Anti-américanisme: Vous avez dit ‘étatsunien’ ? (Forget statues – let’s rename the whole map, starting with America’s very name !)

20 juillet, 2020

5 things you need to know now - No agreement on recovery plan yet ...jcdurbant (@jcdurbant) | Twitter
Don’t know much about history (…) Don’t know much about geography … Sam Cooke
As many of you know, my name is Lilith Sinclair. I’m an Afro-indigenous, non-binary local organizer here in Portland, organizing for the abolition of not just the militarized police state, but also the United states as we know it. Lilith Sinclair
Someone from a country that calls itself Ecuador may not be in a very strong position to object to the appropriation of geography in the cause of national identity. John Ryle
J’emploie ici le mot américain au sens « noble ». Animateur de Radio-Canada
Some people would restrict the use of the word « American » to indicate any inhabitant of the Americas (which Europeans tend to consider a single continent, called « America ») rather than specifically a citizen of the United States; and perceive the latter usage of « American » to be potentially ambiguous, and perhaps aggressive in tone or imperialistic, a rather widespread view in Latin America. However, many in the US assert that the word « America » in « United States of America » denotes the country’s proper name, and is not a geographical indicator. They argue that the interpretation of United States of America to mean a country named United States located in the continent of America is mistaken. Instead, they argue that the preposition of is equivalent to the of in Federative Republic of Brazil, Commonwealth of Australia, Federal Republic of Germany. That is, the of indicates the name of the state. In addition, other countries use « United » or « States » in their names as well. Indeed, the formal name of Mexico is Estados Unidos Mexicanos, currently officially translated as « United Mexican States » but in the past translated as « United States of Mexico ». Regardless, many question a nation’s right to formally appropriate the name of a continent for itself, citing the fact that America existed long before the United States of America. Indeed, Amerigo Vespucci (who travelled extensively throughout the Caribbean basin) never set foot on present US territory One counter-argument is that the United States of America is the first sovereign American state to arise from the European colonies, and therefore is perfectly entitled to lay claim to this name for itself, although the appropriation of a continental name by a single country has no historical precedent. The rebellious colonies perceived themselves, in their quest for independence, as moral representatives of all the colonized European inhabitants of the continent. This view is evident in the name of the colonial allied government, the Continental Congress. Another counter-argument is that it is not particularly unusual for a nation or organization to name itself after a geographical feature, even one that it does not uniquely occupy. Ecuador is the Spanish word for the equator, which runs through the country of Ecuador, athough other countries also lie on the equator. In addition, the United States of America is not the only entity which shares a name with a larger entity, yet is considered more well-known than the larger entity. The City of New York lies within the State of New York. However, the term New Yorker is generally used to refer to a resident of New York City. Most proponents of the « US citizen = American » nomenclature have no problem with the simultaneous usage of « American » as an adjective for all inhabitants of the Americas, and make the distinction between the demonym for a country and the demonym for a continent (or continents). They argue that there is no reason the two cannot share the term if it is used in distinct but equally legitimate contexts. In other cases, the motivation is not so much political as it is academic, to avoid a perceived ambiguity. For instance, in legal circles a citizen of the United States is usually referred to as a ‘U.S. citizen’, not an ‘American citizen’, which could arguably apply to citizens of other American nation states as well. Wikipedia
As many people from the various nations throughout the New World consider themselves to be « Americans », some people think the common usage of « American » to refer to only people from the U.S. should be avoided in international contexts where it might be ambiguous. Many neologisms have been proposed to refer to the United States instead of « American ». However, they are virtually unused, and most commentators feel that it is unlikely that they will catch on. Encyclopedia
Over the past month, I have been spellbound by the actions of activists determined to compel America to confront the ugliness of its past. The protests at the Emancipation Memorial, the removal of Teddy Roosevelt’s statue in New York, and now even the bold calls for rethinking Mount Rushmore on the site of Lakota land reveal that our country has more learning to do about what we choose to glorify. But last week, as many celebrated the Supreme Court’s ruling that Oklahoma—almost half of it at least—belongs to the jurisdiction of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, I have also been thinking about the relics of our past that are so ingrained in our present that we misremember our history. One such relic is the names of the very places in which we live. (…) On July 3, in the shadow of Mt. Rushmore, President Trump said, “As we meet here tonight there is a growing danger that threatens every blessing our ancestors fought so hard for.” He then doubled down, saying, “Our nation is witnessing a merciless campaign to wipe out our history, defame our heroes, erase our values and indoctrinate our children.” Children are being indoctrinated, but not in the way Trump suggests. Instead, they are being fed an uncomplex version of history—one that minimizes the experiences of those on the margins to turn white men who did evil things into heroes. The name Bixby had become so common in my area that we didn’t think about where it came from. That’s why we tear down, rename and rethink. We do it to tell the whole story, not just the parts that make us feel good. Perhaps we need to do this not just for statues and monuments and schools and sports teams but for cities and counties too. Perhaps we should begin again with the full weight of history upon which we stand. (…) People who marginalized and oppressed didn’t just affect those who lived at the time–Bixby’s actions, along with so many others’, caused the Creek Nation to lose the jurisdictional power they just, in part, won back–and the places that bear their names should no longer remain without scrutiny. History demands that we remember all of it or it isn’t true history at all. Caleb Gayle
[L’appellation américain] n’est pas non plus confondante. Lorsqu’on parle des Américains, on sait bien qu’il ne s’agit pas des Canadiens ou des Mexicains. Le français dispose d’ailleurs du terme Nord-Américain, qui englobe tous les habitants de l’Amérique du Nord, et du terme Sud-Américain, qui désigne ceux de l’Amérique du Sud. Paul Roux
Plusieurs ont remarqué que le mot a repris du poil de la bête depuis l’an 2000. Certains pensent qu’il est revenu dans la foulée du 11-Septembre; c’est une possibilité. Il y a six ou sept ans, il était à peine employé. Si Robert Solé a pris la peine d’en parler dans une chronique de langue du Monde le 10 novembre 2003, pour dire que « le terme ne passe pas », c’est que le mot commençait à se rencontrer plus souvent tout en restant assez discret. Si on traçait un graphique de son emploi depuis le début, on verrait le terme monter, atteindre un plateau, descendre un peu plus tard, puis remonter tranquillement après une longue absence. On peut se demander s’il ne connaît pas un regain passager, avant de retomber à nouveau hors d’usage. Bien des facteurs entrent en jeu. Il y a notamment le contraste entre l’usage québécois et l’usage français, et aussi celui entre les grands médias et les sources plus marquées politiquement, notamment sur le Web. (…) Et le mot revient souvent sous la plume des mêmes journalistes. À la Presse, Joneed Khan s’en est fait le champion. Il parle du président états-unien, du Congrès états-unien, du retrait états-unien d’Irak, du projet états-unien de Zone de libre-échange des Amériques. Il est frappant de voir que même lui n’a pas renoncé à américain : il a mentionné le Congrès américain en juillet dernier et le secrétaire d’État américain le 13 septembre. Moments d’inattention? Dans les grandes encyclopédies électroniques comme l’Universalis ou Encarta, les occurrences se comptent sur les doigts de la main. Wikipédia renferme quelque deux mille états-unien, par exemple il est question de la « guerre de sécession états-unienne » à l’article sur le film Le bon, la brute et le truand. Mais ces états-unien font face à cent mille américain. En outre, un bon nombre d’entre eux viennent de pages où les collaborateurs poursuivent justement des discussions, parfois musclées, sur l’opportunité d’accepter le mot dans l’encyclopédie. C’est un peu la cour du roi Pétaud dans cette merveilleuse encyclopédie, mais il n’est pas du tout sûr que le mot s’y imposera. C’est véritablement dans les médias et les sites contestataires ou militants qu’états-unien fleurit. Le réseau Voltaire, « réseau de presse non alignée », est exemplaire à cet égard : les rédacteurs l’emploient deux fois plus souvent qu’américain. On le rencontre souvent sur le site des « Amis de la Terre », groupe de défense de l’environnement, et sur « Grand Soir », « un journal alternatif d’information militante ». Mais américain reste quand même plus fréquent : on continue de parler des élections américaines, on n’en est pas encore aux élections états-uniennes. Il ne fait pas de doute que le mot est marqué à gauche sur l’échiquier politique. Il suffit pour s’en convaincre de jeter un coup d’oeil sur le journal communiste français L’Humanité : 118 occurrences d’états-unien en 2007, un net contraste avec le reste de la presse française. Mais la pente n’est pas à pic là non plus : 127 occurrences en 2005, 105 en 2006 – contre des milliers d’américain. On s’attendrait à le rencontrer souvent dans les pages de publications comme Courrier international, mais l’une des rares occurrences que j’y ai trouvées apparaissait dans un article reproduit du Devoir! Je note enfin qu’un wikipédiste a affirmé que le mot figurait dans certains manuels scolaires de géographie. On peut résumer la situation comme suit. Dans la presse en général, le terme s’est mis à grimper des deux côtés de l’Atlantique il y a quelques années, pour atteindre assez vite un plateau. Il semble avoir déjà amorcé sa descente en France. Il reste plus fréquent chez nous, mais il serait exagéré de dire qu’il a le vent dans les voiles. Pour le reste, l’usage est assez circonscrit. En fait, l’avenir du terme dépendra en grande partie de l’influence qu’exerceront des sites comme ceux que j’ai mentionnés, et ils ne sont pas négligeables, ainsi que de la détermination des blogueurs et autres internautes à l’employer. Il faut avouer que cinquante ans d’allées et venues dans les dictionnaires et une fréquence encore relativement faible dans l’usage lui donnent un peu l’air d’un néologisme attardé. Mais qui sait, peut-être que la diffusion de l’article du New York Times et le blogue du Monde lui donneront un nouvel élan. Avec Internet les choses peuvent changer vite. Il faudrait quand même toute une rééducation pour en généraliser l’emploi. Pensons à tout ce qu’il faudrait rebaptiser. Ne dites pas : la guerre américano-mexicaine, dites : la guerre mexicano-états-unienne. Ne dites pas : la révolution américaine, les relations canado-américaines, le vin américain, etc. Dites : l’armée états-unienne, les Noirs états-uniens, Je me suis acheté une voiture états-unienne. Et n’oublions pas les cinquante États états-uniens. Nul ne contestera que la logique plaide pour états-unien. Mais en face il y a l’histoire, l’usage, la langue, l’euphonie, les habitudes. C’est beaucoup. Pour être efficace, il faudrait en même temps intensifier l’emploi géographiquement correct d’américain, ce qui ferait surgir l’ambiguïté de partout. Remarquons que les États-Uniens continueraient d’être des Américains – comme nous! Combien parmi nous sont prêts à se définir comme « Américains »? On peut prédire une certaine résistance. De plus, s’il y a un brin d’anti-américanisme dans la promotion d’états-unien, forcément il sera lui aussi péjoratif. C’est comme si on remettait chaque fois sous le nez des Américains la carte du continent. Plusieurs ont rappelé qu’il serait abusif d’accuser ces derniers de s’être appelés ainsi à cause de prétentions hégémoniques. Comme le rappelle le Grand dictionnaire terminologique de l’OQLF, ils ont formé leur gentilé à partir du nom de leur pays, États-Unis d’Amérique, de la même manière que, plus tard, les Mexicains à partir d’États-Unis du Mexique. Il faut revenir au point de départ et se demander où est le problème. Nous arrive-t-il souvent de rester perplexes parce que le mot américain devant nos yeux est ambigu? Prend-on les Canadiens pour des habitants des États-Unis? Paul Roux a répondu à la question dans son blogue « Les amoureux du français » sur le site de la Presse le 9 novembre 2006 : (…) « Lorsqu’on parle des Américains, on sait bien qu’il ne s’agit pas des Canadiens ou des Mexicains. Le français dispose d’ailleurs du terme Nord-Américain, qui englobe tous les habitants de l’Amérique du Nord, et du terme Sud-Américain, qui désigne ceux de l’Amérique du Sud. » Les Américains en ont attrapé eux-mêmes un complexe et ont cherché d’autres noms. (…) Quelques exemples des termes qui ont été proposés au fil du temps : Usian, Usanian, USAian, Usonian, Columbard, Fredonian, United Statesian, Colonican, U-S-ian, USAn, etc. Du côté espagnol, la situation est bien différente. Le Diccionario Panhispánico de Dudas de la Real Academia Española, qui recueille l’usage de l’ensemble des pays hispanophones, recommande d’employer estadounidense, et non americano, pour désigner nos voisins du Sud. Dans son Diccionario de la Lengua Española, l’académie précise que estadounidense veut dire « Natural de los Estados Unidos de América », tandis que americano est défini comme « Natural de América ». Mais il est normal que le monde hispanophone et les Latino-Américains en particulier soient plus sensibles à l’emploi du mot americano. Estadounidense est aussi très euphonique. On m’a fait remarquer par ailleurs que l’agence de presse espagnole EFE, qui recommande aussi l’emploi de estadounidense dans son vade-mecum, incline à penser que norteamericano reste plus fréquent dans l’usage (« Norteamericanos es tal vez el más usado, si bien no es el más preciso »). Norteamericano? On dirait que, vu d’Europe ou d’Amérique latine, le Canada se retrouve toujours dans un angle mort. Jacques Desrosiers

Vous avez dit ‘étatsunien’ ?

A l’heure où après l’hystérie collective du virus chinois

Le psychodrame racialiste des Vies noires qui comptent …

Nos nouveaux iconoclastes et flagellants s’attaquent …

Quand ce n’est pas à leurs propres propagandistes

Non seulement à la police …

Mais, entre noms de rue et statues, à notre histoire

Et à présent à notre géographie

Retour sur ce nouveau tic de nos anti-américains …

Où, entre médias et universitaires, le dernier chic est le barbarisme « étatsunien » …

Nos voisins les « États-Uniens »
Jacques Desrosiers
L’Actualité langagière, volume 4, numéro 4
BTB
2007

Mon collègue André Racicot a discuté du mot états-unien dans sa chronique de L’Actualité terminologique il y a sept ans1. Il arrivait à la conclusion qu’il était trop tard pour renverser un usage solidement établi. Je ne suis pas plus optimiste que lui sur l’avenir de ce drôle de gentilé, mais il est intéressant de revenir sur la question, parce que le mot s’est gagné des partisans depuis l’an 2000, et que le débat a même fait surface l’été dernier dans rien de moins que le New York Times.

L’article du Times – plaisamment intitulé « There’s a Word for People Like You » – était une traduction maison d’un topo que venaient de faire paraître les deux correcteurs du journal Le Monde sur leur blogue « Langue sauce piquante2  ». Ils n’apportaient pas de solution au problème, si problème il y a, mais expliquaient aux lecteurs du Times qu’en français le mot américain désignait les habitants des États-Unis de façon maladroite – n’y a-t-il pas aussi sur le continent « américain » des Canadiens, des Mexicains, des Argentins…? – et qu’un concurrent, états-unien, avait pris place à ses côtés, sans vraiment annoncer sa mort, puisque américain avait une légitimité historique.

Il aurait été audacieux de proposer autre chose que la cohabitation. Leur topo leur avait d’ailleurs valu des volées de bois vert des nombreux internautes qui fréquentent leur site. Beaucoup y décelaient une marque d’anti-américanisme, certains voyaient même se pointer la « machine de guerre altermondialiste ». Difficile de nier qu’états-unien dissimule mal une certaine réserve à l’égard des États-Unis. Récemment un animateur de Radio-Canada précisait en posant une question à son invité au sujet des relations Québec-Mexique : « J’emploie ici le mot américain au sens « noble ». » Il évoquait le continent. Américain au sens courant est presque péjoratif aux yeux de certains. Les correcteurs du Monde s’étaient défendus en affirmant que « les Québécois et les autres francophones canadiens utilisent depuis bien avant la naissance du mouvement altermondialiste le terme « états-uniens » ». C’était beaucoup nous prêter.

Mais l’article avait le singulier mérite de rappeler que le mot a été inventé au Québec il y a une soixantaine d’années, sans donner de source. Sa fréquence a d’ailleurs été plus élevée de ce côté-ci de l’Atlantique. Ce n’est pas étonnant : nous sommes les premiers concernés. Gaston Dulong le fait d’ailleurs figurer dans son Dictionnaire des canadianismes publié chez Larousse, ainsi que Sinclair Robinson et Donald Smith dans le Dictionnaire du français canadien, bien qu’étrangement ces derniers le classent dans la langue « populaire et familière ».

Le mot a eu une présence erratique dans les dictionnaires français depuis quelques décennies. Il a fait une première apparition, sans trait d’union, dans le Grand Larousse encyclopédique en 1961. Pierre Gilbert le notait dans son Dictionnaire des mots nouveaux en 19713. Il en avait trouvé trois occurrences, dont l’une de 1955 dans Esprit, les deux autres des années soixante. Dupré en recommandait l’emploi en 1972 dans l’Encyclopédie du bon français, « lorsque américain serait absurde et ambigu, et qu’on ne peut employer « des États-Unis », par exemple lorsqu’il y a un autre complément par de : la politique états-unienne d’aide à l’Amérique latine ». On ne peut pas dire que cet avis ait provoqué une révolution. Pourquoi d’ailleurs ne pourrait-on dire : la politique d’aide des États-Unis à l’Amérique latine?

Il est absent du Grand dictionnaire encyclopédique Larousse (le GDEL) publié en 1983, mais réapparaît en 1995 dans son successeur, le Grand Larousse universel. En 1985, la deuxième édition du Grand Robert le donnait encore comme rare. Aujourd’hui il figure à peu près partout, mais je note que le Petit Robert ne l’a pas gardé dans son édition de poche 2008.

Le Petit Robert le fait remonter à 1955. Il s’appuie sans doute sur la citation dénichée par Pierre Gilbert. Un traducteur du Bureau m’avait pourtant signalé que le mot avait été à la mode au Québec aux alentours de la Deuxième Guerre mondiale. Or dans une page d’archives reproduite par le Devoir en mai 2007, je suis tombé sur un article du 7 mai 1945 résumant une conférence d’André Laurendeau, qui déclarait dans un débat sur la langue :

« Vous auriez d’un côté une langue solidement assise, bien enracinée, parlée par huit millions de Canadiens et 140 millions d’États-Uniens, et comprise par trois millions et demi de Canadiens jadis d’expression française4… »

Un wikipédiste a trouvé une occurrence plus vieille encore, dans un article paru en 1942 dans la French Review, « La Vie Intellectuelle au Canada Français », sous la plume de Marine Leland :

« Le roman canadien-français ne peut se comparer, ni du point de vue de la qualité ni de celui de la quantité, à la poésie ou à l’histoire canadienne. Il ne peut se comparer non plus au roman états-unien5. »

Leland, une Franco-Américaine d’origine québécoise, était une éminente spécialiste des études canadiennes-françaises. D’après la page reproduite en fac-similé dans Internet, l’article avait d’abord paru dans Le Travailleur, un hebdo publié au Massachusetts. Le mot était donc connu des Franco-Américains, du moins dans les milieux intellectuels.

Mais la plus vieille référence est celle mentionnée par le Dictionnaire culturel en langue française, publié par les éditions Le Robert en 2005 sous la direction d’Alain Rey, qui a retracé états-unien dans un article d’André Laurendeau (encore lui!) paru en 1941, « L’Enseignement secondaire », sans préciser davantage la source. Il doit s’agir de L’Action nationale, dont Laurendeau était le directeur à l’époque.

Ces références montrent que le mot était en vogue dans les années 40. Pourtant, à ma connaissance, Bélisle ne le fera entrer dans son Dictionnaire général de la langue française au Canada qu’au moment de la deuxième édition en 1971, en le faisant précéder d’une petite fleur de lys pour indiquer que c’était un québécisme, avec l’exemple : la marine états-unienne. Son usage a sans doute été marginal, même pendant la guerre. Laurendeau lui-même était loin de l’employer systématiquement. Plus tard, dans un éditorial du Devoir du 16 mars 1955 portant sur les relations canado-américaines, il emploie exclusivement américain6. La vogue était passée, semble-t-il.

Plusieurs ont remarqué que le mot a repris du poil de la bête depuis l’an 2000. Certains pensent qu’il est revenu dans la foulée du 11-Septembre; c’est une possibilité. Il y a six ou sept ans, il était à peine employé. Si Robert Solé a pris la peine d’en parler dans une chronique de langue du Monde le 10 novembre 2003, pour dire que « le terme ne passe pas », c’est que le mot commençait à se rencontrer plus souvent tout en restant assez discret. Si on traçait un graphique de son emploi depuis le début, on verrait le terme monter, atteindre un plateau, descendre un peu plus tard, puis remonter tranquillement après une longue absence. On peut se demander s’il ne connaît pas un regain passager, avant de retomber à nouveau hors d’usage.

Bien des facteurs entrent en jeu. Il y a notamment le contraste entre l’usage québécois et l’usage français, et aussi celui entre les grands médias et les sources plus marquées politiquement, notamment sur le Web.

Prenons l’usage français. Pour le Monde, les moteurs de recherche relèvent dans les cinq dernières années une vingtaine d’articles où apparaît le terme (en tenant compte du féminin et du pluriel). Ce n’est pas beaucoup. En 2007, de janvier à la fin octobre, on n’en trouve que quelques-uns. Quand on restreint le domaine à lemonde.fr et à l’année écoulée, Google recense une centaine de pages, mais en regardant de près on verra que presque toutes les occurrences viennent de blogues ou de réactions d’abonnés à des articles, et non des journalistes maison. Dans les archives de L’Express, une dizaine en tout, et en 2007 deux seulement. Et tout comme dans le Monde, ces occurrences isolées sont écrasées par un millier d’américain. Tout se passe comme si, en France, états-unien avait essayé de se tailler une place dans les années 2002 à 2006, mais qu’il était déjà sur une pente descendante.

Du côté québécois, la fréquence est plus élevée, mais encore modeste toutes proportions gardées. Dans la Presse, le terme revient dans 200 articles de janvier à octobre 2007. Le chiffre est constant depuis quelques années. Dans le Devoir, si l’on interroge le moteur de recherche du site, on passe de quelques articles par année avant l’an 2000, à une soixantaine par année de 2001 à 2004, puis à une centaine de 2005 à 2007. J’ai noté plus précisément : 90 de janvier à octobre 2005, 90 de janvier à octobre 2006, et 105 de janvier à octobre 2007. Ce n’est pas une montée vertigineuse. De plus, il faut mettre ces chiffres en perspective : dans le cas de la Presse, américain apparaît dans plus de 20 000 articles par année. L’autre ne lui fait pas beaucoup d’ombre.

Et le mot revient souvent sous la plume des mêmes journalistes. À la Presse, Joneed Khan s’en est fait le champion. Il parle du président états-unien, du Congrès états-unien, du retrait états-unien d’Irak, du projet états-unien de Zone de libre-échange des Amériques. Il est frappant de voir que même lui n’a pas renoncé à américain : il a mentionné le Congrès américain en juillet dernier et le secrétaire d’État américain le 13 septembre. Moments d’inattention?

Dans les grandes encyclopédies électroniques comme l’Universalis ou Encarta, les occurrences se comptent sur les doigts de la main. Wikipédia renferme quelque deux mille états-unien, par exemple il est question de la « guerre de sécession états-unienne » à l’article sur le film Le bon, la brute et le truand. Mais ces états-unien font face à cent mille américain. En outre, un bon nombre d’entre eux viennent de pages où les collaborateurs poursuivent justement des discussions, parfois musclées, sur l’opportunité d’accepter le mot dans l’encyclopédie. C’est un peu la cour du roi Pétaud dans cette merveilleuse encyclopédie, mais il n’est pas du tout sûr que le mot s’y imposera.

C’est véritablement dans les médias et les sites contestataires ou militants qu’états-unien fleurit. Le réseau Voltaire, « réseau de presse non alignée », est exemplaire à cet égard : les rédacteurs l’emploient deux fois plus souvent qu’américain7. On le rencontre souvent sur le site des « Amis de la Terre », groupe de défense de l’environnement, et sur « Grand Soir », « un journal alternatif d’information militante ». Mais américain reste quand même plus fréquent : on continue de parler des élections américaines, on n’en est pas encore aux élections états-uniennes8.

Il ne fait pas de doute que le mot est marqué à gauche sur l’échiquier politique. Il suffit pour s’en convaincre de jeter un coup d’oeil sur le journal communiste français L’Humanité : 118 occurrences d’états-unien en 2007, un net contraste avec le reste de la presse française. Mais la pente n’est pas à pic là non plus : 127 occurrences en 2005, 105 en 2006 – contre des milliers d’américain9. On s’attendrait à le rencontrer souvent dans les pages de publications comme Courrier international, mais l’une des rares occurrences que j’y ai trouvées apparaissait dans un article reproduit du Devoir10!

Je note enfin qu’un wikipédiste a affirmé que le mot figurait dans certains manuels scolaires de géographie.

On peut résumer la situation comme suit. Dans la presse en général, le terme s’est mis à grimper des deux côtés de l’Atlantique il y a quelques années, pour atteindre assez vite un plateau. Il semble avoir déjà amorcé sa descente en France. Il reste plus fréquent chez nous, mais il serait exagéré de dire qu’il a le vent dans les voiles. Pour le reste, l’usage est assez circonscrit. En fait, l’avenir du terme dépendra en grande partie de l’influence qu’exerceront des sites comme ceux que j’ai mentionnés, et ils ne sont pas négligeables, ainsi que de la détermination des blogueurs et autres internautes à l’employer. Il faut avouer que cinquante ans d’allées et venues dans les dictionnaires et une fréquence encore relativement faible dans l’usage lui donnent un peu l’air d’un néologisme attardé. Mais qui sait, peut-être que la diffusion de l’article du New York Times et le blogue du Monde lui donneront un nouvel élan. Avec Internet les choses peuvent changer vite.

Il faudrait quand même toute une rééducation pour en généraliser l’emploi. Pensons à tout ce qu’il faudrait rebaptiser. Ne dites pas : la guerre américano-mexicaine, dites : la guerre mexicano-états-unienne. Ne dites pas : la révolution américaine, les relations canado-américaines, le vin américain, etc. Dites : l’armée états-unienne, les Noirs états-uniens, Je me suis acheté une voiture états-unienne. Et n’oublions pas les cinquante États états-uniens.

Nul ne contestera que la logique plaide pour états-unien. Mais en face il y a l’histoire, l’usage, la langue, l’euphonie, les habitudes. C’est beaucoup. Pour être efficace, il faudrait en même temps intensifier l’emploi géographiquement correct d’américain, ce qui ferait surgir l’ambiguïté de partout. Remarquons que les États-Uniens continueraient d’être des Américains – comme nous! Combien parmi nous sont prêts à se définir comme « Américains »? On peut prédire une certaine résistance. De plus, s’il y a un brin d’anti-américanisme dans la promotion d’états-unien, forcément il sera lui aussi péjoratif. C’est comme si on remettait chaque fois sous le nez des Américains la carte du continent.

Plusieurs ont rappelé qu’il serait abusif d’accuser ces derniers de s’être appelés ainsi à cause de prétentions hégémoniques. Comme le rappelle le Grand dictionnaire terminologique de l’OQLF, ils ont formé leur gentilé à partir du nom de leur pays, États-Unis d’Amérique, de la même manière que, plus tard, les Mexicains à partir d’États-Unis du Mexique.

Il faut revenir au point de départ et se demander où est le problème. Nous arrive-t-il souvent de rester perplexes parce que le mot américain devant nos yeux est ambigu? Prend-on les Canadiens pour des habitants des États-Unis? Paul Roux a répondu à la question dans son blogue « Les amoureux du français » sur le site de la Presse le 9 novembre 2006 :

« [l’appellation américain] n’est pas non plus confondante. Lorsqu’on parle des Américains, on sait bien qu’il ne s’agit pas des Canadiens ou des Mexicains. Le français dispose d’ailleurs du terme Nord-Américain, qui englobe tous les habitants de l’Amérique du Nord, et du terme Sud-Américain, qui désigne ceux de l’Amérique du Sud. »

Les Américains en ont attrapé eux-mêmes un complexe et ont cherché d’autres noms. L’Encyclopedia4u.com résume ainsi le problème :

« As many people from the various nations throughout the New World consider themselves to be « Americans », some people think the common usage of « American » to refer to only people from the U.S. should be avoided in international contexts where it might be ambiguous. Many neologisms have been proposed to refer to the United States instead of « American ». However, they are virtually unused, and most commentators feel that it is unlikely that they will catch on. »

Quelques exemples des termes qui ont été proposés au fil du temps : Usian, Usanian, USAian, Usonian, Columbard, Fredonian, United Statesian, Colonican, U-S-ian, USAn, etc.

Du côté espagnol, la situation est bien différente. Le Diccionario Panhispánico de Dudas de la Real Academia Española, qui recueille l’usage de l’ensemble des pays hispanophones, recommande d’employer estadounidense, et non americano, pour désigner nos voisins du Sud. Dans son Diccionario de la Lengua Española, l’académie précise que estadounidense veut dire « Natural de los Estados Unidos de América », tandis que americano est défini comme « Natural de América ». Mais il est normal que le monde hispanophone et les Latino-Américains en particulier soient plus sensibles à l’emploi du mot americano. Estadounidense est aussi très euphonique. On m’a fait remarquer par ailleurs que l’agence de presse espagnole EFE, qui recommande aussi l’emploi de estadounidense dans son vade-mecum, incline à penser que norteamericano reste plus fréquent dans l’usage (« Norteamericanos es tal vez el más usado, si bien no es el más preciso11 »). Norteamericano? On dirait que, vu d’Europe ou d’Amérique latine, le Canada se retrouve toujours dans un angle mort12.

NOTES

REMARQUE

Après la date de tombée de cet article, j’ai relevé sur le site de L’Action nationale, qui reproduit maintenant le contenu complet de ses numéros depuis 1933, une occurrence d’états-unien dans un article d’octobre 1934, « La radio », signé par Arthur Laurendeau. Un article de 1936 attribue la paternité du mot à Paul Dumas, membre du mouvement Jeune-Canada. Le mot revient dans une soixantaine d’articles de 1934 à 1945. Ensuite il apparaît de façon plus éparse. – J. D.

Voir aussi:

Etats-Uniens

Langue sauce piquante

Le blog des correcteurs du Monde

Le continent américain est vaste, et il est tout de même étrange de faire d’un pays un continent, répondions-nous à un lecteur abonné et étonné de lire dans la lettre matinale du Monde.fr (baptisée « Check-List ») le terme « Etats-Uniens » pour désigner les habitants… des Etats-Unis. Et nous ajoutions : « Il ne faut pas voir dans le choix de ce terme la patte de l’altermondialisme ou une marque d’anti-américanisme. Car parler des ‘Américains’ pour désigner les seuls habitants des Etats-Unis, cela ne fait-il pas aussi Grand Satan ? » Martine Jacot, journaliste au Monde et ancienne correspondante du journal à Montréal, rappelle que « les Québécois et autres francophones canadiens utilisent depuis bien avant la naissance du mouvement altermondialiste le terme ‘états-uniens’ ». Si l’on persiste à appeler « Américains » les Etats-Uniens, il faudra alors faire de même pour les Mexicains par exemple, puisque géographiquement parlant, le Mexique fait partie de l’Amérique… du Nord.

Reconnaissons qu’ »Etats-Uniens » a contre lui la coalition de deux mots renforcés par une div’, un combat inégal avec la puissance toute nue du Ricain.

Voir également:

Canada. “Anglos” et “francos”, compatriotes malgré tout

Josée Blanchette
Le Devoir – Montréal
02/03/2005

Chaque samedi, une chaîne anglophone diffuse une émission sur le Québec présentée par une chanteuse à la mode. L’occasion pour une chroniqueuse du Devoir de s’interroger avec humour sur l’identité canadienne

Pauvre Mitsou. Une partie des médias s’acharne sur son cas parce qu’elle représentera tout le Canada français le samedi soir sur la CBC [télévision publique canadienne anglophone]. L’émission [destinée à présenter l’actualité du Québec aux anglophones] s’intitule Au Courant…
et la moitié du bottin de l’Union des artistes a été sollicitée pour animer cette vitrine de nos mœurs et de notre culture à l’intention du ROC (rest of Canada).
Allez comprendre quelque chose aux “anglos”. Ils éprouvent un je-ne-sais-quoi devant les avantages de Mitsou. Why not, coconut ? She’s so French ! A mon avis, il faut tirer parti de cet émoi visuel et simplement aiguiller l’aiguillon en aidant Mitsou à mieux représenter les “francos” du Canada. Elle est charmante, son sourire ferait craquer la Joconde, elle va faire grimper les cotes d’écoute et c’est ce qu’on attend d’une émission, même plate. Comme animatrice, elle s’inscrit parfaitement dans la tendance télévisuelle des émissions d’information : format sexy et contenu mou. De la part d’un pays qui subventionne les danseuses roumaines, donne sa bénédiction au mariage homosexuel et paie des pushers [revendeurs] de marijuana à des fins médicales, il ne faut pas s’attendre à beaucoup plus de sérieux.
Mitsou devra d’abord apprendre à connaître ceux à qui elle s’adresse, l’autre solitude [“les deux solitudes” est l’expression consacrée pour désigner les francos et les anglos au Canada], et s’abonner à Canadian Geographic. Les Canadiens du ROC sont aussi différents de Terre-Neuve à Vancouver qu’un Gaspésien peut l’être d’un Cayen. L’ancien Premier ministre Mackenzie King disait que certains pays avaient trop d’histoire et que le Canada avait trop de géographie. Du moins, c’est un pays horizontal. En général, les Canadiens sont fiers de l’être et ne comprennent pas l’indifférence, entretenue ou viscérale, à l’endroit de l’unifolié [le drapeau national, avec sa feuille d’érable].
Un journaliste de la CBC m’a appelée “from Toronto” l’autre jour pour me demander de lui résumer de quelle façon je me sentais canadienne.
“Mais d’aucune façon ! Le programme des commandites [programme fédéral destiné à promouvoir le Canada auprès des Québécois, qui s’est terminé par un scandale] a été un échec, faut croire !
— Vous n’êtes pas fière de [l’astronaute] Julie Payette ? a-t-il insisté.
— J’espère que ses parents le sont. Pas moi. Je n’ai rien à voir là-dedans. D’ailleurs, je n’ai rien à voir dans le fait que mes propres parents aient baisé au Canada plutôt qu’au Tibet pour me concevoir.”

Six fuseaux horaires multiculturels

Les Canadiens ont bien des marottes, dont celle de visiter leur pays et de traverser ses six fuseaux horaires en entier, a mari usque ad mare [de la mer à la mer]. Ils ne le feront probablement jamais, mais c’est une façon de montrer qu’ils tiennent très fort à leur peu d’attachement les uns pour les autres. Ça, je l’ai puisé dans mon guide de voyage préféré en terre canadienne : Xenophobe’s Guide to the Canadians. La mosaïque culturelle qui nous tient lieu de pays y est dépeinte avec beaucoup d’éloquence.
On y apprend que nos obsessions nationales sont le hockey et la feuille d’érable (que bien des Etats-Uniens épinglent sur leur sac à dos lorsqu’ils voyagent), que les maisons canadiennes sont équipées de deux portes d’entrée, voire d’une troisième qui ferme le vestibule, et que les Canadiens sont extrêmement polis. On a même retrouvé une femme Alzheimer errant à Los Angeles. Les policiers ont déduit qu’elle était canadienne parce qu’elle s’excusait lorsqu’on lui marchait sur les pieds.
On ajoute aussi que le ROC a peur de perdre le Québec à cause de toutes ces années à bûcher pour apprendre le français. Oh yeah ? Call me stupid ! Et, plus que tout, les Canadiens ne sont pas des Etats-Uniens, même si 90 % de la population vit à moins de 300 kilomètres de la frontière. [Le Premier ministre] Paul Martin est un béni-oui-oui qui couche avec un éléphant [le symbole des républicains américains], c’est tout. En raison de son multiculturalisme, la devise du Canada est : “Take the best, leave the rest” [Prenons le meilleur, laissons le reste].
Quelques sujets qui plairont aux anglos :
– La poutine [plat typique composé de frites, de sauce brune et de cheddar] au foie gras du restaurant Au pied de cochon. Même la poutine peut être snob et le foie gras prolo.
– Comment traverser un passage piétonnier sans se faire tuer à Montréal. “Vive la différence !” – Notre cidre de glace, qui figure même sur la carte des vins du George V à Paris. Those crazy French !
– Référendum : la seule fois que les Québécois ont voté oui, c’était en 1919, pour savoir si la prohibition devait prendre fin. La seule fois qu’ils étaient sobres pour y répondre, aussi…
– Le Québec, dernier cendrier du Canada. Notre attachement viscéral au mégot et à la fumée secondaire.
– L’avortement, en hausse constante au Québec : 30 000 l’an dernier (contre 73 000 naissances). Notre mort la plus certaine et notre peu d’enthousiasme à nous reproduire au Canada.

Voir de même:

The trouble with Americans
John Ryle
The Guardian
7 September 1998

A reader in Ecuador takes me to task for my use of the word ‘American’. Why, asks Lincoln Reyes, is it routine to use this word, without qualification, as a synonym for ‘citizen of the United States’ when the majority of Americans, properly speaking, are not from there, but from other countries in North, South or Central America? If you are a Latin American like him, he says, it is galling to be consistently written out of the geography of the continent that gave you birth. No wonder people regard the US as imperialist, when it appropriates the entire hemisphere for its own exclusive domain name. How do I think it feels to be Mexican, Chilean or Canadian, confronted every day with such linguistic chauvinism? What I think is that Mexicans and Canadians have got used to it. They’ve had to. It is not impossible to change the name of a country. (Where, we may ask, are the Zaires of yesteryear?) But renaming the most powerful country in the world is not on the agenda. When Osama bin Laden declares war on ‘America’, we know he does not include Ecuador or Mexico. The usage is worldwide and unlikely to change. This column, though, has never been one to turn its back on lost causes. So let us ask why it is that, in an age of political correctness, of sedulous public avoidance of terms that can cause offence to nations and ethnic groups, America has been exempted from reproach? The US is the home of political correctness. What Lincoln Reyes is suggesting is that it take a dose of its own medicine. Does the US have some proprietorial claim on the name of the continent it occupies? Some kind of historical precedence? Not at all. Amerigo Vespucci was an Italian who almost certainly never set foot in North America. He did explore the coast of South America, however, and in the 16th century a German cartographer named the southern part of the continent after him; only later was the term extended to include the north. So the US calling itself ‘America’ is something like South Africa calling itself ‘Africa’, or the Federal Republic of Germany ‘Europa’. Even the phrase ‘United States’ is not the preserve of the authors of the US Constitution: Brazil’s official name is the United States of Brazil.

Luckily, since there’s no other claimant for the name ‘Brazil’, it is seldom used. Even Lincoln Reyes would permit the USA to call itself the United States. But there is a problem when it comes to US citizens. United Statespersons? Usanians? Hardly. If we are to follow the Reyes Rule we will have to refer to them as ‘people from’ or ‘citizens of’ the US. Both take up a lot of breath. Since we talk about the US so much, we need short words and synonyms to avoid monotony. And synecdoche to avoid redundancy: ‘Washington’ is used to stand for the US government and ‘America’ stands for the country itself – the whole represents the part. But it seems there is no figure of speech that can produce a concise and acceptable term in English for its inhabitants.

There’s a word in Spanish, estadounidense, but it is hard to get your tongue around. ‘Gringo’, of course, is the word most Spanish speakers use. But apart from its pejorative overtones, the word ‘gringo’ is not specific enough. Canadians are gringos; and you and I, if we are anglophone, are probably gringos too, whether we are white or black or brown.

Contrariwise, in some parts of South America ‘gringo’ is used for anyone, even a native, who is fair in colouring. What about ‘yanqui’? It is also pejorative, of course. And the word means something different and more specific within the US. The use of ‘yanqui’ in South America is a reversal, in fact, of the rhetorical move that enshrines ‘American’ as a synonym for US citizen. Where people in the US, in calling themselves Americans, have taken the whole for the part; Spanish speakers, in borrowing ‘yankee’ for a New Englander, and extending it to the whole of the United States, have used the part for the whole. The negative connotation of ‘yanqui’ in Spanish reflects the distaste for US hegemony that my Ecuadorian correspondent exemplifies. ‘Yankee’, its equivalent in British English, has a weird, jocular air. We haven’t used ‘yank’ for yonks. It belongs with ‘Old Blighty’ and ‘Johnny Foreigner’. If political correctness does not proscribe such terms, good taste surely does.

Let us, then, register Lincoln Reyes’s proposal. But someone from a country that calls itself Ecuador may not be in a very strong position to object to the appropriation of geography in the cause of national identity. There are other countries that lie on the Equator; any of them could claim the name for their own. I don’t suppose people in Equatorial Guinea are too upset about Ecuador’s bid for nominal rights over the noughth parallel, but if Lincoln Reyes is serious about curtailing US linguistic imperialism, he may have to look at changing the name of his own country as well.

Voir encore

Caleb Gayle
Time
July 13, 2020
Caleb Gayle is a writer and author of forthcoming book, Cow Tom’s Cabin (under contract with Riverhead Books), a narrative account of how many Black Native Americans, including Cow Tom’s descendants, were marginalized by white supremacy in America

When I was growing up in Tulsa, my teachers would move quickly from the Trail of Tears that began in the 1830s to the oil boom in Oklahoma of the first half of the 20th century. During the early 19th century, the state of Oklahoma became the destination for Native American Nations who were forcibly removed from the south and southeastern United States, but no one drew a straight line from the marginalization of Native Americans to white men’s accumulation of land on which they could profit. The way history was taught, I assumed that the devastation happened so many years ago that it wasn’t relevant. I even had one teacher mention that Native Americans were “standing in the way of progress.” I didn’t know that that teacher was echoing the sentiments of the namesake of the town, Bixby.

Over the past month, I have been spellbound by the actions of activists determined to compel America to confront the ugliness of its past. The protests at the Emancipation Memorial, the removal of Teddy Roosevelt’s statue in New York, and now even the bold calls for rethinking Mount Rushmore on the site of Lakota land reveal that our country has more learning to do about what we choose to glorify. But last week, as many celebrated the Supreme Court’s ruling that Oklahoma—almost half of it at least—belongs to the jurisdiction of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, I have also been thinking about the relics of our past that are so ingrained in our present that we misremember our history. One such relic is the names of the very places in which we live.

Tams Bixby, a Minnesotan, became chairman of something called the Dawes Commission in 1903, as its founder Henry Dawes took ill. “Henry Dawes may have given the commission its name, but Tams Bixby defined its character and would serve as its leader during the critical period of enrollment and allotment, and he would make the daily decisions that affected the life and future of all of the people in Indian Territory,” Kent Canter wrote in the Dawes Commission And the Allotment of the Five Civilized Tribes, 1893-1914.

The Dawes Commission was a government body designed to persuade the Creek, Cherokee, Seminole, Chickasaw and Choctaw Nations (once called the Five Civilized Tribes) to abandon the communal land ownership system they had long used and to divide the land into allotments that would belong to individuals. In order to complete that process, the commission had to determine who belonged to each tribe, a question Dawes and then Bixby sought to answer using ancestral bloodlines. But, as Sandy Grande, director of the Center for the Critical Study of Race and Ethnicity at Connecticut College, wrote in Red Pedagogy: Native American Social and Political Thought, “Since there was no ‘scientific’ means of determining precise bloodlines, commission members often ascribed blood status based on their own racist notions of what it meant to be Indian—designating full-blood status to ‘poorly assimilated’ Indians and mixed blood status to those who most resembled whites.” The decisions, made by the commission and not by members of the tribe, determined who got which land, and still have ramifications for tribal membership today. Crucially, any land left over once the tribal territories were divided would be available for the U.S. government, and in turn to white settlers. This process would lead to these Nations losing more than 100 million acres of land—land they were promised would be theirs and theirs alone.

Until I started writing a book about the history of Black citizens of the Creek Nation, I did not know that the town of Bixby, on the outskirts of my childhood home, was named in honor of the man who led this devastating effort. My teachers never told me about him, likely because they weren’t given the chance to weigh the full measure of history either.

On July 3, in the shadow of Mt. Rushmore, President Trump said, “As we meet here tonight there is a growing danger that threatens every blessing our ancestors fought so hard for.” He then doubled down, saying, “Our nation is witnessing a merciless campaign to wipe out our history, defame our heroes, erase our values and indoctrinate our children.”

Children are being indoctrinated, but not in the way Trump suggests. Instead, they are being fed an uncomplex version of history—one that minimizes the experiences of those on the margins to turn white men who did evil things into heroes. The name Bixby had become so common in my area that we didn’t think about where it came from. That’s why we tear down, rename and rethink. We do it to tell the whole story, not just the parts that make us feel good. Perhaps we need to do this not just for statues and monuments and schools and sports teams but for cities and counties too. Perhaps we should begin again with the full weight of history upon which we stand.

It’s not just Bixby, of course. In Oklahoma, Jackson County is named for Confederate General Stonewall Jackson, while Roger Mills County is named for Roger Q. Mills, a U.S. senator who served in the Confederate Army and had ties to the Ku Klux Klan. I’ve driven through both of them without even thinking about the origins of their names. Likewise, Stephens County, Texas, was named after Alexander Stephens, the Vice President of the Confederate States, and his boss, Jefferson Davis, has counties named in Texas, Georgia and Mississippi as well as a parish in Louisiana. People who marginalized and oppressed didn’t just affect those who lived at the time–Bixby’s actions, along with so many others’, caused the Creek Nation to lose the jurisdictional power they just, in part, won back–and the places that bear their names should no longer remain without scrutiny.

History demands that we remember all of it or it isn’t true history at all.

When I was growing up in Tulsa, my teachers would move quickly from the Trail of Tears that began in the 1830s to the oil boom in Oklahoma of the first half of the 20th century. During the early 19th century, the state of Oklahoma became the destination for Native American Nations who were forcibly removed from the south and southeastern United States, but no one drew a straight line from the marginalization of Native Americans to white men’s accumulation of land on which they could profit. The way history was taught, I assumed that the devastation happened so many years ago that it wasn’t relevant. I even had one teacher mention that Native Americans were “standing in the way of progress.” I didn’t know that that teacher was echoing the sentiments of the namesake of the town, Bixby.
Over the past month, I have been spellbound by the actions of activists determined to compel America to confront the ugliness of its past. The protests at the Emancipation Memorial, the removal of Teddy Roosevelt’s statue in New York, and now even the bold calls for rethinking Mount Rushmore on the site of Lakota land reveal that our country has more learning to do about what we choose to glorify. But last week, as many celebrated the Supreme Court’s ruling that Oklahoma—almost half of it at least—belongs to the jurisdiction of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, I have also been thinking about the relics of our past that are so ingrained in our present that we misremember our history. One such relic is the names of the very places in which we live.
Tams Bixby, a Minnesotan, became chairman of something called the Dawes Commission in 1903, as its founder Henry Dawes took ill. “Henry Dawes may have given the commission its name, but Tams Bixby defined its character and would serve as its leader during the critical period of enrollment and allotment, and he would make the daily decisions that affected the life and future of all of the people in Indian Territory,” Kent Canter wrote in the Dawes Commission And the Allotment of the Five Civilized Tribes, 1893-1914.
The Dawes Commission was a government body designed to persuade the Creek, Cherokee, Seminole, Chickasaw and Choctaw Nations (once called the Five Civilized Tribes) to abandon the communal land ownership system they had long used and to divide the land into allotments that would belong to individuals. In order to complete that process, the commission had to determine who belonged to each tribe, a question Dawes and then Bixby sought to answer using ancestral bloodlines. But, as Sandy Grande, director of the Center for the Critical Study of Race and Ethnicity at Connecticut College, wrote in Red Pedagogy: Native American Social and Political Thought, “Since there was no ‘scientific’ means of determining precise bloodlines, commission members often ascribed blood status based on their own racist notions of what it meant to be Indian—designating full-blood status to ‘poorly assimilated’ Indians and mixed blood status to those who most resembled whites.” The decisions, made by the commission and not by members of the tribe, determined who got which land, and still have ramifications for tribal membership today. Crucially, any land left over once the tribal territories were divided would be available for the U.S. government, and in turn to white settlers. This process would lead to these Nations losing more than 100 million acres of land—land they were promised would be theirs and theirs alone.
Until I started writing a book about the history of Black citizens of the Creek Nation, I did not know that the town of Bixby, on the outskirts of my childhood home, was named in honor of the man who led this devastating effort. My teachers never told me about him, likely because they weren’t given the chance to weigh the full measure of history either.
On July 3, in the shadow of Mt. Rushmore, President Trump said, “As we meet here tonight there is a growing danger that threatens every blessing our ancestors fought so hard for.” He then doubled down, saying, “Our nation is witnessing a merciless campaign to wipe out our history, defame our heroes, erase our values and indoctrinate our children.”
Children are being indoctrinated, but not in the way Trump suggests. Instead, they are being fed an uncomplex version of history—one that minimizes the experiences of those on the margins to turn white men who did evil things into heroes. The name Bixby had become so common in my area that we didn’t think about where it came from. That’s why we tear down, rename and rethink. We do it to tell the whole story, not just the parts that make us feel good. Perhaps we need to do this not just for statues and monuments and schools and sports teams but for cities and counties too. Perhaps we should begin again with the full weight of history upon which we stand.
It’s not just Bixby, of course. In Oklahoma, Jackson County is named for Confederate General Stonewall Jackson, while Roger Mills County is named for Roger Q. Mills, a U.S. senator who served in the Confederate Army and had ties to the Ku Klux Klan. I’ve driven through both of them without even thinking about the origins of their names. Likewise, Stephens County, Texas, was named after Alexander Stephens, the Vice President of the Confederate States, and his boss, Jefferson Davis, has counties named in Texas, Georgia and Mississippi as well as a parish in Louisiana. People who marginalized and oppressed didn’t just affect those who lived at the time–Bixby’s actions, along with so many others’, caused the Creek Nation to lose the jurisdictional power they just, in part, won back–and the places that bear their names should no longer remain without scrutiny.
History demands that we remember all of it or it isn’t true history at all.

Voir enfin:

There’s a Word for People Like You
Martine Rousseau and Olivier Houdart
The New York Times
July 6, 2007

Paris
WHAT is the proper term to refer to those of you who live in the United States of America? The word “American” is so deeply embedded in your nation’s identity that it may seem curious to you that there could be any discussion about it, but some people — in Latin America, for example — find it offensive, while others, including some in France, simply find it imprecise.

“Américain” (in French the ethnonym is capitalized, the adjective is lower case) is a word with many meanings, depending on context: “américains” applies to all Américains (from the United States), yet all Américains (from North and South America) are not necessarily américains.

That’s why “Américain,” which first appeared in French as early as the 16th century and is applicable to groups other than just the inhabitants of the United States (in contrast to Canadien, Mexicain, Argentin, etc.), has a certain unsatisfactory quality about it, and it would be preferable to find something more precise. The French do use certain diminutives — like “Ricains” (first attestation in 1918), “Amerlos” (1936) and “Amerloques” (1945) — that refer to only the United States, but the news media can’t use them; they aren’t necessarily hostile but they did take on a pejorative tinge during the cold war.

Helpfully, though, in Quebec about six decades ago the word États-Unien, derived from the French for United States, États-Unis, was born. Its spread was modest at first, but today it’s frequent in the news media, and there’s even a radio program here that uses it exclusively. In ordinary conversation, though, the French still say “Américains.” A recent occurrence of “États-Uniens” (though far from the first) on the Web site of our newspaper, Le Monde, provoked the ire of readers who saw anti-American and anti-globalist sentiment behind it.

When we published a note on our language blog defending the use of États-Uniens — the word is neither pretty nor musical, but it answers a certain need — we had an outpouring of responses. They ranged from absolute opposition to the word (because of its supposed anti-Americanism, its ugliness, its snobbishness, its sarcastic tone, its lack of usefulness for anyone but academics — and because it sounds like space aliens) to enthusiastic approval, notably as a counter to the “imperialist” appropriation of a whole continent by one country’s ethnonym.

Readers also suggested similar terms that they considered more melodic, like Usaniens or Usiens (following the example of the Greek word Usanos, derived from U.S.A., even though those initials are actually the equivalent of I.P.A. in that language).

One reader even declared, “The United States of America is the only country in the world that doesn’t have a name: the first two words define its political organization, the last the continent it sits on.” That doesn’t seem entirely fair: while the United States at least mentions a continent, the old Soviet Union had no geographic anchorage at all.

As for us, although we’d be delighted to be the founders of a new linguistic mandate, we find that Américain has historical legitimacy, while États-Unien, its challenger, solves a lexical problem — indeed, they complement each other and we should let the two of them cohabit. Besides, we can then prove wrong Pierre Bayle, the great French historian of the 17th century, who wrote that as in nature, “the birth of one word is usually the death of another.” Therefore we say, during the week of your national holiday, vive l’Américain — and l’États-Unien.


Médias: A l’exemple de Saturne, la Révolution dévore ses enfants (Spot the error when the mainstream media want to cut ties with even moderate anti-Trump conservatives… because they won’t bend the knee to critical theory’s version of reality !)

17 juillet, 2020

https://www.click2houston.com/resizer/YvjRZGx6lUqtkm5X7MTSZcpEyHg=/1600x1059/smart/filters:format(jpeg):strip_exif(true):strip_icc(true):no_upscale(true):quality(65):fill(FFF)/cloudfront-us-east-1.images.arcpublishing.com/gmg/T4YEM7I2WFDCZCGZOC3NFKOH7M.jpg

