Green Book: Comment torpiller la chance de cinq oscars (Behind its African-American art of coded communication, the Green Book subversively promoted an image of affluent African-Americans that white Americans rarely saw and which eventually had a democratizing effect on the country)

26 janvier, 2019

Image result for The Green book Victor hugo Green cover"Colored waiting room" à Durham, Caroline du Nord, en mai 1940.Le pianiste et compositeur Don Shirley à New York, en 1960.

Image result for Green Book film posterOn April 4, 1967, exactly one year before his assassination, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. stepped up to the lectern at the Riverside Church in Manhattan. The United States had been in active combat in Vietnam for two years and tens of thousands of people had been killed, including some 10,000 American troops. The political establishment — from left to right — backed the war, and more than 400,000 American service members were in Vietnam, their lives on the line. Many of King’s strongest allies urged him to remain silent about the war or at least to soft-pedal any criticism. They knew that if he told the whole truth about the unjust and disastrous war he would be falsely labeled a Communist, suffer retaliation and severe backlash, alienate supporters and threaten the fragile progress of the civil rights movement. King rejected all the well-meaning advice and said, “I come to this magnificent house of worship tonight because my conscience leaves me no other choice.” Quoting a statement by the Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam, he said, “A time comes when silence is betrayal” and added, “that time has come for us in relation to Vietnam.” It was a lonely, moral stance. And it cost him. But it set an example of what is required of us if we are to honor our deepest values in times of crisis, even when silence would better serve our personal interests or the communities and causes we hold most dear. It’s what I think about when I go over the excuses and rationalizations that have kept me largely silent on one of the great moral challenges of our time: the crisis in Israel-Palestine. I have not been alone. Until very recently, the entire Congress has remained mostly silent on the human rights nightmare that has unfolded in the occupied territories. Our elected representatives, who operate in a political environment where Israel’s political lobby holds well-documented power, have consistently minimized and deflected criticism of the State of Israel, even as it has grown more emboldened in its occupation of Palestinian territory and adopted some practices reminiscent of apartheid in South Africa and Jim Crow segregation in the United States. Many civil rights activists and organizations have remained silent as well, not because they lack concern or sympathy for the Palestinian people, but because they fear loss of funding from foundations, and false charges of anti-Semitism. They worry, as I once did, that their important social justice work will be compromised or discredited by smear campaigns. Similarly, many students are fearful of expressing support for Palestinian rights because of the McCarthyite tactics of secret organizations like Canary Mission, which blacklists those who publicly dare to support boycotts against Israel, jeopardizing their employment prospects and future careers. Reading King’s speech at Riverside more than 50 years later, I am left with little doubt that his teachings and message require us to speak out passionately against the human rights crisis in Israel-Palestine, despite the risks and despite the complexity of the issues. King argued, when speaking of Vietnam, that even “when the issues at hand seem as perplexing as they often do in the case of this dreadful conflict,” we must not be mesmerized by uncertainty. “We must speak with all the humility that is appropriate to our limited vision, but we must speak.” And so, if we are to honor King’s message and not merely the man, we must condemn Israel’s actions: unrelenting violations of international law, continued occupation of the West Bank, East Jerusalem, and Gaza, home demolitions and land confiscations. We must cry out at the treatment of Palestinians at checkpoints, the routine searches of their homes and restrictions on their movements, and the severely limited access to decent housing, schools, food, hospitals and water that many of them face. We must not tolerate Israel’s refusal even to discuss the right of Palestinian refugees to return to their homes, as prescribed by United Nations resolutions, and we ought to question the U.S. government funds that have supported multiple hostilities and thousands of civilian casualties in Gaza, as well as the $38 billion the U.S. government has pledged in military support to Israel. And finally, we must, with as much courage and conviction as we can muster, speak out against the system of legal discrimination that exists inside Israel, a system complete with, according to Adalah, the Legal Center for Arab Minority Rights in Israel, more than 50 laws that discriminate against Palestinians — such as the new nation-state law that says explicitly that only Jewish Israelis have the right of self-determination in Israel, ignoring the rights of the Arab minority that makes up 21 percent of the population. Of course, there will be those who say that we can’t know for sure what King would do or think regarding Israel-Palestine today. That is true. The evidence regarding King’s views on Israel is complicated and contradictory. Although the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee denounced Israel’s actions against Palestinians, King found himself conflicted. Like many black leaders of the time, he recognized European Jewry as a persecuted, oppressed and homeless people striving to build a nation of their own, and he wanted to show solidarity with the Jewish community, which had been a critically important ally in the civil rights movement. Ultimately, King canceled a pilgrimage to Israel in 1967 after Israel captured the West Bank. During a phone call about the visit with his advisers, he said, “I just think that if I go, the Arab world, and of course Africa and Asia for that matter, would interpret this as endorsing everything that Israel has done, and I do have questions of doubt.” He continued to support Israel’s right to exist but also said on national television that it would be necessary for Israel to return parts of its conquered territory to achieve true peace and security and to avoid exacerbating the conflict. There was no way King could publicly reconcile his commitment to nonviolence and justice for all people, everywhere, with what had transpired after the 1967 war. Today, we can only speculate about where King would stand. Yet I find myself in agreement with the historian Robin D.G. Kelley, who concluded that, if King had the opportunity to study the current situation in the same way he had studied Vietnam, “his unequivocal opposition to violence, colonialism, racism and militarism would have made him an incisive critic of Israel’s current policies.” Indeed, King’s views may have evolved alongside many other spiritually grounded thinkers, like Rabbi Brian Walt, who has spoken publicly about the reasons that he abandoned his faith in what he viewed as political Zionism. (…) During more than 20 visits to the West Bank and Gaza, he saw horrific human rights abuses, including Palestinian homes being bulldozed while people cried — children’s toys strewn over one demolished site — and saw Palestinian lands being confiscated to make way for new illegal settlements subsidized by the Israeli government. He was forced to reckon with the reality that these demolitions, settlements and acts of violent dispossession were not rogue moves, but fully supported and enabled by the Israeli military. For him, the turning point was witnessing legalized discrimination against Palestinians — including streets for Jews only — which, he said, was worse in some ways than what he had witnessed as a boy in South Africa. (…) Jewish Voice for Peace, for example, aims to educate the American public about “the forced displacement of approximately 750,000 Palestinians that began with Israel’s establishment and that continues to this day.” (…) In view of these developments, it seems the days when critiques of Zionism and the actions of the State of Israel can be written off as anti-Semitism are coming to an end. There seems to be increased understanding that criticism of the policies and practices of the Israeli government is not, in itself, anti-Semitic. (…) the Rev. Dr. William J. Barber II (…) declared in a riveting speech last year that we cannot talk about justice without addressing the displacement of native peoples, the systemic racism of colonialism and the injustice of government repression. In the same breath he said: “I want to say, as clearly as I know how, that the humanity and the dignity of any person or people cannot in any way diminish the humanity and dignity of another person or another people. To hold fast to the image of God in every person is to insist that the Palestinian child is as precious as the Jewish child.” Guided by this kind of moral clarity, faith groups are taking action. In 2016, the pension board of the United Methodist Church excluded from its multibillion-dollar pension fund Israeli banks whose loans for settlement construction violate international law. Similarly, the United Church of Christ the year before passed a resolution calling for divestments and boycotts of companies that profit from Israel’s occupation of Palestinian territories. Even in Congress, change is on the horizon. For the first time, two sitting members, Representatives Ilhan Omar, Democrat of Minnesota, and Rashida Tlaib, Democrat of Michigan, publicly support the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement. In 2017, Representative Betty McCollum, Democrat of Minnesota, introduced a resolution to ensure that no U.S. military aid went to support Israel’s juvenile military detention system. Israel regularly prosecutes Palestinian children detainees in the occupied territories in military court. None of this is to say that the tide has turned entirely or that retaliation has ceased against those who express strong support for Palestinian rights. To the contrary, just as King received fierce, overwhelming criticism for his speech condemning the Vietnam War — 168 major newspapers, including The Times, denounced the address the following day — those who speak publicly in support of the liberation of the Palestinian people still risk condemnation and backlash. Bahia Amawi, an American speech pathologist of Palestinian descent, was recently terminated for refusing to sign a contract that contains an anti-boycott pledge stating that she does not, and will not, participate in boycotting the State of Israel. In November, Marc Lamont Hill was fired from CNN for giving a speech in support of Palestinian rights that was grossly misinterpreted as expressing support for violence. Canary Mission continues to pose a serious threat to student activists. And just over a week ago, the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute in Alabama, apparently under pressure mainly from segments of the Jewish community and others, rescinded an honor it bestowed upon the civil rights icon Angela Davis, who has been a vocal critic of Israel’s treatment of Palestinians and supports B.D.S. But that attack backfired. Within 48 hours, academics and activists had mobilized in response. The mayor of Birmingham, Randall Woodfin, as well as the Birmingham School Board and the City Council, expressed outrage at the institute’s decision. The council unanimously passed a resolution in Davis’ honor, and an alternative event is being organized to celebrate her decades-long commitment to liberation for all. I cannot say for certain that King would applaud Birmingham for its zealous defense of Angela Davis’s solidarity with Palestinian people. But I do. In this new year, I aim to speak with greater courage and conviction about injustices beyond our borders, particularly those that are funded by our government, and stand in solidarity with struggles for democracy and freedom. My conscience leaves me no other choice. Michelle Alexander
“I think it’s a trope that has certainly been seen in Hollywood films for decades. Think about the white teacher in the inner city school. The Michelle Pfeiffer one [in Dangerous Minds]. The Principal. Music of the Heart, where Meryl Streep was a music teacher. Wildcats. I think these stories probably read well in a pitch meeting: ‘Goldie Hawn coaching an inner city football team.’“They make it look like Japan would not have made it out of the feudal period without Tom Cruise.” And the west wouldn’t have been tamed and we’d have no civilization if Kevin Costner didn’t ride into town. Laurence Lerman
Belle becomes empowered to challenge the white characters that view themselves as her savior on their veiled racism, which marks a welcome departure from one of Hollywood’s most enduring cinematic tropes: the white savior. When it comes to race-relations dramas—and slavery narratives, in particular—the white savior has become one of Hollywood’s most reliably offensive clichés. The black servants of The Help needed a perky, progressive Emma Stone to shed light on their plight; the football bruiser in The Blind Side couldn’t have done it without fiery Sandra Bullock; the black athletes in Cool Runnings and The Air Up There needed the guidance of their white coach; and in 12 Years A Slave, Solomon Northup, played by Chiwetel Ejiofor, is liberated at the eleventh hour by a Jesus-looking Brad Pitt (in a classic Deus Ex Machina). The issue, according to Lerman, is more complex given the nature of Hollywood and the various power structures at play. While there are plenty of important stories to tell featuring people of color, there are only a small number of people of color in Hollywood with the clout to get a film green-lit—especially since we’re living in an age where international box office trumps domestic. This troubling disparity often results in a white star needing to be featured in a film with a predominantly minority cast to secure the necessary financing—as was the case with Pitt’s appearance in 12 Years A Slave, a film produced by his company, Plan B. And who can forget the controversy over the outrageous Italian movie posters for 12 Years A Slave, which prominently featured the film’s white movie stars—Pitt and Michael Fassbender—in favor of the movie’s real star, Chiwetel Ejiofor. Without ruining the film for you, part of what makes Belle so refreshing is that its portrayal of black characters, namely Belle, is one of dignity. They aren’t the typical uneducated blacks you see in films that need to be shown the light by a white knight, for they’re blessed with more intellect and class than many of their white subjugators, who soon come to realize that Belle, through her grace and wisdom, is their savior. “Her family thought they were giving her great love, but until she’s able to take that freedom for herself and find self-love and feel comfortable in her own skin, that’s when she’s ready to challenge them,” says Mbatha-Raw. “It just felt like a story that needed to be told.” The Daily Beast
“Driving Miss Daisy” (…) “The Upside” (…)  “Green Book” (…) symbolize a style of American storytelling in which the wheels of interracial friendship are greased by employment, in which prolonged exposure to the black half of the duo enhances the humanity of his white, frequently racist counterpart. All the optimism of racial progress — from desegregation to integration to equality to something like true companionship — is stipulated by terms of service. Thirty years separate “Driving Miss Daisy” from these two new films, but how much time has passed, really? The bond in all three is conditionally transactional, possible only if it’s mediated by money. “The Upside” has the rich, quadriplegic author Phillip Lacasse (Cranston) hire an ex-con named Dell Scott (Hart) to be his “life auxiliary.” “Green Book” reverses the races so that some white muscle (Mortensen) drives the black pianist Don Shirley (Ali) to gigs throughout the Deep South in the 1960s. It’s “The Upside Down.” These pay-for-playmate transactions are a modern pastime, different from an entire history of popular culture that simply required black actors to serve white stars without even the illusion of friendship. It was really only possible in a post-integration America, possible after Sidney Poitier made black stardom loosely feasible for the white studios, possible after the moral and legal adjustments won during the civil rights movements, possible after the political recriminations of the black power and blaxploitation eras let black people regularly frolic among themselves for the first time since the invention of the Hollywood movie. Possible, basically, only in the 1980s, after the movements had more or less subsided and capitalism and jokey white paternalism ran wild. On television in this era, rich white sitcom families vacuumed up little black boys, on “Diff’rent Strokes,” on “Webster.” On “Diff’rent Strokes,” the adopted boys are the orphaned Harlem sons of Phillip Drummond’s maid. Not only was money supposed to lubricate racial integration; it was perhaps supposed to mitigate a history of keeping black people apart and oppressed. (…) The sitcoms weren’t officially social experiments, but they were light advertisements for the civilizing (and alienating) benefits of white wealth on black life. (…) Any time a white person comes anywhere close to the rescue of a black person the academy is primed to say, “Good for you!,” whether it’s “To Kill a Mockingbird,” “Mississippi Burning,” “The Blind Side,” or “The Help.” The year “Driving Miss Daisy” won those Oscars, Morgan Freeman also had a supporting role in a drama (“Glory”) that placed a white Union colonel at its center and was very much in the mix that night. (…) And Spike Lee lost the original screenplay award for “Do the Right Thing,” his masterpiece about a boiled-over pot of racial animus in Brooklyn. (…) Lee’s movie dramatized a starker truth — we couldn’t all just get along. For what it’s worth, Lee is now up for more Oscars. His film “BlacKkKlansman” has six nominations. Given the five for “Green Book,” basically so is “Driving Miss Daisy.” Which is to say that 2019 might just be 1990 all over again. (…) One headache with these movies, even one as well done as “Driving Miss Daisy,” is that they romanticize their workplaces and treat their black characters as the ideal crowbar for closed white minds and insulated lives. Who knows why, in “The Upside,” Phillip picks the uncouth, underqualified Dell to drive him around, change his catheter and share his palatial apartment. But by the time the movie’s over, they’re paragliding together to Aretha Franklin. We’re told that this is based on a true story. It’s not. It’s a remake of a far more nauseating French megahit — “Les Intouchables” — and that claimed to be based on a true story. “The Upside” seems based on one of those paternalistic ’80s movies, “Disorderlies,” the one where the Fat Boys wheel an ailing Ralph Bellamy around his mansion. (…) Most of these black-white-friendship adventures were foretold by Mark Twain. Somebody is white Huck and somebody else is his amusingly dim black sidekick, Jim. This movie is just a little more flagrant about it. There’s a way of looking at the role reversal in “Green Book” as an upgrade. Through his record company, Don hires a white nightclub bouncer named Tony Vallelonga. (Most people call him Tony Lip.) We don’t meet Don for about 15 minutes, because the movie needs us to know that Tony is a sweet, Eye-talian tough guy who also throws out perfectly good glassware because his wife let black repairmen drink from it. By this point, you might have heard about the fried chicken scene in “Green Book.” It comes early in their road trip. Tony is shocked to discover that Don has never had fried chicken. He also appears never to have seen anybody eat fried chicken, either. (“What do we do about the bones?”) So, with all the greasy alacrity and exuberant crassness that Mortensen can conjure, Tony demonstrates how to eat it while driving. As comedy, it’s masterful — there’s tension, irony and, when the car stops and reverses to retrieve some litter, a punch line that brings down the house. But the comedy works only if the black, classical-pop fusion pianist is from outer space (and not in a Sun Ra sort of way). You’re meant to laugh because how could this racist be better at being black than this black man who’s supposed to be better than him? (…) The movie’s tagline is “based on a true friendship.” But the transactional nature of it makes the friendship seem less true than sponsored. So what does the money do, exactly? The white characters — the biological ones and somebody supposedly not black enough, like fictional Don — are lonely people in these pay-a-pal movies. The money is ostensibly for legitimate assistance, but it also seems to paper over all that’s potentially fraught about race. The relationship is entirely conscripted as service and bound by capitalism and the fantastically presumptive leap is, The money doesn’t matter because I like working for you. And if you’re the racist in the relationship: I can’t be horrible because we’re friends now. That’s why the hug Sandra Bullock gives Yomi Perry, the actor playing her maid, Maria, at the end of “Crash,” remains the single most disturbing gesture of its kind. It’s not friendship. Friendship is mutual. That hug is cannibalism. Money buys Don a chauffeur and, apparently, an education in black folkways and culture. (Little Richard? He’s never heard him play.) Shirley’s real-life family has objected to the portrait. Their complaints include that he was estranged from neither black people nor blackness. Even without that thumbs-down, you can sense what a particularly perverse fantasy this is: that absolution resides in a neutered black man needing a white guy not only to protect and serve him, but to love him, too. Even if that guy and his Italian-American family and mob associates refer to Don and other black people as eggplant and coal. In the movie’s estimation, their racism is preferable to its nasty, blunter southern cousin because their racism is often spoken in Italian. And, hey, at least Tony never asks Don to eat his fancy dinner in a supply closet. Mahershala Ali is acting Shirley’s isolation and glumness, but the movie determines that dining with racists is better than dining alone. The money buys Don relative safety, friendship, transportation and a walking-talking black college. What the money can’t buy him is more of the plot in his own movie. It can’t allow him to bask in his own unique, uniquely dreamy artistry. It can’t free him from a movie that sits him where Miss Daisy sat, yet treats him worse than Hoke. He’s a literal passenger on this white man’s trip. Tony learns he really likes black people. And thanks to Tony, now so does Don. Wesley Morris (NYT)
Today, our thousands of travelers, if they be thoughtful enough to arm themselves with a Green Book, may free themselves of a lot of worry and inconvenience as they plan a trip. Victor Hugo Green
Victor Hugo Green remains a mysterious figure about whom we know very little. He rarely spoke directly to Green Book readers, instead publishing testimonial letters in what the historian Cotten Seiler describes as an act of promotional “ventriloquism.” The debut edition did not exhort black travelers to boycotts or include demands for equal rights. Instead, Green represented the guide as a benign compilation of “facts and information connected with motoring, which the Negro Motorist can use and depend upon.” The coolly reasoned language put white readers at ease and allowed the Green Book to attract generous corporate and government sponsorship. Green nevertheless practiced the African-American art of coded communication, addressing black readers in messages that went over white peoples’ heads. Consider the passage: “Today, our thousands of travelers, if they be thoughtful enough to arm themselves with a Green Book, may free themselves of a lot of worry and inconvenience as they plan a trip.” White readers viewed this as a common-sense statement about vacation planning. For African-Americans who read in black newspapers about the fates that befell people like Ms. Derricotte, the notion of “arming” oneself with the guide referred to taking precautions against racism on the road. The Green Book was subversive in another way as well. It promoted an image of African-Americans that white Americans rarely saw — and that Hollywood deliberately avoided in films for fear of offending racist Southerners. The guide’s signature image, shown on the cover of the 1948 edition — and used as stationery logo for Victor Green, Inc. — consisted of a smiling, well-dressed couple striding toward their car carrying expensive suitcases. Green believed exposing white Americans to the black elite might persuade white business owners that black consumer spending was significant enough to make racial discrimination imprudent. Like the black elite itself, he subscribed to the view that affluent travelers of color could change white minds about racism simply by venturing to places where black people had been unseen. As it turned out, black travelers had a democratizing effect on the country. Like many African-American institutions that thrived during the age of extreme segregation, the Green Book faded in influence as racial barriers began to fall. It ceased publication not long after the Supreme Court ruled that the Civil Rights Act of 1964 outlawed racial discrimination in public accommodations. Nevertheless, the guide’s three decades of listings offer an important vantage point on black business ownership and travel mobility in the age of Jim Crow. In other words, the Green Book has a lot more to say about the time when it was the Negro traveler’s bible. Grant Staples
Green Book, Sur les routes du Sud, c’est l’histoire (vraie) de la relation entre le pianiste de jazz afro-américain Don Shirley et le videur italo-américain Tony Lip – de son vrai nom Frank Anthony Vallelonga. Les deux hommes se retrouvent ensemble sur les routes de l’Amérique profonde : celle, ségrégationniste, du sud du pays, dans les années 60, à l’occasion d’une tournée de concerts. Le sophistiqué Don Shirley a besoin d’un chauffeur garde du corps alors que le bourru Tony Lip a besoin d’argent. Les deux hommes, respectivement incarnés par Mahershala Ali et Viggo Mortensen, tous deux impériaux, vont apprendre à s’apprivoiser malgré leurs préjugés respectifs (l’un, tendance raciste, sur les Noirs ; l’autre, tendance snob, sur les prolos.) (…) Le Negro Motorist Green Book était un guide indispensable quand on était un voyageur noir dans l’Amérique ségrégationniste. L’ouvrage, du nom de son auteur, le postier noir Victor H. Green, est publié tous les ans entre 1936 et 1966, et recense les motels, hôtels, bars, restaurants et stations-service où la clientèle de couleur est admise. Dans le film, Tony est contraint d’en faire usage pour trouver des endroits acceptant Don Shirley. (…) Green Book, qui vient de remporter trois Golden Globes (meilleur film, meilleur scénario et meilleur acteur dans un second rôle pour Mahershala Ali), se rendra aux Oscars, le 24 février prochain, fort de cinq nominations. Si la concurrence risque d’être rude face à Roma pour le meilleur film, ou à Christian Bale pour la statuette du meilleur acteur (il est époustouflant dans le rôle de Dick Cheney dans le film Vice, d’Adam McKay, en salle le 13 février), le film peut permettre à Mahershala Ali de rafler son deuxième oscar du meilleur second rôle, deux ans après celui qu’il a déjà obtenu pour Moonlight, de Barry Jenkins. (…) La famille de Don Shirley reproche aux scénariste d’avoir enjolivé, voire inventé la réalité, parlant d’une « symphonie de mensonges » : selon elle, les deux hommes ne sont pas devenus aussi amis que le film le laisse entendre, et Don Shirley n’était pas brouillé avec son frère. Les auteurs se défendent en affirmant avoir travaillé l’histoire avec Don Shirley lui-même. Certains critiques américains reprochent aussi au film de ne pas être « suffisamment noir » et de positionner le film depuis un point de vue blanc, comme Hollywood a tendance à le faire, sur le mode du white savior (« sauveur blanc »). Autre polémique, celle causée par diverses frasques de l’équipe : l’exhumation d’un tweet de Nick Vallelonga dans lequel il affirmait avoir vu des musulmans célébrer la chute des Twin Towers le 11 septembre 2001, confirmant ainsi des propos de Donald Trump, alors candidat à la présidence des Etats-Unis ; l’usage du « N word » (nigger) par Viggo Mortensen lors d’une interview, ou les excuse de Peter Farrelly qui a, dans le passé, montré son pénis « dans une tentative d’être drôle », notamment devant l’actrice Cameron Diaz. Autant de taches dans la cour aux Oscars… Télérama

Attention: une subversion peut en cacher une autre !

Au lendemain d’un Martin Luther King Day …

Où plus de 50 ans après sa mort l’on utilise son anniversaire pour appeler au boycott d’un Etat dont il avait défendu l’existence …

Et où sous prétexte de droits d’auteur et de protection de la vie privée, ses quatre enfants continuent à bloquer non seulement la libre circulation de ses discours historiques …

Mais, contraignant l’unique long-métrage Selma à la paraphrase et à la dissimulation des différends familiaux du Dr. King, la production de tout film sur l’ensemble de sa vie

Et à la veille d’un triomphe annoncé (trois Golden Globes, cinq nominations aux Oscars, dont un 2e pour l’acteur principal) d’un film célébrant la mémoire d’un véritable génie de la musique noir …

Qui à l’instar du fameux petit Michelin noir de l’époque (le Green book du titre et du nom de son auteur, un certain Victor Hugo Green) et de sa petite élite noire d’utilsateurs …

Avait tant fait, via un courageux périple de 18 mois à travers un sud alors livré aux affres de la discrimination, pour en subvertir les bases …

Devinez qui, sous prétexte d’une amitié jugée exagérément présentée avec son chauffeur-garde du corps blanc et d’un climat historique jugé pas assez noir, est en train de torpiller la possibilité de pas moins de cinq oscars …

Pour une communauté afro-américaine qui par ailleurs ne manque pas de rappeler sa sous-représentation dans le cinéma américain ?

“Green Book” à livre ouvert : tout ce qu’il faut savoir sur ce favori des Oscars
Caroline Besse
Télérama
25/01/2019

Après avoir remporté trois Golden Globes, le film de Peter Farrelly est nominé cinq fois aux Oscars. Si vous avez aimé le duo formé par Viggo Mortensen et Mahershala Ali, voici l’occasion d’approfondir le sujet…

De quoi parle le film ?

Green Book, Sur les routes du Sud, c’est l’histoire (vraie) de la relation entre le pianiste de jazz afro-américain Don Shirley et le videur italo-américain Tony Lip – de son vrai nom Frank Anthony Vallelonga. Les deux hommes se retrouvent ensemble sur les routes de l’Amérique profonde : celle, ségrégationniste, du sud du pays, dans les années 60, à l’occasion d’une tournée de concerts.

Le sophistiqué Don Shirley a besoin d’un chauffeur garde du corps alors que le bourru Tony Lip a besoin d’argent. Les deux hommes, respectivement incarnés par Mahershala Ali et Viggo Mortensen, tous deux impériaux, vont apprendre à s’apprivoiser malgré leurs préjugés respectifs (l’un, tendance raciste, sur les Noirs ; l’autre, tendance snob, sur les prolos.)

Qui le réalise ?

Le réalisateur, Peter Farrelly, commet ici son premier film sans son frère Bobby. Après la série, dans les années 90, de comédies foutraques tendance scato et aujourd’hui cultes, Dumb et Dumber, Fous d’Irène ou Mary à tout prix, le cadet de la fratrie se lance dans la réalisation en solitaire de cette « dramédie » tendance buddy movie, en adaptant un scénario coécrit par Nick Vallelonga, le fils de Tony.

Qui est le vrai Tony Lip ?

C’est le genre d’homme qui a connu mille vies grâce à un bagout et à une tchatche hors du commun, qui lui ont d’ailleurs valu le surnom de « Lip » (« la lèvre » – de là où naît son talent de persuasion.) Son travail de videur dans le célèbre club new-yorkais The Copacabana, dans les années 60, lui a permis de rencontrer tout un tas de célébrités, dont Frank Sinatra ou Francis Ford Coppola. Ce dernier lui offre un rôle dans Le Parrain, en tant qu’invité du mariage. On le voit aussi dans Donnie Brasco, mais surtout dans la série Les Soprano, dans le rôle du mafieux à lunettes Carmine Lupertazzi. Il est mort en janvier 2013, trois mois avant Don Shirley.

Qu’est-ce qu’un « Green Book » ?

Le Negro Motorist Green Book était un guide indispensable quand on était un voyageur noir dans l’Amérique ségrégationniste. L’ouvrage, du nom de son auteur, le postier noir Victor H. Green, est publié tous les ans entre 1936 et 1966, et recense les motels, hôtels, bars, restaurants et stations-service où la clientèle de couleur est admise. Dans le film, Tony est contraint d’en faire usage pour trouver des endroits acceptant Don Shirley.

Quelles sont les chances du film aux Oscars ?

Green Book, qui vient de remporter trois Golden Globes (meilleur film, meilleur scénario et meilleur acteur dans un second rôle pour Mahershala Ali), se rendra aux Oscars, le 24 février prochain, fort de cinq nominations. Si la concurrence risque d’être rude face à Roma pour le meilleur film, ou à Christian Bale pour la statuette du meilleur acteur (il est époustouflant dans le rôle de Dick Cheney dans le film Vice, d’Adam McKay, en salle le 13 février), le film peut permettre à Mahershala Ali de rafler son deuxième oscar du meilleur second rôle, deux ans après celui qu’il a déjà obtenu pour Moonlight, de Barry Jenkins.

Quelle(s) polémiqu(e)s  entourent le film ?

La famille de Don Shirley reproche aux scénariste d’avoir enjolivé, voire inventé la réalité, parlant d’une « symphonie de mensonges » : selon elle, les deux hommes ne sont pas devenus aussi amis que le film le laisse entendre, et Don Shirley n’était pas brouillé avec son frère. Les auteurs se défendent en affirmant avoir travaillé l’histoire avec Don Shirley lui-même.

Certains critiques américains reprochent aussi au film de ne pas être « suffisamment noir » et de positionner le film depuis un point de vue blanc, comme Hollywood a tendance à le faire, sur le mode du white savior (« sauveur blanc »).

Autre polémique, celle causée par diverses frasques de l’équipe : l’exhumation d’un tweet de Nick Vallelonga dans lequel il affirmait avoir vu des musulmans célébrer la chute des Twin Towers le 11 septembre 2001, confirmant ainsi des propos de Donald Trump, alors candidat à la présidence des Etats-Unis ; l’usage du « N word » (nigger) par Viggo Mortensen lors d’une interview, ou les excuse de Peter Farrelly qui a, dans le passé, montré son pénis « dans une tentative d’être drôle », notamment devant l’actrice Cameron Diaz. Autant de taches dans la cour aux Oscars…

Voir aussi:

The Green Book’s Black History
Lessons from the Jim Crow-era travel guide for African-American elites.
Brent Staples
NYT
Jan. 25, 2019

[The New York Times and Oculus are presenting a virtual-reality film, “Traveling While Black,” related to this Opinion essay. To view it, you can watch on the Oculus platform or download the NYT VR app on your mobile device.]

Imagine trudging into a hotel with your family at midnight — after a long, grueling drive — and being turned away by a clerk who “loses” your reservation when he sees your black face.

This was a common hazard for members of the African-American elite in 1932, the year Dr. B. Price Hurst of Washington, D.C., was shut out of New York City’s Prince George Hotel despite having confirmed his reservation by telegraph.

Hurst would have planned his trip differently had he been headed to the South, where “whites only” signs were ubiquitous and well-to-do black travelers lodged in homes owned by others in the black elite. Hurst was a member of Washington’s “Colored Four Hundred” — as the capital’s black upper crust once was known — and was familiar with having to plan his life around hotels, restaurants and theaters in the city, and throughout the Jim Crow South, that screened out people of color.

Hurst expected better of New York City. He did not let the matter rest after the Prince George turned his travel-weary family into the streets. He wrote an anguished letter to Walter White, then executive secretary of the N.A.A.C.P., explaining how he had been rejected by four hotels before shifting his search to the black district of Harlem. He then sued the Prince George for violating New York State’s civil rights laws, winning a settlement that put the city’s hotels on notice that discrimination could carry a financial cost.

African-Americans who embraced automobile travel to escape filthy, “colored-only” train cars learned quickly that the geography of Jim Crow was far more extensive than they had imagined. The motels and rest stops that deprived them of places to sleep were just the beginning.

While driving, these families were often forced to relieve themselves in roadside ditches because the filling stations that sold them gas barred them from using “whites only” bathrooms.

White motorists who drove clunkers deliberately damaged expensive cars driven by black people — to put Negroes “in their places.”

“Sundown Towns” across the country banned African-Americans from the streets after dark, a constant reminder that the reach of white supremacy was vast indeed.

As still happens today, police officers who pulled over motorists of color for “driving while black” raised the threat that black passengers would be arrested, battered or even killed during the encounter.

The Negro Traveler’s Bible

The Hurst case was a cause célèbre in 1936 when a Harlem resident and postal worker named Victor Hugo Green began soliciting material for a national travel guide that would steer black motorists around the humiliations of the not-so-open road and point them to businesses that were more than happy to accept colored dollars. As the historian Gretchen Sullivan Sorin writes in her revelatory study of “The Negro Motorist Green Book,” the guide became “the bible of every Negro highway traveler in the 1950s and early 1960s.”

Green, who died in 1960, is experiencing a renaissance thanks to heightened interest from filmmakers: The 2018 feature film “Green Book” won three Golden Globes earlier this month, and the documentary “Driving While Black” is scheduled for broadcast by PBS next year.

Then there is The New York Times opinion section’s Op-Doc film “Traveling While Black,” which debuts this Friday at the Sundance Film Festival. The brief film offers a revealing view of the Green Book era as told through Ben’s Chili Bowl, a black-owned restaurant in Washington, and reminds us that the humiliations heaped upon African-Americans during that time period extended well beyond the one Hurst suffered in New York City.

Sandra Butler-Truesdale, born in the capital in the 1930s, references an often-forgotten trauma — and one of the conceptual underpinnings of the Jim Crow era — when she recalls that Negroes who shopped in major stores were not allowed to try on clothing before they bought it. Store owners at the time offered a variety of racist rationales, including that Negroes were insufficiently clean. At bottom, the practice reflected the irrational belief that anything coming in contact with African-American skin — including clothing, silverware or bed linens — was contaminated by blackness, rendering it unfit for use by whites.

This had deadly implications in places where emergency medical services were assigned on the basis of race. Of all the afflictions devised in the Jim Crow era, medical racism was the most lethal. African-American accident victims could easily be left to die because no “black” ambulance was available. Black patients taken to segregated hospitals, where they sometimes languished in basements or even boiler rooms, suffered inferior treatment.

In a particularly telling case in 1931, the light-skinned father of Mr. White, the N.A.A.C.P. leader, was struck by a car and mistakenly admitted to the beautifully equipped “white” wing of Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta. When relatives who were recognizably black came looking for him, hospital employees dragged the victim from the examination table to the decrepit Negro ward across the street, where he later died.

That same year, Juliette Derricotte, the celebrated African-American educator and dean of women at Fisk University, succumbed to injuries suffered in a car accident near Dalton, Ga., after a white hospital refused her treatment.

Advertising to the Black Elite

Victor Hugo Green remains a mysterious figure about whom we know very little. He rarely spoke directly to Green Book readers, instead publishing testimonial letters in what the historian Cotten Seiler describes as an act of promotional “ventriloquism.” The debut edition did not exhort black travelers to boycotts or include demands for equal rights. Instead, Green represented the guide as a benign compilation of “facts and information connected with motoring, which the Negro Motorist can use and depend upon.”

The coolly reasoned language put white readers at ease and allowed the Green Book to attract generous corporate and government sponsorship. Green nevertheless practiced the African-American art of coded communication, addressing black readers in messages that went over white peoples’ heads. Consider the passage: “Today, our thousands of travelers, if they be thoughtful enough to arm themselves with a Green Book, may free themselves of a lot of worry and inconvenience as they plan a trip.”

White readers viewed this as a common-sense statement about vacation planning. For African-Americans who read in black newspapers about the fates that befell people like Ms. Derricotte, the notion of “arming” oneself with the guide referred to taking precautions against racism on the road.

The Green Book was subversive in another way as well. It promoted an image of African-Americans that white Americans rarely saw — and that Hollywood deliberately avoided in films for fear of offending racist Southerners. The guide’s signature image, shown on the cover of the 1948 edition — and used as stationery logo for Victor Green, Inc. — consisted of a smiling, well-dressed couple striding toward their car carrying expensive suitcases.

Green believed exposing white Americans to the black elite might persuade white business owners that black consumer spending was significant enough to make racial discrimination imprudent. Like the black elite itself, he subscribed to the view that affluent travelers of color could change white minds about racism simply by venturing to places where black people had been unseen. As it turned out, black travelers had a democratizing effect on the country.

Like many African-American institutions that thrived during the age of extreme segregation, the Green Book faded in influence as racial barriers began to fall. It ceased publication not long after the Supreme Court ruled that the Civil Rights Act of 1964 outlawed racial discrimination in public accommodations. Nevertheless, the guide’s three decades of listings offer an important vantage point on black business ownership and travel mobility in the age of Jim Crow.

In other words, the Green Book has a lot more to say about the time when it was the Negro traveler’s bible.

Voir enfin:

In many Oscar bait movies, interracial friendships come with a paycheck, and follow the white character’s journey to enlightenment.

CreditCreditPhoto illustration by Delphine Diallo for The New York Times; Universal Pictures, STX Films, Warner Bros. DreamWorks Pictures (Film stills)

Wesley Morris

NYT

 

“Driving Miss Daisy” is the sort of movie you know before you see it. The whole thing is right there in the poster. White Jessica Tandy is giving black Morgan Freeman a stern look, and he looks amused by her sternness. They’re framed in a rearview mirror, which occupies only about 20 percent of the space. You can make out his chauffeur’s cap and that she’s in the back seat. The rest is three actors’ names, a tag line, a title, tiny credits, and white space.

That rearview-mirror image isn’t a still from the movie but a warmly painted rendering of one, this vague nuzzling of Norman Rockwell Americana. And its warmth evokes a very particular past. If you’ve ever seen the packaging for Cream of Wheat or a certain brand of rice, if you’ve even seen some Shirley Temple movies, you knew how Miss Daisy would be driven: gladly.

As movie posters go, it’s ingeniously concise. But whoever designed it knew the concision was possible because we’d know the shorthand of an eternal racial dynamic. I got off the subway last month and saw a billboard of black Kevin Hart riding on the back of white Bryan Cranston’s motorized wheelchair. They’re both ecstatic. And maybe they’re obligated to be. Their movie is called “The Upside.” A few months before that, I was out getting a coffee when I saw a long, sexy billboard of white Viggo Mortensen driving black Mahershala Ali in a minty blue car for a movie called “Green Book.”

Not knowing what these movies were “about” didn’t mean it wasn’t clear what they were about. They symbolize a style of American storytelling in which the wheels of interracial friendship are greased by employment, in which prolonged exposure to the black half of the duo enhances the humanity of his white, frequently racist counterpart. All the optimism of racial progress — from desegregation to integration to equality to something like true companionship — is stipulated by terms of service. Thirty years separate “Driving Miss Daisy” from these two new films, but how much time has passed, really? The bond in all three is conditionally transactional, possible only if it’s mediated by money. “The Upside” has the rich, quadriplegic author Phillip Lacasse (Cranston) hire an ex-con named Dell Scott (Hart) to be his “life auxiliary.” “Green Book” reverses the races so that some white muscle (Mortensen) drives the black pianist Don Shirley (Ali) to gigs throughout the Deep South in the 1960s. It’s “The Upside Down.”

These pay-for-playmate transactions are a modern pastime, different from an entire history of popular culture that simply required black actors to serve white stars without even the illusion of friendship. It was really only possible in a post-integration America, possible after Sidney Poitier made black stardom loosely feasible for the white studios, possible after the moral and legal adjustments won during the civil rights movements, possible after the political recriminations of the black power and blaxploitation eras let black people regularly frolic among themselves for the first time since the invention of the Hollywood movie. Possible, basically, only in the 1980s, after the movements had more or less subsided and capitalism and jokey white paternalism ran wild.

On television in this era, rich white sitcom families vacuumed up little black boys, on “Diff’rent Strokes,” on “Webster.” On “Diff’rent Strokes,” the adopted boys are the orphaned Harlem sons of Phillip Drummond’s maid. Not only was money supposed to lubricate racial integration; it was perhaps supposed to mitigate a history of keeping black people apart and oppressed.

The sitcoms weren’t officially social experiments, but they were light advertisements for the civilizing (and alienating) benefits of white wealth on black life. The plot of “Trading Places,” from 1983, actually was an experiment, a pungent, complicated one, in which conniving white moneybags install a broke and hustling Eddie Murphy in disgraced Dan Aykroyd’s banking job. The scheme creates an accidental friendship between the duped pair and they both wind up rich.

But that Daddy Warbucks paternalism was how, in 1982, the owner of the country’s most ferocious comedic imagination — Richard Pryor — went from desperate janitor to live-in amusement for the bratty son of a rotten businessman (Jackie Gleason). You have to respect the bluntness of that one. The movie was called “The Toy,” and it’s simultaneously dumb, wild and appalling. I was younger than its little white protagonist (he’s “Master” Eric Bates) when I saw it, but I can still remember the look of embarrassed panic on Pryor’s face while he’s trapped in something called the Wonder Wheel. It’s a look that never quite goes away as he’s made to dress in drag, navigate the Ku Klux Klan and make Gleason feel good about his racism and terrible parenting.

These were relationships that continued the rules of the past, one in which Poitier was frequently hired to turn bigots into buddies. The rules didn’t need to be disguised by yesterday. These arrangements could flourish in the present. So maybe that was the alarming appeal of “Driving Miss Daisy.” It went there. It went back there. And people went for it. The movie came out at the end of 1989, won four Oscars (best picture, actress, adapted screenplay, makeup), got besotted reviews and made a pile of money. Why wasn’t a mystery.

Any time a white person comes anywhere close to the rescue of a black person the academy is primed to say, “Good for you!,” whether it’s “To Kill a Mockingbird,” “Mississippi Burning,” “The Blind Side,” or “The Help.” The year “Driving Miss Daisy” won those Oscars, Morgan Freeman also had a supporting role in a drama (“Glory”) that placed a white Union colonel at its center and was very much in the mix that night. (Denzel Washington won his first Oscar for playing a slave-turned-Union soldier in that movie.) And Spike Lee lost the original screenplay award for “Do the Right Thing,” his masterpiece about a boiled-over pot of racial animus in Brooklyn. I was 14 then, and the political incongruity that night was impossible not to feel. “Driving Miss Daisy” and “Glory” were set in the past and the people who loved them seemed stuck there. The giddy reception for “Miss Daisy” seemed earnest. But Lee’s movie dramatized a starker truth — we couldn’t all just get along.

For what it’s worth, Lee is now up for more Oscars. His film “BlacKkKlansman” has six nominations. Given the five for “Green Book,” basically so is “Driving Miss Daisy.” Which is to say that 2019 might just be 1990 all over again. And yet viewed separately from the cold shower of “Do the Right Thing,” “Driving Miss Daisy” does operate with more finesse, elegance and awareness than my teenage self wanted to see. It’s still not the best movie of 1989. But it does know the southern caste system and the premium that system placed on propriety.

The movie turns the 25-year relationship between Daisy, an elderly Jewish white widow from Atlanta, and Hoke, her elderly, widowed black driver, into both this delicate, modest, tasteful thing — a love letter, a corsage — and something amusingly perverse. Proud old prejudiced Daisy says she doesn’t want to be driven anywhere. But doesn’t she? Hoke treats her pride like a costume. He stalks her with her own new car until she succumbs and lets him drive her to the market. What passes between them feels weirdly kinky: southern-etiquette S&M.

Bruce Beresford directed the movie and Alfred Uhry based it on his Pulitzer Prize-winning play, which he said was inspired by his grandmother and her chauffeur, and it does powder over the era’s upheavals, uprisings and blowups. But it doesn’t sugarcoat the history fueling the regional and national climes, either. Daisy’s fortune comes from cotton, and Hoke, with ruthless affability, keeps reminding her that she’s rich. When she says things are a-changing, he tells her not that much.

Platonic love blossoms, obviously. But the movie’s one emotional gaffe would seem to come near the end when Daisy grabs Hoke’s hand and tells him so. “You’re my best friend,” she creaks. But her admission arises not from one of their little S&M drives but after a bout of dementia. And in a wide shot, he stands above her, a little stooped, halfway in, halfway out, moved yet confused. And in his posture resides an entire history of national racial awkwardness: He has to mind his composure even as she’s losing her mind.

One headache with these movies, even one as well done as “Driving Miss Daisy,” is that they romanticize their workplaces and treat their black characters as the ideal crowbar for closed white minds and insulated lives.

Who knows why, in “The Upside,” Phillip picks the uncouth, underqualified Dell to drive him around, change his catheter and share his palatial apartment. But by the time the movie’s over, they’re paragliding together to Aretha Franklin. We’re told that this is based on a true story. It’s not. It’s a remake of a far more nauseating French megahit — “Les Intouchables” — and that claimed to be based on a true story. “The Upside” seems based on one of those paternalistic ’80s movies, “Disorderlies,” the one where the Fat Boys wheel an ailing Ralph Bellamy around his mansion.

Phillip’s largess and tolerance take Dell from opera-phobic to opera-curious to opera queen, leading to Dell’s being able to afford to transport his ex and their son out of the projects, and permitting Dell to take his boss’s luxury cars for a spin whether or not he’s riding shotgun. And Dell provides entertainment (and drugs) that ease Phillip’s sense of isolation and self-consciousness. But this is also a movie that needs Dell to steal one of Phillip’s antique first-editions as a surprise gift to his estranged son, and not a copy of some Judith Krantz or Sidney Sheldon novel, either. He swipes “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” (and to reach it, his hand has to skip past a few Horatio Alger books, too). Most of these black-white-friendship adventures were foretold by Mark Twain. Somebody is white Huck and somebody else is his amusingly dim black sidekick, Jim. This movie is just a little more flagrant about it.

There’s a way of looking at the role reversal in “Green Book” as an upgrade. Through his record company, Don hires a white nightclub bouncer named Tony Vallelonga. (Most people call him Tony Lip.) We don’t meet Don for about 15 minutes, because the movie needs us to know that Tony is a sweet, Eye-talian tough guy who also throws out perfectly good glassware because his wife let black repairmen drink from it.

By this point, you might have heard about the fried chicken scene in “Green Book.” It comes early in their road trip. Tony is shocked to discover that Don has never had fried chicken. He also appears never to have seen anybody eat fried chicken, either. (“What do we do about the bones?”) So, with all the greasy alacrity and exuberant crassness that Mortensen can conjure, Tony demonstrates how to eat it while driving. As comedy, it’s masterful — there’s tension, irony and, when the car stops and reverses to retrieve some litter, a punch line that brings down the house. But the comedy works only if the black, classical-pop fusion pianist is from outer space (and not in a Sun Ra sort of way). You’re meant to laugh because how could this racist be better at being black than this black man who’s supposed to be better than him?

The movie Peter Farrelly directed and wrote, with Brian Currie and Tony’s son Nick, is suspiciously like “Driving Miss Daisy,” but same-sex, with Don as Daisy and Tony as Hoke. Indeed, “Miss Daisy” features a fried chicken scene, too, a delicate one, in which Hoke tells her the flame is too high on the skillet and she waves him off. Once he’s left the kitchen, she furtively, begrudgingly adjusts the burner. It’s like Farrelly watched that scene and thought it needed a stick of cartoon dynamite.

Before they head out, a white character from Don’s record company gives Tony a listing of black-friendly places to house Don: The Green Book. The idea for “The Negro Motorist Green Book” belongs to Victor Hugo Green, a postal worker, who introduced it in 1936. It guided black road trippers to stress-free gas, food and lodging in the segregated South. The story of its invention, distribution and updating is an amusing, invigorating, poignant and suspenseful story of an astonishing social network, and warrants a movie in itself. In the meantime, what does Tony need a Green Book for? He is the Green Book.

The movie’s tagline is “based on a true friendship.” But the transactional nature of it makes the friendship seem less true than sponsored. So what does the money do, exactly? The white characters — the biological ones and somebody supposedly not black enough, like fictional Don — are lonely people in these pay-a-pal movies. The money is ostensibly for legitimate assistance, but it also seems to paper over all that’s potentially fraught about race. The relationship is entirely conscripted as service and bound by capitalism and the fantastically presumptive leap is, The money doesn’t matter because I like working for you. And if you’re the racist in the relationship: I can’t be horrible because we’re friends now. That’s why the hug Sandra Bullock gives Yomi Perry, the actor playing her maid, Maria, at the end of “Crash,” remains the single most disturbing gesture of its kind. It’s not friendship. Friendship is mutual. That hug is cannibalism.

Money buys Don a chauffeur and, apparently, an education in black folkways and culture. (Little Richard? He’s never heard him play.) Shirley’s real-life family has objected to the portrait. Their complaints include that he was estranged from neither black people nor blackness. Even without that thumbs-down, you can sense what a particularly perverse fantasy this is: that absolution resides in a neutered black man needing a white guy not only to protect and serve him, but to love him, too. Even if that guy and his Italian-American family and mob associates refer to Don and other black people as eggplant and coal. In the movie’s estimation, their racism is preferable to its nasty, blunter southern cousin because their racism is often spoken in Italian. And, hey, at least Tony never asks Don to eat his fancy dinner in a supply closet.

Mahershala Ali is acting Shirley’s isolation and glumness, but the movie determines that dining with racists is better than dining alone. The money buys Don relative safety, friendship, transportation and a walking-talking black college. What the money can’t buy him is more of the plot in his own movie. It can’t allow him to bask in his own unique, uniquely dreamy artistry. It can’t free him from a movie that sits him where Miss Daisy sat, yet treats him worse than Hoke. He’s a literal passenger on this white man’s trip. Tony learns he really likes black people. And thanks to Tony, now so does Don.

Lately, the black version of these interracial relationships tends to head in the opposite direction. In the black version, for one thing, they’re not about money or a job but about the actual emotional, psychological work of being black among white people. Here, the proximity to whiteness is toxic, a danger, a threat. That’s the thrust of Jeremy O. Harris’s stage drama “Slave Play,” in which the traumatic legacy of plantation life pollutes the black half of the show’s interracial relationships. That’s a particularly explicit, ingenious example. But scarcely any of the work I’ve seen in the last year by black artists — not Jackie Sibblies Drury’s equally audacious play “Fairview,” not Boots Riley’s “Sorry to Bother You,” not “Blindspotting,” which Daveed Diggs co-wrote and stars in, not Barry Jenkins’s “If Beale Street Could Talk” or Ryan Coogler’s “Black Panther” — emphasizes the smoothness and joys of interracial friendship and certainly not through employment. The health of these connections is iffy, at best.

In 1989, Lee was pretty much on his own as a voice of black racial reality. His rankled pragmatism now has company and, at the Academy Awards, it’s also got stiff competition. He helped plant the seeds for an environment in which black artists can look askance at race. But a lot of us still need the sense of fantastical racial contentment that movies like “The Upside” and “Green Book” are slinging. I’ve seen “Green Book” with paying audiences, and it cracks people up the way any of Farrelly’s comedies do. The kind of closure it offers is like a drug that Lee’s never dealt. The Charlottesville-riot footage that he includes as an epilogue in “BlacKkKlansman” might bury the loose, essentially comedic movie it’s attached to in furious lava. Lee knows the past too well to ever let the present off the hook. The volcanoes in this country have never been dormant.

The academy’s embrace of Lee at this stage of his career (this is his first best director nomination) suggests that it’s come around to what rankles him. Of course, “BlacKkKlansman” is taking on the unmistakable villainy of the KKK in the 1970s. But what put Lee on the map 30 years ago was his fearlessness about calling out the universal casual bigotry of the moment, like Daisy’s and Tony’s. It’s hot as hell in “Do the Right Thing,” and in the heat, almost everybody has a problem with who somebody is. The pizzeria owned by Sal (Danny Aiello) comes to resemble a house of hate. Eventually Sal’s delivery guy, Mookie (played by Lee), incites a melee by hurling a trash can through the store window. He’d already endured a conversation with Pino (John Turturro), Sal’s racist son, in which he tells Mookie that famous black people are “more than black.”

Closure is impossible because the blood is too bad, too historically American. Lee had conjured a social environment that’s the opposite of what “The Upside,” “Green Book,” and “Driving Miss Daisy” believe. In one of the very last scenes, after Sal’s place is destroyed, Mookie still demands to be paid. To this day, Sal’s tossing balled-up bills at Mookie, one by one, shocks me. He’s mortally offended. Mookie’s unmoved. They’re at a harsh, anti-romantic impasse. We’d all been reared on racial-reconciliation fantasies. Why can’t Mookie and Sal be friends? The answer’s too long and too raw. Sal can pay Mookie to deliver pizzas ‘til kingdom come. But he could never pay him enough to be his friend.

A version of this article appears in print on , on Page AR1 of the New York edition with the headline: Friendship Or Fantasy ?
Voir par ailleurs:

A New Hope

Can ‘Belle’ End Hollywood’s Obsession with the White Savior?

The black characters in films like ‘The Help’ and ’12 Years A Slave’ always seem to need a white knight. But the black protagonist in ‘Belle,’ a new film about racism and slavery in England, takes matters into her own hands.

The film Belle, which opens this weekend in limited release stateside, is inspired by a true story, deals with the horrors of the African slave trade, and its director is black and British. For these reasons, comparisons to the recent recipient of the Best Picture Oscar, 12 Years a Slave, are inevitable.

But there are some notable differences.

Among them, Belle is set in England, while 12 Years a Slave is set in America. 12 Years a Slave depicts—in unflinching detail—the brutalities of slavery, while Belle merely hints at its physical and psychological toll. But the most significant deviation is this: whereas 12 Years a Slave faced criticism for being yet another film to perpetuate the “white savior” cliché in cinema, in Belle, the beleaguered black protagonist does something novel: she saves herself.

Belle marks the first film I’ve seen in which a black woman with agency stands at the center of the plot as a full, eloquent human being who is neither adoring foil nor moral touchstone for her better spoken white counterparts,” the novelist and TV producer Susan Fales-Hill told The Daily Beast.

Directed by the Amma Asante, the film is inspired by the 1779 painting of Dido Elizabeth Belle, a mixed race woman in a turban hauling fruit, and her white cousin, Lady Elizabeth Murray. The artwork was commissioned by William Murray, acting Lord Chief Justice of England, and depicts the two nieces smiling with Murray’s hand resting on Belle’s waist—a gesture suggesting equality, not subservience. While its artist is unknown, the portrait hung in England’s Kenwood House, alongside works by Vermeer and Rembrandt, until 1922.

The painting’s mysterious subject, Belle, was the daughter of an African slave known as Maria Belle and Admiral Sir John Lindsay, an English aristocrat. She was ultimately raised by Lindsay’s uncle, William Murray, the aforementioned Lord Chief Justice and 1st Earl of Mansfield, with many of the privileges befitting a woman of her family’s high standing. Since not much is known of Belle’s life inside the Mansfield estate, Asante and screenwriter Misan Sagay took some artistic license in dramatizing the dehumanizing racial prejudice their protagonist endured that even her social standing and wealth could not erase.

For instance, while not permitted to dine with the servants of her home since they were considered beneath her, she was also not permitted to dine with her family when guests were present since she was considered beneath them. This racial balancing act makes Belle one of the most genteel yet uncomfortable depictions of racism ever to grace the screen. Here, the racism isn’t as black-and-white—those providing Belle with her luxury attire, emotional affection, and protection from the racial brutality of the outside world also see her as a lesser being.

“For me, this point of view is so refreshing,” Gugu Mbatha-Raw, who plays Belle, told The Daily Beast. “I’d never seen a period drama like this with a woman of color as the lead who wasn’t being brutalized, wasn’t being raped, was going through this personal evolution but was also in a privileged world and articulate and educated. I just hadn’t seen that on film before.”

Indeed, Belle becomes empowered to challenge the white characters that view themselves as her savior on their veiled racism, which marks a welcome departure from one of Hollywood’s most enduring cinematic tropes: the white savior.

When it comes to race-relations dramas—and slavery narratives, in particular—the white savior has become one of Hollywood’s most reliably offensive clichés. The black servants of The Help needed a perky, progressive Emma Stone to shed light on their plight; the football bruiser in The Blind Side couldn’t have done it without fiery Sandra Bullock; the black athletes in Cool Runnings and The Air Up There needed the guidance of their white coach; and in 12 Years A Slave, Solomon Northup, played by Chiwetel Ejiofor, is liberated at the eleventh hour by a Jesus-looking Brad Pitt (in a classic Deus Ex Machina).

“I think it’s a trope that has certainly been seen in Hollywood films for decades,” longtime film critic Laurence Lerman, formerly of Variety, says. “Think about the white teacher in the inner city school. The Michelle Pfeiffer one [in Dangerous Minds]. The Principal. Music of the Heart, where Meryl Streep was a music teacher. Wildcats. I think these stories probably read well in a pitch meeting: ‘Goldie Hawn coaching an inner city football team.’”

But, as he went on to explain, the execution often leaves something to be desired and doesn’t always reflect well on the communities it depicts—ones rooted in chaos that need a white savior to restore order. Lerman further noted that this cinematic trope is not limited to the depiction of inner cities or black people. Of the Last Samurai he said, “They make it look like Japan would not have made it out of the feudal period without Tom Cruise.” And the worst offender, in his opinion, is Dances with Wolves. “The west wouldn’t have been tamed and we’d have no civilization if Kevin Costner didn’t ride into town,” he says sarcastically.

The issue, according to Lerman, is more complex given the nature of Hollywood and the various power structures at play. While there are plenty of important stories to tell featuring people of color, there are only a small number of people of color in Hollywood with the clout to get a film green-lit—especially since we’re living in an age where international box office trumps domestic. This troubling disparity often results in a white star needing to be featured in a film with a predominantly minority cast to secure the necessary financing—as was the case with Pitt’s appearance in 12 Years A Slave, a film produced by his company, Plan B. And who can forget the controversy over the outrageous Italian movie posters for 12 Years A Slave, which prominently featured the film’s white movie stars—Pitt and Michael Fassbender—in favor of the movie’s real star, Chiwetel Ejiofor.

Without ruining the film for you, part of what makes Belle so refreshing is that its portrayal of black characters, namely Belle, is one of dignity. They aren’t the typical uneducated blacks you see in films that need to be shown the light by a white knight, for they’re blessed with more intellect and class than many of their white subjugators, who soon come to realize that Belle, through her grace and wisdom, is their savior.

“Her family thought they were giving her great love, but until she’s able to take that freedom for herself and find self-love and feel comfortable in her own skin, that’s when she’s ready to challenge them,” says Mbatha-Raw. “It just felt like a story that needed to be told.”

Voir enfin:

Historian at the Movies: Belle reviewed

As part of our Historian at the Movies series, James Walvin OBE, professor emeritus of the University of York, reviews Belle, a true story film about Dido Elizabeth Belle, the illegitimate mixed-race daughter of Admiral Sir John Lindsay (Matthew Goode) and an African slave woman.

**Please be aware that this review contains spoilers**

 

 

Q: Did you enjoy the film?

A: I ought to have enjoyed this film, but watched it, twice, with mounting dissatisfaction.

Belle hit the screens in the UK on 13 June amid a massive publicity campaign. The main star’s face (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) adorned the London underground, ads festooned the newspapers, and the media in general fell over themselves to provide free, and largely adulatory publicity.

Here, it seemed, is a film for our times. It is the story of slavery and the law, of beauty and the beast, and of Britain at a late 18th-century major turning point. It also speaks one of my special interests: the history of black people in Britain, and slavery.

It tells the dramatic true story of the daughter of an African slave woman and an English sailor, raised in the company of the Lord Chief Justice Mansfield (at the time when he was adjudicating major slave cases – Somerset and the Zong. [In the 1783 Zong case, the owners of the Zong slave ship made a claim to their insurers for the loss of the hundreds of slaves thrown overboard by the crew as disease and malnutrition ravaged the ship. Insurers refused to pay, but the case was taken to court and they lost. Lord Mansfield, the Lord Chief Justice for the case, compared the loss of the ‘slave cargo’ to the loss of horses, viewing the enslaved as property.]

The film is also the story of a beautiful woman celebrated in a major portrait. It is sumptuous, eye-watering and glossy: think Downton Abbey meets the slave trade. Yet for all the hype, for all the overblown praise and self-promotion of those involved, I disliked it.

There are some fine performances by a number of prominent actors, but even their skills and efforts can’t deflect the film’s basic flaws.

Q: Is the film historically accurate?

A: It is always hard for an historian to assess a film that is based on real events. After all, the makers need to weave a compelling story and a visual treat from evidence that is often sparse and unyielding.

In this case, much of the historical evidence is there – though festooned in the film with imaginary relishes and fictional tricks. Partly accurate, the whole thing reminded me of the classic Morecombe and Wise sketch with Andre Previn (Eric bashing away on the piano): all the right notes – but not necessarily in the right order.

Q: What did the film get right?

A: The film was a bold statement about the black presence in British history, and was good at revealing the social and racial tensions of Belle’s presence in the wider world of Mansfield’s Kenwood House. Here was a world, thousands of miles away from slavery, but enmeshed in its consequences.

The message, however, was delivered with thunderous and didactic simplicity: Belle is often given lines that sound as if they’ve been nicked from an abolitionist’s sermon. Her suitor (later her husband), Mr Davinier, offers a wincing portrayal of outraged humanity.

Q: What did it miss?

A: The real difficulty is that we know very little about Belle. To overcome that problem, the filmmakers had available a major event to bulk out a fading story: they hitch the fragments known about Belle onto the story of the massacre on the Zong slave ship.

The second half of the film is the story of Belle’s fictional involvement in that case. It portrays her growing outrage (following the simpering lead of her would-be suitor), and her activity as abolitionist mole in the Mansfield house. The aim is to illustrate Belle wooing Mansfield over to the abolitionist cause. To do this, the filmmakers make free with recently published material on the Zong. In truth, Belle is nowhere to be found in the Zong affair – except that is, in the film.

Tom Wilkinson’s Mansfield finds his cold legal commercial heart softened, and edged towards abolition by the eyelash-fluttering efforts of his stunning great niece. And lo! It works! In an expectant crowded courtroom scene (which could have been called 112 Angry Men), Mansfield’s adjudication becomes, not a point of law, but the first bold assertion towards the end of slavery. In reality, he merely stated that there should be another hearing of the Zong case – this time with evidence not known at the earlier hearing.

With freedom (for three quarters of a million slaves) beckoning over the horizon, Belle and her suitor step outside, find love, and Mansfield’s blessing – in the form of a knowing smile from Tom Wilkinson.

The film has all the ingredients for success. Lachrymose sentimentality, delivered to the screen by bucket-loads of opulent abundance. It has beauty at every turn (the brute ugliness of slavery remains a mere noise off-stage). Humanity and justice finally win out – all aided and propelled forward by female beauty.

I left the cinema asking myself: who would be spinning faster in their respective graves: Lord Mansfield or Dido Elizabeth Belle?

How many stars (out of 5) would you award the film?

For enjoyment: *
For historical accuracy: **


Médias: Attention, un négationnisme peut en cacher un autre ! (After France inter, Télérama presents Galilee and Nazareth as « Israeli colonies »)

4 janvier, 2019

Secondhandsmoke
L’oppression mentale totalitaire est faite de piqûres de moustiques et non de grands coups sur la tête. (…) Quel fut le moyen de propagande le plus puissant de l’hitlérisme? Etaient-ce les discours isolés de Hitler et de Goebbels, leurs déclarations à tel ou tel sujet, leurs propos haineux sur le judaïsme, sur le bolchevisme? Non, incontestablement, car beaucoup de choses demeuraient incomprises par la masse ou l’ennuyaient, du fait de leur éternelle répétition.[…] Non, l’effet le plus puissant ne fut pas produit par des discours isolés, ni par des articles ou des tracts, ni par des affiches ou des drapeaux, il ne fut obtenu par rien de ce qu’on était forcé d’enregistrer par la pensée ou la perception. Le nazisme s’insinua dans la chair et le sang du grand nombre à travers des expressions isolées, des tournures, des formes syntaxiques qui s’imposaient à des millions d’exemplaires et qui furent adoptées de façon mécanique et inconsciente. Victor Klemperer (LTI, la langue du IIIe Reich)
Ce qui est grave dans le texte de l’abbé Pierre, c’est quand il parle de la Shoah de Josué. C’est abominable. Bien entendu, les textes sur Josué sont effrayants, mais ce sont des textes qui sont absolument courants dans la littérature de l’époque. Si vous prenez inversement la stèle de Mesha, roi de Moab, qui est au Louvre, vous avez les mêmes appels à l’extermination du voisin… On est donc dans cet univers-là. Alors parler de la Shoah à ce sujet est extrêmement grave. Les révisionnistes et les négationnistes français (…) ont une spécificité, qui les distingue des Italiens ou des Américains : leur filiation n’est pas d’extrême droite. Leur public, ceux qui les entendent et les suivent, est celui de Le Pen, pour appeler les choses par leur nom. Mais les intellectuels qui fournissent à ce public des denrées viennent en fait de l’ultra-gauche. Rassinier, cet ancien député socialiste devenu le père du révisionnisme, a fait, dans les années 50, le pont entre l’extrême droite et l’ultra-gauche. Pierre Vidal-Naquet
Alors là, je trouverai le fond du problème de la sensibilité d’un Juif, en lui disant : toutes vos énergies se trouvent mobilisées par la réinstallation du grand temple de Salomon à Jérusalem, bref, de l’ancienne cité du roi David et du roi Salomon. Or vous vous basez pour cela sur tout ce qui dans la Bible parle de Terre promise. Or, je ne peux pas ne pas me poser cette question : que reste-t-il d’une promesse lorsque ce qui a été promis, on vient de le prendre en tuant par de véritables génocides des peuples qui y habitaient, paisiblement, avant qu’ils y entrent ? Les jours … Quand on relit le livre de Josué, c’est épouvantable ! C’est une série de génocides, groupe par groupe, pour en prendre possession ! Alors foutez-nous la paix avec la parole de Terre promise ! Je crois que – c’est çà que j’ai au fond de mon coeur – que votre mission a été – ce qui, en fait, s’est accompli partiellement – la diaspora, la dispersion à travers le monde entier pour aller porter la connaissance que vous étiez jusqu’alors les seuls à porter, en dépit de toutes les idolâtries qui vous entouraient, etc. Abbé Pierre (passage censuré dans Dieu et les Hommes, publié dans Le secret de l’abbé Pierre de Michel-Antoine Burnier et Cécile Romane, Mille et une nuits)
Détestés à mort de toutes les classes de la société, tous enrichis par la guerre, dont ils ont profité sur le dos des Russes, des Boches et des Polonais, et assez disposés à une révolution sociale où ils recueilleraient beaucoup d’argent en échange de quelques mauvais coups. De Gaulle (détaché auprès de l’armée polonaise, sur les juifs de Varsovie, lettre à sa mère, 1919)
On pouvait se demander, en effet, et on se demandait même chez beaucoup de Juifs, si l’implantation de cette communauté sur des terres qui avaient été acquises dans des conditions plus ou moins justifiables et au milieu des peuples arabes qui lui étaient foncièrement hostiles, n’allait pas entraîner d’incessants, d’interminables, frictions et conflits. Certains même redoutaient que les Juifs, jusqu’alors dispersés, mais qui étaient restés ce qu’ils avaient été de tous temps, c’est-à-dire un peuple d’élite, sûr de lui-même et dominateur, n’en viennent, une fois rassemblés dans le site de leur ancienne grandeur, à changer en ambition ardente et conquérante les souhaits très émouvants qu’ils formaient depuis dix-neuf siècles. De Gaulle (conférence de presse du 27 novembre 1967)
Est-ce que tenter de remettre les pieds chez soi constitue forcément une agression imprévue ? Michel Jobert
Ce n’est pas une politique de tuer des enfants. Chirac (accueillant Barak à Paris, le 4 octobre 2000)
La situation est tragique mais les forces en présence au Moyen-Orient font qu’au long terme, Israël, comme autrefois les Royaumes francs, finira par disparaître. Cette région a toujours rejeté les corps étrangers. Dominique de Villepin (Paris, automne 2001)
Pourquoi accepterions-nous une troisième guerre mondiale à cause de ces gens là? Daniel Bernard (ambassadeur de France, après avoir qualifié Israël de « petit pays de merde », Londres, décembre 2001)
Les Israéliens se sont surarmés et en faisant cela, ils font la même faute que les Américains, celle de ne pas avoir compris les leçons de la deuxième guerre mondiale, car il n’y a jamais rien de bon à attendre d’une guerre. Et la force peut détruire, elle ne peut jamais rien construire, surtout pas la paix. Le fait d’être ivre de puissance et d’être seul à l’avoir, si vous n’êtes pas très cultivé, enfant d’une longue histoire et grande pratique, vous allez toujours croire que vous pouvez imposer votre vision. Israël vit encore cette illusion, les Israéliens sont probablement dans la période où ils sont en train de comprendre leurs limites. C’était Sharon le premier général qui s’est retiré de la bande de Gaza car il ne pouvait plus la tenir. Nous défendons absolument le droit à l’existence d’Israël et à sa sécurité, mais nous ne défendons pas son droit à se conduire en puissance occupante, cynique et brutale … Michel Rocard (Al Ahram, 2006)
Ecoutez, je rentre de Lyon plein d’indignation à l’égard de cet attentat odieux qui voulait frapper les israélites qui se rendaient à la synagogue et qui a frappé des Français innocents qui traversaient la rue Copernic. C’est un acte qui mérite d’être sévèrement sanctionné. Raymond Barre (le 3 octobre 1980, TFI, suite à l’attentat de la synagogue parisienne de la rue Copernic, 4 morts, 20 blessés)
C’était des Français qui circulaient dans la rue et qui se trouvent fauchés parce qu’on veut faire sauter une synagogue. Alors, ceux qui voulaient s’en prendre aux Juifs, ils auraient pu faire sauter la synagogue et les juifs. Mais pas du tout, ils font un attentat aveugle et y a 3 Français, non juifs, c’est une réalité, non juifs. Et cela ne veut pas dire que les Juifs, eux ne sont pas Français. (…) C’est « une campagne » « faite par le lobby juif le plus lié à la gauche » (…) « je considère que le lobby juif – pas seulement en ce qui me concerne – est capable de monter des opérations qui sont indignes et je tiens à le dire publiquement. Raymond Barre (20 février 2007, France Culture, diffusée le 1er mars)
J’ai tellement entendu les propos de M. Gollnisch à Lyon que cela finissait par ne plus m’émouvoir. Quand on entend à longueur de journée tout ce qui se dit à droite et à gauche, à la fin on n’y porte plus attention. Raymond Barre (01.03.2007)
Comme tous les ans durant la période de Noël, des milliers de pèlerins et touristes du monde entier convergent vers la ville de Bethléem. Mais pour les chrétiens de Gaza, soumis à des restrictions de mouvements, cette possibilité semble désormais relever du privilège. L’accès au territoire palestinien est en effet rigoureusement contrôlé par les autorités militaires israéliennes qui délivrent des permis d’entrée et de sortie. Chaque année, un certain nombre d’entre eux est concédé aux chrétiens de Gaza souhaitant se rendre à Jérusalem ou en Cisjordanie pour les fêtes de Noël et de Pâques. Pour Noël 2018, 500 permis de sortie ont été promis par Israël, mais en pratique, seuls 220 ont été effectivement délivrés pour le moment à des personnes âgées entre 16 et 35 ans ou de plus de 55 ans, ce qui donne lieu à des situations problématiques au sein de plusieurs familles: le père obtenant un permis mais pas la mère et inversement, ou des permis accordés aux enfants mais pas aux parents et inversement. Mgr Giacinto Boulos Marcuzzo, vicaire patriarcal pour Jérusalem et la Palestine avoue ne pas saisir la politique choisie par Israël dans ce domaine. «C’est une logique d’occupation que nous ne comprenons pas, ni ne justifions», assène-t-il. Pouvoir se rendre à Bethléem pour fêter Noël devrait être un droit naturel pour un chrétien gazaoui et non pas un privilège, déplore l’évêque italien. Mgr Marcuzzo se trouvait d’ailleurs à Gaza dimanche dernier, en compagnie de l’administrateur apostolique du patriarcat latin de Jérusalem, Mgr Pierbattista Pizzaballa, pour célébrer Noël avec la petite communauté latine locale, selon une tradition désormais bien installée. Le vicaire patriarcal évoque une atmosphère générale empreinte de tristesse, même si la médiation égyptienne et qatarie entreprise ces derniers jours a fait baisser la tension dans le territoire palestinien, après des semaines de fièvre et d’affrontements liés aux «marches du retour». La présence chrétienne quant à elle s’amoindrit sensiblement. Face à des conditions de vie précaires et au manque évident de perspectives, l’émigration reste une tentation inexorable. On comptait il y a encore quelques années environ 3 000 chrétiens de toute confessions à Gaza; ils ne représentent aujourd’hui que 1 200 âmes, dont 120 catholiques latins. Vatican news
A Gaza également, l’ambiance est sombre (…) Une partie de la communauté chrétienne de la bande Gaza ne pourra pas se rendre dans la ville natale du Christ en raison des restrictions de circulation imposées par Israël qui comme chaque année n’a délivré des permis qu’au compte-gouttes. (…) Tous aimeraient être à Béthléem pour Noël, mais cette année seules 600 personnes ont reçu des permis, plus d’un tiers de la toute petite communauté chrétienne de l’enclave s’apprête donc à passer le réveillon sur place et sans grand enthousiasme.  (…) Un Noël maussade dans une bande de Gaza soumise à un sévère blocus israélien et ces restrictions de circulation concernent plus de deux millions de Palestiniens (…) Une situation qui a contribué à l’exode des chrétiens de Gaza. On en comptait 3.500 il y a 15 ans, selon les estimations, ils ne seraient plus qu’un millier aujourd’hui. France Inter
La radio du service public avait diffusé un reportage décrivant trois localités de Galilée comme des « colonies ». Suite à la mobilisation des lecteurs d’InfoEquitable, France Inter a corrigé cette faute en leur accordant désormais le statut bien plus représentatif de « villes ». (…) Nous indiquions que France Inter n’avait corrigé que la version écrite du reportage mais pas la bande audio. Or il s’avère que, presque à la même heure où nous publiions ces lignes, la médiatrice de Radio France annonçait, dans un échange avec un auditeur qui avait certainement suivi notre appel à protester auprès d’elle, que le son du reportage allait aussi être modifié. Deux heures après la parution de notre article, c’est ce qui a été fait et le reportage audio parle désormais aussi de « villes » et non plus de « colonies ». Aurélien Colly, le journaliste auteur du reportage, a également reconnu l’usage d’un terme inapproprié. Merci à Radio France d’avoir réagi et à nos lecteurs d’avoir permis la correction de cette erreur. Nous sommes satisfaits de la reconnaissance de cette erreur par la radio. Cependant, la correction sur le site ne s’accompagne d’aucun commentaire pour faire savoir aux lecteurs que le texte initial comportait une erreur importante. Plus grave, la chronique audio inchangée est toujours en ligne. Or, comme l’expliquait InfoEquitable dans l’article qui a poussé France Inter à réagir, le reportage reste très tendancieux. En particulier, il donne la parole à un « vieux forgeron libanais » supposément âgé d’une soixantaine d’année qui raconte des souvenirs qu’il ne pourrait avoir que s’il avait au moins 75 ans, traite les Juifs (pas les Israéliens, les Juifs !) de voleurs de terres et fait comprendre qu’Israël doit « redevenir la Palestine » (argument trompeur puisque la Palestine antérieure à 1948 fut une région sous mandat britannique et non un Etat arabe). L’homme appelle donc à éliminer l’Etat d’Israël et cela ne suscite aucun commentaire critique de la part du journaliste Aurélien Colly, envoyé spécial permanent de France Inter à Beyrouth, qui interviewe par ailleurs également un membre du Hezbollah sans préciser que ce mouvement est considéré comme terroriste par de nombreuses autorités dont celles de l’Union européenne… Au vu du reste de la chronique, le recours au terme de « colonies » pour désigner des localités situées sur le territoire internationalement reconnu d’Israël n’est pas anodin. Davantage qu’une simple erreur factuelle, il se situe en conformité avec la ligne du Hezbollah qui nie le droit aux Juifs d’avoir un Etat : raison pour laquelle nous avions intitulé notre première critique « France Inter reprend la propagande du Hezbollah ». Cette correction a minima suscite d’autres questions pour France Inter Est-ce que cette identification sans distanciation avec le narratif d’une organisation terroriste correspond aux standards journalistiques de France Inter, une radio financée par les contributions du public français ? Le journaliste a-t-il été sanctionné par la rédaction pour cette faute qui peut avoir des conséquences, en France, sur la sécurité des Juifs qui sont diabolisés dans le reportage (rappelons les paroles du « forgeron » : « Quand on était petit, on allait en Palestine. (…) Les Juifs n’étaient pas comme aujourd’hui, ils étaient sages, ils n’attaquaient personne, ne prenaient les terres de personne. ») ? Nous ne manquerons pas de publier une éventuelle réponse de France Inter à ces questions. InfoEquitable
Ces silhouettes permettent à Annemarie Jacir [NDLR la réalisatrice] de cerner une ville comme pétrifiée par l’occupation israélienne, où la tension semble rôder en permanence entre les populations — musulmane à 60 % et chrétienne à 40 %. Télérama (première version)
Ces silhouettes permettent à Annemarie Jacir de cerner une ville, où la tension semble rôder en permanence entre les populations — musulmane à 60 % et chrétienne à 40 %. Télérama (version corrigée)
En novembre dernier, un correspondant de France Inter avait décrit trois localités de Galilée comme des « colonies ». La Galilée fait partie d’Israël depuis l’indépendance de ce pays en 1948 et cette description revenait à faire de l’Etat d’Israël dans son intégralité une colonie – sous-entendu, un pays occupant de manière illégitime un territoire ne lui appartenant pas ; un pays implicitement appelé à disparaître, donc. Après la révélation de cette erreur par InfoEquitable, la radio avait reconnu le problème et corrigé le reportage. Moins de deux mois plus tard, Télérama commet exactement la même erreur. Dans le numéro 3596 du 12 décembre 2018, le critique Pierre Murat donne son avis sur le film « Wajib : l’invitation au mariage ». L’histoire se déroule à Nazareth. Commençant par évoquer les personnages du film, Pierre Murat enchaîne : Ces silhouettes permettent à Annemarie Jacir [NDLR la réalisatrice] de cerner une ville comme pétrifiée par l’occupation israélienne, où la tension semble rôder en permanence entre les populations — musulmane à 60 % et chrétienne à 40 %.  Nazareth, occupée par Israël ? Nazareth se trouve en Galilée, dans le district nord d’Israël. Elle en est la plus grande ville. Depuis 1948, cette région fait partie de l’Etat d’Israël. Il est courant que la Cisjordanie (ou Judée-Samarie, région occupée par la Jordanie de 1949 jusqu’à la victoire israélienne de 1967 qui fut obtenue après une guerre provoquée et perdue par la Jordanie et ses alliés arabes), soit décrite comme « territoire occupé par Israël ». Bien que cette terminologie nous paraisse inappropriée, elle peut se comprendre lorsqu’elle s’applique à la Cisjordanie du point de vue des partisans de la « solution à deux Etats », qui disent souhaiter un retrait total israélien de cette région, mais la coexistence d’un futur « Etat de Palestine » avec un Etat d’Israël restreint à ses frontières « d’avant 1967 ». Mais Nazareth n’est pas située en Cisjordanie (West Bank sur la carte ci-dessous). La ville, tout en étant habitée presque exclusivement par des minorités nationales (arabes musulmane et chrétienne), se trouve de façon incontestable dans les frontières internationalement reconnues de l’Etat juif. A moins de considérer Paris comme occupée par la France, ou Tokyo par le Japon, la seule manière de comprendre la désignation de Nazareth comme une ville occupée est la volonté de ne pas reconnaître la légitimité du pays dont elle fait partie, l’Etat d’Israël, et donc de le voir disparaître. Infoequitable
Dans son numéro 3598, daté du 12 décembre 2018, Télérama « aime beaucoup » Wajib : l’invitation au mariage, un film palestinien sorti sur les écrans en 2017 et dont l’actualité est la sortie en DVD. Dire que Télérama adôôôre tout ce qui est palestinien relève du pléonasme, mais ce qui va sans dire semble aller encore mieux pour l’hebdomadaire d’opinion quand il peut enfoncer le clou avec un maillet fabriqué du bois dont on fait la propagande antisioniste « Ces silhouettes permettent à Annemarie Jacir (la réalisatrice, NDLR) de cerner une ville comme pétrifiée par l’occupation israélienne, où la tension semble rôder en permanence entre les populations — musulmane à 60 % et chrétienne à 40 %. (Télérama) » explique le critique, Pierre Murat. La ville « pétrifiée par l’occupation israélienne », c’est Nazareth, surnommée « la capitale arabe d’Israël » (les mots importants –au pluriel, car il y en a deux– sont « arabe » et « Israël »). Capitale arabe d’Israël ? Oui. En 2017, cette ville israélienne comptait 76.551 habitants, majoritairement des Arabes israéliens, 69% musulmans et 30,9% chrétiens. En termes administratifs, Nazareth est la capitale régionale de la Galilée et c’est la seule zone urbaine israélienne de plus de 50.000 habitants qui possède une majorité arabe (Wikipédia). Dans la doxa antisioniste téléramienne (excusez encore le pléonasme), une ville à majorité arabe ne peut exister qu’en territoire occupé. De plus, si l’on constate une tension (qu’elle soit réelle ou cinématographique) entre musulmans et chrétiens, seuls les Juifs peuvent en être responsables, preuve que Nazareth est occupée. C’est ainsi qu’on boucle une boucle idéologique dans le groupe Le Monde. Cette annexion de Nazareth par une Palestine fantasmée est-elle seulement une grossière erreur de culture générale dans un magazine culturel ou bien une répétition à vocation pédagogique, consistant à faire entrer subliminalement dans l’inconscient du lecteur le substantif « occupation » chaque fois que l’adjectif « israélien » est utilisé ? Dans le narratif palestino-téléramien présentant Nazareth comme « occupée », la précision sur les populations en présence sert aussi à agréger musulmans et chrétiens comme victimes égalitaires du joug de l’occupant et à exonérer l’une des deux communautés ARABES (on le souligne) d’avoir lâché un rôdeur nommé tension. Au cas où le film lui-même (palestinien, on le rappelle, donc peut-être partial ?) ne suffirait pas à induire chez le spectateur, ou simplement chez le lecteur du magazine d’opinion, une animosité vis-à-vis de l’État juif, le critique en rajoute une couche : « Le fils ne peut supporter que son père, par prudence, par lâcheté, songe à inviter au mariage un ami juif — en fait, un « inspecteur du savoir » (sic) qui, depuis des années, surveille et censure son enseignement. » Décryptons : 1) Il est impossible qu’un Palestinien ait un ami juif. 2) Les Juifs sont tellement mauvais que survivre à la cohabitation avec eux implique une prudence confinant à la lâcheté. 3) Un Juif et un Palestinien ne sauraient avoir d’autres rapports que dominant/dominé. Le critique de Télérama partage probablement la croyance de son parti en l’apartheid de la part des Israéliens vis-à-vis des pauvre palestiniens. Même si aucun fait réel n’y apporte le moindre crédit, cela n’empêche pas le prosélytisme. En revanche, bien que les chiffres et les témoignages abondent de la maltraitance subie par les chrétiens d’Orient en général et ceux des Territoires palestiniens en particulier, il ne peut pas, il ne veut pas y croire. Pourtant, si Nazareth est bien la « capitale arabe d’Israël », si cette ville à majorité musulmane est la capitale régionale de la Galilée, c’est parce que les citoyens israéliens vivent dans un pays démocratique et que rien n’empêche une minorité au plan national de représenter une majorité au plan régional ou local. En revanche, s’il existe, en Cisjordanie, des implantations juives protégées par l’armée (ce qui se traduit en palestinolâtrie et donc en Télérama dans le texte par « colonies »), c’est parce que des Juifs seraient aussitôt assassinés s’ils tentaient d’y vivre comme le font les musulmans de l’autre côté de la Ligne verte. Comme Pierre Murat de Télérama ne veut pas le savoir, nulle allusion perfide autre qu’antisioniste ne salit sa critique. Cela dit, Annemarie Jacir a situé son film dans la Nazareth israélienne, où toutes les religions sont libres et égales devant la loi, pas dans la Bethléem palestinienne, où une seule minorité dhimmie est tolérée pour des raisons 100% économiques. Bethléem est située à environ 10 km au sud de Jérusalem. 30.000 habitants y vivaient en 2006 sous l’administration de l’Autorité palestinienne. 30.000 habitants en immense majorité musulmans, en immense majorité de moins en moins tolérants vis-à-vis de l’une des plus anciennes communautés chrétiennes au monde. La ville étant un lieu de pèlerinage chrétien, qui lui rapporte l’essentiel de ses revenus hors charité internationale, cette communauté survit encore. En revanche, le tombeau de la matriarche Rachel, situé à l’entrée de la ville, n’est accessible aux pèlerins juifs du monde entier qu’à leurs risques et périls, le péril encouru par les juifs israéliens étant la mort. Dans toute la Cisjordanie, y compris à Bethléem, la proportion des chrétiens baisse fortement. Ils ne représentent plus, dans la ville où est né Jésus, qu’un pourcentage de la population inférieur à 10% (La Croix), contre plus de 30% en 1993. Les chiffres ci-dessous montrent l’évolution de la population israélienne avec la part qu’y occupe chaque religion (Bureau des statistiques, Israël). En Israël, pas en Territoire palestinien, car Gaza est devenue Judenrein et quasiment Christianrein. Quant à l’Autorité palestinienne, elle « convainc » les chrétiens d’émigrer de Cisjordanie par harcèlement et persécutions, mais pas de façon assez ostensible pour se voir privée des subventions internationales. Liliane Messika

Attention: un négationnisme peut en cacher un autre !

