Présidence Trump: Vous avez dit accident de l’histoire ? (As Trump keeps defying economic and diplomatic logic, even critics wonder if pigs can fly after all)

29 juillet, 2018
Le vieux monde se meurt, le nouveau monde tarde à apparaître et dans ce clair-obscur surgissent les monstres. Antonio Gramsci
Si Trump est élu, l’économie américaine va s’écrouler et les marchés financiers ne vont jamais s’en remettre. Paul Krugman (2016)
No, pigs do not fly. Donald Trump is dreaming. Robert Brusca (FAO Economics, 12.10.2016)
Au moins, Donald Trump a eu le mérite d’encourager le débat sur l’impact de la mondialisation sur l’économie, c’est sain. Steven Friedman
Was Trump disqualified by his occasional but demonstrable character flaws and often rank vulgarity? To believe that plaint, voters would have needed a standard by which both past media of coverage of the White House and the prior behavior of presidents offered some useful benchmarks. Unfortunately, the sorts of disturbing things we know about Trump we often did not know in the past about other presidents. By any fair measure, the sexual gymnastics in the White House and West Wing of JFK and Bill Clinton, both successful presidents, were likely well beyond President Trump’s randy habits. Harry Truman’s prior Tom Pendergast machine connections make Trump steaks and Trump university seem minor. By any classical definition, Lyndon Johnson could have been characterized as both a crook and a pervert. In sum, the public is still not convinced that Trump’s crudities are necessarily different from what they imagine of some past presidents. But it does seem convinced, in our age of a 24/7 globalized Internet, that 90 percent negative media coverage of the Trump tenure is quite novel. Personal morality and public governance are related, but we are not always quite sure how. Jimmy Carter was both a more moral person and a worse president than Bill Clinton. Jerry Ford was a more ethical leader than Donald Trump — and had a far worse first 16 months. FDR was a superb wartime leader — and carried on an affair in the White House, tried to pack and hijack the Supreme Court, sent U.S. citizens into internment camps, and abused his presidential powers in ways that might get a president impeached today. In the 1944 election, the Republican nominee Tom Dewey was the more ethical — and stuffy — man. In matters of spiritual leadership and moral role models, we wish that profane, philandering (including an affair with his step-niece), and unsteady General George S. Patton had just conducted himself in private and public as did the upright General Omar Bradley. But then we would have wished even more that Bradley had just half the strategic and tactical skill of Patton. If he had, thousands of lives might have been spared in the advance to the Rhine. Trump is currently not carrying on an affair with his limousine driver, as Ike probably was with Kay Summersby while commanding all Allied forces in Europe following D-Day. Rarely are both qualities, brilliance and personal morality, found in a leader — even among our greatest, such as the alcoholic Grant or the foul-mouthed and occasionally crude Truman. Richard Feynman in some ways may have been the most important — or at least the most interesting — physicist of our age, but his tawdry and sometimes callous private life would have made Feynman Target No. 1 of the MeToo movement. Trump did not run in a vacuum. A presidential vote is not a one-person race for sainthood but, like it or not, often a choice between a bad and worse option. Hillary Clinton would have likely ensured a 16-year progressive regnum. As far as counterfactual “what ifs” go, by 2024, at the end of Clinton’s second term, a conservative might not have recognized the federal judiciary, given the nature of lifetime appointees. The lives of millions of Americans would have been radically changed in an Obama-Clinton economy that probably would not have seen GDP or unemployment levels that Americans are now enjoying. Fracking, coal production, and new oil exploration would have been vastly curtailed. The out-of-control EPA would have become even more powerful. Half the country simply did not see the democratic socialist European Union, and its foreign and domestic agendas, as the model for 21st-century America. (…) Open borders, Chinese trade aggression, the antics of the Clinton Foundation, the Uranium One deal, the Iran deal, estrangement from Israel and the Gulf states, a permanently nuclear North Korea, leading from behind — all that and far more would be the continued norm into the 2020s. Ben Rhodes, architect of the Iran deal and the media echo chamber, might have been the national-security adviser. The red-state losers would be institutionalized as clingers, crazies, wackos, deplorables, and irredeemables in a Clinton administration. A Supreme Court with justices such as Loretta Lynch, Elizabeth Warren, and Eric Holder would have made the court little different in its agendas from those of the ACLU, Planned Parenthood, and Harvard Law School. (…) The proverbial Republican elite had become convinced that globalization, open borders, and free but unfair trade were either unstoppable or the fated future or simply irrelevant. Someone or something — even if painfully and crudely delivered — was bound to arise to remind the conservative Washington–New York punditocracy, the party elite, and Republican opinion makers that a third of the country had all but tuned them out. It was no longer sustainable to expect the conservative base to vote for more versions of sober establishmentarians like McCain and Romney just because they were Republicans, well-connected, well-résuméd, well-known, well-behaved, and played by the gloves-on Marquess of Queensberry political rules. Instead, such men and much of orthodox Republican ideology were suspect. Amnestied illegal aliens would not in our lifetimes become conservative family-values voters. Vast trade deficits with China and ongoing chronic commercial cheating would not inevitably lead to the prosperity that would guarantee Chinese democracy. Asymmetrical trade deals were not sacrosanct under the canons of free trade. Unfettered globalization, outsourcing, and offshoring were not both inevitable and always positive. The losers of globalization did not bring their misery on themselves. The Iran deal was not better than nothing. North Korea would not inevitably remain nuclear. Middle East peace did not hinge of constant outreach to and subsidy of the corrupt and autocratic Palestinian Authority and Hamas cliques. Lots of deep-state rust needed scraping. Yet it is hard to believe that either a Republican or Democratic traditionalist would have seen unemployment go below 4 percent, or the GDP rate exceed 3 percent, or would have ensured the current level of deregulation and energy production. A President Mitt Romney might not have rammed through a tax-reform policy like that of the 2017 reform bill. I cannot think of a single Republican 2016 candidate who either could or would have in succession withdrawn from the Paris Climate Accord, moved the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem, demanded China recalibrate its asymmetrical and often unfair mercantile trade policies, sought to secure the border, renounced the Iran deal, moved to denuclearize North Korea, and hectored front-line NATO allies that their budgets do not reflect their promises or the dangers on their borders. The fact that Trump never served in the military or held a political office before 2016 may explain his blunders and coarseness. But such lacunae in his résumé also may account for why he is not constrained by New York–Washington conventional wisdom. His background makes elites grimace, though their expertise had increasingly calcified and been proved wrong and incapable of innovative approaches to foreign and domestic crises. Something or someone was needed to remind the country that there is no longer a Democratic party as we once knew it. It is now a progressive and identity-politics religious movement. Trump took on his left-wing critics as few had before, did not back down, and did not offer apologies. He traded blow for blow with them. The result was not just media and cultural hysteria but also a catharsis that revealed what Americans knew but had not seen so overtly demonstrated by the new Left: the unapologetic media bias; chic assassination talk; the politicization of sports, Hollywood, and entertainment in slavish service to progressivism; the Internet virtue-signaling lynch mob; the out-of-control progressive deep state; and the new tribalism that envisions permanent ethnic and racial blocs while resenting assimilation and integration into the melting pot. For good or evil, the trash-talking and candid Trump challenged progressives. They took up the offer in spades and melted down — and America is getting a good look at where each side really sits. In the end, only the people will vote on Trumpism. His supporters knew full well after July 2016 that his possible victory would come with a price — one they deemed more than worth paying given the past and present alternatives. Most also no longer trust polls or the media. To calibrate the national mood, they simply ask Trump voters whether they regret their 2016 votes (few do) and whether any Never Trump voters might reconsider (some are), and then they’re usually reassured that what is happening is what they thought would happen: a 3 percent GDP economy, low unemployment, record energy production, pushbacks on illegal immigration, no Iran deal, no to North Korean missiles pointed at the U.S., renewed friendship with Israel and the Gulf states, a deterrent foreign policy, stellar judicial appointments — along with Robert Mueller, Stormy Daniels, Michael Cohen, and lots more, no doubt, to come. Victor Davis Hanson
Donald Trump has a big promise for the U.S. economy: 4% growth. No chance, say 11 economists surveyed by CNNMoney. And a paper published Tuesday by the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco backs them up. (…) The Republican presidential nominee made the promise in a speech in New York in September. « I believe it’s time to establish a national goal of reaching 4% economic growth, » he said. Since the Great Recession, growth has averaged 2%. Brusca and the other economists surveyed say that 4% growth is impossible, or at least highly unlikely. The reasons: Unemployment is already really low, lots of Baby Boomers are retiring, and there are far fewer manufacturing jobs today than in past decades. Trump’s team says it will get to 4% growth with tax cuts, better trade deals and more manufacturing jobs. One reason for slower growth is lower productivity — for example, how many widgets an assembly line worker can produce in an hour. Another problem is that the example of the assembly line worker is increasingly outdated: America has shed about 5.6 million manufacturing jobs since 2000, mostly because of innovation and partly because of trade, studies show. Manufacturing jobs tend to have higher productivity — and wages — than jobs in other service industries like retail, education and health care, which have added lots of low-productivity jobs while manufacturing jobs have disappeared. Interestingly, American manufacturers are producing more than ever before — in dollar terms. But as technology replaces jobs on the assembly line, more goods can be produced with fewer workers. On top of that, the economy is already near what economists consider full employment, meaning the unemployment rate can’t go much lower. The unemployment rate is 5% and was as low as 4.7% earlier this year. It can’t go much lower because there will always be people leaving jobs or searching for them. If the job market is already near capacity, the economy can’t expand much more, economists say. Unemployment did go really low in 2000 — as low as 3.8% — and the economy was growing above a 4% pace. But the San Francisco Fed attributes those good times to the late 1990s internet revolution. (…) Many economists call for more spending on building new roads, bridges and highways, as do both Trump and Hillary Clinton. (…) Many experts say comprehensive immigration reform — a path to citizenship — would create more documented workers. Historically, documented workers tend to have higher productivity than undocumented workers because they generally have higher job skills and can take on jobs that produce more valuable goods. Productivity has nothing to do with work ethic. CNN (12.10.2018)
The Soviet Union was famously described as « Upper Volta with rockets », a catchphrase that was updated by the geographically precise to become « Burkina Faso with rockets ». It was a powerfully succinct description. The United States was rich and space-age powerful; the Soviet Union was poor and space-age powerful. The contradictions and paradoxes that stemmed from that could never fully be resolved – least of all by the citizens of the Soviet Union themselves. During the 1930s, Stalin turned Russia into an industrially powerful nation, and made his Soviet compatriots feel proud of what they had achieved. The defeat of Hitler’s might, at the cost of millions of lives, was also seen as proof of Soviet greatness. The idea that Soviet was best took deep root. It convinced some Western visitors, and millions of Russians. Even now, many Russians find it hard to believe that there was anything wrong with the model itself. In last night’s episode of the Cold War series, interviewees visibly hankered after a time when Khrushchev was in his Kremlin, and all was right with the Soviet world. (…) While Cold War stripped some of the humbug from old-fashioned propaganda, Tim Whewell’s Correspondent special, « Two Weddings and the Rouble », was a bleak illustration of life in Russia today, seven years after the final collapse of the superpower and the propaganda machine. The Cold War has vanished; and with it, the heart of Russia’s pride. (…) The film resolutely avoided politics, though the story of the collapsing rouble – six to the dollar one day, 20 to the dollar a few days later – always lurked in the background. But the underlying theme was best expressed by the father who angrily complained that « this once-great country has been robbed and humiliated ». Humiliated: certainly. Russia these days is now Upper Volta without the rockets (all its best scientists have gone abroad; those who remain are usually unpaid). But robbed? Who did the robbing, and why? The comment reflected the still-deep Russian fatalism which enables millions to believe that somebody else is always responsible, and that Russians can change nothing themselves. It is not true – but many Russians believe it to be true, which comes to almost the same thing. (…) As Whewell noted, this is a country which has worshipped « one false prophet too many ». Gagarin and the sputnik era are still glowingly remembered as the time when the Soviet Union truly seemed great. As for the future: it sometimes seems difficult to find a Russian who has room for any optimism at all. Katya’s parents, it seems fair to guess, will never believe in anything again. As for Katya herself – maybe. If not, Russia is truly lost. The Independent
We hear too much about Vladimir Putin these days and not nearly enough about the actual forces reshaping the world. Yes, the Russian president has proved a brilliant tactician. And, President Trump’s fantasies aside, he is a ruthless enemy of American power and European coherence. Yet Russia remains a byword for backwardness and corruption. Its gross domestic product is less than 10% that of the U.S. or the European Union. With a declining population and a fundamentally adverse geopolitical situation, the Russian Federation remains a shadow of its Soviet predecessor. Add up the consequences of Mr. Putin’s troops, nukes, disinformation campaigns, financial aid to populist parties—and throw in the power of his authoritarian example. Russia still does not have the ability to roll back the post-1990 democratic revolution, overpower the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, or dissolve the EU. The West is in crisis because of European weakness, not Russian strength. Some of the Continent’s difficulties are well known. France foolishly imagined the euro would contain the rise of a newly united Germany after the Cold War. In fact it has propelled Germany’s unprecedented economic rise while driving a wedge between Europe’s indebted South and creditor North. The Continent’s so-called migration policy is a humanitarian and a political disaster. Berlin’s feckless approach to security has left Europe’s most important power a geopolitical midget, lecturing sanctimoniously while others shape the world. Meanwhile the EU’s Byzantine government machinery grinds at an ever slower pace, creating openings for Mr. Putin and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Europe’s weakness invites authoritarian assertion in the borderlands. Walter Russell Mead
My [Chinese] interlocutors say that Mr Trump is the US first president for more than 40 years to bash China on three fronts simultaneously: trade, military and ideology. They describe him as a master tactician, focusing on one issue at a time, and extracting as many concessions as he can. They speak of the skilful way Mr Trump has treated President Xi Jinping. “Look at how he handled North Korea,” one says. “He got Xi Jinping to agree to UN sanctions [half a dozen] times, creating an economic stranglehold on the country. China almost turned North Korea into a sworn enemy of the country.” But they also see him as a strategist, willing to declare a truce in each area when there are no more concessions to be had, and then start again with a new front. For the Chinese, even Mr Trump’s sycophantic press conference with Vladimir Putin, the Russian president, in Helsinki had a strategic purpose. They see it as Henry Kissinger in reverse. In 1972, the US nudged China off the Soviet axis in order to put pressure on its real rival, the Soviet Union. Today Mr Trump is reaching out to Russia in order to isolate China. In the short term, China is talking tough in response to Mr Trump’s trade assault. At the same time they are trying to develop a multiplayer front against him by reaching out to the EU, Japan and South Korea. But many Chinese experts are quietly calling for a rethink of the longer-term strategy. They want to prepare the ground for a new grand bargain with the US based on Chinese retrenchment. Many feel that Mr Xi has over-reached and worry that it was a mistake simultaneously to antagonise the US economically and militarily in the South China Sea. Instead, they advocate economic concessions and a pullback from the aggressive tactics that have characterised China’s recent foreign policy. Mark Leonard
In the one year since President Trump took office, the first quarter of 2017 through the first quarter of 2018, real GDP grew at a 2.55 percent annual rate. This is higher than the growth for six of the eight years former President Obama was in office, or even five of the eight years when former President George W. Bush was in office. Moreover, the economic growth rate in the first year of Trump in office is higher than the average annual growth rate for the entire presidencies of both Obama at 2.05 percent and Bush at 1.71 percent. For the full 65 years from the first quarter of 1953 through the first quarter of 2018, annual real GDP growth in the United States averaged 2.95 percent, which is still substantially higher than the first year under Trump. The growth rate for the second quarter of 2018 is 4.1 percent. This is a nice sign of American prosperity and is the strongest quarter of economic growth since the third quarter of 2014. Net exports contributed about 1 percent, while the change in private inventories subtracted 1 percent. Lots of changes like this happen on a quarter by quarter basis and should not be taken too seriously. (…) While the GDP growth of any one quarter can be offset, revised or magnified in subsequent quarters, a pattern appears to be emerging under the stewardship of the Trump administration, which makes a lot of sense, at least to me. (…) When it comes to trade, there are problems and risks in the vision Trump is carrying out. Trade should be free and with minimum barriers placed on American exports to other countries and foreign exports to the United States. (…) Finally, we have had a serious government spending problem in the United States for years. The economist Milton Friedman was famous for saying “government spending is taxation.” (…) The latest GDP figure is a great number that aids our recovery from the awful 16 years under Bush and Obama. It will also reduce deficits in the long term if such robust economic growth continues. But the challenge is far from over. We have a lot of work to do to fan the flames of prosperity and to hold at bay the prosperity killers. But one step forward is still one step forward, and it is a heck of a lot better than one step backward. Arthur B. Laffer
So much for “secular stagnation.” You remember that notion, made fashionable by economist Larry Summers and picked up by the press corps to explain why the U.S. economy couldn’t rise above the 2.2% doldrums of the Obama years. Well, with Friday’s report of 4.1% growth in the second quarter, the U.S. economy has now averaged 3.1% growth for the last six months and 2.8% for the last 12. The lesson is that policies matter and so does the tone set by political leaders. For eight years Barack Obama told Americans that inequality was a bigger problem than slow economic growth, that stagnant wages were the fault of the rich, and that government through regulation and politically directed credit could create prosperity. The result was slow growth, and secular stagnation was the intellectual attempt to explain that policy failure. The policy mix changed with Donald Trump’s election and a Republican Congress to turn it into law. Deregulation and tax reform were the first-year priorities that have liberated risk-taking and investment, spurring a revival in business confidence and growth to give the long expansion a second wind. (…) Deregulation signaled to business that arbitrary enforcement and compliance costs wouldn’t be imposed on ideological whim. Tax reform broke the bottleneck on capital mobility and investment from the highest corporate tax rate in the developed world. Above all, the political message from Washington after eight years is that faster growth is possible and investment to turn a profit is encouraged. (…) It would be nice to think that all Americans would take satisfaction in this growth. But in the polarized politics of 2018, the same people who said this growth revival could never happen are now saying that it can’t last. It’s a “sugar high,” as Mr. Summers has put it, due to one-time boosts like government spending and consumption. (…) There are risks to this outlook, not least from Mr. Trump’s tariff policies.. (…) The way to help the economy is for Mr. Trump to build on this week’s trade truce with the European Union, withdraw the tariffs on both sides, and work toward a “zero tariff” deal. Meantime, wrap up the Nafta revision with Mexico and Canada within weeks so Congress can approve it this year. Mr. Trump could claim he had honored another campaign promise while removing a pall on investmentWSJ
One thing came through loud and clear in President Trump’s press conference Wednesday with European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker. When they announced an alliance against third parties’ “unfair trading practices,” they didn’t even have to mention China by name for listeners to know who their target was. Cooperation between the U.S. and EU will squeeze China’s protectionist model, and even before this agreement, there’s been evidence that China is already running up the white flag. Yes, China is acting tough in one sense, quickly imposing tariffs in retaliation for those enacted by the Trump administration. But while U.S. stocks approach all-time highs and the dollar grows stronger, Chinese stocks are in a bear market, down 25% since January. The yuan had its worst single month ever in June, and is well on its way to a repeat this month. Chinese corporate bonds have defaulted at a record rate in the past six months, yet this week China unveiled a new stimulus program designed to encourage even more corporate borrowing. (…) Weakening one’s currency is a standard weapon in trade wars, and one that China has often been accused of using—including in a tweet by Mr. Trump last week. Devaluation would be even more dangerous in this case because of China’s power to dump the $1.4 trillion in U.S. Treasury securities it holds. But by denying its intention to plunge the yuan, China has disarmed itself voluntarily. This was no act of noble pacifism; it had to be done. Devaluing the currency would risk scaring investors away, an existential threat to an emerging economy. For China, whose state-capitalism model has so far never produced a recession, such capital flight might expose previously hidden economic weaknesses. These weaknesses accumulate without the market discipline that occasional recessions impose. The fragility of China’s economy can be seen in its growth rate, which is slowing despite rising financial leverage, and in its overinvestment in commodities and real estate. The escalating trade war with the U.S. could tip China into the unknown territory of recession—and then capital flight could push it into a financial crash and depression. That would create mass joblessness in an economy that has never recorded unemployment higher than 4.3%. With that scenario in mind, the Chinese government must be wondering whether it has enough riot police. The risk of capital flight is real. The last time China let the yuan weaken—a slide that began in early 2014 and was punctuated in mid-2015 by the abandonment of the dollar peg in favor of a basket of currencies—the Chinese ended up losing almost $1 trillion in foreign reserves, which they have yet to recover. Now the sharp weakening of the yuan shows some degree of capital flight again is under way. No wonder that, despite tough talk from some quarters, the PBOC disarmed itself voluntarily to avoid further capital flight. The bank also is already offering to reimburse local firms for tariffs on imported U.S. goods. What’s more, China has put out a yard sign for international investors by announcing unilateral easing of foreign-ownership restrictions in some industries. China is beginning to realize that trade war isn’t really war. It’s more like a drinking contest at a fraternity: the game is less inflicting harm on your opponent than inflicting it on yourself, turn by turn. In trade wars, nations impose burdensome import tariffs on themselves in the hope that they’ll be able to stomach the pain longer than their competitor. Why play such a game? Because a carefully chosen act of self-harm can be an investment toward a worthy goal. For example, President Reagan’s arms race against the Soviet Union in the 1980s was in some sense a costly self-imposed tax. But it turned out the U.S. could bear the burden better than the Soviets could—Uncle Sam eventually out-drank the Russian bear and won the Cold War. The U.S. will win the trade war with China in the same way. The PBOC’s statements show that the Chinese understand they are too vulnerable to take very many more drinks. The only question is what they will be willing to offer Mr. Trump to get him to take yes for an answer. No wonder Beijing has ordered its state-influenced media to stop demonizing Mr. Trump—officials are desperate to minimize the pain when President Xi Jinping has to cut the inevitable deal. The drinking-contest metaphor takes us only so far. The wonderful thing about reciprocal trade is that it is a positive-sum game in which all contestants are made better off. If the conflict forces China to accept more foreign investors and goods, comply with World Trade Organization rules, and respect foreign intellectual property, it may feel it has lost but will in fact be better off. With this openness, both economic and political, China could spur a decadeslong second wave of growth that would bring hundreds of millions still living in rural poverty into glittering new cities. It took Nixon to go to China and show it the way to the 20th century. Now, through the unlikely method of trade war, Donald Trump is ushering China into the 21st century. Donald Luskin
Si l’on regarde les faits, et uniquement les faits, un constat s’impose: on ne peut pas trouver dans l’histoire récente des Etats-Unis un président ayant mené à bien autant de réformes en un laps de temps si court. Même Reagan a mis trois ans à réformer la fiscalité américaine! Trump, lui, l’a fait en quelques mois. Alors certes, «The Donald» n’a pas réussi à démanteler complètement l’Obamacare, suite aux oppositions rencontrées dans son propre parti ; mais sa réforme fiscale inclut la fin du «mandat individuel», cette fameuse obligation de souscrire à une assurance santé. Plus exactement, l’amende pour le non-respect de cette obligation est supprimée par la réforme. Cette mesure était nécessaire. En 2009, les conséquences de cette mesure coercitive, emblématique de la présidence d’Obama, ne s’étaient pas fait attendre. Il y avait eu d’énormes bugs informatiques qui ont découragé des millions de personnes de souscrire en ligne. Puis des millions d’Américains ont été contraints de résilier leur assurance privée, alors que nombre d’entre eux n’en ressentaient nullement l’envie. Depuis 2009, plus de 2 400 pages de réglementations se sont accumulées pour réguler le fonctionnement du système. Le président Obama avait promis de baisser les franchises de santé grâce à ce programme, mais ce fut tout le contraire: elles ont augmenté de 60 % en moyenne. Les primes d’assurance ont bondi dans l’ensemble de 25 % (et même jusqu’à 119 % dans l’état d’Arizona). Les assureurs ne s’en sortaient plus à cause des réglementations très strictes qui leur ont été imposées. Obama avait aussi promis de baisser le prix de l’assurance santé d’environ 2 500 dollars par famille et par an ; en réalité, le prix a augmenté de 2 100 dollars! Trump met fin à cette dérive en ouvrant le système un peu plus à la concurrence et en donnant aux Américains la liberté de choisir. (…) La réforme fiscale adoptée par le Congrès des États-Unis contient de nombreuses mesures audacieuses, que les Américains attendaient. Par exemple la baisse de la taxe sur les bénéfices des entreprises (de 35 % à 21 %), qui s’accompagne d’une déduction fiscale généreuse pour les entreprises dont les profits ne sont déclarés qu’au travers des revenus de leurs propriétaires. Plusieurs taxes ont par ailleurs été supprimées, comme la taxe minimum de 20 % sur les bénéfices effectifs. Surtout, le président Trump a entamé une vaste opération visant à rapatrier entre 2 000 et 4 000 milliards de dollars de profits placés à l’étranger, en diminuant la taxe sur ces profits de 35 % à moins de 15 %. Autre mesure symbolique: la suppression de la taxe sur les héritages au-dessous de 10 millions de dollars satisfait une large partie de l’électorat républicain. Certains Etats dont la fiscalité est particulièrement élevée, comme la Californie, seront également obligés de se réformer pour faire face à la suppression de certaines déductions fiscales. Leurs habitants ne pourront plus en effet déduire l’impôt sur le revenu local de leurs impôts fédéraux. Plusieurs mesures abolissent l’interdiction des forages de pétrole en Alaska. À l’heure actuelle, Trump a ouvert toutes les possibilités d’exploitation sur le continent américain, ce qui fera du pays l’un des principaux exportateurs de matières premières. Trump se positionne ainsi en ennemi du politiquement correct et reste méfiant à l’égard des gourous du réchauffement climatique. Il a été le seul à avoir le courage de se retirer de la COP 21, cette mascarade coûteuse qui consiste à organiser de gigantesques réunions de chefs d’État aux frais des contribuables. Il a supprimé la prime à la voiture électrique (pour une économie de 7 milliards de dollars) ainsi que les subventions aux parcs d’éoliennes. Enfin, Trump s’est attaqué aux réglementations. Entre janvier et décembre 2017, il a supprimé la moitié (45 000) des pages que contient le Code des réglementations. Plus de 1 500 réglementations importantes ont été abolies, dont beaucoup dans le domaine de l’environnement. Les économies obtenues sont estimées à plus de 9 milliards de dollars. Faisant fi des protestations, il a libéré le secteur d’internet de plusieurs contraintes anachroniques. Au plan international, Trump s’oppose à la Chine dont les pratiques commerciales douteuses ont fait l’objet d’enquêtes de la part de Washington. Mais cette position juste face aux Chinois ne devrait pas conduire la Maison Blanche à cautionner des mesures restrictives de la liberté du commerce et des échanges, qui risqueraient de peser sur la croissance américaine et même mondiale. (…) En tout état de cause, en ce début janvier 2018, l’économie américaine semble partir sur des bases solides. Le troisième trimestre de croissance s’est élevé à plus de 3 %, et le taux de chômage est au plus bas, à seulement 4.1 % (2.1 millions d’emplois créés en une année, du jamais vu depuis 1990), et même à 6.8 % pour la population noire, un taux qui n’a jamais été si faible depuis 1973. Les effets des baisses d’impôt se font d’ores et déjà sentir: des entreprises comme AT&T, Comcast, Wells Fargo, Boeing, Nexus Services ont annoncé des primes et des hausses de salaires. Nicolas Lecaussin
Volontarisme fiscal, brutalité commerciale : les critiques pleuvent sur la méthode du président américain, mais les États-Unis affichent d’excellentes performances économiques. Sur le climat, l’Iran, Israël, il s’est mis au ban de la communauté internationale. Ses tweets rageurs matinaux, son imprévisibilité, sa brutalité, laissent pantois. Ses démêlés avec le FBI et la justice interrogent sur sa capacité à mener son mandat jusqu’à son terme. Et pourtant. La méthode de Donald Trump, exposée il y a trente ans déjà, dans son best-seller l’Art du deal, du temps où le futur président de la première puissance mondiale n’était qu’un loup new-yorkais de l’immobilier, semble faire mouche. Depuis qu’il est installé à la Maison-Blanche, Donald Trump l’a éprouvée à plusieurs reprises, notamment avec la Corée du Nord. Il profère les pires menaces, exerce une pression maximale sur l’adversaire ou le partenaire, puis se dit prêt à discuter. Sur le front commercial, le président américain a marqué des points. Il a arraché des concessions au Brésil, son deuxième fournisseur d’acier ainsi qu’à la Corée du Sud. Évidemment, disposer du plus gros budget militaire de la planète (610 milliards de dollars, davantage que les sept pays suivants réunis) et diriger la première économie (un PIB de 19.000 milliards de dollars, une fois et demie celui de la Chine) offre quelques arguments. (…) L’issue est encore très incertaine, mais Trump a réussi à amener les Chinois à la table pour discuter d’une réduction du déficit commercial américain. Washington n’a pas non plus gagné son bras de fer contre l’Europe. (…) «Sa tactique de négociation est de taper fort et de se faire mousser auprès de son électorat, ajoute Florence Pisani, économiste chez Candriam et coauteur d’un livre sur l’économie américaine. C’est un jeu assez dangereux, car cela crée de l’incertitude et reporte les projets d’investissement.» Les bons indicateurs qui se succèdent semblent pourtant démentir cette vision pessimiste. À 3,9 %, le chômage est au plus bas depuis près de vingt ans, l’industrie crée des emplois, les ménages ont davantage confiance qu’au début du mandat. (…) « Il n’y a pas eu de changement majeur de tendance depuis l’arrivée de Trump, nuance Christian Leuz, économiste allemand installé depuis quinze ans aux États-Unis, à l’University of Chicago Booth School of Business. Obama a laissé une économie en bonne santé, il est encore trop tôt pour attribuer les bons résultats à Trump. » Ce leg solide est aussi largement imputable à dix ans de politique monétaire généreuse de la Fed, rappellent de nombreux économistes. Sa réforme fiscale, arrachée de haute lutte au Congrès, devrait tout de même avoir un impact positif sur l’économie. Elle a gonflé le profit des entreprises et permis à certaines comme Apple de rapatrier des milliards mis à l’abri à l’étranger. Florence Pisani pondère encore: une enquête récente de la réserve fédérale d’Atlanta indique que moins de 10 % des entreprises envisagent d’investir davantage malgré les réductions d’impôt. Quant aux ménages, ils pourraient perdre en impôts locaux (ceux des États) ce qu’ils ont gagné sur les impôts fédéraux. Même si le programme des grands travaux reste encore dans le flou, les dépenses votées par le Congrès devraient cependant soutenir l’activité de 0,3 % de PIB supplémentaire, concède Florence Pisani. Un surcroît de dépenses qui pourrait léguer au successeur de Trump «un déficit budgétaire de plus de 5 % du PIB et une dette alourdie», avertit Steven Friedman. Fabrice Nodé-Langlois
Selon la première estimation du Département du commerce, la croissance au second trimestre atteint 4,1% en rythme annuel. On n’a pas vu de conjoncture aussi favorable aux États-Unis depuis 2014. Donald Trump qualifie ces chiffres de «fascinants» et de «tout à fait tenables». Il y voit la preuve que sa politique de déréglementation et de baisses d’impôts porte ses fruits. D’autant que l’estimation de l’expansion de janvier à mars est révisée à la hausse de 2 à 2, 2% en rythme annuel. (…) Voilà déjà plus d’un an qu’il tourne en dérision les experts qui affirment qu’il ne sera pas possible de dépasser durablement 3% de croissance. Leurs arguments sont toujours que l’Amérique approche de la fin d’un très long cycle d’expansion engagé depuis l’été 2009, que la croissance démographique est désormais modeste et surtout que les hausses de productivité ne sont pas suffisantes pour renouer avec des taux de croissance dignes des années Reagan. Au cours du premier semestre l’expansion atteint néanmoins 3,1%. Si la montée des barrières douanières, les relèvements de taux directeurs par la Réserve fédérale et la hausse des coûts des matières premières ne font pas dérailler la conjoncture, le pari de Donald Trump peut être gagné, au moins en 2018. (…) Avec un taux de chômage au plus bas depuis la fin du siècle dernier, des créations d’emplois encore très fortes en moyenne de 215.000 postes par mois depuis janvier et une inflation de l’ordre de 2%, il pense présenter à l’opinion un premier bilan positif. Surtout s’il arrive à passer sous silence que, contrairement à l’orthodoxie fiscale prônée jadis par le Parti républicain, le déficit budgétaire en forte hausse est en partie responsable de l’accélération actuelle de la croissance. Signe de la confiance et du moral élevé des Américains, la consommation, qui représente plus des deux tiers du Produit intérieur brut (PIB) aux États-Unis, bondit au rythme de 4% au second trimestre, après une maigre progression de 0,5% de janvier à mars. Paradoxalement, les fortes tensions commerciales entre Washington et ses partenaires ont stimulé la croissance au cours du printemps. Dans l’anticipation de droits de douane chinois sur les denrées agricoles, les producteurs américains de soja ont par exemple tout fait pour avancer leurs livraisons avant le mois de juillet, date d’entrée en vigueur des mesures de rétorsion décidées par Pékin. Près d’un quart de la croissance a été donc généré par le commerce extérieur. Pierre-Yves Dugua
En 1917, contre les thèses de Marx, c’est en Russie, à Saint Pétersbourg, qu’éclate la Révolution. Enjeu intellectuel et enjeu politique, [Gramsci] va s’efforcer de comprendre pourquoi la Révolution a eu lieu en Russie et non en Allemagne, en France ou dans le Nord de l’Italie. Autour de la Révolution de 1917, s’ordonnent aussi une série de questionnements fondamentaux pour comprendre la pensée de Gramsci: hégémonie, crises, guerres de mouvements ou de positions, blocs historiques… Il distingue deux types de sociétés. Pour faire simple, celles où il suffit, comme en Russie, de prendre le central téléphonique et le palais présidentiel pour prendre le pouvoir. La bataille pour «l’hégémonie» vient après, ce sont les sociétés «orientales» qui fonctionnent ainsi… Et celles, plus complexes, où le pouvoir est protégé par des tranchées et des casemates, qui représentent des institutions culturelles ou des lieux de productions intellectuelles, de sens, qui favorisent le consentement. Dans ce cas, avant d’atteindre le central téléphonique, il faut prendre ces lieux de pouvoir. C’est ce que l’on appelle le front culturel, c’est le cas des sociétés occidentales comme la société française, italienne ou allemande d’alors. Au contraire de François Hollande et de François Lenglet, Antonio Gramsci ne croit pas à l’économicisme, c’est-à-dire à la réduction de l’histoire à l’économique. Il perçoit la force des représentations individuelles et collectives, la force de l’idéologie… Ce refus de l’économicisme mène à ouvrir le «front culturel», c’est-à-dire à développer une bataille qui porte sur la représentation du monde tel qu’on le souhaite, sur la vision du monde… Le front culturel consiste à écrire des articles au sein d’un journal, voire à créer un journal, à produire des biens culturels (pièces de théâtre, chansons, films etc…) qui contribuent à convaincre les gens qu’il y a d’autres évidences que celles produites jusque-là par la société capitaliste. La classe ouvrière doit produire, selon Gramsci, ses propres références. Ses intellectuels, doivent être des «intellectuels organiques», doivent faire de la classe ouvrière la «classe politique» chargée d’accomplir la vraie révolution: c’est-à-dire une réforme éthique et morale complète. L’hégémonie, c’est l’addition de la capacité à convaincre et à contraindre. Convaincre c’est faire entrer des idées dans le sens commun, qui est l’ensemble des évidences que l’on ne questionne pas. La crise (organique), c’est le moment où le système économique et les évidences qui peuplent l’univers mental de chacun «divorcent». Et l’on voit deux choses: le consentement à accepter les effets matériels du système économique s’affaiblit (on voit alors des grèves, des mouvements d’occupation des places comme Occupy Wall Street, Indignados, etc); et la coercition augmente: on assiste alots à la répression de grèves, aux arrestations de syndicalistes etc… Au contraire, un «bloc historique» voit le jour lorsqu’un mode de production et un système idéologique s’imbriquent parfaitement, se recoupent: le bloc historique néolibéral des années 1980 à la fin des années 2000 par exemple. Car le néolibéralisme n’est pas qu’une affaire économique, il est aussi une affaire éthique et morale. (…) il apporte à l’œuvre de Marx l’une des révisions ou l’un des compléments les plus riches de l’histoire du marxisme. Pour beaucoup de socialistes, il faut attendre que les lois de Marx sur les contradictions du capitalisme se concrétisent pour que la Révolution advienne. La Révolution d’Octobre, selon Gramsci, invalide cette thèse. Elle se fait «contre le Capital», du nom du grand livre de Karl Marx. Antonio Gramsci fascine au-delà de la gauche… Ainsi en France, en Italie ou en Autriche, des courants d’extrême droite se sont réclamés d’une version tronquée et biaisée du gramscisme. Ce «gramscisme de droite» faisait l’impasse sur l’aspect «économique» du gramscisme et le caractère émancipateur pour n’en retenir que la méthode le «combat culturel». Gaël Brustier
Les prédécesseurs de Trump, depuis la seconde guerre mondiale, voyaient dans la promotion d’un ordre libéral international, appuyé sur un tissu d’alliances, de forums multilatéraux et d’interdépendances économiques, la source de projection de la puissance américaine. Trump renverse la table. Ces règles restreignent l’Amérique: elles lui imposent des tabous et des normes bridant sa puissance, ne lui permettant pas de défendre au mieux ses intérêts. L’Amérique se laisse berner par ses partenaires commerciaux ; ses alliés profitent de sa générosité pour se comporter en passagers clandestins et financer leurs systèmes sociaux sous couvert de parapluie militaire américain. Dans un monde de jeu à somme nulle, le rapport de force brut favorisera le plus fort, donc l’Amérique. Ces thèmes ne sont pas nouveaux pour Trump qui répète ces antiennes depuis les années 1980. Sur le plan intérieur comme international, la question se pose: Donald Trump est-il un accident de l’histoire, élu sur un concours de circonstances, ou la manifestation de forces plus profondes traversant l’Amérique? Certes les idiosyncrasies du président sont incontestables. Sa vulgarité et sa personnalité brutale, son parcours d’homme d’affaires passé par la télé réalité ainsi que son inexpérience gouvernementale en font à coup sûr un animal politique sans précédent dans l’histoire américaine. De plus, son impopularité (à relativiser par le soutien fidèle de sa base) et les incertitudes pesant autour de l’enquête du Procureur Muller laissent certains espérer que la parenthèse sera de courte durée, qu’il suffit de s’armer de patience. Il faut doucher cet optimisme: le parti démocrate est profondément divisé et peine à faire émerger de nouvelles personnalités. L’économie américaine se porte bien, malgré des réalités souvent plus dures masquées par les statistiques, des inégalités aux addictions aux drogues. La réélection de Trump en 2020 n’est pas du tout à exclure ; mais l’enjeu va bien au-delà. Traiter Donald Trump comme une aberration historique qui sera suivie par un retour à «la normale» représenterait une erreur majeure de la part des Européens, pour trois raisons principales. Tout d’abord, l’Amérique traverse une période de questionnement profond sur son leadership international et les objectifs de sa politique étrangère, conséquence tardive de la fin de la Guerre Froide qui l’a privée d’adversaire clair et donc de continuité stratégique. Tous les présidents élus depuis la fin de la guerre froide, l’ont été sur une plateforme plaçant la priorité sur le plan intérieur: Bill Clinton insistant sur l’économie, George W. Bush comme Barack Obama contre l’interventionnisme de leur prédécesseur. Les divisions profondes qui affectent les États-Unis et l’absence de priorité internationale qui fasse consensus, Chine, terrorisme, immigration, commerce international, doivent nous préparer à une politique américaine plus erratique et déterminée par des considérations intérieures et électorales. Deuxièmement, le désastre irakien et la crise financière ont encouragé une tendance au repli et nourri le scepticisme d’une partie non négligeable de l’électorat quant à l’engagement international des États-Unis. L’observateur de Washington ne peut à cet égard que constater le décalage profond entre les experts de politique étrangère peuplant les think tanks et revues du reste de la population américaine. Durant la campagne présidentielle, Hillary Clinton avait ainsi dû changer de position sur le traité de libre-échange transpacifique pour suivre l’électorat, tandis que Trump pouvait brandir avec fierté la longue liste des experts de sécurité nationale «Never Trump» qui s’opposait à lui. Le fameux volte-face d’Obama sur la ligne rouge en Syrie a été largement critiqué à Washington comme à Paris, y compris par des membres de son entourage, mais soutenu par une large majorité de la population. À cet égard, Trump s’inscrit dans une forme de continuité avec son prédécesseur, Barack Obama, tout aussi prompt à dénoncer les experts interventionnistes de Washington. Les deux présidents partagent un scepticisme face à la notion «d’exceptionnalisme» américain. Obama comme Trump se gardent bien de voir une quelconque mission civilisatrice dans la politique étrangère américaine, promouvant le «nation building at home». Les conséquences étaient différentes: le scepticisme d’Obama sur les limites de puissance américaine l’entraînait à favoriser les accords multilatéraux comme le JCPOA ou l’accord de Paris sur le climat. À l’inverse, Trump prône l’unilatéralisme botté, dans la tradition du nationalisme martial d’un Andrew Jackson, président entre 1829 et 1837. Mais les deux approches sont deux pôles d’un même mouvement de retrait et de normalisation de la puissance américaine. Enfin, repli ou non, l’Europe perd sa centralité stratégique pour les États-Unis. Obama dénonçait déjà dans un entretien au journaliste Jeffrey Goldberg les alliés européens «passagers clandestins». Plutôt que de regretter sa non-intervention en Syrie, c’est l’intervention en Libye qu’Obama désigne comme son principal échec de politique étrangère, pointant du doigt la France et la Grande Bretagne responsables de ne pas avoir assuré la reconstruction post-conflit. L’une des principales annonces de politique étrangère fut le «pivot» vers l’Asie. Le réengagement américain en Europe fut tardif et réticent, provoqué par l’annexion de la Crimée par la Russie en 2014. Mais ici aussi Obama a laissé Angela Merkel et François Hollande en première ligne pour négocier les accords de Minsk avec Vladimir Poutine. Les années 1990, caractérisées par l’attention portée à l’expansion de l’OTAN et les interventions américaines (tardives) dans les Balkans seront probablement une exception, reliquat de la guerre froide et d’un bref moment unipolaire triomphant. (…) Cela implique un investissement considérable dans notre défense et sécurité: l’Europe est-elle prête à affronter seule une crise comparable aux Balkans dans sa périphérie demain? La crise syrienne, avec ses conséquences sur l’Union Européenne en matière de réfugiés et l’émergence de Daesh, devrait servir de réveil stratégique. Or, la posture européenne s’est essentiellement limitée à espérer un engagement américain. Au-delà de l’investissement dans le militaire, les Européens doivent prendre les mesures pour se préserver des conséquences des décisions américaines, en particulier des sanctions extraterritoriales. Aujourd’hui Trump exploite la faiblesse des Européens. Peut-être cette séquence n’est elle qu’un cycle de plus dans le balancier permanent entre repli égoïste et aventurisme messianique qu’Henry Kissinger a souvent déploré dans l’histoire diplomatique américaine. Après les années de doute de la présidence Carter, post Watergate et Vietnam ont suivi l’optimisme triomphant des années Reagan. Mais l’Europe ne peut fonder sa stratégie sur cet espoir. De plus, même si le successeur de Trump renoue avec l’internationalisme, l’Europe n’en sera pas moins vue comme un partenaire secondaire, grevée par ses divisions et sa faiblesse militaire. Benjamin Haddad
Donald Trump est un cauchemar pour ses angéliques adversaires. Ils voudraient voir en lui un plouc en sursis. Mais les faits leur donnent tort. Certes, l’acteur Robert De Niro a reçu, dimanche, les vivats du public new-yorkais pour avoir crié sur scène, les poings levés : « Fuck Trump  !  » (« J’emmerde Trump  !  »). Après la décision du président américain de suspendre un temps, le 24 mai, les discussions avec la Corée du Nord, Le Monde avait titré, avec d’autres : « La méthode Trump en échec ». Or l’Histoire se montre aimable avec le proscrit du show-biz, des médias et autres enfants de chœur. L’accord conclu, mardi à Singapour, entre Trump et Kim Jong-un est un coup de maître. Il se mesure à l’aigreur des dépités. Alors que les « experts » prédisaient le clash et la duperie, tous deux ont signé un document dans lequel le Coréen réaffirme « son engagement ferme et inébranlable en faveur d’une dénucléarisation complète de la péninsule coréenne ». Les pinailleurs pinaillent. Le jeune tyran n’est pas devenu pour autant fréquentable, après s’être ainsi habilement hissé au niveau de la première démocratie du monde. Sa dictature communiste demeure encore ce qui se fait de pire. Toutefois, ce qui restait d’anachronique dans ce reliquat de guerre froide prend théoriquement fin. Il est à espérer que Trump et les dirigeants de la Corée du Sud sauront inciter le despote à ouvrir rapidement son pays-prison au monde qu’il a choisi d’approcher et de visiter. La poignée de main de mardi est déjà de celles qui resteront dans les livres. À ce rituel, le Coréen n’a pas eu à malaxer les doigts de l’Américain, à la manière d’Emmanuel Macron, pour mimer sa domination. Vendredi, des médias ont désigné le président français vainqueur de Trump, au G7 (Québec), au prétexte qu’il avait laissé la trace « féroce » de son pouce sur la peau de son rival. « Ma poignée de main, ce n’est pas innocent  », avait théorisé le chef de l’État il y a un an. En dépit de ses pénibles défauts, Trump se grandit de l’infantilisme de ses adversaires. Ceux qui reprochent au milliardaire hâbleur ses foucades et son narcissisme se comportent en prêcheurs apeurés et plaintifs, dépassés par les événements. Ivan Rioufol
Emmanuel Macron ne voit pas que l’histoire s’écrit sans lui. Les « populistes » qu’il méprise sont ceux qui, forts du soutien de leurs électeurs, remportent les victoires. Donald Trump vient de signer avec la Corée du Nord, mardi, un accord capital sur la dénucléarisation progressive de la péninsule coréenne. Le texte, à compléter, éloigne la perspective d’un conflit nucléaire. En s’opposant à l’arrivée en Italie d’un bateau transportant des clandestins, Matteo Salvini, le ministre de l’Intérieur italien, a également démontré que la détermination d’un homme à appliquer son programme était plus efficace qu’un bavardage multilatéral, incapable de produire une ligne claire. Face à Trump et à Salvini, Macron ne cache plus son aversion. Benjamin Griveaux, porte-parole du gouvernement, a qualifié le rapprochement historique entre les Etats-Unis et la Corée du nord de simple « événement significatif », alors même que Trump et Kim Jong Un ont confirmé, ce mercredi, des invitations dans leur pays respectif. Hier, le chef de l’Etat a dénoncé, parlant du refus italien d’accueillir l’Aquarius et ses 629 clandestins, « la part de cynisme et d’irresponsabilité » du nouveau gouvernement. La France s’est pourtant gardée d’ouvrir, même en Corse, un de ses ports au navire indésirable. L’Aquarius a finalement trouvé à accoster à Valence (Espagne). Les donneurs de leçons feraient mieux de s’abstenir quand eux-mêmes se révèlent incapables d’appliquer ce qu’ils exigent des autres… Le président français a eu les honneurs de la presse américaine pour sa « féroce » poignée de main avec Trump, lors du G7 : elle a laissé la trace de son pouce sur la peau du président américain. Cette vacuité dans l’évaluation des rapports de force résume la détresse du camp du Bien, confronté à sa marginalisation. Car un basculement idéologique est en cours, sous la pression des nations excédées. Trump est plus populaire aux Etats-Unis que Macron ne l’est en France. Les sondages soutiennent Salvini. Le chef de l’Etat se trompe d’adversaires quand il réserve ses attaques à ces fortes têtes, tout en ménageant ceux qui insultent la France. Ivan Rioufol
Selon moi, Macron n’a pas apporté une révolution telle qu’il le prétend. Au contraire, il nous fait vivre un grand bond en arrière. Il fait revivre ce que les Français croyaient pouvoir rejeter. Les Français pensaient avoir compris que Macron avait analysé la fracture entre les élites et le peuple. Malheureusement, on se rend compte, au contraire, que Macron a redynamisé le pouvoir des élites en canalisant la société civile qu’il avait appelée à la rescousse pour en faire un parti godillot. (…) Macron achève le système. C’est un accident de l’Histoire dans la mesure où sa venue a surpris tout le monde. Il y a encore un an, personne ne le voyait arriver à ce point de son parcours politique. Il a bénéficié d’un effondrement des partis qui étaient des partis vermoulus. Il n’a suffi qu’à donner un coup d’épaule pour qu’ils s’effondrent. Il a également bénéficié de cette coalition des affaires contre François Fillon dans la dernière ligne droite. Il est le produit d’un monde finissant. Il est un des rares, en Europe, à défendre une vision postnationale, une Europe souveraine, et à ne pas comprendre que tout ne se résume pas à l’économie. (…) Il ne veut expliquer les grandes questions sociétales qu’à travers l’économie et, donc, avec une vue beaucoup trop restreinte pour répondre aux questions liées à l’immigration, au communautarisme et à la montée de l’islam radical. Ce sont des sujets qui, pour lui, sont des impensés politiques. (…) Je pense qu’il y a beaucoup d’impostures dans ses postures. Il fait croire qu’il est ce Nouveau Monde. Pour l’instant, tout démontre qu’il n’a fait que reproduire la vieille technocratie, le monde des experts, le monde des financiers, le monde de Bercy. Tout ce monde-là a repris les commandes. Au contraire, François Fillon avait demandé le courage de la vérité. On peut donc se demander si son éviction n’était pas due au fait qu’il se soit peut-être approché de trop près du sujet brûlant de la dénonciation de cette mascarade et ces grands mensonges qui font croire qu’on peut faire une démocratie sans le peuple. Macron a théorisé lui-même son rôle de Président Jupiter, c’est-à-dire de Dieu coupé du peuple. (…)  je pense qu’il n’a fait que reprendre ce que les Américains ont précisément rejeté. Je vois notre Président comme étant un Barack Obama blanc ou un Justin Trudeau intellectuel. On voit bien que la politique de Barack Obama a conduit à l’éviction de Hillary Clinton et à l’élection de son exact contraire Donald Trump. Je fais le pari que si Macron poursuit dans cette voie du politiquement correct qu’il a réhabilité à l’image de ce qu’était Barack Obama, il va accélérer les processus de rejet de ce monde faux et de cet establishment que Donald Trump a réussi à pulvériser malgré tous ses défauts. (…) Si on trace ces lignes tel que je vous les décris, je pense que son essoufflement est programmé. Il a fait l’impasse sur de grandes questions qui se posent dès à présent. Comment répondre à une immigration de peuplement ? Comment répondre à un islam radical et colonisateur ? Comment répondre à une fracturation de la société ? Comment répondre au terrorisme ? Nous ne pouvons pas répondre à toutes ces questions simplement par l’économie. Toute sa campagne a été construite sur le rejet des populismes et sur le rejet d’un discours qui, précisément, alerte sur ces grandes questions sociétales. Or, nous voyons bien que, partout en Europe, l’opinion se raidit. Par conséquent, soit Macron est obligé de se dédire, et dans ce cas il va falloir qu’il fasse un grand travail de retour sur lui-même, soit il continue dans un aveuglement et dans une sorte d’idéologie « béni-oui-ouiste » qui l’empêchera d’apporter les réponses qu’attendent les Français. Nous le voyons en Allemagne, avec le discrédit de la chancelière après sa politique qui avait été soutenue par Emmanuel Macron. Nous le voyons aussi en Autriche, en Catalogne et même chez nous, en Corse, avec ce réveil identitaire. Toutes ces réactions sont le produit d’un impensé d’une partie de la politique qui se berce de politiquement correct, qui pense que l’immigration n’est pas un problème et que les peuples peuvent indifféremment se remplacer. Ivan Rioufol

Attention: un accident historique peut en cacher un autre !

Croissance à plus de 4%, taux de chômage au plus bas (4.1 % , 2.1 millions d’emplois créés en une année, du jamais vu depuis 1990), y compris pour les minorités (6.8 % pour la population noire, du jamais vu depuis 45 ans !), renégociation d’accords ou de traités commerciaux (Brésil, Corée du sud, Europe, Chine) …

A l’heure où après avoir prédit l’apocalypse …

Suite à l’élection du président Trump …

Nos beaux et bons esprits ont de plus en plus de mal à expliquer …

Sans compter, avec peut-être 10 points d’écart, l‘inversion des courbes de popularité entre les deux côtés de l’Atlantique …

La désormais indéniable embellie de l’économie américaine …

Comme, à l’instar d’une « Haute Volta » réduite outre « ses fusées » à sa capacité de nuisance et de l’Iran à la Corée du nord ou aux territoires dit palestiniens, le début de reflux et de marginalisation des forces du mal les plus radicales …

Comment ne pas voir …

L’obstination économiciste comme l’aveuglement post-nationaliste et immigrationniste des conséquences sociales et culturelles de la mondialisation ….

De la part de ses homologues français ou allemand  pour ce qu’elle est vraiment ….

A savoir de plus en plus décalée par rapport aux aspirations des peuples

Comme à la réalité gramcscienne de l’histoire elle-même ?

« Emmanuel Macron est un accident de l’Histoire. Il a bénéficié de l’effondrement des partis vermoulus »

Ivan Rioufol publie, aux Éditions de L’Artilleur, un livre intitulé Macron, la grande mascarade. Sa thèse est limpide : Macron n’a pas apporté la révolution, comme il veut le faire croire, mais il fait vivre au contraire un grand bond en arrière. Il a redynamisé le pouvoir des élites en canalisant la société civile qu’il avait appelée à la rescousse pour n’en faire qu’un parti godillot.
Boulevard Voltaire
21 décembre 2017

Ivan Rioufol, vous publiez aux Éditions de L’Artilleur un livre intitulé Macron, la grande mascarade. Pourquoi ce titre ?

J’ai appelé ce livre ainsi en hommage à Nicolás Gómez Dávila. Il explique, dans l’un de ses aphorismes, que toute époque finit en mascarade.
La thèse que je défends est le fruit de mes observations quasi quotidiennes. Selon moi, Macron n’a pas apporté une révolution telle qu’il le prétend. Au contraire, il nous fait vivre un grand bond en arrière. Il fait revivre ce que les Français croyaient pouvoir rejeter. Les Français pensaient avoir compris que Macron avait analysé la fracture entre les élites et le peuple. Malheureusement, on se rend compte, au contraire, que Macron a redynamisé le pouvoir des élites en canalisant la société civile qu’il avait appelée à la rescousse pour en faire un parti godillot.

Vous affirmez que Macron n’est qu’un accident de l’Histoire. Ne serait-il pas davantage une conséquence de notre époque ?

Macron achève le système. C’est un accident de l’Histoire dans la mesure où sa venue a surpris tout le monde. Il y a encore un an, personne ne le voyait arriver à ce point de son parcours politique. Il a bénéficié d’un effondrement des partis qui étaient des partis vermoulus. Il n’a suffi qu’à donner un coup d’épaule pour qu’ils s’effondrent. Il a également bénéficié de cette coalition des affaires contre François Fillon dans la dernière ligne droite. Il est le produit d’un monde finissant. Il est un des rares, en Europe, à défendre une vision postnationale, une Europe souveraine, et à ne pas comprendre que tout ne se résume pas à l’économie. Je lui fais le procès de ne voir que d’un œil. Il ne veut expliquer les grandes questions sociétales qu’à travers l’économie et, donc, avec une vue beaucoup trop restreinte pour répondre aux questions liées à l’immigration, au communautarisme et à la montée de l’islam radical. Ce sont des sujets qui, pour lui, sont des impensés politiques.

Pour reprendre Gramsci, Macron serait-il le vieux monde qui tarde à disparaître ?

En effet, c’est un peu cela. Je pense qu’il y a beaucoup d’impostures dans ses postures. Il fait croire qu’il est ce Nouveau Monde. Pour l’instant, tout démontre qu’il n’a fait que reproduire la vieille technocratie, le monde des experts, le monde des financiers, le monde de Bercy. Tout ce monde-là a repris les commandes. Au contraire, François Fillon avait demandé le courage de la vérité. On peut donc se demander si son éviction n’était pas due au fait qu’il se soit peut-être approché de trop près du sujet brûlant de la dénonciation de cette mascarade et ces grands mensonges qui font croire qu’on peut faire une démocratie sans le peuple. Macron a théorisé lui-même son rôle de Président Jupiter, c’est-à-dire de Dieu coupé du peuple.

Tsípras, Renzi, Trudeau… Le monde occidental semble céder à la mode du Young Leaders. Cela expliquerait-il l’élection de Macron ?

Non, je pense que le jeunisme est accessoire, dans cette affaire-là. Naturellement, sa jeunesse, son intelligence tactique incontestable, sa dextérité et ses qualités lui ont facilité la tâche. Je ne dis pas qu’il en soit dépourvu, mais je pense qu’il n’a fait que reprendre ce que les Américains ont précisément rejeté. Je vois notre Président comme étant un Barack Obama blanc ou un Justin Trudeau intellectuel. On voit bien que la politique de Barack Obama a conduit à l’éviction de Hillary Clinton et à l’élection de son exact contraire Donald Trump. Je fais le pari que si Macron poursuit dans cette voie du politiquement correct qu’il a réhabilité à l’image de ce qu’était Barack Obama, il va accélérer les processus de rejet de ce monde faux et de cet establishment que Donald Trump a réussi à pulvériser malgré tous ses défauts.

Selon vous, la mascarade cessera d’ici 2022, ou est-il parti pour rester un 2e mandat ? La bulle Macron pourrait-elle éclater ?

Si on trace ces lignes tel que je vous les décris, je pense que son essoufflement est programmé. Il a fait l’impasse sur de grandes questions qui se posent dès à présent. Comment répondre à une immigration de peuplement ? Comment répondre à un islam radical et colonisateur ? Comment répondre à une fracturation de la société ? Comment répondre au terrorisme ? Nous ne pouvons pas répondre à toutes ces questions simplement par l’économie.
Toute sa campagne a été construite sur le rejet des populismes et sur le rejet d’un discours qui, précisément, alerte sur ces grandes questions sociétales. Or, nous voyons bien que, partout en Europe, l’opinion se raidit. Par conséquent, soit Macron est obligé de se dédire, et dans ce cas il va falloir qu’il fasse un grand travail de retour sur lui-même, soit il continue dans un aveuglement et dans une sorte d’idéologie « béni-oui-ouiste » qui l’empêchera d’apporter les réponses qu’attendent les Français. Nous le voyons en Allemagne, avec le discrédit de la chancelière après sa politique qui avait été soutenue par Emmanuel Macron. Nous le voyons aussi en Autriche, en Catalogne et même chez nous, en Corse, avec ce réveil identitaire. Toutes ces réactions sont le produit d’un impensé d’une partie de la politique qui se berce de politiquement correct, qui pense que l’immigration n’est pas un problème et que les peuples peuvent indifféremment se remplacer.

Macron serait-il capable d’éviter, pour reprendre le titre d’un de vos livres, « cette guerre civile qui vient » ?

Je ne dis pas que Macron va accélérer ce processus. Mais je crains que, par la paresse intellectuelle de son idéologie et le confort intellectuel qui consiste à ne pas vouloir s’arrêter sur les grandes questions existentielles, il aggrave cette lente dissolution de la France. Cela pourrait aussi désemparer davantage cette société oubliée, cette France périphérique qui ne se reconnaît ni en lui ni en d’autres. En général, elle s’abstient ou vote pour le Front national.

Voir aussi:

Et si Donald Trump n’était pas qu’un accident historique ?

FIGAROVOX/ANALYSE – Benjamin Haddad pense que les Européens auraient tort de croire que Donald Trump est une parenthèse historique.


Benjamin Haddad est chercheur au Hudson Institute, un think tank spécialisé dans les relations internationales à Washington.


Le sommet du G7 au Canada, quelques jours après l’imposition de tarifs douaniers sur l’acier et l’aluminium sur les partenaires commerciaux des États-Unis, a illustré une fois de plus les différends entre les Européens et le président Donald Trump. On a finalement surestimé, peut-être par vœu pieux, l’imprévisibilité de Trump. Sur les tarifs douaniers, l’accord nucléaire iranien, Jérusalem ou encore le climat, le président américain, inspiré de son slogan America First, finit par mettre en œuvre ses promesses de campagnes de façon unilatérale et péremptoire, au détriment de la relation transatlantique.

Les prédécesseurs de Trump, depuis la seconde guerre mondiale, voyaient dans la promotion d’un ordre libéral international, appuyé sur un tissu d’alliances, de forums multilatéraux et d’interdépendances économiques, la source de projection de la puissance américaine. Trump renverse la table. Ces règles restreignent l’Amérique: elles lui imposent des tabous et des normes bridant sa puissance, ne lui permettant pas de défendre au mieux ses intérêts. L’Amérique se laisse berner par ses partenaires commerciaux ; ses alliés profitent de sa générosité pour se comporter en passagers clandestins et financer leurs systèmes sociaux sous couvert de parapluie militaire américain. Dans un monde de jeu à somme nulle, le rapport de force brut favorisera le plus fort, donc l’Amérique. Ces thèmes ne sont pas nouveaux pour Trump qui répète ces antiennes depuis les années 1980.

Sur le plan intérieur comme international, la question se pose: Donald Trump est-il un accident de l’histoire, élu sur un concours de circonstances, ou la manifestation de forces plus profondes traversant l’Amérique? Certes les idiosyncrasies du président sont incontestables. Sa vulgarité et sa personnalité brutale, son parcours d’homme d’affaires passé par la télé réalité ainsi que son inexpérience gouvernementale en font à coup sûr un animal politique sans précédent dans l’histoire américaine. De plus, son impopularité (à relativiser par le soutien fidèle de sa base) et les incertitudes pesant autour de l’enquête du Procureur Muller laissent certains espérer que la parenthèse sera de courte durée, qu’il suffit de s’armer de patience.

Il faut doucher cet optimisme: le parti démocrate est profondément divisé et peine à faire émerger de nouvelles personnalités. L’économie américaine se porte bien, malgré des réalités souvent plus dures masquées par les statistiques, des inégalités aux addictions aux drogues. La réélection de Trump en 2020 n’est pas du tout à exclure ; mais l’enjeu va bien au-delà.

Traiter Donald Trump comme une aberration historique qui sera suivie par un retour à «la normale» représenterait une erreur majeure de la part des Européens, pour trois raisons principales.

Tout d’abord, l’Amérique traverse une période de questionnement profond sur son leadership international et les objectifs de sa politique étrangère, conséquence tardive de la fin de la Guerre Froide qui l’a privée d’adversaire clair et donc de continuité stratégique. Tous les présidents élus depuis la fin de la guerre froide, l’ont été sur une plateforme plaçant la priorité sur le plan intérieur: Bill Clinton insistant sur l’économie, George W. Bush comme Barack Obama contre l’interventionnisme de leur prédécesseur. Les divisions profondes qui affectent les États-Unis et l’absence de priorité internationale qui fasse consensus, Chine, terrorisme, immigration, commerce international, doivent nous préparer à une politique américaine plus erratique et déterminée par des considérations intérieures et électorales.

Deuxièmement, le désastre irakien et la crise financière ont encouragé une tendance au repli et nourri le scepticisme d’une partie non négligeable de l’électorat quant à l’engagement international des États-Unis. L’observateur de Washington ne peut à cet égard que constater le décalage profond entre les experts de politique étrangère peuplant les think tanks et revues du reste de la population américaine. Durant la campagne présidentielle, Hillary Clinton avait ainsi dû changer de position sur le traité de libre-échange transpacifique pour suivre l’électorat, tandis que Trump pouvait brandir avec fierté la longue liste des experts de sécurité nationale «Never Trump» qui s’opposait à lui. Le fameux volte-face d’Obama sur la ligne rouge en Syrie a été largement critiqué à Washington comme à Paris, y compris par des membres de son entourage, mais soutenu par une large majorité de la population.

À cet égard, Trump s’inscrit dans une forme de continuité avec son prédécesseur, Barack Obama, tout aussi prompt à dénoncer les experts interventionnistes de Washington. Les deux présidents partagent un scepticisme face à la notion «d’exceptionnalisme» américain. Obama comme Trump se gardent bien de voir une quelconque mission civilisatrice dans la politique étrangère américaine, promouvant le «nation building at home». Les conséquences étaient différentes: le scepticisme d’Obama sur les limites de puissance américaine l’entraînait à favoriser les accords multilatéraux comme le JCPOA ou l’accord de Paris sur le climat. À l’inverse, Trump prône l’unilatéralisme botté, dans la tradition du nationalisme martial d’un Andrew Jackson, président entre 1829 et 1837.

Mais les deux approches sont deux pôles d’un même mouvement de retrait et de normalisation de la puissance américaine.

Enfin, repli ou non, l’Europe perd sa centralité stratégique pour les États-Unis. Obama dénonçait déjà dans un entretien au journaliste Jeffrey Goldberg les alliés européens «passagers clandestins». Plutôt que de regretter sa non-intervention en Syrie, c’est l’intervention en Libye qu’Obama désigne comme son principal échec de politique étrangère, pointant du doigt la France et la Grande Bretagne responsables de ne pas avoir assuré la reconstruction post-conflit. L’une des principales annonces de politique étrangère fut le «pivot» vers l’Asie. Le réengagement américain en Europe fut tardif et réticent, provoqué par l’annexion de la Crimée par la Russie en 2014. Mais ici aussi Obama a laissé Angela Merkel et François Hollande en première ligne pour négocier les accords de Minsk avec Vladimir Poutine. Les années 1990, caractérisées par l’attention portée à l’expansion de l’OTAN et les interventions américaines (tardives) dans les Balkans seront probablement une exception, reliquat de la guerre froide et d’un bref moment unipolaire triomphant.

Que peuvent les Européens face à cette puissance plus erratique, plus repliée, moins européenne? À court terme, rester unis et fermes sur leurs positions tout en essayant de maintenir le lien avec le président pour assurer le damage control: l’approche privilégiée par Emmanuel Macron est la seule réaliste. À cet égard, il est le pendant international du Congrès, de la justice américaine, voire de certains conseillers du président Trump qui ont, tant bien que mal, réussi à maîtriser certains des instincts présidentiels. Le Pentagone, dirigé par le général James Mattis, assure la continuité de la fermeté vis-à-vis de Moscou: les sanctions contre la Russie n’ont pas été levées par exemple, et l’administration a renforcé la présence militaire en Europe de l’Est dans le cadre de l’opération de réassurance de l’OTAN.

Les décrets exécutifs sur l’immigration ont été fortement retoqués par la justice, tandis que les principales dispositions d’Obamacare n’ont pu être annulées, faute de majorité au Sénat.

Mais à long terme, les Européens doivent se préparer à une Amérique distante voire hostile. L’Europe ne doit pas abandonner la promotion de son modèle de multilatéralisme et de coopération mais sa défense passe par la prise en compte du fait qu’il est l’exception, plutôt que la norme aujourd’hui. Cela implique un investissement considérable dans notre défense et sécurité: l’Europe est-elle prête à affronter seule une crise comparable aux Balkans dans sa périphérie demain? La crise syrienne, avec ses conséquences sur l’Union Européenne en matière de réfugiés et l’émergence de Daesh, devrait servir de réveil stratégique. Or, la posture européenne s’est essentiellement limitée à espérer un engagement américain. Au-delà de l’investissement dans le militaire, les Européens doivent prendre les mesures pour se préserver des conséquences des décisions américaines, en particulier des sanctions extraterritoriales. Aujourd’hui Trump exploite la faiblesse des Européens.

Peut-être cette séquence n’est elle qu’un cycle de plus dans le balancier permanent entre repli égoïste et aventurisme messianique qu’Henry Kissinger a souvent déploré dans l’histoire diplomatique américaine. Après les années de doute de la présidence Carter, post Watergate et Vietnam ont suivi l’optimisme triomphant des années Reagan. Mais l’Europe ne peut fonder sa stratégie sur cet espoir. De plus, même si le successeur de Trump renoue avec l’internationalisme, l’Europe n’en sera pas moins vue comme un partenaire secondaire, grevée par ses divisions et sa faiblesse militaire. L’incertitude durable autour de la posture américaine doit entraîner l’Europe à s’engager dans la voie de l’autonomie stratégique.

Voir également:

Croissance : la conjoncture sourit à Donald Trump
Les États-Unis enregistrent au second trimestre la plus forte croissance depuis 2014, à 4,1% en rythme annuel, selon une première estimation. De quoi renforcer le président dans sa certitude que sa politique de déréglementation et de baisses d’impôts est la bonne.
Pierre-Yves Dugua
Le Figaro
27/07/2018

De notre correspondant à Washington

L’économie américaine se porte aussi bien que prévu. Selon la première estimation du Département du commerce, la croissance au second trimestre atteint 4,1% en rythme annuel. On n’a pas vu de conjoncture aussi favorable aux États-Unis depuis 2014.

Donald Trump qualifie ces chiffres de «fascinants» et de «tout à fait tenables». Il y voit la preuve que sa politique de déréglementation et de baisses d’impôts porte ses fruits. D’autant que l’estimation de l’expansion de janvier à mars est révisée à la hausse de 2 à 2, 2% en rythme annuel.

«Le monde entier nous envie», selon Trump

«Depuis notre arrivée nous constatons la création de 400.000 emplois dans le secteur manufacturier… des milliards de dollars reviennent vers les États-Unis… des usines rouvrent… les demandes d’indemnisation chômage sont au plus bas depuis près de 50 ans… Le monde entier nous envie» proclame le président, convaincu que la presse américaine refuse d’admettre le succès de sa politique.

Voilà déjà plus d’un an qu’il tourne en dérision les experts qui affirment qu’il ne sera pas possible de dépasser durablement 3% de croissance. Leurs arguments sont toujours que l’Amérique approche de la fin d’un très long cycle d’expansion engagé depuis l’été 2009, que la croissance démographique est désormais modeste et surtout que les hausses de productivité ne sont pas suffisantes pour renouer avec des taux de croissance dignes des années Reagan.

Au cours du premier semestre l’expansion atteint néanmoins 3,1%. Si la montée des barrières douanières, les relèvements de taux directeurs par la Réserve fédérale et la hausse des coûts des matières premières ne font pas dérailler la conjoncture, le pari de Donald Trump peut être gagné, au moins en 2018.

Les élections législatives en ligne de mire

En fait, il ne faut à Donald Trump que cinq mois de conjoncture aussi porteuse. C’est l’horizon économique très court qui suffit à ce président politiquement incorrect pour aborder avec sérénité les élections législatives de novembre prochain. Avec un taux de chômage au plus bas depuis la fin du siècle dernier, des créations d’emplois encore très fortes en moyenne de 215.000 postes par mois depuis janvier et une inflation de l’ordre de 2%, il pense présenter à l’opinion un premier bilan positif. Surtout s’il arrive à passer sous silence que, contrairement à l’orthodoxie fiscale prônée jadis par le Parti républicain, le déficit budgétaire en forte hausse est en partie responsable de l’accélération actuelle de la croissance.

Signe de la confiance et du moral élevé des Américains, la consommation, qui représente plus des deux tiers du Produit intérieur brut (PIB) aux États-Unis, bondit au rythme de 4% au second trimestre, après une maigre progression de 0,5% de janvier à mars.

Paradoxalement, les fortes tensions commerciales entre Washington et ses partenaires ont stimulé la croissance au cours du printemps. Dans l’anticipation de droits de douane chinois sur les denrées agricoles, les producteurs américains de soja ont par exemple tout fait pour avancer leurs livraisons avant le mois de juillet, date d’entrée en vigueur des mesures de rétorsion décidées par Pékin. Près d’un quart de la croissance a été donc généré par le commerce extérieur.

Voir de même:

Économie américaine: et si Trump réussissait?

Fabrice Nodé-Langlois

Le Figaro

18/05/2018

DÉCRYPTAGE – Volontarisme fiscal, brutalité commerciale : les critiques pleuvent sur la méthode du président américain, mais les États-Unis affichent d’excellentes performances économiques.

Sur le climat, l’Iran, Israël, il s’est mis au ban de la communauté internationale. Ses tweets rageurs matinaux, son imprévisibilité, sa brutalité, laissent pantois. Ses démêlés avec le FBI et la justice interrogent sur sa capacité à mener son mandat jusqu’à son terme.

Et pourtant. La méthode de Donald Trump, exposée il y a trente ans déjà, dans son best-seller l’Art du deal, du temps où le futur président de la première puissance mondiale n’était qu’un loup new-yorkais de l’immobilier, semble faire mouche. Depuis qu’il est installé à la Maison-Blanche, Donald Trump l’a éprouvée à plusieurs reprises, notamment avec la Corée du Nord. Il profère les pires menaces, exerce une pression maximale sur l’adversaire ou le partenaire, puis se dit prêt à discuter.

Sur le front commercial, le président américain a marqué des points. Il a arraché des concessions au Brésil, son deuxième fournisseur d’acier ainsi qu’à la Corée du Sud. Évidemment, disposer du plus gros budget militaire de la planète (610 milliards de dollars, davantage que les sept pays suivants réunis) et diriger la première économie (un PIB de 19.000 milliards de dollars, une fois et demie celui de la Chine) offre quelques arguments. «Face à des “petits” pays, les États-Unis ont des leviers de négociations, commente Steven Friedman, économiste américain chez BNP Paribas AM. Mais avec des grands pays comme la Chine, il faudra sûrement de longues négociations pour trouver un compromis.»

De fait, Washington et Pékin ont repris leurs négociations vendredi. L’Administration Trump a fixé un ultimatum à mardi prochain, 22 mai: faute d’accord, les États-Unis imposeront des droits de douane sur des produits chinois importés représentant une valeur de 50 milliards de dollars. L’issue est encore très incertaine, mais Trump a réussi à amener les Chinois à la table pour discuter d’une réduction du déficit commercial américain.

L’Europe prévient l’OMC qu’elle est prête à riposter

Washington n’a pas non plus gagné son bras de fer contre l’Europe. L’Union européenne affiche au moins une unité de façade. Elle a même notifié, vendredi, à l’OMC (Organisation mondiale du commerce) qu’elle est prête à prendre des contre-mesures tarifaires. Au sommet de Sofia, jeudi, les chefs d’État européens ont répété qu’ils voulaient d’abord une exemption définitive des surtaxes sur l’acier et l’aluminium avant de négocier une plus grande ouverture de leur marché.

«Au moins, Donald Trump a eu le mérite d’encourager le débat sur l’impact de la mondialisation sur l’économie, c’est sain», remarque Steven Friedman, pourtant critique du président. «Sa tactique de négociation est de taper fort et de se faire mousser auprès de son électorat, ajoute Florence Pisani, économiste chez Candriam et coauteur d’un livre sur l’économie américaine (*). C’est un jeu assez dangereux, car cela crée de l’incertitude et reporte les projets d’investissement.» Les bons indicateurs qui se succèdent semblent pourtant démentir cette vision pessimiste. À 3,9 %, le chômage est au plus bas depuis près de vingt ans, l’industrie crée des emplois, les ménages ont davantage confiance qu’au début du mandat. Résumé en langage Trump, cela donne ce tweet, publié jeudi: «Malgré la chasse aux sorcières dégoûtante, illégale et injustifiée, nous avons accompli les meilleurs 17 premiers mois d’une Administration dans l’histoire américaine».

Un leg solide

«Il n’y a pas eu de changement majeur de tendance depuis l’arrivée de Trump, nuance Christian Leuz, économiste allemand installé depuis quinze ans aux États-Unis, à l’University of Chicago Booth School of Business. Obama a laissé une économie en bonne santé, il est encore trop tôt pour attribuer les bons résultats à Trump.»

Ce leg solide est aussi largement imputable à dix ans de politique monétaire généreuse de la Fed, rappellent de nombreux économistes. Sa réforme fiscale, arrachée de haute lutte au Congrès, devrait tout de même avoir un impact positif sur l’économie. Elle a gonflé le profit des entreprises et permis à certaines comme Apple de rapatrier des milliards mis à l’abri à l’étranger. Florence Pisani pondère encore: une enquête récente de la réserve fédérale d’Atlanta indique que moins de 10 % des entreprises envisagent d’investir davantage malgré les réductions d’impôt.

Quant aux ménages, ils pourraient perdre en impôts locaux (ceux des États) ce qu’ils ont gagné sur les impôts fédéraux. Même si le programme des grands travaux reste encore dans le flou, les dépenses votées par le Congrès devraient cependant soutenir l’activité de 0,3 % de PIB supplémentaire, concède Florence Pisani.

Un surcroît de dépenses qui pourrait léguer au successeur de Trump «un déficit budgétaire de plus de 5 % du PIB et une dette alourdie», avertit Steven Friedman. Il faudra attendre la fin de l’année pour mieux mesurer l’impact des mesures de Trump. Surtout, il ne faut jamais oublier qu’aux États-Unis, en matière de politique intérieure, rien ou presque ne se décide sans le Congrès. «Il y a comme un pacte de Faust entre Trump et les parlementaires républicains, explique Christian Leuz. En échange d’avancées sur des sujets qui leur sont chers, ils sont obligés d’accepter le style Trump.» Jusqu’à ce que les divergences sur l’immigration et le libre-échange, ou les élections de novembre, ne fassent voler ce pacte en éclats.

(*) «L’Économie américaine», avec Anton Brender, éditions La Découverte.

Voir de plus:

Politiquement incorrectes, les réformes de Trump sont un succès pour l’économie américaine

FIGAROVOX/TRIBUNE – Un an après l’arrivée fracassante du nouvel occupant de la Maison-Blanche, l’économie américaine est au beau fixe. Nicolas Lecaussin décrypte les réussites de la politique fiscale de Trump.


Nicolas Lecaussin est directeur de l’IREF (Institut de Recherches Économiques et Fiscales, Paris).


Dans un éditorial publié en 2016, avant le changement à la Maison Blanche, l’économiste Paul Krugman, titulaire du prix Nobel, écrivait: «Si Trump est élu, l’économie américaine va s’écrouler et les marchés financiers ne vont jamais s’en remettre». Un an après sa prise de fonction, le président Trump est à la tête d’un pays en plein boom économique, et dont l’indice boursier a battu tous les records.

On m’objectera que Trump est provocateur, imprévisible, irascible. Qu’il ne peut pas s’empêcher de tweeter tout (et surtout n’importe quoi). Mais si l’on regarde les faits, et uniquement les faits, un constat s’impose: on ne peut pas trouver dans l’histoire récente des Etats-Unis un président ayant mené à bien autant de réformes en un laps de temps si court. Même Reagan a mis trois ans à réformer la fiscalité américaine! Trump, lui, l’a fait en quelques mois.

Alors certes, «The Donald» n’a pas réussi à démanteler complètement l’Obamacare, suite aux oppositions rencontrées dans son propre parti ; mais sa réforme fiscale inclut la fin du «mandat individuel», cette fameuse obligation de souscrire à une assurance santé. Plus exactement, l’amende pour le non-respect de cette obligation est supprimée par la réforme.

Cette mesure était nécessaire. En 2009, les conséquences de cette mesure coercitive, emblématique de la présidence d’Obama, ne s’étaient pas fait attendre. Il y avait eu d’énormes bugs informatiques qui ont découragé des millions de personnes de souscrire en ligne. Puis des millions d’Américains ont été contraints de résilier leur assurance privée, alors que nombre d’entre eux n’en ressentaient nullement l’envie. Depuis 2009, plus de 2 400 pages de réglementations se sont accumulées pour réguler le fonctionnement du système. Le président Obama avait promis de baisser les franchises de santé grâce à ce programme, mais ce fut tout le contraire: elles ont augmenté de 60 % en moyenne. Les primes d’assurance ont bondi dans l’ensemble de 25 % (et même jusqu’à 119 % dans l’état d’Arizona).

Les assureurs ne s’en sortaient plus à cause des réglementations très strictes qui leur ont été imposées. Obama avait aussi promis de baisser le prix de l’assurance santé d’environ 2 500 dollars par famille et par an ; en réalité, le prix a augmenté de 2 100 dollars! Trump met fin à cette dérive en ouvrant le système un peu plus à la concurrence et en donnant aux Américains la liberté de choisir.

Ce n’est pas tout. La réforme fiscale adoptée par le Congrès des États-Unis contient de nombreuses mesures audacieuses, que les Américains attendaient. Par exemple la baisse de la taxe sur les bénéfices des entreprises (de 35 % à 21 %), qui s’accompagne d’une déduction fiscale généreuse pour les entreprises dont les profits ne sont déclarés qu’au travers des revenus de leurs propriétaires. Plusieurs taxes ont par ailleurs été supprimées, comme la taxe minimum de 20 % sur les bénéfices effectifs.

Surtout, le président Trump a entamé une vaste opération visant à rapatrier entre 2 000 et 4 000 milliards de dollars de profits placés à l’étranger, en diminuant la taxe sur ces profits de 35 % à moins de 15 %.

Autre mesure symbolique: la suppression de la taxe sur les héritages au-dessous de 10 millions de dollars satisfait une large partie de l’électorat républicain.

Certains Etats dont la fiscalité est particulièrement élevée, comme la Californie, seront également obligés de se réformer pour faire face à la suppression de certaines déductions fiscales. Leurs habitants ne pourront plus en effet déduire l’impôt sur le revenu local de leurs impôts fédéraux.

Plusieurs mesures abolissent l’interdiction des forages de pétrole en Alaska. À l’heure actuelle, Trump a ouvert toutes les possibilités d’exploitation sur le continent américain, ce qui fera du pays l’un des principaux exportateurs de matières premières. Trump se positionne ainsi en ennemi du politiquement correct et reste méfiant à l’égard des gourous du réchauffement climatique. Il a été le seul à avoir le courage de se retirer de la COP 21, cette mascarade coûteuse qui consiste à organiser de gigantesques réunions de chefs d’État aux frais des contribuables. Il a supprimé la prime à la voiture électrique (pour une économie de 7 milliards de dollars) ainsi que les subventions aux parcs d’éoliennes.

Enfin, Trump s’est attaqué aux réglementations. Entre janvier et décembre 2017, il a supprimé la moitié (45 000) des pages que contient le Code des réglementations. Plus de 1 500 réglementations importantes ont été abolies, dont beaucoup dans le domaine de l’environnement. Les économies obtenues sont estimées à plus de 9 milliards de dollars. Faisant fi des protestations, il a libéré le secteur d’internet de plusieurs contraintes anachroniques.

Au plan international, Trump s’oppose à la Chine dont les pratiques commerciales douteuses ont fait l’objet d’enquêtes de la part de Washington. Mais cette position juste face aux Chinois ne devrait pas conduire la Maison Blanche à cautionner des mesures restrictives de la liberté du commerce et des échanges, qui risqueraient de peser sur la croissance américaine et même mondiale. On songe ici à la proposition faite par la Chambre des Représentants de faire payer aux multinationales une taxe de 20 % sur les achats faits à des filiales étrangères de leur groupe. Ou encore, celle du Sénat de réimposer les sociétés américaines au taux de 13 % sur les services facturés de l’étranger par les sociétés du groupe.

En tout état de cause, en ce début janvier 2018, l’économie américaine semble partir sur des bases solides. Le troisième trimestre de croissance s’est élevé à plus de 3 %, et le taux de chômage est au plus bas, à seulement 4.1 % (2.1 millions d’emplois créés en une année, du jamais vu depuis 1990), et même à 6.8 % pour la population noire, un taux qui n’a jamais été si faible depuis 1973.

Les effets des baisses d’impôt se font d’ores et déjà sentir: des entreprises comme AT&T, Comcast, Wells Fargo, Boeing, Nexus Services ont annoncé des primes et des hausses de salaires.

Le pire ennemi de Trump est certainement lui-même. Cet homme d’affaires n’est pas un politicien professionnel. Saura-t-il alors se contrôler, pour continuer à remettre l’Amérique sur les rails et mépriser l’idéologiquement correct, sans se laisser aller à des provocations futiles?