A l’exemple de Saturne, la révolution dévore ses enfants. Jacques Mallet du Pan (1793)
On pensait d’ordinaire que le socialisme était une sorte de libéralisme augmenté d’une morale. L’État allait prendre votre vie économique en charge et vous libérerait de la crainte de la pauvreté, du chômage, etc., mais il n’aurait nul besoin de s’immiscer dans votre vie intellectuelle privée. Maintenant la preuve a été faite que ces vues étaient fausses. George Orwell (Literature and Totalitarianism, 1941)
Déjà, nous ne savons littéralement presque rien de la Révolution et des années qui la précédèrent. Tous les documents ont été détruits ou falsifiés, tous les livres récrits, tous les tableaux repeints. Toutes les statues, les rues, les édifices, ont changé de nom, toutes les dates ont été modifiées. Et le processus continue tous les jours, à chaque minute. L’histoire s’est arrêtée. Rien n’existe qu’un présent éternel dans lequel le Parti a toujours raison. Je sais naturellement que le passé est falsifié, mais il me serait impossible de le prouver, alors même que j’ai personnellement procédé à la falsification. Winston (1984, George Orwell)
Nous sommes une société qui, tous les cinquante ans ou presque, est prise d’une sorte de paroxysme de vertu – une orgie d’auto-purification à travers laquelle le mal d’une forme ou d’une autre doit être chassé. De la chasse aux sorcières de Salem aux chasses aux communistes de l’ère McCarthy à la violente fixation actuelle sur la maltraitance des enfants, on retrouve le même fil conducteur d’hystérie morale. Après la période du maccarthisme, les gens demandaient : mais comment cela a-t-il pu arriver ? Comment la présomption d’innocence a-t-elle pu être abandonnée aussi systématiquement ? Comment de grandes et puissantes institutions ont-elles pu accepté que des enquêteurs du Congrès aient fait si peu de cas des libertés civiles – tout cela au nom d’une guerre contre les communistes ? Comment était-il possible de croire que des subversifs se cachaient derrière chaque porte de bibliothèque, dans chaque station de radio, que chaque acteur de troisième zone qui avait appartenu à la mauvaise organisation politique constituait une menace pour la sécurité de la nation ? Dans quelques décennies peut-être les gens ne manqueront pas de se poser les mêmes questions sur notre époque actuelle; une époque où les accusations de sévices les plus improbables trouvent des oreilles bienveillantes; une époque où il suffit d’être accusé par des sources anonymes pour être jeté en pâture à la justice; une époque où la chasse à ceux qui maltraitent les enfants est devenu une pathologie nationale. Dorothy Rabinowitz
A statue of Jesus Christ was decapitated and knocked off a pedestal at a Catholic church in Florida, another in a string of similar incidents nationwide. (…) In a separate incident, a Catholic congregation in Ocala, several hours north of Miami, was targeted Saturday morning while preparing for Mass. Steven Anthony Shields, 24, is accused of slamming his vehicle into the church before setting it on fire. (…) In another act of violence, the pastor of St. Stephen Catholic Church in Chattanooga, Tenn., found a statue of Mary decapitated on Saturday and they have not located the statue’s head, Catholic News Agency reports. (…) Statues of the Virgin Mary also were vandalized in Boston and New York City over the weekend. A 249-year-old Catholic church in the Archdiocese of Los Angeles caught fire Saturday morning. Capt. Antonio Negrete of the San Gabriel Fire Department told the local Fox 11 news outlet the recent destruction of monuments to Junipero Serra, the founder of the California mission system – whom Indigenous activists view as a symbol of oppression – will be a factor in the investigation. Following George Floyd’s police-related death in May, Black Lives Matter leaders and protesters called for the toppling of statues, from Confederate symbols to former U.S. presidents and abolitionists. Activist Shaun King called for all images depicting Jesus as a « White European » and his mother to be torn down because they’re forms of « White supremacy » and « racist propaganda. » Meanwhile, people on social media point out the lack of mainstream coverage of the recent anti-Catholic incidents. « Churches are being burned to the ground. What?, » Mike Cernovich, a controversial right-leaning author, said in a video on Twitter. « Why is this not the biggest story of the day? » Sean Feucht, a California worship leader and pastor, commenting on the incidents asked, « Where’s the outrage? » Fox 5
J’ai été embauchée dans le but de faire venir au journal les voix qui n’apparaîtraient pas dans ses pages autrement : (…) les centristes, les conservateurs et ceux qui ne se sentent pas chez eux au New York Times. La raison de ce recrutement était claire : le journal n’avait pas anticipé le résultat de l’élection présidentielle de 2016, ce qui montrait qu’il n’avait pas une bonne compréhension du pays qu’il couvre. Pourtant , le journal n’a pas tiré les enseignements qui auraient dû suivre le scrutin. Mes incursions dans la pensée non orthodoxe ont fait de moi l’objet d’un harcèlement constant de la part de mes collègues qui ne partagent pas mes opinions. Ils me traitent de nazie et de raciste (…). Mon travail et ma personne sont ouvertement dénigrés sur les chaînes Slack [outil de communication interne] de la société (…). Certains collaborateurs y soutiennent qu’il faut se débarrasser de moi si le journal veut être véritablement ‘inclusif’ et d’autres postent l’émoji de la hache [‘ax’ signifie à la fois ‘hache’ et ‘virer’] à côté de mon nom. Bari Weiss
Chaque jour des jeunes noirs sont tués par des gangs à Chicago. Où sont les militants de Black Lives Matter? Quand des Noirs tuent des Noirs, les militants Black Lives Matter ne viennent pas faire ce bazar. Femme noire de Chicago
On pose une équivalence entre Histoire et Occident. Selon cette logique, toute l’histoire, surtout quand elle est criminelle, est faite par l’Occident. Lorsque quelque chose de mal se passe, c’est donc l’Occident qui est responsable. Comme si rien ne pouvait advenir sans nous. Or, ce n’est absolument pas le cas. Notre impérialisme absolu sur l’histoire nous conduit à une culpabilisation absolue de nous-mêmes et à une victimisation tout aussi absolue d’autrui. Gabriel Martinez-Gros
Pour l’instant, les médias ne s’intéressent à la vie des Noirs que quand ils sont tués par des Blancs (ce qui est en fait statistiquement très rare). Et cela contribue à invisibiliser encore davantage la vie des Noirs. (….) Aux Etats-Unis, 93 % des Noirs victimes d’un homicide sont tués par d’autres Noirs. S’il est normal de condamner le meurtre [?] ignoble et tragique de George Floyd, il est curieux de voir nombre de personnes s’en prendre à la police américaine dans son ensemble et ne rien dire sur les gangs, alors que les gangs tuent bien plus de Noirs (et de manière bien plus «systémique») que ne le fait la police. Si nous pensons véritablement que «Black Lives Matter», alors nous devons nous intéresser à TOUTES les vies noires et ne pas sélectionner une toute petite minorité d’entre elles à cause d’arrière-pensées idéologiques. Derrière cette volonté de ne s’intéresser aux Noirs que lorsqu’ils sont tués par des Blancs, il existe un véritable arrière-fond raciste, non seulement raciste anti-blancs, mais aussi et surtout raciste anti-Noirs: la vie des Noirs n’aurait d’intérêt que quand elle viendrait valider l’idée d’un «racisme systémique» des sociétés occidentales. Une telle vision est en fait le fruit de l’ethnocentrisme délirant qui caractérise l’Occident. L’Occident pense qu’il est le centre de l’Histoire, que tout tourne autour de lui et que tout ce qui arrive dans le monde (bon ou mauvais) est de son fait. Dans le passé, cette «folie des Blancs» (pour reprendre une expression employée par l’écrivain André Malraux dans son roman La Voie royale, qui se déroule dans l’Indochine coloniale) a poussé l’Occident à se croire supérieur aux autres civilisations, à broyer la diversité du monde et à coloniser une bonne partie du globe. Aujourd’hui, le même ethnocentrisme pousse certains à considérer que l’Occident est la source de tous les maux. Dans la vision ethnocentrique, peu importe que l’Occident soit défini comme supérieur (la Colonisation) ou comme coupable (la repentance), il doit toujours être le pivot de l’Histoire. Rien ne saurait arriver en dehors de lui. L’Occident a beaucoup de mal à admettre qu’il n’est qu’une civilisation comme les autres et parmi d’autres: il préfèrera même parfois s’enfermer dans la repentance et dans une culpabilité imaginaire (mais qui lui permettent de rester l’acteur central) plutôt que de le reconnaître. Egocentrique, il ne s’intéresse à la vie des Noirs que quand ce sont des Blancs qui sont les assassins. (…) Le plus grand paradoxe est que la mouvance «décoloniale», qui constitue la pointe avancée des événements actuels, n’a absolument pas décolonisé son imaginaire et continue d’imaginer que le «Grand Méchant Occident» est à l’origine de tous les maux dont souffre le monde. Or, une telle vision, en plus d’être totalement fausse sur le plan factuel, est paternaliste: elle infantilise les populations non-blanches et les dépossède de leur Histoire, de leur parole, de leur action. On l’a bien vu dans certaines vidéos récentes. À Chicago, une femme noire s’oppose aux militants de l’ultra-gauche, déclarant: «Chaque jour des jeunes noirs sont tués par des gangs à Chicago. Où sont les militants de Black Lives Matter? Quand des Noirs tuent des Noirs, les militants Black Lives Matter ne viennent pas faire ce bazar.» Une militante (blanche) lui fait la leçon et lui répond de manière surréaliste. Complètement déconnectée des réalités du ghetto noir, où les meurtres intra-communautaires sont en effet quotidiens, elle lui fait la leçon et lui répond dans un jargon d’universitaire: «Mais que faîtes-vous de l’oppression systémique?». De même, des militants décoloniaux (blancs), voulant déboulonner la statue de Frederick Douglass (ancien esclave noir et militant abolitionniste!), se sont opposés à des guides touristiques noirs qui ont vaillamment défendu la statue. Si elles n’étaient pas accompagnées d’explications, les images feraient vraiment penser que les manifestants sont des suprémacistes blancs racistes et non pas des militants de gauche agissant au nom de l’antiracisme et prétendant que «Black Lives Matter». Mais cette ressemblance n’a rien d’un hasard, car suprémacistes blancs et militants décoloniaux partagent le même imaginaire ethnocentrique selon lequel l’Homme blanc serait au centre de tout (soit pour être supérieur, comme le pensent les suprémacistes, soit pour faire le mal comme le pensent les décoloniaux), ce qui prive mécaniquement les Noirs de toute histoire autonome. C’est ce qu’a bien souligné, en France, l’écrivaine (noire) Tania de Montaigne, fustigeant le concept de «privilège blanc» défendu récemment par la réalisatrice et militante décoloniale (blanche) Virginie Despentes. Tania de Montaigne voit dans cette notion un fantasme raciste qui ne correspond à rien de réel et qui, sous prétexte d’anti-racisme, réédite inconsciemment le discours raciste traditionnel de la hiérarchie des races, plaçant les Blancs au sommet d’une pyramide, et fait les non-Blancs comme d’éternels mineurs, toujours victimisés et qui devraient être aidés avec condescendance. Il en va de même dans les discours sur l’esclavage et la colonisation. Comme le souligne dans les colonnes du Figaro, l’historien Pierre Vermeren,: «La guerre et l’esclavage appartiennent de manière continue à la longue histoire des sociétés humaines (…) Aujourd’hui, il subsiste près de 46 millions d’esclaves dans le monde, dont la moitié en Asie (Chine, Inde et Pakistan) et près d’une autre en Afrique, au Sahel notamment. Les sociétés de la péninsule Arabique sont également concernées.» Et Pierre Vermeren nous rappelle qu’en ce qui concerne l’esclavage africain, il a existé trois traites distinctes: la traite européenne à destination des Amériques (où des Africains vendaient aux Européens les captifs issus de tribus rivales, car on oublie trop souvent de dire que si des Européens ont acheté des esclaves, c’est bien que quelqu’un les leur avait vendus sur place), la traite arabo-musulmane (à propos de laquelle les travaux de l’historien sénégalais Tidiane N’Diaye ont démontré que dix-sept millions de victimes noires furent asservies par les Arabes, parfois mutilées et assassinées, pendant plus de treize siècles sans interruption) et la traite interne à l’Afrique subsaharienne (qui continue encore aujourd’hui et qui fut combattue jadis par les colonisateurs français et britanniques, la colonisation ayant globalement eu lieu après que ces deux pays eurent aboli l’esclavage). Mais là encore, l’Occident ne veut pas admettre l’extrême banalité historique de la guerre et de l’esclavage. Il veut en avoir le monopole. Il préfère être pleinement coupable et se sentir ainsi toujours à part plutôt que de se trouver commun, rangé au côté des autres. Ainsi les traites d’esclaves commises par d’autres et où il n’a pris aucune part ne l’intéressent pas. Plutôt que de lutter concrètement contre l’esclavage actuel en Libye ou en Mauritanie, on préférera donc se flageller en s’en prenant à Colbert (alors que le Code noir ne représente qu’une infime partie de la vie et de l’œuvre de ce grand serviteur de l’État, les statues à son effigie honorant son rôle dans la construction de l’administration française et nullement son rôle supposé dans la traite esclavagiste, qui d’ailleurs ne posait pas de problèmes moraux à l’époque). Le plus dramatique est que toute ces actions hystériques, qui sapent la paix sociale, n’améliorent absolument pas la cause des Noirs. Si les vies noires comptent vraiment, alors, plutôt que de déboulonner des statues, les militants du Black Lives Matter (blancs pour une grande partie d’entre eux) feraient mieux d’alerter l’opinion sur les massacres inter-ethniques en Afrique ou d’aller sur place pour lutter contre les maladies et la famine. Ou plus simplement, ils pourraient aller dans les ghettos noirs des États-Unis pour protester contre la tyrannie des gangs, faire du soutien scolaire pour les enfants, distribuer de la nourriture et assister la population. Il faudra bien le dire un jour: Philippe de Villiers, en mettant sur pied un programme de co-développement humanitaire avec le Bénin lorsqu’il était président du conseil général de Vendée, a fait bien davantage pour les vies noires que les déboulonneurs de statue. De même, certaines universités américaines décident de retirer certains auteurs de leurs programmes sous prétexte que les hommes blancs sont trop représentés. Comme le faisait remarquer Christopher Lasch dans La Révolte des élites, ce genre de décisions prises par des gauchistes blancs généralement issus de la bourgeoisie, n’améliore absolument pas la situation concrète des minorités. Il serait plus pertinent au contraire de garder la culture classique intacte et de la diffuser à tous, Noirs compris. Et comme le fait remarquer au Figaro, Willfred Reilly, professeur afro-américain de sciences politiques, à propos de l’hystérie actuelle: «Tout cela ne va pas améliorer les scores des minorités aux tests universitaires. » Mais ce racisme anti-Noir inconscient ne se limite pas à la seule sphère «décoloniale». Ainsi Joe Biden, invité le 22 mai sur une radio noire, par un animateur noir, a déclaré: «Si vous n’arrivez pas à vous décider entre moi et Trump, c’est que vous n’êtes pas réellement noir.» Pour Biden, les électeurs noirs semblent être un troupeau de moutons, privés de tout libre arbitre politique. Jean-Loup Bonnamy
I’m glad that the law enforcement agencies are subject to the same standard as everybody else. Mark McCloskey
The reason high-income people leave the city, and why I can’t talk my friends into moving in, is crime. Why live where your life is at risk, where you are affronted by thugs, bums, drug addicts and punks when you can afford not to. What St. Louis can do without are the murderers, beggars, drug addicts and street corner drunks. St. Louis needs more people of substance and fewer of subsistence. Mark McCloskey (1993)
Une foule d’au moins 100 personnes a abattu le portail historique en fer forgé de Portland Place, ils se sont précipités vers ma maison, où ma famille dînait dehors et nous ont fait craindre pour nos vies. J’étais terrifié que nous soyons assassinés en quelques secondes, que notre maison soit brûlée, nos animaux de compagnie tués. Nous étions seuls face à une foule en colère. Il s’agit d’une propriété privée. Il n’y a pas de trottoirs ou de rues publics. Mark McCloskey
La scène est à peine croyable. Des manifestants américains du mouvement «Black lives matter» se rendant devant le domicile de la maire de Saint Louis, Lyda Krewson, pour exiger sa démission, ont été menacés dimanche par un couple d’avocats, lourdement armés, alors qu’ils passaient devant leur villa. Mark et Patricia McCloskey ont ainsi été filmés pointant leurs armes en direction des 300 personnes marchant devant eux. Lui tenait un fusil de type AR-15, quand sa femme préférait brandir une arme de poing. NBC News rapporte que les portails de plusieurs propriétés du quartier ont été détériorés. Ironie de l’histoire, le couple en question a fait de la défense des victimes de dommages corporels sa spécialité. Cnews
I think that a total elimination is something we need to reevaluate. Right now, bad guys are saying if you don’t see a blue and white you can do whatever you want. Eric Adams (Brooklyn Borough President)
The guns keep going off and now we have a 1-year-old and the blood is on the hands of the mayor and the state Legislature. Community activist Tony Herbert
It says something when you’re at a Black Lives Matter protest; you have more minorities on the police side than you have in a violent crowd. And you have white people screaming at black officers ‘you have the biggest nose I’ve ever seen.’ You hear these things and you go ‘Are these people, are they going to say something to this person?’ No. (…) Having people tell you what to do with your life, that you need to quit your job, that you’re hurting your community but they’re not even a part of the community. Once again you as a privileged white person telling someone of color what to do with their life. (…) When you’re standing on the line and they’re getting called those names and they’re being accused of being racist when you’ve seen those officers helping people of color, getting blood on them trying to rescue someone who has been shot—gang violence, domestic violence—and you see them and they’re truly trying to help save someone’s life and they they turn around and are called a racist by people that have never seen anything like that, that have never had to put themselves out there. It’s disgusting. Officer Jakhary Jackson (Portland)
Mark McCloskey graduated magna cum laude from Southern Methodist University in Dallas in 1982, where he studied sociology, criminal justice and psychology before attending the Southern Methodist University of Law in 1985. He is a Missouri native and graduated from Mary Institute and Saint Louis Country Day School in Ladue, Missouri, in 1975, according to his Facebook profile. On his law firm’s website, McCloskey is described as, “an AV rated attorney who has been nominated for dozens of awards and honors and has been voted by his peers for memberships to many exclusive ‘top rated lawyer’ and ‘multimillion dollar lawyer’ associations throughout the country.” The website also notes McCloskey has appeared on in the media, including KSDK in St. Louis and Fox News. The website states, “several of his cases have been cited in national legal publications as the highest verdicts recovered in the country for those particular injuries.” McCloskey’s profile also says: Since 1986, he has exclusively represented individuals seriously injured as a result of accidents, medical malpractice, defective products, and the negligence of others. For the past 21 years, his firm has concentrated on the representation of people injured or killed through traumatic brain injuries, neck, back or other significant neurological or orthopedic injury. Mark T. McCloskey is licensed to practice law in the state and federal courts of Missouri, Illinois, Texas and the Federal Courts of Nebraska. Additionally, he has represented individuals injured through medical malpractice, dangerous products, automobiles, cars, motorcycles, boats, defective hand guns, airplane crashes, explosions, electrocution, falls, assaults, rapes, poisoning, fires, inadequate security, premises liability, dram shop liability (serving intoxicating patrons), excessive force by police, construction accidents, and negligent maintenance of premises (including retail establishments, parking lots, government property, homes, schools, playgrounds, apartments, commercial operations, parks and recreational facilities) for the past 30 years and has filed and tried personal injury lawsuits in over 28 states. Heavy.com
According to her Facebook profile, Patricia Novak McCloskey is a native of Industry, Pennsylvania, where she graduated from Western Beaver High School in 1977. McCloskey then studied at Penn State University, graduating in 1982 with a degree in labor studies and a minor in Spanish. She, like her husband, attended SMU Law School in Dallas, graduating in 1986. According to their law firm’s website, “Patricia N. McCloskey is a Phi Beta Kappa, Summa Cum Laude graduate of Pennsylvania State University, graduating first in her class and with the highest cumulative average in her department in forty-seven years. Patricia N. McCloskey is also a graduate of Southern Methodist University School of Law, which she completed while simultaneously working full time and still graduating in the top quarter of her class.” The website adds: After several years working with a major law firm in St. Louis on the defense side, she moved to representation of the injured. Since 1994, she has exclusively represented those injured by the negligence of others with Mark McCloskey. She has acted in various roles in the community including being a past Board Member of Therapeutic Horsemanship, a law student mentor, a member of the Missouri Bar Association ethical review panel and a St. Louis city committee woman. Patricia McCloskey has extensive trial experience in personal injury and wrongful death cases arising out of all aspects of negligence, including traumatic brain injury, products liability and product defect, medical malpractice, wrongful death, neck, back and spinal cord injuries, motor vehicle collisions, motorcycle collisions, airplane crashes, and many others as set forth further. Heavy.com
Notre nation fait face à une campagne visant à effacer notre histoire, diffamer nos héros, supprimer nos valeurs et endoctriner nos enfants. (…) Le désordre violent que nous avons vu dans nos rues et nos villes qui sont dirigées par des libéraux démocrates dans tous les cas est le résultat d’années d’endoctrinement extrême et de partialité dans l’éducation, le journalisme et d’autres institutions culturelles. (…) Nous croyons en l’égalité des chances, une justice égale et un traitement égal pour les citoyens de toutes races, origines, religions et croyances. Chaque enfant, de chaque couleur – né et à naître – est fait à l’image sainte de Dieu. Donald Trump
Nous sommes en train de passer à côté d’un processus essentiel en jeu actuellement, l’articulation, désastreuse entre les sociétés de la honte et de l’honneur (« shame culture ») et les civilisations de la culpabilité (« guilt culture »), distinction établie par Dodds, un ethnologue. La honte est définie par lui comme un fait social extériorisé (perdre la face) et la culpabilité comme un sentiment intériorisé (…) Les membres des sociétés de la honte ne se sentent pas honteux « par essence », mais l’honneur est pour eux une valeur dominante qui ne concerne pas que soi, mais aussi le groupe familial, culturel auquel on appartient. Reconnaître une faute devant les personnes qui y sont extérieures, c’est déshonorer son groupe, c’est « l’achouma », mot clé au Maghreb qui signifie la honte. On ne peut reconnaître que la moindre erreur ait pu être commise par soi ou les autres membres de son groupe sous peine de déshonneur, la faute en incombe forcément à l’extérieur. Le modèle relationnel dominant prend la forme d’être le plus fort ou d’être humilié. Qui va mépriser l’autre ? Qui va faire honte à l’autre ou avoir honte ? Qui va soumettre l’autre ? Dans le TER, trois personnes d’origine sahélienne ont les pieds sur les sièges et téléphonent à tue-tête avec un poste de radio ouvert à côté d’eux. Je leur demande poliment de respecter le règlement. Réponse sèche : « Vous dites ça parce qu’on est étrangers », suivi d’une augmentation du volume sonore vocal du téléphone. Me voilà désigné comme un blanc raciste en quelques secondes, et c’est moi qui suis coupable, qui devrais donc avoir honte. Je parcours le train à la recherche d’un contrôleur, en vain. En l’absence d’un tiers incarnant une loi qui est la même pour tous, je n’ai pas d’autre solution que de m’incliner dans l’espace public. Je me sens… misérable. De même, quand dans les « quartiers », un jeune de 14 ans, sur un scooter volé, sans casque parce que « c’est pour les petits », se tue en percutant à toute vitesse un véhicule, il ne meurt pas à cause d’une accumulation d’imprudences mais forcément à cause d’autrui. De préférence à cause de la police. On ne décède pas accidentellement, on est tué. Comment une interpellation pourrait-elle de dérouler calmement avec ce modèle relationnel ? Qu’il soit à pied, en scooter, ou en voiture, celui qui accepte de se soumettre (et oui ! le mot est dit) à un contrôle policier ne rencontrera aucun problème de violence policière. Et les représentants du pays d’accueil tout désignés pour être méprisés puisqu’ils incarnent la légalité de la société dans l’espace public sont les policiers sur lesquels on crache sans vergogne. Le policier n’a pas le droit de répondre, il sera méprisé s’il agit (la sanction) ou s’il ne fait rien (la soumission). Quelle inversion ! C’est celui qui crache qui devrait être méprisé pour sa lâcheté car il ne risque rien. Le piège, c’est que les membres des sociétés de la honte ont compris que les membres des civilisations de la culpabilité, judéo-chrétiennes, ont une forte tendance à accepter de se sentir coupable, et il est alors « pratique » de leur faire éprouver de la honte au lieu de la ressentir soi-même. Et plus les membres de la civilisation de la culpabilité se sentent coupables, plus les membres de la société de la honte se décrivent comme victimes, dans une inflation interminable, alors que le problème initial de situe à l’intérieur même de leur société. (…) Cet écart entre société de la honte et civilisation de la culpabilité crée d’importantes tensions concernant l’acceptation d’une loi commune, ensemble de contraintes qui se situent au-dessus de tous, et de la reconnaissance d’une dette. Dans les sociétés de la honte, la relation à la loi n’inclut pas sa notion pourtant fondatrice de culpabilité. Accepter les contraintes extérieures signifie non pas reconnaître la nécessité de respecter d’indispensables limites pour une vie en commun, mais est vécue comme une immixtion intolérable dans le fonctionnement familial et groupal. (…) Et lorsqu’on argue qu’il y a du racisme dans la police puisque les personnes issues des sociétés de la honte font l’objet de contrôles policiers beaucoup plus fréquents que les autres, la réponse est qu’elles sont plus nombreuses à ne pas respecter la loi que les personnes qui ont intégré la culpabilité. Faut-il que chaque fois qu’un tel jeune est contrôlé, une dame sortant d’un super marché avec son cabas de légumes le soit aussi pour éviter toute discrimination ? La société de la honte, c’est aussi l’incapacité de reconnaître une dette envers le milieu d’accueil. Dans le cadre d’une immigration économique, tous sont venus au départ parce que leur pays ne les nourrissait pas assez, ne les soignait pas, était profondément corrompu, sinon ils retourneraient y vivre. Cette blessure originelle ne se referme pas et laisse les sujets dans une sorte d’entre-deux. Reconnaître ce qu’on doit au pays d’accueil, c’est accepter de penser que sa propre origine est entachée, conflictuelle, et la solution à ce malaise peut consister à dire que c’est l’extérieur, le lieu d’accueil, qui est inhospitalier et doit être dénigré. Reconnaître ce qu’on reçoit de bien, c’est trahir ses origines, de même que les policiers noirs ou maghrébins heureux d’exercer leur métier sont qualifiés de traîtres. Il est donc nécessaire de remettre l’achouma à sa place, de rétablir le lieu de la honte et de la remettre dans le camp de ceux qui font tout pour la projeter sur autrui. Ceux qui ont la volonté de se désigner de toutes façons comme victimes ont besoin de désigner des agresseurs. Mais ce n’est pas parce que des individus ou leurs parents ont été victimes dans leur histoire personnelle, familiale, culturelle, que d’autres doivent accepter d’endosser ce rôle de bourreau. Plus les membres d’une civilisation de la culpabilité se laissent accuser, plus ils sont méprisés. Au contraire, imaginons (on a le droit de rêver) qu’une seule personnalité politique ose déclarer : « Vous devriez avoir honte d’élever vos enfants sans leur inculquer un minimum de respect pour le pays qui vous accueille et qui vous soigne gratuitement, de ne pas leur expliquer que rien n’est dû, de laisser vos enfants conduire des véhicules volés, d’abîmer la démocratie qui vous protège et de mentir en vous présentant comme des victimes, etc. ». Énoncer ceci ne changerait rien à la manière de se comporter des délinquants en question, pas plus qu’égrener leurs délits et parler de « sauvageons », et ne calmerait en rien les militants communautaristes. Mais ceci donnerait aux autres le sentiment que la honte n’est pas en eux, et leur permettrait d’éprouver un sentiment de légitimité dont beaucoup de citoyens éprouvent le besoin qu’il soit reconnu. Une telle formulation constitue le fondement incontournable de toute action politique efficace car elle permettrait d’arrêter de tendre l’autre joue. Et d’accepter enfin l’idée que dans certaines circonstances, seules la force de caractère et la force physique inspirent du respect. Maurice Berger
Andy Warhol disait que « tout le monde doit avoir son quart d’heure de célébrité ». « Maintenant, tout le monde, blanc, doit avoir son quart d’heure de honte. On est entré dans une flagellation collective. Mais c’est encore plus compliqué que ça. On a les sociétés de la honte et les civilisations de la culpabilité. Pour les premiers, ce sont des sociétés où la honte est une valeur dominante, comme reconnaître qu’on a fait une faute, se déshonorer, déshonorer son groupe, sa culture, à l’inverse, des sociétés « judéo-chrétiennes. Toutes les personnes des minorités ne fonctionnent pas comme ça, de même de que toutes les personnes de la civilisation de la culpabilité ne se sentent pas prêts à se sentir coupable. On a une imbrication entre des personnes qui vont forcément se présenter comme victimes, quoi qu’elles aient fait d’illégal et en face des membres de la civilisation de la culpabilité qui vont forcément se sentir coupable. Plus ces personnes se reconnaissent coupables, plus ceux qui ont tendance à se sentir victimes vont en abuser. (…) J’y suis opposé. Que les Américains fassent cela pour ce qui s’est produit dans leur pays, j’en ai que faire. Ce n’est même pas un symbole, c’est quelque chose de littéral : on s’humilie alors qu’on n’a pas de quoi s’humilier. C’est un geste de soumission, c’est quelque chose qui inverse tout. Je ne vois pas de quoi nous devrions avoir honte, nous en France. Maurice Berger
Nous vivons (…) une époque qui rappelle le Moyen Âge avec son oligarchie, ses clercs et son dogme. Une sorte d’aristocratie de la tech a émergé et a fait alliance avec la classe intellectuelle, pour mettre en place une nouvelle vision de la société, qui a pour ambition de remplacer les valeurs plus traditionnelles portées depuis l’après-guerre par la classe moyenne. Tout l’enjeu futur de la politique est de savoir si «le tiers état» d’aujourd’hui – les classes moyennes paupérisées et les classes populaires – se soumettra à leur contrôle. Nous sommes entrés dans le paradigme d’une oligarchie concentrant la richesse nationale à un point jamais atteint à l’époque contemporaine. Cinq compagnies détiennent l’essentiel de la richesse nationale en Amérique! Une poignée de patrons de la tech et «leurs chiens de garde» de la finance, contrôlent chacun des fortunes de dizaines de milliards de dollars en moyenne et ils ont à peine 40 ans, ce qui veut dire que nous allons devoir vivre avec eux et leur influence pour tout le reste de nos vies! (…) La globalisation et la financiarisation ont été des facteurs majeurs de cette concentration effrénée de la richesse. La délocalisation de l’industrie vers la Chine a coûté 1,5 million d’emplois manufacturiers au Royaume-Uni, et 3,4 millions à l’Amérique. Les PME, les entreprises familiales, l’artisanat, ont été massivement détruits, débouchant sur une paupérisation des classes moyennes, qui étaient le cœur du modèle capitaliste libéral américain. La crise du coronavirus a accéléré la tendance. Les compagnies de la tech sortent grandes gagnantes de l’épreuve. Jeff Bezos, le patron d’Amazon, vient juste d’annoncer que sa capitalisation a progressé de 30 milliards de dollars alors que les petites compagnies se noient! Les inégalités de classe ne font que s’accélérer, avec une élite intellectuelle et managériale qui s’en sort très bien – les fameux clercs qui peuvent travailler à distance – , et le reste de la classe moyenne qui s’appauvrit. Les classes populaires, elles, ont subi le virus de plein fouet, ont bien plus de risques de l’attraper, ont souffert du confinement dans leurs petits appartements, et ont pour beaucoup perdu leur travail. C’est un tableau très sombre qui émerge avec une caste de puissants ultra-étroite et de «nouveaux serfs», sans rien de substantiel entre les deux: 70 % des Américains estiment que leurs enfants vivront moins bien qu’eux. (…) La Silicon Valley, jadis une terre promise des self-made-men est devenue le visage de l’inégalité et des nouvelles forteresses industrielles. Les géants technologiques comme Google ou Facebook ont tué la culture des start-up née dans les garages californiens dans les années 1970 et qui a perduré jusque dans les années 1990, car ils siphonnent toute l’innovation. Je suis évidemment pour la défense de l’environnement, mais l’idéologie verte très radicale qui prévaut en Californie avantage aussi les grandes compagnies qui seules peuvent survivre aux régulations environnementales drastiques, alors que les PME n’y résistent pas ou s’en vont ailleurs. On sous-estime cet aspect socio-économique de la «transition écologique», qui exclut les classes populaires et explique par exemple vos «gilets jaunes», comme le raconte le géographe Christophe Guilluy. Vu la concentration de richesses, l’immobilier californien a atteint des prix records et les classes populaires ont été boutées hors de San Francisco, pourtant un bastion du «progressisme» politique. La ville, qui se veut l’avant-garde de l’antiracisme et abritait jadis une communauté afro-américaine très vivante, n’a pratiquement plus d’habitants noirs, à peine 5 %, un autre paradoxe du progressisme actuel. (…) Il y a un vrai parallèle entre la situation d’aujourd’hui et l’alliance de l’aristocratie et du clergé avant la Révolution française. Et cela vaut pour tous les pays occidentaux. Ces clercs rassemblent les élites intellectuelles d’aujourd’hui, qui sont presque toutes situées à gauche. Si je les nomme ainsi, c’est pour souligner le caractère presque religieux de l’orthodoxie qu’elles entendent imposer, comme jadis l’Église catholique. Au XIIIe siècle, à l’université de Paris, personne n’aurait osé douter de l’existence de Dieu. Aujourd’hui, personne n’ose contester sans risque les nouveaux dogmes, j’en sais quelque chose. Je suis pourtant loin d’être conservateur, je suis un social-démocrate de la vieille école, qui juge les inégalités de classe plus pertinentes que les questions d’identité, de genre, mais il n’y a plus de place pour des gens comme moi dans l’univers mental et politique de ces élites. Elles entendent remplacer les valeurs de la famille et de la liberté individuelle qui ont fait le succès de l’Amérique après-guerre et la prospérité de la classe moyenne, par un credo qui allie défense du globalisme, justice sociale (définie comme la défense des minorités raciales et sexuelles, NDLR), modèle de développement durable imposé par le haut et redéfinition des rôles familiaux. Elles affirment que le développement durable est plus important que la croissance qui permettait de sortir les classes populaires de la pauvreté. Ce point créera une vraie tension sociale. Ce qui est frappant, c’est l’uniformité de ce «clergé». (…) Parmi les journalistes, seulement 7 % se disent républicains. C’est la même chose, voire pire, dans les universités, le cinéma, la musique. On n’a plus le droit d’être en désaccord avec quoi que ce soit! Écrire que le problème de la communauté noire est plus un problème socio-économique que racial, est devenu risqué, et peut vous faire traiter de raciste! J’ai travaillé longtemps comme journaliste avant d’enseigner, et notamment pour le Washington Post, le Los Angeles Times et d’autres… Il arrive que j’y trouve encore de très bons papiers, mais dans l’ensemble, je ne peux plus les lire tellement ils sont biaisés sur les sujets liés à la question raciale, à Trump ou à la politique! Je n’ai aucune sympathie pour Donald Trump, que je juge toxique, mais la haine qu’il suscite va trop loin. On voit se développer un journalisme d’opinion penchant à gauche, qui mène à ce que la Rand Corporation (une institution de recherche prestigieuse, fondée initialement pour les besoins de l’armée américaine, NDLR) qualifie de «décomposition de la vérité». (…) Je dois dire avoir aussi été très choqué par le «projet 1619» (ce projet affirme que l’origine de l’Amérique n’est pas 1776 et la proclamation de l’Indépendance, mais 1619 avec l’arrivée de bateaux d’esclaves sur les côtes américaines, NDLR), lancé par le New York Times, qui veut démontrer que toute l’histoire américaine est celle d’un pays raciste. Oui, l’esclavage a été une chose horrible, mais les succès et progrès américains ne peuvent être niés au nom des crimes commis. Je n’ai rien contre le fait de déboulonner les généraux confédérés, qui ont combattu pour le Sud esclavagiste. Mais vouloir déboulonner le général Ulysse Grant, grand vainqueur des confédérés, ou encore George Washington, est absurde. La destruction systématique de notre passé, et du sens de ce qui nous tient ensemble, est très dangereuse. Cela nous ramène à l’esprit de la Révolution culturelle chinoise. Si l’on continue, il n’y aura plus que des tribus. (…) Je crois que c’est Huxley qui dans Le Meilleur des mondes, affirme qu’une tyrannie appuyée sur la technologie ne peut être défaite. La puissance des oligarchies et des élites culturelles actuelles est renforcée par le rôle croissant de la technologie, qui augmente le degré de contrôle de ce que nous pensons, lisons, écoutons… Quand internet est apparu, il a suscité un immense espoir. On pensait qu’il ouvrirait une ère de liberté fertile pour les idées, mais c’est au contraire devenu un instrument de contrôle de l’information et de la pensée! Même si les blogs qui prolifèrent confèrent une apparence de démocratie et de diversité, la réalité actuelle, c’est quelques compagnies basées dans la Silicon Valley qui exercent un contrôle de plus en plus lourd sur le flux d’informations. Près des deux tiers des jeunes s’informent sur les réseaux sociaux. De plus, Google, Facebook, Amazon sont en train de racheter les restes des médias traditionnels qu’ils n’ont pas tués. Ils contrôlent les studios de production de films, YouTube… Henry Ford et Andrew Carnegie n’étaient pas des gentils, mais ils ne vous disaient pas ce que vous deviez penser. (…) Ils sont persuadés que tous les problèmes ont une réponse technologique. Ce sont des techniciens brillants, grands adeptes du transhumanisme, peu préoccupés par la baisse de la natalité ou la question de la mobilité sociale, et bien plus déconnectés des classes populaires que les patrons d’entreprises sidérurgiques d’antan. Leur niveau d’ignorance sur le plan historique ou littéraire est abyssal, et en ce sens, ils sont sans doute plus effrayants encore que l’aristocratie d’Ancien Régime. De plus, se concentrer sur les sujets symboliques comme le genre, les transgenres, le changement climatique, leur permet d’évacuer les sujets de «classe», qui pourraient menacer leur pouvoir. (…) Je pense que Zuckerberg a eu raison et qu’il a du courage, mais il semble être poussé à adopter un rôle de censeur. Un auteur que je connais, environnementaliste dissident, vient de voir sa page Facebook supprimée. C’est une tendance dangereuse, car laisser à quelques groupes privés le pouvoir de contrôler l’information, ouvre la voie à la tyrannie. Cela me ramène au thème central de ce livre qui se veut un manifeste en faveur de la classe moyenne, menacée de destruction après avoir été le pilier de nos démocraties. La démocratie est fondamentalement liée à la dispersion de la propriété privée. C’est pour cela que j’ai toujours eu de l’admiration pour les Pays-Bas, pays qui a toujours créé de la terre, en gagnant sur la mer, et a donc toujours assuré la croissance de sa classe moyenne. Quand cela cesse et que la richesse se concentre entre quelques mains, on revient à un contrôle de la société par le haut, qu’il soit établi par des régimes de droite ou de gauche. (…) Trump est un idiot et un type détestable, qui, je l’espère, sera désavoué, car il suscite beaucoup de tensions négatives. Mais je n’ai jamais vu un président traité comme il l’a été. La volonté de le destituer était déjà envisagée avant même qu’il ait mis un pied à la Maison-Blanche! Je pense aussi que la presse n’est pas honnête à son sujet. Prenons par exemple son discours au mont Rushmore, l’un des meilleurs qu’il ait faits, et dans lequel il tente de réconcilier un soutien au besoin de justice raciale, et la défense du patrimoine américain. Il y a cité beaucoup de personnages importants comme Frederick Douglass ou Harriet Tubman, mais la presse n’en a pas moins rapporté qu’il s’agissait d’un discours raciste, destiné à rallier les suprémacistes blancs! On l’accuse de tyrannie, mais la plus grande tyrannie qui nous menace est l’alliance des oligarques et des clercs. Le seul avantage de Trump, c’est d’être un contre-pouvoir face à eux. Malheureusement, cela ne signifie pas qu’il ait une vision cohérente. Surtout, il divise terriblement le pays, or nous avons besoin d’une forme d’unité minimale. (…) Je dirais à ce stade que Trump va avoir du mal à gagner – j’évalue ses chances à une sur trois. Il pourrait revenir si une forme de rebond économique se dessine ou s’il s’avérait évident que Joe Biden n’a plus toutes ses capacités intellectuelles. Si les démocrates l’emportent, ma prédiction est qu’ils en feront trop, et qu’une nouvelle rébellion, qui nous fera regretter Trump, surgira en boomerang. À moins qu’une nouvelle génération de jeunes conservateurs – comme Josh Hawley, JD Vance ou Marco Rubio – capables de défendre les classes populaires tout en faisant obstacle à la révolution culturelle de la gauche, ne finisse par émerger. J’aimerais aussi voir un mouvement remettant vraiment le social à l’honneur se dessiner à gauche, mais je n’y crois pas trop, vu l’obsession de l’identité… Ce qui est sûr, c’est que l’esprit de 2016 et des «gilets jaunes» ne va pas disparaître. Regardez ce qui s’est passé en Australie: on pensait que les travaillistes gagneraient, mais ce sont les populistes qui ont raflé la mise, parce que la gauche verte était devenue tellement anti-industrielle, que les classes populaires l’ont désertée! Joel Kotkin
« Le Meilleur des mondes » décrit par Aldous Huxley serait-il en train de pointer le nez sur les côtes de Californie et de gagner l’Amérique? Dans son nouveau livre, L’Avènement du néo-féodalisme, le géographe américain Joel Kotkin, cousin californien du géographe français Christophe Guilluy, qui scrute depuis des années avec inquiétude la destruction des classes moyennes à la faveur de la délocalisation et de la financiarisation de l’économie, s’interroge sur la «tyrannie» que dessine l’émergence d’une oligarchie ultra-puissante et contrôlant une technologie envahissante. Joel Kotkin décrit l’alliance de l’oligarchie de la Silicon Valley, composée de quelques milliardaires passionnés de transhumanisme, et persuadés que la technologie est la réponse à tous les problèmes, avec une classe intellectuelle de «clercs» qui se comporte comme un «nouveau clergé» et instaure de nouveaux dogmes – sur la globalisation, le genre, «le privilège blanc» – avec une ferveur toute religieuse. Il devient dangereux d’exprimer ses désaccords, regrette cet ancien social-démocrate, qui explique ne plus avoir sa place à gauche. Une situation d’intolérance que le départ fracassant de la journaliste Bari Weiss du New York Times, forcée de quitter le navire sous la pression de pairs devenus «censeurs», vient d’illustrer avec éloquence. Laure Mandeville
The intellectually intolerant mob claimed two high-profile victims Tuesday with the resignations of New York Times editor Bari Weiss and New York Magazine journalist Andrew Sullivan. These are just two examples of the deadly virus spreading through our public life: McCarthyism of the woke. McCarthyism is the pejorative term liberals gave to the anti-communist crusades of 1950s-era Sen. Joseph McCarthy of Wisconsin. From his perch as chair of the Government Operations Committee, McCarthy launched a wave of investigations to ferret out supposed communist subversion of government agencies. Armed with his favorite question — “Are you now or have you ever been a member of the Communist Party?” — McCarthy terrorized his targets and silenced his critics. Thousands of people lost their jobs as a result, often based on nothing more than innuendo or chance associations. The mob fervor extended to the state governments and the private sector, too. States enacted “loyalty oaths” requiring people employed by the government, including tenured university faculty members, to disavow “radical beliefs” or lose their jobs. Many refused and were fired. Hollywood notoriously rooted out real and suspected communists, creating the infamous “blacklist” of people who were informally barred from any work with Hollywood studios. The “red scare” even nearly toppled America’s favorite television star, Lucille Ball, who had registered to vote as a communist in the 1930s. Today’s “cancel culture” is nothing more than McCarthyism in a woke costume. It stems from a noble goal — ending racial discrimination. Like its discredited cousin, however, it has transmogrified into something sinister and inimical to freedom. Battling racism is good and necessary; trying to suppress voices that one disagrees with is not. Woke McCarthyism goes wrong when it seeks to do the one thing that America has always sworn not to do: enforce uniformity of thought. Indeed, this principle, enshrined in the First Amendment, is so central to American national identity that it is one of the five quotes inscribed in the Jefferson Memorial: “I have sworn upon the altar of God eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man.” Weiss’s resignation letter describes numerous examples of her colleagues judging her guilty of “wrongthink” and trying to pressure superiors to fire or suppress her. She explains that “some coworkers insist I need to be rooted out if this company is to be a truly ‘inclusive’ one, while others post ax emojis next to my name.” Others, she wrote, called her a racist and a Nazi, or criticized her on Twitter without reprimand. She notes that this behavior, tolerated by the paper through its editors, constitutes “unlawful discrimination, hostile work environment, and constructive discharge.” Sullivan’s reason for departure is less clear — though he said it is “self-evident.” He had publicly supported Weiss, writing: “The mob bullied and harassed a young woman for thoughtcrimes. And her editors stood by and watched.” In other words, both Weiss and Sullivan — like so many others — seem to have left their jobs because they were targeted for refusing to conform to its ideas of right thinking. Do you now or have you ever thought that Donald Trump might make a good president? Congratulations, president of Goya Foods: Your company is boycotted. Are you now or have you ever been willing to publish works from a conservative U.S. senator that infuriated liberal Twitter? Former New York Times editor James Bennet, the bell tolls for thee. The mob even sacrifices people whose only crime is familial connection on its altar. The stepmother of the Atlanta police officer who shot and killed Rayshard Brooks, Melissa Rolfe, was fired from her job at a mortgage lender because some employees felt uncomfortable working with her. Such tactics work best when they force people to confess to seek repentance for the crimes they may or may not have committed. McCarthy knew this, and so he always offered lenience to suspected communists who would “name names” and turn in other supposed conspirators. The woke inquisition uses the same tactic, forcing those caught in its maw to renounce prior statements they find objectionable. NFL quarterback Drew Brees surrendered to the roar while noted leftists such as J.K. Rowling and Noam Chomsky are being pilloried for their defense of free speech. McCarthy was enabled by a frightened and compliant center-right. They knew he was wrong, but they also knew the anti-communist cause was right and were unsure how to embrace the just cause and excise the zealous overreach. It wasn’t until McCarthy attacked the U.S. Army that one man, attorney Joseph Welch, had the courage to speak up. “Have you no decency, sir?” he said as McCarthy tried to slander a colleague. The bubble burst, and people found the inquisitorial emperor had no clothes. The Senate censured him in 1954, and McCarthy died in 1957, a broken man. It won’t be as easy to defeat the woke movement. There isn’t one person whose humiliation will break the spell. This movement is deep, decentralized and widespread.  Henry Olsen
Every cultural revolution starts at year zero, whether explicitly or implicitly. The French Revolution recalibrated the calendar to begin anew, and the genocidal Pol Pot declared his own Cambodian revolutionary ascension as the beginning of time. Somewhere after May 25, 2020, the death of George Floyd, while in police custody, sparked demonstrations, protests, and riots. And they in turn ushered in a new revolutionary moment. Or at least we were told that — in part by Black Lives Matter, in part by Antifa, in part by terrified enablers in the corporate world, the new Democratic Party, the military, the universities, and the media. What was uniquely different about this cultural revolution was how willing and quickly the entire progressive establishment — elected officials, celebrities, media, universities, foundations, retired military — was either on the side of the revolution or saw it as useful in aborting the Trump presidency, or was terrified it would be targeted and so wished to appease the Jacobins. This reborn America was to end all of the old that had come before and supposedly pay penance for George Floyd’s death and, by symbolic extension, America’s inherent evil since 1619. As in all cultural revolutions, the protestors claimed at first at that they wanted only to erase supposedly reactionary elements: Confederate statues, movies such as Gone with the Wind, some hurtful cartoons, and a few cranky conservative professors and what not. But soon such recalibration steam rolled, fueled by acquiescence, fright, and timidity. Drunk with ego and power, it moved on to attack almost anything connected with the past or present of the United States itself. Soon statues of General Grant, and presidents including George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Andrew Jackson were either toppled or defaced. The message was that their crimes were being white and privileged — in the way that today’s white and privileged should meet a similar fate. Or, as the marchers, who tried to storm Beverly Hills, put it: “Eat the Rich.” They were met by tear gas, and not a single retired general double-downed on his outrage at law enforcement for using tear gas against civilians. Did the BLM idea of cannibalizing the billionaires include LeBron James, Beyoncé, Oprah Winfrey, and likely soon-to-be billionaire Barack Obama? Name changing is always a barometer of a year-zero culture revolution that seeks to wipe out the past and, with it, anyone wedded to it. And so it was only a matter of time that the Woodrow Wilson Princeton School of Public and International Affairs was Trotskyized. Liberals cringed but kept silent, given that Wilson is still a hero for his support of the League of Nations, and his utopian efforts at Versailles, despite his characteristic progressive allegiance to pseudoscientific race-based genetics. Any revolution that claims it will not tolerate commemoration of any century-old enemies must put its handwipes where its mouth is. And revolutionaries always follow the path of least resistance. So in our era, that means the mob has focused on the hollow men and women now serving as university presidents, corporate CEOs, sports-franchise owners and coaches, politicians, news anchors, and even in some cases retired high-ranking officers of the military. It was easy wringing promises from these hierarchies to remove the trademark faces of Aunt Jemimah and Uncle Ben from popular food brands, and to win hundreds of new, costly diversity-coordinator billets, more mandatory race and gender indoctrination training, a “black” national anthem to be played at sporting events, and promises to BLM to rename military bases. Indeed, in no time, these elites were volunteering to debase themselves. Dan Cathy, CEO of the Chick-fil-A fast-food restaurant chain, urged white people to shine the shoes of blacks in the manner that the disciples had washed the feet of Jesus — and indeed Dan Cathy sort of did just that when he polished the sneakers of rapper Lecrae. Such is the new bottom line of profits in corporate America. (…) The 1960s saw Southern rural folk culture as a sort of hippie alternative to the dominant wealth and suburbanism of the mainstream. And all that is supposedly over now? Could Ry Cooder sing “I’m a Good Old Rebel” for a movie like The Long Riders, exploring the contradictions of ex-Confederate thugs like the James boys and the Youngers? Would anyone play the Band’s “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down,” or even the version of it by leftist Joan Baez? Could Ken Burns now still make The Civil War, 30 years after its original release, with a folksy Shelby Foote contextualizing the Confederate defeat as thousands of brave men dying for a tragic cause beneath them? Would a liberal Southerner like the late Jody Powell still dare to voice the words of Stonewall Jackson or Horton Foote or Jefferson Davis? In our more enlightened revolutionary times, were all these players useful idiots in the cause of racism? (…) In the exhilaration of exercising power ruthlessly and unchecked, the cultural revolutionists soon turn on their own: poor Trump-hating Dan Abrams losing his cop reality show, the two liberal trial lawyers armed on their mansion lawn in St. Louis terrified of the mob entering their gated estate community, bewildered CHOP activists wondering where the police were once mayhem and death were among them, the inner city of Chicago or New York in the age of police drawbacks wondering how high the daily murder rate will climb once shooters fathom that there are no police, and inner-city communities furious that the ER is too crowded with shooting victims to properly treat COVID-19 arrivals. Do we now really expect that the Wilson Center in Washington will be cancelled, the Washington Monument cut down to size, and Princeton, Yale, and Stanford renamed? The logic of the revolution says yes, but the liberal appeasers of it are growing uneasy. They are realizing that their own elite status and referents are now in the crosshairs. And so they are on the verge of becoming Thermidors. And what will the new icons be under our new revolutionary premises? Will we say the old statues were bad because they were not perfect, but the new replacements are perfect despite being a tad bad in places? Will we dedicate more memorials to Martin Luther King Jr., the great advocate of the civil-rights movement, or do we focus instead on his plagiarism, his often poor treatment of women, and his reckless promiscuity? Gandhi is gone, but who replaces him, Subhas Chandra Bose? Will Princeton rename their school of diplomacy in honor of the martyred Malcom X, slain by the black nationalist Nation of Islam? Malcom may now become ubiquitous, but he said things about white people that would have made what Wilson said about black people look tame. Puritanical cultural revolutionaries are always a minority of society. But whether they win or lose — that is, whether they end up as Bolsheviks or Jacobins — hinges on how successfully they terrify the masses into submission, and how quickly they can do that before repulsion grows over their absurd violence and silly rhetoric. When the backlash comes, as it must when mobs destroy statues at night, loot, burn, and obliterate what Mao called the “four olds” of a culture revolution — Old Customs, Old Culture, Old Habits, and Old Ideas — it may not be pretty. We can see its contours already: Asian Americans further discriminated against to allow for new university mandates jettisoning SAT scores and GPAs, while schools set new larger percentages of African-American admissions and transform their entire diversity industry into a black-advocacy enterprise; virtue-signaling and now hard-left white CEOs and college presidents and provosts asked to step down, to do their own small white-male part in yielding their prized jobs to someone more woke and less pink. Gun sales are at record levels. I supposed the revolutionaries never investigated the original idea of a police force and the concept of the government’s legal monopoly on violence? It was not just to protect the law-abiding from the criminal, but to protect the criminal from the outraged vigilante. Only police can stop blood feuds such as the ones we see in Chicago or like the medieval ones of Iceland’s Njáls saga, or the postbellum slaughtering of the Hatfields and McCoys. We are already seeing a counterrevolution — as the Left goes ballistic that anyone would appear on his lawn pointing a semiautomatic rifle to protect mere “brick and mortar.” Without a functioning police force, do we really believe that the stockbroker is going to walk home in the evening in New York City without a firearm, or that the suburbanite in Minneapolis in an expansive home will not have a semiautomatic rifle, or that the couple who drives to Los Angeles with the kids to visit Disneyland will not have a 9mm automatic in their car console? The Left has energized the Second Amendment in a way the NRA never could, and for the next decade, there will be more guns in pockets, cars, and homes than at any time in history. Do Nike, the NFL, and the NBA really believe that their fan clientele will buy into the Black Lives Matter special national anthem and BLM corporate logos on their uniforms? Publicly, perhaps their clients will say so, but at home and in private where fans have absolute control of the remotes or their Amazon accounts, probably not. (…) The BLM problem is that never in history has a radical cultural revolution at its outset declared itself both race-based and yet predicated on a small minority of the population, whose strategy was to shame and debase the majority that was sympathetic to the idea of relegating race to insignificance. If sowing the wind has been getting ugly, reaping the whirlwind will be more so. Victor Davis Hanson
A l’exemple de Saturne, la Révolution dévore ses enfants
En ces temps étranges …
Où après l’hystérie collective du virus chinois
Puis, le psychodrame des iconoclastes (y compris religieux) du Black Lives Matter …
Certains policiers noirs commencent à s’inquiéter du chaos laissé dans leurs quartiers par des manifestations Black Lives Matter où il y a plus de blancs que dans les forces de police en face d’elles …
Et des responsables noirs américains en sont à plaider, devant la recrudescence des violences, pour le retour de la police
Et à l’heure où après le départ fracassant, pour cause de pensée non conforme, d’une journaliste du New York Times …
Un autre de ses confrères progressistes se voit pousser dehors du New York magazine …
Comment ne pas repenser …
A la célèbre formule, au moment justement où la révolution française commençait à dévorer ses propres enfants, du journaliste et publiciste genevois Jacques Mallet du Pan  ?
Et comment ne pas en voir la meilleure métaphore …
Dans la fulfurance avec laquelle …
Un couple de stars du barreau de Saint Louis il y a deux semaines  …
Est passé pilori médiatique oblige …
Pour être descendus les armes à la main pieds nus dans leur jardin …
Dans la panique suscitée par un groupes de manifestants Black lives matter passant devant leurs portes…
De valeureux défenseurs des victimes en tous genres de la société américaine …
A meilleurs mais bien involontaires supports publicitaires de la NRA ?
Year Zero
Victor Davis Hanson
National Review
July 7, 2020Every cultural revolution starts at year zero, whether explicitly or implicitly. The French Revolution recalibrated the calendar to begin anew, and the genocidal Pol Pot declared his own Cambodian revolutionary ascension as the beginning of time.

Somewhere after May 25, 2020, the death of George Floyd, while in police custody, sparked demonstrations, protests, and riots. And they in turn ushered in a new revolutionary moment. Or at least we were told that — in part by Black Lives Matter, in part by Antifa, in part by terrified enablers in the corporate world, the new Democratic Party, the military, the universities, and the media.

What was uniquely different about this cultural revolution was how willing and quickly the entire progressive establishment — elected officials, celebrities, media, universities, foundations, retired military — was either on the side of the revolution or saw it as useful in aborting the Trump presidency, or was terrified it would be targeted and so wished to appease the Jacobins.

This reborn America was to end all of the old that had come before and supposedly pay penance for George Floyd’s death and, by symbolic extension, America’s inherent evil since 1619. As in all cultural revolutions, the protestors claimed at first at that they wanted only to erase supposedly reactionary elements: Confederate statues, movies such as Gone with the Wind, some hurtful cartoons, and a few cranky conservative professors and what not.

But soon such recalibration steam rolled, fueled by acquiescence, fright, and timidity. Drunk with ego and power, it moved on to attack almost anything connected with the past or present of the United States itself.

Soon statues of General Grant, and presidents including George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Andrew Jackson were either toppled or defaced. The message was that their crimes were being white and privileged — in the way that today’s white and privileged should meet a similar fate. Or, as the marchers, who tried to storm Beverly Hills, put it: “Eat the Rich.” They were met by tear gas, and not a single retired general double-downed on his outrage at law enforcement for using tear gas against civilians. Did the BLM idea of cannibalizing the billionaires include LeBron James, Beyoncé, Oprah Winfrey, and likely soon-to-be billionaire Barack Obama?

Name changing is always a barometer of a year-zero culture revolution that seeks to wipe out the past and, with it, anyone wedded to it. And so it was only a matter of time that the Woodrow Wilson Princeton School of Public and International Affairs was Trotskyized. Liberals cringed but kept silent, given that Wilson is still a hero for his support of the League of Nations, and his utopian efforts at Versailles, despite his characteristic progressive allegiance to pseudoscientific race-based genetics.

Rebranding

Any revolution that claims it will not tolerate commemoration of any century-old enemies must put its handwipes where its mouth is. And revolutionaries always follow the path of least resistance. So in our era, that means the mob has focused on the hollow men and women now serving as university presidents, corporate CEOs, sports-franchise owners and coaches, politicians, news anchors, and even in some cases retired high-ranking officers of the military.

It was easy wringing promises from these hierarchies to remove the trademark faces of Aunt Jemimah and Uncle Ben from popular food brands, and to win hundreds of new, costly diversity-coordinator billets, more mandatory race and gender indoctrination training, a “black” national anthem to be played at sporting events, and promises to BLM to rename military bases.

Indeed, in no time, these elites were volunteering to debase themselves. Dan Cathy, CEO of the Chick-fil-A fast-food restaurant chain, urged white people to shine the shoes of blacks in the manner that the disciples had washed the feet of Jesus — and indeed Dan Cathy sort of did just that when he polished the sneakers of rapper Lecrae. Such is the new bottom line of profits in corporate America.

Yet, the culture of erasure takes some time to reach all the eddies and pools of a huge society as variegated as America. Take the new reconstruction of the Civil War. In the old days before this May, the war was considered a catastrophic nemesis due a hubristic Confederacy. Yet, given that there were only 7 to 8 percent of the nation’s households in 1860 owning slaves, it should have been possible to end slavery without harvesting nearly 700,000 Americans.

But it was not, because — according to the traditional American tragic theme — millions of non-slave-owning white poor of the Confederacy fought tenaciously, and ultimately for a plantation culture that had marginalized them. Their rationale was that their sacred soil and homes were “invaded” by “Yankees” in a war of “Northern aggression.”

Liberal Hollywood bought into this tragic notion of misguided but somewhat honorable losers who had headed westward, penniless in defeat, after the war. Most Westerns of the 1950s — John Ford’s The Searchers or George Stevens’s Shane — saw Confederate pedigrees of a losing and disreputable cause as central to the outsider’s creed of the gunfighter. These Confederate vets were dead-enders useful in ridding a fragile civilization on the frontier of its demons, but too volatile to live within it during the peaceful aftermath when gunplay was no longer needed.

The 1960s saw Southern rural folk culture as a sort of hippie alternative to the dominant wealth and suburbanism of the mainstream.

And all that is supposedly over now?

Could Ry Cooder sing “I’m a Good Old Rebel” for a movie like The Long Riders, exploring the contradictions of ex-Confederate thugs like the James boys and the Youngers?

Would anyone play the Band’s “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down,” or even the version of it by leftist Joan Baez?

Could Ken Burns now still make The Civil War, 30 years after its original release, with a folksy Shelby Foote contextualizing the Confederate defeat as thousands of brave men dying for a tragic cause beneath them? Would a liberal Southerner like the late Jody Powell still dare to voice the words of Stonewall Jackson or Horton Foote or Jefferson Davis? In our more enlightened revolutionary times, were all these players useful idiots in the cause of racism?

Are there now three Americas? One of white guilt and penance, one of black anger and victimization, and another seething in silence as they see their 244 years of history written off as something worse than the pasts of Somalia, Peru, Iran, or Serbia.

There are now two realities — beyond two national anthems, beyond black and white dorms, black and white segregated safe spaces on campus, and beyond now segregated black and white history, language, philosophy, and science and math.

For blatantly racist diatribes dug up from the past, there is one standard of contextualization for 1619 architect Nikole Hannah-Jones and the creators of Black Lives Matter, and another that forces silly entertainers like late-night host Jimmy Kimmel to go into exile? In the new America, skin color adjudicates whether one can with impunity be openly racist — as it used to be before the civil-rights movement, whose values and methods the Left purportedly seeks to embrace and resurrect.

If so, then we know from history the script that now follows.

In the exhilaration of exercising power ruthlessly and unchecked, the cultural revolutionists soon turn on their own: poor Trump-hating Dan Abrams losing his cop reality show, the two liberal trial lawyers armed on their mansion lawn in St. Louis terrified of the mob entering their gated estate community, bewildered CHOP activists wondering where the police were once mayhem and death were among them, the inner city of Chicago or New York in the age of police drawbacks wondering how high the daily murder rate will climb once shooters fathom that there are no police, and inner-city communities furious that the ER is too crowded with shooting victims to properly treat COVID-19 arrivals.

Do we now really expect that the Wilson Center in Washington will be cancelled, the Washington Monument cut down to size, and Princeton, Yale, and Stanford renamed?

The logic of the revolution says yes, but the liberal appeasers of it are growing uneasy. They are realizing that their own elite status and referents are now in the crosshairs. And so they are on the verge of becoming Thermidors.

And what will the new icons be under our new revolutionary premises?

Will we say the old statues were bad because they were not perfect, but the new replacements are perfect despite being a tad bad in places? Will we dedicate more memorials to Martin Luther King Jr., the great advocate of the civil-rights movement, or do we focus instead on his plagiarism, his often poor treatment of women, and his reckless promiscuity? Gandhi is gone, but who replaces him, Subhas Chandra Bose? Will Princeton rename their school of diplomacy in honor of the martyred Malcom X, slain by the black nationalist Nation of Islam? Malcom may now become ubiquitous, but he said things about white people that would have made what Wilson said about black people look tame.

Puritanical cultural revolutionaries are always a minority of society. But whether they win or lose — that is, whether they end up as Bolsheviks or Jacobins — hinges on how successfully they terrify the masses into submission, and how quickly they can do that before repulsion grows over their absurd violence and silly rhetoric.

When the backlash comes, as it must when mobs destroy statues at night, loot, burn, and obliterate what Mao called the “four olds” of a culture revolution — Old Customs, Old Culture, Old Habits, and Old Ideas — it may not be pretty.

We can see its contours already: Asian Americans further discriminated against to allow for new university mandates jettisoning SAT scores and GPAs, while schools set new larger percentages of African-American admissions and transform their entire diversity industry into a black-advocacy enterprise; virtue-signaling and now hard-left white CEOs and college presidents and provosts asked to step down, to do their own small white-male part in yielding their prized jobs to someone more woke and less pink.

Gun sales are at record levels. I supposed the revolutionaries never investigated the original idea of a police force and the concept of the government’s legal monopoly on violence? It was not just to protect the law-abiding from the criminal, but to protect the criminal from the outraged vigilante.

Only police can stop blood feuds such as the ones we see in Chicago or like the medieval ones of Iceland’s Njáls saga, or the postbellum slaughtering of the Hatfields and McCoys. We are already seeing a counterrevolution — as the Left goes ballistic that anyone would appear on his lawn pointing a semiautomatic rifle to protect mere “brick and mortar.”

Without a functioning police force, do we really believe that the stockbroker is going to walk home in the evening in New York City without a firearm, or that the suburbanite in Minneapolis in an expansive home will not have a semiautomatic rifle, or that the couple who drives to Los Angeles with the kids to visit Disneyland will not have a 9mm automatic in their car console? The Left has energized the Second Amendment in a way the NRA never could, and for the next decade, there will be more guns in pockets, cars, and homes than at any time in history.

Do Nike, the NFL, and the NBA really believe that their fan clientele will buy into the Black Lives Matter special national anthem and BLM corporate logos on their uniforms? Publicly, perhaps their clients will say so, but at home and in private where fans have absolute control of the remotes or their Amazon accounts, probably not.

The counterrevolution will be easy to spot. Suddenly a left-wing institution will refuse to change its name. Gone with the Wind will insidiously reappear on the schedule of TBN classic movies. Statue topplers all of a sudden will be scouted out and arrested and have felonies on their record — and no one will complain.

NFL’s attendance will crater. Joe Biden will begin cataloguing both good and bad statues, and correct and incorrect name changing, and by October he will be saying, “One the one hand . . . on the other hand . . . ”

Segregation will doom this revolution. It is the worst poison in a multiracial society. Yet it is the signature issue of Black Lives Matter — everything from separate safe spaces and theme houses based on skin color in universities to specials fees and rules for non-blacks. The popular forces of integration, assimilation, and intermarriage will not be harnessed by racial-separatist czars, asking for DNA pedigrees as they sleuth for microaggressions and implicit biases.

The BLM problem is that never in history has a radical cultural revolution at its outset declared itself both race-based and yet predicated on a small minority of the population, whose strategy was to shame and debase the majority that was sympathetic to the idea of relegating race to insignificance. 

If sowing the wind has been getting ugly, reaping the whirlwind will be more so.

Voir aussi:

Vidéo : un riche couple d’Américains sort lourdement armé pour défendre sa propriété contre des manifestants

La scène est à peine croyable. Des manifestants américains du mouvement «Black lives matter» se rendant devant le domicile de la maire de Saint Louis, Lyda Krewson, pour exiger sa démission, ont été menacés dimanche par un couple d’avocats, lourdement armés, alors qu’ils passaient devant leur villa.

Mark et Patricia McCloskey ont ainsi été filmés pointant leurs armes en direction des 300 personnes marchant devant eux. Lui tenait un fusil de type AR-15, quand sa femme préférait brandir une arme de poing. NBC News rapporte que les portails de plusieurs propriétés du quartier ont été détériorés. Ironie de l’histoire, le couple en question a fait de la défense des victimes de dommages corporels sa spécialité.

Le président Trump a retweeté une vidéo de l’incident, sans le commenter. La scène a, faut-il s’en douter, choqué un nombre important d’internautes. D’autres y ont vu l’occasion de lancer des parodies.

Voir également:

Médias.

Démission au “New York Times” : “Ils me traitent de nazie et de raciste”

Courrier international

Décrivant un environnement de travail “intolérant” et fustigeant une certaine bien-pensance qui confine à l’“autocensure”, Bari Weiss, une journaliste chargée de faire vivre la diversité des opinions dans les colonnes du prestigieux quotidien américain, a présenté sa démission.

Sa lettre de démission est adressée à Arthur Gregg Sulzberger, directeur de la publication du New York Times. Dans ce texte publié sur son site personnel, Bari Weiss explique les raisons de son départ du quotidien de centre gauche.

Auteure et éditrice des pages Opinion du journal depuis 2017, la journaliste rappelle avoir été embauchée “dans le but de faire venir au journal les voix qui n’apparaîtraient pas dans ses pages autrement : […] les centristes, les conservateurs et ceux qui ne se sentent pas chez eux au New York Times. La raison de ce recrutement était claire : le journal n’avait pas anticipé le résultat de l’élection présidentielle de 2016, ce qui montrait qu’il n’avait pas une bonne compréhension du pays qu’il couvre.”

Pourtant, écrit Bari Weiss, le journal “n’a pas tiré les enseignements qui auraient dû suivre le scrutin”.

Mes incursions dans la pensée non orthodoxe ont fait de moi l’objet d’un harcèlement constant de la part de mes collègues qui ne partagent pas mes opinions. Ils me traitent de nazie et de raciste […]. Mon travail et ma personne sont ouvertement dénigrés sur les chaînes Slack [outil de communication interne] de la société […]. Certains collaborateurs y soutiennent qu’il faut se débarrasser de moi si le journal veut être véritablement ‘inclusif’ et d’autres postent l’émoji de la hache [‘ax’ signifie à la fois ‘hache’ et ‘virer’] à côté de mon nom.”

Dans un article écrit par le spécialiste média du quotidien américain, le New York Times indique que “Mme Weiss […] est connue pour sa tendance à remettre en question certains aspects des mouvements pour la justice sociale qui se développent depuis quelques années”. Ainsi, le mois dernier, la journaliste de 36 ans avait critiqué l’émoi d’une partie de sa rédaction après la publication d’une tribune d’un sénateur républicain demandant une intervention militaire pour “rétablir l’ordre” face aux manifestations du mouvement Black Lives Matter.

Dans la foulée, Bari Weiss décrivait sur Twitter la “guerre civile” qui ferait rage au sein de la rédaction du NYT et d’autres médias américains entre la “‘Nouvelle Garde’ – des gens en général jeunes qui sont attachés à la justice sociale – et la ‘Vieille Garde’ – les progressistes qui ont en général plus de 40 ans”. “Nombre de membres de la rédaction ont protesté sur Twitter et déclaré que c’était faux ou que cela ne représentait pas leurs positions”, commente l’article du New York Times.

“Twitter ne figure pas sur la une du New York Times, mais il en est devenu le rédacteur en chef ultime”, poursuit Bari Weiss dans sa lettre, regrettant les extrêmes précautions que prendrait l’équipe du quotidien pour ne pas froisser ses lecteurs les plus “éveillés”. Sur un ton railleur, elle interroge :

Pourquoi proposer quelque chose de difficile à avaler pour nos lecteurs, ou écrire quelque chose d’audacieux pour finir par passer par le processus abrutissant de le rendre idéologiquement acceptable, alors que nous pouvons assurer notre emploi (et des clics) en publiant une 4 000e tribune avançant que Donald Trump constitue un danger pour le pays et pour le monde ? L’autocensure est ainsi devenue la norme.”

“Nous remercions Bari pour les nombreuses contributions qu’elle a apportées à la rubrique Opinion. Je suis personnellement déterminée à ce que le New York Times continue à publier des voix, des vécus et des points de vue venant de tout l’échiquier politique dans la page Opinion”, a réagi Kathleen Kingsbury, responsable de cette rubrique.

Voir de même:

« L’Amérique vit un nouveau Moyen Âge, avec son oligarchie, ses clercs et son dogme »

GRAND ENTRETIEN – Notre monde est entré «dans un nouveau Moyen Âge» version high-tech, marqué par un accroissement inquiétant des inégalités, avertit le géographe Joel Kotkin.

Laure Mandeville
Le Figaro
16 juillet 2020

«Le Meilleur des mondes» décrit par Aldous Huxley serait-il en train de pointer le nez sur les côtes de Californie et de gagner l’Amérique? Dans son nouveau livre, L’Avènement du néo-féodalisme, le géographe américain Joel Kotkin, cousin californien du géographe français Christophe Guilluy, qui scrute depuis des années avec inquiétude la destruction des classes moyennes à la faveur de la délocalisation et de la financiarisation de l’économie, s’interroge sur la «tyrannie» que dessine l’émergence d’une oligarchie ultra-puissante et contrôlant une technologie envahissante.

Joel Kotkin décrit l’alliance de l’oligarchie de la Silicon Valley, composée de quelques milliardaires passionnés de transhumanisme, et persuadés que la technologie est la réponse à tous les problèmes, avec une classe intellectuelle de «clercs» qui se comporte comme un «nouveau clergé» et instaure de nouveaux dogmes – sur la globalisation, le genre, «le privilège blanc» – avec une ferveur toute religieuse. Il devient dangereux d’exprimer ses désaccords, regrette cet ancien social-démocrate, qui explique ne plus avoir sa place à gauche. Une situation d’intolérance que le départ fracassant de la journaliste Bari Weiss du New York Times , forcée de quitter le navire sous la pression de pairs devenus «censeurs», vient d’illustrer avec éloquence.

LE FIGARO. – Vous publiez L’Avènement du néo-féodalisme*, un ouvrage qui décrit l’émergence en Amérique, et plus encore en Chine, en Europe et même au Japon, d’un système caractérisé par une concentration de plus en plus inégalitaire de la richesse et du pouvoir entre les mains d’une petite minorité de «seigneurs» de la tech et de la finance. Retournons-nous vraiment au Moyen Âge version high-tech ?

Joel KOTKIN. – Nous vivons effectivement une époque qui rappelle le Moyen Âge avec son oligarchie, ses clercs et son dogme. Une sorte d’aristocratie de la tech a émergé et a fait alliance avec la classe intellectuelle, pour mettre en place une nouvelle vision de la société, qui a pour ambition de remplacer les valeurs plus traditionnelles portées depuis l’après-guerre par la classe moyenne. Tout l’enjeu futur de la politique est de savoir si «le tiers état» d’aujourd’hui – les classes moyennes paupérisées et les classes populaires – se soumettra à leur contrôle. Nous sommes entrés dans le paradigme d’une oligarchie concentrant la richesse nationale à un point jamais atteint à l’époque contemporaine. Cinq compagnies détiennent l’essentiel de la richesse nationale en Amérique! Une poignée de patrons de la tech et «leurs chiens de garde» de la finance, contrôlent chacun des fortunes de dizaines de milliards de dollars en moyenne et ils ont à peine 40 ans, ce qui veut dire que nous allons devoir vivre avec eux et leur influence pour tout le reste de nos vies!

La globalisation et la financiarisation ont été des facteurs majeurs de cette concentration effrénée de la richesse. La délocalisation de l’industrie vers la Chine a coûté 1,5 million d’emplois manufacturiers au Royaume-Uni, et 3,4 millions à l’Amérique. Les PME, les entreprises familiales, l’artisanat, ont été massivement détruits, débouchant sur une paupérisation des classes moyennes, qui étaient le cœur du modèle capitaliste libéral américain. La crise du coronavirus a accéléré la tendance. Les compagnies de la tech sortent grandes gagnantes de l’épreuve. Jeff Bezos, le patron d’Amazon, vient juste d’annoncer que sa capitalisation a progressé de 30 milliards de dollars alors que les petites compagnies se noient! Les inégalités de classe ne font que s’accélérer, avec une élite intellectuelle et managériale qui s’en sort très bien – les fameux clercs qui peuvent travailler à distance – , et le reste de la classe moyenne qui s’appauvrit. Les classes populaires, elles, ont subi le virus de plein fouet, ont bien plus de risques de l’attraper, ont souffert du confinement dans leurs petits appartements, et ont pour beaucoup perdu leur travail. C’est un tableau très sombre qui émerge avec une caste de puissants ultra-étroite et de «nouveaux serfs», sans rien de substantiel entre les deux: 70 % des Américains estiment que leurs enfants vivront moins bien qu’eux.

La destruction systématique de notre passé est très dangereuse. Cela nous ramène à l’esprit de la Révolution culturelle chinoise. Si l’on continue, il n’y aura plus que des tribus

Vous écrivez que la Silicon Valley est une sorte de laboratoire futuriste de ce qui attend l’Amérique. Votre description ne donne pas envie…

La Silicon Valley, jadis une terre promise des self-made-men est devenue le visage de l’inégalité et des nouvelles forteresses industrielles. Les géants technologiques comme Google ou Facebook ont tué la culture des start-up née dans les garages californiens dans les années 1970 et qui a perduré jusque dans les années 1990, car ils siphonnent toute l’innovation. Je suis évidemment pour la défense de l’environnement, mais l’idéologie verte très radicale qui prévaut en Californie avantage aussi les grandes compagnies qui seules peuvent survivre aux régulations environnementales drastiques, alors que les PME n’y résistent pas ou s’en vont ailleurs. On sous-estime cet aspect socio-économique de la «transition écologique», qui exclut les classes populaires et explique par exemple vos «gilets jaunes», comme le raconte le géographe Christophe Guilluy. Vu la concentration de richesses, l’immobilier californien a atteint des prix records et les classes populaires ont été boutées hors de San Francisco, pourtant un bastion du «progressisme» politique. La ville, qui se veut l’avant-garde de l’antiracisme et abritait jadis une communauté afro-américaine très vivante, n’a pratiquement plus d’habitants noirs, à peine 5 %, un autre paradoxe du progressisme actuel.

Vous parlez d’alliance de cette oligarchie avec de nouveaux clercs, presque un nouveau «clergé», gardien des nouveaux «dogmes». Que voulez-vous dire?

Il y a un vrai parallèle entre la situation d’aujourd’hui et l’alliance de l’aristocratie et du clergé avant la Révolution française. Et cela vaut pour tous les pays occidentaux. Ces clercs rassemblent les élites intellectuelles d’aujourd’hui, qui sont presque toutes situées à gauche. Si je les nomme ainsi, c’est pour souligner le caractère presque religieux de l’orthodoxie qu’elles entendent imposer, comme jadis l’Église catholique. Au XIIIe siècle, à l’université de Paris, personne n’aurait osé douter de l’existence de Dieu. Aujourd’hui, personne n’ose contester sans risque les nouveaux dogmes, j’en sais quelque chose. Je suis pourtant loin d’être conservateur, je suis un social-démocrate de la vieille école, qui juge les inégalités de classe plus pertinentes que les questions d’identité, de genre, mais il n’y a plus de place pour des gens comme moi dans l’univers mental et politique de ces élites. Elles entendent remplacer les valeurs de la famille et de la liberté individuelle qui ont fait le succès de l’Amérique après-guerre et la prospérité de la classe moyenne, par un credo qui allie défense du globalisme, justice sociale (définie comme la défense des minorités raciales et sexuelles, NDLR), modèle de développement durable imposé par le haut et redéfinition des rôles familiaux. Elles affirment que le développement durable est plus important que la croissance qui permettait de sortir les classes populaires de la pauvreté. Ce point créera une vraie tension sociale. Ce qui est frappant, c’est l’uniformité de ce «clergé».

Parmi les journalistes, seulement 7 % se disent républicains. C’est la même chose, voire pire, dans les universités, le cinéma, la musique. On n’a plus le droit d’être en désaccord avec quoi que ce soit! Écrire que le problème de la communauté noire est plus un problème socio-économique que racial, est devenu risqué, et peut vous faire traiter de raciste! J’ai travaillé longtemps comme journaliste avant d’enseigner, et notamment pour le Washington Post, le Los Angeles Times et d’autres… Il arrive que j’y trouve encore de très bons papiers, mais dans l’ensemble, je ne peux plus les lire tellement ils sont biaisés sur les sujets liés à la question raciale, à Trump ou à la politique! Je n’ai aucune sympathie pour Donald Trump, que je juge toxique, mais la haine qu’il suscite va trop loin. On voit se développer un journalisme d’opinion penchant à gauche, qui mène à ce que la Rand Corporation (une institution de recherche prestigieuse, fondée initialement pour les besoins de l’armée américaine, NDLR) qualifie de «décomposition de la vérité».

Je dois dire avoir aussi été très choqué par le «projet 1619» (ce projet affirme que l’origine de l’Amérique n’est pas 1776 et la proclamation de l’Indépendance, mais 1619 avec l’arrivée de bateaux d’esclaves sur les côtes américaines, NDLR), lancé par le New York Times, qui veut démontrer que toute l’histoire américaine est celle d’un pays raciste. Oui l’esclavage a été une chose horrible, mais les succès et progrès américains ne peuvent être niés au nom des crimes commis. Je n’ai rien contre le fait de déboulonner les généraux confédérés, qui ont combattu pour le Sud esclavagiste. Mais vouloir déboulonner le général Ulysse Grant, grand vainqueur des confédérés, ou encore George Washington, est absurde. La destruction systématique de notre passé, et du sens de ce qui nous tient ensemble, est très dangereuse. Cela nous ramène à l’esprit de la Révolution culturelle chinoise. Si l’on continue, il n’y aura plus que des tribus.

Vous soulignez le danger particulier de l’alliance de l’oligarchie de la tech et des élites, en raison du rôle croissant de la technologie…

Je crois que c’est Huxley qui dans Le Meilleur des mondes, affirme qu’une tyrannie appuyée sur la technologie ne peut être défaite. La puissance des oligarchies et des élites culturelles actuelles est renforcée par le rôle croissant de la technologie, qui augmente le degré de contrôle de ce que nous pensons, lisons, écoutons… Quand internet est apparu, il a suscité un immense espoir. On pensait qu’il ouvrirait une ère de liberté fertile pour les idées, mais c’est au contraire devenu un instrument de contrôle de l’information et de la pensée! Même si les blogs qui prolifèrent confèrent une apparence de démocratie et de diversité, la réalité actuelle c’est quelques compagnies basées dans la Silicon Valley qui exercent un contrôle de plus en plus lourd sur le flux d’informations. Près des deux tiers des jeunes s’informent sur les réseaux sociaux. De plus, Google, Facebook, Amazon sont en train de racheter les restes des médias traditionnels qu’ils n’ont pas tués. Ils contrôlent les studios de production de films, YouTube… Henry Ford et Andrew Carnegie n’étaient pas des gentils, mais ils ne vous disaient pas ce que vous deviez penser.

Trump va avoir du mal à gagner. Il pourrait revenir si une forme de rebond économique se dessine ou s’il s’avérait évident que Joe Biden n’a plus toutes ses capacités intellectuelles

Et que pensent ces nouveaux oligarques du XXIe siècle?

Ils sont persuadés que tous les problèmes ont une réponse technologique. Ce sont des techniciens brillants, grands adeptes du transhumanisme, peu préoccupés par la baisse de la natalité ou la question de la mobilité sociale, et bien plus déconnectés des classes populaires que les patrons d’entreprises sidérurgiques d’antan. Leur niveau d’ignorance sur le plan historique ou littéraire est abyssal, et en ce sens, ils sont sans doute plus effrayants encore que l’aristocratie d’Ancien Régime. De plus, se concentrer sur les sujets symboliques comme le genre, les transgenres, le changement climatique, leur permet d’évacuer les sujets de «classe», qui pourraient menacer leur pouvoir.

Que pensez-vous de la bataille entre Zuckerberg, qui a refusé de bannir les tweets de Trump, et les autres grands patrons de la tech, qui veulent bannir «les mauvaises pensées»?

Je pense que Zuckerberg a eu raison et qu’il a du courage, mais il semble être poussé à adopter un rôle de censeur. Un auteur que je connais, environnementaliste dissident, vient de voir sa page Facebook supprimée. C’est une tendance dangereuse, car laisser à quelques groupes privés le pouvoir de contrôler l’information, ouvre la voie à la tyrannie. Cela me ramène au thème central de ce livre qui se veut un manifeste en faveur de la classe moyenne, menacée de destruction après avoir été le pilier de nos démocraties. La démocratie est fondamentalement liée à la dispersion de la propriété privée. C’est pour cela que j’ai toujours eu de l’admiration pour les Pays-Bas, pays qui a toujours créé de la terre, en gagnant sur la mer, et a donc toujours assuré la croissance de sa classe moyenne. Quand cela cesse et que la richesse se concentre entre quelques mains, on revient à un contrôle de la société par le haut, qu’il soit établi par des régimes de droite ou de gauche.

Face à cette réalité, Trump et la rébellion anti-élites qui le porte pourraient-ils gagner à nouveau?

Trump est un idiot et un type détestable, qui, je l’espère, sera désavoué, car il suscite beaucoup de tensions négatives. Mais je n’ai jamais vu un président traité comme il l’a été. La volonté de le destituer était déjà envisagée avant même qu’il ait mis un pied à la Maison-Blanche! Je pense aussi que la presse n’est pas honnête à son sujet. Prenons par exemple son discours au mont Rushmore, l’un des meilleurs qu’il ait faits, et dans lequel il tente de réconcilier un soutien au besoin de justice raciale, et la défense du patrimoine américain. Il y a cité beaucoup de personnages importants comme Frederick Douglass ou Harriet Tubman, mais la presse n’en a pas moins rapporté qu’il s’agissait d’un discours raciste, destiné à rallier les suprémacistes blancs! On l’accuse de tyrannie, mais la plus grande tyrannie qui nous menace est l’alliance des oligarques et des clercs. Le seul avantage de Trump, c’est d’être un contre-pouvoir face à eux. Malheureusement, cela ne signifie pas qu’il ait une vision cohérente. Surtout, il divise terriblement le pays, or nous avons besoin d’une forme d’unité minimale.

Je dirais à ce stade que Trump va avoir du mal à gagner – j’évalue ses chances à une sur trois. Il pourrait revenir si une forme de rebond économique se dessine ou s’il s’avérait évident que Joe Biden n’a plus toutes ses capacités intellectuelles. Si les démocrates l’emportent, ma prédiction est qu’ils en feront trop, et qu’une nouvelle rébellion, qui nous fera regretter Trump, surgira en boomerang. À moins qu’une nouvelle génération de jeunes conservateurs – comme Josh Hawley, JD Vance ou Marco Rubio – capables de défendre les classes populaires tout en faisant obstacle à la révolution culturelle de la gauche, ne finisse par émerger. J’aimerais aussi voir un mouvement remettant vraiment le social à l’honneur se dessiner à gauche, mais je n’y crois pas trop, vu l’obsession de l’identité… Ce qui est sûr, c’est que l’esprit de 2016 et des «gilets jaunes» ne va pas disparaître. Regardez ce qui s’est passé en Australie: on pensait que les travaillistes gagneraient, mais ce sont les populistes qui ont raflé la mise, parce que la gauche verte était devenue tellement anti-industrielle, que les classes populaires l’ont désertée!

* The Coming of Neo-Feudalism: A Warning to the Global Middle Class, Joel Kotkin, Hardcover, 288 p., $20,65.

Voir de plus:

Dear A.G.,

It is with sadness that I write to tell you that I am resigning from The New York Times.

I joined the paper with gratitude and optimism three years ago. I was hired with the goal of bringing in voices that would not otherwise appear in your pages: first-time writers, centrists, conservatives and others who would not naturally think of The Times as their home. The reason for this effort was clear: The paper’s failure to anticipate the outcome of the 2016 election meant that it didn’t have a firm grasp of the country it covers. Dean Baquet and others have admitted as much on various occasions. The priority in Opinion was to help redress that critical shortcoming.

I was honored to be part of that effort, led by James Bennet. I am proud of my work as a writer and as an editor. Among those I helped bring to our pages: the Venezuelan dissident Wuilly Arteaga; the Iranian chess champion Dorsa Derakhshani; and the Hong Kong Christian democrat Derek Lam. Also: Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Masih Alinejad, Zaina Arafat, Elna Baker, Rachael Denhollander, Matti Friedman, Nick Gillespie, Heather Heying, Randall Kennedy, Julius Krein, Monica Lewinsky, Glenn Loury, Jesse Singal, Ali Soufan, Chloe Valdary, Thomas Chatterton Williams, Wesley Yang, and many others.

But the lessons that ought to have followed the election—lessons about the importance of understanding other Americans, the necessity of resisting tribalism, and the centrality of the free exchange of ideas to a democratic society—have not been learned. Instead, a new consensus has emerged in the press, but perhaps especially at this paper: that truth isn’t a process of collective discovery, but an orthodoxy already known to an enlightened few whose job is to inform everyone else.

Twitter is not on the masthead of The New York Times. But Twitter has become its ultimate editor. As the ethics and mores of that platform have become those of the paper, the paper itself has increasingly become a kind of performance space. Stories are chosen and told in a way to satisfy the narrowest of audiences, rather than to allow a curious public to read about the world and then draw their own conclusions. I was always taught that journalists were charged with writing the first rough draft of history. Now, history itself is one more ephemeral thing molded to fit the needs of a predetermined narrative.

My own forays into Wrongthink have made me the subject of constant bullying by colleagues who disagree with my views. They have called me a Nazi and a racist; I have learned to brush off comments about how I’m “writing about the Jews again.” Several colleagues perceived to be friendly with me were badgered by coworkers. My work and my character are openly demeaned on company-wide Slack channels where masthead editors regularly weigh in. There, some coworkers insist I need to be rooted out if this company is to be a truly “inclusive” one, while others post ax emojis next to my name. Still other New York Times employees publicly smear me as a liar and a bigot on Twitter with no fear that harassing me will be met with appropriate action. They never are.

There are terms for all of this: unlawful discrimination, hostile work environment, and constructive discharge. I’m no legal expert. But I know that this is wrong.

I do not understand how you have allowed this kind of behavior to go on inside your company in full view of the paper’s entire staff and the public. And I certainly can’t square how you and other Times leaders have stood by while simultaneously praising me in private for my courage. Showing up for work as a centrist at an American newspaper should not require bravery.

Part of me wishes I could say that my experience was unique. But the truth is that intellectual curiosity—let alone risk-taking—is now a liability at The Times. Why edit something challenging to our readers, or write something bold only to go through the numbing process of making it ideologically kosher, when we can assure ourselves of job security (and clicks) by publishing our 4000th op-ed arguing that Donald Trump is a unique danger to the country and the world? And so self-censorship has become the norm.

What rules that remain at The Times are applied with extreme selectivity. If a person’s ideology is in keeping with the new orthodoxy, they and their work remain unscrutinized. Everyone else lives in fear of the digital thunderdome. Online venom is excused so long as it is directed at the proper targets.

Op-eds that would have easily been published just two years ago would now get an editor or a writer in serious trouble, if not fired. If a piece is perceived as likely to inspire backlash internally or on social media, the editor or writer avoids pitching it. If she feels strongly enough to suggest it, she is quickly steered to safer ground. And if, every now and then, she succeeds in getting a piece published that does not explicitly promote progressive causes, it happens only after every line is carefully massaged, negotiated and caveated.

It took the paper two days and two jobs to say that the Tom Cotton op-ed “fell short of our standards.” We attached an editor’s note on a travel story about Jaffa shortly after it was published because it “failed to touch on important aspects of Jaffa’s makeup and its history.” But there is still none appended to Cheryl Strayed’s fawning interview with the writer Alice Walker, a proud anti-Semite who believes in lizard Illuminati.

The paper of record is, more and more, the record of those living in a distant galaxy, one whose concerns are profoundly removed from the lives of most people. This is a galaxy in which, to choose just a few recent examples, the Soviet space program is lauded for its “diversity”; the doxxing of teenagers in the name of justice is condoned; and the worst caste systems in human history includes the United States alongside Nazi Germany.

Even now, I am confident that most people at The Times do not hold these views. Yet they are cowed by those who do. Why? Perhaps because they believe the ultimate goal is righteous. Perhaps because they believe that they will be granted protection if they nod along as the coin of our realm—language—is degraded in service to an ever-shifting laundry list of right causes. Perhaps because there are millions of unemployed people in this country and they feel lucky to have a job in a contracting industry.

Or perhaps it is because they know that, nowadays, standing up for principle at the paper does not win plaudits. It puts a target on your back. Too wise to post on Slack, they write to me privately about the “new McCarthyism” that has taken root at the paper of record.

All this bodes ill, especially for independent-minded young writers and editors paying close attention to what they’ll have to do to advance in their careers. Rule One: Speak your mind at your own peril. Rule Two: Never risk commissioning a story that goes against the narrative. Rule Three: Never believe an editor or publisher who urges you to go against the grain. Eventually, the publisher will cave to the mob, the editor will get fired or reassigned, and you’ll be hung out to dry.

For these young writers and editors, there is one consolation. As places like The Times and other once-great journalistic institutions betray their standards and lose sight of their principles, Americans still hunger for news that is accurate, opinions that are vital, and debate that is sincere. I hear from these people every day. “An independent press is not a liberal ideal or a progressive ideal or a democratic ideal. It’s an American ideal,” you said a few years ago. I couldn’t agree more. America is a great country that deserves a great newspaper.

None of this means that some of the most talented journalists in the world don’t still labor for this newspaper. They do, which is what makes the illiberal environment especially heartbreaking. I will be, as ever, a dedicated reader of their work. But I can no longer do the work that you brought me here to do—the work that Adolph Ochs described in that famous 1896 statement: “to make of the columns of The New York Times a forum for the consideration of all questions of public importance, and to that end to invite intelligent discussion from all shades of opinion.”

Ochs’s idea is one of the best I’ve encountered. And I’ve always comforted myself with the notion that the best ideas win out. But ideas cannot win on their own. They need a voice. They need a hearing. Above all, they must be backed by people willing to live by them.

Sincerely,

Bari

Voir encore:

The Intelligencer
July 17, 2020

The good news is that my last column in this space is not about “cancel culture.” Well, almost. I agree with some of the critics that it’s a little nuts to say I’ve just been “canceled,” sent into oblivion and exile for some alleged sin. I haven’t. I’m just no longer going to be writing for a magazine that has every right to hire and fire anyone it wants when it comes to the content of what it wants to publish.

The quality of my work does not appear to be the problem. I have a long essay in the coming print magazine on how plagues change societies, after all. I have written some of the most widely read essays in the history of the magazine, and my column has been popular with readers. And I have no complaints about my interaction with the wonderful editors and fact-checkers here — and, in fact, am deeply grateful for their extraordinary talent, skill, and compassion. I’ve been in the office maybe a handful of times over four years, and so there’s no question of anyone mistreating me or vice versa. In fact, I’ve been proud and happy to be a part of this venture.

What has happened, I think, is relatively simple: A critical mass of the staff and management at New York Magazine and Vox Media no longer want to associate with me, and, in a time of ever tightening budgets, I’m a luxury item they don’t want to afford. And that’s entirely their prerogative. They seem to believe, and this is increasingly the orthodoxy in mainstream media, that any writer not actively committed to critical theory in questions of race, gender, sexual orientation, and gender identity is actively, physically harming co-workers merely by existing in the same virtual space. Actually attacking, and even mocking, critical theory’s ideas and methods, as I have done continually in this space, is therefore out of sync with the values of Vox Media. That, to the best of my understanding, is why I’m out of here.

Two years ago, I wrote that we all live on campus now. That is an understatement. In academia, a tiny fraction of professors and administrators have not yet bent the knee to the woke program — and those few left are being purged. The latest study of Harvard University faculty, for example, finds that only 1.46 percent call themselves conservative. But that’s probably higher than the proportion of journalists who call themselves conservative at the New York Times or CNN or New York Magazine. And maybe it’s worth pointing out that “conservative” in my case means that I have passionately opposed Donald J. Trump and pioneered marriage equality, that I support legalized drugs, criminal-justice reform, more redistribution of wealth, aggressive action against climate change, police reform, a realist foreign policy, and laws to protect transgender people from discrimination. I was one of the first journalists in established media to come out. I was a major and early supporter of Barack Obama. I intend to vote for Biden in November.

It seems to me that if this conservatism is so foul that many of my peers are embarrassed to be working at the same magazine, then I have no idea what version of conservatism could ever be tolerated. And that’s fine. We have freedom of association in this country, and if the mainstream media want to cut ties with even moderate anti-Trump conservatives, because they won’t bend the knee to critical theory’s version of reality, that’s their prerogative. It may even win them more readers, at least temporarily. But this is less of a systemic problem than in the past, because the web has massively eroded the power of gatekeepers to suppress and control speech. I was among the first to recognize this potential for individual freedom of speech, and helped pioneer individual online media, specifically blogging, 20 years ago.

And this is where I’m now headed.

Since I closed down the Dish, my bloggy website, five years ago, after 15 years of daily blogging, I have not missed the insane work hours that all but broke my health. But here’s what I do truly and deeply miss: writing freely without being in a defensive crouch; airing tough, smart dissent and engaging with readers in a substantive way that avoids Twitter madness; a truly free intellectual space where anything, yes anything, can be debated without personal abuse or questioning of motives; and where readers can force me to change my mind (or not) by sheer logic or personal testimony.

I miss a readership that truly was eclectic — left, liberal, centrist, right, reactionary — and that loved to be challenged by me and by each other. I miss just the sheer fun that used to be a part of being a hack before all these dreadfully earnest, humor-free puritans took over the press: jokes, window views, silly videos, contests, puns, rickrolls, and so on. The most popular feature we ever ran was completely apolitical — The View From Your Window contest. It was as simple and humanizing as the current web is so fraught and dehumanizing. And in this era of COVID-19 isolation and despair, the need for a humane, tolerant, yet provocative and interesting, community is more urgent than ever.

So, yeah, after being prodded for years by Dishheads, I’m going to bring back the Dish.

I’ve long tried to figure out a way to have this kind of lively community without endangering my health and sanity. Which is why the Weekly Dish, which launches now, is where I’ve landed. The Weekly Dish will be hosted by Substack, a fantastic company that hosts an increasingly impressive number of individual free thinkers, like Jesse Singal and Matt Taibbi. There is a growing federation of independent thinkers and writers not subject to mainstream media’s increasingly narrow range of acceptable thought.

The initial basic formula — which, as with all things Dish, will no doubt evolve — is the following: this three-part column, with perhaps a couple of added short posts or features (I probably won’t be able to resist); a serious dissent section, where I can air real disagreement with my column, and engage with it constructively and civilly; a podcast, which I’ve long wanted to do, but never found a way to fit in; and yes, reader window views again, and the return of The View From Your Window contest. I’m able to do all this because Chris Bodenner, the guru of the Dish in-box and master of the Window View contest, is coming back to join me. He’ll select the dissents, as he long did, in ways that will put me on the spot.

Some have said that this good-faith engagement with lefty and liberal readers made me a better writer and thinker. And I think they’re right. Twitter has been bad for me; it’s just impossible to respond with the same care and nuance that I was able to at the Dish. And if we want to defend what’s left of liberal democracy, it’s not enough to expose and criticize the current model. We just need to model and practice liberal democracy better.

And that’s my larger hope and ambition. If the mainstream media will not host a diversity of opinion, or puts the “moral clarity” of some self-appointed saints before the goal of objectivity in reporting, if it treats writers as mere avatars for their race and gender or gender identity, rather than as unique individuals whose identity is largely irrelevant, then the nonmainstream needs to pick up the slack. What I hope to do at the Weekly Dish is to champion those younger writers who are increasingly shut out of the Establishment, to promote their blogs, articles, and podcasts, to link to them, and encourage them. I want to show them that they have a future in the American discourse. Instead of merely diagnosing the problem of illiberalism, I want to try to be part of the solution.

I’ll still probably piss you off, on a regular basis. “If liberty means anything at all it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear,” as my journalistic mentor George Orwell put it. But I’ll also be directly accountable, and open to arguments that I, too, don’t want to hear but need to engage. And I hope to find readers who are fine with being pissed off — if it prompts them to reevaluate ideas.

If you believe in that vision or are simply interested in engaging a variety of ideas in a free-wheeling debate, then please join us. Those of you who were loyal Dishheads receive this column every Friday in an email, and you will get the same email next week directing you to the new Weekly Dish. If you are not on that list, or have not received an email lately, or have gotten to know me from my work at New York alone, you can add your name by clicking here.

The Weekly Dish will be free for a bit, while we iron out kinks and prep a podcast for the fall. But if you want to subscribe right away, or be a founding Weekly Dishhead, we’d love it, and it would help us enormously in getting this off the ground.

Dishness lives. All we’re waiting for is you.

See you next Friday.

Voir aussi:

Peak Jacobinism?

Even the woke eventually fear the guillotine. A few of its appeasers and abettors are becoming embarrassed by some of the outright racists and nihilists of BLM and the Maoists of Antifa — and their wannabe hangers-on who troll the Internet hoping to scalp some minor celebrity.

The woke rich too are worried over talk about substantial wealth, capital-gains, and income taxes, even though they have the resources to navigate around the legislation from their wink-and-nod brethren. Soon, even Hunter Biden and the Clintons could be checking in with their legal teams to see how much it will cost them to get around the Squad’s new tax plan.

The lines are thinning a bit for the guillotine. And the guillotiners are starting to panic as they glimpse faces of a restless mob always starved for something to top last night’s torching. Finally, even looters and arsonists get tired of doing the same old, same old each night. They get bored with the puerile bullhorn chants, the on-spec spray-paint defacement, and the petite fascists among them who hog the megaphones. For the lazy and bored, statue toppling — all of those ropes, those icky pry bars, those heavy sledgehammers, and so much pulling — becomes hard work, especially as the police, camera crews, and fisticuffs thin out on the ground. And the easy bronze and stone prey are now mostly rubble. Now it’s either the big, tough stuff like Mount Rushmore or the crazy targets like Lincoln and Frederick Douglass.

There are only so many ways for adult-adolescents to chant monotonously “Eat the Rich! Kill the Pigs! Black Lives Matter!” blah, blah, blah. And there are only so many Road Warrior Antifa ensembles of black hoodies, black masks, black pants, and black padding — before it all it ends up like just another shrill teachers’-union meeting in the school cafeteria or a prolonged adolescent Halloween prankster show.

Some 150 leftist writers and artists recently signed a letter attesting that they are suddenly wary of cancel culture. They want it stopped and prefer free speech. Of course, they first throat-cleared about the evil Trump, as if the president had surveilled Associated Press reporters, or sicced the FBI on a political campaign, or used CIA informants and foreign dossier-mongers to undermine a political opponent. And some petition signers soon retracted, with “I didn’t know what I was doing” apologies. Nonetheless, it was a small sign that not all of the liberal intelligentsia were going to sit still and wait for the mob to swallow them.

They learned well from #MeToo that, in the end, being emancipated, feminist, and woke did not mean that anyone accused of anything was protected by the Bill of Rights, statutes of limitations, the right to cross-examination, sincere apologies, and all that reactionary jazz, whether the accused was Al Franken or Garrison Keillor. Everyone else can also learn from #MeToo: As the revolution moved on from Brett Kavanaugh to Joe Biden himself, it went the way of the fading Jacobins. Tara Reid, after all, was tsked-tsked away in the old-boy “she’s lying” fashion. If not, then she might have empowered the evil Trump in his reelection bid.

The Lincoln County, Ore., authorities just backed off from their earlier homage to Jim Crow — they had issued an edict that all residents would be equal and wear masks in public except African Americans, who would be more equal than others and not be required to wear them. Even Oregon has standards?

The CEO of Goya, Robert Unanue, recently ignored calls to ruin his company — for his sin of praising the U.S. president. So far, he seems utterly unfazed by the pajama-boy mob.

The inveterate racist and anti-Semite Al Sharpton can’t decide whether he wants to dynamite Mount Rushmore or chisel Obama’s visage on it. How strange that the radical Left is divorcing the Democratic Party from all its iconic American referents and leaving them with nothing to replace them except painted slogans of Black Lives Matter on city streets, Kente-cloth shawls, and a Woodie Guthrie song or two. Bill de Blasio believes it is legal for a mayor to ban all public demonstrations — except those predicated on skin color, as he exempts Black Lives Matter outings. That Confederate idea may be too much even for the city’s liberals in hiding.

Seattle’s CHAZ/CHOP is gone. Warlord Raz Simone is back to his capitalist land-lording without even a citation for trespassing. Maybe former CHOP residents will get a discount at his Airbnb rentals.

The streets of our big cities are no longer a “summer of love” hate-fest targeting Donald Trump, but downright scary, given that murdering someone on sight is a COVID-get-out-of-jail-free crime. Blue-state officials green-lighted the multibillion-dollar wreckage and are now coming cup in hand, begging the Trump administration to pay for it. Their logic is: “Don’t dare send your damn troops to interrupt our beautiful looting and arson, but now please send your racist money for us to clean up the mess.”

