Présidence Trump: Attention, un fascisme peut en cacher un autre (Behind the Left’s constant crying wolf, Trump’s actions are largely an extension of prior temporary policies and a long-overdue return to sanity)

14 février, 2017
no-borders http://cdn3.i-scmp.com/sites/default/files/styles/landscape/public/images/methode/2017/02/03/21099374-e933-11e6-925a-a992a025ddf7_1280x720.JPG?itok=IYzRzJ5Zhttps://refusefascism.org/wp-content/uploads/IMG_0881.jpghttps://assets.metrolatam.com/cl/2015/10/21/18gnguw7qnrvujpg-1200x800.jpghttp://www.bigbendnewswire.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/1123US_Sunrise_haze_fence_up_hill-Kopie.jpghttps://jcdurbant.files.wordpress.com/2014/05/image.jpeg?w=1200&h=http://atlantablackstar.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Deportation-Obama-HuffPost.jpg
deporter-in-chief
o-deportations
o-deportations-stats
http://cdn.static-economist.com/sites/default/files/images/2014/02/blogs/graphic-detail/20140208_gdc296.png
Les fascistes de demain s’appelleront eux-mêmes antifascistes. Churchill
Normally intercepts of U.S. officials and citizens are some of the most tightly held government secrets. This is for good reason. Selectively disclosing details of private conversations monitored by the FBI or NSA gives the permanent state the power to destroy reputations from the cloak of anonymity. This is what police states do. (…) Flynn was a fat target for the national security state. He has cultivated a reputation as a reformer and a fierce critic of the intelligence community leaders he once served with when he was the director the Defense Intelligence Agency under President Barack Obama. Flynn was working to reform the intelligence-industrial complex, something that threatened the bureaucratic prerogatives of his rivals. He was also a fat target for Democrats. Remember Flynn’s breakout national moment last summer was when he joined the crowd at the Republican National Convention from the dais calling for Hillary Clinton to be jailed. In normal times, the idea that U.S. officials entrusted with our most sensitive secrets would selectively disclose them to undermine the White House would alarm those worried about creeping authoritarianism. Imagine if intercepts of a call between Obama’s incoming national security adviser and Iran’s foreign minister leaked to the press before the nuclear negotiations began? The howls of indignation would be deafening. In the end, it was Trump’s decision to cut Flynn loose. In doing this he caved in to his political and bureaucratic opposition. Nunes told me Monday night that this will not end well. « First it’s Flynn, next it will be Kellyanne Conway, then it will be Steve Bannon, then it will be Reince Priebus, » he said. Put another way, Flynn is only the appetizer. Trump is the entree. Eli Lake
There does appear to be a well orchestrated effort to attack Flynn and others in the administration. From the leaking of phone calls between the president and foreign leaders to what appears to be high-level FISA Court information, to the leaking of American citizens being denied security clearances, it looks like a pattern. Devin Nunes (House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence)
The United States is much better off without Michael Flynn serving as national security adviser. But no one should be cheering the way he was brought down. The whole episode is evidence of the precipitous and ongoing collapse of America’s democratic institutions — not a sign of their resiliency. Flynn’s ouster was a soft coup (or political assassination) engineered by anonymous intelligence community bureaucrats. The results might be salutary, but this isn’t the way a liberal democracy is supposed to function. Unelected intelligence analysts work for the president, not the other way around. Far too many Trump critics appear not to care that these intelligence agents leaked highly sensitive information to the press — mostly because Trump critics are pleased with the result. « Finally, » they say, « someone took a stand to expose collusion between the Russians and a senior aide to the president! » It is indeed important that someone took such a stand. But it matters greatly who that someone is and how they take their stand. Members of the unelected, unaccountable intelligence community are not the right someone, especially when they target a senior aide to the president by leaking anonymously to newspapers the content of classified phone intercepts, where the unverified, unsubstantiated information can inflict politically fatal damage almost instantaneously. President Trump was roundly mocked among liberals for that tweet. But he is, in many ways, correct. These leaks are an enormous problem. And in a less polarized context, they would be recognized immediately for what they clearly are: an effort to manipulate public opinion for the sake of achieving a desired political outcome. It’s weaponized spin. But no matter what Flynn did, it is simply not the role of the deep state to target a man working in one of the political branches of the government by dishing to reporters about information it has gathered clandestinely. It is the role of elected members of Congress to conduct public investigations of alleged wrongdoing by public officials. In a liberal democracy, how things happen is often as important as what happens. Procedures matter. So do rules and public accountability. The chaotic, dysfunctional Trump White House is placing the entire system under enormous strain. That’s bad. But the answer isn’t to counter it with equally irregular acts of sabotage — or with a disinformation campaign waged by nameless civil servants toiling away in the surveillance state. Those cheering the deep state torpedoing of Flynn are saying, in effect, that a police state is perfectly fine so long as it helps to bring down Trump. It is the role of Congress to investigate the president and those who work for him. If Congress resists doing its duty, out of a mixture of self-interest and cowardice, the American people have no choice but to try and hold the government’s feet to the fire, demanding action with phone calls, protests, and, ultimately, votes. That is a democratic response to the failure of democracy. Sitting back and letting shadowy, unaccountable agents of espionage do the job for us simply isn’t an acceptable alternative. Down that path lies the end of democracy in America. Damon Linker
The model of the imperial Obama presidency is the greater fear. Over the last eight years, Obama has transformed the powers of presidency in a way not seen in decades. Obama, as he promised with his pen and phone, bypassed the House and Senate to virtually open the border with Mexico. He largely ceased deportations of undocumented immigrants. He issued executive-order amnesties. And he allowed entire cities to be exempt from federal immigration law. The press said nothing about this extraordinary overreach of presidential power, mainly because these largely illegal means were used to achieve the progressive ends favored by many journalists. The Senate used to ratify treaties. In the past, a president could not unilaterally approve the Treaty of Versailles, enroll the United States in the League of Nations, fight in Vietnam or Iraq without congressional authorization, change existing laws by non-enforcement, or rewrite bankruptcy laws. Not now. Obama set a precedent that he did not need Senate ratification to make a landmark treaty with Iran on nuclear enrichment. He picked and chose which elements of the Affordable Care Act would be enforced — predicated on his 2012 reelection efforts. Rebuffed by Congress, Obama is now slowly shutting down the Guantanamo Bay detention center by insidiously having inmates sent to other countries (…) One reason Americans are scared about the next president is that they should be. In 2017, a President Trump or a President Clinton will be able to do almost anything he or she wishes without much oversight — thanks to the precedent of Obama’s overreach, abetted by a lapdog press that forgot that the ends never justify the means. Victor Davis Hanson
Key to the strategy of change is to remind citizens that the present action is a corrective of past extremism, a move to the center not to the opposite pole, and must be understood as reluctantly reactive, not gratuitously revolutionary. Such forethought is not a sign of timidity or backtracking, but rather the catalyst necessary to make change even more rapid and effective. Take Trump’s immigration stay. In large part, it was an extension of prior temporary policies enacted by both Presidents Bush and Obama. It was also a proper correction of Trump’s own unwise and ill-fated campaign pledge to temporarily ban Muslims rather than take a pause to vet all immigrants from war-torn nations in the Middle East. Who would oppose such a temporary halt? Obviously Democrats, on the principle that the issue might gain political traction so that they could tar Trump as an uncouth racist and xenophobe, and in general as reckless, incompetent, and confused. Obviously, the Left in general sees almost any restriction on immigration as antithetical to its larger project of a borderless society run by elites such as themselves. Obviously Republican establishmentarians fear any media meme suggesting that they are complicit in an illiberal enterprise. Perhaps the Trump plan was, first, to ensure that radical Islamist terrorists and their sympathizers do not enter the U.S., as they so often enter Europe; second, to send a message to the international community that entry into the country is a privilege not an entitlement; and, third, symbolically to reassert the powers of assimilation, integration, and intermarriage as we slow and refine legal immigration. (The U.S. currently has about 40 million foreign-born residents, or a near record 14 percent of the population; one in four Californians was not born in the United States.) (…) Take the wall with Mexico and the campaign promise to make “Mexico pay.” (…) The aim again is to remind the country that the action is a reaction to past excess and extremism. To take another example, if we are going to get into a minor tiff with Australia over its refugee problem, then it might be wise to explain that Australia’s own refugee policies are among the most restrictive in the world, and that, on principle, the United States cannot involve itself in the internal immigration affairs of other nations and therefore must allow Australia free rein to determine its own immigration future. And we carefully would explain the consequences of that decision of non-interference. In truth, Australia, not Trump, was the more culpable. (Immigrants, many from the Middle East, heading toward Australia will undergo vetting that permits them entry into the U.S. but not into Australia — in a deal that was understandably not much publicized by the lame-duck Obama administration?) In terms of strategy, the Trump people surely grasp the rationale of their opponents: to react hysterically to every presidential act, raising the volume and chaos of dissent to such a level that moderate Republicans go into a fetal position and sigh, “Please just make all this go away” — and thus turn their animus upon their own. Trump may think that the Left’s crying wolf constantly will imperil their authenticity and turn their shrieks into mere background noise Or he may wager that the protesters will raise the temperature so high they themselves will melt down before the administration does. Perhaps. But just as likely, the Left is gambling that each outrage is a small nick to the capillaries of the Trump administration — after a few months the total blood loss will match the fatal damage of an aneurysm. The result will then be such a loss of public credibility that the Trump administration will become paralyzed (think Watergate, Iran-Contra, or the furor over Iraq), or so deterred that it will shift course and fall into line. Trump needs to carefully consider the full effect of executive orders and the certain reactions against them to the second and third degree — not because he should cease issuing them (so far the orders have almost all been inspired), but to ensure that they are effective and understood. In this way, they may win rather than lose public support, especially if the relevant cabinet secretaries are on board and out front with the media. In other words, only by taking actions deliberately and with forethought can he bring about not so much change as a long-overdue return to sanity. Victor Davis Hanson
La chancelière allemande Angela Merkel et les Premiers ministres des 16 Landers allemands ont conclu jeudi un accord visant à faciliter les expulsions de réfugiés dont la demande d’asile a été rejetée. Les expulsions sont normalement du ressort des landers, mais Merkel souhaite coordonner un certain nombre de choses au niveau fédéral pour accélérer les procédures. Le gouvernement fédéral veut s’accaparer plus de pouvoirs pour refuser des permis de séjour et effectuer lui-même les expulsions. L’un des objectifs centraux du plan en 16 points est de construire un centre de rapatriement à Potsdam (Berlin) qui comptera un représentant pour chaque lander. En outre, il prévoit la création de centres d’expulsion à proximité des aéroports pour faciliter les expulsions collectives. Un autre objectif est de faciliter l’expulsion des immigrants qui présentent un danger pour la sécurité du pays et de favoriser les «retours volontaires» d’autres migrants par le biais d’incitations financières s’ils acceptent de quitter le pays avant qu’une décision ait été prise au regard de leur demande d’asile. Une somme de 40 millions d’euros est consacrée à ce projet. Selon le ministère allemand de l’Intérieur, 280.000 migrants ont sollicité l’asile en Allemagne en 2016. C’est trois fois moins que les 890.000 de l’année précédente, au plus fort de la crise des réfugiés en Europe. Près de 430 000 demandes d’asile sont encore en cours d’instruction. L’Express
Jamais les Etats-Unis n’ont expulsé autant d’immigrés clandestins. Au point où « The Economist  » n’hésite pas à qualifier Barack Obama de « deporter-in-chief » (le chef des expulseurs). Depuis son arrivée à la Maison-Blanche, quelque 2 millions de clandestins ont été expulsés, soit à un rythme neuf fois plus élevé qu’il y a vingt ans et un record pour un président américain. Et la « machine infernale à expulser  » coûte cher aux Etats-Unis, plus que tout autre budget fédéral destiné à la lutte contre la criminalité. La conséquence de ces expulsions est lourde. Non seulement elles conduisent à des séparations familiales déchirantes, mais elles appauvrissent l’Amérique, affirme l’hebdomadaire. Le nouveau patron de Microsoft, Satya Nadella, né en Inde, est évidemment l’exemple des bienfaits de l’immigration pour l’économie. La moitié en outre des doctorats universitaires sont obtenus par des immigrés, ainsi que quatre cinquièmes des brevets dans le domaine pharmaceutique. Les refus de plus en plus fréquents d’accorder des permis de séjour à des étudiants réduisent les chances de former de nouveaux Nadella. Sans oublier les clandestins non qualifiés qui acceptent des emplois dont les Américains ne veulent pas… et qui paient leurs impôts. Pour Obama, il s’agit d’un paradoxe qui s’explique peut-être par sa volonté de faire porter le chapeau à son opposition républicaine hostile à son projet de réforme visant à légaliser 12 millions d’immigrés illégaux. Mais le président ne devrait pas utiliser une telle stratégie et plutôt s’employer à enrayer la machine infernale des expulsions. Les Echos (10/02/2014)
Washington s’inquiète de voir la violence liée à la guerre contre les narcotrafiquants empiéter sur les États-Unis (…) La guerre contre le narcotrafic menée par le président Felipe Calderon a provoqué une explosion de violence (plus de 7 200 morts officiellement en 2008). Barack Obama s’est dit mardi «préoccupé par le niveau accru de la violence (…) et son impact sur les communautés vivant de part et d’autre de la frontière.» Dans la foulée, la Maison-Blanche a dévoilé une nouvelle stratégie pour endiguer la montée en puissance des gangs mexicains, qui gagnent des milliards de dollars en exportant la drogue vers les États-Unis, où ils se fournissent en armes et en argent liquide. Washington prévoit d’augmenter les effectifs des agents des ministères de la Justice, du Trésor et de la Sécurité intérieure et ­d’installer de nouveaux outils de surveillance aux postes frontières. L’Administration Obama compte aussi s’appuyer sur les 700 millions de dollars d’aide aux forces de sé­curité mexicaines alloués pour 2008 et 2009. Parallèlement, les États-Unis en­visagent de placer des troupes en état d’alerte, probablement des réservistes de la Garde nationale, qui seraient envoyés à la frontière en cas d’urgence. Ils souhaitent aussi imposer un nouvel accord militaire au Mexique. Le Figaro (25/03/2009)
Newly obtained congressional data shows hundreds of terror plots have been stopped in the U.S. since 9/11 – mostly involving foreign-born suspects, including dozens of refugees. The files (…) give fresh insight into the true scope of the terror threat and cover a wide range of cases, including: A Seattle man plotting to attack a U.S. military facility An Atlantic City man using his “Revolution Muslim” site to encourage confrontations with U.S. Jewish leaders “at their home An Iraq refugee arrested in January, accused of traveling to Syria to “take up arms” with terror groups While the June 12 massacre at an Orlando gay nightclub marked the deadliest terror attack on U.S. soil since 2001, the data shows America has been facing a steady stream of plots. For the period September 2001 through 2014, data shows the U.S. successfully prosecuted 580 individuals for terrorism and terror-related cases. Further, since early 2014, at least 131 individuals were identified as being implicated in terror. Across both those groups, the senators reported that at least 40 people initially admitted to the U.S. as refugees later were convicted or implicated in terror cases. Among the 580 convicted, they said, at least 380 were foreign-born. The top countries of origin were Pakistan, Lebanon and Somalia, as well as the Palestinian territories. (…) Specifically, they show a sharp spike in cases in 2015, largely stemming from the arrest of suspects claiming allegiance to the Islamic State. (…) The allegations detailed in the subcommittee’s research pertain to a range of cases, involving suspects caught traveling or trying to travel overseas to fight, as well as suspects ensnared in controversial sting operations which civil-liberties groups including the ACLU have criticized. In a 2014 report, Human Rights Watch said nearly half of the federal counterterror convictions at the time came from “informant-based cases,” many of them sting operations where the informants played a role in the plot. (…) But even in some of those cases, federal agents got involved after learning of a serious suspected plot. In the case of the Seattle suspect, Abu Khalid Abdul-Latif, authorities said he approached someone in 2011 about attacking a military installation. That citizen alerted law enforcement and worked with them to capture Latif and an accomplice. Fox news (June 2016)
A review of information compiled by a Senate committee in 2016 reveals that 72 individuals from the seven countries covered in President Trump’s vetting executive order have been convicted in terror cases since the 9/11 attacks. These facts stand in stark contrast to the assertions by the Ninth Circuit judges who have blocked the president’s order on the basis that there is no evidence showing a risk to the United States in allowing aliens from these seven terror-associated countries to come in. In June 2016 the Senate Subcommittee on Immigration and the National Interest, then chaired by new Attorney General Jeff Sessions, released a report on individuals convicted in terror cases since 9/11. Using open sources (because the Obama administration refused to provide government records), the report found that 380 out of 580 people convicted in terror cases since 9/11 were foreign-born. (…) The Center has extracted information on 72 individuals named in the Senate report whose country of origin is one of the seven terror-associated countries included in the vetting executive order: Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen. (…) According to the report, at least 17 individuals entered as refugees from these terror-prone countries. Three came in on student visas and one arrived on a diplomatic visa. At least 25 of these immigrants eventually became citizens. Ten were lawful permanent residents, and four were illegal aliens. These immigrant terrorists lived in at least 16 different states, with the largest number from the terror-associated countries living in New York (10), Minnesota (8), California (8), and Michigan (6). Ironically, Minnesota was one of the states suing to block Trump’s order to pause entries from the terror-associated countries, claiming it harmed the state. At least two of the terrorists were living in Washington, which joined with Minnesota in the lawsuit to block the order. Thirty-three of the 72 individuals from the seven terror-associated countries were convicted of very serious terror-related crimes, and were sentenced to at least three years imprisonment. The crimes included use of a weapon of mass destruction, conspiracy to commit a terror act, material support of a terrorist or terror group, international money laundering conspiracy, possession of explosives or missiles, and unlawful possession of a machine gun. Some opponents of the travel suspension have tried to claim that the Senate report was flawed because it included individuals who were not necessarily terrorists because they were convicted of crimes such as identity fraud and false statements. About a dozen individuals in the group from the seven terror-associated countries are in this category. Some are individuals who were arrested and convicted in the months following 9/11 for involvement in a fraudulent hazardous materials and commercial driver’s license scheme that was extremely worrisome to law enforcement and counter-terrorism agencies, although a direct link to the 9/11 plot was never claimed. The information in this report was compiled by Senate staff from open sources, and certainly could have been found by the judges if they or their clerks had looked for it. Another example that should have come to mind is that of Abdul Razak Ali Artan, who attacked and wounded 11 people on the campus of Ohio State University in November 2016. Artan was a Somalian who arrived in 2007 as a refugee. Center for immigration studies

Attention: un fascisme peut en cacher un autre !

Gouvernement par décrets, ouverture virtuellement complète des vannes de l’immigration mexicaine, amnisties par fait du prince, villes-refuges quasiment soustraites à la loi fédérale, court-circuitage du Congrès accordant l’accès à l’arme nucléaire à un pays appelant à l’annihilation d’un de ses voisins, explosion complètement inouïe du budget fédéral, loi calamiteuse sur la sécurité sociale, élargissement non maitrisé et caché de terroristes notoires, record largement secret d’exécutions parajudiciaires, dénonciation systématique du prétendu racisme policier privant de fait les plus démunis de leur droit à la sécurité la plus élémentaire  …

A l’heure où, quand ce n’est pas l’ancien président lui-même, nos beaux esprits et nos belles âmes des médias et du monde du spectacle (ou même apparemment de la fonction publique ou des services secrets ?)

Multiplient, entre révélations d’écoutes secrètes ou analyses de poignées de mains, les fuites, obstructions et  dénigrements pour saboter les premières semaines, certes quelque peu cahotiques, de l’Administration Trump …

(Contrairement à ce que nos médias paresseux et partiaux nous rabâchent, ce n’est pas pour « contacts inappropriés » avec l’ambassadeur russe mais pour mensonge à ses chefs – du moins officiellement – que Flynn démissionne et que – vendetta personnelle ? – le FBI n’a pas hésité à confirmer, pour ceux qui ne le savaient pas encore, la mise sur écoute systématique de tous les contacts des citoyens américains avec l’étranger, hauts fonctionnaires et ambassadeurs compris) …

Pendant que se confirme l’origine majoritairement musulmane des auteurs d’attentats sur le sol américain depuis ou avant le 11 septembre …

Et qu’alors que la fameuse générosité européenne semble se heurter elle aussi au dur mur de la réalité de ce côté-ci de l’Atlantique, se poursuit l’hallali contre la seule véritable alternance aux cinq années de gâchis socialiste …

Comment ne pas voir …

En creux pour ceux qui ont encore un peu de mémoire …

Et au-delà de l’évident correctif face à la véritable radicalité d’une administration ayant battu tous les records, si l’on ajoute les « memorandums », de décrets présidentiels …

L’incroyable indulgence complice qui avait suivi l’élection de Barack Obama il y a huit ans …

Mais aussi la non moins incroyable amnésie …

Pour une administration qui non seulement appliqua plusieurs moratoires sur l’immigration de certains pays musulmans  …

Mais poursuivit, au moins jusqu’en 2010 et sur fond d’intensification du trafic de drogue, la construction d’un des pas moins de douze murs que compte la planète

Et, entre deux promesses d’amnistie, battit en son temps le record toutes catégories d’expulsions de clandestins ?

Entre les États-Unis et le Mexique, un mur très politique
Philippe Gélie

Le Figaro

02/10/2006

LES ÉTATS-UNIS vont ériger une barrière de 1 120 kilomètres de long sur leur frontière avec le Mexique. La loi adoptée en ce sens par le Sénat vendredi soir, juste avant la fin de la session parlementaire, ignore la volonté du président d’introduire une réforme globale de l’immigration, dans laquelle le volet répressif aurait été complété par un programme d’accueil des travailleurs étrangers. Mais, à cinq semaines des élections de mi-mandat, George W. Bush a annoncé son intention de ratifier la loi telle qu’elle est, plutôt que d’offrir un spectacle de division dans son propre parti.

Le texte prévoit l’érection d’au moins deux rangées de palissades et de grillages sur un peu plus de la moitié des 3 200 kilomètres de frontière entre les États-Unis et le Mexique, principal point d’entrée des immigrants clandestins. Il donne 18 mois au département de la Sécurité du territoire pour prendre «le contrôle opérationnel» de la frontière, notion définie par l’arrêt de «tous» les passages illégaux. En moyenne, 1,2 million de clandestins sont arrêtés chaque année du côté américain, un chiffre constant depuis dix ans malgré le renforcement incessant des contrôles.

Des obstacles juridiques

Cent vingt kilomètres de palissades existent déjà, le nombre de gardes-frontière a été triplé et 6 000 soldats de la Garde nationale ont été déployés en renfort l’été dernier. Le seul résultat visible jusqu’ici a été de repousser les candidats à l’immigration toujours plus loin dans des zones désertiques, faisant passer le nombre de morts d’une douzaine à 400 par an. Selon les autorités d’Arizona, la fortification de la frontière a donné le jour à une nouvelle criminalité organisée, plus sophistiquée que les passeurs d’autrefois. À raison de 1 600 dollars par immigrant, son chiffre d’affaires atteindrait 2,5 milliards de dollars par an.

La réponse du Congrès a été de budgéter 1,2 milliard de dollars pour lancer un projet qui devrait en coûter au total 7 milliards d’ici à son achèvement fin 2008. Il prévoit la multiplication des drones, des radars, des caméras de surveillance et des plaques sensibles enfouies dans le sol. Les zones concernées par ce «mur» de haute technologie s’étendent sur une partie de la Californie, la quasi-totalité de la frontière sud de l’Arizona et du Nouveau-Mexique, ainsi que deux tronçons le long du Rio Grande au Texas. Le terrain, extrêmement difficile par endroits, jette le doute sur la faisabilité de l’opération : il faudra gravir des sommets escarpés, plonger au fond de canyons ou traverser des rivières rapides.

Des obstacles juridiques sont également prévisibles, la barrière étant censée traverser plusieurs réserves indiennes dont les tribus sont opposées à sa construction. Des associations de protection de la nature prévoient d’introduire des recours en justice au nom du respect de la vie sauvage. Même les ranchers du Texas s’inquiètent de l’impact sur leur main-d’oeuvre de travailleurs frontaliers. «Ce n’est pas réalisable, estime le sénateur de l’Arizona Jim Kolbe, c’est juste une déclaration politique avant les élections.»

Voir aussi:

Barack Obama veut sécuriser la frontière avec le Mexique

Lamia Oualalou, à Rio de Janeiro
Le Figaro

25/03/2009

Washington s’inquiète de voir la violence liée à la guerre contre les narcotrafiquants empiéter sur les États-Unis, alors que Hillary Clinton est attendue mercredi à Mexico.

La secrétaire d’État Hillary Clinton doit s’attendre à un accueil plutôt froid en arrivant au Mexique mercredi. Sa visite, la première d’une série de visites de hauts fonctionnaires avant le voyage du président Barack Obama, prévu à la mi-avril, a pour objectif de panser les plaies alors que les relations entre les deux pays, qui partagent une frontière de 3 000 kilomètres, traversent une phase délicate.

La guerre contre le narcotrafic menée par le président Felipe Calderon a provoqué une explosion de violence (plus de 7 200 morts officiellement en 2008). Barack Obama s’est dit mardi «préoccupé par le niveau accru de la violence (…) et son impact sur les communautés vivant de part et d’autre de la frontière.» Dans la foulée, la Maison-Blanche a dévoilé une nouvelle stratégie pour endiguer la montée en puissance des gangs mexicains, qui gagnent des milliards de dollars en exportant la drogue vers les États-Unis, où ils se fournissent en armes et en argent liquide.

Washington prévoit d’augmenter les effectifs des agents des ministères de la Justice, du Trésor et de la Sécurité intérieure et ­d’installer de nouveaux outils de surveillance aux postes frontières. L’Administration Obama compte aussi s’appuyer sur les 700 millions de dollars d’aide aux forces de sé­curité mexicaines alloués pour 2008 et 2009.

Parallèlement, les États-Unis en­visagent de placer des troupes en état d’alerte, probablement des réservistes de la Garde nationale, qui seraient envoyés à la frontière en cas d’urgence. Ils souhaitent aussi imposer un nouvel accord militaire au Mexique. «La question de la sécurité a pris une place excessive et exclusive, il faut que les États-Unis se recentrent sur la relation commerciale, qui est fondamentale», dit Laura Carlsen, directrice des Amérique au Centre de politique internationale – CIP, basé à Washington.

Représailles commerciales
La semaine dernière, le gouvernement de Felipe Calderon a établi une liste de 90 produits américains qui seront surtaxés à l’entrée du territoire mexicain. Une décision prise en représailles à une mesure du Congrès américain mettant fin à la circulation de camions mexicains au-delà du Rio Grande, comme le prévoyait l’accord de libre-échange nord-américain (Alena), qui unit les États-Unis, le Canada et le Mexique. Le Congrès estime que les véhicules mexicains ne répondent pas aux normes de sécurité américaines. «C’est une mesure protectionniste, dictée par le puissant syndicat de camionneurs Teamsters», tranche Leo Zuckermann, analyste au Cide, un centre d’études politiques et économiques à Mexico.

«En ces moments de crise économique, alors qu’il faut éviter le protectionnisme, les États-Unis envoient un signal négatif au Mexique et au reste du monde», estime le ministre de l’Économie Gerardo Ruiz Mateos. La liste des produits frappés de surtaxe – fruits, légumes, shampoings – exclut les denrées de première nécessité afin de ne pas pénaliser le consommateur. Mexico a également tenu à ce qu’ils proviennent de 40 États américains. «Le but est de montrer à la Maison-Blanche que la relation commerciale pèse dans les deux sens, et qu’elle est fondamentale pour certains États», explique Laura Carlsen.

Pour Barack Obama, la crise avec le Mexique vire au casse-tête. «Il a promis pendant sa campagne de renégocier l’Alena à l’avantage des travailleurs américains, une proposition rejetée par Mexico, rappelle Tomas Ayuso, chercheur au Coha (Conseil sur les affaires hémisphériques) de Washington. Mais il est dangereux de froisser le Mexique, qui est son troisième partenaire commercial.»

Obama semble l’avoir compris. Il a changé de discours, substituant aux critiques des éloges sur «l’ex­tra­ordinaire travail» de Felipe Calderon.

Voir également:

Le mur États-Unis-Mexique en 15 images

Le reportage de Christian Latreille

Radio Canada

7 juin 2016

L’immigration est un sujet controversé de la campagne présidentielle américaine. Le candidat républicain Donald Trump promet notamment de bâtir un mur plus haut et plus long entre les États-Unis et le Mexique. Nous sommes allés voir ce fameux mur.

Le mur entre les deux pays se construit par étapes. Le fondateur de l’association des Anges de la frontière, Enrique Morones, montre deux générations de murs. La première atteint trois mètres et a été fabriquée sous Bill Clinton avec de la tôle recyclée de la guerre du Vietnam. La deuxième, d’environ cinq mètres de hauteur, a été construite sous George W. Bush.

Derrière Enrique Morones, une brèche dans le mur. En fait, le mur n’est pas uniforme et ne s’étend que sur 1120 km des 3200 km de la frontière entre les États-Unis et le Mexique. Plus souvent une montagne, une rivière ou un désert séparent les deux pays.

Après le mur, le désert. Les bénévoles des Anges de la frontière, un groupe né en 1986, déposent des bouteilles d’eau pour aider ceux qui doivent survivre dans le désert aride après avoir franchi le mur.

Les clandestins attachent des morceaux d’étoffe sous leurs souliers pour éviter de laisser des traces de pas facilement détectables par les gardes-frontières.

La zone de San Diego-Tijuana comprend un des systèmes de sécurité les plus sophistiqués le long de la frontière entre les États-Unis et le Mexique.

Mur, clôture, caméras, détecteurs et barbelés. Il y a aussi les patrouilleurs qui surveillent continuellement le mur. Malgré tout cet arsenal, de nombreux immigrants réussissent à passer illégalement chaque semaine.

Les clandestins parviennent à percer le mur avec des scies mécaniques. Selon les gardes-frontières, seulement 30 % des clandestins qui tentent d’entrer illégalement au pays se font prendre. « On fait du mieux qu’on peut, avec ce qu’on nous donne », dira l’un d’eux.

Le syndicat des gardes-frontières a appuyé le candidat Donald Trump. Le vice-président, Terence Shigg, apporte des nuances à la position de Trump sur l’immigration. Le candidat républicain propose notamment de déporter les quelque 11 millions de sans-papiers qui se trouvent aux États-Unis. Selon Terence Shigg, la déportation massive n’est pas la solution; il faut plus de gens pour traiter les demandes d’asile, plus de juges en immigration, plus de centres de détention.

Christopher Harris, du syndicat des gardes-frontières, se tient du côté américain de la frontière. À quelques pas de là, il a tué un clandestin; un douloureux souvenir qui le hante encore. Il aime citer une ancienne patronne : « Montrez-moi un mur de 15 pieds, et je vous montrerai une échelle de 16 pieds ».

On estime à près de 11 000 le nombre de personnes mortes depuis 1994 en tentant d’entrer illégalement aux États-Unis. Plusieurs centaines d’entre elles sont enterrées ici, dans ce cimetière de fortune.

Les corps de nombreuses personnes n’ont pas été réclamés. Elles restent donc anonymes. Des « John Doe », comme l’indique l’inscription sur la pierre. C’est pour éviter que les victimes ne tombent dans l’oubli que les Anges de la frontière entretiennent régulièrement le cimetière.

Jeune enfant, Walfred a été abandonné au Guatemala par sa mère, qui a tenté sa chance aux États-Unis. Après quatre ans d’attente, il a réussi à franchir la frontière illégalement pour la rejoindre. Pour le moment, il est protégé par un décret présidentiel signé par Barack Obama en 2012.

Walfred et sa mère connaissent des jours plus heureux. Elle gère une petite entreprise d’entretien ménager, tout en vivant dans la clandestinité. Un sacrifice qu’elle accepte volontiers pour être avec son seul enfant.

Voir encore:

The Obama Administration Stopped Processing Iraq Refugee Requests For 6 Months In 2011

Although the Obama administration currently refuses to temporarily pause its Syrian refugee resettlement program in the United States, the State Department in 2011 stopped processing Iraq refugee requests for six months after the Federal Bureau of Investigation uncovered evidence that several dozen terrorists from Iraq had infiltrated the United States via the refugee program.

After two terrorists were discovered in Bowling Green, Kentucky, in 2009, the FBI began reviewing reams of evidence taken from improvised explosive devices (IEDs) that had been used against American troops in Iraq. Federal investigators then tried to match fingerprints from those bombs to the fingerprints of individuals who had recently entered the United States as refugees:

An intelligence tip initially led the FBI to Waad Ramadan Alwan, 32, in 2009. The Iraqi had claimed to be a refugee who faced persecution back home — a story that shattered when the FBI found his fingerprints on a cordless phone base that U.S. soldiers dug up in a gravel pile south of Bayji, Iraq on Sept. 1, 2005. The phone base had been wired to unexploded bombs buried in a nearby road.

An ABC News investigation of the flawed U.S. refugee screening system, which was overhauled two years ago, showed that Alwan was mistakenly allowed into the U.S. and resettled in the leafy southern town of Bowling Green, Kentucky, a city of 60,000 which is home to Western Kentucky University and near the Army’s Fort Knox and Fort Campbell. Alwan and another Iraqi refugee, Mohanad Shareef Hammadi, 26, were resettled in Bowling Green even though both had been detained during the war by Iraqi authorities, according to federal prosecutors.

The terrorists were not taken into custody until 2011. Shortly thereafter, the U.S. State Department stopped processing refugee requests from Iraqis for six months in order to review and revamp security screening procedures:

As a result of the Kentucky case, the State Department stopped processing Iraq refugees for six months in 2011, federal officials told ABC News – even for many who had heroically helped U.S. forces as interpreters and intelligence assets. One Iraqi who had aided American troops was assassinated before his refugee application could be processed, because of the immigration delays, two U.S. officials said. In 2011, fewer than 10,000 Iraqis were resettled as refugees in the U.S., half the number from the year before, State Department statistics show.

According to a 2013 report from ABC News, at least one of the Kentucky terrorists passed background and fingerprint checks conducted by the Department of Homeland Security prior to being allowed to enter the United States. Without the fingerprint evidence taken from roadside bombs, which one federal forensic scientist referred to as “a needle in the haystack,” it is unlikely that the two terrorists would ever have been identified and apprehended.

“How did a person who we detained in Iraq — linked to an IED attack, we had his fingerprints in our government system — how did he walk into America in 2009?” asked one former Army general who previously oversaw the U.S. military’s anti-IED efforts.

President Barack Obama has thus far refused bipartisan calls to pause his administration’s Syrian refugee program, which many believe is likely to be exploited by terrorists seeking entry into the United States. The president has not explained how his administration can guarantee that no terrorists will be able to slip into the country by pretending to be refugees, as the Iraqi terrorists captured in Kentucky did in 2009. One of those terrorists, Waad Ramadan Alwan, even came into the United States by way of Syria, where his fingerprints were taken and given to U.S. military intelligence officials.

Obama has also refused to explain how his administration’s security-related pause on processing Iraq refugee requests in 2011 did not “betray our deepest values.”

Voir de même:

Study Reveals 72 Terrorists Came From Countries Covered by Trump Vetting Order

Jessica Vaughan
Center for immigration studies
February 11, 2017

A review of information compiled by a Senate committee in 2016 reveals that 72 individuals from the seven countries covered in President Trump’s vetting executive order have been convicted in terror cases since the 9/11 attacks. These facts stand in stark contrast to the assertions by the Ninth Circuit judges who have blocked the president’s order on the basis that there is no evidence showing a risk to the United States in allowing aliens from these seven terror-associated countries to come in.

In June 2016 the Senate Subcommittee on Immigration and the National Interest, then chaired by new Attorney General Jeff Sessions, released a report on individuals convicted in terror cases since 9/11. Using open sources (because the Obama administration refused to provide government records), the report found that 380 out of 580 people convicted in terror cases since 9/11 were foreign-born. The report is no longer available on the Senate website, but a summary published by Fox News is available here.

The Center has obtained a copy of the information compiled by the subcommittee. The information compiled includes names of offenders, dates of conviction, terror group affiliation, federal criminal charges, sentence imposed, state of residence, and immigration history.

The Center has extracted information on 72 individuals named in the Senate report whose country of origin is one of the seven terror-associated countries included in the vetting executive order: Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen. The Senate researchers were not able to obtain complete information on each convicted terrorist, so it is possible that more of the convicted terrorists are from these countries.

The United States has admitted terrorists from all of the seven dangerous countries:

  • Somalia: 20
  • Yemen: 19
  • Iraq: 19
  • Syria: 7
  • Iran: 4
  • Libya: 2
  • Sudan: 1
  • Total: 72

According to the report, at least 17 individuals entered as refugees from these terror-prone countries. Three came in on student visas and one arrived on a diplomatic visa.

At least 25 of these immigrants eventually became citizens. Ten were lawful permanent residents, and four were illegal aliens.

These immigrant terrorists lived in at least 16 different states, with the largest number from the terror-associated countries living in New York (10), Minnesota (8), California (8), and Michigan (6). Ironically, Minnesota was one of the states suing to block Trump’s order to pause entries from the terror-associated countries, claiming it harmed the state. At least two of the terrorists were living in Washington, which joined with Minnesota in the lawsuit to block the order.

Thirty-three of the 72 individuals from the seven terror-associated countries were convicted of very serious terror-related crimes, and were sentenced to at least three years imprisonment. The crimes included use of a weapon of mass destruction, conspiracy to commit a terror act, material support of a terrorist or terror group, international money laundering conspiracy, possession of explosives or missiles, and unlawful possession of a machine gun.

Some opponents of the travel suspension have tried to claim that the Senate report was flawed because it included individuals who were not necessarily terrorists because they were convicted of crimes such as identity fraud and false statements. About a dozen individuals in the group from the seven terror-associated countries are in this category. Some are individuals who were arrested and convicted in the months following 9/11 for involvement in a fraudulent hazardous materials and commercial driver’s license scheme that was extremely worrisome to law enforcement and counter-terrorism agencies, although a direct link to the 9/11 plot was never claimed.

The information in this report was compiled by Senate staff from open sources, and certainly could have been found by the judges if they or their clerks had looked for it. Another example that should have come to mind is that of Abdul Razak Ali Artan, who attacked and wounded 11 people on the campus of Ohio State University in November 2016. Artan was a Somalian who arrived in 2007 as a refugee.

President Trump’s vetting order is clearly legal under the provisions of section 212(f) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, which says that the president can suspend the entry of any alien or group of aliens if he finds it to be detrimental to the national interest. He should not have to provide any more justification than was already presented in the order, but if judges demand more reasons, here are 72.

Voir aussi:

Homeland Security

Anatomy of the terror threat: Files show hundreds of US plots, refugee connection

Now PlayingWhy are Democrat women so rattled by Trump?

Newly obtained congressional data shows hundreds of terror plots have been stopped in the U.S. since 9/11 – mostly involving foreign-born suspects, including dozens of refugees.

The files are sure to inflame the debate over the Obama administration’s push to admit thousands more refugees from Syria and elsewhere, a proposal Donald Trump has vehemently opposed on the 2016 campaign trail.

“[T]hese data make clear that the United States not only lacks the ability to properly screen individuals prior to their arrival, but also that our nation has an unprecedented assimilation problem,” Sens. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., and Ted Cruz, R-Texas, told President Obama in a June 14 letter, obtained by FoxNews.com.

The files also give fresh insight into the true scope of the terror threat and cover a wide range of cases, including:

  • A Seattle man plotting to attack a U.S. military facility
  • An Atlantic City man using his “Revolution Muslim” site to encourage confrontations with U.S. Jewish leaders “at their homes”
  • An Iraq refugee arrested in January, accused of traveling to Syria to “take up arms” with terror groups

While the June 12 massacre at an Orlando gay nightclub marked the deadliest terror attack on U.S. soil since 2001, the data shows America has been facing a steady stream of plots. For the period September 2001 through 2014, data shows the U.S. successfully prosecuted 580 individuals for terrorism and terror-related cases. Further, since early 2014, at least 131 individuals were identified as being implicated in terror.

Across both those groups, the senators reported that at least 40 people initially admitted to the U.S. as refugees later were convicted or implicated in terror cases.

Among the 580 convicted, they said, at least 380 were foreign-born. The top countries of origin were Pakistan, Lebanon and Somalia, as well as the Palestinian territories.

Both Sessions and Cruz sit on the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration and the National Interest, which compiled the terror-case information based on data from the Justice Department, news reports and other open-source information. The files were shared with FoxNews.com.

The files include dates, states of residence, countries of origin for foreign-born suspects, and reams of other details.

Specifically, they show a sharp spike in cases in 2015, largely stemming from the arrest of suspects claiming allegiance to the Islamic State. They also show a heavy concentration of cases involving suspects from California, Texas, New York and Minnesota, among other states.

The senators say the terror-case repository still is missing critical details on suspects’ immigration history, which they say the Department of Homeland Security has “failed to provide.” Immigration data the senators compiled came from other sources.

Sessions and Cruz asked the president in their letter to order the departments of Justice, Homeland Security and State to « update » and provide more detailed information. The senators have sent several letters to those departments since last year requesting immigration histories of those tied to terror.

“The administration refuses to give out the information necessary to establish a sound policy that protects Americans from terrorists,” Sessions said in a statement to Fox News.

Asked about the complaints, DHS spokeswoman Gillian M. Christensen told FoxNews.com the department “will respond to the senators’ request directly and not through the press.”

“More than 100 Congressional committees, subcommittees, caucuses, commissions and groups exercise oversight and ensure accountability of DHS and we work closely with them on a daily basis. We’ve received unprecedented requests from a number of senators and representatives for physical paper files for more than 700 aliens,” she said, adding that officials have to review each page manually for privacy and other issues.

Cruz ran unsuccessfully this year for the Republican presidential nomination. Sessions, an ardent critic of the administration’s immigration policies, is supporting presumptive GOP nominee Trump.

The allegations detailed in the subcommittee’s research pertain to a range of cases, involving suspects caught traveling or trying to travel overseas to fight, as well as suspects ensnared in controversial sting operations which civil-liberties groups including the ACLU have criticized.

In a 2014 report, Human Rights Watch said nearly half of the federal counterterror convictions at the time came from “informant-based cases,” many of them sting operations where the informants played a role in the plot.

The report said: “In some cases the Federal Bureau of Investigation may have created terrorists out of law-abiding individuals by conducting sting operations that facilitated or invented the target’s willingness to act.”

But even in some of those cases, federal agents got involved after learning of a serious suspected plot. In the case of the Seattle suspect, Abu Khalid Abdul-Latif, authorities said he approached someone in 2011 about attacking a military installation. That citizen alerted law enforcement and worked with them to capture Latif and an accomplice.

FoxNews.com’s Liz Torrey contributed to this report. 

Voir par ailleurs:

La guerre des cartels mexicains franchit la frontière des Etats-Unis

Déjà, l’Arizona subit une hausse alarmante de la criminalité. Selon différentes sources, l’Etat frontalier serait devenu la principale plaque tournante nord-américaine de l’immigration illégale et du narcotrafic. Ailleurs, sur l’ensemble du territoire, les cartels mexicains contrôleraient la plupart du marché, d’après un rapport du Centre national de renseignement des drogues. Liés aux gangs américains, ils seraient parvenus à s’implanter dans 230 villes des Etats-Unis.

Nicolas Bourcier

EL PASO (TEXAS) ENVOYÉ SPÉCIAL

Le Monde

24.03.2009

« N ‘y allez pas. » D’emblée, l’injonction de Ramon Bracamontes prend des allures de mise en garde. Les mots, le ton de ce journaliste texan d’El Paso, enquêteur reconnu, calme et d’habitude souriant, en disent long sur le degré d’inquiétude qui prévaut de ce côté-ci de la frontière.

Evoquer le Mexique et la ville d’en face, Ciudad Juarez, située juste de l’autre côté du Rio Grande et de son « rideau de fer », c’est prendre le risque de subir une logorrhée interminable de crimes et d’horreurs liés à la guerre des narcotrafiquants et leurs sicaires. « Moi-même, j’ai peur, insiste-t-il. Les autorités américaines au Mexique m’ont affirmé qu’elles ne pouvaient plus assurer la protection des ressortissants des Etats-Unis. Et de ce côté-ci, nous assistons, chaque jour un peu plus, au débordement de cette violence. »

C’est dire l’importance de la première visite, prévue les mercredi 25 et jeudi 26 mars, de la secrétaire d’Etat Hillary Clinton au Mexique. Sa venue a été placée sous le signe de la lutte contre la drogue. Plus de 800 policiers et militaires y ont été tués depuis décembre 2006. Quelque 6 000 assassinats y ont été recensés l’année dernière (le double de 2007). Avant Noël, les autorités ont découvert dans la petite ville de Chilpancingo, enveloppées dans des sacs en plastique, huit têtes décapitées de soldats puis trois autres dans une glacière à Ciudad Juarez en janvier. Quelques jours plus tard, c’était au tour du responsable de la police locale de démissionner sous la pression des cartels de la drogue. Le maire de la ville frontière, lui, a fini par s’installer avec sa famille en face, à El Paso.

Déjà, en décembre 2006, lors de son élection, le président mexicain, Felipe Calderon, avait admis que « le crime organisé était devenu hors de contrôle ». Depuis, le chef de l’Etat, conservateur et partisan d’une stratégie musclée contre le crime organisé, a déployé sur le territoire 45 000 soldats contre les gangs des narcotrafiquants, dont près de 5 000, cagoulés de noir et lourdement armés, pour la seule ville de Ciudad Juarez.

Les arrestations se sont multipliées – souvent de façon arbitraire, d’après les organisations de défense des droits de l’homme. Les règlements de compte dans les prisons ont atteint de nouveaux sommets. Tout comme les attaques contre des domiciles, les extorsions, les saisies de cocaïne, les prises d’otages et les meurtres avec plus de 1 100 homicides pour les seules huit premières semaines de l’année.

Les autorités mexicaines assurent que le pouvoir central est en train de gagner. A les en croire, l’explosion de violence serait paradoxalement le fruit des efforts de l’Etat pour désorganiser le trafic de drogue. En novembre 2008, Noe Ramirez, le procureur en charge de l’unité spécialisée dans le crime organisé, n’a-t-il pas été inculpé pour avoir fourni des informations au cartel de Sinaloa contre un demi-million de dollars par mois ? Et Francisco Velasco Delgado, le chef de la police de Cancun, arrêté pour avoir protégé le cartel dit du Golfe, commanditaire présumé de l’assassinat en janvier d’un général ?

Pour Washington, l’effort reste insuffisant. Rendu public il y a quelques semaines, un document du Pentagone concluait que deux grands pays pouvaient connaître un effondrement rapide de l’Etat : le Pakistan et, précisément, le voisin mexicain. Un avis rejeté fermement par Mexico, mais alimenté depuis par de nombreuses voix. Barry McCaffrey, général à la retraite et « M. Drogue » de Bill Clinton, affirme que les Etats-Unis ne peuvent pas se permettre d’avoir « un narco-Etat à leur porte« , ajoutant que « les dangers et les problèmes croissants du Mexique menacent la sécurité nationale de notre pays ».

Déjà, l’Arizona subit une hausse alarmante de la criminalité. Selon différentes sources, l’Etat frontalier serait devenu la principale plaque tournante nord-américaine de l’immigration illégale et du narcotrafic. Ailleurs, sur l’ensemble du territoire, les cartels mexicains contrôleraient la plupart du marché, d’après un rapport du Centre national de renseignement des drogues. Liés aux gangs américains, ils seraient parvenus à s’implanter dans 230 villes des Etats-Unis.

C’est dans ce contexte que le général Victor Renuart, le chef du commandement de la zone Amérique du Nord, a expliqué, lors d’une audition au Sénat, le 17 mars, que Washington envisageait d’envoyer plus de troupes ou d’agents spécialisés à la frontière. Selon lui, toutes les composantes des forces de l’ordre et de l’armée seront probablement concernées dans ce combat sans pour autant donner une estimation chiffrée des besoins.

Deux semaines auparavant, Rick Perry, le gouverneur républicain du Texas, avait exigé l’envoi de 1 000 hommes supplémentaires. « Je me fiche de savoir s’il s’agit de militaires, de gardes nationaux ou d’agents des douanes, a-t-il lâché. Nous sommes très préoccupés par le fait que le gouvernement fédéral ne s’occupe pas de la sécurité à la frontière de façon adéquate. »

Une équipe formée de représentants de plusieurs agences gouvernementales s’est réunie la semaine dernière afin d’épauler Mexico. Une initiative qui fait suite au déjeuner, le 12 janvier à Washington, entre Barack Obama et le président mexicain. D’après l’hebdomadaire The Economist, citant des sources mexicaines, M. Calderon aurait proposé un « partenariat stratégique » et la mise en place rapide d’un groupe binational d’experts afin d’améliorer la coopération entre les deux pays.

Devant l’éventualité d’une nouvelle militarisation de la frontière, le président mexicain a exhorté, il y a quelques jours, Washington à surveiller, de son côté, plus étroitement ses importations d’armes et leur vente aux particuliers. Il a demandé des contrôles plus stricts à la frontière d’où les cartels reçoivent leur arsenal et des millions de dollars en espèces en provenance des Etats-Unis.

Après Hillary Clinton, le président américain effectuera à son tour une visite officielle, les 16 et 17 avril, au Mexique. La première en Amérique latine depuis son accession à la Maison Blanche.

Nicolas Bourcier – EL PASO (TEXAS) ENVOYÉ SPÉCIAL

En savoir plus sur http://www.lemonde.fr/ameriques/article/2009/03/24/la-guerre-des-cartels-mexicains-franchit-la-frontiere-des-etats-unis_1171893_3222.html#Z3v6zkJA11su7rMg.99

Ce que peut (encore) faire Barack Obama avant la fin de son mandat

Le président sortant a jusqu’au 20 janvier 2017, date de l’investiture de Donald Trump, pour prendre ses dernières mesures.

Lucas Wicky

Le Monde

28.12.2016

Barack Obama entre dans la dernière ligne droite de son mandat présidentiel. Le 20 janvier 2017, Donald Trump, dont l’élection a été confirmée le 19 décembre par le vote des grands électeurs, prêtera serment et s’installera à la Maison Blanche. Le président sortant se trouve ainsi placé dans la position inconfortable du « lame duck » (canard boiteux), selon l’expression consacrée outre-Atlantique : celle d’un élu dont le mandat arrive à terme et qui est toujours en poste, alors que son successeur est déjà élu mais n’occupe pas encore le poste.

Pour autant, M. Obama ne semble pas disposé à faire « profil bas » durant cette période de transition officielle, qui limite, théoriquement, ses marges de manœuvre. Pour preuve, le 20 décembre, il a décrété l’interdiction des forages gaziers et pétroliers dans de vastes zones de l’Arctique et de l’Atlantique. Les observateurs y ont vu une sorte de coup de force avant l’arrivée de M. Trump, tant cette disposition s’inscrit à rebours des orientations de ce dernier, qui, au contraire, a promis de déréguler l’extraction pétrolière pendant son mandat.

Barack Obama va-t-il profiter des prochaines semaines pour faire passer d’autres mesures avant de quitter la fonction présidentielle ? En a-t-il les moyens ? Voici un tour d’horizon des leviers dont il dispose encore, ou pas, et de la pérennité des mesures qu’il pourrait prendre.

Peut-il faire voter de nouvelles réformes ?

Non

En tout cas, pas en passant par le Congrès (pouvoir législatif). Depuis deux ans, M. Obama n’y dispose pas d’une majorité. C’est pourquoi toutes les réformes d’ampleur du président sortant ont été bloquées. Les élections de mi-mandat avaient en effet permis aux républicains d’obtenir la majorité au Sénat, tandis qu’ils contrôlaient la Chambre des représentants depuis 2010. Les démocrates n’ont pas réussi à renverser ce rapport de force lors des dernières élections, en novembre.

Peut-il « contourner » les parlementaires ?

Oui, dans certains cas

Des leviers ont notamment permis à M. Obama d’agir sur la question des armes, de promouvoir la diversité au sein de la Sécurité nationale ou de protéger une partie de la mer de Bering. Il s’agit des executive actions, en l’occurence des décrets présidentiels (executive orders) ou des mémorandums, qui viennent préciser la manière dont une loi existante doit s’appliquer (les décrets doivent nécessairement mentionner la loi concernée, à la différence des mémorandums).

Le président dispose d’un troisième outil afin de se passer de la validation du Sénat : les accords exécutifs. M. Obama y a eu recours en politique étrangère. Par exemple pour « signer l’accord de Paris sur le changement climatique et conclure l’accord controversé sur le programme nucléaire iranien », note John Copeland Nagle, professeur de droit à l’université Notre Dame law school.

M. Obama a toutefois eu moins recours aux décrets présidentiels que ses prédécesseurs républicains, Ronald Reagan et George W. Bush, mais à plus de mémorandums, selon USA Today.

Les décisions prises à travers des « actes exécutifs » sont-elles irréversibles ?

Non

L’utilisation de ces executive actions n’est pas explicitement prévue par la Constitution des Etats-Unis. Leur utilisation a plusieurs fois été jugée abusive ou « anticonstitutionnelle » par les républicains. En réalité, il revient aux tribunaux fédéraux (s’ils sont saisis par un plaignant) ou à la Cour suprême (en cas d’appel) de juger si ces actes exécutifs respectent ou non la Constitution.

Quoi qu’il en soit, la plupart de ces actes exécutifs peuvent être « instantanément défaits par Donald Trump », prévient Vincent Michelot, professeur de civilisation américaine à Sciences Po Lyon.

C’est d’ailleurs ce que promet le futur locataire de la Maison Blanche, qui a l’intention de revenir sur plusieurs réformes de son prédécesseur. Dans son contrat présidentiel, on peut lire ce qu’il compte faire dès son premier jour de mandat :

« Premièrement, abroger toutes les actions exécutives inconstitutionnelles, mémorandums et décrets mis en place par le président Obama. »

Certains actes présidentiels pris par M. Obama peuvent-ils contraindre son successeur ?

Oui

Face au risque de détricotage par son successeur, M. Obama possède une marge de manœuvre : appliquer, à travers des executive actions, des lois n’étant pas prévues pour être réversibles. C’est ce qu’il a fait pour interdire les forages offshore en Arctique et Atlantique : il s’est appuyé sur l’Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act, loi sur les terres du plateau continental, qui donne au président le pouvoir de protéger les eaux fédérales et rend cette protection permanente dans le temps.

Le texte actuel ne permet pas d’autoriser à nouveau l’exploitation d’hydrocarbures une fois qu’une zone a été sanctuarisée. Et Vincent Michelot de préciser :

« Certaines règles édictées ces derniers jours seront très difficiles à abroger […] et consommatrices de temps parlementaire. Elles donnent aussi la possibilité aux associations de défense de l’environnement de porter le débat devant le judiciaire, ce qui signifie des procédures d’une durée de deux à quatre ans. »

Ce type de mesure pourrait-il être multiplié dans les prochains jours ? Vincent Michelot n’exclut pas cette possibilité :

« Si d’autres décisions similaires sont dans les tuyaux, notamment en matière d’environnement, M. Obama a tout intérêt à ne pas les annoncer à l’avance, pour bénéficier de l’effet de surprise et surtout mettre l’administration Trump au pied du mur. »

Le président sortant dispose-t-il d’autres pouvoirs en cette fin de mandat ?

Oui

Barack Obama a par exemple la possibilité de suspendre des dirigeants de l’administration ou de l’armée et de rendre publics des programmes confidentiels. L’hebdomadaire de gauche The Nation l’a appelé, début décembre, à utiliser une partie de ces pouvoirs. Notamment pour « déclassifier des documents secrets, gracier des lanceurs d’alertes [comme Chelsea Manning ou Edward Snowden] et punir des hauts responsables ayant abusé de leur pouvoir ». Pour l’heure, le président démocrate n’a pas donné suite à leur demande.

Par ailleurs, l’article II de la Constitution des Etats-Unis confère au président le pouvoir « d’accorder […] des grâces pour crimes contre les Etats-Unis ». Il s’agit d’une prérogative que M. Obama a largement utilisée au cours des derniers jours.

Pour la seule journée du 19 décembre, il a accordé 153 « commutations » (réduction ou suppression de peine) et 78 « pardons » (oubli de la condamnation après que celle-ci a été effectuée et plein rétablissement des droits civils – le vote par exemple). Il a d’ores et déjà battu le record historique du nombre de grâces accordées par un président en exercice.

« Il y aura d’autres grâces présidentielles pour certains condamnés », pronostique Vincent Michelot. L’administration Obama redoute un tournant sécuritaire avec M. Trump. Ce mouvement de grâces est donc également un message politique. Le dernier communiqué de la Maison Blanche sur le sujet est explicite :

« Nous devons rappeler que la grâce est un outil de dernier ressort et que seul le Congrès peut mettre en place les réformes plus larges nécessaires pour assurer à long terme que notre système de justice pénale fonctionne plus équitablement et plus efficacement au service de la sécurité publique. »


Liberté d’expression: Après l’histoire, c’est désormais la sociologie qui se dit dans les prétoires (French historian sued for spilling the beans on Arab antisemitism)

10 février, 2017
deracinement
https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/nintchdbpict000300125351.jpg?strip=all&w=960

‘All further migration from mainly Muslim countries should be stopped’