Voir encore:

Donald Trump has a big promise for the U.S. economy: 4% growth.

No chance, say 11 economists surveyed by CNNMoney. And a paper published Tuesday by the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco backs them up.
« No, pigs do not fly, » says Robert Brusca, senior economist at FAO Economics, a research firm. « Donald Trump is dreaming. »
The Republican presidential nominee made the promise in a speech in New York in September. « I believe it’s time to establish a national goal of reaching 4% economic growth, » he said.
Since the Great Recession, growth has averaged 2%. Brusca and the other economists surveyed say that 4% growth is impossible, or at least highly unlikely. The reasons: Unemployment is already really low, lots of Baby Boomers are retiring, and there are far fewer manufacturing jobs today than in past decades.

Trump’s team says it will get to 4% growth with tax cuts, better trade deals and more manufacturing jobs.

One reason for slower growth is lower productivity — for example, how many widgets an assembly line worker can produce in an hour.

Another problem is that the example of the assembly line worker is increasingly outdated: America has shed about 5.6 million manufacturing jobs since 2000, mostly because of innovation and partly because of trade, studies show.

Manufacturing jobs tend to have higher productivity — and wages — than jobs in other service industries like retail, education and health care, which have added lots of low-productivity jobs while manufacturing jobs have disappeared.

Interestingly, American manufacturers are producing more than ever before — in dollar terms. But as technology replaces jobs on the assembly line, more goods can be produced with fewer workers.

On top of that, the economy is already near what economists consider full employment, meaning the unemployment rate can’t go much lower.

The unemployment rate is 5% and was as low as 4.7% earlier this year. It can’t go much lower because there will always be people leaving jobs or searching for them.

If the job market is already near capacity, the economy can’t expand much more, economists say.

Unemployment did go really low in 2000 — as low as 3.8% — and the economy was growing above a 4% pace. But the San Francisco Fed attributes those good times to the late 1990s internet revolution.

There are solutions to boost growth, the Fed notes.

Many economists call for more spending on building new roads, bridges and highways, as do both Trump and Hillary Clinton.

After World War II, the creation of the Interstate Highway System was a major boost to productivity and growth. You could go much faster from point A to point B.

Other solutions are a little more dreamy.

Many experts say comprehensive immigration reform — a path to citizenship — would create more documented workers. Historically, documented workers tend to have higher productivity than undocumented workers because they generally have higher job skills and can take on jobs that produce more valuable goods. Productivity has nothing to do with work ethic.

Outside of immigration reform and infrastructure spending, the Federal Reserve says America needs a game-changing invention, such as the IT innovation in the 1990s. New technology from fast-growing countries like China and India may also help too.

« Another wave of the IT revolution from machine learning and robots could boost productivity growth, » says Federal Reserve senior research adviser John Fernald.

Voir aussi:

American prosperity of Trump era marks real turning point in history
Arthur Laffer
The Hill
07/28/18

Gross domestic product, or GDP, is the measure of choice when assessing the health of any economy, especially in the United States. GDP, which is measured at annual rates, includes the value of production of all goods and services produced in a country. In the one year since President Trump took office, the first quarter of 2017 through the first quarter of 2018, real GDP grew at a 2.55 percent annual rate. This is higher than the growth for six of the eight years former President Obama was in office, or even five of the eight years when former President George W. Bush was in office.

Moreover, the economic growth rate in the first year of Trump in office is higher than the average annual growth rate for the entire presidencies of both Obama at 2.05 percent and Bush at 1.71 percent. For the full 65 years from the first quarter of 1953 through the first quarter of 2018, annual real GDP growth in the United States averaged 2.95 percent, which is still substantially higher than the first year under Trump.

The growth rate for the second quarter of 2018 is 4.1 percent. This is a nice sign of American prosperity and is the strongest quarter of economic growth since the third quarter of 2014. Net exports contributed about 1 percent, while the change in private inventories subtracted 1 percent. Lots of changes like this happen on a quarter by quarter basis and should not be taken too seriously.

The Commerce Department releases its quarterly estimates, but it has also revised a lot of historical numbers, although usually by only very small amounts. Perhaps its biggest revision was for the first four quarters of the Trump presidency. What had been an estimated annual growth of 2.82 percent was revised down to 2.55 percent, even though the first quarter of 2018 itself was revised up from 2 percent to 2.2 percent. This example is only meant to show the fragility of these numbers.

While the GDP growth of any one quarter can be offset, revised or magnified in subsequent quarters, a pattern appears to be emerging under the stewardship of the Trump administration, which makes a lot of sense, at least to me. I believe that people individually, and the economy collectively, respond strongly to economic incentives.

Other economists do not concur on this point. Jason Furman, the top economist for Obama, disagrees with me on the effects that Trump policies have on real GDP growth. In fact, using the ploy of damning with faint praise, he said of the 2017 tax cuts in a recent debate, “I think policy can make a difference. The tax cuts will make a very, very small positive difference, probably about half of one-tenth of 1 percent.”

History tells us a very different story than the naysayers. Lowering taxes and decreasing regulation has had powerful effects on growth over long periods of time. Taxes have a very important impact on employment, jobs, output and growth. An economy quite simply cannot be taxed into prosperity. The tax cuts signed by Trump stand in stark contrast to the tax increases under Obama. Corporate and personal tax rates were way too high. The Republican bill reduced those tax rates a lot. It included 100 percent expensing of capital expenditures, territorial taxation, and the elimination of state and local tax deductions to promote growth.

Trump has also waged war on debilitating regulations, including eliminating the Affordable Care Act individual mandate, along with reducing other health care and energy regulations as well. Monetary policy is now refocusing on market forces rather than zero interest rates, which means that money will flow to where it is needed, not to where some university professors believe it should go.

When it comes to trade, there are problems and risks in the vision Trump is carrying out. Trade should be free and with minimum barriers placed on American exports to other countries and foreign exports to the United States. We should, as a world, move to zero tariffs everywhere. We should eliminate other barriers and trade subsidies. Obviously, such an ideal world is not plausible, but there is no reason we cannot try.

Foreigners produce some things better than we do, and we produce some things better than they do. Both Americans and foreigners alike would be foolish in the extreme if Americans did not sell foreigners those products Americans make better than foreigners in exchange for those products foreigners make better than Americans do. It is a winning strategy for everyone and makes for great prosperity around the world.

Finally, we have had a serious government spending problem in the United States for years. The economist Milton Friedman was famous for saying “government spending is taxation.” He is completely correct. If a country taxes people who work and pays people when they do not work, then it is unsurprising if a lot more people choose not to work.

The latest GDP figure is a great number that aids our recovery from the awful 16 years under Bush and Obama. It will also reduce deficits in the long term if such robust economic growth continues. But the challenge is far from over. We have a lot of work to do to fan the flames of prosperity and to hold at bay the prosperity killers. But one step forward is still one step forward, and it is a heck of a lot better than one step backward.

Arthur B. Laffer is chairman of Laffer Associates. He was an economic adviser to the 2016 presidential campaign of Donald Trump and served as an economic adviser to the White House during the Reagan administration.

Voir également:

The Return of 3% Growth
Tax reform and deregulation have lifted the economy out of the Obama doldrums.
The Wall Street Journal
July 28, 2018

So much for “secular stagnation.” You remember that notion, made fashionable by economist Larry Summers and picked up by the press corps to explain why the U.S. economy couldn’t rise above the 2.2% doldrums of the Obama years. Well, with Friday’s report of 4.1% growth in the second quarter, the U.S. economy has now averaged 3.1% growth for the last six months and 2.8% for the last 12.

The lesson is that policies matter and so does the tone set by political leaders. For eight years Barack Obama told Americans that inequality was a bigger problem than slow economic growth, that stagnant wages were the fault of the rich, and that government through regulation and politically directed credit could create prosperity. The result was slow growth, and secular stagnation was the intellectual attempt to explain that policy failure.

The policy mix changed with Donald Trump’s election and a Republican Congress to turn it into law. Deregulation and tax reform were the first-year priorities that have liberated risk-taking and investment, spurring a revival in business confidence and growth to give the long expansion a second wind.

The nearby chart shows GDP growth by quarter over the last four years. The numbers show that the long, weak expansion that began in mid-2009 had flagged to below 2% growth in the last half of 2015 and in 2016. Nonresidential fixed investment in particular had slumped to an average quarterly increase of merely 0.6% in those final two years of the Obama Presidency. An economic expansion that was already long in the tooth began to fade and could have slid into recession with a negative shock.

The Paul Ryan-Donald Trump growth agenda was targeted to revive that investment weakness. Deregulation signaled to business that arbitrary enforcement and compliance costs wouldn’t be imposed on ideological whim. Tax reform broke the bottleneck on capital mobility and investment from the highest corporate tax rate in the developed world. Above all, the political message from Washington after eight years is that faster growth is possible and investment to turn a profit is encouraged.

The chart and the second-quarter GDP report show that this policy mix is working. Growth popped to a higher plane of nearly 3% in the middle of 2017 as business and consumer confidence increased with the Trump Administration’s policies taking center stage. A growth dip in the last quarter of 2017 on tax-reform uncertainties carried over to the start of the first quarter, but growth has since accelerated.

The acceleration has been driven by business investment, which increased 6.3% in 2017 and has averaged 9.4% in the first half of 2018. This investment surge has come in productive areas like equipment and commercial construction. It has not come from padding inventories that have to be sold down, or in a housing mania like the one that drove growth in the mid-2000s. Both housing and inventories subtracted from growth in the second quarter.

It would be nice to think that all Americans would take satisfaction in this growth. But in the polarized politics of 2018, the same people who said this growth revival could never happen are now saying that it can’t last. It’s a “sugar high,” as Mr. Summers has put it, due to one-time boosts like government spending and consumption.

But there are reasons to think that a 3% growth pace can continue with the right policies. The investment boom will drive productivity gains and job creation that will flow to higher wages and lift consumer spending. Inventories will have to be replenished and new household formation is increasing again, which should help housing demand.

Most intriguing is that the government’s annual revisions to long-term GDP on Friday showed a sharp increase in the personal savings rate. The increase was due to an upward revision in wages and salaries and jumped to 6.7% from 3.4% for 2017 and averaged 7% in the first half of this year. That’s about $500 billion more in the pockets of Americans than previously estimated and helps to explain why consumer spending has remained strong. With tight labor markets, consumer spending should keep contributing to growth.

There are risks to this outlook, not least from Mr. Trump’s tariff policies. This is the President’s version of Mr. Obama’s regulatory assault, with arbitrary victims, uncertainty that limits business investment, and the risks of escalation. Mr. Trump crowed at the White House on Friday that his trade policies are helping the economy, but the second-quarter lift from net exports isn’t likely to last amid foreign retaliation for his steel and aluminum tariffs.

The way to help the economy is for Mr. Trump to build on this week’s trade truce with the European Union, withdraw the tariffs on both sides, and work toward a “zero tariff” deal. Meantime, wrap up the Nafta revision with Mexico and Canada within weeks so Congress can approve it this year. Mr. Trump could claim he had honored another campaign promise while removing a pall on investment.

The other major risk is the Federal Reserve’s attempt to unwind the extraordinary monetary policies of the last decade. If near-zero rates and trillions in bond-buying lifted asset prices artificially, as some of our friends think, then reversing those policies could cause those prices to fall with uncertain results.
All of which is another reason to thank tax reform and deregulation for unleashing animal spirits and giving the expansion renewed life. It’s worth recalling that not a single Democrat in Congress voted for tax reform and nearly all of them opposed every vote to repeal the Obama Administration’s onerous rules. Had they prevailed, we’d still be experiencing secular stagnation instead of arguing if 4.1% growth is too much of a good thing.

Voir par ailleurs:

Putin Is Weak. Europe Doesn’t Have to Be
Moscow is a sideshow. The real dangers come from within the Continent.
Walter Russell Mead
WSJ
July 23, 2018

We hear too much about Vladimir Putin these days and not nearly enough about the actual forces reshaping the world. Yes, the Russian president has proved a brilliant tactician. And, President Trump’s fantasies aside, he is a ruthless enemy of American power and European coherence. Yet Russia remains a byword for backwardness and corruption. Its gross domestic product is less than 10% that of the U.S. or the European Union. With a declining population and a fundamentally adverse geopolitical situation, the Russian Federation remains a shadow of its Soviet predecessor. Add up the consequences of Mr. Putin’s troops, nukes, disinformation campaigns, financial aid to populist parties—and throw in the power of his authoritarian example. Russia still does not have the ability to roll back the post-1990 democratic revolution, overpower the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, or dissolve the EU.

The West is in crisis because of European weakness, not Russian strength. Some of the Continent’s difficulties are well known. France foolishly imagined the euro would contain the rise of a newly united Germany after the Cold War. In fact it has propelled Germany’s unprecedented economic rise while driving a wedge between Europe’s indebted South and creditor North. The Continent’s so-called migration policy is a humanitarian and a political disaster. Berlin’s feckless approach to security has left Europe’s most important power a geopolitical midget, lecturing sanctimoniously while others shape the world. Meanwhile the EU’s Byzantine government machinery grinds at an ever slower pace, creating openings for Mr. Putin and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Europe’s weakness invites authoritarian assertion in the borderlands.

Another failure of equal consequence still is not widely understood: the failure to integrate the countries of Central and Eastern Europe into Western prosperity and institutional life. The world’s 10 fastest-shrinking countries are all in Eastern Europe: Bulgaria, Croatia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Poland, Romania, Serbia and Ukraine. All expect to see their populations shrink at least 15% by 2050. For the enterprising and mobile, there is good news; between three million and five million Romanians live and work in other EU countries, enjoying opportunities they could not find at home. But for those who cannot or do not wish to move on, life can be hard. Almost 30 full years after the fall of communism, more than one-fourth of Romanians live on less than $5.50 a day. Across Romania, less than half of households have an internet connection, and only 52% have a computer. Romania and Bulgaria—where living standards are lower than in Turkey—are exceptionally poor. Conditions are better elsewhere, but the gap between prosperous European countries like Germany and postcommunist states like Poland remains immense. Poles on average earn only a third as much as Germans. The rural, eastern parts of Poland are poorer still. Conditions in ex-Soviet countries like Armenia, Belarus, Georgia and Ukraine are even worse. Corruption is rampant, with weak institutions unable to stop it.

The hubris that led so many in the West to believe that Europe had entered a posthistorical paradise is fading. A clearer if darker picture has emerged. Swaths of Central and Eastern Europe will not smoothly and painlessly assimilate into the West. If voters in these countries lose faith that Western ideas and institutions can improve their lives, the political gap between East and West will widen. When the EU is more preoccupied with internal divisions, it is less able to respond effectively to Russian moves.

Europe’s weakness has provided Mr. Putin with opportunities to promote Russian power by supporting populist parties across the EU and deepening his relationship with leaders like Hungary’s Viktor Orbán. Yet even in the age of Trump, Moscow is too weak, too poor, too regressive and too remote to shape European politics. The days when Russian rulers like Catherine the Great and Alexander I could direct events across the Continent are gone for good. The collapse of the Soviet Union and the unification of Germany mean the most important relationship in the trans-Atlantic world is between Washington and Berlin.

President Trump is right that much of the trans-Atlantic relationship needs to be rethought. He is right that Germany asks too much and offers too little for the current relationship to be sustainable. He is right that the European Union has worked itself into a political crisis, and that the Continent’s errors and illusions strengthen Mr. Putin’s hand. But if the president thinks Mr. Putin’s Russia can serve as the linchpin of a new American security strategy, he is overestimating Russia’s capacity, misreading Mr. Putin’s goals, and underestimating the importance of the trans-Atlantic alliance. Moscow is a sideshow. To protect American prosperity and security, Mr. Trump most needs to strike a deal with Berlin.

Voir également:

Televison: From Burkina Faso with rockets to Upper Volta without
Steve Crashaw
The Independent
15 November 1998

The Soviet Union was famously described as « Upper Volta with rockets », a catchphrase that was updated by the geographically precise to become « Burkina Faso with rockets ». It was a powerfully succinct description. The United States was rich and space-age powerful; the Soviet Union was poor and space-age powerful. The contradictions and paradoxes that stemmed from that could never fully be resolved – least of all by the citizens of the Soviet Union themselves.

During the 1930s, Stalin turned Russia into an industrially powerful nation, and made his Soviet compatriots feel proud of what they had achieved. The defeat of Hitler’s might, at the cost of millions of lives, was also seen as proof of Soviet greatness.

The idea that Soviet was best took deep root. It convinced some Western visitors, and millions of Russians. Even now, many Russians find it hard to believe that there was anything wrong with the model itself. In last night’s episode of the Cold War series, interviewees visibly hankered after a time when Khrushchev was in his Kremlin, and all was right with the Soviet world.

« Sputnik », the title of last night’s episode, is the Russian word for a fellow-traveller: the spaceship was seen as a travelling companion for the planet earth. Here it was that we found true Soviet heroes, including Yuri Gagarin, the first man in space. As a Moscow baker declared – still misty-eyed, after all these years: « Gagarin, he was everybody’s love. He and his smile. I still keep his photograph. »

Television news may sometimes seem deeply superficial – never mind the reality, listen to that fabulous soundbite. But television history, with the participation of those who were in the front row of the stalls or even centre-stage at the events described, can, at its best, be more enlightening than anything that you could have read in the newspapers at the time. Series like the Cold War put things neatly into perspective, with descriptions of historic events coming directly from witnesses and participants – last night included a Soviet rocket designer, an aide to Khrushchev, and Gagarin’s running-mate. The heroism and the lies are equally visible.

The Cold War series gives a small example of why it must sometimes be quite fun to be a media billionaire. You flick your fingers, and unbelievable projects just happen. A few years ago, Ted Turner, creator of CNN, mused that he would like to do a definitive history of the Cold War. And thus it came to pass, without all the doggedly begging memos to potential backers which are usually par for the course. Turner was put in touch with Jeremy Isaacs, who had produced the landmark World at War series. Isaacs, in turn, gathered a team of experienced producers and writers, including highly respected figures like the journalist Neal Ascherson and (for last night’s programme on the space race) defence specialist Lawrence Freedman. Unsurprisingly, the result is much more than just televisual flam.

Last night’s programme included some dramatic eyewitness accounts of events – like a Soviet space disaster, where one woman remembered how « people fell like burning torches from the top of the rocket ». Her words were accompanied by dramatic pictures from the heart of the conflagration – pictures that you can be sure never appeared on the Soviet Nine O’Clock News. At that time, Soviet disasters were strictly not for public consumption.

At the same time, Sputnik exposed the absurdity that accompanied the whole notion of the space race. Shamed by the early Soviet lead, America had to prove that anything Russia could do, America could do better; Russia responded in kind. America became so fixated with the idea of the « missile gap » – that is, let’s spend more billions of dollars on defence – that they found one even when it did not exist. Almost forty years on, President Kennedy’s defence secretary, Robert McNamara, cheerfully acknowledged: « A major charge was that there was a missile gap. It took us about three weeks to determine: yes, there is a gap – but the gap is in our favour. » Was that what Time or Newsweek were writing at the time? Unlikely.

While Cold War stripped some of the humbug from old-fashioned propaganda, Tim Whewell’s Correspondent special, « Two Weddings and the Rouble », was a bleak illustration of life in Russia today, seven years after the final collapse of the superpower and the propaganda machine. The Cold War has vanished; and with it, the heart of Russia’s pride. Whewell’s film focused on two newly-marrieds. On the one hand, there was Yuri, the self-confident young entrepreneur who was about to take his new wife Yulia on a honeymoon to Thailand (they had already been to Cyprus; but there were too many Russians, so they wanted something more exotic). On the other, there was Katya, the 18-year-old accounts clerk who trudged round looking for jobs that might, if she was lucky, pay her one or two dollars a day.

Hauntingly photographed by Ian Perry (lots of wistfully Russian townscapes at dawn), « Two Weddings », a depiction of life in the provincial town of Yaroslavl, painted a simple portrait of Russia’s sadness. We saw the queues of blood donors, who come back day after day in the hope that they can thus earn a few more kopecks. We met the father who boasted of a good day in the potato fields by telling us of what he had managed to steal: « Today I took three buckets out. » And, above all, we are confronted with the despair. Vodka was described as the only way of blotting everything else out, if only for a short while. As one character said: « A swamp doesn’t go anywhere. It silts up – that’s what’s happening to our state. »

The film resolutely avoided politics, though the story of the collapsing rouble – six to the dollar one day, 20 to the dollar a few days later – always lurked in the background. But the underlying theme was best expressed by the father who angrily complained that « this once-great country has been robbed and humiliated ». Humiliated: certainly. Russia these days is now Upper Volta without the rockets (all its best scientists have gone abroad; those who remain are usually unpaid). But robbed? Who did the robbing, and why? The comment reflected the still-deep Russian fatalism which enables millions to believe that somebody else is always responsible, and that Russians can change nothing themselves. It is not true – but many Russians believe it to be true, which comes to almost the same thing.

As Whewell noted, this is a country which has worshipped « one false prophet too many ». Gagarin and the sputnik era are still glowingly remembered as the time when the Soviet Union truly seemed great. As for the future: it sometimes seems difficult to find a Russian who has room for any optimism at all. Katya’s parents, it seems fair to guess, will never believe in anything again. As for Katya herself – maybe. If not, Russia is truly lost.

Voir de plus:

The Chinese are wary of Donald Trump’s creative destruction

Mark Leonard

The Financial Times

July 24, 2018

Donald Trump is leading a double life. In the west, most foreign policy experts see him as reckless, unpredictable and self-defeating. But though many in Asia dislike him as much as the Europeans do, they see him as a more substantial figure. I have just spent a week in Beijing talking to officials and intellectuals, many of whom are awed by his skill as a strategist and tactician.

One of the people I met was the former vice-foreign minister He Yafei. He shot to global prominence in 2009 when he delivered a finger-wagging lecture to President Barack Obama at the Copenhagen climate conference before blowing up hopes of a deal. He is somewhat less belligerent where Mr Trump is concerned. He worries that strategic competition has become the new normal and says that “trade wars are just the tip of the iceberg”.

Few Chinese think that Mr Trump’s primary concern is to rebalance the bilateral trade deficit. If it were, they say, he would have aligned with the EU, Japan and Canada against China rather than scooping up America’s allies in his tariff dragnet. They think the US president’s goal is nothing less than remaking the global order.

They think Mr Trump feels he is presiding over the relative decline of his great nation. It is not that the current order does not benefit the US. The problem is that it benefits others more in relative terms. To make things worse the US is investing billions of dollars and a fair amount of blood in supporting the very alliances and international institutions that are constraining America and facilitating China’s rise.

In Chinese eyes, Mr Trump’s response is a form of “creative destruction”. He is systematically destroying the existing institutions — from the World Trade Organization and the North American Free Trade Agreement to Nato and the Iran nuclear deal — as a first step towards renegotiating the world order on terms more favourable to Washington.

Once the order is destroyed, the Chinese elite believes, Mr Trump will move to stage two: renegotiating America’s relationship with other powers. Because the US is still the most powerful country in the world, it will be able to negotiate with other countries from a position of strength if it deals with them one at a time rather than through multilateral institutions that empower the weak at the expense of the strong.

My interlocutors say that Mr Trump is the US first president for more than 40 years to bash China on three fronts simultaneously: trade, military and ideology. They describe him as a master tactician, focusing on one issue at a time, and extracting as many concessions as he can. They speak of the skilful way Mr Trump has treated President Xi Jinping. “Look at how he handled North Korea,” one says. “He got Xi Jinping to agree to UN sanctions [half a dozen] times, creating an economic stranglehold on the country. China almost turned North Korea into a sworn enemy of the country.” But they also see him as a strategist, willing to declare a truce in each area when there are no more concessions to be had, and then start again with a new front.

For the Chinese, even Mr Trump’s sycophantic press conference with Vladimir Putin, the Russian president, in Helsinki had a strategic purpose. They see it as Henry Kissinger in reverse. In 1972, the US nudged China off the Soviet axis in order to put pressure on its real rival, the Soviet Union. Today Mr Trump is reaching out to Russia in order to isolate China.

In the short term, China is talking tough in response to Mr Trump’s trade assault. At the same time they are trying to develop a multiplayer front against him by reaching out to the EU, Japan and South Korea. But many Chinese experts are quietly calling for a rethink of the longer-term strategy. They want to prepare the ground for a new grand bargain with the US based on Chinese retrenchment. Many feel that Mr Xi has over-reached and worry that it was a mistake simultaneously to antagonise the US economically and militarily in the South China Sea.

Instead, they advocate economic concessions and a pullback from the aggressive tactics that have characterised China’s recent foreign policy. They call for a Chinese variant of “splendid isolationism”, relying on growing the domestic market rather than disrupting other countries’ economies by exporting industrial surpluses.

So which is the real Mr Trump? The reckless reactionary destroying critical alliances, or the “stable genius” who is pressuring China? The answer seems to depend on where you ask the question. Things look different from Beijing than from Brussels.

The writer is director of the European Council on Foreign Relations

Voir encore:

China Is Losing the Trade War With Trump
It’s like a drinking contest: You harm yourself and hope your opponent isn’t able to withstand as much.
Donald L. Luskin
WSJ
July 27, 2018

One thing came through loud and clear in President Trump’s press conference Wednesday with European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker. When they announced an alliance against third parties’ “unfair trading practices,” they didn’t even have to mention China by name for listeners to know who their target was. Cooperation between the U.S. and EU will squeeze China’s protectionist model, and even before this agreement, there’s been evidence that China is already running up the white flag.

Yes, China is acting tough in one sense, quickly imposing tariffs in retaliation for those enacted by the Trump administration. But while U.S. stocks approach all-time highs and the dollar grows stronger, Chinese stocks are in a bear market, down 25% since January. The yuan had its worst single month ever in June, and is well on its way to a repeat this month. Chinese corporate bonds have defaulted at a record rate in the past six months, yet this week China unveiled a new stimulus program designed to encourage even more corporate borrowing.

That’s probably why Yi Gang, a governor of the People’s Bank of China, took the extraordinary step of channeling Herbert Hoover, saying in a statement this month that “the fundamentals of China’s economy are sound.” And it’s why Sun Guofeng, head of the PBOC’s financial research institute, said, China “will not make the yuan’s exchange rate a tool to cope with trade conflicts.”

Weakening one’s currency is a standard weapon in trade wars, and one that China has often been accused of using—including in a tweet by Mr. Trump last week. Devaluation would be even more dangerous in this case because of China’s power to dump the $1.4 trillion in U.S. Treasury securities it holds. But by denying its intention to plunge the yuan, China has disarmed itself voluntarily. This was no act of noble pacifism; it had to be done. Devaluing the currency would risk scaring investors away, an existential threat to an emerging economy. For China, whose state-capitalism model has so far never produced a recession, such capital flight might expose previously hidden economic weaknesses.

These weaknesses accumulate without the market discipline that occasional recessions impose. The fragility of China’s economy can be seen in its growth rate, which is slowing despite rising financial leverage, and in its overinvestment in commodities and real estate. The escalating trade war with the U.S. could tip China into the unknown territory of recession—and then capital flight could push it into a financial crash and depression. That would create mass joblessness in an economy that has never recorded unemployment higher than 4.3%. With that scenario in mind, the Chinese government must be wondering whether it has enough riot police.
The risk of capital flight is real. The last time China let the yuan weaken—a slide that began in early 2014 and was punctuated in mid-2015 by the abandonment of the dollar peg in favor of a basket of currencies—the Chinese ended up losing almost $1 trillion in foreign reserves, which they have yet to recover. Now the sharp weakening of the yuan shows some degree of capital flight again is under way.
No wonder that, despite tough talk from some quarters, the PBOC disarmed itself voluntarily to avoid further capital flight. The bank also is already offering to reimburse local firms for tariffs on imported U.S. goods. What’s more, China has put out a yard sign for international investors by announcing unilateral easing of foreign-ownership restrictions in some industries.
China is beginning to realize that trade war isn’t really war. It’s more like a drinking contest at a fraternity: the game is less inflicting harm on your opponent than inflicting it on yourself, turn by turn. In trade wars, nations impose burdensome import tariffs on themselves in the hope that they’ll be able to stomach the pain longer than their competitor.
Why play such a game? Because a carefully chosen act of self-harm can be an investment toward a worthy goal. For example, President Reagan’s arms race against the Soviet Union in the 1980s was in some sense a costly self-imposed tax. But it turned out the U.S. could bear the burden better than the Soviets could—Uncle Sam eventually out-drank the Russian bear and won the Cold War.
The U.S. will win the trade war with China in the same way. The PBOC’s statements show that the Chinese understand they are too vulnerable to take very many more drinks. The only question is what they will be willing to offer Mr. Trump to get him to take yes for an answer. No wonder Beijing has ordered its state-influenced media to stop demonizing Mr. Trump—officials are desperate to minimize the pain when President Xi Jinping has to cut the inevitable deal.
The drinking-contest metaphor takes us only so far. The wonderful thing about reciprocal trade is that it is a positive-sum game in which all contestants are made better off. If the conflict forces China to accept more foreign investors and goods, comply with World Trade Organization rules, and respect foreign intellectual property, it may feel it has lost but will in fact be better off. With this openness, both economic and political, China could spur a decadeslong second wave of growth that would bring hundreds of millions still living in rural poverty into glittering new cities.
It took Nixon to go to China and show it the way to the 20th century. Now, through the unlikely method of trade war, Donald Trump is ushering China into the 21st century.
 
Mr. Luskin is chief investment officer at Trend Macrolytics LLC.

Voir enfin:

Pourquoi citent-ils tous Gramsci?

Le nom de Gramsci revient sans cesse depuis plusieurs mois, dans les médias, sur les réseaux sociaux, il est cité en permanence. Qui est-il et quelle est sa pensée?

Gaël Brustier
Slate
24 janvier 2017

Le 9 novembre 2016, au lendemain de l’élection de Donald Trump, sur les réseaux sociaux circulait cette phrase d’Antonio Gramsci:

«Le vieux monde se meurt, le nouveau monde tarde à apparaître et dans ce clair-obscur surgissent les monstres».

Lundi 23 janvier, au lendemain du premier tour de la primaire de gauche, Benoît Hamon citait le philosophe à son tour :

«Je pense à cette définition de la crise d’Antonio Gramsci qui dit que la crise c’est quand le vieux est mort et que le neuf ne peut pas naître et nous sommes dans un moment comme celui-là, et il a rajouté que de ce clair-obscur peut naître un monstre.»

Il est devenu fréquent d’entendre des hommes politiques ou des commentateurs invoquer Gramsci, souvent pour dire que les victoires des idées précèdent les victoires politiques ou électorales. Mais cet intellectuel italien est un penseur trop important pour en rester là et ne pas le découvrir un peu davantage. S’il est autant cité en ce début de XXIe c’est qu’il a forgé des outils intellectuels essentiels aujourd’hui…

L’unité obsessionnelle

Homme politique, journaliste et penseur italien né en 1891, Gramsci est d’abord sarde, c’est-à-dire d’une île de Méditerranée périphérique par rapport au reste du Royaume d’Italie tout juste unifié. Issu d’un milieu pauvre, élève particulièrement brillant, enfant très tôt atteint de tuberculose osseuse qui le maintient à une taille de 1m50, il sera préoccupé par la question de cette unité du pays.

Son parcours le mène à Turin dans le Piémont, au Nord, où il fera ses études. C’est là qu’il s’établit et vit, en tant que journaliste et intellectuel, parmi les ouvriers de la capitale du Piémont. Il participe notamment à l’aventure du Biennio Rosso, «deux années rouges», faites de mobilisations paysannes et de manifestations ouvrières qui descendent jusqu’aux zones rurales du Pô.

Du Piémont, Gramsci est bien placé pour analyser ces fractures du pays. Le Nord industriel et le Sud paysan ne sont un que formellement par la couronne royale, et maintenus d’un bloc seulement par un système politique à la fois libéral et autoritaire qui parvient, notamment, à susciter le consentement des masses paysannes du Sud, au sein d’un «bloc méridional».

Sa vie intellectuelle le mène alors d’abord vers le socialisme car pour Gramsci, c’est l’avènement d’une société socialiste qui peut permettre d’achever l’unité italienne, et accomplira un saut civilisationnel de l’ampleur de la Renaissance.

Ouvrir le front culturel

En 1917, contre les thèses de Marx, c’est en Russie, à Saint Pétersbourg, qu’éclate la Révolution. Enjeu intellectuel et enjeu politique, il va s’efforcer de comprendre pourquoi la Révolution a eu lieu en Russie et non en Allemagne, en France ou dans le Nord de l’Italie. Autour de la Révolution de 1917, s’ordonnent aussi une série de questionnements fondamentaux pour comprendre la pensée de Gramsci: hégémonie, crises, guerres de mouvements ou de positions, blocs historiques…

Il distingue deux types de sociétés. Pour faire simple, celles où il suffit, comme en Russie, de prendre le central téléphonique et le palais présidentiel pour prendre le pouvoir. La bataille pour «l’hégémonie» vient après, ce sont les sociétés «orientales» qui fonctionnent ainsi… Et celles, plus complexes, où le pouvoir est protégé par des tranchées et des casemates, qui représentent des institutions culturelles ou des lieux de productions intellectuelles, de sens, qui favorisent le consentement. Dans ce cas, avant d’atteindre le central téléphonique, il faut prendre ces lieux de pouvoir. C’est ce que l’on appelle le front culturel, c’est le cas des sociétés occidentales comme la société française, italienne ou allemande d’alors.

Au contraire de François Hollande et de François Lenglet, Antonio Gramsci ne croit pas à l’économicisme, c’est-à-dire à la réduction de l’histoire à l’économique. Il perçoit la force des représentations individuelles et collectives, la force de l’idéologie… Ce refus de l’économicisme mène à ouvrir le «front culturel», c’est-à-dire à développer une bataille qui porter sur la représentation du monde tel qu’on le souhaite, sur la vision du monde…

Le front culturel consiste à écrire des articles au sein d’un journal, voire à créer un journal, à produire des biens culturels (pièces de théâtre, chansons, films etc…) qui contribuent à convaincre les gens qu’il y a d’autres évidences que celles produites jusque-là par la société capitaliste.

L’hégémonie, c’est l’addition de la capacité à convaincre et à contraindre

La classe ouvrière doit produire, selon Gramsci, ses propres références. Ses intellectuels, doivent être des «intellectuels organiques», doivent faire de la classe ouvrière la «classe politique» chargée d’accomplir la vraie révolution: c’est-à-dire une réforme éthique et morale complète. L’hégémonie, c’est l’addition de la capacité à convaincre et à contraindre.

Convaincre c’est faire entrer des idées dans le sens commun, qui est l’ensemble des évidences que l’on ne questionne pas.

La crise (organique), c’est le moment où le système économique et les évidences qui peuplent l’univers mental de chacun «divorcent». Et l’on voit deux choses: le consentement à accepter les effets matériels du système économique s’affaiblit (on voit alors des grèves, des mouvements d’occupation des places comme Occupy Wall Street, Indignados, etc); et la coercition augmente: on assiste alots à la répression de grèves, aux arrestations de syndicalistes etc…

Au contraire, un «bloc historique» voit le jour lorsqu’un mode de production et un système idéologique s’imbriquent parfaitement, se recoupent: le bloc historique néolibéral des années 1980 à la fin des années 2000 par exemple. Car le néolibéralisme n’est pas qu’une affaire économique, il est aussi une affaire éthique et morale.

Le communisme

C’est en France, à Lyon, en janvier 1926, qu’Antonio Gramsci prend la tête du Parti communiste italien, issu d’une scission de l’aile gauche du Parti socialiste italien au congrès de Livourne, cinq ans plus tôt. Faisant le choix des communistes contre les socialistes «maintenus», il est donc chargé de forger le noyau dirigeant du parti qui deviendra après 1945 le plus puissant et le plus brillant d’Occident. Son portrait orne encore les permanences du parti centriste, très lointain héritier (!) du PCI.

En 1922, son ancien collègue à Avanti!, un journal socialiste, Benito Mussolini (1883-1945), socialiste renégat qui a fondé le mouvement fasciste, a pris le pouvoir. Il fait voter en 1926 des lois qui lui donnent de larges pouvoirs. Gramsci, pourtant député de Venise, est arrêté en novembre de cette même année.

En 1927, Mussolini le fait emprisonner pour vingt ans, «pour empêcher son cerveau de fonctionner», dixit le procureur fasciste de l’époque. Il ne tiendra que 10 ans, avant de mourir des conséquences d’une tuberculose osseuse mal soignée, dans les geôles, puis les cliniques du régime. Mais il aura auparavant réussi à écrire une œuvre politique majeure: les Cahiers de prison.

Car dans sa cellule, il obtient progressivement le droit de disposer de quatre livres en même temps, et de quoi écrire. Naît alors progressivement une somme dans laquelle il utilise des «codes» pour tromper la censure..

A travers ces écrits, il devient le grand penseur des crises, casquette qui lui donne tant de pertinence aujourd’hui, et surtout depuis 2007 et 2008 que la crise financière propage ses effets. Dans ces Cahiers, il apporte à l’œuvre de Marx l’une des révisions ou l’un des compléments les plus riches de l’histoire du marxisme. Pour beaucoup de socialistes, il faut attendre que les lois de Marx sur les contradictions du capitalisme se concrétisent pour que la Révolution advienne. La Révolution d’Octobre, selon Gramsci, invalide cette thèse. Elle se fait «contre le Capital», du nom du grand livre de Karl Marx.

Au-delà de la gauche

Antonio Gramsci fascine au-delà de la gauche… Ainsi en France, en Italie ou en Autriche, des courants d’extrême droite se sont réclamés d’une version tronquée et biaisée du gramscisme. Ce «gramscisme de droite» faisait l’impasse sur l’aspect «économique» du gramscisme et le caractère émancipateur pour n’en retenir que la méthode le «combat culturel».

A gauche, en France, il a souvent été caricaturé ou dédaigné. On parle souvent de «combat culturel contre le FN» alors que le changement éthique et moral concerne, si l’on suit Gramsci, tous les aspects de la vie sociale et englobe donc, logiquement, le combat contre l’extrême droite, qui ne peut pas être «détaché».

On retrouve Gramsci dans les combats du Tiers Monde, on le retrouve dans les travaux d’Edward Said ou de Joseph Massad, dans les Subaltern Studies en Inde notamment…

En France, le philosophe André Tosel se réclame de Gramsci, auteur cette année d’un Étudier Gramsci paru aux Editions Kimé, ouvrage majeur pour comprendre l’auteur des Cahiers de Prison. Les économiste et sociologue Cédric Durand et Razmig Keucheyan, appliquent les outils de Gramsci notamment à l’analyse et la critique du processus d’intégration européenne. Il font le lien avec les thèses de Nicos Poulantzas qui prolongea, comme Stuart Hall, ainsi qu’Ernesto Laclau et Chantal Mouffe, les thèses et travaux de Gramsci. Appartenant au courant post-marxiste, Chantal Mouffe, qui intervient de plus en plus en France, est l’inspiratrice de PODEMOS, le nouveau parti de la gauche radicale espagnole. Deux de ses fondateurs et principaux animateurs –Pablos Iglesias et Inigo Errejon– se réclament de l’héritage de Gramsci.

Le penseur italien fait partie du patrimoine intellectuel de l’Europe. Il a forgé des outils qui sont utiles aujourd’hui pour analyser le monde, comprendre comment les gens le voient et participent à la vie sociale, comment individus et médias interagissent, comment les représentations et les identités se forment continuellement et magmatiquement. Il a donné naissance à des écoles de pensée foisonnantes et utiles pour qui veut agir sur le monde.

Voir par ailleurs:

The Trump Rationale

 

 

 

His voters knew what they were getting, and most support him still.Why exactly did nearly half the country vote for Donald Trump?

Why also did the arguments of Never Trump Republicans and conservatives have marginal effect on voters? Despite vehement denunciations of the Trump candidacy from many pundits on the right and in the media, Trump nonetheless got about the same percentage of Republican voters (88–90 percent) as did McCain in 2008 and Romney in 2012, who both were handily defeated in the Electoral College.

Here are some of reasons voters knew what they were getting with Trump and yet nevertheless assumed he was preferable to a Clinton presidency.

1) Was Trump disqualified by his occasional but demonstrable character flaws and often rank vulgarity? To believe that plaint, voters would have needed a standard by which both past media of coverage of the White House and the prior behavior of presidents offered some useful benchmarks. Unfortunately, the sorts of disturbing things we know about Trump we often did not know in the past about other presidents. By any fair measure, the sexual gymnastics in the White House and West Wing of JFK and Bill Clinton, both successful presidents, were likely well beyond President Trump’s randy habits. Harry Truman’s prior Tom Pendergast machine connections make Trump steaks and Trump university seem minor. By any classical definition, Lyndon Johnson could have been characterized as both a crook and a pervert. In sum, the public is still not convinced that Trump’s crudities are necessarily different from what they imagine of some past presidents. But it does seem convinced, in our age of a 24/7 globalized Internet, that 90 percent negative media coverage of the Trump tenure is quite novel.

2) Personal morality and public governance are related, but we are not always quite sure how. Jimmy Carter was both a more moral person and a worse president than Bill Clinton. Jerry Ford was a more ethical leader than Donald Trump — and had a far worse first 16 months. FDR was a superb wartime leader — and carried on an affair in the White House, tried to pack and hijack the Supreme Court, sent U.S. citizens into internment camps, and abused his presidential powers in ways that might get a president impeached today. In the 1944 election, the Republican nominee Tom Dewey was the more ethical — and stuffy — man. In matters of spiritual leadership and moral role models, we wish that profane, philandering (including an affair with his step-niece), and unsteady General George S. Patton had just conducted himself in private and public as did the upright General Omar Bradley. But then we would have wished even more that Bradley had just half the strategic and tactical skill of Patton. If he had, thousands of lives might have been spared in the advance to the Rhine.

Trump is currently not carrying on an affair with his limousine driver, as Ike probably was with Kay Summersby while commanding all Allied forces in Europe following D-Day. Rarely are both qualities, brilliance and personal morality, found in a leader — even among our greatest, such as the alcoholic Grant or the foul-mouthed and occasionally crude Truman. Richard Feynman in some ways may have been the most important — or at least the most interesting — physicist of our age, but his tawdry and sometimes callous private life would have made Feynman Target No. 1 of the MeToo movement.

3) Trump did not run in a vacuum. A presidential vote is not a one-person race for sainthood but, like it or not, often a choice between a bad and worse option. Hillary Clinton would have likely ensured a 16-year progressive regnum. As far as counterfactual “what ifs” go, by 2024, at the end of Clinton’s second term, a conservative might not have recognized the federal judiciary, given the nature of lifetime appointees. The lives of millions of Americans would have been radically changed in an Obama-Clinton economy that probably would not have seen GDP or unemployment levels that Americans are now enjoying. Fracking, coal production, and new oil exploration would have been vastly curtailed. The out-of-control EPA would have become even more powerful. Half the country simply did not see the democratic socialist European Union, and its foreign and domestic agendas, as the model for 21st-century America.

What John Brennan, James Clapper, James Comey, Loretta Lynch, Andrew McCabe, Lisa Page, Samantha Power, Susan Rice, Peter Strzok, Sally Yates, and others did in 2016 would never have been known — given that their likely obstruction, lying, and lawbreaking were predicated on being unspoken recommendations for praise and advancement in a sure-thing Clinton administration. Christopher Steele might have either been unknown — or lionized.

Open borders, Chinese trade aggression, the antics of the Clinton Foundation, the Uranium One deal, the Iran deal, estrangement from Israel and the Gulf states, a permanently nuclear North Korea, leading from behind — all that and far more would be the continued norm into the 2020s. Ben Rhodes, architect of the Iran deal and the media echo chamber, might have been the national-security adviser. The red-state losers would be institutionalized as clingers, crazies, wackos, deplorables, and irredeemables in a Clinton administration. A Supreme Court with justices such as Loretta Lynch, Elizabeth Warren, and Eric Holder would have made the court little different in its agendas from those of the ACLU, Planned Parenthood, and Harvard Law School.

4) Something had gone haywire with the Republican party at the national level. Since 1988, it had failed to achieve 51 percent of the popular presidential vote, losing the popular vote in five out of the past six elections, writing off as permanently lost the purple states of the Midwest. Most Republicans privately had all but given up on cracking the Electoral College matrix, given the lost-for-good big blue states such as California, Illinois, Massachusetts, and New York, changing demography in the Southwest, and the supposedly permanently forfeited Florida, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.

The proverbial Republican elite had become convinced that globalization, open borders, and free but unfair trade were either unstoppable or the fated future or simply irrelevant. Someone or something — even if painfully and crudely delivered — was bound to arise to remind the conservative Washington–New York punditocracy, the party elite, and Republican opinion makers that a third of the country had all but tuned them out. It was no longer sustainable to expect the conservative base to vote for more versions of sober establishmentarians like McCain and Romney just because they were Republicans, well-connected, well-résuméd, well-known, well-behaved, and played by the gloves-on Marquess of Queensberry political rules. Instead, such men and much of orthodox Republican ideology were suspect.

Amnestied illegal aliens would not in our lifetimes become conservative family-values voters. Vast trade deficits with China and ongoing chronic commercial cheating would not inevitably lead to the prosperity that would guarantee Chinese democracy. Asymmetrical trade deals were not sacrosanct under the canons of free trade. Unfettered globalization, outsourcing, and offshoring were not both inevitable and always positive. The losers of globalization did not bring their misery on themselves. The Iran deal was not better than nothing. North Korea would not inevitably remain nuclear. Middle East peace did not hinge of constant outreach to and subsidy of the corrupt and autocratic Palestinian Authority and Hamas cliques.

5) Lots of deep-state rust needed scraping. Yet it is hard to believe that either a Republican or Democratic traditionalist would have seen unemployment go below 4 percent, or the GDP rate exceed 3 percent, or would have ensured the current level of deregulation and energy production. A President Mitt Romney might not have rammed through a tax-reform policy like that of the 2017 reform bill. I cannot think of a single Republican 2016 candidate who either could or would have in succession withdrawn from the Paris Climate Accord, moved the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem, demanded China recalibrate its asymmetrical and often unfair mercantile trade policies, sought to secure the border, renounced the Iran deal, moved to denuclearize North Korea, and hectored front-line NATO allies that their budgets do not reflect their promises or the dangers on their borders.

The fact that Trump never served in the military or held a political office before 2016 may explain his blunders and coarseness. But such lacunae in his résumé also may account for why he is not constrained by New York–Washington conventional wisdom. His background makes elites grimace, though their expertise had increasingly calcified and been proved wrong and incapable of innovative approaches to foreign and domestic crises.

Something or someone was needed to remind the country that there is no longer a Democratic party as we once knew it. It is now a progressive and identity-politics religious movement. Trump took on his left-wing critics as few had before, did not back down, and did not offer apologies. He traded blow for blow with them. The result was not just media and cultural hysteria but also a catharsis that revealed what Americans knew but had not seen so overtly demonstrated by the new Left: the unapologetic media bias; chic assassination talk; the politicization of sports, Hollywood, and entertainment in slavish service to progressivism; the Internet virtue-signaling lynch mob; the out-of-control progressive deep state; and the new tribalism that envisions permanent ethnic and racial blocs while resenting assimilation and integration into the melting pot. For good or evil, the trash-talking and candid Trump challenged progressives. They took up the offer in spades and melted down — and America is getting a good look at where each side really sits.

In the end, only the people will vote on Trumpism. His supporters knew full well after July 2016 that his possible victory would come with a price — one they deemed more than worth paying given the past and present alternatives. Most also no longer trust polls or the media. To calibrate the national mood, they simply ask Trump voters whether they regret their 2016 votes (few do) and whether any Never Trump voters might reconsider (some are), and then they’re usually reassured that what is happening is what they thought would happen: a 3 percent GDP economy, low unemployment, record energy production, pushbacks on illegal immigration, no Iran deal, no to North Korean missiles pointed at the U.S., renewed friendship with Israel and the Gulf states, a deterrent foreign policy, stellar judicial appointments — along with Robert Mueller, Stormy Daniels, Michael Cohen, and lots more, no doubt, to come.


Affaire Benalla: A Paris comme à Gaza, le théâtre de rue vaincra ! (Pallywood comes to Paris)

23 juillet, 2018

https://static.mediapart.fr/etmagine/default/files/2018/07/21/img-1217.jpg?width=481&height=1334&width_format=pixel&height_format=pixel

Lorsqu’un Sanhédrin s’est déclaré unanime pour condamner, l’accusé sera acquitté. Le Talmud
Presque aucun des fidèles ne se retenait de s’esclaffer, et ils avaient l’air d’une bande d’anthropophages chez qui une blessure faite à un blanc a réveillé le goût du sang. Car l’instinct d’imitation et l’absence de courage gouvernent les sociétés comme les foules. Et tout le monde rit de quelqu’un dont on voit se moquer, quitte à le vénérer dix ans plus tard dans un cercle où il est admiré. C’est de la même façon que le peuple chasse ou acclame les rois. Marcel Proust
Prévoyante, la ville d’Athènes entretenait à ses frais un certain nombre de malheureux […]. En cas de besoin, c’est-à-dire quand une calamité s’abattait ou menaçait de s’abattre sur la ville, épidémie, famine, invasion étrangère, dissensions intérieures, il y avait toujours un pharmakos à la disposition de la collectivité. […] On promenait le pharmakos un peu partout, afin de drainer les impuretés et de les rassembler sur sa tête ; après quoi on chassait ou on tuait le pharmakos dans une cérémonie à laquelle toute la populace prenait part. […] D’une part, on […] [voyait] en lui un personnage lamentable, méprisable et même coupable ; il […] [était] en butte à toutes sortes de moqueries, d’insultes et bien sûr de violences ; on […] [l’entourait], d’autre part, d’une vénération quasi-religieuse ; il […] [jouait] le rôle principal dans une espèce de culte.  René Girard
Il arrive que les victimes d’une foule soient tout à fait aléatoires ; il arrive aussi qu’elles ne le soient pas. Il arrive même que les crimes dont on les accuse soient réels, mais ce ne sont pas eux, même dans ce cas-là, qui joue le premier rôle dans le choix des persécuteurs, c’est l’appartenance des victimes à certaines catégories particulièrement exposées à la persécution. (…) il existe donc des traits universels de sélection victimaire (…) à côté des critères culturels et religieux, il y en a de purement physiques. La maladie, la folie, les difformités génétiques, les mutilations accidentelles et même les infirmités en général tendent à polariser les persécuteurs. (…) l’infirmité s’inscrit dans un ensemble indissociable du signe victimaire et dans certains groupes — à l’internat scolaire par exemple — tout individu qui éprouve des difficultés d’adaptation, l’étranger, le provincial, l’orphelin, le fils de famille, le fauché, ou, tout simplement, le dernier arrivé, est plus ou moins interchangeables avec l’infirme. (…) lorsqu’un groupe humain a pris l’habitude de choisir ses victimes dans une certaine catégorie sociale, ethnique, religieuse, il tend à lui attribuer les infirmités ou les difformités qui renforceraient la polarisation victimaire si elles étaient réelles. (…) à la marginalité des miséreux, ou marginalité  du dehors, il faut en ajouter une seconde, la marginalité du dedans, celle des riches et du dedans. Le monarque et sa cour font parfois songer à l’oeil d’un ouragan. Cette double marginalité suggère une organisation tourbillonnante. En temps normal, certes, les riches et les puissants jouissent de toutes sortes de protections et de privilèges qui font défaut aux déshérités. Mais ce ne sont pas les circonstances normales qui nous concernent ici, ce sont les périodes de crise. Le moindre regard sur l’histoire universelle révèle que les risques de mort violente aux mains d’une foule déchaînée sont statistiquement plus élevés pour les privilégiés que pour toute autre catégorie. A la limite ce sont toutes les qualités extrêmes qui attirent, de temps en temps, les foudres collectives, pas seulement les extrêmes de la richesse et de la pauvreté, mais également ceux du succès et de l’échec, de la beauté et de la laideur, du vice de la vertu, du pouvoir de séduire et du pouvoir de déplaire ; c’est la faiblesse des femmes, des enfants et des vieillards, mais c’est aussi la force des plus forts qui devient faiblesse devant le nombre. René Girard
La participation médiocre, les conditions de cette victoire dans le contexte du «Fillongate», puis face à un adversaire «repoussoir», dans sa fonction d’épouvantail traditionnel de la politique française, donnent à cette élection un goût d’inachevé. Les Français ont-ils jamais été en situation de «choisir»? Tandis que la France «d’en haut» célèbre son sauveur providentiel sur les plateaux de télévision, une vague de perplexité déferle sur la majorité silencieuse. Que va-t-il en sortir? Par-delà l’euphorie médiatique d’un jour, le personnage de M. Macron porte en lui un potentiel de rejet, de moquerie et de haine insoupçonnable. Son style «jeunesse dorée», son passé d’énarque, d’inspecteur des finances, de banquier, d’ancien conseiller de François Hollande, occultés le temps d’une élection, en font la cible potentielle d’un hallucinant lynchage collectif, une victime expiatoire en puissance des frustrations, souffrances et déceptions du pays. Quant à la «France d’en haut», médiatique, journalistique, chacun sait à quelle vitesse le vent tourne et sa propension à brûler ce qu’elle a adoré. Jamais une présidence n’a vu le jour sous des auspices aussi incertains. Cette élection, produit du chaos, de l’effondrement des partis, d’une vertigineuse crise de confiance, signe-t-elle le début d’une renaissance ou une étape supplémentaire dans la décomposition et la poussée de violence? En vérité, M. Macron n’a aucun intérêt à obtenir, avec «En marche», une majorité absolue à l’Assemblée qui ferait de lui un nouvel «hyperprésident» censé détenir la quintessence du pouvoir. Sa meilleure chance de réussir son mandat est de se garder des sirènes de «l’hyperprésidence» qui mène tout droit au statut de «coupable idéal» des malheurs du pays, à l’image de tous ses prédécesseurs. De la part du président Macron, la vraie nouveauté serait dans la redécouverte d’une présidence modeste, axée sur l’international, centrée sur l’essentiel et le partage des responsabilités avec un puissant gouvernement réformiste et une Assemblée souveraine, conformément à la lettre – jamais respectée – de la Constitution de 1958. Maxime Tandonnet (07.05.2017)
Dans la guerre moderne, une image vaut mille armes. Bob Simon
Pendant 24 mn à peu près on ne voit que de la mise en scène … C’est un envers du décor qu’on ne montre jamais … Mais oui tu sais bien que c’est toujours comme ça ! Entretien Jeambar-Leconte (RCJ)
Karsenty est donc si choqué que des images truquées soient utilisées et éditées à Gaza ? Mais cela a lieu partout à la télévision, et aucun journaliste de télévision de terrain, aucun monteur de film, ne seraient choqués. Clément Weill-Raynal (France 3)
Oh, ils font toujours ça. C’est une question de culture. Représentants de France 2 (cités par Enderlin)
L’image correspondait à la réalité de la situation, non seulement à Gaza, mais en Cisjordanie. Charles Enderlin (Le Figaro, 27/01/05)
J’ai travaillé au Liban depuis que tout a commencé, et voir le comportement de beaucoup de photographes libanais travaillant pour les agences de presse m’a un peu troublé. Coupable ou pas, Adnan Hajj a été remarqué pour ses retouches d’images par ordinateur. Mais, pour ma part, j’ai été le témoin de pratique quotidienne de clichés posés, et même d’un cas où un groupe de photographes d’agences orchestraient le dégagement des cadavres, donnant des directives aux secouristes, leur demandant de disposer les corps dans certaines positions, et même de ressortir des corps déjà inhumés pour les photographier dans les bras de personnes alentour. Ces photographes ont fait moisson d’images chocs, sans manipulation informatique, mais au prix de manipulations humaines qui posent en elles-mêmes un problème éthique bien plus grave. Quelle que soit la cause de ces excès, inexpérience, désir de montrer de la façon la plus spectaculaire le drame vécu par votre pays, ou concurrence effrénée, je pense que la faute incombe aux agences de presse elles-mêmes, car ce sont elles qui emploient ces photographes. Il faut mettre en place des règles, faute de quoi toute la profession finira par en pâtir. Je ne dis pas cela contre les photographes locaux, mais après avoir vu ça se répéter sans arrêt depuis un mois, je pense qu’il faut s’attaquer au problème. Quand je m’écarte d’une scène de ce genre, un autre preneur de vue dresse le décor, et tous les autres suivent… Brian X (Journaliste occidental anonyme)
L’attaque a été menée en riposte aux tirs incessants de ces derniers jours sur des localités israéliennes à partir de la zone visée. Les habitants de tous les villages alentour, y compris Cana, ont été avertis de se tenir à l’écart des sites de lancement de roquettes contre Israël. Tsahal est intervenue cette nuit contre des objectifs terroristes dans le village de Cana. Ce village est utilisé depuis le début de ce conflit comme base arrière d’où ont été lancées en direction d’Israël environ 150 roquettes, en 30 salves, dont certaines ont atteint Haïfa et des sites dans le nord, a déclaré aujourd’hui le général de division Gadi Eizenkot, chef des opérations. Tsahal regrette tous les dommages subis par les civils innocents, même s’ils résultent directement de l’utilisation criminelle des civils libanais comme boucliers humains par l’organisation terroriste Hezbollah. (…) Le Hezbollah place les civils libanais comme bouclier entre eux et nous, alors que Tsahal se place comme bouclier entre les habitants d’Israël et les terroristes du Hezbollah. C’est la principale différence entre eux et nous. Rapport de l’Armée israélienne
Après trois semaines de travail intense, avec l’assistance active et la coopération de la communauté Internet, souvent appelée “blogosphère”, nous pensons avoir maintenant assez de preuves pour assurer avec certitude que beaucoup des faits rapportés en images par les médias sont en fait des mises en scène. Nous pensons même pouvoir aller plus loin. À notre avis, l’essentiel de l’activité des secours à Khuraybah [le vrai nom de l’endroit, alors que les médias, en accord avec le Hezbollah, ont utilisé le nom de Cana, pour sa connotation biblique et l’écho du drame de 1996] le 30 juillet a été détourné en exercice de propagande. Le site est devenu en fait un vaste plateau de tournage, où les gestes macabres ont été répétés avec la complaisance des médias, qui ont participé activement et largement utilisé le matériau récolté. La tactique des médias est prévisible et tristement habituelle. Au lieu de discuter le fond de nos arguments, ils se focalisent sur des détails, y relevant des inexactitudes et des fausses pistes, et affirment que ces erreurs vident notre dossier de toute valeur. D’autres nous étiquètent comme de droite, pro-israéliens ou parlent simplement de théories du complot, comme si cela pouvait suffire à éliminer les éléments concrets que nous avons rassemblés. Richard North (EU Referendum)
Lorsque les médias se prêtent au jeu des manipulations plutôt que de les dénoncer, non seulement ils sacrifient les Libanais innocents qui ne veulent pas que cette mafia religieuse prenne le pouvoir et les utilise comme boucliers, mais ils nuisent aussi à la société civile de par le monde. D’un côté ils nous dissimulent les actes et les motivations d’organisations comme le Hamas ou le Hezbollah, ce qui permet aux musulmans ennemis de la démocratie, en Occident, de nous (leurs alliés progressistes présumés) inviter à manifester avec eux sous des banderoles à la gloire du Hezbollah. De l’autre, ils encouragent les haines et les sentiments revanchards qui nourrissent l’appel au Jihad mondial. La température est montée de cinq degrés sur l’échelle du Jihad mondial quand les musulmans du monde entier ont vu avec horreur et indignation le spectacle de ces enfants morts que des médias avides et mal inspirés ont transmis et exploité. Richard Landes
S’il est trop tôt pour affirmer qu’une telle action de combat a pleinement rempli ses objectifs, une grande partie de ces objectifs ont sans nul doute été atteints. Le premier objectif atteint à ce stade est que ces marches ont rétabli le droit au retour dans la conscience palestinienne, arabe et internationale comme l’un des droits et principes importants du peuple palestinien. […] Un autre but atteint par ces marches est qu’elles ont remis la cause nationale palestinienne à l’ordre du jour international, alors que certains défaitistes prétendaient que l’agenda mondial était trop chargé et n’avait pas de place pour la cause nationale palestinienne. Ils ont essayé de l’utiliser pour promouvoir d’autres concessions. […] Je dois souligner un important objectif stratégique accompli le 14 mai. Notre peuple à Gaza a enregistré, aux yeux du monde entier, son témoignage sur le transfert de l’ambassade américaine à Jérusalem et sur la déclaration de Jérusalem comme la capitale de l’entité d’occupation. Au nom du peuple arabe palestinien et de tous les peuples arabes et islamiques, notre peuple de Gaza a rejeté cette décision et cette démarche, par cette importante activité, en enregistrant son témoignage pour l’histoire, et en signant ce témoignage avec le sang des martyrs – notre peuple a sacrifié soixante martyrs le 14 mai, ainsi que trois mille blessés. Ils ont été utilisés pour signer le rejet de notre peuple de la décision imprudente de transférer l’ambassade des États-Unis à Jérusalem. […] Notre peuple a imposé son ordre du jour au monde entier – les écrans de télévision du monde devaient présenter une image romantique de l’ouverture de l’ambassade américaine à Jérusalem, mais notre peuple… a forcé le monde entier à diviser les écrans de télévision … Cette méthode [de combat] est appropriée pour cette étape, mais les circonstances peuvent changer, et nous devrons peut-être retourner à la lutte armée. Lorsque cela se produira, notre peuple, les factions et le Hamas n’hésiteront pas à utiliser tous les moyens requis par les circonstances. […] L’ennemi affirme que nous utilisons les gens comme boucliers humains et les poussons vers la clôture, mais nous disons que ces jeunes et ces hommes auraient pu choisir une autre option. Ils auraient pu faire pleuvoir des milliers de missiles sur les villes de l’occupation lorsque les États-Unis ont ouvert leur ambassade à Jérusalem. Mais ils n’ont pas choisi cette voie. Nombre d’entre eux ont quitté leurs uniformes militaires et mis leurs armes de côté. Ils ont temporairement abandonné les moyens de la lutte armée et se sont tournés vers cette merveilleuse méthode civilisée, respectée par le monde et adaptée aux circonstances actuelles. […] Notre peuple a imposé son ordre du jour au monde entier. Les écrans de télévision du monde devaient présenter une image romantique de l’ouverture de l’ambassade américaine à Jérusalem, mais notre peuple, par sa conscience collective, a forcé le monde entier à diviser les écrans de télévision entre les images de fraude, de tromperie, de fausseté et d’oppression, manifestes dans la tentative d’imposer Jérusalem comme la capitale de l’Etat d’occupation, et les images d’injustice, d’oppression, d’héroïsme et de détermination, données par notre propre peuple dans ses sacrifices, le sacrifice de ses enfants comme une offrande pour Jérusalem et pour le droit au retour. […] Lorsque nous avons décidé de nous lancer dans ces marches, nous avons décidé de transformer ce qui nous est le plus cher – les corps de nos femmes et de nos enfants – en barrage pour stopper l’effondrement de la réalité arabe, un barrage qui empêche la course de nombreux Arabes vers la normalisation des liens avec l’entité spoliatrice, qui occupe notre Jérusalem, pille notre terre, souille nos lieux saints et opprime notre peuple jour et nuit. Yahya Sinwar
On Friday, the Palestinian terror group Hamas, which controls the Gaza Strip, is inaugurating what it is calling “The March of Return.” According to Hamas’s leadership, the “March of Return” is scheduled to run from March 30 – the eve of Passover — through May 15, the 70th anniversary of Israel’s establishment. According to Israeli media reports, Hamas has budgeted $10 million for the operation. Throughout the “March of Return,” Hamas intends to send thousands of civilians to the Israeli border. Hamas is planning to set up tent camps along the border fence and then, presumably, order participants to overrun it on May 15. The Palestinians refer to May 15 as “Nakba,” or Catastrophe Day. (…) what is it trying to accomplish by sending them into harm’s way? Why is the terror group telling Gaza residents to place themselves in front of the border fence and challenge Israeli security forces charged with defending Israel? The answer here is also obvious. Hamas intends to provoke Israel to shoot at the Palestinian civilians it is sending to the border. It is setting its people up to die because it expects their deaths to be captured live by the cameras of the Western media, which will be on hand to watch the spectacle. In other words, Hamas’s strategy of harming Israel by forcing its soldiers to kill Palestinians is predicated on its certainty that the Western media will act as its partner and ensure the success of its lethal propaganda stunt. Given widespread assessments that Iran is keen to start a new round of war between Israel and its terror proxies, Hamas in Gaza and Hezbollah in Lebanon, it is possible that Hamas intends for this lethal propaganda stunt to be the initial stage of a larger war. By this assessment, Hamas is using the border operation to cultivate and escalate Western hostility against Israel ahead of a larger shooting war. (…) The real issue revealed by Hamas’s planned operation — as it was revealed by the Mavi Marmara, as well as by Hamas’s military campaigns against Israel in 2014, 2011 and 2008-09 —  is not how Israel will deal with it. The real issue is that Hamas’s entire strategy is predicated on its faith that the Western media and indeed the Western left will side with it against Israel. Hamas is certain that both the media and leftist activists and politicians in Europe and the U.S. will blame Israel for Palestinian civilian casualties. And as past experience proves, Hamas is right to believe the media and leftist activists will play their assigned role. So long as the media and the left rush to indict Israel for its efforts to defend itself and its citizens against its terrorist foes, who turn the laws of war on their head as a matter of course, these attacks will continue and they will escalate. If this border assault does in fact serve as the opening act in a larger terror war against Israel, then a large portion of the blame for the bloodshed will rest on the shoulders of the Western media for empowering the terrorists of Hamas and Hezbollah to attack Israel. Caroline Glick
The video turned out to be from an art workshop which creates this health exercise annually in Gaza. The goal of the workshop is to recreate child injuries sustained in warzones so that doctors can get familiar with them and learn how to care for injured children, the owner of the workshop, Abd al-Baset al-Loulou said. Al Arabya
Dix-huit morts et au moins 1 400 blessés. La « grande marche du retour », appelée vendredi par la société civile palestinienne et encadrée par le Hamas, le long de la barrière frontalière séparant la bande de Gaza et Israël, a dégénéré lorsque l’armée israélienne a tiré à balles réelles sur des manifestants qui s’approchaient du point de passage. (…) Famille, enfants, musique, fête, puis débordements habituels de jeunes lançant des cailloux à l’armée. Lorsque les émeutiers sont arrivés à quelques centaines de mètres de la fameuse grille, les snipers israéliens sont entrés en action. L’un des garçons, « armé » d’un pneu, a été abattu d’une balle dans la nuque alors qu’il s’enfuyait. (…) Ce mouvement, qui exige le « droit au retour » et la fin du blocus de Gaza, doit encore durer six semaines. C’est long. Le gouvernement israélien compte peut-être sur l’usure des protestataires, la fatigue, le renoncement, persuadé que quelques balles en plus pourraient faire la différence. A-t-il la mémoire courte ? Selon la Torah, Moïse avait 80 ans lorsqu’a commencé la traversée du désert. Ces quarante années d’errance douloureuse sont au coeur de tous les Juifs. Espérer qu’après soixante-dix ans d’exil les Palestiniens oublient leur histoire à coups de fusil est aussi absurde que ne pas faire la différence entre une balle de 5,56 et une pierre calcaire … Le Canard enchainé (Balles perdues, 04.04.2018)
Pro-Israel organization StandWithUs has resorted to claiming Palestinians are faking injuries to garner international sympathy and supported their claims by posting videos showing « Palestinians practicing for the cameras. » The Palestinians in the video were actually practicing how to evacuate the wounded during the protest… Telesur
Oui ! Oui ! Je suis tellement heureux ! L’Afrique a gagné la Coupe du monde ! L’Afrique a gagné la Coupe du monde ! Je sais bien, je sais bien. Il faut dire que c’est l’équipe de France. Mais regardez ces gars, hein ? Regardez ces gars ! Vous n’avez pas ce bronzage en vous promenant dans le sud de la France, les mecs. La France est devenue l’équipe de rechange de l’Afrique, une fois que le Nigeria et le Sénégal ont été éliminés. Trevor Noah
Toutes les « personnes noires » du monde ont célébrité la victoire des joueurs français en raison de leur « identité africaine. (…) J’ai trouvé ces arguments bizarres de dire qu’ils ne sont pas Africains, ils sont Français. Pourquoi ne peuvent-ils pas être les deux ? Pourquoi cette réflexion binaire de devoir choisir un groupe de personnes ? Pourquoi ne peuvent-ils pas être africains ? Dans ce que je lis, pour être français, il faut effacer tout ce qui te lie à l’Afrique. Quand je dis qu’ils sont Africains, je ne le dis pas pour exclure leur identité française, mais je le fais pour les inclure et partager avec eux l’identité africaine qui est la mienne. Je leurs dis : je vous vois mes frères français d’origine africaine. Trevor Noah
I’ve lived a life where I’ve never really fitted in in any particular way. Even now, people still debate on what I am. People will say, “Oh you’re black,” And then someone will turn around and say, “No but he’s not black, he’s not black; he’s colored.” And then colored people will say “but you’re not colored.” And then when you get older it’s cool because you’ve lived everywhere and nowhere, you’ve been everyone and no one, so you can say everything and nothing, and that’s really what affects my comedy and everything that I say. And if ever this comedy thing doesn’t work out, I’ve got poverty to fall back on, and I’m pretty sure I’ll be cool there. Trevor Noah
On a beau résister à l’envie (la nécessité) de réagir aux identitaires de l’autre bord, ceux du Sud en échec qui l’affirment avec le sourire sale, on finit par y venir. Non pour verser dans le contre-argument (inutile face aux extrémistes du Net), mais parce que cela a des conséquences, consolide un déni spectaculaire au Sud et sert à habiller la joie de rancune. Car la victoire de l’équipe française à la Coupe du monde n’est pas une victoire de l’Afrique. C’est un échec de l’Afrique. L’échec des pays de ce continent à retenir leurs enfants, à les faire rêver d’autre chose que de fuir par mers et par déserts, les soutenir, les former et leur offrir la sécurité, la possibilité du succès et celle de l’hommage. Si la moitié de l’équipe algérienne de football avait été française et qu’elle avait réussi la prouesse de décrocher deux Coupes du monde, j’aurais conclu à l’échec de la France à aimer et retenir ses enfants, pas à la victoire de l’Algérie seulement. Proclamer que c’est une victoire africaine n’est pas seulement un contresens, mais aussi un déni. Cela sert à fermer les yeux sur l’état des pays au Sud, l’état de leurs démocraties. Terres des rêves chétifs, des injustices, des caricatures des régimes assassins de sens et de vies et des « pères de la nation », déshérence des élites et sécheresse des cœurs et des gazons. Où est la victoire de l’Afrique si pour réussir il faut la quitter ? Ces joueurs que l’on dit « africains » (…), que serait-il advenu d’eux chez nous au Sud, entre nous ? Répéter que c’est une victoire des immigrés et de leurs descendants est une belle chose : cela peut aider la France à voir dans l’Autre autre chose qu’une menace. Mais le répéter pour faire le procès de la France sans faire le procès des siens, de leur racisme chez nous, leur rejet de l’autre, leurs campagnes d’expulsions nocturnes dans les déserts, c’est une forme de rancune seulement. Faire la leçon de l’acceptation et de l’altérité heureuse et ses bénéfices, sans retourner contre soi ce jugement juste et sévère, est une lâcheté. Quel est l’état du migrant, son périple, ses douleurs, ses blessures et l’histoire de ses rejets entre les pays africains eux-mêmes ? Quel est l’état de nos frontières, entre nous, au Sud ? Entre le Maghreb et les pays subsahariens ? En France, ces joueurs que l’on dit « africains » ont pu finir champions du monde dans un pays qui a ses difficultés, ses peurs, ses xénophobes, ses justes et ses âmes magnifiques. Que serait-il advenu d’eux chez nous au Sud, entre nous ? « J’aurais voulu, par exemple, que l’Algérie gagne une Coupe du monde, au lieu de médire sur celle des autres et y trouver des consolations risibles à ses échecs » rajoute encore le journalMais il se trouve qu’il y avait aussi des raisons idiotes : des Italiens y voyaient, dans cette équipe, le rêve de la souche pure, l’équipe d’un pays « sans mélange », sans « races importées », sans couleurs, rêve des identitaires du vieux continent, au moment même où des Maghrébins ou d’autres y voyaient une revanche sur leur sort, une occasion de joie par l’aigreur, une vengeance presque, une leçon faite à la France. Tout le paradoxe malheureux de ceux qui n’assument pas le présent, son don et sa complexité pour rêver les uns de revanche, les autres de souche pure. La belle équipe croate se retrouva chargée d’incarner la pureté des extrêmes droites en Occident ou le contrepoids à nos défaites au Sud, nos jalousies. Autant que l’équipe de France se retrouva, pour certains, objet de fantasmes sur une Afrique où ils ne veulent pas vivre, qu’ils défendent en la quittant, qu’ils proclament glorieuse en fermant les yeux sur nos échecs. Voilà, c’est dit. Il le fallait. Il était si insupportable pour le chroniqueur de garder le silence sur cette foire des dénis et des hypocrisies. La France a gagné, elle en a été heureuse et j’aurais voulu vivre ce moment chez moi, moi aussi, grâce aux miens. Les voir réussir dans la diversité, être acclamés dans le festin des différences, sur les toits du monde, avoir un président capable de saluer les siens et de rire avec leur bonheur. J’aurais voulu, par exemple, que l’Algérie gagne une Coupe du monde, au lieu de médire sur celle des autres et y trouver des consolations risibles à ses échecs. Répéter que c’est une victoire de l’Afrique, c’est faire l’éloge de l’échec en croyant défendre la vertu, réelle et nécessaire cependant, de l’acceptation. Kamel Daoud
Dans le cas français spécialement, et européen plus largement, la colonisation a particulièrement concerné des populations de religion musulmane. Depuis la décolonisation d’une part et la fin des grands récits de l’émancipation nationaliste ou anti-impérialiste d’autre part, une forme de pensée post-coloniale s’est développée, accompagnée des désormais incontournables « études » qui vont avec dans le monde universitaire. Elle est appuyée sur une idée simple: l’homme « blanc », européen, occidental, chrétien (et juif aussi) est resté fondamentalement un colonisateur en raison de traits qui lui seraient propres, par essence en quelque sorte : raciste, impérialiste, dominateur, etc. Par conséquent, les anciens colonisés sont restés des dominés, des victimes de cet homme « blanc », européen, occidental, judéo-chrétien… À partir des années 1970, à l’occasion de la crise économique qui commence et de l’installation d’une immigration venue de ses anciennes colonies, cette manière de voir postcoloniale va peu à peu phagocyter la pensée de l’émancipation ouvrière classique et de la lutte des classes qui s’est développée depuis la Révolution industrielle et incarnée dans le socialisme notamment. La figure du « damné de la terre » va ainsi se replier sur celle de l’ancien colonisé, donc de l’immigré désormais, c’est-à-dire celui qui est différent, qui est « l’autre ». Non plus principalement à raison de sa position dans le processus de production économique ou de sa situation sociale mais de son pays d’origine, de la couleur de sa peau, de son origine ethnique puis, plus récemment, de sa religion. Et ce, précisément au moment même où de nouvelles lectures, radicalisées, de l’islam deviennent des outils de contestation des régimes en place dans le monde arabo-musulman. (…) Toute une partie de la gauche, politique, associative, syndicale, intellectuelle, orpheline du grand récit socialiste et communiste, va trouver dans le combat pour ces nouveaux damnés de la terre une nouvelle raison d’être alors qu’elle se convertit très largement aux différentes formes du libéralisme. Politique avec les droits de l’Homme et la démocratie libérale contre les résidus du totalitarisme communiste ; économique avec la loi du marché et le capitalisme financier contre l’étatisme et le keynésianisme ; culturel avec l’émancipation individuelle à raison de l’identité propre de chacun plutôt que collective. En France, la forme d’antiracisme qui se développe dans les années 1980 sous la gauche au pouvoir témoigne bien de cette évolution. À partir de là, on peut aisément dérouler l’histoire des trente ou quarante dernières années pour arriver à la situation actuelle. Être du côté des victimes et des dominés permet de se donner une contenance morale voire un but politique alors que l’on a renoncé, dans les faits sinon dans le discours, à toute idée d’émancipation collective et de transformation de la société autrement qu’au travers de l’attribution de droits individuels aux victimes et aux dominés précisément. À partir du moment où ces victimes et ces dominés sont incarnés dans la figure de « l’autre» que soi-même, ils ne peuvent en aucun cas avoir tort et tout ce qu’ils font, disent, revendiquent, devient un élément indissociable de leur identité de victime et de dominé. Dans un tel cadre, l’homme « blanc », européen, occidental, judéo-chrétien… ne peut donc jamais, par construction, avoir raison, quoi qu’il dise ou fasse. Il est toujours déjà coupable et dominateur. On retrouve là la dérive essentialiste dont on parlait plus haut. Pour toute une partie de la gauche, chez les intellectuels notamment, tout ceci est devenu une doxa. Tout questionnement, toute remise en question, toute critique étant instantanément considérée à la fois comme une mécompréhension tragique de la société, de l’Histoire et des véritables enjeux contemporains. Mais aussi comme une atteinte insupportable au Bien, à la seule et unique morale, et comme le signe d’une attitude profondément réactionnaire, raciste, « islamophobe », etc. C’est pour cette raison, me semble-t-il, que l’on retrouve aujourd’hui, dans le débat intellectuel et plus largement public, une violence que l’on avait oubliée depuis l’époque de la guerre froide. Tout désaccord, toute nuance, tout questionnement est y immédiatement disqualifié. (…) Ce qui est intéressant en l’espèce, chez ces « nouvelles » féministes – on pourrait plutôt parler de post-féminisme d’ailleurs -, c’est qu’elles enrobent leur discours de toute une rhétorique  dite « intersectionnelle » du nom du concept forgé par l’universitaire Kimberlé Crenshaw en 1993 (dans un article de la Stanford Law Review). Le but est de montrer que la lutte féministe et la lutte antiraciste peuvent se recouper pour défendre les minorités opprimées après les difficultés des mouvements identitaires des années 1970-80 à unir leurs forces (notamment après l’échec des « Rainbow Coalitions »1 et l’affaire Anita Hill/Clarence Thomas2) et à s’articuler ensuite aux revendications sociales. Or, ce qui pouvait être adapté aux Etats-Unis des années 1980-90 ne l’est pas à la France d’aujourd’hui, pour tout un ensemble de raisons qu’il serait long de détailler ici. Tout ce discours que l’on retrouve dans l’idée de convergence des luttes également ces derniers temps masque en réalité une forme de hiérarchisation implicite entre les différentes minorités à défendre. Et, comme on le constate à chaque fois, les exemples que vous citez sont très clairs : ce ne sont pas les femmes qui sont en haut de la liste, ni d’ailleurs les homosexuels. Ce qui prévaut systématiquement, y compris chez ces post-féministes, c’est l’attention à des critères identitaires de type ethno-raciaux ou religieux. Ce qui induit d’étranges alliances et de bien plus étranges contradictions encore puisque, par exemple, on retrouve des militants du progressisme des mœurs, favorables aux droits des femmes ou des homosexuels aux côtés de militants islamistes qui sont très conservateurs en matière de mœurs. Dans ce post-féminisme, on n’hésite plus désormais à parler d’émancipation de la femme à propos de jeunes filles portant le voile islamique, au prétexte qu’elles auraient librement choisi de se soumettre à des règles religieuses qui sont pourtant explicitement contraires à l’égalité entre hommes et femmes. La confusion est totale, sur le plan philosophique, entre liberté, consentement et choix. Mais aussi sur le plan politique puisque dans toute une partie de la gauche, ce genre de renversement idéologique apparaît désormais comme tout à fait normal. On en a eu récemment un exemple frappant avec l’affaire de la présidente de la section de l’Unef de Paris-Sorbonne, qui porte un voile islamique. (…) il y a un dévoiement d’une partie de la lutte antiraciste, devenue relativiste et essentialiste. Là encore, le fait que des organisations (associations, syndicats, partis) qui se réclament de la gauche, du projet progressiste, de l’émancipation collective… en viennent à adopter ou à justifier l’idée qu’on puisse se rassembler dans des réunions « non mixtes », entre « racisés », pour lutter contre le racisme, est d’une incohérence philosophique et politique totale. Si la gauche, c’est ça, alors il n’y a plus de gauche. C’est aussi simple que cela. Tout le combat historique pour l’universalisme, l’humanisme, contre le racisme, pour l’émancipation… perd son sens. Derrière de telles idées, on trouve finalement une forme de racisme brut et qui ne se cache même plus chez certains auteurs et certains militants de la mouvance dite « décoloniale » ou « indigéniste ». Je pense à Houria Bouteldja notamment dans son livre Les Blancs, les Juifs et nous paru en 2016. Ce racisme, venu du raisonnement sur la colonisation dont on parlait plus haut, conduit à rendre responsables et coupables de toutes les injustices, de toutes les discriminations et de tous les crimes… les « blancs », par un processus d’essentialisation pur et simple. De telles idées sont ultra-minoritaires, mais cela ne les rend pas moins dangereuses par le véritable terrorisme intellectuel qu’elles font peser sur toute cette gauche, sur nombre de médias notamment qui n’osent pas en révéler le caractère aussi fallacieux intellectuellement que destructeur politiquement et socialement. S’il y a un politiquement correct, c’est bien là qu’il se trouve : dans le refus non seulement de dire ce que l’on voit mais surtout de voir ce que l’on voit comme nous y incitait Péguy. Et gare à celui, surtout s’il est un « mâle blanc », qui ose ne serait-ce que constater cette dérive. Il sera immédiatement accusé d’être à son tour un « identitaire » et, évidemment, raciste, sexiste, islamophobe… Toute réalité, on n’ose même pas parler de vérité, est abolie au profit d’une vision purement idéologique qui ne fonctionne que par la terreur qu’elle fait régner. Laurent Bouvet
Aujourd’hui, ce jeune si ’brun’ auquel on demandait plus qu’au ’petit blond’ d’à côté est aux USA. Il m’a dit récemment : ’Je voudrais revoir mon prof de sixième. Celui-ci lui avait dit : ’Jamais tu n’iras au-delà de la cinquième’… Aujourd’hui, les Nations unies le sollicitent. Il a réussi sa vie, mais garde en tête ce prof ! Acteur de l’emploi
C’est toujours les mêmes métiers qui reviennent pour les filles et les mêmes métiers pour les garçons (garde d’enfants, vendeuse pour les filles, et mécanicien, plombier pour les garçons. Acteur de l’emploi
L’humoriste Yassine Belattar (…) est venu à Nantes, pour rencontrer les proches d’Aboubakar Fofana, tué le 3 juillet par un tir policier, parler aux animateurs du quartier du Breil où a eu lieu le drame, aux avocats de la famille… Sans mettre en avant sa nouvelle casquette de membre du Conseil présidentiel des villes. L’humoriste issu des banlieues franciliennes a une voix qui porte, quitte à faire grincer des dents, et il n’est pas du genre à la fermer quand un sujet lui tient à cœur. « Ça sert à quoi, sinon, d’être artiste ? » Jordan, 24 ans, habitant du Breil et  «meilleur ami» d’Aboubakar se tient à ses côtés. Ils partagent la même indignation.  « Pendant 48 heures, notre ami s’est fait traiter de voyou. Il a été insulté sur les réseaux sociaux. Des commentaires racistes se sont réjouis de sa mort ! Une double peine pour sa famille,  se désole le jeune Nantais.  « Tout ça parce que la police – via les médias- a laissé croire qu’il avait été tué dans un acte de légitime défense »,  renchérit Yassine. Ils racontent : «  Ce garçon de 22 ans vivait à Nantes depuis un an et neuf mois. Ok, il avait fait des conneries à Garges-lès-Gonesses, difficile d’y échapper quand on grandit dans l’une des banlieues les plus mal famées de France. Mais, fort d’une famille très unie, aimante, il était parti à Nantes pour se reconstruire, trouver du travail. Et il est victime d’un fait divers affreux. »  Yassine Belattar ajoute : « Je suis tombé de ma chaise quand je me suis rendu compte que le policier avait menti ! » Le drame a provoqué cinq nuits d’émeutes à Nantes : 175 voitures brûlées, une trentaine de bâtiments public et commerces dégradés ou ravagés par des incendies… Un choc pour la ville.  « En banlieue parisienne, ça aurait été bien pire, affirme Belattar.  Ici, les habitants espèrent encore dans la justice, les associations sont présentes dans des quartiers qui ne sont pas éloignés du centre-ville. Mais la violence n’est pas une solution. Ce n’est pas en brûlant une bibliothèque qu’on va faire revivre Aboubakar. Le problème des émeutes, c’est qu’au bout d’un moment, ça devient comme une espèce de jeu pour des très jeunes gens. Et dans cinq ans, à cause de ça, le gamin qui aura marqué Breil sur son CV ne va pas forcément se faire rappeler ». Ils ne veulent pas évoquer les suites judiciaires de cette affaire, pour laisser le champ aux avocats de la famille. Mais l’humoriste, confirmant que le CRS auteur du tir est d’origine maghrébine, balaie l’hypothèse d’un homicide raciste :  « Pour nous, ce n’est pas un Rebeu qui a tué un Noir. C’est un policier qui a tué un jeune. Voilà le problème. »  Jordan et lui espèrent que le « mensonge » initial du policier, provoquera un déclic,  « un renouveau »,  dans les relations devenues détestables entre les forces de l’ordre et les jeunes.  « C’est peut-être l’occasion d’ouvrir une nouvelle page. Il faut qu’ils se parlent. Qu’ils crèvent l’abcès pour de vrai. Oui, des policiers n’en peuvent plus de se faire insulter. Oui, certains peuvent friser le  burn-out . Oui, les gens des quartiers se font maltraiter, insultés eux aussi et ont peur de la police, contrairement aux gens des centres-villes, martèle l’humoriste. Ouest France
Dans les cas de crime flagrant ou de délit flagrant […], toute personne a qualité pour en appréhender l’auteur et le conduire devant l’officier de police judiciaire le plus proche. Code de procédure pénale (article 73)
Monsieur Alexandre BENALLA est abasourdi par l’utilisation médiatique et politique de son action du 1er mai 2018 sur deux fauteurs de trouble qui agressaient les policiers. Monsieur BENALLA, en sa qualité de chargé de mission, adjoint au chef de cabinet du Président de la République, a été invité par la DOPC de la Préfecture de police de Paris, à observer les opérations de maintien de l’ordre à l’occasion des manifestations du 1er mai, annoncées pour être particulièrement violentes. Il a été accueilli et équipé par les services de police qui lui ont assigné différentes positions. A l’occasion de cette observation, Monsieur BENALLA a pu compléter ses connaissances du maintien de l’ordre et n’avait pas vocation à intervenir personnellement sur ces opérations. Toutefois, témoin des agissements de deux individus particulièrement virulents et de l’apparent dépassement des capacités opérationnelles des policiers sur place, Monsieur BENALLA a pris l’initiative de prêter main forte au dispositif en aidant à la maîtrise de ces personnes. Cette action vigoureuse mais menée sans violence n’a causé aucune blessure. Les individus ont pu être interpellés, présentés à un officier de police judiciaire, et n’ont déposé plainte contre personne. Monsieur BENALLA a immédiatement rendu compte de de son intervention personnelle qui lui a été vivement reprochée. Il a fait l’objet d’une sanction administrative de la part de son employeur. Cette initiative personnelle de Monsieur BENALLA, qui s’inscrit dans le cadre des dispositions de l’article 73 du code de procédure pénale et n’a eu aucune conséquence pour les personnes interpellées, sert manifestement aujourd’hui à porter atteinte à la Présidence de la République dans des conditions qui défient l’entendement. Monsieur BENALLA est un serviteur de l’Etat et n’a jamais failli dans cet engagement. Il collabore pleinement avec l’institution judiciaire et appelle chacun à garder sa raison. Mes Laurent-Franck Lienard et Audrey Gadot (avocats d’Alexandre Benalla)
Ne relayer pas l’article de libération parlant de rétropédalage concernant tolbiac. Ce n’est que mensonges et calomnie. Après avoir voulu nous faire taire nous empêcher de parler, après nous avoir voulu nous intimider et nous faire peur, après nous avoir lâchés à la vindicte populaire et aux chiens fascistes, aujourd’hui ils mentent comme des arracheurs de dents pour nous discréditer. La journaliste en question a demander le contact avec les témoins ce qui lui a été refusé pour protéger les témoins qui ont rdv dans la semaine avec l’avocat. Elle a ensuite sollicité Leila qui lui a répondu qu’elle ne donnait aucune interview. Cet article est un torchon, et toute la machine politico-médiatique se met en marche contre des étudiants résistants. ON NE LÂCHERA RIEN !
hasta la victoria siempre ! Taha Bouhafs (24.04.2018)
C’est une rumeur qui a enflé depuis ce vendredi, jusqu’à prendre des proportions énormes et qui semble prendre de court aujourd’hui tous ses protagonistes. L’un d’eux, Taha Bouhafs, militant insoumis grenoblois âgé d’une vingtaine d’années est l’ex-candidat de la France insoumise aux dernières législatives en Isère. Le candidat malheureux aux élections de juin 2017 a participé au blocus de la faculté de Tolbiac et se retrouve depuis quelques jours pris sur les charbons ardents des réseaux sociaux. Le militant, qui a relayé certaines rumeurs de violence sans avoir vérifié leur véracité est aujourd’hui la cible d’une violente campagne de dénigrement. Le campus de Tolbiac, occupé par des étudiants qui militaient contre la loi ORE (qui instaure une sélection à l’entrée de l’université) depuis le 26 mars dernier, a été évacué par les CRS ce vendredi tôt dans la matinée. Si l’évacuation s’est fait dans un climat de tension, les confrontations violentes redoutées n’ont finalement pas eu lieu, malgré quelques accrochages. Pourtant, assez rapidement, une rumeur faisant état d’un blessé grave imputable à l’intervention des forces de l’ordre a été relayée sur les réseaux sociaux. Le magazine en ligne Reporterre a le premier relayé trois témoignages faisant état d’une chute grave. Des témoignages confus évoquaient tour à tour « une chute », « une flaque de sang », « un homme inanimé » gisant au sol, « un homme entre la vie et la mort », et même un décès. Problème, personne n’a réussi au bout de plusieurs jours, à mettre la main sur ce soi-disant blessé grave et la préfecture de police a démenti cette version dès ce vendredi. Face aux rumeurs de violences et au sous-entendus complotistes, Libération a finalement publié ce mardi une enquête fouillée qui démonte les rumeurs faisant état d’un blessé grave. Selon le quotidien, qui cite le magazine Reporterre, les témoins qui affirmaient avoir vu le blessé grave n’étaient pas des témoins directs et leur témoignage est infondé. Reporterre, qui a mené en interne une contre-enquête va dans le même sens et reconnaît que ces témoignages étaient « fallacieux ». Taha Bouhafs, qui était à Tolbiac au moment de l’évacuation persiste pourtant et remet en cause l’enquête de Libé. Le militant insoumis, dans un post Facebook aux accents victimaires, accuse le quotidien national de « mensonges et de calomnie ». Il assure que le contact des témoins a été « refusé » à la journaliste pour les « protéger » car ils ont « rendez-vous dans la semaine avec l’avocat ». Là aussi, Reporterre met à mal cette version et assure que l’un des prétendus témoins, qui devait rencontrer un avocat, a fait faux-bond deux fois au rendez-vous juridique… Taha Bouhafs est depuis ce mercredi ciblé sur les réseaux sociaux, par des internautes qui lui reprochent d’avoir relayé des accusations graves sans les avoir vérifiées. Il avait également affirmé dans un Tweet que « les CRS avaient épongé le sang des étudiants à l’intérieur de la Fac pour ne laisser aucune trace » (son compte Twitter est aujourd’hui protégé). (…)  le député FN Gilbert Collard a publié une vidéo de l’évacuation où on voit Taha Bouhafs face aux forces de l’ordre. Le jeune homme, visiblement à bout de nerfs, interpelle et insulte les CRS impassibles qui l’empêchent de franchir le cordon de sécurité. (…) Face au flot de critiques, le militant a publié un nouveau communiqué ce mercredi, il y assure que « l’évacuation ne s’est pas faite dans le calme » mais reconnaît ne pas avoir été « témoin direct de l’événement ». Contacté par la rédaction de France 3, Taha Bouhafs n’a pour le moment pas directement répondu à nos questions. France 3 régions
L’affaire Benalla évoque un climat nauséabond de basse police et de cabinet privé au cœur de l’Élysée. Cette privatisation de la sécurité présidentielle, avec ses dérives barbouzardes, dévoile la part d’ombre du monarchisme macronien. C’est une alerte sur la dérive de cette présidence vers un pouvoir encore plus sans partage du chef de l’État, dans une marche consulaire, avec coup de force permanent. Edwy Plenel (Mediapart)
Ce qui paraissait au départ n’être qu’une affaire subalterne de brutalité individuelle commise par un sous-fifre se change en affaire d’Etat. Pourquoi ? A cause du mensonge. Le gorille n’a pas été sanctionné, mais protégé. Sur ordre de qui, sinon du président lui-même ? Et pourquoi cette mansuétude ? On craint de comprendre : diverses sources corroborées par d’autres vidéos montre qu’Alexandre Benalla vivait en fait dans l’intimité du couple présidentiel, qu’il accompagnait le chef de l’Etat dans ses visites officielles mais aussi dans ses activités privées, au tennis, au ski ou pendant ses vacances. Pourquoi (…) s’en remettre à un affidé, alors même qu’il est sans réelle qualification et connu pour son impulsivité ? Parce que c’est un proche, qui a rendu tant de services, ou qui en sait trop ? Hypothèses redoutables… Laurent Joffrin (Libération)
Ces faits montrent « qu’il existe au ‘château’ des nervis au statut flou, chargés d’opaques sinon basses besognes. On se croirait revenu au sale temps des barbouzeries orchestrées par le SAC gaulliste. Cette découverte fissure l’image d’Emmanuel Macron, qui a toujours insisté sur l’exemplarité et l’intégrité nécessaire à sa fonction. La communication présidentielle, jusque-là parfaitement lissée, a volé en éclats. Et l’on constate que le vieux monde, rance, est toujours bien là. La tentative manifeste d’étouffer le scandale est explosive. Pourquoi ce président, qui dès son arrivée n’avait pas hésité à virer le chef d’état-major des armées pour quelques mots critiques sur le budget de la Défense, a-t-il été incapable de se défaire d’un collaborateur instable traînant déjà plusieurs casseroles ? Pourquoi l’Elysée avait-il besoin de cet homme, alors qu’il existe un service officiel pour cela, le Groupe de sécurité de la présidence de la République (GSPR) ? Quelle était la relation exacte entre le candidat-puis-président Macron et cet homme qui le suivait comme son ombre ? En ne traitant pas cette affaire comme elle aurait dû l’être, l’Elysée a ouvert la boîte des mille questions légitimes, mais forcément embarrassantes. Pascal Riché (L’Obs)
Les égards et avantages dont il bénéficiait avant l’affaire témoignent tout à la fois de la grande confiance que lui accordait le chef de l’État que des tâches ambiguës dont il s’acquittait pour lui. Récent bénéficiaire d’un appartement de fonction quai Branly à Paris, Alexandre Benalla disposait également d’une voiture de fonction équipée de tous les attributs d’un véhicule de police haut de gamme. À la demande du directeur de cabinet du président de la République, il s’était également vu attribuer un badge lui donnant accès à l’ensemble des locaux de l’Assemblée nationale dont l’Hémicycle. De quoi s’interroger sur l’étendue de son champ d’action au service du président de la République. (…) Selon nos informations, c’est notamment lui qui aurait supervisé la sécurisation du Palais de l’Élysée, notamment l’installation des barrières de plots rétractables rue du Faubourg-Saint-Honoré, après avoir démontré au chef de l’État qu’un commando déterminé et aguerri pourrait mettre moins de cinq minutes à atteindre son bureau depuis la rue. De quoi mettre en porte-à-faux le commandement militaire de l’Élysée, officiellement en charge de la sécurisation du Palais. Au fil du temps, le poids et l’influence d’Alexandre Benalla à l’Élysée ont fini par agacer fortement. Notamment au sein de l’équipe officielle chargée de la protection du président, le GSPR, qui dépend du ministère de l’Intérieur. Avec Emmanuel Macron, il travaillait d’égal à égal avec l’équipe d’Alexandre Benalla. De quoi nourrir de solides inimitiés, et pas qu’avec le GSPR. Face à l’omniprésence du garde du corps du président sur le terrain et ses velléités de diriger l’ensemble des opérations, l’agacement des forces de l’ordre n’a fait que grandir. La semaine dernière encore, alors que l’équipe de France de football revenait victorieuse de sa campagne de Russie, un incident a opposé Alexandre Benalla et un gendarme sur le tarmac de l’aéroport. Décrit comme «agité et très autoritaire», il tente de prendre en main le dispositif de sécurité, jusqu’à ce qu’un gendarme lui demande qui il est. «Vous me manquez de respect», réplique-t-il alors en exhibant le pin qui atteste qu’il travaille à l’Élysée et en ajoutant: «Le préfet, je l’emmerde.» Selon plusieurs témoignages, Alexandre Benalla est coutumier de ces coups de sang. À la manière d’Emmanuel Macron, qu’il admire au-delà de tout pour avoir «disrupté» l’élection présidentielle, lui veut «disrupter» la sécurité présidentielle. Au total, ce sont quatre services différents qui s’occupent de la sécurité du président de la République. Lequel avait engagé une réflexion pour rationaliser l’ensemble. Il était notamment question de fusionner le GSPR et le commandement militaire pour former un organe de protection unique. Pour avoir participé à la réflexion et en avoir initié le chantier, Alexandre Benalla était suspecté de vouloir prendre la tête de cette sorte de secret service à la française. Une sorte de revanche pour lui, qui avait très mal vécu la fin de la campagne présidentielle en 2017. Approché par En marche! pour assurer la sécurité du candidat Macron, Alexandre Benalla recrute des gardes du corps et entre très vite dans les petits papiers du futur président. Il y a d’un côté l’équipe politique, le premier cercle de la macronie, de l’autre l’équipe sécurité, elle aussi au contact d’Emmanuel Macron quasiment 24 heures sur 24 et 7 jours sur 7. C’est dans cette période que se crée son lien d’amitié avec ce candidat qu’il adore. Comme beaucoup de ceux qui approchent Emmanuel Macron, il tombe en admiration devant lui. Au point d’éprouver un sentiment de dépossession lorsque l’État entre dans le jeu et dépêche des policiers du SPHP (service de protection des hautes personnalités) pour assurer sa protection. Il faut passer la main, les frictions sont nombreuses. Car les policiers observent d’un très mauvais œil les libertés que prend Emmanuel Macron avec sa sécurité personnelle. Les contraintes de l’État d’un côté, la liberté revendiquée d’un candidat de l’autre. Entre les deux, les gardes du corps privés d’Alexandre Benalla, qui cèdent tout au patron. Comme ce jour de mars 2017 à Mayotte lorsqu’Emmanuel Macron décide, malgré un retard important, de traverser une rue bondée pour tenir un meeting en plein air, alors que la nuit est déjà noire. «C’est de la folie», souffle alors un policier selon qui aucune des conditions élémentaires de sécurité n’était réunie ce soir-là. Mais pas pour les gardes du corps d’Emmanuel Macron. Ce sont d’ailleurs eux que l’on retrouve derrière le candidat, Alexandre Benalla en tête, dans l’entre-deux-tours de la campagne présidentielle lorsqu’il décide d’aller au contact des salariés de Whirlpool dont l’usine va fermer. Ils viennent de recevoir la visite de Marine Le Pen, le climat est survolté, le chaos indescriptible. Il a bien sûr été fortement recommandé à Emmanuel Macron de ne pas se rendre sur le site. «C’est pas les mecs de la sécurité qu’il faut écouter. […] Il faut prendre le risque. Il faut aller au cœur à chaque fois. Si vous écoutez les mecs de la sécurité, vous finissez comme Hollande. Peut-être que vous êtes en sécurité, mais vous êtes mort», lance-t-il alors à ses équipes. La prise de risque physique s’avérera payante. Ceux qui lui auront permis de le prendre en tireront profit et une solide réputation de «cow-boys». Une fois élu président de la République, Emmanuel Macron emmène Alexandre Benalla avec lui au Palais. C’est même lui qui l’accompagne le soir de son élection lors de sa grande marche à travers la cour du Louvre. Quelques jours plus tôt, c’est aussi lui qui avait joué le rôle d’Emmanuel Macron pour les repérages de la séquence. Pour ce président qui ne veut rien sacrifier de sa précieuse liberté, son garde du corps est celui qui lui permet de sortir du cadre extrêmement contraint qu’impose sa fonction. On retrouve d’ailleurs Benalla au côté du chef de l’État sur presque toutes les images disruptives qui façonnent l’image d’un président jeune et moderne, en balade à vélo au Touquet, en ski à La Mongie ou sur un terrain de foot à Marseille. Malgré la sanction disciplinaire infligée par le directeur de cabinet du président, Patrick Strzoda, après les événements du 1er Mai, Alexandre Benalla est resté jusqu’au bout dans le premier cercle. Il était notamment présent dans le bus des Bleus lors de leur descente des Champs-Élysées la semaine dernière. Le Figaro
Sous Emmanuel Macron, les deux équipes – celle du GSPR et celle d’Alexandre Benalla – travaillaient d’égal à égal, et ce dispositif a fait naître d’importantes rivalités. En théorie, les déplacements du chef de l’Etat sont protégés par les policiers et gendarmes d’élite du GSPR. Mais interrogé sur sa mission à l’Elysée, Alexandre Benalla, alors âgé de 25 ans, se vantait de gérer « toute la sécurité privée » autour du chef de l’Etat. D’après nos informations, le jeune gendarme réserviste travaillait d’ailleurs activement à une fusion des différents services en charge de la sécurité du chef de l’Etat: entre policiers et gendarmes, au sein et à l’extérieur de l’Elysée. Une sorte de « Secret Service », du nom de agents qui assurent la sécurité du président américain et la Maison-Blanche, à la française. Une idée qui devait permettre de corriger des « incohérences » dans les moyens de communication utilisés par les différents agents, et qui a été approuvé par Emmanuel Macron. Le projet a fait l’objet de plusieurs réunions au Palais, avec des annonces prévues pour le mois de septembre. Ce nouveau service cherchait par ailleurs un local, avec en tête l’actuelle salle de presse. Mais malgré l’aval présidentiel, il n’était pas du goût de tous. L’idée déplaisait notamment au ministère de l’Intérieur, croit savoir le JDD. Des éléments qui alimentent l’hypothèse selon laquelle la fuite de la vidéo, mais surtout l’identification de Benalla sur les images des violences du 1er mai, pourraient directement être liées à ces rivalités et tensions. Une question qui se pose légitimement, tant l’attitude du jeune protégé d’Emmanuel Macron semble avoir fait grincer des dents. BFMTV
Benalla voulait aller plus loin : avec d’autres, il faisait partie du comité de pilotage sur la création d’une direction de la sécurité de la présidence de la République (DSPR), destinée à chapeauter toute la protection du chef de l’État. « L’idée était de reprendre la main, de devenir autonome par rapport au GSPR, qui dépend de l’Intérieur, d’ouvrir le recrutement à des profils mieux adaptés, tout en ayant la main sur la formation. C’était un projet de la présidence, validé au plus haut niveau. » Macron en avait accepté le principe, ce qui ne plaisait guère à la Place Beauvau. « Ça ne se fera pas », avaient assuré des responsables policiers, refusant même de participer aux réunions budgétaires. De quoi attiser les rivalités. « Ce jeune de 26 ans qui recadre tout le monde ne pouvait que se créer des inimitiés dans la police », poursuit cet ami pour lequel, si les premières vidéos ont été diffusées par les réseaux de La France insoumise, l’identification ultérieure de Benalla semble signée : « Le coup vient de l’Intérieur. » Au-delà d’une sanction initiale (deux semaines de mise à pied avec suspension de salaire), de nouvelles révélations sur l’appartement de fonction qu’il s’était vu attribuer à Paris, quai Branly (là où résidait jadis Mazarine, la fille cachée de François Mitterand), sur sa Renault Talisman de fonction ou sur son confortable salaire de 7.113 euros brut mensuels posent question : pourquoi tant de faveurs? Volonté de préserver un proche qui connaît nombre de ses secrets? Dérive du système monarchique français, où le chef de l’État donne ses ordres au GSPR, à la différence du Secret service américain, qui impose ses exigences? JDD
« Sentant le vent tourner en recevant des appels de journalistes, il y a trois jours, à propos de la vidéo le mettant en cause», comme le raconte une source policière au Figaro, Alexandre Benalla, aux abois, aurait alors tenté d’allumer un contre-feu en cherchant d’autres séquences de la scène de la Contrescarpe, susceptibles, à ses yeux, de le dédouaner. Le «chargé de mission» aurait alors sollicité un contrôleur général affecté à l’état-major de la DOPC, réputé proche de lui. Ce haut fonctionnaire, dont le nom avait publiquement circulé l’hiver dernier pour le très prisé poste de directeur de la sécurité du PSG, aurait consenti à rendre ce précieux «service». Sans en avertir a priori son directeur, le contrôleur général aurait alors demandé à un jeune commissaire, lui aussi affecté à l’état-major de l’ordre public, de sélectionner la séquence. Il se trouve que ce dernier, considéré comme un fonctionnaire jusqu’ici irréprochable et très prometteur, était aussi place de la Contrescarpe ce fameux 1er Mai, avec un détachement de CRS, afin de libérer les lieux occupés par un reliquat de militants anarcho-autonomes. Sur place, il aurait même croisé Alexandre Benalla, avant de rédiger une fiche de «mise à disposition» de la personne maîtrisée. «C’est la preuve que ce commissaire n’a rien dissimulé», assure un de ses pairs dans la police, convaincu qu’«il s’est trouvé là à la mauvaise heure, au mauvais moment». «Connu comme le loup blanc des services d’ordre parisien, poursuit en off ce fonctionnaire, Benalla était aussi redouté sur le terrain en raison d’une proximité avec le chef de l’État dont il ne se cachait pas…» Le soir du 1er Mai, Alexandre Benalla s’était ainsi invité à la salle d’information et de commandement (SIC) de la DOPC, au moment où le ministre de l’Intérieur et le préfet de police étaient venus soutenir les forces après une éprouvante journée. Mais ce n’est qu’en voyant la vidéo le lendemain que le grand patron de la police parisienne a découvert qu’Alexandre Benalla avait été dans le dispositif. Après s’être exécuté, en faisant copie de la séquence de vidéoprotection demandée, le jeune commissaire l’a transmise à un officier. Lequel, au printemps dernier, est passé au grade de commandant. À la surprise de syndicats, dont l’un d’eux parle de «circonstances rocambolesques». Une promotion à laquelle s’en est ajoutée une autre, dans la foulée, puisqu’il a été bombardé «officier de liaison» à l’Élysée. Alors que le parquet de Paris a par ailleurs cosaisi l’Inspection générale de la police nationale (IGPN, «police des polices»), les trois fonctionnaires ont été suspendus à titre conservatoire jusqu’à quatre mois, en l’absence de poursuite judiciaire. Samedi matin, ils ont cependant été placés en garde à vue pour «détournement d’images issues d’un système de vidéo-protection» et «violation du secret professionnel». Face à la polémique qui enfle, Gérard Collomb a «condamné lourdement» des «agissements qui, s’ils devaient être confirmés, […] portent atteinte à l’image d’exemplarité […] de la police nationale». Depuis 48 heures, les investigations sont menées au pas de charge. Après l’audition en toute discrétion, et en qualité de témoin, jeudi, du directeur de cabinet d’Emmanuel Macron, Patrick Strzoda, les policiers ont aussi placé en garde à vue Vincent Crase. Comme pour Alexandre Benalla, cette dernière a été prolongée de 24 heures samedi matin. Ce chef d’escadron de réserve de la gendarmerie, employé de LaREM et proche d’Alexandre Benalla, est lui aussi accusé d’avoir commis des violences sur la place de la Contrescarpe. Les enquêteurs pourraient aussi s’intéresser au «3e homme» présent à ses côtés sur les images. Il s’agit d’un major de la DOPC qui avait pour mission de l’accompagner toute la journée pendant sa «mission d’observation». De ces auditions, qui pourraient éclabousser d’autres protagonistes et les faire tomber comme dans un jeu de dominos, il ressort déjà les contours d’un curieux cercle de relations personnelles, risquant d’écorner l’image de «République exemplaire» promue au plus haut sommet de l’État. Le Figaro
« Alexandre » Benalla, 26 ans, en charge de la protection très rapprochée d’Emmanuel Macron est né en septembre 1991 dans cette ville, une arrière-cour de la banlieue parisienne. Originaire du Maroc, lui qui aurait modifié son prénom pour le franciser, n’a pas laissé le souvenir du solide gaillard aux épaules larges qu’on lui connaît après les images de l’agression commise sur un manifestant le 1er mai dernier à Paris sur la place de la Contrescarpe. (…) Mais « Ben » est ambitieux. « Il avait de l’ambition trop sans doute… Mais il lui manquait un peu d’éducation. Sans lui faire injure, il était lourdaud mais côté physique il en imposait. Même trop. C’était le robocop de l’équipe. Il fallait parfois le retenir », se souvient un réserviste qui a fait sa préparation militaire gendarmerie (PMG) avec lui. Une formation accélérée d’une centaine d’heures qui permet à des civils d’endosser l’uniforme dans la réserve opérationnelle. Il devient gendarme adjoint de réserve militaire du rang avant d’obtenir le grade de brigadier-chef et a pour responsable un certain Sébastien Lecornu, lieutenant de réserve de la gendarmerie et maire de Vernon (Eure), devenu depuis secrétaire d’État à la Transition écologique. (…) « Il ne cachait rien de ses ambitions. Il voulait briller. Il était attiré par le milieu politique, car il savait qu’il pouvait en tirer profit. Moi au bout de 8 ans, je suis toujours simple gendarme… », critique cet ancien qui a côtoyé Alexandre Benalla et qui juge « immorale » cette promotion « au grade de lieutenant-colonel ». Dans un communiqué interne, la gendarmerie indique qu’Alexandre Benalla « n’a plus été employé dans la réserve opérationnelle depuis 2015 et radié en 2017 à sa demande ». Curieusement, il a été intégré comme « spécialiste expert » de la gendarmerie et son grade de lieutenant-colonel lui a été été attribué en raison de son « niveau d’expertise ». Une promotion qui « ulcère » dans les rangs de la gendarmerie. C’est sur proposition de l’Élysée que le brigadier-chef de réserve a en effet été nommé en 2017 lieutenant-colonel de la réserve opérationnelle, la plus prestigieuse, au titre « de la sécurité des installations » sans aucune référence militaire ou universitaire reconnue ou même professionnelle. Une promotion vertigineuse surtout pour son âge. Nous on passe les concours de Saint-Cyr, d’autres l’École militaire inter-armes, ou de Polytechnique ! Au mieux on peut être colonel à 40 ans à quelques exceptions si on a réussi encore le concours de l’École de guerre. C’est plutôt vers 43/44 ans pour la plupart », s’étonne un patron de groupement de gendarmerie. Le Parisien
Ils avaient une attitude extrêmement pacifique, souriante et décontractée. Je ne suis pas certain que ces deux jeunes faisaient partie des manifestants, puis le garçon a pointé un doigt en direction des CRS, sans doute pour dire sa manière de penser sur cette charge. (…) le garçon, à mon sens, fait de la résistance passive et en même temps, il essaie de dialoguer. Naguib Michel Sidhom (photographe et ancien journaliste AFP et Monde)
Presque au contact de la ligne de CRS, on reconnaît sans difficulté les deux manifestants qui seront quelques instants plus tard interpellés par Alexandre Benalla et Vincent Crase. Ce couple, qui parle en grec et en français dans les vidéos et qui n’est pas réapparu depuis, jette alors violemment trois objets sur la ligne de CRS, qui est à quelques mètres d’eux. Juste avant que la jeune femme leur fasse un bras d’honneur. (…) Alors que le manifestant est maîtrisé et à terre, Alexandre Benalla le saisit, le relève, lui donne plusieurs coups, le jette à terre, et enfin lui adresse un violent coup de pied. Ismaël Halissat
Avec le report, à la rentrée, de la révision constitutionnelle, dont l’examen n’était que suspendu à l’Assemblée nationale, l’affaire Benalla a pris, lundi, une ampleur nouvelle car elle affecte, désormais, la mise en oeuvre des réformes voulues par le chef de l’Etat. Même si elle apparaît sage dans ce contexte d’hystérie estivale qui s’est emparée du monde politique, cette décision marque un tournant dans le quinquennat d’Emmanuel Macron. Ce n’est plus Jupiter omnipotent, mais Jupiter empêtré. Et, plus Janus que jamais, le peuple français, royaliste hier encore, se redécouvre des pulsions régicides. La verticalité du pouvoir, qu’était parvenu à rétablir le successeur de François Hollande, vacille, heurtée par les écarts de conduite d’un barbouzard. Mais ce qui doit inquiéter dans cette affaire, ce n’est pas tant ce qu’elle révélerait d’un fonctionnement – assurément perfectible – du pouvoir, c’est qu’elle relance la vieille mécanique du dénigrement. Elites et populistes, progressistes et conservateurs, tout ce que la transformation macronienne compte d’adversaires s’est coalisé en une conjuration des défaitistes, prompte à jeter le bébé avec l’eau du bain. A leurs yeux, le comportement condamnable d’un homme, et la liberté qui lui fut donnée d’agir ainsi, deviennent les symptômes d’un mal plus profond. Selon cette habitude bien française qui consiste à tirer des leçons de tout événement en toutes circonstances, l’affaire Benalla signerait la faillite d’un système et d’une politique. Il n’est qu’à écouter les sermons de Jean-Luc Mélenchon pour s’en convaincre. C’est la revanche de ceux qui ont perdu dans les urnes et dans les rues. Profiter de l’occasion pour instruire le procès du Président, de son équipe et de sa gouvernance, éreinter sa majorité certes maladroite et inexpérimentée, c’est affaiblir le redressement du pays. (…) Ce qui se joue, dans cette tempête de l’été 2018, ce n’est pas seulement une épreuve politique, dont dépendra en partie la capacité du Président à poursuivre avec autorité des réformes courageuses, c’est d’abord une bataille intellectuelle avec les forces de l’ultra-gauche. Laquelle n’hésite pas, il faut le rappeler, à user d’une grande violence dans les manifestations. C’est à cette inversion des valeurs que l’on reconnaît les glissements de l’histoire. Pour que ce triste épisode n’ouvre pas un chapitre aux populismes, les responsables politiques des formations de gouvernement feraient bien de ramener l’affaire Benalla à ce qu’elle est en réalité : un scandale d’été, pas un scandale d’Etat. Jean-François Pécresse
C’est en définitive la conséquence la plus grave de cette affaire, qui menace de ternir dans son ensemble l’action des forces de l’ordre chargées d’encadrer ces manifestations violentes. Or leur comportement lors de ces événements est, compte tenu de la situation, largement exemplaire. Seulement certains journalistes, on l’a vu avec Yann Moix à Calais, conçoivent effectivement la police comme un instrument d’État de nature essentiellement répressive et non comme une force de sécurité et de protection de la population. Dans cette mesure, ils voient dans toutes les bavures, qui sont statistiquement très rares, le signe d’une pratique générale ; ce qu’aucun élément concret ne confirme. (…) La manière dont communiquent les mouvements violents vise à présenter leurs membres comme des jeunes laissant exploser leur colère. Le phénomène serait donc spontané et passionnel. Cette violence est en réalité méthodique et renvoie à une longue tradition de pratiques dites subversives. Les partis ou groupes révolutionnaires veulent renverser l’ordre établi. Pour justifier leur propre violence il leur faut prouver que l’ordre qu’ils combattent est illégitime, qu’il est lui-même violent et injuste. Pour ce faire il leur faut exposer les forces de l’ordre à des situations où leurs concepts opérationnels deviennent inopérants et où elles sont donc amenées à commettre des erreurs et exercer la force de manière excessive ou sur des innocents. Le black block constitue un exemple typique de cette technique. Le public comprend que la police soit habilitée à faire un usage proportionnel de la force contre les manifestants violents. L’objectif du black block est donc d’attirer l’action de la police en dehors de ce cadre. Pour cela les militants ne vont pas créer une manifestation séparée mais au contraire s’immiscer au milieu des manifestants pacifiques. Les organisations ou individus non violents, mais favorables à la cause ou aux moyens d’action du black block, vont quant à eux tâcher d’empêcher l’identification des éléments violents. Par exemple en s’interposant entre le black block et la police ou encore en portant le même genre de vêtements noirs que ces derniers. Les forces de sécurité sont alors confrontées à une alternative. Soit elles agissent et prennent alors le risque de provoquer des victimes collatérales. Soit elles n’agissent pas et laissent faire les violences. En sachant que même lorsqu’elles interviennent, les techniques citées plus haut rendent impossible le rassemblement des preuves ou l’identification des auteurs. Le perfectionnement des téléphones portables a rendu possible une mise en scène de la violence policière qui consiste à capter les images des réactions policières en omettant le travail préalable de harcèlement et de provocation effectué par certains militants violents. Pour faire une guerre civile, il faut être deux. Étant donné la détermination de ces groupes violents à provoquer des incidents, on peut au contraire saluer le professionnalisme des forces de sécurité. Avec la prise vidéo systématique des interventions par les « journalistes indépendants », le petit nombre d’incidents justifiant des sanctions à l’égard des policiers montre que le portrait d’une institution violente et raciste est très éloigné de la réalité. Aussi navrante que soit l’affaire Benalla, elle ne doit pas servir de prétexte afin de discréditer le difficile travail des forces de l’ordre. Alexis Carré
Attention: un théâtre de rue peut en cacher un autre !