In California, the jails and prisons are emptying, ostensibly because of the virus, in reality to enact a long-desired agenda of emptying and defunding prisons. As a result, you cannot find an automatic handgun in most California gun shops: The more left-wing a community, the harder to find a gun on the shelf. For what reason do liberals think liberals are buying guns?

COVID-19 is back for a while. The more the Left insists that millions in the streets for a month were not violating quarantines and had no effect on the second wave, the more protestors got infected and graciously went home to spread it to their more vulnerable relatives. Even leftists who were not infected know that this narrative is untrue and that their own demonstrations essentially ended the legitimacy of mass quarantining.

The hated police are slowing down in anticipation of early retirements, layoffs, and budget shortages. The logic is that going into the inner city is a trifecta losing proposition for them: Either get shot, or get accused, or get hated for doing your proper duty. De facto “community policing” seems to be operating in Atlanta, Chicago, and New York as murder spikes and shooters rediscover how it once worked out in Deadwood, Dodge City, and Tombstone. One can learn a lot about “community policing” by watching a 1950s Western in which “community leaders” plead for the outgunned sheriff to remove the accused from his jail cell and hand him over to the posse, which, with one minor lynching, would make it all go away.

How did woke Beverley Hills left-wing zillionaires respond to the Black Lives marcher shouting into their enclave “Eat the Rich”?

Try now politically correct tear gas.

When an Atherton or Georgetown liberal calls 911, will he now first say: “One, I am not an angry white person calling to rat out a suspect of color. Two, I am not calling to save my ‘brick and mortar’ property at the expense of the life of a marginalized victim. Three, I support defunding the police. And so, four, look — an individual of unknown appearance may kind of, sort of be shattering our bedroom window and could be pondering a felonious infraction. So could you send out a community facilitator to inquire?”

The Marxist-birthed Black Lives Matter now resembles Robespierre’s ridiculous Cult of the Supreme Being. So likewise it has become our new state-sponsored religion for America’s nonbelievers. All that is left is to set up a BLM statue on a man-made mountain in D.C. where all can take the knee.

Suddenly retired generals are growing quiet. It’s as if the much-reported “small number” of violent protesters somehow got really, really big. And they do not necessarily worship the military.

Or maybe promises of renaming Fort Bragg and tearing down the Lee statue at West Point strangely did not quite satisfy the architects of Black Lives Matter. It is, after all, a blink of an eye from “Defund the Police!” to “Defund the Military!” (How strange that retired four-star generals in their sixties and seventies suddenly discovered in late spring 2020 that their once hallowed bases a century ago were named after racist Confederate mediocrities. Who would have thought?)

If the chairman of the Joint Chiefs won’t even appear on camera with the commander in chief who restored a decrepit Pentagon budget, and the pantheon of retired military luminaries believes that proof of a Mussolini, Nazi, or fascist in the White House is to be found in the act of securing the southern U.S. border, or not staying another 20 years in Afghanistan, or not inserting American youth into the middle of Kurdish-Turkish bloodletting while inside Russian- and Iranian-occupied fascist Syria, then many might decide that the U.S. military should deal on its own with the defunding Left.

The NFL pulled a Joe Biden VP trick and prematurely promised to play the “black national anthem” at a few games so that all can stand in homage in racial solidarity and then all kneel in disrespect for the subsequent ecumenical national anthem.

Players can wear political insignia to remind incorrect viewers at home about how they are to think correctly. Will extra points be given for great passes and catches by the most woke?

NFL owners can’t yet fathom how they have conjured up a brilliant new way of destroying a 100-year heritage and an inherited huge audience. Is the message of the most non-diverse players to their most diverse fans now to be: “We don’t like your racist country and won’t stand for your toxic anthem, but you owe us to stay tuned for the commercial ads and to come out to the stadium to pay oppressed multimillionaires like us”?

Anyone who watches such an NFL game this fall might as just as well get it over with and enroll in a more honest North Korean–style reeducation camp. If that doesn’t work out, one can always tune in to the NBA preseason and hear more lectures from philosopher-king coach Steven Kerr, contextualizing the many reasons the NBA honors the power of Chinese Communist Party money.

As the cities turn into wastelands, children are gunned down, and careers are destroyed, fewer and fewer bore us by intoning that Trump is Mussolini, or that he resembles the operators of Auschwitz. Fewer still care about the spiraling tragic carnage of the inner cities — not Black Lives Matter, not the Squad, not Nancy Pelosi.

When will we see the BLM/Antifa/Democratic agenda spelled out in full? A new inheritance tax for the midlevel retiring Google executives? A yearly wealth tax on Beyoncé, Cher, and LeBron James? No more carbon foot-printing in a private jet for Barack and Michelle, or Bill and Hillary? Reparations for Maxine Waters? No police force for Pacific Heights?

Terrified inner-city dwellers can’t count on their progressive governors or mayors, or sympathetic billionaires, who will soon be able to hire politically incorrect ex-policemen at a bargain to beef up their private security patrols.

So the revolution is tiring, devouring its own, terrifying its enablers, embarrassing its abettors, and becoming worried that somewhere some courageous nobody might dare say, “You have done enough. Have you no sense of decency?”

The unhinged revolution is trying to make the U.S. into one big CHOP. Millions of Americans seem to be scrambling to avoid it, preferring instead to let the effort cannibalize itself at a safe distance — at least for now.

Voir également:

The Illiberal Liberal Media

As Bari Weiss’s departure confirms, the New York Times has narrowed its spectrum of allowable opinion.

Judith Miller

City Journal

July 14, 2020

What New York Times contributing editor and writer Bari Weiss recently called the “civil war” within the Times has just claimed another victim: Bari Weiss.

In a scathing open letter to publisher A. G. Sulzberger that instantly went viral on Twitter and other social media, Weiss asserted that she was resigning to protest the paper’s failure to defend her against internal and external bullying; senior editors’ abandonment of the paper’s ostensible commitment to publishing news and opinion that stray from an ideological orthodoxy; and the capitulation of many Times reporters and senior editors to the prevailing intolerance of far-Left mobs on Twitter, which she called the paper’s “ultimate editor.”

Weiss was apparently stripped of her role as editor, and not immediately offered another position; the implication that she was no longer welcome was clear. “The paper of record is, more and more, the record of those living in a distant galaxy, one whose concerns are profoundly removed from the lives of most people,” she wrote. “Nowadays, standing up for principle at the paper does not win plaudits. It puts a target on your back.”

Weiss did not respond to a request for comment. But friends and supporters said Tuesday that her decision was prompted in part by events surrounding the forced resignation last month of opinion editor James Bennet, to whom she reported during her three years at the Times. Bennet left the paper, and his deputy James Dao was demoted, after Times staffers revolted against their decision to publish an op-ed by Senator Tom Cotton arguing for deploying the military into U.S. cities to quell riots, if local law enforcement was unable to restore order. Many staffers protested the paper’s decision to give Cotton the powerful platform of the Times’s opinion page.

Some reporters argued that the conservative senator’s claims were contradicted by the paper’s own coverage, and that publishing the essay had endangered blacks, including minority reporters at the paper. Other Times staffers criticized Weiss’s characterization of the debate over Bennet’s publication of the Cotton op-ed as a “civil war” inside the Times between “the (mostly young) wokes” and “(mostly 40+) liberals,” reflecting a broader culture war throughout the country. Several staffers attacked her for having betrayed the paper by publicly describing its internal feuds.

In the aftermath of the Cotton episode, Weiss and many others quietly opposed the paper’s new “red flag” system, which effectively enables even junior editors to “stop or delay the publication of an article containing a controversial view or position,” as one senior editor characterized it.

Weiss has been a lightning rod ever since arriving from the Wall Street Journal, along with her friend, former colleague, and fellow columnist Bret Stephens, who declined to comment today on her resignation. Soon after joining the Times, she wrote a piece about a figure skater of Asian-American descent who was the first American woman to land a triple axel at the Olympics. She was attacked on Twitter after posting a story on the achievement, tweeting the line from the Hamilton musical “Immigrants get the job done”—but the skater was not an immigrant herself, merely the child of immigrants. Twitter exploded, accusing Weiss of “othering” an Asian-American woman.

At the Times, Weiss described herself as a centrist liberal concerned that far-Left critiques stifled free speech. She frequently wrote about anti-Semitism and the Women’s March and warned of the dangers of overly zealous proponents of #MeToo culture in a controversial column about comic Aziz Ansari, which inspired a skit on Saturday Night Live. One friend said that many of Weiss’s Times colleagues resented her because they envied her success. “She was a mid-level editor who made a splash and whose essays became the basis of Saturday Night Live skits,” the friend and former colleague said, asking not to be named.

In her letter, Weiss wrote that she had joined the paper to help publish “voices that would not otherwise appear in the paper of record, such as first-time writers, centrists, conservatives and others who would not naturally think of the Times as their home.” She had been hired, she wrote, after the paper failed to anticipate Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential election victory because it “didn’t have a firm grasp of the country it covers.” But after three years at the paper, she wrote in her open letter, Weiss had concluded, “with sadness,” that she could no longer perform this mission at the nation’s ostensible paper of record, given the bullying that she had experienced within the newsroom and the almost daily attacks on her, often from Times colleagues, on social media. She deplored the paper’s unwillingness to defend her or act to stop the online intimidation. “They have called me a Nazi and a racist; I have learned to brush off comments about how I’m ‘writing about the Jews again,’” she wrote.

Her criticism of Sulzberger rang true to several Times veterans, who note that he has been accused before of yielding to disgruntled liberal staff members. A publisher said to have intervened often in the paper’s news decisions, Sulzberger initially defended James Bennet and the decision to publish the Cotton op-ed, for instance. But faced with a staff revolt, he criticized the essay and the paper’s publication of it, saying that the editorial process had been too “rushed” and that the essay “did not meet our standards.”

Weiss’s departure was quickly hailed by her many critics within and outside of the paper on social media, among them Glenn Greenwald, who has called her a “hypocrite” for her alleged efforts to suppress Arab professors while in college, and for her defense of Israel and some of its controversial policies as a newspaper writer. But her stinging letter rang true to many others, among them former presidential aspirant Andrew Yang and talk-show host Bill Maher. “As a longtime reader who has in recent years read the paper with increasing dismay over just the reasons outlined here, I hope this letter finds receptive ears at the paper. But for the reasons outlined here, I doubt it,” Maher wrote on Twitter.

Her resignation was also lamented by such leading right-of-center thinkers as Glenn Loury. “What a shame—for the country, and on the Times,” wrote Loury, an economics professor at Brown University, in an email. Calling Weiss “courageous,” he added that while the climate she described at the paper was “no surprise,” that it had “driven her to this point is, indeed, shocking.” He also noted that Weiss was one of the few Times writers to sign the controversial “Harpers letter,” which he speculated might have been “the last straw” for the paper.

That letter, signed by over 150 academics, writers, and other intellectuals and artists, decried the “rising illiberalism” resulting not only from President Trump and his followers’ provocations, but also from what signatories called the growing “dogma and coercion” of those who oppose Trump. The rise of online mobs to suppress controversial views with which they disagree, said the letter, has become “a potent and possibly destructive force.” The signers deplored what they described as American liberals’ growing “intolerance of opposing views, a vogue for public shaming and ostracism, and the tendency to dissolve complex policy issues in a blinding moral certainty.”

Only one prominent Times reporter was quick to leap to Weiss’s defense. “It’s one thing that many of our readers and staff disagree with @bariweiss’ views—fine,” tweeted Rukmini Callimachi, an award-winning foreign correspondent and reporter. “But the fact that she has been openly bullied, not just on social media, but in internal slack channels is not okay.”

In a statement, acting editorial page editor Kathleen Kingbury said that the paper appreciated “the many contributions that Bari made to Times Opinion.” A Times spokesperson said that Sulzberger was not planning to issue a public response to Weiss’s letter. But given the evidently censorious climate at the paper of record these days, silence should not surprise us.

Voir de plus:

July 16, 2020

The intellectually intolerant mob claimed two high-profile victims Tuesday with the resignations of New York Times editor Bari Weiss and New York Magazine journalist Andrew Sullivan. These are just two examples of the deadly virus spreading through our public life: McCarthyism of the woke.

McCarthyism is the pejorative term liberals gave to the anti-communist crusades of 1950s-era Sen. Joseph McCarthy of Wisconsin. From his perch as chair of the Government Operations Committee, McCarthy launched a wave of investigations to ferret out supposed communist subversion of government agencies. Armed with his favorite question — “Are you now or have you ever been a member of the Communist Party?” — McCarthy terrorized his targets and silenced his critics. Thousands of people lost their jobs as a result, often based on nothing more than innuendo or chance associations.

The mob fervor extended to the state governments and the private sector, too. States enacted “loyalty oaths” requiring people employed by the government, including tenured university faculty members, to disavow “radical beliefs” or lose their jobs. Many refused and were fired. Hollywood notoriously rooted out real and suspected communists, creating the infamous “blacklist” of people who were informally barred from any work with Hollywood studios. The “red scare” even nearly toppled America’s favorite television star, Lucille Ball, who had registered to vote as a communist in the 1930s.

Today’s “cancel culture” is nothing more than McCarthyism in a woke costume. It stems from a noble goal — ending racial discrimination. Like its discredited cousin, however, it has transmogrified into something sinister and inimical to freedom. Battling racism is good and necessary; trying to suppress voices that one disagrees with is not. Woke McCarthyism goes wrong when it seeks to do the one thing that America has always sworn not to do: enforce uniformity of thought. Indeed, this principle, enshrined in the First Amendment, is so central to American national identity that it is one of the five quotes inscribed in the Jefferson Memorial: “I have sworn upon the altar of God eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man.”

Weiss’s resignation letter describes numerous examples of her colleagues judging her guilty of “wrongthink” and trying to pressure superiors to fire or suppress her. She explains that “some coworkers insist I need to be rooted out if this company is to be a truly ‘inclusive’ one, while others post ax emojis next to my name.” Others, she wrote, called her a racist and a Nazi, or criticized her on Twitter without reprimand. She notes that this behavior, tolerated by the paper through its editors, constitutes “unlawful discrimination, hostile work environment, and constructive discharge.”

Sullivan’s reason for departure is less clear — though he said it is “self-evident.” He had publicly supported Weiss, writing: “The mob bullied and harassed a young woman for thoughtcrimes. And her editors stood by and watched.”

In other words, both Weiss and Sullivan — like so many others — seem to have left their jobs because they were targeted for refusing to conform to its ideas of right thinking. Do you now or have you ever thought that Donald Trump might make a good president? Congratulations, president of Goya Foods: Your company is boycotted. Are you now or have you ever been willing to publish works from a conservative U.S. senator that infuriated liberal Twitter? Former New York Times editor James Bennet, the bell tolls for thee.

The mob even sacrifices people whose only crime is familial connection on its altar. The stepmother of the Atlanta police officer who shot and killed Rayshard Brooks, Melissa Rolfe, was fired from her job at a mortgage lender because some employees felt uncomfortable working with her.

Such tactics work best when they force people to confess to seek repentance for the crimes they may or may not have committed. McCarthy knew this, and so he always offered lenience to suspected communists who would “name names” and turn in other supposed conspirators. The woke inquisition uses the same tactic, forcing those caught in its maw to renounce prior statements they find objectionable. NFL quarterback Drew Brees surrendered to the roar while noted leftists such as J.K. Rowling and Noam Chomsky are being pilloried for their defense of free speech.

McCarthy was enabled by a frightened and compliant center-right. They knew he was wrong, but they also knew the anti-communist cause was right and were unsure how to embrace the just cause and excise the zealous overreach. It wasn’t until McCarthy attacked the U.S. Army that one man, attorney Joseph Welch, had the courage to speak up. “Have you no decency, sir?” he said as McCarthy tried to slander a colleague. The bubble burst, and people found the inquisitorial emperor had no clothes. The Senate censured him in 1954, and McCarthy died in 1957, a broken man.

It won’t be as easy to defeat the woke movement. There isn’t one person whose humiliation will break the spell. This movement is deep, decentralized and widespread. But it can be beaten if someone’s courage can awaken the center-left as Welch’s did for the 1950s center-right.

Can Joe Biden be that person? If elected, he might have to as the frenzy shows no signs of abating on its own. But if a man who says he’s running to save the soul of America cannot defend America’s heart and soul, millions will have the right to ask him Welch’s immortal question: Have you no decency, sir?

Voir enfin:

Mark McCloskey & Patricia McCloskey: St. Louis Couple Pull Guns on Protesters
Emily Bicks
Heavy.com
Jun 30, 2020

Mark McCloskey and Patricia McCloskey are a St. Louis couple who were seen pointing guns at protesters who were walking by their home in St. Louis, Missouri, on June 28. The husband and wife, who work together as personal injury trial lawyers, came out of their house armed to prevent protesters from walking onto their property in the Forest Park area. Video and photos of the incident went viral on Twitter.

In the videos shared online, however, it doesn’t appear that anyone walking in Sunday’s protest calling for the resignation of St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson was trespassing on their palatial lawn or approached their house. While Mark McCloskey, 63, holds a large assault weapon and Patty McCloskey, 61, holds a handgun in the video, they end up pointing their weapons at each other while staring down protesters. While a video does show the protesters walking through a pedestrian gate next to signs that say “private street,” “no trespassing” and “access limited to residents,” witnesses have said the protesters were peaceful and did not approach the McCloskeys or go onto the lawn of the “Midwestern palazzo” where they live.

Another video shared on Twitter that has now been made unavailable showed Patty McCloskey holding her gun straight at passing protesters, one wearing a T-shirt that read, “Hands up, don’t shoot.”

The McCloskeys could not be reached for comment by Heavy. But Mark McCloskey told KSDK:

We were threatened with our lives, threatened with a house being burned down, my office building being burned down, even our dog’s life being threatened. It was, it was about as bad as it can get. I mean, those you know, I really thought it was Storming the Bastille that we would be dead and the house would be burned and there was nothing we could do about it. It was a huge and frightening crowd. And they were they broken the gate were coming at us.

Mark McCloskey told KMOV, “A mob of at least 100 smashed through the historic wrought iron gates of Portland Place, destroying them, rushed towards my home where my family was having dinner outside and put us in fear for our lives. “This is all private property. There are no public sidewalks or public streets. I was terrified that we’d be murdered within seconds, our house would be burned down, our pets would be killed. We were all alone facing an angry mob.”

St. Louis Police have not commented about whether an investigation into the incident is ongoing or if the couple could face charges. On social media, people have called for the McCloskeys to be arrested and have directed people to make complaints to the Missouri bar. According to BuzzFeed News, a St. Louis Police report identifies the couple as the victims in the incident and the news site reports the McCloskeys called police.

“The police report states that the couple contacted police ‘when they heard a loud commotion coming from the street’ and ‘observed a large group of subjects forcefully break an iron gate marked with ‘No Trespassing’ and ‘Private Street’ signs,’ BuzzFeed wrote. “Police said the couple claimed protesters were ‘yelling obscenities and threats of harm to both victims’ and that they brought out their guns when they ‘observed multiple subjects who were armed.’” Police didn’t say in the report if officers verified whether any protesters were armed or if weapons were pointed at the McCloskeys, according to BuzzFeed News. Krewson, the St. Louis mayor who was the target of the protest hasn’t commented about the incident.

Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner said in a statement an investigation into the incident is ongoing. Gardner said, ” I am alarmed at the events that occurred over the weekend, where peaceful protestors were met by guns and a violent assault. We must protect the right to peacefully protest, and any attempt to chill it through intimidation or threat of deadly force will not be tolerated.”

She added, “My office is currently working with the public and police to investigate these events. Make no mistake: we will not tolerate the use of force against those exercising their First Amendment rights, and will use the full power of Missouri law to hold people accountable.”

Here’s what you need to know about Mark and Patty McCloskey:


1. The McCloskeys Bought Their Million-Dollar Home at Portland Place in February 1988 & Were Profiled in a St.
Louis Magazine After Renovating It

The couple was featured in St. Louis Magazine for their impressive renovation of the famous estate in 1988. Now more than 30 years after purchasing the home, which was once owned by Edward and Anna Busch Faust — the son of a revered St. Louis restaurateur and daughter of the beer-making Busch family — they have restored the Renaissance palazzo back to its original glory.

Mark McCloskey told the magazine, “All the plumbing was made by Mott, which was the premiere manufacturer at the turn of the century, and all the door and window hardware was made by P.E. Guerin.” Patricia McCloskey noted “the glass in the windows” was from the second-floor reception hall at the 14th century Palazzo Davanzati in Florence, “and the shutters, at least the ironwork, are probably original.” The property is appraised at $1.15 million, according to St. Louis city property records.

Armed St. Louis Lawyers Confront Protesters – Riverfront TimesMark and Patricia McCloskey brandish guns at marchers in St. Louis’ Central West End. Video by Theo Welling/Riverfront Times2020-06-29T03:51:46Z

In 1992, the couple were involved in a “brouhaha” over cohabitation rules in the Portland Place neighborhood, according to an article from The St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Patty McCloskey was at the time a board member for the Portland Place homeowners’ association. She opposed a bylaw change to allow cohabitation in the HOA, which put the association in line with city law that doesn’t allow for discrimination.

Patty McCLoskey disputed claims made at the time by her opponents that she and her husband were trying to keep gay people out of the neighborhood. “This is insanity,” she told the newspaper. “It isn’t about gay-bashing. I want to enforce restrictions. … certain people on the street are renting their houses, and we couldn’t get a few of the trustees to agree to make a phone call and tell them it was inappropriate.” A neighbor, Dr. Saul Boyarsky, told the newspaper the McCloskeys were, “trying to preserve the exclusivity of the neighborhood.”

In videos on Sunday, the McCloskeys could be seen outside their million-dollar home with guns. While holding a rifle, Mark McCloskey can be heard yelling to the crowd, “Private property! Get out! Private property, get out!” Patricia McCloskey, holding a handgun, also yelled at the protesters. One person in the protest can be heard yelling back, “Calm down,” as others tell the group to keep moving and not engage with the couple. Another person can be heard saying, “Then call the f—— cops, you idiot!” and “It’s a public street.” The area where the McCloskeys live does have signs saying it is a private street. But it is not clear if Missouri law allows them to point guns at people for entering into the area.

Mark McCloskey told KSDK the protesters were on private property:

Everything inside the Portland Place gate is private property. There is nothing public in Portland Place. Being inside that gate is like being in my living room. There is no public anything in Portland Place. It is all private property. And you’ve got to appreciate that if there are two or three hundred people, I don’t know how many there were. We were told that 500 people showed up at the Lyda Krewson house, which is not on our street, as you know. But how many of them came through Portland Place? I don’t know. But it was a big crowd and they were aggressive, wearing body armor and screaming at us and threatening to harm us. And how they were going to be living in our house after they kill us.

He said he and his wife are “urban pioneers”:

And to call these people protesters either. I’ve lived in the City of St. Louis for 32 years. We were, you know, urban pioneers back when we bought on Portland Place in 1988. And we have done everything for 32 years to improve the neighborhood and to keep this historic neighborhood going. And it’s very frustrating to see it get targeted. And of course, we’d been told by the press and by Expect US, that they wanted to start targeting middle-class neighborhoods and upper-class neighborhoods and bring their revolution outside of the cities. And we got an email from our trustees on Thursday saying that they were going to do this on Friday. We’re very worried about it.

The full interview can be seen below:

Interview with man who pulled out gun amid protestST. LOUIS — Mark McCloskey said he and his wife Patricia appear in the now-viral photos of the protest in their Central West End neighborhood. McCloskey gave an interview to 5 On Your Side anchor Anne Allred. Below is the transcript of the interview Monday morning: Anne Allred: Tell me what happened last night. Mark McCloskey: We came back to the house. I don’t know what time it is, I’ve been up ever since. I’m a little, I’m a little blurry, but we were preparing dinner. We went out to the east patio, open porch that faces Kingshighway on one side and Portland Place Drive on the south, and we’re sitting down for dinner. We heard all this stuff going on down on Maryland Plaza. And then the mob started to move up Kingshighway, but it got parallel with the Kingshighway gate on Portland Place. Somebody forced the gate, and I stood up and announced that this is private property. Go back. I can’t remember in detail anymore. I went inside, I got a rifle. And when they … because as soon as I said this is private property, those words enraged the crowd. Horde, absolute horde came through the now smashed down gates coming right at the house. My house, my east patio was 40 feet from Portland Place Drive. And these people were right up in my face, scared to death. And then, I stood out there. The only thing we said is this is private property. Go back. Private property. Leave now. At that point, everybody got enraged. There were people wearing body armor. One person pulled out some loaded pistol magazine and clicked them together and said that you were next. We were threatened with our lives, threatened with a house being burned down, my office building being burned down, even our dog’s life being threatened. It was, it was about as bad as it can get. I mean, those you know, I really thought it was Storming the Bastille that we would be dead and the house would be burned and there was nothing we could do about it. It was a huge and frightening crowd. And they were they broken the gate were coming at us. Allred: There have been some reports on Twitter and people who say they were there. It says they are saying the gate was already broken. McCloskey: Yes. That is nonsense. Absolute nonsense. The gate was up, broken. The gate was broken physically in half. Our trustees on Portland Place came out later in the night and chained it all up with an automotive tow chain it looks like. But no, you can talk to the trustees on Portland Place. The gate was not broken in half and laying on the ground one second before they came in the storm. Allred: Were the protesters on your private property at any point? McCloskey: Everything inside the Portland Place gate is private property. There is nothing public in Portland Place. Being inside that gate is like being in my living room. There is no public anything in Portland Place. It is all private property. And you’ve got to appreciate that if there are two or three hundred people, I don’t know how many there were. We were told that 500 people showed up at the Lyda Krewson house, which is not on our street, as you know. But how many of them came through Portland Place? I don’t know. But it was a big crowd and they were aggressive, wearing body armor and screaming at us and threatening to harm us. And how they were going to be living in our house after they kill us. Allred: And what has happened since last night, and those images exploded online? McCloskey: Well, I’ve had to turn the phones off in my office, so I had to come over here last night and have the office boarded up because we’re getting threats against the building and everybody. It is interesting to me that the very people that are asking the mayor to resign for ‘doxxing’ people have now put all of my information all over the web, everywhere in the world. Is there some hypocrisy there? You know, maybe I’m maybe I’m missing something. But we’ve had to turn off our telephones here at the office because all my lines have been going continuously since I got here at 10:30 last night. I am getting thousands of emails. I going to have to turn off my website. And it’s all it’s been both threatening and encouraging because of the number of people who have voiced their support. But there’s also been an awful lot of people who have the very direct threats of violence against me and my family. Allred: And you said you’ve received death threats? McCloskey: Oh, God, yes. The death threats started within minutes. I mean, I don’t know how long this whole event started. But I’ll bet we got our first e-maildeath threats before the mob moved on from Portland Place. Allred: When you see the images online of you and your wife on the patio, armed now after the fact. What do you think? McCloskey: Well, you know, we were always obviously upset. My wife doesn’t know anything about guns, but she knows about being scared. And she grabbed a pistol and I had a rifle, and I was very, very careful I didn’t point the rifle at anybody.2020-06-29T18:37:04Z

The protesters on Sunday were not targeting the McCloskeys’ home, but were instead walking to the St. Louis mayor’s house. After Krewson listed the names and addresses of protesters looking to defund the police during a Facebook live interview, she offered a formal apology.

Krewson said in a statement, “I would like to apologize for identifying individuals who presented letters to me at City Hall as I was answering a routine question during one of my updates earlier today. While this is public information, I did not intend to cause distress or harm to anyone. The post has been removed and again, I sincerely apologize.”

However, the damage was already done, and St. Louis residents accused her of doxing protesters. She was also publicly called out by Tishaura O. Jones, the treasurer of St. Louis, and St. Louis Alderwoman Megan Ellyia Green.

On Sunday, as reported by KMOV4, around 300 protesters chanted “resign Lyda, take the cops with you,” while marching toward her home in the Central West End.


2. The Couple, Who Have Been Married Since 1985 & Run the McCloskey Law Center, Located Inside the Historic Nieman Mansion, Met While Studying at SMU Law School

Medical Malpractice Litigation: Today’s realitySt. Louis Medical Malpractice Lawyer Mark T. McCloskey discusses what you are up against if you are injured or a relative is killed through medical negligence or mistake.2015-07-16T19:08:28Z

As stated on their website, the McCloskeys, “have devoted their professional careers to assisting those sustaining serious traumatic brain injury, neck, back, spinal cord and other serious, disabling or fatal neurological injuries. The goal of our practice is to provide those sustaining such devastating injuries, or the survivors of those killed as a result of such devastating injuries, with meaningful compensation.

“We strive to provide the seriously injured and their survivors with a means to having as full and as comfortable a life as possible by obtaining every penny of reasonable compensation for their injuries and losses.”

They started their law firm, McCloskey, P.C., in 1994, according to Mark McCloskey’s LinkedIn profile. McCloskey writes on his LinkedIn profile:

We have focused our practice on the representation of individuals suffering brain/head injury, spinal cord injury, birth injuries, and all other serious injuries as the result of the negligence of others for over 29 years. If you have suffered devastating injury or the loss of a loved one as the result of car wrecks, airplane crash, medical errors, dangerous or defective products or machines, explosion, fire, falls, or through any other causes, let us help you put your lives back together. ‘If it wasn’t your fault, why are you paying for it?’

Mark and Patricia McCloskey have been married since 1985 and have one adult daughter, according to their website and social media profiles. They met while studying at the Southern Methodist University Law School. They both graduated from SMU Law.

Niemann Mansion: the home of the McCloskey Law CenterMark T. McCloskey and the McCloskey Law Center invite you to explore our office in the historic Niemann Mansion, an 1887 German style home in the Central West End of St. Louis which we have restored to its period splendor.2015-07-16T20:00:58Z

Their office is located inside the historic Nieman Mansion in St. Louis’ Central West End, which the McCloskeys have also restored.


3. Mark McCloskey, Who Has Been an Attorney Since 1986, Represents a Victim of Police Brutality

welcome to the courtroomWelcome to the McCloskey Law Center. For over a quarter of a century we have devoted our professional careers to helping victims and families who have suffered catastrophic loss, injury, death due to the negligence of others, dangerous machines and products, and almost any other unsafe practice or, structure or act. If we can be of assistance to you, please call us at (314) 721-4000 OR (800)835-46812015-07-16T14:18:00Z

Mark McCloskey graduated magna cum laude from Southern Methodist University in Dallas in 1982, where he studied sociology, criminal justice and psychology before attending the Southern Methodist University of Law in 1985. He is a Missouri native and graduated from Mary Institute and Saint Louis Country Day School in Ladue, Missouri, in 1975, according to his Facebook profile.

On his law firm’s website, McCloskey is described as, “an AV rated attorney who has been nominated for dozens of awards and honors and has been voted by his peers for memberships to many exclusive ‘top rated lawyer’ and ‘multimillion dollar lawyer’ associations throughout the country.” The website also notes McCloskey has appeared on in the media, including KSDK in St. Louis and Fox News. The website states, “several of his cases have been cited in national legal publications as the highest verdicts recovered in the country for those particular injuries.” McCloskey’s profile also says:

Since 1986, he has exclusively represented individuals seriously injured as a result of accidents, medical malpractice, defective products, and the negligence of others. For the past 21 years, his firm has concentrated on the representation of people injured or killed through traumatic brain injuries, neck, back or other significant neurological or orthopedic injury.

Mark T. McCloskey is licensed to practice law in the state and federal courts of Missouri, Illinois, Texas and the Federal Courts of Nebraska. Additionally, he has represented individuals injured through medical malpractice, dangerous products, automobiles, cars, motorcycles, boats, defective hand guns, airplane crashes, explosions, electrocution, falls, assaults, rapes, poisoning, fires, inadequate security, premises liability, dram shop liability (serving intoxicating patrons), excessive force by police, construction accidents, and negligent maintenance of premises (including retail establishments, parking lots, government property, homes, schools, playgrounds, apartments, commercial operations, parks and recreational facilities) for the past 30 years and has filed and tried personal injury lawsuits in over 28 states.

McCloskey is representing a victim of police brutality in a lawsuit against a Missouri police department and officer. According to the Associated Press, David Maas, a Woodson Terrace Police officer at the time, was caught on dashcam video appearing to assault a man and was indicted on a federal charge in March.

For the incident, which took place in April 2019, Maas was charged with one count of deprivation fo rights under color of law, according to the U.S. attorney’s office. The victim was identified by the initials, “I.F.,” which matches the 2019 civil lawsuit brought by Isaiah Forman, the AP reported. Maas is accused of kicking Forman, who is black, while he was surrendering.

“I’m glad that the law enforcement agencies are subject to the same standard as everybody else,” Mark McCloskey, said to the AP.

On his Facebook page, McCloskey defended the jury’s decision in the 2011 case against Casey Anthony, who was accused of murder in the death of her daughter. McCloskey wrote on Facebook after the controversial 2011 verdict, “thank God that the jury saw through all the hype and found there WAS in fact not enough evidence on this case. Stop your crazy RAILING after you’ve spent so much time trying this girl in the media.”

Mark McCloskey is also a member of a St. Louis Lamborghini club.

In 1993, Mark McCloskey wrote a letter to the editor about crime in St. Louis. He wrote, “the reason high-income people leave the city, and why I can’t talk my friends into moving in, is crime. Why live where your life is at risk, where you are affronted by thugs, bums, drug addicts and punks when you can afford not to. What St. Louis can do without are the murderers, beggars, drug addicts and street corner drunks. St. Louis needs more people of substance and fewer of subsistence.”


4. Patricia McCloskey Is Originally From Pennsylvania & Studied at Penn State Before Attending SMU Law School

According to her Facebook profile, Patricia Novak McCloskey is a native of Industry, Pennsylvania, where she graduated from Western Beaver High School in 1977. McCloskey then studied at Penn State University, graduating in 1982 with a degree in labor studies and a minor in Spanish. She, like her husband, attended SMU Law School in Dallas, graduating in 1986.

According to their law firm’s website, “Patricia N. McCloskey is a Phi Beta Kappa, Summa Cum Laude graduate of Pennsylvania State University, graduating first in her class and with the highest cumulative average in her department in forty-seven years. Patricia N. McCloskey is also a graduate of Southern Methodist University School of Law, which she completed while simultaneously working full time and still graduating in the top quarter of her class.” The website adds:

After several years working with a major law firm in St. Louis on the defense side, she moved to representation of the injured. Since 1994, she has exclusively represented those injured by the negligence of others with Mark McCloskey. She has acted in various roles in the community including being a past Board Member of Therapeutic Horsemanship, a law student mentor, a member of the Missouri Bar Association ethical review panel and a St. Louis city committee woman.

Patricia McCloskey has extensive trial experience in personal injury and wrongful death cases arising out of all aspects of negligence, including traumatic brain injury, products liability and product defect, medical malpractice, wrongful death, neck, back and spinal cord injuries, motor vehicle collisions, motorcycle collisions, airplane crashes, and many others as set forth further

Patricia McCloskey is licensed to practice law in Missouri and Illinois, according to the law firm’s website.


5. The McCloskeys Were Given the Meme Treatment on Twitter

Thousands of online users slammed Mark and Patty McCloskey not only for pulling out firearms against peaceful protesters but for the way they incorrectly held their weapons, for running out of their home barefoot, for Mark’s salmon-colored shirt, and more.

While some Twitter members remade popular movie posters to feature the personal injury lawyers, others wondered if the trial attorneys broke the law by pointing their weapons at the protesters. Don Calloway tweeted, “A fellow lawyer from Missouri, a guy I know named Mark McCloskey committed an assault tonight in STL by pointing his AR 15 at peaceful protesters. He should be arrested and charged with assault immediately. The MO Bar should revoke their licenses.”

The McCloskeys also had their share of supporters online. One man tweeted, “The same people destroying private property and threatening residents wonder why residents are coming out of their homes with AR-15’s…? Lmao.” Ryan Fournier, founder of Students for Trump, tweeted, “God Bless the couple in St. Louis who stood their ground and defended their property. God Bless the Second Amendment.”

While some on social media have claimed the McCloskeys are registered Democrats, it was not immediately possible to determine whether the couple are actually registered as Democrats or if they are registered Republicans. But Federal Election Commission records show Mark McCloskey has contributed thousands of dollars to the Trump Make America Great Again Committee, the Republican National Committee and Donald J. Trump for President Inc. He also made contributions to a Republican congressional candidate, Bill Phelps, in 1996, and to the Bush-Quayle campaign in 1992.

Patricia McCloskey also made a contribution to the RNC in 2018 and to a Republican Senate dinner in 1988.


Guerre culturelle: L’Amérique a la rage – et c’est nous qui lui avons donnée ! (From Plato to NATO, Western Civ has got to go: Was it the course in Western civilization or Western civilization itself that had to go ?)

4 juillet, 2020

From Plato to NATO: The Idea of the West and Its Opponents: Gress ...https://mobile.agoravox.fr/local/cache-vignettes/L768xH1047/French_Theory-b41ed.jpg

The star athlete and activist took to Twitter to share the powerful rejection, along with a video of actor James Earl Jones reciting Frederick Douglass's renowned speech 'What to the Slave Is the 4th of July?'
Pres. Trump to visit Mt. Rushmore for July 4th - CBSN Live Video ...
President Trump at Mount Rushmore on Friday.Il faut se rappeler que les chefs militaires allemands jouaient un jeu désespéré. Néanmoins, ce fut avec un sentiment d’effroi qu’ils tournèrent contre la Russie la plus affreuse de toutes les armes. Ils firent transporter Lénine, de Suisse en Russie, comme un bacille de la peste, dans un wagon plombé. Winston Churchill
Debout ! les damnés de la terre ! Debout ! les forçats de la faim ! La raison tonne en son cratère, C’est l’éruption de la fin. Du passé faisons table rase, Foule esclave, debout ! debout ! Le monde va changer de base : Nous ne sommes rien, soyons tout ! C’est la lutte finale Groupons-nous, et demain, L’Internationale, Sera le genre humain. Eugène Pottier (1871)
Attention, l’Amérique a la rage (…) La science se développe partout au même rythme et la fabrication des bombes est affaire de potentiel industriel. En tuant les Rosenberg, vous avez tout simplement essayé d’arrêter les progrès de la science. (…) Vous nous avez déjà fait le coup avec Sacco et Vanzetti et il a réussi. Cette fois, il ne réussira pas. Vous rappelez-vous Nuremberg et votre théorie de la responsabilité collective. Eh bien ! C’est à vous aujourd’hui qu’il faut l’appliquer. Vous êtes collectivement responsables de la mort des Rosenberg, les uns pour avoir provoqué ce meurtre, les autres pour l’avoir laissé commettre. Jean-Paul Sartre (« Les animaux malades de la rage », Libération, 22 juin 1953)
Notre nation fait face à une campagne visant à effacer notre histoire, diffamer nos héros, supprimer nos valeurs et endoctriner nos enfants. (…) Le désordre violent que nous avons vu dans nos rues et nos villes qui sont dirigées par des libéraux démocrates dans tous les cas est le résultat d’années d’endoctrinement extrême et de partialité dans l’éducation, le journalisme et d’autres institutions culturelles. (…) Nous croyons en l’égalité des chances, une justice égale et un traitement égal pour les citoyens de toutes races, origines, religions et croyances. Chaque enfant, de chaque couleur – né et à naître – est fait à l’image sainte de Dieu. Donald Trump
Our nation is witnessing a merciless campaign to wipe out our history, defame our heroes, erase our values, and indoctrinate our children. Angry mobs are trying to tear down statues of our Founders, deface our most sacred memorials, and unleash a wave of violent crime in our cities. Many of these people have no idea why they are doing this, but some know exactly what they are doing. They think the American people are weak and soft and submissive. But no, the American people are strong and proud, and they will not allow our country, and all of its values, history, and culture, to be taken from them. One of their political weapons is “Cancel Culture” — driving people from their jobs, shaming dissenters, and demanding total submission from anyone who disagrees. This is the very definition of totalitarianism, and it is completely alien to our culture and our values, and it has absolutely no place in the United States of America. (…) In our schools, our newsrooms, even our corporate boardrooms, there is a new far-left fascism that demands absolute allegiance. If you do not speak its language, perform its rituals, recite its mantras, and follow its commandments, then you will be censored, banished, blacklisted, persecuted, and punished. (…) Make no mistake: this left-wing cultural revolution is designed to overthrow the American Revolution. In so doing, they would destroy the very civilization that rescued billions from poverty, disease, violence, and hunger, and that lifted humanity to new heights of achievement, discovery, and progress. To make this possible, they are determined to tear down every statue, symbol, and memory of our national heritage. Our people have a great memory. They will never forget the destruction of statues and monuments to George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant, abolitionists, and many others. The violent mayhem we have seen in the streets of cities that are run by liberal Democrats, in every case, is the predictable result of years of extreme indoctrination and bias in education, journalism, and other cultural institutions. Against every law of society and nature, our children are taught in school to hate their own country, and to believe that the men and women who built it were not heroes, but that were villains. The radical view of American history is a web of lies — all perspective is removed, every virtue is obscured, every motive is twisted, every fact is distorted, and every flaw is magnified until the history is purged and the record is disfigured beyond all recognition. This movement is openly attacking the legacies of every person on Mount Rushmore. They defile the memory of Washington, Jefferson, Lincoln, and Roosevelt. Today, we will set history and history’s record straight. (….) We believe in equal opportunity, equal justice, and equal treatment for citizens of every race, background, religion, and creed. Every child, of every color — born and unborn — is made in the holy image of God. We want free and open debate, not speech codes and cancel culture. We embrace tolerance, not prejudice. We support the courageous men and women of law enforcement. We will never abolish our police or our great Second Amendment, which gives us the right to keep and bear arms. We believe that our children should be taught to love their country, honor our history, and respect our great American flag. We stand tall, we stand proud, and we only kneel to Almighty God. This is who we are. This is what we believe. And these are the values that will guide us as we strive to build an even better and greater future. President Trump
Hey, hey, ho, ho, Western Civ has got to go!  Jesse Jackson (1987)
By focusing these ideas on all of us they are crushing the psyche of those others to whom Locke, Hume, and Plato are not speaking. . . . The Western culture program as it is presently structured around a core list and an outdated philosophy of the West being Greece, Europe, and Euro-America is wrong, and worse, it hurts people mentally and emotionally. Bill King (Stanford Black Student Union,1988)
Still nominally very much part of an atheistic, anti-foundational, French academic avant-garde in the United States, and now increasingly prominent in his position at Johns Hopkins, Girard was even one of the chief organizers of “The Languages of Criticism and the Sciences of Man,” the enormously influential conference, in Baltimore in October 1966, that brought to America from France skeptical celebrity intellectuals including Jacques Lacan, Lucien Goldmann, Roland Barthes, and, most consequentially, the most agile of Nietzschean nihilists, Jacques Derrida, still obscure in 1966 (and always bamboozlingly obscurantist) but propelled to fame by the conference and his subsequent literary productivity and travels in America: another glamorous, revolutionary “Citizen Genet,” like the original Jacobin visitor of 1793–94. After this standing-room-only conference, Derrida and “deconstructionism,” left-wing Nietzscheanism in the high French intellectual mode, took America by storm, which is perhaps the crucial story in the subsequent unintelligibility, decline, and fall of the humanities in American universities, in terms both of enrollments and of course content. The long-term effect can be illustrated in declining enrollments: at Stanford, for example, in 2014 alone “humanities majors plummeted from 20 percent to 7 percent,” according to Ms. Haven. The Anglo-American liberal-humanistic curricular and didactic tradition of Matthew Arnold (defending “the old but true Socratic thesis of the interdependence of knowledge and virtue”), Columbia’s Arnoldian John Erskine (“The Moral Obligation to Be Intelligent,” 1913), Chicago’s R. M. Hutchins and Mortimer Adler (the “Great Books”), and English figures such as Basil Willey (e.g., The English Moralists, 1964) and F. R. Leavis (e.g., The Living Principle: “English” as a Discipline of Thought, 1975) at Cambridge, and their successor there and at Boston University, Sir Christopher Ricks, was rapidly mocked, demoted, and defenestrated, with Stanford students eventually shouting, “Hey, hey, ho, ho! / Western civ has got to go!” The fundamental paradox of a relativistic but left-wing, Francophile Nietzscheanism married to a moralistic neo-Marxist analysis of cultural traditions and power structures — insane conjunction! — is now the very “gas we breathe” on university campuses throughout the West (…). Girard quietly repented his role in introducing what he later called “the French plague” to the United States, with Derrida, Foucault, and Paul DeMan exalting ludicrous irrationalism to spectacular new heights. M. D. Aeschliman
Nous sommes une société qui, tous les cinquante ans ou presque, est prise d’une sorte de paroxysme de vertu – une orgie d’auto-purification à travers laquelle le mal d’une forme ou d’une autre doit être chassé. De la chasse aux sorcières de Salem aux chasses aux communistes de l’ère McCarthy à la violente fixation actuelle sur la maltraitance des enfants, on retrouve le même fil conducteur d’hystérie morale. Après la période du maccarthisme, les gens demandaient : mais comment cela a-t-il pu arriver ? Comment la présomption d’innocence a-t-elle pu être abandonnée aussi systématiquement ? Comment de grandes et puissantes institutions ont-elles pu accepté que des enquêteurs du Congrès aient fait si peu de cas des libertés civiles – tout cela au nom d’une guerre contre les communistes ? Comment était-il possible de croire que des subversifs se cachaient derrière chaque porte de bibliothèque, dans chaque station de radio, que chaque acteur de troisième zone qui avait appartenu à la mauvaise organisation politique constituait une menace pour la sécurité de la nation ? Dans quelques décennies peut-être les gens ne manqueront pas de se poser les mêmes questions sur notre époque actuelle; une époque où les accusations de sévices les plus improbables trouvent des oreilles bienveillantes; une époque où il suffit d’être accusé par des sources anonymes pour être jeté en pâture à la justice; une époque où la chasse à ceux qui maltraitent les enfants est devenu une pathologie nationale. Dorothy Rabinowitz
You always told us not to boast. Gisela Warburg
How can the proposed Declaration be applicable to all human beings and not be a statement of rights conceived only in terms of the values prevalent in the countries of Western Europe and America?” Melville J. Herskovits  (The American Anthropological Association, 1947)
Nelson (…) was what you would now call, without hesitation, a white supremacist. While many around him were denouncing slavery, Nelson was vigorously defending it. Britain’s best known naval hero – so idealised that after his death in 1805 he was compared to no less than “the God who made him” – used his seat in the House of Lords and his position of huge influence to perpetuate the tyranny, serial rape and exploitation organised by West Indian planters, some of whom he counted among his closest friends. It is figures like Nelson who immediately spring to mind when I hear the latest news of confederate statues being pulled down in the US. These memorials – more than 700 of which still stand in states including Virginia, Georgia and Texas – have always been the subject of offence and trauma for many African Americans, who rightly see them as glorifying the slavery and then segregation of their not so distant past. But when these statues begin to fulfil their intended purpose of energising white supremacist groups, the issue periodically attracts more mainstream interest. The reaction in Britain has been, as in the rest of the world, almost entirely condemnatory of neo-Nazis in the US and of its president for failing to denounce them. But when it comes to our own statues, things get a little awkward. The colonial and pro-slavery titans of British history are still memorialised: despite student protests, Oxford University’s statue of imperialist Cecil Rhodes has not been taken down; and Bristol still celebrates its notorious slaver Edward Colston. (…)  Britain has committed unquantifiable acts of cultural terrorism – tearing down statues and palaces, and erasing the historical memory of other great civilisations during an imperial era whose supposed greatness we are now, so ironically, very precious about preserving intact. And we knew what we were doing at the time. One detail that has always struck me is how, when the British destroyed the centuries-old Summer Palace in Beijing in 1860 and gave a little dog they’d stolen as a gift to Queen Victoria, she humorously named it “Looty”. This is one of the long list of things we are content to forget while sucking on the opium of “historical integrity” we claim our colonial statues represent. We have “moved on” from this era no more than the US has from its slavery and segregationist past. The difference is that America is now in the midst of frenzied debate on what to do about it, whereas Britain – in our inertia, arrogance and intellectual laziness – is not. The statues that remain are not being “put in their historical context”, as is often claimed. Take Nelson’s column. Yes, it does include the figure of a black sailor, cast in bronze in the bas-relief. He was probably one of the thousands of slaves promised freedom if they fought for the British military, only to be later left destitute, begging and homeless, on London’s streets when the war was over. But nothing about this “context” is accessible to the people who crane their necks in awe of Nelson. The black slaves whose brutalisation made Britain the global power it then was remain invisible, erased and unseen. Afua Hirsch
Why are we experiencing the worst civil disturbances in decades? It is because the proponents of radical change won’t have it any other way. Early 20th Century Italian Marxist Antonio Gramsci theorized that the path to a communist future came through gradually undermining the pillars of western civilization. We are now seeing the results of decades of such erosion, in education, in faith, in politics and in the media. The old standards of freedom, individual responsibility, equality and civic order are being assaulted by proponents of socialism, radical deconstruction and mob rule. Those who charge that institutional racism is rampant in America are the same as those who run the country’s major institutions – city governments, academe, the media, Hollywood, major sports leagues and the Washington, D.C. deep state bureaucracy. Accountability? None.  The irony is rich. At the same time, the only legal and institutional structures that mandate racially based outcomes do so in favor of other-than-majority groups. Anyone who questions this arrangement winds up cancelled. The public debate is hardwired for disunity, making the former language of inclusion the new dog whistle of racism. The exclusionary slogan “black lives matter” is sanctified while the more unifying “all lives matter” is called divisive. People who say they want a colorblind society are called bigots even as progressives push for segregated events and housing on college campuses and “CHOP” protesters demand Black-only hospitals. Martin Luther King’s dream that people will “live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character” is judged by today’s progressives as a call for white supremacy. The media goes out of its way to coddle violent protesters, calling them peaceful even as they verbally abuse and then throw bottles at police, saying they are not “generally speaking, unruly” standing in front of a burning building. Political leaders who benefit from disunity keep fanning the flames. For example House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s reckless charge that the Senate police reform bill is “trying to get away with the murder of George Floyd” is irresponsibly divisive, especially since it was drafted by African American Senator Tim Scott (R-SC). Public monuments have borne the brunt of the violence in recent weeks. As President Trump predicted, the vandalism has moved well beyond statues of Confederates. Practically any statue is fair game. Washington, Jefferson, even Ulysses S. Grant, the man who defeated Lee’s army, all have been toppled by the mobs. And liberal city governments are taking down statues at least as fast as the rioters. But it would be a mistake to think that the statues themselves are at issue, or even what they symbolize. Rather it is the need for the radicals not just to cleanse American history but to make people feel ashamed of every aspect of it. In this way they clear a path for a radical future, buttressed by an unwavering sense of moral superiority that entitles them to smack down any dissent, usually gagging people in the name of “free speech.” We were told for years that anything the Trump administration did that was remotely controversial was an attempt to divide the country. Democrats frequently blamed insidious foreign influence, using expressions like “right out of Putin’s playbook” to keep the Russian collusion canard alive. But they are the ones who are weakening and dividing the country, to the evident glee of our Russian and Chinese adversaries. They have completely adopted longstanding Russian and Chinese propaganda lines about the United States being a country of endemic racism, poverty and oppression, when in fact America is an opportunity society and one of the most racially diverse and tolerant countries in the world. The protesters, their political allies and media backers are working hard to create the very sort of divisions they claim to oppose, because a weak, divided and ashamed America is their pathway to power. Chris Farrell
The statue of Columbus sat in front of Columbus City Hall for 65 years. It was a gift from the people of Genoa, Italy. Now the mayor’s office says it’s “in safekeeping at a secure city facility.” What a blow to U.S.-Italy relations. At least he could offer to give the statue back. A second Columbus likeness, a marble of the navigator pointing west, was booted last month by Columbus State Community College, where it used to stand in the downtown Discovery District. The mayor’s office says the unelected Columbus Art Commission will launch a “participatory process” to find new art that “offers a shared vision for the future.” Good luck. “Let’s just leave the space empty,” one Dispatch letter suggested, “because if not everyone is happy should anyone be happy?” What a sad sign of the times. WSJ
ABC News published a report this week titled “New government data, shared first with ABC News, shows the country’s premier outdoor spaces – the 419 national parks – remain overwhelmingly white.” The story’s headline reads, “America’s national parks face existential crisis over race,” adding in the subhead, “A mostly white workforce, visitation threatens parks‘ survival and public health.” “Just 23% of visitors to the parks were people of color,” the report adds, “77% were white. Minorities make up 42% of the U.S. population.” As it turns out, white people really enjoy hiking and camping, and that is a problem for the parks, the ABC News report claims, because people of color will be a majority in America by 2044. The article then goes on to quote outdoor enthusiasts of color who say they do not feel welcome at the “overwhelmingly white” national parks. These advocates, the article reads, “say they hope the moment since George Floyd’s death in police custody brings attention to systemic racism in the outdoors as well as other parts of society and translates into a long-term change in attitudes and behavior.” Sorry, everyone. Even national parks are racist now. This is not normal behavior from our press. This is a mental breakdown in the works. People of the future will look at all this and wonder how on earth these stories made it into print. The best thing that can happen now for the news industry is for the pandemic to pass, the lockdowns to lift, and for everyone to go outside and get some fresh air. Because the way nearly everyone in the press is behaving now, it seems clear that cabin fever has set in hard, and it is an epidemic we may not shake as quickly as the coronavirus. Becket Adams
People have said for decades that America needs to have “an honest conversation about race.” Is this what they had in mind—this drama of marches, riots, witness videos, tear-gassings, surging police lines, Trump tweets, Zoom pressers, statue-topplings, Facebook screeds, cable television rants, window-smashings, shop-burnings, police-defundings, escalating murder rates and the distant thunder of editorial boards? Veterans in the field of less-than-revolutionary race relations learned that a certain amount of truth-suppression is actually helpful—preferable to the “honesty” of hatred, for example. Much progress has been accomplished under cover of hypocrisy—or, if you like, civility. Good manners and artful hypocrisy were Booker T. Washington’s game, but he was written off as an Uncle Tom long ago. We live now in the regime and culture of confrontation—ideology as performance, anger as proof of authenticity. You remember how much trouble Joe Biden got into when he bragged about his ability to get along with segregationists in the 1970s. Mr. Biden was preening thoughtlessly on his skill in the arts of the old hypocrisy. Now he has learned his lesson and embraces the left’s idea of honesty—no deviation from the party line or from the officially approved emotions. How do you judge a moment of history when you are in the thick of it? How can you tell if all of this will be remembered as historic or will be superseded and forgotten as another momentary sensation, another self-important mirage? The current moment feels intensely historic now, but we shall see. Black Lives Matter has ambitions to abolish its own version of the Chinese Cultural Revolution’s “Four Olds”—old customs, old culture, old habits, old ideas—and to add a fifth, old statues. Yet this summer the titanic racial theme competes and fuses with other superstories—the pandemic and its economic consequences, the presidential race, America’s long-running politico-religious civil war. Raw emotion pours out of social media and into the streets—outrage, with a touch of holiday. On the other side is an oddly silent majority. It seems eerie that so much of the country—the land of “white supremacy,” as the left likes to think of it—gives the appearance of having almost acquiesced, as if it has conceded that the eruptions might be justified and even overdue. Can it be that the silenced majority has had an epiphany, that in its heart it acknowledges the justice of black Americans calling in Thomas Jefferson’s IOU, “I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just, and that his justice cannot sleep forever”? There’s some of that—changed minds, old prejudice grown reflective. In any case, the silenced majority, out of moral courtesy, has been reluctant to criticize people demonstrating in the wake of George Floyd’s killing. At the same time, it recoils—more indignantly and incredulously each day—from the left’s overall program and mind-set, which it considers insidious if not crazy. When major cities propose to cut off funds for their police departments or to abolish them altogether, that Swiftian absurdity makes a deep impression, confirming a broader doubt about the left’s intentions and mental health. The most tragic impediment to an honest conversation about race in America is fear—an entirely realistic fear of being slain by the cancel culture. This fear to speak is a civic catastrophe and an affront to the Constitution. It induces silent rage in the silenced. It is impossible to exaggerate the corrupting effect that the terror of being called a “racist”—even a whiff of the toxin, the slightest hint, the ghost of an imputation—has on freedom of discussion and the honest workings of the American public mind. Racism in America is no longer totalitarian, as it once was, especially in the South. The cancel culture is the new totalitarianism, a compound of McCarthyism, the Inquisition, the Cultural Revolution, the Taliban and what has become a lethal and systemic ignorance of history—almost a hatred of it. All that wild, unearned certainty, all that year-zero zealotry, discredits those who associate themselves with the cause and makes a mockery of their sweet intentions. Much of the white woke rage is radiant with mere self-importance. And it’s going to backfire. Newton’s Third Law of Motion hasn’t been repealed: For every action there is still an equal and opposite reaction. My sense is that there is quietly building a powerful backlash, which will express itself on Nov. 3, if not before. My guess is that polls now showing Mr. Biden far ahead don’t reflect reality. It may be impossible for President Trump to win; for some reason, he collaborates daily with his enemies to sabotage his chances. But the outcome is by no means as certain as the polls now suggest. Lance Morrow
We must resist the temptation to romanticize history’s losers. The other civilizations overrun by the West’s, or more peacefully transformed by it through borrowings as much as by impositions, were not without their defects either, of which the most obvious is that they were incapable of providing their inhabitants with any sustained improvement in the material quality of their lives. (…)  civilization is much more than just the contents of a few first-rate art galleries. It is a highly complex human organization (…) as much about sewage pipes as flying buttresses.”  Niall Ferguson French postmodern theory refuses to distinguish between high and low culture, attempting to make it futile even to discuss whether this or that work of art is or is not lovely or important. If you want to argue that Kanye West’s lyrics are as good as Shakespeare, or Mongolian yurts are as sophisticated a form of architecture as Bauhaus, then Foucault will support you all the way. But if you want to understand why we do not have child slavery in the West, or disenfranchised women, or imprisonment without trial, or the imprisonment of newspaper editors, you simply have to study the cultural history that produced such an unusual and extraordinary situation in human history. It is inescapable and not susceptible to postmodernist analysis. It’s not about the aesthetic or literary superiority of certain artworks, but about the unequivocal good of human dignity. If Ms. Rashatwar finds the idea of losing her human rights so “romantic,” she is always welcome to move to Saudi Arabia, which is still awaiting its Enlightenment. The late, very great Gertrude Himmelfarb identified three separate Enlightenments — English, French, and Scottish — at different though overlapping stages of the 18th century, with different emphases in different places at different times. Chartres Cathedral was not dedicated until 1260, so there were five centuries between then and the Enlightenments, but they were the moments when people began to throw off superstition and belief in magic and witchcraft, to look at the world afresh, unafraid of what they might find and where it might take them, even at the risk of unbelief. If the Islamic world had had such a moment, it would not have been left behind in so many areas of accomplishment since it was turned back from the gates of Vienna in 1683, with the result that its fascist-fundamentalist wing might not have existed to lash out in such fury and resentment on 9/11. The recent Security Conference in Munich took as its theme and title “Westlessness” — an ugly word in English, worse in German — intending to prompt international decision-makers into thinking about what might happen if the Trump administration were ever to get as tough over NATO underfunding as it has long threatened to do. Another fear of Westlessness, however, should be about the eclipse of Western civilization as a subject for study, as a result of a hugely successful Gramscian march through the institutions that started long before Jesse Jackson and his megaphone visited Stanford. For far from becoming a Kumbaya touchy-feely place, a truly Westless world would be a neo-Darwinian free-for-all in which every state merely grabbed what it could, a return to the world Hobbes wrote about in Leviathan. The Left should beware what it claims to wish for, and Western civilization should be taught once more in our schools and colleges. For as Churchill knew as the bombs were falling and London was burning in December 1940, it is worth fighting for. Andrew Roberts

Après la peste… la rage !

En ces temps étranges …

Où après l’hystérie collective du virus chinois

Et le psychodrame – de Colomb et la fête nationale jusqu’aux… parcs nationaux ! – du prétendu « racisme systémique » …

L’Amérique semble à nouveau emportée – et tout l’Occident peut-être avec elle ?

Par une de ces vagues périodiques de furie auto-purificatrice

Et où en ce singulier 244e anniversaire de la Déclaration d’indépendance américaine …

Le président américain se voit contraint …

Entre deux manifestations ou déboulonnages de statues …

A en rappeler toute l’importance au pied même d’un de ses plus imposants symboles  …

Comment ne pas repenser …

Avec la National Review

A ces alors bien innocents jours il y a trente ans à peine …

Où reprenant les nouveaux diktats de la French theory de nos Foucault et Derrida …

Jessie Jackson et ses amis appelaient au sein même de l’université Stanford

A rien de moins que… la fin de la Civilisation occidentale ?

Why We Must Teach Western Civilization

Andrew Roberts National Review April 30, 2020 Tuesday, December 3, 1940, Winston Churchill read a memorandum by the military strategist Basil Liddell Hart that advocated making peace with Nazi Germany. It argued, in a summary written by Churchill’s private secretary, Jock Colville, that otherwise Britain would soon see “Western Europe racked by warfare and economic hardship; the legacy of centuries, in art and culture, swept away; the health of the nation dangerously impaired by malnutrition, nervous strains and epidemics; Russia . . . profiting from our exhaustion.” Colville admitted it was “a terrible glimpse of the future,” but nonetheless courageously concluded that “we should be wrong to hesitate” in rejecting any negotiation with Adolf Hitler.

It is illuminating — especially in our own time of “nervous strains and epidemics” — that in that list of horrors, the fear of losing the “legacy of centuries” of Western European art and culture rated above almost everything else. For Churchill and Colville, the prospect of losing the legacy of Western civilization was worse even than that of succumbing to the hegemony of the Soviet Union. 

Yet today, only eight decades later, we have somehow reached a situation in which Sonalee Rashatwar, who is described by the Philadelphia Inquirer as a “fat-positivity activist and Instagram therapist,” can tell that newspaper, “I love to talk about undoing Western civilization because it’s just so romantic to me.” Whilst their methods are obviously not so appallingly extreme, Ms. Rashatwar and the cohorts who genuinely want to “undo” Western civilization are now succeeding where Adolf Hitler and the Nazis failed.

 The evidence is rampant in the academy, where a preemptive cultural cringe is “decolonizing” college syllabuses — that is, wherever possible removing Dead White European Males (DWEMs) from it — often with overt support from deans and university establishments. Western Civilization courses, insofar as they still exist under other names, are routinely denounced as racist, “phobic,” and generally so un-woke as to deserve axing. 

Western civilization, so important to earlier generations, is being ridiculed, abused, and marginalized, often without any coherent response. Of course, today’s non-Western colonizations, such as India’s in Kashmir and China’s in Tibet and Uighurstan, are not included in the sophomores’ concept of imperialism and occupation, which can be done only by the West. The “Amritsar Massacre” only ever refers to the British in the Punjab in 1919, for example, rather than the Indian massacre of ten times the number of people there in 1984. Nor can the positive aspects of the British Empire even be debated any longer, as the closing down of Professor Nigel Biggar’s conferences at Oxford University on the legacy of colonialism eloquently demonstrates.

We all know the joke that Mahatma Gandhi supposedly made when he was asked what he thought about Western civilization: “I think it might be a good idea.” The gag is apocryphal, in fact, first appearing two decades after his death. But very many people have taken it literally, arguing that there really is no such thing as Western civilization, from ideologues such as Noam Chomsky to the activists of the Rhodes Must Fall movement at Oxford University, who demand the removal from Oriel College of the statue of the benefactor of the Rhodes Scholarships.

Increasingly clamorous demands by African and Asian governments for the restitution of artifacts “stolen” from their countries during colonial periods are another aspect of the attack, an attempt to guilt-shame the West. It also did not help that for eight years before 2016, the United States was led by someone who was constantly searching for aspects of Western behavior for which to apologize.

This belief that Western civilization is at heart morally defective has recently been exemplified by the New York Times’ inane and wildly historically inaccurate “1619 Project,” which essentially attempts to present the entirety of American history from Plymouth Rock to today solely through the prism of race and slavery. “America Wasn’t a Democracy until Black Americans Made It One” was the headline of one essay in the New York Times Magazine launching the project, alongside “American Capitalism Is Brutal: You Can Trace That to the Plantation” and “How Segregation Caused Your Traffic Jam.” When no fewer than twelve — in the circumstances very brave — American Civil War historians sent a letter itemizing all the myriad factual errors in the project’s founding document, the New York Times refused to print it. Yet the Project plans to create and distribute school curriculums that will “recenter” America’s memory.

None of this would amount to much if only schools and colleges were not so keen to apologize for and deny Western civilization, and to abolish or dumb down the teaching of important aspects of it. The classics faculty at Oxford University, to take one example of many, has recently recommended that Homer’s Iliad and Virgil’s Aeneid be removed from the initial module of the literae Humaniores program in ancient literature, history, and philosophy, giving as their reason the difference in recent exam results between male and female undergraduates, and the difference in expertise in Latin and Greek between privately and publicly educated students. The supposed guardians of the discipline are therefore willing to put social experimentation and social leveling before the best possible teaching of the humanities, a disgraceful position for one of the world’s greatest universities to have adopted.

A glance at the fate of “Western Civ” courses in the United States suggests that there is a deep malaise in our cultural self-confidence. The origin of the concept of Western civilization as a subject is found in the “War Issues” course offered to students at Columbia University in 1918, just after the United States’ entry into World War I. By learning the politics, history, philosophy, and culture of the Western world, students were given the opportunity to understand the values for which they were about to be asked to risk their lives. In 1919, the Columbia course was developed into “An Introduction to Contemporary Civilization,” which was followed by a similar innovation at the University of Chicago in 1931.

By 1964, no fewer than 40 of the 50 top American colleges required students to take such a class, which, to take Stanford University as an example, had evolved into a core canon of around 15 works, including those by Homer, Virgil, Plato, Dante, Milton, and Voltaire. While the content of the Western Civ courses was considerably more flexible, complex, and diverse than subsequent critics have suggested (as Herbert Lindenberger’s study The History in Literature: On Value, Genre, Institutions explains), the courses did indeed treat Western civilization as a uniform entity. In the last decade, that was derided as so inherently and obviously evil that Western Civ courses had disappeared altogether, miraculously holding out in their Columbia birthplace and in few other places, including brave, non-government-funded outposts of sanity such as Hillsdale College in Michigan and the incipient Ralston College in Savannah.

For all that we must of course take proper cognizance of other cultures, the legacy of Western culture, in terms of both its sheer quality and its quantity, is unsurpassed in human history. We are deliberately underplaying many of the greatest contributions made to poetry, architecture, philosophy, music, and art by ignoring that fact, often simply in order to try to feel less guilty about imperialism, colonialism, and slavery, even though the last was a moral crime committed by only a minority of some few people’s great-great-great-grandparents.

As a result, future generations cannot be certain that they will be taught about the overwhelmingly positive aspects of Western civilization. They might not now be shown the crucial interconnection between, for example, the Scrovegni Chapel by Giotto at Padua, which articulates the complex scholasticism of Saint Augustine in paint; Machiavelli’s The Prince, the first work of modern political theory; Botticelli’s Primavera, the quintessence of Renaissance humanism in a single painting; the works of Teresa of Ávila and Descartes, which wrestle with the proof of discrete individual identity; Beethoven’s symphonies, arguably the most complex and profound orchestral works ever written; and Shakespeare, whose plays Harold Bloom has pointed out, “remain the outward limit of human achievement: aesthetically, cognitively, in certain ways morally, even spiritually.” Even if students are taught about these works individually, they will not be connected in a context that makes it clear how important they are to Western civilization.

We cannot therefore know, once the present campaign against Western civilization reaches its goal, that our children and grandchildren will be taught about the living thing that intimately connects Europe’s Gothic cathedrals, which are mediations in stone between the individual and the sublime; the giants of the 19th-century novel, from Dickens to Flaubert to Tolstoy, in whose works contemporary life realistically observed becomes a fit subject for art; the Dutch masters of the 17th century such as Rembrandt, who wrestled visually with the human condition in a fashion that still speaks to us across the centuries; Versailles, the Hermitage, and the Alhambra, which, though bombastic, are undeniably ravishing expressions of the human will. Faced with the argument that Western culture is no longer relevant, it’s tempting to adopt Dr. Johnson’s argument, aim a good kick at the nearest neoclassical building, and announce, “I refute it thus.”

Mention of the Alhambra in Granada prompts the thought that any course in Western civilization worth its name ought also to include the Umayyad Caliphate, of which Córdoba  in modern-day Spain was the capital between 756 and 929. In the wake of the conquest of Spain and the establishment of the Muslim confederacy of Al-Andalus, Córdoba  became a flourishing, polyglot, multicultural environment in which religious tolerance, despite Jews’ and Christians’ being obliged to pay a supplementary tax to the state, produced an atmosphere of intellectual progressiveness that made it one of the most important cities in the world. Discoveries in trigonometry, pharmacology, astronomy, and surgery can all be traced to Córdoba. At a certain point, then, a very particular set of historical circumstances produced an equally particular set of intellectual ideas, which had significant material consequences. The study of Western civilization is therefore emphatically not solely that of Christian DWEMs.

In 1988, Jesse Jackson led Stanford students in the chant, “Hey, hey, ho, ho, Western Civ has got to go!” The protests attracted national headlines and inspired a television debate between the university’s president and William Bennett, then secretary of education. Bill King, the president of the Stanford Black Student Union, claimed at that time, “By focusing these ideas on all of us they are crushing the psyche of those others to whom Locke, Hume, and Plato are not speaking. . . . The Western culture program as it is presently structured around a core list and an outdated philosophy of the West being Greece, Europe, and Euro-America is wrong, and worse, it hurts people mentally and emotionally.” He presented no actual evidence that reading Locke, Hume, or Plato has ever hurt anyone mentally or emotionally, and that was of course decades before the snowflake generation could proclaim themselves offended by the “micro-aggression” of a raised eyebrow. 

In 2016, over 300 Stanford students signed a petition requesting a ballot on the restoration of the Western Civ course. Fewer people voted for the ballot than voted to have it in the first place. In his book The Lost History of Western Civilization, Stanley Kurtz places the events at Stanford center stage for what went so badly wrong later across America, as the skewed thinking behind the deconstructionist, multiculturalist, postmodern, and intersectional movements caused so much damage to education for so long. 

Kurtz reminds us that what the Western Civ courses really did was to root a people in their past and their values. The trajectory of Western culture was shown to have run from Greece via Rome to Christendom, infused by Judaic ideas and morality along the way via Jerusalem, but then detouring briefly through the Dark Ages, recovering in the Renaissance, which led to the Reformation, the Enlightenment, and thus the scientific, rational, and politically liberated culture of Europe and European America. “From Plato to NATO,” as the catchphrase went. 

At the center of this transference of values across time and space was democracy, of which Winston Churchill famously said, “Many forms of government have been tried, and will be tried in this world of sin and woe. No one pretends that democracy is perfect or all-wise. Indeed, it has been said that democracy is the worst form of government, except for all those other forms that have been tried from time to time.” The generations who grew up knowing that truth, rather than weltering in guilt and self-doubt about “false consciousness” and so on, were the lucky ones, because they were allowed to study the glories of Western civilization in a way that was unembarrassed, unashamed, and not saddled with accusations of guilt in a centuries-old crime that had absolutely nothing to do with them. They could learn about the best of their civilization, and how it benefited — and continues to benefit — mankind. 

As Ian Jenkins, the senior curator of the Ancient Greek collection at the British Museum, put it in his book on the Elgin Marbles — politically correctly entitled “The Parthenon Sculptures” — “Human figures in the frieze are more than mere portraits of the Athenian people of the day. Rather they represent a timeless humanity, one which transcends the present to encompass a universal vision of an ideal society.” The Parthenon itself set out the architectural laws of proportion that still obtain to this day, and later in the book Jenkins points out how the sculptures “transcend national boundaries and epitomize universal and enduring values of excellence.” It was no coincidence that interest in them permeated the Western Enlightenments of the 18th century. 

While the Parthenon was being built, Pericles contrasted the openness and moderation of Athenian civic life with the militaristic, secretive, dictatorial Spartans in his Funeral Speech of 430 b.c., and this struck a chord with the Enlightenment thinkers of 23 centuries later, just as it should continue to do with us today, reminding us why Western values are indeed superior to those that actuate the leaders of modern China, Russia, Iran, Venezuela, North Korea, and Zimbabwe. Marxism-Leninism began as a Western concept but was overthrown in the West, whereas it tragically still thrives in other parts of the world. And yes, we know that the architect Phidias employed slaves and metics (foreigners) in building the Parthenon, not just Athenian freemen.

“Carved around the middle of the fifth century bc,” writes Neil MacGregor, former director of the British Museum, the Elgin Marbles “are the product of a creative culture that is credited with the invention of such aspects of modern Western civilization as democracy, philosophy, history, medicine, poetry and drama.” Of course, no one is claiming that Oriental, Persian, and Arab civilizations did not have all of those listed — except democracy, which they did not have then and most still do not today — and no one suggests that Aboriginal Australians, South Sea Islanders, the Aztecs and Incas, ancient Egyptians, or the Khmer Empire that built Angkor Wat for the god Vishnu did not have their own worthy civilizations, too. 

Yet even the very greatest achievements and physical creations of those other civilizations simply cannot compare to what the Greco-Roman and Judeo-Christian Western civilization has produced in philosophy, history, medicine, poetry, and drama, let alone democracy. 

Anyone reading Charles Murray’s superb and unanswerable book Human Accomplishment cannot but accept that the contribution made to mankind — the whole of it, not just the West — by DWEMs has statistically utterly dwarfed that made by the whole of the rest of the world combined. Whilst the transformative powers of cathedrals and concertos are relatively debatable, Nobel prizes for science and medical breakthroughs can be numerically compared, as can the fact that there is no one in any other civilization who can objectively match the sheer volume and density of the poetic and dramatic work of Shakespeare. To deny that is to start going down the route of the discredited Afrocentrist historians who were reduced to claiming that ancient African civilizations had visited Latin America and significantly influenced the cultures they found there.

“From the constitution drafted by the founding fathers of the American republic to the war-time speeches of Winston Churchill,” Jenkins writes, “many have found inspiration for their brand of liberal humanism, and for a doctrine of the open society, in the Funeral Speech of Perikles.” If Pericles had lost an election or been ostracized in the annual vote of Athenians, he would have stood down from office in the same way that Boris Johnson, Donald Trump, and Emmanuel Macron would after a defeat in a free and fair election in their countries, whereas that is inconceivable in many totalitarian countries not infused by the ethics of the West. That is ultimately why we should not apologize for Western civilization, why it should be proselytized around the world and certainly taught as a discrete discipline in our schools and universities. 

Western Civilization courses never pretended that the West invented civilization, as the French anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss emphasized in his foreword to the UNESCO International Social Science Bulletin in 1951. Considering some of the most ancient sites of human habitation in the world, such as Mohenjo-daro and Harappa in the Indus Valley, he observed straight streets intersecting at right angles, industrial workshops, utilitarian housing for workers, public baths, drains and sewers, pleasant suburbs for the wealthier classes; in short, what he called “all the glamour and blemishes of a great modern city.” Five thousand years ago, therefore, the most ancient civilizations of the old world were giving their lineaments to the new. As a new history of the world by the British historian Simon Sebag Montefiore will shortly demonstrate, the inhabitants of Egypt, China, and Persia were creating sophisticated art and architecture, legal and numerical systems, and literary and musical traditions while the peoples of Europe were still covered in woad and living in mud huts. 

What might Homer have to say about being civilized? The Iliad, which describes the clash between the Greeks and the Trojans, is not a description of a conflict between two nation-states. Adam Nicolson characterizes the conflict in The Mighty Dead: Why Homer Matters as “the deathly confrontation of two ways of understanding the world.” In this 4,000-year-old scenario, the Greeks are the barbarians. They are northern warriors, newly technologically empowered with ships and bronze spears, who want what the Trojans have got. They are pirates: coarse, animalistic, in love with violence. They are savage, rootless nomads who trade women as commodities (a three-legged metal tripod to put vases on is worth twelve oxen; a woman, four) and lust after the treasure hidden within Troy’s walls.

The city of Troy is wealthy, ordered, graceful, and stable, and the Greeks covet it. In the climax of the poem, Achilles, the ultimate man of the plains, confronts Hector of Troy, the man of the city. In disarmingly exhilarating and violent poetry, the outsider slaughters the insider. The barbarians have won. Or have they? After the battle, Priam, Hector’s grieving father, visits Achilles in his tent. Troy is doomed but Achilles marvels at Priam’s humility, at his ability to respect the man who has murdered his beloved son. From the “mutuality and courage of that wisdom,” writes Nicolson, “its blending of city and plain, a vision of the future might flower.”

Our word “civilization” derives from the Latin “civilis,” from “civis” (citizen) via “civitas” (city). The city is the locus for human encounter and understanding, for exchange and connection, for the development of communal and peaceful coexistence, for the flourishing of both everyday exchange and sophisticated arts. Opponents of the teaching of Western civilization object that European countries built their wealth and cultural achievements on the colonial exploitation and enslavement of non-European peoples. Yet as Homer demonstrates, the development of civilization has always been predicated upon darker forces. 

The Crusaders of medieval Europe were no more bloody and cruel than the wars of conversion enacted by the expanding Islamic world in the seventh and eighth centuries. The Ethiopian Empire (1270–1974) was founded upon slavery, as was the Ottoman Empire (1299–1924). If the history of the West needs to be taught critically, then so too does that of the East or the so-called global South. No civilization has been morally pure. 

“Competition and monopoly,” writes Niall Ferguson sagely in his book Civilization: The West and the Rest, “science and superstition; freedom and slavery; curing and killing; hard work and laziness — in each case, the West was the father to both the good and the bad.” Those early Western Civ courses never tried to argue that it was flawless — Karl Marx sometimes used to be taught in them, after all — but in the 20th century, students had more common sense and took that for granted, and were not looking for ever-new ways to be offended.

Christianity, for all its schisms and intolerance, its occasionally obnoxious obscurantism and iconoclasm, has been overall an enormous force for good in the world. The Sermon on the Mount was, as Churchill put it, “the last word in ethics.” 

Christians abolished slavery in the 1830s (or three decades later in America’s case), whereas outside Christendom the practice survived for much longer, and identifiable versions of it still exist in some non-Christian and anti-Christian countries today. 

The abolition of slavery did not merely happen by votes in Parliament and proclamations from presidents; it was fought for by (and against) Christians with much blood spilt on both sides. That would not have happened without the Judeo-Christian values and the Western Enlightenment that are so central to Western civilization. The Royal Navy ran its West Africa Preventive Squadron for over 60 years with the sole task of fighting slavery, during which time it freed around 160,000 slaves, and an estimated 17,000 British seamen died of disease or in battle achieving that. 