Alors qu’après France inter (désinformation, avec Radio Vatican, comprise sur le Noël de Gaza) …
Télérama présente la Galilée et Nazareth (première ville israélienne à majorité arabe) comme « colonies israéliennes » (erreurs depuis corrigées, mais sans le préciser, sous la pression du site Infoequitable et peut-être aussi de l’excellente critique du blog de Liliane Messika) …
Comment ne pas repenser …
Au tristement fameux lapsus barrien des « Français innocents » bien sûr …
Dont, on s’en souvient, l’ancien premier ministre et maire de Lyon avait déploré la mort suite à l’attentat de la synagogue parisienne de la rue Copernic il y a bientôt 40 ans …
Mais également à ce tout aussi révélateur aveu du même un quart de siècle plus tard
Lorsque défendant sa défense de son ancien collègue et conseiller municipal Bruno Gollnish condamné pour négationnisme (mais blanchi deux ans plus tard) …
Il avait involontairement donné l’une des sources possibles de sa pensée en expliquant avoir « tellement entendu les propos de M. Gollnisch à Lyon que cela finissait par ne plus l’émouvoir et que « quand on entend à longueur de journée tout ce qui se dit à droite et à gauche, à la fin on n’y porte plus attention » …
A savoir cette sorte d’antisémitisme passif (comme le tabagisme du même nom dont la science médicale nous dit qu’il pourrait presque être pire que l’actif) ou involontaire, inconscient ou par défaut, devenu tellement ordinaire que l’on n’est est même plus conscient …
Qui n’est pas sans rappeler ces fameuses « piqûres de moustiques » de « l’oppression mentale totalitaire » dont Klemperer nous avait appris, on s’en souvient, qu’elles avaient été le  » moyen de propagande le plus puissant de l’hitlérisme » pour son adoption par le plus grand nombre « de façon mécanique et inconsciente » …
Mais qui sous sa forme modernisée et plus présentable de l’anti-israélisme, 80 ans plus tard, se diffuserait à jet continu et par petites touches homéopathiques et donc presque imperceptibles …
Et dont apparemment seraient à présent victimes …
Les médias mêmes qui en sont les principaux diffuseurs ?

L’idéologie à géographie variable de Télérama

Dans son numéro 3598, daté du 12 décembre 2018, Télérama « aime beaucoup » Wajib : l’invitation au mariage, un film palestinien sorti sur les écrans en 2017 et dont l’actualité est la sortie en DVD. Dire que Télérama adôôôre tout ce qui est palestinien relève du pléonasme, mais ce qui va sans dire semble aller encore mieux pour l’hebdomadaire d’opinion quand il peut enfoncer le clou avec un maillet fabriqué du bois dont on fait la propagande antisioniste.

Que c’est beau Nazareth, dans la nuit de l’intelligence

« Ces silhouettes permettent à Annemarie Jacir (la réalisatrice, NDLR) de cerner une ville comme pétrifiée par l’occupation israélienne, où la tension semble rôder en permanence entre les populations — musulmane à 60 % et chrétienne à 40 %. (Télérama) » explique le critique, Pierre Murat.

La ville « pétrifiée par l’occupation israélienne », c’est Nazareth, surnommée « la capitale arabe d’Israël » (les mots importants –au pluriel, car il y en a deux– sont « arabe » et « Israël »). Capitale arabe d’Israël ? Oui. En 2017, cette ville israélienne comptait 76.551 habitants, majoritairement des Arabes israéliens, 69% musulmans et 30,9% chrétiens. En termes administratifs, Nazareth est la capitale régionale de la Galilée et c’est la seule zone urbaine israélienne de plus de 50.000 habitants qui possède une majorité arabe (Wikipédia).

Dans la doxa antisioniste téléramienne (excusez encore le pléonasme), une ville à majorité arabe ne peut exister qu’en territoire occupé. De plus, si l’on constate une tension (qu’elle soit réelle ou cinématographique) entre musulmans et chrétiens, seuls les Juifs peuvent en être responsables, preuve que Nazareth est occupée. C’est ainsi qu’on boucle une boucle idéologique dans le groupe Le Monde[1].

Étude d’une sourate de Télérama

Cette annexion de Nazareth par une Palestine fantasmée est-elle seulement une grossière erreur de culture générale dans un magazine culturel[2] ou bien une répétition à vocation pédagogique, consistant à faire entrer subliminalement dans l’inconscient du lecteur le substantif « occupation » chaque fois que l’adjectif « israélien » est utilisé ?

Dans le narratif palestino-téléramien présentant Nazareth comme « occupée », la précision sur les populations en présence sert aussi à agréger musulmans et chrétiens comme victimes égalitaires du joug de l’occupant et à exonérer l’une des deux communautés ARABES (on le souligne) d’avoir lâché un rôdeur nommé tension.

Au cas où le film lui-même (palestinien, on le rappelle, donc peut-être partial ?) ne suffirait pas à induire chez le spectateur, ou simplement chez le lecteur du magazine d’opinion, une animosité vis-à-vis de l’État juif, le critique en rajoute une couche : « Le fils ne peut supporter que son père, par prudence, par lâcheté, songe à inviter au mariage un ami juif — en fait, un « inspecteur du savoir » (sic) qui, depuis des années, surveille et censure son enseignement. »

Décryptons : 1) Il est impossible qu’un Palestinien ait un ami juif. 2) Les Juifs sont tellement mauvais que survivre à la cohabitation avec eux implique une prudence confinant à la lâcheté. 3) Un Juif et un Palestinien ne sauraient avoir d’autres rapports que dominant/dominé.

Apartheid fantasmé et apartheid excusé, les deux mamelles de Télérama

Le critique de Télérama partage probablement la croyance de son parti en l’apartheid de la part des Israéliens vis-à-vis des pauvrepalestiniens. Même si aucun fait réel n’y apporte le moindre crédit, cela n’empêche pas le prosélytisme. En revanche, bien que les chiffres et les témoignages abondent de la maltraitance subie par les chrétiens d’Orient en général et ceux des Territoires palestiniens en particulier, il ne peut pas, il ne veut pas y croire.

Pourtant, si Nazareth est bien la « capitale arabe d’Israël », si cette ville à majorité musulmane est la capitale régionale de la Galilée, c’est parce que les citoyens israéliens vivent dans un pays démocratique et que rien n’empêche une minorité au plan national de représenter une majorité au plan régional ou local.

En revanche, s’il existe, en Cisjordanie, des implantations juives protégées par l’armée (ce qui se traduit en palestinolâtrie et donc en Télérama dans le texte par « colonies »), c’est parce que des Juifs seraient aussitôt assassinés s’ils tentaient d’y vivre comme le font les musulmans de l’autre côté de la Ligne verte.

Comme Pierre Murat de Télérama ne veut pas le savoir, nulle allusion perfide autre qu’antisioniste ne salit sa critique.

Cela dit, Annemarie Jacir a situé son film dans la Nazareth israélienne, où toutes les religions sont libres et égales devant la loi, pas dans la Bethléem palestinienne, où une seule minorité dhimmie[3] est tolérée pour des raisons 100% économiques.

Bethléem est située à environ 10 km au sud de Jérusalem. 30.000 habitants[4] y vivaient en 2006 sous l’administration de l’Autorité palestinienne. 30.000 habitants en immense majorité musulmans, en immense majorité de moins en moins tolérants vis-à-vis de l’une des plus anciennes communautés chrétiennes au monde. La ville étant un lieu de pèlerinage chrétien, qui lui rapporte l’essentiel de ses revenus hors charité internationale, cette communauté survit encore. En revanche, le tombeau de la matriarche Rachel, situé à l’entrée de la ville, n’est accessible aux pèlerins juifs du monde entier qu’à leurs risques et périls, le péril encouru par les juifs israéliens étant la mort.

Télérama ne laisse ni faits ni chiffres interférer avec son idéologie

Dans toute la Cisjordanie, y compris à Bethléem, la proportion des chrétiens baisse fortement. Ils ne représentent plus, dans la ville où est né Jésus, qu’un pourcentage de la population inférieur à 10% (La Croix), contre plus de 30% en 1993.

Les chiffres ci-dessous montrent l’évolution de la population israélienne avec la part qu’y occupe chaque religion (Bureau des statistiques, Israël). En Israël, pas en Territoire palestinien, car Gaza est devenue Judenrein et quasiment Christianrein. Quant à l’Autorité palestinienne, elle « convainc » les chrétiens d’émigrer de Cisjordanie par harcèlement et persécutions, mais pas de façon assez ostensible pour se voir privée des subventions internationales.

tableau Télérama.jpg

Si l’augmentation du nombre de chrétiens en Israël depuis 1993 n’est pas visible en termes de pourcentages, c’est en raison de l’augmentation substantielle du nombre des citoyens des deux autres confessions.

Le dernier recensement de la population palestinienne a été publié le 29 mars 2018. « Le recensement, a dit la présidente du BCPS (Bureau central palestinien des statistiques, NDLR), Ola Awad, a révélé que 97,9 % des Palestiniens étaient musulmans, alors que la population chrétienne était estimée à moins de 1 %. (Times of Israel Rapporté au total (4,78 millions), cela fait environ 45.000 personnes.

En Israël, où les chrétiens représentent, en 2017, 2% de la population totale, cela correspond à 175.960 habitants, alors qu’en 1950, ils comptaient pour 2,6% d’une la population qui n’atteignait pas le million, soit 26.000 personnes.

C’est donc une augmentation de 677% (oui, SIX CENT SOIXANTE-DIX-SEPT pour cent !)

Ce chiffre vaut plus que mille mots (maux ?) écrits dans Télérama. LM♦

Liliane Messika, mabatim.info

[1] Télérama appartient au groupe Le Monde depuis 2003, comme Le Monde diplomatique, vaisseau amiral de la propagande antisioniste en langue française depuis toujours.
[2]Télérama est un magazine culturel français à parution hebdomadaire (Wikipedia)
[3] « Un dhimmi est un terme historique du Droit musulman qui désigne un citoyen non-musulman d’un État musulman, lié à celui-ci par un ‘’pacte de protection’’ discriminatoire. » (Akadem)
[4] Données détaillées les plus récentes du Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics, les chiffres de 2018 ne concernant que la globalité de la Cisjordanie.

Voir aussi:

Nazareth, « ville comme pétrifiée par l’occupation israélienne » : il n’existe aucune justification à cette description, sauf à contester la légitimité de l’Etat d’Israël.

Mise à jour

Suite à l’article d’InfoEquitable, Télérama a corrigé sa phrase en supprimant dans la version internet de l’article la mention d‘occupation israélienne. InfoEquitable remercie la rédaction pour cette réaction.

 

 

Nous avons cependant demandé si un prochain numéro papier du magazine pourrait contenir un rectificatif à l’attention des lecteurs de l’édition du 12 décembre. Ce genre d’imprécision est en effet susceptible de nourrir le ressentiment contre Israël, et par extension contre les Juifs injustement accusés d’occuper un territoire ne leur appartenant pas. Les lecteurs de l’édition papier de Télérama méritent à notre avis d’être informés lorsqu’une telle erreur factuelle se produit. 

 

_ _ _

 

En novembre dernier, un correspondant de France Inter avait décrit trois localités de Galilée comme des « colonies ». La Galilée fait partie d’Israël depuis l’indépendance de ce pays en 1948 et cette description revenait à faire de l’Etat d’Israël dans son intégralité une colonie – sous-entendu, un pays occupant de manière illégitime un territoire ne lui appartenant pas ; un pays implicitement appelé à disparaître, donc. Après la révélation de cette erreur par InfoEquitable, la radio avait reconnu le problème et corrigé le reportage.

Moins de deux mois plus tard, Télérama commet exactement la même erreur. Dans le numéro 3596 du 12 décembre 2018, le critique Pierre Murat donne son avis sur le film « Wajib : l’invitation au mariage » (en complément à cette revue, nous recommandons à nos lecteur le décryptage, véritable « critique de la critique de Télérama », de Liliane Messika).

L’histoire se déroule à Nazareth. Commençant par évoquer les personnages du film, Pierre Murat enchaîne :

Ces silhouettes permettent à Annemarie Jacir [NDLR la réalisatrice] de cerner une ville comme pétrifiée par l’occupation israélienne, où la tension semble rôder en permanence entre les populations — musulmane à 60 % et chrétienne à 40 %.

Nazareth, occupée par Israël ?

Nazareth se trouve en Galilée, dans le district nord d’Israël. Elle en est la plus grande ville. Depuis 1948, cette région fait partie de l’Etat d’Israël.

Il est courant que la Cisjordanie (ou Judée-Samarie, région occupée par la Jordanie de 1949 jusqu’à la victoire israélienne de 1967 qui fut obtenue après une guerre provoquée et perdue par la Jordanie et ses alliés arabes), soit décrite comme « territoire occupé par Israël ». Bien que cette terminologie nous paraisse inappropriée, elle peut se comprendre lorsqu’elle s’applique à la Cisjordanie du point de vue des partisans de la « solution à deux Etats », qui disent souhaiter un retrait total israélien de cette région, mais la coexistence d’un futur « Etat de Palestine » avec un Etat d’Israël restreint à ses frontières « d’avant 1967 ».

Mais Nazareth n’est pas située en Cisjordanie (West Bank sur la carte ci-dessous). La ville, tout en étant habitée presque exclusivement par des minorités nationales (arabes musulmane et chrétienne), se trouve de façon incontestable dans les frontières internationalement reconnues de l’Etat juif.

A moins de considérer Paris comme occupée par la France, ou Tokyo par le Japon, la seule manière de comprendre la désignation de Nazareth comme une ville occupée est la volonté de ne pas reconnaître la légitimité du pays dont elle fait partie, l’Etat d’Israël, et donc de le voir disparaître.

Est-ce ce que la rédaction de Télérama souhaite ? Nos lecteurs peuvent poser la question à Télérama ici.

Nous avons pour notre part peine à croire que ce soit le cas, et serons rassurés si, comme France Inter a su le faireTélérama corrige la phrase en question.

Voir également:

La radio du service public avait diffusé un reportage décrivant trois localités de Galilée comme des « colonies ». Suite à la mobilisation des lecteurs d’InfoEquitable, France Inter a corrigé cette faute en leur accordant désormais le statut bien plus représentatif de « villes ».

 

—-

Mise à jour

Nous indiquions que France Inter n’avait corrigé que la version écrite du reportage mais pas la bande audio. Or il s’avère que, presque à la même heure où nous publiions ces lignes, la médiatrice de Radio France annonçait, dans un échange avec un auditeur qui avait certainement suivi notre appel à protester auprès d’elle, que le son du reportage allait aussi être modifié. Deux heures après la parution de notre article, c’est ce qui a été fait et le reportage audio parle désormais aussi de « villes » et non plus de « colonies ». 

 

 

Aurélien Colly, le journaliste auteur du reportage, a également reconnu l’usage d’un terme inapproprié.

 

 

Merci à Radio France d’avoir réagi et à nos lecteurs d’avoir permis la correction de cette erreur.

 

—-

Nous sommes satisfaits de la reconnaissance de cette erreur par la radio.

Cependant, la correction sur le site ne s’accompagne d’aucun commentaire pour faire savoir aux lecteurs que le texte initial comportait une erreur importante.

Plus grave, la chronique audio inchangée est toujours en ligne. Or, comme l’expliquait InfoEquitable dans l’article qui a poussé France Inter à réagir, le reportage reste très tendancieux.

 

 

En particulier, il donne la parole à un « vieux forgeron libanais » supposément âgé d’une soixantaine d’année qui raconte des souvenirs qu’il ne pourrait avoir que s’il avait au moins 75 ans, traite les Juifs (pas les Israéliens, les Juifs !) de voleurs de terres et fait comprendre qu’Israël doit « redevenir la Palestine » (argument trompeur puisque la Palestine antérieure à 1948 fut une région sous mandat britannique et non un Etat arabe). L’homme appelle donc à éliminer l’Etat d’Israël et cela ne suscite aucun commentaire critique de la part du journaliste Aurélien Colly, envoyé spécial permanent de France Inter à Beyrouth, qui interviewe par ailleurs également un membre du Hezbollah sans préciser que ce mouvement est considéré comme terroriste par de nombreuses autorités dont celles de l’Union européenne…

Au vu du reste de la chronique, le recours au terme de « colonies » pour désigner des localités situées sur le territoire internationalement reconnu d’Israël n’est pas anodin. Davantage qu’une simple erreur factuelle, il se situe en conformité avec la ligne du Hezbollah qui nie le droit aux Juifs d’avoir un Etat : raison pour laquelle nous avions intitulé notre première critique « France Inter reprend la propagande du Hezbollah ».

Cette correction a minima suscite d’autres questions pour France Inter

Est-ce que cette identification sans distanciation avec le narratif d’une organisation terroriste correspond aux standards journalistiques de France Inter, une radio financée par les contributions du public français ?

Le journaliste a-t-il été sanctionné par la rédaction pour cette faute qui peut avoir des conséquences, en France, sur la sécurité des Juifs qui sont diabolisés dans le reportage (rappelons les paroles du « forgeron »« Quand on était petit, on allait en Palestine. (…) Les Juifs n’étaient pas comme aujourd’hui, ils étaient sages, ils n’attaquaient personne, ne prenaient les terres de personne. ») ?

Nous ne manquerons pas de publier une éventuelle réponse de France Inter à ces questions.

Voir enfin:

On aime beaucoup

55%
L’avis de la communauté

Télérama

La critique par Pierre Murat

Les marches sont rudes. Le vieux monsieur — il continue de fumer malgré sa récente opération du cœur — s’arrête, ahane, mais finit son ascension. Abu Shadi, prof renommé, sillonne les rues de Nazareth en compagnie de son fils, Shadi, spécialement rentré d’Italie, où il végète. Ces deux facteurs improvisés rencontrent des gens plus ou moins extravagants que la réalisatrice contemple avec tendresse : une vieille dame loufoque qui, pour Noël, a érigé, dans son salon, une crèche gigantesque ; un petit homme discret, tout gêné de devoir présenter à la compagnie son garçon, objet de railleries secrètes parce que « efféminé »… Ces silhouettes permettent à Annemarie Jacir de cerner une ville, où la tension semble rôder en permanence entre les populations — musulmane à 60 % et chrétienne à 40 %.

Elle rôde aussi, et éclate par accès subits, entre les deux héros. Le père reproche au fils d’avoir fui, mais, surtout, de vivre à l’étranger avec la fille d’un membre influent de l’OLP. Le fils ne peut supporter que son père, par prudence, par lâcheté, songe à inviter au mariage un ami juif — en fait, un « inspecteur du savoir » (sic) qui, depuis des années, surveille et censure son enseignement. D’autres souvenirs, encore plus amers et douloureux, surgissent. C’est dire que la cigarette partagée par les deux hommes, tandis que le soir tombe sur Nazareth, ne résout rien. La réalisatrice semble offrir cet instant suspendu à ses héros (interprétés par deux comédiens formidables, père et fils dans la vie) comme une récréation. Une trêve inattendue. Un petit moment de paix illusoire, insensé et d’autant plus précieux.


Cinéma/First man: Look what they’ve done to my flag, Ma ! (First postnational hero: why can’t Lalaland recognize a true American hero when it sees one ?)

23 octobre, 2018
Condamner le nationalisme parce qu’il peut mener à la guerre, c’est comme condamner l’amour parce qu’il peut conduire au meurtre. C.K. Chesterton
Deliverance did for them [North Georgians] what ‘Jaws’ did for sharks. Daniel Roper (North Georgia Journal)
The movie, ‘Deliverance’ made tourist dollars flow into the area, but there was one memorable, horrifying male rape scene that lasted a little more than four minutes, but has lasted 40 years inside the hearts and minds of the people who live here. CNN
Il n’y a pas d’identité fondamentale, pas de courant dominant, au Canada. Il y a des valeurs partagées — ouverture, compassion, la volonté de travailler fort, d’être là l’un pour l’autre, de chercher l’égalité et la justice. Ces qualités sont ce qui fait de nous le premier État postnational. Justin Trudeau
Vous allez dans certaines petites villes de Pennsylvanie où, comme ans beaucoup de petites villes du Middle West, les emplois ont disparu depuis maintenant 25 ans et n’ont été remplacés par rien d’autre (…) Et il n’est pas surprenant qu’ils deviennent pleins d’amertume, qu’ils s’accrochent aux armes à feu ou à la religion, ou à leur antipathie pour ceux qui ne sont pas comme eux, ou encore à un sentiment d’hostilité envers les immigrants. Barack Hussein Obama (2008)
Pour généraliser, en gros, vous pouvez placer la moitié des partisans de Trump dans ce que j’appelle le panier des pitoyables. Les racistes, sexistes, homophobes, xénophobes, islamophobes. A vous de choisir. Hillary Clinton (2016)
On vous demande une carte blanche, et vous salissez l’adversaire, et vous proférez des mensonges. Votre projet, c’est de salir, c’est de mener une campagne de falsifications, de vivre de la peur et des mensonges. La France que je veux vaut beaucoup mieux que ça. Il faut sortir d’un système qui vous a coproduit. Vous en vivez. Vous êtes son parasite. L’inefficacité des politiques de droite et de gauche, c’est l’extrême droite qui s’en nourrit. Je veux mener la politique qui n’a jamais été menée ces trente dernières années. Emmanuel Macron (2017)
Les démocrates radicaux veulent remonter le temps, rendre de nouveau le pouvoir aux mondialistes corrompus et avides de pouvoir. Vous savez qui sont les mondialistes? Le mondialiste est un homme qui veut qu’il soit bon de vivre dans le monde entier sans, pour dire le vrai, se soucier de notre pays. Cela ne nous convient pas. (…) Vous savez, il y a un terme devenu démodé dans un certain sens, ce terme est « nationaliste ». Mais vous savez qui je suis? Je suis un nationaliste. OK? Je suis nationaliste. Saisissez-vous de ce terme! Donald Trump
La NFL et CBS voulaient vraiment Rihanna pour l’année prochaine à  Atlanta. Ils lui ont fait l’offre, mais elle a dit non à cause de la polémique sur le genou au sol. Elle n’est pas d’accord avec la position de la NFL. Proche de la chanteuse Rihanna
Je sais que ça ressemble à un sacrifice de privilégiée, mais c’est tout ce que je peux faire. Frapper la NFL au niveau des annonceurs, c’est le seul moyen de leur faire vraiment mal. Je sais que s’opposer à la NFL, c’est comme s’opposer à la NRA (une association américaine qui fait la promotion des armes à feu, ndlr). C’est très dur, mais vous ne voulez pas être fier de votre vie? Amy Schumer
Car les yeux du monde sont dorénavant tournés vers l’espace, vers la Lune et les planètes au-delà, et nous avons fait le serment de ne pas voir cet espace sous le joug d’un étendard hostile et spoliateur, mais sous la bannière de la liberté et de la paix. Nous avons fait le serment de ne pas voir l’espace envahi par des armes de destruction massive, mais par des instruments de connaissance et de découverte. Cependant, les promesses de cette nation ne pourront être tenues qu’à l’impérieuse condition que nous soyons les premiers. Et telle est bien notre intention. En résumé, notre suprématie dans le domaine scientifique et industriel, nos espoirs de paix et de sécurité, nos obligations envers nous-mêmes et envers les autres, tout cela exige de nous cet effort ; afin de percer ces mystères pour le bien de l’humanité toute entière et devenir la première nation au monde à s’engager dans l’espace. Nous levons les voiles pour explorer ce nouvel océan, car il y a de nouvelles connaissances à acquérir, de nouveaux droits à conquérir, qui doivent être conquis et utilisés pour le développement de tous les peuples. Car la science spatiale, comme la science nucléaire et toutes les technologies, n’a pas de conscience intrinsèque. Qu’elle devienne une force bénéfique ou maléfique dépend de l’homme et c’est seulement si les États-Unis occupent une position prééminente que nous pourrons décider si ce nouvel océan sera un havre de paix ou un nouveau champ de bataille terrifiant. John Kennedy (12.09.1962)
In the end it was decided by Congress that this was a United States project. We were not going to make any territorial claim, but we were to let people know that we were here and put up a US flag. My job was to get the flag there. I was less concerned about whether that was the right artefact to place. I let other, wiser minds than mine make those kinds of decisions. Neil Armstrong
C’est de la folie totale. Et un mauvais service rendu à un moment où notre peuple a besoin de rappels de ce que nous pouvons accomplir lorsque nous travaillons ensemble. Le peuple américain a payé pour cette mission, sur des fusées construites par des Américains, avec de la technologie américaine et pour transporter des astronautes américains. Ce n’était pas une mission de l’ONU. Marco Rubio
I think it’s very unfortunate. (…) it’s almost like they’re embarrassed at the achievement coming from America. I think it’s a terrible thing. (…) because when you think of Neil Armstrong and when you think about the landing on the moon, you think about the American flag. And I understand they don’t do it. So for that reason I wouldn’t even want to watch the movie. (…) I don’t want to get into the world of boycotts. Same thing with Nike. I wouldn’t say you don’t buy Nike because of the Colin Kaepernick. I mean, look, as much as I disagree, as an example, with the Colin Kaepernick endorsement, in another way, I wouldn’t have done it. In another way, it is what this country is all about, that you have certain freedoms to do things that other people may think you shouldn’t do. So you know, I personally am on a different side of it, you guys are probably too, I’m on a different side of it. Donald Trump
Pour répondre à la question de savoir s’il s’agissait d’une revendication politique, la réponse est non. Mon but avec ce film était de partager avec le public les aspects invisibles et inconnus de la mission états-unienne sur la lune – en particulier la saga personnelle de Neil Armstrong et ce qu’il a pu penser et ressentir pendant ces quelques heures de gloire. Damien Chazelle
Cette histoire est humaine et elle est universelle. Bien sûr, il célèbre une réalisation américaine. Il célèbre également une réalisation ‘pour toute l’humanité. Les cinéastes ont choisi de se concentrer sur Neil qui regarde la Terre, sa marche vers le Petit Cratère Occidental, son expérience personnelle et unique de clôturer ce voyage, un voyage qui a eu tant de hauts et de bas dévastateurs. Mark et Rick Armstrong
Je pense que cela a été largement considéré à la fin comme une réalisation humaine [et] c’est ainsi que nous avons choisi de voir les choses. Je pense aussi que Neil était extrêmement humble, comme beaucoup de ces astronautes, et qu’à maintes reprises, il a différé l’attention de lui-même aux 400 000 personnes qui ont rendu la mission possible. Ryan Gosling
I think this was widely regarded in the end as a human achievement [and] that’s how we chose to view it. I also think Neil was extremely humble, as were many of these astronauts, and time and time again he deferred the focus from himself to the 400,000 people who made the mission possible. He was reminding everyone that he was just the tip of the iceberg – and that’s not just to be humble, that’s also true. So I don’t think that Neil viewed himself as an American hero. From my interviews with his family and people that knew him, it was quite the opposite. And we wanted the film to reflect Neil. I’m Canadian, so might have cognitive bias. Ryan Gosling
As a half-Canadian, half-French, I agree with everything Ryan said. Damien Chazelle
We’ve read a number of comments about the film today and specifically about the absence of the flag planting scene, made largely by people who haven’t seen the movie. As we’ve seen it multiple times, we thought maybe we should weigh in. This is a film that focuses on what you don’t know about Neil Armstrong. It’s a film that focuses on things you didn’t see or may not remember about Neil’s journey to the moon. The filmmakers spent years doing extensive research to get at the man behind the myth, to get at the story behind the story. It’s a movie that gives you unique insight into the Armstrong family and fallen American Heroes like Elliot See and Ed White. It’s a very personal movie about our dad’s journey, seen through his eyes. This story is human and it is universal. Of course, it celebrates an America achievement. It also celebrates an achievement “for all mankind,” as it says on the plaque Neil and Buzz left on the moon. It is a story about an ordinary man who makes profound sacrifices and suffers through intense loss in order to achieve the impossible. Although Neil didn’t see himself that way, he was an American hero. He was also an engineer and a pilot, a father and a friend, a man who suffered privately through great tragedies with incredible grace. This is why, though there are numerous shots of the American flag on the moon, the filmmakers chose to focus on Neil looking back at the earth, his walk to Little West Crater, his unique, personal experience of completing this journey, a journey that has seen so many incredible highs and devastating lows. In short, we do not feel this movie is anti-American in the slightest. Quite the opposite. But don’t take our word for it. We’d encourage everyone to go see this remarkable film and see for themselves. Rick and Mark Armstrong and James R. Hansen
In ‘First Man’ I show the American flag standing on the lunar surface, but the flag being physically planted into the surface is one of several moments of the Apollo 11 lunar EVA that I chose not to focus upon. To address the question of whether this was a political statement, the answer is no. My goal with this movie was to share with audiences the unseen, unknown aspects of America’s mission to the moon — particularly Neil Armstrong’s personal saga and what he may have been thinking and feeling during those famous few hours. I wanted the primary focus in that scene to be on Neil’s solitary moments on the moon — his point of view as he first exited the LEM, his time spent at Little West Crater, the memories that may have crossed his mind during his lunar EVA. This was a feat beyond imagination; it was truly a giant leap for mankind. This film is about one of the most extraordinary accomplishments not only in American history, but in human history. My hope is that by digging under the surface and humanizing the icon, we can better understand just how difficult, audacious and heroic this moment really was. Damien Chazelle
[The moon landing] cost money, it tore families apart. There was this tremendous sacrifice and loss that came with the success story that we all know,” Chazelle said. “That, in some ways more than anything, was what motivated us — trying to put a human face to that toll and really pay tribute to the people who literally gave everything so that all of us can grow up knowing that people walked on the moon. Damien Chazelle
By focusing on that loss and sacrifice and failure, it humanizes this person who we think of as an idol and helps us really understand that this wasn’t easy, this wasn’t superheroes that did it. Josh Singer
I don’t know if I’ll do that. That’s a hard one — never conquered the script on that. To tell the drama of it is going to be difficult. I’ve met with him, played golf with him. He’s a very nice guy but he likes his privacy and I can’t blame him for that. Clint Eastwood
Voulant absolument se décoller des références L’Etoffe des héros et Apollo (la grandeur de la nation américaine dans toute sa splendeur), Chazelle bidouille les séquences dans l’espace en secouant sa caméra, en bricolant l’image et en filmant les poils de barbe de son personnage. C’est parfois un peu fatigant parce que systématique.  En revanche – et c’est là où l’eastwoodien qui est en lui se réveille – la partie intimiste est passionnante. Armstrong est prêt à tout sacrifier pour être le premier. Pas forcément pour recevoir les applaudissements mais pour nourrir sa propre névrose. Comme si le héros américain, bouffé par une machine mythologique basée sur le « do it yourself » devait forcément en passer par là. Armstrong a le visage fermé et Ryan Gosling, qui n’est pas l’acteur le plus expressif au monde, est parfait. Claire Foy, son épouse, également ; femme de tête, actrice de coeur. La face cachée de la Lune est finalement ce qu’il y a de plus intéressant à voir. L’Express
Avec La La Land, Damien Chazelle, le jeune prodige de Hollywood, remettait de la fragilité dans la glorieuse comédie musicale à l’américaine : danser et chanter n’y était pas si facile pour les deux acteurs principaux, et la mise en scène exploitait subtilement leurs faiblesses. Dans cette biographie de Neil Armstrong, la discipline incertaine, laborieuse, faillible, c’est la conquête spatiale elle-même. Le cinéaste insiste sans cesse sur la précarité des engins et vaisseaux pilotés par l’astronaute, du début des années 1960 à ses premiers pas sur la Lune, le 21 juillet 1969. Leitmotiv des scènes d’action : les antiques cadrans à aiguilles s’affolent, les carlingues tremblotent, fument, prennent feu… La réussite, lorsqu’elle survient, paraît arbitraire, et ne parvient jamais à dissiper l’effroi et le doute devant l’entreprise du héros. Voilà comment, dès la saisissante première scène, le réalisateur s’approprie le genre si codifié du biopic hollywoodien. Le visage de Ryan Gosling est l’autre facteur majeur de stylisation. Avec son jeu minimaliste, son refus de l’expressivité ordinaire, l’acteur de Drive bloque la sympathie et l’identification. Damien Chazelle filme sa star en très gros plans, avec une fascination encore accentuée depuis La La Land : Ryan Gosling est lunaire bien avant d’alunir et il le demeure ensuite. Le scénario donne et redonne, trop souvent, l’explication la plus évidente à cette absence mélancolique — la perte d’une fille, emportée en bas âge par le cancer. Cette tragédie intime, véridique, devient même la composante la plus convenue, avec flash-back mélodramatiques sur le bonheur familial perdu, un peu comme pour le personnage de spationaute de Sandra Bullock dans Gravity, d’Alfonso Cuarón. Or l’attendrissement sied peu à Damien Chazelle, cinéaste cruel, dur — voir le sadisme de Whiplash, et le gâchis amoureux de La La Land, pour cause d’égocentrisme des deux amants. Le film brille, en revanche, dès qu’il s’agit de la distance qui éloigne toujours plus le héros des siens — sa femme et ses deux fils —, au fil des expériences spatiales. Sommé par son épouse d’annoncer son départ vers la Lune à ses enfants, Neil Armstrong leur parle soudain comme s’il était en conférence de presse, sans plus d’émotion ni de tendresse — scène glaçante. Plus tard, l’homme (en quarantaine après une mission) est séparé de sa femme par une épaisse cloison de verre. La paroi devient alors, tout comme le casque-miroir du scaphandre, le symbole d’une vie à part, « hors de ce monde » — les mots de l’épouse. A la même époque, des mouvements sociaux dénoncent, aux Etats-Unis, les dépenses publiques faramineuses consacrées à la conquête spatiale, tandis que des millions de citoyens vivent mal. Damien Chazelle s’attarde sur cette critique-là, comme pour contredire la formule d’Armstrong une fois sur la Lune : « … un grand pas pour l’humanité »… Scepticisme et froideur contribuent ainsi à élever First Man au-delà de l’hagiographie attendue, au profit d’une réelle étrangeté, et d’une grande tenue. Télérama
Damien Chazelle nous propose d’entrer dans l’intimité de ce héros de l’espace. Cernant au plus près ce personnage complexe, qui n’arriva jamais à faire le deuil d’une enfant de deux ans emportée par une tumeur au cerveau, il nous fait ainsi entrer dans la psyché de ces pionniers de l’aventure spatiale. Très vite, et une scène en particulier est terrifiante, Neil Armstrong est littéralement absorbé par son envie d’infini, de découverte, au point de dire au revoir à ses enfants, en 1969, sous forme d’interview ! (…) Entre drame intime et conquête spatiale, le dernier opus de Damien Chazelle est aussi un véritable documentaire sur ces moments exceptionnels.  (…) Si le scénario fait l’impasse sur le fanion américain hardiment planté sur le sol lunaire, il ne fait pas l’économie des problèmes liés aux dépenses titanesques de la recherche spatiale aux USA. Sommes absolument exorbitantes dont le but inavoué était de rattraper le retard sur l’URSS dans ce domaine… Actu.fr
What do words cost? In contemporary Hollywood, quite a bit, apparently. If you believe those who say First Man was hurt by Ryan Gosling’s ‘globalist’ defense of director Damien Chazelle’s decision not to depict astronaut Neil Armstrong’s planting of an American flag on the moon—and the Internet is crawling with those who make that claim—then Gosling’s explanation cost up to $45,000 a word this weekend. First Man, from Universal and DreamWorks among others, opened to about $16.5 million in ticket sales at the domestic box office. That’s $4.5 million short of expectations that were pegged at around $21 million. At the Venice Film Festival in late August, Gosling, who is Canadian, spoke about 100 words in defending the flag-planting omission. “I don’t think that Neil viewed himself as an American hero,” he said:  “From my interviews with his family and people that knew him, it was quite the opposite. And we wanted the film to reflect Neil. If the ensuing controversy really suppressed ticket sales—and who can know whether sharper-than-expected competition from Venom and A Star Is Born was perhaps a bigger factor?—the $45,000-per-word price tag is just a down payment. Under-performance by First Man of, say, $50 million over the long haul would raise the per-word price to a breathtaking $500,000. Such is the terror of entertainment in the age of digital rage and partisanship. The simplest moment of candor at a routine promotional appearance can suddenly become a show-killer. The real math, of course, is mysterious. To what extent a slip of the tongue or an interesting thought helped or hindered a film or television show will never be clear. But, increasingly, the stray word seems to be taking a toll on vastly expensive properties that have been years, or even decades, in the making. Michael Cieply
Movies about space exploration have tended to be pretty strong box-office performers lately, whether they’re films based on events that did happen, films based on events that didn’t happen or films based on events that will one day happen if only we could get Matt Damon enough potatoes. So it’s been a surprise to see “First Man,” the Neil Armstrong drama starring Ryan Gosling and Claire Foy and directed by “La La Land” filmmaker Damien Chazelle, do as poorly as it has. The film took in just $16 million last week in its first weekend of release, despite showing on nearly 4,000 screens. (…) It didn’t do much better on its second weekend — barely $8 million in receipts and bested by four other releases. Absent a major awards run, the film seems poised to become a disappointment for its studio, Universal, not to mention its star and its previously red-hot director. (…) “First Man,” about one of the great unifying American achievements of the 20th century and the internal conflict of the man who risked hi s life to achieve it, was humming along, seemingly set for a nice theatrical run after its premieres at the upscale Venice and Toronto film festivals in the late summer. That’s when several outlets, including Business Insider, pointed out the absence of an iconic moment in the moon-landing saga, with Armstrong not shown planting the American flag on the lunar surface. Gosling himself, a Canadian, poured some unintentional gasoline on the flame when he told reporters that “I don’t think he saw himself as an American hero,” referring to Armstrong. (…) This in turn set off political leaders, particularly Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.). (…) The Rubio criticism was echoed by a number of public figures, including fellow Armstrong moonwalker Buzz Aldrin, who tweeted photos many saw as a pointed response to the omission. (…) By the time it was over, the film had become as divisive as the lunar-landing itself was unifying. Some Hollywood pundits certainly thought so. In a post on the trade site Deadline, Michael Cieply asked, “What Do Words Cost? For ‘First Man,’ Perhaps, Quite A Lot,” and broke down the box-office underperformance by the word count in Gosling’s interview. Meanwhile, the Hollywood Reporter columnist Scott Feinberg advanced the theory even more directly. “FIRST MAN got Swiftboated,” he posted on Twitter, referring to the politically motivated set of attacks during the 2004 presidential election about John Kerry’s Vietnam War record. “I genuinely believe its box-office performance was undercut by the BS about the planting of the American flag.” He makes a potent case, given the decibel level of the controversy and the fact that “First Man” contains subject matter that might be expected to play strongly in red states. (…) One inference they both might have pointed out, and even agreed on: In times so divided, making a movie about unity could be the most politicizing act of all. Steven Zeitchik
The First Man true story reveals that unlike many astronauts, Neil Armstrong was not the hotshot type, nor was he a fame-seeker. He was a man of few words who was driven to accomplish something no other human being had done. Up to his death, he largely remained a bit of an enigma. (…) The movie is based on author James R. Hansen’s New York Times bestselling biography First Man: The Life of Neil A. Armstrong. First published in 2005, the book is the only official biography of Armstrong. (…) Film rights to the book were sold in 2003, prior to its publication, but a Neil Armstrong movie took years to get off the ground. Initially, Clint Eastwood had been attached to direct. (…) As we explored the First Man true story, we quickly discovered that there are no good photos of Neil Armstrong on the Moon. (…) The reason for the lack of photos of Armstrong on the lunar surface is because most of the time it was Armstrong who was carrying the camera. (…) Aldrin (…) felt horrible that there were so few photos of Armstrong but there was too much going on at the time to realize it. The most iconic shot of an astronaut on the Moon is of Buzz Aldrin standing and posing for the camera. If you look closely at that photo, you can actually see Armstrong taking the picture in the visor’s reflection. (…) We do know that he took with him remnants of fabric and the propeller from the Wright Brothers plane in which they took the first powered flight in 1903. (…) Armstrong’s Moon walk lasted 2 and 3/4 hours, even though it feels much shorter in the movie. Astronauts on the five subsequent NASA missions that landed men on the Moon were given progressively longer periods of time to explore the lunar surface, with Apollo 17 astronauts spending 22 hours on EVA (Extravehicular Activity). The reason Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin didn’t get to spend more time outside the Lunar Module is that there were uncertainties as to how well the spacesuits would hold up to the extremely high temperatures on the lunar surface. History vs. Hollywood
When Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin planted the American flag on the moon in 1969, it marked one of the proudest moments in US history. But a new film about Armstrong has chosen to leave out this most patriotic of scenes, arguing that the giant leap for mankind should not be seen as an example of American greatness. The film, First Man, was unveiled at the Venice Film Festival yesterday, where the absence of the stars and stripes was noted by critics. Its star, Ryan Gosling, was asked if the film was a deliberately un-American take on the moon landing. He replied that Armstrong’s accomplishment « transcended countries and borders ». (…)The planting of the flag was controversial in 1969. There was disagreement over whether a US or United Nations flag should be used. Armstrong said later: « In the end it was decided by Congress that this was a United States project. We were not going to make any territorial claim, but we were to let people know that we were here and put up a US flag. My job was to get the flag there. » The Telegraph
On Thursday evening, Ryan Gosling made international news when he justified the fact that the new Damien Chazelle biopic of Neil Armstrong will skip the whole planting the American flag on the moon thing. Gosling, a Canadian, explained, “I think this was widely regarded in the end as a human achievement [and] that’s how we chose to view it.” Now, the real reason that the film won’t include the planting of the American flag is that the distributors obviously fear that Chinese censors will be angry, and that foreign audiences will scorn the film. But it’s telling that the Left seems to attribute every universal sin to America, and every specific victory to humanity as a whole. Slavery: uniquely American. Racism: uniquely American. Sexism: uniquely American. Homophobia: uniquely American. Putting a man on the moon: an achievement of humanity. All of this is in keeping with a general perspective that sees America as a nefarious force in the world. This is Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States view: that America’s birth represented the creation of a terrible totalitarian regime, but that Maoist China is the “closest thing, in the long history of that ancient country, to a people’s government, independent of outside control”; that Castro’s Cuba had “no bloody record of suppression,” but that the U.S. responded to the “horrors perpetrated by the terrorists against innocent people in New York by killing other innocent people in Afghanistan.” In reality, however, America remains the single greatest force for human freedom and progress in the history of the world. And landing a man on the moon was part of that uniquely American legacy. President John F. Kennedy announced his mission to go to the moon in 1961; in 1962, he gave a famous speech at Rice University in which he announced the purpose of the moon landing (…) The moon landing was always nationalist. It was nationalism in service of humanity. But that’s been America’s role in the world for generations. Removing the American flag from an American mission demonstrates the anti-American animus of Hollywood, if we’re to take their values-laden protestations seriously. Ben Shapiro
When the prime minister says Canada is the world’s “first postnational state,” I believe he’s saying this is a place where respect for minorities trumps any one group’s way of doing things. (…) The New York Times writer who obtained this quote said Trudeau’s belief Canada has no core identity is his “most radical” political position. It seems especially so combined with criticism Trudeau is a lightweight on national security and sovereignty. Not too many Canadians, however, seem disturbed by Trudeau talking about us as a “postnational state.” Maybe they just write it off as political bafflegab. But of all the countries in the world, Canada, with its high proportion of immigrants and official policy of multiculturalism, may also be one of the few places where politicians and academics treat virtually all forms of nationalism with deep suspicion. Of course, no one defends nationalism in its rigid or extreme forms. Ultranationalism has been blamed for us-against-them belligerence throughout the 20th century, which led to terrible military aggressions out of Germany, Japan, the former Yugoslavia, China and many regions of Africa. But would it be wise to let nationalism die? What if our sense of a national identity actually was eradicated? What if borders were erased and the entire world became “transnational?” We sometimes seem to be heading that way, with the rise of the European Union, the United Nations and especially transnational deals such as the North American Free Trade Agreement and the looming Trans-Pacific Partnership. The aim of these transnational business agreements is to override the rules, customs and sovereignty of individual nations and allow the virtually unrestricted flow of global migrants and money. Such transnational agreements benefit some, especially the “cosmopolitan” elites and worldwide corporations. But the results for others are often not pretty. (…) Trudeau contradicts himself, or is at least being naive, when he argues Canada is a postnational state. On one hand Trudeau claims Canada has no “core identity.” On the other hand he says the Canadian identity is quite coherent – we all share the values of “openness, respect, compassion, willingness to work hard, to be there for each other, to search for equality and justice. » Can it be both ways? Most Canadians don’t think so. Regardless of what Trudeau told the New York Times, a recent Angus Reid Institute poll confirmed what many Canadians judge to be common sense: 75 per cent of residents believe there is a “unique Canadian culture.” I wish some of that common sense about nationalism was being brought to the housing affordability crisis in Vancouver and Toronto. (…) As a result many average Canadians who are desperate to make a home and livelihood in Metro Vancouver can’t come close to affording to live here. It’s the kind of thing that can happen when too many politicians believe we’re living in the world’s first “postnational state.” Douglas Todd
Dans le cas de Christophe Guilluy, traité par le géographe, Jacques Lévy, invité le 9 octobre des Matins de Guillaume Erner sur France Culture, d’ « idéologue géographe du Rassemblement national », ce sont vingt-et-un géographes, historiens, sociologues, politistes, membres de la rédaction de la revue Métropolitiques, qui se sont chargés de l’exécution pour la partie scientifique, quand Thibaut Sardier, journaliste à Libération se chargeait du reste consistant, pour l’essentiel, à trouver une cohérence à des potins glanés auprès de personnes ayant côtoyé Christophe Guilluy ou ayant un avis sur lui. La tribune des vingt-et-un s’intitule « Inégalités territoriales : parlons-en ! » On est tenté d’ajouter : « Oui, mais entre nous ! ». On se demande si les signataires ont lu le livre qu’ils attaquent, tant la critique sur le fond est générale et superficielle. Ils lui reprochent d’abord le succès de sa France périphérique qui a trouvé trop d’échos, à leur goût, dans la presse, mais aussi auprès des politiques, de gauche comme de droite. Pour le collectif de Métropolitiques, Christophe Guilluy est un démagogue et un prophète de malheur qui, lorsqu’il publie des cartes et des statistiques, use « d’oripeaux scientifiques » pour asséner des « arguments tronqués ou erronés », « fausses vérités » qui ont des « effets performatifs ». Christophe Guilluy aurait donc fait naître ce qu’il décrit, alimentant ainsi « des visions anxiogènes de la France ». Ce collectif se plaint de l’écho donné par la presse aux livres de Christophe Guilluy qui soutient des « théories nocives », alors que ses membres si vertueux, si modestes, si rigoureux et si honnêtes intellectuellement sont si peu entendus et que « le temps presse ». Le même collectif aurait, d’après Thibaut Sardier, déclaré que l’heure n’était plus aux attaques ad hominem ! On croit rêver. Thibaut Sardier, pour la rubrique « potins », présente Christophe Guilluy comme un « consultant et essayiste […], géographe de formation [qui] a la réputation de refuser les débats avec des universitaires ou les interviews dans certains journaux, comme Libé ». L’expression « géographe de formation » revient dans le texte pour indiquer au lecteur qu’il aurait tort de considérer Christophe Guilluy comme un professionnel de la géographie au même titre que ceux qui figurent dans le collectif, qualifiés de chercheurs, ou que Jacques Lévy. Je cite : « Le texte de Métropolitiques fait écho aux relations houleuses entre l’essayiste, géographe de formation, et les chercheurs. » Si l’on en croit Thibaut Sardier, Christophe Guilluy aurait le temps d’avoir des relations avec LES chercheurs en général. Le même Thibaut Sardier donne à Jacques Lévy, le vrai géographe, l’occasion de préciser sa pensée : « Je ne veux pas dire qu’il serait mandaté par le RN. Mais sa vision de la France et de la société correspond à celle de l’électorat du parti. » Le journaliste a tendance à lui donner raison. La preuve : « La place qu’il accorde à la question identitaire et aux travaux de Michèle Tribalat, cités à droite pour défendre l’idée d’un ‘grand remplacement’ plaide en ce sens. » Thibaut Sardier se fiche pas mal de ce que j’ai pu effectivement écrire – il n’a probablement jamais lu aucun de mes articles ou de mes livres – tout en incitant incidemment le lecteur à l’imiter, compte tenu du danger qu’il encourrait s’il le faisait. Ce qui compte, c’est que je sois lue et citée par les mauvaises personnes. Ne pas croire non plus à l’affiliation à gauche de Christophe Guilluy. Le vrai géographe en témoigne : « On ne peut être progressiste si on ne reconnaît pas le fait urbain et la disparition des sociétés rurales. » Voilà donc des propos contestant l’identité politique que Christophe Guilluy pourrait se donner pour lui en attribuer une autre, de leur choix, et qui justifie son excommunication, à une époque où il est devenu pourtant problématique d’appeler Monsieur une personne portant une moustache et ayant l’air d’être un homme ! Et l’on reproche à Christophe Guilluy de ne pas vouloir débattre avec ceux qui l’écrasent de leur mépris, dans un article titré, c’est un comble, « Peut-on débattre avec Christophe Guilluy ? » Mais débattre suppose que l’on considère celui auquel on va parler comme son égal et non comme une sorte d’indigent intellectuel que l’on est obligé de prendre en compte, de mauvais gré, simplement parce que ses idées ont du succès et qu’il faut bien combattre les théories nocives qu’il développe. Michèle Tribalat
Étant donné l’état de fragilisation sociale de la classe moyenne majoritaire française, tout est possible. Sur les plans géographique, culturel et social, il existe bien des points communs entre les situations françaises et américaines, à commencer par le déclassement de la classe moyenne. C’est « l’Amérique périphérique » qui a voté Trump, celle des territoires désindustrialisés et ruraux qui est aussi celle des ouvriers, employés, travailleurs indépendants ou paysans. Ceux qui étaient hier au cœur de la machine économique en sont aujourd’hui bannis. Le parallèle avec la situation américaine existe aussi sur le plan culturel, nous avons adopté un modèle économique mondialisé. Fort logiquement, nous devons affronter les conséquences de ce modèle économique mondialisé : l’ouvrier – hier à gauche –, le paysan – hier à droite –, l’employé – à gauche et à droite – ont aujourd’hui une perception commune des effets de la mondialisation et rompent avec ceux qui n’ont pas su les protéger. La France est en train de devenir une société américaine, il n’y a aucune raison pour que l’on échappe aux effets indésirables du modèle. (…) Dans l’ensemble des pays développés, le modèle mondialisé produit la même contestation. Elle émane des mêmes territoires (Amérique périphérique, France périphérique, Angleterre périphérique… ) et de catégories qui constituaient hier la classe moyenne, largement perdue de vue par le monde d’en haut. (…) la perception que des catégories dominantes – journalistes en tête – ont des classes populaires se réduit à leur champ de vision immédiat. Je m’explique : ce qui reste aujourd’hui de classes populaires dans les grandes métropoles sont les classes populaires immigrées qui vivent dans les banlieues c’est-à-dire les minorités : en France elles sont issues de l’immigration maghrébine et africaine, aux États-Unis plutôt blacks et latinos. Les classes supérieures, qui sont les seules à pouvoir vivre au cœur des grandes métropoles, là où se concentrent aussi les minorités, n’ont comme perception du pauvre que ces quartiers ethnicisés, les ghettos et banlieues… Tout le reste a disparu des représentations. Aujourd’hui, 59 % des ménages pauvres, 60 % des chômeurs et 66 % des classes populaires vivent dans la « France périphérique », celle des petites villes, des villes moyennes et des espaces ruraux. (…) Faire passer les classes moyennes et populaires pour « réactionnaires », « fascisées », « pétinisées » est très pratique. Cela permet d’éviter de se poser des questions cruciales. Lorsque l’on diagnostique quelqu’un comme fasciste, la priorité devient de le rééduquer, pas de s’interroger sur l’organisation économique du territoire où il vit. L’antifascisme est une arme de classe. Pasolini expliquait déjà dans ses Écrits corsaires que depuis que la gauche a adopté l’économie de marché, il ne lui reste qu’une chose à faire pour garder sa posture de gauche : lutter contre un fascisme qui n’existe pas. C’est exactement ce qui est en train de se passer. (…) Il y a un mépris de classe presque inconscient véhiculé par les médias, le cinéma, les politiques, c’est énorme. On l’a vu pour l’élection de Trump comme pour le Brexit, seule une opinion est présentée comme bonne ou souhaitable. On disait que gagner une élection sans relais politique ou médiatique était impossible, Trump nous a prouvé qu’au contraire, c’était faux. Ce qui compte, c’est la réalité des gens depuis leur point de vue à eux. Nous sommes à un moment très particulier de désaffiliation politique et culturel des classes populaires, c’est vrai dans la France périphérique, mais aussi dans les banlieues où les milieux populaires cherchent à préserver ce qui leur reste : un capital social et culturel protecteur qui permet l’entraide et le lien social. Cette volonté explique les logiques séparatistes au sein même des milieux modestes. Une dynamique, qui n’interdit pas la cohabitation, et qui répond à la volonté de ne pas devenir minoritaire. (…) La bourgeoisie d’aujourd’hui a bien compris qu’il était inutile de s’opposer frontalement au peuple. C’est là qu’intervient le « brouillage de classe », un phénomène, qui permet de ne pas avoir à assumer sa position. Entretenue du bobo à Steve Jobs, l’idéologie du cool encourage l’ouverture et la diversité, en apparence. Le discours de l’ouverture à l’autre permet de maintenir la bourgeoisie dans une posture de supériorité morale sans remettre en cause sa position de classe (ce qui permet au bobo qui contourne la carte scolaire, et qui a donc la même demande de mise à distance de l’autre que le prolétaire qui vote FN, de condamner le rejet de l’autre). Le discours de bienveillance avec les minorités offre ainsi une caution sociale à la nouvelle bourgeoisie qui n’est en réalité ni diverse ni ouverte : les milieux sociaux qui prônent le plus d’ouverture à l’autre font parallèlement preuve d’un grégarisme social et d’un entre-soi inégalé. (…) Nous, terre des lumières et patrie des droits de l’homme, avons choisi le modèle libéral mondialisé sans ses effets sociétaux : multiculturalisme et renforcement des communautarismes. Or, en la matière, nous n’avons pas fait mieux que les autres pays. (…) Le FN n’est pas le bon indicateur, les gens n’attendent pas les discours politiques ou les analyses d’en haut pour se déterminer. Les classes populaires font un diagnostic des effets de plusieurs décennies d’adaptation aux normes de l’économie mondiale et utilisent des candidats ou des référendums, ce fut le cas en 2005, pour l’exprimer. Christophe Guilluy
Les candidats ont compris que la France périphérique existait, c’est pourquoi leurs diagnostics sont assez proches. Mais ils ont la plus grande difficulté à remettre en cause leur modèle économique, aussi ne dépassent-ils pas le stade du constat. Un parti et un discours politiques s’adressent d’abord à un électorat. Or, l’électorat de la France périphérique se trouve ailleurs que dans les grands partis de gouvernement, ce qui complique un peu les choses. François Fillon a compris que son socle électoral libéral-conservateur ne suffisait pas et qu’il devait aussi parler à cette France populaire périphérique. Au PS, certains cadres m’ont contacté pendant la primaire car ils ont compris que quelque chose se jouait dans ces territoires. Mais ces élus lucides sont enfermés dans leur électorat, ce qui n’aide pas ces thématiques à émerger. En réalité, aucune thématique n’a émergé dans la campagne présidentielle. Une fois l’affaire Fillon retombée, le débat portera sur un autre sujet monothématique :  quel niveau le Front national atteindra. Cela permet de ne pas parler de l’essentiel. (…) Le Front national n’est que la fin d’une longue histoire de mise à l’écart de ce qu’on appelait hier la classe moyenne et aujourd’hui les classes populaires. Ces dernières soulèvent des problèmes aussi essentiels que le choix du modèle économique mondialisé, le multiculturalisme, les flux migratoires. Passer son temps à se demander si Marine Le Pen peut atteindre 30%, 35%, 45% voire être élue permet de faire l’impasse sur le fond. Si rien n’est fait, Marine Le Pen ou un autre candidat contestant le modèle dominant sous une autre étiquette gagnera en 2022, si ce n’est en 2017. On est à un moment de basculement. Il suffit de prolonger les courbes et les dynamiques en cours pour comprendre que si cela ne se fait pas maintenant, cela arrivera plus tard. De deux choses l’une : soit on décide de se rendre sur ces territoires délaissés et de prendre au sérieux le diagnostic des habitants, soit on reste dans une logique de citadelle qui consiste à serrer les fesses pour préserver l’essentiel et essayer de passer encore un tour. (…) Rien ne sert de s’alarmer sans comprendre les causes des phénomènes qu’on combat. Le FN n’est qu’un indicateur. De la même manière, après le Brexit et l’élection de Trump, le monde d’en haut a exprimé son angoisse. Mais les racines du Brexit sont à chercher dans le thatchérisme qui a désindustrialisé le Royaume-Uni. Et les racines de la victoire de Trump se trouvent dans les années 1980 et 1990, époque de dérégulation et de financiarisation de l’économie sous Reagan et Clinton. Sur le temps long, l’émergence du Front national correspond bien sûr à l’installation d’une immigration de masse mais aussi à la désindustrialisation de la France engagée à la fin des années 1970. (…) C’est systémique. Jusqu’à une certaine mesure, la diabolisation du FN marche. Car si on prend une à une les grandes thématiques qui structurent l’électorat, comme le rapport à la mondialisation, le capitalisme mondialisé, la financiarisation, l’immigration (70% des Français considèrent qu’il faut arrêter les flux migratoires !), on obtient des majorités écrasantes en faveur du discours du FN. Et pourtant le Front national ne rassemble qu’une minorité d’électeurs. Cela veut bien dire que la diabolisation fonctionne, quoique de plus en plus mal. Si le système en place parvient à faire élire un Macron, il préservera l’essentiel mais en sortira fragilisé : certains sondages donnent Marine Le Pen à 40% voire 45% au second tour, ce qui est considérable par rapport aux 18% de Jean-Marie Le Pen en 2002. La dynamique est de ce côté-là. De ce point de vue, la grande différence entre Marine Le Pen et Donald Trump c’est que celui-ci avait la puissance du Parti républicain derrière lui, ce dont ne dispose pas la présidente du FN. (…) N’oublions pas que la France d’en haut agglomère beaucoup de monde, toutes les catégories qui veulent sauver le statu quo ou l’accentuer, autant dire les privilégiés et les bénéficiaires du système économique en place. Ce qui est intéressant chez Macron, c’est qu’il se définit comme un candidat ni de gauche ni de droite. Il arrive d’en haut et en cas de duel avec Marine Le Pen au second tour, on verra un clivage chimiquement pur : le haut contre le bas, les métropoles mondialisées contre la France périphérique, etc. Même si ces sujets-là ne seront à mon avis pas abordés si on a droit à une quinzaine antifasciste entre les deux tours. On voit bien que le clivage droite-gauche est cassé. Mais l’amusant, c’est qu’au moment où ce clivage ne marche plus, on organise des primaires de gauche et de droite dont les vainqueurs (Hamon et Fillon) sont d’ailleurs aujourd’hui dans l’impasse ! (…) J’avais rencontré Emmanuel Macron et lui avais montré mes cartes. Dans son livre Révolution, il cite d’ailleurs La France périphérique plusieurs fois. C’est quelqu’un d’intelligent qui valide mon diagnostic sans bouger de son système idéologique. Selon la bonne vieille logique des systèmes, quand le communisme ne marche plus, il faut plus de communisme, quand le modèle mondialisé ne fait pas société, quand la métropolisation ne marche pas, il faut encore plus de mondialisation et de métropolisation ! Le bateau ne change pas de direction mais tangue sérieusement (…) Pour le moment, personne n’offre de véritable modèle alternatif. C’est toute la difficulté. Quand je me balade en France, j’entends des élus qui ont des projets de développement locaux mais tout cela est très dispersé et ne fait pas un projet à l’échelle du pays. D’autant que ces élus et ces territoires détiennent de moins en moins de pouvoir politique. A l’image de la Clause Molière contre le travail détaché, c’est par petites touches que le système sera grignoté. Mais n’oublions pas que les élus locaux ne pèsent absolument rien ! Les départements n’ont par exemple plus aucune compétence économique, ce qui fait que la France périphérique a perdu non seulement sa visibilité culturelle mais aussi son pouvoir politique. Changer les choses exige une certaine mobilité intellectuelle car il ne s’agira pas de gommer du jour au lendemain le modèle économique tel qu’il est. On ne va pas supprimer les métropoles et se priver des deux tiers du PIB français ! Dans l’état actuel des choses, l’économie française se passe de la France périphérique, crée suffisamment de richesses et fait un peu de redistribution. D’ailleurs, ce n’est pas un hasard si l’idée du revenu universel arrive aujourd’hui sur le devant de la scène avec Benoît Hamon. (…) La question centrale demeure : comment donner du travail à ces millions de Français ? Comment faire société avec cette France rurale et péri-urbaine ? Le revenu universel valide la mise à l’écart de la classe moyenne paupérisée dans les pays développés. A partir de là, reste à gérer politiquement la question pour éviter les révoltes et autres basculements politiques violents. Dans l’esprit des gagnants de la mondialisation, cela risque de se faire à l’ancienne, avec beaucoup de redistribution, des cotations, voire un revenu universel. Mais ils oublient un petit détail : ce gros bloc constitue potentiellement une majorité de Français !  En réalité, les tenants du système n’ont aucun projet pour le développement économique de ces territoires, si ce n’est de prétendre que la prospérité des métropoles arrivera par ruissellement jusqu’aux zones rurales et que le numérique nous fera nous en sortir. Ils ne perçoivent absolument pas la dynamique de désaffiliation politique et culturelle qui s’approfondit dans ces territoires. Ce n’est pas socialement  ni politiquement durable. Si la France d’en haut ne fixe pas comme priorité le sauvetage des classes populaires, le système est condamné. Les métropoles sont devenues les citadelles intellectuelles du monde d’en haut (…) Le FN, qui est le parti de la sortie de la classe moyenne, a capté les catégories délaissées les unes après les autres. D’abord les ouvriers, premiers touchés par la mondialisation, puis les employés, les paysans et maintenant la petite fonction publique. En face, le monde hyper-intégré se réduit comme peau de chagrin. Christophe Guilluy
Ce qui est intéressant, c’est que les deux candidats sont ceux qui se positionnent en dehors du clivage gauche-droite. Ceux qui ont été identifiés à droite et à gauche, issus des primaires, ne sont pas au second tour. La structure n’est plus le clivage gauche / droite. Le clivage qui émerge est lié complètement au temps long, c’est-à-dire à l’adaptation de l’économie française à l’économie monde. Dès 1992, avec Maastricht, ce clivage était apparu, avec la contestation d’un modèle mondialisé. Si on veut remonter plus loin, les causes sont à chercher dans le virage libéral, qui est le basculement des sociétés occidentales dans le néolibéralisme. C’est une logique ou les sociétés vont se désindustrialiser au profit de la Chine ou de l’Inde par exemple. Cela est aussi vrai avec Donald Trump ou le Brexit, qui nait de la financiarisation de l’économie américaine sous Clinton et du thatchérisme. Ce sont des dynamiques de temps long qui vont avoir un impact d’abord sur les catégories qui sont concernées par ce grand plan social de l’histoire : celui des classes moyennes. Tout cela se fait au rythme de la sortie de la classe moyenne. Logiquement, ce sont d’abord les ouvriers, qui subissent ce processus de désaffiliation politique et culturelle, qui sont les premiers à grossir le nombre des abstentionnistes et à rejoindre les mouvements populistes. Puis, ce sont les employés, les agriculteurs, qui suivent ce mouvement. La désaffiliation aux appartenances s’accentue. Les ouvriers qui votaient à gauche se retrouvent dans l’abstention ou dans le vote Front national, c’est également le cas aujourd’hui du monde rural qui votait à droite. Ce que l’on constate, c’est que l’effet majeur de la disparition des classes moyennes est de mettre hors-jeu les partis traditionnels. Parce que le Parti socialiste ou Les Républicains ont été conçus pour et par la classe moyenne. Or, ces partis continuent de s’adresser à une classe moyenne qui n’existe plus, qui est mythique. Il ne reste plus que les retraités, cela a d’ailleurs été le problème de François Fillon, qui a perdu par son incapacité à capter le vote de la France périphérique, ces gens qui sont au front de la mondialisation. Il ne capte que ceux qui sont protégés de la mondialisation ; les retraités. C’est le même constat à gauche, dont le socle électoral reste la fonction publique, qui est aussi plus ou moins protégée de la mondialisation. Nous parlons d’électorats qui se réduisent d’année en année, ce n’est donc pas un hasard que les partis qui s’adressent à eux ne parviennent plus à franchir le premier tour. C’est aussi ce qui passe en Europe, ou aux États Unis. Les territoires populistes sont toujours les mêmes, l’Amérique périphérique, l’Europe périphérique. Ce sont toujours ces territoires où l’on créé le moins d’emplois qui produisent ces résultats : les petites villes, les villes moyennes désindustrialisées et les zones rurales. La difficulté est intellectuelle pour ce monde d’en haut ; les politiques, les journalistes, les universitaires etc… Il faut penser deux choses à la fois. Objectivement, nous avons une économie qui créée de la richesse, mais ce modèle fonctionne sur un marché de l’emploi très polarisé, et qui intègre de moins en moins et créé toujours plus d’inégalités sociales et territoriales C’est ce qui a fait exploser ce clivage droite gauche qui était parfait, aussi longtemps que 2 Français sur 3 faisaient partie de la classe moyenne. Si on n’intègre pas les gens économiquement, ils se désaffilient politiquement. (…) C’est son modèle inversé. Emmanuel Macron comme Marine Le Pen ont fait le constat que cela ne se jouait plus autour du clivage gauche / droite. Ils ont pris en compte la polarisation de l’économie, entre un haut et un bas, et sans classes moyennes. Dans ce sens-là, l’un est la réponse de l’autre. (…) Géographiquement, c’est l’opposition entre la France des métropoles et la France périphérique qui structure le match Emmanuel Macron/ Marine Le Pen. On a déjà pu voir quelques cartes sur l’opposition est ouest, mais ce clivage est ancien, hérité, il ne dit rien des dynamiques en cours. Lorsque j’étais étudiant ces cartes est ouest existaient déjà, elles expriment l’héritage de l’industrie, et donc de la désindustrialisation. C’est là où il y a le plus de chômage, de pauvreté, d’ouvriers, et le plus de gens qui votent FN. Ce qui est intéressant, c’est de voir les dynamiques. C’est en zoomant à partir des territoires qui créent le plus d’emplois et ceux qui en créent le moins. Par exemple, en Bretagne, ou Marine Le Pen fait 6% à Rennes, et 20% dans les zones rurales. C’est toujours un distinguo entre les dynamiques économiques. Aujourd’hui les classes populaires ne vivent plus aux endroits où se créent les emplois et la richesse. Le marché de l’immobilier s’est chargé, non pas dans une logique de complot, évidemment, mais dans une simple logique de marché, de chasser les catégories dont le marché de l’emploi n’avait pas besoin. Ces gens se trouvent déportés vers les territoires où il ne se passe rien. Or, les élites n’ont de cesse de parier sur la métropolisation, il est donc nécessaire que s’opère une révolution intellectuelle. Il serait peut-être temps de penser aux gens qui ne bénéficient pas de ces dynamiques, si on ne veut pas finir avec un parti populiste en 2022. (…) Tout le bas ne peut pas être représenté que par le Front national. Il faut que les partis aillent sur ces thématiques. Il y a toujours eu un haut et un bas, et des inégalités, la question est qu’il faut que le haut soit exemplaire pour le bas, et qu’il puisse se connecter avec le bas. Il faut que le « haut » intègre les problématiques du « bas » de façon sincère. C’est exactement ce qui s’était passé avec le parti communiste, qui était composé d’une base ouvrière, mais aussi avec des intellectuels, des gens qui parlaient « au nom de ». Aujourd’hui c’est la grande différence, il n’y a pas de haut qui est exemplaire pour le bas. La conséquence se lit dans le processus de désaffiliation et de défiance des milieux populaires dans la France périphérique mais aussi en banlieues. Plus personne n’y croit et c’est cela l’immense problème de la classe politique, des journalistes etc. et plus généralement de la France d’en haut. Ces gens-là considèrent que le diagnostic des gens d’en bas n’est pas légitime. Ce qui est appelé « populisme ». Et cela est hyper fort dans les milieux académiques, et cela pèse énormément. On ne prend pas au sérieux ce que disent les gens. Et là, toute la machinerie se met en place. Parce que l’aveuglement face aux revendications des classes populaires se double d’une volonté de se protéger en ostracisant ces mêmes classes populaires. La posture de supériorité morale de la France d’en haut permet en réalité de disqualifier tout diagnostic social. La nouvelle bourgeoisie protège ainsi efficacement son modèle grâce à la posture antifasciste et antiraciste. L’antifascisme est devenu une arme de classe, car elle permet de dire que ce racontent les gens n’est de toute façon pas légitime puisque fasciste, puisque raciste. La bien-pensance est vraiment devenue une arme de classe. Notons à ce titre que dans les milieux populaires, dans la vie réelle les gens, quels que soient leurs origines ne se parlent pas de fascisme ou d’antifascistes, ça, ce n’est qu’un truc de la bourgeoisie. Dans la vie, les gens savent que tout est compliqué, et les gens sont en réalité d’une hyper subtilité et cherchent depuis des décennies à préserver leur capital social et culturel sans recourir à la violence. Le niveau de violence raciste en France reste très bas par rapport à la situation aux États Unis ou au Royaume Uni. Cette posture antifasciste, à la fin, c’est un assèchement complet de la pensée. Plus personne ne pense la question sociale, la question des flux migratoires, la question de l’insécurité culturelle, celle du modèle économique et territorial. Mais le haut ne pourra se régénérer et survivre que s’il parvient à parler et à se connecter avec le bas. Ce que j’espère, c’est que ce clivage Macron Le Pen, plutôt que de se régler par la violence, se règle par la politique. Cela implique que les partis intègrent toutes ces questions ; mondialisation, protectionnisme, identité, migrations etc… On ne peut pas traiter ces questions derrière le masque du fascisme ou de l’antifascisme. Christophe Guilluy
La Corse est un territoire assez emblématique de la France périphérique. Son organisation économique est caractéristique de cette France-là. Il n’y a pas de grande métropole mondialisée sur l’île, mais uniquement des villes moyennes ou petites et des zones rurales. Le dynamisme économique est donc très faible, mis à part dans le tourisme ou le BTP, qui sont des industries dépendantes de l’extérieur. Cela se traduit par une importante insécurité sociale : précarité, taux de pauvreté gigantesque, chômage des jeunes, surreprésentation des retraités modestes. L’insécurité culturelle est également très forte. Avant de tomber dans le préjugé qui voudrait que « les Corses soient racistes », il convient de dire qu’il s’agit d’une des régions (avec la PACA et après l’Ile-de-France) où le taux de population immigrée est le plus élevé. Il ne faut pas l’oublier. La sensibilité des Corses à la question identitaire est liée à leur histoire et leur culture, mais aussi à des fondamentaux démographiques. D’un côté, un hiver démographique, c’est-à-dire un taux de natalité des autochtones très bas, et, de l’autre, une poussée de l’immigration notamment maghrébine depuis trente ans conjuguée à une natalité plus forte des nouveaux arrivants. Cette instabilité démographique est le principal générateur de l’insécurité culturelle sur l’île. La question qui obsède les Corses aujourd’hui est la question qui hante toute la France périphérique et toutes les classes moyennes et populaires occidentales au XXIe siècle : « Vais-je devenir minoritaire dans mon île, mon village, mon quartier ? » C’est à la lumière de cette angoisse existentielle qu’il faut comprendre l’affaire du burkini sur la plage de Sisco, en juillet 2016, ou encore les tensions dans le quartier des Jardins de l’Empereur, à Ajaccio, en décembre 2015. C’est aussi à l’aune de cette interrogation qu’il faut évaluer le vote « populiste » lors de la présidentielle ou nationaliste aujourd’hui. En Corse, il y a encore une culture très forte et des solidarités profondes. À travers ce vote, les Corses disent : « Nous allons préserver ce que nous sommes. » Il faut ajouter à cela l’achat par les continentaux de résidences secondaires qui participe de l’insécurité économique en faisant augmenter les prix de l’immobilier. Cette question se pose dans de nombreuses zones touristiques en France : littoral atlantique ou méditerranéen, Bretagne, beaux villages du Sud-Est et même dans les DOM-TOM. En Martinique aussi, les jeunes locaux ont de plus en plus de difficultés à se loger à cause de l’arrivée des métropolitains. La question du « jeune prolo » qui ne peut plus vivre là où il est né est fondamentale. Tous les jeunes prolos qui sont nés hier dans les grandes métropoles ont dû se délocaliser. Ils sont les pots cassés du rouleau compresseur de la mondialisation. La violence du marché de l’immobilier est toujours traitée par le petit bout de la lorgnette comme une question comptable. C’est aussi une question existentielle ! En Corse, elle est exacerbée par le contexte insulaire. Cela explique que, lorsqu’ils proposent la corsisation des emplois, les nationalistes font carton plein chez les jeunes. C’est leur préférence nationale à eux. (…) La condition de ce vote, comme de tous les votes populistes, est la réunion de l’insécurité sociale et culturelle. Les électeurs de Fillon, qui se sont majoritairement reportés sur Macron au second tour, étaient sensibles à la question de l’insécurité culturelle, mais étaient épargnés par l’insécurité sociale. À l’inverse, les électeurs de Mélenchon étaient sensibles à la question sociale, mais pas touchés par l’insécurité culturelle. C’est pourquoi le débat sur la ligne que doit tenir le FN, sociale ou identitaire, est stérile. De même, à droite, sur la ligne dite Buisson. L’insécurité culturelle de la bourgeoisie de droite, bien que très forte sur la question de l’islam et de l’immigration, ne débouchera jamais sur un vote « populiste » car cette bourgeoisie estime que sa meilleure protection reste son capital social et patrimonial et ne prendra pas le risque de l’entamer dans une aventure incertaine. Le ressort du vote populiste est double et mêlé. Il est à la fois social et identitaire. De ce point de vue, la Corse est un laboratoire. L’offre politique des nationalistes est pertinente car elle n’est pas seulement identitaire. Elle prend en compte la condition des plus modestes et leur propose des solutions pour rester au pays et y vivre. Au-delà de l’effacement du clivage droite/gauche et d’un rejet du clanisme historique, leur force vient du fait qu’ils représentent une élite et qu’ils prennent en charge cette double insécurité. Cette offre politique n’a jamais existé sur le continent car le FN n’a pas intégré une fraction de l’élite. C’est même tout le contraire. Ce parti n’est jamais parvenu à faire le lien entre l’électorat populaire et le monde intellectuel, médiatique ou économique. Une société, c’est une élite et un peuple, un monde d’en bas et un monde d’en haut, qui prend en charge le bien commun. Ce n’est plus le cas aujourd’hui. Le vote nationaliste et/ou populiste arrive à un moment où la classe politique traditionnelle a déserté, aussi bien en Corse que sur le continent. L’erreur de la plupart des observateurs est de présenter Trump comme un outsider. Ce n’est pas vrai. S’il a pu gagner, c’est justement parce qu’il vient de l’élite. C’est un membre de la haute bourgeoisie new-yorkaise. Il fait partie du monde économique, médiatique et culturel depuis toujours, et il avait un pied dans le monde politique depuis des années. Il a gagné car il faisait le lien entre l’Amérique d’en haut et l’Amérique périphérique. Pour sortir de la crise, les sociétés occidentales auront besoin d’élites économiques et politiques qui voudront prendre en charge la double insécurité de ce qu’était hier la classe moyenne. C’est ce qui s’est passé en Angleterre après le Brexit, ce qui s’est passé aux Etats-Unis avec Trump, ce qui se passe en Corse avec les nationalistes. Il y a aujourd’hui, partout dans le monde occidental, un problème de représentation politique. Les électeurs se servent des indépendantismes, comme de Trump ou du Brexit, pour dire autre chose. En Corse, le vote nationaliste ne dit pas l’envie d’être indépendant par rapport à la France. C’est une lecture beaucoup trop simpliste. Si, demain, il y a un référendum, les nationalistes le perdront nettement. D’ailleurs, c’est simple, ils ne le demandent pas. (…) [Avec la Catalogne] Le point commun, c’est l’usure des vieux partis, un système représentatif qui ne l’est plus et l’implosion du clivage droite/gauche. Pour le reste, la Catalogne, c’est l’exact inverse de la Corse. Il ne s’agit pas de prendre en charge le bien commun d’une population fragilisée socialement, mais de renforcer des positions de classes et territoriales dans la mondialisation. La Catalogne n’est pas l’Espagne périphérique, mais tout au contraire une région métropole. Barcelone représente ainsi plus de la moitié de la région catalane. C’est une grande métropole qui absorbe l’essentiel de l’emploi, de l’économie et des richesses. Le vote indépendantiste est cette fois le résultat de la gentrification de toute la région. Les plus modestes sont peu à peu évincés d’un territoire qui s’organise autour d’une société totalement en prise avec les fondamentaux de la bourgeoisie mondialisée. Ce qui porte le nationalisme catalan, c’est l’idéologie libérale libertaire métropolitaine, avec son corollaire : le gauchisme culturel et l’« antifascisme » d’opérette. Dans la rhétorique nationaliste, Madrid est ainsi présentée comme une « capitale franquiste » tandis que Barcelone incarnerait l’« ouverture aux autres ». La jeunesse, moteur du nationalisme catalan, s’identifie à la gauche radicale. Le paradoxe, c’est que nous assistons en réalité à une sécession des riches, qui ont choisi de s’affranchir totalement des solidarités nationales, notamment envers les régions pauvres. C’est la « révolte des élites » de Christopher Lasch appliquée aux territoires. L’indépendance nationale est un prétexte à l’indépendance fiscale. L’indépendantisme, un faux nez pour renforcer une position économique dominante. Dans Le Crépuscule de la France d’en haut (*), j’ironisais sur les Rougon-Macquart déguisés en hipsters. Là, on pourrait parler de Rougon-Macquart déguisés en « natios ». Derrière les nationalistes, il y a les lib-lib. (…) L’exemple de la Catalogne préfigure peut-être, en effet, un futur pas si lointain où le processus de métropolisation conduira à l’avènement de cités-Etats. En face, les défenseurs de la nation apparaîtront comme les défenseurs du bien commun. Aujourd’hui, la seule critique des hyperriches est une posture trop facile qui permet de ne pas voir ce que nous sommes devenus, nous : les intellectuels, les politiques, les journalistes, les acteurs économiques, et on pourrait y ajouter les cadres supérieurs. Nous avons abandonné le bien commun au profit de nos intérêts particuliers. Hormis quelques individus isolés, je ne vois pas quelle fraction du monde d’en haut au sens large aspire aujourd’hui à défendre l’intérêt général. (…) [Pour Macron] Le point le plus intéressant, c’est qu’il s’est dégagé du clivage droite/gauche. La comparaison avec Trump n’est ainsi pas absurde. Tous les deux ont l’avantage d’être désinhibés. Mais il faut aussi tenir à l’esprit que, dans un monde globalisé dominé par la finance et les multinationales, le pouvoir du politique reste très limité. Je crois davantage aux petites révolutions culturelles qu’au grand soir. Trump va nous montrer que le grand retournement ne peut pas se produire du jour au lendemain mais peut se faire par petites touches, par transgressions successives. Trump a amené l’idée de contestation du libre-échange et mis sur la table la question du protectionnisme. Cela n’aura pas d’effets à court terme. Ce n’est pas grave car cela annonce peut-être une mutation à long terme, un changement de paradigme. La question est maintenant de savoir qui viendra après Trump. La disparition de la classe moyenne occidentale, c’est-à-dire de la société elle-même, est l’enjeu fondamental du XXIe siècle, le défi auquel devront répondre ses successeurs. (…) On peut cependant rappeler le mépris de classe qui a entouré le personnage de Johnny, notamment via « Les Guignols de l’info ». Il ne faut pas oublier que ce chanteur, icône absolue de la culture populaire, a été dénigré pendant des décennies par l’intelligentsia, qui voyait en lui une espèce d’abruti, chantant pour des « déplorables », pour reprendre la formule de Hillary Clinton. L’engouement pour Johnny rappelle l’enthousiasme des bobos et de Canal+ pour le ballon rond au moment de la Coupe du monde 1998. Le foot est soudainement devenu hype. Jusque-là, il était vu par eux comme un sport d’ « ouvriers buveurs de bière ». On retrouve le même phénomène aux États-Unis avec le dénigrement de la figure du white trash ou du redneck. Malgré quarante ans d’éreintement de Johnny, les classes populaires ont continué à l’aimer. Le virage à 180 degrés de l’intelligentsia ces derniers jours n’est pas anodin. Il démontre qu’il existe un soft power des classes populaires. L’hommage presque contraint du monde d’en haut à ce chanteur révèle en creux l’importance d’un socle populaire encore majoritaire. C’est aussi un signe supplémentaire de l’effritement de l’hégémonie culturelle de la France d’en haut. Les classes populaires n’écoutent plus les leçons de morale. Pas plus en politique qu’en chanson. Christophe Guilluy
Nous sommes dans un processus de sortie lente – mais dans un processus de sortie quand même – de la classe moyenne de la part des différentes catégories qui la composent, les unes après les autres. C’est ce que j’ai voulu identifier. La notion de classe moyenne est déjà morte mais on utilise encore cette catégorie comme si elle existait encore. Mais en réalité, en parlant des classes moyennes aujourd’hui, on parle des catégories supérieures. Finalement, quand on regarde les élections, toutes les vagues populistes reposent sur deux éléments. D’une part, une sociologie, c’est-à-dire le socle de l’ancienne classe moyenne que sont les catégories populaires, ouvriers, employés, petits paysans, petits indépendants, etc…et on retrouve ces mêmes catégories partout. Et d’autre part des territoires. C’est la géographie des périphéries avec à chaque fois les mêmes logiques quel que soit le pays occidental que l’on considère. (…) Les classes ouvrières britannique et américaine ont été fracassées beaucoup plus rapidement que la classe populaire française. Il y a les effets de l’État providence en France qui sont réels, et qui a fait que nous avons encore des catégories protégées dans notre pays. (…) Emmanuel Macron a fait des scores de dirigeant soviétique dans les grandes métropoles, avec des pourcentages incroyables à Paris, Bordeaux, Toulouse etc…Emmanuel Macron se sauve avec les deux gros bataillons que sont les retraités et les fonctionnaires – la majorité des fonctionnaires ont voté Macron – qui sont les deux catégories qui sont en train d’être tondues par ce président. Nous sommes donc effectivement à la limite d’un système qui se raccroche à des catégories encore protégées mais le vent tourne. (…) Aujourd’hui, 30% des 53-69 ans vivent sous le seuil de pauvreté, nous voyons les choses se transformer en douceur pour des catégories que l’on pensait préservées. Cela est le contexte français, mais en Grande Bretagne par exemple, les retraités ont été fracassés tout de suite et n’ont pas hésité à voter en faveur du Brexit. L’idée que les retraités vont continuer à protéger le système est à mon avis un leurre. C’est la même chose pour les fonctionnaires, les catégories B et C qui s’en prennent plein la figure ne vont pas éternellement protéger un système dont elles ne bénéficient pas. Cela est vraiment intéressant de constater que tout évolue partout mais toujours en fonction des contextes. (…) Les catégories modestes ont été relativement mieux protégées en France qu’elles ne l’ont été aux Etats-Unis ou en Grande Bretagne. On a bien un contexte français très particulier avec une fonction publique très importante etc…c’est là-dessus que nous faisons la différence. Mais une fois encore, cela n’est qu’une question de temps. Et le temps joue effectivement vers la disparition de cette classe moyenne. C’est donc bien la structuration sociale de l’ensemble des pays développés qui est en train de se modifier avec ces 20-30% de gens « en haut » qui vont s’en sortir et une immense classe populaire qui n’est plus dans l’espoir d’une amélioration de ses conditions de vie. (…) ces gens ont vraiment joué le jeu de la mondialisation et de l’Europe. Il n’y a jamais eu d’opposition de principe, ils ont joué le jeu et après 20 ou 30 ans ils font le diagnostic pour eux-mêmes et pour leurs enfants que finalement cela n’a pas marché. Il s’agit simplement d’un constat rationnel de leur part. Ce qui est frappant, c’est que tous les modèles sont affectés, du modèle américain au britannique, au modèle français républicain, jusqu’au modèle scandinave. (…) Mais (…) la disparition de la classe moyenne a commencé par les ouvriers, les paysans, les employés, les professions intermédiaires et demain, ce sera une fraction des catégories supérieures qui sera emportée. On voit déjà que les jeunes diplômés du supérieur n’arrivent plus à s’intégrer. Le processus est enclenché et il va détruire aussi des catégories qui pensent encore être protégées. (…) A partir du moment où la gauche a abandonné la question sociale, elle a abandonné les catégories populaires et c’est la dessus que le divorce s’est réalisé. Ce mouvement s’est accompagné d’une forme d’ostracisation des plus modestes qui était très forte dans certains milieux de gauche, et aujourd’hui la rupture est totale. On a en plus un processus de sécession, que Christopher Lash avait vu très tôt, qui est celle des bourgeoisies, qui s’ajoute au phénomène de citadellisation des élites, qui fait qu’il n’y a pas plus de connexion entre ces catégories. (…) Il faut arrêter le discours du magistère des prétentieux. Cette idée de rééducation du peuple, en lui montrant la voie, n’est pas possible. Une société c’est une majorité de catégories modestes et l’objectif d’une démocratie, c’est de servir prioritairement ces catégories. C’est dans ce sens là qu’il faut aller. Il faut prendre ces gens au sérieux, il faut prendre en compte les diagnostics des classes populaires sur leurs souhaits d’être protégés, ce qui ne veut pas dire être assistés. Ces catégories veulent du travail, elles veulent qu’on les respecte culturellement, et ne pas se faire traiter de « déplorables » ou de sans dents » – ce qui fait partie intégrante du problème identitaire que nous avons aujourd’hui qui est le produit de ces attaques là -. (…) Les gens veulent de la protection, du travail, de la régulation économique mais aussi une régulation des flux migratoires. Je parle ici de tout le monde d’en bas, parce que la demande de régulation des flux migratoires vient de toutes les catégories modestes quelles que soient les origines. Tout le monde veut la même chose alors que lorsque les gens parlent de la question migratoire, on les place sur la question raciale, non. C’est anthropologiquement vrai pour toutes les catégories modestes, et cela est vrai partout. Dans tous les pays, les catégories modestes veulent vivre tranquillement, ce qui ne veut pas dire vivre derrière des murs, mais vivre dans un environnement que l’on connaît avec des valeurs communes. (…) Ce qui est amusant aujourd’hui, c’est qu’il y a une ethnicisation des classes moyennes – on pense blanc – cela montre bien la fin du concept qui était censé être intégrateur pour le plus grand nombre. (…) Les autoritaires ne sont pas ceux que l’on croit. Sauver les démocraties occidentales, c’est faire entendre le plus grand nombre. (…) Soit le monde d’en haut refuse d’entendre la majorité et on basculera dans une forme d’autoritarisme soft, ce qui pourrait faire durer le système un peu plus longtemps, mais avec le risque que cela se termine très mal. Soit  on essaye de faire baisser la tension en disant : « maintenant on essaye d’intégrer économiquement et culturellement le plus grand nombre ». Cette réflexion existe, il n’y a pas encore de parti politique qui représente tout cela, qui fait cette connexion, mais cela est en gestation. Il n’y a pas 50 sorties possibles de cette impasse, il n’y en a qu’une. Inclure les catégories populaires parce qu’elles sont la société elle-même. C’est pour cela que le discours sur les marges a été destructeur. Les ouvriers, les ruraux etc…ce ne sont pas des marges, c’est un tout, et ce tout est la société. Maintenant tout est sur la table, les diagnostics sont faits. Alors il faut se retrousser les manches et aller dans le dur en essayant de réellement inventer quelque chose de plus efficace, et en oubliant ce truc absurde du premier de cordée. Mais là, il faut bien remarquer le problème que nous avons concernant le personnel en place. Ils pensent tous la même chose. Il faut une révolution culturelle du monde d’en haut, ce qui devrait être à la portée des nations occidentales…cela ne coûte pas cher. La question pour eux est donc de protéger ou disparaître. Christophe Guilluy
Les catégories populaires – qui comprennent aussi les petits agriculteurs, ainsi que les jeunes et les retraités issus de ces catégories – n’ont donc nullement disparu. Leur part dans la population française est restée à peu près stable depuis un demi-siècle. La nouveauté, c’est uniquement que «le peuple» est désormais moins visible, car il vit loin des grands centres urbains. Le marché foncier crée les conditions d’accueil des populations dont les métropoles ont besoin. En se désindustrialisant, les grandes villes nécessitent beaucoup moins d’employés et d’ouvriers. Face à la flambée des prix dans le parc privé, les catégories populaires cherchent des logements en dehors des grandes agglomérations. Le problème crucial politique et social de la France, c’est donc que la majeure partie des catégories populaires ne vit plus là où se crée la richesse. Nulle volonté de «chasser les pauvres», pas de complot, simplement la loi du marché. Le projet économique de la France, tourné vers la mondialisation, n’a plus besoin des catégories populaires, en quelque sorte. C’est une situation sans précédent depuis la révolution industrielle. (…)  Dans tous les pays développés, on vérifie le phénomène déjà constaté en France: la majorité des catégories populaires vit désormais à l’écart des territoires les plus dynamiques, ceux qui créent de l’emploi. Ces évolutions dessinent les contours d’une Amérique périphérique et d’une Angleterre périphérique tout autant que d’une France périphérique. De la Rust Belt américaine au Yorkshire britannique, des bassins industriels de l’est de l’Allemagne au Mezzogiorno italien, villes petites et moyennes, régions désindustrialisées et espaces ruraux décrochent. (…)  La dimension sociale et économique du vote populiste se complète par une dynamique culturelle. Les catégories les plus fragiles socialement (celles qui ne peuvent mettre en œuvre des stratégies d’évitements résidentiels et scolaires) sont aujourd’hui les plus sensibles à la question migratoire. Les mêmes demandent à être protégés d’un modèle économique et sociétal qui les fragilise. Dans des sociétés multiculturelles, l’assimilation ne fonctionne plus. L’autre ne devient plus soi, ce qui suscite de l’inquiétude. Le nombre de l’autre importe. Personne n’a envie de devenir minoritaire dans les catégories populaires. En France, l’immobilier social, dernier parc accessible aux catégories populaires des métropoles, s’est spécialisé dans l’accueil des populations immigrées. Les catégories populaires d’origine européenne et qui sont éligibles au parc social s’efforcent d’éviter les quartiers où les HLM sont nombreux. Elles préfèrent consentir des sacrifices pour déménager en grande banlieue, dans les petites villes ou les zones rurales afin d’accéder à la propriété et d’acquérir un pavillon. Dans chacun des grands pays industrialisés, les catégories populaires « autochtones » éprouvent une insécurité culturelle. (…) ce sont bien les territoires populaires les plus éloignés des grandes métropoles qui portent la dynamique populiste. La Rust Belt et les régions désindustrialisées de Grande-Bretagne pèsent respectivement plus dans le vote Trump ou dans le Brexit que New York ou le Grand Londres. Dans les zones périurbaines de Rotterdam, ce sont bien aussi les catégories modestes (qui ne se confondent pas avec les pauvres) qui voient leur statut de référent culturel remis en question par la dynamique migratoire et qui votent pour Geert Wilders. Ainsi, si la situation de l’ouvrier allemand n’est pas celle du paysan français, de l’employé néerlandais ou d’un petit travailleur indépendant italien, il existe un point commun : tous, quel que soit leur niveau de vie, font le constat d’être fragilisés par un modèle économique qui les a relégués socialement et culturellement. (…) On ne s’intègre pas à un modèle ou à un système de valeur mais à une population à qui on désire ressembler. On se marie, on tisse des liens d’amitié, de voisinage avec des gens qui sont proches. Or cette intégration ne se réalise pas dans n’importe quelle catégorie sociale, mais d’abord dans des milieux populaires. Et ce qui a changé depuis les années 1970 et surtout 1980, c’est précisément le changement de statut de ces catégories populaires. Les ouvriers, les employés, les « petites gens » sont désormais perçus en grande partie comme les perdants de la mondialisation. Quel nouveau venu dans un pays peut avoir envie de ressembler à des « autochtones » qui ne sont pas en phase d’ascension sociale et que, de surcroît, leurs propres élites méprisent en raison de l’attachement des intéressés à certaines valeurs traditionnelles ? Souvenons-nous de la phrase de Hillary Clinton présentant les électeurs de Donald Trump comme des « déplorables » pendant la campagne présidentielle de 2016 aux États-Unis. C’est pourquoi, alors que la France, les États-Unis, la Grande-Bretagne ou la Scandinavie se sont construits sur des modèles culturels très différents, tous ces pays connaissent la même dynamique populiste, la même crise sociale et identitaire et le même questionnement sur la pertinence de leurs modèles d’intégration. (…) la rupture entre le haut et le bas (…) nous conduit à un modèle qui ne fait plus société. La disparition de la classe moyenne n’en est qu’une conséquence. Le monde d’en haut refuse d’écouter celui d’en bas qui le lui rend bien notamment en grossissant les camps de l’abstention ou du vote populiste. Cette rupture du lien, y compris conflictuel, entre le haut et le bas, porte en germe l’abandon du bien commun et nous fait basculer dans l’asociété. Trump vient de l’élite américaine, c’est un des points communs qu’il partage avec Macron. Tous les deux se sont affranchis de leur propre camp pour se faire élire : Macron de la gauche, Trump du camp républicain. Ils ont enterré le vieux clivage gauche-droite. Les deux ont compris que nous étions entrés dans le temps de la disparition de la classe moyenne occidentale. L’un et l’autre ont saisi que, pour la première fois dans l’histoire, les classes populaires, celles qui constituaient hier le socle de la classe moyenne, vivent désormais sur les territoires qui créent le moins d’emplois : dans l’Amérique périphérique et dans la France périphérique. Mais la comparaison s’arrête là. Si Trump a été élu par l’Amérique périphérique, Macron a au contrai- re construit sa dynamique électorale à partir des métropoles mondialisées. Si le président français est conscient de la fragilisation sociale de la France périphérique, il pense que la solution passe par une accélération de l’adaptation de l’économie française aux normes de l’économie mondialisée. À l’opposé, le président américain fait le constat des limites d’un modèle qu’il convient de réguler (protectionnisme, remise en cause des traités de libre-échange, volonté de réguler l’immigration, politique de grands travaux) afin de créer de l’emploi sur ces territoires de la désindustrialisation américaine. Il existe un autre point de divergence fondamental, c’est le refus chez Trump d’un argumentaire moral qui sert depuis des décennies à disqualifier les classes populaires. Christophe Guilluy
Les pays de l’OCDE, et plus encore les démocraties occidentales, répondent pleinement au projet que la Dame de fer appelait de ses vœux. Partout, trente ans de mondialisation ont agi comme une concasseuse du pacte social issu de l’après-guerre. La fin de la classe moyenne occidentale est actée. Et pas seulement en France. Les poussées de populisme aux Etats-Unis, en Italie, et jusqu’en Suède, où le modèle scandinave de la social-démocratie n’est désormais plus qu’une sorte de zombie, en sont les manifestations les plus évidentes. Personne n’ose dire que la fête est finie. On se rassure comme on peut. Le monde académique, le monde politique et médiatique, chacun constate la montée des inégalités, s’inquiète de la hausse de la dette, de celle du chômage, mais se rassure avec quelques points de croissance, et soutient que l’enjeu se résume à la question de l’adaptabilité. Pas celle du monde d’en haut. Les gagnants de la mondialisation, eux, sont parfaitement adaptés à ce monde qu’ils ont contribué à forger. Non, c’est aux anciennes classes moyennes éclatées, reléguées, que s’adresse cette injonction d’adaptation à ce nouveau monde. Parce que, cahin-caha, cela marche, nos économies produisent des inégalités, mais aussi plus de richesses. Mais faire du PIB, ça ne suffit pas à faire société. (…) Election de Trump, Brexit, arrivée au pouvoir d’une coalition improbable liant les héritiers de la Ligue du Nord à ceux d’une partie de l’extrême gauche en Italie. De même qu’il y a une France périphérique, il y a une Amérique périphérique, un Royaume-Uni périphérique, etc. La périphérie, c’est, pour faire simple, ces territoires autour des villes-mondes, rien de moins que le reste du pays. L’agglomération parisienne, le Grand-Londres, les grandes villes côtières américaines, sont autant de territoires parfaitement en phase avec la mondialisation, des sortes de Singapour. Sauf que, contrairement à cette cité-Etat, ces territoires disposent d’un hinterland, d’une périphérie. L’explosion du prix de l’immobilier est la traduction la plus visible de cette communauté de destin de ces citadelles où se concentrent la richesse, les emplois à haute valeur ajoutée, où le capital culturel et financier s’accumule. Cette partition est la traduction spatiale de la notion de ruissellement des richesses du haut vers le bas, des premiers de cordée vers les autres. Dans ce modèle, la richesse créée dans les citadelles doit redescendre vers la périphérie. Trente ans de ce régime n’ont pas laissé nos sociétés intactes. Ce sont d’abord les ouvriers et les agriculteurs qui ont été abandonnés sur le chemin, puis les employés, et c’est maintenant au tour des jeunes diplômés d’être fragilisés. Les plans sociaux ne concernent plus seulement l’industrie mais les services, et même les banques… Dans les territoires de cette France périphérique, la dynamique dépressive joue à plein : à l’effondrement industriel succède celui des emplois présentiels lequel provoque une crise du commerce dans les petites villes et les villes moyennes. Les gens aux Etats-Unis ou ailleurs ne se sont pas réveillés un beau matin pour se tourner vers le populisme. Non, ils ont fait un diagnostic, une analyse rationnelle : est-ce que ça marche pour eux ou pas. Et, rationnellement, ils n’ont pas trouvé leur compte. Et pas que du point de vue économique. S’il y a une exception française, c’est la victoire d’Emmanuel Macron, quand partout ailleurs les populistes semblent devoir l’emporter. (…) Emmanuel Macron est le candidat du front bourgeois. A Paris, il n’est pas anodin que les soutiens de François Fillon et les partisans de La Manif pour tous du XVIe arrondissement aient voté à 87,3 % pour le candidat du libéralisme culturel, et que leurs homologues bobos du XXe arrondissement, contempteurs de la finance internationale, aient voté à 90 % pour un banquier d’affaires. Mais cela ne fait pas une majorité. Si Emmanuel Macron l’a emporté, c’est qu’il a reçu le soutien de la frange encore protégée de la société française que sont les retraités et les fonctionnaires. Deux populations qui ont lourdement souffert au Royaume-Uni par exemple, comme l’a traduit leur vote pro-Brexit. Et c’est bien là le drame qui se noue en France. Car, parmi les derniers recours dont dispose la technocratie au pouvoir pour aller toujours plus avant vers cette fameuse adaptation, c’est bien de faire les poches des retraités et des fonctionnaires. Emmanuel Macron applique donc méticuleusement ce programme. Il semble récemment pris de vertige par le risque encouru pour les prochaines élections, comme le montre sa courbe de popularité, laquelle se trouve sous celle de François Hollande à la même période de leur quinquennat. Un autre levier, déjà mis en branle par Margaret Thatcher puis par les gouvernements du New Labour de Tony Blair, est la fin de l’universalité de la redistribution et la concentration de la redistribution. Sous couvert de faire plus juste, et surtout de réduire les transferts sociaux, on réduit encore le nombre de professeurs, mais on divise les classes de ZEP en deux, on limite l’accès des classes populaires aux HLM pour concentrer ce patrimoine vers les franges les plus pauvres, et parfois non solvables. De quoi fragiliser le modèle de financement du logement social en France, déjà mis à mal par les dernières réformes, et ouvrir la porte à sa privatisation, comme ce fut le cas dans l’Angleterre thatchérienne. (…) Partout en Europe, dans un contexte de flux migratoire intensifié, ce ciblage des politiques publiques vers les plus pauvres – mais qui est le plus pauvre justement, si ce n’est celui qui vient d’arriver d’un territoire 10 fois moins riche ? – provoque inexorablement un rejet de ce qui reste encore du modèle social redistributif par ceux qui en ont le plus besoin et pour le plus grand intérêt de la classe dominante. C’est là que se noue la double insécurité économique et culturelle. Face au démantèlement de l’Etat-providence, à la volonté de privatiser, les classes populaires mettent en avant leur demande de préserver le bien commun comme les services publics. Face à la dérégulation, la dénationalisation, elles réclament un cadre national, plus sûr moyen de défendre le bien commun. Face à l’injonction de l’hypermobilité, à laquelle elles n’ont de toute façon pas accès, elles ont inventé un monde populaire sédentaire, ce qui se traduit également par une économie plus durable. Face à la constitution d’un monde où s’impose l’indistinction culturelle, elles aspirent à la préservation d’un capital culturel protecteur. Souverainisme, protectionnisme, préservation des services publics, sensibilité aux inégalités, régulation des flux migratoires, sont autant de thématiques qui, de Tel-Aviv à Alger, de Detroit à Milan, dessinent un commun des classes populaires dans le monde. Ce soft power des classes populaires fait parfois sortir de leurs gonds les parangons de la mondialisation heureuse. Hillary Clinton en sait quelque chose. Elle n’a non seulement pas compris la demande de protection des classes populaires de la Rust Belt, mais, en plus, elle les a traités de « déplorables ». Qui veut être traité de déplorable ou, de ce côté-ci de l’Atlantique, de Dupont Lajoie ? L’appartenance à la classe moyenne n’est pas seulement définie par un seuil de revenus ou un travail d’entomologiste des populations de l’Insee. C’est aussi et avant tout un sentiment de porter les valeurs majoritaires et d’être dans la roue des classes dominantes du point de vue culturel et économique. Placées au centre de l’échiquier, ces catégories étaient des références culturelles pour les classes dominantes, comme pour les nouveaux arrivants, les classes populaires immigrées. En trente ans, les classes moyennes sont passées du modèle à suivre, l’American ou l’European way of life, au statut de losers. Il y a mieux comme référents pour servir de modèle d’assimilation. Qui veut ressembler à un plouc, un déplorable… ? Personne. Pas même les nouveaux arrivants. L’ostracisation des classes populaires par la classe dominante occidentale, pensée pour discréditer toute contestation du modèle économique mondialisé – être contre, c’est ne pas être sérieux – a, en outre, largement participé à l’effondrement des modèles d’intégration et in fine à la paranoïa identitaire. L’asociété s’est ainsi imposée partout : crise de la représentation politique, citadéllisation de la bourgeoisie, communautarisation. Qui peut dès lors s’étonner que nos systèmes d’organisation politique, la démocratie, soient en danger ? Christophe Guilluy
Qui pourrait avoir envie d’intégrer une catégorie sociale condamnée par l’histoire économique et présentée par les médias comme une sous-classe  faible, raciste, aigrie et inculte ? (…) On peut débattre sans fin de la pertinence des modèles, de la crise identitaire, de la nécessité de réaffirmer les valeurs républicaines, de définir un commun: tous ces débats sont vains si les modèles ne sont plus incarnés. On ne s’assimile pas, on ne se marie pas, on ne tombe psas amoureux d’un système de valeurs, mais d’individus et d’un mode vie que l’on souhaite adopter. Christophe Guilluy
En 2016, Hillary Clinton traitait les électeurs de son opposant républicain, c’est-à-dire l’ancienne classe moyenne américaine déclassée, de « déplorables ». Au-delà du mépris de classe que sous-tend une expression qui rappelle celle de l’ancien président français François Hollande qui traitait de « sans-dents » les ouvriers ou employés précarisés, ces insultes (d’autant plus symboliques qu’elles étaient de la gauche) illustrent un long processus d’ostracisation d’une classe moyenne devenue inutile.  (…) Depuis des décennies, la représentation d’une classe moyenne triomphante laisse peu à peu la place à des représentations toujours plus négatives des catégories populaires et l’ensemble du monde d’en haut participe à cette entreprise. Le monde du cinéma, de la télévision, de la presse et de l’université se charge efficacement de ce travail de déconstruction pour produire en seulement quelques décennies la figure répulsive de catégories populaires inadaptées, racistes et souvent proches de la débilité. (…) Des rednecks dégénérés du film « Deliverance » au beauf raciste de Dupont Lajoie, la figure du « déplorable » s’est imposée dès les années 1970 dans le cinéma. La télévision n’est pas en reste. En France, les années 1980 seront marquées par l’émergence de Canal +, quintessence de ll’idéologie libérale-libertaire dominante. (…) De la série « Les Deschiens », à la marionnette débilitante de Johnny Hallyday des Guignols de l’info, c’est en réalité toute la production audiovisuelle qui donne libre cours à son mépris de classe. Christophe Guilluy
La diabolisation vise moins les partis populistes ou leur électorat (considéré comme définitivement « perdu » aux yeux de la classe dominante) que la fraction des classes supérieures et intellectuelles qui pourrait être tentée par cette solidarité de classe et ainsi créer les conditions du changement. (…) Si l’élection de Donald Trump aux Etats-Unis a provoqué autant de réactions violentes dans l’élite mondialisée, ce n’est pas parce qu’il parle comme un « white trash » mais parce que au contraire il est issu de l’hyper-classe. En évoquant le protectionnisme ou la régulation des flux migratoires, Donald Trump brise le consensus idéologique à l’intérieur même de la classe dominante. Il contribue ainsi à un basculement d’une fraction des classes supérieures qui assurent la survie du système. Le 45e président n’a pas gagné parce qu’il a fait le plein de voix dans la « white working class » mais parce qu’il a réalisé l’alliance improbable entre une fraction du monde d’en haut et celui de l’Amérique périphérique. La prise de conscience des réalités populaires par une fraction de l’élite est un vrai risque, elle peut se réaliser à tout moment, dans n’importe quel pays ou région. Christophe Guilluy
Quitte à scier, comme la polémique qui a suivi et semblent l’indiquer les premiers chiffres d’exploitation en berne, la branche sur laquelle l’industrie cinématographique américaine reste néanmoins assise …
Comment ne pas regretter …
Ce qu’aurait pu en faire, avant son jet de l’éponge et à l’inverse d’un réalisateur et d’un acteur principal issus du « premier Etat postnational » autoproclamé, un Clint Eastwood ?
Et comment surtout ne pas y voir …
Après l’ancien collègue d’Armstrong Buzz Aldrin, le sénateur Rubio ou le président Trump
L’énième illustration et confirmation ….
De cette entreprise systématique de déconstruction et de délégitimation des valeurs de la classe moyenne américaine et occidentale …
Qui comme le décrit si bien le désormais sulfureux lui aussi géographe français Christophe Guilluy notamment dans son dernier ouvrage …
Est en train non seulement de démoraliser tout le socle populaire d’une classe moyenne hier encore triomphante …
Mais de priver une immigration désormais hors de contrôle de toute chance d’assimilation ?
.
Fier d’être américain : Buzz Aldrin twitte une photo du drapeau américain sur la Lune en pleine controverse avec le film “First Man”