Au lendemain d’un couronnement ô combien fêté, saccages et pillages compris, de la diversité d’une équipe de France de football…

Présentée comme « victoire de l’Afrique » à la fois par les plus « réactionnaires » comme les plus « progressistes » …

Mais d’une Afrique que, comme le rappelle l’écrivain algérien Kamel Daoud, il faut quitter pour réussir …

Eclipsant totalement une vraie « bavure » cette fois et cinq nuits d’émeute suite à la mort apparemment accidentelle – mais à caractère non racial en ce pays où l’on vient de bouter le mot même hors de la constitution – il y a à peine trois semaines d’un délinquant multirécidiviste noir refusant une interpellation par un policier d’origine maghrébine
Les griefs n’en finissent pas de s’accumuler sur la tête, nouveau pharmakos, du garde du corps personnel de l’Elysée, pour avoir, comme le montre les images d’avant-interpellation, prêté main-forte à des policiers assaillis par des manifestants particulièrement récalcitrants et déchainés …
Et se voit même reprocher non seulement de s’être procuré, pour assurer sa défense, les images de la séquence complète de son intervention …
Mais d’avoir osé, contre l’assignation identitaire, pousser l’ambition et la volonté d’intégration lui ou sa famille jusqu’à franciser son propre prénom
Comment ne pas voir avec le chercheur Alexis Carré
La véritable banalisation, derrière tout cela, du discours anti-flics des groupuscules violents tentant non seulement d’imposer, à partir de « bavures » statistiquement très rares, le signe d’une pratique générale ?
Mais comment aussi ne pas reconnaitre …
A l’instar de la longue tradition du théâtre de rue palestinien connu sous le nom de Pallywood
Qui vient encore, selon les dires mêmes de leurs dirigeants, de « sacrifier 60 martyrs ainsi que 3 000 blessés dont « nombre d’entre eux avaient quitté leurs uniformes militaires et mis leurs armes de côté » pour « forcer le monde entier à diviser leurs écrans de télévision » …
Le véritable cas d’école que constitue cet épisode des tactiques de subversion de l’ordre établi de ces groupes …
Qui peuvent aller jusqu’à la fabrication desdites « bavures » en poussant les forces de l’ordre à la faute, y compris en se mêlant à des manifestants pacifiques plus ou moins consentants …
Pour, perfectionnement des téléphones portables aidant, finalement mettre en scène la violence policière dénoncée …
En omettant tout simplement des images desdites réactions policières tout le travail préalable de harcèlement et de provocation de la part des militants violents qui les ont motivées ?

Polémique
Affaire Benalla : bien plus qu’un fait divers, l’indicateur d’une décomposition française
Alors que la polémique médiatique se concentre sur les violences honteuses commises par Alexandre Benalla, le garde du corps d’Emmanuel Macron, Alexis Carré s’interroge sur l’identité de l’homme qui filme la scène. Taha Bouhafs, militant insoumis proche de Jean-Luc Mélenchon, est connu pour avoir déjà été présent lors de nombreuses scènes d’agitation similaire.
Atlantico
20 Juillet 2018

Atlantico.fr : L’ampleur que prend « l’affaire Benalla » vous surprend-elle ?

Alexis Carré : Les faits qui sont reprochés à ce chargé de mission de l’Élysée sont difficilement justifiables. C’est aussi le cas de la manière dont sa hiérarchie semble les avoir traités.
Il est toutefois difficile de suivre les nombreuses voix qui voudraient faire de cet incident l’illustration d’un appareil d’État globalement arbitraire, violent et inégalitaire.
Et c’est en définitive la conséquence la plus grave de cette affaire, qui menace de ternir dans son ensemble l’action des forces de l’ordre chargées d’encadrer ces manifestations violentes. Or leur comportement lors de ces événements est, compte tenu de la situation, largement exemplaire.
Seulement certains journalistes, on l’a vu avec Yann Moix à Calais, conçoivent effectivement la police comme un instrument d’État de nature essentiellement répressive et non comme une force de sécurité et de protection de la population. Dans cette mesure, ils voient dans toutes les bavures, qui sont statistiquement très rares, le signe d’une pratique générale ; ce qu’aucun élément concret ne confirme.

L’homme qui a filmé le garde du corps d’Emmanuel Macron en train de rouer de coups un manifestant est Taha Bouhafs, un militant de la France insoumise qui s’est fait déjà connaître pour de nombreuses violences lors de manifestations. Si cette vidéo est accablante pour le garde du corps d’Emmanuel Macron, ne l’est-elle pas au moins autant pour les militants insoumis qui ont provoqué les forces de l’ordre violemment ?

La manière dont communiquent les mouvements violents vise à présenter leurs membres comme des jeunes laissant exploser leur colère. Le phénomène serait donc spontané et passionnel. Cette violence est en réalité méthodique et renvoie à une longue tradition de pratiques dites subversives. Les partis ou groupes révolutionnaires veulent renverser l’ordre établi. Pour justifier leur propre violence il leur faut prouver que l’ordre qu’ils combattent est illégitime, qu’il est lui-même violent et injuste. Pour ce faire il leur faut exposer les forces de l’ordre à des situations où leurs concepts opérationnels deviennent inopérants et où elles sont donc amenées à commettre des erreurs et exercer la force de manière excessive ou sur des innocents. Le black block constitue un exemple typique de cette technique. Le public comprend que la police soit habilitée à faire un usage proportionnel de la force contre les manifestants violents. L’objectif du black block est donc d’attirer l’action de la police en dehors de ce cadre. Pour cela les militants ne vont pas créer une manifestation séparée mais au contraire s’immiscer au milieu des manifestants pacifiques. Les organisations ou individus non violents, mais favorables à la cause ou aux moyens d’action du black block, vont quant à eux tâcher d’empêcher l’identification des éléments violents. Par exemple en s’interposant entre le black block et la police ou encore en portant le même genre de vêtements noirs que ces derniers.
Les forces de sécurité sont alors confrontées à une alternative. Soit elles agissent et prennent alors le risque de provoquer des victimes collatérales. Soit elles n’agissent pas et laissent faire les violences. En sachant que même lorsqu’elles interviennent, les techniques citées plus haut rendent impossible le rassemblement des preuves ou l’identification des auteurs.

Comment se fait-il que les exactions des policiers soient si systématiquement filmées par les mêmes militants ? L’extrême gauche, d’une certaine manière, ne cherche-t-elle pas à susciter les violences pour mieux se victimiser ?

Le perfectionnement des téléphones portables a rendu possible une mise en scène de la violence policière qui consiste à capter les images des réactions policières en omettant le travail préalable de harcèlement et de provocation effectué par certains militants violents.

En somme, les insoumis ont adopté le 1er mai une stratégie proche de la guerre civile ?

Pour faire une guerre civile, il faut être deux. Étant donné la détermination de ces groupes violents à provoquer des incidents, on peut au contraire saluer le professionnalisme des forces de sécurité. Avec la prise vidéo systématique des interventions par les « journalistes indépendants », le petit nombre d’incidents justifiant des sanctions à l’égard des policiers montre que le portrait d’une institution violente et raciste est très éloigné de la réalité. Aussi navrante que soit l’affaire Benalla, elle ne doit pas servir de prétexte afin de discréditer le difficile travail des forces de l’ordre.
Voir aussi:

L’affaire Benalla, un scandale d’été, pas un scandale d’Etat
Non, l’affaire Benalla ne signe pas la faillite d’un système ou d’une politique, comme le voudraient les populistes.
Jean-Francis Pecresse
Les Echos
23/07/2018

Avec le report, à la rentrée, de la révision constitutionnelle, dont l’examen n’était que suspendu à l’Assemblée nationale, l’affaire Benalla a pris, lundi, une ampleur nouvelle car elle affecte, désormais, la mise en oeuvre des réformes voulues par le chef de l’Etat. Même si elle apparaît sage dans ce contexte d’hystérie estivale qui s’est emparée du monde politique, cette décision marque un tournant dans le quinquennat d’Emmanuel Macron.

Ce n’est plus Jupiter omnipotent, mais Jupiter empêtré . Et, plus Janus que jamais, le peuple français, royaliste hier encore, se redécouvre des pulsions régicides. La verticalité du pouvoir, qu’était parvenu à rétablir le successeur de François Hollande, vacille, heurtée par les écarts de conduite d’un barbouzard.

Conjuration des défaitistes

Mais ce qui doit inquiéter dans cette affaire, ce n’est pas tant ce qu’elle révélerait d’un fonctionnement – assurément perfectible – du pouvoir, c’est qu’elle relance la vieille mécanique du dénigrement. Elites et populistes, progressistes et conservateurs, tout ce que la transformation macronienne compte d’adversaires s’est coalisé en une conjuration des défaitistes, prompte à jeter le bébé avec l’eau du bain.

A leurs yeux, le comportement condamnable d’un homme, et la liberté qui lui fut donnée d’agir ainsi, deviennent les symptômes d’un mal plus profond. Selon cette habitude bien française qui consiste à tirer des leçons de tout événement en toutes circonstances, l’affaire Benalla signerait la faillite d’un système et d’une politique. Il n’est qu’à écouter les sermons de Jean-Luc Mélenchon pour s’en convaincre.

Le procès du Président

C’est la revanche de ceux qui ont perdu dans les urnes et dans les rues. Profiter de l’occasion pour instruire le procès du Président , de son équipe et de sa gouvernance, éreinter sa majorité certes maladroite et inexpérimentée, c’est affaiblir le redressement du pays. Bien sûr, passées la suppression de l’ISF et la réforme du Code de Travail, le bilan est incomplet les projets parfois décevants. Une grosse année après l’élection, tout reste à faire pour réduire la sphère publique pour baisser les charges, déréguler l’économie pour doper la croissance, moderniser l’organisation et le financement de la santé pour soigner mieux et moins cher, rénover les banlieues pour relancer l’ascenseur social…

Inversion des valeurs

Mais, fût-elle isolée dans un monde qui se replie sur ses frontières, la direction empruntée est la bonne. A force d’exiger toujours le meilleur, le tempérament national finit par récolter le pire. Ce qui se joue, dans cette tempête de l’été 2018, ce n’est pas seulement une épreuve politique, dont dépendra en partie la capacité du Président à poursuivre avec autorité des réformes courageuses, c’est d’abord une bataille intellectuelle avec les forces de l’ultra-gauche. Laquelle n’hésite pas, il faut le rappeler, à user d’une grande violence dans les manifestations. C’est à cette inversion des valeurs que l’on reconnaît les glissements de l’histoire. Pour que ce triste épisode n’ouvre pas un chapitre aux populismes, les responsables politiques des formations de gouvernement feraient bien de ramener l’affaire Benalla à ce qu’elle est en réalité : un scandale d’été, pas un scandale d’Etat.

Voir également:

Alexandre Benalla, gloire et chute d’un garde du corps

RÉCIT – L’ancien membre du service d’ordre d’En marche! avait pris une importance grandissante à l’Élysée, où il s’était attiré de solides inimitiés.

C’est une série de paires de baffes qui ébranle les fondements du macronisme, menace le chef de l’État et fait vaciller la République. Au fil des révélations sur celui qui les a distribuées ce mardi 1er mai place de la Contrescarpe, à Paris, Alexandre Benalla, le mystère s’épaissit sur le rôle exact du garde du corps du président de la République.

Les égards et avantages dont il bénéficiait avant l’affaire témoignent tout à la fois de la grande confiance que lui accordait le chef de l’État que des tâches ambiguës dont il s’acquittait pour lui. Récent bénéficiaire d’un appartement de fonction quai Branly à Paris, Alexandre Benalla disposait également d’une voiture de fonction équipée de tous les attributs d’un véhicule de police haut de gamme.

À la demande du directeur de cabinet du président de la République, il s’était également vu attribuer un badge lui donnant accès à l’ensemble des locaux de l’Assemblée nationale dont l’Hémicycle. De quoi s’interroger sur l’étendue de son champ d’action au service du président de la République.

À l’Élysée, les mots sont d’ailleurs pesés au trébuchet pour décrire son poste. «Il était chargé de mission rattaché au pôle chefferie du cabinet, explique un conseiller d’Emmanuel Macron. Dans ce cadre, il était en charge de la logistique et de l’organisation des déplacements du président de la République. Il assurait également l’interface entre divers services chargés de la protection du président et du Palais: le GSPR (groupe de sécurité du président de la République), le commandement militaire et la Préfecture de police. Il n’avait aucune fonction, aucune activité et aucune mission au sein du GSPR.»

Voilà pour le cadre général. Dans le détail, Alexandre Benalla était tout de même extrêmement impliqué, et de très près, dans la gestion de la sécurité du chef de l’État.

Selon nos informations, c’est notamment lui qui aurait supervisé la sécurisation du Palais de l’Élysée, notamment l’installation des barrières de plots rétractables rue du Faubourg-Saint-Honoré, après avoir démontré au chef de l’État qu’un commando déterminé et aguerri pourrait mettre moins de cinq minutes à atteindre son bureau depuis la rue. De quoi mettre en porte-à-faux le commandement militaire de l’Élysée, officiellement en charge de la sécurisation du Palais.

Au fil du temps, le poids et l’influence d’Alexandre Benalla à l’Élysée ont fini par agacer fortement. Notamment au sein de l’équipe officielle chargée de la protection du président, le GSPR, qui dépend du ministère de l’Intérieur. Avec Emmanuel Macron, il travaillait d’égal à égal avec l’équipe d’Alexandre Benalla. De quoi nourrir de solides inimitiés, et pas qu’avec le GSPR.

«Le préfet, je l’emmerde»

Face à l’omniprésence du garde du corps du président sur le terrain et ses velléités de diriger l’ensemble des opérations, l’agacement des forces de l’ordre n’a fait que grandir. La semaine dernière encore, alors que l’équipe de France de football revenait victorieuse de sa campagne de Russie, un incident a opposé Alexandre Benalla et un gendarme sur le tarmac de l’aéroport. Décrit comme «agité et très autoritaire», il tente de prendre en main le dispositif de sécurité, jusqu’à ce qu’un gendarme lui demande qui il est. «Vous me manquez de respect», réplique-t-il alors en exhibant le pin’s qui atteste qu’il travaille à l’Élysée et en ajoutant: «Le préfet, je l’emmerde.»

Selon plusieurs témoignages, Alexandre Benalla est coutumier de ces coups de sang. À la manière d’Emmanuel Macron, qu’il admire au-delà de tout pour avoir «disrupté» l’élection présidentielle, lui veut «disrupter» la sécurité présidentielle.

Au total, ce sont quatre services différents qui s’occupent de la sécurité du président de la République. Lequel avait engagé une réflexion pour rationaliser l’ensemble. Il était notamment question de fusionner le GSPR et le commandement militaire pour former un organe de protection unique. Pour avoir participé à la réflexion et en avoir initié le chantier, Alexandre Benalla était suspecté de vouloir prendre la tête de cette sorte de secret service à la française. Une sorte de revanche pour lui, qui avait très mal vécu la fin de la campagne présidentielle en 2017.

Approché par En marche! pour assurer la sécurité du candidat Macron, Alexandre Benalla recrute des gardes du corps et entre très vite dans les petits papiers du futur président. Il y a d’un côté l’équipe politique, le premier cercle de la macronie, de l’autre l’équipe sécurité, elle aussi au contact d’Emmanuel Macron quasiment 24 heures sur 24 et 7 jours sur 7. C’est dans cette période que se crée son lien d’amitié avec ce candidat qu’il adore. Comme beaucoup de ceux qui approchent Emmanuel Macron, il tombe en admiration devant lui. Au point d’éprouver un sentiment de dépossession lorsque l’État entre dans le jeu et dépêche des policiers du SPHP (service de protection des hautes personnalités) pour assurer sa protection. Il faut passer la main, les frictions sont nombreuses.

Sur tous les fronts

Car les policiers observent d’un très mauvais œil les libertés que prend Emmanuel Macron avec sa sécurité personnelle. Les contraintes de l’État d’un côté, la liberté revendiquée d’un candidat de l’autre. Entre les deux, les gardes du corps privés d’Alexandre Benalla, qui cèdent tout au patron. Comme ce jour de mars 2017 à Mayotte lorsqu’Emmanuel Macron décide, malgré un retard important, de traverser une rue bondée pour tenir un meeting en plein air, alors que la nuit est déjà noire. «C’est de la folie», souffle alors un policier selon qui aucune des conditions élémentaires de sécurité n’était réunie ce soir-là. Mais pas pour les gardes du corps d’Emmanuel Macron.

Ce sont d’ailleurs eux que l’on retrouve derrière le candidat, Alexandre Benalla en tête, dans l’entre-deux-tours de la campagne présidentielle lorsqu’il décide d’aller au contact des salariés de Whirlpool dont l’usine va fermer. Ils viennent de recevoir la visite de Marine Le Pen, le climat est survolté, le chaos indescriptible. Il a bien sûr été fortement recommandé à Emmanuel Macron de ne pas se rendre sur le site. «C’est pas les mecs de la sécurité qu’il faut écouter. […] Il faut prendre le risque. Il faut aller au cœur à chaque fois. Si vous écoutez les mecs de la sécurité, vous finissez comme Hollande. Peut-être que vous êtes en sécurité, mais vous êtes mort», lance-t-il alors à ses équipes.

La prise de risque physique s’avérera payante. Ceux qui lui auront permis de le prendre en tireront profit et une solide réputation de «cow-boys».

Une fois élu président de la République, Emmanuel Macron emmène Alexandre Benalla avec lui au Palais. C’est même lui qui l’accompagne le soir de son élection lors de sa grande marche à travers la cour du Louvre. Quelques jours plus tôt, c’est aussi lui qui avait joué le rôle d’Emmanuel Macron pour les repérages de la séquence.

Pour ce président qui ne veut rien sacrifier de sa précieuse liberté, son garde du corps est celui qui lui permet de sortir du cadre extrêmement contraint qu’impose sa fonction. On retrouve d’ailleurs Benalla au côté du chef de l’État sur presque toutes les images disruptives qui façonnent l’image d’un président jeune et moderne, en balade à vélo au Touquet, en ski à La Mongie ou sur un terrain de foot à Marseille.

Malgré la sanction disciplinaire infligée par le directeur de cabinet du président, Patrick Strzoda, après les événements du 1er Mai, Alexandre Benalla est resté jusqu’au bout dans le premier cercle. Il était notamment présent dans le bus des Bleus lors de leur descente des Champs-Élysées la semaine dernière. Comme si le chef de l’État avait fait à ses troupes la même promesse que Didier Deschamps à ses joueurs pendant la Coupe du monde: «Je vous protégerai tous un par un.» Difficile, voire impossible désormais tant l’affaire a pris de l’ampleur et menace de se retourner contre le président de la République. Lequel a dû se résoudre à engager la procédure de licenciement de son collaborateur. Non sans l’avoir eu auparavant au téléphone. Selon le JDD, Emmanuel Macron et Alexandre Benalla se sont parlé dès les débuts de l’affaire.

Voir de même:

Émeutes à Nantes. Yassine Belattar : « Jeunes et police doivent se parler »
Recueilli par François Chrétien
Ouest France
10/07/2018

Venu à Nantes rencontrer les proches du jeune homme tué par un tir policier, l’humoriste Yassine Belattar espère que ce drame servira à enclencher un renouveau dans les relations entre Police et quartiers.

Il est venu à Nantes, pour rencontrer les proches d’Aboubakar Fofana, tué le 3 juillet par un tir policier, parler aux animateurs du quartier du Breil où a eu lieu le drame, aux avocats de la famille… Sans mettre en avant sa nouvelle casquette de membre du Conseil présidentiel des villes. L’humoriste issu des banlieues franciliennes a une voix qui porte, quitte à faire grincer des dents, et il n’est pas du genre à la fermer quand un sujet lui tient à cœur. « Ça sert à quoi, sinon, d’être artiste ? »

« Double peine pour la famille »
Jordan, 24 ans, habitant du Breil et  «meilleur ami» d’Aboubakar se tient à ses côtés. Ils partagent la même indignation.  « Pendant 48 heures, notre ami s’est fait traiter de voyou. Il a été insulté sur les réseaux sociaux. Des commentaires racistes se sont réjouis de sa mort ! Une double peine pour sa famille,  se désole le jeune Nantais.  « Tout ça parce que la police – via les médias- a laissé croire qu’il avait été tué dans un acte de légitime défense »,  renchérit Yassine. Ils racontent : «  Ce garçon de 22 ans vivait à Nantes depuis un an et neuf mois. Ok, il avait fait des conneries à Garges-lès-Gonesses, difficile d’y échapper quand on grandit dans l’une des banlieues les plus mal famées de France. Mais, fort d’une famille très unie, aimante, il était parti à Nantes pour se reconstruire, trouver du travail. Et il est victime d’un fait divers affreux. »  Yassine Belattar ajoute : « Je suis tombé de ma chaise quand je me suis rendu compte que le policier avait menti ! »

« En Ile-de-France, ça aurait été pire »
Le drame a provoqué cinq nuits d’émeutes à Nantes : 175 voitures brûlées, une trentaine de bâtiments public et commerces dégradés ou ravagés par des incendies… Un choc pour la ville.  « En banlieue parisienne, ça aurait été bien pire, affirme Belattar.  Ici, les habitants espèrent encore dans la justice, les associations sont présentes dans des quartiers qui ne sont pas éloignés du centre-ville. Mais la violence n’est pas une solution. Ce n’est pas en brûlant une bibliothèque qu’on va faire revivre Aboubakar. Le problème des émeutes, c’est qu’au bout d’un moment, ça devient comme une espèce de jeu pour des très jeunes gens. Et dans cinq ans, à cause de ça, le gamin qui aura marqué Breil sur son CV ne va pas forcément se faire rappeler ».

« Pas un homicide raciste »
Ils ne veulent pas évoquer les suites judiciaires de cette affaire, pour laisser le champ aux avocats de la famille. Mais l’humoriste, confirmant que le CRS auteur du tir est d’origine maghrébine, balaie l’hypothèse d’un homicide raciste :  « Pour nous, ce n’est pas un Rebeu qui a tué un Noir. C’est un policier qui a tué un jeune. Voilà le problème. »  Jordan et lui espèrent que le « mensonge » initial du policier, provoquera un déclic,  « un renouveau »,  dans les relations devenues détestables entre les forces de l’ordre et les jeunes.  « C’est peut-être l’occasion d’ouvrir une nouvelle page. Il faut qu’ils se parlent. Qu’ils crèvent l’abcès pour de vrai. Oui, des policiers n’en peuvent plus de se faire insulter. Oui, certains peuvent friser le  burn-out . Oui, les gens des quartiers se font maltraiter, insultés eux aussi et ont peur de la police, contrairement aux gens des centres-villes, martèle l’humoriste.  S’il faut faire des Assises, c’est le moment. Et je suis prêt à donner un coup de main pour animer des débats. »

Voir de plus:

Rumeurs de violence à Tolbiac : un ex-candidat de la France Insoumise en Isère pris dans la tempête

Taha Bouhafs, ex-candidat de la France Insoumise aux législatives en Isère s’est retrouvé mêlé ces derniers jours aux événements de Tolbiac et aux rumeurs de violence policière. Le militant, qui a relayé des témoignages infondés est désormais la cible d’une violente campagne de dénigrement.

FT

C’est une rumeur qui a enflé depuis ce vendredi, jusqu’à prendre des proportions énormes et qui semble prendre de court aujourd’hui tous ses protagonistes. L’un d’eux, Taha Bouhafs, militant insoumis grenoblois âgé d’une vingtaine d’années est l’ex-candidat de la France insoumise aux dernières législatives en Isère.

Le candidat malheureux aux élections de juin 2017 a participé au blocus de la faculté de Tolbiac et se retrouve depuis quelques jours pris sur les charbons ardents des réseaux sociaux. Le militant, qui a relayé certaines rumeurs de violence sans avoir vérifié leur véracité est aujourd’hui la cible d’une violente campagne de dénigrement.

Une évacuation, des rumeurs confuses

Le campus de Tolbiac, occupé par des étudiants qui militaient contre la loi ORE (qui instaure une sélection à l’entrée de l’université) depuis le 26 mars dernier, a été évacué par les CRS ce vendredi tôt dans la matinée. Si l’évacuation s’est fait dans un climat de tension, les confrontations violentes redoutées n’ont finalement pas eu lieu, malgré quelques accrochages.

Pourtant, assez rapidement, une rumeur faisant état d’un blessé grave imputable à l’intervention des forces de l’ordre a été relayée sur les réseaux sociaux. Le magazine en ligne Reporterre a le premier relayé trois témoignages faisant état d’une chute grave.

Des témoignages confus évoquaient tour à tour « une chute », « une flaque de sang », « un homme inanimé » gisant au sol, « un homme entre la vie et la mort », et même un décès. Problème, personne n’a réussi au bout de plusieurs jours, à mettre la main sur ce soi-disant blessé grave et la préfecture de police a démenti cette version dès ce vendredi.

Des témoignages « fallacieux »

Face aux rumeurs de violences et au sous-entendus complotistes, Libération a finalement publié ce mardi une enquête fouillée qui démonte les rumeurs faisant état d’un blessé grave. Selon le quotidien, qui cite le magazine Reporterre, les témoins qui affirmaient avoir vu le blessé grave n’étaient pas des témoins directs et leur témoignage est infondé. Reporterre, qui a mené en interne une contre-enquête va dans le même sens et reconnaît que ces témoignages étaient « fallacieux« .

Taha Bouhafs, qui était à Tolbiac au moment de l’évacuation persiste pourtant et remet en cause l’enquête de Libé. Le militant insoumis, dans un post Facebook aux accents victimaires, accuse le quotidien national de « mensonges et de calomnie« . Il assure que le contact des témoins a été « refusé » à la journaliste pour les « protéger » car ils ont « rendez-vous dans la semaine avec l’avocat« .

Là aussi, Reporterre met à mal cette version et assure que l’un des prétendus témoins, qui devait rencontrer un avocat, a fait faux-bond deux fois au rendez-vous juridique…

Taha Bouhafs est depuis ce mercredi ciblé sur les réseaux sociaux, par des internautes qui lui reprochent d’avoir relayé des accusations graves sans les avoir vérifiées. Il avait également affirmé dans un Tweet que « les CRS avaient épongé le sang des étudiants à l’intérieur de la Fac pour ne laisser aucune trace » (son compte Twitter est aujourd’hui protégé).

Mais le jeune homme est également pris pour cible par des commentaires injurieux, dont certains aux relents clairement racistes, d’autres appelant à la violence.

Histoire d’ajouter de l’huile sur le feu, le député FN Gilbert Collard a publié une vidéo de l’évacuation où on voit Taha Bouhafs face aux forces de l’ordre.
Le jeune homme, visiblement à bout de nerf, interpelle et insulte les CRS impassibles qui l’empêchent de franchir le cordon de sécurité.

En légende de la vidéo, le député frontiste regrette que le jeune homme « n’ait pas pris de tarte avec ou sans crème »…

« Jamais je n’ai affirmé ou même laissé croire que j’aurais été témoin de la scène »

Face au flot de critiques, le militant a publié un nouveau communiqué ce mercredi, il y assure que « l’évacuation ne s’est pas faite dans le calme » mais reconnaît ne pas avoir été « témoin direct de l’événement« .

Contacté par la rédaction de France 3, Taha Bouhafs n’a pour le moment pas directement répondu à nos questions.

Voir encore:

Blessé grave à Tolbiac: un témoin avoue avoir menti, le site «Reporterre» rétropédale

«Libération» a enquêté sur la rumeur d’un blessé grave lors de l’évacuation du campus parisien. Aucun élément ne vient l’accréditer. Mercredi, «Reporterre», qui citait trois témoins directs du «drame», va publier une enquête pour revenir sur ses premiers articles
Pauline Moullot
Libération
24 avril 2018

La rumeur finit de se dégonfler. Elle courait depuis l’évacuation de Tolbiac: un étudiant aurait chuté et serait tombé dans le coma. Malgré les démentis (de la préfecture, des hôpitaux) ce week-end, l’affirmation a continué à circuler, se nourrissant même des démentis officiels pour instiller le soupçon d’un mensonge d’Etat… Libération a enquêté. Plusieurs riverains, dont les fenêtres donnent directement sur l’endroit de la chute supposée, confirment formellement n’avoir vu ni ambulance, ni pompiers, ni chute. Nous n’avons retrouvé aucun témoin direct ayant vu la scène. Au contraire, Leïla, l’une des trois témoins principaux cités par les médias ayant accrédité cette rumeur, nous a avoué avoir menti. Le magazine en ligne Reporterre, qui a le premier relayé des témoignages faisant état d’une chute grave, nous a confirmé «après enquête» que ces témoignages ne sont pas fiables. Ils révèlent à Libération qu’ils publieront un article (publié depuis) revenant sur leur premier article. Récit d’une rumeur.

Comme nous l’expliquions dans une réponse CheckNews, des rumeurs faisant état d’un étudiant mort, puis dans le coma et gravement blessé ont commencé à circuler vendredi après-midi. Plusieurs heures déjà après l’évacuation. Tout s’emballe en milieu d’après-midi, quand le journal en ligne Reporterre publie plusieurs témoignages affirmant qu’un étudiant aurait chuté en tentant de s’enfuir: «Un baqueux lui a chopé la cheville. Ça l’a déséquilibré, et le camarade est tombé du haut du toit, en plein sur le nez. On a voulu le réanimer. Il ne bougeait pas. Du sang sortait de ses oreilles…» Un deuxième témoin aurait assisté à la scène. Et un troisième aurait vu le corps et les flaques de sang. Car, selon les étudiants, des policiers ou équipes de nettoyage de la Ville de Paris (selon les versions) auraient nettoyé des traces de sang. Problème: on ignore l’identité de la victime présumée, son état, et l’hôpital où elle aurait été transférée.

Rumeur qui persiste

Plusieurs médias reprennent ces informations: Politis relaie les témoignages de deux témoins; le Média diffuse le témoignage d’une jeune fille, Leïla, qui raconte avoir vu du sang lui sortir par les oreilles; et Marianne reprend le récit d’une responsable de l’Unef affirmant qu’un étudiant est dans le coma, avant de se corriger pour écrire «gravement blessé», puis de finalement reprendre le démenti de la préfecture.

Car au fur et à mesure de la journée, la préfecture dément à deux reprises qu’un étudiant ait été gravement blessé. L’université dit se fier au communiqué de la préfecture et affirme que ses équipes de sécurité n’ont vu aucune scène de ce genre. Le ministère de l’Intérieur confirme le démenti, mais la rumeur continue de persister. Vendredi soir, en assemblée générale sur le site de Censier à Paris-III, des étudiants affirment que la victime serait un migrant, ce qui expliquerait notamment qu’aucun proche ne se soit manifesté…

Samedi matin, Reporterre maintient son information et publie trois témoignages. Il y aurait deux témoins directs et une troisième personne ayant vu le corps à terre. Dans la foulée, SUD Santé, qui a cherché sans succès où la personne blessée aurait pu être hospitalisée, s’interroge dans un communiqué sur une «rumeur ou [un] mensonge d’Etat». «Nous savons qu’un patient a été proposé à la grande garde de neurochirurgie mais refusé parce que ne relevant pas de la chirurgie et transféré dans un autre établissement, note le syndicat sans qu’aucun lien direct ne soit établi avec Tolbiac. Les faits sont pour pour le moins troublants», conclut-il en demandant à l’APHP de «lever le voile sur cette affaire».

Samedi après-midi, c’est au tour des hopitaux de Paris de communiquer… en démentant la rumeur.

Que ce soit vendredi ou samedi, Reporterre a mis à jour ses articles au fur et à mesure. Notamment en publiant des démentis contredisant leurs témoignages, dont celui de Mao Peninou, maire adjoint chargé de la propreté de la Ville de Paris: « Nous avons mené une enquête dans nos services. Qui conclut que n’avons ni nettoyé ni repéré de taches de sang ou quoi que ce soit de ressemblant à Tolbiac ou dans ses environs.» Une témoin citée par Reporterre confirme pourtant que des traces ont été nettoyées.

Reporterre de moins en moins affirmatif

Résumons la situation en fin de week-end: d’un côté, plusieurs témoins continuent d’être cités pour affirmer qu’une personne est grièvement blessée. De l’autre, les autorités dans leur ensemble démentent formellement. Lundi matin, quand on commence à revenir à froid sur l’enquête, les étudiants et SUD AP-HP renvoient vers l’article de Reporterre. Sauf que le site, de son côté, commence à être moins sûr…

Le fondateur du site et rédacteur en chef, Hervé Kempf, explique à Libération qu’un des témoignages évoqués brièvement dans l’article publié vendredi soir, s’est révélé faux. On y lisait: «Selon un.e membre de la « Commune libre de Tolbiac » et ami.e de l’étudiant blessé, contacté.e par Reporterre, son camarade a été transporté à l’hôpital Cochin, à Paris. Le personnel hospitalier lui a confirmé l’arrivée d’un étudiant de Tolbiac, inconscient. L’étudiant, inscrit à Tolbiac, est âgé d’une vingtaine d’années. Il est membre de la Commune libre.» Sauf que «l’ami», n’a plus jamais répondu aux sollicitations de Reporterre. «Peu après, on a eu le démenti de SUD Santé [disant n’avoir aucune confirmation d’une hospitalisation, ndlr] et on l’a publié à la suite.» Hervé Kempf explique avoir conservé l’article en l’état, sans le retirer et en publiant les démentis au fur et à mesure, dans un souci de transparence. «S’il s’avère que les témoignages ne sont pas fiables, on le dira», prévient-il alors.

Libération a cherché à entrer en contact avec les autres témoins cités. En vain. Il s’avère que le témoin clé, Désiré dans l’article de Reporterre, est injoignable: il protégerait son identité. Le deuxième témoin, selon la Commune libre de Tolbiac, serait beaucoup plus difficile à joindre, dit-on sur un ton un peu embarrassé. A mi-mots, on nous concède que sa fiabilité commence à être mise en doute. Quant au troisième témoin de Reporterre, celui qui a vu la flaque, les étudiants ignorent qui il est. On apprendra par la suite qu’il s’agit de Leïla, l’étudiante qui racontait au Média que «la première chose qu’on a vue […], c’est un gars devant les grilles, la tête complètement explosée, une flaque de sang énorme». Contactée par Libération, elle reconnaît pourtant avoir menti… tout en continuant d’affirmer qu’il y a bien eu un blessé grave. Mais elle ne l’a pas vu : «Je ne suis pas un témoin visuel. Les témoins ne veulent pas parler aux médias, c’est pourquoi nous relatons les faits.» 

Flaque de sang nettoyée ?

La rumeur s’appuie donc finalement sur deux témoins… introuvables. Un avocat aurait été contacté, mais n’aurait finalement pas pris le dossier. Impossible de le contacter aussi. Des riverains auraient-ils pu assister à la scène? On nous parle d’une passante qui, dans un bus, aurait aperçu un camion de pompiers… Les étudiants ont mis sur pied une équipe d’enquête, qui n’a en fait rien de plus que les témoignages. Ni vidéo, ni photos…

Une enquête de voisinage a été menée par Libération dans l’immeuble qui donne sur la rue Baudricourt (où auraient eu lieu les faits) et les fameux parapets de l’université. Six riverains, réveillés au moment de l’évacuation et qui l’ont regardée par leurs fenêtres, assurent formellement n’avoir ni vu, ni entendu aucune ambulance, camion de pompiers ou gyrophare. Personne non plus nettoyant d’éventuelles flaques de sang.

Contacté par Libération, mardi soir, Reporterre a affirmé avoir fini son enquête. Et en conclut donc que les témoignages cités dans leurs précédents articles n’étaient pas fiables. Les journalistes «n’arrivent pas à remettre la main» sur les témoins, et Désiré, «qui avait pourtant tout consigné dans un récit écrit très cohérent» (qui sera publié sur le site mercredi matin), a fait deux fois faux bond à l’avocat contacté par les étudiants. Le journal en ligne explique donc qu’il reviendra sur cette enquête, «en expliquant le contexte de l’intervention, avec des étudiants choqués, dans un état d’excitation, de peur et de colère», dans un article finalement publié mardi soir.

Vendredi, à l’aube, les CRS ont débarqué dans l’université occupée. Une opération «sans incident» pour les autorités, mais les étudiants parlent de matraques et de blessures.

Voir par ailleurs:

Incidents après la victoire des Bleus : deux morts, des heurts et 292 gardes à vue

V.F. avec AFP
Le Parisien
16 juillet 2018

La célébration de la victoire des Bleus a été endeuillée par deux accidents mortels et marquée par de nombreux incidents à Paris et en province.

La victoire des Bleus en finale de la Coupe du monde de football, dimanche, à Moscou, a été endeuillée par deux accidents mortels, dans l’Oise et en Haute-Savoie. Lors de cette soirée, des heurts opposant notamment forces de l’ordre et « casseurs » ont également éclaté dimanche à Paris et en régions, en marge des rassemblements festifs célébrant la victoire française.

Un total de 292 personnes ont été placées en garde à vue dans toute la France, selon le bilan établi lundi par le ministère de l’Intérieur. Quarante-cinq policiers et gendarmes ont été blessés au cours d’incidents mais aucun ne l’a été gravement, a précisé le porte-parole du ministère.

Quand les Champs-Elysées explosent de joie au coup de sifflet final Deux accidents mortels. La victoire des Bleus a été endeuillée par plusieurs accidents graves, dont deux mortels. A Annecy (Haute-Savoie), un quinquagénaire s’est tué en plongeant dans un canal, dans une trop faible profondeur d’eau. A Saint-Félix (Oise), un automobiliste qui faisait la fête tout en conduisant est mort après avoir encastré sa voiture dans un platane.

Trois enfants, âgés de 3 et 6 ans, ont été gravement blessés après avoir été percutés par une moto à Frouard (Meurthe-et-Moselle).

A Toul (Meurthe-et-Moselle), un policier a été blessé dans une échauffourée et un spectateur touché par l’explosion d’un pétard, selon L’Est Républicain.

A Aubenas (Ardèches), trois piétons marchant sur le trottoir ont été heurtés par un automobiliste, rapporte le Dauphiné. Très légèrement blessés, ils ont été transportés au centre hospitalier.

A La Flèche (Sarthe), une femme a été blessée et hospitalisée dimanche soir après avoir chuté de la plateforme d’un pick-up explique Ouest France.

Des blessés et 102 interpellations à Paris. 102 personnes ont été interpellées dimanche soir à Paris, et 90 d’entre elles placées en garde à vue, a annoncé lundi le préfet de police de Paris. De nombreux blessés sont à déplorer.

« Compte tenu de la foule présente et malgré des débordements inacceptables, on doit enregistrer un bilan mesuré », a souligné le préfet Michel Delpuech, lors d’une conférence de presse.

Ailleurs en Ile-de-France, 24 voitures ont brûlé dans le département de la Seine-Saint-Denis et la fête a été gâchée en Essonne (voitures de police caillassées, affrontements entre bandes et incendies en série). Des voitures ont également brûlé en Seine-et-Marne et dans le Val-de-Marne. Une cinquantaine de personnes ont été interpellées ce week-end dans le Val-d’Oise.

Trente interpellations après les violences à Lyon. Les forces de l’ordre ont interpellé 30 personnes dimanche soir à Lyon après les violences, vols et échauffourées.

Parmi elles, 18 ont été placées en garde à vue pour des « vols » par effraction après le saccage, notamment, d’une boutique de vêtements Lacoste et d’une vitrine du grand magasin Le Printemps au centre-ville.

Les 12 autres sont mises en cause pour des « violences » et « jets de projectiles » sur les forces de l’ordre, ces affrontements sur la presqu’île et dans le quartier de la Guillotière ayant fait 11 blessés légers parmi les 360 gendarmes et policiers mobilisés pour encadrer la soirée.

Le Drugstore des Champs-Elysées pillé par des casseurs. Dans la capitale, une trentaine de casseurs ont pénétré avant 22 heures dans le Drugstore Publicis des Champs-Elysées, pillant notamment bouteilles de vin ou de champagne, avant d’être dispersés par les forces de l’ordre qui se sont ensuite employées à protéger l’entrée du magasin. Au moins deux autres supérettes ont également fait l’objet de pillages.

Champs-Elysées : des casseurs pillent le Drugstore Publicis Des échauffourées ont éclaté sporadiquement sur la prestigieuse avenue entre forces de l’ordre et groupes de « casseurs », les gaz lacrymogènes répondant aux jets de bouteilles ou de chaises. L’avenue s’est progressivement vidée des centaines de milliers fêtards qui y ont célébré la victoire des Bleus dès le coup de sifflet final. Vers 23 h 30, les forces de l’ordre ont fait usage d’engins lanceurs d’eau pour disperser les derniers fauteurs de troubles.

Deux hommes grièvement blessés à Paris. Un homme a reçu un violent coup de casque lors d’une rixe survenue vers 21 h 10 à proximité des Champs-Elysées. Il a été hospitalisé dans un état grave, selon une source policière.

Un peu plus tard dans la soirée, vers 23 h 30, le conducteur d’un scooter, sans saque, s’est engagé à contresens de la circulation sur le boulevard périphérique extérieur au niveau de la porte de Champerret dans le 17e arrondissement rapporte Le Point. Le pilote a heurté de plein fouet une automobile puis un deux-roues. Il a été transporté dans un état critique vers l’hôpital du Kremlin-Bicêtre dans le Val-de-Marne.

Ailleurs en Ile-de-France, quelque 24 voitures ont brûlé en Seine-Saint-Denis et de nombreux incidents ont gâché la fête en Essonne (voitures de police caillassées, affrontements entre bandes, incendies en série). Des voitures ont également brûlé en Seine-et Marne et dans le Val-de-Marne. Une cinquantaine de personnes ont été interpellées ce week-end dans le Val-d’Oise.

Incidents à Marseille. Plusieurs incidents ont éclaté, notamment autour du Vieux-Port et de la fan zone. « ll y a eu de nombreux jets de projectiles, deux membres des forces de l’ordre ont été blessés, et 10 personnes ont été interpellées », a rapporté un porte-parole de la police. Peu avant 23 heures, la situation était redevenue calme.

A Nantes, sept personnes ont été interpellées dimanche soir pour notamment des jets de projectiles sur les forces de l’ordre quai de Turenne indique une journaliste de Presse Océan sur Twitter.

A Ajaccio, des échauffourées ont éclaté après le coup de sifflet final entre des supporteurs de l’équipe de France qui fêtaient la victoire et des personnes affirmant soutenir la Croatie, ont rapporté les pompiers et les services de la préfecture. Il n’y a pas eu de blessés.

A Strasbourg ou à Rouen, des heurts sporadiques ont opposé des jeunes aux forces de l’ordre, les gaz lacrymogènes répondant aux jets de projectiles. Sept personnes ont été interpellées à Rouen, a rapporté la préfecture.

Voir de plus:

« L’Afrique a gagné la Coupe du monde ! » : La blague raciste de Trevor Noah dans « The Daily Show »
Florian Guadalupe
Téléstar
17 Juillet 2018

Une blague très douteuse. Hier soir, dans « The Daily Show », un late show américain de la chaîne Comedy Central, l’animateur Trevor Noah a commenté la victoire de l’équipe de France à la Coupe du monde de football en Russie. Après avoir diffusé un zapping des réactions médiatiques au sacre des joueurs tricolores, le présentateur s’est amusé à assimiler les joueurs menés par Didier Deschamps à des Africains.

« Vous n’avez pas ce bronzage dans le sud de la France »

« Oui ! Oui ! Je suis tellement heureux ! L’Afrique a gagné la Coupe du monde ! L’Afrique a gagné la Coupe du monde !« , a chanté Trevor Noah, en croisant les bras, clin d’oeil au film « Black Panther », et geste notamment repris par la communauté afro-américaine. Il a ensuite poursuivi en montrant les joueurs tricolores titulaires lors de la finale contre la Croatie : « Je sais bien, je sais bien. Il faut dire que c’est l’équipe de France. Mais regardez ces gars, hein ? Regardez ces gars !« . Et d’enchaîner : « Vous n’avez pas ce bronzage en vous promenant dans le sud de la France, les mecs. La France est devenue l’équipe de rechange de l’Afrique, une fois que le Nigeria et le Sénégal ont été éliminés« . puremedias.com vous propose de visionner la séquence.

En Italie, les réseaux sociaux ont été le réceptacle de nombreux propos racistes envers l’équipe de France, victorieuse. « Ce n’est pas la France qui a gagné, c’est l’Afrique« , a par exemple titré « La Repubblica », citant un commentaire lu sur les réseaux sociaux, dans un article les dénonçant. Dans le journal le plus vendu du pays, le « Corriere della Sera », un journaliste a tenu pour sa part des propos douteux : « Une équipe pleine de champions africains mélangés à de très bons joueurs blancs face à une équipe seulement de blancs d’un pays au centre de trois grandes écoles de football, celle slave, allemande et italienne.« 

« C’est l’Afrique qui a gagné »

Auparavant, le président vénézuélien avait déjà dérapé après le sacre des Bleus, en déclarant : « L’équipe de France ressemblait à l’équipe d’Afrique, en vrai, c’est l’Afrique qui a gagné (…) L’Afrique a tellement été méprisée et dans ce mondial, la France gagne grâce aux joueurs africains ou fils d’Africains

Voir aussi:

« Honteux » : Nagui réagit au dérapage raciste de Trevor Noah sur l’Équipe de France
Clément Garin
Téléstar
19 juillet 2018

L’animateur de Tout le monde veut prendre sa place et N’oubliez pas les paroles a réagi à la blague douteuse faite par l’animateur américain Trevor Noah, affirmant que l’Afrique avait remporté la Coupe du monde.

Trevor Noah se croyait-il vraiment drôle en annonçant l’Afrique gagnante de la Coupe du monde ? En voulant faire une « blague », l’animateur américain a provoqué une vive polémique en France. Sur le plateau du Daily Show, Trevor Noah a félicité les joueurs de l’Équipe de France tout en les ramenant honteusement à leurs origines : « Je sais que ce sont les joueurs de l’équipe de France, mais regardez ces gars-là ».

Très vite, le sketch a fait le tour du monde, et l’animateur doit aujourd’hui faire face à une véritable volée de bois vert sur les réseaux sociaux. Accusé de racisme par des centaines de milliers d’internautes, Trevor Noah a même fait réagir Nagui. Très fan des Bleus, qu’il est allé supporté durant toute la Coupe du monde en Russie, l’animateur de N’oubliez pas les paroles et de Tout le monde veut prendre sa place a commenté ce dérapage sur Twitter : « Honteux et surtout pas drôle ».

Benjamin Mendy répond aux tweets racistes

Reste à savoir quelle suite va être donnée à ce dérapage aux États-Unis. L’animateur réagira-t-il de lui-même à la polémique ? La chaîne Comedy Central va-t-elle, de facto, s’en mêler ? Depuis plusieurs jours, les Bleus champions du monde font face à de nombreux commentaires racistes sur les réseaux sociaux, poussant même Benjamin Mendy à répondre à SPORF avec un tweet liké près de 150 000 fois.

Voir également:

Trevor Noah répond à la polémique qu’il a lancée sur la victoire des Bleus : « C’est le miroir du colonialisme de la France »
Clément Garin
Téléstar
19 juillet 2018

Il y a quelques jours, l’animateur américain Trevor Noah félicitait « les Africains » d’avoir remporté la Coupe du monde. Une blague douteuse qu’il a tenté d’expliquer ce mercredi sur le plateau du Daily Show.

La polémique ne désemplit pas. Lundi dernier, sur le plateau du Daily Show, l’animateur vedette Trevor Noah évoquait la victoire des Bleus à la Coupe du monde en félicitant les « Africains » champions du monde. Une supposée blague qui n’a pas été appréciée, et qui a provoqué un véritable tollé en France. Ce mercredi, l’animateur s’est expliqué, sans pour autant s’excuser.

Évoquant ce qui est pour lui « le miroir du colonialisme en France », Trevor Noah a estimé que les Bleus étaient les simples représentants de « la diversité » française : « Ils ont été éduqués en France, ils ont appris à joueur au football en France, ils sont des citoyens français. Ils sont fiers de leur pays, la France. Les origines riches et variées de ces joueurs sont le miroir de la diversité de la France. Maintenant, je ne veux pas passer pour un trou du cul, mais je pense que c’est plus le miroir du colonialisme de la France » a estimé l’animateur.

« Si vous tracez la lignée de ces joueurs, vous verrez comment ils sont devenus Français, comment leur famille a appris la langue française » a osé Trevor Noah, assumant les nombreuses critiques et insultes qu’il a reçues sur les réseaux sociaux, et s’en prenant aux « nazis de France qui utilisent le fait que ces joueurs ont des origines africaines pour chier sur leur identité française« . Trevor Noah a tenu à indiquer que toutes les « personnes noires » du monde ont célébrité la victoire des joueurs français en raison de leur « identité africaine ».

« Je partage avec eux l’identité africaine qui est la mienne »

« J’ai trouvé ces arguments bizarres de dire qu’ils ne sont pas Africains, ils sont Français. Pourquoi ne peuvent-ils pas être les deux ? Pourquoi cette réflexion binaire de devoir choisir un groupe de personne ? Pourquoi ne peuvent-ils pas être africains ? Dans ce que je lis, pour être français, il faut effacer tout ce qui te lie à l’Afrique. Quand je dis qu’ils sont Africains, je ne le dis pas pour exclure leur identité française, mais je le fais pour les inclure et partager avec eux l’identité africaine qui est la mienne. Je leurs dis : je vous vois mes frères français d’origine africaine » a conclu l’animateur. La boucle est bouclée.

Voir enfin:

Laurent Bouvet: « Si la gauche, c’est ça, alors il n’y a plus de gauche »

Entretien avec le fondateur du Printemps républicain (1/3)


Universitaire et républicain de gauche membre du Parti socialiste jusqu’en 2007, Laurent Bouvet a créé en 2016 le Printemps républicain, un mouvement en pointe dans la défense de la laïcité et le combat contre l’islamisme et l’antisémitisme. Entretien (1/3). 


Franck Crudo : Une interview entre deux mâles blancs de bientôt plus de 50 ans, ça craint un peu par les temps qui courent non ? Que vous inspire cette terminologie employée de plus en plus souvent, y compris au plus haut sommet de l’Etat ?