When considering “the rest” — those civilizations that did not produce what Western civilization has — Ferguson is unblushingly honest. “We must resist the temptation to romanticize history’s losers,” he writes. “The other civilizations overrun by the West’s, or more peacefully transformed by it through borrowings as much as by impositions, were not without their defects either, of which the most obvious is that they were incapable of providing their inhabitants with any sustained improvement in the material quality of their lives.” For all my earlier concentration on art and architecture, poetry and music, Ferguson is also correct to point out that “civilization is much more than just the contents of a few first-rate art galleries. It is a highly complex human organization,” which is why his book is “as much about sewage pipes as flying buttresses.” 

In response to the issuing of the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, the American Anthropological Association released a critique that asked, “How can the proposed Declaration be applicable to all human beings and not be a statement of rights conceived only in terms of the values prevalent in the countries of Western Europe and America?” The question assumes that the 30 articles of the Declaration could not be universal, since universality of human rights was of necessity a “Western” assumption. This was intended as a criticism, not an endorsement.

Yet the West has not stolen these values, as the Greeks stole the Trojans’ gold; it has not appropriated or co-opted them. Rather they are seen as objectionable because they do, indeed, according to their detractors, inhere in Western culture. So, given that a belief in human rights is, apparently, predicated on Western culture, is not that culture worth examining and teaching? 

Instead, there is an entire industry devoted to trying to topple DWEM heroes from their pedestals — literally, in the case of the British activist Afua Hirsch’s attempt to have Admiral Nelson removed from his column in Trafalgar Square in London on the grounds that he did not campaign to abolish the slave trade (which was not abolished by Britain until two years after his death in 1805). 

The climate-change movement is similarly riddled with anti-Western assumptions, whereby capitalism, development, and growth are demonized, all of them supposedly primarily Western concepts. A glance at the actual carbon emissions from the new coal-fired power stations still being built every month in China should put Western climate self-haters right about the importance of development and growth, but campaigning against democratic, guilt-ridden Western governments is far easier than taking the fight to Beijing and Delhi, which now is where the real difference can be made. When Greta Thunberg denounces Xi Jinping and the Chinese Communist Party outside the Great Hall of the People, she will be worthy of our respect; until then, she is merely playing on Western guilt, like every other demagogic critic of the West so beloved of the Left. 

The self-hatred virus is a particularly virulent and infectious one, and has almost entirely overtaken the academy in its attitude towards Western civilization. We all know the concept of the self-hating Jew who instinctively and immediately blames Israel for everything bad that happens in the Middle East (and often in the wider world, too). If the term is unfamiliar, look at some of the lobbying organizations on Washington’s K Street, or the equally virulent “Jews for Corbyn” movement inside the ultra-left Momentum organization in Britain. 

Western self-hatred, which is quite different from healthy self-criticism, has gone far too far in our society. American self-haters such as Noam Chomsky and Michael Moore have made hugely successful careers out of a knee-jerk reaction that whatever ill befalls the West is solely its own fault. They argue, of course, that they in fact like their country — rarely “love,” as that would differentiate it from other countries — and it’s only one particular administration or policy with which they take issue rather than the whole culture. Yet this is false. If after a lifetime one has never — as in Jeremy Corbyn’s case — once supported a single Western military operation under any circumstance, and always had a good word for every opponent of the West, whether it be a state actor or a leftist terrorist group, then the truth becomes obvious.

British self-hatred goes back a long way, via Thomas Paine and Kim Philby, but today it is not enough for the Chomskys and Corbyns merely to hate their own country; they must hate the West in general, which for them tends to mean NATO, the special relationship, the Anglo-American form of (relatively) free markets and free enterprise, and of course the concept of Western civilization itself, which they consider an artificial construct. Recently Seumas Milne, Jeremy Corbyn’s spin doctor, tried to argue that capitalism has killed more people than Communism, although of course he did not accept the figure of 100 million that most responsible historians recognize was Communism’s death toll in the 20th century. 

Mention of Corbyn and Milne prompts the thought that all too often consideration of the contribution of Judeo-Christian thought to Western civilization tends to underplay the first — Judeo — part of the conjoined twins. It is impossible not to spot an enormous overlap — the shaded area in the Venn diagram — between hatred of the concept of Western civilization on one side and at least a certain haziness over anti-Semitism on the other. In America, there are unfortunately still those who believe that Western civilization is at risk from Jewish culture. This view is as ignorant as it is obnoxious. For without the “Judeo” half of the phenomenon, Western civilization would simply not exist. 

Once again, Charles Murray is invaluable here in enumerating in numbers and places and names and statistics the contribution made in every field by Jews over the millennia, around 100 times what it ought to be in relation to their demographic numbers on the planet. Writing of Max Warburg’s daughter Gisela in his book The Warburgs, Ron Chernow recalls how, “once asked at a birthday party whether she was Jewish, Gisela refused to answer. When Alice [her mother] asked why, Gisi stammered confusedly, ‘You always told us not to boast.’” That might be true of her, but philo-Semitic Gentiles such as I enjoy boasting about the contribution the Jews have made to Western civilization in every sphere. Beware the hater of Western civilization; very often there’s an anti-Semite not very far away.

French postmodern theory refuses to distinguish between high and low culture, attempting to make it futile even to discuss whether this or that work of art is or is not lovely or important. If you want to argue that Kanye West’s lyrics are as good as Shakespeare, or Mongolian yurts are as sophisticated a form of architecture as Bauhaus, then Foucault will support you all the way. But if you want to understand why we do not have child slavery in the West, or disenfranchised women, or imprisonment without trial, or the imprisonment of newspaper editors, you simply have to study the cultural history that produced such an unusual and extraordinary situation in human history. It is inescapable and not susceptible to postmodernist analysis. It’s not about the aesthetic or literary superiority of certain artworks, but about the unequivocal good of human dignity. If Ms. Rashatwar finds the idea of losing her human rights so “romantic,” she is always welcome to move to Saudi Arabia, which is still awaiting its Enlightenment.

The late, very great Gertrude Himmelfarb identified three separate Enlightenments — English, French, and Scottish — at different though overlapping stages of the 18th century, with different emphases in different places at different times. Chartres Cathedral was not dedicated until 1260, so there were five centuries between then and the Enlightenments, but they were the moments when people began to throw off superstition and belief in magic and witchcraft, to look at the world afresh, unafraid of what they might find and where it might take them, even at the risk of unbelief. If the Islamic world had had such a moment, it would not have been left behind in so many areas of accomplishment since it was turned back from the gates of Vienna in 1683, with the result that its fascist-fundamentalist wing might not have existed to lash out in such fury and resentment on 9/11.

The recent Security Conference in Munich took as its theme and title “Westlessness” — an ugly word in English, worse in German — intending to prompt international decision-makers into thinking about what might happen if the Trump administration were ever to get as tough over NATO underfunding as it has long threatened to do. Another fear of Westlessness, however, should be about the eclipse of Western civilization as a subject for study, as a result of a hugely successful Gramscian march through the institutions that started long before Jesse Jackson and his megaphone visited Stanford. 

For far from becoming a Kumbaya touchy-feely place, a truly Westless world would be a neo-Darwinian free-for-all in which every state merely grabbed what it could, a return to the world Hobbes wrote about in Leviathan. The Left should beware what it claims to wish for, and Western civilization should be taught once more in our schools and colleges. For as Churchill knew as the bombs were falling and London was burning in December 1940, it is worth fighting for.

— This essay is sponsored by National Review Institute.

Voir aussi:

‘Hey, Hey, Ho, Ho, Western Civ Has Got to Go’

Robert Curry American Greatness June 10, 2019

On January 15, 1987, Jesse Jackson and around 500 protesters marched down Palm Drive, Stanford University’s grand main entrance, chanting “Hey hey, ho ho, Western Civ has got to go.”

They were protesting Stanford University’s introductory humanities program known as “Western Culture.” For Jackson and the protesters, the problem was its lack of “diversity.” The faculty and administration raced to appease the protesters, and “Western Culture” was formally replaced with “Cultures, Ideas, and Values.”

The new program included works on race, class, and gender and works by ethnic minority and women authors. Western culture gave way to multi-culture. The study of Western civilization succumbed to the Left’s new dogma, multiculturalism.

When I attended college in the 1960s, taking and passing the year-long course in the history of Western civilization was required for graduation. The point of the requirement was perfectly clear. Students were expected to be proficient with the major works of their civilization if they were to be awarded a degree. It was the mark of an educated person to know these things.

Because it was a required course, it was taught by a senior professor in a large lecture hall with hundreds of students. The course was no walk in the park. When I took the course, only one student got an A grade for the first semester. Students went down in wave after wave. Many dropped out of the course, planning to try again later. Others dropped out of school or transferred to another college or university.

Student protests were all the rage on campus in those days, too. But nobody protested the Western Civ course, its contents, the difficulty involved, or the fact that it was required. Students evidently accepted the idea that studying the story of how we got here and who shaped that story was essential to becoming an educated person.

It is also not at all clear that the faculty in those days would have raced to appease student protesters chanting “Hey, hey, ho, ho, Western Civ has got to go.”

Many of the faculty, after all, had served in World War II. My best friends on the faculty had all served either in the European or the Pacific theater. They had put their lives on the line to defend Western civilization, and served with others who had lost their lives in that fight. Whether they were teaching Plato or Italian art of the Renaissance and the Baroque eras, they taught with the passion of men who had fought as soldiers and were working as teachers to preserve Western culture. Perhaps my fellow students would not have dared to present our teachers with that particular protest.

The protesting students at Stanford in 1987 were pushing against an open door. Radicalized professors, products of the student protests of the 1960s, welcomed the opportunity to do what they already wanted done. The protesters provided the excuse. Instead of doing the hard work of teaching Western civilization, they were free to preach multiculturalism—and the change was presented to the world as meeting the legitimate demands of students.

It is worth noting, I think, that the chant has an interesting ambiguity. Was it the course in Western civilization or Western civilization itself that had to go? Clearly, Jackson was leading the protesters in demanding a change in the curriculum at Stanford, but the Left, having gotten rid of “Western Civ” at Stanford and at most other colleges, is reaching for new extremes. Today, ridding the world of Western civilization as a phenomenon doesn’t seem like such a stretch.

In the wee hours of the morning recently, in a nearly deserted international airport terminal, I got into conversation with a fellow passenger while we waited for our luggage. He told me he was returning from a stay at an eco-resort. He said because of cloudy weather there had been no hot water on most days—and little hot water when there was any—and the electric light ran out every night soon after nightfall.

The worst part for him, he said, was the requirement to put used toilet paper in a special container provided for that purpose. When I remarked that what he had experienced at the resort was what the Greens have planned for all of us, he cheerfully agreed. He went on to say that he believed the real purpose of the Greens’ plan is population control, that a truly green future would only be able to support a much smaller population.

The amazing part is this: he conveyed a complete agreement with the environmentalist project and what he believed to be its underlying purpose. It seemed that what he had experienced at the resort had not caused him to re-think his attitude, or even to consider that there was a risk he might not survive the transition to a much smaller population.

As he spoke, I easily imagined him as a younger person chanting “Hey, hey, ho, ho, Western Civ has got to go.”

Voir également:

‘An Honest Conversation About Race’?

Is confrontation wise? Much progress has been accomplished under cover of hypocrisy—or civility.

Lance Morrow
The Wall Street Journal
July 2, 2020

People have said for decades that America needs to have “an honest conversation about race.” Is this what they had in mind—this drama of marches, riots, witness videos, tear-gassings, surging police lines, Trump tweets, Zoom pressers, statue-topplings, Facebook screeds, cable television rants, window-smashings, shop-burnings, police-defundings, escalating murder rates and the distant thunder of editorial boards?

Veterans in the field of less-than-revolutionary race relations learned that a certain amount of truth-suppression is actually helpful—preferable to the “honesty” of hatred, for example. Much progress has been accomplished under cover of hypocrisy—or, if you like, civility. Good manners and artful hypocrisy were Booker T. Washington’s game, but he was written off as an Uncle Tom long ago.

We live now in the regime and culture of confrontation—ideology as performance, anger as proof of authenticity. You remember how much trouble Joe Biden got into when he bragged about his ability to get along with segregationists in the 1970s. Mr. Biden was preening thoughtlessly on his skill in the arts of the old hypocrisy. Now he has learned his lesson and embraces the left’s idea of honesty—no deviation from the party line or from the officially approved emotions.

How do you judge a moment of history when you are in the thick of it? How can you tell if all of this will be remembered as historic or will be superseded and forgotten as another momentary sensation, another self-important mirage? The current moment feels intensely historic now, but we shall see.

Black Lives Matter has ambitions to abolish its own version of the Chinese Cultural Revolution’s “Four Olds”—old customs, old culture, old habits, old ideas—and to add a fifth, old statues. Yet this summer the titanic racial theme competes and fuses with other superstories—the pandemic and its economic consequences, the presidential race, America’s long-running politico-religious civil war.

Raw emotion pours out of social media and into the streets—outrage, with a touch of holiday. On the other side is an oddly silent majority. It seems eerie that so much of the country—the land of “white supremacy,” as the left likes to think of it—gives the appearance of having almost acquiesced, as if it has conceded that the eruptions might be justified and even overdue. Can it be that the silenced majority has had an epiphany, that in its heart it acknowledges the justice of black Americans calling in Thomas Jefferson’s IOU, “I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just, and that his justice cannot sleep forever”?

There’s some of that—changed minds, old prejudice grown reflective. In any case, the silenced majority, out of moral courtesy, has been reluctant to criticize people demonstrating in the wake of George Floyd’s killing. At the same time, it recoils—more indignantly and incredulously each day—from the left’s overall program and mind-set, which it considers insidious if not crazy. When major cities propose to cut off funds for their police departments or to abolish them altogether, that Swiftian absurdity makes a deep impression, confirming a broader doubt about the left’s intentions and mental health.

The most tragic impediment to an honest conversation about race in America is fear—an entirely realistic fear of being slain by the cancel culture. This fear to speak is a civic catastrophe and an affront to the Constitution. It induces silent rage in the silenced. It is impossible to exaggerate the corrupting effect that the terror of being called a “racist”—even a whiff of the toxin, the slightest hint, the ghost of an imputation—has on freedom of discussion and the honest workings of the American public mind.

Racism in America is no longer totalitarian, as it once was, especially in the South. The cancel culture is the new totalitarianism, a compound of McCarthyism, the Inquisition, the Cultural Revolution, the Taliban and what has become a lethal and systemic ignorance of history—almost a hatred of it. All that wild, unearned certainty, all that year-zero zealotry, discredits those who associate themselves with the cause and makes a mockery of their sweet intentions. Much of the white woke rage is radiant with mere self-importance.

And it’s going to backfire. Newton’s Third Law of Motion hasn’t been repealed: For every action there is still an equal and opposite reaction. My sense is that there is quietly building a powerful backlash, which will express itself on Nov. 3, if not before. My guess is that polls now showing Mr. Biden far ahead don’t reflect reality. It may be impossible for President Trump to win; for some reason, he collaborates daily with his enemies to sabotage his chances. But the outcome is by no means as certain as the polls now suggest.

Mr. Morrow is a senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center.

Voir de plus:

Amid a pandemic, the woke-ist media are experiencing a psychotic break

Becket Adams
Washington Examiner
July 03, 2020
 
If the press suffered a nervous breakdown after the 2016 election ⁠— and they did ⁠— they are experiencing a full-on psychotic break amid the COVID-19 pandemic and the George Floyd protests.

It is as if the lockdowns and nationwide demonstrations caused media executives to snap, leaving them in a wide-eyed, obsessive frenzy to cleanse society of all problematics, screaming all the while, “Out, damned spot!”

CNN, for example, engaged in explicit political activism this week when it sought to shame companies that have yet to pull ads from Facebook over CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s persistent refusal to censor problematic speech.

“These are the big brands that haven’t pulled ads from Facebook yet,” reads the headline. The report then goes on to name and shame the businesses that have had the temerity to continue to advertise on one of the biggest social media platforms in the world.

This is not news reporting. This is activism. It is a poorly disguised effort by a major newsroom to pressure companies into boycotting a social media platform that is too committed to political neutrality and too opposed to political censorship for the media’s taste. In any other time and place, the press would have mocked and condemned the CNN article. But these are unusual times. Many journalists today agree with CNN’s shaming tactics and the reasons behind them, and so the Facebook report came and went this week with barely a whimper of objection from our brave Fourth Estate.

Over at the New York Times, the occupied opinion section, which claims to have standards against “needlessly harsh” commentaries that fall “short of the thoughtful approach that advances useful debate,” published an especially unhinged article this week titled “America’s Enduring Caste System.”

“Throughout human history, three caste systems have stood out,” writes contributor Isabel Wilkerson. “The lingering, millenniums-long caste system of India. The tragically accelerated, chilling and officially vanquished caste system of Nazi Germany. And the shape-shifting, unspoken, race-based caste pyramid in the United States.”

She adds, “Each version relied on stigmatizing those deemed inferior to justify the dehumanization necessary to keep the lowest-ranked people at the bottom and to rationalize the protocols of enforcement. A caste system endures because it is often justified as divine will, originating from sacred text or the presumed laws of nature, reinforced throughout the culture and passed down through the generations.”

Yes, it seems a bit off for Wilkerson to lump the U.S. in with Nazi Germany, but that is not even the craziest part. That distinction goes to her exceptionally ignorant assertion that 2 of the 3 most notable caste systems in history come from the last 250 years. Several ancient empires would beg to differ. Then again, if your viewpoint is the right one, New York Times editors will not be sticklers for facts.

Elsewhere at the New York Times, the news section decided this week that now is a good time to remind its readers that Mount Rushmore is very problematic.

“Mount Rushmore was built on land that belonged to the Lakota tribe and sculpted by a man who had strong bonds with the Ku Klux Klan,” the paper reported. “It features the faces of 2 U.S. presidents who were slaveholders.”

All true. Also, while we are on the topic of unjustly seized land, please enjoy this excerpt from Reason magazine explaining how the New York Times Building in midtown Manhattan came to be built:

On September 24, 2001, as New York firefighters were still picking their comrades’ body parts out of the World Trade Center wreckage, New York Times Co. Vice Chairman and Senior Vice President Michael Golden announced that the Gray Lady was ready to do its part in the healing.

« We believe there could not be a greater contribution, » Golden told a clutch of city officials and journalists, « than to have the opportunity to start construction of the first major icon building in New York City after the tragic events of Sept. 11. » Bruce Ratner, president of the real estate development company working with the Times on its proposed new Eighth Avenue headquarters, called the project a « very important testament to our values, culture and democratic ideals. »

Those « values » and « democratic ideals » included using eminent domain to forcibly evict 55 businesses–including a trade school, a student housing unit, a Donna Karan outlet, and several mom-and-pop stores–against their will, under the legal cover of erasing « blight, » in order to clear ground for a 52-story skyscraper. The Times and Ratner, who never bothered making an offer to the property owners, bought the Port Authority-adjacent property at a steep discount ($85 million) from a state agency that seized the 11 buildings on it; should legal settlements with the original tenants exceed that amount, taxpayers will have to make up the difference. On top of that gift, the city and state offered the Times $26 million in tax breaks for the project, and Ratner even lobbied to receive $400 million worth of U.S. Treasury-backed Liberty Bonds–instruments created by Congress to help rebuild Lower Manhattan. Which is four miles away.

The New York Times report this week claims that the history of Mount Rushmore is of particular relevance now because President Trump plans to attend July Fourth festivities at the South Dakota monument. Curious, then, that the New York Times did not think that history worth reevaluating when former President Barack Obama visited the exact same site during the 2008 campaign or when the New York Times’s own Maureen Dowd wondered in 2016 whether Obama would qualify as a “Mount Rushmore president. »

Lastly, ABC News published a report this week titled “New government data, shared first with ABC News, shows the country’s premier outdoor spaces – the 419 national parks – remain overwhelmingly white.”

The story’s headline reads, “America’s national parks face existential crisis over race,” adding in the subhead, “A mostly white workforce, visitation threatens parks’ survival and public health.”

“Just 23% of visitors to the parks were people of color,” the report adds, “77% were white. Minorities make up 42% of the U.S. population.”

As it turns out, white people really enjoy hiking and camping, and that is a problem for the parks, the ABC News report claims, because people of color will be a majority in America by 2044. The article then goes on to quote outdoor enthusiasts of color who say they do not feel welcome at the “overwhelmingly white” national parks. These advocates, the article reads, “say they hope the moment since George Floyd’s death in police custody brings attention to systemic racism in the outdoors as well as other parts of society and translates into a long-term change in attitudes and behavior.”

Sorry, everyone. Even national parks are racist now.

This is not normal behavior from our press. This is a mental breakdown in the works. People of the future will look at all this and wonder how on earth these stories made it into print.

The best thing that can happen now for the news industry is for the pandemic to pass, the lockdowns to lift, and for everyone to go outside and get some fresh air. Because the way nearly everyone in the press is behaving now, it seems clear that cabin fever has set in hard, and it is an epidemic we may not shake as quickly as the coronavirus.

Voir encore:

FARRELL: The Left Is Clearing A Pathway To Power

Chris Farrell Daily Caller June 25, 2020

Why are we experiencing the worst civil disturbances in decades? It is because the proponents of radical change won’t have it any other way.

Early 20th Century Italian Marxist Antonio Gramsci theorized that the path to a communist future came through gradually undermining the pillars of western civilization. We are now seeing the results of decades of such erosion, in education, in faith, in politics and in the media. The old standards of freedom, individual responsibility, equality and civic order are being assaulted by proponents of socialism, radical deconstruction and mob rule.

Those who charge that institutional racism is rampant in America are the same as those who run the country’s major institutions – city governments, academe, the media, Hollywood, major sports leagues and the Washington, D.C. deep state bureaucracy. Accountability? None.  The irony is rich.

At the same time, the only legal and institutional structures that mandate racially based outcomes do so in favor of other-than-majority groups. Anyone who questions this arrangement winds up cancelled.

The public debate is hardwired for disunity, making the former language of inclusion the new dog whistle of racism. The exclusionary slogan “black lives matter” is sanctified while the more unifying “all lives matter” is called divisive. People who say they want a colorblind society are called bigots even as progressives push for segregated events and housing on college campuses and “CHOP” protesters demand Black-only hospitals. Martin Luther King’s dream that people will “live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character” is judged by today’s progressives as a call for white supremacy.

The media goes out of its way to coddle violent protesters, calling them peaceful even as they verbally abuse and then throw bottles at police, saying they are not “generally speaking, unruly” standing in front of a burning building. Political leaders who benefit from disunity keep fanning the flames. For example House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s reckless charge that the Senate police reform bill is “trying to get away with the murder of George Floyd” is irresponsibly divisive, especially since it was drafted by African American Senator Tim Scott (R-SC).

Public monuments have borne the brunt of the violence in recent weeks. As President Trump predicted, the vandalism has moved well beyond statues of Confederates. Practically any statue is fair game. Washington, Jefferson, even Ulysses S. Grant, the man who defeated Lee’s army, all have been toppled by the mobs. And liberal city governments are taking down statues at least as fast as the rioters. But it would be a mistake to think that the statues themselves are at issue, or even what they symbolize. Rather it is the need for the radicals not just to cleanse American history but to make people feel ashamed of every aspect of it. In this way they clear a path for a radical future, buttressed by an unwavering sense of moral superiority that entitles them to smack down any dissent, usually gagging people in the name of “free speech.”

We were told for years that anything the Trump administration did that was remotely controversial was an attempt to divide the country. Democrats frequently blamed insidious foreign influence, using expressions like “right out of Putin’s playbook” to keep the Russian collusion canard alive. But they are the ones who are weakening and dividing the country, to the evident glee of our Russian and Chinese adversaries. They have completely adopted longstanding Russian and Chinese propaganda lines about the United States being a country of endemic racism, poverty and oppression, when in fact America is an opportunity society and one of the most racially diverse and tolerant countries in the world. The protesters, their political allies and media backers are working hard to create the very sort of divisions they claim to oppose, because a weak, divided and ashamed America is their pathway to power.

Chris Farrell is director of investigations and research for Judicial Watch, a nonprofit government watchdog organization. He is a former military intelligence officer.

Voir encore:

Columbus Is Racist, Says Columbus

The explorer is ejected from a city that—for now—bears his name

Wall Street Journal

July 2, 2020

The city of Columbus, Ohio, this week unceremoniously evicted a 16-foot bronze statue . . . of Christopher Columbus. “For many people in our community, the statue represents patriarchy, oppression and divisiveness,” said Mayor Andrew Ginther, giving the removal order two weeks ago. “That does not represent our great city.”

Which great city, precisely? He forgot to mention. Or perhaps the mayor is going to start referring to his town euphemistically as “Ohio’s capital” and so forth, the way some people refuse to say the name of the Washington Redskins football team. This could make campaigning for his re-election rather awkward: Vote Ginther for mayor of [Unmentionable Racist].

Don’t laugh, because a petition at change.org has 118,000 signatures—an eighth of Columbus’s population—to rechristen the city Flavortown. That would reflect the region’s status as “one of the nation’s largest test markets for the food industry,” while honoring the enduring legacy of a Columbus native, the celebrity chef Guy Fieri. Alas, the petition’s creator has since apologized. Renaming the city, he says, “should be a fight led by those most affected,” and “as a white male, I don’t have a say in this.”

A columnist for the Columbus Dispatch noodled—jokingly?—that because “it’s always dangerous to name something after humans,” how about: Pleistocene, Ohio. Is the unpronounceable symbol once used by the musician Prince available again, or would that be cultural appropriation of Minnesota? A letter to the Dispatch had a bold idea: “Cowed, Ohio.”

The statue of Columbus sat in front of Columbus City Hall for 65 years. It was a gift from the people of Genoa, Italy. Now the mayor’s office says it’s “in safekeeping at a secure city facility.” What a blow to U.S.-Italy relations. At least he could offer to give the statue back. A second Columbus likeness, a marble of the navigator pointing west, was booted last month by Columbus State Community College, where it used to stand in the downtown Discovery District.

The mayor’s office says the unelected Columbus Art Commission will launch a “participatory process” to find new art that “offers a shared vision for the future.” Good luck. “Let’s just leave the space empty,” one Dispatch letter suggested, “because if not everyone is happy should anyone be happy?” What a sad sign of the times.

Voir par ailleurs:

STATEMENT ON HUMAN RIGHTS

SUBMITTED TO THE COMMISSION ON HUMAN RIGHTS, UNITED NATIONS BY THE EXECUTIVE BOARD, AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION

American Anthropologist

NEW SERIES Vol. 49 OCTOBER-DECEMBER, 1947 No. 4

The problem faced by the Commission on Human Rights of the United Nations in preparing its Declaration on the Rights of Man must be approached from two points of view. The first, in terms of which the Declaration is ordinarily conceived, concerns the respect for the personality of the individual as such, and his right to its fullest development as a member of his society. In a world order, however, respect for the cultures of differing human groups is equally important.

These are two facets of the same problem, since it is a truism that groups are composed of individuals, and human beings do not function outside the societies of which they form a part. The problem is thus to formulate a statement of human rights that will do more than just phrase respect for the indi- vidual as an individual. It must also take into full account the individual as a member of the social group of which he is a part, whose sanctioned modes of life shape his behavior, and with whose fate his own is thus inextricably bound.

Because of the great numbers of societies that are in intimate contact in the modern world, and because of the diversity of their ways of life, the primary task confronting those who would draw up a Declaration on the Rights of Man is thus, in essence, to resolve the following problem: How can the pro- posed Declaration be applicable to all human beings, and not be a statement of rights conceived only in terms of the values prevalent in the countries of Western Europe and America?

Before we can cope with this problem, it will be necessary for us to outline some of the findings of the sciences that deal with the study of human culture, that must be taken into account if the Declaration is to be in accord with the present state of knowledge about man and his modes of life.

If we begin, as we must, with the individual, we find that from the moment of his birth not only his behavior, but his very thought, his hopes, aspirations, the moral values which direct his action and justify and give meaning to his life in his own eyes and those of his fellows, are shaped by the body of custom of the group of which he becomes a member. The process by means of which this is accomplished is so subtle, and its effects are so far-reaching, that only after considerable training are we conscious of it. Yet if the essence of the Declaration is to be, as it must, a statement in which the right of the individual to develop his personality to the fullest is to be stressed, then this must be based on a recognition of the fact that the personality of the individual can develop only in terms of the culture of his society.

Over the past fifty years, the many ways in which man resolves the prob- lems of subsistence, of social living, of political regulation of group life, of reaching accord with the Universe and satisfying his aesthetic drives has been widely documented by the researches of anthropologists among peoples living in all parts of the world. All peoples do achieve these ends. No two of them, however, do so in exactly the. same way, and some of them employ means that differ, often strikingly, from one another.

Yet here a dilemma arises. Because of the social setting of the learning process, the individual cannot but be convinced that his own way of life is the most desirable one. Conversely, and despite changes originating from within and without his culture that he recognizes as worthy of adoption, it becomes equally patent to him that, in the main, other ways than his own, to the degree they differ from it, are less desirable than those to which he is accustomed. Hence valuations arise, that in themselves receive the sanction of accepted belief.

The degree to which such evaluations eventuate in action depends on the basic sanctions in the thought of a people. In the main, people are willing to live and let live, exhibiting a tolerance for behavior of another group different than their own, especially where there is no conflict in the subsistence field. In the history of Western Europe and America, however, economic expansion, control of armaments, and an evangelical religious tradition have translated the recognition of cultural differences into a summons to action. This has been emphasized by philosophical systems that have stressed absolutes in the realm of values and ends. Definitions of freedom, concepts of the nature of human rights, and the like, have thus been narrowly drawn. Alternatives have been decried, and suppressed where controls have been established over non- European peoples. The hard core of similarities between cultures has con- sistently been overlooked.

The consequences of this point of view have been disastrous for mankind. Doctrines of the « white man’s burden » have been employed to implement economic exploitation and to deny the right to control their own affairs to millions of peoples over the world, where the expansion of Europe and America has not meant the literal extermination of whole populations. Rationalized in terms of. ascribing cultural inferiority to these peoples, or in conceptions of their backwardness in development of their ‘ »primitive mentality, » that justified their being held in the tutelage of their superiors, the history of the ex- pansion of the western world has been marked by demoralization of human personality and the disintegration of human rights among the peoples over whom hegemony has been established.

The values of the ways of life of these peoples have been consistently misunderstood and decried. Religious beliefs that for untold ages have carried conviction, and permitted adjustment to the Universe have been attacked as superstitious, immoral, untrue. And, since power carries its own conviction, this has furthered the process of demoralization begun by economic exploita- tion and the loss of political autonomy. The white man’s burden, the civilizing mission, have been heavy indeed. But their weight has not been borne by those who, frequently in all honesty, have journeyed to the far places of the world to uplift those regarded by them as inferior.

We thus come to the first proposition that the study of human psychology and culture dictates as essential in drawing up a Bill of Human Rights in terms of existing knowledge:

1. The individual realizes his personality through his culture, hence respect for individual differences entails a respect for cultural differences. There can be no individual freedom, that is, when the group with which the individual indentifies himself is not free. There can be no full development of the individual personality as long as the individual is told, by men who have the power to enforce their commands, that the way of life of his group is in- ferior to that of those who wield the power.

This is more than an academic question, as becomes evident if one looks about him at the world as it exists today. Peoples who on first contact with European and American might were awed and partially convinced of the superior ways of their rulers have, through two wars and a depression, come to re-examine the new and the old. Professions of love of democracy, of devotion to freedom have come with something less than conviction to those who are themselves denied the right to lead their lives as seems proper to them. The religious dogmas of those who profess equality and practice discrimination, who stress the virtue of humility and are themselves arrogant in insistence on their beliefs have little meaning for peoples whose devotion to other faiths makes theseinconsistencies as clear as the desert landscape at high noon. Small wonder that these peoples, denied the right to live in terms of their own cultures, are discovering new values in old beliefs they had been led to question.

No consideration of human rights can be adequate without taking into account the related problem of human capacity. Man, biologically, is one. Homo sapiens is a single species, no matter how individuals may differ in their aptitudes, their abilities, their interests. It is established that any normal individual can learn any part of any culture other than his own, provided only he is afforded the opportunity to do so. That cultures differ in degree of complexity, of richness of content, is due to historic forces, not biological ones. All existing ways of life meet the test of survival. Of those cultures that have disappeared, it must be remembered that their number includes some that were great, powerful, and complex as well as others that were modest, content with the status quo, and simple. Thus we reach a second principle:

2. Respect for differences between cultures is validated by the scientific fact that no iechnique of qualitatively evaluating cultures has been discovered.

This principle leads us to a further one, namely that the aims that guide the life of every people are self-evident in their significance to that people. It is the principle that emphasizes the universals in human conduct rather than the absolutes that the culture of Western Europe and America stresses. It recognizes that the eternal verities only seem so because we have been taught to regard them as such; that every people, whether it expresses them or not, lives in devotion to verities whose eternal nature is as real to them as are those of Euroamerican culture to Euroamericans. Briefly stated, this third principle that must be introduced into our consideration is the following,:

3. Standards and values are relative to the culture from which they de- rive so that any attempt to formulate postulates that grow out of the beliefs or moral codes of one culture must to that extent detract from the applicability of any Declaration of Human Rights to mankind as a whole.

Ideas of right and wrong, good and evil, are found in all societies, though they differ in their expression among different peoples. What is held to be a human right in one society may be regarded as anti-social by another people, or by the same people in a different period of their history. The saint of one epoch would at a later time be confined as a man not fitted to cope with reality. Even the nature of the physical world, the colors we see, the sounds we hear, are conditioned by the language we speak, which is part of the culture into which we are born.

The problem of drawing up a Declaration of Human Rights was relatively simple in the Eighteenth Century, because it was not a matter of human rights, but of the rights of men within the framework of the sanctions laid by a single society. Even then, so noble a document as the American Declaration of Independence, or the American Bill of Rights, could be written by men who themselves were slave-owners, in a country where chattel slavery was a part of the recognized social order. The revolutionary character of the slogan « Liberty, Equality, Fraternity » was never more apparent than in the struggles to imple- ment it by extending it to the French slave-owning colonies.

Today the problem is complicated by the fact that the Declaration must be of world-wide applicability. It must embrace and recognize the validity of many different ways of life. It will not be convincing to the Indonesian, the African, the Indian, the Chinese, if it lies on the same plane as like docu- ments of an earlier period. The rights of Man in the Twentieth Century can- not be circumscribed by the standards of any single culture, or be dictated by the aspirations of any single people. Such a document will lead to frustration, not realization of the personalities of vast numbers of human beings.

Such persons, living in terms of values not envisaged by a limited Declaration, will ‘thus be excluded from the freedom of full participation in the only right and proper way of life that can be known to them, the institutions, sanctions and goals that make up the culture of their particular society.

Even where political systems exist that deny citizens the right of participation in their government, or seek to conquer weaker peoples, underlying cultural values may be called on to bring the peoples of such states to a realization of the consequences of the acts of their governments, and thus enforce a brake upon discrimination and conquest. For the political system of a people is only a small part of their total culture.

World-wide standards of freedom and justice, based on the principle that man is free only when he lives as his society defines freedom, that his rights are those he recognizes as a member of his society, must be basic. Conversely, an effective world-order cannot be devised except insofar as it permits the free play of personality of the members of its constituent social units, and draws strength from the enrichment to be derived from the interplay of varying personalities.

The world-wide acclaim accorded the Atlantic Charter, before its restricted applicability was announced, is evidence of the fact that freedom is under- stood and sought after by peoples having the most diverse cultures. Only when a statement of the right of men to live in terms of their own traditions is incorporated into the proposed Declaration, then, can the next step of defining the rights and duties of human groups as regards each other be set upon the firm foundation of the present-day scientific knowledge of Man.

JUNE 24, 1947

Voir aussi:

LA LEÇON DE LA FRENCH THEORY

FRENCH THEORY FOUCAULT, DERRIDA, DELEUZE ET CIE ET LES MUTATIONS DE LA VIE INTELLECTUELLE AUX ETATS-UNIS de François Cusset La Découverte, 367 p.

Sylvano Santini

Spirale

3 mars 2010

CERTAINS penseurs français irrationnels, transgressifs, libidinaux, obscurs, géniaux, etc. ont fait fortune aux États-Unis avec leur spirale théorique. Qu’on les ait repris ou rejetés, aimés ou détes-tés, tant à l’université que dans les milieux ar-tistiques underground, le fait est indéniable : une frange de la pensée française a contaminé et as-saini l’Amérique. Ce paradoxe évidemment vo-lontaire rejoue assez bien l’extrémisme étatsu-nien quant aux affaires intellectuelles : Baudrillard, Deleuze, Foucault, Derrida et con-sorts sont des démons fascistes pour les uns, des prophètes pour les autres. Y a-t-il un juste mi-lieu? Interrogation hasardeuse, car justement, aux États-Unis, c’est de lui qu’il n’est jamais question.

Les Américains ont créé quelque chose ces dernières décennies, n’en déplaise à ceux qui les perçoivent comme les conservateurs du musée européen. Mais ne s’agit-il pas ici encore de l’Eu-rope? Il serait donc plus prudent de dire qu’ils ont recréé quelque chose sous le nom original de French Theory en accueillant, hors de la France, la théorie française. Incontestable phénomène qui persiste depuis ses débuts bigarrés dans les années soixante-dix jusqu’à son épuration uni-versitaire qui se poursuit encore aujourd’hui. L’heure des bilans est arrivée au tournant du millénaire : que s’est-il donc passé ces trente dernières années pour qu’on demande à Bau-drillard de participer au scénario de la saga Ma-trix ou pour qu’un DJ techno cite Deleuze ? Les Américains ont fait leur propre bilan en 2001 (French Theoryin America, Routledge), les Fran-çais, en 2003 (French Theory. Foucault, Derrida, Deleuze et Cie et les mutations de la vie intellec-tuelle aux États- Unis, La Découverte) et plus cu-rieusement, un certain réseau canadien s’est in-terposé comme arbitre en 2002 (« The American Production of French Theory », Substance, n » 97). Si les premiers s’évertuent à présenter les thèses caractéristiques qu’a laissées la théorie française dans la pensée américaine, et les der-niers, un écho lointain de ce qui s’est véritable-ment passé, le bilan mis au point par François Cusset est de loin le plus satisfaisant et ce, autant pour ceux qui raillent le phénomène que pour ceux qui le respectent.

La fête et la caricature de la théorie française

Cusset connaît bien les États-Unis et encore mieux le monde de l’édition dans lequel il a œuvré et où a été inventé en partie le phéno-mène. Que des intellectuels américains adaptent les thèses de penseurs français, ce n’est pas un précédent, on l’avait fait déjà avec le surréalisme et l’existentialisme. Ce qui est toutefois nouveau ici, c’est qu’il ne s’agit pas d’une simple adapta-tion mais d’une véritable appropriation qui dé-bouche sur l’invention de perspectives théo-riques non négligeables : la French Theory. Si cette appropriation positive s’est déroulée sur les campus universitaires, ce n’est pas exactement par là que la théorie française s’est fait connaître aux États-Unis. Dans les seventies, années pro-fondément marquées par un désir libératoire qui prenait la forme d’expériences individuelles de désubjectivation (la Sainte Trinité : drogue, sexe, rock), certains universitaires, dont Sylvère Lotringer, ont introduit la théorie française dans la contre-culture américaine. Moment festif et joyeux, fait de rencontres inusitées entre intel-lectuels et artistes (Deleuze et Guattari ont ren-contré Bob Dylan backstage’.), cet « entre-deux » est typique, selon Cusset, de la première vague de French Theorists. La popularité non universitaire de la théorie française continue à persister au-delà des seventies dans les milieux artistiques, alternatifs, informatiques, etc. où l’on cite allègrement des passages de Mille Plateaux ou de l’indécidable déconstruction de Derrida. Cusset reconnaît tout de même l’intérêt de ces récupé-rations qui tournent souvent à la caricature, car si certains artistes y ont trouvé une manière légitime de parler de leur art, la théorie, elle, y est devenue vivante. Encore que la pensée des philosophes français y ait été entièrement pervertie (les contre-sens avec Baudrillard sont élo-quents), l’union entre la théorie et l’œuvre a représenté peut-être la meilleure réponse qu’on leur a donnée. Mais tout le monde avait déjà compris que c’était par l’université que la théorie française devait passer pour rester.

L’incidence politique de la théorie

Autre lieu, autre réception. Les départements de français et plus largement ceux de littérature ont ouvert les portes des campus universitaires à la théorie française, tout en se hissant au sommet des humanités en maniant des concepts nou-veaux mais flous, flexibles et surtout tellement poreux que les autres disciplines y trouvaient leur compte : en quelques années, les littéraires étaient devenus les dépositaires de l’« éthos uni-versitaire ». Des mégastars naissaient sur son cré-dit ; tout un domaine de recherches y trouvait 42 son impulsion (les cult’studs’) ; les étudiants l’utilisaient pour affirmer haut et fort leur pas-sage à l’âge adulte. On récupérait, sans retour, ce que des stratégies éditoriales avaient fabriqué de toutes pièces en publiant côte à côte les vedettes de l’heure : portrait d’une famille française née à l’étranger que Ton a appelée, selon les milieux et les humeurs, poststructuraliste, postmoderne, et plus récemment postmarxiste. Si les études universitaires n’étaient pas en reste de récupéra-tions mimétiques et caricaturales qui se limi-taient trop souvent à une clique de campus qui défendait complaisamment son auteur fétiche — concurrence typiquement américaine entre universités —, il y a des domaines où la lecture des auteurs français a été fine et de grand inté-rêt. La palme revient ici aux études postcoloniales et aux politiques identitaires qui, selon Cusset, ont réussi à sortir la théorie française du marasme textualiste en reconnaissant ses inci-dences politiques. Il n’invoque pas d’ailleurs les moindres penseurs en parlant de Spivak, Saïd, Butler, etc. Tous et toutes, d’une manière ou d’une autre, ont reconnu l’apport considérable de la théorie française quant aux vives réflexions sur la question du statut des minorités qui avaient atteint un sommet avec le débat concer-nant le « politically correct » dans les années quatre-vingt. Pour la première fois peut-être, les débats universitaires s’étendaient dans les grands médias américains : les noms de Derrida, de Foucault, de Baudrillard, etc., étaient dorénavant connus du grand public.

Mais ce qui est à retenir de ces débats parfois houleux, c’est que les penseurs des minorités ont déplacé le paradigme marxiste et la théorie cri-tique inspirée de l’école de Francfort (deux pi-liers dans les études politiques universitaires américaines qui critiquaient l’apolitisme de la French Theory) en reconnaissant la validité de la théorie française dans les luttes hors campus, c’est-à-dire celles qui ont lieu dans la rue. Mais cette validité, souligne Cusset, a également sa limite, car, quoiqu’elle ait servi à rendre compte des différences, elle a surtout démontré qu’il était difficile d’éviter l’illusion marxienne d’une prise directe de la théorie sur la pratique. Pour justifier ainsi l’incapacité des penseurs de la mi-norité à unir la théorie française avec les luttes sociales concrètes, il souligne leur aveuglement et le silence qui en découle face aux phénomènes de récupération capitaliste des minorités qui a eu lieu aux yeux de tous sous la bannière mar-keting Benetton. Si la moitié du chemin semble parcouru en alliant la théorie française avec la n’a pas encore été entièrement déployé : il semble que les Américains aient mal politisé la théorie française, ne retenant qu’une partie de la complexité des rapports interhumains et les mi-crofascismes qui peuvent en découler dans l’ordre du monde orienté non plus par la domi-nation mais par le contrôle.

La limite d’un travail de déblayage

Cusset a fait un travail assez remarquable en re-pérant et en présentant tous les lieux qui ont servi à introduire et à répandre la théorie fran-çaise aux États-Unis : des fanzines aux publica-tions prestigieuses, en passant par le scratching, l’art new-yorkais et les débats universitaires, le terrain est pour ainsi dire déblayé. De plus, en remontant chronologiquement l’histoire de cette réception, il montre les mutations du champ in-tellectuel américain qui se jouent d’abord dans les départements de littérature et ensuite dans les études plus spécifiques sur les minorités. Sa pré-sentation est claire et agréable à lire. Cusset ne cherche pas à renouveler le genre de l’histoire d’un courant de pensées en s’alignant sur la ma-nière de faire de François Dosse avec le structu-ralisme ou de Didier Eribon avec Foucault. Tout comme eux du reste, il ne manque pas de saler sa mise en récit d’anecdotes et de dérapages ri-dicules qui font sourire et qui donneront surtout satisfaction aux professeurs qui cherchent à in-valider la joyeuse pensée post-nietzschéenne française qui plaît tant à quelques étudiants. Mais le travail de Cusset dévoile ses limites, qui sont aussi celles du genre, lorsqu’il présente les penseurs américains qui se sont le mieux approprié, selon lui, la théorie française. On remarque assez vite qu’il n’a pas lu tous leurs ouvrages, paraphrasant et citant les petits readers qu’il critique par ailleurs : « De même qu’à l’instar de sa consœur Gayatri Spivak, il [E. Saïd[ se méfie des « méthodes » générales et des « systèmes » explicatifs, qui en devenant « souverains » font perdre à leurs praticiens « tout contact avec la ré-sistance et l’hétérogénéité propres à la société ci-vile », laquelle peut mettre à meilleur profit une cri-tique ponctuelle, qui doit « être toujours en situa-tion ». » Mots ou concepts clés insérés dans une phrase qui a la vertu de synthétiser toute la pen-sée d’un auteur (ici de deux auteurs), telle est la marque des readers fort populaires auprès des undergraduates. Mais peut-on reprocher ce raccourci à Cusset? La tâche qu’il s’est donnée était énorme en voulant tout couvrir, tout présenter. En avouant la limite de son travail et en ouvrant le chantier à la fin du livre, il semble régler ses comptes avec le lecteur qui, l’ayant suivi jusque-là, était peut-être déçu de ne pas avoir eu droit à un véritable dialogue entre les textes français et américains : « De ces mécomptes providentiels, de ces trahisons créatrices, sinon performatives, l’histoire mouvementée, retracée parfois ici et là, reste encore à écrire. » Mais la raison en est aussi ailleurs, puisque, avec son travail, il veut remuer la France.

À l’heure de la « théorie-monde »

Cusset ne cache pas l’intention de son travail en l’énonçant dès l’introduction et en la rappelant ici et là dans l’ouvrage. Et « Pendant ce temps-là en France », titre du dernier chapitre, en donne un assez bon indice : les nouveaux phi-losophes français autoproclamés en 1977 (BHL, Glucksmann et Clavel) et extrêmement critiques à l’égard de la Pensée 68 ont bloqué le champ in-tellectuel français en recentrant le débat sur les enjeux humanitaires et les droits de l’homme et en ayant recours au gros concept de l’État. Si l’on en croit Cusset, il s’agit pratiquement d’une régression qui semble avoir fait prendre du retard à la pensée française en ce qu’elle a rejeté les plus prolifiques penseurs des dernières décennies. « Pendant ce temps-là en France », en effet, car ailleurs, de New York à Sidney ou de Rome à Buenos Aires, une nouvelle « classe d’intellectuels transnationale » centrée sur la théorie française (et convergente sur certains points avec la théo-rie critique) se forge une « théorie-monde », selon l’expression de François Cusset. Si la démonstration d’une telle théorie reste encore à faire, l’évidence de sa nécessité, elle, semble acquise. Car la complexité du monde actuel demande 43 autre chose que la bonne conscience rationnelle des nouveaux philosophes qui, au demeurant, accumulent aux yeux de tous les succès de li-brairie en utilisant la stratégie marketing qui sied tant au capital. La « théorie-monde », celle peut-être de Bruno Latour avec ses Sciences studies qui a le mérite, selon Cusset, de s’opposer à la fer-veur rationaliste des Français et à la textualisa-tion outrancière des Américains, mais qu’il ré-duit à peu près au programme de Foucault : analyser les effets de pouvoir dans les formations discursives et ceux du discours dans les pratiques.

Si Cusset ne cache pas sa hargne, c’est qu’il veut que la France retrouve l’enfant qu’elle a mis au monde mais qui a grandi ailleurs. C’est peut-être pour cette raison qu’il exagère l’importance des nouveaux philosophes et qu’il passe à peu près sous silence les héritiers discrets de la théo-rie française en France. On pense par exemple à Jacques Rancière qui marche à différents mo-ments de son œuvre dans les pistes ouvertes par elle. Mais aussi à ceux qui travaillent au Centre Michel Foucault à Paris et qui ont organisé deux colloques sur sa pensée ces dernières années en France et qui font suite aux Dits et Écrits; à ceux plus souterrainement qui ont ouvert le Chantier-Deleuze à Nanterre, qui organisent des colloques (Paris et Lyon à l’automne 2003), qui en discu-tent dans Les Cahiers de Nœsis (Nice) et qui poursuivent parallèlement la pensée du philo-sophe dont on vient de publier tous les écrits quelques années après le succès de L’abécédaire. Tout cela est marginal évidemment, trop creux ou trop discret ! Certes, mais le réveil n’aura pas lieu tel que le désire Cusset. Les débats qu’il a peut-être voulu susciter n’ont pas eu lieu, et à lire les quelques comptes rendus parus dans les quo-tidiens et les revues en France, rien ne les laisse présager. Ça ne sert strictement à rien de vou-loir donner des leçons à quiconque en espérant haut et fort une résurrection de la théorie fran-çaise en France. Les « trahisons créatrices restent à écrire », dit-il. On attend impatiemment son prochain ouvrage, sa trahison.

Voir enfin:

Journée « Autour du livre de François Cusset French Theory » et des Cultural Studies

Transatlantica

[19 novembre 2004]
Compte rendu coordonné par Marie-Jeanne Rossignol (Paris VII) et Pierre Guerlain (Paris X)


Introduction

La parution du livre de François Cusset, French Theory. Foucault, Derrida, Deleuze & Cie et les mutations de la vie intellectuelle aux Etats-Unis en 2003, à La Découverte, a soudain donné une plus grande visibilité en France aux Cultural Studies et autres mouvements intellectuels inspirés de théoriciens européens (et non seulement français) qui ont fleuri aux Etats-Unis pendant les vingt années passées. Ce livre tout à fait passionnant, érudit et ancré dans une expérience personnelle (l’auteur, sociologue, travaillait aux Services culturels français à New York pendant la période) a engagé quelques américanistes curieux de ces mouvements intellectuels à se réunir pour discuter des thèses de Cusset et à élargir le débat aux Cultural Studies et à leur inscription universitaire ainsi qu’à leur impact politique. Organisé à l’initiative de Marie-Jeanne Rossignol et Pierre Guerlain, ce forum Paris7/Paris X s’est tenu le 19 novembre à l’Université Paris X-Nanterre. Il a réuni les participants suivants : Françoise-Michèle Bergot, Cornelius Crowley, Paris X-Nanterre, Craig Carson, Nanterre, Marc Deneire, Nancy 2, Pierre Guerlain, Paris X – Nanterre, André Kaenel, Nancy 2, Alison Halsz, Paris X-Nanterre, Thierry Labica, Paris X-Nanterre, Hélène Le Dantec-Lowry, Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle, Catherine Lejeune, Paris 7-Denis Diderot, Guillaume Marche, Paris XII-Val de Marne, Brigitte Marrec, Paris X-Nanterre, Jean-Paul Rocchi, Paris 7-Denis Diderot, Marie-Jeanne Rossignol, Paris 7-Denis Diderot. Les intervenants ont souvent tenu à mêler rappel de leur expérience personnelle, analyse de l’ouvrage et réflexion sur les Cultural Studies lors de ce forum de réflexion, dont vous est ici livré ici un compte rendu légèrement révisé, où alternent brèves interventions et développements plus étoffés.

La parole a été passée tout d’abord à Marie-Jeanne Rossignol :

Pour résumer rapidement sa thèse, on peut dire que selon François Cusset, de remarquables intellectuels comme Foucault, Deleuze et autres brillants penseurs des années 1970 ont trouvé un meilleur accueil aux Etats-Unis qu’en France à partir des années 1980 : ce sont les campus américains qui ont profité de l’incroyable fermentation intellectuelle présente dans leurs travaux, pour diverses raisons, et en particulier, la structure du milieu universitaire américain. Aux Etats-Unis, les idées et l’imagination ; à la France, de bien ennuyeux « nouveaux philosophes » qui ont paradoxalement accompagné les années de gauche au pouvoir.

Il est vrai que, pour la génération d’après 1968, les auteurs dont parle Cusset, par exemple Foucault, Derrida, Kristeva ou Cixous, ont effectivement très vite disparu de l’écran des références intellectuelles indispensables, à partir des années 1980, c’est-à-dire quand une certaine jeunesse universitaire aurait dû s’emparer d’eux. Foucault, lecture de lycée, est quand même resté incontournable dans les années qui ont suivi, en particulier grâce à la présence dominante d’Arlette Farge dans les études sur le XVIIIè français ; mais c’est effectivement surtout aux Etats-Unis, en 1988 et après, que je les ai retrouvés, évidemment sous leur forme américaine (19). D’où un retour « en décalage » en France en 1989, après un séjour d’un an, face à un monde intellectuel et politique dont les références paraissaient quelque peu désuètes. Et qui le paraissent encore aujourd’hui.

Alors que j’étais naturellement assez éloignée de la théorie, l’atmosphère américaine très « théorique » m’a énormément apporté, car comme le dit Cusset (21), elle se doublait d’une « pragmatique des textes », c’est-à-dire leur « aptitude à l’usage, à l’opération » : on y puisait « des idées nouvelles » sans avoir besoin de lire Deleuze, Derrida. Les concepts rebondissaient d’un texte à l’autre et créaient une fermentation véritable par rapport à laquelle, au retour, les problématiques de l’histoire française paraissaient ternes et habituelles. C’est là un des points forts du livre de Cusset : avoir rappelé que ces lecteurs américains des philosophes français de la génération 68 ont su écouter « ces fulgurances d’il y a trois décennies, étiquetées par l’histoire des idées »(23).

Un autre mérite de cet ouvrage est de souligner les défauts de cette approche : l’inspiration française est devenue « la respiration » française par un processus de citation perpétuelle, de « scansion » sans « explicitation » (104, 234). En histoire, où les chercheurs sont souvent peu attirés par des lectures philosophiques, ce fut particulièrement le cas : des concepts complexes tels qu’ « autorité » ou « patriarcat » étaient assénés plus que véritablement intégrés. Les plus grandes réussites de la période auront concerné des sujets qui étaient également portés par l’histoire culturelle des années 60 et 70, l’histoire afro-américaine et l’histoire des femmes, en plein essor, mais qui ont trouvé un deuxième souffle dans cette injection de concepts. Etudiants ou grands penseurs, les Américains sont devenus les « usagers » des textes : en disant cela, Cusset s’inscrit lui-même dans une lecture post-moderne de l’acte de lecture (292) : « La part d’ « invention » américaine désigne dès lors l’aptitude à faire dire aux auteurs français ce qu’on en comprend, ou du moins ce qu’on a besoin d’en tirer ».

Ce sentiment de décalage entre une réalité française terne et les bouleversements américains est d’autant plus net, dans les années qui suivent mon retour, en 1989, lorsque se répand en histoire américaine un débat sur l’histoire, récits subjectifs ou science objective, qui n’a presque aucun écho en France. C’est qu’en effet, comme Cusset l’explique bien, les philosophes français ont été captés tout d’abord par la discipline littéraire aux Etats-Unis. Alors qu’en France, leur lecture et leur interprétation relevaient de la philosophie, aux Etats-Unis ils s’épanouissent dans les départements de lettres ; cette appropriation, renforcée des analyses de J. Derrida, conduit à ramener tout texte et toute interprétation au cadre littéraire. En histoire américaine, cela conduit à des clivages et à des ruptures entre anciens et modernes : les anciens, parfois à gauche comme Eugene Genovese, sont des tenants de l’objectivité en histoire : les modernes, du relativisme narratif (88, 93). Mais sur ces débats en histoire, Cusset paraît peu renseigné ou cela lui paraît périphérique. En tout cas, il est clair qu’aux Etats-Unis, dans les années 1980, la subversion, l’imagination, la résistance aux autorités tirent leur inspiration des départements de français. A Duke, on compare les fauteuils confortables du département d’anglais (celui où officie alors Stanley Fish) aux sièges effondrés du département d’histoire, longtemps dominé par les historiens du sud et de l’armée. Les spécialistes d’histoire afro-américaine mènent la guerre à ces derniers, choisissent des bureaux dans un autre coin du campus et soutiennent une jeune collègue qui propose un nouveau champ, les « théories ». En France, pendant ce temps, l’histoire ne connaît pas de tels renouvellements théoriques, à l’image des études cinématographiques dont parle Cusset (95).

La différence persistante entre France et Etats-Unis, si Cusset avait davantage envisagé le cas de l’histoire, aurait été encore plus saisissante. Il n’aurait pu écrire (143) : « Qu’on parle le patois derridien ou le dialecte foucauldien, la chose est entendue, peut-être même mieux qu’elle ne l’a jamais été en France : il n’y a plus désormais de discours de vérité, mais seulement des dispositifs de vérité, transitoires, tactiques, politiques ». Rien de moins accepté en France, rien de plus entendu aux Etats-Unis : même des milieux très traditionalistes sur le plan méthodologique, comme l’histoire des relations internationales, ont remis en cause leurs sources, leurs postulats, leurs angles d’approche. Il n’est que de lire la revue Diplomatic History des années 1990 à 2004 : alors que ce champ était considéré comme ancien, en perte de vitesse, la revue a su publier des numéros entiers sur les Africains-Américains et la politique étrangère des Etats-Unis ; l’environnement et les relations internationales ; récemment son rédacteur en chef s’est rendu au congrès d’American Studies, haut lieu de la theory, pour un rapprochement hautement improbable naguère. (Robert D. Schulzinger, « Diplomatic History and American Studies, » Passport vol. 35:2 (August 2004), 21-23).

L’influence du post-colonialisme sur l’écriture de l’histoire américaine est bien notée par Cusset (155) et là aussi la différence avec l’histoire de France ne saurait être plus saisissante, à l’exception de Nathan Wachtel et même si l’histoire coloniale s’est quand même considérablement développée dans les vingt dernières années. Mais sur ce point encore, il ne faut pas négliger le rôle des historiens radicaux, militants politiques des années 60, influencés par l’histoire culturelle de E. P. Thompson, qui ont réécrit le récit national américain en donnant une place importante aux Noirs, aux Indiens. Dès les années 1980, les manuels universitaires sont rédigés sous leur direction et reprennent cette vision d’un passé contrasté.

Sur les Cultural Studies, Cusset s’attarde peu (145-148), alors que sous ce vocable se réunit une nébuleuse d’origines disciplinaires, touchant aussi bien à la littérature populaire qu’à la littérature classique, au canon relu et corrigé qu’au contre-canon minoritaire ou ethnique. Il lui donne une acception étroite et donc réductrice, voire caricaturale, un peu décevante. Que lui-même remet en question (153) en ajoutant qu’elles « peuvent elles-mêmes avoir pour objet la question identitaire et non plus la pop culture, avec les Black, Chicano ou même French Cultural Studies ». A ce sujet, F. Cusset va dans le sens commun qui consiste à critiquer les CS et toute la «théorie» américaine au motif qu’elles auraient perdu de vue l’argument politique qui sous-tendait le travail des philosophes français.

Certes, en même temps, ce mouvement intellectuel s’est inscrit dans une tradition de combats pour les droits initiés par le Civil Rights movement puis repris par les féministes. Sur les campus, l’ambiance était au « personal is political », peut-être moins hérité de Foucault que des féministes américaines. Mais pourquoi ne serait-il pas « politique » de s’indigner que seuls des Blancs écrivent l’histoire des Noirs, que seuls des hommes prennent des décisions dans les entreprises et les administrations ? Est-ce réduire le politique au symbolique ? (186-188, 200-202). Les limites politiques du mouvement intellectuel américain ne doivent-elles pas être jugées à l’aune des grandes tendances politiques aux Etats-Unis ces 50 dernières années, un éloignement de la question sociale et un fort accent sur la question des droits individuels mais aussi communautaires ?

Le tableau du milieu universitaire est excellent. La description de ce qui en constitue l’originalité en particulier (208) mérite que l’on s’y appesantisse au moment où le milieu universitaire français tombe sous la coupe des critères américains et globaux de recherche et de publication. Les années d’après 1970 sont également celles d’une explosion des postes dans les universités américaines, donc d’une explosion des publications dans un contexte concurrentiel qui se ferme : à partir de la fin des années 1980, peu de recrutements. Un marché problématique sur certains créneaux étroits comme l’histoire américaine : 50% des historiens américains, mais un terrain bien mince en termes de sources et de durée. Parlant de la littérature (235), Cusset signale que les étudiants passent moins de temps à lire les textes qu’à comparer les critiques des textes : il en va ainsi en histoire où la lecture de l’historiographie est au centre du travail, bien plus que la lecture de documents.

Utile et même essentiel, ce rappel de la domination planétaire des modes intellectuels américaines et de ses méthodes : être professionnel, c’est travailler à la manière des Américains. Les auteurs français sont lus par le prisme de leurs interprètes (302-303) ; l’internationale des idées devient l’internationale des campus, dont sont absents les Français.

Catherine Lejeune:

Indéniablement, French Theory donne un socle théorique aux Cultural Studies. Cependant François Cusset, à l’instar d’autres penseurs marxistes, ne manque pas de les critiquer (qu’il qualifie, au passage, de « disciplines abâtardies »).
A mon sens, il réduit un peu trop les CS à l’étude textuelle et stylistique de la pop culture, même s’il reconnaît à l’occasion qu’elles peuvent avoir pour objet d’étude la question identitaire, et non plus la pop culture, comme c’est le cas des African American Studies, des Chicano Studies etc…. En effet les Cultural Studies ont contribué à revitaliser les études ethniques, les études post-coloniales ou encore les plus récentes Subaltern Studies. Il faut mettre ce renouvellement des problématiques identitaires à leur crédit, ce que ne fait pas l’auteur. D’une manière générale, si l’on peut accepter que Cusset se limite à un survol de la question des Cultural Studies même s’il y fait souvent référence, on peut regretter qu’il en sous-estime l’impact et qu’il néglige leurs rapports avec l’histoire, la sociologie, l’anthropologie (disciplines que les Cultural Studies ont soit ébranlées soit renouvelées sur le plan épistémologique).

Pour François Cusset, les seules études ethniques qui valent sont celles qui concernent les Africains-Américains. Elles seules ont acquis leurs lettres de noblesse. « La question afro-américaine », dit-il, « justifiant une étude des ségrégations est un cas à part, plus ancien, plus impératif, chargé d’une plus lourde histoire : de fait, elle relève moins d’une création universitaire que les Chicano, Asian-American, Native-American Studies ou même les Gay/Women Studies ». Nul ne contestera la centralité, la primordialité de la question afro-américaine, mais le survol est là trop rapide, et de ce fait réducteur. Peut-on ainsi mettre tous les groupes ethniques sur le même plan compte tenu de la différence des situations d’un groupe à l’autre, qu’il s’agisse de la nature et de l’ampleur de la discrimination ou de la teneur des combats pour les droits civiques passés et présents ? De surcroît, chacun de ces groupes a eu sa part de réalité ségrégationniste. Il y a donc une histoire raciste et/ou discriminatoire de ces populations dont on ne peut réduire l’étude, contrairement à ce qu’affirme Cusset, au seul besoin d’existence intellectuelle au sein de l’université.

Jean-Paul Rocchi:

Dés le début de French Theory, François Cusset définit l’enjeu d’une étude à la fois riche et synthétique. Il s’agit en fait « [d’] explorer la généalogie politique et intellectuelle, et les effets, jusque chez nous et jusqu’à aujourd’hui, d’un malentendu proprement structural » entre théories françaises et universités américaines (15). C’est l’occasion pour Cusset de se pencher sur les conditions de production de la théorie, du difficile rapport entre émission nationale et réception étrangère dans lequel elle s’inscrit, mais aussi de porter un regard critique sur l’universalisme français et le communautarisme américain. French Theory reflète bien en effet la crispation identitaire française dont est symptomatique la fortune américaine de théoriciens tels que Foucault, Derrida ou Deleuze. Ce sont en effet ceux-là même qui ont le plus radicalement critiqué le monolithisme identitaire et la domination du sujet qui ont eu une reconnaissance transatlantique appuyée.

Bien que l’auteur s’interroge sur le fracture hexagonale entre théorie et sphère politique, son argumentation ne va pas jusqu’à examiner la question complexe d’une identité française souvent réduite avec commodité à celle seule de la citoyenneté. Se dessine alors, sous-jacente à sa thèse d’une différance entre théories françaises et pratiques identitaires américaines, la nostalgie d’un logocentrisme et d’une lecture théorique légitime déclinée sur le double mode du « ce que certes nous ne faisons pas mais que les autres font bien mal »; une nostalgie dont était déjà empreint son précédent ouvrage, Queer Critics, la littérature française déshabillée par ses homos-lecteurs (PUF, 2002), consacré au cadre théorique queer anglo-saxon appliqué à la littérature française.

Ce complexe de la lecture légitime est particulièrement perceptible dans l’analyse de l’utilisation « utilitariste » que les politiques identitaires américaines auraient faite de Derrida, un dévoiement que Christian Delacampagne qualifiait de « malentendu » dans un récent article publié à l’occasion de la mort du philosophe (« Histoire d’une success story », Le Monde, 11.10.04). Une perversion qui procèderait selon Cusset du hiatus entre l’enjeu de la déconstruction, comprise comme critique de la structure, de la connaissance et du rapport entre loi et écriture, et « la très vague définition littéraro-institutionnelle qui prévaut aux Etats-Unis : ‘terme dénotant un style de lecture analytique qui tient pour suspect le contenu manifeste des textes’ » (121). Plus loin, dans son chapitre consacré aux « Chantiers de la déconstruction », Cusset poursuit sa critique en soulignant que peu de réflexions politiques peuvent se réclamer de Derrida, tant sa pensée, déployée « en deçà du vrai et du faux » s’accommode mal de positionnements tranchés, de choix pratiques arrêtés ou d’engagements effectifs (136-137).

Pourtant, ne peut-on pas se demander si les politiques identitaires à l’université n’ont pas constitué aux États-Unis, plutôt que le supposé dévoiement que Cusset stigmatise, le terreau favorable à l’épanouissement de la pensée de celui qui se décrivait comme « étant en synchronie avec la postcolonialité » (Arte, 13/10/04) et dont la critique de la métaphysique occidentale n’est pas sans lien avec sa propre histoire algérienne ? N’y a-t-il pas dans le développement des départements et programmes d’Etudes afro-américaines aux Etats-Unis une même remise en cause du logocentrisme, de la métaphysique occidentale, et de leur expression américaine à travers la question raciale ? Le hiatus ne semble pas si profond, si tant est que l’on comprenne l’étude des textes comme l’occasion de mettre au jour les liens entre philosophie, histoire et idéologie, une pratique dont la tradition afro-américaine fait tôt l’épreuve à travers la maîtrise de l’écriture par les esclaves. Par ailleurs, et pour ce qui est de l’inadéquation entre la philosophie dérridienne et le politique, l’argument est contredit par Derrida lui-même et notamment dans ses textes « Racism’s Last Word » et « But, beyond…(Open Letter to Anne McClintock and Rob Nixon) » qui étudient les discours et l’idéologie du régime de l’apartheid (in Henry Louis Gates, Jr, «Race», Writing and Difference, 1986).

Il est en outre surprenant de considérer que toute « structure d’opposition [étant] irréductible aux référents qu’elle affiche » empêche, si ce n’est de réduire à néant la dite structure, d’y infléchir les rapports d’inégalités. N’est-ce pas ce à quoi W. E. B. Du Bois et Frantz Fanon se sont attelés en rétablissant un sujet noir réaffirmé à la place de l’antithèse de la dialectique hégélienne du maître et de l’esclave, la négation de la négation ?

La philosophie aussi est affaire de politique. A moins que l’on entende par « politique », le seul terrain social, la seule matérialité. Cette conception a cependant déjà montré ses limites. C’est au nom de la seule matérialité que le marxisme, péchant par excès d’idéalisme, a analysé le racisme comme une mystification de la bourgeoisie destinée à diviser la lutte prolétarienne, jugeant a priori que les classes populaires ne pouvaient avoir de préjugés (cf Varet, Racisme et philosophie, essai sur une limite de la pensée, 1973, 352-362).

Le hiatus est-il entre une définition réductrice et l’enjeu ambitieux de la déconstruction, ou en encore entre philosophie et action politique ? Peut-être est-il en fait inhérent au rapport entre théorie et expérience, dans la difficulté de leur ordonnance dans le temps tout comme la description de leur interaction. Ces difficultés peuvent conduire à une lecture partielle voire partiale qui, d’une part fait de l’expérience le lieu et l’occasion d’un asservissement et d’une perversion de la théorie et d’autre part tend à minimiser le poids de l’expérience indigène / communautaire.

C’est ainsi que French Theory présente également la faiblesse d’arrimer les penseurs des identités américaines et les critiques de la différence à une théorie française dont l’influence est postérieure à celle de larges mouvements sociaux de la dissidence et de la marginalité américains. Les Afro-Américains ont-ils attendu Derrida pour « déconstruire » la réalité matérielle et la métaphysique blanche américaine que la ségrégation leur renvoyait au visage ? « On Being Crazy » (1923) de Du Bois, qui s’attache à décrire le lien entre matérialité, langage et idéologie, est en cela un démenti frappant. En outre, lorsque Cusset fustige les départements de littérature américains pour avoir transformé la théorie française en un métadiscours subversif destiné à remettre les sciences en cause plutôt qu’à porter un regard sur le réel (chapitre « Littérature et théorie »), on touche à la limite du cadre interculturel. La distinction occidentale entre théorie / philosophie d’une part et littérature d’autre part est elle pertinente dans le cadre de la tradition afro-américaine pour laquelle la systématisation théorique, fût-elle littéraire, artistique, philosophique ou politique, s’ancre dans l’expérience, une subjectivité réflexive et non dans la connaissance objective du monde ?

C’est là où, de façon assez ironique, French Theory, outre de révéler en creux les crispations actuelles de la scène intellectuelle française, reproduit parfois dans son approche de l’objet américain la même transformation culturelle dont il souligne les travers au sein des universités américaines.

On peut dès lors conclure avec prudence que, pour offrir des éclairages différents et significatifs, l’approche comparatiste ne saurait prétendre à l’exhaustivité.

P. Guerlain:

Le livre n’aborde pas suffisamment le paradoxe entre ce ferment politique de gauche sur les campus et la montée de la droite politique. Les catégories du multiculturalisme, qui découlent en partie de la French Theory, ont d’abord servi à rendre certains groupes et certaines méthodologies visibles et ont donc eu, dans les années 60 et 70, un effet positif indéniable mais elles favorisent aujourd’hui une réduction du politique aux catégories du marketing. Les « market niches » s’accommodent fort bien d’un découpage identitaire, en grande partie ethnique. Le multiculturalisme communautariste a été coopté par l’ultra-droite sans grande difficulté. L’hégémonie de l’ultra-droite américaine sur le champ politique s’accommode fort bien d’une politique de la différence qui ne va pas plus loin que la surface. Un Colin Powell ou une Condolezza Rice au gouvernement et la question du racisme est balayée. La politique de rélégation sociale dont sont victimes les pauvres, tous les pauvres mais les Noirs sont sur-représentés parmi les pauvres, disparaît de l’espace du débat politique derrière des querelles sémantiques, en partie inspirées par les débats universitaires liés aux nouvelles théories. (Lire Loïc Wacquant, Punir les Pauvres, sur ce point). Il ne s’agit pas tellement ici de parler de dépasser le marxisme ou non (il n’y a pas de théorie ou d’horizon indépassables) mais de ne pas rejeter la réflexion en termes de classes sociales et de fonctionnement socio-économique global au profit de logiques communautaires qui desservent toujours les communautés les plus marginalisées. L’université et la French theory ont participé à la déconstruction de tout universalisme, jugé abstrait, français et xénophobe, au profit d’un particularisme qui pourtant renouait avec des racines conservatrices et qui contribue à enfermer les groupes dans leurs appartenances communautaires et à gommer les liens qui peuvent exister entre groupes ethniques différents mais semblables sur le plan socio-économique.

On peut donc se poser la question de savoir si les militants des campus ont vraiment fait de la politique ? Derrida, auteur érudit et multilingue dont les positions politiques sont respectables, était-il un penseur authentiquement politique ? Sa créativité et son intervention ne sont-elles pas d’abord littéraires ? Contrairement à Saïd, il n’a pas de prolongement dans le monde des acteurs de la politique. C’est d’ailleurs à l’université et dans les départements de littérature que Derrida a connu un grand succès, pas ailleurs, notamment dans les départements de philosophie ou de sociologie ou dans l’espace du débat public.

La désignation de French theory isole dans un cadre national ce qui est en fait une construction théorique qui est d’abord américaine et va bien au-delà d’un échange franco-américain puisque certains auteurs indiens, palestinien et américain dans le cas de Saïd, mais aussi britanniques ont joué un rôle dans la dissémination de cette French theory. La réintroduction d’une catégorie nationale a peut-être valeur de symptôme car le postmodernisme a cherché à abolir les frontières et la référence à l’Etat-nation. De même que les théoriciens de la mondialisation dite néo-libérale ont un peu vite enterré les Etats-nations, les postmodernes ont oublié ou marginalisé les références nationales qui font figure ici de retour de refoulé. Dans le cas des Etats-Unis, pays où le nationalisme bien affirmé se vit souvent sur un mode exceptionnaliste et expansionniste, l’abandon de la référence à l’état-nation a des effets d’aveuglement.

Il faut aussi appréhender la question suivante : que fait la théorie ou à quoi sert la théorie ? Pour les artistes et les spécialistes de littérature, la théorie est peut-être une relance de la créativité, en histoire et sciences sociales la théorie peut et même doit interroger l’écriture et les biais d’écriture pour échapper aux tentatives toujours renaissantes du positivisme sans que l’on puisse évacuer la catégorie du réel et donc l’adéquation au réel de la théorie. Les sciences sociales ne peuvent scier la branche du réel sur laquelle elles sont assises, alors que la littérature n’a pas à affronter cette question. Il y a dans la confusion entre les registres théoriques une difficulté particulière car ce qui vaut pour le texte de fiction ne s’applique pas forcément à la sociologie ou à l’histoire.

Le singulier de French Theory pose problème car les divers auteurs abordés par Cusset n’ont pas forcément grand-chose à voir entre eux. Il y a là un effet « rag-bag » qu’il faut aussi comprendre en termes d’enjeux de carrière ou de positionnement dans l’univers de la mode universitaire. Dans un cadre de célébration de la diversité et de la différence, afficher une origine française à un groupe de théories permet de se singulariser et de se démarquer d’un anti-intellectualisme ambiant. Dans de nombreux cas, la théorie est un substitut de religion, quelque chose qui permet de tenir pour des raisons fort personnelles et qui n’ont rien à voir avec les « vérités d’adéquation » dont parle Todorov dans Critique de la critique.

Le livre de Cusset fait le point sur une influence culturelle donnée de façon magistrale mais souvent trop rapide. Ainsi, il aborde des thématiques essentielles sans les traiter (négation du social, 106, dépolitisation par les CS, 149), fait de Chomsky un marxiste orthodoxe (139) ce qui indique qu’il ne connaît rien à Chomsky et aux marxistes orthodoxes mais répète des a priori glanés ici ou là, il ne connaît pas bien l’affaire Sokal et termine par une violence anti-française quelque peu surprenante. Son livre a néanmoins le mérite de signaler de nombreuses apories du passage des idées d’un champ à l’autre (ici on aimerait plus de références à Bourdieu) ou d’un paysage intellectuel national à un autre ainsi que les glissements contradictoires d’un champ intellectuel, celui des CS, d’une origine marxiste britannique à une adaptation américaine qui passe par des théoriciens français en rupture de marxisme. Il y a du « food for thought » pour des penseurs fort éloignés les uns des autres dans ce livre qui doit donc être salué comme un grand moment de remue-méninges.

Thierry Labica:

Pouvait-on s’attendre à ce que les idées de Derrida soient politiques au sens traditionnel du terme ? Quant aux idées françaises, quel que soit le terreau d’accueil aux USA, elles bénéficiaient d’une écoute traditionnelle dans les milieux intellectuels américains, et ce depuis toujours. Le débat intellectuel français, sophistiqué et provocateur, fertilise les autres. En France, en revanche, les années 1980 et 1990 ont été celles du règlement de l’héritage intellectuel du PC, avec le rôle de Furet en particulier : les Français été occupés à autre chose.

Cornelius Crowley:

Quelle est la bonne définition du politique ? La décision ? L’acte d’opposition ? Qu’est-ce qu’une bonne position politique ? Agir ? Penser ? Tout ce travail hypertextualisé est éminemment politique. L’idée d’une autre politique à venir est bien chez Derrida. Il permet de dépasser les oppositions manichéennes, de voir le lien entre l’Amérique et le monde musulman. D’entrevoir un autre engagement.

P. Guerlain :

On ne peut nier une différence entre Derrida et des intellectuels comme Chomsky ou Saïd qui sont impliqués dans la politique du « réel ».

André Kaenel :

Le livre de FC est d’abord un bon livre d’histoire intellectuelle et culturelle comparée. C’est le genre de livre que la plupart de ceux qui, comme moi, enseignent les études américaines en France n’auront aucune peine à reconnaître comme le produit d’une véritable réflexion croisée sur les Etats-Unis. En même temps, comme toute réflexion croisée exercée à partir d’un point précis, en l’occurrence la France, le livre de F. Cusset propose également une réflexion sur nous-mêmes, intellectuels et chercheurs français ou européens, et sur nos pratiques. Le regard à la fois critique et admiratif que porte F. Cusset sur les appropriations et les détournements de la théorie française aux USA se double, dans son avant-dernier chapitre, d’une jérémiade, rhétorique politique bien américaine analysée par Sacvan Bercovitch, sur les résistances et l’hermétisme, de ce côté-ci de l’Atlantique, face au foisonnement théorique issu de ces appropriations et détournements. Le fait que French Theory ne soit cependant pas l’ouvrage d’un américaniste (sauf erreur) mais qu’il éclaire néanmoins les pratiques des enseignants-chercheurs travaillant sur les USA constitue un autre décalage à ajouter à ceux que le livre de F. Cusset éclaire si utilement. En effet, il nous explique qu’il n’y a pas eu de retour de théorie en France pour la French Theory pour des raisons qu’il énumère en fin de volume. Du moins n’y a-t-il pas eu de retour de l’ampleur du transfert vers les USA qui a eu lieu à partir du milieu des années 60.

