAS-VERCHERE, une profonde réforme de nos services de renseignement a été accomplie avec la transformation de la Direction centrale du Renseignement intérieur en Direction générale de la Sécurité intérieure. La création de 432 emplois à la DGSI a été programmée. Ils doivent permettre de renforcer les compétences et de diversifier les recrutements : informaticiens, analystes, chercheurs ou interprètes. 130 sont déjà pourvus. Nous avons aussi amélioré la coopération entre les services intérieurs et extérieurs et également renforcé, même s’il faut encore faire davantage, nos échanges avec les services étrangers, à la suite de l’initiative que j’ai pu prendre il y a deux ans avec les ministres européens et notamment avec la ministre belge, Joëlle MILQUET puisque son pays est également confronté à ce problème là. Initiative que Bernard CAZENEUVE a prolongée encore avec la réunion de nombreux ministres de l’Intérieur Place Beauvau. Mais il faut aller plus loin, et j’ai demandé au ministre de l’Intérieur de m’adresser dans les huit jours des propositions de renforcement. Elles devront notamment concerner Internet et les réseaux sociaux qui sont plus que jamais utilisés pour l’embrigadement, la mise en contact, et l’acquisition de techniques permettant de passer à l’acte.

Nous sommes aussi l’une des dernières démocraties occidentales à ne pas disposer d’une cadre légal cohérent pour l’action des services de renseignement. Ce qui pose un double problème. Un travail important a été fourni par la mission d’information sur l’évaluation du cadre juridique des services de renseignement, présidée par Jean-Jacques URVOAS en 2013. Un prochain projet de loi quasiment prêt visera à donner aux services tous les moyens juridiques pour accomplir leurs missions, tout en respectant les grands principes républicains de protection des libertés publiques et individuelles, ce texte de loi qui sera sans aucun doute enrichi par vos travaux doit être, c’est ma conviction, adopté le plus rapidement possible.

Au cours de l’année, nous lancerons également la surveillance des déplacements aériens des personnes suspectes d’activités criminelles. C’est le système PNR. La plateforme de contrôle française sera opérationnelle dès septembre 2015. Il reste à mettre en place un dispositif similaire au niveau européen. J’appelle de manière solennelle ici dans cette enceinte le Parlement européen à prendre enfin toute la mesure de ces enjeux, et de voter, comme nous le lui demandons depuis deux ans avec l’ensemble des gouvernements, à adopter ce dispositif qui est indispensable : nous ne pouvons plus perdre de temps !

Mesdames et Messieurs, les phénomènes de radicalisation sont présents sur l’ensemble du territoire. Il faut donc agir partout. Le plan d’action adopté en avril dernier a permis de renouveler l’approche administrative et préventive. La plateforme de signalement est particulièrement sollicitée par les familles. Elle a permis d’éviter de nombreux départs.

Les préfets, en lien avec les collectivités territoriales qui doivent être associées à ces démarches, mettent progressivement en place des dispositifs de suivi et de réinsertion des personnes radicalisées. Là encore, j’ai demandé au ministre de l’Intérieur en lien avec d’autres membres du gouvernement concerné par ces sujets de m’indiquer les moyens nécessaires pour amplifier ces actions.

Les phénomènes de radicalisation se développent, nous le savons, vous l’avez dit, en prison. Ce n’est pas nouveau ! L’administration pénitentiaire renforce d’ailleurs l’action de ses services de renseignement en lien étroit avec le ministère de l’Intérieur. Il faut, là aussi, accroître nos efforts. Dans nos prisons, des imans, comme des aumôniers de tous les cultes interviennent. C’est normal ! Mais il faut un cadre clair à cette d’intervention. Il nous faut aussi parvenir à une réelle professionnalisation. Enfin, avant la fin de l’année, sur la base de l’expérience menée depuis cet automne à la prison de Fresnes, la surveillance des détenus considérés comme radicalisés sera organisée dans des quartiers spécifiques créés au sein d’établissements pénitentiaires.

Une formation de haut niveau sera dispensée aussi aux services de la protection judiciaire de la jeunesse. Comprendre le parcours de radicalisation d’un jeune est toujours complexe. Nous savons la facilité avec laquelle certains jeunes délinquants de droit commun basculent dans des processus de radicalisation et le passage de la délinquance de droit commun à la radicalisation et au terrorisme est un phénomène que nous avons décrit à maintes reprises ici dans les travaux de l’Assemblée nationale. Mais nous devons savoir prendre les mesures adaptées qui s’imposent. Il faut, certes, accompagner, aider, suivre de nombreux mineurs menacés par cette radicalisation. Il faut aussi prendre acte de la nécessité de créer, au sein de la direction de la PJJ, une unité de renseignement, à l’instar de ce qui est fait dans l’administration pénitentiaire. Pour tous ces axes de travail, mais aussi pour répondre aux besoins du parquet anti-terroriste, j’ai demandé à la Garde des Sceaux de me faire des propositions également dans les jours qui viennent.

Mesdames et Messieurs, la lutte contre le terrorisme demande une vigilance de chaque instant. Nous devons pouvoir connaître en permanence l’ensemble des terroristes condamnés, connaitre leur lieu de vie, contrôler leur présence ou leur absence.

J’ai demandé aux ministres de l’Intérieur et de la Justice d’étudier les conditions juridiques de mise en place d’un nouveau fichier. Il obligera les personnes condamnées à des faits de terrorisme ou ayant intégré des groupes de combat terroristes à déclarer leur domicile et à se soumettre à des obligations de contrôle. De telles dispositions existent déjà pour d’autres formes de délinquance à risque élevé de récidive. Nous devons l’appliquer en matière d’engagement terroriste, toujours sous le contrôle strict du juge.

Mesdames et Messieurs, toutes ces propositions – et il y en aura d’autres, je n’en doute pas et n’en doutez pas – avant leur mise en œuvre et application, feront l’objet d’une consultation ou d’une présentation au Parlement au-delà bien sûr des textes législatifs.

Mesdames et Messieurs les députés, les épreuves tragiques que nous venons de traverser nous marquent, marquent notre pays et marquent notre conscience. Mais nous devons être capables de poser rapidement à chaque fois un diagnostic lucide aussi sur l’état de notre société, sur ses urgences. Ce sont des débats que nous aurons l’occasion évidemment de mener.

Je vais en dire quelques mots, en m’excusant de prendre plus de temps que nécessaire à ce qui était prévu.

Le premier sujet qu’il faut aborder clairement, c’est la lutte contre l’antisémitisme.

L’histoire nous l’a montré, le réveil de l’antisémitisme, c’est le symptôme d’une crise de la démocratie, d’une crise de la République. C’est pour cela qu’il faut y répondre avec force. Après Ilan HALIMI, en 2006, après les crimes de Toulouse, les actes antisémites connaissent en France une progression insupportable. Il y a les paroles, les insultes, les gestes, les attaques ignobles, comme à Créteil il y a quelques semaines qui, je l’ai rappelé ici dans cet hémicycle, n’ont pas soulevé l’indignation qui était attendue par nos compatriotes juifs dans le pays. Il y a cette inquiétude immense, cette peur que nous avons les uns et les autres sentie, palpée samedi dans la foule devant cet HYPER CACHER porte de Vincennes ou à la synagogue de la Victoire dimanche soir. Comment accepter qu’en France, terre d’émancipation des juifs, il y a deux siècles, mais qui fut aussi, il y a 70 ans, l’une des terres de son martyre, comment peut-on accepter que l’on puisse entendre dans nos rues crier « mort aux juifs » ? Comment peut-on accepter les actes que je viens de rappeler ? Comment peut-on accepter que des Français soient assassinés par ce qu’ils sont juifs ? Comment peut-on accepter que des compatriotes ou qu’un citoyen tunisien, que son père avait envoyé en France pour qu’il soit protégé alors qu’il va acheter son pain pour le Shabbat, meurt parce qu’il est juif ? Ce n’est pas acceptable et à la communauté nationale qui peut-être n’a pas suffisamment réagi, à nos compatriotes français juifs, je leur dis que cette fois-ci, nous ne pouvons pas l’accepter, que nous devons là aussi nous rebeller et en posant le vrai diagnostic. Il y a un antisémitisme que l’on dit historique remontant du fond des siècles mais il y a surtout ce nouvel antisémitisme qui est né dans nos quartiers, sur fond d’Internet, de paraboles, de misère, sur fond des détestations de l’Etat d’Israël, et qui prône la haine du juif et de tous les juifs. Il faut le dire, il faut poser les mots pour combattre cet antisémitisme inacceptable !

Et comme j’ai eu l’occasion de le dire, comme la ministre Ségolène ROYAL l’a dit ce matin à Jérusalem, comme Claude LANZMANN l’a écrit dans une magnifique tribune dans Le Monde, oui, disons-le à la face du monde : sans les juifs de France, la France ne serait plus la France. Et ce message, c’est à nous tous de le clamer haut et fort. Nous ne l’avons pas dit ! Nous ne nous sommes pas assez indignés ! Et comment accepter que, dans certains établissements, collèges ou lycées, on ne puisse pas enseigner ce qu’est la Shoah ? Comment on peut accepter qu’un gamin de 7 ou 8 ans dise à son enseignant quand il lui pose la question « quel est ton ennemi ? » et qu’il lui répond « c’est le juif » ? Quand on s’attaque aux juifs de France, on s’attaque à la France et on s’attaque à la conscience universelle, ne l’oublions jamais !

Et quelle terrible coïncidence, quel affront que de voir un récidiviste de la haine tenir son spectacle dans des salles bondées au moment même où, samedi soir, la Nation, Porte de Vincennes, se recueillait. Ne laissons jamais passer ces faits et que la justice soit implacable à l’égard de ces prédicateurs de la haine ! Je le dis avec force ici à la tribune de l’Assemblée nationale !

Et allons jusqu’au bout du débat. Allons jusqu’au bout du débat, Mesdames et Messieurs les députés, quand quelqu’un s’interroge, un jeune, un citoyen ou un jeune, et qu’il vient me dire à moi ou à la ministre de l’Education nationale « mais je ne comprends pas, cet humoriste, lui, vous voulez le faire taire et les journalistes de Charlie Hebdo, vous les montez au pinacle » mais il y a une différence fondamentale et c’est cette bataille que nous devons gagner, celle de la pédagogie auprès de notre jeunesse, il y a une différence fondamentale entre la liberté d’impertinence – le blasphème n’est pas dans notre droit, il ne le sera jamais – il y a une différence fondamentale entre cette liberté et l’antisémitisme, le racisme, l’apologie du terrorisme, le négationnisme qui sont des délits, qui sont de crimes et que la justice devra sans doute punir avec encore plus de sévérité.

L’autre urgence, c’est de protéger nos compatriotes musulmans. Ils sont, eux aussi, inquiets. Des actes antimusulmans inadmissibles, intolérables, se sont à nouveau produits ces derniers jours. Là aussi, s’attaquer à une mosquée, à une église, à un lieu de culte, profaner un cimetière, c’est une offense à nos valeurs. Et le préfet LATRON a en charge à la demande du ministre de l’Intérieur en lien avec tous les préfets de faire en sorte que la protection de tous les lieux de culte soit assurée. L’Islam est la deuxième religion de France. Elle a toute sa place en France. Et notre défi, pas en France, mais dans le monde, c’est de faire cette démonstration : la République, la laïcité, l’égalité hommes / femmes sont compatibles avec toutes les religions sur le sol national qui acceptent les principes et les valeurs de la République. Mais cette République doit faire preuve de la plus grande fermeté, de la plus grande intransigeance, face à ceux qui tentent, au nom de l’Islam, d’imposer une chape de plomb sur des quartiers, de faire régner leur ordre sur fond de trafics et sur fond de radicalisme religieux, un ordre dans lequel l’homme domine la femme, où la foi, oui madame la présidente POMPILI, vous avez eu raison de le rappeler, l’emporterait sur la raison.

J’avais ici, devant cette Assemblée, il y a quelques mois, évoqué les insuffisances et les échecs de trente ans de politique d’intégration. Mais, en effet, quand de vrais ghettos urbains se forment, où l’on n’est plus qu’entre soi, où l’on ne prône que le repli, que la mise en congé de la société, où l’Etat n’est plus présent, comment aller vers la République, saisir cette main fraternelle qu’elle tend ?

Et surtout, comment tirer un trait catégorique sur cette frontière trop souvent ténue qui fait que l’on peut basculer – pas d’angélisme, regardons les faits en face – dans nos quartiers, de l’Islam tolérant, universel, bienveillant vers le conservatisme, vers l’obscurantisme, l’islamisme, et pire la tentation du djihad et du passage à l’acte.

Ce débat, il n’est pas entre l’Islam et la société. C’est bien un débat au sein même de l’Islam, que l’islam de France doit mener en son sein, en s’appuyant sur les responsables religieux, sur les intellectuels, sur les Musulmans qui nous disent depuis plusieurs jours qu’ils ont peur. Je l’ai déjà rappelé, comme vous tous j’ai des amis français, de confession et de culture musulmane. L’un de mes plus proches amis m’a dit l’autre jour, il avait les yeux plein de larmes et de tristesse, qu’il avait honte d’être musulman. Eh bien moi je ne veux plus que dans notre pays il y ait des Juifs qui puissent avoir peur. Et je ne veux pas qu’il y ait des Musulmans qui aient honte parce que la République elle est fraternelle, elle est généreuse, elle est là pour accueillir chacun.

Enfin, enfin, la réponse aux urgences de notre société elle doit forte, sans hésitations : la République et ses valeurs. Et ce sont mes derniers mots.

Les valeurs ce sont en premier lieu la laïcité qui est gage d’unité et de tolérance.

La laïcité, elle s’apprend bien sûr à l’école, qui en est un des bastions. C’est là, peu importe les croyances, les origines, que tous les enfants de la République ont accès à l’éducation, au savoir, à la connaissance.

J’étais, ce matin avec la ministre de l’Education nationale, Najat VALLAUD-BELKACEM, devant les recteurs de France. Et je leur ai adressé un message de mobilisation totale. Un message d’exigence. Un message qui doit répercuter à tous les niveaux de l’éducation nationale, autour du seul enjeu qui importe : la laïcité ! La laïcité ! La laïcité, parce que c’est le cœur de la République et donc de l’école.

La République n’est pas possible sans l’école, et l’école n’est pas possible sans la République. Et on a laissé passer trop de choses, je le disais il y a un instant, dans l’école.

La laïcité, oui la laïcité, la possibilité de croire, de ne pas croire. L’éducation a des valeurs fondamentales, doit plus que jamais – c’est aussi cette réponse – être le combat de la France face à l’attaque que nous avons connue. Et arborons fièrement ce principe puisqu’on nous attaque à cause de la laïcité, à cause des lois que nous avons votées ici interdisant les signes religieux à l’école prohibant le voile intégral, revendiquons les, parce que c’est ça qui doit qui doit nous aider à être encore davantage plus forts.

Cette France qui s’est retrouvée dans l’épreuve, ce moment où le monde entier est venu à elle, car le monde sait lui aussi la grandeur de la France et ce qu’elle incarne d’universel.

La France c’est l’esprit des lumières. La France c’est l’élément démocratique, la France c’est la République chevillée au corps. La France c’est une liberté farouche. La France c’est la conquête de l’égalité. La France c’est une soif de fraternité. Et la France c’est aussi ce mélange si singulier de dignité, d’insolence, et d’élégance. Rester fidèle à l’esprit du 11 janvier 2015 c’est donc être habité par ses valeurs.

Rester fidèle à l’esprit du 11 janvier 2015 c’est apporter les réponses aux questions que se posent les Français. Rester fidèle à l’esprit du 11 janvier 2015 c’est comprendre que le monde a changé, qu’il y aura un avant et un après. Et au nom même de nos valeurs, apporter la riposte avec toute la détermination nécessaire : fermeté, unité, sont les termes qui ont été encore utilisés par le président de la République ce matin.

Nous allons entretenir, je l’espère, comme un feu ardent, cet état d’esprit et nous appuyer sur la force de son message d’unité. Et en revendiquant fièrement ce que nous sommes. En le faisant, en nous rappelant sans cesse de nos héros, ceux qui sont tombés, ces 17, la semaine dernière.

En nous souvenant toujours de ces héros que sont les forces de l’ordre.

Avec beaucoup d’émotion nous l’avons encore ressenti ce matin, vous étiez nombreux sur tous les bancs, dans la cour de la préfecture de police de Paris. C’est ça aussi la France. Il y avait trois couleurs. Trois couleurs de ces trois policiers, ces deux policiers nationaux et cette policière municipale. Elle représentait, ils représentaient la diversité des parcours et des origines. Trois couleurs différentes. Trois parcours, mais trois Français. Trois serviteurs de l’Etat. Et devant les cercueils, aux côtés de leurs familles, il n’y avait que trois couleurs, celles du drapeau national. C’est au fond ça le plus beau message.

Je vous avais dit, ici, au mois d’avril ma fierté, comme chacun d’entre vous, d’être français. Il y a quelque chose qui nous a tous renforcé, après ces événements, et après les marches de cette fin de semaine.

Je crois que nous le sentons tous, c’est plus que jamais la fierté d’être français. Ne l’oublions jamais !


René Girard: L’Angleterre victorienne vaut donc les sociétés archaïques (Only in America: René is, like Tocqueville, a great French thinker who could yet nowhere exist but in the United States)

5 novembre, 2015
GirardPassion

Nul n’est prophète en son pays. Jésus

Écris donc les choses que tu as vues, et celles qui sont, et celles qui doivent arriver après elles. Jean (Apocalypse 1: 19)
Que signifie donc ce qui est écrit: La pierre qu’ont rejetée ceux qui bâtissaient est devenue la principale de l’angle? Jésus (Luc 20: 17)
Soyez fils de votre Père qui est dans les cieux (qui) fait lever son soleil sur les méchants et sur les bons et (…) pleuvoir sur les justes et sur les injustes. Jésus (Matthieu 5: 45)
Il n’y a pas en littérature de beaux sujets d’art et (…) Yvetot donc vaut Constantinople. Gustave Flaubert
I’ve said this for years: The best analogy for what René represents in anthropology and sociology is Heinrich Schliemann, who took Homer under his arm and discovered Troy. René had the same blind faith that the literary text held the literal truth. Like Schliemann, his major discovery was excoriated for using the wrong methods. Academic disciplines are more committed to methodology than truth. Robert Pogue Harrison (Stanford)
René would never have experienced such a career in France. Such a free work could indeed only appear in America. That is why René is, like Tocqueville, a great French thinker and a great French moralist who could yet nowhere exist but in the United States. René ‘discovered America’ in every sense of the word: He made the United States his second country, he made there fundamental discoveries, he is a pure ‘product’ of the Franco-American relationship, he finally revealed the face of an universal – and not an imperial – America. Benoît Chantre
Il était mondialement reconnu mais ne le fut jamais vraiment en France – même s’il était membre de l’Académie Française. Il était trop archaïque pour les modernes, trop littéraire pour les philosophes, pas assez à la mode pour l’intelligentsia dominante et même trop chrétien pour un grand nombre – y compris certaines instances catholiques. S’il est reconnu (l’est et le sera de plus en plus), il l’a été contre l’époque, contre les pensées dominantes, contre les institutions en place, contre les médias. En France, il fut un marginal, un intellectuel qualifié «d’original» pour mieux le laisser en dehors de l’université quand, en elle, le règne des structures et du marxisme écrasait tout le reste. Pour avoir fait toute sa carrière universitaire aux Etats-Unis, à Stanford en particulier ; pour ne s’être rangé sous le drapeau d’aucunes des modes intellectuelles germanopratines, qu’elle soit structuraliste, sartrienne, foucaldienne, maoïste, deleuzienne ou autres ; Pour s’être intéressé, trente ans avant Régis Debray, au «fait religieux» quand il était encore classé dans l’enfer de la superstition ; pour avoir osé se dire «chrétien» – crime de lèse modernité – ce qui, aux yeux de nos maîtres à penser (et donc à excommunier), lui retirait toute légitimité scientifique ; pour n’avoir pas, ou peu, de relais en France (même s’il était devenu, sur le tard, membre de l’Académie française) alors qu’il est traduit en plus de vingt-cinq langues ; Pour toutes ces raisons et bien d’autres, René Girard fut à part dans le paysage intellectuel hexagonal. Damien Le Guay
Nous qui faisions les malins avec notre tradition, nous qui moquions la ringardise de nos pères, découvrions en lisant Girard que ce vieux livre poussiéreux, la Bible, était encore à lire. Qu’elle nous comprenait infiniment mieux que nous ne la comprenions. Ce que Girard nous a donné à lire, ce n’est rien moins que le monde commun des classiques de la France catholique, de l’Europe chrétienne, celui dont nous avions hérité mais que nous laissions lui aussi prendre la poussière dans un coin du bazar mondialisé. Nous pouvions grâce à lui nous plonger dans les livres de nos pères et y trouver une merveilleuse intelligence du monde. Avec lui, nous nous découvrions tout uniment fils de nos pères, français et catholiques. Car ce que nous apprend René Girard, c’est que nous ne sommes pas nés de la dernière pluie, que nous avons pour vivre et exister besoin du désir des autres, que nous ne sommes pas ces être libres et sans attaches que les catastrophes du XXe siècle auraient fait de nous. « C’est un garçon sans importance collective, c’est tout juste un individu. » Cette phrase de Céline qui m’a longtemps trotté dans la tête adolescent était tout un programme. Elle plaisait beaucoup à Sartre qui l’a mise en exergue de La Nausée. Elle donnait à la foule des pékins moyens dans mon genre une image très avantageuse d’eux-mêmes, au moment de l’effondrement des grands récits. Nous n’appartenions à rien ni à personne. Nous étions seulement nous-mêmes, libres et incréés. La lecture attentive de Girard balaye ces prétentions infantiles, qui pourtant structurent encore la psyché de l’Occident. Non, nous ne sommes pas à nous-mêmes nos propres pères. Non, nous ne sommes pas libres et possesseurs de nos désirs. Comme le dit l’Eglise depuis toujours, nous naissons esclaves de nos péchés, de notre désir dit Girard, et seul le Dieu de nos pères peut nous en libérer.  Prouver cette vérité constitue toute l’ambition intellectuelle de Girard, une vérité bien particulière puisqu’elle appartient à la fois à l’ordre de la science et à celui de la spiritualité. (…) Or, pour avoir raison aujourd’hui, pour gagner la compétition médiatique, il faut s’affirmer victime de la violence du monde, de l’Etat, du groupe. « Le monde moderne est plein de vertus chrétiennes devenues folles » disait Chesterton, un auteur selon le goût de René Girard. À quelques heureuses exceptions près, l’université s’est pendant longtemps gardée de se pencher sérieusement sur l’œuvre d’un penseur que son catholicisme de mieux en mieux assumé rendait de plus en plus hérétique. Cependant, à court de concept opératoire pour penser le réel, la sociologie a aujourd’hui recours jusqu’à la nausée (qui lui vient facilement) au concept du bouc émissaire pour expliquer à peu près tout et son contraire : la façon dont on traite la religion musulmane et la condition féminine en Occident par exemple. Typiquement, le girardien sans christianisme, cet oxymoron  qui prolifère aujourd’hui, s’efforce de découvrir la violence, les boucs émissaires et le ressentiment partout, sauf là où cela ferait vraiment une différence, la seule différence qui tienne, c’est-à-dire en lui-même. C’est ainsi que les bien-pensants passent leur temps à dénoncer le racisme dégoutant du bas-peuple de France sans paraître voir le racisme de classe dont ils font preuve à cette occasion.  Ce girardisme sans christianisme est le pire des contresens d’un monde qui pourtant n’en est pas avare : le monde post-moderne est plein de concepts girardiens devenus fous. Emmanuel Dubois de Prisque
Il n’y a que l’Occident chrétien qui ait jamais trouvé la perspective et ce réalisme photographique dont on dit tant de mal: c’est également lui qui a inventé les caméras. Jamais les autres univers n’ont découvert ça. Un chercheur qui travaille dans ce domaine me faisait remarquer que, dans le trompe l’oeil occidental, tous les objets sont déformés d’après les mêmes principes par rapport à la lumière et à l’espace: c’est l’équivalent pictural du Dieu qui fait briller son soleil et tomber sa pluie sur les justes comme sur les injustes. On cesse de représenter en grand les gens importants socialement et en petit les autres. C’est l’égalité absolue dans la perception. René Girard
Aujourd’hui on repère les boucs émissaires dans l’Angleterre victorienne et on ne les repère plus dans les sociétés archaïques. C’est défendu. René Girard
Les mondes anciens étaient comparables entre eux, le nôtre est vraiment unique. Sa supériorité dans tous les domaines est tellement écrasante, tellement évidente que, paradoxalement, il est interdit d’en faire état. René Girard
On apprend aux enfants qu’on a cessé de chasser les sorcières parce que la science s’est imposée aux hommes. Alors que c’est le contraire: la science s’est imposée aux hommes parce que, pour des raisons morales, religieuses, on a cessé de chasser les sorcières. René Girard
Notre monde est de plus en plus imprégné par cette vérité évangélique de l’innocence des victimes. L’attention qu’on porte aux victimes a commencé au Moyen Age, avec l’invention de l’hôpital. L’Hôtel-Dieu, comme on disait, accueillait toutes les victimes, indépendamment de leur origine. Les sociétés primitives n’étaient pas inhumaines, mais elles n’avaient d’attention que pour leurs membres. Le monde moderne a inventé la “victime inconnue”, comme on dirait aujourd’hui le “soldat inconnu”. Le christianisme peut maintenant continuer à s’étendre même sans la loi, car ses grandes percées intellectuelles et morales, notre souci des victimes et notre attention à ne pas nous fabriquer de boucs émissaires, ont fait de nous des chrétiens qui s’ignorent. René Girard
Je crois que les intellectuels sont même fréquemment moins clairvoyants que la foule car leur désir de se distinguer les pousse à se précipiter vers l’absurdité à la mode alors que l’individu moyen devine le plus souvent, mais pas toujours, que la mode déteste le bon sens. (…)  dans notre univers médiatique, chacun se choisit un rôle dans une pièce de théâtre écrite par quelqu’un d’autre. Cette pièce tient l’affiche pendant un certain temps et tous les jours chacun la rejoue consciencieusement dans la presse, à la télévision et dans les conversations mondaines. Et puis, un beau jour, en très peu de temps, on passe à autre chose de tout aussi stéréotypé, car mimétique toujours. Le répertoire change souvent, en somme, mais il y a toujours un répertoire. (…) Il y a une dissidence qui est pur esprit de contradiction, un désir mimétique redoublé et inversé, mais il y a aussi une dissidence réelle, héroïque et proprement géniale, devant laquelle il convient de s’incliner. Pensez à la «dissidence» d’Antigone dans la pièce de Sophocle, par exemple! Je ne prétends pas expliquer Soljénitsyne par le désir mimétique. (…) Notre univers mental nous paraît constitué essentiellement de valeurs positives auxquelles nous adhérons librement, parce qu’elles sont justes, raisonnables, vraies. L’envers de tout cela au sein des cultures les plus diverses repose sur l’expulsion de certaines victimes et l’exécration des «valeurs» qui leur sont associées. Les valeurs positives sont l’envers de cette exécration. Dans la mesure où cette exécration «structure» notre vision du monde, elle joue donc elle aussi un rôle très important. (…) Il est bien évident que nos descendants, en regardant notre époque, y repèreront un même type d’uniformité, de conformisme et d’aveuglement que nous découvrons dans les époques passées. Bien des choses qui nous paraissent aujourd’hui comme des évidences indubitables leur paraîtront proches de la superstition collective. A mes yeux, la «conversion» consiste justement à prendre conscience de cela. A s’arracher à ces adhérences inconscientes. C’est d’ailleurs un premier pas vers la modestie… René Girard
Dans tout l’Occident, d’ailleurs, la confusion systématique entre le message chrétien et l’institution cléricale persiste en dépit de tout ce qui devrait la faire cesser. Depuis le XVIIe siècle, l’Eglise catholique a perdu non seulement tout ce qu’il lui restait de pouvoir temporel mais la plupart de ses fidèles, et aussi son clergé, qui, en dehors d’exceptions remarquables, est au-dessous de zéro, aux Etats-Unis notamment, pourri de contestations puériles, ivre de conformisme antireligieux. Les anticatholiques militants ne semblent rien voir de tout cela. Ils sont plus croyants, au fond, que leurs adversaires et ils voient plus loin qu’eux, peut-être. Ils voient que l’effondrement de toutes les utopies antichrétiennes, plus la montée de l’islam, plus tous les bouleversements à venir, va forcément, dans un avenir proche, transformer de fond en comble notre vision du christianisme. (…) Ce qui est sûr, c’est qu’en exilant le religieux dans une espèce de ghetto, comme notre conception de la laïcité tend à le faire, on s’interdit de comprendre. On appauvrit tout à la fois la religion et la recherche non religieuse. René Girard
Je suis personnellement convaincu que les écrivains occidentaux majeurs, qu’ils soient ou non chrétiens, des tragiques grecs à Dante, de Shakespeare à Cervantès ou Pascal et jusqu’aux grands romanciers et poètes de notre époque, sont plus pertinents pour comprendre le drame de la modernité que tous nos philosophes et tous nos savants. René Girard
On n’arrive plus à faire la différence entre le terrorisme révolutionnaire et le fou qui tire dans la foule. L’humanité se prépare à entrer dans l’insensé complet. C’est peut-être nécessaire. Le terrorisme oblige l’homme occidental à mesurer le chemin parcouru depuis deux mille ans. Certaines formes de violence nous apparaissent aujourd’hui intolérables. On n’accepterait plus Samson secouant les piliers du Temple et périr en tuant tout le monde avec lui. Notre contradiction fondamentale, c’est que nous sommes les bénéficiaires du christianisme dans notre rapport à la violence et que nous l’avons abandonné sans comprendre que nous étions ses tributaires. René Girard
People are against my theory, because it is at the same time an avant-garde and a Christian theory. The avant-garde people are anti-Christian, and many of the Christians are anti-avant-garde. Even the Christians have been very distrustful of me. René Girard
Theories are expendable. They should be criticized. When people tell me my work is too systematic, I say, ‘I make it as systematic as possible for you to be able to prove it wrong. René Girard
Pour restituer à la crucifixion sa puissance de scandale, il suffit de la filmer telle quelle, sans rien y ajouter, sans rien en retrancher. Mel Gibson a-t-il réalisé ce programme jusqu’au bout? Pas complètement sans doute, mais il en a fait suffisamment pour épouvanter tous les conformismes. (…) Les récits de la Passion contiennent plus de détails concrets que toutes les œuvres savantes de l’époque. Ils représentent un premier pas en avant vers le toujours plus de réalisme qui définit le dynamisme essentiel de notre culture dans ses époques de grande vitalité. Le premier moteur du réalisme, c’est le désir de nourrir la méditation religieuse qui est essentiellement une méditation sur la Passion du Christ. En enseignant le mépris du réalisme et du réel lui-même, l’esthétique moderne a complètement faussé l’interprétation de l’art occidental. Elle a inventé, entre l’esthétique d’un côté, le technique et le scientifique de l’autre, une séparation qui n’a commencé à exister qu’avec le modernisme, lequel n’est peut-être qu’une appellation flatteuse de notre décadence. La volonté de faire vrai, de peindre les choses comme si on y était a toujours triomphé auparavant et, pendant des siècles, elle a produit des chefs-d’oeuvre dont Gibson dit qu’il s’est inspiré. Il mentionne lui-même, me dit-on, le Caravage. Il faut songer aussi à certains Christ romans, aux crucifixions espagnoles, à un Jérôme Bosch, à tous les Christ aux outrages… (…) Pour comprendre ce qu’a voulu faire Mel Gibson, il me semble qu’il faut se libérer de tous les snobismes modernistes et postmodernistes et envisager le cinéma comme un prolongement et un dépassement du grand réalisme littéraire et pictural. (…)  Dans la tragédie grecque, il était interdit de représenter la mort du héros directement, on écoutait un messager qui racontait ce qui venait de se passer. Au cinéma, il n’est plus possible d’éluder l’essentiel. Court-circuiter la flagellation ou la mise en croix, par exemple, ce serait reculer devant l’épreuve décisive. Il faut représenter ces choses épouvantables «comme si on y était». Faut-il s’indigner si le résultat ne ressemble guère à un tableau préraphaélite? (..)  D’où vient ce formidable pouvoir évocateur qu’a sur la plupart des hommes toute représentation de la Passion fidèle au texte évangélique? Il y a tout un versant anthropologique de la description évangélique, je pense, qui n’est ni spécifiquement juif, ni spécifiquement romain, ni même spécifiquement chrétien et c’est la dimension collective de l’événement, c’est ce qui fait de lui, essentiellement, un phénomène de foule. (…) D’un point de vue anthropologique, la Passion n’a rien de spécifiquement juif. C’est un phénomène de foule qui obéit aux mêmes lois que tous les phénomènes de foule. Une observation attentive en repère l’équivalent un peu partout dans les nombreux mythes fondateurs qui racontent la naissance des religions archaïques et antiques. Presque toutes les religions, je pense, s’enracinent dans des violences collectives analogues à celles que décrivent ou suggèrent non seulement les Evangiles et le Livre de Job mais aussi les chants du Serviteur souffrant dans le deuxième Isaïe, ainsi que de nombreux psaumes. Les chrétiens et les juifs pieux, bien à tort, ont toujours refusé de réfléchir à ces ressemblances entre leurs livres sacrés et les mythes. Une comparaison attentive révèle que, au-delà de ces ressemblances et grâce à elles on peut repérer entre le mythique d’un côté et, de l’autre, le judaïque et le chrétien une différence à la fois ténue et gigantesque qui rend le judéo-chrétien incomparable sous le rapport de la vérité la plus objective. A la différence des mythes qui adoptent systématiquement le point de vue de la foule contre la victime, parce qu’ils sont conçus et racontés par les lyncheurs, et ils tiennent toujours, par conséquent, la victime pour coupable (l’incroyable combinaison de parricide et d’inceste dont Œdipe est accusé, par exemple), nos Écritures à nous tous, les grands textes bibliques et chrétiens innocentent les victimes des mouvements de foules, et c’est bien ce que font les Évangiles dans le cas de Jésus. (…) Il y a deux grandes attitudes à mon avis dans l’histoire humaine, il y a celle de la mythologie qui s’efforce de dissimuler la violence, car, en dernière analyse, c’est sur la violence injuste que les communautés humaines reposent. (…) Cette attitude est trop universelle pour être condamnée. C’est l’attitude d’ailleurs des plus grands philosophes grecs et en particulier de Platon, qui condamne Homère et tous les poètes parce qu’ils se permettent de décrire dans leurs oeuvres les violences attribuées par les mythes aux dieux de la cité. Le grand philosophe voit dans cette audacieuse révélation une source de désordre, un péril majeur pour toute la société. Cette attitude est certainement l’attitude religieuse la plus répandue, la plus normale, la plus naturelle à l’homme et, de nos jours, elle est plus universelle que jamais, car les croyants modernisés, aussi bien les chrétiens que les juifs, l’ont au moins partiellement adoptée. L’autre attitude est beaucoup plus rare et elle est même unique au monde. Elle est réservée tout entière aux grands moments de l’inspiration biblique et chrétienne. Elle consiste non pas à pudiquement dissimuler mais, au contraire, à révéler la violence dans toute son injustice et son mensonge, partout où il est possible de la repérer. C’est l’attitude du Livre de Job et c’est l’attitude des Evangiles. C’est la plus audacieuse des deux et, à mon avis, c’est la plus grande. C’est l’attitude qui nous a permis de découvrir l’innocence de la plupart des victimes que même les hommes les plus religieux, au cours de leur histoire, n’ont jamais cessé de massacrer et de persécuter. C’est là qu’est l’inspiration commune au judaïsme et au christianisme, et c’est la clef, il faut l’espérer, de leur réconciliation future. C’est la tendance héroïque à mettre la vérité au-dessus même de l’ordre social. C’est à cette aventure-là, il me semble, que le film de Mel Gibson s’efforce d’être fidèle. René Girard

La Passion selon René

Au lendemain de la mort, au vénérable âge de 91 ans,  de l’anthropologue franco-américain de la violence René Girard …

Nouveau Tocqueville lui aussi longtemps ignoré dans son pays natal …

Mais introducteur dans son pays d’adoption de la « peste » du structuralisme et de la fameuse French theory dont il ne cessera de se démarquer …

Et en cette première journée nationale contre le harcèlement à l’école

Confirmant la prise de conscience par nos sociétés de l’importance, dès l’enfance, des phénomènes de bouc émissaire analysés par Girard …

Alors qu’avec le rejet coup sur coup de la marijuana récréationnelle, des droits transgenres et des sanctuaires pour immigrés clandestins ainsi que l’élection d’un gouverneur anti-« mariage pour tous » dans un certain nombre d’états américains, la fin catastrophique des années Obama pourrait bien voir le reflux de ces idées chrétiennes devenues folles que nos prétendus progressistes avaient cru pouvoir définitivement imposer à l’Occident tout entier …

Quel meilleur hommage que cette magistrale défense  …

 Que republie aujourd’hui Le Figaro à qui il l’avait alors livrée  …

Du réalisme, à travers le film honni de Mel Gibson, tant dans l’art que dans la recherche qu’il avait défendu toute sa vie ?

Lui qui, contre le structuralisme et le postmodernisme déréalisants des sciences humaines, avaient toujours insisté …

Pour accorder le même regard dans la lignée des grands peintres et des grands écrivains

Tant à l’Angleterre victorienne qu’aux sociétés archaïques …

Et tant aux grands mythes grecs qu’aux grands textes bibliques

Pour finir par y découvrir comme moteur même de cette attitude aussi singulière que révolutionnaire …

Le scandale suprême de la supériorité de la révélation judéo-chrétienne ?

La Passion du Christ vue par René Girard
René Girard
Le Figaro

05/11/2015

FIGAROVOX/DOCUMENT – Le philosophe et professeur René Girard est mort ce 4 novembre. Lors de la sortie de La Passion du Christ en 2004, il avait écrit pour Le Figaro un texte fleuve en défense du film de Mel Gibson. Archives.

Philosophe français ayant enseigné 45 ans aux États-Unis, René Girard a vu le film de Mel Gibson pour Le Figaro Magazine. Il salue le travail du cinéaste pour inscrire la Passion du Christ dans une tradition esthétique et théologique.

Une violence au service de la foi

Bien avant la sortie de son film aux Etats-Unis, Mel Gibson avait organisé pour les sommités journalistiques et religieuses des projections privées. S’il comptait s’assurer ainsi la bienveillance des gens en place, il a mal calculé son coup, ou peut-être a-t-il fait preuve, au contraire, d’un machiavélisme supérieur.

Les commentaires ont tout de suite suivi et, loin de louer le film ou même de rassurer le public, ce ne furent partout que vitupérations affolées et cris d’alarme angoissés au sujet des violences antisémites qui risquaient de se produire à la sortie des cinémas. Même le New Yorker, si fier de l’humour serein dont, en principe, il ne se départ jamais, a complètement perdu son sang-froid et très sérieusement accusé le film d’être plus semblable à la propagande nazie que toute autre production cinématographique depuis la Seconde Guerre mondiale.

Rien ne justifie ces accusations. Pour Mel Gibson, la mort du Christ est l’oeuvre de tous les hommes, à commencer par Gibson lui-même. Lorsque son film s’écarte un peu des sources évangéliques, ce qui arrive rarement, ce n’est pas pour noircir les Juifs mais pour souligner la pitié que Jésus inspire à certains d’entre eux, à un Simon de Cyrène par exemple, dont le rôle est augmenté, ou à une Véronique, la femme qui, selon une tradition ancienne, a offert à Jésus, pendant la montée au Golgotha, un linge sur lequel se sont imprimés les traits de son visage.

Plus les choses se calment, plus il devient clair, rétrospectivement, que ce film a déclenché dans les médias les plus influents du monde une véritable crise de nerfs qui a plus ou moins contaminé par la suite l’univers entier.

Plus les choses se calment, plus il devient clair, rétrospectivement, que ce film a déclenché dans les médias les plus influents du monde une véritable crise de nerfs qui a plus ou moins contaminé par la suite l’univers entier. Le public n’avait rien à voir à l’affaire puisqu’il n’avait pas vu le film. Il se demandait avec curiosité, forcément, ce qu’il pouvait bien y avoir dans cette Passion pour semer la panique dans un milieu pas facile en principe à effaroucher. La suite était facile à prévoir: au lieu des deux mille six cents écrans initialement prévus, ils furent plus de quatre mille à projeter The Passion of the Christ à partir du mercredi des Cendres, jour choisi, de toute évidence, pour son symbolisme pénitentiel.

Dès la sortie du film, la thèse de l’antisémitisme a perdu du terrain mais les adversaires du film se sont regroupés autour d’un second grief, la violence excessive qui, à les en croire, caractériserait ce film. Cette violence est grande, indubitablement, mais elle n’excède pas, il me semble, celle de bien d’autres films que les adversaires de Mel Gibson ne songent pas à dénoncer. Cette Passion a bouleversé, très provisoirement sans doute, l’échiquier des réactions médiatiques au sujet de la violence dans les spectacles. Tous ceux qui, d’habitude, s’accommodent très bien de celle-ci ou voient même dans ses progrès constants autant de victoires de la liberté sur la tyrannie, voilà qu’ils la dénoncent dans le film de Gibson avec une véhémence extraordinaire. Tous ceux qui, au contraire, se font d’habitude un devoir de dénoncer la violence, sans obtenir jamais le moindre résultat, non seulement tolèrent ce même film mais fréquemment ils le vénèrent.