L’astronaute légendaire Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin a twitté dimanche soir des photos historiques de l’alunissage d’Apollo 11 au cœur de l’indignation suscitée par la décision du réalisateur de First Man Damien Chazelle d’exclure le drapeau américain d’être planté sur la Lune.

Joshuah Caplan

Breibart

traduction Nouvel Ordre mondial

3 septembre 2018

Buzz Aldrin a twitté deux photos de la mission de 1969, mettant en évidence le drapeau américain, avec divers hashtags, dont “#proudtobeanAmerican” et “onenation”.

Samedi, Aldrin a tweeté quatre photos de lui-même en portant un t-shirt qui se lit “Buzz Aldrin, Future Martian”, avec un astronaute plantant le drapeau américain sur une planète.

De plus, l’astronaute emblématique a retwitté la photo de l’utilisateur @pir8lksat40 qui le salue avec une photo de l’alunissage derrière lui.

Aldrin a également retwitté une photo de lui-même en saluant tout en se tenant à côté d’une photo agrandie de la mission Apollo 11 qui inclut le drapeau sur la lune.

La semaine dernière, Chazelle a rejeté les critiques selon lesquelles l’omission du drapeau américain était censée être une revendication politique. “Pour répondre à la question de savoir s’il s’agissait d’une revendication politique, la réponse est non”, a déclaré le réalisateur de First Man dans une interview avec Variety. “Mon but avec ce film était de partager avec le public les aspects invisibles et inconnus de la mission états-unienne sur la lune – en particulier la saga personnelle de Neil Armstrong et ce qu’il a pu penser et ressentir pendant ces quelques heures de gloire.”

Mark et Rick Armstrong, les fils de l’astronaute d’Apollo 11 Neil Armstrong, ont critiqué ceux qui ont étiqueté le sujet “d’antiaméricain”.

“Cette histoire est humaine et elle est universelle. Bien sûr, il célèbre une réalisation américaine. Il célèbre également une réalisation ‘pour toute l’humanité’”, peut-on lire dans la déclaration des Armstrong. “Les cinéastes ont choisi de se concentrer sur Neil qui regarde la Terre, sa marche vers le Petit Cratère Occidental, son expérience personnelle et unique de clôturer ce voyage, un voyage qui a eu tant de hauts et de bas dévastateurs.”

Dans une interview accordée au Telegraph, Ryan Gosling, star de First Man, a déclaré que la décision d’exclure le drapeau américain était motivée par l’idée que l’alunissage est considéré comme un “accomplissement humain plutôt qu’américain”.

“Je pense que cela a été largement considéré à la fin comme une réalisation humaine [et] c’est ainsi que nous avons choisi de voir les choses”, a déclaré l’acteur, qui joue Armstrong, au journal britannique. “Je pense aussi que Neil était extrêmement humble, comme beaucoup de ces astronautes, et qu’à maintes reprises, il a différé l’attention de lui-même aux 400 000 personnes qui ont rendu la mission possible”, a déclaré l’acteur au journal britannique.

Le sénateur Marco Rubio (F-FL) a pris Twitter pour faire exploser l’omission du drapeau américain comme une “folie totale” et un “mauvais service” rendu au peuple américain. “C’est de la folie totale. Et un mauvais service rendu à un moment où notre peuple a besoin de rappels de ce que nous pouvons accomplir lorsque nous travaillons ensemble”, a écrit Rubio. “Le peuple américain a payé pour cette mission, sur des fusées construites par des Américains, avec de la technologie américaine et pour transporter des astronautes américains. Ce n’était pas une mission de l’ONU.”

Voir aussi:

Hollywood Just Cut The Flag Out Of The Moon Landing. Here’s Why That Matters.

On Thursday evening, Ryan Gosling made international news when he justified the fact that the new Damien Chazelle biopic of Neil Armstrong will skip the whole planting the American flag on the moon thing. Gosling, a Canadian, explained, “I think this was widely regarded in the end as a human achievement [and] that’s how we chose to view it.”

Now, the real reason that the film won’t include the planting of the American flag is that the distributors obviously fear that Chinese censors will be angry, and that foreign audiences will scorn the film. But it’s telling that the Left seems to attribute every universal sin to America, and every specific victory to humanity as a whole. Slavery: uniquely American. Racism: uniquely American. Sexism: uniquely American. Homophobia: uniquely American. Putting a man on the moon: an achievement of humanity.

All of this is in keeping with a general perspective that sees America as a nefarious force in the world. This is Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States view: that America’s birth represented the creation of a terrible totalitarian regime, but that Maoist China is the “closest thing, in the long history of that ancient country, to a people’s government, independent of outside control”; that Castro’s Cuba had “no bloody record of suppression,” but that the U.S. responded to the “horrors perpetrated by the terrorists against innocent people in New York by killing other innocent people in Afghanistan.”

In reality, however, America remains the single greatest force for human freedom and progress in the history of the world. And landing a man on the moon was part of that uniquely American legacy. President John F. Kennedy announced his mission to go to the moon in 1961; in 1962, he gave a famous speech at Rice University in which he announced the purpose of the moon landing:

For the eyes of the world now look into space, to the moon and to the planets beyond, and we have vowed that we shall not see it governed by a hostile flag of conquest, but by a banner of freedom and peace. We have vowed that we shall not see space filled with weapons of mass destruction, but with instruments of knowledge and understanding. Yet the vows of this Nation can only be fulfilled if we in this Nation are first, and, therefore, we intend to be first. In short, our leadership in science and in industry, our hopes for peace and security, our obligations to ourselves as well as others, all require us to make this effort, to solve these mysteries, to solve them for the good of all men, and to become the world’s leading space-faring nation. We set sail on this new sea because there is new knowledge to be gained, and new rights to be won, and they must be won and used for the progress of all people. For space science, like nuclear science and all technology, has no conscience of its own. Whether it will become a force for good or ill depends on man, and only if the United States occupies a position of pre-eminence can we help decide whether this new ocean will be a sea of peace or a new terrifying theater of war.

The moon landing was always nationalist. It was nationalism in service of humanity. But that’s been America’s role in the world for generations. Removing the American flag from an American mission demonstrates the anti-American animus of Hollywood, if we’re to take their values-laden protestations seriously.

Voir également:

Why Neil Armstrong’s sons don’t think the biopic ‘First Man’ is anti-American

The Washington Post

September 3

Ryan Gosling is not an American, but he is part of a species that visited a celestial body beyond Earth.

That is one perspective the Canadian used in describing the Apollo 11 mission, and specifically Neil Armstrong, whom he plays in the upcoming film “First Man.”

It depicts the 1969 mission to land men on the moon and return them safely. But the film does not show Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin unfurling and planting an American flag on the lunar surface. And its creators, including Gosling, say they view the moment as a human achievement more than an American one, and have suggested Armstrong did not believe he was an “American hero.”

“From my interviews with his family and people that knew him, it was quite the opposite,” Gosling said, according to Britain’s Telegraph newspaper. “And we wanted the film to reflect Neil.”

Predictably, the Canadian actor’s comments, paired with the omission of the Stars and Stripes, have sparked outrage, particularly in American conservative circles. The criticism, in turn, has prompted Armstrong’s sons to defend the film’s depiction of events and its attention to quieter, lesser-known aspects of their father’s life.

“This story is human and it is universal. Of course, it celebrates an America achievement. It also celebrates an achievement ‘for all mankind,’ as it says on the plaque Neil and Buzz left on the moon,” according to a statement released Friday by Rick and Mark Armstrong.

The statement was also attributed to “First Man” biographer James R. Hansen, according to Hollywood Reporter.

“It is a story about an ordinary man who makes profound sacrifices and suffers through intense loss in order to achieve the impossible,” the men said. Their father died in 2012.

Some conservative figures have taken Gosling’s Telegraph interview as proof of Hollywood globalism run amok, and an outcropping of the ongoing controversy over NFL players kneeling during the national anthem to protest police killing of black citizens.

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) weighed in Saturday among conservatives propelling social media calls for boycotts of the film.

“Really sad: Hollywood erases American flag from moon landing. This is wrong, and consistent with Leftists’ disrespecting the flag & denying American exceptionalism,” Cruz, who is in an unexpectedly tight reelection race, wrote on Twitter. “JFK saw that it mattered that America go to the moon — why can’t Hollywood see that today?”

“Fox & Friends,” a Fox News program favored by President Trump, discussed the issue Friday.

Co-host Pete Hegseth simply called Gosling “an idiot.”

Ainsley Earhardt, his co-host, grimly assessed the social implications.

“This is where our country is going. They don’t think America is great,” she said. “They want to kneel for the flag.” Later in the day, #BoycottFirstMan was trending on social media.

Chuck Yeager, the legendary American pilot who was the first to break the sound barrier, called leaving out the flag-planting “more Hollywood make-believe.”

On Sunday Aldrin tweeted photos of the historic moment with the hashtag #proudtobeanAmerican.

Director Damien Chazelle, who also helmed “La La Land” and “Whiplash,” has echoed the sentiments of the Armstrong brothers on the selective storytelling.

“I wanted the primary focus in that scene to be on Neil’s solitary moments on the moon — his point of view as he first exited the [Lunar Module], his time spent at Little West Crater, the memories that may have crossed his mind during his lunar [exploration],” he said in a statement Friday, according to Hollywood Reporter.

The film, which debuted this past week at the Venice Film Festival, will arrive stateside Oct. 12, and have plenty of American flags waving throughout.

“First Man” does not show the flag planting, but there are several shots of the U.S. flag on the moon, Daily Beast writer Marlow Stern said after attending the screening.

Ironically, the controversy may endure longer than the flag itself: Aldrin told controllers he saw the flag knocked over with a blast of spacecraft exhaust, NASA has said.

The flag really wasn’t designed to endure the blastoff, let alone the lunar environment, or lack thereof. It was purchased from a Sears store for $5.50, NASA said. Department-store flags cannot even withstand terrestrial wear and tear, like sunlight and wind, for more than a few years.

On the moon, decades of extreme temperatures, ultraviolet radiation and micrometeorites have probably disintegrated the flag entirely, scientists say, and the bombardment of unfiltered sunlight has probably bleached flags left on subsequent missions stark white.

Even the original flag planting was controversial. Debate raged over whether to raise an American flag or a banner of the United Nations. Congress forbid NASA from placing flags of other countries or international bodies on the moon during U.S.-funded missions, the agency said.

“In the end, it was decided by Congress that this was a United States project. We were not going to make any territorial claim, but we were to let people know that we were here and put up a U.S. flag,” Armstrong said, according to Newsweek. “My job was to get the flag there. I was less concerned about whether that was the right artifact to place. I let other, wiser minds than mine make those kinds of decisions.”

Voir de même:

‘First Man’: Neil Armstrong film fails to fly flag for US patriotism
Anita Singh
The Telegraph
29 August 2018

When Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin planted the American flag on the moon in 1969, it marked one of the proudest moments in US history.

But a new film about Armstrong has chosen to leave out this most patriotic of scenes, arguing that the giant leap for mankind should not be seen as an example of American greatness.

The film, First Man, was unveiled at the Venice Film Festival yesterday, where the absence of the stars and stripes was noted by critics.

Its star, Ryan Gosling, was asked if the film was a deliberately un-American take on the moon landing. He replied that Armstrong’s accomplishment « transcended countries and borders ».

Gosling explained: « I think this was widely regarded in the end as a human achievement [and] that’s how we chose to view it. I also think Neil was extremely humble, as were many of these astronauts, and time and time again he deferred the focus from himself to the 400,000 people who made the mission possible. »

« He was reminding everyone that he was just the tip of the iceberg – and that’s not just to be humble, that’s also true.

« So I don’t think that Neil viewed himself as an American hero. From my interviews with his family and people that knew him, it was quite the opposite. And we wanted the film to reflect Neil. »

Gosling joked: « I’m Canadian, so might have cognitive bias. » The film’s director, Damien Chazelle, Who previously worked with Gosling on the Oscar-winning La La Land, is French-Canadian.

The planting of the flag was controversial in 1969. There was disagreement over whether a US or United Nations flag should be used. Armstrong said later: « In the end it was decided by Congress that this was a United States project. We were not going to make any territorial claim, but we were to let people know that we were here and put up a US flag.

« My job was to get the flag there. I was less concerned about whether that was the right artefact to place. I let other, wiser minds than mine make those kinds of decisions. »

First Man is based on an authorised biography of Armstrong by James Hansen. It has the backing of the astronaut’s family, including his two sons, and of NASA.

Armstrong died in 2012, aged 82. President Obama paid tribute to him as « among the greatest of American heroes – not just of his time, but of all time ».

First Man also features Claire Foy as Armstrong’s first wife, Janet, mother of his two boys. She said her focus was on the family dynamics behind the space mission: « I wanted to honour how these children saw their mum and dad. Their dad wasn’t an astronaut to them, he was their dad. »

Venice in recent years has been a launch pad for Oscar campaigns – including last year’s best picture winner, The Shape of Water – and First Man will be a contender.

Other films being unveiled include a new version of A Star Is Born, featuring Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper.

There is only one woman director in the official line-up, Jennifer Kent, prompting criticism from female filmmakers. However, the Festival director, Albert Barbera, has resisted pressure to introduce gender balance, saying: « If we impose quotas, I resign. »

:: The London Film Festival released its competition line-up yesterday with five of the 10 contenders directed by women. Tricia Tuttle, the festival’s artistic director, said it was « a real pleasure to see that half of these films come from female directors ».

Voir de plus:

Neil Armstrong’s Sons, Director Damien Chazelle Defend Absence of Flag-Planting Scene in ‘First Man’
Dave McNary
Variety
August 31, 2018

Neil Armstrong’s sons and director Damien Chazelle have defended the absence of a flag-planting scene in the movie “First Man,” which details the 1969 moon landing.

Rick Armstrong and Mark Armstrong released a statement jointly with “First Man” author James R. Hansen on Friday in the wake of claims that the lack of the flag planting in the movie is unpatriotic.

“We do not feel this movie is anti-American in the slightest,” the trio said. “Quite the opposite. But don’t take our word for it. We’d encourage everyone to go see this remarkable film and see for themselves.”

“First Man” is directed by Chazelle from a script by Josh Singer, based on Hansen’s book “First Man: The Life of Neil A. Armstrong.” The film stars Ryan Gosling as Neil Armstrong and focuses on the the years leading up to the Apollo 11 mission in 1969. “First Man” had its world premiere at the Venice Film Festival on Wednesday and hits theaters in the U.S. on Oct. 12.

Gosling has also responded to the criticism, telling reporters when asked about the omission, “I think this was widely regarded in the end as a human achievement [and] that’s how we chose to view it. I also think Neil was extremely humble, as were many of these astronauts, and time and time again he deferred the focus from himself to the 400,000 people who made the mission possible.”

“In ‘First Man’ I show the American flag standing on the lunar surface, but the flag being physically planted into the surface is one of several moments of the Apollo 11 lunar EVA that I chose not to focus upon,” he said in a statement. “To address the question of whether this was a political statement, the answer is no. My goal with this movie was to share with audiences the unseen, unknown aspects of America’s mission to the moon — particularly Neil Armstrong’s personal saga and what he may have been thinking and feeling during those famous few hours.”

“I wanted the primary focus in that scene to be on Neil’s solitary moments on the moon — his point of view as he first exited the LEM, his time spent at Little West Crater, the memories that may have crossed his mind during his lunar EVA,” Chazelle added. “This was a feat beyond imagination; it was truly a giant leap for mankind. This film is about one of the most extraordinary accomplishments not only in American history, but in human history. My hope is that by digging under the surface and humanizing the icon, we can better understand just how difficult, audacious and heroic this moment really was.”

Armstrong died in 2012 at the age of 82.

Here’s the statement from Armstrong’s son and Hansen:

We’ve read a number of comments about the film today and specifically about the absence of the flag planting scene, made largely by people who haven’t seen the movie. As we’ve seen it multiple times, we thought maybe we should weigh in.

This is a film that focuses on what you don’t know about Neil Armstrong. It’s a film that focuses on things you didn’t see or may not remember about Neil’s journey to the moon. The filmmakers spent years doing extensive research to get at the man behind the myth, to get at the story behind the story. It’s a movie that gives you unique insight into the Armstrong family and fallen American Heroes like Elliot See and Ed White. It’s a very personal movie about our dad’s journey, seen through his eyes.

This story is human and it is universal. Of course, it celebrates an America achievement. It also celebrates an achievement “for all mankind,” as it says on the plaque Neil and Buzz left on the moon. It is a story about an ordinary man who makes profound sacrifices and suffers through intense loss in order to achieve the impossible.

Although Neil didn’t see himself that way, he was an American hero. He was also an engineer and a pilot, a father and a friend, a man who suffered privately through great tragedies with incredible grace. This is why, though there are numerous shots of the American flag on the moon, the filmmakers chose to focus on Neil looking back at the earth, his walk to Little West Crater, his unique, personal experience of completing this journey, a journey that has seen so many incredible highs and devastating lows.

In short, we do not feel this movie is anti-American in the slightest. Quite the opposite. But don’t take our word for it. We’d encourage everyone to go see this remarkable film and see for themselves.

Voir encore:

Cinéma: First Man, La la lune

Le réalisateur de Whiplash retrace la vie de l’astronaute Neil Amstrong, homme névrosé et obsédé. Le film décolle souvent mais pas toujours.

Eric Libiot

L’Express

Damien Chazelle est un Clint Eastwood en velours. L’un et l’autre racontent des héros (du quotidien ou de la grande histoire) mus par leur seule obsession. Eastwood fait plutôt dans le brutal, quand Chazelle y met de la rondeur et quelques pas de danse. Mais entre Red Stovall (Honkytonk Man) et William Munny (Impitoyable) d’un côté, Andrew (Whiplash) et Sebastian (La la land), de l’autre, il n’est question que d’hommes qui se détruisent pour parvenir à leurs fins. Le revers de la médaille du héros américain. Difficile de dire quelle voie va emprunter Chazelle – il est moins désabusé que le grand Clint – mais s’il se durcit la couenne, il pourrait devenir un portraitiste passionnant du rêve étoilé d’aujourd’hui.

First Man. Le premier homme sur la lune (et pourquoi pas rallonger le titre en italien et en chinois tant qu’à faire ?), raconte l’épopée de Neil Armstrong, le gars qui fit un petit pas pour l’homme et un grand pour l’humanité. Pilote moyen qui parvint à s’envoler et à marquer son temps à force d’abnégation et de maîtrise. Héros national mais tête de lard, père absent et mari mal luné. On a assez envie de lui mettre deux claques.

Ryan Gosling parfait

Voulant absolument se décoller des références L’Etoffe des héros et Apollo (la grandeur de la nation américaine dans toute sa splendeur), Chazelle bidouille les séquences dans l’espace en secouant sa caméra, en bricolant l’image et en filmant les poils de barbe de son personnage. C’est parfois un peu fatigant parce que systématique.

En revanche – et c’est là où l’eastwoodien qui est en lui se réveille – la partie intimiste est passionnante. Armstrong est prêt à tout sacrifier pour être le premier. Pas forcément pour recevoir les applaudissements mais pour nourrir sa propre névrose. Comme si le héros américain, bouffé par une machine mythologique basée sur le « do it yourself » devait forcément en passer par là. Armstrong a le visage fermé et Ryan Gosling, qui n’est pas l’acteur le plus expressif au monde, est parfait. Claire Foy, son épouse, également ; femme de tête, actrice de coeur. La face cachée de la Lune est finalement ce qu’il y a de plus intéressant à voir.

First Man. Le premier homme sur la lune, de Damien Chazelle. 2 h 22.

First Man – Le premier homme sur la lune – Bande Annonce

Voir aussi:

First Man : le premier homme sur la lune

Louis Guichard

Télérama

17 octobre 2018
Après La La Land, Ryan Gosling enfile le scaphandre de Neil Armstrong avec une froideur lunaire fascinante. Une biographie distanciée et troublante.

Avec La La Land, Damien Chazelle, le jeune prodige de Hollywood, remettait de la fragilité dans la glorieuse comédie musicale à l’américaine : danser et chanter n’y était pas si facile pour les deux acteurs principaux, et la mise en scène exploitait subtilement leurs faiblesses. Dans cette biographie de Neil Armstrong, la discipline incertaine, laborieuse, faillible, c’est la conquête spatiale elle-même. Le cinéaste insiste sans cesse sur la précarité des engins et vaisseaux pilotés par l’astronaute, du début des années 1960 à ses premiers pas sur la Lune, le 21 juillet 1969. Leitmotiv des scènes d’action : les antiques cadrans à aiguilles s’affolent, les carlingues tremblotent, fument, prennent feu… La réussite, lorsqu’elle survient, paraît arbitraire, et ne parvient jamais à dissiper l’effroi et le doute devant l’entreprise du héros. Voilà comment, dès la saisissante première scène, le réalisateur s’approprie le genre si codifié du biopic hollywoodien. Le visage de Ryan Gosling est l’autre facteur majeur de stylisation. Avec son jeu minimaliste, son refus de l’expressivité ordinaire, l’acteur de Drive bloque la sympathie et l’identification. Damien Chazelle filme sa star en très gros plans, avec une fascination encore accentuée depuis La La Land : Ryan Gosling est lunaire bien avant d’alunir et il le demeure ensuite.

Le scénario donne et redonne, trop souvent, l’explication la plus évidente à cette absence mélancolique — la perte d’une fille, emportée en bas âge par le cancer. Cette tragédie intime, véridique, devient même la composante la plus convenue, avec flash-back mélodramatiques sur le bonheur familial perdu, un peu comme pour le personnage de spationaute de Sandra Bullock dans Gravity, d’Alfonso Cuarón. Or l’attendrissement sied peu à Damien Chazelle, cinéaste cruel, dur — voir le sadisme de Whiplash, et le gâchis amoureux de La La Land, pour cause d’égocentrisme des deux amants. Le film brille, en revanche, dès qu’il s’agit de la distance qui éloigne toujours plus le héros des siens — sa femme et ses deux fils —, au fil des expériences spatiales. Sommé par son épouse d’annoncer son départ vers la Lune à ses enfants, Neil Armstrong leur parle soudain comme s’il était en conférence de presse, sans plus d’émotion ni de tendresse — scène glaçante. Plus tard, l’homme (en quarantaine après une mission) est séparé de sa femme par une épaisse cloison de verre. La paroi devient alors, tout comme le casque-miroir du scaphandre, le symbole d’une vie à part, « hors de ce monde » — les mots de l’épouse. A la même époque, des mouvements sociaux dénoncent, aux Etats-Unis, les dépenses publiques faramineuses consacrées à la conquête spatiale, tandis que des millions de citoyens vivent mal. Damien Chazelle s’attarde sur cette critique-là, comme pour contredire la formule d’Armstrong une fois sur la Lune : « … un grand pas pour l’humanité »… Scepticisme et froideur contribuent ainsi à élever First Man au-delà de l’hagiographie attendue, au profit d’une réelle étrangeté, et d’une grande tenue.

Voir également:

What Do Words Cost? For ‘First Man,’ Perhaps, Quite A Lot
Michael Cieply
Deadline

October 14, 2018

What do words cost? In contemporary Hollywood, quite a bit, apparently.

If you believe those who say First Man was hurt by Ryan Gosling’s ‘globalist’ defense of director Damien Chazelle’s decision not to depict astronaut Neil Armstrong’s planting of an American flag on the moon—and the Internet is crawling with those who make that claim—then Gosling’s explanation cost up to $45,000 a word this weekend.

First Man, from Universal and DreamWorks among others, opened to about $16.5 million in ticket sales at the domestic box office. That’s $4.5 million short of expectations that were pegged at around $21 million. At the Venice Film Festival in late August, Gosling, who is Canadian, spoke about 100 words in defending the flag-planting omission. “I don’t think that Neil viewed himself as an American hero,” he said:  “From my interviews with his family and people that knew him, it was quite the opposite. And we wanted the film to reflect Neil. »

If the ensuing controversy really suppressed ticket sales—and who can know whether sharper-than-expected competition from Venom and A Star Is Born was perhaps a bigger factor?—the $45,000-per-word price tag is just a down payment. Under-performance by First Man of, say, $50 million over the long haul would raise the per-word price to a breathtaking $500,000.

Such is the terror of entertainment in the age of digital rage and partisanship. The simplest moment of candor at a routine promotional appearance can suddenly become a show-killer.

The real math, of course, is mysterious. To what extent a slip of the tongue or an interesting thought helped or hindered a film or television show will never be clear.

But, increasingly, the stray word seems to be taking a toll on vastly expensive properties that have been years, or even decades, in the making. Asked in May by a Huffington Post interviewer whether Star Wars character Lando Calrissian was “pansexual,” Jonathan Kasdan, co-writer of Solo: A Star Wars Story, answered: “I would say yes.”

What followed was a full-throated digital debate about sexual identity in the Star Wars series. Some fans loved it. Some didn’t. But the film, which had about $213.8 million in domestic ticket sales, seriously lagged its predecessors, leaving a scary question: Did Kasdan’s answer cost Disney and Lucasfilm some millions of dollars per word?

On the conservative side of the Great Divide, Roseanne Barr cost herself and ABC tens of millions of dollars per word when she compared former Obama White House advisor Valerie Jarrett to a combination of the Muslim Brotherhood and Planet Of The Apes, in a brief Tweet that led to her own firing and her show’s cancellation. On the progressive side, Marvel and Star Wars writer Chuck Wendig was just fired for a series of Tweets saying things at least as rude about Republicans (though the cost-per-word is clearly lower than Barr’s).

In retrospect, I begin to understand a backstage encounter I once witnessed between Bob Weinstein and Viggo Mortensen before a press conference at the Toronto International Film Festival.

Weinstein was delivering a ferocious, finger-jabbing lecture about what Mortensen could and could not say as he answered questions about his role in John Hillcoat’s The Road.

Back in 2009, this struck me as a rude, heavy-handed attempt to censor an intelligent actor who was perfectly capable of speaking for himself. But having seen what a few misplaced words can now cost, I suspect that Weinstein was ahead of his time.

Voir aussi:

The dangers of Trudeau’s ‘postnational’ Canada
Douglas Todd
The Vancouver Sun
April 28, 2016

Justin Trudeau says Canada is the world’s first « postnational state. » But the goal of the alternative, transnationalism, is to override the rules, customs and sovereignty of individual nations and allow the virtually unrestricted flow of global money.

I’m trying to understand Justin Trudeau’s idealistic thinking.

When the prime minister says Canada is the world’s “first postnational state,” I believe he’s saying this is a place where respect for minorities trumps any one group’s way of doing things.

‘There is no core identity, no mainstream in Canada,’ Trudeau claimed after the October election. ‘There are shared values – openness, respect, compassion, willingness to work hard, to be there for each other, to search for equality and justice.”

The New York Times writer who obtained this quote said Trudeau’s belief Canada has no core identity is his “most radical” political position. It seems especially so combined with criticism Trudeau is a lightweight on national security and sovereignty.

Not too many Canadians, however, seem disturbed by Trudeau talking about us as a “postnational state.”

Maybe they just write it off as political bafflegab. But of all the countries in the world, Canada, with its high proportion of immigrants and official policy of multiculturalism, may also be one of the few places where politicians and academics treat virtually all forms of nationalism with deep suspicion.

Of course, no one defends nationalism in its rigid or extreme forms. Ultranationalism has been blamed for us-against-them belligerence throughout the 20th century, which led to terrible military aggressions out of Germany, Japan, the former Yugoslavia, China and many regions of Africa.

But would it be wise to let nationalism die?

 

What if our sense of a national identity actually was eradicated? What if borders were erased and the entire world became “transnational?”

We sometimes seem to be heading that way, with the rise of the European Union, the United Nations and especially transnational deals such as the North American Free Trade Agreement and the looming Trans-Pacific Partnership.

The aim of these transnational business agreements is to override the rules, customs and sovereignty of individual nations and allow the virtually unrestricted flow of global migrants and money.

Such transnational agreements benefit some, especially the “cosmopolitan” elites and worldwide corporations. But the results for others are often not pretty.

Indeed, a case can be made that the housing affordability crises in Metro Vancouver and Toronto is a result of a “postnational” mindset.

Canada’s politicians are failing to put serious effort into protecting residents of Vancouver or Toronto from transnational financial forces.

Before digging further into the influences behind our overheated housing markets, however, I’ll make a case for healthy nationalism.

Avoid extremes

The first thing to keep in mind is to not judge nationalism by its extremes.

As G.K. Chesterton once said, condemning nationalism because it can lead to war is like condemning love because it can lead to murder.

In recent years many regions have developed generally positive forms of nationalism: Scotland, the Czech Republic, the U.S., Argentina, Japan, Sweden to name a few.

Healthy nationalism encourages diverse people to cooperate.

“Patriotism is what makes us behave unselfishly. It is why we pay taxes to support strangers, why we accept election results when we voted for the loser, why we obey laws with which we disagree,” writes Daniel Hannan, author of Inventing Freedom.

“A functioning state requires broad consensus on what constitutes the first-person plural. Take that sense away, you get Syria or Iraq or Ukraine or – well, pretty much any war zone you can name.”

Though Canada’s particular style of nationalism is fluid and not simple to define, it’s part of what makes the country attractive to immigrants, who often arrive from dysfunctional regions torn by corruption and cynicism about national officials.

Many immigrants seem to realize that it’s not normally nationalism that foments catastrophic division – it’s religion, race or tribalism.

In contrast, some of the world’s most economically successful and egalitarian countries have a sense of mutual trust and appreciation for good government that is in part based on the glue of nationalism.

People in proud Nordic countries, for instance, often decorate even their birthday cakes with their national flags. At the same time Nordic nations are generous to their disadvantaged and in distributing foreign aid.

Michael McDonald, former head of the University of B.C.’s Centre for Applied Ethics, thinks Trudeau’s belief that Canada is the world’s first “postnational state” emerges out of his concern that it’s dangerous to “affirm a dominant culture that suppresses and marginalizes those outside the mainstream.”

But even though the ethics professor believes it’s important to protect minorities, he isn’t prepared to overlook the value of nationalism.

McDonald believes being Canadian is like being a member of a community, or a big family.

“Some are born into the family and others are adopted. There is a shared family history – interpreted in diverse ways,” McDonald says.

“Not everyone is happy being in the family. Some think being a family member is important and others do not. But we are shaped by our families, and we shape ourselves within and sometimes against our families. So also with our country.”

Transnationalist dangers

Embracing McDonald’s view that Canada is a giant, unruly but somewhat bonded family, I’d suggest Trudeau contradicts himself, or is at least being naive, when he argues Canada is a postnational state.

On one hand Trudeau claims Canada has no “core identity.” On the other hand he says the Canadian identity is quite coherent – we all share the values of “openness, respect, compassion, willingness to work hard, to be there for each other, to search for equality and justice.”

Can it be both ways?

Most Canadians don’t think so. Regardless of what Trudeau told the New York Times, a recent Angus Reid Institute poll confirmed what many Canadians judge to be common sense: 75 per cent of residents believe there is a “unique Canadian culture.”

I wish some of that common sense about nationalism was being brought to the housing affordability crisis in Vancouver and Toronto.

While some of the strongest support for transnationalism comes from big business, we need to hear more from economists who stand up for healthy nationalism.

They include the famous Scottish economist Adam Smith, who is often cited as the father of capitalism. Smith believed free enterprise would work most effectively within the cultures of unified nations.

 

Healthy nationalism requires loyalty between citizens and leaders, says Geoffrey Taunton-Collins, who writes for http://www.adamsmith.org. A nation’s leaders are expected to protect their citizens from outside powers.

That is not what is happening in Vancouver and Toronto, where the forces of transnationalism have been allowed to run amok. “The city has become a commodity,” former Vancouver city councillor Jonathan Baker recently lamented. It’s being increasingly occupied by transnational wealth.

Global capital is coming to Toronto and Vancouver because it seeks a haven that has no ethical, legal or physical boundaries, Eveline Xia and UBC planning department director Penny Gurstein wrote this month in The Vancouver Sun.

Xia and Gurstein say federal and B.C. politicians are not protecting citizens from transnational speculators. Unlike the officials who represent London, Hong Kong or Singapore, Xia and Gurstein say, Canadian politicians are failing to regulate residency requirements on home purchases or charge nonresidents extra fees.

As a result many average Canadians who are desperate to make a home and livelihood in Metro Vancouver can’t come close to affording to live here.

It’s the kind of thing that can happen when too many politicians believe we’re living in the world’s first “postnational state.”

Voir enfin:

First Man (2018)

History vs. Hollywood
Questioning the Story:

How much of Neil Armstrong’s life does the First Man movie cover?

The biopic covers the period of Neil Armstrong’s life from 1961 up to the Apollo 11 Moon landing on July 20, 1969. On that day, Armstrong became the first person to set foot on the lunar surface. He was joined by Buzz Aldrin approximately 20 minutes later. This can be seen in the Apollo 11 Moon Landing Video.

Was astronaut Neil Armstrong really an introverted and quiet hero like he’s portrayed to be in the movie?Yes. The First Man true story reveals that unlike many astronauts, Neil Armstrong was not the hotshot type, nor was he a fame-seeker. He was a man of few words who was driven to accomplish something no other human being had done. Up to his death, he largely remained a bit of an enigma.

Is the First Man movie based on a Neil Armstrong book?

Yes. The movie is based on author James R. Hansen’s New York Times bestselling biography First Man: The Life of Neil A. Armstrong. First published in 2005, the book is the only official biography of Armstrong. It chronicles his involvement in the space program, concluding with the climactic Apollo 11 mission. At the same time, it explores his personal life as well. Armstrong gave his full support to Hansen and encouraged others to provide any necessary information that the author requested. Film rights to the book were sold in 2003, prior to its publication, but a Neil Armstrong movie took years to get off the ground. Initially, Clint Eastwood had been attached to direct.

Was Ryan Gosling the first choice for the role of Neil Armstrong?

Yes. Director Damien Chazelle told People Magazine that the first time he ever met Ryan Gosling was to pitch him the role in the Neil Armstrong biopic. This was before the director and actor teamed up to make the 2016 musical La La Land together.

Is the movie’s opening scene, in which Neil Armstrong pilots an X-15 rocket plane into the stratosphere, depicted accurately?

For the most part, yes. He indeed had trouble returning to Earth as the plane began to bounce off the atmosphere instead of slicing back into it. Armstrong was more than 20 miles above the Earth. The only part of that scene that isn’t as realistic is when we’re able to look out the window of his plane and see the white clouds just below. At 120,000 feet, he was roughly double the altitude of the highest clouds, so realistically, the clouds would have been much further beneath him. -TIME

Is the song playing when Neil and Janet dance in the living room based on an actual song that they listened to?

Yes. The eerie space melody that Neil and Janet dance to in the biopic is an actual song that they listened to. “It was a track that Neil and Janet shared with each other and that Neil wound up bringing with him on the Apollo 11 mission, » says director Damien Chazelle. « It’s called ‘Lunar Rhapsody’. It’s quite appropriate, but it’s this sort of weird Theremin orchestral track from the early days of the Theremin [an electric instrument with metal antennas].” -People.com

Did Neil Armstrong really lose a daughter to brain cancer?

Yes. On January 28, 1962, Neil and Janet lost their two-year-old daughter Karen to a case of pneumonia while suffering from a malignant brain tumor. « I thought the best thing for me to do in that situation was to continue with my work, » said Armstrong, « keep things as normal as I could, and try as hard as I could not to have it affect my ability to do useful things. » He became an astronaut that same year. The movie seems to depict this time in Armstrong’s life rather accurately. -First Man Book Interview

Did Neil Armstrong’s home really catch on fire?

Yes. Though the scene was cut from the final version of the movie, the First Man true story confirms that the Armstrongs’ Houston home caught fire in the spring of 1964. Janet woke in the middle of the night and smelled smoke, at which time she alerted Neil. Astronaut Ed White (portrayed by Jason Clarke in the movie) was their neighbor at the time and jumped the fence to help. The Armstrongs nearly lost their lives. Neil passed their ten-month-old son Mark through a window to Ed. He then went to save his six-year-old son Rick, holding a wet cloth over Rick’s face as they made it outside to the backyard. Neil described the 25 feet to Rick’s bedroom as « the longest journey I ever made in my life. » Rick was okay except for a burn on his thumb.

Not shown in the movie, the Armstrongs’ home burned to cinders in a 1964 house fire. They nearly lost their lives. Actor Ryan Gosling stands in the backyard of the burning home in a scene omitted from the biopic (above).

Did Neil Armstrong almost die while training for the lunar landing?

Yes. Two Lunar Landing Research Vehicles were built. Each used a single jet engine turned right-side up to simulate the Moon’s one-sixth gravity of Earth. On May 6, 1968, Neil Armstrong was piloting one of the vehicles roughly 100 feet above the ground. Unanticipated depletion of helium used to pressurize the fuel tanks led to a total failure of his flight controls and the LLRV started to go into a roll. He ejected and parachuted safely to the ground. Future analysis concluded that if he had ejected just half a second later, his parachute would not have deployed in time. His brush with death can be seen in the Neil Armstrong LLRV Training Crash Video. The top image below shows Neil Armstrong floating to the ground after Lunar Landing Research Vehicle 1 exploded into a ball of flames upon hitting the field. -First Man book

Did astronaut Neil Armstrong injure his face during the Lunar Lander training accident like in the movie?

No, he did not injure his face when he was forced to eject from the Lunar Landing Research Vehicle and parachute to the ground. The worst that happened was that he bit his tongue hard during his impact with the ground.

Did Neil Armstrong really have a serious talk with his kids about the possibility of him not returning from the mission?

Yes. Armstrong’s sons, Rick and Mark, told USA Today that their father indeed talked with them before going to space and walking on the moon. « That scene came from us, » Rick said. He and his brother collaborated with director Damien Chazelle for two-and-a-half years. As for the specifics of the conversation, Mark says he was too young to remember, but Rick says that the movie gets the gist of it right. However, he never remembers directly asking his father, « Do you think you’re coming back? »

« I didn’t have any doubt that he was coming back, » says Rick, who was 12 at the time. « So I wouldn’t have asked that. » -Collider

« We think we’re coming back, but there is some risk, » is basically what Armstrong told his sons. With regard to the oldest son shaking his father’s hand at the end of the conversation, that was added by the filmmakers. Rick said that it could have happened, or maybe it was a hug. He wasn’t sure.

Were Neil and Buzz really running low on fuel as they approached the moon’s surface?

As Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin descended to the moon’s surface in the Lunar Lander, they believed that they were running low on fuel because the computers were telling that to mission control, indicating that they had less than a minute to either touch down or abort the mission. The nail-biting sequence is true. However, they later learned that the lander hadn’t actually been low on fuel.

« You got a bunch of guys about to turn blue. We’re breathing again. Thanks a lot, » flight controller Charlie Duke radioed to Armstrong after the successful landing. -The Wrap

Does the lunar footprint in the famous photo belong to Neil Armstrong?

No. The famous photo of the lunar footprint that is often shown with Armstrong’s iconic quote, « That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind, » is actually Buzz Aldrin’s footprint, not Neil Armstrong’s. Therefore, it’s not the footprint of the first step taken on the Moon, which we see in the movie. Aldrin made the bootprint in the photo as part of an experiment to test the properties of the lunar regolith (the loose rock and dust sitting on top of the lunar bedrock).

Why aren’t there any good photos of Neil Armstrong on the Moon?

As we explored the First Man true story, we quickly discovered that there are no good photos of Neil Armstrong on the Moon. The best image is displayed below. It was taken by fellow astronaut Buzz Aldrin and shows Armstrong removing equipment from storage in the Lunar Module. The reason for the lack of photos of Armstrong on the lunar surface is because most of the time it was Armstrong who was carrying the camera. Some people blamed Aldrin for the insufficient number of photos of Armstrong, reasoning that he wanted the limelight since Armstrong was first to step onto the moon. Aldrin later addressed the criticism, saying he felt horrible that there were so few photos of Armstrong but there was too much going on at the time to realize it.

The most iconic shot of an astronaut on the Moon is of Buzz Aldrin standing and posing for the camera. If you look closely at that photo, you can actually see Armstrong taking the picture in the visor’s reflection.

Did Neil Armstrong really leave his daughter Karen’s bracelet on the moon?

No. It is here that the movie perhaps takes one of its biggest liberties. There is no historical record that Armstrong left a bracelet of his daughter’s on the moon (in the film, he drops it into Little West Crater). Astronauts flew with a PPK (personal preference kit), which included any non-regulation or sentimental items that they wanted to bring with them. Armstrong said that he lost the manifest for his PPK, so we can’t be sure what all it contained. We do know that he took with him remnants of fabric and the propeller from the Wright Brothers plane in which they took the first powered flight in 1903. Since Karen’s death is believed to have set the course of Armstrong’s life (especially at NASA), it’s not hard to imagine him bringing a sentimental item of Karen’s like the bracelet to the moon. We just don’t know for certain if he did, and if so, what he brought. -TIME

How much time did Neil Armstrong spend walking on the Moon?

Armstrong’s Moon walk lasted 2 and 3/4 hours, even though it feels much shorter in the movie. Astronauts on the five subsequent NASA missions that landed men on the Moon were given progressively longer periods of time to explore the lunar surface, with Apollo 17 astronauts spending 22 hours on EVA (Extravehicular Activity). The reason Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin didn’t get to spend more time outside the Lunar Module is that there were uncertainties as to how well the spacesuits would hold up to the extremely high temperatures on the lunar surface. -Space.com

Did Neil Armstrong and his wife Janet stay together?

No. After 38 years of marriage, Neil Armstrong’s wife Janet divorced him on April 12, 1994 after a long separation. He had begun a relationship with Carol Held Knight, a widow who he had met at a golf tournament in 1992. Armstrong married Knight, who was 15 years his junior, on June 12, 1994, exactly two months after his divorce became final.

Apollo 11 Moon Landing Footage & Related Videos

Below, you can further explore the true story behind the Neil Armstrong biopic First Man by watching actual footage of the 1969 Apollo 11 Moon landing, including witnessing Armstrong take the first steps on the surface of the Moon. You can also view footage of his ejection from the Lunar Landing Research Vehicle (LLRV) and its subsequent crash, which happened more than a year prior to landing on the Moon.

Neil Armstrong Lunar Lander Training Crash
Apollo 11 Moon Landing Live Broadcast Footage
First Man Movie Trailer

Voir de même:

The Impact of “Deliverance”

Stacey Eidson
Metro spirit
April 15, 2015

Long before moviegoers watched in horror as actor Ned Beatty was forced to strip off his clothes and told to “squeal like a pig” during a film set in the rural mountains of North Georgia, there was the novel by Atlanta writer and poet James Dickey that started it all.

It’s been 45 years since “Deliverance” first hit the book shelves across this nation, but the profound impact that the tale of four suburban men canoeing down the dangerous rapids of a remote Georgia river and encountering a pair of deranged mountain men can still be felt today.

When the book was first released back in April of 1970, the reaction was definitely mixed, to say the least. Most critics praised the adventurous tale, describing the novel as “riveting entertainment” or a “monument to tall stories.”

The New York Times called the book a “double-clutching whopper” of a story that was a “weekend athlete’s nightmare.”

“Four men decide to paddle two canoes down the rapids of a river in northern Georgia to get one last look at pure wilderness before the river is dammed up and ‘the real estate people get hold of it,’” the New York Times book review stated in 1970.

But to the shock of the reader, the whitewater adventure turns into a struggle for survival when the character Bobby Trippe is brutally sodomized by a mountain man while his friend Ed Gentry is tied to a nearby tree.

“In the middle of the second day of the outing, two of the campers pull over to the riverbank for a rest,” the New York Times wrote in 1970. “Out of the woods wander two scrofulous hillbillies with a shotgun, and proceed to assault the campers with a casual brutality that leaves the reader squirming.

“It’s a bad situation inside an impossible one wrapped up in a hopeless one, with rapids crashing along between sheer cliffs and bullets zinging down from overhead. A most dangerous game.”

The New Republic described “Deliverance” as a powerful book that readers would not soon forget.

“I wondered where the excitement was that intrigued Lewis so much; everything in Oree was sleepy and hookwormy and ugly, and most of all, inconsequential. Nobody worth a damn could ever come from such a place.”

“How a man acts when shot by an arrow, what it feels like to scale a cliff or to capsize, the ironic psychology of fear,” The New Republic review stated. “These things are conveyed with remarkable descriptive writing.”

But the Southern Review probably said it best by stating that “Deliverance” touched on the basic “questions that haunt modern urban man.”

The book spent 26 weeks on the New York Times best-selling hardback list, and 16 weeks on that newspaper’s paperback list.

Within two years, it had achieved its eighth printing and sold almost 2 million copies.

The novel was having an immediate impact on the image of northern Georgia, according to the book, “Dear Appalachia: Readers, Identity, and Popular Fiction since 1878” by author Emily Satterwhite.

“Dickey’s novel created for readers an Appalachia that served as the site of a collective ‘nightmare,’ to use a term adopted by several of Dickey’s reviewers,” Satterwhite wrote. “The rape of city men by leering ‘hicks,’ central to the novel… became almost synonymous with popular conceptions of the mountain South.”

The book is a tall tale written by a man raised in a wealthy neighborhood in Atlanta, who both loved and feared the mountains of North Georgia, according to Satterwhite.

“Dickey’s father, James II, was a lawyer who loved hunting and cockfighting; his North Georgia farm served as a refuge from his wife, her family inheritance and the Buckhead mansion and servants that her wealth afforded them even in the depths of the Great Depression,” Satterwhite wrote, adding that James Dickey, like his father, was also uncomfortable with his family’s wealth. “Dickey preferred to claim that he grew up in the mountains. He attributed his blustery aggressiveness to his ‘North Georgia folk heritage’ and averred, ‘My people are all hillbillies. I’m only second-generation city.’”

\
But that was far from the truth.

“Though Dickey’s ancestors had indeed lived in mountainous Fannin County, Georgia, they were not the plain folks he made them out to be,” Satterwhite wrote. “He failed to acknowledge that they were slaveholders and among the largest landowners and wealthiest residents of the county. Dickey’s romantic — and racist — vision of Appalachia as a place apart stayed with him his entire life.”

Dickey’s conflicting feeling about these so-called “mountain people” of North Georgia is evident in many of the conversations between two of the novel’s main characters, graphic artist Ed Gentry and outdoor survivalist Lewis Medlock.

In the beginning of the book, Lewis attempts to describe to Ed, the narrator of the novel and the character who is generally believed to be loosely based on Dickey himself, what makes the mountains of northern Georgia so special.

Lewis insists that there “may be something important in the hills.”

But Ed quickly fires back, “I don’t mind going down a few rapids with you and drinking a little whiskey by a campfire. But I don’t give a fiddler’s f*** about those hills.”

Lewis continues to try to persuade Ed by telling him about a recent trip he took with another friend, Shad Mackey, who got lost in these very same mountains.

“I happened to look around, and there was a fellow standing there looking at me,” Lewis said. “‘What you want, boy down around here?’ he said. He was skinny, and had on overall pants and a white shirt with the sleeves rolled up. I told him I was going down the river with another guy, and that I was waiting for Shad to show up.”

The man who stepped out of the woods was a moonshiner who, to Lewis’ surprise, offered to help.

“‘You say you got a man back up there hunting with a bow and arrow. Does he know what’s up there?’ he asked me. ‘No,’ I said. ‘It’s rougher than a night in jail in south Georgia,’ he said, ‘and I know what I’m talking about. You have any idea whereabouts he is?’ I said no, ‘just up that way someplace, the last time I saw him.’”

What happened next opened Lewis’ eyes to these mountain people, he told Ed.

“The fellow stood up and went over to his boy, who was about fifteen. He talked to him for a while, and then came about halfway back to me before he turned around and said, ‘Son, go find that man.’

“The boy didn’t say a thing. He went and got a flashlight and an old single-shot twenty-two. He picked up a handful of bullets from a box and put them in his pocket. He called his dog, and then he just faded away.”