Toutefois, depuis quelques temps, un retour a lieu, modestement. Outre le livre de F. Cusset, cette journée d’étude en est un exemple. Ce retour s’opère, de façon significative, par le biais de la langue : sans la connaissance de l’anglais de son auteur, le livre de F. Cusset n’aurait pas vu le jour, du moins pas sous une forme aussi complète et réussie ; de même, la plupart de personnes qui interviennent lors de cette journée relèvent de la 11ème section du CNU (nos spécialités sont la littérature, la civilisation, l’histoire, l’anthropologie ou la sociolinguistique) et travaillent sur le domaine nord-américain. La langue anglaise, et les différentes spécialisations qui s’appuient sur elle, forment donc la passerelle première qui permet le retour de la French Theory, son appropriation et ses détournements par l’université française. On peut ici noter que c’était déjà la langue, mais le français cette fois, qui avait permis à l’origine le passage des idées de Derrida et Foucault aux USA, où elles avaient d’abord fait leur chemin dans des départements de français, avant de passer dans des départements d’anglais, puis de littérature comparée (Cusset, 89). Il en allait de même pour le volume Cultural Studies/Etudes culturelles publié aux PUN en début d’année, qui était l’œuvre d’anglicistes au sens large. J’ajoute que la communauté des anglicistes n’a pas le monopole des Cultural Studies, comme en témoignent les travaux effectués en France dans les domaines des études filmiques (cf. G. Sellier et N. Burch) ou dans celui de la sociologie des médias (cf. l’introduction aux CS de Mattelart et Neveu, publié en 2003 à La Découverte, chez le même éditeur que French Theory).

Mais la connaissance de langue anglaise ne permet pas à elle seule d’expliquer les passages, transferts et appropriations de la théorie entre l’Europe et les USA — dans un sens comme dans l’autre. Le livre de François Cusset nous rappelle l’importance capitale des personnes et des institutions dans la transmission des savoirs et des idées. Plutôt que de parler au nom des autres collègues, je mentionnerai ici, au travers de quelques jalons de ma propre histoire intellectuelle, les circonstances dans lesquelles je me suis trouvé à trafiquer avec la théorie dans le cadre de mes recherches sur la littérature et la culture américaines.

Il m’est difficile de traiter séparément les relais institutionnels et personnels. C’est à l’Université de Genève, dans le département d’anglais, vers le milieu des années 1980, que le vent de la French Theory a commencé à souffler sur mes travaux en littérature américaine. Une thèse de doctorat sur la figure de l’auteur dans l’œuvre de Melville m’avait amené a m’intéresser à la manière dont l’espace public américain au milieu du XIXè siècle concevait la figure de l’auteur, comment un discours public (et politique) sur l’auteur se faisait jour dans un contexte de nationalisme culturel exacerbé. Les enseignants du département d’anglais, professeurs ou assistants, comme moi, étaient alors majoritairement anglophones, issus des meilleures universités britanniques et américaines. Les débats sur le canon littéraire qui avaient commencé à agiter Cambridge et Yale trouvaient naturellement un écho dans leurs pratiques pédagogiques, fortement marquées par l’influence de la déconstruction et par l’impact des Cultural Studies en Grande-Bretagne (son impact américain devait se faire sentir quelques années plus tard). C’est un plaisir pour moi que de rendre hommage, pour la première fois publiquement, à ces collègues et passeurs d’exception, parmi lesquels John Higgins, Pete de Bolla, Tom Ferraro, Bill Readings (l’auteur de The University in Ruins, mort dans un accident d’avion il y a tout juste 10 ans). A la faveur de cours parfois assurés en commun, de discussions informelles, de séminaires de type work in progress, et encouragé par la liberté que nous laissait l’institution d’offrir les enseignements de notre choix, mes cours et ma recherche se sont ouverts à certaines des idées alors en vogue aux USA et en Grande-Bretagne. C’est dans ce milieu intellectuel, extrêmement fertile sur les plans personnel et académique, que je me suis tourné vers les travaux de Michel Foucault et de Pierre Bourdieu pour comprendre l’enchevêtrement, dans le champ littéraire américain au XIXè siècle, des discours (juridiques, moraux ou politiques) et des institutions (la question du droit d’auteur, par exemple). Et pour comprendre comment, à l’intérieur de ce champ en mutation, et souvent contre ses règles, Melville construisit sa trajectoire d’écrivain. La théorie française, qui ne s’appelait pas encore ainsi, opérait là, pour moi, un retour dans une contexte cosmopolite francophone, mais non français, après un détour par Cambridge, Oxford, Duke ou Yale.

Yale, justement, où je devais passer une année en tant que chercheur invité en 1988-1989, pour poursuivre mes recherches sur Melville, était alors secouée par l’affaire Paul de Man, à laquelle FC consacre plusieurs pages. Je rappelle ici ces révélations, faites en 1986, selon lesquelles le critique d’origine belge, professeur à Yale jusqu’à sa mort en 1983, avait signé des articles à teneur antisémite dans un journal bruxellois durant la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Il y eut à l’époque un colloque tendu consacré à l’héritage de de Man en présence de ses anciens collègues et amis : nombreux étaient les enseignants et les collègues à voir alors dans l’affaire de Man le début de la fin de la « déconstruction ». Autre souvenir de cette année : le nom « Derrida » écrit en grand à la mousse à raser sur un sentier du campus et dont il ne restait déjà plus qu’une trace à peine lisible.

En quittant il y a une dizaine d’années l’Université de Genève pour l’Education nationale, la Suisse pour l’Europe, c’est un autre déplacement que j’ai opéré, d’une réflexion centrée sur la littérature américaine à une autre sur un objet que je découvrais alors, la « civilisation ». Ce champ non disciplinaire qu’on disait transdisciplinaire, reposait (repose ?) sur des fondements positivistes étroits et envisageait l’étude de la civilisation britannique ou américaine dans une optique principalement entomologique (il s’agissait d’épingler le système politique, les institutions, la population, l’immigration, etc.) — d’où la réflexion sur le champ lui-même était absente. Ceci alors que les Etudes américaines aux USA étaient en train de prendre un tournant théorique sous les coups de butoir des « Nouveaux américanistes » (New Americanists). Autour de la figure de Donald Pease, ces nouveaux américanistes insufflaient à un champ jusqu’alors hostile à la théorie et historiquement centré sur la nation américaine, un parfum continental, dont le canal privilégié était Althusser et la critique idéologique. Certains de leurs textes, d’un abord souvent difficile, ont nourri ma réflexion sur l’exportation culturelle américaine à l’époque de la Guerre froide, dont participaient d’ailleurs l’encouragement en Europe des American Studies dès la fin des années quarante. D’autres projets de recherche, en cours ou en veilleuse, sur le cinéma américain se sont nourris de travaux dans la mouvance des Cultural Studies américains sur l’identité nationale et post-nationale dans un contexte de mondialisation, ou sur la réception des produits culturels (e.g. sur l’apocalypse nucléaire dans le cinéma de la Guerre froide, sur l’image du pouvoir et de la Présidence américaine, ou sur le « siècle américain au cinéma entre Pearl Harbor et le 11 septembre »).

A chacune de ces étapes du parcours (Melville, l’exportation des études américaines ou le cinéma) la théorie, qu’elle soit française ou non, a fait partie de ma boîte à outil. Si je n’étais pas si maladroit avec le marteau ou l’équerre, je revendiquerais volontiers la définition que donnait Laurence Grossberg des Cultural Studies comme « bricolage ». En tous les cas, ma démarche intellectuelle doit beaucoup aux déplacements, aux décrochages et aux décalages qu’analyse si bien F. Cusset dans son livre. Les CS, en particulier, me paraissent fournir un ensemble de textes, de protocoles intellectuels, de démarches, et de concepts fertiles pour penser une pratique d’enseignant et de chercheur en « civilisation » américaine dans le contexte institutionnel précis de l’Université française. Ce qui ne revient pas à dire que tout est bon à prendre dans les CS (cerner ce « tout » me paraît d’ailleurs difficile). Les dérives textualistes relevées par F. Cusset sont réelles (ce que Mattelart et Neveu appellent dans l’un des sous-titres de leur livre le « théoricisme chic et choc comme ersatz d’engagement »). En même temps, la vitalité du champ des CS, son bouillonnement et les possibilités de croisements qu’il ouvre en font un outil utile pour fendiller la gangue positiviste des études de « civilisation »).

Dans un essai institulé «Traveling Theory,» repris dans The World, the Text, and the Critic (1983), Edward Saïd analyse les convergences et les divergences entre les idées de Georg Lukacs, Lucien Goldman et Raymond Williams. Il y défend une vision de la théorie comme un projet nécessairement partiel, incomplet. La théorie est selon lui inévitablement affaire de transfert, de voyage et d’emprunt. Et Saïd d’ajouter : « Car nous sommes obligés d’emprunter si nous voulons échapper aux contraintes de notre environnement intellectuel immédiat » (241). C’est l’enseignement principal que je tirerais de l’ébauche de biographie intellectuelle que j’ai esquissé ici aujourd’hui. C’est aussi, me semble-t-il, celui qu’on peut tirer des pérégrinations de la théorie française analysées par FC.

Guillaume Marche :

Il s’agit d’un livre très érudit, qui situe de manière utile la genèse en France et le devenir aux Etats-Unis de la « French Theory ». L’auteur fait une sociologie des savoirs — notamment philosophiques — et de la vie universitaire américaine très convaincante. Mais son traitement des références sociologiques l’est moins : il va trop vite en besogne pour réduire « la » sociologie américaine à un « héritage positiviste » (106). Le chapitre 13 et la conclusion donnent néanmoins à réfléchir sur la dichotomie texte/société, dont certains usages de la « French Theory » cherchent à dépasser le caractère bloquant. Dans les pages 343 et suivantes, Cusset formule même les termes d’un dépassement indispensable de la dichotomie universalisme/différentialisme, qui tend à assimiler — à tort — différentialisme, essentialisme et séparatisme. Se pose in fine la question de l’usage de la théorie : c’est surtout selon qu’elle est descriptive ou prescriptive qu’elle s’avère en phase ou en décalage avec le terrain et l’expérience des acteurs : là se situe, par exemple, l’un des écueils de la théorie queer, qui a tendance à traiter les mobilisations sur le terrain comme si elles étaient, pour ainsi dire, en retard sur la théorie (164-167). D’autres auteurs se proposent plutôt de rendre compte des mobilisations fondées sur l’expérience afin d’en explorer le sens tout en les accompagnant (cf. Kath Weston. Long Slow Burn : Sexuality and Social Science. Routledge 1998).

Marc Deneire :

Avoir vécu sur différents campus américains de 1986 à 1998, c’est avoir participé à une immense conversation, un aller-retour entre les contacts personnels et les textes. D’une université à l’autre, d’un département à l’autre, des références communes (comme Michel de Certeau), qui n’étaient d’ailleurs pas seulement françaises (Habermas en faisait partie). A la fin des années 1980, c’était la fin du New Criticism et la découverte de Derrida a permis un renouvellement autour de la déconstruction. La théorie a permis de se positionner dans le cadre d’une pratique discursive, et également de « s’éclater », se faire plaisir et éclater les points de vue, les identités. Pour ceux qui ont eu cette expérience américaine, tout retour en France est difficile : l’anti-multiculturalisme est dominant. Autre différence : si les universitaires et intellectuels américains sont séparés de leur base, ils sont au moins unis dans leur communauté par cette conversation.

Cornelius Crowley :

Les années 1980 ont vu en France la non-rencontre de cette théorie française, de la réflexion politique telle que Derrida et Foucault avaient pu l’imaginer, et de la gauche enfin au pouvoir.

P-Guerlain et T. Labica s’interrogent pour finir sur ce paysage intellectuel et universitaire français depuis les années 1980, champ occupé également par Lacan en matière de mode intellectuelle dans les années 70 ou Bourdieu (dont Cusset parle peu). La mode ne laisse pas forcément toujours de la place à tous les penseurs importants et parfois met en lumière des penseurs plus médiatiques ou flamboyants que profonds. Bourdieu est finalement peut-être plus important sur le plan scientifiques que d’autres qui ont eu plus de succès à un moment donné sur les campus américains.

Indications bibliographiques:CHAMOISEAU, Patrick. Ecrire en pays dominé. Paris : Gallimard, 1997.

CUSSET, François. French Theory, Foucault, Derrida, Deleuze et Cie et les mutations de la vie intellectuelle aux Etats-Unis. Paris : La Découverte, 2003.

CUSSET, François. Queer Critics, la littérature française déshabillée par ses homos-lecteurs. Paris : PUF, 2002.

DU BOIS, W. E. B., « On Being Crazy » in Nathan Huggins (ed.), Du Bois, Writings. New York : The Library of America, 1986.

DERRIDA, Jacques, « But, beyond…(Open Letter to Anne McClintock and Rob Nixon) » in Henry Louis, Gates, Jr (ed.), « Race », Writing, and Difference. Chicago : The University of Chicago Press, 1986.

DERRIDA, Jacques, « Racism’s Last Word » in Henry Louis, Gates, Jr (ed.), « Race », Writing, and Difference. Chicago : The University of Chicago Press, 1986.

DUBOIS, Laurent, « Republic at Sea » in Transition, n° 79.

EAGLETON, Terry. After Theory. New York : Basic Books, 2003.

FANON, Frantz. Peau noire, masques blancs. Paris : Le Seuil, 1952.

GROSSBERG, Lawrence, Cary NELSON, and Paula A. TREICHLER (eds.). Cultural Studies. London : Routledge, 1992.

GUERLAIN, Pierre, « Affaire Sokal : Swift sociologue ; les cultural studies entre jargon, mystification et recherche », Annales du Monde Anglophone, N° 9 (1er semestre 1999), 141-160.

Iris n° 26, SELLIER, Geneviève (dir.), « Cultural Studies, Gender Studies et études filmiques ». Paris, 1998.

KAENEL, André, Catherine LEJEUNE et Marie-Jeanne ROSSIGNOL. Cultural Studies. Etudes Culturelles. Nancy : Presses Universitaires de Nancy, 2003. Sur ce livre voir également dans TransatlanticA le compte-rendu de Pierre Guerlain :
http://etudes.americaines.free.fr/TRANSATLANTICA/CR/kaenel_lejeune_rossignol.html
La bibliographie de cet ouvrage est étendue et pédagogique.

KAENEL, André. ‘Words are Things’: Herman Melville and the Invention of Authorship in Nineteenth-Century America. Berne : Peter Lang, 1992.

MATTELART, Armand et Erik NEVEU. Introduction aux Cultural Studies. Paris : La Découverte, 2003

PEASE, Donald E. (ed.), « New Americanists : Revisionist Interventions into the Canon, » Boundary 2 :17 (Spring 1990) & « New Americanists 2: National Identities and Postnational Narratives,» Boundary 2:19 (Spring 1992).

READINGS, Bill. The University in Ruins. Cambridge : Harvard UP, 1996.

SAID, Edward. The World, the Text, and the Critic. New York : Columbia UP, 1982.

TODOROV, Tzvetan. Critique de la critique, Un roman d’apprentissage. Paris : Seuil, 1984.

VARET, Gilbert. Racisme et philosophie. Essai sur une limite de la pensée. Paris : Denoël, 1973.

WACQUANT, Loïc. Punir les pauvres. Marseille : Agone, 2004.

WESTON, Kath. Long Slow Burn : Sexuality and Social Science. Londres : Routledge 1998.

WRIGHT, Michelle, M.. Becoming Black. Creating Identity in the African Diaspora. Durham : Duke University Press, 2004.

A consulter également la revue publiée par Routledge Cultural Studies :
http://www.unc.edu/depts/cultstud/journal

ou l’International Journal of Cultural Studies publié par Sage :
http://ics.sagepub.com

et un site recensant les liens possibles vers des sites de Cultural Studies :
http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/Cultural/Default.asp

et chez Duke UP une revue féministe de Cultural Studies :
http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/differences


Messianisme homosexuel: Quand le cannibalisme n’est plus qu’une affaire de goût (What moral depravities can not be excused by the sole criterion of « warm, meaningful human relations » or « fulfillment », the newest semantic heirs to « love »?)

11 février, 2020

Image may contain: 2 people, people standing

Si toutes les valeurs sont relatives, alors le cannibalisme n’est plus qu’une affaire de goût. Leo Strauss (?)
Tu ne coucheras pas avec un homme comme on couche avec une femme. C’est une abomination. Lévitique 18:22
Il n’y aura aucune prostituée parmi les filles d’Israël, et il n’y aura aucun prostitué parmi les fils d’Israël. Tu n’apporteras point dans la maison de l’Éternel, ton Dieu, le salaire d’une prostituée ni le prix d’un chien, pour l’accomplissement d’un voeu quelconque; car l’un et l’autre sont en abomination à l’Éternel, ton Dieu. Deutéronome 23: 17-18
La vertu même devient vice, étant mal appliquée, et le vice est parfois ennobli par l’action. Frère Laurent (Roméo et Juliette, Shakespeare)
Le monde moderne n’est pas mauvais : à certains égards, il est bien trop bon. Il est rempli de vertus féroces et gâchées. Lorsqu’un dispositif religieux est brisé (comme le fut le christianisme pendant la Réforme), ce ne sont pas seulement les vices qui sont libérés. Les vices sont en effet libérés, et ils errent de par le monde en faisant des ravages ; mais les vertus le sont aussi, et elles errent plus férocement encore en faisant des ravages plus terribles. Le monde moderne est saturé des vieilles vertus chrétiennes virant à la folie.  G.K. Chesterton
La liberté, c’est la liberté de dire que deux et deux font quatre. Lorsque cela est accordé, le reste suit. George Orwell (1984)
Parler de liberté n’a de sens qu’à condition que ce soit la liberté de dire aux gens ce qu’ils n’ont pas envie d’entendre. George Orwell
Il faut constamment se battre pour voir ce qui se trouve au bout de son nez. Orwell
Le plus difficile n’est pas de dire ce que l’on voit mais d’accepter de voir ce que l’on voit. Péguy
Si vous admettez qu’un homme revêtu de la toute-puissance peut en abuser contre ses adversaires, pourquoi n’admettez-vous pas la même chose pour une majorité?  (…) Le pouvoir de tout faire, que je refuse à un seul de mes semblables, je ne l’accorderai jamais à plusieurs. Tocqueville
Si j’étais législateur, je proposerais tout simplement la disparition du mot et du concept de “mariage” dans un code civil et laïque. Le “mariage”, valeur religieuse, sacrale, hétérosexuelle – avec voeu de procréation, de fidélité éternelle, etc. -, c’est une concession de l’Etat laïque à l’Eglise chrétienne – en particulier dans son monogamisme qui n’est ni juif (il ne fut imposé aux juifs par les Européens qu’au siècle dernier et ne constituait pas une obligation il y a quelques générations au Maghreb juif) ni, cela on le sait bien, musulman. En supprimant le mot et le concept de “mariage”, cette équivoque ou cette hypocrisie religieuse et sacrale, qui n’a aucune place dans une constitution laïque, on les remplacerait par une “union civile” contractuelle, une sorte de pacs généralisé, amélioré, raffiné, souple et ajusté entre des partenaires de sexe ou de nombre non imposé.(…) C’est une utopie mais je prends date. Jacques Derrida
C’est le sens de l’histoire (…) Pour la première fois en Occident, des hommes et des femmes homosexuels prétendent se passer de l’acte sexuel pour fonder une famille. Ils transgressent un ordre procréatif qui a reposé, depuis 2000 ans, sur le principe de la différence sexuelle. Evelyne Roudinesco
Les enfants adoptés ou nés sous X revendiquent aujourd’hui le droit de connaître leur histoire. Nul n’échappe à son destin, l’inconscient vous rattrape toujours. (…)  les enfants adoptés ou issus de la PMA ne sortent jamais indemnes des perturbations liées à leur naissance. Il faut rester ouvert, être attentif à leurs questions, s’ils en posent, et surtout ne pas chercher à cacher la vérité. L’idéal serait de trouver une position équilibrée entre le système de transparence absolue à l’américaine et le système de dissimulation à la française, lequel, ne l’oublions pas, reposait autrefois sur une intention généreuse d’égalité des droits entre les enfants issus de différentes filiations. Evelyne Roudinesco
1936, dans les quartiers bourgeois de Tokyo. Sada Abe, ancienne prostituée devenue domestique, aime épier les ébats amoureux de ses maîtres et soulager de temps à autre les vieillards vicieux. Son patron Kichizo, bien que marié, va bientôt manifester son attirance pour elle et va l’entraîner dans une escalade érotique qui ne connaîtra plus de bornes. Kichizo a désormais deux maisons : celle qu’il partage avec son épouse et celle qu’il partage avec Sada. Les rapports amoureux et sexuels entre Sada et Kichizo sont désormais épicés par des relations annexes, qui sont pour eux autant de célébrations initiatiques. Progressivement, ils vont avoir de plus en plus de mal à se passer l’un de l’autre, et Sada va de moins en moins tolérer l’idée qu’il puisse y avoir une autre femme dans la vie de son compagnon. Kichizo demande finalement à Sada, pendant un de leurs rapports sexuels, de l’étrangler sans s’arrêter, quitte à le tuer. Sada accepte, l’étrangle jusqu’à ce qu’il meure, avant de l’émasculer, dans un geste ultime de mortification ; puis elle écrit sur la poitrine de Kichizo, avec le sang de ce dernier : ‘Sada et Kichi, maintenant unis’. Wikipedia
Il nous arriverait, si nous savions mieux analyser nos amours, de voir que souvent les femmes ne nous plaisent qu’à cause du contrepoids d’hommes à qui nous avons à les disputer (…) ce contrepoids supprimé, le charme de la femme tombe. On en a un exemple dans l’homme qui, sentant s’affaiblir son goût pour la femme qu’il aime, applique spontanément les règles qu’il a dégagées, et pour être sûr qu’il ne cesse pas d’aimer la femme, la met dans un milieu dangereux où il faut la protéger chaque jour. Proust (La Prisonnière)
C’est déjà ou presque de l’homosexualité, en vérité, que nous parlons puisque le modèle-rival se trouve normalement un individu du même sexe, du fait même que l’objet est hétérosexuel. Toute rivalité sexuelle est donc structurellement homosexuelle. Ce que nous appelons homosexualité, c’est la subordination complète, cette fois, de l’appétit sexuel aux effets du jeu mimétique qui concentre toutes les puissances d’attention et d’absorption du sujet sur l’individu responsable du double bind, le modèle en tant que rival, le rival en tant que modèle. Pour rendre cette genèse plus évidente, il faut évoquer ici un fait curieux observé par l’éthologie. Chez certains singes, quand un mâle se reconnaît battu par un rival et renonce à la femelle qu’il lui disputait, il se met, vis à vis de ce vainqueur, en position, nous dit-on, d’ ‘offre homosexuelle’. (…) S’il n’y a pas d’homosexualité ‘véritable’ chez les animaux, c’est parce que le mimétisme, chez eux, n’est pas assez intense pour infléchir durablement l’appétit sexuel vers le rival. Il est déjà assez intense, pourtant, au paroxysme des rivalités mimétiques, pour ébaucher cet infléchissement. Si j’ai raison, on devrait trouver dans les formes rituelles, le chaînon manquant entre la vague ébauche animale et l’homosexualité proprement dite. Et effectivement, l’homosexualité rituelle est un phénomène assez fréquent; elle se situe au paroxysme de la crise et on la trouve dans des cultures qui ne font aucune place, semble-t-il, à l’homosexualité, en dehors des rites religieux. Une fois de plus, en somme, c’est dans un contexte de rivalité aigüe qu’apparait l’homosexualité. Une comparaison du phénomène animal, de l’homosexualité rituelle, et de l’homosexualité moderne ne peut manquer de signaler que c’est le mimétisme qui entraine la sexualité et non l’inverse. De cette l’homosexualité rituelle, il faut rapprocher, je pense, un certain cannibalisme rituel qui se pratique dans des cultures , également, où le cannibalisme n’existe pas en temps ordinaire. Dans ce cas comme dans l’autre, il me semble, l’appétit instinctuel, alimentaire ou sexuel, se détache de l’objet que les hommes se disputent pour se fixer sur celui ou ceux qui nous le disputent. (…) Un des avantages de la genèse par la rivalité, c’est qu’elle se présente de façon absolument symétrique chez les deux sexes. Autrement dit, toute rivalité sexuelle est de structure homosexuelle chez la femme comme chez l’homme, aussi longtemps toutefois que l’objet reste hétérosexuel, c’est-à-dire qu’il reste l’objet prescrit par le montage instinctuel hérité de la vie animale. (…) C’est sur ce parallélisme que se base Proust pour affirmer qu’on peut transcrire une expérience homosexuelle en termes hétérosexuels sans jamais trahir la vérité de l’un ou l’autre désir. René Girard
On a commencé avec la déconstruction du langage et on finit avec la déconstruction de l’être humain dans le laboratoire. (…) Elle est proposée par les mêmes qui d’un côté veulent prolonger la vie indéfiniment et nous disent de l’autre que le monde est surpeuplé. René Girard
En conclusion, nous devons nous demander pourquoi le principe de précaution si souvent mis en avant et dans tous les domaines, y compris à propos du maïs transgénique, ne devrait pas s’appliquer au projet de loi actuel. Maurice Berger
La lisibilité de la filiation, qui est dans l’intérêt de l’enfant, est sacrifiée au profit du bon vouloir des adultes et la loi finit par mentir sur l’origine de la vieConférence des évêques
C’est au nom de l’égalité, de l’ouverture d’esprit, de la modernité et de la bien-pensance dominante qu’il nous est demandé d’accepter la mise en cause de l’un des fondements de notre société. (…) Ce n’est pas parce que des gens s’aiment qu’ils ont systématiquement le droit de se marier. Des règles strictes délimitent et continueront de délimiter les alliances interdites au mariage. Un homme ne peut pas se marier avec une femme déjà mariée, même s’ils s’aiment. De même, une femme ne peut pas se marier avec deux hommes. (…) « le mariage pour tous est uniquement un slogan car l’autorisation du mariage homosexuel maintiendrait des inégalités et des discriminations à l’encontre de tous ceux qui s’aiment, mais dont le mariage continuerait d’être interdit. (…) L’enjeu n’est pas ici l’homosexualité qui est un fait, une réalité, quelle que soit mon appréciation de Rabbin à ce sujet (…)  c’est l’institution qui articule l’alliance de l’homme et de la femme avec la succession des générations. C’est l’institution d’une famille, c’est-à-dire d’une cellule qui crée une relation de filiation directe entre ses membres. C’est un acte fondamental dans la construction et dans la stabilité tant des individus que de la société. (…) résumer le lien parental aux facettes affectives et éducatives, c’est méconnaître que le lien de filiation est un vecteur psychique et qu’il est fondateur pour le sentiment d’identité de l’enfant. (…) l’enfant ne se construit qu’en se différenciant, ce qui suppose d’abord qu’il sache à qui il ressemble. Il a besoin, de ce fait, de savoir qu’il est issu de l’amour et de l’union entre un homme, son père, et une femme, sa mère, grâce à la différence sexuelle de ses parents. (…) Le droit à l’enfant n’existe ni pour les hétérosexuels ni pour les homosexuels. Aucun couple n’a droit à l’enfant qu’il désire, au seul motif qu’il le désire. L’enfant n’est pas un objet de droit mais un sujet de droit. Gilles Bernheim
Ce qui pose problème dans la loi envisagée, c’est le préjudice qu’elle causerait à l’ensemble de notre société au seul profit d’une infime minorité, une fois que l’on aurait brouillé de façon irréversible trois choses:  les généalogies en substituant la parentalité à la paternité et à la maternité;  le statut de l’enfant, passant de sujet à celui d’un objet auquel chacun aurait droit; les identités où la sexuation comme donnée naturelle serait dans l’obligation de s’effacer devant l’orientation exprimée par chacun, au nom d’une lutte contre les inégalités, pervertie en éradication des différences. Ces enjeux doivent être clairement posés dans le débat sur le mariage homosexuel et l’homoparentalité. Ils renvoient aux fondamentaux de la société dans laquelle chacun d’entre nous a envie de vivre. Gilles Bernheim (Grand rabbin de France)
He said, ‘Look Juan Carlos, the pope loves you this way. God made you like this and he loves you. Juan Carlos Cruz
The pope is saying what every reputable biologist and psychologist will tell you, which is that people do not choose their sexual orientation. A great failing of the church is that many Catholics have been reluctant to say so, which then “makes people feel guilty about something they have no control over. Rev. James Martin (Jesuit)
The Vatican declined to confirm or deny the remarks in keeping with its policy not to comment on the pope’s private conversations. The comments first were reported by Spain’s El Pais newspaper. Official church teaching calls for gay men and lesbians to be respected and loved, but considers homosexual activity “intrinsically disordered.” Francis, though, has sought to make the church more welcoming to gays, most famously with his 2013 comment “Who am I to judge?” He also has spoken of his own ministry to gay and transgender people, insisting they are children of God, loved by God and deserving of accompaniment by the church. As a result, some sought to downplay the significance of the comments as merely being in line with Francis’ pastoral-minded attitude. In addition, there was a time not so long ago when the Catholic Church officially taught that sexual orientation was not something people choose, the implication being it was how God made them. The first edition of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, the dense summary of Catholic teaching published by St. John Paul II in 1992, said gay individuals “do not choose their homosexual condition; for most of them it is a trial.” The updated edition, which is the only edition available online and on the Vatican website, was revised to remove the reference to homosexuality not being a choice. The revised edition says: “This inclination, which is objectively disordered, constitutes for most of them a trial.” Francis DeBernardo, executive director of New Ways Ministry, which advocates for equality for LGBTQ Catholics, said the pope’s comments were “tremendous” and would do a lot of good. “It would do a lot better if he would make these statements publicly, because LGBT people need to hear that message from religious leaders, from Catholic leaders,” he said. The Rev. James Martin, a Jesuit whose book “Building a Bridge” called for the church to find new pastoral ways of ministering to gays, noted that the pope’s comments were in a private conversation, not a public pronouncement or document. But citing the original version of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, Martin said they were nevertheless significant. Martin’s book is being published this week in Italian, with a preface by the Francis-appointed bishop of Bologna, Monsignor Matteo Zuppi, a sign that the message of acceptance is being embraced even in traditionally conservative Italy. NBC news
Why did god make me this way? Why did god make me wrong? Mia Lamay
The doctor said that we had a girl coming, so we started thinking of girl names. » « ‘Mia’ was born in 2010. » « Mia constantly wanted to change her clothes, like 12 times a day. » »Then the dog sweater came and she became obsessed with wearing one garment for six months straight. In hindsight I think she was trying to dispel a sense of discomfort in her image that was being shown to the world. » »She would take on boy personas and always want to play with boy things, we thought we had a tomboy on our hands. » « She didn’t fit in with the boys and she didn’t fit in with the girls. It was obvious to her and to the other kids. » « Her need to play boy roles and to be seen or spoken to as a boy at home became very persistent, and very consistent. Those are the hallmarks of a possibly transgender child — consistence, persistence, and insistence. And she was meeting all of those markers. » « A mother’s heart knows when her child is suffering, » says Jacob’s mom. « He was talking about hating his body, I found him angrily poking at himself one day, wanting to be something different. He would say ‘Why did god make me this way? Why did god make me wrong?' »One day after a near car accident, Jacob’s mom realized that if something were to happen, she didn’t want to « force her to be Mia for that one last day. At that point, my mind was made up. » In April of last year, the family took a trip and bought Jacob a Prince Charming costume. « We hadn’t yet transitioned Jacob, but he had short hair and was wearing almost entirely boy clothes… and he just glowed. Something clicked. » « There had been a video that had gone viral of an adorable little boy in California, Ryland Whittington, and his parents had made a video of him explaining transitioning and clearly this boy is so happy now. We were struck by that. » Jacob’s parents showed him the video of the boy, asking if he wanted to be like Ryland, but he said: « I can’t, I can be what I like at home, but I have to be Mia at school. » Jacob’s parents explained that he could start at a new school where everyone would know him as a boy from the beginning, and he immediately said « That’s what I want. I want to be a boy always. I want to be a boy named Jacob. » « Before the transition, he didn’t smile a lot. I had never seen him throw his head back and laugh. He’s a different person, he’s becoming himself. » »He started looking people in the eye, talking to people, and striking up conversations. I realized how much he had come out of his shell and how much being Jacob suited him. » »I couldn’t ask for a better son, » concludes Jacob’s dad. His mom agrees: « I want him to know how proud of him I am, how brave I believe he is, how no matter what I am in his corner, and I will always love him — because he’s my son. » Business insider
It’s not how you act, or what you wear, or anything like that. It’s just how you really are inside. … You just feel like you just got put in the wrong body. Jacob Lemay
Fourth grader Jacob Lemay knew he was a boy before he could properly pronounce the word “transgender.” His whole family now advocates for trans rights. Now, Mimi Lemay has written a memoir titled “What We Will Become” about love, acceptance and change. Jacob is now in fourth grade. He has a pet hedgehog named Trinket, and he loves hockey, jumping on his backyard trampoline and playing with his sisters. He is a typical 9-year-old boy in every way, except for being transgender. He said some of his friends know and some don’t. But to most kids, it’s just not that big a deal. Over the last five years, he has grown and matured, and he is more sophisticated now when he talks about what it means to him to be transgender. And since he has reached the early stages of puberty, Jacob has opted to take a puberty blocker. This is a completely reversible step endorsed by the medical community. It is also the very kind of treatment that some state lawmakers are looking to stop. More than half a dozen states, most recently Ohio, have introduced bills seeking to ban gender-affirming health care for minors. This type of care, Mimi Lemay said, will save the lives of children like Jacob. More than half a dozen states, most recently Ohio, have introduced bills seeking to ban gender-affirming health care for minors. This type of care, Mimi Lemay said, will save the lives of children like Jacob. Mimi and Joe Lemay said their entire family now advocates for transgender rights. In fact, Jacob recently asked presidential hopeful Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., a question at a televised town hall. The Lemays said they want to keep sharing their story to help other families with trans kids. “Your child will be OK as long as you support them,” Mimi Lemay said. “There is no harm in saying to your child, ‘I see you … and believe you, and you are who you say you are.’ NBC news
Je suis un prêtre clandestin. (…) À 18 ans, j’ai fait mon coming-out. Cela ne s’est pas bien passé. Au point que j’en suis venu à cette alternative : le suicide ou l’exil. (…) J’ai été accusé d’être un activiste homosexuel infiltré dans l’Église. Tout récemment, un archevêque a même voulu me défroquer. (…) Le point de départ a été la découverte de l’œuvre de René Girard. Avec sa lecture rigoureusement anthropologique du texte biblique, il a montré que l’on n’est face ni à une mythologie ni même à une théologie humaine mais, au contraire, à une anthropologie divine. (…) René Girard m’a aidé à prendre conscience que ce n’est pas Dieu qui est violent mais l’homme. Par exemple, le Christ n’est pas sacrifié par les hommes pour payer le prix exigé par un dieu sanguinaire. Que signifie alors la mort de Jésus ? Que les hommes sont violents. Et, ne se rebellant pas, Jésus s’est donné au milieu d’un de nos typiques épisodes de lynchage comme incarnant le pardon en tant que valeur divine. (…) La haine des autres est réelle mais je n’ai pas à me laisser définir par elle. Je cherche toujours à enseigner comment vivre au-delà du ressentiment. Devenir soi et pardonner, voici quelque chose au cœur de la foi chrétienne. (…) Si le rejet de l’homosexualité au sein de l’Église est si fort, c’est aussi parce qu’il y a tellement de gays mal à l’aise au sein du clergé (…) Cette parole est trop rare et pourtant indispensable pour que les positions dogmatiques sur la famille ou sur l’homosexualité évoluent au sein de l’Église et de la société. James Alison
In general, despite what those who try to conflate “gay” with “paedophile” would have you believe, a knowing clerical gay milieu is genuinely shocked and baffled when minors are involved. In all these cases, in as far as the behaviour was adult-related, plenty of people in authority sort-of-knew what was going on, and had known throughout the clerics’ respective careers. However the informal rule among the Catholic Clergy – the last remaining outpost of enforced homosociality in the Western world – is strictly “don’t ask, don’t tell.” Typically, blind eyes are turned to the active sex lives of those clerics who have them, only two things being beyond the pale: whistle-blowing on the sex lives of others, or public suggestions that the Church’s teaching in this area is wrong. These lead to marginalisation, whether formal or informal. Given all this, it seems to me entirely reasonable that people should now be asking “How deep does this go?” If such careers were the result of blind eyes being turned, legal settlements made, and these clerics themselves were in positions of influence and authority, how much more are we going to learn about those who promoted and protected them? Or about those whom they promoted? So it is that voices like Rod Dreher – keenly followed blogger at The American Conservative – are resuscitating talk of the “Lavender Mafia”, and the demand, which became popular in conservative circles from 2002 onwards, that the priesthood be purged of gay men. Investigative journalists are being encouraged to lay bare the informal gay networks of friendship, patronage, and potential for blackmail which structure clerical life (or are being excoriated for their politically correct cowardice in failing to do so). The aim is to weed out the gays, especially the treasonous bishops who have perpetuated the system. Ross Douthat – the New York Times columnist – has called for a papally mandated investigation into the American Church (I guess along the lines of Mgr Charles Scicluna’s in Chile) in order to restore its moral authority. Others, like Robert Mickens, The Tablet’s Rome correspondent for many years, are equally aware of the “elephant in the sacristy” which is the massively disproportionate number of gay men in the clergy, but highlight the refusal of the Roman authorities to engage in any kind of publicly accountable, adult discussion about this fact. Their refusal reinforces collective dishonesty and perpetuates the psychosexual immaturity of all gay clergy, whether celibate, partnered or practitioners of so-called “serial celibacy”. How to approach this issue in a healthy way? As a gay priest myself I am obviously more in agreement with Mickens than with Dreher or Douthat. However I would like to record my complete sympathy with the passion of the latter two as well as with their rage at a collective clerical dishonesty which renders farcical the claim to be teachers of anything at all, let alone divine truth. Jesus becomes credible through witnesses, not corrupt party-line pontificators. Having said that, I suspect that particular interventions, whether by civil authority or Papal mandate, are always going to run aground on the fact that they can only deal with, and bring to light specific bad acts, usually ones that rise to the level of criminality. I cannot imagine a one-off legal intervention in this sphere that would be able to make appropriate distinctions where there are so many fine lines: between innocent friendship, sexually charged admiration, abusive sexual suggestion, emotional blackmail, financial blackmail, recognition of genuine talent, genuine love lived platonically, genuine love lived with sexual intimacy, sexual favours granted with genuine freedom, sexual favours granted out of fear or in exchange for promotion, covering peccadillos for a friend, covering graver matters for a rival in exchange for some benefit, not wanting to know too much about other people’s lives, or obsessively wanting to know too much about them. Let alone the usual rancours of break-ups, career disappointments, petty jealousies, bitterness, revenge and so on. All of these tend to shade into or out of each other over time, making effective outside assessment, even if it were desirable, impossible. (…) An anecdotal illustration: a few years ago, I found myself leading a retreat for Italian gay priests in Rome. Of the nearly fifty participants some were single, some partnered, for others it was the first time they had ever been able to talk honestly with other priests outside the confessional. Among them there were seven or eight mid-level Vatican officials. I asked one from the Congregation for the Clergy what he made of those attending with their partners. He smiled and said, “Of course, we know that the partnered ones are the healthy ones.” Let that sink in. In the clerical closet, dishonesty is functional, honesty is dysfunctional, and the absence or presence of circumspect sexual practice between adult males is irrelevant. And so to some systemic dimensions of “The elephant in the sacristy”. The first is its size. A far, far greater proportion of the clergy, particularly the senior clergy, is gay than anyone has been allowed to understand, even the bishops and cardinals themselves. Harvard Professor Mark Jordan’s phrase “a honeycomb of closets”, in which each enclosed participant has very little access to the overall picture, is exactly right. But the proportion is going to become more and more self-evident thanks to social media and the generalized expectations of gay honesty and visibility in the civil sphere. This despite many years of bishops resisting accurate sociological clergy surveys. At the time of the last papal election in 2013 we did have hints that the Vatican and the cardinal electors were shocked at discovering from reports commissioned by Benedict how many of them were gay. Part of their shock has to have been their fear at how the faithful would be scandalized if they had any idea. They were right to be afraid, and the faithful are going to have an idea as the implosion of the closet accelerates. (…) A second dimension is grasped when you understand the general rule that the heterosexuality of a cleric is inversely proportional to the stridency of his homophobia. This is one of the reasons why I am sceptical of all attempts to “weed out the gays”. The principal clerical crusaders in this area turn out to be gay themselves – in some cases, so deeply in denial that they don’t know it. And in some cases knowingly so. My own experience, which has since been confirmed by hundreds of echoes worldwide, is that there are proportionately few straight men in the clergy (leaving aside rural dioceses in some countries, where heterosexual concubinage is the customary norm) and they do not, as a rule, persecute gay men. It is closeted men who are the worst persecutors. Some are very sadly disturbed souls who cannot but try to clean outwardly what they cannot admit to being inwardly. These can’t be helped since Church teaching reinforces their hell. For others the lure of upward mobility leads them to strategic displays of enthusiasm for the enforcement of the house rules. A third dimension is that banning gay men from the seminary never works. In practise, the ban means that those “tempted” by honesty will be weeded out, or will weed themselves out, uncomfortable with the inducements to a double life. Those unconcerned by honesty, and happy to swim in the wake of the double lives of those doing the weeding, will learn how to look the part. The only seminaries that might avoid this are those that differentiate on the basis not of sexual orientation, but of honesty, which is a primary requisite for any form of psycho-sexual maturity. And there are some that do, presumably with the permission of wise Bishops, but in quiet contravention of the official line. These of course are instantly vulnerable to accusations of being liberal, of promoting homosexuality or whatever, when in practical terms, the reverse is true. For honesty is effectively forbidden by a Church teaching, which tells you that you are an intrinsically heterosexual person who is inexplicably suffering from a grave objective disorder called “same-sex attraction”. And so we get seminaries in which there are no gay seminarians, but whose rectors nevertheless push programmes like those of “Courage” on their oh-so-non-gay-but-transitorily-same-sex-attracted charges. A fourth dimension: no attempt to view this issue through culture war lenses will be helpful. The clerical closet is not the result of some 1960s liberal conspiracy. It is a systemic structure in which, absent scandal, all of its survivors are functional. (…) This is not a matter of left or right, traditional or progressive, good or bad, chaste or practising; nor even a matter of twenty five years of Karol Wojtyla’s notoriously poor judgment of character, though all these feed into it. It is a systemic structural trap, and if we are to get out of it, it must be described in such a way as to recognise that unknowing innocence as much as knowing guilt, well-meaning error as well as malice, has been, and is, involved in both its constitution and its maintenance. (…) What is to be done, and what is quietly happening? In my view the first thing is for the laity to be encouraged in their fast growing majority acceptance of being gay as a normal part of life. This, despite fierce resistence from elements of the clerical closet. Pope Francis’ reported conversation with Juan Carlos Cruz (a gay man abused in his youth by the Chilean priest, Fr Karadima) is a gem in this area: “Look Juan Carlos, the pope loves you this way. God made you like this and he loves you”. This remark led to much spluttering and explaining away from those who realise that the moment you say “God made you like this” then the game is up as regards the “intrinsic evil” of the acts. Nevertheless, it is only when straightforward, and obviously true, Christian messaging like Francis’ becomes normal among the laity themselves that honesty can become the norm among the clergy. Otherwise we will continue with the absurd and pharisaical current situation in which there is one rule for the clergy (“doesn’t matter what you do so long as you don’t say so in public or challenge the teaching”) and another for the laity, passed off as “the teaching of the Church”, and brutally enforced, for instance, among employees of Catholic schools, parish organists, softball coaches and the like. Only when it is clear (as it is increasingly) that the laity are quite confident in the (obviously true) view that “if you are this way, then learning to love appropriately is going to flow from, not despite, this” will it be possible to change, without scandal, the formal rules regarding the clergy. I bring this out since much was made of Francis’ reported answer to the Italian Bishops when asked if they should admit gay men to the seminary: “if you are in any doubt, no”. This was read as Francis being against gay men. I read the remark differently: that of a wise and merciful man addressing a group of men, a significant proportion of whom are gay, and telling them, in effect, that only those among them who are capable of honesty in dealing with their future charges should induct people like themselves into the clergy. “Are you yourself going to vacillate in standing up publicly for the honesty of the young man? If so, don’t make his future dependent on your cowardice”. James Alison
Aucune religion n’interdit le cannibalisme. Je ne trouve pas non plus de loi qui nous empêche de manger des gens. J’ai profité de l’espace entre la morale et la loi et c’est là-dessus que j’ai basé mon travail. Zhu Yu 
Sur internet : les gens racontent beaucoup de choses. Des choses pour se faire peur, ou pour se faire jouir, et parfois les deux se confondent. Il suffit de fouiller un peu sur le web pour s’en rendre compte. Commençons par le vore, une « paraphilie » (ce qu’on appelait autrefois « perversion », une pratique ou attirance considérée comme « anormale ») qui consiste à avaler ou être avalé par un animal ou un individu, sans effusion de sang ni violence. On se fait engloutir d’un coup, gloups, comme le Petit Chaperon rouge, fantasme du retour au ventre de la mère, avant de ressortir indemne. La plupart des sites pornos en proposent quelques vidéos, souvent une mauvaise 3D, le reste se passe dans la tête. Variantes : les giant vore, où des hommes minuscules se font ingurgiter par d’immenses maîtresses plantureuses ; ou le cock vore, lorsque la proie se fait avaler par un urètre géant, souvent à grands traits de style manga et avec des personnages indéterminés, quelque part entre l’humain et l’animal. Loin de ces supports masturbatoires, d’autres préfèrent une version plus réaliste : des vidéos façon snuff movies, où des membres plus vrais que nature grillent sur des barbecues. Devant lesquelles on se demande si c’est pour de faux, ou pas. Ils ont un rapport sexuel, puis décident ensemble de couper le pénis de Bernd, de le faire flamber, de le goûter. Puis ils le font sauter à la poêle avant de le terminer. Dans les Google Groupes, des topics spécialisés recensent les annonces de milliers de personnes « sérieuses » qui veulent manger, ou se faire manger, au milieu de dessins et montages grossiers de femmes avec une pomme dans la bouche et d’hommes avec une broche dans le derrière. Mais pour remonter à la source de l’imaginaire cannibale, il faut se rendre sur le forum DolcettGirls : fondé par un dessinateur canadien sous le pseudo de Perro Loco, il rassemble une communauté qui s’échange bons plans pornos, nouvelles érotiques, comics mordants et recettes. C’est à Perro Loco, aussi, qu’on doit le Cannibal Cafe Forum, institution fermée après un « terrible fait divers » : c’est là que l’informaticien allemand Armin Meiwes (aka le cannibale de Rotenbourg) a posté ses annonces pour trouver sa victime. En 2001, il reçoit la réponse de Bernd Jürgen Brandes, un Berlinois de 43 ans à la recherche de « l’excitation ultime ». Armin, qui rêve de « quelqu’un qui serait pour toujours avec lui », le reçoit. Ils ont un rapport sexuel, puis décident ensemble de couper le pénis de Bernd, de le faire flamber, de le goûter. Puis ils le font sauter à la poêle avant de le terminer. Armin tue ensuite Bernd de plusieurs coups de couteau, en découpe 30 kg et met « les meilleurs morceaux » au congélateur. « Ce qui a le plus choqué n’est pas le fait que Meiwes ait mangé une partie de Brandes, mais que Brandes ait consenti à être mangé », note le psychologue Mark Grifths, de la Nottingham Trent University : « On connaît peu la prévalence de ce type de comportements, bien que Meiwes affirme qu’au moins 800 personnes partageaient sa passion. » Alors Perro Loco a fermé le Cannibal Cafe et ouvert DolcettGirls, spécialisé dans les trips trash. Depuis cette affaire, il affirme que son site n’est qu’une plate-forme d’échanges de fantasmes, pas de rencontres meurtrières. Condamné à perpétuité, Armin est aujourd’hui en prison. Et végétarien. (…) Comme l’explique Bill Schutt dans son livre Cannibalism, a Perfectly Natural History, la nature abonde de cas de cannibalisme. Les araignées Amaurobius ferox pondent dans l’unique but de nourrir leur portée. Quand les bébés deviennent trop gros et que les œufs viennent à manquer, maman se laisse dévorer, dernière étape avant que sa progéniture, une fois adulte, puisse reproduire le schéma. En se faisant cannibaliser, les mantes religieuses produisent plus de sperme. Et on ne vous parle pas des requins : les fœtus s’entredévorent dans l’utérus de la mère et seul naît le plus fort, ragaillardi par toutes ces protéines avalées. Difficile pourtant de généraliser : d’une région à une autre, ou même d’un groupe à un autre au sein d’une même espèce, le cannibalisme apparaît ou disparaît. Pas de déterminisme, simplement une stratégie contingente de survie et d’évolution. Il en fut de même chez les humains : chez nous non plus, le cannibalisme n’a jamais été ancré, jamais des « sauvages » n’ont mangé leur prochain comme ils auraient savouré un steak d’élan. Chez nos ancêtres préhistoriques, on ne soupçonne que des cas isolés ; d’ailleurs l’espèce n’aurait pas survécu à un cannibalisme généralisé. Partout où l’anthropophagie s’est développée, elle était encadrée et liée à un contexte précis. Plus souvent, elle ne se résumait en réalité qu’à des fantasmes d’Occidentaux ou à des arguments inventés pour mieux éradiquer des populations (coucou Christophe Colomb). « Le cannibalisme survient toujours dans des sociétés en proie à des crises historiques, démographiques ou écologiques terribles. En plus, dès que les Européens arrivaient, ils décuplaient les crises, et vingt ans après les premiers contacts, le phénomène avait pris des proportions monumentales », explique l’anthropologue et chercheur au CNRS Georges Guille-Escuret. Parfois autorisé, voire valorisé (pour honorer un ancêtre ou saluer le courage d’un ennemi), le cannibalisme a très vite été rejeté par ceux qui ne le pratiquaient pas. « Nous vivons dans des sociétés qui ont décrété une rupture entre le monde de la nature et celui de la culture, analyse l’anthropologue. Dans la vision chinoise par exemple, cette césure n’existe pas : le cannibalisme va être progressivement prohibé pour maintenir les rapports sociaux, mais une anthropophagie pour raisons médicales ou sexuelles perdure encore, ce n’est pas un tabou ultime. » Chez nous, si. La faute aux Grecs, tout d’abord, qui jugeaient le cannibalisme incompatible avec le fonctionnement d’une cité, au même titre qu’un gouvernement de femmes. « Deux sociétés les effrayaient : les cannibales et les Amazones. D’ailleurs, partout où on a trouvé les premiers, on a subodoré les secondes. » Plus tard vient s’ajouter la phobie chrétienne : le fait de consommer de la chair humaine devient un sacrilège, l’homme ayant été créé « à l’image de Dieu ». « Il y a aussi la règle de l’interdiction du “redoublement du même” : on ne peut pas mettre l’identique sur l’identique », développe l’anthropologue. En clair : on ne couche pas avec sa sœur car c’est le même sang, on ne mange pas un membre de notre espèce car c’est la même chair. « En Polynésie, on considère même que le cannibalisme est un inceste alimentaire. Mais le double tabou, la phobie politique grecque et la phobie cosmogonique chrétienne, peut créer une double fascination. Toute prohibition implique une contestation fantasmatique. On n’interdit pas sans provoquer le désir de transgression. » Alors, dès qu’un cas est connu, tout le monde fait « beurk », mais tout le monde veut savoir. L’histoire du vol 571, où les survivants du crash ont dû manger leurs congénères pendant les deux mois qu’ont duré les recherches dans les Andes, a été adaptée au cinéma. Luka Rocco Magnotta, le dépeceur de Montréal, a son fan-club et va bientôt se marier. Issei Sagawa, l’étudiant japonais qui a mangé une Néerlandaise à Paris en 1981 (jugé irresponsable et libéré depuis), a écrit une douzaine de livres et tourné des pubs pour des restaurants de viande. Il a même participé à quelques pornos. « Il n’y a rien de plus excitant qu’une jolie fille en train de manger, quoi qu’elle mange. » Au restaurant, si Appetizing Kid en voit une en train de ronger une cuisse de poulet « ou une saucisse » avec les mains, le Croate de 28 ans reconnaît qu’il doit masquer son trouble avec sa serviette. « Je suis sûr que beaucoup imaginent pire, mais ils ne l’admettront jamais. » « La sexualité et l’alimentation sont des zones de métaphore l’une pour l’autre : c’est universel, comme Levi-Strauss l’avait remarqué, confirme Georges Guille-Escuret. Dans le cannibalisme, beaucoup de métaphores sexuelles s’expriment. Le va-et-vient est permanent. » Ne dit-on pas qu’il/elle est « à croquer » ? Au lit, qui ne s’est jamais fait mordiller une oreille ou un téton ? Et ce bébé joufflu, pourquoi mémé dit-elle qu’« on le mangerait » en embrassant ses petits petons ? « Bien sûr, je trouve excitant une cannibale qui mange une jambe ou la masculinité d’un mec, mais je préfère encore plus le vore classique, précise Appetizing Kid : un requin qui avale un surfeur, une géante qui mange un homme… » Alors quand Dinoshark ou Shark Attack passe à la télé, il sort le Sopalin. Des cannibales, des vrais, il affirme en avoir croisé. Il a vu des photos (je recevrai moi-même quelques images où le montage est difficile à prouver). Des gens dont il se tient éloigné. « J’aime l’art, l’imaginaire du cannibalisme, mais ça reste virtuel pour la plupart d’entre nous. On estime plus nos vies que nos fantasmes. » Ce désir, le psychologue américain Steven J. Scher et son équipe l’ont analysé. Résultat : le degré d’horreur que nous ressentons vis-à-vis de l’anthropophagie dépend de notre attirance pour la victime. En demandant à leurs cobayes de choisir, parmi plusieurs personnes, qui ils embrasseraient et qui ils mangeraient, ils ont remarqué qu’on trouve moins dégoûtant de manger une personne de l’autre sexe, soit un potentiel partenaire. On trouve aussi moins répugnant de manger une personne « sexuellement attirante » qu’une moche, un adulte qu’un enfant. « La corrélation [entre désir et cannibalisme] est proche de 90 %, écrivent-ils dans leur étude. En général, ce qui provoque le dégoût à l’idée de manger une personne est aussi ce qui provoque le dégoût lorsqu’il s’agit de choisir un partenaire sexuel. » A quel moment peut-on switcher de « tiens, si on faisait l’amour » à « tiens, si on se grignotait l’oignon » ? D’un point de vue purement sadomasochiste, on peut imaginer le fait de cannibaliser comme l’acte ultime de domination, et le fait d’être mangé comme celui de la soumission. Neon
L’oppression mentale totalitaire est faite de piqûres de moustiques et non de grands coups sur la tête. (…) Quel fut le moyen de propagande le plus puissant de l’hitlérisme? Etaient-ce les discours isolés de Hitler et de Goebbels, leurs déclarations à tel ou tel sujet, leurs propos haineux sur le judaïsme, sur le bolchevisme? Non, incontestablement, car beaucoup de choses demeuraient incomprises par la masse ou l’ennuyaient, du fait de leur éternelle répétition.[…] Non, l’effet le plus puissant ne fut pas produit par des discours isolés, ni par des articles ou des tracts, ni par des affiches ou des drapeaux, il ne fut obtenu par rien de ce qu’on était forcé d’enregistrer par la pensée ou la perception. Le nazisme s’insinua dans la chair et le sang du grand nombre à travers des expressions isolées, des tournures, des formes syntaxiques qui s’imposaient à des millions d’exemplaires et qui furent adoptées de façon mécanique et inconsciente. Victor Klemperer (LTI, la langue du IIIe Reich)
Il m’était arrivé plusieurs fois que certains gosses ouvrent ma braguette et commencent à me chatouiller. Je réagissais de manière différente selon les circonstances, mais leur désir me posait un problème. Je leur demandais : « Pourquoi ne jouez-vous pas ensemble, pourquoi m’avez-vous choisi, moi, et pas d’autres gosses? » Mais s’ils insistaient, je les caressais quand même ». Daniel Cohn-Bendit (Grand Bazar, 1975)
Dénoncé en direct comme un quasi-pédophile appelé à répondre de ses actes devant la justice pour les outrages imposés à des  jeunes filles flétries», «Gab’la rafale» tint le choc, mais ce lynchage télévisuel laissa des traces. En avouant son penchant pour des jouvencelles, Matzneff fut la proie d’un néopuritanisme conquérant qui, paradoxalement, accompagnerait, les années suivantes, le déferlement d’une pornographie «chic» sévissant aussi bien dans le cinéma, la publicité que la littératureLe Figaro (2009)
 Matzneff est un personnage public. Lui permettre d’exprimer au grand jour ses viols d’enfants sans prendre les mesures nécessaires pour que cela cesse, c’est donner à la pédophilie une tribune, c’est permettre à des adultes malades de violenter des enfants au nom de la littérature. Marie-France Botte et Jean-Paul Mari
Un écrivain comme Gabriel Matzneff n’hésite pas à faire du prosélytisme. Il est pédophile et s’en vante dans des récits qui ressemblent à des modes d’emploi. Or cet écrivain bénéficie d’une immunité qui constitue un fait nouveau dans notre société. Il est relayé par les médias, invité sur les plateaux de télévision, soutenu dans le milieu littéraire. Souvenez-vous, lorsque la Canadienne Denise Bombardier l’a interpellé publiquement chez Pivot, c’est elle qui, dès le lendemain, essuya l’indignation des intellectuels. Lui passa pour une victime : un comble ! (…) Je ne dis pas que ce type d’écrits sème la pédophilie. Mais il la cautionne et facilite le passage du fantasme à l’acte chez des pédophiles latents. Ces écrits rassurent et encouragent ceux qui souffrent de leur préférence sexuelle, en leur suggérant qu’ils ne sont pas les seuls de leur espèce. D’ailleurs, les pédophiles sont très attentifs aux réactions de la société française à l’égard du cas Matzneff. Les intellectuels complaisants leur fournissent un alibi et des arguments: si des gens éclairés défendent cet écrivain, n’est-ce pas la preuve que les adversaires des pédophiles sont des coincés, menant des combats d’arrière-garde? Bernard Cordier (psychiatre, 1995)
Nous considérons qu’il y a une disproportion manifeste entre la qualification de ‘crime’ qui justifie une telle sévérité, et la nature des faits reprochés; d’autre part, entre le caractère désuet de la loi et la réalité quotidienne d’une société qui tend à reconnaître chez les enfants et les adolescents l’existence d’une vie sexuelle (si une fille de 13 ans a droit à la pilule, c’est pour quoi faire ?), TROIS ANS DE PRISON POUR DES CARESSES ET DES BAISERS, CELA SUFFIT !” Nous ne comprendrions pas que, le 29 janvier, Dejager, Gallien et Bruckardt ne retrouvent pas la liberté.  Aragon, Ponge, Barthes, Beauvoir, Deleuze, Glucksmann,  Hocquenghem, Kouchner, Lang, Gabriel Matzneff, Catherine Millet,  Sartre, Schérer et Sollers (Pétition de soutien à trois accusés de pédophilie, Le Monde, 1977)
Presidents run for re-election against real opponents, not public perceptions. For all the media hype, voters often pick the lesser of two evils, not their ideals of a perfect candidate. Victor Davis Hanson
How can evangelicals support Donald Trump? That question continues to befuddle and exasperate liberals. How, they wonder, can a man who is twice divorced, a serial liar, a shameless boaster (including about alleged sexual assault) and an unrepentant xenophobe earn the enthusiastic backing of so many devout Christians? About 80% of evangelicals voted for Trump in 2016; according to a recent poll, almost 70% of white evangelicals approve of how he has handled the presidency – far more than any other religious group. To most Democrats, such support seems a case of blatant hypocrisy and political cynicism. Since Trump is delivering on matters such as abortion, the supreme court and moving the US embassy in Israel to Jerusalem, conservative Christians are evidently willing to overlook the president’s moral failings. In embracing such a one-dimensional explanation, however, liberals risk falling into the same trap as they did in 2016, when their scorn for evangelicals fed evangelicals’ anger and resentment, contributing to Trump’s huge margin among this group. Bill Maher fell into this trap during a biting six-minute polemic he delivered on his television show in early March. Evangelicals, he said, “needed to solve this little problem” – they want to support a Republican president, but this particular one “happens to be the least Christian person ever”. “How to square the circle?” he asked. “Say that Trump is like King Cyrus.” According to Isaiah 45, God used the non-believer Cyrus as a vessel for his will; many evangelicals today believe that God is similarly using the less-than-perfect Trump to achieve Christian aims. But Trump isn’t a vessel for God’s will, Maher said, and Cyrus “wasn’t a fat, orange-haired, conscience-less scumbag”. Trump’s supporters “don’t care”, he ventured, because “that’s religion. The more it doesn’t make sense the better, because it proves your faith.” Maher portrayed evangelical Christians as a dim-witted group willing to make the most ludicrous theological leaps to advance their agenda. As I watched, I tried to imagine how evangelicals would view this routine. I think they would see a secular elitist eager to assert what he considers his superior intelligence. They would certainly sense his contempt for the many millions of Americans who believe fervently in God, revere the Bible and see Trump as representing their interests. Maher’s diatribe reminded me of a pro-Trump acquaintance from Ohio who now lives in Manhattan and who says that New York liberals are among the most intolerant people he has ever met. Liberals have good cause to decry the ideology of conservative Christians, given their relentless assault on abortion rights, same-sex marriage, transgender rights and climate science. But the disdain for Christians common among the credentialed class can only add to the sense of alienation and marginalization among evangelicals. Many evangelicals feel themselves to be under siege. In a 2016 survey, 41% said it was becoming more difficult to be an evangelical. And many conservative Christians see the national news media as unrelievedly hostile to them. Most media coverage of evangelicals falls into a few predictable categories. One is the exotic and titillating – stories of ministers who come out as transgender, or stories of evangelical sexual hypocrisies. Another favorite subject is progressive evangelicals who challenge the Christian establishment. (…) In 2016, [ the Times’ Nicholas Kristof,] wrote a column criticizing the pervasive discrimination toward Christians in liberal circles. He quoted Jonathan Walton, a black evangelical and professor of Christian morals at Harvard, who compared the common condescension toward evangelicals to that directed at racial minorities, with both seen as “politically unsophisticated, lacking education, angry, bitter, emotional, poor”. Strangely, the group most overlooked by the press is the people in the pews. It would be refreshing for more reporters to travel through the Bible belt and talk to ordinary churchgoers about their faith and values, hopes and struggles. Such reporting would no doubt show that the world of American Christianity is far more varied and complex than is generally thought. It would reveal, for instance, a subtle but important distinction between the Christian right and evangelicals in general, who tend to be less political (though still largely conservative). This kind of deep reporting would probably also highlight the enduring power of a key tenet of the founder of Protestantism. “Faith, not works,” was Martin Luther’s watchword. In his view, it is faith in Christ that truly matters. If one believes in Christ, then one will feel driven to do good works, but such works are always secondary. Trump’s own misdeeds are thus not central; what he stands for – the defense of Christian interests and values – is. Luther also preached the doctrine of original sin, which holds that all humans are tainted by Adam’s transgression in the Garden of Eden and so remain innately prone to pride, anger, lust, vengeance and other failings. Many evangelicals have themselves struggled with divorce, broken families, addiction and abuse. We are thus all sinners – the president included. (…) I can hear the reactions of some readers to this column: Enough! Enough trying to understand a group that helped put such a noxious man in the White House. Yet such a reaction is both ungenerous and shortsighted. Liberals take pride in their empathy for “the other” and their efforts to understand the perspective of groups different from themselves. They should apply that principle to evangelicals. If liberals continue to scoff, they risk reinforcing the rage of evangelicals – and their support for Trump. Michael Massing
Comment les évangéliques peuvent-ils soutenir Donald Trump? Cette question continue de brouiller et d’exaspérer les progressistes. Comment, se demandent-ils, un homme qui est divorcé deux fois, un menteur en série, un fanfaron éhonté (y compris au sujet d’une agression sexuelle présumée) et un xénophobe impénitent peut-il obtenir le soutien enthousiaste de tant de chrétiens dévots? Environ 80% des évangéliques ont voté pour Trump en 2016; selon un récent sondage, près de 70% des évangéliques blancs approuvent la façon dont il a géré la présidence – bien plus que tout autre groupe religieux. Pour la plupart des démocrates, un tel soutien semble être un cas d’hypocrisie flagrante et de cynisme politique. Étant donné que Trump se prononce sur des questions telles que l’avortement, la Cour suprême et le déplacement de l’ambassade américaine en Israël à Jérusalem, les chrétiens conservateurs sont évidemment prêts à ignorer les défauts moraux du président. Cependant, en adoptant une telle explication unidimensionnelle, les libéraux risquent de tomber dans le même piège qu’en 2016, lorsque leur mépris pour les évangéliques a nourri la colère et le ressentiment des évangéliques, contribuant à l’énorme marge de Trump parmi ce groupe. Bill Maher est tombé dans ce piège dans la diatribe mordante de six minutes qu’il a prononcée lors de son émission de télévision début mars. Les évangéliques, a-t-il dit, « devaient résoudre ce petit problème » – ils veulent soutenir un président républicain, mais celui-ci « se trouve être le moins chrétien de tous les temps ». « Comment résoudre cette quadrature du cercle? », a-t-il demandé. « Dire que Trump est comme le roi Cyrus. » Selon Ésaïe 45, Dieu a utilisé le non-croyant Cyrus comme véhicule de sa volonté; de nombreux évangéliques croient aujourd’hui que Dieu utilise de la même manière un Trump moins que parfait pour atteindre les objectifs chrétiens. Mais Trump n’est pas un vaisseau pour la volonté de Dieu, a déclaré Maher, et Cyrus « n’était pas un nul gras, aux cheveux orange et sans conscience ». Les partisans de Trump « ne s’en soucient pas », s’est-il aventuré, parce que « c’est la religion. Moins cela a de sens, mieux c’est, car cela prouve votre foi. »Maher a dépeint les chrétiens évangéliques comme un groupe humble disposé à faire les sauts théologiques les plus ridicules pour faire avancer leur programme. Pendant que je regardais, j’ai essayé d’imaginer comment les évangéliques verraient cette routine. Je pense qu’ils verraient un élitiste laïc désireux d’affirmer ce qu’il considère comme son intelligence supérieure. Ils ressentiraient certainement son mépris pour les millions d’Américains qui croient ardemment en Dieu, vénèrent la Bible et considèrent Trump comme représentant leurs intérêts. La diatribe de Maher m’a rappelé une connaissance pro-Trump de l’Ohio qui vit maintenant à Manhattan et qui dit que les libéraux de New York sont parmi les personnes les plus intolérantes qu’il ait jamais rencontrées. Les libéraux ont de bonnes raisons de dénoncer l’idéologie des chrétiens conservateurs, étant donné leur assaut incessant contre les droits à l’avortement, le mariage homosexuel, les droits des transgenres et la science du climat. Mais le mépris pour les chrétiens, commun à la classe diplômée, ne peut qu’ajouter au sentiment d’aliénation et de marginalisation des évangéliques. De nombreux évangéliques se sentent assiégés. Dans une enquête de 2016, 41% ont déclaré qu’il devenait plus difficile d’être évangélique. Et de nombreux chrétiens conservateurs considèrent les médias nationaux comme hostiles à leur égard. La plupart des reportages médiatiques sur les évangéliques se répartissent en quelques catégories prévisibles. L’une est les histoires exotiques et émouvantes – des histoires de pasteurs qui se révèlent transgenres, ou des histoires d’hypocrisies sexuelles évangéliques. Un autre sujet de prédilection est celui des évangélistes progressistes qui défient l’establishment chrétien. (…) En 2016, [léditorialiste du NYT Nicholas Kristof] a écrit une chronique critiquant la discrimination omniprésente envers les chrétiens dans les milieux de gauche. Il a cité Jonathan Walton, un évangélique noir et professeur de morale chrétienne à Harvard, qui a comparé la condescendance commune envers les évangéliques à celle dirigée contre les minorités raciales, les deux étant considérées comme «politiquement peu sophistiquées, manquant d’éducation, en colère, amères, émotionnelles, pauvres». Étrangement, le groupe le plus négligé par la presse est celui des blancs. Il serait rafraîchissant que davantage de journalistes parcourent la « Bible belt » et parlent aux fidèles ordinaires de leur foi et de leurs valeurs, de leurs espoirs et de leurs luttes. De tels reportages montreraient sans aucun doute que le monde du christianisme américain est beaucoup plus varié et complexe qu’on ne le pense généralement. Cela révélerait, par exemple, une distinction subtile mais importante entre la droite chrétienne et les évangéliques en général, qui ont tendance à être moins politiques (quoique encore largement conservateurs). Ce genre de reportage approfondi mettrait probablement également en évidence le pouvoir durable d’un principe clé du fondateur du protestantisme.«La foi, pas les œuvres», était le mot d’ordre de Martin Luther. Selon lui, c’est la foi en Christ qui compte vraiment. Si l’on croit en Christ, on se sent poussé à faire de bonnes œuvres, mais ces œuvres sont toujours secondaires. Les propres manquements de Trump ne sont donc pas centraux; mais c’est ce qu’il représente – la défense des intérêts et des valeurs chrétiennes – qui l’est. Luther a également prêché la doctrine du péché originel, selon laquelle tous les humains sont entachés par la transgression d’Adam dans le jardin d’Eden et restent donc naturellement enclins à l’orgueil, la colère, la luxure, la vengeance et d’autres défauts. De nombreux évangéliques ont eux-mêmes lutté contre le divorce, la rupture dans leurs familles, la toxicomanie et les abus. Nous sommes donc tous pécheurs – y compris le président. (…) J’entends les réactions de certains lecteurs à cette chronique: Il y en assez d’essayer de comprendre un groupe qui a permis l’arrivée d’un homme aussi nocif à la Maison Blanche. Pourtant, une telle réaction est à la fois peu généreuse et à courte vue. Les libéraux sont fiers de leur empathie pour ‘l’autre’ et de leurs efforts pour comprendre la perspective de groupes différents d’eux. Ils devraient appliquer ce principe aux évangéliques. Si la gauche continue ses moqueries, elle risque de renforcer la rage des évangéliques – et leur soutien à Trump. » Michael Massing
C’est au nom de la liberté, bien entendu, mais aussi au nom de l’ « amour, de la fidélité, du dévouement » et de la nécessité de « ne pas condamner des personnes à la solitude » que la Cour suprême des Etats-Unis a finalement validé le mariage entre personnes de même sexe. Tels furent en tout cas les mots employés au terme de cette longue décision rédigée par le Juge Kennedy au nom de la Cour. (…) Le mariage gay est entré dans le droit américain non par la loi, librement débattue et votée au niveau de chaque Etat, mais par la jurisprudence de la plus haute juridiction du pays, laquelle s’impose à tous les Etats américains. Mais c’est une décision politique. Eminemment politique à l’instar de celle qui valida l’Obamacare, sécurité sociale à l’américaine, reforme phare du Président Obama, à une petite voix près. On se souviendra en effet que cette Cour a ceci de particulier qu’elle prétend être totalement transparente. Elle est composée de neuf juges, savants juristes, et rend ses décisions à la suite d’un vote. Point de bulletins secrets dans cette enceinte ; les votants sont connus. A se fier à sa composition, la Cour n’aurait jamais dû valider le mariage homosexuel : cinq juges conservateurs, quatre progressistes. Cinq a priori hostiles, quatre a priori favorables. Mais le sort en a décidé autrement ; le juge Kennedy, le plus modéré des conservateurs, fit bloc avec les progressistes, basculant ainsi la majorité en faveur de ces derniers. C’est un deuxième coup dur pour les conservateurs de la Cour en quelques mois : l’Obamacare bénéficia également de ce même coup du sort ; à l’époque ce fut le président, le Juge John Roberts, qui permit aux progressistes de l’emporter et de valider le système. (…) La spécificité de l’évènement est que ce sont des juges qui, forçant l’interprétation d’une Constitution qui ne dit rien du mariage homosexuel, ont estimé que cette union découlait ou résultait de la notion de « liberté ». C’est un « putsch judiciaire » selon l’emblématique juge Antonin Scalia, le doyen de la Cour. Un pays qui permet à un « comité de neuf juges non-élus » de modifier le droit sur une question qui relève du législateur et non du pouvoir judiciaire, ne mérite pas d’être considéré comme une « démocratie ». Mais l’autre basculement désormais acté, c’est celui d’une argumentation dont le centre de gravité s’est déplacé de la raison vers l’émotion, de la ratio vers l’affectus. La Cour Suprême des Etats-Unis s’est en cela bien inscrite dans une tendance incontestable au sein de la quasi-totalité des juridictions occidentales. L’idée même de raisonnement perd du terrain : énième avatar de la civilisation de l’individu, les juges éprouvent de plus en plus de mal à apprécier les arguments en dehors de la chaleur des émotions. Cette décision fait en effet la part belle à la médiatisation des revendications individualistes, rejouées depuis plusieurs mois sur le modèle de la « lutte pour les droits civiques ». Ainsi la Cour n’hésite pas à comparer les lois traditionnelles du mariage à celles qui, à une autre époque, furent discriminatoires à l’égard des afro-américains et des femmes. (…) La Maison Blanche s’est instantanément baignée des couleurs de l’arc-en-ciel, symbole de la « gay pride ». Les réseaux sociaux ont été inondés de ces mêmes couleurs en soutien à ce qui est maintenant connu sous le nom de la cause gay. (…) Comme le relève un autre juge de la Cour ayant voté contre cette décision, il est fort dommage que cela se fasse au détriment du droit et de la Constitution des Etats-Unis d’Amérique. Yohann Rimokh
Le droit a pour rôle d’instituer et d’assurer les personnes de leur identité. Il faudrait se demander si reporter sur les individus, et en particulier sur les jeunes, le poids de devoir définir et (ré)affirmer eux-mêmes à tout moment les éléments de leur identité sans jamais pouvoir rien tenir pour acquis est vraiment libérateur. Muriel Fabre-Magnan
Une des raisons qui m’ont poussée à écrire ce livre était la lassitude de voir des termes juridiques employés à contresens, comme le contrat ou le consentement, qu’on associe toujours à la liberté dans le grand public, alors qu’en réalité, pour un juriste, qui dit contrat et consentement dit au contraire que l’on renonce à une partie de sa liberté ; le contrat n’est pas le mode normal de l’exercice des libertés. Je voulais alors souligner le risque de retournement de la liberté qui en résulte. Le lexique utilisé dans le cadre de débats de société conduit en outre souvent à polariser les opinions. La question de la Cour européenne des droits de l’homme (CEDH) est un excellent exemple. On trouve un camp qui pousse à une interprétation toujours plus individualiste des droits de l’homme par la CEDH et un autre qui condamne de façon générale les droits de l’homme. Le Royaume-Uni, par exemple, avait menacé de dénoncer la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme avant même le Brexit. Il me semble possible et préférable de trouver une voie alternative : il faut en effet défendre les droits de l’homme, qui sont une avancée démocratique essentielle, et la CEDH a ainsi rendu une série d’arrêts extrêmement précieux, par exemple pour condamner l’état des prisons, garantir le respect des droits de la défense ou encore dénoncer des pays qui se livrent à des traitements inhumains ou dégradants. Et, en même temps, la CEDH dérape parfois dans ses arrêts et abuse de ses prérogatives. Seule une analyse juridique précise permet de démonter les rouages, comprendre à quel endroit exact se fait ce dérapage et d’essayer d’y remédier. Sinon, on est inévitablement conduit à adopter une position excessive dans un sens ou dans un autre. (…) C’est effectivement très récemment que ce terme de liberté a pris un sens général, et presque philosophique, qui est celui du droit pour les individus de mener leur vie comme ils l’entendent. La liberté est devenue la faculté de pouvoir faire tous les choix pour soi-même, ce qu’on appelle aujourd’hui un droit à l’autonomie personnelle. Cet énoncé peut certes sembler satisfaisant dans un cadre autre que juridique, mais demander au droit de garantir que les personnes puissent faire ce qu’elles veulent quand elles veulent conduit à l’effet inverse et à un risque de retournement de cette liberté. Si, en effet, le droit doit garantir à toute personne la possibilité de faire ce qu’elle veut, y compris de renoncer à sa liberté, on finit évidemment par détruire le concept même de liberté. (…) Et, comme le soulignent plusieurs auteurs, l’ultralibéralisme économique ou sociétal sont les deux faces d’une même médaille. La liberté est souvent revendiquée pour que les autres puissent se mettre à notre disposition. La faculté de renoncer à sa liberté n’est cependant pas la liberté. Plus généralement, ce qu’on appelle une protection des personnes contre elles-mêmes, et qui est dénoncé comme une forme de paternalisme étatique, est en réalité toujours une protection des personnes contre autrui. L’exemple de la prostitution est assez typique, et il illustre aussi un des autres points que je voulais souligner dans ce livre, à savoir que tous les débats contemporains, sociétaux ou économiques qui posent la question de la licéité sont toujours appréciés par rapport au seul critère du consentement. Cela signifie que l’on ramène tout à un débat interindividuel quand il serait plus pertinent de s’interroger, par exemple, sur les politiques économiques et sociales donnant aux personnes une plus grande faculté de choix de vie. Que signifie le consentement d’une prostituée si elle n’a pas d’autre choix que de consentir ? (…) La liberté sexuelle implique la faculté pour chacun d’avoir la sexualité de son choix sans avoir à subir aucune discrimination. Mais pourquoi l’État devrait-il donner sa bénédiction à chaque nouvelle pratique ? De même, la contractualisation des relations sexuelles n’est pas la meilleure façon de protéger juridiquement contre les agressions sexuelles ni de respecter le consentement des personnes. Si on contractualise, on s’oblige à ces pratiques. Or la liberté consiste en la capacité de pouvoir refuser un rapport initialement consenti. (…) Le droit doit tenir compte des évolutions sociales, mais il est aussi un horizon tracé pour une société. Il est en effet de l’ordre du devoir-être. Les juristes opposent toujours le fait et le droit, donc le réel et ce qui doit être. Le droit est, dans une société, les valeurs et les objectifs sur lesquels les personnes s’accordent. Pour vivre ensemble, il est nécessaire de définir un projet commun, lequel peut évidemment évoluer dans le temps. Le terme d’institution de la liberté cherche à exprimer l’aspect dynamique de cette liberté et le rôle que le droit doit jouer pour la garantir. On ne naît pas libre, on le devient, et c’est ce processus d’émancipation que doit soutenir le droit. Muriel Fabre-Magnan
Nine in 10 Americans are satisfied with the way things are going in their personal life, a new high in Gallup’s four-decade trend. The latest figure bests the previous high of 88% recorded in 2003. Gallup
The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Monday shows that 50% of Likely U.S. Voters approve of President Trump’s job performance. Forty-eight percent (48%) disapprove. Rasmussen (Feb. 10, 2020)
The turnout in the Iowa caucus was below what we expected, what we wanted. Trump’s approval rating is probably as high as it’s been. This is very bad. And now it appears the party can’t even count votes. (…) We have candidates on the debate stage talking about open borders and decriminalizing illegal immigration. They’re talking about doing away with nuclear energy and fracking. You’ve got Bernie Sanders talking about letting criminals and terrorists vote from jail cells. It doesn’t matter what you think about any of that, or if there are good arguments — talking about that is not how you win a national election. It’s not how you become a majoritarian party. For fuck’s sake, we’ve got Trump at Davos talking about cutting Medicare and no one in the party has the sense to plaster a picture of him up there sucking up to the global elites, talking about cutting taxes for them while he’s talking about cutting Medicare back home. Jesus, this is so obvious and so easy and I don’t see any of the candidates taking advantage of it. The Republicans have destroyed their party and turned it into a personality cult, but if anyone thinks they can’t win, they’re out of their damn minds. (…) Bernie Sanders isn’t a Democrat. He’s never been a Democrat. He’s an ideologue. And I’ve been clear about this: If Bernie is the nominee, I’ll vote for him. No question. I’ll take an ideological fanatic over a career criminal any day. But he’s not a Democrat. (…) what I’m saying is the Democratic Party isn’t Bernie Sanders, whatever you think about Sanders. (…) First, a lot of people don’t trust the Democratic Party, don’t believe in the party, for reasons you’ve already mentioned, and so they just don’t care about that. They want change. And I guess the other thing I’d say is, 2016 scrambled our understanding of what’s possible in American politics. (…) Sanders might get 280 electoral votes and win the presidency and maybe we keep the House. But there’s no chance in hell we’ll ever win the Senate with Sanders at the top of the party defining it for the public. Eighteen percent of the country elects more than half of our senators. That’s the deal, fair or not. So long as McConnell runs the Senate, it’s game over. There’s no chance we’ll change the courts, and nothing will happen, and he’ll just be sitting up there screaming in the microphone about the revolution. The purpose of a political party is to acquire power. All right? Without power, nothing matters. (…) [The answer is] framing, repeating, and delivering a coherent, meaningful message that is relevant to people’s lives and having the political skill not to be sucked into every rabbit hole that somebody puts in front of you. The Democratic Party is the party of African Americans. It’s becoming a party of educated suburbanites, particularly women. It’s the party of Latinos. We’re a party of immigrants. Most of the people aren’t into all this distracting shit about open borders and letting prisoners vote. They don’t care. They have lives to lead. They have kids. They have parents that are sick. That’s what we have to talk about. That’s all we should talk about. It’s not that this stuff doesn’t matter. And it’s not that we shouldn’t talk about race. We have to talk about race. It’s about how you deliver and frame the message. (…) They’ve tacked off the damn radar screen. And look, I don’t consider myself a moderate or a centrist. I’m a liberal. But not everything has to be on the left-right continuum. (…) Here’s another stupid thing: Democrats talking about free college tuition or debt forgiveness. I’m not here to debate the idea. What I can tell you is that people all over this country worked their way through school, sent their kids to school, paid off student loans. They don’t want to hear this shit. And you saw Warren confronted by an angry voter over this. It’s just not a winning message. The real argument here is that some people think there’s a real yearning for a left-wing revolution in this country, and if we just appeal to the people who feel that, we’ll grow and excite them and we’ll win. But there’s a word a lot of people hate that I love: politics. It means building coalitions to win elections. It means sometimes having to sit back and listen to what people think and framing your message accordingly. That’s all I care about. (…) We can’t win the Senate by looking down at people. The Democratic Party has to drive a narrative that doesn’t give off vapors that we’re smarter than everyone or culturally arrogant. (…) With a lot of these candidates, their consultants are telling them, “If you doubt it, just go left. We got to get the nomination.” (…) I’m hoping that someone gets knocked off their horse on the road to Damascus. (…) Mayor Pete has to demonstrate over the course of a campaign that he can excite and motivate arguably the most important constituents in the Democratic Party: African Americans. These voters are a hell of a lot more important than a bunch of 25-year-olds shouting everyone down on Twitter. James Carville
Progressive candidates and new Democratic representatives have offered lots of radical new proposals lately about voting and voters. They include scrapping the 215-year-old Electoral College. Progressives also talk of extending the vote to 16- or 17-year-olds and ex-felons. They wish to further relax requirements for voter identification, same-day registration and voting, and undocumented immigrants voting in local elections.The 2016 victory of Donald Trump shocked the left. It was entirely unexpected, given that experts had all but assured a Hillary Clinton landslide. Worse still for those on the left, Trump, like George W. Bush in 2000 and three earlier winning presidential candidates, lost the popular vote.  From 2017 on, Trump has sought to systematically dismantle the progressive agenda that had been established by his predecessor, Barack Obama — often in a controversial and unapologetic style. The furor over the 2016 Clinton loss and thenew Trump agenda, the fear that Trump could be re-elected, and anger about the Electoral College have mobilized progressives to demand changes to the hallowed traditions of electing presidents. (…) Most Americans are skeptical of reparations. They do not favor legalizing infanticide. They do not want open borders, sanctuary cities, or blanket amnesties. They are troubled by the idea of wealth taxes and top marginal tax rates of 70 percent or higher. Many Americans certainly fear the Green New Deal. Many do not favor abolishing all student debt, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or the Electoral College. Nor do many Americans believe in costly ideas such as Medicare for All and free college tuition. The masses do not unanimously want to stop pipeline construction or scale back America’s booming natural gas and oil production. A cynic might suggest that had Hillary Clinton actually won the 2016 Electoral College vote but lost the popular vote to Trump, progressives would now be praising our long-established system of voting. Had current undocumented immigrants proved as conservative as past waves of legal immigrants from Hungary and Cuba, progressives would now likely wish to close the southern border and perhaps even build a wall. If same-day registration and voting meant that millions of new conservatives without voter IDs were suddenly showing their Trump support at the polls, progressives would insist on bringing back old laws that required voters to have previously registered and to show valid identification at voting precincts. If felons or 16-year-old kids polled conservative, then certainly there would be no progressive push to let members of these groups vote. Expanding and changing the present voter base and altering how we vote is mostly about power, not principles. Without these radical changes, a majority of American voters, in traditional and time-honored elections, will likely not vote for the unpopular progressive agenda. Victor Davis Hanson
When candidate Donald Trump campaigned on calling China to account for its trade piracy, observers thought he was either crazy or dangerous. Conventional Washington wisdom had assumed that an ascendant Beijing was almost preordained to world hegemony. Trump’s tariffs and polarization of China were considered about the worst thing an American president could do. The accepted bipartisan strategy was to accommodate, not oppose, China’s growing power. The hope was that its newfound wealth and global influence would liberalize the ruling communist government. Four years later, only a naif believes that. Instead, there is an emerging consensus that China’s cutthroat violations of international norms were long ago overdue for an accounting. China’s re-education camps, its Orwellian internal surveillance, its crackdown on Hong Kong democracy activists and its secrecy about the deadly coronavirus outbreak have all convinced the world that China has now become a dangerous international outlier. Trump courted moderate Arab nations in forming an anti-Iranian coalition opposed to Iran’s terrorist and nuclear agendas. His policies utterly reversed the Obama administration’s estrangement from Israel and outreach to Tehran. Last week, Trump nonchalantly offered the Palestinians a take-it-or-leave-it independent state on the West Bank, but without believing that a West Bank settlement was the key to peace in the entire Middle East. Trump’s cancellation of the Iran deal, in particular, was met with international outrage. More global anger followed after the targeted killing of Iranian terrorist leader Gen. Qassem Soleimani. In short, Trump’s Middle East recalibrations won few supporters among the bipartisan establishment. But recently, Europeans have privately started to agree that more sanctions are needed on Iran, that the world is better off with Soleimani gone, and that the West Bank is not central to regional peace. Iran has now become a pariah. U.S.-sponsored sanctions have reduced the theocracy to near-bankruptcy. Most nations understand that if Iran kills Americans or openly starts up its nuclear program, the U.S. will inflict disproportional damage on its infrastructure — a warning that at first baffled, then angered and now has humiliated Iran. In other words, there is now an entirely new Middle East orthodoxy that was unimaginable just three years ago. Suddenly the pro-Iranian, anti-Western Palestinians have few supporters. Israel and a number of prominent Arab nations are unspoken allies of convenience against Iran. And Iran itself is seemingly weaker than at any other time in the theocracy’s history. Stranger still, instead of demanding that the U.S. leave the region, many Middle Eastern nations privately seem eager for more of a now-reluctant U.S. presence. (…) Trump got little credit for these revolutionary changes because he is, after all, Trump — a wheeler-dealer, an ostentatious outsider, unpredictable in action and not shy about rude talk. But his paradoxical and successful policies — the product of conservative, antiwar and pro-worker agendas — are gradually winning supporters and uniting disparate groups. (…) The result of the new orthodoxy is that the U.S. has become no better friend to an increasing number of allies and neutrals, and no worse an adversary to a shrinking group of enemies. And yet Trump’s paradox is that America’s successful new foreign policy is as praised privately as it is caricatured publicly — at least for now. Victor Davis Hanson
Une cote de popularité au plus bas, des cafouillages dans la majorité, une étude qui remet en question sa politique économique… Les obstacles se multiplient pour le président de la République française. Cela pourrait avoir des conséquences désastreuses pour la suite, explique la presse étrangère. “Pas de repos pour Emmanuel Macron”, souligne le quotidien espagnol El País. En effet, si “le président a survécu à la plus longue grève de ces dernières décennies en France, il ne cesse d’accumuler les problèmes”. Le conflit autour des retraites, d’une part, n’est pas totalement réglé. Certes, les transports ont repris et les dernières manifestations ont rassemblé moins de monde qu’au début du mouvement. Mais “les ennuis de Macron ne sont pas terminés”, prévient le site britannique The Article. “Beaucoup s’attendent à ce que le printemps à Paris soit, eh bien, le printemps à Paris.” D’autant que de nombreux secteurs, habituellement peu prompts à protester, ont rejoint la grogne. Aujourd’hui, avec les 22 000 amendements déposés en parallèle au projet de réforme, le processus législatif est encore loin d’être terminé. Des journées de mobilisations sont d’ailleurs déjà prévues à la RATP le 17 février et partout en France le 20 février. Dans sa majorité aussi, Emmanuel Macron rencontre des difficultés. À un mois des municipales, La République en marche multiplie les faux pas et fait preuve de division. Avec bien sûr, le duel fraticide entre les candidats, Benjamin Griveaux (tête d’affiche officielle) et Cédric Villani (dissident qui refuse de reculer) pour la mairie de Paris. Mais les récents cafouillages des ministres macronistes, au sujet du droit au blasphème ou de la durée d’allongement du congé en cas de perte d’un enfant, n’arrangent pas non plus les choses pour Macron. Résultat ? Le gouvernement est “qualifié d’amateur” et l’image du président se retrouve toujours plus entachée, relate ABC. Au point que le jeune chef d’État rivalise désormais avec “François Hollande pour le titre de président le plus impopulaire de l’histoire de la Vème République”. Selon les derniers sondages, 73 % des Français auraient une mauvaise opinion d’Emmanuel Macron. Ce n’est assurément pas le rapport publié le 5 février par l’OFCE [Observatoire français des conjonctures économiques] qui va changer la donne. Après l’abrogation partielle de l’impôt de solidarité sur la fortune (ISF), le chef d’État avait très vite “hérité du surnom de ‘président des riches’”, rappelle le quotidien Suisse Le Temps. Or, la récente publication des économistes “juge qu’il correspond à la réalité”. Plus aucun doute : “La théorie macronienne du ‘ruissellement’ – selon laquelle l’attractivité fiscale conçue pour inciter les entreprises et les ménages les plus aisés à investir engendre à terme une hausse de revenus pour tous – ne fonctionne pas.” Pire encore, ajoute le quotidien suisse, “l’OFCE souligne une détérioration de la fracture sociale” puisque, assurent les experts : Les ménages appartenant aux 20 % les plus modestes, c’est-à-dire ceux ayant un niveau de vie individuel inférieur à 1 315 euros par mois, devraient perdre en 2020.” Ces difficultés pourraient avoir de lourdes conséquences sur l’avenir politique de Macron, prévient donc The Financial Times. Un an à peine après le “grand débat national”, “son attitude hautaine et son manque de finesse psychologique le rendent vulnérable”, et Marine Le Pen entend profiter de la situation pour la prochaine présidentielle. Or, sa potentielle arrivée à l’Élysée, en 2022, incarnerait un “séisme politique” dont les “ondes de choc seraient ressenties bien au-delà des frontières de la France”. Toutefois, si “le ciel s’assombrit pour le Roi Soleil français, il est beaucoup trop tôt pour affirmer que c’en est fait des espoirs de Macron”, rassure le FT. Ceux qui prédisent aujourd’hui sa chute, sont les mêmes qui se sont souvent trompés en 2017 sur sa capacité à briser l’ancien système” du bipartisme français. En somme, personne n’est capable de dire si la crise actuelle que rencontre le chef de l’État s’envenimera pour le reste de son quinquennat, conclut El País.“Mais en tout cas, elle envoie un signal inquiétant pour le président.” Courrier international
La dauphine désignée d’Angela Merkel en Allemagne, Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, a décidé de renoncer à lui succéder et va abandonner la présidence du parti conservateur, a indiqué à l’AFP ce lundi 10 février une source proche du mouvement. Lors d’une réunion ce matin de la direction du parti démocrate-chrétien CDU de la chancelière, Kramp-Karrenbauer a notamment justifié sa décision par les événements de Thuringe et la tentation d’une frange du parti de s’allier avec le mouvement d’extrême droite Alternative pour l’Allemagne (AfD). Elle a expliqué qu’«une partie de la CDU a une relation non clarifiée avec l’AfD» mais aussi avec le parti de gauche radicale Die Linke, alors qu’elle même rejette clairement toute alliance avec l’une ou l’autre de ces formations, a indiqué à l’AFP une source proche du mouvement. Dans la mesure où la candidature à la chancellerie doit aller de pair avec la présidence du parti à ses yeux, AKK a en conséquence décidé de renoncer dans les mois qui viennent à cette présidence. «AKK va organiser cet été le processus de sélection de la candidature à la chancellerie» pour succéder à Angela Merkel au plus tard fin 2021, a indiqué cette source. «Elle va continuer à préparer le parti pour affronter l’avenir et ensuite abandonner la présidence», a-t-elle ajouté. Elle doit en revanche conserver son poste de ministre de la Défense. AKK avait été élue en décembre 2018 à la présidence de la CDU, en remplacement d’Angela Merkel qui avait à l’époque renoncé en raison de son impopularité croissante après une série de revers électoraux et la poussée dans les urnes de l’extrême droite. AKK n’a toutefois jamais réussi à s’imposer à la présidence de la CDU. Elle a été en particulier très critiquée après l’alliance surprise nouée la semaine dernière entre des élus CDU de Thuringe et l’extrême droite pour élire un nouveau dirigeant pour cet Etat régional. AKK s’est vu reprocher de ne pas tenir son parti, tiraillé entre adversaires et partisans d’une coopération avec l’AfD, surtout dans les Etats de l’ex-RDA, où l’extrême droite est très puissante et complique la formation des majorités régionales. Le Figaro
Buttigieg is a gay Episcopalian veteran in a party torn between identity politics and heartland appeals. He’s also a fresh face in a year when millennials are poised to become the largest eligible voting bloc. Many Democrats are hungry for generational change, and the two front runners are more than twice his age. (…) In many ways, Buttigieg is Trump’s polar opposite: younger, dorkier, shorter, calmer and married to a man. His success may depend on whether Democrats want a fighter to match Trump, or whether Americans want to ‘change the channel,’ as Buttigieg puts it. ‘People already have a leader who screams and yells,’ he says. ‘How do you think that’s working out for us?’Time
Le 16 juin 2015, Buttigieg annonce dans une publication qu’il est homosexuel. Il est le premier homme politique ouvertement gay de l’Indiana. Le 28 décembre 2017, Buttigieg annonce ses fiançailles avec Chasten Glezman (né en 1989), professeur de pédagogie Montessori dans un collège privé de l’Indiana. Le couple se marie le 16 juin 2018 lors d’une cérémonie à la cathédrale de Saint-James de South Bend et fait en 2019 la couverture du magazine Time. En plus de l’anglais, Pete Buttigieg parle le norvégien, le français, l’espagnol, l’italien, le maltais, l’arabe et le dari, soit un total de huit langues. Buttigieg est chrétien et a déclaré que sa foi avait fortement influencé sa vie. Wikipedia
Va-t-il transformer l’essai? Après ses résultats inespérés dans l’Iowa (toujours contestés par Bernie Sanders), Pete Buttigieg espère bien récolter les fruits de l’énorme coup de pouce médiatique dont il a bénéficié tout au long de cette semaine chaotique. Le jeune candidat, encore inconnu il y a un an, croise donc les doigts ce mardi 11 février pour à nouveau s’imposer -ou du moins décrocher un score plus qu’honorable- dans le New Hampshire, deuxième État à voter aux primaires démocrates.  Si créer la surprise au cours des prochains scrutins et finir par décrocher la nomination du parti cet été est actuellement le rêve de tous les candidats, la seule vraie prouesse sera la suivante: battre Donald Trump lors de l’élection générale du 3 novembre et le sortir de la Maison Blanche. Pete Buttigieg est-il le meilleur candidat pour cette périlleuse mission? Le HuffPost a rassemblé plusieurs forces (et faiblesses) du candidat pour tenter d’y voir plus clair. Comme il aime souvent le rappeler en campagne, Pete Buttigieg a un atout majeur face à Donald Trump: son CV. Il faut dire qu’on pourrait difficilement imaginer un curriculum plus à l’opposé de celui du président républicain. Contrairement à l’occupant actuel de la Maison Blanche, le démocrate a tout d’abord de l’expérience politique. Alors que le magnat de l’immobilier était l’hôte d’une téléréalité avant de se présenter à la présidence, Pete Buttigieg vient lui de terminer son 2e mandat de maire. Trump s’est construit dans la plus grande ville du pays qu’est New York, Buttiegieg a fait décoller sa carrière à South Bend, 100.000 habitants, dans l’État de l’Indiana. Buttigieg met aussi régulièrement en avant son expérience dans l’armée. Il a passé sept mois en Afghanistan, un avantage sur tous ses concurrents démocrates et surtout sur Trump. Ce dernier a en effet réussi à échapper pas mois de cinq fois à la guerre du Vietnam: quatre reports grâce aux études qu’il suivait puis une dispense médicale pour une excroissance osseuse au pied dont les médias n’ont jamais retrouvé de trace. Diplômé de grandes universités, le candidat a aussi montré qu’il était polyglotte. En plus de l’anglais, il peut parler en norvégien, espagnol, italien, arabe, dari ou encore français comme il l’a montré en commentant l’incendie de Notre-Dame. Face à un président qui est parfois pointé du doigt pour la faiblesse du vocabulaire qu’il emploie dans son anglais natal. Pete Buttigieg se présente aussi aux antipodes de Donald Trump sur des aspects plus personnels. Là où Trump s’emporte et est devenu le roi du surnom mesquin, Buttigieg apparaît dans ses interventions comme calme, confiant et au point sur ses dossiers. Alors que les Américains LGBT ont vu leurs droits régresser sous la présidence républicaine, Buttigieg est le premier candidat démocrate ouvertement gay et apparaît régulièrement au bras de son mari Chasten. Âgé de seulement 38 ans, il est de loin le plus jeune de la course. Il n’hésite pas non plus à mettre l’accent sur sa foi chrétienne, un sujet généralement accaparé par les républicains. Quant à son programme, il ne renferme pas (encore?) de mesure phare, mais sa position modérée sur les impôts et la couverture santé pourrait bien attirer de précieux électeurs indépendants qui avaient penché pour Donald Trump en 2016. Au sein de ce groupe-clé pour départager une élection, la question du système de santé sera en effet la priorité numéro un pour faire son choix en novembre 2020, selon un sondage Gallup paru en janvier. Si la réussite de Pete Buttigieg dans l’Iowa et un très bon score dans le New Hampshire ce mardi serait un énorme tremplin, le candidat traîne cependant un énorme problème de popularité auprès d’électorats-clés pour un démocrate dans une élection présidentielle. Comme le montrent de nombreux sondages, l’ancien maire n’enregistre pour l’heure qu’un soutien très faible auprès des deux minorités ethniques principales aux États-Unis: les électeurs afro-américains et hispaniques. La présence de ces derniers, qui ont peu voté républicain en 2016, sera cruciale dans les bureaux de vote en novembre 2020 face à Trump. Les difficultés ne s’arrêtent pas là. Buttigieg pourrait aussi avoir une mauvaise surprise avec les jeunes, potentiel sous-exploité en 2016. Bien qu’il se vante d’incarner le renouveau politique du haut de ses 38 ans, le candidat n’est à l’heure actuelle pas très populaire avec les démocrates de moins de 38 ans, un groupe d’âge qui englobera 25% des électeurs en novembre. Son approche trop modérée ne fait pas le poids face à la politique autrement plus radicale de Sanders, qui lui a gagné le soutien massif des générations Y et Z. Buttigieg pourrait donc avoir bien du mal à donner envie à ce réservoir de voix démocrates de participer au scrutin. Reste enfin la faible notoriété de l’ancien maire de South Bend. The Huffington post
Il est déjà assez sûr de déduire des recherches en laboratoire et des parallèles éthologiques que les différentes manières dont les hommes et les femmes sont câblés sont directement liées à nos rôles sexuels traditionnels … Freud a dramatiquement déclaré que notre anatomie est notre destinée. Les scientifiques qui frémissent devant une formulation aussi dramatique, quelle que soit sa justesse, pourraient le reformuler ainsi: l’anatomie est fonctionnelle, les fonctions corporelles ont des significations psychologiques profondes pour les gens, et l’anatomie et la fonction sont souvent élaborées socialement. Arno Karlen
Les questions morales nous entraînent dans le bourbier de perpétuelles recherches philosophiques de nature fondamentale. D’une certaine manière, cela facilite le problème pour celui qui cherche une opinion juive. Le judaïsme n’accepte pas le type de relativisme poussé utilisé pour justifier le mode de vie homosexuel comme un simple mode de vie alternatif. Et tandis que la question de l’autonomie humaine mérite certainement d’être prise en considération dans le domaine de la sexualité, il faut se méfier des conséquences de tout argument quand il est poussé jusqu’à sa logique extrême. Le judaïsme chérit clairement la sainteté comme une valeur supérieure à la liberté ou à la santé. De plus, si l’autonomie de chaque individu nous amène à conférer une légitimité morale à toute forme d’expression sexuelle que celui-ci désire, nous devons être prêts à tirer la couverture de cette validité morale sur presque tout le catalogue de la perversion décrit par Krafft-Ebing, puis, par le tour de passe-passe consistant à accorder des droits civiques aux pratiques moralement non répréhensibles ou à autoriser le prosélytisme public aux défenseurs de la sodomie, du fétichisme ou de n’importe autre pratique. Dans ce cas, pourquoi pas dans le système scolaire? Et si le consentement est obtenu avant la mort d’un partenaire, pourquoi pas la nécrophilie ou le cannibalisme? Sûrement, si nous déclarons que la pédérastie est simplement idiosyncrasique et non une « abomination », quel droit avons-nous de condamner le cannibalisme sexuel – simplement parce que la plupart des gens réagiraient avec répulsion et dégoût? «L’affection aimante et désintéressée» et les «relations personnelles significatives» – les grands slogans de la Nouvelle Moralité et les représentants de l’éthique de la situation – sont devenus la litanie de la sodomie à notre époque. Une logique simple devrait nous permettre d’utiliser les mêmes critères pour excuser l’adultère ou tout autre acte considéré jusqu’ici comme immoral: et c’est exactement ce qui a été fait, et il a reçu la sanction non seulement des progressistes et des humanistes, mais de certains les religieux aussi. « Amour », « épanouissement », « exploiteur », « significatif » – la liste elle-même ressemble à un lexique de termes chargés d’émotions tirés au hasard des sources disparates des cercles agnostiques à la fois chrétiens et psychologiquement orientés. Logiquement, nous devons nous poser la question suivante: quelles dépravations morales ne peuvent pas être excusées par le seul critère des «relations humaines chaleureuses et significatives» ou de «l’accomplissement», les nouveaux héritiers sémantiques de «l’amour»? L’amour, l’épanouissement et le bonheur peuvent également être atteints dans les contacts incestueux – et certainement dans les relations polygames. N’y a-t-il plus rien qui soit « pécheur », « contre nature » ou « immoral » s’il est pratiqué « entre deux adultes consentants? » Pour les groupes religieux, établir qu’une relation homosexuelle doit être jugée selon les mêmes critères qu’une relation hétérosexuelle – c’est-à-dire «si elle vise à entretenir une relation d’amour permanente» – revient à abandonner la dernière prétention de représenter le « judéo-chrétien ». Dr. Norman Lamm
The moral issues lead us into the quagmire of perennial philosophical disquisitions of a fundamental nature. In a way, this facilitates the problem for one seeking a Jewish view. Judaism does not accept the kind of thoroughgoing relativism used to justify the gay life as merely an alternate lifestyle And while the question of human autonomy is certainly worthy of consideration in the area of sexuality, one must beware of the consequences of taking the argument to its logical extreme. Judaism clearly cherishes holiness as a greater value than either freedom or health. Furthermore, if every individual’s autonomy leads us to lend moral legitimacy to any form of sexual expression he may desire, we must be ready to pull the blanket of this moral validity over almost the whole catalogue of perversion described by Krafft-Ebing, and then, by the legerdemain of granting civil rights to the morally non-objectionable, permit the advocates of buggery, fetishism, or whatever to proselytize in public. In that case, why not in the school system? And if consent is obtained before the death of one partner, why not necrophilia or cannibalism? Surely, if we declare pederasty to be merely idiosyncratic and not an « abomination, » what right have we to condemn sexually motivated cannibalism – merely because most people would react with revulsion and disgust? « Loving, selfless concern » and « meaningful personal relationships » – the great slogans of the New Morality and the exponents of situation ethics – have become the litany of sodomy in our times. Simple logic should permit us to use the same criteria for excusing adultery or any other act heretofore held to be immoral: and indeed, that is just what has been done, and it has received the sanction not only of liberals and humanists, but of certain religionists as well. « Love, » « fulfillment, » « exploitative, » « meaningful » – the list itself sounds like a lexicon of emotionally charged terms drawn at random from the disparate sources of both Christian and psychologically-orientated agnostic circles. Logically, we must ask the next question: what moral depravities can not be excused by the sole criterion of « warm, meaningful human relations » or « fulfillment, » the newest semantic heirs to « love »? Love, fulfillment, and happiness can also be attained in incestuous contacts -and certainly in polygamous relationships. Is there nothing at all left that is « sinful, » « unnatural, » or « immoral » if it is practiced « between two consenting adults? » For religious groups to aver that a homosexual relationship should be judged by the same criteria as a heterosexual one – i.e., « whether it is intended to foster a permanent relationship of love » – is to abandon the last claim of representing the « Judeo-Christian tradition. »Clearly, while Judaism needs no defense or apology in regard to its esteem for neighborly love and compassion for the individual sufferer, it cannot possibly abide a wholesale dismissal of its most basic moral principles on the grounds that those subject to its judgments find them repressive. All laws are repressive to some extent -they repress illegal activities- and all morality is concerned with changing man and improving him and his society. Homosexuality imposes on one an intolerable burden of differentness, of absurdity, and of loneliness, but the Biblical commandment outlawing pederasty cannot be put aside solely on the basis of sympathy for the victim of these feelings. Morality, too, is an element which each of us, given his sensuality, his own idiosyncracies, and his immoral proclivities, must take into serious consideration before acting out his impulses. Several years ago I recommended that Jews regard homosexual deviance as a pathology, thus reconciling the insights of Jewish tradition with the exigencies of contemporary life and scientific information, such as it is, on the nature of homosexuality. (…) The proposal that homosexuality be viewed as an illness will immediately be denied by three groups of people. Gay militants object to this view as an instance of heterosexual condescension. Evelyn Hooker and her group of psychologists maintain that homosexuals are no more pathological in their personality structures than heterosexuals. And psychiatrists Thomas Szasz in the U.S. and Ronald Laing in England reject all traditional ideas of mental sickness and health as tools of social repressiveness or, at best, narrow conventionalism. While granting that there are indeed unfortunate instances where the category of mental disease is exploited for social or political reasons, we part company with all three groups and assume that there are significant number of pederasts and lesbians who, by the criteria accepted by most psychologists and psychiatrists, can indeed be termed pathological. (…) Of course, one cannot say categorically that all homosexuals are sick – any more than one can casually define all thieves as kleptomaniacs. In order to develop a reasonable Jewish approach to the problem and to seek in the concept of illness some mitigating factor, it is necessary first to establish the main types of homosexuals. Dr. Judd Marmor speaks of four categories. « Genuine homosexuality » is based on strong preferential erotic feelings for members of the same sex. « Transitory homosexual behavior » occurs among adolescents who would prefer heterosexual experiences but are denied such opportunities because of the social, cultural, or psychological reasons. « Situational homosexual exchanges » are characteristic of prisoners, soldiers and others who are heterosexual but are denied access to women for long periods of time. « Transitory and opportunistic homosexuality » is that of delinquent young men who permit themselves to be used by pederasts in order to make money or win other favors, although their primary erotic interests are exclusively heterosexual. To these may be added, for purposes of our analysis, two other types. The first category, that of genuine homosexuals, may be said to comprehend two sub-categories: those who experience their condition as one of duress or uncontrollable passion which they would rid themselves of if they could, and those who transform their idiosyncrasy into an ideology, i.e., the gay militants who assert the legitimacy and validity of homosexuality as an alternative way to heterosexuality. The sixth category is based on what Dr. Rollo May has called « the New Puritanism », the peculiarly modern notion that one must experience all sexual pleasures, whether or not one feels inclined to them, as if the failure to taste every cup passed at the sumptuous banquet of carnal life means that one has not truly lived. Thus, we have transitory homosexual behavior not of adolescents, but of adults who feel that: they must « try everything » at least once or more than once in their lives. (…) Clearly, genuine homosexuality experienced under duress (Hebrew: ones) most obviously lends itself to being termed pathological especially where dysfunction appears in other aspects of personality. Opportunistic homosexuality, ideological homosexuality, and transitory adult homosexuality are at the other end of the spectrum, and appear most reprehensible. As for the intermediate categories, while they cannot be called illness, they do have a greater claim on our sympathy than the three types mentioned above. (…) To apply the Halakhah strictly in this case is obviously impossible; to ignore it entirely is undesirable, and tantamount to regarding Halakhah as a purely abstract, legalistic system which can safely be dismissed where its norms and prescriptions do not allow full formal implementation. Admittedly, the method is not rigorous, and leaves room to varying interpretations as well as exegetical abuse, but it is the best we can do. Hence there are types of homosexuality that do not warrant any special considerateness, because the notion of ones or duress (i.e., disease) in no way applies. Where the category of mental illness does apply, the act itself remains to´evah (an abomination), but the fact of illness lays upon us the obligation of pastoral compassion, psychological understanding, and social sympathy. In these senses, homosexuality is no different from any other social or anti-halakhic act, where it is legitimate to distinguish between the objective itself including its social and moral consequences, and the mentality and inner development of the person who perpetrates the act. For instance, if a man murders in a cold and calculating fashion for reasons of profit, the act is criminal and the transgressor is criminal. If, however, a psychotic murders, the transgressor is diseased rather than criminal, but the objective act itself remains a criminal one. The courts may therefore treat the perpetrator of the crime as they would a patient, with all the concomitant compassion and concern for therapy, without condoning the act as being morally neutral. To use halakhic terminology, the objective crime remains a ma´aseh averah, whereas a person who transgresses is considered innocent on the grounds of ones. In such case, the transgressor is spared the full legal consequences of his culpable act, although the degree to which he may be held responsible varies from case to case. (…) By the same token, in orienting ourselves to certain types of homosexuals as patients rather than criminals, we do not condone the act but attempt to help the homosexual. Under no circumstances can Judaism suffer homosexuality to become respectable. Were society to give its open or even tacit approval to homosexuality, it would invite more aggressiveness on the part of adult pederasts toward young people. Indeed, in the currently permissive atmosphere, the Jewish view would summon us to the semantic courage of referring to homosexuality not as « deviance » with the implication of moral neutrality and non-judgmental idiosyncrasy, but as « perversion » – a less clinical and more old-fashioned word, perhaps, but one that is more in keeping with the Biblical to´evah. (…) There is nothing in the Jewish law’s letter or spirit that should incline us toward advocacy of imprisonment for homosexuals. The Halakhah did not, by and large, encourage the denial of freedom as a recommended form of punishment. Flogging is, from a certain perspective, far less cruel and far more enlightened. Since capital punishment is out of the question, and since incarceration is not an advisable substitute, we are left with one absolute minimum: strong disapproval of the proscribed act. But we are not bound to any specific penological instrument that has no basis in Jewish law or tradition. (…) As long as violence and the seduction of children are not involved, it would best to abandon all laws on homosexuality and leave it to the inevitable social sanctions to control, informally,what can be controlled. However, this approach is not consonant with Jewish tradition. The repeal of anti-homosexual laws implies the removal of the stigma from homosexuality, and this diminution of social censure weakens society in its training of the young toward acceptable patterns of conduct. The absence of adequate social reproach may well encourage the expression of homosexual tendencies by those in whom they might otherwise be suppressed. Law itself has an educative function, and the repeal of laws, no matter how justifiable such repeal may be from one point of view, does have the effect of signaling the acceptability of greater permissiveness. Perhaps all that has been said above can best be expressed in the proposals that follow. First, society and government must recognize the distinctions between the various categories enumerated earlier in this essay. We must offer medical and psychological assistance to those whose homosexuality is an expression of pathology, who recognize it as such, and are willing to seek help. We must be no less generous to the homosexual than to the drug addict, to whom the government extends various forms of therapy upon request. Second, jail sentences must be abolished for all homosexuals, save those who are guilty of violence, seduction of the young, or public solicitation. Third, the laws must remain on the books, but by mutual consent of judiciary and police, be unenforced. This approximates to what lawyers call « the chilling effect », and is the nearest one can come to the category so well known in the Halakhah, whereby strong disapproval is expressed by affirming a halakhic prohibition, yet no punishment is mandated. It is a category that bridges the gap between morality and law. In a society where homosexuality is so rampant, and where incarceration is so counterproductive, the hortatory approach may well be a way of formalizing society’s revulsion while avoiding the pitfalls in our accepted penology. (…) Regular congregations and other Jewish groups should not hesitate to accord hospitality and membership, on an individual basis, to those « visible » homosexuals who qualify for the category of the ill. Homosexuals are no less in violation of Jewish norms than Sabbath desecrators or those who disregard the laws of kashrut. But to assent to the organization of separate « gay » groups under Jewish auspices makes no more sense, Jewishly, than to suffer the formation of synagogues that care exclusively to idol worshipers, adulterers, gossipers, tax evaders, or Sabbath violators. Indeed, it makes less sense, because it provides, under religious auspices, a ready-made clientele from which the homosexual can more easily choose his partners. In remaining true to the sources of Jewish tradition. Jews are commanded to avoid the madness that seizes society at various times and in many forms, while yet retaining a moral composure and psychological equilibrium sufficient to exercise that combination of discipline and charity that is the hallmark of Judaism. Dr. Norman Lamm