Laurent Bouvet : Ça m’inspire toujours la même chose, depuis que j’ai rencontré pour la première fois cette manière de désigner les gens à raison de tel ou tel critère de leur identité, dans les années 1990 sur les campus américains que j’ai fréquentés pour faire ma thèse de doctorat : un mouvement immédiat de répulsion à l’égard de tout identitarisme, donc de tout essentialisme. Il faut se tenir le plus loin possible de cette manière de parler, de faire, de penser. Elle est contraire à l’humanisme universaliste qui est pour moi le socle d’un monde et d’une société vivables.

Dans le même ordre d’idée, Alain Finkielkraut écrit : « Un Arabe qui brûle une école c’est une révolte. Un blanc qui brûle une école, c’est du fascisme… »

Ce que dénonce ici Alain Finkielkraut, et il a entièrement raison, c’est le deux poids deux mesures qui est pratiqué par une partie des médias notamment, ou encore par une partie du monde politique, et, bien sûr, par une partie du monde académique, dans les sciences sociales notamment. Or on devrait pouvoir se mettre d’accord, malgré nos divergences politiques, sur le fait que quelqu’un qui brûle une école doit être jugé en fonction de son acte, criminel, et non de tel ou tel critère de son identité. Ça vaut pour tout.

Comment expliquez-vous qu’une partie de nos élites républicaines soit autant dans le déni voire la compromission vis-à-vis de l’islam radical et abandonne les valeurs de la République et des Lumières (sur la laïcité, l’égalité homme-femme, la liberté d’expression, etc.) au nom de l’antiracisme ?

On ne peut que constater et regretter, d’abord, qu’il existe des raisons électoralistes et clientélistes, à l’attitude de certains élus ou candidats, dans certaines villes, dans certains quartiers, à l’égard de représentants ou supposés tels, de l’islam radical, dans ses différentes acceptions : salafiste, frériste… Ça n’est d’ailleurs pas propre à la politique, cela existe aussi dans le syndicalisme, dans l’entreprise, dans les services publics. Le raisonnement qui conduit à ce genre de considérations est en général assez sommaire : il s’agit de gagner des élections, d’acheter la paix sociale…

C’est surtout un raisonnement à court terme, car le résultat est toujours le renforcement de cet islam radical, de son image, de ses moyens, en particulier auprès des musulmans. Et le calcul (d’intérêt) conduit donc le plus souvent à un résultat inverse à celui qui était attendu. Le problème est que l’on est là dans un phénomène assez large qui fonctionne comme une échelle de perroquet : il est très difficile, voire impossible, dès lors que l’on a fait une concession ou accepté une demande de revenir en arrière.

Y a-t-il uniquement des raisons électoralistes ? 

Non, il n’y a pas que de l’électoralisme ou du calcul d’intérêts immédiats. Il y a aussi une explication plus large, de nature à la fois historique et idéologique, du fait que certains acteurs politiques et sociaux se montrent complaisants voire favorables vis-à-vis de l’islam radical. On peut essayer de résumer cette inclination à partir de ce que j’appellerai ici le complexe colonial.

Dans le cas français spécialement, et européen plus largement, la colonisation a particulièrement concerné des populations de religion musulmane. Depuis la décolonisation d’une part et la fin des grands récits de l’émancipation nationaliste ou anti-impérialiste d’autre part, une forme de pensée post-coloniale s’est développée, accompagnée des désormais incontournables « études » qui vont avec dans le monde universitaire. Elle est appuyée sur une idée simple: l’homme « blanc », européen, occidental, chrétien (et juif aussi) est resté fondamentalement un colonisateur en raison de traits qui lui seraient propres, par essence en quelque sorte : raciste, impérialiste, dominateur, etc. Par conséquent, les anciens colonisés sont restés des dominés, des victimes de cet homme « blanc », européen, occidental, judéo-chrétien…

À partir des années 1970, à l’occasion de la crise économique qui commence et de l’installation d’une immigration venue de ses anciennes colonies, cette manière de voir postcoloniale va peu à peu phagocyter la pensée de l’émancipation ouvrière classique et de la lutte des classes qui s’est développée depuis la Révolution industrielle et incarnée dans le socialisme notamment. La figure du « damné de la terre » va ainsi se replier sur celle de l’ancien colonisé, donc de l’immigré désormais, c’est-à-dire celui qui est différent, qui est « l’autre ». Non plus principalement à raison de sa position dans le processus de production économique ou de sa situation sociale mais de son pays d’origine, de la couleur de sa peau, de son origine ethnique puis, plus récemment, de sa religion. Et ce, précisément au moment même où de nouvelles lectures, radicalisées, de l’islam deviennent des outils de contestation des régimes en place dans le monde arabo-musulman.

Notre histoire et cette vision purement idéologique expliquent ainsi qu’une partie de la gauche fasse aujourd’hui de l’islam la religion des opprimés et des musulmans les nouveaux damnés de la terre… ?

Oui. Toute une partie de la gauche, politique, associative, syndicale, intellectuelle, orpheline du grand récit socialiste et communiste, va trouver dans le combat pour ces nouveaux damnés de la terre une nouvelle raison d’être alors qu’elle se convertit très largement aux différentes formes du libéralisme. Politique avec les droits de l’Homme et la démocratie libérale contre les résidus du totalitarisme communiste ; économique avec la loi du marché et le capitalisme financier contre l’étatisme et le keynésianisme ; culturel avec l’émancipation individuelle à raison de l’identité propre de chacun plutôt que collective. En France, la forme d’antiracisme qui se développe dans les années 1980 sous la gauche au pouvoir témoigne bien de cette évolution.

À partir de là, on peut aisément dérouler l’histoire des trente ou quarante dernières années pour arriver à la situation actuelle. Être du côté des victimes et des dominés permet de se donner une contenance morale voire un but politique alors que l’on a renoncé, dans les faits sinon dans le discours, à toute idée d’émancipation collective et de transformation de la société autrement qu’au travers de l’attribution de droits individuels aux victimes et aux dominés précisément. À partir du moment où ces victimes et ces dominés sont incarnés dans la figure de « l’autre» que soi-même, ils ne peuvent en aucun cas avoir tort et tout ce qu’ils font, disent, revendiquent, devient un élément indissociable de leur identité de victime et de dominé. Dans un tel cadre, l’homme « blanc », européen, occidental, judéo-chrétien… ne peut donc jamais, par construction, avoir raison, quoi qu’il dise ou fasse. Il est toujours déjà coupable et dominateur. On retrouve là la dérive essentialiste dont on parlait plus haut.

Pour toute une partie de la gauche, chez les intellectuels notamment, tout ceci est devenu une doxa. Tout questionnement, toute remise en question, toute critique étant instantanément considérée à la fois comme une mécompréhension tragique de la société, de l’Histoire et des véritables enjeux contemporains. Mais aussi comme une atteinte insupportable au Bien, à la seule et unique morale, et comme le signe d’une attitude profondément réactionnaire, raciste, « islamophobe », etc.

C’est pour cette raison, me semble-t-il, que l’on retrouve aujourd’hui, dans le débat intellectuel et plus largement public, une violence que l’on avait oubliée depuis l’époque de la guerre froide. Tout désaccord, toute nuance, tout questionnement est y immédiatement disqualifié.

L’un des exemples les plus frappants, ce sont ces féministes qui relèguent au second plan leur combat en tentant de minimiser une triste réalité, voire même une horreur (Caroline de Haas au sujet du harcèlement dans le quartier de la Chapelle, Clémentine Autain après les viols de Cologne, etc.). Comment expliquer qu’un antiracisme à ce point dévoyé écrase toutes les autres valeurs, y compris le féminisme chez certaines féministes ?

C’est la suite logique de ce que nous disions plus haut. Ce qui est intéressant en l’espèce, chez ces « nouvelles » féministes – on pourrait plutôt parler de post-féminisme d’ailleurs -, c’est qu’elles enrobent leur discours de toute une rhétorique  dite « intersectionnelle » du nom du concept forgé par l’universitaire Kimberlé Crenshaw en 1993 (dans un article de la Stanford Law Review). Le but est de montrer que la lutte féministe et la lutte antiraciste peuvent se recouper pour défendre les minorités opprimées après les difficultés des mouvements identitaires des années 1970-80 à unir leurs forces (notamment après l’échec des « Rainbow Coalitions »1 et l’affaire Anita Hill/Clarence Thomas2) et à s’articuler ensuite aux revendications sociales.

Or, ce qui pouvait être adapté aux Etats-Unis des années 1980-90 ne l’est pas à la France d’aujourd’hui, pour tout un ensemble de raisons qu’il serait long de détailler ici. Tout ce discours que l’on retrouve dans l’idée de convergence des luttes également ces derniers temps masque en réalité une forme de hiérarchisation implicite entre les différentes minorités à défendre. Et, comme on le constate à chaque fois, les exemples que vous citez sont très clairs : ce ne sont pas les femmes qui sont en haut de la liste, ni d’ailleurs les homosexuels. Ce qui prévaut systématiquement, y compris chez ces post-féministes, c’est l’attention à des critères identitaires de type ethno-raciaux ou religieux. Ce qui induit d’étranges alliances et de bien plus étranges contradictions encore puisque, par exemple, on retrouve des militants du progressisme des mœurs, favorables aux droits des femmes ou des homosexuels aux côtés de militants islamistes qui sont très conservateurs en matière de mœurs.

Dans ce post-féminisme, on n’hésite plus désormais à parler d’émancipation de la femme à propos de jeunes filles portant le voile islamique, au prétexte qu’elles auraient librement choisi de se soumettre à des règles religieuses qui sont pourtant explicitement contraires à l’égalité entre hommes et femmes. La confusion est totale, sur le plan philosophique, entre liberté, consentement et choix. Mais aussi sur le plan politique puisque dans toute une partie de la gauche, ce genre de renversement idéologique apparaît désormais comme tout à fait normal. On en a eu récemment un exemple frappant avec l’affaire de la présidente de la section de l’Unef de Paris-Sorbonne, qui porte un voile islamique.

Le racisme et l’antiracisme ne sont-ils pas au final l’avers et le revers de la même médaille ? Cette tendance à tout racialiser, à catégoriser les individus en fonction de la couleur de leur peau…

Oui, il y a un dévoiement d’une partie de la lutte antiraciste, devenue relativiste et essentialiste. Là encore, le fait que des organisations (associations, syndicats, partis) qui se réclament de la gauche, du projet progressiste, de l’émancipation collective… en viennent à adopter ou à justifier l’idée qu’on puisse se rassembler dans des réunions « non mixtes », entre « racisés », pour lutter contre le racisme, est d’une incohérence philosophique et politique totale. Si la gauche, c’est ça, alors il n’y a plus de gauche. C’est aussi simple que cela. Tout le combat historique pour l’universalisme, l’humanisme, contre le racisme, pour l’émancipation… perd son sens.

Derrière de telles idées, on trouve finalement une forme de racisme brut et qui ne se cache même plus chez certains auteurs et certains militants de la mouvance dite « décoloniale » ou « indigéniste ». Je pense à Houria Bouteldja notamment dans son livre Les Blancs, les Juifs et nous paru en 2016. Ce racisme, venu du raisonnement sur la colonisation dont on parlait plus haut, conduit à rendre responsables et coupables de toutes les injustices, de toutes les discriminations et de tous les crimes… les « blancs », par un processus d’essentialisation pur et simple.

De telles idées sont ultra-minoritaires, mais cela ne les rend pas moins dangereuses par le véritable terrorisme intellectuel qu’elles font peser sur toute cette gauche, sur nombre de médias notamment qui n’osent pas en révéler le caractère aussi fallacieux intellectuellement que destructeur politiquement et socialement. S’il y a un politiquement correct, c’est bien là qu’il se trouve : dans le refus non seulement de dire ce que l’on voit mais surtout de voir ce que l’on voit comme nous y incitait Péguy. Et gare à celui, surtout s’il est un « mâle blanc », qui ose ne serait-ce que constater cette dérive. Il sera immédiatement accusé d’être à son tour un « identitaire » et, évidemment, raciste, sexiste, islamophobe… Toute réalité, on n’ose même pas parler de vérité, est abolie au profit d’une vision purement idéologique qui ne fonctionne que par la terreur qu’elle fait régner.

Face à cela, il faut garder le calme des vieilles troupes, et continuer de se battre pour un antiracisme fondé sur l’universalisme et l’humanisme. En développant les mesures concrètes et les moyens des politiques publiques contre toutes les discriminations. En s’engageant, publiquement, avec détermination et rigueur pour défendre les principes qui, depuis deux cents ans, sont ceux qui ont permis l’émancipation de tous, sans distinction de sexe, de race, de religion, d’origine.

Voir par ailleurs:

Yahya Sinwar, chef du Hamas à Gaza : Nos hommes ont quitté leurs uniformes militaires pour rejoindre les marches ; nous avons décidé de créer un barrage avec les corps de nos femmes et enfants

MEMRI

27 mai 2018

Voir les extraits vidéo sur MEMRI TV

Yahya Al-Sinwar, chef du Hamas à Gaza, a souligné dans une interview accordée à Al-Jazira que même si le Hamas a choisi la méthode « merveilleuse et civilisée » des affrontements non armés, il n’hésiterait pas à recourir de nouveau à la lutte armée, le cas échéant. Selon lui, les membres du Hamas auraient pu « faire pleuvoir des milliers de missiles » sur les villes israéliennes, mais ont plutôt choisi de quitter leurs uniformes militaires et de rejoindre les marches. Il a ajouté que, face aux images de la nouvelle ambassade des Etats-Unis à Jérusalem, les Palestiniens avaient donné une image d’héroïsme et de détermination avec leurs sacrifices, « le sacrifice de leurs enfants comme offrande pour Jérusalem et le droit au retour ».

« Lorsque nous avons décidé de nous lancer dans ces marches, nous avons décidé de transformer ce qui nous est le plus cher – les corps de nos femmes et de nos enfants – en un barrage empêchant l’effondrement de la réalité arabe », a-t-il déclaré. Extraits : 

Les objectifs de la « Marche du retour » : rétablir le droit au retour dans la conscience palestinienne, arabe et internationale ; remettre la cause nationale palestinienne à l’ordre du jour mondial 

Yahya Sinwar : S’il est trop tôt pour affirmer qu’une telle action de combat a pleinement rempli ses objectifs, une grande partie de ces objectifs ont sans nul doute été atteints. Le premier objectif atteint à ce stade est que ces marches ont rétabli le droit au retour dans la conscience palestinienne, arabe et internationale comme l’un des droits et principes importants du peuple palestinien. […]

Un autre but atteint par ces marches est qu’elles ont remis la cause nationale palestinienne à l’ordre du jour international, alors que certains défaitistes prétendaient que l’agenda mondial était trop chargé et n’avait pas de place pour la cause nationale palestinienne. Ils ont essayé de l’utiliser pour promouvoir d’autres concessions. […]

Je dois souligner un important objectif stratégique accompli le 14 mai. Notre peuple à Gaza a enregistré, aux yeux du monde entier, son témoignage sur le transfert de l’ambassade américaine à Jérusalem et sur la déclaration de Jérusalem comme la capitale de l’entité d’occupation. Au nom du peuple arabe palestinien et de tous les peuples arabes et islamiques, notre peuple de Gaza a rejeté cette décision et cette démarche, par cette importante activité, en enregistrant son témoignage pour l’histoire, et en signant ce témoignage avec le sang des martyrs – notre peuple a sacrifié soixante martyrs le 14 mai, ainsi que trois mille blessés. Ils ont été utilisés pour signer le rejet de notre peuple de la décision imprudente de transférer l’ambassade des États-Unis à Jérusalem. […] 

Notre peuple a imposé son ordre du jour au monde entier – les écrans de télévision du monde devaient présenter une image romantique de l’ouverture de l’ambassade américaine à Jérusalem, mais notre peuple… a forcé le monde entier à diviser les écrans de télévision

Cette méthode [de combat] est appropriée pour cette étape, mais les circonstances peuvent changer, et nous devrons peut-être retourner à la lutte armée. Lorsque cela se produira, notre peuple, les factions et le Hamas n’hésiteront pas à utiliser tous les moyens requis par les circonstances. […]

L’ennemi affirme que nous utilisons les gens comme boucliers humains et les poussons vers la clôture, mais nous disons que ces jeunes et ces hommes auraient pu choisir une autre option. Ils auraient pu faire pleuvoir des milliers de missiles sur les villes de l’occupation lorsque les États-Unis ont ouvert leur ambassade à Jérusalem. Mais ils n’ont pas choisi cette voie. Nombre d’entre eux ont quitté leurs uniformes militaires et mis leurs armes de côté. Ils ont temporairement abandonné les moyens de la lutte armée et se sont tournés vers cette merveilleuse méthode civilisée, respectée par le monde et adaptée aux circonstances actuelles. […]

Notre peuple a imposé son ordre du jour au monde entier. Les écrans de télévision du monde devaient présenter une image romantique de l’ouverture de l’ambassade américaine à Jérusalem, mais notre peuple, par sa conscience collective, a forcé le monde entier à diviser les écrans de télévision entre les images de fraude, de tromperie, de fausseté et d’oppression, manifestes dans la tentative d’imposer Jérusalem comme la capitale de l’Etat d’occupation, et les images d’injustice, d’oppression, d’héroïsme et de détermination, données par notre propre peuple dans ses sacrifices, le sacrifice de ses enfants comme une offrande pour Jérusalem et pour le droit au retour. […]

Lorsque nous avons décidé de nous lancer dans ces marches, nous avons décidé de transformer ce qui nous est le plus cher – les corps de nos femmes et de nos enfants – en barrage pour stopper l’effondrement de la réalité arabe, un barrage qui empêche la course de nombreux Arabes vers la normalisation des liens avec l’entité spoliatrice, qui occupe notre Jérusalem, pille notre terre, souille nos lieux saints et opprime notre peuple jour et nuit.

Journaliste : Vous parlez de « l’Accord du siècle »…

Yahya Sinwar : L’Accord du siècle et tout compromis visant à éliminer notre cause palestinienne nationale. […]


Sommet d’Helsinki: Attention, une faute peut en cacher une autre ! (Leftist witch hunt: Guess who forced Trump into the impossible choice of kowtowing to Putin or to the delegitimization of his own election ?)

19 juillet, 2018

Sur toutes ces questions, mais particulièrement la défense antimissiles, on peut trouver une solution, mais il doit me laisser une marge de manœuvre. Sur toutes ces questions, mais particulièrement la défense antimissiles, on peut trouver une solution, mais il doit me laisser une marge de manœuvre. (…) C’est ma dernière élection. Après mon élection, j’aurai plus de flexibilité. Barack Obama (27.03.2012)
Je n’ai jamais vu de ma vie, ou dans l’histoire politique moderne, un candidat à la présidentielle chercher à discréditer les élections et le processus électoral avant que le vote n’ait lieu. C’est sans précédent et ce n’est basé sur aucun fait. Si quand les choses tournent mal pour vous et que vous commencez à perdre, vous rejetez le blâme sur autrui, alors vous n’avez pas ce qu’il faut pour faire ce boulot. (…) Mais le point important sur lequel je veux insister ici, c’est qu’il n’y a pas de personne sérieuse qui pourrait suggérer que vous pourriez même manipuler les élections américaines, en partie parce qu’elles sont très décentralisées et que le nombre de votes est important. Il n’y a aucune preuve que cela s’est déjà produit par le passé ou qu’il y a des cas où cela se produira cette fois-ci. Et donc je conseillerais à M. Trump d’arrêter de pleurnicher et d’essayer de défendre ses opinions pour obtenir des suffrages. Barack Obama (18.10. 2016)
Il n’y a jamais eu collusion, l’élection, je l’ai gagnée haut la main. Cette enquête russe nous empêche de coopérer, alors qu’il y a tant à faire. Donald Trump
The probe is a disaster for our country. I think it’s kept us apart. It’s kept us separated. There was no collusion at all. Everybody knows it. People are being brought out to the fore, so far that I know virtually none of it related to the campaign. And they are going to have to try really hard to find somebody that did relate to the campaign. It was a clean campaign. (…) I do have a relationship with him. And I think that he’s done a very brilliant and amazing job. Really, a lot of people would say, he has put himself at the forefront of the world as a leader. Donald Trump
First of all, he said there was no collusion whatsoever. I guess he said he said as strongly as you can say it. (…) I think it’s a shame, we are talking about nuclear proliferation. We’re talking about Syria and humanitarian aid, we’re talking about all these different things, and we get questions on the witch hunt. And I don’t think the people out in the country buy it. But the reporters like to give it a shot. I thought that President Putin was very, very strong. (…) And at the end of this meeting, I think we really came to a lot of good conclusions, a really good conclusion for Israel. Something very strong.(…) in Syria, we are getting very close. I think it’s becoming a humanitarian situation, and a lot of people are going to move back to Syria from Turkey and from Jordan and from different places, they’re going to move back, less so from Europe. But they will be moving back from lots of different places. So I really think we are not far apart on Syria. I do think that on Iran, he probably would have liked to keep the deal in place because that’s good for Russia. You know, they do business with — it’s good for a lot of the countries that do business with Iran, but it’s not good for this country and it’s ultimately not good for the world. And if you look at what is happening, is falling apart, they have rights in all their cities. The inflation is rampant and going through the roof, and not that you want to hurt anybody, but that regime, we will let the people know that we are behind them 100 percent. But they are having big protests all over the country, probably as big as they have ever had before. And that all happens since I terminated that deal. (…) And he also said he wants to be very helpful with North Korea. We are doing well with North Korea. We have time. There is no rush. You know, it’s been going on for many years, but we are doing very well. As you know, we got our hostages back. There’s been no testing. There’s been no nuclear explosion, which we would have known about immediately. There’s been no rockets going over Japan. No missiles going over Japan. And that’s now been nine months, and the relationship is very good. You saw the nice letter he wrote. (…) I think it was great today, but I think it was really bad five hours ago. I think we really had a potential problem. I think with two nuclear nations. Ninety percent of the nuclear power in the world between these two nations, and we’ve had a phony witch hunt deal drive us apart. (…) You have to understand, you take a look, you look at all these people, I mean, some were hackers, some of them. Then again, you know, these are 14 people and they have 12 people. These aren’t 12 people involve in the campaign. Then you have many other people. Some told a lie. You look at Flynn, it’s a shame. But the FBI didn’t think he was lying. With Paul Manafort, who clearly is a nice man. You look at what’s going on with him. It’s like Al Capone. Donald Trump
I’ll begin by stating that I have full faith and support for America’s great intelligence agencies. Always have. And I have felt very strongly that, while Russia’s actions had no impact at all on the outcome of the election, let me be totally clear in saying that — and I’ve said this many times — I accept our intelligence community’s conclusion that Russia’s meddling in the 2016 election took place. Could be other people also; there’s a lot of people out there. There was no collusion at all. And people have seen that, and they’ve seen that strongly. The House has already come out very strongly on that. A lot of people have come out strongly on that. (…)  Now (…) I got a transcript. I reviewed it. I actually went out and reviewed a clip of an answer that I gave, and I realized that there is need for some clarification. It should have been obvious — I thought it would be obvious — but I would like to clarify, just in case it wasn’t. In a key sentence in my remarks, I said the word « would » instead of « wouldn’t. » The sentence should have been: I don’t see any reason why I wouldn’t — or why it wouldn’t be Russia. So just to repeat it, I said the word « would » instead of « wouldn’t. » And the sentence should have been — and I thought it would be maybe a little bit unclear on the transcript or unclear on the actual video — the sentence should have been: I don’t see any reason why it wouldn’t be Russia. Sort of a double negative. (…) I have, on numerous occasions, noted our intelligence findings that Russians attempted to interfere in our elections. Unlike previous administrations, my administration has and will continue to move aggressively to repeal any efforts — and repel — we will stop it, we will repel it — any efforts to interfere in our elections. (…) As you know, President Obama was given information just prior to the election — last election, 2016 — and they decided not to do anything about it. The reason they decided that was pretty obvious to all: They thought Hillary Clinton was going to win the election, and they didn’t think it was a big deal. When I won the election, they thought it was a very big deal. And all of the sudden they went into action, but it was a little bit late. So he was given that in sharp contrast to the way it should be. And President Obama, along with Brennan and Clapper and the whole group that you see on television now — probably getting paid a lot of money by your networks — they knew about Russia’s attempt to interfere in the election in September, and they totally buried it. And as I said, they buried it because they thought that Hillary Clinton was going to win. (…) Yesterday, we made significant progress toward addressing some of the worst conflicts on Earth. So when I met with President Putin for about two and a half hours, we talked about numerous things. (…) President Putin and I addressed the range of issues, starting with the civil war in Syria and the need for humanitarian aid and help for people in Syria. We also spoke of Iran and the need to halt their nuclear ambitions and the destabilizing activities taking place in Iran. As most of you know, we ended the Iran deal, which was one of the worst deals anyone could imagine. And that’s had a major impact on Iran. And it’s substantially weakened Iran. And we hope that, at some point, Iran will call us and we’ll maybe make a new deal, or we maybe won’t. But Iran is not the same country that it was five months ago, that I can tell you. They’re no longer looking so much to the Mediterranean and the entire Middle East. They’ve got some big problems that they can solve, probably much easier if they deal with us. (…) We discussed Israel and the security of Israel. And President Putin is very much involved now with us in a discussion with Bibi Netanyahu on working something out with surrounding Syria and — Syria, and specifically with regards to the security and long-term security of Israel. A major topic of discussion was North Korea and the need for it to remove its nuclear weapons. Russia has assured us of its support. President Putin said he agrees with me 100 percent, and they’ll do whatever they have to do to try and make it happen. Donald Trump

Today is about how we can strengthen America’s economy even more. And we think the best place to start is with America’s middle-class families and our small businesses. So today, we’re here to talk to you about making permanent this tax relief — one, so they can continue to grow; two, so we can add a million and a half new jobs; and three, we can protect them against a future Washington trying to steal back those hard-earned dollars that you and the Republican Congress has given them.J’ai relu le texte de mes déclarations et je me suis aperçu qu’il manquait une négation. Je voulais dire: «Je ne vois pas de raison pour que la Russie ne l’ait pas fait» (interférer dans l’élection, NDLR). Je pense que ceci clarifie la question. J’ai une foi et une confiance entières en nos formidables agences de renseignement. J’accepte leurs conclusions selon lesquelles des interventions de la Russie ont eu lieu. Nous agirons avec force pour repousser et stopper toute (nouvelle) interférence dans nos élections. Cette ingérence de Moscou «n’a eu aucun impact» sur le résultat du scrutin qu’il a remporté.
Donald Trump
Many on the left, they want you to believe this alleged interference is shocking, unprecedented turn of events, but we all know that Russian election meddling is not new at all. Now, remember, ahead of the 2016 presidential election cycle. In 2014, the House Intel Committee chairman, Devin Nunes, he issued a very stern warning about Putin’s belligerent actions and attempts to denigrate the United States and, by the way, yes, impact our 2016 election. And we also know, you can go way back to 2008, we know that Russia hacked into both the McCain campaign and even the presidential campaign of Barack Obama himself. And despite this, in 2016, when Hillary Clinton appeared to have a firm lead in the polls — oh, just before the election, it was President Obama who laughed off any notion that American elections could possibly be tampered with. How wrong he was. (…) That’s when he thought Hillary was going to win. Now that Trump is president, after nearly a decade of playing down Russian interference and its impact on our elections, the left is in total freak out mode, trying desperately to connect Russian hacking to the Trump presidency. This is a total left-wing conspiracy, a fantasy. This is the witch hunt. Every single report, every investigation into our election shows absolutely no votes were changed, none were altered in the 2016 election. Not a single vote. And by the way, it’s important to point out every major country in the world engages in election interference. As Senator Rand Paul put it, we all do it, and this includes the Clinton campaign. In fact, if you’re looking for Russian interference, look no further than Hillary Clinton and the DNC in 2016. They actually paid, oh, yes, through a law firm that they funnel money, Fusion GPS. Yes, then they got a foreign entity, foreign spy by the name of Christopher Steele, he put together phony opposition research, and now the infamous dossier, which has been debunked, filled with lies, Russian lies, Russian propaganda, and all paid for by Hillary Clinton and the Democratic Party to manipulate you, the American people in the lead up to the 2016 election. Nobody in the media seems to care about Obama’s attempt at interference in the last Israeli election against our number one ally in the Middle East, Israel, and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. And by all accounts, today’s meeting, always productive and very important. As we all know, there are a lot of serious issues between the U.S. and Russia, but predictably, even before this meeting took place, yes, the destroy Trump, hate Trump media, they were already, hoping and predicting failure. You see, success for Donald Trump is bad for their agenda, especially in the lead up to the 2018 midterm elections. (…) Former CIA director, you know the guy that was a former communist turned CNN paid hack, John Brennan, he actually tweeted out: Donald Trump’s press conference performance in Helsinki rises to and exceeds the threshold of high crimes and misdemeanors. It was nothing short of treasonous. Not only were his comments imbecilic, he is wholly in the pocket of Putin. Republican patriots, where are you? John, let’s address you for a second here. What have you done on Obama’s watch to prevent Russian meddling? What role did you play in all of this?  (…) As you can see, it was all a predetermined outcome. It didn’t matter what happened at today’s meeting. Your mainstream media just blind hatred for President Trump and they long predetermined that anything the president does is terrible. It’s devastating, apocalyptic. And at this point, they are just a broken record. (…) Look at the economy. Look at the progress in North Korea. And while the left always acts like the sky is literally falling because Donald Trump actually wants to discuss safety and security with nuclear weapons, nuclear proliferation, Syria, Iran, a lot of other important issues, including interference. By the way, meeting with Putin is that bad, we all know the truth. U.S. diplomacy is in good hands, despite what they have told you. The president has never been afraid to walk away from a bad deal, never been afraid to call out foreign leaders, and hold all of them accountable. As we saw, he was critical of the British government’s execution of Brexit. And, by the way, he rightfully called out many of our allies in NATO. Why? They are not paying their fair share for their own national defense, even criticizing the German Chancellor Angela Merkel, and her country’s lucrative energy deals Vladimir Putin’s Russia, which creates a dangerous dependency on Russia and energy, which is the lifeblood of their economy. After all, if the West is so worried about Russia, well, why would they be willing to give him billions and billions of dollars to make Russia rich again? Instead, the president is now rightly pushing Germany to kill its oil and gas deals with Russia and get their energy from us in that the United States, which would also mean millions of high-paying career jobs for Americans. Now, this move would not only benefit the United States, it would also absolutely wreck Russia’s economy. Now, Putin should be very concerned about that possibility, as it would literally destroy Russia’s economy and probably destroy him politically. (…) And now, the president has been even more forceful with our enemies. Look at North Korea, little rocket man, fire and fury. Our button works, yours doesn’t, and it’s bigger. Now, despite what the media predicted, there is real progress on the Korean peninsula, because the president’s peace through strength strategy is working. It always works. Appeasement doesn’t work. Bribing dictators doesn’t work. Now, there hasn’t been a single rocket fired in months, American hostages, thank God, they have come home. One nuclear site in fact has been dismantled and shuttered, and the process continues to this day. And this is something else that the mainstream media will never tell you. President Trump has been incredibly tough on Russia. This is something they won’t report under his administration, the U.S. issued sanctions against roughly 200 individuals and entities related to Russia. Other stinging economic sanctions against Russia have also increased, and U.S. forces on the ground in Syria inflicted heavy casualties on even Russian soldiers during a skirmish earlier this year, an enormous embarrassment for Vladimir Putin. And the United States has been busy arming Ukraine with lethal weapon systems, but the media, they are not going to focus on any of this. Instead, it’s Russia, Russia, Russia, collusion, collusion, collusion. If they are not talking about Stormy, it’s all the time. It’s 24/7. Now, with this is a backdrop, the president moves forward with his very important diplomacy and as a leader of the free world, President Trump, he must meet with the leaders of Russia, China, North Korea, and others (…) And specifically, Russia must stop coordinating with the Iranian regime. They must stop supporting President Assad in Syria. And yes, they need to stop, yes, meddling in anybody’s elections and be held accountable for their actions. Now, the years of weak and feckless leadership under Obama are now over. No more cargo planes full of cash, and as President Trump frequently says, a good relationship with Putin and Russia, when you’re not trying to bribe them, it is very positive thing for the country. However, under President Trump, any hostile or aggressive action by Putin’s regime will be and should be met with strength, not appeasement, not bribery, not cash, not kissing the rings of dictators. And while the mainstream media and left, as they peddle their conspiracy theories, well, the administration is now putting forth some truth and some precedent and some facts. And by the way, Reagan proved it to all of us. Peace through strength works. Diplomacy is important. Trust but verify. Sean Hannity
Let me go back, because everybody in the media is so focused on this. In 2014, in « The Washington times, » Devin Nunes said with certainty that Russia would try to impact the 2016 elections. Barack Obama in the month before the 2016 elections, and I will read and I will quote , « No serious person out there would suggest that somehow you can even rig America’s elections, no evidence that it has happened in the past, which is not true, and number two, or that it could happen in this election, and I invite Mr. Trump to stop whining and to go out there and try to get votes. » He said that two weeks before the election. Sean Hannity
L’un des premiers producteurs d’aluminium du monde, le russe Rusal, s’est retrouvé gravement fragilisé ce lundi par les nouvelles sanctions décrétées par les Etats-Unis contre des oligarques russes et leurs entreprises, qui risquent de porter un nouveau coup à l’économie russe. (…) Confronté à un vent de panique boursière généralisé sur les marchés russes, le gouvernement russe a dû monter au créneau pour assurer qu’il soutiendrait les entreprises visées par ce nouveau train de mesures punitives, qui constituent une escalade d’une violence inattendue dans la confrontation entre Moscou et Washington. Au total, ces sanctions, censées punir Moscou notamment pour ses « attaques » « les démocraties occidentales », ciblent 38 personnes et entreprises qui ne peuvent plus faire affaire avec des Américains, notamment sept Russes désignés comme des « oligarques » proches du Kremlin par l’administration de Donald Trump, présents dans des dizaines de sociétés en Russie comme à l’étranger. Le Dauphiné Libéré (09.04.2018)
How did Trump luck out by getting such hopeless geebos for opponents? It can’t just be chance. At every turn, these dummies choose to lock themselves into the most implausible and indefensible positions imaginable, then push all their chips into the center of the table. It’s almost supernatural – maybe Trump won the intervention of some ancient demon by heading over to the offices of the Weekly Standard and snatching away one of its Never Trump scribblers to use as a virgin sacrifice. How did this guy win, and in doing so crush the avatar of the establishment, the smartest woman in the world, Felonia Milhous von Pantsuit? One of his secrets to success is really no secret at all. It is to embrace the obvious. Unlike our exhausted establishment, Trump rarely holds to bizarre, indefensible positions. You would think that would be an instinctive thing for politicians of both parties – “I know! I’ll adopt stands on issues that won’t make my constituents ask ‘What the hell is wrong with you?’” – but it isn’t. Instead, the establishment has somehow talked itself into taking positions that are so clearly ridiculous that Normals scratch their heads, baffled at what they are being told by their betters via the lapdog liberal media. Look at NATO. The entire foreign policy establishment is scandalized that Trump says he expects the Europeans to cover their fair share of the NATO nut. Now a normal American is going to think “Yeah, I think they ought to pay their share of their own defense. Sounds reasonable.” But the establishment collectively wets itself – “HE’S DESTROYING THIS ESSENTIAL ALLIANCE BY ASKING THE PEOPLE BENEFITING FROM IT MOST TO ACTUALLY PARTICIPATE IN IT!” And the Normals (many of whom, like me, actually served in NATO) wonder, “Well, if it’s so essential, why aren’t the allies eager to pay for it?” And the establishment responds, “SHUT UP, RUSSIAN STOOGE! ASKING THE ALLIES TO MAKE NATO MORE EFFECTIVE BY PAYING WHAT THEY PROMISED, WHICH IS STILL A FRACTION OF WHAT THE U.S. PAYS, IS PLAYING RIGHT INTO PUTIN’S HANDS. ALSO, THE EMOLUMENTS CLAUSE SOMEHOW.” Here’s a test. Leave DC or New York, drive a few hours out to America, find a random guy on the street and ask, “Hey, don’t you think it’s awful that Trump wants our allies to increase their contributions to their own defense to just about half of what the U.S. pays?” You can safely assume he’ll respond, “Wait, why only half?” The Normal/Elite disconnect was also in full effect regarding the new SCOTUS dude. The establishment decided it’s going to bork Brett by pointing out that he bought baseball tickets and apparently liked beer in college, like there’s not a significant portion of Americans who wouldn’t be thrilled to have their next justice be nicknamed “Kegmaster K.” And what’s the new fussiness about alcohol, or are they upset because he quaffs brewskis (RUSSIANS!) instead of guzzling chardonnay? The Dems weren’t so picky about partying in 2016 when Stumbles McMyTurn was staggering all over the map. Well, not in Wisconsin. Then the establishment attacked Brett’s family for looking like a normal family instead of a traveling freak show. The Kavanaugh kids didn’t have nose rings or teen tatts, and they presumably know which bathroom to use. This, to the establishment, is unforgiveable. To Normal Americans, this constant social warfare against people who don’t want to be sketchy mutants is just more inspiration for more militancy. The Democrats have also decided that they want to go into November on the platform of abolishing ICE and opening the borders to future Democrat voters from festering Third World hellholes. Perhaps they didn’t read the polls, but Normal Americans – the ones not appearing on CNN, working for Soros-funded agitator collectives, or in college squandering their dads’ money on degrees in Oppression Studies – actually like borders. If Trump’s brain trust gathered together in his palatial Mar-a-Lago estate to concoct a scheme to get the Democrat Party to adopt the most tone-deaf possible platform, they could not have drafted one better than what the Democrats have created for themselves. The Dems ought to be required to report everything they have done lately to the Federal Elections Commission as an in-kind donation to the Republicans in 2018. And then there is the Mueller/ FBI/Collusion/Treason charade, which has normal people asking, “Is that still a thing?” Yeah, kind of, though it becomes less thingy every day as it becomes obvious that Sad Bassett Hound Mueller and the Conflict-of-Interest Crew’s got no-thing. The establishment is convinced that Peter Strzok came out of that hearing not looking like a guy who probably has a sex dungeon in his basement. But he totally looked like he has a sex dungeon in his basement, thereby launching a thousand memes of him leering, smirking, and generally channeling Paul Lynde. One of the secrets of Trump’s success is having really, really stupid enemies, enemies who are so tone-deaf and out-of-touch that they simply cannot adopt commonsense positions that resonate among normal Americans. The establishment instead insists on telling Americans that up is down, black is white, and girls can have penises. Nope. No wonder the Normals have gotten militant, and no wonder a leader like Donald Trump came along with the vision to exploit the opening the establishment left for an outsider to rise and prevail by embracing the obvious. Kurt Sclichter
Trump being Trump, he is unable to separate (a) the way Russia’s perfidy has been exploited by his political opponents to attack him (i.e., the unsuccessful attempt to delegitimize his presidency) from (b) Russia’s perfidy itself, as an attack on the United States. No matter how angry this president may be at the Democrats and the media, the significance to any president of Russia’s influence operation must be that it succeeded beyond Putin’s wildest dreams. Whether you’re a Democrat invested in the narrative that Russia’s shenanigans cost Hillary Clinton the presidency, or a Republican in denial that Putin sought to boost Trump at Clinton’s expense, the reality is that Putin was undoubtedly trying to sow discord in our body politic. That interpretation of events is something any president should be able to rally most of the country behind. The provocation warrants a determined response that bleeds Putin, the very opposite of kowtowing to the despot on the world stage. Now, let’s put to the side the recent cyber-espionage and other influence operations directed at our country. It has been only four months since Putin’s regime attempted to murder former double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter, Yulia, in the British city of Salisbury. It has been only a few days since a British couple fell into a coma after exposure to the same Soviet-era nerve agent (Novichok) used on the Skripals. The second incident happened just seven miles from the first, strongly suggesting that Putin’s regime is guilty of depraved indifference to the dangers its targeted assassinations on Western soil — the territory of our closest ally — pose to innocent bystanders. In 2006, the Putin regime similarly murdered a former Russian spy, Alexander Litvinenko, in London, poisoning his tea with radioactive polonium. Meanwhile, reporting that is based mainly on the account of a former KGB agent (who defected to the West and has been warned he is a target) indicates that Putin’s operatives are working off a hit list of eight people (including Sergei Skirpal) who reside in the West. Putin’s annexation of Crimea was just the most notorious of his recent adventures in territorial aggression. He has effectively annexed the Georgian regions of Abkhazia and South Ossetia, and the separatist war he is puppeteering in eastern Ukraine still rages in this its fifth year. He is casting a menacing eye at the Baltics. This, even as Russia props up the monstrous Assad regime in Syria and allies with Iran, the jihadist regime best known for sponsoring anti-American terrorism around the world. And just five months ago, at a major speech touting improved weapons capabilities, Putin spiced up the demonstration with a video diagramming a hypothetical nuclear missile attack on . . . yes . . . Florida. There is no doubt that we have to deal with this monster. Realpolitik adherents may even be right that there is potential for cooperation with Russia in areas of mutual interest (at least provided that the dealing is done with eyes open about Putin’s core anti-Americanism). But there is no reason why we need to deal with Russia in a forum at which the U.S. president stands there and pretends that a brutal autocrat, who has become incalculably rich by looting his crumbling country, is a statesman promoting peace and better relations. I would say that no matter who was president. In the case of President Trump specifically, for all his “you’re fired” bravado and reports of mercurial outbursts at some subordinates, he does not like unpleasant face-to-face confrontations. He may unload at a rally, but face to face, the president’s m.o. is to defuse confrontation with unctuous banter — an easy solution for someone who seems not to believe that anything he says in the moment will bind him in the future. This, inevitably, leads to foolish and sometimes reprehensible assertions (e.g., saying, in apparent defense of Putin, “There are a lot of killers. What? You think our country’s so innocent?”). The president appears to subscribe to the Swamp school of thought that negotiations are good for their own sake — though he conflates what is good for him (promoting his image as a master deal-maker) with what is good for the country (negotiations often aren’t). This is another iteration of the president’s tendency to personalize things, particularly relations between governments. That trait puts him at a distinct disadvantage with someone like Putin, who knows well the uses of flattery and grievance.
Donald Trump avait déjà tenu de tels propos et indiqué ses doutes sur le rapport des renseignements concluant à l’ingérence de la Russie dans l’élection, au premier semestre 2017. Mais ce qui était peu prévisible, c’est qu’il a remis en cause le travail des renseignements américains devant Vladimir Poutine, et en terre étrangère. Cela montre qu’il a franchi un seuil, une étape. (…) Cela choque les Républicains qui ne peuvent désormais plus ignorer la position de Donald Trump, qui a dit devant des caméras, et face à Vladimir Poutine, qu’il fait davantage confiance au président russe qu’à la justice et la police de son pays. Or, le parti des Républicains est le parti de la loi et de l’ordre. Pour eux, voir un président des Etats-Unis faire moins confiance aux institutions qu’à un dirigeant étranger, cela pose un énorme problème. D’autant plus qu’avant l’élection de Trump, les Républicains étaient en opposition avec la Russie de Poutine. Leurs critiques reflètent aussi ce malaise. (…) au-delà des protestations verbales symboliques, il ne devrait rien se passer concrètement, pour trois raisons. D’abord, Trump est aujourd’hui bien plus proche de l’électorat républicain que ne le sont les élus du parti au Congrès (élus en 2012, 2014 et 2016). La preuve, c’est que selon l’institut de sondages américain Gallup, en 2014 22 % des sympathisants républicains sondés jugeait la Russie comme étant une amie ou un allié, mais ils sont 40 % aujourd’hui. L’électorat républicain, sans doute sous l’effet de Trump, s’est radouci envers la Russie. Deuxièmement, que pourraient faire les Républicains ? Les institutions américaines permettent au président des Etats-Unis de faire à peu près ce qu’il veut en politique étrangère. Un impeachment ou une motion de censure sont hautement improbables. D’autant que les élus sont en pleine campagne électorale des mid-terms, ils n’ont pas d’intérêt à aller contre le président. Enfin, il faut se souvenir que les Républicains ont passé un pacte faustien avec Trump. La plupart des élus y sont allés avec des pincettes, en se bouchant le nez, mais Trump leur a apporté la Maison Blanche, de manière inespérée, et il a exécuté l’agenda économique et social des conservateurs : baisse d’impôts, nomination de deux juges conservateurs à la Cour suprême… Cela vaut bien un Helsinki. (…) Trump n’a jamais fait mystère de sa volonté d’un « reboot », un redémarrage dans les échanges avec la Russie. Sauf qu’à Helsinki on a plutôt vu une soumission, une vassalisation du président américain. Pour Poutine, dont le pays est sous le coup de fortes sanctions à la fois américaines et européennes, c’est une victoire diplomatique et symbolique importante. C’est tout de même très étrange, pour un président dont l’entourage est sous le coup d’enquêtes fédérales pour une collusion avec la Russie, de donner autant de gages éventuels de quelque chose de trouble dans son lien avec Poutine. (…) Par ailleurs, sur le fond, les deux dirigeants n’ont pas annoncé grand-chose à l’issue de leur tête à tête de 2 heures et de leur entretien avec leurs conseillers d’une heure. Ils ont relancé l’idée d’un groupe commun de cybersécurité, mais c’est tout. En dépit de cette volonté affichée d’un nouveau départ, comme avec la Corée du Nord d’ailleurs, il n’y a aucune matière pour l’instant. Le seul dossier sur lequel ils ont insisté, c’est le désarmement nucléaire et la lutte contre la prolifération nucléaire. Mais Poutine a réitéré à Helsinki son soutien à l’Iran, à l’encontre de la position de Trump. Corentin Sellin
Les excuses ne sont pas le fort de Donald Trump. Il a été nourri par ses mentors – feus son père, Fred, et l’avocat maccarthyste Roy Cohn – dans la conviction qu’elles ne sont qu’un aveu de faiblesse. Depuis, il s’y tient: ne jamais reconnaître une erreur, ne jamais battre en retraite. Il faut donc que la tempête ait été puissante pour que le président américain ait effectué mardi un repli tactique. À Helsinki, la veille, il avait accordé plus de crédit aux protestations d’innocence de Vladimir Poutine qu’aux accusations étayées de ses services de renseignements à propos des interférences russes dans la campagne de 2016. Il était parfaitement satisfait de sa prestation, confirme un collaborateur à la Maison-Blanche, jusqu’à ce qu’il prenne la mesure des reproches quasi universels en regardant la télévision à bord d’Air Force One durant le vol de retour. Même Fox News, qui l’applaudit en tout, jugeait «une clarification nécessaire». Même Newt Gingrich, l’ancien speaker de la Chambre, qui a écrit deux livres en deux ans pour donner du sens au trumpisme, l’appelait à «corriger immédiatement la plus grave erreur de sa présidence». Trump s’est donc plié à cet exercice déplaisant, à sa manière. Il a formulé le démenti le moins vraisemblable qu’on puisse trouver, afin que ses supporteurs ne soient pas dupes. «Je voulais dire: je ne vois aucune raison pour laquelle ce ne serait PAS la Russie», a déclaré le président. (…) «Cette excuse défie toute crédibilité, estime Jonathan Lemire, le correspondant de l’Associated Press dont la question avait provoqué le dérapage. Pour admettre que sa langue ait fourché dans cette phrase, il faudrait ignorer tout le reste de sa conférence de presse» avec le président russe. (…) Bien peu, chez ses partisans comme parmi ses adversaires, ont pris cette mise au point pour argent comptant. Car Donald Trump l’a lue ostensiblement devant les caméras avec le ton mécanique de quelqu’un qui accomplit une formalité, et en s’écartant deux fois du script préparé par ses collaborateurs. D’abord pour s’exclamer: «Il n’y a pas eu de collusion du tout!», une phrase qu’il avait rajoutée à la main. Ensuite pour atténuer le démenti tout juste formulé: «J’accepte la conclusion de notre communauté du renseignement selon laquelle l’interférence de la Russie dans l’élection de 2016 a eu lieu. Ce pourrait aussi être d’autres gens ; des tas de gens un peu partout.» (…) «Trump a mis au point une méthode d’excuses composée à parts égales de retraite et de réaffirmation», analyse Marc Fisher dans le Washington Post, pointant «le changement de ton quand il exprime ses véritables sentiments». Selon lui, on assiste au même «processus» que l’été dernier lors des incidents racistes de Charlottesville: «Insulte, excuses réticentes, signal clair qu’il croit vraiment ce qu’il avait dit au départ, répétition.» De fait, le correctif de mardi ne vise pas à clore la polémique, il lui offre seulement la protection d’avoir dit une chose et son contraire. Maintenant qu’il a rempli cette «obligation formelle», le chef de la Maison-Blanche peut continuer à asséner sa version des faits. Le Figaro
Sous les yeux d’un Poutine buvant visiblement du petit-lait, Donald Trump lâche une réponse surréaliste ce lundi au palais présidentiel d’Helsinki où il donne une conférence de presse avec son homologue russe, au terme de leur sommet bilatéral de quelques heures, face à une salle pleine à craquer de journalistes. Du jamais-vu. Le reporter de l’agence AP vient tout juste de lui demander qui il croit, concernant l’existence d’une immixtion russe dans la campagne présidentielle de 2016. Ses propres services qui affirment unanimes qu’il y a eu une attaque russe massive pour orienter le cours de l’élection? Ou Poutine qui dément absolument? À la stupéfaction générale des journalistes, Donald Trump ne veut pas trancher. «J’ai confiance dans les deux. Je fais confiance à mes services, mais la dénégation de Vladimir Poutine a été très forte et très puissante», déclare-t-il. Ce faisant, il assène un coup terrible aux services de renseignement de son propre pays, au vu et su de la planète entière. C’est une manière de dire qu’il est si soupçonneux à l’encontre de l’enquête russe qu’il pencherait presque pour «la vérité» que Poutine entend imposer. «Ce que j’aimerais savoir, c’est où sont passés les serveurs?» (du Parti démocrate, qui ont été hackés par la Russie, NDLR), s’interroge Trump. Il insiste: «Et où sont passés les 33.000 e-mails de Hillary Clinton, ce n’est pas en Russie qu’ils se seraient perdus!» Pour le président américain, «il n’y a jamais eu collusion, l’élection, je l’ai gagnée haut la main», sans l’aide de personne. «Cette enquête russe nous empêche de coopérer, alors qu’il y a tant à faire», dit Trump. Sur l’estrade, où les deux hommes sont côte à côte, Poutine jubile, comme s’il assistait à un spectacle qui ne semble pas le concerner mais dont il se délecte néanmoins. Événement sans précédent dans l’histoire des deux pays, Trump ouvre un boulevard à son homologue qui a toujours défendu une forme de relativisme, destiné à démontrer que les institutions démocratiques des États-Unis ne sont pas plus fiables que la parole du président russe. C’est une technique éprouvée. (…) Avant la séance de questions, la conférence de presse avait pourtant plutôt bien commencé, les deux hommes mettant l’accent sur la nécessité de reconstruire une relation «très détériorée» sur une base pragmatique. «Notre relation n’a jamais été aussi mauvaise mais depuis quatre heures, cela a changé», avait déclaré Donald Trump, visiblement satisfait, mais plutôt sérieux et contenu. Lisant ses fiches d’un ton neutre, Vladimir Poutine, lui, avait énuméré une longue liste de sujets sur lesquels Washington et Moscou pourraient coopérer, de l’établissement d’un cessez-le-feu entre Israël et la Syrie sur le plateau du Golan jusqu’au désarmement bilatéral entre les deux plus grandes puissances nucléaires, en passant par la dénucléarisation de la péninsule nord-coréenne. Cerise sur le gâteau, le chef du Kremlin a aussi proposé de prolonger l’accord de livraison de gaz qui unit son pays à l’Ukraine et qui doit expirer à la fin de cette année. Une initiative susceptible d’apaiser à la fois Washington et l’Union européenne. Mais très vite, la relation russo-américaine a été rattrapée par ses vieux démons, ceux de l’ingérence russe dans le scrutin présidentiel de 2016. Toutes les inquiétudes que les observateurs américains et européens nourrissaient vis-à-vis de l’ambiguïté de Trump sur la Russie, et de sa capacité à être manipulé par l’ex-espion du KGB Vladimir Poutine, ont soudain trouvé confirmation. Ce lundi soir, des réactions indignées commençaient à fuser depuis Washington. Le Figaro
De retour d’Helsinki, le président américain s’est employé mardi à éteindre la tempête politique provoquée par ses propos tenus la veille, dans lesquels il désavouait ses propres services secrets. Au milieu des critiques suscitées par son attitude devant Poutine à Helsinki, Donald Trump, de retour mardi à Washington DC, a profité d’une réunion à la Maison-Blanche avec des élus pour se dédire: «J’ai relu le texte de mes déclarations et je me suis aperçu qu’il manquait une négation. Je voulais dire: «Je ne vois pas de raison pour que la Russie ne l’ait pas fait» (interférer dans l’élection, NDLR). Je pense que ceci clarifie la question. J’ai une foi et une confiance entières en nos formidables agences de renseignement. J’accepte leurs conclusions selon lesquelles des interventions de la Russie ont eu lieu. Nous agirons avec force pour repousser et stopper toute (nouvelle) interférence dans nos élections.» Cette ingérence de Moscou «n’a eu aucun impact» sur le résultat du scrutin qu’il a remporté, a toutefois tenu à souligner le milliardaire républicain. Difficile de se contredire plus explicitement, une démarche en soi remarquable de la part d’un président allergique à admettre le moindre tort. Mais les accusations touchaient un nerf sensible, jetant sur lui le soupçon infamant de faiblesse, ou pire, de trahison. «J’ai vu les renseignements russes manipuler beaucoup de gens dans ma carrière, mais je n’aurais jamais cru que le président des États-Unis serait l’un d’eux», avait ainsi déclaré Will Hurd, un ancien de la CIA élu républicain du Texas. Le Washington Post dénonçait «la collusion, à la vue de tous», entre Trump et Poutine. Le New York Times l’accusait de «s’être couché aux pieds» du président russe, par «mollesse» et «obséquiosité». Même le conservateur Wall Street Journal avait dénoncé son «empressement» auprès du chef du Kremlin comme «un embarras national». Le Figaro
Dans le flot de réactions inquiètes qui fusent, trois explications du «mystère d’Helsinki» émergent. La première, revendiquée à demi-mot par nombre de leaders démocrates et même républicains, est une explication carrément complotiste. Elle présuppose que Donald Trump a été «ferré» depuis longtemps par les services secrets russes et que ces derniers auraient finalement fini par le propulser au sommet du pouvoir américain, au terme d’une magnifique opération de déstabilisation. Une variante de cette hypothèse est que Trump a été compromis lors de son voyage russe de 2013 et que Moscou «le tient». Deuxième hypothèse, sans doute plus crédible: celle de l’obsession de la légitimité chez un président en divorce total avec le système politique qu’il est censé présider. Parce qu’il a le sentiment que toute la machine d’État – ce fameux État profond qu’il déteste – est contre lui et que son élection est constamment en question, Trump semble incapable d’accepter l’idée qu’une immixtion russe ait pu faciliter sa victoire. Son insécurité est telle qu’il préfère croire aux «contes» politiques de Poutine plutôt que de reconnaître les conclusions de ses services sur les attaques russes contre la démocratie américaine. Un scénario qui aurait été facilité par son ego surdimensionné, face à un ancien espion du KGB ultra-expérimenté. À ces versions peut s’en ajouter une troisième. Celle d’un plan de Trump en direction de la Russie, pour la rallier à l’Amérique, sur des dossiers clé comme la en dépit des divergences idéologiques et des conseils quasi unanimes des experts (que Trump a toujours méprisés). Ce mardi, plusieurs observateurs russes évoquaient une telle hypothèse, soulignant que la première partie de la conférence de presse avait fait apparaître certains thèmes de coopération potentiels, notamment le soutien à Israël (contre l’Iran?). «Je suis prêt à prendre un risque politique pour promouvoir la paix, plutôt que de sacrifier la paix à la politique», a d’ailleurs dit Trump pendant la conférence de presse, phrase qui a été noyée dans le scandale de la question de l’immixtion. Laure Mandeville
NATO’s problems predated Trump and in many ways come back to Germany, whose example most other NATO nations ultimately tend to follow. The threat to both the EU and NATO is not Trump’s America, but a country that is currently insisting on an artificially low euro for mercantile purposes and that is at odds with its southern Mediterranean partners over financial liabilities, with its Eastern European neighbors over illegal immigration, with the United Kingdom over the conditions of Brexit, and with the U.S. over a paltry investment in military readiness of 1.3 percent of GDP while it’s piling up the largest account surplus in the world, at over $260 billion, and a $65 billion trade surplus with the U.S. Germany, a majority of whose tanks and fighters are thought not to be battle-ready, cannot expect an American-subsidized united NATO front against the threat of Vladimir Putin if it is now cutting a natural-gas agreement with Russia that undermines the Baltic States and Ukraine — countries that Putin is increasingly targeting. The gas deal will not only empower Putin; it will make Germany dependent on Russian energy — an untenable situation. Merkel can package all that in mellifluous diplomatic-speak, and Trump can rail about it in crude polemics, but the facts remain facts, and they are of Merkel’s making, not Trump’s. The same themes hold true regarding attitudes toward Putin, who (again) predated Trump and his press conference in Helsinki, where the president gave to the press an unfortunate apology-tour/Cairo-speech–like performance, reminiscent of past disastrous meetings with or assessments of Russian leaders by American presidents, such as FDR on Stalin: “I just have a hunch that Stalin is not that kind of man. Harry [Hopkins] says he’s not and that he doesn’t want anything but security for his country, and I think if I give him everything I possibly can and ask for nothing in return, noblesse oblige, he won’t try to annex anything and will work with me for a world of democracy and peace.” Or Kennedy’s blown summit with Khrushchev in Geneva: “He beat the hell out of me. It was the worst thing in my life. He savaged me.” Or Reagan’s weird offer to share American SDI technology and research with Gorbachev or, without much consultation with his advisers, to eliminate all ballistic missiles at Reykjavik. Trump confused trying to forge a realist détente with some sort of bizarre empathy for Putin, whose actions have been hostile and bellicose to the U.S. and based on perceptions of past American weakness. But again, Trump did not create an empowered Putin — and he has done more than any other president so far to check Putin’s ambitions. Putin in 2016 continued longstanding Russian cyberattacks and election interference because of past impunity (Obama belatedly told Putin to “cut it out” only in September 2016). He swallowed Crimea and parts of eastern Ukraine after the famous Hillary-managed “reset” — a surreal Chamberlain-like policy in which we simultaneously appeased Putin in fact while in rhetoric lecturing him about his classroom cut-up antics and macho style. Had Trump been overheard on a hot mic in Helsinki promising more flexibility with Putin on missile defense after our midterm elections, in expectation for electorally advantageous election-cycle quid pro quo good behavior from the Russians, we’d probably see articles of impeachment introduced on charges of Russian collusion. And yet the comparison would be even worse than that. After all, America kept Obama’s 2011 promise “to Vladimir,” in that we really did give up on creating credible missile defenses in Eastern Europe, breaking pledges made by a previous administration — music to Vladimir Putin’s ears. It would be preferable if Trump’s rhetoric reinforced his solid actions, which in relation to Putin’s aggression consist of wisely keeping or increasing tough sanctions, accelerating U.S. oil production, decimating Russian mercenaries in Syria, and arming Ukrainian resistance. But then again, Trump has not quite told us that he has looked into Putin’s eyes and seen a straightforward and trustworthy soul. Nor in desperation did he invite Putin into the Middle East after a Russian hiatus of nearly 40 years to prove to the world that Bashar al-Assad had eliminated his WMD trove — which Assad subsequently continued to use at his pleasure. There is currently no scandal over uranium sales to Russia, and the secretary of state’s spouse has not been discovered to have recently pocketed $500,000 to speak in Moscow. In a perfect world, we would like to see carefully chosen words enhancing effective muscular action. Instead, in the immediate past, we heard sober and judicious rhetoric ad nauseam, coupled with abject appeasement and widely perceived dangerous weakness. Now we have ill-timed bombast that sometimes mars positive achievement. Neither is desirable. But the latter is far preferable to the former. Victor Davis Hanson
We are in dangerous times. Amid the hysteria over the Russian summit, the Mueller collusion probe, nonstop unsupported allegations and rumors, the Strzok and Page testimonies, the ongoing congressional investigations into improper CIA and FBI behavior, and a completely unhinged media, there is a growing crisis of rising tensions between two superpowers that together possess a combined arsenal of 3,000 instantly deployable nuclear weapons and another 10,000 in storage. That latter existential fact apparently has been forgotten in all the recriminations. So it is time for all parties to deescalate and step back a bit. Trump understandably wants to avoid progressive charges that he is obstructing Robert Mueller’s ostensible investigation of Russian collusion, and he also wants some sort of détente with Russia. Mueller has likely indicted Russians, timed on the eve of the summit, in part on the assumption that they would more or less not personally defend themselves and never appear on U.S. soil. Add that all up, and Trump apparently has discussed with Putin an idea of allowing Mueller’s investigators to visit Russia to interview those they have indicted. But in the quid pro quo world of big-power rivalry, Putin, of course, wants reciprocity — the right also to interview American citizens or residents (among them a former U.S. ambassador to Russia) whom he believes have transgressed against Russia. Trump needs to squash Putin’s ridiculous “parity” request immediately. Mueller would learn little or nothing from interviewing his targets on Russian soil — and likely never imagined that he would or could. On the other hand, given recent Russian attacks on critics abroad, Moscow’s interviewing any Russian antagonist anywhere is not necessarily a safe or sane enterprise. And being indicted under the laws of a constitutional republic is hardly synonymous with earning the suspicion of the Russian autocracy. Most importantly, the idea that a former U.S. ambassador to Russia, Professor Michael McFaul — long after the expiration of his government tenure — would submit to Russian questioning is absurd. Of course, it would also undermine the entire sanctity of American ambassadorial service. So, Putin’s offer, to the extent we know the details of it, will soon upon examination be seen as patently unhinged. In refusal, Trump has a good opportunity to remind the world why all American critics of the Putin government — and especially of his own government as well — are uniquely free and protected to voice any notion they wish. Victor Davis Hanson
AP reporter John Lemire placed Trump in an impossible position. Noting that Putin denied meddling in the 2016 elections and the intelligence community insists that Russia meddled, he asked Trump, “Who do you believe?” If Trump had said that he believed his intelligence community and gave no credence to Putin’s denial, he would have humiliated Putin and destroyed any prospect of cooperative relations.Trump tried to strike a balance. He spoke respectfully of both Putin’s denials and the US intelligence community’s accusation. It wasn’t a particularly coherent position. It was a clumsy attempt to preserve the agreements he and Putin reached during their meeting. And it was blindingly obviously not treason. In fact, Trump’s response to Lemire, and his overall conduct at the press conference, did not convey weakness at all. Certainly he was far more assertive of US interests than Obama was in his dealings with Russia. In Obama’s first summit with Putin in July 2009, Obama sat meekly as Putin delivered an hour-long lecture about how US-Russian relations had gone down the drain. As Daniel Greenfield noted at Frontpage magazine Tuesday, in succeeding years, Obama capitulated to Putin on anti-missile defense systems in Poland and the Czech Republic, on Ukraine, Georgia and Crimea. Obama gave Putin free rein in Syria and supported Russia’s alliance with Iran on its nuclear program and its efforts to save the Assad regime. He permitted Russian entities linked to the Kremlin to purchase a quarter of American uranium. And of course, Obama made no effort to end Russian meddling in the 2016 elections. Trump in contrast has stiffened US sanctions against Russian entities. He has withdrawn from Obama’s nuclear deal with Iran. He has agreed to sell Patriot missiles to Poland. And he has placed tariffs on Russian exports to the US. So if Trump is Putin’s agent, what was Obama? (…) The Democrats and their allies in the media use the accusation that Trump is an agent of Russia as an elections strategy. Midterm elections are consistently marked with low voter turnout. So both parties devote most of their energies to rallying their base and motivating their most committed members to vote. (…) But (…) the problem with playing domestic politics on the international scene is that doing so has real consequences for international security and for US national interests.(…)  for instance (…) Europe is economically dependent on trade with the US and strategically dependent on NATO. So why are the Europeans so open about their hatred of Trump and their rejection of his trade policies, his policy towards Iran and his insistence that they pay their fair share for their own defense? (…) The answer of course is that they got a green light to adopt openly anti-American policies from the forces in the US that have devoted their energies since Trump’s election nearly two years ago to delegitimizing his victory and his presidency. Those calling Trump a traitor empowered the Europeans to defy the US on every issue. Trump’s opponents’ unsubstantiated allegation that his campaign colluded with Russia during the 2016 elections has constrained Trump’s ability to perform his duties.(…) Time will tell if we just averted war. But what we did learn is that Israel’s position in a war with Iran is stronger than it could have been if the two leaders hadn’t met in Helsinki. (…) Trump’s opponents’ obsession with bringing him down has caused great harm to his presidency and to America’s position worldwide. It is a testament to Trump’s commitment to the US and its allies that he met with Putin this week. And the success of their meeting is something that all who care about global security and preventing a devastating war in the Middle East should be grateful for. Caroline Glick

C’est bien la chasse aux sorcières et la conspiration gauchiste, imbécile !

A l’heure où au lendemain d’un aussi calamiteux qu’énigmatique sommet du président américain avec son homologue russe …

Qui nous a valu un surréaliste – mais depuis doublement désavoué – numéro de génuflexion de Donald Trump devant un Poutine empoisonneur des peuples et maitre reconnu des fausses équivalences morales

Comme, entre les références à – excusez du peu ! – Pearl Harbor, la Nuit de cristal et le 11/9, un tout aussi invraisemblable déluge des plus délirantes critiques de la part de ses adversaires politiques ou médiatiques …

Qui rappelle …

Mis à part le chroniqueur de Fox news Sean Hannity, l’historien militaire américain Victor Davis Hanson ou la célèbre éditorialiste du Jerusalem Post Caroline Glick

Qui il y à peine six ans ces mêmes belles âmes n’avaient rien trouvé à redire lorsque le président Obama avait fait part à Poutine, sur un micro resté ouvert, de sa « flexibilité » possible après sa réélection …

Que deux semaines avant l’élection présidentielle de 2016 le même Obama rappelait au candidat Trump « l’impossibilité de manipuler les élections » américaines du fait de leur caractère « décentralisé » et du « nombre de bulletins » …

Et qu’enfin, contrairement à l‘Administration précédente et entre sanctions et actions militaires ou dénonciations de mauvais traités, il y a longtemps qu’il n’y avait pas eu un gouvernement américain aussi intransigeant avec la Russie et ses affidés ?

Et dès lors comment qualifier …

Pour expliquer un comportement aussi mystérieux et schizophrénique de la part du président américain …

Les agissements d’une gauche américaine qui n’ayant toujours pas digéré sa défaite de 2016 …

Court-circuite totalement, via ses chiens de garde médiatiques, les réelles avancées dudit sommet notamment concernant la sécurité d’Israël face à l’aventurisme militaire iranien …

Et place délibérément son président à nouveau devant un choix impossible

A savoir celui cette fois-ci de la génuflexion devant Poutine ..

Contre ses propres services qui n’avaient alors rien fait …

Ou sous prétexte d’une influence russe qui, hostilité anti-démocrate oblige après huit ans d’administration Obama, ne pouvait avoir qu’un effet marginal ou anecdotique …

L’assentiment à la délégitimation de sa propre élection ?

Le voyage européen de Trump, un «carnage» et une énigme
Laure Mandeville
Le Figaro
17/07/2018

DÉCRYPTAGE – Durant son périple de cinq jours sur le Vieux continent, le président américain a mis l’Otan en ébullition tout en amorçant un redémarrage des relations russo-américaines, quitte à provoquer le désarroi américain et occidental.

Le voyage avait commencé par une volée de bois de vert administrée à ses alliés de l’Otan et de l’Union européenne. Il s’est fini par une «génuflexion» devant le président Poutine à Helsinki et un désaveu de son propre pays, exprimé à la face du monde entier. «Un carnage diplomatique», a pour sa part écrit l’éditorialiste du Financial Times Edward Luce, qui affirme que le contraste entre la brutalité utilisée face aux Européens et le soutien inconditionnel apporté à Poutine (malgré l’annexion de la Crimée, l’invasion rampante de l’Ukraine, l’attaque au poison Novitchok contre l’ex-espion Skripal, les mensonges répétés sur la frappe d’un missile russe contre un avion de ligne néerlandais et, pour finir, les tentatives de déstabilisation des élections) a jeté «l’Occident dans une crise existentielle».

«Le résultat du voyage de cinq jours de M. Trump, est un Otan en ébullition et un redémarrage réel des relations russo-américaines, entièrement en faveur de M. Poutine», constate-t-il.

Difficile d’être en désaccord avec l’analyse. Mais reste une lourde énigme. Pourquoi Donald Trump a-t-il pris le risque de susciter un séisme américain et occidental, en prenant fait et cause pour Vladimir Poutine sur la question de l’immixtion russe dans la campagne présidentielle, allant jusqu’à dénigrer ses propres services de renseignements en sa présence?

Quand on revient sur le fil des événements, la séquence «occidentale» du voyage d’Europe est finalement assez compréhensible. Face à l’Otan, l’ancien homme d’affaires s’est comporté en accord avec ses priorités de toujours, à savoir qu’il lui fallait absolument arracher à ses alliés ce que ses prédécesseurs avaient toujours échoué à obtenir, faute, selon lui, de ténacité: un rééquilibrage du budget de la défense de l’Alliance qui allégerait le fardeau américain. «Il faut que ça change, l’état des lieux est injuste pour l’Amérique», n’a-t-il cessé de tonner, avant de parler de l’Otan comme d’un «facteur d’unification formidable». Tout dans cette partie était du Trump classique. Les «coups de poing» sur la table, la capacité à hurler le matin puis à apaiser le jeu le soir. Tout ne visait qu’un but: obtenir un changement favorable à l’intérêt de «L’Amérique d’abord».

Séquence russe

Le problème de la mystérieuse et scandaleuse séquence russe qui a suivi à Helsinki est que, en désavouant son pays, Trump a semblé oublier qu’il était le président des États-Unis. «À la fin de la semaine, “L’Amérique d’abord” s’est mise à ressembler incroyablement à “La Russie d’abord”», a résumé d’un tweet l’expert Richard Haas. À travers toute la classe politique américaine, les accusations de «trahison» et de «faiblesse» se sont multipliées. Interrogé sur le fait de savoir si on pouvait comparer le comportement de Trump avec Poutine à celui de Roosevelt face à Staline à Yalta, l’historien Robert Dallek semblait perplexe: «Roosevelt était face aux dures réalités de la sortie de la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Nous n’avons pas d’idée claire mais juste des hypothèses sur la question de savoir pourquoi Trump semble être à un tel degré dans la poche de Vladimir Poutine», a-t-il répondu.

Dans le flot de réactions inquiètes qui fusent, trois explications du «mystère d’Helsinki» émergent. La première, revendiquée à demi-mot par nombre de leaders démocrates et même républicains, est une explication carrément complotiste. Elle présuppose que Donald Trump a été «ferré» depuis longtemps par les services secrets russes et que ces derniers auraient finalement fini par le propulser au sommet du pouvoir américain, au terme d’une magnifique opération de déstabilisation. Une variante de cette hypothèse est que Trump a été compromis lors de son voyage russe de 2013 et que Moscou «le tient».

L’obsession de la légitimité

Deuxième hypothèse, sans doute plus crédible: celle de l’obsession de la légitimité chez un président en divorce total avec le système politique qu’il est censé présider. Parce qu’il a le sentiment que toute la machine d’État – ce fameux État profond qu’il déteste – est contre lui et que son élection est constamment en question, Trump semble incapable d’accepter l’idée qu’une immixtion russe ait pu faciliter sa victoire. Son insécurité est telle qu’il préfère croire aux «contes» politiques de Poutine plutôt que de reconnaître les conclusions de ses services sur les attaques russes contre la démocratie américaine. Un scénario qui aurait été facilité par son ego surdimensionné, face à un ancien espion du KGB ultra-expérimenté.

À ces versions peut s’en ajouter une troisième. Celle d’un plan de Trump en direction de la Russie, pour la rallier à l’Amérique, sur des dossiers clé comme la Corée, la Chine ou l’Iran, en dépit des divergences idéologiques et des conseils quasi unanimes des experts (que Trump a toujours méprisés). Ce mardi, plusieurs observateurs russes évoquaient une telle hypothèse, soulignant que la première partie de la conférence de presse avait fait apparaître certains thèmes de coopération potentiels, notamment le soutien à Israël (contre l’Iran?). «Je suis prêt à prendre un risque politique pour promouvoir la paix, plutôt que de sacrifier la paix à la politique», a d’ailleurs dit Trump pendant la conférence de presse, phrase qui a été noyée dans le scandale de la question de l’immixtion.

Les deux heures de conversation en tête à tête entre les deux hommes ont-elles pu déboucher sur un accord stratégique secret, que Trump a jugé suffisamment important pour faire front avec Poutine, sur la question de l’immixtion dans la campagne américaine? «On avait l’impression qu’ils étaient alliés face aux journalistes», a noté un observateur russe. Le résultat immédiat de ce plan, s’il existe, sera sans doute à l’opposé de ce que voulait Trump. Un désarroi américain et occidental qui devrait susciter une levée de boucliers contre Poutine. «Je crains la réponse qui va venir Washington», a noté l’éditorialiste du Moskovski Komsomolets, appelant à ne pas crier victoire.

Voir aussi:

Trump prend parti pour Poutine, contre ses propres services
Laure Mandeville et Pierre Avril
Le Figaro
16/07/2018

VIDÉO – À Helsinki, le président des Etats-Unis a obstinément refusé de condamner Moscou pour l’ingérence dans la campagne présidentielle américaine.

À Helsinki

Sous les yeux d’un Poutine buvant visiblement du petit-lait, Donald Trump lâche une réponse surréaliste ce lundi au palais présidentiel d’Helsinki où il donne une conférence de presse avec son homologue russe, au terme de leur sommet bilatéral de quelques heures, face à une salle pleine à craquer de journalistes. Du jamais-vu. Le reporter de l’agence AP vient tout juste de lui demander qui il croit, concernant l’existence d’une immixtion russe dans la campagne présidentielle de 2016. Ses propres services qui affirment unanimes qu’il y a eu une attaque russe massive pour orienter le cours de l’élection? Ou Poutine qui dément absolument? À la stupéfaction générale des journalistes, Donald Trump ne veut pas trancher. «J’ai confiance dans les deux. Je fais confiance à mes services, mais la dénégation de Vladimir Poutine a été très forte et très puissante», déclare-t-il.

Ce faisant, il assène un coup terrible aux services de renseignement de son propre pays, au vu et su de la planète entière. C’est une manière de dire qu’il est si soupçonneux à l’encontre de l’enquête russe qu’il pencherait presque pour «la vérité» que Poutine entend imposer. «Ce que j’aimerais savoir, c’est où sont passés les serveurs?» (du Parti démocrate, qui ont été hackés par la Russie, NDLR), s’interroge Trump. Il insiste: «Et où sont passés les 33.000 e-mails de Hillary Clinton, ce n’est pas en Russie qu’ils se seraient perdus!» Pour le président américain, «il n’y a jamais eu collusion, l’élection, je l’ai gagnée haut la main», sans l’aide de personne. «Cette enquête russe nous empêche de coopérer, alors qu’il y a tant à faire», dit Trump.

Poutine jubile

Sur l’estrade, où les deux hommes sont côte à côte, Poutine jubile, comme s’il assistait à un spectacle qui ne semble pas le concerner mais dont il se délecte néanmoins. Événement sans précédent dans l’histoire des deux pays, Trump ouvre un boulevard à son homologue qui a toujours défendu une forme de relativisme, destiné à démontrer que les institutions démocratiques des États-Unis ne sont pas plus fiables que la parole du président russe. C’est une technique éprouvée.

«Moi aussi j’ai travaillé dans les services de renseignement, lance le chef du Kremlin au journaliste américain. Mais la Russie est un pays démocratique. Les États-Unis aussi non? Si l’on veut tirer un bilan définitif de cette affaire, cela doit être réglé non pas par un service de renseignement mais par la justice.» Au reporter qui le presse de dire s’il est intervenu dans le processus électoral américain, il répond seulement: «Je voulais que Trump gagne parce qu’il voulait normaliser les relations russo-américaines… Mais laissez tomber cette histoire d’ingérence, c’est une absurdité totale!… La Russie ne s’est jamais ingérée dans un processus électoral et ne le fera jamais.»

Vladimir Poutine a été piqué par la question d’un journaliste de Reuters qui évoquait la possibilité d’une extradition des douze agents russes suspectés par le procureur Robert Mueller d’avoir piraté le compte du serveur démocrate. «Nous y sommes prêts à condition que cette coopération soit réciproque», a rétorqué le chef du Kremlin, laissant entendre que les États-Unis devaient eux aussi poursuivre les espions américains opérant sur le sol russe.

Avant la séance de questions, la conférence de presse avait pourtant plutôt bien commencé, les deux hommes mettant l’accent sur la nécessité de reconstruire une relation «très détériorée» sur une base pragmatique. «Notre relation n’a jamais été aussi mauvaise mais depuis quatre heures, cela a changé», avait déclaré Donald Trump, visiblement satisfait, mais plutôt sérieux et contenu.

Lisant ses fiches d’un ton neutre, Vladimir Poutine, lui, avait énuméré une longue liste de sujets sur lesquels Washington et Moscou pourraient coopérer, de l’établissement d’un cessez-le-feu entre Israël et la Syrie sur le plateau du Golan jusqu’au désarmement bilatéral entre les deux plus grandes puissances nucléaires, en passant par la dénucléarisation de la péninsule nord-coréenne.

Cerise sur le gâteau, le chef du Kremlin a aussi proposé de prolonger l’accord de livraison de gaz qui unit son pays à l’Ukraine et qui doit expirer à la fin de cette année. Une initiative susceptible d’apaiser à la fois Washington et l’Union européenne. Mais très vite, la relation russo-américaine a été rattrapée par ses vieux démons, ceux de l’ingérence russe dans le scrutin présidentiel de 2016. Toutes les inquiétudes que les observateurs américains et européens nourrissaient vis-à-vis de l’ambiguïté de Trump sur la Russie, et de sa capacité à être manipulé par l’ex-espion du KGB Vladimir Poutine, ont soudain trouvé confirmation.

«Un signe de faiblesse»

Ce lundi soir, des réactions indignées commençaient à fuser depuis Washington. «La Maison-Blanche est maintenant confrontée à une seule, sinistre question: qu’est-ce qui peut bien pousser Donald Trump à mettre les intérêts de la Russie au-dessus de ceux des États-Unis», a écrit le chef de l’opposition démocrate au Sénat, Chuck Schumer, sur Twitter après la conférence de presse commune des deux dirigeants à Helsinki, parlant de propos «irréfléchis, dangereux et faibles».

«Le président Trump a raté une occasion de tenir la Russie clairement responsable pour son ingérence dans les élections de 2016 et de lancer un avertissement ferme au sujet des prochains scrutins», a regretté le sénateur républicain Lindsey Graham. «Cette réponse du président Trump sera considérée par la Russie comme un signe de faiblesse», a ajouté cet élu souvent en phase avec le milliardaire républicain. «C’est une honte», a dénoncé pour sa part l’ancien sénateur d’Arizona Jeff Flake, dans l’opposition républicaine à Trump. «Je n’aurais jamais pensé voir un jour notre président américain se tenir à côté du président russe et mettre en cause les États-Unis pour l’agression russe.»

Voir également:

Après avoir rencontré Poutine à Helsinki, Trump est-il «un faible» ou «un traître» ?
Philippe Gélie
Le Figaro
17/07/2018

Le chef de la Maison-Blanche a fait l’unanimité contre lui aux États-Unis en se désolidarisant de ses services de renseignement devant le président russe.

De notre correspondant à Washington,

Donald Trump est parvenu à faire quasiment l’unanimité contre lui avec sa prestation à Helsinki face à Vladimir Poutine. «Lamentable», «surréaliste», «répugnant», «horrible», «antipatriotique», «une honte nationale»… Un déluge de commentaires négatifs venus de la droite comme de la gauche. Même Fox News a eu des états d’âme, c’est dire.

Si l’empressement de Trump auprès de Poutine lui a valu son lot de reproches, c’est surtout l’échange avec Jonathan Lemire de l’Associated Press qui a marqué les esprits. «Le président russe nie avoir interféré dans l’élection de 2016, toutes les agences de renseignement américaines concluent l’inverse: qui croyez-vous?» À question simple, réponse alambiquée. «Où sont les serveurs (informatiques du Parti démocrate, NDLR)?», s’est lancé Trump, avant de donner son sentiment: «Le président Poutine dit que ce n’est pas la Russie. Je ne vois pas de raison pour que ce soit elle

Le directeur du renseignement national, Dan Coats, nommé par Trump, a jugé bon de publier une mise au point immédiate, apparemment sans l’avoir fait valider par la Maison-Blanche: «Nous avons été clairs dans notre évaluation des interférences russes dans l’élection de 2016 et de leurs efforts persistants, généralisés, de saper notre démocratie. Nous continuerons à fournir du renseignement objectif et sans fard en appui de notre sécurité nationale.»

Le «Charlottesville» de la politique étrangère?

«Extraordinaire», s’est exclamé le New York Times, pour qui cet épisode est «l’équivalent de Charlottesville en politique étrangère», une référence aux événements racistes de l’été dernier où Donald Trump avait vu «des gens bien des deux côtés». Cette fois, «il a jeté aux orties toute notion conventionnelle sur la façon dont un président doit se comporter à l’étranger. Au lieu de défendre l’Amérique contre ceux qui la menacent, il attaque ses propres concitoyens et institutions tout en applaudissant le chef d’une puissance hostile.»

Le site du Washington Post affichait lundi soir une pleine page de chroniques aux titres incendiaires: «Trump remplace la fierté nationale par la vanité personnelle», «C’est un fan de Poutine, un jour nous saurons pourquoi»… Même le Wall Street Journal, habituellement mesuré dans ses critiques, s’est fendu d’un éditorial sévère, titré: «La doctrine ‘Trump d’abord’». Estimant que son «empressement» au côté du président russe fut «un embarras national», il l’accuse «d’avoir projeté de la faiblesse.»

Plus que les adjectifs désobligeants, c’est ce soupçon qui risque de toucher un point sensible chez Trump. La plupart des interrogations suscitées par le sommet d’Helsinki oscillent entre deux infamies: est-il un faible ou un traître?

Les démocrates confortés dans leur thèse

Le représentant républicain du Texas Will Hurd, un ancien agent de la CIA, déclare sur CNN: «J’ai vu les renseignements russes manipuler beaucoup de gens dans ma carrière. Je n’aurais jamais cru que le président des États-Unis serait l’un d’eux.» John O’Brennan, ancien directeur de la CIA sous Barack Obama, ose tweeter le mot: la conférence de presse de Trump «n’était rien moins que de la trahison.» Nancy Pelosi, chef des démocrates à la Chambre, embraye: «Cela prouve que les Russes ont quelque chose sur le président, personnellement, financièrement ou politiquement.»

Dans les rangs républicains, John McCain est le plus sévère, comme d’habitude, l’accusant «d’avoir été non seulement incapable, mais de n’avoir pas voulu se dresser contre Poutine» et d’avoir fait «le choix conscient de défendre un tyran.» Lindsey Graham déplore «une occasion manquée» qui sera «perçue comme de la faiblesse» et recommande de vérifier si un système d’écoute n’a pas été dissimulé dans le ballon de foot offert par Poutine à Trump! Côté démocrate, le sénateur Chuck Schumer reproche lui aussi au président d’être «inconséquent, dangereux et faible.»