Nous sommes entrés dans un mouvement qui est de l’ordre du religieux. Entrés dans la mécanique du sacrilège : la victime, dans nos sociétés, est entourée de l’aura du sacré. Du coup, l’écriture de l’histoire, la recherche universitaire, se retrouvent soumises à l’appréciation du législateur et du juge comme, autrefois, à celle de la Sorbonne ecclésiastique. Françoise Chandernagor (février 2007)
Il n’y a pas une culture française, il y a une culture en France et elle est diverse. Emmanuel Macron
Poland showed the strongest opposition to migrants arriving from Muslim countries, with 71 per cent supporting the ban. Opposition to further migration was also intense in Austria (65 per cent), Belgium (64 per cent), Hungary (64 perc cent) and France (61 per cent) and Greece (58 per cent). The idea of a Trump-style ban also received support in Germany, with 53 per cent calling for increased curbs and 51 per cent in Italy. But there was not majority support in Britain or Spain, which was most opposed to the idea of a ban with only 41 per cent voicing support. Overall, across all ten of the European countries an average of 55 per cent agreed that all further migration from mainly Muslim countries should be stopped. The Sun
Selon une étude menée par l’institut de recherche britannique Chatham House, les Européens seraient majoritairement favorables à la fermeture de leurs frontières aux individus originaires de pays musulmans. 55% des personnes interrogées ont ainsi déclaré être d’accord avec cette affirmation : “Toute immigration supplémentaire venant de pays à majorité musulmane doit cesser”. Un chiffre impressionnant. Dans le commentaire de l’étude, l’institut livre ses conclusions : “Nos résultats sont frappants et donnent à réfléchir. Ils suggèrent que l’opposition à l’immigration venant de pays à majorité musulmane n’est pas confinée à l’électorat de Donald Trump aux Etats-Unis mais est largement répandue”. Largement, mais plus spécialement dans les pays qui “ont été au centre de la crise migratoire ou ont vécu des attaques terroristes ces dernières années”. La Pologne (71%), l’Autriche (65%), la Hongrie et la Belgique (64%), ainsi que la France (61%), sont ainsi parmi les plus favorables à l’assertion de départ. Valeurs actuelles
Ils ont tout, c’est connu. Vous êtes passé par le centre-ville de Metz ? Toutes les bijouteries appartiennent aux juifs. On le sait, c’est tout. Vous n’avez qu’à lire les noms israéliens sur les enseignes. Vous avez regardé une ancienne carte de la Palestine et une d’aujourd’hui ? Ils ont tout colonisé. Maintenant c’est les bijouteries. Ils sont partout, sauf en Chine parce que c’est communiste. Tous les gouvernements sont juifs, même François Hollande. Le monde est dirigé par les francs-maçons et les francs-maçons sont tous juifs. Ce qui est certain c’est que l’argent injecté par les francs-maçons est donné à Israël. Sur le site des Illuminatis, le plus surveillé du monde, tout est écrit. (…) On se renseigne mais on ne trouve pas ces infos à la télévision parce qu’elle appartient aux juifs aussi. Si Patrick Poivre d’Arvor a été jeté de TF1 alors que tout le monde l’aimait bien, c’est parce qu’il a été critique envers Nicolas Sarkozy, qui est juif… (…)  Mais nous n’avons pas de potes juifs. Pourquoi ils viendraient ici ? Ils habitent tous dans des petits pavillons dans le centre, vers Queuleu. Ils ne naissent pas pauvres. Ici, pour eux, c’est un zoo, c’est pire que l’Irak. Peut-être que si j’habitais dans le centre, j’aurais des amis juifs, mais je ne crois pas, je n’ai pas envie. J’ai une haine profonde. Pour moi, c’est la pire des races. Je vous le dis du fond du cœur, mais je ne suis pas raciste, c’est un sentiment. Faut voir ce qu’ils font aux Palestiniens, les massacres et tout. Mais bon, on ne va pas dire que tous les juifs sont des monstres. Pourquoi vouloir réunir les juifs et les musulmans ? Tout ça c’est politique. Cela ne va rien changer. C’est en Palestine qu’il faut aller, pas en France. Karim
Ce sont les cerveaux du monde. Tous les tableaux qui sont exposés au centre Pompidou appartiennent à des juifs. A Metz, tous les avocats et les procureurs sont juifs. Ils sont tous hauts placés et ils ne nous laisseront jamais monter dans la société. « Ils ont aussi Coca-Cola. Regardez une bouteille de Coca-Cola, quand on met le logo à l’envers on peut lire : « Non à Allah, non au prophète ». C’est pour cela que les arabes ont inventé le « Mecca-cola ». Au McDo c’est pareil. Pour chaque menu acheté, un euro est reversé à l’armée israélienne. Les juifs, ils ont même coincé les Saoudiens. Ils ont inventé les voitures électriques pour éviter d’acheter leur pétrole. C’est connu. On se renseigne. (…) Si Mohamed Merah n’avait pas été tué par le Raid, le Mossad s’en serait chargé. Il serait venu avec des avions privés. Ali
En fait, tout est écrit dans le Coran. Le châtiment des juifs, c’est l’enfer. L’histoire de Moïse est belle. Dieu lui a fait faire des miracles. Il a coupé la mer en deux pour qu’il puisse la traverser. Mais après tous ces miracles, les juifs ont préféré adorer un veau d’or. C’est à cause de cela que ce peuple est maudit par Dieu. Je parle avec mon père de ces choses-là. Parce que parmi les autres musulmans, il y a des sectes, des barbus qui peuvent t’envoyer te faire exploser je ne sais où. Alors je mets des remparts avec eux. Je suis fragile d’esprit, je préfère parler de ça avec ma famille, elle m’apporte l’islam qui me fait du bien. Djamal
À en croire, par ordre d’entrée en scène, Enzo Traverso, Luc Boltanski et Arnaud Esquerre, Edwy Plenel, Philippe Corcuff, Renaud Dély, Pascal Blanchard, Claude Askolovitch et Yvan Gastaut: les années 1930 sont de retour. La droite intégriste et factieuse occupe la rue, la crise économique pousse à la recherche d’un bouc émissaire et l’islamophobie prend le relais de l’antisémitisme. Tous les auteurs que j’ai cités observent, comme l’écrit Luc Boltanski: «la présence de thèmes traditionalistes et nationalistes issus de la rhétorique de l’Action française et la réorientation contre les musulmans d’une hostilité qui fut dans la première moitié du XXe siècle principalement dirigé contre les juifs». Cette analogie historique prétend nous éclairer: elle nous aveugle. Au lieu de lire le présent à la lumière du passé, elle en occulte la nouveauté inquiétante. Il n’y avait pas dans les années 1930 d’équivalent juif des brigades de la charia qui patrouillent aujourd’hui dans les rues de Wuppertal, la ville de Pina Bausch et du métro suspendu. Il n’y avait pas d’équivalent du noyautage islamiste de plusieurs écoles publiques à Birmingham. Il n’y avait pas d’équivalent de la contestation des cours d’histoire, de littérature ou de philosophie dans les lycées ou les collèges dits sensibles. Aucun élève alors n’aurait songé à opposer au professeur, qui faisait cours sur Flaubert, cette fin de non-recevoir: «Madame Bovary est contraire à ma religion.» Il n’y avait pas, d’autre part, de charte de la diversité. On ne pratiquait pas la discrimination positive. Ne régnait pas non plus à l’université, dans les médias, dans les prétoires, cet antiracisme vigilant qui traque les mauvaises pensées des grands auteurs du patrimoine et qui sanctionne sous le nom de «dérapage» le moindre manquement au dogme du jour: l’égalité de tout avec tout. Quant à parler de retour de l’ordre moral alors que les œuvres du marquis de Sade ont les honneurs de la Pléiade, que La Vie d’Adèle a obtenu la palme d’or à Cannes et que les Femen s’exhibent en toute impunité dans les églises et les cathédrales de leur choix, c’est non seulement se payer de mots, mais réclamer pour l’ordre idéologique de plus en plus étouffant sous lequel nous vivons les lauriers de la dissidence. (…) Pour dire avec Plenel et les autres que ce sont les musulmans désormais qui portent l’étoile jaune, il faut faire bon marché de la situation actuelle des juifs de France. S’il n’y a pratiquement plus d’élèves juifs dans les écoles publiques de Seine-Saint-Denis, c’est parce que, comme le répète dans l’indifférence générale Georges Bensoussan, le coordinateur du livre Les Territoires perdus de la République (Mille et Une Nuits), l’antisémitisme y est devenu un code culturel. Tous les musulmans ne sont pas antisémites, loin s’en faut, mais si l’imam de Bordeaux et le recteur de la grande mosquée de Lyon combattent ce phénomène avec une telle vigueur, c’est parce que la majorité des antisémites de nos jours sont musulmans. Cette réalité, les antiracistes officiels la nient ou la noient dans ses causes sociales pour mieux incriminer au bout du compte «la France aux relents coloniaux». Ce n’est pas aux dominés, expliquent-ils en substance, qu’il faut reprocher leurs raccourcis détestables ou leur passage à l’acte violent, c’est à la férocité quotidienne du système de domination. (…) Au début de l’affaire Dreyfus, Zola écrivait Pour les juifs. Après m’avoir écouté sur France Inter, Edwy Plenel indigné écrit Pour les musulmans. Fou amoureux de cette image si gratifiante de lui-même et imbu d’une empathie tout abstraite pour une population dont il ne veut rien savoir de peur de «l’essentialiser», il signifie aux juifs que ceux qui les traitent aujourd’hui de «sales feujs» sont les juifs de notre temps. Le racisme se meurt, tant mieux. Mais si c’est cela l’antiracisme, on n’a pas vraiment gagné au change. Et il y a pire peut-être: l’analogie entre les années 1930 et notre époque, tout entière dressée pour ne pas voir le choc culturel dont l’Europe est aujourd’hui le théâtre, efface sans vergogne le travail critique que mènent, avec un courage et une ténacité admirables, les meilleurs intellectuels musulmans. (…) Pendant ce temps, tout à la fierté jubilatoire de dénoncer notre recherche effrénée d’un bouc émissaire, les intellectuels progressistes fournissent avec le thème de «la France islamophobe» un bouc émissaire inespéré au salafisme en expansion. En même temps qu’il fait de nouveaux adeptes, l’Islam littéral gagne sans cesse de nouveaux Rantanplan. Ce ne sont pas les années 1930 qui reviennent, ce sont, dans un contexte totalement inédit, les idiots utiles. (…) Autrefois, on m’aurait peut-être traité de «sale race», me voici devenu «raciste» et «maurrassien» parce que je veux acquitter ma dette envers l’école républicaine et que j’appelle un chat, un chat. Entre ces deux injures, mon cœur balance. Mais pas longtemps. Mon père et mes grands-parents ayant été déportés par l’État dont Maurras se faisait l’apôtre, c’est la seconde qui me semble, excusez-moi du terme mais il n’y en a pas d’autres, la plus dégueulasse. (…) J’attends d’avoir fini le livre d’Eric Zemmour pour réagir. Mais d’ores et déjà, force m’est de constater que ceux qui dénoncent jour et nuit les amalgames et les stigmatisations se jettent sur l’analyse irrecevable que Zemmour fait du régime de Vichy pour pratiquer les amalgames stigmatisants avec tous ceux qu’ils appellent les néoréactionnaires et les néomaurrassiens. Ils ont besoin que le fascisme soit fort et même hégémonique pour valider leur thèse. Le succès de Zemmour pour eux vient à point nommé. Mais je le répète, ce n’est pas être fasciste que de déplorer l’incapacité grandissante de la France à assumer sa culture. Et ce n’est surement pas être antifasciste que de se féliciter de son effondrement. Alain Finkielkraut 
L’antisémitisme traditionnel en France est originellement marqué par l’Eglise, l’extrême droite et le nationalisme: c’est l’antisémitisme de l’affaire Dreyfus qui connaît son acmé sous Vichy. L’antisémitisme nouveau est un antisémitisme d’importation. Il est lié à la fois à la culture traditionnelle des pays magrébins, à l’islam et au contexte colonial. En Algérie, le décret Crémieux qui permit aux juifs de devenir français dès 1870 attise la jalousie des musulmans. En Tunisie et au Maroc, les juifs n’étaient pas français mais leur émancipation par le biais de l’école leur a donné une large avance sur le plan scolaire et social sur la majorité musulmane. Cela s’est terminé par le départ de la minorité juive. Cet antisémitisme-là s’est transposé sur notre territoire par le truchement de l’immigration familiale (c’est cela qui a été importé et pas le conflit israélo-palestinien comme le répètent les médias). Un antisémitisme qui préexistait toutefois auparavant (mais en mode mineur) comme le rappellent les affrontements survenus à Belleville en juin 1967 ou le Mouvement des Travailleurs arabes au début des années 1970. Paradoxalement, cet antisémitisme ne s’est pas dilué, mais enkysté. C’est dans les familles qu’il se transmet et s’apprend. Arrivé à l’école, l’affaire est déjà jouée. Nouveau par les formes et l’origine, il épouse parfois le vocabulaire de l’antisémitisme traditionnel. Par exemple, le mot «youpin», qui avait tendance à disparaître en France, est réutilisé dans des milieux de banlieues qui ne le connaissaient pas. Bref, les différentes branches de l’antisémitisme sont en train de se conjuguer. L’extrême droite traditionnelle qui connait un renouveau, une certaine ultra gauche qui par le biais de l’antisionisme a parfois du mal à maquiller son antisémitisme (l’enquête Fondapol d’octobre 2014 menée par Dominique Reynié était édifiante à cet égard). On a oublié que l’antisémitisme plongeait de longues racines à gauche, depuis Proudhon jusqu’aux propos de Benoît Frachon en juin 1967, secrétaire général de la CGT. Mais la branche la plus massive, et de loin, est la branche arabo-islamiste. Celle-là seule passe aux actes, elle insulte, frappe et tue. Elle n’est d’ailleurs pas seulement arabo-islamiste car elle déborde aujourd’hui dans les banlieues. Nombre de jeunes qui ne sont pas issus de l’immigration arabo-musulmane adoptent pourtant le code culturel de l’antisémitisme, lequel est devenu un code d’intégration dans les cités. Ainsi, ici, l’intégration à la France se fait-elle à rebours, en chassant la part juive de la société française. Adopter ces clichés et ce langage c’est se donner plus de chances d’être intégré dans l’économie sociale des banlieues. Et pour parler comme la banlieue, il faut parler «anti-feuj». (…) En tant qu’historien, je suis frappé par la stupidité d’une telle comparaison [sort des musulmans aujourd’hui à celui des juifs hier]. Je n’ai pas souvenir dans l’histoire des années 30 d’avoir entendu parler de l’équivalent juif de Mohammed Merah, de Mehdi Nemmouche ou des frères Kouachi se mettant à attaquer des écoles françaises, des boutiques ou des Eglises. Assistait-on dans les années 1930 à un repli communautaire des juifs? Tout au contraire, s’agissait-il d’une course éperdue vers l’intégration et l’assimilation. Les juifs cherchaient à se faire le plus petit possible. Ils étaient 330 000, dont 150 000 juifs étrangers qui vivaient dans la crainte d’être expulsés. Beaucoup étaient des réfugiés de la misère, d’autres fuyaient le nazisme et les violences antisémites d’Europe orientale. Aujourd’hui, place Beauvau, on estime la minorité musulmane entre six et dix millions de personnes. Ils n’ont pas été chassés par un régime qui veut les exterminer mais sont venus ici, dans l’immense majorité des cas, pour trouver des conditions de vie meilleures. Les situations sont incomparables, ne serait-ce qu’au regard des effectifs concernés: en Europe, aujourd’hui, un musulman sur quatre vit en France. Cette question est toutefois intéressante à un autre titre: pourquoi une partie de la population française d’origine maghrébine est-elle habitée par un mimétisme juif, une obsession juive, voire une jalousie sociale comme si l’histoire du Maghreb colonial se perpétuait ici? L’histoire de la Shoah est-elle en cause? Elle n’a pas été surestimée, il s’agit bien de la plus profonde coupure anthropologique du siècle passé, et elle dépasse de loin la seule question antisémite. En réalité, c’est la trivialisation de cette tragédie historique qui a produit des effets pervers. Car la Shoah, elle, au-delà de toutes les instrumentalisations, reste une question d’histoire cardinale qui interroge politiquement toutes les sociétés. Qu’est-ce qu’un génocide? Comment en est-on arrivé-là? Pourquoi l’Allemagne? Pourquoi l’Europe? Pourquoi les juifs? Comment une idéologie meurtrière se met-elle en place? Comment des hommes ordinaires, bons pères de famille, deviennent-ils parfois des assassins en groupe? Cette césure historique, matrice d’un questionnement sans fin, a été rabaissée à un catéchisme moralisateur («Plus jamais ça!») et à une avalanche assez niaiseuse de bons sentiments qui, pédagogiquement, ne sont d’aucune utilité. Et qui fait que nous passons parfois à côté des mécanismes politiques qui régulent des sociétés de masse d’autant plus dangereuses qu’anomiées. Le discours de la repentance a pu stériliser la pensée et frapper de silence des questions jugées iconoclastes. Comme les questions d’histoire culturelle évoquées tout à l’heure. Comme si invoquer le facteur culturel à propos de minorités dont l’intégration est en panne serait emprunter le «chemin d’Auschwitz». Cet affadissement a paralysé la réflexion politique, enté sur la conviction erronée que les situations se reproduisent à l’identique. Or, si les mécanismes sont les mêmes, les situations ne le sont jamais. Le travail de l’historien illustre sans fin le mot d’Héraclite: «On ne se baigne jamais deux fois dans le même fleuve…» (…) Mais ces lois [mémorielles] ont des effets pervers. Dans des sociétés de masse animées par la passion de l’égalité, toute différence, est perçue comme une injustice. La Shoah étant perçue comme le summum de la souffrance, le peuple juif aux yeux de certains est devenu le «peuple élu de la souffrance». De là une concurrence des mémoires alimentée plus encore par un cadre de références où la victime prend le pas sur le citoyen. Comme s’il fallait avoir été victime d’une tragédie historique pour être reconnu. Second élément de la dérive, la transgression qui permet d’échapper à l’anonymat. Et dans une société qui a fait de la Shoah (contre les historiens) une «religion civile», la meilleure façon de transgresser est de s’en prendre à cette mémoire soit dans le franc négationnisme hier, soit dans la bêtise de masse (qui se veut dérision) type Dieudonné aujourd’hui. Sur ce plan, tous les éléments sont réunis pour favoriser la transgression qui canalise les frustrations innombrables d’un temps marqué au sceau du «désenchantement du monde». C’est d’ailleurs pourquoi on a tort de réagir à chacune des provocations relatives à la Shoah. C’est précisément ce qu’attend le provocateur, notre indignation est sa jouissance. (…) Pour une journée de jumelage avec Tel-Aviv, il a fallu déployer 500 CRS. L’ampleur de la polémique me parait disproportionnée. Israël n’est pas un Etat fasciste et le conflit avec les Palestiniens est de basse intensité. Il y a pratiquement tous les jours entre cinquante et cent morts par attentats dans le monde arabo-musulman dans l’indifférence générale. La guerre civile en Syrie a fait à ce jour, et en quatre ans, 240 000 morts. Le conflit israélo-palestinien en aurait fait 90 000 depuis 1948. La disproportion est frappante. Peu importe que des Arabes tuent d’autres Arabes. Tout le monde s’en moque. Les juifs seuls donnent du prix à ces morts. Dès qu’ils sont de la partie, on descend dans la rue. Cette passion débordante, disproportionnée, n’interroge pas le conflit. Elle interroge ce que devient la société française. Les menaces sur Tel Aviv sur scène sont venues des mêmes milieux qui ont laissé faire les violences de Barbès en juillet 2014, la tentative d’assaut contre la la synagogue de la rue de la Roquette à Paris et une semaine plus tard contre celle de Sarcelles. Bref, je le redis, ce n’est pas le conflit qui a été importé, c’est l’antisémitisme du Maghreb. Les cris de haine d’aujourd’hui sont l’habillage nouveau d’une animosité ancienne. (…) A la lecture de Christophe Guilluy, on comprend d’ailleurs qu’il n’y a pas deux France, mais trois. La France périphérique méprisée par les élites, qui souffre et est tenue de se taire. Elle constitue le gros du vivier FN. La France des biens nés, intégrée socialement, plus aisée et qui regarde avec condescendance la France populaire qui «pense mal». Enfin, une troisième France, tout aussi en souffrance que la première, en voie de désintégration sous l’effet de la relégation géographique, sociale, scolaire, et dont une frange se radicalise. Mais l’erreur, ici, serait de lier la poussée islamiste à la seule déshérence sociale: dès lors que des jeunes intégrés, et diplômés basculent vers la radicalité islamiste, on comprend que le facteur culturel a été longtemps sous-estimé. (…) A force de nier le réel, on a fait le lit du FN. Les millions de Français qui sont aujourd’hui sympathisants du Front national n’ont pas le profil de fascistes. Beaucoup d’entre eux votaient jadis à gauche, et le FN authentiquement parti d’extrême droite, est aussi aujourd’hui le premier parti ouvrier de France. Comment en est-on arrivé-là? Quelle responsabilité ont les classes dominantes dans ce naufrage et, notamment la classe intellectuelle? Voilà les questions qui importent vraiment. En revanche, la question rhétorique du «plus grand danger», FN ou islamisme, vise à nous faire taire. Avec à la clé ce chantage: «A dénoncer la poussée de l’islamisme, du communautarisme, la désintégration d’une partie de l’immigration de masse, vous faites le jeu du Front national!». Tenter de répondre à la question ainsi formulée, c’est tomber dans ce piège rhétorique. Il faudrait, au contraire, retourner cette question à ceux qui la posent: n’avez-vous pas fait le jeu du FN en invalidant la parole d’une partie du peuple français, en le qualifiant de «franchouillard», de raciste, de fasciste? Et en sous estimant le sentiment d’abandon et de mépris vécu par ces dominés de toujours? Georges Bensoussan
En 2002, nous étions encore habités par le mot «République», agité comme un talisman, comme un sésame salvateur. Or, la République est d’abord une forme de régime. Elle ne désigne pas un ancrage culturel ou historique. La nation, elle, est l’adhésion à un ensemble de valeurs et rien d’autre. Ce n’est pas le sang, pas le sol, pas la race. Peut être Français, quelle que soit sa couleur de peau ou sa religion, celui qui adhère au roman national selon la définition bien connue d’Ernest Renan: «Une nation est une âme, un principe spirituel. Deux choses qui, à vrai dire, n’en font qu’une, constituent cette âme, ce principe spirituel. L’une est dans le passé, l’autre dans le présent. L’une est la possession en commun d’un riche legs de souvenirs ; l’autre est le consentement actuel, le désir de vivre ensemble, la volonté de continuer à faire valoir l’héritage qu’on a reçu indivis.» Nous avions un peu délaissé cette définition pour mettre en avant les valeurs de la République. Nous avons fait une erreur de diagnostic. Nous n’avions pas vu que la nation, et non seulement la République, était en train de se déliter. Une partie de la population française, née en France, souvent de parents eux-mêmes nés en France, a le sentiment de ne pas appartenir à celle-ci. Alors qu’ils sont français depuis deux générations pour beaucoup, certains adolescents dans les collèges et lycées, comme aussi certains adultes, n’hésitent plus à affirmer que la France n’est pas leur pays. Ajoutant: «Mon pays c’est l’Algérie…» (ou la Tunisie, etc…). Les incidents lors de la minute de silence pour les assassinés de Merah comme pour ceux de janvier 2015 furent extrêmement nombreux. On a cherché comme toujours à masquer, à minimiser, à ne pas nommer. Dans la longue histoire de l’immigration en France, cet échec à la 3° génération est un fait historique inédit. Certains historiens de l’immigration font remarquer, à juste titre, qu’il y eut toujours des problèmes d’intégration, même avec l’immigration européenne. Mais pour la première fois dans l’Histoire nous assistons à un phénomène de désintégration, voire de désassimilation. C’est pourquoi, ce n’est pas la République seule qui est en cause, mais bien la nation française: notre ancrage historique, nos valeurs, notre langue, notre littérature et notre Histoire. Toute une partie de la jeunesse de notre pays se reconnaît de moins en moins dans notre culture. Elle lui devient un code culturel étranger, une langue morte et pas seulement pour des raisons sociales. Nous sommes en train d’assister en France à l’émergence de deux peuples au point que certains évoquent des germes de guerre civile. (…)  la culture est tout sauf une essence. Ce qui est essence s’appelle «la race». Lorsqu’on est né dans un groupe ethnique, on n’en sort pas. On restera toujours ethniquement parlant Juif du Maroc ou Sénégalais peul. En revanche, la culture s’acquiert. Elle est dynamique. On peut être Juif du Maroc ou Sénégalais peul, lorsqu’on vit en France et qu’on finit par aimer ce pays, on devient français. La culture est le contraire absolu de l’essence. L’histoire culturelle, c’est l’histoire des mentalités, des croyances, de la mythologie, des valeurs d’une société qui permet de comprendre l’imaginaire des hommes d’un temps donné. Cette histoire n’est pas fixe. Il suffit pour s’en convaincre de réfléchir à la conception de l’enfant dans la culture occidentale, à l’image qu’on s’en faisait au Moyen-Age, au XVIIIe siècle, au XXe siècle. Il s’agit là d’un processus dynamique, rien d’un fixisme. Mais si la culture est le contraire de la race, pourquoi une telle frilosité à faire de l’histoire culturelle, une telle peur de nommer les problèmes culturels par leurs noms? Dans un domaine moins polémique, pourquoi certains ont-ils encore peur de dire que le nazisme est un enfant de l’Allemagne et pas seulement de l’Europe? Qu’il y a dans le nazisme des éléments qui n’appartiennent qu’à la culture allemande traditionnelle depuis Luther et même bien avant. Les grands germanistes français du XX° siècle le savaient, depuis Edmond Vermeil jusqu’à Rita Thalmann et plus près de nous Edouard Husson. Est-ce faire du racisme anti-allemand que le dire? Est-ce faire du racisme que constater dans la culture musulmane, le Coran et les hadiths sont présents des éléments qui rendent impossible la coexistence sur un pied d’égalité avec les non musulmans. Je ne parle pas de la tolérance du dhimmi. Je parle d’égalité et de culture du compromis et de la négociation. Travaillant plusieurs années sur l’histoire des juifs dans le monde arabe aux XIXe et au XXe siècle (pour juifs en pays arabes. Le grand déracinement, 1850-1975, Tallandier, 2012), j’avais constaté l’existence d’une culture arabo-musulmane, du Maroc à l’Irak, entachée d’un puissant antijudaïsme, et ce bien avant le sionisme et la question d’Israël et de la Palestine. Il existe en effet, et de longue date, une culture arabo-musulmane anti-juive, souvent exacerbée par la colonisation (mais qui n’en fut toutefois jamais à l’origine). Il fallait faire de l’histoire culturelle pour comprendre comment, pourquoi et quand la minorité juive qui s’était progressivement émancipée grâce à l’école, s’était heurtée à une majorité arabo-musulmane aux yeux de laquelle l’émancipation des juifs était inconcevable et irrecevable. Il n’était question alors ni de sionisme, ni d’Israël ni de Gaza. Et encore moins de «territoires occupés» qui, pour les ignorants et les naïfs, constituent le cœur du problème actuel. Ce conflit entre une majorité qui ne supporte pas que le dominé de toujours s’émancipe, et le dominé de toujours qui ne supporte plus la domination d’autrefois, se traduit par un divorce, et donc un départ. Il s’agit là d’histoire culturelle. Où est le racisme? Georges Bensoussan
Nous sommes dans le déni. Peut-être parce qu’étant donnée l’horreur des exactions subies par les juifs dans le monde chrétien, et particulièrement sous les nazis, on a voulu croire à un islam tolérant. Or la légende d’Al Andalus, cette Espagne musulmane où les trois monothéismes auraient cohabité harmonieusement sous des gouvernements musulmans, a été forgée de toute pièce par le judaïsme européen au XIXe siècle, en particulier par les Juifs allemands, afin de promouvoir leur propre émancipation. Elle a ensuite été reprise par le monde arabe dans le but de montrer que les responsables de l’antagonisme entre juifs et Arabes étaient le sionisme et la naissance de l’État d’Israël. Coupables du départ massif des communautés juives d’Irak, d’Égypte, de Syrie, de Libye, du Maroc, etc., soit près d’un million de personnes entre 1945 et 1970. Mais, s’ils étaient si heureux dans leur pays d’origine, pourquoi ces gens sont-ils partis de leur plein gré ? En Irak, par exemple, les juifs comptaient parmi les plus arabisés d’Orient, et n’étaient guère tentés par le sionisme. Or ils ont été plus de 90 % en 1951-1952 à quitter le pays, après avoir subi le pogrom de Bagdad en juin 1941 – plus de 180 morts –, après avoir été victimes de meurtres, d’enlèvements, d’arrestations, de séquestrations, de vols et de torture dans les commissariats. C’est cette réalité-là qui a poussé ces juifs à l’exil. Un véritable processus d’épuration ethnique, d’autant plus sournois qu’à l’exception de l’Égypte, il n’a pas pris la forme d’une expulsion. (…) à eux seuls, des agents sionistes peuvent difficilement déraciner une communauté qui ne veut pas partir. Si les Juifs du Maroc ont quitté en masse leur pays – un tiers déjà avant l’indépendance –, c’est parce qu’ils avaient peur. D’expérience, ils craignaient le retour de la souveraineté arabe sur leurs terres. Ils ne se voyaient pas d’avenir dans leur pays, où la législation leur rendait la vie de plus en plus difficile. (…) Le Sultan, dit-on, se serait opposé au port de l’étoile jaune par ses sujets juifs. À ceci près qu’il n’y eut jamais d’étoile jaune au Maroc (et pas même en zone sud en France). Le sultan a fait appliquer à la lettre les statuts des juifs d’octobre 1940 et de juin 1941. (…) L’administration de Vichy était si gangrenée par l’antisémitisme (à commencer par le Résident général Charles Noguès) que l’attitude du sultan, par contraste, en apparaissait presque bienveillante ! En second lieu, les Juifs marocains partis en masse s’installer en Israël constituaient la partie la plus pauvre de la judéité marocaine, celle qui, de faible niveau social et professionnel, essuiera de front le racisme des élites ashkénazes. Être « marocain » en Israël était (et demeure) un « marqueur » péjoratif. Cette immigration s’est mise à idéaliser son passé marocain, sa culture, le temps de sa jeunesse, parfois tissé, au niveau individuel, de relations d’amitié entre juifs et Arabes. Ajoutons que la mémoire collective est socialement stratifiée. Il faut donc compter avec celle, moins douloureuse, des classes plus aisées qui ont émigré, elles, davantage, en France ou au Canada. Il justifie l’infériorisation du juif par le musulman : il autorise en effet les membres des religions dites du Livre à pratiquer leur foi, à la condition de payer un impôt spécial et d’accepter de se comporter en « soumis ». Leurs maisons ne doivent pas être plus hautes que celles des musulmans, ils doivent pratiquer discrètement leur foi, et leur voix ne vaut rien devant un tribunal musulman. Tout cela a fait du juif un être de second ordre. Les témoignages abondent, de non-juifs en particulier – des militaires, des commerçants, des médecins –, sur la misère et la manière infamante dont les juifs pouvaient être traités. Mais ce statut avait été intégré par des communautés profondément religieuses, marquées par l’attente messianique et considérant que ce qu’elles vivaient était le prix de l’Exil. Les choses ont changé avec l’arrivée des Européens et la possibilité d’avoir accès à une éducation marquée par les valeurs issues des Lumières. Pour autant, le regard arabo-musulman sur « le Juif » ne changera pas de sitôt : un sujet toléré tant qu’il accepte son infériorité statutaire. Même les juifs qui rejoindront le combat des indépendances arabes comprendront peu à peu qu’ils ne seront jamais acceptés. De fait, tous ont été écartés ou sont partis d’eux-mêmes, et la création de l’État d’Israël ne fera qu’accroître le rejet. (…) il faut distinguer le monde turc, plus tolérant que le monde arabe, même si la situation est loin d’y avoir été idyllique. Le statut de dhimmi a été aboli dans l’Empire ottoman par deux fois, en 1839 et 1856, et l’on constate que les contrées où les juifs connurent la condition la plus dure – le Yémen, la Perse et le Maroc – ne furent que peu ou pas du tout colonisées par les Turcs. (…) Dans la France d’aujourd’hui, les problèmes d’intégration d’une fraction des jeunes Français d’origine arabo-musulmane font rejouer les préjugés ancestraux et donnent prise à la culture du complot qui cristallise sur « le Juif », cette cible déjà désignée dans l’imaginaire culturel maghrébin, et aggravée par la réussite de la communauté juive de France. Mais qu’y a-t-il de « raciste » à faire ce constat, à moins d’invalider toute tentative de décrire le réel ? Ce qui est inquiétant dans mon affaire, au-delà de ma personne, est que la justice donne suite à la dénonciation du CCIF, dont l’objectif est de nous imputer le raisonnement débile du racisme pour mieux, moi et d’autres avec moi, nous réduire au silence. (…) Quand les faits leur donnent tort, ils invoquent l’« objectivité » alors que le seul souci de l’historien face aux sources, a fortiori quand elles contreviennent à sa vision du monde, demeure l’honnêteté. Comme au temps où il était impossible de critiquer l’Union soviétique au risque, sinon, de « faire le jeu de l’impérialisme », la doxa progressiste s’enferme dans cette paresse de l’esprit. Il n’est donc pas possible aujourd’hui de dire que le monde arabe, quoique colonisé hier, fut tout autant raciste, antisémite et esclavagiste. Quand la sociologue franco-algérienne Fanny Colonna a montré dès les années cinquante le poids de l’islamisme dans le nationalisme algérien, elle s’est heurtée aux « pieds rouges », ces intellectuels qui soutenaient le FLN et qui ne voulaient pas faire le jeu des opposants à la décolonisation. Orwell le soulignait jadis, certains intellectuels ont du mal à accepter une réalité dérangeante. Georges Bensoussan
La pire insulte qu’un Marocain puisse faire à un autre, c’est de le traiter de juif, c’est avec ce lait haineux que nous avons grandi. Saïd Ghallab (Les Temps modernes, 1965)
Cet antisémitisme il est déjà déposé dans l’espace domestique. Il est dans l’espace domestique et il est quasi naturellement déposé sur la langue, déposé dans la langue. Une des insultes des parents à leurs enfants quand ils veulent les réprimander, il suffit de les traiter de juif. Mais ça toutes les familles arabes le savent. C’est une hypocrisie monumentale que de ne pas voir que cet antisémitisme il est d’abord domestique et bien évidemment il est sans aucun doute renforcé, durci, légitimé, quasi naturalisé au travers d’un certain nombre de distinctions à l’extérieur. Mais il le trouvera chez lui, et puis il n’y aura pas de discontinuité radicale entre chez lui et l’environnement extérieur parce que l’environnement extérieur en réalité était le plus souvent dans ce qu’on appelle les ghettos, il est là, il est dans l’air que l’on respire. Il n’est pas du tout étranger et il est même difficile d’y échapper en particulier quand on se retrouve entre soi, ce sont les mêmes mots qui circulent. Ce sont souvent les mêmes visions du monde qui circulent. Ce sont souvent les mêmes visions du monde, fondées sur les mêmes oppositions et en particulier cette première opposition qui est l’opposition « eux et nous ». Smain Laacher
L’intégration est en panne aujourd’hui effectivement nous sommes en présence d’un autre peuple qui se constitue au sein de la nation française qui fait régresser un certain nombre de valeurs démocratiques qui nous ont portés » (…) Cet antisémitisme viscéral (…) on ne peut pas le laisser sous silence. Il se trouve qu’un sociologue algérien, Smaïn Laacher, d’un très grand courage, vient de dire dans un film qui passera sur France 3 « c’est une honte de maintenir ce tabou, à savoir que dans les familles arabes en France, et tout le monde le sait mais personne ne veut le dire, l’antisémitisme on le tête avec le lait de la mère ». Georges Bensoussan
L’insulte en arabe « espèce de juif ! » n’est pas antisémite car « on ne pense pas ce qu’on dit ». Il s’agit « d’une expression figée, passée dans le langage courant. Nacira Guénif (Paris VIII)
Les juifs ne tuent pas d’Arabes ? Et en Palestine ? Avocat du CCIF
Si le tribunal cède à cette intimidation, ce sera à la fois une catastrophe intellectuelle et une catastrophe morale… Si on refuse de voir la réalité et si on incrimine ceux qui s’efforcent de la penser, on n’a plus aucune chance d’échapper à la division et à la montée de la haine ! Alain Finkielkraut
Bensoussan a rappelé qu’il y avait un antisémitisme de tradition culturelle dans les pays arabo-musulmans. Une tradition qui fait l’objet d’un déni massif, mais qu’avait eue le courage de proclamer par exemple un sociologue comme Smain Laacher, professeur à Strasbourg, dans un documentaire télévisé de France 3. (…) L’autre accusation concerne (…) l’affirmation répétée de son interlocuteur d’une unité sans problème de la population française. Il exprimait au contraire sa crainte que la population musulmane ne finisse par constituer une forme de contre-société, un peuple dans le peuple. Cette crainte, partagée par beaucoup d’observateurs et d’analystes ne relève que de la liberté de jugement qui est le propre d’un homme d’étude. M. Bensoussan ne soulignait d’ailleurs le phénomène que pour le déplorer et insistait sur la nécessité de le regarder en face pour mieux le dominer. Le déni de la réalité n’ayant jamais été le meilleur moyen de la transformer. Il paraît évident que l’accusation du CCIF n’est qu’une manière de tester la résistance de la justice républicaine aux pressions sur la liberté d’opinion et d’expression. Car c’est bien de cela qu’il s’agit. Pierre Nora
Les propos reprochés ne sont en rien un acte d’islamophobie… (…) J’ai moi-même dénoncé cette culture de la haine inculquée dans les familles arabes à leurs enfants, haine contre le juif, le chrétien, l’homosexuel. (…)  Dire que l’antisémitisme relève de la culture, c’est simplement répéter ce qui est écrit dans le Coran et enseigné à la mosquée. Boualem Sansal
Comment aurais-je pu imaginer un jour, en trente années de vie d’avocat à avoir à défendre un chercheur qui a fait de la dénonciation du racisme l’essentiel de sa vie professionnelle, à avoir à le défendre contre une accusation aussi infâme ! (…) Comment ces plaintes ont-elles pu être considérées comme recevables par le ministère public, alors que le CCIF a partie liée avec les idéologues islamistes ? » »Comment accepter ces dénonciations d’un racisme d’Etat alors même que le CCIF a refusé de condamner les attentats, les crimes contre Charlie ? M° Michel Laval
La justice française ne badine pas avec les figures de style. Pour avoir paraphrasé une citation utilisant une métaphore, l’historien Georges Bensoussan comparaissait le 25 janvier devant la 17ème chambre correctionnelle, pour « provocation à la haine raciale ». C’est à la suite du signalement fait auprès du Procureur de la République par le CCIF (Collectif contre l’islamophobie en France) que celui-ci a décidé de poursuivre Bensoussan. Plusieurs autres associations antiracistes (Licra, MRAP, LDH, SOS Racisme) se sont jointes au CCIF et se sont donc aussi portées partie civiles. (…) On étudie l’antisémitisme nazi, stalinien, communiste mais  l’antisémitisme issu du monde arabo-musulman reste un tabou majeur dans notre République des lettres. « Pas d’amalgame », « islamophobie », les injonctions ne manquent pas pour censurer tout regard critique, tout constat raisonné de ce qui ravage la culture commune d’une grande partie de la jeunesse « issue de la diversité » dans les « quartiers difficiles». Les euphémismes sont indispensables pour ne pas oser nommer ces territoires occupés dans la République, ceux qui ont été désertés par les familles juives pour mettre leurs enfants à l’abri des menaces et des insultes antisémites. Ces euphémismes sont la règle obligée du discours pour ne pas nommer les choses et il faudra attendre que Mohamed Merah tue des enfants juifs parce qu’ils sont Juifs pour que enfin on prenne la mesure de cet aboutissement. (…) Bensoussan était jugé pour avoir dit explicitement que la haine antijuive, en France, avait muté, qu’elle n’était plus le fait exclusif de l’extrême droite nazifiante et de ses épigones et qu’elle se manifestait aujourd’hui de manière particulièrement vivace dans les mentalités arabo-musulmanes. Pire, il aurait suggéré que cette haine antijuive était profondément inscrite dans la culture des populations arabo-musulmanes. Pour certains, cet état de choses ne peut être vrai, cette parole ne doit pas être dite. Elle serait une affabulation qui obéirait à une obsession idéologique de Bensoussan, celle d’un projet destructeur du récit enchanté du « vivre-ensemble » judéo-arabe ou judéo-musulman. (…) Les paroles de Bensoussan dans Répliques évoquaient avec lucidité l’antisémitisme de personnes de culture arabo-musulmane ou maghrébine. Il n’était pas le premier à le dire puisque de grands intellectuels, notamment maghrébins, l’avaient déjà souligné en faisant remarquer qu’il était plus facile de se voiler la face que de dire le réel dans sa crudité, sans pour cela tomber dans un racisme nauséabond. Boualem Sansal, Kamel Daoud, Fethi Benslama, Riad Sattouf,  pour ne citer que des auteurs reconnus en France, ont largement décrit et dénoncé ces éléments culturels, hélas fréquemment présents dans les mentalités d’une partie de ces populations. L’erreur de Georges Bensoussan, la seule, fut de ne pas reprendre exactement les mots prononcés par Laacher dans le documentaire diffusé par FR3. (…) Des plaidoiries des parties civiles au réquisitoire de la procureure, ce fut un défilé des poncifs idéologiques du politiquement correct, défenseur de l’humanité souffrante sous le joug du colon sioniste, du planteur raciste et esclavagiste en Caroline du sud. Ce Juif-SS-Dupont la joie de Bensoussan en prit pour son grade. (…) Plus grave fut le témoignage de Mohamed Sifaoui cité par la Licra. Comment cet adversaire farouche de l’islamisme pouvait-il se retrouver ainsi sur le même banc que le CCIF ? Comment ce journaliste, menacé de mort par les islamistes, ne se trouvait-il pas au contraire aux côtés de Bensoussan ? Comment la Licra elle-même, peut-elle être partie civile contre Bensoussan ? Comment Sifaoui qui écrivait, le 6 juillet 2015, que cette « prétendue association antiraciste (le CCIF) avait beaucoup de mal à condamner l’antisémitisme » pouvait-il à ce point changer de bord alors qu’en juin 2015, le CCIF traitait Sifaoui de « chantre de la haine » ? En revenant sur la fameuse métaphore de « l’antisémitisme tété au sein », il évoque même « un biberon empli d’un lait fabriqué en Israël ! ». (…) Un procès de même nature a été intenté par l’association des Indigènes de la République, contre Pascal Bruckner  qui avait déclaré, début 2015, qu’il fallait « faire le procès des collabos des assassins de Charlie ». Pascal Bruckner fut aussi trainé devant la 17e chambre pour des propos visant deux associations, selon lui, seraient des «complices idéologiques» des terroristes: «Les Indivisibles» de la militante « antiraciste » Rokhaya Diallo (qui n’en est plus membre) et «Les Indigènes de la République» dont Houria Bouteldja est la porte-parole. L’écrivain avait déclaré au cours de l’émission d’Arte 28 minutes qu’il fallait «faire le dossier des collabos, des assassins de Charlie» et accusé ces associations de «justifier idéologiquement la mort des journalistes de Charlie Hebdo». Ces deux associations qui avaient attaqué Pascal Bruckner pour diffamation suite à des propos sur l’islamisme ont été déboutées par la justice. Comment un Etat, la France, qui combat militairement le djihadisme après avoir été attaquée sur son propre sol par le terrorisme islamiste, peut-elle, dans le même temps, faire un procès à ceux qui dévoilent les stratégies de diffusion de son idéologie ? Comment la justice peut-elle accorder un crédit aux accusations de racisme énoncées par ceux-là même qui sont les promoteurs de la haine antijuive et antifrançaise ?  Comment peut-elle être à ce point aveugle devant la manipulation des mots, le dévoiement des institutions, celui des règles démocratiques visant justement à les retourner contre la première des libertés qui est celle de penser librement? Lentement mais sûrement, l’islamisme impose son agenda à l’Europe et à la France. Bien sûr, la police marque des points contre les projets terroristes, les déjoue et arrête préventivement des tueurs, mais l’arbre des terroristes ne saurait cacher la forêt de leurs complices, collabos et idiots utiles. Quand quelques jours après le massacre au camion tueur sur la promenade des Anglais à Nice, le 14 juillet dernier, l’affaire du burkini a occupé le devant de la scène estivale, il fallait bien se rendre compte que la République avait affaire à des ennemis particulièrement retors et intelligents : avoir réussi à faire qualifier la France de pays raciste alors que le sang à Nice n’était pas encore sec, révélait une grande efficacité de la propagande islamiste. Chaque jour qui passe nous révèle cette progression tous azimuts avec un partage des taches bien ordonné : présence dans le paysage, conquête de nouveaux territoires perdus pour la République, menaces contre les femmes, intimidation, action en justice contre des supposés islamophobes, chantage, séduction sur les vertus cachées de la religion de paix et d’amour. Alors que Houria Bouteldja, porte-parole des Indigènes de la République, est l’auteur du livre Les blancs, les juifs et nous explicitement raciste et antisémite, ce sont Bensoussan et Bruckner qui sont convoqués devant le tribunal pour répondre de leur « racisme » ou de leur « islamophobie ». Dans cette affaire, les idiots utiles ne sont pas ceux que l’on croit : ce ne sont pas les terroristes, mais bien plutôt ceux qui les inspirent, les promeuvent, les soutiennent. Ce sont eux qui occupent le terrain conquis, abandonnés par des démocrates soucieux de ne pas apparaître comme « islamophobes ». Ces islamo-fascistes ont lu Gramsci : « Le vieux monde se meurt, le nouveau monde tarde à apparaître et dans ce clair-obscur surgissent les monstres » Les monstres nouveaux ont bien compris que la victoire politique avait un préalable : la conquête des esprits. Au bal orchestré par Tariq Ramadan et le CCIF, les faux culs de l’antiracisme, la LICRA, le MRAP, la LDH, SOS Racisme, seront sur la piste. Jacques Tarnero

Après l’histoire, c’est désormais la sociologie qui se dit dans les prétoires !

A l’heure où sur l’immigration, l’Europe vote largement Trump

Et qu’après le lynchage médiatique du seul véritable espoir d’alternative pour la prochaine présidentielle …

La nouvelle coqueluche des médias pour mai prochain en est à nier l’existence même d’une culture française

Pendant que pris à son tour entre kippa, burkha et double nationalité dans les fausses équivalences morales dont raffolent nos médias, le parti des bonnes questions s’enferre à nouveau dans les mauvaises réponses

Et qu »à l’ONU sur fond d’épuration religieuse du Moyen-Orient, c’est la présence même des juifs sur leurs lieux les plus sacrés qu’on dénie …

Devinez qui désormais l’on traine, entre deux attentats ou menaces islamistes, devant nos tribunaux débordés …

Pour après les « territoires perdus » de nos écoles et les « territoires interdits » de nos services publics …

Avoir osé évoquer le secret de polichinelle de l’origine proprement familiale de l’antisémitisme de nombre de nos chères têtes blondes ?

Affaire Bensoussan: au bal des faux-culs antiracistes

SOS Racisme et la Licra au secours du CCIF

Jacques Tarnero est essayiste et auteur de documentaires.

Causeur

04 février 2017

Georges Bensoussan et Pascal Brucker sont traînés devant les tribunaux pour avoir dénoncé l’antisémitisme culturel d’une partie du monde arabo-musulman, banlieues françaises comprises. C’est affligeant. Mais que dire des authentiques antiracistes qui se joignent au choeur des pleureuses?

La justice française ne badine pas avec les figures de style. Pour avoir paraphrasé une citation utilisant une métaphore, l’historien Georges Bensoussan comparaissait le 25 janvier devant la 17ème chambre correctionnelle, pour « provocation à la haine raciale ». C’est à la suite du signalement fait auprès du Procureur de la République par le CCIF (Collectif contre l’islamophobie en France) que celui-ci a décidé de poursuivre Bensoussan. Plusieurs autres associations antiracistes (Licra, MRAP, LDH, SOS Racisme) se sont jointes au CCIF et se sont donc aussi portées partie civiles.

Le procès d’une métaphore 

Cette audience de douze heures devant la 17ème chambre correctionnelle est à marquer d’une pierre noire : la justice fit procès, au nom de l’antiracisme, à un historien ayant dénoncé par ses travaux, l’antisémitisme. On retiendra ce moment symbolique: ce Durban-sur-Seine, en tous points semblable à ce qui s’est déroulé l’été 2001, à Durban, en Afrique du sud, lors d’une conférence de l’ONU, censée dénoncer le racisme, ce sont des « mort aux juifs » qui furent scandés au nom de l’antiracisme. Cette agonie de la lucidité, drapée  dans les vertueux habits de la justice et de la vérité, signifie une effroyable défaite intellectuelle, morale et politique. Les derniers mots de Georges Bensoussan, à la fin de l’audience, ont donné toute l’intensité symbolique à ce moment : « Ce soir, Madame la présidente, pour la première fois de ma vie, j’ai eu la tentation de l’exil. » On ne saurait mieux dire l’accablement ressenti car il était déjà minuit passé dans ce siècle qui commence.

Du début de l’après-midi jusqu’à une heure du matin, ce fut un concentré des mauvaises passions de l’époque qui fut exposé, trituré, contesté, plaidé. « L’antisémitisme n’est pas une pensée, c’est une passion. », ces mots de Sartre conservaient toute leur pertinence au Palais de justice. De ces passions toujours vives, cette audience en fut le miroir. Toute l’œuvre de l’historien Georges Bensoussan a consisté à démasquer, à révéler, à mettre à jour, à raconter l’antisémitisme. Directeur éditorial de la Revue d’histoire de la Shoah, Bensoussan fouille depuis trente ans les labyrinthes multiples de cette passion. Mais ce que Bensoussan ne savait peut-être pas, c’est qu’il existait en France, en 2017, des interdits de penser.

Un antisémitisme tabou

On étudie l’antisémitisme nazi, stalinien, communiste mais  l’antisémitisme issu du monde arabo-musulman reste un tabou majeur dans notre République des lettres. « Pas d’amalgame », « islamophobie », les injonctions ne manquent pas pour censurer tout regard critique, tout constat raisonné de ce qui ravage la culture commune d’une grande partie de la jeunesse « issue de la diversité » dans les « quartiers difficiles». Les euphémismes sont indispensables pour ne pas oser nommer ces territoires occupés dans la République, ceux qui ont été désertés par les familles juives pour mettre leurs enfants à l’abri des menaces et des insultes antisémites. Ces euphémismes sont la règle obligée du discours pour ne pas nommer les choses et il faudra attendre que Mohamed Merah tue des enfants juifs parce qu’ils sont Juifs pour que enfin on prenne la mesure de cet aboutissement. On a cru un temps que l’immense manifestation du 11 janvier où tout le monde fut « Charlie », c’était sans compter avec la Nuit debout des cervelles éteintes.

Bensoussan était jugé pour avoir dit explicitement que la haine antijuive, en France, avait muté, qu’elle n’était plus le fait exclusif de l’extrême droite nazifiante et de ses épigones et qu’elle se manifestait aujourd’hui de manière particulièrement vivace dans les mentalités arabo-musulmanes. Pire, il aurait suggéré que cette haine antijuive était profondément inscrite dans la culture des populations arabo-musulmanes. Pour certains, cet état de choses ne peut être vrai, cette parole ne doit pas être dite. Elle serait une affabulation qui obéirait à une obsession idéologique de Bensoussan, celle d’un projet destructeur du récit enchanté du « vivre-ensemble » judéo-arabe ou judéo-musulman. C’est bien connu. Depuis Mohamed Merah, depuis le Bataclan et l’Hyper casher, ce vivre-ensemble s’épanouit de jour en jour. C’est donc pour réinjecter l’espoir et la fraternité dans la République, que le MRAP, la Licra, SOS Racisme et la LDH se sont associés au  CCIF (Collectif Contre l’Islamophobie en France), pour poursuivre devant la XVIIe chambre correctionnelle ce raciste voilé nommé Georges Bensoussan.

De quoi Bensoussan était-il présumé coupable ?

Dans l’émission Répliques du 10 octobre 2015, produite et animée par Alain Finkielkraut sur France Culture, Georges Bensoussan débattait avec Patrick Weil de l’état de la France. Les propos mis en cause furent les suivants : « (…) l’intégration est en panne aujourd’hui effectivement nous sommes en présence d’un autre peuple qui se constitue au sein de la nation française qui fait régresser un certain nombre de valeurs démocratiques qui nous ont portés » (…) Cet antisémitisme viscéral (…) on ne peut pas le laisser sous silence. Il se trouve qu’un sociologue algérien, Smaïn Laacher, d’un très grand courage, vient de dire dans un film qui passera sur France 3 « c’est une honte de maintenir ce tabou, à savoir que dans les familles arabes en France, et tout le monde le sait mais personne ne veut le dire, l’antisémitisme on le tête avec le lait de la mère ».

En octobre 2015, à la suite d’une pétition hébergée par Mediapart et signée par une quinzaine de personnes, le MRAP déclarait qu’il entendait  « faire citer Georges Bensoussan devant le tribunal correctionnel pour injures racistes et provocation à la haine et à la violence raciste ». De leur côté, les sites internet Palestine solidarité et Oumma.com s’étaient associés à ces dénonciations dans des termes d’une extrême violence. Oumma.com avait publié un texte signé Jacques-Marie Bourget dont on peut aujourd’hui saisir toute la menace: «  Je n’ai pas entendu dire que le CSA ou la direction de France Culture, s’ils existent encore, avaient rappelé Finkielkraut à ne pas propager haine et mensonge. Car si l’antisémitisme n’est pas une opinion mais un délit, il doit en aller de même de l’islamophobie la plus grotesque et primaire. À Smaïn Laacher, qui n’est pas Gandhi, on pourrait faire remarquer que ce que les musulmans français « tètent », ce n’est pas l’antisémitisme mais d’abord le lait d’amertume, celui de l’injustice historique faite au peuple palestinien. Si personne ne vient crier « halte à la haine », armons-nous et préparons dès maintenant la guerre civile ».

Les paroles de Bensoussan dans Répliques évoquaient avec lucidité l’antisémitisme de personnes de culture arabo-musulmane ou maghrébine. Il n’était pas le premier à le dire puisque de grands intellectuels, notamment maghrébins, l’avaient déjà souligné en faisant remarquer qu’il était plus facile de se voiler la face que de dire le réel dans sa crudité, sans pour cela tomber dans un racisme nauséabond. Boualem Sansal, Kamel Daoud, Fethi Benslama, Riad Sattouf,  pour ne citer que des auteurs reconnus en France, ont largement décrit et dénoncé ces éléments culturels, hélas fréquemment présents dans les mentalités d’une partie de ces populations.

Crime contre la pensée juste

L’erreur de Georges Bensoussan, la seule, fut de ne pas reprendre exactement les mots prononcés par Laacher dans le documentaire diffusé par FR3. Il ne faisait qu’exprimer à travers une métaphore ce que celui-ci déclarait: “donc cet antisémitisme il est déjà déposé dans l’espace domestique. Il est dans l’espace domestique et il est quasi naturellement déposé sur la langue, déposé dans la langue. Une des insultes des parents à leurs enfants quand ils veulent les réprimander, il suffit de les traiter de juif. Mais ça toutes les familles arabes le savent. C’est une hypocrisie monumentale que de ne pas voir que cet antisémitisme il est d’abord domestique et bien évidemment il est sans aucun doute renforcé, durci, légitimé, quasi naturalisé au travers d’un certain nombre de distinctions à l’extérieur. Mais il le trouvera chez lui, et puis il n’y aura pas de discontinuité radicale entre chez lui et l’environnement extérieur parce que l’environnement extérieur en réalité était le plus souvent dans ce qu’on appelle les ghettos, il est là, il est dans l’air que l’on respire. Il n’est pas du tout étranger et il est même difficile d’y échapper en particulier quand on se retrouve entre soi, ce sont les mêmes mots qui circulent. Ce sont souvent les mêmes visions du monde qui circulent. Ce sont souvent les mêmes visions du monde, fondées sur les mêmes oppositions et en particulier cette première opposition qui est l’opposition « eux et nous ».

Nulle part on ne peut trouver trace d’arguments « biologiques» pour nourrir ces constats et leur prêter une valeur « raciste ». L’expression “téter avec le lait de la mère”, est d’un usage courant dans la langue française depuis plusieurs siècles. Georges Bensoussan, en s’y référant, avait usé métaphoriquement de l’expression « l’antisémitisme, on le tète avec le lait de sa mère ». Ce crime contre « la pensée juste », Bensoussan, douze heures durant, va en savourer les effets.

Ce procès fut un grand moment judiciaire

Georges Bensoussan fut donc d’abord interrogé par la Présidente du Tribunal, Fabienne Siredey-Garnier, sur ses propos mais aussi sur ses travaux. Rappelant qu’il travaille depuis vingt-cinq ans sur les sujets liés à la Shoah, au nazisme, à l’antisémitisme et plus généralement aux mécanismes conduisant à la haine de l’autre. Il a élargi son champ de recherches, notamment, sur le statut des juifs dans les pays musulmans. Bensoussan devait citer l’expression utilisée en 1965 dans la revue les Temps modernes par l’auteur marocain Saïd Ghallab. Sous le titre Les juifs vont en enfer, qui écrivait alors : « ... la pire insulte qu’un Marocain puisse faire à un autre, c’est de le traiter de juif, c’est avec ce lait haineux que nous avons grandi… ». Désormais, en France, toutes les enquêtes réalisées sur l’antisémitisme par la Fondation pour la recherche politique, comme les témoignages multiples recueillis dans son enquête collective Les territoires perdus de la République ou son dernier ouvrage Une France soumise, attestent d’une croissance des préjugés antijuifs chez les jeunes de culture musulmane. La récente enquête de l’Institut Montaigne révélant que 28% de ces mêmes publics estiment que la loi islamique (la charia) prime les lois françaises, confirme la radicalisation en cours.

Bensoussan rappelait le contexte du moment : l’enlèvement et l’assassinat de Ilan Halimi, en 2006, dont la justice avait nié dans un premier temps le caractère antisémite, les crimes de Mohamed Merah, les attentats de l’Hypercasher et du Bataclan. Les élèves juifs désertent les écoles et les lycées publics des quartiers dits « sensibles ». Bensoussan conclut cette première déposition par ces mots : « Est-ce moi qui dois me trouver devant ce tribunal aujourd’hui ? N’est-ce pas l’antisémitisme qui nous a conduits à la situation actuelle qui devrait être jugé ? »

Des parties civiles très politiquement correctes

Des plaidoiries des parties civiles au réquisitoire de la procureure, ce fut un défilé des poncifs idéologiques du politiquement correct, défenseur de l’humanité souffrante sous le joug du colon sioniste, du planteur raciste et esclavagiste en Caroline du sud. Ce Juif-SS-Dupont la joie de Bensoussan en prit pour son grade.

Quelques perles à charge contre Bensoussan méritent d’être rapportées : une éminente universitaire de Paris VIII, Nacira Guénif, déclara pour commenter les propos de Smain Laacher, que l’insulte en arabe « espèce de juif ! » n’est pas antisémite car « on ne pense pas ce qu’on dit », et qu’il s’agit « d’une expression figée, passée dans le langage courant »….

Plus grave fut le témoignage de Mohamed Sifaoui cité par la Licra. Comment cet adversaire farouche de l’islamisme pouvait-il se retrouver ainsi sur le même banc que le CCIF ? Comment ce journaliste, menacé de mort par les islamistes, ne se trouvait-il pas au contraire aux côtés de Bensoussan ? Comment la Licra elle-même, peut-elle être partie civile contre Bensoussan ? Comment Sifaoui qui écrivait, le 6 juillet 2015, que cette « prétendue association antiraciste (le CCIF) avait beaucoup de mal à condamner l’antisémitisme » pouvait-il à ce point changer de bord alors qu’en juin 2015, le CCIF traitait Sifaoui de « chantre de la haine » ? En revenant sur la fameuse métaphore de « l’antisémitisme tété au sein », il évoque même « un biberon empli d’un lait fabriqué en Israël ! ». Plus tard, dans sa plaidoirie, l’avocat du CCIF interpellera l’historien : « Les juifs ne tuent pas d’Arabes ? Et en Palestine ? »

Les choses sont dites. Sous Bensoussan, l’ennemi subliminal est nommé : Israël, dont Bensoussan a écrit l’histoire du mouvement national, le sionisme. En attribuant à Bensoussan une volonté de destruction de «  tous les moments positifs entre juifs et arabes. N’est-il pas en train d’écrire une histoire qui peut servir à des milieux douteux ? C’est un destructeur des ponts entre juifs et arabes. » En rejoignant à son tour le camp du déni du réel la Licra et Sifaoui effectuent un inquiétant retournement.

Ce fut surtout un grand moment politique

Cité en défense de Bensoussan, Alain Finkielkraut présentait tout l’enjeu de ce procès: « Si le tribunal cède à cette intimidation, ce sera à la fois une catastrophe intellectuelle et une catastrophe morale… Si on refuse de voir la réalité et si on incrimine ceux qui s’efforcent de la penser, on n’a plus aucune chance d’échapper à la division et à la montée de la haine ! » La jeune procureure de la République, dans son réquisitoire, était-elle du côté de ceux qui essaient de penser la complexité du moment présent ou bien s’est-elle conformée aux mécanismes du politiquement correct, à  l’idéologie dominante ? On peut craindre le pire tant son propos était empreint des mots et des clichés déjà énoncés par les parties civiles. Revendiquant fièrement qu’elle était l’auteur de la décision de poursuivre Bensoussan en justice, elle justifiait ce choix par « le passage à l’acte dans le champ lexical » opéré par Bensoussan. Ce très chic déplacement du propos juridique vers le jargon linguistique, est un indicateur de la finesse intellectuelle de l’accusation.

En rappelant que Georges Bensoussan avait dirigé deux publications de la Revue d’Histoire de la Shoah, consacrés au génocide des Arméniens et à celui commis au Rwanda contre les Tutsis, Elisabeth de Fontenay tint à mettre en valeur dans son témoignage, les qualités d’ouverture intellectuelle de l’historien : son travail n’obéit pas à une vision communautariste des choses, bien au contraire, il a su mettre en valeur la folie universelle du XXe siècle comme siècle des crimes contre l’humanité, des massacres de masse et des totalitarismes génocidaires. C’est aussi ce que Yves Ternon vint confirmer. Pour cet ancien chirurgien ayant soutenu le FLN pendant la guerre d’Algérie, le soutien aux victimes des fascismes, du colonialisme ne se partage pas. Le crime contre l’humanité et sa négation forment un ensemble problématique pour penser les parts maudites de histoire contemporaine. Georges Bensoussan fait ce travail de fouilles ? quitte à exhumer des vérités dérangeantes. Regarder au plus près les discours ayant conduit au crime ou pouvant y conduire, est-ce cela qui est reproché à Bensoussan ? Elisabeth de Fontenay et Yves Ternon disent leur stupéfaction devant l’accusation faite à Bensoussan. C’est ce que le témoignage écrit de Pierre Nora, lu par la présidente du tribunal, vint confirmer : « Bensoussan a rappelé qu’il y avait un antisémitisme de tradition culturelle dans les pays arabo-musulmans. Une tradition qui fait l’objet d’un déni massif, mais qu’avait eue le courage de proclamer par exemple un sociologue comme Smain Laacher, professeur à Strasbourg, dans un documentaire télévisé de France 3. (…) L’autre accusation concerne (…) l’affirmation répétée de son interlocuteur d’une unité sans problème de la population française. Il exprimait au contraire sa crainte que la population musulmane ne finisse par constituer une forme de contre-société, un peuple dans le peuple. Cette crainte, partagée par beaucoup d’observateurs et d’analystes ne relève que de la liberté de jugement qui est le propre d’un homme d’étude. M. Bensoussan ne soulignait d’ailleurs le phénomène que pour le déplorer et insistait sur la nécessité de le regarder en face pour mieux le dominer. Le déni de la réalité n’ayant jamais été le meilleur moyen de la transformer. Il paraît évident que l’accusation du CCIF n’est qu’une manière de tester la résistance de la justice républicaine aux pressions sur la liberté d’opinion et d’expression. Car c’est bien de cela qu’il s’agit ».

Faut-il désespérer de la justice de la République ?

Dans sa plaidoirie en défense de Bensoussan, M° Michel Laval fit d’abord part de sa stupéfaction devant le moment qu’il était en train de vivre : « Comment aurais-je pu imaginer un jour, en trente années de vie d’avocat à avoir à défendre un chercheur qui a fait de la dénonciation du racisme l’essentiel de sa vie professionnelle, à avoir à le défendre contre une accusation aussi infâme ! »

Il fit aussi remarquer plusieurs erreurs bien plus ordinaires dans la citation à comparaitre signifiée à Bensoussan : il y était question d’une émission de radio nommée « les Répliques » qui aurait eu lieu en novembre 2015 (et non pas en octobre)

En assimilant les propos de Bensoussan à ceux d’Eric Zemmour, Madame la procureure ne fit pas preuve de finesse. Sans doute les grandes causes ne s’embarrassent pas de détails, portées qu’elles sont par le souffle puissant de leur générosité. En voulant caricaturer Georges Bensoussan, en le présentant comme un réactionnaire raciste, le ministère public s’est aligné sur l’idéologie du célèbre « mur des cons » bien connu pour son impartialité.

De cette accumulation d’accusations diffamatoires, M° Laval, fit son miel. Le ton se fit ensuite plus ironique devant la sottise et la posture morale de l’accusation, devant la « traque des mots » alors que « dans ce palais de justice la valeur la plus importante c’était la liberté de penser ! » M° Laval dénonça le moment présent, celui de la « perversion du système judiciaire par l’idéologie » « Comment ces plaintes ont-elles pu être considérées comme recevables par le ministère public, alors que le CCIF a partie liée avec les idéologues islamistes ? » »Comment accepter ces dénonciations d’un racisme d’Etat alors même que le CCIF a refusé de condamner les attentats, les crimes contre Charlie ? »

Le témoignage du grand écrivain algérien Boualem Sansal, lue par la présidente, vint conclure la défense de Bensoussan : « Les propos reprochés ne sont en rien un acte d’islamophobie… (…) J’ai moi-même dénoncé cette culture de la haine inculquée dans les familles arabes à leurs enfants, haine contre le juif, le chrétien, l’homosexuel… » Boualem Sansal écrit ensuite : « Dire que l’antisémitisme relève de la culture, c’est simplement répéter ce qui est écrit dans le Coran et enseigné à la mosquée ». Sera-t-il poursuivi à la XVIIe chambre ?

Un procès de même nature a été intenté par l’association des Indigènes de la République, contre Pascal Bruckner  qui avait déclaré, début 2015, qu’il fallait « faire le procès des collabos des assassins de Charlie ». Pascal Bruckner fut aussi trainé devant la 17e chambre pour des propos visant deux associations, selon lui, seraient des «complices idéologiques» des terroristes: «Les Indivisibles» de la militante « antiraciste » Rokhaya Diallo (qui n’en est plus membre) et «Les Indigènes de la République» dont Houria Bouteldja est la porte-parole. L’écrivain avait déclaré au cours de l’émission d’Arte 28 minutes qu’il fallait «faire le dossier des collabos, des assassins de Charlie» et accusé ces associations de «justifier idéologiquement la mort des journalistes de Charlie Hebdo». Ces deux associations qui avaient attaqué Pascal Bruckner pour diffamation suite à des propos sur l’islamisme ont été déboutées par la justice.

L’étrange défaite

Comment un Etat, la France, qui combat militairement le djihadisme après avoir été attaquée sur son propre sol par le terrorisme islamiste, peut-elle, dans le même temps, faire un procès à ceux qui dévoilent les stratégies de diffusion de son idéologie ? Comment la justice peut-elle accorder un crédit aux accusations de racisme énoncées par ceux-là même qui sont les promoteurs de la haine antijuive et antifrançaise ?  Comment peut-elle être à ce point aveugle devant la manipulation des mots, le dévoiement des institutions, celui des règles démocratiques visant justement à les retourner contre la première des libertés qui est celle de penser librement?

Lentement mais sûrement, l’islamisme impose son agenda à l’Europe et à la France. Bien sûr, la police marque des points contre les projets terroristes, les déjoue et arrête préventivement des tueurs, mais l’arbre des terroristes ne saurait cacher la forêt de leurs complices, collabos et idiots utiles. Quand quelques jours après le massacre au camion tueur sur la promenade des Anglais à Nice, le 14 juillet dernier, l’affaire du burkini a occupé le devant de la scène estivale, il fallait bien se rendre compte que la République avait affaire à des ennemis particulièrement retors et intelligents : avoir réussi à faire qualifier la France de pays raciste alors que le sang à Nice n’était pas encore sec, révélait une grande efficacité de la propagande islamiste.

Chaque jour qui passe nous révèle cette progression tous azimuts avec un partage des taches bien ordonné : présence dans le paysage, conquête de nouveaux territoires perdus pour la République, menaces contre les femmes, intimidation, action en justice contre des supposés islamophobes, chantage, séduction sur les vertus cachées de la religion de paix et d’amour. Alors que Houria Bouteldja, porte-parole des Indigènes de la République, est l’auteur du livre Les blancs, les juifs et nous explicitement raciste et antisémite, ce sont Bensoussan et Bruckner qui sont convoqués devant le tribunal pour répondre de leur « racisme » ou de leur « islamophobie ».

Dans cette affaire, les idiots utiles ne sont pas ceux que l’on croit : ce ne sont pas les terroristes, mais bien plutôt ceux qui les inspirent, les promeuvent, les soutiennent. Ce sont eux qui occupent le terrain conquis, abandonnés par des démocrates soucieux de ne pas apparaître comme « islamophobes ». Ces islamo-fascistes ont lu Gramsci : « Le vieux monde se meurt, le nouveau monde tarde à apparaître et dans ce clair-obscur surgissent les monstres » Les monstres nouveaux ont bien compris que la victoire politique avait un préalable : la conquête des esprits.

Au bal orchestré par Tariq Ramadan et le CCIF, les faux culs de l’antiracisme, la LICRA, le MRAP, la LDH, SOS Racisme, seront sur la piste.

Voir aussi:

GEORGES BENSOUSSAN : »Si les juifs ont quitté en masse le Maroc, c’est parce qu’ils avaient peur »
Le Point

24/01/2017

INTERVIEW. Pour Georges Bensoussan, la tolérance de l’islam n’est qu’un mythe. La preuve, les souffrances subies par les juifs en terre musulmane.
PROPOS RECUEILLIS PAR CATHERINE GOLLIAU

Mercredi 25 janvier, Georges Bensoussan passe devant un tribunal pour avoir dit que l’antisémitisme des musulmans était une transmission familiale. À tort ou à raison ? Ce spécialiste de l’histoire des juifs d’Europe de l’Est et de la Shoah est un historien engagé. En 2002, il rédigeait la postface des Territoires perdus de la République (Fayard), où des professeurs de collège témoignaient de la violence des adolescents, de leur racisme, leur antisémitisme et leur sexisme. Lui-même sort chez Albin Michel Une France soumise, un ouvrage collectif préfacé par Élisabeth Badinter « herself », où enseignants, policiers, travailleurs sociaux disent pourquoi ils ne peuvent plus exercer leur métier dans les écoles et les banlieues. Toujours à cause de cette violence et de ce rejet de l’autre – et particulièrement du Juif – , qui ne font que s’accentuer. Mais cette haine, d’où vient-elle ? Pour l’historien, comme il l’explique dans Les Juifs du monde arabe. La question interdite, qui paraît également cette semaine chez Odile Jacob, elle est directement liée au statut du dhimmi, imposé par le Coran au juif et au chrétien, soumission imposée qui s’est perpétuée jusqu’à la période coloniale, et qui est resté dans les consciences, même s’il a officiellement disparu des États modernes.

Le Point.fr : Pour vous, contrairement à ce qu’affirment nombre d’historiens, les juifs n’ont pas été bien traités dans le monde musulman…
Georges Bensoussan : Oui, nous sommes dans le déni. Peut-être parce qu’étant donnée l’horreur des exactions subies par les juifs dans le monde chrétien, et particulièrement sous les nazis, on a voulu croire à un islam tolérant. Or la légende d’Al Andalus, cette Espagne musulmane où les trois monothéismes auraient cohabité harmonieusement sous des gouvernements musulmans, a été forgée de toute pièce par le judaïsme européen au XIXe siècle, en particulier par les Juifs allemands, afin de promouvoir leur propre émancipation. Elle a ensuite été reprise par le monde arabe dans le but de montrer que les responsables de l’antagonisme entre juifs et Arabes étaient le sionisme et la naissance de l’État d’Israël. Coupables du départ massif des communautés juives d’Irak, d’Égypte, de Syrie, de Libye, du Maroc, etc., soit près d’un million de personnes entre 1945 et 1970. Mais, s’ils étaient si heureux dans leur pays d’origine, pourquoi ces gens sont-ils partis de leur plein gré ? En Irak, par exemple, les juifs comptaient parmi les plus arabisés d’Orient, et n’étaient guère tentés par le sionisme. Or ils ont été plus de 90 % en 1951-1952 à quitter le pays, après avoir subi le pogrom de Bagdad en juin 1941 – plus de 180 morts –, après avoir été victimes de meurtres, d’enlèvements, d’arrestations, de séquestrations, de vols et de torture dans les commissariats. C’est cette réalité-là qui a poussé ces juifs à l’exil. Un véritable processus d’épuration ethnique, d’autant plus sournois qu’à l’exception de l’Égypte, il n’a pas pris la forme d’une expulsion.

Vous ne pouvez nier pourtant que les sionistes ont largement œuvré pour que les juifs viennent s’installer en Israël…
Bien évidemment, et comment le leur reprocher ? Ils voulaient renforcer leur jeune État. Mais à eux seuls, des agents sionistes peuvent difficilement déraciner une communauté qui ne veut pas partir. Si les Juifs du Maroc ont quitté en masse leur pays – un tiers déjà avant l’indépendance –, c’est parce qu’ils avaient peur. D’expérience, ils craignaient le retour de la souveraineté arabe sur leurs terres. Ils ne se voyaient pas d’avenir dans leur pays, où la législation leur rendait la vie de plus en plus difficile.
L’administration de Vichy était si gangrenée par l’antisémitisme que l’attitude du sultan du Maroc, par contraste, en apparaissait presque bienveillante !

Le sultan du Maroc a pourtant la réputation d’avoir protégé les juifs entre 1939 et 1945, quand le pays était contrôlé par le gouvernement de Vichy…
Le Sultan, dit-on, se serait opposé au port de l’étoile jaune par ses sujets juifs. À ceci près qu’il n’y eut jamais d’étoile jaune au Maroc (et pas même en zone sud en France). Le sultan a fait appliquer à la lettre les statuts des juifs d’octobre 1940 et de juin 1941.

Si c’est une légende, elle est pourtant entretenue dans les milieux juifs d’origine marocaine…
En partie, oui, et pour plusieurs raisons. L’administration de Vichy était si gangrenée par l’antisémitisme (à commencer par le Résident général Charles Noguès) que l’attitude du sultan, par contraste, en apparaissait presque bienveillante ! En second lieu, les Juifs marocains partis en masse s’installer en Israël constituaient la partie la plus pauvre de la judéité marocaine, celle qui, de faible niveau social et professionnel, essuiera de front le racisme des élites ashkénazes. Être « marocain » en Israël était (et demeure) un « marqueur » péjoratif. Cette immigration s’est mise à idéaliser son passé marocain, sa culture, le temps de sa jeunesse, parfois tissé, au niveau individuel, de relations d’amitié entre juifs et Arabes. Ajoutons que la mémoire collective est socialement stratifiée. Il faut donc compter avec celle, moins douloureuse, des classes plus aisées qui ont émigré, elles, davantage, en France ou au Canada.
Leurs maisons ne doivent pas être plus hautes que celles des musulmans, ils doivent pratiquer discrètement leur foi, et leur voix ne vaut rien devant un tribunal musulman
Le statut de « dhimmi » imposé aux chrétiens et aux juifs par le Coran explique-t-il l’antisémitisme que vous dénoncez ?
Il justifie l’infériorisation du juif par le musulman : il autorise en effet les membres des religions dites du Livre à pratiquer leur foi, à la condition de payer un impôt spécial et d’accepter de se comporter en « soumis ». Leurs maisons ne doivent pas être plus hautes que celles des musulmans, ils doivent pratiquer discrètement leur foi, et leur voix ne vaut rien devant un tribunal musulman. Tout cela a fait du juif un être de second ordre. Les témoignages abondent, de non-juifs en particulier – des militaires, des commerçants, des médecins –, sur la misère et la manière infamante dont les juifs pouvaient être traités. Mais ce statut avait été intégré par des communautés profondément religieuses, marquées par l’attente messianique et considérant que ce qu’elles vivaient était le prix de l’Exil. Les choses ont changé avec l’arrivée des Européens et la possibilité d’avoir accès à une éducation marquée par les valeurs issues des Lumières. Pour autant, le regard arabo-musulman sur « le Juif » ne changera pas de sitôt : un sujet toléré tant qu’il accepte son infériorité statutaire. Même les juifs qui rejoindront le combat des indépendances arabes comprendront peu à peu qu’ils ne seront jamais acceptés. De fait, tous ont été écartés ou sont partis d’eux-mêmes, et la création de l’État d’Israël ne fera qu’accroître le rejet.

Mais leur situation était-elle la même partout ? Les Juifs de Salonique ont prospéré sous les Turcs et ont vu leur statut se détériorer quand les Grecs orthodoxes ont pris le contrôle de la ville, en 1922…
En effet, il faut distinguer le monde turc, plus tolérant que le monde arabe, même si la situation est loin d’y avoir été idyllique. Le statut de dhimmi a été aboli dans l’Empire ottoman par deux fois, en 1839 et 1856, et l’on constate que les contrées où les juifs connurent la condition la plus dure – le Yémen, la Perse et le Maroc – ne furent que peu ou pas du tout colonisées par les Turcs.
Dans la France d’aujourd’hui, les problèmes d’intégration d’une fraction des jeunes Français d’origine arabo-musulmane font rejouer les préjugés ancestraux

Vous dénoncez l’antisémitisme des émigrés de la troisième génération en France, ce qui vous vaut d’ailleurs un procès pour racisme intenté par le Collectif contre l’islamophobie en France (CCIF).
J’ai effectivement été assigné pour « propos racistes », parce que, lors d’une émission de France Culture, et à propos d’une partie de l’immigration maghrébine, j’ai usé de la métaphore d’un « antisémitisme tété avec le lait de sa mère ». Je ne faisais pourtant, par cette formule, que reprendre celle utilisée par le sociologue Smaïn Laacher qui, dans un documentaire diffusé sur France 3, parlait d’un antisémitisme « quasi naturellement déposé sur la langue, déposé dans la langue […]. Bon, mais ça toutes les familles arabes le savent ! C’est une hypocrisie monumentale de ne pas voir que cet antisémitisme, il est d’abord domestique […] comme dans l’air qu’on respire ». Ces deux métaphores disaient la même chose, une transmission culturelle et non génétique : le lait n’est pas le sang. À ceci près que l’une est dite par un Arabe, l’autre par un juif. L’indignation est sélective… Dans la France d’aujourd’hui, les problèmes d’intégration d’une fraction des jeunes Français d’origine arabo-musulmane font rejouer les préjugés ancestraux et donnent prise à la culture du complot qui cristallise sur « le Juif », cette cible déjà désignée dans l’imaginaire culturel maghrébin, et aggravée par la réussite de la communauté juive de France. Mais qu’y a-t-il de « raciste » à faire ce constat, à moins d’invalider toute tentative de décrire le réel ? Ce qui est inquiétant dans mon affaire, au-delà de ma personne, est que la justice donne suite à la dénonciation du CCIF, dont l’objectif est de nous imputer le raisonnement débile du racisme pour mieux, moi et d’autres avec moi, nous réduire au silence.

Vos collègues vous reprochent de manquer de l’objectivité indispensable à l’historien…
Quand les faits leur donnent tort, ils invoquent l’« objectivité » alors que le seul souci de l’historien face aux sources, a fortiori quand elles contreviennent à sa vision du monde, demeure l’honnêteté. Comme au temps où il était impossible de critiquer l’Union soviétique au risque, sinon, de « faire le jeu de l’impérialisme », la doxa progressiste s’enferme dans cette paresse de l’esprit. Il n’est donc pas possible aujourd’hui de dire que le monde arabe, quoique colonisé hier, fut tout autant raciste, antisémite et esclavagiste. Quand la sociologue franco-algérienne Fanny Colonna a montré dès les années cinquante le poids de l’islamisme dans le nationalisme algérien, elle s’est heurtée aux « pieds rouges », ces intellectuels qui soutenaient le FLN et qui ne voulaient pas faire le jeu des opposants à la décolonisation. Orwell le soulignait jadis, certains intellectuels ont du mal à accepter une réalité dérangeante.

Les Juifs du monde arabe. La question interdite, Odile Jacob, 167 pages, 21,90 euros
Une France soumise – Les voix du refus, Albin Michel, 2017, 664 pages, 24,90 euros

Voir également:

Valeurs actuelles

8 février 2017

Islamisation. Selon une étude de l’institut britannique Chatham House repérée par RT, plus de la moitié des Européens sont d’accord avec l’idée de stopper l’immigration en provenance des pays à majorité musulmane.

 C’est ce que Donald Trump avait promis pendant la campagne présidentielle, et qui avait fait hurler tant de commentateurs : stopper l’immigration en provenance de certains pays à majorité musulmane, pour réduire la menace terroriste qui pèse sur les Etats-Unis. Depuis son élection, le décret pris par le président suscite l’indignation et l’opposition d’une large partie de la classe politique américaine, malgré le sceau apposé par le suffrage.

“Toute immigration supplémentaire venant de pays à majorité musulmane doit cesser”

Une telle mesure pourrait-elle être prise en Europe ? Le vieux continent a été touché depuis deux ans par une série d’attentats terroristes, commis le plus souvent par des individus visés par le controversé décret anti-immigration.

Selon une étude menée par l’institut de recherche britannique Chatham House, les Européens seraient majoritairement favorables à la fermeture de leurs frontières aux individus originaires de pays musulmans. 55% des personnes interrogées ont ainsi déclaré être d’accord avec cette affirmation : “Toute immigration supplémentaire venant de pays à majorité musulmane doit cesser”. Un chiffre impressionnant.

“Nos résultats sont frappants et donnent à réfléchir”

Dans le commentaire de l’étude, l’institut livre ses conclusions : “Nos résultats sont frappants et donnent à réfléchir. Ils suggèrent que l’opposition à l’immigration venant de pays à majorité musulmane n’est pas confinée à l’électorat de Donald Trump aux Etats-Unis mais est largement répandue”.

Largement, mais plus spécialement dans les pays qui “ont été au centre de la crise migratoire ou ont vécu des attaques terroristes ces dernières années”. La Pologne (71%), l’Autriche (65%), la Hongrie et la Belgique (64%), ainsi que la France (61%), sont ainsi parmi les plus favorables à l’assertion de départ.

Voir enfin:

The Jewish Chronicle

February 7, 2017

French Jewish scholar Georges Bensoussan is being sued by Muslim anti-racism groups for saying in a radio debate: “In French Arab families, babies suckle antisemitism with their mothers’ milk.”

Mr Bensoussan, who is the editor of the magazine The Shoah History Review, said he was roughly quoting Algerian sociologist Smain Laacher, but the groups suing him claim his statements amounted to incitement to hatred.

In a Paris court last week, Mr Bensoussan argued that many Muslim scholars “have said the same things that I have but they’re not being sued”.

Several scholars testified at the stand, some saying they were outraged to see Mr Bensoussan in court, others saying the historian had crossed red lines.

“I was shocked by his words. I am an Arab and I’m not an anti-Semite. My family has never taught me to hate Jews,” said journalist Mohamed Sifaoui. “I sent emissaries to Georges Bensoussan to ask him to apologize to those he has hurt but he refused. He’s a historian he should be more subtle. Of course many Muslims are anti-Semitic. Saying otherwise would be dishonest. But there are also Muslims who fight antisemitism. Denying that is also dishonest.”

But the judge noted that Mr Sifaoui himself had written in an article that “Arabs don’t visit Auschwitz” and that Arabs are either “swamped by a culture of indifference” or “they suckle on anti-Semitic hatred nipples”.

“My expression is completely different from the one Bensoussan used,” replied Mr Sifaoui.

“Many Muslim scholars have said the same things that I have but they’re not being sued. That’s racism!” argued Mr Bensoussan.

“I’m surprised I have to defend him in front of a court,” said philosopher Alain Finkielkraut who hosts the radio show on which Mr Bensoussan made the controversial statement. “Anti-racist groups want to ban all thought and debate. They say we’re accusing a whole community but Bensoussan says he’s fighting for integration. He’s quoting Arab scholars. If he’s convicted it would be an intellectual and moral catastrophe. Denying reality will only bring more division and hatred.”

“Georges Bensoussan is not a bigot. He signed petitions for peace in the Middle East. He dedicated several issued of the Shoah memorial magazine to the Armenian and Rwandan genocides. He’s denouncing a problem that exists. All those who cherish democracy should thank him,” said retired Professor Elisabeth de Fontenay.

Historian Yves Ternon, who has studied the Armenian genocide said he admired Mr Bensoussan. “We’ve worked together for decades, studying the scientific similarities between genocides,” said Ternon. “You know revisionists have tools: one of them is to accuse those who accuse them. Bensoussan is a whistleblower. When hatred against Jews spreads, everyone gets hurt.”

The judge read out a study showing that the far-right and Muslims tend to have antisemitic beliefs.

He said: “Nineteen per cent of the French population believes Jews have too much political power. The share is at 51 per cent among Muslims and 63 per cent among religious Muslims.”

“I don’t believe in that study but it’s true that among Muslims we use the expression ‘Jew – sorry!’ to disapprove of something. However that’s not really hatred. It’s an old expression which isn’t really considered as a hate insult today,” said Nacera Guenif, a sociologist testifying against the historian. “What’s important is that Mr Bensoussan is spreading a dangerous theory. When you say all Muslims behave in a bad way, you encourage suspicion that can lead to hate and violence. When you’re a historian, when you have a popular radio show you also have responsibilities.”

Mr Bensoussan told the court he had apologised several times to those who were hurt by his comments. He said he did not mean to generalise his remarks to all Muslims.

The court is due to rule on March 7.

Voir par ailleurs:

La victoire de l’Orientalisme
Richard Landes
(publié dans le Middle-East Quarterly du site Middle East Forum)
Hiver 2017
Traduction Magali Marc/Dreuz
The Augean Stables
29 janvier 2017

Que l’on considère l’impact d’Edward Saïd (1935-2003) sur le monde universitaire comme un grand triomphe ou comme une tragique catastrophe, peu de gens peuvent remettre en question l’étonnante portée et la pénétration de son magnum opus, L’Orientalisme.

En une génération, une transformation radicale a dominé les études du Moyen-Orient : une nouvelle catégorie d’universitaires «post-coloniaux», ayant une perspective libératrice et anti-impérialiste, a remplacé une génération d’érudits que Saïd a dénigrés en les traitant d’«Orientalistes».

Cette transformation ne se limitait pas aux études du Moyen-Orient : Saïd et son paradigme post-colonial réunissaient un large éventail d’acolytes dans de nombreux domaines des sciences sociales et humaines.

Pourtant, quand on examine les événements des deux dernières décennies, on peut dire que les héritiers académiques de Saïd se sont plantés de façon spectaculaire dans leurs analyses et prescriptions concernant la façon dont il fallait s’y prendre pour régler les problèmes du Moyen-Orient.

Nulle part cela n’a été aussi évident que dans la lecture erronée du désastreux «processus de paix» israélo-palestinien d’Oslo et des fameux «printemps arabes» qui se sont rapidement détériorés en vagues de guerres tribales et sectaires, créant des millions de réfugiés, dont beaucoup ont littéralement détruit les malheureux rivages de l’Europe.

Une grande partie de cet échec peut être attribuée aux restrictions imposées par la pensée postcoloniale sur la capacité de discuter de la dynamique sociale et politique du Moyen-Orient. Si les experts et les journalistes ont été hypnotisés par les perspectives de paix arabo-israélienne et le mirage d’une vague de démocratisation arabe, c’est en partie parce qu’ils avaient systématiquement sous-estimé le rôle de la culture d’honneur et de honte dans les sociétés arabes et musulmanes et son impact sur la religiosité islamique.

La dynamique «honneur-honte» dans les dimensions politique et religieuse
Les termes honneur-honte désignent des cultures où l’acquisition, l’entretien et la restauration de l’honneur public triomphent de toutes les autres préoccupations.

Alors que tout le monde se soucie de ce que les autres pensent et veut sauver la face même si cela signifie mentir, dans les cultures d’honneur et de honte, ces préoccupations dominent le discours public : il n’y a pas de prix trop élevé à payer– y compris la vie– pour préserver l’honneur.

Dans de telles cultures politiques, l’opinion publique accepte, attend, exige même que le sang soit versé pour l’honneur.

Dans de telles sociétés, quand les gens critiquent publiquement ceux qui sont au pouvoir– ceux qui ont l’honneur– ils attaquent leur être même. Si ces derniers ne répondaient pas– de préférence par la violence– ils perdraient la face.

Les sociétés autoritaires permettent donc à leurs mâles dominants de supprimer violemment ceux dont les paroles les offensent.

Conséquemment, les cultures d’honneur et de honte ont une immense difficulté à tolérer la liberté d’expression, de religion, de la presse tout autant que de traiter avec les sociétés qui pratique cette tolérance.

Dans les cultures où les gens se font eux-mêmes justice, cette insistance sur l’honneur peut signifier tuer quelqu’un qui a tué un parent, et dans la culture japonaise, l’honneur peut signifier se suicider.

Cependant, dans certaines cultures d’honneur, cette préoccupation signifie tuer un membre de la famille pour sauver l’honneur de la famille. Le «jugement public», dont le verdict détermine le sort de la communauté demeure le vecteur qui motive le besoin de sauver la face, et définit les façons de faire. Le terme arabe pour «commérage» est kalam an-nas, (la parole du peuple), qui est souvent sévère dans son jugement des autres.