Jamais on n’avait filmé avec un tel réalisme

Pour justifier leur attitude, les opposants empruntent à leurs adversaires habituels tous les arguments qui leur paraissent excessifs et même ridicules dans la bouche de ces derniers. Ils redoutent que cette Passion ne «désensibilise» les jeunes, ne fasse d’eux de véritables drogués de la violence, incapables d’apprécier les vrais raffinements de notre culture. On traite Mel Gibson de «pornographe» de la violence, alors qu’en réalité il est un des très rares metteurs en scène à ne pas systématiquement mêler de l’érotisme à la violence.

Certains critiques poussent l’imitation de leurs adversaires si loin qu’ils mêlent le religieux à leurs diatribes. Ils reprochent à ce film son «impiété», ils vont jusqu’à l’accuser, tenez-vous bien, d’être «blasphématoire».

Cette Passion a provoqué, en somme, entre des adversaires qui se renvoient depuis toujours les mêmes arguments, un étonnant chassé-croisé. Cette double palinodie se déroule avec un naturel si parfait que l’ensemble a toute l’apparence d’un ballet classique, d’autant plus élégant qu’il n’a pas la moindre conscience de lui-même.

Quelle est la force invisible mais souveraine qui manipule tous ces critiques sans qu’ils s’en aperçoivent? A mon avis, c’est la Passion elle-même. Si vous m’objectez qu’on a filmé celle-ci bien des fois dans le passé sans jamais provoquer ni l’indignation formidable ni l’admiration, aussi formidable sans doute mais plus secrète, qui déferlent aujourd’hui sur nous, je vous répondrai que jamais encore on n’avait filmé la Passion avec le réalisme implacable de Gibson.

C’est la saccharine hollywoodienne d’abord qui a dominé le cinéma religieux, avec des Jésus aux cheveux si blonds et aux yeux si bleus qu’il n’était pas question de les livrer aux outrages de la soldatesque romaine. Ces dernières années, il y a eu des Passions plus réalistes, mais moins efficaces encore, car agrémentées de fausses audaces postmodernistes, sexuelles de préférence, sur lesquelles les metteurs en scène comptaient pour pimenter un peu les Evangiles jugés par eux insuffisamment scandaleux. Ils ne voyaient pas qu’en sacrifiant à l’académisme de «la révolte» ils affadissaient la Passion, ils la banalisaient.

Pour restituer à la crucifixion sa puissance de scandale, il suffit de la filmer telle quelle, sans rien y ajouter, sans rien en retrancher. Mel Gibson a-t-il réalisé ce programme jusqu’au bout? Pas complètement sans doute, mais il en a fait suffisamment pour épouvanter tous les conformismes.

Le principal argument contre ce que je viens de dire consiste à accuser le film d’infidélité à l’esprit des Evangiles. Il est vrai que les Evangiles se contentent d’énumérer toutes les violences que subit le Christ, sans jamais les décrire de façon détaillée, sans jamais faire voir la Passion «comme si on y était».

Tirer de la nudité et de la rapidité du texte évangélique un argument contre le réalisme de Mel Gibson, c’est escamoter l’histoire. C’est ne pas voir que, au premier siècle de notre ère, la description réaliste au sens moderne ne pouvait pas être pratiquée, car elle n’était pas encore inventée.
C’est parfaitement exact, mais tirer de la nudité et de la rapidité du texte évangélique un argument contre le réalisme de Mel Gibson, c’est escamoter l’histoire. C’est ne pas voir que, au premier siècle de notre ère, la description réaliste au sens moderne ne pouvait pas être pratiquée, car elle n’était pas encore inventée. L’impulsion première dans le développement du réalisme occidental vient très probablement de la Passion. Les Évangiles n’ont pas délibérément rejeté une possibilité qui n’existait pas à leur époque. Il est clair que, loin de fuir le réalisme, ils le recherchent, mais les ressources font défaut. Les récits de la Passion contiennent plus de détails concrets que toutes les œuvres savantes de l’époque. Ils représentent un premier pas en avant vers le toujours plus de réalisme qui définit le dynamisme essentiel de notre culture dans ses époques de grande vitalité. Le premier moteur du réalisme, c’est le désir de nourrir la méditation religieuse qui est essentiellement une méditation sur la Passion du Christ.

En enseignant le mépris du réalisme et du réel lui-même, l’esthétique moderne a complètement faussé l’interprétation de l’art occidental.
En enseignant le mépris du réalisme et du réel lui-même, l’esthétique moderne a complètement faussé l’interprétation de l’art occidental. Elle a inventé, entre l’esthétique d’un côté, le technique et le scientifique de l’autre, une séparation qui n’a commencé à exister qu’avec le modernisme, lequel n’est peut-être qu’une appellation flatteuse de notre décadence. La volonté de faire vrai, de peindre les choses comme si on y était a toujours triomphé auparavant et, pendant des siècles, elle a produit des chefs-d’oeuvre dont Gibson dit qu’il s’est inspiré. Il mentionne lui-même, me dit-on, le Caravage. Il faut songer aussi à certains Christ romans, aux crucifixions espagnoles, à un Jérôme Bosch, à tous les Christ aux outrages…

Loin de mépriser la science et la technique, la grande peinture de la Renaissance et des siècles modernes met toutes les inventions nouvelles au service de sa volonté de réalisme. Loin de rejeter la perspective, le trompe-l’oeil, on accueille tout cela avec passion. Qu’on songe au Christ mort de Mantegna…

Pour comprendre ce qu’a voulu faire Mel Gibson, il me semble qu’il faut se libérer de tous les snobismes modernistes et postmodernistes et envisager le cinéma comme un prolongement et un dépassement du grand réalisme littéraire et pictural. Si les techniques contemporaines passent souvent pour incapables de transmettre l’émotion religieuse, c’est parce que jamais encore de grands artistes ne les ont transfigurées. Leur invention a coïncidé avec le premier effondrement de la spiritualité chrétienne depuis le début du christianisme.

Si les artistes de la Renaissance avaient disposé du cinéma, croit-on vraiment qu’ils l’auraient dédaigné? C’est avec la tradition réaliste que Mel Gibson s’efforce de renouer. L’aventure tentée par lui consiste à utiliser à fond les ressources incomparables de la technique la plus réaliste qui fût jamais, le cinéma. Les risques sont à la mesure de l’ambition qui caractérise cette entreprise, inhabituelle aujourd’hui, mais fréquente dans le passé.

Si l’on entend réellement filmer la Passion et la crucifixion, il est bien évident qu’on ne peut pas se contenter de mentionner en quelques phrases les supplices subis par le Christ. Il faut les représenter. Dans la tragédie grecque, il était interdit de représenter la mort du héros directement, on écoutait un messager qui racontait ce qui venait de se passer. Au cinéma, il n’est plus possible d’éluder l’essentiel. Court-circuiter la flagellation ou la mise en croix, par exemple, ce serait reculer devant l’épreuve décisive. Il faut représenter ces choses épouvantables «comme si on y était». Faut-il s’indigner si le résultat ne ressemble guère à un tableau préraphaélite?

Au-delà d’un certain nombre de coups, la flagellation romaine, c’était la mort certaine, un mode d’exécution comme les autres, en somme, au même titre que la crucifixion. Mel Gibson rappelle cela dans son film. La violence de sa flagellation est d’autant plus insoutenable qu’elle est admirablement filmée, ainsi que tout le reste de l’oeuvre d’ailleurs.

Mel Gibson se situe dans une certaine tradition mystique face à la Passion: «Quelle goutte de sang as-tu versée pour moi?», etc. Il se fait un devoir de se représenter les souffrances du Christ aussi précisément que possible, pas du tout pour cultiver l’esprit de vengeance contre les Juifs ou les Romains, mais pour méditer sur notre propre culpabilité.

Cette attitude n’est pas la seule possible, bien sûr, face à la Passion. Et il y aura certainement un mauvais autant qu’un bon usage de son film, mais on ne peut pas condamner l’entreprise a priori, on ne peut pas l’accuser les yeux fermés de faire de la Passion autre chose qu’elle n’est. Jamais personne, dans l’histoire du christianisme, n’avait encore essayé de représenter la Passion telle que réellement elle a dû se dérouler.

Dans la salle où j’ai vu ce film, sa projection était précédée de trois ou quatre coming attractions remplies d’une violence littéralement imbécile, ricanante, pétrie d’insinuations sado-masochistes, dépourvue de tout intérêt non seulement religieux mais aussi narratif, esthétique ou simplement humain. Comment ceux qui consomment quotidiennement ces abominations, qui les commentent, qui en parlent à leurs amis, peuvent-ils s’indigner du film de Mel Gibson? Voilà qui dépasse mon entendement.

Comment pourrait-on exagérer les souffrances d’un homme qui doit subir, l’un après l’autre, les deux supplices les plus terribles inventés par la cruauté romaine ?
Il faut donc commencer par absoudre le film du reproche absurde «d’aller trop loin», «d’exagérer à plaisir les souffrances du Christ». Comment pourrait-on exagérer les souffrances d’un homme qui doit subir, l’un après l’autre, les deux supplices les plus terribles inventés par la cruauté romaine?

Une fois reconnue la légitimité globale de l’entreprise, il est permis de regretter que Mel Gibson soit allé plus loin dans la violence que le texte évangélique ne l’exige. Il fait commencer les brutalités contre Jésus tout de suite après son arrestation, ce que les Evangiles ne suggèrent pas. Ne serait-ce que pour priver ses critiques d’un argument spécieux, le metteur en scène aurait mieux fait, je pense, de s’en tenir à l’indispensable. L’effet global serait tout aussi puissant et le film ne prêterait pas le flanc au reproche assez hypocrite de flatter le goût contemporain pour la violence.

D’où vient ce formidable pouvoir évocateur qu’a sur la plupart des hommes toute représentation de la Passion fidèle au texte évangélique? Il y a tout un versant anthropologique de la description évangélique, je pense, qui n’est ni spécifiquement juif, ni spécifiquement romain, ni même spécifiquement chrétien et c’est la dimension collective de l’événement, c’est ce qui fait de lui, essentiellement, un phénomène de foule.

La foule qui fait un triomphe à Jésus ce dimanche-là est celle-là même qui hurlera à la mort cinq jours plus tard. Mel Gibson a raison, je pense, de souligner le revirement de cette foule, l’inconstance cruelle des foules, leur étrange versatilité.
Une des choses que le Pilate de Mel Gibson dit à la foule ne figure pas dans les Evangiles mais me paraît fidèle à leur esprit: «Il y a cinq jours, vous désiriez faire de cet homme votre roi et maintenant vous voulez le tuer.» C’est une allusion à l’accueil triomphal fait à Jésus le dimanche précédent, le dimanche dit des Rameaux dans le calendrier liturgique. La foule qui fait un triomphe à Jésus ce dimanche-là est celle-là même qui hurlera à la mort cinq jours plus tard. Mel Gibson a raison, je pense, de souligner le revirement de cette foule, l’inconstance cruelle des foules, leur étrange versatilité. Toutes les foules du monde passent aisément d’un extrême à l’autre, de l’adulation passionnée à la détestation, à la destruction frénétique d’un seul et même individu. Il y a d’ailleurs un grand texte de la Bible qui ressemble beaucoup plus à la Passion évangélique qu’on ne le perçoit d’habitude, et c’est le Livre de Job. Après avoir été le chef de son peuple pendant de nombreuses années, Job est brutalement rejeté par ce même peuple qui le menace de mort par l’intermédiaire de trois porte-parole toujours désignés, assez cocassement, comme «les amis de Job».

Le propre d’une foule agitée, affolée, c’est de ne pas se calmer avant d’avoir assouvi son appétit de violence sur une victime dont l’identité le plus souvent ne lui importe guère. C’est ce que sait fort bien Pilate qui, en sa qualité d’administrateur, a de l’expérience en la matière. Le procurateur propose à la foule, pour commencer, de faire crucifier Barrabas à la place de Jésus. Devant l’échec de cette première manoeuvre très classique, à laquelle il recourt visiblement trop tard, Pilate fait flageller Jésus dans l’espoir de satisfaire aux moindres frais, si l’on peut dire, l’appétit de violence qui caractérise essentiellement ce type de foule.

Si Pilate procède ainsi, ce n’est pas parce qu’il est plus humain que les Juifs, ce n’est pas forcément non plus à cause de son épouse. L’explication la plus vraisemblable, c’est que, pour être bien noté à Rome qui se flatte de faire régner partout la pax romana, un fonctionnaire romain préférera toujours une exécution légale à une exécution imposée par la multitude.

D’un point de vue anthropologique, la Passion n’a rien de spécifiquement juif. C’est un phénomène de foule qui obéit aux mêmes lois que tous les phénomènes de foule. Une observation attentive en repère l’équivalent un peu partout dans les nombreux mythes fondateurs qui racontent la naissance des religions archaïques et antiques.

Presque toutes les religions, je pense, s’enracinent dans des violences collectives analogues.
Presque toutes les religions, je pense, s’enracinent dans des violences collectives analogues à celles que décrivent ou suggèrent non seulement les Evangiles et le Livre de Job mais aussi les chants du Serviteur souffrant dans le deuxième Isaïe, ainsi que de nombreux psaumes. Les chrétiens et les juifs pieux, bien à tort, ont toujours refusé de réfléchir à ces ressemblances entre leurs livres sacrés et les mythes. Une comparaison attentive révèle que, au-delà de ces ressemblances et grâce à elles on peut repérer entre le mythique d’un côté et, de l’autre, le judaïque et le chrétien une différence à la fois ténue et gigantesque qui rend le judéo-chrétien incomparable sous le rapport de la vérité la plus objective. A la différence des mythes qui adoptent systématiquement le point de vue de la foule contre la victime, parce qu’ils sont conçus et racontés par les lyncheurs, et ils tiennent toujours, par conséquent, la victime pour coupable (l’incroyable combinaison de parricide et d’inceste dont Œdipe est accusé, par exemple), nos Écritures à nous tous, les grands textes bibliques et chrétiens innocentent les victimes des mouvements de foules, et c’est bien ce que font les Évangiles dans le cas de Jésus. C’est ce que montre Mel Gibson.

Tandis que mythes répètent sans fin l’illusion meurtrière des foules persécutrices, toujours analogues à celles de la Passion, parce que cette illusion apaise la communauté et lui fournit l’idole autour de laquelle elle se rassemble, les plus grands textes bibliques, et finalement les Évangiles, révèlent le caractère essentiellement trompeur et criminel des phénomènes de foule sur lesquels reposent les mythologies du monde entier.

Il y a deux grandes attitudes à mon avis dans l’histoire humaine, il y a celle de la mythologie qui s’efforce de dissimuler la violence, car, en dernière analyse, c’est sur la violence injuste que les communautés humaines reposent. Et c’est ce que nous faisons tous si nous nous abandonnons à notre instinct. Nous essayons de recouvrir du manteau de Noé la nudité de la violence humaine. Et nous marchons à reculons s’il le faut, pour ne pas nous exposer, en regardant de trop près la violence, à sa puissance contagieuse.

Cette attitude est trop universelle pour être condamnée. C’est l’attitude d’ailleurs des plus grands philosophes grecs et en particulier de Platon, qui condamne Homère et tous les poètes parce qu’ils se permettent de décrire dans leurs oeuvres les violences attribuées par les mythes aux dieux de la cité. Le grand philosophe voit dans cette audacieuse révélation une source de désordre, un péril majeur pour toute la société.

Cette attitude est certainement l’attitude religieuse la plus répandue, la plus normale, la plus naturelle à l’homme et, de nos jours, elle est plus universelle que jamais, car les croyants modernisés, aussi bien les chrétiens que les juifs, l’ont au moins partiellement adoptée.

L’autre attitude est beaucoup plus rare et elle est même unique au monde. Elle est réservée tout entière aux grands moments de l’inspiration biblique et chrétienne. Elle consiste non pas à pudiquement dissimuler mais, au contraire, à révéler la violence dans toute son injustice et son mensonge, partout où il est possible de la repérer. C’est l’attitude du Livre de Job et c’est l’attitude des Evangiles. C’est la plus audacieuse des deux et, à mon avis, c’est la plus grande. C’est l’attitude qui nous a permis de découvrir l’innocence de la plupart des victimes que même les hommes les plus religieux, au cours de leur histoire, n’ont jamais cessé de massacrer et de persécuter. C’est là qu’est l’inspiration commune au judaïsme et au christianisme, et c’est la clef, il faut l’espérer, de leur réconciliation future. C’est la tendance héroïque à mettre la vérité au-dessus même de l’ordre social. C’est à cette aventure-là, il me semble, que le film de Mel Gibson s’efforce d’être fidèle.

Voir aussi:

Mort de l’académicien René Girard
Sebastien Lapaque
Le Figaro
05/11/2015

Penseur franc-tireur et lecteur universel, le philosophe s’est éteint mercredi à l’âge de 91  ans aux États-Unis a annoncé l’Université de Stanford. Il y a longtemps enseigné.

Il concevait son œuvre comme une participation active à un combat intellectuel et spirituel essentiel pour notre avenir. Observateur attentif du monde, il lui arrivait d’être très inquiet. Mais il ne lui déplaisait pas de voir scintiller dans les brasiers du siècle quelques lueurs d’apocalypse. Il se souvenait de l’exhortation de Jean à Patmos: «Écris donc ce que tu as vu, ce qui est et ce qui doit arriver ensuite.» L’inspiration évangélique du titre d’un nombre important de ses livres – Des choses cachées depuis la fondation du monde, Quand ces choses commenceront, Je vois Satan tomber comme l’éclair… – marque bien où était son cœur. Penseur franc-tireur et lecteur universel, René Girard assumait le scandale de croire à la vérité révélée du christianisme dans un siècle voué au doute et à la déconstruction.

Il avait cependant des Évangiles une lecture toute à lui. Pendant près de trente ans, il s’est employé à démontrer que ces récits de la vie de Jésus étaient une théorie de l’homme avant d’être une théorie de Dieu. Quand ses contemporains cherchaient la vérité sur l’origine des institutions humaines chez Marx et Freud, il la trouvait dans les Écritures, lues avec Le Rouge et le Noir, Madame Bovary, Don Quichotte, Les Frères Karamazov, Le Général Dourakine et À la recherche du temps perdu. Par là, il a imposé une herméneutique nouvelle. Une des singularités de son esprit est d’avoir toujours refusé le divorce du savoir et de la littérature. En plein triomphe des sciences humaines, René Girard répétait qu’après les Évangiles, les textes les plus éclairants sur notre culture n’étaient ni philosophiques, ni psychologiques, ni sociologiques, mais littéraires. «Je suis personnellement convaincu, expliquait-il, que les écrivains occidentaux majeurs, qu’ils soient ou non chrétiens, des tragiques grecs à Dante, de Shakespeare à Cervantès ou Pascal et jusqu’aux grands romanciers et poètes de notre époque, sont plus pertinents pour comprendre le drame de la modernité que tous nos philosophes et tous nos savants.»

«Je suis personnellement convaincu que les écrivains occidentaux majeurs, qu’ils soient ou non chrétiens… sont plus pertinents pour comprendre le drame de la modernité que tous nos philosophes et tous nos savants»
Longtemps dédaigné par un clergé intellectuel acquis au structuralisme, à la linguistique et au formalisme, ignoré par l’institution universitaire française, peu connu du grand public, élu à l’Académie française à 80 ans passés, René Girard s’était très tôt fait connaître aux États-Unis. Né à Avignon le jour de Noël 1923, élève à l’École des chartes de 1943 à 1947, où il a passé un diplôme d’archiviste-paléographe, il avait 23 ans lorsqu’il traversa l’Atlantique. Il a alors enseigné la littérature française à l’université d’Indiana, où il a obtenu son doctorat d’histoire, avant de rejoindre l’université John Hopkins de Baltimore, puis la fameuse université de Stanford, en 1974, où il a dirigé le département de langue, littérature et civilisation françaises jusqu’à la fin de sa carrière. Il a souvent expliqué que cet exil dans l’Université américaine, où les chercheurs se voient réserver un cadre et des conditions de travail exceptionnels, a été la chance de sa vie.

Il était admiré et méprisé pour la même raison: avoir eu la prétention de proposer une théorie générale de l’agir et du désir au moment où toute intelligence du monde de portée universelle était frappée de suspicion. Glissant de la critique littéraire à l’anthropologie, René Girard a décortiqué le mécanisme du désir mimétique tel qu’il était mis en scène dans les textes qu’il étudiait et montré qu’il était inhérent à la condition humaine. Par la suite, il a bouleversé la conception que l’on se faisait de la violence et imposé une défense anthropologique du christianisme, ultime scandale d’une pensée qui s’est épanouie livre après livre au long de cinq décennies. Parmi ses ouvrages devenus des classiques, retenons Mensonge romantique et vérité romanesque (1961),La Violence et le Sacré (1972), Critique dans un souterrain (1976), Le Bouc émissaire (1982), Shakespeare: les feux de l’envie (1990).

Anthropologue révolutionnaire, intellectuel au parcours singulier, catholique romain assez peu en phase avec la pastorale de son temps, René Girard n’a jamais été revendiqué par l’institution ecclésiale, comme le fut par exemple Jacques Maritain, familier de la Cour de Rome. Peut-être parce que sa pensée, comme celle de tout vrai penseur chrétien – Érasme, Pascal, Kierkegaard -, sentait un peu le fagot. Persuadé que la vocation des critiques littéraires est de maintenir le sens et la fonction religieuse du langage, René Girard a souvent défendu la nécessité du scandale pour la pensée, un mot qu’on rencontre plus souvent dans le grec des Évangiles que le mot péché. Le skandalon, c’est le piège qui fait trébucher. Mais, parce qu’il nous tient et retient, cet obstacle nous permet d’avancer. Ainsi celui de la Croix, point nodal de toute la réflexion sur la condition humaine de René Girard, matière et mobile d’une grande partie de ses livres. Selon lui, c’est grâce au Christ que le bouc émissaire a cessé d’être coupable et que les origines de la violence ont enfin été révélées. Par là, la Croix nous a délivré des religions archaïques. En rendant tout sacrifice absurde, Jésus s’impose comme un anti-Œdipe. Son histoire est un «retournement de mythe» qui montre que la victime dit la vérité et que c’est la persécution qui porte le mensonge. Dans les histoires précédentes, c’était déjà vrai, mais ce n’était pas dit, les dieux paraissant déchaînés contre les victimes.

Spectateur curieux du nihilisme contemporain et de ses manifestations, René Girard regardait la montée de la violence dans le monde à la fois avec effroi et avec beaucoup d’intérêt. «On n’arrive plus à faire la différence entre le terrorisme révolutionnaire et le fou qui tire dans la foule, nous confiait-il voici quelques années. L’humanité se prépare à entrer dans l’insensé complet. C’est peut-être nécessaire. Le terrorisme oblige l’homme occidental à mesurer le chemin parcouru depuis deux mille ans. Certaines formes de violence nous apparaissent aujourd’hui intolérables. On n’accepterait plus Samson secouant les piliers du Temple et périr en tuant tout le monde avec lui. Notre contradiction fondamentale, c’est que nous sommes les bénéficiaires du christianisme dans notre rapport à la violence et que nous l’avons abandonné sans comprendre que nous étions ses tributaires.»

Bibliographie
1961Mensonge romantique et vérité romanesque
1963Dostoïevski: du double à l’unité
1972La Violence et le sacré
1976Critique dans un souterrain
1978Des choses cachées depuis la fondation du monde
1982Le Bouc émissaire
1985La Route antique des hommes pervers
1990Shakespeare: les feux de l’envie
1994Quand ces choses commenceront…
1999Je vois Satan tomber comme l’éclair
2001Celui par qui le scandale arrive
2002La Voix méconnue du réel
2003Le Sacrifice
2004Les Origines de la culture
2006Vérité ou foi faible. Dialogue sur christianisme et relativisme
2007Dieu, une invention?
De la violence à la divinité
Achever Clausewitz
2008Anorexie et désir mimétique
2009Christianisme et modernité
2010La Conversion de l’art
2011Géométries du désir
Sanglantes origines

Voir aussi:

Religion, désir, violence : pourquoi il faut lire René Girard

Damien Le Guay

Le Figaro
05/11/2015

FIGAROVOX/ANALYSE -Damien Le Gay explique pourquoi le philosophe et académicien compte et comptera de plus en plus.


Damien Le Guay, philosophe, président du comité national d’éthique du funéraire, membre du comité scientifique de la SFAP, enseignant à l’espace éthique de l’AP-HP, vient de faire paraitre un livre sur ces questions: Le fin mot de la vie – contre le mal mourir en France, aux éditions du CERF.


Depuis le début des années 1960, sa place intellectuelle fut singulière et sa pensée originale. C’est pourquoi son œuvre, pour avoir été rejeté pendant longtemps, restera comme l’une des plus importante de l’époque. Il était mondialement reconnu mais ne le fut jamais vraiment en France – même s’il était membre de l’Académie Française. Il était trop archaïque pour les modernes, trop littéraire pour les philosophes, pas assez à la mode pour l’intelligentsia dominante et même trop chrétien pour un grand nombre – y compris certaines instances catholiques. S’il est reconnu (l’est et le sera de plus en plus), il l’a été contre l’époque, contre les pensées dominantes, contre les institutions en place, contre les médias. En France, il fut un marginal, un intellectuel qualifié «d’original» pour mieux le laisser en dehors de l’université quand, en elle, le règne des structures et du marxisme écrasait tout le reste. Et pourtant, il compte et comptera de plus en plus.

Pour avoir fait toute sa carrière universitaire aux Etats-Unis, à Stanford en particulier ; pour ne s’être rangé sous le drapeau d’aucunes des modes intellectuelles germanopratines, qu’elle soit structuraliste, sartrienne, foucaldienne, maoïste, deleuzienne ou autres ; Pour s’être intéressé, trente ans avant Régis Debray, au «fait religieux» quand il était encore classé dans l’enfer de la superstition ; pour avoir osé se dire «chrétien» – crime de lèse modernité – ce qui, aux yeux de nos maîtres à penser (et donc à excommunier), lui retirait toute légitimité scientifique ; pour n’avoir pas, ou peu, de relais en France (même s’il était devenu, sur le tard, membre de l’Académie française) alors qu’il est traduit en plus de vingt-cinq langues ; Pour toutes ces raisons et bien d’autres, René Girard fut à part dans le paysage intellectuel hexagonal.

En 1961, avec Mensonge romantique et vérité romanesque, Il s’intéresse à la littérature pour ce qu’elle dit de l’homme ; En 1972, avec La violence et le sacré, il décortique les mécanismes religieux pour mieux comprendre la violence ; En 1978, avec Des choses cachées depuis la fondation du monde, il considère le christianisme comme une sorte de «sur-religion» qui vient abolir les autres, les rendant inefficaces et presque obsolètes. Sa pensée s’inscrit mal dans une lignée clairement définie. Pour être ailleurs, certains la mettent nulle part. Voilà qui est plus commode pour ronronner entre soi! Anthropologue Il critique l’anthropologie quand, avec Lévi-Strauss, elle condamne le sacrifice en le dépouillant de toute signification ; critique littéraire, il rejette ceux qui, comme Georges Poulet, pensent que la littérature, devenue un monde en soi, ne se réfère qu’a elle seule, n’a rien à révéler des vérités humaines radicales – comme le mimétisme ; chrétien, il critique les catholiques trop immergés dans le monde et peu conscients des enjeux de l’Apocalypse.

René Girard, un Durkheim pascalien…

Alors qui est-il? D’où sort-il? Sorte de guelfe chez les gibelins et de gibelin chez les guelfes, selon la posture d’un Erasme, soucieux de ne rien céder à personne, il était à la fois disciple de Durkheim et s’inscrit dans la lignée de Pascal. Posture intenable s’il en est. Dans le camp des religieux il est trop durkheimien ; dans le camp des sociologues, trop religieux. Et quand il est question de ces «maîtres du soupçon» qui depuis la fin du XIX ème siècle, tendent à renvoyer l’homme vers des forces qui, en coulisse, le domineraient, comme s’il était marionnette plutôt qu’acteur, René Girard, lui aussi, se réclame de cette tradition qui disqualifie l’autonomie moderne. Il ne met pas en exergue des forces sociales, des pulsions inconscientes ou des généalogies insoupçonnées, mais, dans un même effet de déplacement, une rivalité mimétique au fondement de tout. L’individu n’est jamais seul. La conscience s’acquiert non par la raison mais le désir.

Alors il est un Durkheim pascalien – ce qui équivaut à un oxymore intellectuel. Unique membre de cette singulière catégorie, il retient de l’auteur des Formes élémentaires de la vie religieuse, une approche qui fait de la religion un effet de coagulation sociale et une manière collective de réguler la violence. De Pascal il garde le souci d’une apologie chrétienne pleine de raison. «Tous mes livres», dit-il «sont des apologies plus ou moins explicites du christianisme.» Le Christ, première victime innocente, qui dit son innocence à la face du monde, dénude, par-là même, tous les mécanismes du religieux archaïque. Alors, aujourd’hui, nous ne pouvons qu’être chrétiens, même si le christianisme n’a pas été pleinement reçu. René Girard en appelle à une «éthique nouvelle» qui ne peut naître, selon lui, «qu’au sein du mimétisme libéré – libéré par le christianisme».

Qu’il soit du coté de Durkheim ou de celui de Pascal, il privilégie l’analyse et délaisse les a priori idéologiques. Ni rationalisme ni fidéisme. Il faut dire qu’aujourd’hui la situation est inédite. La violence est déchaînée. Plus rien ne la tient. Le religieux ne fait plus son office. Tenir les deux termes de l’équation: à la fois l’analyse du religieux, selon les méthodes durkheimiennes et l’horizon chrétien, dans la lignée d’un prophétisme pascalien. C’est ce que fit René Girard, laissant, dans son sillage, beaucoup de mécontentements, d’incompréhensions, d’incertitudes et de points d’interrogations.

Comment sortir de la nature violente de l’homme?

René Girard, lui, insiste sur une histoire par nature tragique et une violence en dehors de toute maîtrise. Contrairement aux «modernes» qui pensent pouvoir contrôler les réactions en chaîne de la violence, comme on contrôle une fusion nucléaire, il met l’accent sur un processus qui finit par ne plus être tenu. Il échappe à tout le monde. Telle fut la leçon du siècle passé: cette «montée aux extrêmes», selon la formule de Clausewitz, stratège prussien mort en 1831 auquel il confronte sa pensée dans Achever Clausewitz (2007), ne conduit pas, après coup, à la réconciliation des hommes entre eux. Cette formule d’une «montée» de la violence lui parait pertinente. René Girard, lui, sorte d’écologiste de la violence, met l’accent sur un processus d’imitation qui oppose les hommes entre eux. Tout débute par la rivalité. Cette rivalité appelle en retour la vengeance et la vengeance le meurtre et le meurtre la vengeance. L’humanité entre ainsi dans un cercle sans fin. Notons que pour lui la violence vient toujours répondre à une offense – que cette offense soit réelle, imaginaire ou symbolique. La violence est une réponse. Elle n’est pas première. La rivalité, elle, est première. Le désir de ce que l’autre possède est à l’origine de tout. Le violent, lui, est d’abord un offensé. Du moins le croit-il. Toute vengeance est une revanche. Un retour. Un second temps. Une réponse.

Comment alors briser ce cercle, interrompre ce jeu à l’infini de renvoi? Seul, nous dit René Girard, le religieux, par l’instauration du sacrifice, rompt cette circularité de la vengeance et du meurtre. De toute évidence le sacrifice archaïque est arbitraire. La victime est chargée de «tous les péchés du monde». Son meurtre réconcilie la communauté avec les puissances divine et surtout avec elle-même. Dans toutes les sociétés, fussent-elles des plus primitives, on retrouve ce mécanisme du «bouc émissaire». Il permet d’évacuer la violence, d’apaiser les consciences et de mettre un terme, provisoire, aux rivalités en cascade. D’une certaine façon le sacrifice brise le miroir des rivalités. Elles ne se voient plus, ne se répondent plus l’une l’autre. La réconciliation s’opère donc sur le dos d’un autre. Ce meurtre fondateur, instaure des rites qui eux-mêmes font naître les institutions. Et c’est ainsi que naît la culture et toutes les institutions qui la mettent en forme.

La nouveauté chrétienne…

Or, le christianisme, dans un souci de vérité, retire à l’homme ses «béquilles sacrificielles» en reconnaissant la pleine et entière innocence de la victime. Le Christ, dit et reconnu innocent, n’endosse plus la culpabilité sociale bien commode pour justifier des sacrifices. «Le religieux» dit rené Girard «invente le sacrifice ; le christianisme l’en prive». Cette privation est un pari éthique, une invitation à sortir du cycle de la violence par le haut (les Béatitudes). Et si les hommes s’accordaient entre eux au diapason de la bienveillance! Telle est le sens de l’invitation chrétienne.

L’avantage des intuitions creusées et explorées de bien des manières, comme celle de René Girard autour des rivalités mimétiques, est qu’elles prennent le risque de devenir obsessionnelles. Au début, il rêvait d’un savoir sur la violence qui, une fois connu, permettrait de la maîtriser. Cette prétention l’a quitté. La réconciliation des hommes entre eux, conçue, au début, comme quasiment automatique est devenue, au fil des années, incertaine pour ne pas dire problématique. Reste une certitude: le religieux empêche la société de se détruire. Certitude d’autant plus vitale que nous assistons à une montée planétaire de la violence religieuse avec le risque d’une déflagration totale. Sur ce versant-là de nos inquiétudes qui se profilent à l’horizon, René Girard peut nous aider à avancer. Il reste un appui sérieux pour nous éviter de mourir. Mourir par cet actuel jeu de miroir à l’infini des rivalités mimétiques – autre nom de la démocratie-égalitariste. Mourir par ce retour au fondamentalisme religieux, loin de l’intelligence des textes et de la compréhension du vrai mécanisme de la violence.

Voir encore:

Hommage à René Girard
Une pensée profonde exposée aux malentendus
François Hien
Causeur
05 novembre 2015

René Girard est mort hier, à 91 ans. Nous sommes nombreux à avoir l’impression d’avoir perdu un être proche. Pour ma part, et malgré son grand âge, il m’a fallu sa mort pour que je prenne conscience que j’avais toujours pensé le rencontrer un jour. Le contraire me semblait inconcevable.

René Girard a signé une des œuvres les plus profondes de notre époque, dans une langue constamment limpide. Cette œuvre protéiforme déploie une intuition unique, grâce à laquelle elle retrace l’entièreté de l’histoire de l’homme. Je vais essayer de résumer ici en termes simples l’histoire de l’humanité selon Girard.

De nombreux mammifères, nous apprend l’éthologie, ont un comportement mimétique. Ce mimétisme est d’appropriation, c’est-à-dire qu’un individu va désirer l’objet qu’un autre désire, par imitation. Evidemment, cette convergence sur un même objet crée un conflit, que le monde animal résout par l’instauration de « systèmes de dominance » : l’individu qui a remporté le conflit gagne une position de domination qui n’est pas transmissible. C’est donc improprement qu’on parle de « sociétés animales ».

Il nous faut supposer qu’à une époque très éloignée, une certaine catégorie de mammifères n’a pas su engendrer ces sociétés de dominance, et est restée dans l’instabilité de la violence. Or, les individus  n’imitent  pas  seulement  le  désir  de  leur  voisin,  ils  imitent  aussi  sa  violence.  Ces ralliements mimétiques à la violence du voisin convergent comme une série de ruisseaux qui se mêlent et se transforment en un puissant torrent ; la violence intestine va devenir unanime, et un seul individu en sera la victime.

À ce stade, cet individu n’est rien d’autre que la cible malchanceuse d’un mécanisme aveugle. Or, il se trouve que sa mise à mort va calmer, pour un temps, les violences. Les hommes disposent alors d’un calme relatif à la faveur duquel ils commencent à inventer trois institutions, pour éviter le retour de la violence : les interdits, les rituels, et les mythes. Les interdits sont autant de moyens d’éviter les convergences de désir ; les rituels rejouent une partie de la crise mimétique et s’achèvent par un sacrifice, la répétition rituelle du meurtre fondateur ; et les mythes sont des interprétations, du  point  de  vue  des  persécuteurs,  de  cette  violence  fondatrice.  Voilà  pourquoi  les  divinités archaïques sont toujours ambivalentes, à la fois bonnes et mauvaises : les hommes leur assimilent la violence  intestine,  mais  également  sa  résolution  sacrificielle.  La  divinité  n’est  qu’une  fausse transcendance, une manière qu’ont trouvé les hommes de projeter leur violence hors d’eux. C’est la raison pour laquelle on a dit de la théorie girardienne qu’elle était «  la première vraie théorie athée du sacrifice ».

Les systèmes culturels sont des systèmes de différences qui empêchent la convergence des désirs sur les mêmes objets. Là où les rapports de force suffisent à produire cet effet dans le monde animal, les humains ont  besoin  de déployer  des systèmes  d’autant plus  complexes qu’ils  sont cumulatifs. Le mécanisme victimaire fait accéder les hommes au symbolisme, et leur permet de transmettre  l’ordre  différencié.  Ces  sociétés  se  complexifient,  certaines  inventent  des  formes d’organisation politique, des échanges économiques.

Mais ces institutions ne fonctionnent qu’en maintenant dans la méconnaissance les hommes qui en bénéficient. Par principe, la victime émissaire (ou la longue série de victimes émissaire qui a progressivement affiné l’institution) fait écran à la violence de tous. Or cette méconnaissance, si elle est nécessaire au bon fonctionnement des ordres culturels, peut aussi leur être fatale. Peu à peu, le souvenir de la violence se perd. Certains interdits sont moins respectés, des éléments essentiels du rituel disparaissent. Les désirs convergent à nouveau sur les mêmes objets, et c’est le retour de l’indifférenciation violente : les frères s’affrontent en doubles mimétiques, chacun croyant réagir à la violence de l’autre. Les hiérarchies ne tiennent plus, les liens familiaux se dissolvent : c’est la crise mimétique, que si souvent les mythes figurent sous le nom de « peste » – cette maladie de la contagion fatale et de l’indifférencié.

Comme  les  fois  précédentes,  il  faut  bien  trouver  un  coupable  à  ces  « pestes ».  Les mécanismes victimaires se remettent en place, la victime émissaire est mise à mort, la paix revient, les différences affluent de nouveau ; de nouveaux interdits sont générés par la crise  ; un nouveau mythe en garde une trace déformée.

Voilà selon Girard le modèle, ici schématisé, de la genèse des cultures humaines et de leur fonctionnement cyclique. Une société est un système de différences mécaniquement générées par des  crises  sacrificielles.  Elle  est  intégralement  fille  du  religieux.  Le  religieux,  c’est  cette transcendance de la violence que les hommes ont besoin de poser hors de soi tout autant qu’ils ont besoin de s’en protéger. Le religieux procède à ce double miracle, sans qu’il y ait besoin que quiconque l’ait conçu : il protège de la violence, et il sacralise cette violence, il la rend étrangère aux hommes, il leur fait croire qu’ils n’y étaient pour rien. Ce n’est qu’au prix de cette méconnaissance que les hommes peuvent vivre entre eux et se doter de règles positives. Mais cette méconnaissance est en elle-même dangereuse puisqu’elle camoufle le danger véritable, la violence intestine, qui finit invariablement par revenir.

Cette histoire de l’humanité nous serait insaisissable si nous n’étions pas nous-mêmes sortis du cycle  décrit  ci-dessus.  Etre  encore  dans  ce  cycle,  c’est  être  situé  quelque  part  dans  la méconnaissance évolutive qui enveloppe le mécanisme sacrificiel. Notre sortie du cycle, Girard l’attribue au judéo-chrétien. Le  Christ,  lui,  n’est  rien  d’autre  qu’une  victime  émissaire consentante qui refuse absolument de répondre à la violence, et qui révèle par sa Passion ce qui était jusqu’alors  resté  dissimulé :  que  les  victimes  immolées  par  les  foules  sacrificielles  étaient innocentes de ce dont on les accusait.

La révélation évangélique peut être source de violence plus encore que de paix. Car à des hommes incapables de se réconcilier, elle a retiré les « béquilles sacrificielles » qui les protégeaient de leur propre violence. L’Apocalypse prédit par les Ecritures n’est pas celle d’un Dieu vengeur déchaîné contre nous : ce n’est que le fruit de notre propre violence, montée aux extrêmes. Et René Girard de s’étonner qu’en une époque où il est devenu concevable, et même probable, que l’homme finisse par détruire l’homme, personne n’aille regarder la pertinence des textes apocalyptiques, leur validité anthropologique.