Quand le cannibalisme n’est plus qu’une affaire de goût…

A l’heure où l’actualité se charge de nous rappeler chaque jour …

Les ravages dans tous les secteurs de la société, entre « mariage » et « enfants pour tous », du dérèglement des moeurs que nous vivons …

Pendant que devant le retour du réel le costume messianique de nos Obama français ou allemand semble lui aussi sérieusement prendre l’eau …

Et où face à l’insubmersible Donald Trump …

Et la confirmation de plus en plus éclatante par la réalité et les faits  …

De la justesse, face aux tigres de papier iraniens, chinois ou palestiniens, de nombre de ses intuitions et décisions …

Les Démocrates et progressistes américains semblent au contraire redoubler dans la caricature et dans l’aberration

Entre soutien aux villes-sanctuaire et appels à l’extension du droit de vote aux mineurs, repris de justice et immigrés illégaux comme à la suppression du collège électoral, des contrôles d’identité pour les électeurs et des frontières …

Et où profitant de la campagne présidentielle américaine …

Les lobbies homosexuels et leur claque médiatique …

Tentent contre toute évidence …

De nous imposer la candidature de ce qui serait …

Jeune, ancien militaire, surdiplômé d’Harvard, malto-américain, polyglotte, dûment marié à l’église et revendiquant sa foi chrétienne, s’il vous plait !

Le premier président ouvertement homosexuel et, putsch judiciaire et couverture de Time aidant, de son éventuelle « première famille » …

Petit retour avec le président de la Yeshiva university, le Dr. Norman Lamm

Et contre les nouveaux diktats de la pensée unique et du politiquement correct …

A la réalité non seulement biblique mais concrète de tous les jours …

Des nombreux problèmes moraux et sociaux que, sauf rares exceptions, posent …

Le véritable messianisme homosexuel qui, par médias et show biz interposés, nous est actuellement imposé …

Et qui au nom des nouveaux impératifs catégoriques de l »amour », de « l’épanouissement » et du « bonheur » …

Pourrait en arriver à nous faire avaliser …

A condition bien sûr d’être pratiqué « entre deux adultes consentants » et avec la « visée d’une relation d’amour permanente »…

Sans compter, dès l’âge de deux ans, le choix de sa propre assignation sexuelle …

Tant les contacts incestueux que les relations polygames …

Voire la nécrophilie ou le cannibalisme sexuel ?

Judaism and the Modern Attitude to Homosexuality
Dr. Norman Lamm
Jonah web
March 30, 2007

Dr. Norman Lamm presently serves as President of Yeshiva University.

Popular wisdom has it that our society is wildly hedonistic, with the breakdown of family life, rampant immorality, and the world, led by the United States, in the throes of a sexual revolution. The impetus of this latest revolution is such that new ground is constantly being broken, while bold deviations barely noticed one year are glaringly more evident the year following and become the norm for the « younger generation » the year after that.

Some sex researchers accept this portrait of a steady deterioration in sex inhibitions and of increasing permissiveness. Opposed to them are the « debunkers » who hold that this view is mere fantasy and that, while there may have been a significant leap in verbal sophistication, there has probably been only a short hop in actual behavior. They point to statistics which confirm that now, as in Kinsey’s day, there has been no reported increase in sexual frequencies along with alleged de-inhibition to rhetoric and dress. The « sexual revolution » is, for them, largely a myth. Yet others maintain that there is in Western society a permanent revolution against moral standards, but that the form and style of the revolt keeps changing.

The determination of which view is correct will have to be left to the sociologists and statisticians -or, better, to historians of the future who will have the benefit of hindsight. But certain facts are quite clear. First, the complaint that moral restraints are crumbling has a two or three thousand year history in Jewish tradition and in continuous history of Western civilization. Second, there has been a decided increase at least in the area of sexual attitudes, speech, and expectations, if not in practice. Third, such social and psychological phenomena must sooner or later beget changes in mores and conduct. And finally, it is indisputable that most current attitudes are profoundly at variance with traditional Jewish views on sex and sex morality.

Of all the current sexual fashions, the one most notable for its militancy, and which most conspicuously requires illumination from the sources of Jewish tradition, is that of sexual deviancy. This refers primarily to homosexuality, male or female, along with a host of other phenomena such as transvestism and transexualism. They all form part of the newly approved theory of idiosyncratic character of sexuality. Homosexuals have demanded acceptance in society, and this demand has taken various forms -from a plea that they should not be liable to criminal prosecution, to a demand that they should not be subjected to social sanctions, and then to a strident assertion that they represent an « alternative life-style » no less legitimate that « straight heterosexuality. The various forms of homosexual apologetics appear largely in contemporary literature and theater, as well as in the daily press. In the United States, « gay » activists have become increasingly and progressively more vocal and militant.

Legal Position

Homosexuals have, indeed, been suppressed by the law. For instance, the Emperor Valentinian, in 390 C.E., decreed that pederasty be punished by burning at the stake. The sixth-century Code of Justinian ordained that homosexuals be tortured, mutilated, paraded in public, and executed. A thousand years later, Gibbon said of the penalty the Code decreed that « pederasty became the crime of those to whom no crime could be imputed ». In more modern times, however, the Napoleonic Code declared consensual homosexuality legal in France. A century ago, anti-homosexual laws were repealed in Belgium and Holland. In this century, Denmark, Sweden and Switzerland followed suit and, more recently, Czechoslovakia and England. The most severe laws in the West are found in the United States, where they come under the jurisdiction of the various states and are known by a variety of names, usually as « sodomy laws ». Punishment may range from light fines to five or more years in prison (in some cases even life imprisonment), indeterminate detention to a mental hospital, and even to compulsory sterilization. Moreover, homosexuals are, in various states, barred from licensed professions, from many professional societies, from teaching, and from the civil service -to mention only a few of the sanctions encountered by the known homosexual.

More recently, a new tendency has been developing in the United States and elsewhere with regard to homosexuals. Thus, in 1969, the National Institute of Mental Health issued a majority report advocating that adult consensual homosexuality be declared legal. The American Civil Liberties Union concurred. Earlier, Illinois had done so in 1962, and in 1971 the state of Connecticut revised its laws accordingly. Yet despite the increasing legal and social tolerance of deviance, basic feelings toward homosexuals have not really changed. The most obvious example is France, where although legal restraints were abandoned over 150 years ago, the homosexual of today continues to live in shame and secrecy.

Statistics

Statistically, the proportion the proportion of homosexuals in society does not seem to have changed much since Professor Kinsey’s day (his book, Sexual Behavior in the Human Male, was published in 1948, and his volume on the human female in 1953). Kinsey’s studies revealed that hard-core male homosexuals constituted about 4-6% of the population: 10% experienced « problem » behavior during a part of their lives. One man out of three indulges in some form of homosexual behavior from puberty until his early twenties. The dimensions of the problem become quite overwhelming when it is realized that, according to these figures, of 200 million people in the United States some ten million will become or are predominant or exclusive homosexuals, and over 25 million will have at least a few years of significant homosexual experience.

The New Permissiveness

The most dramatic change in our attitudes to homosexuality has taken place in the new mass adolescent subculture -the first such in history- where it is part of the whole new outlook on sexual restraints in general. It is here that the fashionable Sexual Left has had its greatest success on a wide scale, appealing especially to the rejection of Western traditions of sex roles and sex typing. A number of different streams feed into this ideological reservoir from which the new sympathy for homosexuality flows. Freud and his disciples began the modern protest against traditional restraints, and blamed the guilt that follows transgression for the neuroses that plague man. Many psychoanalysts began to overemphasize the importance of sexuality in human life, and this ultimately gave birth to a kind of sexual messianism. Thus, in our own day Wilhelm Reich identifies sexual energy as « vital energy per se » and, in conformity with his Marxist ideology, seeks to harmonize Marx and Freud. For Reich and his followers, the sexual revolution is a machina ultima for the whole Leninist liberation in all spheres of life and society. Rebellion against restrictive moral codes has become, for them, not merely a way to hedonism but a form of sexual mysticism: orgasm is seem not only as the pleasurable climatic release of internal sexual pressure, but as a means to individual creativity and insight as well as to the reconstruction and liberation of society. Finally, the emphasis on freedom and sexual autonomy derives from the Sartrean version of Kant’s view of human autonomy.

It is in this atmosphere that pro-deviationist sentiments have proliferated, reaching into many strata of society. Significantly, religious groups have joined the sociologists and ideologists of deviance to affirm what has been called « man’s birthright of unbounded ambisexuality. » A number of Protestant churches in America, and an occasional Catholic clergyman, have plead for more sympathetic attitudes toward homosexuals. Following the new Christian permissiveness espoused in Sex and Morality (1966), the report of a working party of the British Council of Churches, a group of American Episcopalian clergymen in November 1967 concluded that homosexual acts ought not to be considered wrong, per se. A homosexual relationship is, they implied, no different from a heterosexual marriage: but must be judged by one criterion -« whether it is intended to foster a permanent relation of love. » Jewish apologists for deviationism have been prominent in the Gay Liberation movement and have not hesitated to advocate their position in American journals and in the press. Christian groups began to emerge which catered to a homosexual clientele, and Jews were not too far behind. This latest Jewish exemplification of the principle of wie es sich christelt, so juedelt es sich will be discussed at the end of this essay.

Homosexual militants are satisfied neither with a « mental health » approach nor with demanding civil rights. They are clear in insisting on society’s recognition of sexual deviance as an « alternative lifestyle, » morally legitimate and socially acceptable.
Such are the basic facts and theories of the current advocacy of sexual deviance. What is the classical Jewish attitude to sodomy, and what suggestions may be made to develop a Jewish approach to the complex problem of the homosexual in contemporary society?

Biblical View

The Bible prohibits homosexual intercourse and labels it an abomination: « Thou shalt not lie with a man as one lies with a woman: it is an abomination » (Lev. 18:22). Capital punishment is ordained for both transgressors in Lev. 20:13. In the first passage, sodomy is linked with buggery, and in the second with incest and buggery. (There is considerable terminological confusion with regard to these words. We shall here use « sodomy » as a synonym for homosexuality and « buggery » for sexual relations with animals.)

The city of Sodom had the questionable honor of lending its name to homosexuality because of the notorious attempt at homosexual rape, when the entire population -« both young and old, all the people from every quarter »- surrounded the home of Lot, the nephew of Abraham, and demanded that he surrender his guests to them « that we may know them » (Gen. 19:5). The decimation of the tribe of Benjamin resulted from the notorious incident, recorded in Judges 19, of a group of Benjamites in Gibeah who sought to commit homosexual rape.

Scholars have identified the kadesh proscribed by the Torah (Deut. 23:18) as a ritual male homosexual prostitute. This form of healthen cult penetrated Judea from the Canaanite surroundings in the period of the early monarchy. So Rehoboam, probably under the influence of his Ammonite mother, tolerated this cultic sodomy during his reign (I Kings 14:24). His grandson Asa tried to cleanse the Temple in Jerusalem of the practice (I Kings 15:12), as did his great-grandson Jehoshaphat. But it was not until the days of Josiah and the vigorous reforms he introduced that the kadesh was finally removed from the Temple and the land (II Kings 23:7). The Talmund too (Sanhedrin, 24b) holds that the kadesh was a homosexual functionary. (However, it is possible that the term also alludes to a heterosexual male prostitute. Thus, in II kings 23:7, women are described as weaving garments for the idols in the batei ha-kedeshim (houses of the kadesh): the presence of women may imply that the kadesh was not necessarily homosexual. The Talmudic opinion identifying the kadesh as a homosexual prostitute may be only an asmakhta. Moreover, there are other opinions in Talmudic literature as to the meaning of the verse: see Onkelos, Lev. 23:18, and Nachmanides and Torah Temimah, ad loc.)

Talmudic Approach

Rabbinic exegesis of the Bible finds several other homosexual references in the scriptural narratives. The generation of Noah was condemned to eradication by the Flood because they had sunk so low morally that, according to Midrashic teaching, they wrote out formal marriage contracts for sodomy and buggery -a possible cryptic reference to such practices in the Rome of Nero and Hadrian (Lev. R. 18:13).

Of Ham, the son of Noah, we are told that « he saw the nakedness of his father » and told his two brothers (Gen. 9:22). Why should this act have warranted the harsh imprecation hurled at Ham by his father? The Rabbis offer two answers: one, that the text implied that Ham castrated Noah: second, that the Biblical expression is an idiom for homosexual intercourse (see Rashi, ad loc.). On the scriptural story of Potiphar’s purchase of Joseph as a slave (Gen. 39:1), the Talmund comments that he acquired him for homosexual purposes, but that a miracle occurred and God sent the angel Gabriel to castrate Potiphar (Sotah 13b).

Post-Biblical literature records remarkably few incidents of homosexuality. Herod’s son Alexander, according to Josephus (Wars, I, 24:7), had homosexual contact with a young eunuch. Very few reports of homosexuality have come to us from the Talmudic era (TJ Sanhedrin 6:6, 23c: Jos. Ant., 15:25-30).

The incidence of sodomy among Jews is interestingly reflected in the Halakhah on mishkav zakhur (the Talmudic term for homosexuality: the Bible uses various terms- thus the same term in Num. 31:17 and 35 refers to heterosexual intercourse by a woman, whereas the expression for male homosexual intercourse in Lev. 18:22 and 20:13 is mishkevei ishah). The Mishnah teaches that R. Judah forbade two bachelors from sleeping under the same blanket, for fear that this would lead to homosexual temptation (Kiddushin 4:14). However, the Sages permitted it (ibid.) because homosexuality was so rare among Jews that such preventive legislation was considered unnecessary (Kiddushin 82a). This latter view is codified as Halakhah by Malmonides (Yad, Issurei Bi’ah 22:2). Some 400 years later R. Joseph Caro , who did not codify the law against sodomy proper, nevertheless cautioned against being alone with another male because of the lewdness prevalent « in our times » (Even ha-Ezer 24). About a hundred years later, R. Joel Sirkes reverted to the original ruling, and suspended the prohibition because such obscene acts were unheard of amongst Polish Jewry (Bayit Hadash to Tur, Even ha-Ezer 24). Indeed, a distinguished contemporary of R. Joseph Caro, R. Solomon Luria, went even further and declared homosexuality so very rare that, if one refrains from sharing a blanket with another male as a special act of piety, one is guilty of self-righteous pride or religious snobbism (for the above and additional authorities, see Ozar ha-Posekim, IX, 236-238).

Responsa

As is to be expected, the responsa literature is also very scant in discussions of homosexuality. One of the few such responsa is by the late R. Abraham Isaac Ha-Kohen Kook, when he was still the rabbi of Jaffa. In 1912 he was asked about a ritual slaughterer who had come under suspicion of homosexuality. After weighing all aspects of the case, R. Kook dismissed the charges against the accused, considering them unsupported hearsay. Furthermore, he maintained the man might have repented and therefore could not be subject to sanctions at the present time.

The very scarcity of halakhic deliberations on homosexuality, and the quite explicit insistence of various halakhic authorities, provide sufficient evidence of the relative absence of this practice among Jews from ancient times down to the present. Indeed, Prof. Kinsey found that, while religion was usually an influence of secondary importance on the number of homosexual as well as heterosexual acts by males. Orthodox Jews proved an exception, homosexuality being phenomenally rare among them.

Jewish laws treated the female homosexual more leniently than the male. It considered lesbianism as issur, an ordinary religious violation, rather than arayot, a specifically sexual infraction, regarded much more severely than issur. R. Huna held that lesbianism is the equivalent of harlotry and disqualified the woman from marrying a priest. The Halakhah is, however, more lenient, and decides that while the act is prohibited, the lesbian is not punished and is permitted to marry a priest (Sifra 9:8: Shab. 65a: Yev. 76a). However, the transgression does warrant disciplinary flagellation (Maimonides, Yad, Issurei Bi’ah 21:8). The less punitive attitude of the Halakhah to the female homosexual than to the male does not reflect any intrinsic judgment on one as opposed to the other, but is rather the result of a halakhic technicality: there is no explicit Biblical proscription of lesbianism, and the act does not entail genital intercourse (Maimonides, loc. cit.).

The Halakhah holds that the ban on homosexuality applies universally, to non-Jew as well as to Jew (Sanh 58a: Maimonides, Melakhim 9:5, 6). It is one of the six instances of arayot (sexual transgressions) forbidden to the Noachide (Maimonides, ibid).

Most halakhic authorities – such as Rashba and Ritba – agree with Maimonides. A minority opinion holds that pederasty and buggery are « ordinary » prohibitions rather than arayot – specifically sexual infractions which demand that one submit to martyrdom rather than violate the law – but the Jerusalem Talmud supports the majority opinion. (See D. M. Krozer, Devar Ha-Melekh, I, 22, 23 (1962), who also suggests that Maimonides may support a distinction whereby the « male » or active homosexual partner is held in violation of arayot whereas the passive or « female » partner transgresses issur, an ordinary prohibition.)

Reasons of Prohibition

Why does the Torah forbids homosexuality? Bearing in mind that reasons proferred for the various commandments are not to be accepted as determinative, but as human efforts to explain immutable divine law, the rabbis of the Talmud and later Talmudists did offer a number of illuminating rationales for the law.

As stated, the Torah condemns homosexuality as to’evah, an abomination. The Talmud records the interpretation of Bar Kapparah who, in a play on words, defined to’evah as to’eh attah bah. « You are going astray because of it » (Nedarim 51a). The exact meaning of this passage is unclear, and various explanations have been put forward.

The Pesikta (Zutarta) explains the statement of Bar Kapparah as referring to the impossibility of such a sexual resulting in procreation. One of the major functions (if not the major purpose) of sexuality is reproduction, and this reason for man’s sexual endowment is frustrated by mishkav zakhur (so too Sefer ha-Hinnukh, no. 209).

Another interpretation is that of the Tosafot and R. Asher ben Jehiel (in their commentaries to Ned. 51a) which applies the « going astray » or wandering to the homosexual’s abandoning his wife. In other words, the abomination consists of the danger that a married man with homosexual tendencies may disrupt his family life in order to indulge his perversions. Saadiah Gaon holds the rational basis of most of the Bible’s moral legislation to be the preservation of the family structure (Emunot ve-De’ot 3:1: cf. Yoma 9a). (This argument assumes contemporary cogency in the light of the avowed aim of some gay militants to destroy the family, which they consider an « oppressive institution. »)

A third explanation is given by a modern scholar, Rabbi Baruch Ha-Levi Epstein (Torah Temimah to Lev. 18:22), who emphasizes the unnaturalness of the homosexual liaison: « You are going astray from the foundations of the creation. » Mishkav zakhur defies the very structure of the anatomy of the sexes, which quite obviously was designed for heterosexual relationships.

It may be, however, that the very variety of interpretations of to’evah points to a far more fundamental meaning, namely, that an act characterized as an « abomination » is prima facie disgusting and cannot be further defined or explained. Certain acts are considered to’evah by the Torah, and there the matter rests. It is, as it were, a visceral reaction, an intuitive disqualification of the act, and we run the risk of distorting the Biblical judgment if we rationalize it. To’evah constitutes a category of objectionableness sui generis: it is a primary phenomenon. (This lends additional force to Rabbi David Z. Hoffmann’s contention that to’evah is used by the Torah to indicate the repulsiveness of a proscribed act, no matter how much it may be in vogue among advanced and sophisticated cultures: see his Sefer Va-yikra, II, p. 54.).

Jewish Attitudes

It is on the basis of the above that an effort must be made to formulate a Jewish response to the problems of homosexuality in the conditions under which most Jews live today, namely, those of free and democratic societies and, with the exception of Israel, non-Jewish lands and traditions.

Four general approaches may be adopted:1) Repressive: No leniency toward the homosexual, lest the moral fiber of the rest of society be weakened.2) Practical: Dispense with imprisonment and all forms of social harassment, for eminently practical and prudent reasons.3) Permissive: The same as the above, but for the ideological reasons, viz., the acceptance of homosexuality as a legitimate alternative « lifestyle »4) Psychological: Homosexuality, in at least some forms, should be recognized as a disease and this recognition must determine our attitude toward the homosexual.
Let us consider each of these critically.

Repressive Attitude

Exponents of the most stringent approach hold that pederasts are the vanguard of moral malaise, especially in our society. For on thing, they are dangerous to children. According to a recent work, one third of the homosexuals in the study were seduced in their adolescence by adults. It is best for society that they be imprisoned, and if our present penal institutions are faulty, let them be improved. Homosexuals should certainly not be permitted to function as teachers, group leaders, rabbis, or in any other capacity where they might be models for, and come into close contact with, young people. Homosexuality must not be excused as a sickness. A sane society assumes that its members have free choice, and are therefore responsible for their conduct. Sex offenders, including homosexuals, according to another recent study, operate « at a primate level with the philosophy that necessity is the mother of improvisation. » As Jews who believe that the Torah legislated certain moral laws for all mankind, it is incumbent upon us to encourage all societies, including non-Jewish ones, to implement the Noachide laws. And since, according to the halakhah, homosexuality is prohibited to Noachides as well as to Jews, we must seek to strengthen the moral quality of society by encouraging more restrictive laws against homosexuals. Moreover, if we are loyal to the teachings of Judaism, we cannot distinguish between « victimless » crimes and crimes of violence. Hence, if our concern for the murder, racial oppression, or robbery, we must do no less with regard to sodomy.

This argument is, however, weak on a number of grounds. Practically, it fails to take into cognizance the number of homosexuals of all categories, which, as we have pointed out, is vast. We cannot possibly imprison all offenders, and it is a manifest miscarriage of justice to vent our spleen only on the few unfortunates who are caught by the police. It is inconsistent because there has been no comparable outcry for harsh sentencing of other transgressors of sexual morality, such as those who indulge in adultery or incest. To take consistency to its logical conclusion, this hard line on homosexuality should not stop with imprisonment but demand the death sentence, as is Biblically prescribed. And why not the same death sentence for blasphemy, eating a limb torn from a live animal, idolatry, robbery -all of which are Noachide commandments? And why not capital punishment for Sabbath transgressors in the State of Israel? Why should the pederast be singled out for opprobrium and be made an object lesson while all others escape?

Those who might seriously consider such logically consistent, but socially destructive, strategies had best think back to the fate of that Dominican reformer, the monk Girolamo Savonarola, who in 15th-century Florence undertook a fanatical campaign against vice and all suspected of venal sin, with emphasis on pederasty. The society of that time and place, much like ours, could stand vast improvement. But too much medicine in too strong doses was the monk’s prescription, whereupon the population rioted and the zealot was hanged.

Finally, there is indeed some halakhic warrant for distinguishing between violent and victimless (or consensual and non-consensual) crimes. Thus, the Talmud permits a passer-by to kill a man in pursuit of another man or of a woman when the pursuer is attempting homosexual or heterosexual rape, as the case may be, whereas this is not permitted in the case of a transgressor pursuing an animal to commit buggery or on his way to worship an idol or to violate the Sabbath, (Sanh. 8:7, and v. Rashi to Sanh. 73a, s.v. al ha-behemah).

Practical Attitude

The practical approach is completely pragmatic and attempts to steer clear of any ideology in its judgments and recommendations. It is, according to its advocates, eminently reasonable. Criminal laws requiring punishment for homosexuals are simply unenforceable in society at the present day. We have previously cited the statistics on the extremely high incidence of pederasty in our society. Kinsey once said of the many sexual acts outlawed by the various states, that, were they all enforced, some 95% of men in the United States would be in jail. Furthermore, the special prejudice of law enforcement authorities against homosexuals – rarely does one hear of police entrapment or of jail sentences for non-violent heterosexuals – breeds a grave injustice: namely, it is an invitation to blackmail. The law concerning sodomy has been called « the blackmailer’s charter. » It is universally agreed that prison does little to help the homosexual rid himself of his peculiarity. Certainly, the failure of rehabilitation ought to be of concern to civilized men. But even if it is not, and the crime be considered so serious that incarceration is deemed advisable even in the absence of any real chances of rehabilitation, the casual pederast almost always leaves prison as a confirmed criminal. He has been denied the company of women and forced into society of those whose sexual expression is almost always channeled to pederasty. The casual pederast has become a habitual one: his homosexuality has now been ingrained in him. Is society any safer for having taken an errant man and, in the course of a few years, for having taught him to transform his deviancy into a hard and fast perversion, then turning him loose on the community? Finally, from a Jewish point of view, since it is obviously impossible for us to impose the death penalty for sodomy, we may as well act on purely practical grounds and do away with all legislation and punishment in this area of personal conduct.

This reasoning is tempting precisely because it focuses directly on the problem and is free of any ideological commitments. But the problem with it is that it is too smooth, too easy. By the same reasoning one might, in a reductio ad absurdum do away with all laws on income tax evasion, or forgive, and dispense with all punishment of Nazi murders. Furthermore, the last element leaves us with a novel view of the Halakhah: if it cannot be implemented in its entirely, it ought to be abandoned completely. Surely the Noachide laws, perhaps above all others, place us under clear moral imperatives, over and above purely penological instructions? The very practicality of this position leaves it open to the charge of evading the very real moral issues, and for Jews the halakhic principles, entailed in any discussion of homosexuality.

Permissive Attitude

The ideological advocacy of a completely permissive attitude toward consensual homosexuality and the acceptance of its moral legitimacy is, of course, the « in » fashion in sophisticated liberal circles. Legally, it holds that deviancy is none of the law’s business; the homosexual’s civil rights are as sacred as those of any other « minority group. » From the psychological angle, sexuality must be emancipated from the fetters of guilt induced by religion and code-morality, and its idiosyncratic nature must be confirmed.

Gay Liberationists aver that the usual « straight » attitude toward homosexuality is based on three fallacies or myths: that homosexuality is an illness; that it is unnatural; and that it is immoral. They argue that it cannot be considered an illness, because so many people have been shown to practice it. It is not unnatural, because its alleged unnaturalness derives from the impossibility of sodomy leading to reproduction, whereas our overpopulated society no longer needs to breed workers, soldiers, farmers, or hunters. And it is not immoral, first, because morality is relative, and secondly, because moral behavior is that characterized by « selfless, loving concern. »

Now, we are here concerned with the sexual problem as such, and not with homosexuality as a symbol of the whole contemporary ideological polemic against restraint and tradition. Homosexuality is too important – and too agonizing – a human problem to allow it to be exploited for political aims or entertainment or shock value.

The bland assumption that pederasty cannot be considered an illness because of the large number of people who have or express homosexual tendencies cannot stand up under criticism. No less an authority than Freud taught that a whole civilization can be neurotic. Erich Fromm appeals for the establishment of The Sane Society – because ours is not. If the majority of a nation are struck down by typhoid fever, does this condition, by so curious a calculus of semantics, become healthy? Whether or not homosexuality can be considered an illness is a serious question, and it does depend on one’s definition of health and illness. But mere statistics are certainly not the coup de grâce to the psychological argument, which will be discussed shortly.

The validation of gay life as « natural » on the basis of changing social and economic conditions is an act of verbal obfuscation. Even if we were to concur with the widely held feeling that the world’s population is dangerously large, and that Zero Population Growth is now a desideratum, the anatomical fact remains unchanged: the generative organs are structured for generation. If the words « natural » and « unnatural » have any meaning at all, they must be rooted in the unchanging reality of man’s sexual apparatus rather than in his ephmeral social configurations.

Militant feminists along with the gay activists react vigorously against the implication that natural structure implies the naturalness or unnaturalness of certain acts, but this very view has recently been confirmed by one of the most informed writers on the subject. « It is already pretty safe to infer from laboratory research and ethological parallels that male and female are wired in ways that relate to our traditional sex roles… Freud dramatically said that anatomy is destiny. Scientists who shudder at the dramatic, no matter how accurate, could rephrase this: anatomy is functional, body functions have profound psychological meanings to people, and anatomy and function are often socially elaborated » (Arno Karlen, Sexuality and Homosexuality, p. 501).

The moral issues lead us into the quagmire of perennial philosophical disquisitions of a fundamental nature. In a way, this facilitates the problem for one seeking a Jewish view. Judaism does not accept the kind of thoroughgoing relativism used to justify the gay life as merely an alternate lifestyle And while the question of human autonomy is certainly worthy of consideration in the area of sexuality, one must beware of the consequences of taking the argument to its logical extreme. Judaism clearly cherishes holiness as a greater value than either freedom or health. Furthermore, if every individual’s autonomy leads us to lend moral legitimacy to any form of sexual expression he may desire, we must be ready to pull the blanket of this moral validity over almost the whole catalogue of perversion described by Krafft-Ebing, and then, by the legerdemain of granting civil rights to the morally non-objectionable, permit the advocates of buggery, fetishism, or whatever to proselytize in public. In that case, why not in the school system? And if consent is obtained before the death of one partner, why not necrophilia or cannibalism? Surely, if we declare pederasty to be merely idiosyncratic and not an « abomination, » what right have we to condemn sexually motivated cannibalism – merely because most people would react with revulsion and disgust?

« Loving, selfless concern » and « meaningful personal relationships » – the great slogans of the New Morality and the exponents of situation ethics – have become the litany of sodomy in our times. Simple logic should permit us to use the same criteria for excusing adultery or any other act heretofore held to be immoral: and indeed, that is just what has been done, and it has received the sanction not only of liberals and humanists, but of certain religionists as well. « Love, » « fulfillment, » « exploitative, » « meaningful » – the list itself sounds like a lexicon of emotionally charged terms drawn at random from the disparate sources of both Christian and psychologically-orientated agnostic circles. Logically, we must ask the next question: what moral depravities can not be excused by the sole criterion of « warm, meaningful human relations » or « fulfillment, » the newest semantic heirs to « love »?

Love, fulfillment, and happiness can also be attained in incestuous contacts -and certainly in polygamous relationships. Is there nothing at all left that is « sinful, » « unnatural, » or « immoral » if it is practiced « between two consenting adults? » For religious groups to aver that a homosexual relationship should be judged by the same criteria as a heterosexual one – i.e., « whether it is intended to foster a permanent relationship of love » – is to abandon the last claim of representing the « Judeo-Christian tradition. »

I have elsewhere essayed a criticism of the situationalists, their use of the term « love, » and their objections to traditional morality as exemplified by the Halakhah as « mere legalism » (see my Faith and Doubt, chapter IX, p. 249 ff). Situationalists, such as Joseph Fletcher, have especially attacked « pilpolistic Rabbis » for remaining entangled in the coils of statutory and legalistic hairsplitting. Among the other things this typically Christian polemic reveals is an ignorance of the nature of Halakhah and its place in Judaism, which never held that law was totality of life, pleaded again and again for supererogatory conduct, recognized that individuals may be disadvantaged by the law, and which strove to rectify what could be rectified without abandoning the large majority to legal and moral chaos simply because of the discomfiture of the few.

Clearly, while Judaism needs no defense or apology in regard to its esteem for neighborly love and compassion for the individual sufferer, it cannot possibly abide a wholesale dismissal of its most basic moral principles on the grounds that those subject to its judgments find them repressive. All laws are repressive to some extent -they repress illegal activities- and all morality is concerned with changing man and improving him and his society. Homosexuality imposes on one an intolerable burden of differentness, of absurdity, and of loneliness, but the Biblical commandment outlawing pederasty cannot be put aside solely on the basis of sympathy for the victim of these feelings. Morality, too, is an element which each of us, given his sensuality, his own idiosyncracies, and his immoral proclivities, must take into serious consideration before acting out his impulses.

Psychological Attitudes

Several years ago I recommended that Jews regard homosexual deviance as a pathology, thus reconciling the insights of Jewish tradition with the exigencies of contemporary life and scientific information, such as it is, on the nature of homosexuality (Jewish Life, Jan-Feb. 1968). The remarks that follow are an expansion and modification of that position, together with some new data and notions.

The proposal that homosexuality be viewed as an illness will immediately be denied by three groups of people. Gay militants object to this view as an instance of heterosexual condescension. Evelyn Hooker and her group of psychologists maintain that homosexuals are no more pathological in their personality structures than heterosexuals. And psychiatrists Thomas Szasz in the U.S. and Ronald Laing in England reject all traditional ideas of mental sickness and health as tools of social repressiveness or, at best, narrow conventionalism. While granting that there are indeed unfortunate instances where the category of mental disease is exploited for social or political reasons, we part company with all three groups and assume that there are significant number of pederasts and lesbians who, by the criteria accepted by most psychologists and psychiatrists, can indeed be termed pathological. Thus, for instance, Dr. Albert Ellis, an ardent advocate of the right to deviancy, denies there is such a thing as a well-adjusted homosexual. In an interview, he has stated that whereas he used to believe that most homosexuals were neurotic, he is now convinced that about 50% are borderline psychotics, that the usual fixed male homosexual is a severe phobic, and that lesbians are even more disturbed than male homosexuals (see Karlem, op. cit., p. 223ff.).

No single cause of homosexuality has been established. In all probability, it is based on a conglomeration of a number of factors. There is overwhelming evidence that the condition is developmental, not constitutional. Despite all efforts to discover something genetic in homosexuality, no proof has been adduced, and researchers incline more and more to reject the Freudian concept of fundamental human biological bisexuality and its corollary of homosexual latency. It is now widely believed that homosexuality is the result of a whole family constellation. The passive, dependent, phobic male homosexual is usually the product of an aggressive, covertly seductive mother who is overly rigid and puritanical with her son – thus forcing him into a bond where he is sexually aroused, yet forbidden to express himself in any heterosexual way – and of a father who is absent, remote, emotionally detached, or hostile (I. Bieber et al. Homosexuality, 1962).

Can the homosexual be cured? There is a tradition of therapeutic pessimism that goes back to Freud but a number of psychoanalysis, including Freud’s daughter Anna, have reported successes in treating homosexuals as any other phobics (in this case, fear of the female genitals). It is generally accepted that about a third of all homosexuals can be completely cured: behavioral therapists report an even larger number of cures.

Of course, one cannot say categorically that all homosexuals are sick – any more than one can casually define all thieves as kleptomaniacs. In order to develop a reasonable Jewish approach to the problem and to seek in the concept of illness some mitigating factor, it is necessary first to establish the main types of homosexuals. Dr. Judd Marmor speaks of four categories. « Genuine homosexuality » is based on strong preferential erotic feelings for members of the same sex. « Transitory homosexual behavior » occurs among adolescents who would prefer heterosexual experiences but are denied such opportunities because of the social, cultural, or psychological reasons. « Situational homosexual exchanges » are characteristic of prisoners, soldiers and others who are heterosexual but are denied access to women for long periods of time. « Transitory and opportunistic homosexuality » is that of delinquent young men who permit themselves to be used by pederasts in order to make money or win other favors, although their primary erotic interests are exclusively heterosexual. To these may be added, for purposes of our analysis, two other types. The first category, that of genuine homosexuals, me be said to comprehend two sub-categories: those who experience their condition as one of duress or uncontrollable passion which they would rid themselves of if they could, and those who transform their idiosyncrasy into an ideology, i.e., the gay militants who assert the legitimacy and validity of homosexuality as an alternative way to heterosexuality. The sixth category is based on what Dr. Rollo May has called « the New Puritanism », the peculiarly modern notion that one must experience all sexual pleasures, whether or not one feels inclined to them, as if the failure to taste every cup passed at the sumptuous banquet of carnal life means that one has not truly lived. Thus, we have transitory homosexual behavior not of adolescents, but of adults who feel that: they must « try everything » at least once or more than once in their lives.

A Possible Halakhic Solution

This rubric will now permit us to apply the notion of disease (and, from the halakhic point of view, of its opposite, moral culpability) to the various types of sodomy. Clearly, genuine homosexuality experienced under duress (Hebrew: ones) most obviously lends itself to being termed pathological especially where dysfunction appears in other aspects of personality. Opportunistic homosexuality, ideological homosexuality, and transitory adult homosexuality are at the other end of the spectrum, and appear most reprehensible. As for the intermediate categories, while they cannot be called illness, they do have a greater claim on our sympathy than the three types mentioned above.

In formulating the notion of homosexuality as a disease, we are not asserting the formal halakhic definition of mental illness as mental incompetence, as described in TB Hag. 3b, 4a, and elsewhere. Furthermore, the categorization of a prohibited sex act as ones (duress) because of uncontrolled passions is valid, in a technical halakhic sense, only for a married woman who was ravished and who, in the course of the act, became a willing participant. The Halakhah decides with Rava, against the father of Samuel, that her consent is considered duress because of the passions aroused in her (Ket, 51b). However, this holds true only if the act was initially entered into under physical compulsion (Kesef Mishneh to Yad, Sanh. 20:3). Moreover, the claim of compulsion by one’s erotic passions is not valid for a male, for any erection is considered a token of his willingness (Yev, 53b; Maimonides, Yad, Sanh, 20:3). In the case of a male who was forced to cohabit with a woman forbidden to him, some authorities consider him guilty and punishable, while others hold him guilty but not subject to punishment by the courts (Tos., Yev, 53b; Hinnukh, 556; Kesef Mishneh, loc. cit.: Maggid Mishneh to Issurei Bi´ah, 1:9). Where a male is sexually aroused in a permissible manner, as to begin coitus with his wife and is then forced to conclude the act with another woman, most authorities exonerate him (Rabad and Maggid Mishned, to Issurei Bi´ah, in loc). If, now, the warped family background of the genuine homosexual is considered ones, the homosexual act may possibly lay claim to some mitigation by the Halakhah. (However, see Minhat Hinnukh, 556, end; and M. Feinstein, Iggerot Moshe (1973) on YD, no. 59, who holds, in a different context, that any pleasure derived from a forbidden act performed under duress increases the level of prohibition. This was anticipated by R. Joseph Engel, Atvan de-Oraita, 24). These latter sources indicate the difficulty of exonerating sexual transgressors because of psycho-pathological reasons under the technical rules of the Halakhah.

However, in the absence of a Sanhedrin and since it is impossible to implement the whole halakhic penal system, including capital punishment, such strict applications are unnecessary. What we are attempting is to develop guidelines, based on the Halakhah, which will allow contemporary Jews to orient themselves to the current problems of homosexuality in a manner articulating with the most fundamental insights of the Halakhah in a general sense, and consistent with the broadest world-view that the halakhic commitment instills in its followers. Thus, the aggadic statement that « no man sins unless he is overcome by a spirit of madness » (Sot. 3a) is not an operative halakhic rule, but does offer guidance on public policy and individual pastoral compassion. So in the present case, the formal halakhic strictures do not in any case apply nowadays, and it is our contention that the aggadic principle must lead us to seek out the mitigating halakhic elements so as to guide us in our orientation to homosexuals who, by the standards of modern psychology, may be regarded as acting under compulsion.

To apply the Halakhah strictly in this case is obviously impossible; to ignore it entirely is undesirable, and tantamount to regarding Halakhah as a purely abstract, legalistic system which can safely be dismissed where its norms and prescriptions do not allow full formal implementation. Admittedly, the method is not rigorous, and leaves room to varying interpretations as well as exegetical abuse, but it is the best we can do.

Hence there are types of homosexuality that do not warrant any special considerateness, because the notion of ones or duress (i.e., disease) in no way applies. Where the category of mental illness does apply, the act itself remains to´evah (an abomination), but the fact of illness lays upon us the obligation of pastoral compassion, psychological understanding, and social sympathy. In these sense, homosexuality is no different from any other social or anti-halakhic act, where it is legitimate to distinguish between the objective itself including its social and moral consequences, and the mentality and inner development of the person who perpetrates the act. For instance, if a man murders in a cold and calculating fashion for reasons of profit, the act is criminal and the transgressor is criminal. If, however, a psychotic murders, the transgressor is diseased rather than criminal, but the objective act itself remains a criminal one. The courts may therefore treat the perpetrator of the crime as they would a patient, with all the concomitant compassion and concern for therapy, without condoning the act as being morally neutral. To use halakhic terminology, the objective crime remains a ma´aseh averah, whereas a person who transgresses is considered innocent on the grounds of ones. In such case, the transgressor is spared the full legal consequences of his culpable act, although the degree to which he may be held responsible varies from case to case.

An example of a criminal act that is treated with compassion by the Halakhah, which in practice considers the act pathological rather than criminal, is suicide. Technically, the suicide or attempted suicide is in violation of the law. The Halakhah denies to the suicide the honor of a eulogy, the rending of the garments by relatives or witnesses to the death, and (according to Maimonides) insist that the relatives are not to observe the usual mourning period for the suicide. Yet, in the course of time, the tendency has been to remove the stigma from the suicide on the basis of mental disease. Thus, halakhic scholars do not apply the technical category of intentional (la-da´at) suicide to one who did not clearly demonstrate before performing the act, that he knew what he was doing and was of sound mind, to the extent that there was no hiatus between the act of self-destruction and actual death. If these conditions are not present, we assume that it was an insane act or that between the act and death he experienced pangs of contrition and is therefore repentant, hence excused before the law. There is even one opinion which exonerates the suicide unless he received adequate warning (hatra´ah) before performing the act, and responded in a manner indicating that he was fully aware of what he was doing and that he was lucid (J.M Tykocinski, Gesher ha-Hayyim, I, ch. 25, and Encyclopaedia Judaica, 15:490).

Admittedly, there are differences between the two cases: pederasty is clearly a severe violation of Biblical law, whereas the stricture against suicide is derived exegetically from a verse in the Genesis. Nevertheless, the principle operative in the one is applicable to the other: where one can attribute an act to mental illness, it is done out of simple humanitarian considerations.

The suicide analogy should not, of course, lead one to conclude that there are grounds for a blanket exculpation of homosexuality as mental illness. Not all forms of homosexuality can be so termed, as indicated above, and the act itself remains an « abomination ». With few exceptions, most people do not ordinarily propose that suicide be considered an acceptable and legitimate alternative to the rigors of daily life. No sane and moral person sits passively and watches a fellow man attempt suicide because he « understands » him and because it has been decided that suicide is a « morally neutral » act. By the same token, in orienting ourselves to certain types of homosexuals as patients rather than criminals, we do not condone the act but attempt to help the homosexual. Under no circumstances can Judaism suffer homosexuality to become respectable. Were society to give its open or even tacit approval to homosexuality, it would invite more aggressiveness on the part of adult pederasts toward young people. Indeed, in the currently permissive atmosphere, the Jewish view would summon us to the semantic courage of referring to homosexuality not as « deviance » with the implication of moral neutrality and non-judgmental idiosyncrasy, but as « perversion » – a less clinical and more old-fashioned word, perhaps, but one that is more in keeping with the Biblical to´evah.

Yet, having passed this moral judgment, we cannot in the name of Judaism necessarily demand that we strive for the harshest possible punishment. Even where it was halakhically feasible to execute capital punishment, we have a tradition of leniency. Thus, R. Akiva and R. Tarfon declared that had they lived during the time of the Sanhedrin, they never would have executed a man. Although the Halakhah does not decide in their favor (Mak., end of ch. I), it was rare indeed that the death penalty was actually imposed. Usually, the Biblically mandated penalty was regarded as an index of the severity of the transgression, and the actual execution was avoided by strict insistence upon all technical requirements – such al hatra´ah (forewarning the potential criminal) and rigorous cross-examination of witnesses, etc. In the same spirit, we are not bound to press for the most punitive policy toward contemporary lawbreakers. We are required to lead them to rehabilitation (teshuva). The Halakhah sees no contradiction between condemning a man to death and exercising compassion, even love, toward him (Sanh. 52a). Even a man on the way to his execution was encouraged to repent (Sanh. 6:2). In the absence of a death penalty, the tradition of teshuva and pastoral compassion to the sinner continues.