À ce sujet, le psychologue Talib Kafaji a écrit :

«La culture arabe est une culture de jugement, et tout ce qu’une personne fait est sujet au jugement… induisant de nombreuses peurs… avec de graves conséquences sur la vie individuelle. Éviter ce jugement peut être la préoccupation constante des gens, presque comme si toute la culture était paralysée par le kalam [an] –nas.»

Autrement dit, dans la société arabe, tous les individus sont les otages les unes des autres.

En dépit de sa résonnance «orientaliste», cette attention à un jugementalisme paralysant et omniprésent fournit des aperçus importants sur les dysfonctionnements du monde arabe d’aujourd’hui.

Les cultures d’honneur et de honte ont tendance à être à somme nulle : les hommes d’honneur gardent jalousement leur honneur et considèrent l’ascension des autres comme une menace pour eux-mêmes. Dans les cultures à somme nulle de «bien limité», l’honneur pour une personne signifie la honte pour les autres. Si l’autre gagne, vous perdez. Afin que vous ayez le dessus, l’autre doit perdre.

Ceux qui sont juste en dessous continuent de défier ceux qui sont juste au-dessus, et l’ascension n’est possible que par l’agression. Tu n’es pas un homme tant que tu n’as pas tué un autre homme. La prise des biens d’autrui –par le vol ou le pillage– est supérieure à la production. Domine ou soit dominé. Le visage noirci (de la honte) est lavé dans le sang (de l’honneur).

Cette même mentalité dite «à somme nulle», «gouverne-ou-soit-gouverné», qui domine la plupart des interactions dans la politique des cultures d’honneur et de honte, a son analogie dans la religiosité du triomphalisme, la croyance que la domination de sa religion sur les autres constitue la preuve de la vérité de cette religion.

De la même manière que les chrétiens ont pris la conversion de l’Empire romain au Christianisme comme un signe que leurs revendications sur les Juifs avaient triomphé ; les musulmans triomphalistes, dans une expression suprême de la religiosité inspirée par l’honneur, croient que l’islam est une religion de domination destinée à gouverner le monde.

Cette dynamique d’honneur et de honte explique en grande partie l’hostilité arabe et musulmane envers Israël, ainsi qu’envers l’Occident.

Israël, un État de Juifs libres (c’est-à-dire, des infidèles non-dhimmis), vivant à l’intérieur du Dar al-Islam historique (royaume de la soumission), constitue un blasphème vivant. La capacité d’Israël à survivre aux efforts répétés des Arabes pour le détruire constitue un état permanent de honte arabe devant toute la communauté mondiale. Cela fait de l’hostilité musulmane triomphaliste envers Israël un cas particulièrement grave d’une hostilité généralisée envers les infidèles et les musulmans «modérés».

Tout effort pour comprendre ce qui se passe dans le monde arabe aujourd’hui doit tenir compte de cette dynamique religio-culturelle.

Pourtant, dans l’ensemble, cette dynamique n’est pas seulement ignorée, mais ceux qui en parlent sont réprimandés pour (prétendument) contribuer à aggraver le conflit plutôt que de le comprendre.

Une grande partie de cette ignorance (à la fois active et intransitive) remonte à Saïd, qui a fait de l’analyse «honneur-honte» un péché «orientaliste» particulièrement impardonnable.

Avant même que n’arrive la contribution de Saïd, l’anthropologie s’était éloignée de cette analyse. Lui en a fait un dogme. A tel point que, dans le dernier tiers du XXe siècle, il est devenu paradoxalement honteux– voire raciste– qu’un anthropologue discute de l’«honneur et de la honte» arabe ou musulmane.

La honte de Saïd et la désorientation de l’Occident
L’Orientalisme de Saïd a exploité une tendance occidentale à l’autocritique morale concernant l’analyse des autres cultures, dans le but de protéger son peuple de la honte. Pour lui, la critique des Arabes ou des musulmans reflète les préjugés ethnocentriques de l’Occident et de son projet culturel discriminatoire de domination impérialiste.

Ce n’était pas ce que les orientalistes croyaient faire, eux pensaient qu’ils offraient des observations précises concernant les caractéristiques et les conditions d’une autre culture et de son histoire.

Pour Saïd, au contraire, tout contraste entre les cultures de l’Occident démocratique et celles des Arabes et des musulmans– certainement ceux qui montraient ces derniers sous une lumière peu flatteuse– étaient des exemples lamentables de xénophobie hostile dirigée contre des «inférieurs», et ne pouvaient pas constituer une réflexion sur une réalité sociale.

À propos du dix-neuvième siècle, Saïd a écrit : «Tout Européen qui parlait de l’Orient était raciste, impérialiste et presque totalement ethnocentrique».

Saïd a lancé un plaidoyer en faveur d’une alternative : il fallait à tout prix éviter d’orientaliser l’Orient, encore et encore.

Sans l’«Orient» il y aurait des érudits, des critiques, des intellectuels, des êtres humains pour lesquels les distinctions raciales, ethniques et nationales seraient moins importantes que l’entreprise commune dans la promotion de la communauté humaine.

Bien compris, cet appel demande aux chercheurs de ne pas parler de différences ethniques, raciales ou religieuses, alors que la plupart des moyen-orientaux vous diront que ce sont des questions culturelles très importantes pour eux.

Ainsi, dans la nouvelle édition d’«Orientalisme» publiée en 1994, SaÏd se plaignait-il de la focalisation croissante de l’Occident sur le danger que représente l’islam : «les médias électroniques et imprimés ont été inondés par des stéréotypes dégradants qui amalgament l’islam et le terrorisme, les Arabes et la violence, l’Orient et la tyrannie.»
Ces phénomènes, insistait Saïd, ne faisaient pas partie de l’ensemble de l’image et se concentrer sur eux «était humiliant et déshumanisant pour les gens en situation d’infériorité… qui se trouvaient niés, supprimés, déformés.»

En substance, Saïd exhortait ses collègues non-musulmans à ignorer les questions mêmes qu’ils avaient le plus besoin de comprendre afin de suivre les développements du XXIe siècle.

De ce fait, les facteurs qui prédominent aujourd’hui dans la culture politique arabe et musulmane– le zèle religieux, la violence, le terrorisme, l’autoritarisme débridé et l’exploitation des faibles, y compris des femmes, des réfugiés et bien sûr de ces victimes permanentes de la culture politique arabe, les Palestiniens, ne doivent pas être mentionnés parce que cela déprécierait les Arabes et les musulmans et les heurterait dans leur sensibilité.

Ceux qui violent ces nouvelles directives anti-orientalistes déclenchent la colère de ceux qu’ils critiquent et les protestations véhémentes, quoique moins violentes, de leurs concitoyens, les accusant lorsqu’ils critiquent l’islam de faire preuve de racisme et de rejeter le blâme sur les victimes. Ceux qui critiquent le discours haineux musulman sont accusés d’aggraver le conflit.

Ainsi, les traits que les esprits racistes ont développés en Orient et qui font leur force, ne sont discutés qu’à contrecœur par les mandarins des études du Moyen-Orient et les universitaires post-coloniaux, et seulement quand ils sont poussés à le faire, principalement pour les minimiser. Avec pour conséquence, que les auditoires occidentaux demeurent à ce jour mal informés sur les Arabes et sur les musulmans.

Alors que Saïd a formulé sa critique de l’Occident en termes postmodernistes et humanistes, elle pourrait bien être reformulée en fonction de la dynamique culturelle de l’honneur et de la honte. Le «kalam an-nas»– l’opinion publique dont la désapprobation est si douloureuse– contribue à expliquer la direction qu’a prise la pensée de Saïd menant à l’orientalisme.

En tant qu’Arabe qui a connu un grand succès en se servant des règles occidentales, entouré de collègues admiratifs (son «monde d’honneur»), Saïd a vécu la défaite arabe catastrophique de la guerre des Six Jours de 1967 comme une «punition du destin».

Le tissu de racisme, de stéréotypes culturels, d’impérialisme politique, d’idéologie déshumanisante qui règne chez les Arabes ou les musulmans est très fort, et c’est ce tissu que chaque Palestinien en est venu à ressentir comme étant son destin exclusif et punitif.

Aucun universitaire américain ne s’était identifié sans réserve avec les Arabes culturellement et politiquement.

Il y a certainement eu des identifications à un certain niveau, mais elles n’ont jamais pris une forme «acceptable» comme l’a fait l’identification de la gauche américaine avec le sionisme.

En tant que «Palestinien», Saïd avait perdu la face dans cette catastrophe. Sa réponse d’honneur ne fut pas de porter un regard autocritique sur les attitudes et les acteurs arabes qui avaient contribué à la fois à cette guerre inutile et à cette défaite catastrophique, mais fut plutôt d’exprimer sa colère envers ceux qui pensaient du mal des Arabes et qui prétendaient occuper le haut du pavé en matière de morale.

En conséquence, il ne s’est pas préoccupé de savoir si la cause palestinienne qu’il soutenait «sans réserve» en souhaitant que les autres suivent reflétait (ou dédaignait) les valeurs de la gauche auxquelles il avait fait appel.

Pour celui qui défend son honneur, la défense d’un côté ou un autre dans un conflit n’est pas basée sur l’intégrité ou sur les valeurs de la gauche, mais sur l’idée de sauver l’honneur, sur la façon dont on sauve la face.

Il n’est donc pas surprenant que peu de sujets aient autant enflammé Saïd que la discussion sur le rôle de la culture arabe dans la recherche, le maintien et la reconquête de l’honneur et l’évitement et l’élimination de la honte.

Étant donné que des traits culturels tels que le patriarcat misogyne, les homicides d’honneur, les querelles sanglantes, l’esclavage, les massacres de civils, etc., ne semblaient pas très bons aux gauchistes occidentaux, Saïd devait sauver la face arabe en évitant ce regard occidental hostile.

Il a eu l’idée brillante de rendre honteux pour les universitaires occidentaux le fait même de se référer à ces questions dans la discussion du monde arabe, en qualifiant ce type de questionnement de raciste.

Ses règles du jeu de l’orientalisme, au contraire, exigeaient une action positive et morale. En conséquence, Saïd et ses acolytes réprimandaient quiconque osait expliquer l’obsession périlleuse musulmane arabe de détruire Israël en termes de questions culturelles. «Comment osez-vous les traiter comme un groupe de sauvages, d’irréductibles, de fous superstitieux qui se nourrissent de fantasmes de vengeance génocidaire pour rétablir l’honneur perdu et retrouver leur situation de domination ?!»

Au contraire, disait Saïd «la relation entre Arabes, musulmans et terrorisme» que tant d’orientalistes établissent est «entièrement factice».

Pour tout outsider, soupçonner les dirigeants palestiniens (ou Arabes ou musulmans) de comportements belliqueux constitue pour les post-coloniaux, une agression inacceptable, une forme de racisme. Selon eux, le conflit concerne l’impérialisme israélien et la résistance naturelle qu’il provoque.

Grâce à cette brillante sauvegarde de la «face» arabe, à cette façon d’utiliser le kalam an-nas, l’orientalisme de Saïd a su contourner les vecteurs du jugement négatif paralysant.

D’une part, cette défense protégeait les Arabes des critiques publiques, de l’autre, elle faisait de l’Occident «impérialiste» (et de son avant-garde supposée les «colons» israéliens), l’objet d’une critique implacable.

Son succès à cet égard a donné naissance à une génération de spécialistes du Moyen-Orient, y compris des universitaires, qui ont décrit les mondes arabe et musulman comme des «sociétés civiles florissantes», d’imminentes «démocraties» tout en décrivant l’Occident comme un monde raciste, impérialiste, qui a besoin d’être déconstruit, théoriquement et pratiquement.

Un tel mouvement a peut-être flatté l’image que les Arabes et les Occidentaux (gauchistes) avaient d’eux-mêmes, mais il a eu pour prix l’ignorance des réalités plus sombres sur le terrain.

Pourtant, pour beaucoup, cette ignorance semblait être un faible prix à payer. Après tout, le cadre de référence de Saïd offrait aux progressistes pacifistes un moyen d’éviter le choc des civilisations.

Donner aux Arabes et aux musulmans le bénéfice du doute, les traiter avec honneur plutôt que de les inciter gratuitement à la critique, voilà la façon de résoudre les conflits et d’apporter la paix.

Les éducateurs occidentaux qui adoptaient le discours de Saïd considéraient ses thèses comme une sorte de récit thérapeutique qui, en accentuant le positif et en dissimulant le négatif, encourageait l’autre plutôt que de l’aliéner.

Il s’agissait, entre autres, de traiter les Arabes et les musulmans comme si leur culture politique avait déjà atteint ce niveau de modernité, d’engagement sociétal envers les droits universels de l’homme, de paix par la tolérance, d’égalitarisme. Tout cela dans le but de favoriser les relations positives– alors qu’en réalité, une telle évaluation n’était pas objective.

Le monde postmoderne ne peut pas être (est même très éloigné) de toute évaluation objective (ce que, présumément, il prétend être).

De la «Paix» d’Oslo au Jihad
Peu de débâcles illustrent mieux la folie qui consiste à ignorer la dynamique de la honte et de l’honneur que le «processus de paix» d’Oslo qui a fondé sa logique sur le principe d’un échange de «terre pour la paix» : Israël céderait des terres aux Palestiniens (la plus grande partie de la Judée/Samarie et Gaza) afin de créer un État indépendant et les Palestiniens enterreraient la hache de guerre puisqu’ils obtiendraient ce qu’ils voulaient sans avoir à se battre.

Ainsi, les accords d’Oslo changeraient l’engagement palestinien défini par leur charte, de reconquérir l’honneur arabe et musulman en effaçant la honte qu’est Israël, et les amèneraient à accepter la légitimité de l’existence de l’État hébreu.

Un tel changement dépendait de la compréhension de ce que cette concession promise à Israël amènerait, étant donné que les Palestiniens «aspirent», à la liberté de se gouverner dans la paix et la dignité. Cela semblait être un contrat gagnant-gagnant si évident, que, comme Gavin Esler de la BBC l’avait déclaré, «le conflit allait être résolu avec un courriel.»

Ce que les architectes d’Oslo et leurs partisans occidentaux ont si complètement sous-estimé, c’est l’emprise que l’univers basé sur l’honneur aurait sur le président de l’Organisation de libération de la Palestine (OLP), Yasser Arafat.

Ce manque de perspicacité a non seulement dominé la pensée dans les cercles occidentaux (eux qui n’étaient pas mis en danger par un tel pari), mais avait aussi cours dans les cercles politiques et du renseignement israélien, qui eux avaient beaucoup à perdre.

Il est clair que ce n’est pas seulement la direction politique d’Israël qui a été prise en otage par la conception chimérique de l’instauration d’une ère de paix avec l’Autorité palestinienne. Le système de sécurité militaire et le service de sécurité Shin Bet ont eu des difficultés à se libérer du même sentiment. Les fonctionnaires du renseignement n’étaient pas toujours disposés à laisser les faits perturber leur perception idéalisée de la réalité.

Le simple fait que les analystes occidentaux et israéliens aient négligé de leur prêter attention, cependant, ne signifie pas que les règles d’honneur et de honte aient cessé d’opérer.

Après la cérémonie de signature de l’entente sur la pelouse de la Maison-Blanche, le président de l’OLP, Arafat, s’est trouvé la cible d’une immense hostilité de la part de son groupe d’honneur arabe et musulman pour avoir porté la honte à tous les Arabes et à tous les musulmans.

Lorsqu’il est arrivé à Gaza en juillet 1994, le Hamas l’a dénoncé en ces termes : «Sa visite est honteuse et humiliante, car elle se produit dans l’ombre de l’occupation et à l’ombre de la soumission humiliante d’Arafat devant le gouvernement ennemi et sa volonté. Il veut présenter une défaite comme une victoire.»

Edward Saïd, fier membre du Conseil national palestinien, semi-parlement de l’OLP, a fait écho aux paroles du Hamas : les compromis impliquaient un acte humiliant et «dégradant… d’obéissance… Une capitulation… qui a produit un état d’abjection et d’obéissance… se soumettant honteusement à Israël.»

Ainsi l’intellectuel «post-colonial» a utilisé le langage tribal à somme nulle d’honneur et de honte arabe et musulmane, attaquant la négociation comme déshonorante. C’était la langue même dont les Occidentaux évitaient de discuter de peur qu’ils n’«orientassent l’Orient».

Et pourtant Arafat a utilisé le même langage d’honneur et de honte en arabe, dès que les accords ont été signés et que le Prix Nobel a été accordé.

Six mois après son retour de Tunisie en juillet 1994 à ce qui était devenu un territoire sous contrôle palestinien grâce aux accords d’Oslo, il a défendu sa politique devant des musulmans d’Afrique du Sud, non pas en parlant de la «paix des braves», mais plutôt en invoquant le traité de Mahaybiya de Muhammad, signé quand il était en position de faiblesse, rompu quand il fut en position de force.

Dans la mesure où les Arabes avaient accepté le processus d’Oslo, ils le considéraient comme un cheval de Troie, non pas comme une concession (nécessairement) humiliante. Un projet de guerre honorable et non pas de paix ignominieuse.

Dans les cultures où, pour l’honneur, «ce qui a été pris par la force doit être repris par la force», toute négociation est forcément honteuse et lâche.

De façon générale, les journalistes et les décideurs occidentaux, y compris le «camp de la paix» en Israël, et même les services de renseignement, ont ignoré les invocations répétées d’Arafat à Hudaybiya.

Les partisans de la paix les considéraient comme des railleries conçues pour apaiser l’opinion publique (en elle-même une chose qui méritait qu’on y réfléchisse) et étaient persuadés que, finalement, l’appel plus mature de la communauté internationale placerait Arafat du côté de la raison positive. Les praticiens du «journalisme de paix» en Israël, par exemple, ont délibérément évité des nouvelles décourageantes de ce genre et le sens de Hudaybiya en particulier.

Dans son mémoire de 800 pages sur l’échec d’Oslo, Dennis Ross, l’envoyé américain du Moyen-Orient le plus impliqué dans les négociations avec la direction palestinienne, n’a pas eu un mot à dire sur la controverse de Hudaybiya, en dépit du fait qu’il avait correctement jugé le comportement problématique d’Arafat et son «échec à préparer son peuple aux compromis nécessaires à la paix».

Le péché d’Arafat n’était pas d’omission, mais de commission : il préparait systématiquement son peuple à la guerre sous le nez des Israéliens et de l’Occident.

Plutôt que d’examiner les conséquences de cette contre-preuve, ceux qui appuyaient le processus attaquaient quiconque y attirait l’attention.

Le Conseil des relations américano-islamiques (CAIR), une soi-disant organisation de défense des droits civils musulmans ayant des liens avec les mêmes confréries musulmanes dont le Hamas est une branche, a mené l’attaque au nom de la protection de la réputation du prophète Muhammad.

Daniel Pipes a écrit plusieurs textes concernant le discours de la mosquée de Johannesburg et le sens du traité de Hudaybiya, ainsi que sur les problèmes rencontrés par les Occidentaux quand ils osaient soulever ce sujet.

En dépit de son insistance à se montrer juste envers le prophète musulman sur des bases historiques, les écrits de Pipes lui ont amené une volée de condamnations furieuses et une accusation précoce d’islamophobie.

Les protestataires interdisaient essentiellement aux critiques d’examiner les preuves pertinentes à leurs préoccupations pressantes. Au lieu de cela, les enthousiastes de la paix voyaient Arafat et les dirigeants palestiniens comme des acteurs modernes à part entière qui souhaitaient avoir leur propre pays et leur liberté, et auxquels on pouvait faire confiance pour le respect de leurs engagements.

La plupart pensaient qu’Arafat, quand l’occasion se présenterait, choisirait l’imparfait, la somme positive, le gagnant-gagnant, plutôt que la somme nulle, tout ou rien, gagnant-perdant.

Ils «avaient foi» en la direction palestinienne et faisaient honte à quiconque osait suggérer que les Palestiniens s’accrochaient encore fermement à leur désir atavique de vengeance.

Ainsi, alors que Jérusalem et Washington se préparaient à une grande finale du processus de paix à Camp David à l’été 2000, alors même que les médias israéliens préparaient leur peuple à la paix, les médias d’Arafat préparaient les Palestiniens à la guerre. Et aucun des principaux décideurs n’y a porté attention.

L’incapacité à comprendre la dynamique du maintien de l’honneur (en luttant contre Israël) et à éviter la honte (provoquée par le compromis avec Israël) a condamné Oslo à l’échec dès le départ.

Les gens impliqués, qui pensaient que les deux parties étaient «si proches» et que si seulement Israël avait donné plus, les accords auraient réussi, ont été dupés.

Pour les décideurs palestiniens, ils n’ont jamais été proches. Même une entente réussie aurait mené à plus de guerres.

En effet, selon cette logique, plus l’accord favorisait les Palestiniens– c’est-à-dire, plus les Israéliens étaient affaiblis– plus l’agression accompagnerait leur mise en œuvre.

Une fois qu’Oslo a explosé, les Occidentaux qui se sont accrochés à leurs fantasmes ont continué à mal comprendre les événements ultérieurs.

Au lendemain du «non» retentissant mais prévisible d’Arafat à Camp David en juillet 2000, et à plusieurs reprises après le déclenchement de sa guerre de terreur (minimisée en tant qu’«Intifada al-Aqsa») fin septembre, les apologistes ont fait des efforts héroïques afin d’interpréter son comportement comme étant rationnel et d’ignorer sa planification délibérée de la guerre de terreur, et ont blâmé Israël.

Dans le cadre de la contre-attaque, les critiques à l’encontre d’Arafat, en particulier pour son comportement caractéristique de la culture d’honneur et de honte, ont suscité des cris de racisme.

Par exemple, lors d’une interview avec l’universitaire israélien Benny Morris, l’ancien premier ministre israélien Ehud Barak se plaignait des mensonges systématiques d’Arafat, qui faisait de chaque discussion un calcul entre la dénonciation des mensonges ou l’idée de les ignorer et d’accepter de se mettre en position de faiblesse.

Ces remarques ont agacé les observateurs du Moyen-Orient, Hussein Agha et Robert Malley :

Les mots de [Barak] dans l’entretien initial étaient sans équivoque. «Ils sont le produit d’une culture dans laquelle dire un mensonge… ne crée pas de dissonance». «Ils ne souffrent pas du problème du mensonge tel qu’il existe dans la culture judéo-chrétienne. La vérité est perçue comme non pertinente.» etc. Mais, clairement, la précision factuelle et la cohérence logique n’étaient pas souhaitées par Morris et Barak. Ce qui importe, c’est l’autojustification de quelqu’un qui a choisi de faire carrière– et peut-être de revenir– en se livrant à la vilification d’un peuple tout entier».

C’est du classique Edward Saïd : attaquez les motifs de vos critiques (souvent par projection) ; clamez que vous subissez une blessure morale à cause de l’insulte, et dans le processus, détournez l’attention de la précision des remarques orientalistes.

Bien qu’appuyées sur des preuves tangibles de l’utilisation étendue et typiquement palestinienne de mensonges évidents lors des négociations, l’accusation de Barak devenait, dans les mains des apologistes d’Arafat, la «vilification d’un peuple entier».

Le succès de cette utilisation de ce que l’on pourrait appeler la «carte raciste» signifie que la littérature académique sur le mensonge dans la culture arabe, qui devrait couvrir les murs des bibliothèques (du moins dans les bibliothèques de nos services de renseignement) est sérieusement sous-développée. Si Oslo a échoué, c’est principalement parce que les Israéliens et les Américains ont refusé de croire que les Palestiniens leur mentaient –d’un bout à l’autre du processus.

Ignorance de la quête du califat
Pour cette raison, et bien des raisons analogues, lorsque les djihadistes sont sortis du ventre du cheval d’Oslo à la fin de septembre 2000, trop d’Occidentaux, désireux d’interpréter la violence comme le «désespoir» des combattants de la liberté dont les droits ont été niés, ont ignoré les preuves à l’effet qu’Arafat avait planifié la guerre, et ont jeté le blâme sur Israël.

En conséquence, de nombreux journalistes et spécialistes, qui ont dit à leurs auditoires occidentaux que l’Intifada al-Aqsa était un soulèvement national de libération contre l’occupation, semblaient n’avoir aucune idée (ou s’ils en avaient une, ont choisi de ne pas la révéler) que dans l’esprit de plusieurs de ces combattants l’intifada al-Aqsa était le lancement d’une nouvelle phase de djihad global apocalyptique dont l’objectif messianique était un califat mondial pour lequel la terreur des attaques suicides constituait l’arme la plus nouvelle et la plus puissante.

La réaction indifférente, voire négative, de la communauté d’experts aux premières études de la pensée apocalyptique du Hamas dans les années 1990, signifiait que la sphère publique occidentale allait devoir attendre la seconde décennie du XXIe siècle pour découvrir que le djihad global qui a créé un califat dans des parties substantielles de la Syrie et de l’Irak et qui ciblait les infidèles dans leur propre pays, était issu des mêmes visions apocalyptiques.

En fait, la plupart des observateurs ne savent toujours pas comment les djihadistes mondiaux ont exploité l’Intifada al-Aqsa pour alimenter leurs campagnes et leur recrutement.

Ainsi, au lieu de se méfier de ce nouvel impérialisme religieux violent et de condamner les opérations de martyre sauvage du djihad, les journalistes européens diffusent sa propagande de guerre antisioniste en tant que nouvelle tandis que les progressistes européens le saluent et l’encouragent.

Désinformés par les reportages des médias en avril 2002 du massacre supposé des forces de défense israéliennes à Jénine, les manifestants occidentaux marchaient dans les rues avec des simulations de ceintures explosives pour montrer leur solidarité avec les «martyrs» du Hamas.

Après la guerre du Liban en 2006, des savants comme la pacifiste Judith Butler, ont accueilli le Hamas et le Hezbollah dans la «gauche progressiste mondiale» en tant que «camarades dans la lutte anti-impérialiste».

Les progressistes malheureusement mal informés ont accueilli avec enthousiasme un djihad qui frappait alors Israël, mais qui maintenant hante le monde entier, et en particulier le monde musulman.

Les professionnels de l’information occidentaux– journalistes, experts, analystes politiques, même traducteurs– ont été tellement aveuglés par leur propre rhétorique post-coloniale, qu’ils ont été incapables d’identifier l’islam triomphaliste qui a constamment augmenté son élan vers un califat mondial dans cette génération et ce siècle.

S’ils se sont rendu compte de la présence de ces musulmans impérialistes, ils refusent d’en parler et attaquent quiconque le fait. Cette attitude prédominante a gravement endommagé la capacité de l’Occident à distinguer entre les faux modérés qui veulent réduire les infidèles du monde entier à la dhimmitude et les modérés qui veulent vraiment vivre en paix avec les non-musulmans.

Presque tout le monde conviendra que ces djihadistes qui recourent à l’épée, comme Al-Qaïda ou l’État islamique, ne sont pas des modérés.

Mais qu’en est-il de ceux qui s’en tiennent au da’wa (sommation à la conversion), et qui travaillent de manière non violente dans le même but ultime de rétablir le califat ?

Quand Yusuf Qaradawi des Frères Musulmans dit que «les États-Unis et l’Europe seront conquis non pas par le djihad, mais par le da’wa», cela fait-il de lui un modéré ? Et si le prédicateur du da’wa jouait juste au bon flic pendant que le djihadiste joue au méchant flic ? (NDT : good cop, bad cop)

Du point de vue de l’objectif millénaire d’un califat mondial, la différence entre les islamistes radicaux et les «modérés» est moins une question de vision que de calendrier, moins une question de buts différents que de tactiques différentes.

De telles connexions, cependant, ne s’inscrivent pas sur les écrans radars des professionnels de l’information qui demeurent fidèles aux réticences anti-orientalistes de Saïd. Ils nous poussent plutôt à les voir comme étant clairement distincts. Une telle approche tombe dans le piège djihadiste classique.

Lorsque les partisans du da’wa du califat dénonce les violences d’Al-Qaïda ou de l’ÉI, insistant sur le fait que ces djihadistes n’ont rien à voir avec l’islam, ils le font comme une tactique de guerre cognitive trompeuse.

Ils savent très bien que l’Islam qu’ils ont adopté est une religion de conquête. Ils ne veulent tout simplement pas que les «infidèles» occidentaux, leurs ennemis jurés et leurs cibles, reconnaissent cette hostilité implacable et impérialiste, du moins tant que le djihad mondial est militairement faible.

Ils préfèrent que les décideurs occidentaux renoncent au discours «islamophobe» de la domination mondiale et, apaisent plutôt les griefs des musulmans.

Beaucoup trop d’Occidentaux se sont conformés –en partant du discours de George W. Bush sur l’«Islam, religion de paix» juste après les attentats terroristes du 11 septembre, aux grands efforts de l’administration Obama pour ignorer, refuser et sublimer tout ce qui ressemble à de la violence islamique, jusqu’à une longue série d’universitaires qui auraient dû se hâter de corriger le dossier après la concession rhétorique de Bush et ont plutôt fait des efforts pour souligner la nature pacifique de l’Islam.

Les choses s’aggravent progressivement. L’insistance sur la similitude fondamentale de la culture arabe/musulmane et de la culture occidentale (la «grande majorité» des musulmans pacifiques, les «sociétés civiles dynamiques» en Syrie et en Irak) est passée d’une expérience thérapeutique à une formule dogmatique : la remettre en question est raciste et «islamophobe».

Ceux qui violent cette norme et qui discutent de ces choses désagréables sont punis, exclus, exilés. En effet, la crainte de l’accusation d’«islamophobie» est si forte qu’elle est venue jouer le rôle du serpent de mer qui a étranglé Laocoon quand il a essayé d’avertir les Troyens de la ruse du Cheval de bois offert par les Grecs.

Les politiciens, les policiers et les journalistes britanniques, par exemple, n’ont rien fait pour protéger des milliers de jeunes filles contre l’exploitation sexuelle pendant plus d’une décennie, afin d’éviter d’être qualifiés d’«islamophobes».

Peu d’incidents illustrent mieux cette cécité et cette incompétence auto-induites que la façon dont les professionnels de l’information occidentaux ont traité les soulèvements arabes de 2010-11. Dans une interprétation erronée des manifestations populaires, propulsées dans les médias sociaux, qui ont chassé certains dictateurs arabes de leurs perchoirs, les érudits ont interprété les soulèvements à la lumière des révolutions démocratiques européennes : le «Printemps des Nations» de 1848 et la libération de l’Europe de l’Est et de la Russie en 1989.

Rejetant systématiquement le danger que les Frères musulmans puissent prendre le pouvoir lors d’élections démocratiques, les commentateurs et les décideurs ont appelé à soutenir le mouvement islamiste, considéré par les professionnels de l’information post-coloniaux comme leur miroir, leur compagnon d’armes.

Si les «Orientalistes» pré-Saïd n’avaient (soi-disant) vu que le mauvais côté (des islamistes) par projection, après eux, les post-orientalistes ne pouvaient voir que le bien.

Cette approche politiquement correcte a même infecté les services de renseignements américains.

En février 2011, juste au moment où l’administration Obama prenait des décisions cruciales (et trompeuses) sur la façon de faire face à la crise égyptienne, James Clapper, directeur des renseignements au niveau national, a présenté une étonnante évaluation devant le Congrès (qu’il a reniée par la suite) :

«Le terme “Fraternité musulmane”… est un terme générique pour une variété de mouvements, dans le cas de l’Égypte, c’est un groupe très hétérogène, largement laïque, qui a évité la violence et a dénoncé Al Qaïda comme une perversion de l’islam ..»

Il est difficile de cataloguer les idées fausses impliquées dans cette déclaration étonnamment stupide. Elle traduit un manque de compréhension du comportement religieux triomphaliste et une application superficielle d’une terminologie inappropriée qui laisse l’observateur se demander s’il s’agissait d’un acte délibéré de désinformation ou d’un véritable produit de la collecte et de l’évaluation des renseignements des États-Unis.

Il est aussi difficile de séparer cette évaluation opérationnelle totalement désorientée de la discussion académique qui la sous-tend, largement influencée par le paradigme pénitentiel auquel Saïd exhortait l’Occident. Ici les dupes occidentaux doivent interpréter la non-violence comme un signe de modération musulmane et attribuer la violence musulmane à la provocation occidentale. Nous devons supposer que lorsque les musulmans dénoncent la violence, ils sont avec «nous» et non avec «eux», qu’ils ne partagent pas l’objectif djihadiste d’un califat mondial.

Plutôt que de combattre un ennemi aspirant à la domination mondiale, les islamistes exhortent l’Occident à s’attaquer au sentiment d’impuissance des musulmans en les habilitant.

Les résultats de cette méconnaissance aveugle de la réalité sur le terrain– le pouvoir des mouvements religieux inspirés par l’honneur ; le calcul variable de la violence selon que l’on se sent faible ou fort ; les réponses à la faiblesse perçue et à l’absence de détermination de la part des ennemis signifient que ce que les leaders de la pensée occidentale prenaient pour un printemps démocratique, qu’ils accueillaient avec enthousiasme, était en réalité le printemps de la guerre tribale et apocalyptique. Un djihad d’Oslo à grande échelle. Une guerre générationnelle, cataclysmique, «une Guerre des Trente ans» qui ne fait que commencer.

Où l’Occident est intervenu (Libye, Egypte), il a échoué, et où il n’est pas intervenu (la Syrie), la situation a explosé.

Alors que des millions de réfugiés sont jetés sur les rivages européens par ces bouleversements, les décideurs occidentaux restent captifs de leurs clichés suicidaires («nous ne pouvons simplement pas leur refuser l’entrée») qui témoignent d’une profonde ignorance de la culture arabe et musulmane, de ceux qui les font fuir, et de ceux qui ont le pouvoir, mais pas le désir de s’attaquer à cette destruction de leurs sociétés sous les coups du califat.

Conclusion
A travers la porte dérobée d’une préoccupation pour les «autres», sans réciprocité, les Occidentaux éduqués ont permis à un discours hostile, intimidant basé sur l’honneur et la honte d’occuper une grande partie de leur espace public : c’est l’«islamophobie», et non l’islamisme qui est le problème.

Les Palestiniens continuent de sauver la face et de retrouver leur honneur en salissant Israël qui, par son existence même et son succès, leur fait honte.

Pendant ce temps, de nombreux guerriers de la justice sociale, remplis de culpabilité post-coloniale et craignant le label «islamophobe», unissent leurs forces à la «brigade d’honneur» afin de pousser Israël au-delà des limites acceptables.

Dans le cadre plus large du développement civilisationnel, c’est lamentable. Il a fallu un millénaire d’efforts constants et douloureux pour que la culture occidentale apprenne à sublimer la libido dominandi de l’homme au point de créer une société tolérante à la diversité, qui résout les différends avec un discours d’équité plutôt que de violence et où l’échange est gagnant-gagnant. Les échanges à somme positive sont la norme souhaitée.

Insister, comme le font beaucoup de gauchistes, pour que cette réussite exceptionnelle soit considérée comme le mode par défaut de l’humanité, indépendamment de la mesure dans laquelle l’autre est éloigné de cet objectif précieux et de manière à exempter les ennemis de la démocratie de la responsabilité civique de l’autocritique au prix de redoubler son propre fardeau, fini par saper les libertés que la civilisation occidentale s’est données au cours des siècles.

À moins que les universitaires et les professionnels de l’information ne s’emparent et ne cultivent les champs de connaissance tels que la dynamique de la honte et de l’honneur et le triomphalisme islamiste, les Occidentaux ne pourront pas comprendre les sociétés arabes et islamiques et continueront d’accuser les critiques et non l’objectif légitime des critiques au risque de perdre leurs valeurs démocratiques et leurs intérêts nationaux.

L’incapacité de s’engager dans l’autocritique est la plus grande faiblesse des cultures basées sur l’honneur et la honte, et la capacité de le faire est la plus grande force de ceux qui croient fermement à l’intégrité.

Pourtant, maintenant, paradoxalement, l’incapacité des islamistes est devenue leur force, et notre surempressement à compenser est devenu notre faiblesse.


Présidence Trump: Attention: une ignorance peut en cacher une autre ! (Don’t know much about history: Our geographically and historically challenged leaders are emblematic of disturbing trends in American education)

8 février, 2017
superhackDon’t know much about history … Sam Cooke
Barack is one of the smartest people you will ever encounter who will deign to enter this messy thing called politics. Michelle Obama
Féru d’histoire, je sais aussi la dette que la civilisation doit à l’islam. Barack Hussein Obama
Le Saint Coran nous enseigne que quiconque tue un innocent tue l’humanité tout entière, et que quiconque sauve quelqu’un, sauve l’humanité tout entière. Barack Hussein Obama
Nous cherchons à ouvrir un nouveau chemin en direction du monde musulman, fondé sur l’intérêt mutuel et le respect mutuel. (…) Nous sommes une nation de chrétiens, de musulmans, de juifs, d’hindous et de non croyants. Barack Hussein Obama (discours d’investiture, le 20 janvier 2009)
Une nation de musulmans, de chrétiens et de juifs … Barack Hussein Obama (Entretien à la télévision saoudienne Al-Arabiya, 27 janvier, 2009)
Nous exprimerons notre appréciation profonde de la foi musulmane qui a tant fait au long des siècles pour améliorer le monde, y compris mon propre pays. Barack Hussein Obama (Ankara, avril 2009)
Les Etats-Unis et le monde occidental doivent apprendre à mieux connaître l’islam. D’ailleurs, si l’on compte le nombre d’Américains musulmans, on voit que les Etats-Unis sont l’un des plus grands pays musulmans de la planète. Barack Hussein Obama (entretien pour Canal +, le 2 juin 2009)
Salamm aleïkoum (…) Comme le dit le Saint Coran, « Crains Dieu et dis toujours la vérité ». (…) Je suis chrétien, mais mon père était issu d’une famille kényane qui compte des générations de musulmans. Enfant, j’ai passé plusieurs années en Indonésie où j’ai entendu l’appel à la prière (azan) à l’aube et au crépuscule. Jeune homme, j’ai travaillé dans des quartiers de Chicago où j’ai côtoyé beaucoup de gens qui trouvaient la dignité et la paix dans leur foi musulmane. Barack Hussein Obama (Prêche du Caire)
If we don’t deepen our ports all along the Gulf — places like Charleston, South Carolina; or Savannah, Georgia; or Jacksonville, Florida . . .  Barack Hussein Obama
It is just wonderful to be back in Oregon, and over the last 15 months we’ve traveled to every corner of the United States. I’ve now been in fifty …. seven states? I think one left to go. One left to go. Alaska and Hawaii, I was not allowed to go to even though I really wanted to visit but my staff would not justify it. Barack Hussein Obama
The average reporter we talk to is 27 years old, and their only reporting experience consists of being around political campaigns. That’s a sea change. They literally know nothing. (…) We created an echo chamber. They were saying things that validated what we had given them to say. Ben Rhodes (conseiller-adjoint à la sécurité extérieure d’Obama)
It is with a heavy heart and somber mind that we remember and honor the victims, survivors, heroes of the Holocaust. It is impossible to fully fathom the depravity and horror inflicted on innocent people by Nazi terror. Yet, we know that in the darkest hours of humanity, light shines the brightest.‎ As we remember those who died, we are deeply grateful to those who risked their lives to save the innocent. In the name of the perished, I pledge to do everything in my power throughout my Presidency, and my life, to ensure that the forces of evil never again defeat the powers of good. Together, we will make love and tolerance prevalent throughout the world. Donald Trump
Despite what the media reports, we are an incredibly inclusive group and we took into account all of those who suffered. Spokesperson Hope Hicks
 I mean, everyone’s suffering in the Holocaust including obviously all of the Jewish people affected, and the miserable genocide that occurred is something that we consider to be extraordinarily sad and something that can never be forgotten. White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus
There were indeed millions of innocent people whom the Nazis killed in many horrific ways, some in the course of the war and some because the Germans perceived them—however deluded their perception—to pose a threat to their rule. They suffered terribly. But that was not the Holocaust. Deborah Lipstadt
After the Holocaust took away so much from the Jews, we must not take the Holocaust itself away from the Jews. Those victims were murdered not merely because they were different. They were murdered not merely because they were an ‘other.’ They were murdered because they were Jews. Ron Dermer, the Israeli ambassador to the United States
Je le respecte, mais «ça ne veut pas dire que je vais m’entendre avec lui.  C’est un leader dans son pays, et je pense qu’il vaut mieux s’entendre avec la Russie que l’inverse. (…) Beaucoup de tueurs, beaucoup de tueurs. Pensez-vous que notre pays soit si innocent? Donald Trump
Je ne pense pas qu’il y ait aucune équivalence entre la manière dont les Russes se comportent et la manière dont les États-Unis se comportent. C’est un ancien du KGB, un voyou, élu d’une manière que beaucoup de gens ne trouvent pas crédible.  Mitch McConnell (chef de file des républicains au Sénat)
Quand est-ce qu’un activiste démocrate a été empoisonné par le parti Républicain, ou vice-versa? Nous ne sommes pas comme Poutine. Marc Rubio (sénateur républicain de Floride)
Dans son « parler vrai » à l’adresse du monde arabe, après avoir commencé par prétendre mensongèrement que, comme l’Amérique, l’islam cultivait « la justice et le progrès, la tolérance et la dignité de tout être humain », Obama a été sciemment et fondamentalement malhonnête. Par cette malhonnêteté, il a entrepris de placer le monde musulman sur un pied d’égalité morale avec le monde libre. (…) Malheureusement, une analyse attentive de ses déclarations montre qu’Obama adopte bel et bien le point de vue des Arabes, selon lequel Israël serait un élément étranger – et donc injustifiable – dans le monde arabe. En réalité, loin de dénoncer leur refus d’accepter Israël, Obama le légitime. L’argument fondamental que les Arabes utilisent contre Israël est que la seule raison de sa création aurait été d’apaiser la mauvaise conscience des Européens après la Shoah. Selon leurs dires, les Juifs n’auraient aucun droit sur la Terre d’Israël du point de vue légal, historique et moral. Or, cet argument est complètement faux ». (…) « La communauté internationale a reconnu les droits légaux, historiques et moraux du peuple juif sur la Terre d’Israël bien avant que quiconque ait jamais entendu parler d’Adolf Hitler. En 1922, la Société des Nations avait mandaté la « reconstitution » – et non la création – du foyer national juif sur la Terre d’Israël dans ses frontières historiques sur les deux rives du Jourdain. Cependant, dans ce qu’il présentait lui-même comme un exemple de parler-vrai, Obama a ignoré cette vérité fondamentale au profit du mensonge arabe. Il a donné du crédit à son mensonge en déclarant, hors de propos, que « l’aspiration à un territoire juif est ancrée dans un passé tragique ». Il a ensuite lié de façon explicite la création de l’État d’Israël à la Shoah, en formulant une leçon d’histoire intéressée sur le génocide des Juifs d’Europe. Pire encore que son aveuglement délibéré vis-à-vis des justifications historiques, légales et morales de la renaissance d’Israël, il y a la manière dont Obama a évoqué Israël même. De façon odieuse et mensongère, Obama a allègrement comparé la manière dont Israël traite les Palestiniens à celle dont les esclavagistes blancs, en Amérique, traitaient leurs esclaves noirs. De même, il a assimilé les terroristes palestiniens à la catégorie, moralement pure, des esclaves. De façon plus ignoble encore, en utilisant le terme de « résistance », euphémisme arabe pour désigner le terrorisme palestinien, Obama a conféré à celui-ci la grandeur morale des révoltes des esclaves et du mouvement des droits civiques. Caroline Glick (Haaretz)
Les squelettes qui encombrent tous les placards d’Obama n’ont jamais été dérangés ni examinés par la presse dite Mainstream, c’est-à-dire la presse « honorable ». Alors qu’un comportement systématique et permanent de coopération avec l’extrême-gauche raciste, violente et fraudeuse, avec les plus extrêmes représentants du Black Power, apôtres d’un fascisme noir, a été démontré par des enquêtes répétées, la grande presse, les networks de télévision sont restés d’un silence de plomb. Sa carrière politique a-t-elle été lancée par le terroriste non repenti Bill Ayers, du Weather Underground, équivalent américain d’Action directe ? Obama ment sans vergogne. A propos d’Ayers : « c’est un type qui habite dans ma rue », alors que l’autre l’a fait entrer au conseil d’une fondation où il siège, et qui finance toutes sortes d’organisations louches mais situées à l’extrême-gauche, dont ACORN, aujourd’hui inculpée de fraude électorale dans dix Etats de l’Union. La presse ne pipe mot. Alors que sa carrière politique a été couvée et promue par la sordide organisation démocrate de Chicago, machine à tricher et à voler, qui fait pâlir la Corse, Marseille et Naples réunies, qu’il y a été financé par l’escroc syrien Antoine Rezko, actuellement pensionnaire des prisons fédérales, on n’en trouve pas un mot dans les media. (…) De même, les networks de télévision procèdent par montage pour présenter un Obama clair, clairvoyant, décidé, alors qu’il bafouille et hésite quand le téléprompteur lui manque, ou qu’il n’est pas en situation de réciter les talking points (les paragraphes pondus par son équipe). Ce qui donne des discours et des réponses pleins de « mots codes » et vides de contenu ; comme il a remarquablement assimilé l’art tout washingtonien de réciter les dossiers, un peu à la façon énarque, il peut prétendre savoir de quoi il parle, alors qu’en matière de politique étrangère, il a l’ignorance crasse du novice. On me dira : vous exagérez ! Il est brillant diplômé de Harvard ! A quoi je ferai remarquer qu’un universitaire décrit comme de grande classe devrait avoir écrit quelques articles de grande revue de droit qui auront fait date. Ici, rien, le désert. Qu’on se souvienne des présidentielles de 2000 – Bush avait été un étudiant pas très assidu, quoique diplômé de la prestigieuse université de Yale ; mais il avait été bambocheur et buveur – la grande presse faisait florès du moindre verre de whisky jamais avalé. Aujourd’hui, elle passe au microscope le moindre pas de la famille Palin, et s’acharne à trouver tous les poux du monde dans la tête du gouverneur de l’Alaska. Les media se sont transformées en une machine à faire élire Obama, qui est donc à la fois le candidat du Parti Démocrate et du Parti de la presse. Laurent Murawiec
Obama demande pardon pour les faits et gestes de l’Amérique, son passé, son présent et le reste, il s’excuse de tout. Les relations dégradées avec la Russie, le manque de respect pour l’Islam, les mauvais rapports avec l’Iran, les bisbilles avec l’Europe, le manque d’adulation pour Fidel Castro, tout lui est bon pour battre la coulpe de l’Amérique. Plus encore, il célèbre la contribution (totalement inexistante) de l’Islam à l’essor de l’Amérique, et il se fend d’une révérence au sanglant et sectaire roi d’Arabie, l’Abdullah de la haine. Il annule la ceinture anti-missiles sise en Alaska et propose un désarmement nucléaire inutile. (…) Plus encore, cette déplorable Amérique a semé le désordre et le mal partout dans le monde. Au lieu de collaborer multilatéralement avec tous, d’œuvrer au bien commun avec Poutine, Chavez, Ahmadinejad, Saddam Hussein, Bachir al-Assad, et Cie, l’insupportable Bush en a fait des ennemis. (…) Il n’y a pas d’ennemis, il n’y a que des malentendus. Il ne peut y avoir d’affrontements, seulement des clarifications. Laurent Murawiec
Si vous êtes Israéliens, Obama vous laisse le choix du costume : si l’uniforme SS vous déplait, vous avez celui d’esclavagiste faisant claquer son fouet dans une plantation de la banlieue d’Atlanta en 1850, ou celui de policier au service de la discrimination du côté de Soweto. Joli choix, non? Guy Millière
Obama (…) dit que Thomas Jefferson était un lecteur du Coran, mais omet de rappeler, ce que tout lecteur de la correspondance de Jefferson sait, que si celui qui fut le troisième Président des Etats-Unis a lu le Coran, c’était pour comprendre la mentalité de gens qui exerçaient des actes de prédation violente contre des navires marchands américains. Obama cite par ailleurs une phrase de John Adams disant que ‘les Etats-Unis sont en paix’ avec le monde musulman, mais il omet de signaler que la phrase de John Adams figure dans un accord de paix qui suit une action de guerre menée par les Etats-Unis aux fins que les actes de prédation susdits cessent. (…) Et je passe sur les propos concernant l’invention de l’algèbre, du compas, de la boussole, de l’imprimerie de la médecine moderne, par des musulmans. Obama, ou son téléprompteur, n’ont jamais dû ouvrir un livre d’histoire des sciences et des techniques. (..) Je garde le meilleur pour la fin: ‘tout au long de l’histoire, l’islam a démontré, par les paroles et par les actes, les possibilités de la tolérance religieuse et de l’égalité raciale’. (…) Dire une telle phrase en gardant son sérieux implique un talent certain dans l’aptitude à dire n’importe quoi en gardant son sérieux. Enfin, et c’est le plus grave, c’est même si grave que là, on n’est plus dans le douteux, mais dans le répugnant, Obama pousse le relativisme moral et les comparaisons bancales jusqu’à un degré où il frôle le révisionnisme qu’il dénonce par ailleurs. Oser comparer la destruction des Juifs d’Europe par le régime nazi et ses complices au sort subi par le ‘peuple palestinien’ depuis soixante années montre, qu’à force d’écouter des gens comme Jeremiah Wright, il reste des salissures dans les neurones ». Guy Millière
Le réel, c’est un pays en proie à la plus grave menace d’éclatement social et culturel depuis les années 30. Le réel, c’est une explosion sans précédent des inégalités. Le réel, c’est l’abîme qui sépare les privilégiés et les élites mondialisées. Le réel, ce sont des usines fermées, des entreprises délocalisées, des emplois raréfiés, des salariés déprimés, et des électeurs frustrés. Le réel, c’est une immigration massive (11 millions de clandestins sans doits et sous-payés !) encouragée par le patronat pour accentuer le dumping social et la guerre des pauvres contre les pauvres. Le réel, c’est le bide de l’ère Obama à l’exception de l’Obamacare, qui a joué de son image pour faire oublier un bilan se ramenant à un grand vide. Le réel, c’est le rejet de la famille Clinton, considérée à tort ou à raison comme le symbole de l’entre-soi, de l’arrivisme et du copinage. Le réel, enfin, c’est un candidat qui a surfé sur toute ces frustrations pour l’emporter alors qu’il est lui-même le représentant type de l’Amérique du fric. Clinton, un discours convenu et rejeté. Le réel, c’est un Donald Trump que l’on a réduit à ses propres outrances – ce qui n’est guère compliqué – en oubliant que sur nombre de sujets (la folie du libre-échange, les délocalisations, la misère ouvrière, le rejet de l’élite), il a su développer une démagogie d’autant plus efficace qu’en face, Hillary Clinton s’est contentée de reprendre un discours convenu, attendu et rejeté. Cette dernière est même allée jusqu’à traiter les électeurs de Trump de personnes « pitoyables », étalant ainsi un mépris de classe qui n’a sans doute pas été pour rien dans sa déroute. Et voilà comment on en est arrivé à un résultat que les experts en tout et en rien n’ont pas vu venir, car eux-mêmes vivent dans une bulle. Tout comme ils ont été incapables de prévoir le Brexit, ou quelques années plus tôt la victoire du non au traité constitutionnel européen en 2005, il était inconcevable à leurs yeux qu’un homme aussi détestable que Donald Trump puisse l’emporter. Toutes proportions gardées, c’est la même cécité qui les conduit à ne rien comprendre au phénomène Le Pen en France, lequel n’est pas sans analogie avec l’effet Trump. Face à la colère qui conduit nombre de citoyens déboussolés à se tourner vers le FN, ils se contentent encore trop souvent de condamnations morales, sans prendre en compte un mouvement de fond qui se joue des barrières de la diabolisation. Mieux vaudrait s’en apercevoir avant qu’il ne soit trop tard. Marianne
Donald Trump, éreinté par les prêcheurs d’amour, en devient estimable. La gauche morale, qui refuse de se dire vaincue, dévoile l’intolérance qu’elle dissimulait du temps de sa domination. Cette semaine, les manifestations anti-Trump se succèdent à Washington, où le président prête serment ce vendredi. La presse ne cache rien de la répulsion que lui inspire celui qui a gagné en lui tournant le dos. Les artistes de variétés se glorifient de ne vouloir chanter pour lui. Des stylistes de mode font savoir qu’ils n’habilleront pas la First Lady, Melania. Des peintres demandent à Ivanka, la fille, de décrocher leurs œuvres de son appartement. Au pays de la démocratie, le choix du peuple et des grands électeurs est refusé par une caste convaincue de sa supériorité. (…) Le sectarisme des prétendus bienveillants montre leur pharisaïsme. Les masques n’ont pas fini de tomber. C’est un monde ancien qu’enterre Trump à la Maison-Blanche : celui des bons sentiments étalés et des larmes furtives, alibis des lâchetés. La vulgarité du cow-boy mégalomane et son expression brutale ne suffisent pas à le disqualifier. D’autant que ses procureurs se ridiculisent. Le mondialiste George Soros, qui avait parié sur la frayeur des marchés, aurait perdu près d’un milliard de dollars. En quelques tweets, Trump a obtenu que Ford annule un projet d’usine au Mexique au profit d’un investissement dans le Michigan. Fiat-Chrystler va également rapatrier une production de véhicules. General Motors promet d’investir un milliard de dollars. Carrier (climatiseurs) va sauver 1 000 postes. Amazon annonce 100 000 emplois et Walmart 10 000. L’effet Trump s’est déjà mis en branle. L’éléphant va casser de la porcelaine. Mais la révolution des œillères, ôtées grâce à lui, est à ce prix. Il va être difficile, pour les orphelins de l’obamania et les pandores du bien-pensisme, de faire barrage à l’insurrection populaire qui s’exprime, faute de mieux, derrière ce personnage instinctif. Ivan Rioufol
Iran now stands at the apex of an arc of influence stretching from Tehran to the Mediterranean, from the borders of NATO to the borders of Israel and along the southern tip of the Arabian Peninsula. It commands the loyalties of tens of thousands in allied militias and proxy armies that are fighting on the front lines in Syria, Iraq and Yemen with armored vehicles, tanks and heavy weapons. They have been joined by thousands of members of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps, Iran’s most prestigious military wing, who have acquired meaningful battlefield experience in the process. For the first time in its history, the Institute for the Study of War noted in a report last week, Iran has developed the capacity to project conventional military force for hundreds of miles beyond its borders. “This capability, which very few states in the world have, will fundamentally alter the strategic calculus and balance of power within the Middle East,” the institute said. America’s Sunni Arab allies, who blame the Obama administration’s hesitancy for Iran’s expanded powers, are relishing the prospect of a more confrontational U.S. approach. Any misgivings they may have had about Trump’s anti-Muslim rhetoric have been dwarfed by their enthusiasm for an American president they believe will push back against Iran. The Washington Post
Now that Obama is out of office, the Washington Post is beginning to look at the consequences of his policies. One of the biggest: Iran is now a regional superpower, but still as hostile to the U.S. and its allies as ever…. The American interest
Donald Trump was not my favorite in the primaries; but once he was likely to win the nomination (April 2016), I simply went to his website and collated his positions with Hillary Clinton’s on sanctuary cities, illegal immigration, defense, foreign policy, taxes, regulation, energy development, the EPA, the 2nd Amendment, the wall, school choice, and a host of other issues. The comparison supported my suspicions that he was more conservative and would not lose the Supreme Court for a generation to progressive massaging of the law, which was inevitable under Hillary Clinton. I think his appointments, Supreme Court pick, and executive orders have supported that belief that he is far more conservative than Hillary Clinton’s agendas. Oh, I came to another conclusion: I initially thought Trump might be the only nominee who would lose to Hillary Clinton; soon, however, I began to believe that he might be the only one who could beat her, given he was the first Republican to campaign in the Lee Atwater-style of 1988 and actually fought back against the WikiLeaks nexus of the media and Democratic Party. As for his sometimes reckless tweets and outbursts, I calibrated three variables: 1) Were they any different from past presidents’? In fact, they were—but not to a degree that I thought his behavior endangered the republic. For all his antics at rallies, he did not yet say “punish our enemies” or urge his supporters to take a gun to a knife fight or to get in “their faces.” His silliness was similar to Joe Biden’s (“put you all in chains,” or his belief that FDR went on TV to the nation in 1929). Yes, I wish Trump was more sober and judicious, but then again we have had very unsober presidents and vice presidents in the past (LBJ showed the nation his surgery scars and reportedly exposed himself during a meeting). FDR carried on an affair while president. No need to mention JFK’s nocturnal romps. So far Trump is not using the Oval Office bathroom for trysts with subordinate interns. Much of Trump’s oafishness is media created and reflects a bit of class disdain. We all need, however, to watch every president and call out crudity when it occurs. (I am still not happy with the strained explanations of his jerky movements as not an affront to a disabled person.) 2) Did the media play a role in the demonization of Trump? I think it did. In the last few weeks we were told falsely that his lawyer went to Prague to cut a deal with the Russians, that he removed the bust of Martin Luther King from the Oval Office, and that he engaged in sexual debaucheries in Moscow—all absolutely not true. Who would trust the media after all that? So much of the hysteria is driven by a furious media that was not so furious when Obama signed executive orders circumventing the law or the Clintons ran a veritable shake-down operation (where is it now?) at the Clinton Foundation. Not wanting to take refugees from Australia that had sent back to sea arriving migrants and had them deposited them in camps in nearby islands is not exactly an extreme position (by liberal standards, Australia is the illiberal actor, not Trump). 3) Do Trump’s episodic outbursts threaten his agendas? I don’t know, but the media will ensure that they will, if he is not more circumspect. So far he is by design creating chaos and has befuddled his opponents, but I think in the long run he must limit his exposure to gratuitous attacks by curbing his tweets—and I have written just that in the past. Trump’s agenda is fine; his pushback against an unhinged Left and biased media is healthy, but he must economize his outbursts given that the strategy of his opponents is to nick him daily in hopes of an aggregate bleed. We have four more years and he needs to conserve his strength and stamina and not get sidelined with spats with Merle Streep or Arnold at the Apprentice. Remember, Obama was the revolution that sought to remake the country; the reaction to it is pushing the country back to the center—which appears now revolutionary. Trump’s stances on energy development, immigration, and foreign policy are not that much different from Bill Clinton’s or George H.W. Bush’s. They seem revolutionary because again he is correcting a revolution. Who had ever dreamed in 1995 of a sanctuary city, emulating the nullification policies of the Old Confederacy? Victor Davis Hanson
President Obama has a habit of asserting strategic nonsense with such certainty that it is at times embarrassing and frightening. Nowhere is that more evident than in his rhetoric about the Middle East. (…) in July 2015, Obama claimed that the now growing ISIS threat could not be addressed through force of arms, assuring the world that “Ideologies are not defeated with guns, they are defeated by better ideas.” Such a generic assertion seems historically preposterous. The defeat of German Nazism, Italian fascism, and Japanese militarism was not accomplished by Anglo-American rhetoric on freedom. What stopped the growth of Soviet-style global communism during the Cold War were both armed interventions such as the Korean War and real threats to use force such as during the Berlin Airlift and Cuban Missile Crisis— along with Ronald Reagan’s resoluteness backed by a military buildup that restored credible Western military deterrence. In contrast, Obama apparently believes that strategic threats are not checked with tough diplomacy backed by military alliances, balances of power, and military deterrence, much less by speaking softly and carrying a big stick. Rather, crises are resolved by ironing out mostly Western-inspired misunderstandings and going back on heat-of-the moment, ad hoc issued deadlines, red lines, and step-over lines, whether to the Iranian theocracy, Vladimir Putin, or Bashar Assad. Sometimes the administration’s faith in Western social progressivism is offered to persuade an Iran or Cuba that they have missed the arc of Westernized history—and must get back on the right side of the past by loosening the reins of their respective police states. Obama believes that engagement with Iran in non-proliferation talks—which have so far given up on prior Western insistences on third-party, out of the country enrichment, on-site inspections, and kick-back sanctions—will inevitably ensure that Iran becomes “a successful regional power.” That higher profile of the theocracy apparently is a good thing for the Middle East and our allies like Israel and the Gulf states.  (…) In his February 2, 2015 outline of anti-ISIS strategy—itself an update of an earlier September 2014 strategic précis—Obama again insisted that “one of the best antidotes to the hateful ideologies that try to recruit and radicalize people to violent extremism is our own example as diverse and tolerant societies that welcome the contributions of all people, including people of all faiths.” The idea, a naïve one, is that because we welcome mosques on our diverse and tolerant soil, ISIS will take note and welcome Christian churches. One of Obama’s former State Department advisors, Georgetown law professor Rosa Brooks, recently amplified that reductionist confidence in the curative power of Western progressivism. She urged Americans to tweet ISIS, which, like Iran, habitually executes homosexuals. Brooks hoped that Americans would pass on stories about and photos of the Supreme Court’s recent embrace of gay marriage: “Do you want to fight the Islamic State and the forces of Islamic extremist terrorism? I’ll tell you the best way to send a message to those masked gunmen in Iraq and Syria and to everyone else who gains power by sowing violence and fear. Just keep posting that second set of images [photos of American gays and their supporters celebrating the Supreme Court decision]. Post them on Facebook and Twitter and Reddit and in comments all over the Internet. Send them to your friends and your family. Send them to your pen pal in France and your old roommate in Tunisia. Send them to strangers.” Such zesty confidence in the redemptive power of Western moral superiority recalls First Lady Michelle Obama’s efforts to persusade the murderous Boko Haram to return kidnapped Nigerian preteen girls. Ms. Obama appealed to Boko Haram on the basis of shared empathy and universal parental instincts. (“In these girls, Barack and I see our own daughters. We see their hopes, their dreams and we can only imagine the anguish their parents are feeling right now.”) Ms. Obama then fortified her message with a photo of her holding up a sign with the hash-tag #BringBackOurGirls. Vladimir Putin’s Russia has added Crimea and Eastern Ukraine to his earlier acquisitions in Georgia. He is most likely eyeing the Baltic States next. China is creating new strategic realities in the Pacific, in which Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and the Philippines will eventually either be forced to acquiesce or to seek their own nuclear deterrent. The Middle East has imploded. Much of North Africa is becoming a Mogadishu-like wasteland. The assorted theocrats, terrorists, dictators, and tribalists express little fear of or respect for the U.S. They believe that the Obama administration does not know much nor cares about foreign affairs. They may be right in their cynicism. A president who does not consider chlorine gas a chemical weapon could conceivably believe that the Americans once liberated Auschwitz, that the Austrians speak an Austrian language, and that the Falklands are known in Latin America as the Maldives. Both friends and enemies assume that what Obama or his administration says today will be either rendered irrelevant or denied tomorrow. Iraq at one point was trumpeted by Vice President Joe Biden as the administration’s probable “greatest achievement.” Obama declared that Iraq was a “stable and self-reliant” country in no need of American peacekeepers after 2011. Yanking all Americans out of Iraq in 2011 was solely a short-term political decision designed as a 2012 reelection talking point. The American departure had nothing to do with a disinterested assessment of the long-term security of the still shaky Iraqi consensual government. When Senator Obama damned the invasion of Iraq in 2003; when he claimed in 2004 that he had no policy differences with the Bush administration on Iraq; when he declared in 2007 that the surge would fail; when he said in 2008 as a presidential candidate that he wanted all U.S. troops brought home; when he opined as President in 2011 that the country was stable and self-reliant; when he assured the world in 2014 that it was not threatened by ISIS; and when in 2015 he sent troops back into an imploding Iraq—all of these decisions hinged on perceived public opinion, not empirical assessments of the state of Iraq itself. The near destruction of Iraq and the rise of ISIS were the logical dividends of a decade of politicized ambiguity. After six years, even non-Americans have caught on that the more Obama flip-flops on Iraq, deprecates an enemy, or ignores Syrian redlines, the less likely American arms will ever be used and assurances honored. The world is going to become an even scarier place in the next two years. The problem is not just that our enemies do not believe our President, but rather that they no longer even listen to him. Victor Davis Hanson
President Obama (…) believes history follows some predetermined course, as if things always get better on their own. Obama often praises those he pronounces to be on the “right side of history.” He also chastises others for being on the “wrong side of history” — as if evil is vanished and the good thrives on autopilot. When in 2009 millions of Iranians took to the streets to protest the thuggish theocracy, they wanted immediate U.S. support. Instead, Obama belatedly offered them banalities suggesting that in the end, they would end up “on the right side of history.” Iranian reformers may indeed end up there, but it will not be because of some righteous inanimate force of history, or the prognostications of Barack Obama. Obama often parrots Martin Luther King Jr.’s phrase about the arc of the moral universe bending toward justice. But King used that metaphor as an incentive to act, not as reassurance that matters will follow an inevitably positive course. Another of Obama’s historical refrains is his frequent sermon about behavior that doesn’t belong in the 21st century. At various times he has lectured that the barbarous aggression of Vladimir Putin or the Islamic State has no place in our century and will “ultimately fail” — as if we are all now sophisticates of an age that has at last transcended retrograde brutality and savagery. In Obama’s hazy sense of the end of history, things always must get better in the manner that updated models of iPhones and iPads are glitzier than the last. In fact, history is morally cyclical. Even technological progress is ethically neutral. It is a way either to bring more good things to more people or to facilitate evil all that much more quickly and effectively. In the viciously modern 20th century — when more lives may have been lost to war than in all prior centuries combined — some 6 million Jews were put to death through high technology in a way well beyond the savagery of Attila the Hun or Tamerlane. Beheading in the Islamic world is as common in the 21st century as it was in the eighth century — and as it will probably be in the 22nd. The carnage of the Somme and Dresden trumped anything that the Greeks, Romans, Franks, Turks, or Venetians could have imagined. (…) What explains Obama’s confusion? A lack of knowledge of basic history explains a lot. (…) Obama once praised the city of Cordoba as part of a proud Islamic tradition of tolerance during the brutal Spanish Inquisition — forgetting that by the beginning of the Inquisition an almost exclusively Christian Cordoba had few Muslims left. (…) A Pollyannaish belief in historical predetermination seems to substitute for action. If Obama believes that evil should be absent in the 21st century, or that the arc of the moral universe must always bend toward justice, or that being on the wrong side of history has consequences, then he may think inanimate forces can take care of things as we need merely watch. In truth, history is messier. Unfortunately, only force will stop seventh-century monsters like the Islamic State from killing thousands more innocents. Obama may think that reminding Putin that he is now in the 21st century will so embarrass the dictator that he will back off from Ukraine. But the brutish Putin may think that not being labeled a 21st-century civilized sophisticate is a compliment. In 1935, French foreign minister Pierre Laval warned Joseph Stalin that the Pope would admonish him to go easy on Catholics — as if such moral lectures worked in the supposedly civilized 20th century. Stalin quickly disabused Laval of that naiveté. “The Pope?” Stalin asked, “How many divisions has he got?” There is little evidence that human nature has changed over the centuries, despite massive government efforts to make us think and act nicer. What drives Putin, Boko Haram, or ISIS are the same age-old passions, fears, and sense of honor that over the centuries also moved Genghis Khan, the Sudanese Mahdists, and the Barbary pirates. Obama’s naive belief in predetermined history — especially when his facts are often wrong — is a poor substitute for concrete moral action. Victor Davis Hanson
Let’s hope that the era of ‘lead from behind’ and violated red lines is over. For eight years, the Obama administration misjudged Vladimir Putin’s Russia, as it misjudged most of the Middle East, China, and the rest of the world as well. Obama got wise to Russia only when Putin imperiled not just U.S. strategic interests and government records but also supposedly went so far as to tamper with sacrosanct Democratic-party secrets, thereby endangering the legacy of Barack Obama. Putin was probably bewildered by Obama’s media-driven and belated concern, given that the Russians, like the Chinese, had in the past hacked U.S. government documents that were far more sensitive than the information it may have mined and leaked in 2016 — and they received nothing but an occasional Obama “cut it out” whine. Neurotic passive-aggression doesn’t merely bother the Russians; it apparently incites and emboldens them. (…) Russia had once lost a million civilians at the siege of Leningrad when Hitler’s Army Group North raced through the Baltic States (picking up volunteers as it went) and met up with the Finns. At Sevastopol, General Erich von Manstein’s Eleventh Army may well have inflicted 100,000 Russian Crimean casualties in a successful but nihilistic effort to take and nearly destroy the fortress. The Kiev Pocket and destruction of the Southwestern Front of the Red Army in the Ukraine in September 1941 (700,000 Russians killed, captured, or missing) may have been the largest encirclement and mass destruction of an army in military history. For Putin, these are not ancient events but rather proof of why former Soviet bloodlands were as much Russian as Puerto Rico was considered American. We find such reasoning tortured, given Ukrainian and Crimean desires to be free; Putin insists that Russian ghosts still flitter over such hallowed ground. Reconstruction of Putin’s mindset is not justification for his domestic thuggery or foreign expansionism at the expense of free peoples. But it does remind us that he is particularly ill-suited to listen to pat lectures from American sermonizers whose unwillingness to rely on force to back up their sanctimony is as extreme as their military assets are overwhelming. Putin would probably be less provoked by a warning from someone deemed strong than he would be by obsequious outreach from someone considered weak. There were areas where Obama might have sought out Putin in ways advantageous to the U.S., such as wooing him away from Iran or playing him off against China or lining him up against North Korea. But ironically, Obama was probably more interested in inflating the Persian and Shiite regional profile than was Putin himself. Putin would probably be less provoked by a warning from someone deemed strong than he would be by obsequious outreach from someone considered weak. If Obama wished to invite Putin into the Middle East, then at least he might have made an effort to align him with Israel, the Gulf States, Egypt, and Jordan, in pursuit of their shared goal of wiping out radical Islamic terrorism. In the process, these powers might have grown increasingly hostile to Syria, Hezbollah, and Iran. But Obama was probably more anti-Israeli than Putin, and he also disliked the moderate Sunni autocracies more than Putin himself did. As far as China, Putin was delighted that Obama treated Chinese aggression in the Spratly Islands as Obama had treated his own in Ukraine: creased-brow angst about bad behavior followed by indifference. The irony of the failed reset was that in comparative terms the U.S. — given its newfound fossil-fuel wealth and energy independence, the rapid implosion of the European Union, and its continuing technological superiority — should have been in an unusually strong position as the leader of the West. Unhinged nuclear proliferation, such as in Pakistan and North Korea and soon in Iran, is always more of a long-term threat to a proximate Russia than to a distant America. And Russia’s unassimilated and much larger Muslim population is always a far more existential threat to Moscow than even radical Islamic terrorism is at home to the U.S. In other words, there were realist avenues for cooperation that hinged on a strong and nationalist U.S. clearly delineating areas where cooperation benefitted both countries (and the world). Other spheres in which there could be no American–Russian consensus could by default have been left to sort themselves out in a may-the-best-man-win fashion, hopefully peaceably. Such détente would have worked only if Obama had forgone all the arc-of-history speechifying and the adolescent putdowns, meant to project strength in the absence of quiet toughness. Let us hope that Donald Trump, Rex Tillerson, and Jim Mattis know this and thus keep mostly silent, remind Putin privately (without trashing a former president) that the aberrant age of Obama is over, carry huge sticks, work with Putin where and when it is in our interest, acknowledge his help, seek to thwart common enemies — and quietly find ways to utilize overwhelming American military and economic strength to discourage him from doing something unwise for both countries. Victor Davis Hanson
In reference to the Falkland Islands, President Obama called them the Maldives — islands southwest of India — apparently in a botched effort to use the Argentine-preferred “Malvinas.” The two island groups may sound somewhat alike, but they are continents apart. Again, without basic geographical knowledge, the president’s commentary on the Falklands is rendered superficial. When in the state of Hawaii, Obama announced that he was in “Asia.” He lamented that the U.S. Army’s Arabic-language translators assigned to Iraq could better be used in Afghanistan, failing to recognize that Arabic isn’t the language of Afghanistan. And he also apparently thought Austrians speak a language other than German. The president’s geographical illiteracy is a symptom of the nation’s growing ignorance of once-essential subjects such as geography and history. The former is not taught any more as a required subject in many of our schools and colleges. The latter has often been redefined as race, class, and gender oppression so as to score melodramatic points in the present rather than to learn from the tragedy of the past. The president in his 2009 Cairo speech credited the European Renaissance and Enlightenment to Islam’s “light of learning” — an exaggeration if not an outright untruth on both counts. Closer to home, the president claimed in 2011 that Texas had historically been Republican — while in reality it was a mostly Jim Crow Democratic state for over a century. Republicans started consistently carrying Texas only after 1980. Recently, Obama claimed that 20th-century Communist strongman Ho Chi Minh “was actually inspired by the U.S. Declaration of Independence and Constitution, and the words of Thomas Jefferson.” That pop assertion is improbable, given that Ho systematically liquidated his opponents, slaughtered thousands in land-redistribution schemes, and brooked no dissent. Even more ahistorical was Vice President Joe Biden’s suggestion that George W. Bush should have gone on television in 2008 to address the nation as President Roosevelt had done in 1929 — a time when there was neither a President Roosevelt nor televisions available for purchase. In 2011, a White House press kit confused Wyoming with Colorado — apparently because they’re both rectangular-shaped states out West. Our geographically and historically challenged leaders are emblematic of disturbing trends in American education that include a similar erosion in grammar, English composition, and basic math skills. The controversial Lois Lerner, a senior official at the IRS — an agency whose stock in trade is numbers — claimed that she was “not good at math” when she admitted that she did not know that one-fourth of 300 is 75.  In the zero-sum game of the education curriculum, each newly added therapeutic discipline eliminated an old classical one. The result is that if Americans emote more and have more politically correct thoughts on the environment, race, class, and gender, they are less able to advance their beliefs through fact-based knowledge. Despite supposedly tough new standards and vast investments, about 56 percent of students in recent California public-school tests did not perform up to their grade levels in English. Only about half met their grade levels in math. A degree from our most prestigious American university is no guarantee a graduate holding such a credential will know the number of states or the location of Savannah. If we wonder why the Ivy League–trained Obama seems confused about where cities, countries, and continents are, we might remember that all but one Ivy League university eliminated their geography departments years ago. As a rule now, when our leaders allude to a place or an event in the past, just assume their references are dead wrong. Victor Davis Hanson
Attention: une ignorance peut en cacher une autre !
Oubli des juifs dans son discours sur la Journée de l’Holocauste, résurrection involontaire de l’abolitionniste noir Frederick Douglass mort en 1895, défense de Poutine et appel obamien à l’examen de conscience de son propre pays …
A l’heure où en une Amérique plus que jamais divisée …
La bienpensance des mauvais perdants multiplie déclarations, manifestations ou obstructions à la politique et à la personne du nouveau président que s’est choisi le peuple américain …
Et que refusant de reconnaitre ses réels faux pas face à tant de mauvaise foi, l’Administration Trump s’enferre dans les explications les plus farfelues …
Pendant qu’avec les nouvelles provocations du régime voyou iranien, une presse jusqu’ici aux ordres commence à peine à découvrir l’état du désastre laissé par l’ancien locataire de la Maison Blanche …
Comment ne pas y voir aussi avec l’historien américain Victor Davis Hanson …

Le symptôme d’un système éducatif ayant sacrifié au nom de la pensée politiquement correcte sur l’environment, la race, la classe ou le genre …

Les connaissances les plus basiques sur l’histoire ou la géographie ?