Nous avons toujours le réflexe de créer des boucs émissaires (notre société contemporaine est saturée de ces mécanismes), mais la sacralisation ne prend pas – et notre civilisation ne se clôt plus sur le dos de ses victimes. Nous sommes condamnés à avancer vers un paroxysme de violence réciproque et planétaire – ou bien, nous suggère Girard, à devenir enfin «  chrétiens », c’est-à-dire à imiter le Christ : refuser radicalement l’engrenage de la violence, quitte à y laisser sa vie.

Dans tous les livres que Girard a publiés, du premier au dernier, il ne raconte jamais autre chose que cette longue histoire, qui prend l’humanité à son origine et qui prédit sa fin. Girard moque souvent le besoin qu’à la psychanalyse d’engendrer pulsions et instincts à tout va pour expliquer des phénomènes qu’elle est incapable d’unifier. « Freud n’en est plus à un instinct près » dit-il. De ce point de vue, Girard est particulièrement économe mais n’écrase pas le divers  : il prétend qu’à partir du mimétisme seul, on peut redéployer toutes les manifestations humaines, ses institutions, son art, sa violence…

Pour finir, je voudrais dire un mot des implications pour le lecteur d’une telle théorie. Devenir « girardien », ce n’est pas appartenir à une secte ; ce n’est pas tenir pour vrai tout ce que Girard a écrit ; c’est d’abord se laisser aller à une «  conversion » qui n’est pas d’ordre religieux, mais qui est un bouleversement du regard sur soi, une critique personnelle de son propre désir.

Pour comprendre à quel point la théorie de Girard est vraie, il faut avoir cheminé à rebours de son désir, non pas pour atteindre un illusoire « moi » authentique, mais au contraire pour aboutir à l’inexistence de ce moi, toujours déjà agi par des « désirs selon l’autre ». La théorie mimétique est un dévoilement progressif dont le lecteur n’est jamais absent de ce qui se dévoile à lui. Elle menace l’existence du sujet que je croyais être. Elle s’attaque à ce que je croyais le plus original chez moi.

Il n’est pas un lecteur de Girard, même le plus convaincu, qui ne se soit dit à la lecture de Mensonge romantique et vérité romanesque : « Il a raison, tout ça est vrai. Heureusement que pour ma part j’y échappe en partie. » Il serait suicidaire de ne se lire soi-même qu’avec les lunettes girardiennes ; on a besoin de croire un minimum aux raisons que notre désir se donne ; ces raisons constituent toujours une résistance en nous à la théorie mimétique, plus ou moins grande selon les individus. Il ne s’agit pas de s’en défendre, mais de le savoir. La lecture de Girard nous impose donc un double processus de révélation : on se rend compte d’abord que notre propre désir obéit aux lois décelées par Girard ; et dans un second temps, on se rend compte qu’on a feint l’adhésion totale à ses thèses, et qu’il reste en nous un moi « néo-romantique » qui ne se croit pas concerné par ces lois. Ainsi, la découverte de Girard doit nous interdire, in fine, le surplomb de celui qui aurait compris, contre tous ceux qui seraient encore des croyants naïfs en l’autonomie de leur désir.

Les théories modernes, fussent-elles particulièrement humiliantes pour le sujet, tournent en avant-garde parce qu’un petit noyau de fidèles s’enorgueillit d’avoir le courage intellectuel de les tenir pour vraies. Par nature, il ne peut en être de même avec René Girard : construire une avant-garde autour de ses théories, ce serait reconstituer la distinction de valeur entre «  moi » et « les autres » dont sa lecture devrait nous avoir guéris. Nous n’avons pas d’autre choix que d’entrer en dissidence de notre propre désir, et de n’en tirer aucun profit social qui nous replongerait dans les postures dont Girard nous aide à nous affranchir.

Bien entendu, cela n’empêche pas d’éminents girardiens de se prévaloir de ses thèses contre tous  les  imbéciles  qui  n’y  comprennent  rien.  Girard  n’est  pas  à  l’abri  des  malentendus.  Sa bonhommie et sa gentillesse, vantées par tous ceux qui l’ont côtoyé, auraient sans doute pardonné même ces contresens moraux. « Ils ne savent pas ce qu’ils font ».

René Girard est mort à Stanford, à 91 ans. Nous sommes nombreux à pleurer ce cher professeur.

Voir aussi:

Le génie du girardisme
Il faut lire René Girard
Basile de Koch
Causeur
13 janvier 2008

Je ne pense pas que “toutes les religions se valent”, contrairement à l’opinion professée par 62% de mes camarades catholiques pratiquants (sondage La Croix, 11-11-07). Sinon je laisserais tomber aussi sec le catholicisme, et peut-être même sa pratique.

Au contraire je suis intimement touché, non par la grâce hélas, mais par la beauté de ma religion à moi, la seule qui repose tout entière sur l’Amour. Le coup du Créateur qui va jusqu’à se faire homme par amour pour sa créature (et pour lui montrer qu’elle-même peut “faire le chemin à l’envers”, comme disait le poète), c’est dans la Bible et nulle part ailleurs !

Le génie du christianisme, c’est d’avoir transmis aux hommes vaille que vaille depuis 2000 ans cette Bonne Nouvelle : si ça se trouve, Dieu tout-puissant nous aime inconditionnellement depuis toujours et pour toujours ; Il l’aurait notamment prouvé dans les années 30 de notre ère, à l’occasion d’une apparition mouvementée en Judée-Galilée.

Le génie du girardisme, c’est de mettre en lumière le message christique comme l’unique et évident remède aux maux dont souffre la race humaine depuis la Genèse, c’est-à-dire depuis toujours, et dont notre époque risque désormais de crever, grâce aux progrès des sciences et des techniques.

J’ai mis longtemps à comprendre René Girard. Il répondait brillamment, dans un langage philosophique et néanmoins sensé, à des questions que je ne me posais pas (sur le mimétisme, le désir, la violence…) Et puis j’ai fini par comprendre que mes “questions métaphysiques” manquaient de précision – et aussitôt j’ai commencé d’apprécier les réponses de René. Il faut dire aussi que ce mec ne fait rien comme tout le monde. Y a qu’à voir comment il définit son métier : “anthropologue de la violence et des religions”, je vous demande un peu ! Qu’est-ce que c’est que cette improbable glace à deux boules ? Serait-ce à dire que toute violence vient du religieux, comme l’ânonne avec succès un vulgaire Onfray ? Non, cent fois non : Girard est un philosophe chrétien, c’est-à-dire l’inverse exact d’Onfray.

Au commencement était le “désir mimétique”, nous dit René Girard. Et d’opposer le besoin, réel et parfois vital, au désir, “essentiellement social (…) et dépourvu de tout fondement dans la réalité”. Alors, je vous vois venir : cette critique du désir ne serait-elle pas une vulgaire démarcation de l’infinie sagesse bouddhiste ? Eh bien pas du tout, si je puis me permettre ! Le christianisme ne nous propose pas de choisir entre le désir et le Néant (rebaptisé “Nirvana”), mais entre le désir et l’Amour, source de vie éternelle.

Il est cocasse, à propos du désir mimétique, de voir notre anthropologue mettre dans le même sac Don Quichotte et Madame Bovary. “Individualistes”, ces personnages ? Tu parles ! Don Quichotte se rêve en “chevalier errant”… comme tous les Espagnols de qualité en ce début de XVIIe siècle décadent. Quant à Emma, c’est la lecture de romans qui instille en elle l’envie mimétique d’être une « Parisienne » comme ses héroïnes. Au moins Quichotte et Emma ont-ils l’excuse d’être eux-mêmes des personnages de fiction – ce qui n’est malheureusement pas le cas de tout le monde.

Proust, par exemple, n’est pas un héros de roman, c’est le contraire : un écrivain. Même que son premier roman Jean Santeuil (découvert, par bonheur, seulement en 1956) était plat et creux à la fois. Explication de l’anthropologue, qui décidément se fait critique littéraire quand il veut : Marcel n’a pas encore pigé l’idée qui fera tout le charme de sa Recherche. Le désir est toujours extérieur, inaccessible ; on court après lui et, quand on croit enfin le saisir, il est bientôt rattrapé par la réalité qui le tue aussitôt : “Ce n’était que cela…”

“Le désir dure trois semaines”, confiait l’an dernier Carla Bruni, favorite de notre président depuis maintenant neuf semaines et demi. “L’amour dure trois ans”, prêche en écho le beigbederologue Beigbeder. Mais ces intéressantes considérations sont faussées par une fâcheuse confusion de vocabulaire. L’amour au sens girardien, et d’ailleurs chrétien du terme, n’a rien à voir avec le désir. On peut jouer tant qu’on veut au cache-cache des désirs mimétiques croisés, et même appeler ça “amour” ; mais comme dit l’ami René, “comprendre et être compris, c’est quand même plus solide” !

Voir également:

René Girard, l’éclaireur

Victimes partout, chrétiens nulle part?

Emmanuel Dubois de Prisque

Causeur

6 novembre 2015

 

René Girard, qui n’était ni philosophe, ni anthropologue, ni critique littéraire, est mort le 4 novembre 2015 à Stanford, Californie, à l’âge de 91 ans. René Noël Théophile Girard, dont le père, esprit libre, conservateur du palais des Papes, se prénommait Joseph, et la mère, catholique pratiquante, se prénommait Marie, est né le 25 décembre 1923 à Avignon. Parti de France après la guerre et ses études à l’école des Chartes, il est devenu aux Etats-Unis  un universitaire sans chapelle. Il s’est converti au catholicisme de son enfance peu avant la quarantaine, sous l’effet de ses lectures.

À le lire, je connais plus d’un post-moderne autoproclamé, à commencer par moi, dont la vie a été bouleversée. Nous qui faisions les malins avec notre tradition, nous qui moquions la ringardise de nos pères, découvrions en lisant Girard que ce vieux livre poussiéreux, la Bible, était encore à lire. Qu’elle nous comprenait infiniment mieux que nous ne la comprenions. Ce que Girard nous a donné à lire, ce n’est rien moins que le monde commun des classiques de la France catholique, de l’Europe chrétienne, celui dont nous avions hérité mais que nous laissions lui aussi prendre la poussière dans un coin du bazar mondialisé. Nous pouvions grâce à lui nous plonger dans les livres de nos pères et y trouver une merveilleuse intelligence du monde. Avec lui, nous nous découvrions tout uniment fils de nos pères, français et catholiques. Car ce que nous apprend René Girard, c’est que nous ne sommes pas nés de la dernière pluie, que nous avons pour vivre et exister besoin du désir des autres, que nous ne sommes pas ces être libres et sans attaches que les catastrophes du XXe siècle auraient fait de nous.

« C’est un garçon sans importance collective, c’est tout juste un individu. » Cette phrase de Céline qui m’a longtemps trotté dans la tête adolescent était tout un programme. Elle plaisait beaucoup à Sartre qui l’a mise en exergue de La Nausée. Elle donnait à la foule des pékins moyens dans mon genre une image très avantageuse d’eux-mêmes, au moment de l’effondrement des grands récits. Nous n’appartenions à rien ni à personne. Nous étions seulement nous-mêmes, libres et incréés. La lecture attentive de Girard balaye ces prétentions infantiles, qui pourtant structurent encore la psyché de l’Occident. Non, nous ne sommes pas à nous-mêmes nos propres pères. Non, nous ne sommes pas libres et possesseurs de nos désirs. Comme le dit l’Eglise depuis toujours, nous naissons esclaves de nos péchés, de notre désir dit Girard, et seul le Dieu de nos pères peut nous en libérer.  Prouver cette vérité constitue toute l’ambition intellectuelle de Girard, une vérité bien particulière puisqu’elle appartient à la fois à l’ordre de la science et à celui de la spiritualité.

J’ai eu la chance de rencontrer Girard et de discuter à deux reprises assez longuement avec lui. Il aimait à s’amuser des malentendus provoqués par son œuvre.  Il racontait qu’à la fin de ses conférences, des lecteurs enthousiastes venaient le voir pour lui confier qu’il avait vu juste, que les boucs émissaires existaient, qu’ils étaient effectivement le socle de la vie commune, et que d’ailleurs lui, René Girard, avait la chance d’en avoir un en face de lui.  Ce qu’il percevait ainsi, c’était la naissance de cette concurrence victimaire qu’une mauvaise compréhension de son œuvre contribuait à exacerber. Pour René Girard, comprendre son œuvre ou se convertir au christianisme (ce qui fut pour moi une seule et même chose) impliquait de se découvrir non pas victime, mais pécheur.

Or, pour avoir raison aujourd’hui, pour gagner la compétition médiatique, il faut s’affirmer victime de la violence du monde, de l’Etat, du groupe. « Le monde moderne est plein de vertus chrétiennes devenues folles » disait Chesterton, un auteur selon le goût de René Girard. À quelques heureuses exceptions près, l’université s’est pendant longtemps gardée de se pencher sérieusement sur l’œuvre d’un penseur que son catholicisme de mieux en mieux assumé rendait de plus en plus hérétique. Cependant, à court de concept opératoire pour penser le réel, la sociologie a aujourd’hui recours jusqu’à la nausée (qui lui vient facilement) au concept du bouc émissaire pour expliquer à peu près tout et son contraire : la façon dont on traite la religion musulmane et la condition féminine en Occident par exemple.

Typiquement, le girardien sans christianisme, cet oxymoron  qui prolifère aujourd’hui, s’efforce de découvrir la violence, les boucs émissaires et le ressentiment partout, sauf là où cela ferait vraiment une différence, la seule différence qui tienne, c’est-à-dire en lui-même. C’est ainsi que les bien-pensants passent leur temps à dénoncer le racisme dégoutant du bas-peuple de France sans paraître voir le racisme de classe dont ils font preuve à cette occasion.  Ce girardisme sans christianisme est le pire des contresens d’un monde qui pourtant n’en est pas avare : le monde post-moderne est plein de concepts girardiens devenus fous.

Voir de même:

Mort de René Girard, anthropologue et théoricien de la « violence mimétique »
Jean Birnbaum

Le Monde

05.11.2015

L’anthropologue René Girard est mort mercredi 4 novembre, à Stanford, aux Etats-Unis. Il avait 91 ans. Fondateur de la « théorie mimétique », ce franc-tireur de la scène intellectuelle avait bâti une œuvre originale, qui conjugue réflexion savante et prédication chrétienne. Ses livres, commentés aux quatre coins du monde, forment les étapes d’une vaste enquête sur le désir humain et sur la violence sacrificielle où toute société, selon Girard, trouve son origine inavouable.

« Le renommé professeur français de Stanford, l’un des quarante Immortels de la prestigieuse Académie française, est décédé à son domicile de Stanford mercredi des suites d’une longue maladie », a indiqué l’université californienne où il a longtemps enseigné.
Né le 25 décembre 1923, à Avignon, René Noël Théophile grandit dans une famille de la petite bourgeoisie intellectuelle. Son père, radical-socialiste et anticlérical, est conservateur de la bibliothèque et du musée d’Avignon, puis du Palais des papes. Sa mère, elle, est une catholique tendance Maurras, passionnée de musique et de littérature. Le soir, elle lit du Mauriac ou des romans italiens à ses cinq enfants. La famille ne roule pas sur l’or, elle est préoccupée par la crise, la montée des périls. Plutôt heureuse, l’enfance de René Girard n’en est donc pas moins marquée par l’angoisse.

Quand on lui demandait quel était son premier souvenir politique, il répondait sans hésiter : les manifestations ligueuses du 6 février 1934. « J’ai grandi dans une famille de bourgeois décatis, qui avait été appauvrie par les fameux emprunts russes au lendemain de la première guerre mondiale, nous avait-il confié lors d’un entretien réalisé en 2007. Nous faisions partie des gens qui comprenaient que tout était en train de foutre le camp. Nous avions une conscience profonde du danger nazi et de la guerre qui venait. Enfant, j’ai toujours été un peu poltron, chahuteur mais pas batailleur. Dans la cour de récréation, je me tenais avec les petits, j’avais peur des grands brutaux. Et j’enviais les élèves du collège jésuite qui partaient skier sur le mont Ventoux… »

Longue aventure américaine
Après des études agitées (il est même renvoyé du lycée pour mauvaise conduite), le jeune Girard finit par obtenir son bac. En 1940, il se rend à Lyon dans l’idée de préparer Normale-Sup. Mais les conditions matérielles sont trop pénibles, et il décide de rentrer à Avignon. Son père lui suggère alors d’entrer à l’Ecole des chartes. Il y est admis et connaît à Paris des moments difficiles, entre solitude et ennui. Peu emballé par la perspective de plonger pour longtemps dans les archives médiévales, il accepte une offre pour devenir assistant de français aux Etats-Unis. C’est le début d’une aventure américaine qui ne prendra fin qu’avec sa mort, la trajectoire académique de Girard se déroulant essentiellement outre-Atlantique.

Vient alors le premier déclic : chargé d’enseigner la littérature française à ses étudiants, il commente devant eux les livres qui ont marqué sa jeunesse, Cervantès, Dostoïevski ou Proust. Puis, comparant les textes, il se met à repérer des résonances, rapprochant par exemple la vanité chez Stendhal et le snobisme chez Flaubert ou Proust. Emerge ainsi ce qui sera le grand projet de sa vie : retracer le destin du désir humain à travers les grandes œuvres littéraires.

De la littérature à l’anthropologie religieuse
En 1957, Girard intègre l’université Johns-Hopkins, à Baltimore. C’est là que s’opérera le second glissement décisif : de l’histoire à la littérature, et de la littérature à l’anthropologie religieuse. « Tout ce que je dis m’a été donné d’un seul coup. C’était en 1959, je travaillais sur le rapport de l’expérience religieuse et de l’écriture romanesque. Je me suis dit : c’est là qu’est ta voie, tu dois devenir une espèce de défenseur du christianisme », confiait Girard au Monde, en 1999.

A cette époque, il amasse les notes pour nourrir le livre qui restera l’un de ses essais les plus connus, et qui fait encore référence aujourd’hui : Mensonge romantique et vérité romanesque (1961). Il y expose pour la première fois le cadre de sa théorie mimétique. Bien qu’elle engage des enjeux profonds et extrêmement complexes, il est d’autant plus permis d’exposer cette théorie en quelques mots que Girard lui-même la présentait non comme un système conceptuel, mais comme la description de simples rapports humains. Résumons donc. Pour comprendre le fonctionnement de nos sociétés, il faut partir du désir humain et de sa nature profondément pathologique. Le désir est une maladie, chacun désire toujours ce que désire autrui, voilà le ressort principal de tout conflit. De cette concurrence « rivalitaire » naît le cycle de la fureur et de la vengeance. Ce cycle n’est résolu que par le sacrifice d’un « bouc émissaire », comme en ont témoigné à travers l’histoire des épisodes aussi divers que le viol de Lucrèce, l’affaire Dreyfus ou les procès de Moscou.

Prédicateur chrétien
C’est ici qu’intervient une distinction fondamentale aux yeux de Girard : « La divergence insurmontable entre les religions archaïques et le judéo-chrétien. » Pour bien saisir ce qui les différencie, il faut commencer par repérer leur élément commun : à première vue, dans un cas comme dans l’autre, on a affaire au récit d’une crise qui se résout par un lynchage transfiguré en épiphanie. Mais là où les religions archaïques, tout comme les modernes chasses aux sorcières, accablent le bouc émissaire dont le sacrifice permet à la foule de se réconcilier, le christianisme, lui, proclame haut et fort l’innocence de la victime. Contre ceux qui réduisent la Passion du Christ à un mythe parmi d’autres, Girard affirme la singularité irréductible et la vérité scandaleuse de la révélation chrétienne. Non seulement celle-ci rompt la logique infernale de la violence mimétique, mais elle dévoile le sanglant substrat de toute culture humaine : le lynchage qui apaise la foule et ressoude la communauté.

Girard, longtemps sceptique, a donc peu à peu endossé les habits du prédicateur chrétien, avec l’enthousiasme et la pugnacité d’un exégète converti par les textes. De livre en livre, et de La Violence et le sacré (1972) jusqu’à Je vois Satan tomber comme l’éclair (1999), il exalte la force subversive des Evangiles.

Un engagement religieux critiqué
Cet engagement religieux a souvent été pointé par ses détracteurs, pour lesquels sa prose relève plus de l’apologétique chrétienne que des sciences humaines. A ceux-là, l’anthropologue répondait que les Evangiles étaient la véritable science de l’homme… « Oui, c’est une espèce d’apologétique chrétienne que j’écris, mais elle est bougrement bien ficelée », ironisait, dans un rire espiègle, celui qui ne manquait jamais ni de culot ni d’humour.

Adoptant une écriture de plus en plus pamphlétaire, voire prophétique, il était convaincu de porter une vérité que personne ne voulait voir et qui pourtant crevait les yeux. Pour lui, la théorie mimétique permettait d’éclairer non seulement la construction du désir humain et la généalogie des mythes, mais aussi la violence présente, l’infinie spirale du ressentiment et de la colère, bref l’apocalypse qui vient. « Aujourd’hui, il n’y a pas besoin d’être religieux pour sentir que le monde est dans une incertitude totale », prévenait, un index pointé vers le ciel, celui qui avait interprété les attentats du 11-Septembre comme la manifestation d’un mimétisme désormais globalisé.

Il y a ici un autre aspect souvent relevé par les critiques de Girard : sa prétention à avoir réponse à tout, à tout expliquer, depuis les sacrifices aztèques jusqu’aux attentats islamistes en passant par le snobisme proustien. « Don’t you think you are spreading yourself a bit thin ? » [« tu ne penses pas que tu t’étales un peu trop ? »], lui demandaient déjà ses collègues américains, poliment, dans les années 1960… « Je n’arrive pas à éviter de donner cette impression d’arrogance », admettait-il, narquois, un demi-siècle plus tard.

Relatif isolement
Ajoutez à cela le fait que Girard se réclamait du « bon sens » populaire contre les abstractions universitaires, et vous comprendrez pourquoi ses textes ont souvent reçu un accueil glacial dans le monde académique. Les anthropologues, en particulier, n’ont guère souhaité se pencher sur ses hypothèses, hormis lors d’une rencontre internationale qui eut lieu en 1983 en Californie, non loin de Stanford, l’université où Girard enseigna de 1980 jusqu’à la fin de ses jours.

Confrontant son modèle conceptuel à leurs enquêtes de terrain, quelques chercheurs français ont aussi accepté de discuter les thèses de Girard. A chaque fois, l’enjeu de cette confrontation s’est concentré sur une question : les sacrifices rituels propres aux sociétés traditionnelles relèvent-ils vraiment du lynchage victimaire ? Et, même quand c’est le cas, peut-on échafauder une théorie de la religion, voire un discours universel sur l’origine de la culture humaine, en se fondant sur ces pratiques archaïques ?

Cordiale ou frontale, cette discussion revenait toujours à souligner le relatif isolement, mais aussi la place singulière, de René Girard dans le champ intellectuel. Ayant fait des Etats-Unis sa patrie d’adoption, cet autodidacte jetait un regard perplexe sur la pensée française, et notamment sur le structuralisme et la déconstruction. Mêlant sans cesse littérature, psychanalyse et théologie, cet esprit libre ne respectait guère les cadres de la spécialisation universitaire. Animé d’une puissante conviction chrétienne, cet homme de foi ne craignait pas d’affirmer que sa démarche évangélique valait méthode scientifique. Se réclamant de l’anthropologie, ce provocateur-né brossait la discipline à rebrousse-poil en optant pour une réaffirmation tranquille de la supériorité culturelle occidentale. Pour Girard, en effet, qui prétend découvrir l’universelle origine de la civilisation, on doit d’abord admettre la prééminence morale et culturelle du christianisme.

« Vous n’êtes pas obligés de me croire », lançait René Girard à ceux que son pari laissait perplexes. Du reste, il aimait exhiber ses propres doutes, comme s’il était traversé par une vérité à prendre ou à laisser, et dont lui-même devait encore prendre toute la mesure. Rythmant ses phrases de formules du type « si j’ai raison… », confiant ses incertitudes à l’égard du plan qu’il avait choisi pour tel ou tel livre, il séduisait les plus réticents par la virtuosité éclairante de son rapport aux textes. Exégète à la curiosité sans limites, il opposait à la férocité du monde moderne, à l’accélération du pire, la virtuosité tranquille d’un lecteur qui n’aura jamais cessé de servir les Ecritures.

Voir encore:

René Girard, dernier désir
Robert Maggiori
Libération
5 novembre 2015

L’inventeur de la théorie mimétique et penseur d’une anthropologie fondée sur l’exclusion-sacralisation du bouc émissaire s’est éteint mercredi.

Membre de l’Académie française, René Girard n’a pourtant pas trouvé place dans l’université française : dans l’immédiat après-guerre, il émigre aux Etats Unis, obtient son doctorat en histoire à l’université d’Indiana, puis enseigne la littérature comparée à la Johns Hopkins University de Baltimore (il organise là un célèbre colloque sur «le Langage de la critique et les sciences de l’homme» auquel participent Roland Barthes, Jacques Lacan et Jacques Derrida, qui fait découvrir le structuralisme aux Américains) et, jusqu’à sa retraite en 1995, à Stanford – où, professeur de langue, littérature et civilisation françaises, il côtoie Michel Serres et Jean-Pierre Dupuy.

Né le jour de Noël 1923 à Avignon, élève de l’Ecole des chartes, il est mort mercredi à Stanford, Californie, à l’âge de 91 ans. C’était une forte personnalité, tenace, parfois bourrue, qui a creusé son sillon avec l’énergie des solitaires, et entre mille difficultés, car le retentissement international de ses théories – dont certains des concepts, notamment celui de «bouc émissaire», sont quasiment tombés dans la grammaire commune des sciences humaines et même le langage commun – n’a jamais fait disparaître les violentes critiques, les incompréhensions, les rejets, encore accrus par le fait que Girard, traditionaliste, a toujours refusé les crédos postmodernes, marxistes, déconstructivistes, structuralistes, psychanalytiques…

Porté par une profonde foi religieuse, fin interprète du mystère de la Passion du Christ, il a bâti une œuvre considérable, qui se déploie de la littérature à l’anthropologie, de l’ethnologie à la théologie, à la psychologie, la sociologie, la philosophie de la religion et la philosophie tout court. Les linéaments de toute sa pensée sont déjà contenus dans son premier ouvrage, Mensonge romantique et vérité romanesque (1961) dans lequel, à partir de l’étude très novatrice des grands romans occidentaux (Stendhal, Cervantes, Flaubert, Proust, Dostoïevski…), il forge la théorie du «désir mimétique» – l’homme ne désire que selon le désir de l’autre –, qui aura un écho considérable à mesure qu’il l’appliquera à des domaines extérieurs à la littérature.

Etre désirant
La nature humaine a en son fond la mimesis : au sens où les actions des hommes sont toujours entreprises parce qu’ils les voient réalisées par un «modèle». L’homme est par excellence un être désirant, qui nourrit son désir du désir de l’autre et adopte ainsi coutumes, modes, façons d’être, pensées, actions en adaptant les coutumes, les modes, les façons d’être de ceux qui sont «autour» de lui. La différence entre l’animal et l’homme n’est pas dans l’intelligence ou quoi que ce soit d’autre, mais dans le fait que le premier a des appétits, qui le clouent à l’instinct, alors que le second a des désirs, qui l’incitent d’abord à observer puis à imiter. C’est ce principe mimétique qui guide les «mouvements» des individus dans la société. De là la violence généralisée, car le conflit apparaît dès qu’il y a «triangle», c’est-à-dire dès que le désir porte sur un «objet» qui est déjà l’objet du désir d’un autre.

Naissent ainsi l’envie, la jalousie, la haine, la vengeance. La vengeance ne cesse de s’alimenter de la haine des «rivaux», et implique toute la communauté, menaçant ainsi les fondements de l’ordre social. Seul le sacrifice d’une victime innocente, qu’une «différence» (réelle ou créée) distingue de tous les autres, pourra apaiser les haines et guérir la communauté. C’est la théorie du «bouc émissaire», qui a rendu René Girard célèbre. En focalisant son attention sur l’aspect le plus énigmatique du sacré, l’auteur de la Violence et le sacré (1972) montre en effet – on peut en avoir une illustration dans le film de Peter Fleischmann, Scènes de chasse en Bavière, où un jeune homme, soupçonné d’être homosexuel, devient l’objet d’une véritable chasse à l’homme de la part de tous les habitants du village – que l’immolation d’une victime sacrificielle, attestée dans presque toutes les traditions religieuses et la littérature mythologique, sert à apaiser la «guerre de tous contre tous» dont Thomas Hobbes avait fait le centre de sa philosophie.

Lorsqu’une communauté est sur le point de s’autodétruire par des affrontements intestins, des «guerres civiles», elle trouve moyen de se «sauver» si elle trouve un bouc émissaire (on peut penser à la «chasse aux sorcières», à n’importe qu’elle époque, sous toutes latitudes, et quelle que soit la «sorcière»), sur lequel décharger la violence : bouc émissaire à qui est ensuite attribuée une valeur sacrée, précisément parce qu’il ramène la paix et permet de recoudre le lien social. Souvent, les mythes et les rites ont occulté l’innocence de la victime, mais, selon Girard, la révélation biblique, culminant avec les récits évangéliques de la Passion du Christ, l’a au contraire révélée, de sorte que le christianisme ne peut être considéré comme une simple «variante» des mythes païens (d’où la violente critique que Girard fait de la Généalogie de la morale de Nietzsche, de la conception «dionysiaque» célébrée par le philosophe allemand, et de l’assimilation entre le Christ et les diverses incarnations païennes du dieu-victime).

Faits et événements réels
Dans l’optique girardienne, il s’agissait assurément de proposer un «autre discours» anthropologique, qui se démarquât (et montrât la fausseté) de ceux qui étaient devenus dominants, grâce, évidemment, à l’œuvre de Levi-Strauss (et, d’un autre côté, de Freud). Ne pensant pas du tout qu’on puisse rendre raison de la «pensée sauvage» en s’attachant aux mythes, entendus comme «création poétique» ou «narration» coupée du réel, René Girard enracine son anthropologie dans des faits et des événements réellement arrivés, comme des épisodes de lynchage ou de sacrifices rituels dont la victime est ensuite sacralisée mais qui se fondent toujours, d’abord, sur des accusations absurdes, comme celles de diffuser la peste, de rendre impure la nourriture ou d’empoisonner les eaux.

La théorie mimétique et l’anthropologie fondée sur l’exclusion-sacralisation du bouc émissaire, sont les deux paradigmes que Girard applique à de nombreux champs du savoir, et qui lui permettent de définir un schéma herméneutique capable d’expliquer une foule de phénomènes, sociaux, politiques, littéraires, religieux. Son travail, autrement dit, visait à la constitution d’une anthropologie générale, rationnelle, visant à une explication globale des comportements humains. C’est sans doute pourquoi il a suscité tant d’enthousiasmes et attiré tant de critiques. On ne saurait ici pas même citer toutes les thématiques qu’il a traitées, ni les auteurs avec lesquels il a critiquement dialogué. Ce qui est sûr, c’est que René Girard a toujours maintenu droite la barre de son navire, malgré les vents contraires, et, à l’époque de l’hyper-spécialisation contemporaine, a eu l’audace de formuler une «pensée unitaire» qui a fait l’objet de mille commentaires dans le monde entier, parce que vraiment suggestive, et dont l’ambition était de mettre à nu les racines de la culture humaine. «La vérité est extrêmement rare sur cette terre. Il y a même raison de penser qu’elle soit tout à fait absente.» Ce qui n’a pas été suffisant pour dissuader René Girard de la chercher toute sa vie.

Voir de plus:

René Girard, l’homme qui nous aidait à penser la violence et le sacré
Henri Tincq

Slate

05.11.2015

Mort à l’âge de 91 ans, il n’avait cessé de s’interroger sur la façon dont la religion devient violente, ou est instrumentalisée au nom de la violence.

Mort le 4 novembre à Stanford (Etats-Unis) à l’âge de 91 ans, le philosophe et anthropologue français René Girard, membre de l’Académie française, est sans doute le penseur qui a le mieux mis à jour le lien entre la violence et le sacré.

C’est en développant (après Aristote) sa thèse sur le «désir mimétique» qui anime tout homme que René Girard a été conduit à s’interroger sur la violence. En effet, si le «désir mimétique» –celui de possèder à son tour ce que l’autre possède– permet à l’homme d’accroître ses facultés d’apprentissage, il accroît aussi sa propre violence et provoque la plupart des conflits d’appropriation. La notion de «rivalité mimétique» permet d’éclairer non seulement la construction du désir humain et la généalogie des mythes, mais aussi la spirale du ressentiment et de la colère, en un mot la violence du monde.

Découlant de cette première thèse, la deuxième théorie de René Girard –qu’il expose dans son célèbre ouvrage La violence et le sacré (1972)– est celle du «mécanisme victimaire», selon lui à l’origine de toute forme de religieux archaïque et extrémiste. A son paroxysme, la violence se fixe toujours sur une «victime arbitraire», qui fait contre elle l’unanimité du groupe. L’élimination du «bouc émissaire» devient alors un impératif collectif. C’est elle qui exorcise et fait retomber la violence du groupe. La «victime émissaire» devient «sacrée», c’est-à-dire porteuse de ce pouvoir de déchaîner la crise comme de ramener la paix.

René Girard découvre ainsi la genèse du «religieux archaïque»; du sacrifice rituel comme répétition de l’événement originaire; du mythe comme récit de cet événement; des interdits fixés à l’accès des objets à l’origine des «rivalités» qui ont dégénéré dans cette crise. Cette élaboration religieuse se fait au long de la répétition de crises mimétiques, dont la résolution n’apporte la paix que de façon temporaire. Pour l’anthopologue, l’élaboration des rites et des interdits constituait une sorte de «savoir empirique» sur la violence.

Comment les religions sont devenues extrémistes

Ces deux thèses liées sur la «rivalité mimétique» et le «mécanisme émissaire» ont conduit René Girard –qui a toujours affiché sa foi chrétienne malgré les critiques d’une partie de la communauté scientifique– à s’interroger sur l’origine et le devenir des religions, jusqu’à leurs formes extrémistes d’aujourd’hui. Pour lui, à la naissance des religions, il existe aussi une «rivalité mimétique» autour d’un même «capital symbolique», fondé sur les trois «piliers» que sont le monothéisme, la fonction prophétique et la Révélation.

Pendant des siècles, ce capital symbolique avait été monopolisé par l’Ancien Testament biblique et par le message de Jésus de Nazareth. Mais au septième siècle surgissait le prophète Mahomet et un troisième acteur –l’islam– affirmant que ce qui avait été transmis par les précédents prophètes n’était pas complet, que leur message avait été altéré. Cette rivalité a engendré de la violence entre les «peuples du Livre» dès les premiers temps de l’islam. Au point qu’aujourd’hui encore, on dit que les monothéismes sont porteurs d’une violence structurelle: ils ont fait naître une notion de «vérité» unique, exclusive de toute articulation concurrente.

René Girard va interpréter les attentats du 11 septembre 2001 comme la manifestation d’un «mimétisme» désormais globalisé. Il déclare, dans une interview au Monde en novembre 2001, que le terrorisme islamique s’explique par la volonté «de rallier et mobiliser tout un tiers-monde de frustrés et de victimes dans des rapports de rivalité mimétique avec l’Occident». Pour lui, les «ennemis» de l’Occident font des Etats-Unis «le modèle mimétique de leurs aspirations, au besoin en le tuant». Il a cette formule:

«Le terrorisme est suscité par un désir exacerbé de convergence et de ressemblance avec l’Occident. L’islam fournit le ciment qu’on trouvait autrefois dans le marxisme. Son rapport mystique avec la mort nous le rend le plus mystérieux encore.»
Double rapport
Les rapports entre la violence et le sacré vont poursuivre le philosophe jusqu’à la fin de sa vie. On se souvient que le nom de Dieu porté à l’absolu pour combler des frustrations sociales, politiques, identitaires ou pour justifier un projet totalitaire est responsable d’une partie des plus grands crimes. La Torah, l’Evangile et le Coran ont été le prétexte à nombre de pogroms, de croisades et d’Inquisitions.

Autrement dit, le sacré suscite et engendre de la violence. Fondé ou non sur une transcendance divine, il constitue un mode de représentation de l’univers qui échappe à l’emprise de l’homme, exige sa soumission totale, définit des prescriptions et des interdits. C’est le sacré qui, en dernière instance, donne à l’homme son identité, le conduit à «sacrifier» sa propre vie ou celle des autres. Dans tous les mythes religieux, babyloniens ou autres, les divinités du bien et de l’ordre s’arrachent toujours, dans une lutte violente, au chaos, au mal et à la mort.

Les panthéons des religions monothéistes sont remplis de dieux de la guerre
Mais si le sacré produit de la violence, le processus fonctionne aussi en sens inverse. La violence produit du sacré. L’homme utilise, ou même construit le sacré, pour justifier, légitimer, réguler sa propre violence. Les «guerres saintes» n’ont d’autre but que de mobiliser les ressources du sacré pour une prétendue noble cause: Gott mit uns («Dieu est avec nous»), écrivaient les soldats nazis sur leur ceinturon, alors que l’idéologie nazie était fondamentalement athée.  Cela a toujours existé, quelles que soient les civilisations et les époques. Les panthéons des religions monothéistes sont remplis de dieux de la guerre.

Après René Girard, la question reste ainsi posée: est-ce que ce sont les religions qui sèment les germes de discorde et de violence, par des vérités transformées en dogmatismes? Ou est-ce que ce sont les hommes qui se réclament d’elles et qui se fabriquent leur propre image de Dieu, qui prennent prétexte de tout, y compris du nom divin, pour justifier leur propre violence et fanatisme?

Voir aussi:

L’académicien René Girard est mort à 91 ans
Le philosophe chrétien est décédé mercredi 4 novembre, à Stanford aux États-Unis, à l’âge de 91 ans.
La Croix (avec AFP)
5/11/15

Le philosophe René Girard en novembre 1990. Ce spécialiste des religions et du phénomène de violence est décédé mercredi 4 novembre à 91 ans .

« Le nouveau Darwin des sciences humaines », s’est éteint mercredi 4 novembre, à l’âge de 91 ans. « Le renommé professeur français de Stanford, l’un des 40 immortels de la prestigieuse Académie française, est décédé à son domicile de Stanford mercredi des suites d’une longue maladie », a indiqué l’université américaine dans un communiqué.

René Girard, philosophe et académicien, théoricien du « désir mimétique », était reconnu pour ses livres qui « ont offert une vision audacieuse et vaste de la nature, de l’histoire et de la destinée humaine », poursuit l’université, où il a longtemps dirigé le département de langue, littérature et civilisation française. Archiviste-paléographe de formation, René Girard était installé aux États-Unis depuis 1947.

L’Académie française, une reconnaissance
Traduites dans de nombreuses langues et très reconnues aux États-Unis, ses œuvres sont assez mal connues du grand public français. C’est pourquoi sa nomination au fauteuil numéro 37 de l’Académie française, en 2005, était une véritable reconnaissance pour l’intellectuel.

« Je peux dire sans exagération que, pendant un demi-siècle, la seule institution française qui m’ait persuadé que je n’étais pas oublié en France, dans mon propre pays, en tant que chercheur et en tant que penseur, c’est l’Académie française », avait-il expliqué ce jour-là dans son discours devant les Immortels. Le penseur chrétien succédait alors au Père dominicain Ambroise-Marie Carré.

Une œuvre autour des religions
Né un soir de Noël 1923 à Avignon, René Girard a d’abord consacré sa carrière à l’étude des religions dans les sociétés humaines et aux logiques de mimétisme qui aboutissent à la violence. Selon l’anthropologue, tous les récits sacrés ont en commun un meurtre fondateur. Ce constat servit de base à son livre La Violence et le Sacré en 1972. René Girard s’intéressa également au rôle du bouc émissaire dans les groupes.

Pour René Girard, seul le christianisme – à la lecture de l’Évangile – est capable de mettre à nu le mécanisme victimaire qui fonde les religions, à la différence des croyances archaïques, et permet de dépasser les logiques de mimétisme à l’origine de toutes les violences.

Ses textes ont provoqué engouement ou critique, les uns lui reprochant son analyse trop anthropologique, les autres de dresser par son travail une apologie croyante du christianisme.

Voir également:

Entretien
René Girard : “Si l’Histoire a vraiment un sens, alors ce sens est redoutable”
Propos recueillis par Xavier Lacavalerie
Publié le 05/01/2008. Mis à jour le 05/11/2015

DisparitionRené Girard, l’anthropologue des désirs et de la violence n’est plus
EntretienDavid Graeber, anthropologue : “Nous pourrions être déjà sortis du capitalisme sans nous en rendre compte”
Portrait René Girard, l’essence du sacrifice

L’anthropologue René Girard est mort mercredi 4 novembre, à Stanford, aux Etats-Unis. Nous l’avions rencontré en 2008 : poursuivant sa réflexion sur la violence et le sacré, relisant Clausewitz, le théoricien de la guerre, il nous expliquait que selon lui, nous vivions en pleine apocalypse. En attendant de revenir sur sa carrière et son oeuvre, voici cet entretien tel qu’il avait été publié dans “Télérama”.