Ari Fleisher, ancien porte-parole de George W. Bush et supporteur de Trump, avoue son désarroi sur Twitter: «Je continue à croire qu’il n’y a pas eu de collusion entre sa campagne et la Russie, mais quand Trump accepte les arguments de Poutine aussi facilement et naïvement, je peux comprendre pourquoi les démocrates pensent que Poutine doit avoir quelque chose sur lui.»

Une rencontre programmée avec les élus du Congrès

Sur Fox News, Bret Baier a qualifié la performance présidentielle de «surréaliste» et Neil Cavuto de «répugnante», un ton inédit sur cette antenne. Il ne s’est guère trouvé que Sean Hannity, confident et inconditionnel du président, pour le défendre dans son émission lundi soir: c’est la «chasse aux sorcières», la «conspiration gauchiste» qui est «dégoûtante», a-t-il martelé, avant de diffuser l’interview que lui avait accordée Trump juste après le sommet. On n’y a rien appris de plus, mais le journaliste a fait de son mieux, saluant d’emblée la réponse «très forte» du chef de la Maison-Blanche sur «les serveurs démocrates».

Durant le vol du retour, Donald Trump a tweeté à bord d’Air Force One: «J’ai une grande confiance dans mes responsables du renseignement. Toutefois, pour construire un meilleur avenir, nous ne pouvons pas nous focaliser sur le passé. Les deux plus grandes puissances nucléaires doivent s’entendre!» Une rencontre avec les élus du Congrès a été ajoutée à son agenda ce mardi pour tenter d’apaiser leurs inquiétudes.

Voir de même:

Trump se dédit et accuse la Russie d’ingérence dans la présidentielle de 2016
Philippe Gélie
Le Figaro
17/07/2018

De retour d’Helsinki, le président américain s’est employé mardi à éteindre la tempête politique provoquée par ses propos tenus la veille, dans lesquels il désavouait ses propres services secrets.

Au milieu des critiques suscitées par son attitude devant Poutine à Helsinki, Donald Trump, de retour mardi à Washington DC, a profité d’une réunion à la Maison-Blanche avec des élus pour se dédire: «J’ai relu le texte de mes déclarations et je me suis aperçu qu’il manquait une négation. Je voulais dire: «Je ne vois pas de raison pour que la Russie ne l’ait pas fait» (interférer dans l’élection, NDLR). Je pense que ceci clarifie la question. J’ai une foi et une confiance entières en nos formidables agences de renseignement. J’accepte leurs conclusions selon lesquelles des interventions de la Russie ont eu lieu. Nous agirons avec force pour repousser et stopper toute (nouvelle) interférence dans nos élections.» Cette ingérence de Moscou «n’a eu aucun impact» sur le résultat du scrutin qu’il a remporté, a toutefois tenu à souligner le milliardaire républicain.

Difficile de se contredire plus explicitement, une démarche en soi remarquable de la part d’un président allergique à admettre le moindre tort. Mais les accusations touchaient un nerf sensible, jetant sur lui le soupçon infamant de faiblesse, ou pire, de trahison. «J’ai vu les renseignements russes manipuler beaucoup de gens dans ma carrière, mais je n’aurais jamais cru que le président des États-Unis serait l’un d’eux», avait ainsi déclaré Will Hurd, un ancien de la CIA élu républicain du Texas. Le Washington Post dénonçait «la collusion, à la vue de tous», entre Trump et Poutine. Le New York Times l’accusait de «s’être couché aux pieds» du président russe, par «mollesse» et «obséquiosité». Même le conservateur Wall Street Journal avait dénoncé son «empressement» auprès du chef du Kremlin comme «un embarras national».

Stupéfaction générale

Lundi, les dénégations du 45e président des États-Unis sur la question brûlante de l’ingérence russe dans la campagne 2016, attestée de façon unanime par les enquêteurs du FBI et les agences américaines du renseignement, avaient provoqué la stupéfaction générale. Interrogé lors d’une conférence de presse commune avec le président Vladimir Poutine à Helsinki sur la question d’une ingérence russe dans la présidentielle américaine, Trump avait affirmé que cette information lui avait été fournie par le chef de la CIA, mais qu’il n’avait aucune raison de la croire. «J’ai le président Poutine qui vient de dire que ce n’était pas la Russie (…) Et je ne vois pas pourquoi cela le serait», avait lancé Donald Trump, laissant entendre qu’il était plus sensible aux dénégations du dirigeant russe qu’aux conclusions de ses propres services.

Lors de son vol de retour de la capitale finlandaise, le président américain n’avait pu que constater les conséquences de ses égards vis-à-vis de son homologue russe, se retrouvant vertement critiqué jusque par des ténors du parti républicain. Donald Trump doit réaliser que «la Russie n’est pas notre alliée», a ainsi lancé le chef de file des républicains au Congrès, Paul Ryan. Le sénateur républicain John McCain a quant à lui dénoncé «un des pires moments de l’histoire de la présidence américaine».

Voir de plus:

Les zigzags diplomatiques de Trump sèment le trouble
Philippe Gélie
Le Figaro
18/07/2018

VIDÉOS – Les changements de pied du président américain sur l’attitude à adopter face à la Russie suscitent l’incompréhension en Europe et aux États-Unis.

De notre correspondant à Washington

Les excuses ne sont pas le fort de Donald Trump. Il a été nourri par ses mentors – feus son père, Fred, et l’avocat maccarthyste Roy Cohn – dans la conviction qu’elles ne sont qu’un aveu de faiblesse. Depuis, il s’y tient: ne jamais reconnaître une erreur, ne jamais battre en retraite.

Il faut donc que la tempête ait été puissante pour que le président américain ait effectué mardi un repli tactique. À Helsinki, la veille, il avait accordé plus de crédit aux protestations d’innocence de Vladimir Poutine qu’aux accusations étayées de ses services de renseignements à propos des interférences russes dans la campagne de 2016. Il était parfaitement satisfait de sa prestation, confirme un collaborateur à la Maison-Blanche, jusqu’à ce qu’il prenne la mesure des reproches quasi universels en regardant la télévision à bord d’Air Force One durant le vol de retour. Même Fox News, qui l’applaudit en tout, jugeait «une clarification nécessaire». Même Newt Gingrich, l’ancien speaker de la Chambre, qui a écrit deux livres en deux ans pour donner du sens au trumpisme (1), l’appelait à «corriger immédiatement la plus grave erreur de sa présidence».

Trump s’est donc plié à cet exercice déplaisant, à sa manière. Il a formulé le démenti le moins vraisemblable qu’on puisse trouver, afin que ses supporteurs ne soient pas dupes. «Je voulais dire: je ne vois aucune raison pour laquelle ce ne serait PAS la Russie», a déclaré le président. «On se demande bien qui a pensé à ça, mais peu importe», ironisait mercredi le Wall Street Journal dans son éditorial. «Cette excuse défie toute crédibilité, estime Jonathan Lemire, le correspondant de l’Associated Press dont la question avait provoqué le dérapage. Pour admettre que sa langue ait fourché dans cette phrase, il faudrait ignorer tout le reste de sa conférence de presse» avec le président russe. Même en lui faisant crédit de rectifier le tir, «cette déclaration a été faite avec 24 heures de retard et au mauvais endroit», a déclaré le sénateur démocrate Chuck Schumer.

«Obligation formelle»
Bien peu, chez ses partisans comme parmi ses adversaires, ont pris cette mise au point pour argent comptant. Car Donald Trump l’a lue ostensiblement devant les caméras avec le ton mécanique de quelqu’un qui accomplit une formalité, et en s’écartant deux fois du script préparé par ses collaborateurs. D’abord pour s’exclamer: «Il n’y a pas eu de collusion du tout!», une phrase qu’il avait rajoutée à la main. Ensuite pour atténuer le démenti tout juste formulé: «J’accepte la conclusion de notre communauté du renseignement selon laquelle l’interférence de la Russie dans l’élection de 2016 a eu lieu. Ce pourrait aussi être d’autres gens ; des tas de gens un peu partout.» Pour faire bonne mesure, il avait biffé de sa plume une phrase l’engageant à «amener toute personne impliquée devant la justice», une promesse qu’il n’a pas faite.

«Trump a mis au point une méthode d’excuses composée à parts égales de retraite et de réaffirmation», analyse Marc Fisher dans le Washington Post, pointant «le changement de ton quand il exprime ses véritables sentiments». Selon lui, on assiste au même «processus» que l’été dernier lors des incidents racistes de Charlottesville: «Insulte, excuses réticentes, signal clair qu’il croit vraiment ce qu’il avait dit au départ, répétition.» De fait, le correctif de mardi ne vise pas à clore la polémique, il lui offre seulement la protection d’avoir dit une chose et son contraire. Maintenant qu’il a rempli cette «obligation formelle», le chef de la Maison-Blanche peut continuer à asséner sa version des faits: «Tellement de gens au sommet du renseignement ont adoré ma performance à la conférence de presse d’Helsinki», a-t-il tweeté mercredi. Et: «Si la réunion de l’Otan a été un triomphe reconnu […], la rencontre avec la Russie pourrait se révéler être, sur le long terme, un succès encore plus grand.»

Les supporteurs du président l’approuvent quoi qu’il fasse et, lorsqu’ils ont des doutes, se convainquent qu’«il est plus dur en privé» ou qu’«il a un plan» ou qu’il concocte en secret «un mégadeal». Mais les responsables républicains semblent de moins en moins enclins à cette crédulité.

Tandis que le Wall Street Journalappelle le Congrès à «endiguer Poutine – et Trump», les élus envisagent d’adopter de nouvelles sanctions contre le Kremlin, voire d’inscrire la Russie sur la liste des États sponsors du terrorisme. Les démocrates demandent aussi à auditionner tous les participants au sommet d’Helsinki, ce que le secrétaire d’État, Mike Pompeo, fera mercredi prochain devant le Sénat.

(1) Understanding Trump , 2017, et Trump’s America , 2018.

Voir encore:

Sommet d’Helsinki: «On a vu une soumission, une vassalisation de Trump» face à Poutine
INTERVIEW Le spécialiste des Etats-Unis Corentin Sellin revient pour « 20 Minutes » sur l’attitude de Donald Trump lors de sa rencontre avec Vladimir Poutine…
Propos recueillis par Laure Cometti
20 minutes
17/07/18

Les propos de Donald Trump sur l’éventuelle ingérence russe lors de l’élection présidentielle de 2016 ont provoqué un coup de tonnerre outre-Atlantique. Lors de sa rencontre avec Vladimir Poutine à Helsinki, le président américain a indiqué croire davantage aux dénégations de son homologue russe  qu’aux rapports établis par les services de renseignements de son pays.

Ces déclarations faites lors d’une conférence de presse commune ont suscité de très virulentes critiques, même au sein de l’entourage du président des Etats-Unis. 20 Minutes revient sur cette séquence diplomatique et politique avec Corentin Sellin, agrégé d’histoire, professeur en classe préparatoire et spécialiste des Etats-Unis*.

Les propos de Donald Trump sur l’ingérence russe dans l’élection de 2016 sont-ils si nouveaux ?

Ils étaient prévisibles car Donald Trump avait déjà tenu de tels propos et indiqué ses doutes sur le rapport des renseignements concluant à l’ingérence de la Russie dans l’élection, au premier semestre 2017. Mais ce qui était peu prévisible, c’est qu’il a remis en cause le travail des renseignements américains devant Vladimir Poutine, et en terre étrangère. Cela montre qu’il a franchi un seuil, une étape.

Pourquoi cette prise de position du président américain choque autant aux Etats-Unis, même ses alliés Républicains ?

Cela choque les Républicains qui ne peuvent désormais plus ignorer la position de Donald Trump, qui a dit devant des caméras, et face à Vladimir Poutine, qu’il fait davantage confiance au président russe qu’à la justice et la police de son pays. Or, le parti des Républicains est le parti de la loi et de l’ordre. Pour eux, voir un président des Etats-Unis faire moins confiance aux institutions qu’à un dirigeant étranger, cela pose un énorme problème. D’autant plus qu’avant l’élection de Trump, les Républicains étaient en opposition avec la Russie de Poutine. Leurs critiques reflètent aussi ce malaise.

Ce tollé suscité par Trump chez les Républicains peut-il lui coûter quelque chose politiquement ?

Non, au-delà des protestations verbales symboliques, il ne devrait rien se passer concrètement, pour trois raisons. D’abord, Trump est aujourd’hui bien plus proche de l’électorat républicain que ne le sont les élus du parti au Congrès (élus en 2012, 2014 et 2016). La preuve, c’est que selon l’institut de sondages américain Gallup, en 2014 22 % des sympathisants républicains sondés jugeait la Russie comme étant une amie ou un allié, mais ils sont 40 % aujourd’hui. L’électorat républicain, sans doute sous l’effet de Trump, s’est radouci envers la Russie.

Deuxièmement, que pourraient faire les Républicains ? Les institutions américaines permettent au président des Etats-Unis de faire à peu près ce qu’il veut en politique étrangère. Un impeachment ou une motion de censure sont hautement improbables. D’autant que les élus sont en pleine campagne électorale des mid-terms, ils n’ont pas d’intérêt à aller contre le président.

Enfin, il faut se souvenir que les Républicains ont passé un pacte faustien avec Trump. La plupart des élus y sont allés avec des pincettes, en se bouchant le nez, mais Trump leur a apporté la Maison Blanche, de manière inespérée, et il a exécuté l’agenda économique et social des conservateurs : baisse d’impôts, nomination de deux juges conservateurs à la Cour suprême… Cela vaut bien un Helsinki.

Ce sommet marque-t-il un tournant dans les relations entre Washington et Moscou ?

Trump n’a jamais fait mystère de sa volonté d’un « reboot », un redémarrage dans les échanges avec la Russie. Sauf qu’à Helsinki on a plutôt vu une soumission, une vassalisation du président américain. Pour Poutine, dont le pays est sous le coup de fortes sanctions à la fois américaines et européennes, c’est une victoire diplomatique et symbolique importante.

C’est tout de même très étrange, pour un président dont l’entourage est sous le coup d’enquêtes fédérales pour une collusion avec la Russie, de donner autant de gages éventuels de quelque chose de trouble dans son lien avec Poutine. Selon le Washington Post, il y a aussi un problème interne à la Maison Blanche, car Trump n’a pas suivi les recommandations de ses conseillers.

Par ailleurs, sur le fond, les deux dirigeants n’ont pas annoncé grand-chose à l’issue de leur tête à tête de 2 heures et de leur entretien avec leurs conseillers d’une heure. Ils ont relancé l’idée d’un groupe commun de cybersécurité, mais c’est tout. En dépit de cette volonté affichée d’un nouveau départ, comme avec la Corée du Nord d’ailleurs, il n’y a aucune matière pour l’instant. Le seul dossier sur lequel ils ont insisté, c’est le désarmement nucléaire et la lutte contre la prolifération nucléaire. Mais Poutine a réitéré à Helsinki son soutien à l’Iran, à l’encontre de la position de Trump.

* Coauteur de Les Etats-Unis et le monde de la doctrine de Monroe à la création de l’ONU : (1823-1945) (Ed. Atlande).

Voir aussi:

Who is betraying America?
So far, unlike Obama’s foreign policy by this point in his presidency, none of Trump’s exchanges have brought disaster on America or its allies.
Caroline B. Glick
The Jerusalem Post
07/20/2018

Did US President Donald Trump commit treason in Helsinki when he met Monday with Russian President Vladimir Putin? Should he be impeached?

That is what his opponents claim. Former president Barack Obama’s CIA director John Brennan accused Trump of treason outright.
Brennan tweeted, “Donald Trump’s press conference performance in Helsinki [with Putin] rises to and exceeds the threshold of ‘high crimes and misdemeanors.’ It was nothing short of treasonous.”

Fellow senior Obama administration officials, including former FBI director James Comey, former defense secretary Ashton Carter, and former deputy attorney general Sally Yates parroted Brennan’s accusation.

Almost the entire US media joined them in condemning Trump for treason.

Democratic leaders have led their own charge. Democratic Congressman Steve Cohen from Tennessee insinuated the US military should overthrow the president, tweeting, “Where are our military folks? The Commander-in-Chief is in the hands of our enemy!”

Senate minority leader Charles Schumer said that Trump is controlled by Russia. And Trump’s Republican opponents led by senators Jeff Flake and John McCain attacked him as well.

Trump allegedly committed treason when he refused to reject Putin’s denial of Russian interference in the US elections in 2016 and was diffident in relation to the US intelligence community’s determination that Russia did interfere in the elections.

Trump walked back his statement from Helsinki at a press appearance at the White House Tuesday. But it is still difficult to understand what all the hullaballoo about the initial statement was about.

AP reporter John Lemire placed Trump in an impossible position. Noting that Putin denied meddling in the 2016 elections and the intelligence community insists that Russia meddled, he asked Trump, “Who do you believe?”

If Trump had said that he believed his intelligence community and gave no credence to Putin’s denial, he would have humiliated Putin and destroyed any prospect of cooperative relations.

Trump tried to strike a balance. He spoke respectfully of both Putin’s denials and the US intelligence community’s accusation. It wasn’t a particularly coherent position. It was a clumsy attempt to preserve the agreements he and Putin reached during their meeting.

And it was blindingly obviously not treason.

In fact, Trump’s response to Lemire, and his overall conduct at the press conference, did not convey weakness at all. Certainly he was far more assertive of US interests than Obama was in his dealings with Russia.

In Obama’s first summit with Putin in July 2009, Obama sat meekly as Putin delivered an hour-long lecture about how US-Russian relations had gone down the drain.

As Daniel Greenfield noted at Frontpage magazine Tuesday, in succeeding years, Obama capitulated to Putin on anti-missile defense systems in Poland and the Czech Republic, on Ukraine, Georgia and Crimea. Obama gave Putin free rein in Syria and supported Russia’s alliance with Iran on its nuclear program and its efforts to save the Assad regime. He permitted Russian entities linked to the Kremlin to purchase a quarter of American uranium. And of course, Obama made no effort to end Russian meddling in the 2016 elections.

TRUMP IN contrast has stiffened US sanctions against Russian entities. He has withdrawn from Obama’s nuclear deal with Iran. He has agreed to sell Patriot missiles to Poland. And he has placed tariffs on Russian exports to the US.

So if Trump is Putin’s agent, what was Obama?

Given the nature of Trump’s record, and the context in which he made his comments about Russian meddling in the 2016 elections, the question isn’t whether he did anything wrong. The question is why are his opponents accusing him of treason for behaving as one would expect a president to behave? What is going on?

The answer to that is clear enough. Brennan signaled it explicitly when he tweeted that Trump’s statements “exceed the threshold of ‘high crimes and misdemeanors.’” The unhinged allegations of treason are supposed to form the basis of impeachment hearings.

The Democrats and their allies in the media use the accusation that Trump is an agent of Russia as an elections strategy. Midterm elections are consistently marked with low voter turnout. So both parties devote most of their energies to rallying their base and motivating their most committed members to vote.

To objective observers, the allegation that Trump betrayed the United States by equivocating in response to a rude question about Russian election interference is ridiculous on its face. But Democratic election strategists have obviously concluded that it is catnip for the Democratic faithful. For them it serves as a dog whistle.

The promise of impeachment for votes is too radical to serve as an official campaign strategy. For the purpose of attracting swing voters and not scaring moderate Democrats away from the party and the polls, Democratic leaders Nancy Pelosi and Steny Hoyer say they have no interest in impeaching Trump. Impeachment talk, they insist, is a mere distraction.

But by embracing Brennan’s claim of treason, Pelosi, Hoyer, Schumer and other top Democrats are winking and nodding to the progressive radicals now rising in their party. They are telling the Linda Sarsours and Cynthia Nixons of the party that they will impeach Trump if they win control of the House of Representatives.

The problem with playing domestic politics on the international scene is that doing so has real consequences for international security and for US national interests.

Consider, for instance, Europe’s treatment of Trump.

Europe is economically dependent on trade with the US and strategically dependent on NATO. So why are the Europeans so open about their hatred of Trump and their rejection of his trade policies, his policy towards Iran and his insistence that they pay their fair share for their own defense?

Why did EU Council President Donald Tusk attack Trump with such contempt and condescension in Brussels? Tusk, who chairs the meetings of EU leaders, is effectively the EU president. And the day before last week’s NATO conference he chided Trump for criticizing Europe’s low defense spending.

“America,” he said with a voice dripping with contempt, “appreciate your allies. After all you don’t have that many.”

That of course, was news to the countries of Asia, Africa, Latin America, Europe and the Middle East that depend on America and work diligently to develop and maintain strong ties to Washington.

Leaving aside the ridiculousness of his remarks, where did Tusk get the idea that it is reasonable to speak so scornfully to an American president?

Where did EU’s foreign policy commissioner Federica Mogherini get the idea that it is okay for her to work urgently and openly to undermine legally constituted US sanctions against Iran for its illicit nuclear weapons program?

The answer of course is that they got a green light to adopt openly anti-American policies from the forces in the US that have devoted their energies since Trump’s election nearly two years ago to delegitimizing his victory and his presidency. Those calling Trump a traitor empowered the Europeans to defy the US on every issue.

Trump’s opponents’ unsubstantiated allegation that his campaign colluded with Russia during the 2016 elections has constrained Trump’s ability to perform his duties.

Consider his relations with Putin.

If there is anything to criticize about Trump’s summit with Putin it is that it came too late. It should have happened a year ago. That it happened this week speaks not to Trump’s eagerness to meet Putin but to the urgency of the hour.

After securing control over the Deraa province along Syria’s border with Jordan last week, the Assad regime, supported by Iranian regime forces, Hezbollah forces and Shiite militia forces began its campaign to restore regime control over the Quneitra province along the Syrian border with Israel.

As Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu and all government and military officials have stated clearly and consistently for years, Israel cannot accept Iranian presence in Syria. If Iran does not remove its forces from Syria generally and from southern Syria specifically, there will be war imminently between Israel, Iran and its Hezbollah, Shiite militia and Syrian regime allies.

Israel prefers to fight that war sooner rather than later to prevent Iran and its allies from entrenching their positions in Syria and make victory more difficult. So, in the interest of preventing such a war, Trump had no choice but to bite the political bullet and sit down to discuss Syria face to face with Putin to try to come up with a deal that would see Russia push Iran and Hezbollah out of Syria.

From what the two leaders said at their joint press conference it’s hard to know what was agreed to. But Netanyahu’s jubilant response indicates that some deal was reached.

Certainly their statements were strong, unequivocal signals to Iran. When Trump said, “The United States will not allow Iran to benefit from our successful campaign against ISIS,” he signaled strongly that US forces in eastern Syria will support Israel in a war against Iran and its allied forces in Syria just as it fought with the Kurds and its other allies in Syria against ISIS.

When Putin endorsed Israel’s position that the 1974 Syrian-Israeli disengagement agreement must be implemented along the border, he told the Iranians that in any Iranian-Israeli war in Syria, Putin will not side with Iran.

Time will tell if we just averted war. But what we did learn is that Israel’s position in a war with Iran is stronger than it could have been if the two leaders hadn’t met in Helsinki.

And this is exceedingly important.

Trump is being condemned for adopting a conciliatory tone towards Putin while employing a combative tone towards the Europeans and particularly Germany at the NATO summit. This criticism ignores how Trump operates in the international arena.

Trump views his exchanges with foreign leaders as separate engagements. He has goals he wishes to advance with China; with North Korea; with Russia; with Canada; with Mexico; with Europe; with Britain; with US Arab allies. In each separate engagement, Trump employs a combination of carrots and sticks. In each engagement he adopts a distinct manner that he believes advances his goals.

So far, unlike Obama’s foreign policy by this point in his presidency, none of Trump’s exchanges have brought disaster on America or its allies. To the contrary, America and its allies have much greater strategic maneuver room across a wide spectrum of threats and joint adversaries than they had when Obama left office.

Trump’s opponents’ obsession with bringing him down has caused great harm to his presidency and to America’s position worldwide. It is a testament to Trump’s commitment to the US and its allies that he met with Putin this week. And the success of their meeting is something that all who care about global security and preventing a devastating war in the Middle East should be grateful for.

Voir également:

Peter Beinart’s Amnesia
NATO’s problems, Putin’s aggression, and American passivity predate Trump, who had my vote in 2016 — a vote I don’t regret.
Victor Davis Hanson
National Review
July 17, 2018

Peter Beinart has posted a trademark incoherent rant, this time against Rich Lowry and me over our supposed laxity in criticizing Trumpian over-the-top rhetoric on NATO.

At various times, I have faulted Germany for much of NATO’s problems; I was delighted that we got out of the Iran deal and happier still that we pulled out of the empty Paris climate-change accord; and I agree that NAFTA needs changes. All that apparently for Beinart constitutes support for Trump’s sin of saying that the U.S. has “no obligation to meet America’s past commitments to other countries.”

Last time I looked, the Paris climate accord and the Iran deal (and its stealth “side” deals) were pushed through as quasi-executive orders and never submitted to Congress as treaties — largely because the Obama administration understood that both deals would have been summarily rejected and lacked support from most of Congress and also the American people, owing to the deal’s inherent flaws.

The U.S. may soon come closer to meeting carbon-emission-reduction goals than most of the signatories of the Paris farce. Following the Iran pullout, Iranians now seem more inclined to protest their theocratic government. They are confident in voicing their dissent in a way we have not seen since we ignored Iranian protesters during the Green Revolution of 2009. Incidents of Iranian harassment of U.S. ships in the Persian Gulf this year have mysteriously declined to almost zero.

The architects of NAFTA who in 1993 promised normalization and parity in North America through free trade and porous borders apparently did not envision something like the Andrés Manuel López Obrador presidency, which seems to think it exercises sovereignty over U.S. immigration policy, a cumulative influx of some 20 million foreign nationals illegally crossing the southern border over the last three decades, a current $71 billion Mexican trade surplus, $30 billion in remittances sent annually out of the U.S. to Mexico, record numbers of assassinations, and a nearly failed state as cartels virtually run affairs in some areas of Mexico. After all that, asking for clarifications of and likely modification to NAFTA is hardly breaking American commitments.

Beinart believes that, by giving some credence to Trump’s art-of-the-deal bombast about NATO, I therefore have excused Trump’s existential threats to the alliance. Beinart needs to take a deep breath and examine carefully whether Trump’s rhetoric about the vast majority of NATO’s members’ reluctance to meet their past promises undermines the alliance more than what the members themselves have actually done.

So far, Trump has upped U.S. defense spending and by extension its contribution to NATO’s military readiness, and he has gained some traction in getting members to pay what they pledged after the utter failure of past presidential jawboning (Obama rebuked “free-riders”). The real crisis in NATO is not U.S. capability or willpower, but whether a Dutch or Belgian youth would, could, or should march off to Erdogan’s Turkey should Ankara invoke Article V in a dispute with Israel, the Kurds, or Iraq, or whether governments such as those in Spain or Italy would really keep commitments and order their troops to Estonia if Russian troops swarmed in.

So NATO’s problems predated Trump and in many ways come back to Germany, whose example most other NATO nations ultimately tend to follow. The threat to both the EU and NATO is not Trump’s America, but a country that is currently insisting on an artificially low euro for mercantile purposes and that is at odds with its southern Mediterranean partners over financial liabilities, with its Eastern European neighbors over illegal immigration, with the United Kingdom over the conditions of Brexit, and with the U.S. over a paltry investment in military readiness of 1.3 percent of GDP while it’s piling up the largest account surplus in the world, at over $260 billion, and a $65 billion trade surplus with the U.S.

Germany, a majority of whose tanks and fighters are thought not to be battle-ready, cannot expect an American-subsidized united NATO front against the threat of Vladimir Putin if it is now cutting a natural-gas agreement with Russia that undermines the Baltic States and Ukraine — countries that Putin is increasingly targeting. The gas deal will not only empower Putin; it will make Germany dependent on Russian energy — an untenable situation.

Merkel can package all that in mellifluous diplomatic-speak, and Trump can rail about it in crude polemics, but the facts remain facts, and they are of Merkel’s making, not Trump’s.

The same themes hold true regarding attitudes toward Putin, who (again) predated Trump and his press conference in Helsinki, where the president gave to the press an unfortunate apology-tour/Cairo-speech–like performance, reminiscent of past disastrous meetings with or assessments of Russian leaders by American presidents, such as FDR on Stalin: “I just have a hunch that Stalin is not that kind of man. Harry [Hopkins] says he’s not and that he doesn’t want anything but security for his country, and I think if I give him everything I possibly can and ask for nothing in return, noblesse oblige, he won’t try to annex anything and will work with me for a world of democracy and peace.” Or Kennedy’s blown summit with Khrushchev in Geneva: “He beat the hell out of me. It was the worst thing in my life. He savaged me.” Or Reagan’s weird offer to share American SDI technology and research with Gorbachev or, without much consultation with his advisers, to eliminate all ballistic missiles at Reykjavik.

Trump confused trying to forge a realist détente with some sort of bizarre empathy for Putin, whose actions have been hostile and bellicose to the U.S. and based on perceptions of past American weakness. But again, Trump did not create an empowered Putin — and he has done more than any other president so far to check Putin’s ambitions.

Putin in 2016 continued longstanding Russian cyberattacks and election interference because of past impunity (Obama belatedly told Putin to “cut it out” only in September 2016). He swallowed Crimea and parts of eastern Ukraine after the famous Hillary-managed “reset” — a surreal Chamberlain-like policy in which we simultaneously appeased Putin in fact while in rhetoric lecturing him about his classroom cut-up antics and macho style.

Had Trump been overheard on a hot mic in Helsinki promising more flexibility with Putin on missile defense after our midterm elections, in expectation for electorally advantageous election-cycle quid pro quo good behavior from the Russians, we’d probably see articles of impeachment introduced on charges of Russian collusion. And yet the comparison would be even worse than that. After all, America kept Obama’s 2011 promise “to Vladimir,” in that we really did give up on creating credible missile defenses in Eastern Europe, breaking pledges made by a previous administration — music to Vladimir Putin’s ears.

It would be preferable if Trump’s rhetoric reinforced his solid actions, which in relation to Putin’s aggression consist of wisely keeping or increasing tough sanctions, accelerating U.S. oil production, decimating Russian mercenaries in Syria, and arming Ukrainian resistance. But then again, Trump has not quite told us that he has looked into Putin’s eyes and seen a straightforward and trustworthy soul. Nor in desperation did he invite Putin into the Middle East after a Russian hiatus of nearly 40 years to prove to the world that Bashar al-Assad had eliminated his WMD trove — which Assad subsequently continued to use at his pleasure. There is currently no scandal over uranium sales to Russia, and the secretary of state’s spouse has not been discovered to have recently pocketed $500,000 to speak in Moscow.

In a perfect world, we would like to see carefully chosen words enhancing effective muscular action. Instead, in the immediate past, we heard sober and judicious rhetoric ad nauseam, coupled with abject appeasement and widely perceived dangerous weakness. Now we have ill-timed bombast that sometimes mars positive achievement.

Neither is desirable. But the latter is far preferable to the former.

Finally, Beinart ends by mistakenly suggesting that in 2016 I weighed in with “count us out” Republicans along with the other National Review authors. And he now suggests that I have flipped back to Trump: “Now, it appears, Lowry and Hanson want back in.”

But here, too, he is mistaken. I never participated in the “Against Trump” NR issue and never counted myself “out” during the November 2016 election, so how could I beg to be let back in?

Rather, like about half the country and 90 percent of the Republican party, I (as a deplorable) saw the choice in 2016 as a rather easy one between the latest iteration of Hillary Clinton and her known progressive agenda and Trump’s proposed antithesis to the ongoing Obama project of fundamental transformation.

And so far, nothing since November 2016 has convinced me otherwise.

Voir de même:

Putin’s False Equivalency
Victor Davis Hanson
National Review
July 19, 2018

We are in dangerous times. Amid the hysteria over the Russian summit, the Mueller collusion probe, nonstop unsupported allegations and rumors, the Strzok and Page testimonies, the ongoing congressional investigations into improper CIA and FBI behavior, and a completely unhinged media, there is a growing crisis of rising tensions between two superpowers that together possess a combined arsenal of 3,000 instantly deployable nuclear weapons and another 10,000 in storage. That latter existential fact apparently has been forgotten in all the recriminations. So it is time for all parties to deescalate and step back a bit.

Trump understandably wants to avoid progressive charges that he is obstructing Robert Mueller’s ostensible investigation of Russian collusion, and he also wants some sort of détente with Russia. Mueller has likely indicted Russians, timed on the eve of the summit, in part on the assumption that they would more or less not personally defend themselves and never appear on U.S. soil.

Add that all up, and Trump apparently has discussed with Putin an idea of allowing Mueller’s investigators to visit Russia to interview those they have indicted.

But in the quid pro quo world of big-power rivalry, Putin, of course, wants reciprocity — the right also to interview American citizens or residents (among them a former U.S. ambassador to Russia) whom he believes have transgressed against Russia.

Trump needs to squash Putin’s ridiculous “parity” request immediately. Mueller would learn little or nothing from interviewing his targets on Russian soil — and likely never imagined that he would or could.

On the other hand, given recent Russian attacks on critics abroad, Moscow’s interviewing any Russian antagonist anywhere is not necessarily a safe or sane enterprise. And being indicted under the laws of a constitutional republic is hardly synonymous with earning the suspicion of the Russian autocracy.

Most importantly, the idea that a former U.S. ambassador to Russia, Professor Michael McFaul — long after the expiration of his government tenure — would submit to Russian questioning is absurd. Of course, it would also undermine the entire sanctity of American ambassadorial service.

McFaul, a colleague at the Hoover Institution, who would probably disagree with most of my views, years ago was targeted as an enemy by Vladimir Putin and more recently has been sharply critical of the Trump administration. But, of course, he is a widely admired patriot, a scholar, and voices his candid views, like all of us, under the assumption of free speech and absolute protection under the Constitution. As an ambassador, he was also accorded diplomatic immunity as insurance that his implementation of then U.S. policy would not earn him retaliation from Moscow, both then or now. McFaul is wise enough not to voluntarily submit to be questioned by Russian operatives, and the U.S. government must never suggest that he should.

So, Putin’s offer, to the extent we know the details of it, will soon upon examination be seen as patently unhinged. In refusal, Trump has a good opportunity to remind the world why all American critics of the Putin government — and especially of his own government as well — are uniquely free and protected to voice any notion they wish.

No, the President Did Not Need to Meet with Putin
Andrew C. McCarthy
National Review
July 17, 2018

The United States should have contacts with Russia, but the president should not be holding summit meetings with a despot.Prior to President Trump’s dismal performance at Monday’s meeting with Russian despot Vladimir Putin, I expressed bafflement over his longstanding insistence that we need to have good relations with Moscow. This has never made sense to me. We have often done quite well, thank you very much, while having a strained modus vivendi with Moscow, even when it was the seat of a much more important power than today’s Russia.

It is not possible to have good relations with a thug regime unless one is willing to overlook and effectively ratify its thug behavior. Yet the widely perceived “need” to have good relations with Russia leads seamlessly to a second wrongheaded notion: It was appropriate, indeed essential, for the two leaders to meet at a ceremonial summit.

There is no need, nor is it desirable, for the president of the United States to give the dictator of the Kremlin the kind of prestigious spectacle Putin got in Helsinki. When I’ve made this point, as recently as Monday night in a panel on The Story, Martha MacCallum’s Fox News program, I’ve gotten pushback that, I respectfully suggest, misses the point.

The counterargument, premised on the fact that it is important for the United States and Russia to have dialogue, maintains that this dialogue must be conducted at the chief-executive-to-chief-executive level. There is, after all, a long history of such meetings, tracing back to FDR’s recognition of the Soviet Union in 1933 (only after, I would note, years of antagonistic relations following the October Revolution).

To be clear, I did not and do not take the position that the United States should not have contacts with Russia in areas of mutual concern, or that it should not defuse tensions lest they escalate into unnecessary confrontations between the world’s two dominant nuclear powers. But these communications channels have long existed. They range from diplomatic, military, intelligence, and even law-enforcement contacts all the way up to occasional phone calls between the heads of state, and even the odd sidelines conferral between leaders at this or that multilateral conference.

The question, to the contrary, is whether the president of the United States should hold summit-style meetings with the Russian despot, complete with the pride, pomp, and circumstance of a glorious press conference, at which the two stand before the world as if they were amiable peers, trying their best to address the world’s problems.

We are no longer in the era of the Second World War, or even the Cold War. We are not in a ferocious global conflict in which a grudging alliance with Stalin’s Soviet Union makes sense (especially when the Russians are taking the vast majority of the casualties). Nor are we in a bipolar global order in which we are rivaled by a tyrannical Soviet empire. Modern Russia is a fading country. Yes, it has a worrisome nuclear stockpile, strong armed forces, and highly capable intelligence services; but these assets can scarcely obscure Russia’s declining population, pervasive societal dysfunction (high levels of drunkenness, disease, and unemployment), low life expectancy, and third-rate economy. Putin’s regime — more like a marriage of rulers and organized crime than a principled system of government — must terrorize its people to maintain its grip on power.

We don’t need summit meetings between our head of state and theirs. Even during the Cold War, when it could rightly be argued that we had to deal with our ubiquitous geopolitical foe, such meetings did not happen very often. For example, in the decade-plus between President Kennedy’s Vienna meeting with Khrushchev and President Nixon’s trip to Moscow, there appears to have been just one meeting (between LBJ and Alexei Kosygin in 1967). Contact was also sparse in the decade between the end of the Nixon–Ford term and Reagan’s first meeting with Gorbachev in 1985 (after which the meetings became more frequent as the Soviet Union declined and collapsed). Many of these meetings are memorable precisely because they were unusual events. Whether the top-level U.S.–U.S.S.R. meetings succeeded or not, they were arguably worth having because there was something potentially highly beneficial in them for us.

That is not true of top-level meetings with Putin’s Russia. We could have them or not have them and nothing would change for the better — in fact, as yesterday shows, things are more apt to change for the worse. Putin should be made to earn his meeting with America’s president by good behavior.

Whether you’re a Democrat invested in the narrative that Russia’s shenanigans cost Hillary Clinton the presidency, or a Republican in denial that Putin sought to boost Trump at Clinton’s expense, the reality is that Putin was undoubtedly trying to sow discord in our body politic.

Let’s consider the background circumstances of Monday’s meeting.

There is, of course, the cyber-espionage attack on the election. Trump being Trump, he is unable to separate (a) the way Russia’s perfidy has been exploited by his political opponents to attack him (i.e., the unsuccessful attempt to delegitimize his presidency) from (b) Russia’s perfidy itself, as an attack on the United States. No matter how angry this president may be at the Democrats and the media, the significance to any president of Russia’s influence operation must be that it succeeded beyond Putin’s wildest dreams.

Whether you’re a Democrat invested in the narrative that Russia’s shenanigans cost Hillary Clinton the presidency, or a Republican in denial that Putin sought to boost Trump at Clinton’s expense, the reality is that Putin was undoubtedly trying to sow discord in our body politic. That interpretation of events is something any president should be able to rally most of the country behind. The provocation warrants a determined response that bleeds Putin, the very opposite of kowtowing to the despot on the world stage.

Now, let’s put to the side the recent cyber-espionage and other influence operations directed at our country. It has been only four months since Putin’s regime attempted to murder former double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter, Yulia, in the British city of Salisbury. It has been only a few days since a British couple fell into a coma after exposure to the same Soviet-era nerve agent (Novichok) used on the Skripals. The second incident happened just seven miles from the first, strongly suggesting that Putin’s regime is guilty of depraved indifference to the dangers its targeted assassinations on Western soil — the territory of our closest ally — pose to innocent bystanders. In 2006, the Putin regime similarly murdered a former Russian spy, Alexander Litvinenko, in London, poisoning his tea with radioactive polonium. Meanwhile, reporting that is based mainly on the account of a former KGB agent (who defected to the West and has been warned he is a target) indicates that Putin’s operatives are working off a hit list of eight people (including Sergei Skirpal) who reside in the West.

Putin’s annexation of Crimea was just the most notorious of his recent adventures in territorial aggression. He has effectively annexed the Georgian regions of Abkhazia and South Ossetia, and the separatist war he is puppeteering in eastern Ukraine still rages in this its fifth year. He is casting a menacing eye at the Baltics. This, even as Russia props up the monstrous Assad regime in Syria and allies with Iran, the jihadist regime best known for sponsoring anti-American terrorism around the world.

He may unload at a rally, but face to face, the president’s m.o. is to defuse confrontation with unctuous banter — an easy solution for someone who seems not to believe that anything he says in the moment will bind him in the future.

And just five months ago, at a major speech touting improved weapons capabilities, Putin spiced up the demonstration with a video diagramming a hypothetical nuclear missile attack on . . . yes . . . Florida.

There is no doubt that we have to deal with this monster. Realpolitik adherents may even be right that there is potential for cooperation with Russia in areas of mutual interest (at least provided that the dealing is done with eyes open about Putin’s core anti-Americanism). But there is no reason why we need to deal with Russia in a forum at which the U.S. president stands there and pretends that a brutal autocrat, who has become incalculably rich by looting his crumbling country, is a statesman promoting peace and better relations.

I would say that no matter who was president. In the case of President Trump specifically, for all his “you’re fired” bravado and reports of mercurial outbursts at some subordinates, he does not like unpleasant face-to-face confrontations. He may unload at a rally, but face to face, the president’s m.o. is to defuse confrontation with unctuous banter — an easy solution for someone who seems not to believe that anything he says in the moment will bind him in the future. This, inevitably, leads to foolish and sometimes reprehensible assertions (e.g., saying, in apparent defense of Putin, “There are a lot of killers. What? You think our country’s so innocent?”).

The president appears to subscribe to the Swamp school of thought that negotiations are good for their own sake — though he conflates what is good for him (promoting his image as a master deal-maker) with what is good for the country (negotiations often aren’t). This is another iteration of the president’s tendency to personalize things, particularly relations between governments. That trait puts him at a distinct disadvantage with someone like Putin, who knows well the uses of flattery and grievance.

Summit meetings with brutal dictators do not well serve the president. More important, they do not well serve the nation.

Voir de plus:

The Likeliest Explanation for Trump’s Helsinki Fiasco
Jonah Goldberg
National review
July 18, 2018

Character, not collusion, best explains the president’s bizarre deference to Vladimir Putin.Last week, I wrote that the best way to think about a Trump Doctrine is as nothing more than Trumpism on the international stage. By Trumpism, I do not mean a coherent ideological program, but a psychological phenomenon, or simply the manifestation of his character.

On Monday, we literally saw President Trump on an international stage, in Helsinki, and he seemed hell-bent on proving me right.

During a joint news appearance with Russian president Vladimir Putin, Trump demonstrated that, when put to the test, he cannot see any issue through a prism other than his grievances and ego.

In a performance that should elicit some resignations from his administration, the president sided with Russia over America’s national-security community, including Dan Coats, the Trump-appointed director of national intelligence.

Days ago, Coats issued a blistering warning that not only had Russia meddled in our election — undisputed by almost everyone save the president himself — but it is preparing to do so again. But when asked about Russian interference in Helsinki, Trump replied, “All I can do is ask the question. My people came to me, Dan Coats came to me and some others. They said they think it’s Russia. I have President Putin. He just said it’s not Russia. I will say this. I don’t see any reason why it would be [Russia]. . . . I have confidence in both parties.”

Separately, when asked about the frosty relations between the two countries, Trump said, “I hold both countries responsible. . . . I think we’re all to blame. . . . I do feel that we have both made some mistakes.”

Even if Russia hadn’t meddled in the election at all, Trump would still admire Putin because Trump admires men like Putin — which is why he’s praised numerous other dictators and strongmen.

Amid these and other appalling statements, Trump made it clear that he can only understand the investigation into Russian interference as an attempt to rob him of credit for his electoral victory, and thus to delegitimize his presidency.

For most people with a grasp of the facts — supporters and critics alike — the question of Russian interference and the question of Russian collusion with the Trump campaign are separate. Russia did interfere in the election, full stop. Whether there was collusion is still an open question, even if many Trump supporters have made up their minds about it. Whether Russian interference, or collusion, got Trump over the finish line is ultimately unknowable, though I think it’s very unlikely.

But for Trump these distinctions are meaningless. Even when his own Department of Justice indicts twelve Russian intelligence agents, the salient issue for Trump in Helsinki is that “they admit these are not people involved in the campaign.” All you need to know is: We ran a brilliant campaign, and that’s why I’m president.

The great parlor game in Washington (and beyond) is to theorize why Trump is so incapable of speaking ill of Putin and so determined to make apologies for Russia.

Among the self-styled “resistance,” the answer takes several sometimes overlapping, sometimes contradictory forms. One theory is that the Russians have “kompromat” — that is, embarrassing or incriminating intelligence on Trump. Another is that he is a willing asset of the Russians — “Agent Orange” — with whom he colluded to win the presidency.

These theories can’t be wholly dismissed, even if some overheated versions get way ahead of the available facts. But their real shortcoming is that they are less plausible than the Aesopian explanation: This is who Trump is. Even if Russia hadn’t meddled in the election at all, Trump would still admire Putin because Trump admires men like Putin — which is why he’s praised numerous other dictators and strongmen.

The president’s steadfast commitment to a number of policies — animosity toward NATO, infatuation with protectionism, an Obama-esque obsession with eliminating nuclear weapons, and his determination that a “good relationship” with Russia should be a policy goal rather than a means to one — may have some ideological underpinning. (These policies all seem to be rooted in intellectual fads of the 1980s.)

But Trump’s stubborn refusal to listen to his own advisers in the matter of the Russia investigation likely stems from his inability to admit that his instincts are ever wrong. As always, Trump’s character trumps all.

Voir encore:

Sanctions américaines : le géant russe Rusal dégringole de 50 % en bourse
Les nouvelles sanctions décrétées par les Etats-Unis contre des oligarques russes et leurs entreprises ont fait l’effet d’un coup de tonnerre ce lundi.
Le Dauphiné libéré
09.04.2018

L’un des premiers producteurs d’aluminium du monde, le russe Rusal, s’est retrouvé gravement fragilisé ce lundi par les nouvelles sanctions décrétées par les Etats-Unis contre des oligarques russes et leurs entreprises, qui risquent de porter un nouveau coup à l’économie russe.

À la Bourse de Hong Kong, où ce géant est coté, l’action de Rusal a perdu 50 % de sa valeur, soit plus de 3,5 milliards d’euros partis en fumée. Le groupe a prévenu que les sanctions « pourraient aboutir à un défaut technique sur certaines obligations du groupe », affirmant évaluer « l’impact de tels défauts techniques sur sa position financière ».

Au delà de l’entreprise, qui joue un rôle majeur sur les marchés des matières premières, le prix de l’aluminium a connu sa plus forte hausse en trois ans sur la Bourse des métaux de Londres, le LME, la tonne prenant 3,55 %.

À Moscou, le marchés boursiers, pourtant habitués à de réguliers durcissements des sanctions occidentales depuis 2014, ont réagi violemment, chutant ce lundi de près de 10 %, tandis que le rouble revenait à ses plus bas niveau depuis plusieurs mois.

38 personnes et entreprises visées par les sanctions

Confronté à un vent de panique boursière généralisé sur les marchés russes, le gouvernement russe a dû monter au créneau pour assurer qu’il soutiendrait les entreprises visées par ce nouveau train de mesures punitives, qui constituent une escalade d’une violence inattendue dans la confrontation entre Moscou et Washington.

Au total, ces sanctions, censées punir Moscou notamment pour ses « attaques » « les démocraties occidentales », ciblent 38 personnes et entreprises qui ne peuvent plus faire affaire avec des Américains, notamment sept Russes désignés comme des « oligarques » proches du Kremlin par l’administration de Donald Trump, présents dans des dizaines de sociétés en Russie comme à l’étranger.

Parmi ces multimilliardaires figure Oleg Deripaska et les actifs sous son contrôle : les holdings Basic Element et En+ mais aussi Rusal, l’un des premiers producteurs mondiaux d’aluminium, dont il représente environ 7% de la production mondiale d’aluminium, au risque de déstabiliser tout ce secteur à l’échelle de la planète.

Oleg Deripaska, 50 ans et déjà proche du clan de Boris Eltsine dans les années 1990, a déclaré que son inclusion dans la liste était « désagréable mais anticipée » : « Les raisons de me mettre sur la liste des sanctions sont complètement dépourvues de fondements, ridicules, et simplement absurdes ».

Sa holding En+, également en chute libre à la bourse de Londres, a été « suspendue temporairement » par l’autorité financière. Elle avait débuté en fanfare sa cotation à Londres en novembre 2017, première société russe à s’y introduire depuis les sanctions de 2014.

« Il est très probable que l’impact soit défavorable aux activités et aux perspectives du groupe », a déclaré En+ dans un communiqué ce lundi. « Le groupe a l’intention de continuer à remplir ses engagements tout en recherchant des solutions (…) pour gérer l’impact des sanctions »

Moscou entend riposter

Moscou ayant promis une réponse « dure » dès vendredi, elle pourrait entraîner une nouvelle surenchère. « Cette histoire est scandaleuse au vu de l’illégalité (de ces sanctions), au vu de la violation de toutes les normes », a déclaré aux journalistes le porte-parole du Kremlin, Dmitri Peskov.

Le Premier ministre Dmitri Medvedev a demandé à ses adjoints de lui préparer des propositions concrètes pour soutenir les entreprises sanctionnées.

« Les sanctions américaines pourraient se traduire en une perturbation de l’offre mondiale, notamment aux Etats-Unis », ont expliqué les analystes de Commerzbank.

Voir par ailleurs:

Trump: Witch hunt drove a phony wedge between US, Russia
Fox news
July 16, 2018

President Trump addresses nuclear proliferation, European Union and media attacks. On ‘Hannity,’ the president calls Strzok a ‘disgrace’ to the country and FBI.

This is a rush transcript from « Hannity, » July 16, 2018. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

SEAN HANNITY, HOST: And this is a Fox News alert.

It is 9:00 p.m. in New York City and our nation’s capital, 6:00 p.m. on the West Coast. It is 4:00 a.m. in Helsinki, Finland. And earlier today, President Trump, he went face to face with the Russian president, Vladimir Putin.

Now, this is their third in person meeting, but their first official summit. All topics were on the table and appeared to be a no-holds-barred open, productive, adult discussion on many of the issues between our two countries.

I sat down for an interview with the president right after he met with Vladimir Putin. We’re going to play that for you in just a moment.

But first, a lot to get to, so sit tight for our breaking news — Helsinki addition — opening monologue.

(MUSIC)

HANNITY: All right. President Trump is just not slowing down, and some people in the media, on the left, they are having a very hard time dealing with the fact that he moved so fast. As I like to call it, it’s kind of moving at the speed of Trump. Now, this was the president’s 21st visit to a foreign country in just 18 months. And after today’s one-on-one meeting with Vladimir Putin, the two leaders held a joint press conference.

Let’s take a look.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: I’m here today to continue the proud tradition of bold American diplomacy. From the earliest days of our republic, American leaders have understood that diplomacy and engagement is preferable to conflict and hostility. Nothing would be easier politically than to refuse to meet, to refuse to engage, but that would not accomplish anything.

As president, I cannot make decisions on foreign policy in a futile effort to appease artisan critics or the media or Democrats who want to do nothing but resist and obstruct.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

HANNITY: Now, big leaders, they also addressed the big elephant in the room, and that was election interference. Let’s watch this.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

TRUMP: The probe is a disaster for our country. I think it’s kept us apart. It’s kept us separated. There was no collusion at all. Everybody knows it. People are being brought out to the fore, so far that I know virtually none of it related to the campaign. And they are going to have to try really hard to find somebody that did relate to the campaign. It was a clean campaign.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

HANNITY: Now, of course, this meeting comes just days after the Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein announced the indictments of 12 Russian agents who were accused of hacking the DNC and the Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta, even though the DNC, they have refused to turn over their hack server to the FBI.

When will they turn that over? Where is that server?

Now, President Trump weighed in on this very issue during this joint presser. Let’s take a look at this.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

TRUMP: Let me just say, we have two thoughts. We have groups that are wondering why the FBI never took the server. Why haven’t they taken the server? Why would was the FBI told to lead the office of the Democratic National Committee?

I really believe that this will probably go on for a while, but I don’t think it can go on without finding out what happened to the server. What happened to the servers of the Pakistani gentlemen that worked on the DNC? Where are those servers? They are missing. Where are they?

What happened to Hillary Clinton’s emails? Thirty-three thousand emails gone. Just gone to.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

HANNITY: Exactly. What happened to all of those things?

And tonight, many on the left, they want you to believe this alleged interference is shocking, unprecedented turn of events, but we all know that Russian election meddling is not new at all. Now, remember, ahead of the 2016 presidential election cycle.

In 2014, the House Intel Committee chairman, Devin Nunes, he issued a very stern warning about Putin’s belligerent actions and attempts to denigrate the United States and, by the way, yes, impact our 2016 election. And we also know, you can go way back to 2008, we know that Russia hacked into both the McCain campaign and even the presidential campaign of Barack Obama himself.

And despite this, in 2016, when Hillary Clinton appeared to have a firm lead in the polls — oh, just before the election, it was President Obama who laughed off any notion that American elections could possibly be tampered with. How wrong he was. You may remember this.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BARACK OBAMA, FORMER PRESIDENT: There is no serious person out there who would suggest somehow that you could even rig America’s elections. There’s no evidence that that has happened in the past or that there are instances in which that will happen this time.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

HANNITY: Interesting. That’s when he thought Hillary was going to win.

Now that Trump is president, after nearly a decade of playing down Russian interference and its impact on our elections, the left is in total freak out mode, trying desperately to connect Russian hacking to the Trump presidency.

This is a total left-wing conspiracy, a fantasy. This is the witch hunt. Every single report, every investigation into our election shows absolutely no votes were changed, none were altered in the 2016 election. Not a single vote.

And by the way, it’s important to point out every major country in the world engages in election interference. As Senator Rand Paul put it, we all do it, and this includes the Clinton campaign.

In fact, if you’re looking for Russian interference, look no further than Hillary Clinton and the DNC in 2016. They actually paid, oh, yes, through a law firm that they funnel money, Fusion GPS. Yes, then they got a foreign entity, foreign spy by the name of Christopher Steele, he put together phony opposition research, and now the infamous dossier, which has been debunked, filled with lies, Russian lies, Russian propaganda, and all paid for by Hillary Clinton and the Democratic Party to manipulate you, the American people in the lead up to the 2016 election.

Nobody in the media seems to care about Obama’s attempt at interference in the last Israeli election against our number one ally in the Middle East, Israel, and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

And by all accounts, today’s meeting, always productive and very important. As we all know, there are a lot of serious issues between the U.S. and Russia, but predictably, even before this meeting took place, yes, the destroy Trump, hate Trump media, they were already, hoping and predicting failure. You see, success for Donald Trump is bad for their agenda, especially in the lead up to the 2018 midterm elections.

Take a look.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIPS)

ANDREA MITCHELL, MSNBC: We have never had a summit with the KGB spy master, someone who has, you know, completely studied and examined Donald Trump, and a president who spends the weekend golfing and has not been preparing.

JAKE TAPPER, CNN: What do you think is going through Putin’s mind? And how is he likely to be interpreting President Trump’s behavior?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: He’s delighted. He’s absolutely delighted. He wants to throw the United States off balance, and he wants to divide the United States with its allies. Mission almost accomplished.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE, CBS: This does not seem like a president who is really going there to really hold Putin accountable.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE, NBC: I just don’t see how we can expect anything to come out of this and why Donald Trump is forcing the issue so much.

(END VIDEO CLIPS)

HANNITY: And it gets even worse. Take a look at this despicable cartoon, yes, published by so-called paper of record, The New York Times Opinion Page on Twitter early this morning.

Take a look.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

HOST: Do you have a relationship with a Vladimir Putin?

TRUMP: I do have a relationship with him. And I think that he’s done a very brilliant and amazing job. Really, a lot of people would say, he has put himself at the forefront of the world as a leader.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

HANNITY: Now, that’s your corrupt mainstream media, pretty disgusting.

Now naturally, the anti-Trump hatred, the hysteria continued after today’s meeting. Look at this. Former CIA director, you know the guy that was a former communist turned CNN paid hack, John Brennan, he actually tweeted out: Donald Trump’s press conference performance in Helsinki rises to and exceeds the threshold of high crimes and misdemeanors. It was nothing short of treasonous. Not only were his comments imbecilic, he is wholly in the pocket of Putin. Republican patriots, where are you?

John, let’s address you for a second here. What have you done on Obama’s watch to prevent Russian meddling? What role did you play in all of this?

Now, you had just undermined this country, and frankly, you should be ashamed. Let’s take a look at this corruption.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIPS)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE, MSNBC: We are under attack from Russia. If they were physical missiles, like during the Cuban missile crisis, Americans would be in the streets and protesting, and asking the president to protect us. These are invisible missiles.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE, MSNBC: It’s time for Americans to be out on the streets and it to speak up about the democracy that we hold dear, and what we expect of the president of the United States.

ANDERSON COOPER, CNN: You have been watching the most disgraceful performances by an American president at a summit in front of a Russian leader joint that I have ever seen.

(END VIDEO CLIPS)

Voir enfin:

TRANSCRIPT: Trump backtracks on Russia comments

CNN

July 17, 2018

(CNN)President Donald Trump, facing an onslaught of bipartisan fury over his glowing remarks about Vladimir Putin, said more than 24 hours afterward that he had misspoken during his news conference with the autocratic Russian leader.

Here are Trump’s full remarks, in which he said « there is some need for clarification » about his comments on Russian interference in the 2016 election, as released by the White House:
THE PRESIDENT: Thank you, everybody. Yesterday, I returned from a trip from Europe where I met with leaders from across the region to seek a more peaceful future for the United States. We’re working very hard with our allies, and all over the world we’re working. We’re going to have peace. That’s what we want; that’s what we’re going to have. I say peace through strength.
I have helped the NATO Alliance greatly by increasing defense contributions from our NATO Allies by over $44 billion. And Secretary Stoltenberg was fantastic. As you know, he reported that they’ve never had an increase like this in their history, and NATO was actually going down as opposed to going up. And I increased it by my meeting last year — $44 billion. And this year will be over — it will be hundreds of billions of dollars over the coming years.
And I think there’s great unity with NATO. There’s a lot of very positive things happening. There’s a great spirit that we didn’t have before, and there’s a lot of money that they’re putting up. They weren’t paying their bills on time, and now they’re doing that. And I want to just say thank you very much to Secretary Stoltenberg. He really has been terrific. So we had a tremendous success.
I also had meetings with Prime Minister May on the range of issues concerning our special relationship, and that’s between the United Kingdom and ourselves. We met with the Queen, who is absolutely a terrific person, where she reviewed her Honor Guard for the first time in 70 years, they tell me. We walked in front of the Honor Guard, and that was very inspiring to see and be with her. And I think the relationship, I can truly say, is a good one. But she was very, very inspiring indeed.
Most recently, I returned from Helsinki, Finland, and I was going to give a news conference over the next couple of days about the tremendous success. Because as successful as NATO was, I think this was our most successful visit. And that had to do, as you know, with Russia.
I met with Russian President Vladimir Putin in an attempt to tackle some of the most pressing issues facing humanity. We have never been in a worse relationship with Russia than we are as of a few days ago, and I think that’s gotten substantially better. And I think it has the possibility of getting much better. And I used to talk about this during the campaign. Getting along with Russia would be a good thing. Getting along with China would be a good thing. Not a bad thing; a good thing. In fact, a very good thing.
We’re nuclear powers — great nuclear powers. Russia and us have 90 percent of the nuclear weapons. So I’ve always felt getting along is a positive thing, and not just for that reason.
I entered the meeting with the firm conviction that diplomacy and engagement is better than hostility and conflict. And I feel that with everybody. We have 29 members in NATO, as an example, and I have great relationships — or at least very good relationships — with everybody.
The press covered it quite inaccurately. They said I insulted people. Well, if asking for people to pay up money that they are supposed to pay is insulting, maybe I did. But I can tell you, when I left, everybody was thrilled. And that’s the way this was, too.
My meeting with President Putin was really interesting in so many different ways because we haven’t had relationships with Russia for a long time, and we started. Let me begin by saying that, once again, the full faith and support for America’s intelligence agencies — I have a full faith in our intelligence agencies.
Whoops, they just turned off the light. That must be the intelligence agents. (Laughter.) There it goes. Okay. You guys okay? Good. (Laughter.) That was strange. But that’s okay.
So I’ll begin by stating that I have full faith and support for America’s great intelligence agencies. Always have. And I have felt very strongly that, while Russia’s actions had no impact at all on the outcome of the election, let me be totally clear in saying that — and I’ve said this many times — I accept our intelligence community’s conclusion that Russia’s meddling in the 2016 election took place. Could be other people also; there’s a lot of people out there.
There was no collusion at all. And people have seen that, and they’ve seen that strongly. The House has already come out very strongly on that. A lot of people have come out strongly on that.
I thought that I made myself very clear by having just reviewed the transcript. Now, I have to say, I came back, and I said, « What is going on? What’s the big deal? » So I got a transcript. I reviewed it. I actually went out and reviewed a clip of an answer that I gave, and I realized that there is need for some clarification.
It should have been obvious — I thought it would be obvious — but I would like to clarify, just in case it wasn’t. In a key sentence in my remarks, I said the word « would » instead of « wouldn’t. » The sentence should have been: I don’t see any reason why I wouldn’t — or why it wouldn’t be Russia. So just to repeat it, I said the word « would » instead of « wouldn’t. » And the sentence should have been — and I thought it would be maybe a little bit unclear on the transcript or unclear on the actual video — the sentence should have been: I don’t see any reason why it wouldn’t be Russia. Sort of a double negative.
So you can put that in, and I think that probably clarifies things pretty good by itself.
I have, on numerous occasions, noted our intelligence findings that Russians attempted to interfere in our elections. Unlike previous administrations, my administration has and will continue to move aggressively to repeal any efforts — and repel — we will stop it, we will repel it — any efforts to interfere in our elections. We’re doing everything in our power to prevent Russian interference in 2018.
And we have a lot of power. As you know, President Obama was given information just prior to the election — last election, 2016 — and they decided not to do anything about it. The reason they decided that was pretty obvious to all: They thought Hillary Clinton was going to win the election, and they didn’t think it was a big deal.
When I won the election, they thought it was a very big deal. And all of the sudden they went into action, but it was a little bit late. So he was given that in sharp contrast to the way it should be. And President Obama, along with Brennan and Clapper and the whole group that you see on television now — probably getting paid a lot of money by your networks — they knew about Russia’s attempt to interfere in the election in September, and they totally buried it. And as I said, they buried it because they thought that Hillary Clinton was going to win. It turned out it didn’t happen that way.
By contrast, my administration has taken a very firm stance — it’s a very firm stance — on a strong action. We’re going to take strong action to secure our election systems and the process. Furthermore, as has been stated — and we’ve stated it previously and on many occasions: No collusion.
Yesterday, we made significant progress toward addressing some of the worst conflicts on Earth. So when I met with President Putin for about two and a half hours, we talked about numerous things. And among those things are the problems that you see in the Middle East, where they’re much involved, we’re very much involved. I entered the negotiations with President Putin from a position of tremendous strength. Our economy is booming. And our military is being funded $700 billion this year; $716 billion next year.
It will be more powerful as a military than we’ve ever had before. President Putin and I addressed the range of issues, starting with the civil war in Syria and the need for humanitarian aid and help for people in Syria.
We also spoke of Iran and the need to halt their nuclear ambitions and the destabilizing activities taking place in Iran. As most of you know, we ended the Iran deal, which was one of the worst deals anyone could imagine. And that’s had a major impact on Iran. And it’s substantially weakened Iran. And we hope that, at some point, Iran will call us and we’ll maybe make a new deal, or we maybe won’t.
But Iran is not the same country that it was five months ago, that I can tell you. They’re no longer looking so much to the Mediterranean and the entire Middle East. They’ve got some big problems that they can solve, probably much easier if they deal with us. So we’ll see what happens. But we did discuss Iran.
We discussed Israel and the security of Israel. And President Putin is very much involved now with us in a discussion with Bibi Netanyahu on working something out with surrounding Syria and — Syria, and specifically with regards to the security and long-term security of Israel.
A major topic of discussion was North Korea and the need for it to remove its nuclear weapons. Russia has assured us of its support. President Putin said he agrees with me 100 percent, and they’ll do whatever they have to do to try and make it happen.
Discussions are ongoing and they’re going very, very well. We have no rush for speed. The sanctions are remaining. The hostages are back. There have been no tests. There have been no rockets going up for a period of nine months. And I think the relationships are very good. So we’ll see how that goes.
We have no time limit. We have no speed limit. We have — we’re just going through the process. But the relationships are very good. President Putin is going to be involved in the sense that he is with us. He would like to see that happen.
Perhaps the most important issue we discussed at our meeting prior to the press conference was the reduction of nuclear weapons throughout the world. The United States and Russia have 90 percent, as I said, and we could have a big impact. But nuclear weapons is, I think, the greatest threat of our world today.
And they’re a great nuclear power. We’re a great nuclear power. We have to do something about nuclear. And so that was a matter that we discussed actually in great detail, and President Putin agrees with me.
The matters we discussed are profound in their importance and have the potential to save millions of lives. I understand the many disagreements between our countries, but I also understand the dialogue and the — when you think about it, dialogue with Russia or dialogue with other countries. But dialogue with Russia, in this case, where we’ve had such poor relationships for so many years, dialogue is a very important thing and it’s a very good thing.
So if we get along with them, great. If we don’t get along with them, then, well, we won’t get along with them. But I think we have a very good chance of having some very positive things.
I thought that the meeting that I had with President Putin was really strong. I think that they were willing to do things that, frankly, I wasn’t sure whether or not they would be willing to do. And we’ll be having future meetings and we’ll see whether or not that comes to fruition. But we had a very, very good meeting.
So I just wanted to clear up, I have the strongest respect for our intelligence agencies headed by my people. We have great people, whether it’s Gina or Dan Coats, or any of them. I mean, we have tremendous people, tremendous talent within the agencies. I think they’re being guided properly. And we all want the same thing; we want success for our country.
So with that, we’re going to start a meeting now on tax reductions. We’re going to be putting in a bill. Kevin Brady is with us, and I might ask Kevin just to say a couple of words about that, and then we’ll get back on to a private meeting. But, Kevin, could you maybe give just a brief discussion about what we’ll be talking about?
REPRESENTATIVE BRADY: Yes, sir. Mr. President, thank you for having members of the Ways and Means Committee here today. You know, peace through strength is foreign policy that works. And it works best when America has a strong economy and a strong military. Under your leadership, House and Senate Republicans are delivering on both of them.
Today is about how we can strengthen America’s economy even more. And we think the best place to start is with America’s middle-class families and our small businesses. So today, we’re here to talk to you about making permanent this tax relief — one, so they can continue to grow; two, so we can add a million and a half new jobs; and three, we can protect them against a future Washington trying to steal back those hard-earned dollars that you and the Republican Congress has given them.
So thank you very much for having us here today.
THE PRESIDENT: And the time of submittal, what would you think that would be, Kevin?
REPRESENTATIVE BRADY: So we anticipate to the House voting on this in September and the Senate setting a timetable as well.
THE PRESIDENT: Good. Well, that’s great.
Thank you very much everybody. Thank you very much. Thank you.
Q Did you talk about reducing sanctions with Mr. Putin? Did you talk about — did you talk about rolling back sanctions?
THE PRESIDENT: We’re not lifting sanctions. What?
Q The Russians sanctions will remain. Is that what you meant?
THE PRESIDENT: Yeah, everything is remaining. We’re not lifting sanctions.
Q Are you going to increase sanctions on Russia, sir?
THE PRESIDENT: Not lifting sanctions. No.

Mondial 2018: A l’italienne (With the death of Spain’s sterile tiki-taka passing for passing’s sake and France’s final catenaccio win, will the 2018 World Cup also mark the end of beautiful football as we knew it ?)

16 juillet, 2018
Au coup d’envoi de France-Belgique, à Saint-Pétersbourg, le 10  juillet.
Le football est un sport simple : 22 hommes courent après un ballon pendant 90 minutes et à la fin, c’est l’Italie qui gagne. D’après Gary Linaker
La défense dicte ses lois à la guerre. Carl von Clausewitz
Pratiqué avec sérieux, le sport n’a rien à voir avec le fair-play. il déborde de jalousie haineuse, de bestialité, du mépris de toute règle, de plaisir sadique et de violence; en d’autres mots, c’est la guerre, les fusils en moins. George Orwell
La main de Thierry Henry, c’est le summum de la chance. Il a fait son job, c’est l’arbitre qui aurait dû voir la main. Ce n’est pas de la tricherie, le football c’est comme ça. Daniel Cohn-Bendit (Europe-Ecologie)
La morale de ce match, c’est que l’on peut tricher du moment qu’on n’est pas pris. L’équipe de France va traîner pendant des années cette image d’équipe de tricheurs. Philippe de Villiers (Mouvement pour la France)
Si nous avons le ballon, les autres ne peuvent pas marquer. Johan Cruyff
On peut avoir le contrôle sans avoir le ballon. José Mourinho
Je préfère perdre avec la Belgique que gagner avec la France. On a le plus beau jeu, c’est plus mon style. Eden Hazard
Il n’y a pas eu beaucoup de mots dans le vestiaire après la défaite car il y avait beaucoup de tristesse. On méritait mieux sur ce match même si on s’attendait à une rencontre de la sorte avec une équipe qui défend bien et qui joue en contre. Le petit point noir, c’est évidemment ce but sur phase arrêtée. Mais on connaît la France de Deschamps, on s’attendait à cela et on n’a pas trouvé la petite étincelle pour marquer ce but. Je ne l’ai pas trouvée. La France a marqué en premier et cela devenait compliqué. Nous sommes tombés sur plus costauds. On aurait pu faire mieux mais on ne l’a pas fait. On aurait pu jouer 120 minutes s’il le fallait. On avait le ballon et tout le monde était à 100 %. Mais je suis très fier d’avoir fait partie de cette équipe. On a montré qu’en Belgique, on savait jouer au football. On est tous déçus mais heureux de ce qu’on a fait. En tant que capitaine, je suis fier. Eden Hazard
Trouvez-vous son comportement normal lorsqu’il prend son carton jaune? Mbappé doit faire attention car il a un capital sympathie très important, mais cela peut vite basculer. Malgré l’image de groupe sympathique que dégage l’équipe de France, je suis révolté devant autant de simulateurs, menteurs et tricheurs sur tous les matchs. Johnny Blanc
Je préfère gagner en étant beau. Il y a plus d’équipes qui ont gagné en étant belles que moches. Gagner en étant moche, c’est une exception. Et si la France devient championne du monde, ce sera le champion du monde le plus moche de l’histoire. Daniel Riolo
La France a été la meilleure équipe, cela ne fait aucun doute. Mais si vous n’êtes pas français, les émotions suscitées par cette finale sont davantage de l’ordre du peu mémorable que de l’inoubliable. (…) On peut dire que si la France n’a pas eu vraiment à se dépasser pendant cette Coupe du monde, c’est parce qu’elle était tout simplement trop forte. Mais si la plus prestigieuse compétition footballistique peut être gagnée au petit galop, c’est qu’il y a peut-être un problème avec la course. The Irish Times
L’arbitrage vidéo a détruit la finale. Les Croates sont en droit de se demander comment la VAR, un système créé pour éliminer les erreurs d’arbitrage, a pu, en moins de dix-huit minutes, se tromper de la sorte. D’abord en validant un but entaché d’une probable position de hors-jeu, et ensuite en accordant un penalty extrêmement douteux. (…) ces Bleus-là “ne seront certainement pas appréciés au-delà des frontières du pays. The Scotsman
 La main d’Ivan Perisic dans la surface de réparation était “un cas limite”, et c’est ce “penalty discutable qui a fait basculer la finale. Volé’, c’est sans doute un peu fort, écrit le journal, mais en tout cas on ne peut pas dire que le titre de champion du monde de la France est vraiment mérité. De Standaard
Nous pourrions le considérer comme l’un des nôtres, assure le journal sportif, si on garde à l’esprit les cinq saisons qu’il a passées au sein de la Juventus, en tant que joueur, et le passage de série B en série A. Corriere dello Sport
Le sélectionneur des Bleus n’a jamais accordé d’importance à l’esthétique, et si l’Italie ne s’est pas qualifiée pour ce Mondial, la France nous la rappelle match après match. El Pais
Allons enfants de l’Italie, pourrait-on dire, pas seulement pour forcer la rime, mais car il y a beaucoup plus d’Italie que vous ne l’imaginez dans cette France qui pour la deuxième fois en vingt ans est championne du monde. La Gazzetta dello sport
Le sacre mondial de l’équipe de France de Didier Deschamps est salué par la presse internationale et européenne, pendant que les Bleus sont en train de rentrer en France. Les medias du monde entier ne manquent pas de souligner le style défensif de la formation de Didier Deschamps. Aux premiers rangs, les quotidiens italiens, et particulièrement la Gazzetta dello Sport, qui n’hésite pas à titrer «France championne à l’italienne». «Allons enfants de l’Italie, pourrait-on dire, pas seulement pour forcer la rime, mais car il y a beaucoup plus d’Italie que vous ne l’imaginez dans cette France qui pour la deuxième fois en vingt ans est championne du monde», débute le quotidien au papier rose sur sa deuxième page. «Souffrir, défendre, créer un groupe, voire devenir «uni», presque comme un bloc unique à la manière des Azzurri de Bearzot et de Lippi», décrit Fabio Licari, qui voit dans cette équipe de France un air d’Italie 2006. Mais ce qui sonne comme un compliment de l’autre côté des Alpes ne l’est pas forcément au-delà du Rhin. Pour le grand quotidien allemand die Welt, qui titre pourtant «Vive la France», une question se pose : «pourquoi le sélectionneur français s’est-il contenté d’un football cynique ?» «L’équipe de l’entraîneur Didier Deschamps a brillé au cours du tournoi avec un pragmatisme froid, malgré des footballeurs très talentueux comme Kylian Mbappé, Antoine Griezmann ou Paul Pogba, en laissant généralement le jeu à l’adversaire pour contre-attaquer au moment décisif», décrypte Christoph Cöln, pour qui «la finale 2018 n’était pas un feu d’artifice footballistique, malgré les nombreux buts». Un avis qui diffère de celui de la presse britannique. «Les meilleurs depuis 1966», titre le Daily Mail, quand le Mirror s’essaye aux jeux de mots : «Déjà Blue». Pour le Telegraph, qui n’hésite pas à dire que «la France règne en maître», «cette Coupe du Monde nous manquera comme aucune autre». «Le lendemain de la fête nationale, la France est championne et à juste titre. Mais seulement après la rencontre la plus remarquable, folle et controversée, contre une Croatie courageuse, lors de laquelle il y eut la VAR, une véritable tempête dans le ciel au-dessus de Moscou, un premier but contre son camp en finale de Coupe du Monde, une superbe frappe d’une nouvelle superstar mondiale, une horrible gaffe de gardien de but par l’homme qui a soulevé le trophée», narre Jason Burt. Le Figaro
Dans de nombreux journaux étrangers, la victoire des Bleus fait grincer des dents. “La France a été la meilleure équipe, cela ne fait aucun doute”, admet du bout des lèvres The Irish Times. “Mais si vous n’êtes pas français, les émotions suscitées par cette finale sont davantage de l’ordre du peu mémorable que de l’inoubliable. » (…)  De l’autre côté de la mer d’Irlande, l’emballement n’est pas non plus de mise. “L’arbitrage vidéo a détruit la finale”, se morfond The Scotsman. “Les Croates sont en droit de se demander comment la VAR, un système créé pour éliminer les erreurs d’arbitrage, a pu, en moins de dix-huit minutes, se tromper de la sorte. D’abord en validant un but entaché d’une probable position de hors-jeu, et ensuite en accordant un penalty extrêmement douteux.” (…) Même analyse en Belgique : pour De Standaard, le quotidien de référence néerlandophone, la main d’Ivan Perisic dans la surface de réparation était “un cas limite”, et c’est ce “penalty discutable qui a fait basculer la finale”. “‘Volé’, c’est sans doute un peu fort, écrit le journal, mais en tout cas on ne peut pas dire que le titre de champion du monde de la France est vraiment mérité.” (…) Bon joueur, le Corriere dello Sport salue les prouesses de Didier Deschamps, tout en précisant que le héros du jour est un sélectionneur “à l’italienne”. “Nous pourrions le considérer comme l’un des nôtres, assure le journal sportif, si on garde à l’esprit les cinq saisons qu’il a passées au sein de la Juventus, en tant que joueur, et le passage de série B en série A [qu’il a accompagné en tant qu’entraîneur, lors de la saison 2006-2007]”. Pour La Gazzetta dello Sport, c’est carrément toute la victoire qui est “à l’italienne”, puisque c’est indubitablement la carrière transalpine de Didier Deschamps qui lui a permis d’acquérir “l’art italien de la défense et de la tactique”. Courrier international
During the course of these four matches, they have completed an inherently unbelievable 3129 passes, an average of 782 passes per game. Argentina have the second most passes in the tournament, with some 800 passes less than what Spain has managed. The ‘Tiki-taka’ system came to prominence when Johann Cruyff took over the reigns of Barcelona during the late 80s and the early 90s. It continued to gain momentum even after his departure, with Van Gaal and Rijkaard following the same system. It reached its zenith at Barcelona when Pep Guardiola came to the fore – and arguably the greatest team in club football completed a sextuple of trophies playing some of the best football the world had ever seen. And then, it caught on to the Spanish national team. A major portion of that Barcelona team played for La Furia Roja, and when then manager Vincent Del Bosque integrated the style into the team’s play, it instantly paid dividends. Spain went on to win the 2008 Euros, the 2010 World Cup in South Africa, and the 2012 Euros, combining the tiki-taka with more direct football when the style suited them. This bastardized version was the brain child of Luis Aragones – the manager who led Spain to the 2008 Euros. Del Bosque’s system was more focused on the Barcelona style of the tiki-taka, a return to the basics that saw small, physically suspect players go toe to toe against the bigger, more physically endowed players. After Spain’s exit in Brazil, the system came under attack. The Netherlands had taken apart everything Spain stood for, and Van Persie’s soaring header was the cherry on top of a performance that showed the world that direct football could beat the slow build-up if done well. Then came Barcelona’s slight falling out with the system as well. Luis Enrique’s system at Barcelona invited contempt and concern from many a fan who had watched the beautiful passing from the years gone by. It was considered too direct to be played by Barcelona, and despite a treble in his first season and a double in the second, Enrique was shown the door after his third season at the club. Bayern Munich shifted to a form of tiki-taka when Guardiola took over at the club, but after his departure they have returned back to their original blitzkrieg style of play. Arsenal have lost all semblance of proper tactics during the last year of Wenger, and at present only Manchester City, under the tutelage of Pep Guardiola, are the last proponents of the system. (…) Spain’s newer system saw passes, but no urgency. It was possession for the sake of possession, and not possession that has the intent to score. At times, it was more boring than the ‘bus-parking’ by Mourinho, and that is saying a lot. Most of the time, the ball remained in the Spanish half – with the defenders passing the ball over and over to each other, while the Russians stayed back and bided their time.The reason the plan failed was because tiki-taka in its basic form is designed to sandbag the opponent. It aims to hit the opponent with a continuous flow of attack and tire out the defenders. It operates with the assumption that the ball should be regained within the opposition half, and never let them have a moment of respite. The initial success of tiki-taka happened because the teams were not used to it, and got tired from chasing the ball for too long. Against a Russian team that did not fall into their trap, Spain was all bark and no bite. And when the plan failed, Spain did not have a fail-safe. Putting crosses into the box after taking out Diego Costa, unsurprisingly, did not work. All the players on the field tried to pass themselves into a corner, before switching the ball to the other wing – rinsing and repeating till the final whistle. Maybe Lopetegui’s Spain would have done better, but that is not a question we can know the answer to. The fact is that Spain’s tiki-taka failed, and rather spectacularly considering how well their opponents exposed a critical flaw in its design. Football evolves with time. Just like how ‘total football’ came into praise and then disappeared from the limelight, it is time for tiki-taka to take a step back. As teams get more and more defensive when playing against the possession based sides, they should at least temper their football with a good plan B if they want to get anywhere near a trophy again. Sportskeeda
Le football français est longtemps passé pour un indécrottable romantique, dont on célébrait les glorieuses défaites, Séville 1982 par exemple, tandis que les autres nations accumulaient les titres. Fidèle à ce qu’il était sur le terrain, un travailleur de l’ombre et un apôtre de la victoire avant tout, Didier Deschamps a transformé son équipe de France en une terrible machine à gagner. (…) A défaut d’être impressionnante par son niveau de jeu, cette finale, décousue, a été la plus prolifique depuis l’unique sacre anglais à domicile face à la RFA en 1966 (4-2). Qu’importe la manière, dans dix ans, seule cette deuxième étoile ajoutée au maillot tricolore pendant l’été moscovite restera. La leçon de l’Euro 2016 a été bien apprise. Deschamps n’aime pas perdre et c’est certainement pour cela qu’il a presque tout gagné dans sa carrière : notamment deux Ligues des champions, un Euro et, désormais, deux Coupes du monde… (…) Pourtant, cette finale, spécialement la première période, aura été paradoxalement l’un des matchs les moins aboutis des Bleus, depuis l’entame contre l’Australie, le 16 juin. Une ouverture du score contre son camp de Mario Mandzukic et un penalty contestable (une main d’Ivan Perisic qui semblait non intentionnelle) obtenu grâce à la VAR (arbitrage vidéo), voilà les deux maigres coups d’éclat qui ont permis aux Français de faire basculer la rencontre. Le troisième but tricolore, inscrit par Paul Pogba, au terme d’une contre-attaque, et la frappe chirurgicale de Kylian Mbappé pour le quatrième, n’ont été que la punition attendue et infligée à un adversaire qui, mené et épuisé par ses trois prolongations successives, devait dès lors se découvrir. En capitaine fair-play, le gardien Hugo Lloris a offert aux Croates, d’une relance calamiteuse, la réduction du score. Pas certain que cela suffise à les consoler, pas plus que le titre de meilleur joueur de la Coupe du monde attribué au capitaine Luka Modric. Le Monde
Revers de la médaille : le temps de jeu, beaucoup plus important pour les Croates, est devenu le principal désavantage de la sélection au damier – les Bleus ont donc l’avantage, ayant également profité d’une journée supplémentaire de repos. La solidité de la défense française, verrouillée autour de Rafael Varane et N’Golo Kanté, scellée par l’efficacité d’Hugo Lloris dans les buts, permet aux Bleus de garder un bloc bas et d’attendre les offensives de leurs adversaires. Les deux équipes se complètent à ce stade, puisque pour la Croatie, c’est l’inverse : le sélectionneur Zlatko Dalic encourage ses joueurs à garder le ballon le plus loin de leur but – et donc de maintenir un bloc haut. Luka Modrić se charge de l’animation offensive, permettant aux Croates de déclencher rapidement leurs actions vers l’avant. Comme face à l’Argentine et à l’Uruguay, les défenseurs français pourraient donc profiter d’un coup de pied arrêté dans la surface adverse pour exploiter les failles de la Croatie. Les courses de Kylian Mbappé vers l’avant, précieuses pour percer le premier rideau croate, vont constituer une des clefs de la rencontre. Le Monde
Largement favoris, les Bleus s’appuient sur une ossature défensive ultrasolide, autour d’une charnière centrale dominatrice dans les airs et protégée par un N’Golo Kanté qui ratisse tous les ballons. Si l’on ajoute un Hugo Lloris en grande forme dans les buts, cela donne le cocktail idéal pour jouer très bas : domination physique, grande discipline (seulement six fautes commises face à la Belgique) et pensée collective. (…) A l’inverse, la Croatie, positionnée en moyenne beaucoup plus haut sur le terrain, se protège en éloignant au maximum le ballon de sa cage. En multipliant les passes, elle élabore certes des offensives qui doivent déstabiliser l’adversaire, mais elle impose surtout son propre tempo à la partie. A la façon de l’Espagne 2010, elle endort parfois plus qu’elle ne crée. (…) Le symbole de cette philosophie ambivalente se nomme Luka Modric, génial milieu du Real Madrid, dont la candidature au prochain Ballon d’or prend chaque jour un peu plus d’épaisseur. Au cœur du jeu, il est le baromètre, tantôt devant la défense comme pendant une heure face à la Russie, tantôt relayeur voire numéro 10. A travers Modric, ce sont bien sûr les forces mais aussi, et peut-être surtout, toutes les faiblesses croates qui apparaissent au grand jour. Car si son importance dans l’orientation et la gestion du jeu est cruciale, il doit être mis dans les bonnes conditions pour briller et déchargé d’une partie du travail défensif. D’où le recours au pressing, stratégie peu utilisée dans cette Coupe du monde qui, bien appliquée, oblige l’adversaire à se précipiter et à rendre le ballon. (…) Le football est imprévisible, mais le rapport de force semble jusqu’ici nettement à l’avantage des Bleus : pourquoi Samuel Umtiti et Raphaël Varane, impeccables face aux grands gabarits belges et uruguayens lors des deux derniers matchs et même buteurs de la tête, ne pourraient-ils pas réitérer la performance contre un adversaire qui peine à défendre dans sa surface ? C’est cette question, et l’évidence de la réponse malgré la taille de l’attaquant Mario Mandzukic, qui laisse imaginer un match à la physionomie similaire à ceux contre la Belgique et l’Argentine. Un adversaire qui veut le ballon, une équipe de France très contente de le laisser, et une grosse bataille au milieu pour rendre les attaques croates les plus inoffensives possibles. Si l’Angleterre, qui défendait à huit en laissant deux attaquants prêts à contre-attaquer, a été trahie par son infériorité numérique au milieu (un 5-3-2 où la ligne de trois doit couvrir toute la largeur), la France a prouvé qu’elle n’avait pas peur de mettre dix joueurs dans son camp, la vitesse de Kylian Mbappé suffisant à se montrer dangereux une fois le ballon récupéré. Tout le monde, à l’exception parfois du Parisien, est donc concerné par cette récupération, avec une stratégie simple : Antoine Griezmann et Olivier Giroud empêchent les milieux d’être trouvés dans de bonnes conditions, Paul Pogba se charge de marquer le passeur et N’Golo Kanté se concentre sur la cible. Contre l’Argentine, ce n’est pas tant en défendant bien sur Lionel Messi qu’en le coupant d’Ever Banega, son principal pourvoyeur de ballons, que la France avait tué la menace dans l’œuf. Si Marouane Fellaini fut également géré facilement, Pogba, qui est le plus apte à remplir le rôle à condition de permuter avec Blaise Matuidi au milieu, pourrait trouver en Modric son adversaire le plus coriace… Car la Croatie, dont le jeu peut vite devenir stéréotypé, entre actions individuelles des ailiers Ivan Perisic et Ante Rebic et multiples centres des latéraux Vrsaljko et Strinic, est jusqu’ici animée d’une force qui dépasse la tactique – là où la France, qui adapte la sienne à l’adversaire, n’a jamais eu besoin d’exploits. Christophe Kuchly

Et à la fin, c’est l’Italie qui gagne !