Mais ne pas repenser également à l’ignorance dans les mêmes domaines de base …

D’un certain Lecteur de téléprompteur en chef …

 A qui tant l’exotisme de sa couleur que la prétendue coolitude de son âge …

Avait si longtemps valu l’indulgence complice de nos mêmes censeurs des médias aujourd’hui ?

Victor Davis Hanson
National Review
August 15, 2013
Today’s leaders are totally ignorant of what used to be the building blocks of learning. In Sam Cooke’s classic 1959 hit “Wonderful World,” the lyrics downplayed formal learning with lines like, “Don’t know much about history . . . Don’t know much about geography.”
Over a half-century after Cooke wrote that lighthearted song, such ignorance is now all too real. Even our best and brightest — or rather our elites especially — are not too familiar with history or geography.
Both disciplines are the building blocks of learning. Without awareness of natural and human geography, we are reduced to a self-contained void without accurate awareness of the space around us. An ignorance of history creates the same sort of self-imposed exile, leaving us ignorant of both what came before us and what is likely to follow.
In the case of geography, Harvard Law School graduate Barack Obama recently lectured, “If we don’t deepen our ports all along the Gulf — places like Charleston, South Carolina; or Savannah, Georgia; or Jacksonville, Florida . . . ” The problem is that all the examples he cited are cities on the East Coast, not the Gulf of Mexico. If Obama does not know where these ports are, how can he deepen them?
Obama’s geographical confusion has become habitual. He once claimed that he had been to all “57 states.” He also assumed that Kentucky was closer to Arkansas than it was to his adjacent home state of Illinois.
In reference to the Falkland Islands, President Obama called them the Maldives — islands southwest of India — apparently in a botched effort to use the Argentine-preferred “Malvinas.” The two island groups may sound somewhat alike, but they are continents apart. Again, without basic geographical knowledge, the president’s commentary on the Falklands is rendered superficial.
When in the state of Hawaii, Obama announced that he was in “Asia.” He lamented that the U.S. Army’s Arabic-language translators assigned to Iraq could better be used in Afghanistan, failing to recognize that Arabic isn’t the language of Afghanistan. And he also apparently thought Austrians speak a language other than German.
The president’s geographical illiteracy is a symptom of the nation’s growing ignorance of once-essential subjects such as geography and history. The former is not taught any more as a required subject in many of our schools and colleges. The latter has often been redefined as race, class, and gender oppression so as to score melodramatic points in the present rather than to learn from the tragedy of the past.
The president in his 2009 Cairo speech credited the European Renaissance and Enlightenment to Islam’s “light of learning” — an exaggeration if not an outright untruth on both counts.
Closer to home, the president claimed in 2011 that Texas had historically been Republican — while in reality it was a mostly Jim Crow Democratic state for over a century. Republicans started consistently carrying Texas only after 1980.
Recently, Obama claimed that 20th-century Communist strongman Ho Chi Minh “was actually inspired by the U.S. Declaration of Independence and Constitution, and the words of Thomas Jefferson.” That pop assertion is improbable, given that Ho systematically liquidated his opponents, slaughtered thousands in land-redistribution schemes, and brooked no dissent.
Even more ahistorical was Vice President Joe Biden’s suggestion that George W. Bush should have gone on television in 2008 to address the nation as President Roosevelt had done in 1929 — a time when there was neither a President Roosevelt nor televisions available for purchase. In 2011, a White House press kit confused Wyoming with Colorado — apparently because they’re both rectangular-shaped states out West.
Our geographically and historically challenged leaders are emblematic of disturbing trends in American education that include a similar erosion in grammar, English composition, and basic math skills.
The controversial Lois Lerner, a senior official at the IRS — an agency whose stock in trade is numbers — claimed that she was “not good at math” when she admitted that she did not know that one-fourth of 300 is 75.
In the zero-sum game of the education curriculum, each newly added therapeutic discipline eliminated an old classical one. The result is that if Americans emote more and have more politically correct thoughts on the environment, race, class, and gender, they are less able to advance their beliefs through fact-based knowledge.
Despite supposedly tough new standards and vast investments, about 56 percent of students in recent California public-school tests did not perform up to their grade levels in English. Only about half met their grade levels in math.

A degree from our most prestigious American university is no guarantee a graduate holding such a credential will know the number of states or the location of Savannah. If we wonder why the Ivy League–trained Obama seems confused about where cities, countries, and continents are, we might remember that all but one Ivy League university eliminated their geography departments years ago. As a rule now, when our leaders allude to a place or an event in the past, just assume their references are dead wrong.

 Voir aussi:
For the president, belief in historical predetermination substitutes for action.
Victor Davis Hanson
National Review On line
August 28, 2014
President Obama doesn’t know much about history.
In his therapeutic 2009 Cairo speech, Obama outlined all sorts of Islamic intellectual and technological pedigrees, several of which were undeserved. He exaggerated Muslim contributions to printing and medicine, for example, and was flat-out wrong about the catalysts for the European Renaissance and Enlightenment.
He also believes history follows some predetermined course, as if things always get better on their own. Obama often praises those he pronounces to be on the “right side of history.” He also chastises others for being on the “wrong side of history” — as if evil is vanished and the good thrives on autopilot.
When in 2009 millions of Iranians took to the streets to protest the thuggish theocracy, they wanted immediate U.S. support. Instead, Obama belatedly offered them banalities suggesting that in the end, they would end up “on the right side of history.” Iranian reformers may indeed end up there, but it will not be because of some righteous inanimate force of history, or the prognostications of Barack Obama.
Obama often parrots Martin Luther King Jr.’s phrase about the arc of the moral universe bending toward justice. But King used that metaphor as an incentive to act, not as reassurance that matters will follow an inevitably positive course.
Another of Obama’s historical refrains is his frequent sermon about behavior that doesn’t belong in the 21st century. At various times he has lectured that the barbarous aggression of Vladimir Putin or the Islamic State has no place in our century and will “ultimately fail” — as if we are all now sophisticates of an age that has at last transcended retrograde brutality and savagery.
In Obama’s hazy sense of the end of history, things always must get better in the manner that updated models of iPhones and iPads are glitzier than the last. In fact, history is morally cyclical. Even technological progress is ethically neutral. It is a way either to bring more good things to more people or to facilitate evil all that much more quickly and effectively.
In the viciously modern 20th century — when more lives may have been lost to war than in all prior centuries combined — some 6 million Jews were put to death through high technology in a way well beyond the savagery of Attila the Hun or Tamerlane. Beheading in the Islamic world is as common in the 21st century as it was in the eighth century — and as it will probably be in the 22nd. The carnage of the Somme and Dresden trumped anything that the Greeks, Romans, Franks, Turks, or Venetians could have imagined.
What explains Obama’s confusion?
A lack of knowledge of basic history explains a lot. Obama or his speechwriters have often seemed confused about the liberation of Auschwitz, “Polish death camps,” the political history of Texas, or the linguistic relationship between Austria and Germany. Obama reassured us during the Bowe Bergdahl affair that George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Franklin Roosevelt all similarly got American prisoners back when their wars ended — except that none of them were in office when the Revolutionary War, Civil War, or World War II officially ended.
Contrary to Obama’s assertion, President Rutherford B. Hayes never dismissed the potential of the telephone. Obama once praised the city of Cordoba as part of a proud Islamic tradition of tolerance during the brutal Spanish Inquisition — forgetting that by the beginning of the Inquisition an almost exclusively Christian Cordoba had few Muslims left.
A Pollyannaish belief in historical predetermination seems to substitute for action. If Obama believes that evil should be absent in the 21st century, or that the arc of the moral universe must always bend toward justice, or that being on the wrong side of history has consequences, then he may think inanimate forces can take care of things as we need merely watch. In truth, history is messier. Unfortunately, only force will stop seventh-century monsters like the Islamic State from killing thousands more innocents. Obama may think that reminding Putin that he is now in the 21st century will so embarrass the dictator that he will back off from Ukraine. But the brutish Putin may think that not being labeled a 21st-century civilized sophisticate is a compliment.
In 1935, French foreign minister Pierre Laval warned Joseph Stalin that the Pope would admonish him to go easy on Catholics — as if such moral lectures worked in the supposedly civilized 20th century. Stalin quickly disabused Laval of that naiveté. “The Pope?” Stalin asked, “How many divisions has he got?”
There is little evidence that human nature has changed over the centuries, despite massive government efforts to make us think and act nicer. What drives Putin, Boko Haram, or ISIS are the same age-old passions, fears, and sense of honor that over the centuries also moved Genghis Khan, the Sudanese Mahdists, and the Barbary pirates. Obama’s naive belief in predetermined history — especially when his facts are often wrong — is a poor substitute for concrete moral action.
Voir encore:

Top 10 Lists

Top 10 Obama Gaffes

The Left had a grand old time with President George W. Bush’s mangling of the English language, and let Sarah Palin or Michele Bachmann make a slip of the tongue and the mainstream media will turn it into a major news story.   Not so with President Obama’s verbal missteps.   Here, to bring balance to the ridicule, are the Top 10 Obama Gaffes:

1.   How many states?   Vice President Dan Quayle was virtually laughed out of Washington for misspelling potato back in 1992, yet Barack Obama made a more elementary flub when, during the 2008 campaign, he said: “I’ve now been in 57 states-I think one left to go.”

2.   Hero soldier mix-up:   While commending troops at Fort Drum, N.Y., for their completed deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan, President Obama said, “A comrade of yours, Jared Monti, was the first person who I was able to award the Medal of Honor to who actually came back and wasn’t receiving it posthumously.”   Wrong hero.   Sgt. 1st Class Jared Monti was killed in action, another soldier, Staff Sgt. Sal Giunta, was the first living recipient of the Medal of Honor that fought in Afghanistan.

3.   What year is it?   During a trip to London’s Westminster Abbey, President Obama signed the guest book and dated it 24 May 2008.   Oops.   It was 2011.   (Maybe he was wistfully dreaming about his 2008 election campaign at the time.)

4.   Look at the map:   Not only does Obama not know how many states there are, he also doesn’t know where they are.   During the 2008 primary campaign, he explained why he was trailing Hillary Clinton in Kentucky: “Sen. Clinton, I think, is much better known, coming from a nearby state of Arkansas.   So it’s not surprising that she would have an advantage in some of those states in the middle.”   Obama’s home state of Illinois, and not Arkansas, shares a border with Kentucky.

5.   What language is that?   In April 2009, on one of his many foreign trips, President Obama mused, “I don’t know what the term is in Austrian” for “wheeling and dealing.”   Oops, Mr. President.   There is no Austrian language.

6.   Twister casualties:   After a devastating tornado hit Kansas, Obama discussed the tragedy without help from a teleprompter, saying, ”In case you missed it, this week, there was a tragedy in Kansas.   Ten thousand people died-an entire town destroyed.”   He was only off by 9,988 as the twister killed 12 people.

7.   How old is Malia?   The President last month thought he was so clever, unfavorably comparing Republican procrastination on the debt limit to his daughters finishing their homework early.   In his remarks, Obama made a reference to daughter Malia, saying she was 13 years old, when at the time she was 12.   Imagine the press reaction if Michele Bachmann made a misstatement about any of her five children or 23 foster kids.

8.   Special Olympics insensitivity:   The President called and apologized to the head of the Special Olympics, after making this insensitive comment following a game of bowling:   “No, no.   I have been practicing.   … I bowled a 129.   It’s like-it was like Special Olympics, or something.”   Maybe he should have also apologized to bowlers for his feeble effort.

9.   Faith confusion:   No wonder so many Americans are unsure of the President’s faith, as he seems to be confused himself.   During the 2008 campaign, during an interview with ABC’s George Stephanopoulos, Obama said, “What I was suggesting-you’re absolutely right that John McCain has not talked about my Muslim faith,” before Stephanopoulos jumped in to help, saying ”your Christian faith.”

10.   Health care inefficiencies:   During the health care debate, President Obama explained all the benefits of ObamaCare, saying, “The reforms we seek would bring greater competition, choice, savings and inefficiencies to our health care system.”   Mr. President, we already have enough inefficiency in health care and, yes, your “reforms” will only make it worse.

Voir de plus:

The Thomas Hobbes Presidency
Conservatives were outraged by Obama’s apologies. What about Trump’s slander?
Bret Stephens
The Wall Street Journal
Feb. 6, 2017

First, the obvious: Had it been Barack Obama, rather than Donald Trump, who suggested a moral equivalency between the United States and Vladimir Putin’s Russia, Republican politicians would not now be rushing through their objections to the comparison in TV interviews while hoping to pivot to tax reform.

Had it been the president of three weeks ago who had answered Bill O’Reilly’s comment that Mr. Putin “is a killer” by saying, “We’ve got a lot of killers,” and “What do you think? Our country’s so innocent?” conservative pundits wouldn’t rest with calling the remark “inexplicable” or “troubling.” They would call it moral treason and spend the next four years playing the same clip on repeat, right through the next election.

In 2009, Mr. Obama gave a series of speeches containing passing expressions of regret for vaguely specified blemishes from the American past. Examples: “The United States is still working through some of our own darker periods in history.” And “we’ve made some mistakes.” This was the so-called Apology Tour, in which the word “apologize” was never uttered. Even so, conservatives still fume about it.

This time, Mr. Trump didn’t apologize for America. He indicted it. He did so in language unprecedented for any sitting or former president. He did it in a manner guaranteed, and perhaps calculated, to vindicate every hard-left slander of “Amerika.” If you are the sort who believes the CIA assassinated JFK, masterminded the crack-cocaine epidemic, and deliberately lied us into the war in Iraq—conspiracy theories on a moral par with the way the Putin regime behaves in actual fact—then this president is for you.

Only he’s worse.

For the most part, the left’s various indictments of the U.S., whether well- or ill-grounded, have had a moral purpose: to shame Americans into better behavior. We are reminded of the evils of slavery and Jim Crow in order not to be racist. We dilate on the failure in Vietnam to guard against the arrogance of power. We recall the abuses of McCarthyism in order to underscore the importance of civil liberties.

Mr. Trump’s purpose, by contrast, isn’t to prevent a recurrence of bad behavior. It’s to permit it. In this reading, Mr. Putin’s behavior isn’t so different from ours. It’s largely the same, except more honest and effective. The U.S. could surely defeat ISIS—if only it weren’t hampered by the kind of scruples that keep us from carpet bombing Mosul in the way the Russians obliterated Aleppo. The U.S. could have come out ahead in Iraq—if only we’d behaved like unapologetic conquerors, not do-gooder liberators, and taken their oil.

This also explains why Mr. Trump doesn’t believe in American exceptionalism, calling the idea “insulting [to] the world” and seeing it as an undue burden on our rights and opportunities as a nation. Magnanimity, fair dealing, example setting, win-win solutions, a city set upon a hill: All this, in the president’s mind, is a sucker’s game, obscuring the dog-eat-dog realities of life. Among other distinctions, Mr. Trump may be our first Hobbesian president.

It would be a mistake to underestimate the political potency of this outlook, with its left-right mix of relativism and jingoism. If we’re no better than anyone else, why not act like everyone else? If phrases such as “the free world” or the “liberal international order” are ideological ploys by which the Davos elite swindle the proletarians of Detroit, why sacrifice blood and treasure on their behalf? Nationalism is usually a form of moral earnestness. Mr. Trump’s genius has been to transform it into an expression of cynicism.

That cynicism won’t be easy to defeat. Right now, a courageous Russian opposition activist named Vladimir Kara-Murza is fighting for his life in a Moscow hospital, having been poisoned for a second time by you-can-easily-guess-who. Assuming Mr. Trump is even aware of the case, would he be wrong in betting that most Americans are as indifferent to his fate as he is?

The larger question for conservatives is how Mr. Trump’s dim view of the world will serve them over time. Honorable Republicans such as Nebraska’s Sen. Ben Sasse have been unequivocal in their outrage, which will surely cost them politically. Others have hit the mute button, on the theory that it’s foolish to be baited by the president’s every crass utterance. The risk is that silence quickly becomes a form of acquiescence. Besides, since when did conservatives reared to their convictions by the rhetoric of Winston Churchill and Ronald Reagan hold words so cheap?

Speaking of Reagan, Feb. 6 would have been his 106th birthday. Perhaps because he had been an actor, the 40th president knew that Americans preferred stories in which good guys triumphed over bad ones, not the ones in which they were pretty much all alike. Conservatives should beware the president’s invitation to a political film noir in which the outcome is invariably bleak.

Voir de même:

WH: No mention of Jews on Holocaust Remembrance Day because others were killed too
Jake Tapper, Anchor and Chief Washington Correspondent

CNN
February 3, 2017

Washington (CNN)The White House statement on International Holocaust Remembrance Day didn’t mention Jews or anti-Semitism because « despite what the media reports, we are an incredibly inclusive group and we took into account all of those who suffered, » administration spokeswoman Hope Hicks told CNN on Saturday.

Hicks provided a link to a Huffington Post UK story noting that while 6 million Jews were killed by the Nazis, 5 million others were also slaughtered during Adolf Hitler’s genocide, including « priests, gypsies, people with mental or physical disabilities, communists, trade unionists, Jehovah’s Witnesses, anarchists, Poles and other Slavic peoples, and resistance fighters. »

Asked if the White House was suggesting President Donald Trump didn’t mention Jews as victims of the Holocaust because he didn’t want to offend the other people the Nazis targeted and killed, Hicks replied, « it was our honor to issue a statement in remembrance of this important day. »

The presidential reference to the « innocent people » victimized by the Nazis without a mention of Jews or anti-Semitism by the White House on International Holocaust Remembrance Day was a stark contrast to statements by former Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama.
Anti-Defamation League Director Jonathan Greenblatt tweeted that the « @WhiteHouse statement on #HolocaustMemorialDay, misses that it was six million Jews who perished, not just ‘innocent people' » and « Puzzling and troubling @WhiteHouse #HolocaustMemorialDay stmt has no mention of Jews. GOP and Dem. presidents have done so in the past. »
Asked about the White House explanation that the President didn’t want to exclude any of the other groups Nazis killed by specifically mentioning Jews, Greenblatt told CNN that the United Nations established International Holocaust Remembrance Day not only because of Holocaust denial but also because so many countries — Iran, Russia and Hungary, for example — specifically refuse to acknowledge Hitler’s attempt to exterminate Jews, « opting instead to talk about generic suffering rather than recognizing this catastrophic incident for what is was: the intended genocide of the Jewish people. »
Downplaying or disregarding the degree to which Jews were targeted for elimination during the Holocaust is a common theme of nationalist movements like those seen in Russia and Eastern Europe, Greenblatt said.
Initially, after being asked about the ADL criticism and the omission of any mention of Jews or anti-Semitism, Hicks provided a statement from Ronald Lauder of the World Jewish Congress that seemed to criticize Greenblatt and the ADL.
« It does no honor to the millions of Jews murdered in the Holocaust to play politics with their memory, » the Lauder statement read in part. « Any fair reading of the White House statement today on the International Holocaust Memorial Day will see it appropriately commemorates the suffering and the heroism that mark that dark chapter in modern history. »
Editor’s note February 2, 2017: This article has been updated to correct an erroneous statement by ADL director Jonathan Greenblatt about Poland’s recognition of the Jewish victims of the Holocaust. The ADL has retracted that comment and apologized. « I made a mistake by including Poland as one of the countries which does not always recognize the Jewish people as the intended target of the Nazi genocide, » Greenblatt said in a letter to the Polish ambassador. « I regret this mistake, and want to assure you that it was not intended as an affront to your government or the people of Poland
Voir pareillement:

The White House Holocaust Horror

Taking the Jews out of the Holocaust

So much for giving people the benefit of the doubt who offer no sign they deserve it. The Trump White House issued a statement on Friday commemorating Holocaust Remembrance Day, and the statement didn’t make specific mention of the Jewish people—who were the target of the Holocaust, or Shoah, which is a term devised after World War II to describe the effort by Nazi Germany to eradicate Jews from the face of the earth. After reading it, I thought to myself, “The Trump White House is an amateur operation, understaffed and without much executive-branch experience, and whoever wrote the statement and issued it blew it out of ignorance and sloppiness.”

I won’t be making that mistake again.

Jake Tapper of CNN reported Saturday night that Trump spokesperson Hope Hicks defended and even celebrated the White House statement. The decision not to mention the Jews was deliberate, Hicks said, a way of demonstrating the inclusive approach of the Trump administration: “Despite what the media reports, we are an incredibly inclusive group and we took into account all of those who suffered…it was our honor to issue a statement in remembrance of this important day.”

No, Hope Hicks, and no to whomever you are serving as a mouthpiece. The Nazis killed an astonishing number of people in monstrous ways and targeted certain groups—Gypsies, the mentally challenged, and open homosexuals, among others. But the Final Solution was aimed solely at the Jews. The Holocaust was about the Jews. There is no “proud” way to offer a remembrance of the Holocaust that does not reflect that simple, awful, world-historical fact. To universalize it to “all those who suffered” is to scrub the Holocaust of its meaning.

Given Hicks’s abominable statement, one cannot simply write this off. For there is a body of opinion in this country, and in certain precincts of the Trump coalition, who have long made it clear they are tired of what they consider a self-centered Jewish claim to being the great victims of the Nazis. Case in point: In 1988, as a speechwriter in the Reagan Administration, I drafted the president’s remarks at the laying of the cornerstone of the Holocaust Museum in Washington. As was the practice, the speech was sent around to 14 White House offices, including an office called Public Liaison staffed by conservatives whose job it was to do outreach to ethnic and religious groups. The official at Public Liaison who supported anti-Communist groups in Eastern Europe was tasked with the job of reviewing it. She sent the speech back marked up almost sentence by sentence. At the top, she wrote something like, “This must be redone. What about the suffering of the Poles and the Slovaks? The president should not be taking sides here.”

I was astonished, and horrified, and took the document to my superior, who told me to ignore it. “She has a bee in her bonnet about this,” he said of the Public Liaison official.

On another occasion, in an article commissioned by a conservative magazine, I wrote a sentence in which I called the Jews “the most beleaguered people in history.” An editor there objected, and insisted we add the word “uniquely” between “most” and “beleaguered” because there was an element, he said, of “special pleading.”

I bring these anecdotes up to say that the Hope Hicks statement does not arrive without precedent. It is, rather, the culmination of something—the culmination of decades of ill feeling that seems to center on the idea that the Jews have somehow made unfair “use” of the Holocaust and it should not “belong” to them. Someone in that nascent White House thought it was time to reflect that view through the omission of the specifically Jewish quality of the Holocaust.

Now the question is: Who was it?

In those remarks at the cornerstone laying, President Reagan said this: “I think all of us here are aware of those, even among our own countrymen, who have dedicated themselves to the disgusting task of minimizing or even denying the truth of the Holocaust. This act of intellectual genocide must not go unchallenged, and those who advance these views must be held up to the scorn and wrath of all good and thinking people in this nation and across the world.” This was in reference to the new and horrifying field of Holocaust denial. It is heartbreaking to think these are words that can now be applied to the White House in which a Republican successor to Reagan is now resident, only 28 years after he departed it for the last time. Heartbreaking and enraging.

Voir aussi:
The Trump Administration’s Flirtation With Holocaust Denial
The White House statement on Holocaust Remembrance day did not mention Jews or antisemitism.
Deborah Lipstadt
The Atlantic
Jan 30, 2017
Holocaust denial is alive and well in the highest offices of the United States. It is being spread by those in President Trump’s innermost circle. It may have all started as a mistake by a new administration that is loath to admit it’s wrong. Conversely, it may be a conscious attempt by people with anti-Semitic sympathies to rewrite history. Either way it is deeply disturbing.For me these developments are intensely personal—not because I have immediate family members who died in the Holocaust. I don’t. But I have spent a good number of years fighting something which the White House now seems to be fostering.Last Friday, I was in Amsterdam attending a screening of the movie Denial. It’s a film about the libel suit David Irving, once arguably the world’s most influential Holocaust denier, brought against me for having called him a denier. The trial, held in 2000, lasted 10 weeks. Because of the nature of British libel laws which placed the burden of proof on me, I had no choice but to fight. Had I not fought he would have won by default and his denial version of the Holocaust—no gas chambers, no mass killings, no Hitler involvement, and that this is all a myth concocted by Jews—would have been enshrined in British law.
After an intense day of press interviews and screenings, I had gone for a short walk. Intent on enjoying my surroundings, I ignored the pinging of my phone. Ironically, I had just reached the Anne Frank House, the place where Anne wrote her diary, when the pinging became so incessant that I checked to see what was happening.I quickly learned that the White House had released a statement for Holocaust Remembrance Day that did not mention Jews or anti-Semitism. Instead it bemoaned the “innocent victims.” The internet was buzzing and many people were fuming. Though no fan of Trump, I chalked it up as a rookie mistake by a new administration busy issuing a slew of executive orders. Someone had screwed up. I refused to get agitated, and counseled my growing number of correspondents to hold their fire. A clarification would certainly soon follow. I was wrong.In a clumsy defense Hope Hicks, the White House director of strategic communications, insisted that, the White House, by not referring to Jews, was acting in an “inclusive” manner. It deserved praise not condemnation. Hicks pointed those who inquired to an article which bemoaned the fact that, too often the “other” victims of the Holocaust were forgotten. Underlying this claim is the contention that the Jews are “stealing” the Holocaust for themselves. It is a calumny founded in anti-Semitism.

There were indeed millions of innocent people whom the Nazis killed in many horrific ways, some in the course of the war and some because the Germans perceived them—however deluded their perception—to pose a threat to their rule. They suffered terribly. But that was not the Holocaust.

The Holocaust was something entirely different. It was an organized program with the goal of wiping out a specific people. Jews did not have to do anything to be perceived as worthy of being murdered. Old people who had to be wheeled to the deportation trains and babies who had to be carried were all to be killed. The point was not, as in occupied countries, to get rid of people because they might mount a resistance to Nazism, but to get rid of Jews because they were Jews. Roma (Gypsies) were also targeted. Many were murdered. But the Nazi anti-Roma policy was inconsistent. Some could live in peace and even serve in the German army.
German homosexuals were horribly abused by the Third Reich. Some were given the chance of “reforming” themselves and then going to serve on the eastern front, where many of them became cannon fodder. Would I have wanted to be a homosexual in the Reich, or in the rest of Nazi occupied Europe? Absolutely not. But they were not systematically wiped out.This is a matter of historical accuracy and not of comparative pain. If my family members had been killed by the Germans for resisting or for some other perceived wrong I would not be—nor should I be—comforted by the fact that they were not killed as part of the Holocaust.Had the Germans won, they probably would have eliminated millions of other peoples, including the Roma, homosexuals, dissidents of any kind, and other “useless eaters.” But it was only the Jews whose destruction could not wait until after the war. Only in the case of the Jews could war priorities be overridden. Germany was fighting two wars in tandem, a conventional war and a war against the Jews. It lost the first and, for all intents and purposes, nearly won the second.
The de-Judaization of the Holocaust, as exemplified by the White House statement, is what I term softcore Holocaust denial. Hardcore denial is the kind of thing I encountered in the courtroom. In an outright and forceful fashion, Irving denied the facts of the Holocaust. In his decision, Judge Charles Grey called Irving a liar and a manipulator of history. He did so, the judge ruled, deliberately and not as the result of mistakes.
Softcore denial uses different tactics but has the same end-goal. (I use hardcore and softcore deliberately because I see denial as a form of historiographic pornography.) It does not deny the facts, but it minimizes them, arguing that Jews use the Holocaust to draw attention away from criticism of Israel. Softcore denial also makes all sorts of false comparisons to the Holocaust. In certain Eastern European countries today, those who fought the Nazis may be lauded, but if they did so with a communist resistance group they may be prosecuted. Softcore denial also includes Holocaust minimization, as when someone suggests it was not so bad. “Why are we hearing about that again?”What we saw from the White House was classic softcore denial. The Holocaust was de-Judaized. It is possible that it all began with a mistake. Someone simply did not realize what they were doing. It is also possible that someone did this deliberately. The White House’s chief strategist, Steve Bannon, boasted that while at Breitbart he created a platform for alt-right. Richard Spencer, the self-proclaimed leader of the alt-right, has invited overt Holocaust deniers to alt-right conferences, and his followers have engaged in outright denial. During the campaign, he was reportedly responsible for speeches and ads that many observers concluded trafficked in anti-Semitic tropes.After Hicks’s defense of the statement, Chief of Staff Reince Priebus doubled down, insisting that they made no mistake. On Meet the Press Chuck Todd gave Priebus repeated chances to retract or rephrase the statement. Priebus refused and dug in deeper, declaring “everyone’s suffering in the Holocaust, including obviously, all of the Jewish people… [was] extraordinarily sad.”In the penultimate sentence of the president’s statement on Holocaust Remembrance Day, the White House promised to ensure that “the forces of evil never again defeat the powers of good.” But the statement was issued on the same day as the order banning refugees. It is hard not to conclude that this is precisely what happened at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue on Holocaust Remembrance Day.
Voir également:

Trump implied Frederick Douglass was alive. The abolitionist’s family offered a ‘history lesson.’

Cleve R. Wootson Jr.

Washington Post

Feb. 7, 2017

The world may never know whether President Donald Trump just got a little sloppy with his verb tenses on Wednesday morning or simply had no idea that the famous black abolitionist Frederick Douglass was, in fact, dead.

« Frederick Douglass is an example of somebody who’s done an amazing job and is getting recognized more and more, I notice, » the president said.

Critics seized on Trump’s comments at a Black History Month event, mercilessly attacking him for statements that spoke of Douglass in the present tense.

The Atlantic asked, simply: « Does Donald Trump actually know who Frederick Douglass was? » and said that Trump’s remarks were « transparently empty. »
The Washington Post’s Dana Milbank joked that Trump « raised the dead. »

And someone started a Frederick Douglass Twitter account that trolled the president before it was deleted (although some of the tweets have been saved).

« In surprise move @PressSec announces @realDonaldTrump has named Frederick Douglass to National Security Council. »

Even White House press secretary Sean Spicer struggled to clarify Douglass-gate when asked at a briefing later on Wednesday. « I think there’s contributions – I think he wants to highlight the contributions that he has made, » Spicer said of Trump’s reference to Douglass. « And I think through a lot of the actions and statements that he’s going to make, I think the contributions of Frederick Douglass will become more and more. »

Trump criticizes media as he marks African American History Month
But the descendants of the revered abolitionist – who, just to be clear, died in 1895 after becoming a powerful voice against slavery and then Jim Crow – responded on Wednesday.

« My first instinct was to go on the attack, » said Kenneth B. Morris Jr., Douglass’ great-great-great grandson. « I think it was obvious to anyone that heard [Trump’s] comments or read his comments that he was not up to speed on who Frederick Douglass was. We just thought that was an opportunity to do a history lesson and to make some points about what we’re currently working on. »

The family released a statement on the Huffington Post on Wednesday.

« Like the President, we use the present tense when referencing Douglass’s accomplishments because his spirit and legacy are still very much alive, not just during Black History Month, but every month, » the family wrote.

« . . . We believe, if he had more time to elaborate, the President would have mentioned the following: Frederick Douglas has done an amazing job . . . »

Then the family mic-dropped several things Douglass has done a great job at:

« Enduring the inhumanity of slavery after being born heir to anguish and exploitation but still managing to become a force for solace and liberty when America needed it most. »

« Teaching himself to read and write and becoming one of the country’s most eloquent spokespersons. »

« Composing the Narrative of his life and helping to expose slavery for the crime against humankind that it is. »

« Risking life and limb by escaping the abhorrent institution »

« Arguing against unfair U.S. immigration restrictions. »

If Douglass were still alive, he’d celebrate his 200th birthday next year.

The family’s statement said they were involved in several initiatives that highlight their ancestor’s legacy.

« We look forward to helping re-animate Douglass’ passion for equality and justice over the coming year leading up to his Bicentennial in 2018, » the statement said. « We encourage the President to join in that effort. »

Voir encore:

A Lesson in Black History
Charles M. Blow
The New York Times
Feb. 6, 2017

Last week at a supposed Black History Month “listening session” at the White House, Donald Trump made this baffling statement: “I am very proud now that we have a museum on the National Mall where people can learn about Reverend King, so many other things. Frederick Douglass is an example of somebody who’s done an amazing job that is being recognized more and more, I notice.”

It sounded a bit like he thought the inimitable Douglass, who died in 1895, was some lesser-known black leader who was still alive.

When Press Secretary Sean Spicer was asked what Trump meant by his Douglass comments, Spicer responded:

“I think he wants to highlight the contributions that he has made. And I think through a lot of the actions and statements that he’s going to make, I think the contributions of Frederick Douglass will become more and more.”

Assuming that the “he” in that sentence refers to Douglass, these numbskulls are actually referring to him as a living person and have absolutely no clue who Douglass is and what he means to America.

Social media had a field day with this, relentlessly mocking the team, but for me the emotion was overwhelming sadness: How could the American “president” or a White House press secretary, or any American citizen for that matter, not know who Douglass is?

Let’s be absolutely clear here: Frederick Douglass is a singular, towering figure of American history. The entire legacy of black intellectual thought and civil rights activism flows in some way through Douglass, from W.E.B. DuBois to Booker T. Washington, to the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., to President Barack Obama himself.

Douglass was one of the most brilliant thinkers, writers and orators America has ever produced. Furthermore, he harnessed and mastered the media of his day: Writing an acclaimed autobiography, establishing his own newspaper and becoming the most photographed American of the 19th century.

Put another way: If modern social media existed during Douglass’s time, he would have been one of its kings.

Douglass also was a friend of Susan B. Anthony and an advocate for women’s civil rights as well as the civil rights of black people, understanding even then the intersectionality of oppressions. In fact, the motto of his newspaper, The North Star, was “Right is of no Sex — Truth is of no Color — God is the Father of us all, and we are all Brethren.”

But perhaps one of the best reasons Trump and Spicer need to bone up on Douglass is to understand his relationship with Abraham Lincoln and to get a better sense of what true leadership looks like.

Douglass was a blistering critic of Lincoln from the beginning. In Lincoln’s first Inaugural Address, he quoted from one of his previous speeches in which he had said “I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the states where it exists,” and he went on to defend the Fugitive Slave Act, promising the slave states full enforcement of it as long as it was on the books.

This incensed Douglass, who said of the remarks: “Not content with the broadest recognition of the right of property in the souls and bodies of men in the slave states, Mr. Lincoln next proceeds, with nerves of steel, to tell the slaveholders what an excellent slave hound he is.”

Although Douglass’s cutting critique of Lincoln began to soften after Lincoln announced the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, Douglass continued to be unhappy throughout the Civil War about the unequal treatment of black soldiers in the Union Army. But even in the midst of this criticism, Lincoln entertained Douglass at the White House.

Although Douglass wasn’t fully satisfied with Lincoln’s positions, Douglass remarked of the meeting: “Mr. Lincoln listened with earnest attention and with very apparent sympathy, and replied to each point in his own peculiar, forcible way.”

This stands in stark contrast to Trump’s avoidance of black intellectuals and even any real critics. Trump’s “listening session” seemed to be populated only by his black appointees and supporters.

Lincoln and Douglass would go on to develop a genuine friendship and Douglass would become something of Lincoln’s conscience on the slave issue. In fact, Lincoln called Douglass “one of the most meritorious men, if not the most meritorious man, in the United States.”

That is what leadership and growth look like. Lincoln grew from the association with and counsel from his onetime critic, to become one of the greatest presidents America has ever known.

Indeed Black History Month began not as a month but a week: Negro History week, the second week of February. It was established in 1926 by noted black historian Carter G. Woodson, and choosing February was no coincidence: It honored the birthdays of Lincoln, who freed the slaves, and Douglass, who helped direct his conscience.

Trump would do well to study this history; he has much to learn from it. As the historian Woodson’s personal motto went: “It’s never too late to learn.”

Voir également:

Donald Trump’s Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
Marking Black History Month, the president made some strange observations about Douglass and Martin Luther King, but mostly talked about himself.
David A. Graham
The Atlantic
Feb 1, 2017

Does Donald Trump actually know who Frederick Douglass was? The president mentioned the great abolitionist, former slave, and suffrage campaigner during a Black History Month event Wednesday morning, but there’s little to indicate that Trump knows anything about his subject, based on the rambling, vacuous commentary he offered:

“I am very proud now that we have a museum on the National Mall where people can learn about Reverend King, so many other things, Frederick Douglass is an example of somebody who’s done an amazing job and is getting recognized more and more, I notice. Harriet Tubman, Rosa Parks, and millions more black Americans who made America what it is today. Big impact.” Within moments, he was off-topic, talking about some of his favorite subjects: CNN, himself, and his feud with CNN.

Trump’s comments about King were less transparently empty but maybe even stranger. “Last month we celebrated the life Reverend Martin Luther King Jr., whose incredible example is unique in American history,” Trump said, employing a favorite meaningless adjective. But this wasn’t really about King. It was about Trump: “You read all about Martin Luther King when somebody said I took a statue out of my office. And it turned out that that was fake news. The statue is cherished. It’s one of the favorite things—and we have some good ones. We have Lincoln, and we have Jefferson, and we have Dr. Martin Luther King.”

Even beyond the strange aside about Douglass and the digression from King, Trump’s comments point to the superficiality of his engagement with African American culture. He named perhaps the four most famous figures in black history with no meaningful elaboration. (Trump was reading from a sheet, but at least he was able to name Tubman, unlike his vanquished rival Gary Johnson.)
In a way, Trump isn’t totally wrong about Douglass “getting recognized more and more,” though one is left to scratch one’s head at where precisely he noticed that. Douglass’s heyday of influence was in the mid to late 19th century—when he was also among The Atlantic’s biggest-name writers—but he may be better known than ever among the broadest swath of the American public thanks to his ascension into the Pantheon of black history figures taught in schools since the United States established Black History Month in 1976.

It is a real and praiseworthy accomplishment for Douglass’s name to keep spreading. But the frequent, and often valid, critique of Black History Month is that it encourages a tokenist approach to African American culture, leading everyone from national leaders to elementary-school teachers to recite a catechism of well-known figures, producing both shallow engagement and privileging a passé Great Man (and Woman) theory of history. Hardly any politician is immune to this; faced with the necessity of holding an event to mark the month, they too recite the list. But even by that standard, Trump’s comments are laughably vacuous.

George W. Bush, for example, recalled in 2002 how February was “the month in which Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass were born, two men, very different, who together ended slavery.” Bill Clinton exhorted audiences to visit Douglass’s home in Washington’s Anacostia neighborhood, at a time when that was well-off the beaten tourist path. George H.W. Bush admired Jacob Lawrence’s depiction of Douglass. Ronald Reagan repeatedly quoted Douglass in his own remarks, and was fond of boasting that Douglass was a fellow Republican.

The gulf between Trump and his predecessors is particularly poignant, of course, in the wake of the presidency of Barack Obama, a man who by virtue of his own skin color never had to resort to the detached tributes of white presidents. When the museum Trump cited opened, Obama spoke, saying as only he could have:

Yes, African Americans have felt the cold weight of shackles and the stinging lash of the field whip. But we’ve also dared to run north and sing songs from Harriet Tubman’s hymnal. We’ve buttoned up our Union Blues to join the fight for our freedom. We’ve railed against injustice for decade upon decade, a lifetime of struggle and progress and enlightenment that we see etched in Frederick Douglass’s mighty, leonine gaze.
Trump, by contrast, has long spoken of the black community in fundamentally instrumental terms, from his business career to his political one. African Americans were a monolithic demographic to be won or lost, depending on the occasion. The young real-estate developer first made headlines when the Trump Organization was accused of working to keep blacks out of its real-estate developments; the company eventually settled with the Justice Department without admitting guilt. The question in that case was not the personal prejudices (absent or present) of Trump and his father Fred. Instead, the company appeared to have decided that blacks were bad for business and would drive out white tenants, so the Trumps allegedly opted to keep them out.
During the campaign, Trump viewed black voters with similarly cool detachment. He spoke about blacks and other minorities in conspicuously distancing terms, as “they” and “them.” His leading black surrogates included Omarosa, most famous for appearing on The Apprentice with Trump, and Don King, a clownish and past-his-prime boxing promoter notable for killing two men; Hillary Clinton’s campaign, meanwhile, called on LeBron James, Beyonce, and Obama. When Trump spotted a black man at a rally in California, he called out, “Oh, look at my African American over here. Look at him. Are you the greatest?”

When Trump announced a black-voter outreach operation, he mostly delivered his message to overwhelmingly white audiences in overwhelmingly white locales, and employed a series of racist and outdated stereotypes about inner-city crime, poverty, and lack of education, in what he appeared to believe represented benign patronization. Meanwhile, his own aides told reporters their political goal was to suppress black votes by encouraging African Americans to sit the election out.

In the end, Trump won 8 percent of the black vote, according to exit polling, besting Mitt Romney’s showing against Barack Obama but falling well short of the recent GOP high-water mark of 17 percent in 1976 (to say nothing of his prediction that he’d win 95 percent of African Americans in his 2020 campaign).

Trump continues to indicate he holds a view of black Americans that is instrumental, as he showed on Wednesday at his Black History Month event. “If you remember, I wasn’t going to do well with the African American community, and after they heard me speaking and talking about the inner city and lots of other things, we ended up getting, I won’t get into details, but we ended up getting substantially more than other candidates who have run in the past years,” he said, somewhat misleadingly. “And now we’re going to take that to new levels.” February might be Black History Month, but every month is Trump History Month.

Voir enfin:

Putin, Obama — and Trump

Victor Davis Hanson

National Review

January 17, 2017

Let’s hope that the era of ‘lead from behind’ and violated red lines is over. For eight years, the Obama administration misjudged Vladimir Putin’s Russia, as it misjudged most of the Middle East, China, and the rest of the world as well. Obama got wise to Russia only when Putin imperiled not just U.S. strategic interests and government records but also supposedly went so far as to tamper with sacrosanct Democratic-party secrets, thereby endangering the legacy of Barack Obama.

Putin was probably bewildered by Obama’s media-driven and belated concern, given that the Russians, like the Chinese, had in the past hacked U.S. government documents that were far more sensitive than the information it may have mined and leaked in 2016 — and they received nothing but an occasional Obama “cut it out” whine. Neurotic passive-aggression doesn’t merely bother the Russians; it apparently incites and emboldens them.

Obama’s strange approach to Putin since 2009 apparently has run something like the following. Putin surely was understandably angry with the U.S. under the cowboy imperialist George W. Bush, according to the logic of the “reset.” After all, Obama by 2009 was criticizing Bush more than he was Putin for the supposed ills of the world. But Barack Obama was not quite an American nationalist who sought to advance U.S. interests.

Instead, he posed as a new sort of soft-power moralistic politician — not seen since Jimmy Carter — far more interested in rectifying the supposed damage rather than the continuing good that his country has done. If Putin by 2008 was angry at Bush for his belated pushback over Georgia, at least he was not as miffed at Bush as Obama himself was.

Reset-button policy then started with the implicit agreement that Russia and the Obama administration both had legitimate grievances against a prior U.S. president — a bizarre experience for even an old hand like Putin. (Putin probably thought that the occupation and reconstruction of Iraq were a disaster not on ethical or even strategic grounds but because the U.S. had purportedly let the country devolve into something like what Chechnya was before Putin’s iron grip.)

In theory, Obama would captivate Putin with his nontraditional background and soaring rhetoric, the same way he had charmed urban progressive elites at home and Western European socialists abroad. One or two more Cairo speeches would assure Putin that a new America was more interested in confessing its past sins to the Islamic world than confronting its terrorism. And Obama would continue to show his bona fides by cancelling out Bush initiatives such as missile defense in Eastern Europe, muting criticism of Russian territorial expansionism, and tabling the updating and expansion of the American nuclear arsenal. All the while, Obama would serve occasional verbal cocktails for Putin’s delight — such as the hot-mic promise to be even “more flexible” after his 2012 reelection, the invitation of Russia into the Middle East to get the Obama administration off the hook from enforcing red lines over Syrian WMD use, and the theatrical scorn for Mitt Romney’s supposedly ossified Cold War–era worries about Russian aggression.

As Putin was charmed, appeased, and supposedly brought on board, Obama increasingly felt free to enlighten him (as he does almost everyone) about how his new America envisioned a Westernized politically correct world. Russians naturally would not object to U.S. influence if it was reformist and cultural rather than nationalist, economic, and political — and if it sought to advance universal progressive ideals rather than strictly American agendas. Then, in its own self-interest, a grateful Russia would begin to enact at home something akin to Obama’s helpful initiatives: open up its society, with reforms modeled after those of the liberal Western states in Europe. Putin quickly sized up this naïf. His cynicism and cunning told him that Obama was superficially magnanimous mostly out of a desire to avoid confrontations. And as a Russian, he was revolted by the otherworldly and unsolicited advice from a pampered former American academic. Putin continued to crack down at home and soon dressed up his oppression with a propagandistic anti-American worldview: America’s liberal culture reflected not freedom but license; its global capitalism promoted cultural decadence and should not serve as anyone’s blueprint. Putin’s cynicism and cunning told him that Obama was superficially magnanimous mostly out of a desire to avoid confrontations.

As the West would pursue atheism, indulgence, and globalism, Putin would return Russia to Orthodoxy, toughness, and fervent nationalism — a czarist appeal that would resonate with other autocracies abroad and mask his own oppressions, crony profiteering, and economic mismanagement at home. Note that despite crashing oil prices and Russian economic crises, Putin believed (much as Mussolini did) that at least for a time, a strong leader in a weak country can exercise more global clout than a weak leader in a strong country — and that Russians could for a while longer put up with poverty and lack of freedom if they were at least feared or respected abroad. He also guessed that just as the world was finally nauseated by Woodrow Wilson’s six months of moralistic preening at Versailles, so too it would tire of the smug homilies of Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, and John Kerry.

Putin grew even more surprised at Obama’s periodic red lines, deadlines, and step-over lines, whose easy violations might unite global aggressors in the shared belief that America was hopelessly adrift, easy to manipulate, obnoxious in its platitudinous sermonizing, and certainly not the sort of strong-horse power that any aggressors should fear.

Perhaps initially Putin assumed that Obama’s lead-from-behind redistributionist foreign policy (the bookend to his “you didn’t build that” domestic recalibration) was some sort of clever plot to suggest that a weak United States could be taken advantage of — and then Obama would strike hard when Putin fell for the bait and overreached. But once Putin realized that Obama was serious in his fantasies, he lost all respect for his benefactor, especially as an increasingly petulant and politically enfeebled Obama compensated by teasing Putin as a macho class cut-up — just as he had often caricatured domestic critics who failed to appreciate his godhead.

Putin offered America’s enemies and fence-sitting opportunists a worldview that was antithetical to Obama’s. Lead-from-behind foreign policy was just provocative enough to discombobulate a few things overseas but never strong or confident enough to stay on to fix them. When China, Iran, North Korea, ISIS, or other provocateurs challenged the U.S., Putin was at best either indifferent and at worst supportive of our enemies, on the general theory that anything the U.S. sought to achieve, Russia would be wise to oppose.

Putin soon seemed to argue that the former Soviet Republics had approximately the same relation to Russia as the Caribbean, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands have to the United States. Russia was simply defining and protecting its legitimate sphere of influence, as the post-colonial U.S. had done (albeit without the historic costs in blood and treasure).

Russia had once lost a million civilians at the siege of Leningrad when Hitler’s Army Group North raced through the Baltic States (picking up volunteers as it went) and met up with the Finns. At Sevastopol, General Erich von Manstein’s Eleventh Army may well have inflicted 100,000 Russian Crimean casualties in a successful but nihilistic effort to take and nearly destroy the fortress. The Kiev Pocket and destruction of the Southwestern Front of the Red Army in the Ukraine in September 1941 (700,000 Russians killed, captured, or missing) may have been the largest encirclement and mass destruction of an army in military history.

For Putin, these are not ancient events but rather proof of why former Soviet bloodlands were as much Russian as Puerto Rico was considered American. We find such reasoning tortured, given Ukrainian and Crimean desires to be free; Putin insists that Russian ghosts still flitter over such hallowed ground.

Reconstruction of Putin’s mindset is not justification for his domestic thuggery or foreign expansionism at the expense of free peoples. But it does remind us that he is particularly ill-suited to listen to pat lectures from American sermonizers whose unwillingness to rely on force to back up their sanctimony is as extreme as their military assets are overwhelming. Putin would probably be less provoked by a warning from someone deemed strong than he would be by obsequious outreach from someone considered weak.

There were areas where Obama might have sought out Putin in ways advantageous to the U.S., such as wooing him away from Iran or playing him off against China or lining him up against North Korea. But ironically, Obama was probably more interested in inflating the Persian and Shiite regional profile than was Putin himself. Putin would probably be less provoked by a warning from someone deemed strong than he would be by obsequious outreach from someone considered weak.

If Obama wished to invite Putin into the Middle East, then at least he might have made an effort to align him with Israel, the Gulf States, Egypt, and Jordan, in pursuit of their shared goal of wiping out radical Islamic terrorism. In the process, these powers might have grown increasingly hostile to Syria, Hezbollah, and Iran. But Obama was probably more anti-Israeli than Putin, and he also disliked the moderate Sunni autocracies more than Putin himself did. As far as China, Putin was delighted that Obama treated Chinese aggression in the Spratly Islands as Obama had treated his own in Ukraine: creased-brow angst about bad behavior followed by indifference.

The irony of the failed reset was that in comparative terms the U.S. — given its newfound fossil-fuel wealth and energy independence, the rapid implosion of the European Union, and its continuing technological superiority — should have been in an unusually strong position as the leader of the West. Unhinged nuclear proliferation, such as in Pakistan and North Korea and soon in Iran, is always more of a long-term threat to a proximate Russia than to a distant America. And Russia’s unassimilated and much larger Muslim population is always a far more existential threat to Moscow than even radical Islamic terrorism is at home to the U.S.

In other words, there were realist avenues for cooperation that hinged on a strong and nationalist U.S. clearly delineating areas where cooperation benefitted both countries (and the world). Other spheres in which there could be no American–Russian consensus could by default have been left to sort themselves out in a may-the-best-man-win fashion, hopefully peaceably.

Such détente would have worked only if Obama had forgone all the arc-of-history speechifying and the adolescent putdowns, meant to project strength in the absence of quiet toughness.

Let us hope that Donald Trump, Rex Tillerson, and Jim Mattis know this and thus keep mostly silent, remind Putin privately (without trashing a former president) that the aberrant age of Obama is over, carry huge sticks, work with Putin where and when it is in our interest, acknowledge his help, seek to thwart common enemies — and quietly find ways to utilize overwhelming American military and economic strength to discourage him from doing something unwise for both countries.

Voir par ailleurs:

Trump défend à nouveau Poutine, au désespoir des Républicains
Le Figaro AFP, AP, Reuters Agences
06/02/2017

VIDÉO – «Pensez-vous que notre pays soit si innocent?», a répondu le président américain au sujet des crimes supposés du président russe, dans une interview à la chaîne Fox News, suscitant la colère de son propre camp.

Le président américain Donald Trump a défendu une nouvelle fois Vladimir Poutine devant l’opinion publique américaine, montrant qu’il ne renonçait pas à trouver des accords avec le président russe sur les affaires de la planète. Une nouvelle flambée des combats entre forces ukrainiennes et séparatistes pro-russes dans l’est de l’Ukraine a contraint la semaine dernière l’administration américaine à critiquer Moscou et à promettre le maintien des sanctions internationales qui visent la Russie.

Mais dimanche, dans une interview diffusée sur Fox News avant le démarrage du très populaire Super Bowl, le président américain a défendu une nouvelle fois sa volonté de chercher à réchauffer les relations avec son homologue russe.

«Je le respecte», mais «ça ne veut pas dire que je vais m’entendre avec lui», a-t-il dit.» C’est un leader dans son pays, et je pense qu’il vaut mieux s’entendre avec la Russie que l’inverse», a-t-il ajouté.

Et au journaliste qui lui objectait que Vladimir Poutine était un «tueur», Donald Trump a invité de manière surprenante l’Amérique à un examen de conscience. «Beaucoup de tueurs, beaucoup de tueurs. Pensez-vous que notre pays soit si innocent?», a-t-il demandé, sans expliciter sa pensée. Cette dernière réflexion a immédiatement suscité une salve de critiques, y compris dans son propre camp où Vladimir Poutine fait souvent figure de repoussoir. «Je ne pense pas qu’il y ait aucune équivalence entre la manière dont les Russes se comportent et la manière dont les États-Unis se comportent», a déclaré Mitch McConnell, le chef de file des républicains au Sénat. «C’est un ancien du KGB, un voyou, élu d’une manière que beaucoup de gens ne trouvent pas crédible», a-t-il renchéri.

Quant au néoconservateur Marc Rubio, sénateur républicain de Floride, et rival de Donald Trump lors de la primaire du Grand Old Party, il a tweeté: «Quand est-ce qu’un activiste démocrate a été empoisonné par le parti Républicain, ou vice-versa? Nous ne sommes pas comme Poutine».

L’électorat républicain préoccupé par Daech plutôt que par Poutine

Dans son interview à Fox News, le président américain a aussi expliqué dans quel domaine il aimerait particulièrement se mettre d’accord avec Moscou: «Si la Russie nous aide dans le combat contre (le groupe) État islamique (…) et contre le terrorisme islamique à travers le monde, c’est une bonne chose».

Donald Trump a demandé au Pentagone de lui fournir, d’ici la fin février, un plan pour accélérer la campagne contre l’EI, qui n’a que trop traîné en longueur selon lui. Or, les militaires américains ne cachent pas que l’attitude de Moscou sera déterminante pour préparer l’ultime bataille contre le groupe terroriste, la conquête de sa capitale autoproclamée Raqqa. La coalition ne peut pas par exemple lancer l’offensive sur la ville sans avoir une idée de ce que sera le statut de la ville libérée – un débat dans lequel la Russie joue un rôle clef.

En cherchant un rapprochement avec le maître du Kremlin, Donald Trump est en décalage, voire en opposition avec nombre de caciques républicains, comme John McCain, l’ancien candidat républicain à la présidentielle de 2008, qui ne perd pas une occasion de dénoncer la menace russe.

Toutefois, une enquête publiée vendredi par le New York Times montre bien qu’il n’est peut-être pas tant que ça en décalage avec l’électorat républicain, pour qui la menace islamique radicale éclipse la menace russe. Interrogé sur l’endroit du monde qui représente pour lui la principale menace pour les États-Unis, l’électorat démocrate place à l’inverse la Corée du Nord en tête, suivie immédiatement par la Russie. Mais l’électorat républicain mentionne après la Corée du Nord une longue liste de pays musulmans, avant de citer la Russie, selon cette enquête.

Voir aussi:

MSM watch

Washington Post Wakes Up to the Fact That Iran Is Stronger Than Ever

Now that Obama is out of office, the Washington Post is beginning to look at the consequences of his policies. One of the biggest: Iran is now a regional superpower, but still as hostile to the U.S. and its allies as ever.

Oops:

Iran now stands at the apex of an arc of influence stretching from Tehran to the Mediterranean, from the borders of NATO to the borders of Israel and along the southern tip of the Arabian Peninsula. It commands the loyalties of tens of thousands in allied militias and proxy armies that are fighting on the front lines in Syria, Iraq and Yemen with armored vehicles, tanks and heavy weapons. They have been joined by thousands of members of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps, Iran’s most prestigious military wing, who have acquired meaningful battlefield experience in the process.

For the first time in its history, the Institute for the Study of War noted in a report last week, Iran has developed the capacity to project conventional military force for hundreds of miles beyond its borders. “This capability, which very few states in the world have, will fundamentally alter the strategic calculus and balance of power within the Middle East,” the institute said.

America’s Sunni Arab allies, who blame the Obama administration’s hesitancy for Iran’s expanded powers, are relishing the prospect of a more confrontational U.S. approach. Any misgivings they may have had about Trump’s anti-Muslim rhetoric have been dwarfed by their enthusiasm for an American president they believe will push back against Iran.

If only someone had warned that appeasing Iran was a dangerous policy that could backfire horribly…

When Walter Russell Mead testified before the Senate Armed Services Committee in 2015, he argued that the Iran Deal shouldn’t be analyzed merely as an arms control agreement or even on its own terms. It needed (and still needs) to be assessed in the context of a broader strategic framework for the Middle East. At that point, it was already clear the Obama Administration’s entire Middle East policy pivoted on the deal. Other American interests (in Syria and Yemen, for instance) were secondary to getting an arms control agreement in place with Iran. The mistake wasn’t so much the narrow deal itself as the fact that the deal was promoted not as part of a strategy, but rather in lieu of one.

The consequences of not paying attention to the big picture are now obvious to all. We’re glad the Washington Post is finally getting it. We just wish they’d done so sooner.

Voir enfin:

 


Présidence Trump: Attention, une révolution peut en cacher une autre (Revolutionary normalcy: Trump seems a revolutionary only because he is loudly undoing a revolution)

4 février, 2017
byanymeansopen-borderstrump-targettrum-meltdown-time-coverspiegel-trump3spiegel-trump
death-prez
churchill_bust_trump
trumpmlkbust
mlk_bust_whitehouseGeorge Orwell disait,  je crois dans 1984, que dans les temps de tromperie généralisée, dire la vérité est un acte révolutionnaire. David Hoffmann
Le langage politique est destiné à rendre vraisemblables les mensonges, respectables les meurtres,
et à donner l’apparence de la solidité à ce qui n’est que vent;
George Orwell
Ce n’est pas en refusant de mentir que nous abolirons le mensonge : c’est en usant de tous les moyens pour supprimer les classes. (…) Tous les moyens sont bons lorsqu’ils sont efficaces. Jean-Paul Sartre (Les mains sales, II, 5, 1948)
Ce que nous voulons, c’est la liberté par tous les moyens, la justice par tous les moyens et  l’égalité par tous les moyens. Malcom X (1964)
The Martin Luther King jr. Bust has been moved out of the Oval Office according The People Magazine DC Bureau Chief who was in there this pm. April Ryan
Correction: An earlier version of the story said that a bust of Martin Luther King had been moved. It is still in the Oval Office. Time
Now, when I was elected as President of the United States, my predecessor had kept a Churchill bust in the Oval Office. There are only so many tables where you can put busts — otherwise it starts looking a little cluttered. (Laughter.) And I thought it was appropriate, and I suspect most people here in the United Kingdom might agree, that as the first African American President, it might be appropriate to have a bust of Dr. Martin Luther King in my office to remind me of all the hard work of a lot of people who would somehow allow me to have the privilege of holding this office. Barack Hussein Obama
Il est temps de tuer le président. Monisha Rajesh
Trump c’est le candidat qui redonne aux Américains l’espoir, l’espoir qu’il soit assassiné avant son investiture. Pablo Mira (France Inter)
Ils ont été horriblement traités. Savez-vous que si vous étiez chrétien en Syrie, il était impossible, ou du moins très difficile d’entrer aux États-Unis ? Si vous étiez un musulman, vous pouviez entrer, mais si vous étiez chrétien, c’était presque impossible et la raison était si injuste, tout le monde était persécuté… Ils ont coupé les têtes de tout le monde, mais plus encore des chrétiens. Et je pensais que c’était très, très injuste. Nous allons donc les aider. Donald Trump
L’amour du prochain est une valeur chrétienne et cela implique de venir en aide aux autres. Je crois que c’est ce qui unit les pays occidentaux. Sigmar Gabriel (ministre allemand des Affaires étrangères)
Obama, franchement il fait partie des gens qui détestent l’Amérique. Il a servi son idéologie mais pas l’Amérique. Je remets en cause son patriotisme et sa dévotion à l’église qu’il fréquentait. Je pense qu’il était en désaccord avec lui-même sur beaucoup de choses. Je pense qu’il était plus musulman dans son cœur que chrétien. Il n’a pas voulu prononcer le terme d’islamisme radical, ça lui écorchait les lèvres. Je pense que dans son cœur, il est musulman, mais on en a terminé avec lui, Dieu merci. Evelyne Joslain
Mais pourquoi n’appelle-t-on pas ce mur, qui sépare les Gazaouites de leurs frères égyptiens « mur de la honte » ou « de l’apartheid »? Liliane Messika
Trump’s executive order is so modest that the foundation of it is essentially existing law. That law was passed unanimously by both bodies of Congress in 2002. In fact, it garnered the support of 16 Democrat senators and 57 Democrat House members who are still serving in their respective bodies! Following 9/11, Congress passed the Enhanced Border Security and Visa Entry Reform Act, which addressed many of the insecurities in our visa tracking system. The bill passed the House and Senate unanimously. The bill was originally sponsored by a group of bipartisan senators, including Ted Kennedy and Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. (F, 0%). Among other provisions, it restricted non-immigrant visas from countries designated as state sponsors of terror (….) The directive to cut off non-immigrant visas from countries designated as state sponsors of terror is still current law on the books [8 U.S. Code § 1735]. Presidents Bush and Obama later used their discretion to waive the ban, but Trump is actually following the letter of the law — the very law sponsored and passed by Democrats — more closely than Obama did. Trump used his 212(f) authority to add immigrant visas, but that doesn’t take away the fact that every Democrat in the 2002 Senate supported the banning of non-immigrant visas.At present, only three of the countries —  Sudan, Syria, and Iran —  are designated as state sponsors by the State Department. At the time Democrats agreed to the ban in 2002, the State Department also included Libya and Iraq in that list. Although Libya and Iraq were on the list due to the presence of Gadhafi and Saddam Hussein as sponsors of terror, there is actually more of a reason to cut off visas now. Both are completely failed states with no reliable data to vet travelers. Both are more saturated with Islamist groups now than they were in 2002. The same goes for Yemen and Somalia. Neither country is a state sponsor of terror because neither has a functioning governments. They are terrorist havens. Thus, the letter of the law already applies to three of the countries, and the spirit of the law applies to all of them. Plus, the State Department could add any new country to the list, thereby making any future suspension of visas from those specific countries covered under §1735, in addition to the broad general power (INA 212(f)) to shut off any form of immigration. Given that Trump has backed down on green card holders, his executive order on “Muslim countries” is essentially current law, albeit only guaranteed for 90 days! Conservative review
From my perspective in Iraq, I wonder why all of these protesters were not protesting in the streets when ISIS came to kill Christians and Yazidis and other minority groups. They were not protesting when the tens of thousands of displaced Christians my archdiocese has cared for since 2014 received no financial assistance from the U.S. government or the U.N. There were no protests when Syrian Christians were only let in at a rate that was 20 times less than the percentage of their population in Syria. I do not understand why some Americans are now upset that the many minority communities that faced a horrible genocide will finally get a degree of priority in some manner. I would also say this, all those who cry out that this is a “Muslim Ban” – especially now that it has been clarified that it is not – should understand clearly that when they do this, they are hurting we Christians specifically and putting us at greater risk. (…) Here in Iraq we Christians cannot afford to throw out words carelessly as the media in the West can do. I would ask those in the media who use every issue to stir up division to think about this. For the media these things become an issue of ratings, but for us the danger is real. Archévêque irakien
Notre pays a encore bénéficié, ces dernières heures, des atouts de la diversité et de l’apport des disciples d’Allah. Ce matin, à 10 heures, un musulman, armé d’une machette, a attaqué, près du Louvre, une patrouille de soldats, aux cris d’Allah akbar. Abdallah E-H, selon les premières informations, aurait 29 ans, serait égyptien, et travaillerait à Dubaï. Remarquons que si on appliquait le décret Trump en France, en l’élargissant, sans doute ce sympathique touriste n’aurait-il jamais mis les pieds en France, ni n’aurait blessé un militaire avec sa machette. Riposte laïque
La portée dissuasive de l’opération Sentinelle n’était pas à la hauteur des attentes, puisque des militaires se trouvaient non loin du Bataclan et des terrasses et n’ont rien pu faire (…) Elles souhaitaient engager le feu mais on leur a donné l’ordre de ne pas faire usage de leurs armes. L’action des militaires est extrêmement réduite et leur chaîne de commandement est très complexe. (…) Rien ne prouve aujourd’hui que la présence d’une patrouille Sentinelle a permis d’éviter un attentat. Il y a bien eu au départ un rôle psychologique : voir des militaires en kaki partout, dans les rues, dans les transports, rassure la population car la menace est bien réelle. 93% des Français font confiance à l’armée pour lutter contre le terrorisme, tandis que l’antimilitarisme n’est que résiduel en France : il tourne autour de 10%. Mais on peut aussi ajouter qu’en décembre 2015, si 70% des Français approuvaient l’opération Sentinelle, ils n’étaient que 50% à la juger efficace, selon un sondage Ifop pour le ministère de la Défense. Il y a également une part importante de communication politique. Les militaires bénéficient d’une bonne image dans l’opinion publique, le gouvernement joue donc cette carte. L’opération Sentinelle fonctionne en réalité selon le principe du trompe-l’œil : elle diffuse une image de puissance dans les rues mais on ne peut que constater son impuissance effective. (…) Les militaires de Sentinelle ne sont en tout cas pas mis en avant dans le cadre de ce qui devrait être le coeur de leur action : la lutte contre le terrorisme. Un militaire, c’est fait pour faire la guerre. Les militaires de Sentinelle endossent davantage le rôle d’auxiliaires de police de proximité. par leurs présence dans les transports et dans les rues. Une étude réalisée par Elie Tenenbaum, chercheur à l’Institut français des relations internationales (Ifri), souligne que les patrouilles Sentinelle d’Ile-de-France ont été victimes de 1.300 « actions contre la force » entre janvier et septembre 2015, dont 70% d’actes malveillants. Parmi les auteurs de ces violences, certains étaient peut-être des fanatiques, mais ça, rien ne permet de l’affirmer…Et il est évidemment compliqué de faire le tri parmi les personnes qui ont commis ces actes. (…) Comme l’a récemment rappelé le général Sainte-Claire Deville, commandant des forces terrestres, avant 2015, les militaires passaient 5% de leur temps en opération intérieure (principalement dans le cadre du plan Vigipirate) et 15% en opération extérieure. Le reste du temps, ils s’entrainaient et se reposaient. Depuis le début de Sentinelle, ils sont mobilisés 50% de leur temps en opération intérieure et 15% en opération intérieure. Leurs temps de repos et de formation sont donc considérablement entamés. Des troupes fatiguées et peu entraînées sont sans aucun doute bien moins efficaces. (…) C’est d’abord une question pratique et économique. Les militaires sont rapidement mobilisables, efficaces, fiables. Si l’on raisonne à court terme il est également moins onéreux de les utiliser massivement que de recruter et mobiliser à niveau équivalent les forces de l’ordre. (…) De plus en plus de spécialistes, comme Michel Goya [spécialiste des armées, NDLR], plaident pour sa suppression ou, tout du moins, pour un réaménagement drastique, qui permettrait de mobiliser un nombre beaucoup plus faible de militaires, dans des dispositifs plus souples et moins statiques. Mais l’opération Sentinelle ne peut de toute façon pas être pensée isolément : la question de la lutte contre le terrorisme est surtout celle des services de renseignement et de police. Bénédicte Chéron (historienne)
The golden age of an objective press was a pretty narrow span of time in our history. Before that, you had folks like Hearst who used their newspapers very intentionally to promote their viewpoints. I think Fox is part of that tradition — it is part of the tradition that has a very clear, undeniable point of view. It’s a point of view that I disagree with. It’s a point of view that I think is ultimately destructive for the long-term growth of a country that has a vibrant middle class and is competitive in the world. But as an economic enterprise, it’s been wildly successful. And I suspect that if you ask Mr. Murdoch what his number-one concern is, it’s that Fox is very successful. Obama

Fox is not a news organization.

Rahm Emanuel (White House Chief of Staff, October 2009)

Fox operates almost as either the research arm or the communications arm of the Republican Party.

Anita Dunn (White House Communications Director)

When we see a pattern of distortion, we’re going to be honest about that pattern of distortion.

Valerie Jarrett (Obama senior advisor)

As John Podhoretz wrote, these are days of promise and opportunity for America’s political media professionals. So far, they’re squandering their shot. By indulging in ill-considered hysteria and posturing before like-minded colleagues, they sacrifice the credibility they’ll need to expose President Donald Trump’s mendacities. To repair some of the strained bonds between audience and journalist, media professionals must display some restraint when reacting to the latest alleged assault on freedom and decency. That is most easily achieved by recognizing that many of the unprecedented developments of the Trump era aren’t unprecedented at all. (…) The Obama administration was calling Fox “fake news” before “fake news” was a phenomenon. (…) The Obama administration’s “blog” content (now maintained by the National Archives and Records Administration), which includes former Press Secretary Josh Earnest’s “Regional Roundup: What America’s Newspapers are Saying About the Iran Deal.” The blog consisted entirely of favorable headlines from around the country reciting verbatim (and false) administration claims about the nuclear accord. “The Iran Deal” even had its own Twitter account which disseminated not only favorable press mentions but also crafted insipid pop culture memes to get the millennial generation jazzed about nuclear non-proliferation. Imagine the anxiety among journalists when the Trump White House mirrors this tactic. John Podhoretz’s admonition is particularly relevant because so many of these Obama-era precedents did not get the left’s “creeping fascism” sense tingling at the time. To rend garments over these actions now only because the Trump White House is undertaking them is not just unwise; it’s insulting.

Noah Rothman

The Trump administration’s flurry of reversing the earlier flurry of Obama executive orders and the Left’s hysterical response is proving a sort of strategic Game of Thrones. (…) The model is Watergate, Iran-Contra, or the summer of 2006, when the furious rhetoric almost made and in one case did make presidential governance impossible. Given the current role of a biased media (it acted quite differently during the disastrous rollout of Obamacare, the flagrant lying about its impact, and the imploding AFC website), they hope to so increase the temperature that everyone melts down, with the goal of the in-power people liquefying first. They assume their blanket obstructionism will not suffer the public-relations boomerang that damaged the Republicans during shutdowns of the Clinton administration and slowdowns to stop Obama, given the media megaphone broadcasting their cause. In contrast, the Trump people may believe that the Left is becoming so unhinged that their inflated rhetoric has lost all credibility and eventually becomes counter-productive. In Napoleonic terms by attacking everything, the Left is attacking nothing. Second, by raising the stakes, they bring out of the woodwork the true malevolence of the Left such as the adolescent boycott of the inauguration by many in the Congress, the unprofessionalism of the media typified by the Martin Luther King bust fiasco or Michael Cohen’s nonexistent Prague meetings, the unhinged behavior of the acting attorney general, the repulsive rhetoric of a Madonna or Ashley Judd, and the creepy talk of journalists abroad of assassination. In that sense, the executive orders are pheromones that draw out and expose unattractive predators. (…) Where does this stand-off lead and how does it end? Who knows, but the Trump people, in strategic terms, need in advance to configure the third- and fourth-order effects of their executive orders to ensure: that they are seen as reactive to preexisting extremism (…), that (…) that their policies are understood as focused and sober (e.g., the travel ban affects a minuscule number of would-be entrants in an otherwise generous policy of accepting up to 50,000 newcomers; the wall is normal practice in much of the world (Israel, the Gulf States, increasingly in Europe), and we are trying not to react in kind to Mexico, given that Mexico’s own immigration practices, both in terms of punishment and questions of race and ethnicity, are in some sense racist and draconian). The loser, as in all strategic collisions, is he who more slowly misreads constantly shifting public opinion and is more guided by ideological zeal rather than empiricism and so doubles down on rather than modifies a failing strategy. The best indices of who seems to be getting the upper-hand are of course polls on particular issues and on Trump’s favorability — and the unity or lack of among congressional Republicans.

Victor Davis Hanson
Securing national borders seems pretty orthodox. In an age of anti-Western terrorism, placing temporary holds on would-be immigrants from war-torn zones until they can be vetted is hardly radical. Expecting “sanctuary cities” to follow federal laws rather than embrace the nullification strategies of the secessionist Old Confederacy is a return to the laws of the Constitution. Using the term “radical Islamic terror” in place of “workplace violence” or “man-caused disasters” is sensible, not subversive. Insisting that NATO members meet their long-ignored defense-spending obligations is not provocative but overdue. Assuming that both the European Union and the United Nations are imploding is empirical, not unhinged. Questioning the secret side agreements of the Iran deal or failed Russian reset is facing reality. Making the Environmental Protection Agency follow laws rather than make laws is the way it always was supposed to be. Unapologetically siding with Israel, the only free and democratic country in the Middle East, used to be standard U.S. policy until Obama was elected. (…) Expecting the media to report the news rather than massage it to fit progressive agendas makes sense. In the past, proclaiming Obama a “sort of god” or the smartest man ever to enter the presidency was not normal journalistic practice. (…) Half the country is having a hard time adjusting to Trumpism, confusing Trump’s often unorthodox and grating style with his otherwise practical and mostly centrist agenda. In sum, Trump seems a revolutionary, but that is only because he is loudly undoing a revolution. Victor Davis Hanson

Attention: une révolution peut en cacher une autre !