Critique littéraire, fasciné par l’étude des religions dans les sociétés archaïques, le chartiste et historien René Girard (né à Avignon en 1923) se livre depuis 1961 à une activité qui l’a longtemps fait passer pour un doux rêveur, un peu marginal et farfelu. A l’époque où tous les intellectuels français se passionnaient pour le politique, le structuralisme ou la psychanalyse, il effectuait tranquillement une relecture anthropologique des Evangiles et de toute la tradition prophétique juive. Pas seulement en tant que croyant, mais comme scientifique, avec l’ambition de réaliser, selon son propre aveu, « l’équivalent ethnologique de L’Origine des espèces ». Quelques ouvrages clés – La Violence et le Sacré (1972), Des choses cachées depuis la fondation du monde (1978), Le Bouc émissaire (1982), Celui par qui le scandale arrive (2001) – témoignent de la singularité de ce parcours et de l’originalité de son apport à l’histoire de la pensée et de l’anthropologie. Longtemps « exilé » aux Etats-Unis, où il a enseigné à l’université de Stanford (Californie), René Girard a entraîné dans son sillage nombre d’admirateurs et d’élèves, et a reçu une tardive consécration hexagonale en étant élu à l’Académie française (1). Il vient de publier un livre d’entretiens assez inattendu, consacré à… Clausewitz, le théoricien de la guerre, sur lequel, en son temps, Raymond Aron avait écrit un essai brillantissime (2), mais forcément daté, oblitéré par les enjeux de la guerre froide entre les Etats-Unis et le monde communiste. Explications et rencontre avec un franc-tireur de la pensée.

On pourrait dire que le point de départ de toute votre oeuvre réside dans ce que vous appelez le « désir mimétique » et dans la violence, que vous mettez au fondement même de toute organisation sociale…
Toute l’histoire – et le malheur ! – de l’humanité commence en effet par la rivalité mimétique. A savoir : je veux ce que l’autre désire ; l’autre souhaite sûrement ce que je possède. Tout désir n’est que le désir d’un autre pris pour modèle. Lorsque cette rivalité mimétique entre deux personnes se met en place, elle a tendance à gagner rapidement tout le groupe, par contagion, et la violence se déchaîne. Cette violence, il faut bien la réguler. Elle se focalise alors sur un individu, sur une victime désignée, un bouc émissaire, quelqu’un de coupable, forcément coupable. Son lynchage collectif a pour fonction de rétablir la paix dans la communauté, jusqu’aux prochaines tensions. Le désir mimétique est donc à la fois un mal absolu – puisqu’il déchaîne la violence – et un remède – puisqu’il régule les sociétés et réconcilie les hommes entre eux, autour de la figure du bouc émissaire. Dans la ritualisation de cette violence inaugurale s’enracine le fonctionnement de toutes les sociétés et les religions archaïques. Puis vint le christianisme. Là, n’en déplaise aux anthropologues et aux théologiens qui ont trop souvent vu dans la figure du Christ un bouc émissaire comme tous les autres, il se passe quand même quelque chose de radicalement différent. La personne lynchée n’est pas une victime qui se sait coupable. Au contraire, elle revendique son innocence et rachète le monde par sa passion.

A vos yeux, il s’agit donc d’une rupture essentielle ?
Oui, définitive même. Mais la Passion a dévoilé une fois pour toutes l’origine sacrificielle de l’Humanité en nous confrontant à ce qui était caché depuis la fondation du monde : la réalité crue de la violence et la nécessité du sacrifice d’un innocent. Elle a défait le sacré en révélant sa violence fondamentale, même si le Christ a confirmé la part de divin que toutes les religions portent en elles. Le christianisme n’apparaît pas seulement comme une autre religion, comme une religion de plus, qui a su libérer la violence ou la sainteté : elle proclame, de fait, la fin des boucs émissaires, donc la fin de toutes les religions possibles. Moment historique décisif, qui consacre la naissance d’une civilisation privée de sacrifices humains, mais qui génère aussi sa propre contradiction et un scepticisme généralisé. Le religieux est complètement démystifié – ce qui pourrait être une bonne chose, dans l’absolu, mais se révèle en réalité une vraie catastrophe, car les êtres humains ne sont pas préparés à cette terrible épreuve : les rites qui les avaient lentement éduqués, qui les avaient empêchés de s’autodétruire, il faut dorénavant s’en passer, maintenant que les victimes innocentes ne peuvent plus être immolées. Et l’homme, pour son malheur, n’a rien de rechange.

Dans ces conditions, à quoi aboutissent les inévitables tensions, au sein des sociétés humaines ?
A la violence généralisée et aux guerres. J’ai retrouvé chez le baron Carl von Clausewitz (1780-1831), auteur d’un célèbre traité au titre spartiate mais éloquent, De la guerre (3), une reformulation étonnante de cette « rivalité mimétique », quand il définit la guerre comme une « montée aux extrêmes ». On peut analyser cette expression comme une incapacité de la politique à contenir l’accroissement mimétique, c’est-à-dire réciproque, de la violence. Longtemps, les innombrables lecteurs et commentateurs de ce texte (3), Raymond Aron en tête, se sont aveuglés sur une autre célèbre formule : « La guerre, c’est la continuation de la politique par d’autres moyens. » Elle tendrait à affirmer que la guerre est une étape, un moment exceptionnel, qui a forcément une fin et une solution politique, alors que c’est exactement l’inverse : le politique est constamment débordé par le déchaînement de la violence. Et cette violence se développe et s’intensifie, jusqu’à son paroxysme, chacune des parties opposées renchérissant en permanence sur l’autre, avec encore plus de vigueur et de détermination.

Qui était ce fameux baron von Clausewitz ?
Un militaire, un général prussien. A l’âge de 12 ans, il a assisté à l’incroyable bataille de Valmy (le 20 septembre 1792), au cours de laquelle une armée de volontaires français, mal habillés, mal armés et sous-équipés, a battu la formidable armée de métier prussienne commandée par le duc de Brunswick. Quelques années plus tard, il se retrouve à la bataille d’Iéna (14 octobre 1806) et subit la plus humiliante et la plus rapide des défaites imposées par l’armée napoléonienne à ses ennemis. Et savez-vous ce qu’il fait ? Contrairement à la plupart des généraux prussiens battus qui se rangent au côté de leur vainqueur, il choisit l’exil. Il rejoint l’armée russe du maréchal Koutouzov et la coalition, afin de continuer à combattre les armées de Napoléon, cet ennemi qui l’agace tant, mais qui le fascine. L’armée prussienne ne lui pardonnera d’ailleurs jamais d’avoir eu raison, à peu près seul contre tous, mais le conservera quand même dans ses rangs. Clausewitz en gardera longtemps une certaine amertume et une profonde mélancolie. Il passera le reste de son existence à rédiger son fameux traité, De la guerre, qui restera inachevé et sera publié un an après sa mort, en 1832, par les soins de sa femme.
Dans ce traité posthume se profile tout le drame du monde moderne, la période où les guerres européennes se sont exaspérées, particulièrement entre la France et ce qui allait devenir l’Allemagne, de la bataille d’Iéna à l’écrasement des nazis en 1945 : un siècle et demi d’affrontements et d’escalades, tissé de victoires, de défaites et d’esprit de revanche. Si cette rivalité, et cette montée aux extrêmes, n’avait pas fait des millions et des millions de morts, elle aurait vraiment un aspect presque comique. Car les Prussiens parlent des Français exactement comme les Français parlent des Prussiens. Ils disent que nous sommes un peuple de guerriers par excellence, dignes héritiers des légions romaines ; que notre langue manque d’harmonie et qu’elle est faite pour donner des ordres ou aboyer des commandements. Toujours le mimétisme…

Vous prétendez « achever Clausewitz », pour reprendre le titre de votre ouvrage. « Achever », comme on tue un ennemi ? Ou comme on termine un livre ?
D’un certain côté, Clausewitz a fait oeuvre de visionnaire. Il a parfaitement compris que, dans cette montée aux extrêmes, il fallait tenir compte des outils de la violence et du rôle prépondérant qu’allaient jouer les moyens technologiques auxquels il pouvait penser. Mais il ne pouvait pas prévoir l’invention des armes modernes de destruction massive, ni la prolifération des engins nucléaires, l’espionnage par satellite ou la communication généralisée en temps réel. On dirait que la montée aux extrêmes ne lui a pas assez fait peur pour qu’il puisse envisager le pire.
« Achever Clausewitz », c’est à la fois reconnaître en quoi son travail a été prémonitoire, mais aussi pousser son raisonnement jusqu’au bout. Car, fort des campagnes et des expéditions de Napoléon, Clausewitz a eu des intuitions très fortes. Il a, par exemple, compris l’importance que pouvait revêtir la guérilla – il fait naturellement référence aux affrontements entre les Espagnols et l’armée de Napoléon – et l’utilité de ce harcèlement permanent, capable de tenir en échec les armées classiques, aussi puissantes soient-elles. Il a également défendu l’idée que, dans un conflit, c’était finalement toujours le défenseur qui avait le dernier mot, et qu’il y avait toujours une Berezina pour mettre un point final à tous les Austerlitz triomphants. Voyez combien la suite lui a donné raison.

Mais sa vision était forcément limitée…
Effectivement, il ne pouvait pas prévoir le déchaînement de la violence généralisée au niveau de la planète. Car c’est là que nous en sommes arrivés, après deux conflits mondiaux, deux bombardements atomiques, plusieurs génocides et sans doute la fin des guerres « classiques », armée identifiable contre armée identifiée, au profit d’une violence en apparence plus sporadique, mais autrement plus dévastatrice. Prenez le génocide perpétré par les Khmers rouges ou les massacres inter-ethniques au Rwanda : 800 000 personnes exécutées à la machette en quelques semaines ! On revient d’un coup plusieurs milliers d’années en arrière, peut-être à l’époque de l’affrontement entre l’homme de Neandertal et l’homme de Cro-Magnon, dont on n’est même pas sûr qu’il se soit produit, mais qui a vu, dans tous les cas, l’éradication complète d’un groupe de population… Sauf qu’au Rwanda cela a pris beaucoup moins de temps.

Et puis il y a la question du terrorisme…
Oui, le terrorisme est, en quelque sorte, une métastase de la guerre. Mais ce qui me paraît le plus flagrant dans cette affaire, ce n’est pas ce que l’on souligne généralement. Il ne s’agit pas simplement d’un affrontement entre deux religions, entre musulmans radicaux d’un côté et protestants fondamentalistes de l’autre. Encore moins d’un choix de civilisations qui seraient opposées. Ce qui me frappe plutôt, c’est la diffusion de ce terrorisme. Partout, au Moyen-Orient, en Asie et en Asie du Sud-Est, il existe de petits groupes, des voisins, des communautés, qui se dressent les unes contre les autres, pour des raisons complexes, liées à l’économie, au mode de vie, autant qu’aux différences religieuses. Bien sûr, l’acte fondateur et symbolique des attentats du 11 septembre 2001, à New York, a frappé tous les esprits. Vivant moi-même aux Etats-Unis, j’ai pu voir les effets ravageurs de ce terrorisme, désormais perçu comme une menace sans fin, sans visage, frappant à l’aveugle, à laquelle les républicains n’ont pu apporter aucune parade efficace, uniquement parce qu’ils cherchent obscurément à rester dans le monde d’hier, où l’on pense qu’il faut simplement écraser son ennemi, « l’axe du Mal ».

Au regard de cette évolution, on s’aperçoit que la vision de Clausewitz était prémonitoire.
Clausewitz a eu l’intuition fulgurante du cours accéléré de l’Histoire. Mais il l’a aussitôt dissimulée pour essayer de donner à son traité un ton technique, froid et savant. C’est un homme rationnel, héritier des Lumières, comme d’ailleurs tous ses commentateurs ultérieurs, freinés dans leurs analyses et retenus par leur époque, leur sagesse, leur esprit raisonnable, leur optimisme. Mais il faut regarder la réalité en face. Achever l’interprétation de ce traité, De la guerre, c’est lui donner son sens religieux et sa véritable dimension d’apocalypse. C’est en effet dans les textes apocalyptiques, dans les Evangiles synoptiques de Matthieu, Marc et Luc et dans les Epîtres de Paul, qu’est décrit ce que nous vivons, aujourd’hui, nous qui savons être la première civilisation susceptible de s’autodétruire de façon absolue et de disparaître. La parole divine a beau se faire entendre – et avec quelle force ! -, les hommes persistent avec acharnement à ne pas vouloir reconnaître le mécanisme de leur violence et s’accrochent frénétiquement à leurs fausses différences, à leurs erreurs et à leurs aveuglements. Cette violence extrême est, aujourd’hui, déchaînée à l’échelle de la planète entière, provoquant ce que les textes bibliques avaient annoncé il y a plus de deux mille ans, même s’ils n’avait pas forcément une valeur prédicative : une confusion générale, les dégâts de la nature mêlés aux catastrophes engendrées par la folie humaine. Une sorte de chaos universel. Si l’Histoire a vraiment un sens, alors ce sens est redoutable…

C’est totalement désespérant…
L’esprit humain, libéré des contraintes sacrificielles, a inventé les sciences, les techniques, tout le meilleur – et le pire ! – de la culture. Notre civilisation est la plus créative et la plus puissante qui fût jamais, mais aussi la plus fragile et la plus menacée. Mais, pour reprendre les vers de Hölderlin, « Aux lieux du péril croît/Aussi ce qui sauve »…

A LIRE
Achever Clausewitz, entretiens avec Benoît Chantre, éd. Carnets Nord, 364 p., 22 EUR.

(1) Lire son discours de réception du 15 décembre 2005 (publié sous le titre Le Tragique et la Pitié, éd. du Pommier, 2007), non pour l’éloge que fait René Girard, selon la coutume, du révérend père Carré, auquel il succède, mais pour la flamboyante réponse de Michel Serres, exposant avec chaleur et clarté tout le système girardien.

(2) Penser la guerre, Clausewitz, éd. Gallimard, 1976, 2 vol. Lire également Sur Clausewitz (1987, rééd. éd. Complexe, 2005).

(3) Ce traité est universellement considéré comme LA grande théorie de la guerre moderne. Il est même cité en référence par un général de l’armée américaine en opération en Afghanistan dans le dernier film de Robert Redford, Lions et Agneaux, une histoire d’apocalypse en marche…

Voir encore:

Réné Girard en débat

Deux ouvrages témoignent des échanges et débats provoqués par les théories de René Girardsur la violence et le sacrifice

Elodie Maurot
La Croix

23/2/11

SANGLANTES ORIGINES René Girard Flammarion , 394 pages , 23 € 

Jusqu’à aujourd’hui, les théories de René Girard sur la violence et le phénomène du bouc émissaire ont fait débat. Les uns louant une oeuvre quasi prophétique, dévoilant les mécanismes inconscients à l’oeuvre dans la société. Les autres dénonçant une vision trop générale, voire idéologique, donnant au judéo-christianisme un rôle majeur, celui d’avoir révélé le mécanisme du sacrifice et d’en avoir détruit l’efficacité.

Les deux ouvrages qui viennent d’être publiés offrent l’occasion de prendre le pouls de ce débat qui se joua essentiellement à l’extérieur de nos frontières. Les échanges dont ils témoignent faisaient suite à la publication de La Violence et le Sacré, en 1972, dans lequel René Girard exposait les grandes lignes de sa thèse : l’universalité du « désir mimétique » qui pousse les hommes à désirer les mêmes objets et à entrer en rivalité, la violence engendrée par cette concurrence, le choix de boucs émissaires permettant de reconstituer le groupe.

Sanglantes origines montre que le monde universitaire américain fut loin d’acquiescer univoquement à ces propositions. Aux États-Unis comme en France, beaucoup d’universitaires restèrent méfiants vis-à-vis d’une oeuvre se jouant des frontières entre disciplines, mêlant anthropologie, psychologie, philosophie, voire théologie. Les entretiens qui eurent lieu en Californie à l’automne 1983, entre René Girard et divers confrères (Walter Burkert, historien du rite ; Jonathan Smith, historien des religions ; Renato Rosaldo, ethnologue) témoignent de ces débats contradictoires, toutefois régulés par une éthique de la discussion exemplaire.

Le noeud du désaccord apparaît essentiellement lié au statut de la théorie girardienne. Sans faire mystère de ses convictions chrétiennes, Girard a toujours revendiqué un point de vue strictement scientifique, regardant les phénomènes religieux comme une classe particulière de phénomènes naturels. Cette lecture générale, quasi darwinienne, viendra heurter l’empirisme de ces adversaires, qui lui reprochent d’ignorer le terrain et d’accorder trop d’importance aux représentations et aux textes.

La discussion devait aussi se tenir sur un autre versant, avec les théologiens. La publication en français de l’ouvrage du jésuite suisse Raymund Schwager (1935-2004) offre un bel exemple de la réception des travaux de Girard dans le milieu théologique. De manière précoce, Schwager accepta son hypothèse clé : la vérité du christianisme est reliée à la question de la violence. Depuis la figure du serviteur souffrant chez Isaïe jusqu’à la mise à mort du Christ, le théologien trace le dévoilement progressif d’une logique de violence.

Pourquoi cette démystification ne fut-elle pas prise en compte plus tôt par les Églises ? Pourquoi celles-ci eurent-elles recours à la violence contre l’enseignement de leurs Écritures, notamment envers les juifs ? Telle est la question qui taraude Schwager. « La vérité biblique sur le penchant universel à la violence a été tenue à l’écart par un puissant processus de refoulement », constate-t-il.

La vérité biblique sur la violence, « obscurcie sur de nombreux points, (……) dénaturée en partie », n’a pourtant « jamais été totalement falsifiée par les Églises », juge-t-il. « Elle a traversé l’histoire et agi comme un levain », puis fut indirectement reprise par les Lumières. D’où cet hommage de Schwager à la modernité et aux « maîtres du soupçon » : « Les critiques d’un Kant, d’un Feuerbach, d’un Marx, d’un Nietzsche et d’un Freud se situent dans une dépendance non dite par rapport à l’impulsion prophétique. »

Selon lui, c’est donc dans un dialogue avec les philosophes de la modernité que le christianisme peut retrouver son coeur ardent, la non-violence.

Lire aussi « Avons-nous besoin d’un bouc émissaire ? » de Raymond Schwager.

Voir de même:

Que valent nos valeurs? Interview: René Girard
La Croix
13/12/02

Le temps s’est remis à la philosophie
La Croix s’est interrogée sur les valeurs, en se demandant notamment, dans la suite du 11 septembre, s’il existe des valeurs universelles. Quelle serait votre réponse à une telle interrogation ?

René Girard : Le mot me gêne parce que, lorsqu’on dit « valeur », on parle de quelque chose de purement conceptuel que nous reconnaissons. Or, nous avons nombre de valeurs que nous ne sommes pas capables de formuler, mais qui comptent énormément pour nous, dont certaines sont dues à un état de la société assez récent. Par exemple, les valeurs égalitaires, très fortes en France, ne seraient pour beaucoup de gens pas reconnues comme des valeurs, mais comme des données irréductibles de l’existence humaine. Pour répondre sur le 11 septembre, je constate que le terrorisme est regardé par beaucoup comme une fatalité, comme une manière de lutter contre d’autres valeurs que les siennes. Cela me donne à penser que les « valeurs universelles » sont bien compromises.

_ En quoi la valeur d’égalité peut elle, justement, être reliée à la violence qui a éclaté le 11 septembre ?

_ Nous vivons dans un monde très égalitaire et concurrentiel à la fois où chacun aspire au même type de réussite. L’existence démocratique est très difficile. Et il est évident que nous vivons dans un univers où il y a des gagnants et des perdants, un univers plein de ressentiment, d’humiliation. Si vous lisez les déclarations de Ben Laden, vous observez qu’il met les nations et les individus sur le même plan. Dans une déclaration, il se réfère à Hiroshima : il est dans ce globalisme moderne et il pose des revendications au niveau planétaire. Par conséquent, c’est vraiment un homme moderne, influencé par les valeurs occidentales. Car il n’y a plus que les valeurs occidentales, le reste c’est du folklore.

_ Pourtant, Al-Qaeda utilise un mode d’action suicidaire inconnu en Occident…

_ Le phénomène est effectivement inédit en Occident et donc peu compréhensible. Il peut malgré tout se lier à ce que Nietzsche appelle le « ressentiment », ce que Dostoïevski appelle aussi le « souterrain ». L’une des qualités majeures du ressentiment, c’est que l’on préfère perdre soi-même pourvu que l’autre perde. Chez le kamikaze, cela est poussé à l’extrême. Pourtant, l’islam, ce n’est pas cela. Nous sommes donc dans l’exceptionnel.

_ On aurait pu penser qu’au lendemain du 11 septembre, les Etats-Unis s’interrogeraient sur ce qui avait suscité une telle haine à leur égard. Cela a-t-il été le cas ?

_ Si des terroristes avaient fait sauter la tour Eiffel, est-ce que cela aurait provoqué ce genre d’examen de conscience ? Je ne le crois pas. En Amérique comme en France, il y a une confiance morale en soi imperturbable et totale. Aujourd’hui, nous sommes dans des attitudes extrêmement tranchées, des réactions vitales en somme. L’Américain du Middle West dit : « Je me défends quand on m’attaque. » Ce qu’il faut dire aux Américains, ce n’est pas : « Vous êtes des sauvages », mais plutôt : « Vous êtes peut-être en train de commettre la plus grande erreur stratégique qui soit. » Il y a un discours impérial qui n’avait jamais été tenu aux Etats-Unis et qui y est tenu maintenant, notamment dans le milieu intellectuel gravitant autour du président Bush. Beaucoup d’Américains pensent pourtant qu’il n’y a pas d’empire américain possible. La comparaison que l’on fait parfois avec l’Empire romain est d’ailleurs très fausse. A l’époque de l’Empire romain, les populations concernées vivaient à l’état tribal. Alors, être protégé par l’Empire romain ou par un autre…

_ L’Occident s’est-il trompé pour en arriver à être si déconcerté aujourd’hui ?

_ Rappelons-nous les dernières pages de La Légende des siècles de Victor Hugo : l’aviation qui apporte la paix au monde. On nous a refait le coup récemment en nous disant que c’était les ordinateurs qui avaient battu les Soviétiques et le communisme. Devant Ben Laden, c’est tout le contraire qui se produit : nous nous trouvons face à des gens qui s’installent en Amérique, qui deviennent assez Américains pour fonctionner dans cet univers et qui tout à coup se jettent avec des avions sur les tours. La technologie se retourne contre l’Amérique, qui avait tellement cru en la bonté de l’homme !

_ Le message chrétien pourrait-il être redécouvert dans un tel contexte ?

_ Le monde ne serait pas ce qu’il est aujourd’hui sans le christianisme. Mais beaucoup de gens ne savent pas ce qu’ils doivent au judéo-christianisme, à la Bible, sur le plan des valeurs. Nous avons trahi le christianisme en l’utilisant à des fins matérialistes, consuméristes. Dès que l’on parle de la violence, il se trouve des gens pour s’insurger : « Et le religieux, qui nous promettait la paix universelle, qu’a-t-il fait pour nous ? » Je leur réponds que les Evangiles ne promettent pas la paix universelle. Le christianisme, c’est : « Je ne suis pas venu apporter la paix, mais le glaive. » Vous prenez le christianisme comme un gadget permettant de repousser la violence chez le voisin. Vous vous imaginez que l’on peut se servir du christianisme comme d’un instrument politique au niveau le plus bas, que l’on peut l’asservir. Mais le christianisme dit des vérités sur l’homme. Loin d’être usé, il pourrait revenir comme une espèce de coup de tonnerre. Les gens n’ont pas envie d’être rassurés. Ils veulent que les chrétiens leur apportent du sens et de la signification. Ce que ne peut fournir le tout économique.

_ Dans ce tableau très sombre, quelle issue proposez-vous ?

_ Elle est dans le partage : des matières premières, de la recherche, des ressources médicales… C’est ce qui nous sauverait peut-être, y compris sur le plan économique. Souvenons-nous du plan Marshall, qui a réussi à tous les niveaux. Globalement, je m’inquiète du manque de sérieux, du manque d’unité des gouvernants, de leur inconscience de la situation psychologique extraordinaire dans laquelle le monde se trouve. Ce n’est pas nouveau. J’ai vécu depuis 1937 dans un monde en désarroi. Mais on ne se rend pas compte que la période qui a suivi la guerre, de Khrouchtchev à aujourd’hui, nous a rendus plus complaisants envers nous-mêmes.

_ On vous a cru d’abord « oiseau de malheur », parce que votre pensée s’élaborait autour du thème de la violence. Votre oeuvre est aujourd’hui relue sous un autre jour. Qu’en pensez-vous ?

_ Ce que je disais n’a pas été pris au sérieux parce que, durant ces cinquante dernières années, la philosophie a évacué la violence. La philosophie et la théologie ont présenté les textes eschatologiques et apocalyptiques un peu comme une bonne farce. Mais ce n’est pas cela du tout ! Leur présence dans les Evangiles pose de sérieux problèmes. Lorsque les hommes sont privés du garde-fou sacrificiel, ils peuvent se réconcilier _ c’est ce que le christianisme appelle Royaume de Dieu. Ce Royaume de Dieu, pour l’obtenir, il ne suffit pas de renoncer à l’initiative de la violence : ce que prône l’Evangile, c’est le renoncement universel à la violence. Voilà une valeur qui pourrait être universelle, et qui ne l’est pas encore !

Recueilli par Laurent d’ERSU et Robert MIGLIORINI

La brillante carrière d’un expatrié

Né en 1923 à Avignon, René Girard a choisi, au sortir de la guerre, de s’expatrier aux Etats-Unis. Il était diplômé de l’école des Chartes, à la Sorbonne. Il y avait acquis le goût de l’érudition et l’art du déchiffrement des textes. Installé d’abord, en 1947, à l’université d’Indiana où il enseigne alors le français, il rejoint finalement, en 1974, la renommée Stanford University en Californie. Il y dirige à partir de 1981 le département de langue, littérature et civilisation françaises. Il n’enseigne plus depuis 1996 et poursuit la publication d’ouvrages, vivant entre Paris et les Etats-Unis. Il est notamment l’auteur de l’essai La Violence et le sacré (1972) et des Choses cachées depuis la fondation du monde (1978). Dans cette oeuvre qui suscite des réactions passionnelles, René Girard développe la thèse du conflit mimétique, explication globale du conflit dans nos sociétés fondée sur l’analyse du rôle central du bouc émissaire. Il vient de publier, toujours chez Grasset, une sélection de textes jusqu’ici seulement disponibles en anglais, La Voix méconnue du réel (318 p., 20 E).

Sagesses

« Pour voir face à face, dans son universalité et son imprégnation de toutes choses, l’esprit de Vérité, il faut être en mesure d’aimer comme soi-même la plus chétive des créatures. Et qui aspire à cela ne peut se permettre de s’exclure d’aucun domaine où se manifeste la vie. C’est pourquoi mon dévouement à la Vérité m’a entraîné dans le champ de la politique ; et je puis dire sans la moindre hésitation, mais aussi en toute humilité, que ceux-là n’entendent rien à la religion, qui prétendent que la religion n’a rien de commun avec la politique. »

(Gandhi, Autobiographie)

MIGLIORINI Robert

Voir par ailleurs:

Ben Laden, un an après
Un essai girardien de Bruno de Cessole
Causeur

Jérome Leroy

06 mai 2012

Un an après sa mort, il est peut-être temps d’essayer de comprendre le sens du phénomène Ben Laden, d’interroger celui qui reste la figure la plus accomplie du Négatif en ce début de XXIème siècle : celle de Ben Laden. On pourra utilement se tourner vers le livre de Bruno de Cessole Ben Laden, le bouc émissaire idéal (La Différence), écrivain et critique à Valeurs Actuelles. Après tout, ce sont les écrivains qui durent, contrairement aux spécialistes qui se démodent au gré des événements. C’est l’écrivain qui discerne, presque malgré lui, comme une plaque sensible, ce qui fait la ligne de force d’une époque, ses zones névralgiques cachées et douloureuses, ses glissements tectoniques et occultes.

Atlantistes fascinés par le choc des civilisations, européens accrochés à des vestiges de grandeur ou altermondialistes en mal de nouvelles grilles de lecture, abandonnez tout espoir à l’orée de Ben Laden, le bouc émissaire idéal ! Ce livre commencera par vous renvoyer dos à dos : « Au fanatisme mortifère des « fous d’Allah », à leur mépris de la vie et de la mort, à leur attirance pour le sacrifice et l’holocauste, nous ne pouvons opposer que le mol oreiller de notre scepticisme, l’obscénité de notre matérialisme consumériste, et la fragilité d’un modèle économico-politique, qui depuis la crise américaine de 2008 et la crise de la zone euro de 2011, prend l’eau de toute part et ne fait plus rêver. »
Avec celui qui, un certain 11 septembre 2001, nous fit rentrer dans l’Histoire aussi vite que Fukuyama avait voulu nous en faire sortir après la chute du Mur de Berlin, Bruno de Cessole veut cerner ce qui s’est joué et se jouera encore longtemps dans la cartographie bouleversée de nos imaginaires.

Le cœur du raisonnement de Cessole, la ligne de force entêtante et mélancolique de son essai, c’est que rien ne s’est terminé avec l’opération militaire des Seals, le 1er mai 2011, quand Ben Laden fut exécuté dans sa résidence d’Abottabad, à quelques centaines de mètres du Saint-Cyr Pakistanais, avant que sa dépouille ne soit immergée en mer d’Oman. Cette opération nocturne minutieusement décrite par l’auteur, ressemblait davantage à une cérémonie d’exorcisme qu’à une action de commando, comme s’il s’était agi de répondre symboliquement par l’obscurité d’un refoulement définitif à la surexposition pixélisée des Twin Towers s’effondrant sur elles-mêmes dans un cauchemar d’une horrible et insoutenable perfection plastique.

Mais on ne refoule pas le réel et Ben Laden a d’une certaine manière gagné la guerre qu’il avait déclenchée : « Peut-on considérer comme une flagrante défaite stratégique le formidable chaos irakien, le réveil des affrontements entre chiites et sunnites, la prolifération des terroristes islamistes dans un pays où Al-Qaïda n’était pas implanté auparavant ; la fragilité du régime corrompu de Karzaï ; la dégradation des relations américaines avec le Pakistan, et les innombrables bavures commises par les Américains depuis leur entrée en guerre, sources d’un ressentiment durable, sinon inexpiable dans le monde musulman. »

Plus grave encore, pour ce lecteur attentif de René Girard qu’est Cessole, Ben Laden a remporté des batailles symboliques sur plusieurs plans. Nous avons voulu tricher avec lui, en faire un bouc émissaire idéal, fabriqué à la demande, si commode pour réaffirmer notre propre cohésion vacillante. Mais voilà que la créature nous échappe, que Ben Laden devient le rival mimétique par excellence, réintroduit la violence archaïque jusque dans notre vocabulaire, comme Bush partant en « croisade » contre l’ « axe du mal », et qu’il nous force à désirer en lui à la fois ce qui nous manque et ce qui nous tue.

Ben Laden aurait pu être notre salut paradoxal, conclut Cessole en pessimiste bernanosien; mais il n’est que la preuve ultime de notre fascination nihiliste pour notre propre fin.

Voir enfin:

Une campagne contre le harcèlement scolaire hérisse les profs
Mattea Battaglia

Le Monde

03.11.2015

La ministre de l’éducation nationale se serait sans doute volontiers passé de cette polémique. Najat Vallaud-Belkacem se voit sommée de retirer la vidéo de sa campagne contre le harcèlement à l’école, qui suscite un tollé chez les syndicats d’enseignants.

Le petit film, déjà mis en ligne par le ministère, doit aussi être diffusé au cinéma et à la télévision à compter de jeudi 5 novembre, jour de la première journée nationale « Non au harcèlement ».
L’exaspération des professeurs dépasse, largement, les clivages habituels : du SGEN-CFDT, syndicat dit réformateur, au SNALC, habituellement présenté comme « de droite » (même s’il le récuse), en passant par la Société des agrégés ou l’organisation des inspecteurs SNPI-FSU, tous y sont allés de leur critique contre un clip qui, à leurs yeux, rend l’enseignant, présenté au mieux comme inattentif, au pire comme harcelant, directement responsable du harcèlement scolaire. Un phénomène qui touche 700 000 élèves chaque année, de source ministérielle.

« Une vidéo caricaturale et méprisante »
Ce sujet grave « ne peut être réduit à une enseignante, le nez collé au tableau, qui ne se soucierait pas des élèves et notamment de ceux victimes de gestes et de paroles humiliantes pendant la classe », a réagi lundi le principal syndicat d’instituteurs, le SNUipp-FSU, qui dénonce une vidéo « caricaturale et méprisante pour les enseignants et pour les élèves victimes ». (…) Avec les fonds dégagés pour financer ce clip, le ministère aurait été bien mieux avisé de diffuser dans les écoles des ressources pédagogiques existantes et les vidéos de qualité réalisées par les élèves eux-mêmes ». Qu’importe si, en l’occurrence, les fonds en question sont… nuls : « Nous n’avons pas déboursé un seul euro pour ce clip réalisé en partenariat avec Walt Disney », fait-on valoir dans l’entourage de Mme Vallaud-Belkacem. Mais dans le climat d’inquiétude, voire de net désenchantement, de la communauté éducative face aux réformes promises pour 2016 (collège, programmes), ce « couac » dans la communication ministérielle passe mal.

D’après le ministère de l’éducation, le clip d’une minute « est d’abord censé interpeller les écoliers de 7 à 11 ans, car c’est dès le plus jeune âge que débute le harcèlement ». Coproduit par la journaliste Mélissa Theuriau, qui aurait elle-même été victime de harcèlement au collège, le petit film montre un petit garçon aux cheveux roux, Baptiste, qui, en plein cours, se voit la cible des quolibets et boulettes de papier lancés par ses camarades.

Une campagne plus vaste
A l’origine de l’indignation des syndicats, les neuf secondes au cours desquelles son enseignante, les yeux rivés au tableau, semble ignorer la détresse de l’enfant harcelé, auquel elle tourne le dos avant de l’interpeller : « Baptiste, t’es avec nous ? ». Le « happy end » – une petite camarade vient en aide à Baptiste, lui enjoignant d’« en parler » pour que « ça cesse » – n’atténue guère l’impression d’une mise en scène peu nuancée.

Si la vidéo fait mouche du côté des enfants, comme on veut le croire au cabinet de la ministre, le moins qu’on puisse dire est qu’elle a manqué sa cible côté enseignants. Et risque d’occulter, aux yeux de l’opinion publique, le contenu plus vaste de la campagne contre le harcèlement présentée le 29 octobre par Najat Vallaud-Belkacem. Parmi les mesures annoncées, figure entre autres, l’ouverture d’un numéro vert (le 30 20) et l’objectif de former au cours des dix-huit prochains mois pas moins de 300 000 enseignants et personnels de direction sur la question.

Mélissa Theuriau défend son clip
Mélissa Theuriau, coproductrice du petit film, s’est expliquée au micro d’Europe 1 : « Je montre une institutrice qui a le dos tourné, comme tous les professeurs et les instituteurs qui font un cours à des enfants, et qui ne voit pas dans son dos une situation d’isolement, une petite situation qui est en train de s’installer et qui arrive tous les jours dans toutes les salles de classe de ce pays et des autres pays. »

La journaliste assure que son but était de ne pas faire un clip qui s’adresse aux adultes ou aux professeurs, mais bel et bien aux enfants. « Si tous les instituteurs étaient alertes et réactifs à cette problématique de l’isolement, on n’aurait pas besoin de former, de détecter le harcèlement, on n’aurait pas 700 000 enfants par an en souffrance », a-t-elle poursuivi.

Voir de même:

René Girard, penseur chrétien

Brice Couturier

France Culture

06.11.2015

La pensée de René Girard est absolument essentielle pour comprendre le monde dans lequel nous vivons, en ce début du XXI° siècle. Pourquoi ? Parce qu’elle tourne autour de la question de la violence dans son rapport avec la religion. Y a-t-il question plus actuelle ? Le bouc-émissaire se conclut sur une méditation sur la prophétie « L’heure vient même où qui vous tuera estimera rendre un culte à Dieu. » On ne saurait être plus contemporain, vous en conviendrez…

Pour connaître la pensée de René Girard, rien de mieux que de se reporter au résumé très pratique qu’il en donne lui-même dans l’Introduction de 2007 à la réédition, par Grasset, de ses œuvres majeures. Il s’agit d’un recueil intitulé De la violence à la divinité. On y voit, en effet, sa pensée s’y constituer dans sa cohérence, faire système.

Mensonge romantique et vérité romanesque pose le concept de base de cette pensée : celui désir médiatisé, de désir mimétique : le désir le plus violent est celui qui poursuit ce que possède l’être auquel nous nous identifions. Il est la conséquence de la rivalité mimétique. Celle-ci mêle étrangement haine et vénération, aspiration à la ressemblance et à l’élimination. De manière générale, nous sommes attirés par ce qui attire les autres et non par les objets de convoitise pour eux-mêmes. Le « mensonge romantique », c’est le refus de reconnaître l’existence de ce tiers – l’autre, les autres dans l’émergence du désir.

La concurrence, qu’elle soit « mimétique » ou non, est à l’origine, dit Girard, de « mille choses utiles ». On n’invente, on n’innove que dans l’espoir de précéder un autre inventeur, un autre innovateur. Comment dompter la compétition, saine en soi, mais qui peut à tout moment s’emballer et déboucher sur la violence ?

C’est ici qu’intervient, avec La violence et le sacré, la figure du bouc-émissaire. « On ne peut tromper la violence que dans la mesure où on ne la prive pas de tout exutoire, où on lui fournit quelque chose à se mettre sous la dent », écrit Girard. L’unanimité du groupe, menacée par la rivalité mimétique, se fait sur le dos d’une victime expiatoire ; souvent, dit Girard, un étranger en visite. Sa mise à mort collective permet à la communauté de se ressouder.

Par la suite, cette victime pourra bien être divinisée, dans la mesure où l’on aura pris conscience du rôle, bien involontaire, de « sauveur de la communauté » qu’elle a été amenée à jouer. Mais sur le moment, elle est désignée comme coupable. Et la communauté massacreuse comme innocente. Telle serait l’origine des religions archaïques, dont leurs mythes livrent la clé, à travers le sacrifice rituel, répétition, symbolique ou non, de la mise à mort originelle.

Girard était chrétien. Non pas par héritage et tradition. Mais parce que christianisme lui est apparu comme la conséquence logique de son cheminement intellectuel. Si Jésus est, en effet, présenté comme un nouveau bouc-émissaire, le récit qui rapporte son supplice (les Evangiles) prend fait et cause pour la victime. Là réside la nouveauté. C’est ce que développe le bouc émissaire. Ce qui était caché devient manifeste au moment même où le Dieu nouveau cesse d’exiger le sacrifice et même l’empêche – c’est la signification de l’intervention d’un ange, arrêtant le sacrifice d’Isaac par Abraham.

René Girard était un inclassable. Il travaillait sur les textes littéraires, comme sur les récits des ethnologues et lisait la Bible et les Evangiles autant en théologien qu’en mythologue.

L’intelligentsia française a toujours eu du mal à digérer cet intellectuel, mondialement connu, mais qui présentait le défaut de n’être ni marxiste dans les années 60, ni structuraliste dans les années 70, ni déconstructiviste dans les années 90, ni keynésien aujourd’hui… En outre, il prenait très au sérieux la religion à une époque où elle était donnée comme en voie d’extinction…

On sait à présent comment les choses ont tourné. Comme le rappelle Damien Le Gay dans son excellent article du FigaroVox d’hier, l’Université, en France, n’en a pas voulu. Il ne fallait pas compter sur les média pour le comprendre, tant sa théorie est étrangère à leur doxa. Je signale l’article d’Olivier Rey, dans Le Figaro de ce matin, qui met le doigt sur le problème central posé par cette pensée, ce qu’il appelle « une boucle assumée » : prétendre comprendre le christianisme à la lumière de ce qu’on croit en avoir découvert. Dieu sait quel usage le Parti des Média va bien pouvoir faire de sa dépouille…

La mort de René Girard, penseur de la violence
Jean-Claude Guillebaud
Le Nouvel Obs

13-08-2010

Mis à jour le 05-11-2015

Le philosophe et académicien français René Girard est décédé mercredi à l’âge de 91 ans aux Etats-Unis. C’est l’Université de Stanford, en Californie, où il a longtemps dirigé le département de langue, littérature et civilisation française, qui l’a annoncé
Si son œuvre a été largement traduite pour l’étranger, elle reste mal connue du grand public en France
Désir mimétique, mythologie sacrificielle et enseignement évangélique : en 2010, Jean-Claude Guillebaud présentait dans «le Nouvel Observateur» le message du plus américain de nos grands esprits.

Le théoricien du « désir mimétique »
Nous sommes quelques-uns à tenir René Girard pour l’un des trois ou quatre principaux penseurs de ce temps. Longtemps professeur à l’université de Stanford en Californie, René Girard – académicien depuis 2005 – vit aux Etats-Unis depuis 1947. Ce philosophe, historien des religions et spécialiste de littérature française, né en 1923 à Avignon, a gagné de cette vie «ailleurs» un statut éditorial singulier.