Entre le tika-taka démonétisé et stérile de l’Espagne ….
Le catenaccio « pas emballant et cynique » mais finalement victorieux de la France …
Et le beau jeu, finalement défait, quelque part entre la Belgique et la Croatie …
Comment ne pas voir …
Bien cachée sous les tombereaux d’hagiographies dont nous bassinent nos médias hexagonaux …
Mais s’étalant pourtant en grosses lettres – et en français, s’il vous plait ! – en une de la Gazzetta dello sport
La vérité de cette improbable victoire des Bleus à Moscou …
Orchestrée avec certes un petit coup de pouce tant de la chance que de la bienveillance de l’arbitrage
Par l’un des plus italiens, entre trois saisons comme joueur et une saison comme entraineur à la Juventus, des sélectionneurs français ?

Non, le monde entier ne se réjouit pas de la victoire des Bleus

Carole Lyon et Sasha Mitchell

Courrier international
16/07/2018

D’accord, d’accord, la France a gagné. Mais était-ce bien mérité ? N’est-ce pas un peu grâce à nous ? Et d’ailleurs, est-ce si important ? Dans de nombreux journaux étrangers, la victoire des Bleus fait grincer des dents.

“La France a été la meilleure équipe, cela ne fait aucun doute”, admet du bout des lèvres The Irish Times. “Mais si vous n’êtes pas français, les émotions suscitées par cette finale sont davantage de l’ordre du peu mémorable que de l’inoubliable.”

Pour le quotidien de Dublin, la sélection de Didier Deschamps inspire, “avec réticence”, “du respect plutôt que de l’admiration, de la stupéfaction et de la tendresse”. Et le journal irlandais d’enfoncer le clou, en usant d’une métaphore équestre : “On peut dire que si la France n’a pas eu vraiment à se dépasser pendant cette Coupe du monde, c’est parce qu’elle était tout simplement trop forte. Mais si la plus prestigieuse compétition footballistique peut être gagnée au petit galop, c’est qu’il y a peut-être un problème avec la course.”

“Un penalty discutable a fait basculer la finale”

De l’autre côté de la mer d’Irlande, l’emballement n’est pas non plus de mise. “L’arbitrage vidéo a détruit la finale”, se morfond The Scotsman. “Les Croates sont en droit de se demander comment la VAR, un système créé pour éliminer les erreurs d’arbitrage, a pu, en moins de dix-huit minutes, se tromper de la sorte. D’abord en validant un but entaché d’une probable position de hors-jeu, et ensuite en accordant un penalty extrêmement douteux.” Le journal d’Edimbourg, s’il salue une équipe solide dotée de fabuleux (jeunes) joueurs, assure dans la foulée que ces Bleus-là “ne seront certainement pas appréciés au-delà des frontières du pays”.
Même analyse en Belgique : pour De Standaard, le quotidien de référence néerlandophone, la main d’Ivan Perisic dans la surface de réparation était “un cas limite”, et c’est ce “penalty discutable qui a fait basculer la finale”. “‘Volé’, c’est sans doute un peu fort, écrit le journal, mais en tout cas on ne peut pas dire que le titre de champion du monde de la France est vraiment mérité.”

La France n’a clairement pas donné le meilleur d’elle-même, ajoute La Libre Belgique, qui a vu des Bleus “pas emballants, cyniques”, et glisse :

Les plus caustiques diront que les Français n’ont jamais autant couru vers l’avant qu’au moment d’aller embrasser l’un des quatre buteurs de l’après-midi”.

Plus généralement, la presse belge a surtout choisi de parler d’autre chose. Fait assez rare dans le pays, les quotidiens francophones et flamands consacrent leurs unes à un même sujet : l’accueil triomphal des Diables rouges sur la Grand-Place de Bruxelles, au lendemain de leur victoire en petite finale.

“La très grande majorité des Italiens soutenait le camp adverse”

C’est d’ailleurs aussi ce que fait le journal italien Tuttosport, qui titre, pour le sixième jour consécutif, sur le transfert de Cristiano Ronaldo à la Juventus de Turin.

Bon joueur, le Corriere dello Sport salue les prouesses de Didier Deschamps, tout en précisant que le héros du jour est un sélectionneur à l’italienne”. “Nous pourrions le considérer comme l’un des nôtres, assure le journal sportif, si on garde à l’esprit les cinq saisons qu’il a passées au sein de la Juventus, en tant que joueur, et le passage de série B en série A [qu’il a accompagné en tant qu’entraîneur, lors de la saison 2006-2007]”.

Pour La Gazzetta dello Sport, c’est carrément toute la victoire qui est “à l’italienne”, puisque c’est indubitablement la carrière transalpine de Didier Deschamps qui lui a permis d’acquérir “l’art italien de la défense et de la tactique”.

Enfin, dans son éditorial, le directeur du Corriere dello Sport tâche de prendre acte.

La France est donc championne du monde pour la deuxième fois en vingt ans. Le grand rêve d’un petit pays [la Croatie] ne s’est pas réalisé. Mauvaise pioche également pour une très large majorité des Italiens – dont votre serviteur –, qui, au cours de cette finale pauvre en tactique et déterminée par les circonstances, soutenait le camp adverse.”

Mais “il faut tout de même admettre que le succès des Français est mérité”.

Voir aussi:

Un sacre «à l’italienne» : la presse étrangère salue, ou regrette, la victoire des Bleus
Romain Bougourd
Le Figaro
16/07/2018

Le titre de l’équipe de France ne laisse pas insensible la presse internationale, qui salue Didier Deschamps ou regrette son jeu défensif.

Le sacre mondial de l’équipe de France de Didier Deschamps est salué par la presse internationale et européenne, pendant que les Bleus sont en train de rentrer en France. Les medias du monde entier ne manquent pas de souligner le style défensif de la formation de Didier Deschamps. Aux premiers rangs, les quotidiens italiens, et particulièrement la Gazzetta dello Sport, qui n’hésite pas à titrer «France championne à l’italienne». «Allons enfants de l’Italie, pourrait-on dire, pas seulement pour forcer la rime, mais car il y a beaucoup plus d’Italie que vous ne l’imaginez dans cette France qui pour la deuxième fois en vingt ans est championne du monde», débute le quotidien au papier rose sur sa deuxième page.

«Souffrir, défendre, créer un groupe, voire devenir «uni», presque comme un bloc unique à la manière des Azzurri de Bearzot et de Lippi», décrit Fabio Licari, qui voit dans cette équipe de France un air d’Italie 2006. Mais ce qui sonne comme un compliment de l’autre côté des Alpes ne l’est pas forcément au-delà du Rhin. Pour le grand quotidien allemand die Welt, qui titre pourtant «Vive la France», une question se pose : «pourquoi le sélectionneur français s’est-il contenté d’un football cynique ?» «L’équipe de l’entraîneur Didier Deschamps a brillé au cours du tournoi avec un pragmatisme froid, malgré des footballeurs très talentueux comme Kylian Mbappé, Antoine Griezmann ou Paul Pogba, en laissant généralement le jeu à l’adversaire pour contre-attaquer au moment décisif», décrypte Christoph Cöln, pour qui «la finale 2018 n’était pas un feu d’artifice footballistique, malgré les nombreux buts».

«La France règne en maître»

Un avis qui diffère de celui de la presse britannique. «Les meilleurs depuis 1966», titre le Daily Mail, quand le Mirror s’essaye aux jeux de mots : «Déjà Blue». Pour le Telegraph, qui n’hésite pas à dire que «la France règne en maître», «cette Coupe du Monde nous manquera comme aucune autre». «Le lendemain de la fête nationale, la France est championne et à juste titre. Mais seulement après la rencontre la plus remarquable, folle et controversée, contre une Croatie courageuse, lors de laquelle il y eut la VAR, une véritable tempête dans le ciel au-dessus de Moscou, un premier but contre son camp en finale de Coupe du Monde, une superbe frappe d’une nouvelle superstar mondiale, une horrible gaffe de gardien de but par l’homme qui a soulevé le trophée», narre Jason Burt.

Mais les médias étrangers mettent particulièrement en avant le sélectionneur des Bleus Didier Deschamps. Le Corrierre dello Sport, en premier lieu, l’affiche en Une : «Deschamps Elysées». «Au-delà de la ligne d’arrivée, il y a la Coupe du Monde remportée grâce à la qualité de ses talents mais aussi grâce à l’ingéniosité de Deschamps. Il a relevé son équipe nationale après la défaite contre le Portugal en finale des derniers Championnats d’Europe, en faisant confiance à ces garçons qui, en moyenne 26 ans, garantissent un avenir glorieux pour la France», avance le quotidien sportif italien.

La victoire de Didier Deschamps

Même son de cloche chez les Catalans de Mundo Deportivo. «Il (Deschamps) a établi un plan pour gagner la Coupe du monde, qu’il avait déjà emporté comme joueur en 1998 (…). Ses joueurs ont cru au plan de son entraîneur et cela a été remarqué sur le terrain. Didier Deschamps n’a trompé personne. La liste des 23 qu’il a choisi annonçait déjà ses plans», raconte le quotidien sportif. Un deuxième sacre de champion du monde, comme joueur puis comme entraîneur, qui n’empêche pas la presse croate d’encenser ses «héros». «Merci héros! Vous nous avez tout donné», titre le quotidien sportif Sportske Novosti. «’Flamboyants’, vous êtes les plus grands, vous êtes notre fierté, vos noms seront écrits à jamais en lettres d’or!», commente Sportske Novosti.

Voir également:

Vu de l’étranger. Les “Terminators” français s’offrent une finale de Coupe du monde

Corentin Pennarguear

Courrier international
11/07/2018

Les Bleus ont battu la Belgique 1-0, mardi 10 juillet, et se qualifient pour la finale de la Coupe du monde. Qu’elle affronte la Croatie ou l’Angleterre dimanche, la France sera favorite, s’accorde à dire la presse étrangère.

Pendant le match, les supporters des deux camps ont régulièrement oublié de chanter et d’encourager leur sélection. “Parfois, on avait l’impression de se trouver au beau milieu d’un tournoi d’échecs”, relate la Süddeutsche Zeitung. Mais ce n’était pas par manque de spectacles ou d’émotions, pointe le quotidien allemand. Car entre la France et la Belgique ce mardi 10 juillet, “il s’agissait plutôt d’un match de boxe étincelant”.

“Les yeux dans les yeux, les deux camps se sont fixés tout le long du match, prêts à asséner à l’autre le coup de poing décisif, raconte la SZ. À chaque action, chaque ballon distribué, on approchait le KO, l’échec et mat. Haletant.”

“Ce duel était ce qu’a offert de mieux la Coupe du monde jusqu’à présent”, enchaîne la Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung de l’autre côté du Rhin. Le journal de Francfort estime avoir assisté à “une demi-finale palpitante entre les deux équipes les plus complètes au monde”.

Une équipe “impossible à briser”

Dans ce match serré, tendu à l’extrême, c’est la France qui l’a emporté grâce à une tête rageuse du défenseur Samuel Umtiti et à un combat des Bleus sur chaque ballon. “La France a été tellement forte, tellement impossible à briser…”, reconnaît The Independent. Pour le quotidien britannique en ligne, “les Bleus ont réduit en miettes la confiance et la verve de cette équipe belge”.

Si Kylian Mbappé, le numéro 10 français, “est encore celui qui a attiré tous les regards”, explique la publication de Londres, “il a été soutenu par énormément de joueurs français déterminés à se battre pour gagner le ballon”. À tel point, selon The Independent, que “même N’Golo Kanté n’est pas sorti du lot sur ce point”.

Avec cette bataille physique et malgré le potentiel offensif des joueurs sur le terrain, “on a eu droit à un match tactique, fermé, cloisonné par une formation hexagonale pas forcément chatoyante mais très impressionnante d’organisation, de maîtrise et d’efficacité”, admet Le Soir. D’après le journal belge, “cette équipe de France est plus que jamais à l’image de son entraîneur, Didier Deschamps. L’homme qui contrôle tout et qui s’adapte à toutes les oppositions a créé un collectif prêt à mettre le talent individuel au service de l’intérêt général et de la roublardise.” Et le quotidien de Bruxelles de plier genou : “Chapeau.”

Avec ce parcours qui la conduit en finale du Mondial 2018, un aspect de cette équipe de France devient de plus en plus évident, souligne The Wall Street Journal: “un nouveau sentiment de sérénité.” Si les Bleus gardent “des joueurs d’instinct comme Mbappé”, les hommes de Deschamps sont avant tout destinés à la contre-attaque, juge le quotidien américain. Et par conséquent, “dès que la France a pris l’avantage, la panique s’est doucement répandue dans les rangs belges”.

Et au final, “c’est la France qui a imposé sa loi”, titre le quotidien espagnol El País après le match. “Brillante, juste et efficace dès qu’elle le peut” : pour le journal de Madrid, cette sélection a la patte de l’influence italienne de Didier Deschamps.

Le sélectionneur des Bleus n’a jamais accordé d’importance à l’esthétique, et si l’Italie ne s’est pas qualifiée pour ce Mondial, la France nous la rappelle match après match.”

Résultat, “les Bleus jouent le genre de football qui inspire davantage le respect que l’amour”, considère The Irish Times, qui a vu des “Terminators” sur le terrain face aux Belges. Le journal irlandais focalise son analyse sur Kylian Mbappé, “la différence majeure par rapport à la France de 2016”, qui a perdu la finale de l’Euro face au Portugal : “Il peut détruire les défenseurs adverses comme aucun autre footballeur sur la planète à l’heure actuelle ; il peut les dribbler, tourner autour d’eux, les battre à la course sur cinq mètres ou cinquante mètres ; il peut réaliser une passe parfaite à son coéquipier sans que vous-même n’ayez vu qu’il était là.”

Des revanches à prendre

Avec cette équipe, dimanche, la France peut prendre deux revanches. D’abord, “celle qui résulte de cette finale frustrante de l’Euro 2016 contre le Portugal”, se souvient The Independent. Ensuite, “refermer une blessure de 12 ans qui n’a toujours pas cicatrisé, quand elle tenait la finale de la Coupe du monde face à l’Italie entre ses mains et que la tête de Zinédine Zidane s’est abattue sur le torse de Marco Materazzi”, écrit La Nación, en Argentine.

“Les Bleus sont favoris pour soulever le trophée, que ce soit l’Angleterre ou la Croatie en face”, assure The Guardian depuis Londres. Même sentiment à Madrid, El Mundo voit “une France tout en muscles qui sent bon la coupe du monde”.

“L’équipe de Deschamps a atteint une troisième finale de championnat du monde sans passer par les prolongations, avec une solidité de champion”, apprécie également La Vanguardia, avant de lancer un rappel tranchant : “Il y a deux ans, avant la finale de l’Euro, cette même équipe avait crié victoire trop tôt. Elle sera son pire ennemi dimanche prochain.”

Voir également:

Gary Neville: France deserved World Cup win despite VAR ‘Middleweight versus heavyweight in Moscow’
Skysport
16/07/18

Gary Neville paid tribute to France after their World Cup triumph, declaring that the best team had prevailed at Russia 2018.

In an incident-packed showpiece, France led 2-1 at half-time after a Mario Mandzukic own goal and an Antoine Griezmann penalty controversially awarded via VAR, with Ivan Perisic briefly bringing Croatia level.

But quickfire strikes by Paul Pogba and Kylian Mbappe midway through the second half put France on course for glory, and rendered a Hugo Lloris error academic.

Neville admitted the penalty call left « a bit of a cloud » over the result but was in no doubt that France deserved their second World Cup crown.

« There’s a little bit of a cloud because of the penalty decision in the first half but the best team won, » Neville said.

« To beat an Argentina team with Lionel Messi, a Uruguay side with Luis Suarez, with Diego Godin that also does the horrible stuff, to beat a Belgium side with Eden Hazard, Kevin De Bruyne, Romelu Lukaku… they’ve come through everything.

« They can win all types of games. They haven’t got just good, skilful players in Kylian Mbappe and Antoine Griezmann – players who’ve lit up this World Cup in moments – they’re also tough and resilient. »

Neville conceded Zlatko Dalic’s side had a right to feel aggrieved but said the final felt like a mismatch in the end.

« The Croatians will be upset – they’ll say they were hard done-by but you felt whatever happened, France would step up a gear and get through it, » Neville told ITV.

« Croatia deserve all the respect in the world but it felt like middleweight versus heavyweight. France were able to land the blows. They were more powerful.

« We’ve become accustomed to thinking possession is the dominating factor in the game because of what Spain and Pep Guardiola have done but it’s changed a bit in this World Cup. France counter-attacked, punched them and knocked them out.

« Don’t let Croatia’s possession convince you that France weren’t in control of that game. They were the best team in the competition. They deserved it. »

Voir de même:

World Cup final VAR: BBC pundits slam referee over France vs Croatia decisionsVAR took centre stage in the first half of the World Cup final – but not everyone agreed with the decisions that went France’s way.
Aaron Stokes
Daily Express
Jul 15, 2018

Didier Deschamps’ men went in front thanks to a Mario Mandzukic own goal in the first half.

But Antoine Griezmann has been criticised for diving to earn a free-kick before the Croatia striker headed into his own net.

After conceding an Ivan Perisic goal moments later, France looked to regain the lead.

And when the Inter Milan forward handled in his own area, the referee pointed to spot, allowing Griezmann to slot home his fourth of the tournament.

But BBC pundits Alan Shearer and Rio Ferdinand were not happy with the referee or VAR in the first period

« Two bad decisions have turned the game on its head, » said Ferdinand.

« The character the players have shown has been phenomenal.

« They have got around this French team, got in their faces and shown their experience and guile.

« Croatia are the team who have come out and said ‘we’re going to win this World Cup.’ And yet they’re behind. »

Shearer then added: « It will be such a shame if this game is decided on that decision.

« That is not a deliberate handball and it shouldn’t be a penalty.

« The referee didn’t give it initially, but then he is certain he has made an error after going to the VAR?

« I don’t agree with it. »

Voir encore:

Fans fume over ‘absolute amateur’ refereeing decision
7Sport
11 Jul. 2018

Belgium fans were left fuming during their World Cup semi-final loss to France when a blatant foul on Eden Hazard went unpunished.

The Belgian star was hacked down by Olivier Giroud on the edge of the area in the 79th minute of France’s 1-0 victory on Wednesday morning.

The ensuing foul would have given Belgium a golden opportunity to equalise from the set piece, but the referee inexplicably allowed play to continue.

Belgian players were gobsmacked, and fans took to social media to vent.

One social media user even labelled the referee an ‘absolute amateur’ over the bizarre call.

Samuel Umtiti was the unlikely hero as France reached the World Cup final for the third time in 20 years.

Defender Umtiti headed home a corner from Antoine Griezmann in the 51st minute to settle the all-European tie, booking Les Bleus a trip to Moscow and a clash against either Croatia or England.

Goalkeepers Hugo Lloris and Thibaut Courtois both made smart saves to make sure an intriguing game remained scoreless at the interval.

However, Umtiti popped up with the game’s telling moment early in the second half, nodding the ball home to score his third international goal.

Belgium pushed hard for an equaliser but Roberto Martinez watched on as his team suffered their first defeat in 25 outings, ending their hopes of winning the tournament for the first time in history as their so-called golden generation came up short.

Voir par ailleurs:

Coupe du monde 2018 : France-Croatie, bataille d’idées pour un trophée
La Croatie et la France, qui partira favorite de ce match, ont des approches tactiques opposées, liées aux caractéristiques de leur défense.
Christophe Kuchly
Le Monde
13.07.2018

Analyse tactique. « La défense dicte ses lois à la guerre. » La maxime est de Carl von Clausewitz, théoricien militaire prussien et auteur du traité fondateur De la guerre, dans lequel les partisans du catenaccio (« verrou ») se retrouvent sans doute beaucoup plus que ceux du football total. Près de deux siècles plus tard, cette phrase apparemment sans rapport avec la finale de la Coupe du monde, qui opposera la France à la Croatie dimanche 15 juillet à Moscou, résume pourtant l’un des enjeux tactiques de cette rencontre. C’est en effet la protection de son propre but, plus que l’attaque de celui de l’adversaire, qui dictera le comportement des deux équipes.

Est-ce à dire que Croates et Français passeront le match repliés dans leur camp et que personne ne prendra l’initiative ? Pas vraiment. Car les deux formations ont des approches opposées, liées aux caractéristiques de leur arrière-garde. Largement favoris, les Bleus s’appuient sur une ossature défensive ultrasolide, autour d’une charnière centrale dominatrice dans les airs et protégée par un N’Golo Kanté qui ratisse tous les ballons. Si l’on ajoute un Hugo Lloris en grande forme dans les buts, cela donne le cocktail idéal pour jouer très bas : domination physique, grande discipline (seulement six fautes commises face à la Belgique) et pensée collective. De quoi suivre José Mourinho, quand il assure : « On peut avoir le contrôle sans avoir le ballon. »

Philosophie ambivalente

A l’inverse, la Croatie, positionnée en moyenne beaucoup plus haut sur le terrain, se protège en éloignant au maximum le ballon de sa cage. En multipliant les passes, elle élabore certes des offensives qui doivent déstabiliser l’adversaire, mais elle impose surtout son propre tempo à la partie. A la façon de l’Espagne 2010, elle endort parfois plus qu’elle ne crée. Et rappelle la fameuse phrase de Johan Cruyff, dont le romantisme n’était pas toujours téméraire : « Si nous avons le ballon, les autres ne peuvent pas marquer. » Le symbole de cette philosophie ambivalente se nomme Luka Modric, génial milieu du Real Madrid, dont la candidature au prochain Ballon d’or prend chaque jour un peu plus d’épaisseur. Au cœur du jeu, il est le baromètre, tantôt devant la défense comme pendant une heure face à la Russie, tantôt relayeur voire numéro 10.

A travers Modric, ce sont bien sûr les forces mais aussi, et peut-être surtout, toutes les faiblesses croates qui apparaissent au grand jour. Car si son importance dans l’orientation et la gestion du jeu est cruciale, il doit être mis dans les bonnes conditions pour briller et déchargé d’une partie du travail défensif. D’où le recours au pressing, stratégie peu utilisée dans cette Coupe du monde qui, bien appliquée, oblige l’adversaire à se précipiter et à rendre le ballon.

Face à la Russie, en quarts de finale, Modric n’avait pas suivi le déplacement de Denis Cheryshev, bien content alors de profiter d’un peu d’espace pour frapper en lucarne. Contre l’Angleterre, mercredi soir, un retour en catastrophe mais mal maîtrisé lui avait fait commettre une faute à l’entrée de la surface, convertie directement par Kieran Trippier. Les autres buts concédés par la Croatie ? Un penalty à la suite d’une main du défenseur Dejan Lovren contre l’Islande, une touche mal défendue face au Danemark et une tête russe sur coup franc. Et qui sait quelle serait l’affiche de la finale si, en début de prolongation, Sime Vrsaljko n’avait pas sauvé sur la ligne une tête de l’Anglais John Stones sur… corner, la seule phase arrêtée où la Croatie n’a pas encore été battue.

Le football est imprévisible, mais le rapport de force semble jusqu’ici nettement à l’avantage des Bleus : pourquoi Samuel Umtiti et Raphaël Varane, impeccables face aux grands gabarits belges et uruguayens lors des deux derniers matchs et même buteurs de la tête, ne pourraient-ils pas réitérer la performance contre un adversaire qui peine à défendre dans sa surface ? C’est cette question, et l’évidence de la réponse malgré la taille de l’attaquant Mario Mandzukic, qui laisse imaginer un match à la physionomie similaire à ceux contre la Belgique et l’Argentine. Un adversaire qui veut le ballon, une équipe de France très contente de le laisser, et une grosse bataille au milieu pour rendre les attaques croates les plus inoffensives possibles.

La défense française dicte ses lois

Si l’Angleterre, qui défendait à huit en laissant deux attaquants prêts à contre-attaquer, a été trahie par son infériorité numérique au milieu (un 5-3-2 où la ligne de trois doit couvrir toute la largeur), la France a prouvé qu’elle n’avait pas peur de mettre dix joueurs dans son camp, la vitesse de Kylian Mbappé suffisant à se montrer dangereux une fois le ballon récupéré. Tout le monde, à l’exception parfois du Parisien, est donc concerné par cette récupération, avec une stratégie simple : Antoine Griezmann et Olivier Giroud empêchent les milieux d’être trouvés dans de bonnes conditions, Paul Pogba se charge de marquer le passeur et N’Golo Kanté se concentre sur la cible. Contre l’Argentine, ce n’est pas tant en défendant bien sur Lionel Messi qu’en le coupant d’Ever Banega, son principal pourvoyeur de ballons, que la France avait tué la menace dans l’œuf. Si Marouane Fellaini fut également géré facilement, Pogba, qui est le plus apte à remplir le rôle à condition de permuter avec Blaise Matuidi au milieu, pourrait trouver en Modric son adversaire le plus coriace…

Car la Croatie, dont le jeu peut vite devenir stéréotypé, entre actions individuelles des ailiers Ivan Perisic et Ante Rebic et multiples centres des latéraux Vrsaljko et Strinic, est jusqu’ici animée d’une force qui dépasse la tactique – là où la France, qui adapte la sienne à l’adversaire, n’a jamais eu besoin d’exploits. Ni un penalty raté en fin de prolongation en huitième de finale, ni une égalisation concédée sur le fil en quart, ni la fatigue accumulée, n’ont empêché les hommes de Zlatko Dalic, menés lors de leurs trois dernières rencontres, de poursuivre l’aventure. Et si Lovren a échoué cette année en finale de Ligue des champions, les titres européens accumulés par Rakitic, Modric, Mandzukic, Kovacic (huit C1 et une C3 à eux quatre) et Vrsaljko (une C3), font plus qu’équilibrer la balance de l’expérience des grands rendez-vous.

D’autant qu’il reste une variable de taille : comment la France, qui devrait être capable de provoquer des déséquilibres partout sur le terrain, réagirait-elle en cas de scénario défavorable ? Menée presque par hasard par l’Argentine, elle était partie à l’attaque, les boulevards défensifs de l’Albiceleste et une volée de Benjamin Pavard inversant immédiatement la dynamique. Neuf minutes de course-poursuite suffisent-elles à juger de la percussion d’une équipe qui semblait presque inoffensive sur attaque placée il y a de cela un mois ? Si la défense française dicte ses lois dans ce Mondial, la puissance de son attaque n’a pas encore été inscrite dans les textes.

Voir aussi:

Finale France-Croatie : le pragmatisme des Bleus face à l’héroïsme des « Vatreni »
Lors d’une finale inédite, des Croates fatigués mais galvanisés tenteront de renverser l’équipe de France, favorite au terme d’une Coupe du monde maîtrisée.
Le Monde
15.07.2018

Dimanche 15 juillet, à partir de 17 heures, l’équipe de France de football tentera d’inscrire sur son maillot une deuxième étoile de champion du monde, vingt ans après le sacre à domicile des Bleus d’Aimé Jacquet.

Face à une sélection croate héroïque – les joueurs de Zlatko Dalic ont été menés dans deux des trois rencontres de la phase à élimination directe, sont allés trois fois en prolongation et ont remporté deux séances de tirs au but – les Français restent favoris, mais attention : forts de leurs stars européennes et poussés par 4 millions de supporters, les Croates ont de légitimes chances de croire en leur victoire dans le stade Loujniki de Moscou, pour ce qui serait un succès inédit en cinq participations à la Coupe du monde.

Léger avantage statistique aux Français

Depuis le début de la Coupe du monde, les Bleus n’ont encaissé que quatre buts – dont trois contre l’Argentine, en huitième de finale – contre cinq pour les Croates, sans compter les penaltys encaissés par ceux-ci lors des deux séances de tirs au but.

Les Croates ont, cependant, l’avantage côté offensif : douze buts inscrits, contre huit seulement pour la France en six matchs. Ils ont aussi mieux réussi leur phase de poule, avec trois victoires en trois matchs, dont une de prestige face à l’Argentine (3-0).

Les « Vatreni » entre fougue et fatigue

C’est l’une des principales certitudes avant la rencontre de dimanche : les Croates ne lâcheront rien. Extrêmement soudé, le collectif guidé par Luka Modrić a montré une grande ténacité depuis le début de la phase finale : face au Danemark, « les Enflammés », leur surnom, ont subi le score avant de remporter la rencontre aux tirs au but – la première de l’histoire de la Coupe du monde avec cinq arrêts de la part des gardiens, dont trois pour le portier de Monaco, Danijel Subašić.

Face à la Russie, l’histoire se répète : à égalité à la fin des prolongations, après avoir été menés, les Croates l’emportent aux tirs au but. En demi-finale, cette fois face à l’Angleterre, l’attaquant Mario Mandžukić libère ses coéquipiers en inscrivant, une nouvelle fois en prolongation, le but qualifiant son équipe pour la finale face à la France.

Revers de la médaille : le temps de jeu, beaucoup plus important pour les Croates, est devenu le principal désavantage de la sélection au damier – les Bleus ont donc l’avantage, ayant également profité d’une journée supplémentaire de repos.

L’opposition de style défensif, enjeu central de la finale

La solidité de la défense française, verrouillée autour de Rafael Varane et N’Golo Kanté, scellée par l’efficacité d’Hugo Lloris dans les buts, permet aux Bleus de garder un bloc bas et d’attendre les offensives de leurs adversaires.

Les deux équipes se complètent à ce stade, puisque pour la Croatie, c’est l’inverse : le sélectionneur Zlatko Dalic encourage ses joueurs à garder le ballon le plus loin de leur but – et donc de maintenir un bloc haut. Luka Modrić se charge de l’animation offensive, permettant aux Croates de déclencher rapidement leurs actions vers l’avant.

Comme face à l’Argentine et à l’Uruguay, les défenseurs français pourraient donc profiter d’un coup de pied arrêté dans la surface adverse pour exploiter les failles de la Croatie. Les courses de Kylian Mbappé vers l’avant, précieuses pour percer le premier rideau croate, vont constituer une des clefs de la rencontre.

L’espoir du Ballon d’or pour Luka Modrić

Vainqueur de la Ligue des Champions avec le Real Madrid, véritable star dans son pays et grand animateur du jeu croate, le milieu de terrain pourrait, en ramenant chez lui la première Coupe du monde de l’histoire de sa sélection, décrocher dans quelque mois le Ballon d’Or.

« Quand on parle de toi sur ce genre de sujet c’est super et agréable, mais je ne me préoccupe pas de cela, préfère-t-il répondre face à la presse. Je veux que mon équipe gagne, que, si Dieu veut, on remporte la Coupe »

Côté français, malgré les bonnes saisons d’Antoine Griezmann à l’Atlético Madrid et de Kylian Mbappé au Paris-Saint-Germain, une victoire en Coupe du monde ne suffirait pas à espérer le titre de meilleur joueur de la planète.

Voir encore:

World Cup 2018: Time for Spain to move away from tiki-taka
Shyam Kamal
Sportskeeda
2 Jul, 2018

Spain’s famed Tiki-taka system failed to match against some astute defending
If there was one thing that Vincent Del Bosque’s Spain was known for, other than their 2010 World Cup win – it was their style of play. It was Spain’s greatest ever team playing one of the most attractive styles of football, and it looked set for Spain to dominate football like Brazil had done in the past.

Oh, how the mighty have fallen!

In the 2018 World Cup, Spain ended the tournament with just one win to their name – a sluggish win against Iran in the second round of the group stage, and 3 draws (losing the last one to penalties against Russia).

In the process, they have conceded 6 goals, and scored 7; 3-3 against Portugal, 1-0 against Iran, 2-2 against Morocco and finally, 1-1 against Russia.

During the course of these four matches, they have completed an inherently unbelievable 3129 passes, an average of 782 passes per game. Argentina have the second most passes in the tournament, with some 800 passes less than what Spain has managed.

The origin
Without the very best players, Tiki-taka as a system has its downfalls

The ‘Tiki-taka’ system came to prominence when Johann Cruyff took over the reigns of Barcelona during the late 80s and the early 90s. It continued to gain momentum even after his departure, with Van Gaal and Rijkaard following the same system.

It reached its zenith at Barcelona when Pep Guardiola came to the fore – and arguably the greatest team in club football completed a sextuple of trophies playing some of the best football the world had ever seen.

And then, it caught on to the Spanish national team. A major portion of that Barcelona team played for La Furia Roja, and when then manager Vincent Del Bosque integrated the style into the team’s play, it instantly paid dividends.

Spain went on to win the 2008 Euros, the 2010 World Cup in South Africa, and the 2012 Euros, combining the tiki-taka with more direct football when the style suited them. This bastardized version was the brain child of Luis Aragones – the manager who led Spain to the 2008 Euros.

Del Bosque’s system was more focused on the Barcelona style of the tiki-taka, a return to the basics that saw small, physically suspect players go toe to toe against the bigger, more physically endowed players.

After Spain’s exit in Brazil, the system came under attack. The Netherlands had taken apart everything Spain stood for, and Van Persie’s soaring header was the cherry on top of a performance that showed the world that direct football could beat the slow build-up if done well.

The Nadir
Then came Barcelona’s slight falling out with the system as well.

Luis Enrique’s system at Barcelona invited contempt and concern from many a fan who had watched the beautiful passing from the years gone by. It was considered too direct to be played by Barcelona, and despite a treble in his first season and a double in the second, Enrique was shown the door after his third season at the club.

Bayern Munich shifted to a form of tiki-taka when Guardiola took over at the club, but after his departure they have returned back to their original blitzkrieg style of play.

Arsenal have lost all semblance of proper tactics during the last year of Wenger, and at present only Manchester City, under the tutelage of Pep Guardiola, are the last proponents of the system.

Spain came into the World Cup armed by only one established striker in Diego Costa, and a midfield that is enough to make any team envious. It did not feel the need for them to have another striker, considering that their midfield would be holding the ball most of the time anyway.

As it turns out, holding the ball is the only thing they know to do. Against Russia, Spain kept passing the ball with nothing coming out of it, and their play had no urgency whatsoever. They recorded their first shot on target only after Russia scored the equalizer, and even then it was too late.

The reason the plan failed was because tiki-taka in its basic form is designed to sandbag the opponent.

It aims to hit the opponent with a continuous flow of attack and tire out the defenders. It operates with the assumption that the ball should be regained within the opposition half, and never let them have a moment of respite.

That is where Spain failed.

Spain’s newer system saw passes, but no urgency. It was possession for the sake of possession, and not possession that has the intent to score. At times, it was more boring than the ‘bus-parking’ by Mourinho, and that is saying a lot.

Most of the time, the ball remained in the Spanish half – with the defenders passing the ball over and over to each other, while the Russians stayed back and bided their time. The initial success of tiki-taka happened because the teams were not used to it, and got tired from chasing the ball for too long.

Against a Russian team that did not fall into their trap, Spain was all bark and no bite
And when the plan failed, Spain did not have a fail-safe. Putting crosses into the box after taking out Diego Costa, unsurprisingly, did not work.

All the players on the field tried to pass themselves into a corner, before switching the ball to the other wing – rinsing and repeating till the final whistle.

Maybe Lopetegui’s Spain would have done better, but that is not a question we can know the answer to. The fact is that Spain’s tiki-taka failed, and rather spectacularly considering how well their opponents exposed a critical flaw in its design.

Football evolves with time. Just like how ‘total football’ came into praise and then disappeared from the limelight, it is time for tiki-taka to take a step back.

As teams get more and more defensive when playing against the possession based sides, they should at least temper their football with a good plan B if they want to get anywhere near a trophy again.

Voir enfin:

La France remporte la Coupe du monde : vingt ans après, les Bleus de nouveau sur le toit du monde
Les Bleus ont montré, dimanche à Moscou, une impressionnante détermination pour battre la Croatie (4-2) et ainsi remporter leur deuxième titre de champion du monde.
Anthony Hernandez (envoyé spécial à Moscou)
Le Monde
15.07.2018

Le football français est longtemps passé pour un indécrottable romantique, dont on célébrait les glorieuses défaites, Séville 1982 par exemple, tandis que les autres nations accumulaient les titres. Fidèle à ce qu’il était sur le terrain, un travailleur de l’ombre et un apôtre de la victoire avant tout, Didier Deschamps a transformé son équipe de France en une terrible machine à gagner. Ironie de l’histoire, pour quelqu’un qui était surnommé « la Dèche » et a connu le cauchemar bulgare de 1993.

Dimanche 15 juillet, au stade Loujniki de Moscou, les Tricolores se sont montrés impitoyables (4-2) face à des Croates méritants, pour remporter le Mondial 2018. Pendant que le président russe Vladimir Poutine, enfin sorti de sa tanière, s’éloignait sous le déluge moscovite comme étranger à la joie tricolore, les joueurs français pouvaient brandir un trophée historique, vingt ans après les deux coups de tête victorieux de Zinédine Zidane au Stade de France. 1998-2018, le lien est tout trouvé : le capitaine Didier Deschamps devenu le sélectionneur Didier Deschamps.

La leçon de l’Euro 2016 a été bien apprise
A défaut d’être impressionnante par son niveau de jeu, cette finale, décousue, a été la plus prolifique depuis l’unique sacre anglais à domicile face à la RFA en 1966 (4-2). Qu’importe la manière, dans dix ans, seule cette deuxième étoile ajoutée au maillot tricolore pendant l’été moscovite restera. La leçon de l’Euro 2016 a été bien apprise. Deschamps n’aime pas perdre et c’est certainement pour cela qu’il a presque tout gagné dans sa carrière : notamment deux Ligues des champions, un Euro et, désormais, deux Coupes du monde… « Une finale, cela se gagne, oui. Parce que celle qu’on a perdue il y a deux ans, on ne l’a toujours pas digérée », avait-il dit mardi soir.

Les bras tendus vers le ciel et le poing rageur, le sélectionneur tricolore pouvait laisser exploser une joie mêlée à sa légendaire rage de vaincre. Après le Brésilien Mario Zagallo et l’Allemand Franz Beckenbauer, il peut désormais s’enorgueillir d’être le troisième à avoir gagné la Coupe du monde à la fois en tant que joueur et en tant qu’entraîneur.

Une performance inimaginable pour celui qui, au départ, n’était jamais le meilleur footballeur, ni le meilleur entraîneur, mais qui a toujours su transmettre sa hargne et sa détermination à un groupe. « C’est tellement beau, tellement merveilleux, a-t-il exulté, Je suis super heureux pour ce groupe-là, car on est partis de loin quand même. Cela n’a pas été toujours simple, mais à force de travail, d’écoute… Là, ils sont sur le toit du monde pour quatre ans. »

Solidité défensive
Kylian Mbappé poursuit, lui, sa quête de records : à 19 ans, il est le deuxième plus jeune buteur en finale d’une Coupe du monde, derrière le Brésilien Pelé (en 1958). Sans forcément en être conscient, le Parisien, désigné meilleur jeune du tournoi, restera sur l’une des images fortes de ce mois de compétition, l’unique accroc à l’opération de communication maîtrisée du Kremlin : son high five avec l’une des quatre Pussy Riot, affublées d’un costume policier, et dont le mouvement a revendiqué l’envahissement de la pelouse en deuxième période.

Elu homme du match, parfois éclipsé par son jeune coéquipier, Antoine Griezmann a, lui, répondu présent au meilleur moment d’un coup franc précis sur le premier but, d’un penalty plein de sang-froid sur le deuxième et grâce, en général, à une performance éclatante tout au long des quatre-vingt-dix minutes.

Plus globalement, comme sa devancière de 1998, cette équipe de France aura bâti son succès sur une solidité défensive insoupçonnée avant la compétition, à laquelle elle aura ajouté un jeu ultra-direct et rapide, redoutable pour forcer les défenses adverses.

Un mur de damiers rouge et blanc
Pourtant, cette finale, spécialement la première période, aura été paradoxalement l’un des matchs les moins aboutis des Bleus, depuis l’entame contre l’Australie, le 16 juin. Une ouverture du score contre son camp de Mario Mandzukic et un penalty contestable (une main d’Ivan Perisic qui semblait non intentionnelle) obtenu grâce à la VAR (arbitrage vidéo), voilà les deux maigres coups d’éclat qui ont permis aux Français de faire basculer la rencontre.

Le troisième but tricolore, inscrit par Paul Pogba, au terme d’une contre-attaque, et la frappe chirurgicale de Kylian Mbappé pour le quatrième, n’ont été que la punition attendue et infligée à un adversaire qui, mené et épuisé par ses trois prolongations successives, devait dès lors se découvrir. En capitaine fair-play, le gardien Hugo Lloris a offert aux Croates, d’une relance calamiteuse, la réduction du score. Pas certain que cela suffise à les consoler, pas plus que le titre de meilleur joueur de la Coupe du monde attribué au capitaine Luka Modric.

Aux abords du stade Loujniki, comme à l’intérieur des tribunes de ce gigantesque stade, théâtre des Jeux de Moscou en 1980, les Français ont dû faire face à une forte adversité. Tout d’abord à la forte supériorité numérique des supporteurs croates, 10 000 balkaniques qui ont constitué un véritable mur de damiers rouge et blanc. Puis au soutien massif des autres spectateurs à l’outsider. Brésiliens, qui se voyaient en finale, Colombiens, Sud-Coréens ou Mexicains, beaucoup avouaient soutenir la Croatie.

L’égale de l’Argentine et de l’Uruguay
« Elle joue avec le cœur, avec plus de passion. Pour clôturer cette Coupe du monde folle, la victoire d’une équipe inattendue serait idéale. Mais je pense que la France va gagner, vous avez les meilleurs joueurs », prophétisait Leandro, venu de Rio avec ses amis. Les Bleus pouvaient tout de même compter sur quelques soutiens éparpillés, à l’image de Munzi, un Malaisien fanatique de Mbappé, ou de Kensuke, un Japonais qui arborait le maillot d’un certain Lilian Thuram, double buteur lors de la demi-finale du Mondial 1998 contre… la Croatie.

Avec ce deuxième succès sur les six dernières Coupes du monde, l’équipe de France distance l’Angleterre et l’Espagne. Surtout, elle égale des nations de football telles que l’Uruguay et l’Argentine. Devant, il ne reste plus que l’Italie et l’Allemagne (quatre titres) et le Brésil (cinq titres). Nantis d’une moyenne d’âge de 25 ans et 10 mois, ces Bleus paraissent armés pour continuer à gagner.

Didier Deschamps sera normalement encore aux commandes jusqu’à l’Euro 2020, au moins. Quoi de plus logique pour ce père la victoire, qui a su s’adapter à une jeune génération qui le lui rend à merveille, comme le prouve l’intrusion joyeuse et festive de ses joueurs en conférence de presse. « Excusez-les, ils sont jeunes et heureux », a résumé Deschamps, arrosé d’eau des pieds à la tête.


Présidence Trump: Ils déversent leurs problèmes sur les États-Unis (As with many of his crusades, guess who basic numbers always seem to support in the end ?)

15 juillet, 2018

At that point, you’ve got Europe and a number of Gulf countries who despise Qaddafi, or are concerned on a humanitarian basis, who are calling for action. But what has been a habit over the last several decades in these circumstances is people pushing us to act but then showing an unwillingness to put any skin in the game. (…) Free riders (…) So what I said at that point was, we should act as part of an international coalition. But because this is not at the core of our interests, we need to get a UN mandate; we need Europeans and Gulf countries to be actively involved in the coalition; we will apply the military capabilities that are unique to us, but we expect others to carry their weight. Obama (2016)
Trump’s approval rating trajectory has diverged from past presidents. Trump’s approval rating has actually ticked up as the 2018 midterm elections approach. The Hill
Nous protégeons l’Allemagne, la France et tout le monde et nous payons beaucoup d’argent pour ça… Ça dure depuis des décennies mais je dois m’en occuper parce que c’est très injuste pour notre pays et pour nos contribuables. Nous sommes censés vous défendre contre la Russie alors pourquoi payez-vous des milliards de dollars à la Russie pour l’énergie ! En fait l’Allemagne est captive de la Russie. Donald Trump
Quand le Mexique nous envoie ces gens, ils n’envoient pas les meilleurs d’entre eux. Ils apportent des drogues. Ils apportent le crime. Ce sont des violeurs. Donald Trump
Ce que je dis – et j’ai beaucoup de respect pour les Mexicains. J’aime les Mexicains. J’ai beaucoup de Mexicains qui travaillent pour moi et ils sont géniaux. Mais nous parlons ici d’un gouvernement beaucoup plus intelligent que notre gouvernement. Beaucoup plus malin, plus rusé que notre gouvernement, et ils envoient des gens. Et ils envoient – si vous vous souvenez, il y a des années, quand Castro a ouvert ses prisons et il les a envoyés partout aux États-Unis (…) Et vous savez, ce sont les nombreux repris de justice endurcis qu’il a envoyés. Et, vous savez, c’était il y a longtemps, mais (…)  à titre d’exemple, cet horrible gars qui a tué une belle femme à San Francisco. Le Mexique ne le veut pas. Alors ils l’envoient. Comment pensez-vous qu’il est arrivé ici cinq fois? Ils le chassent. Ils déversent leurs problèmes sur États-Unis et nous n’en parlons pas parce que nos politiciens sont stupides. (…) Et je vais vous dire quelque chose: la jeune femme qui a été tuée – c’était une statistique. Ce n’était même pas une histoire. Ma femme me l’a rapporté. Elle a dit, vous savez, elle a vu ce petit article sur la jeune femme de San Francisco qui a été tuée, et j’ai fait des recherches et j’ai découvert qu’elle a été tuée par cet animal … qui est venu illégalement dans le pays plusieurs fois et qui d’ailleurs a une longue liste de condamnations. Et je l’ai rendu public et maintenant c’est la plus grande histoire du monde en ce moment. … Sa vie sera très importante pour de nombreuses raisons, mais l’une d’entre elles sera de jeter de la lumière et de faire la lumière sur ce qui se passe dans ce pays. Donald Trump
Ou vous avez des frontières ou vous n’avez pas de frontières. Maintenant, cela ne signifie pas que vous ne pouvez pas permettre à quelqu’un de vraiment bien devenir citoyen. Mais je pense qu’une partie du problème de ce pays est que nous accueillons des gens qui, dans certains cas, sont bons et, dans certains cas, ne sont pas bons et, dans certains cas, sont des criminels. Je me souviens, il y a des années, que Castro envoyait le pire qu’il avait dans ce pays. Il envoyait des criminels dans ce pays, et nous l’avons fait avec d’autres pays où ils nous utilisent comme dépotoir. Et franchement, le fait que nous permettons que cela se produise est ce qui fait vraiment du mal à notre pays. Donald Trump
I was in primary school in my native Colombia when my father was murdered. I was six – just one year older than my daughter is now. My father was an officer in the Colombian army at a time when wearing a uniform made you a target for narcoterrorists, Farc fighters and guerrilla groups. What I remember clearly from those early years is the bombing and the terror. I was so afraid, especially after my dad died. At night, I would curl up in my mother’s bed while she held me close. She could not promise me that everything was going to be all right, because it wasn’t true. I don’t want my daughter to grow up like that. But when I turn on my TV, I see terrorist attacks in San Bernardino and in Orlando. There are dangerous people coming across our borders. Trump was right. Some are rapists and criminals, but some are good people, too. But how do we know who is who, when you come here illegally? I moved to the US in 2006 on a work permit. It took nearly five years and thousands of dollars to become a US citizen. I know the process is not perfect, but it’s the law. Why would I want illegals coming in when I had to go through this? It’s not fair that they’re allowed to jump the line and take advantage of so many benefits, ones that I pay for with my tax dollars. People assume that because I’m a woman, I should vote for the woman; or that because I’m Latina, I should vote for the Democrat. The Democrats have been pandering to minorities and women for the last 50 years. They treat Latinos as if we’re all one big group. I’m Colombian – I don’t like Mariachi music. Donald Trump is not just saying what he thinks people want to hear, he’s saying what they’re afraid to say. I believe that he’s the only candidate who can make America strong and safe again. Ximena Barreto (31, San Diego, California)
This week, as President Trump comes out in support of a bill that seeks to halve legal immigration to the United States, his administration is emphasizing the idea that Americans and their jobs need to be protected from all newcomers—undocumented and documented. To support that idea, his senior policy adviser Stephen Miller has turned to a moment in American history that is often referenced by those who support curbing immigration: the Mariel boatlift of 1980. But, in fact, much of the conventional wisdom about that episode is based on falsehoods rooted in Cold War rhetoric. During a press briefing on Wednesday, journalist Glenn Thrush asked Miller to provide statistics showing the correlation between the presence of low-skill immigrants and decreased wages for U.S.-born and naturalized workers. In response, Miller noted the findings of a recent study by Harvard economist George Borjas on the Mariel boatlift, which contentiously argued that the influx of over 125,000 Cubans who entered the United States from April to October of 1980 decreased wages for southern Florida’s less educated workers. Borjas’ study, which challenged an earlier influential study by Berkeley economist David Card, has received major criticisms. A lively debate persists among economists about the study’s methods, limited sample size and interpretation of the region’s racial categories—but Miller’s conjuring of Mariel is contentious on its own merits. The Mariel boatlift is an outlier in the pages of U.S. immigration history because it was, at its core, a result of Cold War posturing between the United States and Cuba. Fidel Castro found himself in a precarious situation in April 1980 when thousands of Cubans stormed the Peruvian embassy seeking asylum. Castro opened up the port of Mariel and claimed he would let anyone who wanted to leave Cuba to do so. Across the Florida Straits, the United States especially prioritized receiving people who fled communist regimes as a Cold War imperative. Because the newly minted Refugee Act had just been enacted—largely to address the longstanding bias that favored people fleeing communism—the Marielitos were admitted under an ambiguous, emergency-based designation: “Cuban-Haitian entrant (status pending).” (…) In order to save face, Castro put forward the narrative that the Cubans who sought to leave the island were the dregs of society and counter-revolutionaries who needed to be purged because they could never prove productive to the nation. This sentiment, along with reports that he had opened his jails and mental institutes as part of this boatlift, fueled a mythology that the Marielitos were a criminal, violent, sexually deviant and altogether “undesirable” demographic. In reality, more than 80% of the Marielitos had no criminal past, even in a nation where “criminality” could include acts antithetical to the revolutionary government’s ideals. In addition to roughly 1,500 mentally and physically disabled people, this wave of Cubans included a significant number of sex workers and queer and transgender people—some of whom were part of the minority who had criminal-justice involvement, having been formerly incarcerated because of their gender and sexual transgression. Part of what made Castro’s propaganda scheme so successful was that his regime’s repudiation of Marielitos found an eager audience in the United States among those who found it useful to fuel the nativist furnace. U.S. legislators, policymakers and many in the general public accepted Castro’s negative depiction of the Marielitos as truth. By 1983, the film Scarface had even fictionalized a Marielito as a druglord and violent criminal. Then and now, the boatlift proved incredibly unpopular among those living in the United States and is often cited as one of the most vivid examples of the dangers of lax immigration enforcement. In fact, many of President Jimmy Carter’s opponents listed Mariel as one of his and the Democratic Party’s greatest failures, even as his Republican successor, President Ronald Reagan, also embraced the Marielitos as part of an ideological campaign against Cuba. Julio Capó, Jr.
For an economist, there’s a straightforward way to study how low-skill immigration affects native workers: Find a large, sudden wave of low-skill immigrants arriving in one city only. Watch what happens to wages and employment for native workers in that city, and compare that to other cities where the immigrants didn’t go. An ideal “natural experiment” like this actually happened in Miami in 1980. Over just a few months, 125,000 mostly low-skill immigrants arrived from Mariel Bay, Cuba. This vast seaborne exodus — Fidel Castro briefly lifted Cuba’s ban on emigration -— is known as the Mariel boatlift. Over the next few months, the workforce of Miami rose by 8 percent. By comparison, normal immigration to the US increases the nationwide workforce by about 0.3 percent per year. So if immigrants compete with native workers, Miami in the 1980s is exactly where you should see natives’ wages drop. Berkeley’s Card examined the effects of the Cuban immigrants on the labor market in a massively influential study in 1990. In fact, that paper became one of the most cited in immigration economics. The design of the study was elegant and transparent. But even more than that, what made the study memorable was what Card found. In a word: nothing. The Card study found no difference in wage or employment trends between Miami — which had just been flooded with new low-skill workers — and other cities. This was true for workers even at the bottom of the skills ladder. Card concluded that “the Mariel immigration had essentially no effect on the wages or employment outcomes of non-Cuban workers in the Miami labor market. » (…) Economists ever since have tried to explain this remarkable result. Was it that the US workers who might have suffered a wage drop had simply moved away? Had low-skill Cubans made native Miamians more productive by specializing in different tasks, thus stimulating the local economy? Was it that the Cubans’ own demand for goods and services had generated as many jobs in Miami as they filled? Or perhaps was it that Miami employers shifted to production technologies that used more low-skill labor, absorbing the new labor supply? Regardless, there was no dip in wages to explain. The real-life economy was evidently more complex than an “Econ 101” model would predict. Such a model would require wages to fall when the supply of labor, through immigration, goes up. This is where two new studies came in, decades after Card’s — in 2015. One, by Borjas, claims that Card’s analysis had obscured a large fall in the wages of native workers by using too broad a definition of “low-skill worker.” Card’s study had looked at the wages of US workers whose education extended only to high school or less. That was a natural choice, since about half of the newly-arrived Cubans had a high school degree, and half didn’t. Borjas, instead, focuses on workers who did not finish high school — and claimed that the Boatlift caused the wages of those workers, those truly at the bottom of the ladder, to collapse. The other new study (ungated here), by economists Giovanni Peri and Vasil Yasenov, of the UC Davis and UC Berkeley, reconfirms Card’s original result: It cannot detect an effect of the boatlift on Miami wages, even among workers who did not finish high school. (The wages of Miami workers with high school degrees (and no more than that) jump up right after the Mariel boatlift, relative to prior trends. The wages of those with less than a high school education appear to dip slightly, for a couple of years, although this is barely distinguishable amid the statistical noise. And these same inflation-adjusted wages were also falling in many other cities that didn’t receive a wave of immigrants, so it’s not possible to say with statistical confidence whether that brief dip on the right is real. It might have been — but economists can’t be sure. The rise on the left, in contrast, is certainly statistically significant, even relative to corresponding wage trends in other cities. Here is how the Borjas study reaches exactly the opposite conclusion. The Borjas study slices up the data much more finely than even Peri and Yasenov do. It’s not every worker with less than high school that he looks at. Borjas starts with the full sample of workers of high school or less — then removes women, and Hispanics, and workers who aren’t prime age (that is, he tosses out those who are 19 to 24, and 60 to 65). And then he removes workers who have a high school degree. In all, that means throwing out the data for 91 percent of low-skill workers in Miami in the years where Borjas finds the largest wage effect. It leaves a tiny sample, just 17 workers per year. When you do that, the average wages for the remaining workers look like this: (…) For these observations picked out of the broader dataset, average wages collapse by at least 40 percent after the boatlift. Wages fall way below their previous trend, as well as way below similar trends in other cities, and the fall is highly statistically significant. There are two ways to interpret these findings. The first way would be to conclude that the wage trend seen in the subgroup that Borjas focuses on — non-Hispanic prime-age men with less than a high school degree — is the “real” effect of the boatlift. The second way would be to conclude, as Peri and Yasenov do, that slicing up small data samples like this generates a great deal of statistical noise. If you do enough slicing along those lines, you can find groups for which wages rose after the Boatlift, and others for which it fell. In any dataset with a lot of noise, the results for very small groups will vary widely. Researchers can and do disagree about which conclusion to draw. But there are many reasons to favor the view that there is no compelling basis to revise Card’s original finding. There is not sufficient evidence to show that Cuban immigrants reduced any low-skill workers’ wages in Miami, even small minorities of them, and there isn’t much more that can be learned about the Mariel boatlift with the data we have. (…) Around 1980, the same time as the Boatlift, two things happened that would bring a lot more low-wage black men into the survey samples. First, there was a simultaneous arrival of large numbers of very low-income immigrants from Haiti without high school degrees: that is, non-Hispanic black men who earn much less than US black workers but cannot be distinguished from US black workers in the survey data. Nearly all hadn’t finished high school. That meant not just that Miami suddenly had far more black men with less than high school after 1980, but also that those black men had much lower earnings. Second, the Census Bureau, which ran the CPS surveys, improved its survey methods around 1980 to cover more low-skill black men due to political pressure after research revealed that many low-income black men simply weren’t being counted. (…) In sum, the evidence from the Mariel boatlift continues to support the conclusion of David Card’s seminal research: There is no clear evidence that wages fell (or that unemployment rose) among the least-skilled workers in Miami, even after a sudden refugee wave sharply raised the size of that workforce. This does not by any means imply that large waves of low-skill immigration could not displace any native workers, especially in the short term, in other times and places. But politicians’ pronouncements that immigrants necessarily do harm native workers must grapple with the evidence from real-world experiences to the contrary. Michael Clemens (Center for Global Development, Washington, DC)
His name was Luis Felipe. Born in Cuba in 1962, he came to the United States on a fishing boat and ended up in prison for shooting his girlfriend. He founded the New York chapter of the Latin Kings in 1986. Soon he was ordering murders from his prison cell. Esquire
Judge Martin says the extreme conditions are necessary to protect society.  »I do not do it out of my sense of cruelty, » the judge said at the sentencing, after Mr. Felipe had expressed remorse for the killings. But noting that the defendant had been convicted for ordering the murder of three Latin Kings and the attempted murder of four others, the judge said that without such restrictions,  »some of the young men sitting in this court today who are supporters of Mr. Felipe might well be murdered in the future. » (…) That Mr. Felipe, a man of charisma and intelligence, is nonetheless a ruthless criminal is not in dispute. His accounts of his background vary. He has said that his mother was a prostitute and that both parents are now dead. At the age of 9, he was sent to prison for robbery. On his 19th birthday in 1980, he arrived in the United States during the Mariel boatlift. In short order, Mr. Felipe became a street thug, settling in Chicago. There he joined the Latin Kings, a Hispanic organization established in the 1940’s. He moved to the Bronx. One night in 1981, in what has been described as a drunken accident, he shot and killed his girlfriend. He fled to Chicago and was not apprehended until 1984. Sentenced to nine years for second-degree manslaughter, he ended up at Collins Correctional Facility in Helmuth, N.Y. At Collins, he found an inmate system lorded over by black gangs and white guards. In 1986, he started a fledgling New York prison chapter of the Latin Kings. In a manifesto that followers circulated, he laid out elaborate laws and rituals, emphasizing Latin pride, family values, rigorous discipline and swift punishment. He was paroled in 1989 but by 1991 had returned to prison. He was eventually sent to Attica for a three-year sentence for possession of stolen property. His word spread, not least because he wrote thousands of letters, his prose a mix of flamboyant grandiosity and street bluntness. As King Blood, Inka, First Supreme Crown, Mr. Felipe corresponded with Latin Kings in and out of prison. (At its peak, the gang was estimated to have about 2,000 members.) He soared with self-aggrandizement, styling himself as both autocratic patriarch and jailhouse Ann Landers, dispensing advice about romance, family squabbles, schoolyard disputes. But in 1993 and 1994, disciplinary troubles erupted throughout the Latin Kings, with members vying for power, filching gang money, looking sideways at the wrong women. Infuriated, King Blood wrote to his street lieutenants: B.O.S. (beat on sight) and T.O.S. (terminate on sight).  »Even while he was in Attica in segregation, he was able to order the leader of the Latin Kings on Rikers Island to murder someone who ended up being badly slashed in the face, » said Alexandra A. E. Shapiro, a Federal prosecutor. One victim was choked and beheaded. A second was killed accidentally during an attempt on another man. A third was gunned down. Federal authorities, who had been monitoring Mr. Felipe’s mail, arrested 35 Latin Kings. Thirty-four pleaded guilty. Only Mr. Felipe insisted on a trial. The Latin Kings still revere him, said Antonio Fernandez, King Tone, the gang’s new leader, who is trying to reposition it as a mainstream organization.  »He brought a message of hope, » he said. NYT
Luis « King Blood » Felipe, who founded the New York chapter in 1986 (…) ran the gang from prison like a demented puppet-master. He ordered the murders of three Kings and plotted to murder three others. He routinely dispatched « T.O.S. » orders–shorthand for « Terminate on Sight. » In one particularly gory execution, a rival was strangled, decapitated and set afire in a bathtub. His Kings tattoo was peeled off his arm with a knife. Convicted of racketeering in 1996, Felipe was sentenced to life imprisonment in solitary confinement to cut him off from the Kings. LA Times
Julio Gonzalez, a jilted lover whose arson revenge at the unlicensed Happy Land nightclub in the Bronx in 1990 claimed 87 lives, making him the nation’s worst single mass murderer at the time, died on Tuesday at a hospital in Plattsburgh, N.Y., where he had been taken from prison. He was 61 (…) Mr. Gonzalez was born in Holguín, a city in Oriente Province in Cuba, on Oct. 10, 1954. He served three years in prison in the 1970s for deserting the Cuban Army. In 1980, when he was 25, he joined what became known as the Mariel boatlift, an effort organized by Cuban-Americans and agreed to by the Cuban government that brought thousands of Cuban asylum-seekers to the United States. It was later learned that many of the refugees had been released from jails and mental hospitals. Mr. Gonzalez was said to have faked a criminal record as a drug dealer to help him gain passage. (…) Mr. Gonzalez had just lost his job at a Queens lamp warehouse when he showed up at Happy Land. There he argued heatedly with his girlfriend, Lydia Feliciano, about their six-year on-again, off-again relationship and about her quitting as a coat checker at the club. Around 3 a.m., a bouncer ejected him. According to testimony, Mr. Gonzalez walked three blocks to an Amoco service station, where he found an empty one-gallon container and bought $1 worth of gasoline from an attendant he knew there. He returned to the club. (…) Mr. Gonzalez splashed the gasoline at the bottom of a rickety staircase, the club’s only means of exit, and ignited it. Then he went home and fell asleep. (…) Ms. Feliciano was among the six survivors. She recounted her argument with Mr. Gonzalez to the police, who went to his apartment, where he confessed. “I got angry, the devil got to me, and I set the fire,” he told detectives. (…) During a video conference-call interview at the time, he said he had not realized how many people were inside Happy Land that night, that he had nothing against them and that his anger had been directed at the bouncer. NYT
Cet exode des Marielitos a commencé par un coup de force. Le 5 avril 1980, 10 000 Cubains entrent dans l’ambassade du Pérou à La Havane et demandent à ce pays de leur accorder asile. Dix jours plus tard, Castro déclare que ceux qui veulent quitter Cuba peuvent le faire à condition d’abandonner leurs biens et que les Cubains de Floride viennent les chercher au port de Mariel. L’hypothèse est que Castro voit dans cette affaire une double opportunité : Il se débarrasse d’opposants -il en profite également pour vider ses prisons et ses asiles mentaux et sans doute infiltrer, parmi les réfugiés, quelques agents castristes ; Il espère que cet afflux soudain d’exilés va profondément déstabiliser le sud de la Floride et affaiblir plus encore le brave Président Jimmy Carter, préchi-prêcheur démocrate des droits de l’homme, un peu trop à gauche pour endosser l’habit de grand Satan impérialiste que taille à tous les élus de la Maison Blanche le leader cubain. De fait, du 15 avril au 31 octobre 1980, quelque 125 000 Cubains quitteront l’île. 2 746 d’entre eux ont été considérés comme des criminels selon les lois des Etats-Unis et incarcérés. Le Nouvel Obs
Avec l’autorisation du président Fidel Castro, 125 000 Cubains quittent leur île par le port de Mariel pour trouver refuge aux États-Unis. Cet exode massif posera plusieurs problèmes aux Américains qui y mettront un terme après deux mois. Le 3 avril 1980, six Cubains entrent de force à l’ambassade du Pérou à La Havane pour s’y réfugier. Les autorités cubaines demandent leur retour sans succès. Voulant donner une leçon au Pérou, le président Castro fait retirer les gardes protégeant l’ambassade. Celle-ci est submergée par plus de 10 000 personnes qui sont vite aux prises avec des problèmes de salubrité et le manque de nourriture. Pendant que d’autres ambassades sont envahies (Costa Rica, Espagne), la communauté cubano-américaine entreprend une campagne de support. Voulant récupérer le mouvement, Castro annonce le 23 avril une politique de porte ouverte pour ceux qui veulent quitter Cuba. Il invite les Cubains habitant aux États-Unis à venir chercher leurs proches au port de Mariel. Cet exode, qui se fait avec 17 000 navires de toutes sortes, implique environ 125 000 personnes, en grande partie des gens de la classe ouvrière, des Noirs et des jeunes. Son envergure reflète un profond mécontentement face à l’économie cubaine et la baisse de la ferveur révolutionnaire. D’abord favorables à cet exode, les États-Unis sont vite débordés. Le 14 mai, le président Jimmy Carter fait établir un cordon de sécurité pour arrêter les navires. Placés dans des camps militaires et des prisons fédérales, les réfugiés sont interrogés à leur arrivée. Parmi eux, on retrouve des criminels et des malades mentaux qui ont quitté avec le soutien des autorités cubaines, ce qui a un effet négatif sur la population. Carter cherche à remplacer l’exode maritime par un pont aérien avec un quota de 3000 personnes par année. Mais aucun accord n’est conclu avec Cuba. Submergées par un exode en provenance de Haïti, les autorités américaines mettront fin à l’exode cubain le 20 juin 1980. Perspective monde
As BuzzFeed investigative reporter Ken Bensinger chronicles in his new book, Red Card: How the U.S. Blew the Whistle on the World’s Biggest Sports Scandal, the investigation’s origins began before FIFA handed the 2018 World Cup to Russia and the 2022 event to Qatar. The case had actually begun as an FBI probe into an illegal gambling ring the bureau believed was run by people with ties to Russian organized crime outfits. The ring operated out of Trump Tower in New York City. Eventually, the investigation spread to soccer, thanks in part to an Internal Revenue Service agent named Steve Berryman, a central figure in Bensinger’s book who pieced together the financial transactions that formed the backbone of the corruption allegations. But first, it was tips from British journalist Andrew Jennings and Christopher Steele ― the former British spy who is now known to American political observers as the man behind the infamous so-called “pee tape” dossier chronicling now-President Donald Trump’s ties to Russia ― that pointed the Americans’ attention toward the Russian World Cup, and the decades of bribery and corruption that had transformed FIFA from a modest organization with a shoestring budget into a multibillion-dollar enterprise in charge of the world’s most popular sport. Later, the feds arrested and flipped Chuck Blazer, a corrupt American soccer official and member of FIFA’s vaunted Executive Committee. It was Blazer who helped them crack the case wide open, as HuffPost’s Mary Papenfuss and co-author Teri Thompson chronicled in their book American Huckster, based on the 2014 story they broke of Blazer’s role in the scandal. Russia’s efforts to secure hosting rights to the 2018 World Cup never became a central part of the FBI and the U.S. Department of Justice’s case. Thanks to Blazer, it instead focused primarily on CONCACAF, which governs soccer in the Caribbean and North and Central America, and other officials from South America. But as Bensinger explained in an interview with HuffPost this week, the FIFA case gave American law enforcement officials an early glimpse into the “Machiavellian Russia” of Vladimir Putin “that will do anything to get what it wants and doesn’t care how it does it.” And it was Steele’s role in the earliest aspects of the FIFA case, coincidentally, that fostered the relationship that led him to hand his Trump dossier to the FBI ― the dossier that has now helped form “a big piece of the investigative blueprint,” as Bensinger said, that former FBI director Robert Mueller is using in his probe of Russian meddling in the election that made Trump president. HuffPost
There are sort of these weird connections to everything going on in the political sphere in our country, which I think is interesting because when I was reporting the book out, it was mostly before the election. It was a time when Christopher Steele’s name didn’t mean anything. But what I figured out over time is that this had nothing to do with sour grapes, and the FBI agents who opened the case didn’t really care about losing the World Cup. The theory was that the U.S. investigation was started because the U.S. lost to Qatar, and Bill Clinton or Eric Holder or Barack Obama or somebody ordered up an investigation. What happened was that the investigation began in July or August 2010, four or five months before the vote happened. It starts because this FBI agent, who’s a long-term Genovese crime squad guy, gets a new squad ― the Eurasian Organized Crime Squad ― which is primarily focused on Russian stuff. It’s a squad that’s squeezed of resources and not doing much because under Robert Mueller, who was the FBI director at the time, the FBI was not interested in traditional crime-fighting. They were interested in what Mueller called transnational crime. So this agent looked for cases that he thought would score points with Mueller. And one of the cases they’re doing involves the Trump Tower. It’s this illegal poker game and sports book that’s partially run out of the Trump Tower. The main guy was a Russian mobster, and the FBI agent had gone to London ― that’s how he met Steele ― to learn about this guy. Steele told him what he knew, and they parted amicably, and the parting shot was, “Listen, if you have any other interesting leads in the future, let me know.” Steele had already been hired by the English bid for the 2018 World Cup at that point. What Chris Steele starts seeing on behalf of the English bid is the Russians doing, as it’s described in the book, sort of strange and questionable stuff. It looks funny, and it’s setting off alarm bells for Steele. So he calls the FBI agent back, and says, “You should look into what’s happening with the World Cup bid. » (…) It’s tempting to look at this as a reflection of the general U.S. writ large obsession with Russia, which certainly exists, but it’s also a different era. This was 2009, 2010. This was during the Russian reset. It was Obama’s first two years in office. He’s hugging Putin and talking about how they’re going to make things work. Russia is playing nice-nice. (…)That’s what I find interesting about this case is that, what we see in Russia’s attempt to win the World Cup by any means is the first sort of sign of the Russia we now understand exists, which is kind of a Machiavellian Russia that will do anything to get what it wants and doesn’t care how it does it. It was like a dress rehearsal for that. (…) It’s one of these things that looks like an accident, but so much of world history depends on these accidents. Chris Steele, when he was still at MI-6, investigated the death of Alexander Litvinenko, who was the Russian spy poisoned with polonium. It was Steele who ran that investigation and determined that Putin probably ordered it. And then Steele gets hired because of his expertise in Russia by the English bid, and he becomes the canary in the coal mine saying, “Uh oh, guys, it’s not going to be that easy, and things are looking pretty grim for you.” (…) I don’t know if that would have affected whether or not Chris Steele later gets hired by Fusion GPS to put together the Trump dossier. But it’s certain that the relationship he built because of the FIFA case meant that the FBI took it more seriously.   (…) I think [FIFA vice president Jérôme Valcke] and others were recognizing this increasingly brazen attitude of the criminality within FIFA. They had gone from an organization where people were getting bribes and doing dirty stuff, but doing it very carefully behind closed doors. And it was transitioning to one where the impunity was so rampant that people thought they could do anything. And I think in his mind, awarding the World Cup to Russia under very suspicious circumstances and also awarding it to Qatar, which by any definition has no right to host this tournament, it felt to him and others like a step too far. I don’t think he had any advance knowledge that the U.S. was poking around on it, but he recognized that it was getting out of hand. People were handing out cash bribes in practically broad daylight, and as corrupt as these people were, they didn’t tend to do that. (…) The FIFA culture we know today didn’t start yesterday. It started in 1974 when this guy gets elected, and within a couple years, the corruption starts. And it starts with one bribe to Havelange, or one idea that he should be bribed. And it starts a whole culture, and the people all sort of learn from that same model. The dominoes fell over time. It’s not a new model, and things were getting more and more out of hand over time. FIFA had been able to successfully bat these challenges down over the years. There’s an attempted revolt in FIFA in 2001 or 2002 that Blatter completely shut down. The general secretary of FIFA was accusing Blatter and other people of either being involved in corruption or permitting corruption, and there’s a moment where it seems like the Executive Committee was going to turn against Blatter and vote him out and change everything. But they all blinked, and Blatter dispensed his own justice by getting rid of his No. 2 and putting in people who were going to be loyal to him. The effect of those things was more brazen behavior. (…) It was an open secret. I think it’s because soccer’s just too big and important in all these other countries. I think other countries have just never been able to figure out how to deal with it. The best you’d get was a few members of Parliament in England holding outraged press conferences or a few hearings, but nothing ever came of it. It’s just too much of a political hot potato because soccer elsewhere is so much more important than it is the U.S. People are terrified of offending the FIFA gods There’s a story about how Andrew Jennings, this British journalist, wanted to broadcast a documentary detailing FIFA corruption just a week or so before the 2010 vote, and when the British bid and the British government got a hold of it, they tried really hard to stifle the press. They begged the BBC not to air the documentary until after the vote, because they were terrified of FIFA. That’s reflective of the kind of attitudes that all these countries have. (…) it reminds me of questions about Chuck Blazer. Is he all bad, or all good? He’s a little bit of both. The U.S. women’s national team probably wouldn’t exist without him. The Women’s World Cup probably wouldn’t either. Major League Soccer got its first revenue-positive TV deal because of Chuck Blazer. (…) At the same time, he was a corrupt crook that stole a lot of money that could’ve gone to the game. And so, is he good or bad? Probably more bad than good, but he’s not all bad. That applies to the Gold Cup. The Gold Cup is a totally artificial thing that was made up ultimately as a money-making scheme for Blazer, but in the end, it’s probably benefited soccer in this country. So it’s clearly not all bad. (…) The money stolen from the sport isn’t just the bribes. Let’s say I’m a sports marketing firm, and I bribe you a million dollars to sign over a rights contract to me. The first piece of it is that million dollars that could have gone to the sport. But it’s also the opportunity cost: What would the value of those rights have been if it was taken to the free market instead of a bribe? All that money is taken away from the sport. And the second thing was traveling to South America and seeing the conditions of soccer for fans, for kids and for women. That was really eye-opening. There are stadiums in Argentina and Brazil that are absolutely decrepit. And people would explain, the money that was supposed to come to these clubs never comes. You have kids still playing with the proverbial ball made of rags and duct tape, and little girls who can’t play because there are no facilities or leagues for women at all. When you see that, and then you see dudes making millions in bribes and also marketing guys making far more from paying the bribes, I started to get indignant about it. FIFA always ties itself to children and the good of the game. But it’s absurd when you see how they operate. The money doesn’t go to kids. It goes to making soccer officials rich. (…) When massive amounts of money mixes with a massively popular cultural phenomenon, is it ever going to be clean? I wish it would be different, but it seems kind of hopeless. How do you regulate soccer, and who can oversee this to make sure that people behave in an ethical, clean and fair way that benefits everyone else? It’s not an accident that every single international sports organization is based in Switzerland. The answer is because the Swiss, not only do they offer them a huge tax break, they also basically say, “You can do whatever you want and we’re not going to bother you.” That’s exactly what these groups want. Well, how do you regulate that? I don’t think the U.S. went in saying, “We’re going to regulate soccer.” I think they thought if we can give soccer a huge kick in the ass, if we can create so much public and political pressure on them that sponsors will run away, they’ll feel they have no option but to react and clean up their act. It’s sort of, kick ’em where it hurts. (…) But also, the annoying but true reality of FIFA is that when the World Cup is happening, all the soccer fans around the world forget all their anger and just want to watch the tournament. For three and a half years, everyone bitches about what a mess FIFA is, and then during the World Cup everyone just wants to watch soccer. There could be some reinvigoration in the next few months when the next stupid scandal appears. And I do think Qatar could reinvigorate more of that. There’s a tiny piece of me that thinks we could still see Qatar stripped of the World Cup. That would certainly spur a lot of conversation about this. Ken Bensinger
The United States has the world’s largest trade deficit. It’s been that way since 1975. The deficit in goods and services was $566 billion in 2017. Imports were $2.895 trillion and exports were only $2.329 trillion. The U.S. trade deficit in goods, without services, was $810 billion. The United States exported $1.551 trillion in goods. The biggest categories were commercial aircraft, automobiles, and food. It imported $2.361 trillion. The largest categories were automobiles, petroleum, and cell phones. (…) The Largest U.S. Deficit Is With China More than 65 percent of the U.S. trade deficit in goods was with China. The $375 billion deficit with China was created by $506 billion in imports. The main U.S. imports from China are consumer electronics, clothing, and machinery. Many of these imports are actually made by American companies. They ship raw materials to be assembled in China for a lower cost. They are counted as imports even though they create income and profit for these U.S. companies. Nevertheless, this practice does outsource manufacturing jobs. America only exported $130 billion in goods to China. The top three exports were agricultural products, aircraft, and electrical machinery. The second largest trade deficit is $69 billion with Japan. The world’s fifth largest economy needs the agricultural products, industrial supplies, aircraft, and pharmaceutical products that the United States makes. Exports totaled $68 billion in 2017.Imports were higher, at $137 billion. Much of this was automobiles, with industrial supplies and equipment making up another large portion. Trade has improved since the 2011 earthquake, which slowed the economy and made auto parts difficult to manufacture for several months. The U.S. trade deficit with Germany is $65 billion. The United States exports $53 billion, a large portion of which is automobiles, aircraft, and pharmaceuticals. It imports $118 billion in similar goods: automotive vehicles and parts, industrial machinery, and medicine. (…) The trade deficit with Canada is $18 billion. That’s only 3 percent of the total Canadian trade of $582 billion. The United States exports $282 billion to Canada, more than it does to any other country. It imports $300 billion. The largest export by far is automobiles and parts. Other large categories include petroleum products and industrial machinery and equipment. The largest import is crude oil and gas from Canada’s abundant shale oil fields. The trade deficit with Mexico is $71 billion. Exports are $243 billion, mostly auto parts and petroleum products. Imports are $314 billion, with cars, trucks, and auto parts being the largest components. The Balance
On connaît les photos de ces hommes et de ces femmes débarquant sur des plages européennes, engoncés dans leurs gilets de sauvetage orange, tentant à tout prix de maintenir la tête de leur enfant hors de l’eau. Impossible également d’oublier l’image du corps du petit Aylan Kurdi, devenu en 2016 le symbole planétaire du drame des migrants. Ce que l’on sait moins c’est que le « business » des passeurs rapporte beaucoup d’argent. Selon la première étude du genre de l’Office des Nations unies contre la drogue et le crime (l’UNODC), le trafic de migrants a rapporté entre 5,5 et 7 milliards de dollars (entre 4,7 et 6 milliards d’euros) en 2016. C’est l’équivalent de ce que l’Union européenne a dépensé la même année dans l’aide humanitaire, selon le rapport. (…) En 2016, au moins 2,5 millions de migrants sont passés entre les mains de passeurs, estime l’UNODC qui rappelle la difficulté d’évaluer une activité criminelle. De quoi faire fructifier les affaires de ces contrebandiers. Cette somme vient directement des poches des migrants qui paient des criminels pour voyager illégalement. Le tarif varie en fonction de la distance à parcourir, du nombre de frontières, les moyens de transport utilisés, la production de faux papiers… La richesse supposée du client est un facteur qui fait varier les prix. Evidemment, payer plus cher ne rend pas le voyage plus sûr ou plus confortable, souligne l’UNODC. Selon les estimations de cette agence des Nations unies, ce sont les passages vers l’Amérique du Nord qui rapportent le plus. En 2016, jusqu’à 820 000 personnes ont traversé la frontière illégalement, versant entre 3,1 et 3,6 milliards d’euros aux trafiquants. Suivent les trois routes de la Méditerranée vers l’Union européenne. Environ 375 000 personnes ont ainsi entrepris ce voyage en 2016, rapportant entre 274 et 300 millions d’euros aux passeurs. Pour atteindre l’Europe de l’Ouest, un Afghan peut ainsi dépenser entre 8000 € et 12 000 €. Sans surprise, les rédacteurs du rapport repèrent que l’Europe est une des destinations principales des migrants. (…) Les migrants qui arrivent en Italie sont originaires à 89 % d’Afrique, de l’Ouest principalement. 94 % de ceux qui atteignent l’Espagne sont également originaires d’Afrique, de l’Ouest et du Nord. En revanche, la Grèce accueille à 85 % des Afghans, Syriens et des personnes originaires des pays du Moyen-Orient. (…) des milliers de citoyens de pays d’Amérique centrale et de Mexicains traversent chaque année la frontière qui sépare les Etats-Unis du Mexique. Les autorités peinent cependant à quantifier les flux. Ce que l’on sait c’est qu’en 2016, 2 404 personnes ont été condamnées pour avoir fait passer des migrants aux Etats-Unis. 65 d’entre eux ont été condamnés pour avoir fait passer au moins 100 personnes.Toujours en 2016, le Mexique, qui fait office de « pays-étape » pour les voyageurs, a noté que les Guatémaltèques, les Honduriens et les Salvadoriens formaient les plus grosses communautés sur son territoire. En 2016, les migrants caribéens arrivaient principalement d’Haïti, note encore l’UNODC. (…) Sur les 8189 décès de migrants recensés par l’OIM en 2016, 3832 sont morts noyés (46 %) en traversant la Méditerranée. Les passages méditerranéens sont les plus mortels. L’un d’entre eux force notamment les migrants à parcourir 300 kilomètres en haute mer sur des embarcations précaires. C’est aussi la cruauté des passeurs qui est en cause. L’UNODC décrit le sort de certaines personnes poussées à l’eau par les trafiquants qui espèrent ainsi échapper aux gardes-côtes. Le cas de centaines de personnes enfermées dans des remorques sans ventilation, ni eau ou nourriture pendant des jours est également relevé. Meurtre, extorsion, torture, demande de rançon, traite d’être humain, violences sexuelles sont également le lot des migrants, d’où qu’ils viennent. En 2017, 382 migrants sont décédés de la main des hommes, soit 6 % des décès. (…) Le passeur est le plus souvent un homme mais des femmes (des compagnes, des sœurs, des filles ou des mères) sont parfois impliquées dans le trafic, définissent les rédacteurs de l’étude. Certains parviennent à gagner modestement leur vie, d’autres, membres d’organisations et de mafias font d’importants profits. Tous n’exercent pas cette activité criminelle à plein temps. Souvent le passeur est de la même origine que ses victimes. Il parle la même langue et partage avec elles les mêmes repères culturels, ce qui lui permet de gagner leur confiance. Le recrutement des futurs « clients » s’opère souvent dans les camps de réfugiés ou dans les quartiers pauvres. Facebook, Viber, Skype ou WhatsApp sont devenus des indispensables du contrebandier qui veut faire passer des migrants. Arrivé à destination, le voyageur publie un compte rendu sur son passeur. Il décrit s’il a triché, échoué ou s’il traitait mal les migrants. Un peu comme une note de consommateur, rapporte l’UNODC. Mieux encore, les réseaux sociaux sont utilisés par les passeurs pour leur publicité. Sur Facebook, les trafiquants présentent leurs offres, agrémentent leur publication d’une photo, détaillent les prix et les modalités de paiement. L’agence note que, sur Facebook, des passeurs se font passer pour des ONG ou des agences de voyages européennes qui organisent des passages en toute sécurité. D’autres, qui visent particulièrement les Afghans, se posent en juristes spécialistes des demandes d’asile… Le Parisien
Mr. Trump’s anger at America’s allies embodies, however unpleasantly, a not unreasonable point of view, and one that the rest of the world ignores at its peril: The global world order is unbalanced and inequitable. And unless something is done to correct it soon, it will collapse, with or without the president’s tweets. While the West happily built the liberal order over the past 70 years, with Europe at its center, the Americans had the continent’s back. In turn, as it unravels, America feels this loss of balance the hardest — it has always spent the most money and manpower to keep the system working. The Europeans have basically been free riders on the voyage, spending almost nothing on defense, and instead building vast social welfare systems at home and robust, well-protected export industries abroad. Rather than lash back at Mr. Trump, they would do better to ask how we got to this place, and how to get out. The European Union, as an institution, is one of the prime drivers of this inequity. At the Group of 7, for example, the constituent countries are described as all equals. But in reality, the union puts a thumb on the scales in its members’ favor: It is a highly integrated, well-protected free-trade area that gives a huge leg up to, say, German car manufacturers while essentially punishing American companies who want to trade in the region. The eurozone offers a similar unfair advantage. If it were not for the euro, Germany would long ago have had to appreciate its currency in line with its enormous export surplus. (…) how can the very same politicians and journalists who defended the euro bailout payments during the financial crisis, arguing that Germany profited disproportionately from the common currency, now go berserk when Mr. Trump makes exactly this point? German manufacturers also have the advantage of operating in a common market with huge wage gaps. Bulgaria, one of the poorest member states, has a per capita gross domestic product roughly equal to that of Gabon, while even in Slovakia, Poland and Hungary — three relative success stories among the recent entrants to the union — that same measure is still roughly a third of what it is in Germany. Under the European Union, German manufacturers can assemble their cars in low-wage countries and export them without worrying about tariffs or other trade barriers. If your plant sits in Detroit, you might find the president’s anger over this fact persuasive. Mr. Trump is not the first president to complain about the unfair burden sharing within NATO. He’s merely the first president not just to talk tough, but to get tough. (…) All those German politicians who oppose raising military spending from a meager 1.3 percent of gross domestic product should try to explain to American students why their European peers enjoy free universities and health care, while they leave it up to others to cover for the West’s military infrastructure (…) When the door was opened, in 2001, many in the West believed that a growing Chinese middle class, enriched by and engaged with the world economy, would eventually claim voice and suffrage, thereby democratizing China. The opposite has happened. China, which has grown wealthy in part by stealing intellectual property from the West, is turning into an online-era dictatorship, while still denying reciprocity in investment and trade relations. (…) China’s unchecked abuse of the global free-trade regime makes a mockery of the very idea that the world can operate according to a rules-based order. Again, while many in the West have talked the talk about taking on China, only Mr. Trump has actually done something about it. Jochen Bittner (Die Zeit)
Is the Trump administration out to wreck the liberal world order? No, insisted Secretary of State Mike Pompeo in an interview at his office in Foggy Bottom last week: The administration’s aim is to align that world order with 21st-century realities. Many of the economic and diplomatic structures Mr. Trump stands accused of undermining, Mr. Pompeo argues, were developed in the aftermath of World War II. Back then, he tells me, they “made sense for America.” But in the post-Cold War era, amid a resurgence of geopolitical competition, “I think President Trump has properly identified a need for a reset.” Mr. Trump is suspicious of global institutions and alliances, many of which he believes are no longer paying dividends for the U.S. “When I watch President Trump give guidance to our team,” Mr. Pompeo says, “his question is always, ‘How does that structure impact America?’ ” The president isn’t interested in how a given rule “may have impacted America in the ’60s or the ’80s, or even the early 2000s,” but rather how it will enhance American power “in 2018 and beyond.” Mr. Trump’s critics have charged that his “America First” strategy reflects a retreat from global leadership. “I see it fundamentally differently,” Mr. Pompeo says. He believes Mr. Trump “recognizes the importance of American leadership” but also of “American sovereignty.” That means Mr. Trump is “prepared to be disruptive” when the U.S. finds itself constrained by “arrangements that put America, and American workers, at a disadvantage.” Mr. Pompeo sees his task as trying to reform rules “that no longer are fair and equitable” while maintaining “the important historical relationships with Europe and the countries in Asia that are truly our partners.” The U.S. relationship with Germany has come under particular strain. Mr. Pompeo cites two reasons. “It is important that they demonstrate a commitment to securing their own people,” he says, in reference to Germany’s low defense spending. “When they do so, we’re prepared to do the right thing and support them.” And then there’s trade. The Germans, he says, need to “create tariff systems and nontariff-barrier systems that are equitable, reciprocal.” But Mr. Pompeo does not see the U.S.-German rift as a permanent reorientation of U.S. foreign policy. Once the defense and trade issues are addressed, “I’m very confident that the relationship will go from these irritants we see today to being as strong as it ever was.”  (…) In addition to renegotiating relationships with existing allies, the Trump administration is facing newly assertive great-power adversaries. “For a decade plus,” Mr. Pompeo says, U.S. foreign policy was “very focused on counterrorism and much less on big power struggles.” Today, while counterterrorism remains a priority, geopolitics is increasingly defined by conflicts with powerful states like China and Russia. Mr. Pompeo says the U.S. must be assertive but flexible in dealing with both Beijing and Moscow. He wants the U.S. relationship with China to be defined by rule-writing and rule-enforcing, not anarchic struggle. China, he says, hasn’t honored “the normal set of trade understandings . . . where these nation states would trade with each other on fair and reciprocal terms; they just simply haven’t done it. They’ve engaged in intellectual property theft, predatory economic practices.” Avoiding a more serious confrontation with China down the line will require both countries to appreciate one another’s long-term interests. The U.S. can’t simply focus on “a tariff issue today, or a particular island China has decided to militarize” tomorrow. Rather, the objective must be to create a rules-based structure to avoid a situation in which “zero-sum is the endgame for the two countries.” Mr. Pompeo also sees room for limited cooperation with Russia even as the U.S. confronts its revisionism. “There are many things about which we disagree. Our value sets are incredibly different, but there are also pockets where we find overlap,” he says. “That’s the challenge for a secretary of state—to identify those places where you can work together, while protecting America against the worst pieces of those governments’ activities.” (…) And the president’s agenda, as Mr. Pompeo communicates it, is one of extraordinary ambition: to rewrite the rules of world order in America’s favor while working out stable relationships with geopolitical rivals. Those goals may prove elusive. Inertia is a powerful force in international relations, and institutions and pre-existing agreements are often hard to reform. Among other obstacles, the Trump agenda creates the risk of a global coalition forming against American demands. American efforts to negotiate more favorable trading arrangements could lead China, Europe and Japan to work jointly against the U.S. That danger is exacerbated by Mr. Trump’s penchant for dramatic gestures and his volatile personal style. Yet the U.S. remains, by far, the world’s most powerful nation, and many countries will be looking for ways to accommodate the administration at least partially. Mr. Trump is right that the international rules and institutions developed during the Cold War era must be retooled to withstand new political, economic and military pressures. Mr. Pompeo believes that Mr. Trump’s instincts, preferences, and beliefs constitute a coherent worldview. (…) The world will soon see whether the president’s tweets of iron can be smoothly sheathed in a diplomatic glove. Walter Russell Mead
Illegal and illiberal immigration exists and will continue to expand because too many special interests are invested in it. It is one of those rare anomalies — the farm bill is another — that crosses political party lines and instead unites disparate elites through their diverse but shared self-interests: live-and-let-live profits for some and raw political power for others. For corporate employers, millions of poor foreign nationals ensure cheap labor, with the state picking up the eventual social costs. For Democratic politicos, illegal immigration translates into continued expansion of favorable political demography in the American Southwest. For ethnic activists, huge annual influxes of unassimilated minorities subvert the odious melting pot and mean continuance of their own self-appointed guardianship of salad-bowl multiculturalism. Meanwhile, the upper middle classes in coastal cocoons enjoy the aristocratic privileges of having plenty of cheap household help, while having enough wealth not to worry about the social costs of illegal immigration in terms of higher taxes or the problems in public education, law enforcement, and entitlements. No wonder our elites wink and nod at the supposed realities in the current immigration bill, while selling fantasies to the majority of skeptical Americans. Victor Davis Hanson
Much has been written — some of it either inaccurate or designed to obfuscate the issue ahead of the midterms for political purposes — about the border fiasco and the unfortunate separation of children from parents. (…) The media outrage usually does not include examination of why the Trump administration is enforcing existing laws that it inherited from the Bush and Obama administrations that at any time could have been changed by both Democratic and Republican majorities in Congress; of the use of often dubious asylum claims as a way of obtaining entry otherwise denied to those without legal authorization — a gambit that injures or at least hampers thousands with legitimate claims of political persecution; of the seeming unconcern for the safety of children by some would-be asylum seekers who illegally cross the border, rather than first applying legally at a U.S. consulate abroad; of the fact that many children are deliberately sent ahead, unescorted on such dangerous treks to help facilitate their own parents’ later entrance; of the cynicism of the cartels that urge and facilitate such mass rushes to the border to overwhelm general enforcement; and of the selective outrage of the media in 2018 in a fashion not known under similar policies and detentions of the past. In 2014, during a similar rush, both Barack Obama (“Do not send your children to the borders. If they do make it, they’ll get sent back.”) and Hillary Clinton (“We have to send a clear message, just because your child gets across the border, that doesn’t mean the child gets to stay. So, we don’t want to send a message that is contrary to our laws or will encourage more children to make that dangerous journey.”) warned — again to current media silence — would-be asylum seekers not to use children as levers to enter the U.S. (…) Mexico is the recipient of about $30 billion in annual remittances (aside from perhaps more than $20 billion annually sent to Central America) from mostly illegal aliens within the U.S. It is the beneficiary of an annual $71 billion trade surplus with the U.S. And it is mostly culpable for once again using illegal immigration and the lives of its own citizens — and allowing Central Americans unfettered transit through its country — as cynical tools of domestic and foreign policy. Illegal immigration, increasingly of mostly indigenous peoples, ensures an often racist Mexico City a steady stream of remittances (now its greatest source of foreign exchange), without much worry about how its indigent abroad can scrimp to send such massive sums back to Mexico. Facilitating illegal immigration also establishes and fosters a favorable expatriate demographic inside the U.S. that helps to recalibrate U.S. policy favorably toward Mexico. And Mexico City also uses immigration as a policy irritant to the U.S. that can be magnified or lessened, depending on Mexico’s own particular foreign-policy goals and moods at any given time.
All of the above call into question whether Mexico is a NAFTA ally, a neutral, or a belligerent, a status that may become perhaps clearer during its upcoming presidential elections. So far, it assumes that the optics of this human tragedy facilitate its own political agendas, but it may be just as likely that its cynicism could fuel renewed calls for a wall and reexamination of the entire Mexican–U.S. relationship and, indeed, NAFTA.
Victor Davis Hanson
This year there have been none of the usual Iranian provocations — frequent during the Obama administration — of harassing American ships in the Persian Gulf. Apparently, the Iranians now realize that anything they do to an American ship will be replied to with overwhelming force. Ditto North Korea. After lots of threats from Kim Jong-un about using his new ballistic missiles against the United States, Trump warned that he would use America’s far greater arsenal to eliminate North Korea’s arsenal for good. Trump is said to be undermining NATO by questioning its usefulness some 69 years after its founding. Yet this is not 1948, and Germany is no longer down. The United States is always in. And Russia is hardly out but is instead cutting energy deals with the Europeans. More significantly, most NATO countries have failed to keep their promises to spend 2 percent of their GDP on defense. Yet the vast majority of the 29 alliance members are far closer than the U.S. to the dangers of Middle East terrorism and supposed Russian bullying. Why does Germany by design run up a $65 billion annual trade surplus with the United States? Why does such a wealthy country spend only 1.2 percent of its GDP on defense? And if Germany has entered into energy agreements with a supposedly dangerous Vladimir Putin, why does it still need to have its security subsidized by the American military? Trump approaches NAFTA in the same reductionist way. The 24-year-old treaty was supposed to stabilize, if not equalize, all trade, immigration, and commerce between the three supposed North American allies. It never quite happened that way. Unequal tariffs remained. Both Canada and Mexico have substantial trade surpluses with the U.S. In Mexico’s case, it enjoys a $71 billion surplus, the largest of U.S. trading partners with the exception of China. Canada never honored its NATO security commitment. It spends only 1 percent of its GDP on defense, rightly assuming that the U.S. will continue to underwrite its security. During the lifetime of NAFTA, Mexico has encouraged millions of its citizens to enter the U.S. illegally. Mexico’s selfish immigration policy is designed to avoid internal reform, to earn some $30 billion in annual expatriate remittances, and to influence U.S. politics. Yet after more than two decades of NAFTA, Mexico is more unstable than ever. Cartels run entire states. Murders are at a record high. Entire towns in southern Mexico have been denuded of their young males, who crossed the U.S. border illegally. The U.S. runs a huge trade deficit with China. The red ink is predicated on Chinese dumping, patent and copyright infringement, and outright cheating. Beijing illegally occupies neutral islands in the South China Sea, militarizes them, and bullies its neighbors. All of the above has become the “normal” globalized world. But in 2016, red-state America rebelled at the asymmetry. The other half of the country demonized the red-staters as protectionists, nativists, isolationists, populists, and nationalists. However, if China, Europe, and other U.S. trading partners had simply followed global trading rules, there would have been no Trump pushback — and probably no Trump presidency at all. Had NATO members and NAFTA partners just kept their commitments, and had Mexico not encouraged millions of its citizens to crash the U.S. border, there would now be little tension between allies. Instead, what had become abnormal was branded the new normal of the post-war world. Again, a rich and powerful U.S. was supposed to subsidize world trade, take in more immigrants than all the nations of the world combined, protect the West, and ensure safe global communications, travel, and commerce. After 70 years, the effort had hollowed out the interior of America, creating two separate nations of coastal winners and heartland losers. Trump’s entire foreign policy can be summed up as a demand for symmetry from all partners and allies, and tit-for-tat replies to would-be enemies. Did Trump have to be so loud and often crude in his effort to bully America back to reciprocity? Who knows? But it seems impossible to imagine that globalist John McCain, internationalist Barack Obama, or gentlemanly Mitt Romney would ever have called Europe, NATO, Mexico, and Canada to account, or warned Iran or North Korea that tit would be met by tat. Victor Davis Hanson