Several hours later, the boy returned with Shad, who had broken his leg. When Lewis finishes his story, it’s obvious the tale means very little to Ed.

“That fellow wasn’t commanding his son against his will,” Lewis said. “The boy just knew what to do. He walked out into the dark.”

Ed quickly asks, “So?”

“So, we’re lesser men, Ed,” Lewis said. “I’m sorry, but we are.”

“From the ubiquitous rendition of the ‘Dueling Banjos’ theme song to allude to danger from hicks to bumper stickers for tourists reading, ‘Paddle faster, I hear banjoes,’ the novel and film have created artifacts that many of us encounter on an almost weekly basis.”

When the pair reaches the fictitious mountain town of Oree, Georgia, in the novel, Ed is clearly even less impressed.

“An old man with a straw hat and work shirt appeared at Lewis’ window, talking in. He looked like a hillbilly in some badly cast movie, a character actor too much in character to be believed. I wondered where the excitement was that intrigued Lewis so much; everything in Oree was sleepy and hookwormy and ugly, and most of all, inconsequential. Nobody worth a damn could ever come from such a place.”

As Lewis continues to negotiate with the mountain men, Ed becomes even more harsh in his description of Oree and its residents.

“There is always something wrong with people in the country, I thought. In the comparatively few times I had ever been in the rural South I had been struck by the number of missing fingers. Offhand, I had counted around twenty, at least. There had also been several people with some form of crippling or twisting illness, and some blind or one-eyed. No adequate medical treatment maybe. But there was something else. You’d think that farming was a healthy life, with fresh air and fresh food and plenty of exercise, but I never saw a farmer who didn’t have something wrong with him, and most of the time obviously wrong.

“The catching of an arm in a tractor park somewhere off in the middle of a field where nothing happened but that the sun blazed back more fiercely down the open mouth of one’s screams. And so many snakebites deep in the woods as one stepped over a rotten log, so many domestic animals suddenly turning and crushing one against the splintering side of a barn stall. I wanted none of it, and I didn’t want to be around where it happened either. But I was there, and there was no way for me to escape, except by water, from the country of nine-fingered people.”

The South Squeals Like a Pig

The portrait of mountain people as toothless, sexual deviants in a “country of nine-fingered people” was too much for many Southerners to accept.

“The consequences of fictional representation have never been more powerful for the imagination of mountainness — or perhaps even for southernness, ruralness, and ‘primitiveness’ more generically — than in the case of ‘Deliverance,’” Satterwhite wrote.

By the time director John Boorman brought “Deliverance” to the big screen in 1972 starring Burt Reynolds as Lewis and Jon Voight as Ed, the damage to the South’s reputation was in full force.

The movie, which was primarily filmed in Rabun County in North Georgia during the summer of 1971, grossed about $6.5 million in its first year and was considered a great success at home and internationally.

“Indeed, it would be difficult to overstate the thoroughness with which ‘Deliverance,’ transformed by Dickey and director John Boorman into a film classic, has imbricated itself into Americans’ understanding and worldview,” Satterwhite wrote. “From the ubiquitous rendition of the ‘Dueling Banjos’ theme song to allude to danger from hicks to bumper stickers for tourists reading, ‘Paddle faster, I hear banjoes,’ the novel and film have created artifacts that many of us encounter on an almost weekly basis.”

Ironically, the movie’s most memorable line, “Squeal like a pig!” was never a part of the book. It was allegedly improvised by the actor during filming.

But the South wanted to still promote Dickey, an accomplished Atlanta author, so articles in the Columbia Record and other South Carolina and Georgia newspapers frequently featured Dickey’s novel. The film version of “Deliverance” was also honored at the Atlanta film festival.

“Southern hopes for self-promotion were evident at the film’s premiere in Atlanta,” Satterhite wrote. “Dickey leaned over to say to Jimmy Carter, then the governor: ‘Ain’t no junior league movie is it, Governor?’ ‘It’s pretty rough,’ Carter agreed, ‘but it’s good for Georgia.’ Carter paused. ‘It’s good for Georgia. I hope.’”

However, the success of “Deliverance” had such an impact on the Peach State, Carter decided to create a state film office in 1973 to ensure Georgia kept landing movie roles.

As a result, the film and video industry has contributed more than $5 billion to the state’s economy since the Georgia Film Commission was established.

But the release of “Deliverance” was, without question, a difficult time for rural Southerners, wrote Western Kentucky University professor Anthony Harkins, author of “Hillbilly: A Cultural History of an American Icon.”

The mountaineers of “Deliverance” were “crippled misfits and savage sodomizers of the North Georgia wilderness” who terrorize the foursome of Atlanta canoeists who simply want to run the rapids of the fictitious Cahulawassee River.

“Indisputably the most influential film of the modern era in shaping national perceptions of southern mountaineers and rural life in general, Deliverance’s portrayal of degenerate, imbecilic, and sexually voracious predators bred fear into several generations of Americans,” Harkins wrote. “As film scholar Pat Arnow only partly facetiously argued in 1991, the film ‘is still the greatest incentive for many non-Southerners to stay on the Interstate.’”

“As film scholar Pat Arnow only partly facetiously argued in 1991, the film ‘is still the greatest incentive for many non-Southerners to stay on the Interstate.’”

In fact, Harkins points out that Daniel Roper of the North Georgia Journal described the movie’s devastating local effect as “Deliverance did for them [North Georgians] what ‘Jaws’ did for sharks.”

“The film’s infamous scenes of sodomy at gunpoint and of a retarded albino boy lustily playing his banjo became such instantly recognizable shorthand for demeaning references to rural poor whites that comedians needed to say only ‘squeal like a pig’ or hum the opening notes of the film’s guitar banjo duet to gain an immediate visceral reaction from a studio audience,” Harkins writes.

Harkins believes that’s not at all what Dickey intended in writing both the book and the movie’s screenplay.

“To (the character) Lewis (and Dickey), the mountain folk’s very backwardness and social isolation has allowed them to retain a physical and mental toughness and to preserve a code of commitment to family and kin that has long ago been lost in the rush to a commodified existence,” Harkins wrote. “Lewis praised the ‘values’ passed down from father to son.”

But all of that meaning appeared to be lost in the film, Harkins wrote. Instead, Hollywood was much more interested in the horrific tale and captivating adventure of traveling down a North Georgia river being chased by crazed hillbillies.

The film was about the shock and fear of such an incident in the rural mountains that enthralled moviegoers.

“The film explicitly portrays Lewis (Burt Reynolds) shooting the rapist through the back with an arrow and the man’s shocked expression as he sees the blood smeared projectile protruding from his chest just before he dies violently,” Harkins wrote.

Surprisingly, Dickey seemed to thoroughly enjoy that scene in the film during the movie’s New York premiere, Harkins writes.

“Known for his outrageous antics and drunken public appearances, (Dickey) is said to have shouted out in the crowded theater, ‘Kill the son of a bitch!’ at the moment Lewis aims his fatal arrow,” Harkins wrote. “And then ‘Hot damn’ once the arrow found its mark.”

Many years later, Ned Beatty, the actor in the famous rape scene wrote an editorial for the New York Times called “Suppose Men Feared Rape.”

“‘Squeal like a pig.’ How many times has that been shouted, said or whispered to me since then?” wrote Beatty, who, according to Atlanta’s Creative Loafing would reply, “When was the last time you got kicked by an old man?”

Beatty wrote the editorial amid the outcry of 1989’s high-profile Central Park jogger rape case, and offered his experience with the snide catcalls, Creative Loafing reported.

“Somewhere between their shouts and my threats lies a kernel of truth about how men feel about rape,” he wrote. “My guess is, we want to be distanced from it. Our last choice would be to identify with the victim. If we felt we could truly be victims of rape, that fear would be a better deterrent than the death penalty.”

The Shock in Rabun County, Georgia

The rape of Ned Beatty’s character was easily the most memorable scene in the film, and, needless to say, many of the residents in Rabun County who were interviewed after the movie was released were less than thrilled.

“Resentment grew even while the film was being made,” Harkins wrote. “As word of how the mountaineers were being portrayed spread, (James Dickey’s son) Christopher Dickey, who was staying with his family in a low-budget motel and had more contact with the local residents acting or working on the set than did Boorman and the lead actors staying in chalets at a nearby golf resort, began to fear for his safety. Shaped by a century of media depictions of brutally violent mountaineers, he worried that some ‘real mountain men’ with ‘real guns’ might ‘teach some of these movie people a lesson.’”

Although many people in the region still bristle at the movie’s portrayal of locals as ignorant hillbillies, there were some major benefits to the book and film.

“That river doesn’t care about you. It’ll knock your brains out. Most of the people going up there don’t know about whitewater rivers. They are just out for a lark, just like those characters in ‘Deliverance.’ They wouldn’t have gone up there if I hadn’t written the book.”

Both helped create the more than $20 million rafting and outdoor sports industry along the Chattooga River in North Georgia.

In 2012, the national media descended on Rabun County again when reporters quickly learned the film’s 40th anniversary was going to be celebrated during the Chattooga River Festival.

“The movie, ‘Deliverance’ made tourist dollars flow into the area, but there was one memorable, horrifying male rape scene that lasted a little more than four minutes, but has lasted 40 years inside the hearts and minds of the people who live here,” CNN reported in 2012.

Rabun County Commissioner Stanley “Butch” Darnell told the media he was disgusted by the way the region was depicted in the film.

“We were portrayed as ignorant, backward, scary, deviant, redneck hillbillies,” he told CNN. “That stuck with us through all these years and in fact that was probably furthest from the truth. These people up here are a very caring, lovely people.”

“There are lots of people in Rabun County that would be just as happy if they never heard the word, ‘Deliverance’ again,” he added.

The news media interviewed everyone, including Rabun County resident Billy Redden, who as a teen was asked to play the “Banjo boy” in the film.

“I don’t think it should bother them. I think they just need to start realizing that it’s just a movie,” Redden, who still lives in Rabun County and works at Walmart, told CNN in 2012. “It’s not like it’s real.”

The Rabun County Convention and Visitor’s Bureau also pointed out that tourism brings in more than $42 million a year in revenue, which makes for a huge surplus for a county whose operating budget was about $17 million at the time.

Several local businesses embraced the 2012 festival including the owners of the Tallulah Gorge Grill.

The Tallulah Gorge is the very gorge that Jon Voight climbed out of near the end of the 1972 film and the owners of the Tallulah Gorge Grill wanted to celebrate that milestone.

“It is hard to believe that 40 years have passed since this movie first brought fame to the Northeast Georgia Mountains,” Tanya Jacobson-Smith wrote on the grill’s website promoting the festival. “Much has happened over the years here in Rabun County Georgia and around the world. Some good, some bad. Some still believe the movie was a poor portrayal of this county and it’s people. Other’s believe it is at least part of what has helped this region survive.”

Both thoughts are justified, Jacobson-Smith wrote.

“When ‘Deliverance’ was released in 1972, it was for many outside the community their first introduction to the beauty of the Blue Ridge Mountains, and the ways of the people living and working in their shadow,” she wrote. “Many of us (myself included) saw the breathtaking beauty of this area for the first time via the big screen. We caught a glimpse into the lives of the people who inhabit this place, some good and some not so good. There are those who believe that ‘Deliverance’ made the mountain people seem ‘backwards, uneducated, scary, and even deviant.’ I believe there were also many who, like myself, saw a people of great strength, caring and compassion. A community knit together by hardship, sharing and caring for each other and willing to help anyone who came along.”

She wrote that, as in any community, if people look hard enough and thoroughly examine its residents, they will find some bad, but most often they will find “a greater good that outshines the bad.”

“That is certainly the case here in the Northeast Georgia Mountains,” she wrote. “Most importantly ‘Deliverance’ introduced the world to the natural beauty of this mountain region, the unforgettable sounds of the Appalachian music and the wild excitement of river rafting. Drawn here by what they saw on the big screen, tourists flocked to the area to see and experience for themselves the good things they had seen in the movie.”

As a result, tourists filled hotels and campgrounds to capacity, tasted the local fare in restaurants and cafes and discovered the thrill of swimming in, or paddling on, the state’s beautiful rivers and lakes.

“Forty years later, people from all over the world still come to this area to experience the beauty and simplicity of mountain living,” she wrote. “It is here in these beautiful mountains that ‘strangers’ find a vibrant community of lifelong residents and newcomers, working together to maintain a quality of life that has been lost in much of today’s world.”

Over the years, Rabun County and surrounding North Georgia communities have embraced these changes. Some parts of the area have become a playground for high-end homeowners with multi-million-dollar lakefront property.

But there was also some growing pains.

Thousands of “suburbanites” flocked to the river in search of whitewater thrills and exhibited what author Anthony Harkins calls “the Deliverance syndrome.”

These individuals showed the “same lack of respect and reverence for the river that the characters in the film had displayed,” Harkins wrote, adding “to the shame of local guides, some even would make pig squeals when they reached the section of the river where the rape scene had been filmed.”

Some of those individuals paid a price.

“Seventeen people drowned on the river between 1972 and 1975, most with excessive blood-alcohol levels, until new regulations were imposed when the river was officially designated Wild and Scenic in 1974,” Harkins wrote.

Ironically, some people like to point out that “Deliverance” author James Dickey tried to warn people prior to his death in 1997 about their need to respect the rivers located in the mountains of North Georgia.

“That river doesn’t care about you. It’ll knock your brains out,” Dickey told the Associated Press in 1973. “Most of the people going up there don’t know about whitewater rivers. They are just out for a lark, just like those characters in ‘Deliverance.’ They wouldn’t have gone up there if I hadn’t written the book. There’s nothing I can do about it. I can’t patrol the river. But it just makes me feel awful.”

Voir par ailleurs:

Comment le néolibéralisme détruit les classes moyennes, par Christophe Guilluy

« There is no such thing as society » (« La société, cela n’existe pas »), ce message de Margaret Thatcher de 1987, au plus fort de son pouvoir, vous en tirez le titre de votre dernier livre*. Vous êtes devenu thatchérien ?
Christophe Guilluy : Moi, non. Mais le monde, oui. En tout cas, les pays de l’OCDE, et plus encore les démocraties occidentales, répondent pleinement au projet que la Dame de fer appelait de ses vœux. Partout, trente ans de mondialisation ont agi comme une concasseuse du pacte social issu de l’après-guerre. La fin de la classe moyenne occidentale est actée. Et pas seulement en France. Les poussées de populisme aux Etats-Unis, en Italie, et jusqu’en Suède, où le modèle scandinave de la social-démocratie n’est désormais plus qu’une sorte de zombie, en sont les manifestations les plus évidentes. Personne n’ose dire que la fête est finie. On se rassure comme on peut. Le monde académique, le monde politique et médiatique, chacun constate la montée des inégalités, s’inquiète de la hausse de la dette, de celle du chômage, mais se rassure avec quelques points de croissance, et soutient que l’enjeu se résume à la question de l’adaptabilité. Pas celle du monde d’en haut. Les gagnants de la mondialisation, eux, sont parfaitement adaptés à ce monde qu’ils ont contribué à forger. Non, c’est aux anciennes classes moyennes éclatées, reléguées, que s’adresse cette injonction d’adaptation à ce nouveau monde. Parce que, cahin-caha, cela marche, nos économies produisent des inégalités, mais aussi plus de richesses. Mais faire du PIB, ça ne suffit pas à faire société.
Comme géographe, vous avez imposé dans le débat hexagonal la notion de « France périphérique« . Ce n’est pas une de ces fameuses exceptions françaises ?

Election de Trump, Brexit, arrivée au pouvoir d’une coalition improbable liant les héritiers de la Ligue du Nord à ceux d’une partie de l’extrême gauche en Italie. De même qu’il y a une France périphérique, il y a une Amérique périphérique, un Royaume-Uni périphérique, etc. La périphérie, c’est, pour faire simple, ces territoires autour des villes-mondes, rien de moins que le reste du pays. L’agglomération parisienne, le Grand-Londres, les grandes villes côtières américaines, sont autant de territoires parfaitement en phase avec la mondialisation, des sortes de Singapour. Sauf que, contrairement à cette cité-Etat, ces territoires disposent d’un hinterland, d’une périphérie. L’explosion du prix de l’immobilier est la traduction la plus visible de cette communauté de destin de ces citadelles où se concentrent la richesse, les emplois à haute valeur ajoutée, où le capital culturel et financier s’accumule. Cette partition est la traduction spatiale de la notion de ruissellement des richesses du haut vers le bas, des premiers de cordée vers les autres. Dans ce modèle, la richesse créée dans les citadelles doit redescendre vers la périphérie. Trente ans de ce régime n’ont pas laissé nos sociétés intactes. Ce sont d’abord les ouvriers et les agriculteurs qui ont été abandonnés sur le chemin, puis les employés, et c’est maintenant au tour des jeunes diplômés d’être fragilisés. Les plans sociaux ne concernent plus seulement l’industrie mais les services, et même les banques… Dans les territoires de cette France périphérique, la dynamique dépressive joue à plein : à l’effondrement industriel succède celui des emplois présentiels lequel provoque une crise du commerce dans les petites villes et les villes moyennes.

Les gens aux Etats-Unis ou ailleurs ne se sont pas réveillés un beau matin pour se tourner vers le populisme. Non, ils ont fait un diagnostic, une analyse rationnelle : est-ce que ça marche pour eux ou pas. Et, rationnellement, ils n’ont pas trouvé leur compte. Et pas que du point de vue économique. S’il y a une exception française, c’est la victoire d’Emmanuel Macron, quand partout ailleurs les populistes semblent devoir l’emporter.

En quoi la victoire d’Emmanuel Macron est-elle un cas particulier ?

Emmanuel Macron est le candidat du front bourgeois. A Paris, il n’est pas anodin que les soutiens de François Fillon et les partisans de La Manif pour tous du XVIe arrondissement aient voté à 87,3 % pour le candidat du libéralisme culturel, et que leurs homologues bobos du XXe arrondissement, contempteurs de la finance internationale, aient voté à 90 % pour un banquier d’affaires. Mais cela ne fait pas une majorité. Si Emmanuel Macron l’a emporté, c’est qu’il a reçu le soutien de la frange encore protégée de la société française que sont les retraités et les fonctionnaires. Deux populations qui ont lourdement souffert au Royaume-Uni par exemple, comme l’a traduit leur vote pro-Brexit. Et c’est bien là le drame qui se noue en France. Car, parmi les derniers recours dont dispose la technocratie au pouvoir pour aller toujours plus avant vers cette fameuse adaptation, c’est bien de faire les poches des retraités et des fonctionnaires. Emmanuel Macron applique donc méticuleusement ce programme. Il semble récemment pris de vertige par le risque encouru pour les prochaines élections, comme le montre sa courbe de popularité, laquelle se trouve sous celle de François Hollande à la même période de leur quinquennat. Un autre levier, déjà mis en branle par Margaret Thatcher puis par les gouvernements du New Labour de Tony Blair, est la fin de l’universalité de la redistribution et la concentration de la redistribution. Sous couvert de faire plus juste, et surtout de réduire les transferts sociaux, on réduit encore le nombre de professeurs, mais on divise les classes de ZEP en deux, on limite l’accès des classes populaires aux HLM pour concentrer ce patrimoine vers les franges les plus pauvres, et parfois non solvables. De quoi fragiliser le modèle de financement du logement social en France, déjà mis à mal par les dernières réformes, et ouvrir la porte à sa privatisation, comme ce fut le cas dans l’Angleterre thatchérienne.

Cette situation, vous la décrivez comme explosive…

Partout en Europe, dans un contexte de flux migratoire intensifié, ce ciblage des politiques publiques vers les plus pauvres – mais qui est le plus pauvre justement, si ce n’est celui qui vient d’arriver d’un territoire 10 fois moins riche ? – provoque inexorablement un rejet de ce qui reste encore du modèle social redistributif par ceux qui en ont le plus besoin et pour le plus grand intérêt de la classe dominante. C’est là que se noue la double insécurité économique et culturelle. Face au démantèlement de l’Etat-providence, à la volonté de privatiser, les classes populaires mettent en avant leur demande de préserver le bien commun comme les services publics. Face à la dérégulation, la dénationalisation, elles réclament un cadre national, plus sûr moyen de défendre le bien commun. Face à l’injonction de l’hypermobilité, à laquelle elles n’ont de toute façon pas accès, elles ont inventé un monde populaire sédentaire, ce qui se traduit également par une économie plus durable. Face à la constitution d’un monde où s’impose l’indistinction culturelle, elles aspirent à la préservation d’un capital culturel protecteur. Souverainisme, protectionnisme, préservation des services publics, sensibilité aux inégalités, régulation des flux migratoires, sont autant de thématiques qui, de Tel-Aviv à Alger, de Detroit à Milan, dessinent un commun des classes populaires dans le monde. Ce soft power des classes populaires fait parfois sortir de leurs gonds les parangons de la mondialisation heureuse. Hillary Clinton en sait quelque chose. Elle n’a non seulement pas compris la demande de protection des classes populaires de la Rust Belt, mais, en plus, elle les a traités de « déplorables ». Qui veut être traité de déplorable ou, de ce côté-ci de l’Atlantique, de Dupont Lajoie ? L’appartenance à la classe moyenne n’est pas seulement définie par un seuil de revenus ou un travail d’entomologiste des populations de l’Insee. C’est aussi et avant tout un sentiment de porter les valeurs majoritaires et d’être dans la roue des classes dominantes du point de vue culturel et économique. Placées au centre de l’échiquier, ces catégories étaient des références culturelles pour les classes dominantes, comme pour les nouveaux arrivants, les classes populaires immigrées. En trente ans, les classes moyennes sont passées du modèle à suivre, l’american ou l’european way of life, au statut de losers. Il y a mieux comme référents pour servir de modèle d’assimilation. Qui veut ressembler à un plouc, un déplorable… ? Personne. Pas même les nouveaux arrivants. L’ostracisation des classes populaires par la classe dominante occidentale, pensée pour discréditer toute contestation du modèle économique mondialisé – être contre, c’est ne pas être sérieux – a, en outre, largement participé à l’effondrement des modèles d’intégration et in fine à la paranoïa identitaire. L’asociété s’est ainsi imposée partout : crise de la représentation politique, citadéllisation de la bourgeoisie, communautarisation. Qui peut dès lors s’étonner que nos systèmes d’organisation politique, la démocratie, soient en danger ?

Voir aussi:

Guilluy / Smith : démolition médiatique demandée!

Ces intellectuels qui pensent mal et que certains médias exécutent


Depuis la parution de leur dernier livre, Christophe Guilluy et Stephen Smith sont victimes d’une fatwa. Coupables de penser différemment de la majorité de la « communauté scientifique », sur les sujets démographiques et migratoires notamment, ils sont minutieusement disqualifiés médiatiquement. 


Une constante des liquidations professionnelles en sciences sociales est le mélange d’attaques personnelles – on s’en prend à l’auteur, on se livre à une analyse psychologique et idéologique de l’auteur, de son passé, de penchants politiques dont il n’est pas forcement conscient lui-même – et de critiques qui, pour être percutantes, nécessitent de faire des raccourcis ou une lecture partielle, parfois des démonstrations frauduleuses. Au mieux, on le taxe d’imprudence, au pire on l’accuse de faire le jeu du camp du mal et des heures les plus sombres qui ne sont pas toutes derrière nous.

Eux pour tous et tous contre un !

Deux affaires récentes racontent le règlement de compte de deux gêneurs, Stephen Smith et Christophe Guilluy. Le premier a écrit un livre traitant de l’avenir des migrations subsahariennes qui a rencontré un gros succès – La ruée vers l’Europe : La jeune Afrique en route pour le Vieux Continent. Le second vient de publier No Society, la fin de la classe moyenne occidentale, dont certains commentaires laissent à penser qu’il n’a pas été vraiment lu. C’est le cas lorsqu’on lui attribue l’expression « ancienne classe moyenne blanche » qui n’apparaît jamais dans son livre (Libération).

Dans ces deux affaires, un procès en légitimité est fait aux auteurs qui, contrairement à ceux qui les ont pris en grippe, n’auraient pas les compétences nécessaires pour traiter les sujets qu’ils abordent.

Deux solutions pour liquider professionnellement un gêneur : ou on y va seul, mais soutenu par des titres qui rendent la contestation quasiment impossible aux yeux du grand public ou des journalistes, ou, n’écoutant que son courage, on chasse en groupe et on se met à plusieurs pour revendiquer les compétences dont manquerait le fauteur de trouble.

« Vrai » scientifique contre « faux » scientifique

Le procès fait à Stephen Smith relève du premier cas. Le démolisseur, François Héran, est présenté, à tour de rôle ou en même temps, comme philosophe, anthropologue,  sociologue ou démographe, sans oublier ses titres académiques : directeur de l’Ined pendant 10 ans, fraîchement nommé professeur au Collège de France et directeur du tout récent Institut Convergences sur les migrations. Avec tout ça, il ne peut que parler d’or. C’est le syndrome Mister Chance. Si l’on y ajoute le fait que la première salve a été tirée dans une revue de réputation scientifique – Population & Sociétés, le quatre pages de l’Ined – l’effet médiatique est assuré. En effet, le plan de bataille a consisté à frapper fort sur le terrain scientifique, puis à finir le travail dans la presse ou sur internet. Le timing est impeccable. Et si l’accusé se rebelle, l’accusateur est à peu près sûr d’avoir le dernier mot ; un journal ne se risquerait pas à refuser ses pages à un aussi grand savant. Sans compter la reprise en boucle sur internet. Aucun décodeur donc pour voir si la réfutation, dénommée scientifique avec une certaine emphase par son auteur et ceux qui le répètent sans en connaître, tient la route. Pas même les « Décodeurs » du Monde qui titra le 12 septembre 2018 sur la « réponse des démographes », comme si un homme aussi prestigieux – « sociologue, anthropologue et démographe, meilleur spécialiste du sujet » – ne pouvait qu’entraîner l’ensemble de la profession derrière lui. Il faut dire, à la décharge du Monde, que la publication dans la supposée très sérieuse revue Population & sociétés de l’Ined peut le laisser croire.

Permis de tuer

Le succès provient d’abord de la satisfaction idéologique procurée par la dénégation d’un risque de migrations massives en provenance de l’Afrique. Ouf ! On croit tenir là un argument scientifique à opposer aux prophètes de malheur. Une lecture attentive et critique est alors impossible, y compris par les chercheurs en sciences sociales qui en auraient les moyens et dont c’est la mission. C’est ainsi que la sociologue Dominique Méda répondit ceci à Guillaume Erner, l’animateur des Matins de France Culture, qui l’interrogeait lundi 15 octobre sur la nécessité d’un débat avec ceux qui pensent mal (il était question de Christophe Guilluy): « Je pense qu’il faut absolument débattre. Je pense à une autre controverse sur l’immigration, le fait qu’on va être submergés par l’Afrique subsaharienne [là, Guillaume Erner intervient pour préciser qu’il s’agit de Stephen Smith et de François Héran qui ont été tous deux reçus, séparément, dans l’émission]… C’est très bien, évidemment il faut donner autant… Les médias ont un rôle absolument central… dans cette question. Il faut donner autant de place à l’un qu’à l’autre… Et montrer… François Héran a fait une démonstration magistrale pour montrer la fausseté des thèses du premier. Donc il faut absolument débattre. »

Cette déclaration de Dominique Méda est intéressante car elle dénote une conception du débat  particulière – débattre, oui, à condition d’être sûr d’écraser son adversaire – et un aveuglement sur les qualités scientifiques de la démonstration de François Héran, qu’elle qualifie de magistrale. Elle a donc privilégié sa satisfaction idéologique à l’interrogation scientifique qui aurait pu l’alerter sur le caractère frauduleux de la démonstration magistrale en question.

On ne « fact-check » pas les bons scientifiques !

J’ai la chance de porter un intérêt aux questions méthodologiques et d’avoir déjà exercé cet intérêt sur les écrits antérieurs de François Héran. Mais, comme on va le voir, la critique était à la portée d’un lecteur ordinaire. François Héran fait l’hypothèse, dans sa démonstration magistrale, qu’il existe un rapport fixe dans le temps entre la population résidant en Afrique subsaharienne et celle d’immigrés de cette origine résidant en Europe, et donc en France. Si la population subsaharienne double d’ici 2050, celle vivant en France doublerait aussi.

La première question à se poser est : est-ce que cette relation repose sur une observation antérieure ? Les instituts de statistiques, lorsqu’ils élaborent des projections, apportent un soin tout particulier à quantifier ce qui s’est passé avant le démarrage de la projection. Il serait, à cet égard, utile d’avoir l’avis de l’Insee qui réalise les projections de population pour la France sur la méthode de projection de François Héran.

Que disent donc les observations rétrospectives de ce rapport supposé fixe par François Héran ? De 1982 à 2015, la population immigrée d’Afrique hors Maghreb a été multipliée par 5,1 en France, alors qu’elle ne l’a été que par 2,4 en Afrique hors Maghreb. L’hypothèse à la base de la démonstration magistrale est donc fausse et conditionne entièrement la conclusion qu’en tire François Héran. Ce raisonnement était à la portée de tous, a fortiori des sept membres du comité de rédaction de Population & Sociétés, dont le rédacteur en chef Gilles Pison. Là aussi, la satisfaction idéologique et le fait que tous partagent la même idéologie ont prévalu sur l’esprit critique attendu d’un comité de rédaction. C’est même la partie de l’histoire qui m’attriste le plus : les relecteurs de la revue de vulgarisation de l’Ined, institut public de recherche scientifique, n’y ont vu que du feu.

Je passe ici sur la morgue et le mépris affichés à l’égard de Stephen Smith dans d’autres publications. Cette exécution s’est faite au prix d’une simplification outrancière de son livre qui, rappelons-le, présente, en conclusion, cinq scénarios qui ne se réduisent pas à celui critiqué par François Héran dans lequel Stephen Smith se demande ce qui se passerait si l’Afrique subsaharienne rejoignait en trente ans un niveau de développement équivalent à celui du Mexique.

« Je ne veux pas dire que Christophe Guilluy serait mandaté par le RN, mais… »

Dans le cas de Christophe Guilluy, traité par le géographe, Jacques Lévy, invité le 9 octobre des Matins de Guillaume Erner sur France Culture, d’ « idéologue géographe du Rassemblement national », ce sont vingt-et-un géographes, historiens, sociologues, politistes, membres de la rédaction de la revue Métropolitiques, qui se sont chargés de l’exécution pour la partie scientifique, quand Thibaut Sardier, journaliste à Libération se chargeait du reste consistant, pour l’essentiel, à trouver une cohérence à des potins glanés auprès de personnes ayant côtoyé Christophe Guilluy ou ayant un avis sur lui.

La tribune des vingt-et-un s’intitule « Inégalités territoriales : parlons-en ! » On est tenté d’ajouter : « Oui, mais entre nous ! ». On se demande si les signataires ont lu le livre qu’ils attaquent, tant la critique sur le fond est générale et superficielle. Ils lui reprochent d’abord le succès de sa France périphérique qui a trouvé trop d’échos, à leur goût, dans la presse, mais aussi auprès des politiques, de gauche comme de droite. Pour le collectif de Métropolitiques, Christophe Guilluy est un démagogue et un prophète de malheur qui, lorsqu’il publie des cartes et des statistiques, use « d’oripeaux scientifiques » pour asséner des « arguments tronqués ou erronés », « fausses vérités » qui ont des « effets performatifs ». Christophe Guilluy aurait donc fait naître ce qu’il décrit, alimentant ainsi « des visions anxiogènes de la France ». Ce collectif se plaint de l’écho donné par la presse aux livres de Christophe Guilluy qui soutient des « théories nocives », alors que ses membres si vertueux, si modestes, si rigoureux et si honnêtes intellectuellement sont si peu entendus et que « le temps presse ». Le même collectif aurait, d’après Thibaut Sardier, déclaré que l’heure n’était plus aux attaques ad hominem ! On croit rêver.

Thibaut Sardier, pour la rubrique « potins », présente Christophe Guilluy comme un « consultant et essayiste […], géographe de formation [qui] a la réputation de refuser les débats avec des universitaires ou les interviews dans certains journaux, comme Libé ». L’expression « géographe de formation » revient dans le texte pour indiquer au lecteur qu’il aurait tort de considérer Christophe Guilluy comme un professionnel de la géographie au même titre que ceux qui figurent dans le collectif, qualifiés de chercheurs, ou que Jacques Lévy. Je cite : « Le texte de Métropolitiques fait écho aux relations houleuses entre l’essayiste, géographe de formation, et les chercheurs. » Si l’on en croit Thibaut Sardier, Christophe Guilluy aurait le temps d’avoir des relations avec LES chercheurs en général. Le même Thibaut Sardier donne à Jacques Lévy, le vrai géographe, l’occasion de préciser sa pensée : « Je ne veux pas dire qu’il serait mandaté par le RN. Mais sa vision de la France et de la société correspond à celle de l’électorat du parti. » Le journaliste a tendance à lui donner raison. La preuve : « La place qu’il accorde à la question identitaire et aux travaux de Michèle Tribalat, cités à droite pour défendre l’idée d’un ‘grand remplacement’ plaide en ce sens. » Thibaut Sardier se fiche pas mal de ce que j’ai pu effectivement écrire – il n’a probablement jamais lu aucun de mes articles ou de mes livres – tout en incitant incidemment le lecteur à l’imiter, compte tenu du danger qu’il encourrait s’il le faisait. Ce qui compte, c’est que je sois lue et citée par les mauvaises personnes.

« Peut-on débattre avec Christophe Guilluy ? »

Ne pas croire non plus à l’affiliation à gauche de Christophe Guilluy. Le vrai géographe en témoigne : « On ne peut être progressiste si on ne reconnaît pas le fait urbain et la disparition des sociétés rurales. » Voilà donc des propos contestant l’identité politique que Christophe Guilluy pourrait se donner pour lui en attribuer une autre, de leur choix, et qui justifie son excommunication, à une époque où il est devenu pourtant problématique d’appeler Monsieur une personne portant une moustache et ayant l’air d’être un homme !

Et l’on reproche à Christophe Guilluy de ne pas vouloir débattre avec ceux qui l’écrasent de leur mépris, dans un article titré, c’est un comble, « Peut-on débattre avec Christophe Guilluy ? » Mais débattre suppose que l’on considère celui auquel on va parler comme son égal et non comme une sorte d’indigent intellectuel que l’on est obligé de prendre en compte, de mauvais gré, simplement parce que ses idées ont du succès et qu’il faut bien combattre les théories nocives qu’il développe.

Voir encore:

Peut-on débattre avec Christophe Guilluy ?

Thibaut Sardier

Le géographe, théoricien de la «France périphérique», annonce dans son dernier essai la disparition de la classe moyenne occidentale. Celui qui avait ouvert une réflexion intéressante sur les inégalités de territoires a radicalisé son discours. Quitte à refuser toute controverse ?

Consultant et essayiste, Christophe Guilluy, géographe de formation, a la réputation de refuser les débats avec des universitaires ou les interviews dans certains journaux, comme Libé. Pourtant, il y a matière à discussion. Son dernier livre, No Society (Flammarion, 2018), élargit à l’Occident des réflexions auparavant centrées sur la France et explique que les classes moyennes ont disparu, créant des sociétés de plus en plus polarisées. D’un côté, Guilluy distingue des dominants vainqueurs de la mondialisation, volontairement retranchés à l’abri des grandes métropoles. De l’autre, l’ancienne classe moyenne blanche, appauvrie, se trouve selon lui reléguée dans les espaces ruraux et périurbains, ce que Guilluy englobe sous le terme «France périphérique» quand il ne s’intéresse qu’à l’Hexagone. Ces perdants de la mondialisation conserveraient toutefois un soft power dont on trouve la trace dans la victoire de Trump et des partis populistes européens, qui défendraient les sujets jusqu’ici négligés par les élites : «Souverainisme, protectionnisme, préservation des services publics, refus des inégalités, régulation des flux migratoires, frontières, ces thématiques dessinent un commun, celui des classes populaires dans le monde», écrit-il.

A ses contradicteurs, Guilluy oppose une fin de non-recevoir. Il invite à ne pas écouter «les médias» et «le monde académique», dont le discours a pour seul but de légitimer les dominants. A plus forte raison s’ils tentent d’introduire de la nuance : «Cette rhétorique […] vise à mettre en avant la complexité pour mieux occulter le réel. Dans ce schéma, les classes populaires n’existent pas, la France périphérique non plus.»

Certains tentent pourtant le débat contradictoire. Dans la tribune qu’ils signent, les membres de la revue en ligne Métropolitiques, spécialisée dans les questions d’aménagement urbain, appellent à des débats sur les enjeux socio-spatiaux que connaissent nos sociétés. Rédacteur en chef de la revue, Aurélien Delpirou (1) justifie l’initiative : «Les débats sont préemptés par quelques figures devenues référentes pour les médias et pour les politiques. Il y a un grand décalage entre les idées qu’ils véhiculent et les savoirs académiques.» Premier objectif : critiquer les éléments qui fondent le raisonnement de Guilluy. Membre de Métropolitiques, la sociologue Anaïs Collet montre la difficulté à parler de disparition de la classe moyenne en France : «Même si on se limite aux « professions intermédiaires » de l’Insee, qui en forment le cœur incontestable pour les définir, les classes moyennes regroupent encore un quart des actifs, une proportion qui reste en croissance.» La chercheuse réfute aussi l’hypothèse d’un décrochage des classes moyennes d’hier, qui seraient devenues les classes populaires d’aujourd’hui : «Depuis trente ans, les enfants des professions intermédiaires sont la catégorie qui a le plus progressé parmi les diplômés du supérieur, même si les plus fragiles sont effectivement en difficulté.»

Mais la controverse entre Guilluy et le monde universitaire dépasse les enjeux scientifiques, elle concerne aussi les questions politiques. Organisé autour de l’idée que «Guilluy contribue, avec d’autres, à alimenter des visions anxiogènes de la France», le texte de Métropolitiques fait écho aux relations houleuses entre l’essayiste, géographe de formation, et les chercheurs. Le 9 octobre sur France Culture, Jacques Lévy le présentait comme un «idéologue géographe du Rassemblement national». Le géographe précise à Libération : «Je ne veux pas dire qu’il serait mandaté par le RN. Mais sa vision de la France et de la société correspond à celle de l’électorat du parti.» Dans No Society, la place qu’il accorde à la question identitaire et aux travaux de Michèle Tribalat, cités à droite pour défendre l’idée d’un «grand remplacement», plaide en ce sens. Difficile pourtant de situer politiquement Guilluy. Docteur en géographie, Laurent Chalard a retracé les étapes de sa réception politique. Il rappelle que ses premières tribunes furent publiées dans des journaux de gauche comme Libé dans les années 2000, et qu’il fut reçu à l’Elysée tant par Nicolas Sarkozy que par François Hollande. «Il a un fort prisme marxiste, avec la grande place donnée aux classes sociales, mais aussi une influence chevènementiste, avec un attachement à la souveraineté nationale», précise Chalard. Pour Lévy, l’opposition nette qu’il opère entre des métropoles mondialisées et des périphéries héritières de la France rurale le rattache à un courant conservateur. «On ne peut être progressiste si on ne reconnaît pas le fait urbain et la disparition des sociétés rurales», explique Lévy.

A la question politique s’ajoute celle de la médiatisation. «Sa médiatisation débute en 2011-2012, lorsque ses thèses sont reprises par Sarkozy,explique Chalard. Cela suscite une méfiance vis-à-vis de Guilluy, qui n’a pas de doctorat et se tient à l’écart du monde universitaire. Certains mandarins estiment que ce sont eux qui devraient avoir voix au chapitre.» A rebours des premiers ouvrages comme l’Atlas des nouvelles fractures françaises ou Fractures françaises, plutôt bien accueillis par nombre d’universitaires qui disent y avoir trouvé des pistes de réflexion, ceux parus à partir de 2014 sont jugés plus polémiques et scientifiquement peu fondés, ce qui débouche sur un «Guilluy bashing» parfois jugé excessif. C’est le cas de Pierre Veltz, économiste et sociologue : «Même s’il n’était pas le premier, il a pointé le fait que les groupes en difficulté ne se trouvent pas uniquement dans les banlieues, qu’il y avait aussi un décrochage dans les périphéries (2)», analyse-t-il avant de nuancer : «Mais contrairement à ce qu’il dit, les fractures sociales traversent les territoires.» Même constat pour l’économiste Laurent Davezies : «Il s’est fait lyncher. Cela l’a poussé à radicaliser son discours.»

Avec ses deux derniers ouvrages, c’est bien cette «radicalisation» qui pose problème, car elle diffuse une vision pessimiste des questions sociales et spatiales qui, par son succès médiatique, devient une prophétie autoréalisatrice. «Après dix ans à répéter les mêmes termes, vous construisez une réalité», explique l’économiste Frédéric Gilli, membre de Métropolitiques. Or, d’autres lectures sont possibles : «En France, les inégalités sont relativement contenues, grâce notamment à la redistribution. Elles sont bien plus fortes dans les pays anglo-saxons ou les pays émergents», souligne Veltz. Christophe Guilluy répondrait sans doute que son dernier livre s’intéresse désormais à tout l’Occident.

Pour l’équipe de Métropolitiques, qui signe la tribune, l’heure n’est plus aux attaques ad hominem. Il ne s’agit pas de refuser à Guilluy sa légitimité à parler, mais de revendiquer la possibilité de débattre pour élaborer une vision plus pertinente du territoire : «La France a longtemps construit son imaginaire territorial autour des campagnes, par opposition à la ville. Malgré l’urbanisation du territoire, nous sommes restés dans ce mode binaire», explique Gilli, qui espère ainsi «une société plus apaisée». Pour cela, il faudra poursuivre les efforts de vulgarisation, dans les médias, «mais aussi dans nos cours, où nous ne cessons de vulgariser les connaissances», souligne Collet. Un défi : il est plus délicat d’émettre des idées complexes que des oppositions binaires entre dominants et dominés, ou entre métropoles et espaces périphériques. Pas facile de nuancer l’idée d’un crépuscule de la France sans nier pour autant les difficultés des territoires.

(1) Trois signataires de la tribune sont cités dans cet article : Aurélien Delpirou, Anaïs Collet et Frédéric Gilli.

(2) La France invisible de Stéphane Beaud, Joseph Confavreux, Jade Lindgaard (La Découverte, 2006).

Voir enfin:

Face au Brexit, à Trump, aux populismes, le Front des bourgeoisies sort les crocs

«There is no society» : la société, ça n’existe pas. C’est en octobre 1987 que Margaret Thatcher prononce ces mots. Depuis, son message a été entendu par l’ensemble des classes dominantes occidentales. Voyage dans l’histoire du scandale de la destruction des classes moyennes, avec « No Society », le dernier livre de Christophe Guilluy, publié chez Flammarion. Extrait 1/2.

Représentantes autoproclamées de la société ouverte et du vivre-ensemble, les classes dominantes et supérieures du XXIe siècle ont réalisé en quelques décennies ce qu’aucune bourgeoisie n’avait réussi auparavant : se mettre à distance, sans conflit ni violence, des classes populaires. La citadellisation, que la technostructure appelle « métropolisation », n’est que la forme géographique du processus de sécession des bourgeoisies au temps de la mondialisation.

Une bourgeoisie asociale

L’arnaque de la société ou de la ville ouverte offre au monde d’en haut une supériorité morale qui lui permet de dissimuler la réalité de son repli géographique et culturel. L’« open society » est certainement la plus grande fake news de ces dernières décennies. En réalité, la société ouverte et mondialisée est bien celle du repli du monde d’en haut sur ses bastions, ses emplois, ses richesses. Abritée dans ses citadelles, la bourgeoisie « progressiste » du XXIe siècle a mis le peuple à distance et n’entend plus prendre en charge ses besoins. L’objectif est désormais de jouir des bienfaits de la mondialisation sans contraintes nationales, sociales, fiscales, culturelles… et, peut-être, demain, biologiques.

En 1979, l’historien et sociologue Christopher Lasch révélait comment la culture du narcissisme et de l’égoïsme allait conduire l’Amérique à sa ruine antisociale. Il dessinait déjà avec précision le portrait d’une nouvelle bourgeoisie asociale, et notamment son incapacité à évoluer et à interagir en dehors de ses propres réseaux. Inadaptée à la vie en société, elle vit aujourd’hui totalement dans le déni de la réalité des classes populaires.

On comprend dans ce contexte que l’émergence du monde des périphéries populaires et la menace qu’elle fait peser aient provoqué un tel vent de panique dans le monde d’en haut. Un petit monde de plus en plus fermé qui semble désormais tenté par la fuite de Varennes.

Vent de panique : le front des bourgeoisies

La vague populiste qui traverse l’Occident a déclenché un mouvement de panique sans précédent au sein de la classe dominante. Rappelons-nous par exemple les réactions politiques, médiatiques, académiques suscitées par le vote en faveur du Brexit ou l’élection de Donald Trump. Insultes, refus affichés des résultats électoraux : le comportement des classes dominantes et supérieures a révélé tous les symptômes de l’hystérie d’une bourgeoisie asociale. Découvrant la fragilité de sa position, le monde d’en haut a réagi en faisant front et en renforçant sa bunkerisation.

Extrait de No Society, Christophe Guilluy, Flammarion, 2018.

Comment l’Etat, et donc les hommes politiques, sont devenus dépendants des marchés financiers

«There is no society» : la société, ça n’existe pas. C’est en octobre 1987 que Margaret Thatcher prononce ces mots. Depuis, son message a été entendu par l’ensemble des classes dominantes occidentales. Voyage dans l’histoire du scandale de la destruction des classes moyennes, avec « No Society », le dernier livre de Christophe Guilluy, publié chez Flammarion. Extrait 2/2.

Atlantico

L’abandon du bien commun accompagne fatalement le processus de sécession du monde d’en haut. Ne pouvant assumer politiquement cette démission, et notamment le démantèlement d’un État-providence jugé trop coûteux, les classes dominantes ont créé les conditions de leur impuissance à réguler, à protéger. Cela passe par une dépendance accrue au système bancaire et aux normes supranationales du modèle mondialisé. Peu à peu, les marges de manœuvre des pouvoirs publics et politiques se sont ainsi réduites. Cet affaiblissement progressif de la gouvernance politique et sociale permet aujourd’hui de justifier la fuite en avant économique et sociétale promue par des classes dominantes désormais irresponsables.

Créer les conditions de l’impuissance des pouvoirs publics

Depuis des décennies, la classe dominante n’a de cesse de déplorer les conséquences d’un modèle économique et sociétal qu’elle promeut par ailleurs avec constance. Elle plébiscite par exemple un modèle fondé sur la division internationale du travail qui condamne les classes populaires occidentales, mais feint de déplorer l’explosion du chômage et de la précarité. Elle abandonne sa souveraineté monétaire à la Commission européenne et aux marchés financiers mais s’inquiète aujourd’hui de l’explosion de la dette et de la dépendance des États aux banques.

Si les effets de la « loi de 1973 » font débat (entre libéraux et antilibéraux de gauche et de droite) et qu’elle n’est évidemment pas la cause unique de l’envolée de l’endettement français (les emprunts d’État existaient avant 1973), elle a néanmoins contribué à créer les conditions d’un renforcement de la dépendance aux marchés financiers. Cette loi, inspirée de la Réserve fédérale américaine, interdit à la Banque centrale de faire des avances au Trésor français, c’est-à-dire de prêter de l’argent à l’État à un taux équivalent à zéro. Obligé de financer son endettement par des emprunts aux banques privées, l’État perd alors une part essentielle de sa souveraineté. Ce mécanisme, opérationnel dans l’ensemble des pays développés, a permis à l’industrie de la finance de prendre le contrôle de l’économie, mais aussi du monde politique. La suite est connue. La dépendance à l’industrie de la finance plonge les États dans la spirale de la dette en justifiant la nécessité d’une baisse des dépenses publiques et à terme le démantèlement de l’État-providence. Protégé par son impuissance, le très rebelle François Hollande pouvait déclarer sans risque : « Mon ennemi, c’est la finance », et suggérer une hypothétique reprise en main du politique sur la banque (la fameuse promesse de la séparation entre les banques de dépôts et les banques d’affaires), il savait que cette proposition transgressive ne serait jamais suivie d’effet.


US Open/50e: Reviens, Arthur, ils sont devenus fous ! (Contrary to Ali or Kaepernick, the Jackie Robinson of tennis stayed committed to respectful dialogue knowing real change came from rational advocacy and hard work not emotional self-indulgence)

9 septembre, 2018

Arthur Ashe participates in a hearing on apartheid, at the United Nations in New York.

Segregation and racism had made me loathe aspects of the white South, but had scarcely left me less of a patriot. In fact, to me and my family, winning a place on our national team would mark my ultimate triumph over all those people who had opposed my career in the South in the name of segregation. (…) Despite segregation, I loved the United States. It thrilled me beyond measure to hear the umpire announce not my name but that of my country: ‘Game, United States,’ ‘Set, United States,’ ‘Game, Set, and Match, United States.’ (…) There were times when I felt a burning sense of shame that I was not with blacks—and whites—standing up to the fire hoses and police dogs. (…) I never went along with the pronouncements of Elijah Muhammad that the white man was the devil and that blacks should be striving for separate development—a sort of American apartheid. That never made sense to me. (…) Jesse, I’m just not arrogant, and I ain’t never going to be arrogant. I’m just going to do it my way. Arthur Ashe
I’ve always believed that every man is my brother. Clay will earn the public’s hatred because of his connections with the Black Muslims. Joe Louis
I’ve been told that Clay has every right to follow any religion he chooses and I agree. But, by the same token, I have every right to call the Black Muslims a menace to the United States and a menace to the Negro race. I do not believe God put us here to hate one another. Cassius Clay is disgracing himself and the Negro race. Floyd Patterson
Clay is so young and has been misled by the wrong people. He might as well have joined the Ku Klux Klan. Floyd Patterson
Bluebirds with bluebirds, red birds with red birds, pigeons with pigeons, eagles with eagles. God didn’t make no mistake! (…) I don’t hate rattlesnakes, I don’t hate tigers — I just know I can’t get along with them. I don’t want to try to eat with them or sleep with them. (…)  I know whites and blacks cannot get along; this is nature. (…) I like what he [George Wallace] says. He says Negroes shouldn’t force themselves in white neighborhoods, and white people shouldn’t have to move out of the neighborhood just because one Negro comes. Now that makes sense. Muhammed Ali
A black man should be killed if he’s messing with a white woman. (…) We’ll kill anybody who tries to mess around with our women. Muhammed Ali
Long before he died, Muhammad Ali had been extolled by many as the greatest boxer in history. Some called him the greatest athlete of the 20th century. Still others, like George W. Bush, when he bestowed the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2005, endorsed Ali’s description of himself as “the greatest of all time.” Ali’s death Friday night sent the paeans and panegyrics to even more exalted heights. Fox Sports went so far as to proclaim Muhammad Ali nothing less than “the greatest athlete the world will ever see.” As a champion in the ring, Ali may have been without equal. But when his idolizers go beyond boxing and sports, exalting him as a champion of civil rights and tolerance, they spout pernicious nonsense. There have been spouters aplenty in the last few days — everyone from the NBA commissioner (“Ali transcended sports with his outsized personality and dedication to civil rights”) to the British prime minister (“a champion of civil rights”) to the junior senator from Massachusetts (“Muhammad Ali fought for civil rights . . . for human rights . . . for peace”). Time for a reality check. It is true that in his later years, Ali lent his name and prestige to altruistic activities and worthy public appeals. By then he was suffering from Parkinson’s disease, a cruel affliction that robbed him of his mental and physical keenness and increasingly forced him to rely on aides to make decisions on his behalf. But when Ali was in his prime, the uninhibited “king of the world,” he was no expounder of brotherhood and racial broad-mindedness. On the contrary, he was an unabashed bigot and racial separatist and wasn’t shy about saying so. In a wide-ranging 1968 interview with Bud Collins, the storied Boston Globe sports reporter, Ali insisted that it was as unnatural to expect blacks and whites to live together as it would be to expect humans to live with wild animals. “I don’t hate rattlesnakes, I don’t hate tigers — I just know I can’t get along with them,” he said. “I don’t want to try to eat with them or sleep with them.” Collins asked: “You don’t think that we can ever get along?” “I know whites and blacks cannot get along; this is nature,” Ali replied. That was why he liked George Wallace, the segregationist Alabama governor who was then running for president. Collins wasn’t sure he’d heard right. “You like George Wallace?” “Yes, sir,” said Ali. “I like what he says. He says Negroes shouldn’t force themselves in white neighborhoods, and white people shouldn’t have to move out of the neighborhood just because one Negro comes. Now that makes sense.” This was not some inexplicable aberration. It reflected a hateful worldview that Ali, as a devotee of Elijah Muhammad and the segregationist Nation of Islam, espoused for years. At one point, he even appeared before a Ku Klux Klan rally. It was “a hell of a scene,” he later boasted — Klansmen with hoods, a burning cross, “and me on the platform,” preaching strict racial separation. “Black people should marry their own women,” Ali declaimed. “Bluebirds with bluebirds, red birds with red birds, pigeons with pigeons, eagles with eagles. God didn’t make no mistake!” In 1975, amid the frenzy over the impending “Thrilla in Manila,” his third title fight with Joe Frazier, Ali argued vehemently in a Playboy interview that interracial couples ought to be lynched. “A black man should be killed if he’s messing with a white woman,” he said. And it was the same for a white man making a pass at a black woman. “We’ll kill anybody who tries to mess around with our women.” But suppose the black woman wanted to be with the white man, the interviewer asked. “Then she dies,” Ali answered. “Kill her too.” Jeff Jacoby
Muhammad Ali was the most controversial boxer in the history of the sport, arguably the most gifted and certainly the best known. His ring glories and his life on the political and racial frontline combine to make him one of the most famous, infamous and discussed figures in modern history. During his life he stood next to Malcolm X at a fiery pulpit, dined with tyrants, kings, crooks, vagabonds, billionaires and from the shell of his awful stumbling silence during the last decade his deification was complete as he struggled with his troubled smile at each rich compliment. (…) He was a one-man revolution and that means he made enemies faster than any boy-fighter – which is what he was when he first became world heavyweight champion – could handle. (…) but (…) His best years as a prize-fighter were denied him and denied us by his refusal to be drafted into the American military system in 1967. At that time he was boxing’s finest fighter, a man so gifted with skills that he knew very little about what his body did in the ring; his instincts, his speed and his developing power at that point of his exile would have ended all arguments over his greatness forever had he been allowed to continue fighting. Ali was out of the ring for three years and seven months and the forced exile took away enough of his skills to deny us the Greatest at his greatest, but it made him the icon he became. “We never saw the best of my guy,” Angelo Dundee told me in Mexico City in 1993. Dundee should know. He had been collecting the fighter’s sweat as the chief trainer from 1960 and would until the ring end in 1981. (…) He had gained universal respect during the break because of his refusal to endorse the bloody conflict in Vietnam, but he often walked a thin line in the 70s with the very people that had been happy to back his cause. He was not as loved then as he is now, and there are some obvious reasons for that. In 1970 there were still papers in Britain that called him Cassius Clay, the birth name he had started to shred the day after beating Sonny Liston for the world title in 1964. In America he still divided the boxing press and the people. In the 70s he attended a Ku Klux Klan meeting, accepted their awards and talked openly and disturbingly about mixed race marriages and a stance he shared with the extremists. His harshest opinions are always overlooked, discarded like his excessive cruelty in the ring, and explained by a misguided concept that everything he said and did, that was either uncomfortable or just wrong, was justifiable under some type of Ali law that insisted there was a twinkle in his eye. There probably was a twinkle in his eye but he had some misguided racist ideas back then and celebrated them. In the ring he had hurt and made people suffer during one-sided fights and spat at the feet of one opponent. He was mean and there is nothing wrong with that in boxing, but he was also cruel to honest fighters, men that had very little of his talent and certainly none of his wealth. The way he treated Joe Frazier before and after their three fights remains a shameful blot on Ali’s legacy. I sat once in dwindling light with Frazier in Philadelphia at the end of three days of talking and listened to his words and watched his tears of hate and utter frustration as he outlined the harm Ali’s words had caused him and his family. Big soft Joe had no problem with the damage Ali’s fists had caused him, that was a fair fight but the verbal slaughter had been a mismatch and recordings of that still make me feel sick. I don’t laugh at that type of abuse. (…) Away from the ring excellence he went to cities in the Middle East to negotiate for the release of hostages and smiled easily when men in masks, carrying AK47s, put blindfolds on him and drove like the lunatics they were through bombed streets. “Hey man, you sure you know where you’re going?” he asked one driver. “I hope you do, coz I can’t see a thing.” He went on too many missions to too many countries for too long, his drive draining his life as he handed out Islamic leaflets. He was often exploited on his many trips, pulled every way and never refusing a request. On a trip to Britain in 2009 he was bussed all over the country for a series of bad-taste dinners that ended with people squatting down next to his wheelchair; Ali’s gaze was off in another realm, but the punters, who had paid hundreds for the sickening pleasure, stuck up their thumbs or made fists for the picture. The great twist in the abhorrent venture was that Ali’s face looked so bad that his head was photo-shopped for a more acceptable Ali face. Who could have possibly sanctioned that atrocity? During his fighting days he had men to protect him, men like Gene Kilroy, the man with the perm, that loved him and helped form a protective guard at his feet to keep the jackals from the meat. When he left the sport and was alone for the first time in the real world, there were people that fought each other to get close, close enough to insert their invisible transfusion tubes deep into his open heart. His daughters started to resurrect their own wall of protection the older they got, switching duties from sitting on Daddy’s lap to watching his back like the devoted sentinels they became. In the end it felt like the whole world was watching his back, watching the last moments under the neon of the King of the World. Steve Bunce
I think Ali is being done a disservice by the way in which he’s these days cast as benign. He was always a lot more complicated than that. (…) Ali has been post-rationalised as a champion of the civil rights movement. But far from promoting the idea of black and white together, his was a much more tricky, divisive politics. John Dower
Far from being embarrassed about sharing jaw-time with the Grand Chief Bigot or whatever the loon in the sheet called himself, Ali boasted about it. The revelation of his cosy chats with white supremacists comes in a television documentary screened on More4. As Ali finds himself overtaken as the most celebrated black American in history, True Stories: Thrilla In Manila provides a timely re-assessment of his politics. (…) Before his third fight with Frazier, Ali was at his most elevated, symbolically as well as in the ring. Hard to imagine when these days he elicits universal reverence, back then he was a figure who divided America, as loathed as he was admired. At the time he was taking his lead from the Nation of Islam, which, in its espousal of a black separatism, found its politics dovetailing with the cross-burning lynch mob out on the political boondocks. Ali was by far the organisation’s most prominent cipher. The film reminds us why. Back then, black sporting prowess reinforced many a prejudiced theory about the black man being good for nothing beyond physical activity. But here was Ali, as quick with his mind as with his fists. When he held court the world listened. Intriguingly, the film reveals, many of his better lines were scripted for him by his Nation of Islam minders. Ferdie Pacheco, the man who converted Ali to the bizarre cause which insisted that a spaceship would imminently arrive in the United States to take the black man to a better place, tells Dower’s cameras that it was he who came up with the line, « No Viet Cong ever called me nigger ». There was never a more succinct summary of America’s hypocrisy in forcing its beleaguered black citizenry to fight in Vietnam. (…) The film suggests it was his opponent who got the blunt end of Ali’s political bludgeon. The pair were once friends and Frazier had supported Ali’s stance on refusing the draft. But leading up to the fight Ali turned on his old mate with a ferocity which makes uncomfortable viewing even 30 years on. Viciously disparaging of Frazier, he calls him an Uncle Tom, a white man’s puppet. Ali riled Frazier to the point where he entered the ring so infuriated that he abandoned his game plan and blindly struck out. So distracted was he by Ali’s politically motivated jibes, he lost. Indeed, what we might be watching in Dower’s film is not so much the apex of Ali’s political potency as the birth of sporting mind games. Jim White
In 1974, in the middle of a Michael Parkinson interview, Muhammad Ali decided to dispense with all the safe conventions of chat show etiquette. “You say I got white friends,” he declared, “I say they are associates.” When his host dared to suggest that the boxer’s trainer of 14 years standing, Angelo Dundee, might be a friend, Ali insisted, gruffly: “He is an associate.” Within seconds, with Parkinson failing to get a word in edgeways, Ali had provided a detailed account of his reasoning. “Elijah Muhammad,” he told the TV viewers of 1970s Middle England, “Is the one who preached that the white man of America, number one, is the Devil!” The whites of America, said Ali, had “lynched us, raped us, castrated us, tarred and feathered us … Elijah Muhammad has been preaching that the white man of America – God taught him – is the blue-eyed, blond-headed Devil!  No good in him, no justice, he’s gonna be destroyed! “The white man is the Devil.  We do believe that.  We know it!” In one explosive, virtuoso performance, Ali had turned “this little TV show” into an exposition of his beliefs, and the beliefs of “two million five hundred” other followers of the radically – to some white minds, dangerously – black separatist religious movement, the Nation of Islam. At the height of his tirade, Ali drew slightly nervous laughter from the studio when he told Parkinson “You are too small mentally to tackle me on anything I represent.” (…) By the time he met Ali in 1962, Malcolm X was Elijah Muhammad’s chief spokesman and most prominent apostle. His belief that violence was sometimes necessary, and the Nation of Islam’s insistence that followers remain separate from and avoid participation in American politics meant that not every civil rights leader welcomed Muhammad Ali joining the movement. “When Cassius Clay joined the Black Muslims [The Nation of Islam],” said Martin Luther King, “he became a champion of racial segregation, and that is what we are fighting against.” The bitter irony is that soon after providing the Nation of Islam with its most famous convert, Malcolm X became disillusioned with the movement.  A trip to Mecca exposed him to white Muslims, shattering his belief that whites were inherently evil.  He broke from the Nation of Islam and toned down his speeches. Ali, though, remained faithful to Elijah Muhammad.  “Turning my back on Malcolm,” he admitted years later, “Was one of the mistakes that I regret most in my life.” (…) By then, though, Ali’s own attitudes to the « blue-eyed devils” had long since mellowed.  In 1975 he converted to the far more conventional Sunni Islam – possibly prompted by the fact that Elijah Muhammad had died of congestive heart failure in the same year, and his son Warith Deen Mohammad had moved the Nation of Islam towards inclusion in the mainstream Islamic community. He rebranded the movement the “World Community of Islam in the West”, only for Farrakhan to break away in 1978 and create a new Nation of Islam, which he claimed remained true to the teachings of “the Master” [Fard]. “The Nation of Islam taught that white people were devils,” he wrote in 2004.  “I don’t believe that now; in fact, I never really believed that. But when I was young, I had seen and heard so many horrible stories about the white man that this made me stop and listen. » The attentive listener to the 1974 interview, might, in fact, have sensed that even then Ali wasn’t entirely convinced about white men being blue-eyed devils. He had, after all, set the bar pretty high for “associates” like Angelo Dundee to become friends. “I don’t have one black friend hardly,” he had said.  “A friend is one who will not even consider [before] giving his life for you.” And, despite calling Parky “the biggest hypocrite in the world” and “a joke”, he could also get a laugh by reassuring the chat show host: “I know you [are] all right.” Adam Lusher
[want police to back off] No. That represented our progressive, our activists, our liberal journalists, our politicians. But it did not represent the overall community because we know for a fact that around the time that Freddie Gray was killed, we start to see homicides increase. We had five homicides in that neighborhood while we were protesting. What I wanted to see happen was that people would build a trust relationship with our police department so that they would feel more comfortable with having conversations with the police about crime in their neighborhood because they would feel safer. So we wanted the police there. We wanted them engaging the community. We didn’t want them there beating the hell out of us. We didn’t want that. (…) We’ve not seen any changes in those relationships. What we have seen was that the police has distanced themselves, and the community has distanced themselves even further. So there is – the divide has really intensified. It hasn’t decreased. And of course, we want to delineate the whole concept of the culture of bad policing that exists. Nobody denies that. But as a result of this, we don’t see the policing – the level of policing we need in our community to keep the crime down in these cities that we’re seeing bleed to death. Reverend Kinji Scott (Baltimore)
The crime victories of the last two decades, and the moral support on which law and order depends, are now in jeopardy thanks to the falsehoods of the Black Lives Matter movement. Police operating in inner-city neighborhoods now find themselves routinely surrounded by cursing, jeering crowds when they make a pedestrian stop or try to arrest a suspect. Sometimes bottles and rocks are thrown. Bystanders stick cell phones in the officers’ faces, daring them to proceed with their duties. Officers are worried about becoming the next racist cop of the week and possibly losing their livelihood thanks to an incomplete cell phone video that inevitably fails to show the antecedents to their use of force.  (…) As a result of the anti-cop campaign of the last two years and the resulting push-back in the streets, officers in urban areas are cutting back on precisely the kind of policing that led to the crime decline of the 1990s and 2000s. (…) On the other hand, the people demanding that the police back off are by no means representative of the entire black community. Go to any police-neighborhood meeting in Harlem, the South Bronx, or South Central Los Angeles, and you will invariably hear variants of the following: “We want the dealers off the corner.” “You arrest them and they’re back the next day.” “There are kids hanging out on my stoop. Why can’t you arrest them for loitering?” “I smell weed in my hallway. Can’t you do something?” I met an elderly cancer amputee in the Mount Hope section of the Bronx who was terrified to go to her lobby mailbox because of the young men trespassing there and selling drugs. The only time she felt safe was when the police were there. “Please, Jesus,” she said to me, “send more police!” The irony is that the police cannot respond to these heartfelt requests for order without generating the racially disproportionate statistics that will be used against them in an ACLU or Justice Department lawsuit. Unfortunately, when officers back off in high crime neighborhoods, crime shoots through the roof. Our country is in the midst of the first sustained violent crime spike in two decades. Murders rose nearly 17 percent in the nation’s 50 largest cities in 2015, and it was in cities with large black populations where the violence increased the most. (…) I first identified the increase in violent crime in May 2015 and dubbed it “the Ferguson effect.” (…) The number of police officers killed in shootings more than doubled during the first three months of 2016. In fact, officers are at much greater risk from blacks than unarmed blacks are from the police. Over the last decade, an officer’s chance of getting killed by a black has been 18.5 times higher than the chance of an unarmed black getting killed by a cop. (…) We have been here before. In the 1960s and early 1970s, black and white radicals directed hatred and occasional violence against the police. The difference today is that anti-cop ideology is embraced at the highest reaches of the establishment: by the President, by his Attorney General, by college presidents, by foundation heads, and by the press. The presidential candidates of one party are competing to see who can out-demagogue President Obama’s persistent race-based calumnies against the criminal justice system, while those of the other party have not emphasized the issue as they might have. I don’t know what will end the current frenzy against the police. What I do know is that we are playing with fire, and if it keeps spreading, it will be hard to put out. Heather Mac Donald
It’s ironic that Jerry’s longest-lasting legacy is that the big shoe company co-opted his slogan. Nike has Just Do It in all of their ad campaigns.
Sam Leff (Yippie, close friend of Hoffman’s)
Je ne vais pas afficher de fierté pour le drapeau d’un pays qui opprime les Noirs. Il y a des cadavres dans les rues et des meurtriers qui s’en tirent avec leurs congés payés. Colin Kaepernick
Je pense que tous les athlètes, tous les humains et tous les Afro-Américains devraient être totalement reconnaissants et honorés [par les manifestations lancées par les anciens joueurs de la NFL Colin Kaepernick et Eric Reid]. Serena Williams
Je ne suis pas une tricheuse! Vous me devez des excuses! (…) Je ne suis pas une tricheuse! Je suis mère de famille, je n’ai jamais triché de ma vie ! Serena Williams
For her country, Osaka has already succeeded in a major milestone: She is the first Japanese woman to reach the final of any Grand Slam. And she’s currently her country’s top-ranked player. Yet in Japan, where racial homogeneity is prized and ethnic background comprises a big part of cultural belonging, Osaka is considered hafu or half Japanese. Born to a Japanese mother and a Haitian father, Osaka grew up in New York. She holds dual American and Japanese passports, but plays under Japan’s flag. Some hafu, like Miss Universe Japan Ariana Miyamoto, have spoken publicly about the discrimination the term can confer. “I wonder how a hafu can represent Japan,” one Facebook user wrote of Miyamoto, according to Al Jazeera America’s translation. For her part, Osaka has spoken repeatedly about being proud to represent Japan, as well as Haiti. But in a 2016 USA Today interview she also noted, “When I go to Japan people are confused. From my name, they don’t expect to see a black girl.” On the court, Osaka has largely been embraced as one of her country’s rising stars. Off court, she says she’s still trying to learn the language. “I can understand way more Japanese than I can speak,” she said. (…) Earlier this year, Osaka reveled a four-word mantra keeps her steady through tough matches: “What would Serena do?” Her idolization of the 23 Grand Slam-winning titan is well-known. “She’s the main reason why I started playing tennis,” Osaka told the New York Times. Time
Des sportifs semblent désormais plus facilement se mettre en avant pour évoquer leurs convictions, que ce soient des championnes de tennis ou des footballeurs. Mais ces athlètes activistes restent encore minoritaires. Peu ont suivi Kaepernick lorsqu’il s’est agenouillé pendant l’hymne national. La plupart se focalisent sur leur sport, ils ne sont pas vraiment désireux de jouer les trouble-fête. Dans notre culture, ces sportifs sont des dieux, qui peuvent exercer une influence positive. Ils peuvent être un bon exemple d’engagement civique pour des jeunes. Et puis une bonne controverse comme l’affaire Kaepernick permet de pimenter un peu le sport et d’élargir le débat au-delà du jeu. Orin Starn (anthropologue)
Son genou droit posé à terre le 1er septembre 2016 a fait de lui un paria. Ce jour-là, Colin Kaepernick, quarterback des San Francisco 49ers, avait une nouvelle fois décidé de ne pas se lever pour l’hymne national. Coupe afro et regard grave, il était resté dans cette position pour protester contre les violences raciales et les bavures policières qui embrasaient les Etats-Unis. Plus d’un an après, la polémique reste vive. Son boycott lui vaut toujours d’être marginalisé et tenu à l’écart par la Ligue nationale de football américain (NFL). L’affaire rebondit ces jours, à l’occasion des débuts de la saison de la NFL. Sans contrat depuis mars, Colin Kaepernick est de facto un joueur sans équipe, à la recherche d’un nouvel employeur. (…) Plus surprenant, une centaine de policiers new-yorkais ont manifesté ensemble fin août à Brooklyn, tous affublés d’un t-shirt noir avec le hashtag #imwithkap. Le célèbre policier Frank Serpico, 81 ans, qui a dénoncé la corruption généralisée de la police dans les années 1960 et inspiré Al Pacino pour le film Serpico (1973), en faisait partie. Les sportifs américains sont nombreux à afficher leur soutien à Colin Kaepernick. C’est le cas notamment des basketteurs Kevin Durant ou Stephen Curry, des Golden State Warriors. (…) La légende du baseball Hank Aaron fait également partie des soutiens inconditionnels de Colin Kaepernick. Sans oublier Tommie Smith, qui lors des Jeux olympiques de Mexico en 1968 avait, sur le podium du 200 mètres, levé son poing ganté de noir contre la ségrégation raciale, avec son comparse John Carlos. Le geste militant à répétition de Colin Kaepernick, d’abord assis puis agenouillé, a eu un effet domino. Son coéquipier Eric Reid l’avait immédiatement imité la première fois qu’il a mis le genou à terre. Une partie des joueurs des Cleveland Browns continuent, en guise de solidarité, de boycotter l’hymne des Etats-Unis, joué avant chaque rencontre sportive professionnelle. La footballeuse homosexuelle Megan Rapinoe, championne olympique en 2012 et championne du monde en 2015, avait elle aussi suivi la voie de Colin Kaepernick et posé son genou à terre. Mais depuis que la Fédération américaine de football (US Soccer) a édicté un nouveau règlement, en mars 2017, qui oblige les internationaux à se tenir debout pendant l’hymne, elle est rentrée dans le rang. Colin Kaepernick lui-même s’était engagé à se lever pour l’hymne pour la saison 2017. Une promesse qui n’a pas pour autant convaincu la NFL de le réintégrer. Barack Obama avait pris sa défense; Donald Trump l’a enfoncé. En pleine campagne, le milliardaire new-yorkais avait qualifié son geste d’«exécrable», l’hymne et le drapeau étant sacro-saints aux Etats-Unis. Il a été jusqu’à lui conseiller de «chercher un pays mieux adapté». Les chaussettes à motifs de cochons habillés en policiers que Colin Kaepernick a portées pendant plusieurs entraînements – elles ont été très remarquées – n’ont visiblement pas contribué à le rendre plus sympathique à ses yeux. Mais ni les menaces de mort ni ses maillots brûlés n’ont calmé le militantisme de Colin Kaepernick. Un militantisme d’ailleurs un peu surprenant et parfois taxé d’opportunisme: métis, de mère blanche et élevé par des parents adoptifs blancs, Colin Kaepernick n’a rallié la cause noire, et le mouvement Black Lives Matter, que relativement tardivement. Avant Kaepernick, la star de la NBA LeBron James avait défrayé la chronique en portant un t-shirt noir avec en lettres blanches «Je ne peux pas respirer». Ce sont les derniers mots d’un jeune Noir américain asthmatique tué par un policier blanc. Par ailleurs, il avait ouvertement soutenu Hillary Clinton dans sa course à l’élection présidentielle. Timidement, d’autres ont affiché leurs convictions politiques sur des t-shirts, mais sans aller jusqu’au boycott de l’hymne national, un geste très contesté. L’élection de Donald Trump et le drame de Charlottesville provoqué par des suprémacistes blancs ont contribué à favoriser l’émergence de ce genre de protestations. Ces comportements signent un retour du sportif engagé, une espèce presque en voie de disparition depuis les années 1960-1970, où de grands noms comme Mohamed Ali, Billie Jean King ou John Carlos ont porté leur militantisme à bras-le-corps. Au cours des dernières décennies, l’heure n’était pas vraiment à la revendication politique, confirme Orin Starn, professeur d’anthropologie culturelle à l’Université Duke en Caroline du Nord. A partir des années 1980, c’est plutôt l’image du sportif businessman qui a primé, celui qui s’intéresse à ses sponsors, à devenir le meilleur possible, soucieux de ne déclencher aucune polémique. Un sportif lisse avant tout motivé par ses performances et sa carrière. Comme le basketteur Michael Jordan ou le golfeur Tiger Woods. Le Temps
It was an incredible match. I mean, Arthur was an innovator. It was the first time he sort of sat down at the side of the court in between — they didn’t have chairs at the side of the court for a long time; we sort of had to towel off and go on — but he would sit and cover his head with the towel and just think. It was the first time you were conscious of the mental side of tennis. Arthur was instrumental in that. . . . Arthur was a thinker. Virginia Wade
Arthur didn’t need Vietnam. Arthur had his own Vietnam right there in the United States in those days, and some of the things that I saw while I was there — he didn’t need that. The thing that I always think about, and this was always the most important thing in my mind, was that Arthur represented so many possibilities. Arthur was the first to do so much so often that those of us who knew him would say: ‘What’s next? What mountain was he going to climb next?’ Arthur was always different. (…) Growing up, Arthur was a sponge. . . . That was just his nature. He was a voracious reader, and he had to satisfy his intellect. I tell people if Arthur had concentrated on just tennis, he would have been the best in the world. But tennis was a vehicle. . . . He wanted to be able to take kids outside of their environs, outside of their element for a little while and expose them to what they can be. . . . And, let’s face it, most parents don’t have the wherewithal to do that. It’s not easy. What happens is you get somebody like Arthur — and following Arthur, LeBron James is starting to do things — to expose kids. It’s so important that that happens. (…) “Until Arthur came along and Althea came along, tennis was a sport of the elites. Then you get two playground children — one from Harlem, one from Richmond — to break into the bigs. People had to stop and think about that. It opened the doors for other people, and that’s what it was all about. That’s what it was all about for him. Johnnie Ashe
The Apollo program was a national effort that depended on American derring-do and sacrifice. History is usually airbrushed to remove a figure who has fallen out of favor with a dictatorship, or to hide away an episode of national shame. Leave it to Hollywood to erase from a national triumph its most iconic moment. The new movie First Man, a biopic about the Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, omits the planting of the American flag during his historic walk on the surface of the moon. Ryan Gosling, who plays Armstrong in the film, tried to explain the strange editing of his moonwalk: “This was widely regarded in the end as a human achievement. I don’t think that Neil viewed himself as an American hero.” Armstrong was a reticent man, but he surely considered himself an American, and everyone else considered him a hero. (“You’re a hero whether you like it or not,” one newspaper admonished him on the 10th anniversary of the landing.) Gosling added that Armstrong’s walk “transcended countries and borders,” which is literally true, since it occurred roughly 238,900 miles from Earth, although Armstrong got there on an American rocket, walked in an American spacesuit, and returned home to America. (…) It was a chapter in a space race between the United States and the Soviet Union that involved national prestige and the perceived worth of our respective economic and political systems. The Apollo program wasn’t about the brotherhood of man, but rather about achieving a national objective before a hated and feared adversary did. The mission of Apollo 11 was, appropriately, soaked in American symbolism. The lunar module was called Eagle, and the command module Columbia. There had been some consideration to putting up a U.N. flag, but it was scotched — it would be an American flag and only an American flag. (…) There may be a crass commercial motive in the omission — the Chinese, whose market is so important to big films, might not like overt American patriotic fanfare. Neither does much of our cultural elite. They may prefer not to plant the flag — but the heroes of Apollo 11 had no such compunction. National Review
Billed as being based on “a crazy, outrageous incredible true story” about how a black cop infiltrated the KKK, Spike Lee’s BlacKkKlansman would be more accurately described as the story of how a black cop in 1970s Colorado Springs spoke to the Klan on the phone. He pretended to be a white supremacist . . . on the phone. That isn’t infiltration, that’s prank-calling. A poster for the movie shows a black guy wearing a Klan hood. Great starting point for a comedy, but it didn’t happen. The cop who actually attended KKK meetings undercover was a white guy (played by Adam Driver). These led . . . well, nowhere in particular. No plot was foiled. Those meetups mainly revealed that Klansmen behave exactly how you’d expect Klansmen to behave. The movie is a typical Spike Lee joint: A thin story is told in painfully didactic style and runs on far too long. (…)  Washington (son of Denzel) has an easygoing charisma as the unflappable Ron Stallworth, a rookie cop in Colorado Springs who volunteers to go undercover as a detective in 1972, near the height of the Black Power movement and a moment when law enforcement was closely tracking the activities of radicals such as Stokely Carmichael, a.k.a. Kwame Ture, a speech of whose Stallworth says he attended while posing as an ordinary citizen. In the movie, Stallworth experiences an awakening of black pride and falls for a student leader, Patrice (a luminous Laura Harrier, who also played Peter Parker’s girlfriend in Spider-Man: Homecoming), inspiring in him the need to do something for his people. (…) The Klan also turn out to be grandstanders and blowhards given to Carmichael-style paranoid prophecies and seem to hope to troll their enemies into attacking them. When Lee realizes he needs something to actually happen besides racist talk, he turns to a subplot featuring a white-supremacist lady running around with a purse full of C-4 explosive with which she intends to blow up the black radicals. It’s so unconvincing that you watch it thinking, “I really doubt this happened.” It didn’t. The only other tense moment in the film, in which Driver’s undercover cop (who is Jewish) is nearly subjected to a lie-detector test about his religion by a suspicious Klansman, is also fabricated. Lee frames his two camps as opposites, but whether we’re with the black-power types or the white-power yokels, they’re equally wrong about the race war they seem to yearn for. The two sides are equally far from the stable center, the color-blind institution holding society together, which turns out to be . . . the police! After some talk from the radical Patrice (whose character is also a fabrication) about how the whole system is corrupt and she could never date a “pig,” and a scene in which Stallworth implies the police’s code of covering for one another reminds him of the Klan, Lee winds up having the police unite to fight racism, with one bad apple expunged and everybody else on the otherwise all-white force supporting Ron. That Spike Lee has turned in a pro-cop film has to be counted one of the stranger cultural developments of 2018, but Lee seems to have accidentally aligned with cops in the course of issuing an anti-Trump broadside. (…) (See also: an introduction in which Alec Baldwin plays a Southern cracker called Dr. Kennebrew Beauregard who rants about desegregation for several minutes, then is never seen again.) Lee’s other major goal is to link Stallworth’s story to Trumpism using David Duke. Duke, like Trump, said awful things at the time of the Charlottesville murder and played a part in the Stallworth story when the cop was assigned to protect the Klan leader (played by Topher Grace) on a visit to Colorado Springs and later threw his arm around him while posing for a picture. Saying Duke presaged Trump seems like a stretch, though. After all the nudge-nudge MAGA lines uttered by the Klansmen throughout the film, the let-me-spell-it-out-for-you finale, with footage from the Charlottesville white-supremacist rally, seems de trop. BlacKkKlansman was timed to hit theaters one year after the anniversary of the horror in Virginia. That Charlottesville II attracted only two dozen pathetic dorks to the cause of white supremacy would seem to undermine the coda. The Klan’s would-be successors, far from being more emboldened than they have been since Stallworth’s time, appear to be nearly extinct. National review
The all-seeing social-justice eye penetrates every aspect of our lives: sports, movies, public monuments, social media, funerals . . .A definition of totalitarianism might be the saturation of every facet of daily life by political agendas and social-justice messaging. At the present rate, America will soon resemble the dystopias of novels such as 1984 and Brave New World in which all aspects of life are warped by an all-encompassing ideology of coerced sameness. Or rather, the prevailing orthodoxy in America is the omnipresent attempt of an elite — exempt from the consequences of its own ideology thanks to its supposed superior virtue and intelligence — to mandate an equality of result. We expect their 24/7 political messaging on cable-channel news networks, talk radio, or print and online media. And we concede that long ago an NPR, CNN, MSNBC, or New York Times ceased being journalistic entities as much as obsequious megaphones of the progressive itinerary. But increasingly we cannot escape anywhere the lidless gaze of our progressive lords, all-seeing, all-knowing from high up in their dark towers. (…) Americans have long accepted that Hollywood movies no longer seek just to entertain or inform, but to indoctrinate audiences by pushing progressive agendas. That commandment also demands that America be portrayed negatively — or better yet simply written out of history. Take the new film First Man, about the first moon landing. Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong became famous when he emerged from The Eagle, the two-man lunar module, and planted an American flag on the moon’s surface. Yet that iconic act disappears from the movie version. (At least Ryan Gosling, who plays Armstrong, does not walk out of the space capsule to string up a U.N. banner.) Gosling claimed that the moon landing should not be seen as an American effort. Instead, he advised, it should be “widely regarded as a human achievement” — as if any nation’s efforts or the work of the United Nations in 1969 could have pulled off such an astounding and dangerous enterprise. I suppose we are to believe that Gosling’s Canada might just as well have built a Saturn V rocket. (…) Sports offers no relief. It is now no more a refuge from political indoctrination than is Hollywood. Yet it is about as difficult to find a jock who can pontificate about politics as it is to encounter a Ph.D. or politico who can pass or pitch. The National Football League, the National Basketball Association, and sports channels are now politicalized in a variety of ways, from not standing up or saluting the flag during the National Anthem to pushing social-justice issues as part of televised sports analysis. What a strange sight to see tough sportsmen of our Roman-style gladiatorial arenas become delicate souls who wilt on seeing a dreaded hand across the heart during the playing of the National Anthem. Even when we die, we do not escape politicization. At a recent eight-hour, televised funeral service for singer Aretha Franklin, politicos such as Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton went well beyond their homages into political harangues. Pericles or Lincoln they were not. (…) Politics likewise absorbed Senator John McCain’s funeral the next day. (…) Even the long-ago dead are fair game. Dark Age iconoclasm has returned to us with a fury. Any statue at any time might be toppled — if it is deemed to represent an idea or belief from the distant past now considered racist, sexist, or somehow illiberal. Representations of Columbus, the Founding Fathers, and Confederate soldiers have all been defaced, knocked down, or removed. The images of mass murderers on the left are exempt, on the theory that good ends always allow a few excessive means. So are the images and names of robber barons and old bad white guys, whose venerable eponymous institutions offer valuable brands that can be monetized. At least so far, we are not rebranding Stanford and Yale with indigenous names. Victor Davis Hanson
Johnnie Ashe, like Wade, remembers his brother as an intellectual and an innovator, as someone who was meant to change the world. That’s why, when Johnnie came to understand that the military wouldn’t send two brothers into active duty in a war zone at the same time, he volunteered for a second tour in Vietnam. He was three months away from coming home.Since Johnnie stayed on active duty, Arthur could compete for both the U.S. amateur and U.S. Open championships in 1968. He is the only person to have won both. Ashe had many projects that helped extend his legacy beyond that of a pioneering tennis player who won 33 career singles championships; ever the thinker, bringing tennis and educational opportunities to youths was Ashe’s passion. He helped found the National Junior Tennis & Learning network in 1968, a grass-roots organization designed to make tennis more accessible. Today, the NJTL receives significant funding from the USTA. The Washington Post
Arthur Ashe always had an exquisite sense of timing, whether he was striking a topspin backhand or choosing when to speak out for liberty and justice for all. So we shouldn’t be surprised that the 50th anniversary of his victory at the first U.S. Open — a milestone to be celebrated on Saturday at the grand stadium bearing his name — coincides with a national conversation on the First Amendment rights and responsibilities of professional athletes. Mr. Ashe has been gone for 25 years, struck down at the age of 49 by AIDS, inflicted by an H.I.V.-tainted blood transfusion. But the example he set as a champion on and off the court has never been more relevant. As Colin Kaepernick, LeBron James and others strive to use their athletic stardom as a platform for social justice activism, they might want to look back at what this soft-spoken African-American tennis star accomplished during the age of Jim Crow and apartheid. (…) He began his career as the Jackie Robinson of men’s tennis — a vulnerable and insecure racial pioneer instructed by his coaches to hold his tongue during a period when the success of desegregation was still in doubt. At the same time, Mr. Ashe’s natural shyness and deferential attitude toward his elders and other authority figures all but precluded involvement in the civil rights struggle and other political activities during his high school and college years. The calculus of risk and responsibility soon changed, however, as Mr. Ashe reinvented himself as a 25-year-old activist-in-training during the tumultuous year of 1968. With his stunning victory in September at the U.S. Open, where he overcame the best pros in the world as a fifth-seeded amateur, he gained a new confidence that affected all aspects of his life. Mr. Ashe’s political transformation had begun six months earlier when he gave his first public speech, a discourse on the potential importance of black athletes as community leaders, delivered at a Washington forum hosted by the Rev. Jefferson Rogers, a prominent black civil rights leader Mr. Ashe had known since childhood. Mr. Rogers had been urging Mr. Ashe to speak out on civil rights issues for some time, and when he finally did so, it released a spirit of civic engagement that enveloped his life. “This is the new Arthur Ashe,” the reporter Neil Amdur observed in this paper, “articulate, mature, no longer content to sit back and let his tennis racket do the talking.” In part, Mr. Ashe’s new attitude reflected a determination to make amends for his earlier inaction. “There were times, in fact,” he recalled years later, “when I felt a burning sense of shame that I was not with other blacks — and whites — standing up to the fire hoses and the police dogs, the truncheons, bullets and bombs.” He added: “As my fame increased, so did my anguish.” During the violent spring of 1968, the assassinations of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., whom Mr. Ashe had come to admire above all other black leaders, and Senator Robert F. Kennedy, whom he had supported as a presidential candidate, shook Mr. Ashe’s faith in America. But he refused to surrender to disillusionment. Instead he dedicated himself to active citizenship on a level rarely seen in the world of sports. His activism began with an effort to expand economic and educational opportunities for young urban blacks, but his primary focus soon turned to the liberation of black South Africans suffering under apartheid. Later he supported a wide variety of causes, playing an active role in campaigns for black political power, high educational standards for college athletes, criminal justice reform, equality of the sexes and AIDS awareness. He also became involved in numerous philanthropic enterprises. By the end of his life, Mr. Ashe’s success on the court was no longer the primary source of his celebrity. He had become, along with Muhammad Ali, a prime example of an athlete who transcended the world of sports. In 2016, President Barack Obama identified Mr. Ali and Mr. Ashe as the sports figures he admired above all others. While noting the sharp contrast in their personalities, he argued that both men were “transformational” activists who pushed the nation down the same path to freedom and democracy. Mr. Ashe practiced his own distinctive brand of activism, one based on unemotional appeals to common sense and enlightened philosophical principles as simple as the Golden Rule. He had no facility for, and little interest in, using agitation and drama to draw attention to causes, no matter how worthy they might be. A champion of civility, he always kept his cool and never raised his voice in anger or frustration. Viewing emotional appeals as self-defeating and even dangerous, he relied on reasoned persuasion derived from careful preparation and research. Mr. Ashe preferred to make a case in written form, or as a speaker on the college lecture circuit or as a witness before the United Nations. His periodic opinion pieces in The Washington Post and other newspapers tackled a number of thorny issues related to sports and the broader society, including upholding high academic standards for college athletic eligibility and the expulsion of South Africa from international athletic competition. In the 1980s, he devoted several years to researching and writing “A Hard Road to Glory,” a groundbreaking three-volume history of African-American athletes. In retirement Mr. Ashe became a popular tennis broadcaster known for his clever quips, yet as an activist he never resorted to sound bites that excited audiences with reductionist slogans. Often working behind the scenes, he engaged in high-profile public debate only when he felt there was no other way to advance his point of view. Suspicious of quick fixes, he advocated incremental and gradual change as the best guarantor of true progress. Yet he did not let this commitment to long-term solutions interfere with his determination to give voice to the voiceless. Known as a risk taker on the court, he was no less bold off the court, where he never shied away from speaking truth to power. He was arrested twice, in 1985 while participating in an anti-apartheid demonstration in front of the South African Embassy and in 1992 while picketing the White House in protest of the George H.W. Bush administration’s discriminatory policies toward Haitian refugees. The first arrest embarrassed the American tennis establishment, which soon removed him from his position as captain of the U.S. Davis Cup team, and the second occurred during the final months of his life as he struggled with the ravages of AIDS. In both cases he accepted the consequences of his principled activism with dignity. Mr. Ashe was a class act in every way, a man who practiced what he preached without being diverted by the temptations of power, fame or fortune. When we place his approach to dissent and public debate in a contemporary frame, it becomes obvious that his legacy is the antithesis of the scorched-earth politics of Trumpism. If Mr. Ashe were alive today, he would no doubt be appalled by the bullying tactics and insulting rhetoric of a president determined to punish athletes who have the courage and audacity to speak out against police brutality toward African-Americans. And yet we can be equally sure that Mr. Ashe would honor his commitment to respectful dialogue, refusing to lower himself to the president’s level of unrestrained invective. (…) Mr. Ashe would surely be gratified that to date, this high road has led to more protest, not less, confirming his belief that real change comes from rational advocacy and hard work, not emotional self-indulgence. As we celebrate his remarkable life and legacy a quarter-century after his death, we can be confident that Mr. Ashe would rush to join today’s activists in spirit and solidarity, solemnly but firmly taking a knee for social justice. Raymond Arsenault

Reviens, Arthur, Ils sont devenus fous !