Il ne fut pas mêlé aux querelles de l’après-guerre, ni à celles qui suivirent. Ainsi ses livres furent-ils perçus, dès l’origine, comme des objets philosophiques non identifiés. A bien réfléchir, son œuvre théorique n’a cessé de bousculer le champ de la pensée. Une œuvre venue d’ailleurs, à tous les sens du terme. Elle a suscité une abondance incroyable de commentaires, gloses, ouvrages collectifs, attaques, accusations, etc.

On ne résumera pas ici la pensée de Girard, organisée tout entière autour du «désir mimétique» et d’une relecture «non sacrificielle» du message évangélique. On en dira seulement quelques mots. Depuis «Mensonge romantique et vérité romanesque», paru en 1961, et «la Violence et le sacré» (1972), René Girard creuse infatigablement son sillon. Peu d’auteurs auront été aussi opiniâtres que lui.

René Girard et son « hypothèse »
De livre en livre, Girard approfondit et enrichit ce qu’il appelle son «hypothèse» : la mise en évidence du rôle de l’imitation, de la mimésis, dans le fonctionnement du désir et tout ce qui en résulte, notamment le sacrifice d’un bouc émissaire par un groupe humain en proie à la réciprocité concurrente du désir. Pour Girard – et pour Freud qui l’avait pressenti dans «Totem et tabou» – ce meurtre inaugural, ce lynchage d’une victime par ses persécuteurs est le fondement anthropologique de toutes les cultures humaines.

Le groupe, en somme, refait son unité sur le sacrifice d’un seul, sacrifice qui ramène temporairement le calme tandis qu’est promue une «vérité» unanime, celle des persécuteurs. Cette fausse vérité sert de fondement culturel à la persécution des victimes puisqu’elle les présente comme des coupables, des trublions, des menaces. Ainsi la foule des persécuteurs se convainc-elle de la justesse ontologique de l’oppression qu’elle exerce. Les foules en mal de lapidation sont «unanimes», chaque résolution se nourrissant – par contagion mimétique – de la résolution des «autres».

Depuis son second livre, «la Violence et le sacré» (1973), Girard réexamine avec une patiente finesse le texte biblique, et surtout évangélique, en qui il voit un dévoilement radical de l’unanimité sacrificielle, une déconstruction du discours meurtrier. La subversion radicale du christianisme – à ne pas confondre avec son instrumentalisation historique par la «chrétienté» – tient au fait qu’il déconstruit le discours des persécuteurs, en montre la fausseté et contribue, de siècle en siècle, à le rendre illégitime.

Le point de vue des victimes retrouve une pertinence que nous avons le plus intériorisée sans nous en rendre compte. Aujourd’hui, nul ne peut tenir «innocemment» un discours de l’oppression. Ce dernier doit se déguiser en projet «libérateur», il doit contrefaire, en somme, le message évangélique. Toute l’histoire des totalitarismes contemporains – ceux qui ont ensanglanté le XXe siècle, peut être relue comme une immense et meurtrière contrefaçon. Comme le phénoménologue Michel Henry disparu en 2002 et au-delà de toute bondieuserie, Girard définit donc le message évangélique comme une prodigieuse «subversion» anthropologique qui n’en finit pas de faire son chemin dans le monde.

Girard, Lévi-Strauss : un désaccord complice
Pour Girard, il faut prendre au sérieux ce que racontent les mythes. La violence sacrificielle sur laquelle se fondent très lointainement nos cultures n’est pas une figure de style. La grande rupture évangélique qui dévoile en quelque sorte le mécanisme sacrificiel et disqualifie sa violence ne l’est pas non plus.

C’est notamment sur ce point que Girard a entretenu pendant des décennies avec Claude Lévi-Strauss ce qu’on pourrait appeler un désaccord complice. Pour dire les choses en peu de mots, Girard reproche à l’auteur du «Totémisme aujourd’hui» de ne voir dans les mythes qu’une aptitude à symboliser la pensée, un «truc» archaïque, ce qui le conduit à minimiser le rôle joué par la violence effective dont les mythes, de siècle en siècle, conservent le souvenir terrifié.

Avec Nietzsche, on n’ira pas jusqu’à parler de «complicité» dans la mesure où Girard est le plus conséquent des anti-nietzschéens contemporains. Il n’empêche que sa familiarité avec l’œuvre et la lecture qu’il fait de ce maître du soupçon perpétue entre eux une singulière «intimité», dont c’est peu de dire qu’elle est féconde. Sauf à tenir Girard pour un fou ou un imposteur de génie, après l’avoir lu, on ne peut plus considérer notre histoire de la même façon. Girard est aujourd’hui académicien, mais son œuvre, n’en doutons pas, est une bombe à retardement.

Le Nouvel Observateur. Dans votre dernier livre, à une réponse sur la croyance en général, vous suggérez une analyse de la «conversion»? au sens large du terme et pas seulement dans son acception religieuse? tout à fait saisissante. Vous dites que votre conversion personnelle fut la découverte de votre propre mimétisme. Qu’est-ce à dire?

René Girard. Notre regard sur le réel est très évidemment influencé par nos désirs. Depuis Marx, par exemple, nous savons que notre situation économique, notre désir d’argent, aussi mimétique que possible, influence notre vision de toutes choses. Depuis Freud nous savons qu’il en va de même pour nos désirs sexuels, même et surtout si nous ne nous en rendons pas compte.

Nous cherchons à nous défaire de toutes ces distorsions, mais les méthodes objectives telles que l’analyse sociologique ou la psychanalyse restent grossières, mensongères même, dans la mesure où le mimétisme toujours individuel de nos désirs et de leurs conflits leur échappe. Les méthodes faussement objectives ne tiennent aucun compte de l’influence qu’exerce sur chacun de nous notre propre expérience, notre existence concrète.

Pour analyser mes propres désirs, personne n’est compétent, pas même moi si je ne réussis pas à jeter sur eux un regard aussi soupçonneux que sur le désir des autres. Et je trouve toujours au départ de mes désirs un modèle souvent déjà transformé en rival.

Je définis donc comme «conversion» le pouvoir de se détacher suffisamment de soi pour dévoiler ce qu’il y a de plus secrètement public en chacun de nous, le modèle, collectif ou individuel, qui domine notre désir. Il faut renoncer à s’agripper (consciemment ou inconsciemment) à autrui comme à un moi plus moi que moi-même, celui que je rêve d’absorber. Il y a quelque chose d’héroïque à révéler ce que chacun de nous tient le plus à dissimuler, en se le dissimulant à lui-même. C’est beaucoup plus difficile que de faire étalage de sa propre sexualité.

Cela signifie-t-il que la plupart des «opinions» ou «convictions» auxquelles nous sommes si attachés sont le produit mimétique d’un climat historique particulier, d’une opinion majoritaire, etc.?

R. Girard. Le plus souvent, mais pas toujours. Les oppositions systématiques – et symétriques – sont souvent des efforts délibérés pour échapper au mimétisme, et par conséquent sont mimétiques également. Soucieuses de s’opposer à l’erreur commune, elles finissent par ne plus en être que l’image inversée. Elles sont donc tributaires de cela même à quoi elles voulaient échapper. Il faut analyser chaque cas séparément. Ce qui est certain, c’est que nous sommes infiniment plus imprégnés des «préjugés» de notre époque et de notre groupe humain que nous ne l’imaginons. Nous sommes mimétiquement datés et situés, si je puis dire.

Vous citez le cas de Heidegger, qui se croit étranger au mimétisme et qui pourtant, en devenant nazi, se met à penser lui aussi comme «on» pense autour de lui. Cela signifie-t-il que sa propre réflexion ne suffit pas à le prémunir contre la puissance du mimétisme? Peut-on généraliser la remarque

R. Girard. Le désir mimétique est de plus en plus visible dans notre monde et, depuis le romantisme, nous voyons beaucoup le désir mimétique des autres mais pour n’en réussir que mieux, le plus souvent, à nous cacher le nôtre. Nous nous excluons de nos propres observations.

C’est ce que fait Heidegger, il me semble, lorsqu’il définit le désir du vulgum pecus par le «on», qu’il appelle aussi «inauthenticité», tout en se drapant fort noblement dans sa propre authenticité, autrement dit dans un individualisme inaccessible à toute influence. Il est facile de constater que, au moment où «on» était nazi autour de lui, Heidegger l’était aussi et, au moment où «on» a renoncé au nazisme, Heidegger aussi y a renoncé.

Ces coïncidences justifient une certaine méfiance à l’égard de la philosophie heideggérienne. Elles ne justifient pas, en revanche, qu’on traite ce philosophe en criminel de guerre ainsi que le font nos «politiquement corrects». Ces derniers ressemblent plus à Heidegger qu’ils ne s’en doutent car, comme lui, ils représentent leur soumission aux modes politiques comme enracinée au plus profond de leur être. Peut-être ont-ils moins d’être qu’ils ne pensent.

Cet enfermement inconscient dans le mimétisme aide-t-il à comprendre pourquoi de nombreux intellectuels français ont pu se fourvoyer, selon les époques, dans le stalinisme, le maoïsme, le fascisme? Et pourquoi, de ce point de vue, ils n’étaient guère plus clairvoyants que les foules? Le mimétisme serait un grand «égalisateur» en faisant de chacun, fût-il savant, un simple «double»? 

R. Girard. Je crois que les intellectuels sont même fréquemment moins clairvoyants que la foule car leur désir de se distinguer les pousse à se précipiter vers l’absurdité à la mode alors que l’individu moyen devine le plus souvent, mais pas toujours, que la mode déteste le bon sens.

Ce que vous dites là fait penser à une belle phrase de Bernanos, prononcée en 1947: «Le mensonge a changé de répertoire.» Ce «mensonge» dont parle Bernanos, n’est-ce pas, précisément, le «suivisme» désespérant des foules, c’est-à-dire le mimétisme? 

R. Girard. Le mot «répertoire» est admirable car, dans notre univers médiatique, chacun se choisit un rôle dans une pièce de théâtre écrite par quelqu’un d’autre. Cette pièce tient l’affiche pendant un certain temps et tous les jours chacun la rejoue consciencieusement dans la presse, à la télévision et dans les conversations mondaines. Et puis, un beau jour, en très peu de temps, on passe à autre chose de tout aussi stéréotypé, car mimétique toujours. Le répertoire change souvent, en somme, mais il y a toujours un répertoire.

Mais si le mimétisme est si puissant, comment expliquer le phénomène de la dissidence? Comment et pourquoi des hommes et des femmes échappent-ils à l’opinion commune et se révèlent capables, comme l’a fait Soljénitsyne et quelques autres, d’avoir «raison contre tous»?

R. Girard. Il y a une dissidence qui est pur esprit de contradiction, un désir mimétique redoublé et inversé, mais il y a aussi une dissidence réelle, héroïque et proprement géniale, devant laquelle il convient de s’incliner. Pensez à la «dissidence» d’Antigone dans la pièce de Sophocle, par exemple! Je ne prétends pas expliquer Soljénitsyne par le désir mimétique.

Ce que vous dites, c’est qu’il est infiniment plus difficile qu’on le croit d’accéder à un minimum d’objectivité, c’est-à-dire à une vision non mimétique et non sacrificielle de «notre» monde? 

R. Girard. Notre univers mental nous paraît constitué essentiellement de valeurs positives auxquelles nous adhérons librement, parce qu’elles sont justes, raisonnables, vraies. L’envers de tout cela au sein des cultures les plus diverses repose sur l’expulsion de certaines victimes et l’exécration des «valeurs» qui leur sont associées. Les valeurs positives sont l’envers de cette exécration. Dans la mesure où cette exécration «structure» notre vision du monde, elle joue donc elle aussi un rôle très important.

Nous savons aujourd’hui que même dans le domaine des sciences de la nature, au niveau de l’infiniment petit, l’observation affecte l’objet observé. Pour toute recherche soucieuse de vérité, l’objectivité est essentielle. Mais pour se rendre objectif, il faut tenir compte de tout ce qui influence notre perception de l’objet, la distance qui nous sépare de lui, l’éclairage, etc.

Dans le domaine des sciences de la nature, tout au moins en ce qui concerne la perception ordinaire, on est dans le domaine du mathématiquement mesurable, on peut reproduire les conditions d’observation pour tous les observateurs. Une certaine objectivité est donc relativement facile à obtenir.

L’erreur du vieux positivisme fut de croire qu’il en irait de même dans le domaine de l’homme, une fois le religieux éliminé. L’observateur pourrait se détacher sans peine de ce qu’il observe et se mettre à distance en appliquant des recettes standardisées. Il est bien évident que nos descendants, en regardant notre époque, y repéreront un même type d’uniformité, de conformisme et d’aveuglement que nous découvrons dans les époques passées. Bien des choses qui nous paraissent aujourd’hui comme des évidences indubitables leur paraîtront proches de la superstition collective.

A mes yeux, la «conversion» consiste justement à prendre conscience de cela. A s’arracher à ces adhérences inconscientes. C’est d’ailleurs un premier pas vers la modestie…

Le faites-vous toujours? Vous-même, dans ce dernier livre, vous donnez in fine un texte très polémique qui est une réponse à Régis Debray. Serait-ce de votre part une façon de succomber à votre tour au mimétisme polémique? 

R. Girard. L’esprit rivalitaire joue un rôle, je le crains, dans tous mes textes polémiques. Ecrire est si pénible pour moi que je ne pourrais pas m’y remettre, parfois, sans l’aide d’un excitant quelconque. Le plus puissant de tous, car il se rapporte directement à ce que je veux dire, c’est une bonne rasade de rivalité mimétique.

Régis Debray m’a intéressé pour deux raisons: l’une est négative, c’est son ignorance totale de ce que je répète depuis plus de quarante ans, la rivalité mimétique justement. Il n’a jamais regardé cela de près. L’autre est positive, c’est son réalisme face au phénomène religieux. Les solutions qu’il ébauche vont dans la direction qui m’intéresse mais s’arrêtent en cours de route.

Diriez-vous que le tort principal de Régis Debray, c’est d’être plus fasciné par la «messagerie» (le catholicisme historique) que par le «message», c’est-à-dire la rupture évangélique, dont il ne saisit pas l’importance?

R. Girard. Oui. Dans tout l’Occident, d’ailleurs, la confusion systématique entre le message chrétien et l’institution cléricale persiste en dépit de tout ce qui devrait la faire cesser. Depuis le XVIIe siècle, l’Eglise catholique a perdu non seulement tout ce qu’il lui restait de pouvoir temporel mais la plupart de ses fidèles, et aussi son clergé, qui, en dehors d’exceptions remarquables, est au-dessous de zéro, aux Etats-Unis notamment, pourri de contestations puériles, ivre de conformisme antireligieux.

Les anticatholiques militants ne semblent rien voir de tout cela. Ils sont plus croyants, au fond, que leurs adversaires et ils voient plus loin qu’eux, peut-être. Ils voient que l’effondrement de toutes les utopies antichrétiennes, plus la montée de l’islam, plus tous les bouleversements à venir, va forcément, dans un avenir proche, transformer de fond en comble notre vision du christianisme.

Récemment, en France, vous avez scandalisé en défendant le film de Mel Gibson, réduisant la force du témoignage christique à la violence exhibitionniste par lui endurée, alors même que les représentants des institutions chrétiennes, de l’archevêque de Paris à de nombreux évêques, pasteurs ou théologiens, se montraient très hostiles à ce film.

R. Girard. C’est aux Etats-Unis que j’ai vu le film et que j’ai écrit un article sur lui. J’ai dit ce que je pensais en fonction des réactions américaines, parfois très virulentes dans l’hostilité, mais beaucoup plus diverses qu’ici. La France a trop tendance à imaginer l’Amérique dans cette Passion: «Hollywood à l’état pur», ai-je pu lire, alors qu’en réalité Hollywood est étranger à l’affaire. Un évêque du Québec m’a dit qu’il avait amené une de ses paroisses voir ce film et que, après la projection, lesdits paroissiens, tous de langue française, étaient restés en prière une bonne demi-heure dans le cinéma spontanément transformé en église.

Comment expliquez-vous qu’en France seuls les catholiques très traditionalistes aient soutenu le film? N’est-ce pas paradoxal de vous retrouver dans ce camp-là?

R. Girard. Le fait d’être un anthropologue révolutionnaire ne m’empêche pas, bien au contraire, d’être un catholique très conservateur. J’évite comme la peste les liturgies filandreuses, les catéchismes émasculés et les théologies désarticulées. Ce qui est sûr, c’est qu’en exilant le religieux dans une espèce de ghetto, comme notre conception de la laïcité tend à le faire, on s’interdit de comprendre. On appauvrit tout à la fois la religion et la recherche non religieuse.

Voir enfin:

Stanford professor and eminent French theorist René Girard, member of the Académie Française, dies at 91
A member of the prestigious Académie Française, René Girard was called « the new Darwin of the human sciences. » His many books offered a bold, sweeping vision of human nature, human history and human destiny. He died Nov. 4 at 91.
Cynthia Haven

Stanford news

November 4, 2015

René Girard was one of the leading thinkers of our era – a provocative sage who bypassed prevailing orthodoxies and « isms » to offer a bold, sweeping vision of human nature, human history and human destiny.

L.A. Cicero French theorist René Girard was one of the leading thinkers of our era, a faculty member at Stanford since 1981 and one of the immortels of the Académie Française.
The renowned Stanford French professor, one of the 40 immortels of the prestigious Académie Française, died at his Stanford home on Nov. 4 at the age of 91, after long illness.

Fellow immortel and Stanford Professor Michel Serres once dubbed him « the new Darwin of the human sciences. » The author who began as a literary theorist was fascinated by everything. History, anthropology, sociology, philosophy, religion, psychology and theology all figured in his oeuvre.

International leaders read him, the French media quoted him. Girard influenced such writers as Nobel laureate J.M. Coetzee and Czech writer Milan Kundera – yet he never had the fashionable (and often fleeting) cachet enjoyed by his peers among the structuralists, poststructuralists, deconstructionists and other camps. His concerns were not trendy, but they were always timeless.

In particular, Girard was interested in the causes of conflict and violence and the role of imitation in human behavior. Our desires, he wrote, are not our own; we want what others want. These duplicated desires lead to rivalry and violence. He argued that human conflict was not caused by our differences, but rather by our sameness. Individuals and societies offload blame and culpability onto an outsider, a scapegoat, whose elimination reconciles antagonists and restores unity.

According to author Robert Pogue Harrison, the Rosina Pierotti Professor in Italian Literature at Stanford, Girard’s legacy was « not just to his own autonomous field – but to a continuing human truth. »

« I’ve said this for years: The best analogy for what René represents in anthropology and sociology is Heinrich Schliemann, who took Homer under his arm and discovered Troy, » said Harrison, recalling that Girard formed many of his controversial conclusions by a close reading of literary, historical and other texts. « René had the same blind faith that the literary text held the literal truth. Like Schliemann, his major discovery was excoriated for using the wrong methods. Academic disciplines are more committed to methodology than truth. »

Girard was always a striking and immediately recognizable presence on the Stanford campus, with his deep-set eyes, leonine head and shock of silver hair. His effect on others could be galvanizing. William Johnsen, editor of a series of books by and about Girard from Michigan State University Press, once described his first encounter with Girard as « a 110-volt appliance being plugged into a 220-volt outlet. »

Girard’s first book, Deceit, Desire and the Novel (1961 in French; 1965 in English), used Cervantes, Stendhal, Proust and Dostoevsky as case studies to develop his theory of mimesis. The Guardian recently compared the book to « putting on a pair of glasses and seeing the world come into focus. At its heart is an idea so simple, and yet so fundamental, that it seems incredible that no one had articulated it before. »

The work had an even bigger impact on Girard himself: He underwent a conversion, akin to the protagonists in the books he had cited. « People are against my theory, because it is at the same time an avant-garde and a Christian theory, » he said in 2009. « The avant-garde people are anti-Christian, and many of the Christians are anti-avant-garde. Even the Christians have been very distrustful of me. »

Girard took the criticism in stride: « Theories are expendable, » he said in 1981. « They should be criticized. When people tell me my work is too systematic, I say, ‘I make it as systematic as possible for you to be able to prove it wrong.' »

In 1972, he spurred international controversy with Violence and the Sacred (1977 in English), which explored the role of archaic religions in suppressing social violence through scapegoating and sacrifice.

Things Hidden Since the Foundation of the World (1978 in French; 1987 in English), according to its publisher, Stanford University Press, was « the single fullest summation of Girard’s ideas to date, the book by which they will stand or fall. » He offered Christianity as a solution to mimetic rivalry, and challenged Freud’s Totem and Taboo.

He was the author of nearly 30 books, which have been widely translated, including The Scapegoat, I Saw Satan Fall Like Lightning, To Double Business Bound, Oedipus Unbound and A Theater of Envy: William Shakespeare.

His last major work was 2007’s Achever Clausewitz (published in English as Battling to the End: Politics, War, and Apocalypse), which created the kind of firestorm only a public intellectual in France can ignite. French President Nicolas Sarkozy cited his words, and reporters trekked to Girard’s Paris doorstep daily. The book, which takes as its point of departure the Prussian military historian and theorist Carl von Clausewitz, had implications that placed Girard firmly in the 21st century.

A French public intellectual in America
René Noël Théophile Girard was born in Avignon on Christmas Day, 1923.

His father was curator of Avignon’s Musée Calvet and later the city’s Palais des Papes, France’s biggest medieval fortress and the pontifical residence during the Avignon papacy. Girard followed in his footsteps at l’École des Chartes, a training ground for archivists and librarians, with a dissertation on marriage and private life in 15th-century Avignon. He graduated as an archiviste-paléographe in 1947.

In the summer of 1947, he and a friend organized an exhibition of paintings at the Palais des Papes, under the guidance of Paris art impresario Christian Zervos. Girard rubbed elbows with Picasso, Matisse, Braque and other luminaries. French actor and director Jean Vilar founded the theater component of the festival, which became the celebrated annual Avignon Festival.

Girard left a few weeks later for Indiana University in Bloomington, perhaps the single most important decision of his life, to launch his academic career. He received his PhD in 1950 with a dissertation on « American Opinion on France, 1940-43. »

« René would never have experienced such a career in France, » said Benoît Chantre, president of Paris’ Association Recherches Mimétiques, one of the organizations that have formed around Girard’s work. « Such a free work could indeed only appear in America. That is why René is, like Tocqueville, a great French thinker and a great French moralist who could yet nowhere exist but in the United States. René ‘discovered America’ in every sense of the word: He made the United States his second country, he made there fundamental discoveries, he is a pure ‘product’ of the Franco-American relationship, he finally revealed the face of an universal – and not an imperial – America. »

At Johns Hopkins University, Girard was one of the organizers for the 1966 conference that introduced French theory and structuralism to America. Lucien Goldmann, Roland Barthes, Jacques Lacan and Jacques Derrida also participated in the standing-room-only event. Girard quipped that he was « bringing la peste to the United States. »

Girard had also been on the faculties at Bryn Mawr, Duke and the State University of New York at Buffalo before he came to Stanford as the inaugural Andrew B. Hammond Professor in French Language, Literature and Civilization in 1981.

Girard was a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and twice a Guggenheim Fellow. He was elected to the Académie Française in 2005, an honor previously given to Voltaire, Jean Racine and Victor Hugo. He also received a lifetime achievement award from the Modern Language Association in 2009. In 2013, King Juan Carlos of Spain awarded him the Order of Isabella the Catholic, a Spanish civil order bestowed for his « profound attachment » to « Spanish culture as a whole. » He was also a Chevalier de la Légion d’honneur and Commandeur des Arts et des Lettres.

Others were impressed, but Girard was never greatly impressed with himself, though his biting wit sometimes rankled critics. Stanford’s Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht, the Albert Guérard Professor in Literature, called him « a great, towering figure – no ostentatiousness. » He added, « It’s not that he’s living his theory – yet there is something of his personality, intellectual behavior and style that goes with his work. I find that very beautiful.

« Despite the intellectual structures built around him, he’s a solitaire. His work has a steel-like quality – strong, contoured, clear. It’s like a rock. It will be there and it will last. »

Girard is survived by his wife of 64 years, Martha, of Stanford; two sons, Daniel, of Hillsborough, California, and Martin, of Seattle; a daughter, Mary Girard Brown, of Newark, California; and nine grandchildren.

Memorial plans have not been announced.

Voir enfin:

Politics
Are Liberals Losing the Culture Wars ?
Tuesday’s elections, which hinged on social issues such as gay rights and pot, call into question Democrats’ insistence that Republicans are out of step with the times.
Molly Ball
The Atlantic
Nov 4, 2015

In Tuesday’s elections, voters rejected recreational marijuana, transgender rights, and illegal-immigrant sanctuaries; they reacted equivocally to gun-control arguments; and they handed a surprise victory to a Republican gubernatorial candidate who emphasized his opposition to gay marriage.

Democrats have become increasingly assertive in taking liberal social positions in recent years, believing that they enjoy majority support and even seeking to turn abortion and gay rights into electoral wedges against Republicans. But Tuesday’s results—and the broader trend of recent elections that have been generally disastrous for Democrats not named Barack Obama—call that view into question. Indeed, they suggest that the left has misread the electorate’s enthusiasm for social change, inviting a backlash from mainstream voters invested in the status quo.

Consider these results:

  • The San Francisco sheriff who had defended the city’s sanctuary policy after a sensational murder by an illegal immigrant was voted out.
  • Two Republican state senate candidates in Virginia were targeted by Everytown for Gun Safety, former New York Mayor Mike Bloomberg’s gun-control group. One won and one lost, leaving the chamber in GOP hands.
  • Matt Bevin, the Republican gubernatorial nominee in Kentucky, pulled out a resounding victory that defied the polls after emphasizing social issues and championing Kim Davis, the county clerk who went to jail rather than issue same-sex marriage licenses. Bevin told the Washington Post on the eve of the vote that he’d initially planned to stress economic issues, but found that “this is what moves people.”

There were particular factors in all of these races: The San Francisco sheriff was scandal-ridden, for example, and the Ohio initiative’s unique provisions divided pro-pot activists. But taken together these results ought to inspire caution among liberals who believe their cultural views are widely shared and a recipe for electoral victory.

Democrats have increasingly seized the offensive on social issues in recent years, using opposition to abortion rights and gay marriage to paint Republican candidates as extreme and backward. In some cases, this has been successful:
Red-state GOP Senate candidates Todd Akin and Richard Mourdock lost after making incendiary comments about abortion and rape in 2012, a year when Obama successfully leaned into cultural issues to galvanize the Democratic base. “The Republican Party from 1968 up to 2008 lived by the wedge, and now they are politically dying by the wedge,” Democratic consultant Chris Lehane told the New York Times last year, a view echoed by worried Republicans urging their party to get with the times.But the Democrats’ culture-war strategy has been less successful when Obama is not on the ballot. Two campaigns that made abortion rights their centerpiece in 2014, Wendy Davis’s Texas gubernatorial bid and Mark Udall’s Senate reelection campaign in Colorado, fell far short. In most of the country, particularly between the coasts, it’s far from clear that regular voters are willing to come to the polls for social change. Gay marriage won four carefully selected blue-state ballot campaigns in 2012 before the Supreme Court took the issue to the finish line this year. Recreational marijuana has likewise been approved only in three blue states plus Alaska. Gun-control campaigners have repeatedly failed to outflank the N.R.A. in down-ballot elections that turned on the issue. Republicans in state offices have liberalized gun laws and restricted abortion, generating little apparent voter backlash.

An upcoming gubernatorial election in Louisiana is turning into a referendum on another hot button issue—crime—with Republican David Vitter charging that his opponent, John Bel Edwards, wants to release “dangerous thugs, drug dealers, back into our neighborhoods.” The strategy, which has been criticized for its racial overtones, may or may not work for Vitter, who is dealing with scandals of his own. Yet many liberals angrily reject the suggestion that the push to reduce incarceration could lead to a political backlash based on anecdotal reports of sensational crimes.

To be sure, Tuesday was an off-off-year election with dismally low voter turnout, waged in just a handful of locales. But liberals who cite this as an explanation often fail to take the next step and ask why the most consistent voters are consistently hostile to their views, or why liberal social positions don’t mobilize infrequent voters. Low turnout alone can’t explain the extent of Democratic failures in non-presidential elections in the Obama era, which have decimated the party in state legislatures, governorships, and the House and Senate. Had the 2012 electorate shown up in 2014, Democrats still would have lost most races, according to Michael McDonald, a University of Florida political scientist, who told me the turnout effect “was worth slightly more than 1 percentage point to Republican candidates in 2014”—enough to make a difference in a few close races, but not much across the board.Liberals love to point out the fractiousness of the GOP, whose dramatic fissures have racked the House of Representatives and tormented party leaders. But as Matt Yglesias recently pointed out, Republican divisions are actually signs of an ideologically flexible big-tent party, while Democrats are in lockstep around an agenda whose popularity they too often fail to question. Democrats want to believe Americans are on board with their vision of social change—but they might win more elections if they meet voters where they really are.

Armes à feu: Quand Hollywood dénonce la violence qu’il a lui-même semée (Who needs the NRA when you’ve got Hollywood ?)