Attention: un dépotoir peut en cacher un autre !

Au lendemain du Sommet de l’Otan et de la visite au Royaume-Uni

D’un président américain contre lequel se sont à nouveau déchainés nos médias et nos belles âmes …

Et en cette finale de la Coupe du monde en un pays qui, entre dopage et corruption, empoisonne les citoyens de ses partenaires …

A l’heure où des mensonges nucléaires et de l’aventurisme militaire des Iraniens

Aux méga-excédents commerciaux et filouteries sur la propriété intellectuelle des Chinois …

Comme aux super surplus du commerce extérieur, la radinerie défensive et la mise sous tutelle énergétique russe des Allemands

Et sans parler, entre deux attentats terroristes ou émeutes urbaines, du « business » juteux (quelque 7 milliards annuels quand même !) des passeurs de prétendus « réfugiés » …

L’actualité comme les sondages confirment désormais presque quotidiennement les fortes intuitions de l’éléphant dans le magasin de porcelaine …

Comment qualifier un pays qui …

Derrière les « fake news » et images victimaires dont nous bassinent jour après jour nos médias …

Et entre le contrôle d’états entiers par les cartels de la drogue, les taux d’homicides records et les villes entières vidées de leurs forces vives par l’émigration sauvage …

Se permet non seulement, comme le rappelle l’historien militaire américain Victor Davis Hanson, d’intervenir dans la politique américaine …

Mais encourage, à la Castro et repris de justice compris, ses citoyens par millions à pénétrer illégalement aux États-Unis …

Alors qu’il bénéficie par ailleurs, avec plus de 70 milliards de dollars et sans compter les quelque 30 milliards de ses expatriés, du plus important excédent commercial avec les Etats-Unis après la Chine ?

Reciprocity Is the Method to Trump’s Madness
Victor Davis Hanson

National Review

July 12, 2018

The president sends a signal: Treat us the way we treat you, and keep your commitments.Critics of Donald Trump claim that there’s no rhyme or reason to his foreign policy. But if there is a consistency, it might be called reciprocity.

Trump tries to force other countries to treat the U.S. as the U.S. treats them. In “don’t tread on me” style, he also warns enemies that any aggressive act will be replied to in kind.

The underlying principle of Trump commercial reciprocity is that the United States is no longer powerful or wealthy enough to alone underwrite the security of the West. It can no longer assume sole enforcement of the rules and protocols of the post-war global order.

This year there have been none of the usual Iranian provocations — frequent during the Obama administration — of harassing American ships in the Persian Gulf. Apparently, the Iranians now realize that anything they do to an American ship will be replied to with overwhelming force.

Ditto North Korea. After lots of threats from Kim Jong-un about using his new ballistic missiles against the United States, Trump warned that he would use America’s far greater arsenal to eliminate North Korea’s arsenal for good.

Trump is said to be undermining NATO by questioning its usefulness some 69 years after its founding. Yet this is not 1948, and Germany is no longer down. The United States is always in. And Russia is hardly out but is instead cutting energy deals with the Europeans.

More significantly, most NATO countries have failed to keep their promises to spend 2 percent of their GDP on defense.

Yet the vast majority of the 29 alliance members are far closer than the U.S. to the dangers of Middle East terrorism and supposed Russian bullying.

Why does Germany by design run up a $65 billion annual trade surplus with the United States? Why does such a wealthy country spend only 1.2 percent of its GDP on defense? And if Germany has entered into energy agreements with a supposedly dangerous Vladimir Putin, why does it still need to have its security subsidized by the American military?

Canada never honored its NATO security commitment. It spends only 1 percent of its GDP on defense, rightly assuming that the U.S. will continue to underwrite its security.

Trump approaches NAFTA in the same reductionist way. The 24-year-old treaty was supposed to stabilize, if not equalize, all trade, immigration, and commerce between the three supposed North American allies.

It never quite happened that way. Unequal tariffs remained. Both Canada and Mexico have substantial trade surpluses with the U.S. In Mexico’s case, it enjoys a $71 billion surplus, the largest of U.S. trading partners with the exception of China.

Canada never honored its NATO security commitment. It spends only 1 percent of its GDP on defense, rightly assuming that the U.S. will continue to underwrite its security.

During the lifetime of NAFTA, Mexico has encouraged millions of its citizens to enter the U.S. illegally. Mexico’s selfish immigration policy is designed to avoid internal reform, to earn some $30 billion in annual expatriate remittances, and to influence U.S. politics.

Yet after more than two decades of NAFTA, Mexico is more unstable than ever. Cartels run entire states. Murders are at a record high. Entire towns in southern Mexico have been denuded of their young males, who crossed the U.S. border illegally.

The U.S. runs a huge trade deficit with China. The red ink is predicated on Chinese dumping, patent and copyright infringement, and outright cheating. Beijing illegally occupies neutral islands in the South China Sea, militarizes them, and bullies its neighbors.

All of the above has become the “normal” globalized world.

If China, Europe, and other U.S. trading partners had simply followed global trading rules, there would have been no Trump pushback — and probably no Trump presidency at all.
But in 2016, red-state America rebelled at the asymmetry. The other half of the country demonized the red-staters as protectionists, nativists, isolationists, populists, and nationalists.

However, if China, Europe, and other U.S. trading partners had simply followed global trading rules, there would have been no Trump pushback — and probably no Trump presidency at all.

Had NATO members and NAFTA partners just kept their commitments, and had Mexico not encouraged millions of its citizens to crash the U.S. border, there would now be little tension between allies.

Instead, what had become abnormal was branded the new normal of the post-war world.

Again, a rich and powerful U.S. was supposed to subsidize world trade, take in more immigrants than all the nations of the world combined, protect the West, and ensure safe global communications, travel, and commerce.

After 70 years, the effort had hollowed out the interior of America, creating two separate nations of coastal winners and heartland losers.

Trump’s entire foreign policy can be summed up as a demand for symmetry from all partners and allies, and tit-for-tat replies to would-be enemies.

Did Trump have to be so loud and often crude in his effort to bully America back to reciprocity?

Who knows?

But it seems impossible to imagine that globalist John McCain, internationalist Barack Obama, or gentlemanly Mitt Romney would ever have called Europe, NATO, Mexico, and Canada to account, or warned Iran or North Korea that tit would be met by tat.

Voir aussi:

Pompeo on What Trump Wants
An interview with Trump’s top diplomat on America First and ‘the need for a reset.’
Walter Russell Mead
The Wall Street Journal
June 25, 2018

Is the Trump administration out to wreck the liberal world order? No, insisted Secretary of State Mike Pompeo in an interview at his office in Foggy Bottom last week: The administration’s aim is to align that world order with 21st-century realities.
Many of the economic and diplomatic structures Mr. Trump stands accused of undermining, Mr. Pompeo argues, were developed in the aftermath of World War II. Back then, he tells me, they “made sense for America.” But in the post-Cold War era, amid a resurgence of geopolitical competition, “I think President Trump has properly identified a need for a reset.”
Mr. Trump is suspicious of global institutions and alliances, many of which he believes are no longer paying dividends for the U.S. “When I watch President Trump give guidance to our team,” Mr. Pompeo says, “his question is always, ‘How does that structure impact America?’ ” The president isn’t interested in how a given rule “may have impacted America in the ’60s or the ’80s, or even the early 2000s,” but rather how it will enhance American power “in 2018 and beyond.”
Mr. Trump’s critics have charged that his “America First” strategy reflects a retreat from global leadership. “I see it fundamentally differently,” Mr. Pompeo says. He believes Mr. Trump “recognizes the importance of American leadership” but also of “American sovereignty.” That means Mr. Trump is “prepared to be disruptive” when the U.S. finds itself constrained by “arrangements that put America, and American workers, at a disadvantage.” Mr. Pompeo sees his task as trying to reform rules “that no longer are fair and equitable” while maintaining “the important historical relationships with Europe and the countries in Asia that are truly our partners.”
The U.S. relationship with Germany has come under particular strain. Mr. Pompeo cites two reasons. “It is important that they demonstrate a commitment to securing their own people,” he says, in reference to Germany’s low defense spending. “When they do so, we’re prepared to do the right thing and support them.” And then there’s trade. The Germans, he says, need to “create tariff systems and nontariff-barrier systems that are equitable, reciprocal.”
But Mr. Pompeo does not see the U.S.-German rift as a permanent reorientation of U.S. foreign policy. Once the defense and trade issues are addressed, “I’m very confident that the relationship will go from these irritants we see today to being as strong as it ever was.” He adds that he has a “special place in my heart” for Germany, having spent his “first three years as a soldier patrolling . . . the West and East German border.”
In addition to renegotiating relationships with existing allies, the Trump administration is facing newly assertive great-power adversaries. “For a decade plus,” Mr. Pompeo says, U.S. foreign policy was “very focused on counterrorism and much less on big power struggles.” Today, while counterterrorism remains a priority, geopolitics is increasingly defined by conflicts with powerful states like China and Russia.
Mr. Pompeo says the U.S. must be assertive but flexible in dealing with both Beijing and Moscow. He wants the U.S. relationship with China to be defined by rule-writing and rule-enforcing, not anarchic struggle. China, he says, hasn’t honored “the normal set of trade understandings . . . where these nation states would trade with each other on fair and reciprocal terms; they just simply haven’t done it. They’ve engaged in intellectual property theft, predatory economic practices.”
Avoiding a more serious confrontation with China down the line will require both countries to appreciate one another’s long-term interests. The U.S. can’t simply focus on “a tariff issue today, or a particular island China has decided to militarize” tomorrow. Rather, the objective must be to create a rules-based structure to avoid a situation in which “zero-sum is the endgame for the two countries.”
Mr. Pompeo also sees room for limited cooperation with Russia even as the U.S. confronts its revisionism. “There are many things about which we disagree. Our value sets are incredibly different, but there are also pockets where we find overlap,” he says. “That’s the challenge for a secretary of state—to identify those places where you can work together, while protecting America against the worst pieces of those governments’ activities.”
Mr. Pompeo says his most important daily task is to understand what the president is thinking. As he prepared for the job, “I spoke to every living former secretary of state,” Mr. Pompeo says. “They gave me two or three big ideas about things you needed to do to successfully deliver on American foreign policy. Not one of them got out of their top two without saying that a deep understanding and good relationship with the commander in chief—with the person whose foreign policy you’re implementing—is absolutely central.”
He continues: “It needs to be known around the world that when you speak, you’re doing so with a clear understanding of what the president is trying to achieve. So I spend a lot of time thinking about that—trying to make sure that I have my whole workforce, my whole team, understanding the commander’s intent in a deep way.”
And the president’s agenda, as Mr. Pompeo communicates it, is one of extraordinary ambition: to rewrite the rules of world order in America’s favor while working out stable relationships with geopolitical rivals. Those goals may prove elusive. Inertia is a powerful force in international relations, and institutions and pre-existing agreements are often hard to reform.
Among other obstacles, the Trump agenda creates the risk of a global coalition forming against American demands. American efforts to negotiate more favorable trading arrangements could lead China, Europe and Japan to work jointly against the U.S. That danger is exacerbated by Mr. Trump’s penchant for dramatic gestures and his volatile personal style.
Yet the U.S. remains, by far, the world’s most powerful nation, and many countries will be looking for ways to accommodate the administration at least partially. Mr. Trump is right that the international rules and institutions developed during the Cold War era must be retooled to withstand new political, economic and military pressures.
Mr. Pompeo believes that Mr. Trump’s instincts, preferences, and beliefs constitute a coherent worldview. The secretary’s aim is to undertake consistent policy initiatives based on that worldview. This endeavor will strike many of the administration’s critics as quixotic. But Mr. Pompeo is unquestionably right that no secretary of state can succeed without the support of the president, and he is in a better position than most to understand Mr. Trump’s mind.
The world will soon see whether the president’s tweets of iron can be smoothly sheathed in a diplomatic glove.
Voir également:

De Cuba aux Etats-Unis : il y a trente ans, les Marielitos

Michel Faure

C’était il y a trente ans très exactement. Mai 1980. J’étais jeune journaliste, envoyé spécial de Libération à Key West, en Floride. Je restais des heures, fasciné, sur le quai du port où arrivaient, les unes après les autres en un flot continu extraordinaire, des embarcations diverses -bateaux de pêche, petits et gros, vedettes de promenade, yachts chics– chargées de réfugiés cubains.

C’était une noria incessante, menée avec beaucoup d’enthousiasme. Ces bateaux battaient tous pavillon des Etats-Unis et, pour la plupart, étaient la propriété d’exilés cubains vivant en Floride. Ils débarquaient leurs passagers sous les vives lumières des télévisions et les applaudissements d’une foule de badauds émus aux larmes et scrutant chaque visage avec intensité, dans l’espoir d’y retrouver les traits d’un parent, d’un ami ou d’un amour perdu de vue depuis plus de vingt ans.

Puis les bateaux repartaient pour un nouveau voyage à Mariel, le port cubain d’où partaient les exilés et qui leur donnera un surnom, « los Marielitos ».

La Croix Rouge et la logistique gouvernementale américaine ont fait du bon travail. Les arrivants, épuisés, l’air perdu, souvent inquiets, étaient accueillis avec égards, hydratés, nourris et enveloppés de couvertures.

Ils passaient à travers un double contrôle, médical et personnel, avant d’être rassemblés sous un immense hangar, libres de répondre, s’ils le souhaitaient, aux questions des journalistes, avant d’être transportés par avion à Miami.

Quand les Cubains étaient accueillis sous les bravos

Ceux que j’ai rencontrés, dans ces instants encore très incertains pour eux, racontaient plus ou moins la même histoire : la misère de tous les jours sous la surveillance constante des CDR, les Comités de la révolution, les commissaires politiques du quartier qui avaient (et ont toujours) le pouvoir de vous rendre la vie à peu près tolérable ou de vous la pourrir à jamais.

Oser dire qu’on aurait aimé vivre ailleurs n’arrangeait pas votre cas. Un mot du CDR et vous perdiez votre boulot. Le travail privé n’existant pas, le seul fait de survivre était l’indice d’un délit, genre travail au noir. Pour des raisons éminemment politiques, vous vous retrouviez donc en prison, délinquant de droit commun.

Bref, la routine infernale, les engrenages implacables et cruels de la criminalisation de la vie quotidienne pour quiconque ne courbait pas l’échine.

A Miami, dans un stade gigantesque, j’ai assisté quelques jours plus tard à des scènes de tragédies antiques, émouvantes à en pleurer. Les milliers de sièges du stade étaient occupés par des familles cubaines vivant aux Etats-Unis et, de jour comme de nuit, arrivaient de l’aéroport des autobus qui déposaient leurs occupants débarqués de Mariel (en ce seul mois de mai 1980, ils furent 86 000).

Ils étaient accueillis dans le stade sous les bravos. Puis, dans le silence revenu, un speaker énonçait ces noms interminables dont le castillan a le secret, ces Maria de la Luz Martinez de Sanchez, ou ces José-Maria Antonio Perez Rodriguez.

Et soudain, un cri dans un coin du stade, le faisceau lumineux des télés pointé vers un groupe de gens sautant en l’air de joie puis dévalant les escaliers du stade pour tomber dans les bras des cousins ou frères et sœurs retrouvés.

La stratégie de Fidel Castro

Cet exode des Marielitos a commencé par un coup de force. Le 5 avril 1980, 10 000 Cubains entrent dans l’ambassade du Pérou à La Havane et demandent à ce pays de leur accorder asile.

Dix jours plus tard, Castro déclare que ceux qui veulent quitter Cuba peuvent le faire à condition d’abandonner leurs biens et que les Cubains de Floride viennent les chercher au port de Mariel.

L’hypothèse est que Castro voit dans cette affaire une double opportunité :

  • Il se débarrasse d’opposants -il en profite également pour vider ses prisons et ses asiles mentaux et sans doute infiltrer, parmi les réfugiés, quelques agents castristes ;
  • Il espère que cet afflux soudain d’exilés va profondément déstabiliser le sud de la Floride et affaiblir plus encore le brave Président Jimmy Carter, préchi-prêcheur démocrate des droits de l’homme, un peu trop à gauche pour endosser l’habit de grand Satan impérialiste que taille à tous les élus de la Maison Blanche le leader cubain.

De fait, du 15 avril au 31 octobre 1980, quelque 125 000 Cubains quitteront l’île. 2 746 d’entre eux ont été considérés comme des criminels selon les lois des Etats-Unis et incarcérés.

L’économie de la région de Miami a absorbé en deux ou trois ans le choc de cet exode et, depuis, se porte très bien, notamment parce que de nombreux exilés étaient des professionnels diplômés (médecins, professeurs…) qui non seulement se sont facilement intégrés au sein de la société de Miami, mais l’ont aussi dynamisée.

Parmi les Marielitos, un poète : Reinaldo Arenas

En août 1994, 30 000 autres Cubains, « los Balseros » -ainsi nommés parce qu’ils s’enfuyaient par la mer sur des embarcations aussi précaires que des « balsas », des chambres à air de camion- ont rejoint à leur tour les côtes de Floride.

Puis la politique a repris la main. Castro a compris que le spectacle de ces exodes à répétition et le nombre et la qualité des exilés fragilisaient l’image du régime et son avenir. Les Etats-Unis, quant à eux, ont entendu les voix des conservateurs défenseurs des frontières.

Tout cela a abouti à un accord migratoire qui traduit une politique américaine absurde et déshonorante consistant à n’admettre sur le territoire des Etats-Unis que ceux qui l’auront touché du pied, et renvoyer tous les autres en direction de Cuba qu’ils fuyaient.

L’accommodement avec une dictature l’a emporté sur la générosité à l’endroit de ses réfugiés.

Parmi les Marielitos, il faut noter la présence de l’écrivain et poète Reinaldo Arenas, qui mourra quelques années plus tard du sida, à New York. Son véritable crime fut d’être homosexuel et son livre, « Avant la Nuit », a été remarquablement adapté en 2000 par Julian Schnabel avec le film « Before the Night Falls ». Il montre la terrible épreuve que fut pour tous les exilés le passage des contrôles du port de Mariel.

Voir de même:

Trump Was Right: Castro Did Send Criminals to U.S.

The Weekly Standard

If you ever worry about the quality of news on the Internet, consider a recent story at BuzzFeed from reporter Adrian Carrasquillo. The writer notes indignantly that Donald Trump’s infamous campaign comments about Mexican immigrants were not unprecedented: Speaking on a radio talk show, in 2011, Trump had anticipated his claim that « Mexico was sending criminals and rapists » to the United States (in Carrasquillo’s words) by « appear[ing] to suggest Fidel Castro had hatched a similar gambit. »

Here is what Trump said in 2011:

I remember, years ago, where Castro was sending his worst over to this country. He was sending criminals over to this country, and we’ve had that with other countries where they use us as a dumping ground.

Carrasquillo acknowledged that Trump’s facts are not imaginary— »Trump was speaking about the Mariel boatlift in 1980, when more than 125,000 Cubans came to the U.S. because of the island’s floundering economy »—but he seems to have gleaned what knowledge he has about the Mariel boatlift from the Internet, or perhaps a friend or neighbor: « Castro did send prisoners and mentally ill people to the U.S. mixed in with other refugees, » Carrasquillo wrote.

In fact, of course, it was not Cuba’s « floundering economy »—Cuba’s economy, it could reasonably be argued, has always been floundering—that prompted the exodus; it was Fidel Castro’s malice. The Jimmy Carter administration, as Democratic administrations tend to do, had been seeking a rapprochement with the Cuban regime, and in early 1980, Castro—habitually angered by the official American welcome to Cuban refugees—rewarded Carter’s credulity by emptying his nation’s jails, prisons, and mental institutions and sending their occupants, in overcrowded vessels, across the Straits of Florida to Miami.

It was an extraordinarily cruel, and cynical, gesture on Castro’s part; but of course, hardly surprising. And in any case, it swiftly halted Carter’s flirtation with Cuba.

What Adrian Carrasquillo doesn’t appear to know, however, and what gives this episode contemporary resonance, is that the Mariel boatlift, and its attendant migrant crisis, had political repercussions that extend to the present day. One of the repositories for Cuban criminals chosen by the Carter White House was Fort Chaffee, Arkansas, where there were subsequent riots and mass escapes. The governor of Arkansas, one Bill Clinton, was furious that his state had been chosen to pay the price for Carter’s misjudgment—and he complained loudly and publicly about it. So loudly, in fact, that it made Carter’s efforts to settle refugees elsewhere politically toxic.

Jimmy Carter never forgave Bill Clinton for the Mariel/Fort Chaffee debacle. And vice versa, since it was one of the main reasons which led to Clinton’s defeat for re-election in November 1980. It also explains the continued enmity between the senior living Democratic ex-president, Carter, and Clinton—whose wife Hillary is currently running for president.

A handful of lessons may be drawn from all this: The roots of political issues are deep and complicated; the settlement of refugees is a sensitive matter; and it seldom pays presidents to trust the Castro regime. From a journalistic standpoint, however, it raises an urgent question: Does BuzzFeed employ editors with knowledge of events before, say, 2011?

Voir de plus:

Years Before Mexican Comments, Trump Said Castro Was Sending Criminals To U.S.
« I remember, years ago, where Castro was sending his worst over to this country. He was sending criminals over to this country, and we’ve had that with other countries where they use us as a dumping ground. »
Adrian Carrasquillo
BuzzFeed News
October 6, 2016

Four years before Donald Trump roiled the presidential race by announcing that Mexico was sending criminals and rapists — their worst — to the U.S., he appeared to suggest Fidel Castro had hatched a similar gambit.

Speaking on Laura Ingraham’s radio show in 2011, Trump took a rhetorical tact that will be familiar to anyone paying even a passing interest to the 2016 presidential election.

« You either have borders or you don’t have borders. Now, that doesn’t mean you can’t make it possible for somebody that’s really good to become a citizen. But I think part of the problem that this country has is we’re taking in people that are, in some cases, good, and in some cases, are not good and in some cases are criminals, » Trump said.

« I remember, years ago, where Castro was sending his worst over to this country. He was sending criminals over to this country, and we’ve had that with other countries where they use us as a dumping ground, » he continued. « And frankly, the fact that we allow that to happen is what’s really hurting this country very badly. »

Liberal media watchdog Media Matters provided the audio from their archives, after a request by BuzzFeed News.

While Trump does not mention Fidel Castro’s full name, he made similar comments about Cubans on conservative radio last summer, just weeks after his initial remarks about Mexicans during his June announcement.

“And they’re sending — if you remember, years ago, when Castro opened up his jails, his prisons, and he sent them all over to the United States because let the United States have them,” Trump said. “And you know, these were the many hardcore criminals that he sent over. »

Trump was speaking about the Mariel boatlift in 1980, when more than 125,000 Cubans came to the U.S. because of the island’s floundering economy. Castro did send prisoners and mentally ill people to the U.S. mixed in with other refugees.

In a statement, Trump campaign senior advisor and Hispanic outreach director, AJ Delgado, said his remarks in 2011 were absolutely correct and only underscore his « keen awareness » of historical facts.

« The 1980 Mariel boatlift out of Cuba certainly did contain thousands of criminals, including violent criminals, the Castro regime having taken it as an opportunity to empty many of its prisons and send those individuals to the U.S, » she said, stressing that the matter is not in dispute.

« Worth noting, this 2011 audio also proves Mr. Trump’s years-long consistency: even five years ago, he was advocating for the same sound immigration policies he advocates today — one that places Americans’ safety and security first, » she added.

Trump’s relationship with Cuban-American voters is somewhat unusual for a Republican nominee. For years, support for the embargo on Cuba has been a major Republican plank; a recent Newsweek report also alleged that Trump violated the Cuban embargo when he disguised payments from his companies in Cuba in an attempt to make money on the island.

The Republican nominee changed his opinion on immigration multiple times in the past few years, including during the campaign. But he has also struck a nativist and restrictionist tone on the dangers and nefarious intentions of foreigners coming to the country for years. Though Barack Obama’s two campaigns showed the traditionally Republican voting bloc beginning to fray somewhat, that’s put more pressure on those voters, particularly younger ones.

« We know how Donald Trump feels about the Hispanic community, and this is just more of the same, » said Joe Garcia, a Cuban-American Democrat running for congress in Florida where Trump has become a flashpoint in his race against Rep. Carlos Curbelo, who has also denounced Trump. « Whether he makes hateful statements today or five years ago, Trump’s sentiments toward minority groups have been very clear. »

Ana Navarro, a CNN commentator and Republican strategist who has staunchly opposed Trump, noted that being a « marielito » was somewhat taboo for a while, « but it’s important not to forget all the good people who came. Many have gone on to make great contributions to the U.S. »

Jose Parra, a Democratic strategist from Florida who served as a senior adviser to Sen. Harry Reid, argued the comments leave no doubt that Trump doesn’t just have it out for Mexicans.

« Now we know that when he says Mexicans, he means all Hispanics, » Parra said. « He was talking about Cubans in this case… the issue is Hispanics not Mexicans. It’s immigrants period. »

Nathaniel Meyersohn contributed reporting.

Voir encore:

Trump Says Mexican Immigrants Are Just Like « Hardcore Criminals » Castro Sent To U.S.
Trump also took credit for bringing to the public’s attention the death of a San Francisco woman killed by an undocumented immigrant.
Andrew Kaczynski
BuzzFeed News
July 10, 2015

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump on Wednesday compared undocumented Mexican immigrants to the « hardcore criminals » Fidel Castro sent to the United States in the early 1980s.

Speaking on conservative radio, the real estate mogul addressed the controversy surrounding his characterization of Mexican immigrants as « rapists » in his presidential announcement speech.

« A lot of people said, ‘Would you apologize?’ I said, ‘Absolutely, I’d apologize, if there was something to apologize for, » Trump told radio host Wayne Dupree on Wednesday.

« But what I said is exactly true. You understand that, Wayne. And what I’m saying — and I have great respect for the Mexican people. I love the Mexican people. I have many Mexicans working for me and they’re great. »

« But that’s — we’re not talking about — we’re talking about a government that’s much smarter than our government, » Trump continued. « Much sharper, more cunning than our government, and they’re sending people. »

Trump then went on to compare the immigrants coming into the country from Mexico to Cuban exiles who came to the U.S. as a part of the Mariel boatlift in 1980. Many of those exiles were later found to be inmates released from Cuban prisons and mental health facilities.

« And they’re sending — if you remember, years ago, when Castro opened up his jails, his prisons, and he sent them all over to the United States because let the United States have them, » Trump stated. « And you know, these were the many hardcore criminals that he sent over. And, you know, that was a long time ago but essentially Mexico is sending over — as an example, this horrible guy that killed a beautiful woman in San Francisco. Mexico doesn’t want him. So they send him over. How do you think he got over here five times? They push him out. They’re pushing their problems onto the United States, and we don’t talk about it because our politicians are stupid. »

Trump then took credit for bringing to the public’s attention the death of the San Francisco woman killed by an undocumented immigrant.

« I don’t even think it’s a question of, uh, good politics. I think they’re just stupid. I don’t think they know what they’re doing. So I bring it up and, you’re right, it became a big story, » said Trump.

« And I’ll tell you something: the young woman that was killed — that was a statistic. That wasn’t even a story. My wife brought it up to me. She said, you know, she saw this little article about the young woman in San Francisco that was killed, and I did some research and I found out that she was killed by this animal … who illegally came into the country many times, by the way, and who has a long record of convictions. And I went public with it and now it’s the biggest story in the world right now. … Her life will be very important for a lot of reasons, but one of them would be that she’s throwing light and showing light on what’s happening in this country. »

Voir par ailleurs:

The White House Used This Moment as Proof the U.S. Should Cut Immigration. Its Real History Is More Complicated

Julio Capó, Jr.

Time
August 4, 2017

This week, as President Trump comes out in support of a bill that seeks to halve legal immigration to the United States, his administration is emphasizing the idea that Americans and their jobs need to be protected from all newcomers—undocumented and documented. To support that idea, his senior policy adviser Stephen Miller has turned to a moment in American history that is often referenced by those who support curbing immigration: the Mariel boatlift of 1980. But, in fact, much of the conventional wisdom about that episode is based on falsehoods rooted in Cold War rhetoric.

During a press briefing on Wednesday, journalist Glenn Thrush asked Miller to provide statistics showing the correlation between the presence of low-skill immigrants and decreased wages for U.S.-born and naturalized workers. In response, Miller noted the findings of a recent study by Harvard economist George Borjas on the Mariel boatlift, which contentiously argued that the influx of over 125,000 Cubans who entered the United States from April to October of 1980 decreased wages for southern Florida’s less educated workers. Borjas’ study, which challenged an earlier influential study by Berkeley economist David Card, has received major criticisms. A lively debate persists among economists about the study’s methods, limited sample size and interpretation of the region’s racial categories—but Miller’s conjuring of Mariel is contentious on its own merits.

The Mariel boatlift is an outlier in the pages of U.S. immigration history because it was, at its core, a result of Cold War posturing between the United States and Cuba.

Fidel Castro found himself in a precarious situation in April 1980 when thousands of Cubans stormed the Peruvian embassy seeking asylum. Castro opened up the port of Mariel and claimed he would let anyone who wanted to leave Cuba to do so. Across the Florida Straits, the United States especially prioritized receiving people who fled communist regimes as a Cold War imperative. Because the newly minted Refugee Act had just been enacted—largely to address the longstanding bias that favored people fleeing communism—the Marielitos were admitted under an ambiguous, emergency-based designation: “Cuban-Haitian entrant (status pending).” At this week’s press conference, Miller avoided discussions of guest workers because they enter under separate procedures. It’s important to note, however, that the Marielitos also entered under a separate category.

In order to save face, Castro put forward the narrative that the Cubans who sought to leave the island were the dregs of society and counter-revolutionaries who needed to be purged because they could never prove productive to the nation. This sentiment, along with reports that he had opened his jails and mental institutes as part of this boatlift, fueled a mythology that the Marielitos were a criminal, violent, sexually deviant and altogether “undesirable” demographic.

In reality, more than 80% of the Marielitos had no criminal past, even in a nation where “criminality” could include acts antithetical to the revolutionary government’s ideals. In addition to roughly 1,500 mentally and physically disabled people, this wave of Cubans included a significant number of sex workers and queer and transgender people—some of whom were part of the minority who had criminal-justice involvement, having been formerly incarcerated because of their gender and sexual transgression.

Part of what made Castro’s propaganda scheme so successful was that his regime’s repudiation of Marielitos found an eager audience in the United States among those who found it useful to fuel the nativist furnace. U.S. legislators, policymakers and many in the general public accepted Castro’s negative depiction of the Marielitos as truth. By 1983, the film Scarface had even fictionalized a Marielito as a druglord and violent criminal.

Then and now, the boatlift proved incredibly unpopular among those living in the United States and is often cited as one of the most vivid examples of the dangers of lax immigration enforcement. In fact, many of President Jimmy Carter’s opponents listed Mariel as one of his and the Democratic Party’s greatest failures, even as his Republican successor, President Ronald Reagan, also embraced the Marielitos as part of an ideological campaign against Cuba. And the political consequences of the reaction to Mariel didn’t stop there: the episode also helped birth the English-only movement in the United States, after Dade County residents voted to remove Spanish as a second official language in November of 1980. (The new immigration proposal that Trump supports would also privilege immigrants who can speak English.)

While the Mariel boatlift—with its massive influx of people in a short period of time—may appear to be an ideal case study for economists to explore whether immigrants decreased wages for U.S.-born workers, its Cold War-influenced and largely anomalous history makes it less so.

During this week’s press conference, Miller later told Thrush that, more than statistics, we should use “common sense” in crafting our policies. As the case of the Mariel boatlift shows, so-called common sense can be inextricably informed by ulterior motives, prejudice and global political disagreement. When history is used to inform policy decisions, this too must be factored.

Historians explain how the past informs the present

Julio Capó, Jr. is assistant professor of history at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and was a visiting scholar at the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney. His book on Miami’s queer past, Welcome to Fairyland, is forthcoming from the University of North Carolina Press.

Voir aussi:

There’s no evidence that immigrants hurt any American workers
The debate over the Mariel boatlift, a crucial immigration case study, explained.
Michael Clemens

Aug 3, 2017

Pressed by a New York Times reporter yesterday for evidence that immigration hurts American workers, White House senior adviser Stephen Miller said: “I think the most recent study I would point to is the study from George Borjas that he just did about the Mariel Boatlift.” Michael Clemens recently explained why that much-cited study shouldn’t be relied upon:

Do immigrants from poor countries hurt native workers? It’s a perpetual question for policymakers and politicians. That the answer is a resounding “Yes!” was a central assertion of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign. When a study by an economist at Harvard University recently found that a famous influx of Cuban immigrants into Miami dramatically reduced the wages of native workers, immigration critics argued that the debate was settled.

The study, by Harvard’s George Borjas, first circulated as a draft in 2015, and was finally published in 2017. It drew attention from the Atlantic, National Review, New Yorker, and others. Advocates of restricting immigration declared that the study was a “BFD” that had “nuked” their opponents’ views. The work underpinning the paper became a centerpiece of Borjas’s mass-market book on immigration, We Wanted Workers, which has been cited approvingly by US Attorney General Jeff Sessions as proving the economic harms of immigration.

But there’s a problem. The study is controversial, and its finding — that the Cuban refugees caused a large, statistically unmistakable fall in Miami wages — may be simply spurious. This matters because what happened in Miami is the one historical event that has most shaped how economists view immigration.

In his article, Borjas claimed to debunk an earlier study by another eminent economist, David Card, of UC Berkeley, analyzing the arrival of the Cubans in Miami. The episode offers a textbook case of how different economists can reach sharply conflicting conclusions from exactly the same data.

Yet this is not an “on the one hand, on the other” story: My own analysis suggests that Borjas has not proved his case. Spend a few minutes digging into the data with me, and it will become apparent that the data simply does not allow us to conclude that those Cubans caused a fall in Miami wages, even for low-skill workers.

The Mariel boatlift offered economists a remarkable opportunity to study the effect of immigration

For an economist, there’s a straightforward way to study how low-skill immigration affects native workers: Find a large, sudden wave of low-skill immigrants arriving in one city only. Watch what happens to wages and employment for native workers in that city, and compare that to other cities where the immigrants didn’t go.

An ideal “natural experiment” like this actually happened in Miami in 1980. Over just a few months, 125,000 mostly low-skill immigrants arrived from Mariel Bay, Cuba. This vast seaborne exodus — Fidel Castro briefly lifted Cuba’s ban on emigration -— is known as the Mariel boatlift. Over the next few months, the workforce of Miami rose by 8 percent. By comparison, normal immigration to the US increases the nationwide workforce by about 0.3 percent per year. So if immigrants compete with native workers, Miami in the 1980s is exactly where you should see natives’ wages drop.

Berkeley’s Card examined the effects of the Cuban immigrants on the labor market in a massively influential study in 1990. In fact, that paper became one of the most cited in immigration economics. The design of the study was elegant and transparent. But even more than that, what made the study memorable was what Card found.

In a word: nothing.

The Card study found no difference in wage or employment trends between Miami — which had just been flooded with new low-skill workers — and other cities. This was true for workers even at the bottom of the skills ladder. Card concluded that “the Mariel immigration had essentially no effect on the wages or employment outcomes of non-Cuban workers in the Miami labor market.”

You can see Card’s striking result in the graph below: There’s just no sign of a dip in low-skill Miami wages after the huge arrival of low-skill Cubans in 1980. The red line is the average wage, in each year, for workers in Miami, ages 19 to 65, whose education doesn’t go beyond high school. The dotted red lines show the interval of statistical confidence, so the true average wage could fall anywhere between the dotted lines.

These estimates come from a slice of a nationwide survey, in which small groups of individuals are chosen to represent the broader population. (It’s known as the March Supplement of the Current Population Survey, or CPS). Carving out low-skill workers in Miami alone, that leaves an average of 185 observations of workers per year, during the crucial years.

The gray dashed line shows what the wage would be if the pre-1980 trend had simply continued after 1980. As you can see, there is no dip in wages after those Cubans greatly increased the low-skill labor supply in 1980. If anything, wages rose relative to their previous trend in Miami. The same is true relative to wage trends in other, similar cities.

Current Population Survey, Clemens

Economists ever since have tried to explain this remarkable result. Was it that the US workers who might have suffered a wage drop had simply moved away? Had low-skill Cubans made native Miamians more productive by specializing in different tasks, thus stimulating the local economy? Was it that the Cubans’ own demand for goods and services had generated as many jobs in Miami as they filled? Or perhaps was it that Miami employers shifted to production technologies that used more low-skill labor, absorbing the new labor supply?

Regardless, there was no dip in wages to explain. The real-life economy was evidently more complex than an “Econ 101” model would predict. Such a model would require wages to fall when the supply of labor, through immigration, goes up.

Slicing up the data — all too finely

This is where two new studies came in, decades after Card’s — in 2015. One, by Borjas, claims that Card’s analysis had obscured a large fall in the wages of native workers by using too broad a definition of “low-skill worker.” Card’s study had looked at the wages of US workers whose education extended only to high school or less. That was a natural choice, since about half of the newly-arrived Cubans had a high school degree, and half didn’t.

Borjas, instead, focuses on workers who did not finish high school — and claimed that the Boatlift caused the wages of those workers, those truly at the bottom of the ladder, to collapse.

The other new study (ungated here), by economists Giovanni Peri and Vasil Yasenov, of the UC Davis and UC Berkeley, reconfirms Card’s original result: It cannot detect an effect of the boatlift on Miami wages, even among workers who did not finish high school.

In short, different well-qualified economists arrive at opposite conclusions about the effects of immigration, looking at the same data about the same incident, with identical modern analytical tools at their disposal. How that happened has a lot to teach about why the economics of immigration remains so controversial.

Suppose we are concerned that the graph above, covering all low-skill workers in Miami, is too aggregated — meaning it combines too many different kinds of workers. We would not want to miss the effects on certain subgroups that may have competed more directly with the newly-arrived Cubans. For example, the Mariel migrants were mostly men. They were Hispanic. Many of them were prime-age workers (age 25 to 59). So we should look separately at what happened to wages for each of those groups of low-skill workers who might compete with the immigrants more directly: men only, non-Cuban Hispanics only, prime-age workers only. Here’s what wages look like for those slices of the same data:

Here again, if anything, wages rose for each of these groups of low-skill workers after 1980, relative to their previous trend. There isn’t any dip in wages to explain. And, again, the same is true if you compare wage trends in Miami to trends in other, similar cities.

Peri and Yasenov showed that there is still no dip in wages even when you divide up low-skill workers by whether or not they finished high school. About half of the Mariel migrants had finished high school, and the other half hadn’t. So you might expect negative wage effects on both groups of workers in Miami. Here is what the wage trends look like for those two groups.

The wages of Miami workers with high school degrees (and no more than that) jump up right after the Mariel boatlift, relative to prior trends. The wages of those with less than a high school education appear to dip slightly, for a couple of years, although this is barely distinguishable amid the statistical noise. And these same inflation-adjusted wages were also falling in many other cities that didn’t receive a wave of immigrants, so it’s not possible to say with statistical confidence whether that brief dip on the right is real. It might have been — but economists can’t be sure. The rise on the left, in contrast, is certainly statistically significant, even relative to corresponding wage trends in other cities.

Here is how the Borjas study reaches exactly the opposite conclusion. The Borjas study slices up the data much more finely than even Peri and Yasenov do. It’s not every worker with less than high school that he looks at. Borjas starts with the full sample of workers of high school or less — then removes women, and Hispanics, and workers who aren’t prime age (that is, he tosses out those who are 19 to 24, and 60 to 65). And then he removes workers who have a high school degree.

In all, that means throwing out the data for 91 percent of low-skill workers in Miami in the years where Borjas finds the largest wage effect. It leaves a tiny sample, just 17 workers per year. When you do that, the average wages for the remaining workers look like this:

For these observations picked out of the broader dataset, average wages collapse by at least 40 percent after the boatlift. Wages fall way below their previous trend, as well as way below similar trends in other cities, and the fall is highly statistically significant.

How to explain the divergent conclusions?

There are two ways to interpret these findings. The first way would be to conclude that the wage trend seen in the subgroup that Borjas focuses on — non-Hispanic prime-age men with less than a high school degree — is the “real” effect of the boatlift. The second way would be to conclude, as Peri and Yasenov do, that slicing up small data samples like this generates a great deal of statistical noise. If you do enough slicing along those lines, you can find groups for which wages rose after the Boatlift, and others for which it fell. In any dataset with a lot of noise, the results for very small groups will vary widely.

Researchers can and do disagree about which conclusion to draw. But there are many reasons to favor the view that there is no compelling basis to revise Card’s original finding. There is not sufficient evidence to show that Cuban immigrants reduced any low-skill workers’ wages in Miami, even small minorities of them, and there isn’t much more that can be learned about the Mariel boatlift with the data we have.

Here are three reasons why Card’s canonical finding stands.

Borjas’s theory doesn’t fit the evidence

The first reason is economic theory. The simple theory underlying all of this analysis is that when the supply of labor rises, wages have to fall. But if we interpret the wage drop in Borjas’s subgroup as an effect of the Boatlift, we need to interpret the upward jumps in the other graphs above, too, as effects of the Boatlift. That is, we would need to interpret the sharp post-Boatlift rise in wages for low-skill Miami Hispanics, regardless of whether they had a high school degree, as another effect of the influx of workers.

But wait. The theory of supply and demand cannot explain how a massive infusion of low-skill Cuban Hispanics would cause wages to rise for other Hispanics, who would obviously compete with them. For the same reason, we would need to conclude that the boatlift caused a large rise in the wages of Miami workers with high school degrees only, both Hispanic and non-Hispanic — who constitute the large majority of low-skill workers in Miami. And so on.

Economic theory doesn’t offer a reason why such a big benefit should happen. So we should be suspicious of jumping to the rosy conclusion that the Mariel boatlift caused big wage increases for the other 91 percent of low-skill workers in Miami. One could reach that conclusion by the same method Borjas used, if one sought such a result. But we should hesitate to make strong conclusions — one way or another — from any handpicked subset of the data.

The study states that this was done because, among other reasons, the arrival of non-Cuban Hispanics in some of the other cities that Miami is being compared to — including Anaheim and Rochester — may have driven down wages in those places. But the graphs shown here are just for Miami, unaffected by that hypothetical concern.

As you can see above, the wages of low-skill Hispanics as a whole jumped upward in Miami in the years after the boatlift. Dropping the data on groups that experienced wage increases, without a sound theoretical reason to do so, ensures by construction that wages fall in the small group that remains. The method determines the result.

There’s too much noise in the data to conclude native workers were hurt

The second reason the data backs Peri and Yasenov’s interpretation is statistical noise caused by small subsamples. Because there is a great deal of noise in the data, if we’re willing to take low-skill workers in Miami and hand-pick small subsets of them, we can always find small groups of workers whose wages rose during a particular period, and other groups whose wages fell. But at some point we’re learning more about statistical artifacts than about real-world events.

Remember the key Borjas sample in each year — the one that experienced a large drop in wages — was just 17 men. By picking various small subsets of the data, a researcher could hypothetically get any positive or negative “effect” of the boatlift.

Race made a difference here

Yet another reason to believe the Card study remains solid has to do with something very different from statistical noise. Average wages in tiny slices of the data can change sharply because of small but systematic changes in who is getting interviewed. And it turns out that the CPS sample includes vastly more black workers in the data used for the Borjas study after the boatlift than before it.

Because black men earned less than others, this change would necessarily have the effect of exaggerating the wage decline measured by Borjas. The change in the black fraction of the sample is too big and long-lasting to be explained by random error. (This is my own contribution to the debate. I explore this problem in a new research paper that I co-authored with Jennifer Hunt, a professor of economics at Rutgers University.)

Around 1980, the same time as the Boatlift, two things happened that would bring a lot more low-wage black men into the survey samples. First, there was a simultaneous arrival of large numbers of very low-income immigrants from Haiti without high school degrees: that is, non-Hispanic black men who earn much less than US black workers but cannot be distinguished from US black workers in the survey data. Nearly all hadn’t finished high school.

That meant not just that Miami suddenly had far more black men with less than high school after 1980, but also that those black men had much lower earnings. Second, the Census Bureau, which ran the CPS surveys, improved its survey methods around 1980 to cover more low-skill black men due to political pressure after research revealed that many low-income black men simply weren’t being counted.

You can see what happened in the graph below, which has a point for each year’s group of non-Hispanic men with less than high school, in the data used by Borjas (ages 25 to 59). The horizontal axis is the fraction of the men in the sample who are black. The vertical axis is the average wage in the sample. Because black men in Miami at this skill level earned much less than non-blacks, it’s no surprise that the more black men are covered by each year’s sample, the lower the average wage.

But here’s the critical problem: The fraction of black workers in this sample increased dramatically between the years just before the boatlift (in red) and the years just after the boatlift (in blue). That demographic shift would make the average wage in this group appear to fall right after the boatlift, even if no one’s wages actually changed in any subpopulation. What changed was who was included in the sample.

Why hadn’t this problem affected Card’s earlier results? Because there wasn’t any shift like this for workers who had finished high school only (as opposed to less than high school). Here is the same graph for those workers (again, non-Hispanic males 25 to 59):

Here, too, you can see that in the years where the survey covered more black men, the average wage is lower. But for this group, there wasn’t any increase in the relative number of blacks surveyed after 1980. If anything, black fraction of the sample is a little lower right after 1980. So the average wage in the post-boatlift years (blue) isn’t any lower than the average wage in the pre-boatlift years (red). About two-thirds of Card’s sample was these workers, where the shift in the fraction of black workers did not happen.

When the statistical results in the Borjas study are adjusted to allow for changing black composition of the sample in each city, the result becomes fragile. In the dataset Borjas focuses on, the result suddenly depends on which set of cities one chooses to compare Miami to. And in the other, larger CPS dataset that covers the same period, there is no longer a statistically significant dip in wages at all.

You might think that there’s an easy solution: Just test for the effects of the boatlift on workers who aren’t black. But this is really pushing the data further than it can go. By the time you’ve discarded women, and Hispanics, and workers under 25, and workers over 59, and anyone who finished high school— and blacks, you’ve thrown away 98 percent of the data on low-skill workers in Miami. There are only four people left in each year’s survey, on average, during the years that the Borjas study finds the largest effect. The average wage in that minuscule slice of the data looks like this:

With samples that small, the statistical confidence interval (represented by the dotted lines) is huge, meaning we can’t infer anything general from the results. We can’t distinguish large declines in wages from large rises in wages — at least until several years after the boatlift happened, and those can’t be plausibly attributed to the boatlift. Taking just four workers at a time from the larger dataset, a researcher could achieve practically any result whatsoever. There may have been a wage decline in this group, or a rise, but there just isn’t sufficient evidence to know.

David Card’s canonical conclusion stands

In sum, the evidence from the Mariel boatlift continues to support the conclusion of David Card’s seminal research: There is no clear evidence that wages fell (or that unemployment rose) among the least-skilled workers in Miami, even after a sudden refugee wave sharply raised the size of that workforce.

This does not by any means imply that large waves of low-skill immigration could not displace any native workers, especially in the short term, in other times and places. But politicians’ pronouncements that immigrants necessarily do harm native workers must grapple with the evidence from real-world experiences to the contrary.

Michael Clemens is an economist at the Center for Global Development in Washington, DC, and the IZA Institute of Labor Economics in Bonn, Germany. His book The Walls of Nations is forthcoming from Columbia University Press.

Voir aussi:

The Republican candidate wants to deport immigrants and build a wall to keep Mexicans out. So what drives los Trumpistas?

Lauren Gambino

‘Trump is our wakeup call’

Raul Rodriguez, 74, Apple Valley, California

I always carry a bullhorn with me to rallies and campaign events. Into it I shout: “America, wake up!” Americans have been asleep for way too long. We need to realise that the future of our country is at stake.

If we don’t elect Donald Trump, we’ll get another four years of Barack Obama and frankly, I don’t know what would happen to this wonderful country of ours. Obama has already done so much to destroy our way of life and Hillary Clinton is promising to carry on where he left off. Like Obama, she wants to change our fundamental values – the ones people like my father fought to defend.

My father was born in Durango, Mexico. When he came to the US he joined the military and served as a medic during the second world war. He was a very proud American – he truly loved this country. I think I got my sense of patriotism from him.

Obama and Hillary Clinton want to have open borders. They let illegal immigrants cross our borders and now they want to accept thousands of Syrians. We don’t know who these people are. If they want to come to this country, they have to do it the right way, like my father did it.

I’m tired of politicians telling voters what they want to hear and then returning to Washington and doing whatever their party tells them to do. Politicians are supposed to represent the people – not their parties or their donors.

Part of the reason I like Donald Trump is because he isn’t an established politician. Sometimes that hurts him and people get offended. But the truth hurts. Even if he doesn’t say it well, he’s not wrong. Trump is our wakeup call.

‘Democrats treat Latinos as if we’re all one big group’

Ximena Barreto, 31, San Diego, California

I was in primary school in my native Colombia when my father was murdered. I was six – just one year older than my daughter is now. My father was an officer in the Colombian army at a time when wearing a uniform made you a target for narcoterrorists, Farc fighters and guerrilla groups.

What I remember clearly from those early years is the bombing and the terror. I was so afraid, especially after my dad died. At night, I would curl up in my mother’s bed while she held me close. She could not promise me that everything was going to be all right, because it wasn’t true. I don’t want my daughter to grow up like that.

But when I turn on my TV, I see terrorist attacks in San Bernardino and in Orlando. There are dangerous people coming across our borders. Trump was right. Some are rapists and criminals, but some are good people, too. But how do we know who is who, when you come here illegally?

I moved to the US in 2006 on a work permit. It took nearly five years and thousands of dollars to become a US citizen. I know the process is not perfect, but it’s the law. Why would I want illegals coming in when I had to go through this? It’s not fair that they’re allowed to jump the line and take advantage of so many benefits, ones that I pay for with my tax dollars.

People assume that because I’m a woman, I should vote for the woman; or that because I’m Latina, I should vote for the Democrat. The Democrats have been pandering to minorities and women for the last 50 years. They treat Latinos as if we’re all one big group. I’m Colombian – I don’t like Mariachi music. Donald Trump is not just saying what he thinks people want to hear, he’s saying what they’re afraid to say. I believe that he’s the only candidate who can make America strong and safe again.

‘Trump beat the system: what’s more American than that?’

Bertran Usher, 20, Inglewood, California

Pinterest
Bertran Usher, centre. Photograph: Edoardo Delille and Giulia Piermartiri/Institute

Donald Trump is the candidate America deserves. For decades, Americans have bemoaned politicians and Washington insiders. We despise political speak and crave fresh, new ideas. When you ask for someone with no experience, this is what you get. It’s like saying you don’t want a doctor to operate on you.

But Trump is a big FU to America. He beat the system and proved everyone wrong. What’s more American than that?

As a political science student who one day hopes to go into politics, I am studying this election closely. Both candidates are deeply unpopular and people of my generation are not happy with their choices. I believe we can learn what not to do from this election. I see how divided the country is, and it’s the clearest sign that politicians will have to learn to work together to make a difference. It’s not always easy, but I’ve seen this work.

I was raised in a multicultural household. My mother, a Democrat, is Latino and African American, raised in the inner city of Los Angeles. My father, a Republican, is an immigrant from Belize. My parents and I don’t always see eye to eye on everything, but our spirited debates have helped add nuance to my politics.

I’m in favour of small government, but I support gay rights. I believe welfare is an important service for Americans who need it, but I think our current programme needs to be scaled back. I think we need to have stricter enforcement of people who come to the country illegally, but I don’t think we should deport the DREAMers [children of immigrants who were brought to the country illegally, named after the 2001 Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors Act].

Trump can be a nut, but I think he’s the best candidate in this election. Though there are issues of his I disagree with, at least he says what’s on his mind, as opposed to Hillary Clinton, who hides what she’s thinking behind her smile.

It’s up to my generation to fix the political mess we’re in. I plan to be a part of the solution.

‘Trump’s The Art Of The Deal inspired me to be a businessman’

Omar Navarro, 27, Torrance, California

When I was a kid, people would ask what I wanted to be when I grew up. I would tell them: I want to be president of the United States. If that doesn’t work out, I want to be a billionaire like Trump.

In a way, I supported him long before he announced he was running for president. He was my childhood hero. I read The Art Of The Deal as a student; it inspired me to become a businessman. Now I own a small business and am running for Congress in California’s 43rd district.

Trump built an empire and a strong brand that’s recognisable all around the world; he’s a household name and a world-class businessman. Almost anywhere you go, you can see the mark of Donald Trump on a building or property. When I see that, I see the American Dream.

Some people ask me how I can support Donald Trump as the son of a Mexican and Cuban immigrants. They are categorising me. In this country we label people: Hispanic, African American, Asian, Caucasian. We separate and divide people into social categories based on race, ethnicity, gender and creed. To me, this is a form of racism. I’m proud of my Hispanic heritage but I’m an American, full stop.

Like all immigrants, my parents came to this country for a better opportunity. But they did it legally. They didn’t cut the line. They assimilated to the American way of life, learned English and opened small businesses.

Why should we allow people to skirt the law? Imagine making a dinner reservation and arriving at the restaurant to find out that another family has been seated at your table. How is that fair?

We have to have laws and as a country we must enforce those laws. A society without laws is just anarchy. If someone invited you to their house and asked you to remove your shoes would you keep them on? If we don’t enforce the rules, why would anyone respect them? I believe Donald Trump will enforce the rules.

‘He has taken a strong stand against abortion’

Jimena Rivera, 20, student at the University of Texas at Brownsville

I’m Mexican, so I don’t have a vote, but I support Donald Trump because he is the one candidate who opposes abortion. He may have wavered in the beginning, but since becoming the nominee he has taken a strong stand against abortion.

Hillary Clinton is running as the leader of a party that has pushed a very pro-choice platform. Even Democrats like her running mate, Tim Kaine, who is a devout Catholic, compromise their faith to support abortion.

I don’t always agree with his positions on immigration. I see the border wall every day. I’m not convinced that it’s effective. The people who want to cross will find a way. I don’t think it’s right that they do, but most of them are looking for a better way of life. A wall won’t stop them.

‘Lower taxes and less regulation will create more jobs’

Marissa Desilets, 22, Palm Springs, California

I am a proud Hispanic conservative Republican woman. I became politically engaged as a political science and economics major at university. By my junior year, I was a member of the campus Republicans’ club. As a student of economics, I am very impressed with Trump’s economic agenda. I believe we must cut taxes for everyone and eliminate the death tax. Lowering taxes and reeling back regulations will create more jobs – meaning more tax-paying Americans. This in turn will generate more revenue for the Treasury.

I also support Trump because he favours strong leadership and promised to preserve the constitution of the United States. We must have a rule of law in this country. We must close our open borders. Like Trump says: “a nation without borders is not a nation.” This doesn’t mean we should not allow any immigrants. We should welcome new immigrants who choose to legally enter our beautiful country.

This won’t be the case if Hillary Clinton becomes president. I would expect the poor to become poorer and our country to become divided. I believe that liberals’ reckless domestic spending will bankrupt our future generations. I refuse to support a party that desires to expand the government and take away my civil liberties.

‘He has gone through so many divorces, yet raised such a close-knit family’

Dr Alexander Villicana, 80, Pasadena, California

I am an example of the opportunities this country has to offer. My parents came from Mexico at the turn of the 20th century. They were not educated but they worked hard to make a better life for us and it paid off.

I went to school and studied cosmetic surgery. Now I work as a plastic surgeon and have been in practice for the last 40 years. I have a beautiful family and my health. I am Hispanic – but I am a citizen of the United States and I feel very patriotic for this country that has given me so much.

I’m supporting Trump because I agree with his vision for our economy. He has experience at the negotiating table, so he knows what to do to create jobs and increase workers’ salaries. In Trump’s America people would be rewarded for their hard work rather than penalised with hefty taxes.

The security of our nation is a top priority for me. I think it would be impossible to deport 11 million people who are here illegally, but we have to do a better job of understanding who is in our country and who is trying to come into our country.

A lot of what Trump says, especially about security and immigration, is twisted by the media. What he said about Mexicans, for example, that wasn’t negative – it was the truth. There are Mexicans bringing over drugs and perpetrating rapes. But what he also said – and the media completely ignored – is that many Mexicans are good people coming over for a better quality of life.

He may be blunt and occasionally offensive but I find him likable. I was so impressed by Trump and his family at the Republican National Convention. It’s hard for me to imagine that someone who has gone through so many divorces has managed to raise such a close-knit family. None of his children had to work and yet they spoke with eloquence and integrity about their father.

‘When Trump is harsh about Mexicans, he is right’

Francisco Rivera, 43, Huntington Park, California

People ask me how I can support Donald Trump. I say, let me tell you a story. I was in line at the movie theatre recently when I saw a young woman toss her cupcake into a nearby planter as if it were a trash can. I walked over to her and said, “Honey, excuse me, does that look like a garbage can to you?” And you know what she told me? “There’s already trash in the planter, so what does it matter?”

I asked her what part of Mexico she was from. She seemed surprised and asked how I knew she was from Mexico. “Look at what you just did,” I told her. “Donald Trump may sound harsh when he speaks about Mexicans, but he is right. It’s people like you that make everyone look bad.”

I moved from Mexico with my family when I was seven. I still carry a photo of my brother and I near our home, to remind people how beautiful the city once was. Now I spend my time erasing graffiti from the walls and picking up trash. Sixty years ago, we accepted immigrants into our country who valued the laws, rules and regulations that made America the land of opportunity. Back in those days, people worked hard to improve themselves and their communities.

I’m tired of living in a lawless country. It’s like we put a security guard at the front door, but the Obama administration unlocked the back door. And I have seen what my own people have done to this country. They want to convert America into the country they left behind. This country has given me so many opportunities I wouldn’t have had if my mom had raised her family in Mexico. I want America to be great again, and that’s why in November I am going to vote for Donald Trump.

‘I voted for Obama twice, but Hillary gets a free pass’

Teresa Mendoza, 44, Mesa, Arizona

In my day job I am a real estate agent but every now and then I dabble in standup comedy. Comedy used to be a safe space. You could say whatever you wanted to and it was understood that it was meant to make people laugh. Now everything has to be politically correct. You can’t say “Hand me the black crayon” without someone snapping back at you: “What do you mean by that?” Donald Trump offended a lot of people when he gave the speech calling [Mexicans] rapists and criminals but he didn’t offend me.

I was a liberal Democrat all my life. Before this I voted for Obama twice. I wanted to be a part of history. If it wasn’t for Obamacare and the ridiculous growth of our federal government, I’d probably still be a Democrat, asleep at the wheel. But I woke up and realised I’m actually much more in line with Republicans on major policy points.

I like to joke that I’m an original anchor baby. My parents came from Mexico in the 1970s under the Bracero work programme making me a California-born Chicana. We later became US citizens. But now that I’m a Republican, Hillary Clinton is trying to tell me I’m “alt-right”. It’s strange isn’t it? All of a sudden I’m a white nationalist.

My sons and I go back and forth. They don’t like Trump. But it’s what they’re hearing in school, from their friends and teachers, who are all getting their news from the same biased news outlets.

I’m very concerned about the role the media is taking in this election. The networks sensationalise and vilify Trump while they give Hillary Clinton a free pass. It amazes me. I don’t care if Trump likes to eat his fried chicken with a fork and a knife. I do care that Clinton has not been held responsible for the Benghazi attacks.

Voir également:

En 2016, le business des passeurs de migrants s’élevait à 7 milliards de dollars

Zoé Lauwereys
Le Parisien
10 juillet 2018

L’Office des Nations unies contre la drogue et le crime (l’UNODC) livre un rapport détaillé sur le trafic fructueux des passeurs.

On connaît les photos de ces hommes et de ces femmes débarquant sur des plages européennes, engoncés dans leurs gilets de sauvetage orange, tentant à tout prix de maintenir la tête de leur enfant hors de l’eau. Impossible également d’oublier l’image du corps du petit Aylan Kurdi, devenu en 2016 le symbole planétaire du drame des migrants. Ce que l’on sait moins c’est que le « business » des passeurs rapporte beaucoup d’argent. Selon la première étude du genre de l’Office des Nations unies contre la drogue et le crime (l’UNODC), le trafic de migrants a rapporté entre 5,5 et 7 milliards de dollars (entre 4,7 et 6 milliards d’euros) en 2016. C’est l’équivalent de ce que l’Union européenne a dépensé la même année dans l’aide humanitaire, selon le rapport.

A quoi correspond cette somme ?

En 2016, au moins 2,5 millions de migrants sont passés entre les mains de passeurs, estime l’UNODC qui rappelle la difficulté d’évaluer une activité criminelle. De quoi faire fructifier les affaires de ces contrebandiers. Cette somme vient directement des poches des migrants qui paient des criminels pour voyager illégalement. Le tarif varie en fonction de la distance à parcourir, du nombre de frontières, les moyens de transport utilisés, la production de faux papiers… La richesse supposée du client est un facteur qui fait varier les prix. Evidemment, payer plus cher ne rend pas le voyage plus sûr ou plus confortable, souligne l’UNODC.Selon les estimations de cette agence des Nations unies, ce sont les passages vers l’Amérique du Nord qui rapportent le plus. En 2016, jusqu’à 820 000 personnes ont traversé la frontière illégalement, versant entre 3,1 et 3,6 milliards d’euros aux trafiquants. Suivent les trois routes de la Méditerranée vers l’Union européenne. Environ 375 000 personnes ont ainsi entrepris ce voyage en 2016, rapportant entre 274 et 300 millions d’euros aux passeurs.Pour atteindre l’Europe de l’Ouest, un Afghan peut ainsi dépenser entre 8000 € et 12 000 €.

L’Europe, une destination de choix

Sans surprise, les rédacteurs du rapport repèrent que l’Europe est une des destinations principales des migrants. Les pays d’origine varient, mais l’UNODC parvient à chiffrer certains flux. Les migrants qui arrivent en Italie sont originaires à 89 % d’Afrique, de l’Ouest principalement. 94 % de ceux qui atteignent l’Espagne sont également originaires d’Afrique, de l’Ouest et du Nord. LIRE AUSSI >Migrants : pourquoi ils ont choisi la France

En revanche, la Grèce accueille à 85 % des Afghans, Syriens et des personnes originaires des pays du Moyen-Orient.

En route vers l’Amérique du Nord

Le nord de l’Amérique et plus particulièrement les Etats-Unis accueillent d’importants flux de migrants. Comme l’actualité nous l’a tristement rappelé récemment, des milliers de citoyens de pays d’Amérique centrale et de Mexicains traversent chaque année la frontière qui sépare les Etats-Unis du Mexique. Les autorités peinent cependant à quantifier les flux. Ce que l’on sait c’est qu’en 2016, 2 404 personnes ont été condamnées pour avoir fait passer des migrants aux Etats-Unis. 65 d’entre eux ont été condamnés pour avoir fait passer au moins 100 personnes.Toujours en 2016, le Mexique, qui fait office de « pays-étape » pour les voyageurs, a noté que les Guatémaltèques, les Honduriens et les Salvadoriens formaient les plus grosses communautés sur son territoire. En 2016, les migrants caribéens arrivaient principalement d’Haïti, note encore l’UNODC.

Un trafic mortel

S’appuyant sur les chiffres de l’Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM), le rapport pointe les risques mortels encourus par les migrants. Première cause : les conditions de voyage difficiles. Sur les 8189 décès de migrants recensés par l’OIM en 2016, 3832 sont morts noyés (46 %) en traversant la Méditerranée. Les passages méditerranéens sont les plus mortels. L’un d’entre eux force notamment les migrants à parcourir 300 kilomètres en haute mer sur des embarcations précaires.C’est aussi la cruauté des passeurs qui est en cause. L’UNODC décrit le sort de certaines personnes poussées à l’eau par les trafiquants qui espèrent ainsi échapper aux gardes-côtes. Le cas de centaines de personnes enfermées dans des remorques sans ventilation, ni eau ou nourriture pendant des jours est également relevé. Meurtre, extorsion, torture, demande de rançon, traite d’être humain, violences sexuelles sont également le lot des migrants, d’où qu’ils viennent. En 2017, 382 migrants sont décédés de la main des hommes, soit 6 % des décès.

Qui sont les passeurs ?

Le passeur est le plus souvent un homme mais des femmes (des compagnes, des sœurs, des filles ou des mères) sont parfois impliquées dans le trafic, définissent les rédacteurs de l’étude. Certains parviennent à gagner modestement leur vie, d’autres, membres d’organisations et de mafias font d’importants profits. Tous n’exercent pas cette activité criminelle à plein temps. Souvent le passeur est de la même origine que ses victimes. Il parle la même langue et partage avec elles les mêmes repères culturels, ce qui lui permet de gagner leur confiance. Le recrutement des futurs « clients » s’opère souvent dans les camps de réfugiés ou dans les quartiers pauvres.

Les réseaux sociaux, nouvel outil des passeurs

Facebook, Viber, Skype ou WhatsApp sont devenus des indispensables du contrebandier qui veut faire passer des migrants. Arrivé à destination, le voyageur publie un compte rendu sur son passeur. Il décrit s’il a triché, échoué ou s’il traitait mal les migrants. Un peu comme une note de consommateur, rapporte l’UNODC.Mieux encore, les réseaux sociaux sont utilisés par les passeurs pour leur publicité. Sur Facebook, les trafiquants présentent leurs offres, agrémentent leur publication d’une photo, détaillent les prix et les modalités de paiement.L’agence note que, sur Facebook, des passeurs se font passer pour des ONG ou des agences de voyages européennes qui organisent des passages en toute sécurité. D’autres, qui visent particulièrement les Afghans, se posent en juristes spécialistes des demandes d’asile…

Voir enfin:

How The Pee Tape Explains The World Cup

Bidding for the 2018 World Cup was the first glimpse of today’s “Machiavellian Russia,” Ken Bensinger explains in his new book about FIFA’s corruption scandal.

On the morning of May 27, 2015, Swiss police officers raided the Baur au Lac Hotel in Zurich and arrested nine of the world’s top soccer officials on behalf of the United States government. In the coming days, the world would learn about deep-seated corruption throughout FIFA, global soccer’s governing body, that stretched from its top ranks to its regional confederations to its marketing partners around the world.

Top soccer officials from across North, South and Central America and the Caribbean were among those implicated in the case, which also brought down top executives from sports marketing firms that had bribed their way into controlling the broadcast and sponsorship rights associated with soccer’s biggest events. FIFA’s longtime president, Joseph “Sepp” Blatter, eventually resigned in disgrace.

It was the biggest organized-corruption scandal in sports history, and some within FIFA were skeptical of the Americans’ motives. In 2010 the U.S. had bid to host the 2022 World Cup, only to lose a contentious vote to Qatar. For FIFA officials, it felt like a case of sour grapes.

But as BuzzFeed investigative reporter Ken Bensinger chronicles in his new book, Red Card: How the U.S. Blew the Whistle on the World’s Biggest Sports Scandal, the investigation’s origins began before FIFA handed the 2018 World Cup to Russia and the 2022 event to Qatar. The case had actually begun as an FBI probe into an illegal gambling ring the bureau believed was run by people with ties to Russian organized crime outfits. The ring operated out of Trump Tower in New York City.

Eventually, the investigation spread to soccer, thanks in part to an Internal Revenue Service agent named Steve Berryman, a central figure in Bensinger’s book who pieced together the financial transactions that formed the backbone of the corruption allegations. But first, it was tips from British journalist Andrew Jennings and Christopher Steele ― the former British spy who is now known to American political observers as the man behind the infamous so-called “pee tape” dossier chronicling now-President Donald Trump’s ties to Russia ― that pointed the Americans’ attention toward the Russian World Cup, and the decades of bribery and corruption that had transformed FIFA from a modest organization with a shoestring budget into a multibillion-dollar enterprise in charge of the world’s most popular sport. Later, the feds arrested and flipped Chuck Blazer, a corrupt American soccer official and member of FIFA’s vaunted Executive Committee. It was Blazer who helped them crack the case wide open, as HuffPost’s Mary Papenfuss and co-author Teri Thompson chronicled in their book American Huckster, based on the 2014 story they broke of Blazer’s role in the scandal.