Restauration des frontières nationales,  moratoire et meilleur contrôle de l’immigration issue de zones sensibles face à une menace terroriste croissante, refus de la continuation de l’épuration  religieuse du Monde dit « arabe », rappel de la loi nationale et remise en cause des « villes sanctuaires »,  explicitation de la menace terroriste islamique, rappel des membres de l’OTAN à leurs obligations de défense, dénonciation de l’incurie de l’ONU et du fiasco de l’UE, remise en question d’accords secrets accordant l’accès à l’arme nucléaire à un pays appelant ouvertement à l’annihilation d’un de ses voisins, retour à la politique d’alliance avec  le seul pays libre et démocratique du Moyen-Orient, dénonciation des manipulations d’une presse systématiquement partisane …

A l’heure où un nouvel attentat terroriste en plein coeur de la capitale française …

Confirme à la fois l’intuition trumpienne et l’efficacité israélienne

Mais aussi la mauvaise foi de nos médias se plaignant en fait que le décret Trump ne va pas assez loin …

Alors qu’après les faux dossiers des services secrets, la taille comparée des foules d’investiture présidentielle ou la bataille des bustes du Bureau ovale …

Ces derniers en sont quasiment, comme pour précédemment avec le président Bush, à l’appel à l’assassinat politique

Comment ne pas voir avec l’historien américain Victor Davis Hanson …

Et derrière la flamboyance et les mauvaises manières du tribun Trump …

La véritable radicalité de l’Administration Obama …

Et partant la normalité proprement révolutionnaire de son successeur ?

When Normalcy Is Revolution

Trump’s often unorthodox style shouldn’t be confused with his otherwise practical and mostly centrist agenda.

Victor Davis Hanson

National Review

February 2, 2017

By 2008, America was politically split nearly 50/50 as it had been in 2000 and 2004. The Democrats took a gamble and nominated Barack Obama, who became the first young, Northern, liberal president since John F. Kennedy narrowly won in 1960.

Democrats had believed that the unique racial heritage, youth, and rhetorical skills of Obama would help him avoid the fate of previous failed Northern liberal candidates Hubert Humphrey, George McGovern, Walter Mondale, Michael Dukakis, and John Kerry. Given 21st-century demography, Democrats rejected the conventional wisdom that only a conservative Democrat with a Southern accent could win the popular vote (e.g., Lyndon Johnson, Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton, Al Gore).

Moreover, Obama mostly ran on pretty normal Democratic policies rather than a hard-left agenda. His platform included opposition to gay marriage, promises to balance the budget, and a bipartisan foreign policy.

Instead, what followed was a veritable “hope and change” revolution not seen since the 1930s. Obama pursued a staunchly progressive agenda — one that went well beyond the relatively centrist policies upon which he had campaigned. The media cheered and signed on.

Soon, the border effectively was left open. Pen-and-phone executive orders offered immigrant amnesties. The Senate was bypassed on a treaty with Iran and an intervention in Libya.

Political correctness under the Obama administration led to euphemisms that no longer reflected reality.

Poorly conceived reset policy with Russia and a pivot to Asia both failed. The Middle East was aflame.

The Iran deal was sold through an echo chamber of deliberate misrepresentations.

The national debt nearly doubled during Obama’s two terms. Overregulation, higher taxes, near-zero interest rates, and the scapegoating of big businesses slowed economic recovery. Economic growth never reached 3 percent in any year of the Obama presidency — the first time that had happened since Herbert Hoover’s presidency.

A revolutionary federal absorption of health care failed to fulfill Obama’s promises and soon proved unviable.

Culturally, the iconic symbols of the Obama revolution were the “you didn’t build that” approach to businesses and an assumption that race/class/gender would forever drive American politics, favorably so for the Democrats.

Then, Hillary Clinton’s unexpected defeat and the election of outsider Donald Trump sealed the fate of the Obama Revolution.

For all the hysteria over the bluntness of the mercurial Trump, his agenda marks a return to what used to be seen as fairly normal, as the U.S. goes from hard left back to the populist center.

Trump promises not just to reverse almost immediately all of Obama’s policies, but to do so in a pragmatic fashion that does not seem to be guided by any orthodox or consistently conservative ideology.

Trade deals and jobs are Trump’s obsessions — mostly for the benefit of blue-collar America.

He calls for full-bore gas and oil development, a common culture in lieu of identity politics, secure borders, deregulation, tax reform, a Jacksonian foreign policy, nationalist trade deals in places of globalization, and traditionalist values.

In normal times, Trumpism — again, the agenda as opposed to Trump the person — might be old hat. But after the last eight years, his correction has enraged millions.

Yet securing national borders seems pretty orthodox. In an age of anti-Western terrorism, placing temporary holds on would-be immigrants from war-torn zones until they can be vetted is hardly radical. Expecting “sanctuary cities” to follow federal laws rather than embrace the nullification strategies of the secessionist Old Confederacy is a return to the laws of the Constitution.

Using the term “radical Islamic terror” in place of “workplace violence” or “man-caused disasters” is sensible, not subversive.

Insisting that NATO members meet their long-ignored defense-spending obligations is not provocative but overdue. Assuming that both the European Union and the United Nations are imploding is empirical, not unhinged.

Questioning the secret side agreements of the Iran deal or failed Russian reset is facing reality. Making the Environmental Protection Agency follow laws rather than make laws is the way it always was supposed to be.

Unapologetically siding with Israel, the only free and democratic country in the Middle East, used to be standard U.S. policy until Obama was elected.

Issuing executive orders has not been seen as revolutionary for the past few years — until now.

Expecting the media to report the news rather than massage it to fit progressive agendas makes sense. In the past, proclaiming Obama a “sort of god” or the smartest man ever to enter the presidency was not normal journalistic practice.

Freezing federal hiring, clamping down on lobbyists, and auditing big bureaucracies — after the Obama-era IRS, VA, GSA, EPA, State Department, and Secret Service scandals — are overdue. Half the country is having a hard time adjusting to Trumpism, confusing Trump’s often unorthodox and grating style with his otherwise practical and mostly centrist agenda.
In sum, Trump seems a revolutionary, but that is only because he is loudly undoing a revolution.

Voir aussi:

Our Game of Thrones
Victor Davis Hanson
National Review
January 31, 2017
The Trump administration’s flurry of reversing the earlier flurry of Obama executive orders and the Left’s hysterical response is proving a sort of strategic Game of Thrones.
Trump’s opponents believe that they are bleeding him from a thousand nicks. Without the requisite political clout, their ultimate goal is to drive crazy uncomfortable Republican establishmentarians and force them into a fetal position where they beg for it all to just go away, turning on their own first rather than their adversaries. Or they wish to create such universal chaos that bend-with-the-wind federal judges go with the flow and start issuing endless injunctions in a way they rarely did with Obama’s executive orders.
The model is Watergate, Iran-Contra, or the summer of 2006, when the furious rhetoric almost made and in one case did make presidential governance impossible. Given the current role of a biased media (it acted quite differently during the disastrous rollout of Obamacare, the flagrant lying about its impact, and the imploding AFC website), they hope to so increase the temperature that everyone melts down, with the goal of the in-power people liquefying first. They assume their blanket obstructionism will not suffer the public-relations boomerang that damaged the Republicans during shutdowns of the Clinton administration and slowdowns to stop Obama, given the media megaphone broadcasting their cause.
*** In contrast, the Trump people may believe that the Left is becoming so unhinged that their inflated rhetoric has lost all credibility and eventually becomes counter-productive. In Napoleonic terms by attacking everything, the Left is attacking nothing. Second, by raising the stakes, they bring out of the woodwork the true malevolence of the Left such as the adolescent boycott of the inauguration by many in the Congress, the unprofessionalism of the media typified by the Martin Luther King bust fiasco or Michael Cohen’s nonexistent Prague meetings, the unhinged behavior of the acting attorney general, the repulsive rhetoric of a Madonna or Ashley Judd, and the creepy talk of journalists abroad of assassination. In that sense, the executive orders are pheromones that draw out and expose unattractive predators.
*** Where does this stand-off lead and how does it end? Who knows, but the Trump people, in strategic terms, need in advance to configure the third- and fourth-order effects of their executive orders to ensure: that they are seen as reactive to preexisting extremism (e.g., sanctuary-city policies are subversive and reactionary Confederate/states’-rights acts that lead to George Wallace–like nihilism), that they are seen as refining prior presidential precedents (e.g., Obama gave them the example of temporary suspending visas to Middle Easterners and identifying particular countries that posed increased risks), that they are anticipating criticism (e.g., they might have exempted green-card holders and helpers of the U.S. military abroad from their temporary halt in immigration from areas of the Middle East), that they are putting the onus on their opponents (e.g., placing temporary and small — and therefore likely to be paid rather than circumvented — duties on remittances instead of a trade tariff-like fee would remind the American taxpayer that he should not, even indirectly, have to pay for building the wall, and reassure Mexico the U.S. is not leveling fees on those Mexican citizens who did not come into the United States illegally, given at present U.S. social services often subsidize the freeing-up of cash for remittances, a great majority of which come from those residing in the U.S. illegally),
And, finally, that their policies are understood as focused and sober (e.g., the travel ban affects a minuscule number of would-be entrants in an otherwise generous policy of accepting up to 50,000 newcomers; the wall is normal practice in much of the world (Israel, the Gulf States, increasingly in Europe), and we are trying not to react in kind to Mexico, given that Mexico’s own immigration practices, both in terms of punishment and questions of race and ethnicity, are in some sense racist and draconian). The loser, as in all strategic collisions, is he who more slowly misreads constantly shifting public opinion and is more guided by ideological zeal rather than empiricism and so doubles down on rather than modifies a failing strategy.

The best indices of who seems to be getting the upper-hand are of course polls on particular issues and on Trump’s favorability — and the unity or lack of among congressional Republicans.

Voir encore:

The Democrat Patient
Victor Davis Hanson
National Review

January 31, 2017

Ignoring the symptoms, misdiagnosing the malady, skipping the treatment

If progressives were to become empiricists, they would look at the symptoms of the last election and come up with disinterested diagnoses, therapies, and prognoses.

Although their hard-left candidate won the popular vote, even that benchmark was somewhat deceiving — given the outlier role of California and the overwhelming odds in their favor. The Republicans ran a candidate who caused a veritable civil war in their ranks and who was condemned by many of the flagship conservative media outlets. Trump essentially ran against a united Democratic party, the Republican establishment, the mainstream media (both liberal and conservative) — and won.

He was outspent. He was out-organized. He was outpolled and demonized daily as much by Republicans as Democrats. Yet he not only destroyed three political dynasties (the Clintons, Bushes, and Obamas) but also has seemingly rendered the Obama election matrix nontransferable to anyone other than Obama himself.

Not that Hillary did not try to copy Obama’s formula. She brought on Obama politicos to staff her campaign. She supported all the Obama initiatives, from Obamacare and record debt to a collapsed foreign policy. She spoke in a faux-inner city accent the same way Obama had to get out the African-American vote. She outdid Obama’s clinger speech by her own twist of “deplorables” and “irredeemables.” She returned to her own hard-left phase of the 1990s. Yet she was trounced in the electoral college and saw the fabled “blue wall” crumble.

DIAGNOSIS
Any reasonable post-election autopsy for a party would identify certain inconvenient truths.

1) The African-American vote is vital to the Democratic party, but it is dubious to suppose that blacks will register, turn out, and vote in a bloc (as they did in 2008 and 2012) for a Democratic candidate other than Barack Obama. The very efforts to ensure that 95 percent of blacks will vote for other Democratic nominees might only polarize other groups in an increasingly multiracial and multiethnic America. Trump, of course, knows all this and will make the necessary adjustments.

2) Asians and Hispanics are less a monolithic voting bloc. Supposedly discredited melting-pot assimilation, integration, and intermarriage are still the norm and can temper tribal solidarities and peel away from Democrats a third of their assumed constituents — in an electoral landscape where there is already only a thin margin of error, given that Democrats have written off the white working classes. In the case of Latinos, red states such as Texas and Arizona are unlikely to be flipped soon by Latino bloc voting, especially if Trump closes down the border and ends illegal immigration as a demographic electoral tool of the Democratic party. And Latino electoral-college strength is dissipated in states that are likely to be blue anyway (California, Nevada, New Mexico).

3) The race/class/gender agenda so favored by coastal elites and promulgated by media, Hollywood, and popular culture is an anathema to Middle America, especially its strange disconnect between affluence and the mandate for purportedly progressive equality. Moralistic lectures from wealthy people are not a way to win over the working classes. Rants by Hollywood celebrities and racialist sermons by would-be DNC chairs will not win over 51 percent of the voters in swing states. The twin agents of progressive dogma, the media and the university, are themselves under financial duress, must recalibrate, and have lost support from half the country.

4) Fairly or not, the entire environmental movement, as represented by Al Gore’s campaign against global warming, has become elitist and often hypocritical, and is evident in the lifestyles of wealthy utopians who have the capital and influence to navigate around the irritating results of their nostrums. Building Keystone is a better issue than the Paris Climate Change protocols. There is little support for Bay Area environmentalism among blue-collar building trades and unions — largely because radical climate change is now a religion and skeptics are hounded as heretics.

5) For the foreseeable future, the blue wall of the Midwest seems more vulnerable than the red wall in the South. The small towns and cities in swing states are as electorally powerful as the large, blue cities.

6) What the media and Democrats see as Trump’s outrageous extremism now looks, to more than half the country, like a tardy return to normalcy: employing the words “radical Islamic terror,” or asking cities to follow federal law rather than go full Confederate, or deporting illegal aliens who have committed crimes, or building a wall to stop easy illegal entry across the U.S. border, or putting a temporary hold on unvetted refugees from war-torn states in the Middle East. In the eyes of many Middle Americans, all these measures, even if sometimes hastily and sloppily embraced, are not acts of revolution; they are common-sense corrections of what were themselves extremist acts, or they are simply continuances of presidential executive-order power as enshrined by Obama and sanctified by the media.

TREATMENT
As a result, one might have thought that Democrats would look in 2017 to bread-and-butter economic issues and try to find candidates who are 21st-century updates of Hubert Humphrey or Harry Truman, or perhaps populist minority nominees or a younger version of Joe Biden. Or is it even worse? The Democratic party of 2017 is nothing like the party of 2008, when Hillary Clinton in the primaries ran as a guns-rights Annie Oakley, with a boilermaker in one hand and a bowling ball in the other, and Barack Obama kept assuring the nation that gay marriage was contrary to his religious principles.

Instead of seeing Barack Obama (both his successful two elections and his failed two terms) as the wave of the future, Democrats would be wise to reassess his electoral legacy as a unique phenomenon. In truth, Obama’s legacy is twofold: He took the party hard left, and he downsized it to a minority party of the two coasts and big cities. And then he faded off into the sunset to a multimillionaire retirement of golf and homilies.

The progressive movement, the Democratic party and its cultural appendages in entertainment and the media seem to be doubling down on a failed electoral strategy. Instead, they all hope that either Donald Trump will crack and spontaneously implode after some new sort of Access Hollywood disclosure, or that their own unrelenting invective will eventually grind him down, as it did with Richard Nixon.

Consider a potpourri of left-wing reactions to Trump. Would-be Democratic National Committee chairwoman Sally Boynton Brown pontificated: “I’m a white woman. I don’t get it. . . . My job is to listen and be a voice and shut other white people down when they want to interrupt.” Ashley Judd gave an incoherent rant at the Inauguration Day protest marches. In reading a bizarre poem, she variously compared Trump to Hitler, alleged that he had incestuous desires for his own daughter. and then indulged in rank vulgarity.

Another Hillary Clinton bedrock supporter, Madonna, told the assembled thousands, “I’m angry. Yes, I’m outraged. Yes, I have thought an awful lot about blowing up the White House.”

Secret Service agent and loud Hillary Clinton supporter Kerry O’Grady wrote on her Facebook page that she would “take jail time over a bullet or an endorsement for what I believe to be a disaster to this the country.” Making her presidential preference clear, she ended her post with “I am with Her.”

BuzzFeed’s rumor mongering about Trump did not meet National Enquirer standards. Time magazine’s Zeke Miller decided, on no evidence whatsoever, that Trump had suddenly removed the bust of Martin Luther King Jr. from the Oval Office. Miller reported the scoop as breaking news — after all, it would confirm Trump’s alleged racism — before retracting the story.

None of these reactions will convince those in the swing states that they erred in voting for Donald Trump.

PROGNOSIS

In sum, the architects of Democratic-party reform are themselves the problem, not the solution. On key issues, they represent a minority opinion, one confined to the entertainment industry, academia, race/class/gender elite activists, and the wealthy scions of Silicon Valley, Hollywood, and Wall Street. In addition, minority activists themselves do not get out in the heartland and mistakenly believe that the demeanor, mindset, and, yes, guilt of white urban liberal elites in their midst characterize the white working and middle classes in general. And they mistakenly assume they themselves cannot be out-of-touch elites, given their ethnic and racial heritage, when in fact many most certainly are. Do Eric Holder and Colin Kaepernick know more about poverty and hardship than a West Virginian miner or an out-of-work fabricator in southern Ohio? Does an affluent Van Jones visit depressed rural Michigan to lecture out-of-work plant workers and welders about their endemic white privilege?

The current Democratic reset plan certainly does not resemble the 1976 strategy of nominating a governor from the South in order to avoid another 1972 McGovern catastrophe; nor does it share the 1992 wisdom of nominating Bill Clinton to fend off a second Dukakis disaster.

For now, the Democratic-party strategists are doubling down on boutique environmentalism and race/gender victimhood, while hoping that Donald Trump implodes in scandal, war, or depression. They are clueless that their present rabid frenzy is doing as much political damage to their cause as is the object of their outrage.

Voir encore:

Mourad B. était très gentil : il a juste tué son docteur de 48 coups de couteau

Paul Le Poulpe

Riposte laïque

3 février 2017

Notre pays a encore bénéficié, ces dernières heurs, des atouts de la diversité et de l’apport des disciples d’Allah.

Ce matin, à 10 heures, un musulman, armé d’une machette, a attaqué, près du Louvre, une patrouille de soldats, aux cris d’Allah akbar. Abdallah E-H, selon les premières informations, aurait 29 ans, serait égyptien, et travaillerait à Dubaï. Remarquons que si on appliquait le décret Trump en France, en l’élargissant, sans doute ce sympathique touriste n’aurait-il jamais mis les pieds en France, ni n’aurait blessé un militaire avec sa machette. Francis Gruzelle, de manière très réactive, nous avait résumé l’événement.

http://ripostelaique.com/louvre-face-a-une-attaque-djihadiste-nos-militaires-ripostent-enfin-a-lisraelienne.html

Quelques heures avant, à Nogent-le-Rotrou, le docteur Rousseaux n’a pas eu la chance des militaires. Ce médecin de 64 ans, apprécié par l’ensemble de ses patients, a été sauvagement assassiné dans son cabinet par un homme de 42 ans, Mourad B. On ne sait pas pourquoi on n’a pas le droit d’avoir son nom de famille. Les conditions du meurtre sont abominables. 48 coups de couteau, rien de moins, sur l’ensemble du corps et au visage. Donc probablement à la gorge…

Qui est donc ce Mourad B ? Comme toujours quand l’assassin est musulman, personne ne comprend. Il était le plus gentil du quartier. Il causait avec tout le monde. Il faisait du vélo. Il interpellait tout le temps tout le monde, et il était jovial. Ah ! Petit détail, il avait viré d’un emploi de voisinage pour vol. Mais on ne va pas salir une image aussi séduisante du musulman modéré, de l’homme de paix, de la chance pour la France. Bref, comme d’habitude, personne ne comprend.

Donc, il va avoir eu une crise de « déséquilibré », et on s’attend à entendre le procureur Tarrare du coin nous faire le coup d’une crise inexplicable, même si l’individu, arrêté aux Mureaux, a agressé le personnel soignant à Limay.

En attendant, ce fait divers, que les autorités vont tout faire pour occulter, et nous raconter qu’il n’a rien à voir avec l’islam, pose un ensemble de questions politiques que nous n’allons pas occulter.

http://www.leparisien.fr/faits-divers/medecin-de-l-eure-et-loir-tue-de-48-coups-de-couteau-un-patient-en-garde-a-vue-03-02-2017-6650613.php#xtor=AD-1481423553

Nous avons en France dix millions de musulmans. Si un Mourad B, ou bien un Abdallah E-H, qui ne sont pas recensés par les autorités françaises comme particulièrement dangereux, peuvent massacrer un paisible médecin pour l’un, et attaquer à la machette des militaires pour l’autre, faut-il d’abord continuer à faire entrer des musulmans en France, ou bien leur fermer la frontière ? Donald Trump a partiellement répondu à la question, en interdisant, pour trois mois, l’entrée de son pays à sept nationalités.

Toute la caste politico-médiatique pleurniche, mais la cote du nouveau président des Etats-Unis n’a jamais été aussi haute.

Supposons que Marine Le Pen ou Nicolas Dupont-Aignan annoncent qu’ils arrêteront les visas des pays musulmans, Algérie, Tunisie et Maroc d’abord, quelles seraient les réactions en France ? Je leur pronostique un bond spectaculaire dans les sondages.

Au-delà de cela, peut-on garder en France des gens qui se réclament musulmans, dont adeptes de l’islam ? Notre ami Maxime Lepante, pour avoir affirmé le contraire, est victime de deux plaintes du Parquet de Paris.

http://ripostelaique.com/eviter-genocide-faut-expulser-musulmans.html

http://ripostelaique.com/attentat-a-hache-train-allemand-musulmans.html

Et celui-ci, faisant d’une pierre deux coups, entend faire assumer la responsabilité de ces propos à Pierre Cassen, puisque, de manière obsessionnelle, des juges ont décidé que notre fondateur était toujours le vrai directeur de publication de Riposte Laïque. Ils vont même jusqu’à contredire des décisions de justice pour prouver cela, c’est dire pour eux l’importance de faire tomber notre fondateur.

Qu’est qu’un musulman ? C’est quelqu’un qui se réclame de l’islam. Qu’est-ce que l’islam ? C’est un dogme qui demande à ses disciples de tuer tous les mécréants, et de conquérir l’ensemble du monde. D’où parfois, et même souvent, dans leur comportement, quelques marques de « déséquilibres » comme l’explique si bien la psychiatre Wafa Sultan. Car enfin, ces agressions sauvages au couteau ne reviennent-elles pas trop souvent, de manière répétitive, pour qu’enfin des politiques commencent à se poser les bonnes questions… et surtout à amener les bonnes solutions pour protéger les Français.

Précisons que le fait d’être né musulman n’implique pas, fort heureusement, l’obligation de demeurer dans l’islam, et que nombre d’esprits libres (pas assez) parviennent à s’en émanciper, totalement ou partiellement. Mais dans ce cas, ils ne sont plus musulmans.

Conclusion : avoir écrit, comme Maxime, qu’il faut expulser tous les musulmans, est-ce une incitation à la haine, ou le plus élémentaire principe de précaution ?

En tout cas, si on avait suivi à la lettre les écrits de Maxime, le docteur Rousseaux serait encore vivant, et n’aurait pas connu de terribles derniers moments, à 64 ans, poignardé à 48 reprises dans les souffrances que l’on devine (combien de temps avant de mourir ?), avec la douleur de ses proches qu’on imagine.

Mais avec les gouvernants que nous avons, la seule question est : dans combien de temps Mourad B. sera-t-il remis en liberté, comme l’ont été le chauffard de Dijon et tant d’autres psychopathes musulmans « déséquilibrés » ?

Voir de plus:

Trump’s executive order is so modest that the foundation of it is essentially existing law. That law was passed unanimously by both bodies of Congress in 2002. In fact, it garnered the support of 16 Democrat senators and 57 Democrat House members who are still serving in their respective bodies!

Following 9/11, Congress passed the Enhanced Border Security and Visa Entry Reform Act, which addressed many of the insecurities in our visa tracking system. The bill passed the House and Senate unanimously. The bill was originally sponsored by a group of bipartisan senators, including Ted Kennedy and Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. (F, 0%). Among other provisions, it restricted non-immigrant visas from countries designated as state sponsors of terror:

SEC. 306. RESTRICTION ON ISSUANCE OF VISAS TO NONIMMIGRANTS FROM COUNTRIES THAT ARE STATE SPONSORS OF INTERNATIONAL TERRORISM.

(a) IN GENERAL- No nonimmigrant visa under section 101(a)(15) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C.1101(a)(15)) shall be issued to any alien from a country that is a state sponsor of international terrorism unless the Secretary of State determines, in consultation with the Attorney General and the heads of other appropriate United States agencies, that such alien does not pose a threat to the safety or national security of the United States. In making a determination under this subsection, the Secretary of State shall apply standards developed by the Secretary of State, in consultation with the Attorney General and the heads of other appropriate United States agencies, that are applicable to the nationals of such states.

The directive to cut off non-immigrant visas from countries designated as state sponsors of terror is still current law on the books [8 U.S. Code § 1735]. Presidents Bush and Obama later used their discretion to waive the ban, but Trump is actually following the letter of the law — the very law sponsored and passed by Democrats — more closely than Obama did. Trump used his 212(f) authority to add immigrant visas, but that doesn’t take away the fact that every Democrat in the 2002 Senate supported the banning of non-immigrant visas.

Given that Trump has backed down on green card holders, his executive order on “Muslim countries” is essentially current law, albeit only guaranteed for 90 days!

At present, only three of the countries —  Sudan, Syria, and Iran —  are designated as state sponsors by the State Department. At the time Democrats agreed to the ban in 2002, the State Department also included Libya and Iraq in that list. Although Libya and Iraq were on the list due to the presence of Gadhafi and Saddam Hussein as sponsors of terror, there is actually more of a reason to cut off visas now. Both are completely failed states with no reliable data to vet travelers. Both are more saturated with Islamist groups now than they were in 2002. The same goes for Yemen and Somalia. Neither country is a state sponsor of terror because neither has a functioning governments. They are terrorist havens.

Thus, the letter of the law already applies to three of the countries, and the spirit of the law applies to all of them. Plus, the State Department could add any new country to the list, thereby making any future suspension of visas from those specific countries covered under §1735, in addition to the broad general power (INA 212(f)) to shut off any form of immigration. Given that Trump has backed down on green card holders, his executive order on “Muslim countries” is essentially current law, albeit only guaranteed for 90 days!

Sixteen sitting Democrats, including their Minority Leader, voted for the 2002 bill [several of them were in the House at the time]:

In addition, such prominent Democrats as former Vice President Biden, former Secretary of State Clinton, former Secretary of State Kerry, and former Majority Leader Reid vote voted for the bill.

In the House, 57 sitting Democrats voted for the 2002 bill, including leadership members, such as Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif. (F, 10%), Steny Hoyer, D-M.D. (F, 8%), and James Clyburn, D-S.C. (F, 8%).

If anything, the need to ratchet down immigration and visas from the Middle East is even more important now than after 9/11.

Dianne Feinstein has now introduced a bill to overturn Trump’s executive order, but her bill would also overturn, in part, the law on the books she herself sponsored and supported in 2002. In addition, a number of Republicans who are whining about the order, such as John McCain, R-Ariz. (F, 32%), voted for the 2002 bill.

The 2002 bill also established a program to monitor foreign students in the U.S. As part of that program, the Bush administration created the National Security Entry-Exit Registration System (NSEERS), which required visa recipients from countries that represented a security risk (at least 25 countries fell into that category) to register with an ICE office and report regularly about their plans. Unfortunately, Obama’s DHS abolished the program in May 2011. Now, there are twice as many foreign students in the United States, including well over 150,000 from the very countries originally monitored by the Bush administration’s program.

If anything, the need to ratchet down immigration and visas from the Middle East is even more important now than after 9/11. Back then we were concerned with Al Qaeda-style, command-and-control attacks whereby professional operators infiltrate our country in order to commit a large-scale terror attack. Theoretically, strong intelligence can preempt these attacks. What we are dealing with today is a ubiquitous threat of homegrown terror from years’ worth of irresponsible immigration policies, in conjunction with cyber jihad.  Any number of people from these countries who subscribe to Sharia can do us harm with smaller attacks that cannot be picked up by the intelligence community.

Yet, many Republicans are now to the left of even where Democrats were just 15 years ago. As for Democrats, any shred of intellectual honesty and concern for American security has been compromised to serve their ultimate goal of creating a permanent voting bloc at any and all costs.

Voir enfin:

Terrorisme : « L’opération Sentinelle est un trompe-l’œil »

Pointée du doigt par la commission d’enquête parlementaire, l’opération de déploiement militaire a montré ses limites lors des attentats. L’historienne Bénédicte Chéron dénonce son inefficacité.
L’Obs

06 juillet 2016

Créée au lendemain des attentats de janvier 2015, l’opération Sentinelle vise à déployer massivement des militaires sur le sol français pour prévenir les actes de terrorisme. La commission d’enquête parlementaire sur les attentats de 2015 en France, dite commission Fenech, a pointé dans son rapport, rendu public mardi 5 juillet, l’inefficacité de ce dispositif dans le cadre des attentats du 13 novembre.

« Les policiers de la BAC, arrivés les premiers, voulaient au moins que les militaires de l’opération Sentinelle, arrivés sur place, leur prêtent leurs fusils d’assaut Famas, puisque les militaires n’avaient pas le droit de tirer. Et ils ont essuyé un refus ! » fulmine le député Les républicains Georges Fenech, président de la commission d’enquête.

L’opération Sentinelle est-elle une coquille vide ou a-t-elle un rôle à jouer dans la lutte contre le terrorisme en France ? Pour l’historienne Bénédicte Chéron, chercheuse à l’Irice (Identités, Relations internationales et civilisations de l’Europe) – Paris-Sorbonne, ces troupes peuvent « jouer un rôle préventif » mais doivent « être repensées » en vue d’intégrer « davantage de souplesse ».

En quoi consiste l’opération Sentinelle ?

– L’opération Sentinelle a mis en place d’importants moyens humains depuis janvier 2015 pour lutter contre le terrorisme. L’armée participait certes déjà au plan Vigipirate depuis 25 ans mais il ne s’agissait pas d’une opération à part entière. Avec Sentinelle, 10.000 soldats sont déployés dans toute la France. Leur mission, sous l’autorité du ministère de l’Intérieur, est d’assurer une présence continue sur le territoire, en particulier aux abords des lieux sensibles : lieux de culte, sites touristiques, zones d’événements sportifs…

Pourquoi ce dispositif est-il jugé inefficace par la commission Fenech ?

– Les attentats du 13 novembre n’ont pu être évités malgré l’existence de cette opération. La portée dissuasive de l’opération Sentinelle n’était pas à la hauteur des attentes, puisque des militaires se trouvaient non loin du Bataclan et des terrasses et n’ont rien pu faire [à lire à ce sujet : l’enquête de « l’Obs »].

Pourquoi ces patrouilles n’ont-elles pas pu intervenir ?

– Elles souhaitaient engager le feu mais on leur a donné l’ordre de ne pas faire usage de leurs armes. L’action des militaires est extrêmement réduite et leur chaîne de commandement est très complexe.

Faut-il en conclure que l’opération Sentinelle est inutile ?

– Rien ne prouve aujourd’hui que la présence d’une patrouille Sentinelle a permis d’éviter un attentat. Il y a bien eu au départ un rôle psychologique : voir des militaires en kaki partout, dans les rues, dans les transports, rassure la population car la menace est bien réelle.

93% des Français font confiance à l’armée pour lutter contre le terrorisme, tandis que l’antimilitarisme n’est que résiduel en France : il tourne autour de 10%. Mais on peut aussi ajouter qu’en décembre 2015, si 70% des Français approuvaient l’opération Sentinelle, ils n’étaient que 50% à la juger efficace, selon un sondage Ifop pour le ministère de la Défense.

Il y a également une part importante de communication politique. Les militaires bénéficient d’une bonne image dans l’opinion publique, le gouvernement joue donc cette carte.

L’opération Sentinelle fonctionne en réalité selon le principe du trompe-l’œil : elle diffuse une image de puissance dans les rues mais on ne peut que constater son impuissance effective.

N’y a-t-il pas néanmoins des situations au cours desquelles ces patrouilles se sont illustrées ?

– Les militaires de Sentinelle ne sont en tout cas pas mis en avant dans le cadre de ce qui devrait être le coeur de leur action : la lutte contre le terrorisme. Un militaire, c’est fait pour faire la guerre. Les militaires de Sentinelle endossent davantage le rôle d’auxiliaires de police de proximité. par leurs présence dans les transports et dans les rues.

Une étude réalisée par Elie Tenenbaum, chercheur à l’Institut français des relations internationales (Ifri), souligne que les patrouilles Sentinelle d’Ile-de-France ont été victimes de 1.300 « actions contre la force » entre janvier et septembre 2015, dont 70% d’actes malveillants. Parmi les auteurs de ces violences, certains étaient peut-être des fanatiques, mais ça, rien ne permet de l’affirmer…Et il est évidemment compliqué de faire le tri parmi les personnes qui ont commis ces actes.

Cette mobilisation de tous les instants est usante pour les soldats…

– Comme l’a récemment rappelé le général Sainte-Claire Deville, commandant des forces terrestres, avant 2015, les militaires passaient 5% de leur temps en opération intérieure (principalement dans le cadre du plan Vigipirate) et 15% en opération extérieure. Le reste du temps, ils s’entrainaient et se reposaient. Depuis le début de Sentinelle, ils sont mobilisés 50% de leur temps en opération intérieure et 15% en opération intérieure. Leurs temps de repos et de formation sont donc considérablement entamés. Des troupes fatiguées et peu entraînées sont sans aucun doute bien moins efficaces.

Comment expliquer que les militaires soient autant sollicités ?

– C’est d’abord une question pratique et économique. Les militaires sont rapidement mobilisables, efficaces, fiables. Si l’on raisonne à court terme il est également moins onéreux de les utiliser massivement que de recruter et mobiliser à niveau équivalent les forces de l’ordre.

Faut-il supprimer ce dispositif ou peut-on l’améliorer ?

– De plus en plus de spécialistes, comme Michel Goya [spécialiste des armées, NDLR], plaident pour sa suppression ou, tout du moins, pour un réaménagement drastique, qui permettrait de mobiliser un nombre beaucoup plus faible de militaires, dans des dispositifs plus souples et moins statiques. Mais l’opération Sentinelle ne peut de toute façon pas être pensée isolément : la question de la lutte contre le terrorisme est surtout celle des services de renseignement et de police.

Propos recueillis par Maïté Hellio, le 5  juillet 2016

Voir par ailleurs:

Obama Era Precedents Haunt Media
Noah Rothman
Commentary
Jan. 25, 2017

As John Podhoretz wrote, these are days of promise and opportunity for America’s political media professionals. So far, they’re squandering their shot. By indulging in ill-considered hysteria and posturing before like-minded colleagues, they sacrifice the credibility they’ll need to expose President Donald Trump’s mendacities. To repair some of the strained bonds between audience and journalist, media professionals must display some restraint when reacting to the latest alleged assault on freedom and decency. That is most easily achieved by recognizing that many of the unprecedented developments of the Trump era aren’t unprecedented at all.

On Tuesday evening, the President of the United States applauded the Fox News Channel “for being number one in inauguration ratings.” In issuing this congratulatory note, he also attacked CNN for being “fake news.” A predictable series of horrified and disappointed reactions from media professionals followed. Notable among them was that of CNN media reporter Dylan Byers: “The President of the United States wants you to watch one news organization and not another…” While Trump’s behavior hardly befits an American president, he is also crudely mirroring the Obama administration, which spent its first year in office seeking to discredit Fox News as a respectable media outlet.

The Obama administration was calling Fox “fake news” before “fake news” was a phenomenon. In October of 2009, White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel told CNN that Fox was “not a news organization.” White House Communications Director Anita Dunn echoed Emanuel, saying that Fox “operates almost as either the research arm or the communications arm of the Republican Party.” “When we see a pattern of distortion, we’re going to be honest about that pattern of distortion,” said senior advisor to the president, Valerie Jarrett, when asked to defend the White House’s campaign against Fox.

Obama was still prosecuting the case against Fox nearly a year after the White House and the cable news network supposedly buried the hatchet. Just days before the 2010 midterm elections, Obama told Rolling Stone that Fox was cast in the mold of Hearst-era yellow journalism, and it pushes a point of view. “It’s a point of view that I think is ultimately destructive for the long-term growth of a country,” Obama said.

When the administration allegedly tried to exclude Fox in a round of interviews with “pay czar” Kenneth Feinberg in 2009, it inspired other networks to rally to Fox’s side. They did so not only out of professional courtesy but fear the future such a precedent might yield.

Fox News was not discredited by the president’s efforts. Arguably, the campaign had the opposite of its intended effect. There is a cautionary tale here for those cheering on Trump’s attacks on the press, but also one for media professionals who seem to have forgotten the last decade.

This isn’t the only recent development that has sent reporters into paroxysms of trepidation over this sacrifice of presidential dignity. Indicative of this administration’s obsessive fixation with its media coverage, the White House press office released on Wednesday a press release summing up the positive coverage it has received.

“Don’t recall ever seeing a WH do this,” remarked Huffington Post White House reporter Christina Wilkie. “Some might call it Propaganda,” NBC News’ Katy Tur averred. “I didn’t totally expect the 1984-esque dystopian future to be so soon, but life comes at ya fast,” snarked the Center for American Progress’s economist Katie Bahn. But this, too, is not an unparalleled abuse of the public trust; at least, not for those who remember how the Obama administration sold the public on the Iran nuclear accords in 2015.

The Obama administration’s “blog” content (now maintained by the National Archives and Records Administration), which includes former Press Secretary Josh Earnest’s “Regional Roundup: What America’s Newspapers are Saying About the Iran Deal.” The blog consisted entirely of favorable headlines from around the country reciting verbatim (and false) administration claims about the nuclear accord. “The Iran Deal” even had its own Twitter account which disseminated not only favorable press mentions but also crafted insipid pop culture memes to get the millennial generation jazzed about nuclear non-proliferation. Imagine the anxiety among journalists when the Trump White House mirrors this tactic.

John Podhoretz’s admonition is particularly relevant because so many of these Obama-era precedents did not get the left’s “creeping fascism” sense tingling at the time. To rend garments over these actions now only because the Trump White House is undertaking them is not just unwise; it’s insulting.


Réfugiés: Attention, une préférence peut en cacher une autre (Refugee madness: Our tradition has never been an unlimited open-door policy)

29 janvier, 2017
byanymeans

open-borders

christians_muslims_convert_die_syria_1
syrian_refugee_graph
no-jews mecca-muslims-only-road-signNous déclarons notre droit sur cette terre, à être des êtres humains, à être respectés en tant qu’êtres humains, à accéder aux droits des êtres humains dans cette société, sur cette terre, en ce jour, et nous comptons le mettre en œuvre par tous les moyens nécessaires. Malcom X (1964)
Ce n’est pas en refusant de mentir que nous abolirons le mensonge : c’est en usant de tous les moyens pour supprimer les classes. (…) Tous les moyens sont bons lorsqu’ils sont efficaces. Jean-Paul Sartre (les mains sales, II, 5, 1963)
L’avenir ne doit pas appartenir à ceux qui calomnient le prophète de l’Islam. Barack Obama (siège de l’ONU, New York, 26.09.12)
Ils ont été horriblement traités. Savez-vous que si vous étiez chrétien en Syrie, il était impossible, ou du moins très difficile d’entrer aux États-Unis ? Si vous étiez un musulman, vous pouviez entrer, mais si vous étiez chrétien, c’était presque impossible et la raison était si injuste, tout le monde était persécuté… Ils ont coupé les têtes de tout le monde, mais plus encore des chrétiens. Et je pensais que c’était très, très injuste. Nous allons donc les aider. Donald Trump
L’amour du prochain est une valeur chrétienne et cela implique de venir en aide aux autres. Je crois que c’est ce qui unit les pays occidentaux. Sigmar Gabriel (ministre allemand des Affaires étrangères)
Obama, franchement il fait partie des gens qui détestent l’Amérique. Il a servi son idéologie mais pas l’Amérique. Je remets en cause son patriotisme et sa dévotion à l’église qu’il fréquentait. Je pense qu’il était en désaccord avec lui-même sur beaucoup de choses. Je pense qu’il était plus musulman dans son cœur que chrétien. Il n’a pas voulu prononcer le terme d’islamisme radical, ça lui écorchait les lèvres. Je pense que dans son cœur, il est musulman, mais on en a terminé avec lui, Dieu merci. Evelyne Joslain
Christians are believed to have constituted about 30% of the Syrian population as recently as the 1920s. Today, they make up about 10% of Syria’s 22 million people. Hundreds of thousands of Christians have been displaced by fighting or left the country. Melkite Greek Catholic Patriarch Gregorios III Laham said last year that more than 1,000 Christians had been killed, entire villages cleared, and dozens of churches and Christian centres damaged or destroyed. Many fear that if President Assad is overthrown, Christians will be targeted and communities destroyed as many were in Iraq after the US-led invasion in 2003. They have also been concerned by the coming to power of Islamist parties in post-revolutionary Egypt and Tunisia. Patriarch Gregorios said the threat to Christianity in Syria had wider implications for the religion’s future in the Middle East because the country had for decades provided a refuge for Christians from neighbouring Lebanon, Iraq and elsewhere. BBC
The Orlando nightclub shooter, the worst mass-casualty gunman in US history, was the son of immigrants from Afghanistan. The San Bernardino shooters were first and second generation immigrants from Pakistan. Nidal Hassan, the Fort Hood killer, was the son of Palestinian immigrants. The Tsarnaev brothers who detonated bombs at the 2013 Boston marathon held Kyrgyz nationality. The would-be 2010 Times Square car bomber was a naturalized immigrant from Pakistan. The ringleader of the Paris attacks of November 2015, about which Donald Trump spoke so much on the campaign trail, was a Belgian national of Moroccan origins. President Trump’s version of a Muslim ban would have protected the United States from none of the above. (…) As ridiculous as was the former Obama position that Islamic terrorism has nothing to do with Islam, the new Trump position that all Muslims are potential terrorists is vastly worse. What Trump has done is to divide and alienate potential allies—and push his opponents to embrace the silliest extremes of the #WelcomeRefugees point of view. By issuing his order on Holocaust Remembrance Day, Trump empowered his opponents to annex the victims of Nazi crimes to their own purposes. The Western world desperately needs a more hardheaded approach to the issue of refugees. It is bound by laws and treaties written after World War II that have been rendered utterly irrelevant by a planet on the move. Tens of millions of people seek to exit the troubled regions of Central America, the Middle East, West Africa, and South Asia for better opportunities in Europe and North America. The relatively small portion of that number who have reached the rich North since 2013 have already up-ended the politics of the United States, the United Kingdom, and the European Union. German chancellor Angela Merkel’s August 2015 order to fling open Germany’s doors is the proximate cause of the de-democratization of Poland since September 2015, of the rise of Marine LePen in France, of the surge in support for Geert Wilders in the Netherlands, and—I would argue—of Britain’s vote to depart the European Union. The surge of border crossers from Central America into the United States in 2014, and Barack Obama’s executive amnesties, likewise strengthened Donald Trump. (…) without the dreamy liberal refusal to recognize the reality of nationhood, the meaning of citizenship, and the differences between cultures, Trump would never have gained the power to issue that order. (…) When liberals insist that only fascists will defend borders, then voters will hire fascists to do the job liberals won’t do. This weekend’s shameful chapter in the history of the United States is a reproach not only to Trump, although it is that too, but to the political culture that enabled him. Angela Merkel and Donald Trump may be temperamental opposites. They are also functional allies. David Frum
Trump isn’t making this up; Obama-administration policy effectively discriminated against persecuted religious-minority Christians from Syria (even while explicitly admitting that ISIS was pursuing a policy of genocide against Syrian Christians), and the response from most of Trump’s liberal critics has been silence (…) Liberals are normally the first people to argue that American policy should give preferential treatment to groups that are oppressed and discriminated against, but because Christians are the dominant religious group here — and the bêtes noires of domestic liberals — there is little liberal interest in accommodating U.S. refugee policy to the reality on the ground in Syria. So long as Obama could outsource religious discrimination against Christian refugees to Jordan and the U.N., his supporters preferred the status quo to admitting that Trump might have a point. On the whole, 2016 was the first time in a decade when the United States let in more Muslim than Christian refugees, 38,901 overall, 75 percent of them from Syria, Somalia, and Iraq, all countries on Trump’s list — and all countries in which the United States has been actively engaged in drone strikes or ground combat over the past year. Obama had been planning to dramatically expand that number, to 110,000, in 2017 — only after he was safely out of office. This brings us to a broader point: The United States in general, and the Obama administration in particular, never had an open-borders policy for all refugees from everywhere, so overwrought rhetoric about Trump ripping down Lady Liberty’s promise means comparing him to an ideal state that never existed. In fact, the Obama administration completely stopped processing refugees from Iraq for six months in 2011 over concerns about terrorist infiltration, a step nearly identical to Trump’s current order, but one that was met with silence and indifference by most of Trump’s current critics. Only two weeks ago, Obama revoked a decades-old “wet foot, dry foot” policy of allowing entry to refugees from Cuba who made it to our shores. His move, intended to signal an easing of tensions with the brutal Communist dictatorship in Havana, has stranded scores of refugees in Mexico and Central America, and Mexico last Friday deported the first 91 of them to Cuba. This, too, has no claim on the conscience of Trump’s liberal critics. After all, Cuban Americans tend to vote Republican. Even more ridiculous and blinkered is the suggestion that there may be something unconstitutional about refusing entry to refugees or discriminating among them on religious or other bases (a reaction that was shared at first by some Republicans, including Mike Pence, when Trump’s plan was announced in December 2015). There are plenty of moral and political arguments on these points, but foreigners have no right under our Constitution to demand entry to the United States or to challenge any reason we might have to refuse them entry, even blatant religious discrimination. Under Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution, Congress’s powers in this area are plenary, and the president’s powers are as broad as the Congress chooses to give him. If liberals are baffled as to why even the invocation of the historically problematic “America First” slogan by Trump is popular with almost two-thirds of the American public, they should look no further than people arguing that foreigners should be treated by the law as if they were American citizens with all the rights and protections we give Americans. Liberals are likewise on both unwise and unpopular ground in sneering at the idea that there might be an increased risk of radical Islamist terrorism resulting from large numbers of Muslims entering the country as refugees or asylees. There have been many such cases in Europe, ranging from terrorists (as in the Brussels attack) posing as refugees to the infiltration of radicals and the radicalization of new entrants. The 9/11 plotters, several of whom overstayed their visas in the U.S. after immigrating from the Middle East to Germany, are part of that picture as well. Here in the U.S., we have had a number of terror attacks carried out by foreign-born Muslims or their children. The Tsarnaev brothers who carried out the Boston Marathon bombing were children of asylees; the Times Square bomber was a Pakistani immigrant; the underwear bomber was from Nigeria; the San Bernardino shooter was the son of Pakistani immigrants; the Chattanooga shooter was from Kuwait; the Fort Hood shooter was the son of Palestinian immigrants. All of this takes place against the backdrop of a global movement of radical Islamist terrorism that kills tens of thousands of people a year in terrorist attacks and injures or kidnaps tens of thousands more. There are plenty of reasons not to indict the entire innocent Muslim population, including those who come as refugees or asylees seeking to escape tyranny and radicalism, for the actions of a comparatively small percentage of radicals. But efforts to salami-slice the problem into something that looks like a minor or improbable outlier, or to compare this to past waves of immigrants, are an insult to the intelligence of the public. The tradeoffs from a more open-borders posture are real, and the reasons for wanting our screening process to be a demanding one are serious. Like it or not, there’s a war going on out there, and many of its foot soldiers are ideological radicals who wear no uniform and live among the people they end up attacking. If your only response to these issues is to cry “This is just xenophobia and bigotry,” you’re either not actually paying attention to the facts or engaging in the same sort of intellectual beggary that leads liberals to refuse to distinguish between legal and illegal immigrants. Andrew Cuomo declared this week, “If there is a move to deport immigrants, I say then start with me” — because his grandparents were immigrants. This is unserious and childish: President Obama deported over 2.5 million people in eight years in office, and I didn’t see Governor Cuomo getting on a boat back to Italy. (…) A more trenchant critique of Trump’s order is that he’s undercutting his own argument by how narrow the order is. Far from a “Muslim ban,” the order applies to only seven of the world’s 50 majority-Muslim countries. Three of those seven (Iran, Syria, and Sudan) are designated by the State Department as state sponsors of terror, but the history of terrorism by Islamist radicals over the past two decades — even state-sponsored terrorism – is dominated by people who are not from countries engaged in officially recognized state-sponsored terrorism. The 9/11 hijackers were predominantly Saudi, and a significant number of other attacks have been planned or carried out by Egyptians, Pakistanis, and people from the various Gulf states. But a number of these countries have more significant business and political ties to the United States (and in some cases to the Trump Organization as well), so it’s more inconvenient to add them to the list. Simply put, there’s no reason to believe that the countries on the list are more likely to send us terrorists than the countries off the list. That said, the seven states selected do include most of the influx of refugees and do present particular logistical problems in vetting the backgrounds of refugees. If Trump’s goal is simply to beef up screening after a brief pause, he’s on firmer ground. (…) But our tradition has never been an unlimited open-door policy, and President Trump’s latest moves are not nearly such a dramatic departure from the Obama administration as Trump’s liberal critics (or even many of his fans) would have you believe. Dan McLaughlin
Experts say another reason for the lack of Christians in the makeup of the refugees is the makeup of the camps. Christians in the main United Nations refugee camp in Jordan are subject to persecution, they say, and so flee the camps, meaning they are not included in the refugees referred to the U.S. by the U.N. “The Christians don’t reside in those camps because it is too dangerous,” Shea said. “They are preyed upon by other residents from the Sunni community, and there is infiltration by ISIS and criminal gangs.” “They are raped, abducted into slavery and they are abducted for ransom. It is extremely dangerous; there is not a single Christian in the Jordanian camps for Syrian refugees,” Shea said. Fox news
Les États-Unis ont accepté 10 801 réfugiés syriens, dont 56 chrétiens. Pas 56 pour cent; 56 au total, sur 10 801. C’est-à-dire la moitié de 1 pour cent. Newsweek

Attention: une préférence peut en cacher une autre !

Alors qu’après l’accident industriel Obama qui a mis avec l’abandon de l’Irak le Moyen-Orient à feu et à sang …

Et sa version Merkel qui a déversé sur l’Europe, avec son lot d’attentats, une véritable invasion musulmane …

Sans compter après l’expulsion des juifs et leur interdiction d’accès dans nombre de pays musulmans, la menace de la disparition de son berceau historique de la totalité de la population chrétienne …

Nos belles âmes n’ont pas, entre deux appels plus ou moins subtils à l’assassinat du nouveau président américain, de mots assez durs …

Pour condamner – même s’il oublie étrangement les fourriers saoudiens et qataris ou pakistanais dudit terrorisme – le moratoire de trois mois de ce dernier …

Sur l’entrée des citoyens de sept pays particulièrement à risque (Syrie, Irak, Iran, Libye, Somalie, Soudan et Yemen) …

Et de quatre mois sur l’accueil de réfugiés de pays en guerre ainsi que la priorité aux réfugiés chrétiens de Syrie …

Devinez combien de chrétiens figuraient dans les quelque 10 000 réfugiés syriens que les Etats-Unis ont accueillis l’an dernier ?

Tollé international après le décret anti-réfugiés de Donald Trump
Les Echos
28/01 / 17

Au lendemain de la signature d’un décret interdisant l’entrée aux Etats-Unis pour les ressortissants de sept pays à majorité musulmane, la communauté internationale a fait part de son indignation.

Les réactions ne se sont pas faites attendre. Au lendemain de la signature d’un décret suspendant l’entrée aux Etats-Unis des réfugiés et des ressortissants de sept pays majoritairement musulmans, la communauté internationale n’a pas dissimulé son indignation.

A commencer par François Hollande qui a exhorté l’Europe à « engager avec fermeté » le dialogue avec le président américain. Le chef de l’Etat français a d’ailleurs fait cette déclaration quelques heures avant son premier entretien téléphonique avec son homologue américain.

Ce samedi soir, à l’occasion d’un appel prévu entre les deux présidents, Hollande en a profité pour rappeler à Trump que « le repli sur soi est une réponse sans issue », a rapporté l’Elysée. Il a par ailleurs invité le président américain au « respect » du principe de « l’accueil des réfugiés ».

L’Allemagne et la France sur la même ligne

Plus tôt dans la journée, les chefs de la diplomatie française et allemande ont aussi exprimé leur inquiétude. « Nous avons des engagements internationaux que nous avons signés. L’accueil des réfugiés qui fuient la guerre, qui fuient l’oppression, ça fait partie de nos devoirs », a martelé Jean-Marc Ayrault.

« L’amour du prochain est une valeur chrétienne et cela implique de venir en aide aux autres. Je crois que c’est ce qui unit les pays occidentaux », a renchérit Sigmar Gabriel, nommé ministre allemand des Affaires étrangères vendredi.

Côté Royaume-Uni, Theresa May a quant à elle refusé de condamner la décision de Donald Trump. « Les Etats-Unis sont responsables de la politique américaine sur les refugiés. Le Royaume-Uni est responsable de la politique britannique sur les réfugiés », a-t-elle répondu. « Nous ne sommes pas d’accord avec ce type d’approche », a néanmoins précisé un porte-parole, indiquant que le gouvernement britannique interviendrait si la mesure venait à avoir un impact sur les citoyens de son pays.

Réactions des principaux concernés

Concerné par le décret, l’Iran a vivement réagi ce samedi. La République islamique « prendra les mesures consulaires, juridiques et politiques appropriées », a expliqué le ministère des Affaires étrangères dans un communiqué, parlant d' »un affront fait ouvertement au monde musulman et à la nation iranienne ».

L’exécutif iranien a aussi déclaré que « tout en respectant le peuple américain et pour défendre les droits de ses citoyens », il a décidé « d’appliquer la réciprocité après la décision insultante des Etats-Unis concernant les ressortissants iraniens et tant que cette mesure n’aura pas été levée. »

Pour l’instant, les autres pays visés par ce décret, à savoir l’Irak, la Libye, la Somalie, le Soudan, la Syrie et le Yémen, n’ont pas réagi publiquement. En revanche, le Premier ministre turc a affirmé que la crise des réfugiés ne serait pas résolue « en érigeant des murs ». La Turquie est le premier pays à subir de plein fouet les conséquences de la guerre civile en Syrie et l’afflux de réfugiés.

Le Canada continuera d’accueillir des réfugiés « indépendamment de leur foi »

Sans commenter directement la décision américaine, le Premier ministre canadien Justin Trudeau a affirmé la volonté de son pays d’accueillir les réfugiés « indépendamment de leur foi ».

Répondant d’autre part à des inquiétudes sur l’impact du décret sur le Canada, le bureau du Premier ministre a affirmé tard dans la soirée avoir reçu des assurances de Washington que les Canadiens possédant la double nationalité des pays visés ne seraient pas affectés par l’interdiction.

Soutien israélien

Le président américain a en revanche été applaudi par le président tchèque Milos Zeman qui s’est félicité de que le président américain « protège son pays » et se soucie « de la sécurité de ses citoyens. Exactement ce que les élites européennes ne font pas », a tweeté son porte-parole.

De même pour le Premier ministre israélien, Benjamin Netanyahu, qui a écrit sur son compte twitter : « Président Trump a raison. J’ai fait construire un mur aux frontières sud d’Israël. Ca a empêché l’immigration illégale. Un vrai succès. Une grande idée. »

Indignation aux Etats-Unis

Sur le sol américain, le décret intitulé « Protéger la nation contre l’entrée de terroristes étrangers aux Etats-Unis » a déjà fait déjà l’objet d’une plainte déposée par plusieurs associations de défense des droits civiques américaines, dont la puissante ACLU, qui veulent le bloquer.

L’opposition démocrate aux Etats-Unis a de son côté dénoncé un décret « cruel » qui sape « nos valeurs fondamentales et nos traditions, menace notre sécurité nationale et démontre une méconnaissance totale de notre strict processus de vérification, le plus minutieux du monde » selon les mots du sénateur démocrate Ben Cardin, membre de la commission des Affaires étrangères du Sénat.

Ces mesures figuraient en bonne place dans le programme du candidat républicain, qui avait un temps envisagé d’interdire à tous les musulmans de se rendre aux Etats-Unis.

Voir aussi:

Trump annonce la suspension du programme d’accueil des réfugiés le 27 janvier 2017 dans les locaux du Pentagone à Washington. © Carlos Barria/Reuters

Donald Trump tient ses promesses de campagne. Cette fois, c’est sur la protection du territoire contre la menace terroriste qu’il a signé deux décrets. L’un interdit l’accès aux citoyens de sept pays arabes, l’autre met en pause l’accueil de réfugiés de pays en guerre.

Les ressortissants de sept pays sont désormais persona non grata aux Etats-Unis. Ainsi en a décidé le nouveau président Donald Trump en fermant temporairement l’accès de son pays aux citoyens de Syrie, de l’Irak, de la Libye, de la Somalie, du Soudan et du Yemen. Objectif affirmé par Donald Trump, «maintenir les terroristes islamistes radicaux hors des Etats-Unis d’Amérique».

Il a annoncé que de nouvelles mesures de contrôle seraient mises sur pied, sans préciser lesquelles. «Nous voulons être sûrs que nous ne laissons pas entrer dans notre pays les mêmes menaces que celles que nos soldats combattent à l’étranger.»
Dans le même temps le président annonce que priorité sera donnée aux réfugiés chrétiens de Syrie.

Washington va également arrêter pendant quatre mois le programme d’accueil des réfugiés de pays en guerre. Pour l’année 2016, l’administration américaine avait admis près de 85.000 réfugiés, dont 10.000 Syriens. Elle s’était donné pour objectif d’accueillir 110.000 réfugiés en 2017, un chiffre ramené à 50.000 par l’administration Trump. Ce programme date de 1980 et n’a été interrompu qu’une fois, après les attentats du 11 septembre 2001.

Réactions indignées
Les murs qui se dressent, les barrières qui se ferment, partout dans le monde, les réactions aux premières mesures de Donald Trump se multiplient.
La plus symbolique est surement celle de la jeune Pakistanaise Malala Yousafzaï, cible des fondamentalistes talibans et prix Nobel de la paix en 2014. Elle a déclaré avoir «le coeur brisé de voir l’Amérique tourner le dos à son fier passé d’accueil de réfugiés et de migrants».

Onze autres prix Nobel et des universitaires renommés ont également lancé une pétition réclamant la reprise de l’accueil des visiteurs des sept pays visés. «Une épreuve injustifiée pour des gens qui sont nos étudiants, nos collègues, nos amis et des membres de notre communauté.»

Deux ONG, l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM) et le Haut commissariat de l’Onu pour les réfugiés (HCR), ont appelé Donald Trump à maintenir l’accueil aux Etats-Unis. «Les besoins des réfugiés et des migrants à travers le monde n’ont jamais été aussi grands et le programme américain de réinstallation est l’un des plus importants du monde», écrivent les deux ONG dans un communiqué commun.

Même le fondateur de Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, s’en est indigné sur sa page, rappelant que les Etats-Unis sont un pays de migrants, à commencer par sa famille.

Conséquences
Selon A. Ayoub, directeur juridique du Comité arabo-américain contre les discriminations, les conséquences sont immédiates. Ces mesures frappent notamment des Arabo-Américains dont des proches étaient en route pour une visite aux Etats-Unis. Le regroupement de familles séparées par la guerre va aussi devenir impossible.

Voir également:

Middle East

‘Gross injustice’: Of 10,000 Syrian refugees to the US, 56 are Christian

September 02, 2016

The Obama administration hit its goal this week of admitting 10,000 Syrian refugees — yet only a fraction of a percent are Christians, stoking criticism that officials are not doing enough to address their plight in the Middle East.

Of the 10,801 refugees accepted in fiscal 2016 from the war-torn country, 56 are Christians, or .5 percent.

A total of 10,722 were Muslims, and 17 were Yazidis.

The numbers are disproportionate to the Christian population in Syria, estimated last year by the U.S. government to make up roughly 10 percent of the population. Since the outbreak of civil war in 2011, it is estimated that between 500,000 and 1 million Christians have fled the country, while many have been targeted and slaughtered by the Islamic State.

In March, Secretary of State John Kerry said the U.S. had determined that ISIS has committed genocide against minority religious groups, including Christians and Yazidis.

“In my judgment, Daesh is responsible for genocide against groups in territory under its control, including Yazidis, Christians and Shia Muslims,” Kerry said at the State Department, using an alternative Arabic name for the group.

He also accused ISIS of “crimes against humanity” and « ethnic cleansing. »

Yet, despite the strong words, relatively few from those minority groups have been brought into the United States. A State Department spokesperson told FoxNews.com that religion was only one of many factors used in determining a refugee’s eligibility to enter the United States.

Critics blasted the administration for not making religion a more important factor, as the U.S. government has prioritized religious minorities in the past in other cases.

“It’s disappointingly disproportional,” Matthew Clark, senior counsel at the American Center for Law and Justice (ACLJ), told FoxNews.com. “[The Obama administration has] not prioritized Christians and it appears they have actually deprioritized them, put them back of the line and made them an afterthought.”

“This is de facto discrimination and a gross injustice,” said Nina Shea, director of the Hudson Institute’s Center for Religious Freedom.

Experts say another reason for the lack of Christians in the make-up of the refugees is the make-up of the camps. Christians in the main United Nations refugee camp in Jordan are subject to persecution, they say, and so flee the camps, meaning they are not included in the refugees referred to the U.S. by the U.N.

“The Christians don’t reside in those camps because it is too dangerous,” Shea said. “They are preyed upon by other residents from the Sunni community and there is infiltration by ISIS and criminal gangs.”

“They are raped, abducted into slavery and they are abducted for ransom. It is extremely dangerous, there is not a single Christian in the Jordanian camps for Syrian refugees,” Shea said.

However, Kristin Wright, director of advocacy for Open Doors USA – a group that advocates for Christians living in dangerous areas across the world – told FoxNews.com that another reason is many Christians are choosing to stick it out in Syria, or going instead to urban areas for now.

“Many have fled to urban areas instead of the camps, so they may be living in Beirut instead of living in a broader camp, meaning many are not registering as refugees,” Wright said. “They may still come to the U.S. but may come through another immigration pathway.”

However, others called on the Obama administration, in light of its genocide declaration, to do more to assist Christians, including setting up safe zones in Syria or actively seeking out Christians via the use of contractors to bring them to safety.

In March, Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., introduced legislation that would give special priority to refugees who were members of persecuted religious minorities in Syria.

“We must not only recognize what’s happening as genocide, but also take action to relieve it, » Cotton said.

“The administration did the right thing by recognizing genocide, but by not taking action, it deflates it and makes it so Christians and others are not receiving any help,” Clark said. “So it’s all words and no actions, it’s just lip service on the issue of the genocide.”

This week, the ACLJ filed a lawsuit against the State Department for not responding to Freedom of Information Act requests about what the administration is doing to combat the genocide.

For Shea, the question is not just about helping refugees, but the very survival of Christianity in the 2,000-year community that has existed since the apostolic era of Christianity.

« This Christian community is dying, » she said. « I fear that there will be no Christians left when the dust settles. »

Adam Shaw is a Politics Reporter and occasional Opinion writer for FoxNews.com. He can be reached here or on Twitter: @AdamShawNY.

 Voir encore:
Refugee Madness: Trump Is Wrong, But His Liberal Critics Are Crazy
Dan McLaughlin
January 28, 2017
The anger at his new policy is seriously misplaced.

President Trump has ordered a temporary, 120-day halt to admitting refugees from seven countries, all of them war-torn states with majority-Muslim populations: Iraq, Iran, Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Libya, and Somalia. He has further indicated that, once additional screening provisions are put in place, he wants further refugee admissions from those countries to give priority to Christian refugees over Muslim refugees. Trump’s order is, in characteristic Trump fashion, both ham-handed and underinclusive, and particularly unfair to allies who risked life and limb to help the American war efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan. But it is also not the dangerous and radical departure from U.S. policy that his liberal critics make it out to be. His policy may be terrible public relations for the United States, but it is fairly narrow and well within the recent tradition of immigration actions taken by the Obama administration.

First, let’s put in context what Trump is actually doing. The executive order, on its face, does not discriminate between Muslim and Christian (or Jewish) immigrants, and it is far from being a complete ban on Muslim immigrants or even Muslim refugees. Trump’s own stated reason for giving preference to Christian refugees is also worth quoting:

Trump was asked whether he would prioritize persecuted Christians in the Middle East for admission as refugees, and he replied, “Yes.” “They’ve been horribly treated,” he said. “Do you know if you were a Christian in Syria it was impossible, at least very tough, to get into the United States? If you were a Muslim you could come in, but if you were a Christian it was almost impossible. And the reason that was so unfair — everybody was persecuted, in all fairness — but they were chopping off the heads of everybody, but more so the Christians. And I thought it was very, very unfair. “So we are going to help them.”

Trump isn’t making this up; Obama-administration policy effectively discriminated against persecuted religious-minority Christians from Syria (even while explicitly admitting that ISIS was pursuing a policy of genocide against Syrian Christians), and the response from most of Trump’s liberal critics has been silence:

The United States has accepted 10,801 Syrian refugees, of whom 56 are Christian. Not 56 percent; 56 total, out of 10,801. That is to say, one-half of 1 percent. The BBC says that 10 percent of all Syrians are Christian, which would mean 2.2 million Christians. . . . Experts say [one] reason for the lack of Christians in the makeup of the refugees is the makeup of the camps. Christians in the main United Nations refugee camp in Jordan are subject to persecution, they say, and so flee the camps, meaning they are not included in the refugees referred to the U.S. by the U.N. “The Christians don’t reside in those camps because it is too dangerous,” [Nina Shea, director of the Hudson Institute’s Center for Religious Freedom] said. “They are preyed upon by other residents from the Sunni community, and there is infiltration by ISIS and criminal gangs.” “They are raped, abducted into slavery and they are abducted for ransom. It is extremely dangerous; there is not a single Christian in the Jordanian camps for Syrian refugees,” Shea said.

Liberals are normally the first people to argue that American policy should give preferential treatment to groups that are oppressed and discriminated against, but because Christians are the dominant religious group here — and the bêtes noires of domestic liberals — there is little liberal interest in accommodating U.S. refugee policy to the reality on the ground in Syria. So long as Obama could outsource religious discrimination against Christian refugees to Jordan and the U.N., his supporters preferred the status quo to admitting that Trump might have a point.

On the whole, 2016 was the first time in a decade when the United States let in more Muslim than Christian refugees, 38,901 overall, 75 percent of them from Syria, Somalia, and Iraq, all countries on Trump’s list — and all countries in which the United States has been actively engaged in drone strikes or ground combat over the past year. Obama had been planning to dramatically expand that number, to 110,000, in 2017 — only after he was safely out of office.

This brings us to a broader point: The United States in general, and the Obama administration in particular, never had an open-borders policy for all refugees from everywhere, so overwrought rhetoric about Trump ripping down Lady Liberty’s promise means comparing him to an ideal state that never existed. In fact, the Obama administration completely stopped processing refugees from Iraq for six months in 2011 over concerns about terrorist infiltration, a step nearly identical to Trump’s current order, but one that was met with silence and indifference by most of Trump’s current critics.

Only two weeks ago, Obama revoked a decades-old “wet foot, dry foot” policy of allowing entry to refugees from Cuba who made it to our shores. His move, intended to signal an easing of tensions with the brutal Communist dictatorship in Havana, has stranded scores of refugees in Mexico and Central America, and Mexico last Friday deported the first 91 of them to Cuba. This, too, has no claim on the conscience of Trump’s liberal critics. After all, Cuban Americans tend to vote Republican.

Even more ridiculous and blinkered is the suggestion that there may be something unconstitutional about refusing entry to refugees or discriminating among them on religious or other bases (a reaction that was shared at first by some Republicans, including Mike Pence, when Trump’s plan was announced in December 2015). There are plenty of moral and political arguments on these points, but foreigners have no right under our Constitution to demand entry to the United States or to challenge any reason we might have to refuse them entry, even blatant religious discrimination. Under Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution, Congress’s powers in this area are plenary, and the president’s powers are as broad as the Congress chooses to give him. If liberals are baffled as to why even the invocation of the historically problematic “America First” slogan by Trump is popular with almost two-thirds of the American public, they should look no further than people arguing that foreigners should be treated by the law as if they were American citizens with all the rights and protections we give Americans.

Liberals are likewise on both unwise and unpopular ground in sneering at the idea that there might be an increased risk of radical Islamist terrorism resulting from large numbers of Muslims entering the country as refugees or asylees. There have been many such cases in Europe, ranging from terrorists (as in the Brussels attack) posing as refugees to the infiltration of radicals and the radicalization of new entrants. The 9/11 plotters, several of whom overstayed their visas in the U.S. after immigrating from the Middle East to Germany, are part of that picture as well. Here in the U.S., we have had a number of terror attacks carried out by foreign-born Muslims or their children. The Tsarnaev brothers who carried out the Boston Marathon bombing were children of asylees; the Times Square bomber was a Pakistani immigrant; the underwear bomber was from Nigeria; the San Bernardino shooter was the son of Pakistani immigrants; the Chattanooga shooter was from Kuwait; the Fort Hood shooter was the son of Palestinian immigrants. All of this takes place against the backdrop of a global movement of radical Islamist terrorism that kills tens of thousands of people a year in terrorist attacks and injures or kidnaps tens of thousands more.

There are plenty of reasons not to indict the entire innocent Muslim population, including those who come as refugees or asylees seeking to escape tyranny and radicalism, for the actions of a comparatively small percentage of radicals. But efforts to salami-slice the problem into something that looks like a minor or improbable outlier, or to compare this to past waves of immigrants, are an insult to the intelligence of the public. The tradeoffs from a more open-borders posture are real, and the reasons for wanting our screening process to be a demanding one are serious.

Like it or not, there’s a war going on out there, and many of its foot soldiers are ideological radicals who wear no uniform and live among the people they end up attacking. If your only response to these issues is to cry “This is just xenophobia and bigotry,” you’re either not actually paying attention to the facts or engaging in the same sort of intellectual beggary that leads liberals to refuse to distinguish between legal and illegal immigrants. Andrew Cuomo declared this week, “If there is a move to deport immigrants, I say then start with me” — because his grandparents were immigrants. This is unserious and childish: President Obama deported over 2.5 million people in eight years in office, and I didn’t see Governor Cuomo getting on a boat back to Italy.

Conservatives have long recognized these points — which is another way of saying that a blank check for refugee admissions is no more a core principle of the Right than it is of the Left.

A more trenchant critique of Trump’s order is that he’s undercutting his own argument by how narrow the order is. Far from a “Muslim ban,” the order applies to only seven of the world’s 50 majority-Muslim countries. Three of those seven (Iran, Syria, and Sudan) are designated by the State Department as state sponsors of terror, but the history of terrorism by Islamist radicals over the past two decades — even state-sponsored terrorism – is dominated by people who are not from countries engaged in officially recognized state-sponsored terrorism. The 9/11 hijackers were predominantly Saudi, and a significant number of other attacks have been planned or carried out by Egyptians, Pakistanis, and people from the various Gulf states. But a number of these countries have more significant business and political ties to the United States (and in some cases to the Trump Organization as well), so it’s more inconvenient to add them to the list. Simply put, there’s no reason to believe that the countries on the list are more likely to send us terrorists than the countries off the list.

That said, the seven states selected do include most of the influx of refugees and do present particular logistical problems in vetting the backgrounds of refugees. If Trump’s goal is simply to beef up screening after a brief pause, he’s on firmer ground.

The moral and strategic arguments against Trump’s policy are, however, significant. America’s open-hearted willingness to harbor refugees from around the world has always been a source of our strength, and sometimes an effective tool deployed directly against hostile foreign tyrannies. Today, for example, the chief adversary of Venezuela’s oppressive economic policies is a website run by a man who works at a Home Depot in Alabama, having been granted political asylum here in 2005. And the refugee problem is partly one of our own creation. My own preference for Syrian refugees, many of them military-age males whom Assad is trying to get out of his country, has been to arm them, train them, and send them back, after the tradition of the Polish and French in World War II and the Czechs in World War I. But that requires support that neither Trump nor Obama has been inclined to provide, and you can’t seriously ask individual Syrians to fight a suicidal two-front war against ISIS and the Russian- and Iranian-backed Assad without outside support. So where else can they go?

Also, some people seeking refugee status or asylum may have stronger claims on our gratitude. Consider some of the first people denied entry under the new policy:

The lawyers said that one of the Iraqis detained at Kennedy Airport, Hameed Khalid Darweesh, had worked on behalf of the United States government in Iraq for ten years. The other, Haider Sameer Abdulkhaleq Alshawi, was coming to the United States to join his wife, who had worked for an American contractor, and young son, the lawyers said.

These specific cases may or may not turn out to be as sympathetic as they appear; these are statements made by lawyers filing a class action, who by their own admission haven’t even spoken to their clients. But in a turn of humorous irony that undercut some of the liberal narrative, it turns out that Darweesh told the press that he likes Trump. Trump’s moves are not as dramatic a departure from the Obama administration as his critics would have you believe.

Certainly, we should give stronger consideration to refugee or asylum claims from people who are endangered as a result of their cooperation with the U.S. military. But such consideration can still be extended on a case-by-case basis, as the executive order explicitly permits: “Notwithstanding a suspension pursuant to subsection (c) of this section or pursuant to a Presidential proclamation described in subsection (e) of this section, the Secretaries of State and Homeland Security may, on a case-by-case basis, and when in the national interest, issue visas or other immigration benefits to nationals of countries for which visas and benefits are otherwise blocked.”

Trump also seems to have triggered some unnecessary chaos at the airports and borders around the globe by signing the order without a lot of adequate advance notice to the public or to the people charged with administering the order. That’s characteristic of his early administration’s public-relations amateur hour, and an unnecessary, unforced error. Then again, the core policy is one he broadcast to great fanfare well over a year ago, so this comes as no great shock.