30 octobre, 2015
-inglourious-basterdsDjangochiraq-HatefulEighttarantino-oscar
TarantinoTarantinoDemo
reservoir-dogs
https://jcdurbant.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/oecd.png?w=450&h=261
https://jcdurbant.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/guns_cars.jpg?w=449&h=435
Guns_race
Puisqu’ils ont semé du vent, ils moissonneront la tempête. Osée 8: 7
Si toutes les valeurs sont relatives, alors le cannibalisme est une affaire de goût. Leo Strauss
I’m not too proud of Hollywood these days with the immorality that is shown in pictures, and the vulgarity. I just have a feeling that maybe Hollywood needs some outsiders to bring back decency and good taste to some of the pictures that are being made. Ronald Reagan (1989)
Les images violentes accroissent (…) la vulnérabilité des enfants à la violence des groupes dans la mesure où ceux qui les ont vues éprouvent de sensations, des émotions et des états du corps difficiles à maîtriser et donc angoissants, et qu’ils sont donc particulièrement tentés d’adopter les repères que leur propose leur groupe d’appartenance, voire le leader de ce groupe (…) et rendent la violence ‘ordinaire’ en désensibilisant les spectateurs à ses effets, et elles augmentent la peur d’être soi-même victime de violences, même s’il n’y a pas de risque objectif à cela. Serge Tisseron
Un des jeunes tueurs de Littleton, Eric Harris, avait passé une centaine d’heures à reprogrammer le jeu vidéo Doom pour que tout corresponde plus ou moins à son école (…) [jusqu’à] « incorporer le plan du rez-de-chaussée du lycée Columbine dans son jeu. En outre, il l’avait reprogrammé pour fonctionner « en mode Dieu », où le joueur est invincible. (…) Le 1er décembre 1997, à Paducah (Kentucky), Michael Carneal, alors âgé de 14 ans et armé de six pistolets, avait attendu la fin de la session quotidienne de prière à l’école pour tuer trois fillettes (…) et d’en blesser cinq autres. Lorsque la police a saisi son ordinateur, on a découvert qu’il en était un usager assidu, recherchant souvent sur Internet les films obscènes et violents. Parmi ses favoris, Basketball Diaries et Tueurs nés, film qui a influencé aussi les tueurs de Littleton. (…) En examinant l’ordinateur de Michael Carneal, la police a également découvert qu’il était un passionné de Doom, le fameux jeu qui consiste pour l’essentiel à passer rapidement d’une cible à l’autre et à tirer sur ses « ennemis » en visant surtout la tête. Le jeune Carneal, qui n’avait jamais utilisé d’arme auparavant, a réussi à toucher huit personnes, cinq à la tête, trois à la poitrine, avec seulement huit balles – un exploit considérable même pour un tireur bien entraîné. (…) Le colonel David Grossman, psychologue militaire, qui donne des cours sur la psychologie du meurtre à des Bérets verts et des agents fédéraux, est un témoin-expert dans ce procès. Il fait remarquer que les jeux vidéos consistant à viser et à tirer ont le même effet que les techniques d’entraînement militaire utilisées pour amener le soldat à surmonter son aversion à tuer. Selon lui, ces jeux sont encore plus efficaces que les exercices d’entraînement militaire, si bien que les Marines se sont procurés une version de « Doom » pour entraîner leurs soldats.  Helga Zepp-LaRouche
More ink equals more blood,  newspaper coverage of terrorist incidents leads directly to more attacks. It’s a macabre example of win-win in what economists call a « common-interest game. Both the media and terrorists benefit from terrorist incidents, » their study contends. Terrorists get free publicity for themselves and their cause. The media, meanwhile, make money « as reports of terror attacks increase newspaper sales and the number of television viewers ». Bruno S. Frey (University of Zurich) et Dominic Rohner (Cambridge)
Nous avons constaté que le sport était la religion moderne du monde occidental. Nous savions que les publics anglais et américain assis devant leur poste de télévision ne regarderaient pas un programme exposant le sort des Palestiniens s’il y avait une manifestation sportive sur une autre chaîne. Nous avons donc décidé de nous servir des Jeux olympiques, cérémonie la plus sacrée de cette religion, pour obliger le monde à faire attention à nous. Nous avons offert des sacrifices humains à vos dieux du sport et de la télévision et ils ont répondu à nos prières. Terroriste palestinien (Jeux olympiques de Munich, 1972)
Kidnapper des personnages célèbres pour leurs activités artistiques, sportives ou autres et qui n’ont pas exprimé d’opinions politiques peut vraisemblablement constituer une forme de propagande favorable aux révolutionnaires. ( …) Les médias modernes, par le simple fait qu’ils publient ce que font les révolutionnaires, sont d’importants instruments de propagande. La guerre des nerfs, ou guerre psychologique, est une technique de combat reposant sur l’emploi direct ou indirect des médias de masse.( …) Les attaques de banques, les embuscades, les désertions et les détournements d’armes, l’aide à l’évasion de prisonniers, les exécutions, les enlèvements, les sabotages, les actes terroristes et la guerre des nerfs sont des exemples. Les détournements d’avions en vol, les attaques et les prises de navires et de trains par les guérilleros peuvent également ne viser qu’à des effets de propagande. Carlos Marighela (« Minimanuel de guerilla urbaine », 1969)
Le discours de l’excuse s’est alors trouvé survalorisé, les prises de position normatives ont été rejetées comme politiquement incorrectes et les policiers ont fait office de boucs émissaires. Lucienne Bui Trong
The reality of the job (…) is far less glamorous. (…) As crime has fallen across America since the 1990s, policing has shifted more towards social work than the drama seen on TV. Police culture, however, has not caught up. (…) And as Ms Rahr admits, if you try to recruit cops by telling them they are social workers, fewer may apply. At least part of the glamour of the job is the promise that you get the chance to use violence against bad people in a way that ordinary civilians never can, except in video games. The Economist
La notion des années 1960 selon laquelle les mouvements sociaux seraient une réponse légitime à une injustice sociale a créé l’impression d’une certaine rationalité des émeutes. Les foules ne sont toutefois pas des entités rationnelles. Les émeutes de Londres ont démontré l’existence d’un manque de pensée rationnelle des événements du fait de leur caractère tout à fait spontané et irrationnel. Les pillards ont pillé pour piller et pour beaucoup ce n’était pas nécessairement l’effet d’un sentiment d’injustice. Au cours des émeutes danoises il y avait d’un côté un sens de la rationalité dans les manifestations de jeunes dans la mesure où ils étaient mus par une motivation politique. Cependant, les autres jeunes qui n’étaient pas normalement affiliés à  l’organisation « Ungdomshuset » se sont impliqués dans le  conflit et ont participé aux émeutes sans en partager les objectifs. Ils étaient là pour s’amuser et l’adrénaline a fait le reste. Les émeutes peuvent assumer une dynamique auto-entretenue qui n’est pas mue par des motifs rationnels. Lorsque les individus forment une foule, ils peuvent devenir irrationnels et être motivés par des émotions que génèrent  les émeutes elles-mêmes. L’aspect intéressant des émeutes  de Londres était de confirmer l’inutilité du traitement du phénomène de foule par  une stratégie de communication. La méthode rationnelle n’aboutit à rien contrairement à la forme traditionnelle de confinement. Cela montre bien qu’à certains moments, la solution efficace est de ne pas gérer les foules par le dialogue. Christian Borch
Why manufacture guns that go off when you drop them?. Kids play with guns. We put childproof safety caps on aspirin bottles because if kids take too many aspirin, they get sick. You could blame the parents for gun accidents but, as with aspirin, manufacturers could help. It’s very easy to make childproof guns. »The gun-control debate often makes it look like there are only two options: either take away people’s guns, or not. That’s not it at all. This is more like a harm-reduction strategy. Recognize that there are a lot of guns out there, and that reasonable gun policies can minimize the harm that comes from them. (…) It’s not as if a 19-year-old in the United States is more evil than a 19-year-old in Australia— there’s no evidence for that. But a 19-year-old in America can very easily get a pistol. That’s very hard to do in Australia. So when there’s a bar fight in Australia, somebody gets punched out or hit with a beer bottle. Here, they get shot. (…) What guns do is make crimes lethal. They also make suicide attempts lethal: about 60 percent of suicides in America involve guns. If you try to kill yourself with drugs, there’s a 2 to 3 percent chance of dying. With guns, the chance is 90 percent. (…) In Wyoming it’s hard to have big gang fights. Do you call up the other gang and drive 30 miles to meet up? (…) Handguns are the crime guns. They are the ones you can conceal, the guns you take to go rob somebody. You don’t mug people at rifle-point. (…) We have done four surveys on self-defense gun use. And one thing we know for sure is that there’s a lot more criminal gun use than self-defense gun use. And even when people say they pulled their gun in ‘self-defense,’ it usually turns out that there was just an escalating argument —at some point, people feel afraid and draw guns. (…) How often might you appropriately use a gun in self-defense?.  Answer: zero to once in a lifetime. How about inappropriately —because you were tired, afraid, or drunk in a confrontational situation? There are lots and lots of chances. When your anger takes over, it’s nice not to have guns lying around. (…)  « A determined criminal will always get a gun » (…) Yes, but a lot of people aren’t that determined. I’m sure there are some determined yacht buyers out there, but when you raise the price high enough, a lot of them stop buying yachts. (…)  « You can go to a gun show, flea market, the Internet, or classified ads and buy a gun— no questions asked. (…) For decades, there were no plaintiff victories beyond the appellate level » in the tobacco litigation. Reasonable suits might allege things that the manufacturers could do to make guns safer. (…) People say, ‘Teach kids not to pull the trigger,’ but kids will do it. (…)  You could make it hard to remove a serial number. You won’t eliminate the problem, but you can decrease it. (…) You can arrest speeders, but you can also put speed bumps or chicanes [curved, alternating-side curb extensions] into residential areas where children play….Just as…you can revoke the license of bad doctors, but also build [a medical] environment in which it’s harder to make an error, and the mistakes made are not serious or fatal. (…) We know what works. We know that speed kills, so if you raise speed limits, expect to see more highway deaths. Motorcycle helmets work; seat belts work. Car inspections and driver education have no effect. Right-on-red laws mean more pedestrians hit by cars. (…) The goal at home and abroad is to make sure the guns we have are safe, and that people use them properly. We’d like to create a world where it’s hard to make mistakes with guns— and when you do make a mistake, it’s not a terrible thing.  David Hemenway (Harvard)
On est des Arabes et des Noirs, faut qu’on se soutienne. (…) Les juifs sont les rois car ils bouffent l’argent de l’Etat et, moi, comme je suis noir, je suis considéré comme un esclave par l’Etat. Yousouf Fofana (février 2006)
On est en guerre contre ce pays (…) Ce pays, on le quittera quand il nous rendra ce qu’on nous doit. Tribu Ka (novembre 2006)
Je suis un être humain doué de conscience. Si vous estimez que des meurtres sont commis, alors vous devez vous insurger contre cet état de fait. Je suis ici pour dire que je suis du côté de ceux qui ont été assassinés. Quentin Tarantino
When I see murders, I do not stand by. … I have to call a murder a murder, and I have to call the murderers the murderers. Tarantino
Monsieur Tarantino gagne bien sa vie grâce à ses films, diffusant de la violence dans la société, et montrant du respect pour des criminels. Et maintenant, on se rend compte qu’il déteste les flics. La rhétorique haineuse déshumanise la police et encourage les attaques à notre encontre.  Philadelphia Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 5
Le réalisateur Quentin Tarantino a pris part d’une façon irresponsable et totalement inacceptable à ce qui s’est passé le week-end dernier à New York en assimilant les policiers à des meutriers. Los Angeles Police Protective League
Ce n’est pas étonnant que quelqu’un qui gagne sa vie en glorifiant le crime et la violence déteste les policiers. Les officiers de police que Quentin Tarantino appelle des “meurtriers” ne vivent pas dans l’une de ses fictions dépravées conçues pour le grand écran. Ils prennent des risques et doivent parfois même sacrifier leur vie, afin de protéger les communautés des vrais crimes. Patrick Lynch (syndicaliste policier de New York)
Les syndicats de policiers de New York et de Los Angeles s’insurgent contre les propos tenus par le réalisateur hollywoodien lors d’une récente manifestation contre les violences policières. “Le plus grand syndicat de police de Los Angeles soutient l’appel au boycott des films de Quentin Tarantino lancé par le NYPD [le département de police de New York]”, rapporte le Los Angeles Times. Lors d’une manifestation contre les violences policières organisée samedi 24 octobre dans la Grosse Pomme, le réalisateur a en effet déclaré : “Je suis un être humain doué de conscience. Si vous estimez que des meurtres sont commis, alors vous devez vous insurger contre cet état de fait. Je suis ici pour dire que je suis du côté de ceux qui ont été assassinés.” Cette phrase, prononcée quelques jours seulement “après la mort d’un officier de police du NYPD lors d’une course-poursuite d’un suspect dans le quartier de East Harlem” a mis le feu aux poudres, souligne le quotidien de Los Angeles. Courrier international
Le nouveau film de Spike Lee, Chiraq, suscite la polémique à Chicago, où le tournage vient de débuter. En cause: le titre. Cette expression, contraction de «Chicago» et d’«Iraq», a été inventée par des rappeurs locaux en référence à une zone du sud de la ville où la violence par armes à feu prolifère. Plusieurs hommes politiques ont déjà dénoncé ce titre qui risque, selon eux, d’offrir une vision négative de la ville des vents. Le maire de Chicago Rahm Emanuel (Parti démocrate) a contesté le mois dernier le titre, indiquant que la ville devrait avoir son mot à dire après la réduction fiscale de 3 millions de dollars accordée au long métrage. Les Chicagoans, confrontés chaque jour à la violence, voient eux aussi d’un mauvais œil le tournage, rapporte le New York Times. Janelle Rush, une étudiante de 24 ans citée par le quotidien américain, n’apprécie pas le titre, mais pense «qu’il serait judicieux de montrer les quartiers de la ville que les médias ne montrent pas». Elle espère cependant «que[ce film] pourra renverser la tendance et présenter [Chicago] sous un aspect positif. Pour révéler qu’il y a autre chose que la violence par armes à feu». Le Figaro
Every time a Quentin Tarantino film comes out, his critics attack him with a vehemence as vivid as his on-screen carnage. Sure, he’s a cinematic virtuoso, but that only fuels their rancor. He’s so talented; now will he please grow up? We hope not. So much of today’s entertainment is either infantile or geriatric: the comedies about farts and body parts (the cult of Adam Sandler) and the pensive portraits of sensitive misfits (the curse of Sundance). In this dank atmosphere, Tarantino’s teen-boy fixations — men with gigantic guns, beautiful gals with mean mouths — are a real tonic. At 42, he still has a movie love as convulsive as a schoolboy’s crush, still has a young man’s bravado. He’ll attempt anything, from the ricocheting narratives of Pulp Fiction to the single-plot, two-part Kill Bill. And since he’s got gifts to match his guts, he can pull off these cool stunts. Who else even tries? Some of the best people, actually, all of whom have benefited from Tarantino’s trailblazing. Screenwriter Charlie Kaufman’s movies are as depressive as Tarantino’s are manic, but he shares Q.T.’s fondness for subverting structure and for dialogue as ornate as an aria. Kevin Smith (Clerks, Dogma) brandishes a Tarantinish expertise in trash culture. Robert Rodriguez, a frequent collaborator, has paid lavish homage to Pulp Fiction in his three-story Sin City, part of which Q.T. directed. The bad news with Tarantino is that each successive film takes longer (two years, three, six) to produce — and that he’s threatened to retire before he’s 60. « I’m not going to be this old guy that keeps cranking them out, » he has said. In that case, Q.T., crank ’em out faster, right now. The world needs lots more movies from this incorrigible, irreplaceable adolescent. Richard Corliss (Time)
Quentin Tarantino has been named the most-studied director in the UK. A survey of 17 academics by the recently-relaunched PureMovies.co.uk film website found that the controversial director had been referenced more than any other in the essays and dissertations marked over the last five years. (…) Head of Film Studies at Uxbridge College Dr Garth Twa said: « It’s no surprise. Tarantino is visceral, accessible, and students new to film studies have an immediate handle on visual pleasure. What is great about Tarantino is that he can serve as a gateway to appreciate everything from the French New Wave to genre studies to gender representation in film. Digital spy
Tarantino’s films have garnered both critical and commercial success. He has received many industry awards, including two Academy Awards, two Golden Globe Awards, two BAFTA Awards and the Palme d’Or, and has been nominated for an Emmy and a Grammy. He was named one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World by Time in 2005. Filmmaker and historian Peter Bogdanovich has called him « the single most influential director of his generation ». Wikipedia
I think it’s absolutely not only appropriate, but overdue, to have a dialogue » about violence on screen When I was driving along the street the other day in L.A., I saw two billboards where guns were featured prominently … with a pleasant, happy-looking young couple…. My thought was: ‘Does my industry think guns will help sell tickets? Robert Redford
Reservoir Dogs est un film de gangsters américain réalisé par Quentin Tarantino et sorti en 1992. Il décrit une bande de truands et les événements qui surviennent avant et après un braquage raté. (…) Dans la planque, Pink et White discutent ensuite du comportement de psychopathe de Blonde, qui a tué plusieurs civils. Pink s’oppose ensuite à la volonté de White d’emmener Orange à l’hôpital et les deux hommes, à bout de nerfs, finissent par se braquer mutuellement, Blonde faisant son apparition à ce moment-là. Il les informe qu’Eddie Cabot est en route pour les rejoindre, puis qu’il a réussi à capturer un policier. (…) Tandis que les trois hommes interrogent le policier, Eddie Cabot arrive et, persuadé que personne ne les a balancés, s’emporte contre les gangsters et demande à White et à Pink de le suivre jusqu’à l’endroit où ce dernier a caché les diamants, laissant Blonde avec le policier et Orange, évanoui et se vidant de son sang. (…)  Blonde met la radio et, dansant sur Stuck in the Middle with You de Stealers Wheel, se met à torturer le policier pour le plaisir : il lui coupe une oreille au rasoir, l’asperge d’essence et s’apprête à le faire brûler vif quand Orange, sorti de sa torpeur, dégaine son pistolet et vide son chargeur sur Blonde. Wikipedia
The thing that I am really proud of in the torture scene in Dogs with Mr. Blonde, Michael Madsen, is the fact that it’s truly funny up until the point that he cuts the cop’s ear off. While he’s up there doing that little dance to “Stuck in the Middle With You,” I pretty much defy anybody to watch and not enjoy it. He’s enjoyable at it, you know? He’s cool. And then when he starts cutting the ear off, that’s not played for laughs. The cop’s pain is not played like one big joke, it’s played for real. And then after that when he makes a joke, when he starts talking in the ear, that gets you laughing again. So now you’ve got his coolness and his dance, the joke of talking into the ear and the cop’s pain, they’re all tied up together. And that’s why I think that scene caused such a sensation, because you don’t know how you’re supposed to feel when you see it. Quentin Tarentino
I do think it’s a cultural catharsis, and it’s a cinematic catharsis. Even — it can even be good for the soul, actually. I mean, not to sound like a brute, but one of the things though that I actually think can be a drag for a whole lot of people about watching a movie about, either dealing with slavery or dealing with the Holocaust, is just, it’s just going to be pain, pain and more pain. And at some point, all those Holocaust TV movies — it’s like, ‘God, I just can’t watch another one of these.’ But to actually take an action story and put it in that kind of backdrop where slavery or the pain of World War II is the backdrop of an exciting adventure story — that can be something else. And then in my adventure story, I can have the people who are historically portrayed as the victims be the victors and the avengers. Tarantino
What happened during slavery times is a thousand times worse than [what] I show. So if I were to show it a thousand times worse, to me, that wouldn’t be exploitative, that would just be how it is. If you can’t take it, you can’t take it. (…) Now, I wasn’t trying to do a Schindler’s List you-are-there-under-the-barbed-wire-of-Auschwitz. I wanted the film to be more entertaining than that. … But there’s two types of violence in this film: There’s the brutal reality that slaves lived under for … 245 years, and then there’s the violence of Django’s retribution. And that’s movie violence, and that’s fun and that’s cool, and that’s really enjoyable and kind of what you’re waiting for. (…) The only thing that I’ve ever watched in a movie that I wished I’d never seen is real-life animal death or real-life insect death in a movie. That’s absolutely, positively where I draw the line. And a lot of European and Asian movies do that, and we even did that in America for a little bit of time. … I don’t like seeing animals murdered on screen. Movies are about make-believe. … I don’t think there’s any place in a movie for real death. (…)There haven’t been that many slave narratives in the last 40 years of cinema, and usually when there are, they’re usually done on television, and for the most part … they’re historical movies, like history with a capital H. Basically, ‘This happened, then this happened, then that happened, then this happened.’ And that can be fine, well enough, but for the most part they keep you at arm’s length dramatically. (…) There haven’t been that many slave narratives in the last 40 years of cinema, and usually when there are, they’re usually done on television, and for the most part … they’re historical movies, like history with a capital H. Basically, ‘This happened, then this happened, then that happened, then this happened.’ And that can be fine, well enough, but for the most part they keep you at arm’s length dramatically. Because also there is this kind of level of good taste that they’re trying to deal with … and frankly oftentimes they just feel like dusty textbooks just barely dramatized. (…) I like the idea of telling these stories and taking stories that oftentimes — if played out in the way that they’re normally played out — just end up becoming soul-deadening, because you’re just watching victimization all the time. And now you get a chance to put a spin on it and actually take a slave character and give him a heroic journey, make him heroic, make him give his payback, and actually show this epic journey and give it the kind of folkloric tale that it deserves — the kind of grand-opera stage it deserves. (…) The Westerns of the ’50s definitely have an Eisenhower, birth of suburbia and plentiful times aspect to them. America started little by little catching up with its racist past by the ’50s, at the very, very beginning of [that decade], and that started being reflected in Westerns. Consequently, the late ’60s have a very Vietnam vibe to the Westerns, leading into the ’70s. And by the mid-’70s, you know, most of the Westerns literally could be called ‘Watergate Westerns,’ because it was about disillusionment and tearing down the myths that we have spent so much time building up. Quentin Tarantino
I just think you know there’s violence in the world, tragedies happen, blame the playmakers. It’s a western. Give me a break. Quentin Tarantino
Les films traitant de l’Holocauste représentent toujours les juifs comme des victimes. Je connais cette histoire. Je veux voir quelque chose de différent. Je veux voir des Allemands qui craignent les juifs. Ne tombons pas dans le misérabilisme et faisons plutôt un film d’action fun. Quentin Tarantino
Pourquoi me condamnerait-on ? Parce que j’étais trop brutal avec les nazis ? Quentin Tarantino
J’avais envie que Django Unchained traite du voyage initiatique de mon personnage et que l’esclavagisme n’apparaisse qu’en toile de fond. Pour moi, l’histoire avait plus de sens, était plus puissante, si elle était présentée à travers un genre comme le western spaghetti qui permet l’aventure et une forme d’excitation absente des films historiques. Quentin Tarantino
Due to the terrible tragedy in Newtown, Connecticut, and out of honour and respect for the families of the victims whose lives were senselessly taken, we are postponing the Pittsburgh premiere of Jack Reacher. Our hearts go out to all those who lost loved ones. Reacher, which stars Tom Cruise, features a sniper attack. Spokesman for Paramount Pictures
Ainsi que le veut le genre du western, souvent comparé à la tragédie grecque, les grands sentiments sont là – l’amour et la haine –, mais le mélange est saugrenu, exorbitant, selon les principes de l’esthétique kitsch postmoderne, qui offre toutes les émotions possibles juxtaposées, comme les produits variés dans un supermarché. Car la signature de Tarantino promet une violence excessive, « gratuite », comme elle a été souvent définie, conjuguée à une ambition morale qui se pare d’amoralité (ou vice versa) : les bons sentiments politiquement corrects et les mauvais sentiments politiquement incorrects sont malaxés dans l’effervescence des images, de l’intrigue, des dialogues. Et, comme dans le style postmoderne, les passions tragiques et le sentimentalisme mélodramatique sont combinés au plaisir de la comédie et de la farce : la caricature des personnages méprisables – tel le propriétaire de Candyland (!), Calvin, homme cruel et sanguinaire, passionné de lutte Mandingo – provoque le rire plus que l’indignation, et une ironie délicieuse émane de l’adorable docteur Schultz (Christoph Waltz), chasseur de primes, anti-esclavagiste convaincu, qui fait le mal pour le bien. Quant aux mauvais sentiments, au langage obscène, à la profusion du terme « nigger », ils correspondent à ce que Tarantino adore et ce sur quoi on n’arrête pas de l’interroger : une brutalité extrême qui indique que, pour lui, le cinéma n’a pas grand-chose à voir avec la réalité du monde et de ses malheurs, mais avec l’infinie réalité des images filmiques, inséparables des armes à feu, assaisonnées de conversations qui attrapent au vol des débris de discours politico-sociaux contemporains, que ce soit la misère des non-salariés, comme dans la conversation initiale de « Reservoir Dogs » (1992), ou le nazisme dans « Inglorious Basterds » (2009), ou le racisme américain dans ce dernier film. Le mixage des émotions ne fait qu’exalter l’impureté caractéristique des arts et du cinéma en particulier, où règnent l’adaptation, l’inspiration, la citation, le remake, l’hommage à une œuvre du passé, voire le pillage. Sans parler du va-et-vient le plus composite entre l’image filmique et la bande-son, cher à ces réalisateurs qui, depuis les années 1960, sont imbus de musique pop. (…) Un bric-à-brac de genres, sous-genres et contre-genres chante la gloire des œuvres populaires, dans le bruit des lames de couteau et des armes à feu, où l’on tue comme on mange des cacahuètes, dans le rythme vertigineux de l’action et des dialogues interminables, dans la filiation des « Trois Mousquetaires », œuvre qui orne la bibliothèque de Calvin Candie. On comprend la différence entre le cinéphile et le geek : le populaire absolu du western de Tarantino sorti en France en janvier 2013, contrairement aux « westerns » urbains de Scorsese dans les années 1970 ou au western mystique « Dead Man » (1995) de Jim Jarmusch, n’est pas profond. Mais, divertissement, pure surface, il surfe sur les choses et les idées, comme les accents — allemand ou du Sud — colorent les voix des acteurs, ou les effets spéciaux, les décors et les gros plans style télé de « Django Unchained » frappent les yeux et les esprits le temps d’un éclair. On peut regretter la pensée de la caméra et la cruelle intensité existentielle de « Reservoir Dogs », mais on a du plaisir et on est gagné par le bonheur des acteurs et du metteur en scène s’adonnant à fond à cette activité inépuisable chez les êtres humains : faire semblant. Patrizia Lombardo (Professeur de littérature et de cinéma)
Tarantino a définitivement fait taire les accusations à l’encontre de ses films jugés fun, cool, mais vides et inconséquents, en s’engageant dans ce qu’il nomme « une trilogie politique et historique sur l’oppression », commencée en 2009 avec « Inglourious Basterds ». L’accusation d’esthétisation de la violence, devenue un objet de spectacle gratuit, décontextualisé de toute mise en perspective morale ou politique, semble certes tomber en désuétude derrière le choix récent de sujets politiques sensibles – les Juifs durant la Seconde Guerre mondiale et l’esclavage afro-américain. Mais, le tournant en apparence politique que prend le cinéma de Tarantino cache une violence tout autant injustifiée qui mérite d’être réinterrogée. (…) Depuis « Kill Bill », on peut résumer l’ensemble des films de Tarantino à des récits de vengeance, thème de prédilection du cinéaste. Chacun des films use d’un processus de justification souvent simpliste et conservateur (..) Que la vengeance relève de motivations personnelles ou plus universelles, elle semble ainsi perdre de son caractère gratuit, sous couvert d’un argumentaire en surface politisant bien rodé. Le premier volet de la « trilogie de l’oppression », « Inglourious Basterds », vient à première vue satisfaire un fantasme de revanche contre les plus grands méchants désignés par l’histoire de l’humanité. La violence contre les nazis serait ici une juste rétribution. Eli Roth, réalisateur ultra-violent de la série « Hostel », décrit ainsi le film comme du « porno kasher » : « ça relève presque d’une satisfaction sexuelle profonde de vouloir tuer des nazis, d’un orgasme presque. Mon personnage tue des nazis. Je peux regarder ça en boucle ». Lawrence Bender, le producteur, déclare à Tarantino : « en tant que membre de la communauté juive, je te remercie, parce que ce film est un putain de rêve pour les juifs ». Pour défendre la violence de son film, le cinéaste explique lui-même avoir voulu rompre avec les traditions politiquement correctes (…) Ce choix esthétique met le sujet historique au second plan et vient prouver implicitement qu’il n’a aucune perspective morale – ceci expliquant les nombreuses accusations de révisionnisme à l’encontre du film. Lorsqu’un journaliste lui fait d’ailleurs remarquer que la violence excessive contre les nazis puisse offenser certains spectateurs, Tarantino lui répond avec une désinvolture déconcertante : « Pourquoi me condamnerait-on ? Parce que j’étais trop brutal avec les nazis ? ». « Django Unchained » est donc une réponse évidente à « Inglourious Basterds ». À nouveau, le sujet politique de fond, l’esclavage américain, semble évincé, bien qu’étant présenté comme l’argument promotionnel premier des discours de Tarantino qui répète sans hésiter qu’il a la capacité et la légitimité de faire un film sur ce sujet. (…)  Tarantino pense pourtant réaliser le film sur l’esclavage « que l’Amérique n’a jamais voulu faire parce qu’elle en a honte ». Dans le fond, l’idéologie et la réflexion politique intéresse peu Tarantino. L’esclavage est une nouvelle configuration de ses récits de vengeance, une nouvelle exploration d’un genre cinématographique, ici le western spaghetti.  À nouveau l’argument du fun, de l’excitation, vient secondariser le sujet politique. Tarantino préfère dédramatiser son propos au risque de le décontextualiser. La vengeance de Django ne semble d’ailleurs pas animée de motivations politiques. Il fait preuve de cruauté aussi bien en massacrant les oppresseurs blancs, qu’en humiliant d’autres esclaves noirs. Le film se termine sur la mort sadique par Django du traitre noir, devenu une caricature de l’oncle Tom, ami des blancs. Devenu à son tour l’opprimé oppresseur, Django s’enfuit victorieux du massacre final, paradoxalement en endossant fièrement le costume de M. Candie, le négrier monstrueux qu’il a sévèrement corrigé. L’usage de la violence était déjà tout autant problématique à la fin d’ »Inglourious Basterds ». Durant l’Opération Kino, les nazis nous sont d’abord présentés comme un public extatique devant la violence des images de leur film de propagande. Mais dans un effet de renversement, c’est ensuite les Basterds et Shoshanna qui nous sont présentés dans le même rôle du public jouissant de la violence du spectacle. Les « Basterds » transforment d’ailleurs rapidement leur croisade, non en leçon morale d’humanité, mais plutôt en spectacle trivial, se moquant sans impunité des soldats allemands. En décontextualisant idéologiquement les sujets politiques de fond, Tarantino facilite en un sens la consommation de son cinéma, au profit d’un plaisir plus immédiat avec ses spectateurs, dénué de toute moralisation. Mais il propose dans le même temps une vision réductrice, fétichisée, simplifiant souvent l’Histoire à l’histoire du cinéma. Cela peut paraître cool de citer des discours transgressifs sur la violence mais, sur le mode de la fétichisation, Tarantino occulte tout l’arrière-plan historique. Célia Sauvage
One reason slave owners wouldn’t have pitted their slaves against each other in such a way is strictly economic. Slavery was built upon money, and the fortune to be made for owners was in buying, selling, and working them, not in sending them out to fight at the risk of death. David Blight (Yale)
Slaves were sometimes sent to fight for their owners; it just wasn’t to the death. Tom Molineaux was a Virginia slave who won his freedom—and, for his owner, $100,000—after winning a match against another slave. He went on to become the first black American to compete for the heavyweight championship when he fought the white champion Tom Cribb in England in 1810. (He lost.) According to Frederick Douglass, wrestling and boxing for sport, like festivals around holidays, were “among the most effective means in the hands of the slaveholder in keeping down the spirit of insurrection.” Aisha Harris
My area of expertise is slavery, Civil War, and reconstruction and I have never encountered something like that. It was rumored to have occurred. I don’t know that it was called Mandingo Fighting, however, but there were all sorts of things going on in the South pitting people against one another. To the death, I’ve never encountered anything like that, no. That doesn’t mean that it didn’t happen in some backwater area, but I’ve never seen any evidence of it. (…) It’s a stretch because enslaved people are property, and people don’t want to lose their property unless they’re being reimbursed for it. It would seem odd to me that someone would allow his enslaved laborer to fight to the death because someone like that would cost them a lot of money. But then it’s a gambling enterprise so maybe someone would be willing to do that. I’ve looked at slave narratives and I’ve never seen something like that in slave narratives. Edna Greene Medford (Howard University)
It’s the “new sadism” in cinema – the wave of films in which violence is graphic, bloody but always underpinned by irony or gallows humour. There is something disconcerting about sitting in a crowded cinema as an audience guffaws at the latest garroting or falls about in hysterics as someone is beheaded or has a limb lopped off. Many recent movies squeeze the comedy out of what would normally seem like horrific acts of bloodletting. (…)  In Quentin Tarantino’s films, the violence, torture and bloodletting sit side by side with wisecracking dialogue and moments of slapstick. His latest, Django Unchained, features whippings, brutal wrestling matches and one scene in which dogs rip a slave to pieces. We know, though, that Tarantino’s tongue is in his cheek. Scenes that would be very hard to stomach in a conventional drama are lapped up by spectators who know all about the director’s love of genre and delight in pastiching old spaghetti Westerns. A certain sadism has always defined crime movies. (…) Nor is there anything new in making very dry comedy out of violence and death. (…) What has changed now is that genre lines have become very blurred. (…) Ideas that might have previously been confined to exploitation pics have spilled into the mainstream. In the era of computer games like Call of Duty and Assassin’s Creed, death isn’t taken very seriously. Film-makers with no direct experience of war beyond what they’ve seen in other movies regard staging killings as just another part of cinematic rhetoric. At the same time, state-of-the art make-up and digital effects enable violence to be shown in far greater and bloodier detail than ever before. Tarantino turns to heavy political and historical topics (the Holocaust in Inglourious Basterds, slavery in Django Unchained) but tips us the wink as he does so. One problem he and others face is the literal quality of film. When a slave is being flayed or a police officer is having his ear cut off, it isn’t always possible to put inverted commas round the scene and let the audience know that this horrific moment is stylised and shouldn’t be taken too seriously. (…) Acts of killing define the new sadism in cinema. The challenge now for film-makers is jolting audiences who’ve already seen death portrayed so many times on screen before. When they get it right, they can create scenes of extraordinary power and beauty – and they can use humour to distance themselves from the charge that they are being exploitative. Even so, the film-makers themselves sometimes appear just a little bashful about the enormous body counts in their work. The US premiere of Django Unchained was postponed after the Connecticut school massacre in mid December. The real-life incident in which a lone gunman killed 20 school children made it seem perverse and tasteless to celebrate Tarantino’s comic-book violence. (…) Even so, what’s often startling about the new sadism in cinema is the disregard for the victims, who are treated as walk-on props, there to be dispensed with in the most humorous, bloody and imaginative way possible. In 1989, Danny Boyle produced (and conceived) Alan Clarke’s Elephant – a TV movie set at the height of the Troubles in Northern Ireland. This was an essay about killing. Eighteen random murders were shown. Viewers learnt nothing at all about the killers or the victims. The film-makers were reminding us how desensitised we had become to sectarian violence in Northern Ireland. A quarter of a century on, that casual detachment about death has become a staple of mainstream cinema. Geoffrey Mcnab
The most confusing moment in Quentin Tarantino’s new film, Django Unchained , comes in the final credits. The viewer sees an assurance from the American Humane Association that no animals were harmed in the film’s making. In this movie, set in the south before the US civil war, slaves get tied to trees and whipped. A naked black wrestler is ordered to bash another’s head in with a very big hammer. Dogs chew a runaway slave to pieces. This is to set the stage for an exuberant massacre of white men and women at the close. Mr Tarantino lingers over his victims as they writhe, gasp and scream in agony. One walks out of Django worried less about Mr Tarantino’s attitude towards animals than about his attitude towards people. A.O. Scott, The New York Times critic, calls it a “troubling and important movie about slavery and racism”. He is wrong. (…) The period detail sometimes seems accurate (slaveholders may have flung the word “nigger” around as often as Mr Tarantino’s characters do), and sometimes does not (there never was any such thing as “Mandingo fighting”). Of course, we must not mistake a feature film for a public television documentary – Mr Tarantino’s purpose is to entertain, not to enlighten. But this is why the film is neither important nor troubling, except as a cultural symptom. Django uses slavery the way a pornographic film might use a nurses’ convention: as a pretext for what is really meant to entertain us. What is really meant to entertain us in Django is violence. Mr Scott writes that “vengeance in the American imagination has been the virtually exclusive prerogative of white men”. Cinematically, black people should get to partake in “regenerative violence” the way white people have for so long. He adds: “Think about that when the hand-wringing starts about Django Unchained and ask yourself why the violence in this movie will suddenly seem so much more problematic, so much more regrettable, than what passes without comment in Jack Reacher or Taken 2.” But this now-the-shoe’s-on-the-other-foot argument is disingenuous. In no major US film do white people exact racial vengeance of the sort Django does. And Mr Tarantino’s love of violence is not “suddenly” problematic. It is the sole pleasure anyone could possibly take in his first film, the appalling Reservoir Dogs.Pulp Fiction and Jackie Brown, for all their situational irony and madcap humour, also have memorable scenes of horrific violence. But Mr Tarantino’s last two films have taken a strange turn. He has not just shown cruelty but tried to politicise and ennoble it. Inglourious Basterds features a gang of American Jews who travel around Germany scalping Nazis and smashing their heads with baseball bats. It ends with a torture scene (one of our heroes carves a swastika into a Nazi’s head) that we are surely meant to enjoy. Nazis and slaveholders, of course, are stock villains of political correctness. Film-makers have been killing them off for decades. What is novel about Mr Tarantino is his fussy, lawyerly setting of ground rules to broaden the circumstances in which one can kill with joy and impunity. Scalping is OK because “a Nazi ain’t got no humanity”. Django can kneecap the plantation major-domo Stephen (Samuel L. Jackson) because he has stipulated at the start of the film that there is “nothing lower than a head house-nigger”. Of course, Stephen is more the slave system’s victim than its representative. He is a slave. The indignities visited on various slaves (“After this we’ll see if you break eggs again!” hollers one brute as he gets ready to whip a young woman) serve to make us comfortable with the final racial retribution, even though Django’s vengeance claims white people (hillbillies and jailers) who have no more control over the system than Stephen. (…) Where Mr Tarantino sees a solidarity with the victims of the past, others might see a contemporary white American eager to believe that, given the opportunity, other peoples of yesteryear would have behaved as shabbily as his own people did.  Christopher Caldwell
The American film industry is the second great pillar of the gun culture. And it’s not just Clint Eastwood’s Smith & Wesson from Dirty Harry, which, as everyone who lived through the 1970s knows, was then “the most powerful handgun in the world,” able to “blow your head clean off.” Hollywood’s cameras adore weapons of any kind, and pay them loving heed in movies of every political persuasion. Think of the close-up on Rambo’s machine gun as it spasms its way through an ammo belt in the 1985 installment of the series, or the shell casings tinkling delicately on the floor as cops die by the dozens in The Matrix (1999), or the heroic slo-mo of Sean Penn’s tommy gun in Gangster Squad (2013), or the really special Soviet submachine gun that everyone lusts after in Jack Abramoff’s 1989 action movie Red Scorpion. It’s the mother of all product placements, and as far as we know it doesn’t cost the arms makers a dime. Even more delectable is the effect that guns have on human flesh, a phenomenon so titillating for moviemakers that it often surpasses the pleasures of plot and dialogue. Discussing the many, many graphic shootings in his recent Django Unchained, for example, director Quentin Tarantino identifies screen violence as the reason most viewers go to his movies in the first place. “That’s fun, and that’s cool, and that’s really enjoyable,” he told NPR. “And kind of what you’re waiting for. » (…)  In Tarantino’s pseudohistorical revenge fantasies, humans are oversize water balloons just waiting to be popped, so that they can spurt their exciting red contents over walls and bystanders. The role of the star is relatively simple: he or she must make those human piñatas give up their payload. Yes, there are plots along the way, clever ones wherein Tarantino burnishes his controversial image by daring to take on such sacred cows as Nazis and slave owners. But the nonstars in his movies mainly exist to beg for their lives and then be orgasmically deprived of them, spouting blood like so many harpooned porpoises. Okay, I got carried away there. Let me catch my breath and admit it: Tarantino would never show someone harpooning a porpoise. After all, a line in the credits for Django Unchained declares that “no horses were harmed in the making of this movie.” But harpooning a human? After having first blasted off the human’s balls and played a sunny pop song from the Seventies while the human begged for mercy in the background? No problem. The movies I describe here are essentially advertisements for mass murder. You can also read them in dozens of other ways, I know. You can talk about Tarantino’s clever and encyclopedically allusive command of genre, or about how the latest Batman movie advances the “franchise,” or about the inky shady shadowiness of, well, nearly everything the industry cranks out nowadays. And to give them their due, most of the movies I’ve mentioned take pains to clarify that what they depict are good-guy-on-bad-guy murders — which makes homicide okay, maybe even wholesome. In decades past, let’s recall, there was a fashion for viewing the gangster film as a delicate metaphor, interesting mainly for the dark existentialism it spotlighted in our souls. But today, as I absorb the blunt aesthetic blows of one ultraviolent film after another, all I can make of it is that Hollywood, for reasons of its own, is hopelessly enamored of homicide. The plot is barely there anymore. Good guys and bad guys are hopelessly jumbled, their motives as vague as those of the Sandy Hook shooter, Adam Lanza. A movie like The Dark Knight Rises (2012) is nearly impossible to make sense of; only its many murders hold it together. All the rest shrinks, but the act of homicide expands, ramifies, multiplies madly. And what can we read in this act itself? Well, most obviously, that ordinary humans are weak and worth little, that they achieve beauty only when they are brought to efflorescence by the discharge of a star’s sidearm. Also: killers are glamorous creatures. And lastly: society and law are futile exercises. Whether we’re dealing with vigilantes, hit men, or a World War II torture squad, nobody can shield us from the power of an armed man. (Except, of course, another armed man, as Wayne LaPierre and Hollywood never tire of informing us.) For the industry itself, meanwhile, so many things come together in the act of murder — audience pleasure, actor coolness, the appearance of art — that everything else is essentially secondary. Hence the basic principles of Hollywood’s antisocial faith. A man isn’t really a man if he can’t use a shotgun to change the seat of another man’s soul into so much garbage. Or if he doesn’t know how to fire a pistol sideways, signifying that thuggish disregard for who or what gets caught in the spray of bullets. [*] Yet few of them complained about Tarantino’s 2009 slice of war porn, Inglourious Basterds, since the people being tortured so graphically and so hilariously by a U.S. Army hit squad were Nazis. At times, my erudite liberal colleagues have no problem understanding this. They’re quick to characterize Zero Dark Thirty (2012) as an advertisement for torture and other Bush-era outrages.[*] It’s sadism!, they cry. But the larger sadism that is obviously the film industry’s truest muse . . . that they don’t want to discuss. Bring that up and the conversation is immediately suspended in favor of legal arguments about censorship, free speech, and the definition of “incitement.” Movies can’t be said to have caused mass murders, they correctly point out. Not even Natural Born Killers (1994) — a movie that insists on the complicity of the media in romanticizing murderers, that itself proceeds to romanticize murderers, and that has been duly shadowed by a long string of alleged copycat murders, including the Columbine massacre. No, these are works of art. And art is, you know, all edgy and defiant and shit. Not surprisingly, Quentin Tarantino has lately become the focus for this sort of criticism. The fact that Django Unchained arrived in theaters right around the time of the Sandy Hook massacre didn’t help. Yet he has refused to give an inch in discussing the link between movie violence and real life. “Obviously I don’t think one has to do with the other,” he told an NPR interviewer. “Movies are about make-believe. It’s about imagination. Part of the thing is we’re trying to create a realistic experience, but we are faking it.” Is it possible that anyone in our cynical world credits a self-serving sophistry like this? Of course an industry under fire will claim that its hands are clean, just as the NRA has done — and of course a favorite son, be it Tarantino or LaPierre, can be counted on to make the claim louder than anyone else. But do they really believe that imaginative expression is without consequence? One might as well claim that advertising itself has no effect — because the spokesmen aren’t really enjoying that Sprite, you know, only pretending to. Or that TV speeches don’t matter, since the politician’s words are strung together for dramatic effect, and are not themselves a show of official force. To insist on a full, pristine separation of the dramatic imagination from the way humans actually behave is to fly in the face of nearly everything we know about cultural history. For centuries, people misinterpreted the reign of Richard III because of a play by Shakespeare. The revival of the Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s was advanced by D. W. Griffith’s Birth of a Nation. In our own era, millions of Americans believe in the righteous innocence of businessmen because of a novel by Ayn Rand. And here is why I personally will never believe it when the film industry claims its products have no effect on human behavior. Like every American, I carry around in my head a collection of sights and sounds that I will never be able to erase, no matter what I think about Hollywood. To this day, those bits of dialogue and those filmed images affect the way I do everything from answering the phone to pruning my roses. I can’t get on my Honda scooter without recalling Steve McQueen in The Great Escape, or look out an airplane window without remembering The Best Years of Our Lives. When I shot at paper targets in the Boy Scouts, I thought of Sergeant York, and should I ever become an L.A. cop I will probably mimic the mannerisms of Ryan Gosling in Gangster Squad. I doubt very much that we will see effective gun control enacted this time around. (…) The political arm of the gun culture, headquartered at the big NRA building in northern Virginia, is still powerful enough to block any meaningful change. However, the other pillar of the gun culture — the propaganda bureau relaxing in the Los Angeles sun — is much more vulnerable. Its continued well-being depends to a real degree on the approbation and collaboration of critics. Which is to say that my colleagues in journalism are, in part, responsible for this monster. We have fostered it with puff pieces and softball interviews and a thousand “press junkets” — the free vacations for journalists that secure avalanches of praise for a movie before anyone has seen it. This refusal on the part of critics to criticize is what has allowed Quentin Tarantino to be crowned a cinematic genius of our time.  It is time for the boot-licking to end. Mick LaSalle, film critic for the San Francisco Chronicle, recently recalled how he self-censored a review of The Dark Knight Rises, declining to say in print that he found it to be “a wallow in nonstop cruelty and destruction.” But in the wake of the Connecticut school massacre, LaSalle explained, he had come around to a new understanding of critical responsibility. “If movies are cruel and nihilistic, say so,” he wrote. “Say it explicitly. Don’t run from that observation.” It’s a lesson that every one of us in journalism ought to be taking to heart these days. It is our job to say it explicitly — to tell the world what god-awful heaps of cliché and fake profundity and commercialized sadism this industry produces. The fake blood spilled by Hollywood cries out for it. Thomas Frank

Attention: une NRA peut en cacher une autre !

Fascination malsaine pour la violence, stylisation et magnification de l’extrême violence, désamorçage de toute réflexion par l’ironie et la parodie, décontextualisation totale de sujets politiques ou historiques aussi problématiques que la Shoah ou l’esclavage aux Etats-Unis, extrême amoralité, recherche du plaisir immédiat pour le spectateur, virtuosité gratuite et tapageuse, systématisation de la citation jusqu’au pillage, mélange vertigineux de genres et de sous-genres, hypersurficialité, réduction de l’Histoire à  l’histoire du cinéma, multipliation des invraisemblances (quel intérêt pour un propriétaire d’esclaves – comme d’ailleurs dans « 12 years a slave » – de maltraiter une force de travail extrêmement coûteuse ?) et des anachronismes (pas de Ku Klu Klan avant la Guerre de succession) …

En ces temps décidément étranges où l’on célèbre, sur fond de culture de l’excuse généralisée et stèles et noms de rues compris, les explosions communauaires de violence ….

Et à l’heure où, non contents de prôner le contrôle des armes et de dénoncer les brutalités policières aux Etats-Unis …

Un Hollywood qui, avec Spike Lee et Quentin Tarentino nous avait déjà valu des scènes d’une rare cruauté notamment contre les policiers, sort deux nouvelles odes à la violence

Se permet à présent d’accuser les policiers de meurtres et de prendre le parti de ceux qui les tuent …

Comment ne pas voir avec les quelques critiques qui osent braver la permissivité ambiante …

Non seulement l’incroyable mauvaise foi d’une industrie qui inspire tant les criminels que les policiers eux-mêmes …

Mais l’inquiétante escalade de violence que peuvent générer, dans la profession elle-même et au-delà dans la société en général, des réalisateurs aussi brillants et influents qu’un Quentin Tarantino

Dans un flot continu de jeux vidéos toujours plus réalistes, de véritable snuff videos djihadistes et de médias toujours plus demandeurs

Mais aussi, au niveau national comme international et sans compter une circulation des armes exponentielle, de revendications identitaires toujours plus exacerbées ?

Et surtout comment ne pas presque physiquement ressentir, quand pour ses deux derniers films, ils choisit de traiter des questions historiques aussi majeures que l’esclavage aux Etats-Unis ou le nazisme …

Le plus grand mépris dont il fait montre tant pour la réalité historique que pour la vie humaine ?

Blood Sport
Thomas Frank
Harper’s

March 2013

For a time in December, it looked as though the nation was finally ready to take on the gun culture. Perhaps you recall the moment: twenty grade-schoolers, along with their teachers and their principal, had been added to the roster of 30,000 people killed by guns in America each year. The details of the massacre were at once terrible and familiar — indeed, you could have guessed them as soon as you heard the first sketchy news bulletins. A murderer lost in some sanguinary fantasy. High-capacity magazines. In the starring role, one of our society’s prized slaughtering machines: an AR-15 assault rifle. And for the families of the six- and seven-year-olds whose bodies were blown apart, there would be teddy bears, support groups, wooden messages from the secretary of education.

On December 21, a week after the shooting, began the second obligatory chapter in this oft-told tale. Wayne LaPierre, the lavishly compensated face of the National Rifle Association, stepped up to a podium at the Willard Hotel in Washington and twisted his features into an expression meant to indicate sorrow. What came gurgling from LaPierre’s throat, though, was righteous accusation mixed with a heavy dollop of class resentment. It was the assembled men and women of the press who were somehow to blame, droned this million-dollar-a-year man who had apparently not bothered to read his script in advance. Gun owners were victims, you see, who had been demonized by the media and the “political class here in Washington.” Oh, pity the man with a MAC-10!

Next came the other parts of the traditional catechism. America’s leaders were soft on crime, unwilling “to prosecute dangerous criminals.” They gave too much money away in foreign aid. They miscategorized certain weapons as Thing A when they were obviously Thing B. Each of these grievances you could have heard, almost word for word, back in the 1970s. They are specimens of a chronic paranoia that never dissipates, no matter how many millions we imprison or how respectfully journalists learn to speak of the M16 and the sexy SIG Sauer.

But this time around, these bullet points were missing something. Matters had gone too far, and the NRA was desperate to escape the blame. But how? Well, if you are a prominent conservative lobbyist and one day there’s a catastrophe that stems pretty directly from your cherished policy initiatives, what do you do? You insist that the world hasn’t gone far enough in implementing your demands. So the solution to the massacre culture must obviously be more guns in more places than ever before: universities, churches, strip clubs, hospitals, tanning salons, bowling alleys.

And should something go wrong in this weapon-saturated world — for example, should someone use one of those weapons in precisely the way it was designed to be used — we may seek answers only within the narrow parameters of the ideologically permissible. Which is to say: We must meet every fresh mass murder with the conclusion that the United States, already home to some 300 million firearms, isn’t weapon-saturated enough. The task before us is to arm not only the guards in our elementary schools but also the teachers, the custodians, the cafeteria workers, the hall monitors. And on and on until the arms race is the preeminent logic of civilian life. Only then will the streets of Dodge City be safe.

I worry that I have not made sufficiently clear where I stand on this issue. For the record: gun control works. It seems obvious to me that, when considering the towering difference in murder statistics between the United States and other industrialized lands, the most relevant factor is the ready availability of certain kinds of firearms. I believe that the ideology of libertarianism, with its twin gods Market and Magnum, is not just bankrupting us; it is killing us. And I believe that Wayne LaPierre bears a certain moral responsibility for the massacre culture, regardless of his intentions or his exalted stature in Washington.

The reason I want to be clear about this is that I also think Wayne LaPierre got something right. In his Willard Hotel address, he tried to get the assembled media types to acknowledge their own culpability for our pandemic violence. “Media conglomerates,” he intoned, “compete with one another to shock, violate, and offend every standard of civilized society by bringing an ever more toxic mix of reckless behavior and criminal cruelty into our homes — every minute of every day of every month of every year.”

Coming from the NRA, of course, this was pretty base hypocrisy. It doesn’t take much skill with a remote to confirm that some of the most sadistic entertainment ever filmed follows the line of none other than the National Rifle Association. Over and over, we are shown spineless liberals with a soft spot for the murderers and rapists in our midst, who leave society’s dirty work to the big man with the big gun. Indeed, Wayne LaPierre basically gave the genre a shout-out when he reasoned, all too cinematically, that “the only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun.”