Russia’s efforts to secure hosting rights to the 2018 World Cup never became a central part of the FBI and the U.S. Department of Justice’s case. Thanks to Blazer, it instead focused primarily on CONCACAF, which governs soccer in the Caribbean and North and Central America, and other officials from South America.

But as Bensinger explained in an interview with HuffPost this week, the FIFA case gave American law enforcement officials an early glimpse into the “Machiavellian Russia” of Vladimir Putin “that will do anything to get what it wants and doesn’t care how it does it.” And it was Steele’s role in the earliest aspects of the FIFA case, coincidentally, that fostered the relationship that led him to hand his Trump dossier to the FBI ― the dossier that has now helped form “a big piece of the investigative blueprint,” as Bensinger said, that former FBI director Robert Mueller is using in his probe of Russian meddling in the election that made Trump president.

Ahead of Sunday’s World Cup final, which will take place in Moscow, HuffPost spoke with Bensinger about Red Card, the parallels between the FIFA case and the current American political environment, FIFA’s reform efforts, and whether the idea of corruption-free global soccer is at all possible.

The following is a lightly edited transcription of our discussion.

You start by addressing the main conspiracy theory around this, which is that this was a case of sour grapes from the United States losing out on hosting the 2022 World Cup. But the origin was a more traditional FBI investigation into Russian organized crime, right?

That’s correct. And there are sort of these weird connections to everything going on in the political sphere in our country, which I think is interesting because when I was reporting the book out, it was mostly before the election. It was a time when Christopher Steele’s name didn’t mean anything. But what I figured out over time is that this had nothing to do with sour grapes, and the FBI agents who opened the case didn’t really care about losing the World Cup. The theory was that the U.S. investigation was started because the U.S. lost to Qatar, and Bill Clinton or Eric Holder or Barack Obama or somebody ordered up an investigation.

What happened was that the investigation began in July or August 2010, four or five months before the vote happened. It starts because this FBI agent, who’s a long-term Genovese crime squad guy, gets a new squad ― the Eurasian Organized Crime Squad ― which is primarily focused on Russian stuff. It’s a squad that’s squeezed of resources and not doing much because under Robert Mueller, who was the FBI director at the time, the FBI was not interested in traditional crime-fighting. They were interested in what Mueller called transnational crime. So this agent looked for cases that he thought would score points with Mueller. And one of the cases they’re doing involves the Trump Tower. It’s this illegal poker game and sports book that’s partially run out of the Trump Tower. The main guy was a Russian mobster, and the FBI agent had gone to London ― that’s how he met Steele ― to learn about this guy. Steele told him what he knew, and they parted amicably, and the parting shot was, “Listen, if you have any other interesting leads in the future, let me know.”

It was the first sort of sign of the Russia we now understand exists, which is kind of a Machiavellian Russia that will do anything to get what it wants and doesn’t care how it does it.

Steele had already been hired by the English bid for the 2018 World Cup at that point. What Chris Steele starts seeing on behalf of the English bid is the Russians doing, as it’s described in the book, sort of strange and questionable stuff. It looks funny, and it’s setting off alarm bells for Steele. So he calls the FBI agent back, and says, “You should look into what’s happening with the World Cup bid.” And my sense is the FBI agent, at that point, says something along the lines of: “What’s the World Cup? And what’s FIFA?”

He really didn’t know much about it, to the point that when he comes back to New York and opens the case, it’s sort of small and they don’t take it too seriously. They were stymied, trying to figure out how to make it a case against Russia. Meanwhile, the vote happens and Russia wins its bid for the 2018 World Cup.

So it’s more a result of the U.S. government’s obsession, if you will, with Russia and Russian crime generally?

The story would be different if this particular agent was on a different squad. But he was an ambitious agent just taking over a squad and trying to make a name for himself. This was his first management job, and he wanted to make big cases. He decides to go after Russia in Russia as a way to make a splash. It’s tempting to look at this as a reflection of the general U.S. writ large obsession with Russia, which certainly exists, but it’s also a different era. This was 2009, 2010. This was during the Russian reset. It was Obama’s first two years in office. He’s hugging Putin and talking about how they’re going to make things work. Russia is playing nice-nice. The public image is fairly positive in that period. It wasn’t, “Russia’s the great enemy.” It was more like, “Russia can be our friend!”

That’s what I find interesting about this case is that, what we see in Russia’s attempt to win the World Cup by any means is the first sort of sign of the Russia we now understand exists, which is kind of a Machiavellian Russia that will do anything to get what it wants and doesn’t care how it does it. It was like a dress rehearsal for that.

Steele has become this sort of household name in politics in the U.S., thanks to the Trump dossier. But here he is in the FIFA scandal. Was this coincidental, because he’s the Russia guy and we’re investigating Russia?

It’s one of these things that looks like an accident, but so much of world history depends on these accidents. Chris Steele, when he was still at MI-6, investigated the death of Alexander Litvinenko, who was the Russian spy poisoned with polonium. It was Steele who ran that investigation and determined that Putin probably ordered it. And then Steele gets hired because of his expertise in Russia by the English bid, and he becomes the canary in the coal mine saying, “Uh oh, guys, it’s not going to be that easy, and things are looking pretty grim for you.”

That’s critical. I don’t know if that would have affected whether or not Chris Steele later gets hired by Fusion GPS to put together the Trump dossier. But it’s certain that the relationship he built because of the FIFA case meant that the FBI took it more seriously. The very same FBI agent that he gave the tip on FIFA to was the agent he calls up in 2016 to say, “I have another dossier.”

The FBI must get a crazy number of wild, outlandish tips all the time, but in this case, it’s a tip from Christopher Steele, who has proven his worth very significantly to the FBI. This is just a year after the arrests in Zurich, and the FBI and DOJ are feeling very good about the FIFA case, and they’re feeling very good about their relationship with Christopher Steele.

If we think about the significance of the dossier ― and I realize that we’ve learned that the FBI had already begun to look into Trump and Russia prior to having it ― it’s also clear that the dossier massively increased the size of the investigation, led to the FISA warrants where we’re listening to Carter Page and others, and formed a big piece of the investigative blueprint for Mueller today. Steele proved his worth to the FBI at the right time, and that led to his future work being decisive

To the investigation itself: In 2010, FIFA votes to award the 2018 World Cup to Russia and the 2022 World Cup to Qatar, and you quote (now former) FIFA vice president Jérôme Valcke as saying, “This is the end of FIFA.” So there were some people within FIFA that saw this vote as a major turning point in its history?

I think he and others were recognizing this increasingly brazen attitude of the criminality within FIFA. They had gone from an organization where people were getting bribes and doing dirty stuff, but doing it very carefully behind closed doors. And it was transitioning to one where the impunity was so rampant that people thought they could do anything. And I think in his mind, awarding the World Cup to Russia under very suspicious circumstances and also awarding it to Qatar, which by any definition has no right to host this tournament, it felt to him and others like a step too far.

I don’t think he had any advance knowledge that the U.S. was poking around on it, but he recognized that it was getting out of hand. People were handing out cash bribes in practically broad daylight, and as corrupt as these people were, they didn’t tend to do that.

You write early in the book that this all started with the election, as FIFA president, of João Havelange in 1974. He takes advantage of modern marketing and media to begin to turn FIFA into the organization that we know today. Is it fair to say that this corruption scandal was four decades in the making?

I haven’t thought of it that way, but in a way, you’re right. The FIFA culture we know today didn’t start yesterday. It started in 1974 when this guy gets elected, and within a couple years, the corruption starts. And it starts with one bribe to Havelange, or one idea that he should be bribed. And it starts a whole culture, and the people all sort of learn from that same model. The dominoes fell over time. It’s not a new model, and things were getting more and more out of hand over time. FIFA had been able to successfully bat these challenges down over the years. There’s an attempted revolt in FIFA in 2001 or 2002 that Blatter completely shut down. The general secretary of FIFA was accusing Blatter and other people of either being involved in corruption or permitting corruption, and there’s a moment where it seems like the Executive Committee was going to turn against Blatter and vote him out and change everything. But they all blinked, and Blatter dispensed his own justice by getting rid of his No. 2 and putting in people who were going to be loyal to him. The effect of those things was more brazen behavior.

Everyone knew this was going on. Why didn’t it come to light sooner?

It was an open secret. I think it’s because soccer’s just too big and important in all these other countries. I think other countries have just never been able to figure out how to deal with it. The best you’d get was a few members of Parliament in England holding outraged press conferences or a few hearings, but nothing ever came of it. It’s just too much of a political hot potato because soccer elsewhere is so much more important than it is the U.S. People are terrified of offending the FIFA gods.

There’s a story about how Andrew Jennings, this British journalist, wanted to broadcast a documentary detailing FIFA corruption just a week or so before the 2010 vote, and when the British bid and the British government got a hold of it, they tried really hard to stifle the press. They begged the BBC not to air the documentary until after the vote, because they were terrified of FIFA. That’s reflective of the kind of attitudes that all these countries have.

A lot of the things that resulted from the bribery and the corruption, or that were done to facilitate bribery and corruption, helped grow the sport here. The Gold Cup, the Women’s World Cup, the growth of the World Cup and Copa America. To the average fan, these are “good” developments for the sport. And yet, they were only created to make these guys rich. How do you square that?

Well, it reminds me of questions about Chuck Blazer. Is he all bad, or all good? He’s a little bit of both. The U.S. women’s national team probably wouldn’t exist without him. The Women’s World Cup probably wouldn’t either. Major League Soccer got its first revenue-positive TV deal because of Chuck Blazer.

A lot of these guys were truly surprised. If they thought they were doing something wrong, they didn’t think it was something that anyone cared about.

At the same time, he was a corrupt crook that stole a lot of money that could’ve gone to the game. And so, is he good or bad? Probably more bad than good, but he’s not all bad.

That applies to the Gold Cup. The Gold Cup is a totally artificial thing that was made up ultimately as a money-making scheme for Blazer, but in the end, it’s probably benefited soccer in this country. So it’s clearly not all bad.

You’d like to think that we could take these things that end up being a good idea, and clean them up and wash away the bad.

Blazer is a fascinating figure, and it seems like there are hints of sympathy for him and some of the other corrupt players in the book. Were all of these guys hardened criminals, or did they get wrapped up in how the business worked, and how it had worked for so long?

There’s no question he’s greedy. But there’s something about the culture of corruption that it can almost sneak up on a person. Blazer had a longer history of it. He always had a touch of corruption about him. But I think a lot of the officials in the sport came up because they loved the sport and wanted to be involved in running it. And then they found out that people were lining their pockets and they thought: “Everyone else is doing it. I’d be a fool not to participate in this.”

And when they end up getting arrested and charged, it’s not the same as a mafia guy in Brooklyn. A lot of these guys were truly surprised. If they thought they were doing something wrong, they didn’t think it was something that anyone cared about. They clearly aren’t innocent, and they went to great lengths to hide it. But at the same time, the impunity came from a culture of believing it was OK to do that stuff. And this really was a case of the FBI and DOJ pulling the rug out from under these people.

One point you stress in the book is that fundamentally, this was a crime against the development of the sport, particularly in poorer nations and communities. How did FIFA’s corruption essentially rob development money from the lower levels of soccer?

That’s something that took me a little while to understand. But when I understood the way the bribery took place, it became clearer to me. The money stolen from the sport isn’t just the bribes. Let’s say I’m a sports marketing firm, and I bribe you a million dollars to sign over a rights contract to me. The first piece of it is that million dollars that could have gone to the sport. But it’s also the opportunity cost: What would the value of those rights have been if it was taken to the free market instead of a bribe?

All that money is taken away from the sport. And the second thing was traveling to South America and seeing the conditions of soccer for fans, for kids and for women. That was really eye-opening. There are stadiums in Argentina and Brazil that are absolutely decrepit. And people would explain, the money that was supposed to come to these clubs never comes. You have kids still playing with the proverbial ball made of rags and duct tape, and little girls who can’t play because there are no facilities or leagues for women at all. When you see that, and then you see dudes making millions in bribes and also marketing guys making far more from paying the bribes, I started to get indignant about it. FIFA always ties itself to children and the good of the game. But it’s absurd when you see how they operate. The money doesn’t go to kids. It goes to making soccer officials rich.

Former U.S. Soccer President Sunil Gulati pops up a couple times. He’s friends with Blazer, he ends up with a seat on the Executive Committee. Is there a chance U.S. Soccer is wrapped up in this, and we just don’t know about it yet?

I will say that I don’t believe Gulati is a cooperator. People wonder that and it’s reasonable. It’s curious how this guy who came up in Blazer’s shadow and rose to so much power, and literally had office space in the CONCACAF offices, could be clean. And he might not be clean, but more likely, he’s the kind of guy who decided to turn a blind eye to all the corruption and pretend he didn’t see it.

That said, there are legitimate questions about how U.S. Soccer operates that weirdly parallels a lot of the corruption that we saw in South America, the Caribbean and Central America. The relationship between U.S. Soccer, MLS and this entity called Soccer United Marketing ― that relationship is very questionable. MLS has the rights to the U.S. Soccer Federation wrapped up for years and years to come. There hasn’t been open bidding for those rights since 2002, I think it is. SUM has MLS, but it also has the rights for the U.S. Soccer Federation for men and women. There’s a lot of money to be made, and SUM’s getting all that, and since they haven’t put it out for public bid, it’s really not clear that U.S. Soccer is getting full value for its product. And in that sense it parallels the sort of corruption we saw.

What do you make of FIFA’s reform efforts?

FIFA is battling itself as it tries to reform itself. I’m suspicious of current FIFA president Gianni Infantino. This is a guy who grew up 6 miles from Sepp Blatter. His career echoes that. He was the general secretary of UEFA, which is not unlike being the general secretary of FIFA. Both of them are very similar in a lot of ways, in their ambitions and their role being the sport’s bureaucrat. Their promises to win elections by spilling money all over the place is just too similar. That said, I think Infantino recognizes that that culture is what led to these problems, and he sees an organization that’s in financial chaos right now. This World Cup’s going to bring in a lot of money, but the last three years have been massively income-negative. They’re losing money because of sponsors running away in droves and massive legal bills. I think he sees a pathway to financial security for FIFA by making more money and being more transparent.

When massive amounts of money mixes with a massively popular cultural phenomenon, is it ever going to be clean? It seems kind of hopeless.

But he still talks about patronage and handing out money, and federations around the world are still getting busted for taking bribes. The Ghana football federation got dissolved a week before the World Cup because a documentary came out that showed top officials taking bribes on secret camera. It’s still a deeply corrupt culture. Baby steps are being taken, but it seems like 42-plus years of corruption can’t be cleaned up in two or three years.

On that note, one of the marketing guys in the book says, “There will always be payoffs.” That stuck out to me, because I’m cynical about FIFA’s willingness or ability to clean this up at all. From your reporting, do you believe “there will always be payoffs” is the reality of the situation, given the structure of our major international sporting organizations?

This is like, “What is human nature all about?” When massive amounts of money mixes with a massively popular cultural phenomenon, is it ever going to be clean? I wish it would be different, but it seems kind of hopeless. How do you regulate soccer, and who can oversee this to make sure that people behave in an ethical, clean and fair way that benefits everyone else? It’s not an accident that every single international sports organization is based in Switzerland. The answer is because the Swiss, not only do they offer them a huge tax break, they also basically say, “You can do whatever you want and we’re not going to bother you.” That’s exactly what these groups want. Well, how do you regulate that?

I don’t think the U.S. went in saying, “We’re going to regulate soccer.” I think they thought if we can give soccer a huge kick in the ass, if we can create so much public and political pressure on them that sponsors will run away, they’ll feel they have no option but to react and clean up their act. It’s sort of, kick ’em where it hurts.

My cynicism about the ability for anyone to clean it up made me feel sorry for Steve Berryman, the IRS agent who’s one of the main investigators and one of your central characters. He said he’ll never stop until he cleans up the sport, and I couldn’t help but think, “That’ll never happen.”

That’s right. It’ll never happen. People like him are driven. It’s not just soccer for him. He cared so much about this. He felt, “I have to do this until it’s over, or else it’s a failed investigation.” I think people like him sometimes recognize that they can never get there, but it’s still disheartening, every piece of new corruption we see, and these guys think, “I’ve worked so hard, and … ”

The World Cup is going on right now, it’s in Russia, and corruption has barely been a part of the story. Do you think the book and the upcoming Qatari World Cup will reinvigorate that conversation, or are people just resigned to the belief that this is what FIFA is?

There is some of that resignation. But also, the annoying but true reality of FIFA is that when the World Cup is happening, all the soccer fans around the world forget all their anger and just want to watch the tournament. For three and a half years, everyone bitches about what a mess FIFA is, and then during the World Cup everyone just wants to watch soccer. There could be some reinvigoration in the next few months when the next stupid scandal appears. And I do think Qatar could reinvigorate more of that. There’s a tiny piece of me that thinks we could still see Qatar stripped of the World Cup. That would certainly spur a lot of conversation about this.

You talk at the end of the book about a shift in focus to corruption in the Asian federation. Are DOJ and the FBI tying up loose ends, or are there deeper investigations still going?

There are clear signs that there’s more. This is still cleaning up pieces from the old case, but just Tuesday, a Florida company pleaded guilty to two counts of fraud in the FIFA case. It was a company that was known from the written indictments, but no one had known they were going to be pleading guilty, so it was a new piece of the case. This company’s going to pay $25 million in fines and forfeitures, and it was sort of a sign from DOJ that they have finished what they’re going to do.

That piece at the end of the book with the guy going off to the South Pacific is a guy named Richard Lai. He’s from Guam and he pleaded guilty in May or June of 2017. That was a pretty strong clue, too, that they’re looking at the Asian Football Confederation, which is the one that includes Qatar. I do know from sources that the cooperators in the case are still actively talking to prosecutors, and still spending many, many hours with them discussing many aspects of the case. So I wouldn’t be surprised to see more. That said, a lot of the people who were involved in the case in the beginning have moved on. It’s natural to have some turnover, and people who inherit a case aren’t necessarily as emotionally bought into it as the people who started. So at some point, it could get old.

But not Steve Berryman. He’s still going?

Steve Berryman will never stop.


14 juillet/229e: De la Bastille au goulag (Looking back at Charles Krauthammer’s reflections on the revolution in France)

14 juillet, 2018

The Whore of Babylon (Hans Burgkmair the Elder, 1523)The Fireside angel (Max Ernst, 1937)

Liberty leading the people (Yue Minjun, 1996)
Puis je vis monter de la mer une bête qui avait dix cornes et sept têtes, et sur ses cornes dix diadèmes, et sur ses têtes des noms de blasphème. La bête que je vis était semblable à un léopard; ses pieds étaient comme ceux d’un ours, et sa gueule comme une gueule de lion. Le dragon lui donna sa puissance, et son trône, et une grande autorité. Et je vis l’une de ses têtes comme blessée à mort; mais sa blessure mortelle fut guérie. Et toute la terre était dans l’admiration derrière la bête. Et ils adorèrent le dragon, parce qu’il avait donné l’autorité à la bête; ils adorèrent la bête, en disant: Qui est semblable à la bête, et qui peut combattre contre elle? Et il lui fut donné une bouche qui proférait des paroles arrogantes et des blasphèmes; et il lui fut donné le pouvoir d’agir pendant quarante-deux mois. Et elle ouvrit sa bouche pour proférer des blasphèmes contre Dieu, pour blasphémer son nom, et son tabernacle, et ceux qui habitent dans le ciel. Et il lui fut donné de faire la guerre aux saints, et de les vaincre. Et il lui fut donné autorité sur toute tribu, tout peuple, toute langue, et toute nation. Et tous les habitants de la terre l’adoreront, ceux dont le nom n’a pas été écrit dès la fondation du monde dans le livre de vie de l’agneau qui a été immolé. Si quelqu’un a des oreilles, qu’il entende! Apocalypse 13: 1-7
Et je vis une femme assise sur une bête écarlate, pleine de noms de blasphème, ayant sept têtes et dix cornes. Cette femme était vêtue de pourpre et d’écarlate, et parée d’or, de pierres précieuses et de perles. Elle tenait dans sa main une coupe d’or, remplie d’abominations et des impuretés de sa prostitution. Sur son front était écrit un nom, un mystère: Babylone la grande, la mère des impudiques et des abominations de la terre. Et je vis cette femme ivre du sang des saints et du sang des témoins de Jésus. Apocalypse 17: 2-6
Une nation ne se régénère que dans un bain de sang. Saint Just
L’arbre de la liberté doit être revivifié de temps en temps par le sang des patriotes et des tyrans. Jefferson
Qu’un sang impur abreuve nos sillons … La Marseillaise
La guillotine n’était qu’un épouvantail qui brisait la résistance active. Cela ne nous suffit pas. (…) Nous ne devons pas seulement « épouvanter » les capitalistes, c’est-à-dire leur faire sentir la toute-puissance de l’Etat prolétarien et leur faire oublier l’idée d’une résistance active contre lui. Nous devons briser aussi leur résistance passive, incontestablement plus dangereuse et plus nuisible encore. Nous ne devons pas seulement briser toute résistance, quelle qu’elle soit. Nous devons encore obliger les gens à travailler dans le cadre de la nouvelle organisation de l’Etat. Lénine
La reine appartient à plusieurs catégories victimaires préférentielles; elle n’est pas seulement reine mais étrangère. Son origine autrichienne revient sans cesse dans les accusations populaires. Le tribunal qui la condamne est très fortement influencé par la foule parisienne. Notre premier stéréotype est également présent: on retrouve dans la révolution tous les traits caractéristiques des grandes crises qui favorisent les persécutions collectives. (…) Je ne prétends pas que cette façon de penser doive se substituer partout à nos idées sur la Révolution française. Elle n’en éclaire pas moins d’un jour intéressant une accusation souvent passée sous silence mais qui figure explicitement au procès de la reine, celui d’avoir commis un inceste avec son fils. René Girard
Le communisme, c’est le nazisme, le mensonge en plus. Jean-François Revel
Il est malheureux que le Moyen-Orient ait rencontré pour la première fois la modernité occidentale à travers les échos de la Révolution française. Progressistes, égalitaristes et opposés à l’Eglise, Robespierre et les jacobins étaient des héros à même d’inspirer les radicaux arabes. Les modèles ultérieurs — Italie mussolinienne, Allemagne nazie, Union soviétique — furent encore plus désastreux. Ce qui rend l’entreprise terroriste des islamistes aussi dangereuse, ce n’est pas tant la haine religieuse qu’ils puisent dans des textes anciens — souvent au prix de distorsions grossières —, mais la synthèse qu’ils font entre fanatisme religieux et idéologie moderne. Ian Buruma et Avishai Margalit
En dépit du fait que tous les historiens sérieux, fussent-ils ardemment républicains, conviennent que la Révolution française pose un problème, l’imagerie officielle, celle des manuels scolaires du primaire et du secondaire, celle de la télévision, montre les événements de 1789 et des années suivantes comme le moment fondateur de notre société, en gommant tout ce qu’on veut cacher : la Terreur, la persécution religieuse, la dictature d’une minorité, le vandalisme artistique, etc. Aujourd’hui, on loue 1789 en reniant 1793. On veut bien de la Déclaration des Droits de l’homme, mais pas de la Loi des suspects. Mais comment démêler 1789 de 1793, quand on sait que le phénomène terroriste commence dès 1789 ? (…) L’idée de base du Livre noir de la Révolution est de montrer cette face de la réalité qui n’est jamais montrée, et rappeler qu’il y a toujours eu une opposition à la Révolution française, mais sans trahir l’Histoire. Qu’on le veuille ou non, qu’on l’aime ou non, la Révolution, c’est un pan de l’Histoire de la France et des Français. On ne l’effacera pas: au moins faut-il la comprendre. Jean Sévillia
The painting which I did after the defeat of the Republicans was L’ange du foyer (Fireside angel). This is, of course, an ironic title for a clumsy figure devastating everything that gets in its way. At the time, this was my impression of what was happening in the world, and I think I was right. Max Ernst (1948)
The war began in July 1936, when General Francisco- Franco led a revolt against the Spanish Republic. The Spanish Left had won a parliamentary majority but was unable to restrain those among them who were deter-mined that their turn in power should be used to destroy the Right. Franco’s revolt became a civil war, and Franco received the support of Mussolini’s Italy and Hitler’s Germany, which went so far as to send troops — using the Spanish war to try out new weapons and tactics. The Republicans were supported by volunteers from all over the world, as well as by Stalin’s Soviet Union. Horrifying and sadistic atrocities were committed by both sides After Franco’s victory the German painter Max Ernst created his spectral L’ange du foyer (Fireside angel), an apocalyptic monster bursting with destructive energy, a King-Kong-like Angel of Death spreading fear and terror. All art
The people now armed themselves with such weapons as they could find in armourer shops & privated houses, and with bludgeons, & were roaming all night through all parts of the city without any decided & practicable object. The next day the states press on the King to send away the troops, to permit the Bourgeois of Paris to arm for the preservation of order in the city, & offer to send a deputation from their body to tranquilize them. He refuses all their propositions. A committee of magistrates & electors of the city are appointed, by their bodies, to take upon them its government. The mob, now openly joined by the French guards, force the prisons of St. Lazare, release all the prisoners, & take a great store of corn, which they carry to the corn market. Here they get some arms, & the French guards begin to to form & train them. The City committee determine to raise 48,000 Bourgeois, or rather to restrain their numbers to 48,000, On the 16th they send one of their numbers (Monsieur de Corny whom we knew in America) to the Hotel des Invalides to ask arms for their Garde Bourgeoise. He was followed by, or he found there, a great mob. The Governor of the Invalids came out & represented the impossibility of his delivering arms without the orders of those from whom he received them. De Corny advised the people then to retire, retired himself, & the people took possession of the arms. It was remarkable that not only the invalids themselves made no opposition, but that a body of 5000 foreign troops, encamped with 400 yards, never stirred. Monsieur De Corny and five others were then sent to ask arms of Monsieur de Launai, Governor of the Bastille. They found a great collection of people already before the place, & they immediately planted a flag of truce, which was answered by a like flag hoisted on the parapet. The depositition prevailed on the people to fall back a little, advanced themselves to make their demand of the Governor. & in that instant a discharge from the Bastille killed 4 people of those nearest to the deputies. The deputies retired, the people rushed against the place, and almost in an instant were in possession of a fortification, defended by 100 men, of infinite strength, which in other times had stood several regular sieges & had never been taken. How they got in, has as yet been impossible to discover. Those, who pretend to have been of the party tell so many different stories as to destroy the credit of them all. They took all the arms, discharged the prisoners & such of the garrison as were not killed in the first moment of fury, carried the Governor and Lieutenant Governor to the Greve (the place of public execution) cut off their heads, & sent them through the city in triumph to the Palais royal… I have the honor to be with great esteem & respect, Sir, your most obedient and most humble servant. Thomas Jefferson (lettre à John Jay, 19 juillet 1789)
Les journées les plus décisives de la Révolution française sont contenues, sont impliquées dans ce premier fait qui les enveloppe : le 14 juillet 1789. Et voilà pourquoi aussi c’est la vraie date révolutionnaire, celle qui fait tressaillir la France ! On comprend que ce jour-là notre Nouveau Testament nous a été donné et que tout doit en découler. Léon Gambetta (14 juillet 1872)
Les légitimistes s’évertuent alors à démonter le mythe du 14 Juillet, à le réduire à l’expression violente d’une foule (pas du peuple) assoiffée de sang (les meurtres des derniers défenseurs de la Bastille malgré la promesse de protection) allant jusqu’au sacrilège du cadavre (des têtes dont celle du gouverneur Launay parcourant Paris plantée au bout d’une pique) (…) la Bastille n’était pas un bagne, occupée qu’elle était par quelques prisonniers sans envergure, elle n’était pas la forteresse du pouvoir royal absolu tourné contre le peuple à travers l’instrumentalisation des canons, elle n’était pas la forteresse à partir de laquelle la reconquête de la ville pouvait être envisagée puisqu’elle n’était défendue que par quelques soldats qui du reste se sont rendus en fin d’après-midi. Le mythe de la prise de la Bastille tombe de lui-même pour les monarchistes et même plus il est une création politique construisant artificiellement le mythe du peuple s’émancipant, plus encore il apparaît comme annonciateur de la Terreur, justifiant les surnoms de « saturnales républicaines », de « fête de l’assassinat »… Pierrick Hervé
Dans les grandes démocraties du monde, la Grande-Bretagne, l’Allemagne, les Etats-unis, le Canada, les fêtes nationales se fêtent sans défilé militaire. Ce sont les dictatures qui font les défilés militaires. C’est l’URSS, c’est la Chine, c’est l’Iran; ce sont des pays non démocratiques. Et la France est l’une des seules démocraties à organiser sa fête nationale autour d’un défilé militaire: ça n’a aucune justification même historique. Sylvain Garel (élu vert de Paris, 02.07.10)
Le défilé du 14 Juillet tel que nous le connaissons aujourd’hui n’a été instauré qu’en 1880, grâce à un vote de l’Assemblée nationale faisant du 14 juillet le jour de la Fête nationale française. La jeune IIIe République cherche à créer un imaginaire républicain commun pour souder le régime, après des décennies d’instabilité (Directoire, Consulat, premier et second Empire, IIe République …). C’est dans la même période que la Marseillaise sera adoptée comme hymne national. La date a pourtant fait polémique au sein de l’hémicycle. Pouvait-on adopter comme acte fondateur de la Nation la sanglante prise de la Bastille? Les conservateurs s’y opposent. Le rapporteur de la loi, Benjamin Raspail, propose alors une autre date : le 14 juillet 1790, jour de la Fête de la Fédération. Le premier anniversaire de la prise de la Bastille avait été célébré à Paris par le défilé sur le Champ-de-Mars de milliers de «fédérés», députés et délégués venus de toute la France. Louis XVI avait prêté serment à la Nation, et avait juré de protéger la Constitution. (…) Convaincue, l’Assemblée nationale a donc adopté le 14 Juillet comme Fête nationale, mais sans préciser si elle se réfèrait à 1789 ou 1790. (…) La IIIe République est née en 1870 après la défaite de l’Empereur Napoléon III à Sedan contre la Prusse. La France y a perdu l’Alsace et la Lorraine, ce qui sera vécu comme un traumatisme national. Dix ans après la défaite, le régime veut montrer que le pays s’est redressé. Jules Ferry, Léon Gambetta et Léon Say remettent aux militaires défilant à Longchamp de nouveaux drapeaux et étendards, remplaçant ceux de 1870. L’armée est valorisée comme protectrice de la Nation et de la République. Hautement symbolique, ce premier défilé du 14 Juillet permet également de montrer à l’opinion nationale et internationale le redressement militaire de la France, qui compte bien reconquérir les territoires perdus. Le caractère militaire du 14 Juillet est définitivement acquis lors du «Défilé de la victoire» de 1919 sur les Champs-Elysées. Le Figaro (16.07.11)
The line from from the Bastille to the gulag is not straight, but the connection is unmistakable. Modern totalitarianism has its roots in 1789. Indeed, the French Revolution was such a model for future revolutions that it redefined the word. That is why 1776 has long been treated as a kind of pseudo-revolution, as Irving Kristol pointed out in a prescient essay written during America’s confused and embarrassed bicentennial celebration of 1776. The American Revolution was utterly lacking in the messianic, bloody-minded idealism of the French. It rearranged the constitutional furniture. Its revolutionary leaders died in their own beds. What kind of a revolution was that?” The French Revolution failed …. because it tried to create the impossible: a regime both of liberty and of “patriotic” state power. The history of the revolution is proof that these goals are incompatible. The American Revolution succeeded because it chose one, liberty. The Russian Revolution became deranged when it chose the other, state power. The French Revolution, to its credit and sorrow, wanted both. (T)heir revolution, with its glamour and influence, did not only popularize, it deified revolution. There are large parts of the world where even today the worst brutality and arbitrariness are justified by the mere invocation of the word revolution – without reference to any other human value. For the Chinese authorities to shoot a dissident in the back of the head, they have only to show that he is a “counterrevolutionary.” The fate then, of all messianic revolution – revolution, that is, on the French model – is that in the end it can justify itself and its crimes only by reference to itself. In Saint-Just’s famous formulation: “The Republic consists in the extermination of everything that opposes it.” This brutal circularity of logic is properly called not revolution but nihilism. Charles Krauthammer (1989)
Attention: une fête peut en cacher une autre !
En ces temps désormais dits post-modernes et post-historiques …
Où sous le poids du progressisme le plus échevelé et d’une réalité migratoire proprement apocalyptique …
Les idées de nation et de patriotisme sont passés de gros mots à fictions objectives …
Et en ce jour où entre défilé militaire soviétique et débauche de drapeaux nationaux en d’autres temps proscrits …
Nous Français ne savons plus très bien ce que nous sommes censés fêter …
Comment ne pas repenser …
A ces fortes paroles du chroniqueur américain qui vient tout juste de disparaitre Charles Krauthammer
Rappelant lors du bicentenaire de la Révolution française …
La longue filiation pressentie dès 1937 par le peintre allemand Marx Ernst
Mais déjà prophétisée 2 000 ans plus tôt par l’Apocalypse …
Et hélas bien confirmée par l’histoire depuis …
Entre la Bastille et le goulag ?

A FAILED REVOLUTION
Charles Krauthammer
The Washington Post
July 14, 1989

Two hundred years ago today a mob stormed the Bastille and freed its seven prisoners: four forgers, two lunatics and an aristocrat imprisoned at his family’s request for « libertinism. » It might have been eight had not the Marquis de Sade — whose cell contained a desk, a wardrobe, a dressing table, tapestries, mattresses, velvet cushions, a collection of hats, three kinds of fragrances, night lamps and 133 books — left a week earlier.

When the battle was lost, the governor of the Bastille, a minor functionary named Bernard-Rene’ de Launay, could have detonated a mountain of gunpowder, destroying himself, the mob, and much of the surrounding faubourg Saint-Antoine. He chose instead to surrender. His reward was to be paraded through the street and cut down with knives and pistol shots. A pastry cook named Desnot, declining a sword, sawed off his head with a pocket knife. For the French Revolution, it was downhill from there on.

Now, after 200 years, the French themselves seem finally to be coming to terms with that reality. There is a tentativeness to this week’s bicentennial celebration that suggests that French enthusiasm for the revolution has tempered. This circumspection stems from two decades of revisionist scholarship that stresses the reformist impulses of the ancien regime and the murderous impulses of the revolutionary regime that followed.

Simon Schama’s « Citizens » is but the culmination of this trend. But the receptivity to such revisionism stems from something deeper: the death of doctrinaire socialism, which in France had long claimed direct descent from the revolution. Disillusion at the savage failure of the revolutions in our time — Russian, Chinese, Cuban, Vietnamese — has allowed reconsideration of the event that was father to them all. One might say that romance with revolution died with Solzhenitsyn.

The line from the Bastille to the gulag is not straight, but the connection is unmistakable. Modern totalitarianism has its roots in 1789. « The spirit of the French Revolution has always been present in the social life of our country, » said Gorbachev during his visit to France last week. Few attempts at ingratiation have been more true or more damning.

Indeed, the French Revolution was such a model for future revolutions that it redefined the word. That is why 1776 has long been treated as a kind of pseudo-revolution, as Irving Kristol pointed out in a prescient essay written during America’s confused and embarrassed bicentennial celebration of 1976. The American Revolution was utterly lacking in the messianic, bloody-minded idealism of the French. It rearranged the constitutional furniture. Its revolutionary leaders died in their own beds. What kind of revolution was that? Thirteen years later, Kristol’s answer has become conventional wisdom: a successful revolution, perhaps the only successful revolution of our time.

The French Revolution failed, argues Schama, because it tried to create the impossible: a regime both of liberty and of « patriotic » state power. The history of the revolution is proof that these goals are incompatible. The American Revolution succeeded because it chose one, liberty. The Russian Revolution became deranged when it chose the other, state power. The French Revolution, to its credit and sorrow, wanted both.

Its great virtue was to have loosed the idea of liberty upon Europe. Its great vice was to have created the model, the monster, of the mobilized militarized state — revolutionary France invented universal conscription, that scourge of the 20th century only now beginning to wither away.

The French cannot be blamed for everything, alas, but their revolution, with its glamour and influence, did not only popularize, it deified revolution. There are large parts of the world where even today the worst brutality and arbitrariness are justified by the mere invocation of the word revolution — without reference to any other human value. For the Chinese authorities to shoot a dissident in the back of the head, they have only to show that he is a « counterrevolutionary. » In Cuba, Gen. Arnaldo Ochoa Sanchez, erstwhile hero of the revolution, is condemned to death in a show trial and upon receiving his sentence confesses his sins and declares that at his execution his « last thought would be of Fidel and of the great revolution. »

The fate, then, of all messianic revolution — revolution, that is, on the French model — is that in the end it can justify itself and its crimes only by reference to itself. In Saint-Just’s famous formulation: « The Republic consists in the extermination of everything that opposes it. » This brutal circularity of logic is properly called not revolution but nihilism.

Voir par ailleurs:

The French Revolution

Quartz

July 14, 2018

Bloody beginnings and a long legacy


July 14 marks the 229th anniversary of the Storming of the Bastille and the symbolic start of the French Revolution. The bloody revolt toppled the 200-year-old Bourbon dynasty, and ushered in a radical new government, reshaping European history forever.

The French Revolution brought the world the terror of the guillotine and the ravages of the Napoleonic Wars. But in its radical reimagining of society, it swept away the conventions and structures that had governed France since the end of the Roman era, and introduced systems based on the enlightenment principles of reason and science.

Some of those ideas persist to this day—like the metric system, which emerged from the National Assembly’s desire to standardize weights and measures. Other, equally ambitious ideas, like the Republican calendar—with 10 months and 10-day weeks—somehow failed to catch on. More enduring were the radical concepts of the innate rights of men and women that run throughout western systems of law, philosophy, and political theory.

So on this Bastille Day, pop open the champagne, spread the brie thick, and run a kilometer or deux to celebrate two centuries of liberté, égalité, and fraternité.

By the digits

693: Deputies, out of the 745 in the National Assembly, who voted to convict King Louis XVI of treason on January 15, 1793. None voted to acquit. He was beheaded six days later.

16,594: Death sentences given to counter-revolutionaries during the Reign of Terror of 1793-94.

300,000: Estimated total number of French aristocrats, or 1% of the population, in 1789.

800: Estimated different standards for weights and measures in France before the introduction of the metric system.

100: Seconds in the metric minute, used for 17 months during the French Revolution.

7: Countries that don’t use the metric system as the official system of weights and measures. (Myanmar, Liberia, Palau, Micronesia, Samoa, the Marshall Islands, and the United States.)

fun fact!

Interstate 19 in Arizona is the only stretch of federal highway in the US to use kilometers exclusively. The signs, initially part of a pilot program by the Carter Administration to introduce the metric system, have been kept in place in part because the local tourism industry wants them to greet visitors from Mexico.

Brief history

The metric system


1215: The Magna Carta declares that there should be national standards for the measurement of wine, beer, and cloth.

1678: Anglican clergyman and philosopher John Wilkins publishes An Essay towards a Real Character, and a Philosophical Language, which proposes a universal language and system of measurement, based on units of 10.

1790: The National Assembly of France drafts a committee to establish a new standard for weights and measures that would be valid “for all people, for all time,” in the words of mathematician (and revolutionary) Marquis de Condorcet.

1799: The distance of the meter—named after metron, the Greek word for measure—is fixed at 1/10,000,000 of the length between the North Pole and the Equator, arrived at after two French surveyors spent six years measuring the distance between Dunkirk and Barcelona, which was used to calculate the longer distance. A platinum bar officially one meter long is cast.

1840: The metric system becomes compulsory in France.

1875: Seventeen nations (including the US) sign the Treaty of the Meter, creating international bodies to standardize weights and measurements worldwide, according to the metric system.

1975: US president Gerald Ford signs the Metric Conversion Act, declaring the metric system the preferred (but voluntary) system and establishing the US Metric Board, to speed America’s conversion.

1982: US president Ronald Reagan dismantles the Metric Board.

1999: Mars Climate Orbiter, a $328 million satellite, disintegrates over Mars because software produced by Lockheed Martin, the contractor, generated numbers in the English system instead of the metric system, as specified by its agreement with NASA.

The rights of women


When the revolutionaries of France wrote about égalité, few, if any, extended that right to women. One observer across the English Channel, however, saw that the principles of the revolution applied to women as well as men.

Mary Wollstonecraft—a British author who established herself when few women earned a living by writing—wrote A Vindication of the Rights of Women in 1791 in response to Edmund Burke’s Reflections on the French Revolution. While Burke argued the revolution would fail because society was inherently traditional and hierarchical, Wollstonecraft made the case not only for the rights of men, but for women as well—a radical position at the end of the 18th century.

In his book Emile, or On Education, Enlightenment philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau wrote that women should be educated only to the extent they could serve men. But Wollstonecraft argued that women “ought to cherish a nobler ambition, and by their abilities and virtues exact respect.” Women, she wrote, deserved the same opportunities as men, and should be able to earn a living and support themselves with dignity.

Wollstonecraft, the mother of Frankenstein author Mary Shelley, had a messy personal life, which was used to discredit her ideas in the 19th century. But her ideas inspired writers from Jane Austen to Virginia Woolf, and suffragists like Elizabeth Cady Stanton. By the 20th century, Wollstonecraft was rightly regarded as a pioneering feminist.

Giphy
Pop quiz

Which is not another name for the guillotine?

Scottish MaidenHalifax GibbetNational RazorUrsula’s Cleaver

If your inbox doesn’t support this quiz, find the solution at bottom of email.
save the date!

How to make time


The Republican Calendar was one of the more radical innovations of the revolution. Born out of a desire to wipe the slate of clean of aristocratic and religious references and start history afresh, the new calendar began on the autumn solstice of September 22, 1792, or 1 Vendemiaire I, the day the new Republic was proclaimed.

Instead of the seven-day week of the Bible, the Republican Calendar was based on the 10-day week, with the tenth day, decadi, devoted to rest and play. There were 10 months, each three weeks long, with five special days (or six, in a leap year) devoted to celebrations used to round out the year to 365 days. Those days bore names such as the Fête de la Vertu (Celebration of Virtues) and Fête de l’Opinion (Celebration of Convictions).

The calendar was designed by a committee that included mathematicians, astronomers, and poets, who based the naming of days and months after the agricultural cycle, and borrowed heavily from Latin. The winter months, for example, became Nivôse (snowy), Pluviôse (rainy), and Ventôse (windy). Each day also got a name—360 in all—replacing the Catholic convention of each day bearing the name of a saint. The fifth, 15th, and 25th days of each month were named after farm animals (bull, ram, duck), the 10th and 20th were named after farm implements (rakes, spades), while the rest were named after trees, fruits, vegetables and herbs. According to one modern calculation, today is 25 Messidor CCXXVI, named for the Guinea hen. (There’s a Twitter account that will help you keep up.)

As you might expect, there were problems. Starting each year on the autumnal equinox proved tricky, since the timing of astronomical events can vary and leap days had to be inserted to even things up, confusing everyone. Farm workers, the ostensible heroes the calendar celebrated, hated having a day off every 10 days instead of every seven. So 12 years after its introduction, it was abolished by Napoleon in 1806.

Giphy
Quotable

“Long usage of the Gregorian calendar has filled the people’s memory with a considerable number of images that they have long revered, and which today remain the source of their religious errors. It is therefore necessary to replace these visions of ignorance with the realities of reason, and this sacerdotal prestige with nature’s truth.”

— Committee to draft a new calendar

Watch this!

The French Revolution’s decimal time wasn’t the last attempt to rationalize timekeeping. A more recent effort was Swatch Internet Time in 1998. Part of a (not very successful) marketing campaign for a new line of watches, the system divided the 24-hour day into 1,000 “.beats” (yes, with a period—trés moderne).

The time, which was displayed on Swatches alongside boring old Gregorian time, was given as @416, which would be read as 416 beats after midnight, or 4am. Since it was the same all over the world, it was touted as being a new way of telling time that negated the need for translating pesky time zones.


Disparition de Claude Lanzmann: La preuve, c’est justement qu’il n’y en a pas ! (The proof is not the corpses; the proof is the absence of corpses)

11 juillet, 2018
L’ignorance volontaire du passé entraîne la falsification du présent. (…) Lanzmann parle avec un scepticisme opiniâtre de crimes “imputés” à Staline par la “propagande nazie”. Se rend-il même compte qu’il se laisse ainsi envahir par une obsession de nier ce qui lui déplaît identique à celle qui pousse un Robert Faurisson et les “révisionnistes” à mettre en doute les preuves de l’existence des camps de la mort ? Ses faux camps de la mort à lui, mais soviétiques ceux-là, sont ceux où avant juin 1941 furent de surcroît déportés 2 millions de Polonais dont la moitié au moins périrent de mauvais traitements. Jean-François Revel
Jamais la France n’acceptera les solutions de facilité que d’aucuns aujourd’hui proposent qui consisteraient à organiser des déportations, à travers l’Europe, pour aller mettre dans je ne sais quel camp, à ses frontières ou en son sein ou ailleurs, les étrangers. Emmanuel Macron
La question du négationnisme demande tout autre chose qu’une halte rue Geoffroy L’Asnier pour mobiliser l’électorat juif contre Marine Le Pen car ce ne sont pas des jeunes militants du FN qui rendent impossible l’enseignement de la Shoah dans les écoles ou qui vont chercher des faits alternatifs aux camps de la mort. De cette terrible réalité, je ne vois guère d’écho dans la campagne d’Emmanuel Macron. Il ne cesse de faire des clins d’œil aux jeunes de banlieues et réserve ses coups à la bonne vieille bête immonde. Alain Finkielkraut
Shoah (…) is a documentary of absences. There is no newsreel footage, there are no old photos, no corpses. Sometimes Lanzmann trains his camera on an empty field for several minutes. We see a seeming bucolic idyll – just the place for a picnic. Only the caption – Treblinka – tells us something intolerable happened here. For a long time, Lanzmann tells me, he resisted going to Poland. « Why would I want to? What would I see? » Instead, he toured the world interviewing Holocaust survivors for his film, pushing them hard to recall their experiences. Interviewees such as Abraham Bomba, whom Lanzmann filmed cutting hair in his Tel Aviv salon. As Bomba worked, he told Lanzmann how he was forced to cut women’s hair at Treblinka just before they were gassed. At one point in the interview, Bomba recalled how a fellow barber was working when his wife and sister came into the gas chamber. Bomba broke down and pleaded with Lanzmann that he be allowed to stop telling the story. Lanzmann said: « You have to do it. I know it’s very hard. » This was his principal method on Shoah: to incarnate the truth of what happened through survivors’ testimonies, even at the cost of reopening old wounds. With testimonies such as these, Lanzmann initially thought, he needn’t go to the scene of the crimes – to death camps such as Treblinka, Belzec, Sobibor or Auschwitz-Birkenau. But, four years into his work on Shoah, Lanzmann changed his mind. « Finally, I realised I was meeting people, but couldn’t understand what they were telling me. I had to go there. I arrived in Poland loaded like a bomb with knowledge. But the fuse was missing – Poland was the fuse. » What astounded him when he arrived in villages near the death camps was that life carried on regardless – as though the tragedy of the Holocaust had been erased. « When I saw the village of Treblinka still existed, that people who were witnesses to everything still existed, that there was a normal train station, the bomb that I was exploded. I started to shoot. » What he started to shoot were testimonies of non-Jewish Polish bystanders. Were they oblivious to what was happening? Overwhelmingly not: Lanzmann interviews Jewish victims and bystanders who recalled that non-Jewish Poles made throat-cutting gestures to Jews as they arrived at the death camps on trains – to alert them to what was about to happen, perhaps, or maybe to revel in their looming murders. Lanzmann found evidence of Polish antisemitism in the villages around the death camps: a male interviewee relates how he’s happy the Jews are gone, but would rather they had gone to Israel voluntarily than be exterminated. In an interview outside a Catholic church, with Simon Srebnik present, bystanders alleged the Holocaust was just retribution for the killing of Jesus. While inculpating Poles in Shoah, Lanzmann in this interview exculpates the Allies from the charge of doing nothing to save the Jews. « Could the Jews have been saved? My answer is no. I’m very deeply convinced of this. Everybody talks about the bombing of Birkenau. Some in the War Refugee Board [created by President Franklin Roosevelt in 1943] were for bombing, and there were others who were against for reasons that cannot be despised. » What reasons? « Some pilots asked, ‘What is the meaning of this, to bomb the people we’re meant to rescue?’ A terrible contradiction. « Money, not bombs, would have helped the Jews, because the Germans were running out of money. But in wartime you can’t send money because there are rules. But some religious Jews did send money to Slovakia that got into German hands, and for a while the deportations stopped. » The question of whether the allies could have saved the lives of the Jews goes to the heart of one of the most important interviews Lanzmann conducted for Shoah, namely the one with the Polish spy and diplomat Jan Karski. In 1943, Karski was commissioned by the exiled Polish government to tell allied leaders about the fate of Poland, and by two Jewish leaders in Warsaw to do the same about the fate of the Jews. « They asked him to mobilise the conscience of the world, » says Lanzmann. In Shoah, Karski recounts what he saw in the ghetto and in camps. At the end of that interview, Karski says of his visit to Washington and London: « I made my report. » Why end the interview there? « Everybody knows that the Jews were not rescued. He didn’t need to say more. It was very strong to end that way. » But last year, Lanzmann changed his mind. He decided to release a film of the rest of the 33-year-old Karski interview, in which he told Lanzmann in detail of his mission to brief allied leaders. In this new film, The Karski Report, the Polish spy tells us that he met Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter, a Jew, who, upon hearing Karski’s description of the horrors befalling Jews in Poland, said: « I do not believe you. » But Frankfurter was not calling Karski a liar. Indeed, at the same meeting, Frankfurter clarified what he meant: « I did not say that he was lying, I said that I could not believe him. There is a difference. » Human inability to believe in the intolerable is what The Karski Report is about. At the start of the film, Lanzmann quotes the French philosopher Raymond Aron, who, when asked about the Holocaust, said: « I knew, but I didn’t believe it, and because I didn’t believe it, I didn’t know. » No wonder Lanzmann, a friend of Jean-Paul Sartre and lover of Simone de Beauvoir, is concerned with such philosophical issues. « The human brain is not prepared to understand this – even on the steps of the gas chamber. Karski says this very clearly. » Hence, for Lanzmann, the primacy of oral testimony as a mode of representation and understanding at the heart of Shoah. But that primacy is paradoxical: the tragedy of Karski’s mission, if it was a tragedy, was to have witnessed something of such unprecedented horror that no mere report could convey its import, still less move the allies to action. Why release this film now? Lanzmann released The Karski Report after the publication in 2009 of a novel called Jan Karski by the French writer Yannick Haenel. The novel became a French bestseller, but Lanzmann attacked it as « a falsification of history and of its protagonists ». « It’s a scandal about Karski, because he tries to make Karski into a man obsessed with the rescue of the Jews. He was not. » So Karski was not, as Haenel’s novel implies, the man who tried and failed to stop the Holocaust? « No! He says: ‘The Jews were not the centre of my mission. Poland was the centre of my mission.’ He says that very clearly. » « I said to myself, ‘You are an idiot, because you have the film of the second day’s interview to show that Karski was not as he is depicted in this novel.’ So I released The Karski Report to re-establish the truth. » Haenel, for his part, argues Lanzmann does not understand his novel. But what is the truth? Is truth only what emerges from oral testimony such as that given by Shoah’s interviewees? Sometimes, just as Adorno injuncted writing poetry after Auschwitz, so Lanzmann seems to be prohibiting – or at least reserving the right to slur – art about the Holocaust that is not based on oral testimony. Isn’t something to be said for artists who, in an act of creative empathy, try to imagine the lives of others embroiled in the Holocaust and legacy (consider, say, Nicole Kraus’s recent novel Great House, steeped as it is in creatively imagining the lives of Holocausts survivors)? « Of course one can make art about the Holocaust after my film, » Lanzmann says. « All I do say is that great literature always adds to reality. » The implication is clear: Haenel’s literary imagining of Karski’s inner world distorts and subtracts from reality, while Lanzmann clearly believes Shoah, does otherwise. He wrote in the French newspaper Libération recently that when one watches Shoah, « one bears witness for nine hours 30 minutes to the incarnation of the truth, the contrary of the sanitisation of historical science. » « That, » he says, « is why it remains important to see my film. » The Guardian
L’agence de presse officielle Fars a dénoncé la diffusion de Shoah, l’accusant d’être une tentative faite par Israël pour prendre le peuple iranien comme cible « de sa propagande pour contrer les efforts déployés par l’Iran dans les organisations internationales pour réfuter ses allégations concernant le mythe de l’holocauste. » Des dizaines de sites pro-gouvernementaux en Iran se sont joints au chœur des protestations, attaquant la chaîne Pars et l’accusant de « lécher les bottes des Sionistes ». Des médias en langue persane à l’étranger, qui ont un large public en Iran, comme la Télévision la Voix de l’Amérique en persan, Manoto TV, Radio France Internationale (en persan) et la Voix d’Israël (en persan), ont diffusé de longs reportages sur « Shoah » en persan et ont interviewé des intellectuels iraniens soulignant qu’il fallait que les Iraniens puissent avoir accès à ce type de film. De nombreux sites Internet en langue persane, représentant tout un éventail d’opinions, ont rapporté l’événement. Le film de neuf heures et demie a été sous-titré en persan, en turc et en arabe par le Projet Aladin. Cette organisation internationale, basée à Paris, s’attache à promouvoir le rapprochement interculturel, en particulier entre Juifs et Musulmans. (…) Le Projet Aladin prévoit d’organiser des avant-premières de « Shoah » dans plusieurs capitales du monde musulman, en commençant par Istanbul et Ankara le mois prochain. « Shoah, » sous-titré en turc, sera présenté au Festival International du Film d’Istanbul et ensuite diffusé à la télévision nationale turque. Crif
Pour reprendre un mot de Marcel Ophuls, on ne réalise pas un film comme Shoah en respectant les règles de fair-play d’un joueur de cricket d’Eton. J’ai piégé beaucoup de monde, à commencer par la bureaucratie communiste polonaise pour obtenir la possibilité de tourner librement en Pologne. J’ai piégé des nazis, j’ai eu un faux nom, des faux papiers, et je n’ai reculé devant rien pour percer la muraille d’ignorance et de silence qui enfermait alors la Shoah. J’ai en effet répété à Karski ce que j’avais dit à Varsovie : que la question du sauvetage des juifs serait importante dans mon film, celle de la responsabilité des Alliés aussi. Cela, c’était au début de mon travail. Je me suis ensuite convaincu que tout cela était infiniment plus complexe que je ne l’avais pensé. Avoir « piégé » Karski ne nous a pas empêchés d’être très proches l’un de l’autre à Washington et d’entretenir ensuite une longue correspondance. « Shoah, écrivit-il en 1985, est sans aucun doute le plus grand film qui ait été fait sur la tragédie des juifs. » Il fit preuve de beaucoup de courage en écrivant cela à un moment où Shoah était attaqué tous azimuts en Pologne, et où le gouvernement polonais demandait à la France de l’interdire. Ce petit jeune homme décrète que je ne comprends pas la littérature. Et il ose écrire : « Contrairement à ce tribunal de l’Histoire, d’où parle Lanzmann, la littérature est un espace libre, où la « vérité » n’existe pas. » Il n’est pas de phrase plus sotte. La littérature n’a affaire qu’à la vérité ; si celle-ci n’est pas l’affaire de Yannick Haenel, c’est que Jan Karski, roman, et quoi qu’en dise Sollers, n’est pas de la littérature. Claude Lanzmann
J’ai payé. Une somme pas mince. Je les ai tous payés, les Allemands. Claude Lanzmann
Je considère que le peuple iranien est un grand peuple, une haute et ancienne civilisation. Un peuple opprimé aujourd’hui par une dictature cléricale de fer, mais qui est en train de protester, de se révolter d’une certaine façon. De nombreuses manifestations y ont eu lieu bien avant celles dont on parle aujourd’hui dans le reste du monde arabe. Concernant la Shoah, la position officielle défendue par le président, M. Ahmadinejad, est qu’elle n’a non seulement jamais existé mais qu’elle est une invention des Juifs et des sionistes. Fatalement, cela a des effets. Contrer ce négationnisme est donc un pas important, et Shoah est le meilleur moyen pour cela. (…) Shoah est un film sans cadavre. Pourquoi il n’y en a pas ? Parce qu’il n’y a pas de trace. L’extermination des juifs voulue par les nazis était le crime parfait. Les fourgons arrivaient, les gens étaient gazés, asphyxiés dans les deux ou trois heures qui suivaient leur arrivée et les corps étaient brûlés. Les gros os qui n’avaient pas été brûlés étaient réduits en cendres à coups de maillet et de marteau et cette poussière d’os était jetée dans les rivières et dans les lacs. Les nazis non seulement détruisaient les Juifs, mais détruisaient la destruction elle-même. Pas de trace. Et dire aujourd’hui « cela n’a pas existé », c’est souscrire pleinement au désir hitlérien. Shoah est la construction d’une mémoire, ce n’est pas une preuve que cela a existé, car pour Ahmadinejad et les autres, la preuve ce seraient des cadavres. Mais la preuve, c’est justement qu’il n’y en a pas ! C’est ça la Shoah, c’est la disparition totale. Claude Lanzmann

Attention: une disparition peut en cacher une autre !

Au lendemain de la disparition de Claude Lanzmann

Et à l’heure où, dans l’indifférence générale, le peuple iranien se lève contre le joug khomeniste qui l’opprime depuis près de 40 ans …

Pendant que d’autres, par démagogie et électoralisme faciles, mélangent tout et nous rejouent à tout bout de champ « les heures les plus noires notre histoire« …

Comment ne pas repenser à la magistrale leçon …

Que l’auteur de « Shoah » et lui-même victime en son temps, à l’instar de son maitre à penser Sartre, de négationnisme pro-communiste

Avait donnée il y a sept ans à l’occasion de la diffusion sur deux chaînes satellitaires à direction de l’Iran d’une version sous-titrée en farsi de son oeuvre …

Où il expliquait justement contre le négationnisme du régime iranien …

Que la disparition de toute trace faisait justement partie de la Solution finale …

Et en était donc de ce fait même la preuve ultime !

Claude Lanzmann : « Shoah est le meilleur moyen de lutter contre le négationnisme d’Ahmadinejad »

Le grand film du cinéaste-écrivain sera diffusé pour la première fois en Iran le 7 mars.

Propos recueillis par Marion Cocquet

Le Point
Voir aussi:

Shoah de Claude Lanzmann diffusé en Iran par une chaine satellite : Les réactions des iraniens en cascade

Des centaines de mails et d’appels téléphoniques de téléspectateurs à Téhéran, Ispahan, Chiraz, Machad et d’autres villes en Iran ont été largement positifs après que la chaîne satellitaire Pars, basée à Los Angeles, ait commencé à diffuser pour la première fois ce lundi « Shoah » de Claude Lanzmann en persan, selon le présentateur chevronné de la chaîne, Alireza Meybodi qui présentait le film.
Crif
11 Mars 2011

Le mercredi, l’agence de presse officielle Fars a dénoncé la diffusion de Shoah, l’accusant d’être une tentative faite par Israël pour prendre le peuple iranien comme cible « de sa propagande pour contrer les efforts déployés par l’Iran dans les organisations internationales pour réfuter ses allégations concernant le mythe de l’holocauste. »

Des dizaines de sites pro-gouvernementaux en Iran se sont joints au chœur des protestations, attaquant la chaîne Pars et l’accusant de « lécher les bottes des Sionistes. » (Voir l’annexe A).

Des médias en langue persane à l’étranger, qui ont un large public en Iran, comme la Télévision la Voix de l’Amérique en persan, Manoto TV, Radio France Internationale (en persan) et la Voix d’Israël (en persan), ont diffusé de longs reportages sur « Shoah » en persan et ont interviewé des intellectuels iraniens soulignant qu’il fallait que les Iraniens puissent avoir accès à ce type de film. De nombreux sites Internet en langue persane, représentant tout un éventail d’opinions, ont rapporté l’événement (voir l’annexe B).

Le film de neuf heures et demie a été sous-titré en persan, en turc et en arabe par le Projet Aladin. Cette organisation internationale, basée à Paris, s’attache à promouvoir le rapprochement interculturel, en particulier entre Juifs et Musulmans.

Les Iraniens, en Iran et partout dans le monde, ont pu voir le premier épisode de « Shoah, » sous-titré en persan, ce lundi. Et des épisodes d’une heure seront diffusés quotidiennement au cours des quinze jours à venir.

Dans une interview réalisée avant la diffusion du film, Claude Lanzmann a déclaré : « Niez la Shoah autant que vous le voulez, Président Ahmadinejad ; aujourd’hui, ce n’est pas vous qui décidez, mais ce sont les téléspectateurs à Téhéran et Chiraz, à qui le projet Aladin a donné l’occasion de forger leur propre jugement sur ce sujet. »

En présentant le film sur la chaîne Pars, Alireza Meybodi a décrit la négation de la Shoah comme un « fléau qui n’a rien à voir avec la grande culture et la civilisation de l’Iran. » Il a qualifié la diffusion du film de Lanzmann en persan de « moment historique. »

Après la diffusion, Alireza Meybodi a déclaré aux journalistes qu’il avait été agréablement surpris par l’ampleur des réactions des téléspectateurs en Iran même, ou en Europe et en Amérique du Nord. « Nous avons reçu beaucoup d’appels et de courriels positifs de téléspectateurs après la diffusion de ce lundi. » Il a précisé que la station de télévision a décidé de consacrer un programme d’appels téléphoniques en direct pour recevoir les réactions de téléspectateurs vivant en Iran et partout dans le monde.

Le lancement de « Shoah » en persan a été marqué à Paris par une manifestation organisée à l’UNESCO ce lundi. Elle a réuni quatre cents personnalités, dont des intellectuels, des écrivains, des ambassadeurs, de hauts fonctionnaires, des cinéastes, des éditeurs et des journalistes qui ont regardé le premier épisode du film en direct.

Décrivant le film « Shoah » comme « monument dans l’histoire de la Shoah et chef-d’œuvre du cinéma, » la Directrice générale de l’UNESCO, Irina Bokova, a déclaré que la traduction du film en persan a été « une étape décisive faite pour partager la vérité sur la Shoah dans le monde. » Elle ajoutait que l’UNESCO a joué un rôle actif dans les activités du Projet Aladin dès le départ et continuera à le faire à l’avenir.

Le ministre de la Culture, Frédéric Mitterrand, a qualifié « Shoah » de « chef-d’œuvre cinématographique et historique », affirmant qu’ « il y a un avant et un après ‘Shoah’. » Il a salué le projet Aladin pour son travail si nécessaire, fait pour rapprocher les cultures.
La Présidente du Projet Aladin, Anne-Marie Revcolevschi, a remercié les milliers d’Iraniens qui ont consulté le site internet d’Aladin en persan (www.projetaladin.org) ou ont téléchargé des livres traduits en persan sur la Bibliothèque numérique d’Aladin (www.aladdinlibrary.org). Elle a annoncé que la version en persan du livre de Lanzmann, « Shoah, » était désormais disponible en téléchargement gratuit à partir de cette bibliothèque. Notant que le Projet Aladin a organisé des conférences et débats sur la Shoah dans dix villes du Moyen-Orient et d’Afrique du Nord en 2010, elle a appelé les autorités iraniennes à autoriser l’organisation d’une conférence similaire à l’Université de Téhéran.

Après la projection du film à l’UNESCO, le journaliste Philippe Dessaint a animé une table ronde qui a réuni Claude Lanzmann, Anne-Marie Revcolevschi, la sociologue et écrivain iranienne Chahla Chafiq, l’Ambassadeur de France aux Droits de l’Homme, François Zimeray, l’Iranienne Ladan Boroumand de la Fondation des Droits de l’Homme, l’historien Alexandre Adler et le journaliste et auteur iranien, Nasser Etemadi.

Le Projet Aladin prévoit d’organiser des avant-premières de « Shoah » dans plusieurs capitales du monde musulman, en commençant par Istanbul et Ankara le mois prochain. « Shoah, » sous-titré en turc, sera présenté au Festival International du Film d’Istanbul et ensuite diffusé à la télévision nationale turque. « J’espère que la diffusion de « Shoah » en Turquie va être un exemple important pour le monde musulman. Seules les œuvres d’art peuvent rapprocher les êtres humains, » a déclaré Claude Lanzmann.

Le projet Aladin tient à remercier les organisations et les fondations qui ont aidé à financer la traduction et le sous-titrage de « Shoah » : la Fondation Edmond J. Safra, la Conférence sur les Revendications matérielles juives contre l’Allemagne (Claims Conference), la Fondation pour la Mémoire de la Shoah, la Fondation Evens et le Centre National de la Cinématographie (CNC), et l’agence Colorado qui s’est occupé des relations presse de l’événement.

Le Projet Aladin
Le Projet Aladin est une organisation internationale basée à Paris. Son objectif est de promouvoir le rapprochement interculturel, en particulier entre juifs et musulmans, par le biais de l’éducation, la connaissance de l’histoire, le dialogue et le respect mutuel.
Lancé sous le patronage de l’UNESCO en 2009, le Projet Aladin est soutenu par de nombreux dirigeants dans le monde, des organisations internationales et plus d’un millier d’intellectuels, d’ universitaires et de personnalités sur les cinq continents. Le 1er Février 2011, le Projet Aladin a organisé la visite à Auschwitz d’une délégation internationale de deux cents personnalités politiques, religieuses et culturelles venues de quarante pays.
Annexe A : Exemples de réactions des médias officiels et pro-gouvernementaux et de sites Web iraniens :
Journalists News Agency à Téhéran: « La télévision Pars TV lèche les bottes des Sionistes”
Mashergh News, un site pro-gouvernemental influent : « Le film « Shoah » est diffusé en persan pour montrer aux iraniens que cela a existé »
L’Agence de presse Fars, organisme étatique : « Des chaines de télévision par satellite de Los Angeles volent à la rescousse d’Israël. »
Quds (journal publié à Machhad ) : « la télévision Pars TV recherche les faveurs des Sionistes »
Yalasarat : site Web proche du Président iranien : « Des chaînes de télévision satellitaires aident Israël »
Tabnak : site info influent proche du gouvernement : « Les sionistes s’engagent sérieusement pour prouver que l’holocauste a eu bien lieu »
Annexe B : Exemples de réactions sur des sites Web iraniens et des sites Web de médias en langue persane
Roozonline: site info populaire iranien
“Shoah de Lanzmann, le meilleur moyen pour lutter contre Ahmadinejad”
Manoto TV: chaine satellite iranienne basée à Londres:
“Shoah diffusé pour la première fois en Iran”
Site des sympathisants du Mouvement vert à l’étranger:
“L’interview du cinéaste Claude Lanzmann avec le Point”
RFI en persan: “Table-ronde à l’UNESCO à l’occasion de la diffusion de Shoah en persan »
Voir également:

Non, Monsieur Haenel, je n’ai en rien censuré le témoignage de Jan Karski, par Claude Lanzmann
L’auteur du film « Shoah » répond aux critiques formulées par le romancier.

Le Monde

30.01.2010

Si Yannick Haenel n’a répondu à aucun des arguments de fond que j’exposais dans mon article de Marianne du 23-29 janvier, c’est bien parce qu’il ne le pouvait pas. Je vais, quant à moi, répondre point par point à ses esquives de la vérité, à ses amalgames, à ses mensonges, ses insultes mêmes.

Pour commencer, Haenel court au plus facile, répliquant à des propos de seconde main et à des interprétations de Pierre Assouline, qui tendent à transformer un enjeu véritable en une guéguerre d’ego (voir « Lanzmann contre-attaque sur Karski », « Le Monde des livres » du 22 janvier).

Selon Assouline, je ne « décolérerais pas  » depuis qu’Haenel a obtenu le prix Interallié, au mois de novembre 2009. Haenel, adossé à cette colère imaginaire, y va encore plus carrément et nous assène « l’immensité de (ma) jalousie ». Foutre ! Quitte à peiner Haenel, j’ai beau me sonder impitoyablement, je ne vois pas ce qui, en sa personne et en son livre, pourrait la susciter.

Mais il faut aller vers l’ignoble. Haenel s’étonne de ce que j’ai mis cinq mois à m’aviser que Jan Karski était un faux roman et une oeuvre malhonnête. Je me suis complètement expliqué là-dessus dans mon article de Marianne. D’un mot, les deux premiers chapitres que j’avais parcourus me déplaisaient, car ils parasitaient mon travail et celui de Karski : la paraphrase ne requiert nul talent et ne m’apprenait rien. Quant au troisième et dernier chapitre (le « roman »), j’avais tout simplement refusé de le lire, tant je pressentais qu’il n’aurait que des rapports très lointains avec la vérité.

Mais surtout, par amitié et respect pour notre éditeur commun, Antoine Gallimard, je ne voulais pas entraver la carrière du livre d’Haenel. Je n’ai lu ces 72 pages que quelques jours avant Noël. Le portrait qui y est brossé du président Roosevelt, le récit de la rencontre Karski-Roosevelt, les pensées prêtées à Karski, etc., ont fait se lever en moi la honte et la colère, honte de m’être tu, semblant ainsi cautionner Haenel, colère devant le culot idéologique et la bassesse d’imagination de l’auteur.

Bassesse qui se retrouve dans la façon dont Haenel interprète ma prise de conscience tardive. C’est mon « agenda » (sic) qui, selon lui, exige ma colère : « Son attaque contre mon livre, dit-il, coïncide en effet avec une rediffusion de Shoah sur Arte et avec la signature d’un contrat, sur la même chaîne, pour un film sur Karski : dans le domaine de la publicité, le hasard fait toujours bien les choses. »

Pareille affirmation est ignominieuse et relève de la paire de gifles. Non, Monsieur Haenel, ce n’est pas mon agenda qui a exigé ma colère, c’est ma colère qui a dicté mon agenda. En ce qui concerne Shoah sur Arte, le contrat était signé depuis bien longtemps.

Ce n’est pas le cas du film intitulé Le Rapport Karski, que je viens de réaliser, en un mois, à partir des rushes tournés en 1978, non intégrés à Shoah, dans lequel Karski, d’une façon dévastatrice pour le « romancier », relate les événements auxquels il a participé et la conception qu’il se faisait de sa mission. J’ai réalisé ce film dans l’intention avouée de rétablir au plus vite la vérité. A ce propos, la « fiction » doit-elle conduire les directeurs littéraires à mentir froidement ? Interrogé par Thomas Wieder (Le Monde du 26 janvier), Philippe Sollers, qui a publié Jan Karski dans sa collection « L’infini » (Gallimard), déclare : « Je trouve étrange que Lanzmann ne réagisse que maintenant, alors que je lui en avais adressé les épreuves avant l’été. » Sollers ment – et c’est triste -, les choses se sont passées comme je le raconte dans Marianne : il m’a averti, un matin, par téléphone, de la publication, par lui, du Karski, « magnifique hommage à Shoah », et a raccroché sans que j’aie pu placer un mot, sans même me dire le nom de l’auteur.

Dans le fatras qu’est son mémoire en défense, Haenel reprend, sans vergogne, la doxa qui fait de moi le grand prêtre de l’Interdit et le propriétaire vindicatif de la Shoah. Je serais donc aussi le « propriétaire de Jan Karski comme on l’est d’une marque » (sic). Vulgarité d’esprit qui transpire dans chaque ligne du livre. « Il (Lanzmann) ignore sans doute que Karski a participé à d’autres films que le sien. » Haenel devrait apprendre à lire : je consacre trois pages du Lièvre de Patagonie (Gallimard) aux assauts que subit Karski lorsque des chaînes de télévision, ayant appris que je l’avais retrouvé et tourné avec lui, voulurent en faire autant.

Dans Shoah, Karski est inoubliable. Son extraordinaire visage, ses soupirs exténués, sa voix qui incarne véritablement ses paroles, ces paroles mêmes, ébranlent le spectateur aux tréfonds. J’ai tourné avec Karski pendant deux jours entiers chez lui, à Washington, en 1978. Je n’ai intégré à Shoah que la première journée, laissant seulement Karski dire à la fin de son récit : « But I reported what I saw » (« Mais j’ai fait mon rapport sur ce que j’avais vu »). Il était clair qu’il avait réussi sa mission, passant de Varsovie à Londres, puis, plus tard, à Washington.

J’ai exposé les raisons de cette décision de créateur, elle n’est en rien une censure, comme ose le dire Haenel, prétendant que j’avais ainsi « rendu impossible qu’on puisse voir dans (mon) film un Polonais qui n’est pas antisémite » (sic). Il faudrait, ici, aller considérablement plus loin que la paire de gifles (rassurons Haenel, la guillotine ne se profile pas) : Karski, pendant tout le temps où on le voit dans Shoah, apparaît comme un homme bouleversé par le sort des juifs, à qui le film rend entièrement et fraternellement justice.

Et Karski n’est pas seul : il y a dans Shoah d’autres Polonais portant encore une blessure qui se rouvre dès qu’on évoque l’extermination. Mais, selon Haenel, j’aurais empêché Karski de « raconter sa mission en faveur des juifs », récit qui aurait montré sa vraie grandeur. Que ce monsieur prenne patience : il saura bientôt ce que Karski a dit le deuxième jour et il rendra gorge des accusations de mensonge et de trahison qu’il porte contre moi. Je respecte Karski bien plus que lui, je l’aime, contrairement à ce qu’il allègue, je l’ai aimé dès le premier instant, le spectateur de Shoah lui aussi ne peut que l’aimer.

Enfin, voici l’estocade, le coup mortel : je me garde, paraît-il, de raconter que j’ai piégé Karski pour le convaincre de se laisser filmer. Pauvre Haenel au moralisme simplet ! Pour reprendre un mot de Marcel Ophuls, on ne réalise pas un film comme Shoah en respectant les règles de fair-play d’un joueur de cricket d’Eton.

J’ai piégé beaucoup de monde, à commencer par la bureaucratie communiste polonaise pour obtenir la possibilité de tourner librement en Pologne. J’ai piégé des nazis, j’ai eu un faux nom, des faux papiers, et je n’ai reculé devant rien pour percer la muraille d’ignorance et de silence qui enfermait alors la Shoah. J’ai en effet répété à Karski ce que j’avais dit à Varsovie : que la question du sauvetage des juifs serait importante dans mon film, celle de la responsabilité des Alliés aussi. Cela, c’était au début de mon travail.

Je me suis ensuite convaincu que tout cela était infiniment plus complexe que je ne l’avais pensé. Avoir « piégé » Karski ne nous a pas empêchés d’être très proches l’un de l’autre à Washington et d’entretenir ensuite une longue correspondance. « Shoah, écrivit-il en 1985, est sans aucun doute le plus grand film qui ait été fait sur la tragédie des juifs. »

Il fit preuve de beaucoup de courage en écrivant cela à un moment où Shoah était attaqué tous azimuts en Pologne, et où le gouvernement polonais demandait à la France de l’interdire.

Ce petit jeune homme décrète que je ne comprends pas la littérature. Et il ose écrire : « Contrairement à ce tribunal de l’Histoire, d’où parle Lanzmann, la littérature est un espace libre, où la « vérité » n’existe pas. » Il n’est pas de phrase plus sotte. La littérature n’a affaire qu’à la vérité ; si celle-ci n’est pas l’affaire de Yannick Haenel, c’est que Jan Karski, roman, et quoi qu’en dise Sollers, n’est pas de la littérature.

Claude Lanzmann est écrivain, cinéaste

Voir de même:

Claude Lanzmann’s Holocaust documentary, Shoah, was meant to be an ‘incarnation of the truth’. His new film responds to a threat to that truth

Claude Lanzmann went to Iran recently. « As you know, » the 85-year-old director, a Jewish Frenchman, tells me in his Paris office, « Ahmadinejad doesn’t believe there was a Holocaust. The Iranians wanted me to prove to them on television that there was. They wanted to see the corpses. »

What did he tell them? The director of the nine-and-a-half hour documentary Shoah (1985) about the mass murder of Jews in Nazi death camps swivels round in his chair and fixes me. « I told them there’s not a single corpse in Shoah. The people who arrived at Treblinka, Belzec or Sobibor were killed within two or three hours and their corpses burned. The proof is not the corpses; the proof is the absence of corpses. There were special details who gathered the dust and threw it into the wind or into the rivers. Nothing of them remained. »

Among the Jews detailed to dispose of human remains was Simon Srebnik, whom Lanzmann lured from his home in Israel to the site of Chelmno, the first camp where Jews were gassed. In Shoah’s opening sequence, we see Srebnik being rowed along the Narew river. As the boat eases through calm waters, Srebnik sings, his lovely voice mingling with the sound of the breeze in the summer trees.

« It is not beautiful, » snaps Lanzmann when I tell him my first impression of this sequence. Only later do we learn that what Srebnik is singing is a Nazi marching song that, during his captivity, he was taught and compelled to sing for his captors’ entertainment. Only later do we learn that Srebnik was one of the Jews compelled by Nazis to daily dump sacks of crushed bones of Holocaust victims into this all-too-calm river. Two days before Chelmno was liberated by Soviet troops, remaining prisoners were shot in the head, among them Srebnik. Amazingly, he survived.

Shoah, which will be screened as part of the London documentary film festival Open City later this month, followed by a Q and A with the director, is a documentary of absences. There is no newsreel footage, there are no old photos, no corpses. Sometimes Lanzmann trains his camera on an empty field for several minutes. We see a seeming bucolic idyll – just the place for a picnic. Only the caption – Treblinka – tells us something intolerable happened here

For a long time, Lanzmann tells me, he resisted going to Poland. « Why would I want to? What would I see? » Instead, he toured the world interviewing Holocaust survivors for his film, pushing them hard to recall their experiences. Interviewees such as Abraham Bomba, whom Lanzmann filmed cutting hair in his Tel Aviv salon. As Bomba worked, he told Lanzmann how he was forced to cut women’s hair at Treblinka just before they were gassed.

At one point in the interview, Bomba recalled how a fellow barber was working when his wife and sister came into the gas chamber. Bomba broke down and pleaded with Lanzmann that he be allowed to stop telling the story. Lanzmann said: « You have to do it. I know it’s very hard. » This was his principal method on Shoah: to incarnate the truth of what happened through survivors’ testimonies, even at the cost of reopening old wounds.

With testimonies such as these, Lanzmann initially thought, he needn’t go to the scene of the crimes – to death camps such as Treblinka, Belzec, Sobibor or Auschwitz-Birkenau. But, four years into his work on Shoah, Lanzmann changed his mind. « Finally, I realised I was meeting people, but couldn’t understand what they were telling me. I had to go there. I arrived in Poland loaded like a bomb with knowledge. But the fuse was missing – Poland was the fuse. »

What astounded him when he arrived in villages near the death camps was that life carried on regardless – as though the tragedy of the Holocaust had been erased. « When I saw the village of Treblinka still existed, that people who were witnesses to everything still existed, that there was a normal train station, the bomb that I was exploded. I started to shoot. »

What he started to shoot were testimonies of non-Jewish Polish bystanders. Were they oblivious to what was happening? Overwhelmingly not: Lanzmann interviews Jewish victims and bystanders who recalled that non-Jewish Poles made throat-cutting gestures to Jews as they arrived at the death camps on trains – to alert them to what was about to happen, perhaps, or maybe to revel in their looming murders. Lanzmann found evidence of Polish antisemitism in the villages around the death camps: a male interviewee relates how he’s happy the Jews are gone, but would rather they had gone to Israel voluntarily than be exterminated. In an interview outside a Catholic church, with Simon Srebnik present, bystanders alleged the Holocaust was just retribution for the killing of Jesus.

While inculpating Poles in Shoah, Lanzmann in this interview exculpates the Allies from the charge of doing nothing to save the Jews. « Could the Jews have been saved? My answer is no. I’m very deeply convinced of this. Everybody talks about the bombing of Birkenau. Some in the War Refugee Board [created by President Franklin Roosevelt in 1943] were for bombing, and there were others who were against for reasons that cannot be despised. » What reasons? « Some pilots asked, ‘What is the meaning of this, to bomb the people we’re meant to rescue?’ A terrible contradiction.

« Money, not bombs, would have helped the Jews, because the Germans were running out of money. But in wartime you can’t send money because there are rules. But some religious Jews did send money to Slovakia that got into German hands, and for a while the deportations stopped. »

The question of whether the allies could have saved the lives of the Jews goes to the heart of one of the most important interviews Lanzmann conducted for Shoah, namely the one with the Polish spy and diplomat Jan Karski. In 1943, Karski was commissioned by the exiled Polish government to tell allied leaders about the fate of Poland, and by two Jewish leaders in Warsaw to do the same about the fate of the Jews. « They asked him to mobilise the conscience of the world, » says Lanzmann. In Shoah, Karski recounts what he saw in the ghetto and in camps. At the end of that interview, Karski says of his visit to Washington and London: « I made my report. »

Why end the interview there? « Everybody knows that the Jews were not rescued. He didn’t need to say more. It was very strong to end that way. »

But last year, Lanzmann changed his mind. He decided to release a film of the rest of the 33-year-old Karski interview, in which he told Lanzmann in detail of his mission to brief allied leaders. In this new film, The Karski Report, the Polish spy tells us that he met Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter, a Jew, who, upon hearing Karski’s description of the horrors befalling Jews in Poland, said: « I do not believe you. » But Frankfurter was not calling Karski a liar. Indeed, at the same meeting, Frankfurter clarified what he meant: « I did not say that he was lying, I said that I could not believe him. There is a difference. »

Human inability to believe in the intolerable is what The Karski Report is about. At the start of the film, Lanzmann quotes the French philosopher Raymond Aron, who, when asked about the Holocaust, said: « I knew, but I didn’t believe it, and because I didn’t believe it, I didn’t know. » No wonder Lanzmann, a friend of Jean-Paul Sartre and lover of Simone de Beauvoir, is concerned with such philosophical issues. « The human brain is not prepared to understand this – even on the steps of the gas chamber. Karski says this very clearly. » Hence, for Lanzmann, the primacy of oral testimony as a mode of representation and understanding at the heart of Shoah.

But that primacy is paradoxical: the tragedy of Karski’s mission, if it was a tragedy, was to have witnessed something of such unprecedented horror that no mere report could convey its import, still less move the allies to action.

Why release this film now? Lanzmann released The Karski Report after the publication in 2009 of a novel called Jan Karski by the French writer Yannick Haenel. The novel became a French bestseller, but Lanzmann attacked it as « a falsification of history and of its protagonists ». « It’s a scandal about Karski, because he tries to make Karski into a man obsessed with the rescue of the Jews. He was not. » So Karski was not, as Haenel’s novel implies, the man who tried and failed to stop the Holocaust? « No! He says: ‘The Jews were not the centre of my mission. Poland was the centre of my mission.’ He says that very clearly. »

« I said to myself, ‘You are an idiot, because you have the film of the second day’s interview to show that Karski was not as he is depicted in this novel.’ So I released The Karski Report to re-establish the truth. » Haenel, for his part, argues Lanzmann does not understand his novel.

But what is the truth? Is truth only what emerges from oral testimony such as that given by Shoah’s interviewees? Sometimes, just as Adorno injuncted writing poetry after Auschwitz, so Lanzmann seems to be prohibiting – or at least reserving the right to slur – art about the Holocaust that is not based on oral testimony. Isn’t something to be said for artists who, in an act of creative empathy, try to imagine the lives of others embroiled in the Holocaust and legacy (consider, say, Nicole Kraus’s recent novel Great House, steeped as it is in creatively imagining the lives of Holocausts survivors)? « Of course one can make art about the Holocaust after my film, » Lanzmann says. « All I do say is that great literature always adds to reality. »

The implication is clear: Haenel’s literary imagining of Karski’s inner world distorts and subtracts from reality, while Lanzmann clearly believes Shoah, does otherwise. He wrote in the French newspaper Libération recently that when one watches Shoah, « one bears witness for nine hours 30 minutes to the incarnation of the truth, the contrary of the sanitisation of historical science. »

« That, » he says, « is why it remains important to see my film. »

Shoah and The Karski Report are both being screened at the Open City festival, on 18 and 19 June. Details: opencitylondon.com