The American tradition of accepting refugees and asylees from around the world, especially from the clutches of our enemies, is a proud one, and it is a sad thing to see that compromised. And while Middle Eastern Christians should be given greater priority in escaping a region where they are particularly persecuted, the next step in this process should not be one that seeks to permanently enshrine a preference for Christians over Muslims generally. But our tradition has never been an unlimited open-door policy, and President Trump’s latest moves are not nearly such a dramatic departure from the Obama administration as Trump’s liberal critics (or even many of his fans) would have you believe. — Dan McLaughlin is an attorney in New York City and an NRO contributing columnist.

Voir enfin:

The Roots of a Counterproductive Immigration Policy
The liberal scorn for nationhood and refusal to adapt immigration policy to changing circumstances enables the rise of extremism in the West.
David Frum
The Atlantic monthly
Jan 28, 2017

The Orlando nightclub shooter, the worst mass-casualty gunman in US history, was the son of immigrants from Afghanistan. The San Bernardino shooters were first and second generation immigrants from Pakistan. Nidal Hassan, the Fort Hood killer, was the son of Palestinian immigrants. The Tsarnaev brothers who detonated bombs at the 2013 Boston marathon held Kyrgyz nationality. The would-be 2010 Times Square car bomber was a naturalized immigrant from Pakistan. The ringleader of the Paris attacks of November 2015, about which Donald Trump spoke so much on the campaign trail, was a Belgian national of Moroccan origins. President Trump’s version of a Muslim ban would have protected the United States from none of the above.

If the goal is to exclude radical Muslims from the United States, the executive order Trump announced on Friday seems a highly ineffective way to achieve it. The Trump White House has incurred all the odium of an anti-Muslim religious test, without any attendant real-world benefit. The measure amounts to symbolic politics at its most stupid and counterproductive. Its most likely practical effect will be to aggravate the political difficulty of dealing directly and speaking without euphemisms about Islamic terrorism. As ridiculous as was the former Obama position that Islamic terrorism has nothing to do with Islam, the new Trump position that all Muslims are potential terrorists is vastly worse.
What Trump has done is to divide and alienate potential allies—and push his opponents to embrace the silliest extremes of the #WelcomeRefugees point of view. By issuing his order on Holocaust Remembrance Day, Trump empowered his opponents to annex the victims of Nazi crimes to their own purposes.

The Western world desperately needs a more hardheaded approach to the issue of refugees. It is bound by laws and treaties written after World War II that have been rendered utterly irrelevant by a planet on the move. Tens of millions of people seek to exit the troubled regions of Central America, the Middle East, West Africa, and South Asia for better opportunities in Europe and North America. The relatively small portion of that number who have reached the rich North since 2013 have already up-ended the politics of the United States, the United Kingdom, and the European Union. German chancellor Angela Merkel’s August 2015 order to fling open Germany’s doors is the proximate cause of the de-democratization of Poland since September 2015, of the rise of Marine LePen in France, of the surge in support for Geert Wilders in the Netherlands, and—I would argue—of Britain’s vote to depart the European Union. The surge of border crossers from Central America into the United States in 2014, and Barack Obama’s executive amnesties, likewise strengthened Donald Trump.

It’s understandable why people in the poor world would seek to relocate. It’s predictable that people in the destination nations would resist. Interpreting these indelible conflicts through the absurdly inapt analogy of German and Austrian Jews literally fleeing for their lives will lead to systematically erroneous conclusions.

We need a new paradigm for a new time. The social trust and social cohesion that characterize an advanced society like the United States are slowly built and vulnerable to erosion. They are eroding. Trump is more the symptom of that erosion than the cause.

Trump’s executive order has unleashed chaos, harmed lawful U.S. residents, and alienated potential friends in the Islamic world. Yet without the dreamy liberal refusal to recognize the reality of nationhood, the meaning of citizenship, and the differences between cultures, Trump would never have gained the power to issue that order.

Liberalism and nationhood grew up together in the 19th century, mutually dependent. In the 21st century, they have grown apart—or more exactly, liberalism has recoiled from nationhood. The result has not been to abolish nationality, but to discredit liberalism.

When liberals insist that only fascists will defend borders, then voters will hire fascists to do the job liberals won’t do. This weekend’s shameful chapter in the history of the United States is a reproach not only to Trump, although it is that too, but to the political culture that enabled him. Angela Merkel and Donald Trump may be temperamental opposites. They are also functional allies.

 


Antiracisme: Appropriation culturelle, espaces protégés, signalisation des contenus, bienvenue au meilleur des mondes que nous préparent nos universités! (Executing Socrates all over again: How trigger warnings end up silencing all students)

15 janvier, 2017
queens-racist-party pc1 pc4 pc5 pc6 pc7pc8 pc9 safe-space trigger-warnings safespace2 real-world cutoutsno-lepenparliament-hill-yoga
Le monde moderne n’est pas mauvais : à certains égards, il est bien trop bon. Il est rempli de vertus féroces et gâchées. Lorsqu’un dispositif religieux est brisé (comme le fut le christianisme pendant la Réforme), ce ne sont pas seulement les vices qui sont libérés. Les vices sont en effet libérés, et ils errent de par le monde en faisant des ravages ; mais les vertus le sont aussi, et elles errent plus férocement encore en faisant des ravages plus terribles. Le monde moderne est saturé des vieilles vertus chrétiennes virant à la folie.  G.K. Chesterton
La noble idée de « la guerre contre le racisme » se transforme graduellement en une idéologie hideusement mensongère. Et cet antiracisme sera, pour le XXIe siècle, ce qu’a été le communisme pour le XXe. Alain Finkielkraut
L’ordre politico-économique actuel est paradoxal. Il faut commencer par reconnaître que les notions de mondialisation et de « gouvernance mondiale » vont, en fait, de pair avec celle de bureaucratie. Ce qui se prétend libéral a tendance à ne pas l’être du tout. L’invocation d’une forme d’autoritarisme constitue certes un symptôme du rejet du système actuel, mais ça n’est pas nécessairement le dernier mot du virage politique actuel. Nous vivons d’ores et déjà dans un système de bureaucratie absolue, qui, dans le même temps, aspire à ne plus rien gérer que de dérisoire et fait mine de « déréguler » en invoquant la mondialisation et ses avatars. Sur la base de l’économie administrée d’après guerre s’est construite une machine administrative qui, à partir des années 1970, a commencé, comme ivre de son propre pouvoir, à vaciller et à se prétendre libérale. Depuis 2008, « le roi est nu ». On assiste, en particulier dans le monde anglophone, à une prise de conscience des failles fondamentales du système de « gouvernance mondiale ». Trump et le Brexit sont des manifestations historiques de ce phénomène. Il suffit de s’amuser à lire le Financial Times ou le Wall Street Journal entre les lignes pour se convaincre que, malgré les dichotomies électorales, cette prise de conscience y touche autant l’élite financière que les classes populaires. On réalise enfin que les bureaucraties pseudo-libérales ne comprennent pas les marchés et ne font qu’aggraver des phénomènes de bulles à répétition. Dans le même temps, ce système bureaucratique repose en fait sur une destruction de l’élite traditionnelle et de l’élite scientifique qui, dans le cas français, se fait au profit de la « haute fonction publique ». On est très loin d’un système de démocratie libérale et même à l’opposé. Si l’on s’intéresse à la fulgurance de Fukuyama, on pourrait lui rétorquer que la démocratie libérale n’a simplement pas eu lieu… Exit la fin de l’histoire. Le populisme est, dans une certaine mesure, une réaction aux dérives et aux échecs de ce système de déresponsabilisation. La petite musique autoritaire des populistes occidentaux fait surtout écho au discrédit donc souffre l’antienne pseudo-libérale. Les partis traditionnels, s’ils sont sincères dans leur invocation du libéralisme, seraient bien inspirés de comprendre la nécessité d’un retour à un véritable système de gouvernement et de responsabilité, seul rempart contre l’extrémisme. (…) La question de l’islamisme en occident est double. On observe une sorte d’effet de résonance entre, d’un côté, la crise politico-religieuse qui ravage le monde arabe et y détruit des constructions étatiques aussi violentes que fragiles et, de l’autre, la crise propre aux démocraties occidentales. Ces deux crises simultanées sont pourtant d’une nature très différente. La plupart des pays développés font face à une dégénérescence spécifique de leur système étatique en une bureaucratie tentaculaire (publique et privée) qui, dans le même temps, s’est déresponsabilisée en invoquant la mondialisation. Mais cette « décadence » se manifeste à la suite d’un immense succès. Ce succès a notamment reposé sur l’alliance entre développement des institutions, facilité de financement et progrès technique. Les systèmes politiques occidentaux présentent pourtant désormais, malgré l’ultra-individualisme, des maux associés aux systèmes collectivistes. D’un côté, la standardisation de l’existence, l’isolement et l’extension continue du périmètre de la bureaucratie produisent un effet d’aliénation croissante, de sentiment d’inutilité et de crise psychique profonde dans la société et au cœur même de l’élite. De l’autre, la logique bureaucratique et la dissociation géographique entre conception, production et consommation sapent le fonctionnement du capitalisme (entraînant une stagnation de la productivité) et la notion de citoyenneté. Les classes populaires, les jeunes, les sous-diplômés puis les surdiplômés… en fait plus personne à terme n’est appelé à être véritablement inclus dans un tel système en dehors d’un microcosme bureaucratique qui évoque celui du communisme. Dans ce contexte, l’appel électoral récurrent aux minorités par la classe des pseudo-progressistes est une imposture vouée à l’échec, comme l’a montré la déconvenue de Mme Clinton. (…) La réponse la plus raisonnable c’est la démocratie libérale dans un cadre institutionnel et géographique raisonnable (un cadre national, vu de façon apaisée, serait un bon candidat), pas l’ersatz brandi par une bureaucratie aux abois. Il faut d’abord voir la réalité de nos systèmes politico-économiques et analyser leurs échecs. La pire des approches consisteraient à prolonger le statu quo économique globaliste des quatre dernières décennies tout en invoquant la modernité et le progressisme. C’est l’approche suivie par un certain nombre d’acteurs politiques ultra-conformistes, d’Hillary Clinton aux Etats-Unis au courant Macron-Hollande en France. La plupart des mouvements populistes européens apparaissent incapables de gouverner du fait de leur désorganisation et de leur ancrage dans une forme ou une autre d’extrémisme. Quoi que l’on pense du personnage de Donald Trump et des relents xénophobes de sa campagne, il faut reconnaitre que sa relative autonomie financière de milliardaire lui a permis de mettre les pieds dans le plat de la question de la localisation de la production industrielle. Il sera impossible de renouer avec la croissance, les gains de productivité et le plein emploi sans surmonter cette question. Le meilleur moyen de répondre à la tendance à l’autoritarisme, c’est d’y opposer un renouveau de l’idée de gouvernement. En Europe et en France en particulier, cela n’adviendra que lorsqu’un parti sérieux se résoudra à aborder simultanément la question du poids de la bureaucratie dans l’économie (sans s’égarer dans les manipulations du fonctionnaire Macron) et du rééquilibrage européen face à l’unilatéralisme allemand. Rémi Bourgeot
Les années 90 ont en effet été marquées par l’idée d’une « Fin de l’Histoire », une sorte de happy end qui aurait vu l’humanité entière s’acheminer vers un monde apaisé grâce à l’accroissement des richesses, la fin progressive de la misère et le développement de l’Etat de droit partout dans le monde. Cette idée d’un monde sans ennemi après la chute de l’Urss, où les valeurs libérales et démocratiques de l’Occident l’auraient définitivement emporté, s’est heurtée à l’irruption d’un nouvel antagonisme historique, celui qui oppose l’islam radicalisé à un Occident qui, loin d’être sûr de lui-même, est travaillé par une profonde fracture. Il y a donc deux fractures à prendre en compte: la fracture qui divise le monde islamique entre musulmans pacifiques et musulmans radicalisés et la fracture qui divise l’Occident entre ceux qui prétendent universaliser le modèle occidental et notamment le modèle américain- c’était le cas de la famille Bush et des néos conservateurs américains- et ceux qui pensent que l’Occident traverse une grave, très grave crise spirituelle et morale, une crise de légitimité liée notamment au recul des valeurs traditionnelles. Autrement dit la bataille a lieu sur tous les fronts et elle déchire chacun des camps. La victoire de Trump est aussi la victoire d’une forme de critique de l’Occident libéral et post moderne par ceux qui récusent ce nouveau monde qui prétend ringardiser tous ceux qui y rechignent. Les Américains qui l’ont élu voudraient que leur pays renoue avec un imaginaire puissant celui d’un rêve américain, mais un rêve américain qui ne soit pas celui des minorités et du politiquement correct, notion qui est réellement née aux Etats-Unis et que les élites libérales et progressistes américaines ont exporté en Europe depuis les années 60. Un rêve américain accessible d’abord à ceux qui ont créé les Etats-Unis, à savoir les blancs eux-mêmes, qui seront peut-être la minorité de demain. La victoire de Trump signifie peut-être la fin d’une période marquée par la culpabilisation de l’américain blanc, qu’il soit pauvre, riche ou des classes moyennes, par les lobbys féministes et afro-américains. En Europe, la question est sensiblement différente, car l’angoisse qui aujourd’hui prédomine est liée à l’immigration et surtout à l’islam. Le Brexit a signifié le refus des classes populaires anglaises de voir l’Angleterre se mondialiser à l’aune d’une immigration sans limite. Il n’y a pas, à mon sens, de menace autoritaire en Europe. Dès lors qu’un gouvernement est élu par la majorité d’une population, la démocratie exige que les vœux de cette majorité soient pris en compte. Arrêter ou limiter les flux migratoires n’a rien à voir avec un principe dictatorial. Cela fait partie intégrante des droits des peuples à disposer d’eux-mêmes. (…) Les jeunes qui s’engagent dans le Djihad, si l’on en croit ceux qui ont étudié leurs motivations, notamment Olivier Roy ou Gilles Keppel, ont l’impression de vivre dans un monde factice et virtuel, celui d’Internet, un monde déréalisé. La motivation mystique, selon Olivier Roy qui a écrit un livre intéressant, Le Djihad et la mort, n’est en partie qu’un alibi. Ce que cherchent ces jeunes dans le Djihad c’est avant tout une forme d’excitation et de reconnaissance. La société où nous sommes -c’est une idée que je développe dans « Malaise de l’Occident, vers une révolution conservatrice » (Pierre Guillaume de Roux)- est une société de l’illusion et du simulacre. Nous pouvons tous croire que nous existons dans le regard des autres en envoyant un message sur Twitter ou sur Facebook. La société du spectacle mondialisée permet à des quidams de satisfaire leur narcissisme à peu de frais. Elle permet aussi d’exprimer une pulsion de mort qui va venger le quidam de son anonymat et du sentiment de nullité qui l’habite. L’islam radical est un moyen de reconnaissance pour ceux qui n’ont que la peur et la terreur pour enfin exister dans le regard des autres. Faire peur est toujours mieux que faire pitié. Voilà ce que se disent ceux qui nous haïssent notamment parce que nous ne cessons de les plaindre. Le discours sur l’exclusion que la gauche tient depuis longtemps enferme les gens dans leur sentiment victimaire. Pour autant le malaise de notre civilisation est aussi profond que réel. Nous avons perdu le gout d’être nous-même et l’Europe multiculturelle des élites a contribué à la diffusion de ce sentiment. Ce n’est pas un hasard si le livre de Michel Onfray, qui n’est pas un homme de droite, s’intitule « Décadence ». Abrutis par le consumérisme les peuples européens ont peut-être perdu le gout de se défendre et cette absence de pugnacité ne peut que renforcer le mépris des islamistes. (…) Je ne crois pas à l’avenir d’un régime autoritaire en France. Nous sommes des peuples individualistes et les Français n’ont jamais supporté une quelconque dictature. Le régime de Vichy, qui a duré 4 ans, était une plaisanterie à côté du national-socialisme et la dictature napoléonienne n’a été possible, quelques années durant, que parce que la gloire de Napoléon était telle que les Français ont accepté de limiter leurs libertés. Les libertés fondamentales d’opinion et de contestation sont inhérentes au tempérament gaulois et De Gaulle lui-même a dû en tenir compte, alors que son tempérament était autoritaire. Par contre je crois à la nécessité d’un Etat fort et respecté. Pour cela le prochain président devra jouir d’une majorité importante qui lui assure une légitimité durable. Paul-François Paoli
Il est certain que l’on a observé, sous l’ère Obama, un relatif repli de l’hégémonie américaine qui a laissé le champ libre à l’émergence ou la réémergence de puissances régionales, dont certaines ont des ambitions mondiales : la Russie, la Chine, l’Iran sont les plus antagoniques à la puissance américaine. Cependant, un tel repli n’est pas inédit et rien ne permet d’affirmer qu’il sera définitif, au contraire. En effet, les Etats-Unis ont souffert durant la dernière décennie de deux traumatismes majeurs : d’une part un traumatisme psychologico-militaire, avec l’impasse de la politique américaine de « guerre contre la terreur » et de remodelage démocratique du Moyen Orient, en commençant par l’Irak, qui s’est soldée par un piteux retrait – lequel a gâché une victoire militaire authentique après le succès du surge – auquel a bien vite succédé le chaos terroriste islamiste; d’autre part un traumatisme économique, la crise de 2008 et ses conséquences. Tout ceci a provoqué une crise de conscience aux Etats-Unis, avec un doute important sur la légitimité et l’intérêt du pays à se projeter ainsi à travers le monde ; et aujourd’hui, hors des Etats-Unis, l’on se demande si le règne de l’Amérique ne touche pas à sa fin et s’il n’est pas temps d’envisager un monde « multipolaire » dans lequel il faudrait se repositionner, éventuellement en revoyant l’alliance américaine. Mais à vrai dire, nous avons déjà connu la même chose il y a quarante ans : après la présidence de Nixon, dans les années 1970, le rêve américain semblait brisé par la guerre du Vietnam, qui avait coûté cher, économiquement et humainement, pour un résultat nul puisque le Sud-Vietnam fut envahi deux ans après le retrait américain et tout le pays bascula dans le communisme. La même année, en 1975, les accords d’Helsinki sont souvent considérés comme l’apogée de l’URSS et en 1979, l’Iran échappe à l’influence américaine. Nombreux à l’époque ont cru que c’en était fini de la puissance américaine et que les soviétiques, dont le stock d’armes nucléaires gonflait à grande vitesse, deviendraient le véritable hégémon mondial. En fait, la décennie s’achevait par l’élection de Ronald Reagan et America is back, et au cours des dix années suivantes, l’Union soviétique s’effondrait et l’Amérique triomphait. Donc, s’il est certain que nous sommes actuellement dans une phase de repli de la puissance américaine, rien ne permet de dire qu’elle doit se prolonger. Au contraire, l’élection « surprise  » de Donald Trump, dont le slogan de campagne « Make America Great Again » était l’un des slogans de Reagan, m’apparaît comme un premier signe du retour du leadership américain, et je ne pense pas qu’il faudra attendre cinq ans pour le voir. En revanche, il est certain que les puissances ennemies ou rivales des Etats-Unis, qui ont énormément profité du reflux américain, ont la volonté de l’exploiter plus avant, et que le retour d’une Amérique sûre d’elle-même ne sera pas pour leur plaire. Les réactions estomaquées qu’ont provoqué les premiers tweets de Donald Trump à propos de la Chine et de Taïwan ne sont qu’un aperçu de cette évolution. (…) l’Inde est le grand émergent d’aujourd’hui, d’un niveau comparable à ce qu’était la Chine au tournant du millénaire. Des usines commencent à quitter la Chine pour s’installer en Inde : la Chine perd des emplois au profit de l’Inde par délocalisation ! Des études démographiques, publiées il y a quelques mois, donnaient en outre une population indienne dépassant la population chinoise dès 2022. De plus, l’Inde peut espérer dans les années qui viennent une forme de soutien des Etats-Unis dans une sorte d’alliance de revers contre la Chine. Par ailleurs, l’Inde commence à se comporter elle aussi en puissance régionale en se constituant un réseau d’alliances : elle vient ainsi de livrer des missiles au Vietnam, vieil ennemi de la Chine, en forme de représailles au soutien chinois au Pakistan, et surtout à la constitution du « corridor économique » sino-pakistanais dont le tracé passe par le Cachemire, territoire revendiqué par l’Inde. La montée en puissance du rival indien, face à une Chine qui est encore elle-même une jeune puissance, est l’un des principaux défis à la stabilité de l’Asie dans les années qui viennent, car la Chine pourrait être tentée d’enrayer la menace indienne avant qu’elle ne soit trop imposante. A ce propos, il faut voir que la Chine pourrait vouloir profiter de l’avantage démographique tant qu’il est de son côté pour tenter militairement sa chance. Il faut savoir que la population chinoise souffre d’un gros déséquilibre au plan des sexes : sur la population des 18-34 ans, la population masculine est supérieure de vingt millions à la population féminine. Cela signifie que la Chine peut perdre vingt millions d’hommes dans un conflit sans virtuellement aucune conséquence démographique à long terme, puisque ce sont des individus qui ne pourront pas, statistiquement, disposer d’un partenaire pour se reproduire. Pour des esprits froids comme ceux des dirigeants du Parti Communiste Chinois, cela peut sembler une fenêtre de tir intéressante. (…) Si l’Etat islamique ne devrait pas survivre longtemps comme entité territoriale, il a probablement de beaux jours devant lui comme réseau terroriste : son reflux territorial en Syrie et en Irak a été concomittant à un essaimage, en Libye notamment, et le réseau devrait se renforcer en Europe avec le retour des djihadistes ayat combattu au Moyen Orient.  (…) on a déjà commencé à observer ce retour des nationalismes en Europe avec le PiS en Pologne, la progression d’Alternative fur Deutschland en Allemagne, le Brexit… et bien sûr la montée du Front national en France. Parier sur la poursuite du mouvement en Europe dans les années qui viennent relève de l’évidence. La crise migratoire et l’expansion du terrorisme islamiste ont évidemment favorisé ce mouvement, de même que le manque de vision à l’échelle européenne et l’appel d’air désastreux d’Angela Merkel. Il faut ajouter à cela le fait que le fer de lance du populisme nationaliste sur le continent européen, la Russie de Poutine, finance et soutient le développement des discours les plus sommaires sur l’islam et l’immigration, bénéficiant certes du politiquement correct qui a empêché de débattre de certaines questions jusqu’à présent, mais également renforçant ce refus du débat de peur qu’il doive se faire dans les termes des populistes. Il en résulte une forme d’impasse intellectuelle et politique qui peut déboucher sur des formes de violence. (…) Par ailleurs, à l’échelle du monde, on observe également une montée des nationalismes : les ambitions des pays comme la Russie, la Chine, l’Iran, mais aussi la Turquie ou l’Inde en relèvent, évidemment. On peut également parler, à propos de l’élection de Donald Trump, d’un retour d’une forme de nationalisme américain, et contrairement à ce qui a été beaucoup dit, la présidence de Trump ne sera certainement pas isolationniste : l’on assiste simplement à une mutation de l’impérialisme américain, qui risque de tourner le dos à l’idéalisme qui en était le fond depuis un siècle et la présidence de Woodrow Wilson, pour une forme plus pragmatique avec Trump et son souci de faire des « deals » avantageux. Deals qui peuvent impliquer, avant la négociation, d’imposer un rapport de force, comme il semble vouloir le faire avec la Chine – raison pour laquelle il cherche à ménager Poutine, afin de n’avoir pas à se soucier de l’Europe et d’avoir les mains libres en Asie. (…) Après huit décennies de paix nucléaire, nous nous sommes imprégnés de l’idée, en Occident, que de grandes guerres entre Etats sont impossibles en raison du risque d’anéantissement nucléaire. Or, l’escalade actuelle entre Russie et Etats-Unis en Europe de l’Est, où chacun installe du matériel et des troupes , montre que les forces conventionnelles revêtent encore un aspect important. Par ailleurs, il s’est produit un changement important lors de l’affaire de Crimée : Vladimir Poutine a dit qu’il était prêt, lors de l’annexion de ce territoire, à utiliser l’arme nucléaire si l’Occident se faisait trop menaçant. C’est un événement d’une importance historique qui n’a pratiquement pas été relevé par les commentateurs : Vladimir Poutine a énoncé une toute nouvelle doctrine nucléaire, très dangereuse : il s’agit non plus d’une arme de dissuasion défensive, mais de dissuasion offensive. L’arme nucléaire est désormais utilisée par la Russie pour couvrir des annexions, des opérations extérieures, un usage qui n’a jamais été fait auparavant. C’est tout simplement du chantage nucléaire. Après des décennies de terreur face à l’idée de « destruction mutuelle assurée », le président russe a compris que l’effet paralysant de l’arme nucléaire pouvait être utilisé non seulement pour se défendre, mais pour attaquer, avec l’idée que les pays de l’Otan préfèreront n’importe quel recul au risque d’extermination atomique. Et cela rend de nouveaux affrontements sur champs de bataille vraisemblables : après ne pas avoir osé, durant des décennies, s’affronter par crainte de l’anéantissement nucléaire, les grandes puissances pourraient être poussées à se battre uniquement de manière conventionnelle en raison des mêmes craintes. Cela peut paraître paradoxal mais est probable si Vladimir Poutine tente d’autres mouvements en agitant encore la menace nucléaire. En revanche, le rôle éminent des cyberattaques me paraît incontestable, et si elles ne remplaceront pas la guerre conventionnelle, elle s’y surajoureront certainement. Il faut voir, en effet, que généralement, les grandes guerres sont menées avec les armes qui ont terminé les guerres précédentes : les Prussiens ont gagné la guerre de 1870 grâce à leur forte supériorité d’artillerie, avec des canons chargés par la culasse alors que les canons français se chargeaient encore par la bouche ; la guerre de 1914-1918 fut d’abord une guerre d’artillerie, et donc de position et de tranchées, amenant un blocage qui ne fut surmonté que par le développement de l’aviation et des blindés. Aviations et blindés qui furent les armes principales de la Seconde Guerre mondiale débutée avec la Blitzkrieg allemande, et terminée par l’arme nucléaire. A son tour, l’arme nucléaire a été l’arme principale de la Guerre froide : on dit, à tort, qu’elle n’a pas été utilisée, mais elle l’a, au contraire, été continuellement : par nature arme de dissuasion, elle servait en permanence à dissuader. De fait, elle a eu, à l’échelle mondiale, un rôle comparable à celui de l’artillerie en 1914 : la Guerre froide a été une guerre mondiale de tranchées, où les lignes ont peu bougé jusqu’à ce que les Etats-Unis surmontent le blocage en lançant l’Initiative de Défense Stratégique de Reagan, qui fit plier l’Union soviétique, incapable de suivre dans ce défi technologique et économique – tout comme l’Allemagne de 1918 avait été incapable de fabriquer des chars d’assaut dignes de ce nom. Les armes principales du prochain conflit seront donc celles retombées de l’IDS : les missiles à très haute précision, notamment antisatellites, et celles reposant sur les technologies de guerre électronique en tous genres. L’on sait, depuis le virus Stuxnet, que les cyberarmes peuvent causer d’importants dégâts physiques, comparable à des frappes classiques. En 2014, une aciérie allemande a vu l’un de ses hauts fourneaux détruit par une cyberattaque. Des cyberattaques massives peuvent servir à déstabiliser un pays, notamment en attaquant les infrastructures essentielles : distribution d’eau et d’électricité, mais aussi à préparer, tout simplement, une invasion militaire classique. Elles peuvent aussi provoquer de telles invasions en représailles : un pays harcelé par des cyberattaques pourrait être tenté d’intervenir militairement contre le pays qu’il soupçonne de l’attaquer ainsi. Ainsi donc, si je ne pense pas que les guerres à venir pourraient vraiment se limiter à des cyberattaques, sans confrontation physique, il me paraît certain que ce sont bien avec des cyberattaques massives que s’ouvriront les hostilités. Philippe Fabry
Il y a plus de 200 différends territoriaux dans le monde et l’Union européenne a décidé de se concentrer sur Israël et la Cisjordanie. Le conflit que nous avons avec les Palestiniens est connu et la seule manière d’essayer de le résoudre, c’est de s’assoir autour d’une table pour négocier et discuter. Le fait que les Palestiniens refusent de venir négocier – et notre Premier ministre les a invités à le faire à plusieurs reprises ces derniers mois – montre qu’il n’y a pas de réelle volonté politique en ce sens. Et le fait est que Mahmoud Abbas a pris une décision stratégique il y a deux ou trois ans quand il a choisi d’exercer via la communauté internationale une pression sur Israël en espérant que le gouvernement israélien serait poussé à faire des concessions. Malheureusement pour lui, les Israéliens ne cèdent pas à la pression et nous l’avons montré dans le passé. Quand on a été prêt à faire des concessions territoriales avec l’Egypte et la Jordanie, c‘était parce que la population israélienne se rendait compte que l’autre partie était de bonne foi, mais quand l’autre partie n’est pas vue comme étant de bonne foi, alors les chances de concessions sont vraiment minces. Aliza Bin-Noun (ambassadrice d’Israël en France)
Cette résolution est une honte car on veut ainsi à nouveau expulser les Juifs des terres de leurs ancêtres, la Judée et la Samarie et Jérusalem. Est-il utile de rappeler qu’avant la guerre d’indépendance d’Israël, les Juifs y vivaient depuis des millénaires ? Sans la purification ethnique que la Jordanie a effectuée en 1948, les Juifs y auraient été encore présents à ce jour. Maintenant, on veut à nouveau effectuer une purification ethnique à l’encontre des Juifs. C’est un peu comme si on allait à Saint-Denis, là où se trouve la basilique où la plupart des Rois de France sont inhumés et que l’on demandait l’expulsion des chrétiens de Saint-Denis sous prétexte qu’une majorité musulmane s’y trouve. Philippe Karsenty
The safe space, Ms. Byron explained, was intended to give people who might find comments “troubling” or “triggering,” a place to recuperate. The room was equipped with cookies, coloring books, bubbles, Play-Doh, calming music, pillows, blankets and a video of frolicking puppies, as well as students and staff members trained to deal with trauma. Emma Hall, a junior, rape survivor and “sexual assault peer educator” who helped set up the room and worked in it during the debate, estimates that a couple of dozen people used it. At one point she went to the lecture hall — it was packed — but after a while, she had to return to the safe space. “I was feeling bombarded by a lot of viewpoints that really go against my dearly and closely held beliefs,” Ms. Hall said. Safe spaces are an expression of the conviction, increasingly prevalent among college students, that their schools should keep them from being “bombarded” by discomfiting or distressing viewpoints. Think of the safe space as the live-action version of the better-known trigger warning, a notice put on top of a syllabus or an assigned reading to alert students to the presence of potentially disturbing material. Some people trace safe spaces back to the feminist consciousness-raising groups of the 1960s and 1970s, others to the gay and lesbian movement of the early 1990s. In most cases, safe spaces are innocuous gatherings of like-minded people who agree to refrain from ridicule, criticism or what they term microaggressions — subtle displays of racial or sexual bias — so that everyone can relax enough to explore the nuances of, say, a fluid gender identity. As long as all parties consent to such restrictions, these little islands of self-restraint seem like a perfectly fine idea. But the notion that ticklish conversations must be scrubbed clean of controversy has a way of leaking out and spreading. Once you designate some spaces as safe, you imply that the rest are unsafe. It follows that they should be made safer. (…) I’m old enough to remember a time when college students objected to providing a platform to certain speakers because they were deemed politically unacceptable. Now students worry whether acts of speech or pieces of writing may put them in emotional peril. Two weeks ago, students at Northwestern University marched to protest an article by Laura Kipnis, a professor in the university’s School of Communication. Professor Kipnis had criticized — O.K., ridiculed — what she called the sexual paranoia pervading campus life. At Oxford University’s Christ Church college in November, the college censors (a “censor” being more or less the Oxford equivalent of an undergraduate dean) canceled a debate on abortion after campus feminists threatened to disrupt it because both would-be debaters were men. “I’m relieved the censors have made this decision,” said the treasurer of Christ Church’s student union, who had pressed for the cancellation. “It clearly makes the most sense for the safety — both physical and mental — of the students who live and work in Christ Church. » A year and a half ago, a Hampshire College student group disinvited an Afrofunk band that had been attacked on social media for having too many white musicians; the vitriolic discussion had made students feel “unsafe.” Last fall, the president of Smith College, Kathleen McCartney, apologized for causing students and faculty to be “hurt” when she failed to object to a racial epithet uttered by a fellow panel member at an alumnae event in New York. The offender was the free-speech advocate Wendy Kaminer, who had been arguing against the use of the euphemism “the n-word” when teaching American history or “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.” (…)  Still, it’s disconcerting to see students clamor for a kind of intrusive supervision that would have outraged students a few generations ago. But those were hardier souls. Now students’ needs are anticipated by a small army of service professionals — mental health counselors, student-life deans and the like. This new bureaucracy may be exacerbating students’ “self-infantilization,” as Judith Shapiro, the former president of Barnard College, suggested in an essay for Inside Higher Ed. Another reason students resort to the quasi-medicalized terminology of trauma is that it forces administrators to respond. Universities are in a double bind. They’re required by two civil-rights statutes, Title VII and Title IX, to ensure that their campuses don’t create a “hostile environment” for women and other groups subject to harassment. However, universities are not supposed to go too far in suppressing free speech, either. If a university cancels a talk or punishes a professor and a lawsuit ensues, history suggests that the university will lose. But if officials don’t censure or don’t prevent speech that may inflict psychological damage on a member of a protected class, they risk fostering a hostile environment and prompting an investigation. As a result, students who say they feel unsafe are more likely to be heard than students who demand censorship on other grounds. Judith Shulevitz
A determination to treat adults as children is becoming a feature of life on campus, and not just in America. Strangely, some of the most enthusiastic supporters of this development are the students themselves. (…) Last year a debate on abortion at Oxford University was cancelled after some students complained that hearing the views of anti-abortionists would make them feel unsafe. Many British universities now provide “safe spaces” for students to protect them from views which they might find objectionable. Sometimes demands for safe space enter the classroom. Jeannie Suk, a Harvard law professor, has written about how students there tried to dissuade her from discussing rape in class when teaching the law on domestic violence, lest it trigger traumatic memories. Like many bad ideas, the notion of safe spaces at universities has its roots in a good one. Gay people once used the term to refer to bars and clubs where they could gather without fear, at a time when many states still had laws against sodomy. In the worst cases, though, an idea that began by denoting a place where people could assemble without being prosecuted has been reinvented by students to serve as a justification for shutting out ideas. At Colorado College, safety has been invoked by a student group to prevent the screening of a film celebrating the Stonewall riots which downplays the role of minorities in the gay-rights movement. The same reasoning has led some students to request warnings before colleges expose them to literature that deals with racism and violence. People as different as Condoleezza Rice, a former secretary of state, and Bill Maher, a satirist, have been dissuaded from giving speeches on campuses, sometimes on grounds of safety. What makes this so objectionable is that there are plenty of things on American campuses that really do warrant censure from the university. Administrators at the University of Oklahoma managed not to notice that one of its fraternities, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, had cheerily sung a song about hanging black people from a tree for years, until a video of them doing so appeared on the internet. At the University of Missouri, whose president resigned on November 9th, administrators did a poor job of responding to complaints of unacceptable behaviour on campus—which included the scattering of balls of cotton about the place, as a put-down to black students, and the smearing of faeces in the shape of a swastika in a bathroom. Distinguishing between this sort of thing and obnoxious Halloween costumes ought not to be a difficult task. But by equating smaller ills with bigger ones, students and universities have made it harder, and diminished worthwhile protests in the process. The University of Missouri episode shows how damaging this confusion can be: some activists tried to prevent the college’s own newspaper from covering their demonstration, claiming that to do so would have endangered their safe space, thereby rendering a reasonable protest absurd. Fifty years ago student radicals agitated for academic freedom and the right to engage in political activities on campus. Now some of their successors are campaigning for censorship and increased policing by universities of student activities. The supporters of these ideas on campus are usually described as radicals. They are, in fact, the opposite. The Economist
Le scandale canadien du mois, révélé par le quotidien La Presse, nous vient de l’université Queen’s en Ontario. À la mi-novembre s’est tenu sur le campus un bal costumé, où certains étudiants se sont déguisés en moines bouddhistes, en combattants Viêt-cong ou en cheikhs arabes. Un banal bal costumé, donc. Mais non, ça ne se passe plus comme ça au Canada. En effet, dès que la nouvelle a circulé, l’antiracisme universitaire s’est instantanément mobilisé pour condamner ce scandale. Et l’accusation est grave : il s’agirait là d’un cas manifeste d’appropriation culturelle. Le badaud de bonne foi se demandera de quoi on parle. Ce concept est en vogue depuis quelques années dans les universités américaines. (…) il y a appropriation culturelle lorsqu’une personne associée à la majorité blanche dominante (lorsque c’est un homme hétérosexuel, c’est encore pire) s’approprie un symbole culturel – sacré ou non – lié à une minorité dominée pour l’instrumentaliser de manière esthétique ou ludique. C’est aussi pour cela qu’en novembre 2015, un cours de yoga avait été annulé à l’université d’Ottawa, parce qu’il légitimait, nous a-t-on expliqué, une sorte de néocolonialisme s’emparant sans gêne de pratiques culturelles de sociétés victimes de l’Occident. Étrange retournement. On croyait devoir chanter le métissage, mais l’antiracisme se retourne et célèbre l’essentialisme identitaire : chacun restera dans sa case et n’en sortira jamais. Paradoxalement, les mêmes célèbrent la théorie du genre qui permet à chacun de céder au fantasme de l’auto-engendrement tout en multipliant les bricolages identitaires. (…) Tout cela peut faire rire. Mais on devrait s’inquiéter de ce que deviennent les universités nord-américaines, où le multiculturalisme et le politiquement correct s’accouplent pour engendrer une forme de bêtise fanatisée qui voit partout s’exercer l’empire de l’homme blanc et pousse à une résistance généralisée contre lui. C’est aussi dans cet esprit que se multiplient les safe spaces où les différentes minorités victimes peuvent se replier dans un entre-soi réconfortant pour se dérober au regard inquisiteur de leurs bourreaux putatifs. Tant qu’à parler sans cesse de radicalisation, on devrait s’inquiéter de celle du multiculturalisme, qui devient de plus en plus ouvertement un racisme antiblanc et de celle du féminisme qui devient un sexisme antihomme. Le politiquement correct est rendu fou, l’esprit de sérieux domine tout, et la nouvelle police des mœurs diversitaires met son nez partout. Amis français, soyez attentifs, ça arrivera bientôt chez vous. Mathieu Bock-Côté
Although trigger warnings and safe spaces claim to create an environment where everyone is free to speak their minds, the spirit of tolerance and respect that inspires these policies can also stifle dialogue about controversial topics, particularly race, gender, and, in my experience, religious beliefs. Students should be free to argue their beliefs without fear of being labeled intolerant or disrespectful, whether they think certain sexual orientations are forbidden by God, life occurs at the moment of conception, or Islam is the exclusive path to salvation; and conversely, the same freedom should apply to those who believe God doesn’t care about who we have sex with, abortion is a fundamental right, or Islam is based on nothing more than superstitious nonsense. As it stands, that freedom does not exist in most academic settings, except when students’ opinions line up with what can be broadly understood as progressive political values.Trigger warnings and safe spaces are terms that reflect the values of the communities in which they’re used. The loudest, most prominent advocates of these practices are often the people most likely to condemn Western yoga as “cultural appropriation,” to view arguments about the inherent danger of Islam as hate speech, or to label arguments against affirmative action as impermissible microaggressions. These advocates routinely use the word “ally” to describe those who support their positions on race, gender, and religion, implying that anyone who disagrees is an “enemy.”Understood in this broader context, trigger warnings and safe spaces are not merely about allowing traumatized students access to education. Whatever their original purpose may have been, trigger warnings are now used to mark discussions of racism, sexism, and U.S. imperialism. The logic of this more expansive use is straightforward: Any threat to one’s core identity, especially if that identity is marginalized, is a potential trigger that creates an unsafe space. But what about situations in which students encounter this kind of discussion from fellow students? Would a University of Chicago freshman want to express an opinion that might make her someone’s enemy? Would she want to be responsible for intolerant, disrespectful hate speech that creates an unsafe space? Best, instead, to remain silent. (…) The unpleasant truth is that historically marginalized groups, including racial minorities and members of the LGBT community, are not the only people whose beliefs and identities are marginalized on many college campuses. Those who believe in the exclusive truth of a single revealed religion or those who believe that all religions are nonsensical are silenced by the culture of trigger warnings and safe spaces. (…) There is no doubt that in America, the perspective of white, heterosexual Christian males has enjoyed disproportionate emphasis, particularly in higher education. Trigger warnings, safe spaces, diversity initiatives, and attention to social justice: all of these are essential for pushing back against this lopsided power dynamic. But there is a very real danger that these efforts will become overzealous and render opposing opinions taboo. Instead of dialogues in which everyone is fairly represented, campus conversations about race, gender, and religion will devolve into monologues about the virtues of tolerance and diversity. I have seen it happen, not only at the University of Chicago, my alma mater, but also at the school where I currently teach, James Madison University, where the majority of students are white and Christian. The problem, I’d wager, is fairly widespread, at least at secular universities.Silencing these voices is not a good thing for anyone, especially the advocates of marginalized groups who hope to sway public opinion. Take for example the idea that God opposes homosexuality, a belief that some students still hold. On an ideal campus, these students would feel free to voice their belief. They would then be confronted by opposing arguments, spoken, perhaps, by the very people whose sexual orientation they have asserted is sinful. At least in this kind of environment, these students would have an opportunity to see the weaknesses in their position and potentially change their minds. But if students do not feel free to voice their opinions, they will remain silent, retreating from the classroom to discuss their position on homosexuality with family, friends, and other like-minded individuals. They will believe, correctly in some cases, that advocates of gay rights see them as hateful, intolerant bigots who deserve to be silenced, and which may persuade them to cling with even greater intensity to their convictions.A more charitable interpretation of the University of Chicago letter is that it is meant to inoculate students against allergy to argument. Modern, secular, liberal education is supposed to combine a Socratic ideal of the examined life with a Millian marketplace of ideas. It is boot camp, not a hotel. In theory, this will produce individuals who have cultivated their intellect and embraced new ideas via communal debate—the kind of individuals who make good neighbors and citizens.The communal aspect of the debate is important. It demands patience, open-mindedness, empathy, the courage to question others and be questioned, and above all, attempting to see things as others do. But even though academic debate takes place in a community, it is also combat. Combat can hurt. It is literally offensive. Without offense there is no antagonistic dialogue, no competitive marketplace, and no chance to change your mind. Impious, disrespectful Socrates was executed in Athens for having the temerity to challenge people’s most deeply held beliefs. It would be a shame to execute him again. Alan Levinovitz

Attention, un racisme peut en cacher un autre !

Condamnation d’un bal costumé et annulation d’un cours de yoga, accusations d’appropriation culturelle, espaces protégés (avec biscuits, livres à colorier, bulles, pâte à modeler, musique apaisante, oreillers, couvertures et vidéo de chiots batifolant), signalisation des contenus, essentialisme identitaire, racisme antiblanc, sexisme antihomme ou antichristianisme primaire …

A l’heure où  entre une Allemagne où brûler une synagogue est devenu une manière justifiée d’ « attirer l’attention sur le conflit entre Gaza et Israël » …

Et un Vatican où le simple appel à la purification ethnique des seuls juifs et chrétiens de leurs berceaux historiques vous vaut une ambassade

Et après la résolution de la honte du mois dernier …

La planète entière assemblée à Paris communie …

En l’absence des protagonistes et à respectivement cinq jours et cinq mois du départ des gouvernements de ses principaux organisateurs …

Pour une énième condamnation du seul Etat d’Israël

Pendant que contre le choix du peuple américain et entre menaces de boycott et menaces de mort, Hollywood et les réseaux sociaux veulent nous faire passer pour le plus avancé des progressismes leur loi de la foule et de la rue …

Devinez…

Au nom même du métissage et de la diversité …

A quoi peuvent bien se déchirer et nous préparer nos universités ?

Appropriation culturelle, un racisme déguisé ?

Se déguiser n’est pas jouer

Mathieu Bock-Côté est sociologue, auteur du « Multiculturalisme comme religion politique » (Cerf Ed., 2016).
Causeur
30 décembre 2016

Le scandale canadien du mois, révélé par le quotidien La Presse, nous vient de l’université Queen’s en Ontario. À la mi-novembre s’est tenu sur le campus un bal costumé, où certains étudiants se sont déguisés en moines bouddhistes, en combattants Viêt-cong ou en cheikhs arabes. Un banal bal costumé, donc. Mais non, ça ne se passe plus comme ça au Canada.

En effet, dès que la nouvelle a circulé, l’antiracisme universitaire s’est instantanément mobilisé pour condamner ce scandale. Et l’accusation est grave : il s’agirait là d’un cas manifeste d’appropriation culturelle. Le badaud de bonne foi se demandera de quoi on parle. Ce concept est en vogue depuis quelques années dans les universités américaines.

On définira la chose ainsi : il y a appropriation culturelle lorsqu’une personne associée à la majorité blanche dominante (lorsque c’est un homme hétérosexuel, c’est encore pire) s’approprie un symbole culturel – sacré ou non – lié à une minorité dominée pour l’instrumentaliser de manière esthétique ou ludique. C’est aussi pour cela qu’en novembre 2015, un cours de yoga avait été annulé à l’université d’Ottawa, parce qu’il légitimait, nous a-t-on expliqué, une sorte de néocolonialisme s’emparant sans gêne de pratiques culturelles de sociétés victimes de l’Occident.

L’antiracisme identitaire

Étrange retournement. On croyait devoir chanter le métissage, mais l’antiracisme se retourne et célèbre l’essentialisme identitaire : chacun restera dans sa case et n’en sortira jamais. Paradoxalement, les mêmes célèbrent la théorie du genre qui permet à chacun de céder au fantasme de l’auto-engendrement tout en multipliant les bricolages identitaires.

Dans le cas qui nous intéresse ici, celui de l’université Queen’s, s’ajoutait l’accusation de reproduire des stéréotypes racistes. Tout cela peut faire rire. Mais on devrait s’inquiéter de ce que deviennent les universités nord-américaines, où le multiculturalisme et le politiquement correct s’accouplent pour engendrer une forme de bêtise fanatisée qui voit partout s’exercer l’empire de l’homme blanc et pousse à une résistance généralisée contre lui.

C’est aussi dans cet esprit que se multiplient les safe spaces où les différentes minorités victimes peuvent se replier dans un entre-soi réconfortant pour se dérober au regard inquisiteur de leurs bourreaux putatifs.

Tant qu’à parler sans cesse de radicalisation, on devrait s’inquiéter de celle du multiculturalisme, qui devient de plus en plus ouvertement un racisme antiblanc et de celle du féminisme qui devient un sexisme antihomme. Le politiquement correct est rendu fou, l’esprit de sérieux domine tout, et la nouvelle police des mœurs diversitaires met son nez partout. Amis français, soyez attentifs, ça arrivera bientôt chez vous.

 Voir aussi:

How Trigger Warnings Silence Religious Students
Practices meant to protect marginalized communities can also ostracize those who disagree with them.
Alan Levinovitz
The Atlantic
Aug 30, 2016

Last week, the University of Chicago’s dean of students sent a welcome letter to freshmen decrying trigger warnings and safe spaces—ways for students to be warned about and opt out of exposure to potentially challenging material. While some supported the school’s actions, arguing that these practices threaten free speech and the purpose of higher education, the note also led to widespread outrage, and understandably so. Considered in isolation, trigger warnings may seem straightforwardly good. Basic human decency means professors like myself should be aware of students’ traumatic experiences, and give them a heads up about course content—photographs of dead bodies, extended accounts of abuse, disordered eating, self-harm—that might trigger an anxiety attack and foreclose intellectual engagement. Similarly, it may seem silly to object to the creation of safe spaces on campus, where members of marginalized groups can count on meeting supportive conversation partners who empathize with their life experiences, and where they feel free to be themselves without the threat of judgment or censure.In response to the letter, some have argued that the dean willfully ignored or misunderstood these intended purposes to play up a caricature of today’s college students as coddled and entitled. Safe spaces and trigger warnings pose no real threat to free speech, these critics say—that idea is just a specter conjured up by crotchety elites who fear empowered students.Perhaps. But as a professor of religious studies, I know firsthand how debates about trigger warnings and safe spaces can have a chilling effect on classroom discussions. It’s not my free speech I’m worried about; professors generally feel confident presenting difficult or controversial material, although some may fear for their jobs after seeing other faculty members subjected to intense and public criticism. Students, on the other hand, do not have that assurance. Their ability to speak freely in the classroom is currently endangered—but not in the way some of their peers might think. Although trigger warnings and safe spaces claim to create an environment where everyone is free to speak their minds, the spirit of tolerance and respect that inspires these policies can also stifle dialogue about controversial topics, particularly race, gender, and, in my experience, religious beliefs.
Students should be free to argue their beliefs without fear of being labeled intolerant or disrespectful, whether they think certain sexual orientations are forbidden by God, life occurs at the moment of conception, or Islam is the exclusive path to salvation; and conversely, the same freedom should apply to those who believe God doesn’t care about who we have sex with, abortion is a fundamental right, or Islam is based on nothing more than superstitious nonsense. As it stands, that freedom does not exist in most academic settings, except when students’ opinions line up with what can be broadly understood as progressive political values.Trigger warnings and safe spaces are terms that reflect the values of the communities in which they’re used. The loudest, most prominent advocates of these practices are often the people most likely to condemn Western yoga as “cultural appropriation,” to view arguments about the inherent danger of Islam as hate speech, or to label arguments against affirmative action as impermissible microaggressions. These advocates routinely use the word “ally” to describe those who support their positions on race, gender, and religion, implying that anyone who disagrees is an “enemy.”Understood in this broader context, trigger warnings and safe spaces are not merely about allowing traumatized students access to education. Whatever their original purpose may have been, trigger warnings are now used to mark discussions of racism, sexism, and U.S. imperialism. The logic of this more expansive use is straightforward: Any threat to one’s core identity, especially if that identity is marginalized, is a potential trigger that creates an unsafe space.

But what about situations in which students encounter this kind of discussion from fellow students? Would a University of Chicago freshman want to express an opinion that might make her someone’s enemy? Would she want to be responsible for intolerant, disrespectful hate speech that creates an unsafe space? Best, instead, to remain silent.

This attitude is a disaster in the religious-studies classroom. As the Boston University professor Stephen Prothero put it in his book God Is Not One, “Students are good with ‘respectful,’ but they are allergic to ‘argument.’” Religion can be an immensely important part of one’s identity—for many, more important than race or sexual orientation. To assert that a classmate’s most deeply held beliefs are false or evil is to attack his or her identity, arguably similar to the way in which asserting that a transgender person is mistaken about their gender is an attack on their identity.Objections to “anti-Muslim” campus speakers as promoting “hate speech” and creating a “hostile learning environment” vividly illustrate the connection between contentious assertions about religion, trigger warnings, and safe spaces. The claim that Islam—or, by implication, any religious faith—is false or dangerous is indistinguishable from hostile hate speech. To make such a claim in class is to be a potential enemy of fellow students, to marginalize them, disrespect them, and make them feel unsafe. If respect requires refraining from attacking people’s identity, then the only respectful discussion of religion is one in which everyone affirms everyone else’s beliefs, describes those beliefs without passing judgment, or simply remains silent.As Prothero notes, that’s usually what ends up happening. According to anonymous in-class surveys, about one-third of my students believe in the exclusive salvific truth of Christianity. But rarely do these students defend their beliefs in class. In private, they have told me that they believe doing so could be construed as hateful, hostile, intolerant, and disrespectful; after all, they’re saying that if others don’t believe what they do, they’ll go to hell. Then there are my students, about one-fourth of them, who think no religion is true. They probably agree with Thomas Jefferson that the final book of the New Testament is “merely the ravings of a maniac, no more worthy, nor capable of explanation, than the incoherences of our own nightly dreams.” But they’d never say so in class. This kind of comment would likely seem even worse when directed at religious minorities, including those who practice Judaism, Islam, or Buddhism.
One could make the case that students who refrain from religious debate are making a mistake by confusing religious identity, which is free game for criticism, with racial and gender identity, which are not. Racial and gender identity deserve special consideration because they are unchosen aspects of one’s biological and historical self, while religious identity is a set of propositions about reality that can be accepted or rejected on the basis of evidence and argument. But this argument is itself controversial. Religion is a part of one’s historical self, and to reject religious beliefs often means rejecting family and friends. (Nor, as Jews can attest, are the categories of religion and race separable.) Religion also has a great deal to say about sex and gender, and may shape people’s perceptions of their own sexuality or gender identity.

The unpleasant truth is that historically marginalized groups, including racial minorities and members of the LGBT community, are not the only people whose beliefs and identities are marginalized on many college campuses. Those who believe in the exclusive truth of a single revealed religion or those who believe that all religions are nonsensical are silenced by the culture of trigger warnings and safe spaces. I know this is true because I know these students are in my classroom, but I rarely hear their opinions expressed in class.

There is no doubt that in America, the perspective of white, heterosexual Christian males has enjoyed disproportionate emphasis, particularly in higher education. Trigger warnings, safe spaces, diversity initiatives, and attention to social justice: all of these are essential for pushing back against this lopsided power dynamic. But there is a very real danger that these efforts will become overzealous and render opposing opinions taboo. Instead of dialogues in which everyone is fairly represented, campus conversations about race, gender, and religion will devolve into monologues about the virtues of tolerance and diversity. I have seen it happen, not only at the University of Chicago, my alma mater, but also at the school where I currently teach, James Madison University, where the majority of students are white and Christian. The problem, I’d wager, is fairly widespread, at least at secular universities.Silencing these voices is not a good thing for anyone, especially the advocates of marginalized groups who hope to sway public opinion. Take for example the idea that God opposes homosexuality, a belief that some students still hold. On an ideal campus, these students would feel free to voice their belief. They would then be confronted by opposing arguments, spoken, perhaps, by the very people whose sexual orientation they have asserted is sinful. At least in this kind of environment, these students would have an opportunity to see the weaknesses in their position and potentially change their minds. But if students do not feel free to voice their opinions, they will remain silent, retreating from the classroom to discuss their position on homosexuality with family, friends, and other like-minded individuals. They will believe, correctly in some cases, that advocates of gay rights see them as hateful, intolerant bigots who deserve to be silenced, and which may persuade them to cling with even greater intensity to their convictions.A more charitable interpretation of the University of Chicago letter is that it is meant to inoculate students against allergy to argument. Modern, secular, liberal education is supposed to combine a Socratic ideal of the examined life with a Millian marketplace of ideas. It is boot camp, not a hotel. In theory, this will produce individuals who have cultivated their intellect and embraced new ideas via communal debate—the kind of individuals who make good neighbors and citizens.The communal aspect of the debate is important. It demands patience, open-mindedness, empathy, the courage to question others and be questioned, and above all, attempting to see things as others do. But even though academic debate takes place in a community, it is also combat. Combat can hurt. It is literally offensive. Without offense there is no antagonistic dialogue, no competitive marketplace, and no chance to change your mind. Impious, disrespectful Socrates was executed in Athens for having the temerity to challenge people’s most deeply held beliefs. It would be a shame to execute him again.
Voir également:

Students Are Literally ‘Hiding from Scary Ideas,’ Or Why My Mom’s Nursery School Is Edgier Than College

Safe spaces are infantilizing and insulting.

Robby Soave
Mar. 22, 2015

My mother is a nursery school teacher. Her classroom is a place for children between one and two years of age—adorable little tykes who are learning how to crawl, how to walk, and eventually, how to talk. Coloring materials, Play-Doh, playful tunes, bubbles, and nap time are a few of the components of her room: a veritable « safe space » for the kids entrusted to her expert care.

We’ll come back to that in a minute.

Judith Shulevitz—formerly of The New Republic, where her eminently reasonable and fact-based perspective has been replaced by mean-spirited blathering—writes that college students now fear perspectives that clash with their own so deeply that they are quite literally hiding from them.

In a must-read op-ed for The New York Times, Shulevitz provides examples of the most egregious instances. At Brown University last fall, for instance, the prospect of a debate between leftist-feminist Jessica Valenti and libertarian-feminist (and Reason contributor) Wendy McElroy was so horrifying to some students—including Sexual Assault Task Force member Katherine Byron—that the creation of a « safe space » was necessary. McElroy’s contrarian perspective on the existence of rape culture ran the risk of « invalidating people’s experiences » and « damaging » them, according to Byron.

The safe space she created, as described by Shulevitz, sounds familiar to me:

The safe space, Ms. Byron explained, was intended to give people who might find comments “troubling” or “triggering,” a place to recuperate. The room was equipped with cookies, coloring books, bubbles, Play-Doh, calming music, pillows, blankets and a video of frolicking puppies, as well as students and staff members trained to deal with trauma. Emma Hall, a junior, rape survivor and “sexual assault peer educator” who helped set up the room and worked in it during the debate, estimates that a couple of dozen people used it. At one point she went to the lecture hall — it was packed — but after a while, she had to return to the safe space. “I was feeling bombarded by a lot of viewpoints that really go against my dearly and closely held beliefs,” Ms. Hall said.

It’s my mother’s classroom!

To say that the 18-year-olds at Brown who sought refuge from ideas that offended them are behaving like toddlers is actually to insult the toddlers—who don’t attend daycare by choice, and who routinely demonstrate more intellectual courage than these students seem capable of. (Anyone who has ever observed a child tackling blocks for the first time, or taking a chance on the slide, knows what I mean.)

Lest anyone conclude that Brown must be a laughable outlier, read the rest of Shulevitz’s essay:

A few weeks ago, Zineb El Rhazoui, a journalist at Charlie Hebdo, spoke at the University of Chicago, protected by the security guards she has traveled with since supporters of the Islamic State issued death threats against her. During the question-and-answer period, a Muslim student stood up to object to the newspaper’s apparent disrespect for Muslims and to express her dislike of the phrase “I am Charlie.” …

A few days later, a guest editorialist in the student newspaper took Ms. El Rhazoui to task. She had failed to ensure “that others felt safe enough to express dissenting opinions.” Ms. El Rhazoui’s “relative position of power,” the writer continued, had granted her a “free pass to make condescending attacks on a member of the university.” In a letter to the editor, the president and the vice president of the University of Chicago French Club, which had sponsored the talk, shot back, saying, “El Rhazoui is an immigrant, a woman, Arab, a human-rights activist who has known exile, and a journalist living in very real fear of death. She was invited to speak precisely because her right to do so is, quite literally, under threat.”

You’d be hard-pressed to avoid the conclusion that the student and her defender had burrowed so deep inside their cocoons, were so overcome by their own fragility, that they couldn’t see that it was Ms. El Rhazoui who was in need of a safer space.

Caving to students’ demands for trigger warnings and safe spaces is doing them no favors: it robs them of the intellectually-challenging, worldview-altering kind of experience they should be having at college. It also emboldens them to seek increasingly absurd and infantilizing restrictions on themselves and each other.

As their students mature, my mother and her co-workers encourage the children to forego high chairs and upgrade from diapers to « big kid » toilets. If only American college administrators and professors did the same with their students.

Voir encore:

In College and Hiding From Scary Ideas
Judith Shulevitz
The New York Times
March 21, 2015

KATHERINE BYRON, a senior at Brown University and a member of its Sexual Assault Task Force, considers it her duty to make Brown a safe place for rape victims, free from anything that might prompt memories of trauma.

So when she heard last fall that a student group had organized a debate about campus sexual assault between Jessica Valenti, the founder of feministing.com, and Wendy McElroy, a libertarian, and that Ms. McElroy was likely to criticize the term “rape culture,” Ms. Byron was alarmed. “Bringing in a speaker like that could serve to invalidate people’s experiences,” she told me. It could be “damaging.”

Ms. Byron and some fellow task force members secured a meeting with administrators. Not long after, Brown’s president, Christina H. Paxson, announced that the university would hold a simultaneous, competing talk to provide “research and facts” about “the role of culture in sexual assault.” Meanwhile, student volunteers put up posters advertising that a “safe space” would be available for anyone who found the debate too upsetting.

The safe space, Ms. Byron explained, was intended to give people who might find comments “troubling” or “triggering,” a place to recuperate. The room was equipped with cookies, coloring books, bubbles, Play-Doh, calming music, pillows, blankets and a video of frolicking puppies, as well as students and staff members trained to deal with trauma. Emma Hall, a junior, rape survivor and “sexual assault peer educator” who helped set up the room and worked in it during the debate, estimates that a couple of dozen people used it. At one point she went to the lecture hall — it was packed — but after a while, she had to return to the safe space. “I was feeling bombarded by a lot of viewpoints that really go against my dearly and closely held beliefs,” Ms. Hall said.

Safe spaces are an expression of the conviction, increasingly prevalent among college students, that their schools should keep them from being “bombarded” by discomfiting or distressing viewpoints. Think of the safe space as the live-action version of the better-known trigger warning, a notice put on top of a syllabus or an assigned reading to alert students to the presence of potentially disturbing material.

Some people trace safe spaces back to the feminist consciousness-raising groups of the 1960s and 1970s, others to the gay and lesbian movement of the early 1990s. In most cases, safe spaces are innocuous gatherings of like-minded people who agree to refrain from ridicule, criticism or what they term microaggressions — subtle displays of racial or sexual bias — so that everyone can relax enough to explore the nuances of, say, a fluid gender identity. As long as all parties consent to such restrictions, these little islands of self-restraint seem like a perfectly fine idea.

But the notion that ticklish conversations must be scrubbed clean of controversy has a way of leaking out and spreading. Once you designate some spaces as safe, you imply that the rest are unsafe. It follows that they should be made safer.

This logic clearly informed a campaign undertaken this fall by a Columbia University student group called Everyone Allied Against Homophobia that consisted of slipping a flier under the door of every dorm room on campus. The headline of the flier stated, “I want this space to be a safer space.” The text below instructed students to tape the fliers to their windows. The group’s vice president then had the flier published in the Columbia Daily Spectator, the student newspaper, along with an editorial asserting that “making spaces safer is about learning how to be kind to each other.”

A junior named Adam Shapiro decided he didn’t want his room to be a safer space. He printed up his own flier calling it a dangerous space and had that, too, published in the Columbia Daily Spectator. “Kindness alone won’t allow us to gain more insight into truth,” he wrote. In an interview, Mr. Shapiro said, “If the point of a safe space is therapy for people who feel victimized by traumatization, that sounds like a great mission.” But a safe-space mentality has begun infiltrating classrooms, he said, making both professors and students loath to say anything that might hurt someone’s feelings. “I don’t see how you can have a therapeutic space that’s also an intellectual space,” he said.

I’m old enough to remember a time when college students objected to providing a platform to certain speakers because they were deemed politically unacceptable. Now students worry whether acts of speech or pieces of writing may put them in emotional peril. Two weeks ago, students at Northwestern University marched to protest an article by Laura Kipnis, a professor in the university’s School of Communication. Professor Kipnis had criticized — O.K., ridiculed — what she called the sexual paranoia pervading campus life.

The protesters carried mattresses and demanded that the administration condemn the essay. One student complained that Professor Kipnis was “erasing the very traumatic experience” of victims who spoke out. An organizer of the demonstration said, “we need to be setting aside spaces to talk” about “victim-blaming.” Last Wednesday, Northwestern’s president, Morton O. Schapiro, wrote an op-ed article in The Wall Street Journal affirming his commitment to academic freedom. But plenty of others at universities are willing to dignify students’ fears, citing threats to their stability as reasons to cancel debates, disinvite commencement speakers and apologize for so-called mistakes.

At Oxford University’s Christ Church college in November, the college censors (a “censor” being more or less the Oxford equivalent of an undergraduate dean) canceled a debate on abortion after campus feminists threatened to disrupt it because both would-be debaters were men. “I’m relieved the censors have made this decision,” said the treasurer of Christ Church’s student union, who had pressed for the cancellation. “It clearly makes the most sense for the safety — both physical and mental — of the students who live and work in Christ Church.”

A year and a half ago, a Hampshire College student group disinvited an Afrofunk band that had been attacked on social media for having too many white musicians; the vitriolic discussion had made students feel “unsafe.”

Last fall, the president of Smith College, Kathleen McCartney, apologized for causing students and faculty to be “hurt” when she failed to object to a racial epithet uttered by a fellow panel member at an alumnae event in New York. The offender was the free-speech advocate Wendy Kaminer, who had been arguing against the use of the euphemism “the n-word” when teaching American history or “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.” In the uproar that followed, the Student Government Association wrote a letter declaring that “if Smith is unsafe for one student, it is unsafe for all students.”

“It’s amazing to me that they can’t distinguish between racist speech and speech about racist speech, between racism and discussions of racism,” Ms. Kaminer said in an email.

The confusion is telling, though. It shows that while keeping college-level discussions “safe” may feel good to the hypersensitive, it’s bad for them and for everyone else. People ought to go to college to sharpen their wits and broaden their field of vision. Shield them from unfamiliar ideas, and they’ll never learn the discipline of seeing the world as other people see it. They’ll be unprepared for the social and intellectual headwinds that will hit them as soon as they step off the campuses whose climates they have so carefully controlled. What will they do when they hear opinions they’ve learned to shrink from? If they want to change the world, how will they learn to persuade people to join them?

Only a few of the students want stronger anti-hate-speech codes. Mostly they ask for things like mandatory training sessions and stricter enforcement of existing rules. Still, it’s disconcerting to see students clamor for a kind of intrusive supervision that would have outraged students a few generations ago. But those were hardier souls. Now students’ needs are anticipated by a small army of service professionals — mental health counselors, student-life deans and the like. This new bureaucracy may be exacerbating students’ “self-infantilization,” as Judith Shapiro, the former president of Barnard College, suggested in an essay for Inside Higher Ed.

But why are students so eager to self-infantilize? Their parents should probably share the blame. Eric Posner, a professor at the University of Chicago Law School, wrote on Slate last month that although universities cosset students more than they used to, that’s what they have to do, because today’s undergraduates are more puerile than their predecessors. “Perhaps overprogrammed children engineered to the specifications of college admissions offices no longer experience the risks and challenges that breed maturity,” he wrote. But “if college students are children, then they should be protected like children.”

Another reason students resort to the quasi-medicalized terminology of trauma is that it forces administrators to respond. Universities are in a double bind. They’re required by two civil-rights statutes, Title VII and Title IX, to ensure that their campuses don’t create a “hostile environment” for women and other groups subject to harassment. However, universities are not supposed to go too far in suppressing free speech, either. If a university cancels a talk or punishes a professor and a lawsuit ensues, history suggests that the university will lose. But if officials don’t censure or don’t prevent speech that may inflict psychological damage on a member of a protected class, they risk fostering a hostile environment and prompting an investigation. As a result, students who say they feel unsafe are more likely to be heard than students who demand censorship on other grounds.

The theory that vulnerable students should be guaranteed psychological security has roots in a body of legal thought elaborated in the 1980s and 1990s and still read today. Feminist and anti-racist legal scholars argued that the First Amendment should not safeguard language that inflicted emotional injury through racist or sexist stigmatization. One scholar, Mari J. Matsuda, was particularly insistent that college students not be subjected to “the violence of the word” because many of them “are away from home for the first time and at a vulnerable stage of psychological development.” If they’re targeted and the university does nothing to help them, they will be “left to their own resources in coping with the damage wrought.” That might have, she wrote, “lifelong repercussions.”

Perhaps. But Ms. Matsuda doesn’t seem to have considered the possibility that insulating students could also make them, well, insular. A few weeks ago, Zineb El Rhazoui, a journalist at Charlie Hebdo, spoke at the University of Chicago, protected by the security guards she has traveled with since supporters of the Islamic State issued death threats against her. During the question-and-answer period, a Muslim student stood up to object to the newspaper’s apparent disrespect for Muslims and to express her dislike of the phrase “I am Charlie.”

Ms. El Rhazoui replied, somewhat irritably, “Being Charlie Hebdo means to die because of a drawing,” and not everyone has the guts to do that (although she didn’t use the word guts). She lives under constant threat, Ms. El Rhazoui said. The student answered that she felt threatened, too.

A few days later, a guest editorialist in the student newspaper took Ms. El Rhazoui to task. She had failed to ensure “that others felt safe enough to express dissenting opinions.” Ms. El Rhazoui’s “relative position of power,” the writer continued, had granted her a “free pass to make condescending attacks on a member of the university.” In a letter to the editor, the president and the vice president of the University of Chicago French Club, which had sponsored the talk, shot back, saying, “El Rhazoui is an immigrant, a woman, Arab, a human-rights activist who has known exile, and a journalist living in very real fear of death. She was invited to speak precisely because her right to do so is, quite literally, under threat.”

You’d be hard-pressed to avoid the conclusion that the student and her defender had burrowed so deep inside their cocoons, were so overcome by their own fragility, that they couldn’t see that it was Ms. El Rhazoui who was in need of a safer space.

Judith Shulevitz is a contributing opinion writer and the author of “The Sabbath World: Glimpses of a Different Order of Time.”

Voir de plus:

Trigger happy
The « trigger warning » has spread from blogs to college classes. Can it be stopped?
Jenny Jarvie
New Republic
March 4, 2014

The headline above would, if some readers had their way, include a « trigger warning »—a disclaimer to alert you that this article contains potentially traumatic subject matter. Such warnings, which are most commonly applied to discussions about rape, sexual abuse, and mental illness, have appeared on message boards since the early days of the Web. Some consider them an irksome tic of the blogosphere’s most hypersensitive fringes, and yet they’ve spread from feminist forums and social media to sites as large as the The Huffington Post. Now, the trigger warning is gaining momentum beyond the Internet—at some of the nation’s most prestigious universities.

Last week, student leaders at the University of California, Santa Barbara, passed a resolution urging officials to institute mandatory trigger warnings on class syllabi. Professors who present « content that may trigger the onset of symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder » would be required to issue advance alerts and allow students to skip those classes. According to UCSB newspaper The Daily Nexus, Bailey Loverin, the student who sponsored the proposal, decided to push the issue after attending a class in which she “felt forced” to sit through a film that featured an “insinuation” of sexual assault and a graphic depiction of rape. A victim of sexual abuse, she did not want to remain in the room, but she feared she would only draw attention to herself by walking out.

On college campuses across the country, a growing number of students are demanding trigger warnings on class content. Many instructors are obliging with alerts in handouts and before presentations, even emailing notes of caution ahead of class. At Scripps College, lecturers give warnings before presenting a core curriculum class, the “Histories of the Present: Violence, » although some have questioned the value of such alerts when students are still required to attend class. Oberlin College has published an official document on triggers, advising faculty members to « be aware of racism, classism, sexism, heterosexism, cissexism, ableism, and other issues of privilege and oppression, » to remove triggering material when it doesn’t « directly » contribute to learning goals and « strongly consider » developing a policy to make « triggering material » optional. Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart, it states, is a novel that may « trigger readers who have experienced racism, colonialism, religious persecution, violence, suicide and more. » Warnings have been proposed even for books long considered suitable material for high-schoolers: Last month, a Rutgers University sophomore suggested that an alert for F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby say, « TW: suicide, domestic abuse and graphic violence. »

What began as a way of moderating Internet forums for the vulnerable and mentally ill now threatens to define public discussion both online and off. The trigger warning signals not only the growing precautionary approach to words and ideas in the university, but a wider cultural hypersensitivity to harm and a paranoia about giving offense. And yet, for all the debate about the warnings on campuses and on the Internet, few are grappling with the ramifications for society as a whole.

Not everyone seems to agree on what the trigger warning is, let alone how it should be applied. Initially, trigger warnings were used in self-help and feminist forums to help readers who might have post traumatic stress disorder to avoid graphic content that might cause painful memories, flashbacks, or panic attacks. Some websites, like Bodies Under Siege, a self-injury support message board, developed systems of adding abbreviated topic tags—from SI (self injury) to ED (eating disorders)—to particularly explicit posts. As the Internet grew, warnings became more popular, and critics began to question their use. In 2010, Susannah Breslin wrote in True/Slant that feminists were applying the term « like a Southern cook applies Pam cooking spray to an overused nonstick frying pan »—prompting Feministing to call her a « certifiable asshole, » and Jezebel to lament that the debate has « been totally clouded by ridiculous inflammatory rhetoric. »

The term only spread with the advent of social media. In 2012, The Awl’s Choire Sicha argued that it had « lost all its meaning. » Since then, alerts have been applied to topics as diverse as sex, pregnancy, addiction, bullying, suicide, sizeism, ableism, homophobia, transphobia, slut shaming, victim-blaming, alcohol, blood, insects, small holes, and animals in wigs. Certain people, from rapper Chris Brown to sex columnist Dan Savage, have been dubbed “triggering.” Some have called for trigger warnings for television shows such as « Scandal » and « Downton Abbey. » Even The New Republic has suggested the satirical news site, The Onion, carry trigger warnings.

At the end of last year, Slate declared 2013 the « Year of the Trigger Warning,” noting that such alerts had become the target of humor. Jezebel, which does not issue trigger warnings, raised hackles in August by using the term as a headline joke: « It’s Time To Talk About Bug Infestations [TRIGGER WARNING]. » Such usage, one critic argued, amounted to « trivializing » such alerts and « trolling people who believe in them. » And in Britain, Suzanne Moore, a feminist columnist for The Guardian, was taken to task when she put a trigger warning on her Twitter bioline, mocking those who followed her feeds only to claim offense. Some critics have ridiculed her in turn: « Trigger warning, @Suzanne_moore is talking again. » (Moore’s Twitter bio now reads, « Media Whore. »)

The backlash has not stopped the growth of the trigger warning, and now that they’ve entered university classrooms, it’s only a matter of time before warnings are demanded for other grade levels. As students introduce them in college newspapers, promotional material for plays, even poetry slams, it’s not inconceivable that they’ll appear at the beginning of film screenings and at the entrance to art exhibits. Will newspapers start applying warnings to articles about rape, murder, and war? Could they even become a regular feature of speech? « I was walking down Main Street last night when—trigger warning—I saw an elderly woman get mugged. »

The « Geek Feminism Wiki » states that trigger warnings should be used for « graphic descriptions or extensive discussion » of abuse, torture, self-harm, suicide, eating disorders, body shaming, and even « psychologically realistic » depictions of the mental state of people suffering from those; it notes that some have gone further, arguing for warnings before the « depiction or discussion of any consensual sexual activity [and] of discriminatory attitudes or actions, such as sexism or racism. » The definition on the Queer Dictionary Tumblr is similar, but expands warnings even to discussion of statistics on hate crimes and self-harming.