But as a description of the world we live in, what LaPierre said was . . . well, correct. Media companies obviously do compete to project violence into our homes. And why is that? Because the American film industry is the second great pillar of the gun culture.

And it’s not just Clint Eastwood’s Smith & Wesson from Dirty Harry, which, as everyone who lived through the 1970s knows, was then “the most powerful handgun in the world,” able to “blow your head clean off.” Hollywood’s cameras adore weapons of any kind, and pay them loving heed in movies of every political persuasion. Think of the close-up on Rambo’s machine gun as it spasms its way through an ammo belt in the 1985 installment of the series, or the shell casings tinkling delicately on the floor as cops die by the dozens in The Matrix (1999), or the heroic slo-mo of Sean Penn’s tommy gun in Gangster Squad (2013), or the really special Soviet submachine gun that everyone lusts after in Jack Abramoff’s 1989 action movie Red Scorpion. It’s the mother of all product placements, and as far as we know it doesn’t cost the arms makers a dime.

Even more delectable is the effect that guns have on human flesh, a phenomenon so titillating for moviemakers that it often surpasses the pleasures of plot and dialogue. Discussing the many, many graphic shootings in his recent Django Unchained, for example, director Quentin Tarantino identifies screen violence as the reason most viewers go to his movies in the first place. “That’s fun, and that’s cool, and that’s really enjoyable,” he told NPR. “And kind of what you’re waiting for.”

In Tarantino’s pseudohistorical revenge fantasies, humans are oversize water balloons just waiting to be popped, so that they can spurt their exciting red contents over walls and bystanders. The role of the star is relatively simple: he or she must make those human piñatas give up their payload. Yes, there are plots along the way, clever ones wherein Tarantino burnishes his controversial image by daring to take on such sacred cows as Nazis and slave owners. But the nonstars in his movies mainly exist to beg for their lives and then be orgasmically deprived of them, spouting blood like so many harpooned porpoises.

Okay, I got carried away there. Let me catch my breath and admit it: Tarantino would never show someone harpooning a porpoise. After all, a line in the credits for Django Unchained declares that “no horses were harmed in the making of this movie.” But harpooning a human? After having first blasted off the human’s balls and played a sunny pop song from the Seventies while the human begged for mercy in the background? No problem.

The movies I describe here are essentially advertisements for mass murder. You can also read them in dozens of other ways, I know. You can talk about Tarantino’s clever and encyclopedically allusive command of genre, or about how the latest Batman movie advances the “franchise,” or about the inky shady shadowiness of, well, nearly everything the industry cranks out nowadays. And to give them their due, most of the movies I’ve mentioned take pains to clarify that what they depict are good-guy-on-bad-guy murders — which makes homicide okay, maybe even wholesome.

In decades past, let’s recall, there was a fashion for viewing the gangster film as a delicate metaphor, interesting mainly for the dark existentialism it spotlighted in our souls. But today, as I absorb the blunt aesthetic blows of one ultraviolent film after another, all I can make of it is that Hollywood, for reasons of its own, is hopelessly enamored of homicide. The plot is barely there anymore. Good guys and bad guys are hopelessly jumbled, their motives as vague as those of the Sandy Hook shooter, Adam Lanza. A movie like The Dark Knight Rises (2012) is nearly impossible to make sense of; only its many murders hold it together. All the rest shrinks, but the act of homicide expands, ramifies, multiplies madly.

And what can we read in this act itself? Well, most obviously, that ordinary humans are weak and worth little, that they achieve beauty only when they are brought to efflorescence by the discharge of a star’s sidearm. Also: killers are glamorous creatures. And lastly: society and law are futile exercises. Whether we’re dealing with vigilantes, hit men, or a World War II torture squad, nobody can shield us from the power of an armed man. (Except, of course, another armed man, as Wayne LaPierre and Hollywood never tire of informing us.)

For the industry itself, meanwhile, so many things come together in the act of murder — audience pleasure, actor coolness, the appearance of art — that everything else is essentially secondary. Hence the basic principles of Hollywood’s antisocial faith. A man isn’t really a man if he can’t use a shotgun to change the seat of another man’s soul into so much garbage. Or if he doesn’t know how to fire a pistol sideways, signifying that thuggish disregard for who or what gets caught in the spray of bullets.

At times, my erudite liberal colleagues have no problem understanding this. They’re quick to characterize Zero Dark Thirty (2012) as an advertisement for torture and other Bush-era outrages.[*] It’s sadism!, they cry. But the larger sadism that is obviously the film industry’s truest muse . . . that they don’t want to discuss. Bring that up and the conversation is immediately suspended in favor of legal arguments about censorship, free speech, and the definition of “incitement.” Movies can’t be said to have caused mass murders, they correctly point out. Not even Natural Born Killers (1994) — a movie that insists on the complicity of the media in romanticizing murderers, that itself proceeds to romanticize murderers, and that has been duly shadowed by a long string of alleged copycat murders, including the Columbine massacre. No, these are works of art. And art is, you know, all edgy and defiant and shit.

Not surprisingly, Quentin Tarantino has lately become the focus for this sort of criticism. The fact that Django Unchained arrived in theaters right around the time of the Sandy Hook massacre didn’t help. Yet he has refused to give an inch in discussing the link between movie violence and real life. “Obviously I don’t think one has to do with the other,” he told an NPR interviewer. “Movies are about make-believe. It’s about imagination. Part of the thing is we’re trying to create a realistic experience, but we are faking it.”

Is it possible that anyone in our cynical world credits a self-serving sophistry like this? Of course an industry under fire will claim that its hands are clean, just as the NRA has done — and of course a favorite son, be it Tarantino or LaPierre, can be counted on to make the claim louder than anyone else. But do they really believe that imaginative expression is without consequence? One might as well claim that advertising itself has no effect — because the spokesmen aren’t really enjoying that Sprite, you know, only pretending to. Or that TV speeches don’t matter, since the politician’s words are strung together for dramatic effect, and are not themselves a show of official force.

To insist on a full, pristine separation of the dramatic imagination from the way humans actually behave is to fly in the face of nearly everything we know about cultural history. For centuries, people misinterpreted the reign of Richard III because of a play by Shakespeare. The revival of the Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s was advanced by D. W. Griffith’s Birth of a Nation. In our own era, millions of Americans believe in the righteous innocence of businessmen because of a novel by Ayn Rand.

And here is why I personally will never believe it when the film industry claims its products have no effect on human behavior. Like every American, I carry around in my head a collection of sights and sounds that I will never be able to erase, no matter what I think about Hollywood. To this day, those bits of dialogue and those filmed images affect the way I do everything from answering the phone to pruning my roses. I can’t get on my Honda scooter without recalling Steve McQueen in The Great Escape, or look out an airplane window without remembering The Best Years of Our Lives. When I shot at paper targets in the Boy Scouts, I thought of Sergeant York, and should I ever become an L.A. cop I will probably mimic the mannerisms of Ryan Gosling in Gangster Squad.

I doubt very much that we will see effective gun control enacted this time around. Oh, the rules have already been tightened in New York, and the president will gamely joust with the House of Representatives over renewing the ban on assault weapons. But it won’t go much further. The political arm of the gun culture, headquartered at the big NRA building in northern Virginia, is still powerful enough to block any meaningful change.

However, the other pillar of the gun culture — the propaganda bureau relaxing in the Los Angeles sun — is much more vulnerable. Its continued well-being depends to a real degree on the approbation and collaboration of critics.

Which is to say that my colleagues in journalism are, in part, responsible for this monster. We have fostered it with puff pieces and softball interviews and a thousand “press junkets” — the free vacations for journalists that secure avalanches of praise for a movie before anyone has seen it. This refusal on the part of critics to criticize is what has allowed Quentin Tarantino to be crowned a cinematic genius of our time. (When a journalist refuses to grovel, however, Tarantino gets awfully peevish. “This is a commercial for the movie, make no mistake,” he recently told an interviewer bold enough to ask him an uncomfortable question.)

It is time for the boot-licking to end. Mick LaSalle, film critic for the San Francisco Chronicle, recently recalled how he self-censored a review of The Dark Knight Rises, declining to say in print that he found it to be “a wallow in nonstop cruelty and destruction.” But in the wake of the Connecticut school massacre, LaSalle explained, he had come around to a new understanding of critical responsibility. “If movies are cruel and nihilistic, say so,” he wrote. “Say it explicitly. Don’t run from that observation.”

It’s a lesson that every one of us in journalism ought to be taking to heart these days. It is our job to say it explicitly — to tell the world what god-awful heaps of cliché and fake profundity and commercialized sadism this industry produces. The fake blood spilled by Hollywood cries out for it.

[*] Yet few of them complained about Tarantino’s 2009 slice of war porn, Inglourious Basterds, since the people being tortured so graphically and so hilariously by a U.S. Army hit squad were Nazis.

 Voir aussi:

Django Unchained and the ‘new sadism’ in cinema
Quentin Tarantino’s new film is the latest where killing is seen as comical. Geoffrey Macnab wonders why people fall about laughing at disembowelment and garroting on screen?
Geoffrey Macnab
The Independent
12 January 2013

It’s the “new sadism” in cinema – the wave of films in which violence is graphic, bloody but always underpinned by irony or gallows humour. There is something disconcerting about sitting in a crowded cinema as an audience guffaws at the latest garroting or falls about in hysterics as someone is beheaded or has a limb lopped off.

Many recent movies squeeze the comedy out of what would normally seem like horrific acts of bloodletting. Martin McDonagh’s Seven Psychopaths has barely started when we see two assassins who are planning a killing being blithely murdered by a passer-by themselves. The film features throats being cut and many characters being shot to pieces but is played for laughs.

However, the violence isn’t immediately signalled as comic. Seven Psychopaths isn’t like Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975), with its self-consciously farcical scenes of the Black Knight refusing to concede in battle in spite of having had all his limbs cut off.

Ben Wheatley’s recent Grand Guignol camper-van comedy Sightseers shows two British tourists wreaking murderous havoc across the British countryside. When a rambler complains about their dog fouling a field, they bludgeon him to death. “He’s not a person, Tina, he’s a Daily Mail reader,” Chris (Steve Oram) reassures his girlfriend when she expresses some slight misgivings about killing innocent people. Tina (Alice Lowe) has form of her own, throwing a bride-to-be off a cliff after a hen night in which the woman flirts with Steve.

In Quentin Tarantino’s films, the violence, torture and bloodletting sit side by side with wisecracking dialogue and moments of slapstick. His latest, Django Unchained, features whippings, brutal wrestling matches and one scene in which dogs rip a slave to pieces. We know, though, that Tarantino’s tongue is in his cheek. Scenes that would be very hard to stomach in a conventional drama are lapped up by spectators who know all about the director’s love of genre and delight in pastiching old spaghetti Westerns.

A certain sadism has always defined crime movies. Whether it was Lee Marvin scalding Gloria Grahame with the coffee in The Big Heat (1953) or James Cagney’s Cody blithely shooting innocent train drivers in White Heat (1949), audiences watched the antics of gangsters with appalled fascination. From Edwin S Porter’s The Great Train Robbery (1903) to Sam Peckinpah’s blistering, slow-motion shoot-outs in The Wild Bunch (1969), film-makers have always looked to violence for dramatic effect.  Well-choreographed shoot-outs and fist fights will always be intensely cinematic.

Sadism and slapstick likewise go hand in hand. Whether silent comedians slapping and hitting one another, pulling one another’s ears and twisting noses or Farrelly brothers films with their  grotesque set-pieces, comedy movies have always traded in humiliation.

Nor is there anything new in making very dry comedy out of violence and death. Robert Hamer’s Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949) is a supremely elegant and witty film about a serial killer who murders off his own family members just as quickly as Chris and Tina dispose of National Trust-loving tourists in Sightseers. Frank Capra’s Arsenic and Old Lace (1944) features very charming old ladies whose pet hobby is murdering lonely old men. Howard Hawks’s His Girl Friday (1940) turns the plight of a convicted murderer facing execution into the stuff of screwball farce.

What has changed now is that genre lines have become very blurred. Young directors like Edgar Wright (Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz) and Wheatley draw on horror movie conventions even as they make very British comedies. Ideas that might have previously been confined to exploitation pics have spilled into the mainstream. In the era of computer games like Call of Duty and Assassin’s Creed, death isn’t taken very seriously. Film-makers with no direct experience of war beyond what they’ve seen in other movies regard staging killings as just another part of cinematic rhetoric. At the same time, state-of-the art make-up and digital effects enable violence to be shown in far greater and bloodier detail than ever before.

Tarantino turns to heavy political and historical topics (the Holocaust in Inglourious Basterds, slavery in Django Unchained) but tips us the wink as he does so. One problem he and others face is the literal quality of film. When a slave is being flayed or a police officer is having his ear cut off, it isn’t always possible to put inverted commas round the scene and let the audience know that this horrific moment is stylised and shouldn’t be taken too seriously.

As a counterpoint to latest films from Wheatley, Tarantino and McDonagh, it is instructive to watch Joshua Oppenheimer’s grim and startling recent documentary, The Act of Killing. Oppenheimer’s doc follows various real-life killers who murdered thousands of “communists” in Indonesia in the mid 1960s. They’ve never faced punishment for what they did and still openly brag about their part in a genocide. Oppenheimer invites them to re-create some of their grisly deeds as pastiche Hollywood movies. We see these aging hoodlums dress in drag for Vincente Minnelli-like musical scenes or coming on like bad Method actors in gangster pic spoofs or even portraying cowboys in mock spaghetti Westerns. Whatever the genre they choose, there is no escaping the bloodcurdling nature of the deeds they are celebrating.

Acts of killing define the new sadism in cinema. The challenge now for film-makers is jolting audiences who’ve already seen death portrayed so many times on screen before. When they get it right, they can create scenes of extraordinary power and beauty – and they can use humour to distance themselves from the charge that they are being exploitative.

Even so, the film-makers themselves sometimes appear just a little bashful about the enormous body counts in their work. The US premiere of Django Unchained was postponed after the Connecticut school massacre in mid December. The real-life incident in which a lone gunman killed 20 school children made it seem perverse and tasteless to celebrate Tarantino’s comic-book violence.

The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) introduced a “code” in 1930 (not strictly enforced until 1934) partly to clamp down on gangster films felt to glamorize violence. Ever since, the debates about guns, Hollywood and violence have gone round in wearisome circles. Every time there is a real-life atrocity as in Connecticut, films are held up as being in some way to blame, generally by commentators who haven’t actually seen them. Meanwhile, cultural critics are  always quick to point out that violence and art go back thousands of years before the birth of cinema.

Even so, what’s often startling about the new sadism in cinema is the disregard for the victims, who are treated as walk-on props, there to be dispensed with in the most humorous, bloody and imaginative way possible. In 1989, Danny Boyle produced (and conceived) Alan Clarke’s Elephant – a TV movie set at the height of the Troubles in Northern Ireland. This was an essay about killing. Eighteen random murders were shown. Viewers learnt nothing at all about the killers or the victims. The film-makers were reminding us how desensitised we had become to sectarian violence in Northern Ireland. A quarter of a century on, that casual detachment about death has become a staple of mainstream cinema.

‘Django Unchained’ is released on  18 January

Voir également:

Tarantino’s crusade to ennoble violence
Christopher Caldwell

The Financial Times

January 4, 2013

The director uses slavery the way a porn film might use a nurses’ convention

The most confusing moment in Quentin Tarantino’s new film, Django Unchained , comes in the final credits. The viewer sees an assurance from the American Humane Association that no animals were harmed in the film’s making. In this movie, set in the south before the US civil war, slaves get tied to trees and whipped. A naked black wrestler is ordered to bash another’s head in with a very big hammer. Dogs chew a runaway slave to pieces. This is to set the stage for an exuberant massacre of white men and women at the close. Mr Tarantino lingers over his victims as they writhe, gasp and scream in agony. One walks out of Django worried less about Mr Tarantino’s attitude towards animals than about his attitude towards people.
A.O. Scott, The New York Times critic, calls it a “troubling and important movie about slavery and racism”. He is wrong. A German-born bounty hunter (Christoph Waltz) liberates the slave Django (Jamie Foxx), hoping he can identify a murderous gang of overseers. The two try to free Django’s wife from the plantation where she has been brought by the sybaritic Monsieur Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio). The period detail sometimes seems accurate (slaveholders may have flung the word “nigger” around as often as Mr Tarantino’s characters do), and sometimes does not (there never was any such thing as “Mandingo fighting”).

Of course, we must not mistake a feature film for a public television documentary – Mr Tarantino’s purpose is to entertain, not to enlighten. But this is why the film is neither important nor troubling, except as a cultural symptom. Django uses slavery the way a pornographic film might use a nurses’ convention: as a pretext for what is really meant to entertain us. What is really meant to entertain us in Django is violence.

Mr Scott writes that “vengeance in the American imagination has been the virtually exclusive prerogative of white men”. Cinematically, black people should get to partake in “regenerative violence” the way white people have for so long. He adds: “Think about that when the hand-wringing starts about Django Unchained and ask yourself why the violence in this movie will suddenly seem so much more problematic, so much more regrettable, than what passes without comment in Jack Reacher or Taken 2.” But this now-the-shoe’s-on-the-other-foot argument is disingenuous. In no major US film do white people exact racial vengeance of the sort Django does.

And Mr Tarantino’s love of violence is not “suddenly” problematic. It is the sole pleasure anyone could possibly take in his first film, the appalling Reservoir Dogs.Pulp Fiction and Jackie Brown, for all their situational irony and madcap humour, also have memorable scenes of horrific violence. But Mr Tarantino’s last two films have taken a strange turn. He has not just shown cruelty but tried to politicise and ennoble it. Inglourious Basterds features a gang of American Jews who travel around Germany scalping Nazis and smashing their heads with baseball bats. It ends with a torture scene (one of our heroes carves a swastika into a Nazi’s head) that we are surely meant to enjoy.

Nazis and slaveholders, of course, are stock villains of political correctness. Film-makers have been killing them off for decades. What is novel about Mr Tarantino is his fussy, lawyerly setting of ground rules to broaden the circumstances in which one can kill with joy and impunity. Scalping is OK because “a Nazi ain’t got no humanity”. Django can kneecap the plantation major-domo Stephen (Samuel L. Jackson) because he has stipulated at the start of the film that there is “nothing lower than a head house-nigger”. Of course, Stephen is more the slave system’s victim than its representative. He is a slave. The indignities visited on various slaves (“After this we’ll see if you break eggs again!” hollers one brute as he gets ready to whip a young woman) serve to make us comfortable with the final racial retribution, even though Django’s vengeance claims white people (hillbillies and jailers) who have no more control over the system than Stephen.

The film-maker Spike Lee has called this film “disrespectful to my ancestors”. The remark has puzzled people but it should not. Monsieur Candie reminisces, “surrounded by black faces, day in, day out, I had one question: Why don’t they kill us?” It is an excellent question.
However you answer it, the fact is, they didn’t. In the eyes of history, antebellum blacks retain an honour that their white oppressors will forever be denied. Maybe Mr Lee objects to a failure to see that honour. Where Mr Tarantino sees a solidarity with the victims of the past, others might see a contemporary white American eager to believe that, given the opportunity, other peoples of yesteryear would have behaved as shabbily as his own people did.

The writer is a senior editor at The Weekly Standard

Voir encore:

Was There Really “Mandingo Fighting,” Like in Django Unchained?
Much of Django Unchained, Quentin Tarantino’s blaxploitation Western about an ex-slave’s revenge against plantation owners, centers on a practice called “Mandingo fighting.” Slaves are forced to fight to the death for their owners’ wealth and entertainment. Did the U.S. have anything like this form of gladiatorial combat?
Aisha Harris

Slate
Dec. 24 2012

No. While slaves could be called upon to perform for their owners with other forms of entertainment, such as singing and dancing, no slavery historian we spoke with had ever come across anything that closely resembled this human version of cock fighting. As David Blight, the director of Yale’s center for the study of slavery, told me: One reason slave owners wouldn’t have pitted their slaves against each other in such a way is strictly economic. Slavery was built upon money, and the fortune to be made for owners was in buying, selling, and working them, not in sending them out to fight at the risk of death.

While there’s no historical record of black gladiator fights in the U.S., this hasn’t stopped the sport from appearing again and again in popular culture. The 1975 blaxploitation film Mandingo, which Tarantino has cited as “one of [his] favorite movies,” is about a slave named Mede who is trained by his owner to fight to the death in bare-knuckle boxing against other slaves. That film was inspired by the book of the same name by dog-breeder-turned-novelist Kyle Onstott. (The term Mandingo itself comes from the name of a cultural and ethnic group in West Africa, who speak the Manding languages.) There is at least one other cinematic example of the fighting, in Mandingo’s sequel, Drum. (The scene starts at about 10:45 in the video below.)

Slaves were sometimes sent to fight for their owners; it just wasn’t to the death. Tom Molineaux was a Virginia slave who won his freedom—and, for his owner, $100,000—after winning a match against another slave. He went on to become the first black American to compete for the heavyweight championship when he fought the white champion Tom Cribb in England in 1810. (He lost.) According to Frederick Douglass, wrestling and boxing for sport, like festivals around holidays, were “among the most effective means in the hands of the slaveholder in keeping down the spirit of insurrection.”

It’s also true that, as embodied by the fictional “Mandingo fighting,” there has long been a fascination with the supposed physical prowess of the black body. The rise of prizefighting in the 19th century saw black men such as Peter Jackson and George Dixon making a show of their manliness to white and black audiences. Ralph Ellison’s “Battle Royal” scene in Invisible Man—in which the narrator must spar other black men in order to obtain a scholarship to a black college—uses a less sensationalistic approach to portray the fetishization of black men fighting. “This is a vital part of behavior patterns in the South, which both Negroes and whites thoughtlessly accept,” Ellison once said. “It is a ritual in preservation of caste lines, a keeping of taboo to appease the gods and ward off bad luck. It is also the initiation ritual to which all greenhorns are subjected.”

Thanks to David Blight of Yale University.

Voir de même:

Django’ Unexplained: Was Mandingo Fighting a Real Thing?
Max Evry

Nextmovie

Dec 25, 2012

One of the most gruesome scenes in Quentin Tarantino’s new blaxploitation western « Django Unchained » involves blackhearted plantation owner Calvin Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio) presiding over a Roman-style bare-handed battle to the death between his hulking champion slave Samson (Jordon Michael Corbin) and a much less fortunate slave opponent.

After all the eye gauging and head hammering was through, we wondered if this betting « sport, » known within the movie as « Mandingo Fighting, » was based on true accounts of pre-Civil War Mississippi or if Tarantino made it up out of whole cloth.

This is, after all, the same Tarantino who let Eli Roth machine gun Hitler in the face for « Inglourious Basterds, » so the level of historical accuracy is about on par with what we’d expect from a guy who didn’t graduate from high school. That’s not meant as a dig on the auteur, of course, as the man has perhaps one of the most thorough knowledge bases of both black culture and film history among any director in Hollywood, but he’s definitely less interested in realism than he is in f**king people’s shit up.

So was Mandingo Fighting real? Probably not.

We talked to Edna Greene Medford, Professor and chairperson of the history department at Howard University in Washington, D.C., about whether there’s any basis in non-Tarantinized fact.

« My area of expertise is slavery, Civil War, and reconstruction and I have never encountered something like that, » said Professor Medford. « It was rumored to have occurred. I don’t know that it was called Mandingo Fighting, however, but there were all sorts of things going on in the South pitting people against one another. To the death, I’ve never encountered anything like that, no. That doesn’t mean that it didn’t happen in some backwater area, but I’ve never seen any evidence of it. »

This was the wild, wild South, after all, so « anything goes » tended to rule the day, but the main reason Medford thinks the idea of Mandingo Fighting is preposterous comes down to one thing: Simple economics.

« It’s a stretch because enslaved people are property, and people don’t want to lose their property unless they’re being reimbursed for it, » she said. « It would seem odd to me that someone would allow his enslaved laborer to fight to the death because someone like that would cost them a lot of money. But then it’s a gambling enterprise so maybe someone would be willing to do that. I’ve looked at slave narratives and I’ve never seen something like that in slave narratives. »

Paramount

As for the etymology of the term « Mandingo, » it comes from a West African ethnic group called the Mandinka, but was popularized in the late ’50s with the racy novel by Kyle Onstott that also became a 1975 movie called « Mandingo, » which Tarantino has praised alongside « Showgirls » as one of the few big budget exploitation pictures made by a studio.

The subject of the film? A slave trained to fight other slaves. « Mandingo, the pride of his masters! Mandingo, the strongest and the bravest! »

« The term has been used to refer to that ethnic group, » clarified Medford, « but it has also come to personify the very powerful enslaved man who’s rather ferocious. It’s equivalent to ‘the big black buck,’ it’s more of a recent term. »

Even though none of what takes place in « Django Unchained » is true-blue history, it still manages to be « yeehaw! » entertaining while shedding light on something that most Americans try to forget happened so they can go on happily with their Christmas shopping. It’s also not Tarantino’s first use of black bounty hunters or « Mandingo » either, as he combined both into one of Samuel L. Jackson’s more memorably un-PC lines from 1997’s « Jackie Brown » in reference to Robert Forster’s prisoner retriever Winston (Tommy ‘Tiny’ Lister): « Who’s that big, Mandingo-looking n****r you got up there on that picture with you? »

Voir par ailleurs:

« Django Unchained », un réservoir d’émotions postmodernes à la sauce TarantinoPatrizia LombardoProfesseur de littérature et de cinéma
Le Nouvel Obs
 21-01-2013

LE PLUS. Un western-spaghetti qui dénonce l’esclavage et où la vengeance est le personnage principal, tel est le pitch du dernier film de Tarantino. Mais en quoi « Django Unchained » porte-t-il la signature du réalisateur américain ? Réponse de Patrizia Lombardo, professeure de littérature et de cinéma et auteur de l’article « La signature au cinéma ». Attention SPOILERS !

Un désert rocheux, des landes désolées, retravaillées par les effets spéciaux, la marche des esclaves noirs enchaînés, le froid de la nuit qui s’empare du spectateur : le dernier film de Tarantino, « Django Unchained », s’ouvre sur des plans spectaculaires, dignes des westerns, pour présenter une fable d’amour et de vengeance, aux États-Unis, deux ans avant la guerre de Sécession.

L’odyssée des deux protagonistes, l’esclave noir Django et le docteur Schultz, à travers le Texas et le Mississippi, se terminera par l’affranchissement de Django (Jamie Foxx) et ses retrouvailles avec sa femme Broomhilda (Kerry Washington). La scène finale, après un feu d’artifice de balles et de sang, montre un incendie dévastateur, comme à la fin de « Rebecca » d’Hitchcock (1940). Les deux amoureux, enfin réunis et saufs, contemplent l’immense bâtisse de style néoclassique typique de l’architecture du Sud, la demeure du propriétaire de la plantation, Calvin Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio), à laquelle Django a mis le feu – dernier acte de représailles contre les blancs et contre le traître noir Stephen (Samuel L. Jackson).

Esthétique kitsch postmoderne

Ainsi que le veut le genre du western, souvent comparé à la tragédie grecque, les grands sentiments sont là – l’amour et la haine –, mais le mélange est saugrenu, exorbitant, selon les principes de l’esthétique kitsch postmoderne, qui offre toutes les émotions possibles juxtaposées, comme les produits variés dans un supermarché. Car la signature de Tarantino promet une violence excessive, « gratuite », comme elle a été souvent définie, conjuguée à une ambition morale qui se pare d’amoralité (ou vice versa) : les bons sentiments politiquement corrects et les mauvais sentiments politiquement incorrects sont malaxés dans l’effervescence des images, de l’intrigue, des dialogues.

Et, comme dans le style postmoderne, les passions tragiques et le sentimentalisme mélodramatique sont combinés au plaisir de la comédie et de la farce : la caricature des personnages méprisables – tel le propriétaire de Candyland (!), Calvin, homme cruel et sanguinaire, passionné de lutte Mandingo – provoque le rire plus que l’indignation, et une ironie délicieuse émane de l’adorable docteur Schultz (Christoph Waltz), chasseur de primes, anti-esclavagiste convaincu, qui fait le mal pour le bien.

Quant aux mauvais sentiments, au langage obscène, à la profusion du terme « nigger », ils correspondent à ce que Tarantino adore et ce sur quoi on n’arrête pas de l’interroger : une brutalité extrême qui indique que, pour lui, le cinéma n’a pas grand-chose à voir avec la réalité du monde et de ses malheurs, mais avec l’infinie réalité des images filmiques, inséparables des armes à feu, assaisonnées de conversations qui attrapent au vol des débris de discours politico-sociaux contemporains, que ce soit la misère des non-salariés, comme dans la conversation initiale de « Reservoir Dogs » (1992), ou le nazisme dans « Inglorious Basterds » (2009), ou le racisme américain dans ce dernier film.

À la gloire des œuvres populaires

Le mixage des émotions ne fait qu’exalter l’impureté caractéristique des arts et du cinéma en particulier, où règnent l’adaptation, l’inspiration, la citation, le remake, l’hommage à une œuvre du passé, voire le pillage. Sans parler du va-et-vient le plus composite entre l’image filmique et la bande-son, cher à ces réalisateurs qui, depuis les années 1960, sont imbus de musique pop.

Chez Tarantino, dévoreur d’images et de musique, forgé par maintes formes de culture populaire américaine, l’amalgame des références est époustouflant. Son chef-d’œuvre « Reservoir Dogs », qui montrait sa passion pour la Nouvelle Vague, était inspiré par « The Killing » de Stanley Kubrick (1956) et « City on Fire » (1987) de Ringo Lam Ling-Tung. « Pulp Fiction » (1994) reprenait les histoires des magazines bon marché.

« Django Unchained » puise non seulement dans les premiers westerns, mais aussi dans les séries télévisées des années 1950 et 1960, telles « Bonanza » et « Rawhide », non sans passer par les décors de la série récente sur la fièvre de l’or, « Deadwood » (2004-2006). Tarantino est épris surtout des westerns-spaghetti de Sergio Leone et de Sergio Corbucci, auteur de « Django » (1966), auquel il rend hommage en reprenant le nom du personnage et le thème musical de Luis Bacalov.

Bric-à-brac vertigineux tout en surface

Un bric-à-brac de genres, sous-genres et contre-genres chante la gloire des œuvres populaires, dans le bruit des lames de couteau et des armes à feu, où l’on tue comme on mange des cacahuètes, dans le rythme vertigineux de l’action et des dialogues interminables, dans la filiation des « Trois Mousquetaires », œuvre qui orne la bibliothèque de Calvin Candie.

On comprend la différence entre le cinéphile et le geek : le populaire absolu du western de Tarantino sorti en France en janvier 2013, contrairement aux « westerns » urbains de Scorsese dans les années 1970 ou au western mystique « Dead Man » (1995) de Jim Jarmusch, n’est pas profond. Mais, divertissement, pure surface, il surfe sur les choses et les idées, comme les accents — allemand ou du Sud — colorent les voix des acteurs, ou les effets spéciaux, les décors et les gros plans style télé de « Django Unchained » frappent les yeux et les esprits le temps d’un éclair.

On peut regretter la pensée de la caméra et la cruelle intensité existentielle de « Reservoir Dogs », mais on a du plaisir et on est gagné par le bonheur des acteurs et du metteur en scène s’adonnant à fond à cette activité inépuisable chez les êtres humains : faire semblant.

À lire aussi sur CinéObs :

– « Django Unchained » : le Tarantino de la maturité ? par Pascal Mérigeau

– Quentin Tarantino : « Au cinéma, la vengeance, ça ne craint rien », interview par Olivier Bonnard

Voir de plus:

« Django Unchained » ou l’ambiguïté de la violence dans les films de Tarantino

Célia Sauvage

Chargée d’enseignement à Paris III
Le Nouvel Obs
20-01-2013

LE PLUS. « Django Unchained » est un hommage au western spaghetti et en particulier à celui de Sergio Corbucci, « Django ». Après « Inglourious Basterds », le film se veut le deuxième épisode de Tarantino d’une trilogie sur l’oppression. Mais la représentation de la violence par le réalisateur est problématique pour Célia Sauvage, auteur de « Critiquer Quentin Tarantino est-il raisonnable ? » (en librairies le 15 février, éd. Vrin). (SPOILERS).

Alors que « Django Unchained », dernier film de Quentin Tarantino, sort aux États-Unis, le pays est encore sévèrement secoué après la tuerie de Newtown – le massacre relançant le débat sur l’influence de la violence dans les médias. Inévitablement, la réception de « Django Unchained » a été recentrée, moins sur le sujet de l’esclavage américain, que sur la violence des films du réalisateur.

Une trilogie sur l’oppression 

Pas peu fier de cultiver l’art de la polémique, le cinéaste s’est ainsi exprimé violemment contre un journaliste britannique, tentant de réinscrire ses films dans l’actualité médiatique. Tarantino refuse alors férocement de s’expliquer à nouveau sur l’absence de rapports entre le goût pour les films violents et pour la violence réelle : « Je ne mords pas à l’hameçon. Je refuse votre question. Je ne suis pas votre esclave et vous n’êtes pas mon maître. Je ne suis pas votre singe. Je réitère, je ne répondrai pas. »

Tarantino a définitivement fait taire les accusations à l’encontre de ses films jugés fun, cool, mais vides et inconséquents, en s’engageant dans ce qu’il nomme « une trilogie politique et historique sur l’oppression« , commencée en 2009 avec « Inglourious Basterds« .

L’accusation d’esthétisation de la violence, devenue un objet de spectacle gratuit, décontextualisé de toute mise en perspective morale ou politique, semble certes tomber en désuétude derrière le choix récent de sujets politiques sensibles – les Juifs durant la Seconde Guerre mondiale et l’esclavage afro-américain. Mais, le tournant en apparence politique que prend le cinéma de Tarantino cache une violence tout autant injustifiée qui mérite d’être réinterrogée.

Un argumentaire politisant et bien rôdé

Depuis « Kill Bill », on peut résumer l’ensemble des films de Tarantino à des récits de vengeance, thème de prédilection du cinéaste. Chacun des films use d’un processus de justification souvent simpliste et conservateur :

– La Mariée venge, dans un premier temps, son honneur de femme bafouée, puis, tue pour sauver son enfant : « Kill Bill » ;

– Un groupe de cascadeuses prend sa revanche sur un pervers misogyne qui tue des pauvres innocentes pour sa propre jouissance : « Boulevard de la mort » ;

– Une juive et un groupe de soldats américains partent en croisade pour corriger l’ennemi nazi : « Inglourious Basterds » ;

– Un esclave afro-américain sauve sa femme de propriétaires blancs abusifs et sadiques : « Django Unchained ».

Que la vengeance relève de motivations personnelles ou plus universelles, elle semble ainsi perdre de son caractère gratuit, sous couvert d’un argumentaire en surface politisant bien rodé.

Le premier volet de la « trilogie de l’oppression », « Inglourious Basterds », vient à première vue satisfaire un fantasme de revanche contre les plus grands méchants désignés par l’histoire de l’humanité. La violence contre les nazis serait ici une juste rétribution. Eli Roth, réalisateur ultra-violent de la série « Hostel », décrit ainsi le film comme du « porno kasher » : « ça relève presque d’une satisfaction sexuelle profonde de vouloir tuer des nazis, d’un orgasme presque. Mon personnage tue des nazis. Je peux regarder ça en boucle ». Lawrence Bender, le producteur, déclare à Tarantino : « en tant que membre de la communauté juive, je te remercie, parce que ce film est un putain de rêve pour les juifs ».

Rompre avec le politiquement correct

Pour défendre la violence de son film, le cinéaste explique lui-même avoir voulu rompre avec les traditions politiquement correctes : « Les films traitant de l’Holocauste représentent toujours les juifs comme des victimes. Je connais cette histoire. Je veux voir quelque chose de différent. Je veux voir des Allemands qui craignent les juifs. Ne tombons pas dans le misérabilisme et faisons plutôt un film d’action fun. »

Ce choix esthétique met le sujet historique au second plan et vient prouver implicitement qu’il n’a aucune perspective morale – ceci expliquant les nombreuses accusations de révisionnisme à l’encontre du film. Lorsqu’un journaliste lui fait d’ailleurs remarquer que la violence excessive contre les nazis puisse offenser certains spectateurs, Tarantino lui répond avec une désinvolture déconcertante : « Pourquoi me condamnerait-on ? Parce que j’étais trop brutal avec les nazis ? ».

« Django Unchained » est donc une réponse évidente à « Inglourious Basterds ». À nouveau, le sujet politique de fond, l’esclavage américain, semble évincé, bien qu’étant présenté comme l’argument promotionnel premier des discours de Tarantino qui répète sans hésiter qu’il a la capacité et la légitimité de faire un film sur ce sujet. Il n’hésite pas à affirmer, par une pirouette mystique, qu’il a été, dans une vie antérieure, « un esclave noir américain. Je pense même que j’ai trois vies. […] C’est juste un pressentiment. Un truc que je sais ».

Cette anecdote a été mal reçue par la communauté afro-américaine car, non seulement Tarantino réitérait une énième fois être « black inside » mais s’appropriait cette fois l’événement le plus important de l’histoire afro-américaine comme si un blanc pouvait comprendre sans difficulté ce dont la communauté afro-américaine avait pourtant mis des siècles à assimiler.

Le réalisateur afro-américain, Spike Lee, de longue date en conflit avec Tarantino, n’a d’ailleurs pas hésité à exprimer son désaccord avec ce film jugé « irrespectueux pour ses ancêtres ». Tarantino pense pourtant réaliser le film sur l’esclavage « que l’Amérique n’a jamais voulu faire parce qu’elle en a honte ».

Une nouvelle manière d’évoquer la vengeance

Dans le fond, l’idéologie et la réflexion politique intéresse peu Tarantino. L’esclavage est une nouvelle configuration de ses récits de vengeance, une nouvelle exploration d’un genre cinématographique, ici le western spaghetti. Il le dit lui-même : « J’avais envie que Django Unchained traite du voyage initiatique de mon personnage et que l’esclavagisme n’apparaisse qu’en toile de fond. Pour moi, l’histoire avait plus de sens, était plus puissante, si elle était présentée à travers un genre comme le western spaghetti qui permet l’aventure et une forme d’excitation absente des films historiques. »

À nouveau l’argument du fun, de l’excitation, vient secondariser le sujet politique. Tarantino préfère dédramatiser son propos au risque de le décontextualiser. La vengeance de Django ne semble d’ailleurs pas animée de motivations politiques. Il fait preuve de cruauté aussi bien en massacrant les oppresseurs blancs, qu’en humiliant d’autres esclaves noirs. Le film se termine sur la mort sadique par Django du traitre noir, devenu une caricature de l’oncle Tom, ami des blancs. Devenu à son tour l’opprimé oppresseur, Django s’enfuit victorieux du massacre final, paradoxalement en endossant fièrement le costume de M. Candie, le négrier monstrueux qu’il a sévèrement corrigé.

L’usage de la violence était déjà tout autant problématique à la fin d’ »Inglourious Basterds ». Durant l’Opération Kino, les nazis nous sont d’abord présentés comme un public extatique devant la violence des images de leur film de propagande. Mais dans un effet de renversement, c’est ensuite les Basterds et Shoshanna qui nous sont présentés dans le même rôle du public jouissant de la violence du spectacle. Les « Basterds » transforment d’ailleurs rapidement leur croisade, non en leçon morale d’humanité, mais plutôt en spectacle trivial, se moquant sans impunité des soldats allemands.

En décontextualisant idéologiquement les sujets politiques de fond, Tarantino facilite en un sens la consommation de son cinéma, au profit d’un plaisir plus immédiat avec ses spectateurs, dénué de toute moralisation. Mais il propose dans le même temps une vision réductrice, fétichisée, simplifiant souvent l’Histoire à l’histoire du cinéma. Cela peut paraître cool de citer des discours transgressifs sur la violence mais, sur le mode de la fétichisation, Tarantino occulte tout l’arrière-plan historique

Voir aussi:

‘Give me a break’ – Tarantino tires of defending ultra-violent films after Sandy Hook massacre
The Django Unchained director spoke at a press conference in New York a day after Friday’s Connecticut massacre
Matilda Battersby
The Independant
18 December 2012

In the wake of Friday’s shootings at a school in Connecticut which left 26 dead, arts events across America were cancelled.

But director of ultra-violent film Django Unchained went ahead with a press junket on Saturday, and went on to remark that he is tired of defending his films every time America is rocked by gun violence.

Speaking in New York Quentin Tarantino said: “I just think you know there’s violence in the world, tragedies happen, blame the playmakers. It’s a western. Give me a break. »

The Oscar-nominated director of Inglourious Basterds and the Palme d’Or winning Pulp Fiction, said blame for violence should remain squarely with the perpetrators.

At the weekend both the Jack Reacher and Parental Guidance film premieres were cancelled in response to Friday’s massacre.