I do not find any warrant in the Jewish tradition for insisting on prison sentences for homosexuals. The singling-out of homosexuals as victims of society’s righteous indignation is patently unfair. In Western history, anti-homosexual crusades have too often been marked by cruelty, destruction, and bigotry. Imprisonment in modern times has proven to be extremely haphazard. The number of homosexuals unfortunate enough to be apprehended is infinitesimal as compared to the number of known homosexuals; estimates vary from one to 300.000 to one to 6.000.000!. For homosexuals to be singled out for special punishment while all the rest of society indulges itself in every other form of sexual malfeasance (using the definitions of Halakhah, not the New Morality) is a species of double-standard morality that the spirit of Halakhah cannot abide. Thus, the Mishnah declares that the « scroll of the suspected adulteress » (megillat sotah) – whereby a wife suspected of adultery was forced to undergo the test of « bitter waters » – was cancelled when the Sages became aware of the ever-larger number of adulterers in general (Sot. 9:9). The Talmud bases this decision on an aversion to the double standard: if the husband is himself an adulterer, the « bitter waters » will have no effect on his wife, even though she too be guilty of the offense (Sot. 47b). By the same token, a society in which heterosexual immorality is not conspicuously absent has no moral right to sit in stern judgment and mete out harsh penalties to homosexuals.

Furthermore, sending a homosexual to prison is counterproductive if punishment is to contain any element of rehabilitation or teshuva. It has rightly been compared to sending an alcoholic to a distillery. The Talmud records that the Sanhedrin was unwilling to apply the full force of the law where punishment had lost its quality of deterrence; thus, 40 (or four) years before the destruction of the Temple, the Sanhedrin voluntarily left the precincts of the Temple so as not to be able, technically, to impose the death sentence, because it had noticed the increasing rate of homicide (Sanh. 41a, and elsewhere).

There is nothing in the Jewish law’s letter or spirit that should incline us toward advocacy of imprisonment for homosexuals. The Halakhah did not, by and large, encourage the denial of freedom as a recommended form of punishment. Flogging is, from a certain perspective, far less cruel and far more enlightened. Since capital punishment is out of the question, and since incarceration is not an advisable substitute, we are left with one absolute minimum: strong disapproval of the proscribed act. But we are not bound to any specific penological instrument that has no basis in Jewish law or tradition.

How shall this disapproval be expressed? It has been suggested that, since homosexuality will never attain acceptance anyway, society can afford to be humane. As long as violence and the seduction of children are not involved, it would best to abandon all laws on homosexuality and leave it to the inevitable social sanctions to control, informally,what can be controlled.

However, this approach is not consonant with Jewish tradition. The repeal of anti-homosexual laws implies the removal of the stigma from homosexuality, and this diminution of social censure weakens society in its training of the young toward acceptable patterns of conduct. The absence of adequate social reproach may well encourage the expression of homosexual tendencies by those in whom they might otherwise be suppressed. Law itself has an educative function, and the repeal of laws, no matter how justifiable such repeal may be from one point of view, does have the effect of signaling the acceptability of greater permissiveness.

Some New Proposals

Perhaps all that has been said above can best be expressed in the proposals that follow.

First, society and government must recognize the distinctions between the various categories enumerated earlier in this essay. We must offer medical and psychological assistance to those whose homosexuality is an expression of pathology, who recognize it as such, and are willing to seek help. We must be no less generous to the homosexual than to the drug addict, to whom the government extends various forms of therapy upon request.

Second, jail sentences must be abolished for all homosexuals, save those who are guilty of violence, seduction of the young, or public solicitation.

Third, the laws must remain on the books, but by mutual consent of judiciary and police, be unenforced. This approximates to what lawyers call « the chilling effect », and is the nearest one can come to the category so well known in the Halakhah, whereby strong disapproval is expressed by affirming a halakhic prohibition, yet no punishment is mandated. It is a category that bridges the gap between morality and law. In a society where homosexuality is so rampant, and where incarceration is so counterproductive, the hortatory approach may well be a way of formalizing society’s revulsion while avoiding the pitfalls in our accepted penology.

For the Jewish community as such, the same principles, derived from the tradition, may serve as guidelines. Judaism allows for no compromise in its abhorrence of sodomy, but encourages both compassion and efforts at rehabilitation. Certainly, there must be no acceptance of separate Jewish homosexual societies, such as – or specially – synagogues set aside as homosexual congregations. The first such « gay synagogue », apparently, was the « Beth Chayim Chadashim » in Los Angeles. Spawned by that city’s Metropolitan Community Church in March 1972, the founding group constituted itself as a Reform congregation with the help of the Pacific Southwest Council of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations some time in early 1973. Thereafter, similar groups surfaced in New York City and elsewhere. The original group meets on Friday evenings in the Leo Baeck Temple and is searching for a rabbi – who must himself be « gay ». The membership sees itself as justified by « the Philosophy of Reform Judaism ». The Temple president declared that God is « more concerned in our finding a sense of peace in which to make a better world, than He is in whom someone sleeps with » (cited in « Judaism and Homosexuality » C.C.A.R. Journal, summer 1973, p. 38; five articles in this issue of the Reform group’s rabbinic journal are devoted to the same theme, and most of them approve of the Gay Synagogue).

But such reasoning is specious, to say the least. Regular congregations and other Jewish groups should not hesitate to accord hospitality and membership, on an individual basis, to those « visible » homosexuals who qualify for the category of the ill. Homosexuals are no less in violation of Jewish norms than Sabbath desecrators or those who disregard the laws of kashrut. But to assent to the organization of separate « gay » groups under Jewish auspices makes no more sense, Jewishly, than to suffer the formation of synagogues that care exclusively to idol worshipers, adulterers, gossipers, tax evaders, or Sabbath violators. Indeed, it makes less sense, because it provides, under religious auspices, a ready-made clientele from which the homosexual can more easily choose his partners.

In remaining true to the sources of Jewish tradition. Jews are commanded to avoid the madness that seizes society at various times and in many forms, while yet retaining a moral composure and psychological equilibrium sufficient to exercise that combination of discipline and charity that is the hallmark of Judaism.

Voir aussi:

Buttigieg en tête des démocrates dans l’Iowa, une première

Métro

12 novembre 2018

Le jeune maire américain modéré Pete Buttigieg a dépassé pour la première fois les poids lourds de la primaire démocrate dans un sondage publié mardi portant sur l’Iowa, un État-clé dans la course à la Maison-Blanche car il sera le premier à voter.

C’est la première fois que Pete Buttigieg, 37 ans, arrive en tête d’un sondage dans la campagne pour la primaire démocrate.

Le maire enregistre 22% des intentions de vote dans l’Iowa selon un sondage de l’institut de Monmouth University, devant les grands favoris jusqu’ici: l’ancien vice-président de Barack Obama, Joe Biden (19%), la sénatrice progressiste Elizabeth Warren (18%) et le sénateur indépendant Bernie Sanders (13%).

Encore inconnu du grand public il y a un an, le maire de South Bend, dans l’Indiana, s’est depuis forgé un nom en se posant en modéré capable de rassembler l’Amérique pour battre le républicain Donald Trump en novembre 2020.

Ancien militaire, polyglotte et utra-diplômé, il est le premier grand candidat ouvertement homosexuel à la Maison-Blanche, marié depuis 2018 à un enseignant, Chasten.

Dans l’Iowa, où la primaire sera organisée le 3 février, «Buttigieg émerge comme un choix de premier plan pour un large éventail de démocrates», quel que soit leur niveau d’«éducation ou leur idéologie», a écrit mardi Patrick Murray, directeur de l’institut de sondage Monmouth University, dans un communiqué.

Plus de deux tiers des 451 personnes interrogées –du 7 au 11 novembre– disent pouvoir encore changer d’avis, précise l’institut. La marge d’erreur est importante, à 4,6 points, mais ce nouveau sondage vient confirmer l’ascension de M. Buttigieg dans l’Iowa depuis plusieurs semaines.

Sur les 17 candidats encore en lice pour l’investiture démocrate, Joe Biden reste favori au niveau national mais est en perte de vitesse (26,8%), suivi par Elizabeth Warren (20,8%), Bernie Sanders (17%), avec, loin derrière, Pete Buttigieg (7,5%).

Voir également:

Pete Buttigieg, meilleur candidat pour battre Trump à l’élection présidentielle?

Après avoir brillé dans l’Iowa, l’ancien maire mise sur la primaire dans le New Hampshire pour affronter Donald Trump à l’élection présidentielle américaine.

PRÉSIDENTIELLE AMÉRICAINE – Va-t-il transformer l’essai? Après ses résultats inespérés dans l’Iowa (toujours contestés par Bernie Sanders), Pete Buttigieg espère bien récolter les fruits de l’énorme coup de pouce médiatique dont il a bénéficié tout au long de cette semaine chaotique.

Le jeune candidat, encore inconnu il y a un an, croise donc les doigts ce mardi 11 février pour à nouveau s’imposer -ou du moins décrocher un score plus qu’honorable- dans le New Hampshire, deuxième État à voter aux primaires démocrates.

Si créer la surprise au cours des prochains scrutins et finir par décrocher la nomination du parti cet été est actuellement le rêve de tous les candidats, la seule vraie prouesse sera la suivante: battre Donald Trump lors de l’élection générale du 3 novembre et le sortir de la Maison Blanche.

Pete Buttigieg est-il le meilleur candidat pour cette périlleuse mission? Le HuffPost a rassemblé plusieurs forces (et faiblesses) du candidat pour tenter d’y voir plus clair.

Aux antipodes de Trump

Comme il aime souvent le rappeler en campagne, Pete Buttigieg a un atout majeur face à Donald Trump: son CV. Il faut dire qu’on pourrait difficilement imaginer un curriculum plus à l’opposé de celui du président républicain.

Contrairement à l’occupant actuel de la Maison Blanche, le démocrate a tout d’abord de l’expérience politique. Alors que le magnat de l’immobilier était l’hôte d’une téléréalité avant de se présenter à la présidence, Pete Buttigieg vient lui de terminer son 2e mandat de maire. Trump s’est construit dans la plus grande ville du pays qu’est New York, Buttiegieg a fait décoller sa carrière à South Bend, 100.000 habitants, dans l’État de l’Indiana.

Buttigieg met aussi régulièrement en avant son expérience dans l’armée. Il a passé sept mois en Afghanistan, un avantage sur tous ses concurrents démocrates et surtout sur Trump. Ce dernier a en effet réussi à échapper pas mois de cinq fois à la guerre du Vietnam: quatre reports grâce aux études qu’il suivait puis une dispense médicale pour une excroissance osseuse au pied dont les médias n’ont jamais retrouvé de trace.

Diplômé de grandes universités, le candidat a aussi montré qu’il était polyglotte(vidéo ci-dessous). En plus de l’anglais, il peut parler en norvégien, espagnol, italien, arabe, dari ou encore français comme il l’a montré en commentant l’incendie de Notre-Dame. Face à un président qui est parfois pointé du doigt pour la faiblesse du vocabulaire qu’il emploie dans son anglais natal.

 


Hanouka/2184e: Trump invente le sionisme antisémite ! (Ultimate sleight of hand: How can opposition to the existence of an apartheid state be called racism ?)

23 décembre, 2019
tied willyPresident Trump at the Israeli American Council National Summit last week in Hollywood, Fla.En ces jours-là surgit d’Israël une génération de vauriens qui séduisirent beaucoup de personnes en disant : “Allons, faisons alliance avec les nations qui nous entourent, car depuis que nous nous sommes séparés d’elles, bien des maux nous sont advenus.” (…) Plusieurs parmi le peuple s’empressèrent d’aller trouver le roi, qui leur donna l’autorisation d’observer les coutumes païennes. Ils construisirent donc un gymnase à Jérusalem, selon les usages des nations, se refirent des prépuces et renièrent l’alliance sainte pour s’associer aux nations. 1 Maccabées 1: 11-15
Il n’était même pas permis de célébrer le sabbat, ni de garder les fêtes de nos pères, ni simplement de confesser que l’on était Juif. On était conduit par une amère nécessité à participer chaque mois au repas rituel, le jour de la naissance du roi et, lorsqu’arrivaient les fêtes dionysiaques, on devait, couronné de lierre, accompagner le cortège de Dionysos. (…) Ainsi deux femmes furent déférées en justice pour avoir circoncis leurs enfants. On les produisit en public à travers la ville, leurs enfants suspendus à leurs mamelles, avant de les précipiter ainsi du haut des remparts. D’autres s’étaient rendus ensemble dans des cavernes voisines pour y célébrer en cachette le septième jour. Dénoncés à Philippe, ils furent brûlés ensemble, se gardant bien de se défendre eux-mêmes par respect pour la sainteté du jour. (…) Eléazar, un des premiers docteurs de la Loi, homme déjà avancé en âge et du plus noble extérieur, était contraint, tandis qu’on lui ouvrait la bouche de force, de manger de la chair de porc. Mais lui, préférant une mort glorieuse à une existence infâme, marchait volontairement au supplice de la roue,non sans avoir craché sa bouchée, comme le doivent faire ceux qui ont le courage de rejeter ce à quoi il n’est pas permis de goûter par amour de la vie. 2 Maccabées 6 : 6-20
On célébrait à Jérusalem la fête de la Dédicace. C’était l’hiver. Et Jésus se promenait dans le temple, sous le portique de Salomon. Jean 10: 22
La crise maccabéenne n’est pas un affrontement entre un roi grec fanatique et des Juifs pieux attachés à leurs traditions. C’est d’abord une crise interne au judaïsme, d’un affrontement entre ceux qui estiment qu’on peut rester fidèle au judaïsme en adoptant néanmoins certains traits de la civilisation du monde moderne, le grec, la pratique du sport, etc.., et ceux qui au contraire, pensent que toute adoption des mœurs grecques porte atteinte de façon insupportable à la religion des ancêtres. Si le roi Antiochos IV intervient, ce n’est pas par fanatisme, mais bien pour rétablir l’ordre dans une province de son royaume qui, de plus, se place sur la route qu’il emprunte pour faire campagne en Égypte. (…) Là où Antiochos IV commettait une magistrale erreur politique, c’est qu’il n’avait pas compris qu’abolir la Torah ne revenait pas seulement à priver les Juifs de leurs lois civiles, mais conduisait à l’abolition du judaïsme. Maurice Sartre
L’assemblée générale (…) considère que le sionisme est une forme de racisme et de discrimination raciale. Résolution 379 (ONU, le 10 novembre 1975)
L’assemblée générale décide de déclarer nulle la conclusion contenue dans le dispositif de sa résolution 3379 (XXX) du 10 novembre 1975. Résolution 4686 (ONU, le 16 décembre 1991)
I stand before you as the daughter of Palestinian immigrants, parents who experienced being stripped of their human rights – the right to freedom of travel, equal treatment. I cannot stand by and watch this attack on our freedom of speech and the right to boycott the racist policies of the government and the State of Israel. I love our country’s freedom of speech, madam speaker. Dissent is how we nurture democracy. and grow to be better and more humane and just. This is why I oppose resolution 243. All Americans have a right, a constitutional right guaranteed by the first amendment to freedom of speech. To petition their government and participate in boycotts. Speech in pursuit of civil rights at home and abroad is protected by our first amendment. That is one reason why our first amendment is so powerful. With a few exceptions the government is simply not allowed to discriminate against speech based on its viewpoint or speaker. The right to boycott is deeply rooted in the fabric of our country. What was the Boston tea party but a boycott ? Where would we be now with the civil rights activists in the 1950’s and 1960’s like the united farm workers grape boycott? Some of this country’s most important advances in racial equality and equity and workers’ rights has been achieved through collective action, protected by our constitution. Americans of conscience have long and proud history of participating in boycotts, specifically to advocate for human rights abroad. Americans boycotted nazi Germany in response to dehumanization, imprisonment, and genocide of Jewish people. In the 1980’s, many of us in this very body boycotted South African goods in the fight against apartheid. Our right to free speech is being threatened with this resolution. It sets a dangerous precedent because it attempts to delegitimatize a certain people’s political speech and to send a message that our government can and will take action against speech it doesn’t like. Madam speaker, the Supreme court has time and time again recognized the expressive conduct is protected by the constitution. from burning a flag to baking a cake, efforts to restrict and target that protected speech run the risk of eroding the civil rights that form the foundation of our democracy. All Americans have the right to participate in boycotts, and I oppose all legislative efforts that target speech. I urge congress, state governments, and civil rights leaders from all communities to preserve our constitution, preserve our bill of rights, and preserve the first amendment’s guaranteed of freedom of speech by opposing h. res. 246 and the boycott, anti-boycott efforts wherever they rise. Rashida Tlaib (July 23, 2019)
Melania and I send our warmest wishes to Jewish people in the United States, Israel and across the world as you commence the 8-day celebration of Hanukkah. More than 2,000 years ago, the Maccabees boldly reclaimed the Holy Temple in Jerusalem, securing a victory for the Jewish people and their faith. They proudly lit the menorah to rededicate the Second Temple. Even though there was only enough olive oil to burn for one day, through divine providence, the flames miraculously burned for eight nights. As the Jewish community gathers together to celebrate this special and sacred time of year, we are reminded of God’s message of hope, mercy, and love. Throughout the coming eight days, each candle to be lit on the menorah will signal to the world that freedom and justice will always shine brighter than hate and oppression. Today, the relationship between the United States and Israel, one of our most cherished allies and friends, is stronger than ever. We will continue to stand with the Jewish people in defending the God-given right to worship freely and openly. As our Jewish brothers and sisters gather around the menorah each night, we pray for a memorable and blessed celebration of the Festival of Lights. May the light of the menorah and the fellowship of family and friends fill your hearts with happiness and a renewed sense of faith. Happy Hanukkah! President Trump
Le président Donald J. Trump prend un décret présidentiel pour renforcer la lutte contre la montée de l’antisémitisme aux États-Unis. Le décret du président Trump indique clairement que le Titre VI de la loi sur les droits civils de 1964 s’applique à la discrimination antisémite fondée sur la race, la couleur ou l’origine nationale. Dans le cadre de l’application du Titre VI contre la discrimination antisémite dissimulée, les agences se référeront à la définition de l’antisémitisme de l’Alliance internationale pour la mémoire de l’Holocauste (IHRA) ainsi que ses exemples contemporains. (…) Ces dernières années, les Américains ont assisté à une augmentation inquiétante des incidents antisémites et à une montée de la rhétorique correspondante dans l’ensemble du pays. (…) Les incidents antisémites se sont multipliés en Amérique depuis 2013, en particulier dans les écoles et sur les campus universitaires. Il s’agit en particulier d’actes de violence horribles à l’encontre de Juifs américains et de synagogues aux États-Unis. 18 membres démocrates du Congrès ont coparrainé cette année une législation en faveur du mouvement antisémite « Boycott, désinvestissement, sanctions » (BDS). Dans leur résolution, ces membres du Congrès comparaient de manière choquante le soutien à Israël à celui à l’Allemagne nazie. Ambassade des Etats-Unis en France
États-unis. Quand Trump voit le judaïsme comme une nationalité: Sous prétexte de combattre l’antisémitisme, le président américain signe un décret qui empêche toute critique d’Israël. L’Humanité
Le président Trump prévoit de signer mercredi un décret visant à cibler ce qu’il considère comme de l’antisémitisme sur les campus universitaires en menaçant de retenir l’argent fédéral des établissements d’enseignement qui ne parviennent pas à lutter contre la discrimination, ont déclaré mardi trois responsables de l’administration. L’ordonnance devrait effectivement interpréter  le judaïsme comme une race ou une nationalité, et pas seulement comme une religion, pour inciter une loi fédérale pénalisant les collèges et universités qui se dérobent à leur responsabilité à favoriser un climat ouvert pour les étudiants issus de minorités. Ces dernières années, le boycott, le désinvestissement et les sanctions – ou B.D.S. – le mouvement contre Israël a troublé certains campus, laissant certains étudiants juifs se sentir importuns ou attaqués. En signant l’ordonnance, M. Trump utilisera son pouvoir exécutif pour agir là où le Congrès ne l’a pas fait, reproduisant essentiellement une législation bipartite bloquée par le Capitol Hill depuis plusieurs années. D’éminents démocrates se sont joints aux républicains pour promouvoir un tel changement de politique afin de combattre l’antisémitisme ainsi que le mouvement de boycott d’Israël. Mais les critiques se sont plaints qu’une telle politique pourrait être utilisée pour étouffer la liberté d’expression et l’opposition légitime à la politique d’Israël envers les Palestiniens au nom de la lutte contre l’antisémitisme. La définition de l’antisémitisme utilisée dans l’ordonnance correspond à celle utilisée par le Département d’État et par d’autres nations, mais elle a été critiquée comme étant trop ouverte et trop générale. Par exemple, il y est décrit comme antisémite « nier au peuple juif son droit à l’autodétermination » dans certaines circonstances et offre comme exemple de ce comportement « affirmer que l’existence d’un État d’Israël est une entreprise raciste ». (…) Les responsables de l’administration, qui ont insisté sur l’anonymat pour discuter de l’ordonnance avant son annonce officielle, ont déclaré qu’elle n’était pas destiné à étouffer la liberté d’expression. La Maison Blanche a contacté certains démocrates et groupes militants qui ont critiqué le président pour obtenir un soutien à cette décision. (…) Au fil des ans, M. Trump a été accusé de faire des remarques antisémites, de fermer les yeux sur les tropes antisémites ou d’enhardir les suprémacistes blancs comme ceux de Charlottesville, en Virginie, en 2017. Le week-end dernier, il a été critiqué pour ses propos tenus en Floride devant le Conseil israélo-américain au cours de laquelle il a déclaré au public juif qu’ils n’étaient « pas des gens sympas » mais qu’ils appuieraient sa réélection parce que « vous n’allez pas voter pour l’impôt sur la fortune ». Mais il s’est également positionné comme un partisan indéfectible d’Israël et un champion des Juifs américains, en déplaçant l’ambassade des États-Unis à Jérusalem, en soutenant les colonies en Cisjordanie et en reconnaissant la saisie des hauteurs du Golan. Il a également agressé la représentante Ilhan Omar, démocrate du Minnesota, lorsqu’elle a déclaré que le soutien à Israël était « tout au sujet des Benjamins », ce qui signifie de l’argent. (…) L’ordonnance à signer par M. Trump habiliterait le Département de l’éducation à de telles actions. En vertu du titre VI de la loi sur les droits civils de 1964, le ministère peut retenir le financement de tout collège ou programme éducatif qui établit une discrimination «fondée sur la race, la couleur ou l’origine nationale». La religion n’était pas incluse dans les catégories protégées, donc l’ordre de Donald Trump aura pour effet d’embrasser un argument selon lequel les Juifs sont un peuple ou une race d’origine nationale collective au Moyen-Orient, comme les Italo-Américains ou les Polonais américains. La définition de l’antisémitisme qui doit être adoptée par le Département d’État et formulée à l’origine par l’Alliance internationale pour la mémoire de l’Holocauste comprend « une certaine perception des Juifs, qui peut être exprimée comme de la haine envers les Juifs ». Cependant, elle ajoute que « des critiques d’Israël similaires à ce niveau contre tout autre pays ne peut pas être considéré comme antisémite ». (…) Bien qu’un ordre exécutif ne soit pas aussi permanent que la législation et puisse être annulé par le prochain président, l’action de M. Trump peut avoir pour effet d’étendre la politique au-delà de son administration, car ses successeurs peuvent trouver politiquement peu attrayant de le renverser. NYT
President Trump plans to sign an executive order on Wednesday targeting what he sees as anti-Semitism on college campuses by threatening to withhold federal money from educational institutions that fail to combat discrimination, three administration officials said on Tuesday. The order will effectively interpret Judaism as a race or nationality, not just a religion, to prompt a federal law penalizing colleges and universities deemed to be shirking their responsibility to foster an open climate for minority students. NYT
In an alternate universe, the idea of a presidential order designed to protect Jews from discrimination on college campuses would not necessarily create a firestorm of mutual recrimination and internecine political warfare. True, there is no consensus on whether “Jewish” is a religious, cultural, ethnic, or national identity. Most often, it is framed as a combination of at least three, but not always and certainly not in the views of all the various denominations and sects that accept the appellation. But there is no question that anti-Semitic acts are increasing across the United States, and they are being undertaken by people who could not care less about these distinctions. And there is nothing inherently objectionable about using the power of the federal government to try to protect people, including college students, from those incidents’ consequences. But in this universe, the guy who ordered this protection, Donald Trump, has revealed himself repeatedly to be an inveterate anti-Semite. (…) That’s on the one hand. On the other, Trump has been a perfect patsy for Israel’s right-wing government and its supporters in what is misnamed the American “pro-Israel” community. While previous presidents sought, without much success, to restrain Israel on behalf of a hoped-for future peace agreement with the Palestinians, Trump has given that nation’s most corrupt and extremist leadership in its 71-year-history carte blanche—peace and the Palestinians be damned. If the simultaneous embrace of anti-Semitism at home and philo-Semitism when it comes to Israel strikes one as contradictory, this is a mistake. Trump, like so many of today’s elected “populists,” sees considerable advantage in playing to hometown prejudices for personal gain while boosting Israel as a bulwark against worldwide Islam, which many of the president’s supporters consider an even greater offense to Christian belief than Jews are. Jews may be greedy and disloyal at home, but as long as Israel is out there kicking the shit out of the Arabs, it’s a trade-off that right-wing autocrats and their neofascist followers can get behind. (…) But the issue of the executive order is complicated by the fact that it is understood by all to be a means for the federal government to step in and quash the intensifying criticism of Israel on college campuses—most notably, criticism that takes the form of the boycott, divestment, and sanctions movement, or BDS. And it does this in part by insisting, as Jared Kushner recently argued in a New York Times op-ed, that all “anti-Zionism is anti-Semitism.” I’ve been an outspoken critic of the academic BDS movement for some time now. But if you ask me, the movement has been a spectacular failure in every respect, save one: It has succeeded in turning many college campuses into anti-Israel inculcation centers and therefore has scared the bejesus out of the Jewish parents paying for their kids to attend them. At the same time—even if you allow that occasional anti-Semitic comments and actions by some of BDS’s supporters are outliers and not indicative of most of its followers—I find the idea and, even more so, the practice of an academic boycott to be undeniably contradictory to universities’ philosophical commitment to freedom of expression and ideas. Nonetheless, the explicit and intellectually indefensible equation of anti-Zionism with actionable anti-Semitism is an obvious offense to the notion of freedom of expression, however much it cheers the tiny hearts of right-wing Jews and other Trump defenders. Jewish students already had all the protections they needed before Trump’s executive order. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act covers discrimination on the basis of a “group’s actual or perceived ancestry or ethnic characteristics” or “actual or perceived citizenship or residency in a country whose residents share a dominant religion or a distinct religious identity.” The New York Times’ early, inaccurate reporting on the executive order, in which the paper falsely stated that the order would “effectively interpret Judaism as a race or nationality,” deserves special mention here for creating the panic. But the result of the entire episode is that, yet again, the Trump administration has placed a stupid, shiny object before the media, and the hysteria that has ensued has divided Americans, Jews, liberals and conservatives, and free speech and human rights activists, all while the administration continues its relentless assault on our democracy and better selves. The Nation
US President Donald Trump thinks that anti-Semitism is a serious problem in America. But Trump is not so much concerned about neo-Nazis who scream that Jews and other minorities “will not replace us,” for he thinks that many white supremacists are “very fine people.” No, Trump is more worried about US college campuses, where students call for boycotts of Israel in support of the Palestinians. (…) In the first years of the Jewish state, Israel was popular among many leftists, because it was built on socialist ideas. Left-wing opinion in Europe and the United States began to turn against Israel after the Six-Day War in 1967, when Arab territories were occupied by Israeli troops. More and more, Israel came to be seen as a colonial power, or an apartheid state. One may or may not agree with that view of Israel. But few would deny that occupation, as is usually the case when civilians are under the thumb of a foreign military power, has led to oppression. So, to be a strong advocate for Palestinian rights and a critic of Israeli policies, on college campuses or anywhere else, does not automatically make one an anti-Semite. But there are extreme forms of anti-Zionism that do. The question is when that line is crossed. Some would claim that it is anti-Semitic to deny Jews the right to have their own homeland. This is indeed one of the premises of Trump’s presidential order. There are also elements on the radical left, certainly represented in educational institutions, who are so obsessed by the oppression of Palestinians that they see Israel as the world’s greatest evil. Just as anti-Semites in the past often linked Jews with the US, as the twin sources of rootless capitalist malevolence, some modern anti-Zionists combine their anti-Americanism with a loathing for Israel.In the minds of certain leftists, Israel and its American big brother are not just the last bastions of racist Western imperialism. The idea of a hidden Jewish capitalist cabal can also enter left-wing demonology as readily as it infects the far right. This noxious prejudice has haunted the British Labour Party, something its leader, Jeremy Corbyn, has consistently failed to recognize.In short, anti-Zionism can veer into anti-Semitism, but not all critics of Israel are anti-Zionist, and not all anti-Zionists are prejudiced against Jews.Quite where people stand on this issue depends heavily on how they define a Jew – a source of endless vagueness and confusion. (…)There is, in any case, something ill-conceived about the stress on race and nationhood in Trump’s order on combating anti-Semitism. Israel is the only state claiming to represent all Jews, but not all Jews necessarily identify with Israel. Some even actively dislike it. Trump’s order might suggest that such people are renegades, or even traitors. This idea might please Israel’s current government, but it is far from the spirit of the Halakha, or even from the liberal idea of citizenship.Defining Jews as a “race” is just as much of a problem. Jews come from many ethnic backgrounds: Yemenite, Ethiopian, Russian, Moroccan, and Swedish Jews are hard to pin down as a distinctive ethnic group. Hitler saw Jews as a race, but that is no reason to follow his example.To combat racism, wherever it occurs, is a laudable aim. But singling out anti-Semitism in an executive order, especially when the concept is so intimately linked to views on the state of Israel, is a mistake. Extreme anti-Zionists may be a menace; all extremists are. But they should be tolerated, as long as their views are peacefully expressed. To stifle opinions on campuses by threatening to withhold funds runs counter to the freedom of speech guaranteed by the US Constitution. This is, alas, not the only sign that upholding the constitution is not the main basis of the current US administration’s claim to legitimacy. Ian Buruma
Donald Trump has a knack for taking some of humanity’s most problematic ideas and turning them on their head to make them even worse. He has done it again. On Wednesday, he signed an executive order that will allow federal funds to be withheld from colleges where students are not protected from anti-Semitism—using an absurdly defined version of what constitutes anti-Semitism. Recent precedent and the history of legislative efforts that preceded the executive order would suggest that its main targets are campus groups critical of Israeli policies. What the order itself did not make explicit, the President’s son-in-law did: on Wednesday, Jared Kushner published an Op-Ed in the Times in which he stressed that the definition of anti-Semitism used in the executive order “makes clear what our administration has stated publicly on the record: Anti-Zionism is anti-Semitism.” Both Kushner and the executive order refer to the definition of anti-Semitism that was formulated, in 2016, by the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance; it has since been adopted by the State Department. The definition supplies examples of anti-Semitism, and Kushner cited the most problematic of these as the most important: “the targeting of the state of Israel, conceived as a Jewish collectivity”; denial to “the Jewish people their right to self-determination, e.g. by claiming that the existence of a state of Israel is a racist endeavor”; and comparing “contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis.” All three examples perform the same sleight of hand: they reframe opposition to or criticism of Israeli policies as opposition to the state of Israel. And that, says Kushner, is anti-Semitism. To be sure, some people who are critical of Israeli policies are opposed to the existence of the state of Israel itself. And some of those people are also anti-Semites. I am intimately familiar with this brand of anti-Semitism, because I grew up in the Soviet Union, where anti-Zionist rhetoric served as the propaganda backbone of state anti-Semitism. The word “Zionist,” when deployed by Pravda, served as incitement to violence and discrimination against Soviet Jews. All of this can be true at the same time that it is also true that Israel has effectively created an apartheid state, in which some Palestinians have some political rights and the rest have none. Human-rights organizations such as Breaking the Silence and B’Tselem—Israeli groups, founded and run by Jews—continue to document harrowing abuse of Palestinians in Israel, the occupied West Bank, and Gaza. One does not have to be an anti-Semite to be an anti-Zionist, but one certainly can be both an anti-Semite and an anti-Zionist. Trump, however, has inverted this formula by positioning himself as a pro-Zionist anti-Semite. Masha Gessen (New Yorker)
The key point we were making is that sometimes discrimination against Jews, Muslims, and others is based on a perception of shared race, ethnicity, or national origin, and in those cases it’s appropriate to think of that discrimination as race or national origin discrimination as well as religious discrimination. It doesn’t mean that the government is saying that the group is a racial or national group. The government is saying that the discrimination is based on the discriminator’s perception of race or national origin. That’s a very different matter from saying that anti-Israel or pro-Palestinian speech constitutes discrimination. Sam Bagenstos (University of Michigan Law School)
The text of the order, which leaked on Wednesday, does not redefine Judaism as a race or nationality. It does not claim that Jews are a nation or a different race. The order’s interpretation of Title VI—insofar as the law applies to Jews—is entirely in line with the Obama administration’s approach. It only deviates from past practice by suggesting that harsh criticism of Israel—specifically, the notion that it is “a racist endeavor”—may be used as evidence to prove anti-Semitic intent. There is good reason, however, to doubt that the order can actually be used to suppress non-bigoted disapproval of Israel on college campuses. Title VI bars discrimination on the basis of “race, color or national origin” in programs that receive federal assistance—most notably here, educational institutions. It does not prohibit discrimination on the basis of religion, an omission that raises difficult questions about religions that may have an ethnic component. For example, people of all races, ethnicities, and nationalities can be Muslim. But Islamophobia often takes the form of intolerance against individuals of Arab or Middle Eastern origin. If a college permits rampant Islamophobic harassment on campus, has it run afoul of Title VI? In a 2004 policy statement, Kenneth L. Marcus—then–deputy assistant secretary for enforcement at the Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights—answered that question. “Groups that face discrimination on the basis of shared ethnic characteristics,” Marcus wrote, “may not be denied the protection” under Title VI “on the ground that they also share a common faith.” Put differently, people who face discrimination because of their perceived ethnicity do not lose protection because of their religion. The Office of Civil Rights, Marcus continued, “will exercise its jurisdiction to enforce the Title VI prohibition against national origin discrimination, regardless of whether the groups targeted for discrimination also exhibit religious characteristics. Thus, for example, OCR aggressively investigates alleged race or ethnic harassment against Arab Muslim, Sikh and Jewish students.” The Obama administration reaffirmed this position in a 2010 letter written by Assistant Attorney General Thomas E. Perez, who is now the chair of the Democratic National Committee. “We agree,” Perez wrote, with Marcus’ analysis. “Although Title VI does not prohibit discrimination on the basis of religion, discrimination against Jews, Muslims, Sikhs, and members of other religious groups violates Title VI when that discrimination is based on the group’s actual or perceived shared ancestry or ethnic characteristics, rather than its members’ religious practice.” Perez added that Title VI “prohibits discrimination against an individual where it is based on actual or perceived citizenship or residency in a country whose residents share a dominant religion or a distinct religious identity.” On Wednesday, I asked Perez’s former principal deputy, Sam Bagenstos—now a professor at University of Michigan Law School—whether he felt this reasoning equated any religious group of a nationality or race. “The key point we were making,” he told me, “is that sometimes discrimination against Jews, Muslims, and others is based on a perception of shared race, ethnicity, or national origin, and in those cases it’s appropriate to think of that discrimination as race or national origin discrimination as well as religious discrimination. It doesn’t mean that the government is saying that the group is a racial or national group. The government is saying that the discrimination is based on the discriminator’s perception of race or national origin. That’s a very different matter from saying that anti-Israel or pro-Palestinian speech constitutes discrimination.” Trump’s executive order mostly just reaffirms the current law. Trump’s EO does not deviate from this understanding of the overlap between discrimination on the basis of race or nationality and discrimination against religion. It only changes the law insofar as it expands the definition of anti-Semitism that may run afoul of Title VI. In assessing potential violations, the order directs executive agencies to look to the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance’s definition—chiefly “hatred toward Jews” directed at individuals, their property, their “community institutions and religious facilities.” Agencies must also refer to the IHRA’s “Contemporary Examples of Anti-Semitism.” That list contains a number of obvious, unobjectionable examples. But it also includes two more controversial examples: “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination, e.g., by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavor,” and “Applying double standards by requiring of it a behavior not expected or demanded of any other democratic nation.” To the extent that anyone is alarmed by Wednesday’s order, these examples should be the focus of their concern. A tendentious reading of this rule could theoretically get students in trouble for severe condemnation of Israeli policy, even when it does not cross the line into a condemnation of Jews. But the order only directs agencies to consider the IHRA’s list “to the extent that any examples might be useful as evidence of discriminatory intent.” In other words, applying double standards to Israel alone would not trigger a Title VI investigation. Instead, the IHRA’s list would only come into play after an individual is accused of overt anti-Semitism with an ethnic component, and then only as evidence of bigoted intent. Moreover, the order states that agencies “shall not diminish or infringe upon any right protected under Federal law or under the First Amendment” in enforcing Title VI. Because political criticism of Israel is plainly protected speech, the impact of the order’s revised definition of anti-Semitism will likely be limited. In fact, it’s unclear whether Wednesday’s order will have any impact, given that it mostly just reaffirms the current law. The New York Times’ reporting provoked anger among many Jews, who feared that an order to “effectively interpret Judaism as a race or nationality” would stoke anti-Semitism. But the order does no such thing. It restates the federal government’s long-standing interpretation of Title VI to encompass some anti-Jewish bias. And it raises the faint possibility that, in some case down the road, a student’s sharp criticism of Israel may be used as evidence of anti-Semitic intent after he has been accused of targeting Jews because of their perceived race or nationality. Is this order red meat for Republicans who believe colleges are increasingly hostile to Jews? Probably. Will it quash the pro-Palestine movement on campuses or impose an unwanted classification on American Jews? Absolutely not.

Plus raciste que moi, tu meurs !

En cette première journée d’Hanoukah, la Fête des lumières juive célébrant la reconsécration du Temple par les Maccabées en décembre 165 avant notre ère suite à sa désécration par le roi Séleucide (syrien descendant des généraux d’Alexandre) Antiochus (ou Antiochos) IV dit Epiphane …

Qui derrière la tentative d’héllénisation forcée et les mesures d’une sorte de génocide culturel …

Et la véritable crise identitaire que déclencha, avant celle des Romains puis la nôtre aujourd’hui, cette première mondialisation …

Vit en fait au sein même d’Israël non seulement une révolte fiscale…

Mais une véritable guerre civile entre factions opposées du judaïsme (héllenisés contre traditionalistes) …

Les premiers allant jusqu’à faire appel à la puissante occupante des Séleucides pour arbitrer le conflit …

Et au lendemain de la retentissante et réjouissante remise aux poubelles de l’histoire par le peuple britannique …

De la véritable institutionnalisation de l’antisémitisme, derrière le parti de Jeremy Corbyn, de toute une gauche européenne et américaine …

Comment ne pas voir rejouer sous nos yeux, toutes proportions gardées, cette même guerre culturelle …

Au sein même de la communauté juive aussi bien américaine que mondiale …

Et, 70 ans après sa re-création, ce même refus d’une souveraineté juive restaurée

Suite aux premières fuites (d’un toujours aussi zélé NYT ayant conclu un peu hâtivement à une assimilation qui y aurait été faite du judaïsme à une race ou un groupe ethnique) d’un décret que vient de publier le président Trump contre l’antisémitisme  …

Qui, entre appels au boycott d’Israël et intimidation de toute parole pro-israélienne, continue ses ravages sur les campus américains …

Et comment ne pas découvrir horrifié derrière l’interdiction de l’antisionisme …

L’opposition à un « Etat d’apartheid » ne pouvant être, y compris on le sait à coup d’associations au nazisme, qualifié de racisme …

L’abomination de cette nouvelle race de super-racistes …

A savoir celle du… sioniste antisémite ?

Trump’s Racist Ban on Anti-Semitism
To combat racism, wherever it occurs, is a laudable aim. But singling out anti-Semitism in an executive order, especially when the concept is so intimately linked to views on the state of Israel, is a mistake.
Ian Buruma
Project syndicate
Dec 13, 2019

NEW YORK – US President Donald Trump thinks that anti-Semitism is a serious problem in America. But Trump is not so much concerned about neo-Nazis who scream that Jews and other minorities “will not replace us,” for he thinks that many white supremacists are “very fine people.” No, Trump is more worried about US college campuses, where students call for boycotts of Israel in support of the Palestinians.

Trump just signed an executive order requiring that federal money be withheld from educational institutions that fail to combat anti-Semitism. Since Jews are identified in this order as a discriminated group on the grounds of ethnic, racial, or national characteristics, an attack on Israel would be anti-Semitic by definition. This is indeed the position of Jared Kushner, Trump’s Jewish son-in-law, who believes that “anti-Zionism is anti-Semitism.”There are, of course, as many forms of anti-Semitism as there are interpretations of what it means to be Jewish. When Trump and his supporters rant in campaign rallies about shadowy cabals of international financiers who undermine the interests of “ordinary, decent people,” some might interpret that as a common anti-Semitic trope, especially when an image of George Soros is brandished to underline this message. Trump even hinted at the possibility that the liberal Jewish human rights promoter and philanthropist was deliberately funding “caravans” of refugees and illegal aliens so that they could spread mayhem in the US. In Soros’s native Hungary, attacks on him as a cosmopolitan enemy of the people are unmistakably anti-Semitic.Conspiracy theories about sinister Jewish power have a long history. The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, a Russian forgery published in 1903, popularized the notion that Jewish bankers and financiers were secretly pulling the strings to dominate the world. Henry Ford was one of the more prominent people who believed this nonsense.The history of extreme anti-Zionism is not so long. In the first years of the Jewish state, Israel was popular among many leftists, because it was built on socialist ideas. Left-wing opinion in Europe and the United States began to turn against Israel after the Six-Day War in 1967, when Arab territories were occupied by Israeli troops. More and more, Israel came to be seen as a colonial power, or an apartheid state.One may or may not agree with that view of Israel. But few would deny that occupation, as is usually the case when civilians are under the thumb of a foreign military power, has led to oppression. So, to be a strong advocate for Palestinian rights and a critic of Israeli policies, on college campuses or anywhere else, does not automatically make one an anti-Semite. But there are extreme forms of anti-Zionism that do. The question is when that line is crossed.

Some would claim that it is anti-Semitic to deny Jews the right to have their own homeland. This is indeed one of the premises of Trump’s presidential order. There are also elements on the radical left, certainly represented in educational institutions, who are so obsessed by the oppression of Palestinians that they see Israel as the world’s greatest evil. Just as anti-Semites in the past often linked Jews with the US, as the twin sources of rootless capitalist malevolence, some modern anti-Zionists combine their anti-Americanism with a loathing for Israel.

In the minds of certain leftists, Israel and its American big brother are not just the last bastions of racist Western imperialism. The idea of a hidden Jewish capitalist cabal can also enter left-wing demonology as readily as it infects the far right. This noxious prejudice has haunted the British Labour Party, something its leader, Jeremy Corbyn, has consistently failed to recognize.In short, anti-Zionism can veer into anti-Semitism, but not all critics of Israel are anti-Zionist, and not all anti-Zionists are prejudiced against Jews.Quite where people stand on this issue depends heavily on how they define a Jew – a source of endless vagueness and confusion. According to Halakha, or Jewish law, anyone with a Jewish mother, or who has converted to Judaism, is Jewish. That is the general Orthodox view. But more liberal Reform Jews allow Jewish identity to pass through the father as well.On the other hand, while most Orthodox Jews consider a person to be Jewish even if they convert to another religion, Reform Jews do not. Israel’s Law of Return grants “every Jew” the right to immigrate, but refrains from defining Jewishness. Since 1970, even people with one Jewish grandparent have been eligible to become Israeli citizens. In the infamous Nuremberg laws, promulgated by the Nazis in 1935, people with only one Jewish parent could retain German citizenship, while “full” Jews could not.The whole thing is so complicated that Amos Oz, the Israeli novelist, once sought to simplify the matter as follows: “Who is a Jew? Everyone who is mad enough to call himself or herself a Jew, is a Jew.”There is, in any case, something ill-conceived about the stress on race and nationhood in Trump’s order on combating anti-Semitism. Israel is the only state claiming to represent all Jews, but not all Jews necessarily identify with Israel. Some even actively dislike it. Trump’s order might suggest that such people are renegades, or even traitors. This idea might please Israel’s current government, but it is far from the spirit of the Halakha, or even from the liberal idea of citizenship.Defining Jews as a “race” is just as much of a problem. Jews come from many ethnic backgrounds: Yemenite, Ethiopian, Russian, Moroccan, and Swedish Jews are hard to pin down as a distinctive ethnic group. Hitler saw Jews as a race, but that is no reason to follow his example.To combat racism, wherever it occurs, is a laudable aim. But singling out anti-Semitism in an executive order, especially when the concept is so intimately linked to views on the state of Israel, is a mistake. Extreme anti-Zionists may be a menace; all extremists are. But they should be tolerated, as long as their views are peacefully expressed. To stifle opinions on campuses by threatening to withhold funds runs counter to the freedom of speech guaranteed by the US Constitution. This is, alas, not the only sign that upholding the constitution is not the main basis of the current US administration’s claim to legitimacy.

Voir aussi:

The Real Purpose of Trump’s Executive Order on Anti-Semitism
The President’s new order will not protect anyone against anti-Semitism, and it’s not intended to. Its sole aim is to quash the defense—and even the discussion—of Palestinian rights.
Masha Gessen
The New Yorker
December 12, 2019

Donald Trump has a knack for taking some of humanity’s most problematic ideas and turning them on their head to make them even worse. He has done it again. On Wednesday, he signed an executive order that will allow federal funds to be withheld from colleges where students are not protected from anti-Semitism—using an absurdly defined version of what constitutes anti-Semitism. Recent precedent and the history of legislative efforts that preceded the executive order would suggest that its main targets are campus groups critical of Israeli policies. What the order itself did not make explicit, the President’s son-in-law did: on Wednesday, Jared Kushner published an Op-Ed in the Times in which he stressed that the definition of anti-Semitism used in the executive order “makes clear what our administration has stated publicly on the record: Anti-Zionism is anti-Semitism.”

Both Kushner and the executive order refer to the definition of anti-Semitism that was formulated, in 2016, by the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance; it has since been adopted by the State Department. The definition supplies examples of anti-Semitism, and Kushner cited the most problematic of these as the most important: “the targeting of the state of Israel, conceived as a Jewish collectivity”; denial to “the Jewish people their right to self-determination, e.g. by claiming that the existence of a state of Israel is a racist endeavor”; and comparing “contemporary Israeli policy to that of the Nazis.” All three examples perform the same sleight of hand: they reframe opposition to or criticism of Israeli policies as opposition to the state of Israel. And that, says Kushner, is anti-Semitism.

To be sure, some people who are critical of Israeli policies are opposed to the existence of the state of Israel itself. And some of those people are also anti-Semites. I am intimately familiar with this brand of anti-Semitism, because I grew up in the Soviet Union, where anti-Zionist rhetoric served as the propaganda backbone of state anti-Semitism. The word “Zionist,” when deployed by Pravda, served as incitement to violence and discrimination against Soviet Jews. All of this can be true at the same time that it is also true that Israel has effectively created an apartheid state, in which some Palestinians have some political rights and the rest have none. Human-rights organizations such as Breaking the Silence and B’Tselem—Israeli groups, founded and run by Jews—continue to document harrowing abuse of Palestinians in Israel, the occupied West Bank, and Gaza.

In August, I went on a tour designed by Breaking the Silence that aims to show Israelis and foreigners what the occupation looks like. This particular tour ended in a Palestinian village which has been largely overtaken by an Israeli settlement that is illegal under international law. One of the Palestinian houses ended up on territory claimed by the settlers, so the settlers built a chain-link cage around the house, the yard, and the driveway. A young Palestinian child, who is growing up in a house inside a cage, waved to us through the fencing. Comparing this sort of approach to Nazi policies may not make for the most useful argument, but it is certainly not outlandish. The memory of the Holocaust stands as a warning to humanity about the dangers of dehumanizing the other—and invoking that warning in Palestine is warranted.

One does not have to be an anti-Semite to be an anti-Zionist, but one certainly can be both an anti-Semite and an anti-Zionist. Trump, however, has inverted this formula by positioning himself as a pro-Zionist anti-Semite. He has proclaimed his support often for the state of Israel. His Administration’s policies, which have included moving the U.S. Embassy to Jerusalem and, more recently, declaring that the U.S. does not view Israeli settlements in the West Bank as illegal, have pleased the state of Israel, especially its most militantly expansionist citizens. Over the weekend, however, at the Israeli American Council National Summit, in Florida, Trump gave a speech that brimmed with Jewish stereotypes: Jews and greed, Jews and money, Jews as ruthless wheeler-dealers. “A lot of you are in the real estate business because I know you very well,” he said. « You’re brutal killers, not nice people at all.” It was the kind of stuff that requires no definitions, op-eds, or explanations—it was plain, easily recognizable anti-Semitism. And it was not the first time that Trump trafficked in anti-Semitic stereotypes. The world view behind these stereotypes, combined with support for Israel, is also recognizable. To Trump, Jews—including American Jews, some of whom vote for him—are alien beings whom he associates with the state of Israel. He finds these alien beings at once distasteful and worthy of a sort of admiration, perhaps because he ascribes to them many of the features that he also recognizes in himself.

It should come as no surprise that anti-Semitic incidents in the U.S. increased by sixty per cent during the first year of Trump’s Presidency, according to the Anti-Defamation League. The current year is on track to set a record for the number of anti-Semitic attacks. The latest appears to have occurred on Tuesday, when shooters reportedly connected to a fringe group targeted a kosher supermarket in Jersey City, killing four people.

The new executive order will not protect anyone against anti-Semitism, and it’s not intended to. Its sole aim is to quash the defense—and even the discussion—of Palestinian rights. Its victim will be free speech.

Voir également:

No, the Trump Administration Is Not Redefining Judaism as a Nationality

Its executive order on anti-Semitism won’t change much at all.

The New York Times published a bombshell report on Tuesday claiming that President Donald Trump planned to sign an executive order that interpreted Judaism “as a race or nationality” under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Title VI governs federally funded educational programs, so the Times warned that the order might be deployed to squelch anti-Israel speech on campus. “Mr. Trump’s order,” the Times further claimed, “will have the effect of embracing an argument that Jews are a people or a race with a collective national origin in the Middle East, like Italian Americans or Polish Americans.”

That turned out to be untrue. The text of the order, which leaked on Wednesday, does not redefine Judaism as a race or nationality. It does not claim that Jews are a nation or a different race. The order’s interpretation of Title VI—insofar as the law applies to Jews—is entirely in line with the Obama administration’s approach. It only deviates from past practice by suggesting that harsh criticism of Israel—specifically, the notion that it is “a racist endeavor”—may be used as evidence to prove anti-Semitic intent. There is good reason, however, to doubt that the order can actually be used to suppress non-bigoted disapproval of Israel on college campuses.

Title VI bars discrimination on the basis of “race, color or national origin” in programs that receive federal assistance—most notably here, educational institutions. It does not prohibit discrimination on the basis of religion, an omission that raises difficult questions about religions that may have an ethnic component. For example, people of all races, ethnicities, and nationalities can be Muslim. But Islamophobia often takes the form of intolerance against individuals of Arab or Middle Eastern origin. If a college permits rampant Islamophobic harassment on campus, has it run afoul of Title VI?

In a 2004 policy statement, Kenneth L. Marcus—then–deputy assistant secretary for enforcement at the Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights—answered that question. “Groups that face discrimination on the basis of shared ethnic characteristics,” Marcus wrote, “may not be denied the protection” under Title VI “on the ground that they also share a common faith.” Put differently, people who face discrimination because of their perceived ethnicity do not lose protection because of their religion. The Office of Civil Rights, Marcus continued, “will exercise its jurisdiction to enforce the Title VI prohibition against national origin discrimination, regardless of whether the groups targeted for discrimination also exhibit religious characteristics. Thus, for example, OCR aggressively investigates alleged race or ethnic harassment against Arab Muslim, Sikh and Jewish students.”

The Obama administration reaffirmed this position in a 2010 letter written by Assistant Attorney General Thomas E. Perez, who is now the chair of the Democratic National Committee. “We agree,” Perez wrote, with Marcus’ analysis. “Although Title VI does not prohibit discrimination on the basis of religion, discrimination against Jews, Muslims, Sikhs, and members of other religious groups violates Title VI when that discrimination is based on the group’s actual or perceived shared ancestry or ethnic characteristics, rather than its members’ religious practice.” Perez added that Title VI “prohibits discrimination against an individual where it is based on actual or perceived citizenship or residency in a country whose residents share a dominant religion or a distinct religious identity.”

On Wednesday, I asked Perez’s former principal deputy, Sam Bagenstos—now a professor at University of Michigan Law School—whether he felt this reasoning equated any religious group of a nationality or race. “The key point we were making,” he told me, “is that sometimes discrimination against Jews, Muslims, and others is based on a perception of shared race, ethnicity, or national origin, and in those cases it’s appropriate to think of that discrimination as race or national origin discrimination as well as religious discrimination. It doesn’t mean that the government is saying that the group is a racial or national group. The government is saying that the discrimination is based on the discriminator’s perception of race or national origin. That’s a very different matter from saying that anti-Israel or pro-Palestinian speech constitutes discrimination.”

Trump’s EO does not deviate from this understanding of the overlap between discrimination on the basis of race or nationality and discrimination against religion. It only changes the law insofar as it expands the definition of anti-Semitism that may run afoul of Title VI. In assessing potential violations, the order directs executive agencies to look to the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance’s definition—chiefly “hatred toward Jews” directed at individuals, their property, their “community institutions and religious facilities.”

Agencies must also refer to the IHRA’s “Contemporary Examples of Anti-Semitism.” That list contains a number of obvious, unobjectionable examples. But it also includes two more controversial examples: “Denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination, e.g., by claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavor,” and “Applying double standards by requiring of it a behavior not expected or demanded of any other democratic nation.” To the extent that anyone is alarmed by Wednesday’s order, these examples should be the focus of their concern. A tendentious reading of this rule could theoretically get students in trouble for severe condemnation of Israeli policy, even when it does not cross the line into a condemnation of Jews.

But the order only directs agencies to consider the IHRA’s list “to the extent that any examples might be useful as evidence of discriminatory intent.” In other words, applying double standards to Israel alone would not trigger a Title VI investigation. Instead, the IHRA’s list would only come into play after an individual is accused of overt anti-Semitism with an ethnic component, and then only as evidence of bigoted intent. Moreover, the order states that agencies “shall not diminish or infringe upon any right protected under Federal law or under the First Amendment” in enforcing Title VI. Because political criticism of Israel is plainly protected speech, the impact of the order’s revised definition of anti-Semitism will likely be limited.

In fact, it’s unclear whether Wednesday’s order will have any impact, given that it mostly just reaffirms the current law. The New York Times’ reporting provoked anger among many Jews, who feared that an order to “effectively interpret Judaism as a race or nationality” would stoke anti-Semitism. But the order does no such thing. It restates the federal government’s long-standing interpretation of Title VI to encompass some anti-Jewish bias. And it raises the faint possibility that, in some case down the road, a student’s sharp criticism of Israel may be used as evidence of anti-Semitic intent after he has been accused of targeting Jews because of their perceived race or nationality. Is this order red meat for Republicans who believe colleges are increasingly hostile to Jews? Probably. Will it quash the pro-Palestine movement on campuses or impose an unwanted classification on American Jews? Absolutely not.

Voir de même:

In an alternate universe, the idea of a presidential order designed to protect Jews from discrimination on college campuses would not necessarily create a firestorm of mutual recrimination and internecine political warfare. True, there is no consensus on whether “Jewish” is a religious, cultural, ethnic, or national identity. Most often, it is framed as a combination of at least three, but not always and certainly not in the views of all the various denominations and sects that accept the appellation. But there is no question that anti-Semitic acts are increasing across the United States, and they are being undertaken by people who could not care less about these distinctions. And there is nothing inherently objectionable about using the power of the federal government to try to protect people, including college students, from those incidents’ consequences.

But in this universe, the guy who ordered this protection, Donald Trump, has revealed himself repeatedly to be an inveterate anti-Semite. Just a few days before he issued the executive order, he told supporters of the Israeli-American Council, “You’re brutal killers, not nice people at all…. Some of you don’t like me. Some of you I don’t like at all, actually.” He went on to insist nevertheless that the Jews gathered to hear him were “going to be my biggest supporters,” because Democrats were proposing to raise taxes on the superwealthy. In other words, Jews are greedy and care only about their personal fortunes. Trump, of course, was playing to type. He, his party, and his highest-profile supporters have repeatedly demonized Jews in political advertisements, deploying age-old anti-Semitic tropes that have been used to stir up violence against vulnerable Jewish communities in Europe and elsewhere. In addition, Trump frequently implies that Jews are not “real” Americans. He tells Jews that Bibi Netanyahu is “your prime minister” and complains that Jewish Democrats—which is most Jews—are “disloyal to Israel.”

That’s on the one hand. On the other, Trump has been a perfect patsy for Israel’s right-wing government and its supporters in what is misnamed the American “pro-Israel” community. While previous presidents sought, without much success, to restrain Israel on behalf of a hoped-for future peace agreement with the Palestinians, Trump has given that nation’s most corrupt and extremist leadership in its 71-year-history carte blanche—peace and the Palestinians be damned.

If the simultaneous embrace of anti-Semitism at home and philo-Semitism when it comes to Israel strikes one as contradictory, this is a mistake. Trump, like so many of today’s elected “populists,” sees considerable advantage in playing to hometown prejudices for personal gain while boosting Israel as a bulwark against worldwide Islam, which many of the president’s supporters consider an even greater offense to Christian belief than Jews are. Jews may be greedy and disloyal at home, but as long as Israel is out there kicking the shit out of the Arabs, it’s a trade-off that right-wing autocrats and their neofascist followers can get behind.

Most American Jews understandably want no part of this devil’s bargain. They are not interested in having their patriotism questioned. They remain among the most loyal and liberal constituencies in what is left of the decidedly tattered New Deal coalition that Franklin Roosevelt constructed back in the 1930s. And most hold Trump and his alt-right supporters accountable for the atmosphere of menace that has led to horrific attacks on Jews, like the massacre at a Pittsburgh synagogue last year.

But the issue of the executive order is complicated by the fact that it is understood by all to be a means for the federal government to step in and quash the intensifying criticism of Israel on college campuses—most notably, criticism that takes the form of the boycott, divestment, and sanctions movement, or BDS. And it does this in part by insisting, as Jared Kushner recently argued in a New York Times op-ed, that all “anti-Zionism is anti-Semitism.”

I’ve been an outspoken critic of the academic BDS movement for some time now. But if you ask me, the movement has been a spectacular failure in every respect, save one: It has succeeded in turning many college campuses into anti-Israel inculcation centers and therefore has scared the bejesus out of the Jewish parents paying for their kids to attend them. At the same time—even if you allow that occasional anti-Semitic comments and actions by some of BDS’s supporters are outliers and not indicative of most of its followers—I find the idea and, even more so, the practice of an academic boycott to be undeniably contradictory to universities’ philosophical commitment to freedom of expression and ideas.

Nonetheless, the explicit and intellectually indefensible equation of anti-Zionism with actionable anti-Semitism is an obvious offense to the notion of freedom of expression, however much it cheers the tiny hearts of right-wing Jews and other Trump defenders. Jewish students already had all the protections they needed before Trump’s executive order. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act covers discrimination on the basis of a “group’s actual or perceived ancestry or ethnic characteristics” or “actual or perceived citizenship or residency in a country whose residents share a dominant religion or a distinct religious identity.”

The New York Times’ early, inaccurate reporting on the executive order, in which the paper falsely stated that the order would “effectively interpret Judaism as a race or nationality,” deserves special mention here for creating the panic. But the result of the entire episode is that, yet again, the Trump administration has placed a stupid, shiny object before the media, and the hysteria that has ensued has divided Americans, Jews, liberals and conservatives, and free speech and human rights activists, all while the administration continues its relentless assault on our democracy and better selves.

The president’s order would allow the government to withhold money from campuses deemed to be biased, but critics see it as an attack on free speech.

Peter Baker and

NYT

WASHINGTON — President Trump plans to sign an executive order on Wednesday targeting what he sees as anti-Semitism on college campuses by threatening to withhold federal money from educational institutions that fail to combat discrimination, three administration officials said on Tuesday.

The order will effectively interpret Judaism as a race or nationality, not just a religion, to prompt a federal law penalizing colleges and universities deemed to be shirking their responsibility to foster an open climate for minority students. In recent years, the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions — or B.D.S. — movement against Israel has roiled some campuses, leaving some Jewish students feeling unwelcome or attacked.

In signing the order, Mr. Trump will use his executive power to take action where Congress has not, essentially replicating bipartisan legislation that has stalled on Capitol Hill for several years. Prominent Democrats have joined Republicans in promoting such a policy change to combat anti-Semitism as well as the boycott-Israel movement.

But critics complained that such a policy could be used to stifle free speech and legitimate opposition to Israel’s policies toward Palestinians in the name of fighting anti-Semitism. The definition of anti-Semitism to be used in the order matches the one used by the State Department and by other nations, but it has been criticized as too open-ended and sweeping.

For instance, it describes as anti-Semitic “denying the Jewish people their right to self-determination” under some circumstances and offers as an example of such behavior “claiming that the existence of a State of Israel is a racist endeavor.”

Yousef Munayyer, the executive director of the U.S. Campaign for Palestinian Rights, said Mr. Trump’s order is part of a sustained campaign “to silence Palestinian rights activism” by equating opposition to Israeli treatment of Palestinians with anti-Semitism.

“Israeli apartheid is a very hard product to sell in America, especially in progressive spaces,” Mr. Munayyer said, “and realizing this, many Israeli apartheid apologists, Trump included, are looking to silence a debate they know they can’t win.”

Administration officials, who insisted on anonymity to discuss the order before its official announcement, said it was not intended to squelch free speech. The White House reached out to some Democrats and activist groups that have been critical of the president to build support for the move.

Among those welcoming the order on Tuesday was Jonathan Greenblatt, the chief executive of the Anti-Defamation League, who said the group recorded its third-highest level of anti-Semitic episodes in the United States last year.

“Of course we hope it will be enforced in a fair manner,” he said. “But the fact of the matter is we see Jewish students on college campuses and Jewish people all over being marginalized. The rise of anti-Semitic incidents is not theoretical; it’s empirical.”

David Krone, a former chief of staff to Senator Harry Reid of Nevada when he was Senate Democratic leader, has lobbied for years for such a policy change and praised Mr. Trump for taking action.

“I know people are going to criticize me for saying this,” Mr. Krone said, “but I have to give credit where credit is due.” He added, “It’s too important to let partisanship get in the way.”

Mr. Reid helped push for legislation similar to the order called the Anti-Semitism Awareness Act of 2016. It passed the Senate in December 2016 unanimously but died in the House as that session of Congress ended. It has been reintroduced by Democrats and Republicans but has made little progress to Mr. Trump’s desk.

Mr. Krone continued to work on the issue after Mr. Reid retired and reached out through a mutual friend last summer to Jared Kushner, the president’s son-in-law and senior adviser. The Jewish grandson of Holocaust survivors, Mr. Kushner embraced the idea, which also had been explored over the past year by the president’s domestic policy aides. With Mr. Kushner’s support, the White House drafted the order and Mr. Trump agreed to sign it.

Mr. Trump over the years has been accused of making anti-Semitic remarks, turning a blind eye to anti-Jewish tropes or emboldening white supremacists like those in Charlottesville, Va., in 2017. Just last weekend, he drew criticism for remarks in Florida before the Israeli American Council in which he told the Jewish audience they were “not nice people” but would support his re-election because “you’re not going to vote for the wealth tax.”

But he has also positioned himself as an unflinching supporter of Israel and a champion of Jewish Americans, moving the United States Embassy to Jerusalem, supporting settlements in the West Bank and recognizing the seizure of the Golan Heights. He also assailed Representative Ilhan Omar, Democrat of Minnesota, when she said support for Israel was “all about the Benjamins,” meaning money.

Jeremy Ben-Ami, the president of J Street, a liberal Israel advocacy group, said the president’s order was a cynical effort to crack down on critics, not to defend Jews from bias. “It is particularly outrageous and absurd for President Trump to pretend to care about anti-Semitism during the same week in which he once again publicly spouted anti-Semitic tropes about Jews and money,” he said in a statement.

The president’s action comes soon after the Education Department ordered Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to remake their joint Middle East studies program on the grounds that it featured a biased curriculum. The move was part of a broader campaign by Betsy DeVos, the education secretary, and her civil rights chief, Kenneth L. Marcus, to go after perceived anti-Israel bias in higher education.

The order to be signed by Mr. Trump would empower the Education Department in such actions. Under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the department can withhold funding from any college or educational program that discriminates “on the ground of race, color, or national origin.” Religion was not included among the protected categories, so Mr. Trump’s order will have the effect of embracing an argument that Jews are a people or a race with a collective national origin in the Middle East, like Italian Americans or Polish Americans.

The definition of anti-Semitism to be adopted from the State Department and originally formulated by the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance includes “a certain perception of Jews, which may be expressed as hatred toward Jews.” However, it adds that “criticism of Israel similar to that leveled against any other country cannot be regarded as anti-Semitic.”

The American Civil Liberties Union was among the groups that opposed using the definition in the 2016 legislation, deeming it overly broad. “It cannot and must not be that our civil rights laws are used in such a way to penalize political advocacy on the basis of viewpoint,” the group said in a letter to Congress at the time. Kenneth S. Stern, the original lead author of the definition, also objected to using it, saying that “students and faculty members will be scared into silence, and administrators will err on the side of suppressing or censuring speech.”

But Representative Ted Deutch, Democrat of Florida, who was among the sponsors of the 2016 legislation, wrote in an op-ed article in The Times of Israel last week that the definition “was drafted not to regulate free speech or punish people for expressing their beliefs.” Instead, he wrote, “This definition can serve as an important tool to guide our government’s response to anti-Semitism.”

Last week, a group of 80 education, civil rights and religious organizations sent a letter to Ms. DeVos complaining that some Middle East studies centers on college campuses financed by the government under Title VI have sought to boycott Israel or shut down their universities’ study abroad programs in Israel.

“Recent incidents have demonstrated the willingness of faculty across the country to implement the academic boycott of Israel on their campuses,” the letter said.

The president is expected to be joined at the signing by several prominent Republican lawmakers, including Senators Tim Scott of South Carolina and James Lankford of Oklahoma and Representative Doug Collins of Georgia. But Democrats who have advocated the legislation in the past are not expected, including Representative Jerrold Nadler of New York, who on Tuesday released articles of impeachment against Mr. Trump.

While an executive order is not as permanent as legislation and can be overturned by the next president, Mr. Trump’s action may have the effect of extending the policy beyond his administration anyway because his successors may find it politically unappealing to reverse.

Peter Baker reported from Washington, and Maggie Haberman from Hershey, Pa.

Etats-Unis/Antisémitisme – Donald Trump cible l’antisémitisme et le boycott israélien sur les campus universitaires

L’ordonnance du président permettrait au gouvernement de retenir de l’argent sur les campus réputés biaisés, mais les critiques y voient une attaque contre la liberté d’expression.

Publié le 10 décembre dans le New York Times sous le titre Trump Targets Anti-Semitism and Israeli Boycotts on College Campuses

Traduction proposée par le Crif

Le président Trump prévoit de signer mercredi un décret visant à cibler ce qu’il considère comme de l’antisémitisme sur les campus universitaires en menaçant de retenir l’argent fédéral des établissements d’enseignement qui ne parviennent pas à lutter contre la discrimination, ont déclaré mardi trois responsables de l’administration.

L’ordonnance interprétera efficacement le judaïsme comme une race ou une nationalité, et pas seulement comme une religion, pour inciter une loi fédérale pénalisant les collèges et universités réputés pour se dérober à leur responsabilité afin de favoriser un climat ouvert pour les étudiants issus de minorités. Ces dernières années, le boycott, le désinvestissement et les sanctions – ou B.D.S. – le mouvement contre Israël a troublé certains campus, laissant certains étudiants juifs se sentir importuns ou attaqués.

En signant l’ordonnance, M. Trump utilisera son pouvoir exécutif pour agir là où le Congrès ne l’a pas fait, reproduisant essentiellement une législation bipartite bloquée par le Capitol Hill depuis plusieurs années. D’éminents démocrates se sont joints aux républicains pour promouvoir un tel changement de politique afin de combattre l’antisémitisme ainsi que le mouvement de boycott d’Israël.

Mais les critiques se sont plaints qu’une telle politique pourrait être utilisée pour étouffer la liberté d’expression et l’opposition légitime à la politique d’Israël envers les Palestiniens au nom de la lutte contre l’antisémitisme. La définition de l’antisémitisme utilisée dans l’ordonnance correspond à celle utilisée par le Département d’État et par d’autres nations, mais elle a été critiquée comme étant trop ouverte et trop générale.

Par exemple, il y est décrit comme antisémite « nier au peuple juif son droit à l’autodétermination » dans certaines circonstances et offre comme exemple de ce comportement « affirmer que l’existence d’un État d’Israël est une entreprise raciste ».

Yousef Munayyer, directeur exécutif de la Campagne américaine pour les droits des Palestiniens, a déclaré que l’ordonnance de M. Trump faisait partie d’une campagne soutenue « pour faire taire l’activisme pour les droits des Palestiniens » en assimilant l’opposition au traitement israélien des Palestiniens à l’antisémitisme.

« L’apartheid israélien est un produit très difficile à vendre en Amérique, en particulier dans les espaces progressistes« , a déclaré M. Munayyer, « et réalisant cela, de nombreux apologistes de l’apartheid israélien, Trump inclus, cherchent à faire taire un débat qu’ils savent qu’ils ne peuvent pas gagner… « 

Les responsables de l’administration, qui ont insisté sur l’anonymat pour discuter de l’ordonnance avant son annonce officielle, ont déclaré qu’elle n’était pas destiné à étouffer la liberté d’expression. La Maison Blanche a contacté certains démocrates et groupes militants qui ont critiqué le président pour obtenir un soutien à cette décision.

Mardi, Jonathan Greenblatt, directeur général de la Ligue anti-diffamation, a déclaré que le groupe avait enregistré son troisième épisode antisémite aux États-Unis l’année dernière.

« Bien sûr, nous espérons qu’il sera appliqué de manière équitable », a-t-il déclaré. « Mais le fait est que nous voyons des étudiants juifs sur les campus universitaires et des Juifs partout marginalisés. La montée des incidents antisémites n’est pas théorique; c’est empirique. « 

David Krone, ancien chef de cabinet du sénateur Harry Reid du Nevada lorsqu’il était leader démocrate du Sénat, a fait pression pendant des années pour un tel changement de politique et a félicité M. Trump d’avoir pris des mesures.

« Je sais que les gens vont me critiquer pour avoir dit cela », a déclaré M. Krone, « mais je dois donner du crédit là où le mérite est dû ». Il a ajouté: « Il est trop important de laisser la partisanerie faire obstacle. »

M. Reid a aidé à faire pression pour une législation similaire à l’ordonnance appelée Anti-Semitism Awareness Act of 2016. Elle a été adoptée à l’unanimité par le Sénat en décembre 2016, mais est décédée à la Chambre à la fin de cette session du Congrès. Il a été réintroduit par les démocrates et les républicains mais a peu progressé sur le bureau de M. Trump.

M. Krone a continué de travailler sur la question après que M. Reid a pris sa retraite et a contacté l’été dernier un ami commun avec Jared Kushner, gendre du président et conseiller principal. Le petit-fils juif des survivants de l’Holocauste, M. Kushner, a adopté l’idée, qui avait également été explorée au cours de l’année écoulée par les aides à la politique intérieure du président. Avec le soutien de M. Kushner, la Maison-Blanche a rédigé l’ordonnance et M. Trump a accepté de la signer.

Au fil des ans, M. Trump a été accusé de faire des remarques antisémites, de fermer les yeux sur les tropes antisémites ou d’enhardir les suprémacistes blancs comme ceux de Charlottesville, en Virginie, en 2017. Le week-end dernier, il a critiqué les propos tenus dans La Floride devant le Conseil israélo-américain au cours de laquelle il a déclaré au public juif qu’ils n’étaient « pas des gens sympas » mais qu’ils appuieraient sa réélection parce que « vous n’allez pas voter pour l’impôt sur la fortune ».

Mais il s’est également positionné comme un partisan indéfectible d’Israël et un champion des Juifs américains, en déplaçant l’ambassade des États-Unis à Jérusalem, en soutenant les colonies en Cisjordanie et en reconnaissant la saisie des hauteurs du Golan. Il a également agressé la représentante Ilhan Omar, démocrate du Minnesota, lorsqu’elle a déclaré que le soutien à Israël était « tout au sujet des Benjamins », ce qui signifie de l’argent.

Jeremy Ben-Ami, président de J Street, un groupe de défense libéral d’Israël, a déclaré que l’ordre du président était un effort cynique pour réprimer les critiques, pas pour défendre les Juifs contre les préjugés. « Il est particulièrement scandaleux et absurde que le président Trump prétende se préoccuper de l’antisémitisme au cours de la même semaine au cours de laquelle il a de nouveau publiquement jeté des tropes antisémites sur les Juifs et l’argent », a-t-il déclaré dans un communiqué.

L’action du président intervient peu de temps après que le département de l’éducation a ordonné à l’Université Duke et à l’Université de Caroline du Nord à Chapel Hill de refaire leur programme d’études conjointes sur le Moyen-Orient au motif qu’il comportait un programme biaisé. Cette décision faisait partie d’une campagne plus large menée par Betsy DeVos, la secrétaire à l’Éducation, et son chef des droits civiques, Kenneth L. Marcus, pour s’attaquer aux préjugés anti-Israël perçus dans l’enseignement supérieur.

L’ordonnance à signer par M. Trump habiliterait le Département de l’éducation à de telles actions. En vertu du titre VI de la loi sur les droits civils de 1964, le ministère peut retenir le financement de tout collège ou programme éducatif qui établit une discrimination «fondée sur la race, la couleur ou l’origine nationale». La religion n’était pas incluse dans les catégories protégées, donc l’ordre de Donald Trump aura pour effet d’embrasser un argument selon lequel les Juifs sont un peuple ou une race d’origine nationale collective au Moyen-Orient, comme les Italo-Américains ou les Polonais américains.

La définition de l’antisémitisme qui doit être adoptée par le Département d’État et formulée à l’origine par l’Alliance internationale pour la mémoire de l’Holocauste comprend « une certaine perception des Juifs, qui peut être exprimée comme de la haine envers les Juifs« . Cependant, elle ajoute que « des critiques d’Israël similaires à ce niveau contre tout autre pays ne peut pas être considéré comme antisémite ».

L’American Civil Liberties Union faisait partie des groupes qui se sont opposés à l’utilisation de la définition dans la législation de 2016, la jugeant trop large. « Il ne peut et ne doit pas être que nos lois sur les droits civils sont utilisées de manière à pénaliser le plaidoyer politique sur la base du point de vue », a déclaré le groupe dans une lettre au Congrès de l’époque. Kenneth S. Stern, l’auteur principal de la définition, s’est également opposé à son utilisation, affirmant que « les étudiants et les professeurs seront effrayés dans le silence, et les administrateurs se tromperont du côté de la suppression ou de la censure du discours. »

Mais le représentant Ted Deutch, démocrate de Floride, qui était parmi les sponsors de la législation de 2016, a écrit dans un article d’opinion dans le Times of Israel la semaine dernière que la définition « avait été rédigée pour ne pas réglementer la liberté d’expression ou punir les gens pour avoir exprimé leur opinion ». Au lieu de cela, il a écrit: « Cette définition peut servir d’outil important pour guider la réponse de notre gouvernement à l’antisémitisme ». 

La semaine dernière, un groupe de 80 organisations de l’éducation, des droits civils et des organisations religieuses a envoyé une lettre à Mme DeVos se plaignant que certains centres d’études du Moyen-Orient sur les campus universitaires financés par le gouvernement au titre VI ont cherché à boycotter Israël ou à fermer les programmes d’études de leurs universités à l’étranger en Israël.

« Les récents incidents ont démontré la volonté des professeurs à travers le pays de mettre en œuvre le boycott universitaire d’Israël sur leurs campus », indique la lettre.

Le président devrait être rejoint lors de la signature par plusieurs éminents législateurs républicains, dont les sénateurs Tim Scott de Caroline du Sud et James Lankford d’Oklahoma et le représentant Doug Collins de Géorgie. Mais les démocrates qui ont préconisé la législation dans le passé ne sont pas attendus, y compris le représentant Jerrold Nadler de New York, qui a publié mardi des articles de destitution contre M. Trump.

Bien qu’un ordre exécutif ne soit pas aussi permanent que la législation et puisse être annulé par le prochain président, l’action de M. Trump peut avoir pour effet d’étendre la politique au-delà de son administration, car ses successeurs peuvent trouver politiquement peu attrayant à renverser.

Voir de plus:

Donald Trump signe un décret controversé pour élargir la définition de l’antisémitisme sur les campus

Alors que le décret présidentiel vise à défendre les étudiants juifs, les détracteurs de Donald Trump dénoncent une atteinte à la liberté d’expression.

Le Monde avec AFP

12 décembre 2019

Le président américain se retrouve au cœur d’une nouvelle controverse. Donald Trump a signé, mercredi 11 décembre, un décret visant à lutter contre l’antisémitisme sur les campus américains. Ce texte élargit la définition de l’antisémitisme utilisée par le ministère de l’éducation lorsqu’il fait appliquer la loi sur les droits civiques de 1964. Il ordonne en particulier d’utiliser la définition de l’antisémitisme donnée par l’Alliance internationale pour la mémoire de l’Holocauste (IHRA).

« C’est notre message aux universités : si vous voulez bénéficier des énormes sommes que vous recevez chaque année de la part de l’Etat fédéral, vous devez rejeter l’antisémitisme », a déclaré M. Trump à l’occasion d’une cérémonie à la Maison Blanche pour célébrer Hanouka, la fête des lumières. Avec ce décret, Donald Trump « défend les étudiants juifs » et « indique clairement que l’antisémitisme ne sera pas toléré », a insisté son gendre et conseiller Jared Kushner dans une tribune publiée dans le New York Times.

Un décret pour « limiter » les critiques visant Israël

Mais des défenseurs de la liberté d’expression redoutent qu’une définition trop large et trop vague de l’antisémitisme soit utilisée pour interdire tous les propos critiques envers la politique du gouvernement israélien.

Pour Jeremy Ben-Ami, président de l’organisation progressiste juive J-Street, le décret présidentiel « semble moins destiné à combattre l’antisémitisme qu’à limiter la liberté d’expression et sévir sur les campus contre les critiques visant Israël ».