As the list of trigger warning–worthy topics continues to grow, there’s scant research demonstrating how words « trigger » or how warnings might help. Most psychological research on P.T.S.D. suggests that, for those who have experienced trauma, « triggers » can be complex and unpredictable, appearing in many forms, from sounds to smells to weather conditions and times of the year. In this sense, anything can be a trigger—a musky cologne, a ditsy pop song, a footprint in the snow.

As a means of navigating the Internet, or setting the tone for academic discussion, the trigger warning is unhelpful. Once we start imposing alerts on the basis of potential trauma, where do we stop? One of the problems with the concept of triggering—understanding words as devices that activate a mechanism or cause a situation—is it promotes a rigid, overly deterministic approach to language. There is no rational basis for applying warnings because there is no objective measure of words’ potential harm. Of course, words can inspire intense reactions, but they have no intrinsic danger. Two people who have endured similarly painful experiences, from rape to war, can read the same material and respond in wholly different ways.

Issuing caution on the basis of potential harm or insult doesn’t help us negotiate our reactions; it makes our dealings with others more fraught. As Breslin pointed out, trigger warnings can have the opposite of their intended effect, luring in sensitive people (and perhaps connoisseurs of graphic content, too). More importantly, they reinforce the fear of words by depicting an ever-expanding number of articles and books as dangerous and requiring of regulation. By framing more public spaces, from the Internet to the college classroom, as full of infinite yet ill-defined hazards, trigger warnings encourage us to think of ourselves as more weak and fragile than we really are.

What’s more, the fear of triggers risks narrowing what we’re exposed to. Raechel Tiffe, an assistant professor in Communication Arts and Sciences at Merrimack College, Massachusetts, described a lesson in which she thought everything had gone well, until a student approached her about a clip from the television musical comedy, « Glee, » in which a student commits suicide. For Tiffe, who uses trigger warnings for sexual assault and rape, the incident was a « teaching moment »—not for the students, but for her to be more aware of the breadth of students’ sensitivities.

As academics become more preoccupied with students’ feelings of harm, they risk opening the door to a never-ending litany of requests. Last month, students at Wellesley College protested a sculpture of a man in his underwear because, according to the Change.org petition, it was a source of « triggering thoughts regarding sexual assault. » While the petition acknowledged the sculpture may not disturb everyone on campus, it insisted we share a “responsibility to pay attention to and attempt to answer the needs of all of our community members. » Even after the artist explained that the figure was supposed to be sleepwalking, students continued to insist it be moved indoors.

Trigger warnings are presented as a gesture of empathy, but the irony is they lead only to more solipsism, an over-preoccupation with one’s own feelings—much to the detriment of society as a whole. Structuring public life around the most fragile personal sensitivities will only restrict all of our horizons. Engaging with ideas involves risk, and slapping warnings on them only undermines the principle of intellectual exploration. We cannot anticipate every potential trigger—the world, like the Internet, is too large and unwieldy. But even if we could, why would we want to? Bending the world to accommodate our personal frailties does not help us overcome them.

Voir de même:

Student protests
The right to fright
An obsession with safe spaces is not just bad for education: it also diminishes worthwhile campus protests
The Economist
Nov 14th 2015

HALLOWEEN is supposed to last for one night only. At Yale University (motto: “Light and Truth”) it has dragged on considerably longer. As happens at many American universities, Yale administrators sent an advisory e-mail to students before the big night, requesting them to refrain from wearing costumes that other students might find offensive. Given that it is legal for 18-year-old Americans to drive, marry and, in most places, own firearms, it might seem reasonable to let students make their own decisions about dressing-up—and to face the consequences when photographs of them disguised as Osama bin Laden can forever be found on Facebook or Instagram. Yet a determination to treat adults as children is becoming a feature of life on campus, and not just in America. Strangely, some of the most enthusiastic supporters of this development are the students themselves.

In response to the Yale e-mail, a faculty member wrote a carefully worded reply. In it she suggested that students and faculty ought to ponder whether a university should seek to control the behaviour of students in this way. Yes it should, came the reply, in the form of a letter signed by hundreds of students, protests and calls for two academics to resign for suggesting otherwise. Tellingly, the complaint made by some students at Yale’s Silliman College, where the row took place, was that they now felt unsafe.

On the face of it this is odd. New Haven, which surrounds Yale, had 60 shootings in 2014, 12 of them fatal. Thankfully, there has never been a shooting at the university. The choice of words was deliberate, though. Last year a debate on abortion at Oxford University was cancelled after some students complained that hearing the views of anti-abortionists would make them feel unsafe. Many British universities now provide “safe spaces” for students to protect them from views which they might find objectionable. Sometimes demands for safe space enter the classroom. Jeannie Suk, a Harvard law professor, has written about how students there tried to dissuade her from discussing rape in class when teaching the law on domestic violence, lest it trigger traumatic memories.

Bodies upon the gears

Like many bad ideas, the notion of safe spaces at universities has its roots in a good one. Gay people once used the term to refer to bars and clubs where they could gather without fear, at a time when many states still had laws against sodomy.

In the worst cases, though, an idea that began by denoting a place where people could assemble without being prosecuted has been reinvented by students to serve as a justification for shutting out ideas. At Colorado College, safety has been invoked by a student group to prevent the screening of a film celebrating the Stonewall riots which downplays the role of minorities in the gay-rights movement. The same reasoning has led some students to request warnings before colleges expose them to literature that deals with racism and violence. People as different as Condoleezza Rice, a former secretary of state, and Bill Maher, a satirist, have been dissuaded from giving speeches on campuses, sometimes on grounds of safety.

What makes this so objectionable is that there are plenty of things on American campuses that really do warrant censure from the university. Administrators at the University of Oklahoma managed not to notice that one of its fraternities, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, had cheerily sung a song about hanging black people from a tree for years, until a video of them doing so appeared on the internet. At the University of Missouri, whose president resigned on November 9th, administrators did a poor job of responding to complaints of unacceptable behaviour on campus—which included the scattering of balls of cotton about the place, as a put-down to black students, and the smearing of faeces in the shape of a swastika in a bathroom.

Distinguishing between this sort of thing and obnoxious Halloween costumes ought not to be a difficult task. But by equating smaller ills with bigger ones, students and universities have made it harder, and diminished worthwhile protests in the process. The University of Missouri episode shows how damaging this confusion can be: some activists tried to prevent the college’s own newspaper from covering their demonstration, claiming that to do so would have endangered their safe space, thereby rendering a reasonable protest absurd.

Fifty years ago student radicals agitated for academic freedom and the right to engage in political activities on campus. Now some of their successors are campaigning for censorship and increased policing by universities of student activities. The supporters of these ideas on campus are usually described as radicals. They are, in fact, the opposite.

Voir également:

The Trapdoor of Trigger Words

What the science of trauma can tell us about an endless campus debate.

Katy Waldman

Photo illustration by Natalie Matthews-Ramo. Photos by Thinkstock.

As educators and students suited up for the fall semester last month, University of Chicago dean of students John Ellison sent a provocative letter to incoming freshmen about all the cushioning policies they should not expect at their new school. “We do not support so-called ‘trigger warnings,’ we do not cancel invited speakers because their topics might prove controversial, and we do not condone the creation of intellectual ‘safe spaces’ where individuals can retreat from ideas and perspectives at odds with their own,” Ellison wrote.

Ellison’s pre-emptive strike against trigger warnings, or alerts that professors might stamp on coursework that could provoke a strong emotional response, was the latest salvo in a yearslong and stormy conversation on college campuses—a kind of agon between “free speech” and “safe spaces.” The University of Chicago missive seemed to plant a flag in the former camp, declaring itself a Political Correctness Avenger, its cape of First Amendment verities fluttering in the wind.

Its side of the debate insists that students have embraced an ethos of personal fragility—that they are infantilizing themselves by overreacting to tiny slights. A splashy Atlantic cover story from September 2015 on the “coddling of the American mind” argued that universities were playacting at PTSD, co-opting the disorder’s hypersensitivity and hypervigilance. The other side protests administrators’ lack of awareness of marginalized groups; these students say they seek more inclusive, responsive, and enlightened spaces for learning. For them, the “tiny slights” have a name—microaggressions—and a high cost. They accumulate like a swarm of poisonous bee stings. As one outgoing college senior at American University told the Washington Post in May, “I don’t think it’s outrageous for me to want my campus to be better than the world around it. … I think that makes me a good person.”

The Atlantic piece cited Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart and F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby as two classic texts that have stirred calls for trigger warnings due to their racially motivated violence and domestic abuse, respectively. Students at Rutgers in 2014 beseeched a professor to append a trigger warning to descriptions of suicidal thinking in Mrs. Dalloway; students at Columbia did the same in 2015 for scenes of sexual assault in Ovid’s Metamorphoses. In some cases, the flags are meant to shepherd students away from high-voltage material; in others, they simply advise readers to be prepared. Often derided or ironized online by concerned citizens (and especially by free speech advocates), they are a response to something real: Scientists agree that triggers can awaken dormant memories and hijack the rational control board of the cortex, drowning awareness of the present moment in eddies of panic.

Enacted correctly, trigger warnings and related measures are not supposed to constrict academic horizons.

As Ali Vingiano recounts for BuzzFeed, trigger warnings were born not in the ivory tower but on the lady-blogosphere, where they prefaced message-board postings about topics like self-harm, eating disorders, and sexual assault. The advisory labels swam to LiveJournal in the early aughts, then spread across Tumblr, Twitter, and Facebook. By 2012, they speckled such feminist sites as Bitch, Shakesville, and xoJane, creating protective force fields around articles that touched on everything from depression to aggressive dogs. These internet “heads up” notes allowed vulnerable readers to tread lightly through and around subjects that reignited their pain. But they also acquired a sanctimonious, performative aura. “As practiced in the real world,” Amanda Marcotte wrote in Slate last year, “the trigger warning is less about preventive mental health care and more about social signaling of liberal credentials.”

Similarly, the vaudeville toughness of Ellison’s letter felt designed more to make a cultural point than to edify students. Enacted correctly, the measures Ellison invokes are not supposed to constrict academic horizons. They are meant to secure for minority students the same freedoms to speak and explore that white male students have enjoyed for decades.

A spokesman for the University of Chicago, Jeremy Manier, acknowledged on the phone that at issue were “intellectual safe spaces,” not safe spaces in general: The university has already thrown its support behind a “safe space program” for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students. Individual University of Chicago professors, Manier added, are also welcome to use trigger warnings if they so choose.

For all the furor they inspire, trigger warnings are relatively rare. According to a National Coalition Against Censorship survey last year of more than 800 educators, fewer than 1 percent of institutions have adopted a policy on trigger warnings; 15 percent of respondents reported students requesting them in their courses; and only 7.5 percent reported students initiating efforts to require trigger warnings.

What’s more, as the survey notes, while media narratives paint these cautions as forms of left-wing political correctness, a significant minority of trigger warnings arise on conservative campuses in response to explicit or queer content. NCAC executive director Joan Bertin told me that the survey yielded more than 94 reports of sex-related trigger warnings, including from art history teachers displaying homoerotic images and studio drawing teachers importuned to announce nudity and help “conservative students … feel more in control of the material.” A professor wrote in that he’d offered a trigger warning after “a Rastafarian student was very offended at my comparison of Akhenaten’s Great Hymn to Psalm 104.” Requests for advisory labels stemmed from representations of famine, gender stereotypes, childbirth, religious intolerance, spiders, and “sad people.”

Given the myths and emotions enveloping the issue of trigger warnings and safe spaces, it’s worth asking what science can tell us about the actual effects of verbal triggers on the body, brain, and psyche. Certain people experience certain words as dangerous. Should they have to listen to those words anyway?

* * *

During the winter of her freshman year in college, Lindsey met a guy, a junior, at a party. A week later, he asked her to another party and picked her up in his car. She didn’t realize something was wrong until he pulled into a parking lot and told her to get in the backseat. When she refused and asked to go home, he informed her that they weren’t going anywhere until she had sex with him. Then he climbed on top of her and raped her.

It took years for Lindsey to find her way to a therapist, where she discovered that the occasional flashbacks, phantom sensations of being touched, and breathlessness she experienced in the wake of this violation were symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. The episodes struck whenever she saw or read words associated with sexual violence: rape, molest, attack, even incest. She’d notice a tingling shock in her chest and “the feeling of fear, maybe a flash of a point of time during my assault, and sometimes it was like he was doing it again,” she says.

Several months ago, a friend of Lindsey’s was regaling her with stories about the movie Room, in which the young female protagonist is imprisoned for years in a shed and repeatedly raped. Lindsey hadn’t seen it, didn’t want to see it; yet when her friend said the word trapped, she detected the unwanted caress of her disorder across her body, felt her pulse begin to race.

Voir enfin:

Trigger Warnings, un outil pour mieux vivre ensemble sur Internet

Les Trigger Warnings, qu’est-ce donc ? Il s’agit d’une façon de prévenir les internautes qu’un contenu pourrait être choquant pour certaines personnes. Une évidence ? Pas forcément… Petite présentation.

— Publié initialement le 25 juin 2013

– Cet article contient dans sa première sous-partie de petites infos sur les films Les Mondes de Ralph et Iron Man 3.

Laissez-moi vous conter une petite histoire. Il y a quelques semaines, surfant tranquillement sur les eaux calmes des Internets français, je parcourais un site d’actualités lorsque, sous le choc d’une image violente et inattendue, je repoussai — physiquement, et violemment — mon ordi et fis volte-face.

Pourquoi donc ? Je venais de tomber sur une photo de la victime du cannibale de Miami. Un homme, certes vivant et, toutes proportions gardées, « bien » portant, mais qui a néanmoins été attaqué par une personne sous l’emprise de drogues ayant dévoré une partie de son visage. Visage que, donc, je vous laisse imaginer.

Après la stupéfaction et la douleur, je ressentis principalement de la colère. Quelle idée de poster une telle image sans AUCUN préavis, mis à part un titre sur lequel le regard glisse pendant qu’on fait défiler la page ! J’avais l’impression qu’on m’avait collé une baffe, et j’étais très énervée.

Ce qui m’amène à vous parler des Trigger Warnings, une « règle » visant justement à éviter ce genre de mauvaise surprise en ligne.

Qu’est-ce qu’une « trigger » ?

Une « trigger », ou en français un déclencheur, c’est un contenu — des mots, des images, un son, parfois même une odeur — qui déclenche chez quelqu’un ayant vécu un évènement traumatisant le souvenir de cet évènement, parfois suivi de moments très difficiles comme des crises d’angoisse, des flashbacks et d’autres éléments qui se retrouvent notamment dans le trouble de stress post-traumatique.

Pour prendre un exemple qui risque de ne pas déranger trop de monde : si vous êtes phobique, disons, des lapins et que vous étiez dans un parc à boire un Coca quand une boule de poils à oreilles vous a soudain sauté sur le pied, il est possible que le goût ou la vue du Coca vous cause un sentiment de malaise, sans forcément que vous ne vous en rendiez compte.

La plupart des déclencheurs concernent des choses plus sérieuses, comme des agressions, des viols, et d’autres traumatismes très violents.

« Triggers » au cinéma : Les Mondes de Ralph

Récemment, on a vu deux exemples réalistes, au cinéma, de personnes traumatisées réagissant à un déclencheur. Le premier est — et c’est assez surprenant — dans Les Mondes de Ralph, le dernier Disney, sorti pour Noël 2012.

Comme on le voit sur ce post Tumblr, le sergent Calhoun, une femme forte, guerrière et combative, réagit très violemment au surnom « Dynamite Gal » que lui donne innocemment Félix Fixe, un gentil réparateur, car cela la ramène directement à un énorme traumatisme : la mort de son compagnon pendant leur mariage.

Ce simple surnom suffit à provoquer chez elle une terreur soudaine, et pas moins vivace ni moins réelle que celle qui l’a emplie lors de l’évènement traumatisant. Félix n’utilisera d’ailleurs plus jamais ces termes et prendra soin de ne pas la choquer à nouveau, ce qui est la bonne chose à faire.

« Triggers » au cinéma : Iron Man 3

Plus récemment encore, dans Iron Man 3, Tony Stark est gravement traumatisé par un évènement très dur traversé pendant Avengers, dont l’action se situe à New York. Lorsque les gens — et ils sont nombreux à le faire — lui en parlent, il entre dans de violentes crises d’angoisse, se sent hautement vulnérable, a du mal à respirer et ressent le besoin impérieux de se mettre à l’abri dans une de ses armures.

Tony Stark fait un cauchemar lié à son traumatisme

À plusieurs reprises, il indique à divers personnages du film qu’il faut arrêter de lui parler de New York, que cela déclenche chez lui une grande angoisse qui peut le mettre en danger, mais aussi blesser les autres. Cependant, quelques personnages n’en tiennent pas compte et le film montre clairement que ce n’est pas une bonne attitude à avoir envers les personnes ayant traversé des évènements traumatisants.

Prendre en compte les autres pour ne pas les choquer

Forcément, c’est plus facile de ne pas provoquer de déclencheur chez quelqu’un que vous connaissez qu’en ligne. Impossible pour vous de savoir si un-e de vos abonné-e-s Tumblr va être choqué-e par un webcomic sur la culture du viol, ou si un-e de vos followers sur Twitter va jeter son smartphone à l’autre bout de la pièce en ouvrant votre lien pour découvrir le top 10 des pires insectes d’Amazonie.

La solution, c’est donc de prévenir que le contenu est sensible, surtout sur Twitter et Tumblr où, contrairement à Facebook, vous ne connaissez pas tou-te-s vos abonné-e-s. Mais comment faire ça de façon simple, limpide et surtout rapide ?

Les Trigger Warnings sur Tumblr

Sur Tumblr, on peut utiliser les tags « tw », « trigger warning », et préciser quel type de déclencheur contient le post (par exeple : « tw : blood » pour le contenu comportant du sang). Mais il faut utiliser ces tags de façon intelligente, pas comme sur cet exemple :

Ici, impossible de savoir à quel genre de contenu on a affaire. Les tags ne le précisent pas et le « Ne lisez pas ça » ne fait que générer un sentiment de curiosité.

Voici un exemple de Trigger Warning correctement utilisé :

On sait clairement que ce post parle de transphobie et les personnes ne voulant ou ne pouvant pas supporter ce genre de contenu peuvent aisément le contourner.

Une application Chrome, Tumblr Savior, permet d’éviter facilement les contenus sensibles, tant qu’ils sont correctement taggués. Il suffit d’indiquer à l’application quels tags intégrer dans la « Black List » et les posts comportant ces mots-clefs seront invisibles sur votre tableau de bord.

Autant prendre donc quelques minutes chaque jour pour correctement tagguer vos posts « sensibles » ; ce n’est pas grand-chose et ça peut éviter à un-e de vos gentil-le-s followers  des émotions pas très agréables alors qu’il/elle voulait juste traîner sur le Net comme vous et moi.

Les Trigger Warnings sur Twitter

Sur Twitter, les Trigger Warnings sont utiles car le nombre de caractères limité peut donner lieu à des mauvaises surprises. Pas toujours facile de prévenir du contenu caché derrière un lien ou une image en 140 lettres… De plus, avec les liens raccourcis (comme bit.ly, tinyurl…) il est souvent impossible de savoir sur quel site on va finir.

Bien sûr, vous pouvez continuer à tweeter « Voici une photo de ma chatte » et à troller tout le monde avec un cliché de Miaouss, votre persane de six mois, c’est une blague qui ne vieillit jamais (si). Mais comment protéger vos followers d’un contenu sensible ?

Au lieu de tweeter « OH. MON. DIEU. » et d’y ajouter le lien vers une image (probablement photoshoppée, de toute façon) de l’araignée-la-plus-grosse-du-monde-qui-peut-manger-un-lynx-adulte, c’est quand même plus sympa d’ajouter quelques hashtags (#Araignée #Insectes #Arachnophobie #Photoshop) histoire de prévenir que vous allez parler d’un contenu sensible qui risque de faire flipper une bonne partie de vos aimants followers.

Les limites des Trigger Warnings

Bien sûr, les Trigger Warnings ont leur limite. Si vous avez une phobie rare (des lapins ou des papillons par exemple), ou que vous ne supportez absolument PAS qu’on vous parle de patates, il y a peu de chances que vous tombiez sur des gens prêts à vous prévenir qu’ils viennent de poster un gif de lapin mangeant des pommes de terre pendant que de jolis petits papillons volent autour de lui.

C’est la vie.

Pour conclure, l’important est de se rappeler que les Trigger Warnings sont un outil simple pour vivre en communauté et prendre en compte les autres utilisateurs d’Internet, surtout ceux qui vous suivent sur les réseaux sociaux. Dites-vous que sans le savoir, vous avez peut-être déjà échappé à un contenu traumatisant (pour vous) grâce à une personne prévenante !

Voir par ailleurs:

La fin est proche
Rémi Bourgeot, Paul-François Paoli
Atlantico
15 Janvier 2017

La vraie fin de la fin de l’histoire, c’est maintenant. Mais voilà pourquoi la dissolution de nos démocraties libérales ne ressemblera probablement pas à ce que nous en imaginions

Atlantico : La demande d’autoritarisme est un phénomène qui touche une grande partie de l’occident et qui est loin d’épargner la France. L’élection de Donald Trump, le Brexit ou de manière générale la hausse des populismes sont autant d’expressions de cette demande. Angoisse économiques et sociales liées à la mondialisation, déterritorialisation des grands groupes du web (GAFA) et des flux de population… Quelles sont selon vous les causes et les raisons qui ont produit cette demande de la part des sociétés occidentale. Vivons-nous la fin de la « Fin de l’Histoire » comme elle a été conceptualisée par Francis Fukuyama ?

Rémi Bourgeot : L’ordre politico-économique actuel est paradoxal. Il faut commencer par reconnaître que les notions de mondialisation et de « gouvernance mondiale » vont, en fait, de pair avec celle de bureaucratie. Ce qui se prétend libéral a tendance à ne pas l’être du tout. L’invocation d’une forme d’autoritarisme constitue certes un symptôme du rejet du système actuel, mais ça n’est pas nécessairement le dernier mot du virage politique actuel. Nous vivons d’ores et déjà dans un système de bureaucratie absolue, qui, dans le même temps, aspire à ne plus rien gérer que de dérisoire et fait mine de « déréguler » en invoquant la mondialisation et ses avatars. Sur la base de l’économie administrée d’après guerre s’est construite une machine administrative qui, à partir des années 1970, a commencé, comme ivre de son propre pouvoir, à vaciller et à se prétendre libérale. Depuis 2008, « le roi est nu ». On assiste, en particulier dans le monde anglophone, à une prise de conscience des failles fondamentales du système de « gouvernance mondiale ». Trump et le Brexit sont des manifestations historiques de ce phénomène. Il suffit de s’amuser à lire le Financial Times ou le Wall Street Journal entre les lignes pour se convaincre que, malgré les dichotomies électorales, cette prise de conscience y touche autant l’élite financière que les classes populaires. On réalise enfin que les bureaucraties pseudo-libérales ne comprennent pas les marchés et ne font qu’aggraver des phénomènes de bulles à répétition. Dans le même temps, ce système bureaucratique repose en fait sur une destruction de l’élite traditionnelle et de l’élite scientifique qui, dans le cas français, se fait au profit de la « haute fonction publique ». On est très loin d’un système de démocratie libérale et même à l’opposé. Si l’on s’intéresse à la fulgurance de Fukuyama, on pourrait lui rétorquer que la démocratie libérale n’a simplement pas eu lieu… Exit la fin de l’histoire. Le populisme est, dans une certaine mesure, une réaction aux dérives et aux échecs de ce système de déresponsabilisation. La petite musique autoritaire des populistes occidentaux fait surtout écho au discrédit donc souffre l’antienne pseudo-libérale. Les partis traditionnels, s’ils sont sincères dans leur invocation du libéralisme, seraient bien inspirés de comprendre la nécessité d’un retour à un véritable système de gouvernement et de responsabilité, seul rempart contre l’extrémisme.

Paul-François Paoli : Il est très difficile de répondre de manière simple à votre question dont l’enjeu est très vaste. Je vais donc essayer de respecter la complexité sans esquiver la question. Les années 90 ont en effet été marquées par l’idée d’une « Fin de l’Histoire », une sorte de happy end qui aurait vu l’humanité entière s’acheminer vers un monde apaisé grâce à l’accroissement des richesses, la fin progressive de la misère et le développement de l’Etat de droit partout dans le monde. Cette idée d’un monde sans ennemi après la chute de l’Urss, où les valeurs libérales et démocratiques de l’Occident l’auraient définitivement emporté, s’est heurtée à l’irruption d’un nouvel antagonisme historique, celui qui oppose l’islam radicalisé à un Occident qui, loin d’être sûr de lui-même, est travaillé par une profonde fracture. Il y a donc deux fractures à prendre en compte: la fracture qui divise le monde islamique entre musulmans pacifiques et musulmans radicalisés et la fracture qui divise l’Occident entre ceux qui prétendent universaliser le modèle occidental et notamment le modèle américain- c’était le cas de la famille Bush et des néos conservateurs américains- et ceux qui pensent que l’Occident traverse une grave, très grave crise spirituelle et morale, une crise de légitimité liée notamment au recul des valeurs traditionnelles. Autrement dit la bataille a lieu sur tous les fronts et elle déchire chacun des camps.

La victoire de Trump est aussi la victoire d’une forme de critique de l’Occident libéral et post moderne par ceux qui récusent ce nouveau monde qui prétend ringardiser tous ceux qui y rechignent. Les Américains qui l’ont élu voudraient que leur pays renoue avec un imaginaire puissant celui d’un rêve américain, mais un rêve américain qui ne soit pas celui des minorités et du politiquement correct, notion qui est réellement née aux Etats-Unis et que les élites libérales et progressistes américaines ont exporté en Europe depuis les années 60. Un rêve américain accessible d’abord à ceux qui ont créé les Etats-Unis, à savoir les blancs eux-mêmes, qui seront peut-être la minorité de demain. La victoire de Trump signifie peut-être la fin d’une période marquée par la culpabilisation de l’américain blanc, qu’il soit pauvre, riche ou des classes moyennes, par les lobbys féministes et afro-américains. En Europe, la question est sensiblement différente, car l’angoisse qui aujourd’hui prédomine est liée à l’immigration et surtout à l’islam. Le Brexit a signifié le refus des classes populaires anglaises de voir l’Angleterre se mondialiser à l’aune d’une immigration sans limite. Il n’y a pas, à mon sens, de menace autoritaire en Europe. Dès lors qu’un gouvernement est élu par la majorité d’une population, la démocratie exige que les vœux de cette majorité soient pris en compte. Arrêter ou limiter les flux migratoires n’a rien à voir avec un principe dictatorial. Cela fait partie intégrante des droits des peuples à disposer d’eux-mêmes.
Est-ce que la perte des valeurs traditionnelles et d’un modèle, d’un cadre idéologique peuvent permettre d’expliquer, en partie, le fait de voir de jeunes gens aller s’engager dans les rangs de l’Etat Islamique ? Plus modérément, est-ce un facteur explicatif de la montée des extrémismes en Europe ? Comment analyser ce sentiment de dépossession de destin ?

Rémi Bourgeot : La question de l’islamisme en occident est double. On observe une sorte d’effet de résonance entre, d’un côté, la crise politico-religieuse qui ravage le monde arabe et y détruit des constructions étatiques aussi violentes que fragiles et, de l’autre, la crise propre aux démocraties occidentales. Ces deux crises simultanées sont pourtant d’une nature très différente. La plupart des pays développés font face à une dégénérescence spécifique de leur système étatique en une bureaucratie tentaculaire (publique et privée) qui, dans le même temps, s’est déresponsabilisée en invoquant la mondialisation. Mais cette « décadence » se manifeste à la suite d’un immense succès. Ce succès a notamment reposé sur l’alliance entre développement des institutions, facilité de financement et progrès technique. Les systèmes politiques occidentaux présentent pourtant désormais, malgré l’ultra-individualisme, des maux associés aux systèmes collectivistes. D’un côté, la standardisation de l’existence, l’isolement et l’extension continue du périmètre de la bureaucratie produisent un effet d’aliénation croissante, de sentiment d’inutilité et de crise psychique profonde dans la société et au cœur même de l’élite.

De l’autre, la logique bureaucratique et la dissociation géographique entre conception, production et consommation sapent le fonctionnement du capitalisme (entraînant une stagnation de la productivité) et la notion de citoyenneté. Les classes populaires, les jeunes, les sous-diplômés puis les surdiplômés… en fait plus personne à terme n’est appelé à être véritablement inclus dans un tel système en dehors d’un microcosme bureaucratique qui évoque celui du communisme. Dans ce contexte, l’appel électoral récurrent aux minorités par la classe des pseudo-progressistes est une imposture vouée à l’échec, comme l’a montré la déconvenue de Mme Clinton.

Paul-François Paoli : Les jeunes qui s’engagent dans le Djihad, si l’on en croit ceux qui ont étudié leurs motivations, notamment Olivier Roy ou Gilles Keppel, ont l’impression de vivre dans un monde factice et virtuel, celui d’Internet, un monde déréalisé. La motivation mystique, selon Olivier Roy qui a écrit un livre intéressant, Le Djihad et la mort, n’est en partie qu’un alibi. Ce que cherchent ces jeunes dans le Djihad c’est avant tout une forme d’excitation et de reconnaissance. La société où nous sommes -c’est une idée que je développe dans « Malaise de l’Occident, vers une révolution conservatrice » (Pierre Guillaume de Roux)- est une société de l’illusion et du simulacre. Nous pouvons tous croire que nous existons dans le regard des autres en envoyant un message sur Twitter ou sur Facebook. La société du spectacle mondialisée permet à des quidams de satisfaire leur narcissisme à peu de frais. Elle permet aussi d’exprimer une pulsion de mort qui va venger le quidam de son anonymat et du sentiment de nullité qui l’habite. L’islam radical est un moyen de reconnaissance pour ceux qui n’ont que la peur et la terreur pour enfin exister dans le regard des autres.

Faire peur est toujours mieux que faire pitié. Voilà ce que se disent ceux qui nous haïssent notamment parce que nous ne cessons de les plaindre. Le discours sur l’exclusion que la gauche tient depuis longtemps enferme les gens dans leur sentiment victimaire. Pour autant le malaise de notre civilisation est aussi profond que réel. Nous avons perdu le gout d’être nous-même et l’Europe multiculturelle des élites a contribué à la diffusion de ce sentiment. Ce n’est pas un hasard si le livre de Michel Onfray, qui n’est pas un homme de droite, s’intitule « Décadence ». Abrutis par le consumérisme les peuples européens ont peut-être perdu le gout de se défendre et cette absence de pugnacité ne peut que renforcer le mépris des islamistes.
Comment pourrait-on répondre de manière efficace à cette demande d’autoritarisme sans sacrifier nos démocraties selon vous ?

Rémi Bourgeot : La réponse la plus raisonnable c’est la démocratie libérale dans un cadre institutionnelle et géographique raisonnable (un cadre national, vu de façon apaisée, serait un bon candidat), pas l’ersatz brandi par une bureaucratie aux abois. Il faut d’abord voir la réalité de nos systèmes politico-économiques et analyser leurs échecs. La pire des approches consisteraient à prolonger le statu quo économique globaliste des quatre dernières décennies tout en invoquant la modernité et le progressisme. C’est l’approche suivie par un certain nombre d’acteurs politiques ultra-conformistes, d’Hillary Clinton aux Etats-Unis au courant Macron-Hollande en France.

La plupart des mouvements populistes européens apparaissent incapables de gouverner du fait de leur désorganisation et de leur ancrage dans une forme ou une autre d’extrémisme. Quoi que l’on pense du personnage de Donald Trump et des relents xénophobes de sa campagne, il faut reconnaitre que sa relative autonomie financière de milliardaire lui a permis de mettre les pieds dans le plat de la question de la localisation de la production industrielle. Il sera impossible de renouer avec la croissance, les gains de productivité et le plein emploi sans surmonter cette question. Le meilleur moyen de répondre à la tendance à l’autoritarisme, c’est d’y opposer un renouveau de l’idée de gouvernement. En Europe et en France en particulier, cela n’adviendra que lorsqu’un parti sérieux se résoudra à aborder simultanément la question du poids de la bureaucratie dans l’économie (sans s’égarer dans les manipulations du fonctionnaire Macron) et du rééquilibrage européen face à l’unilatéralisme allemand.

Paul-François Paoli : Je ne crois pas à l’avenir d’un régime autoritaire en France. Nous sommes des peuples individualistes et les Français n’ont jamais supporté une quelconque dictature. Le régime de Vichy, qui a duré 4 ans, était une plaisanterie à côté du national-socialisme et la dictature napoléonienne n’a été possible, quelques années durant, que parce que la gloire de Napoléon était telle que les Français ont accepté de limiter leurs libertés. Les libertés fondamentales d’opinion et de contestation sont inhérentes au tempérament gaulois et De Gaulle lui-même a dû en tenir compte, alors que son tempérament était autoritaire. Par contre je crois à la nécessité d’un Etat fort et respecté. Pour cela le prochain président devra jouir d’une majorité importante qui lui assure une légitimité durable.

Voir enfin:

Prospective inquiétante
Tous aux abris : voici à quoi ressemblera le monde en 2022 selon le renseignement américain
Philippe Fabry
Atlantico
14 Janvier 2017

Tous les quatre ans, un groupe d’analystes du NIC (National Intelligence Council) établit un rapport prévisionnel sur l’état du monde dans cinq ans. Pour chacune des grandes prévisions relevée dans ce document, nous avons demandé à Philippe Fabry de les juger possibles ou non.
La fin de la domination américaine, et avec elle de l’ordre mondial tel que nous le connaissons depuis la fin de la Deuxième Guerre mondiale.

Philippe Fabry : Il est certain que l’on a observé, sous l’ère Obama, un relatif repli de l’hégémonie américaine qui a laissé le champ libre à l’émergence ou la réémergence de puissances régionales, dont certaines ont des ambitions mondiales : la Russie, la Chine, l’Iran sont les plus antagoniques à la puissance américaine.

Cependant, un tel repli n’est pas inédit et rien ne permet d’affirmer qu’il sera définitif, au contraire.

En effet, les Etats-Unis ont souffert durant la dernière décennie de deux traumatismes majeurs : d’une part un traumatisme psychologico-militaire, avec l’impasse de la politique américaine de « guerre contre la terreur » et de remodelage démocratique du Moyen Orient, en commençant par l’Irak, qui s’est soldée par un piteux retrait – lequel a gâché une victoire militaire authentique après le succès du surge – auquel a bien vite succédé le chaos terroriste islamiste; d’autre part un traumatisme économique, la crise de 2008 et ses conséquences. Tout ceci a provoqué une crise de conscience aux Etats-Unis, avec un doute important sur la légitimité et l’intérêt du pays à se projeter ainsi à travers le monde ; et aujourd’hui, hors des Etats-Unis, l’on se demande si le règne de l’Amérique ne touche pas à sa fin et s’il n’est pas temps d’envisager un monde « multipolaire » dans lequel il faudrait se repositionner, éventuellement en revoyant l’alliance américaine.

Mais à vrai dire, nous avons déjà connu la même chose il y a quarante ans : après la présidence de Nixon, dans les années 1970, le rêve américain semblait brisé par la guerre du Vietnam, qui avait coûté cher, économiquement et humainement, pour un résultat nul puisque le Sud-Vietnam fut envahi deux ans après le retrait américain et tout le pays bascula dans le communisme. La même année, en 1975, les accords d’Helsinki sont souvent considérés comme l’apogée de l’URSS et en 1979, l’Iran échappe à l’influence américaine. Nombreux à l’époque ont cru que c’en était fini de la puissance américaine et que les soviétiques, dont le stock d’armes nucléaires gonflait à grande vitesse, deviendraient le véritable hégémon mondial. En fait, la décennie s’achevait par l’élection de Ronald Reagan et America is back, et au cours des dix années suivantes, l’Union soviétique s’effondrait et l’Amérique triomphait.

Donc, s’il est certain que nous sommes actuellement dans une phase de repli de la puissance américaine, rien ne permet de dire qu’elle doit se prolonger. Au contraire, l’élection « surprise  » de Donald Trump, dont le slogan de campagne « Make America Great Again » était l’un des slogans de Reagan, m’apparaît comme un premier signe du retour du leadership américain, et je ne pense pas qu’il faudra attendre cinq ans pour le voir.

En revanche, il est certain que les puissances ennemies ou rivales des Etats-Unis, qui ont énormément profité du reflux américain, ont la volonté de l’exploiter plus avant, et que le retour d’une Amérique sûre d’elle-même ne sera pas pour leur plaire. Les réactions estomaquées qu’ont provoqué les premiers tweets de Donald Trump à propos de la Chine et de Taïwan ne sont qu’un aperçu de cette évolution.
L’affirmation de la puissance indienne.

Oui, l’Inde est le grand émergent d’aujourd’hui, d’un niveau comparable à ce qu’était la Chine au tournant du millénaire. Des usines commencent à quitter la Chine pour s’installer en Inde : la Chine perd des emplois au profit de l’Inde par délocalisation ! Des études démographiques, publiées il y a quelques mois, donnaient en outre une population indienne dépassant la population chinoise dès 2022. De plus, l’Inde peut espérer dans les années qui viennent une forme de soutien des Etats-Unis dans une sorte d’alliance de revers contre la Chine.

Par ailleurs, l’Inde commence à se comporter elle aussi en puissance régionale en se constituant un réseau d’alliances : elle vient ainsi de livrer des missiles au Vietnam, vieil ennemi de la Chine, en forme de représailles au soutien chinois au Pakistan, et surtout à la constitution du « corridor économique » sino-pakistanais dont le tracé passe par le Cachemire, territoire revendiqué par l’Inde.

La montée en puissance du rival indien, face à une Chine qui est encore elle-même une jeune puissance, est l’un des principaux défis à la stabilité de l’Asie dans les années qui viennent, car la Chine pourrait être tentée d’enrayer la menace indienne avant qu’elle ne soit trop imposante.

A ce propos, il faut voir que la Chine pourrait vouloir profiter de l’avantage démographique tant qu’il est de son côté pour tenter militairement sa chance. Il faut savoir que la population chinoise souffre d’un gros déséquilibre au plan des sexes : sur la population des 18-34 ans, la population masculine est supérieure de vingt millions à la population féminine. Cela signifie que la Chine peut perdre vingt millions d’hommes dans un conflit sans virtuellement aucune conséquence démographique à long terme, puisque ce sont des individus qui ne pourront pas, statistiquement, disposer d’un partenaire pour se reproduire. Pour des esprits froids comme ceux des dirigeants du Parti Communiste Chinois, cela peut sembler une fenêtre de tir intéressante.
L’accroissement de la menace terroriste.

C’est hélas très vraisemblable. Si l’Etat islamique ne devrait pas survivre longtemps comme entité territoriale, il a probablement de beaux jours devant lui comme réseau terroriste : son reflux territorial en Syrie et en Irak a été concomittant à un essaimage, en Libye notamment, et le réseau devrait se renforcer en Europe avec le retour des djihadistes ayat combattu au Moyen Orient.
Un retour des nationalismes.

A vrai dire, il s’agit ici plus d’un diagnostic que d’un pronostic : l’on a déjà commencé à observer ce retour des nationalismes en Europe avec le PiS en Pologne, la progression d’Alternative fur Deutschland en Allemagne, le Brexit… et bien sûr la montée du Front national en France. Parier sur la poursuite du mouvement en Europe dans les années qui viennent relève de l’évidence. La crise migratoire et l’expansion du terrorisme islamiste ont évidemment favorisé ce mouvement, de même que le manque de vision à l’échelle européenne et l’appel d’air désastreux d’Angela Merkel. Il faut ajouter à cela le fait que le fer de lance du populisme nationaliste sur le continent européen, la Russie de Poutine, finance et soutient le développement des discours les plus sommaires sur l’islam et l’immigration, bénéficiant certes du politiquement correct qui a empêché de débattre de certaines questions jusqu’à présent, mais également renforçant ce refus du débat de peur qu’il doive se faire dans les termes des populistes. Il en résulte une forme d’impasse intellectuelle et politique qui peut déboucher sur des formes de violence. Voilà pour l’Europe.

Par ailleurs, à l’échelle du monde, on observe également une montée des nationalismes : les ambitions des pays comme la Russie, la Chine, l’Iran, mais aussi la Turquie ou l’Inde en relèvent, évidemment.

On peut également parler, à propos de l’élection de Donald Trump, d’un retour d’une forme de nationalisme américain, et contrairement à ce qui a été beaucoup dit, la présidence de Trump ne sera certainement pas isolationniste : l’on assiste simplement à une mutation de l’impérialisme américain, qui risque de tourner le dos à l’idéalisme qui en était le fond depuis un siècle et la présidence de Woodrow Wilson, pour une forme plus pragmatique avec Trump et son souci de faire des « deals » avantageux. Deals qui peuvent impliquer, avant la négociation, d’imposer un rapport de force, comme il semble vouloir le faire avec la Chine – raison pour laquelle il cherche à ménager Poutine, afin de n’avoir pas à se soucier de l’Europe et d’avoir les mains libres en Asie.
Le changement de nature des conflits futurs.

C’est sans doute le point que je juge le plus contestable de ces prévisions.

Après huit décennies de paix nucléaire, nous nous sommes imprégnés de l’idée, en Occident, que de grandes guerres entre Etats sont impossibles en raison du risque d’anéantissement nucléaire. Or, l’escalade actuelle entre Russie et Etats-Unis en Europe de l’Est, où chacun installe du matériel et des troupes , montre que les forces conventionnelles revêtent encore un aspect important.

Par ailleurs, il s’est produit un changement important lors de l’affaire de Crimée : Vladimir Poutine a dit qu’il était prêt, lors de l’annexion de ce territoire, à utiliser l’arme nucléaire si l’Occident se faisait trop menaçant. C’est un événement d’une importance historique qui n’a pratiquement pas été relevé par les commentateurs : Vladimir Poutine a énoncé une toute nouvelle doctrine nucléaire, très dangereuse : il s’agit non plus d’une arme de dissuasion défensive, mais de dissuasion offensive. L’arme nucléaire est désormais utilisée par la Russie pour couvrir des annexions, des opérations extérieures, un usage qui n’a jamais été fait auparavant. C’est tout simplement du chantage nucléaire. Après des décennies de terreur face à l’idée de « destruction mutuelle assurée », le président russe a compris que l’effet paralysant de l’arme nucléaire pouvait être utilisé non seulement pour se défendre, mais pour attaquer, avec l’idée que les pays de l’Otan préfèreront n’importe quel recul au risque d’extermination atomique.

Et cela rend de nouveaux affrontements sur champs de bataille vraisemblables : après ne pas avoir osé, durant des décennies, s’affronter par crainte de l’anéantissement nucléaire, les grandes puissances pourraient être poussées à se battre uniquement de manière conventionnelle en raison des mêmes craintes. Cela peut paraître paradoxal mais est probable si Vladimir Poutine tente d’autres mouvements en agitant encore la menace nucléaire.

En revanche, le rôle éminent des cyberattaques me paraît incontestable, et si elles ne remplaceront pas la guerre conventionnelle, elle s’y surajoureront certainement.

Il faut voir, en effet, que généralement, les grandes guerres sont menées avec les armes qui ont terminé les guerres précédentes : les Prussiens ont gagné la guerre de 1870 grâce à leur forte supériorité d’artillerie, avec des canons chargés par la culasse alors que les canons français se chargeaient encore par la bouche ; la guerre de 1914-1918 fut d’abord une guerre d’artillerie, et donc de position et de tranchées, amenant un blocage qui ne fut surmonté que par le développement de l’aviation et des blindés. Aviations et blindés qui furent les armes principales de la Seconde Guerre mondiale débutée avec la Blitzkrieg allemande, et terminée par l’arme nucléaire.

A son tour, l’arme nucléaire a été l’arme principale de la Guerre froide : on dit, à tort, qu’elle n’a pas été utilisée, mais elle l’a, au contraire, été continuellement : par nature arme de dissuasion, elle servait en permanence à dissuader. De fait, elle a eu, à l’échelle mondiale, un rôle comparable à celui de l’artillerie en 1914 : la Guerre froide a été une guerre mondiale de tranchées, où les lignes ont peu bougé jusqu’à ce que les Etats-Unis surmontent le blocage en lançant l’Initiative de Défense Stratégique de Reagan, qui fit plier l’Union soviétique, incapable de suivre dans ce défi technologique et économique – tout comme l’Allemagne de 1918 avait été incapable de fabriquer des chars d’assaut dignes de ce nom.

Les armes principales du prochain conflit seront donc celles retombées de l’IDS : les missiles à très haute précision, notamment antisatellites, et celles reposant sur les technologies de guerre électronique en tous genres. L’on sait, depuis le virus Stuxnet, que les cyberarmes peuvent causer d’importants dégâts physiques, comparable à des frappes classiques. En 2014, une aciérie allemande a vu l’un de ses hauts fourneaux détruit par une cyberattaque. Des cyberattaques massives peuvent servir à déstabiliser un pays, notamment en attaquant les infrastructures essentielles : distribution d’eau et d’électricité, mais aussi à préparer, tout simplement, une invasion militaire classique. Elles peuvent aussi provoquer de telles invasions en représailles : un pays harcelé par des cyberattaques pourrait être tenté d’intervenir militairement contre le pays qu’il soupçonne de l’attaquer ainsi.

Ainsi donc, si je ne pense pas que les guerres à venir pourraient vraiment se limiter à des cyberattaques, sans confrontation physique, il me paraît certain que ce sont bien avec des cyberattaques massives que s’ouvriront les hostilités.


Piratage russe: A qui profite le crime ? (Cui bono: Warning, a Manchurian candidate can hide another)

11 janvier, 2017

chicago-politicsManchurian candidate

citizenfour-movie-posterfifth_estate
like
I don’t think people want a lot of talk about change; I think they want someone with a real record, a doer not a talker. For legislators who don’t want to take a stand, there’s a third way to vote. Not yes, not no, but present, which is kind of like voting maybe. (…) A president can’t vote present; a president can’t pick or choose which challenges he or she will face. Hillary Clinton (Dec. 2007)
Ma propre ville de Chicago a compté parmi les villes à la politique locale la plus corrompue de l’histoire américaine, du népotisme institutionnalisé aux élections douteuses. Barack Obama (Nairobi, Kenya, août 2006)
C’est bon d’être à la maison. (…) Je suis arrivé à Chicago pour la première fois à l’âge de 20 ans, essayant toujours de comprendre qui j’étais; toujours à la recherche d’un but à ma vie. C’est dans les quartiers non loin d’ici que j’ai commencé à travailler avec des groupes religieux dans l’ombre des aciéries fermées. C’est dans ces rues où j’ai été témoin du pouvoir de la foi et de la dignité tranquille des travailleurs face à la lutte et à la perte. C’est là que j’ai appris que le changement ne se produit que lorsque des gens ordinaires s’impliquent, s’engagent et se rassemblent pour le demander.  (…) Si je vous avais dit il y a huit ans que l’Amérique inverserait une grande récession, redémarrerait notre industrie automobile et libérerait la plus longue période de création d’emplois de notre histoire … Si je vous avais dit que nous ouvririons un nouveau chapitre avec le peuple cubain, stopperions le programme nucléaire iranien sans tirer un coup de feu et que nous nous débarrasserions du cerveau du 11 septembre … Si je vous avais dit que nous aurions obtenu l’égalité du mariage et garanti le droit à l’assurance maladie pour 20 millions de nos concitoyens. Vous auriez pensé qu’on visait un peu trop haut. Mais c’est ce que nous avons fait. (…) par presque toutes les mesures, l’Amérique va mieux et est plus forte qu’avant. Dans dix jours, le monde sera témoin d’une caractéristique de notre démocratie: le transfert pacifique du pouvoir d’un président élu librement à un autre. J’ai confié au président élu Trump que mon administration assurerait la transition la plus harmonieuse possible, tout comme le président Bush l’avait fait pour moi. Parce que c’est à nous tous de nous assurer que notre gouvernement peut nous aider à relever les nombreux défis auxquels nous sommes encore confrontés. (…) Oui, nous pouvons le faire. Oui, nous l’avons fait. Barack Hussein Obama (Chicago, 10.01.2017)
As his second marriage to Sexton collapsed in 1998, Sexton filed an order of protection against him, public records show. Hull won’t talk about the divorce in detail, saying only that it was « contentious » and that he and Sexton are friends. The Chicago Tribune (15.02.04)
Though Obama, the son of a Kenyan immigrant, lagged in polls as late as mid-February, he surged to the front of the pack in recent weeks after he began airing television commercials and the black community rallied behind him. He also was the beneficiary of the most inglorious campaign implosion in Illinois political history, when multimillionaire Blair Hull plummeted from front-runner status amid revelations that an ex-wife had alleged in divorce papers that he had physically and verbally abused her. After spending more than $29 million of his own money, Hull, a former securities trader, finished third, garnering about 10 percent of the vote. (…) Obama ascended to front-runner status in early March as Hull’s candidacy went up in flames amid the divorce revelations, as well as Hull’s acknowledgment that he had used cocaine in the 1980s and had been evaluated for alcohol abuse. The Chicago Tribune (17.03.04)
Axelrod is known for operating in this gray area, part idealist, part hired muscle. It is difficult to discuss Axelrod in certain circles in Chicago without the matter of the Blair Hull divorce papers coming up. As the 2004 Senate primary neared, it was clear that it was a contest between two people: the millionaire liberal, Hull, who was leading in the polls, and Obama, who had built an impressive grass-roots campaign. About a month before the vote, The Chicago Tribune revealed, near the bottom of a long profile of Hull, that during a divorce proceeding, Hull’s second wife filed for an order of protection. In the following few days, the matter erupted into a full-fledged scandal that ended up destroying the Hull campaign and handing Obama an easy primary victory. The Tribune reporter who wrote the original piece later acknowledged in print that the Obama camp had  »worked aggressively behind the scenes » to push the story. But there are those in Chicago who believe that Axelrod had an even more significant role — that he leaked the initial story. They note that before signing on with Obama, Axelrod interviewed with Hull. They also point out that Obama’s TV ad campaign started at almost the same time. The NYT (01.04.07)
After an unsuccessful campaign for Congress in 2000, Illinois state Sen. Barack Obama faced serious financial pressure: numerous debts, limited cash and a law practice he had neglected for a year. Help arrived in early 2001 from a significant new legal client — a longtime political supporter. Chicago entrepreneur Robert Blackwell Jr. paid Obama an $8,000-a-month retainer to give legal advice to his growing technology firm, Electronic Knowledge Interchange. It allowed Obama to supplement his $58,000 part-time state Senate salary for over a year with regular payments from Blackwell’s firm that eventually totaled $112,000. A few months after receiving his final payment from EKI, Obama sent a request on state Senate letterhead urging Illinois officials to provide a $50,000 tourism promotion grant to another Blackwell company, Killerspin. Killerspin specializes in table tennis, running tournaments nationwide and selling its own line of equipment and apparel and DVD recordings of the competitions. With support from Obama, other state officials and an Obama aide who went to work part time for Killerspin, the company eventually obtained $320,000 in state grants between 2002 and 2004 to subsidize its tournaments. Obama’s staff said the senator advocated only for the first year’s grant — which ended up being $20,000, not $50,000. The day after Obama wrote his letter urging the awarding of the state funds, Obama’s U.S. Senate campaign received a $1,000 donation from Blackwell. (…) Business relationships between lawmakers and people with government interests are not illegal or uncommon in Illinois or other states with a part-time Legislature, where lawmakers supplement their state salaries with income from the private sector. But Obama portrays himself as a lawmaker dedicated to transparency and sensitive to even the appearance of a conflict of interest. (…) In his book « The Audacity of Hope, » Obama tells how his finances had deteriorated to such a point that his credit card was initially rejected when he tried to rent a car at the 2000 Democratic convention in Los Angeles. He said he had originally planned to dedicate that summer « to catching up on work at the law practice that I’d left unattended during the campaign (a neglect that had left me more or less broke). » Six months later Blackwell hired Obama to serve as general counsel for his tech company, EKI, which had been launched a few years earlier. The monthly retainer paid by EKI was sent to the law firm that Obama was affiliated with at the time, currently known as Miner, Barnhill & Galland, where he worked part time when he wasn’t tending to legislative duties. The business arrived at an especially fortuitous time because, as the law firm’s senior partner, Judson Miner, put it, « it was a very dry period here, » meaning that the ebb and flow of cases left little work for Obama and cash was tight. The entire EKI retainer went to Obama, who was considered « of counsel » to the firm, according to details provided to The Times by the Obama campaign and confirmed by Miner. Blackwell said he had no knowledge of Obama’s finances and hired Obama solely based on his abilities. « His personal financial situation was not and is not my concern, » Blackwell said. « I hired Barack because he is a brilliant person and a lawyer with great insight and judgment. » Obama’s tax returns show that he made no money from his law practice in 2000, the year of his unsuccessful run for a congressional seat. But that changed in 2001, when Obama reported $98,158 income for providing legal services. Of that, $80,000 was from Blackwell’s company. In 2002, the state senator reported $34,491 from legal services and speeches. Of that, $32,000 came from the EKI legal assignment, which ended in April 2002 by mutual agreement, as Obama ceased the practice of law and looked ahead to the possibility of running for the U.S. Senate. (…) Illinois ethics disclosure forms are designed to reveal possible financial conflicts by lawmakers. On disclosure forms for 2001 and 2002, Obama did not specify that EKI provided him with the bulk of the private-sector compensation he received. As was his custom, he attached a multi-page list of all the law firm’s clients, which included EKI among hundreds. Illinois law does not require more specific disclosure. Stanley Brand, a Washington lawyer who counsels members of Congress and others on ethics rules, said he would have advised a lawmaker in Obama’s circumstances to separately disclose such a singularly important client and not simply include it on a list of hundreds of firm clients, even if the law does not explicitly require it. « I would say you should disclose that to protect and insulate yourself against the charge that you are concealing it, » Brand said. LA Times
One lesson, however, has not fully sunk in and awaits final elucidation in the 2012 election: that of the Chicago style of Barack Obama’s politicking. In 2008 few of the true believers accepted that, in his first political race, in 1996, Barack Obama sued successfully to remove his opponents from the ballot. Or that in his race for the US Senate eight years later, sealed divorced records for both his primary- and general-election opponents were mysteriously leaked by unnamed Chicagoans, leading to the implosions of both candidates’ campaigns. Or that Obama was the first presidential candidate in the history of public campaign financing to reject it, or that he was also the largest recipient of cash from Wall Street in general, and from BP and Goldman Sachs in particular. Or that Obama was the first presidential candidate in recent memory not to disclose either undergraduate records or even partial medical. Or that remarks like “typical white person,” the clingers speech, and the spread-the-wealth quip would soon prove to be characteristic rather than anomalous. Few American presidents have dashed so many popular, deeply embedded illusions as has Barack Obama. And for that, we owe him a strange sort of thanks. Victor Davis Hanson
Selon le professeur Dick Simpson, chef du département de science politique de l’université d’Illinois, «c’est à la fin du XIXe siècle et au début du XXe que le système prend racine». L’arrivée de larges populations immigrées peinant à faire leur chemin à Chicago pousse les politiciens à «mobiliser le vote des communautés en échange d’avantages substantiels». Dans les années 1930, le Parti démocrate assoit peu à peu sa domination grâce à cette politique «raciale». Le système va se solidifier sous le règne de Richard J. Daley, grande figure qui régnera sur la ville pendant 21 ans. Aujourd’hui, c’est son fils Richard M. Daley qui est aux affaires depuis 18 ans et qui «perpétue le pouvoir du Parti démocrate à Chicago, en accordant emplois d’État, faveurs et contrats, en échange de soutiens politiques et financiers», raconte John McCormick. «Si on vous donne un permis de construction, vous êtes censés “payer en retour”», explique-t-il. «Cela s’appelle payer pour jouer», résume John Kass, un autre éditorialiste. Les initiés affirment que Rod Blagojevich ne serait jamais devenu gouverneur s’il n’avait croisé le chemin de sa future femme, Patricia Mell, fille de Dick Mell, un conseiller municipal très influent, considéré comme un rouage essentiel de la machine. (…) Dans ce contexte local plus que trouble, Peraica affirme que la montée au firmament d’Obama n’a pu se faire «par miracle».«Il a été aidé par la machine qui l’a adoubé, il est cerné par cette machine qui produit de la corruption et le risque existe qu’elle monte de Chicago vers Washington», va-t-il même jusqu’à prédire. Le conseiller régional républicain cite notamment le nom d’Emil Jones, l’un des piliers du Parti démocrate de l’Illinois, qui a apporté son soutien à Obama lors de son élection au Sénat en 2004. Il évoque aussi les connexions du président élu avec Anthony Rezko, cet homme d’affaires véreux, proche de Blagojevich et condamné pour corruption, qui fut aussi le principal responsable de la levée de fonds privés pour le compte d’Obama pendant sa course au siège de sénateur et qui l’aida à acheter sa maison à Chicago. «La presse a protégé Barack Obama comme un petit bébé. Elle n’a pas sorti les histoires liées à ses liens avec Rezko», s’indigne Peraica, qui cite toutefois un article du Los Angeles Times faisant état d’une affaire de financement d’un tournoi international de ping-pong qui aurait éclaboussé le président élu. (…) Pour la plupart des commentateurs, Barack Obama a su naviguer à travers la politique locale «sans se compromettre. Le Figaro
La condamnation de M. Blagojevich met une fois de plus la lumière sur la scène politique corrompue de l’Etat dont la plus grande ville est Chicago. Cinq des neuf gouverneurs précédents de l’Illinois ont été accusés ou arrêtés pour fraude ou corruption. Le prédécesseur de M. Blagojevich, le républicain George Ryan, purge actuellement une peine de six ans et demi de prison pour fraude et racket. M. Blagojevich, qui devra se présenter à la prison le 16 février et verser des amendes de près de 22 000 dollars, détient le triste record de la peine la plus lourde jamais infligée à un ex-gouverneur de l’Illinois. Ses avocats ont imploré le juge de ne pas chercher à faire un exemple avec leur client, notant que ce dernier n’avait pas amassé d’enrichissement personnel et avait seulement tenté d’obtenir des fonds de campagne ainsi que des postes bien rémunérés. En plein scandale, M. Blagojevich était passé outre aux appels à la démission venus de son propre parti et avait nommé procédé à la nomination d’un sénateur avant d’être destitué. Mais le scandale a porté un coup à la réputation des démocrates dans l’Illinois et c’est un républicain qui a été élu l’an dernier pour occuper l’ancien siège de M. Obama. AFP (08.12.11)
Dès qu’un organisateur entre dans une communauté, il ne vit, rêve, mange, respire et dort qu’une chose, et c’est d’établir la base politique de masse de ce qu’il appelle l’armée. Saul Alinsky (mentor politique d’Obama)
On se retrouve avec deux conclusions: 1) un président très inexpérimenté a découvert que toute la rhétorique de campagne facile et manichéenne de 2008 n’est pas facilement traduisible en gouvernance réelle. 2) Obama est engagé dans une course contre la montre pour imposer de force un ordre du jour plutôt radical et diviseur à un pays de centre-droit avant que celui-ci ne se réveille et que ses sondages atteignent le seuil fatidique des 40%. Autrement dit, il y a deux options possibles: Ou bien le pays bascule plus à gauche en quatre ans qu’il ne l’a fait en cinquante ou Obama entraine dans sa chute le Congrès démocrate et la notion même de gouvernance de gauche responsable, laissant ainsi derrière lui un bilan à la Carter. Victor Davis Hanson
Bientôt, M. Obama aura ses propres La Mecque et Téhéran à traiter, peut-être à Jérusalem et au Caire. Il ferait bien de jeter un œil au bilan de son co-lauréat au prix Nobel de la paix, comme démonstration de la manière dont les motifs les plus purs peuvent entrainer les résultats les plus désastreux. Bret Stephens
C’est ma dernière élection. Après mon élection, j’aurai plus de flexibilité. Obama (à Medvedev, 27.03.12)
Dans le milieu du renseignement, nous dirions que M. Trump a été recruté comme un agent russe qui s’ignore. Michael Morell (ancien directeur de la CIA)
Republicans, independents, swing voters and GOP members of the House and Senate who are staking their reelection campaigns on their support for Trump to be president and commander in chief should thoughtfully reflect on the recent op-ed in The New York Times by former acting CIA Director Michael Morell. The op-ed is titled “I ran the CIA. Now I’m endorsing Hillary Clinton.” Morell, who has spent decades protecting our security in the intelligence business, offered high praise for the Democratic nominee and former secretary of State based on his years of working closely with her in the high councils of government. But Morell went even further than praising and endorsing Clinton. In one of the most extraordinary and unprecedented statements in the history of presidential politics, which powerfully supports the case that every Republican running for office should unequivocally state that they will refuse to vote for Trump or face potentially catastrophic consequences at the polls, Morell wrote: “In the intelligence business, we would say that Mr. Putin had recruited Mr. Trump as an unwitting agent of the Russian Federation.” This brings to mind the novel and motion picture “The Manchurian Candidate,” which about an American who was captured during the Korean War and brainwashed to unwittingly carry out orders to advance the interests of communists against America. I offer no suggestion about Trump’s motives in repeatedly saying things, and advocating positions, that are so destructive to American national security interests, though Trump owes the American people full and immediate disclosure of his tax returns for them to determine what, if any, business interests or debt may exist with Russian or other hostile foreign sources. Whatever Trump’s motivation, Morell is right in suggesting the billionaire nominee is at the least acting as an “unwitting agent” who often advances the interests of foreign actors hostile to America. Most intelligence experts believe the email leaks attacking Hillary Clinton at the time of the Democratic National Convention were originally obtained through espionage by Russian intelligence services engaging in cyberwar against America, and then shared with WikiLeaks by Russian sources engaged in an infowar against America. Do Republicans running for the House and Senate in 2016 want to be aligned with a Russian strongman and his intelligence services engaging in covert action against America for the presumed purpose of electing Putin’s preferred candidate? Do they believe Trump when he says he was only kidding when he publicly supported these espionage practices and called for them to be escalated? Do Republicans running in 2016 believe that America should have a commander in chief who has harshly criticized NATO and stated that if Russia invades the Baltic states, Eastern Europe states such as Poland, or Western Europe he is not committed to defending our allies against this aggression? Do Republicans running in 2016 support a commander in chief who has endorsed Britain’s vote to leave the European Union, appeared to endorse Russia’s annexation of Crimea, and falsely stated that Russia “is not in Ukraine”? (…) I do not question Donald Trump’s patriotism. But for whatever reason Trump advocates policies, again and again, that would help America’s adversaries like Russia and enemies like ISIS and make him, in Morell’s powerful words, “an unwitting agent of the Russian Federation.” In “The Manchurian Candidate,” our enemies sought to influence our politics at the highest level. What troubles a growing number of Republicans in Congress, and so many Republican and Democratic national security leaders, is that in 2016 life imitates art, aided and abetted by what appears to be a Russian covert action designed to elect the next American president. Brent Budowsky
A former senior intelligence officer for a Western country who specialized in Russian counterintelligence tells Mother Jones that in recent months he provided the bureau with memos, based on his recent interactions with Russian sources, contending the Russian government has for years tried to co-opt and assist Trump—and that the FBI requested more information from him. « This is something of huge significance, way above party politics, » the former intelligence officer says. « I think [Trump’s] own party should be aware of this stuff as well. » Does this mean the FBI is investigating whether Russian intelligence has attempted to develop a secret relationship with Trump or cultivate him as an asset? Was the former intelligence officer and his material deemed credible or not? An FBI spokeswoman says, « Normally, we don’t talk about whether we are investigating anything. » But a senior US government official not involved in this case but familiar with the former spy tells Mother Jones that he has been a credible source with a proven record of providing reliable, sensitive, and important information to the US government. In June, the former Western intelligence officer—who spent almost two decades on Russian intelligence matters and who now works with a US firm that gathers information on Russia for corporate clients—was assigned the task of researching Trump’s dealings in Russia and elsewhere, according to the former spy and his associates in this American firm. This was for an opposition research project originally financed by a Republican client critical of the celebrity mogul. (Before the former spy was retained, the project’s financing switched to a client allied with Democrats.) « It started off as a fairly general inquiry, » says the former spook, who asks not to be identified. But when he dug into Trump, he notes, he came across troubling information indicating connections between Trump and the Russian government. According to his sources, he says, « there was an established exchange of information between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin of mutual benefit. » This was, the former spy remarks, « an extraordinary situation. » He regularly consults with US government agencies on Russian matters, and near the start of July on his own initiative—without the permission of the US company that hired him—he sent a report he had written for that firm to a contact at the FBI, according to the former intelligence officer and his American associates, who asked not to be identified. (He declines to identify the FBI contact.) The former spy says he concluded that the information he had collected on Trump was « sufficiently serious » to share with the FBI. Mother Jones has reviewed that report and other memos this former spy wrote. The first memo, based on the former intelligence officer’s conversations with Russian sources, noted, « Russian regime has been cultivating, supporting and assisting TRUMP for at least 5 years. Aim, endorsed by PUTIN, has been to encourage splits and divisions in western alliance. » It maintained that Trump « and his inner circle have accepted a regular flow of intelligence from the Kremlin, including on his Democratic and other political rivals. » It claimed that Russian intelligence had « compromised » Trump during his visits to Moscow and could « blackmail him. » It also reported that Russian intelligence had compiled a dossier on Hillary Clinton based on « bugged conversations she had on various visits to Russia and intercepted phone calls. » The former intelligence officer says the response from the FBI was « shock and horror. » The FBI, after receiving the first memo, did not immediately request additional material, according to the former intelligence officer and his American associates. Yet in August, they say, the FBI asked him for all information in his possession and for him to explain how the material had been gathered and to identify his sources. The former spy forwarded to the bureau several memos—some of which referred to members of Trump’s inner circle. After that point, he continued to share information with the FBI. « It’s quite clear there was or is a pretty substantial inquiry going on, » he says. « This is something of huge significance, way above party politics, » the former intelligence officer comments. « I think [Trump’s] own party should be aware of this stuff as well. » Mother Jones (Oct 31, 2016)
A quelques jours de l’intronisation d’un multimilliardaire de l’immobilier qui a gagné seul contre tous, Hollywood entre en Résistance. Le scud lancé par Meryl Streep en direction de Donald Trump à la soirée des Golden Globes, traduit fidèlement la posture de la grande majorité des stars américaines, depuis le début de la campagne présidentielle. Il suffit d’évoquer notamment les insultes de Robert de Niro, traitant carrément le futur leader des USA de chien et de porc, entre autres amabilités. L’immense interprète qu’est Meryl Streep a dénoncé, sans jamais le nommer, la violence de celui qui se serait moqué d’un journaliste handicapé, version qui, depuis longtemps, a été catégoriquement contestée par Trump, que l’on sait pourtant capable d’excès en tout genre. Mais c’est ici le mot «violence» qui interpelle. Aux Oscars comme au Grammy Awards, dans toutes ces cérémonies où les millionnaires du grand et du petit écran se coagulent et se congratulent dans une autosatisfaction permanente, on n’a jamais entendu une seule vedette dénoncer – à l’exception, évidemment, de l’après 11 septembre 2001 – les attentats de Paris et de Bruxelles, du Texas et de Floride, de Madrid et de Londres, de Jérusalem et d’Ankara, les ethnocides de communautés entières et les mille et une manières de se débarrasser des homosexuels, des femmes et des apostats, dans un certain nombre de pays de l’hémisphère Sud. Pour les étoiles filantes du Camp du Bien, les évidentes vulgarités de Trump sont beaucoup plus insupportables que la manière dont on assaisonne féministes et gays, athées et libres penseurs, à quelques milliers de kilomètres de leurs somptueuses villas super-protégées de Beverly Hills. Cependant, imperceptiblement mais sûrement, quelque chose est en train de changer. Face à la bonne conscience des privilégiés portant leur humanité en sautoir, le plouc chef de chantier Trump, à coups de tweets et de rendez-vous pris à toute vitesse, modifie d’ores et déjà le paysage. Il ne se passe pas de jour sans que telle compagnie automobile annonce qu’elle crée une usine dans le Michigan ; tel fabricant d’ordinateurs relocalise ses ateliers dans le Middle West, et l’un de nos multimilliardaires, Bernard Arnault, vient de s’engager, dans le hall de la Trump Tower, à créer des milliers d’emplois supplémentaires aux Etats-Unis. Et cela, avant même l’investiture officielle du candidat Républicain, sur la victoire duquel, rappelons-le quand même, personne ne pariait un centime il y a moins d’un an. Tout se passe comme si nous assistons à la fin du «soft power» pratiqué, avec l’insuccès que l’on sait, par Barack Obama. La difficulté du temps présent appelle, qu’on le déplore ou que l’on s’en réjouisse, à un volontarisme vigilant et à un réarmement lucide que les princes qui nous gouvernent avaient totalement oubliés, de part et d’autre de l’Atlantique. Si Hollywood pourra continuer à être «peace and love» en toute tranquillité, elle le devra à des hommes et à des femmes qui sauront faire comprendre aux totalitaires et aux intégristes de tous bords, qu’au-delà de telle limite, leur ticket ne sera jamais plus valable. Ironie du sort: ce sera peut-être grâce à Trump que Meryl Streep et les autres pourront pratiquer, en toute sécurité, leur non-violence considérée comme un des beaux-arts. André Bercoff
Our primary targets are those highly oppressive regimes in China, Russia and Central Eurasia, but we also expect to be of assistance to those in the West who wish to reveal illegal or immoral behavior in their own governments and corporations. Julian Assange (2006)
In Russia, there are many vibrant publications, online blogs, and Kremlin critics such as [Alexey] Navalny are part of that spectrum. There are also newspapers like « Novaya Gazeta », in which different parts of society in Moscow are permitted to critique each other and it is tolerated, generally, because it isn’t a big TV channel that might have a mass popular effect, its audience is educated people in Moscow. So my interpretation is that in Russia there are competitors to WikiLeaks, and no WikiLeaks staff speak Russian, so for a strong culture which has its own language, you have to be seen as a local player. WikiLeaks is a predominantly English-speaking organisation with a website predominantly in English. We have published more than 800,000 documents about or referencing Russia and president Putin, so we do have quite a bit of coverage, but the majority of our publications come from Western sources, though not always. For example, we have published more than 2 million documents from Syria, including Bashar al-Assad personally. Sometimes we make a publication about a country and they will see WikiLeaks as a player within that country, like with Timor East and Kenya. The real determinant is how distant that culture is from English. Chinese culture is quite far away ». (…) “Our primary targets are those highly oppressive regimes in China, Russia and Central Eurasia, but we also expect to be of assistance to those in the West who wish to reveal illegal or immoral behavior in their own governments and corporations.(…) We have published some things in Chinese. It is necessary to be seen as a local player and to adapt the language to the local culture« . Julian Assange (2016)
It was not the quantity of Mr. Snowden’s theft but the quality that was most telling. Mr. Snowden’s theft put documents at risk that could reveal the NSA’s Level 3 tool kit—a reference to documents containing the NSA’s most-important sources and methods. Since the agency was created in 1952, Russia and other adversary nations had been trying to penetrate its Level-3 secrets without great success. Yet it was precisely these secrets that Mr. Snowden changed jobs to steal. In an interview in Hong Kong’s South China Morning Post on June 15, 2013, he said he sought to work on a Booz Allen contract at the CIA, even at a cut in pay, because it gave him access to secret lists of computers that the NSA was tapping into around the world. He evidently succeeded. In a 2014 interview with Vanity Fair, Richard Ledgett, the NSA executive who headed the damage-assessment team, described one lengthy document taken by Mr. Snowden that, if it fell into the wrong hands, would provide a “road map” to what targets abroad the NSA was, and was not, covering. It contained the requests made by the 17 U.S. services in the so-called Intelligence Community for NSA interceptions abroad. On June 23, less than two weeks after Mr. Snowden released the video that helped present his narrative, he left Hong Kong and flew to Moscow, where he received protection by the Russian government. In much of the media coverage that followed, the ultimate destination of these stolen secrets was fogged over—if not totally obscured from the public—by the unverified claims that Mr. Snowden was spoon feeding to handpicked journalists. In his narrative, Mr. Snowden always claims that he was a conscientious “whistleblower” who turned over all the stolen NSA material to journalists in Hong Kong. He has insisted he had no intention of defecting to Russia but was on his way to Latin America when he was trapped in Russia by the U.S. government in an attempt to demonize him. The transfer of state secrets from Mr. Snowden to Russia did not occur in a vacuum. The intelligence war did not end with the termination of the Cold War; it shifted to cyberspace. Even if Russia could not match the NSA’s state-of-the-art sensors, computers and productive partnerships with the cipher services of Britain, Israel, Germany and other allies, it could nullify the U.S. agency’s edge by obtaining its sources and methods from even a single contractor with access to Level 3 documents. Russian intelligence uses a single umbrella term to cover anyone who delivers it secret intelligence. Whether a person acted out of idealistic motives, sold information for money or remained clueless of the role he or she played in the transfer of secrets—the provider of secret data is considered an “espionage source.” By any measure, it is a job description that fits Mr. Snowden. Wall Street Journal
Une enquête choc sur l’ancien employé de la NSA soutient qu’Edward Snowden a volé surtout des documents portant sur des secrets militaires et qu’il a collaboré avec le renseignement russe. (…) il prétend que Snowden se serait fait embaucher intentionnellement par la société Booz Allen Hamilton, afin de se retrouver au contact de documents secrets de la NSA. Sous-entendu: il avait l’intention dès le départ d’intercepter des informations critiques. (…) II trouve également louche que l’informaticien se soit enfui avec son larcin seulement six semaines après avoir pris ses fonctions. Par ailleurs, Epstein souligne que la majeure partie des 1,5 million de documents subtilisés ne concernaient pas les pratiques abusives des services de renseignements américains. (…) Mais Snowden aurait en fait surtout récupéré des détails précieux sur l’organisation et les méthodes de la NSA mettant en péril les intérêts et la défense du pays contre le terrorisme et des Etats rivaux. Des informations de niveau 3 encore jamais dérobées par des espions étrangers depuis la guerre froide. C’est en tous cas ce qu’en disent les militaires qui ont examiné le vol de Snowden à la demande du Pentagone. La démonstration est encore plus troublante concernant la façon dont Snowden a trouvé refuge en Russie, même si elle repose souvent sur des sources de seconde main comme des articles de presse et des reportages. Le jeune homme prétend avoir fui Hong-Kong pour rejoindre l’Amérique latine. Mais les Etats-Unis auraient révoqué son passeport, alors qu’il était en plein vol, le contraignant à trouver refuge en Russie. Faux rétorque le journaliste, les Etats-Unis auraient annulé ses papiers alors qu’il se trouvait encore à Hong-Kong. Snowden aurait donc su dès le départ qu’il se rendait en Russie. Etant donné que le jeune homme se retrouvait sans passeport valide, ni visa russe, la compagnie Aeroflot, à bord de laquelle il a voyagé, était forcément complice de sa fuite, avance l’enquêteur. Cette main tendue d’Aeroflot aurait été confirmée par l’avocat de Snowden dès 2013. Mais Epstein va plus loin en affirmant que toute l’opération d’exfiltration a été pilotée par le gouvernement russe avec l’accord de Poutine en personne. Une équipe des opérations spéciales l’aurait même accueilli à l’arrivée de l’avion, tandis que Sarah Harrison, la porte-parole de Wikileaks – site qu’on dit proche des intérêts russes depuis la publication des documents de la Convention démocrate américaine – aurait été dépêchée pour escorter l’analyste jusqu’en Russie et lui acheter de faux billets d’avion pour brouiller les pistes. Enfin, Edward Snowden avait affirmé avoir détruit ses documents en arrivant à Moscou et être resté à distance des services de renseignements russes. Là encore, Epstein prétend le contraire en s’appuyant sur le témoignage direct d’un parlementaire et d’un avocat russe, tous deux proches du Kremlin. Ils affirment que Snowden avait encore en sa possession des données secrètes et qu’elles lui ont servi de monnaie d’échange avec la Russie. Ce qui expliquerait pourquoi des informations ont continué à fuiter après l’arrivée de Snowden à Moscou comme la révélation embarrassante sur le téléphone de la chancelière allemande Angela Merkel qui était surveillé par la NSA. Epstein semble enfin convaincu que Snowden continue de partager ses informations avec la Russie. BFMTV
As a political leader, Obama has been a disaster for his party. Since his inauguration in 2009, roughly 1,100 elected Democrats nationwide have been ousted by Republicans. Democrats lost their majorities in the US House and Senate. They now hold just 18 of the 50 governorships, and only 31 of the nation’s 99 state legislative chambers. After eight years under Obama, the GOP is stronger than at any time since the 1920s, and the outgoing president’s party is in tatters. In almost every respect, Obama leaves behind a trail of failure and disappointment In his rush to pull US troops out of Iraq and Afghanistan, he created a power vacuum into which terror networks expanded and the Taliban revived. Islamic State’s jihadist savagery not only plunged a stabilized Iraq back into shuddering violence, but also inspired scores of lethal terrorist attacks in the West. For months, Obama and his lieutenants insisted that Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad could be induced to « reform, » and pointedly refused to intervene as an uprising against him metastasized into genocidal slaughter. At last Obama vowed to take action if Assad crossed a « red line » by deploying chemical weapons — but when those weapons were used, Obama blinked. The death toll in Syria climbed into the hundreds of thousands, triggering a flood of refugees greater than any the world had seen since the 1940s. (…) Determined to conciliate America’s adversaries, the president indulged dictatorial regimes in Iran, Russia, and Cuba. They in turn exploited his passivity with multiple treacheries — seizing Crimea and destroying Aleppo (Russia), abducting American hostages for ransom and illicitly testing long-range missiles (Iran), and cracking down mercilessly on democratic dissidents (Cuba). For eight years the nation has been led by a president intent on lowering America’s global profile, not projecting military power, and “leading from behind.” The consequences have been stark: a Middle East awash in blood and bombs, US troops re-embroiled in Iraq and Afghanistan, aggressive dictators ascendant, human rights and democracy in retreat, rivers of refugees destabilizing nations across three continents, the rise of neo-fascism in Europe, and the erosion of US credibility to its lowest level since the Carter years. According to Gallup, Obama became the most polarizing president in modern history. Like all presidents, he faced partisan opposition, but Obama worsened things by regularly taking the low road and disparaging his critics’ motives. In his own words, his political strategy was one of ruthless escalation: “If they bring a knife to the fight, we bring a gun.” During his 2012 reelection campaign, Politico reported that “Obama and his top campaign aides have engaged far more frequently in character attacks and personal insults than the Romney campaign.” And when a Republican-led Congress wouldn’t enact legislation he sought, Obama turned to his “pen and phone” strategy of governing by diktat that polarized politics even more. To his credit, Obama acknowledges that he didn’t live up to his promise to reduce the angry rancor of Washington politics. Had he made an effort to do so, perhaps the campaign to succeed him would not have been so mean. And perhaps 60 percent of voters would not feel that their country, after two terms of Obama’s administration, is “on the wrong track”. Jeff Jacoby
Après son départ de la Maison-Blanche, George W. Bush a mis un point d’honneur à ne pas intervenir dans les débats politiques de son pays. Il s’est notamment gardé de critiquer son successeur, se contentant de défendre sa présidence dans des mémoires ou des conférences et de peindre des tableaux naïfs. Barack Obama ne semble pas vouloir suivre cet exemple après le 20 janvier. Il faut dire qu’il n’est pas aussi impopulaire que son prédécesseur au moment de quitter le 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. Bush récoltait alors 24% d’opinions favorables. À 58%, Obama se situe, à la fin de sa présidence, dans une zone de popularité supérieure, en compagnie des Bill Clinton (61%) et Ronald Reagan (63%), selon les données du Pew Research Center. Mais le 44e président doit s’acquitter d’une lourde dette politique. Une dette envers son propre parti. Les démocrates peuvent se targuer d’avoir remporté le vote populaire dans six des sept dernières élections présidentielles. Mais ils ont été décimés au cours de l’ère Obama dans les deux chambres du Congrès et dans les législatures des États américains. On peut parler d’hécatombe : de 2009 à 2016, le Parti démocrate a perdu 1042 sièges de parlementaire ou postes de gouverneur, à Washington et dans les législatures d’État. Après les élections du 8 novembre, les républicains ont désormais la mainmise complète non seulement sur les branches exécutive et législative à Washington, mais également dans la moitié des États américains. Il s’agit d’un des aspects les plus frappants – et douloureux pour les démocrates – de l’héritage d’Obama, qui doit en porter une part de responsabilité importante.Barack Obama pourrait s’écarter d’une autre façon de l’exemple établi par George W. Bush après son départ de la Maison-Blanche. Il pourrait se permettre de critiquer son successeur. Peut-être pas au cours de la première année de Donald Trump à la Maison-Blanche, mais assurément dans les moments où «certaines questions fondamentales de [la] démocratie [américaine]» seront mises en cause, a-t-il précisé lors d’une baladodiffusion récente animée par son ancien conseiller David Axelrod. Richard Hétu
Attention: un candidat mandchourien peut en cacher un autre !