En ces temps devenus fous …

Où après les médias et, enterrements compris, la haute fonction publique

Et, entre le négationnisme (pas de drapeau américain sur la lune) et la réécriture de l’histoire (les quelques mois d’infiltration du KKK par une équipe de policiers noir et blanc dans une petite ville du Colrado au début des années 70 transformés en film blaxploitation avec toute l’explosive subtilité d’un Spike Lee), Hollywood …

Comme au niveau des grosses multinationales du matériel de sport à l’occasion du 30e anniversaire d’un slogan de toute évidence fauché au yippie Jerry Rubin

Mais faussement attribué (droits obligent ?) aux dernière paroles du tristement célèbre premier exécuté (volontaire et déjà gratifié par Norman Mailer de son panégyrique littéraire) du retour de la peine de mort aux Etats-Unis …

La marchandisation d’un joueur (métis multimillionnaire abandonné par son père noir et adopté par des parents blancs) dont le seul titre de gloire est, outre ses chaussettes anti-policiers et ses tee-shirts à la gloire de Castro, son refus d’honorer le drapeau de son pays pour prétendument dénoncer les brutalités policières contre les noirs …

Tout semble dorénavant permis pour dénigrer l’actuel président américain et les forces de police …

Comment ne pas repenser …

En ce 50e anniversaire …

De la première victoire, dès la création du premier tournoi professionnel, d’un joueur de tennis noir à une épreuve de Grand chelem …

A la figure hélas oubliée d’un Arthur Ashe

Qui, de l’apartheid sud-africain à la défense des réfugiés haïtiens ou des enfants atteints du SIDA jusqu’à l’ONU …

Et loin des outrances racistes à l’époque d’un Mohamed Ali …

Ou de la violence actuelle (et surtout de ses conséquences sur les plus démunis quoi qu’en dise son biographe) du collectif Black lives matter que prétend défendre un Colin Kaeperinck …

Et sans parler du lamentable scandale, au nom d’un prétendu sexisme et face à une improbable nippo-haïtienne élevée aux Etats-Unis mais ne parlant pas japonais, de Serena Williams en finale du même US Open hier …

Avait toujours su joindre l’intelligence et le respect des autres comme de son propre pays à la plus redoutable des efficacités ?

What Arthur Ashe Knew About Protest

The tennis great was committed to respectful dialogue, refusing to lower himself to the level of invective

Raymond Arsenault
Mr. Arsenault is a biographer of Arthur Ashe.
The New York Times
Sept. 8, 2018

Arthur Ashe always had an exquisite sense of timing, whether he was striking a topspin backhand or choosing when to speak out for liberty and justice for all. So we shouldn’t be surprised that the 50th anniversary of his victory at the first U.S. Open — a milestone to be celebrated on Saturday at the grand stadium bearing his name — coincides with a national conversation on the First Amendment rights and responsibilities of professional athletes.

Mr. Ashe has been gone for 25 years, struck down at the age of 49 by AIDS, inflicted by an H.I.V.-tainted blood transfusion. But the example he set as a champion on and off the court has never been more relevant. As Colin Kaepernick, LeBron James and others strive to use their athletic stardom as a platform for social justice activism, they might want to look back at what this soft-spoken African-American tennis star accomplished during the age of Jim Crow and apartheid.

The first thing they will discover is that, like most politically motivated athletes, Mr. Ashe turned to activism only after his formative years as an emerging sports celebrity. He began his career as the Jackie Robinson of men’s tennis — a vulnerable and insecure racial pioneer instructed by his coaches to hold his tongue during a period when the success of desegregation was still in doubt. At the same time, Mr. Ashe’s natural shyness and deferential attitude toward his elders and other authority figures all but precluded involvement in the civil rights struggle and other political activities during his high school and college years.

The calculus of risk and responsibility soon changed, however, as Mr. Ashe reinvented himself as a 25-year-old activist-in-training during the tumultuous year of 1968. With his stunning victory in September at the U.S. Open, where he overcame the best pros in the world as a fifth-seeded amateur, he gained a new confidence that affected all aspects of his life.

Mr. Ashe’s political transformation had begun six months earlier when he gave his first public speech, a discourse on the potential importance of black athletes as community leaders, delivered at a Washington forum hosted by the Rev. Jefferson Rogers, a prominent black civil rights leader Mr. Ashe had known since childhood. Mr. Rogers had been urging Mr. Ashe to speak out on civil rights issues for some time, and when he finally did so, it released a spirit of civic engagement that enveloped his life. “This is the new Arthur Ashe,” the reporter Neil Amdur observed in this paper, “articulate, mature, no longer content to sit back and let his tennis racket do the talking.”

In part, Mr. Ashe’s new attitude reflected a determination to make amends for his earlier inaction. “There were times, in fact,” he recalled years later, “when I felt a burning sense of shame that I was not with other blacks — and whites — standing up to the fire hoses and the police dogs, the truncheons, bullets and bombs.” He added: “As my fame increased, so did my anguish.”

During the violent spring of 1968, the assassinations of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., whom Mr. Ashe had come to admire above all other black leaders, and Senator Robert F. Kennedy, whom he had supported as a presidential candidate, shook Mr. Ashe’s faith in America. But he refused to surrender to disillusionment. Instead he dedicated himself to active citizenship on a level rarely seen in the world of sports.

His activism began with an effort to expand economic and educational opportunities for young urban blacks, but his primary focus soon turned to the liberation of black South Africans suffering under apartheid. Later he supported a wide variety of causes, playing an active role in campaigns for black political power, high educational standards for college athletes, criminal justice reform, equality of the sexes and AIDS awareness. He also became involved in numerous philanthropic enterprises.

By the end of his life, Mr. Ashe’s success on the court was no longer the primary source of his celebrity. He had become, along with Muhammad Ali, a prime example of an athlete who transcended the world of sports. In 2016, President Barack Obama identified Mr. Ali and Mr. Ashe as the sports figures he admired above all others. While noting the sharp contrast in their personalities, he argued that both men were “transformational” activists who pushed the nation down the same path to freedom and democracy.

Mr. Ashe practiced his own distinctive brand of activism, one based on unemotional appeals to common sense and enlightened philosophical principles as simple as the Golden Rule. He had no facility for, and little interest in, using agitation and drama to draw attention to causes, no matter how worthy they might be. A champion of civility, he always kept his cool and never raised his voice in anger or frustration. Viewing emotional appeals as self-defeating and even dangerous, he relied on reasoned persuasion derived from careful preparation and research.

Mr. Ashe preferred to make a case in written form, or as a speaker on the college lecture circuit or as a witness before the United Nations. His periodic opinion pieces in The Washington Post and other newspapers tackled a number of thorny issues related to sports and the broader society, including upholding high academic standards for college athletic eligibility and the expulsion of South Africa from international athletic competition. In the 1980s, he devoted several years to researching and writing “A Hard Road to Glory,” a groundbreaking three-volume history of African-American athletes.

In retirement Mr. Ashe became a popular tennis broadcaster known for his clever quips, yet as an activist he never resorted to sound bites that excited audiences with reductionist slogans. Often working behind the scenes, he engaged in high-profile public debate only when he felt there was no other way to advance his point of view. Suspicious of quick fixes, he advocated incremental and gradual change as the best guarantor of true progress.

Yet he did not let this commitment to long-term solutions interfere with his determination to give voice to the voiceless. Known as a risk taker on the court, he was no less bold off the court, where he never shied away from speaking truth to power.

He was arrested twice, in 1985 while participating in an anti-apartheid demonstration in front of the South African Embassy and in 1992 while picketing the White House in protest of the George H.W. Bush administration’s discriminatory policies toward Haitian refugees. The first arrest embarrassed the American tennis establishment, which soon removed him from his position as captain of the U.S. Davis Cup team, and the second occurred during the final months of his life as he struggled with the ravages of AIDS. In both cases he accepted the consequences of his principled activism with dignity.

Mr. Ashe was a class act in every way, a man who practiced what he preached without being diverted by the temptations of power, fame or fortune. When we place his approach to dissent and public debate in a contemporary frame, it becomes obvious that his legacy is the antithesis of the scorched-earth politics of Trumpism. If Mr. Ashe were alive today, he would no doubt be appalled by the bullying tactics and insulting rhetoric of a president determined to punish athletes who have the courage and audacity to speak out against police brutality toward African-Americans. And yet we can be equally sure that Mr. Ashe would honor his commitment to respectful dialogue, refusing to lower himself to the president’s level of unrestrained invective.

Not all of the activist athletes involved in public protests during the past two years have followed Mr. Ashe’s model of restraint and civility. But many have made a good-faith effort to do so, resisting the temptation to respond in kind to Mr. Trump’s intemperate attacks on their personal integrity and patriotism. In particular, several of the most visible activists — including Mr. Kaepernick, Stephen Curry and Mr. James — have kept their composure and dignity even as they have borne the brunt of Mr. Trump’s racially charged Twitter storms and stump speeches. By and large, they have wisely taken the same high road that Mr. Ashe took two generations ago, eschewing the politics of character assassination while keeping their eyes on the prize.

Mr. Ashe would surely be gratified that to date, this high road has led to more protest, not less, confirming his belief that real change comes from rational advocacy and hard work, not emotional self-indulgence. As we celebrate his remarkable life and legacy a quarter-century after his death, we can be confident that Mr. Ashe would rush to join today’s activists in spirit and solidarity, solemnly but firmly taking a knee for social justice.

Raymond Arsenault is the author of “Arthur Ashe: A Life.”

Voir aussi:

Arthur Ashe’s real legacy was his activism, not his tennis
We remember Ashe for his electrifying talent. But he had a social conscience that was way ahead of its time
Raymond Arsenault
The Guardian
9 Sep 2018

No one had expected a fifth-seeded, 25-year-old amateur on temporary leave from the army to come out on top in a field that included the world’s best pro players. The era of Open tennis, in which both amateurs and professionals competed, was only four months old. Many feared that mixing the two groups was a mistake. Yet Ashe, with help from a string of upsets that eliminated the top four seeds, defeated the Dutchman Tom Okker in the championship match – in the process becoming the first black man to reach the highest echelon of amateur tennis.

As an amateur, Ashe could not accept the champion’s prize money of $14,000. But the lost income proved inconsequential in light of the other benefits that came in the wake of his historic performance. He became not only as a bona fide sports star but also a citizen activist with important things to contribute to society and a platform to do so. Ashe began to speak out on questions of social and economic justice.

Earlier in the year, the assassinations of Martin Luther King and Robert Kennedy had shocked Ashe out of his youthful reticence to become involved in the struggle for civil rights. Over the next 25 years, he worked tirelessly as an advocate for civil and human rights, a role model for athletes interested in more than fame and fortune.

“From what we get, we can make a living,” he counseled. “What we give, however, makes a life.”

Ashe’s 1968 win was truly impressive but his finest moment at the Open came, arguably, in 1992, four and a half months after the public disclosure that he had Aids and nearly a decade after he contracted HIV during a blood transfusion. If we apply Ashe’s professed standard of success, which placed social and political reform well above athletic achievement, the 25th US Open, not the first, is the tournament most deserving of commemoration. Without picking up a racket, he managed to demonstrate a moral leadership that far transcended the world of sports.

On 30 August, on the eve of the first round, a substantial portion of the professional tennis community rallied behind the stricken champion’s effort to raise funds for the new Arthur Ashe Foundation for the Defeat of Aids (AAFDA). The celebrity-studded event, the Arthur Ashe Aids Tennis Challenge, drew a huge crowd and nine of the game’s biggest stars. The support was unprecedented, leading one reporter to marvel: “The tennis world is known by and large as a selfish, privileged world, one crammed with factions and egos. So what is happening at the Open is unthinkable: gender and nationality and politics will take a back seat to a full-fledged effort to support Ashe.”

Participants included CBS correspondent Mike Wallace, then New York City mayor David Dinkins and two of tennis’s biggest celebrities, the up-and-coming star Andre Agassi and the four-time Open champion John McEnroe, who entertained the crowd by clowning their way through a long set. To Ashe’s delight, McEnroe, once known as the “Superbrat” of tennis, even put on a joke tantrum against the umpire.

Several days earlier, on a more serious note, McEnroe had spoken for many of his peers in explaining why he felt passionate about Ashe’s cause.

“It’s not something you can even think twice about when you’re asked to help,” he insisted. “The fact that the disease has happened to a tennis player certainly strikes home with all of us. I’m just glad someone finally organized the tennis community like this, and obviously it took someone like Arthur to do it.”

Ashe was thrilled with the response to the Aids Challenge, which raised $114,000 for the AAFDA. One man walked up and casually handed him a personal check for $25,000. Later in the week the foundation received $30,000 from an anonymous donor in North Carolina. Such generosity was what Ashe had hoped to inspire, and when virtually all of the US Open players complied with the foundation’s request to attach a special patch – “a red ribbon centered by a tiny yellow tennis ball” – to their outfits as a symbolic show of support for Aids victims, he knew he had started something important.

This awakening of social responsibility – among a group of athletes not typically known for political courage – was deeply gratifying to a man whose previous calls to action had been largely ignored. Seven years earlier he was fired as captain of the US Davis Cup team in part because leaders were uncomfortable with his growing political activism, especially his arrest during an anti-apartheid demonstration outside a South African embassy. This rebuke did not shake his belief in active citizenship as a bedrock principle, however, and as the 1992 Open drew to a close he demonstrated just how seriously he regarded personal commitment to social justice.

When his lifelong friend and anti-apartheid ally Randall Robinson asked Ashe to come to Washington for a protest march he immediately said yes, even though the march was scheduled four days before the end of the Open. The march concerned an issue that had become deeply important to Ashe: the Bush administration’s discriminatory treatment of Haitian refugees seeking asylum in the US. With more than 2,000 other protesters, Ashe gathered in front of the White House to seek justice for the growing mass of Haitian “boat people” being forcibly repatriated without a hearing.

In stark contrast to the warm reception accorded Cuban refugees fleeing Castro’s communist regime, the dark-skinned boat people were denied refuge due to a blanket ruling that Haitians, unlike Cubans, were economic migrants undeserving of political asylum. To Ashe and the organizers of the White House protest, this double standard – which flew in the face of the political realities of both islands – smacked of racism.

“The argument incensed me,” Ashe wrote. “Undoubtedly, many of the people picked up were economic refugees, but many were not.”

Ashe knew a great deal about Haiti: he had read widely and deeply about the island’s troubled past; he had visited on several occasions; he and his wife had even honeymooned there in 1977. More recently, he had monitored the truncated career of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, a self-styled champion of the poor whose regime was toppled by a military coup with the tacit support of the Bush administration. Ashe felt compelled to speak out.

“I was prepared to be arrested to protest this injustice,” he said.

Considering his medical condition, he had no business being at a protest; certainly no one would have blamed him if he had begged off. No one, that is, but himself. At the appointed hour, he arrived at the protest site in jeans, T-shirt and straw hat, a human scarecrow reduced to 128lbs on his 6ft 1in frame, but resolute as ever. Big, bold letters on his shirt read: “Haitians Locked Out Because They’re Black.”

The throng included a handful of celebrities, but Ashe alone represented the sports world. He didn’t want to be treated as a celebrity, of course; he simply wanted to make a statement about the responsibilities of democratic citizenship. While he knew his presence was largely symbolic, he hoped to set an example.

Putting oneself at risk for a good cause, he assured one reporter, “does wonders for your outlook … Marching in a protest is a liberating experience. It’s cathartic. It’s one of the great moments you can have in your life.”

Since federal law prohibited large demonstrations close to the White House, the organizers expected arrests. The police did not disappoint: nearly 100 demonstrators, including Ashe, were arrested, handcuffed and carted away. Ashe, despite his physical condition, asked for and received no favors. After paying his fine and calling his wife Jeanne to assure her he was all right, he took the late afternoon train back to New York.

The next night, while sitting on his couch watching the nightly news, he felt a sharp pain in his sternum. Tests revealed he had suffered a mild heart attack, the second of his life. Prior to the trip to Washington, Jeanne had worried something like this might happen. But she knew her husband was never one to play it safe when something important was on the line.

On the tennis court, he had always been prone to fits of reckless play, going for broke with shots that defied logic or sense. Off the court, particularly in his later years, Arthur Ashe almost always went full-out. He did so not because he craved activity for its own sake but rather because he wanted to live a virtuous and productive life. Even near the end, weakened by disease, he still wanted to make a difference. And he did, as he always did.

      • Raymond Arsenault, the John Hope Franklin professor of southern history at the University of South Florida, St Petersburg, is the author of Arthur Ashe: A Life, recently published by Simon & Schuster

    Voir également:

    ‘Arthur was always different’: Reflecting on Ashe’s legacy, 50 years after U.S. Open win
    Ava Wallace
    The Washington Post
    September 3, 2018

    Virginia Wade has many memories of Arthur Ashe, but the one that sticks in her mind isn’t from 50 years ago in New York, when in 1968 they won the first U.S. Open singles titles and Ashe became the first African American man to win a Grand Slam championship. Her favorite memory is from seven years later at Wimbledon.

    Ashe claimed the last of his three major titles in England in 1975 in a match against heavy favorite Jimmy Connors. Wade remembers cool, unruffled Ashe’s daring tennis against the 22-year-old Connors, who hollered back at the crowd when it shouted encouragement. She also remembers the changeovers.

    “It was an incredible match. I mean, Arthur was an innovator,” Wade, 73, said last week. “It was the first time he sort of sat down at the side of the court in between — they didn’t have chairs at the side of the court for a long time; we sort of had to towel off and go on — but he would sit and cover his head with the towel and just think. It was the first time you were conscious of the mental side of tennis. Arthur was instrumental in that. . . . Arthur was a thinker.”

    As the U.S. Open celebrates its 50th anniversary, the U.S. Tennis Association is also honoring Ashe for all that he was: thinker, pioneer, activist, champion.

    The 1968 winner already has a significant presence at Billie Jean King National Tennis Center — the facility’s biggest and most prestigious stage is named for him — but this fortnight, his visage is inescapable. There is a special photo exhibit on the walkway between Court 17 and the Grandstand, and a special “Arthur Ashe legacy booth” decked out in the colors of UCLA, his alma mater. Fans can be seen walking around sporting white T-shirts featuring a picture of Ashe wearing sunglasses, cool as can be.

    At the start of Monday’s evening session, Lt. Gen. Darryl Williams gave Ashe’s younger brother Johnnie a folded American flag in honor of his brother, who died in 1993 from AIDS-related pneumonia after contracting the disease from a tainted blood transfusion. Ashe was an Army lieutenant when he won the U.S. Open as an amateur in 1968; Johnnie, 70, was in the Marine Corps for 20 years.

    Johnnie Ashe, like Wade, remembers his brother as an intellectual and an innovator, as someone who was meant to change the world. That’s why, when Johnnie came to understand that the military wouldn’t send two brothers into active duty in a war zone at the same time, he volunteered for a second tour in Vietnam. He was three months away from coming home.

    “Arthur didn’t need Vietnam. Arthur had his own Vietnam right there in the United States in those days, and some of the things that I saw while I was there — he didn’t need that,” Johnnie said Monday night. “The thing that I always think about, and this was always the most important thing in my mind, was that Arthur represented so many possibilities. Arthur was the first to do so much so often that those of us who knew him would say: ‘What’s next? What mountain was he going to climb next?’ Arthur was always different.”

    Since Johnnie stayed on active duty, Arthur could compete for both the U.S. amateur and U.S. Open championships in 1968. He is the only person to have won both.

    Ashe had many projects that helped extend his legacy beyond that of a pioneering tennis player who won 33 career singles championships; ever the thinker, bringing tennis and educational opportunities to youths was Ashe’s passion. He helped found the National Junior Tennis & Learning network in 1968, a grass-roots organization designed to make tennis more accessible. Today, the NJTL receives significant funding from the USTA.

    “Growing up, Arthur was a sponge. . . . That was just his nature,” Johnnie Ashe said. “He was a voracious reader, and he had to satisfy his intellect. I tell people if Arthur had concentrated on just tennis, he would have been the best in the world. But tennis was a vehicle. . . . He wanted to be able to take kids outside of their environs, outside of their element for a little while and expose them to what they can be. . . . And, let’s face it, most parents don’t have the wherewithal to do that. It’s not easy. What happens is you get somebody like Arthur — and following Arthur, LeBron James is starting to do things — to expose kids. It’s so important that that happens.”

    Billie Jean King called the NJTL one of the best things that ever happened to the sport.

    “Arthur and I had many conversations over the years about how to we make tennis better — for the players, the fans and the sport,” King said in an email Monday. “We both thought tennis needed to be more hospitable, and for Arthur a big part of that was improving access and opportunity to our sport for everyone. Arthur, and Althea Gibson before him, opened doors for people of color in our sport. And, from Venus and Serena [Williams] to Naomi Osaka and Frances Tiafoe, we are seeing the results of his efforts today.”

    Ashe’s efforts as a humanitarian inspired James Blake, who now chairs the USTA Foundation. Blake was growing up when Ashe’s humanitarian career was front and center, both as the leader of the group Artists and Athletes Against Apartheid and as a figure who spoke out to educate the nation about AIDS.

    “He never looked for sympathy,” Blake said. “Instead, he looked for a way to make life better for others that were struggling.”

    Blake counts himself as one who benefited from Ashe’s barrier-breaking career. It’s a legacy not lost on the USTA; Katrina Adams, its president and chief executive, is a black woman.

    But before Maria Sharapova lost in the fourth round to Carla Suarez Navarro and the riveted crowd turned its attention to Roger Federer’s match, Monday night was about Arthur Ashe. Johnnie’s flag came wrapped in a wooden display case.

    “I was thinking what I was going to design to keep it in, but I don’t have to. This is nice,” Johnnie said.

    “Until Arthur came along and Althea came along, tennis was a sport of the elites. Then you get two playground children — one from Harlem, one from Richmond — to break into the bigs. People had to stop and think about that. It opened the doors for other people, and that’s what it was all about. That’s what it was all about for him.”

    Voir de même:

    Waiting for the Next Arthur Ashe
    Harvey Araton
    NYT
    Sept. 7, 2018

    On the second of two occasions when he had the privilege of a conversation with Arthur Ashe, MaliVai Washington, having just become the country’s No. 1 college player as a Michigan sophomore in 1989, happened to mention that he was thinking of turning pro.

    Ashe did not exactly tell him what he wanted to hear.

    “I don’t think he thought it was a very good idea,” Washington said.

    Ashe won the first United States Open at the West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills 50 years ago to the day of Sunday’s men’s final, to be played in a stadium named for him. He also won the 1970 Australian Open and a third and final major in 1975 at Wimbledon.

    After all these years there are the formidable but not mutually exclusive legacies of Ashe: as the only African-American man to win a Grand Slam tournament and as a venerated humanitarian. Washington came tantalizingly close to living up to the former and has found a contextual purpose in the latter.

    Washington, who made it to the Wimbledon final in 1996, can recall some self-imposed pressure to hoist the trophy Ashe had claimed there 21 years earlier because “when you’re the No. 1 black player, you feel a sense of responsibility.”

    That said, Washington was admittedly more focused on the biggest payday of his career, potential lifetime membership in the All England Club and a permanent engraving on its champions wall.

    “I’m honestly not thinking then that much about history and social issues, about how this is going to impact on America, what impact is it going to have on kids,” he said of the final, which he lost to Richard Krajicek of the Netherlands in straight sets. “But at 35, 45, O.K., I can think more intelligently about it and understand the impact.”

    Washington is now 49, the age at which Ashe died in 1993 of AIDS after getting H.I.V. through a blood transfusion. Family life in northern Florida is good for Washington, with a wife, two teenage children, a real estate business and an eponymous foundation in an impoverished area of Jacksonville that for 22 years has provided a tennis introduction for children unlikely to find a private pathway into the sport.

    Washington’s program is affiliated with the National Junior Tennis League, which Ashe co-founded in 1969 to promote discipline and character through tennis among under-resourced youth. If, in the process, another Ashe happened to emerge, so much the better. But that was not the primary function, or point.

    “We’re not a pathway to pro tennis by any stretch of the imagination,” Washington said. “At my foundation, we don’t have that ability, that capacity, never had an interest in going in that direction. We highly encourage kids to play on their high school team, go on to play or try out for their college team.

    “But our biggest bang for our buck is teaching life skills. Stay in our program, and you’ll have a focus on high school education, be on a good track when you leave high school. You’re not going to leave high school with a criminal record, or with a son or daughter.”

    Why there was no African-American male Grand Slam champion successor to Ashe in the years soon after his trailblazing is no great mystery, Washington said.

    Fifty years ago, tennis was largely the province of the wealthy and white, lacking a foundational structure to facilitate such an occurrence. Which doesn’t mean that Ashe didn’t influence the rise of a Yannick Noah, the French Grand Slam champion whom Ashe himself discovered in Cameroon. Or the likes of Richard Williams and Oracene Price, whose parental vision birthed the careers of Venus and Serena Williams. They in turn have been followed by a raft of African-American female players, including the 2017 U.S. Open women’s champion, Sloane Stephens, and the runner-up, Madison Keys.

    This year’s women’s final, on Saturday afternoon, will feature Serena Williams and Naomi Osaka, a half-Japanese, half-Haitian player whose father used the Williams family as a model for his own daughters’ tennis ambitions.

    Looming over the lack of an African-American Grand Slam successor to Ashe is the vexing question of why the United States hasn’t produced a male champion since Andy Roddick won his only major title in New York in 2003. That most of the men’s titles have been claimed by a small handful of European players might be more of a tribute to them than a defining failure of the United States Tennis Association’s development capabilities.

    But on the home front, the issue is a pressing one, especially during America’s Grand Slam tournament, year after year.

    Washington retired in 1999 with four tour victories and a 1994 quarterfinal Australian Open result in addition to his Wimbledon run. He was followed by James Blake, who rose to No. 4 in the world during a 14-year career that included 10 tour titles and three Grand Slam quarterfinals, including two at the U.S. Open.

    Martin Blackman, the U.S.T.A.’s general manager for player development, agreed that a breakthrough by one or two young Americans — white or black — in the foreseeable future could help trigger a wave of next-generation stars from an expanding landscape of prospects at a time when African-American participation has significantly declined in baseball, and football is confronted with health concerns.

    “With tennis starting to be recognized as a really athletic sport, I think we do have a unique opportunity to pull some better athletes into the game,” said Blackman, an African-American man who played briefly on tour and once partnered with Washington to make the junior doubles semifinals of the 1986 Open. “So now it comes down to what can we do at the base to recruit and retain as many great young players as possible, make the game accessible and then get them into the system to stay.”

    Even with better intentions, and greater investment, it still took a set of circumstances worthy of a Disney script to land Frances Tiafoe, one of the more promising young American players, on tour.

    The son of immigrants from Sierra Leone, Tiafoe, 20, was introduced to the sport at a club in College Park, Md., where his father, Frances Sr., had found custodial work. Talent and a noticeable work ethic attracted well-heeled benefactors and helped Tiafoe climb to his current ranking of No. 44.

    He gained his first victory at the U.S. Open over France’s Adrian Mannarino, the 29th seed, in the first round before losing next time out. His father watched from the player’s box on the Grandstand court, high-fiving Frances’ coaches and trainer when the Mannarino match ended, and soon after contended that his son wasn’t all that unique.

    “There have to be thousands of kids like Frances out there, thousands who don’t have the same opportunities,” Frances Sr. said. “I’m not just talking about going to college, but going to the pro level, or just to have that chance, see if it’s possible.”

    This is where Washington holds up a metaphorical sign for caution, if not for an outright stop. Most people, he said, have little understanding of just how forbidding the odds are of becoming a pro, much less a champion.

    Like the Williams sisters, Washington — who was born in Glen Cove, N.Y., but grew up in Michigan — had the benefit of a tennis-driven father, William, who saw four of his five children play professionally. MaliVai, who typically goes by Mal, had by far the most success.

    “When I was a junior player, I was playing seven days a week and there were times when I was in high school where I was playing before school and after school,” he said. “It is so very difficult to win a major. I tried to win one, came close.”

    Then, speaking of Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal, he added: “Federer and Nadal, they’ve won 20 and 17. What makes them so great is hard to understand. You just can’t throw money at kids and think it’s going to happen.”

    So how is it done? Where does one start?

    With smaller social achievements, Washington said. With helping young people love the game recreationally, while pursuing a better life than those in less affluent African-American communities have been dealt.

    He talked of a young female graduate of his program who recently finished college without any debt, thanks to a tennis scholarship. And for the foundation’s head tennis pro, he hired Marc Atkinson, who began playing at Washington’s facility in sixth grade and walked onto the Florida A&M tennis team.

    “He’s married with three kids, and at some point, I imagine he’s going to introduce the sport to his kids,” Washington said. “You know, I often think back to my ancestors and the challenges they had, whether it’s my parents growing up in the Deep South in the 1940s and 1950s, or my great-great-grandpa who was born a slave. I can trace my lineage back to people who were getting up and getting after it, who were trying to make a better life for themselves and their kids.

    “So with the thousands of kids that we’re helping, that tennis champion may be part of that next generation, or the one after that. You don’t know, but maybe 20 years from now, or 50 years from now, you’ll be able to look at a kid and track back a lineage to my youth foundation and that would be really cool.”

    Told that he sounded more like Ashe the humanitarian than Ashe the Grand Slam champion, Washington nodded with approval. His two meetings with Ashe produced “no deep conversations,” he said, and he did not heed Ashe’s advice on staying in school, though he eventually earned a degree in finance from the University of North Florida.

    A voice was nonetheless heard, and still resounds.

    Voir encore:

    Etats-Unis
    Frédéric Potet

La Croix
28/04/1997

A trois reprises, et par la plus pure des coïncidences, la question du sportif noir dans la société américaine s’est retrouvée sur le devant de l’actualité, ces trois dernières semaines. Il y eut d’abord, le 25 mars à Hollywood, l’attribution de l’Oscar du meilleur documentaire à When we were kings, le film de Leon Gast, sorti en France depuis mercredi, et dont le personnage central est le boxeur Mohammed Ali. Vint ensuite, le 13 avril, la victoire au Master d’Augusta (Géorgie, Etats-Unis) de la nouvelle étoile du golf mondial, le jeune Tiger Woods. Deux jours plus tard, enfin, l’Amérique célébrait le 50e anniversaire de l’intégration du premier joueur noir dans une équipe de base-ball professionnel, Jackie Robinson.

Robinson-Ali-Woods. Ces trois noms résumeraient presque la longue marche de l’émancipation du sportif noir aux Etats-Unis. Chacun d’entre eux représente une période, elle-même synonyme d’idéaux et de quête vers la reconnaissance. Si le film de Leon Gast nous montre bien quel incomparable combattant de la cause black fut Mohammed Ali, gageons qu’Ali ne serait pas devenu Ali à l’époque de Woods et que Robinson serait resté un modeste anonyme s’il avait joué dans les années 60.

Nul ne l’ignore plus aujourd’hui : si Jackie Robinson a pu trouver place au sein des Brooklyn Dodgers en cette année 1947, ce fut principalement pour des raisons extrasportives. Ce petit-fils d’esclave était en effet d’un tempérament suffisamment doux et détaché pour ne pas répondre aux concerts d’insultes dont il allait être la cible durant toute sa carrière. A l’instar de son aîné Jesse Owens, sprinter quatre fois médaillé d’or à qui Hitler refusa de serrer la main aux Jeux Olympiques de 1936 à Berlin, Jackie Robinson ne devait jamais rejoindre d’organisation militante. Sa présence au sein d’une équipe de la Major League (première division) allait pouvoir permettre, sans heurt, l’arrivée d’une nouvelle population dans les stades : le public noir.

Le roi dollar fait taire les langues

Autre contexte et autre façon de voir les choses, vingt ans plus tard. En 1964, quelques jours après son premier titre mondial, Cassius Clay intègre le mouvement politico-religieux des Blacks Muslims et devient Mohammed Ali. Trois ans plus tard, il refuse de partir au Vietnam, arguant qu’aucun Vietcong ne l’a « jamais traité de négro ». Rien d’étonnant lorsqu’en 1974, sur une idée du promoteur Don King, il part affronter George Foreman au Zaïre. L’africanisme possède son meilleur apôtre. Dans le film de Leon Gast, le boxeur incarne une sorte de roi-sorcier revenant au pays après plusieurs siècles d’exil. Ali ne fait alors rien d’autre que de la politique. Comme en ont fait les sprinteurs Tommie Smith, John Carlos et Lee Evans (qui deviendra entraîneur en Afrique) le jour où ils brandirent leur poing sur le podium des Jeux de Mexico de 1968.

De cette corporation de champions engagés, Arthur Ashe, décédé en 1993 après une vie passée à lutter contre diverses injustices (apartheid, sida, sort des réfugiés haïtiens), sera le dernier. Les années 80 et 90 sont un tournant. Le basketteur Michael Jordan devient le sportif le mieux payé au monde. Le sprinteur Carl Lewis, le boxeur Mike Tyson et aujourd’hui le très politiquement correct Tiger Woods vont répéter tour à tour qu’« on ne mélange pas sport et politique ». Le roi dollar fait taire les langues alors que, curieusement, le militantisme noir connaît un regain d’intérêt aux Etats-Unis.

Le paradoxe est même total le 16 octobre 1995 quand Louis Farrakhan, leader de la Nation of Islam, réunit un million de personnes à Washington. Ce jour-là, des slogans proclamant l’innocence d’O.J. Simpson reviennent souvent dans la foule. L’ancienne vedette de football américain est suspecté d’avoir tué sa femme. L’affaire a rendu l’Amérique totalement zinzin. A telle enseigne qu’O.J. est devenu une icône pour la population noire. Plus personne, alors, ne se rappelle que du temps de sa splendeur au coeur de la jet-set de Los Angeles, Simpson s’était appliqué à faire oublier aux Blancs qu’il était noir, allant jusqu’à prendre des cours de diction pour changer son accent. La politique, lui aussi, O.J. le disait déjà : ce n’était pas son job.

Voir par ailleurs:

Neil Armstrong Didn’t Forget the Flag
Rich Lowry
National review
September 5, 2018

The Apollo program was a national effort that depended on American derring-do and sacrifice. History is usually airbrushed to remove a figure who has fallen out of favor with a dictatorship, or to hide away an episode of national shame. Leave it to Hollywood to erase from a national triumph its most iconic moment.

The new movie First Man, a biopic about the Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, omits the planting of the American flag during his historic walk on the surface of the moon.

Ryan Gosling, who plays Armstrong in the film, tried to explain the strange editing of his moonwalk: “This was widely regarded in the end as a human achievement. I don’t think that Neil viewed himself as an American hero.” Armstrong was a reticent man, but he surely considered himself an American, and everyone else considered him a hero. (“You’re a hero whether you like it or not,” one newspaper admonished him on the 10th anniversary of the landing.)

Gosling added that Armstrong’s walk “transcended countries and borders,” which is literally true, since it occurred roughly 238,900 miles from Earth, although Armstrong got there on an American rocket, walked in an American spacesuit, and returned home to America.

Apollo 11 was, without doubt, an extraordinary human achievement. Armstrong’s famous words upon descending the ladder to the moon were apt: “One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” A plaque left behind read: “HERE MEN FROM THE PLANET EARTH FIRST SET FOOT UPON THE MOON, JULY 1969 A.D. WE CAME IN PEACE FOR ALL MANKIND.”

But this was a national effort that depended on American derring-do, sacrifice, and treasure. It was a chapter in a space race between the United States and the Soviet Union that involved national prestige and the perceived worth of our respective economic and political systems. The Apollo program wasn’t about the brotherhood of man, but rather about achieving a national objective before a hated and feared adversary did.

The Soviets’ putting a satellite, Sputnik, into orbit first was a profound political and psychological shock. The historian Walter A. McDougall writes in his book on the space race, . . . The Heavens and the Earth:

In the weeks and months to come, Khrushchev and lesser spokesmen would point to the first Sputnik, “companion” or “fellow traveller,” as proof of the Soviet ability to deliver hydrogen bombs at will, proof of the inevitability of Soviet scientific and technological leadership, proof of the superiority of communism as a model for backwards nations, proof of the dynamic leadership of the Soviet premier.

The U.S. felt it had to rise to the challenge. As Vice President Lyndon Johnson put it, “Failure to master space means being second best in every aspect, in the crucial arena of our Cold War world. In the eyes of the world first in space means first, period; second in space is second in everything.”

VIEW SLIDESHOW: Apollo 11

The mission of Apollo 11 was, appropriately, soaked in American symbolism. The lunar module was called Eagle, and the command module Columbia. There had been some consideration to putting up a U.N. flag, but it was scotched — it would be an American flag and only an American flag.

The video of Armstrong and his partner Buzz Aldrin carefully working to set up the flag — fully extend it and sink the pole firmly enough in the lunar surface to stand — after their awe-inspiring journey hasn’t lost any of its power.

The director of First Man, Damien Chazelle, argues that the flag planting isn’t part of the movie because he wanted to focus on the inner Armstrong. But, surely, Armstrong, a former Eagle Scout, had feelings about putting the flag someplace it had never gone before?

There may be a crass commercial motive in the omission — the Chinese, whose market is so important to big films, might not like overt American patriotic fanfare. Neither does much of our cultural elite. They may prefer not to plant the flag — but the heroes of Apollo 11 had no such compunction.

Voir de plus:

What BlacKkKlansman Gets Wrong

It’s a slow, didactic film about a minor episode.

Kyle Smith
National Review
August 28, 2018

Billed as being based on “a crazy, outrageous incredible true story” about how a black cop infiltrated the KKK, Spike Lee’s BlacKkKlansman would be more accurately described as the story of how a black cop in 1970s Colorado Springs spoke to the Klan on the phone. He pretended to be a white supremacist . . . on the phone. That isn’t infiltration, that’s prank-calling. A poster for the movie shows a black guy wearing a Klan hood. Great starting point for a comedy, but it didn’t happen. The cop who actually attended KKK meetings undercover was a white guy (played by Adam Driver). These led . . . well, nowhere in particular. No plot was foiled. Those meetups mainly revealed that Klansmen behave exactly how you’d expect Klansmen to behave.The movie is a typical Spike Lee joint: A thin story is told in painfully didactic style and runs on far too long. Screenwriters ordinarily try to start every scene as late as possible and end it as early as possible; Lee just lets things roll. If the point is made, he keeps making it. If the plot tends toward inertia, that’s just Lee saying, “Don’t get distracted by the story, pay attention to the message I’m sending.” He’s a rule-breaker all right. The rules he breaks are “Don’t be boring,” “Don’t be obvious,” and “Don’t ramble.”

But! BlacKkKlansman keeps getting called spot-on, and (as Quentin Tarantino showed in Django Unchained) the moronic nature of the Klan and its beliefs makes it an excellent target for comedy. Lee doesn’t exactly wield an épée as a satirist, though: His idea of a top joke is having the redneck Klansman think “gooder” is a word. Most of the movie isn’t even attempted comedy.

Lee’s principal achievement here is in showcasing the talents of John David Washington, in the first of what promise to be many starring roles in movies. Washington (son of Denzel) has an easygoing charisma as the unflappable Ron Stallworth, a rookie cop in Colorado Springs who volunteers to go undercover as a detective in 1972, near the height of the Black Power movement and a moment when law enforcement was closely tracking the activities of radicals such as Stokely Carmichael, a.k.a. Kwame Ture, a speech of whose Stallworth says he attended while posing as an ordinary citizen. In the movie, Stallworth experiences an awakening of black pride and falls for a student leader, Patrice (a luminous Laura Harrier, who also played Peter Parker’s girlfriend in Spider-Man: Homecoming), inspiring in him the need to do something for his people. He dismisses Carmichael’s call for armed revolution as mere grandstanding, really just a means for drawing black people together. After the speech, the audience goes to a party instead of a riot.

The Klan also turn out to be grandstanders and blowhards given to Carmichael-style paranoid prophecies and seem to hope to troll their enemies into attacking them. When Lee realizes he needs something to actually happen besides racist talk, he turns to a subplot featuring a white-supremacist lady running around with a purse full of C-4 explosive with which she intends to blow up the black radicals. It’s so unconvincing that you watch it thinking, “I really doubt this happened.” It didn’t. The only other tense moment in the film, in which Driver’s undercover cop (who is Jewish) is nearly subjected to a lie-detector test about his religion by a suspicious Klansman, is also fabricated.

Lee frames his two camps as opposites, but whether we’re with the black-power types or the white-power yokels, they’re equally wrong about the race war they seem to yearn for. The two sides are equally far from the stable center, the color-blind institution holding society together, which turns out to be . . . the police! After some talk from the radical Patrice (whose character is also a fabrication) about how the whole system is corrupt and she could never date a “pig,” and a scene in which Stallworth implies the police’s code of covering for one another reminds him of the Klan, Lee winds up having the police unite to fight racism, with one bad apple expunged and everybody else on the otherwise all-white force supporting Ron.

That Spike Lee has turned in a pro-cop film has to be counted one of the stranger cultural developments of 2018, but Lee seems to have accidentally aligned with cops in the course of issuing an anti-Trump broadside. He has one cop tell us that anti-immigration rhetoric, opposition to affirmative action, “and tax reform” are the kinds of issues that white supremacists will use to snake their way into high office. Tax reform! If there has ever been a president, or indeed a politician, who failed to advocate “tax reform,” I guess I missed it. What candidate has ever said on the stump, “My fellow Americans, I propose no change to tax policy whatsoever!” If Lee grabbed us by the lapels just once per movie, it might be forgivable, but he does it all the time. (See also: an introduction in which Alec Baldwin plays a Southern cracker called Dr. Kennebrew Beauregard who rants about desegregation for several minutes, then is never seen again.)

Lee’s other major goal is to link Stallworth’s story to Trumpism using David Duke. Duke, like Trump, said awful things at the time of the Charlottesville murder and played a part in the Stallworth story when the cop was assigned to protect the Klan leader (played by Topher Grace) on a visit to Colorado Springs and later threw his arm around him while posing for a picture. Saying Duke presaged Trump seems like a stretch, though.

After all the nudge-nudge MAGA lines uttered by the Klansmen throughout the film, the let-me-spell-it-out-for-you finale, with footage from the Charlottesville white-supremacist rally, seems de trop. BlacKkKlansman was timed to hit theaters one year after the anniversary of the horror in Virginia. That Charlottesville II attracted only two dozen pathetic dorks to the cause of white supremacy would seem to undermine the coda. The Klan’s would-be successors, far from being more emboldened than they have been since Stallworth’s time, appear to be nearly extinct.

Voir encore:

US Open: furieuse, Serena Williams crie au scandale et se dit volée par l’arbitre

Cette finale en forme de choc des générations face à la Japonaise Naomi Osaka s’est transformée en véritable psychodrame ce samedi à l’US Open. Jamais entrée dans ce match qui était pour elle une vraie page d’histoire, Serena Williams a sombré dans la chasse à l’arbitre, s’estimant volée.
RMC
09/09/2018

« Je ne suis pas une tricheuse! Vous me devez des excuses! »: des phrases répétées à plusieurs reprises par Serena Williams à l’arbitre, soudainement propulsé en pleine lumière. C’est bien ce qui restera dans les livres d’histoire à propos de cette finale de l’US Open. Tant pis pour Naomi Osaka, impeccable pour remporter, en deux sets, ce choc face à son idole et le premier Grand Chelem de sa carrière (6-2, 6-4).

En cas de victoire ce samedi, l’Américaine pouvait entrer définitivement dans l’histoire en égalant le record de Margaret Court, détentrice de 24 Majeurs, record absolu. La géante de 36 ans a toujours eu du mal avec les moments d’histoire… Pour égaler Steffi Graf et ses 22 sacres en Grand Chelem, Serena Williams en était déjà passée par une demi-finale perdue à Flushing Meadows, deux finales perdues à Melbourne puis Roland-Garros avant le soulagement de Wimbledon 2016. Désillusion encore en demie de l’US Open la même année pour repousser d’un Majeur ce record de l’ère Open qu’elle détient désormais seule.

Williams et l’US Open, c’est compliqué…

Idole de tout un pays, l’Américaine aura également toujours eu du mal à jouer sur son sol. Pour des raisons diverses. Son boycott du tournoi d’Indian Wells durant 14 ans était dû à ces insultes racistes dont elle avait été victime. A l’US Open, où elle a conquis six trophées, la joueuse de 36 ans a connu des émotions contraires, entre ses sacres et ses désillusions. En 2011, face à Samantha Stosur, elle avait écopé d’une amende pour avoir explosé de colère contre l’arbitre, qui lui avait annulé un point pour cause de « come on » lâché avant la fin de l’échange.

Tiens, tiens, des problèmes avec l’arbitre… comme ce samedi. Rattrapée par la pression, Serena Williams a fini par exploser. La faute à son tennis, pas en place, malmené par une Naomi Osaka sans complexe et remarquable, qu’elle a d’ailleurs chaudement félicité à l’issue du match. La faute aussi à ce que l’Américaine a ressenti comme une injustice.

Après un premier set à sens unique, la joueuse de 36 ans a écopé d’un avertissement de la part de l’arbitre. Motif? Coaching. « Je ne suis pas une tricheuse! Je suis mère de famille, je n’ai jamais triché de ma vie », a-t-elle lancé, pleine de colère. Est-ce un quiproquo? Si son entraîneur a bien semblé lui faire un signe, la cadette des soeurs Williams assure ne pas avoir reçu de coaching. Difficile de trancher.

« Ai-je coaché? Oui, je l’ai coachée avec des gestes, a expliqué Patrick Mouratoglou sur Eurosport après la rencontre. Elle ne m’a pas vu. J’ajoute que dans 100% des cas, les joueuses bénéficient de coaching et normalement, surtout en finale d’un Grand Chelem, l’arbitre prévient la joueuse avant un éventuel avertissement. »

Raquette cassée et point perdu

La situation s’est envenimée tandis que la recordwoman de titre en Grand Chelem dans l’ère Open venait de se faire débreaker alors qu’elle semblait pourtant reprendre l’ascendant. Serena Williams en a fracassé sa raquette de rage – chose d’une extrême rareté pour elle – et a donc pris… un nouvel avertissement et un point de pénalité. Fureur.

Au changement de côté, l’arbitre en a fait les frais. « Vous m’avez volé un point! Je ne suis pas une tricheuse », a répété l’Américaine. Estimant que la joueuse était allée trop loin, l’arbitre a donc enchaîné avec un troisième avertissement, synonyme de jeu de pénalité. Derrière, après un jeu de service façon parpaings de Williams, Naomi Osaka a servi pour le match. Pour s’imposer.

Son coach crie au scandale

Pas de poignée de main à l’arbitre pour Serena Williams, qui avait bien tenté d’invoquer le superviseur pour faire annuler son jeu de pénalité… sans succès. « Une fois de plus, la star du show a été l’arbitre de chaise. Pour la deuxième fois dans cet US Open et la troisième fois pour Serena Williams en finale de l’US Open, s’est insurgé son coach Patrick Mouratoglou sur Twitter. Devraient-ils être autorisés à avoir une influence sur le résultat d’un match? Quand déciderons-nous que cela ne doit plus jamais arriver? » Une allusion à ce « coaching par l’arbitre » dont avait bénéficié Nick Kyrgios contre Pierre-Hugues Herbert au deuxième tour.

Une accolade chaleureuse avec son adversaire, des appels à la foule pour applaudir la Japonaise… Serena Williams, en larmes, aura tenté de faire bonne figure sur le podium, avant de s’éclipser. Dur pour son adversaire, presque honteuse d’avoir battu son idole dans de telles conditions. Avec le superviseur, l’Américaine estimait que les hommes n’étaient pas traités de la même manière qu’elle le fut ce samedi. Le débat est ouvert. Sans doute à raison.

Voir enfin:

Serena has mother of all meltdowns in US Open final loss
Brian Lewis
New York Post
September 8, 2018

What was supposed to be history descended into histrionics.

Serena Williams came into Saturday’s U.S. Open final looking for a record-setting title. What she got was a game penalty and an emotional meltdown.

It overshadowed Naomi Osaka’s 6-2, 6-4 win over her idol for her first Grand Slam title, and put a mark on the Open’s golden anniversary.

Though Williams repeatedly demanded an apology from chair umpire Carlos Ramos and got a game penalty after calling him a “liar” and a “thief,” she ended the match in tears. And Osaka — who sat in the stands at Arthur Ashe Stadium when she was 5, watching Williams play — was in tears herself as the pro-Williams crowd rained boos upon the victor’s stand, which included USTA officials.

All in all it was a pitiful scene, Williams actually getting her apology from Osaka instead of Ramos.

“I know everyone was cheering for her. I’m sorry it had to end like this,” said a tearful Osaka, 20, so shaken she nearly dropped her trophy. Meanwhile, Williams — who’d regained her composure — put her arm around her young foe and implored the crowd to stop booing.

“I felt bad because I’m crying and she’s crying,” said Williams. “She just won. I’m not sure if they were happy tears or they were sad tears because of the moment. I felt like, wow, this isn’t how I felt when I won my first Grand Slam. I was like, wow, I definitely don’t want her to feel like that. Maybe it was the mom in me that was like, ‘Listen, we got to pull ourselves together here.’ ”

Williams had come in seeking a milestone win, one that would’ve tied Margaret Court’s all-time record for Grand Slams (24). But Osaka — and Williams’ own temper tantrum — scuttled those plans.

In the second game of the second set, Ramos hit Williams with a code violation for receiving coaching from Patrick Mouratoglou from her player’s box.

“You owe me an apology,” Williams said. “I’ve never cheated in my life. I have a daughter and stand for what’s right for her.”

Still, Mouratoglou admitted he’d given her advice, though threw in the disclaimer she may not have seen it from the other end of the court.

“I just texted Patrick, like, what is he talking about? Because we don’t have signals, we’ve never discussed signals. I don’t even call for on-court coaching,” Williams said. “I’m trying to figure out why he would say that. I don’t understand. Maybe he said, ‘You can do it.’ I was on the far other end, so I’m not sure. I want to clarify myself what he’s talking about.”

Williams got a second code violation four games later, up 3-2. After Osaka broke her serve, Williams broke her racket in frustration and was assessed a point penalty.

“You will never, ever be on another court of mine as long as you live. You’re the liar. When are you going to give me my apology? Say it! Say you’re sorry!” Williams ranted, before ending with, “You’re a thief, too.”

That was the last straw, and Ramos hit her with a third code violation for verbal abuse, which cost Williams a game to put Osaka up 5-3. An irate Williams argued in vain to tournament referee Brian Earley and got closed out two games later.

The U.S. Open released a statement saying “the chair umpire’s decision was final and not reviewable by the Tournament Referee or the Grand Slam Supervisor who were called to the court at that time.” Williams contends that letter of the law wouldn’t have been followed if she’d been male.

“I’ve seen other men call other umpires several things. I’m here fighting for women’s rights and for women’s equality. For me to say ‘thief’ and for him to take a game, it made me feel like it was sexist,” Williams said. “He’s never taken a game from a man because they said ‘thief’. For me it blows my mind.”

Voir de plus:

Colin Kaepernick, ou le difficile retour du sportif engagé

L’ancien quarterback des San Francisco 49ers est toujours sans équipe, ostracisé pour avoir osé boycotter l’hymne national des Etats-Unis. D’autres sportifs le soutiennent dans son activisme politique

Valérie de Graffenried
Le Temps
15 septembre 2017

Son genou droit posé à terre le 1er septembre 2016 a fait de lui un paria. Ce jour-là, Colin Kaepernick, quarterback des San Francisco 49ers, avait une nouvelle fois décidé de ne pas se lever pour l’hymne national. Coupe afro et regard grave, il était resté dans cette position pour protester contre les violences raciales et les bavures policières qui embrasaient les Etats-Unis. «Je ne vais pas afficher de fierté pour le drapeau d’un pays qui opprime les Noirs. Il y a des cadavres dans les rues et des meurtriers qui s’en tirent avec leurs congés payés», avait-il déclaré.

Plus d’un an après, la polémique reste vive. Son boycott lui vaut toujours d’être marginalisé et tenu à l’écart par la Ligue nationale de football américain (NFL).

Des manifestations en sa faveur

L’affaire rebondit ces jours, à l’occasion des débuts de la saison de la NFL. Sans contrat depuis mars, Colin Kaepernick est de facto un joueur sans équipe, à la recherche d’un nouvel employeur. Un agent libre. Plusieurs manifestations de soutien ont eu lieu ces dernières semaines. Le 24 août dernier, c’est devant le siège de la NFL, à New York, que plusieurs centaines de personnes ont manifesté contre son ostracisme. La NAACP, une organisation de défense des Noirs américains, en était à l’origine. Le 10 septembre, une mobilisation similaire a eu lieu du côté de Chicago.

Plus surprenant, une centaine de policiers new-yorkais ont manifesté ensemble fin août à Brooklyn, tous affublés d’un t-shirt noir avec le hashtag #imwithkap. Le célèbre policier Frank Serpico, 81 ans, qui a dénoncé la corruption généralisée de la police dans les années 1960 et inspiré Al Pacino pour le film Serpico (1973), en faisait partie.

Le soutien de Tommie SmithLes sportifs américains sont nombreux à afficher leur soutien à Colin Kaepernick. C’est le cas notamment des basketteurs Kevin Durant ou Stephen Curry, des Golden State Warriors. «Sa posture et sa protestation ont secoué le pays dans le bon sens du terme. J’espère qu’il reviendra en NFL parce qu’il mérite d’y jouer. Il est au sommet de sa forme et peut rendre une équipe meilleure», vient de souligner Stephen Curry au Charlotte Observer.

La légende du baseball Hank Aaron fait également partie des soutiens inconditionnels de Colin Kaepernick. Sans oublier Tommie Smith, qui lors des Jeux olympiques de Mexico en 1968 avait, sur le podium du 200 mètres, levé son poing ganté de noir contre la ségrégation raciale, avec son comparse John Carlos.

Effet domino

Le geste militant à répétition de Colin Kaepernick, d’abord assis puis agenouillé, a eu un effet domino. Son coéquipier Eric Reid l’avait immédiatement imité la première fois qu’il a mis le genou à terre. Une partie des joueurs des Cleveland Browns continuent, en guise de solidarité, de boycotter l’hymne des Etats-Unis, joué avant chaque rencontre sportive professionnelle.

La footballeuse homosexuelle Megan Rapinoe, championne olympique en 2012 et championne du monde en 2015, avait elle aussi suivi la voie de Colin Kaepernick et posé son genou à terre. Mais depuis que la Fédération américaine de football (US Soccer) a édicté un nouveau règlement, en mars 2017, qui oblige les internationaux à se tenir debout pendant l’hymne, elle est rentrée dans le rang.

Colin Kaepernick lui-même s’était engagé à se lever pour l’hymne pour la saison 2017. Une promesse qui n’a pas pour autant convaincu la NFL de le réintégrer.

Des cochons habillés en policiers

Barack Obama avait pris sa défense; Donald Trump l’a enfoncé. En pleine campagne, le milliardaire new-yorkais avait qualifié son geste d’«exécrable», l’hymne et le drapeau étant sacro-saints aux Etats-Unis. Il a été jusqu’à lui conseiller de «chercher un pays mieux adapté». Les chaussettes à motifs de cochons habillés en policiers que Colin Kaepernick a portées pendant plusieurs entraînements – elles ont été très remarquées – n’ont visiblement pas contribué à le rendre plus sympathique à ses yeux.

Mais ni les menaces de mort ni ses maillots brûlés n’ont calmé le militantisme de Colin Kaepernick. Un militantisme d’ailleurs un peu surprenant et parfois taxé d’opportunisme: métis, de mère blanche et élevé par des parents adoptifs blancs, Colin Kaepernick n’a rallié la cause noire, et le mouvement Black Lives Matter, que relativement tardivement.

Avant Kaepernick, la star de la NBA LeBron James avait défrayé la chronique en portant un t-shirt noir avec en lettres blanches «Je ne peux pas respirer». Ce sont les derniers mots d’un jeune Noir américain asthmatique tué par un policier blanc. Par ailleurs, il avait ouvertement soutenu Hillary Clinton dans sa course à l’élection présidentielle. Timidement, d’autres ont affiché leurs convictions politiques sur des t-shirts, mais sans aller jusqu’au boycott de l’hymne national, un geste très contesté. L’élection de Donald Trump et le drame de Charlottesville provoqué par des suprémacistes blancs ont contribué à favoriser l’émergence de ce genre de protestations.

Le retour des athlètes activistes

Ces comportements signent un retour du sportif engagé, une espèce presque en voie de disparition depuis les années 1960-1970, où de grands noms comme Mohamed Ali, Billie Jean King ou John Carlos ont porté leur militantisme à bras-le-corps.

Au cours des dernières décennies, l’heure n’était pas vraiment à la revendication politique, confirme Orin Starn, professeur d’anthropologie culturelle à l’Université Duke en Caroline du Nord. A partir des années 1980, c’est plutôt l’image du sportif businessman qui a primé, celui qui s’intéresse à ses sponsors, à devenir le meilleur possible, soucieux de ne déclencher aucune polémique. Un sportif lisse avant tout motivé par ses performances et sa carrière. Comme le basketteur Michael Jordan ou le golfeur Tiger Woods.

Élargir le débat au-delà du jeu

«Des sportifs semblent désormais plus facilement se mettre en avant pour évoquer leurs convictions, que ce soient des championnes de tennis ou des footballeurs. Mais ces athlètes activistes restent encore minoritaires. Peu ont suivi Kaepernick lorsqu’il s’est agenouillé pendant l’hymne national. La plupart se focalisent sur leur sport, ils ne sont pas vraiment désireux de jouer les trouble-fête», précise l’anthropologue. Pour lui, ce nouvel activisme reste néanmoins réjouissant.

«Dans notre culture, ces sportifs sont des dieux, qui peuvent exercer une influence positive. Ils peuvent être un bon exemple d’engagement civique pour des jeunes.» Et puis, ajoute Orin Starn, une bonne controverse comme l’affaire Kaepernick permet de pimenter un peu le sport et d’élargir le débat au-delà du jeu. Colin Kaepernick ne commentera pas: il refuse les interviews. Mais il continue, sur Twitter, de faire vivre son militantisme et ses convictions. Egal à lui-même.

Voir de même:

Colin Kaepernick, le footballeur américain militant contre les violences policières, devient l’un des visages de Nike

En choisissant le joueur pour sa campagne publicitaire, l’équipementier prend parti dans la mobilisation contre les violences policières infligées aux Noirs américains, qui irrite au plus haut point Donald Trump.

Le Monde

Le joueur de football américain Colin Kaepernick, à l’origine en 2016 du mouvement de boycott de l’hymne américain, est devenu l’un des visages de la dernière campagne de publicité de l’équipementier sportif Nike. Il apparaît aux côtés de la reine du tennis féminin Serena Williams et de la mégastar de la NBA LeBron James dans cette campagne, qui coïncide avec le 30e anniversaire du célèbre slogan « Just do it » de la marque à la virgule.

Sur son compte Twitter, Colin Kaepernick a publié lundi 3 septembre le visuel montrant en gros plan son visage en noir et blanc avec le message « Croyez en quelque chose. Même si cela signifie tout sacrifier ».

Depuis qu’il a lancé son mouvement pour protester contre les violences policières exercées à l’encontre des Noirs américains en posant un genou à terre lors de l’hymne américain, Colin Kaepernick est devenu une personnalité controversée aux Etats-Unis, célébrée par les uns et détestée par les autres, notamment par le président américain Donald Trump, entré en guerre ouverte à l’automne dernier contre les joueurs protestataires.

Lire aussi :   La révolution Kaepernick, ou comment Black Lives Matter a fait école dans les stades américains

Entrée sur le terrain politique pour Nike

Colin Kaepernick n’a pas retrouvé d’équipe depuis l’expiration de son contrat avec San Francisco au début de 2017 et a attaqué en justice la Ligue nationale de football américain (NFL), qu’il accuse de collusion pour l’empêcher de poursuivre sa carrière.

Il est sous contrat depuis 2011 avec Nike qui, à la différence de la plupart de ses autres partenaires, n’a pas résilié son contrat de sponsoring. A trois jours du coup d’envoi de la saison 2018 de NFL, Nike frappe fort en termes de marketing. L’équipementier prend surtout clairement parti – et c’est une première pour une entreprise de cette taille – sur une question qui divise le pays depuis près de deux ans et qui irrite au plus haut point Donald Trump.

Sur le site Internet de la chaîne ESPN, Gino Fisanotti, dirigeant de Nike, a lancé :

« Nous croyons que Colin est l’un des sportifs les plus charismatiques de sa génération, qui utilise la puissance du sport pour faire bouger le monde. »

Le grand groupe américain qui fournit les équipements et les tenues des 32 équipes engagées en NFL et a renouvelé au mois de mars son partenariat pour huit ans avec l’association d’équipes professionnelles de football américain va encore plus loin. Il a prolongé son contrat de partenariat avec Colin Kaepernick et s’est engagé à créer une basket à son nom, honneur suprême pour un sportif professionnel, tout en finançant sa fondation d’aide à l’enfance.

Trump face à la fronde des sportifs

La marque connue pour ses campagnes de publicité novatrices s’expose aussi au courroux de Donald Trump. S’il n’a pas encore envoyé l’un de ses tweets assassins, le président américain mène depuis l’automne dernier une bataille personnelle contre ces joueurs de football américain qui, inspirés par Colin Kaepernick, posent un genou à terre ou lèvent un poing, tête baissée, durant l’hymne américain joué avant chaque match.

Pour Donald Trump et une partie de l’opinion publique américaine, ces gestes sont antipatriotiques, une insulte aux militaires qui ont servi et trouvé la mort sous le drapeau américain. Le président avait demandé aux propriétaires d’équipes de les sanctionner, voire de les licencier.

Lire aussi :   Après le boycott de l’hymne américain, la NFL décide d’obliger les joueurs à rester debout

La NFL pensait avoir désamorcé une réédition de la crise de 2017, qui a pénalisé ses recettes publicitaires et les audiences TV, en édictant au printemps dernier une réglementation autorisant les joueurs à protester à condition qu’ils restent dans les vestiaires pendant l’hymne. Mais cette réglementation a depuis été suspendue pour éviter les recours en justice. C’était avant que Nike ne fasse resurgir Kaepernick et son combat sur le devant de la scène et ne relance de plus belle la polémique.

« Je pense que tous les athlètes, tous les humains et tous les Afro-Américains devraient être totalement reconnaissants et honorés » par les manifestations lancées par les anciens joueurs de la NFL Colin Kaepernick et Eric Reid, a déclaré Serena Williams.

Lire aussi :   Donald Trump ouvre un nouveau front intérieur, cette fois-ci contre le monde du sport

Réplique sur les réseaux sociaux

Les réseaux sociaux n’ont pas tardé à réagir, les partisans de Donald Trump lançant une campagne appelant au boycottage ou à la destruction des produits de l’équipementier, avec l’apparition des hashtags #BoycottNike #JustBurnIt. L’ingénieur du son de John Rich, du duo de musique country Big and Rich, aurait ainsi découpé ses chaussettes Nike, alors qu’un certain Sean Clancy postait sur Twitter la vidéo de l’immolation par le feu d’une paire de chaussures de sport. « D’abord la NFL me force à choisir entre mon sport préféré et mon pays. J’ai choisi mon pays. Puis Nike me force à choisir entre mes chaussures préférées et mon pays », a-t-il écrit. Lydia Rodarte-Quayle invite, elle, à mettre à la poubelle les vêtements de la marque.

Des prises de position aussitôt tournées en ridicule par d’autres internautes, qui se moquent notamment du fait que les partisans du président détruisent des équipements qu’ils ont payés – souvent au prix fort. Ainsi Adolph Joseph DeLaGarza, joueur de football (soccer) du Dynamo de Houston, relève le manque de logique de la démarche : « Donc, en ne voulant pas soutenir ou promouvoir @Nike, vous découpez des chaussettes déjà payées et PUIS vous tweetez @Nike. Logique ! »

Voir enfin:

Nike’s « Just do it » slogan is based on a murderer’s last words, says Dan Wieden

Marcus Fairs
Deezen|
Design Indaba 2015: the advertising executive behind Nike‘s « Just do it » slogan has told Dezeen how he based one of the world’s most recognisable taglines on the words of a convict facing a firing squad (+ interview).Dan Wieden, co-founder of advertising agency Wieden+Kennedy, described the surprising genesis of the slogan in an interview at the Design Indaba conference in Cape Town last month. »I was recalling a man in Portland, » Wieden told Dezeen, remembering how in 1988 he was struggling to come up with a line that would tie together a number of different TV commercials the fledgling agency had created for the sportswear brand. »He grew up in Portland, and ran around doing criminal acts in the country, and was in Utah where he murdered a man and a woman, and was sent to jail and put before a firing squad. »Wieden continued: « They asked him if he had any final thoughts and he said: ‘Let’s do it’. I didn’t like ‘Let’s do it’ so I just changed it to ‘Just do it’. »The murderer was Gary Gilmore, who had grown up in Portland, Oregan – the city that is home to both Nike and Wieden+Kennedy. In 1976 Gilmore robbed and murdered two men in Utah and was executed by firing squad the following year (by some accounts Gilmore actually said « Let’s do this » just before he was shot).

Nike’s first commercial featuring the « Just do it » slogan

Nike co-founder Phil Knight, who was sceptical about the need for advertising, initially rejected the idea. « Phil Knight said, ‘We don’t need that shit’, » Wieden said. « I said ‘Just trust me on this one.’ So they trusted me and it went big pretty quickly. »

The slogan, together with Nike’s « Swoosh » logo, helped propel the sportswear brand into a global giant, overtaking then-rival Reebok, and is still in use almost three decades after it was coined.

Campaign magazine described it as « arguably the best tagline of the 20th century, » saying it « cut across age and class barriers, linked Nike with success – and made consumers believe they could be successful too just by wearing its products. »

The magazine continued: « Like all great taglines, it was both simple and memorable. It also suggested something more than its literal meaning, allowing people to interpret it as they wished and, in doing so, establish a personal connection with the brand. »

Dan Wieden

Born in 1945, Wieden formed Wieden+Kennedy in Portaland with co-founder David Kennedy in 1982. The company now has offices around the world and has « billings in excess of $3 billion, » Wieden said.

Wieden revealed in his lecture at Design Indaba that shares in the privately owned agency had recently been put into a trust, making it « impossible » for the firm to be sold.

« I’ve sworn in private and in public that we will never, ever sell the agency, » Wieden said. « It just isn’t fair that once sold, a handful of people will walk off with great gobs of money and those left behind will face salary cuts or be fired, and the culture will be destroyed. »

He added: « The partners and I got together a couple of years ago and put our shares in a trust, whose only obligation is to never ever, under no circumstances, sell the agency.”

Here is an edited transcript of our interview with Dan Wieden:


Marcus Fairs: You’re probably bored to death of this question but tell me how the Nike slogan came about.

Dan Wieden: So, it was the first television campaign we’d done with some money behind, so we actually came up with five different 30 second spots. The night before I got a little concerned because there were five different teams working, so there wasn’t an overlying sensibility to them all. Some were funny, some were solemn. So I thought you know, we need a tagline to pull this stuff together, which we didn’t really believe in at the time but I just felt it was going to be too fragmented.

So I stayed up that night before and I think I wrote about four or five ideas. I narrowed it down to the last one, which was « Just do it ». The reason I did that one was funny because I was recalling a man in Portland.

He grew up in Portland, and ran around doing criminal acts in the country, and was in Utah where he murdered a man and a woman, and was sent to jail and put before a firing squad. And they asked him if he had any final thoughts and he said: « Let’s do it ».

And for some reason I went: « Now damn. How do you do that? How do you ask for an ultimate challenge that you are probably going to lose, but you call it in? » So I thought, well, I didn’t like « Let’s do it » so I just changed it to « Just do it ».

I showed it to some of the folks in the agency before we went to present to Nike and they said « We don’t need that shit ». I went to Nike and [Nike co-founder] Phil Knight said, « We don’t need that shit ». I said « Just trust me on this one. » So they trusted me and it went big pretty quickly.

Marcus Fairs: Most of Dezeen’s audience is involved in making products, whether it’s trainers or cars or whatever. What is the relationship between what you do and the product?

Dan Wieden: Well if you notice in all the Nike work – I mean there is work that shows individual shoes, but a lot of the work that we do is more talking about the role of sports or athletics. And Nike became strong because it wasn’t just trying to peddle products; it was trying to peddle ideas and the mental and physical options you can take. So it was really unusual and it worked very well.

Marcus Fairs: And what about other clients? What do you do if the client just wants you to show the product?

Dan Wieden: Well, it depends on the client as well. But you have to be adding something to a product that is beyond just taste, or fit, or any of that kind of stuff. You have to have a sensibility about the product, a sort of spirit of the product almost.

Marcus Fairs: And do you turn down brands that have product which you don’t think is good enough?

Dan Wieden: Oh sure. And we fire clients!

Voir enfin:

September 7, 2018

Last year, Naomi Osaka commanded the world’s attention when she bested the U.S. Open’s defending champion Angelique Kerber in a stunning upset in the very first round. This year, the 20-year-old upstart has a shot at claiming the title herself as she challenges six-time champion Serena Williams in a historic final on Saturday.