Voir encore:

Ambassade des Etas-Unis en France

« Le poison vil et haineux de l’antisémitisme doit être condamné et combattu quel que soit le lieu et le moment auquel il surgit. »

Président Donald J. Trump

COMBATTRE L’ANTISÉMITISME : Le président Donald J. Trump prend un décret présidentiel pour renforcer la lutte contre la montée de l’antisémitisme aux États-Unis.

  • Le décret du président Trump indique clairement que le Titre VI de la loi sur les droits civils de 1964 s’applique à la discrimination antisémite fondée sur la race, la couleur ou l’origine nationale.
  • Dans le cadre de l’application du Titre VI contre la discrimination antisémite dissimulée, les agences se référeront à la définition de l’antisémitisme de l’Alliance internationale pour la mémoire de l’Holocauste (IHRA) ainsi que ses exemples contemporains.
  • Le président demande également aux agences fédérales d’identifier d’autres moyens par lesquels le gouvernement peut utiliser ses pouvoirs en matière de lutte contre la discrimination pour combattre l’antisémitisme.
  • Cette action démontre en outre l’engagement indéfectible du président Trump et de son administration à lutter contre toutes les formes d’antisémitisme.

LUTTER CONTRE LA MONTÉE DE LA HAINE : Ces dernières années, les Américains ont assisté à une augmentation inquiétante des incidents antisémites et à une montée de la rhétorique correspondante dans l’ensemble du pays.

  • Au cours des quelques dernières années, on a assisté à une tendance inquiétante à la montée de l’antisémitisme aux États-Unis.
  • Les incidents antisémites se sont multipliés en Amérique depuis 2013, en particulier dans les écoles et sur les campus universitaires.
  • Il s’agit en particulier d’actes de violence horribles à l’encontre de Juifs américains et de synagogues aux États-Unis.
  • 18 membres démocrates du Congrès ont coparrainé cette année une législation en faveur du mouvement antisémite « Boycott, désinvestissement, sanctions » (BDS).
    • Dans leur résolution, ces membres du Congrès comparaient de manière choquante le soutien à Israël à celui à l’Allemagne nazie.

AGIR : Le président Trump et son administration ont pris des mesures à plusieurs reprises pour lutter contre la haine et soutenir la communauté juive.

  • Lors du discours sur l’état de l’Union de cette année, le président Trump a promis de « ne jamais ignorer le vil poison de l’antisémitisme ou ceux qui répandent cette idéologie venimeuse ».
  • Depuis janvier 2017, la division des droits civils du département de la Justice a obtenu 14 condamnations dans des affaires d’attentats ou de menaces contre des lieux de culte.
    • La division a également obtenu 11 condamnations dans des affaires de crimes motivés par la haine en raison des convictions religieuses des victimes.
  • Le département de la Justice a lancé un nouveau site web complet qui constitue un portail centralisé permettant aux forces de l’ordre, aux médias, aux groupes de défense des droits et à d’autres organismes d’accéder à des ressources sur les crimes motivés par la haine.
  • Le service des relations avec la communauté du département de la Justice a facilité 17 forums axés sur la protection des lieux de culte et la prévention des crimes motivés par la haine depuis septembre 2018.
  • Le président a signé la loi JUST Act en faveur des efforts de restitution à la suite de l’Holocauste.
  • L’administration Trump a expulsé le dernier criminel nazi connu des États-Unis.
    Voir enfin:

    NYT

    WASHINGTON — The House, brushing aside Democratic voices of dissent over American policy in the Middle East, on Tuesday overwhelmingly passed a bipartisan resolution condemning the boycott-Israel movement as one that “promotes principles of collective guilt, mass punishment and group isolation, which are destructive of prospects for progress towards peace.”

    The 398-to-17 vote, with five members voting present, came after a debate that was equally lopsided; no one in either party spoke against the measure. The House’s two most vocal backers of the boycott movement — Representatives Rashida Tlaib of Michigan and Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, freshman Democrats and the first two Muslim women in Congress — did not participate in the floor debate.

    However, earlier in the day, Ms. Tlaib, who is Palestinian-American, delivered an impassioned speech in defense of the boycott movement. She branded Israel’s policies toward Palestinians “racist” and invoked American boycotts of Nazi Germany, among others, as an example of what she described as a legitimate economic protest to advance human rights around the world.

    “I stand before you as the daughter of Palestinian immigrants, parents who experienced being stripped of their human rights, the right to freedom of travel, equal treatment,” Ms. Tlaib said. “So I can’t stand by and watch this attack on our freedom of speech and the right to boycott the racist policies of the government and the state of Israel.”

    The Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions, or B.D.S., movement is intended, among other things, to pressure Israel into ending the occupation of the West Bank, and backed by some who advocate a single state with equal rights for all, instead of a Palestinian state alongside Israel. Opponents warn it would lead to the destruction of Israel as a Jewish state; during Tuesday’s debate, they repeatedly quoted from a founder of the movement, Omar Barghouti, who has argued for the creation of a “secular democratic state” and has called for Israel to “accept the dismantling of its Zionist apartheid regime.”

    “Boycotts have been previously used as tools for social justice in this very country,” said Representative Ted Deutch, Democrat of Florida and a backer of the resolution. “But B.D.S. doesn’t seek social justice. It seeks a world in which the state of Israel doesn’t exist.”

    For months, Ms. Tlaib and Ms. Omar have been the target of intense criticism for statements about Israel and Israel’s supporters that many have regarded as anti-Semitic tropes, including insinuations that Jews have dual loyalty to the United States and Israel. Ms. Omar drew the condemnation of House Democratic leaders, and was forced to apologize after invoking an ancient trope about Jews and money by suggesting that American support for Israel was “all about the Benjamins” — a reference to $100 bills.

    At a hearing last week, Ms. Omar spoke out forcefully against Israel, and the resolution.

    “We should condemn in the strongest terms violence that perpetuates the occupation, whether it is perpetuated by Israel, Hamas or individuals,” she said. “But if we are going to condemn violent means of resisting the occupation, we cannot also condemn nonviolent means.”

    Ms. Tlaib, Ms. Omar and two other freshman Democratic women of color — Representatives Ayanna S. Pressley of Massachusetts and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York — have lately been under fire from President Trump, who has accused them of being anti-American and suggested they should “go back” to their home countries, even though just one of them, Ms. Omar, was born outside the United States. Ms. Ocasio-Cortez voted against the resolution, as did a number of other progressives; Ms. Pressley voted in favor.

    The timing of the vote drew complaints from Palestinian rights activists and supporters of Ms. Omar and Ms. Tlaib, who said House Democratic leaders were effectively isolating them. Both women have also joined with Representative John Lewis, Democrat of Georgia and a civil rights icon, in introducing a measure affirming that “all Americans have the right to participate in boycotts in pursuit of civil and human rights at home and abroad,” as protected by the First Amendment.

    “They are displaying leadership even as the president is attacking and marginalizing people of color,” said Yousef Munayyer, the executive director of the U.S. Campaign for Palestinian Rights.

    But Democratic backers of Israel were eager to have their votes on record before Congress goes home for its six-week August recess. Earlier Tuesday, Representative Josh Gottheimer, an ardent supporter of Israel, was joined in his home state, New Jersey, by Elan Carr, the State Department’s envoy to combat anti-Semitism, at an event billed to address anti-Semitism.

    The coming vote proved to be a central topic.

    “There is of course nothing wrong about having a robust debate about our foreign policy, as I said, but that debate veers into something much darker when there is talk of dual loyalty or other ancient tropes,” Mr. Gottheimer said. “These are not legitimate opinions about our foreign policy. We have often seen such anti-Semitic tropes and rhetoric when it comes to the global B.D.S. movement.”

    Asked if he thought the timing of the vote was inopportune, Mr. Gottheimer said, “We should look for any moment to stand up to anti-Semitism, and I think, to me, the sooner the better.”

    Backers of the boycott movement say the resolution threatens free speech rights, and they argue that boycotts are a legitimate form of economic protest. In her remarks, Ms. Tlaib cited civil rights boycotts, boycotts of apartheid South Africa and American boycotts of Nazi Germany “in response to dehumanization, imprisonment and genocide of Jewish people” — a comment that raised eyebrows among Republicans.

    Proponents of the resolution argue that nothing in it abridges the right to free speech; indeed, House Democrats rejected a more far-reaching bill, passed by the Republican-led Senate, that would allow state and local government to break ties with companies that participate in the boycott movement.

    The chief sponsor of the Senate bill, Senator Marco Rubio, Republican of Florida, on Tuesday accused Speaker Nancy Pelosi of promoting a watered-down measure and allowing “the radical, anti-Semitic minority in the Democratic Party to dictate the House floor agenda.”

    During Tuesday’s floor debate, many Republicans, including Representative Lee Zeldin of New York and Representative Steve Scalise of Louisiana, the Republican whip, argued for the Rubio measure. But in a rare moment of House comity, both sounded eager to join with Democrats in passing the bipartisan resolution.

    “If a boycott is being used to advance freedom, that’s one we should support,” Mr. Scalise said. “But if a boycott is being used to undermine the very freedoms that exist in the only real elective democracy in the Middle East, we all need to rise up against that.”


Corbyn/Mélenchon: La synthèse mène au désastre (A long tradition of communist accommodation with antisemitism: how the demagogues from the race-card playing left made the private prejudices of conservative Muslim voters respectable)

17 décembre, 2019

Image may contain: text

L’antisionisme est la trouvaille miraculeuse, l’aubaine providentielle qui réconcilie la gauche anti-impérialiste et la droite antisémite ; (il) donne la permission d’être démocratiquement antisémite. Qui dit mieux ? Il est désormais possible de haïr les Juifs au nom du progressisme ! Il y a de quoi avoir le vertige : ce renversement bienvenu, cette introuvable inversion ne peuvent qu’enfermer Israël dans une nouvelle solitude. Vladimir Jankélévitch
La nation juive n’est pas civilisée, elle est patriarchale, n’ayant point de souverain, n’en reconnaissant aucun en secret, et croyant toute fourberie louable, quand il s’agit de tromper ceux qui ne pratiquent pas sa religion. Elle n’affiche pas ses principes, mais on les connaît assez. Un tort plus grave chez cette nation, est de s’adonner exclusivement au trafic, à l’usure, et aux dépravations mercantiles […] Tout gouvernement qui tient aux bonnes mœurs devrait y astreindre les Juifs, les obliger au travail productif, ne les admettre qu’en proportion d’un centième pour le vice: une famille marchande pour cent familles agricoles et manufacturières; mais notre siècle philosophe admet inconsidérément des légions de Juifs, tous parasites, marchands, usuriers, etc.Charles Fourier (Analyse de la civilisation, 1848)
Juifs. Faire un article contre cette race qui envenime tout, en se fourrant partout, sans jamais se fondre avec aucun peuple. Demander son expulsion de France, à l’exception des individus mariés avec des Françaises ; abolir les synagogues, ne les admettre à aucun emploi, poursuivre enfin l’abolition de ce culte. Ce n’est pas pour rien que les chrétiens les ont appelés déicides. Le juif est l’ennemi du genre humain. Il faut renvoyer cette race en Asie, ou l’exterminer. Pierre-Joseph Proudhon (1849)
Observons le Juif de tous les jours, le Juif ordinaire et non celui du sabbat. Ne cherchons point le mystère du Juif dans sa religion, mais le mystère de sa religion dans le Juif réel. Quelle est donc la base mondaine du judaïsme ? C’est le besoin pratique, l’égoïsme. Quel est le culte mondain du Juif ? C’est le trafic. Quelle est la divinité mondaine du Juif ? C’est l’argent. Karl Marx
L’argent est le dieu jaloux d’Israël devant qui nul autre Dieu ne doit subsister. Karl Marx
Dans les villes, ce qui exaspère le gros de la population française contre les Juifs, c’est que, par l’usure, par l’infatigable activité commerciale et par l’abus des influences politiques, ils accaparent peu à peu la fortune, le commerce, les emplois lucratifs, les fonctions administratives, la puissance publique . […] En France, l’influence politique des Juifs est énorme mais elle est, si je puis dire, indirecte. Elle ne s’exerce pas par la puissance du nombre, mais par la puissance de l’argent. Ils tiennent une grande partie de de la presse, les grandes institutions financières, et, quand ils n’ont pu agir sur les électeurs, ils agissent sur les élus. Ici, ils ont, en plus d’un point, la double force de l’argent et du nombre. Jean Jaurès (La question juive en Algérie, Dépêche de Toulouse, 1er mai 1895)
Nous savons bien que la race juive, concentrée, passionnée, subtile, toujours dévorée par une sorte de fièvre du gain quand ce n’est pas par la force du prophétisme, nous savons bien qu’elle manie avec une particulière habileté le mécanisme capitaliste, mécanisme de rapine, de mensonge, de corset, d’extorsion. Jean Jaurès (Discours au Tivoli, 1898)
Le Brexit et Trump étaient inextricablement liés en 2016 et ils sont inextricablement liés aujourd’hui. Johnson annonce une grande victoire de Trump. Les classes populaires sont fatiguées de leurs élites de new York, de Londres et de Bruxelles, qui leur expliquent comment vivre et comment faire. (…) Si les démocrates n’en tirent pas les leçons, Trump voguera vers une victoire à la Reagan en 1984. Steve Bannon
Avec Johnson, on se retrouve paradoxalement avec une bonne chance d’avoir une social-démocratie modérée. La victoire de Johnson pourrait être, comme le Brexit en 2016, l’indicateur d’une tendance capable de se répéter à nouveau outre-Atlantique. Dans les deux cas, les deux hommes ont été incroyablement sous-estimés par leurs adversaires et les observateurs, qui les ont volontiers présentés comme des clowns. Mais Boris Johnson n’a pas le caractère brutal de Trump et son côté incontrôlable. Il offre de ce point de vue un visage optimiste et décent à la révolte populiste et montre à la droite européenne qu’il est possible de la chevaucher sans quelle dérive vers quelque chose d’illibéral. C’est une bonne nouvelle. David Goodhart
Donald Trump, in his telling, could have shot somebody on Fifth Avenue and won. Boris Johnson could mislead the queen. He could break his promise to get Britain out of Europe by Oct. 31. He could lie about Turks invading Britain and the cost of European Union membership. He could make up stories about building 40 new hospitals. He could double down on the phantom $460 million a week that Brexit would deliver to the National Health Service — and still win a landslide Tory electoral victory not seen since Margaret Thatcher’s triumph in 1987. The British, or at least the English, did not care. Truth is so 20th century. They wanted Brexit done; and, formally speaking, Johnson will now take Britain out of Europe by Jan. 31, 2020, even if all the tough decisions on relations with the union will remain. Johnson was lucky. In the pathetic, emetic Jeremy Corbyn, the soon-to-depart Labour Party leader, he faced perhaps the worst opposition candidate ever. In the Tory press, he had a ferocious friend prepared to overlook every failing. In Brexit-weary British subjects, whiplashed since the 2016 referendum, he had the perfect receptacle for his “get Brexit done.” (…) The British working class, concentrated in the Midlands and the North, abandoned Labour and Corbyn’s socialism for the Tories and Johnson’s nationalism. In the depressed provinces of institutionalized precariousness, workers embraced an old Etonian mouthing about unleashed British potential. Not a million miles from blue-collar heartland Democrats migrating to Trump the millionaire and America First demagogy. That’s not the only parallel with American politics less than 11 months from the election. Johnson concentrated all the Brexit votes. By contrast, the pro-Remain vote was split between Corbyn’s internally divided Labour Party, the hapless Liberal Democrats, and the Scottish National Party. For anybody contemplating the divisions of the Democratic Party as compared with the Trump movement’s fanatical singleness of purpose, now reinforced by the impeachment proceedings, this can only be worrying. The clear rejection of Labour’s big-government socialism also looks ominous for Democrats who believe the party can lurch left and win. The British working class did not buy nationalized railways, electricity distribution and water utilities when they could stick it to some faceless bureaucrat in Brussels and — in that phrase as immortal as it is meaningless — take back their country. (…)That’s the story of our times. Johnson gets and fits those times better than most. He’s a natural. “Brexit and Trump were inextricably linked in 2016, and they are inextricably linked today,” Steve Bannon told me. “Johnson foreshadows a big Trump win. Working-class people are tired of their ‘betters’ in New York, London, Brussels telling them how to live and what to do. Corbyn the socialist program, not Corbyn the man, got crushed. If Democrats don’t take the lesson, Trump is headed for a Reagan-like ’84 victory.” I still think Trump can be beaten, but not from way out left and not without recognition that, as Hugo Dixon, a leader of the now defeated fight for a second British referendum, put it: “There is a crisis of liberalism because we have not found a way to connect to the lives of people in the small towns of the postindustrial wasteland whose traditional culture has been torn away.” Johnson, even with his 80-seat majority, has problems. His victory reconciled the irreconcilable. His moneyed coterie wants to turn Britain into free-market Singapore on the Thames. His new working-class constituency wants rule-Britannia greatness combined with state-funded support. That’s a delicate balancing act. The breakup of Britain has become more likely. The strong Scottish National Party showing portends a possible second Scottish referendum on independence. (…) As my readers know, I am a passionate European patriot who sees the union as the greatest achievement of the second half of the 20th century, and Britain’s exit as an appalling act of self-harm. But I also believe in democracy. Johnson took the decision back to the people and won. His victory must be respected. The fight for freedom, pluralism, the rule of law, human rights, a free press, independent judiciaries, breathable air, peace, decency and humanity continues — and has only become more critical now that Britain has marginalized itself irreversibly in a fit of nationalist delusion. Roger Cohen
Britain’s election on December 12th was the most unpredictable in years—yet in the end the result was crushingly one-sided. As we went to press the next morning, Boris Johnson’s Conservative Party was heading for a majority of well over 70, the largest Tory margin since the days of Margaret Thatcher. Labour, meanwhile, was expecting its worst result since the 1930s. Mr Johnson, who diced with the possibility of being one of Britain’s shortest-serving prime ministers, is now all-powerful. The immediate consequence is that, for the first time since the referendum of 2016, it is clear that Britain will leave the European Union. By the end of January it will be out—though Brexit will still be far from “done”, as Mr Johnson promises. But the Tories’ triumph also shows something else: that a profound realignment in British politics has taken place. Mr Johnson’s victory saw the Conservatives taking territory that Labour had held for nearly a century. The party of the rich buried Labour under the votes of working-class northerners and Midlanders. After a decade of governments struggling with weak or non-existent majorities, Britain now has a prime minister with immense personal authority and a free rein in Parliament. Like Thatcher and Tony Blair, who also enjoyed large majorities, Mr Johnson has the chance to set Britain on a new course—but only if his government can also grapple with some truly daunting tasks. Mr Johnson was lucky in his opponent. Jeremy Corbyn, Labour’s leader, was shunned by voters, who doubted his promises on the economy, rejected his embrace of dictators and terrorists and were unconvinced by his claims to reject anti-Semitism. But the result also vindicates Mr Johnson’s high-risk strategy of targeting working-class Brexit voters. Some of them switched to the Tories, others to the Brexit Party, but the effect was the same: to deprive Labour of its majority in dozens of seats. Five years ago, under David Cameron, the Conservative Party was a broadly liberal outfit, preaching free markets as it embraced gay marriage and environmentalism. Mr Johnson has yanked it to the left on economics, promising public spending and state aid for struggling industries, and to the right on culture, calling for longer prison sentences and complaining that European migrants “treat the UK as though it’s basically part of their own country.” Some liberal Tories hate the Trumpification of their party (the Conservative vote went down in some wealthy southern seats). But the election showed that they were far outnumbered by blue-collar defections from Labour farther north. This realignment may well last. The Tories’ new prospectus is calculated to take advantage of a long-term shift in voters’ behaviour which predates the Brexit referendum. Over several decades, economic attitudes have been replaced by cultural ones as the main predictor of party affiliation. Even at the last election, in 2017, working-class voters were almost as likely as professional ones to back the Tories. Mr Johnson rode a wave that was already washing over Britain. Donald Trump has shown how conservative positions on cultural matters can hold together a coalition of rich and poor voters. And Mr Johnson has an extra advantage in that his is unlikely to face strong opposition soon. Labour looks certain to be in the doldrums for a long time.The Economist
En juin 2016, le coup de tonnerre du Brexit avait précédé l’ouragan Trump, révélant le caractère transatlantique de la révolte nationaliste et populiste qui souffle sur l’Occident. Trois ans plus tard, la retentissante victoire de Boris Johnson annonce-t-elle à son tour une nouvelle prouesse de Donald Trump en novembre 2020? Beaucoup en Amérique accueillent l’idée avec horreur, mais certains commencent à envisager sérieusement l’hypothèse, en observant l’obstination avec laquelle ses électeurs lui restent fidèles, de la même manière que les électeurs du Brexit sont restés fidèles à leur désir de «sortir» de l’Union européenne. Les dérapages de Trump et les gigantesques efforts de ses adversaires pour lui ôter toute légitimité sont loin d’avoir fait bouger les lignes, peut-être même le contraire, à en croire de récents sondages favorables au président américain. Au Royaume-Uni, le slogan résolu de Boris Johnson, «Faisons le Brexit», a de son côté fait merveille, malgré tous les efforts des partisans du maintien dans l’Union qui voient leur rêve de « nouveau référendum » à nouveau fracassé. « Le Brexit et Trump étaient inextricablement liés en 2016 et ils sont inextricablement liés aujourdhui. Johnson annonce une grande victoire de Trump. Les classes populaires sont fatiguées de leurs élites de new York, de Londres et de Bruxelles; qui leur expliquent comment vivre et comment faire. (…) Si les démocrates n’en tirent pas les leçons, Trump voguera vers une victoire à la Reagan en 1984, déclare l’idéologue du national-populisme américain Steve Bannon à l’éditorialiste du New York Times Roger Cohen », qui semble partager à contre-coeur partager son pronostic.Même si on fait difficilement plus américain que Donald Trump, ni plus britannique que Boris Johnson, il y a incontestablement des parallèles saisissants entre les deux hommes et ils sont loin de se limiter à leur tignasse blonde, qui fait le régal des photographes. Premier point commun, les deux hommes appartiennent à l’élite « libérale » de leur pays, mais se sont définis en patriotes réalistes, surfant sur le désir viscéral du retour à la nation de l’électorat et offrant la promesse d’un pays « reprenant le contrôle » de son destin. Tous deux ont également joué de leurs personnalités hétérodoxes et charismatiques pour passer allègrement le Rubicon du politiquement correct et se poser en défenseurs du « petit peuple », grand perdant de la globalisation et de l’ouverture des frontières à l’immigration. Allant à rebours de la doxa du libre-échange pur et dur, ils ont engagé à la hussarde une redéfinition révolutionnaire de l’ADN de leur partis respectifs, instaurant un virage à gauche sur la question du commerce et du protectionnisme, tout en se situant à droite sur les questions sociétales et culturelles. La carte de leur électorat s’en trouve alors métamorphosée par le ralliement à la bannière conservatrice de régions traditionnellement acquises au Labour britannique ou au parti démocrate américain. De ce point de vue, l’humeur de la classe ouvrière des Midlands et du nord de l’Angleterre est presque un copié-collé du ressenti des ouvriers déclassés de l’industrie sidérurgique d l’Ohio ou de la Pennsylvanie. Boris comme Donald ont aussi séduit les petites villes et le pays rural, ce pays dit « périphérique » qui est en réalité « majoritaire », rappelle Christophe Guilluy. « Avec Johnson, on se retrouve paradoxalement avec une bonne chance d’avoir une soicial-démocratie modérée », note l’essayiste David Goodhart. Comme Steve Bannon, l’intellectuel anglais n’exclut pas que la victoire de Johnson soit, comme le Brexit en 2016, ‘l’indicateur d’une tendance capable de se répéter à nouveau outre-Atlantique ». Dans les deux cas, les deux hommes ont été incroyablement sous-estimés par leurs adversaires et les observateurs, qui les ont volontiers présentés comme des clowns, souligne l’intellectuel. Laure Mandeville
While Ken Livingstone was forcing startled historians to explain that Adolf Hitler was not a Zionist, I was in Naz Shah’s Bradford. A politician who wants to win there cannot afford to be reasonable, I discovered. He or she cannot deplore the Israeli occupation of the West Bank and say that the Israelis and Palestinians should have their own states. They have to engage in extremist rhetoric of the “sweep all the Jews out” variety or risk their opponents denouncing them as “Zionists”. George Galloway, who, never forget, was a demagogue from the race-card playing left rather than the far right, made the private prejudices of conservative Muslim voters respectable. Aisha Ali-Khan, who worked as Galloway’s assistant until his behaviour came to disgust her, realised how deep prejudice had sunk when she made a silly quip about David Miliband being more “fanciable” than Ed. Respect members accused her of being a “Jew lover” and, all of a sudden in Bradford politics, that did not seem an outrageous, or even an unusual, insult. Where Galloway led, others followed. David Ward, a now mercifully forgotten Liberal Democrat MP, tried and failed to save his seat by proclaiming his Jew obsession. Nothing, not even the murder of Jews, could restrain him. At one point, he told his constituents that the sight of the Israeli prime minister honouring the Parisian Jews whom Islamists had murdered made him “sick”. (He appeared to find the massacre itself easier to stomach.)Naz Shah’s picture of Israel superimposed on to a map of the US to show her “solution” for the Israeli-Palestinian conflict was not a one-off but part of a race to the bottom. But Shah’s wider behaviour as an MP – a “progressive” MP, mark you – gives you a better idea of how deep the rot has sunk. She ignored a Bradford imam who declared that the terrorist who murdered a liberal Pakistani politician was a “great hero of Islam” and concentrated her energies on expressing her “loathing” of liberal and feminist British Muslims instead. (…) Liberal Muslims make many profoundly uncomfortable. Writers in the left-wing press treat them as Uncle Toms, as Shah did, because they are willing to work with the government to stop young men and women joining Islamic State. While they are criticised, politically correct criticism rarely extends to clerics who celebrate religious assassins. As for the antisemitism that allows Labour MPs to fantasise about “transporting” Jews, consider how jeering and dishonest the debate around that has become. When feminists talk about rape, they are not told as a matter of course “but women are always making false rape accusations”. If they were, they would suspect that their opponents wanted to deny the existence of sexual violence. Yet it is standard in polite society to hear that accusations of antisemitism are always made in bad faith to delegitimise justifiable criticism of Israel. I accept that there are Jews who say that all criticism of Israel is antisemitic. For her part, a feminist must accept that there are women who make false accusations of rape. But that does not mean that antisemitism does not exist, any more than it means that rape never happens. Challenging prejudices on the left wing is going to be all the more difficult because, incredibly, the British left in the second decade of the 21st century is led by men steeped in the worst traditions of the 20th. When historians had to explain last week that if Montgomery had not defeated Rommel at El Alamein in Egypt then the German armies would have killed every Jew they could find in Palestine, they were dealing with the conspiracy theory that Hitler was a Zionist, developed by a half-educated American Trotskyist called Lenni Brenner in the 1980s. When Jeremy Corbyn defended the Islamist likes of Raed Salah, who say that Jews dine on the blood of Christian children, he was continuing a tradition of communist accommodation with antisemitism that goes back to Stalin’s purges of Soviet Jews in the late 1940s. It is astonishing that you have to, but you must learn the worst of leftwing history now. For Labour is not just led by dirty men but by dirty old men, with roots in the contaminated soil of Marxist totalitarianism. If it is to change, its leaders will either have to change their minds or be thrown out of office. Put like this, the tasks facing Labour moderates seem impossible. They have to be attempted, however, for moral as much as electoral reasons. (…) Not just in Paris, but in Marseille, Copenhagen and Brussels, fascistic reactionaries are murdering Jews – once again. Go to any British synagogue or Jewish school and you will see police officers and volunteers guarding them. I do not want to tempt fate, but if British Jews were murdered, the leader of the Labour party would not be welcome at their memorial. The mourners would point to the exit and ask him to leave. If it is incredible that we have reached this pass, it is also intolerable. However hard the effort to overthrow it, the status quo cannot stand. Nick Cohen
Corbyn (…) a dû subir sans secours la grossière accusation d’antisémitisme à travers le grand rabbin d’Angleterre et les divers réseaux d’influence du Likoud (parti d’extrême droite de Netanyahou en Israël). Au lieu de riposter, il a passé son temps à s’excuser et à donner des gages. Dans les deux cas il a affiché une faiblesse qui a inquiété les secteurs populaires. (…) Tel est le prix pour les « synthèses » sous toutes les latitudes. Ceux qui voudraient nous y ramener en France perdent leur temps. En tous cas je n’y céderai jamais pour ma part. Retraite à point, Europe allemande et néolibérale, capitalisme vert, génuflexion devant les ukases arrogantes des communautaristes du CRIF : c’est non. Et non c’est non. Jean-Luc Mélenchon
Most people I know who used to be staunch Labour are now saying no way Jeremy Corbyn. It’s not our party any more. Same label, different bottle. Steve Hurt (engineer)
Because they hate Corbyn that much. The biggest message they can send to him is to elect a Tory government. Activist
Jeremy Corbyn and his supporters have talked a good deal about winning back these working class voters, but his policy positions haven’t been designed to appeal to them. I’m not just talking about his ambivalence on Brexit—there’s a widespread feeling among voters who value flag, faith and family that Corbyn isn’t one of them. Toby Young
It’s the same story across England—working class electors deserting Labour en masse. We won’t have a breakdown of how people voted according to income and occupation for a while yet, but a few of the opinion polls in the run-up to election day contained some astonishing findings. For instance, a Deltapoll survey for the Mail on Sunday last month showed the Conservatives outpolling Labour by 49 per cent to 23 per cent in the C2DE social grades—the bottom half of the National Readership Survey classification system that ranks people according to their occupation. That is to say, people in the bottom half of the NRS distribution—skilled, semi-skilled and unskilled manual workers, state pensioners and people on benefits—were intending to vote Conservative rather than Labour by a ratio of more than two to one. (Exit polls suggest the actual figure was closer to 1.5 to one.) A taste of things to come was provided on Tuesday when a clandestine recording was released of Jon Ashworth MP, Labour’s shadow health spokesman, telling a friend how “dire” things were for the party outside urban, metropolitan areas. “It’s abysmal out there,” he said. “They can’t stand Corbyn and they think Labour’s blocked Brexit.” Ashworth described the electoral map of Britain as “topsy turvey,” a reference not just to the anticipated losses in traditional Labour areas, but to the uptick in support for Labour in middle class cities like Canterbury. One of the other startling features of the opinion polls was Labour’s lead among graduates. As a general rule, the higher the concentration of graduates in an area, the more likely it was to skew Left on Thursday—and vice versa. (Labour held on to Canterbury.) The crumbling of the ‘Red Wall’ is the big story of this election and some commentators are describing it as a “one off.” The conventional wisdom is that working class voters have “lent” their votes to the Conservatives and, barring an upset, will give them back next time round. It’s Brexit, supposedly, that has been the game-changer—an excuse leapt on by Corbyn’s outriders in the media, who are loathe to blame Labour’s defeat on their man. If you look at the working class constituencies that turned blue, most of them voted to leave the European Union in 2016 by a significant margin—Great Grimsby, for instance, an English sea port in Yorkshire, where Leave outpolled Remain by 71.45 to 28.55 per cent. Labour’s problem, according to this analysis, is that it didn’t commit to taking Britain out of the EU during the campaign but instead said it would negotiate a new exit deal and then hold a second referendum in which the public would be able to choose between that deal and Remain. This fudge may have been enough to keep graduates on side, but it alienated working class Leave voters in England’s rust belt. This analysis doesn’t bear much scrutiny. To begin with, the desertion of Labour by its working class supporters—and its increasing popularity with more affluent, better educated voters—is a long-term trend, not an aberration. The disappearance of Labour’s traditional base isn’t just the story of this election, but one of the main themes of Britain’s post-war political history. At its height, Labour managed to assemble a coalition of university-educated liberals in London and the South and low-income voters in Britain’s industrial heartlands in the Midlands and the North—“between Hampstead and Hull,” as the saying goes. But mass immigration and globalization have driven a wedge between Labour’s middle class and working class supporters, as has Britain’s growing welfare bill and its membership of the European Union. Jeremy Corbyn and his supporters have talked a good deal about winning back these working class voters, but his policy positions haven’t been designed to appeal to them. I’m not just talking about his ambivalence on Brexit—there’s a widespread feeling among voters who value flag, faith and family that Corbyn isn’t one of them. Before he became Labour leader in 2015, he was an energetic protestor against nearly every armed conflict Britain has been involved in since Suez, including the Falklands War. He’s also called for the abandonment of Britain’s independent nuclear deterrent, the withdrawal of the UK from NATO and the dismantling of our security services—not to mention declining to sing the National Anthem at a Battle of Britain service in 2015. From the point of view of many working class voters, for whom love of country is still a deeply felt emotion, Corbyn seems to side with the country’s enemies more often than he does with Britain. Corbyn’s victory in the Labour leadership election was followed by a surge in party membership— from 193,754 at the end of 2014 to 388,103 by the end of 2015. But the activists he appeals to are predominantly middle class. According to internal Party data leaked to the Guardian, a disproportionate number of them are “high status city dwellers” who own their own homes. A careful analysis of the policies set out in Labour’s latest manifesto reveals that the main beneficiaries of the party’s proposed increase in public expenditure—which the Conservatives costed at an eye-watering £1.2 trillion—would be its middle class supporters. For instance, the party pledged to cut rail fares by 33 per cent and pay for it by slashing the money spent on roads. But only 11 per cent of Britain’s commuters travel by train compared to 68 per cent who drive—and the former tend to be more affluent than the latter. Corbyn also promised to abolish university tuition fees at a cost of £7.2 billion per annum, a deeply regressive policy which, according to the Institute of Fiscal Studies, would benefit middle- and high-earning graduates with “very little” upside for those on low incomes. It’s also worth noting that Corbyn’s interests and appearance—he’s a 70-year-old vegetarian with a fondness for train-drivers’ hats who has spent his life immersed in protest politics—strike many working class voters as “weird,” a word that kept coming up on the doorstep according to my fellow canvasser in Newcastle. He’s also presided over the invasion of his party by virulent anti-Semites and Labour is currently in the midst of an investigation by Britain’s Equality and Human Rights Commission thanks to his failure to deal with this. One of his supporters has already blamed the Jews for Labour’s defeat. But Corbyn isn’t the main reason C2DE voters have turned away from Labour, any more than Brexit is. Rather, they’ve both exacerbated a trend that’s been underway for at least 45 years, which is the fracturing of the “Hampstead and Hull” coalition and the ebbing away of Labour’s working class support. Another, related phenomenon that’s been overlooked is that these “topsy turvey” politics are hardly unique to Britain. Left-of-center parties in most parts of the Anglosphere, as well as other Western democracies, have seen the equivalent of their own ‘Red Walls’ collapsing. One of the reasons Scott Morrison’s Liberals confounded expectations to win the Australian election last May was because Bill Shorten’s Labour Party was so unpopular in traditional working class areas like Queensland, and support for socially democratic parties outside the large cities in Scandinavia has cratered over the past 15 years or so. Thomas Piketty, the French Marxist, wrote a paper about this phenomenon last year entitled ‘Brahmin Left vs Merchant Right: Rising Inequality and the Changing Structure of Political Conflict’ and it’s the subject of Capital and Ideology, his new book. His hypothesis is that politics in the US, Britain, and France—he confines his analysis to those three countries—is dominated by the struggle between two elite groups: the Brahmin Left and the Merchant Right. He points out that left-wing parties in the US, Britain and France used to rely on ‘nativist’ voters to win elections—low education, low income—but since the 1970s have begun to attract more and more ‘globalist’ voters—high education, high income (with the exception of the top 10 per cent of income earners). The nativists, meanwhile, have drifted to the Right, forming a coalition with the business elite. He crunches the data to show that in the US, from the 1940s to the 1960s, the more educated people were, the more likely they were to vote Republican. Now, the opposite is true, with 70% of voters with masters degrees voting for Hilary in 2016. “The trend is virtually identical in all three countries,” he writes. In Piketty’s view, the electoral preferences of the post-industrial working class—the precariat—is a kind of false consciousness, often engendered by populist snake-charmers like Matteo Salvini and Viktor Orban. He’s intensely suspicious of the unholy alliance between super-rich “merchants” and the lumpen proletariat, and similar noises have been made about the levels of support Boris has managed to attract. Plenty of better writers than me — Douglas Murray, John Gray — have debunked the notion that the only reason low-income voters embrace right-wing politics is because they’re drunk on a cocktail of ethno-nationalism and false hope (with Rupert Murdoch and Vladimir Putin taking turns as mixologists). It surely has more to do with the Left’s sneering contempt for the “deplorables” in the flyover states as they shuttle back and forth between their walled, cosmopolitan strongholds. As Corbyn’s policy platform in Britain’s election showed, left-wing parties now have little to offer indigenous, working class people outside the big cities—and their activists often add insult to injury by describing these left-behind voters as “privileged” because they’re white or cis-gendered or whatever. So long as parties like Labour pander to their middle-class, identitarian activists and ignore the interests of the genuinely disadvantaged, they’ll continue to rack up loss after loss. Get woke, go broke. Will the Democrats learn fdrom Labour’s mistake and make Jo Biden the candidate—or even Pete Buttigieg? I wouldn’t bet on it. The zealots of the post-modern Left have a limitless capacity to ignore reality even when it’s staring them in the face. As I said to a friend last night after the election results starting rolling in, fighting political opponents like Jeremy Corbyn is a bit like competing in a round-the-world yacht race against a team that thinks the earth is flat. It can be kind of fun, even exhilarating. But until they acquire a compass and learn how to read a map, it’s not really a fair fight. Toby Young
C’est signe de naïveté que voir dans l’enseignement de la Shoah le moyen de faire reculer l’antisémitisme. Asséner l’histoire de la Shoah aux élèves comme une forme de catéchisme moral censé les protéger de l’antisémitisme est un non-sens. D’une part, parce que la compassion ne protège de rien : dans nos sociétés, une émotion chasse l’autre. D’autre part, parce qu’à force d’asséner cette histoire sous une forme moraliste on semble oublier que tout catéchisme provoque le rejet. On semble oublier aussi qu’on alimente une concurrence mémorielle qui nourrit le communautarisme. Enfin, qu’enfermer le peuple juif dans une essence de victime ne protège pas de la violence, mais tout au contraire y expose davantage. Georges Bensoussan
Je sais bien que les gens en ont par dessus de la tête de ces juifs qui se plaignent de l’antisémitisme, comme s’il n’y avait pas de trucs plus importants dans la vie. Qu’un type qui avait un peu abusé du chichon jette une vieille dame par dessus son balcon en hurlant qu’elle est le diable, qu’un autre mitraille des petits enfants dans une école confessionnelle ou qu’un troisième fasse un carton sur les clients d’un supermarché casher, et paf, les voilà à nouveau en train de jérémier sur les plateaux de télé…Forcément, ça agace. Regardez les élections en Grande-Bretagne, la gauche les perd dans les grandes largeurs, vraisemblablement parce que son programme de collectivisation des moyens de production était naze et son leader aussi charismatique et enthousiasmant qu’un bonnet de nuit en pilou, eh bien qui entend-on pousser des hauts-cris ? Les juifs. Et pourquoi donc ? Parce que pour l’état-major du Labour, les porteurs de kippa seraient en réalité les deus ex machina de la défaite. Mais bon sang, si on ne peut plus accuser les juifs d’être derrière tout ce qui ne nous fait pas plaisir dans la vie sans les entendre se lamenter devant leur mur, où va-t-on ? Et puis, franchement, il doit avoir un peu raison quelque part, l’ancien maire de Londres Ken Livingstone, lorsqu’il évoque ce satané « vote juif » sans lequel Corbyn serait aujourd’hui Premier ministre à la place de cette crapule de Boris Johnson. D’accord, il n’y a que 300 000 juifs dans tout le pays, les socialistes ont perdu par 4 millions de voix, mais on imagine tout de même que pour un « peuple élu », manipuler un scrutin doit être un jeu d’enfant… D’ailleurs, même notre gauche radicale à nous est d’accord avec l’analyse : les juifs, ils sont tous de droite. Ces Marx, ces Trotski, ces Mendès-France, ces Krivine, ces Cohn-Bendit, ces Bernie Sanders… Tous des fachos notoires. Du coup, on comprend que Mélenchon pousse un coup de gueule sur son blog en commentant le terrible résultat : chez nos voisins du dessus, la gauche a été laminée à cause du « grand rabbin et des réseaux d’influence du Likoud » (un parti politique israélien dont tous les juifs à travers le monde deviennent membres de droit dès leur circoncision). Mieux encore, c’est le Crif français, avec ses « oukases arrogantes » qui imposent « des génuflexions », qui a certainement tenu la main de ces pauvres électeurs britanniques. Fichu cosmopolitisme… D’autant plus que le point de vue de l’insoumis en chef doit être pas mal répandu : zéro réaction chez nos politiques de droite ou de gauche à ses propos ; pas le moindre froncement de sourcil dans la presse « comme il faut »… Un vrai « détail de l’histoire », son commentaire outragé façon Protocole des sages de Sion. Alors, est-ce qu’il est antisémite, le Méluche ? Au sens où, il rêverait d’une solution ultime au problème que pose la terrible engeance dont j’ai moi-même presque honte de faire partie ? Évidemment non. Les antisémites, les vrais, sont de droite (comme les juifs d’ailleurs, mais c’est pour ça qu’on a inventé le mot paradoxe). Non, il n’est pas antisémite. Il constate juste que les juifs utilisent leurs immenses moyens de pression financiers et médiatiques pour accomplir leurs noirs desseins colonialistes et qu’il est temps d’arrêter de se mettre à plat ventre devant eux par faiblesse. C’est tout. On ne va pas en faire un cheddar. Mélenchon, en fait, il dit juste tout haut ce que les gens pensent tout bas, comme le suggérait un autre bateleur d’estrade autrefois. Il dit juste que si Corbyn a perdu, c’est à cause du Crif, des rabbins, du Likoud et des oukases ! Prenez-vous ça dans la gueule, les juifs ! Si vous pensez vraiment qu’on n’a pas vu votre petit jeu ! Retournez manger votre pain azyme dans vos synagogues et arrêtez de vous mettre en travers de la justice sociale, non mais ! Hughes Serraf
Si la volte-face récente de Jean-Luc Mélenchon est un calcul électoraliste, alors ce calcul est une erreur. Car lorsque la Maison Mélenchon multiplie les ententes avec des activistes communautaristes, du strict point de vue électoraliste elle se tire une balle dans chaque pied: d’une, cela ne lui fait rien gagner du côté des Français de confession musulmane ; de deux, cela lui fait perdre massivement des électeurs de gauche qui, musulmans ou pas, sont restés fermes sur la défense de la laïcité et de l’égalité femmes-hommes. Il existe cependant une autre hypothèse que le calcul électoraliste: celle de l’erreur provoquée par un fonctionnement à la va-vite. Peut-être que tous ces députés LFI ont signé en bloc l’appel à marcher contre l’islamophobie parce qu’ils n’ont pas lu le texte avec suffisamment d’attention: ils ont donc cru signer un appel antiraciste habituel, sans en repérer les ambiguïtés. Et aussi, parce qu’ils ne se sont pas renseignés sur les idées d’une partie des porteurs du texte, idées pour le moins problématiques quand on est de gauche. Puis, après coup, Jean-Luc Mélenchon aura tenté de limiter la casse en trouvant des explications plus ou moins vraisemblables à cette catastrophique sortie de route. Toujours est-il que tout cela est incompréhensible venant de Jean-Luc Mélenchon, lui qui plaida rigoureusement contre le concept d’islamophobie au motif qu’on doit avoir, je cite, «le droit de ne pas aimer l’islam». Du reste, il n’y aurait eu aucune polémique et aucun problème si la marche et l’appel à manifester avaient invoqué le racisme anti-maghrébins ou le racisme anti-musulmans, plutôt que ce concept d’islamophobie dont le sens et la légitimité sont l’objet de controverses. Toute cette affaire, c’est vraiment dommage. Car assurément, lors de cette marche, plusieurs milliers de gens ont défilé sincèrement contre le racisme et pas du tout pour le communautarisme d’une partie des initiateurs. Chez LFI et ailleurs, les activistes communautaristes sont en réalité très peu nombreux. Et comme je vous le disais à l’instant, la population qu’ils prétendent défendre, dans sa très large majorité, ne veut pas de leurs idées. Pour compenser cette faiblesse numérique et ce rejet de leurs thèses par ceux qu’ils disent représenter, ils pratiquent donc un entrisme très agressif: partis, facultés, syndicats, médias, etc. Lorsqu’une structure va bien, les activistes communautaristes n’arrivent pas à y avoir une influence: leur entrisme a par exemple échoué dans presque tous les grands médias. Lorsqu’une structure est affaiblie ou en crise, en revanche, ils parviennent à y prendre pied: c’est arrivé à des petits partis et à des syndicats. Or, précisément, après deux années d’erreurs accumulées, la Maison Mélenchon est extrêmement affaiblie. C’est un astre mort, pareil à ces étoiles dont vous percevez encore la lumière alors qu’elles sont déjà éteintes. Au lendemain de la présidentielle de 2017, elle pouvait mobiliser au moins 50 000 militants de terrain dans toute la France pour une opération d’envergure nationale. Actuellement, elle peut difficilement en mobiliser 5 000 et peine à constituer des listes en vue des élections municipales de 2020. L’influence croissante des activistes communautaristes est un signe supplémentaire du fait que la Maison Mélenchon est affaiblie. Dans ce contexte, alors que les activistes communautaristes étaient encore fermement contenus en marge de l’appareil LFI juste après la présidentielle de 2017, aujourd’hui ils y prospèrent. Ce qui ne fait que faciliter la chute de la Maison Mélenchon puisque encore une fois, ni les Français en général, ni les Français de confession musulmane en particulier, ne veulent du communautarisme. Autrement dit, plutôt qu’un problème en soi, l’influence croissante des activistes communautaristes est plutôt un signe supplémentaire du fait que la Maison Mélenchon est affaiblie: l’hémorragie électorale, l’exode massif de militants, l’autodestruction de l’image d’homme d’État de Jean-Luc Mélenchon, ont probablement fait trop de dégâts pour que cela soit réparable. J’ai rejoint La France insoumise à l’été 2017. Je l’ai fait par idéal, parce que j’étais profondément d’accord avec le programme du mouvement: L’Avenir en commun. J’étais très enthousiaste et je me suis mis à la disposition du mouvement pour aider. Charlotte Girard, responsable du programme, m’a confié la formation politique des militants en tandem avec Manon Le Bretton. Pendant un an je ne me suis occupé que de cela. J’étais dans mon coin, et ce d’autant plus que le fonctionnement de l’appareil central est extrêmement cloisonné. Je n’avais des contacts avec le siège que pour des questions logistiques, et de temps en temps pour valider le planning ou les intervenants. Et puis, en été 2018, m’étant porté volontaire pour être l’un des candidats LFI à l’élection européenne, j’ai commencé à fréquenter régulièrement l’appareil central, avec des réunions de coordination, des échanges fréquents avec des cadres, etc. C’est à partir de là que j’ai eu de plus en plus de voyants rouges allumés, au fur et à mesure de ce que je voyais. C’est bien simple: la Maison Mélenchon pratique systématiquement en interne le contraire des valeurs qu’elle affiche. C’est orwellien. Dans les paroles, elle plaide pour une vraie démocratie, pour le respect des droits de l’opposition, pour l’émancipation humaine. Dans les actes, en interne, elle pratique le fonctionnement dictatorial, l’interdiction d’exprimer une parole critique sous peine d’encourir une «purge», et des façons de traiter les gens qui souvent sont humainement détestables. Je raconte par exemple dans un chapitre de mon livre comment les lanceurs d’alerte, qui exigeaient de passer à un fonctionnement démocratique, ont été systématiquement placardisés, calomniés, bannis, ou un mélange des trois. On m’objecte parfois que les tendances dictatoriales de Jean-Luc Mélenchon étaient évidentes dès 2017. Mais ce n’est pas vrai. Dès 2017, certes, chacun voyait qu’il était manifestement un homme à poigne et sujet à des grosses colères. Mais le fonctionnement interne systématiquement dictatorial de LFI, lui, n’était pas encore connu du grand public. On m’objecte plus souvent que ma désillusion aurait dû être plus rapide. Mais c’est négliger plusieurs choses. D’abord, le travail de lucidité est ralenti par le problème du double langage permanent des cadres de l’appareil: telle instance verrouillée est déguisée en instance aux participants «tirés au sort» ; tel congrès où il est interdit de proposer un autre texte que celui de la direction, est déguisé en exercice de démocratie participative ; telle purge pour se débarrasser d’un cadre trop critique, est déguisée en mesure disciplinaire «pour avoir tenu des propos sexistes» ; et ainsi de suite. Il faut donc le temps d’identifier une novlangue interne systématique et d’identifier la réalité autoritaire, centralisée, verrouillée, qu’elle sert à cacher. Ensuite, comme je vous le disais l’appareil est extrêmement opaque, cloisonné. Et les cadres ont souvent peur d’exprimer leurs critiques même entre eux. Comprendre le fonctionnement réel de la machine est donc matériellement difficile – et prend d’autant plus de temps. Enfin, si des dizaines de milliers de militants ont mis du temps avant de quitter La France insoumise, c’est aussi à cause du déni. Quand vous rejoignez un mouvement par idéal, vous devez d’abord épuiser en vous toutes les autres explications possibles, même tordues, avant d’accepter de regarder en face que c’est une vaste escroquerie politique qui trahit l’idéal au nom duquel vous vous êtes engagé. Au premier tour de la présidentielle de 2017, Jean-Luc Mélenchon a frôlé les 20 % malgré sa stratégie, et non pas grâce à elle. Au départ, la Maison Mélenchon a décidé de faire, par rapport à la campagne de 2012, ce qu’on appelle en marketing un «rebranding». Ils ont abandonné le vocabulaire, le message et les symboles de la campagne «Fier d’être de gauche» de 2012. Ils ont remplacé tout cela par une campagne «Fédérer le peuple contre les 1%», avec un message au-delà du clivage gauche-droite, apaisé sur la forme. C’est ce qu’on appelle la stratégie du «populisme de gauche». Jean-Luc Mélenchon est resté malgré lui un candidat d’union de la gauche. Résultat: cela a échoué. En janvier 2017, Jean-Luc Mélenchon reconstitue en intentions de vote son score de la présidentielle de 2012, ce qui signifie que malgré un changement profond de message et de mise en scène, c’est encore l’électorat de gauche radicale qu’il réunifie. Se produit alors cet effet-domino: quelques points d’électorat de centre-gauche abandonnent progressivement le vote Hamon pour le vote Macron, essentiellement par peur de Marine Le Pen et dans l’idée qu’Emmanuel Macron sera un meilleur candidat de barrage au FN. Ce qui fait baisser Benoît Hamon de 17 à 12-13, jusqu’à se trouver à touche-touche avec Jean-Luc Mélenchon. Par conséquent l’effet «vote utile de gauche», qui protège habituellement le candidat du PS contre tout rival de gauche, ne joue plus. Arrivent les débats de premier tour de la présidentielle: Hamon et Mélenchon disent en substance la même chose, mais Mélenchon est meilleur sur le fond et sur la forme. Mélenchon passe donc de quelques points devant Hamon dans les sondages – vraisemblablement un transfert d’électorat «aile gauche du PS». Enfin, dans la dernière ligne droite, Mélenchon étant devenu le candidat le mieux placé à gauche, l’effet «vote utile de gauche» se reconstitue dans la dernière ligne droite à son avantage, et le catapulte à presque 20 %. Il faut souligner que bien sûr, cette montée en puissance n’aurait pas été possible sans les talents d’orateur du candidat, son charisme hors normes, et son grand talent de pédagogue politique sur scène. Toujours est-il qu’ainsi, ce que Jean-Luc Mélenchon a dit, c’est qu’il allait fédérer le peuple par-delà le clivage gauche-droite – mais ce qu’il a fait, c’est être malgré lui un candidat d’union de la gauche. Une fois qu’on a compris cela, on comprend aussi que, lorsque la Maison Mélenchon a interprété ce score comme un nouveau socle de 20 % d’adhésion à la stratégie du «populisme de gauche», c’était une erreur. Puisque Jean-Luc Mélenchon avait été, certes malgré lui, un candidat d’union de la gauche, il fallait former une coalition de type «Front populaire» dès les législatives. Au lieu de cela, La France insoumise a préféré partir seule au combat des législatives, ce qui a mécaniquement abouti à un groupe parlementaire croupion. De même, pendant deux ans, le message politique martelé en boucle, celui de l’appel au soulèvement populaire, n’a correspondu qu’aux attentes de l’électorat de gauche radicale: c’est-à-dire moitié moins que les 20 % de 2017, ce qui a contribué à rétrécir l’espace électoral de LFI. La situation politique de l’Europe est très diverse, sans qu’on constate une dynamique commune à tout le continent. À cela s’ajoute un problème spécifique d’illisibilité du cap fixé. Par exemple, il fut tour à tour question de refuser les alliances avec d’autres forces de gauche, puis de les souhaiter, puis de les refuser à nouveau, et ainsi de suite. Autre exemple, concernant la stratégie «plan A plan B» face à l’Union européenne, il en a existé de 2017 à 2019 presque autant d’interprétations qu’il existe de porte-paroles de LFI. À la longue, cette ligne erratique a nécessairement conduit à ce que des électeurs, rendus méfiants par le flou, se détournent de LFI. rien n’indique un grand effondrement européen de la gauche. 2019 a vu plusieurs victoires. En Espagne, les législatives ont été gagnées par la gauche sociale-démocrate et elle vient de signer un accord de principe avec la gauche radicale pour gouverner ensemble. Au Portugal, les législatives ont été gagnées par la coalition sortante de gauche. En Italie, sans passer par des législatives, un nouveau gouvernement a été installé, sur une coalition du Mouvement 5-Etoiles et de la gauche. On pourrait ainsi multiplier les exemples. On pourrait cependant multiplier aussi les exemples de succès de la droite et dans une moindre mesure de l’extrême droite. Ni vague brune, ni vague bleue, ni vague rose, ni vague rouge: la situation politique de l’Europe, aujourd’hui, est tout simplement très diverse, sans qu’on constate une dynamique commune à tout le continent. Thomas Guénolé
L’antisémitisme de la gauche est un sujet tabou. Depuis longtemps, elle s’est dressée en pourfendeuse du racisme, forcément de droite, oubliant, par exemple, que la chambre du Front Populaire avait voté les pleins pouvoirs à Pétain, vite rejoint à Vichy par Laval, Déat, Marquet, Doriot, Luchaire, Belin et Bousquet. S’il y eut un antijudaïsme catholique, des antisémitismes agnostique (Voltaire) et protestant (Luther), l’un des plus virulents avec celui de l’extrême droite fut révolutionnaire et socialiste. Dans La question juive, Marx dénonce «l’essence du judaïsme et la racine de l’âme juive, l’opportunité et l’intérêt personnel qui se manifeste dans la soif de l’argent». Dans une lettre à Engels, il décrit le socialiste allemand Ferdinand Lassalle comme «un vrai juif de la frontière slave, (…) sa manie de masquer le juif crasseux de Breslau sous toutes sortes de pommades et de fard». Proudhon, qui va inspirer Jaurès, dénonce «l’ennemi du genre humain», une «race» qu’ «il faut renvoyer en Asie ou exterminer» . Staline, idole, sa vie entière, du PCF, lance en 1948 une campagne «anti-cosmopolite», prélude aux exécutions des «blouses blanches» et des intellectuels juifs «incapables de comprendre le caractère national russe». Dans l’entre-deux-guerres, les «néo-socialistes», tous pacifistes, sont aussi à l’œuvre chez nous: Déat souligne le «byzantinisme» de Léon Blum et sa «passivité tout orientale» ; c’est l’époque où la SFIO est accusée de subir une «dictature juive», et que le maire de Bordeaux, Marquet, lui reproche de «pousser à la guerre pour l’URSS et la juiverie». Mais parmi les figures emblématiques de l’antisémitisme de gauche, Jaurès tient une place de choix. Le sujet est tabou par excellence, tant l’idole du socialisme français est encaustiquée! Son journal, La Petite République, désigne le député Reinach comme un «juif ignoble» . Lors de son voyage en Algérie, en avril 1895, Jaurès décrit les juifs qui, «par l’usure, l’infatigable activité commerciale et l’abus de l’influence politique, accaparent peu à peu la fortune, le commerce, les emplois publics (…). Ils tiennent une grande partie de la presse, les grandes institutions financières, et quand ils n’ont pu agir sur les électeurs, ils agissent sur les élus» . Son historien «officiel», Gilles Candar, excusera la diatribe par la «fatigue» de son auteur! L’explication, si facile, par le «contexte» ne tient pas: Clemenceau ne tiendra jamais de tels propos. Dans son discours au Tivoli en 1898, Jaurès est plus caricatural encore: «nous savons bien que la race juive, concentrée, passionnée, subtile, toujours dévorée par une sorte de fièvre du gain quand ce n’est pas par la force du prophétisme, (…) manie avec une particulière habileté le mécanisme capitaliste, mécanisme de rapine, de mensonge, de corset, d’extorsion» . Longtemps convaincu de la culpabilité de Dreyfus, qui aurait échappé à la peine capitale grâce «au prodigieux déploiement de la puissance juive», Jaurès dénonce à la tribune de la Chambre la «bande cosmopolite»! Il sera d’ailleurs sanctionné pour ses propos! Après avoir, une dernière fois, souligné que «l’odeur du ghetto est souvent nauséabonde» , Jaurès opère un revirement tardif lors du procès de Zola, assigné en Justice par le Président Félix Faure en représailles du «J’accuse» paru dans L’Aurore. Devenu dreyfusard, Jaurès, le repenti, obtiendra le soutien financier magnanime du banquier Louis Dreyfus pour son journal l’Humanité… Anne Hidalgo envisageait de débaptiser la rue Alain pour les accents antisémites du journal intime du philosophe. Le fera-t-elle aussi pour Jaurès? L’antisionisme est-il aujourd’hui pour les islamo-gauchistes le cache-sexe de l’antisémitisme? La cause palestinienne est en tout cas mal servie! On se souviendra seulement que les enfants de Marx ont pris, comme Edwy Plenel, dans son journal «Rouge», la défense «inconditionnelle» des terroristes de Septembre Noir. Ceux qui, en 1973, aux JO de Munich, ont assassiné onze athlètes israéliens. Un acte «justifié», disait Sartre, parce que c’étaient des soldats. Bernard Carayon
Il faut distinguer deux choses. L’antisionisme est-il une forme d’antisémitisme dicible ? Et faut-il légiférer en la matière ? Il y a donc deux réponses distinctes. En premier lieu, définir l’antisionisme : c’est l’hostilité à l’idée d’un État juif. Les premiers milieux antisionistes, c’est à l’intérieur du monde juif qu’on les trouve et de bords opposés, d’une part dans les milieux de l’orthodoxie religieuse, de tendance hassidique ou non, d’autre part dans les milieux de la gauche juive, socialiste révolutionnaire ou issue du mouvement bundiste (le parti socialiste juif ouvrier, ndlr) né en 1897, l’année du premier congrès sioniste. Ce qui n’empêche pas d’ailleurs parallèlement et même immédiatement de voir se déclencher un antisionisme virulent du côté de l’Église catholique et des milieux d’extrême droite. Il faut rappeler que les Protocoles des Sages de Sion ont été rédigés dans la foulée du premier congrès sioniste. Ils sont nés du fantasme d’une domination universelle des Juifs à partir du projet de création d’un « foyer national » juif. S’il s’agit de s’opposer à la création d’un État juif, l’antisionisme est donc un débat légitime jusqu’au 14 mai 1948. Ensuite, il perd toute raison d’être puisque l’État existe. Si la polémique persiste, alors cela signifie en bonne logique que l’on est opposé à l’existence de l’État d’Israël. Et dans ce cas, on n’est plus dans un débat politique mais dans un projet meurtrier parce que la disparition d’un Etat, c’est le mot doucereux pour dire expulsions, spoliations et massacres. En ce sens, et depuis 1948, le débat sur la validité ou non du sionisme est clos puisque l’État est là. On peut certes continuer à discuter à l’infini sur ce qu’a représenté le projet sioniste, son bien-fondé ou non, mais on ne peut plus remettre en cause son résultat pratique, la création d’un Etat et d’une société nouvelle forte de neuf millions d’habitants. Pour autant, faut-il légiférer ? Je ne crois pas. L’antisionisme joue d’une ambiguïté, celle de faire croire qu’il se limite à la critique de la politique israélienne quand, en réalité, c’est le droit à l’existence de ce pays que l’antisionisme remet en cause, quelle que soit la politique de ses dirigeants et les concessions qu’ils feront demain. La critique de la politique israélienne, c’est autre chose, ce n’est pas de l’antisionisme ni de l’antisémitisme mais tout simplement la critique légitime de la politique d’un État. Légiférer dans ce domaine est une erreur dès lors que l’on n’a pas expliqué correctement ce que recouvrait le mot antisionisme, un appel à la destruction d’un État et non la critique de sa politique. Légiférer va conférer en effet un caractère intouchable à l’État juif qui ne peut qu’alimenter le fantasme complotiste. Il vaut mieux expliquer comment l’antisémitisme qui n’est plus dicible depuis Auschwitz se dissimule derrière le mot sioniste, comment le mot juif est systématiquement remplacé par le mot sioniste dans une démarche mystificatrice. Pour percer à jour cette supercherie intellectuelle, l’arsenal législatif contre l’antisémitisme suffisait amplement. Je crois surtout que la diabolisation de l’État d’Israël est l’héritage laissé par l’intense propagande communiste. Reste aussi qu’on aura mis cinquante ans à découvrir cette mystification. Léon Poliakov l’avait dit dès 1968, l’antisionisme militant était le refus à peine masqué de l’existence d’un Etat juif. Et plus encore dix ans plus tard le philosophe Vladimir Jankélévitch qui s’exprimait en ces termes : « L’antisionisme est la trouvaille miraculeuse, l’aubaine providentielle qui réconcilie la gauche anti-impérialiste et la droite antisémite ; (il) donne la permission d’être démocratiquement antisémite. Qui dit mieux ? Il est désormais possible de haïr les Juifs au nom du progressisme ! Il y a de quoi avoir le vertige : ce renversement bienvenu, cette introuvable inversion ne peuvent qu’enfermer Israël dans une nouvelle solitude [1]. » La doxa actuelle a fait de l’antisionisme un de ses credo de base pour des raisons profondes. Je ne pense pas qu’une loi puisse infléchir cette tendance. Il est préférable de la comprendre pour désamorcer la part inquiétante de ce raisonnement spécieux. Je crois surtout que la diabolisation de l’État d’Israël est l’héritage laissé par l’intense propagande communiste, aujourd’hui oubliée, en particulier celle de l’ex-Union soviétique qui entre les années 1950 et 1990, a produit une immense « littérature » anti-israélienne imprégnée du vieil antisémitisme russe mâtiné d’anticapitalisme. La diabolisation de l’État juif tient aussi au nouveau rapport de force démographique qui s’est instauré en Europe par le biais d’une immigration arabo-musulmane importante, en particulier en France, le pays qui abrite la plus importante communauté musulmane d’Europe (25% des musulmans d’Europe vivent en France) comme aussi la plus importante communauté juive. Dans leur immense majorité, cette immigration vient du monde arabe et en particulier du Maghreb où la haine de l’État d’Israël est diffuse et quotidienne, en particulier en Algérie. Par surcroit, cette récusation a été sourdement et silencieusement favorisée par la culpabilité née de la Shoah. Dans un autre ordre d’idées, l’État d’Israël a été fondé après la Seconde Guerre mondiale à contre-courant du principe de l’État-nation. Il représente le principe même de l’identité nationale, de la filiation et des racines, un principe qui a été puissamment récusé en Europe par le multiculturalisme dominant. On en veut à l’Etat juif de représenter le principe de l’État-nation dont beaucoup considèrent qu’il est porteur de guerre. D’un autre bord, on lui en veut aussi d’avoir perpétué ce qui est perdu en Europe aujourd’hui et dont on garde une nostalgie mais qui est difficile à dire en ce temps de pensée correcte : l’identité culturelle, l’enracinement et l’amour de la patrie. Des mots qui pourraient vous classer d’emblée à l’extrême droite dans ce tribunal permanent qu’est devenue la vie intellectuelle dans la France d’aujourd’hui. Je reviens sur cette diabolisation de l’État d’Israël comme forme sécularisée, profane et dicible, de l’antique stigmatisation du signe juif qui a participé à la matrice culturelle de l’Europe chrétienne. La restauration de l’indépendance nationale juive est le démenti infligé à l’abaissement d’Israël, partie intrinsèque de la théologie chrétienne comme de la théologie musulmane. Malédiction de l’origine… Il est difficile de sortir de ce moule. Ce n’est toutefois pas impossible à la condition de mettre les mots pour ne plus être parlé par ces mythologies. Il faut faire ici un sort particulier à la passion anti-israélienne qui anime certains Juifs de la diaspora dans leur relation torturée à leur identité juive. Je trouve particulièrement fallacieux d’avancer, par exemple, que les Juifs qui ne vivent pas en Israël sont antisionistes. Non, ils sont au mieux a-sionistes, certainement pas antisionistes. Avoir fait un autre choix que celui de s’établir dans l’État d’Israël ne signifie pas qu’on récuse le projet sioniste, mais simplement qu’on a d’autres attaches, d’autres enracinements, d’autres intérêts et d’autres filiations qui nous interdisent d’émigrer. Ce tour de passe-passe sémantique (tout Juif qui n’habite pas Israël est décrété « antisioniste ») participe d’une logique strictement idéologique. Près de 52% des Juifs du monde vivent aujourd’hui en Israël. En 1948, c’était à peine 5%. L’effectif du peuple juif dans le monde n’est pas de seize millions d’individus mais de treize millions au maximum. Sur ce chiffre, plus de 6,5 millions vivent aujourd’hui dans l’État juif. La seconde incohérence est de continuer à raisonner comme à l’époque d’avant l’État juif. Car la naissance de l’État d’Israël a modifié considérablement l’identité juive, l’identité de tous les Juifs du monde et pas seulement des Juifs citoyens israéliens. Y compris les plus hostiles au concept d’État juif. On est étonné que des militants antisionistes de profession, qui se situent généralement à gauche, se montrent aussi étrangers à la dialectique. Car la création de l’État d’Israël a bouleversé le regard que les Juifs portent sur leur propre identité, elle leur a donné une assurance et une force qu’ils ne connaissaient pas jusque-là. Elle les a transformés. C’est aussi pourquoi l’immense majorité d’entre eux est attachée à la vie et à la survie de l’État juif même s’ils n’ont aucune intention de s’y installer. Qu’on interroge les communautés juives de par le monde et l’on verra combien l’attachement à l’État d’Israël est puissant et va au-delà des vicissitudes de tel ou tel gouvernement, il est ancré dans la quasi-totalité des communautés juives de la diaspora en dépit du regard critique qu’elles peuvent porter sur la politique de l’État juif. Son existence est devenue chose vitale pour la quasi-totalité des Juifs du monde. Qu’on se souvienne par exemple des mots de Raymond Aron à ce sujet à la veille de la Guerre des Six Jours en 1967. Trois points me semblent essentiels. En premier lieu, cette augmentation de 74 % en 2018, une année où il n’y a pas eu de conflit majeur entre Israël et ses voisins, malgré quelques flambées de fièvre avec le Hamas à Gaza, rien toutefois qui ressemble à une véritable guerre comme en 2014, et a fortiori comme en 2006 avec le Hezbollah au Liban. Autrement dit, connecter perpétuellement la flambée d’actes antijuifs commis en France avec le conflit israélo-arabe est un leurre. L’antisémitisme qui sévit aujourd’hui en France se nourrit de lui-même, il peut certes être aggravé par l’actualité proche-orientale mais il n’en est pas né. Il n’a pas été créé par elle. Il est endogène. En matière d’actes agressifs, leurs auteurs sont connus et pour l’essentiel, sinon l’immense majorité d’entre eux, ils ne viennent pas de l’extrême droite. On s’abstiendra donc de désigner les antisémites tout en condamnant bien sûr l’antisémitisme. En deuxième lieu, l’arsenal législatif français est suffisant pour punir sévèrement les auteurs d’actes délictueux. C’est au pouvoir politique et à la justice de faire leur travail. De ne pas tergiverser sur la nature antisémite de crimes pour lesquels, on le sait, une dimension antisémite était avérée comme dans le cas de Sarah Halimi dont l’agresseur a traversé l’appartement de ses voisins maliens sans leur faire de mal pour aller frapper « la Juive » de l’immeuble qu’il bat à mort en la traitant de Sheitan (diable en arabe) avant de la défenestrer. Si ce n’était qu’une bouffée délirante, il s’en serait pris au premier voisin venu. Ce ne fut pas le cas : c’était à « la Juive » qu’il en voulait et à elle seule. Et jusqu’à ce jour, près de trois ans après les faits, on continue à débattre du caractère antisémite ou non de l’agression. En d’autres termes, si l’arsenal législatif suffit, mais si les actes ne suivent pas, c’est que la volonté politique est faible et qu’elle s’appuie sur cette maladie répandue mais qui prend en France une forme aiguë : le déni. Cette faiblesse a des causes profondes, mais elle est camouflée par des discours de compassion, souvent émouvants, qui de la droite à la gauche nous signifient que « la France sans les Juifs ne saurait être la France ». Dans la réalité, on a oublié ce sondage récent, il y a deux ans à peine, qui nous montrait que 67 % des Français étaient indifférents au départ des Juifs. Certes, seule une minorité infime s’en réjouissait et un bon tiers le déplorait. Mais le chiffre de 67 % était là, écrasant qui montrait la force de l’indifférence, ce moteur du malheur. Je doute fort que la loi puisse faire quoique en matière d’évolution sociétale. Nous sommes en présence d’une vague de fond, elle porte à terme l’abandon des Juifs sans qu’entre ici une part d’antisémitisme militant. Cet abandon n’est d’ailleurs que le signe avancé d’une fracturation et d’une désaffiliation françaises plus vastes. Mais c’est un autre sujet. En troisième lieu, c’est signe de naïveté que voir dans l’enseignement de la Shoah le moyen de faire reculer l’antisémitisme. Asséner l’histoire de la Shoah aux élèves comme une forme de catéchisme moral censé les protéger de l’antisémitisme est un non-sens. D’une part, parce que la compassion ne protège de rien : dans nos sociétés, une émotion chasse l’autre. D’autre part, parce qu’à force d’asséner cette histoire sous une forme moraliste on semble oublier que tout catéchisme provoque le rejet. On semble oublier aussi qu’on alimente une concurrence mémorielle qui nourrit le communautarisme. Enfin, qu’enfermer le peuple juif dans une essence de victime ne protège pas de la violence, mais tout au contraire y expose davantage. Georges Bensoussan
 Attention: une synthèse peut en cacher une autre !
Au lendemain du véritable triomphe de Boris Johnson et des Conservateurs britanniques …
Et surtout du désastre du leader travailliste Jeremy Corbyn …
Pendant que refusant d’y reconnaitre le funeste résultat de décennies de radicalisation à l’instar de l’ancien maire de Londres travailliste Jonathan Livingstone, Jean-Luc Mélenchon y va de sa dénonciation des tentatives de synthèse de Corbyn avec la gauche modérée du parti …
Et après avoir défilé le mois dernier contre la prétendue islamophobie, achève son coming out antisémite dans une violente dénonciation des « ukases arrogantes (sic) des communautaristes du CRIF » …
Comment ne pas y voir, du Brexit à l’élection de Trump – et avant sa probable réélection – jusqu’au mouvement des gilets jaunes en France, la continuation d’une révolte de toute une classse ouvrière et moyenne abandonnée par la gauche boboïsée et caviardisée ?
Et comment ne pas se réjouir de ces électeurs de cette même classe …
Qui déjouant toutes les accusations de xénophobie et de racisme dont ils sont régulièrement l’objet …
Ont su au nom des valeurs oubliées de leur classe des « trois F » (family, faith and flag) …
Retrouver le simple sens de la décence qu’oublient justement aujourd’hui leurs accusateurs de gauche …
Et démasquer enfin, de Livingstone à Galloway et Corbyn …
Mais aussi de Marx, Proudhon, Guesde, Jaurès et Lénine et Staline …
Cachée derrière le cache-sexe de l’antisionisme qui, puisque l’État d’Israël existe comme le rappelle Georges Bensoussan, ne vise plus que la disparition d’un Etat, et les expulsions, spoliations et massacres qu’elle suppose …
Cette nouvelle et pourtant si ancienne synthèse du fameux socialisme des imbéciles
Contre laquelle toute nouvelle législation comme le catéchisme moral ne fera que relancer le fantasme complotiste …
Entre la prétendue gauche antifasciste et antiraciste et les plus radicaux des immigrés musulmans dont il lorgnent les votes ?

L’antisionisme est-il un antisémitisme ? Grand entretien avec Georges Bensoussan

Désespérant et indéracinable, l’antisémitisme progresse en France, en Europe et aux Etats-Unis. Une résolution assimilant l’antisionisme à l’antisémitisme a été adoptée par le Parlement, suscitant une vive polémique. Le décryptage de Georges Bensoussan.

Cet entretien avec l’historien Georges Bensoussan apporte un nouvel éclairage sur un débat sulfureux. Rappelant que l’antisémitisme se dissimule effectivement derrière le mot sioniste, il doute néanmoins de l’efficacité d’une loi faussement protectrice qui risque au contraire d’alimenter le fantasme complotiste.

Georges Bensoussan est historien et auteur de nombreux ouvrages, tant sur la mémoire du génocide que sur la situation des juifs dans les pays arabes. Après le prémonitoire Les territoires perdus de la République (2002), il a dirigé l’ouvrage Une France soumise (Albin Michel, 2017) A paraître en janvier : L’alliance israélite universelle. Juifs d’Orient, Lumieres d’Occident (Albin Michel).


Marianne : Quel regard portez-vous sur la loi assimilant l’antisionisme à l’antisémitisme, qui fait polémique ?

Georges Bensoussan : Il faut distinguer deux choses. L’antisionisme est-il une forme d’antisémitisme dicible ? Et faut-il légiférer en la matière ? Il y a donc deux réponses distinctes. En premier lieu, définir l’antisionisme : c’est l’hostilité à l’idée d’un État juif. Les premiers milieux antisionistes, c’est à l’intérieur du monde juif qu’on les trouve et de bords opposés, d’une part dans les milieux de l’orthodoxie religieuse, de tendance hassidique ou non, d’autre part dans les milieux de la gauche juive, socialiste révolutionnaire ou issue du mouvement bundiste (le parti socialiste juif ouvrier, ndlr) né en 1897, l’année du premier congrès sioniste. Ce qui n’empêche pas d’ailleurs parallèlement et même immédiatement de voir se déclencher un antisionisme virulent du côté de l’Église catholique et des milieux d’extrême droite. Il faut rappeler que les Protocoles des Sages de Sion ont été rédigés dans la foulée du premier congrès sioniste. Ils sont nés du fantasme d’une domination universelle des Juifs à partir du projet de création d’un « foyer national » juif.

S’il s’agit de s’opposer à la création d’un État juif, l’antisionisme est donc un débat légitime jusqu’au 14 mai 1948. Ensuite, il perd toute raison d’être puisque l’État existe. Si la polémique persiste, alors cela signifie en bonne logique que l’on est opposé à l’existence de l’État d’Israël. Et dans ce cas, on n’est plus dans un débat politique mais dans un projet meurtrier parce que la disparition d’un Etat c’est le mot doucereux pour dire expulsions, spoliations et massacres. En ce sens, et depuis 1948, le débat sur la validité ou non du sionisme est clos puisque l’État est là. On peut certes continuer à discuter à l’infini sur ce qu’a représenté le projet sioniste, son bien-fondé ou non, mais on ne peut plus remettre en cause son résultat pratique, la création d’un Etat et d’une société nouvelle forte de neuf millions d’habitants.

Pour autant, faut-il légiférer ?

Je ne crois pas. L’antisionisme joue d’une ambiguïté, celle de faire croire qu’il se limite à la critique de la politique israélienne quand, en réalité, c’est le droit à l’existence de ce pays que l’antisionisme remet en cause, quelle que soit la politique de ses dirigeants et les concessions qu’ils feront demain. La critique de la politique israélienne, c’est autre chose, ce n’est pas de l’antisionisme ni de l’antisémitisme mais tout simplement la critique légitime de la politique d’un État. Légiférer dans ce domaine est une erreur dès lors que l’on n’a pas expliqué correctement ce que recouvrait le mot antisionisme, un appel à la destruction d’un État et non la critique de sa politique. Légiférer va conférer en effet un caractère intouchable à l’État juif qui ne peut qu’alimenter le fantasme complotiste. Il vaut mieux expliquer comment l’antisémitisme qui n’est plus dicible depuis Auschwitz se dissimule derrière le mot sioniste, comment le mot juif est systématiquement remplacé par le mot sioniste dans une démarche mystificatrice. Pour percer à jour cette supercherie intellectuelle, l’arsenal législatif contre l’antisémitisme suffisait amplement.

Je crois surtout que la diabolisation de l’État d’Israël est l’héritage laissé par l’intense propagande communiste

Reste aussi qu’on aura mis cinquante ans à découvrir cette mystification. Léon Poliakov l’avait dit dès 1968, l’antisionisme militant était le refus à peine masqué de l’existence d’un Etat juif. Et plus encore dix ans plus tard le philosophe Vladimir Jankélévitch qui s’exprimait en ces termes : « L’antisionisme est la trouvaille miraculeuse, l’aubaine providentielle qui réconcilie la gauche anti-impérialiste et la droite antisémite ; (il) donne la permission d’être démocratiquement antisémite. Qui dit mieux ? Il est désormais possible de haïr les Juifs au nom du progressisme ! Il y a de quoi avoir le vertige : ce renversement bienvenu, cette introuvable inversion ne peuvent qu’enfermer Israël dans une nouvelle solitude [1]. »

Cette mesure votée à l’instigation du député Sylvain Maillard souhaitait lutter contre une préoccupante diabolisation d’Israël…

La doxa actuelle a fait de l’antisionisme un de ses credo de base pour des raisons profondes. Je ne pense pas qu’une loi puisse infléchir cette tendance. Il est préférable de la comprendre pour désamorcer la part inquiétante de ce raisonnement spécieux.

Je crois surtout que la diabolisation de l’État d’Israël est l’héritage laissé par l’intense propagande communiste, aujourd’hui oubliée, en particulier celle de l’ex-Union soviétique qui entre les années 1950 et 1990, a produit une immense « littérature » anti-israélienne imprégnée du vieil antisémitisme russe mâtiné d’anticapitalisme.

La diabolisation de l’État juif tient aussi au nouveau rapport de force démographique qui s’est instauré en Europe par le biais d’une immigration arabo-musulmane importante, en particulier en France, le pays qui abrite la plus importante communauté musulmane d’Europe (25% des musulmans d’Europe vivent e