Invalidations systématiques, dès son premier casse électoral de Chicago de 1996  pour les sénatoriales d’état, des candidatures de ses rivaux sur les plus subtils points de procédure (la qualité des signatures) jusqu’à se retrouver seul en lice, déballages forcés,  quatre ans plus tard aux élections sénatoriales fédérales de 2004, des problèmes de couple (un cas apparemment de violence domestique) ou frasques supposées (des soirées dans des club échangistes) de ses adversaires, que ce soit son propre collègue Blair Hull aux primaires ou le Républicain Jack Ryan à la générale de manière à se retrouver sans opposition devant les électeurs, tentative de rebelote, lors des primaires de 2008, contre sa rivale démocrate malheureuse Hillary Clinton, abandon précipité d’un Irak pacifié puis d’une Syrie fragile à l’avatar survitaminé d’Al Qaeda, extension exponentielle à l’échelle de la planète des éliminations ciblées à coup discrets de drones, abandon à l’ennemi d’un transfuge détenteur de la boite à outil même de ses services de renseignement, lâchage dans la nature des terroristes les plus dangereux de Guantanamo, attribution du droit et des moyens d’accès à l’arme nucléaire d’un pays ayant explicitement appelé à l’effacement de la carte d’un de ses voisins, offre de « flexibilité » post-électorale au principal adversaire strratégique de son propre pays, mise au pilori universel et vote d’une résolution délégitimant la présence même de son principal allié au Moyen-Orient sur ses lieux les plus sacrés …

Alors qu’à moins de dix jours de son investiture à la Maison Blanche …

Et que sur fond, après le retrait américain précipité de la région que l’on sait,  d’un Moyen-Orient à feu et à sang …

Et,  entre arrivée massive de prétendus réfugiés et retour annoncé de milliers de terroristes aguerris, d’une Europe plus que jamais fragilisée …

S’accumulent, entre mise au pilori d’Israël et appui explicite de l’hégémonisme iranien, les dossiers et les menaces potentiellement encore plus explosifs …

Et qu’entre accusations de « candidat mandchourien » et avant les révélations annoncées sans la moindre preuve les plus compromettantes

Via nul doute les canaux habituels de celui qui explique tranquillement l’étrange exclusivité américaine de ses révélations par la trop grand liberté de Moscou et la trop grande distance de Pékin …

Se multiplient, entre Maison Blanche, Hollywood et leur claques médiatiques respectives, les doutes sur la légitimité de l’élection …

Du nouveau président que, contre tous les pronostics et les imprécations de leurs élites, se sont choisis les Américains …

Devinez qui du haut d’une des cotes les plus élevées pour un président américain sortant …

Mais du véritable champ de ruines – du jamais-vu depuis la Seconde Guerre mondiale: quelque 1042 sièges de parlementaire ou postes de gouverneur perdus – qu’il laisse à son propre parti …

Est sur le point d’ajouter entre blâme de son prédécesseur au début et de son successeur à la fin …

Un énième hold up parfait à la longue liste de ceux qui l’ont amené là où il est  ?

Les Russes détiendraient des informations compromettantes sur Trump
Philippe Gélie
Le Figaro
11/01/2017

Selon CNN, les responsables du renseignement américain auraient informé Donald Trump dans un rapport confidentiel que les agents du Kremlin sont en possession d’informations personnelles et financières à son sujet susceptibles de le discréditer.

De notre correspondant à Washington,

Lorsqu’ils lui ont présenté vendredi dernier leur rapport confidentiel sur les interférences russes dans la campagne présidentielle, les responsables du renseignement américain auraient informé Donald Trump que les agents du Kremlin possédaient des «informations compromettantes, personnelles et financières» à son sujet, affirme CNN. L’assertion figurerait dans un addendum de deux pages remis parallèlement à Barack Obama.

Cette allégation proviendrait d’un ancien agent du MI6 britannique, jugé crédible en raison de ses «vastes réseaux» de contacts à travers l’Europe. Celui-ci s’en serait ouvert auprès du FBI dès l’été. La police fédérale aurait attendu de vérifier la fiabilité de ses sources pour inclure l’information dans le rapport sur les piratages russes. Les agences américaines n’auraient pas, à ce stade, vérifié la substance de l’addendum de manière indépendante.

Un ex-ambassadeur britannique aurait cependant eu lui aussi accès aux mêmes informations, par d’autres voies. Il les aurait transmises directement au sénateur John McCain, président de la Commission de la défense du Sénat, qui s’en serait ouvert auprès du directeur du FBI, James Comey, cosignataire du rapport.

Une activité informatique suspecte identifiée

CNN affirme également que, selon l’addendum secret, des personnes liées à Donald Trump auraient communiqué régulièrement avec des proches du Kremlin durant la campagne. Des experts du piratage informatique avaient déjà identifié une activité suspecte entre un serveur du groupe Trump et une adresse e-mail russe fonctionnant en circuit fermé.

Pour les responsables du renseignement, le fait que les Russes n’aient pas diffusé les éléments «compromettants» en leur possession confirmerait leur analyse selon laquelle le Kremlin a tenté de favoriser l’élection de Donald Trump au détriment de Hillary Clinton.

Le président élu ne manquera pas d’être interrogé sur ces nouveaux éléments lors de la conférence de presse qu’il doit tenir ce mercredi, la première du genre depuis juillet. Il a jusqu’ici mis en doute ou minimisé la responsabilité de la Russie dans les piratages, soucieux que rien ne puisse entamer la légitimité de sa victoire.

Si elles sont avérées, ces révélations ne manqueront pas de relancer les soupçons sur les raisons du penchant prorusse de Trump. De nombreux démocrates, mais aussi d’importants élus républicains comme John McCain, le soupçonnent à mots couverts d’être une «marionnette» de Moscou. À l’été, Michael Morell, ancien directeur de la CIA, l’avait quasiment accusé dans le New York Times d’être un «candidat mandchourien»: «Dans le milieu du renseignement, nous dirions que M. Trump a été recruté comme un agent russe qui s’ignore».

Voir aussi:

Brent Budowsky: Donald Trump, a real-life Manchurian candidate
Brent Budowsky
The Hill
08/09/16

With Republicans facing the growing prospect of a landslide defeat that could return control of the Senate and potentially the House to Democrats, 50 leading GOP national security figures announced on Monday that they refuse to vote for Donald Trump because they consider him a danger to American national security.

For many months I have written in The Hill that Trump, now the GOP nominee, has a strange and disquieting habit of offering sympathy and praise to foreign dictators who wish America ill. He has favorably tweeted the words of Benito Mussolini, the Italian fascist from darker days. He has had kind words for Kim Jong Il, the mass murdering dictator of North Korea. And the words of mutual praise exchanged between Trump and former KGB officer and Russian strongman Vladimir Putin will someday be legendary in the history of presidential politics.

Republicans, independents, swing voters and GOP members of the House and Senate who are staking their reelection campaigns on their support for Trump to be president and commander in chief should thoughtfully reflect on the recent op-ed in The New York Times by former acting CIA Director Michael Morell. The op-ed is titled “I ran the CIA. Now I’m endorsing Hillary Clinton.” Morell, who has spent decades protecting our security in the intelligence business, offered high praise for the Democratic nominee and former secretary of State based on his years of working closely with her in the high councils of government. But Morell went even further than praising and endorsing Clinton.

In one of the most extraordinary and unprecedented statements in the history of presidential politics, which powerfully supports the case that every Republican running for office should unequivocally state that they will refuse to vote for Trump or face potentially catastrophic consequences at the polls, Morell wrote: “In the intelligence business, we would say that Mr. Putin had recruited Mr. Trump as an unwitting agent of the Russian Federation.”

This brings to mind the novel and motion picture “The Manchurian Candidate,” which about an American who was captured during the Korean War and brainwashed to unwittingly carry out orders to advance the interests of communists against America.

I offer no suggestion about Trump’s motives in repeatedly saying things, and advocating positions, that are so destructive to American national security interests, though Trump owes the American people full and immediate disclosure of his tax returns for them to determine what, if any, business interests or debt may exist with Russian or other hostile foreign sources.

Whatever Trump’s motivation, Morell is right in suggesting the billionaire nominee is at the least acting as an “unwitting agent” who often advances the interests of foreign actors hostile to America.

Most intelligence experts believe the email leaks attacking Hillary Clinton at the time of the Democratic National Convention were originally obtained through espionage by Russian intelligence services engaging in cyberwar against America, and then shared with WikiLeaks by Russian sources engaged in an infowar against America.

Do Republicans running for the House and Senate in 2016 want to be aligned with a Russian strongman and his intelligence services engaging in covert action against America for the presumed purpose of electing Putin’s preferred candidate? Do they believe Trump when he says he was only kidding when he publicly supported these espionage practices and called for them to be escalated?

Do Republicans running in 2016 believe that America should have a commander in chief who has harshly criticized NATO and stated that if Russia invades the Baltic states, Eastern Europe states such as Poland, or Western Europe he is not committed to defending our allies against this aggression?

Do Republicans running in 2016 support a commander in chief who has endorsed Britain’s vote to leave the European Union, appeared to endorse Russia’s annexation of Crimea, and falsely stated that Russia “is not in Ukraine”?

Do Republicans running in 2016 favor a commander in chief who disdains heroic American POWs by saying he prefers troops who were never captured, and says he would order American troops to commit torture in violation of the Geneva Conventions and international law?

Do Republicans running in 2016 favor a president who campaigns for a ban on immigration of Muslims so extreme that a long list of experts, including retired Gen. and former CIA Director David Petraeus, correctly argue it would help ISIS and other terror groups that seek to kill us?

Do Republicans running in 2016 realize that Trump’s proposal to build a wall on our borders similar to the Berlin Wall erected by the Soviets, coupled with his defamation of immigrants as rapists and murderers, would not only alienate Hispanic voters for a generation but provide a major boost to anti-American extremists across Latin America more successfully than any words Fidel Castro could say today?

I do not question Donald Trump’s patriotism. But for whatever reason Trump advocates policies, again and again, that would help America’s adversaries like Russia and enemies like ISIS and make him, in Morell’s powerful words, “an unwitting agent of the Russian Federation.”

In “The Manchurian Candidate,” our enemies sought to influence our politics at the highest level. What troubles a growing number of Republicans in Congress, and so many Republican and Democratic national security leaders, is that in 2016 life imitates art, aided and abetted by what appears to be a Russian covert action designed to elect the next American president.

Budowsky was an aide to former Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Texas) and Rep. Bill Alexander (D-Ark.), then chief deputy majority whip of the House. He holds an LL.M. in international financial law from the London School of Economics

Voir également:

I Ran the C.I.A. Now I’m Endorsing Hillary Clinton

02/01/2017

Une enquête choc sur l’ancien employé de la NSA soutient qu’Edward Snowden a volé surtout des documents portant sur des secrets militaires et qu’il a collaboré avec le renseignement russe.

Voir de même:

La dette d’Obama

Richard Hétu
La Presse
09 janvier 2017

(New York) Après son départ de la Maison-Blanche, George W. Bush a mis un point d’honneur à ne pas intervenir dans les débats politiques de son pays. Il s’est notamment gardé de critiquer son successeur, se contentant de défendre sa présidence dans des mémoires ou des conférences et de peindre des tableaux naïfs.

Barack Obama ne semble pas vouloir suivre cet exemple après le 20 janvier. Il faut dire qu’il n’est pas aussi impopulaire que son prédécesseur au moment de quitter le 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. Bush récoltait alors 24% d’opinions favorables. À 58%, Obama se situe, à la fin de sa présidence, dans une zone de popularité supérieure, en compagnie des Bill Clinton (61%) et Ronald Reagan (63%), selon les données du Pew Research Center.

Mais le 44e président doit s’acquitter d’une lourde dette politique. Une dette envers son propre parti. Les démocrates peuvent se targuer d’avoir remporté le vote populaire dans six des sept dernières élections présidentielles. Mais ils ont été décimés au cours de l’ère Obama dans les deux chambres du Congrès et dans les législatures des États américains.

On peut parler d’hécatombe : de 2009 à 2016, le Parti démocrate a perdu 1042 sièges de parlementaire ou postes de gouverneur, à Washington et dans les législatures d’État. Après les élections du 8 novembre, les républicains ont désormais la mainmise complète non seulement sur les branches exécutive et législative à Washington, mais également dans la moitié des États américains.

Il s’agit d’un des aspects les plus frappants – et douloureux pour les démocrates – de l’héritage d’Obama, qui doit en porter une part de responsabilité importante.

Dès les élections de mi-mandat de 2010

L’hécatombe démocrate a commencé de façon spectaculaire lors des élections de mi-mandat de 2010. Porté par la colère du Tea Party à l’égard de l’Obamacare et des plans de sauvetage des secteurs financier et automobile, le Parti républicain a notamment reconquis la majorité à la Chambre des représentants en réalisant un gain net de 63 sièges, du jamais-vu depuis la Seconde Guerre mondiale.

Aujourd’hui, Obama se reproche de ne pas avoir consacré assez de temps à la promotion de ses politiques. Il pourrait évidemment se demander si ses politiques répondaient vraiment à l’insatisfaction économique de bon nombre d’Américains, qui ont préféré le message de Donald Trump à celui d’Hillary Clinton dans certains États-clés, dont l’Ohio, la Pennsylvanie, le Michigan et le Wisconsin.

D’autres facteurs

Mais l’hécatombe démocrate tient à d’autres facteurs pour lesquels Obama ne peut être blâmé. L’un d’eux résulte de la plus faible participation de l’électorat démocrate – les jeunes et les minorités en particulier – aux élections de mi-mandat. Un autre découle du découpage des circonscriptions électorales qui favorise les républicains. Lors des élections de mi-mandat de 2014, par exemple, ils ont remporté 57% des sièges du Congrès avec 52% des voix.

Et c’est en contribuant à corriger cette situation que Barack Obama veut acquitter une partie de sa dette envers les démocrates. Avant même la victoire de Donald Trump, il avait annoncé son soutien à un nouveau groupe, le National Democratic Redistricting Committee, dont la mission consistera à renverser les gains républicains dans les législatures d’État et à la Chambre des représentants. Le 44e président s’est engagé à participer à des activités de collecte de fonds pour ce groupe et à faire campagne pour des candidats à des postes de gouverneur et de parlementaire à la Chambre des représentants et dans les législatures d’État.

Une priorité

Les élections de 2017 et de 2018 représentent une priorité pour Obama et le nouveau groupe démocrate, qui sera présidé par l’ancien ministre de la Justice Eric Holder. Ces élections éliront les gouverneurs et parlementaires qui approuveront dans chaque État les nouvelles circonscriptions électorales qui seront créées après le recensement américain de 2020. Or, si les démocrates ne parviennent pas à réaliser des gains dans les législatures d’État, ils risquent de continuer à être désavantagés pendant une autre décennie par un redécoupage partisan des circonscriptions électorales.

Barack Obama pourrait s’écarter d’une autre façon de l’exemple établi par George W. Bush après son départ de la Maison-Blanche. Il pourrait se permettre de critiquer son successeur. Peut-être pas au cours de la première année de Donald Trump à la Maison-Blanche, mais assurément dans les moments où «certaines questions fondamentales de [la] démocratie [américaine]» seront mises en cause, a-t-il précisé lors d’une baladodiffusion récente animée par son ancien conseiller David Axelrod.

«Vous savez, a-t-il ajouté, je suis encore un citoyen, et cela comporte des devoirs et des obligations.»

Mais l’acquittement de sa dette envers le Parti démocrate restera sans doute la plus importante de ses obligations au cours des prochaines années.

Voir de plus:

A Veteran Spy Has Given the FBI Information Alleging a Russian Operation to Cultivate Donald Trump

Has the bureau investigated this material?

On Friday, FBI Director James Comey set off a political blast when he informed congressional leaders that the bureau had stumbled across emails that might be pertinent to its completed inquiry into Hillary Clinton’s handling of emails when she was secretary of state. The Clinton campaign and others criticized Comey for intervening in a presidential campaign by breaking with Justice Department tradition and revealing information about an investigation—information that was vague and perhaps ultimately irrelevant—so close to Election Day. On Sunday, Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid upped the ante. He sent Comey a fiery letter saying the FBI chief may have broken the law and pointed to a potentially greater controversy: « In my communications with you and other top officials in the national security community, it has become clear that you possess explosive information about close ties and coordination between Donald Trump, his top advisors, and the Russian government…The public has a right to know this information. »

Reid’s missive set off a burst of speculation on Twitter and elsewhere. What was he referring to regarding the Republican presidential nominee? At the end of August, Reid had written to Comey and demanded an investigation of the « connections between the Russian government and Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, » and in that letter he indirectly referred to Carter Page, an American businessman cited by Trump as one of his foreign policy advisers, who had financial ties to Russia and had recently visited Moscow. Last month, Yahoo News reported that US intelligence officials were probing the links between Page and senior Russian officials. (Page has called accusations against him « garbage. ») On Monday, NBC News reported that the FBI has mounted a preliminary inquiry into the foreign business ties of Paul Manafort, Trump’s former campaign chief. But Reid’s recent note hinted at more than the Page or Manafort affairs. And a former senior intelligence officer for a Western country who specialized in Russian counterintelligence tells Mother Jones that in recent months he provided the bureau with memos, based on his recent interactions with Russian sources, contending the Russian government has for years tried to co-opt and assist Trump—and that the FBI requested more information from him.

« This is something of huge significance, way above party politics, » the former intelligence officer says. « I think [Trump’s] own party should be aware of this stuff as well. »

Does this mean the FBI is investigating whether Russian intelligence has attempted to develop a secret relationship with Trump or cultivate him as an asset? Was the former intelligence officer and his material deemed credible or not? An FBI spokeswoman says, « Normally, we don’t talk about whether we are investigating anything. » But a senior US government official not involved in this case but familiar with the former spy tells Mother Jones that he has been a credible source with a proven record of providing reliable, sensitive, and important information to the US government.

In June, the former Western intelligence officer—who spent almost two decades on Russian intelligence matters and who now works with a US firm that gathers information on Russia for corporate clients—was assigned the task of researching Trump’s dealings in Russia and elsewhere, according to the former spy and his associates in this American firm. This was for an opposition research project originally financed by a Republican client critical of the celebrity mogul. (Before the former spy was retained, the project’s financing switched to a client allied with Democrats.) « It started off as a fairly general inquiry, » says the former spook, who asks not to be identified. But when he dug into Trump, he notes, he came across troubling information indicating connections between Trump and the Russian government. According to his sources, he says, « there was an established exchange of information between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin of mutual benefit. »

This was, the former spy remarks, « an extraordinary situation. » He regularly consults with US government agencies on Russian matters, and near the start of July on his own initiative—without the permission of the US company that hired him—he sent a report he had written for that firm to a contact at the FBI, according to the former intelligence officer and his American associates, who asked not to be identified. (He declines to identify the FBI contact.) The former spy says he concluded that the information he had collected on Trump was « sufficiently serious » to share with the FBI.

Mother Jones has reviewed that report and other memos this former spy wrote. The first memo, based on the former intelligence officer’s conversations with Russian sources, noted, « Russian regime has been cultivating, supporting and assisting TRUMP for at least 5 years. Aim, endorsed by PUTIN, has been to encourage splits and divisions in western alliance. » It maintained that Trump « and his inner circle have accepted a regular flow of intelligence from the Kremlin, including on his Democratic and other political rivals. » It claimed that Russian intelligence had « compromised » Trump during his visits to Moscow and could « blackmail him. » It also reported that Russian intelligence had compiled a dossier on Hillary Clinton based on « bugged conversations she had on various visits to Russia and intercepted phone calls. »

The former intelligence officer says the response from the FBI was « shock and horror. » The FBI, after receiving the first memo, did not immediately request additional material, according to the former intelligence officer and his American associates. Yet in August, they say, the FBI asked him for all information in his possession and for him to explain how the material had been gathered and to identify his sources. The former spy forwarded to the bureau several memos—some of which referred to members of Trump’s inner circle. After that point, he continued to share information with the FBI. « It’s quite clear there was or is a pretty substantial inquiry going on, » he says.

« This is something of huge significance, way above party politics, » the former intelligence officer comments. « I think [Trump’s] own party should be aware of this stuff as well. »

The Trump campaign did not respond to a request for comment regarding the memos. In the past, Trump has declared, « I have nothing to do with Russia. »

The FBI is certainly investigating the hacks attributed to Russia that have hit American political targets, including the Democratic National Committee and John Podesta, the chairman of Clinton’s presidential campaign. But there have been few public signs of whether that probe extends to examining possible contacts between the Russian government and Trump. (In recent weeks, reporters in Washington have pursued anonymous online reports that a computer server related to the Trump Organization engaged in a high level of activity with servers connected to Alfa Bank, the largest private bank in Russia. On Monday, a Slate investigation detailed the pattern of unusual server activity but concluded, « We don’t yet know what this [Trump] server was for, but it deserves further explanation. » In an email to Mother Jones, Hope Hicks, a Trump campaign spokeswoman, maintains, « The Trump Organization is not sending or receiving any communications from this email server. The Trump Organization has no communication or relationship with this entity or any Russian entity. »)

According to several national security experts, there is widespread concern in the US intelligence community that Russian intelligence, via hacks, is aiming to undermine the presidential election—to embarrass the United States and delegitimize its democratic elections. And the hacks appear to have been designed to benefit Trump. In August, Democratic members of the House committee on oversight wrote Comey to ask the FBI to investigate « whether connections between Trump campaign officials and Russian interests may have contributed to these [cyber] attacks in order to interfere with the US. presidential election. » In September, Sen. Dianne Feinstein and Rep. Adam Schiff, the senior Democrats on, respectively, the Senate and House intelligence committees, issued a joint statement accusing Russia of underhanded meddling: « Based on briefings we have received, we have concluded that the Russian intelligence agencies are making a serious and concerted effort to influence the U.S. election. At the least, this effort is intended to sow doubt about the security of our election and may well be intended to influence the outcomes of the election. » The Obama White House has declared Russia the culprit in the hacking capers, expressed outrage, and promised a « proportional » response.

There’s no way to tell whether the FBI has confirmed or debunked any of the allegations contained in the former spy’s memos. But a Russian intelligence attempt to co-opt or cultivate a presidential candidate would mark an even more serious operation than the hacking.

In the letter Reid sent to Comey on Sunday, he pointed out that months ago he had asked the FBI director to release information on Trump’s possible Russia ties. Since then, according to a Reid spokesman, Reid has been briefed several times. The spokesman adds, « He is confident that he knows enough to be extremely alarmed. »

Voir aussi:

Barack Obama’s legacy of failure
Jeff Jacoby
The Boston Globe
January 8, 2017

AS HE PREPARES to move out of the White House, Barack Obama is understandably focused on his legacy and reputation. The president will deliver a farewell address in Chicago on Tuesday; he told his supporters in an e-mail that the speech would « celebrate the ways you’ve changed this country for the better these past eight years, » and previewed his closing argument in a series of tweets hailing « the remarkable progress » for which he hopes to be remembered.

Certainly Obama has his admirers. For years he has enjoyed doting coverage in the mainstream media. Those press ovations will continue, if a spate of new or forthcoming books by journalists is any indication. Moreover, Obama is going out with better-than-average approval ratings for a departing president. So his push to depict his presidency as years of « remarkable progress » is likely to resonate with his true believers.

But there are considerably fewer of those true believers than there used to be. Most Americans long ago got over their crush on Obama , as they repeatedly demonstrated at the polls.

In 2010, two years after electing him president, voters trounced Obama’s party, handing Democrats the biggest midterm losses in 72 years. Obama was reelected in 2012, but by nearly 4 million fewer votes than in his first election, making him the only president ever to win a second term with shrunken margins in both the popular and electoral vote. Two years later, with Obama imploring voters , « [My] policies are on the ballot — every single one of them, » Democrats were clobbered again. And in 2016, as he campaigned hard for Hillary Clinton, Obama was increasingly adamant that his legacy was at stake. « I’m not on this ballot, » he told campaign rallies in a frequent refrain, « but everything we’ve done these last eight years is on the ballot. » The voters heard him out, and once more turned him down.

As a political leader, Obama has been a disaster for his party. Since his inauguration in 2009, roughly 1,100 elected Democrats nationwide have been ousted by Republicans. Democrats lost their majorities in the US House and Senate. They now hold just 18 of the 50 governorships, and only 31 of the nation’s 99 state legislative chambers. After eight years under Obama, the GOP is stronger than at any time since the 1920s, and the outgoing president’s party is in tatters.

When Obama touts the way he « changed this country for the better these past eight years, » the wreckage of the Democratic Party — to say nothing of the election of Donald Trump — presumably isn’t what he has in mind. Yet the Democrats’ repudiation can’t be divorced from the president and policies he embraced. Obama urged Americans to cast their vote as a thumbs-up or thumbs-down on his legacy. That’s what they did.

In almost every respect, Obama leaves behind a trail of failure and disappointment. Consider just some of his works:

The economy . Obama took office during a painful recession and (with Congress’s help) made it even worse. Historically, the deeper a recession, the more robust the recovery that follows, but the economy’s rebound under Obama was the worst in seven decades. Annual GDP growth since the recession ended has averaged a feeble 2.1 percent, by far the puniest economic performance of any president since World War II. Obama spent more public funds on « stimulus » than all previous stimulus programs combined, with wretched, counterproductive results. On his watch, millions of additional Americans fell below the poverty line. The number of food stamp recipients soared. The national debt doubled to an incredible $20 trillion. According to the Pew Research Center, the share of young adults (18- to 34-year-olds) living in their parents’ homes is the highest it has been since the Great Depression — particularly young men , whose employment and earning levels are far lower than they were a generation ago.

In 2008, when Obama was first elected president, 63 percent of Americans considered themselves middle class. Seven years later, only 51 percent still felt the same way. Obama argues energetically that his economic policies have delivered prosperity and employment. Countless Americans disagree — including many who aren’t Republican. « Millions and millions and millions and millions of people look at that pretty picture of America he painted, » said Bill Clinton after Obama extolled the recovery in his last State of the Union speech, « and they cannot find themselves in it to save their lives. »

The president’s endlessly-repeated vow that Obamacare would not force anyone to give up a health plan they liked was PolitiFact’s 2013 « Lie of the Year. »

Health care . The Affordable Care Act should never have been enacted. Survey after survey confirmed that it lacked majority support, and only through hard-knuckled, party-line maneuvering was the wrenching health-care overhaul rammed through Congress. But Obama was certain the measure would win public support, because of three promises he made over and over: that the law would extend health insurance to the 47 million uninsured, that it would significantly reduce health-insurance costs, and that Americans who had health plans or doctors they liked could keep them.

But Obamacare has been a fiasco. At least 27 million Americans are still without health insurance , and many of those who are newly insured have simply been added to the Medicaid rolls. Far from reducing costs, Obamacare sent premiums and deductibles skyrocketing. Insurance companies, having suffered billions of dollars in losses on the Obamacare exchanges, have pulled out from many of them, leaving consumers in much of the country with few or no options. And the administration, it transpired, knew all along that millions of Americans would lose their medical plans once the law took effect. The deception was so egregious that in December 2013, PolitiFact dubbed « If you like your health plan, you can keep it » as its  » Lie of the Year . »

Foreign policy. The 44th president came to office vowing not to repeat the foreign-policy mistakes of his predecessor. His own were exponentially worse.

In his rush to pull US troops out of Iraq and Afghanistan, he created a power vacuum into which terror networks expanded and the Taliban revived . Islamic State’s jihadist savagery not only plunged a stabilized Iraq back into shuddering violence, but also inspired scores of lethal terrorist attacks in the West . For months, Obama and his lieutenants insisted that Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad could be induced to « reform, » and pointedly refused to intervene as an uprising against him metastasized into genocidal slaughter. At last Obama vowed to take action if Assad crossed a « red line » by deploying chemical weapons — but when those weapons were used, Obama blinked. The death toll in Syria climbed into the hundreds of thousands, triggering a flood of refugees greater than any the world had seen since the 1940s.

Determined to conciliate America’s adversaries, the president indulged dictatorial regimes in Iran, Russia, and Cuba. They in turn exploited his passivity with multiple treacheries — seizing Crimea and destroying Aleppo (Russia), abducting American hostages for ransom and illicitly testing long-range missiles (Iran), and cracking down mercilessly on democratic dissidents (Cuba). Meanwhile, American friends and allies — Israel, Ukraine, Poland and the Czech Republic — Obama undermined or betrayed.

Syria’s dictator slaughtered innocent civilians with chemical weapons, crossing a « red line » that President Obama warned he would not tolerate. But he did tolerate it, with devastating results.

For eight years the nation has been led by a president intent on lowering America’s global profile, not projecting military power, and « leading from behind. » The consequences have been stark: a Middle East awash in blood and bombs, US troops re-embroiled in Iraq and Afghanistan, aggressive dictators ascendant, human rights and democracy in retreat, rivers of refugees destabilizing nations across three continents, the rise of neo-fascism in Europe, and the erosion of US credibility to its lowest level since the Carter years.

National unity . As a candidate for president, Obama promised to soothe America’s bitter and divisive politics, and to replace Red State/Blue State animosity with cooperation and bipartisanship. But the healer-in-chief millions of Americans voted for never showed up.

According to Gallup, Obama became the most polarizing president in modern history. Like all presidents, he faced partisan opposition, but Obama worsened things by regularly taking the low road and disparaging his critics’ motives. In his own words, his political strategy was one of ruthless escalation : « If they bring a knife to the fight, we bring a gun. » During his 2012 reelection campaign, Politico reported that « Obama and his top campaign aides have engaged far more frequently in character attacks and personal insults than the Romney campaign. » And when a Republican-led Congress wouldn’t enact legislation he sought, Obama turned to his « pen and phone » strategy of governing by diktat that polarized politics even more.

To his credit, Obama acknowledges that he didn’t live up to his promise to reduce the angry rancor of Washington politics. Had he made an effort to do so, perhaps the campaign to succeed him would not have been so mean. And perhaps 60 percent of voters would not feel that their country, after two terms of Obama’s administration, is  » on the wrong track . »

Obama’s accession in 2008 as the nation’s first elected black president was an achievement that even Republicans and conservatives could cheer . It marked a moment of hope and transformation; it genuinely did change America for the better.

It was also the high point of Obama’s presidency. What followed, alas, was eight long years of disenchantment and incompetence. Our world today is more dangerous, our country more divided, our national mood more toxic. In a few days, Donald Trump will become the 45th president of the United States. Behold the legacy of the 44th.

( Jeff Jacoby is a columnist for The Boston Globe )

Voir de plus:

Transition 2016

About that Explosive Trump Story: Take a Deep Breath

Benjamin Wittes, Susan Hennessey, Quinta Jurecic

Lawfare

January 10, 2017

This afternoon, CNN reported that President Barack Obama and President-Elect Donald Trump had been briefed by the intelligence community on the existence of a cache of memos alleging communication between the Trump campaign and Russian officials and the possession by the Russian government of highly compromising material against Trump. The memos were compiled by a former British intelligence officer on behalf of anti-Trump Republicans and, later, Democrats working against Trump in the general election. According to CNN, the intelligence officer’s previous work is credible, but the veracity of the specific allegations set forth in the document have not yet been confirmed. Notably, Mother Jones journalist David Corn reported the week before the election on similar allegations that Trump had been “cultivated” by Russian intelligence, on the basis of a memos produced by “a former senior intelligence officer for a Western country.” A similar report also appeared in Newsweek.

This cache of memos has been kicking around official Washington for several weeks now. A great many journalists have been feverishly working to document the allegations within it, which are both explosive and quite various: some of them relate to alleged collusion between Trump campaign officials and Russian intelligence, while others relate to personal sexual conduct by Trump himself that supposedly constitutes a rip-roaring KOMPROMAT file.

If you are finding Lawfare useful in these times, please consider making a contribution to support what we do.We have had the document for a couple of weeks and have chosen, as have lots of other publications, not to publish it while the allegations within it remain unproven. In response to CNN’s report, however, Buzzfeed has now released the underlying document itself, which is available here.

Whether or not its release is defensible in light of the CNN story, it is now important to emphasize several points.

First, we have no idea if any of these allegations are true. Yes, they are explosive; they are also entirely unsubstantiated, at least to our knowledge, at this stage. For this reason, even now, we are not going to discuss the specific allegations within the document.

Second, while unproven, the allegations are being taken quite seriously. The President and President-elect do not get briefed on material that the intelligence community does not believe to be at least of some credibility. The individual who generated them is apparently a person whose work intelligence professionals take seriously. And at a personal level, we can attest that we have had a lot of conversations with a lot of different people about the material in this document. While nobody has confirmed any of the allegations, both inside government and in the press, it is clear to us that they are the subject of serious attention.

Third, precisely because it is being taken seriously, it is—despite being unproven and, in public anyway, undiscussed—pervasively affecting the broader discussion of Russian hacking of the election. CNN reported that Senator John McCain personally delivered a copy of the document to FBI Director James Comey on December 9th. Consider McCain’s comments about the gravity of the Russian hacking episode at last week’s Armed Services Committee hearing in light of that fact. Likewise, consider Senator Ron Wyden’s questioning of Comey at today’s Senate Intelligence Committee hearing, in which Wyden pushed the FBI Director to release a declassified assessment before January 20th regarding contact between the Trump campaign and the Russian government. (Comey refused to comment on an ongoing investigation.)

So while people are being delicate about discussing wholly unproven allegations, the document is at the front of everyone’s minds as they ponder the question: Why is Trump so insistent about vindicating Russia from the hacking charges that everyone else seems to accept?

Fourth, it is significant that the document contains highly specific allegations, many of which are the kind of facts it should be possible to prove or disprove. This is a document about meetings that either took place or did not take place, stays in hotels that either happened or didn’t, travel that either happened or did not happen. It should be possible to know whether at least some of these allegations are true or false.

Finally, fifth, it is important to emphasize that this is not a case of the intelligence community leaking sensitive information about an investigative subject out of revenge or any other improper motive. This type of information, referencing sensitive sources and methods and the identities of U.S. persons, is typically treated by the intelligence community with the utmost care. And this material, in fact, does not come from the intelligence community; it comes, rather, from private intelligence documents put together by a company. It is actually not even classified.

All of which is to say to everyone: slow down, and take a deep breath. We shouldn’t assume either that this is simply a “fake news” episode directed at discrediting Trump or that the dam has now broken and the truth is coming out at last. We don’t know what the reality is here, and the better part of valor is not to get ahead ahead of the facts—a matter on which, incidentally, the press deserves a lot of credit.

 Voir de même:

Conférence du 15 janvier 2017: l’esprit de Munich s’invite à Paris !

Dora Marrache
Europe Israël
Déc 28, 2016

« Vous aviez le choix entre le déshonneur et la guerre. Vous avez choisi le déshonneur, et vous aurez la guerre ». (Winston Churchill)

Le 23 décembre, le vote de la Résolution 2334, a permis aux Juifs de découvrir le vrai Obama, celui qui se cache sous des dehors affables. Bien sûr,  on se console en se disant que Donald Trump fera révoquer cette « honteuse » résolution. Mais là rien n’est moins sûr, car il est à craindre qu’il ne réussisse pas à obtenir les 9 voix qui le soutiendront.

Hélas, Obama n’a pas encore assouvi pleinement son désir de vengeance. La Conférence de Paris permettra au gouvernement israélien de découvrir sans doute l’aspect maléfique du premier président noir des États-Unis, mais aussi  celui du président français qui proclame  son amour des Juifs de France, mais enfonce un couteau dans le dos de leurs frères israéliens.

Prévue initialement en mai 2016, cette conférence a été reportée à plusieurs reprises mais,  à moins d’un report fort improbable (après le 20 janvier, Obama n’aura plus aucun pouvoir),  elle aura lieu le 15 janvier 2017, à Paris.

« La ConférenceBottom of Form sur la paix de Paris : une feuille de route cauchemardesque? » écrivait en juin Shimon Samuels, le directeur des Relations internationales du Centre Simon Wiesenthal, et il  en parlait comme d’un autre Munich. En effet, difficile de ne pas penser à la conférence de Munich quand on parle de la conférence de Paris. Les ressemblances sont frappantes, on pourrait même envisager des Accords calqués sur ceux de Munich.

En revanche, si nombreux étaient ceux qui, au lendemain des Accords de Munich,  ont parlé de « la lâcheté de Munich », il est, hélas fort peu probable qu’ils le soient pour parler de « la lâcheté de Paris ».

Aujourd’hui, le dictateur c’est Abbas qui promet la paix et la fin du terrorisme si on lui donne les territoires qu’il convoite afin de pouvoir ensuite s’accaparer tout Israël.  On va donc tenter de les lui livrer sur un plateau d’argent.

But de la conférence de Paris-  La résolution du conflit israélo-palestinien par la création de l’État palestinien.

Un peu comme la conférence de Munich qui fut organisée à la demande de Paris les 29 et 30 septembre 1938 pour régler le problème germano-tchèque, celle de Paris, organisée également à la demande du gouvernement français, a pour objectif de résoudre le conflit israélo-palestinien. Paris, l’allié inconditionnel des « Palestiniens » feint de vouloir instaurer la paix dans cette région du monde,  alors qu’il ne fait qu’obéir aux ordres de Ramallah.

À cette conférence à laquelle 70 pays sont conviés – plus on est de fous, plus on s’amuse- Israël a choisi,  depuis longtemps d’ailleurs,  de ne pas participer.  L’État juif veut des négociations bilatérales, mais Abbas évidemment préfère obtenir ce qu’il désire sans devoir faire la moindre concession. La conférence aura donc lieu en l’absence du principal intéressé, tout comme celle de Munich organisée en l’absence de la Tchécoslovaquie. Mais tandis que la Russie, allié de la Tchécoslovaquie n’avait pas été invitée à Munich,  l’Amérique, allié-traitre de l’État juif, sera à Paris car le gouvernement est assuré de son soutien depuis mai 2016 et le vote du 23 décembre le lui a confirmé.

On peut donc dire d’ores et déjà que, à l’instar de la Tchécoslovaquie qui fut trahie par la France qui lui avait pourtant garanti ses frontières, Israël sera trahi encore une fois par l’Amérique.

Abbas / Hitler  Abbas se frotte déjà les mains : tout comme Hitler a pu obtenir la Tchécoslovaquie sans rien donner en retour, Abbas espère bien obtenir que l’État juif se retire aux lignes du cessez-le-feu de la guerre de 48.

« La feuille de route, nous explique Shimon Samuels, consiste alors en une résolution préparée par la conférence internationale organisée à Paris, qui doit être votée par les quinze États membres du Conseil de sécurité dans les cinquante jours qui précèdent l’intronisation du président Trump, le 20 janvier prochain ». Et il ajoutait : « Si elle n’est pas rejetée par l’habituel veto américain, qui s’applique à chaque fois que les intérêts vitaux d’Israël sont en jeu, cette résolution fera d’Israël un État paria, passible de sanctions ».

On peut maintenant, à la lumière du vote du 23 décembre, assurer qu’elle ne le sera pas. La France peut dormir tranquille, Obama la suivra fidèlement et sera même disposé à aller encore plus loin.  Comme l’État juif ne se soumettra pas au diktat de Abbas, contrairement aux autres pays, l’ONU votera une résolution pour isoler complètement l’État juif en élargissant le boycott à tous les produits israéliens, puis une autre pour  la proclamation unilatérale de l’État « palestinien » (ce qu’avait suggéré Fabius).

Les Accords de Paris

Pourquoi ne pas les imaginer calqués sur les « Accords de Munich »? Ils se liraient alors ainsi :

(LE 15 JANVIER 2016 LES puissances  (à définir) réunies sont convenues des dispositions et conditions suivantes règlementant ladite cession, et des mesures qu’elle comporte. Chacune d’elles, par cet accord, s’engage à accomplir les démarches nécessaires pour en assurer l’exécution :

  1. L’évacuation des territoires occupés commencera le ….
  2. Ils conviennent que l’évacuation des territoires en question devra être achevée le … sans qu’aucune des installations existantes ait été détruite. Le gouvernement d’Israël, la Puissance occupante, aura la responsabilité d’effectuer cette évacuation sans qu’il en résulte aucun dommage aux dites installations.
  3. Les conditions de cette évacuation seront déterminées dans le détail par une commission internationale, composée de représentants de la France, des États-Unis, … de la Palestine et d’Israël, la Puissance occupante.
  4. L’occupation progressive par l’armée de l’Autorité Palestinienne commencera le … Les zones indiquées sur la carte ci-jointe seront occupées par les soldats palestiniens à des dates fixées ultérieurement et dans l’ordre suivant :
  • la zone 1, les …
  • la zone 2, les …
  • la zone 3, les …
  • la zone 4, les  …
  1. La commission internationale mentionnée au paragraphe 3 déterminera les territoires où doit être effectué un plébiscite. (Ce paragraphe n’apparaitra pas puisque de la Cisjordanie rien ne sera laissé aux Juifs)
  2. La fixation finale des frontières sera établie par la commission internationale.
  3. Il existera un droit d’option permettant d’être inclus dans les territoires transférés ou d’en être exclu. (Ce droit n’existera même pas, Abbas exige un territoire judenrein)
  4. Le gouvernement d’Israël, la Puissance occupante,  libèrera, dans un délai de quatre semaines à partir de la conclusion du présent accord, tous les prisonniers palestiniens retenus dans les prisons d’Israël, et ce quels que soient les délits dont ils se sont rendus coupables

Paris, le 15 janvier 2017

Le président de l’Autorité palestinienne
Abou MAZEN

Le président français
François Hollande

Le président des États-Unis
Barak Hussein Obama

Tout cela est bien beau et c’est le rêve de Abbas. Il caresse l’espoir insensé que la communauté internationale réussira à mettre Israël au pied du mur et qu’il réalisera la première étape de son plan diabolique, à savoir obtenir la totalité de l’État juif. Car il faut être lucide: toutes les guerres qui ont été déclenchées contre l’État juif l’ont été dans ce but et, aujourd’hui, près de 70 ans plus tard,  les Arabes n’ont nullement renoncé à l’objectif qu’ils se sont fixé.

Conclusion  Seulement voilà : Israël n’est pas la Tchécoslovaquie, Israël ne capitulera pas comme l’avait fait le gouvernement tchécoslovaque.

Si Abbas et tous ses acolytes s’imaginent qu’Israël se soumettra aux résolutions de l’ONU -ce qui n’est nullement dans ses habitudes- et qu’il va assister au démantèlement de Jérusalem et de la Judée-Samarie en restant les bras croisés, ce qu’ils se gourent! Ce qu’ils se gourent! Après Munich, conscient que le pire était à venir, Daladier en faisant allusion au peuple français qui croyait avoir obtenu la paix, avait murmuré : « Ah les cons s’ils savaient ! ». Après Paris, y aura-t-il au moins quelques chefs d’État qui se feront la même réflexion? J’en doute fort!

Tous sont tellement aveuglés par la haine qu’ils nourrissent à l’égard de l’État juif qu’ils ne sont pas même capables de réaliser qu’ils ont à faire à un adversaire de taille qui se battra avec le même acharnement qu’au cours des guerres que ses ennemis lui ont déclarées. Les Juifs auxquels ils se heurtent n’ont plus rien en commun avec le Juif honteux, celui qui a servi de bouc émissaire pendant les 2000 ans d’exil.  Les Israéliens sont prêts à la guerre pour défendre leur territoire lilliputien. Les « Palestiniens » le sont-ils?

Si à l’issue de cette conférence, la France passe pour l’artisan incontestable de la « paix », si on joue à Paris l’hymne national « palestinien », ne sommes-nous pas en droit de nous demander si la France ne se prépare pas à devenir le plus grand fossoyeur de l’humanité? Il semble bien, hélas,  que tous les pays invités à Paris ont oublié que le passé est garant de l’avenir.

Voir par ailleurs:

Qui a fait élire Trump ? Pas les algorithmes, mais des millions de “tâcherons du clic” sous-payés

Le débat sur les responsabilités médiatiques (et technologiques) de la victoire de Trump ne semble pas épuisé. Moi par contre je m’épuise à expliquer que le problème, ce ne sont pas les algorithmes. D’ailleurs, la candidate “algorithmique” c’était Clinton : elle avait hérité de l’approche big data au ciblage des électeurs qui avait fait gagner Obama en 2012, et sa campagne était apparemment régie par un système de traitement de données personnelles surnommé Ada.

Au contraire, le secret de la victoire du Toupet Parlant (s’il y en a un) a été d’avoir tout misé sur l’exploitation de masses de travailleurs du clic, situés pour la plupart à l’autre bout du monde. Si Hillary Clinton a dépensé 450 millions de dollars, Trump a investi un budget relativement plus modeste (la moitié en fait), en sous-payant des sous-traitants recrutés sur des plateformes d’intermédiation de micro-travail.

Une armée de micro-tâcherons dans des pays en voie de développement

Vous avez peut-être lu la news douce-amère d’une ado de Singapour qui a fini par produire les slides des présentation de Trump. Elle a été recrutée via Fiverr, une plateforme où l’on peut acheter des services de secrétariat, graphisme ou informatique, pour quelques dollars. Ses micro-travailleurs résident en plus de 200 pays, mais les tâches les moins bien rémunérées reviennent principalement à de ressortissants de pays de l’Asie du Sud-Est. L’histoire édifiante de cette jeune singapourienne ne doit pas nous distraire de la vraie nouvelle : Trump a externalisé la préparation de plusieurs supports de campagne à des tacherons numériques recrutés via des plateformes de digital labor, et cela de façon récurrente. L’arme secrète de la victoire de ce candidat raciste, misogyne et connu pour mal payer ses salariés s’avère être l’exploitation de travailleuses mineures asiatiques. Surprenant, non ?

Hrithie, la “tâcheronne numérique” qui a produit les slides de Donal Trump…

Mais certains témoignages de ces micro-travailleurs offshore sont moins édifiants. Vous avez certainement lu l’histoire des “spammeurs de Macédoine”. Trump aurait profité de l’aide opportuniste d’étudiants de milieux modestes d’une petite ville post-industrielle d’un pays ex-socialiste de l’Europe centrale devenus des producteurs de likes et de posts, qui ont généré et partagé les pires messages de haine et de désinformation pour pouvoir profiter d’un vaste marché des clics.

How Teens In The Balkans Are Duping Trump Supporters With Fake News

A qui la faute ? Au modèle d’affaires de Facebook

A qui la faute ? Aux méchants spammeurs ou bien à leur mandataires ? Selon Business Insider, les responsables de la com’ de Trump ont directement acheté presque 60% des followers de sa page Facebook. Ces fans et la vaste majorité de ses likes proviennent de fermes à clic situées aux Philippines, en Malaysie, en Inde, en Afrique du Sud, en Indonesie, en Colombie… et au Mexique. (Avant de vous insurger, sachez que ceci est un classique du fonctionnement actuel de Facebook. Si vous n’êtes pas au fait de la façon dont la plateforme de Zuckerberg limite la circulation de vos posts pour ensuite vous pousser à acheter des likes, cette petite vidéo vous l’explique. Prenez 5 minutes pour finaliser votre instruction.)

Bien sûr, le travail dissimulé du clic concerne tout le monde. Facebook, présenté comme un service gratuit, se révèle aussi être un énorme marché de nos contacts et de notre engagement actif dans la vie de notre réseau. Aujourd’hui, Facebook opère une restriction artificielle de la portée organique des posts partagés par les utilisateurs : vous avez 1000 « amis », par exemple, mais moins de 10% lit vos messages hilarants ou regarde vos photos de chatons. Officiellement, Facebook prétend qu’il s’agit ainsi de limiter les spams. Mais en fait, la plateforme invente un nouveau modèle économique visant à faire payer pour une visibilité plus vaste ce que l’usager partage aujourd’hui via le sponsoring. Ce modèle concerne moins les particuliers que les entreprises ou les hommes politiques à la chevelure improbable qui fondent leur stratégies marketing sur ce réseau social : ces derniers ont en effet intérêt à ce que des centaines de milliers de personnes lisent leurs messages, et ils paieront pour obtenir plus de clics. Or ce système repose sur des « fermes à clics », qui exploitent des travailleurs installés dans des pays émergents ou en voie de développement. Cet énorme marché dévoile l’illusion d’une participation volontaire de l’usager, qui est aujourd’hui écrasée par un système de production de clics fondé sur du travail caché—parce que, littéralement, délocalisé à l’autre bout du monde.

Flux de digital labor entre pays du Sud et pays du Nord

Une étude récente de l’Oxford Internet Institute montre l’existence de flux de travail importants entre le sud et le nord de la planète : les pays du Sud deviennent les producteurs de micro-tâches pour les pays du Nord. Aujourd’hui, les plus grands réalisateurs de micro-taches se trouvent aux Philippines, au Pakistan, en Inde, au Népal, à Hong-Kong, en Ukraine et en Russie, et les plus grands acheteurs de leurs clics se situent aux Etats-Unis, au Canada, en Australie et au Royaume-Uni. Les inégalités classiques Nord/Sud se reproduisent à une échelle planétaire. D’autant qu’il ne s’agit pas d’un phénomène résiduel mais d’un véritable marché du travail : UpWork compte 10 millions d’utilisateurs, Freelancers.com, 18 millions, etc.

Micro-travailleurs d’Asie, et recruteurs en Europe, Australie et Amérique du Nord sur une plateforme de digital labor.

Nouvel “i-sclavagisme” ? Nouvel impérialisme numérique ? Je me suis efforcé d’expliquer que les nouvelles inégalités planétaires relèvent d’une marginalisation des travailleurs qui les expose à devoir accepter les tâches les plus affreuses et les plus moralement indéfendables (comme par exemple aider un candidat à l’idéologie clairement fasciste à remporter les élections). Je l’explique dans une contribution récente sur la structuration du digital labor en tant que phénomène global (attention : le document est en anglais et fait 42 pages).  Que se serait-il passé si les droits de ces travailleurs du clic avaient été protégés, s’ils avaient eu la possibilité de résister au chantage au micro-travail, s’il avaient eu une voix pour protester contre et pour refuser de contribuer aux rêves impériaux d’un homme politique clairement dérangé, suivi par une cour de parasites corrompus ? Reconnaître ce travail invisible du clic, et le doter de méthodes de se protéger, est aussi – et avant tout – un enjeux de citoyenneté globale. Voilà quelques extraits de mon texte

Extrait de “Is There a Global Digital Labor Culture?” (Antonio Casilli, 2016)

Conclusions:
Pour être plus clair : ce ne sont pas ‘les algorithmes’ ni les ‘fake news’, mais la structure actuelle de l’économie du clic et du digital labor global qui ont aidé la victoire de Trump.
Pour être ENCORE plus clair : la montée des fascismes et l’exploitation du digital labor s’entendent comme larrons en foire. Comme je le rappelais dans un billet récent de ce même blog :

L’oppression des citoyens des démocraties occidentales, écrasés par une offre politique constamment revue à la baisse depuis vingt ans, qui in fine a atteint l’alignement à l’extrême droite de tous les partis dans l’éventail constitutionnel, qui ne propose qu’un seul fascisme mais disponible en différents coloris, va de pair avec l’oppression des usagers de technologies numériques, marginalisés, forcés d’accepter une seule offre de sociabilité, centralisée, normalisée, policée, exploitée par le capitalisme des plateformes qui ne proposent qu’une seule modalité de gouvernance opaque et asymétrique, mais disponible via différents applications.

Voir aussi:

Facebook accusé d’avoir fait le jeu de Donald Trump
Le réseau social a réagi aux critiques en annonçant que les sites publiant de fausses informations ne pourront plus monétiser leur audience sur la plate-forme.
Michaël Szadkowski, Damien Leloup et William Audureau
Le Monde
16.11.2016

Moins d’une semaine après l’élection de Donald Trump, Facebook est pris dans ses contradictions. Accusé d’avoir influencé le dénouement du scrutin en laissant des articles mensongers remonter dans les fils d’actualité de ses utilisateurs, le réseau social est en pleine remise en question. Une première mesure a été annoncée dans la nuit de lundi 14 à mardi 15 novembre : les sites publiant de fausses informations ne pourront plus utiliser Facebook Audience Network, l’outil de monétisation publicitaire de la plate-forme, rapporte le Wall Street Journal citant un porte-parole de Facebook. Il s’agit d’une première disposition face à un phénomène d’une ampleur nouvelle.

Google a pris le même jour une mesure similaire. « Nous allons commencer à interdire les publicités sur les contenus trompeurs, de la même manière que nous interdisons les publicités mensongères », a déclaré le groupe à l’AFP.

Selon le PewResearch Center, 44 % des Américains s’informent directement sur le réseau social. Le site BuzzFeed a calculé que 20 % des articles de médias partisans des démocrates étaient mensongers, et 38 % côté républicain. Une fausse information publiée en juillet annonçant le soutien du pape François à Donald Trump a notamment été partagée près d’un million de fois, relate le New York Times. Une situation déplorée par Bobby Goodlatte, ancien ingénieur de Facebook : « Malheureusement, le News Feed [le fil d’actualité de Facebook] est optimisé pour intéresser et générer des réactions. Comme nous l’avons appris avec cette…

Voir également:

Trump team outsourced making presentation slides to S’porean teen via freelancer site Fiverr

The East View Secondary School student, Hrithie Menon, helped create a Prezi presentation targeted at youths that was used as part of Trump’s presidential campaign after his team approached her for her services via Fiverr, a site that aggregates vendors for digital services.

Prezi is an alternative slide-making programme to PowerPoint.

The teen said she didn’t know who Trump was last year as she did not follow US politics.

She was unable to provide more details about the work done as she is bound by a non-disclosure agreement.

She began doing such work when she was in Primary 4. She has been doing freelance work for clients for the past two years.

She charges US$100 a project and has made about US$2,000 in total so far.

The money help pay for her dental braces.

Hrithie said she completed the Trump campaign slides within two hours in one day.

Ironically, during Trump’s campaigning period at a rally in Florida on Sunday, Nov. 6, the then presidential hopeful told his supporters that they are “living through the greatest jobs theft in the history of the world” and in the process, naming Singapore as one of the culprits of stealing American jobs.

He said then that the United States has lost about 70,000 factories since China joined the World Trade Organisation.

He said: “Goodrich Lighting Systems laid off 255 workers and moved their jobs to India. Baxter Health Care laid off 199 workers and moved their jobs to Singapore. It’s getting worse and worse and worse.”

Yes, 320 million people in the United States and no one can make slides.

Voir de même:

Tech-savvy S’porean teen played part in Trump campaign
Toh Ee Ming
November 17, 2016

SINGAPORE — When the request came from American billionaire Donald Trump’s campaign team to help create a Prezi presentation for youth as part of his presidential campaign last August, East View Secondary School student Hrithie Menon treated it as “just another project” to pay for her own dental braces.

Prezi is a presentation tool used as an alternative to traditional slide-making programmes such as PowerPoint. Hrithie, 15, told TODAY that it was one of the “easiest” projects she has had to do, because it was fairly straightforward and she completed it within two hours.

“At that time, I didn’t really know who he was, so I didn’t (think) it was such a big deal,” the Singaporean student said. It was only when she heard news of the United States presidential election that she realised she did “play a part” in the event, even though she admitted that she does not follow US politics.

While she is unable to share too many details because she is bound to a non-disclosure agreement, she said that the slides were shared across various colleges and university campuses in the US aimed at capturing young people’s votes.

Her parents consider Mr Trump, now the US President-elect, Hrithie’s “biggest client” so far.

Her mother, Madam Shenthil Ranie, 44, who works in the media entertainment industry, said: “(I remember) my husband texting me to say, ‘You’ll never know who this new client is’ … It was so hilarious … That was a big moment for us, to think that my daughter’s freelance work could actually get her such a big gig.”

Hrithie, who learnt the skills herself, has done projects for 20 clients in the last two years, such as creating a Prezi on safety guidelines for the United States Polo Association and working with various brands in Spain and Vietnam.

Clients approach her on the website Fiverr — a marketplace for digital services — where they provide her with the content that she turns into a Prezi video. She charges about US$100 (S$140) a project and has earned close to US$2,000 to date.

The digital native uses with ease various software and tools such as Prezi, Adobe After Effects and VideoScribe, and completes these projects typically within a day.

Her interest in such work was sparked when her father first tasked her to create some videos during her school holidays, when she was in Primary 4. She went on to develop some 15 to 20 android apps, including a celebrity-inspired news app about artistes such as One Direction and Selena Gomez. She also used to buy in bulk various accessories or monopods for taking selfies from e-commerce site AliExpress, to sell through her own Instagram account.

Her father, Mr Haridas Menon, 49, founder of the Singapore Internet Marketing Academy, said: “She somehow has the knack of picking up trends, she has her ears to the ground.”

While she excels in the technical area, Hrithie sometimes has to turn to her parents for help when clients are not as clear in their briefs or when she encounters language difficulties. Even so, her parents are amazed at her abilities and resourceful nature.

“When I see her on this path and what she has achieved, it is mind-blowing for me, to think that she’s so young,” her mother said, hoping that schools may nurture students with similar talents to do more digital work or for them to build new products online.

In her spare time, Hrithie is keen on learning how to help businesses tighten their cyber security on WordPress. Cyber security is an area she is looking to study in a polytechnic in future to enhance her skills.

On how others may pick up skills like hers, Hrithie said: “You just have to have the initiative to go and search for (them) on YouTube. Everything is on the Internet.”

Inside Hillary Clinton’s campaign, she was known as Ada. Like the candidate herself, she had a penchant for secrecy and a private server. As blame gets parceled out Wednesday for the Democrat’s stunning loss to Republican President-elect Donald Trump, Ada is likely to get a lot of second-guessing.

Ada is a complex computer algorithm that the campaign was prepared to publicly unveil after the election as its invisible guiding hand. Named for a female 19th-century mathematician — Ada, Countess of Lovelace — the algorithm was said to play a role in virtually every strategic decision Clinton aides made, including where and when to deploy the candidate and her battalion of surrogates and where to air television ads — as well as when it was safe to stay dark.

The campaign’s deployment of other resources — including  county-level campaign offices and the staging of high-profile concerts with stars like Jay Z and Beyoncé — was largely dependent on Ada’s work, as well.

While the Clinton campaign’s reliance on analytics became well known, the particulars of Ada’s work were kept under tight wraps, according to aides. The algorithm operated on a separate computer server than the rest of the Clinton operation as a security precaution, and only a few senior aides were able to access it.

According to aides, a raft of polling numbers, public and private, were fed into the algorithm, as well as ground-level voter data meticulously collected by the campaign. Once early voting began, those numbers were factored in, too.

What Ada did, based on all that data, aides said, was run 400,000 simulations a day of what the race against Trump might look like. A report that was spit out would give campaign manager Robby Mook and others a detailed picture of which battleground states were most likely to tip the race in one direction or another — and guide decisions about where to spend time and deploy resources.

The use of analytics by campaigns was hardly unprecedented. But Clinton aides were convinced their work, which was far more sophisticated than anything employed by President Obama or GOP nominee Mitt Romney in 2012, gave them a big strategic advantage over Trump.

So where did Ada go wrong?

About some things, she was apparently right. Aides say Pennsylvania was pegged as an extremely important state early on, which explains why Clinton was such a frequent visitor and chose to hold her penultimate rally in Philadelphia on Monday night.

But it appears that the importance of other states Clinton would lose — including Michigan and Wisconsin — never became fully apparent or that it was too late once it did.

Clinton made several visits to Michigan during the general election, but it wasn’t until the final days that she, Obama and her husband made such a concerted effort.

As for Wisconsin: Clinton didn’t make any appearances there at all.

Like much of the political establishment Ada appeared to underestimate the power of rural voters in Rust Belt states.

Clearly, there were things neither she nor a human could foresee — like a pair of bombshell letters sent by the FBI about Clinton’s email server. But in coming days and weeks, expect a debate on how heavily campaigns should rely on data, particularly in a year like this one in which so many conventional rules of politics were cast aside.

Voir encore:

Trump spent about half of what Clinton did on his way to the presidency

Jacob Pramuk
9 Nov 2016

Donald Trump threw out campaign spending conventions as he stormed his way to the American presidency.

The businessman racked up 278 electoral votes as of Wednesday morning, versus 228 for Clinton, with three states still not called by NBC News.

Trump did so with thin traditional campaign spending. His chaotic and often divisive campaign drew constant eyeballs, earning him billions of dollars in free media and allowing him to spend comparatively little on television ads and ground operations.

His campaign committee spent about $238.9 million through mid-October, compared with $450.6 million by Clinton’s. That equals about $859,538 spent per Trump electoral vote, versus about $1.97 million spent per Clinton electoral vote.

Those numbers do not include spending from Oct. 20 to Election Day.

While Trump’s campaign increased its spending on television ads in its final election push, it still used the traditional outreach tool much less than Clinton’s did. As of late October, Clinton spent’s campaign spent about $141.7 million on ads, compared with $58.8 million for Trump’s campaign, according to NBC News.

That disparity extended to campaign payrolls. For example, Clinton’s campaign had about 800 people on payroll at the end of August, versus about 130 for Trump’s. Democrats often have larger ground operations than Republicans.

Still, it wasn’t just Clinton who heavily outspent Trump. He shelled out much less money than other recent nominees, as well.

Through mid-October 2012, the campaigns of President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney spent $630.8 million and $360.7 million, respectively.

Obama’s campaign also spent about $593.9 million through mid-October 2008. Sen. John McCain’s 2008 campaign actually spent less than Trump, about $216.8 million through mid-October.

Voir encore:

But the disclosure of the still-classified findings prompted a blistering attack against the intelligence agencies by Mr. Trump, whose transition office said in a statement on Friday night that “these are the same people that said Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction,” adding that the election was over and that it was time to “move on.”

Mr. Trump has split on the issue with many Republicans on the congressional intelligence committees, who have said they were presented with significant evidence, in closed briefings, of a Russian campaign to meddle in the election.

The rift also raises questions about how Mr. Trump will deal with the intelligence agencies he will have to rely on for analysis of China, Russia and the Middle East, as well as for covert drone and cyberactivities.

At this point in a transition, a president-elect is usually delving into intelligence he has never before seen, and learning about C.I.A. and National Security Agency abilities. But Mr. Trump, who has taken intelligence briefings only sporadically, is questioning not only analytic conclusions, but also their underlying facts.

“To have the president-elect of the United States simply reject the fact-based narrative that the intelligence community puts together because it conflicts with his a priori assumptions — wow,” said Michael V. Hayden, who was the director of the N.S.A. and later the C.I.A. under President George W. Bush.

With the partisan emotions on both sides — Mr. Trump’s supporters see a plot to undermine his presidency, and Mrs. Clinton’s supporters see a conspiracy to keep her from the presidency — the result is an environment in which even those basic facts become the basis for dispute.

Mr. Trump’s team lashed out at the agencies after The Washington Post reported that the C.I.A. believed that Russia had intervened to undercut Mrs. Clinton and lift Mr. Trump, and The New York Times reported that Russia had broken into Republican National Committee computer networks just as they had broken into Democratic ones, but had released documents only on the Democrats.

For months, the president-elect has strenuously rejected all assertions that Russia was working to help him, though he did at one point invite Russia to find thousands of Mrs. Clinton’s emails. There is no evidence that the Russian meddling affected the outcome of the election or the legitimacy of the vote, but Mr. Trump and his aides want to shut the door on any such notion, including the idea that Mr. Putin schemed to put him in office.

Instead, Mr. Trump casts the issue as an unknowable mystery. “It could be Russia,” he recently told Time magazine. “And it could be China. And it could be some guy in his home in New Jersey.”

The Republicans who lead the congressional committees overseeing intelligence, the Pentagon and the Department of Homeland Security take the opposite view. They say that Russia was behind the election meddling, but that the scope and intent of the operation need deep investigation, hearings and public reports.

One question they may want to explore is why the intelligence agencies believe that the Republican networks were compromised while the F.B.I., which leads domestic cyberinvestigations, has apparently told Republicans that it has not seen evidence of that breach. Senior officials say the intelligence agencies’ conclusions are not being widely shared, even with law enforcement.

“We cannot allow foreign governments to interfere in our democracy,” Representative Michael McCaul, a Texas Republican who is the chairman of the Homeland Security Committee and was considered by Mr. Trump for secretary of Homeland Security, said at the conservative Heritage Foundation. “When they do, we must respond forcefully, publicly and decisively.”

Receive occasional updates and special offers for The New York Times’s products and services

He has promised hearings, saying the Russian activity was “a call to action,” as has Senator John McCain of Arizona, one of the few senators left from the Cold War era, when the Republican Party made opposition to the Soviet Union — and later deep suspicion of Russia — the centerpiece of its foreign policy.

Representative Peter T. King, Republican of New York and a member of the House Intelligence Committee, said there was little doubt that the Russian government was involved in hacking the Democratic National Committee. “All of the intelligence analysts who looked at it came to the conclusion that the tradecraft was very similar to the Russians,” he said.

Even one of Mr. Trump’s most enthusiastic supporters, Representative Devin Nunes, Republican of California, said on Friday that he had no doubt about Russia’s culpability. His complaint was with the intelligence agencies, which he said had “repeatedly” failed “to anticipate Putin’s hostile actions,” and with the Obama administration’s lack of a punitive response.

Mr. Nunes, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, said that the intelligence agencies had “ignored pleas by numerous Intelligence Committee members to take more forceful action against the Kremlin’s aggression.” He added that the Obama administration had “suddenly awoken to the threat.”

Like many Republicans, Mr. Nunes is threading a needle. His statement puts him in opposition to the position taken by Mr. Trump and his incoming national security adviser, Michael Flynn, who has traveled to Russia as a private citizen for RT, the state-controlled news operation, and attended a dinner with Mr. Putin.

Mr. Nunes’s contention that Mr. Obama was captivated by a desire to “reset” relations with Russia is also notable, because Mr. Trump has said he is trying to do the same — though he is avoiding that term, which was made popular by Mrs. Clinton in her failed effort as secretary of state in 2009.

There are splits both within the intelligence agencies and the congressional committees that oversee them. Officials say the C.I.A. and the N.S.A. have not always shared their findings with the F.B.I., which they often distrust. The question of how vigorously to investigate also has a political tinge: Democrats on the Senate Intelligence Committee, for example, are pushing hard for a broad investigation, while some Republicans are resisting.

Intelligence can also get politicized, of course, and one of the running debates about the disastrously mistaken assessments of Iraq that Mr. Trump often cites is whether the intelligence itself was tainted or whether the Bush White House read it selectively to support its march to war in 2003.

But what is unfolding in the argument over the Russian hacking is more complex, because tracking the origin of cyberattacks is complicated. It is made all the harder by the fact that the C.I.A. and the N.S.A. do not want to reveal human sources or technical abilities, including American software implants in Russian computer networks.

This much is known: In mid-2015, a hacking group long associated with the F.S.B. — the successor to the old Soviet K.G.B. — got inside the Democratic National Committee’s computer systems. The intelligence