In what Osaka termed her “dream match” against her idol, Saturday’s game pits tennis’ rising star against one of the game’s ultimate greats — if Williams wins she would tie Margaret Court for the overall record of 24 Grand Slam singles titles.

The two have competed only once before, and it’s the newcomer who holds the upper hand. As Serena herself put it, Osaka is “a really good, talented player. Very dangerous.”

Ahead of Saturday’s face off, here’s what to know about the new kid on the block.

A first for Japan

For her country, Osaka has already succeeded in a major milestone: She is the first Japanese woman to reach the final of any Grand Slam. And she’s currently her country’s top-ranked player.

Yet in Japan, where racial homogeneity is prized and ethnic background comprises a big part of cultural belonging, Osaka is considered hafu or half Japanese. Born to a Japanese mother and a Haitian father, Osaka grew up in New York. She holds dual American and Japanese passports, but plays under Japan’s flag.

Some hafu, like Miss Universe Japan Ariana Miyamoto, have spoken publicly about the discrimination the term can confer. “I wonder how a hafu can represent Japan,” one Facebook user wrote of Miyamoto, according to Al Jazeera America’s translation.

For her part, Osaka has spoken repeatedly about being proud to represent Japan, as well as Haiti. But in a 2016 USA Today interview she also noted, “When I go to Japan people are confused. From my name, they don’t expect to see a black girl.”

On the court, Osaka has largely been embraced as one of her country’s rising stars. Off court, she says she’s still trying to learn the language.

“I can understand way more Japanese than I can speak,” she said.

‘Like no one ever was’

In her press conferences, which for now are English only, Osaka has earned a reputation for her youthful candor and nerdy sense of humor.

In response to a reporter asking about her ambitions, she said, “to be the very best, like no one ever was.” After an awkward pause, she clarified, “I’m sorry; that’s the Pokémon theme song. But, yeah, to be the very best, and go as far as I can go.”

At Indian Wells this year, where Osaka stunned her higher-ranked opponents and claimed victory after searing past the world’s number one Simona Halep in the semis and besting Daria Kasatkina in the finals, she proved herself no longer just the underdog. She then proceeded to give what she described as “the worst acceptance speech of all time.”

“Hello, hi, I am—okay never mind,” it began, before a litany of thank you’s petered out into giggles.

But don’t let her soft-spoken persona or goofy interviews fool you. On court, Osaka brings the heat, uncorking both ferocious power and an aggressive baseline game.

W.W.S.D.

Earlier this year, Osaka reveled a four-word mantra keeps her steady through tough matches: “What would Serena do?”

Her idolization of the 23 Grand Slam-winning titan is well-known.

“She’s the main reason why I started playing tennis,” Osaka told the New York Times.

When the two played in Miami in March, six months after Serena nearly died giving birth, Osaka won. Then she Instagrammed a photo of her shaking hands with her idol, captioned only, “Omg.”

After Osaka cleared the U.S. Open semis on Thursday and it became clear she was not only headed to her first Grand Slam final but was also about to face her hero once more, she was asked if she had anything to say to Serena. Her message? “I love you.”

Voir par ailleurs:

Baltimore Residents Blame Record-High Murder Rate On Lower Police Presence
NPR
December 31, 2017

LAUREN FRAYER, HOST:

This year, Baltimore has had well over 300 murders for the third year in a row. Some activists say the high murder rate is because police have backed off and relaxed patrols in neighborhoods like the one where Freddie Gray was arrested. Gray was a black man who died while he was in the back of a Baltimore police van in 2015. Reverend Kenji Scott lives in Baltimore. He’s held positions in local city government and is a pastor and community activist.

KINJI SCOTT: When you think about young people who are out here facing these economic challenges and are homeless and live in places that are uncertain and you’re a parent, you’re scared, not just for yourself really but for your children. I mean, the average age of a homicide victim in Baltimore City right now is 31 years old. We had a young man who attended one of the prime high schools, Poly. His name was Jonathan Tobash, and he was 19 years old, was a Morgan student. And he was killed on his way to the store. That’s the state of Baltimore right now.

FRAYER: What do you see? Is this something that happens in the middle of the night, or is this something that when you live there you see this?

SCOTT: You see this all the time. You’re talking about homicides in the middle of the night. No. The average homicide in Baltimore happens during the day. We have broad daylight shootings all over the city. You’ve had shootings and people have been shot, gunned down and killed in front of the police station.

FRAYER: After the death of Freddie Gray, yourself, families of victims, didn’t you want police to back off?

SCOTT: No. That represented our progressive, our activists, our liberal journalists, our politicians. But it did not represent the overall community because we know for a fact that around the time that Freddie Gray was killed, we start to see homicides increase. We had five homicides in that neighborhood while we were protesting. What I wanted to see happen was that people would build a trust relationship with our police department so that they would feel more comfortable with having conversations with the police about crime in their neighborhood because they would feel safer. So we wanted the police there. We wanted them engaging the community. We didn’t want them there beating the hell out of us. We didn’t want that.

FRAYER: Do you think your experience with high murder rate in Baltimore is unique?

SCOTT: No, it’s not. It’s not. I lost my brother in St. Louis in 2004. I just lost my cousin in Chicago. No, it’s not unique, and that’s the horrible thing.

FRAYER: It’s been three and a half years since Ferguson, Mo., since the killing of Michael Brown, since the Black Lives Matter movement was born to demand reforms to policing. What did they put on the table, and has it worked?

SCOTT: The primary thrust nationwide is what President Obama wanted to do – focus on building relationships with police departments in major cities where there has been a history of conflict. That hasn’t happened. We don’t see that. I don’t know a city that I’ve heard of – Baltimore for certain. We’ve not seen any changes in those relationships. What we have seen was that the police has distanced themselves, and the community has distanced themselves even further. So there is – the divide has really intensified. It hasn’t decreased. And of course, we want to delineate the whole concept of the culture of bad policing that exists. Nobody denies that. But as a result of this, we don’t see the policing – the level of policing we need in our community to keep the crime down in these cities that we’re seeing bleed to death.

FRAYER: Are you optimistic for 2018?

SCOTT: I’m not because as I look at the conclusion of 2017, these same cities – St. Louis, Baltimore, New Orleans and Chicago – these same chocolate (ph), these same black cities are still bleeding to death, and we’re still burying young men in these cities. I want to be hopeful. I’m a preacher. I want to be hopeful. But as it stands, no, not until we really have a real conversation with our frontline officers in the heart of our black communities that does not involve people who are, quote, unquote, « leaders. » We need the frontline police officers, and we need the heart of the black community to step to the forefront of this discussion. That’s what’s important. And that’s when we’re going to see a decrease in crime.

FRAYER: Reverend Kinji Scott in Baltimore, thank you very much.

SCOTT: Thank you.


Effet spectateur: C’est le mimétisme, imbécile ! (Monkey see, monkey do: New example of bystander effect on Paris commuter train confirms everything is mimetic in whatever we do whether good or bad, but compounded by the effect of diversity)

4 juillet, 2018

Je vous le dis en vérité, toutes les fois que vous avez fait ces choses à l’un de ces plus petits de mes frères, c’est à moi que vous les avez faites. Jésus (Matthieu 25: 40)
Un docteur de la loi (…) voulant se justifier, dit à Jésus : Et qui est mon prochain ? Jésus reprit la parole, et dit : Un homme descendait de Jérusalem à Jéricho. Il tomba au milieu des brigands, qui le dépouillèrent, le chargèrent de coups, et s’en allèrent, le laissant à demi mort. Un sacrificateur, qui par hasard descendait par le même chemin, ayant vu cet homme, passa outre. Un Lévite, qui arriva aussi dans ce lieu, l’ayant vu, passa outre. Mais un Samaritain, qui voyageait, étant venu là, fut ému de compassion lorsqu’il le vit. Il s’approcha, et banda ses plaies, en y versant de l’huile et du vin ; puis il le mit sur sa propre monture, le conduisit à une hôtellerie, et prit soin de lui. Le lendemain, il tira deux deniers, les donna à l’hôte, et dit : Aie soin de lui, et ce que tu dépenseras de plus, je te le rendrai à mon retour. Lequel de ces trois te semble avoir été le prochain de celui qui était tombé au milieu des brigands ? C’est celui qui a exercé la miséricorde envers lui, répondit le docteur de la loi. Et Jésus lui dit : Va, et toi, fais de même. Jésus (Luc 10 : 25-37)
Alors les scribes et les pharisiens amenèrent une femme surprise en adultère; et, la plaçant au milieu du peuple, ils dirent à Jésus: Maître, cette femme a été surprise en flagrant délit d’adultère. Moïse, dans la loi, nous a ordonné de lapider de telles femmes: toi donc, que dis-tu? Ils disaient cela pour l’éprouver, afin de pouvoir l’accuser. Mais Jésus, s’étant baissé, écrivait avec le doigt sur la terre. Comme ils continuaient à l’interroger, il se releva et leur dit: Que celui de vous qui est sans péché jette le premier la pierre contre elle. Et s’étant de nouveau baissé, il écrivait sur la terre. Quand ils entendirent cela, accusés par leur conscience, ils se retirèrent un à un, depuis les plus âgés jusqu’aux derniers; et Jésus resta seul avec la femme qui était là au milieu. Alors s’étant relevé, et ne voyant plus que la femme, Jésus lui dit: Femme, où sont ceux qui t’accusaient? Personne ne t’a-t-il condamnée? Elle répondit: Non, Seigneur. Et Jésus lui dit: Je ne te condamne pas non plus: va, et ne pèche plus. Jean 8: 3-11
Ne croyez pas que je sois venu apporter la paix sur la terre; je ne suis pas venu apporter la paix, mais l’épée. Car je suis venu mettre la division entre l’homme et son père, entre la fille et sa mère, entre la belle-fille et sa belle-mère; et l’homme aura pour ennemis les gens de sa maison. Jésus (Matthieu 10 : 34-36)
L’erreur est toujours de raisonner dans les catégories de la « différence », alors que la racine de tous les conflits, c’est plutôt la « concurrence », la rivalité mimétique entre des êtres, des pays, des cultures. La concurrence, c’est-à-dire le désir d’imiter l’autre pour obtenir la même chose que lui, au besoin par la violence. Sans doute le terrorisme est-il lié à un monde « différent » du nôtre, mais ce qui suscite le terrorisme n’est pas dans cette « différence » qui l’éloigne le plus de nous et nous le rend inconcevable. Il est au contraire dans un désir exacerbé de convergence et de ressemblance. (…) Ce qui se vit aujourd’hui est une forme de rivalité mimétique à l’échelle planétaire. Lorsque j’ai lu les premiers documents de Ben Laden, constaté ses allusions aux bombes américaines tombées sur le Japon, je me suis senti d’emblée à un niveau qui est au-delà de l’islam, celui de la planète entière. Sous l’étiquette de l’islam, on trouve une volonté de rallier et de mobiliser tout un tiers-monde de frustrés et de victimes dans leurs rapports de rivalité mimétique avec l’Occident. Mais les tours détruites occupaient autant d’étrangers que d’Américains. Et par leur efficacité, par la sophistication des moyens employés, par la connaissance qu’ils avaient des Etats-Unis, par leurs conditions d’entraînement, les auteurs des attentats n’étaient-ils pas un peu américains ? On est en plein mimétisme. Ce sentiment n’est pas vrai des masses, mais des dirigeants. Sur le plan de la fortune personnelle, on sait qu’un homme comme Ben Laden n’a rien à envier à personne. Et combien de chefs de parti ou de faction sont dans cette situation intermédiaire, identique à la sienne. Regardez un Mirabeau au début de la Révolution française : il a un pied dans un camp et un pied dans l’autre, et il n’en vit que de manière plus aiguë son ressentiment. Aux Etats-Unis, des immigrés s’intègrent avec facilité, alors que d’autres, même si leur réussite est éclatante, vivent aussi dans un déchirement et un ressentiment permanents. Parce qu’ils sont ramenés à leur enfance, à des frustrations et des humiliations héritées du passé. Cette dimension est essentielle, en particulier chez des musulmans qui ont des traditions de fierté et un style de rapports individuels encore proche de la féodalité. (…) Cette concurrence mimétique, quand elle est malheureuse, ressort toujours, à un moment donné, sous une forme violente. A cet égard, c’est l’islam qui fournit aujourd’hui le ciment qu’on trouvait autrefois dans le marxismeRené Girard
L’inauguration majestueuse de l’ère « post-chrétienne » est une plaisanterie. Nous sommes dans un ultra-christianisme caricatural qui essaie d’échapper à l’orbite judéo-chrétienne en « radicalisant » le souci des victimes dans un sens antichrétien. (…) Jusqu’au nazisme, le judaïsme était la victime préférentielle de ce système de bouc émissaire. Le christianisme ne venait qu’en second lieu. Depuis l’Holocauste , en revanche, on n’ose plus s’en prendre au judaïsme, et le christianisme est promu au rang de bouc émissaire numéro un. (…) Le mouvement antichrétien le plus puissant est celui qui réassume et « radicalise » le souci des victimes pour le paganiser. (…) Comme les Eglises chrétiennes ont pris conscience tardivement de leurs manquements à la charité, de leur connivence avec l’ordre établi, dans le monde d’hier et d’aujourd’hui, elles sont particulièrement vulnérables au chantage permanent auquel le néopaganisme contemporain les soumet. René Girard
Notre monde est de plus en plus imprégné par cette vérité évangélique de l’innocence des victimes. L’attention qu’on porte aux victimes a commencé au Moyen Age, avec l’invention de l’hôpital. L’Hôtel-Dieu, comme on disait, accueillait toutes les victimes, indépendamment de leur origine. Les sociétés primitives n’étaient pas inhumaines, mais elles n’avaient d’attention que pour leurs membres. Le monde moderne a inventé la « victime inconnue », comme on dirait aujourd’hui le « soldat inconnu ». Le christianisme peut maintenant continuer à s’étendre même sans la loi, car ses grandes percées intellectuelles et morales, notre souci des victimes et notre attention à ne pas nous fabriquer de boucs émissaires, ont fait de nous des chrétiens qui s’ignorent. René Girard
« Que celui qui se croit sans péché lui jette la première pierre ! » Pourquoi la première pierre ? Parce qu’elle est seule décisive. Celui qui la jette n’a personne à imiter. Rien de plus facile que d’imiter un exemple déjà donné. Donner soi-même l’exemple est tout autre chose. La foule est mimétiquement mobilisée, mais il lui reste un dernier seuil à franchir, celui de la violence réelle. Si quelqu’un jetait la première pierre, aussitôt les pierres pleuvraient. En attirant l’attention sur la première pierre, la parole de Jésus renforce cet obstacle ultime à la lapidation. Il donne aux meilleurs de cette foule le temps d’entendre sa parole et de s’examiner eux-mêmes. S’il est réel, cet examen ne peut manquer de découvrir le rapport circulaire de la victime et du bourreau. Le scandale qu’incarne cette femme à leurs yeux, ces hommes le portent déjà en eux-mêmes, et c’est pour s’en débarrasser qu’ils le projettent sur elle, d’autant plus aisément, bien sûr, qu’elle est vraiment coupable. Pour lapider une victime de bon coeur, il faut se croire différent d’elle, et la convergence mimétique, je le rappelle, s’accompagne d’une illusion de divergence. C’est la convergence réelle combinée avec l’illusion de divergence qui déclenche ce que Jésus cherche à prévenir, le mécanisme du bouc émissaire. La foule précède l’individu. Ne devient vraiment individu que celui qui, se détachant de la foule, échappe à l’unanimité violente. Tous ne sont pas capables d’autant d’initiative. Ceux qui en sont capables se détachent les premiers et, ce faisant, empêchent la lapidation. (…) A côté des temps individuels, donc, il y a toujours un temps social dans notre texte, mais il singe désormais les temps individuels, c’est le temps des modes et des engouements politiques, intellectuels, etc. Le temps reste ponctué par des mécanismes mimétiques. Sortir de la foule le premier, renoncer le premier à jeter des pierres, c’est prendre le risque d’en recevoir. La décision en sens inverse aurait été plus facile, car elle se situait dans le droit fil d’un emballement mimétique déjà amorcé. La première pierre est moins mimétique que les suivantes, mais elle n’en est pas moins portée par la vague de mimétisme qui a engendré la foule. Et les premiers à décider contre la lapidation ? Faut-il penser que chez eux au moins il n’y a aucune imitation ? Certainement pas. Même là il y en a, puisque c’est Jésus qui suggère à ces hommes d’agir comme ils le font. La décision contre la violence resterait impossible, nous dit le christianisme, sans cet Esprit divin qui s’appelle le Paraclet, c’est-à-dire, en grec ordinaire, « l’avocat de la défense » : c’est bien ici le rôle de Jésus lui-même. Il laisse d’ailleurs entendre qu’il est lui-même le premier Paraclet, le premier défenseur des victimes. Et il l’est surtout par la Passion qui est ici, bien sûr, sous-entendue. La théorie mimétique insiste sur le suivisme universel, sur l’impuissance des hommes à ne pas imiter les exemples les plus faciles, les plus suivis, parce que c’est cela qui prédomine dans toute société. Il ne faut pas en conclure qu’elle nie la liberté individuelle. En situant la décision véritable dans son contexte vrai, celui des contagions mimétiques partout présentes, cette théorie donne à ce qui n’est pas mécanique, et qui pourtant ne diffère pas du tout dans sa forme de ce qui l’est, un relief que la libre décision n’a pas chez les penseurs qui ont toujours la liberté à la bouche et de ce fait même, croyant l’exalter, la dévaluent complètement. Si on glorifie le décisif sans voir ce qui le rend très difficile, on ne sort jamais de la métaphysique la plus creuse. Même le renoncement au mimétisme violent ne peut pas se répandre sans se transformer en mécanisme social, en mimétisme aveugle. Il y a une lapidation à l’envers symétrique de la lapidation à l’endroit non dénuée de violence, elle aussi. C’est ce que montrent bien les parodies de notre temps. Tous ceux qui auraient jeté des pierres s’il s’était trouvé quelqu’un pour jeter la première sont mimétiquement amenés à n’en pas jeter. Pour la plupart d’entre eux, la vraie raison de la non-violence n’est pas la dure réflexion sur soi, le renoncement à la violence : c’est le mimétisme, comme d’habitude. Il y a toujours emballement mimétique dans une direction ou dans une autre. En s’engouffrant dans la direction déjà choisie par les premiers, les « mimic men » se félicitent de leur esprit de décision et de liberté. Il ne faut pas se leurrer. Dans une société qui ne lapide plus les femmes adultères, beaucoup d’hommes n’ont pas vraiment changé. La violence est moindre, mieux dissimulée, mais structurellement identique à ce qu’elle a toujours été. Il n’y a pas sortie authentique du mimétisme, mais soumission mimétique à une culture qui prône cette sortie. Dans toute aventure sociale, quelle qu’en soit la nature, la part d’individualisme authentique est forcément minime mais pas inexistante. Il ne faut pas oublier surtout que le mimétisme qui épargne les victimes est infiniment supérieur objectivement, moralement, à celui qui les tue à coups de pierres. Il faut laisser les fausses équivalences à Nietzsche et aux esthétismes décadents. Le récit de la femme adultère nous fait voir que des comportements sociaux identiques dans leur forme et même jusqu’à un certain point dans leur fond, puisqu’ils sont tous mimétiques, peuvent néanmoins différer les uns des autres à l’infini. La part de mécanisme et de liberté qu’ils comportent est infiniment variable. Mais cette inépuisable diversité ne prouve rien en faveur du nihilisme cognitif ; elle ne prouve pas que les comportements sont incomparables et inconnaissables. Tout ce que nous avons besoin de connaître pour résister aux automatismes sociaux, aux contagions mimétiques galopantes, est accessible à la connaissance. René Girard
Jésus s’appuie sur la Loi pour en transformer radicalement le sens. La femme adultère doit être lapidée : en cela la Loi d’Israël ne se distingue pas de celle des nations. La lapidation est à la fois une manière de reproduire et de contenir le processus de mise à mort de la victime dans des limites strictes. Rien n’est plus contagieux que la violence et il ne faut pas se tromper de victime. Parce qu’elle redoute les fausses dénonciations, la Loi, pour les rendre plus difficiles, oblige les délateurs, qui doivent être deux au minimum, à jeter eux-mêmes les deux premières pierres. Jésus s’appuie sur ce qu’il y a de plus humain dans la Loi, l’obligation faite aux deux premiers accusateurs de jeter les deux premières pierres ; il s’agit pour lui de transformer le mimétisme ritualisé pour une violence limitée en un mimétisme inverse. Si ceux qui doivent jeter » la première pierre » renoncent à leur geste, alors une réaction mimétique inverse s’enclenche, pour le pardon, pour l’amour. (…) Jésus sauve la femme accusée d’adultère. Mais il est périlleux de priver la violence mimétique de tout exutoire. Jésus sait bien qu’à dénoncer radicalement le mauvais mimétisme, il s’expose à devenir lui-même la cible des violences collectives. Nous voyons effectivement dans les Évangiles converger contre lui les ressentiments de ceux qu’ils privent de leur raison d’être, gardiens du Temple et de la Loi en particulier. » Les chefs des prêtres et les Pharisiens rassemblèrent donc le Sanhédrin et dirent : « Que ferons-nous ? Cet homme multiplie les signes. Si nous le laissons agir, tous croiront en lui ». » Le grand prêtre Caïphe leur révèle alors le mécanisme qui permet d’immoler Jésus et qui est au cœur de toute culture païenne : » Ne comprenez-vous pas ? Il est de votre intérêt qu’un seul homme meure pour tout le peuple plutôt que la nation périsse » (Jean XI, 47-50) (…) Livrée à elle-même, l’humanité ne peut pas sortir de la spirale infernale de la violence mimétique et des mythes qui en camouflent le dénouement sacrificiel. Pour rompre l’unanimité mimétique, il faut postuler une force supérieure à la contagion violente : l’Esprit de Dieu, que Jean appelle aussi le Paraclet, c’est-à-dire l’avocat de la défense des victimes. C’est aussi l’Esprit qui fait révéler aux persécuteurs la loi du meurtre réconciliateur dans toute sa nudité. (…) Ils utilisent une expression qui est l’équivalent de » bouc émissaire » mais qui fait mieux ressortir l’innocence foncière de celui contre qui tous se réconcilient : Jésus est désigné comme » Agneau de Dieu « . Cela veut dire qu’il est la victime émissaire par excellence, celle dont le sacrifice, parce qu’il est identifié comme le meurtre arbitraire d’un innocent — et parce que la victime n’a jamais succombé à aucune rivalité mimétique — rend inutile, comme le dit l’Épître aux Hébreux, tous les sacrifices sanglants, ritualisés ou non, sur lesquels est fondée la cohésion des communautés humaines. La mort et la Résurrection du Christ substituent une communion de paix et d’amour à l’unité fondée sur la contrainte des communautés païennes. L’Eucharistie, commémoration régulière du » sacrifice parfait » remplace la répétition stérile des sacrifices sanglants. (…) En même temps, le devoir du chrétien est de dénoncer le péché là où il se trouve. Le communisme a pu s’effondrer sans violence parce que le monde libre et le monde communiste avaient accepté de ne plus remettre en cause les frontières existantes ; à l’intérieur de ces frontières, des millions de chrétiens ont combattu sans violence pour la vérité, pour que la lumière soit faite sur le mensonge et la violence des régimes qui asservissaient leurs pays. Encore une fois, face au danger de mimétisme universel de la violence, vous n’avez qu’une réponse possible : le christianisme. René Girard
Si nous voulons aborder le « fait religieux » autrement que sous la forme d’une collection de savoirs, forcément émiettés et terriblement lacunaires, une voie peut être l’approfondissement d’un texte assez bien choisi pour qu’il rende le « religieux » intelligible. Ce postulat d’intelligibilité fonde le christianisme par essence. Il ne saurait y avoir contradiction, en toute dernière instance, entre ce message « religieux » et la rationalité, et ce malgré le contentieux historique lourd entre l’Eglise et la philosophie des Lumières. Ce texte en est une illustration magnifique. Il suffit de le lire en oubliant qu’il nous a été transmis par une institution religieuse pour qu’il nous devienne singulièrement utile, et pour commencer sur le plan professionnel. Voilà une situation dite de « conflit » et qui pourrait dégénérer en « violence ». Cette fois c’est l’analyse du philosophe René Girard qui peut servir d’éclairage. Comme F. Quéré, il observe que l’épisode marque une étape dans un drame qui aboutira à l’explosion de violence du Golgotha, lieu où Jésus mourra crucifié. Mais au cours de cette scène qui se déroule au Temple, la spirale de violence est enrayée. Cette spirale, que Girard nomme aussi « l’escalade » est toujours mimétique ; elle procède d’un entraînement mutuel et aboutit dans un cercle fermé, où, comme dans un chaudron, la tension monte, les pulsions violentes convergeant vers une victime placée sans défense « au milieu du groupe ». La réponse apportée par cet artiste de la non violence qu’est Jésus tient ici d’abord à une attitude. « Mais Jésus, se baissant, se mit à tracer des traits sur le sol ». Les yeux baissés évitent ainsi la rencontre des regards. Or c’est de leur croisement que procède la violence mimétique. Il faut en avoir fait l’expérience pour comprendre à quel point une formule comme « Regarde-moi dans les yeux ! » peut être vécue comme agressive lorsque le maître, outré, croit ainsi provoquer les aveux de l’élève ! Donc, sans regarder cette troupe d’excités, Jésus s’absorbe dans une autre occupation : « il trace des traits sur le sol ». (…) Le verbe « graphein » qui a donné « graphie » pointe aussi bien l’écriture que le dessin. Dommage pour les commentateurs ultérieurs qui y voyaient la relativisation de la Loi de l’Ancien Testament, destinée à être dépassée, puisqu’écrite sur le sable. Mais le terme « gué » n’a pas ce sens : c’est la « terre », ou le « sol », ce socle qui nous est commun, que nous soyons agresseurs ou agressés. Il est possible d’ailleurs que Jésus ait su lire, mais non écrire, ce qui était courant à l’époque. Tout au plus, mais c’est là l’interprétation que me suggère mon enthousiasme, pourrait-on comprendre que l’activité graphique, par la concentration qu’elle requiert, oblige à prendre du recul, et contribue à la résolution du conflit ! (…) Les peintres quant à eux, astreints à rassembler dans une image immobile un développement narratif, anticiperont souvent la suite, et inscriront dans leur représentation la parole de Jésus : « que celui qui n’a jamais péché lui jette la première pierre ». Cette phrase est un coup de génie, parce que c’est aussi la solution la plus simple. D’abord l’énonciation se fait au singulier, sans pour autant désigner nommément quelqu’un. La spirale du « défoulement », toujours collectif, est rompue. Mais avec un grand doigté, par un protagoniste qui prend le risque calculé de l’accompagner : « Allez-y, lapidez-la, mais… ». La phrase reprend très certainement la disposition juridique du Deutéronome relative aux témoins, mais en procurant un éclairage aigu sur son fondement. En matière de lapidation, c’est « commencer » qui est la grande affaire ! Le fait de pointer ainsi la nature du phénomène suffit apparemment à l’inverser : le cercle mortel se défait, et les agresseurs s’en vont, « à commencer par les plus vieux ». Jean-Marc Muller
Des neurones qui stimulent en même temps, sont des neurones qui se lient ensemble. Règle de Hebb (1949)
Le phénomène est déjà fabuleux en soi. Imaginez un peu : il suffit que vous me regardiez faire une série de gestes simples – remplir un verre d’eau, le porter à mes lèvres, boire -, pour que dans votre cerveau les mêmes zones s’allument, de la même façon que dans mon cerveau à moi, qui accomplis réellement l’action. C’est d’une importance fondamentale pour la psychologie. D’abord, cela rend compte du fait que vous m’avez identifié comme un être humain : si un bras de levier mécanique avait soulevé le verre, votre cerveau n’aurait pas bougé. Il a reflété ce que j’étais en train de faire uniquement parce que je suis humain. Ensuite, cela explique l’empathie. Comme vous comprenez ce que je fais, vous pouvez entrer en empathie avec moi. Vous vous dites : « S’il se sert de l’eau et qu’il boit, c’est qu’il a soif. » Vous comprenez mon intention, donc mon désir. Plus encore : que vous le vouliez ou pas, votre cerveau se met en état de vous faire faire la même chose, de vous donner la même envie. Si je baille, il est très probable que vos neurones miroir vont vous faire bailler – parce que ça n’entraîne aucune conséquence – et que vous allez rire avec moi si je ris, parce que l’empathie va vous y pousser. Cette disposition du cerveau à imiter ce qu’il voit faire explique ainsi l’apprentissage. Mais aussi… la rivalité. Car si ce qu’il voit faire consiste à s’approprier un objet, il souhaite immédiatement faire la même chose, et donc, il devient rival de celui qui s’est approprié l’objet avant lui ! C’est la vérification expérimentale de la théorie du « désir mimétique » de René Girard ! Voilà une théorie basée au départ sur l’analyse de grands textes romanesques, émise par un chercheur en littérature comparée, qui trouve une confirmation neuroscientifique parfaitement objective, du vivant même de celui qui l’a conçue. Un cas unique dans l’histoire des sciences ! (…) Notre désir est toujours mimétique, c’est-à-dire inspiré par, ou copié sur, le désir de l’autre. L’autre me désigne l’objet de mon désir, il devient donc à la fois mon modèle et mon rival. De cette rivalité naît la violence, évacuée collectivement dans le sacré, par le biais de la victime émissaire. À partir de ces hypothèses, Girard et moi avons travaillé pendant des décennies à élargir le champ du désir mimétique à ses applications en psychologie et en psychiatrie. En 1981, dans Un mime nommé désir, je montrais que cette théorie permet de comprendre des phénomènes étranges tels que la possession – négative ou positive -, l’envoûtement, l’hystérie, l’hypnose… L’hypnotiseur, par exemple, en prenant possession, par la suggestion, du désir de l’autre, fait disparaître le moi, qui s’évanouit littéralement. Et surgit un nouveau moi, un nouveau désir qui est celui de l’hypnotiseur. (…) et ce qui est formidable, c’est que ce nouveau « moi » apparaît avec tous ses attributs : une nouvelle conscience, une nouvelle mémoire, un nouveau langage et des nouvelles sensations. Si l’hypnotiseur dit : « Il fait chaud » bien qu’il fasse frais, le nouveau moi prend ces sensations suggérées au pied de la lettre : il sent vraiment la chaleur et se déshabille. De toutes ces applications du désir mimétique, j’en suis venu à la théorie plus globale d’une « psychologie mimétique » – qui trouve également une vérification dans la découverte des neurones miroirs et leur rôle dans l’apprentissage. Le désir de l’autre entraîne le déclenchement de mon désir. Mais il entraîne aussi, ainsi, la formation du moi. En fait, c’est le désir qui engendre le moi par son mouvement. Nous sommes des « moi du désir ». Sans le désir, né en miroir, nous n’existerions pas ! Seulement voilà : le temps psychologique fonctionnant à l’inverse de celui de l’horloge, le moi s’imagine être possesseur de son désir, et s’étonne de voir le désir de l’autre se porter sur le même objet que lui. Il y a là deux points nodaux, qui rendent la psychologie mimétique scientifique, en étant aussi constants et universels que la gravitation l’est en physique : la revendication du moi de la propriété de son désir et celle de son antériorité sur celui de l’autre. Et comme la gravitation, qui permet aussi bien de construire des maisons que de faire voler des avions, toutes les figures de psychologie – normale ou pathologique – ne sont que des façons pour le sujet de faire aboutir ces deux revendications. On comprend que la théorie du désir mimétique ait suscité de nombreux détracteurs : difficile d’accepter que notre désir ne soit pas original, mais copié sur celui d’un autre. (…) Boris Cyrulnik explique (…) que – souvent par défaut d’éducation et pour n’avoir pas été suffisamment regardé lui-même – l’être humain peut ne pas avoir d’empathie. Les neurones miroirs ne se développent pas, ou ils ne fonctionnent pas, et cela donne ce que Cyrulnik appelle un pervers. Je ne sais pas si c’est vrai, ça mérite une longue réflexion. (…) Ce rôle de la pression sociale est extraordinairement bien expliqué dans Les Bienveillantes, de Jonathan Littel. Il montre qu’en fait, ce sont des modèles qui rivalisent : révolté dans un premier temps par le traitement réservé aux prisonniers, le personnage principal, officier SS, finit par renoncer devant l’impossibilité de changer les choses. Ses neurones miroirs sont tellement imprégnés du modèle SS qu’il perd sa sensibilité aux influences de ses propres perceptions, et notamment à la pitié. Il y a lutte entre deux influences, et les neurones miroirs du régime SS l’emportent. La cruauté envers les prisonniers devient finalement une habitude justifiée. Plutôt qu’une absence ou carence des neurones miroirs, cela indique peut-être simplement la force du mimétisme de groupe. Impossible de rester assis quand la « ola » emporte la foule autour de vous lors d’un match de football – même si vous n’aimez pas le foot ! Parce que tous vos neurones miroirs sont mobilisés par la pression mimétique de l’entourage. De même, les campagnes publicitaires sont des luttes acharnées entre marques voisines pour prendre possession, par la suggestion, des neurones miroirs des auditeurs ou spectateurs. Et c’est encore la suggestion qui explique pourquoi les membres d’un groupe en viennent à s’exprimer de la même façon. Il semblerait normal que les neurones miroirs soient dotés, comme les autres, d’une certaine plasticité. Ils agissent en tout cas tout au long de la vie. Et la pression du groupe n’a pas besoin d’être totalitaire : dans nos sociétés, c’est de façon « spontanée » que tout le monde fait la même chose. Jean-Michel Oughourlian
En présence de la diversité, nous nous replions sur nous-mêmes. Nous agissons comme des tortues. L’effet de la diversité est pire que ce qui avait été imaginé. Et ce n’est pas seulement que nous ne faisons plus confiance à ceux qui ne sont pas comme nous. Dans les communautés diverses, nous ne faisons plus confiance à ceux qui nous ressemblent. Robert Putnam
J’étais à l’étage inférieur quand j’ai entendu des premiers gémissements, assez faibles. J’ai pensé à des enfants qui avaient fait une bêtise. Les gémissements ont recommencé encore une fois, puis une autre alors je suis montée voir à l’étage ce qu’il se passait. Avec une autre dame, Aurélie, nous nous sommes retrouvées seules. Tous les gens qui étaient là sont descendus à Auber. On a vu la maman vaciller. Nous l’avons allongée et j’ai juste eu le temps de prendre le bébé qui arrivait dans mes bras. (…) Ce qui est grave, c’est l’indifférence. Personne n’est allé voir pourquoi cette dame gémissait, ce qui se passait. Et puis, tous les gens sont descendus sans apporter de l’aide. Ça aurait pu mal finir ou être encore plus grave. Eliane (cadre commerciale)
Il suffit d’une toute petite étincelle et c’est tout le groupe qui s’élève contre l’agresseur. […] Le but ce n’est pas de faire de chacun d’entre nous un super-héros, mais juste de savoir que l’union fait la force. Aurélia Bloch (france info)
Bibb Latané et John Darley, deux chercheurs américains en psychologie sociale, ont mis en lumière l’existence de ce « bystander effect », ou « effet spectateur ». En laboratoire, un participant est installé dans un box, avec un système d’interphone. Un complice, présent dans la discussion, simule alors une crise d’épilepsie. Les chercheurs constatent que si le participant pense être le seul interlocuteur de la victime, il aura davantage tendance à intervenir. Par contre, s’il est dans une discussion de groupe et que les autres ne réagissent pas, c’est le contraire. « L’effet spectateur, c’est le fait que plus il y a de témoins, moins on est poussé à agir parce que la réaction individuelle est influencée par celle des autres », explique Olivia Mons, porte-parole de la fédération France Victimes, à franceinfo. Lorsqu’un groupe de personnes assiste à une scène de détresse, un phénomène de « dilution de la responsabilité » opère. Ainsi, « plus on est nombreux, moins on va réagir », affirme Martine Batt, professeure de psychologie à l’université de Lorraine. Est-ce que j’interprète bien ce qui est en train de se passer, ou bien peut-être que j’exagère ce que je vois ? Pourquoi réagirais-je, alors que les autres ne le font pas ? Est-ce que je suis légitime à intervenir ou est-ce que je vais être ridicule ? Toutes ces interrogations retardent le temps d’action, voire empêchent toute intervention des témoins. Lorsque quelqu’un est le seul spectateur des faits, « il peut y avoir une espèce de calcul qui va se faire », explique Peggy Chekroun, professeure de psychologie sociale à l’université de Paris Nanterre. Il opère alors, « assez automatiquement, rapidement et pas forcément de manière consciente », la balance « coût-bénéfice » de sa propre intervention. Ces facteurs peuvent être personnels (« Vais-je perdre du temps ? ») ou collectifs (« Que va-t-on penser de moi si je n’interviens pas ? »). « La réponse va sortir en fonction de ce calcul », conclut l’enseignante. Sans compter la peur que peut inspirer une situation surprenante et inhabituelle. « C’est une émotion très puissante qui peut être vraiment inhibitrice d’une aide », rappelle Olivia Mons. (…) Culpabilité, honte… Les témoins passifs vivent avec le poids de leur apathie. « On a parfois des personnes qui viennent nous voir en se sentant quasiment autant victimes que la victime directe », explique Olivia Mons. « Bien sûr que la société condamne la non-réaction, on dit toujours ‘Moi j’aurais fait mieux’, parce qu’on a le syndrome du sauveur… Mais il faut nuancer ! », surenchérit-elle. A cause de ces mécanismes de psychologie sociale et de la peur paralysante d’une telle situation, elle appelle à « relativiser le côté ‘je suis témoin et je me sauve parce que je suis lâche' ». Mais pour les victimes, cette apathie de la part des témoins est désastreuse. Elle peut être ressentie comme une double peine : « La peine d’avoir été agressé et la peine surtout de ne pas avoir de valeur aux yeux des autres et d’être rien », analyse Aurélia Bloch, lors de son passage dans l’émission « C à vous », en décembre 2015. L’article 223-6 du Code pénal prévoit une peine de cinq ans de prison et une amende de 75 000 euros pour non-assistance à personne en danger. Mais peu de témoins passifs sont poursuivis en justice : « C’est quelque chose sur lequel on n’a pas beaucoup de jurisprudence », explique Jean-Philippe Vauthier, professeur de droit à l’université de Guyane. Le procureur de Lille avait, dans un premier temps, envisagé des poursuites dans l’affaire de Cécile P., avant d’abandonner, faute d’informations suffisantes sur les témoins. La non-assistance à personne en danger existe « pour combattre l’égoïsme sans imposer l’héroïsme », rappelle Jean-Philippe Vauthier. « Il faut que l’intervention soit sans péril pour moi ou pour les autres, décrypte le spécialiste. Tout va dépendre du mode d’action choisi. On ne va pas forcer quelqu’un à intervenir directement, mais si la personne n’appelle pas les secours, ça pourra lui être reproché. » Comment lutter contre notre inclinaison à rester inactifs ? Qu’il s’agisse d’un accident de la route, un malaise dans la rue ou du harcèlement dans les transports, des attitudes peuvent permettre de contrer l’apathie des témoins. « Il y a différents degrés d’action. Tirer une sonnette d’alarme à quai, avoir une intervention active en cas de harcèlement… ça peut être aussi un simple sourire, se lever ou se rapprocher… ça peut aider, le fait de montrer par un moyen ou un autre une sorte d’empathie avec la victime », argue Olivia Mons La connaissance de « l’effet spectateur » pourrait en limiter les conséquences. « On peut éduquer très tôt contre ses effets, expliquer comment appeler à l’aide et faire des enseignements sur les effets de groupe », prône Martine Batt. Aurélia Bloch en est persuadée, « si c’était à refaire, [elle] ne referai[t] pas du tout de la même façon » : « À l’époque, je ne savais pas du tout quoi faire. […] En fait, je pense que j’étais comme la plupart des personnes qui sont témoins. Je n’étais pas formée. » France info

C’est monkey see, monkey do, imbécile !

A l’heure où l’on reparle …

Avec cet accouchement spontané dans le RER parisien il y a deux semaines où quasiment personne n’est intervenu …

Du fameux effet spectateur

Comment ne pas repenser à ce fascinant documentaire de 2015 d’une journaliste de Franceinfo …

Mais aussi aux lumineuses analyses du regretté René Girard

Montrant l’importance, pour toutes nos actions et confirmé par la découverte des « neurones miroirs », de l’effet mimétique …

Et ce aussi bien pour le mal (les effets de lynchage) …

Que, mondialisation oblige, pour le bien (les effets de sauvetage) …

Ou même ses parodies (les emballements que l’on sait du politiquement correct) …

Et donc de l’importance, à l’instar du fameux épisode évangélique de la femme adultère, de la première pierre …

Ou plus précisément du refus de la première pierre qui peut entrainer tous les autres ?

Mais comment aussi ne pas repenser …

En ces temps d’invasion migratoire (pardon: « mixité sociale » !) imposée

Où entre déséquilibrés ou crieurs d’Allah akbaru la moindre rencontre peut se révéler fatale …

Aux célèbres analyses de Robert Putnam …

Et en particulier au facteur aggravant de la diversité

Qui loin des discours émerveillés et édifiants de nos élites protégées des conséquences de leurs propres décisions …

Peut nous pousser à ne plus faire confiance non seulement à ceux qui ne sont pas comme nous …

Mais aussi à ceux qui nous ressemblent ?

Ils assistent à une agression ou à un accident mais ne font rien : on vous explique le « bystander effect »
Une femme accouche dans une rame de RER et seulement deux personnes parmi les nombreuses présentes lui viennent en aide. Une autre se fait sexuellement agresser sur un quai de métro et aucun des dix témoins ne réagit… Etonnant ?
Lison Verriez
Franceinfo
03/07/2018

Il est environ 11 heures, ce lundi 18 juin. Les passagers du RER A arrivent en gare d’Auber, lorsque des gémissements commencent à se faire entendre à l’étage supérieur de la rame. Lamata Karamoko vient de perdre les eaux et s’apprête à accoucher dans le wagon. « Personne n’est allé voir pourquoi cette dame gémissait, ce qu’il se passait, témoigne Eliane, qui a assisté à la scène, dans Le ParisienEt puis tous les gens sont descendus sans apporter de l’aide. » Avec une autre passagère, elle tente d’épauler la jeune maman.

Et vous, qu’auriez-vous fait ? Accidents, malaises, agressions… Ces dernières années, la presse s’est fait l’écho à de nombreuses reprises de la passivité des témoins de certains faits-divers. Ce phénomène a un nom : le « bystander effect ».

« Plus on est nombreux, moins on va réagir »

Le concept émerge après le meurtre de Kitty Genovese en 1964. Cette New-Yorkaise de 28 ans est agressée, violée et poignardée en pleine rue dans un quartier tranquille du Queens, vers 3 heures du matin, alors qu’elle rentrait du travail. Le lendemain, la presse (en anglais) dénonce le silence des 38 témoins qui auraient assisté, depuis leur domicile, à la lente agonie de la jeune femme. Si le nombre de témoins a par la suite été contesté, des scientifiques se sont emparés de ce cas pour interroger la réaction – ou l’absence de réaction – des témoins.

Bibb Latané et John Darley, deux chercheurs américains en psychologie sociale, ont mis en lumière l’existence de ce « bystander effect », ou « effet spectateur ». En laboratoire, un participant est installé dans un box, avec un système d’interphone. Un complice, présent dans la discussion, simule alors une crise d’épilepsie. Les chercheurs constatent que si le participant pense être le seul interlocuteur de la victime, il aura davantage tendance à intervenir. Par contre, s’il est dans une discussion de groupe et que les autres ne réagissent pas, c’est le contraire.

« L’effet spectateur, c’est le fait que plus il y a de témoins, moins on est poussé à agir parce que la réaction individuelle est influencée par celle des autres », explique Olivia Mons, porte-parole de la fédération France Victimes, à franceinfo. Lorsqu’un groupe de personnes assiste à une scène de détresse, un phénomène de « dilution de la responsabilité » opère. Ainsi, « plus on est nombreux, moins on va réagir », affirme Martine Batt, professeure de psychologie à l’université de Lorraine. Est-ce que j’interprète bien ce qui est en train de se passer, ou bien peut-être que j’exagère ce que je vois ? Pourquoi réagirais-je, alors que les autres ne le font pas ? Est-ce que je suis légitime à intervenir ou est-ce que je vais être ridicule ? Toutes ces interrogations retardent le temps d’action, voire empêchent toute intervention des témoins.

Lorsque quelqu’un est le seul spectateur des faits, « il peut y avoir une espèce de calcul qui va se faire », explique Peggy Chekroun, professeure de psychologie sociale à l’université de Paris Nanterre. Il opère alors, « assez automatiquement, rapidement et pas forcément de manière consciente », la balance « coût-bénéfice » de sa propre intervention. Ces facteurs peuvent être personnels (« Vais-je perdre du temps ? ») ou collectifs (« Que va-t-on penser de moi si je n’interviens pas ? »). « La réponse va sortir en fonction de ce calcul », conclut l’enseignante. 

Sans compter la peur que peut inspirer une situation surprenante et inhabituelle. « C’est une émotion très puissante qui peut être vraiment inhibitrice d’une aide », rappelle Olivia Mons.

« J’ai été témoin d’un viol et je n’ai pas bougé »

« Je suis coupable de non-assistance à personne en danger », reconnaît Aurélia Bloch, dans son documentaire du même nom, diffusé le 8 décembre 2015 sur France 5. Un dimanche d’avril 2004, elle s’installe dans son train apparemment vide, en direction de Paris. Les voix d’une femme et de plusieurs hommes s’élèvent dans la rame. Elle ne les voit pas, mais entend des bruits de coups, la femme dire non et les hommes, ricaner. L’alarme du train est loin. « Elle ne demande pas d’aide », « elle est sûrement consentante », « j’ai peur de passer pour une folle »« Je me posais plein de questions », raconte la journaliste à franceinfo. Elle se terre dans son fauteuil, le reste du trajet, « trente minutes figées, comme anesthésiée », commente-t-elle dans son film.

On est dans la culpabilité sans en parler. […] C’était quelque chose de très enfoui, ça ne faisait pas l’objet d’une culpabilité quotidienne.Aurélia Bloch, journalisteà franceinfo

Jusqu’à l’affaire de Cécile P., en 2014. Sur un quai de métro lillois, cette jeune femme est sexuellement agressée par un homme aux alentours de 22h30. Autour d’elle, une dizaine de témoins, mais aucune réaction. L’affaire, très médiatisée, réveille les souvenirs d’Aurélia Bloch.

C’est une sorte d’exutoire. […] C’était une façon, en comprenant pourquoi les témoins étaient passifs, de comprendre pourquoi je l’avais été.Aurélia Bloch, journalisteà franceinfo

Culpabilité, honte… Les témoins passifs vivent avec le poids de leur apathie. « On a parfois des personnes qui viennent nous voir en se sentant quasiment autant victimes que la victime directe », explique Olivia Mons. « Bien sûr que la société condamne la non-réaction, on dit toujours ‘Moi j’aurais fait mieux’, parce qu’on a le syndrome du sauveur… Mais il faut nuancer ! », surenchérit-elle. A cause de ces mécanismes de psychologie sociale et de la peur paralysante d’une telle situation, elle appelle à « relativiser le côté ‘je suis témoin et je me sauve parce que je suis lâche' ».

Mais pour les victimes, cette apathie de la part des témoins est désastreuse. Elle peut être ressentie comme une double peine : « La peine d’avoir été agressé et la peine surtout de ne pas avoir de valeur aux yeux des autres et d’être rien », analyse Aurélia Bloch, lors de son passage dans l’émission « C à vous », en décembre 2015.

L’article 223-6 du Code pénal prévoit une peine de cinq ans de prison et une amende de 75 000 euros pour non-assistance à personne en danger. Mais peu de témoins passifs sont poursuivis en justice : « C’est quelque chose sur lequel on n’a pas beaucoup de jurisprudence », explique Jean-Philippe Vauthier, professeur de droit à l’université de Guyane. Le procureur de Lille avait, dans un premier temps, envisagé des poursuites dans l’affaire de Cécile P., avant d’abandonner, faute d’informations suffisantes sur les témoins.

La non-assistance à personne en danger existe « pour combattre l’égoïsme sans imposer l’héroïsme », rappelle Jean-Philippe Vauthier. « Il faut que l’intervention soit sans péril pour moi ou pour les autres, décrypte le spécialiste. Tout va dépendre du mode d’action choisi. On ne va pas forcer quelqu’un à intervenir directement, mais si la personne n’appelle pas les secours, ça pourra lui être repproché. »

« Il y a différents degrés d’action »

Comment lutter contre notre inclinaison à rester inactifs ? Qu’il s’agisse d’un accident de la route, un malaise dans la rue ou du harcèlement dans les transports, des attitudes peuvent permettre de contrer l’apathie des témoins. « Il y a différents degrés d’action. Tirer une sonnette d’alarme à quai, avoir une intervention active en cas de harcèlement… ça peut être aussi un simple sourire, se lever ou se rapprocher… ça peut aider, le fait de montrer par un moyen ou un autre une sorte d’empathie avec la victime », argue Olivia Mons.

Il suffit d’une toute petite étincelle et c’est tout le groupe qui s’élève contre l’agresseur. […] Le but ce n’est pas de faire de chacun d’entre nous un super-héros, mais juste de savoir que l’union fait la force.Aurélia Bloch, journalisteà franceinfo

La connaissance de « l’effet spectateur » pourrait en limiter les conséquences. « On peut éduquer très tôt contre ses effets, expliquer comment appeler à l’aide et faire des enseignements sur les effets de groupe », prône Martine Batt. Aurélia Bloch en est persuadée, « si c’était à refaire, [elle] ne referai[t] pas du tout de la même façon » : « À l’époque, je ne savais pas du tout quoi faire. […] En fait, je pense que j’étais comme la plupart des personnes qui sont témoins. Je n’étais pas formée. »

Voir aussi:

Bébé né dans le RER : «J’ai eu très peur mais j’étais contente de l’entendre pleurer»
Elia Dahan et Nicolas Maviel

Le Parisien

19 juin 2018

Nous avons rencontré la femme qui a mis au monde, ce lundi, un bébé dans le RER A avec l’aide de deux femmes présentes. Maman et bébé vont bien.
Allongée sur son lit d’hôpital Lamata, 28 ans, se remet doucement de son accouchement, ce mardi soir. A ses côtés, Mohamed, en layette bleu, dort à poings fermés. Le bébé, prénommé Mohamed, du RER est serein, il mesure 51 cm et pèse 3,4 kilos. L’enfant et sa mère sont arrivés à l’hôpital de Clamart (Hauts-de-Seine) lundi 18 juin vers 18 heures. Quelques heures plus tôt, Lamata donnait naissance à son troisième enfant à la station Auber du RER. « J’étais avec mes deux enfants et je me rendais à l’hôpital, raconte la mère de famille. J’avais rendez-vous ce jeudi, mais je sentais des contractions donc j’ai voulu y aller plus tôt. » Mais dans le RER, les contractions s’accentuent. Lamata, avec ses deux aînés, âgés de 7 et 2 ans se trouve alors à l’étage du wagon. « Il n’y avait personne à ce moment-là, se souvient la jeune maman. Puis mes enfants se sont mis à pleurer, et des gens sont venus. Je ne pensais pas du tout que j’étais en train d’accoucher. » Il est 11h10 et Mohamed pousse son premier cri dans le train. « J’ai eu très peur, mais j’étais contente de l’entendre pleurer », confie la jeune femme. Encore alitée, elle peut compter sur le soutient de sa famille, et de sa cousine, Makoulanga, qui s’est rendu à son chevet ce mardi soir après le travail. « Je m’occupe de ses enfants qui vivent chez moi à Antony pour l’instant », confie cette-dernière en caressant la tête du nouveau-né. Latima a encore à réaliser le caractère exceptionnel de son accouchement. Pour l’instant elle récupère et prend doucement son petit dernier dans ses bras quand il se met à crier pour lui donner le biberon.

Eliane, cadre commerciale, est encore toute bouleversée et émue par son lundi dans le RER A mais aussi… révoltée. Cette maman de quatre grands enfants, entre 20 et 25 ans, a aidé Lamata à accoucher avec une autre passagère, Aurélie.

« J’étais à l’étage inférieur quand j’ai entendu des premiers gémissements, assez faibles. J’ai pensé à des enfants qui avaient fait une bêtise. Les gémissements ont recommencé encore une fois, puis une autre alors je suis montée voir à l’étage ce qu’il se passait », explique cette habitante du Val-de-Marne qui revenait d’un cours d’anglais sur les Champs-Elysées (VIIIe). Et d’enchaîner : « Avec une autre dame, Aurélie, nous nous sommes retrouvées seules. Tous les gens qui étaient là sont descendus à Auber. On a vu la maman vaciller. Nous l’avons allongée et j’ai juste eu le temps de prendre le bébé qui arrivait dans mes bras. »

« Les minutes m’ont paru interminables »
Les deux femmes demandent alors à un monsieur qui passait par là, de tirer la sonnette d’alarme et d’appeler les secours. La maman et ses deux « sages-femmes » se retrouvent à nouveau seules dans leur wagon. « Les minutes m’ont paru interminables avant que les secours n’arrivent. Moi, je ne pensais qu’à mettre le bébé de côté pour qu’il puisse respirer et à couper le cordon ombilical. Aurélie faisait en sorte que la maman reste consciente et que le bébé n’ait pas froid », détaille Eliane.

Si, depuis lundi soir, les enfants d’Eliane sont encore plus fiers de leur maman, cette dernière est très remontée, comme sa comparse. « Ce qui est grave, c’est l’indifférence. Personne n’est allé voir pourquoi cette dame gémissait, ce qu’il se passait. Et puis, tous les gens sont descendus sans apporter de l’aide. Ça aurait pu mal finir ou être encore plus grave », conclut Eliane qui sourit toujours lorsqu’elle repense à ce petit garçon qu’elle a accueilli.


« Marche du retour »: The show must go on (From Gaza to Iran, it’s all smoke and mirrors, stupid !)

9 mai, 2018

 

Le président de l'Autorité palestinienne Mahmoud Abbas devant le Parlement européen à Bruxelles, le 23 juin 2016. (Crédit : AFP/John Thys)
Au coeur de l’accord iranien, il y avait un énorme mythe selon laquelle un régime meurtrier ne cherchait qu’un programme pacifique d’énergie nucléaire. Aujourd’hui nous avons la preuve définitive que la promesse iranienne était un mensonge. Le futur de l’Iran appartient à son peuple et les Iraniens méritent une nation qui rende justice à leurs rêves, qui honore leur histoire. (…) Nous n’allons pas laisser un régime qui scande « Mort à l’Amérique » avoir accès aux armes les plus meurtrières sur terre. Donald Trump
La paix ne peut être obtenue où la violence est récompensée. Donald Trump
Un écran de fumée désigne, dans le domaine militaire, une tactique utilisée afin de masquer la position exacte d’unités à l’ennemi, par l’émission d’une fumée dense. Cette dernière peut-être naturelle mais est le plus souvent produite artificiellement à partir de grenades fumigènes (composées notamment d’acide chlorosulfurique). Certains véhicules blindés, en général des chars, disposent de lance-grenades spécifiquement conçus à cet effet, mais utilisent surtout l’injection de carburant Diesel dans l’échappement de leur moteur pour produire des écrans de fumée pouvant atteindre 400 m de long et persister plusieurs minutes. Par exemple, le T-72 soviétique injecte dix litres de carburant à la minute pour créer ses écrans de fumée. Dans les temps anciens, des simples feux de broussailles bien nourris suffisaient parfois à faire l’affaire.Wikipedia
More ink equals more blood, newspaper coverage of terrorist incidents leads directly to more attacks. It’s a macabre example of win-win in what economists call a « common-interest game. Both the media and terrorists benefit from terrorist incidents. Terrorists get free publicity for themselves and their cause. The media, meanwhile, make money « as reports of terror attacks increase newspaper sales and the number of television viewers. Bruno S. Frey and Dominic Rohner
Nous avons constaté que le sport était la religion moderne du monde occidental. Nous savions que les publics anglais et américain assis devant leur poste de télévision ne regarderaient pas un programme exposant le sort des Palestiniens s’il y avait une manifestation sportive sur une autre chaîne. Nous avons donc décidé de nous servir des Jeux olympiques, cérémonie la plus sacrée de cette religion, pour obliger le monde à faire attention à nous. Nous avons offert des sacrifices humains à vos dieux du sport et de la télévision et ils ont répondu à nos prières. Terroriste palestinien (Jeux olympiques de Munich, 1972)
Les Israéliens ne savent pas que le peuple palestinien a progressé dans ses recherches sur la mort. Il a développé une industrie de la mort qu’affectionnent toutes nos femmes, tous nos enfants, tous nos vieillards et tous nos combattants. Ainsi, nous avons formé un bouclier humain grâce aux femmes et aux enfants pour dire à l’ennemi sioniste que nous tenons à la mort autant qu’il tient à la vie. Fathi Hammad (responsable du Hamas, mars 2008)
Je n’ai pas l’intention de cesser de payer les familles des martyrs prisonniers, même si cela me coûte mon siège. Je continuerai à les payer jusqu’à mon dernier jour. Mahmoud Abbas
 Récemment, un certain nombre de rabbins en Israël ont tenu des propos clairs, demandant à leur gouvernement d’empoisonner l’eau pour tuer les Palestiniens. Mahmoud Abbas
Après qu’il soit devenu évident que les déclarations supposées d’un rabbin, relayées par de nombreux médias, se sont révélées sans fondement, le président Mahmoud Abbas a affirmé qu’il n’avait pas pour intention de s’en prendre au judaïsme ou de blesser le peuple juif à travers le monde. Communiqué Autorité palestinienne
Du XIe siècle jusqu’à l’Holocauste qui s’est produit en Allemagne, les juifs vivant en Europe de l’ouest et de l’est ont été la cible de massacres tous les 10 ou 15 ans. Mais pourquoi est-ce arrivé ? Ils disent: « parce que nous sommes juifs » (…) L’hostilité contre les juifs n’est pas due à leur religion, mais plutôt à leur fonction sociale, leurs fonctions sociales liées aux banques et intérêts. Mahmoud Abbas
Si mes propos devant le Conseil national palestinien ont offensé des gens, en particulier des gens de confession juive, je leur présente mes excuses. Je voudrais assurer à tous que telle n’était pas mon intention et réaffirmer mon respect total pour la religion juive, ainsi que pour toutes les religions monothéistes. Je voudrais renouveler notre condamnation de longue date de l’Holocauste, le crime le plus odieux de l’histoire, et exprimer notre compassion envers ses victimes. Mahmoud Abbas
J’espère que les journalistes diront qu’il s’agit de la seule démocratie pluraliste du Moyen-Orient, un pays libre, un pays sûr. Un pays normal, comme la France ou l’Italie. Il n’y a aucune ville dans le monde qui s’appelle Jérusalem-Ouest. Il n’y a pas de Paris-Ouest ou de Rome-Ouest. La course part de la ville de Jérusalem, donc on écrit « Jérusalem » sur la carte. Sylvan Adams
Amer anniversaire. Israël a fêté mercredi son 70e anniversaire en brandissant sa puissance militaire et son improbable réussite économique face aux menaces régionales renouvelées et aux incertitudes intérieures. Après s’être recueillis depuis mardi à la mémoire de leurs compatriotes tués au service de leur pays ou dans des attentats, les Israéliens ont entamé mercredi soir les célébrations marquant la création de leur Etat proclamé le 14 mai 1948, mais fêté en ce moment en fonction du calendrier hébraïque. (…) Israël agite régulièrement le spectre d’une attaque de l’Iran, son ennemi juré. La crainte d’un tel acte d’hostilité, à la manière de l’offensive surprise d’une coalition arabe lors des célébrations de Yom Kippour en 1973, a été attisée par un raid le 9 avril contre une base aérienne en Syrie, imputé à Israël par le régime de Bachar al-Assad et ses alliés iranien et russe. Mais en février, Israël a admis pour la première fois avoir frappé des cibles iraniennes après l’intrusion d’un drone iranien dans son espace aérien. C’était la première confrontation ouvertement déclarée entre Israël et l’Iran en Syrie. Israël martèle qu’il ne permettra pas à l’Iran de s’enraciner militairement en Syrie voisine. Les journaux israéliens ont publié mercredi des éléments spécifiques sur la présence en Syrie des Gardiens de la révolution, unité d’élite iranienne. La publication de photos satellite de bases aériennes et d’appareils civils soupçonnés de décharger des armes, de cartes et même de noms de responsables militaires iraniens constitue un avertissement, convenaient les commentateurs militaires: Israël sait où et qui frapper en cas d’attaque. (…) Avec plus de 8,8 millions d’habitants, la population a décuplé depuis 1948, selon les statistiques officielles. La croissance s’est affichée à 4,1% au quatrième trimestre 2017. Le pays revendique une douzaine de prix Nobel. Cependant, Israël accuse parmi les plus fortes inégalités des pays développés. L’avenir du Premier ministre, englué dans les affaires de corruption présumée, est incertain. S’agissant du conflit israélo-palestinien, une solution a rarement paru plus lointaine. L’anniversaire d’Israël coïncide avec «la marche du retour», mouvement organisé depuis le 30 mars dans la bande de Gaza, territoire palestinien soumis au blocus israélien. Après bientôt trois semaines de violences le long de la frontière qui ont fait 34 morts palestiniens, de nouvelles manifestations sont attendues vendredi. Le ministère israélien de la Défense a annoncé qu’un «puissant engin explosif», apparemment destiné à un attentat lors des fêtes israéliennes, avait été découvert dans un camion palestinien intercepté à un point de passage entre la Cisjordanie occupée et Israël. Libération
Le Giro d’Italia débute ce vendredi de Jérusalem, offrant à l’Etat hébreu son premier événement sportif d’envergure. Tracé qui esquive les Territoires palestiniens, équipes qui hésitent à s’engager, soupçons d’enveloppes d’argent… les autorités ont éteint toutes les critiques pour en faire une vitrine. Libération
Le monde a basculé ce 8 mai 2018. Rien n’y a fait. Ni les câlins d’Emmanuel Macron. Ni les menaces du président iranien. Ni les assurances des patrons de la CIA et de l’AIEA. Donald Trump a tranché : sous le prétexte non prouvé que l’Iran ne le respecte pas, i l retire les Etats-Unis de l’accord nucléaire signé le 14 juillet 2015. Une folle décision aux conséquences considérables. Après la dénonciation de celui de Paris sur le climat, voici l’abandon unilatéral d’un autre accord qui a été négocié par les grandes puissances pendant plus de dix ans. L’Amérique devient donc, à l’évidence, un « rogue state » – un Etat voyou qui ne respecte pas ses engagements internationaux et ment une fois encore ouvertement au monde. L’invasion de l’Irak n’était donc pas une exception malheureuse : Washington n’incarne plus l’ordre international mais le désordre.  Si l’on en doutait encore, le monde dit libre n’a plus de leader crédible ni même de grand frère. Ce qui va troubler un peu plus encore les opinions publiques et les classes dirigeantes occidentales. Puisque l’Iran en est l’un des plus gros producteurs et qu’il va être empêché d’en vendre, le prix du pétrole, déjà à 70 dollars le baril, va probablement exploser, ce qui risque de ralentir voire de stopper la croissance mondiale – et donc celle de la France.
D’ailleurs, de tous les pays occidentaux, la France est celui qui a le plus à perdre d’un retour des sanctions américaines – directes et indirectes. L’Iran a, en effet, passé commandes de 100 Airbus pour 19 milliards de dollars et a signé un gigantesque contrat avec Total pour l’exploitation du champ South Pars 11. Or Trump a choisi la version la plus dure : interdire de nouveau à toute compagnie traitant avec Téhéran de faire du business aux Etats-Unis. Pour continuer à commercer sur le marché américain, Airbus et Total devront donc renoncer à ces deals juteux. L’Obs
Of all the arguments for the Trump administration to honor the nuclear deal with Iran, none was more risible than the claim that we gave our word as a country to keep it. The Obama administration refused to submit the deal to Congress as a treaty, knowing it would never get two-thirds of the Senate to go along. Just 21 percent of Americans approved of the deal at the time it went through, against 49 percent who did not, according to a Pew poll. The agreement “passed” on the strength of a 42-vote Democratic filibuster, against bipartisan, majority opposition. “The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (J.C.P.O.A.) is not a treaty or an executive agreement, and it is not a signed document,” Julia Frifield, then the assistant secretary of state for legislative affairs, wrote then-Representative Mike Pompeo in November 2015 (…) In the weeks leading to Tuesday’s announcement, some of the same people who previously claimed the deal was the best we could possibly hope for suddenly became inventive in proposing means to fix it. This involved suggesting side deals between Washington and European capitals to impose stiffer penalties on Tehran for its continued testing of ballistic missiles — more than 20 since the deal came into effect — and its increasingly aggressive regional behavior. But the problem with this approach is that it only treats symptoms of a problem for which the J.C.P.O.A. is itself a major cause. The deal weakened U.N. prohibitions on Iran’s testing of ballistic missiles, which cannot be reversed without Russian and Chinese consent. That won’t happen. The easing of sanctions also gave Tehran additional financial means with which to fund its depredations in Syria and its militant proxies in Yemen, Lebanon and elsewhere. Any effort to counter Iran on the ground in these places would mean fighting the very forces we are effectively feeding. Why not just stop the feeding? Apologists for the deal answer that the price is worth paying because Iran has put on hold much of its production of nuclear fuel for the next several years. Yet even now Iran is under looser nuclear strictures than North Korea, and would have been allowed to enrich as much material as it liked once the deal expired. That’s nuts. Apologists also claim that, with Trump’s decision, Tehran will simply restart its enrichment activities on an industrial scale. Maybe it will, forcing a crisis that could end with U.S. or Israeli strikes on Iran’s nuclear sites. But that would be stupid, something the regime emphatically isn’t. More likely, it will take symbolic steps to restart enrichment, thereby implying a threat without making good on it. What the regime wants is a renegotiation, not a reckoning. (…) Even with the sanctions relief, the Iranian economy hangs by a thread: The Wall Street Journal on Sunday reported “hundreds of recent outbreaks of labor unrest in Iran, an indication of deepening discord over the nation’s economic troubles.” This week, the rial hit a record low of 67,800 to the dollar; one member of the Iranian Parliament estimated $30 billion of capital outflows in recent months. That’s real money for a country whose gross domestic product barely matches that of Boston. The regime might calculate that a strategy of confrontation with the West could whip up useful nationalist fervors. But it would have to tread carefully: Ordinary Iranians are already furious that their government has squandered the proceeds of the nuclear deal on propping up the Assad regime. The conditions that led to the so-called Green movement of 2009 are there once again. Nor will it help Iran if it tries to start a war with Israel and comes out badly bloodied. (…) Trump’s courageous decision to withdraw from the nuclear deal will clarify the stakes for Tehran. Now we’ll see whether the administration is capable of following through. Bret Stephens
Hello ! Welcome to the show ! Al Jazeera
It was supposed to be a peaceful day. But as then. Unarmed protesters marched towards the border fence, Israeli soldiers opened fire. Al Jazeera journalist
We will continue to sacrifice the blood of our children. Hamas leader
All impure Jews are dogs. They should be burned. They are dirty. Palestinian woman
Je crois dans la volonté d’un peuple. Ce qui m’inspire, c’est la destruction du mur de Berlin. On ne veut pas mourir. Notre message est pacifique, on ne veut jeter personne à la mer. Si les Israéliens nous tuent, ce sera leur crime. Ahmed Abou Irtema
Nous préférons mourir dans notre pays plutôt qu’en mer, comme les réfugiés syriens, ou enfermés à Gaza ou dans les camps au Liban. Moïn Abou Okal (ministère de l’intérieur de Gaza et membre du comité de pilotage de la marche)
 Les gens sont plein de fureur et de colère, dit  On n’a pris aucune décision pour pousser des centaines de milliers de personnes vers la frontière. On veut que cela reste une manifestation pacifique. Mais il n’y a ni négociations avec Israël ni réconciliation entre factions. Il faut laisser les gens s’exprimer. Ghazi Hamad (responsable des relations internationales du Hamas)
Le cauchemar israélien se résume en une image : celle de dizaines de milliers de manifestants non armés, avançant vers la frontière, pour réclamer leur sortie de la prison à ciel ouvert qu’est Gaza. Les responsables sécuritaires israéliens ont averti : tout franchissement illégal sera considéré comme une menace. Plusieurs alertes sérieuses ont eu lieu ces derniers jours, des individus ayant passé la clôture trop aisément. L’armée, qui craint l’enfouissement d’engins explosifs, a prévu d’employer des drones pour larguer des canettes de gaz lacrymogène. (…) En présentant les manifestants comme des personnes achetées, manipulées ou dangereuses, Israël réduit l’événement de vendredi à une question sécuritaire. Il prive ainsi les Gazaouis de leur intégrité comme sujets politiques, de leur capacité à formuler des espérances et à se mobiliser pour les défendre. Or, l’initiative de ce mouvement n’est pas du tout le fruit de délibérations au bureau politique du Hamas, qui gouverne la bande de Gaza depuis 2007. Le mouvement islamiste, affaibli et isolé, soutient comme les autres factions cette mobilisation, y compris par des moyens logistiques, parce qu’il y voit une façon de mettre enfin Israël sous pression. L’idée originelle, c’est Ahmed Abou Irtema qui la revendique. C’était juste après l’annonce de la reconnaissance unilatérale de Jérusalem comme capitale d’Israël par Donald Trump, le 6 décembre 2017. La réconciliation entre le Hamas et le Fatah du président Mahmoud Abbas était dans l’impasse. La situation humanitaire, plus dramatique que jamais. Ce journaliste de 33 ans, père de quatre garçons, a évoqué l’idée, sur Facebook, d’un vaste rassemblement pacifique. (…) Le jeune homme, comme les autres activistes, ne parle pas d’un Etat palestinien, mais de leurs droits historiques sur des terrains précisément délimités. (…) Ils invoquent l’article 11 de la résolution 194, adoptée par les Nations unies (ONU) à la fin de 1948, sur le droit des réfugiés à retourner chez eux ou à obtenir compensation. (…) de son côté Moïn Abou Okal, fonctionnaire au ministère de l’intérieur et membre du comité de pilotage (…) affirme que les manifestants ne tenteront de pénétrer en Israël que le 15 mai. Le Monde
Depuis deux semaines le Hamas et autres organisations terroristes ont repris à leur compte ce qu’ils veulent faire passer pour un soulèvement populaire «pacifiste». Une fois de plus, le détournement du vocabulaire est habile car ces manifestations à plusieurs couches – l’une pacifique et bon enfant, servant de couverture aux multiples tentatives de destruction de la barrière de séparation entre Gaza et Israël, d’enlèvement de soldats, et d’attentats terroristes heureusement avortés – voudraient promouvoir un «droit au retour» à l’intérieur d’Israël des descendants de descendants de «réfugiés». (…) Voici que des milliers de civils, hommes, femmes, enfants, se massent à proximité des zones tampons établies en bordure de la barrière de sécurité israélienne, dans une ambiance de kermesse destinée à nous faire croire qu’il s’agit là de manifestations au sens démocratique du terme. Voici, également, que des milliers de pneus sont enflammés, dégageant une fumée noirâtre visible depuis les satellites, dans le but d’aveugler les forces de sécurité israéliennes qui ont pourtant prévenu: aucun franchissement sauvage de la barrière-frontière ne sera toléré. Toute tentative sera stoppée par des tirs à balle réelle – ce qui, n’en déplaise à beaucoup, est absolument légal dans toute buffer zone entre entités ennemies. À cette annonce, les dirigeants du Hamas ont dû jubiler! Eux qui jouent gagnant-gagnant dans une stratégie impliquant l’utilisation de leurs civils comme boucliers humains, puisqu’il s’agit surtout d’une guerre d’influence, n’en espéraient pas autant. Dès lors ils allaient enfin pouvoir de nouveau compter leurs morts comme autant de victoires médiatiques. Et cela – au grand dam des Israéliens – s’est déroulé exactement comme prévu. Au moment où paraissent ces lignes, Gaza pleure plus de trente morts et les hôpitaux sont débordés par le nombre de blessés – même si les chiffres sont sujets à caution puisque seulement fournis par le Hamas. Pour une fois, cependant, le Hamas s’est piégé lui-même, en publiant avec fierté l’identité de la majorité des victimes qui, de toute évidence appartiennent à ses troupes. C’est le cas du journaliste Yasser Mourtaja dont le double rôle de correspondant de presse et d’officier salarié du Hamas a également été dévoilé.Mais aurait-il été possible pour Israël d’avoir recours à d’autres moyens? L’alignement de snipers parallèlement à l’utilisation de procédés antiémeutes, était-il vraiment indispensable? Imaginons, un instant, que, dans les semaines à venir, comme annoncé par le dirigeant de l’organisation terroriste, Yahya Sinwar, la «marche du retour» permette à ses militants de détruire les barrières, tandis que des milliers de manifestants, femmes et enfants poussés en première ligne, se ruent à l’intérieur d’Israël, bravant non plus les tirs ciblés des soldats entraînés mais la riposte massive d’un peuple paniqué? En menaçant d’avoir recours à des mesures extrêmes, et en tenant cet engagement, Israël ne fait que dissuader et empêcher le développement d’un cauchemar humanitaire dont les dirigeants du Hamas, acculés économiquement et politiquement, pourraient se régaler. Contrairement aux images promues par d’autres abus du vocabulaire, Gaza n’est pas une «prison à ciel ouvert» mais une bande de 360 km² relativement surpeuplée, où vivent également nombre de millionnaires dans des villas fastueuses côtoyant des quartiers miséreux. Chaque jour, environ 1 500 à 2 500 tonnes d’aide humanitaire et de biens de consommation sont autorisés à passer la frontière par le gouvernement israélien. Plusieurs programmes permettent aux habitants de Gaza de se faire soigner dans les hôpitaux de Tel Aviv et de Haïfa. Un projet d’île portuaire sécurisée est à l’étude à Jérusalem, et des tonnes de fruits et légumes sont régulièrement achetés aux paysans gazaouis par les réseaux de distribution alimentaires israéliens. L’Égypte contrôle toute la partie sud et fait souvent montre de beaucoup plus de rigueur qu’Israël pour protéger sa frontière, sachant que le Hamas est issu des Frères Musulmans, organisation interdite par le gouvernement de Abdel Fatah Al Sissi.Mais Gaza souffre, en effet, et même terriblement! Gaza souffre du fait que le Hamas détourne la majorité des fonds destinés à sa population pour creuser des tunnels et se construire une armée dont le seul but, ouvertement déclaré dans sa charte, est d’oblitérer Israël et d’exterminer ses habitants. Gaza souffre des promesses d’aide financière non tenues par les pays Arabes et qui se chiffrent en milliards de dollars. Gaza souffre de n’avoir que trois heures d’électricité par jour, car les terroristes du Hamas ont envoyé une roquette sur la principale centrale pendant le dernier conflit et l’Autorité Palestinienne, de son côté, refuse de payer les factures correspondant à son alimentation, espérant de la sorte provoquer une crise qui conduira à la perte de pouvoir de son concurrent. Gaza souffre d’un taux de chômage de plus de 50 %, après que ses habitants, dans l’euphorie du départ des Juifs, aient saccagé et détruit les serres à légumes et les manufactures construites par Israël et donc jugées «impures» selon les théories islamistes qui les ont conduits, ne l’oublions pas non plus, à voter massivement pour le Hamas. Gaza souffre enfin de ces détournements du vocabulaire, de ces concepts esthétiques manichéens conçus au détriment des êtres, qui empêchent les hommes de conscience de comprendre le cœur du problème et sont forcés de penser qu’Israël est l’unique cause du malheur de ses habitants.C’est pour cela qu’il faut, une fois de plus, clamer quelques faits incontournables. Israël ne peut faire la paix avec une organisation terroriste vouée à sa disparition. Les habitants de Gaza seraient libres de circuler et de se construire un avenir à l’instant même où ils renonceraient à la disparition de leur voisin. Le Hamas et autres organisations terroristes savent qu’ils peuvent compter sur la sympathie des Nations unies et de nombre d’ONG à prétention humanitaire et ne se privent donc pas d’exploiter la population qu’ils détiennent en otage puisqu’ils savent qu’Israël sera systématiquement condamné à leur place. Pierre Rehov
Welcome to the parade for the return – the latest big show organized by Hamas. Every day between 10,000 and 30,000 Muslim Arabs will participate in this smoke screen operation. Pierre Rehov
I shot the video because I observed many times first hand how Palestinians build their propaganda and I strongly believe that no peace will be possible as long as international media believe their narrative instead of seeing the facts. Hamas knows that it can count on the international community when it launches initiatives such as those ‘peaceful protests’ which have claimed too many lives already, while Israel has no choice but to defend its borders. Pierre Rehov
Behind the Smoke Screen, which was shot in recent weeks by two Palestinian cameramen who work with Rehov on a regular basis, went viral and was published by many pro-Israel organizations. The short movie then goes on to show shocking images of children being dragged to the front lines of the clashes as human shields and disturbing footage of animal cruelty. It shows the contradictory tone of Palestinian leaders speaking in English in front of an international audience versus speaking in Arabic to their own people. It shows the health and environmental risk of the burning tire protests and then asks rhetorically: « Where are the ecologist protests? »It shows Hamas’ goals of crossing the border and carrying out attacks, and, if all else fails, trying to provoke soldiers, hoping for a stray bullet and making the front pages of international newspapers. Jerusalem Post
Pour ceux qui croyaient encore que les écrans ou rideaux de fumée étaient une tactique militaire
Infiltration de terroristes armés, sabotage de la barrière de sécurité, destruction de champs israéliens via l’envoi de cerf-volants enflammés, torture et incinération d’animaux, boucliers humains de femmes et d’enfants, miroirs, écran de fumée …
A l’heure où après avoir le mensonge de 70 ans du refus des ambassades étrangères à Jérusalem …
Et l’imposture entre une accusation d’empoisonnement de puits sous les ovations du Parlement européen et une justification de l’antisémitisme européen sous celles de son propre parlement …
D’un président d’une Autorité palestinienne et auteur enfin reconnu d’une thèse négationniste sur le génocide juif …
Le va-t-en-guerre de la Maison blanche vient, entre – excusez du peu – le retour nord-coréen à la table des négociations, la libération de trois otages américains et avec 57% le plus haut taux d’optimisme national depuis 13 ans, d’éventer la supercherie de 40 ans du programme prétendument pacifique …
D’un régime qui, sous couvert d’un accord jamais avalisé par le Congrès américain mais soutenu par les quislings et gros intérêts économiques européens et entre deux « Mort à l’Amérique ! » et menaces de rayement de la carte d’Israël, multiplie les essais balistiques et du Yemen au Liban met le Moyen-Orient à feu et à sang …
Pendant qu’entre dénonciation de son 70e anniversaire et médisance sur la première venue d’un grand évènement sportif dans la seule démocratie du Moyen-Orient …
Nos médias rivalisent dans la mauvaise foi et la désinformation
Bienvenue au grand barnum de la « Marche du retour » !
Cet incroyable de mélange de fête de l’Huma et kermesse bon enfant …
Qui monopolise depuis six semaines nos écrans et les unes de nos journaux …
Et qui comme le montre l’excellent petit documentaire du réalisateur franco-israélien Pierre Rehov
Se révèle être un petit joyau de propagande et de prestidigitation …
Miroirs et écrans de fumée compris …
Des maitres-illusionistes du Hamas et de nos médias !

WATCH: Exclusive footage from inside Gaza reveals true face of protests

« Hamas knows that it can count on the international community when it launches initiatives such as those ‘peaceful protests’ which have claimed too many lives already. »

Juliane Helmhold
The Jerusalem Post
May 7, 2018 13:13

The short movie Behind the Smoke Screen by filmmaker Pierre Rehov shows exclusive images from inside the Gaza Strip, aimed at changing the international perception of the ongoing six-week protests dubbed the « Great March of Return » by Hamas.