Reacher, which stars Tom Cruise, features a sniper attack. A spokesman for Paramount Pictures said: « Due to the terrible tragedy in Newtown, Connecticut, and out of honour and respect for the families of the victims whose lives were senselessly taken, we are postponing the Pittsburgh premiere of Jack Reacher. Our hearts go out to all those who lost loved ones. »

Speaking of the cancelled red carpet premiere and party for Parental Guidance, which stars Billy Crystal, Bette Midler and Marisa Tomei, a Fox spokesman said: « In light of the horrific tragedy in Newtown, Connecticut we are cancelling the red carpet event and the after party for the Parental Guidance premiere, scheduled today in downtown Los Angeles. The hearts of all involved with this film go out to the victims, their families, their community, and our entire nation in mourning.”

Fox TV screened repeats of comedy series Family Guy and American Dad last night instead of the scheduled Christmas specials, both of which are said to have featured school children and were deemed potentially insensitive.

Twenty children and six women died in the attack at Sandy Hook school by a gunman who shot himself dead at the scene.

Voir également:

Etats-Unis. La police veut boycotter les films de Tarantino
Courrier international
29/10/2015

Les syndicats de policiers de New York et de Los Angeles s’insurgent contre les propos tenus par le réalisateur hollywoodien lors d’une récente manifestation contre les violences policières.

“Le plus grand syndicat de police de Los Angeles soutient l’appel au boycott des films de Quentin Tarantino lancé par le NYPD [le département de police de New York]”, rapporte le Los Angeles Times.

Lors d’une manifestation contre les violences policières organisée samedi 24 octobre dans la Grosse Pomme, le réalisateur a en effet déclaré : “Je suis un être humain doué de conscience. Si vous estimez que des meurtres sont commis, alors vous devez vous insurger contre cet état de fait. Je suis ici pour dire que je suis du côté de ceux qui ont été assassinés.”

Cette phrase, prononcée quelques jours seulement “après la mort d’un officier de police du NYPD lors d’une course-poursuite d’un suspect dans le quartier de East Harlem” a mis le feu aux poudres, souligne le quotidien de Los Angeles.

Dans un communiqué publié le 27 octobre, la Los Angeles Police Protective League, le principal syndicat de police de Los Angeles, a dénoncé les “propos incendiaires” du réalisateur. “Nous sommes en faveur d’un dialogue constructif sur la façon dont la police interagit avec les citoyens de ce pays, peut-on y lire, mais il n’y a pas place pour les propos incendiaires qui font des policiers des cibles de choix.”

Le prochain film de Quentin Tarantino, un western intitulé The Hateful Eight (Les Huit Salopards), doit sortir sur les écrans américains le jour de Noël, le 6 janvier en France.

Voir encore:

Violences policières
Les policiers américains toujours en colère contre Tarantino

Caroline Besse
Télérama

30/10/2015

Le réalisateur avait participé à un rassemblement à New York dénonçant la mort de plusieurs personnes noires à la suite d’interpellations violentes. Les syndicats des forces de l’ordre l’accusent de jeter de l’huile sur le feu.
Quentin Tarantino ne se doutait certainement pas que sa participation au rassemblement du 24 octobre contre les violences « et la terreur » policières, à laquelle il a participé le week-end dernier à New York, provoquerait une telle ire de la part de la police. Après ceux de New York et de Los Angeles, le syndicat de police de Philadelphie a en effet appelé au boycott des films du réalisateur de Pulp Fiction après sa participation à la manifestation. Baptisé « Rise up October », ce rassemblement était organisé pour dénoncer la mort de plusieurs personnes noires après de violentes interpellations policières — récemment, Michael Brown à Ferguson, Christian Taylor au Texas ou Freddie Gray à Baltimore… Des morts qui avaient ensuite provoqué des émeutes.

 « Monsieur Tarantino gagne bien sa vie grâce à ses films, diffusant de la violence dans la société, et montrant du respect pour des criminels. Et maintenant, on se rend compte qu’il déteste les flics », a notamment déclaré le Philadelphia Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 5. « La rhétorique haineuse déshumanise la police et encourage les attaques à notre encontre », a-t-il ajouté. « Le réalisateur Quentin Tarantino a pris part d’une façon irresponsable et totalement inacceptable à ce qui s’est passé le week-end dernier à New York en assimilant les policiers à des meutriers », a dit de son côté la Los Angeles Police Protective League.

« Je suis un être humain avec une conscience… Si vous pensez qu’un meurtre est en train d’être perpétré, vous devez intervenir. Je suis ici pour dire que je suis du côté des victimes », avait notamment déclaré le réalisateur devant la foule présente. « Je dois appeler un meutre un meurtre, et des meutriers des meurtriers. »

Selon le New York Post, certains manifestants portaient des badges où il était inscrit : « Réagissez ! Stop à la terreur policière ! » ou encore : « Un meurtre commis par quelqu’un qui porte un insigne est toujours un meurtre. » A l’issue du rassemblement, onze personnes avaient d’ailleurs été arrêtées.

“C’est un mauvais timing.”
« Honte à lui, particulièrement au moment où nous portons le deuil, après le meurtre d’un policier new-yorkais », avait déclaré le chef de la police de la ville, Bill Bratton. Le rassemblement avait en effet eu lieu quatre jours après le meurtre d’un policier, l’agent du NYPD Randolph Holder, tué d’une balle dans le front alors qu’il poursuivait un homme armé dans Harlem. Interrogé sur ces fâcheuses circonstances, Tarantino avait répondu : « C’est comme ça. C’est un mauvais timing. Mais nous avons demandé à toutes ces familles de venir, et de raconter leur histoire. Ce flic tué, c’est aussi une tragédie. »

Alors que Quentin Tarantino est depuis silencieux, Carl Dix, l’un des organisateurs du mouvement Rising October, a comparé l’appel au boycott des films par la police à l’attitude qu’aurait pu avoir la mafia : « Surtout, ne vous aventurez pas à critiquer la police qui tue des gens, ou il vous sera impossible de travailler dans la ville. » Selon lui, le message de la police est une menace qui ne vise pas seulement le réalisateur, mais toutes les voix qui comptent dans la société.

Voir de même:

Quentin Tarantino : la police de New York appelle au boycott de ses films
Metro

26-10-2015

TRUE STORY – Quentin Tarantino est la cible des policiers new-yorkais. La raison ? Le réalisateur a fait le déplacement depuis Los Angeles pour participer à une manifestation ce samedi dans les rues de la Grande Pomme contre les violences policières. Un engagement qui n’est pas du tout du goût des forces de l’ordre…

Le réalisateur de Pulp Fiction n’est pas prêt de voir les policiers new-yorkais assister à la projection de son prochain film. Un froid qui survient après la participation de Quentin Tarantino au rassemblement « Rise Up October », soit une manifestation de trois jours organisée à New York pour mettre fin à la violence policière et réclamer une réforme du système judiciaire.

Les participants ont prononcé les noms des 250 victimes non armées tuées par des agents de police depuis 1990. Dont celui de Michael Brown, 18 ans, un adolescent afro-américain abattu par la police à Ferguson (Missouri) en août 2014, un décès qui avait provoqué des émeutes dans tous les États-Unis, ou encore celui de Tamir Rice, 12 ans, tué par les forces de l’ordre alors qu’il jouait avec un pistolet en plastique en novembre 2014 à Cleveland (Ohio). Les manifestants brandissaient des pancartes ou des photos de leurs proches victimes d’abus de la police.

C’est un timing maladroit qui a provoqué la colère de la police

Une réunion anti « terreur policière » pour laquelle Quentin Tarantino a prononcé quelques mots : « Quand je vois des meurtres, je ne reste pas là sans rien faire… Il faut appeler les meurtriers des meurtriers ». Malheureusement, quelques jours plus tôt un agent de la police de New-York tombait, tué d’une balle dans la tête par un suspect récidiviste, dans l’exercice de son travail.

Déjà quatre policiers New-yorkais sont morts depuis moins d’un an à New-York. De tristes chiffres qui restent le fruit des lois sur les armes à feu des États-Unis, où les forces de l’ordre sont forcément plus exposées au risque d’être confrontées à des suspects armés qu’en Europe par exemple.

Patrick Lynch, président d’une association d’agents des forces de l’ordre de New York, n’a pas pu se taire face à la présence de Quentin Tarantino à ces journées de protestations : « Ce n’est pas étonnant que quelqu’un qui gagne sa vie en glorifiant le crime et la violence déteste les policiers » a-t-il déclaré au New-York Post, avant d’ajouter : « Les officiers de police que Tarantino appelle des meurtriers ne vivent pas dans une de ses fictions dépravées sur grand écran. Ils prennent des risques et doivent parfois même sacrifier leur vie afin de protéger les communautés des vrais crimes. (…) Il est temps de boycotter les films de Quentin Tarantino”.

Les 8 Salopards, prévu pour une sortie le 6 janvier 2016 ne risque pas d’attirer beaucoup d’agents de la Grande Pomme en salles…

Voir aussi:

Police union calls for Tarantino boycott after anti-cop rally
By Dana Sauchelli, Priscilla DeGregory, Daniel Prendergast, Tom Wilson and Larry Celona
The New York Post

October 25, 2015

The city’s police union is calling for a boycott of Quentin Tarantino films after the “Pulp Fiction’’ director took part in an anti-cop rally less than a week after an officer was killed on the job.

“When I see murders, I do not stand by . . . I have to call the murderers the murderers,” the director — notorious for his violent movies — told a crowd of protesters in Washington Square Park on Saturday, adding that cops are too often “murderers.”

Patrick Lynch, president of the Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association, lashed out against the “Reservoir Dogs” auteur Sunday.

“It’s no surprise that someone who makes a living glorifying crime and violence is a cop-hater, too,” Lynch said in a statement.

“The police officers that Quentin Tarantino calls ‘murderers’ aren’t living in one of his depraved big-screen fantasies — they’re risking and sometimes sacrificing their lives to protect communities from real crime and mayhem.

“New Yorkers need to send a message to this purveyor of degeneracy that he has no business coming to our city to peddle his slanderous ‘Cop Fiction.’ ”

Tarantino acknowledged Saturday that the timing of the rally was “unfortunate.” But he said people had already traveled to be a part of the gathering.

Relatives of Police Officer Randolph Holder, who was killed in East Harlem Tuesday night, were far from appeased.

“I think it’s very disrespectful,” his cousin Shauntel Abrams, 27, said of the protest as she and other relatives gathered at the Church of the Nazarene in Far Rockaway ahead of Holder’s funeral Wednesday.

“Everyone forgets that behind the uniform is a person.”

Meanwhile, retired Police Officer John Mangan, who used to work at PSA 5, where Holder had been stationed, took to the streets on Sunday with a sign reading, “God bless the NYPD,” for a one-man march.

He walked the 7¹/₂ miles from the East Harlem station house to City Hall in a show of support for the fallen cop.

Voir de plus:

LAPD union joins NYPD in call to boycott Quentin Tarantino films

Director Quentin Tarantino participates in a rally to protest police brutality in New York.

James Queally

LA Times (Associated Press)

October 25, 2015

The Los Angeles Police Department’s largest union has thrown its support behind the NYPD’s call for a boycott of Quentin Tarantino’s films after the « Pulp Fiction » director referred to some police officers as murderers during a rally in New York City over the weekend.

Los Angeles Police Protective League President Craig Lally said comments like Tarantino’s encourage attacks on officers and said the union would support the call for a boycott of his films.

Tarantino flew from California to New York City to take part in a protest against police brutality on Saturday, and comments he made during the march quickly drew the ire of the New York Police Department’s Patrolmen’s Benevolent Assn.

Interested in the stories shaping California? Sign up for the free Essential California newsletter >>

« I’m a human being with a conscience, » Tarantino said, according to the Associated Press. « And if you believe there’s murder going on then you need to rise up and stand up against it. I’m here to say I’m on the side of the murdered. »

Ambushes of police are rising again at a difficult time for law enforcement
The comments, which came just days after New York police Officer Randolph Holder was shot and killed while chasing a suspect in East Harlem, prompted furious reactions from NYPD union President Pat Lynch and Police Commissioner William Bratton.

“We fully support constructive dialogue about how police interact with citizens. But there is no place for inflammatory rhetoric that makes police officers even bigger targets than we already are, » Lally said in a statement this week. « Film director Quentin Tarantino took irresponsibility to a new and completely unacceptable level this past weekend by referring to police as murderers during an anti-police march in New York. »

Tarantino’s films are notoriously violent, something critics were quick to harp on. While one of the director’s most iconic scenes involved the torture and eventual murder of a police officer in « Reservoir Dogs,” scores of gangsters, soldiers and other characters have found themselves decapitated or otherwise killed in gruesome fashion in a Tarantino film.

« The Hateful Eight, » a western directed by Tarantino, is set to premiere on Christmas Day.

Voir également:

Tarantino On ‘Django,’ Violence And Catharsis
NPR Staff
December 28, 2012

Transcript

Director Quentin Tarantino has not shied away from painful parts of history. He handled World War II in Inglourious Basterds and now delves into slavery in Django Unchained.

In Quentin Tarantino’s new film, Django Unchained, Jamie Foxx plays the title character, a freed slave turned bounty hunter searching for his wife and their plantation tormentors.

As is the case with all of Tarantino’s films, Django Unchained is incredibly violent. We spoke to the director before the school shootings in Newtown, Conn., and before critics had taken him to task for the film’s brutality. The film also is being debated for the way it brings humor to the story of slavery.

Yet Tarantino insisted then — as he does now — that his new film has a good heart. It’s a love story, he says. And, as with his previous film Inglourious Basterds, it’s also a brand of revisionist history he hopes Americans will find cathartic.

Tarantino speaks with All Things Considered host Audie Cornish about the touchy topics of the film and what he hopes the audience will bring away from it.

Interview Highlights

On making a traditionally somber topic the subject of an action movie

« I do think it’s a cultural catharsis, and it’s a cinematic catharsis. Even — it can even be good for the soul, actually. I mean, not to sound like a brute, but one of the things though that I actually think can be a drag for a whole lot of people about watching a movie about, either dealing with slavery or dealing with the Holocaust, is just, it’s just going to be pain, pain and more pain. And at some point, all those Holocaust TV movies — it’s like, ‘God, I just can’t watch another one of these.’ But to actually take an action story and put it in that kind of backdrop where slavery or the pain of World War II is the backdrop of an exciting adventure story — that can be something else. And then in my adventure story, I can have the people who are historically portrayed as the victims be the victors and the avengers. »

On walking the line between entertainment and exploitation

« I’m not coming from an exploitive place. If you shoot sex like an artist, it’s an artistic representation. If you shoot sex like a pornographer, then it looks like pornography. I want you to see America in 1858 in Chickasaw County [Miss.], and I think we need to see that. You know, it might be one of those things. At the very end of the day, who knows? We’ll find out — court of public opinion will say. But it might be one of those things where, God, you know, maybe it is actually too rough, too painful for a lot of black folks of this generation. But there’s the next generation coming out, and they’re going to live in a world where Django Unchained already exists. »

On why he thinks Hollywood is afraid to approach the subject matter the way he does

« You know, there’s not this big demand for, you know, movies that deal with the darkest part of America’s history, and the part that we’re still paying for to this day. They’re scared of how white audiences are going to feel about it; they’re scared about how black audiences are going to feel about it. And if you tell the story and … you mess it up, you’ve really messed it up.

Calvin Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio), a slave owner, holds Django’s wife captive.
Andrew Cooper/The Weinstein Company
« To tell you the truth, a couple of white Southern actors were offended by it. No black actors that I know of were offended. And I never heard any black actors say an unequivocal ‘No.’ « 

On the idea that white audience members will have a hard time connecting with the subject

« If you have a white audience member sitting there watching the movie, and they’re sitting there and they’re thinking, ‘Well, I didn’t do this. My family didn’t make money off of this, so I have nothing to do with this, nor does anybody in my family have anything to do with this,’ that’s actually a completely fair statement, you know. People don’t have to feel personally guilty about stuff that happened a hundred years ago, but what I expect those people to do is go and see the movie and completely identify with Django 100 percent. And his triumph is their triumph. And they’re going to be cheering him along all the way, and maybe even sometimes, every once in a while, even a little louder. »

Voir par ailleurs:

Quentin Tarantino, ‘Unchained’ And Unruly
NPR

January 02, 2013

Transcript

Quentin Tarantino’s film Django Unchained is a spaghetti western-inspired revenge film set in the antebellum South; it’s about a former slave who teams up with a bounty hunter to target the plantation owner who owns his wife.

The cinematic violence that has come to characterize Tarantino’s work as a screenwriter and director — from Reservoir Dogs at the start of his career in 1992 to 2009’s Inglourious Basterds — is front and center again in Django. And he’s making no apologies.

« What happened during slavery times is a thousand times worse than [what] I show, » he says. « So if I were to show it a thousand times worse, to me, that wouldn’t be exploitative, that would just be how it is. If you can’t take it, you can’t take it.

« Now, I wasn’t trying to do a Schindler’s List you-are-there-under-the-barbed-wire-of-Auschwitz. I wanted the film to be more entertaining than that. … But there’s two types of violence in this film: There’s the brutal reality that slaves lived under for … 245 years, and then there’s the violence of Django’s retribution. And that’s movie violence, and that’s fun and that’s cool, and that’s really enjoyable and kind of what you’re waiting for. »

That said, Tarantino is clear about what — for him — is acceptable violence in a movie and what crosses a line.

« The only thing that I’ve ever watched in a movie that I wished I’d never seen is real-life animal death or real-life insect death in a movie. That’s absolutely, positively where I draw the line. And a lot of European and Asian movies do that, and we even did that in America for a little bit of time. … I don’t like seeing animals murdered on screen. Movies are about make-believe. … I don’t think there’s any place in a movie for real death. »

In the case of Django, Tarantino tells Fresh Air host Terry Gross that he was much more uncomfortable with the prospect of writing the language of white supremacists and directing African-Americans in scenes depicting slavery on American soil than he was about any physical violence being portrayed. His anxiety about directing the slavery scenes was so great, in fact, that he considered shooting abroad.

« I actually went out after I finished the script … with Sidney Poitier for dinner, » he says. « And was telling him about my story, and then telling him about my trepidation and my little plan of how I was going to get past it, and he said, … ‘Quentin, I don’t think you should do that. … What you’re just telling me is you’re a little afraid of your own movie, and you just need to get over that. If you’re going to tell this story, you need to not be afraid of it. You need to do it. Everyone gets it. Everyone knows what’s going on. We’re making a movie. They get it.' »

Interview Highlights
On the catchphrase ‘The D is silent’

« I thought everyone would know how to say the name ‘Django.’ Even if it wasn’t from the spaghetti westerns, at least from Django Reinhardt you would know how to say it. And people would read the script [and say], ‘Oh! D-jango Unchained. OK! » And people would say it all the time. Frankly, I considered it an intelligence test. If you say D-jango you’re definitely going down in my book. »

On conventional slave narratives on screen

There haven’t been that many slave narratives in the last 40 years of cinema, and usually when there are, they’re usually done on television, and for the most part … they’re historical movies, like history with a capital H. Basically, ‘This happened, then this happened, then that happened, then this happened.’ And that can be fine, well enough, but for the most part they keep you at arm’s length dramatically.
« There haven’t been that many slave narratives in the last 40 years of cinema, and usually when there are, they’re usually done on television, and for the most part … they’re historical movies, like history with a capital H. Basically, ‘This happened, then this happened, then that happened, then this happened.’ And that can be fine, well enough, but for the most part they keep you at arm’s length dramatically. Because also there is this kind of level of good taste that they’re trying to deal with … and frankly oftentimes they just feel like dusty textbooks just barely dramatized. »

On giving an enslaved character a heroic journey

« I like the idea of telling these stories and taking stories that oftentimes — if played out in the way that they’re normally played out — just end up becoming soul-deadening, because you’re just watching victimization all the time. And now you get a chance to put a spin on it and actually take a slave character and give him a heroic journey, make him heroic, make him give his payback, and actually show this epic journey and give it the kind of folkloric tale that it deserves — the kind of grand-opera stage it deserves. »

On how Westerns from different decades reflect the concerns of their times

« One of the things that’s interesting about Westerns in particular is [that] there’s no other genre that reflects the decade that they were made or the morals and the feelings of Americans during that decade [more] than Westerns. Westerns are always a magnifying glass as far as that’s concerned.

« The Westerns of the ’50s definitely have an Eisenhower, birth of suburbia and plentiful times aspect to them. America started little by little catching up with its racist past by the ’50s, at the very, very beginning of [that decade], and that started being reflected in Westerns. Consequently, the late ’60s have a very Vietnam vibe to the Westerns, leading into the ’70s. And by the mid-’70s, you know, most of the Westerns literally could be called ‘Watergate Westerns,’ because it was about disillusionment and tearing down the myths that we have spent so much time building up. »

On his early introductions to African-American culture

« [My mother’s] boyfriends would come over, and they’d … take me to blaxploitation movies, trying to, you know, get me to like them and buy me footballs and stuff, and … my mom and her friends would take me to cool bars and stuff, where they’d be playing cool, live rhythm-and-blues music … and I’d be drinking … Shirley Temples — I think I called them James Bond because I didn’t like the name Shirley Temples — and eat Mexican food … while Jimmy Soul and a cool band would be, you know, playing in some lava lounge-y kind of ’70s cocktail lounge. It was really cool. It made me grow up in a real big way. When I would hang around with kids I’d think they were really childish. I used to hang around with really groovy adults. »

Voir encore:

Le prochain Tarantino s’appellera « Les Huit Salopards » en version française
Le Parisien

16 Sept. 2015

« The Hateful Eight »- « Les Huit Salopards » sortira dans les salles obscures début 2016. All Rights Reserved
Le distributeur du 8e long-métrage de Quentin Tarantino, SND, vient d’annoncer le titre français du film « The Hateful Eight ».

La décision est en grande partie celle du réalisateur lui-même qui souhaite renouer avec les racines du western américain.

 Aussi, le film a été tourné dans un format aujourd’hui disparu, le 70mm Panavision, et  la musique est signée par Ennio Morricone, le compositeur italien connu pour avoir imaginé les bandes originales de « Pour une poignée de dollars », « Le Bon, la Brute, et le Truand » ou encore « Il était une fois dans l’Ouest ».

« Les Huit Salopards » fait référence au film « Les Douze Salopards » de Robert Aldrich, et « Les Sept Salopards » de Bruno Fontana.

Il s’agit du deuxième western du cinéaste, trois ans après « Django Unchained ». « The Hateful Eight » plante son décor dans le désert enneigé du Wyoming juste après la guerre civile américaine (1861-1865). Huit personnes sont coincées dans un relais de diligence en raison d’une tempête de neige qui empêche la progression de leur diligence. Samuel L. Jackson sera Warren, alias « The Bounty Hunter ». Kurt Russel incarnera « The Gunman » John Ruth. Seule femme de la bande, « The Prisoner » Daisy Domergue sera campée par Jennifer Jason Leigh. « The Sherif » Chris Mannix sera interprété par Walton Goggins. Demian Bichir héritera du rôle de Bob « The Mexican ». Tim Roth sera Oswaldo Mobray « The Little Man ». Michael Madsen prêtera ses traits à Joe Gage « The Cow Puncher » et Bruce Dern interprétera « The Confederate » Sandy Smithers.

« The Hateful Eight » ou « Les Huit Salopards » sortira le 8 janvier 2016 aux États-Unis, en attendant une date française.

Voir enfin:

Chiraq de Spike Lee suscite la polémique à Chicago
Jérôme Lachasse
Le Figaro

01/06/2015

Le titre du nouveau long métrage du réalisateur de Malcolm X, en référence à la violence par armes à feu, irrite les habitants de la ville des vents, où le tournage vient de commencer.

Le nouveau film de Spike Lee, Chiraq, suscite la polémique à Chicago, où le tournage vient de débuter. En cause: le titre. Cette expression, contraction de «Chicago» et d’«Iraq», a été inventée par des rappeurs locaux en référence à une zone du sud de la ville où la violence par armes à feu prolifère. Plusieurs hommes politiques ont déjà dénoncé ce titre qui risque, selon eux, d’offrir une vision négative de la ville des vents. Le maire de Chicago Rahm Emanuel (Parti démocrate) a contesté le mois dernier le titre, indiquant que la ville devrait avoir son mot à dire après la réduction fiscale de 3 millions de dollars accordée au long métrage.

Les Chicagoans, confrontés chaque jour à la violence, voient eux aussi d’un mauvais œil le tournage, rapporte le New York Times. Janelle Rush, une étudiante de 24 ans citée par le quotidien américain, n’apprécie pas le titre, mais pense «qu’il serait judicieux de montrer les quartiers de la ville que les médias ne montrent pas». Elle espère cependant «que[ce film] pourra renverser la tendance et présenter [Chicago] sous un aspect positif. Pour révéler qu’il y a autre chose que la violence par armes à feu».

Pour le moment, Spike Lee n’a pas confirmé publiquement le sens de son titre. Chiraq, toujours selon le New York Times, pourrait ainsi être une réécriture de la pièce d’Aristophane Lysistrata, où les femmes entament une grève du sexe pour contraindre les hommes à arrêter la guerre du Péloponnèse. Le réalisateur de Malcolm X (1992) a néanmoins posté le 28 mai sur son compte Instagram une image du clap de tournage. Sur celui-ci est écrit «Peace».

Un temps annoncé au casting, Kanye West a dû annuler sa participation en raison de son emploi du temps chargé. Il pourrait cependant contribuer à la bande originale. John Cusack, Jennifer Hudson, Jeremy Piven, Samuel L. Jackson et Common sont, eux, à l’affiche de ce long métrage produit et distribué par Amazon Studios. La date de sortie n’est pas encore connue.


Expo Lascaux 3: Le cinéma serait-il notre Lascaux à nous ? (Cinema as a sacred surface: Do films fulfill the same sacred function as the ritual engravings of temple walls or prehistoric caves?)

9 juillet, 2015
 https://i1.wp.com/culturebox.francetvinfo.fr/sites/default/files/assets/images/2014/02/024_114501_1.jpg He, oh, les enfants ! Vous n’a rien de mieux à faire que de regarder la fresque ? On éteint. Rrrr
Ces associations sont une écriture. Une sorte de message, de mythes sur lesquels la société reposait. Lascaux est un sanctuaire : ses peintres y œuvraient comme on peint une cathédrale, un lieu sacré. Quand je suis dans cette grotte, je suis aspiré vers les « dieux », les cieux de ces hommes préhistoriques, leur panthéon, plus qu’à la rencontre de ces hommes eux-mêmes. Yves Coppens (Conseil scientifique international de la grotte de Lascaux)
Il s’agit de faire sortir la plus célèbre grotte ornée du monde de son écrin périgourdin pour la présenter à un public international, et faire découvrir une reproduction fidèle au millimètre près d’une partie de la grotte qui n’a jamais été montrée. Germinal Peiro (Conseil départemental)
8 septembre 1940. L’armistice à été signé il y a peu par le maréchal Pétain. Dans le petit village de Montignac, la vie s’écoule doucement, peu inquiété par les Allemands. Ils sont encore loin. Ce jour là, Marcel Ravidat et trois autres personnes font une étrange découverte. À la faveur d’un arbre déraciné depuis des années, une excavation effleure le sol, recouverte de ronces. À l’aide de pierres jetées dans le trou, Marcel comprend qu’un boyau descend profondément sous la terre. Il a déjà 18 ans et il est apprenti à l’usine Citroën. Cette journée primordiale est un dimanche, et le travail doit reprendre dès le lendemain. Il faudra attendre le jeudi 12 septembre, début de la semaine de repos, avant que Marcel Ravidat ne revienne sur les lieus. En chemin il croise trois amis, Jacques Marsal, Georges Agniel et Simon Coencas, âgés de 13 à 15 ans. Le quatuor des Inventeurs est formé. Marcel a prévu son expédition cette fois. Armé d’un coutelas, deux lampes et d’une corde, il entreprend d’agrandir l’excavation. Le travail n’est pas de tout repos. Il faut gratter, petit à petit. Finalement le trou s’agrandit et il peut passer. La descente se fait par étape. Après une pente de trois mètres, il atterrit sur un tas d’éboulis, suivis par une autre paroi inclinée. Ses compagnons le rejoignent et, un peu plus loin, les premiers dessins apparaissent sous la flamme vacillante de leur lampe à pétrole. L’endroit paraît large, mais peu pratique. Le lendemain, à coup de pioche, il continue d’explorer la grotte, qui commence à peine à leurs livrer ses secrets. C’en est d’ailleurs trop pour les frêles épaules de nos quatre jeunes garçons. Le 16 septembre, Jacques Marsal, sur les conseils d’un gendarme, prévient son instituteur Léon Laval de la découverte. La grotte de Lascaux, qui ne porte pas encore ce nom, se prépare à affronter le monde extérieur. Les quatre amis suivront des destins différents. Le jeune Marsal, qui dans un récit s’octroit le meilleur rôle, en l’occurrence celui de Marcel Ravidat, véritable découvreur de la grotte, devient le protecteur de la grotte avec ce dernier, jusqu’en 1942. Cette année là, il se fait arrêter par la gendarmerie nationale. L’influence des Allemands a atteint le petit village. Il est alors envoyé en Allemagne pour suivre le Service du Travail Obligatoire. Il reviendra à Montignac en 1948, après une petite escale à Paris où il se marie. À cette époque, La grotte s’ouvre au public et il en devient le guide avec Marcel pendant quinze ans. Peu à peu, l’action du gaz carbonique et l’afflux d’humidité mettent en danger les dessins. Les premiers champignons verdâtres apparaissent. Lors de la fermeture en 1963, il reste sur place comme agent technique, et participera aux diverses évolutions techniques. Il recevra d’ailleurs la Légion d’Honneur, pour son travail sur la machinerie qui contrôle l’atmosphère de la grotte. Il restera le seul des Inventeurs à recevoir cet honneur. Au fil du temps sa renommée continue de grandir, et il devient le « Monsieur Lascaux 24 » jusqu’en 1989, année de son décès. En 1940, Georges Agniel est le seul à retourner à l’école au début du mois d’octobre, à Paris. Très rapidement, il enverra une « carte interzone » à Marcel Ravidat, pour « sauvegarder [ses] intérêts dans l’exploitation de la grotte ». Malgré son jeune âge, 15 ans, il sait que la grotte a un potentiel extraordinaire. Agent technique chez Citroën puis à l’entreprise Thomson-Houston, il ne reviendra que rarement à Montignac, jusqu’au 11 novembre 1986. Sa vie sera la plus tranquille des quatre. De son côté, Simon Coencas repart très rapidement à Paris avec ses parents et son frère. La collaboration est de mise dans la capitale française. Simon et toute sa famille seront déportés à Drancy. Son jeune âge le sauvera, ainsi que sa sœur. N’ayant pas encore 16 ans, ils échapperont à Auschwitz. Pas ses parents. Enchainant les petits boulots (vendeur à la sauvette, groom), il récupérera plus tard l’entreprise de métaux de son beau-père à Montreuil, qu’il fera fructifier. Tout comme Georges Agniel, il ne reviendra que très peu à Montignac. Il sera néanmoins présent ce fameux jour du 11 septembre. Pour l’Inventeur originel, la vie est aussi difficile. Marcel Ravidat gardera la grotte avec son amis Jacques Marsal jusqu’en 1942. Puis, comme beaucoup de jeunes de son âge, il sera requis aux Chantiers de la Jeunesse dans les Hautes-Pyrénées pendant huit mois. À son retour à Montignac, la gendarmerie envoie tous les jeunes au STO. Il trouvera refuge dans une grotte voisine de celle de Lascaux pour éviter le Service du travail Obligatoire et deviend maquisard. Promu caporal, il combattra dans les Vosges, puis en Allemagne. À la fin de la guerre, en 1945, il reprend le travail au garage du village. Mais l’attraction de sa découverte est trop forte. Rapidement il devient ouvrier pour l’aménagement de la grotte, puis guide avec son ami Jacques en 1948. Il est le premier à remarquer les taches de couleur qui commencent à envahir la grotte, qui conduiront à sa fermeture en 1963. Les choix sont limités à cette époque, et il trouve un travail à l’usine comme mécanicien. À cette époque, Jacques Marsal s’est attribué tout le crédit de la trouvaille. Il faudra attendre la parution des archives de l’instituteur Léon Laval pour que la vérité soit rétablie. Il ne quittera plus le village de Montignac. Le 11 novembre 1986, il est présent pour accueillir ses anciens camarades. À l’occasion de la sortie du livre Lascaux, un autre regard de Mario Ruspoli le 11 novembre 1986, les quatre amis sont enfin regroupés. C’est un première depuis 1942. Quatre ans plus tard, ils ne seront plus que trois à assister au jubilée de 1990, qui fête les 50 ans de la grotte. Pendant la célébration, ils sont présenté à François Mitterrand. En 1991, tous les trois sont nommés Chevalier de l’Ordre du Mérite. Décédé en 1995, Marcel Ravidat venait, comme ses amis, tout les ans pour fêter l’anniversaire de leur Invention. Seuls survivants du quatuor, Simon Coencas et Georges Agniel perpétuent la tradition encore aujourd’hui. L’Humanité
Les reflets de la peinture, ses mouvements sur la roche, c’était extraordinaire! Simon Coencas
Il a affronté la guerre, deux pontages et un cancer. À 87 ans, Simon Coencas, dernier des quatre « inventeurs » (découvreurs) de Lascaux, est un survivant. (…) 12 septembre 1940. Simon, ado juif parisien de 13 ans, part en balade dans les bois dominant le village de Montignac avec deux copains un peu plus âgés, Georges et Jacques. Fils d’un marchand de prêt-à-porter, il a trouvé refuge en Dordogne avec ses quatre frères et sœurs : « Après la déclaration de guerre, on s’est installés à Montignac avec ma mère et ma grand-mère en 1940 », dit-il de sa voix rocailleuse. « J’y ai connu Jacques Marsal, dont la mère tenait le restaurant en face de chez nous, et Georges Agniel. On faisait les 400 coups, toujours fourrés dans les bois. Mais pas au hasard : on cherchait le souterrain censé relier la colline au château. » Ce jour-là, en route vers la colline, ils croisent Marcel Ravidat, « un gaillard de 18 ans qui travaillait déjà ». Quatre jours plus tôt, accompagné de Robot, son chien, il a repéré quelque chose. Le souterrain? « Certains racontent que ce chien a trouvé le trou, mais c’est faux. C’est nous. À peine un terrier de lapin, mais ça sonnait creux. » Le quatuor dégage l’entrée de la cavité. « Marcel est passé en premier, on rampait dans ce couloir étroit plein de stalactites et de stalagmites. En descendant, on a été éblouis. C’était la salle des Taureaux! » Face à ces couleurs éclatantes vieilles de 17.000 ans, l’émotion est « indescriptible ». Le lendemain, munis de cordes et d’une lampe Pigeon, la bande des quatre poursuit l’exploration. « Les reflets de la peinture, ses mouvements sur la roche, c’était extraordinaire! » La suite est connue : ils alertent leur instituteur, Léon Laval, et gardent l’entrée. Les visiteurs affluent, dont l’abbé Breuil qui saisit l’importance de cette « chapelle Sixtine de la préhistoire », comme il la baptise. Fin 1940, Lascaux est classée monument historique. Simon n’est plus là. Huit jours après la découverte, les Coencas ont dû regagner Paris : « C’était la guerre. Puis il y a eu les lois raciales, l’étoile… » Le vieil homme raconte l’arrestation de son père : Fresnes, Drancy, Auschwitz. La sienne en octobre 1942, son entrée au camp de Drancy où il retrouve sa mère déportée. Lui en ressort au bout d’un mois grâce à l’intervention de la Croix-Rouge. Il se cache, survit. Après-guerre? Simon épouse Gisèle, toujours à ses côtés. Il fait « trente-six métiers » puis s’installe comme ferrailleur. Rude au labeur, doué en affaires, le couple fait prospérer l’entreprise. Lascaux attire les foules, pour Simon la grotte passe au second plan, mais les amis de Montignac, eux, ne sont jamais loin. Il déjeune souvent avec Georges, qui vit à Nogent-sur-Marne. Quand des inondations frappent Montignac en 1960, il accueille chez lui la famille de Jacques, guide de la grotte jusqu’à sa fermeture en 1963. Réunis à Lascaux en 1986, les inventeurs s’y retrouveront ensuite chaque année, en septembre. Jacques décède en 1989, Marcel en 1995, Georges en 2012. Ne restent que deux veuves – Marinette Ravidat veille sur la colline depuis son salon – et Simon. « Au début, les inventeurs avaient un traitement spécial. Et puis tout le monde s’est emparé de l’histoire », lance le vieil homme, mi-amusé, mi-désabusé. « Ils pourraient quand même nous envoyer un petit chèque! Je le donnerais à la recherche sur le cancer. Je bombe le torse car sans nous la grotte serait peut-être restée inconnue. » De Lascaux, Simon n’a rien emporté. Les stalactites? Égarées. Il en a tiré quelques honneurs : François Mitterrand l’a fait chevalier dans l’ordre du Mérite, Frédéric Mitterrand officier dans l’ordre des Arts et des Lettres. Il a emmené ses enfants voir Lascaux II, le fac-similé ouvert au public depuis 1983, « très bien fait même s’il manque l’odeur de la terre, l’humidité ». À présent, des reproductions des fresques voyagent dans le monde avec l’exposition Lascaux III. Bientôt Lascaux IV… Tout cela, c’est un peu grâce à lui. Ses sept petits-enfants et onze arrière-petits-enfants le savent-ils? Sans doute pas, eux qui ont récemment découvert que leur aïeul est juif. JDD
Il y a 75 ans, le 8 septembre 1940 précisément, en pleine Seconde Guerre mondiale, Marcel Ravidat, 18 ans, court après son chien Robot. Ce dernier s’est engouffré dans un trou de la colline qui surplombe la Vézère au sud de Montignac, en Dordogne. Le jeune apprenti garagiste récupère le coquin sur un amas de cailloux qui roulent, roulent… Et sous ses pieds, un écho résonne ! Intrigué, le jeune homme imagine avoir découvert un souterrain secret menant au manoir de Lascaux. Quatre jours plus tard, il revient avec trois amis Jacques Marsal, 15 ans, du même petit village de Montignac que lui, Georges Agniel 16 ans, en vacances et Simon Coencas, 15 ans, qui a fui Montreuil près de Paris pour se réfugier avec sa famille en zone libre. Les quatre téméraires se sont équipés d’outils de fortune et de lampes à pétrole. Objectif : élargir le trou et pénétrer les entrailles rocheuses à la recherche d’un éventuel trésor. Les jeunes explorateurs ignorent encore qu’ils s’apprêtent à entrer dans la légende, en tirant de son sommeil l’un des plus précieux joyaux de l’Humanité ! Le passage ouvert, Marcel, le plus âgé, descend en premier, en rampant. Après quelques mètres, la galerie s’ouvre sur une grotte et il atteint un vaste espace circulaire, que les préhistoriens baptiseront plus tard « Salle des Taureaux »… mais aveuglé par l’obscurité, ni lui ni ses acolytes, qui l’ont rejoint, ne devinent les aurochs peints au-dessus de leurs têtes ! Ce n’est qu’en arrivant dans un couloir étroit, le « Diverticule axial » que les adolescents pressentent l’ampleur de leur découverte : à la lueur de leur lampe artisanale des dizaines de vaches, de cerfs et de chevaux semblent se mouvoir au-dessus d’eux sur le plafond et les parois. Le lendemain, ils descendent avec une corde au fond d’un puits caché dans un recoin de la grotte… et y découvrent la « scène du Puits » : un homme à tête d’oiseau fait face à un bison qui perd ses entrailles, éventré par une longue sagaie et perdant ses entrailles. La petite bande vient de découvrir une œuvre magistrale de l‘art préhistorique, réalisée il y a 20 000 ans par nos ancêtres Cro-Magnon : la grotte de Lascaux. La cavité n’est pas très grande : 3 000 mètres cube seulement. Mais elle recèle de grandes et nombreuses fresques très élaborées : les artistes ont joué avec les reliefs de la roche pour mieux créer perspectives et mouvements, surprendre le regard du visiteur… Anamorphoses, animaux aux proportions volontairement modifiées, comme les chevaux aux petites têtes sur de gros ventres surplombant des pattes arrondies, typiques de Lascaux. La palette polychrome est riche, du noir, au jaune et au rouge et même, à un endroit, du mauve! L’intensité des couleurs est aussi variée. Et les peintures sont soulignées de traits gravés sur la paroi calcaire. Au total : 1500 gravures, 600 peintures animales, 400 signes se répondant les uns les autres, s’intriquant dans une mise en scène chargée de symboles. Quatre espèces animales reviennent de façon récurrente : les aurochs (ancêtres de nos vaches), les bisons, les chevaux et les cerfs. (…)  Prévenu une dizaine de jours après la découverte, l’abbé Henri Breuil, alors professeur au Collège de France, et réfugié en zone non occupée, se précipite. En ressortant de la grotte, il s’exclame « C’est presque trop beau ! ». Dès décembre 1940, la grotte est classée Monument historique. A partir de 1948, le propriétaire (privé) fait réaliser des aménagements pour accueillir le public. Un million de visiteurs se presseront devant les parois de ce chef d’œuvre jusqu’en 1963, date à laquelle André Malraux, ministre chargé des Affaires culturelles, ordonne la fermeture au public. Les parois se dégradent en effet dangereusement, sous l’effet des variations de température, de l’éclairage et du dioxyde de carbone dé