« I shot the video because I observed many times first hand how Palestinians build their propaganda and I strongly believe that no peace will be possible as long as international media believe their narrative instead of seeing the facts, » the French filmmaker told The Jerusalem Post.

« Hamas knows that it can count on the international community when it launches initiatives such as those ‘peaceful protests’ which have claimed too many lives already, while Israel has no choice but to defend its borders. »

Rehov, who also writes regularly for the French daily Le Figaro, has been producing documentaries about the Arab-Israeli conflict for 18 years, many of which have aired on Israeli media outlets, including The Road to Jenin, debunking Mohammad Bakri’s claim of a massacre in Jenin, War Crimes in Gaza, demonstrating Hamas’ use of civilians as human shields and Beyond Deception Strategy, exploring the plight of minorities inside Israel and how BDS is hurting Palestinians.

Behind the Smoke Screen, which was shot in recent weeks by two Palestinian cameramen who work with Rehov on a regular basis, went viral and was published by many pro-Israel organizations.Behind The Smoke Screen (Pierre Rehov/Youtube)

« Welcome to the parade for the return – the latest big show organized by Hamas. Every day between 10,000 and 30,000 Muslim Arabs will participate in this smoke screen operation, » the video introduces the subject matter in the opening remarks.

The short movie then goes on to show shocking images of children being dragged to the front lines of the clashes as human shields and disturbing footage of animal cruelty.

It shows the contradictory tone of Palestinian leaders speaking in English in front of an international audience versus speaking in Arabic to their own people.

It shows the health and environmental risk of the burning tire protests and then asks rhetorically: « Where are the ecologist protests? »

It shows Hamas’ goals of crossing the border and carrying out attacks, and, if all else fails, trying to provoke soldiers, hoping for a stray bullet and making the front pages of international newspapers.

« I want to present facts, and one image is worth 1000 words, » the filmmaker emphasized.

Voir aussi:

Pierre Rehov : un autre regard sur Gaza

Pierre Rehov
Le Figaro
20/04/2018

FIGAROVOX/TRIBUNE – Le reporter Pierre Rehov s’attaque, dans une tribune, à la grille de lecture dominante dans les médias français des événements actuels à Gaza. Selon lui, la réponse d’Israël est proportionnée à la menace terroriste que représentent les agissements du Hamas.

Pierre Rehov est reporter, écrivain et réalisateur de documentaires, dont le dernier, «Unveiling Jérusalem», retrace l’histoire de la ville trois fois sainte.

Les organisations islamistes qui s’attaquent à Israël ont toujours eu le sens du vocabulaire dans leur communication avec l’Occident. Convaincus à juste titre que peu parmi nous sont capables, ou même intéressés, de décrypter leurs discours d’origine révélateur de leurs véritables intentions, ils nous arrosent depuis des décennies de concepts erronés, tout en puisant à la source de notre propre histoire les termes qui nous feront réagir dans le sens qui leur sera favorable. C’est ainsi que sont nés, au fil des ans, des terminologies acceptées par tous, y compris, il faut le dire, en Israël même.

Prenons par exemple le mot «occupation». Le Hamas, organisation terroriste qui règne sur la bande de Gaza depuis qu’Israël a retiré ses troupes et déraciné plus de 10 000 Juifs tout en laissant les infrastructures qui auraient permis aux Gazaouites de développer une véritable économie indépendante, continue à se lamenter du «fait» que l’État Juif occupe des terres appartenant «de toute éternité au Peuple Palestinien». Il s’agit là, évidemment, d’un faux car les droits éventuels des Palestiniens ne sauraient être réalisés en niant ceux des Juifs sur leur terre ancestrale.

Le terme «occupation» étant associé de triste mémoire à l’Histoire européenne, lorsqu’un lecteur, mal informé, se le voit asséner à longueur d’année par les médias les ONG et les politiciens, la première image qui lui vient est évidemment celle de la botte allemande martelant au pas de l’oie le pavé parisien ou bruxellois.

Cette répétition infligée tout autant qu’acceptée d’un terme erroné a pour but d’occulter un fait essentiel, gravé dans l’Histoire: selon la loi internationale, ces territoires dits «occupés» ne sont que «disputés». Car, afin d’occuper une terre, encore eût-il fallu qu’elle appartînt à un pays reconnu au moment de sa conquête. La «Palestine», renommée ainsi par l’Empereur Hadrien en 127 pour humilier les Juifs après leur seconde révolte contre l’empire romain, n’était qu’une région de l’empire Ottoman jusqu’à la défaite des Turcs en 1917. Ce sont les pays Arabes dans leur globalité qui, en rejetant le plan de partition de l’ONU en 1947, ont empêché la naissance d’une «nation palestinienne» dont on ne retrouve aucune trace dans l’histoire jusqu’à sa mise au goût du jour, en 1964, par Nasser et le KGB.

Depuis deux semaines le Hamas et autres organisations terroristes ont repris à leur compte ce qu’ils veulent faire passer pour un soulèvement populaire « pacifiste ».

Lorsqu’à l’issue d’une guerre défensive, Israël a «pris» la Cisjordanie et Gaza en 1967, ces deux territoires avaient déjà été conquis par la Jordanie et l’Égypte. Ce qui nous conduit à remettre en question une autre révision sémantique. Pourquoi des terres qui, pendant des siècles, se sont appelées Judée-Samarie deviendraient-elles, tout à coup, Cisjordanie ou Rive Occidentale, de par la seule volonté du pays qui les a envahies en 1948 avant d’en expulser tous les Juifs dans l’indifférence générale? Serait-ce pour effacer le simple fait que la Judée… est le berceau du judaïsme?

Mais revenons à Gaza.

Depuis deux semaines le Hamas et autres organisations terroristes ont repris à leur compte ce qu’ils veulent faire passer pour un soulèvement populaire «pacifiste». Une fois de plus, le détournement du vocabulaire est habile car ces manifestations à plusieurs couches – l’une pacifique et bon enfant, servant de couverture aux multiples tentatives de destruction de la barrière de séparation entre Gaza et Israël, d’enlèvement de soldats, et d’attentats terroristes heureusement avortés – voudraient promouvoir un «droit au retour» à l’intérieur d’Israël des descendants de descendants de «réfugiés».

J’ai déjà abondamment écrit, y compris dans ces pages, sur cette aberration tragique perpétuée au profit de l’UNWRA, une agence onusienne empêchant, dans sa forme actuelle, l’établissement et le développement des Arabes de Palestine sur leurs terres d’accueil. Je n’y reviendrai que par une phrase. Pourquoi un enfant, né à côté de Ramallah ou à Gaza, de parents nés au même endroit, ou pire encore, né à Brooklyn ou à Stockholm de parents immigrés, serait-il considéré comme «réfugié» – comme c’est le cas dans les statistiques de l’UNRWA – si un enfant Juif né à Tel Aviv, de parents nés à Bagdad, Damas ou Tripoli, et chassés entre 1948 et 1974 n’a jamais bénéficié du même statut?

Mais voici que des bus affrétés par le Hamas et la Jihad Islamique, et décorés de clés géantes et de noms enluminés de villages disparus censés symboliser ce «droit au retour» au sein d’un pays honni, viennent cueillir chaque vendredi devant les mosquées et les écoles de Gaza une population manipulée, prête aux derniers sacrifices afin de répondre à des mots d’ordre cyniques ou désuets.

Voici que des milliers de civils, hommes, femmes, enfants, se massent à proximité des zones tampons établies en bordure de la barrière de sécurité israélienne, dans une ambiance de kermesse destinée à nous faire croire qu’il s’agit là de manifestations au sens démocratique du terme.

Voici, également, que des milliers de pneus sont enflammés, dégageant une fumée noirâtre visible depuis les satellites, dans le but d’aveugler les forces de sécurité israéliennes qui ont pourtant prévenu: aucun franchissement sauvage de la barrière-frontière ne sera toléré. Toute tentative sera stoppée par des tirs à balle réelle – ce qui, n’en déplaise à beaucoup, est absolument légal dans toute buffer zone entre entités ennemies.

À cette annonce, les dirigeants du Hamas ont dû jubiler! Eux qui jouent gagnant-gagnant dans une stratégie impliquant l’utilisation de leurs civils comme boucliers humains, puisqu’il s’agit surtout d’une guerre d’influence, n’en espéraient pas autant. Dès lors ils allaient enfin pouvoir de nouveau compter leurs morts comme autant de victoires médiatiques. Et cela – au grand dam des Israéliens – s’est déroulé exactement comme prévu. Au moment où paraissent ces lignes, Gaza pleure plus de trente morts et les hôpitaux sont débordés par le nombre de blessés – même si les chiffres sont sujets à caution puisque seulement fournis par le Hamas.

En menaçant d’avoir recours à des mesures extrêmes, Israël ne fait que dissuader et empêcher le développement d’un cauchemar humanitaire.

Pour une fois, cependant, le Hamas s’est piégé lui-même, en publiant avec fierté l’identité de la majorité des victimes qui, de toute évidence appartiennent à ses troupes. C’est le cas du journaliste Yasser Mourtaja dont le double rôle de correspondant de presse et d’officier salarié du Hamas a également été dévoilé .

Mais aurait-il été possible pour Israël d’avoir recours à d’autres moyens? L’alignement de snipers parallèlement à l’utilisation de procédés antiémeutes, était-il vraiment indispensable?

Imaginons, un instant, que, dans les semaines à venir, comme annoncé par le dirigeant de l’organisation terroriste, Yahya Sinwar, la «marche du retour» permette à ses militants de détruire les barrières, tandis que des milliers de manifestants, femmes et enfants poussés en première ligne, se ruent à l’intérieur d’Israël, bravant non plus les tirs ciblés des soldats entraînés mais la riposte massive d’un peuple paniqué?

En menaçant d’avoir recours à des mesures extrêmes, et en tenant cet engagement, Israël ne fait que dissuader et empêcher le développement d’un cauchemar humanitaire dont les dirigeants du Hamas, acculés économiquement et politiquement, pourraient se régaler.

Contrairement aux images promues par d’autres abus du vocabulaire, Gaza n’est pas une «prison à ciel ouvert» mais une bande de 360 km² relativement surpeuplée, où vivent également nombre de millionnaires dans des villas fastueuses côtoyant des quartiers miséreux.

Chaque jour, environ 1 500 à 2 500 tonnes d’aide humanitaire et de biens de consommation sont autorisés à passer la frontière par le gouvernement israélien. Plusieurs programmes permettent aux habitants de Gaza de se faire soigner dans les hôpitaux de Tel Aviv et de Haïfa.

Un projet d’île portuaire sécurisée est à l’étude à Jérusalem, et des tonnes de fruits et légumes sont régulièrement achetés aux paysans gazaouis par les réseaux de distribution alimentaires israéliens.

L’Égypte contrôle toute la partie sud et fait souvent montre de beaucoup plus de rigueur qu’Israël pour protéger sa frontière, sachant que le Hamas est issu des Frères Musulmans, organisation interdite par le gouvernement de Abdel Fatah Al Sissi.

Mais Gaza souffre, en effet, et même terriblement!

Gaza souffre du fait que le Hamas détourne la majorité des fonds destinés à sa population pour creuser des tunnels et se construire une armée dont le seul but, ouvertement déclaré dans sa charte, est d’oblitérer Israël et d’exterminer ses habitants.

Gaza souffre des promesses d’aide financière non tenues par les pays Arabes et qui se chiffrent en milliards de dollars.

Gaza souffre de n’avoir que trois heures d’électricité par jour, car les terroristes du Hamas ont envoyé une roquette sur la principale centrale pendant le dernier conflit et l’Autorité Palestinienne, de son côté, refuse de payer les factures correspondant à son alimentation, espérant de la sorte provoquer une crise qui conduira à la perte de pouvoir de son concurrent.

Gaza souffre d’un taux de chômage de plus de 50 %, après que ses habitants, dans l’euphorie du départ des Juifs, aient saccagé et détruit les serres à légumes et les manufactures construites par Israël et donc jugées «impures» selon les théories islamistes qui les ont conduits, ne l’oublions pas non plus, à voter massivement pour le Hamas.

Israël ne peut faire la paix avec une organisation terroriste vouée à sa disparition.

Gaza souffre enfin de ces détournements du vocabulaire, de ces concepts esthétiques manichéens conçus au détriment des êtres, qui empêchent les hommes de conscience de comprendre le cœur du problème et sont forcés de penser qu’Israël est l’unique cause du malheur de ses habitants.

C’est pour cela qu’il faut, une fois de plus, clamer quelques faits incontournables.

Israël ne peut faire la paix avec une organisation terroriste vouée à sa disparition.

Les habitants de Gaza seraient libres de circuler et de se construire un avenir à l’instant même où ils renonceraient à la disparition de leur voisin.

Le Hamas et autres organisations terroristes savent qu’ils peuvent compter sur la sympathie des Nations unies et de nombre d’ONG à prétention humanitaire et ne se privent donc pas d’exploiter la population qu’ils détiennent en otage puisqu’ils savent qu’Israël sera systématiquement condamné à leur place.

J’en veux, pour exemple, une anecdote affligeante.

En septembre 2017, une organisation regroupant des femmes arabes et israéliennes a organisé une marche en Cisjordanie (Judée-Samarie). Aucun parent n’aurait pu être indifférent aux images de ces mères juives et arabes qui avouent leur quête d’un avenir meilleur pour leurs enfants. Durant la marche, aucun pneu brûlé, pas de lancement de pierres ou de cocktails Molotov, aucune tentative d’envahir Israël, aucun propos haineux. Tout le contraire. C’était une authentique manifestation pacifique.

Seulement, le Hamas a immédiatement condamné la marche en déclarant que «la normalisation est une arme israélienne».

L’ONU, de son côté, n’a pas cru bon promouvoir l’initiative. Pourquoi l’aurait-elle fait?

Il est davantage dans sa tradition, et certainement plus politiquement correct de condamner Israël pour ses «excès» en matière défensive tandis que le Moyen Orient, faute d’une vision honnête, bascule progressivement dans un conflit généralisé.

Voir encore:

Protestations sous haute tension prévues le long de la bande de Gaza

Vendredi, cinq zones, toutes situées à au moins 700 mètres de la clôture, doivent accueillir les Gazaouis du nord au sud de la bande.

Piotr Smolar (Bande de Gaza, envoyé spécial)

Le Monde

Le décor est planté. Le vent puissant éparpille les émanations de gaz lacrymogène. Les sardines empêchent les tentes de s’envoler. On est à la veille du grand jour à Gaza, celui craint par Israël depuis des semaines.

En ce jeudi 29 mars, deux cents jeunes viennent faire leurs repérages près du poste frontière fermé de Karni, en claquettes ou pieds nus. Perchés sur des monticules de sable, ou bien s’avançant vers les soldats israéliens qui veillent à quelques centaines de mètres derrière la clôture, ils semblent leur lancer un avertissement muet.

Le 30 mars est coché de longue date dans le calendrier palestinien : c’est le jour de la Terre, en mémoire de la confiscation de terres arabes en Galilée, en 1976, et des six manifestants tués à l’époque. Mais cette année, il marque surtout le début d’un mouvement à la force et aux développements imprévisibles, intitulé la « marche du retour ».

« Un tournant »

Cette marche doit culminer le 15 mai, jour de la Nakba (la grande « catastrophe » que fut l’expulsion de centaines de milliers de Palestiniens lors de la création d’Israël). Il s’agit d’un appel à des manifestations pacifiques massives pour réclamer le retour vers les terres perdues. Et ce alors que l’Etat hébreu, soutenu par Washington, souhaite une restriction drastique de la définition du réfugié palestinien.

Vendredi, cinq zones ouvertes, toutes situées à au moins 700 mètres de la clôture, doivent accueillir les Gazaouis du nord au sud de la bande, de Jabaliya jusqu’à Rafah. Des mariages seront célébrés, des concerts et des danses organisés. On y parlera aussi politique, blessures familiales, droits historiques. Pour Bassem Naïm, haut responsable du Hamas :

« Ce rassemblement est un tournant. Malgré les divisions entre factions, malgré la politique américaine, nous pouvons être une nouvelle fois créatifs pour relancer la question palestinienne. Israël peut facilement s’en tirer dans un conflit militaire, contre les Palestiniens ou au niveau régional. Mais c’est un tigre de papier. Il est acculé face à la perspective d’une foule pacifique réclamant le respect de ses droits. »

Mélange de fébrilité et d’intoxication

« Acculé », le mot est excessif. Mais, depuis le début de la semaine, dans un mélange de fébrilité et d’intoxication, les autorités israéliennes n’ont cessé de dramatiser les enjeux de cette journée. Les compagnies de bus à Gaza ont reçu des coups de fil intimidants pour qu’elles ne transportent pas les manifestants. Le ministère des affaires étrangères a diffusé à ses ambassades des éléments de langage pour décrédibiliser l’événement. Il s’agirait d’une « campagne dangereuse et préméditée » par le Hamas, qui y consacrerait « plus de dix millions de dollars [plus de 8 millions d’euros] », notamment pour rémunérer les manifestants.

Du côté militaire, le chef d’état-major, Gadi Eizenkot, a averti dans la presse que « plus de cent snipers » seraient déployés le long de la clôture de sécurité frontalière, en plus des unités supplémentaires mobilisées pour l’occasion.

Il s’agit de justifier par avance l’usage possible de la violence, allant de moyens de dispersion classiques jusqu’aux balles réelles. Le cauchemar israélien se résume en une image : celle de dizaines de milliers de manifestants non armés, avançant vers la frontière, pour réclamer leur sortie de la prison à ciel ouvert qu’est Gaza.

Plusieurs alertes sérieuses

Les responsables sécuritaires israéliens ont averti : tout franchissement illégal sera considéré comme une menace. Plusieurs alertes sérieuses ont eu lieu ces derniers jours, des individus ayant passé la clôture trop aisément. L’armée, qui craint l’enfouissement d’engins explosifs, a prévu d’employer des drones pour larguer des canettes de gaz lacrymogène. Quant aux soldats, ils n’hésiteront pas à tirer à balles réelles si des Palestiniens se rapprochent. Huit personnes ont été ainsi tuées en décembre 2017.

En présentant les manifestants comme des personnes achetées, manipulées ou dangereuses, Israël réduit l’événement de vendredi à une question sécuritaire. Il prive ainsi les Gazaouis de leur intégrité comme sujets politiques, de leur capacité à formuler des espérances et à se mobiliser pour les défendre.

Or, l’initiative de ce mouvement n’est pas du tout le fruit de délibérations au bureau politique du Hamas, qui gouverne la bande de Gaza depuis 2007. Le mouvement islamiste, affaibli et isolé, soutient comme les autres factions cette mobilisation, y compris par des moyens logistiques, parce qu’il y voit une façon de mettre enfin Israël sous pression.

L’idée d’un vaste rassemblement pacifique

L’idée originelle, c’est Ahmed Abou Irtema qui la revendique. C’était juste après l’annonce de la reconnaissance unilatérale de Jérusalem comme capitale d’Israël par Donald Trump, le 6 décembre 2017. La réconciliation entre le Hamas et le Fatah du président Mahmoud Abbas était dans l’impasse. La situation humanitaire, plus dramatique que jamais.

Ce journaliste de 33 ans, père de quatre garçons, a évoqué l’idée, sur Facebook, d’un vaste rassemblement pacifique. « Il y a eu énormément de réactions, les associations se sont emparées de la proposition, puis les factions. Un comité de pilotage a vu le jour. »

Ahmed Abou Irtema a une vision, celle d’une foule marchant un jour – pas vendredi – vers ses anciennes terres :

« Je crois dans la volonté d’un peuple. Ce qui m’inspire, c’est la destruction du mur de Berlin. On ne veut pas mourir. Notre message est pacifique, on ne veut jeter personne à la mer. Si les Israéliens nous tuent, ce sera leur crime. »

Le jeune homme, comme les autres activistes, ne parle pas d’un Etat palestinien, mais de leurs droits historiques sur des terrains précisément délimités.

« Les gens sont plein de fureur et de colère »

Qu’ils aient peu de chance d’obtenir gain de cause ne les interroge pas. Ils invoquent l’article 11 de la résolution 194, adoptée par les Nations unies (ONU) à la fin de 1948, sur le droit des réfugiés à retourner chez eux ou à obtenir compensation.

« Nous préférons mourir dans notre pays plutôt qu’en mer, comme les réfugiés syriens, ou enfermés à Gaza ou dans les camps au Liban », explique de son côté Moïn Abou Okal, fonctionnaire au ministère de l’intérieur et membre du comité de pilotage.

Ce dernier affirme que les manifestants ne tenteront de pénétrer en Israël que le 15 mai. La vérité est que rien n’est écrit. Tout dépendra de la force de la mobilisation et de l’ampleur de la réaction israélienne. « Les gens sont plein de fureur et de colère, dit Ghazi Hamad, responsable des relations internationales du Hamas. On n’a pris aucune décision pour pousser des centaines de milliers de personnes vers la frontière. On veut que cela reste une manifestation pacifique. Mais il n’y a ni négociations avec Israël ni réconciliation entre factions. Il faut laisser les gens s’exprimer. »

A l’aube du vendredi 30 mars, un Palestinien a été tué par une frappe israélienne avant le rassemblement prévu à Gaza.

Voir également:

Trump annonce le retrait des Etats-Unis de l’accord nucléaire iranien

Le président américain a promis de « graves » conséquences à l’Iran s’il se dote de la bombe nucléaire ; l’Iran mérite un « meilleur gouvernement »

Le président américain Donald Trump a annoncé mardi le retrait des Etats-Unis de l’accord sur le nucléaire iranien, qu’il a qualifié de « désastreux », et le rétablissement des sanctions contre Téhéran.

« J’annonce aujourd’hui que les Etats-Unis vont se retirer de l’accord nucléaire iranien », a-t-il déclaré dans une allocution télévisée depuis la Maison Blanche.

Trump a démarré son discours par ces mots :

« Aujourd’hui, je veux informer les Américains de nos efforts afin d’empêcher l’Iran d’acquérir l’arme nucléaire. Le régime iranien est le principal sponsor étatique de la terreur. Il exporte de dangereux missiles, alimente les conflits à travers le Moyen-Orient et soutient des groupes terroristes alliés et des milices comme le Hezbollah, le Hamas, les Talibans et Al-Qaïda. Au fil des années, l’Iran et ses mandataires ont bombardé des militaires et des installations américaines [et ont commis une série d’autres attaques contre les Américains et les intérêts américains]. »

« Le régime iranien a financé son long règne de chaos et de terreur en pillant la richesse de son peuple. Aucune mesure prise par le régime n’a été plus dangereuse que sa poursuite vers le nucléaire et ses efforts pour l’obtenir. »

Dans son discours, Trump a déclaré :

« En théorie, le soi-disant accord concernant l’Iran était censé protéger les Etats-Unis et leurs alliés de la folie d’une bombe nucléaire iranienne – une arme qui ne ferait que mettre en péril la survie du régime iranien.

« En fait, l’accord a permis à l’Iran de continuer à enrichir de l’uranium et, au fil du temps, d’atteindre un point de rupture en terme de nucléaire. Il a bénéficié de la levée de sanctions paralysantes en échange de très faibles efforts sur son activité nucléaire. Aucune autre limite n’a été fixé concernant ses autres activités malfaisantes.

« En d’autres termes, au moment où les Etats-Unis disposaient d’un maximum de pouvoir, cet accord désastreux a apporté à ce régime – et c’est un régime de terreur – plusieurs milliards de dollars, dont une partie en espèces, ce qui représente un grand embarras pour moi en tant que citoyen et pour tous les citoyens des Etats-Unis. Un accord plus constructif aurait facilement pu être conclu à ce moment-là. »

Voici les principaux extraits de sa déclaration à la Maison Blanche.

Retrait

« J’annonce aujourd’hui que les Etats-Unis vont se retirer de l’accord nucléaire iranien ».

« Le fait est que c’est un accord horrible et partial qui n’aurait jamais dû être conclu. Il n’a pas apporté le calme. Il n’a pas apporté la paix. Et il ne le fera jamais ».

Sanctions

« Dans quelques instants, je vais signer un ordre présidentiel pour commencer à rétablir les sanctions américaines liées au programme nucléaire du régime iranien. Nous allons instituer le plus haut niveau de sanctions économiques ».

Et « tout pays qui aidera l’Iran dans sa quête d’armes nucléaires pourrait aussi être fortement sanctionné par les Etats-Unis ».

Le conseiller à la sécurité nationale, John Bolton, a de son côté indiqué que le rétablissement des sanctions américaines était effectif immédiatement pour les nouveaux contrats et que les entreprises étrangères auraient quelques mois pour « sortir » d’Iran.

Le Trésor américain a lui fait savoir que les sanctions concernant les anciens contrats conclus en Iran entreraient en vigueur après une période de transition de 90 à 180 jours.

« Vraie solution »

« Alors que nous sortons de l’accord iranien, nous travaillerons avec nos alliés pour trouver une vraie solution complète et durable à la menace nucléaire iranienne. Cela comprendra des efforts pour éliminer la menace du programme de missiles balistiques (de l’Iran), pour stopper ses activités terroristes à travers le monde et pour bloquer ses activités menaçantes à travers le Moyen-Orient ».

« Nous n’allons pas laisser un régime qui scande +Mort à l’Amérique+ avoir accès aux armes les plus meurtrières sur terre ».

« Mais le fait est qu’ils vont vouloir conclure un accord nouveau et durable, un accord qui bénéficierait à tout l’Iran et au peuple iranien. Quand ils (seront prêts), je serai prêt et bien disposé. De belles choses peuvent arriver à l’Iran ».

« Preuve »

« Au coeur de l’accord iranien, il y avait un énorme mythe selon laquelle un régime meurtrier ne cherchait qu’un programme pacifique d’énergie nucléaire. Aujourd’hui nous avons la preuve définitive que la promesse iranienne était un mensonge ».

Régime contre peuple

« Le futur de l’Iran appartient à son peuple » et les Iraniens « méritent une nation qui rende justice à leurs rêves, qui honore leur histoire ».

« Le régime iranien est le principal sponsor étatique de la terreur ». « Il soutient des terroristes et des milices comme le Hezbollah, le Hamas, les talibans et Al-Qaïda ».

L’ancien président américain Barack Obama a qualifié mardi de « grave erreur » la décision de Donald Trump de retirer les Etats-Unis de l’accord sur le nucléaire iranien, jugeant que ce dernier « fonctionne » et est dans l’intérêt de Washington.

« Je pense que la décision de mettre le JCPOA en danger sans aucune violation de l’accord de la part des Iraniens est une grave erreur, » a indiqué l’ex-président américain, très discret depuis son départ de la Maison Blanche, dans un communiqué au ton particulièrement ferme.

Voir de même:

Donald Trump furieux contre Mahmoud Abbas suite à un « mensonge »

 
Des sources palestiniennes ont réfuté cette publication

Le président américain Donald Trump aurait fustigé le président de l’Autorité palestinienne, Mahmoud Abbas, lors de leur réunion à Bethléem, rapporte dimanche Channel 2.

Selon la chaîne, citant des sources israéliennes, Trump aurait « crié » sur Abbas, car ce dernier lui aurait « menti ».

« Vous m’avez menti à Washington lorsque vous avez parlé de l’engagement pour la paix, mais les Israéliens m’ont montré que vous étiez personnellement responsable de l’incitation », aurait déclaré Trump.

Les sources palestiniennes ont cependant contredit la publication de Channel 2, affirmant que la rencontre entre les deux dirigeants avait été calme.

Dans son discours après la réunion avec Abbas, Trump a insisté sur le fait que « la paix ne peut être obtenue où la violence est récompensée ». Une déclaration considérée comme une critique du financement de l’Autorité palestinienne destiné aux familles de terroristes emprisonnés ou tués.

Ce rapport intervient alors que le président américain a affirmé hier que les deux parties sont prêtes à « parvenir à la paix ».

Le président de l’Autorité palestinienne, Mahmoud Abbas, « m’a assuré qu’il est prêt à faire la paix avec Israël, et je le crois », a déclaré Trump ajoutant que Benyamin Netanyahou a de son coté « assuré qu’il était prêt à parvenir à la paix ».

Voir encore:

Territoires palestiniens: Abbas s’excuse après ses propos jugés antisémites

Ses propos ont fait l’objet de vives critiques dans le monde entier ces derniers jours. En début de semaine, dans un discours prononcé devant des représentants de l’Organisation de libération de la Palestine, Mahmoud Abbas avait estimé que les massacres dont les juifs avaient été victimes en Europe, et notamment l’Holocauste, étaient dus au « comportement social » des juifs et non à leur religion. Il évoquait notamment leurs activités bancaires. Des propos largement condamnés sur la scène internationale par les dirigeants israéliens, par les Etats-Unis, l’Union européenne, l’ONU et la France notamment.

De notre correspondant à Jérusalem,  Guilhem Delteil

Finalement, ce vendredi, le président de l’Autorité palestinienne a décidé de présenter ses excuses. Depuis mardi soir, les critiques se succédaient et les mots employés étaient parfois très forts. Le coordinateur de l’ONU pour le processus de paix avait condamné des propos « inacceptables ». Il s’agissait pour lui de « certaines des insultes antisémites les plus méprisantes ». Quant au Premier ministre israélien, il estimait pour sa part que « un négationniste reste un négationniste » et il disait souhaiter voir « disparaître » Mahmoud Abbas.

Face à ce tollé, le président de l’Autorité palestinienne n’a d’abord rien dit. Puis après deux jours de silence, ce vendredi, il a choisi de s’excuser. « Si des gens ont été offensés par ma déclaration (…), spécialement des personnes de confession juive, je leur présente mes excuses », écrit Mahmoud Abbas dans un communiqué. « Je réitère mon entier respect pour la foi juive et les autres religions monothéistes », poursuit-il.

Le président de l’Autorité palestinienne se défend de tout antisémitisme. « Nous le condamnons sous toutes ses formes » assure-t-il. Il tient également à « réitérer », dit-il, sa « condamnation de longue date de l’Holocauste » qu’il qualifie de « crime le plus odieux de l’Histoire ».

Voir de même:

Abbas revient sur ses propos relatifs aux rabbins voulant “empoisonner” les puits palestiniens

Après avoir été accusé de diffamation, le dirigeant de l’AP rétracte son affirmation “sans fondement”, et ajoute ne pas avoir voulu “offenser le peuple juif”

Le président du parlement européen Martin Schulz (à droite) avec le président de l’Autorité palestinienne Mahmoud Abbas au parlement de l’Union européenne à Bruxelles, le 23 juin 2016. (Crédit : AFP/John Thys)

Le président de l’Autorité palestinienne (AP) Mahmoud Abbas a retiré samedi ses propos concernant des rabbins ayant appelé à empoisonné l’eau des Palestiniens, disant qu’il n’avait pas eu l’intention d’offenser les juifs, après qu’Israël et des organisations juives ont affirmé qu’il faisait la promotion de tropes diffamatoires et antisémites.

« Après qu’il soit devenu évident que les déclarations supposées d’un rabbin, relayées par de nombreux médias, se sont révélées sans fondement, le président Mahmoud Abbas a affirmé qu’il n’avait pas pour intention de s’en prendre au judaïsme ou de blesser le peuple juif à travers le monde », a déclaré son bureau dans un communiqué.

Pendant un discours prononcé devant le Parlement de l’Union européenne à Bruxelles jeudi, Abbas avait affirmé que les accusations d’incitations [à la violence] palestiniennes étaient injustes puisque « les Israéliens le font aussi… Certains rabbins en Israël ont dit très clairement à leur gouvernement que notre eau devait être empoisonnée afin de tuer des Palestiniens. »

Un article publié en juin dans la presse turque affirmait qu’un rabbin avait fait un tel appel, mais l’histoire s’était rapidement révélée fausse.

Son bureau a déclaré qu’il « rejetait toutes les accusations formulées à son encontre et à celle du peuple palestinien d’offense au judaïsme. [Il] a également condamné toutes les accusations d’antisémitisme. »

En revanche, Abbas n’a pas retiré son affirmation, également prononcée pendant son discours devant le Parlement européen, que le terrorisme mondial serait éradiqué si Israël se retirait de Cisjordanie et de Jérusalem Est.

Israël a dénoncé jeudi Abbas, le qualifiant de colporteur de mensonges, le bureau du Premier ministre déclarant qu’il « a montré son vrai visage », et qu’il « ment quand il affirme que ses mains sont tendues vers la paix. »

Le Premier ministre Benjamin Netanyahu avait accusé jeudi Abbas de « propager des diffamations au parlement européen ».

« Israël attend le jour où Abbas cessera de colporter des mensonges et d’inciter [à la haine contre Israël]. D’ici là, Israël continuera à se défendre contre les incitations palestiniennes, qui alimentent le terrorisme », pouvait-on lire dans le communiqué du bureau du Premier ministre.

Le Conseil représentatif des institutions juives de France (CRIF), vitrine politique de la première communauté juive d’Europe, avait accusé vendredi Abbas de « propager les caricatures anti juives d’autrefois […] dont on sait qu’elles nourrissent la haine antisémite ».

Voir de plus:

« Jusqu’à son dernier jour », Abbas payera les « familles des martyrs prisonniers »

 Le président de l’Autorité palestinienne a rendu hommage aux efforts déployés par Donald Trump

Le président de l’Autorité palestinienne, Mahmoud Abbas, a déclaré jeudi qu’il ne renoncera pas aux salaires reversés aux terroristes et aux familles des terroristes ayant été emprisonnés en Israël pour avoir mené des attentats, ou ayant tenté de tuer des Israéliens.

« Je n’ai pas l’intention de cesser de payer les familles des martyrs prisonniers, même si cela me coûte mon siège. Je continuerai à les payer jusqu’à mon dernier jour », a déclaré M. Abbas, d’après les médias israéliens.

Le financement par l’Autorité palestinienne de subventions pour les familles des terroristes est un point de discorde entre les Palestiniens et l’administration Trump. Pendant sa visite dans la région plus tôt cette année, le président des Etats-Unis avait souligné que son pays ne tolérerait pas ces rétributions.

Cette déclaration du président de l’AP survient alors que des émissaires américains conduits par Jared Kushner, proche conseiller du président américain, ont rencontré à nouveau cette semaine les dirigeants israéliens et palestiniens.

Après avoir rencontré des responsables saoudiens, émiratis, qataris, jordaniens et égyptiens, la délégation américaine a été reçue jeudi par Benyamin Netanyahou et a rencontré le président de l’Autorité palestinienne Mahmoud Abbas à Ramallah.

M. Trump « est déterminé à parvenir à une solution qui apportera la prospérité et la paix à tout le monde dans cette zone », a déclaré Jared Kushner, au début de ses entretiens avec le Premier ministre israélien à Tel-Aviv, selon une vidéo diffusée par l’ambassade américaine.

Le bureau de Benyamin Netanyahou a qualifié les discussions de « constructives et de substantielles » sans autre détail, indiquant qu’elles allaient se poursuivre « dans les prochaines semaines » et remerciant le président américain « pour son ferme soutien à Israël ».

Le président Abbas a pour sa part rendu hommage aux efforts déployés par Donald Trump et a affirmé que « cette délégation (américaine) œuvre pour la paix ». « Nous savons que c’est difficile et compliqué mais ce n’est pas impossible », a-t-il fait savoir.

(Avec agence)

Voir par ailleurs:

Israël a fêté mercredi son 70e anniversaire en brandissant sa puissance militaire et son improbable réussite économique face aux menaces régionales renouvelées et aux incertitudes intérieures.

Après s’être recueillis depuis mardi à la mémoire de leurs compatriotes tués au service de leur pays ou dans des attentats, les Israéliens ont entamé mercredi soir les célébrations marquant la création de leur Etat proclamé le 14 mai 1948, mais fêté en ce moment en fonction du calendrier hébraïque.

Lors d’une cérémonie à Jérusalem, le Premier ministre Benjamin Netanyahu a salué ce qu’il a appelé les «vrais germes de la paix» qui selon lui commençaient à pousser parmi certains pays arabes.

Il n’a pas donné plus de détails mais des signes de réchauffement, tout particulièrement avec Ryad, ont été récemment enregistrés, alors qu’Israël comme le royaume saoudien voit en l’Iran une grave menace.

Israël agite régulièrement le spectre d’une attaque de l’Iran, son ennemi juré.

La crainte d’un tel acte d’hostilité, à la manière de l’offensive surprise d’une coalition arabe lors des célébrations de Yom Kippour en 1973, a été attisée par un raid le 9 avril contre une base aérienne en Syrie, imputé à Israël par le régime de Bachar al-Assad et ses alliés iranien et russe.

Ali Akbar Velayati, conseiller du guide suprême iranien, l’ayatollah Ali Khamenei, a promis que cette attaque ne resterait «pas sans réponse».

Depuis le début de la guerre en Syrie en 2011, des dizaines de frappes à distance dans ce pays sont attribuées à Israël, qui se garde communément de les confirmer ou démentir. Elles visent des positions syriennes et des convois d’armes au Hezbollah libanais, qui comme l’Iran et la Russie, aide militairement le régime Assad.

– Les «conseils» de Lieberman –

Mais en février, Israël a admis pour la première fois avoir frappé des cibles iraniennes après l’intrusion d’un drone iranien dans son espace aérien. C’était la première confrontation ouvertement déclarée entre Israël et l’Iran en Syrie.

Israël martèle qu’il ne permettra pas à l’Iran de s’enraciner militairement en Syrie voisine.

Les journaux israéliens ont publié mercredi des éléments spécifiques sur la présence en Syrie des Gardiens de la révolution, unité d’élite iranienne.

La publication de photos satellite de bases aériennes et d’appareils civils soupçonnés de décharger des armes, de cartes et même de noms de responsables militaires iraniens constitue un avertissement, convenaient les commentateurs militaires: Israël sait où et qui frapper en cas d’attaque.

L’armée a décidé par précaution de renoncer à envoyer des chasseurs F-15 à des manœuvres prévues en mai aux Etats-Unis, a rapporté la radio militaire.

Sans évoquer une menace iranienne immédiate, le ministre de la Défense Avigdor Lieberman a prévenu: «Nous ne cherchons pas l’aventure», mais «je conseille à nos voisins au nord (Liban et Syrie) et au sud (bande de Gaza) de tenir sérieusement compte» de la détermination à défendre Israël.

– «Forteresse» –

Le 70e anniversaire est l’occasion pour Israël de célébrer le «miracle» de son existence, sa force militaire, la prospérité de la «nation start-up» et son modèle démocratique.

Avec plus de 8,8 millions d’habitants, la population a décuplé depuis 1948, selon les statistiques officielles. La croissance s’est affichée à 4,1% au quatrième trimestre 2017. Le pays revendique une douzaine de prix Nobel.

Cependant, Israël accuse parmi les plus fortes inégalités des pays développés. L’avenir du Premier ministre, englué dans les affaires de corruption présumée, est incertain.

S’agissant du conflit israélo-palestinien, une solution a rarement paru plus lointaine.

L’anniversaire d’Israël coïncide avec «la marche du retour», mouvement organisé depuis le 30 mars dans la bande de Gaza, territoire palestinien soumis au blocus israélien. Après bientôt trois semaines de violences le long de la frontière qui ont fait 34 morts palestiniens, de nouvelles manifestations sont attendues vendredi.

Le ministère israélien de la Défense a annoncé qu’un «puissant engin explosif», apparemment destiné à un attentat lors des fêtes israéliennes, avait été découvert dans un camion palestinien intercepté à un point de passage entre la Cisjordanie occupée et Israël.

«Israël a été établi pour que le peuple juif, qui ne s’est presque jamais senti chez soi nulle part au monde, ait enfin un foyer», a déclaré l’écrivain David Grossman lors d’une cérémonie mardi soir à Tel-Aviv troublée par des militants de droite protestant contre la présence de familles palestiniennes.

«Aujourd’hui, après 70 ans de réussites étonnantes dans tant de domaines, Israël, avec toute sa force, est peut-être une forteresse. Mais ce n’est toujours pas un foyer. Les Israéliens n’auront pas de foyer tant que les Palestiniens n’auront pas le leur».

Cyclisme

Giro : Israël, braquet à l’italienne

Le Giro d’Italia débute ce vendredi de Jérusalem, offrant à l’Etat hébreu son premier événement sportif d’envergure. Tracé qui esquive les Territoires palestiniens, équipes qui hésitent à s’engager, soupçons d’enveloppes d’argent… les autorités ont éteint toutes les critiques pour en faire une vitrine.

Pierre Carrey et Guillaume Gendron, correspondant à Tel-Aviv

Plus de doute, avec Benyamin Nétanyahou qui fait des acrobaties à vélo, le départ du Tour d’Italie (Giro d’Italia) de Jérusalem ce vendredi est bien une affaire politique. «Il faut que je m’entraîne», plaisante le Premier ministre dans une vidéo diffusée fin avril sur les réseaux sociaux où on le voit enfourcher un VTT bleu avec casque et costume-cravate. Etonnamment agile pour ses 68 ans, «Bibi» (en réalité, sa doublure) accomplit le tour d’un rond-point sur la roue arrière… Et exhorte l’équipe d’Israel Cycling Academy, dont deux coureurs sur les huit engagés sont israéliens : «Je vais vous aider à gagner !»

Le big start («grand départ») du Giro à Jérusalem est un big deal pour Israël. Trois jours de course : un contre-la-montre de 9,7 km dans les quartiers ouest de la ville «trois fois sainte», une étape de 167 km reliant le port de Haïfa, au nord, avec les plages de Tel-Aviv et enfin 226 km de canyons désertiques entre Beer Sheva et la station balnéaire d’Eilat, au bord de la mer Rouge, à la pointe sud du pays. Le tracé s’arrête à la «ligne verte» et évite soigneusement les Territoires palestiniens ainsi que la Vieille Ville de Jérusalem (mais longera cependant ses murs) et sa partie Est, dont l’annexion par Israël en 1980 n’a jamais été acceptée par la communauté internationale. En principe donc, pas de plans d’hélico des toits rouges des colonies de Cisjordanie ou du mur de séparation…

Cet événement d’envergure (évalué à 120 millions de shekels, soit 27 millions d’euros, l’équivalent de la somme dépensée mi-avril par l’Etat hébreu pour fêter ses 70 ans) est tout à la fois le premier départ d’un grand tour cycliste hors d’Europe, l’une des plus grandes manifestations sportives ou culturelles jamais organisées en Israël et potentiellement l’événement le plus sécurisé de son histoire (protégé par 6 000 policiers et agents privés). Plus encore que les funérailles d’Yitzhak Rabin, le Premier ministre assassiné en 1995. Question retombées, le gouvernement espère une hausse du tourisme grâce à une audience de la course complètement fantasmée, évaluée à un milliard de téléspectateurs.

De son côté, la société italienne RCS Sport, organisatrice de l’épreuve, entend tenir le Giro, simple «événement sportif», «à l’écart de toute discussion politique». Le consul général d’Italie à Tel-Aviv appuyait ces propos lundi, tout en répétant son attachement à l’antienne de la communauté internationale, soit la solution à deux Etats. A l’inverse, le milliardaire Sylvan Adams, qui a attiré le Giro à Jérusalem, envoie valser cette supposée neutralité et annonce la couleur : «On va contourner les médias traditionnels en s’adressant directement aux fans de sport qui n’en ont rien à faire du conflit et veulent juste admirer nos beaux paysages.»

«Un pays normal»

Ce riche héritier canadien de 59 ans s’est installé en Israël en 2016. Une alyah autant motivée par une fibre sioniste proclamée à tout instant que par une certaine affinité avec la fiscalité israélienne : le magnat de l’immobilier a fait sa valise en s’acquittant d’un redressement de 64 millions d’euros auprès du Trésor québécois. Depuis son arrivée, Adams, six fois champion cycliste canadien chez les vétérans, a décidé de financer une école de vélo, une équipe de deuxième division mondiale – celle que rencontre Nétanyahou dans la vidéo -, la construction d’un vélodrome olympique à Tel-Aviv et, point d’orgue, une grande partie du départ du Giro. Un programme supposé transformer Israël en nation de vélo, ce qu’elle n’était pas jusque-là, mais aussi destiné à soutenir l’effort de communication national, soit une version cycliste de l’hasbara (terme hébraïque signifiant «explication» et «propagande»).

Face à la presse, à Tel-Aviv, Sylvan Adams a dicté fin avril les éléments de langage : «J’espère que les journalistes diront qu’il s’agit de la seule démocratie pluraliste du Moyen-Orient, un pays libre, un pays sûr. Un pays normal, comme la France ou l’Italie.» Normal, il faut le dire vite. Lors de la présentation du tracé à Milan, fin 2017, l’emploi de l’appellation «Jérusalem-Ouest» avait suscité la fureur d’Israël, qui avait obtenu gain de cause (suscitant, en retour, l’indignation des Palestiniens). Désormais, sur les documents officiels, la distinction n’est plus faite. «Il n’y a aucune ville dans le monde qui s’appelle Jérusalem-Ouest, s’agace Adams. Il n’y a pas de Paris-Ouest ou de Rome-Ouest. La course part de la ville de Jérusalem, donc on écrit « Jérusalem » sur la carte.» Représentant de RCS en Israël, Daniel Benaim va dans le même sens : «Quand les hélicoptères vont filmer Jérusalem, ils vont filmer la beauté du tout, on ne va pas diviser la ville !»

Le mouvement propalestinien BDS («Boycott, désinvestissement, sanctions») accuse l’épreuve de «normaliser l’occupation» israélienne, en utilisant des images du Dôme du Rocher ou de la porte de Damas, symboles palestiniens de la Vieille Ville. Haussement d’épaules côté organisateurs. Benaim : «Le BDS a essayé de faire du bruit en Italie, mais ça ne prend pas. Nous sommes heureux de dire qu’il y a une participation totale des équipes.» Deux groupes sportifs ont néanmoins hésité à s’engager, Bahrain-Merida et le Team UAE (Emirats arabes unis), tous deux dirigés par des managers italiens mais financés par des pétromonarchies du Golfe, qui ne reconnaissent pas officiellement Israël. Elles seront finalement au départ. «Les équipes n’ont pas le choix, rappelle le patron d’une formation concurrente. Quand nous avons appris que le Tour d’Italie partait de Jérusalem [peu après les remous causés par la reconnaissance de la ville comme capitale israélienne par Donald Trump, ndlr], nous nous sommes demandé comment on osait envoyer nos coureurs dans cette zone instable. Hélas, les équipes WorldTour [première division mondiale] sont tenues de participer à toutes les épreuves du calendrier. C’est une règle à changer dans un futur proche pour éviter de subir ces parcours absurdes.»

En façade, le milieu du vélo s’attache à éteindre les controverses. Fabio Aru, coureur originaire de Sardaigne, membre du Team UAE qui aurait pu déclarer forfait, sur Sportfair.it : «On m’a demandé si j’avais peur. Au contraire, je suis enthousiaste […]. Le sport peut aider à réconcilier les peuples.» Le Néerlandais Tom Dumoulin (Team Sunweb), vainqueur sortant du Giro, sur Cyclingnews.com : «Je ne suis pas du genre à me mêler de politique ; je suis cycliste. Si une course démarre d’Israël, on doit être au départ.»

Prime secrète

En off, plusieurs concurrents expriment leurs craintes. Pas tant d’être pris pour cible (d’ailleurs, le dispositif de sécurité était en apparence allégé aux abords de leurs hôtels jeudi) mais inquiets de l’effort physique supplémentaire à consentir. Entre les quatre heures de vol retour qui vont entamer leur récupération lundi (direction la Sicile) et la chaleur attendue dimanche dans le désert. Daniel Benaim rejette : «Je les ai vu monter des cols en Sardaigne sous 36 degrés…» Le silence gêné du peloton s’explique peut-être par la récurrence des courses dans des environnements climatiques et politiques discutables. En particulier à Dubaï et Abou Dhabi, où RCS Sport met sur pied des épreuves, ou encore au Qatar qui fut de 2002 à 2016 le terrain de jeu d’Amaury Sport Organisation, propriétaire du Tour de France. Mais il est aussi possible que cette discrétion soit tenue par des arrangements financiers.

La tête d’affiche de l’épreuve, le Britannique Chris Froome (Team Sky, lire ci-contre) aurait ainsi empoché de 1,4 à 2 millions d’euros de prime de participation selon plusieurs médias spécialisés. Menacé de sanctions pour un contrôle positif, le quadruple vainqueur de la Grande Boucle est accueilli à bras ouverts par des organisateurs misant sur sa notoriété. Théoriquement interdite par l’Union cycliste internationale (les coureurs étant rémunérés par leur équipe et non par les patrons d’épreuves), la pratique s’est banalisée. RCS est ainsi soupçonné d’avoir versé, en 2009, de 1 à 3 millions d’euros à Lance Armstrong, directement ou par l’intermédiaire de sa fondation contre le cancer. Par ailleurs, Libération a appris que l’organisateur italien gonfle depuis des années les frais de participation des équipes pour les inciter à aligner leurs stars sur le Giro.

RCS nie toute prime secrète. Ce qui pourrait laisser penser que, si chèque il y a, il a été signé par les Israéliens. Très excité, Sylvan Adams annonçait : «On espère avoir Froome, même si ça coûte cher. C’est comme faire jouer Messi dans sa ville, sauf que là on l’a pour trois jours avec notre beau pays en toile de fond et pas juste un stade anonyme.» Les images doivent être belles à tout prix. Même celles affichant un optimisme forcé (ou naïf), peu raccord avec l’enlisement actuel du processus de paix. Interrogé par le site Insidethegames.biz, le président de l’UCI, le Français David Lappartient veut y croire : «Espérons que le cyclisme permette de promouvoir la paix, comme les JO l’ont fait en Corée.»


Chris Froome, favori des soupçons

«Je n’ai rien fait de mal.» Christopher Froome va bouffer toujours les mêmes questions et répandre toujours la même odeur de petit scandale au long des 3 600 km du Tour d’Italie qui s’élance de Jérusalem ce vendredi. Le Britannique s’attaque à un exploit jamais vu, hors Eddy Merckx et Bernard Hinault : remporter trois grands tours d’affilée. S’il enlève l’épreuve italienne fin mai, Froome signerait un triplé après le Tour de France (en juillet) et celui d’Espagne (en septembre). A moins qu’il perde tout : le leader de l’équipe Sky est accusé d’abus médicamenteux – pour ne pas dire de dopage -, depuis que des doses élevées de salbutamol ont été retrouvées dans ses urines le 7 septembre. Il avance la prise de ventoline pour soigner son asthme et réussit pour le moment à gagner du temps avec ses avocats. Mais Froome devrait tôt ou tard être sanctionné. Donc certainement, si on s’en réfère au cas d’Alberto Contador en 2012, perdre le bénéfice de sa victoire au Tour d’Espagne. Et celle, peut-être à venir, au Tour d’Italie. Dès lors, pourquoi courir le Giro ? Froome le sait : le public retient les victoires acquises sur le terrain et oublie lorsqu’elles sont effacées a posteriori. Et puis, il y a cette histoire de prime de participation secrète que Froome aurait perçue de la part des organisateurs, pour lesquels le scandale constitue manifestement un argument marketing. P.C.

Voir aussi:

A Courageous Trump Call on a Lousy Iran Deal

Bret Stephens
New York Times

May 8, 2018

Of all the arguments for the Trump administration to honor the nuclear deal with Iran, none was more risible than the claim that we gave our word as a country to keep it.

“Our”?

The Obama administration refused to submit the deal to Congress as a treaty, knowing it would never get two-thirds of the Senate to go along. Just 21 percent of Americans approved of the deal at the time it went through, against 49 percent who did not, according to a Pew poll. The agreement “passed” on the strength of a 42-vote Democratic filibuster, against bipartisan, majority opposition.

“The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (J.C.P.O.A.) is not a treaty or an executive agreement, and it is not a signed document,” Julia Frifield, then the assistant secretary of state for legislative affairs, wrote then-Representative Mike Pompeo in November 2015, referring to the deal by its formal name. It’s questionable whether the deal has any legal force at all.

Build on political sand; get washed away by the next electoral wave. Such was the fate of the ill-judged and ill-founded J.C.P.O.A., which Donald Trump killed on Tuesday by refusing to again waive sanctions on the Islamic Republic. He was absolutely right to do so — assuming, that is, serious thought has been given to what comes next.

In the weeks leading to Tuesday’s announcement, some of the same people who previously claimed the deal was the best we could possibly hope for suddenly became inventive in proposing means to fix it. This involved suggesting side deals between Washington and European capitals to impose stiffer penalties on Tehran for its continued testing of ballistic missiles — more than 20 since the deal came into effect — and its increasingly aggressive regional behavior.

But the problem with this approach is that it only treats symptoms of a problem for which the J.C.P.O.A. is itself a major cause. The deal weakened U.N. prohibitions on Iran’s testing of ballistic missiles, which cannot be reversed without Russian and Chinese consent. That won’t happen.

The easing of sanctions also gave Tehran additional financial means with which to fund its depredations in Syria and its militant proxies in Yemen, Lebanon and elsewhere. Any effort to counter Iran on the ground in these places would mean fighting the very forces we are effectively feeding. Why not just stop the feeding?

Apologists for the deal answer that the price is worth paying because Iran has put on hold much of its production of nuclear fuel for the next several years. Yet even now Iran is under looser nuclear strictures than North Korea, and would have been allowed to enrich as much material as it liked once the deal expired. That’s nuts.

Apologists also claim that, with Trump’s decision, Tehran will simply restart its enrichment activities on an industrial scale. Maybe it will, forcing a crisis that could end with U.S. or Israeli strikes on Iran’s nuclear sites. But that would be stupid, something the regime emphatically isn’t. More likely, it will take symbolic steps to restart enrichment, thereby implying a threat without making good on it. What the regime wants is a renegotiation, not a reckoning.

Why? Even with the sanctions relief, the Iranian economy hangs by a thread: The Wall Street Journal on Sundayreported “hundreds of recent outbreaks of labor unrest in Iran, an indication of deepening discord over the nation’s economic troubles.” This week, the rial hit a record low of 67,800 to the dollar; one member of the Iranian Parliament estimated $30 billion of capital outflows in recent months. That’s real money for a country whose gross domestic product barely matches that of Boston.

The regime might calculate that a strategy of confrontation with the West could whip up useful nationalist fervors. But it would have to tread carefully: Ordinary Iranians are already furious that their government has squandered the proceeds of the nuclear deal on propping up the Assad regime. The conditions that led to the so-called Green movement of 2009 are there once again. Nor will it help Iran if it tries to start a war with Israel and comes out badly bloodied.

All this means the administration is in a strong position to negotiate a viable deal. But it missed an opportunity last month when it failed to deliver a crippling blow to Bashar al-Assad, Iran’s puppet in Syria, for his use of chemical weapons. Trump’s appeals in his speech to the Iranian people also sounded hollow from a president who isn’t exactly a tribune of liberalism and has disdained human rights as a tool of U.S. diplomacy. And the U.S. will need to mend fences with its European partners to pursue a coordinated diplomatic approach.

The goal is to put Iran’s rulers to a fundamental choice. They can opt to have a functioning economy, free of sanctions and open to investment, at the price of permanently, verifiably and irreversibly forgoing a nuclear option and abandoning their support for terrorists. Or they can pursue their nuclear ambitions at the cost of economic ruin and possible war. But they are no longer entitled to Barack Obama’s sweetheart deal of getting sanctions lifted first, retaining their nuclear options for later, and sponsoring terrorism throughout.

Trump’s courageous decision to withdraw from the nuclear deal will clarify the stakes for Tehran. Now we’ll see whether the administration is capable of following through.

Voir également:

Trump now needs to bring Iran’s economy to its knees

President Trump’s declaration Tuesday that he would exit the 2015 Iran nuclear deal was more than just a fulfillment of a campaign promise; it was a much-needed shift in US foreign policy. The message to the world: The era of appeasement is over.

The Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action was among the worst deals negotiated in modern times. In exchange for the suspension of America’s toughest economic sanctions, Iran needed only freeze its nuclear program for a limited amount of time — keeping its nuclear capabilities on standby while perfecting its missile arsenal, increasing support to terrorism and expanding its military footprint throughout the Middle East.By withdrawing from the agreement, Trump unshackled America’s most powerful economic weapons and restored US leverage to push back on the entire range of Iran’s malign activities. Trump must now implement a new strategy that forces Iran to withdraw from Syria and Yemen, verifiably and irreversibly dismantle its nuclear and missile programs, end its sponsorship of terrorism and improve its human-rights record.

Sustained political warfare, robust military deterrence and maximum economic pressure will all be necessary. Pressure will build steadily as our re-imposed sanctions take hold.

Under the laws passed by Congress before the nuclear deal, banks throughout the world risk losing their access to the US financial system if they do business with the Central Bank of Iran or in connection with Iran’s energy, shipping, shipbuilding and port sectors. Companies providing insurance and re-insurance for Iran-connected projects face US sanctions as well, as do gold and silver dealers to Iran.

Iran will see its oil-export revenue decline as importers are forced to significantly reduce their purchases. Worse than anything for the regime, Iran’s foreign-held reserves will be on lock-down. Money paid by its oil customers must sit in foreign escrow accounts. Banks that allow Iran to repatriate, transfer or convert these payments to other currencies face the full measure of US financial sanctions.

What happens to a country that is cut off from hard currency and faces declining export revenues? In 2013, we saw the result: a balance-of-payments crisis. What happens, however, when these sanctions are imposed amid a raging liquidity crisis while the Iranian currency is in free-fall and the regime is drawing down its foreign-exchange reserves? The Trump administration is hoping for a situation that makes the mullahs choose between economic collapse and wide-ranging behavioral change.

The strategy just might work, but it’ll take a lot more than just re-imposing sanctions to succeed. Sanctions are only effective if they are enforced. The sooner the Trump administration identifies a sanctions-evading bank and cuts it off from the international financial system, the sooner a global chilling effect will amplify the impact of American sanctions. The same goes for underwriters and gold-traders.

Beyond enforcement, the Trump administration will need key allies to fully implement this pressure campaign. The Saudis, under attack by Iranian missiles from Yemen, should be a willing partner in the effort to drive down Iran’s oil exports — ensuring Saudi production increases to replace Iranian contracts and stabilize the market. Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Bahrain should also combine their market leverage to force European and Asian investors to choose between doing business in their countries or doing business in Iran.Trump will also need Europeans to act on one key issue which, given their opposition to his withdrawal from the deal, may present a diplomatic challenge. Under US law, the president may impose sanctions on secure financial messaging services — like the Brussels-based SWIFT service — if they provide access to the Central Bank of Iran or other blacklisted Iranian banks.

In 2012, when Congress first proposed the idea, the European Union ordered SWIFT to disconnect Iranian banks, which closed a major loophole in US sanctions. Now that Trump has left the deal, SWIFT must once again disconnect Iran’s central bank. If SWIFT refuses, Trump should consider imposing sanctions on the group’s board of directors.

Trump’s Iran pivot from appeasement to pressure offers America the best chance to fundamentally change Iranian behavior and improve our national security. If his administration implements the strategy effectively, the Iranian regime will have a choice: meet America’s demands or face economic collapse.

Richard Goldberg, an architect of congressionally enacted sanctions against Iran, is a senior adviser at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies.

Voir encore:

Trump annonce le retrait des Etats-Unis de l’accord nucléaire iranien

OLJ/Agences
08/05/2018

Donald Trump a annoncé mardi soir  le retrait des Etats-Unis de l’accord nucléaire iranien au risque d’ouvrir une période de vives tensions avec ses alliés européens et d’incertitudes quant aux ambitions atomiques de Téhéran.

Quinze mois après son arrivée au pouvoir, le 45e président des Etats-Unis a décidé, comme il l’avait promis en campagne, de sortir de cet accord emblématique conclu en 2015 par son prédécesseur démocrate Barack Obama après 21 mois de négociations acharnées. « J’annonce aujourd’hui que les Etats-Unis vont se retirer de l’accord nucléaire iranien », a-t-il déclaré dans une allocution télévisée depuis la Maison Blanche, annonçant le rétablissement des sanctions contre la République islamique qui avaient été levées en contrepartie de l’engagement pris par l’Iran de ne pas se doter de l’arme nucléaire. Le locataire de la Maison Blanche n’a donné aucune précision sur la nature des sanctions qui seraient rétablies et à quelle échéance mais il a mis en garde: « tout pays qui aidera l’Iran dans sa quête d’armes nucléaires pourrait aussi être fortement sanctionné par les Etats-Unis ».
Dénonçant avec force cet accord « désastreux », il a assuré avoir la « preuve » que le régime iranien avait menti sur ses activités nucléaires.

Un peu plus tard, le département du Trésor américain a précisé que les Etats-Unis allaient rétablir une large palette de sanctions concernant l’Iran à l’issue de périodes transitoires de 90 et 180 jours, qui viseront notamment le secteur pétrolier iranien ainsi que les transactions en dollar avec la banque centrale du pays. Dans un communiqué et un document publiés sur son site internet, le Trésor précise que le rétablissement des sanctions concerne également les exportations aéronautiques vers l’Iran, le commerce de métaux avec ce pays ainsi que toute tentative de Téhéran d’obtenir des dollars US.

(Lire aussi : Derrière l’accord nucléaire, l’influence de l’Iran en question)

Son allocution était très attendue au Moyen-Orient où beaucoup redoutent une escalade avec la République islamique mais aussi de l’autre côté de planète, en Corée du Nord, à l’approche du sommet entre Donald Trump et Kim Jong Un sur la dénucléarisation de la péninsule. A ce sujet, le chef de la Maison Blanche a également indiqué que le secrétaire d’Etat américain Mike Pompeo arrivera en Corée du Nord d’ici « une heure » pour préparer le sommet entre Donald Trump et Kim Jong Un. « En ce moment même, le secrétaire Pompeo est en route vers la Corée du Nord pour préparer ma future rencontre avec Kim Jong Un », a-t-il déclaré. « On en saura bientôt plus » sur le sort des trois prisonniers américains, a-t-il ajouté.

Réactions

L’Iran souhaite continuer à respecter l’accord de 2015 sur son programme nucléaire, après l’annonce de la décision de Donald Trump, a réagi le président iranien, Hassan Rohani. « Si nous atteignons les objectifs de l’accord en coopération avec les autres parties prenantes de cet accord, il restera en vigueur  (…). En sortant de l’accord, l’Amérique a officiellement sabordé son engagement concernant un traité international », a dit le président iranien dans une allocution télévisée. »J’ai donn é pour consigne au ministère des Affaires étrangères de négocier avec les pays européens, la Chine et la Russie dans les semaines à venir. Si, au bout de cette courte période, nous concluons que nous pouvons pleinement bénéficier de l’accord avec la coopération de tous les pays, l’accord restera en vigueur », a-t-il continué.
M. Rohani a ajouté que Téhéran était prêt à reprendre ses activités nucléaires si les intérêts iraniens n’étaient pas garantis par un nouvel accord après des consultations avec les autres parties signataires du « Plan d’action global conjoint » (JCPOA) de 2015.

La Syrie a également « condamné avec force » l’annonce du retrait des Etats-Unis, affirmant sa « totale solidarité » avec Téhéran et sa confiance dans la capacité de l’Iran à surmonter l’impact de la « position agressive » de Washington.

Le Premier ministre israélien Benjamin Netanyahu a, pour sa part, dit « soutenir totalement » la décision « courageuse » du président américain. « Israël soutient totalement la décision courageuse prise aujourd’hui par le président Trump de rejeter le désastreux accord nucléaire » avec la République islamique, a dit M. Netanyahu en direct sur la télévision publique dans la foulée de la déclaration de M. Trump.

L’Arabie saoudite a également salué mardi soir la décision de Donald Trump de rétablir les sanctions contre l’Iran et de dénoncer l’accord de 2015 sur le programme nucléaire de Téhéran, a fait savoir la télévision saoudienne. Les Emirats arabes unis et Bahreïn, alliés de l’Arabie saoudite dans le Golfe, ont emboîté le pas à Riyad en saluant par la voix de leur ministère des Affaires étrangères la décision de M. Trump. Bahreïn accueille la 5e flotte américaine.

La France, l’Allemagne et le Royaume-Uni « regrettent » la décision américaine de se retirer de l’accord sur le programme nucléaire iranien conclu en 2015, a, de son côté, réagi Emmanuel Macron sur Twitter, évoquant sa volonté de travailler collectivement à un « cadre plus large » sur ce dossier. « Le régime international de lutte contre la prolifération nucléaire est en jeu », a estimé le chef de l’Etat français, qui s’était entretenu au téléphone avec la chancelière allemande Angela Merkel et la Première ministre britannique Theresa May à 19h30 heure de Paris, peu avant la prise de parole de Donald Trump. « Nous travaillerons collectivement à un cadre plus large, couvrant l’activité nucléaire, la période après 2025, les missiles balistiques et la stabilité au Moyen-Orient, en particulier en Syrie, au Yémen et en Irak », a-t-il ajouté, toujours sur Twitter.

Un peu plus tard, la cheffe de la diplomatie européenne Federica Mogherini a déclaré, depuis Rome, que l’UE est « déterminée à préserver » l’accord nucléaire iranien. L’accord de Vienne de 2015 « répond à son objectif qui est de garantir que l’Iran ne développe pas des armes nucléaires, l’Union européenne est déterminée à le préserver », a insisté Mme Mogherini, lors d’une brève déclaration à la représentation de la Commission européenne à Rome, en se disant « particulièrement inquiète » de l’annonce de nouvelles sanctions américaines contre Téhéran..

Le secrétaire général de l’ONU, Antonio Guterres, a, quant à lui, appelé les six autres signataires de l’accord sur le nucléaire iranien « à respecter pleinement leurs engagements », après le retrait des Etats-Unis. « Je suis profondément préoccupé par l’annonce du retrait des Etats-Unis de l’accord JCPOA (en référence à l’acronyme en anglais ndlr) et de la reprise de sanctions américaines », a aussi souligné le patron des Nations unies dans un communiqué.

Le porte-parole de la présidence turque Ibrahim Kalin a, de son côté, estimé que « le retrait unilatéral des Etats-Unis de l’accord sur le nucléaire est une décision qui va causer de l’instabilité et de nouveaux conflits ». « La Turquie va continuer de s’opposer avec détermination à tous types d’armes nucléaires », a ajouté le porte-parole de Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

Le ministère russe des Affaires étrangères a, pour sa part, déclaré que la Russie est « profondément déçue » par la décision du président américain.
« Nous sommes extrêmement inquiets que les Etats-Unis agissent contre l’avis de la plupart des Etats (…) en violant grossièrement les normes du droit international », selon le texte.  Selon Moscou, cette décision de Donald Trump « est une nouvelle preuve de l’incapacité de Washington de négocier » et les « griefs américains concernant l’activité nucléaire légitime de l’Iran ne servent qu’à régler les comptes politiques » avec Téhéran.

Quelles répercussions?

A l’exception des Etats-Unis, tous les signataires ont défendu jusqu’au bout ce compromis qu’ils jugent « historique », soulignant que l’Agence internationale de l’énergie atomique (AIEA) a régulièrement certifié le respect par Téhéran des termes du texte censé garantir le caractère non militaire de son programme nucléaire. En contrepartie des engagements pris par Téhéran, Washington a suspendu ses sanctions liées au programme nucléaire iranien. Mais la loi américaine impose au président de se prononcer sur le renouvellement de cette suspension tous les 120 ou 180 jours, selon le type de mesures punitives. Certaines suspensions arrivent à échéance samedi, mais le gros d’entre elles restent en théorie en vigueur jusqu’à mi-juillet.

Dès mardi soir, le nouvel ambassadeur américain en Allemagne a écrit, sur Twitter, que les entreprises allemandes devraient immédiatement cesser leurs activités en Iran. Le président américain Donald Trump « a dit que les sanctions allaient viser des secteurs critiques de l’économie de l’Iran. Les entreprises allemandes faisant des affaires en Iran devraient cesser leurs opérations immédiatement », a commenté Richard Grenell qui a pris ses fonctions hier.

Airbus a, de son côté, annoncé qu’il allait examiner la décision prise par Donald Trump avant de réagir. « Nous analysons attentivement cette annonce et évaluerons les prochaines étapes en cohérence avec nos politiques internes et dans le respect complet des sanctions et des règles de contrôle des exportations », a dit le responsable de la communication d’Airbus, Rainer Ohler. « Cela prendra du temps », a-t-il ajouté. Un peu plus tard, le secrétaire américain au Trésor, Steve Mnuchin, annonçait que les Etats-Unis allaient retirer à Airbus et à Boeing les autorisations de vendre des avions de ligne à l’Iran.

En janvier, l’ancien magnat de l’immobilier avait lancé un ultimatum aux Européens, leur donnant jusqu’au 12 mai pour « durcir » sur plusieurs points ce texte signé par Téhéran et les grandes puissances (Etats-Unis, Chine, Russie, France, Royaume-Uni, Allemagne). En ligne de mire: les inspections de l’AIEA; la levée progressive, à partir de 2025, de certaines restrictions aux activités nucléaires iraniennes, qui en font selon lui une sorte de bombe à retardement; mais aussi le fait qu’il ne s’attaque pas directement au programme de missiles balistiques de Téhéran ni à son rôle jugé « déstabilisateur » dans plusieurs pays du Moyen-Orient (Syrie, Yémen, Liban…).

L’annonce de mardi va avoir des répercussions encore difficiles à prédire. Les Européens ont fait savoir qu’ils comptent rester dans l’accord quoi qu’il advienne. Mais que vont faire les Iraniens?
Pour l’instant, Téhéran, où cohabitent des ultraconservateurs autour du guide suprême Ali Khamenei et des dirigeants plus modérés autour du président Hassan Rohani, ont soufflé le chaud et le froid.
La République islamique a menacé de quitter à son tour l’accord de 2015, de relancer et accélérer le programme nucléaire, mais a aussi laissé entendre qu’elle pourrait y rester si les Européens pallient l’absence américaine.

Voir de plus:

Accord sur le nucléaire iranien : 10 conséquences de la (folle) décision de Trump

Le monde a basculé le 8 mai 2018, avec la sortie des Etats-Unis de l’accord sur le nucléaire iranien. Voici ce qui risque de se passer maintenant.

Vincent Jauvert

Le monde a basculé ce 8 mai 2018.

Rien n’y a fait. Ni les câlins d’Emmanuel Macron. Ni les menaces du président iranien. Ni les assurances des patrons de la CIA et de l’AIEA. Donald Trump a tranché : sous le prétexte non prouvé que l’Iran ne le respecte pas, il retire les Etats-Unis de l’accord nucléaire signé le 14 juillet 2015. Une folle décision aux conséquences considérables.

  1. Après la dénonciation de celui de Paris sur le climat, voici l’abandon unilatéral d’un autre accord qui a été négocié par les grandes puissances pendant plus de dix ans. L’Amérique devient donc, à l’évidence, un « rogue state » – un Etat voyou qui ne respecte pas ses engagements internationaux et ment une fois encore ouvertement au monde. L’invasion de l’Irak n’était donc pas une exception malheureuse : Washington n’incarne plus l’ordre international mais le désordre.
  2. Si l’on en doutait encore, le monde dit libre n’a plus de leader crédible ni même de grand frère. Ce qui va troubler un peu plus encore les opinions publiques et les classes dirigeantes occidentales.
  3. Puisque l’Iran en est l’un des plus gros producteurs et qu’il va être empêché d’en vendre, le prix du pétrole, déjà à 70 dollars le baril, va probablement exploser, ce qui risque de ralentir voire de stopper la croissance mondiale – et donc celle de la France.
  4. D’ailleurs, de tous les pays occidentaux, la France est celui qui a le plus à perdre d’un retour des sanctions américaines – directes et indirectes. L’Iran a, en effet, passé commandes de 100 Airbus pour 19 milliards de dollars et a signé un gigantesque contrat avec Total pour l’exploitation du champ South Pars 11. Or Trump a choisi la version la plus dure : interdire de nouveau à toute compagnie traitant avec Téhéran de faire du business aux Etats-Unis. Pour continuer à commercer sur le marché américain, Airbus et Total devront donc renoncer à ces deals juteux.
  5. En Iran, le président « réformateur » Rohani, qui avait défendu bec et ongles l’accord en promettant des retombées économiques mirifiques pour son pays et accepté, par cet accord, que son pays démonte les deux tiers de ses centrifugeuses et se sépare de 98% de son uranium enrichi, est humilié. Tandis que le clan des « durs » pavoise.
  6. L’accord dénoncé, l’Iran va donc probablement relancer au plus vite son programme nucléaire militaire en commençant par réassembler les centrifugeuses et les faire tourner dans un bunker enterré très profondément.
  7. Ce qui devrait être le déclencheur d’une course folle à l’armement atomique dans tout le Moyen-Orient. L’Arabie saoudite, grâce au Pakistan, et la Turquie, grâce à son développement économique, ne voudront pas être dépassées par l’Iran et voudront, donc, devenir elles aussi des puissances nucléaires. Si bien qu’Emmanuel Macron a eu raison d’évoquer « un risque de guerre » (dans le « Spiegel » samedi dernier) si les Etats-Unis se retiraient de l’accord. De fait, le risque est grand que cette dénonciation unilatérale, alliée à un retour en force des « conservateurs » à Téhéran, ne précipite un affrontement militaire de grande envergure entre Israël et l’Iran – affrontement qui a déjà commencé à bas bruit, ces dernières semaines, par les frappes de Tsahal contre des bases du Hezbollah en Syrie.
  8. La milice chiite pro-iranienne qui vient de remporter les élections législatives au Liban pourrait profiter de cette victoire électorale inattendue et du retrait unilatéral américain – gros de menaces militaires – pour attaquer le nord d’Israël.
  9. Et, ainsi soutenu politiquement par le président américain, le gouvernement israélien pourrait décider de frapper ce qui reste des installations nucléaires iraniennes, ainsi qu’il l’avait sérieusement envisagé plusieurs fois avant l’accord de 2015. Autrement dit, la seule question est peut-être désormais de savoir lequel des deux pays, l’Iran ou Israël, va lancer la vaste offensive en premier. A moins que les Etats-Unis ne décident de frapper eux-mêmes « préventivement » la République islamique, avec les conséquences géopolitiques que l’on n’ose imaginer. Vous croyez cela impossible ? N’oubliez pas que Donald Trump vient de se choisir un nouveau conseiller à la sécurité. Il s’agit d’un certain John Bolton, un néoconservateur qui milite depuis le 11-Septembre pour que les Etats-Unis renversent le « régime des mollahs »…
  10. Evidemment, cette décision de Trump éloigne un peu plus encore l’espoir d’un règlement politique du conflit syrien. Et augmente les risques sur le terrain d’affrontements militaires entre milices iraniennes et soldats occidentaux – dont les forces spéciales françaises.

     Voir enfin:

    Remarks by President Trump on the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action

    My fellow Americans: Today, I want to update the world on our efforts to prevent Iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon.

    The Iranian regime is the leading state sponsor of terror. It exports dangerous missiles, fuels conflicts across the Middle East, and supports terrorist proxies and militias such as Hezbollah, Hamas, the Taliban, and al Qaeda.

    Over the years, Iran and its proxies have bombed American embassies and military installations, murdered hundreds of American servicemembers, and kidnapped, imprisoned, and tortured American citizens. The Iranian regime has funded its long reign of chaos and terror by plundering the wealth of its own people.

    No action taken by the regime has been more dangerous than its pursuit of nuclear weapons and the means of delivering them.

    In 2015, the previous administration joined with other nations in a deal regarding Iran’s nuclear program. This agreement was known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA.

    In theory, the so-called “Iran deal” was supposed to protect the United States and our allies from the lunacy of an Iranian nuclear bomb, a weapon that will only endanger the survival of the Iranian regime. In fact, the deal allowed Iran to continue enriching uranium and, over time, reach the brink of a nuclear breakout.

    The deal lifted crippling economic sanctions on Iran in exchange for very weak limits on the regime’s nuclear activity, and no limits at all on its other malign behavior, including its sinister activities in Syria, Yemen, and other places all around the world.

    In other words, at the point when the United States had maximum leverage, this disastrous deal gave this regime — and it’s a regime of great terror — many billions of dollars, some of it in actual cash — a great embarrassment to me as a citizen and to all citizens of the United States.

    A constructive deal could easily have been struck at the time, but it wasn’t. At the heart of the Iran deal was a giant fiction that a murderous regime desired only a peaceful nuclear energy program.

    Today, we have definitive proof that this Iranian promise was a lie. Last week, Israel published intelligence documents long concealed by Iran, conclusively showing the Iranian regime and its history of pursuing nuclear weapons.

    The fact is this was a horrible, one-sided deal that should have never, ever been made. It didn’t bring calm, it didn’t bring peace, and it never will.

    In the years since the deal was reached, Iran’s military budget has grown by almost 40 percent, while its economy is doing very badly. After the sanctions were lifted, the dictatorship used its new funds to build nuclear-capable missiles, support terrorism, and cause havoc throughout the Middle East and beyond.

    The agreement was so poorly negotiated that even if Iran fully complies, the regime can still be on the verge of a nuclear breakout in just a short period of time. The deal’s sunset provisions are totally unacceptable. If I allowed this deal to stand, there would soon be a nuclear arms race in the Middle East. Everyone would want their weapons ready by the time Iran had theirs.

    Making matters worse, the deal’s inspection provisions lack adequate mechanisms to prevent, detect, and punish cheating, and don’t even have the unqualified right to inspect many important locations, including military facilities.

    Not only does the deal fail to halt Iran’s nuclear ambitions, but it also fails to address the regime’s development of ballistic missiles that could deliver nuclear warheads.

    Finally, the deal does nothing to constrain Iran’s destabilizing activities, including its support for terrorism. Since the agreement, Iran’s bloody ambitions have grown only more brazen.

    In light of these glaring flaws, I announced last October that the Iran deal must either be renegotiated or terminated.

    Three months later, on January 12th, I repeated these conditions. I made clear that if the deal could not be fixed, the United States would no longer be a party to the agreement.

    Over the past few months, we have engaged extensively with our allies and partners around the world, including France, Germany, and the United Kingdom. We have also consulted with our friends from across the Middle East. We are unified in our understanding of the threat and in our conviction that Iran must never acquire a nuclear weapon.

    After these consultations, it is clear to me that we cannot prevent an Iranian nuclear bomb under the decaying and rotten structure of the current agreement.

    The Iran deal is defective at its core. If we do nothing, we know exactly what will happen. In just a short period of time, the world’s leading state sponsor of terror will be on the cusp of acquiring the world’s most dangerous weapons.

    Therefore, I am announcing today that the United States will withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal.

    In a few moments, I will sign a presidential memorandum to begin reinstating U.S. nuclear sanctions on the Iranian regime. We will be instituting the highest level of economic sanction. Any nation that helps Iran in its quest for nuclear weapons could also be strongly sanctioned by the United States.

    America will not be held hostage to nuclear blackmail. We will not allow American cities to be threatened with destruction. And we will not allow a regime that chants “Death to America” to gain access to the most deadly weapons on Earth.

    Today’s action sends a critical message: The United States no longer makes empty threats. When I make promises, I keep them. In fact, at this very moment, Secretary Pompeo is on his way to North Korea in preparation for my upcoming meeting with Kim Jong-un. Plans are being made. Relationships are building. Hopefully, a deal will happen and, with the help of China, South Korea, and Japan, a future of great prosperity and security can be achieved for everyone.

    As we exit the Iran deal, we will be working with our allies to find a real, comprehensive, and lasting solution to the Iranian nuclear threat. This will include efforts to eliminate the threat of Iran’s ballistic missile program; to stop its terrorist activities worldwide; and to block its menacing activity across the Middle East. In the meantime, powerful sanctions will go into full effect. If the regime continues its nuclear aspirations, it will have bigger problems than it has ever had before.

    Finally, I want to deliver a message to the long-suffering people of Iran: The people of America stand with you. It has now been almost 40 years since this dictatorship seized power and took a proud nation hostage. Most of Iran’s 80 million citizens have sadly never known an Iran that prospered in peace with its neighbors and commanded the admiration of the world.

    But the future of Iran belongs to its people. They are the rightful heirs to a rich culture and an ancient land. And they deserve a nation that does justice to their dreams, honor to their history, and glory to God.

    Iran’s leaders will naturally say that they refuse to negotiate a new deal; they refuse. And that’s fine. I’d probably say the same thing if I was in their position. But the fact is they are going to want to make a new and lasting deal, one that benefits all of Iran and the Iranian people. When they do, I am ready, willing, and able.

    Great things can happen for Iran, and great things can happen for the peace and stability that we all want in the Middle East.

    There has been enough suffering, death, and destruction. Let it end now.

    Thank you. God bless you. Thank you.


Cinéma: Pallywood tous les jours sur un écran chez vous (It’s just standard evacuation practice, stupid ! – complete with shouts of pain and Allahu akbar)

7 avril, 2018

 

Abattre un Européen, c’est faire d’une pierre deux coups, supprimer en même temps un oppresseur et un opprimé ; restent un homme mort et un homme libre. Sartre (préface des « Damnés de la terre » de Franz Fanon, 1961)
L’action de Septembre Noir a fait éclater la mascarade olympique, a bouleversé les arrangements à l’amiable que les réactionnaires arabes s’apprêtaient à conclure avec Israël […] Aucun révolutionnaire ne peut se désolidariser de Septembre Noir. Nous devons défendre inconditionnellement face à la répression les militants de cette organisation […] A Munich, la fin si tragique, selon les philistins de tous poils qui ne disent mot de l’assassinat des militants palestiniens, a été voulue et provoquée par les puissances impérialistes et particulièrement Israël. Il fut froidement décidé d’aller au carnage. Edwy Plenel (alias Joseph Krasny)
Je n’ai jamais fait mystère de mes contributions à Rouge, de 1970 à 1978, sous le pseudonyme de Joseph Krasny. Ce texte, écrit il y a plus de 45 ans, dans un contexte tout autre et alors que j’avais 20 ans, exprime une position que je récuse fermement aujourd’hui. Elle n’avait rien d’exceptionnel dans l’extrême gauche de l’époque, comme en témoigne un article de Jean-Paul Sartre, le fondateur de Libération, sur Munich dans La Cause du peuple–J’accuse du 15 octobre 1972. Tout comme ce philosophe, j’ai toujours dénoncé et combattu l’antisémitisme d’où qu’il vienne et sans hésitation. Mais je refuse l’intimidation qui consiste à taxer d’antisémite toute critique de la politique de l’Etat d’Israël. Edwy Plenel
Pendant 24 mn à peu près on ne voit que de la mise en scène … C’est un envers du décor qu’on ne montre jamais … Mais oui tu sais bien que c’est toujours comme ça ! Entretien Jeambar-Leconte (RCJ)
Au début (…) l’AP accueillait les reporters à bras ouverts. Ils voulaient que nous montrions des enfants de 12 ans se faisant tuer. Mais après le lynchage, quand des agents de l’AP firent leur possible pour détruire et confisquer l’enregistrement de ce macabre événement et que les Forces de Défense Israéliennes utilisèrent les images pour repérer et arrêter les auteurs du crime, les Palestiniens donnèrent libre cours à leur hostilité envers les Etats-Unis en harcelant et en intimidant les correspondants occidentaux. Après Ramallah, où toute bonne volonté prit fin, je suis beaucoup plus prudent dans mes déplacements. Chris Roberts (Sky TV)
La tâche sacrée des journalistes musulmans est, d’une part, de protéger la Umma des “dangers imminents”, et donc, à cette fin, de “censurer tous les matériaux” et, d’autre part, “de combattre le sionisme et sa politique colonialiste de création d’implantations, ainsi que son anéantissement impitoyable du peuple palestinien”. Charte des médias islamiques de grande diffusion (Jakarta, 1980)
Il s’agit de formes d’expression artistique, mais tout cela sert à exprimer la vérité… Nous n’oublions jamais nos principes journalistiques les plus élevés auxquels nous nous sommes engagés, de dire la vérité et rien que la vérité. Haut responsable de la Télévision de l’Autorité palestinienne
Je suis venu au journalisme afin de poursuivre la lutte en faveur de mon peuple. Talal Abu Rahma (lors de la réception d’un prix, au Maroc, en 2001, pour sa vidéo sur al-Dura)
Karsenty est donc si choqué que des images truquées soient utilisées et éditées à Gaza ? Mais cela a lieu partout à la télévision, et aucun journaliste de télévision de terrain, aucun monteur de film, ne seraient choqués. Clément Weill-Raynal (France 3)
Nous avons toujours respecté (et continuerons à respecter) les procédures journalistiques de l’Autorité palestinienne en matière d’exercice de la profession de journaliste en Palestine… Roberto Cristiano (représentant de la “chaîne de télévision officielle RAI, Lettre à l’Autorité palestinienne)
La mort de Mohammed annule, efface celle de l’enfant juif, les mains en l’air devant les SS, dans le Ghetto de Varsovie. Catherine Nay (Europe 1)
Dans la guerre moderne, une image vaut mille armes. Bob Simon
Oh, ils font toujours ça. C’est une question de culture. Représentants de France 2 (cités par Enderlin)
L’image correspondait à la réalité de la situation, non seulement à Gaza, mais en Cisjordanie. Charles Enderlin (Le Figaro, 27/01/05)
J’ai travaillé au Liban depuis que tout a commencé, et voir le comportement de beaucoup de photographes libanais travaillant pour les agences de presse m’a un peu troublé. Coupable ou pas, Adnan Hajj a été remarqué pour ses retouches d’images par ordinateur. Mais, pour ma part, j’ai été le témoin de pratique quotidienne de clichés posés, et même d’un cas où un groupe de photographes d’agences orchestraient le dégagement des cadavres, donnant des directives aux secouristes, leur demandant de disposer les corps dans certaines positions, et même de ressortir des corps déjà inhumés pour les photographier dans les bras de personnes alentour. Ces photographes ont fait moisson d’images chocs, sans manipulation informatique, mais au prix de manipulations humaines qui posent en elles-mêmes un problème éthique bien plus grave. Quelle que soit la cause de ces excès, inexpérience, désir de montrer de la façon la plus spectaculaire le drame vécu par votre pays, ou concurrence effrénée, je pense que la faute incombe aux agences de presse elles-mêmes, car ce sont elles qui emploient ces photographes. Il faut mettre en place des règles, faute de quoi toute la profession finira par en pâtir. Je ne dis pas cela contre les photographes locaux, mais après avoir vu ça se répéter sans arrêt depuis un mois, je pense qu’il faut s’attaquer au problème. Quand je m’écarte d’une scène de ce genre, un autre preneur de vue dresse le décor, et tous les autres suivent… Brian X (Journaliste occidental anonyme)
Pour qui nous prenez-vous ? Nous savons qui vous êtes, nous lisons tout ce que vous écrivez et nous savons où vous habitez. Hussein (attaché de presse du Hezbollah au journaliste Michael Totten)
L’attaque a été menée en riposte aux tirs incessants de ces derniers jours sur des localités israéliennes à partir de la zone visée. Les habitants de tous les villages alentour, y compris Cana, ont été avertis de se tenir à l’écart des sites de lancement de roquettes contre Israël. Tsahal est intervenue cette nuit contre des objectifs terroristes dans le village de Cana. Ce village est utilisé depuis le début de ce conflit comme base arrière d’où ont été lancées en direction d’Israël environ 150 roquettes, en 30 salves, dont certaines ont atteint Haïfa et des sites dans le nord, a déclaré aujourd’hui le général de division Gadi Eizenkot, chef des opérations. Tsahal regrette tous les dommages subis par les civils innocents, même s’ils résultent directement de l’utilisation criminelle des civils libanais comme boucliers humains par l’organisation terroriste Hezbollah. (…) Le Hezbollah place les civils libanais comme bouclier entre eux et nous, alors que Tsahal se place comme bouclier entre les habitants d’Israël et les terroristes du Hezbollah. C’est la principale différence entre eux et nous. Rapport de l’Armée israélienne
Après trois semaines de travail intense, avec l’assistance active et la coopération de la communauté Internet, souvent appelée “blogosphère”, nous pensons avoir maintenant assez de preuves pour assurer avec certitude que beaucoup des faits rapportés en images par les médias sont en fait des mises en scène. Nous pensons même pouvoir aller plus loin. À notre avis, l’essentiel de l’activité des secours à Khuraybah [le vrai nom de l’endroit, alors que les médias, en accord avec le Hezbollah, ont utilisé le nom de Cana, pour sa connotation biblique et l’écho du drame de 1996] le 30 juillet a été détourné en exercice de propagande. Le site est devenu en fait un vaste plateau de tournage, où les gestes macabres ont été répétés avec la complaisance des médias, qui ont participé activement et largement utilisé le matériau récolté. La tactique des médias est prévisible et tristement habituelle. Au lieu de discuter le fond de nos arguments, ils se focalisent sur des détails, y relevant des inexactitudes et des fausses pistes, et affirment que ces erreurs vident notre dossier de toute valeur. D’autres nous étiquètent comme de droite, pro-israéliens ou parlent simplement de théories du complot, comme si cela pouvait suffire à éliminer les éléments concrets que nous avons rassemblés. Richard North (EU Referendum)
Lorsque les médias se prêtent au jeu des manipulations plutôt que de les dénoncer, non seulement ils sacrifient les Libanais innocents qui ne veulent pas que cette mafia religieuse prenne le pouvoir et les utilise comme boucliers, mais ils nuisent aussi à la société civile de par le monde. D’un côté ils nous dissimulent les actes et les motivations d’organisations comme le Hamas ou le Hezbollah, ce qui permet aux musulmans ennemis de la démocratie, en Occident, de nous (leurs alliés progressistes présumés) inviter à manifester avec eux sous des banderoles à la gloire du Hezbollah. De l’autre, ils encouragent les haines et les sentiments revanchards qui nourrissent l’appel au Jihad mondial. La température est montée de cinq degrés sur l’échelle du Jihad mondial quand les musulmans du monde entier ont vu avec horreur et indignation le spectacle de ces enfants morts que des médias avides et mal inspirés ont transmis et exploité. Richard Landes
Nous avons commis une terrible erreur, un texte malencontreux sur l’une de nos photos du jour du 18 avril dernier (à gauche), mal traduit de la légende, tout ce qu’il y a de plus circonstanciée, elle, que nous avait fournie l’AFP*: sur la « reconstitution », dans un camp de réfugiés au Liban, de l’arrestation par de faux militaires israéliens d’un Palestinien, nous avons omis d’indiquer qu’il s’agissait d’une mise en scène, que ces « soldats » jouaient un rôle et que tout ça relevait de la pure et simple propagande. C’est une faute – qu’atténuent à peine la précipitation et la mauvaise relecture qui l’ont provoquée. C’en serait une dans tous les cas, ça l’est plus encore dans celui-là: laisser planer la moindre ambiguïté sur un sujet aussi sensible, quand on sait que les images peuvent être utilisées comme des armes de guerre, donner du crédit à un stratagème aussi grossier, qui peut contribuer à alimenter l’exaspération antisioniste là où elle s’enflamme sans besoin de combustible, n’appelle aucun excuse. Nous avons déconné, gravement. J’ai déconné, gravement: je suis responsable du site de L’Express, et donc du dérapage. A ce titre, je fais amende honorable, la queue basse, auprès des internautes qui ont été abusés, de tous ceux que cette supercherie a pu blesser et de l’AFP, qui n’est EN AUCUN CAS comptable de nos propres bêtises. Eric Mettout (L’Express)
Comment expliquer qu’une légende en anglais qui dit clairement qu’il s’agit d’une mise en scène (la légende, en anglais, de la photo fournie par l’AFP: « LEBANON, AIN EL-HELWEH: Palestinian refugees pose as Israeli soldiers arresting and beating a Palestinian activist during celebrations of Prisoners’ Day at the refugee camp of Ain el-Helweh near the coastal Lebanese city of Sidon on April 17, 2012 in solidarity with the 4,700 Palestinian inmates of Israeli jails. Some 1,200 Palestinian prisoners held in Israeli jails have begun a hunger strike and another 2,300 are refusing food for one day, a spokeswoman for the Israel Prisons Service (IPS) said. »), soit devenue chez vous « Prisonnier palestinien 18/04/2012. Mardi, lors de la Journée des prisonniers, des centaines de détenus palestiniens ont entamé une grève de la faim pour protester contre leurs conditions de détention », étonnant non ? David Goldstein
Que ce soient des attaques au couteau, des opérations de martyrs (c’est à dire des attentats-suicides à la bombe), des jets de pierres, tout le monde doit agir pour que nous puissions ainsi nous unir et permettre de faire passer notre message comme il convient, et atteindre l’objectif qui est la libération de la Palestine, si Allah le veut. Ahed Tamimi
Nous le soutenons tous et sommes fiers de lui. Ahed Tamimi (parlant du chef du Hezbollah, Hassan Nasrallah, qui partage avec elle l’objectif de détruire Israël)
Le monde doit reconnaître la cause palestinienne. L’occupation n’est pas seulement le vol de terres. Nous nous opposons au racisme, au sionisme, à tout le système d’occupation et pas seulement aux colonies. Ahed Tamimi
Israël est une grande colonie. Bassem Tamimi
On Friday, the Palestinian terror group Hamas, which controls the Gaza Strip, is inaugurating what it is calling “The March of Return.” According to Hamas’s leadership, the “March of Return” is scheduled to run from March 30 – the eve of Passover — through May 15, the 70th anniversary of Israel’s establishment. According to Israeli media reports, Hamas has budgeted $10 million for the operation. Throughout the “March of Return,” Hamas intends to send thousands of civilians to the Israeli border. Hamas is planning to set up tent camps along the border fence and then, presumably, order participants to overrun it on May 15. The Palestinians refer to May 15 as “Nakba,” or Catastrophe Day. (…) what is it trying to accomplish by sending them into harm’s way? Why is the terror group telling Gaza residents to place themselves in front of the border fence and challenge Israeli security forces charged with defending Israel? The answer here is also obvious. Hamas intends to provoke Israel to shoot at the Palestinian civilians it is sending to the border. It is setting its people up to die because it expects their deaths to be captured live by the cameras of the Western media, which will be on hand to watch the spectacle. In other words, Hamas’s strategy of harming Israel by forcing its soldiers to kill Palestinians is predicated on its certainty that the Western media will act as its partner and ensure the success of its lethal propaganda stunt. Given widespread assessments that Iran is keen to start a new round of war between Israel and its terror proxies, Hamas in Gaza and Hezbollah in Lebanon, it is possible that Hamas intends for this lethal propaganda stunt to be the initial stage of a larger war. By this assessment, Hamas is using the border operation to cultivate and escalate Western hostility against Israel ahead of a larger shooting war. (…) The real issue revealed by Hamas’s planned operation — as it was revealed by the Mavi Marmara, as well as by Hamas’s military campaigns against Israel in 2014, 2011 and 2008-09 —  is not how Israel will deal with it. The real issue is that Hamas’s entire strategy is predicated on its faith that the Western media and indeed the Western left will side with it against Israel. Hamas is certain that both the media and leftist activists and politicians in Europe and the U.S. will blame Israel for Palestinian civilian casualties. And as past experience proves, Hamas is right to believe the media and leftist activists will play their assigned role. So long as the media and the left rush to indict Israel for its efforts to defend itself and its citizens against its terrorist foes, who turn the laws of war on their head as a matter of course, these attacks will continue and they will escalate. If this border assault does in fact serve as the opening act in a larger terror war against Israel, then a large portion of the blame for the bloodshed will rest on the shoulders of the Western media for empowering the terrorists of Hamas and Hezbollah to attack Israel. Caroline Glick
Je pense que les Palestiniens et les Israéliens ont droit à leur propre terre. Mais nous devons obtenir un accord de paix pour garantir la stabilité de chacun et entretenir des relations normales. Prince héritier Mohammed ben Salmane
A set of photos, below, has been spreading all over social media in the past week. Sometimes, the photos are reposted individually. However, they all send the same message: Israel is supposedly deceiving the world into thinking their soldiers are getting wounded in Gaza by using special effects makeup. Closer analysis of these photos, however, shows that none of them are recent, most were not even taken in Israel, and all of them are taken out of context. France 24
The video turned out to be from an art workshop which creates this health exercise annually in Gaza. The goal of the workshop is to recreate child injuries sustained in warzones so that doctors can get familiar with them and learn how to care for injured children, the owner of the workshop, Abd al-Baset al-Loulou said. Al Arabya
Dix-huit morts et au moins 1 400 blessés. La « grande marche du retour », appelée vendredi par la société civile palestinienne et encadrée par le Hamas, le long de la barrière frontalière séparant la bande de Gaza et Israël, a dégénéré lorsque l’armée israélienne a tiré à balles réelles sur des manifestants qui s’approchaient du point de passage. (…) Famille, enfants, musique, fête, puis débordements habituels de jeunes lançant des cailloux à l’armée. Lorsque les émeutiers sont arrivés à quelques centaines de mètres de la fameuse grille, les snipers israéliens sont entrés en action. L’un des garçons, « armé » d’un pneu, a été abattu d’une balle dans la nuque alors qu’il s’enfuyait. (…) Ce mouvement, qui exige le « droit au retour » et la fin du blocus de Gaza, doit encore durer six semaines. C’est long. Le gouvernement israélien compte peut-être sur l’usure des protestataires, la fatigue, le renoncement, persuadé que quelques balles en plus pourraient faire la différence. A-t-il la mémoire courte ? Selon la Torah, Moïse avait 80 ans lorsqu’a commencé la traversée du désert. Ces quarante années d’errance douloureuse sont au coeur de tous les Juifs. Espérer qu’après soixante-dix ans d’exil les Palestiniens oublient leur histoire à coups de fusil est aussi absurde que ne pas faire la différence entre une balle de 5,56 et une pierre calcaire … Le Canard enchainé (Balles perdues, 04.04.2018)
Pro-Israel organization StandWithUs has resorted to claiming Palestinians are faking injuries to garner international sympathy and supported their claims by posting videos showing « Palestinians practicing for the cameras. » The Palestinians in the video were actually practicing how to evacuate the wounded during the protest… Telesur
On the living-room wall was a “Free Bassem Tamimi” poster, left over from his last imprisonment for helping to organize the village’s weekly protests against the Israeli occupation, which he has done since 2009. He was gone for 13 months that time, then home for 5 before he was arrested again in October. (…) It took the people of Nabi Saleh more than a year to get themselves organized. In December 2009 they held their first march, protesting not just the loss of the spring but also the entire complex system of control — of permits, checkpoints, walls, prisons — through which Israel maintains its hold on the region. Nabi Saleh quickly became the most spirited of the dozen or so West Bank villages that hold weekly demonstrations against the Israeli occupation. Since the demonstrations began, more than 100 people in the village have been jailed. Nariman told me that by her count, as of February, clashes with the army have caused 432 injuries, more than half to minors. The momentum has been hard to maintain — the weeks go by, and nothing changes for the better — but still, despite the arrests, the injuries and the deaths, every Friday after the midday prayer, the villagers, joined at times by equal numbers of journalists and Israeli and foreign activists, try to march from the center of town to the spring, a distance of perhaps half a mile. And every Friday, Israeli soldiers stop them with some combination of tear gas, rubber-coated bullets, water-cannon blasts of a noxious liquid known as “skunk” and occasionally live fire. (…) In March 2011, Israeli soldiers raided the house to arrest him. Among lesser charges, he had been accused in a military court of “incitement,” organizing “unauthorized processions” and soliciting the village youth to throw stones. (In 2010, 99.74 percent of the Palestinians tried in military courts were convicted.) The terms of Bassem’s release forbade him to take part in demonstrations, which are all effectively illegal under Israeli military law, so on the first Friday after I arrived, just after the midday call to prayer, he walked with me only as far as the square, where about 50 villagers had gathered in the shade of an old mulberry tree. They were joined by a handful of Palestinian activists from Ramallah and East Jerusalem, mainly young women; perhaps a dozen college-age European and American activists; a half-dozen Israelis, also mainly women — young anarchists in black boots and jeans, variously pierced. Together they headed down the road, clapping and chanting in Arabic and English. Bassem’s son Abu Yazan, licking a Popsicle, marched at the back of the crowd. Then there were the journalists, scurrying up hillsides in search of better vantage points. In the early days of the protests, the village teemed with reporters from across the globe, there to document the tiny village’s struggle against the occupation. “Sometimes they come and sometimes they don’t,” Mohammad Tamimi, who is 24 and coordinates the village’s social-media campaign, would tell me later. Events in the Middle East — the revolution in Egypt and civil war in Syria — and the unchanging routine of the weekly marches have made it that much harder to hold the world’s attention. That Friday there was just one Palestinian television crew and a few Israeli and European photographers, the regulars among them in steel helmets. In the protests’ first year, to make sure that the demonstrations — and the fate of Palestinians living under Israeli occupation — didn’t remain hidden behind the walls and fences that surround the West Bank, Mohammad began posting news to a blog and later a Facebook page (now approaching 4,000 followers) under the name Tamimi Press. Soon Tamimi Press morphed into a homegrown media team: Bilal Tamimi shooting video and uploading protest highlights to his YouTube channel; Helme taking photographs; and Mohammad e-mailing news releases to 500-odd reporters and activists. Manal, who is married to Bilal, supplements the effort with a steady outpouring of tweets (@screamingtamimi). News of the protests moves swiftly around the globe, bouncing among blogs on the left and right. Left-leaning papers like Britain’s Guardian and Israel’s Haaretz still cover major events in the village — deaths and funerals, Bassem’s arrests and releases — but a right-wing Israeli news site has for the last year begun to recycle the same headline week after week: “Arabs, Leftists Riot in Nabi Saleh.” Meanwhile, a pilgrimage to Nabi Saleh has achieved a measure of cachet among young European activists, the way a stint with the Zapatistas did in Mexico in the 1990s. For a time, Nariman regularly prepared a vegan feast for the exhausted outsiders who lingered after the protests. (Among the first things she asked me when I arrived was whether I was a vegan. Her face brightened when I said no.) Whatever success they have had in the press, the people of Nabi Saleh are intensely conscious of everything they have not achieved. The occupation, of course, persists. When I arrived in June, the demonstrators had not once made it to the spring. Usually they didn’t get much past the main road, where they would turn and find the soldiers waiting around the bend. That week though, they decided to cut straight down the hillside toward the spring. Bashir led the procession, waving a flag. As usual, Israeli Army jeeps were waiting below the spring. The four soldiers standing outside them looked confused — it seemed they hadn’t expected the protesters to make it so far. The villagers marched past them to the spring, where they surprised three settlers eating lunch in the shade, still wet from a dip in one of the pools. One wore only soggy briefs and a rifle slung over his chest. (…) Bassem is employed by the Palestinian Authority’s Interior Ministry in a department charged with approving entrance visas for Palestinians living abroad. In practice, he said, P.A. officials “have no authority” — the real decisions are made in Israel and passed to the P.A. for rubber-stamping. Among other things, this meant that Bassem rarely had to report to his office in Ramallah, leaving his days free to care for his ailing mother — she died several weeks after I left the village last summer — and strategizing on the phone, meeting international visitors and talking to me over many cups of strong, unsweetened coffee. We would talk in the living room, over the hum of an Al Jazeera newscast. A framed image of Jerusalem’s Al Aqsa Mosque hung above the television (more out of nationalist pride than piety: Bassem’s outlook was thoroughly secular). Though many people in Nabi Saleh have been jailed, only Bassem was declared a “prisoner of conscience” by Amnesty International. Foreign diplomats attended his court hearings in 2011. Bassem’s charisma surely has something to do with the attention. A strange, radiant calm seemed to hover around him. He rarely smiled, and tended to drop weighty pronouncements (“Our destiny is to resist”) in ordinary speech, but I saw his reserve crumble whenever one of his children climbed into his lap. When Israeli forces occupied the West Bank in 1967, Bassem was 10 weeks old. His mother hid with him in a cave until the fighting ended. He remembers playing in the abandoned British police outpost that is now the center of the I.D.F. base next to Halamish, and accompanying the older kids who took their sheep to pasture on the hilltop where the settlement now stands. His mother went to the spring for water every day. The settlers arrived when he was 9. (…) When the first intifada broke out in late 1987, Nabi Saleh was, as it is now, a flash point. The road that passes between the village and the settlement connects the central West Bank to Tel Aviv: a simple barricade could halt the flow of Palestinian laborers into Israel. Bassem was one of the main Fatah youth activists for the region, organizing the strikes, boycotts and demonstrations that characterized that uprising. (Nabi Saleh is solidly loyal to Fatah, the secular nationalist party that rules the West Bank; Hamas, the militant Islamist movement that governs Gaza, has its supporters elsewhere in the West Bank but has never had a foothold in the village.) He would be jailed seven times during the intifada and, he says, was never charged with a crime. Before his most recent arrest, I asked him how much time he had spent in prison. He added up the months: “Around four years.” After one arrest in 1993, Bassem told me, an Israeli interrogator shook him with such force that he fell into a coma for eight days. He has a nickel-size scar on his temple from emergency brain surgery during that time. His sister died while he was in prison. She was struck by a soldier and fell down a flight of courthouse stairs, according to her son Mahmoud, who was with her to attend the trial of his brother. (The I.D.F. did not comment on this allegation.) Bassem nonetheless speaks of those years, as many Palestinians his age do, with something like nostalgia. The first intifada broke out spontaneously — it started in Gaza with a car accident, when an Israeli tank transporter killed four Palestinian laborers. The uprising was, initially, an experience of solidarity on a national scale. Its primary weapons were the sort that transform weakness into strength: the stone, the barricade, the boycott, the strike. The Israeli response to the revolt — in 1988, Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin reportedly authorized soldiers to break the limbs of unarmed demonstrators — began tilting international public opinion toward the Palestinian cause for the first time in decades. By the uprising’s third year, however, power had shifted to the P.L.O. hierarchy. The first Bush administration pushed Israel to negotiate, leading eventually to the 1993 Oslo Accord, which created the Palestinian Authority as an interim body pending a “final status” agreement.  But little was resolved in Oslo. A second intifada erupted in 2000, at first mostly following the model set by the earlier uprising. Palestinians blocked roads and threw stones. The I.D.F. took over a house in Nabi Saleh. Children tossed snakes, scorpions and what Bassem euphemistically called “wastewater” through the windows. The soldiers withdrew. Then came the heavy wave of suicide bombings, which Bassem termed “the big mistake.” An overwhelming majority of Israeli casualties during the uprising occurred in about 100 suicide attacks, most against civilians. A bombing at one Tel Aviv disco in 2001 killed 21 teenagers. “Politically, we went backward,” Bassem said. Much of the international good will gained over the previous decade was squandered. Taking up arms wasn’t, for Bassem, a moral error so much as a strategic one. He and everyone else I spoke with in the village insisted they had the right to armed resistance; they just don’t think it works. Bassem could reel off a list of Nabi Saleh’s accomplishments. Of some — Nabi Saleh, he said, had more advanced degrees than any village — he was simply proud. Others — one of the first military actions after Oslo, the first woman to participate in a suicide attack — involved more complicated emotions. In 1993, Bassem told me, his cousin Said Tamimi killed a settler near Ramallah. Eight years later, another villager, Ahlam Tamimi escorted a bomber to a Sbarro pizzeria in Jerusalem. Fifteen people were killed, eight of them minors. Ahlam, who now lives in exile in Jordan, and Said, who is in prison in Israel, remain much-loved in Nabi Saleh. Though everyone I spoke with in the village appeared keenly aware of the corrosive effects of violence — “This will kill the children,” Manal said, “to think about hatred and revenge” — they resented being asked to forswear bloodshed when it was so routinely visited upon them. Said, Manal told me, “lost his father, uncle, aunt, sister — they were all killed. How can you blame him?” The losses of the second intifada were enormous. Nearly 5,000 Palestinians and more than 1,000 Israelis died. Israeli assassination campaigns and the I.D.F.’s siege of West Bank cities left the Palestinian leadership decimated and discouraged. By the end of 2005, Yasir Arafat was dead, Israel had pulled its troops and settlers out of Gaza and the Palestinian Authority president, Mahmoud Abbas, had reached a truce with Prime Minister Ariel Sharon. The uprising sputtered out. The economy was ruined, Gaza and the West Bank were more isolated from each other than ever, and Palestinians were divided, defeated and exhausted. But in 2003, while the intifada was still raging, Bassem and others from Nabi Saleh began attending demonstrations in Budrus, 20 minutes away. Budrus was in danger of being cut off from the rest of the West Bank by Israel’s planned separation barrier, the concrete and chain-link divide that snakes along the border and in many places juts deeply into Palestinian territory. Residents began demonstrating. Foreign and Israeli activists joined the protests. Fatah and Hamas loyalists marched side by side. The Israeli Army responded aggressively: at times with tear gas, beatings and arrests; at times with live ammunition. Palestinians elsewhere were fighting with Kalashnikovs, but the people of Budrus decided, said Ayed Morrar, an old friend of Bassem’s who organized the movement there, that unarmed resistance “would stress the occupation more.” The strategy appeared to work. After 55 demonstrations, the Israeli government agreed to shift the route of the barrier to the so-called 1967 green line. The tactic spread to other villages: Biddu, Ni’lin, Al Ma’asara and in 2009, Nabi Saleh. Together they formed what is known as the “popular resistance,” a loosely coordinated effort that has maintained what has arguably been the only form of active and organized resistance to the Israeli presence in the West Bank since the end of the second intifada in 2005. Nabi Saleh, Bassem hoped, could model a form of resistance for the rest of the West Bank. The goal was to demonstrate that it was still possible to struggle and to do so without taking up arms, so that when the spark came, if it came, resistance might spread as it had during the first intifada. “If there is a third intifada,” he said, “we want to be the ones who started it.” (…) Eytan Buchman, a spokesman for the I.D.F., took issue with the idea that the weekly protests were a form of nonviolent resistance. In an e-mail he described the protests as “violent and illegal rioting that take place around Judea and Samaria, and where large rocks, Molotov cocktails, improvised grenades and burning tires are used against security forces. Dubbing these simply demonstrations is an understatement — more than 200 security-force personnel have been injured in recent years at these riots.” (Molotov cocktails are sometimes thrown at protests at the checkpoints of Beitunia and Kalandia but never, Bassem said, in Nabi Saleh.) Buchman said that the I.D.F. “employs an array of tactics as part of an overall strategy intended to curb these riots and the ensuing acts of violence.” He added that “every attempt is made to minimize physical friction and risk of casualties” among both the I.D.F. and the “rioters.” (…) In the 1980s, youth organizers like Bassem focused on volunteer work: helping farmers in the fields, educating their children. They built trust and established the social networks that would later allow the resistance to coordinate its actions without waiting for orders from above. Those networks no longer exist. Instead there’s the Palestinian Authority. Immediately after the first Oslo Accord in 1993, the scholar Edward Said predicted that “the P.L.O. will . . . become Israel’s enforcer.” Oslo gave birth to a phantom state, an extensive but largely impotent administrative apparatus, with Israel remaining in effective control of the Palestine Authority’s finances, its borders, its water resources — of every major and many minor aspects of Palestinian life. More gallingly to many, Oslo, in Said’s words, gave “official Palestinian consent to continued occupation,” creating a local elite whose privilege depends on the perpetuation of the status quo. That elite lives comfortably within the so-called “Ramallah bubble”: the bright and relatively carefree world of cafes, NGO salaries and imported goods that characterize life in the West Bank’s provisional capital. During the day, the clothing shops and fast-food franchises are filled. New high-rises are going up everywhere. “I didn’t lose my sister and my cousin and part of my life,” Bassem said, “for the sons of the ministers” to drive expensive cars. The NYT
A compter de 2009, les villageois ont décidé de s’investir collectivement. Au point qu’une sorte de rituel du vendredi s’est imposé, sous l’attention grandissante des médias. D’abord, une courte marche dans les rues ; les soldats se tiennent à l’entrée du village, à pied ou en véhicule blindé ; ils décident d’interrompre ce rassemblement, tirent des grenades lacrymogènes ou assourdissantes ; des jeunes, le visage masqué, essaient de les viser avec des pierres, provoquant une réponse plus forte, des arrestations, des blessures. Mais la famille Tamimi ne s’est pas contentée de ce rituel local. En utilisant les réseaux sociaux, elle en a fait une sorte de série sans fin. Une page Facebook, une chaîne sur YouTube, des comptes Twitter, des listes d’envoi par courriel : le visage d’Ahed n’est pas devenu viral par magie. La famille Tamimi a appliqué au village les recettes qui ont marché partout dans le monde, hors des cadres partisans traditionnels, des partis ou des syndicats. Les manifestations ont simplement cessé d’être hebdomadaires, car elles banalisaient la mobilisation et la privaient de tout effet de surprise. « On était conscients de l’importance de ces réseaux sociaux pour toucher la jeunesse, pour planter des graines en eux et susciter un questionnement, explique Manal, 43 ans, tante d’Ahed. Les vidéos changent le regard des gens. Ils ont vu grandir Ahed ainsi. » A l’entrée de la maison de Manal, il y a une sorte de galerie des canettes de gaz lacrymogène, récupérées au fil des ans. Sur sa terrasse, de vieux canapés ont été installés. D’ici, on voit la silhouette des soldats se dessiner sur la colline, en début d’après-midi, le vendredi, à l’heure des confrontations. On peut alors prévenir les gamins qui traînent dans la rue. Le Monde
Imposante crinière blonde, regard azur déterminé, mains désarmées: du haut de ses 16 ans, la jeune Ahed Tamimi est devenue le symbole de la révolte palestinienne contre l’occupation en Cisjordanie. Une vidéo où on la voit en train de frapper deux soldats israéliens à l’entrée de sa maison a fait exploser sa notoriété le 15 décembre dernier. Elle l’a aussi envoyée en prison où la jeune femme doit répondre de douze chefs d’inculpation. Courageuse résistante pour les uns, figure instrumentalisée pour les autres: Ahed Tamimi divise au Proche-Orient et au-delà. Originaire du petit village de Nabi Saleh, jouxtant la colonie de Halamish, la jeune fille est issue d’une famille de militants. Son père, Bassem Tamimi, 50 ans, est l’un des leaders du mouvement de contestation non violent qui a vu le jour dans cette bourgade arabe, privée de sa source d’eau depuis 2009. Marches pacifistes, confrontations avec l’armée: la famille multiplie les actions avec la population locale, caméra au poing. Les images sont ensuite diffusées par Tamimi Press International, un blog créé par l’oncle d’Ahed. «La caméra fait partie de notre lutte, elle rétablit la vérité, explique Bassem Tamimi au Monde. La diffusion de nos films sur les réseaux sociaux permet de contrer les médias conventionnels qui fournissent une image biaisée de la situation.» Les premières traces d’Ahed Tamimi remontent à 2010. Alors âgée de 9 ans, la petite fille vêtue d’une robe taillée dans un keffieh tient tête à un soldat armé. Rebelote en 2012, où elle est filmée brandissant un poing menaçant sous le nez de soldats israéliens. Avec ses jeunes frères et cousins, Ahed est systématiquement placée en tête des cortèges. Une présence jugée «cruciale pour les aider à prendre confiance et leur apprendre à faire face aux problèmes», détaille Bassem Tamimi au Figaro. De quoi alimenter les soupçons de manipulation pour les détracteurs. Quoi qu’il en soit, la notoriété de la jeune militante est lancée. En 2012, le premier ministre turc Recep Tayyip Erdogan la reçoit pour la féliciter. En mars 2013, le New York Times Magazine consacre sa une au village de Nabi Saleh et immortalise le visage d’Ahed Tamimi au côté de onze autres Palestiniens. Le titre en dit long sur la détermination prêtée aux villageois: «S’il y a une troisième intifada, nous voulons être ceux qui l’ont lancée». Dans la vidéo du 15 décembre visionnée plusieurs milliers de fois, Ahed et sa cousine interpellent et molestent physiquement deux soldats israéliens qui demeurent immobiles. Coups de poing, coups de pied, gifles: les deux jeunes femmes rejointes par d’autres habitants finissent par former une chaîne humaine pour bloquer l’entrée du domicile. La veille, son cousin, Mohammed al-Tamimi, avait été touché à la tête par une balle en caoutchouc. Symbole du courage palestinien et d’une jeunesse qui se révolte sans armes, Ahed Tamimi bénéficie d’un large soutien. Sur Twitter, le hashtag #FreeAhedTamimi est devenu viral. Selon la psychiatre Samah Jabr, interrogée par Le Monde, ce mouvement de solidarité n’est pas dû au hasard. «Si Ahed avait été brune et voilée, elle n’aurait pas reçu la même empathie de la part des médias internationaux. Un tel profil [brune et voilée] est plus facilement associé à l’islamisme et donc au terrorisme. Son attitude aurait alors été aussitôt liée à de la violence plus qu’à de l’héroïsme, comme c’est le cas aujourd’hui.» Du côté israélien en revanche, Ahed Tamimi est vue comme une «provocatrice qui sait médiatiser ses actes», elle-même manipulée par sa famille. Face aux méthodes de la jeune activiste, le quotidien Times of Israel souligne la réaction «professionnelle» des soldats de Tsahal qui restent impassibles, malgré l’humiliation. Le Temps

C’est juste un entrainement à l’évacuation, imbécile !

A l’heure où devant le désintérêt croissant du Monde arabe ….

Le Hamas tente par une ultime mise en scène de faire oublier le fiasco toujours plus criant de leur régime  terroriste …

Et qu’entre deux leçons de théologie, nos belles âmes et médias en mal de contenu nous resservent le scénario réchauffé de la riposte disproportionnée d’Israël …

Alors que l’on redécouvre que nos anciens faussaires – certains ayant toujours pignon sur rue – n’avaient rien à envier à nos actuels Charles Enderlin

Retour via notamment l’une de ses plus célèbres praticiennes, récemment prise en flagrant délit de provocation musclée contre un soldtat israélien et arrêtée, Ahed Tamimi alias « Shirley Temper » …

Sur la florissante industrie de fausses images palestinienne plus connue sous le nom de Pallywood …

Ahed Tamimi, icône ou marionnette de la résistance palestinienne?
Issue d’une famille de militants contre l’occupation, la jeune fille de 16 ans s’est récemment filmée en train de molester des soldats israéliens. Son incarcération fait polémique
Sylvia Revello
Le Temps
3 janvier 2018

Imposante crinière blonde, regard azur déterminé, mains désarmées: du haut de ses 16 ans, la jeune Ahed Tamimi est devenue le symbole de la révolte palestinienne contre l’occupation en Cisjordanie. Une vidéo où on la voit en train de frapper deux soldats israéliens à l’entrée de sa maison a fait exploser sa notoriété le 15 décembre dernier. Elle l’a aussi envoyée en prison où la jeune femme doit répondre de douze chefs d’inculpation. Courageuse résistante pour les uns, figure instrumentalisée pour les autres: Ahed Tamimi divise au Proche-Orient et au-delà.

Originaire du petit village de Nabi Saleh, jouxtant la colonie de Halamish, la jeune fille est issue d’une famille de militants. Son père, Bassem Tamimi, 50 ans, est l’un des leaders du mouvement de contestation non violent qui a vu le jour dans cette bourgade arabe, privée de sa source d’eau depuis 2009. Marches pacifistes, confrontations avec l’armée: la famille multiplie les actions avec la population locale, caméra au poing. Les images sont ensuite diffusées par Tamimi Press International, un blog créé par l’oncle d’Ahed. «La caméra fait partie de notre lutte, elle rétablit la vérité, explique Bassem Tamimi au Monde. La diffusion de nos films sur les réseaux sociaux permet de contrer les médias conventionnels qui fournissent une image biaisée de la situation.»

Jeunes en tête de cortège

Les premières traces d’Ahed Tamimi remontent à 2010. Alors âgée de 9 ans, la petite fille vêtue d’une robe taillée dans un keffieh tient tête à un soldat armé. Rebelote en 2012, où elle est filmée brandissant un poing menaçant sous le nez de soldats israéliens.

Avec ses jeunes frères et cousins, Ahed est systématiquement placée en tête des cortèges. Une présence jugée «cruciale pour les aider à prendre confiance et leur apprendre à faire face aux problèmes», détaille Bassem Tamimi au Figaro. De quoi alimenter les soupçons de manipulation pour les détracteurs.

Rencontre avec Recep Tayyip Erdogan

Quoi qu’il en soit, la notoriété de la jeune militante est lancée. En 2012, le premier ministre turc Recep Tayyip Erdogan la reçoit pour la féliciter. En mars 2013, le New York Times Magazine consacre sa une au village de Nabi Saleh et immortalise le visage d’Ahed Tamimi au côté de onze autres Palestiniens. Le titre en dit long sur la détermination prêtée aux villageois: «S’il y a une troisième intifada, nous voulons être ceux qui l’ont lancée».

#FreeAhedTamimi

Dans la vidéo du 15 décembre visionnée plusieurs milliers de fois, Ahed et sa cousine interpellent et molestent physiquement deux soldats israéliens qui demeurent immobiles. Coups de poing, coups de pied, gifles: les deux jeunes femmes rejointes par d’autres habitants finissent par former une chaîne humaine pour bloquer l’entrée du domicile. La veille, son cousin, Mohammed al-Tamimi, avait été touché à la tête par une balle en caoutchouc. Symbole du courage palestinien et d’une jeunesse qui se révolte sans armes, Ahed Tamimi bénéficie d’un large soutien. Sur Twitter, le hashtag #FreeAhedTamimi est devenu viral.

Apparence et empathie

Selon la psychiatre Samah Jabr, interrogée par Le Monde, ce mouvement de solidarité n’est pas dû au hasard. «Si Ahed avait été brune et voilée, elle n’aurait pas reçu la même empathie de la part des médias internationaux. Un tel profil [brune et voilée] est plus facilement associé à l’islamisme et donc au terrorisme. Son attitude aurait alors été aussitôt liée à de la violence plus qu’à de l’héroïsme, comme c’est le cas aujourd’hui.»

«Provocatrice qui médiatise ses actes»

Du côté israélien en revanche, Ahed Tamimi est vue comme une «provocatrice qui sait médiatiser ses actes», elle-même manipulée par sa famille. Face aux méthodes de la jeune activiste, le quotidien Times of Israel souligne la réaction «professionnelle» des soldats de Tsahal qui restent impassibles, malgré l’humiliation.

Voir aussi:

Ahed Tamimi, le nouveau visage de la révolte palestinienne

Julien Licourt

Le Figaro

PORTRAIT – Deux yeux bleus sous un amas de cheveux blonds et bouclés. En quelques années, la jeune fille est devenue un symbole. Âgée de 16 ans, elle jugée aujourd’hui pour avoir frappé des soldats israéliens. Elle risque 7 ans de prison.

Elle rêvait de devenir footballeuse au FC Barcelone. Le sport n’aura pas fait d’elle une icône, l’activisme politique, oui. Ahed Tamimi, 16 ans seulement, est devenue en quelques années, et autant d’images choc, le nouveau visage de la révolte palestinienne face à l’occupation israélienne de la Cisjordanie. La jeune femme, placée en détention fin décembre suite à la diffusion d’une vidéo, devenue virale, où on la voit frapper deux soldats israéliens, est jugée aujourd’hui par un tribunal militaire. Mardi, à l’ouverture de l’audience, la juge a demandé aux journalistes et aux diplomates présents de sortir, autorisant seulement la famille à rester. Retour sur le parcours éclair d’une militante tombée dans l’activisme dès son plus jeune âge.

L’histoire d’Ahed Tamimi est intrinsèquement liée à Nabi Saleh, petit village de Cisjordanie, situé entre Tel Aviv et Jérusalem. Cette bourgade arabe de quelques centaines d’habitants fait face à la colonie israélienne de Halamish, qui s’est appropriée des terres et une source d’eau appartenant au village. Un acte qui révolte les habitants de Nabi Saleh. Dès 2009, une marche hebdomadaire de protestation est organisée et tourne régulièrement à la confrontation avec les forces israéliennes. La famille Tamimi est en pointe de la contestation.

Ahed Tamimi, ici en 2010. Elle est âgée de seulement 9 ans.
Ahed Tamimi, ici en 2010. Elle est âgée de seulement 9 ans. – Crédits photo : ABBAS MOMANI/AFP

Arrêté de nombreuses fois, le père d’Ahed, Bassem Tamimi, 50 ans, en est un des leaders. Bassem rêve de créer «un modèle de résistance civile, qui prouverait que nous ne sommes pas des terroristes et que nous sommes les propriétaires de ces terres, explique-t-il au journal israélien Haaretz, en 2010. Nous voulons envoyer aux Palestiniens et Israéliens le message qu’il existe cet autre modèle de résistance, non-violent.» En 2012, son activisme le conduit une nouvelle fois en prison, Amnesty international mènera une campagne pour faire libérer celui que l’ONG qualifie de «prisonnier de conscience».

L’arme, c’est l’image

Lors des manifestations de Nabi Saleh, les pierres volent. Mais ce ne sont pas les projectiles principaux. La véritable arme ici, c’est l’image. L’oncle d’Ahed, Bilal Tamimi a lancé son «agence de presse citoyenne», «Tamimi press international». En réalité un blog diffusant quelques nouvelles de la lutte locale. La mère d’Ahed, Nariman Tamimi, tout aussi engagée que son mari, se retrouve souvent derrière la caméra, à filmer les confrontations.

Ahed Tamimi, en 2012. C'est l'image qui la fait connaître à l'international.
Ahed Tamimi, en 2012. C’est l’image qui la fait connaître à l’international. – Crédits photo : ABBAS MOMANI/AFP

Et pour parvenir à ses fins, la famille Tamimi ne craint pas non plus de mettre en avant ses enfants. Bassem Tamimi estime même que leur présence est «cruciale pour les aider à prendre confiance et leur apprendre à faire face aux problèmes». C’est ainsi qu’en 2010, Ahed Tamimi se retrouve sur la première photo diffusée à l’international par l’Agence France presse (voir ci-dessus). Âgée de 9 ans, la petite fille est alors vêtue d’une robe taillée dans un keffieh palestinien. Devant elle s’avance un soldat israélien, dont le fusil d’assaut semble presque aussi grand qu’elle.

Deux ans plus tard sera prise la photo qui fera d’elle une icône. La fillette a un peu grandi. Elle est cette fois vêtue d’un débardeur où l’on voit distinctement le mot Love (amour) et le symbole de la paix popularisé par les hippies. Ahed Tamimi, poursuit des militaires, lève un poing menaçant, bien que totalement dérisoire face aux grands soldats qui l’entourent et que cette rébellion infantile fait sourire. «Je suis plus forte que n’importe lequel de tes soldats», hurle-t-elle. Un reportage de France 2 montre qu’Ahed sait déjà comment jouer avec les caméras. De quoi s’attirer les premières critiques de manipulation.

«L’image est la seule arme dont ils disposent, explique au Figaro Bertrand Heilbronn, le président de l’association France Palestine solidarité, qui a pu rencontrer plusieurs fois certains membres de la famille. Bien sûr, ils cherchent à se faire photographier. Mais c’est également la seule façon qu’ils ont de se protéger face à des soldats. Cela fait partie de la lutte non-violente.»

Le New York Times magazine du 17 mars 2013. Ahed Tamimi est située en bas, la deuxième en partant de la droite.
Le New York Times magazine du 17 mars 2013. Ahed Tamimi est située en bas, la deuxième en partant de la droite. – Crédits photo : Capture d’écran.

Notoriété internationale

Qu’importe, sa notoriété est faite. Le premier ministre turc, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, l’invite pour la féliciter. Un honneur dont l’adolescente n’a que faire. «N’importe quel Palestinien vaut deux Erdogan, car on se bat pour notre terre», dira-t-elle en retour. Le New York Times magazine consacre sa une de mars 2013 à Nabi Saleh, avec pour titre «S’il y a une troisième intifada, nous voulons être ceux qui l’ont lancée.» Ahed Tamimi est l’un des douze portraits mis en valeur par la publication américaine.

En 2015, une nouvelle image fait le tour du monde. On y voit un soldat israélien plaquer au sol un jeune enfant, le frère d’Ahed, le bras dans le plâtre, mais accusé d’avoir lancé des pierres sur les militaires. Un groupe de femmes l’agrippent, dont Ahed Tamimi, qui mord la main de l’homme.

Ahed Tamimi tente de faire lâcher prise en mordant le soldat israélien qui tente d'arrêter son petit frère.
Ahed Tamimi tente de faire lâcher prise en mordant le soldat israélien qui tente d’arrêter son petit frère. – Crédits photo : ABBAS MOMANI/AFP

À l’été 2017, Ahed Tamimi réapparait en Afrique du Sud. À 16 ans, elle est maintenant une jeune fille à la grande chevelure blonde et bouclée. Elle porte toujours le keffieh palestinien. La visite est hautement symbolique: accompagnés de deux autres jeunes activistes, elle dépose une gerbe de fleurs au mémorial de Hector Pieterson, jeune Sud-Africain tué lors d’une manifestation de la population noire à Soweto dans les années 1960. Elle expliquait alors lors d’une rencontre avec les habitants qu’elle ne voulait pas être soutenue «à cause de quelques larmes photogéniques, mais parce que nous avons fait le choix d’une juste lutte. C’est la seule façon d’arrêter de pleurer un jour.»

La jeune fille est de toutes les luttes. Aussi, lorsque le président américain Donald Trump décide de transférer l’ambassade américaine à Jérusalem, elle se joint aux manifestations de Palestiniens. Avec sa cousine Nour, elles s’en prennent à deux soldats israéliens, comme elles l’ont fait si souvent. Elles les frappent, les giflent. Les deux hommes restent impassibles.

Relayée par les médias, la vidéo est vue des millions de fois. Sauf que l’image d’Ahed Tamimi n’est pas du tout la même, côté israélien. On n’y voit pas la résistante, mais une «provocatrice qui sait médiatiser ses actes», selon certains journaux, qui soulignent l’humiliation dont sont victimes les soldats de Tsahal et, à travers eux, de tout le pays. Dans la nuit du 18 au 19 décembre, l’adolescente est arrêtée. Les images de la jeune femme sont à nouveau publiées dans tous les médias.

Ahed Tamimi, lors de sa comparution devant le tribunal militaire, le 1er janvier.
Ahed Tamimi, lors de sa comparution devant le tribunal militaire, le 1er janvier. – Crédits photo : AMMAR AWAD/REUTERS

Le 1er janvier, le tribunal décide de retenir 12 chefs d’inculpation contre elle, portant notamment sur 5 autres faits de l’année précédente (agression des forces de sécurité, lancé de pierres ou encore pour avoir participé à des émeutes). La jeune femme risque 7 ans de prison.

Voir aussi:

L’adolescente palestinienne Ahed Tamimi plaide coupable devant la justice militaire israélienne

L’adolescente, devenue un symbole de la lutte contre l’occupation pour une vidéo la montrant giflant un soldat en Cisjordanie, a été condamnée à huit mois de prison.

Piotr Smolar (Nabi Saleh, Cisjordanie, envoyé spécial)

Le Monde

Ahed Tamimi sortira de prison d’ici à l’été. La jeune Palestinienne, arrêtée pour avoir giflé et bousculé un soldat israélien dans son village de Nabi Saleh, en Cisjordanie, a accepté de plaider coupable, mercredi 21 mars. Détenue depuis décembre 2017, elle a été condamnée à huit mois de prison. Le parquet militaire a abandonné huit des douze charges retenues à l’origine contre cette adolescente, devenue une figure iconique sur les réseaux sociaux, dans les territoires occupés et à l’étranger.

Ahed Tamimi, 17 ans, a fait comme les centaines d’autres mineurs palestiniens arrêtés chaque année : elle a plaidé coupable car elle ne pouvait se défendre conformément aux normes du droit.

En 2013, le Fonds des Nations unies pour l’enfance (Unicef) parlait de mauvais traitements « institutionnalisés » sur les mineurs par la justice militaire israélienne. Dans un rapport publié le 20 mars, l’ONG israélienne B’Tselem s’est également penchée sur ce système. Elle souligne la continuité des abus depuis que cette justice des mineurs est apparue en 2009 : arrestations de nuit, isolement, menaces, abus verbaux et parfois physiques…

Selon le rapport, dans « l’écrasante majorité des cas », le tribunal pour mineurs se contente d’entériner la pratique du « plaider coupable ». Une issue acceptée par le clan Tamimi, dès lors que le tribunal avait refusé la publicité des débats. « Cela signifiait qu’il n’y aurait aucun procès équitable, devant témoins, explique Me Gaby Lasky, l’avocate d’Ahed. C’était une façon de la faire taire. » Mais faire taire les Tamimi n’est pas une affaire aisée.

Débat national

L’obstination est le trait de caractère partagé dans le clan, contaminant l’ensemble du village de Nabi Saleh. Depuis tant d’années, la cuisine familiale est le quartier général de la lutte locale. Là où les résidents affluent, où les militants passent, où les journalistes se succèdent, posant la même question : « Pourquoi ici ? » Qu’est-ce qui rend cette commune spéciale, sur la carte des mobilisations palestiniennes ?

Cette interrogation a redoublé de vigueur, le 15 décembre 2017, lorsque Ahed Tamimi a pris à partie un soldat israélien qui s’était présenté, une millième fois, devant la maison familiale. Peu avant, son cousin Mohammed avait eu la boîte crânienne fracassée par une balle en caoutchouc. Il est à présent défiguré. Ahed s’est avancée avec sa cousine. Sa mère Nariman filmait, ce qui lui vaudra la même peine de prison que l’adolescente. Les deux Israéliens en uniforme ont fait preuve de retenue : il s’agissait là d’un épisode banal dans le quotidien de l’occupation. Mais la diffusion virale de la vidéo va changer la donne.

Un débat national s’installe sur la fermeté à adopter en pareilles circonstances. « La société israélienne est malade, affirme Bassem Tamimi. Ils ne supportent pas que leurs soldats soient stoppés. Ils voulaient punir Ahed. » Quatre jours après les faits, elle est placée en détention, comme plus de 300 autres mineurs palestiniens actuellement. La différence est que son procès a éveillé une attention sans égal. Selon un sondage publié le 20 mars par le Palestinian Center for Policy and Survey (PSR), 92 % des personnes interrogées disent connaître l’adolescente. Parmi eux, 64 % l’érigent en modèle.

Résistance

Il faut oublier les boucles d’or d’Ahed, expliquant en partie l’empathie qu’elle suscite à l’étranger. Elle est photogénique, certes, mais surtout elle vient de loin, sans légèreté. « Ahed n’a pas eu d’enfance, murmure son père. Ce n’est pas à elle et à sa génération de gifler ce soldat. Je me sens coupable, mais j’espère qu’ils réussiront. Ahed n’a pas giflé un individu mais un uniforme. Je hais ce régime, ce système, la colonisation. »

Bassem Tamimi est un vétéran de la lutte contre l’occupation, qui a intégré l’échec des négociations de paix dans la foulée des accords d’Oslo (1993). Longtemps favorable à la solution à deux Etats, il a changé d’avis pendant la seconde Intifada.

« Les Israéliens gagnent du temps. Leur plan, c’est le grand Israël, de la mer au Jourdain. »

Les dirigeants palestiniens sont à ses yeux déconsidérés. Pourtant, il a accepté d’être reçu par le président Mahmoud Abbas, le 5 février. « On a besoin de tout le monde », lâche-t-il.

Bassem Tamimi a passé une semaine dans le coma en 1993 après avoir été frappé lors d’un interrogatoire. Sa sœur a été tuée, d’autres membres du clan aussi. Emprisonné à neuf reprises, pour une période totale d’environ quatre ans, le père d’Ahed a confronté ses vues à celles d’autres prisonniers. La lutte armée lui paraissait être une voie sans issue.

Il décida alors de transformer Nabi Saleh en laboratoire de la résistance populaire. Consécration en 2013 : le village fait la « une » du New York Times Magazine. Autant dire que Nabi Saleh exaspère les Israéliens. En 2016, une sous-commission à la Knesset (Parlement) a même demandé des vérifications confidentielles, pour établir si les Tamimi constituaient une vraie famille.

Nabi Saleh est situé à environ vingt kilomètres au nord-ouest de Ramallah. Tout le monde se connaît parmi les 600 habitants. On y dit qu’ils sont déjà 260 à être allés en prison, dont 44 mineurs. On partage les deuils et les mariages, les colères et les joies.

Le village dispose d’une source d’eau naturelle qui fait l’objet d’un conflit intense avec les habitants de Halamish, la colonie israélienne qui occupe un flanc de colline en face. Les colons, installés ici depuis 1977, ont rogné les terres privées palestiniennes, au fil des ans, sous la protection de l’armée.

Viral

A compter de 2009, les villageois ont décidé de s’investir collectivement. Au point qu’une sorte de rituel du vendredi s’est imposé, sous l’attention grandissante des médias. D’abord, une courte marche dans les rues ; les soldats se tiennent à l’entrée du village, à pied ou en véhicule blindé ; ils décident d’interrompre ce rassemblement, tirent des grenades lacrymogènes ou assourdissantes ; des jeunes, le visage masqué, essaient de les viser avec des pierres, provoquant une réponse plus forte, des arrestations, des blessures.

Mais la famille Tamimi ne s’est pas contentée de ce rituel local. En utilisant les réseaux sociaux, elle en a fait une sorte de série sans fin. Une page Facebook, une chaîne sur YouTube, des comptes Twitter, des listes d’envoi par courriel : le visage d’Ahed n’est pas devenu viral par magie.

La famille Tamimi a appliqué au village les recettes qui ont marché partout dans le monde, hors des cadres partisans traditionnels, des partis ou des syndicats. Les manifestations ont simplement cessé d’être hebdomadaires, car elles banalisaient la mobilisation et la privaient de tout effet de surprise.

« On était conscients de l’importance de ces réseaux sociaux pour toucher la jeunesse, pour planter des graines en eux et susciter un questionnement, explique Manal, 43 ans, tante d’Ahed. Les vidéos changent le regard des gens. Ils ont vu grandir Ahed ainsi. »

A l’entrée de la maison de Manal, il y a une sorte de galerie des canettes de gaz lacrymogène, récupérées au fil des ans. Sur sa terrasse, de vieux canapés ont été installés. D’ici, on voit la silhouette des soldats se dessiner sur la colline, en début d’après-midi, le vendredi, à l’heure des confrontations. On peut alors prévenir les gamins qui traînent dans la rue.

Voir également:

Particularly violent pictures from a West Bank rally, featuring a young girl biting an IDF soldier, have received international attention.

Distinctively violent images have emerged from an almost typical protest in the West Bank on Friday and have made their way to major media networks around the world.The pictures, taken during a protest in the village of Nebi Salah, show a young girl and two other women struggling with an IDF soldier, who is holding a Palestinian boy by his arm, preventing the boy from moving.

Video purporting to show the violent incident

The IDF said in response that the boy was throwing stones, and as such a decision was made to arrest him.

The Daily Mail featured the image and wrote, « With terror etched on his face, the boy is powerless to move as the gunman towers over him, with the muzzle of his weapon just inches from his cheek. »

Photo: AFP

Photo: AFP

Photo:Reuters

Photo:Reuters

Photo:Reuters

Photo:Reuters

Photo:Reuters

Photo:Reuters

The British daily further added, « But as he pins the boy to a rock, the soldier suddenly finds himself ambushed by a young girl who forces the weapon from his grasp and bites his hand. Meanwhile, two women claw at his balaclava-clad face and drag him off the youngster. Eventually, the gunman flees the scene, leaving the young girl to cradle the terrified boy in her arms. »

Photo:Reuters

Photo:Reuters

Photo:AFP

Photo:AFP

The Daily Mail mentioned that the circumstances of the incident were unclear, and they were unaware of what caused the soldier to « take such drastic actions. »

However, they do mention that these protests often involve Palestinian youths and children throwing stones at security forces.

The IDF spokesperson has confirmed that the events occurred during a violent protest in which Palestinians threw stones at an IDF force that was set up in the area.

Photo:Reuters

Photo:Reuters

« The youth in the picture was seen throwing rocks, and as such a decision was made to arrest him. During the arrest, a violent provocation began which included a number of Palestinian women and children. As a result of the violent clash, a decision was made by the regional commander to cease the arrest, » the IDF said in a statement.

Army officials added that: « Two additional Palestinian youths were arrested for throwing stones during the violent clashes. The soldier pictured was lightly wounded as a result of the violent actions against him. »

Palestinians also threw stones at an IDF bulldozer during clashes on Friday in the village of Kadum, near Nablus.

The protests occurred a mere day after the outgoing EU envoy to the Palestinian Territories announced that 28 EU member states were advancing measures against the settlements. According to the envoy, John Gatt-Rutter, « there is support within the union to go on with the measures ». Rutter added that, « There are more tools » which the Union could use against the settlements. »

Voir de même:

Israellycool And Readers Get Shirley Temper’s Name Splashed Across Daily Mail (Updated)


Ostensibly, it looks like every Israel hater’s wet dream: images of an armed IDF soldier trying to detain a young boy wearing a sling, while having women and children trying to stop him, armed with nothing but their hands.

Of course, there was context.

“The youth in the picture was seen throwing rocks, and as such a decision was made to arrest him. During the arrest, a violent provocation began which included a number of Palestinian women and children. As a result of the violent clash, a decision was made by the regional commander to cease the arrest,” the IDF said in a statement.

Army officials added that: “Two additional Palestinian youths were arrested for throwing stones during the violent clashes. The soldier pictured was lightly wounded as a result of the violent actions against him.”

But the initial Daily Mail report very much reflected the “simple” narrative

And then something amazing happened.

Israellycool readers recognized the biting girl as the Pallywood star “Shirley Temper”, whose exploits I have documented comprehensively on this blog. Exploits which involve deliberately trying to provoke IDF soldiers under the watchful and encouraging eye of her parents, in order to produce great images for propaganda.

And they might have gotten away with it too, had it not been for those meddling yids!

Readers inundated the Daily Mail with links to this blog showing what Shirley Temper and her family have been up to. And Brian of London also contacted an editor over at the paper.

And the Daily Mail responded – by changing the tone of the story entirely, providing context to it and revealing Shirley Temper’s history.

Questions raised over shocking West Bank image of boy with a broken arm being held at gunpoint by an Israeli soldier after girl, 13, seen biting attacker is revealed as prolific ‘Pallywood star’

Questions have been raised over the authenticity of shocking images of a boy with a broken arm being held at gunpoint by an Israeli soldier after a 13-year-old girl seen biting his attacker is said to be a prolific ‘Pallywood star’.

The remarkable images which surfaced online on Friday appeared to show an IDF soldier armed with a machine gun grappling with the little boy as two women make desperate attempts to pull him off following protests in the West Bank.

A young girl is seen ambushing the balaclava-clad soldier by forcing the weapon from his hands and biting him before he flees the scene.

But it is thought the young girl in the photographs is Ahed Tamimi, whose parents Bassem and Nariman – also pictured – are well-known Palestinian activists in their village of Nabi Saleh.

The teenager has appeared in a string of similar videos where she challenges Israeli security forces and rose to prominence after she was filmed confronting one who arrested her brother, which resulted in her being presented with a bravery award.

She was handed the ‘Handala Award for Courage’ by the president of Turkey, Recep Tayyip Erdo?an, in Istanbul, where she reportedly expressed she would like to live.

Online blogs have dubbed her ‘Shirley Temper’ and accused her of being a ‘Pallywood’ star – a term coined by author Richard Landes, describing the alleged media manipulation by Palestinians to win public relations war against Israel.

Her father, Bassem al-Tamimi, was convicted by an Israeli military court in 2011 for ‘sending people to throw stones, and holding a march without a permit’ – a charge his lawyers deny.

He has been jailed eight times, while his wife has been detained five times. Other family members, including their son Waed, has also been arrested.

Bassem organises weekly protests and it was reportedly at one of these demonstrations that the shocking images are said to have been taken.

An Israeli army spokesman said that Palestinians had been throwing stones at an IDF force which was set up in the area.

An image has emerged on the internet of a boy, said to be the youth that was held at gunpoint, throwing rocks with one arm, while his other remained in plaster and in a sling.

The spokesman added that a decision was made to arrest the boy and it was during the detention that a ‘violent provocation’ began, including a number of Palestinian women and children.

He told Haaretz that there was ‘a violent disturbance of the peace in Nabi Saleh, in which Palestinians threw stones at IDF forces that were in the place.

‘The youth who was photographed was identified by the lookout force as a stone-thrower, and because of this it was decided to detain him.

At the time of the arrest, a violent provocation by a number of Palestinians developed, including women and children. In light of the violent altercation, the commander decided to not to go ahead with the detention.’

He added: ‘Two additional Palestinian youths were arrested for throwing stones during the violent clashes. The soldier pictured was lightly wounded as a result of the violent actions against him.’

Notice the oblique reference to Israellycool as “online blogs” (for the record, I invented the label Shirley Temper).

But I’ll take this as a win. Allowed to go unchecked, this would have been an unmitigated PR disaster for Israel. As it is, I am sure some damage has been done, but not as much as would have been the case had the Daily Mail not been alerted to the Tamimi family’s background in Pallywood productions. Now, Daily Mail readers will see the images, read the article, and might ask “What kind of parents would allow their child – already in a sling – to be placed in harm’s way?”

So thank you dear readers. We really can make a difference.

Update: Ahed Tamimi, Shirley Temper herself, shared on her Facebook page a link to the original Daily Mail story.

She’s in for a rude shock when she discovers it now points to the updated version, which exposes her family’s antics to a larger audience.

Update: It looks like The Telegraph had covered the confrontation, but has now pulled the story.

Update: This photo confirms the IDF account – Shirley Temper’s brother was throwing rocks before his Oscar-winning performance (hat tip: Johnny and other readers).

Update (Brian): The photo of the brother throwing rocks may have been doctored. We have taken it down pending more investigation.

Voir de plus:

Questions raised over shocking West Bank image of boy with a broken arm being held at gunpoint by an Israeli soldier after girl, 13, seen biting attacker is revealed as prolific ‘Pallywood star’

  • Israeli soldier was pictured pinning boy to the floor with machine gun held up near his cheek in the West Bank
  • But the gunman is ambushed by young girl who forces weapon from his hand and two women who claw at his face 
  • Girl in pictures is believed to be Ahed Tamimi, whose parents Bassem and Nariman are Palestinian activists
  • She has appeared in a string of similar videos where she confronts Israeli soldiers and once won a bravery award 
  • Clash happened during demonstrations against Palestinian land confiscation to expand nearby Jewish settlement 

The Daily Mail

Questions have been raised over the authenticity of shocking images of a boy with a broken arm being held at gunpoint by an Israeli soldier after a 13-year-old girl seen biting his attacker is said to be a prolific ‘Pallywood star’.

The remarkable images which surfaced online on Friday appeared to show an IDF soldier armed with a machine gun grappling with the little boy as two women make desperate attempts to pull him off following protests in the West Bank.

A young girl is seen ambushing the balaclava-clad soldier by forcing the weapon from his hands and biting him before he flees the scene.

Scroll down for video 

This shocking image which appears to show Palestinians fighting to free a little boy held by an Israeli soldier appeared online on Friday

This shocking image which appears to show Palestinians fighting to free a little boy held by an Israeli soldier appeared online on Friday

But it is thought the young girl in the photographs is Ahed Tamimi, whose parents Bassem and Nariman – also pictured – are well-known Palestinian activists in their village of Nabi Saleh.

The teenager has appeared in a string of similar videos where she challenges Israeli security forces and rose to prominence after she was filmed confronting one who arrested her brother, which resulted in her being presented with a bravery award.

She was handed the ‘Handala Award for Courage’ by the president of Turkey, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, in Istanbul, where she reportedly expressed she would like to live.

Online blogs have dubbed her ‘Shirley Temper’ and accused her of being a ‘Pallywood’ star – a term coined by author Richard Landes, describing the alleged media manipulation by Palestinians to win public relations war against Israel.

The Israeli soldier is said to have put the young boy in a headlock at gunpoint following a march against Palestinian land confiscation to expand the Jewish Hallamish settlement in the West Bank village of Nabi Saleh

The Israeli soldier is said to have put the young boy in a headlock at gunpoint following a march against Palestinian land confiscation to expand the Jewish Hallamish settlement in the West Bank village of Nabi Saleh

According to an Israeli army spokesperson, the boy in the pictures was accused of throwing stones at IDF soldiers and was arrested

According to an Israeli army spokesperson, the boy in the pictures was accused of throwing stones at IDF soldiers and was arrested

It was then that the soldier was ambushed by a girl, who forces the weapon from his grasp, while two other women desperately fight to free the little boy

It was then that the soldier was ambushed by a girl, who forces the weapon from his grasp, while two other women desperately fight to free the little boy

Her father, Bassem al-Tamimi, was convicted by an Israeli military court in 2011 for ‘sending people to throw stones, and holding a march without a permit’ – a charge his lawyers deny.

He has been jailed eight times, while his wife has been detained five times. Other family members, including their son Waed, has also been arrested.

Bassem organises weekly protests and it was reportedly at one of these demonstrations that the shocking images are said to have been taken.

An Israeli army spokesman said that Palestinians had been throwing stones at an IDF force which was set up in the area.

An image has emerged on the internet of a boy, said to be the youth that was held at gunpoint, throwing rocks with one arm, while his other remained in plaster and in a sling.

The spokesman added that a decision was made to arrest the boy and it was during the detention that a ‘violent provocation’ began, including a number of Palestinian women and children.

He told Haaretz that there was ‘a violent disturbance of the peace in Nabi Saleh, in which Palestinians threw stones at IDF forces that were in the place.

It has emerged that the girl in the pictures (far left) is believed to be Ahed Tamimi, who has appeared in similar videos online where she confronts Israeli soldiers

It has emerged that the girl in the pictures (far left) is believed to be Ahed Tamimi, who has appeared in similar videos online where she confronts Israeli soldiers

She rose to prominence after she was filmed confronting a soldier who arrested her brother, which resulted in her being presented with a bravery award

She rose to prominence after she was filmed confronting a soldier who arrested her brother, which resulted in her being presented with a bravery award

Online blogs have dubbed her 'Shirley Temper' and accused her of being a 'Pallywood' star - a term coined by author Richard Landes, describing the alleged media manipulation by Palestinians to win public relations war against Israel 

Online blogs have dubbed her ‘Shirley Temper’ and accused her of being a ‘Pallywood’ star – a term coined by author Richard Landes, describing the alleged media manipulation by Palestinians to win public relations war against Israel

‘The youth who was photographed was identified by the lookout force as a stone-thrower, and because of this it was decided to detain him. At the time of the arrest, a violent provocation by a number of Palestinians developed, including women and children. In light of the violent altercation, the commander decided to not to go ahead with the detention.’

He added: ‘Two additional Palestinian youths were arrested for throwing stones during the violent clashes. The soldier pictured was lightly wounded as a result of the violent actions against him.’ 

The clash happened in the village of Nabi Saleh, near Ramallah, during protests against Palestinian land confiscation to expand the nearby Jewish Hallamish settlement.

In another flashpoint, Palestinian protester hurled stones at Israeli army bulldozer during clashes which following a protest against Israeli settlements in Qadomem, Kofr Qadom village, near the the West Bank city of Nablus.

They come a day after the European Union’s outgoing envoy to the Palestinian territories said the 28-nation bloc was moving forward with measures against Jewish West Bank settlements.

The envoy, John Gatt-Rutter, did not provide a timeframe. But his remarks to reporters underline European discontent with Israel’s continued expansion of settlements in territory that Palestinians want for a future state.

A Palestinian protester, with a petrol bomb in his pocket, hurls rocks towards Israeli security forces during clashes following a demonstration against the expropriation of Palestinian land by Israel on August 28, 2015 in the village of Kafr Qaddum, near Nablus in the occupied West Bank

A Palestinian protester throws stones towards a vehicle of Israeli security forces firing tear gas canisters during clashes following a demonstration against the expropriation of Palestinian land by Israel on August 28, 2015 in the village of Kafr Qaddum, near Nablus in the occupied West Bank

Violent: A Palestinian protester (left), with a petrol bomb in his pocket, hurls rocks towards Israeli security forces during clashes after a demonstration against the expropriation of Palestinian land by Israel in the village of Kafr Qaddum, near Nablus in the occupied West Bank

Palestinian protester hurls stones at Israeli army bulldozer during clashes which following a protest against Israeli settlements in Qadomem

Palestinian protester hurls stones at Israeli army bulldozer during clashes which following a protest against Israeli settlements in Qadomem

Gatt-Rutter said ‘there is support within the union to go on’, adding that there are ‘more tools’ the EU can use.

The EU, Israel’s biggest trading partner, is exploring guidelines that would require Israel to label settlement products.

It already bars goods produced in settlements from receiving customs exemptions given to Israeli goods.

Gatt-Rutter’s remarks come as a grassroots movement promoting boycotts, divestment and sanctions against Israel is gaining steam.

Members of Israeli security forces aims their weapons towards Palestinian stone throwers during clashes following a demonstration against the expropriation of Palestinian land by Israel in the village of Kafr Qaddum, near Nablus in the occupied West Bank

Members of Israeli security forces aims their weapons towards Palestinian stone throwers during clashes following a demonstration against the expropriation of Palestinian land by Israel in the village of Kafr Qaddum, near Nablus in the occupied West Bank

Voir encore:

After at least 20 were killed last Friday by Israeli forces, protesters ignited tires to create black smoke hoping to block visibility
Telesur
6 April 2018

At least four Palestinian protesters were killed, and over 200 have been wounded after Israeli troops opened fire on protesters along the Israel-Gaza border Friday. Five of the persons injured as thousands participated in the March of Return are said to be in critical condition according to medical officials.

The deaths in Friday’s protest follow 24 others, which took place in the first round of demonstrations last week, and add to the trend of severe violence from Israeli troops that led to over 1000 injuries over the same period. Thousands converged on Gaza’s border with Israel and set fire to mounds of tires, which were supposed to block the visibility of Israeli snipers and avoid more deaths, in the second week of demonstrations.

Israel’s violent response to peaceful protests has been heavily criticized over the last week. The United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights has urged troops to exercise restraint, these calls, however, haven’t been heeded.

Israeli officials have attempted to portray the use of deadly force and firearms as a necessary measure to prevent “terrorists” from infiltrating into Israel and to « protect its border. »

An Israeli military spokesman said Friday they “will not allow any breach of the security infrastructure and fence, which protects Israeli civilians.”

However, the U.N. has reminded the Israeli government that an attempt to cross the border fence does not amount to “threat to life or serious injury that would justify the use of live ammunition.”

The U.N. has also stressed Israel remains the occupying force in Gaza and has the « obligations to ensure that excessive force is not employed against protestors and that in the context of a military occupation, as in the case in Gaza, the unjustified and unlawful recourse to firearms by law enforcement resulting in death may amount to willful killing. »

Israeli Defence Minister Avigdor Lieberman told Israeli public radio Thursday that « if there are provocations, there will be a reaction of the harshest kind like last week, » showing no sign that his government would reconsider their strategy when responding to unarmed protesters.

Pro-Israel organization StandWithUs has resorted to claiming Palestinians are faking injuries to garner international sympathy and supported their claims by posting videos showing « Palestinians practicing for the cameras. » The Palestinians in the video were actually practicing how to evacuate the wounded during the protest.

Other claims advanced by Israeli authorities include accusing the political party Hamas, which Israel considers a terrorist organization, of being, behind the protests.

Asad Abu Sharekh, the spokesperson of the march, has countered the claim saying « the march is organized by refugees, doctors, lawyers, university students, Palestinian intellectuals, academics, civil society organizations and Palestinian families. »

Since March 30th, which marks Palestinian Land Day, thousands have set up several tent encampments within Gaza, some 65 kilometers away from the border.

The symbolic move is part of the Great March of Return which aims to demand the right of over 5 million Palestinian refugees to return to the lands from which they were expelled from after the formation of the state of Israel.

More than half of the 2 million Palestinians who live in Gaza under an over 10-year-long blockade are refugees.

Israel has denied Palestinian refugees this right because of what they call a “demographic threat.”

Voir enfin:

En 1972, dans la revue « Rouge », Edwy Plenel a-t-il vraiment déclaré être solidaire des terroristes des Jeux olympiques de Munich ?

Aerimnos
Checknews
Libération
02/04/2018

Bonjour,

Dans un texte écrit en 1972, publié dans Rouge, l’hebdomadaire de la Ligue communiste révolutionnaire (LCR), Edwy Plenel a, en effet, appelé à «défendre inconditionnellement» les militants de l’organisation palestinienne Septembre Noir, qui venait alors d’assassiner onze membres de l’équipe olympique israélienne lors d’une prise d’otage pendant les Jeux Olympiques de Munich, qui ont eu lieu cette année-là. En ces termes :

« L’action de Septembre Noir a fait éclater la mascarade olympique, a bouleversé les arrangements à l’amiable que les réactionnaires arabes s’apprêtaient à conclure avec Israël (…) Aucun révolutionnaire ne peut se désolidariser de Septembre Noir. Nous devons défendre inconditionnellement face à la répression les militants de cette organisation (…) A Munich, la fin si tragique, selon les philistins de tous poils qui ne disent mot de l’assassinat des militants palestiniens, a été voulue et provoquée par les puissances impérialistes et particulièrement Israël. Il fut froidement décidé d’aller au carnage ».

Voilà plusieurs années que ces mots, signés Joseph Krasny, nom de plume de Plenel dans Rouge, sont connus. C’est en 2008 dans Enquête sur Edwy Plenel, écrit par le journaliste Laurent Huberson, qu’ils sont pour la première fois exhumés. Quasiment un chapitre est consacré à l’anticolonialisme, l’antiracisme, et l’antisionisme radical du jeune militant Plenel. C’est dans ces pages que sont retranscrites ces lignes.

Aujourd’hui, elles figurent en bonne place sur la page Wikipedia du journaliste.

Depuis plusieurs jours, ils refont pourtant surface sur Twitter, partagés la plupart du temps par des comptes proches de l’extrême droite. Ce 3 avril, Gilles-William Goldnadel, avocat, longtemps chroniqueur à Valeurs Actuelles, qui officie aujourd’hui sur C8 dans l’émission de Thierry Ardisson Les Terriens du Dimanche, a interpellé le co-fondateur de Mediapart sur Twitter : «Bonsoir Edwy Plenel, c’est pour une enquête de la France Libre [la webtélé de droite lancée par l’avocat début 2018]. Pourriez-vous s’il vous plaît confirmer ou infirmer les infos qui circulent selon lesquelles vous auriez sous l’alias de Krasny féliciter dans Rouge Septembre Noir ?».

« Ce texte exprime une position que je récuse fermement aujourd’hui »

Plenel n’a pas répondu à Goldnadel sur Twitter. Mais contacté par CheckNews, il a accepté de revenir, par ce mail, sur ce texte écrit en 1972.  En nous demandant de reproduire intégralement sa réponse, «car évidemment, cette campagne n’est pas dénuée d’arrière-pensées partisanes». Que pense donc le Plenel de 2018 des écrits de Krasny en 1972 ?

« Je n’ai jamais fait mystère de mes contributions à Rouge, de 1970 à 1978, sous le pseudonyme de Joseph Krasny. Ce texte, écrit il y a plus de 45 ans, dans un contexte tout autre et alors que j’avais 20 ans, exprime une position que je récuse fermement aujourd’hui. Elle n’avait rien d’exceptionnel dans l’extrême gauche de l’époque, comme en témoigne un article de Jean-Paul Sartre, le fondateur de Libération, sur Munich dans La Cause du peuple–J’accuse du 15 octobre 1972. Tout comme ce philosophe, j’ai toujours dénoncé et combattu l’antisémitisme d’où qu’il vienne et sans hésitation. Mais je refuse l’intimidation qui consiste à taxer d’antisémite toute critique de la politique de l’Etat d’Israël ».

On résume : le co-fondateur de Mediapart, sous le pseudo Joseph Krasny, a bien soutenu en 1972 l’action de l’organisation palestinienne Septembre Noir, qui venait alors d’assassiner onze athlètes israéliens lors des Jeux Olympiques de Munich. Cette chronique, exhumée en 2008 dans un livre critique sur Plenel, a refait surface ces derniers jours sur les réseaux sociaux. Contacté par CheckNews, Edwy Plenel, récuse fermement ce texte aujourd’hui qui, selon lui, n’avait rien d’exceptionnel dans l’extrême gauche de l’époque.

Bien cordialement,

Robin A.

Voir par ailleurs: