Elimination du général Soleimani: Attention, une décision irresponsable peut en cacher une autre ! (Guess who just pulled another decisive blow against Iran’s rogue adventurism ?)

3 janvier, 2020

CA502K5W8AAepmb"Soleimani is my commander" says the lower graffiti on the U.S. embassy in Baghdad at the very end of 2019LONG LIVE TRUMP ! (On Tehran streets after Soleimani's elimination, Jan. 3, 2019)
Image result for damet garm poeticPersian is a beautifully lyrical and highly emotional language, one that adds a touch of poetry to everyday phrases. Discover these 18 poetic Persian phrases you'll wish English had.

3 a.m. There is a phone in the White House and it’s ringing. Who do you want answering the phone? Hillary Clinton ad (2008)
The assassination of Iran Quds Force chief Qassem Soleimani is an extremely dangerous and foolish escalation. The US bears responsibility for all consequences of its rogue adventurism.  Mohammad Javad Zarif (Iranian Foreign Minister)
Le président Trump vient de jeter un bâton de dynamite dans une poudrière, et il doit au peuple américain une explication. C’est une énorme escalade dans une région déjà dangereuse. Joe Biden
Iraqis — Iraqis — dancing in the street for freedom; thankful that General Soleimani is no more. Mike Pompeo
Qassem Soleimani was an arch terrorist with American blood on his hands. His demise should be applauded by all who seek peace and justice. Proud of President Trump for doing the strong and right thing. Nikki Haley
To Iran and its proxy militias: We will not accept the continued attacks against our personnel and forces in the region. Attacks against us will be met with responses in the time, manner and place of our choosing. We urge the Iranian regime to end malign activities. Mark Esper (US Defense Secretary)
At the direction of the President, the U.S. military has taken decisive defensive action to protect U.S. personnel abroad by killing Qasem Soleimani, the head of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps-Quds Force, a U.S.-designated Foreign Terrorist Organization. General Soleimani was actively developing plans to attack American diplomats and service members in Iraq and throughout the region. General Soleimani and his Quds Force were responsible for the deaths of hundreds of American and coalition service members and the wounding of thousands more. He had orchestrated attacks on coalition bases in Iraq over the last several months – including the attack on December 27th – culminating in the death and wounding of additional American and Iraqi personnel. General Soleimani also approved the attacks on the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad that took place this week. This strike was aimed at deterring future Iranian attack plans. The United States will continue to take all necessary action to protect our people and our interests wherever they are around the world. US state department
In March 2007, Soleimani was included on a list of Iranian individuals targeted with sanctions in United Nations Security Council Resolution 1747. On 18 May 2011, he was sanctioned again by the U.S. along with Syrian president Bashar al-Assad and other senior Syrian officials due to his alleged involvement in providing material support to the Syrian government. On 24 June 2011, the Official Journal of the European Union said the three Iranian Revolutionary Guard members now subject to sanctions had been « providing equipment and support to help the Syrian government suppress protests in Syria ». The Iranians added to the EU sanctions list were two Revolutionary Guard commanders, Soleimani, Mohammad Ali Jafari, and the Guard’s deputy commander for intelligence, Hossein Taeb. Soleimani was also sanctioned by the Swiss government in September 2011 on the same grounds cited by the European Union. In 2007, the U.S. included him in a « Designation of Iranian Entities and Individuals for Proliferation Activities and Support for Terrorism », which forbade U.S. citizens from doing business with him. The list, published in the EU’s Official Journal on 24 June 2011, also included a Syrian property firm, an investment fund and two other enterprises accused of funding the Syrian government. The list also included Mohammad Ali Jafari and Hossein Taeb. On 13 November 2018, the U.S. sanctioned an Iraqi military leader named Shibl Muhsin ‘Ubayd Al-Zaydi and others who allegedly were acting on Soleimani’s behalf in financing military actions in Syria or otherwise providing support for terrorism in the region. Wikipedia
The historic nuclear accord between a US-led group of countries and Iran was good news for a man who some consider to be the Middle East’s most effective covert operative. As a result of the deal, Qasem Suleimani, the commander of the Iranian Revolutionary Guards Qods Force and the general responsible for overseeing Iran’s network of proxy organizations, will be removed from European Union sanctions lists once the agreement is implemented, and taken off a UN sanctions list after eight or fewer years. Iran obtained some key concessions as a result of the nuclear agreement, including access to an estimated $150 billion in frozen assets; the lifting of a UN arms embargo, the eventual end to sanctions related to the country’s ballistic missile program; the ability to operate over 5,000 uranium enrichment centrifuges and to run stable elements through centrifuges at the once-clandestine and heavily guarded Fordow facility; nuclear assistance from the US and its partners; and the ability to stall inspections of sensitive sites for as long as 24 days. In light of these accomplishments, the de-listing of a general responsible for coordinating anti-US militia groups in Iraq — someone who may be responsible for the deaths of US soldiers — almost seems gratuitous. It’s unlikely that the entire deal hinged on a single Iranian officer’s ability to open bank accounts in EU states or travel within Europe. But it got into the deal anyway. So did a reprieve for Bank Saderat, which the US sanctioned in 2006 for facilitating money transfers to Iranian regime-supported terror groups like Hezbollah and Islamic Jihad. As part of the deal, Bank Saderat will leave the EU sanctions list on the same timetable as Suleimani, although it will remain under US designation. Like Suleimani’s removal, Bank Saderat’s apparent legalization in Europe suggests that for the purposes of the deal, the US and its partners lumped a broad range of restrictions under the heading of « nuclear-related » sanctions. Suleimani and Bank Saderat are still going to remain under US sanctions related to the Iranian regime’s human rights abuses and support for terrorism. US sanctions have broad extraterritorial reach, and the US Treasury Department has turned into the scourge of compliance desks at banks around the world. But that matters to a somewhat lesser degree inside of the EU, where companies have actually been exempted from complying with certain US « secondary sanctions » on Iran since the mid-1990s. (…) Some time in the next few years, Qasem Suleimani will be able to travel and do business inside the EU, while a bank that’s facilitated the funding of US-listed terror group’s will be allowed to enter the European market. As part of the nuclear deal, the US and its partners bargained away much of the international leverage against some of the more problematic sectors in the Iranian regime, including entities whose wrongdoing went well beyond the nuclear realm. The result is the almost complete reversal of the sanctions regime in Europe. Iran successfully pushed for a broad definition of « nuclear-related sanctions, » and bargained hard — and effectively — for a maximal degree of sanctions relief. And the de-listing of Bank Saderat and Qasem Suleimani, along with the late-breaking effort to classify arms trade restrictions as purely nuclear-related, demonstrates just how far the US and its partners were willing to go to close a historic nuclear deal. Armin Rosen
This was a combatant. There’s no doubt that he fit the description of ‘combatant.’ He was a uniformed member of an enemy military who was actively planning to kill Americans; American soldiers and probably, as well, American civilians. It was the right thing to do. It was legally justified, and I think we should applaud the president for his decision. We send a very powerful message to the Iranian government that we will not stand by as the American embassy is attacked — which is an act of war — and we will not stand by as plans are being made to attack and kill American soldiers. I think every president who had any degree of courage would do the same thing, and I applaud our president for doing it, and the members of the military who carried it out, risking their own lives and safety. I think this is an action that will have saved lives in the end.  The president doesn’t need congressional authorization, or any legal authorization … The president, as the commander-in-chief of the army is entitled to take preventive actions to save the lives of the American military. This is very similar to what Barack Obama did with Ben Rhodes’s authorization and approval — without Congress’s authorization — in killing Osama bin Laden. In fact, that was worse, in some ways, because that was a revenge act. There was no real threat that Osama bin Laden would carry out any future terrorist acts. Moreover, he was not a member of an official armed forces in uniform, so it’s a fortiori from what Obama did and Rhodes did that President Trump has complete legal authority in a much more compelling way to have taken the military action that was taken today. Alan Dershowitz
Trump in full fascist 101 mode-,steal and lie – untill there’s nothing left and start a war – He’s so idiotic he doesn’t know he just attacked Iran And that’s not like anywhere else. John Cusak
Dear , The USA has disrespected your country, your flag, your people. 52% of us humbly apologize. We want peace with your nation. We are being held hostage by a terrorist regime. We do not know how to escape. Please do not kill us. . Rose McGowan
On se réveille dans un monde plus dangereux (…) et l’escalade militaire est toujours dangereuse. Amélie de Montchalin (secrétaire d’État française aux Affaires européennes)
C’est d’abord l’Iranienne qui va vous répondre et celle-là ne peut que se réjouir de ce qui s’est passé. Je parle en mon nom mais je peux vous l’assurer aussi au nom de millions d’Iraniens, probablement la majorité d’entre eux : cet homme était haï, il incarnait le mal absolu ! Je suis révoltée par les commentaires que j’ai entendus venant de certains pseudo-spécialistes de l’Iran, le présentant sur une chaîne de télévision comme un individu charismatique et populaire. Il faut ne rien connaître et ne rien comprendre à ce pays pour tenir ce genre de sottises. Pour l’Iranien lambda, Soleimani était un monstre, ce qui se fait de pire dans la République islamique. (…) Soleimani en était un élément essentiel, aussi puissant que Khameini et ce n’est pas de la propagande que d’affirmer que sa mort ne choque presque personne. (…) Je ne suis pas dans le secret des généraux iraniens mais une simple observatrice informée. Le régime est aux abois depuis des mois, totalement isolé. Ils savent qu’ils n’ont pas d’avenir, la rue et le peuple n’en veulent plus, ils ne peuvent pas vraiment compter sur l’Union européenne et pas plus sur la Chine. Ils n’ont aucun avenir et c’est ce qui rend la situation particulièrement dangereuse car ils sont dans une logique suicidaire. (…) En réalité, ils ont tout perdu et ne peuvent plus sortir du pays pour s’installer à l’étranger car des mandats ont été lancés contre la plupart d’entre eux. Les sanctions ont asséché la manne des pétrodollars et c’est essentiel car il n’y avait pas d’adhésion idéologique à ce régime. (…) Donald Trump (…) a considérablement affaibli ce régime, comme jamais auparavant, et peut-être même a-t-il signé leur arrêt de mort. Nous verrons. Lors des manifestations populaires, à Téhéran et dans d’autre villes, les noms de Khameini, de Rohani, de Soleimani étaient hués. Il n’y a jamais eu de slogans anti-Trump ou contre les Etats-Unis. (…) [Mais] hélas ils n’abandonneront pas le pouvoir tranquillement, j’en suis convaincue. Mahnaz Shirali
The whole “protest” against the United States Embassy compound in Baghdad last week was almost certainly a Suleimani-staged operation to make it look as if Iraqis wanted America out when in fact it was the other way around. The protesters were paid pro-Iranian militiamen. No one in Baghdad was fooled by this. In a way, it’s what got Suleimani killed. He so wanted to cover his failures in Iraq he decided to start provoking the Americans there by shelling their forces, hoping they would overreact, kill Iraqis and turn them against the United States. Trump, rather than taking the bait, killed Suleimani instead. I have no idea whether this was wise or what will be the long-term implications. But (…) Suleimani is part of a system called the Islamic Revolution in Iran. That revolution has managed to use oil money and violence to stay in power since 1979 — and that is Iran’s tragedy, a tragedy that the death of one Iranian general will not change. Today’s Iran is the heir to a great civilization and the home of an enormously talented people and significant culture. Wherever Iranians go in the world today, they thrive as scientists, doctors, artists, writers and filmmakers — except in the Islamic Republic of Iran, whose most famous exports are suicide bombing, cyberterrorism and proxy militia leaders. The very fact that Suleimani was probably the most famous Iranian in the region speaks to the utter emptiness of this regime, and how it has wasted the lives of two generations of Iranians by looking for dignity in all the wrong places and in all the wrong ways. (…) in the coming days there will be noisy protests in Iran, the burning of American flags and much crying for the “martyr.” The morning after the morning after? There will be a thousand quiet conversations inside Iran that won’t get reported. They will be about the travesty that is their own government and how it has squandered so much of Iran’s wealth and talent on an imperial project that has made Iran hated in the Middle East. And yes, the morning after, America’s Sunni Arab allies will quietly celebrate Suleimani’s death, but we must never forget that it is the dysfunction of many of the Sunni Arab regimes — their lack of freedom, modern education and women’s empowerment — that made them so weak that Iran was able to take them over from the inside with its proxies. (…) the Middle East, particularly Iran, is becoming an environmental disaster area — running out of water, with rising desertification and overpopulation. If governments there don’t stop fighting and come together to build resilience against climate change — rather than celebrating self-promoting military frauds who conquer failed states and make them fail even more — they’re all doomed. Thomas L. Friedman
It is impossible to overstate the importance of this particular action. It is more significant than the killing of Osama bin Laden or even the death of [Islamic State leader Abu Bakr] al-Baghdadi. Suleimani was the architect and operational commander of the Iranian effort to solidify control of the so-called Shia crescent, stretching from Iran to Iraq through Syria into southern Lebanon. He is responsible for providing explosives, projectiles, and arms and other munitions that killed well over 600 American soldiers and many more of our coalition and Iraqi partners just in Iraq, as well as in many other countries such as Syria. So his death is of enormous significance. The question of course is how does Iran respond in terms of direct action by its military and Revolutionary Guard Corps forces? And how does it direct its proxies—the Iranian-supported Shia militia in Iraq and Syria and southern Lebanon, and throughout the world? (…) The reasoning seems to be to show in the most significant way possible that the U.S. is just not going to allow the continued violence—the rocketing of our bases, the killing of an American contractor, the attacks on shipping, on unarmed drones—without a very significant response. Many people had rightly questioned whether American deterrence had eroded somewhat because of the relatively insignificant responses to the earlier actions. This clearly was of vastly greater importance. Of course it also, per the Defense Department statement, was a defensive action given the reported planning and contingencies that Suleimani was going to Iraq to discuss and presumably approve. This was in response to the killing of an American contractor, the wounding of American forces, and just a sense of how this could go downhill from here if the Iranians don’t realize that this cannot continue. (…) Iran is in a very precarious economic situation, it is very fragile domestically—they’ve killed many, many hundreds if not thousands of Iranian citizens who were demonstrating on the streets of Iran in response to the dismal economic situation and the mismanagement and corruption. I just don’t see the Iranians as anywhere near as supportive of the regime at this point as they were decades ago during the Iran-Iraq War. Clearly the supreme leader has to consider that as Iran considers the potential responses to what the U.S. has done. It will be interesting now to see if there is a U.S. diplomatic initiative to reach out to Iran and to say, “Okay, the next move could be strikes against your oil infrastructure and your forces in your country—where does that end?” (…) We haven’t declared war, but we have taken a very, very significant action. (…) We’ve taken numerous actions to augment our air defenses in the region, our offensive capabilities in the region, in terms of general purpose and special operations forces and air assets. The Pentagon has considered the implications, the potential consequences and has done a great deal to mitigate the risks—although you can’t fully mitigate the potential risks.  (…) Again what was the alternative? Do it in Iran? Think of the implications of that. This is the most formidable adversary that we have faced for decades. He is a combination of CIA director, JSOC [Joint Special Operations Command] commander, and special presidential envoy for the region. This is a very significant effort to reestablish deterrence, which obviously had not been shored up by the relatively insignificant responses up until now. (…) Obviously all sides will suffer if this becomes a wider war, but Iran has to be very worried that—in the state of its economy, the significant popular unrest and demonstrations against the regime—that this is a real threat to the regime in a way that we have not seen prior to this. (…) The incentive would be to get out from under the sanctions, which are crippling. Could we get back to the Iran nuclear deal plus some additional actions that could address the shortcomings of the agreement? This is a very significant escalation, and they don’t know where this goes any more than anyone else does. Yes, they can respond and they can retaliate, and that can lead to further retaliation—and that it is clear now that the administration is willing to take very substantial action. This is a pretty clarifying moment in that regard. (…) Right now they are probably doing what anyone does in this situation: considering the menu of options. There could be actions in the gulf, in the Strait of Hormuz by proxies in the regional countries, and in other continents where the Quds Force have activities. There’s a very considerable number of potential responses by Iran, and then there’s any number of potential U.S. responses to those actions. Given the state of their economy, I think they have to be very leery, very concerned that that could actually result in the first real challenge to the regime certainly since the Iran-Iraq War. (…) The [Iraqi] prime minister has said that he would put forward legislation to [kick the U.S. military out of Iraq], although I don’t think that the majority of Iraqi leaders want to see that given that ISIS is still a significant threat. They are keenly aware that it was not the Iranian supported militias that defeated the Islamic State, it was U.S.-enabled Iraqi armed forces and special forces that really fought the decisive battles. Gen. David Petraeus
[Qasem Soleimani] was our most significant Iranian adversary during my four years in Iraq, [and] certainly when I was the Central Command commander, and very much so when I was the director of the CIA. He is unquestionably the most significant and important — or was the most significant and important — Iranian figure in the region, the most important architect of the effort by Iran to solidify control of the Shia crescent, and the operational commander of the various initiatives that were part of that effort. (…)  He sent a message to me through the president of Iraq in late March of 2008, during the battle of Basra, when we were supporting the Iraqi army forces that were battling the Shia militias in Basra that were supported, of course, by Qasem Soleimani and the Quds Force. He sent a message through the president that said, « General Petraeus, you should know that I, Qasem Soleimani, control the policy of Iran for Iraq, and also for Syria, Lebanon, Gaza and Afghanistan. » And the implication of that was, « If you want to deal with Iran to resolve this situation in Basra, you should deal with me, not with the Iranian diplomats. » And his power only grew from that point in time. By the way, I did not — I actually told the president to tell Qasem Soleimani to pound sand. (…) I suspect that the leaders in Washington were seeking to reestablish deterrence, which clearly had eroded to some degree, perhaps by the relatively insignificant actions in response to these strikes on the Abqaiq oil facility in Saudi Arabia, shipping in the Gulf and our $130 million dollar drone that was shot down. And we had seen increased numbers of attacks against US forces in Iraq. So I’m sure that there was a lot of discussion about what could show the Iranians most significantly that we are really serious, that they should not continue to escalate. Now, obviously, there is a menu of options that they have now and not just in terms of direct Iranian action against perhaps our large bases in the various Gulf states, shipping in the Gulf, but also through proxy actions — and not just in the region, but even in places such as Latin America and Africa and Europe. (…) I am not privy to the intelligence that was the foundation for the decision, which clearly was, as was announced, this was a defensive action, that Soleimani was going into the country to presumably approve further attacks. Without really being in the inner circle on that, I think it’s very difficult to either second-guess or to even think through what the recommendation might have been. Again, it is impossible to overstate the significance of this action. This is much more substantial than the killing of Osama bin Laden. It’s even more substantial than the killing of Baghdadi. (…) my understanding is that we have significantly shored up our air defenses, our air assets, our ground defenses and so forth. There’s been the movement of a lot of forces into the region in months, not just in the past days. So there’s been a very substantial augmentation of our defensive capabilities and also our offensive capabilities.  And (…) the question Iran has to ask itself is, « Where does this end? » If they now retaliate in a significant way — and considering how vulnerable their infrastructure and forces are at a time when their economy is in dismal shape because of the sanctions. So Iran is not in a position of strength, although it clearly has many, many options available to it, as I mentioned, not just with their armed forces and the Revolutionary Guards Corps, but also with these Quds Force-supported proxy elements throughout the region in the world. (…) I think one of the questions is, « What will the diplomatic ramifications of this be? » And again, there have been celebrations in some places in Iraq at the loss of Qasem Soleimani. So, again, there’s no tears being shed in certain parts of the country. And one has to ask what happens in the wake of the killing of the individual who had a veto, virtually, over the leadership of Iraq. What transpires now depends on the calculations of all these different elements. And certainly the US, I would assume, is considering diplomatic initiatives as well, reaching out and saying, « Okay. Does that send a sufficient message of our seriousness? Now, would you like to return to the table? » Or does Iran accelerate the nuclear program, which would, of course, precipitate something further from the United States? Very likely. So lots of calculations here. And I think we’re still very early in the deliberations on all the different ramifications of this very significant action. (…) I think that this particular episode has been fairly impressively handled. There’s been restraint in some of the communications methods from the White House. The Department of Defense put out, I think, a solid statement. It has taken significant actions, again, to shore up our defenses and our offensive capabilities. The question now, I think, is what is the diplomatic initiative that follows this? What will the State Department and the Secretary of State do now to try to get back to the table and reduce or end the battlefield consequences? [The flag that Donald Trump posted last night, no words] (…) I think relative to some of his tweets that was quite restrained. Gen. David Petraeus
Washington gave Israel a green light to assassinate Qassem Soleimani, the commander of the Quds Force, the overseas arm of Iran’s Revolutionary Guard, Kuwaiti newspaper Al-Jarida reported on Monday. Al-Jarida, which in recent years had broken exclusive stories from Israel, quoted a source in Jerusalem as saying that « there is an American-Israeli agreement » that Soleimani is a « threat to the two countries’ interests in the region. » It is generally assumed in the Arab world that the paper is used as an Israeli platform for conveying messages to other countries in the Middle East. (…) The agreement between Israel and the United States, according to the report, comes three years after Washington thwarted an Israeli attempt to kill the general. The report says Israel was « on the verge » of assassinating Soleimani three years ago, near Damascus, but the United States warned the Iranian leadership of the plan, revealing that Israel was closely tracking the Iranian general. Haaretz (2018)
Most revered military leader’ now joins ‘austere religious scholar’ and ‘mourners’ trying to storm our embassy as word choices that make normal people wonder whose side the American mainstream media is on. Buck Sexton
Make no mistake – this is bigger than taking out Osama Bin Laden. Ranj Alaaldin
The reported deaths of Iranian General Qassem Suleimani and the Iraqi commander of the militia that killed an American last week was a bold and decisive military action made possible by excellent intelligence and the courage of America’s service members. His death is a huge loss for Iran’s regime and its Iraqi proxies, and a major operational and psychological victory for the United States. The Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), led by Suleimani, was responsible for the deaths of more than 600 Americans in Iraq between 2003-2011, and countless more injured. He was a chief architect behind Iran’s continuing reign of terror in the region. This strike against one of the world’s most odious terrorists is no different than the mission which took out Osama bin Laden – it is, in fact, even more justifiable since he was in a foreign country directing terrorist attacks against Americans. Lt. Col. (Ret.) James Carafano (Heritage Foundation)
This is a major blow. I would argue that this is probably the most major decapitation strike the United States has ever carried out. … This is a man who controlled a transnational foreign legion that was controlling governments in numerous different countries. He had a hell of a lot of power and a hell of a lot of control. You have to be a strong leader in order to get these people to work with you, know how and when to play them off one another, and also know which Iranians do I need within the IRGC-QF, which Lebanese do I need, which Iraqis do I need … that’s not something you can just pick up at a local five and dime. It takes decades of experience. (…) It’s an incredible two-fer. This is another one of those old hands. These guys don’t grow on trees. It takes time. Iran has been at war with the United States since the Islamic Revolutionary regime took power in Tehran in 1979. To say that we are going to war or that this is yet another American escalation — I think we need to be a little more detailed. Over the past year, Kata’ib Hizballah, was launching rockets and mortars at Americans in Iraq and eventually killed one. Over the past couple of years we’ve had a number of issues in the Gulf, we’ve had a number of issues in different countries, we’ve had international terrorism issues, you name it, you can throw everything at the wall, and the Iranians have in some way been behind some of it. Even arm supplies to the Taliban … so this didn’t just appear in a vacuum because ‘we didn’t like the Iranians. What the administration must offer now is firm diplomacy backed by the continuing, credible threat of the use of military force. President Trump has wisely shown that he will act with the full powers of his office when American interests are threatened, and the extremist regime in Tehran would be wise to take notice. Phillip Smyth (Washington Institute)
From a military and diplomatic perspective, Soleimani was Iran’s David Petraeus and Stan McChrystal and Brett McGurk all rolled into one. And that’s now the problem Iran faces. I do not know of a single Iranian who was more indispensable to his government’s ambitions in the Middle East. From 2015 to 2017, when we were in the heat of the fighting against the Islamic State in both Syria and Iraq, I would watch Soleimani shuttle back and forth between Syria and Iraq. When the war to prop up Bashar al-Assad was going poorly, Soleimani would leave Iraq for Syria. And when Iranian-backed militias in Iraq began to struggle against the Islamic State, Soleimani would leave Syria for Iraq. That’s now a problem for Iran. Just as the United States often faces a shortage of human capital—not all general officers and diplomats are created equal, sadly, and we are not exactly blessed with a surplus of Arabic speakers in our government—Iran also doesn’t have a lot of talent to go around. One of the reasons I thought Iran erred so often in Yemen—giving strategic weapons such as anti-ship cruise missiles to a bunch of undertrained Houthi yahoos, for example—was a lack of adult supervision. Qassem Soleimani was the adult supervision. He was spread thin over the past decade, but he was nonetheless a serious if nefarious adversary of the United States and its partners in the region. And Iran and its partners will now feel his loss greatly. Soleimani was at least partially, and in many cases directly, responsible for dozens if not hundreds of attacks on U.S. forces in Iraq going back to the height of the Iraq War. Andrew Exum
Soleimani is responsible for the Iranian military terror reign across the Middle East. Many Arab Muslims across the region are celebrating today. Unfortunately, many US Democrats are not. Instead, they are criticizing President Trump. If the death of Soleimani leads to any escalation, it is the Islamic regime of Iran that is to blame. The same Islamic terror regime that past President Obama wanted to align as the US closest ally in the Middle East, handing them the disastrous nuclear deal, as well as billions of dollars in cash. As Iran considers the US “big satan” and Israel as “little satan”, Israel is on high alert for any Iranian attacks in retaliation. Iran has always viewed an attack on Israeli interests as an attack on the USA. Avi Abelow
The successful operation against Qassem Suleimani, head of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, is a stunning blow to international terrorism and a reassertion of American might. (…) President Trump has conditioned his policies on Iranian behavior. When Iran spread its malign influence, Trump acted to check it. When Iran struck, Trump hit back: never disproportionately, never definitively. He left open the possibility of negotiations. He doesn’t want to have the greater Middle East — whether Libya, Syria, Iraq, Iran, Yemen, or Afghanistan — dominate his presidency the way it dominated those of Barack Obama and George W. Bush. America no longer needs Middle Eastern oil. Best to keep the region on the back burner and watch it so it doesn’t boil over. Do not overcommit resources to this underdeveloped, war-torn, sectarian land. The result was reciprocal antagonism. In 2018, Trump withdrew the United States from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action negotiated by his predecessor. He began jacking up sanctions. The Iranian economy turned to a shambles. This “maximum pressure” campaign of economic warfare deprived the Iranian war machine of revenue and drove a wedge between the Iranian public and the Iranian government. Trump offered the opportunity to negotiate a new agreement. Iran refused. And began to lash out. Last June, Iran’s fingerprints were all over two oil tankers that exploded in the Persian Gulf. Trump tightened the screws. Iran downed a U.S. drone. Trump called off a military strike at the last minute and responded indirectly, with more sanctions, cyber attacks, and additional troop deployments to the region. Last September a drone fleet launched by Iranian proxies in Yemen devastated the Aramco oil facility in Abqaiq, Saudi Arabia. Trump responded as he had to previous incidents: nonviolently. Iran slowly brought the region to a boil. First it hit boats, then drones, then the key infrastructure of a critical ally. On December 27 it went further: Members of the Kataib Hezbollah militia launched rockets at a U.S. installation near Kirkuk, Iraq. Four U.S. soldiers were wounded. An American contractor was killed. Destroying physical objects merited economic sanctions and cyber intrusions. Ending lives required a lethal response. It arrived on December 29 when F-15s pounded five Kataib Hezbollah facilities across Iraq and Syria. At least 25 militiamen were killed. Then, when Kataib Hezbollah and other Iran-backed militias organized a mob to storm the U.S. embassy in Baghdad, setting fire to the grounds, America made a show of force and threatened severe reprisals. The angry crowd melted away. The risk to the U.S. embassy — and the possibility of another Benghazi — must have angered Trump. “The game has changed,” Secretary of Defense Mark Esper said hours before the assassination of Soleimani at Baghdad airport. (…) Deterrence, says Fred Kagan of the American Enterprise Institute, is credibly holding at risk something your adversary holds dear. If the reports out of Iraq are true, President Trump has put at risk the entirety of the Iranian imperial enterprise even as his maximum-pressure campaign strangles the Iranian economy and fosters domestic unrest. That will get the ayatollah’s attention. And now the United States must prepare for his answer. The bombs over Baghdad? That was Trump calling Khamenei’s bluff. The game has changed. But it isn’t over. Matthew Continetti
D’un point de vue fonctionnel, [Soleimani] était responsable de la force al-Qods des Gardiens de la Révolution, c’est-à-dire de l’ensemble des opérations menées par l’Iran dans toute la région. Cet homme avait beaucoup de secrets. Il était l’un des vecteurs, sinon le vecteur principal, du déploiement de l’influence de l’Iran. Je ne suis pas de ceux qui pensent qu’il y a une volonté expansionniste de l’Iran, mais Téhéran a développé des réseaux d’influence et c’est probablement Soleimani qui avait la haute main sur ceux-ci. Sur tous les terrains chauds de la région où l’Iran a une influence, on retrouve le général Soleimani. Il avait été localisé en Syrie ces dernières années, ce qui indique que la coordination des opérations des milices chiites dans le pays était sous sa responsabilité. Le fait qu’il ait été assassiné à Bagdad cette nuit prouve qu’il avait une importance logistique sur la coordination des milices en Irak. (…) Il ne faut pas sous-estimer l’importance de cette décision irresponsable de Donald Trump. Depuis le retrait unilatéral des Etats-Unis de l’accord sur le nucléaire, en mai 2018, les tensions avec l’Iran se sont accrues. Ce qui était très important, c’est que ces tensions étaient mesurées, sous contrôle. Elles avaient un fort impact sur la vie quotidienne des Iraniens. Pour autant, il n’y avait pas beaucoup de dérapages militaires : quelques incidents dans le golfe, le bombardement de sites pétroliers en Arabie-Saoudite. C’était un combat à fleuret moucheté. Personne ne franchissait la ligne rouge. Je crains fort qu’elle ait été franchie par cette décision, en raison de la qualité de la cible et de son importance dans le dispositif régional iranien. Les tensions s’étaient ravivées au cours des dernières heures, avec le siège de l’ambassade américaine à Bagdad, sans nul doute mené par les milices iraniennes. Il est évident que Soleimani a tenu un rôle. Cette prise d’assaut venait à la suite d’attaques ciblées des Etats-Unis. (…) Cela s’explique par le manque de sang-froid de Donald Trump. Ce matin, les démocrates s’insurgent, car cette décision a été prise sans concertation. C’est une décision à l’emporte-pièce, il a été sans doute un peu excité par les va-t-en-guerre de son camp, comme le secrétaire d’Etat Mike Pompeo, qui prône une ligne dure contre l’Iran. On y est presque. (…) Les Iraniens ne vont pas rester les deux pieds dans le même sabot. Je ne sais pas de quelles manières ils réagiront, ni où et quand. Ce ne sera sans doute pas tout de suite, mais nul doute qu’ils réagiront. Nous sommes dans une nouvelle séquence, ouverte par cet assassinat ciblé, réalisé au mépris de toutes les conventions internationales. Je ne maîtrise pas tous les paramètres, mais, à chaud, je peux imaginer qu’il y aura une recrudescence d’action militaire contre des objectifs américains, des bases militaires, des ambassades ou des intérêts sur place. Il y a également des risques pour Israël, qui sera peut-être une cible. Les milices pro-iraniennes déployées en Syrie ont une capacité de feu contre des villes israéliennes. Dans la région, il va y avoir un regain de mobilisation de toutes les forces proches de l’Iran, en Irak, au Liban et en Syrie. Je ne veux pas dire qu’il y a un risque d’embrasement général, je n’en sais rien, ce n’est pas la peine d’alimenter le fantasme. Mais la situation est infiniment préoccupante. Il y aura des conséquences, même si on ne sait pas bien les mesurer. (…) Une action sur le détroit d’Ormuz [où transitent de nombreux pétroliers] peut faire partie des mesures mises en œuvre par les Iraniens. Ils peuvent bloquer ou menacer de bloquer. Je ne pense pas qu’ils feront un blocage complet : les Iraniens font de la politique et ils savent que cela se retournerait contre eux. Mais il peut y avoir quelques arraisonnements de navires pétroliers et les cours du pétrole pourraient monter, même si cela n’avait pas été le cas après les incidents de l’été dernier dans le détroit. Didier Billion

Attention: une décision irresponsable peut en cacher une autre !

A l’heure où …

Après les attaques de pétroliers, la destruction d’installations pétrolières saoudiennes et les roquettes sur des bases américaines ayant entrainé la mort d’un citoyen américain …

Et avant sa brillante élimination par les forces américaines …

Le cerveau du dispositif terroriste des mollahs au Moyen-Orient préparait une possible deuxième attaque de l’ambassade américaine à Bagdad …

Pendant que la rue arabe comme la rue iranienne peinent à cacher leur joie …

Devinez quelle « décision irresponsable » dénoncent le parti démocrate américain, nos médias ou nos prétendus spécialistes ?

Mort du général Soleimani : « C’est une décision irresponsable de Donald Trump », estime un spécialiste de la région
Interrogé par franceinfo, Didier Billion, directeur adjoint de l’Institut de relations internationales et stratégique (Iris), spécialiste du Moyen-Orient, redoute qu’une « ligne rouge » ait été franchie.
Propos recueillis par Thomas Baïetto
France Télévisions
03/01/202

Qassem Soleimani est mort. Cet influent général iranien a été tué, vendredi 3 janvier, par une frappe américaine contre son convoi qui circulait sur l’aéroport de Bagdad (Irak). Cette élimination, ordonnée par le président américain Donald Trump, fait craindre une nouvelle escalade militaire dans la région.

Pour franceinfo, Didier Billion, directeur adjoint de l’Institut de relations internationales et stratégiques (Iris) et spécialiste du Moyen-Orient, analyse les possibles conséquences de cette mort.

Franceinfo : Pouvez-vous nous rappeler le rôle de Qassem Soleimani dans le régime iranien ?

Didier Billion : D’un point de vue fonctionnel, il était responsable de la force al-Qods des Gardiens de la Révolution, c’est-à-dire de l’ensemble des opérations menées par l’Iran dans toute la région. Cet homme avait beaucoup de secrets. Il était l’un des vecteurs, sinon le vecteur principal, du déploiement de l’influence de l’Iran. Je ne suis pas de ceux qui pensent qu’il y a une volonté expansionniste de l’Iran, mais Téhéran a développé des réseaux d’influence et c’est probablement Soleimani qui avait la haute main sur ceux-ci.

Sur tous les terrains chauds de la région où l’Iran a une influence, on retrouve le général Soleimani.Didier Billion à franceinfo

Il avait été localisé en Syrie ces dernières années, ce qui indique que la coordination des opérations des milices chiites dans le pays était sous sa responsabilité. Le fait qu’il ait été assassiné à Bagdad cette nuit prouve qu’il avait une importance logistique sur la coordination des milices en Irak.

Comment analysez-vous la décision des Etats-Unis de le tuer ?

Il ne faut pas sous-estimer l’importance de cette décision irresponsable de Donald Trump. Depuis le retrait unilatéral des Etats-Unis de l’accord sur le nucléaire, en mai 2018, les tensions avec l’Iran se sont accrues. Ce qui était très important, c’est que ces tensions étaient mesurées, sous contrôle. Elles avaient un fort impact sur la vie quotidienne des Iraniens. Pour autant, il n’y avait pas beaucoup de dérapages militaires : quelques incidents dans le golfe, le bombardement de sites pétroliers en Arabie-Saoudite. C’était un combat à fleuret moucheté. Personne ne franchissait la ligne rouge.

Je crains fort qu’elle ait été franchie par cette décision, en raison de la qualité de la cible et de son importance dans le dispositif régional iranien. Les tensions s’étaient ravivées au cours des dernières heures, avec le siège de l’ambassade américaine à Bagdad, sans nul doute mené par les milices iraniennes. Il est évident que Soleimani a tenu un rôle. Cette prise d’assaut venait à la suite d’attaques ciblées des Etats-Unis.

Tout indiquait une montée en tension, mais là, ce n’est pas seulement un mort de plus, c’est très important.Didier Billionà franceinfo

Cela s’explique par le manque de sang-froid de Donald Trump. Ce matin, les démocrates s’insurgent, car cette décision a été prise sans concertation. C’est une décision à l’emporte-pièce, il a été sans doute un peu excité par les va-t-en-guerre de son camp, comme le secrétaire d’Etat Mike Pompeo, qui prône une ligne dure contre l’Iran. On y est presque.

A quelles réactions peut-on s’attendre de la part de l’Iran ?

Les Iraniens ne vont pas rester les deux pieds dans le même sabot. Je ne sais pas de quelles manières ils réagiront, ni où et quand. Ce ne sera sans doute pas tout de suite, mais nul doute qu’ils réagiront. Nous sommes dans une nouvelle séquence, ouverte par cet assassinat ciblé, réalisé au mépris de toutes les conventions internationales. Je ne maîtrise pas tous les paramètres, mais, à chaud, je peux imaginer qu’il y aura une recrudescence d’action militaire contre des objectifs américains, des bases militaires, des ambassades ou des intérêts sur place.

Il y a également des risques pour Israël, qui sera peut-être une cible. Les milices pro-iraniennes déployées en Syrie ont une capacité de feu contre des villes israéliennes. Dans la région, il va y avoir un regain de mobilisation de toutes les forces proches de l’Iran, en Irak, au Liban et en Syrie. Je ne veux pas dire qu’il y a un risque d’embrasement général, je n’en sais rien, ce n’est pas la peine d’alimenter le fantasme. Mais la situation est infiniment préoccupante. Il y aura des conséquences, même si on ne sait pas bien les mesurer.

Peut-on s’attendre à des conséquences économiques ?

Une action sur le détroit d’Ormuz [où transitent de nombreux pétroliers] peut faire partie des mesures mises en œuvre par les Iraniens. Ils peuvent bloquer ou menacer de bloquer. Je ne pense pas qu’ils feront un blocage complet : les Iraniens font de la politique et ils savent que cela se retournerait contre eux. Mais il peut y avoir quelques arraisonnements de navires pétroliers et les cours du pétrole pourraient monter, même si cela n’avait pas été le cas après les incidents de l’été dernier dans le détroit.

Voir aussi:

Mort de Soleimani : l’Iran menace, la scène internationale s’inquiète
Le puissant général Qassem Soleimani a été tué à Bagdad. L’ambassade américaine à Bagdad a appelé ses ressortissants à quitter l’Irak « immédiatement ».
Le Point/AFP
03/01/2020

C’est certainement un moment clé du conflit qui oppose les États-Unis à l’Iran. Le puissant général Qassem Soleimani a été tué, jeudi 2 janvier, dans un raid américain à Bagdad, trois jours après une attaque inédite contre l’ambassade américaine. Le général Soleimani « n’a eu que ce qu’il méritait », a abondé le sénateur républicain Tom Cotton. Rapidement, des ténors républicains se sont félicités de ce raid ordonné par Trump. Une attaque dénoncée par ses adversaires démocrates, dont son potentiel rival à la présidentielle, Joe Biden.

Le Premier ministre israélien, Benyamin Netanyahou, a interrompu vendredi son voyage officiel en Grèce afin de rentrer en Israël, a indiqué son bureau à l’Agence France-Presse. Benyamin Netanyahou, arrivé à Athènes jeudi où il a signé un accord avec Chypre et la Grèce en faveur d’un projet de gazoduc, devait rester dans ce pays jusqu’à samedi, mais il a écourté son voyage après l’annonce du décès de Qassem Soleimani, chef des forces iraniennes al-Qods souvent accusées par Israël de préparer des attaques contre l’État hébreu.

La France a plaidé pour la « stabilité »

Le chef du mouvement chiite libanais Hezbollah, grand allié de l’Iran, a promis « le juste châtiment » aux « assassins criminels » responsables de la mort du général iranien Qassem Soleimani. « Apporter le juste châtiment aux assassins criminels […] sera la responsabilité et la tâche de tous les résistants et combattants à travers le monde », a promis dans un communiqué le chef du Hezbollah, Hassan Nasrallah, qui utilise généralement le terme de « Résistance » pour désigner son organisation et ses alliés.

De son côté, la France a plaidé pour la « stabilité » au Moyen-Orient estimant, par la voix d’Amélie de Montchalin, secrétaire d’État aux Affaires européennes, que « l’escalade militaire [était] toujours dangereuse ». « On se réveille dans un monde plus dangereux. L’escalade militaire est toujours dangereuse », a-t-elle déclaré au micro de RTL. « Quand de telles opérations ont lieu, on voit bien que l’escalade est en marche alors que nous souhaitons avant tout la stabilité et la désescalade », a-t-elle ajouté.

Le ministre britannique des Affaires étrangères, Dominic Raab, a appelé « toutes les parties à la désescalade ». « Nous avons toujours reconnu la menace agressive posée par la force iranienne Qods dirigée par Qassem Soleimani. Après sa mort, nous exhortons toutes les parties à la désescalade. Un autre conflit n’est aucunement dans notre intérêt », a déclaré le chef de la diplomatie britannique dans un communiqué.

Éviter une « escalade des tensions »

La Chine a fait part de sa « préoccupation » et a appelé au « calme ». La Chine est l’un des pays signataires de l’accord sur le nucléaire iranien, dont les États-Unis se sont retirés unilatéralement en 2018, et l’un des principaux importateurs de brut iranien. « Nous demandons instamment à toutes les parties concernées, en particulier aux États-Unis, de garder leur calme et de faire preuve de retenue afin d’éviter une nouvelle escalade des tensions », a indiqué devant la presse un porte-parole de la diplomatie chinoise, Geng Shuang.

La Russie a mis en garde contre les conséquences de l’assassinat ciblé à Bagdad du général iranien Qassem Soleimani, une frappe américaine « hasardeuse » qui va se traduire par un « accroissement des tensions dans la région ». « L’assassinat de Soleimani […] est un palier hasardeux qui va mener à l’accroissement des tensions dans la région », a déclaré le ministère russe des Affaires étrangères, cité par les agences RIA Novosti et TASS. « Soleimani servait fidèlement les intérêts de l’Iran. Nous présentons nos sincères condoléances au peuple iranien », a-t-il ajouté.

Les ressortissants américains en Irak appelés à fuir

L’assassinat ciblé du général iranien Qassem Soleimani représente « une escalade dangereuse dans la violence », a déclaré, vendredi, la présidente de la Chambre des représentants, la démocrate Nancy Pelosi. « L’Amérique et le monde ne peuvent pas se permettre une escalade des tensions qui atteigne un point de non-retour », a estimé Nancy Pelosi dans un communiqué.

Le pouvoir syrien a dénoncé la « lâche agression américaine » y voyant une « grave escalade » pour le Moyen-Orient, a rapporté l’agence officielle Sana. La Syrie est certaine que cette « lâche agression américaine […] ne fera que renforcer la détermination à suivre le modèle de ces chefs de la résistance », souligne une source du ministère des Affaires étrangères à Damas citée par Sana.

L’ambassade américaine à Bagdad a appelé ses ressortissants à quitter l’Irak « immédiatement ». La chancellerie conseille vivement aux Américains en Irak de partir « par avion tant que cela est possible », alors que le raid a eu lieu dans l’enceinte même de l’aéroport de Bagdad, « sinon vers d’autres pays par voie terrestre ». Les principaux postes-frontières de l’Irak mènent vers l’Iran et la Syrie en guerre, alors que d’autres points de passage existent vers l’Arabie saoudite et la Turquie.

« Une guerre dévastatrice en Irak »

Le Premier ministre démissionnaire irakien Adel Abdel Mahdi a estimé que le raid allait « déclencher une guerre dévastatrice en Irak ». « L’assassinat d’un commandant militaire irakien occupant un poste officiel est une agression contre l’Irak, son État, son gouvernement et son peuple », affirme Adel Abdel Mahdi dans un communiqué, alors qu’Abou Mehdi al-Mouhandis est le numéro deux du Hachd al-Chaabi, une coalition de paramilitaires pro-Iran intégrée à l’État. « Régler ses comptes contre des personnalités dirigeantes irakiennes ou d’un pays ami sur le sol irakien […] constitue une violation flagrante des conditions autorisant la présence des troupes américaines », ajoute le texte.

Le guide suprême iranien, l’ayatollah Ali Khamenei, s’est engagé vendredi à « venger » la mort du puissant général iranien Qassem Soleimani, tué plus tôt dans un raid américain à Bagdad, et a décrété un deuil national de trois jours dans son pays. « Le martyre est la récompense de son inlassable travail durant toutes ces années. […] Si Dieu le veut, son œuvre et son chemin ne s’arrêteront pas là, et une vengeance implacable attend les criminels qui ont empli leurs mains de son sang et de celui des autres martyrs », a dit l’ayatollah Khamenei sur son compte Twitter en farsi.

L’Iran promet une vengeance

L’Iran et les « nations libres de la région » se vengeront des États-Unis après la mort du puissant général iranien Qassem Soleimani, a promis le président Hassan Rohani. « Il n’y a aucun doute sur le fait que la grande nation d’Iran et les autres nations libres de la région prendront leur revanche sur l’Amérique criminelle pour cet horrible meurtre », a déclaré Hassan Rohani dans un communiqué publié sur le site du gouvernement.

Qaïs al-Khazali, un commandant de la coalition pro-iranienne en Irak, a appelé « tous les combattants » à se « tenir prêts », quelques heures après l’assassinat par les Américains du général iranien Qassem Soleimani à Bagdad. « Que tous les combattants résistants se tiennent prêts, car ce qui nous attend, c’est une conquête proche et une grande victoire », a écrit Qaïs al-Khazali, chef d’Assaïb Ahl al-Haq, l’une des plus importantes factions du Hachd al-Chaabi qui regroupe les paramilitaires pro-Iran sous la tutelle de l’État irakien, dans une lettre manuscrite dont l’Agence France-Presse a pu consulter une copie.

Les républicains serrent les rangs

« J’apprécie l’action courageuse du président Donald Trump contre l’agression iranienne », a salué sur Twitter l’influent sénateur républicain Lindsey Graham, proche allié du président peu après la confirmation par le Pentagone que le locataire de la Maison-Blanche avait donné l’ordre de tuer le général iranien Qassem Soleimani, dans un raid à Bagdad. « Au gouvernement iranien : si vous en voulez plus, vous en aurez plus », a-t-il menacé, avant d’ajouter : « Si l’agression iranienne se poursuit et que je travaillais dans une raffinerie iranienne de pétrole, je songerais à une reconversion. »

Comme cet élu de Caroline du Sud, les républicains serraient les rangs jeudi soir derrière la stratégie du président américain. « Les actions défensives que les États-Unis ont prises contre l’Iran et ses mandataires sont conformes aux avertissements clairs qu’ils ont reçus. Ils ont choisi d’ignorer ces avertissements parce qu’ils croyaient que le président des États-Unis était empêché d’agir en raison de nos divisions politiques internes. Ils ont extrêmement mal évalué », a également salué le sénateur républicain Marco Rubio.

« Un bâton de dynamite »

Dans l’autre camp, les adversaires démocrates du président qui ont approuvé le mois dernier à la Chambre basse du Congrès son renvoi en procès pour destitution ont dénoncé le bombardement et les risques d’escalade avec l’Iran. « Le président Trump vient de jeter un bâton de dynamite dans une poudrière, et il doit au peuple américain une explication », a dénoncé l’ancien vice-président Joe Biden, en lice pour la primaire démocrate en vue de l’élection présidentielle de novembre. « C’est une énorme escalade dans une région déjà dangereuse », a-t-il insisté, dans un communiqué.

« La dangereuse escalade de Trump nous amène plus près d’une autre guerre désastreuse au Moyen-Orient », a dénoncé Bernie Sanders, autre favori de la primaire démocrate. « Trump a promis de terminer les guerres sans fin, mais cette action nous met sur le chemin d’une autre », a poursuivi le sénateur indépendant.

« Un affront aux pouvoirs du Congrès »

Le chef démocrate de la commission des Affaires étrangères de la Chambre des représentants a déploré que Donald Trump n’ait pas notifié le Congrès américain du raid mené en Irak. « Mener une action de cette gravité sans impliquer le Congrès soulève de graves problèmes légaux et constitue un affront aux pouvoirs du Congrès », a écrit dans un communiqué Eliot Engel.

« D’accord, il ne fait aucun doute que Soleimani a beaucoup de sang sur les mains. Mais c’est un moment vraiment effrayant. L’Iran va réagir et probablement à différents endroits. Pensée à tout le personnel américain dans la région en ce moment », a, quant à lui, estimé Ben Rhodes, ancien proche conseiller de Barack Obama. « Un président qui a juré de tenir les États-Unis à l’écart d’une autre guerre au Moyen-Orient vient dans les faits de faire une déclaration de guerre », a réagi le président de l’organisation International Crisis Group Robert Malley.

Voir également:

Frappe américaine : « Pour l’Iranien lambda, le général Soleimani était un monstre »
Propos recueillis par Alain Léauthier
Marianne
03/01/2020

Le puissant général iranien Qassem Soleimani a été éliminé ce vendredi 3 janvier, dans un raid américain sur l’aéroport de Bagdad. Y’a-t-il un risque d’escalade et de guerre ouverte avec les Etats-Unis ? Décryptage avec Mahnaz Shirali, chercheuse iranienne à Sciences Po.

Au fou ! Quelques heures après l’élimination spectaculaire, tôt dans la matinée de ce vendredi 3 janvier, du général Qassem Soleimani, le chef des opérations extérieures (la force al-Qods) des Gardiens de la Révolution iranienne et pilier du régime des mollahs, nombre de chancelleries étrangères condamnaient à demi-mot le raid aérien ciblé ordonné par Donald Trump. « On se réveille dans un monde plus dangereux (…) et l’escalade militaire est toujours dangereuse », a ainsi benoitement déclaré Amélie de Montchalin, la secrétaire d’État française aux Affaires européennes.

En Irak même, l’ex Premier ministre Adel Abdoul Mahdi, proche de Téhéran et obligé de démissionner en décembre sous la pression de la rue, a dénoncé une « atteinte aux conditions de la présence américaine en Irak et atteinte à la souveraineté du pays », allant jusqu’à qualifier d’ « assassinat » la frappe qui a également coûté la vie à Abou Mehdi al-Mouhandis, le numéro deux du Hachd al-Chaabi, une coalition de paramilitaires pro-Iran, désormais intégrés à l’Etat irakien et très actifs dans la tentative d’assaut de l’ambassade américaine à Bagdad il y a trois jours. Dans un tweet musclé, le secrétaire d’État Mike Pompéo l’avait clairement désigné comme un des responsables des évènements ainsi que Qaïs al-Khazali, fondateur de la milice chiite Assaïb Ahl al-Haq, une des factions du Hachd al-Chaabi.

Les mollahs disposent d’une grande variété de relais pour semer le chaos dans la région

Ce dernier ne se trouvait pas dans le convoi visé par la frappe létale et a lancé un appel au djihad – « Que tous les combattants résistants se tiennent prêts car ce qui nous attend, c’est une conquête proche et une grande victoire » – relayant une déclaration tonitruante de l’ayatollah Ali Khamenei. Dans un tweet, le guide suprême iranien a promis une « vengeance implacable » aux « criminels qui ont empli leurs mains de son sang et de celui des autres martyrs », menace sur laquelle s’est aussitôt calé le président Hassan Rohani, longtemps présenté comme le chef de file des « modérés » et réformateurs.

Les dignitaires de la République islamique ne pouvaient guère faire moins à l’issue de plusieurs mois de tensions et d’accrochages indirects qui ont culminé vendredi 27 décembre avec la mort d’un sous-traitant américain lors d’une énième attaque à la roquette contre une base militaire, située cette fois à Kirkouk, dans le nord de l’Irak, en pleine zone pétrolière.

Deux jours plus tard, les avions américains avaient répliqué en bombardant des garnisons des brigades du Hezbollah, autre faction pro-iranienne à la solde de Qassem Soleimani, et c’est autour du cortège funéraire des vingt-cinq « martyrs » tombés ce jour-là qu’avait débuté l’assaut contre l’ambassade des Etats-Unis à Bagdad. En attendant les éventuelles représailles iraniennes, les Etats-Unis ont encouragé leurs ressortissants à quitter au plus vite le sol irakien, tâche qui ne sera pas forcément des plus aisées, et les forces israéliennes ont été placées en état d’alerte maximal. Si une confrontation directe semble pour l’heure exclue, du Yemen au Liban en passant par la Syrie et bien sûr l’Irak, les mollahs disposent d’une grande variété de relais pour semer le chaos dans la région, à l’image du bombardement téléguidé d’installations pétrolières dans l’est de l’Arabie saoudite en septembre dernier.

Aux Etats-Unis, à en croire les commentaires alarmistes de Nancy Pelosi, la présidente démocrate de la Chambre des représentants, et ceux d’une presse lui reprochant déjà des vacances prolongées en Floride alors qu’il met le feu aux poudres, Donald Trump aurait montré une fois de plus l’incohérence de sa politique étrangère. Traître à la cause des Kurdes un jour mais jouant les apprentis sorciers un autre. Tel n’est pourtant pas tout à fait le sentiment de la chercheuse iranienne Mahnaz Shirali, enseignante à Science-Po, dans l’entretien qu’elle nous accorde ce vendredi.


Marianne : Quelle est votre première réaction après la mort de Qassem Soleimani ?

Mahnaz Shirali : C’est d’abord l’Iranienne qui va vous répondre et celle-là ne peut que se réjouir de ce qui s’est passé. Je parle en mon nom mais je peux vous l’assurer aussi au nom de millions d’Iraniens, probablement la majorité d’entre eux : cet homme était haï, il incarnait le mal absolu ! Je suis révoltée par les commentaires que j’ai entendus venant de certains pseudo-spécialistes de l’Iran, le présentant sur une chaîne de télévision comme un individu charismatique et populaire. Il faut ne rien connaître et ne rien comprendre à ce pays pour tenir ce genre de sottises. Pour l’Iranien lambda, Soleimani était un monstre, ce qui se fait de pire dans la République islamique.

C’est un coup dur pour le régime ?

Évidemment, Soleimani en était un élément essentiel, aussi puissant que Khameini et ce n’est pas de la propagande que d’affirmer que sa mort ne choque presque personne.

A quoi peut-on s’attendre ?

Je ne suis pas dans le secret des généraux iraniens mais une simple observatrice informée. Le régime est aux abois depuis des mois, totalement isolé. Ils savent qu’ils n’ont pas d’avenir, la rue et le peuple n’en veulent plus, ils ne peuvent pas vraiment compter sur l’Union européenne et pas plus sur la Chine. Ils n’ont aucun avenir et c’est ce qui rend la situation particulièrement dangereuse car ils sont dans une logique suicidaire.

Les mollahs ont accumulé des fortunes à l’étranger. Ne voudront-ils pas préserver leurs acquis financiers ?

En réalité, ils ont tout perdu et ne peuvent plus sortir du pays pour s’installer à l’étranger car des mandats ont été lancés contre la plupart d’entre eux. Les sanctions ont asséché la manne des pétrodollars et c’est essentiel car il n’y avait pas d’adhésion idéologique à ce régime.

Est-ce à dire que ligne suivi par Trump sur la question iranienne et durement critiquée par de nombreux experts, peut se révéler positive ?

Je ne suis pas compétente pour juger de la politique de Donald Trump. Je peux juste faire quelques observations. Il a considérablement affaibli ce régime, comme jamais auparavant, et peut-être même a-t-il signé leur arrêt de mort. Nous verrons. Lors des manifestations populaires, à Téhéran et dans d’autre villes, les noms de Khameini, de Rohani, de Soleimani étaient hués. Il n’y a jamais eu de slogans anti-Trump ou contre les Etats-Unis.

Mais la situation désormais est explosive…

Probablement oui, hélas, ils n’abandonneront pas le pouvoir tranquillement, j’en suis convaincue.

Voir de même:

Soleimani : La rue iranienne félicite Trump
Iran Resist
03.01.2020

Trump dit avoir mis à mort le Vador immortel des mollahs, Qassem Soleimani. Les adversaires de Trump le blâment. La France s’est jointe à eux par l’intermédiaire de Malbrunot. Mais les Iraniens sont heureux et se félicitent de cette mort et félicitent Trump comme le montre ce slogan écrit dans un quartier chic de Téhéran : Trump Damet garm ! Trump ! Reste en forme !

PNG - 639.5 ko

© IRAN-RESIST.ORG

Par ailleurs, à Kermanshâh (Kurdistan iranien), les gens ont fait un gâteau pour une fête en honneur de l’élimination de Hadj Ghassem Soleimani. Dans une vidéo faisant part de cette initiative, un homme qui partage le gâteau fait référence à Soleimani en utilisant son sobriquet de Shash Ghassem (pisseux Ghassem) !

© IRAN-RESIST.ORG


© IRAN-RESIST. ORG

JPEG - 232.9 ko
JPEG - 36 ko

Il y a d’autres vidéos ou images du même genre.

© IRAN-RESIST.ORG


© IRAN-RESIST. RG

PNG - 430.5 ko
JPEG - 56.1 ko

© IRAN-RESIST.ORG

D’autres opposants en exil appellent aussi les ambassades du régime pour faire part de leur joie et leurs interlocuteurs ne prennent pas la peine de protester !

© IRAN-RESIST.ORG


© IRAN-RESIST. ORG

Il y a aussi des scènes de joie en Irak et en Syrie !

© IRAN-RESIST.ORG


© IRAN-RESIST.ORG

© IRAN-RESIST.ORG


© IRAN-RESIST.ORG

Contrairement aux prédictions des Malbrunot & co (voix du Quai d’Orsay), le Moyen-Orient ne va pas basculer dans le chaos pro-mollahs ! Les Français feraient mieux de changer de discours et suivre les peuples de la région au lieu de suivre leurs ennemis par aversion pour Trump ou par jalousie pour ses succès.

Trump Damet garm !

Voir de plus:

Petraeus Says Trump May Have Helped ‘Reestablish Deterrence’ by Killing Suleimani
The former U.S. commander and CIA director says Iran’s “very fragile” situation may limit its response.
Lara Seligman
Foreign policy
January 3, 2020

As a former commander of U.S. forces in Iraq and Afghanistan and a former CIA director, retired Gen. David Petraeus is keenly familiar with Qassem Suleimani, the powerful chief of Iran’s Quds Force, who was killed in a U.S. airstrike in Baghdad Friday morning.

After months of a muted U.S. response to Tehran’s repeated lashing out—the downing of a U.S. military drone, a devastating attack on Saudi oil infrastructure, and more—Suleimani’s killing was designed to send a pointed message to the regime that the United States will not tolerate continued provocation, he said.

Petraeus spoke to Foreign Policy on Friday about the implications of an action he called “more significant than the killing of Osama bin Laden.” This interview has been edited for clarity and length.

Foreign Policy: What impact will the killing of Gen. Suleimani have on regional tensions?

David Petraeus: It is impossible to overstate the importance of this particular action. It is more significant than the killing of Osama bin Laden or even the death of [Islamic State leader Abu Bakr] al-Baghdadi. Suleimani was the architect and operational commander of the Iranian effort to solidify control of the so-called Shia crescent, stretching from Iran to Iraq through Syria into southern Lebanon. He is responsible for providing explosives, projectiles, and arms and other munitions that killed well over 600 American soldiers and many more of our coalition and Iraqi partners just in Iraq, as well as in many other countries such as Syria. So his death is of enormous significance.

The question of course is how does Iran respond in terms of direct action by its military and Revolutionary Guard Corps forces? And how does it direct its proxies—the Iranian-supported Shia militia in Iraq and Syria and southern Lebanon, and throughout the world?

FP: Two previous administrations have reportedly considered this course of action and dismissed it. Why did Trump act now?

DP: The reasoning seems to be to show in the most significant way possible that the U.S. is just not going to allow the continued violence—the rocketing of our bases, the killing of an American contractor, the attacks on shipping, on unarmed drones—without a very significant response.

Many people had rightly questioned whether American deterrence had eroded somewhat because of the relatively insignificant responses to the earlier actions. This clearly was of vastly greater importance. Of course it also, per the Defense Department statement, was a defensive action given the reported planning and contingencies that Suleimani was going to Iraq to discuss and presumably approve.

This was in response to the killing of an American contractor, the wounding of American forces, and just a sense of how this could go downhill from here if the Iranians don’t realize that this cannot continue.

FP: Do you think this response was proportionate?

DP: It was a defensive response and this is, again, of enormous consequence and significance. But now the question is: How does Iran respond with its own forces and its proxies, and then what does that lead the U.S. to do?

Iran is in a very precarious economic situation, it is very fragile domestically—they’ve killed many, many hundreds if not thousands of Iranian citizens who were demonstrating on the streets of Iran in response to the dismal economic situation and the mismanagement and corruption. I just don’t see the Iranians as anywhere near as supportive of the regime at this point as they were decades ago during the Iran-Iraq War. Clearly the supreme leader has to consider that as Iran considers the potential responses to what the U.S. has done.

It will be interesting now to see if there is a U.S. diplomatic initiative to reach out to Iran and to say, “Okay, the next move could be strikes against your oil infrastructure and your forces in your country—where does that end?”

FP: Will Iran consider this an act of war?

DP: I don’t know what that means, to be truthful. They clearly recognize how very significant it was. But as to the definition—is a cyberattack an act of war? No one can ever answer that. We haven’t declared war, but we have taken a very, very significant action.

FP: How prepared is the U.S. to protect its forces in the region?

DP: We’ve taken numerous actions to augment our air defenses in the region, our offensive capabilities in the region, in terms of general purpose and special operations forces and air assets. The Pentagon has considered the implications the potential consequences and has done a great deal to mitigate the risks—although you can’t fully mitigate the potential risks.

FP: Do you think the decision to conduct this attack on Iraqi soil was overly provocative?

DP: Again what was the alternative? Do it in Iran? Think of the implications of that. This is the most formidable adversary that we have faced for decades. He is a combination of CIA director, JSOC [Joint Special Operations Command] commander, and special presidential envoy for the region. This is a very significant effort to reestablish deterrence, which obviously had not been shored up by the relatively insignificant responses up until now.

FP: What is the likelihood that there will be an all-out war?

DP: Obviously all sides will suffer if this becomes a wider war, but Iran has to be very worried that—in the state of its economy, the significant popular unrest and demonstrations against the regime—that this is a real threat to the regime in a way that we have not seen prior to this.

FP: Given the maximum pressure campaign that has crippled its economy, the designation of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps as a terrorist organization, and now this assassination, what incentive does Iran have to negotiate now?

DP: The incentive would be to get out from under the sanctions, which are crippling. Could we get back to the Iran nuclear deal plus some additional actions that could address the shortcomings of the agreement?

This is a very significant escalation, and they don’t know where this goes any more than anyone else does. Yes, they can respond and they can retaliate, and that can lead to further retaliation—and that it is clear now that the administration is willing to take very substantial action. This is a pretty clarifying moment in that regard.

FP: What will Iran do to retaliate?

DP: Right now they are probably doing what anyone does in this situation: considering the menu of options. There could be actions in the gulf, in the Strait of Hormuz by proxies in the regional countries, and in other continents where the Quds Force have activities. There’s a very considerable number of potential responses by Iran, and then there’s any number of potential U.S. responses to those actions

Given the state of their economy, I think they have to be very leery, very concerned that that could actually result in the first real challenge to the regime certainly since the Iran-Iraq War.

FP: Will the Iraqi government kick the U.S. military out of Iraq?

DP: The prime minister has said that he would put forward legislation to do that, although I don’t think that the majority of Iraqi leaders want to see that given that ISIS is still a significant threat. They are keenly aware that it was not the Iranian supported militias that defeated the Islamic State, it was U.S.-enabled Iraqi armed forces and special forces that really fought the decisive battles.

Lara Seligman is a staff writer at Foreign Policy.

Voir encore:

Gen. Petraeus on Qasem Soleimani’s killing: ‘It’s impossible to overstate the significance’
The World
January 03, 2020

The United States is sending nearly 3,000 additional troops to the Middle East from the 82nd Airborne Division as a precaution amid rising threats to American forces in the region, the Pentagon said on Friday.

Iran promised vengeance after a US airstrike in Baghdad on Friday killed Qasem Soleimani, Tehran’s most prominent military commander and the architect of its growing influence in the Middle East.

The overnight attack, authorized by US President Donald Trump, was a dramatic escalation in the « shadow war » in the Middle East between Iran and the United States and its allies, principally Israel and Saudi Arabia.

As former commander of US forces in Iraq and Afghanistan and a former CIA director, retired Gen. David Petraeus is very familiar with Soleimani. He spoke to The World’s host Marco Werman about what could happen next.

Marco Werman: How did you know Qasem Soleimani?

Gen. David Petraeus: Well, he was our most significant Iranian adversary during my four years in Iraq, [and] certainly when I was the Central Command commander, and very much so when I was the director of the CIA. He is unquestionably the most significant and important — or was the most significant and important — Iranian figure in the region, the most important architect of the effort by Iran to solidify control of the Shia crescent, and the operational commander of the various initiatives that were part of that effort.

General Petraeus, did you ever interact directly or indirectly with him?

Indirectly. He sent a message to me through the president of Iraq in late March of 2008, during the battle of Basra, when we were supporting the Iraqi army forces that were battling the Shia militias in Basra that were supported, of course, by Qasem Soleimani and the Quds Force. He sent a message through the president that said, « General Petraeus, you should know that I, Qasem Soleimani, control the policy of Iran for Iraq, and also for Syria, Lebanon, Gaza and Afghanistan. »

And the implication of that was, « If you want to deal with Iran to resolve this situation in Basra, you should deal with me, not with the Iranian diplomats. » And his power only grew from that point in time. By the way, I did not — I actually told the president to tell Qasem Soleimani to pound sand.

So why do you suppose this happened now, though?

Well, I suspect that the leaders in Washington were seeking to reestablish deterrence, which clearly had eroded to some degree, perhaps by the relatively insignificant actions in response to these strikes on the Abqaiq oil facility in Saudi Arabia, shipping in the Gulf and our $130 million dollar drone that was shot down. And we had seen increased numbers of attacks against US forces in Iraq. So I’m sure that there was a lot of discussion about what could show the Iranians most significantly that we are really serious, that they should not continue to escalate.

Now, obviously, there is a menu of options that they have now and not just in terms of direct Iranian action against perhaps our large bases in the various Gulf states, shipping in the Gulf, but also through proxy actions — and not just in the region, but even in places such as Latin America and Africa and Europe.

Would you have recommended this course of action right now?

I’d hesitate to answer that just because I am not privy to the intelligence that was the foundation for the decision, which clearly was, as was announced, this was a defensive action, that Soleimani was going into the country to presumably approve further attacks. Without really being in the inner circle on that, I think it’s very difficult to either second-guess or to even think through what the recommendation might have been.

Again, it is impossible to overstate the significance of this action. This is much more substantial than the killing of Osama bin Laden. It’s even more substantial than the killing of Baghdadi.

Final question, General Petraeus, how vulnerable are US military and civilian personnel in the Middle East right now as a result of what happened last night?

Well, my understanding is that we have significantly shored up our air defenses, our air assets, our ground defenses and so forth. There’s been the movement of a lot of forces into the region in months, not just in the past days. So there’s been a very substantial augmentation of our defensive capabilities and also our offensive capabilities.

And, you know, the question Iran has to ask itself is, « Where does this end? » If they now retaliate in a significant way — and considering how vulnerable their infrastructure and forces are at a time when their economy is in dismal shape because of the sanctions. So Iran is not in a position of strength, although it clearly has many, many options available to it, as I mentioned, not just with their armed forces and the Revolutionary Guards Corps, but also with these Quds Force-supported proxy elements throughout the region in the world.

Two short questions for what’s next, Gen. Petraeus — US remaining in Iraq, and war with Iran. What’s your best guess?

Well, I think one of the questions is, « What will the diplomatic ramifications of this be? » And again, there have been celebrations in some places in Iraq at the loss of Qasem Soleimani. So, again, there’s no tears being shed in certain parts of the country. And one has to ask what happens in the wake of the killing of the individual who had a veto, virtually, over the leadership of Iraq. What transpires now depends on the calculations of all these different elements. And certainly the US, I would assume, is considering diplomatic initiatives as well, reaching out and saying, « Okay. Does that send a sufficient message of our seriousness? Now, would you like to return to the table? » Or does Iran accelerate the nuclear program, which would, of course, precipitate something further from the United States? Very likely. So lots of calculations here. And I think we’re still very early in the deliberations on all the different ramifications of this very significant action.

Do you have confidence in this administration to kind of navigate all those calculations?

Well, I think that this particular episode has been fairly impressively handled. There’s been restraint in some of the communications methods from the White House. The Department of Defense put out, I think, a solid statement. It has taken significant actions, again, to shore up our defenses and our offensive capabilities. The question now, I think, is what is the diplomatic initiative that follows this? What will the State Department and the Secretary of State do now to try to get back to the table and reduce or end the battlefield consequences?

The flag that Donald Trump posted last night, no words. Was that restraint, do you think?

I think it was. Certainly all things are relative. And I think relative to some of his tweets that was quite restrained.

Voir enfin:

Iran’s strategic mastermind got a huge boost from the nuclear deal

The historic nuclear accord between a US-led group of countries and Iran was good news for a man who some consider to be the Middle East’s most effective covert operative.As a result of the deal, Qasem Suleimani, the commander of the Iranian Revolutionary Guards Qods Force and the general responsible for overseeing Iran’s network of proxy organizations, will be removed from European Union sanctions lists once the agreement is implemented, and taken off a UN sanctions list after eight or fewer years.

Iran obtained some key concessions as a result of the nuclear agreement, including access to an estimated $150 billion in frozen assets; the lifting of a UN arms embargo, the eventual end to sanctions related to the country’s ballistic missile program; the ability to operate over 5,000 uranium enrichment centrifuges and to run stable elements through centrifuges at the once-clandestine and heavily guarded Fordow facility; nuclear assistance from the US and its partners; and the ability to stall inspections of sensitive sites for as long as 24 days. In light of these accomplishments, the de-listing of a general responsible for coordinating anti-US militia groups in Iraq — someone who may be responsible for the deaths of US soldiers — almost seems gratuitous.

It’s unlikely that the entire deal hinged on a single Iranian officer’s ability to open bank accounts in EU states or travel within Europe. But it got into the deal anyway. So did a reprieve for Bank Saderat, which the US sanctioned in 2006 for facilitating money transfers to Iranian regime-supported terror groups like Hezbollah and Islamic Jihad. As part of the deal, Bank Saderat will leave the EU sanctions list on the same timetable as Suleimani, although it will remain under US designation.

Like Suleimani’s removal, Bank Saderat’s apparent legalization in Europe suggests that for the purposes of the deal, the US and its partners lumped a broad range of restrictions under the heading of « nuclear-related » sanctions.

Suleimani and Bank Saderat are still going to remain under US sanctions related to the Iranian regime’s human rights abuses and support for terrorism. US sanctions have broad extraterritorial reach, and the US Treasury Department has turned into the scourge of compliance desks at banks around the world. But that matters to a somewhat lesser degree inside of the EU, where companies have actually been exempted from complying with certain US « secondary sanctions » on Iran since the mid-1990s.

Any company that transacts with a US-designated individual takes on a certain degree of US legal exposure. That actually creates problem for US allies whose companies operate under less restrictive legal regimes. It’s perfectly legal under domestic law for companies in many EU countries — among the US’s closest allies — to perform transactions for certain US-listed individuals and entities. This has been the cause of some trans-Atlantic tensions in the past, with an upshot that’s of immediate relevance to the nuclear deal reached Tuesday.In 1996, the US Congress passed the Iran-Libya Sanctions Act, targeting entities in two longstanding opponents of the US. But these were countries where European companies had routinely invested. The law didn’t just sanction two unfriendly regimes — it effectively sanctioned US allies where business with both countries was legally tolerated.

The law triggered consultations between the US and the EU under the World Trade Organization’s various dispute mechanisms. Diplomatic protests forced the US and and its European allies to figure out a compromise that wouldn’t expose their companies to additional legal scrutiny or lead to an unnecessary escalation in trans-Atlantic trade barriers.

The result is that the US kept the law on the books, but scaled back their implementation in Europe. Then-President Bill Clinton « negotiated an agreement under which the United States would not impose any ISLA sanctions
on European firms – much to Congress’ dismay. »

And in November 1996, the Council of Europe adopted a resolution protecting European companies from the reach of US law. The resolution authorized « blocking recognition or enforcement of decisions or judgments giving effect to the covered laws, » effectively canceling the extraterritoriality of certain US sanctions on European soil (although legal exposure continued for European companies with enough of a US presence to put them under American jurisdiction). In past disputes, companies inside of Europe have had an EU-authorized waiver for complying with US secondary sanctions.

In a post-deal environment in which European companies are eager investors in a far less diplomatically isolated Iran, the 1996 spat could be a sign of things to come, as well as a guideline for smoothing out disputes over US sanctions enforcement in Europe.

Some time in the next few years, Qasem Suleimani will be able to travel and do business inside the EU, while a bank that’s facilitated the funding of US-listed terror group’s will be allowed to enter the European market. As part of the nuclear deal, the US and its partners bargained away much of the international leverage against some of the more problematic sectors in the Iranian regime, including entities whose wrongdoing went well beyond the nuclear realm.The result is the almost complete reversal of the sanctions regime in Europe. « If you look at the competing annexes, the European list is much more comprehensive and there are going to be significant differences between the designation lists that are maintained, » Jonathan Schanzer, vice president for research at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, told Business Insider. « The Europeans look as if they’re about to just open up entirely to Iran. »

Iran successfully pushed for a broad definition of « nuclear-related sanctions, » and bargained hard — and effectively — for a maximal degree of sanctions relief.

And the de-listing of Bank Saderat and Qasem Suleimani, along with the late-breaking effort to classify arms trade restrictions as purely nuclear-related, demonstrates just how far the US and its partners were willing to go to close a historic nuclear deal.

Voir par ailleurs:

Iran: le général Soleimani raconte sa guerre israélo-libanaise de 2006
Le Point/AFP
01/10/2019

La télévision d’Etat iranienne a diffusé mardi soir un entretien exclusif avec le général de division Ghassem Soleimani, un haut commandant des Gardiens de la Révolution, consacré à sa présence au Liban lors du conflit israélo-libanais de l’été 2006.

L’entretien est présenté comme la première interview du général Soleimani, homme de l’ombre à la tête de la force Qods, chargée des opérations extérieures –notamment en Irak et en Syrie— des Gardiens, l’armée idéologique de la République islamique.

Au cours des quelque 90 minutes d’entretien diffusées sur la première chaîne de la télévision d’Etat, le général Soleimani explique avoir passé au Liban, avec le Hezbollah chiite libanais, l’essentiel de ce conflit ayant duré 34 jours.

Le général dit être entré au pays du Cèdre au tout début de la guerre à partir de la Syrie avec Imad Moughnieh, haut commandant militaire du Hezbollah (tué en 2008) considéré par le mouvement chiite comme l’artisan de la « victoire » contre Israël lors de ce conflit ayant fait 1.200 morts côté libanais et 160 côté israélien.

Il revient sur l’élément déclencheur de la guerre: l’attaque, le 12 juillet, d’un commando du Hezbollah parvenu « à entrer en Palestine occupée (Israël, NDLR), attaquer un (blindé) sioniste et capturer deux soldats blessés ».

Mis à part une courte mission au bout « d’une semaine » pour rendre compte de la situation au guide suprême iranien, l’ayatollah Ali Khamenei, et revenir au Liban le jour-même avec un message de sa part pour Hassan Nasrallah, le chef du Hezbollah, le général dit être resté au Liban pour aider ses compagnons d’armes chiites.

Dans l’entretien, l’officier ne mentionne pas la présence d’autres Iraniens. Il livre le récit d’une expérience avant tout personnelle, au contact de Moughnieh et de M. Nasrallah.

Il raconte comment, pris sous des bombardements israéliens sur la banlieue sud de Beyrouth, bastion du Hezbollah, il évacue avec Moughniyeh le cheikh Nasrallah de la « chambre d’opérations » où il se trouve.

Selon son récit, lui et Moughniyeh font passer le chef du Hezbollah cette nuit-là d’abri en cachette avant de revenir tous deux à leur centre de commandement.

La publication de l’interview, réalisée par le bureau de l’ayatollah Khamenei, survient quelques jours après la publication, par ce même bureau, d’une photo inédite montrant Hassan Nasrallah « au-côté » de M. Khamenei et du général Soleimani et accréditant l’idée d’une rencontre récente entre les trois hommes à Téhéran.

Voir aussi:

Trump Calls the Ayatollah’s Bluff

And scores a victory against terrorism
Matthew Continetti
National review
January 3, 2020

The successful operation against Qassem Suleimani, head of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, is a stunning blow to international terrorism and a reassertion of American might. It will also test President Trump’s Iran strategy. It is now Trump, not Ayatollah Khamenei, who has ascended a rung on the ladder of escalation by killing the military architect of Iran’s Shiite empire. For years, Iran has set the rules. It was Iran that picked the time and place of confrontation. No more.

Reciprocity has been the key to understanding Donald Trump. Whether you are a media figure or a mullah, a prime minister or a pope, he will be good to you if you are good to him. Say something mean, though, or work against his interests, and he will respond in force. It won’t be pretty. It won’t be polite. There will be fallout. But you may think twice before crossing him again.

That has been the case with Iran. President Trump has conditioned his policies on Iranian behavior. When Iran spread its malign influence, Trump acted to check it. When Iran struck, Trump hit back: never disproportionately, never definitively. He left open the possibility of negotiations. He doesn’t want to have the greater Middle East — whether Libya, Syria, Iraq, Iran, Yemen, or Afghanistan — dominate his presidency the way it dominated those of Barack Obama and George W. Bush. America no longer needs Middle Eastern oil. Best to keep the region on the back burner and watch it so it doesn’t boil over. Do not overcommit resources to this underdeveloped, war-torn, sectarian land.

The result was reciprocal antagonism. In 2018, Trump withdrew the United States from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action negotiated by his predecessor. He began jacking up sanctions. The Iranian economy turned to a shambles. This “maximum pressure” campaign of economic warfare deprived the Iranian war machine of revenue and drove a wedge between the Iranian public and the Iranian government. Trump offered the opportunity to negotiate a new agreement. Iran refused.

And began to lash out. Last June, Iran’s fingerprints were all over two oil tankers that exploded in the Persian Gulf. Trump tightened the screws. Iran downed a U.S. drone. Trump called off a military strike at the last minute and responded indirectly, with more sanctions, cyber attacks, and additional troop deployments to the region. Last September a drone fleet launched by Iranian proxies in Yemen devastated the Aramco oil facility in Abqaiq, Saudi Arabia. Trump responded as he had to previous incidents: nonviolently.

Iran slowly brought the region to a boil. First it hit boats, then drones, then the key infrastructure of a critical ally. On December 27 it went further: Members of the Kataib Hezbollah militia launched rockets at a U.S. installation near Kirkuk, Iraq. Four U.S. soldiers were wounded. An American contractor was killed.

Destroying physical objects merited economic sanctions and cyber intrusions. Ending lives required a lethal response. It arrived on December 29 when F-15s pounded five Kataib Hezbollah facilities across Iraq and Syria. At least 25 militiamen were killed. Then, when Kataib Hezbollah and other Iran-backed militias organized a mob to storm the U.S. embassy in Baghdad, setting fire to the grounds, America made a show of force and threatened severe reprisals. The angry crowd melted away.

The risk to the U.S. embassy — and the possibility of another Benghazi — must have angered Trump. “The game has changed,” Secretary of Defense Mark Esper said hours before the assassination of Soleimani at Baghdad airport. Indeed it has. The decades-long gray-zone conflict between Iran and the United States manifested itself in subterfuge, terrorism, technological combat, financial chicanery, and proxy forces. Throughout it all, the two sides confronted each other directly only once: in the second half of Ronald Reagan’s presidency. That is about to change.

Deterrence, says Fred Kagan of the American Enterprise Institute, is credibly holding at risk something your adversary holds dear. If the reports out of Iraq are true, President Trump has put at risk the entirety of the Iranian imperial enterprise even as his maximum-pressure campaign strangles the Iranian economy and fosters domestic unrest. That will get the ayatollah’s attention. And now the United States must prepare for his answer.

The bombs over Baghdad? That was Trump calling Khamenei’s bluff. The game has changed. But it isn’t over.

Voir également:

The Shadow Commander
Qassem Suleimani is the Iranian operative who has been reshaping the Middle East. Now he’s directing Assad’s war in Syria.
The New Yorker
September 23, 2013

Last February, some of Iran’s most influential leaders gathered at the Amir al-Momenin Mosque, in northeast Tehran, inside a gated community reserved for officers of the Revolutionary Guard. They had come to pay their last respects to a fallen comrade. Hassan Shateri, a veteran of Iran’s covert wars throughout the Middle East and South Asia, was a senior commander in a powerful, élite branch of the Revolutionary Guard called the Quds Force. The force is the sharp instrument of Iranian foreign policy, roughly analogous to a combined C.I.A. and Special Forces; its name comes from the Persian word for Jerusalem, which its fighters have promised to liberate. Since 1979, its goal has been to subvert Iran’s enemies and extend the country’s influence across the Middle East. Shateri had spent much of his career abroad, first in Afghanistan and then in Iraq, where the Quds Force helped Shiite militias kill American soldiers.

Shateri had been killed two days before, on the road that runs between Damascus and Beirut. He had gone to Syria, along with thousands of other members of the Quds Force, to rescue the country’s besieged President, Bashar al-Assad, a crucial ally of Iran. In the past few years, Shateri had worked under an alias as the Quds Force’s chief in Lebanon; there he had helped sustain the armed group Hezbollah, which at the time of the funeral had begun to pour men into Syria to fight for the regime. The circumstances of his death were unclear: one Iranian official said that Shateri had been “directly targeted” by “the Zionist regime,” as Iranians habitually refer to Israel.

At the funeral, the mourners sobbed, and some beat their chests in the Shiite way. Shateri’s casket was wrapped in an Iranian flag, and gathered around it were the commander of the Revolutionary Guard, dressed in green fatigues; a member of the plot to murder four exiled opposition leaders in a Berlin restaurant in 1992; and the father of Imad Mughniyeh, the Hezbollah commander believed to be responsible for the bombings that killed more than two hundred and fifty Americans in Beirut in 1983. Mughniyeh was assassinated in 2008, purportedly by Israeli agents. In the ethos of the Iranian revolution, to die was to serve. Before Shateri’s funeral, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the country’s Supreme Leader, released a note of praise: “In the end, he drank the sweet syrup of martyrdom.”

Kneeling in the second row on the mosque’s carpeted floor was Major General Qassem Suleimani, the Quds Force’s leader: a small man of fifty-six, with silver hair, a close-cropped beard, and a look of intense self-containment. It was Suleimani who had sent Shateri, an old and trusted friend, to his death. As Revolutionary Guard commanders, he and Shateri belonged to a small fraternity formed during the Sacred Defense, the name given to the Iran-Iraq War, which lasted from 1980 to 1988 and left as many as a million people dead. It was a catastrophic fight, but for Iran it was the beginning of a three-decade project to build a Shiite sphere of influence, stretching across Iraq and Syria to the Mediterranean. Along with its allies in Syria and Lebanon, Iran forms an Axis of Resistance, arrayed against the region’s dominant Sunni powers and the West. In Syria, the project hung in the balance, and Suleimani was mounting a desperate fight, even if the price of victory was a sectarian conflict that engulfed the region for years.

Suleimani took command of the Quds Force fifteen years ago, and in that time he has sought to reshape the Middle East in Iran’s favor, working as a power broker and as a military force: assassinating rivals, arming allies, and, for most of a decade, directing a network of militant groups that killed hundreds of Americans in Iraq. The U.S. Department of the Treasury has sanctioned Suleimani for his role in supporting the Assad regime, and for abetting terrorism. And yet he has remained mostly invisible to the outside world, even as he runs agents and directs operations. “Suleimani is the single most powerful operative in the Middle East today,” John Maguire, a former C.I.A. officer in Iraq, told me, “and no one’s ever heard of him.”

When Suleimani appears in public—often to speak at veterans’ events or to meet with Khamenei—he carries himself inconspicuously and rarely raises his voice, exhibiting a trait that Arabs call khilib, or understated charisma. “He is so short, but he has this presence,” a former senior Iraqi official told me. “There will be ten people in a room, and when Suleimani walks in he doesn’t come and sit with you. He sits over there on the other side of room, by himself, in a very quiet way. Doesn’t speak, doesn’t comment, just sits and listens. And so of course everyone is thinking only about him.”

At the funeral, Suleimani was dressed in a black jacket and a black shirt with no tie, in the Iranian style; his long, angular face and his arched eyebrows were twisted with pain. The Quds Force had never lost such a high-ranking officer abroad. The day before the funeral, Suleimani had travelled to Shateri’s home to offer condolences to his family. He has a fierce attachment to martyred soldiers, and often visits their families; in a recent interview with Iranian media, he said, “When I see the children of the martyrs, I want to smell their scent, and I lose myself.” As the funeral continued, he and the other mourners bent forward to pray, pressing their foreheads to the carpet. “One of the rarest people, who brought the revolution and the whole world to you, is gone,” Alireza Panahian, the imam, told the mourners. Suleimani cradled his head in his palm and began to weep.

The early months of 2013, around the time of Shateri’s death, marked a low point for the Iranian intervention in Syria. Assad was steadily losing ground to the rebels, who are dominated by Sunnis, Iran’s rivals. If Assad fell, the Iranian regime would lose its link to Hezbollah, its forward base against Israel. In a speech, one Iranian cleric said, “If we lose Syria, we cannot keep Tehran.”

Although the Iranians were severely strained by American sanctions, imposed to stop the regime from developing a nuclear weapon, they were unstinting in their efforts to save Assad. Among other things, they extended a seven-billion-dollar loan to shore up the Syrian economy. “I don’t think the Iranians are calculating this in terms of dollars,” a Middle Eastern security official told me. “They regard the loss of Assad as an existential threat.” For Suleimani, saving Assad seemed a matter of pride, especially if it meant distinguishing himself from the Americans. “Suleimani told us the Iranians would do whatever was necessary,” a former Iraqi leader told me. “He said, ‘We’re not like the Americans. We don’t abandon our friends.’ ”

Last year, Suleimani asked Kurdish leaders in Iraq to allow him to open a supply route across northern Iraq and into Syria. For years, he had bullied and bribed the Kurds into coöperating with his plans, but this time they rebuffed him. Worse, Assad’s soldiers wouldn’t fight—or, when they did, they mostly butchered civilians, driving the populace to the rebels. “The Syrian Army is useless!” Suleimani told an Iraqi politician. He longed for the Basij, the Iranian militia whose fighters crushed the popular uprisings against the regime in 2009. “Give me one brigade of the Basij, and I could conquer the whole country,” he said. In August, 2012, anti-Assad rebels captured forty-eight Iranians inside Syria. Iranian leaders protested that they were pilgrims, come to pray at a holy Shiite shrine, but the rebels, as well as Western intelligence agencies, said that they were members of the Quds Force. In any case, they were valuable enough so that Assad agreed to release more than two thousand captured rebels to have them freed. And then Shateri was killed.

Finally, Suleimani began flying into Damascus frequently so that he could assume personal control of the Iranian intervention. “He’s running the war himself,” an American defense official told me. In Damascus, he is said to work out of a heavily fortified command post in a nondescript building, where he has installed a multinational array of officers: the heads of the Syrian military, a Hezbollah commander, and a coördinator of Iraqi Shiite militias, which Suleimani mobilized and brought to the fight. If Suleimani couldn’t have the Basij, he settled for the next best thing: Brigadier General Hossein Hamedani, the Basij’s former deputy commander. Hamedani, another comrade from the Iran-Iraq War, was experienced in running the kind of irregular militias that the Iranians were assembling, in order to keep on fighting if Assad fell.

Late last year, Western officials began to notice a sharp increase in Iranian supply flights into the Damascus airport. Instead of a handful a week, planes were coming every day, carrying weapons and ammunition—“tons of it,” the Middle Eastern security official told me—along with officers from the Quds Force. According to American officials, the officers coördinated attacks, trained militias, and set up an elaborate system to monitor rebel communications. They also forced the various branches of Assad’s security services—designed to spy on one another—to work together. The Middle Eastern security official said that the number of Quds Force operatives, along with the Iraqi Shiite militiamen they brought with them, reached into the thousands. “They’re spread out across the entire country,” he told me.

A turning point came in April, after rebels captured the Syrian town of Qusayr, near the Lebanese border. To retake the town, Suleimani called on Hassan Nasrallah, Hezbollah’s leader, to send in more than two thousand fighters. It wasn’t a difficult sell. Qusayr sits at the entrance to the Bekaa Valley, the main conduit for missiles and other matériel to Hezbollah; if it was closed, Hezbollah would find it difficult to survive. Suleimani and Nasrallah are old friends, having coöperated for years in Lebanon and in the many places around the world where Hezbollah operatives have performed terrorist missions at the Iranians’ behest. According to Will Fulton, an Iran expert at the American Enterprise Institute, Hezbollah fighters encircled Qusayr, cutting off the roads, then moved in. Dozens of them were killed, as were at least eight Iranian officers. On June 5th, the town fell. “The whole operation was orchestrated by Suleimani,” Maguire, who is still active in the region, said. “It was a great victory for him.”

Despite all of Suleimani’s rough work, his image among Iran’s faithful is that of an irreproachable war hero—a decorated veteran of the Iran-Iraq War, in which he became a division commander while still in his twenties. In public, he is almost theatrically modest. During a recent appearance, he described himself as “the smallest soldier,” and, according to the Iranian press, rebuffed members of the audience who tried to kiss his hand. His power comes mostly from his close relationship with Khamenei, who provides the guiding vision for Iranian society. The Supreme Leader, who usually reserves his highest praise for fallen soldiers, has referred to Suleimani as “a living martyr of the revolution.” Suleimani is a hard-line supporter of Iran’s authoritarian system. In July, 1999, at the height of student protests, he signed, with other Revolutionary Guard commanders, a letter warning the reformist President Mohammad Khatami that if he didn’t put down the revolt the military would—perhaps deposing Khatami in the process. “Our patience has run out,” the generals wrote. The police crushed the demonstrators, as they did again, a decade later.

Iran’s government is intensely fractious, and there are many figures around Khamenei who help shape foreign policy, including Revolutionary Guard commanders, senior clerics, and Foreign Ministry officials. But Suleimani has been given a remarkably free hand in implementing Khamenei’s vision. “He has ties to every corner of the system,” Meir Dagan, the former head of Mossad, told me. “He is what I call politically clever. He has a relationship with everyone.” Officials describe him as a believer in Islam and in the revolution; while many senior figures in the Revolutionary Guard have grown wealthy through the Guard’s control over key Iranian industries, Suleimani has been endowed with a personal fortune by the Supreme Leader. “He’s well taken care of,” Maguire said.

Suleimani lives in Tehran, and appears to lead the home life of a bureaucrat in middle age. “He gets up at four every morning, and he’s in bed by nine-thirty every night,” the Iraqi politician, who has known him for many years, told me, shaking his head in disbelief. Suleimani has a bad prostate and recurring back pain. He’s “respectful of his wife,” the Middle Eastern security official told me, sometimes taking her along on trips. He has three sons and two daughters, and is evidently a strict but loving father. He is said to be especially worried about his daughter Nargis, who lives in Malaysia. “She is deviating from the ways of Islam,” the Middle Eastern official said.

Maguire told me, “Suleimani is a far more polished guy than most. He can move in political circles, but he’s also got the substance to be intimidating.” Although he is widely read, his aesthetic tastes appear to be strictly traditional. “I don’t think he’d listen to classical music,” the Middle Eastern official told me. “The European thing—I don’t think that’s his vibe, basically.” Suleimani has little formal education, but, the former senior Iraqi official told me, “he is a very shrewd, frighteningly intelligent strategist.” His tools include payoffs for politicians across the Middle East, intimidation when it is needed, and murder as a last resort. Over the years, the Quds Force has built an international network of assets, some of them drawn from the Iranian diaspora, who can be called on to support missions. “They’re everywhere,” a second Middle Eastern security official said. In 2010, according to Western officials, the Quds Force and Hezbollah launched a new campaign against American and Israeli targets—in apparent retaliation for the covert effort to slow down the Iranian nuclear program, which has included cyber attacks and assassinations of Iranian nuclear scientists.

Since then, Suleimani has orchestrated attacks in places as far flung as Thailand, New Delhi, Lagos, and Nairobi—at least thirty attempts in the past two years alone. The most notorious was a scheme, in 2011, to hire a Mexican drug cartel to blow up the Saudi Ambassador to the United States as he sat down to eat at a restaurant a few miles from the White House. The cartel member approached by Suleimani’s agent turned out to be an informant for the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. (The Quds Force appears to be more effective close to home, and a number of the remote plans have gone awry.) Still, after the plot collapsed, two former American officials told a congressional committee that Suleimani should be assassinated. “Suleimani travels a lot,” one said. “He is all over the place. Go get him. Either try to capture him or kill him.” In Iran, more than two hundred dignitaries signed an outraged letter in his defense; a social-media campaign proclaimed, “We are all Qassem Suleimani.”

Several Middle Eastern officials, some of whom I have known for a decade, stopped talking the moment I brought up Suleimani. “We don’t want to have any part of this,” a Kurdish official in Iraq said. Among spies in the West, he appears to exist in a special category, an enemy both hated and admired: a Middle Eastern equivalent of Karla, the elusive Soviet master spy in John le Carré’s novels. When I called Dagan, the former Mossad chief, and mentioned Suleimani’s name, there was a long pause on the line. “Ah,” he said, in a tone of weary irony, “a very good friend.”

In March, 2009, on the eve of the Iranian New Year, Suleimani led a group of Iran-Iraq War veterans to the Paa-Alam Heights, a barren, rocky promontory on the Iraqi border. In 1986, Paa-Alam was the scene of one of the terrible battles over the Faw Peninsula, where tens of thousands of men died while hardly advancing a step. A video recording from the visit shows Suleimani standing on a mountaintop, recounting the battle to his old comrades. In a gentle voice, he speaks over a soundtrack of music and prayers.

“This is the Dasht-e-Abbas Road,” Suleimani says, pointing into the valley below. “This area stood between us and the enemy.” Later, Suleimani and the group stand on the banks of a creek, where he reads aloud the names of fallen Iranian soldiers, his voice trembling with emotion. During a break, he speaks with an interviewer, and describes the fighting in near-mystical terms. “The battlefield is mankind’s lost paradise—the paradise in which morality and human conduct are at their highest,” he says. “One type of paradise that men imagine is about streams, beautiful maidens, and lush landscape. But there is another kind of paradise—the battlefield.”

Suleimani was born in Rabor, an impoverished mountain village in eastern Iran. When he was a boy, his father, like many other farmers, took out an agricultural loan from the government of the Shah. He owed nine hundred toman—about a hundred dollars at the time—and couldn’t pay it back. In a brief memoir, Suleimani wrote of leaving home with a young relative named Ahmad Suleimani, who was in a similar situation. “At night, we couldn’t fall asleep with the sadness of thinking that government agents were coming to arrest our fathers,” he wrote. Together, they travelled to Kerman, the nearest city, to try to clear their family’s debt. The place was unwelcoming. “We were only thirteen, and our bodies were so tiny, wherever we went, they wouldn’t hire us,” he wrote. “Until one day, when we were hired as laborers at a school construction site on Khajoo Street, which was where the city ended. They paid us two toman per day.” After eight months, they had saved enough money to bring home, but the winter snow was too deep. They were told to seek out a local driver named Pahlavan—“Champion”—who was a “strong man who could lift up a cow or a donkey with his teeth.” During the drive, whenever the car got stuck, “he would lift up the Jeep and put it aside!” In Suleimani’s telling, Pahlavan is an ardent detractor of the Shah. He says of the two boys, “This is the time for them to rest and play, not work as a laborer in a strange city. I spit on the life they have made for us!” They arrived home, Suleimani writes, “just as the lights were coming on in the village homes. When the news travelled in our village, there was pandemonium.”

As a young man, Suleimani gave few signs of greater ambition. According to Ali Alfoneh, an Iran expert at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, he had only a high-school education, and worked for Kerman’s municipal water department. But it was a revolutionary time, and the country’s gathering unrest was making itself felt. Away from work, Suleimani spent hours lifting weights in local gyms, which, like many in the Middle East, offered physical training and inspiration for the warrior spirit. During Ramadan, he attended sermons by a travelling preacher named Hojjat Kamyab—a protégé of Khamenei’s—and it was there that he became inspired by the possibility of Islamic revolution.

In 1979, when Suleimani was twenty-two, the Shah fell to a popular uprising led by Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini in the name of Islam. Swept up in the fervor, Suleimani joined the Revolutionary Guard, a force established by Iran’s new clerical leadership to prevent the military from mounting a coup. Though he received little training—perhaps only a forty-five-day course—he advanced rapidly. As a young guardsman, Suleimani was dispatched to northwestern Iran, where he helped crush an uprising by ethnic Kurds.

When the revolution was eighteen months old, Saddam Hussein sent the Iraqi Army sweeping across the border, hoping to take advantage of the internal chaos. Instead, the invasion solidified Khomeini’s leadership and unified the country in resistance, starting a brutal, entrenched war. Suleimani was sent to the front with a simple task, to supply water to the soldiers there, and he never left. “I entered the war on a fifteen-day mission, and ended up staying until the end,” he has said. A photograph from that time shows the young Suleimani dressed in green fatigues, with no insignia of rank, his black eyes focussed on a far horizon. “We were all young and wanted to serve the revolution,” he told an interviewer in 2005.

Suleimani earned a reputation for bravery and élan, especially as a result of reconnaissance missions he undertook behind Iraqi lines. He returned from several missions bearing a goat, which his soldiers slaughtered and grilled. “Even the Iraqis, our enemy, admired him for this,” a former Revolutionary Guard officer who defected to the United States told me. On Iraqi radio, Suleimani became known as “the goat thief.” In recognition of his effectiveness, Alfoneh said, he was put in charge of a brigade from Kerman, with men from the gyms where he lifted weights.

The Iranian Army was badly overmatched, and its commanders resorted to crude and costly tactics. In “human wave” assaults, they sent thousands of young men directly into the Iraqi lines, often to clear minefields, and soldiers died at a precipitous rate. Suleimani seemed distressed by the loss of life. Before sending his men into battle, he would embrace each one and bid him goodbye; in speeches, he praised martyred soldiers and begged their forgiveness for not being martyred himself. When Suleimani’s superiors announced plans to attack the Faw Peninsula, he dismissed them as wasteful and foolhardy. The former Revolutionary Guard officer recalled seeing Suleimani in 1985, after a battle in which his brigade had suffered many dead and wounded. He was sitting alone in a corner of a tent. “He was very silent, thinking about the people he’d lost,” the officer said.

Ahmad, the young relative who travelled with Suleimani to Kerman, was killed in 1984. On at least one occasion, Suleimani himself was wounded. Still, he didn’t lose enthusiasm for his work. In the nineteen-eighties, Reuel Marc Gerecht was a young C.I.A. officer posted to Istanbul, where he recruited from the thousands of Iranian soldiers who went there to recuperate. “You’d get a whole variety of guardsmen,” Gerecht, who has written extensively on Iran, told me. “You’d get clerics, you’d get people who came to breathe and whore and drink.” Gerecht divided the veterans into two groups. “There were the broken and the burned out, the hollow-eyed—the guys who had been destroyed,” he said. “And then there were the bright-eyed guys who just couldn’t wait to get back to the front. I’d put Suleimani in the latter category.”

Ryan Crocker, the American Ambassador to Iraq from 2007 to 2009, got a similar feeling. During the Iraq War, Crocker sometimes dealt with Suleimani indirectly, through Iraqi leaders who shuttled in and out of Tehran. Once, he asked one of the Iraqis if Suleimani was especially religious. The answer was “Not really,” Crocker told me. “He attends mosque periodically. Religion doesn’t drive him. Nationalism drives him, and the love of the fight.”

Iran’s leaders took two lessons from the Iran-Iraq War. The first was that Iran was surrounded by enemies, near and far. To the regime, the invasion was not so much an Iraqi plot as a Western one. American officials were aware of Saddam’s preparations to invade Iran in 1980, and they later provided him with targeting information used in chemical-weapons attacks; the weapons themselves were built with the help of Western European firms. The memory of these attacks is an especially bitter one. “Do you know how many people are still suffering from the effects of chemical weapons?” Mehdi Khalaji, a fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, said. “Thousands of former soldiers. They believe these were Western weapons given to Saddam.” In 1987, during a battle with the Iraqi Army, a division under Suleimani’s command was attacked by artillery shells containing chemical weapons. More than a hundred of his men suffered the effects.

The other lesson drawn from the Iran-Iraq War was the futility of fighting a head-to-head confrontation. In 1982, after the Iranians expelled the Iraqi forces, Khomeini ordered his men to keep going, to “liberate” Iraq and push on to Jerusalem. Six years and hundreds of thousands of lives later, he agreed to a ceasefire. According to Alfoneh, many of the generals of Suleimani’s generation believe they could have succeeded had the clerics not flinched. “Many of them feel like they were stabbed in the back,” he said. “They have nurtured this myth for nearly thirty years.” But Iran’s leaders did not want another bloodbath. Instead, they had to build the capacity to wage asymmetrical warfare—attacking stronger powers indirectly, outside of Iran.

The Quds Force was an ideal tool. Khomeini had created the prototype for the force in 1979, with the goal of protecting Iran and exporting the Islamic Revolution. The first big opportunity came in Lebanon, where Revolutionary Guard officers were dispatched in 1982 to help organize Shiite militias in the many-sided Lebanese civil war. Those efforts resulted in the creation of Hezbollah, which developed under Iranian guidance. Hezbollah’s military commander, the brilliant and murderous Imad Mughniyeh, helped form what became known as the Special Security Apparatus, a wing of Hezbollah that works closely with the Quds Force. With assistance from Iran, Hezbollah helped orchestrate attacks on the American Embassy and on French and American military barracks. “In the early days, when Hezbollah was totally dependent on Iranian help, Mughniyeh and others were basically willing Iranian assets,” David Crist, a historian for the U.S. military and the author of “The Twilight War,” says.

For all of the Iranian regime’s aggressiveness, some of its religious zeal seemed to burn out. In 1989, Khomeini stopped urging Iranians to spread the revolution, and called instead for expediency to preserve its gains. Persian self-interest was the order of the day, even if it was indistinguishable from revolutionary fervor. In those years, Suleimani worked along Iran’s eastern frontier, aiding Afghan rebels who were holding out against the Taliban. The Iranian regime regarded the Taliban with intense hostility, in large part because of their persecution of Afghanistan’s minority Shiite population. (At one point, the two countries nearly went to war; Iran mobilized a quarter of a million troops, and its leaders denounced the Taliban as an affront to Islam.) In an area that breeds corruption, Suleimani made a name for himself battling opium smugglers along the Afghan border.

In 1998, Suleimani was named the head of the Quds Force, taking over an agency that had already built a lethal résumé: American and Argentine officials believe that the Iranian regime helped Hezbollah orchestrate the bombing of the Israeli Embassy in Buenos Aires in 1992, which killed twenty-nine people, and the attack on the Jewish center in the same city two years later, which killed eighty-five. Suleimani has built the Quds Force into an organization with extraordinary reach, with branches focussed on intelligence, finance, politics, sabotage, and special operations. With a base in the former U.S. Embassy compound in Tehran, the force has between ten thousand and twenty thousand members, divided between combatants and those who train and oversee foreign assets. Its members are picked for their skill and their allegiance to the doctrine of the Islamic Revolution (as well as, in some cases, their family connections). According to the Israeli newspaper Israel Hayom, fighters are recruited throughout the region, trained in Shiraz and Tehran, indoctrinated at the Jerusalem Operation College, in Qom, and then “sent on months-long missions to Afghanistan and Iraq to gain experience in field operational work. They usually travel under the guise of Iranian construction workers.”

After taking command, Suleimani strengthened relationships in Lebanon, with Mughniyeh and with Hassan Nasrallah, Hezbollah’s chief. By then, the Israeli military had occupied southern Lebanon for sixteen years, and Hezbollah was eager to take control of the country, so Suleimani sent in Quds Force operatives to help. “They had a huge presence—training, advising, planning,” Crocker said. In 2000, the Israelis withdrew, exhausted by relentless Hezbollah attacks. It was a signal victory for the Shiites, and, Crocker said, “another example of how countries like Syria and Iran can play a long game, knowing that we can’t.”

Since then, the regime has given aid to a variety of militant Islamist groups opposed to America’s allies in the region, such as Saudi Arabia and Bahrain. The help has gone not only to Shiites but also to Sunni groups like Hamas—helping to form an archipelago of alliances that stretches from Baghdad to Beirut. “No one in Tehran started out with a master plan to build the Axis of Resistance, but opportunities presented themselves,” a Western diplomat in Baghdad told me. “In each case, Suleimani was smarter, faster, and better resourced than anyone else in the region. By grasping at opportunities as they came, he built the thing, slowly but surely.”

In the chaotic days after the attacks of September 11th, Ryan Crocker, then a senior State Department official, flew discreetly to Geneva to meet a group of Iranian diplomats. “I’d fly out on a Friday and then back on Sunday, so nobody in the office knew where I’d been,” Crocker told me. “We’d stay up all night in those meetings.” It seemed clear to Crocker that the Iranians were answering to Suleimani, whom they referred to as “Haji Qassem,” and that they were eager to help the United States destroy their mutual enemy, the Taliban. Although the United States and Iran broke off diplomatic relations in 1980, after American diplomats in Tehran were taken hostage, Crocker wasn’t surprised to find that Suleimani was flexible. “You don’t live through eight years of brutal war without being pretty pragmatic,” he said. Sometimes Suleimani passed messages to Crocker, but he avoided putting anything in writing. “Haji Qassem’s way too smart for that,” Crocker said. “He’s not going to leave paper trails for the Americans.”

Before the bombing began, Crocker sensed that the Iranians were growing impatient with the Bush Administration, thinking that it was taking too long to attack the Taliban. At a meeting in early October, 2001, the lead Iranian negotiator stood up and slammed a sheaf of papers on the table. “If you guys don’t stop building these fairy-tale governments in the sky, and actually start doing some shooting on the ground, none of this is ever going to happen!” he shouted. “When you’re ready to talk about serious fighting, you know where to find me.” He stomped out of the room. “It was a great moment,” Crocker said.

The coöperation between the two countries lasted through the initial phase of the war. At one point, the lead negotiator handed Crocker a map detailing the disposition of Taliban forces. “Here’s our advice: hit them here first, and then hit them over here. And here’s the logic.” Stunned, Crocker asked, “Can I take notes?” The negotiator replied, “You can keep the map.” The flow of information went both ways. On one occasion, Crocker said, he gave his counterparts the location of an Al Qaeda facilitator living in the eastern city of Mashhad. The Iranians detained him and brought him to Afghanistan’s new leaders, who, Crocker believes, turned him over to the U.S. The negotiator told Crocker, “Haji Qassem is very pleased with our coöperation.”

The good will didn’t last. In January, 2002, Crocker, who was by then the deputy chief of the American Embassy in Kabul, was awakened one night by aides, who told him that President George W. Bush, in his State of the Union Address, had named Iran as part of an “Axis of Evil.” Like many senior diplomats, Crocker was caught off guard. He saw the negotiator the next day at the U.N. compound in Kabul, and he was furious. “You completely damaged me,” Crocker recalled him saying. “Suleimani is in a tearing rage. He feels compromised.” The negotiator told Crocker that, at great political risk, Suleimani had been contemplating a complete reëvaluation of the United States, saying, “Maybe it’s time to rethink our relationship with the Americans.” The Axis of Evil speech brought the meetings to an end. Reformers inside the government, who had advocated a rapprochement with the United States, were put on the defensive. Recalling that time, Crocker shook his head. “We were just that close,” he said. “One word in one speech changed history.”

Before the meetings fell apart, Crocker talked with the lead negotiator about the possibility of war in Iraq. “Look,” Crocker said, “I don’t know what’s going to happen, but I do have some responsibility for Iraq—it’s my portfolio—and I can read the signs, and I think we’re going to go in.” He saw an enormous opportunity. The Iranians despised Saddam, and Crocker figured that they would be willing to work with the U.S. “I was not a fan of the invasion,” he told me. “But I was thinking, If we’re going to do it, let’s see if we can flip an enemy into a friend—at least tactically for this, and then let’s see where we can take it.” The negotiator indicated that the Iranians were willing to talk, and that Iraq, like Afghanistan, was part of Suleimani’s brief: “It’s one guy running both shows.”

After the invasion began, in March, 2003, Iranian officials were frantic to let the Americans know that they wanted peace. Many of them watched the regimes topple in Afghanistan and Iraq and were convinced that they were next. “They were scared shitless,” Maguire, the former C.I.A. officer in Baghdad, told me. “They were sending runners across the border to our élite elements saying, ‘Look, we don’t want any trouble with you.’ We had an enormous upper hand.” That same year, American officials determined that Iran had reconfigured its plans to develop a nuclear weapon to proceed more slowly and covertly, lest it invite a Western attack.

After Saddam’s regime collapsed, Crocker was dispatched to Baghdad to organize a fledgling government, called the Iraqi Governing Council. He realized that many Iraqi politicians were flying to Tehran for consultations, and he jumped at the chance to negotiate indirectly with Suleimani. In the course of the summer, Crocker passed him the names of prospective Shiite candidates, and the two men vetted each one. Crocker did not offer veto power, but he abandoned candidates whom Suleimani found especially objectionable. “The formation of the governing council was in its essence a negotiation between Tehran and Washington,” he said.

Voir de même:

Gen. Soleimani: A new brand of Iranian hero for nationalist times
Not a Shiite religious figure and not a martyr, Qassem Soleimani, the living commander of Iran’s elite Qods Force, has been elevated to hero status.
Scott Peterson
The Christian Science Monitor
February 15, 2016

Tehran, Iran
For years the commander of Iran’s elite Qods Force worked from the shadows, conducting the nation’s battles from Afghanistan to Lebanon.

But today Qassem Soleimani is Iran’s celebrity general, a man elevated to hero status by a social media machine that has at least 10 Instagram accounts and spreads photographs and selfies of him at the front lines in Syria and Iraq.

The Islamic Republic long ago turned hero worship into an art form, with its devotion to Shiite religious figures and war martyrs. But the growing personality cult that halos Maj. Gen. Soleimani is different: The gray-haired servant of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) is very much alive, and his ascent to stardom coincides with a growing nationalist trend in Iran.

“Propaganda in Iran is changing, and every nation needs a live hero,” says a conservative analyst in Qom, who asked not to be named.

“The dead heroes now are not useful; we need a live hero now. Iranian people like great commanders, military heroes in history,” he says, ticking off a string of names. “I think Qassem Soleimani is the right person for our new propaganda policy – the right person at the right time.”

Soleimani’s face surged into public view after the self-described Islamic State (IS) swept from Syria into Iraq in June 2014. Frontline photographs of the general mingling with Iranian fighters went viral.

Iranians cite many reasons for his rise, from “saving” Baghdad from IS jihadists and reactivating Shiite militias in Iraq to preserving the rule of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad during nearly six years of war.

Never mind that some analysts suggest that earlier failures to prevent internal upheaval in Iraq and Syria – for years those countries were part of Soleimani’s responsibility – are the reason for Iran’s deep involvement today.

For his part, Soleimani attributes the “collapse of American power in the region” to Iran’s “spiritual influence” in bolstering resistance against the United States, Israel, and their allies.

“It is very extraordinary. Who else can come close?” says a veteran observer in Tehran, Iran, who asked not to be named. “I don’t know how intentional this is; you see people in all walks of life respect him. It shows we can have a very popular hero who is not a cleric.”

“There is no stain on his image,” says the observer.

Indeed, Soleimani has become a source of pride and a symbol for Iranians of all stripes of their nation’s power abroad. At a pro-regime rally, even young Westernized women in makeup pledge to be “soldiers” of Soleimani. At a bodybuilding championship held in his honor, bare-chested men flaunted their muscles beside a huge portrait of him.

Among the Islamic Revolution’s true believers, Soleimani’s exploits are sung by religious storytellers and posted online. His writings about the Iran-Iraq War are steeped in religious language.

In a video from the Syrian front line broadcast on state TV last month, he addressed fighters, saying, of an Iranian volunteer who was killed, “God loves the person who makes holy war his path.”

When erroneous reports of Soleimani’s death recently emerged (Iran has lost dozens of senior IRGC commanders in Syria and Iraq and hundreds of “advisers”), he laughed and said, “This [martyrdom] is something that I have climbed mountains and crossed plains to find.

Some say the hero worship has gone too far; months ago the IRGC ordered Iranian media not to publish frontline selfies. When a young director wanted to make a film inspired by his hero, the general said he was against it and was embarrassed.

Yet Soleimani appears to have relented for Ebrahim Hatamikia, a renowned director of war films.

“Bodyguard” is now premièring at a festival in Tehran. “I made this film for the love of Haj Qassem Soleimani,” the director told an Iranian website, adding that he is “the earth beneath Soleimani’s feet.”

Voir de plus:

The war on ISIS is getting weird in Iraq
Michael B Kelley
Business insider
Mar 25, 2015

The US has started providing « air strikes, airborne intelligence, and Advise & Assist support to Iraqi security forces headquarters » as Baghdad struggles to drive ISIS militants out of Saddam Hussein’s hometown of Tikrit.

The Iraqi assault has heretofore been spearheaded by Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, the head of Iran’s Quds Force, the foreign arm of the Iran Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC), and most of the Iraqi forces are members of Shiite militias beholden to Tehran.

The British magazine The Week features Suleimani in bed with Uncle Sam, which is quite striking given that Suleimani directed « a network of militant groups that killed hundreds of Americans in Iraq, » as detailed by Dexter Filkins in The New Yorker.The notion of the US working on the same side Suleimani is confounding to those who consider him a formidable adversary.

« There’s just no way that the US military can actively support an offensive led by Suleimani, » Christopher Harmer, a former aviator in the United States Navy in the Persian Gulf who is now an analyst with the Institute for the Study of War, told Helene Cooper of The New York Times recently. « He’s a more stately version of Osama bin Laden. »

Suleimani’s Iraqi allies — such as the powerful Badr militia — are known for allegedly burning down Sunni villages and using power drills on enemies.

« It’s a little hard for us to be allied on the battlefield with groups of individuals who are unrepentantly covered in American blood, » Ryan Crocker, a career diplomat who served as the US ambassador to Iraq from 2007 to 2009, told US News.

Nevertheless, American warplanes have provided support for the so-called special groups over the past few months.

Badr commander Hadi al-Ameri recently told Eli Lake of Bloomberg that the US ambassador to Iraq offered airstrikes to support the Iraqi army and the Badr ground forces. Ameri added that Suleimani « advises us. He offers us information, we respect him very much. »

The Wall Street Journal noted that « U.S. officials want to ensure that Iran doesn’t play a central role in the fight ahead. U.S. officials want to be certain that the Iraqi military provides strong oversight of the Shiite militias. »

The question is who tells Suleimani to get out of the way but leave his militias behind.

Voir de plus:

Trump Kills Iran’s Most Overrated Warrior
Suleimani pushed his country to build an empire, but drove it into the ground instead.
Thomas L. Friedman
NYT
Jan. 3, 2020

One day they may name a street after President Trump in Tehran. Why? Because Trump just ordered the assassination of possibly the dumbest man in Iran and the most overrated strategist in the Middle East: Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani.

Think of the miscalculations this guy made. In 2015, the United States and the major European powers agreed to lift virtually all their sanctions on Iran, many dating back to 1979, in return for Iran halting its nuclear weapons program for a mere 15 years, but still maintaining the right to have a peaceful nuclear program. It was a great deal for Iran. Its economy grew by over 12 percent the next year. And what did Suleimani do with that windfall?

He and Iran’s supreme leader launched an aggressive regional imperial project that made Iran and its proxies the de facto controlling power in Beirut, Damascus, Baghdad and Sana. This freaked out U.S. allies in the Sunni Arab world and Israel — and they pressed the Trump administration to respond. Trump himself was eager to tear up any treaty forged by President Obama, so he exited the nuclear deal and imposed oil sanctions on Iran that have now shrunk the Iranian economy by almost 10 percent and sent unemployment over 16 percent.

All that for the pleasure of saying that Tehran can call the shots in Beirut, Damascus, Baghdad and Sana. What exactly was second prize?

With the Tehran regime severely deprived of funds, the ayatollahs had to raise gasoline prices at home, triggering massive domestic protests. That required a harsh crackdown by Iran’s clerics against their own people that left thousands jailed and killed, further weakening the legitimacy of the regime.

Then Mr. “Military Genius” Suleimani decided that, having propped up the regime of President Bashar al-Assad in Syria, and helping to kill 500,000 Syrians in the process, he would overreach again and try to put direct pressure on Israel. He would do this by trying to transfer precision-guided rockets from Iran to Iranian proxy forces in Lebanon and Syria.

Alas, Suleimani discovered that fighting Israel — specifically, its combined air force, special forces, intelligence and cyber — is not like fighting the Nusra front or the Islamic State. The Israelis hit back hard, sending a whole bunch of Iranians home from Syria in caskets and hammering their proxies as far away as Western Iraq.

Indeed, Israeli intelligence had so penetrated Suleimani’s Quds Force and its proxies that Suleimani would land a plane with precision munitions in Syria at 5 p.m., and the Israeli air force would blow it up by 5:30 p.m. Suleimani’s men were like fish in a barrel. If Iran had a free press and a real parliament, he would have been fired for colossal mismanagement.

But it gets better, or actually worse, for Suleimani. Many of his obituaries say that he led the fight against the Islamic State in Iraq, in tacit alliance with America. Well, that’s true. But what they omit is that Suleimani’s, and Iran’s, overreaching in Iraq helped to produce the Islamic State in the first place.

It was Suleimani and his Quds Force pals who pushed Iraq’s Shiite prime minister, Nuri Kamal al-Maliki, to push Sunnis out of the Iraqi government and army, stop paying salaries to Sunni soldiers, kill and arrest large numbers of peaceful Sunni protesters and generally turn Iraq into a Shiite-dominated sectarian state. The Islamic State was the counterreaction.

Finally, it was Suleimani’s project of making Iran the imperial power in the Middle East that turned Iran into the most hated power in the Middle East for many of the young, rising pro-democracy forces — both Sunnis and Shiites — in Lebanon, Syria and Iraq.

As the Iranian-American scholar Ray Takeyh pointed out in a wise essay in Politico, in recent years “Soleimani began expanding Iran’s imperial frontiers. For the first time in its history, Iran became a true regional power, stretching its influence from the banks of the Mediterranean to the Persian Gulf. Soleimani understood that Persians would not be willing to die in distant battlefields for the sake of Arabs, so he focused on recruiting Arabs and Afghans as an auxiliary force. He often boasted that he could create a militia in little time and deploy it against Iran’s various enemies.”

It was precisely those Suleimani proxies — Hezbollah in Lebanon and Syria, the Popular Mobilization Forces in Iraq, and the Houthis in Yemen — that created pro-Iranian Shiite states-within-states in all of these countries. And it was precisely these states-within-states that helped to prevent any of these countries from cohering, fostered massive corruption and kept these countries from developing infrastructure — schools, roads, electricity.

And therefore it was Suleimani and his proxies — his “kingmakers” in Lebanon, Syria and Iraq — who increasingly came to be seen, and hated, as imperial powers in the region, even more so than Trump’s America. This triggered popular, authentic, bottom-up democracy movements in Lebanon and Iraq that involved Sunnis and Shiites locking arms together to demand noncorrupt, nonsectarian democratic governance.

On Nov. 27, Iraqi Shiites — yes, Iraqi Shiites — burned down the Iranian consulate in Najaf, Iraq, removing the Iranian flag from the building and putting an Iraqi flag in its place. That was after Iraqi Shiites, in September 2018, set the Iranian consulate in Basra ablaze, shouting condemnations of Iran’s interference in Iraqi politics.

The whole “protest” against the United States Embassy compound in Baghdad last week was almost certainly a Suleimani-staged operation to make it look as if Iraqis wanted America out when in fact it was the other way around. The protesters were paid pro-Iranian militiamen. No one in Baghdad was fooled by this.

In a way, it’s what got Suleimani killed. He so wanted to cover his failures in Iraq he decided to start provoking the Americans there by shelling their forces, hoping they would overreact, kill Iraqis and turn them against the United States. Trump, rather than taking the bait, killed Suleimani instead.

I have no idea whether this was wise or what will be the long-term implications. But here are two things I do know about the Middle East.

First, often in the Middle East the opposite of “bad” is not “good.” The opposite of bad often turns out to be “disorder.” Just because you take out a really bad actor like Suleimani doesn’t mean a good actor, or a good change in policy, comes in his wake. Suleimani is part of a system called the Islamic Revolution in Iran. That revolution has managed to use oil money and violence to stay in power since 1979 — and that is Iran’s tragedy, a tragedy that the death of one Iranian general will not change.

Today’s Iran is the heir to a great civilization and the home of an enormously talented people and significant culture. Wherever Iranians go in the world today, they thrive as scientists, doctors, artists, writers and filmmakers — except in the Islamic Republic of Iran, whose most famous exports are suicide bombing, cyberterrorism and proxy militia leaders. The very fact that Suleimani was probably the most famous Iranian in the region speaks to the utter emptiness of this regime, and how it has wasted the lives of two generations of Iranians by looking for dignity in all the wrong places and in all the wrong ways.

The other thing I know is that in the Middle East all important politics happens the morning after the morning after.

Yes, in the coming days there will be noisy protests in Iran, the burning of American flags and much crying for the “martyr.” The morning after the morning after? There will be a thousand quiet conversations inside Iran that won’t get reported. They will be about the travesty that is their own government and how it has squandered so much of Iran’s wealth and talent on an imperial project that has made Iran hated in the Middle East.

And yes, the morning after, America’s Sunni Arab allies will quietly celebrate Suleimani’s death, but we must never forget that it is the dysfunction of many of the Sunni Arab regimes — their lack of freedom, modern education and women’s empowerment — that made them so weak that Iran was able to take them over from the inside with its proxies.

I write these lines while flying over New Zealand, where the smoke from forest fires 2,500 miles away over eastern Australia can be seen and felt. Mother Nature doesn’t know Suleimani’s name, but everyone in the Arab world is going to know her name. Because the Middle East, particularly Iran, is becoming an environmental disaster area — running out of water, with rising desertification and overpopulation. If governments there don’t stop fighting and come together to build resilience against climate change — rather than celebrating self-promoting military frauds who conquer failed states and make them fail even more — they’re all doomed.

Voir encore:

Love is a Battlefield
Jon Stewart takes the U.S.-Iran ‘strange bedfellows’ line literally, imagines Iraq as a love triangle
Peter Weber
The Week
June 17, 2014

Yes, Jon Stewart is a comedian, and no, The Daily Show isn’t a hard news-and-analysis show. But on Monday night’s show, Stewart gave a remarkably cogent and creative explanation of the geopolitical situation in Iraq. The U.S. and Iran are discussing coordinating their efforts in Iraq to defeat a common enemy, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) militia. Meanwhile, ISIS is getting financial support from one of America’s biggest Arab allies, and Iran’s biggest Muslim enemy, Saudi Arabia.

Forget « strange bedfellows » — this is a romantic Gordian knot. But it makes a lot of sense when Stewart presents the situation as a love triangle. « Sure, you say ‘Death to America’ and burn our flags, but you do it to our face, » Stewart tells Iran. Meanwhile, Saudi Arabia has been funding America’s enemies behind our backs — but what about its sweet, sweet crude oil? Like all good love triangles, this one has a soundtrack — Stewart draws on the hits of the 1980s to great effect. In fact, the only ’80s song Stewart left out that would have tied this all together: « Love Bites. » –Peter Weber

State Department urges U.S. citizens to ‘depart Iraq immediately’ due to ‘heightened tensions’

4:37 a.m.

The State Department on Friday urged « U.S. citizens to depart Iraq immediately, » citing unspecified « heightened tensions in Iraq and the region » and the « Iranian-backed militia attacks at the U.S. Embassy compound. »

Iranian officials have vowed « harsh » retaliation for America’s assassination Friday of Iran’s top regional military commander, Gen. Qassem Soleimani, outside Baghdad International Airport. Syria similarly criticized the « treacherous American criminal aggression » and warned of a « dangerous escalation » in the region.

Iraq’s outgoing prime minister, Adel Abdul-Mahdi, also slammed the the « liquidation operations » against Soleimani and half a dozen Iraqi militiamen killed in the drone strikes as an « aggression against Iraq, » a « brazen violation of Iraq’s sovereignty and blatant attack on the nation’s dignity, » and an « obvious violation of the conditions of U.S. troop presence in Iraq, which is limited to training Iraqi forces. » A senior Iraqi official said Parliament must take « necessary and appropriate measures to protect Iraq’s dignity, security, and sovereignty. »

The Pentagon said President Trump ordered the assassination of Soleimani as a « defensive action to protect U.S. personnel abroad, » claiming the Quds Force commander was « actively developing plans to attack American diplomats and service members in Iraq and throughout the region. » Peter Weber

If President Trump was watching Fox News at Mar-a-Lago on Thursday night, he got a violently mixed messages on his order to assassinate Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani, head of the elite Quds Force, national hero, and scourge of U.S. forces.

Sean Hannity called into his own show to tell guest host Josh Chaffetz that the killing of Soleimani was « a huge victory and total leadership by the president » and « the opposite of what happened in Benghazi. » Rep. Michael Waltz (R-Fla.) channeled Ronald Reagan and praised Trump’s « peace through strength. » Oliver North, Karl Rove, and Ari Flesischer also lauded Trump’s decision.

Earlier, fellow host Tucker Carlson saw neither peace nor strength in Trump’s actions. He blamed « official Washington, » though, and suggested Trump had been « out-maneuvered » by more hawkish advisers who might be pushing America « toward war despite what the president wants. »

« There’s been virtually no debate or even discussion about this, but America appears to be lumbering toward a new Middle East war, » Carlson said. « The very people demanding action against Iran tonight » are « liars, and they don’t care about you, they don’t care about your kids, they’re reckless and incompetent. And you should keep all of that in mind as war with Iran looms closer tonight. » Trump, he added, « doesn’t seek war and he’s wary of it, particularly in an election year. » When his guest, Curt Mills of The American Conservative, said war with Iran « would be twice as bad » as the Iraq War and « if Trump does this, he’s cooked, » Carlson sadly concurred: « I think that’s right. »

Media Matters’ Matt Gertz pointed out that Hannity has always been more « bellicose » than Carlson on Iran, and both men informally advise Trump off-air as well as on-air. And « if you pay attention to the impact the Fox News Cabinet has on the president, » he tweeted Thursday night, « Tucker Carlson has been off for the holidays the past few days as tensions with Iran mounted. » Coincidence? Maybe. But on such twists does the fate of our world turn.

Voir enfin:

Le massacre des prisonniers politiques de 1988 en Iran : une mobilisation forclose ?
Henry Sorg
Raisons politiques
2008/2 (n° 30), pages 59 à 87

« Au nom de Dieu clément et miséricordieux. J’ai décidé afin de me distraire et me calmer l’esprit, sachant qu’il n’y a pas d’issue pour me sauver de cette douleur, de présenter [mes filles] disparues, Leili et Shirine, dans une note pour mes chers petits-enfants qui ignoreront cette histoire et comment elle est arrivée ­ spécialement les enfants de Shirine. D’abord je dois dire que je n’ai pas de savoir pour exprimer correctement tous mes souvenirs et mes observations sur ce qui s’est passé pour moi et mes enfants durant cette période funeste de la Révolution [en Iran]. Je n’ai pris un crayon et une feuille de papier qu’en de rares occasions de ma vie, alors que dire maintenant que je suis un vieillard de 70 ans aux mains tremblantes, aux yeux plein de sang (…). Mais que faire puisque je suis en conflit avec moi-même. Mon appel intérieur m’a tout pris et me crie : â?œnote ce que tu as vu, ce que tu as entendu et ce que tu as vécuâ?. Mon appel intérieur me crie : â?œpuisque c’est vrai, rapporte que Leili était enceinte de huit mois lorsqu’ils l’ont exécutéeâ?Â ; il me crie : â?œEcris au moins que Shirine, après six ans et neuf mois de prison, et après avoir supporté les tortures les plus sauvages et les plus modernes a finalement été exécutée, et ils n’ont pas rendu son corpsâ?. Si ces souvenirs comportent des erreurs d’écriture, on en comprendra l’essentiel du propos à un certain point. Certainement, les enfants de Shirine veulent savoir qui était leur mère et pourquoi elle a été exécutée. »
Carnet de notes retrouvé à T., Iran

1LA RÉVOLUTION IRANIENNE s’est instituée sur la double violence d’une « guerre sainte [2][2]L’ayatollah Khomeini qualifie la guerre de Jihad défensif et… » contre un ennemi extérieur, l’Irak, et d’une élimination physique des opposants intérieurs, celle notamment des prisonniers politiques en 1988 [3][3]L’auteur remercie Sandrine Lefranc pour sa lecture attentive et…. Durant l’été 1988, après que l’ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini eut accepté de mauvaise grâce la résolution 598 de l’ONU mettant fin à la longue guerre contre l’Irak, les prisons du pays ont été purgées de leurs prisonniers politiques. Le nombre exact de prisonniers exécutés et enterrés dans des fosses communes ou des sections de cimetière reste jusqu’à ce jour inconnu. Les rares recherches menées sur la question, les organisations qui ont capitalisé les témoignages de survivants, les groupes politiques dont les membres ont été exécutés, les témoignages individuels, mais aussi certains anciens responsables de l’État islamique s’accordent pour reconnaître que ce bilan se chiffre en plusieurs milliers [4][4]Voir notamment Ervand Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions. Prisons…. Cet événement a non seulement fait l’objet de la part des autorités publiques iraniennes d’un silence orchestré et d’un déni, mais il n’a pas non plus été documenté ou analysé de façon exhaustive. Vingt ans après les faits, on peine encore à mettre au jour cette réalité qui existe de façon fragmentaire, par assemblage d’ouï-dire et de témoignages : matrice à mythes pour certains acteurs politiques exclus du champ national (tel le Parti des Moudjahidines du Peuple dont les membres furent les principales victimes [5][5]Voir E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 215 ;…), drames familiaux couverts d’un silence gêné pour une population iranienne qui ne souhaite pas vraiment connaître ce qu’elle appelle, pudiquement, « ces histoires-là ».

2 Dans le contexte d’une « démocratisation » de la vie sociale et politique [6][6]Farhad Khosrokhavar, « L’Iran, la démocratie et la nouvelle… à partir des années 1990, les exécutions de 1988 sont absentes du débat initié sur les libertés publiques et, notamment, des revendications exprimées en faveur d’un État de droit et d’une nouvelle société civile [7][7]Ibid., p. 309 et Nouchine Yavari d’Hellencourt, « Islam et…. En effet, le contexte politique autoritaire dans lequel se sont perpétrées les violences d’État ­ de 1979, juste après la Révolution, jusqu’aux massacres de 1988 ­ évolue dans la décennie suivante vers une demande de « réforme » et de libéralisation du régime islamique. Cette transformation procède principalement autour de trois mouvements : d’une part, la réflexion théorique (à la fois politique et théologique) qui occupe le débat publique sur les rapports entre islam et droits de l’homme [8][8]Ibid. ; d’autre part, une série de changements politiques au sein des institutions suite à l’élection du président Khatami en 1997, aux élections municipales de 1999 et celles du 6e Parlement en 2000 ; enfin, l’apparition d’un nouveau rapport au politique dans la société avec l’émergence d’une culture politique qui, en rupture avec l’islamisme révolutionnaire des deux décennies précédentes, se détourne des « concepts identitaires classiques comme “peuple” ou “nation” [vers ceux, nouveaux] de société civile (jâme’e madani), de citoyenneté (shahrvandi) et d’individu (fard)  [9][9]Ibid. ». Ces nouveaux mouvements, s’ils mentionnent éventuellement et discrètement les « événements » de 1988, le font sur le mode de l’allusion et non pas sur celui de la mobilisation.

3 L’étoffe du silence qui entoure les exécutions massives de l’été 1988 est complexe : Qui sont les victimes ? Quelles en sont les raisons ? Quelles en sont les conditions et qui en sont les responsables ? Il s’agit d’abord, en s’appuyant sur la littérature existante ainsi que sur les sources premières accessibles, d’exposer quelques éléments de réponses à ces questions, sur un sujet d’étude inédit en France. D’autre part, il s’agit de réfléchir autour de ces faits connus, mais non reconnus ­ selon la définition que Cohen propose du « déni [10][10]Stanley Cohen, States of Denial, Knowing about Atrocities and… » ­ en se demandant comment fonctionnent les dispositifs d’invisibilisation mis en place par le pouvoir et comment y répondent des pratiques de souvenir. Le massacre de 1988 est l’enjeu d’une mémoire dont il s’agit pour le pouvoir d’effacer la trace, d’abord, de façon à la fois concrète et symbolique, à travers l’interdit du rituel funéraire pour les victimes. Cette tension mémorielle travaille la société iranienne et oppose depuis deux décennies un passé non « commémorable » à un travail de mémoire qui se cristallise autour des sépultures.

4 Peu de matériaux empiriques et d’analyses sont disponibles sur l’exécution en masse des prisonniers politiques qui a clos la période de consolidation du pouvoir et de suppression de l’opposition au Parti républicain islamique de 1981 à 1988. Les sources, disponibles en persan et en anglais, se composent principalement de témoignages et de quelques travaux d’investigation historiques [11][11]E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 209-229 ;…, sociologiques [12][12]Maziar Behrooz, « Reflections on Iran’s Prison System During… et juridiques ­ ces derniers s’intéressant à la qualification des exécutions de masse comme « crime contre l’humanité [13][13]Reza Afshari, Human Rights in Iran : The Abuse of Cultural… ». Les rapports non-gouvernementaux et internationaux [14][14]Conseil Économique et Social des Nations Unies (ECOSOC),… constituent une autre source, qui, tout comme les travaux scientifiques, se fondent principalement sur des entretiens avec de rares prisonniers témoins exilés à l’étranger et avec les proches des victimes, ainsi que sur des témoignages écrits [15][15]Un impressionnant travail a été accompli sur ce point par E.…. À cet égard, les Mémoires de l’ayatollah Montazeri documentent les faits du point de vue de l’organisation politique et, dans une certaine mesure, de l’organisation administrative. D’un autre côté, plusieurs témoignages ont été publiés sous forme de romans, de lettres écrites depuis la prison ou de mémoires [16][16]Notamment Nima Parvaresh, Nabardi nabarabar : gozareshi az haft…. D’autres témoignages, nombreux, restent encore à découvrir et assembler, comme celui que nous nous proposons d’explorer dans cet article.

5 Lors d’un séjour dans la ville de T. en 2004, nous avons pu prendre connaissance d’un carnet de notes d’une cinquantaine de pages écrites entre 1989 et 1990 par un homme âgé. Ce cahier a été trouvé à sa mort par ses proches dans ses effets personnels. Javad L., retraité d’une compagnie publique résidant à T., était père de six enfants dont les cinq aînés, qui avaient suivi de solides formations universitaires, commençaient leur vie adulte à la fin des années 1970. Dans ces pages, il racontait dans le détail les circonstances de l’arrestation et de l’exécution de ses deux filles à la suite de la Révolution de 1978. Celles-ci avaient pris part de façon active au mouvement d’opposition des Moudjahidines du Peuple [17][17]Nous reprenons, parmi les différentes transcriptions possibles,…, au cours de la révolution iranienne et dans les premières années de la nouvelle République islamique. Elles ont été arrêtées dans le cadre de la répression politique mise en place à partir de 1980. Le carnet de notes relate des faits qui s’étendent de 1980 à 1988 et détaille l’arrestation, l’emprisonnement et l’exécution des deux jeunes femmes, la première en 1982 et la seconde en 1988. Les destinataires étant de jeunes enfants au moment des faits, l’écriture cherche à faire passer une mémoire qui imbrique généalogie familiale et histoire nationale : « Certainement, les enfants de Shirine veulent savoir qui était leur mère et pourquoi elle a été exécutée. » Le texte poursuit : « Peut-être qu’il leur sera intéressant de connaître les moudjahidines, de quelles franges de la société ils étaient issus, quels étaient leurs buts et leurs intentions et pourquoi ils ont été massacrés sans merci. Je reprends donc depuis le début, du plus loin que vont mes souvenirs. Inhcha’Allah. »

Les moudjahidines : de la révolution à la répression

6 Les membres, et de façon bien plus déterminante en nombre, les proches et sympathisants du Parti des Moudjahidines du peuple (Moudjahidine-e Khalq) sont les principales cibles des vagues de répression successives entre 1981 et 1988 et forment une large majorité des prisonniers exécutés en 1988. Ce parti politique, dont la formation remonte au lendemain des mouvements de mai 1968 dans le monde, se fonde sur une synthèse entre islamisme, gauche radicale et nationalisme anti-impérialiste. À l’origine, le mouvement revendique l’inspiration du Front National (Jebhe-ye Melli) de Mossadeq et Fatemi [18][18]Mohammad Mossadeq a été Premier ministre de 1951 à 1953. Ayant…. Fortement influencés par les écrits de Shariati [19][19]Ervand Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, New Haven/Londres,…, sociologue des religions et figure intellectuelle de l’opposition à la monarchie pahlavie, les moudjahidines articulent la pensée d’un islam chiite politique à une approche socio-économique marxiste et la revendication d’une société sans classe (nezam-e bi tabaghe-ye tawhidi), ainsi qu’une critique de la domination occidentale et un nationalisme révolutionnaire proche des mouvements de libération nationale du Tiers-monde [20][20]Ibid., p. 100-102.. « Quel était leur programme ? écrit Javad, je ne le sais pas. Ce que je sais, c’est que comme la peste et le choléra, en un clin d’ il, tous les jeunes éduqués, engagés et pieux, filles ou garçons, ont commencé à soutenir le programme des moudjahidines, grisés par leur enthousiasme, comme s’ils avaient trouvé réponse à tous leurs manques dans cette école de pensée. (…) Au début, ils se comptaient parmi les partisans de l’ayatolla Khomeini et de feu l’ayatollah Taleghani, et ils considéraient ceux-ci comme les symboles de leur salut. De jour en jour, le nombre de leurs partisans augmentait. Surtout chez les gens éduqués, des professeurs de lycée aux lycéens. » À la différence des autres partis de gauche, et particulièrement l’historique parti communiste (le Tudeh) dirigé par l’élite intellectuelle et bénéficiant d’une certaine base populaire, le parti mobilise une nombreuse population étudiante et lycéenne issue d’une jeunesse non fortunée, mais qui a eu accès à l’éducation [21][21]Ibid., p. 229 ; voir également A. Matin-Asgari, « Twentieth…. « Les moudjahidines, avec leur combinaison de chiisme, de modernisme et de radicalisme social exerçaient une évidente séduction sur la jeune intelligentsia, composée de plus en plus par les enfants, non pas de l’élite aisée ou des laïques éduqués, mais de la classe moyenne traditionnelle [22][22]E. Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, op. cit., p. 229 (notre… », rappelle Abrahamian, qui insiste d’autre part sur l’extrême jeunesse de sa base. Alors que les cadres du parti ont été politisés dans les mouvements étudiants de la fin des années 1960, la base militante a été socialisée et politisée en 1977-79. En 1981, elle se compose principalement de lycéens et d’étudiants radicalisés par l’expérience de la révolution, vivant encore pour la plupart dans le foyer familial.
Présentés comme « islamo-marxistes » et poursuivis dans les dernières années de la monarchie, les moudjahidines prennent une part active au mouvement qui initie la révolution de 1979. Accueillant avec enthousiasme le retour de l’ayatollah Khomeini de son exil français en 1978, les moudjahidines s’opposent pourtant au principe du Velayat-e Faghih (gouvernement du docteur de la loi islamique) [23][23]Appliqué dans la Constitution iranienne de 1979, ce principe…, qui est au fondement constitutionnel de la nouvelle République islamique, et soutiennent le président de la République laïque Bani Sadr. Mobilisant d’importantes manifestations d’opposition dans les principales villes, les moudjahidines sont un des seuls partis politiques à présenter des candidats dans tout le pays en vue des élections législatives de 1981. Le mouvement et ses membres sont violemment écartés de la vie publique à partir de l’attentat du 28 juin 1981 au siège du Parti républicain islamiste : officiellement attribué aux moudjahidines, cet attentat à la bombe fait 71 morts parmi les hauts responsables de ce parti qui amorce à cette époque son appropriation exclusive du pouvoir [24][24]Haleh Afshar (dir.), Iran : A Revolution in Turmoil, Albany,…. Une Fatwa énoncée par Khomeini rend alors les moudjahidines illégaux, en les identifiant comme monafeghins, « hypocrites en matière de religion ». Cette étiquette, télescopant encore une fois l’actualité politique et la tradition musulmane, reprend le nom donné aux polythéistes de Médine qui s’étaient déclarés du côté de Mahommet et ses premiers fidèles, tout en vendant la ville aux assiégeants de la Mecque : le couperet distingue le chiisme « vrai », en condamnant et en discréditant définitivement l’islamisme révolutionnaire inspiré par Chariati. Le 29 juillet 1981, le dirigeant des Moudjahidine-e Kalq, Massoud Rajavi quitte clandestinement le pays en compagnie du président Bani Sadr pour former, en France, le Conseil National de la Résistance. Par la suite, l’ex-président se distancie du mouvement pris en main par le dirigeant moudjahidine qui recompose une structure politique fermée en recrutant de nouveaux sympathisants dans les villes européennes et américaines. Pour les moudjahidines, l’opposition au régime post-révolutionnaire s’est traduite par un anti-patriotisme stratégique qui les a amenés à s’allier avec l’Irak durant le conflit des années 1980 [25][25]Connie Bruck, « Exiles : How Iran’s Expatriates Are Gaming the…. C’est à cette évolution qu’Abrahamian attribue l’évolution sectaire du parti [26][26]E. Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, op. cit., p. 260-261. et sa rupture avec la société iranienne dans les années 1980. L’isolement du parti et de ses membres, ses pratiques hiérarchiques, ses prises de position ambiguës depuis 2001 sont dénoncées [27][27]C. Bruck, « Exiles… », art. cité ; Human Rights Watch, No… et semblent l’avoir marginalisé comme acteur politique dans l’espace iranien [28][28]Elizabeth Rubin, « The Cult of Rajavi », New York Times….

7 « Pourquoi les moudjahidines ont-ils réussi à élargir la base de la mobilisation politique [dans les années 1970 et 1980], mais échoué à accéder au pouvoir [29][29]E. Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, op. cit., p. 3 (notre… ? » Cette question, qui guide la recherche historique d’Abrahamian sur le mouvement [30][30]Ibid., Javad cherche lui aussi à l’éclaircir quand il évoque les élections de 1981 : « En fait dans beaucoup de villes iraniennes, les moudjahidines avaient la majorité des voix [31][31]Le mouvement était le seul à présenter des candidats partout en…. Malheureusement, après le décompte des votes, la situation a changé, et la raison en était que les jeunes moudjahidines n’étaient pas faits pour la politique. Ils n’avaient pas commencé la lutte pour avoir des postes de pouvoir et du prestige. Ils pensaient établir une société pieuse [32][32]Le manuscrit dit : « une société Tohidie  », d’après le Tohid… et sans classe (…) Quel qu’aient été ces idées en tous cas, elles ont été étouffées dans l’ uf. Par ceux qui s’étaient cachés derrière la Révolution et qui sont apparus tout à coup. »

Le massacre de l’été 1988

8 L’institution d’un État islamique en Iran s’est fondée, à partir de 1981, sur un « régime de terreur » qui a duré aussi longtemps que la guerre contre l’Irak, et s’est traduit concrètement par une élimination physique des opposants politiques potentiels, le recours à la torture et une grande publicité de ces deux pratiques afin de « tenir » la population [33][33]E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confession, op. cit., p. 210.. C’est dans ce contexte que vient en 1988, de l’ayatollah Khomeini, l’ordre de purger les prisons en éliminant les opposants politiques. Les membres les plus actifs de l’opposition au régime islamiste ont déjà été éliminés entre 1981 et 1985 (environ 15 000 exécutions) [34][34]Nader Vahabi, « L’obstacle structurel à l’abolition de la peine… ou se sont exilés à cette même époque. Les prisonniers politiques et d’opinion en 1988 sont des (ex-)sympathisants ou des membres des moudjahidines pour la grande majorité, du Tudeh (PC), de partis d’extrême gauche minoritaires, du PDKI (parti indépendantiste kurde), ou encore sans affiliation. Cette purge a lieu au terme de procès spéciaux : d’une part, une condamnation à mort doit être signée par le Vali-e Faghih, mais Khomeini donne procuration à une équipe composée de membres du clergé et de divers corps administratifs (Information, Intérieur, autorités pénitentiaires) pour mener ces procès qui prennent en réalité la forme de brefs interrogatoires à la chaîne. D’autre part, l’ayatollah Montazeri, alors numéro deux du régime, cite une Fatwa énoncée par Khomeini à propos des moudjahidines : « Ceux qui sont dans des prisons du pays et restent engagés dans leur soutien aux Monafeghin [Moujahidines], sont en guerre contre Dieu et condamnés à mort (…) Annihilez les ennemis de l’Islam immédiatement. Dans cette affaire, utilisez tous les critères qui accélèrent l’application du verdict [35][35]H.-A. Montazeri, Khaterat, op. cit.. » Des témoignages de prisonniers acquittés d’Evin et de Gohar Dasht, à Téhéran, ont été par la suite diffusés dans certains journaux libres de langue iranienne et sur les sites Internet d’ONG iraniennes. Celui de Javad est l’un des rares qui évoque l’événement en province, dans la ville de T. Cet épisode, qui clôt son carnet, commence quand il reçoit un appel le 30 juillet 1988 à 22 h 00, de la prison de D. où sa fille est détenue depuis 1981, lui demandant de venir immédiatement la voir car elle « va partir en voyage demain ». Il est surpris : on est dimanche, or personne ne lui a rien dit lors de la visite hebdomadaire du samedi, qui s’est déroulée normalement la veille. Il se rend à la prison où il rencontre sa fille et lui demande des explications. Shirine raconte : « “Hier soir à 23 heures, alors que tout le monde dormait et que la prison était totalement silencieuse, ils sont venus me chercher, ils m’ont bandé les yeux sans expliquer de quoi il s’agissait et ils m’ont emmenée dans une salle où se tenaient un grand nombre de responsables : le gouverneur municipal, le directeur de la prison, le procureur, le chef du département exécutif et quelques membres [du ministère] de l’Information ainsi que quelques personnes que je n’avais jamais vues auparavant. D’abord, le gouverneur municipal se tourne vers moi et me dit : `D’après ce que nous savons, tu es encore partisane des Monafeghins‘. Je réponds : `S’il n’a pas encore été prouvé pour vous que je ne suis plus dans aucune action et que je n’en soutiens aucune, que faut-il faire pour vous convaincre ?’ Ensuite il demande : `Que penses-tu de la République islamique ?’ Je réponds : `Depuis que la République islamique a vu le jour, il y a de cela sept ans et quelques mois, je suis quant à moi en prison. Je n’ai pas eu de contact avec la société pour pouvoir avoir quelconque aperçu des façons de faire de la République islamique.’ Le gouverneur municipal a ordonné `Emmenez-la’. Il était alors minuit environ. Je ne sais pas quel est le but de cet événement.” Le gardien de prison intervient : “Le but est celui que nous avons dit : ils veulent vous envoyer en voyage, mais j’ignore où”. Moi qui étais le père de la prisonnière, je demande : “Quelle somme d’argent peut-elle avoir avec elle dans ce voyage ?” Il me répond : “Elle peut avoir la somme qu’elle veut”. J’ai donc donné 500 tomans que j’avais sur moi à Shirine. Sa mère lui a donné les habits qu’elle avait apportés. (…) Ensuite, j’ai demandé au responsable de la prison : “Quand pourrons-nous avoir des nouvelles de Shirine et savoir où elle est ?” Il répond “Revenez ici dans quinze jours, peut-être qu’on en saura plus d’ici là.” »
À partir du 19 juillet 1988 à Téhéran, et quelques jours plus tard dans les autres villes, les autorités pénitentiaires isolent les prisons. « Quinze jours plus tard, sa mère et moi nous sommes rendus à la prison. Un grand nombre de proches de prisonniers s’étaient regroupés là, même ceux dont les enfants avaient été libérés il y a un ou deux ans ou quelques mois. Nous leur avons demandé ce qu’ils faisaient là. Ils nous ont répondu qu’ils ne savaient pas eux-mêmes. “Tout ce qu’on sait, c’est que nos enfants sont venus pour leur feuille de présence et ils ne sont pas encore ressortis.” Car la règle était que chaque prisonnier libéré devait se présenter une à deux fois par semaine pour signer une feuille de présence. Des gardiens armés postés sur le trottoir devant la prison ne laissaient personne s’approcher et, de la même façon, des gardiens armés étaient postés devant la porte du tribunal révolutionnaire, situé un peu plus loin, pour empêcher les gens d’approcher. Une grande affiche était placardée au mur : “Pour raison de surcharge de travail, nous ne pouvons accueillir les visiteurs.” » Dans les prisons, les détenus sont isolés par groupes d’affiliation politique et par durée de peine ; les espaces communs sont fermés. À l’extérieur, aucune nouvelle des prisons ne paraît plus dans la presse du pays qui, pour des raisons d’intimidation et de propagande, en est très friande en temps normal : c’est le huis-clos dans lequel s’organisent les exécutions, dont le plus gros se déroule en quelques semaines à la fin août 1988. Selon un prisonnier qui se trouvait alors dans la principale prison d’Evin : « À partir de juillet 1988, pas de journaux, pas de télévision, pas de douche, pas de visite des familles et souvent, pas de nourriture. Dans chaque pièce (d’environ 24 mètres carrés) il y avait plus de 45 prisonniers. Finalement, le 29 ou le 30 juillet, ils ont commencé le massacre [36][36]Hossein Mokhtar, Testimony at the September 1st Conference,….  » Les exécutions ont donc lieu à la suite des « procès » spéciaux menés en quelques jours à l’encontre de milliers de prisonniers. Alors que les questions posées à Shirine sont d’ordre politique et interrogent sa loyauté envers le régime en place, les interrogatoires cités par de nombreuses sources, notamment pour les prisons d’Evin et de Gohar Dasht, indiquent l’usage d’une grammaire religieuse, d’une forme « inquisitoire [37][37]E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 209 et… » et d’une certaine vision politique de l’islam qui cherche, à la surprise des prisonniers, non plus à connaître leurs opinions, mais à déterminer s’ils sont de bons musulmans. Au cours d’un échange de quelques minutes, un jury d’autorités religieuses demandait ainsi aux prisonniers communistes s’ils priaient et si leurs parents priaient : en cas de double réponse négative, les prisonniers étaient acquittés (une personne élevée dans l’athéisme ne peut être un « apostat »), si par contre ils étaient athées de parents religieux, ils étaient alors condamnés à mort pour apostasie. Les moudjahidines quant à eux devaient, pour avoir la vie sauve, prouver qu’ils étaient repentants (et donc s’affirmer prêts à étrangler un autre moudjahidine) et loyaux (prêts à nettoyer les champs de mine de l’armée iranienne avec leur corps) : ceux qui répondaient par la négative à ces questions, et ils furent nombreux, étaient condamnés à mort pour « hypocrisie » [38][38]Ibid.. Le processus, qui se déroule de mi-juillet à début septembre, est orchestré dans la discrétion, notamment par le recours aux pendaisons, qui correspondent par ailleurs à l’exécution appropriée pour les non-musulmans (les Kafer, dont il est interdit de faire couler le sang). D’après témoignages, des prisonniers ignoraient que leurs co-détenus étaient en train d’être exécutés par centaines et pensaient qu’ils étaient « transférés ailleurs [39][39]Témoignage cité dans E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…,… ». La forme de ces procès, menés par des autorités ad hoc pour des prisonniers qui ont déjà été jugés une première fois (parfois rejugés plusieurs fois lors de leur peine ou qui l’ont parfois déjà purgée) soulève la question de savoir si l’on doit parler d’« exécution ». Abrahamian parle des « exécutions de masse de 1988 » [40][40]E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 209. ; le mot avancé par ceux qui ont travaillé sur la qualification juridique des événements comme « crimes contre l’humanité » est celui de « massacre » [41][41]K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art.….

Pratiques d’invisibilisation

9 À partir du mois de novembre 1988, la nouvelle des exécutions est annoncée aux familles lors de la visite hebdomadaire ; très vite, l’émotion gagne la foule qui se rassemble devant la prison. Face à la volonté de discrétion du pouvoir, d’autres méthodes sont adoptées. « C’est en âbân [octobre-novembre] qu’un jour, contre toute attente, la porte de la prison s’ouvrit et on nous dit d’entrer. Nous ne tenions plus en place de joie, et nous nous reprochions de ne pas avoir amené quelques fruits avec nous au cas où, ou d’avoir pris quelques vêtements. Mais après un moment d’attente et d’impatience, ils nous ont distribué des formulaires en nous ordonnant de les remplir, afin de consigner tous renseignements concernant les prisonniers et leur famille : domicile, lieu de travail, salaire, activités quotidiennes, connaissances. Ceux qui pouvaient remplir ce formulaire le faisaient eux-mêmes, et ceux qui ne savaient pas écrire se faisaient aider. Quand les formulaires ont été remplis, ils ont été collectés un par un (…) puis la porte s’est ouverte et on nous a dit : “C’est bon, vous pouvez partir” (…) Cette situation incertaine se poursuivait. Les jours de visite, nous nous réunissions comme d’habitude devant la prison, et finalement, comme d’habitude, nous nous dispersions bredouille. Jusqu’à un samedi, au début du mois d’âzar [novembre] : j’étais moi-même parti à la prison quand on a appelé à la maison en disant : “Dites au père de Shirine L. de se rendre demain matin à D.” (…) Le jour suivant, comme indiqué, nous nous sommes rendus devant la prison de D. à 9 heures. Il y avait d’autres personnes attroupées qui avaient reçu le même appel. Quand je les ai vues, je me suis un peu apaisé.(…) Nous étions une centaine ce jour-là, car ils avaient déjà rendu les affaires personnelles d’une trentaine de prisonnières à leur famille. Après un moment d’attente, ils ont appelé la première personne, qui était un vieillard de 60 à 70 ans, comme moi. Tous, nous retenions notre souffle : pourquoi ont-ils appelé cette seule personne ? Nous attendions tous que le vieil homme ressorte afin de lui demander de quoi il retournait. Cela ne dura pas longtemps, peut-être dix minutes, avant que l’on revoie de loin le vieillard, tenant un bout de papier dans la main. Nous nous sommes rués sur lui, mais il était analphabète et ne savait pas de quoi il s’agissait : “Ils m’ont donné ce papier et m’ont dit de partir, et de me le faire lire dehors. Ensuite ils m’ont présenté une lettre et m’ont dit de mettre mes empreintes au bas. Ils m’ont prévenu de ne pas faire le moindre bruit, sans quoi ils viendraient arrêter toute la famille. Ils m’ont recommandé de ne pas perdre le bout de papier.” Ce bout de papier que le vieillard tenait à la main (…) disait ceci : “telle section, tel rang, tel numéro”. Le vieillard s’est assis dans un coin et s’est mis à pleurer. La deuxième et la troisième personne s’en vont et reviennent de la même manière. J’étais le quatrième : un responsable de l’Information venait devant la porte, appelait la personne, l’accompagnait dans le couloir de la prison. Là-bas, on nous faisait entrer dans une pièce pour une fouille complète ; ensuite on entrait dans une deuxième pièce où un jeune de 25 à 30 ans était assis sur une chaise, entouré de deux pasdars[42][42]Les pasdaran-e Sepah, gardiens de la Révolution, sont la milice…. Après des salutations mielleuses, celui-ci nous demandait : “Que pensez-vous de la République islamique ? Quel souvenir gardez-vous du martyre des 72 compagnons de l’Imam [43][43]Expression désignant l’attentat terroriste de juin 1981 où… ?” Je ne sais pas ce qu’on répondait d’habitude ; quant à moi, j’ai exprimé clairement ma pensée. Puis il me tendit un morceau de papier imprimé en disant : “Lis-le, c’est l’accord qui stipule que vous n’avez aucun droit d’organiser une cérémonie de mise en terre, vous n’avez pas le droit d’organiser de cérémonie religieuse privée, ni dans une mosquée, ni à domicile, ni au cimetière, vous devez vous garder de pleurer à haute voix ou faire réciter le Coran pour les défunts.” Puis il lut lui-même la lettre (…) et me demanda de signer. J’ai déchiré la lettre en morceaux sur sa table. Deux personnes sont entrées dans la pièce et m’ont pris ; elles m’ont emmené par la porte de derrière de la prison et m’ont mis dans une voiture. Elles m’ont conduit jusqu’au carrefour de l’aéroport [à une autre extrémité de la ville] et m’ont fait descendre là-bas, en me mettant dans la poche le bout de papier où était écrit : Cimetière X, section 22, rang 3, tombe no 4. Mais dans cette section du cimetière, il y a beaucoup de tombes recouvertes d’une simple dalle de ciment. Des gens trop curieux ont démontré que ces tombes sont anciennes et ne portent pas de nom ; ou bien c’est en recouvrant la dalle en pierre d’une couche de béton qu’ils les présentaient aux familles comme la tombe des êtres chers qu’ils venaient de perdre. On nous disait : “Ce n’est pas la peine d’aller pleurer sur une tombe vide.” Selon un des gardiens de la prison, il restait 400 prisonniers moudjahidines dans les prisons de D. et du Sepah à T. qui ont été emmenés de nuit avec plusieurs camions spéciaux accompagnés d’un groupe de garde, entre 1 et 3 heures du matin. Ils les ont tous emmenés les yeux bandés, et aucun gardien ordinaire de la prison n’a été engagé pour cette affaire. Où ils les ont emmené et ce qu’ils leur ont fait, Dieu seul le sait. »
Les recherches de Shahrooz [44][44]K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art.… sur la façon dont les familles ont été averties des exécutions confirment le récit de Javad : l’isolement des prisons durant l’été, l’usage du téléphone et l’annonce individuelle des exécutions, la demande d’un engagement écrit au silence, mais aussi la surveillance des familles qui se rendent au cimetière et des interrogatoires hebdomadaires au Komité[45][45]Du français « comité » : désigne les cellules informelles… sur le chemin du retour. Ces stratégies s’inscrivent dans un ensemble de pratiques élaborées par le pouvoir depuis 1981 pour « tenir » les familles, dans un contexte où la grande majorité des prisonniers et des condamnés à mort sont des adolescents ou de jeunes adultes. C’est au niveau de la parenté immédiate qu’agit la répression : les frères et s urs, voisins proches et parents sont souvent incarcérés, pour quelques mois, en même temps que les opposants. Si les parents inquiets parlent trop, s’agitent ou se conduisent de façon bruyante dans les différentes situations administratives (devant le procureur révolutionnaire, le tribunal, etc.) où ils viennent s’enquérir du sort de leurs enfants détenus, une pratique courante du Sepah, d’après Javad, est d’emmener les enfants restant de la famille en représailles. Face aux pratiques de terreur qui prennent appui dans le tissu social immédiat (voisinage, parenté), « personne n’osait respirer fort » remarque Javad, qui se souvient avoir perdu son calme un jour, dans le tribunal, alors qu’on l’y avait envoyé pour demander des nouvelles de sa fille. Quinze jours plus tard, une voiture du Sepah s’arrête chez Javad à minuit et vient chercher la jeune s ur de Shirine « pour un interrogatoire ».

10 Les pratiques d’invisibilisation semblent s’organiser en couches successives : si du cercle témoin de la répression, la famille, peu d’information et d’agitation doit filtrer au-dehors, vers des relais sociaux plus larges, les gardiens s’assurent quant à eux que certaines pratiques de gestion des centres de détention ne soient pas connues des familles. Javad identifie ainsi « trois sortes de morts. Ceux qui meurent sous la torture : leur corps ne sont pas rendus et ils ne disent pas aux proches où ils se trouvent ; ceux qui sont pendus : ils donnent un bout de papier disant qu’ils sont enterrés à tel endroit, mais interdisent les cérémonies et les regroupements autour de la tombe ; ceux qui sont fusillés : ils peuvent rendre le corps à la famille contre une somme de 7 à 10 000 tomans ». Cette distinction s’explique peut-être du fait que la pendaison est réservée aux Kafer, aux non-musulmans, et en l’occurrence aux moudjahidines qui sont considérés tels depuis la Fatwa de 1981. Dès lors, les sépultures doivent être dans les carrés non-musulmans des cimetières, ce qui ne serait pas forcément respecté si le corps était rendu aux familles. En 1988, les corps des victimes ne sont pas rendus aux familles qui refusent de leur côté de reconnaître comme authentiques les tombes indiquées par le pouvoir, en particulier depuis la découverte de charniers qui laissent penser que les prisonniers exécutés ont été enterrés dans des fosses communes [46][46]AI, « Mass Executions of Political Prisoners », Amnesty….

11 Le gouvernement dénie les rumeurs d’exécution massive. Le président de la République, aujourd’hui « Guide suprême de la Révolution », Ali Khamenei, reconnaît que quelques Monafeghins ont été exécutés durant l’été, mais justifie cette action au nom de la sûreté d’État et de la préservation du territoire national [47][47]Ibid.. En 1989, une lettre ouverte de la mission permanente de la République islamique d’Iran à l’ONU répond de manière ambiguë au communiqué d’Amnesty International : « Les autorités de la République islamique d’Iran ont toujours nié l’existence d’exécutions politiques, mais cela ne contredit pas d’autres déclarations postérieures confirmant que des espions et des terroristes ont été exécutés [48][48]UN document A/44/153, ZB février 1989, cité dans AI, Iran :…. » En effet, le 5 juillet 1988, peu après la signature du cessez-le-feu entre l’Iran et l’Irak, l’Organisation des moudjahidines exilée dans une base militaire en Irak lance une offensive armée à la frontière iranienne et pénètre brièvement sur le territoire iranien, avant d’être sévèrement défaite par l’armée adverse. Shahrooz réfute l’idée selon laquelle les exécutions massives de 1988, dont les analystes peinent à saisir clairement l’objectif ou le mobile, seraient une riposte à cette tentative d’attaque militaire, en s’appuyant sur plusieurs témoignages individuels et le rapport du représentant spécial auprès de la Commission des Droits de l’Homme des Nations Unies, selon lesquels les procès et les exécutions de 1988 commencent à partir du mois d’avril, soit avant l’attaque du 5 juillet [49][49]Final Report on the situation of human rights in the Islamic….

12 Il faut mentionner que le pouvoir impliqué dans les violences d’État de 1988, comme dans la gestion de leur héritage, est un corps hétérogène, parcouru de divisions d’au moins deux sortes. D’une part, il comprend des acteurs gouvernementaux, officiels, et différents groupes privés ou paramilitaires liés au Parti républicain islamique (le Hezbollah, le Sepah). D’autre part, le dispositif de répression et l’évolution des pratiques carcérales dans les années 1980 s’inscrivent, au sein même du parti au pouvoir, dans des jeux d’influences et des luttes politiques dont l’enjeu est la succession de Khomeini [50][50]M. Behrooz, « Reflections on Iran’s Prison System… », art.…. Une analyse des ordres mettant en place le massacre et des réponses aux réticences exprimées dans les rangs du Parti républicain islamique montre que cet événement est l’occasion pour le pouvoir de faire « le tri entre les mitigés et les vrais croyants parmi [l]es partisans [du régime], leur imposant par ailleurs le silence au sujet des droits humains [51][51]E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 221 (notre…  » : les exécutions de masse auraient servi à verrouiller et à assurer la continuité du gouvernement mis en place par Khomeini, qui s’éteint en 1989. L’ayatollah Montazeri ­ dauphin et successeur pressenti de Khomeini à la fonction de Guide suprême de la Révolution depuis 1979 ­ est ainsi écarté de la scène publique et placé en résidence surveillée à partir de 1988, suite à ses prises de positions critiques au sujet des exécutions [52][52]Ibid., p. 221-222 ; Azadeh Kian-Thiébaut, « La révolution….

13 À défaut de pouvoir s’appuyer sur un recensement officiel ou encore sur des investigations auprès des familles et dans les fosses présumées ­ les gouvernements successifs rendant risquée les mentions ou recherches sur le sujet ­ il est difficile d’estimer le nombre de victimes du massacre. Pour Amnesty International, elles étaient 2 500 en 1990, soit quelques mois après les événements. Depuis, la collecte d’informations auprès des familles, que ce soit par les partis politiques dont les membres étaient concernés ou par des initiatives de droits de l’homme [53][53]H. Mokhtar, Testimony at the September 1 Conference, op. cit…, dresse une liste nominative de 4 000 à 5 000 victimes. Le Parti des Moudjahidine-e Kalq chiffre le massacre à 30 000 [54][54]Christina Lamb, The Telegraph, « Khomeini fatwa “led to killing…, ce qui est bien supérieur aux chiffres avancés ailleurs. Une récente étude qui tente de rassembler les données dans les différentes provinces conclue au chiffre de 12 000 [55][55]Nasser Mohajer, « The Mass Killings in Iran », Aresh, no 57,…. Aux pratiques violentes du pouvoir répond le souci de mettre au jour des faits précis et de prendre la mesure de l’ampleur de l’événement.

14 Face à cela, les analyses juridiques du « crime contre l’humanité » de 1988 s’interrogent sur l’impossibilité ou l’absence de volonté politique actuelle en ce qui concerne la mobilisation sur le terrain du droit, et en particulier du droit pénal international [56][56]K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art.…. Il serait fort utile de confronter les mobilisations du droit dans l’espace publique en Iran depuis la « démocratisation » des années 1990, et les essais de reformulation des exécutions massives de 1988 en un enjeu des droits de l’homme qui n’ont paradoxalement pas connu de relais effectif et de réalisation concrète [57][57]K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art.…. Ce décalage, ou cette absence, se comprend notamment par le passé révolutionnaire, nezami, et l’implication plus ou moins directe de certains responsables du mouvement réformateur dans les violences d’État durant la mise en place du régime islamique, et, notamment, dans le massacre de 1988. Ainsi, Akbar Ganji, journaliste d’opposition connu pour ses engagements en faveur des libertés civiles, plusieurs fois emprisonné depuis 2000, est-il un ancien commandant des Pasdaran-e Sepah[58][58]Voir par exemple N. Yavari d’Hellencourt, « Islam et…. Saïd Hajarian, autre figure de l’opposition démocrate et directeur du journal réformateur Sobh-e Emrooz, était adjoint du ministre de l’Information Reyshahri 1984 à 1989 [59][59]Voir par exemple Ahmed Vahdat, « The Spectre of Montazeri »,…. Abdullah Nouri, qui s’impose à la fin des années 1990 comme la figure principale du parti réformateur, était ministre de l’Intérieur en 1988 et a fait des déclarations niant les allégations d’exécutions, qu’il attribuait à « une campagne organisée à l’étranger  » tout en affirmant que « la loi islamique et le gouvernement de la République islamique d’Iran respectent la dignité humaine et ont organisé les institutions de la République islamique sur ce principe essentiel [60][60]Cité dans K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and… ». Si l’évocation des événements de l’été 1988 a été une ligne rouge à ne pas franchir sous les mandats réformateurs des années 1990-2000, les élections présidentielles de 2005 et les cadres conservateurs au pouvoir sous le mandat d’Ahmadinejad éloignent d’autant plus une perspective de reconnaissance ou de publicisation que la responsabilité pénale individuelle des membres actuels du gouvernement est engagée dans les exécutions de 1988 ­ et, plus généralement, dans le système pénitentiaire des années 1980. Selon plusieurs sources, l’actuel ministre de l’Intérieur, Mostafa Pour-Mohammadi, a siégé au sein de la commission chargée des procès-minute de l’été 1988, en tant que représentant du ministère de l’Information [61][61]E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 210 ;….

La commémoration

15 Ainsi, en dehors des témoignages mentionnés, les faits dont nous parlons n’ont jamais été évoqués dans l’espace public à un niveau politique ou juridique [62][62]E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit. ; R. Afshari,…. Il s’agit alors de regarder du côté des pratiques mémorielles ­ comme nous le suggère la démarche de Javad. Comment la mémoire intime et familiale acquiert-elle une dimension politique ? Face aux pratiques d’invisibilisation (gestion du deuil, confiscation funéraire, etc.), les rites et les lieux funéraires sont travaillés par l’enjeu d’une commémoration dont il s’agit de saisir la porté et les limites, politiques. Ce mouvement se noue d’abord autour de la référence au « martyre » autour de laquelle s’organise l’Islam révolutionnaire. Face aux exécutions de masse, de 1981 à 1988, la réalité des victimes est revisitée à travers la notion de martyre. L’idée du martyre est présente dans la pensée politique de Chariati [63][63]Paul Vieille, « L’institution shi’ite, la religiosité…, et participe à configurer l’action politique des Moujahidines, qu’il s’agisse de l’engagement révolutionnaire ou, plus tard, de la résistance [64][64]Voir par exemple E. Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, op.…. Principal ressort du discours public et de la communication pour l’engagement populaire dans la guerre contre l’Irak, elle est davantage encore une pierre de touche de l’islam chiite à l’aune de l’idéologie révolutionnaire du Parti républicain islamique [65][65]F. Khosrokhavar, L’islamisme et la mort : le martyre…. Autour de ce « culte du martyre », relayé par un art mural prolifique, s’organise la mobilisation nationale, puis la mémoire officielle du conflit [66][66]Ulrich Marzolph, « The Martyr’s Way to Paradise. Shiite Mural…. Entre 1981 et 1988, les jeunes bassidjis révolutionnaires ont nettoyé par centaines de milliers les champs de mines de l’armée, dans une utopie mortifère et salvatrice qui les érigeait en nouveaux « martyrs » de l’Islam. Dans le contexte d’une guerre qui laisse la société iranienne exsangue de 600 000 à un million d’hommes, la sépulture chiite, l’anonymat, la célébration du martyr et de la nation sont fondus dans des offices religieux publiques et médiatisés pour les combattants victimes [67][67]Ali Reza Sheikholeslami, « The Transformation of Iran’s…. Comme l’illustrent la production et le souvenir des martyrs, et le rapport qu’ils instituent à la mort et au corps, à la colère et à la vengeance, la République islamique s’appuie sur une idéologie « martyropathe [68][68]F. Khosrokhavar, L’islamisme et la mort…, op. cit. », née d’un effondrement de l’utopie révolutionnaire, qui s’impose comme la clé de voûte de l’action politique et de la raison d’État. Or, tandis qu’elle enserre l’espace public dans un réseau de passions orchestré par un dispositif rhétorique et institutionnel, elle verrouille toute possibilité de saisir le souvenir et l’émotion collective hors de cette grille logique étroite. C’est dans cette canalisation politique et totalitaire de l’émotion et du deuil que va s’inscrire, de manière subvertie et discrète, une mémoire émotive du massacre de 1988.
Le vendredi matin, dans les cimetières de province, dans le carré des promis au paradis, les mères des enfants « martyrs » de la guerre pleurent ensemble leurs morts, alors que dans le carré d’à côté, sur des tombes sans inscriptions, d’autres mères, dans une même sociabilité et un même rituel, pleurent leurs « martyrs » à elles : ceux de 1988. Un jeune bassidji écrit ainsi à ses parents depuis le front : « Jusqu’à présent, on n’a pas trouvé le corps de certains martyrs. Si cela se produit dans mon cas, n’en soyez pas tristes [mes parents] : vous n’avez pas épargné ma vie et vous l’avez donné pour Dieu, alors renoncez à mon corps et quand vous en ressentez le besoin, rendez-vous sur la tombe des autres martyrs [69][69]Témoignage paru dans le journal islamiste Keyhan en 1984, cité… ! » Le corps dérobé, disparu, du martyr, qui est une constante de l’idéologie islamique révolutionnaire, se réalise paradoxalement dans le cimetière de Khavaran, dans les fosses communes où ont été enterrés les prisonniers de la prison d’Evin exécutés en 1988. Pour les journalistes de la BBC : « Le cimetière de Khavaran n’est rien d’autre qu’un terrain vague terreux où, ça et là, des familles ont démarqué au hasard et de façon symbolique des tombes à l’aide de pierres. Il y a aussi quelques vraies pierres tombales et les familles affirment les y avoir mises car elles disent que leurs proches exécutés ont été enterrés à cet endroit [70][70]BBC Persia, « Le cimetière de Khavaran : des sépultures sans…. » Les cadres religieux où s’ancre le travail du deuil dessinent un espace de négociation, de répression et de détournement pour les acteurs : l’État en joue pour étouffer la possibilité d’une mémoire du massacre, les familles les détournent pour pleurer et se souvenir, malgré tout. Dès lors, la mémoire des exécutés de l’été 1988 flotte silencieusement dans l’imaginaire « martyropathe » de la République islamique ­ qui a assis sa domination précisément sur ces morts politiques. La mère d’un prisonnier exécuté écrit à sa fille exilée à l’étranger : « Le vendredi, toutes les mères et d’autres membres de la famille sont allés au cimetière. Quelle journée de deuil ! C’était comme l’Ashura. Des mères sont venues avec des portraits de leurs fils ; l’une d’elles avait perdu cinq fils et belles-filles. Finalement, le Komité est venu et nous a dispersé [71][71]AI, Iran : Violations of Human Rights 1987-1990, p. 3. Notre…. »

16 L’Ashura, dans la tradition chiite, est un moment de socialisation et de deuil où chacun pleure pour ses morts et ses peines dans le cadre de la commémoration religieuse du « martyr » d’Hussein. La référence à l’Ashura, et l’idée d’une communauté du deuil qui transparaît dans le témoignage, renvoie à une certaine socialité entre les familles de prisonniers comme le noyau autour duquel s’embraient les pratiques de souvenir. Les exécutions ne sont pas pensées dans le cadre préexistant des partis politiques auxquels appartenaient les victimes, mais à un niveau familial et intime. Toutefois, à partir des proches liés par une communauté d’expérience s’élaborent des pratiques de souvenir à un niveau collectif. Cette socialité est nouée dans l’épreuve qu’a été pour les familles de soutenir les prisonniers durant leur peine et de se tenir informées de leur sort. On trouve la trace de ce lien entre les familles, dans le témoignage de Javad. Ainsi commence le récit de l’annonce des exécutions en automne 1988 : « Le jour suivant, comme indiqué, nous nous sommes rendus devant la prison de D. à 9 heures. Il y avait d’autres personnes attroupées qui avaient reçu le même appel. Quand je les ai vus, je me suis un peu apaisé. Nous nous demandions les uns aux autres : “Et vous, qu’en pensez-vous ?” Chacun donnait son avis, l’un disait : “Ils veulent sûrement accorder une visite”, l’autre : “Ils veulent expliquer pourquoi ils ont interdit les visites”. Bref, dans ce brouhaha, nous étions tous d’accord pour dire que nous allions enfin connaître la fin de cette angoissante incertitude. » Ces moments de rencontre et de socialité jouent une fonction essentielle dans la circulation de l’information. Dans le témoignage de Javad, ce sont les nouvelles données par les familles dont les proches sont transférés d’une ville à l’autre, ou qui ont plusieurs proches prisonniers dans plusieurs villes différentes, qui permettent d’avoir une appréhension plus générale de l’échelle et des procédés de répression politique à un niveau national. La sociabilité des proches apparaît ainsi comme le lieu d’une résistance face aux pratiques du pouvoir, à travers une circulation de l’information qui répond aux stratégies de secret, mais aussi à travers la constitution de solidarités ponctuelles. Après 1988, cette socialité des proches de prisonniers semble avoir été une ressource à partir de laquelle des pratiques collectives de souvenir ont peu à peu vu le jour. La mère d’un prisonnier exécuté à Téhéran et enterré dans le cimetière de Khavaran explique dans un entretien : « Quand nous voulions aller sur sa tombe, on nous emmenait au Komité : “Pourquoi êtes-vous venus ? Et les gens avec qui vous parliez, qui était-ce ?” Un jour par semaine, le Komité nous attendait en chemin et nous emmenait là-bas. Jusqu’en 1989, quand on a organisé une cérémonie avec quelques autres mères pour nos enfants. Le soir, ils sont venus et nous ont dit « Venez à [la prison d’] Evin demain. Le lendemain matin de bonne heure nous sommes allés à Evin. Ils nous ont gardés jusqu’à 14 heures les yeux bandés, puis ils nous ont mis dans une voiture et nous ont emmenés au Komité. Ils nous ont gardés trois jours, et nous ont interrogés individuellement pour savoir comment nous nous connaissions. “Ça fait huit ans que nous allons en visite ensemble, nous avons appris à nous connaître ; ça fait un an que vous avez tué nos enfants, nous avons appris à nous connaître. C’est comme dire bonjour à ses voisins : à force d’aller à Evin, aux Komités, nous avons fini par nous connaître.” Ils ont demandé les noms de famille de toutes les mères. “Je ne les connais pas, ai-je répondu. Je connais leur prénom, c’est tout [72][72]Entretien filmé reproduit sur le site internet de l’ONG de….” » La réponse qui semble émerger dans les décennies suivant l’exécution des prisonniers est celle de pratiques mémorielles qui s’organisent autour de deux choses : la commémoration collective des morts dans le cadre d’une cérémonie rituelle qui est celle du bozorgdasht, et l’identification du massacre de 1988 à un lieu spécifique, qui est le cimetière de Khavaran. Ce dernier point renvoie en effet à l’émergence progressive d’un lieu-symbole, investi d’une mémoire presque narrative de l’événement et des pratiques qui ont orchestré les procès et les exécutions collectives, la confiscation des corps, le silence public. La place qu’a progressivement acquise cet endroit dans la commémoration des exécutions, alors qu’il n’est qu’un lieu parmi les cimetières municipaux et les charniers (dont 21 seraient localisés à ce jour [73][73]Entretien télévisé disponible sur internet : Mosahebe-ye…) où les dépouilles ont été enfouies en 1988, semble indiquer qu’au-delà des souvenirs individuels, les pratiques mémorielles tendent à se ressaisir à un niveau collectif. « Khavaran est un nom qui signifie “ne pas oublier” » titrait ainsi un article consacré à une cérémonie de commémoration dans le cimetière en septembre 2005 [74][74]Mohammad Reza Mohini, « Khavaran est un nom qui signifie “ne…. Pourquoi et comment ce mot-symbole a-t-il émergé ? Qu’indique-t-il sur la façon dont les enjeux de non-oubli se saisissent en termes collectifs, et éventuellement politiques ?

« Khavaran : un nom qui signifie “ne pas oublier” »

17 Les procès orchestrant le massacre de 1988 témoignent de cet Islam politique particulier réintroduit par Khomeini, qui repose notamment sur le réinvestissement politique des mythes fondateurs et de la tradition historique du chiisme. Les condamnés le sont pour « hypocrisie » ou pour « apostasie » ; c’est donc en « damnés », et en vue d’assurer cette damnation, que leur passage de ce monde à l’autre sera organisé. On enterre les victimes avec leurs habits et même leurs chaussures (le rituel exige un linceul blanc) dans des fosses communes très peu profondes, à fleur de terre (l’islam exige une profondeur minimum de 1,5 mètre) [75][75]E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confession…, op. cit., p. 218 ; K.…. Le deuil s’organise dans la société chiite autour de plusieurs étapes de commémoration collectives et de rassemblements funéraires : le troisième jour, le septième jour, le quarantième jour, qui marque la fin officielle des funérailles. En 1988, le quarantième jour était passé lorsque les familles furent informées de la mort de leurs proches. La majorité des exécutions eurent lieu à Téhéran et la gestion des corps semble s’être organisée dans l’obsession des règles du najes (la séparation des musulmans et des non-musulmans, du pur et de l’impur) : des fosses sont apparues, non pas dans le cimetière musulman de Behesht-e-Zara (où même des opposants politiques marxistes exécutés par l’ancien régime furent exhumés et déplacés), mais dans un carré situé dans le cimetière de Khavaran perdu sur une route à 16 km au sud-est de Téhéran, qui est un lieu d’inhumation ba’haie [76][76]Communauté religieuse persécutée.. Le lieu a été renommé Kaferestan (la terre des Kafer, des incroyants) ou encore Lanatabad (le lieu des damnés) ; les familles s’y réfèrent comme Golzar-e Khavaran (le champ de fleurs de Khavaran) car elles y ont planté des fleurs, et qu’une fois par an, à la date anniversaire du massacre, la terre du terrain vague est recouverte de bouquets. Le lieu est même parfois désigné comme golestan (le champ de fleurs), par analogie phonique et retournement du mot gourestan (le cimetière). La guerre des noms en fait en tous cas le lieu d’une mémoire laborieuse, tendue.
C’est dans ce contexte que se sont mises en place à Khavaran des cérémonies de commémoration des morts de 1988, inscrites dans la tradition ritualisée du bozorgdasht, qui est celle d’une visite au cimetière à la date anniversaire de la mort, donnant lieu à un rassemblement laïque des proches pour évoquer le souvenir du défunt. Progressivement, ces visites se sont transformées en cérémonies de commémoration du massacre de 1988. Une fois par an, lors du bozorgdasht, « le cimetière de Khavaran, rapportent les observateurs, est transformé en champs de fleurs et des opposants au régime islamique se mêlent aux familles : on récite des poèmes et on lit des textes sur la vie des disparus, de petites marches de protestation s’organisent même dans le cimetière [77][77]BBC Persia, « Le cimetière de Khavaran… », art. cité ; voir…. » Cependant, deux décennies après les faits, les enjeux de visibilisation du massacre, qui engage la responsabilité individuelle de membres de certaines administrations encore en fonction, restent sensibles. En novembre 2005, une radio américaine en langue persane, Radio Farda, annonce que des pierres tombales du cimetière de Khavaran sont détruites par « des individus non-identifiés [78][78]Nouvelles radiophonique du 19 novembre 2005, Radio Farda,… ». En automne 2007, sept personnes ayant participé au bozorgdasht de proches à Khavaran sont arrêtées et détenues dans la « section 209 » de la prison d’Evin à Téhéran, sous autorité du ministère de l’Information [79][79]AI, Action Urgente, « Iran : Craintes de mauvais traitements/…. Un rapport de Human Rights Watch avance des témoignages de familles de victimes selon lesquels « des tombes improvisées, placées par les familles ont été détruites. On dit que le gouvernement prépare une intervention importante à [Khavaran] afin de supprimer les traces d’inhumation [80][80]Human Rights Watch, Minister of murders, op. cit. Notre…. »

18 Lors des commémorations, la présence d’« opposants du régime » aux côtés des familles des victimes ­ la manifestation regroupait 2 000 personnes en 2005 ­ et de « petites marches de protestations » semble témoigner d’une politisation des rites mortuaires autour desquels se sont cristallisés les enjeux d’oubli et de souvenir liés à l’événement. Ce qu’on constate, c’est la fonction de catalyse du lieu dans l’organisation d’une action collective qui dépasserait le cercle des intimes. Ainsi, les membres de Kanoon-e Khavaran (l’Association Khavaran) fondée en 1996 par les sympathisants d’un groupe politique marxiste exilés en Europe et Amérique du Nord, s’organisent-ils en un réseau d’information qui a pour objet la constitution d’archives relatives aux exécutions, la production d’une liste nominale des victimes ainsi que la localisation de charniers à travers le pays [81][81]Kanoon-e Khavaran, op. cit. (site internet).. D’autre part, dans les différents textes lus lors des commémorations, le nom propre, Khavaran, émerge comme une synthèse des événements de 1988 et de leur mémoire. Ainsi de cette chanson qui commence par : « Khavaran ! Khavaran ! Terre des souvenirs. Il y vient parfois des mères… », ou encore de ce poème lu lors d’un bozorgdasht : « Je suis le cri rouge de la liberté / Lis mon nom, ma mère, dans le ciel de Khavaran / Je suis le drapeau sanglant de la liberté / Lis mon nom, mon épouse, dans le ciel de Khavaran / Je suis la bannière rouge de la liberté / Lis mon nom, mon enfant, dans le ciel de Khavaran / Je suis prisonnier sous la terre sèche de Khavaran / Lis mon nom, peuple courageux, dans le ciel de Khavaran [82][82]M. R. Mohini, « Khavaran est un nom qui signifie “ne pas… ». Si les trois premiers vers opposent le parcours politique des victimes (« le cri rouge de la liberté ») à un lien familial autour duquel se noue le souvenir (la mère, l’épouse, l’enfant), le dernier vers propose la mémoire de l’événement non-publicisé (« prisonnier sous la terre sèche de Khavaran ») comme le levier d’une appropriation politique, et presque la condition de reformation du « peuple courageux », en s’insérant ainsi dans un schème essentiel du discours post-révolutionnaire qui est l’invitation au peuple à réitérer la mobilisation héroïque de la révolution. Or, la difficulté d’une politisation de cette histoire alternative que propose Khavaran se négocie précisément autour de cette référence à l’histoire et la grammaire révolutionnaires, et à son « anachronisme » par rapport à un répertoire contemporain de discours et d’actions centré autour de la revendication de libertés civiles [83][83]F. Khosrokhavar, « L’Iran, la démocratie et la nouvelle…. En effet, la charge mémorielle attribuée à ce charnier signifie-t-elle pour autant la formation d’une mémoire collective à partir de laquelle se reconstruit, dans le contexte iranien actuel, l’enjeu politique des exécutions de masse ? Mais alors, quelle identité se cristallise autour de cette mémoire commune ? C’est avec cette question qu’apparaissent les limites et les tensions liées à la possibilité de « se mobiliser » autour de la constitution des exécutions comme une cause publique.

19 Les enjeux de mémoire et d’identité sont pris dans une relation plastique de réciprocité, rappelle Gillis : « Une dimension fondamentale de toute identité individuelle ou collective, à savoir un sentiment de communauté [a sense of sameness] dans le temps et l’espace, s’élabore à partir du souvenir ; et ce dont on se souvient ainsi est défini par l’identité revendiquée [84][84]John R. Gillis (dir.), Commemorations : The Politics of…. » Or il y a une tension entre les pratiques mémorielles qui émergent sur des sites comme Khavaran, et l’identification des victimes du massacre au mouvement des moudjahidines (auquel plus de 70 % des prisonniers exécutés étaient en effet affiliés). Si les exécutions de 1988 ne sont pas vraiment un secret au sein de la population iranienne, elles sont directement rapportées à la trajectoire politique des moudjahidines qui semblent avoir été exclus des revendications et des références par lesquelles une identité nationale iranienne s’est négociée dans les pays depuis la Révolution. De leur côté, les moudjahidines entretiennent une mémoire des « martyrs » de 1988 liée aux narrations et aux symboles qui construisent l’identité forte et exclusive du groupe en exil, et pour ce faire relisent l’événement comme une confrontation entre le pouvoir et la résistance (c’est-à-dire les moudjahidines) ; cette interprétation laisse de côté la diversité des appartenances politiques des victimes en 1988, comme le fait que de nombreux prisonniers d’opinion s’étaient, au cours de leur détention, détachés de toute étiquette politique ou militante. Pour Shahrooz, c’est là le principal obstacle politique à une mobilisation par le droit faisant du massacre de 1988 un « crime contre l’humanité [85][85]K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art.… ».

Un enjeu actuel

20 Dans ses analyses sur la non-commémoration et l’oubli dans la cité athénienne, Nicole Loraux identifiait le « deuil inoublieux [86][86]Nicole Loraux, La cité divisée. L’oubli dans la mémoire… » comme une passion politique qui lie le familial et la vie de la cité. À l’image de Javad qui a décidé de consigner ses mémoires pour ses petits-enfants, on peut observer que l’enjeu d’une résistance mémorielle face aux événements de 1988 engage les notions d’oubli et de déni face à un silence orchestré du pouvoir. Orchestré, et non total, ni effectif. Cette orchestration, c’est cette attitude ambivalente du pouvoir qui enterre en secret les victimes à fleur de terre, tout en faisant de l’odeur putride qui se dégage du charnier la preuve que ces personnes (qui ne sont officiellement pas là) étaient des non-musulmans ; c’est aussi annoncer la mort des prisonniers aux familles, mais en organisant un dispositif de mise sous silence du deuil (contrats de non-sépulture, annonces différées et au téléphone) ; c’est encore l’énonciation d’une Fatwa de mort de la part du Guide suprême, mais la négation d’exécutions de masse, puisque si l’exécution de prisonniers est reconnue, leur échelle niée. L’émergence d’une commémoration esquisse un réinvestissement politique des rites et des lieux de sépulture là où l’invisibilisation du massacre se fondait sur leur confiscation. Il faudrait pouvoir mener une observation interne, comparée, des structures de mobilisation que révèlent ces commémorations, même si une telle étude s’avère difficile dans le contexte actuel marqué par une nouvelle surveillance du pouvoir, comme le montrent les interventions de 2005 à 2007 sur le site de Khavaran, auprès des familles engagées ou de chercheurs souhaitant explorer le sujet [87][87]Nathalie Nougayrède, « Une chercheuse franco-iranienne empêchée…. En se fondant sur les articles scientifiques, les sources médiatiques, les différents témoignages publiés et les sites associatifs consacrés à ce sujet, il apparaît toutefois que les enjeux du non-oubli restent pris dans une tension mémorielle qui enserre les possibilités de mobilisation [88][88]Nader Khoshdel, « Marasem-e bozorgdasht-e zendanian-e siasi :…. Cette tension ne concerne pas uniquement les écarts entre le travail de commémoration initié par les familles et l’investissement politique et identitaire de l’événement parmi les groupes qui se sont, dans une faible mesure, réorganisés en exil. Elle concerne également l’impossibilité paradoxale de constituer la demande de reconnaissance et de justice comme une cause commune, dans un espace public marqué par la revendication de libertés civiles. L’extériorité des événements de 1988 par rapport à la vie politique et l’étanchéité des revendications civiles face à cette réalité invitent à penser la place singulière qu’occupe le massacre de 1988 dans la complexité des jeux de rupture et de continuité qui tissent l’histoire iranienne contemporaine ­ et donc, les enjeux politiques actuels dont est chargée sa mémoire.

Notes

  • [1]
    Notre traduction.
  • [2]
    L’ayatollah Khomeini qualifie la guerre de Jihad défensif et l’appelle « Défense Sacrée » (Def¯a’e moghaddas) ; au sujet des offensives iraniennes il parle de « Kerbala » en référence à la bataille qui, dans cette ville irakienne, marque en 680 le début de la rupture entre les Chiites et les Sunnites ; la guerre en Irak est appelée « Qadisiyya de Sadam » par référence, ici encore religieuse, à la bataille al-Qadisiyya de Sa’d qui eut lieu en Mésopotamie en 636 entre Musulmans et Perses sassanides, dans le cadre de la conquête musulmane de la Perse (voir à ce sujet Sinan Antoon, « Monumental Disrespect », Middle East Report, no 228, automne 2003, p. 28-30).
  • [3]
    L’auteur remercie Sandrine Lefranc pour sa lecture attentive et ses commentaires.
  • [4]
    Voir notamment Ervand Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions. Prisons and Public Recantations in Modern Iran, Berkeley, University of California Press, 1999 ; Amnesty International (AI), « Iran : Violations of Human Rights 1987-1990  », décembre 1990 ; AI, « Iran : Political Executions », décembre 1988 ; anonyme, « Man shahede ghatle ame zendanyane siyasi boodam » (« J’ai été témoin du massacre des prisonniers politiques »), Cheshmandaz, no 14, hiver 1995 ; Hossein-Ali Montazeri, Khaterat (Mémoires), hhhhttp:// wwww. amontazeri. com(consulté le 7 avril 2008).
  • [5]
    Voir E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 215 ; AI, « Iran : Violations of Human Rights 1987-1990  » ; Kaveh Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor : A Preliminary Report on The 1988 Massacre of Iran’s Political Prisoners », Harvard Human Rights Journal, vol. 20, 2007, p. 227-261, p. 228.
  • [6]
    Farhad Khosrokhavar, « L’Iran, la démocratie et la nouvelle citoyenneté », Cahiers internationaux de sociologie, no 111, 2001/2, p. 291-317.
  • [7]
    Ibid., p. 309 et Nouchine Yavari d’Hellencourt, « Islam et démocratie : de la nécessité d’une contextualisation  », Cemoti, no spécial, La question démocratique et les sociétés musulmanes. Le militaire, l’entrepreneur et le paysan, no 27, hhhhttp:// cemoti. revues. org/ document656. html(consulté le 20 avril 2008).
  • [8]
    Ibid.
  • [9]
    Ibid.
  • [10]
    Stanley Cohen, States of Denial, Knowing about Atrocities and Suffering, Cambridge, Polity Press, 2001.
  • [11]
    E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 209-229 ; Afshin Matin-Asgari, « Twentieth Century Iran’s Political Prisoners », Middle Eastern Studies, vol. 42, no 5, 2006, p. 689-707.
  • [12]
    Maziar Behrooz, « Reflections on Iran’s Prison System During the Montazeri Years (1985­1988)  », Iran Analysis Quarterly, vol. 2, no 3, 2005, p. 11-24.
  • [13]
    Reza Afshari, Human Rights in Iran : The Abuse of Cultural Relativism, Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2001 ; K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 243-257 ; Raluca Mihaila, « Political Considerations in Accountability for Crimes Against Humanity : An Iranian Case Study », Hemispheres : The Tufts University Journal of International Affairs, no spécial, State-Building : Risks and Consequences, 2002, hhhhttp:// ase. tufts. edu/ hemispheres/ (consulté le 7 avril 2008).
  • [14]
    Conseil Économique et Social des Nations Unies (ECOSOC), Commission sur les droits humains, « On the Situation of Human Rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran », Situation of Human Rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran, 27, U.N. Doc. A/44/620 (2 novembre 1989) ; Final Report on the situation of human rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran by the Special Representative of the Commission on Human Rights, Mr. Reynaldo Galindo Pohl, pursuant to Commission resolution 1992/67 of 4 March 1992, E/CN.4/1993/41 ; Human Rights Watch, « Pour-Mohammadi and the 1988 Prison Massacres », Ministers of Murder : Iran’s New Security Cabinet, hhhhttp:// wwww. hrw. org/ backgrounder/ mena/ iran1205/ 2. htm#_Toc121896787(consulté le 7 avril 2008).
  • [15]
    Un impressionnant travail a été accompli sur ce point par E. Abrahambian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 209-229, qui reste la principale référence à ce jour.
  • [16]
    Notamment Nima Parvaresh, Nabardi nabarabar : gozareshi az haft sal zendan 1361­68 (Une bataille inégale : rapport de sept ans en prison 1982­1989), Andeesheh va Peykar Publications, 1995 ; Reza Ghaffari, Khaterate yek zendani az zendanhaye jomhuriyeh islami (Les mémoires d’un prisonnier dans les prisons de la République Islamique), Stockholm, Arash Forlag, 1998 ; anonyme, « Man shahede ghatle ame zendanyane siyasi boodam », op. cit.
  • [17]
    Nous reprenons, parmi les différentes transcriptions possibles, l’orthographe adoptée par l’organisation aujourd’hui [[[[http:// wwww. maryam-rajavi. com/ fr/ content/ view/ 300/ 66/ (consulté le 7 avril 2008). « Moudjahidines » est le pluriel de « moudjahed ».
  • [18]
    Mohammad Mossadeq a été Premier ministre de 1951 à 1953. Ayant nationalisé l’industrie pétrolière iranienne en 1951, il est renversé en 1953 suite à l’opération « TP-Ajax » (menée par la CIA), condamné à trois ans d’emprisonnement, puis assigné à résidence jusqu’à sa mort en 1967. Hosein Fatemi est le fondateur du Front de Libération exécuté en 1955.
  • [19]
    Ervand Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, New Haven/Londres, Yale University Press, 1992, p. 115-125.
  • [20]
    Ibid., p. 100-102.
  • [21]
    Ibid., p. 229 ; voir également A. Matin-Asgari, « Twentieth Century Iran’s Political Prisoners », art. cité, p. 690.
  • [22]
    E. Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, op. cit., p. 229 (notre traduction).
  • [23]
    Appliqué dans la Constitution iranienne de 1979, ce principe théologique confère aux religieux la primauté sur le pouvoir politique et assure une gestion réelle du pouvoir par le Guide de la Révolution (Vali-e Faghih) qui détermine la direction politique générale du pays, arbitre les conflits entre pouvoirs législatif, exécutif et judiciaire et est chef des armées (régulières et paramilitaires).
  • [24]
    Haleh Afshar (dir.), Iran : A Revolution in Turmoil, Albany, SUNY Press, 1985 ; Shaul Bakhash, The Reign of the ayatollahs : Iran and the Islamic Revolution, New York, Basic Books, 1984.
  • [25]
    Connie Bruck, « Exiles : How Iran’s Expatriates Are Gaming the Nuclear Threat », The New Yorker, 6 Mars 2006, p. 48.
  • [26]
    E. Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, op. cit., p. 260-261.
  • [27]
    C. Bruck, « Exiles… », art. cité ; Human Rights Watch, No exit : human rights abuses inside the MKO camps, 2005, [[[http:// hrw. org/ backgrounder/ mena/ iran0505/ ?iran0505.pdf, consulté le 7 avril 2008] ; Human Rights Watch, Statement on Responses to Human Rights Watch Report on Abuses by the Mujahedin-e Khalq Organization (MKO), 15 février 2006, [[[[http:// hrw. org/ mideast/ pdf/ iran021506. pdf(consulté le 7 avril 2008).
  • [28]
    Elizabeth Rubin, « The Cult of Rajavi », New York Times Magazine, 13 juillet 2003, p. 26.
  • [29]
    E. Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, op. cit., p. 3 (notre traduction).
  • [30]
    Ibid.
  • [31]
    Le mouvement était le seul à présenter des candidats partout en Iran.
  • [32]
    Le manuscrit dit : « une société Tohidie  », d’après le Tohid qui est le premier principe d’Islam (« Je dis qu’il y a un seul Dieu ») : une société islamique selon la perspective d’Ali Chariati.
  • [33]
    E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confession, op. cit., p. 210.
  • [34]
    Nader Vahabi, « L’obstacle structurel à l’abolition de la peine de mort en Iran », Panagea, « Diritti umani », mars 2007, hhhttp:// wwww. panagea. eu/ web/ index. php? ?option=com_content&task=view&id=150&Itemid=99999999 (consulté le 28 avril 2008).
  • [35]
    H.-A. Montazeri, Khaterat, op. cit.
  • [36]
    Hossein Mokhtar, Testimony at the September 1st Conference, Mission for Establishment of Human Rights in Iran (MEHR), 1998, en ligne, hhhhttp:// wwww. mehr. org/ massacre_1988. htm(consulté le 7 avril 2008). Notre traduction.
  • [37]
    E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 209 et suiv.
  • [38]
    Ibid.
  • [39]
    Témoignage cité dans E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 214 ; K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 238.
  • [40]
    E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 209.
  • [41]
    K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 227 ; R. Mihaila, « Political Considerations in Accountability for Crimes Against Humanity… », art. cité. Ces travaux prolongent une recherche initiale d’Amnesty International qui a produit plusieurs rapports quasi contemporains aux événements (« Iran : Violations of Human Rights 1987-1990  », art. cité ; « Iran : Political Executions », art. cité) et adopte aujourd’hui la définition de crime contre l’humanité : « Aux termes du droit international en vigueur en 1988, on entend par crimes contre l’humanité des attaques généralisées ou systématiques dirigées contre des civils et fondées sur des motifs discriminatoires, y compris d’ordre politique. » (AI, Action Urgente, « Iran : Craintes de mauvais traitements/ Prisonniers d’opinion présumés », 2 novembre 2007, [en ligne hhhhttp:// asiapacific. amnesty. org/ library/ Index/ FRAMDE131282007,consulté le 7 avril 2008]).
  • [42]
    Les pasdaran-e Sepah, gardiens de la Révolution, sont la milice paramilitaire de la République islamique.
  • [43]
    Expression désignant l’attentat terroriste de juin 1981 où 72 cadres du Parti républicain islamique sont morts : le terme renvoie aux « compagnons l’Imam de Hussein » dans la tradition chiite ; l’« Imam » désigne ici Khomeini.
  • [44]
    K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 240-241.
  • [45]
    Du français « comité » : désigne les cellules informelles d’ordre public mises en place par le Hezbollah au début de la Révolution, et qui se solidifient peu à peu en para-forces de l’ordre, surveillant notamment les m urs islamiques.
  • [46]
    AI, « Mass Executions of Political Prisoners », Amnesty International’s Newsletter, février 1989 ; K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 239.
  • [47]
    Ibid.
  • [48]
    UN document A/44/153, ZB février 1989, cité dans AI, Iran : Violations of Human Rights 1987-1990. Notre traduction.
  • [49]
    Final Report on the situation of human rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran by the Special Representative of the Commission on Human Rights.
  • [50]
    M. Behrooz, « Reflections on Iran’s Prison System… », art. cité.
  • [51]
    E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 221 (notre traduction).
  • [52]
    Ibid., p. 221-222 ; Azadeh Kian-Thiébaut, « La révolution iranienne à l’heure des réformes », Le Monde diplomatique, janvier 1998 : hhhhttp:// wwww. monde-diplomatique. fr/ 1998/ 01/ KIAN_THIEBAUT/ 9782. html#nh1(consulté le 20 avril 2008).
  • [53]
    H. Mokhtar, Testimony at the September 1 Conference, op. cit (notre traduction) ; Kanoon-e Khavaran hhhhttp:// wwww. khavaran. com/ HTMLs/ Fraxan-Zendanian-Jan3008. htm(consulté le 7 avril 2008) ; Bidaran, hhhhttp:// wwww. bidaran. net/ (consulté le 7 avril 2008) ; OMID, A Memorial in Defense of Human Rights in Iran, [en llllignehttp:// wwww. abfiran. org/ english/ memorial. php,consulté le 7 avril 2008].
  • [54]
    Christina Lamb, The Telegraph, « Khomeini fatwa “led to killing of 30,000 in Iran” », 19 juin 2001 ; Conseil National de la Résistance Iranienne, site des moudjahidines du Peuple en exil, hhhhttp:// wwww. ncr-iran. org/ fr/ content/ view/ 3966/ 89/ ,(consulté le 7 avril 2008).
  • [55]
    Nasser Mohajer, « The Mass Killings in Iran », Aresh, no 57, août 1996, p. 7, cité in E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 212.
  • [56]
    K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 257 ; R. Mihaila, « Political Considerations in Accountability for Crimes Against Humanity… », art. cité.
  • [57]
    K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 243-257 ; R. Mihaila, « Political Considerations in Accountability for Crimes Against Humanity… », art. cité.
  • [58]
    Voir par exemple N. Yavari d’Hellencourt, « Islam et démocratie… », art. cité.
  • [59]
    Voir par exemple Ahmed Vahdat, « The Spectre of Montazeri », Rouzegar-e-Now, no 8, janvier-février 2003, p. 48.
  • [60]
    Cité dans K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 241.
  • [61]
    E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit., p. 210 ; R. Ghaffari, Khaterate yek zendani az zendanhaye jomhuriyeh islami, op. cit., note 23, p. 248 ; HRW, « Pour-Mohammadi and the 1988 Prison Massacres », op. cit. ; H.-A. Montazeri, Khaterat, op. cit.
  • [62]
    E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confessions…, op. cit. ; R. Afshari, Human Rights in Iran, op. cit.  ; H.-A. Montazeri, Khaterat , op. cit.
  • [63]
    Paul Vieille, « L’institution shi’ite, la religiosité populaire, le martyre et la révolution », Peuples Méditerranéens, no 16, 1981, p. 77-92.
  • [64]
    Voir par exemple E. Abrahamian, The Iranian Mojahedins, op. cit., p. 206 et 243.
  • [65]
    F. Khosrokhavar, L’islamisme et la mort : le martyre révolutionnaire en Iran, Paris, l’Harmattan, 1995 ; F. Khosrokhavar, Anthropologie de la révolution iranienne. Le rêve impossible, Paris, l’Harmattan, 1997.
  • [66]
    Ulrich Marzolph, « The Martyr’s Way to Paradise. Shiite Mural Art in the Urban Context  », Ethnologia Europaea, vol. 33, no 2, 2003, p. 87-98.
  • [67]
    Ali Reza Sheikholeslami, « The Transformation of Iran’s Political Culture », Critique : Critical Middle Eastern Studies, vol. 17, no 9, 2000, p.105-133.
  • [68]
    F. Khosrokhavar, L’islamisme et la mort…, op. cit.
  • [69]
    Témoignage paru dans le journal islamiste Keyhan en 1984, cité par F. Khosrokhavar, L’islamisme et la mort…, op. cit., p. 92.
  • [70]
    BBC Persia, « Le cimetière de Khavaran : des sépultures sans nom, et la mise au jour des exécutés », 1er septembre 2005, hhhhttp:// wwww. bbc. co. uk/ persian/ iran/ story/ 2005/ 09/ 050902_mf_cemetery. shtml(notre traduction, consulté le 7 avril 2007).
  • [71]
    AI, Iran : Violations of Human Rights 1987-1990, p. 3. Notre traduction.
  • [72]
    Entretien filmé reproduit sur le site internet de l’ONG de défense des droits humains : hhhhttp:// wwww. bidaran. net/ (consulté le 7 avril 2008).
  • [73]
    Entretien télévisé disponible sur internet : Mosahebe-ye Televisione Internasional ba Babake Yazdi Dar Morede Koshtare Tabestane 67 (interview de la chaîne télévisée Internationale avec Babak Yazdi, concernant les massacres de l’été 88), hhhhttp:// khavaran. com/ Ghatleam(consulté le 7 avril 2007).
  • [74]
    Mohammad Reza Mohini, « Khavaran est un nom qui signifie “ne pas oublier” », Bidaran, hhhhttp:// wwww. bidaran. net/ spip. php? article48(consulté le 7 avril 2008).
  • [75]
    E. Abrahamian, Tortured Confession…, op. cit., p. 218 ; K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 282 ; AI, « Mass Executions of Political Prisoners », art. cité.
  • [76]
    Communauté religieuse persécutée.
  • [77]
    BBC Persia, « Le cimetière de Khavaran… », art. cité ; voir aussi M. R Mohini, « Khavaran est un nom qui signifie “ne pas oublier” », art. cité.
  • [78]
    Nouvelles radiophonique du 19 novembre 2005, Radio Farda, Afrade Nashenas Ghabrhaye Edamyane Siyasiye Daheye 60 ra dar Goorestane Khavaran Takhreeb Kardand (« Des individus non identifiés ont détruit les tombes des prisonniers politiques exécutés dans les années 1980 dans le cimetière de Khavaran »).
  • [79]
    AI, Action Urgente, « Iran : Craintes de mauvais traitements/ Prisonniers d’opinion présumés », op. cit.
  • [80]
    Human Rights Watch, Minister of murders, op. cit. Notre traduction.
  • [81]
    Kanoon-e Khavaran, op. cit. (site internet).
  • [82]
    M. R. Mohini, « Khavaran est un nom qui signifie “ne pas oublier” », art. cité.
  • [83]
    F. Khosrokhavar, « L’Iran, la démocratie et la nouvelle citoyenneté », art. cité.
  • [84]
    John R. Gillis (dir.), Commemorations : The Politics of National Identity, Princeton, Princeton University Press, 1994, p. 3 (notre traduction).
  • [85]
    K. Shahrooz, « With Revolutionary Rage and Rancor… », art. cité, p. 259 ; voir aussi R. Mihaila, « Political Considerations in Accountability for Crimes Against Humanity… », art. cité, en ligne.
  • [86]
    Nicole Loraux, La cité divisée. L’oubli dans la mémoire d’Athène, Paris, Payot-Rivages, 2005, p. 164.
  • [87]
    Nathalie Nougayrède, « Une chercheuse franco-iranienne empêchée de quitter Téhéran », Le Monde, 6 septembre 2007.
  • [88]
    Nader Khoshdel, « Marasem-e bozorgdasht-e zendanian-e siasi : goft-o-gou ba Mihan Rousta » (« La cérémonie de bozorgdasht des prisonniers politiques : entretien avec Mihan Rousta »), Sedaye-ma, 13 octobre 2004, hhhhttp:// wwww. sedaye-ma. org/ web/ show_article. php? file= src/ didgah/ mihanrousta_10132006_1. htm(consulté le 7 avril 2008).

11 septembre/18e: Des gens avaient fait quelque chose (While the Ilhan Omars of this world never miss an opportunity to spit on their adopted countries, thank God for Mitchell Zuckoff’s attempt to ‘delay the descent of 9/11 into the well of history’)

11 septembre, 2019

Image result for Nicholas Haros Jr.

Image result for Here's your something NYP coverImage result for George W bush Job approval ratings trend
Related imagehttp://2.bp.blogspot.com/-J5FqbfMis0E/TndH_ZSniVI/AAAAAAAAAZU/5hYzGzijR4o/s1600/IMG_1426.jpgCountries That Lost Citizens On 9/11
Image result for fall and rise zuckoff book cover
Il n’y a pas de plus grand amour que de donner sa vie pour ses amis. (…) Si le monde vous hait, sachez qu’il m’a haï avant vous. (…) S’ils m’ont persécuté, ils vous persécuteront aussi. Jésus (Jean 15: 13-20)
Let’s roll ! Todd Beamer
You’ve got to turn on evil,when it’s coming after you, you’ve gotta face it down … Neil Young (« Let’s roll, 2001)
[Beamer’s wife Lisa] was talking about how he always used to say that (« let’s roll ») with the kids when they’d go out and do something, that it’s what he said a lot when he had a job to do. And it’s just so poignant, and there’s no more of a legendary, heroic act than what those people did. With no promise of martyrdom, no promise of any reward anywhere for this, other than just knowing that you did the right thing. And not even having a chance to think about it or plan it or do anything — just a gut reaction that was heroic and ultimately cost them all their lives. What more can you say? It was just so obvious that somebody had to write something or do something. Neil Young
In the normal course of events, Presidents come to this chamber to report on the state of the Union. Tonight, no such report is needed. It has already been delivered by the American people. We have seen it in the courage of passengers, who rushed terrorists to save others on the ground — passengers like an exceptional man named Todd Beamer. And would you please help me to welcome his wife, Lisa Beamer, here tonight. George W. Bush
Et immédiatement, le centre sacrificiel se mit à générer des réactions habituelles : un sentiment d’unanimité et de deuil. […] Des phrases ont commencé à se dire comme « Nous sommes tous Américains » – un sentiment purement fictif pour la plupart d’entre nous. Ce fut étonnant de voir l’unité se former autour du centre sacré, rapidement nommé Ground Zero, une unité qui se concrétisera ensuite par un drapeau, une grande participation aux cérémonies religieuses, les chefs religieux soudainement pris au sérieux, des bougies, des lieux saints, des prières, tous les signes de la religion de la mort. […] Et puis il y avait le deuil. Comme nous aimons le deuil ! Cela nous donne bonne conscience, nous rend innocents. Voilà ce qu’Aristote voulait dire par katharsis, et qui a des échos profonds dans les racines sacrificielles de la tragédie dramatique. Autour du centre sacrificiel, les personnes présentes se sentent justifiées et moralement bonnes. Une fausse bonté qui soudainement les sort de leurs petites trahisons, leurs lâchetés, leur mauvaise conscience. James Alison
La révolte contre l’ethnocentrisme est une invention de l’Occident, introuvable en dehors. (…) À la différence de toutes les autres cultures, qui ont toujours été ethnocentriques tout de go et sans complexe, nous autres occidentaux sommes toujours simultanément nous-mêmes et notre propre ennemi. René Girard
L’erreur est toujours de raisonner dans les catégories de la « différence », alors que la racine de tous les conflits, c’est plutôt la « concurrence », la rivalité mimétique entre des êtres, des pays, des cultures. La concurrence, c’est-à-dire le désir d’imiter l’autre pour obtenir la même chose que lui, au besoin par la violence. Sans doute le terrorisme est-il lié à un monde « différent » du nôtre, mais ce qui suscite le terrorisme n’est pas dans cette « différence » qui l’éloigne le plus de nous et nous le rend inconcevable. Il est au contraire dans un désir exacerbé de convergence et de ressemblance. (…) Ce qui se vit aujourd’hui est une forme de rivalité mimétique à l’échelle planétaire. Lorsque j’ai lu les premiers documents de Ben Laden, constaté ses allusions aux bombes américaines tombées sur le Japon, je me suis senti d’emblée à un niveau qui est au-delà de l’islam, celui de la planète entière. Sous l’étiquette de l’islam, on trouve une volonté de rallier et de mobiliser tout un tiers-monde de frustrés et de victimes dans leurs rapports de rivalité mimétique avec l’Occident. Mais les tours détruites occupaient autant d’étrangers que d’Américains. Et par leur efficacité, par la sophistication des moyens employés, par la connaissance qu’ils avaient des Etats-Unis, par leurs conditions d’entraînement, les auteurs des attentats n’étaient-ils pas un peu américains ? On est en plein mimétisme.Ce sentiment n’est pas vrai des masses, mais des dirigeants. Sur le plan de la fortune personnelle, on sait qu’un homme comme Ben Laden n’a rien à envier à personne. Et combien de chefs de parti ou de faction sont dans cette situation intermédiaire, identique à la sienne. Regardez un Mirabeau au début de la Révolution française : il a un pied dans un camp et un pied dans l’autre, et il n’en vit que de manière plus aiguë son ressentiment. Aux Etats-Unis, des immigrés s’intègrent avec facilité, alors que d’autres, même si leur réussite est éclatante, vivent aussi dans un déchirement et un ressentiment permanents. Parce qu’ils sont ramenés à leur enfance, à des frustrations et des humiliations héritées du passé. Cette dimension est essentielle, en particulier chez des musulmans qui ont des traditions de fierté et un style de rapports individuels encore proche de la féodalité. (…) Cette concurrence mimétique, quand elle est malheureuse, ressort toujours, à un moment donné, sous une forme violente. A cet égard, c’est l’islam qui fournit aujourd’hui le ciment qu’on trouvait autrefois dans le marxisme.  René Girard
J’ai l’impression que beaucoup de gens ont oublié le 11 Septembre – pas complètement, mais ils l’ont réduit à une espèce de norme tacite. Quand j’ai donné cet entretien au Monde, l’opinion générale pensait qu’il s’agissait d’un événement inhabituel, nouveau, et incomparable. Aujourd’hui, je pense que beaucoup de gens seraient en désaccord avec cette remarque. Malheureusement, l’attitude des Américains face au 11 Septembre a été influencée par l’idéologie politique, à cause de la guerre en Irak. Le fait d’insister sur le 11 Septembre est devenu « « conservateur » et « alarmiste ». Ceux qui aimeraient mettre une fin immédiate à la guerre en Irak tendent donc à le minimiser. Cela dit, je ne veux pas dire qu’ils ont tort de vouloir terminer la guerre en Irak, mais avant de minimiser le 11 Septembre, ils devraient faire très attention et considérer la situation dans sa globalité. Aujourd’hui, cette tendance est très répandue, car les événements dont vous parlez – qui ont eu lieu après le 11 Septembre et qui en sont, en quelque sorte, de vagues réminiscences – sont incomparablement moins puissants et ont beaucoup moins de visibilité. Par conséquent, il y a tout le problème de l’interprétation : qu’est-ce que le 11 Septembre ? (…) je le vois comme un événement déterminant, et c’est très grave de le minimiser aujourd’hui. Le désir habituel d’être optimiste, de ne pas voir l’unicité de notre temps du point de vue de la violence, correspond à un désir futile et désespéré de penser notre temps comme la simple continuation de la violence du XXe siècle. Je pense, personnellement, que nous avons affaire à une nouvelle dimension qui est mondiale. Ce que le communisme avait tenté de faire, une guerre vraiment mondiale, est maintenant réalisé, c’est l’actualité. Minimiser le 11 Septembre, c’est ne pas vouloir voir l’importance de cette nouvelle dimension. (…)  [la guerre froide et le terrorisme islamiste] sont similaires dans la mesure où elles représentent une menace révolutionnaire, une menace globale. Mais la menace actuelle va au-delà de la politique, puisqu’elle comporte un aspect religieux. Ainsi, l’idée qu’il puisse y avoir un conflit plus total que celui conçu par les peuples totalitaires, comme l’Allemagne nazie, et qui puisse devenir en quelque sorte la propriété de l’islam, est tout simplement stupéfiante, tellement contraire à ce que tout le monde croyait sur la politique. Il faudrait beaucoup y travailler, car il n’y a pas de vraie réflexion sur la coexistence des autres religions, et en particulier du christianisme avec l’islam. Le problème religieux est plus radical dans la mesure où il dépasse les divisions idéologiques – que bien sûr, la plupart des intellectuels aujourd’hui ne sont pas prêts d’abandonner. En deçà de ces visions idéologiques, nos réflexions sur le 11 Septembre resteront superficielles. Nous devons réfléchir dans le contexte plus large de la dimension apocalyptique du christianisme. Celle-ci est une menace, car la survie même de la planète est en jeu. Notre planète est menacée par trois choses qui émanent de l’homme : la menace nucléaire, la menace écologique et la manipulation biologique de l’espèce humaine. L’idée que l’homme ne puisse pas maîtriser ses propres pouvoirs est aussi vraie dans le domaine biologique que dans le domaine militaire. C’est cette triple menace mondiale qui domine aujourd’hui. (…) Le terrorisme est une forme de guerre, et la guerre est la continuation de la politique par d’autres moyens. En ce sens, le terrorisme est politique. Mais le terrorisme est la seule forme possible de guerre face à la technologie. Les événements actuels en Irak le confirment. La supériorité de l’Occident, c’est sa technologie, et elle s’est révélée inutile en Irak. L’Occident s’est mis dans la pire des situations en déclarant qu’il transformerait l’Irak en une démocratie jeffersonienne ! C’est précisément ce qu’il ne peut pas faire. Il est impuissant face à l’islam car la division entre les sunnites et les chiites est infiniment plus importante. Alors même qu’ils combattent l’Occident, ils parviennent encore à lutter l’un contre l’autre. Pourquoi l’Occident devrait-il s’investir dans ce conflit interne à l’islam alors que nous ne parvenons même pas à en concevoir l’immense puissance au sein du monde islamique lui-même ? (…) Il s’agit de notre incompréhension du rôle de la religion, et de notre propre monde ; c’est ne pas comprendre que ce qui nous unit est très fragile. Lorsque nous évoquons nos principes démocratiques, parlons-nous de l’égalité et des élections, ou bien parlons-nous de capitalisme, de consommation, de libre échange, etc. ? Je pense que dans les années à venir, l’Occident sera mis à l’épreuve. Comment réagira-t-il : avec force ou faiblesse ? Se dissoudra-t-il ? Les occidentaux devraient se poser la question de savoir s’ils ont de vrais principes, et si ceux-ci sont chrétiens ou bien purement consuméristes. Le consumérisme n’a pas d’emprise sur ceux qui se livrent aux attentats suicides. L’Amérique devrait y réfléchir, car elle offre au monde ce que l’on considère de plus attrayant. Pourquoi cela ne fonctionne- t-il pas vraiment chez les musulmans ? Est-ce par ressentiment ou ont-ils, contre cela, un système de défense bien organisé ? Ou bien, leur perspective religieuse est-elle plus authentique et plus puissante ? Le vrai problème est là. (…) Je suis bien moins affirmatif que je ne l’étais au moment du 11 Septembre sur l’idée d’un ressentiment total. Je me souviens m’être emporté lors d’une rencontre à l’École Polytechnique lorsque je me suis mis d’accord avec Jean-Pierre Dupuy sur l’interprétation du ressentiment du monde musulman. Maintenant, je ne pense pas que cela suffise. Le ressentiment seul peut-il motiver cette capacité de mourir ainsi ? Le monde musulman pourrait-il vraiment être indifférent à la culture de consommation de masse ? Peut-être qu’il l’est. Je ne sais pas. Il serait sans doute excessif de leur attribuer une telle envie. Si les islamistes ont vraiment pour objectif la domination du monde, alors ils l’ont déjà dépassée. Nous ne savons pas si l’industrialisation rapide apparaîtra dans le monde musulman, ou s’ils tenteront de gagner sur la croissance démographique et la fascination qu’ils exercent. Il y a de plus en plus de conversions en Occident. La fascination de la violence y joue certainement un rôle. (…) Il y a là du ressentiment, évidemment. Et c’est ce qui a dû émouvoir ceux qui ont applaudi les terroristes, comme s’ils étaient dans un stade. C’est cela le ressentiment. C’est évident et indéniable. Mais est-ce qu’il représente l’unique force ? La force majeure ? Peut-il être l’unique cause des attentats suicides ? Je n’en suis pas sûr. La richesse accumulée en Occident, comparée au reste du monde, est un scandale, et le 11 Septembre n’est pas sans rapport avec ce fait. Si je ne veux donc pas complètement supprimer l’idée du ressentiment, il ne peut pas être l’unique explication. (…)  L’autre force serait religieuse. Allah est contre le consumérisme, etc. En réalité, le musulman pense que les rituels de prohibition religieuse sont une force qui maintient l’unité de la communauté, ce qui a totalement disparu ou qui est en déclin en Occident. Les gens en Occident ne sont motivés que par le consumérisme, les bons salaires, etc. Les musulmans disent : « leurs armes sont terriblement dangereuses, mais comme peuple, ils sont tellement faibles que leur civilisation peut être facilement détruite ». C’est ce qu’ils pensent et ils n’ont peut-être pas complètement tort. Il me semble qu’il y a quelque chose de juste dans ce propos. Finalement, je crois que la perspective chrétienne sur la violence surmontera tout, mais ce sera une épreuve importante. (…) Il faut faire attention à ne pas justifier le 11 Septembre en le qualifiant de sacrificiel. Je pense que Jean-Pierre Dupuy ne le dit pas. Il maintient une sorte de neutralité. Mais ce qu’il dit sur la nature sacrée de Ground Zero au World Trade Center est, je pense, parfaitement justifié. (…) Je pense que James Alison a raison de parler de la katharsis dans le contexte du 11 Septembre. La notion de katharsis est extrêmement importante. C’est un mot religieux. En réalité, cela veut dire « la purge » au sens de purification. Dans l’Église orthodoxe, par exemple, katharos veut dire purification. C’est le mot qui exprime l’effet positif de la religion. La purge est ce qui nous rend purs. C’est ce que la religion est censée faire, et ce qu’elle fait avec le sacrifice. Je considère l’utilisation du mot katharsis par Aristote comme parfaitement juste. Quand les gens condamnent la théorie mimétique, ils ne voient pas l’apport d’Aristote. Il ne semble parler que de tragédie, mais pourtant, le théâtre tragique traite du sacrifice comme un drame. On l’appelle d’ailleurs ‘l’ode de la chèvre’. Aristote est toujours conventionnel dans ses explications – conventionnel au sens positif. Un Grec très intelligent cherchant à justifier sa religion, utiliserait, je pense, le mot katharsis. Ainsi, ma réponse mettrait l’accent sur la katharsis au sens aristotélicien du terme. (…) pour le 11 Septembre, il y avait la télévision qui nous rendait présents à l’événement, et intensifiait ainsi l’expérience. L’événement était en direct, comme nous le disons en français. On ne savait pas ce qui allait advenir par la suite. Moi-même, j’ai vu le deuxième avion frapper le gratte-ciel, en direct. C’était comme un spectacle tragique, mais réel en même temps. Si nous ne l’avions pas vécu dans le sens le plus littéral, il n’aurait pas eu le même impact. Je pense que si j’avais écrit La Violence et le Sacré après le 11 Septembre, j’y aurais très probablement inclus cet événement. C’est l’événement qui rend possible une compréhension des événements contemporains, car il rend l’archaïque plus intelligible. Le 11 Septembre représente un étrange retour à l’archaïque à l’intérieur du sécularisme de notre temps. Il n’y a pas si longtemps, les gens auraient eu une réaction chrétienne vis-à-vis du 11 Septembre. Aujourd’hui, ils ont une réaction archaïque, qui augure mal de l’avenir. (…) L’avenir apocalyptique n’est pas quelque chose d’historique. C’est quelque chose de religieux sans lequel on ne peut pas vivre. C’est ce que les chrétiens actuels ne comprennent pas. Parce que, dans l’avenir apocalyptique, le bien et le mal sont mélangés de telle manière que d’un point de vue chrétien, on ne peut pas parler de pessimisme. Cela est tout simplement contenu dans le christianisme. Pour le comprendre, lisons la Première Lettre aux Corinthiens : si les puissants, c’est-à-dire les puissants de ce monde, avaient su ce qui arriverait, ils n’auraient jamais crucifié le Seigneur de la Gloire – car cela aurait signifié leur destruction (cf. 1 Co 2, 8). Car lorsque l’on crucifie le Seigneur de la Gloire, la magie des pouvoirs, qui est le mécanisme du bouc émissaire, est révélée. Montrer la crucifixion comme l’assassinat d’une victime innocente, c’est montrer le meurtre collectif et révéler ce phénomène mimétique. C’est finalement cette vérité qui entraîne les puissants à leur perte. Et toute l’histoire est simplement la réalisation de cette prophétie. Ceux qui prétendent que le christianisme est anarchiste ont un peu raison. Les chrétiens détruisent les pouvoirs de ce monde, car ils détruisent la légitimité de toute violence. Pour l’État, le christianisme est une force anarchique, surtout lorsqu’il retrouve sa puissance spirituelle d’autrefois. Ainsi, le conflit avec les musulmans est bien plus considérable que ce que croient les fondamentalistes. Les fondamentalistes pensent que l’apocalypse est la violence de Dieu. Alors qu’en lisant les chapitres apocalyptiques, on voit que l’apocalypse est la violence de l’homme déchaînée par la destruction des puissants, c’est-à-dire des États, comme nous le voyons en ce moment. (…) mais (…) à la fin, la force religieuse est du côté du Christ. Cependant, il semblerait que la vraie force religieuse soit du côté de la violence. (…) Lorsque les puissances seront vaincues, la violence deviendra telle que la fin arrivera. Si l’on suit les chapitres apocalyptiques, c’est bien cela qu’ils annoncent. Il y aura des révolutions et des guerres. Les États s’élèveront contre les États, les nations contre les nations. Cela reflète la violence. Voilà le pouvoir anarchique que nous avons maintenant, avec des forces capables de détruire le monde entier. On peut donc voir l’apparition de l’apocalypse d’une manière qui n’était pas possible auparavant. Au début du christianisme, l’apocalypse semblait magique : le monde va finir ; nous irons tous au paradis, et tout sera sauvé ! L’erreur des premiers chrétiens était de croire que l’apocalypse était toute proche. Les premiers textes chronologiques chrétiens sont les Lettres aux Thessaloniciens qui répondent à la question : pourquoi le monde continue-t-il alors qu’on en a annoncé la fin ? Paul dit qu’il y a quelque chose qui retient les pouvoirs, le katochos (quelque chose qui retient). L’interprétation la plus commune est qu’il s’agit de l’Empire romain. La crucifixion n’a pas encore dissout tout l’ordre. Si l’on consulte les chapitres du christianisme, ils décrivent quelque chose comme le chaos actuel, qui n’était pas présent au début de l’Empire romain. Comment le monde peut-il finir alors qu’il est tenu si fortement par les forces de l’ordre ? (…)  [La religion chrétienne], fondamentalement, c’est la religion qui annonce le monde à venir ; il n’est pas question de se battre pour ce monde. C’est le christianisme moderne qui oublie ses origines et sa vraie direction. L’apocalypse au début du christianisme était une promesse, pas une menace, car ils croyaient vraiment en un monde prochain. (…) Je suis pessimiste au sens actuel du terme. Mais en fait, je suis optimiste si l’on regarde le monde actuel qui confirme vraiment toutes les prédictions. On voit l’apocalypse s’étendre tous les jours : le pouvoir de détruire le monde, les armes de plus en plus fatales, et autres menaces qui se multiplient sous nos yeux. Nous croyons toujours que tous ces problèmes sont gérables par l’homme mais, dans une vision d’ensemble, c’est impossible. Ils ont une valeur quasi surnaturelle. Comme les fondamentalistes, beaucoup de lecteurs de l’Évangile reconnaissent la situation mondiale dans ces chapitres apocalyptiques. Mais les fondamentalistes croient que la violence ultime vient de Dieu, alors ils ne voient pas vraiment le rapport avec la situation actuelle – le rapport religieux. Cela montre combien ils sont peu chrétiens. La violence humaine, qui menace aujourd’hui le monde, est plus conforme au thème apocalyptique de l’Évangile qu’ils ne le pensent. (…) Par exemple, nous avons moins de violence privée. Comparé à aujourd’hui, si vous regardez les statistiques du XVIIIe siècle, c’est impressionnant de voir la violence qu’il y avait. (…) le mouvement pacifiste est totalement chrétien, qu’il l’avoue ou non. Mais en même temps, il y a un déferlement d’inventions technologiques qui ne sont plus retenues par aucune force culturelle. Jacques Maritain disait qu’il y a à la fois plus de bien et plus de mal dans le monde. Je suis d’accord avec lui. Au fond, le monde est en permanence plus chrétien et moins chrétien. Mais le monde est fondamentalement désorganisé par le christianisme. (…) la pensée de Marcel Gauchet résulte de toute l’interprétation moderne du christianisme. Nous disons que nous sommes les héritiers du christianisme, et que l’héritage du christianisme est l’humanisme. Cela est en partie vrai. Mais en même temps, Marcel Gauchet ne considère pas le monde dans sa globalité. On peut tout expliquer avec la théorie mimétique. Dans un monde qui paraît plus menaçant, il est certain que la religion reviendra. Le 11 Septembre est le début de cela, car lors de cette attaque, la technologie n’était pas utilisée à des fins humanistes mais à des fins radicales, métaphysico-religieuses non chrétiennes. Je trouve cela incroyable, car j’ai l’habitude d’observer les forces religieuses et humanistes ensemble, et non pas en opposition. Mais suite au 11 Septembre, j’ai eu l’impression que la religion archaïque revenait, avec l’islam, d’une manière extrêmement rigoureuse. L’islam a beaucoup d’aspects propres aux religions bibliques à l’exception de la compréhension de la violence comme un mal non pas divin mais humain. Il considère la violence comme totalement divine. C’est pour cela que l’opposition est plus significative qu’avec le communisme, qui est un humanisme même s’il est factice et erroné, et qu’il tourne à la terreur. Mais c’est toujours un humanisme. Et tout à coup, on revient à la religion, la religion archaïque – mais avec des armes modernes. Ce que le monde attend est le moment où les musulmans radicaux pourront d’une certaine manière se servir d’armes nucléaires. Il faut regarder le Pakistan, qui est une nation musulmane possédant des armes nucléaires et l’Iran qui tente de les développer. (…) [la Guerre Froide est] complètement dépassée (…) Et la rapidité avec laquelle elle a été dépassée est incroyable. L’Union Soviétique a montré qu’elle devenait plus humaine lorsqu’elle n’a pas tenté de forcer le blocus de Kennedy, et à partir de cet instant, elle n’a plus fait peur. Après Khrouchtchev on a eu rapidement besoin de Gorbatchev. Quand Gorbatchev est arrivé au pouvoir, les oppositions ne se trouvaient plus à l’intérieur de l’humanisme. Les communistes voulaient organiser le monde pour qu’il n’y ait plus de pauvres. Les capitalistes ont constaté que les pauvres n’avaient pas de poids. Les capitalistes l’ont emporté. [Et ce conflit sera plus dangereux parce qu’il ne s’agit plus d’une lutte au sein de l’humanisme] bien qu’ils n’aient pas les mêmes armes que l’Union Soviétique – du moins pas encore. Le monde change si rapidement. Cela dit, de plus en plus de gens en Occident verront la faiblesse de notre humanisme ; nous n’allons pas redevenir chrétiens, mais on fera plus attention au fait que la lutte se trouve entre le christianisme et l’islam, plus qu’entre l’islam et l’humanisme. (…) Avec l’islam je pense que l’opposition est totale. Dans l’islam, si l’on est violent, on est inévitablement l’instrument de Dieu. Cela veut donc dire que la violence apocalyptique vient de Dieu. Aux États-Unis, les fondamentalistes disent cela, mais les grandes églises ne le disent pas. Néanmoins, ils ne poussent pas suffisamment leur pensée pour dire que si la violence ne vient pas de Dieu, elle vient de l’homme, et que nous en sommes responsables. Nous acceptons de vivre sous la protection d’armes nucléaires. Cela a probablement été la plus grande erreur de l’Occident. Imaginez-vous les implications. (…) la dissuasion nucléaire. Mais il s’agit de faibles excuses. Nous croyons que la violence est garante de la paix. Mais cette hypothèse ne me paraît pas valable. Nous ne voulons pas aujourd’hui réfléchir à ce que signifie cette confiance dans la violence. [Après autre événement tel que le 11 Septembre] Je pense que les personnes deviendraient plus conscientes. Mais cela serait probablement comme la première attaque. Il y aurait une période de grande tension spirituelle et intellectuelle, suivie d’un lent relâchement. Quand les gens ne veulent pas voir, ils y arrivent. Je pense qu’il y aura des révolutions spirituelles et intellectuelles dans un avenir proche. Ce que je dis aujourd’hui semble complètement invraisemblable, et pourtant je pense que le 11 Septembre va devenir de plus en plus significatif.  (…) Il faut distinguer entre le sacrifice des autres et le sacrifice de soi. Le Christ dit au Père : « Vous ne vouliez ni holocauste, ni sacrifice ; moi je dis : “Me voici” » (cf. He 10, 6-7). Autrement dit, je préfère me sacrifier plutôt que de sacrifier l’autre. Mais cela doit toujours être nommé sacrifice. Lorsque nous utilisons le mot « sacrifice » dans nos langues modernes, c’est dans le sens chrétien. Dieu dit : « Si personne d’autre n’est assez bon pour se sacrifier lui plutôt que son frère, je le ferai. » Ainsi, je satisfais à la demande de Dieu envers l’homme. Je préfère mourir plutôt que tuer. Mais tous les autres hommes préfèrent tuer plutôt que mourir. (…)  Dans le christianisme, on ne se martyrise pas soi-même. On n’est pas volontaire pour se faire tuer. On se met dans une situation où le respect des préceptes de Dieu (tendre l’autre joue, etc.) peut nous faire tuer. Cela dit, on se fera tuer parce que les hommes veulent nous tuer, non pas parce qu’on s’est porté volontaire. Ce n’est pas comme la notion japonaise de kamikaze. La notion chrétienne signifie que l’on est prêt à mourir plutôt qu’à tuer. C’est bien l’attitude de la bonne prostituée face au jugement de Salomon. Elle dit : « Donnez l’enfant à mon ennemi plutôt que de le tuer. » Sacrifier son enfant serait comme se sacrifier elle-même, car en acceptant une sorte de mort, elle se sacrifie elle-même. Et lorsque Salomon dit qu’elle est la vraie mère, cela ne signifie pas qu’elle est la mère biologique, mais la mère selon l’esprit. Cette histoire se trouve dans le Premier Livre des Rois (3, 16-28), qui est, à certains égards, un livre assez violent. Mais il me semble qu’il n’y a pas de meilleur symbole préchrétien du sacrifice de soi par le Christ. (…) Je vois en cela le contraste du christianisme avec toutes les religions archaïques du sacrifice. Cela dit, la religion musulmane a beaucoup copié le christianisme et elle n’est donc pas ouvertement sacrificielle. Mais la religion musulmane n’a pas détruit le sacrifice de la religion archaïque comme l’a fait le christianisme. Bien des parties du monde musulman ont conservé le sacrifice prémusulman. (…) bien entendu. Il faut lire les romans de William Faulkner. Bien des gens croient que le sud des États-Unis est une incarnation du christianisme. Je dirais que le sud est sans doute la partie la moins chrétienne des États-Unis en termes d’esprit, bien qu’il en soit la plus chrétienne en termes de rituel. Il n’y a pas de doute que le christianisme médiéval était beaucoup plus proche du fondamentalisme actuel. Mais il y a beaucoup de manières de trahir une religion. En ce qui concerne le sud, cela est évident, car il y a un grand retour aux formes les plus archaïques de la religion. Il faut interpréter ces lynchages comme une forme d’acte religieux archaïque. (…) Le terme de « violence religieuse » est souvent employé d’une manière qui ne m’aide pas à résoudre les problèmes que je me pose, à savoir ceux d’un rapport à la violence en mouvement constant et également historique. (…) Je dirais que toute violence religieuse implique un degré d’archaïsme. Mais certains points sont très compliqués. Par exemple, lors de la première guerre mondiale, est-ce que les soldats qui acceptaient d’être mobilisés pour mourir pour leur pays, et beaucoup au nom du christianisme, avaient une attitude vraiment chrétienne ? Il y a là quelque chose qui est contraire au christianisme. Mais il y a aussi quelque chose de vrai. Cela ne supprime pas, à mon avis, le fait qu’il y a une histoire de la violence religieuse, et que les religions, surtout le christianisme, au fond, sont continuellement influencées par cette histoire, bien que son influence soit, le plus souvent, pervertie. René Girard
Des millions de Faisal Shahzad sont déstabilisés par un monde moderne qu’ils ne peuvent ni maîtriser ni rejeter. (…) Le jeune homme qui avait fait tous ses efforts pour acquérir la meilleure éducation que pouvait lui offrir l’Amérique avant de succomber à l’appel du jihad a fait place au plus atteint des schizophrènes. Les villes surpeuplées de l’Islam – de Karachi et Casablanca au Caire – et ces villes d’Europe et d’Amérique du Nord où la diaspora islamique est maintenant présente en force ont des multitudes incalculables d’hommes comme Faisal Shahzad. C’est une longue guerre crépusculaire, la lutte contre l’Islamisme radical. Nul vœu pieu, nulle stratégie de « gain des coeurs et des esprits », nulle grande campagne d’information n’en viendront facilement à bout. L’Amérique ne peut apaiser cette fureur accumulée. Ces hommes de nulle part – Shahzad Faisal, Malik Nidal Hasan, l’émir renégat né en Amérique Anwar Awlaki qui se terre actuellement au Yémen et ceux qui leur ressemblent – sont une race de combattants particulièrement dangereux dans ce nouveau genre de guerre. La modernité les attire et les ébranle à la fois. L’Amérique est tout en même temps l’objet de leurs rêves et le bouc émissaire sur lequel ils projettent leurs malignités les plus profondes. Fouad Ajami
Relire aujourd’hui les principaux textes consacrés à ces attentats par des philosophes de renom constitue une étrange expérience. De manière prévisible, on y rencontre élaborations sophistiquées, affirmations grandioses ou péremptoires, performances rhétoriques bluffantes. Malgré tout, avec le recul, on ne peut qu’être saisi par un décalage profond entre ces performances virtuoses et la réalité rampante du terrorisme mondialisé que nous vivons à présent quotidiennement. Au fil des ans, un écart frappant s’est creusé entre discours subtils et réalités grossières, propos éthérés et faits massifs. Le 11 septembre devait être nécessairement considéré comme une énigme. Le philosophe français Jacques Derrida affirmait qu’« on ne sait pas, on ne pense pas, on ne comprend pas, on ne veut pas comprendre ce qui s’est passé à ce moment-là ». Il fallait d’abord récuser les évidences, considérées comme clichés idéologiques ou manipulations médiatiques. Ne parler donc ni de d’acte de guerre, ni de haine de l’Occident, ni de volonté de détruire les libertés fondamentales. Dialoguant à propos du 11 septembre avec Jürgen Habermas, qui centrait alors son analyse principalement sur la politique de l’Europe, Derrida, pour comprendre l’événement, s’attardait sur la notion d’Ereignis (« événement », ou « avenance ») dans l’histoire de l’être selon Heidegger et finissait par proposer une « hospitalité sans condition ». « C’est eux qui l’on fait, mais c’est nous qui l’avons voulu » soutenait pour sa part le sociologue Jean Baudrillard, attribuant aux rêves suicidaires de l’Occident l’effondrement des tours et la fascination des images des attentats. Pour celui voulait mettre en lumière « l’esprit du terrorisme », les « vrais » responsables étaient donc, au choix, les Etats-Unis, l’hégémonie occidentale ou chacun d’entre nous… D’autres se demandèrent aussitôt « à qui profite le crime » et conclurent que ce ne pouvait être qu’à la CIA, préparant ainsi les théories du complot qui firent florès. Ce ne sont que quelques exemples. Une histoire des lectures philosophiques du 11 septembre reste à écrire. Elle montrerait combien anti-américanisme et anti-capitalisme ont empêché tant d’esprits affutés de voir la nature religieuse du nouveau terrorisme comme les singularités de la nouvelle guerre. S’y ajoutaient la volonté de n’être pas dupe et la défiance envers les propagandes, transformées en déni systématique des informations de base. Les philosophes ont évidemment pour rôle indispensable d’être critiques, donc de démonter préjugés et fausses évidences, mais n’ont-ils pas pour devoir de ne jamais faire l’impasse sur les faits ? Au lieu de mettre en cause l’empire américain, l’arrogance des tours, le règne des images, il fallait scruter l’islamisme politique, les usages inédits de la violence, l’art terroriste de la communication. Quelques-uns l’ont fait, en parlant dans le désert. Aujourd’hui, il est urgent d’analyser ce qu’impliquent les changements intervenus depuis le 11 septembre. Car ce ne sont plus des symboles, comme les Twin Towers ou le Pentagone, qui sont ciblés, mais n’importe qui vivant chez les « impies » – dans la rue, aux terrasses, au concert, à l’école…. Les terroristes ne sont plus des commandos organisés d’ingénieurs formés au pilotage pour transformer des Boeing en bombes, mais de petits délinquants autogérés, s’emparant d’un couteau de cuisine ou d’un camion. Pour en venir à bout, il va falloir rattraper, au plus vite, le temps perdu à penser à côté de la plaque. Roger-Pol Droit
Le Cair a été fondé après le 11 Septembre parce qu’ils ont pris acte du fait que des gens avaient fait quelque chose et que nous tous allions commencer à perdre accès à nos libertés civiles. Ilhan Omar
Je pense que c’est un produit des médias sensationnalistes. Vous avez ces extraits sonores, et ces mots, et tout le monde les prononce avec une telle intensité, car ça doit avoir une signification plus grande. Je me souviens quand j’étais à la fac, j’ai suivi un cours sur l’idéologie du terrorisme. A chaque fois que le professeur disait « Al-Qaeda », ses épaules se soulevaient. Ilhan Omar
I was 18 years old when that happened. I was in a classroom in college and I remember rushing home after being dismissed and getting home and seeing my father in complete horror as he sat in front of that TV. And I remember just feeling, like the world was ending. The events of 9/11 were life-changing, life-altering for all of us. My feeling around it is one of complete horror. None of us are ever going to forget that day and the trauma that we will always have to live with. Ilhan Omar
9/11 was an attack on all Americans. It was an attack on all of us. And I certainly could not understand the weight of the pain that the victims of the families of 9/11 must feel. But I think it is really important for us to make sure that we are not forgetting, right, the aftermath of what happened after 9/11. Many Americans found themselves now having their civil rights stripped from them. And so what I was speaking to was the fact that as a Muslim, not only was I suffering as an American who was attacked on that day, but the next day I woke up as my fellow Americans were now treating me a suspect. Ilhan Omar
This book is painful to read. Even with the passage of nearly 18 years, reliving modern America’s most terrible day hits an exposed nerve that you thought had been fully numbed, only to discover that the ache was merely in remission. In “Fall and Rise: The Story of 9/11,” Mitchell Zuckoff relives each minute of that morning in 2001 through the perspectives of those who endured the worst: passengers and crew members on the four planes turned into missiles by Islamist hijackers; innocents trapped in the burning twin towers and the Pentagon; rescue workers who struggled valiantly but futilely and, in many cases, fatally; people in Shanksville, Pa., on whom death rained from a clear sky. As much as anything, “Fall and Rise” is a quilt work of futures unrealized, from the woman about to tell her parents she was pregnant to the doctor hoping to build a kidney dialysis center, from the retired bookkeeper set to move in with her daughter to the college student with dreams of becoming a child psychologist. Zuckoff, a professor of narrative studies at Boston University and the author of several nonfiction books, relies on his own interviews with survivors, but also leans heavily on government studies, trial transcripts, books and documentaries long in the public realm. And so the overall picture that he shapes is not really new. But freshness of detail seems less his objective than preservation of memory — an attempt, as he says, “to delay the descent of 9/11 into the well of history.” By design, this narrative of close to 500 pages is not encyclopedic. Big Picture grandiosity — how Sept. 11 changed America and the world — has been left to others. The terrorism puppet master Osama bin Laden gets scant attention. Actions (and inactions) of President George W. Bush and his team merit only a few pages. Rudolph Giuliani, who made a lucrative life for himself after 9/11, earns glancing mention. Flawed communications systems that doomed hundreds of New York’s emergency responders are not explored with the kind of detail that can be found in, say, “102 Minutes,” a 2005 work by the New York Times journalists Jim Dwyer and Kevin Flynn. Rather, this book derives its power from its focus on individuals in the main unknown to the larger world, who managed to survive the ordeal or who lost their lives simply because they were unlucky. With journalistic rigor, Zuckoff acknowledges what he doesn’t know, for example how exactly each group of hijackers seized control of its plane. His language is largely unadorned; then again, embellishment is neither needed nor wanted. Many details are hard to take: the melted flesh, the pulverized bodies, the scorched lungs and, for sure, the revived memory of scores of desperate victims leaping from on high to escape the World Trade Center inferno. But there are also inspiring moments, like the grit shown by those aboard United Airlines Flight 93. It was the plane that never reached its target, crashing in Shanksville after passengers revolted against the hijackers. Phone messages that they left “formed a spoken tapestry of grace, warning, bravery, resolve and love.” Heroes abound, though not in the way that word is routinely used and abused. Heroism, as we see here, is often a product of necessity. Some may ask if this book, covering territory already well traveled, needed to be written. For those who lived through the horror, perhaps not. But a full generation has come of age with no memory of that day. It needs to hear anew what happened, and maybe learn that time, in fact, does not heal all wounds. Clyde Haberman
I teach really engaged journalism students. I’m not sure how the generation as a whole reacts to it. My students approach it with curiosity and a little bit of uncertainty because they didn’t experience it. They are well-read and aware of things, but for them it is a little like Pearl Harbor. They know who was involved and can cite numbers. They can say 3,000 dead, 9/11, four hijacked planes, 19 hijackers. They got the test questions down very well. They don’t have the human connection or that feeling for it that I wish they did. I hope that’s what my book can do. Mitchell Zuckoff
There is this entire generation who didn’t live through this, who don’t have any independent memories of what happened those days. Some members of that generation are going off to war to fight in Afghanistan — a war that started after this — and they don’t have any direct connection to it. Right now, other than Osama bin Laden, is there a single name that’s a household name associated with 9/11?. Names are news, and we connect to them, and that is what’s so important about this: before the time passes, before the people who I could talk to were gone, dead or just not available, to capture this as one story. (…) People do I think know to some extent what happened on Flight 93, the 40 heroes of 93, who rose up and fought back to try to save themselves and ultimately ended up saving untold numbers of people, either at the Capitol or the White House, was the destination. But there in Shanksville — and I tell the story largely through Terry Shaffer, who was the volunteer fire chief there, who had been planning for something his whole life, and he thought it might be a pile-up on the Pennsylvania Turnpike. And he races toward the scene expecting to find casualties, expecting to find people he can help. The story of the people in Shanksville and how they came together, and sort of embraced the families of the Flight 93 victims, is I think one of the most beautiful stories I’ve ever heard. (…) One of the advantages of a book almost 18 years after the event is so much of the material has become public, that all the FAA records of the flight altitudes almost on a second-by-second basis, as we’re approaching Shanksville, Pennsylvania, the transcript of the cockpit recorder — which was enormously valuable, where we have the terrorist pilots discussing what they’re doing with each other, ‘Should we put it into the ground?’ All of those different things, because that and the the trial of Zacarias Moussaoui in 2006 [the so-called 20th hijacker,] certainly a conspirator even though he didn’t get on one of the planes. All of that material became available, and it was a mountain of material. But for me, it was priceless. (…) It was too important not to. It becomes a responsibility when you realize that there are so many people who don’t have a human connection to this story — the way I think of it is sometimes, 9/11 is becoming a story reduced to numbers: 9 and 11, four planes, 19 hijackers, 3,000 people killed. But you don’t connect names to it. And I felt if I could do that, if I could give people the story as it unfolded through the people that they could connect to, then I would have done something worthwhile. Mitchell Zuckoff

A ceux pour qui à chaque fois qu’il est prononcé, le nom « Al-Qaeda » soulève les épaules …

En cette 18e commémoration de l’abomination islamiste du 11 septembre 2001 …

Où, après l’avoir minimisé drapée dans son hijab, une membre du Congrès américain nous joue [avant comme à son habitude de se rétracter quatre jours plus tard – mise à jour du 15.09.2019] les sanglots longs de l’automne

Comment ne pas saluer les efforts ô combien méritoires de l’auteur d’un récent livre réunissant l’ensemble des témoignages possibles de l’évènement …

Contre les ravages du temps et les faiblesses et dérives de la psychologie et de la mémoire humaines …

Où à l’instar de ce journaliste de la radio publique américaine NPR qui n’avait en tête comme noms liés au 11/9 hormis Ben Laden, que le nom honni de Mohamed Atta …

Un peuple américain qui au lendemain de la tragédie avait plébiscité leur président jusqu’au score de popularité proprement soviétique ou africain de 99% le traine à présent dans la boue …

Et où, le même peuple qui avait, entre mémoriaux, noms d’écoles ou de bâtiments publics, films, livres, chansons ou tee-shirts, fait un véritable triomphe aux véritables héros du jour et aux dernières paroles de leur leader Todd Beamer (« Let’s roll !« ) …

En est à présent, via l’antisémite de service du Congrès américain Ilhan Omar et heureusement sauf exceptions, à minimiser l’attentat le plus proprement diabolique de leur histoire ?

‘Fall And Rise’ Seeks To Capture 9/11 As ‘One Story’ — And Keep It From Fading
Jeremy Hobson
WBUR
April 29, 2019

« There is this entire generation who didn’t live through this, who don’t have any independent memories of what happened those days, » Zuckoff (@mitchellzuckoff) tells Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson. « Some members of that generation are going off to war to fight in Afghanistan — a war that started after this — and they don’t have any direct connection to it. »

One of the driving forces behind the book was an effort to tie 9/11 into a single narrative before it was too late, Zuckoff says — and to ensure the attacks don’t fade too far from the public consciousness.

« Right now, other than Osama bin Laden, is there a single name that’s a household name associated with 9/11? » he says. « Names are news, and we connect to them, and that is what’s so important about this: before the time passes, before the people who I could talk to were gone, dead or just not available, to capture this as one story. »

Interview Highlights

On starting the book with what happened in the days leading up to Sept. 11

« That was very much by design, to start the book actually on September 10th, because what Mohamed Atta, what Ziad Jarrah, what the other terrorists were doing, all these machinations: training to fly planes coming here, living in this country and coming closer and closer — the circle is tightening — to get them in a position doing trial runs and making this plan which took very little money, a lot of planning but very little money, very little overhead, if you will, and to position themselves where they could be here in Boston, they could go up to Portland, Maine, and be ready to do these events.

« It’s not entirely clear [why they started their journey from Portland.] One strong suspicion we have is that the trip to Portland would allow them to avoid some suspicion. If you had eight Arab men all arriving at Boston’s Logan Airport at the same exact time for the same flights, they thought this might avoid some of that. But that is one of those unanswerable questions. »

« The idea of turning [a plane] into a guided missile wasn’t, quite literally, on the radar for anyone. And that’s unfortunately so sadly why it was so effective. »

Mitchell Zuckoff

On whether all of the hijackers knew the full extent of what they were doing

« I think it’s clear that all 19 knew exactly what was being planned, because it was a very coordinated attack. What happened on each one of the four planes was quite similar, where at a trigger moment, the muscle hijackers — the guys who were not flying the plane — went into attack mode. All of them had discussed … the preparations for purifying themselves for what they understood would be their last day. »

On the hijackers’ use of Mace in the cabin so that it would be more difficult for passengers to thwart the attack

« The Mace is an open question. There was some discussion they had it. A lot of it was just the element of surprise, was the greatest thing, and they committed an act of violence almost on every plane. They immediately cut someone’s throat to make it clear that they meant business. They said they had a bomb, they herded — these were very lightly attended planes, it was a random Tuesday morning to most people — they herded everyone into the back. And they also understood that the flight attendants and the crews would know that there was a standard protocol: You negotiate with terrorists. You expect that they’re going to want to land somewhere and exchange passengers and money for their freedom, or for their political aims. This was not part of anyone’s script except the terrorists.

« The idea of turning [a plane] into a guided missile wasn’t, quite literally, on the radar for anyone. And that’s unfortunately so sadly why it was so effective. »

On how communication failures shaped the way Sept. 11 unfolded

« Communication failures were rampant that day on every level, and that’s where really, that’s the sort of ground zero, if you will, of the communications failures — that people were calling saying what was going on. The airlines knew about it. And then even when it did finally reach the FAA, they weren’t alerting the military. So planes are still taking off. Things are still happening that [are] allowing one after another of these hijackings. The communication failures, they’re rampant, they’re across everything in terms of the communication failures at the towers, communication failures even before it happened.

« A fact that always stayed with me was on 9/11, the FAA had a list, a no-fly list, of a dozen people on it. The State Department had a list, its tip-off terrorists list of 60,000 people it was watching. The director of airline security for the FAA didn’t even know that State Department list existed. »

« Communication failures were rampant that day on every level. »

Mitchell Zuckoff

On stories about passengers on the planes that have stuck with him

« There are so many. One is from … United Flight 175, the second plane that [crashed into the World Trade Center,] took off from from Boston’s Logan Airport. And on that plane was a fellow named Peter Hanson and his wife Sue Kim and their daughter Christine. Christine was 2 years old and she was the youngest person directly affected by 9/11.

« While they were approaching the South Tower and it was clear something terrible was happening, they knew it, Peter called his father Lee in Connecticut, and the two phone calls between Peter and Lee are so poignant. And I spent time with Lee and Eunice Hanson in their home, in Peter’s boyhood bedroom, talking about those. Peter was actually first telling his father, ‘Please call someone, let them know what’s happening.’ And then Peter is actually comforting his father on the phone, when his wife and daughter are there huddled next to him in the back of this plane that they understand is flying too low, is heading toward the Statue of Liberty and toward the World Trade Center. »

On people in the first tower to be hit thinking they didn’t need to evacuate

« They were being told not to evacuate in both the towers. Some people were being told, ‘It’s over in the other tower.’ People didn’t know what was happening. And when the plane cut through, it knocked out the telecommunication system within the building that would have allowed people down in the basement and in the first floor to communicate to them. So the confusion began immediately, and people — some of them stayed in place for well over an hour. They didn’t know there was a ticking clock for the survival of the building.

« I spoke to a number of the Port Authority police officers who were the dispatchers that day who took those calls. They haunted by them still. And they are recorded calls, so I can hear them, I can see the transcripts. They’re remarkable in that they’re trying to keep these people calm, they’re trying to hope for the best. But there is no way up, and there’s no way out. »

On « the miracle of Stairwell B »

« One group of firefighters was Ladder 6, it was a unit in New York led by a remarkable guy named Jay Jonas, and Jay Jonas was a fire captain and he had this team of guys, a half dozen guys, and they’re sent into the North Tower, and they’re going up and they’re walking stair by stair. And when the South Tower collapses, Jay realizes, ‘I gotta get my guys out of here, quick.’

« On the way down, they pause to help a woman, Josephine Harris, who has been injured, who was exhausted, who can’t go any farther. But they slow their exit to help Josephine, and as they’re going farther and farther down through the building to get to the lobby, the North Tower starts to collapse. They’re inside this center stairwell, and they just huddled together, hold on for dear life, and the building literally peels away around them, just keeping a few floors of Stairwell B — which is exactly where they are. And Jay realizes that having slowed to help Josephine ended up saving all of them, because had they been in the lobby, the lobby was completely destroyed. Had they been just outside, they would have been wiped out as well. So it truly was a miracle. »

On what unfolded in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, on 9/11

« People do I think know to some extent what happened on Flight 93, the 40 heroes of 93, who rose up and fought back to try to save themselves and ultimately ended up saving untold numbers of people, either at the Capitol or the White House, was the destination. But there in Shanksville — and I tell the story largely through Terry Shaffer, who was the volunteer fire chief there, who had been planning for something his whole life, and he thought it might be a pile-up on the Pennsylvania Turnpike. And he races toward the scene expecting to find casualties, expecting to find people he can help. The story of the people in Shanksville and how they came together, and sort of embraced the families of the Flight 93 victims, is I think one of the most beautiful stories I’ve ever heard. »

On the difficulties of determining what exactly was happening on the planes

« One of the advantages of a book almost 18 years after the event is so much of the material has become public, that all the FAA records of the flight altitudes almost on a second-by-second basis, as we’re approaching Shanksville, Pennsylvania, the transcript of the cockpit recorder — which was enormously valuable, where we have the terrorist pilots discussing what they’re doing with each other, ‘Should we put it into the ground?’ All of those different things, because that and the the trial of Zacarias Moussaoui in 2006 [the so-called 20th hijacker,] certainly a conspirator even though he didn’t get on one of the planes. All of that material became available, and it was a mountain of material. But for me, it was priceless. »

On why he wrote this book

« It was too important not to. It becomes a responsibility when you realize that there are so many people who don’t have a human connection to this story — the way I think of it is sometimes, 9/11 is becoming a story reduced to numbers: 9 and 11, four planes, 19 hijackers, 3,000 people killed. But you don’t connect names to it. And I felt if I could do that, if I could give people the story as it unfolded through the people that they could connect to, then I would have done something worthwhile. »

Book Excerpt: ‘Fall And Rise’

by Mitchell Zuckoff

Just after 9 a.m., inside her hilltop house in rural Stoystown, Pennsylvania, homemaker Linda Shepley watched her television in shock. The screen showed smoke billowing from a gash in the North Tower as Today show anchor Katie Couric interviewed an NBC producer who witnessed the crash of American Flight 11.

“You say that emergency vehicles are there?” Couric asked Elliott Walker by phone.

“Oh, my goodness!” Walker cried at 9:03 a.m. “Ah! Another one just hit!”

Linda watched the terror in her living room beside her husband, Jim, a Pennsylvania Department of Transportation manager, who’d taken the day off to trade in their old car. The Shepleys saw a grim-faced President Bush speak to the nation from Booker Elementary School in Sarasota, Florida. Then Couric interviewed a terrorism expert but interrupted him for a phone call with NBC military correspondent Jim Miklaszewski, who declared at 9:39 a.m., “Katie, I don’t want to alarm anybody right now, but apparently, it felt just a few moments ago like there was an explosion of some kind here at the Pentagon.”

From the home where they’d lived for nearly three decades, the Shepleys could have driven to Washington in time for lunch or to New York City for an afternoon movie. Yet as the political and financial capitals reeled, those big cities felt almost as far away as the caves of Afghanistan. Jim went to the garage, to clean out the car he still planned to trade in that day. Linda hurried to finish the laundry before she accompanied Jim to the dealership.

Forty-seven years old, with kind eyes and three grown sons, Linda loved the smell of clothes freshly dried by the crisp Allegheny mountain air. As ten o’clock approached, she filled a basket with wet laundry and carried it to the clothesline in her backyard, two grassy acres with unbroken views over rolling hills that stretched southeast toward the neighboring borough of Shanksville. As Linda lifted a wet T-shirt toward the line, she heard a loud thump-thump sound behind her, like a truck rumbling over a bridge. Startled, she glanced over her left shoulder and saw a large commercial passenger plane, its wings wobbling, rocking left and right, flying much too low in the bright blue sky.

As the plane passed overhead at high speed, Linda saw the jet was intact, with neither smoke nor flame coming from either engine. Linda made no connection between the plane’s strange behavior and the news she’d watched minutes earlier about hijacked airliners crashing into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Instead, she suspected that a mechanical problem had forced the plane low and wobbly, on a flight path over her house that she’d never before witnessed. Maybe, Linda thought, the pilot was signaling distress and searching for someplace to make an emergency landing. Linda worried that their local airstrip, Somerset County Airport, was far too small to handle such a big plane. And if that was the pilot’s destination, she thought, he or she was heading the wrong way.

Linda didn’t know the plane was United Flight 93, and she couldn’t imagine that minutes earlier the passengers and crew had taken a vote to fight back. Or that CeeCee Lyles, Jeremy Glick, Todd Beamer, Sandy Bradshaw, and others on board had shared that decision during emotional phone calls, or that the revolt was reaching its peak, or that the four hijackers had resolved to crash the plane short of their target to prevent the hostages from retaking control.

Linda tracked the jet as sunlight glinted off its metal skin. Its erratic flight pattern continued. The right wing dipped farther and farther. The left wing rose higher, until the plane was almost perpendicular with the earth, like a catamaran in high winds. Linda saw it start to turn and roll, flipping nearly upside down. Then the plane plunged, nosediving beyond a stand of hemlocks two miles from where Linda stood. As quickly as the jet disappeared, an orange fireball blossomed, accompanied by a thick mushroom cloud of dark smoke.

“Jim!” Linda screamed. “Call 9-1-1!”

Her husband burst outside, fearing that their neighbor’s Rottweiler mix had broken loose from its chain and attacked her.

“A big plane just crashed!” Linda yelled.

“A small plane,” Jim said skeptically, as he regained his bearings. “No, no, no, no. It was a big one. It was a big one! I saw the engines on the wings.”

Jim rushed inside and grabbed a phone.

Heartsick, still clutching the wet T-shirt, Linda stared toward the rising smoke. Soon she’d wonder whether, in the last seconds before the crash, any of the men and women on board saw her hanging laundry on this glorious late-summer day.


Excerpted from the book FALL AND RISE by Mitchell Zuckoff. Copyright © 2019 by Mitchell Zuckoff. Republished with permission of HarperCollins Publishers.

Voir aussi:

The Many Tragedies of 9/11
Clyde Haberman
The NYT
May 3, 2019

FALL AND RISE
The Story of 9/11
By Mitchell Zuckoff

This book is painful to read. Even with the passage of nearly 18 years, reliving modern America’s most terrible day hits an exposed nerve that you thought had been fully numbed, only to discover that the ache was merely in remission.

In “Fall and Rise: The Story of 9/11,” Mitchell Zuckoff relives each minute of that morning in 2001 through the perspectives of those who endured the worst: passengers and crew members on the four planes turned into missiles by Islamist hijackers; innocents trapped in the burning twin towers and the Pentagon; rescue workers who struggled valiantly but futilely and, in many cases, fatally; people in Shanksville, Pa., on whom death rained from a clear sky. As much as anything, “Fall and Rise” is a quilt work of futures unrealized, from the woman about to tell her parents she was pregnant to the doctor hoping to build a kidney dialysis center, from the retired bookkeeper set to move in with her daughter to the college student with dreams of becoming a child psychologist.

Zuckoff, a professor of narrative studies at Boston University and the author of several nonfiction books, relies on his own interviews with survivors, but also leans heavily on government studies, trial transcripts, books and documentaries long in the public realm. And so the overall picture that he shapes is not really new. But freshness of detail seems less his objective than preservation of memory — an attempt, as he says, “to delay the descent of 9/11 into the well of history.”

By design, this narrative of close to 500 pages is not encyclopedic. Big Picture grandiosity — how Sept. 11 changed America and the world — has been left to others. The terrorism puppet master Osama bin Laden gets scant attention. Actions (and inactions) of President George W. Bush and his team merit only a few pages. Rudolph Giuliani, who made a lucrative life for himself after 9/11, earns glancing mention. Flawed communications systems that doomed hundreds of New York’s emergency responders are not explored with the kind of detail that can be found in, say, “102 Minutes,” a 2005 work by the New York Times journalists Jim Dwyer and Kevin Flynn.

Rather, this book derives its power from its focus on individuals in the main unknown to the larger world, who managed to survive the ordeal or who lost their lives simply because they were unlucky. With journalistic rigor, Zuckoff acknowledges what he doesn’t know, for example how exactly each group of hijackers seized control of its plane. His language is largely unadorned; then again, embellishment is neither needed nor wanted.

Many details are hard to take: the melted flesh, the pulverized bodies, the scorched lungs and, for sure, the revived memory of scores of desperate victims leaping from on high to escape the World Trade Center inferno. But there are also inspiring moments, like the grit shown by those aboard United Airlines Flight 93. It was the plane that never reached its target, crashing in Shanksville after passengers revolted against the hijackers. Phone messages that they left “formed a spoken tapestry of grace, warning, bravery, resolve and love.”

Heroes abound, though not in the way that word is routinely used and abused. Heroism, as we see here, is often a product of necessity.

Some may ask if this book, covering territory already well traveled, needed to be written. For those who lived through the horror, perhaps not. But a full generation has come of age with no memory of that day. It needs to hear anew what happened, and maybe learn that time, in fact, does not heal all wounds.

Clyde Haberman, the former NYC columnist for The Times, is a contributing writer for the newspaper.

FALL AND RISE
The Story of 9/11
By Mitchell Zuckoff
589 pp. Harper/HarperCollins Publishers. $29.99.

Voir également:

 

When the first of the World Trade Center towers collapsed on September 11 2001, paramedic Moussa Diaz was among thousands of people engulfed in the cloud of smoke and debris that surged from the wreckage.

Asphyxiating in the toxic swirl around him, he fought the urge to give up, staggering on until he saw a spotlight wielded by a man with a white beard and long hair.

“Are you Jesus Christ?” Diaz asked, convinced he must already be dead. “No,” came the reply. “I’m a cameraman.”

Those who have been close to death often talk of how the experience played tricks on their mind, including the fleeting belief that they could not possibly have survived and must already be in the afterlife.

Yet as Mitchell Zuckoff notes in his new book about 9/11, little of the extraordinary individual testimony from that awful day has worked its way into the public memory.

The average person may recall what they were doing on 9/11, and perhaps the names of hijackers such as Mohamed Atta, but would likely struggle to name a single one of the 2,977 people who died.

“Of the nearly three thousand men, women, and children killed on 9/11, arguably none can be considered a household name,” Zuckoff writes. “The best ‘known’ victim might be the so-called Falling Man, photographed plummeting from the North Tower.”

This is not because the world sought to forget: merely that in the avalanche of events triggered by the atrocity – Afghanistan was invaded less than a month later – the voices of the day itself got buried in the sheer weight of news coverage.

With that in mind, Zuckoff, who covered the attacks for the Boston Globe, has produced this doorstopper of a reconstruction, aimed partly at younger generations who feel no “personal connection” to what happened. He notes that for some of his students at Boston University, where he now teaches journalism, it seems “as distant as World War I”.

Rather like the investigators who searched the mountains of rubble for victims’ personal effects, it is a mammoth undertaking. As well as interviews with Diaz and others, Zuckoff sifts through official archives, trials of terror suspects, and countless news reports. The stories of rescuers and survivors are interwoven with the poignant last words of victims, many of whom left only desperate voice messages as their planes hit the towers.

This, however, is not a print version of United 93, the Hollywood take on the “Let’s roll” passenger rebellion, which brought down one hijacked plane before it could hit the White House. Reluctant to use journalistic licence for a topic of such gravitas, Zuckoff sticks strictly to the known facts.

As a result, his account of the “Let’s roll” incident favours accuracy over drama, relying partly on the more fragmentary version of events preserved by the cockpit voice recorder. The sounds of a struggle, followed by the hijacker-turned-pilot screaming “Hey, hey, give it to me!” suggests passengers may have got as far as wrestling the joystick from his control. But Zuckoff leaves us to fill in many of the gaps for ourselves.

Far more vivid are the scenes inside the burning towers, where witnesses are still alive to recreate what they saw. A dead lobby guard sits melted to his desk by the fireball from the planes’ fuel. Women have hair clips melted into their skulls by the heat. One paramedic, reminded of his own daughter by the sight of a girl’s severed foot inside a pink trainer, looks skywards to clear his mind, only to see people jumping from the towers.

In all, about 200 people ended their lives that way, one killing a firefighter as they landed. Ernest Armstead, a fire department medic, recalls a harrowing conversation with one female jumper who was somehow still alive, despite being little more than a head on a crumpled torso. When she saw him place a black triage tag around her neck, indicating she was beyond help, she shouted: “I am not dead!”

For many rescuers, it was clear early on that the entire crash scene was beyond help. As they contemplate the 1,000ft climb to the blazing North Tower impact zone – the lifts are out of action – firefighter-farmer Gerry Nevins speaks for all his colleagues when he says: “We may not live through today.” They shake hands, then start climbing nonetheless. Father-of-two Nevins was among the 420 emergency workers to perish.

For all the heroism, it was also a day of failures, not least in imagining that terrorists might use planes as bombs in the first place. Air safety chiefs considered hijackings a thing of the past, leading to lax security procedures that allowed the hijackers to carry knives on board.

A plan to stage an exercise where terrorists flew a cargo plane into the UN’s New York HQ had been ruled out as too fanciful. Boasts that the Twin Towers could withstand airline crashes failed to consider the thousands of gallons of burning jet fuel, which weakened their steel cores and caused them to collapse.

This book is not an easy read: heartwarming in parts, horrific in others and studiously cautious in those areas where only the dead really know what happened.

But as a definitive “lest we forget” account, it will take some beating. For those too young to remember where they were on 9/11, and for all future generations too, it should be required reading.

Voir encore:

Mitchell Zuckoff on Writing His 9/11 Magnum Opus

Adam Vitcavage
The Millions
July 10, 2019

The seniors graduating from high school this year know what 9/11 is. They know four planes, two towers, 3,000-plus victims, 19 terrorists, Osama bin Laden. They know all of that because they were taught it in history classes. Because, to them, that’s all it is: history.

With each passing year, the terrorist attacks that happened on the bright blue morning of September 11, 2001 become more of a history lesson than a lived experience. This year, most high school seniors were born in 2001. Eighteen years later, they have the facts memorized, but often fail to understand the emotional and lived experience of that day.

Fall and Rise: The Story of 9/11, a new book by former Boston Globe reporter and current Boston University professor Mitchell Zuckoff, aims to fix that. Fall and Rise reports the facts, but Zuckoff also weaves the lives of people affected by 9/11 to create a narrative not frequently seen on cable news channels or in documentaries.

Fall and Rise shares stories about pilots, passengers, and aviation professionals linked to American Airlines Flights 11 and 77, and United Airlines Flights 93 and 175. He reveals stories about Mohammed Atta and other terrorists. Zuckoff also dives into the stories of New Yorkers and other Americans who experienced that day in different ways. The result is a woven story that puts the humanity back into a day the history books won’t forget.

I spoke with Zuckoff about what he was doing the day of the attacks, what followed, and how a Boston Globe feature published five days after the attacks turned into an essential book more than 6,000 days later.

The Millions: What was the day of September 11, 2001 like for you?

Mitchell Zuckoff: I was on book leave from the Boston Globe trying to write my first book. When the first plane went in, I didn’t think much of it. It could have been an accident. When the second plane went in, I ran to the phone and it was ringing as I got there. Globe editor Mark Morrow was on the other line and said my book leave was over.

He told me to come to the paper and it became apparent that I was going to be in what we call the control chair to write the lead story for that day. It became a matter of trying to figure out what was going on by taking feeds from several of my colleagues, working closely with the aviation reporter, Matthew Brelis, who took the byline with me. It was an intense and confusing day.

This was personal, on top of everything, because two of the planes took off about a mile from the Globe office at Logan International Airport.

TM: You mention the confusion. When did it become clear to you that it was a coordinated terrorist attack?

MZ: I think when the second plane went in. I was still home. When the first plane went in, we didn’t know what size it was. There was speculation that it was some sightseeing plane that got confused. Then there was no way, 17 minutes apart, that two planes were going to hit two towers accidentally. When I got in my car, we didn’t know about the flight heading to the Pentagon or United 93.

TM: What exactly were you looking for in real time during an event like this?

MZ: Really, what we do on any story. We were trying to answer the who, what, when, where, why, and how of it in as much detail as possible. I was just trying to process it all. My desk is an explosion of papers and printers and notes from reporters. We want it to come out so our readers can digest it in a meaningful way.

TM: I was in seventh grade and in Arizona at the time, so I had no clue what was going on. I was hours back—

MZ: That’s significant. Really significant. Folks on the West Coast, by the time they woke up, it was essentially over. People on the East Coast were watching the Today Show or running to CNN to watch it unfold. It’s a different experience.

TM: I remember it as my mother waking me up for school. She said something, and to this day I remember it as being “They’re attacking us.” I always second-guessed myself, but as you said it was something being reported.

MZ: That would have been a good thing to say.

TM: As the day continued to unfold, how much of a rush was it to finish the initial report out there?

MZ: The adrenaline is flying. We had a rolling deadline because we knew we had as many editions as we needed. The first probably left my hands at 6:00 p.m. I continued to write through the story as it continued to unfold. There were little details—little edits like finding better verbs—that continued to be changed until about 1:00 a.m. or 2:00 a.m.

You can’t unwind after that. You walk around the newsroom waiting until it comes off the presses. I needed to let the adrenaline leave because I knew I wouldn’t be able to sleep.

TM: Then that first week, and this may be a dumb question, but how much did the events consume your writing life?

MZ: Completely. I wrote the lead story again the next day. I came back in and it was understood I would do it again. The next day, on Thursday the 13th, I approached the editors with the idea that I could keep doing the leads, but I had an idea for a narrative I could have done for Sunday’s paper. I needed to dispatch some reporters to help me, but I pitched them to weave a narrative. I wanted to weave together six lives: three people on the first plane and three people from New York: one who got out, one who we didn’t know, and a first responder.

That consumed me all day Thursday and Friday reporting it with those reporters. Then writing it Friday into Saturday for the lead feature in the Sunday paper.

TM: That’s what became the backbone of Fall and Rise. But, at the time, you were already reporting the facts. What was it like going into the humanity of those affected less than a week after the attacks?

MZ: Satisfying in a really deep way. I felt, as much as I valued writing the news, I felt we could do something distinctive and lasting with this narrative. I think all of us—not just reporting the news, but consuming the news—all of us were so inundated with information.

I felt we needed to reflect on the emotion of the moment. By talking about the pilot John Oganowsky and the other folks I focused in on, I felt it could be a bit cathartic. We were all numb and in shock. But this could help.

TM: Did you talk to the people in the narrative or was it strictly the other reporters?

MZ: It was the reporters. I was focused on telling the story of Mohammad Atta. I gave myself that assignment. I was guiding my four teammates to some extent. If someone came up with an important detail or timestamp, I would ask the other reporters to follow up with questions about that particular moment to build around it. I didn’t talk to the families until much later.

TM: When was the first time you talked to survivors or the families of victims?

MZ: I talked to some back then. I was teamed up two weeks after the attacks with Michael Rezendes, who was on the Spotlight team, to write about the terrorists. So, at that point, I wasn’t talking a lot with the families—I did some in 2001 and 2002—but really my deep dive into the families didn’t start until five years ago when I really began working on this book.

TM: What did focusing on the terrorists do to you mentally and emotionally?

MZ: It took a lot out of me. We were really trying to instill the journalistic impartiality to it. But you can’t be objective about this sort of thing. We could be impartial. We couldn’t be exactly sure of who these guys were. We had their identities, but we were aware people use false identities or other’s identities. We had to enforce this impartiality to it. We had to be detached in our work even as we were grieving in our hearts.

TM: With the toll it takes, why continue to write about 9/11 after all these years?

MZ: Exactly that reason: because it does take a toll. The way I process things is to write about them. I didn’t really have a let down for months. I was focused on the work before letting the emotion in. It never really left me. I was still talking about this story to my students. I was still talking about this to my family. There are certain stories that will never leave, but I have to instill something of value into it. I wanted to write something that outlasts me.

TM: You’ve had books come out over the years that weren’t related to 9/11—most notably 13 Hours: The Inside Account of What Really Happened in Benghazi. This comes out nearly 18 years later. What was the process like throughout all these years?

MZ: I was not writing directly on Fall and Rise during those years. I was working on those other books and projects. It was on a back processor in my mind. The lede story from 9/11 hangs in my office at Boston University. It’s in the corner of my eye. I think it was always playing in the back of my mind.

Once I dove into it in 2014, it was all consuming. It was the deepest dive I have ever taken on a story. As much as I care about all of the work I’ve done, I kind of knew I would never tell a more important story than this. I had to respect the stories of the people telling me about the worst day of their lives. That responsibility was with me day and night for these past five years.

TM: What were the families’ responses to a reporter coming to ask about the worst day of their lives after all this time?

MZ: It amazed me because overwhelmingly people said yes. There were some who understood what I was doing, but told me they couldn’t go there again. They couldn’t revisit that day. The ones who said yes were amazing. I know I was tearing open a wound. A lot of the interviews go for hours and hours. There were moments of weeping and I have no problem acknowledging I did so along with them.

TM: These stories aren’t necessarily widely known and now they’re preserved in this book. It’s so important because now 9/11 may just seem like an event students study in textbooks. Eighteen years…your college freshmen were born the year it happened or the year after, I suppose. How does this generation react to it?

MZ: I teach really engaged journalism students. I’m not sure how the generation as a whole reacts to it. My students approach it with curiosity and a little bit of uncertainty because they didn’t experience it. They are well-read and aware of things, but for them it is a little like Pearl Harbor. They know who was involved and can cite numbers. They can say 3,000 dead, 9/11, four hijacked planes, 19 hijackers. They got the test questions down very well. They don’t have the human connection or that feeling for it that I wish they did. I hope that’s what my book can do.

Voir enfin:

Tweets racistes de Trump : qu’a vraiment dit Ilhan Omar sur Al-Qaeda et le 11 Septembre ?

Pauline Moullot
Libération
17 juillet 2019

Le président américain a accusé une élue démocrate d’origine somalienne de «bomber le torse» en pensant à l’organisation terroriste.

Question posée par Annie le 16/07/2019

Bonjour,

Nous avons reformulé votre question, qui était : «Quels ont été les propos d’Ilhan Omar sur Al-Qaeda et sur le 11 Septembre, que Trump a cités par sous-entendu dans sa conférence de presse ?»

Dans une nouvelle saillie raciste lundi 15 juillet, Donald Trump a accusé la députée démocrate Ilhan Omar, née en Somalie, d’encenser Al-Qaeda. Pour comprendre ce qu’il s’est passé, il faut rembobiner au dimanche 14 juillet. Ce jour-là, le président américain s’en prend, sans les nommer, à quatre élues démocrates, toutes issues de minorités, à la Chambre des représentants : Ilhan Omar, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Rashida Tlaib et Ayanna Pressley. Il les appelle notamment à «retourner dans leur pays». La première, réfugiée somalienne, est devenue avec Rashida Tlaib l’une des deux premières femmes musulmanes élues au Congrès en novembre. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez est la plus jeune représentante démocrate de l’histoire, et Ayanna Pressley, première élue afro-américaine au conseil municipal de Boston en 2009. Surnommées «The Squad» par la presse américaine, ces femmes non-blanches se sont démarquées par leur progressisme et leurs prises de position régulières contre la politique de Donald Trump sur l’immigration.

Le lendemain, le Président réitère ses injures racistes en conférence de presse, les appelant de nouveau à quitter les Etats-Unis. A ce moment-là, il assure qu’Ilhan Omar aurait défendu Al-Qaeda et les attentats du 11 Septembre.

A la question «que répondez-vous à ceux qui disent que vos tweets sont racistes ?», Trump rétorque ainsi : «Et bien, elles sont très malheureuses. Elles ne font que se plaindre à longueur de temps. Tout ce que je dis, c’est que si elles veulent partir, qu’elles partent. Elles peuvent partir. Je veux dire, je pense à Omar. Je ne sais pas, je ne l’ai jamais rencontrée. Je l’écoute parler d’Al-Qaeda. Al-Qaeda a tué beaucoup d’Américains. Et elle dit : « Vous pouvez bomber le torse, quand je pense à Al-Qaeda, je peux bomber le torse. » Quand elle parle des attentats du World Trade Center, elle dit « des gens ». Vous vous souvenez de ce fameux « des gens ». Ces personnes, à mon avis, détestent l’Amérique. Donc quand je les entends dire à quel point Al-Qaeda est merveilleux, quand je les entends parler de « ces gens » à propos du World Trade Center…»

Ses propos sur Al-Qaeda

Vous nous demandez ce qu’a vraiment dit Ilhan Omar à propos d’Al-Qaeda et du 11 septembre. L’équipe de Trump a indiqué à nos confrères américains de Politifact que le président faisait référence à deux déclarations d’Omar, largement reprises par les pro-Trump pour la décrédibiliser ces derniers mois.

La première remonte à 2013. Invitée sur une chaîne locale de Minneapolis, TwinCities PBS, Ilhan Omar commente les répercussions sur la communauté somalienne d’un attentat commis par les shebab somaliens au Kenya, affiliés à Al-Qaeda. Plusieurs extraits de cette interview de vingt-huit minutes ont été repris par ses opposants ces derniers mois. Elle ne parle pourtant pas une seule fois de bomber le torse en pensant à Al-Qaeda. Elle discute avec le présentateur du fait que l’on demande à la communauté somalienne aux Etats-Unis de condamner ces actes, et plus largement aux musulmans de condamner tous les actes terroristes. Elle parle alors de «cette supposition qui fait croire que nous sommes tous connectés à ces actes. […] La population générale doit comprendre qu’il y a une différence entre les personnes qui commettent ces actes diaboliques, car c’est un acte diabolique, et nous avons des gens diaboliques dans le monde. Et des gens normaux qui essaient de continuer à mener leur vie.» Elle parle ensuite du fait que les Somaliens sont les premières victimes des shebab et insiste : «Ces personnes exercent la terreur. Et toute leur idéologie est basée sur le fait de terroriser les communautés.»

La partie la plus détournée de l’interview intervient quand le présentateur l’interroge ensuite sur le fait que l’on conserve les noms arabes, sans les traduire, pour désigner les groupes terroristes. Ces noms, qui ont pourtant d’autres significations en arabe, «polluent notre langage quotidien», ajoute le présentateur. Là, Ilhan Omar acquiesce et répond : «Je pense que c’est un produit des médias sensationnalistes. Vous avez ces extraits sonores, et ces mots, et tout le monde les prononce avec une telle intensité, car ça doit avoir une signification plus grande. Je me souviens quand j’étais à la fac, j’ai suivi un cours sur l’idéologie du terrorisme. A chaque fois que le professeur disait « Al-Qaeda », ses épaules se soulevaient.» Ilhan Omar parle donc de la façon dont les médias évoquent les groupes terroristes, et explique comment cela se voit dans le langage corporel. Mais ne parle pas du tout de bomber le torse.

Ses propos sur le 11 Septembre

Enfin, les propos de Trump sur de supposées déclarations d’Ilhan Omar sur l’attentat du World Trade Center visent un discours prononcé par l’élue au Conseil des relations américano-islamiques (Cair) de Los Angeles, en mars. Le président américain avait alors publié sur Twitter une vidéo montrant les tours jumelles s’effondrer, avec une citation d’Ilhan Omar en arrière-plan. Que disait-elle exactement ? Expliquant que les musulmans étaient fatigués d’être considérés comme «des citoyens de seconde zone», elle ajoute : «Le Cair a été fondé après le 11 Septembre parce qu’ils ont pris acte du fait que des gens avaient fait quelque chose et que nous tous allions commencer à perdre accès à nos libertés civiles.» C’est ce terme «gens» qui lui a été reproché. Mais à aucun moment elle ne loue l’organisation terroriste.

Le Washington Post et Ilhan Omar ont fait remarquer que George W. Bush avait utilisé la même expression après les attentats de 2001. «Je vous entends, je vous entends. Et le reste du monde vous entend. Et les gens, ces gens qui ont fait tomber les tours, vont nous entendre bientôt».

Selon le New York Times, Ilhan Omar a qualifié les accusations de Trump de «ridicules». Toutes les élues démocrates ont répliqué lundi 15 juillet, en organisant une conférence de presse commune pour dénoncer le racisme du président américain. Mercredi, celui-ci s’est de nouveau emparé de son clavier pour assurer qu’il n’était pas raciste, en leur demandant de nouveau de quitter le pays.


Bouddhisme: Attention, une religion de paix peut en cacher une autre ! (After Islam’s jihadists, Burma’s ultra-nationalist monks are a tragic reminder that in times of crisis even the most peaceful of religious doctrines can turn homicidal)

8 juillet, 2019

Image result for swastika Buddhist Nazi

Je vous laisse la paix, je vous donne ma paix. Je ne vous donne pas comme le monde donne. Jésus (Jean 14: 27)
Ne croyez pas que je sois venu apporter la paix sur la terre; je ne suis pas venu apporter la paix, mais l’épée. Car je suis venu mettre la division entre l’homme et son père, entre la fille et sa mère, entre la belle-fille et sa belle-mère; et l’homme aura pour ennemis les gens de sa maison. Jésus (Matthieu 10 : 34-36)
Une nation s’élèvera contre une nation, et un royaume contre un royaume; il y aura de grands tremblements de terre, et, en divers lieux, des pestes et des famines; il y aura des phénomènes terribles, et de grands signes dans le ciel.(…) Il y aura des signes dans le soleil, dans la lune et dans les étoiles. Et sur la terre, il y aura de l’angoisse chez les nations qui ne sauront que faire, au bruit de la mer et des flots. Jésus (Luc 21: 10-25)
Ne prenez pas le mal à la légère en disant ‘il ne m’atteindra pas’. Même un pot d’eau finit par se remplir de gouttes de pluie. De même, l’innocent absorbant goutte par goutte finit par se remplir de mal. Gautama Bouddha
Comme une mère protègerait son unique enfant au risque de sa propre vie, cultivons un amour sans limite envers tous les êtres.  Que ces pensées d’amour infini imprègnent le monde tout entier, dessus, dessous, de toutes parts, sans obstacle, sans haine ni inimitié. Metta sutta (hymne de l’amour universel)
Le Bouddha se situe souvent au-delà du Bien et du Mal. Ses paroles devraient nous permettre de limiter les mécaniques du Mal. Texte lu par Bulle Ogier (Le Vénérable W)
Une croyance populaire dit que si on peut tuer un animal, on peut aussi tuer un homme. Nous, les bouddhistes, nous nous opposons au sacrifice des animaux. Texte par Bulle Ogier (Le Vénérable W)
Les événements qui se déroulent sous nos yeux sont à la fois naturels et culturels, c’est-à-dire qu’ils sont apocalyptiques. Jusqu’à présent, les textes de l’Apocalypse faisaient rire. Tout l’effort de la pensée moderne a été de séparer le culturel du naturel. La science consiste à montrer que les phénomènes culturels ne sont pas naturels et qu’on se trompe forcément si on mélange les tremblements de terre et les rumeurs de guerre, comme le fait le texte de l’Apocalypse. Mais, tout à coup, la science prend conscience que les activités de l’homme sont en train de détruire la nature. C’est la science qui revient à l’Apocalypse. René Girard
On a commencé avec la déconstruction du langage et on finit avec la déconstruction de l’être humain dans le laboratoire. (…) Elle est proposée par les mêmes qui d’un côté veulent prolonger la vie indéfiniment et nous disent de l’autre que le monde est surpeuplé. René Girard
Le christianisme (…) nous a fait passer de l’archaïsme à la modernité, en nous aidant à canaliser la violence autrement que par la mort.(…) En faisant d’un supplicié son Dieu, le christianisme va dénoncer le caractère inacceptable du sacrifice. Le Christ, fils de Dieu, innocent par essence, n’a-t-il pas dit – avec les prophètes juifs : « Je veux la miséricorde et non le sacrifice » ? En échange, il a promis le royaume de Dieu qui doit inaugurer l’ère de la réconciliation et la fin de la violence. La Passion inaugure ainsi un ordre inédit qui fonde les droits de l’homme, absolument inaliénables. (…) l’islam (…) ne supporte pas l’idée d’un Dieu crucifié, et donc le sacrifice ultime. Il prône la violence au nom de la guerre sainte et certains de ses fidèles recherchent le martyre en son nom. Archaïque ? Peut-être, mais l’est-il plus que notre société moderne hostile aux rites et de plus en plus soumise à la violence ? Jésus a-t-il échoué ? L’humanité a conservé de nombreux mécanismes sacrificiels. Il lui faut toujours tuer pour fonder, détruire pour créer, ce qui explique pour une part les génocides, les goulags et les holocaustes, le recours à l’arme nucléaire, et aujourd’hui le terrorisme. René Girard
L’éthique de la victime innocente remporte un succès si triomphal aujourd’hui dans les cultures qui sont tombées sous l’influence chrétienne que les actes de persécution ne peuvent être justifiés que par cette éthique, et même les chasseurs de sorcières indonésiens y ont aujourd’hui recours. La même force culturelle et spirituelle qui a joué un rôle si décisif dans la disparition du sacrifice humain est aujourd’hui en train de provoquer la disparition des rituels de sacrifice humain qui l’ont jadis remplacé. Tout cela semble être une bonne nouvelle, mais à condition que ceux qui comptaient sur ces ressources rituelles soient en mesure de les remplacer par des ressources religieuses durables d’un autre genre. Priver une société des ressources sacrificielles rudimentaires dont elle dépend sans lui proposer d’alternatives, c’est la plonger dans une crise qui la conduira presque certainement à la violence. Gil Bailie
L’avenir apocalyptique n’est pas quelque chose d’historique. C’est quelque chose de religieux sans lequel on ne peut pas vivre. C’est ce que les chrétiens actuels ne comprennent pas. Parce que, dans l’avenir apocalyptique, le bien et le mal sont mélangés de telle manière que d’un point de vue chrétien, on ne peut pas parler de pessimisme. Cela est tout simplement contenu dans le christianisme. Pour le comprendre, lisons la Première Lettre aux Corinthiens : si les puissants, c’est-à-dire les puissants de ce monde, avaient su ce qui arriverait, ils n’auraient jamais crucifié le Seigneur de la Gloire – car cela aurait signifié leur destruction (cf. 1 Co 2, 8). Car lorsque l’on crucifie le Seigneur de la Gloire, la magie des pouvoirs, qui est le mécanisme du bouc émissaire, est révélée. Montrer la crucifixion comme l’assassinat d’une victime innocente, c’est montrer le meurtre collectif et révéler ce phénomène mimétique. C’est finalement cette vérité qui entraîne les puissants à leur perte. Et toute l’histoire est simplement la réalisation de cette prophétie. Ceux qui prétendent que le christianisme est anarchiste ont un peu raison. Les chrétiens détruisent les pouvoirs de ce monde, car ils détruisent la légitimité de toute violence. Pour l’État, le christianisme est une force anarchique, surtout lorsqu’il retrouve sa puissance spirituelle d’autrefois. Ainsi, le conflit avec les musulmans est bien plus considérable que ce que croient les fondamentalistes. Les fondamentalistes pensent que l’apocalypse est la violence de Dieu. Alors qu’en lisant les chapitres apocalyptiques, on voit que l’apocalypse est la violence de l’homme déchaînée par la destruction des puissants, c’est-à-dire des États, comme nous le voyons en ce moment. Lorsque les puissances seront vaincues, la violence deviendra telle que la fin arrivera. Si l’on suit les chapitres apocalyptiques, c’est bien cela qu’ils annoncent. Il y aura des révolutions et des guerres. Les États s’élèveront contre les États, les nations contre les nations. Cela reflète la violence. Voilà le pouvoir anarchique que nous avons maintenant, avec des forces capables de détruire le monde entier. On peut donc voir l’apparition de l’apocalypse d’une manière qui n’était pas possible auparavant. Au début du christianisme, l’apocalypse semblait magique : le monde va finir ; nous irons tous au paradis, et tout sera sauvé ! L’erreur des premiers chrétiens était de croire que l’apocalypse était toute proche. Les premiers textes chronologiques chrétiens sont les Lettres aux Thessaloniciens qui répondent à la question : pourquoi le monde continue-t-il alors qu’on en a annoncé la fin ? Paul dit qu’il y a quelque chose qui retient les pouvoirs, le katochos (quelque chose qui retient). L’interprétation la plus commune est qu’il s’agit de l’Empire romain. La crucifixion n’a pas encore dissout tout l’ordre. Si l’on consulte les chapitres du christianisme, ils décrivent quelque chose comme le chaos actuel, qui n’était pas présent au début de l’Empire romain. (..) le monde actuel (…) confirme vraiment toutes les prédictions. On voit l’apocalypse s’étendre tous les jours : le pouvoir de détruire le monde, les armes de plus en plus fatales, et autres menaces qui se multiplient sous nos yeux. Nous croyons toujours que tous ces problèmes sont gérables par l’homme mais, dans une vision d’ensemble, c’est impossible. Ils ont une valeur quasi surnaturelle. Comme les fondamentalistes, beaucoup de lecteurs de l’Évangile reconnaissent la situation mondiale dans ces chapitres apocalyptiques. Mais les fondamentalistes croient que la violence ultime vient de Dieu, alors ils ne voient pas vraiment le rapport avec la situation actuelle – le rapport religieux. Cela montre combien ils sont peu chrétiens. La violence humaine, qui menace aujourd’hui le monde, est plus conforme au thème apocalyptique de l’Évangile qu’ils ne le pensent. René Girard
Les pays européens devraient accueillir ces réfugiés et leur fournir de l’éducation et des formations, l’objectif étant qu’ils rentrent chez eux avec des compétences particulières. Ils seront eux-mêmes mieux, je pense, dans leur propre pays. Mieux vaut garder l’Europe pour les Européens. Tenzyn Gyatso (Dalai Lama)
Les mosquées sont nos casernes, les coupoles nos casques, les minarets nos baïonnettes et les croyants nos soldats. Erdogan (1998)
En réalité, leurs mosquées ne sont pas des lieux de culte comme nos monastères. Ce sont des bases de guerre pour planifier des attaques contre les non-musulmans. J’ai deviné l’intention des musulmans qui est de convertir le monde entier à l’islam. D’ailleurs, on peut voir sur Youtube, quand les membres de l’EI décapitent un chrétien, ils montrent un doigt, c’est-à-dire qu’il doit y avoir un seul Dieu dans le monde. Du fait que les musulmans ls entrent et s’installent dans les pays d’Europe, ils envahissent le monde. Et les dirigeants comme Merkel et compagnie les acceptent sans tenir compte de l’avis du peuple. Aux USA, si le peuple veut rester en paix et en sécurité, il doit choisir Donald Trump. Ashin Wirathu
L’Hitler de Birmanie est bouddhiste et ses juifs sont les musulmans rohingyas. David Aaronovitch
Les caractéristiques des poissons-chats d’Afrique sont : ils grandissent très vite. Ils se reproduisent très vite aussi. Et puis ils sont violents. Ils mangent les membres de leur propre espèce et détruisent les ressources naturelles de leur environnement. Les musulmans sont exactement comme ces poissons. Ashin Wirathu
Si on peut tuer un animal, on peut tuer un homme. Ashin Wirathu
Une foule excitée peut devenir incontrôlable. Cela peut exploser. Ma Ba Tha intervient quand les « kalars » embêtent les bouddhistes. Une fois le problème réglé et les « kalars » sanctionnés, la foule se calme. Voilà le rôle de Ma BA TA. Ashin Wirathu
Nous ne ciblons pas délibérément les entreprises [musulmanes]. Ils tuent des animaux car ils pensent que cela les rend méritants. C’est la principale différence entre eux et nous. Kyaw Sein Win (Ma Ba Tha)
Les musulmans sont des fauteurs de troubles. Ils prétendent garder des couteaux dans leurs mosquées pour les sacrifices d’animaux, mais nous, nous savons qu’ils peuvent s’en servir à tout moment contre nous. Ti Ti Win (professeure de mathématiques, 55 ans)
Notre région est confrontée au risque de perdre son bétail. Les kalars ont déjà tué des milliers de vaches. Vous savez pourquoi ? Ils s’entraînent pour nous égorger ensuite. Pyinyeinda (moine d’Athoke)
En tant que bouddhiste, je m’oppose au massacre de bétail. Par conséquent, j’ai accepté les demandes des moines qui mènent cette campagne. Je les ai aidés à obtenir les licences des abattoirs. Thein Aung (chef du gouvernement de la région d’Ayeyarwady)
Lors de nos deux premières descentes, nous avons découvert que plus de vaches étaient tuées que ne l’autorise la loi. Nous avons donc fait pression sur les autorités municipales pour qu’elles mettent sur liste noire le propriétaire musulman. Elles ont fini par le faire et il a dû fermer son abattoir. Win Shwe
On ne peut plus acheter de bœuf dans toute la région d’Ayeyarwady. Si on veut du bœuf halal, il faut que quelqu’un le fasse venir de Rangoon. Restaurateur musulman de la ville de Kyaungon. David Aaronovitch
Il faut resituer ces discours dans le contexte planétaire, de la progression de l’islamophobie. Une idée s’est installée en Birmanie, selon laquelle le bouddhisme des origines s’inscrivait dans une aire géographique comprenant une large partie de l’Asie, de l’Afghanistan à la Malaisie, englobant l’Inde, et qu’il ne concerne plus aujourd’hui que l’Asie du Sud-Est et le Sri Lanka pour la branche du Theravada, du fait de la pression de l’Islam. Bénédicte Brac de la Perrière
Le groupe « 969 » fait partie de mouvements réactionnels liés à des problèmes identitaires. On a le sentiment d’être agressé par des marges, on réagit en se protégeant. C’est une manière de se définir contre l’autre. Le bouddhisme est dans ce cas une arme symbolique. Raphaël Logier (IEP d’Aix-en-Provence)
Face à la progression de l’islamophobie en Europe, aux États-Unis et ailleurs, le film rappelle que même la doctrine religieuse la plus pacifique risque, si elle est mal interprétée, d’être exploitée à des fins destructrices. The Hollywood reporter
Dès son origine, le bouddhisme insiste sur la compassion envers autrui : le premier bouddhisme, dit Theravâda, toujours présent en Asie du Sud-Est et au Sri Lanka, met l’accent sur une introspection personnelle qui doit permettre de comprendre la nature de nos rapports avec l’autre. Il n’y a pas de dogme fondamental, en dehors de quelques notions issues de l’hindouisme. Il n’existe pas non plus d’autorité ecclésiastique ultime. Ces deux traits font qu’il est de prime abord difficile de parler d’orthodoxie, et à plus forte raison de fondamentalisme bouddhique. Les bouddhismes, par nature pluriels, ont su accueillir en leur sein les doctrines les plus diverses. Plus tard, le bouddhisme Mahâyâna (« grand véhicule »), aujourd’hui répandu en Chine, en Corée, au Japon et au Viêtnam, prône la compassion pour tous les êtres, même les pires. Ce sentiment de communion est fondé sur la croyance en la transmigration des âmes, laquelle conduit les êtres à renaître en diverses destinées, humaines et non-humaines. Le Mahâyâna insiste sur la présence d’une nature de bouddha en tout être. Quant au bouddhisme Vajrayâna (ésotérique, tantrique), issu du Mahâyâna et aujourd’hui localisé au Tibet et en Mongolie, il offre une vision grandiose de l’univers tout entier, qui n’est autre que le corps du Bouddha cosmique. A l’époque contemporaine, compassion et tolérance sont devenues, en partie par la personne médiatique du dalaï-lama actuel, icône moderne du bouddhisme tibétain, l’image de marque même du bouddhisme dans son ensemble. Les penseurs bouddhistes ont rapidement élaboré des concepts propres à expliquer divers degrés de vérité. Le Bouddha lui-même, selon un enseignement ultérieurement synthétisé, notamment par le Mahâyâna, prêchait ainsi une vérité conventionnelle (accessible à tous), adaptée aux facultés limitées de ses auditeurs, réservant la vérité ultime à une élite spirituelle. Ce recours constant à des expédients salvifiques (upâya), balisant des voies différentes et plus ou moins difficiles d’accès au salut, rend le dogmatisme difficile, car tout dogme relève du domaine de la parole, donc de la vérité conventionnelle. Ces théories vont faciliter diverses formes de syncrétisme ou de synthèse, comme celles de Zhiyi (539-597) et de Guifeng Zongmi (780-841) en Chine, de Kûkai (774-835) au Japon, et de Tsong-kha-pa (1357-1419) au Tibet. Il s’agit généralement d’une sorte de syncrétisme militant, par lequel les cultes rivaux (religion bön au Tibet, confucianisme et taoïsme en Chine, shinto au Japon…) sont intégrés à un rang subalterne dans un système dont le point culminant est la doctrine de l’auteur. Ces élaborations aboutissent rapidement à faire du bouddhisme un polythéisme, qui assimile et mêle dans ses panthéons les dieux des religions qui lui préexistaient (de l’hindouisme, du bön, du taoïsme…). Au demeurant, la pratique n’a pas toujours été aussi harmonieuse que la théorie. (…) Mais c’est surtout en raison de son évolution historique que le bouddhisme est conduit à faire des accrocs à ses grands principes. Le principal écueil réside dans les rapports de cette religion avec les cultures qu’elle rencontre au cours de son expansion. L’attitude des bouddhistes envers les religions locales est souvent décrite comme un exemple classique de tolérance. Il s’agit en réalité d’une tentative de mainmise : les dieux indigènes les plus importants sont convertis, les autres sont rejetés dans les ténèbres extérieures, ravalés au rang de démons et, le cas échéant, soumis ou détruits par des rites appropriés. Certes, le processus est souvent représenté dans les sources bouddhiques comme une conversion volontaire des divinités locales. Mais la réalité est fréquemment toute autre, comme en témoignent certains mythes, qui suggèrent que le bouddhisme a parfois cherché à éradiquer les cultes locaux qui lui faisaient obstacle. C’est ainsi que le Tibet est « pacifié » au viiie siècle par le maître indien Padmasambhava, lorsque celui-ci soumet tous les « démons » locaux (en réalité, les anciens dieux) grâce à ses formidables pouvoirs. Un siècle auparavant, le premier roi bouddhique Trisong Detsen a déjà soumis les forces telluriques (énergies terrestres de nature « magique » qui influencent individus et habitats), symbolisées par une démone, dont le corps recouvrait tout le territoire tibétain, en « clouant » celle-ci au sol par des stûpas (monuments commémoratifs et souvent centres de pèlerinage) fichés aux douze points de son corps. Le temple du Jokhang à Lhasa, lieu saint du bouddhisme tibétain, serait le « pieu » enfoncé en la partie centrale du corps de la démone, son sexe. Ce symbolisme, décrivant la « conquête » bouddhique comme une sorte de soumission sexuelle, se retrouve dans un des mythes fondateurs du bouddhisme tantrique, la soumission du dieu Maheshvara par Vajrapâni, émanation terrifiante du bouddha cosmique Vairocana. Maheshvara est l’un des noms de Shiva, l’un des grands dieux de la mythologie hindoue. Ce dernier, ravalé par le bouddhisme au rang de démon, n’a commis d’autre crime que de se croire le Créateur, et de refuser de se soumettre à Vajrapâni, en qui il ne voit qu’un démon. Son arrogance lui vaut d’être piétiné à mort ou, selon un pieux euphémisme, « libéré », malgré la molle intercession du bouddha Vairocana pour freiner la fureur destructrice de son avatar Vajrapâni. Pris de peur, les autres démons (dieux hindous) se soumettent sans résistance. Dans une version encore plus violente, le dieu Rudra (autre forme de Shiva) est empalé par son redoutable adversaire. Le mythe de la soumission de Maheshvara se retrouve au Japon, même si, dans ce dernier pays, les choses se passent dans l’ensemble de manière moins violente. Certes, on voit ici aussi de nombreux récits de conversions plus ou moins forcées des dieux autochtnones. Mais bientôt, une solution plus élégante est trouvée, avec la théorie dite « essence et traces » (honji suijaku). Selon cette théorie, les dieux japonais (kami) ne sont que des « traces », des manifestations locales dont l’« essence » (honji) réside en des bouddhas indiens. Plus besoin de conversion, donc, puisque les kamis sont déjà des reflets des bouddhas. Paradoxalement, la notion d’absolu dégagée par la spéculation bouddhique va permettre aux théoriciens d’une nouvelle religion, le soi-disant « ancien » shinto, de remettre en question la synthèse bouddhique au nom d’une réforme purificatrice et nationaliste. A terme, ce fondamentalisme shinto mènera à la « révolution culturelle » de Meiji (1868-1873), au cours de laquelle le bouddhisme, dénoncé comme religion étrangère, verra une bonne partie de ses temples détruits ou confisqués. Jusqu’à la Seconde Guerre mondiale, la religion officielle japonaise réinvestit les mythes shintos et s’organise autour du culte de l’Empereur divinisé, descendant du plus important kami national, la déesse du Soleil. Par contre-coup, le bouddhisme à son tour se réfugie dans un purisme teinté de modernisme, qui rejette comme autant de « superstitions » les croyances locales. (…) En théorie, le principe de non-dualité si cher au bouddhisme Mahâyâna semble pourtant impliquer une égalité entre hommes et femmes. Dans la réalité monastique, les nonnes restent inférieures aux moines, et sont souvent réduites à des conditions d’existence précaires. (…) Le bouddhisme a par ailleurs longtemps imposé aux femmes toutes sortes de tabous. La misogynie la plus crue s’exprime dans certains textes bouddhiques qui décrivent la femme comme un être pervers, quasi démoniaque. Perçues comme foncièrement impures, les femmes étaient exclues des lieux sacrés, et ne pouvaient par exemple faire de pèlerinages en montagne. Pire encore, du fait de la pollution menstruelle et du sang versé lors de l’accouchement, elles étaient condamnées à tomber dans un enfer spécial, celui de l’Etang de Sang. Le clergé bouddhique offrait bien sûr un remède, en l’occurrence les rites, exécutés, moyennant redevances, par des prêtres. Car le bouddhisme, dans sa grande tolérance, est censé sauver même les êtres les plus vils… (…) Il faut enfin mentionner les luttes intestines qui opposent, au sein de la secte Tendai (tendance majoritaire du bouddhisme japonais du viiie au xiiie siècle), les factions du mont Hiei et du Miidera. A diverses reprises, les monastères des deux protagonistes sont détruits par les « moines-guerriers » du rival. Les raids périodiques de ces armées monacales sur la capitale, Kyôto, défrayent les chroniques médiévales. C’est seulement vers la fin du xvie siècle qu’un guerrier à bout de patience, Oda Nobunaga (1534-1582), décide de raser ces temples et de passer par le fil du sabre les fauteurs de troubles. (…) Avec la montée des nationalismes au xixe siècle, le bouddhisme s’est trouvé confronté à une tendance fondamentaliste. Certes, la chose n’était pas tout à fait nouvelle. Dans le Japon du xiiie siècle, lors des invasions mongoles (elles-mêmes légitimées par les maîtres bouddhiques de la cour de Kûbilaï Khân), les bouddhistes japonais invoquèrent les « vents divins » (kamikaze) qui détruisirent l’armada ennemie. Ils mirent également en avant la notion du Japon « terre des dieux » (shinkoku), qui prendra une importance cruciale dans le Japon impérialiste du xxe siècle. Durant la Seconde Guerre mondiale, les bouddhistes japonais devaient soutenir l’effort de guerre, mettant leur rhétorique au service de la mystique impériale. Même Daisetz T. Suzuki, le principal propagateur du zen en Occident, se fera le porte-parole de cette idéologie belliciste. Plus récemment, c’est à Sri Lanka que cet aspect agonistique a pris le dessus, avec la revendication d’indépendance de la minorité tamoule, qui a conduit depuis 1983 à de sanglants affrontements entre les ethnies sinhala et tamoule. Le discours des Sinhalas constitue l’exemple le plus approchant d’une apologie bouddhique de la guerre sainte. Certes, il s’agit d’un fondamentalisme un peu particulier, puisqu’il repose sur un groupe ethnique plutôt que sur un texte sacré. Il existe bien une autorité scripturaire, le Mahâvamsa, chronique mytho-historique où sont décrits les voyages magiques du Bouddha à Sri Lanka, ainsi que la lutte victorieuse du roi Duttaghâmanî contre les Damilas (Tamouls) au service du bouddhisme. Le Mahâvamsa sert ainsi de caution à la croyance selon laquelle l’île et son gouvernement ont traditionnellement été sinhalas et bouddhistes. C’est notamment dans ses pages qu’apparaît le terme de Dharma-dîpa (île de la Loi bouddhique). Il ne restait qu’un pas, vite franchi, pour faire de Sri Lanka la terre sacrée du bouddhisme, qu’il faut à tout prix défendre contre les infidèles. Ce fondamentalisme est avant tout une idéologie politique. Mentionnons pour finir un cas significatif, puisqu’il met en cause la personne même du dalaï-lama, le personnage qui personnifie aux yeux de la plupart l’image même de la tolérance bouddhique. Il s’agit du culte d’une divinité tantrique du nom de Dorje Shugden, esprit d’un ancien lama, rival du cinquième dalaï-lama, et assassiné par les partisans de celui-ci, adeptes des Gelugpa, au xviie siècle. Par un étrange retour des choses, cette divinité était devenue le protecteur de la secte des Gelugpa, et plus précisément de l’actuel Dalaï-Lama, jusqu’à ce que ce dernier, sur la base d’oracles délivrés par une autre divinité plus puissante, Pehar, en vienne à interdire son culte à ses disciples. Cette décision a suscité une levée de boucliers parmi les fidèles de Shugden, qui ont reproché au dalaï-lama son intolérance. Inutile de dire que les Chinois ont su exploiter cette querelle à toutes fins utiles de propagande. L’histoire a été portée sur les devants de la scène après le meurtre d’un partisan du dalaï-lama par un de ses rivaux, il y a quelques années. Par-delà les questions de personne et les dissensions politiques, ce fait divers souligne les relations toujours tendues entre les diverses sectes du bouddhisme tibétain. Même s’il ne saurait être question de nier l’existence au coeur du bouddhisme d’un idéal de paix et de tolérance, fondé sur de nombreux passages scripturaux, ceux-ci sont contrebalancés par d’autres sources selon lesquelles la violence et la guerre sont permises lorsque le Dharma bouddhique est menacé par des infidèles. Dans le Kalacakra-tantra par exemple, texte auquel se réfère souvent le dalaï-lama, les infidèles en question sont des musulmans qui menacent l’existence du royaume mythique de Shambhala. A ceux qui rêvent d’une tradition bouddhique monologique et apaisée, il convient d’opposer, par souci de vérité, cette part d’ombre. Bernard Faure
En Birmanie, où la population est majoritairement bouddhiste, la minorité musulmane représente environ 5 % des habitants. Dans le delta de l’Irrawaddy, les musulmans vivent essentiellement des activités liées aux abattoirs et au commerce du bœuf. Actuellement, les entreprises musulmanes sont la cible de l’islamophobie que propagent les extrémistes bouddhistes, dont la voix a beaucoup gagné en puissance avec l’ouverture politique de la Birmanie. Depuis fin 2013, une campagne soutenue par Ma Ba Tha [association birmane “pour la protection de la race et de la religion”, créée en juin 2013] a forcé à fermer des dizaines d’abattoirs et d’usines de transformation de viande tenus par des musulmans dans la région d’Ayeyarwady [région du sud de la Birmanie]. Des milliers de vaches ont été enlevées de force à leurs propriétaires musulmans. Les commerces de certains musulmans ont vu leurs revenus s’effondrer. Des documents officiels que nous avons obtenus et des entretiens avec des représentants de l’Etat révèlent que les hauts fonctionnaires soutiennent cette croisade. (…) En 2014, en raison de la pénurie de bétail et du renforcement des restrictions gouvernementales, les populations musulmanes du delta de l’Irrawaddy n’ont pas pu fêter l’Aïd el-Kébir, lors duquel des vaches sont sacrifiées selon la tradition islamique. Kyaw Sein Win, un porte-parole de Ma Ba Tha au siège de Rangoon, affirme que sauver des vies est un aspect central de la philosophie bouddhiste. “Nous ne ciblons pas délibérément les entreprises [musulmanes]. Ils tuent des animaux car ils pensent que cela les rend méritants. C’est la principale différence entre eux et nous”, a-t-il déclaré à Myanmar Now. L’appel à un boycott des entreprises musulmanes a reçu peu d’écho dans les villes, mais la campagne contre les sacrifices, qui repose sur l’aversion traditionnelle des bouddhistes pour l’abattage des vaches, a porté auprès des fidèles du delta de l’Irrawaddy. Dans cette région, cœur de la riziculture birmane, des dizaines de milliers de musulmans, pour la plupart commerçants en ville, vivent aux côtés d’environ six millions de riziculteurs, bouddhistes en majorité. Traditionnellement, les agriculteurs birmans utilisent les vaches et les bœufs comme animaux de trait. Ils ne les vendent aux abattoirs que pour gagner rapidement une importante somme d’argent, en vue d’un mariage ou pour payer un traitement médical. Ma Ba Tha n’a pas demandé aux agriculteurs de ne plus vendre leur bétail. Sa stratégie consiste à s’emparer des licences des abattoirs. En 2014, les moines radicaux du delta de l’Irrawaddy ont créé l’organisation Jivitadana Thetkal (“Sauver des vies”), qui appelle les monastères de la région à collecter chacun environ 100 dollars dans leur congrégation afin de permettre le rachat des licences. (…) Les moines bouddhistes radicaux ont prononcé des sermons enflammés dans les villages du delta pour propager l’idée que l’abattage de vaches constitue un affront au bouddhisme et participe de l’objectif musulman d’exterminer le bétail. (…) En 2014, le groupe a collecté environ 25 000 dollars grâce à des dons publics pour racheter six licences d’abattoirs, mais la plus chère de la ville restait inabordable. Pour atteindre leur objectif, ils ont décidé de prouver que l’abattoir ne respectait pas les quotas de sa licence. (….) Win Shwe et ses compagnons revendiquent également la saisie de plus de 4 000 animaux vivants dans le delta depuis début 2014. Beaucoup de ces bêtes ont ensuite été données à des agriculteurs pauvres de la région pour devenir des animaux de trait, à condition qu’ils s’engagent à ne pas les tuer ou les vendre. Au milieu de l’année 2014, selon des documents obtenus par Myanmar Now, des militants ont toutefois reçu l’accord des autorités pour mettre en œuvre un nouveau plan visant à envoyer le bétail saisi à des populations bouddhistes de Maungdaw, dans l’Etat d’Arakan, à environ 500 km au nord-ouest du delta de l’Irrawaddy. Cette localité très pauvre, la plus à l’ouest du pays, est située sur la frontière avec le Bangladesh. Les musulmans y sont plus nombreux que les bouddhistes. La frontière, que Ma Ba Tha se plaît à appeler “la porte occidentale” du pays, est sous le strict contrôle du gouvernement. Selon la presse, des centaines d’Arakanais qui vivaient dans l’est du Bangladesh se sont réinstallés de l’autre côté de la frontière depuis 2012. Les autorités birmanes ont envoyé les membres de cette ethnie bouddhiste vivre dans des “villages modèles” à Maungdaw, dans ce qui ressemble à une tentative d’accroître la population bouddhiste dans la zone. (…) Cette mesure avait pour but de “protéger la porte occidentale contre l’afflux de musulmans”, selon Win Shwe. “Sans cette porte occidentale, le territoire sera inondé de Bengalis [musulmans du Bangladesh]”, déclare Sein Aung dans un bureau richement décoré d’emblèmes nationalistes, dont des drapeaux portant des swastikas bouddhistes. Sean Turnell, professeur d’économie à l’université Macquarie de Sydney, en Australie, explique que le boycott qui touche les entreprises musulmanes nuit à l’image de la Birmanie sur la scène internationale, notamment auprès des investisseurs potentiels qui s’inquiètent de l’instabilité politique. (…) Devant son restaurant, une immense affiche est placardée : une vache y est représentée, accompagnée d’un verset à la gloire du rôle mythique de l’animal en tant que “mère” de l’humanité. Une image probablement posée par des sympathisants de Ma Ba Tha. La plupart des musulmans qui vivent dans le delta de l’Irrawaddy n’osent pas dénoncer la campagne de peur de subir des représailles de Ma Ba Tha. Myanmar Now
Those who believe that all Buddhists respect their religion’s core principles of peace and tolerance should take a look at The Venerable W (Le Venerable W), director Barbet Schroeder’s eye-opening chronicle of one Burmese monk’s long campaign of racism and violence against his country’s minority Muslim population. The third part in a “trilogy of evil” that began in 1974 with General Idi Amin Dada and continued in 2007 with a look at the controversial French lawyer Jacques Verges in Terror’s Advocate, this scathing portrait gets up close and personal with Ashin Wirathu, the self-appointed spiritual leader of Myanmar’s anti-Muslim crusade. Speaking openly to the camera, Wirathu propagates xenophobia and bigotry against a group that represents only a fraction of the local population, yet have been subject to decades of persecution by both the monk’s followers and the military-controlled Burmese government. The result has been hundreds of deaths, thousands of homes burned to the ground and tens of thousands of Muslims displaced — all of it in the name of a religion that asks, according to one translation of the Metta Sutta, to “cultivate boundless love to all that live in the whole universe.” (…) At a time when Islamophobia is on the rise in Europe, the U.S. and elsewhere, his film is a reminder that even the most peaceful of religious doctrines can, if twisted in the wrong way, be used as a veritable source of evil. (…) Wirathu operates out of the city of Mandalay, a third of whose inhabitants consist of monks or monks-in-training. In the late 90s he formed the “969” movement and began delivering racist sermons to his disciples, referring to Muslims as “kalars” (the equivalent of the n-word) and claiming they are a subspecies who don’t deserve Myanmar citizenship, that their businesses should be boycotted and that they should be banned from intermarriage with Buddhists. Although prejudice against the Rohingya Muslim community, which is based in the western part of Myanmar bordering Bangladesh, dates back to before Wirathu’s time, he has helped accelerate a campaign resulting in many, many deaths and the mass destruction of property. In order to fuel the fire, he often highlights incidents where Muslims have attacked Buddhists (in one case, the rape and murder of a woman), distributing propaganda videos on DVD and backing riots where Rohingyas are driven from their homes while the armed forces stand idly by. What’s especially disturbing about Schroeder’s inquiry is how, on one hand, Wirathu can be seen expounding the peaceful tenets of Buddhism to his followers, while on the other he preaches a holy war meant to ostracize — and indirectly, destroy — an entire segment of the population. The man himself sees no contradiction in the two, simply believing that Muslims are a lesser race unworthy of the basic human rights accorded to Buddhists. While the situation in Myanmar is particularly extreme, Schroeder reveals at one point how, even in a Western nation like France, the perception of Islam’s grip on society versus the reality of that grip is highly exaggerated. Terrorist attacks like those that occurred in Paris in 2015 only help to augment fears and nationalistic tendencies, which is why a candidate like Marine Le Pen was able to capture more than a third of the vote in France’s recent presidential runoff. The Burmese authorities have made some attempts to quell the tide of Islamophobic sentiment, banning the “969” group and jailing Wirathu for several years. But after his release, the popular monk managed to form a new movement, promoting a series of “protection of race and religion bills” that seem to be the first step toward a modern version of the Nuremberg Laws of Nazi Germany. One of those laws has already been enacted, while the government continues to persecute the Rohingyas throughout the land. (…) In a place where Buddhists currently represent more than 90 percent of the populace, it’s unthinkable how a religion that preaches so much love can, in this case, yield so much hate. The Hollywood reporter
Everyone knows that Buddhism is the religion of peace, love and understanding. So there’s something deeply wrong about a Buddhist monk who calmly spouts anti-Muslim hate speech and incites ethnic riots. The monk in question, an influential Burmese figure known as the Venerable Wirathu, is the subject of the powerful third and final installment of Swiss director Barbet Schroeder’s ‘Axis of Evil’ documentary trilogy, which began in 1974 with General Idi Amin Dada: A Self Portrait, and continued in 2007 with Terror’s Advocate, a portrait of controversial lawyer Jacques Vergès. It’s the shocking disjunct between his religion and the rabid nationalism of his sermons, writings and declarations that powers Schroeder’s conventional but nevertheless effective long hard stare into the eyes of intolerance. However, this is also a chilling corrective to accounts of Burma that paint its recent history simply as a fight between courageous pro-democracy forces led by Aung San Suu Kyi (by no means a heroine in this particular story) and a repressive military regime. In the era of Trump (Wirathu is a fan), Farage and Le Pen, it also shines timely light on the mechanisms of nationalistic rhetoric. (…) Draped in saffron robes, his face rarely betraying any emotion, Wirathu is presented partly through outtakes from an interview Schroeder filmed with him in the library of the Mandalay monastery which he heads. The ‘venerable’ monk talks openly about what he sees to be the Muslim threat to Buddhist purity, calmly spouting racial slurs about their breeding capacity, the rape of ‘our women’, animalistic nature and accumulation of wealth that carry terrifying echoes of Nazi anti-Semitic slurs. He repeats the same message to the young monks he teaches and to the crowds of followers who turn out to watch him preach on tacky makeshift stages amidst garlands of flowers and gilt Buddhas. Schroeder’s method at first is simply to dwell on the awful fascination of the ‘Fascist Buddhist’ paradox, with passages promoting the brotherhood of man from the religion’s sacred texts, voiced by veteran French actress Bulle Ogier, underlining the contradiction. Wirathu’s rise from provincial obscurity to ethnic rabble-rouser is then charted, mixing his own account with testimony from a mix of interviewees – who will include two Burmese Buddhist masters who have served prison time, like ‘W’, but for far more noble causes. Wirathu’s nine-year stretch for inciting ethnic hatred came after a spate of 2003 riots in his hometown of Kyaukse and elsewhere which involved lynchings and burnings of Muslim mosques, shops and houses. The mood of the film turns darker in its second half, when Wirathu returns with even greater vitriol to the campaign trail after his release in 2012. News and mobile phone footage captures some of the pogroms launched against Burma’s persecuted Rohingya Muslim minority, mostly in Rakhine state: a scene in which a Buddhist monk beats a Musilm to a pulp with a makeshift club is difficult to erase. By now we’ve worked out what the monk really is. Forget the robes: he’s a classic extremist politician, fanning tensions through the crudest of rhetoric (including a DVD restaging of the rape of a Buddhist girl produced under the aegis of his Ma Ba Tha nationalist movement), then visiting the affected regions to ‘restore order’ and guarantee security. Shot on the hoof, under the noses of a repressive regime, The Venerable W is a fine, stirring documentary about ethnic cleansing in action. Screen daily
Loin de l’image d’Epinal d’un bouddhiste éthéré et tolérant, la religion phare d’Asie est, dans des pays comme le Sri Lanka ou la Birmanie, sous l’influence grandissante de moines nationalistes aux sermons agressifs, notamment contre les musulmans. La semaine dernière, dernier exemple en date de violences intercommunautaires: des foules bouddhistes ont mené des émeutes anti-musulmanes ayant fait au moins trois morts au Sri Lanka. Non loin de là, en Birmanie, secouée par la crise des musulmans rohingyas, la figure de proue du nationalisme bouddhiste, le moine Wirathu, a renoué avec ses sermons enflammés. Il avait été interdit de prise de parole publique après s’être réjoui du meurtre d’un avocat musulman. Et en Thaïlande voisine, où le nationalisme bouddhiste est néanmoins bien moins fort, un moine a fait scandale après avoir appelé à incendier les mosquées. Pour Michael Jerryson, spécialiste des questions de religion à l’université américaine de Youngstown et auteur d’un récent livre sur bouddhisme et violence, cette religion n’échappe pas à la justification de la violence par des prétextes religieux. (…) Et la menace, selon ces bouddhistes soucieux de préserver la prédominance de leur religion dans leur pays, c’est l’islam. Et ce même si les musulmans y sont ultra-minoritaires, de l’ordre de quelques pour cent. La destruction des statues de bouddhas de Bamiyan par les talibans en Afghanistan a profondément marqué l’imaginaire bouddhiste. Et l’ambiance globale de « guerre contre le terrorisme » contribue à l’islamophobie, à laquelle l’Asie n’échappe pas. Même si les minorités musulmanes sont implantées depuis des générations dans ces pays, les moines bouddhistes nationalistes agitent la menace de taux de natalité très élevés (c’est le cas des Rohingyas de Birmanie) – qui à plus ou moins long terme conduiront à une supplantation démographique comme en Malaisie ou en Indonésie. En Birmanie, le moine Wirathu s’est fait le grand prêtre de ce complot musulman visant à éradiquer le bouddhisme – avec des discours si enflammés que sa page Facebook a été fermée. (…) Au SriLanka, les militants bouddhistes tentent eux aussi de s’affirmer politiquement, n’hésitant pas à prendre la tête de manifestations et à en découdre avec la police. Les Tigres tamouls n’étant plus considérés comme une menace depuis leur défaite en 2009, les musulmans, qui ne représentent que 10 % de la population, se sont retrouvés la cible des nationalistes bouddhistes. Figure de proue du mouvement BBS (pour « Buddhist force »), le moine srilankais Galagodaatte Gnanasara, libéré sous caution, est sous le coup de poursuites pour discours de haine et insulte au coran. (…) En Thaïlande, ce mouvement d’idée a moins prise, dans un pays où le clergé bouddhiste est globalement discrédité par des scandales de corruption et de détournements de donations. (…) Cela n’empêche pas les tensions, notamment autour de l’extrême-sud de la Thaïlande, en proie à une rébellion indépendantiste musulmane qui s’en est parfois pris à des moines. Mais cela n’a rien à voir avec ce qui se passe en Birmanie, où, si les moines ne prennent pas eux mêmes les armes, des groupes de civils influencés par leurs idées se forment. Les moines n’agissent pas directement mais « justifient les violences menées par d’autres, que ce soient des milices, des civils, la police ou l’armée », analyse Iselin Frydenlund, de l’Ecole de théologie de Norvège. En Birmanie par exemple, des milices bouddhistes sont accusés de s’être livrées à des exactions contre les Rohingyas lors de ce que l’ONU décrit comme une campagne d' »épuration ethnique », qui a poussé à l’exil au Bangladesh voisin de près de 700.000 Rohingyas. Le Point
Fasciné depuis toujours par le bouddhisme, cette « religion athée qui permet le pessimisme », il est allé en Birmanie, à la rencontre d’Ashin Wirathu. Auprès de ce bonze plein de haine zen qui appelle à l’extermination des populations musulmanes, il boucle sa trilogie du mal, entamée en 1974 avec Général Idi Amin Dada et poursuivie en 2007 avec L’Avocat de la terreur. Selon Barbet Schroeder, le thème du mal est «inépuisable, inséparable de l’humanité, particulièrement pour le 20e siècle sans parler du 21e qui a l’air de vouloir faire de la haine et du mensonge des sujets incontournables». Au terme d’un tournage difficile, dangereux, prématurément interrompu par une situation de plus en plus instable en Birmanie, le cinéaste ramène Le Vénérable W., un documentaire édifiant et terrifiant. Contrairement à son habitude, Barbet Schroeder ne s’est pas contenté de filmer l’agent du mal et de laisser le spectateur découvrir la réalité dans son effrayante nudité. Parce que la Birmanie est méconnue, lointaine, et que la situation politique y est terriblement instable, entre la junte, la présidente Aung San Suu Kyi aux positions ambiguës, les Rohingyas, la minorité musulmane et une centaine d’autres ethnies, le cinéaste a rencontré des journalistes, des moines désapprouvant la croisade de Wirathu. Il a aussi ressemblé des documents d’archives, reportages TV ou fichiers de téléphone portables. Dès 2001, Wirathu prononce de virulents sermons islamophobes. En 2003, suite à des émeutes musulmanes, il est condamné à 25 ans de prison, dont il sort en 2012, suite à une amnistie générale. A la tête du mouvement 969, interdit en 2013 et aussitôt remplacé par Ma Ba Tha, il incite à la haine, monte en épingle des faits divers, propage des fake news. Il affirme que les musulmans (4% de la population birmane) qui «se reproduisent comme des lapins» (slogan dans une manifestation) mettent en péril l’équilibre de la nation. Des foules de moines en robe safran défilent, chantent des chanson nationalistes, éructent de haine, incendient les mosquées et tabassent les gens à mort, pendant que l’armée regarde à côté… Les maisons brûlent par milliers, des corps s’entassent sur des bûchers funéraires. Lorsqu’elles tombent entre les mains des fanatiques, toutes les religions tournent à l’horreur. Le film se termine sur les images d’une rue pakistanaise embrasée par la colère. Une guerre de religion entre bouddhiste et musulmans serait une belle façon de pepétuer au 21e siècle l’obscurantisme du Moyen Age… Le Temps
Le lieu commun veut que le bouddhisme échappe à toute violence. Découvert en Occident au XIXème siècle, il y est surtout perçu comme une philosophie reposant sur des pratiques spirituelles. Pourtant, depuis plusieurs années, cette image est mise à mal. En Birmanie, pays peuplé à 90% de bouddhistes, des moines développent des discours violents et extrémistes à l’encontre des musulmans. Parmi eux, le bonze Ashin Wirathu, surnommé le « Ben Laden » birman et leader d’un groupe nationaliste appelé Ma Ba Tha, « l’Association pour la protection de la race et de la religion ». Depuis août dernier, ces moines sont sous le feu des projecteurs en raison des atrocités commises contre les Rohingyas, minorité ethnique musulmane et apatride qui vit majoritairement dans l’État de l’Arakan, dans l’ouest du pays. (…) Partagée par 500 millions d’adeptes en Asie, cette religion, perçue en Occident de manière simpliste comme une philosophie non-violente reposant sur des pratiques comme la méditation, a en fait une réalité complexe. On ne peut pas parler du bouddhisme au singulier. Il existe en fait trois grandes écoles correspondant à trois zones géographiques bien distinctes. L’école Vajrayana, très minoritaire, est pratiquée au Tibet. C’est la plus connue en Occident. L’école Mahayana ou « bouddhisme du grand véhicule » est implantée en Corée, en Chine, au Japon et dans une grande partie du Vietnam. En Birmanie, comme en Thaïlande, au Laos, au Cambodge ou encore au Sri Lanka, on pratique le bouddhisme Theravada ou « bouddhisme du petit véhicule ». Le bouddhisme Theravada est aussi appelé « la voie des Anciens » : c’est l’école la plus ancienne et la plus proche du bouddhisme primitif. Ses adeptes suivent un enseignement traditionnel pour atteindre le Nirvana, étape de perfection ultime, qui se traduit par la capacité à se détacher de tout sentiment. Il s’agit de sortir du monde terrestre en se détachant des réalités « impermanentes », écrit Henri Tincq.« D’où le développement d’une spiritualité, dans le theravâda, du « non-attachement », puissante chez les moines, qui s’interdisent toute activité mondaine. » Les moines ne travaillent pas, ne se font pas à manger et dépendent ainsi complètement des dons de la population laïque. Face à cette population bouddhiste majoritaire, 6% des 53 millions de Birmans sont chrétiens et 4% sont musulmans. Dans les pays de tradition Theravada, les nations se sont souvent constituées en s’appuyant sur une légitimité religieuse. La Birmanie ne fait pas exception. « En 1980, le régime de Ne Win a recréé le Sangha, le clergé birman. Il en a centralisé l’administration et l’a placé sous l’autorité du pouvoir politique, rappelle l’anthropologue Bénédicte Brac de la Perrière. Plus tard, les militaires ont utilisé la religion pour justifier leur présence au pouvoir. » Ainsi, quand bien même les moines birmans ne devraient pas participer à la vie politique du pays, leur clergé est bel et bien politisé. Ce constat fait, il est plus simple de comprendre le développement d’un discours nationaliste parmi les moines. « Il y a des liens fermement établis entre les nationalismes sud-asiatiques et le bouddhisme, depuis le mouvement de décolonisation du XIXe siècle, et dès le début du XXe siècle un peu partout en Asie du Sud-Est », explique l’anthropologue Lionel Obadia. En 2007, lors de la « Révolution de Safran », des manifestations de moines sont réprimées violemment par l’armée pour avoir protesté pacifiquement contre la hausse des prix initiée par la junte militaire. Pour l’universitaire britannique Paul Fuller, spécialisé dans l’étude du bouddhisme, cela participe encore à renforcer le lien entre nationalisme et bouddhisme. « Jusqu’alors, pour la majorité des Birmans, être un bon bouddhiste, c’était respecter les doctrines du calme mental, du non-attachement et de la compassion, explique Paul Fuller dans un entretien à Asialyst. La Révolution de Safran montre au grand jour l’implication politique des moines et fait naître une nouvelle idée : pour être un bon bouddhiste, il faut aussi agir pour le bien de son pays. » De là se répand une théorie : pour être un bon birman, il faut être un bon bouddhiste. « Les nationalistes s’appuient sur cette idée pour justifier leurs violences : ils luttent pour la protection du bouddhisme et donc, a fortiori, pour la culture birmane. » Enfin, depuis 2011 et l’arrivée au pouvoir du gouvernement de Thein Sein puis, de façon encore plus frappante depuis 2015 et l’arrivée au pouvoir d’Aung San Suu Kyi, les discours nationalistes se font de plus en plus visibles. Pour cause, les mutations politiques et l’ouverture du pays après des années de repli sur lui-même ont entraîné une perte de repères pour la population et renforce la peur d’une disparition progressive de la culture birmane. Par ailleurs, les discours nationalistes sont désormais diffusés beaucoup plus amplement au sein de la population du fait de la démocratisation de l’usage des réseaux sociaux, qui permet de faire transmettre des messages jusqu’alors passés sous silence. (…) En 2011, des affiches et des autocollants portant l’inscription « 969 » apparaissent un peu partout en Birmanie. Ces chiffres, qui font référence aux trois joyaux du Bouddha, donnent leur nom à un mouvement nationaliste et anti-islamique dirigé par un moine de Mandalay, Ashin Wirathu. À travers cette campagne d’affichage, le bonze incite les Birmans à acheter uniquement dans des magasins tenus par des bouddhistes et à boycotter ceux tenus par des musulmans. Alors que le mouvement se répand, des violences à l’encontre des musulmans touchent l’ensemble du pays. En mars 2013, des émeutes éclatent à Meiktila, dans le centre du pays. Pendant trois jours, des magasins et des habitations appartenant à des musulmans sont saccagés. 40 personnes sont tuées. D’autres émeutes similaires ont lieu dans la région de Bagan puis de Rangoun. Jugé responsable de ces violences, le mouvement « 969 » est interdit. Les leaders ne l’entendent pas de cette oreille. En 2013, peu après l’interdiction du mouvement 969, émerge un groupe nommé Ma Ba Tha, ou « Association pour la protection de la race ou de la religion ». Grâce à des centaines de cellules qui quadrillent le territoire national, Ma Ba Tha devient rapidement le plus important des groupes nationalistes bouddhistes. À l’approche des élections législatives de 2015, Ma Ba Tha parvient à développer un réel pouvoir politique. Grâce à un fort lobbying, il fait passer quatre lois entre mai et août, en pleine campagne pour les élections. Ces lois, qui visent clairement les musulmans, permettent un contrôle des naissances dans certaines régions et pour certaines minorités ethniques. Pour se convertir à une autre religion que le bouddhisme ou pour se marier avec une non bouddhiste, il faudra désormais l’accord des autorités locales. Enfin, la polygamie et l’infidélité sont interdites et passibles d’emprisonnement. Plusieurs ONG, comme Human Rights Watch, dénoncent alors des lois « discriminatoires » qui « ignorent les droits humains fondamentaux ». En Birmanie, leur adoption entraîne un mois de festivités organisées par Ma Ba Tha. A noter que maintenant, il faut nommer Ma Ba Tha, la fondation philanthropique Buddhadhamma. L’été dernier, le conseil des grands maîtres du Sangha Maha Nayaka, dont les membres sont choisis par le gouvernement, a demandé à Ma Ba Tha de cesser toutes activités. Les moines leaders ont refusé d’obtempérer et ont simplement changé de nouveau le nom de leur organisation. (….) Une théorie persiste dans l’esprit de nombreux Birmans depuis le début des années 1990 : l’Islam mettrait en péril le bouddhisme. « De nombreux moines et politiciens birmans ont inlassablement répété ces dernières années que l’Islam, perçu comme expansionniste, est une menace. L’Islam écraserait une culture bouddhiste fragile et la société s’en retrouverait ébranlée », explique le journaliste Francis Wade à Asialyst, auteur de l’ouvrage Myanmar’s Enemy Within: Buddhist Violence and the Making of a Muslim « Other ». En mars 2011, la destruction des bouddhas de Bamiyan, en Afghanistan, par des Talibans afghans, renforce encore cette thèse. Les Musulmans sont ainsi perçus comme un ennemi intérieur qui viole les femmes, qui les force à se marier et à se convertir à l’Islam, qui vole les terres des bouddhistes, etc. « Il faut resituer ces discours dans le contexte planétaire, de la progression de l’islamophobie. Une idée s’est installée en Birmanie, selon laquelle le bouddhisme des origines s’inscrivait dans une aire géographique comprenant une large partie de l’Asie, de l’Afghanistan à la Malaisie, englobant l’Inde, et qu’il ne concerne plus aujourd’hui que l’Asie du Sud-Est et le Sri Lanka pour la branche du Theravada, du fait de la pression de l’Islam », explique l’anthropologue Bénédicte Brac de la Perrière. (…) Cette peur est exacerbée depuis l’arrivée au pouvoir d’Aung San Suu Kyi. Ma Ba Tha considère que la Prix Nobel de la Paix est « soumise » aux désirs de la communauté internationale et qu’elle souhaite privilégier les minorités religieuses et ethniques au détriment de la foi bouddhiste et des « vrais » Birmans (…)  L’État de l’Arakan, où vivent des milliers de Rohingyas musulmans, symbolise la frontière entre l’Asie bouddhiste et l’Asie musulmane. De nombreux Birmans pensent ainsi que si les bouddhistes de l’Arakan ne protègent pas leurs frontières et n’empêchent pas les Musulmans d’entrer, alors la Birmanie et le reste de l’Asie du Sud-Est deviendra inévitablement musulmane. Depuis 1982, les Rohingyas sont d’ailleurs considérés comme des immigrés illégaux et on leur refuse la citoyenneté. Ils sont apatrides. En août dernier, le Haut-Commissariat de l’ONU dénonçait ainsi des décennies de « violations persistantes et systématiques des droits de l’homme » envers les Rohingyas. L’ethnie n’est pas la seule visée. Depuis 2011, le sentiment anti-musulman s’est développé sur l’ensemble du territoire comme l’ont montré les campagnes d’affichage du mouvements « 969 » et les violentes manifestations qui suivirent visant ouvertement les musulmans. La crise qui touche actuellement les Rohingyas n’est cependant pas qu’un conflit religieux. Les Rohingyas sont perçus comme une menace pour la sécurité intérieure du pays. L’attaque de postes-frontières par des rebelles de l’Armée du salut des Rohingyas de l’Arakan (ARSA) à la frontière entre la Birmanie et le Bangladesh, qui a fait douze morts en août dernier, a renforcé cette perception. C’est d’ailleurs cet événement qui a mis le feu aux poudres et entraîné une vague de répression sans précédent de la communauté. Au moins 354 villages rohingyas ont été partiellement ou entièrement détruits depuis le 25 août, selon Human Rights Watch. L’ONU, de son côté, dénonce des exactions perpétrées par l’armée birmane. Au total, près de 650 000 Rohingyas ont fui le pays et s’entassent désormais dans des camps au Bangladesh souffrant de malnutrition sévère. (…) Un « Ben Laden », un « Hitler », le « visage de la haine » : voilà les surnoms du moine Ashin Wirathu, une figure tutélaire de Ma Ba Tha. Depuis 2001, le moine de 48 ans déverse sa haine contre les musulmans. Très actif sur les réseaux sociaux, il inonde ses pages de messages où il accuse les musulmans de meurtre ou de viol sans la moindre preuve. (…) Le bonze n’est jamais avare en outrances. Cette réputation sulfureuse lui a valu de faire la Une du Time en 2013. Le journal titrait alors, à côté de son portrait, « Le visage de la terreur bouddhiste ». Plus récemment, Wirathu a été l’objet d’un documentaire de Barbet Schroeder, Le vénérable W, où le réalisateur essaie de comprendre comment un moine censé prôner la compassion et la tolérance peut tomber dans la haine. Dans le documentaire de Shroeder, le bonze apparaît en 2003 en train de distribuer des tracts à des jeunes à Kyauske, sa ville natale. Quelques semaines plus tard, des émeutes éclatent dans la ville faisant onze morts. Wirathu est arrêté et condamné à 25 ans de prison pour incitation à la haine. Il est amnistié en 2012 par le nouveau gouvernement civil du président Thein Sein. Dès sa sortie, il lance le mouvement « 969 ». S’appuyant sur des images d’archives et des interviews du bonze, le documentaire montre un Wirathu qui voue un quasi-culte à Donald Trump et espère convaincre des dangers de l’Islam à travers le monde. Cet été, alors que le documentaire sort en salles en France, Wirathu, lui, connaît des difficultés dans son pays. Fin janvier 2017, il est allé trop loin : après le meurtre d’un avocat musulman et conseiller juridique de la Ligue nationale pour la démocratie d’Aung San Suu Kyi, il a remercié les quatre suspects du meurtre sur sa page Facebook et s’est dit « soulagé pour l’avenir du bouddhisme dans son pays ». En mars dernier, le clergé bouddhiste a soumis le bonze au silence. Il a désormais interdiction de « se livrer à des sermons à travers la Birmanie jusqu’au 9 mars 2018 ». Depuis, le moine apparait en public la bouche recouverte d’un adhésif. (…) Il faut nuancer le pouvoir réel de Ma Ba Tha qui, même s’il est influent, reste un groupe minoritaire dans un pays où le clergé est, certes conservateur, mais pas ouvertement xénophobe. Il est perçu, avant tout, comme un mouvement destiné à la protection et à la promotion du bouddhisme dans un pays en pleine mutation et grâce à cela, il jouit d’une image positive au sein de la population. Dans un rapport de l’International Crisis Group publié en septembre dernier, le think tank américain rappelle que, pour beaucoup de Birmans, diffuser les valeurs du bouddhisme (compassion, charité, etc.) permettrait d’établir la paix entre les ethnies. C’est donc un paradoxe : les détracteurs dénoncent un groupe promouvant des discours de haine, tandis que les défenseurs vantent un mouvement promouvant la paix. Par ailleurs, beaucoup adhèrent au mouvement pour ses nombreuses actions sociales sans adhérer aux discours nationalistes qui y sont prêchés. Ma Ba Tha est en effet parvenu à rassembler de nombreux soutiens en s’affirmant comme un véritable acteur social en Birmanie. La charité a toujours été une valeur bouddhiste : les moines ont un rôle d’accueil et d’aide aux pauvres, aux personnes âgées et aux malades. Lors des importantes inondations dans le nord du pays en 2015, les membres de Ma Ba Tha ont apporté une aide conséquente aux populations en organisant des levée de fonds ou en se rendant au chevet des victimes. De même, le groupe a financé en partie la restauration de pagodes détruites à Bagan lors d’un tremblement de terre en 2016. L’association est aussi connue pour ses nombreuses actions en faveur de l’éducation. Elle a permis la construction de plusieurs écoles Dhamma. Ces « écoles du dimanche » délivrent un enseignement bouddhiste aux enfants, notamment à travers l’apprentissage du pâli, la langue des textes anciens. Enfin, cela peut étonner : Ma Ba Tha compte de nombreuses femmes dans ses rangs. Ces dernières sont engagées dans des grandes campagnes d’information pour sensibiliser les femmes des zones rurales sur leurs droits en matière de mariage et de pratiques religieuses. Beaucoup affirment donc intégrer Ma Ba Tha pour des raisons féministes. Dans certaines régions où les populations se sentent délaissées par le gouvernement sur l’éducation ou la santé, Ma Ba Tha devient ainsi la meilleure solution alternative. (…)  Le gouvernement d’Aung San Suu Kyi a mis en oeuvre des efforts considérables pour tenter de faire taire les voix nationalistes. Preuve en est, il a poussé le clergé birman à interdire le mouvement « 969 » puis plus récemment Ma Ba Tha. Il faut dire que la Prix Nobel de la Paix est souvent la cible des critiques de ces moines nationalistes qui lui reprochent de servir les intérêts de la communauté internationale avant ceux de son pays. Ils critiquent ses discours de réconciliation nationale qu’ils voient comme une porte ouverte aux dérives islamiques mettant en péril de bouddhisme. Lors des élections de 2015, la plupart des dirigeants de Ma Ba Tha n’ont pas officiellement affirmé leur soutien à un candidat. En revanche, le président de l’association de l’époque, Ashin Thiloka, avait appelé à voter pour le candidat qui « protégerait les lois sur la race et la religion ». Ashin Wirathu, lui, avait explicitement appelé à voter pour le Parti de l’Union et du Développement, principal rival de la Ligue nationale pour la Démocratie. Les efforts du gouvernement sont néanmoins restés inefficaces. Dès l’interdiction de Ma Ba Tha, le mouvement est réapparu sous un nouveau nom. Ashin Wirathu a interdiction de prêcher, il diffuse donc de vieux enregistrement de ses discours lors de meetings… Selon l’International Crisis Group, ces interdictions gouvernementales permettent même de mettre de l’eau au moulin de Wirathu. « Chaque fois que le gouvernement interdit un de ces groupes, la théorie du bouddhisme en danger se renforce donnant plus de légitimité aux discours nationalistes. Au lieu d’être sur la défensive, le gouvernement devrait redéfinir la place du bouddhisme dans la Birmanie actuelle », analyse le think tank. (…)  Lorsqu’Ashin Wirathu lance sa campagne « 969′, des moines créent au Sri Lanka le parti Bodu Bala Sena (BBS), « Force du pouvoir bouddhiste ». Comme Ma Ba Tha, ils développent une rhétorique violente à l’encontre de l’Islam. Dans le pays, la plupart des bouddhistes appartiennent à l’ethnie cingalaise qui représente les trois quarts de la population. « Le pays appartient aux Cingalais, ce sont eux qui ont créé cette civilisation et sa culture ! explique un moine membre du mouvement à la BBC. Nous devons rendre le pays aux Cingalais. Nous nous battrons jusqu’au bout. » Ma Ba Tha et le BBS s’affichent d’ailleurs comme des alliés : en 2014, Wirathu avait reçu un accueil triomphal à Colombo de la part des moines du BBS. Les idées de Ma Ba Tha trouvent aussi un écho en Thaïlande où le sud du pays est en proie à une rébellion séparatiste musulmane. Certains moines ont ainsi à plusieurs reprises mis en avant le « danger de l’islam », appelant à faire du bouddhisme une religion d’État. Quelques-uns de ces religieux ont d’ailleurs appelé à réserver aux musulmans séparatistes du sud du pays « le même sort qu’aux Rohingyas ». (…) Figure iconique du bouddhisme et chef spirituel des bouddhistes tibétains, le Dalaï-lama n’a aucune autorité sur les pratiquants de l’école Theravâda. Il n’est donc qu’une voix de la communauté internationale parmi tant d’autres. En juillet 2014, il avait condamné Ma Ba Tha et son homologue sri-lankais BBS, exhortant « les bouddhistes de ces pays à avoir à l’esprit l’image du Bouddha avant de commettre ces crimes ». Et d’ajouter : « Le Bouddha prêche l’amour et la compassion. Si le Bouddha était là, il protégerait les musulmans des attaques des bouddhistes. » En septembre dernier, lui qui ne s’est pas rendu en Birmanie depuis l’arrivée au pouvoir d’Aung San Suu Kyi, a explicitement pris la défense des Rohingyas, plaidant que Bouddha aurait « aidé ces pauvres Musulmans ». Un mois plus tard, une autre voix religieuse s’est exprimée sur le sujet : le Pape François. En visite pour la première fois en Birmanie, il a prononcé un discours très engagé devant des représentants politiques et de la société civile. Il a appelé à « construire un ordre social juste, réconcilié et inclusif » qui garantit « le respect des droits de tous ceux qui considèrent cette terre comme leur maison. (…) François avait au préalable accepté de ne pas prononcer le mot « Rohingya », sur la demande expresse des catholiques birmans, par peur des représailles. Cyrielle Cabot

Attention: une religion de paix peut en cacher une autre !

En ces temps proprement apocalyptiques

Où semblent vouloir se rappeler de plus en plus régulièrement à notre bon souvenir …

Tant le climat et son désormais légendaire « changement » ou, de la Californie à la Sicile, les plaques tectoniques elle-mêmes …

Que, précisément sur les lignes de fracture entre islam et les autres grandes religions, d’israël à la Birmanie mais aussi au Sri Lanka et en Thaïlande et sans compter chiisme et sunnisme, les mouvements tectoniques religieux …

A l’heure où du Yemen à la Syrie, au Liban et en Israël et entre deux annonces de rayage de la carte, la Révolution islamique continue à mettre l’ensemble du Moyen-Orient à feu et à sang …

Ou entre destructions de bouddhas ou d’églises, décapitations en direct, crucifixions et mise en esclavage sexuel et de la Syrie à l’Irak, l’Afghanistan ou le Sri Lanka, la religion d’amour, de tolérance et de paix poursuit sa marche expansionniste …

Et où en Occident, les mêmes parangons de vertu progressiste qui au nom de la défense de l’environnement appellent à la restriction démographique en Europe commanditent, entre mariage, PMA et bientôt GPA pour tous ou au nom des droits des animaux attaques de laboratoires ou de boucheries, des bateaux pour aider les trafiquants humains à approvisonner les eros centers de Rome ou de Berlin …

Ou les mêmes belles âmes qui vivent grassement de la représentation cinématographique, numérique ou médiatique de la violence …

Comme de l’exploitation de la main d’oeuvre bon marché qui avec leurs encouragements déferle désormais sans contrôle sur nos plages et nos frontières …

Nous font la morale sur nos prétendues crispations et manque d’ouverture face à la destruction non seulement, comme nous en avertissait tout récemment encore le Dalai Lama, de nombre de nos emploi mais, entre deux attentats ou agressons sexuelles, de nos modes de vie et cultures …

Comment ne pas voir …

Les limites des prétendues analyses de nos médias, anthropologues ou documentaristes

Qui après avoir, contre toute évidence historique, réduit le bouddhisme à la religion par excellence de la paix …

Nous présentent sauf rares exceptions l’actuel conflit interethnique en Birmanie …

Entre une majorité dont l’aversion au sang versé va jusqu’à la vénération de « vaches sacrées » …

Et une minorité éleveuse de bétail toujours adepte des sacrifices sanglants …

Comme au moment où la croix gammée bascule est sur le point de basculer du côté de sa forme inversée nazie, le simple dévoiement d’un bouddhisme par essence pacifique par la figure tristement célèbre du moine Ashin Wirathu

Tout récemment visé, après son instrumentalisation par la junte au pouvoir, par un mandat d’arrêt pour sédition par son propre gouvernement …

Et qualifié alternativement dans les médias occidentaux de « Ben Laden birman », « Hitler bouddhiste », « visage du terrorisme bouddhiste », « haine en robe safran » ou « fan de Trump » …

Face aux nouveaux juifs et victimes, entre deux attaques de postes-frontières par d’un groupe de rebelles dit « de l’Armée du salut »,  d’une « progression planétaire de l’islamophobie » ?

Cyrielle Cabot

Asialyst

Le lieu commun veut que le bouddhisme échappe à toute violence. Découvert en Occident au XIXème siècle, il y est surtout perçu comme une philosophie reposant sur des pratiques spirituelles. Pourtant, depuis plusieurs années, cette image est mise à mal. En Birmanie, pays peuplé à 90% de bouddhistes, des moines développent des discours violents et extrémistes à l’encontre des musulmans. Parmi eux, le bonze Ashin Wirathu, surnommé le « Ben Laden » birman et leader d’un groupe nationaliste appelé Ma Ba Tha, « l’Association pour la protection de la race et de la religion ». Depuis août dernier, ces moines sont sous le feu des projecteurs en raison des atrocités commises contre les Rohingyas, minorité ethnique musulmane et apatride qui vit majoritairement dans l’État de l’Arakan, dans l’ouest du pays. Quelles sont les caractéristiques du bouddhisme pratiqué en Birmanie ? Comment expliquer le développement de ce discours radical ? Quelle est la réponse du gouvernement d’Aung San Suu Kyi ?

1. Qu’est ce que le bouddhisme Theravada, la religion majoritaire de Birmanie ?

En Birmanie, 90% de la population est de confession bouddhiste. Partagée par 500 millions d’adeptes en Asie, cette religion, perçue en Occident de manière simpliste comme une philosophie non-violente reposant sur des pratiques comme la méditation, a en fait une réalité complexe.
On ne peut pas parler du bouddhisme au singulier. Il existe en fait trois grandes écoles correspondant à trois zones géographiques bien distinctes. L’école Vajrayana, très minoritaire, est pratiquée au Tibet. C’est la plus connue en Occident. L’école Mahayana ou « bouddhisme du grand véhicule » est implantée en Corée, en Chine, au Japon et dans une grande partie du Vietnam. En Birmanie, comme en Thaïlande, au Laos, au Cambodge ou encore au Sri Lanka, on pratique le bouddhisme Theravada ou « bouddhisme du petit véhicule ».
Le bouddhisme Theravada est aussi appelé « la voie des Anciens » : c’est l’école la plus ancienne et la plus proche du bouddhisme primitif. Ses adeptes suivent un enseignement traditionnel pour atteindre le Nirvana, étape de perfection ultime, qui se traduit par la capacité à se détacher de tout sentiment. Il s’agit de sortir du monde terrestre en se détachant des réalités « impermanentes », écrit Henri Tincq.« D’où le développement d’une spiritualité, dans le theravâda, du « non-attachement », puissante chez les moines, qui s’interdisent toute activité mondaine. » Les moines ne travaillent pas, ne se font pas à manger et dépendent ainsi complètement des dons de la population laïque.
Face à cette population bouddhiste majoritaire, 6% des 53 millions de Birmans sont chrétiens et 4% sont musulmans.

2. Comment le bouddhisme s’est-il radicalisé ?

Dans les pays de tradition Theravada, les nations se sont souvent constituées en s’appuyant sur une légitimité religieuse. La Birmanie ne fait pas exception. « En 1980, le régime de Ne Win a recréé le Sangha, le clergé birman. Il en a centralisé l’administration et l’a placé sous l’autorité du pouvoir politique, rappelle l’anthropologue Bénédicte Brac de la Perrière. Plus tard, les militaires ont utilisé la religion pour justifier leur présence au pouvoir. » Ainsi, quand bien même les moines birmans ne devraient pas participer à la vie politique du pays, leur clergé est bel et bien politisé.
Ce constat fait, il est plus simple de comprendre le développement d’un discours nationaliste parmi les moines. « Il y a des liens fermement établis entre les nationalismes sud-asiatiques et le bouddhisme, depuis le mouvement de décolonisation du XIXe siècle, et dès le début du XXe siècle un peu partout en Asie du Sud-Est », explique l’anthropologue Lionel Obadia. En 2007, lors de la « Révolution de Safran », des manifestations de moines sont réprimées violemment par l’armée pour avoir protesté pacifiquement contre la hausse des prix initiée par la junte militaire. Pour l’universitaire britannique Paul Fuller, spécialisé dans l’étude du bouddhisme, cela participe encore à renforcer le lien entre nationalisme et bouddhisme. « Jusqu’alors, pour la majorité des Birmans, être un bon bouddhiste, c’était respecter les doctrines du calme mental, du non-attachement et de la compassion, explique Paul Fuller dans un entretien à Asialyst. La Révolution de Safran montre au grand jour l’implication politique des moines et fait naître une nouvelle idée : pour être un bon bouddhiste, il faut aussi agir pour le bien de son pays. » De là se répand une théorie : pour être un bon birman, il faut être un bon bouddhiste. « Les nationalistes s’appuient sur cette idée pour justifier leurs violences : ils luttent pour la protection du bouddhisme et donc, a fortiori, pour la culture birmane. »
Enfin, depuis 2011 et l’arrivée au pouvoir du gouvernement de Thein Sein puis, de façon encore plus frappante depuis 2015 et l’arrivée au pouvoir d’Aung San Suu Kyi, les discours nationalistes se font de plus en plus visibles. Pour cause, les mutations politiques et l’ouverture du pays après des années de repli sur lui-même ont entraîné une perte de repères pour la population et renforce la peur d’une disparition progressive de la culture birmane. Par ailleurs, les discours nationalistes sont désormais diffusés beaucoup plus amplement au sein de la population du fait de la démocratisation de l’usage des réseaux sociaux, qui permet de faire transmettre des messages jusqu’alors passés sous silence.

3. Comment est né Ma Ba Tha, le principal groupe radical bouddhiste ?

*Matthew Walton and Susan Hayward, « Contesting Buddhist Narratives: Democratization, Nationalism, and Communal Violence in Myanmar », in Policy Studies n°71, East-West Center, Honolulu, Hawaï.

En 2011, des affiches et des autocollants portant l’inscription « 969 » apparaissent un peu partout en Birmanie. Ces chiffres, qui font référence aux trois joyaux du Bouddha, donnent leur nom à un mouvement nationaliste et anti-islamique dirigé par un moine de Mandalay, Ashin Wirathu. À travers cette campagne d’affichage, le bonze incite les Birmans à acheter uniquement dans des magasins tenus par des bouddhistes et à boycotter ceux tenus par des musulmans. Alors que le mouvement se répand, des violences à l’encontre des musulmans touchent l’ensemble du pays. En mars 2013, des émeutes éclatent à Meiktila, dans le centre du pays. Pendant trois jours, des magasins et des habitations appartenant à des musulmans sont saccagés. 40 personnes sont tuées. D’autres émeutes similaires ont lieu dans la région de Bagan puis de Rangoun. Jugé responsable de ces violences, le mouvement « 969 » est interdit. Les leaders ne l’entendent pas de cette oreille. En 2013, peu après l’interdiction du mouvement 969, émerge un groupe nommé Ma Ba Tha, ou « Association pour la protection de la race ou de la religion ». Grâce à des centaines de cellules qui quadrillent le territoire national, Ma Ba Tha devient rapidement le plus important des groupes nationalistes bouddhistes*.

À l’approche des élections législatives de 2015, Ma Ba Tha parvient à développer un réel pouvoir politique. Grâce à un fort lobbying, il fait passer quatre lois entre mai et août, en pleine campagne pour les élections. Ces lois, qui visent clairement les musulmans, permettent un contrôle des naissances dans certaines régions et pour certaines minorités ethniques. Pour se convertir à une autre religion que le bouddhisme ou pour se marier avec une non bouddhiste, il faudra désormais l’accord des autorités locales. Enfin, la polygamie et l’infidélité sont interdites et passibles d’emprisonnement. Plusieurs ONG, comme Human Rights Watch, dénoncent alors des lois « discriminatoires » qui « ignorent les droits humains fondamentaux ». En Birmanie, leur adoption entraîne un mois de festivités organisées par Ma Ba Tha.
A noter que maintenant, il faut nommer Ma Ba Tha, la fondation philanthropique Buddhadhamma. L’été dernier, le conseil des grands maîtres du Sangha Maha Nayaka, dont les membres sont choisis par le gouvernement, a demandé à Ma Ba Tha de cesser toutes activités. Les moines leaders ont refusé d’obtempérer et ont simplement changé de nouveau le nom de leur organisation.

4. Pourquoi les bouddhistes birmans s’en prennent-ils aux Musulmans ?

Une théorie persiste dans l’esprit de nombreux Birmans depuis le début des années 1990 : l’Islam mettrait en péril le bouddhisme. « De nombreux moines et politiciens birmans ont inlassablement répété ces dernières années que l’Islam, perçu comme expansionniste, est une menace. L’Islam écraserait une culture bouddhiste fragile et la société s’en retrouverait ébranlée », explique le journaliste Francis Wade à Asialyst, auteur de l’ouvrage Myanmar’s Enemy Within: Buddhist Violence and the Making of a Muslim « Other ». En mars 2011, la destruction des bouddhas de Bamiyan, en Afghanistan, par des Talibans afghans, renforce encore cette thèse. Les Musulmans sont ainsi perçus comme un ennemi intérieur qui viole les femmes, qui les force à se marier et à se convertir à l’Islam, qui vole les terres des bouddhistes, etc.
« Il faut resituer ces discours dans le contexte planétaire, de la progression de l’islamophobie. Une idée s’est installée en Birmanie, selon laquelle le bouddhisme des origines s’inscrivait dans une aire géographique comprenant une large partie de l’Asie, de l’Afghanistan à la Malaisie, englobant l’Inde, et qu’il ne concerne plus aujourd’hui que l’Asie du Sud-Est et le Sri Lanka pour la branche du Theravada, du fait de la pression de l’Islam », explique l’anthropologue Bénédicte Brac de la Perrière. « Le groupe « 969 » fait partie de mouvements réactionnels liés à des problèmes identitaires. On a le sentiment d’être agressé par des marges, on réagit en se protégeant. C’est une manière de se définir contre l’autre. Le bouddhisme est dans ce cas une arme symbolique », résume ainsi Raphaël Logier, directeur de l’Observatoire du religieux à l’IEP d’Aix-en-Provence.
Cette peur est exacerbée depuis l’arrivée au pouvoir d’Aung San Suu Kyi. Ma Ba Tha considère que la Prix Nobel de la Paix est « soumise » aux désirs de la communauté internationale et qu’elle souhaite privilégier les minorités religieuses et ethniques au détriment de la foi bouddhiste et des « vrais » Birmans.

5. Pourquoi les Rohingyas cristallisent-ils cette haine contre les musulmans ?

L’État de l’Arakan, où vivent des milliers de Rohingyas musulmans, symbolise la frontière entre l’Asie bouddhiste et l’Asie musulmane. De nombreux Birmans pensent ainsi que si les bouddhistes de l’Arakan ne protègent pas leurs frontières et n’empêchent pas les Musulmans d’entrer, alors la Birmanie et le reste de l’Asie du Sud-Est deviendra inévitablement musulmane. Depuis 1982, les Rohingyas sont d’ailleurs considérés comme des immigrés illégaux et on leur refuse la citoyenneté. Ils sont apatrides. En août dernier, le Haut-Commissariat de l’ONU dénonçait ainsi des décennies de « violations persistantes et systématiques des droits de l’homme » envers les Rohingyas. L’ethnie n’est pas la seule visée. Depuis 2011, le sentiment anti-musulman s’est développé sur l’ensemble du territoire comme l’ont montré les campagnes d’affichage du mouvements « 969 » et les violentes manifestations qui suivirent visant ouvertement les musulmans.
La crise qui touche actuellement les Rohingyas n’est cependant pas qu’un conflit religieux. Les Rohingyas sont perçus comme une menace pour la sécurité intérieure du pays. L’attaque de postes-frontières par des rebelles de l’Armée du salut des Rohingyas de l’Arakan (ARSA) à la frontière entre la Birmanie et le Bangladesh, qui a fait douze morts en août dernier, a renforcé cette perception. C’est d’ailleurs cet événement qui a mis le feu aux poudres et entraîné une vague de répression sans précédent de la communauté. Au moins 354 villages rohingyas ont été partiellement ou entièrement détruits depuis le 25 août, selon Human Rights Watch. L’ONU, de son côté, dénonce des exactions perpétrées par l’armée birmane. Au total, près de 650 000 Rohingyas ont fui le pays et s’entassent désormais dans des camps au Bangladesh souffrant de malnutrition sévère.

6. Qui est Ashin Wirathu, le « Ben Laden » birman ?

Un « Ben Laden », un « Hitler », le « visage de la haine » : voilà les surnoms du moine Ashin Wirathu, une figure tutélaire de Ma Ba Tha. Depuis 2001, le moine de 48 ans déverse sa haine contre les musulmans. Très actif sur les réseaux sociaux, il inonde ses pages de messages où il accuse les musulmans de meurtre ou de viol sans la moindre preuve. Lors de ses prêches au vitriol, on peut entendre : « Vaut-il mieux épouser un clochard ou un musulman ? » Réponse : « Un clochard ! » Et d’ajouter : « Et vaut-il mieux se marier avec un chien ou avec un musulman ? » Réponse : « Un chien, car, contrairement au musulman, un chien ne vous demandera jamais de changer de religion… » Le bonze n’est jamais avare en outrances. Cette réputation sulfureuse lui a valu de faire la Une du Time en 2013. Le journal titrait alors, à côté de son portrait, « Le visage de la terreur bouddhiste ». Plus récemment, Wirathu a été l’objet d’un documentaire de Barbet Schroeder, Le vénérable W, où le réalisateur essaie de comprendre comment un moine censé prôner la compassion et la tolérance peut tomber dans la haine.
Dans le documentaire de Shroeder, le bonze apparaît en 2003 en train de distribuer des tracts à des jeunes à Kyauske, sa ville natale. Quelques semaines plus tard, des émeutes éclatent dans la ville faisant onze morts. Wirathu est arrêté et condamné à 25 ans de prison pour incitation à la haine. Il est amnistié en 2012 par le nouveau gouvernement civil du président Thein Sein. Dès sa sortie, il lance le mouvement « 969 ». S’appuyant sur des images d’archives et des interviews du bonze, le documentaire montre un Wirathu qui voue un quasi-culte à Donald Trump et espère convaincre des dangers de l’Islam à travers le monde.
Cet été, alors que le documentaire sort en salles en France, Wirathu, lui, connaît des difficultés dans son pays. Fin janvier 2017, il est allé trop loin : après le meurtre d’un avocat musulman et conseiller juridique de la Ligue nationale pour la démocratie d’Aung San Suu Kyi, il a remercié les quatre suspects du meurtre sur sa page Facebook et s’est dit « soulagé pour l’avenir du bouddhisme dans son pays ». En mars dernier, le clergé bouddhiste a soumis le bonze au silence. Il a désormais interdiction de « se livrer à des sermons à travers la Birmanie jusqu’au 9 mars 2018 ». Depuis, le moine apparait en public la bouche recouverte d’un adhésif.

7. Ces groupes radicaux ont-ils beaucoup d’adeptes ?

Il faut nuancer le pouvoir réel de Ma Ba Tha qui, même s’il est influent, reste un groupe minoritaire dans un pays où le clergé est, certes conservateur, mais pas ouvertement xénophobe. Il est perçu, avant tout, comme un mouvement destiné à la protection et à la promotion du bouddhisme dans un pays en pleine mutation et grâce à cela, il jouit d’une image positive au sein de la population. Dans un rapport de l’International Crisis Group publié en septembre dernier, le think tank américain rappelle que, pour beaucoup de Birmans, diffuser les valeurs du bouddhisme (compassion, charité, etc.) permettrait d’établir la paix entre les ethnies. C’est donc un paradoxe : les détracteurs dénoncent un groupe promouvant des discours de haine, tandis que les défenseurs vantent un mouvement promouvant la paix.
Par ailleurs, beaucoup adhèrent au mouvement pour ses nombreuses actions sociales sans adhérer aux discours nationalistes qui y sont prêchés. Ma Ba Tha est en effet parvenu à rassembler de nombreux soutiens en s’affirmant comme un véritable acteur social en Birmanie. La charité a toujours été une valeur bouddhiste : les moines ont un rôle d’accueil et d’aide aux pauvres, aux personnes âgées et aux malades. Lors des importantes inondations dans le nord du pays en 2015, les membres de Ma Ba Tha ont apporté une aide conséquente aux populations en organisant des levée de fonds ou en se rendant au chevet des victimes. De même, le groupe a financé en partie la restauration de pagodes détruites à Bagan lors d’un tremblement de terre en 2016.
L’association est aussi connue pour ses nombreuses actions en faveur de l’éducation. Elle a permis la construction de plusieurs écoles Dhamma. Ces « écoles du dimanche » délivrent un enseignement bouddhiste aux enfants, notamment à travers l’apprentissage du pâli, la langue des textes anciens. Enfin, cela peut étonner : Ma Ba Tha compte de nombreuses femmes dans ses rangs. Ces dernières sont engagées dans des grandes campagnes d’information pour sensibiliser les femmes des zones rurales sur leurs droits en matière de mariage et de pratiques religieuses. Beaucoup affirment donc intégrer Ma Ba Tha pour des raisons féministes. Dans certaines régions où les populations se sentent délaissées par le gouvernement sur l’éducation ou la santé, Ma Ba Tha devient ainsi la meilleure solution alternative.

8. Que fait le gouvernement d’Aung San Suu Kyi pour lutter contre ces groupes ?

Le gouvernement d’Aung San Suu Kyi a mis en oeuvre des efforts considérables pour tenter de faire taire les voix nationalistes. Preuve en est, il a poussé le clergé birman à interdire le mouvement « 969 » puis plus récemment Ma Ba Tha. Il faut dire que la Prix Nobel de la Paix est souvent la cible des critiques de ces moines nationalistes qui lui reprochent de servir les intérêts de la communauté internationale avant ceux de son pays. Ils critiquent ses discours de réconciliation nationale qu’ils voient comme une porte ouverte aux dérives islamiques mettant en péril de bouddhisme.
Lors des élections de 2015, la plupart des dirigeants de Ma Ba Tha n’ont pas officiellement affirmé leur soutien à un candidat. En revanche, le président de l’association de l’époque, Ashin Thiloka, avait appelé à voter pour le candidat qui « protégerait les lois sur la race et la religion ». Ashin Wirathu, lui, avait explicitement appelé à voter pour le Parti de l’Union et du Développement, principal rival de la Ligue nationale pour la Démocratie.
Les efforts du gouvernement sont néanmoins restés inefficaces. Dès l’interdiction de Ma Ba Tha, le mouvement est réapparu sous un nouveau nom. Ashin Wirathu a interdiction de prêcher, il diffuse donc de vieux enregistrement de ses discours lors de meetings… Selon l’International Crisis Group, ces interdictions gouvernementales permettent même de mettre de l’eau au moulin de Wirathu. « Chaque fois que le gouvernement interdit un de ces groupes, la théorie du bouddhisme en danger se renforce donnant plus de légitimité aux discours nationalistes. Au lieu d’être sur la défensive, le gouvernement devrait redéfinir la place du bouddhisme dans la Birmanie actuelle », analyse le think tank.

9. Existe-t-il des mouvements similaires dans d’autres pays asiatiques ?

*Mikael Gravers, « Anti-Muslim Buddhist Nationalism in Burma and Sri Lanka », in Contemporary Buddhism.

Lorsqu’Ashin Wirathu lance sa campagne « 969′, des moines créent au Sri Lanka le parti Bodu Bala Sena (BBS), « Force du pouvoir bouddhiste ». Comme Ma Ba Tha, ils développent une rhétorique violente à l’encontre de l’Islam. Dans le pays, la plupart des bouddhistes appartiennent à l’ethnie cingalaise qui représente les trois quarts de la population. « Le pays appartient aux Cingalais, ce sont eux qui ont créé cette civilisation et sa culture ! explique un moine membre du mouvement à la BBC. Nous devons rendre le pays aux Cingalais. Nous nous battrons jusqu’au bout. » Ma Ba Tha et le BBS s’affichent d’ailleurs comme des alliés : en 2014, Wirathu avait reçu un accueil triomphal à Colombo de la part des moines du BBS*.

Les idées de Ma Ba Tha trouvent aussi un écho en Thaïlande où le sud du pays est en proie à une rébellion séparatiste musulmane. Certains moines ont ainsi à plusieurs reprises mis en avant le « danger de l’islam », appelant à faire du bouddhisme une religion d’État. Quelques-uns de ces religieux ont d’ailleurs appelé à réserver aux musulmans séparatistes du sud du pays « le même sort qu’aux Rohingyas ».

10. Quelle est la position du Dalaï-lama ?

Figure iconique du bouddhisme et chef spirituel des bouddhistes tibétains, le Dalaï-lama n’a aucune autorité sur les pratiquants de l’école Theravâda. Il n’est donc qu’une voix de la communauté internationale parmi tant d’autres. En juillet 2014, il avait condamné Ma Ba Tha et son homologue sri-lankais BBS, exhortant « les bouddhistes de ces pays à avoir à l’esprit l’image du Bouddha avant de commettre ces crimes ». Et d’ajouter : « Le Bouddha prêche l’amour et la compassion. Si le Bouddha était là, il protégerait les musulmans des attaques des bouddhistes. » En septembre dernier, lui qui ne s’est pas rendu en Birmanie depuis l’arrivée au pouvoir d’Aung San Suu Kyi, a explicitement pris la défense des Rohingyas, plaidant que Bouddha aurait « aidé ces pauvres Musulmans ».
Un mois plus tard, une autre voix religieuse s’est exprimée sur le sujet : le Pape François. En visite pour la première fois en Birmanie, il a prononcé un discours très engagé devant des représentants politiques et de la société civile. Il a appelé à « construire un ordre social juste, réconcilié et inclusif » qui garantit « le respect des droits de tous ceux qui considèrent cette terre comme leur maison. (…) L’avenir de la Birmanie doit être la paix, une paix fondée sur le respect de la dignité et des droits de tout membre de la société, sur le respect de tout groupe ethnique et de son identité, sur le respect de l’Etat de droit et d’un ordre démocratique qui permette à chaque individu et à tout groupe – aucun n’étant exclu – d’offrir sa contribution légitime au bien commun », a insisté le Souverain Pontif. François avait au préalable accepté de ne pas prononcer le mot « Rohingya », sur la demande expresse des catholiques birmans, par peur des représailles.
A propos de l’auteur
Jeune journaliste diplômée de l’école du CELSA (Paris-Sorbonne), Cyrielle Cabot est passionnée par l’Asie du Sud-Est, en particulier la Thaïlande, la Birmanie et les questions de société. Elle est passée par l’Agence-France Presse à Bangkok, Libération et Le Monde.

Voir aussi:

Birmanie. Au cœur de la croisade antimusulmane des bouddhistes radicaux

Représentant à peine 5 % de la population, la minorité musulmane birmane fait l’objet d’une campagne de discrimination orchestrée par des bouddhistes radicaux. Ils réclament notamment la fermeture des abattoirs et commerces tenus par les musulmans.

En Birmanie, où la population est majoritairement bouddhiste, la minorité musulmane représente environ 5 % des habitants. Dans le delta de l’Irrawaddy, les musulmans vivent essentiellement des activités liées aux abattoirs et au commerce du bœuf. Actuellement, les entreprises musulmanes sont la cible de l’islamophobie que propagent les extrémistes bouddhistes, dont la voix a beaucoup gagné en puissance avec l’ouverture politique de la Birmanie.

Depuis fin 2013, une campagne soutenue par Ma Ba Tha [association birmane “pour la protection de la race et de la religion”, créée en juin 2013 – lire aussi encadré à la fin de l’article] a forcé à fermer des dizaines d’abattoirs et d’usines de transformation de viande tenus par des musulmans dans la région d’Ayeyarwady [région du sud de la Birmanie]. Des milliers de vaches ont été enlevées de force à leurs propriétaires musulmans. Les commerces de certains musulmans ont vu leurs revenus s’effondrer. Des documents officiels que nous avons obtenus et des entretiens avec des représentants de l’Etat révèlent que les hauts fonctionnaires soutiennent cette croisade.

Lwin Tun, 49 ans, a investi dans les secteurs du bâtiment, de l’immobilier et de l’hôtellerie, à la fois dans le delta et dans la région de Rangoon. Selon lui, les actions de Ma Ba Tha menacent gravement ses intérêts. “La campagne appelant à un boycott des entreprises gérées par des musulmans dure depuis quelque temps, affirme-t-il. Des tracts sont distribués. La police le sait, mais ne fait rien.

En 2014, en raison de la pénurie de bétail et du renforcement des restrictions gouvernementales, les populations musulmanes du delta de l’Irrawaddy n’ont pas pu fêter l’Aïd el-Kébir, lors duquel des vaches sont sacrifiées selon la tradition islamique. “Ces actions sont une infraction directe à nos droits religieux fondamentaux, martèle Al Haji Aye Lwin, responsable du Centre islamique de Rangoon. D’après moi, les entreprises [musulmanes] perdent dans l’ensemble 30 % de leur chiffre d’affaires.

Kyaw Sein Win, un porte-parole de Ma Ba Tha au siège de Rangoon, affirme que sauver des vies est un aspect central de la philosophie bouddhiste. “Nous ne ciblons pas délibérément les entreprises [musulmanes]. Ils tuent des animaux car ils pensent que cela les rend méritants. C’est la principale différence entre eux et nous”, a-t-il déclaré à Myanmar Now.

Minorité musulmane

L’appel à un boycott des entreprises musulmanes a reçu peu d’écho dans les villes, mais la campagne contre les sacrifices, qui repose sur l’aversion traditionnelle des bouddhistes pour l’abattage des vaches, a porté auprès des fidèles du delta de l’Irrawaddy. Dans cette région, cœur de la riziculture birmane, des dizaines de milliers de musulmans, pour la plupart commerçants en ville, vivent aux côtés d’environ six millions de riziculteurs, bouddhistes en majorité.

Traditionnellement, les agriculteurs birmans utilisent les vaches et les bœufs comme animaux de trait. Ils ne les vendent aux abattoirs que pour gagner rapidement une importante somme d’argent, en vue d’un mariage ou pour payer un traitement médical. Ma Ba Tha n’a pas demandé aux agriculteurs de ne plus vendre leur bétail. Sa stratégie consiste à s’emparer des licences des abattoirs.

En 2014, les moines radicaux du delta de l’Irrawaddy ont créé l’organisation Jivitadana Thetkal (“Sauver des vies”), qui appelle les monastères de la région à collecter chacun environ 100 dollars dans leur congrégation afin de permettre le rachat des licences. “Nous soutenons cette campagne menée par Jivitadana Thetkal, a déclaré le porte-parole Kyaw Sein Win. La plupart de ses membres appartiennent aussi à Ma Ba Tha, mais le siège ne leur donne aucune instruction directe.

Moines radicaux

Les moines bouddhistes radicaux ont prononcé des sermons enflammés dans les villages du delta pour propager l’idée que l’abattage de vaches constitue un affront au bouddhisme et participe de l’objectif musulman d’exterminer le bétail. “Soyons vigilants, avertissent les paroles d’une chanson jouée lors de ces manifestations. Moines bouddhistes et civils, ne soyez plus passifs. Si vous le restez, notre race et notre religion disparaîtront.

Pyinyeinda, 65 ans soutient le mouvement. “Notre région est confrontée au risque de perdre son bétail. Les kalars ont déjà tué des milliers de vaches”, affirme ce moine d’Athoke, employant un terme péjoratif pour qualifier les personnes qui ont des origines indiennes [les nationalistes contestent aux musulmans leurs origines birmanes]. “Vous savez pourquoi ? Ils s’entraînent pour nous égorger ensuite.”

Assis à un bureau sur lequel sont entassés de nombreux livres pour enfants qui reprennent les préceptes du Ma Ba Tha, le chef du gouvernement de la région d’Ayeyarwady, Thein Aung, reconnaît qu’il a approuvé la réduction de moitié du prix de vente des licences des abattoirs à l’organisation radicale et qu’il a soutenu ces opérations. Cet ancien général nommé à son poste par le président Thein Sein en 2011 précise :

En tant que bouddhiste, je m’oppose au massacre de bétail. Par conséquent, j’ai accepté les demandes des moines qui mènent cette campagne. Je les ai aidés à obtenir les licences des abattoirs” .

Il explique que son administration envoie des unités spéciales pour mener des arrestations si les militants signalent des infractions. Les membres de Ma Ba Tha ont ainsi commencé à surveiller les abattoirs et le transport de bétail en vue d’y faire des descentes. Ils dénoncent des infractions présumées aux licences qui limitent le nombre d’animaux pouvant être tués.

Un document officiel de 2014 donne l’ordre aux agents administratifs de 26 localités de coopérer avec les membres de Ma Ba Tha qui surveillent les abattoirs. Dans les villages et les petites villes du delta de l’Irrawaddy, rares sont ceux qui s’aventurent dans le dédale de rizières et de cours d’eau après la tombée de la nuit. Mais à Kyonpyaw, à 150 kilomètres environ de Rangoon, Win Shwe, un secrétaire local de Ma Ba Tha, agit de nuit avec la coopération d’un groupe de moines et de civils.

En 2014, le groupe a collecté environ 25 000 dollars grâce à des dons publics pour racheter six licences d’abattoirs, mais la plus chère de la ville restait inabordable. Pour atteindre leur objectif, ils ont décidé de prouver que l’abattoir ne respectait pas les quotas de sa licence. “Cette usine n’était autorisée à abattre qu’une vache par jour. Quand nous voyions des signes suspects, comme un trop grand nombre de vaches menées à l’intérieur, nous courions vers le bâtiment depuis notre cachette pour vérifier ce qui se passait”, explique-t-il lors d’une interview dans un café local. Win Shwe raconte fièrement :

Lors de nos deux premières descentes, nous avons découvert que plus de vaches étaient tuées que ne l’autorise la loi. Nous avons donc fait pression sur les autorités municipales pour qu’elles mettent sur liste noire le propriétaire musulman. Elles ont fini par le faire et il a dû fermer son abattoir”.

Win Shwe et ses compagnons revendiquent également la saisie de plus de 4 000 animaux vivants dans le delta depuis début 2014. Beaucoup de ces bêtes ont ensuite été données à des agriculteurs pauvres de la région pour devenir des animaux de trait, à condition qu’ils s’engagent à ne pas les tuer ou les vendre.

Au milieu de l’année 2014, selon des documents obtenus par Myanmar Now, des militants ont toutefois reçu l’accord des autorités pour mettre en œuvre un nouveau plan visant à envoyer le bétail saisi à des populations bouddhistes de Maungdaw, dans l’Etat d’Arakan, à environ 500 km au nord-ouest du delta de l’Irrawaddy.

Cette localité très pauvre, la plus à l’ouest du pays, est située sur la frontière avec le Bangladesh. Les musulmans y sont plus nombreux que les bouddhistes. La frontière, que Ma Ba Tha se plaît à appeler “la porte occidentale” du pays, est sous le strict contrôle du gouvernement.

Pression démographique

Selon la presse, des centaines d’Arakanais qui vivaient dans l’est du Bangladesh se sont réinstallés de l’autre côté de la frontière depuis 2012. Les autorités birmanes ont envoyé les membres de cette ethnie bouddhiste vivre dans des “villages modèles” à Maungdaw, dans ce qui ressemble à une tentative d’accroître la population bouddhiste dans la zone.

Par un courrier daté d’août 2014, les autorités de la région d’Ayeyarwady ont notifié à plusieurs localités qu’elles avaient accepté une demande de l’Association des jeunes bouddhistes de Rangoon de rassembler une centaine de vaches pour les envoyer à Maungdaw depuis le port de Maubin, dans le delta. Cette mesure avait pour but de “protéger la porte occidentale contre l’afflux de musulmans”, selon Win Shwe.

Sans cette porte occidentale, le territoire sera inondé de Bengalis [musulmans du Bangladesh]”, déclare Sein Aung dans un bureau richement décoré d’emblèmes nationalistes, dont des drapeaux portant des swastikas bouddhistes. Sein Aung, qui se qualifie de bouddhiste arakanais, est un ancien agent du renseignement militaire. Il dirige à Shwepyithar la branche de l’Association des jeunes bouddhistes de Rangoon.

Pénurie de bœuf hallal

Sean Turnell, professeur d’économie à l’université Macquarie de Sydney, en Australie, explique que le boycott qui touche les entreprises musulmanes nuit à l’image de la Birmanie sur la scène internationale, notamment auprès des investisseurs potentiels qui s’inquiètent de l’instabilité politique. “A petite échelle, il semble que toutes sortes de sociétés soient touchées, des petits commerces aux transporteurs, en passant par des bailleurs de fonds”, précise-t-il.

Un restaurateur musulman de la ville de Kyaungon, dans le delta, affirme que son chiffre d’affaires est passé de 100 dollars à 20 dollars environ à la suite du boycott. Cet homme, qui souhaité garder l’anonymat, a expliqué qu’il ne pouvait plus fournir de bœuf halal à ses clients et confie :

On ne peut plus acheter de bœuf dans toute la région d’Ayeyarwady. Si on veut du bœuf halal, il faut que quelqu’un le fasse venir de Rangoon”.

Devant son restaurant, une immense affiche est placardée : une vache y est représentée, accompagnée d’un verset à la gloire du rôle mythique de l’animal en tant que “mère” de l’humanité. Une image probablement posée par des sympathisants de Ma Ba Tha. La plupart des musulmans qui vivent dans le delta de l’Irrawaddy n’osent pas dénoncer la campagne de peur de subir des représailles de Ma Ba Tha. Certains expliquent que la population musulmane ne peut que se faire discrète, dans l’espoir que la vague actuelle de nationalisme bouddhiste finisse par reculer. “Nous n’avons aucun pays où fuir, résume Khin Maung, responsable d’une mosquée à Kyaungon. Nous sommes tous nés ici, et c’est ici que nous avons grandi.”

Swe Win

POUR EN SAVOIR PLUS

L’Association pour la protection de la race et de la religion, Ma Ba Tha, a gagné du terrain avec l’avènement de la démocratie birmane. Elle a été créée en juin 2013 à la suite d’affrontements qui avaient opposé des bouddhistes et des musulmans, en 2012. Son deuxième congrès s’est tenu en juin 2015 et aurait, selon l’organisation, attiré 6 800 moines et civils. Ma Ba Tha a alors publié un communiqué affirmant qu’elle appellerait le gouvernement à interdire aux musulmans de sacrifier des animaux dans le cadre de manifestations religieuses. Les détracteurs de Ma Ba Tha font valoir que ses activités ne sont pas représentatives de l’ensemble du clergé bouddhiste en Birmanie, qui compte 250 000 membres, selon les données officielles. Les moines associés à Ma Ba Tha ont publiquement accusé le parti d’Aung San Suu Kyi, la Ligue nationale pour la démocratie (LND), d’être incapable de protéger le bouddhisme.

Wirathu, le moine bouddhiste islamophobe visé par un mandat d’arrêt

Une plainte pour sédition a été déposée le 28 mai contre le moine bouddhiste U Wirathu. Le religieux encourt la prison à vie.

U Wirathu avait acquis une notoriété planétaire en 2013 quand le magazine américain Time avait décidé de publier son portrait en couverture sous le titre sans appel : “Le visage du terrorisme bouddhiste”. En rupture avec l’image de tolérance communément associée au bouddhisme, le moine assumait haut et fort ses propos haineux, pour ne pas dire ses appels au crime, dirigés contre les musulmans. En 2017, il avait été interdit de prêche pendant une année en raison de “ses discours de haine contre des religions”, selon le communiqué de l’autorité supervisant la sangha, la communauté des moines bouddhistes.

Aujourd’hui, ce sont des propos visant Aung San Suu Kyi qui semblent lui valoir ses ennuis avec la justice, rapporte le site Myanmar Now. “Mardi après-midi [28 mai], San Min, du Département de l’administration générale, a déposé une plainte contre le moine [pour sédition]”, précise le site. La loi sur la sédition, qui “interdit tout ce qui peut conduire à la haine ou à un outrage du gouvernement”, prévoit des peines allant jusqu’à la prison à perpétuité.

Tournée de meetings

Myanmar Now dit ne pas connaître avec certitude les faits reprochés au moine. “Wirathu a animé récemment à travers le pays une série de meetings pour dénoncer la volonté du gouvernement civil d’amender la Constitution de 2008, qui octroie aux généraux des pouvoirs étendus.” Et, durant l’un de ces rassemblements à Myeik, dans l’extrême sud de la Birmanie, il s’en serait pris à Aung San Suu Kyi, de facto à la tête du pays :

Lorsque des commissions sont mises sur pied, elles le sont avec des étrangers. Ceux qui la conseillent sont tous des étrangers. Ceux qui l’accompagnent sont tous des étrangers.”

Avant d’ajouter : “Ceux qui couchent avec…” Wirathu se serait alors arrêté, provoquant des éclats de rire parmi les 300 personnes venues l’écouter.

U Wirathu est rattaché à un monastère de Mandalay. Myanmar Now dit ne pas savoir où il se trouve actuellement. Mais un juge aurait ordonné à la police de l’amener à Rangoun avant le 4 juin.

Voir par ailleurs:

« Le Vénérable W. », le bouddhiste qui avait la haine

Après ses documentaires consacrés à Idi Amin Dada et Jacques Vergès, l’étonnant Barbet Schroeder boucle sa «trilogie du mal» auprès de Wirathu, le moine birman qui appelle à l’extermination des musulmans

Barbet Schroeder est insaisissable, puisqu’il a touché avec une égal talent le documentaire (Koko le gorille qui parle), la série télé (Mad Men), le cinéma d’auteur (La ValléeMaîtresseLes Tricheurs…) et le cinéma hollywoodien (Le Mystère von BülowJ. F. partagerait appartement).

Barbet Schroeder est infatigable. More (1969), son premier long métrage, film culte, scrute la face d’ombre de l’utopie hippie, incarnée par un jeune couple sombrant à Ibiza dans l’enfer des paradis artificiels; en 2014, le dispensable Amnesia retourne où tout avait commencé, à Ibiza, comme un couvercle qui se referme.

A 76 ans, le cinéaste d’origine suisse a pourtant repris la route. Fasciné depuis toujours par le bouddhisme, cette «religion athée qui permet le pessimisme», il est allé en Birmanie, à la rencontre d’Ashin Wirathu. Auprès de ce bonze plein de haine zen qui appelle à l’extermination des populations musulmanes, il boucle sa trilogie du mal, entamée en 1974 avec Général Idi Amin Dada et poursuivie en 2007 avec L’Avocat de la terreur.

Selon Barbet Schroeder, le thème du mal est «inépuisable, inséparable de l’humanité, particulièrement pour le 20e siècle sans parler du 21e qui a l’air de vouloir faire de la haine et du mensonge des sujets incontournables». Au terme d’un tournage difficile, dangereux, prématurément interrompu par une situation de plus en plus instable en Birmanie, le cinéaste ramène Le Vénérable W., un documentaire édifiant et terrifiant.

Maisons incendiées

Contrairement à son habitude, Barbet Schroeder ne s’est pas contenté de filmer l’agent du mal et de laisser le spectateur découvrir la réalité dans son effrayante nudité. Parce que la Birmanie est méconnue, lointaine, et que la situation politique y est terriblement instable, entre la junte, la présidente Aung San Suu Kyi aux positions ambiguës, les Rohingyas, la minorité musulmane et une centaine d’autres ethnies, le cinéaste a rencontré des journalistes, des moines désapprouvant la croisade de Wirathu. Il a aussi ressemblé des documents d’archives, reportages TV ou fichiers de téléphone portables.

Dès 2001, Wirathu prononce de virulents sermons islamophobes. En 2003, suite à des émeutes musulmanes, il est condamné à 25 ans de prison, dont il sort en 2012, suite à une amnistie générale. A la tête du mouvement 969, interdit en 2013 et aussitôt remplacé par Ma Ba Tha, il incite à la haine, monte en épingle des faits divers, propage des fake news. Il affirme que les musulmans (4% de la population birmane) qui «se reproduisent comme des lapins» (slogan dans une manifestation) mettent en péril l’équilibre de la nation.

Religions tournant à l’horreur

Des foules de moines en robe safran défilent, chantent des chanson nationalistes, éructent de haine, incendient les mosquées et tabassent les gens à mort, pendant que l’armée regarde à côté… Les maisons brûlent par milliers, des corps s’entassent sur des bûchers funéraires. Lorsqu’elles tombent entre les mains des fanatiques, toutes les religions tournent à l’horreur.

Le film se termine sur les images d’une rue pakistanaise embrasée par la colère. Une guerre de religion entre bouddhiste et musulmans serait une belle façon de pepétuer au 21e siècle l’obscurantisme du Moyen Age…

Voir aussi:

Documentaire. “Le Vénérable W” : Barbet Schroeder scrute le doux visage de la haine

Après le dictateur ougandais Amin Dada et l’avocat de la terreur Jacques Vergès, le cinéaste Barbet Schroeder s’est rendu en Birmanie pour clore sa trilogie sur le mal. Il y a rencontré le moine Wirathu, à l’origine de violentes campagnes islamophobes dans le pays. Son fascinant documentaire, Le Vénérable W., sort le 7 juin, en partenariat avec Courrier international.

“Les caractéristiques des poissons-chats d’Afrique sont : ils grandissent très vite. Ils se reproduisent très vite aussi. Et puis ils sont violents. Ils mangent les membres de leurpropre espèce et détruisent les ressources naturelles de leur environnement. Les musulmans sont exactement comme ces poissons.”

Les mots sont assénés d’un ton calme, parfaitement assuré. Celui qui les prononce face caméra, en ouverture du Vénérable W., est loin d’être un obscur inconnu en Birmanie. Le moine Ashin Wirathu est aussi devenu célèbre à l’étranger quand, en 2013, Time, le célèbre magazine américain, l’a mis à sa une avec pour titre “Le visage du terrorisme bouddhiste”.

Le nettoyage ethnique en train de se faire

Présenté en séance spéciale au Festival de Cannes, le documentaire que lui consacre le cinéaste suisse Barbet Schroeder a laissé les critiques médusés. Comme le relève The Hollywood Reporter :

Face à la progression de l’islamophobie en Europe, aux États-Unis et ailleurs, [le] film rappelle que même la doctrine religieuse la plus pacifique risque, si elle est mal interprétée, d’être exploitée à des fins destructrices.”

Barbet Schroeder a pu suivre Wirathu et s’entretenir avec lui pendant une quinzaine d’heures. Il le montre déclamer ses prêches devant des ouailles fascinées et attentives. Alternant avec ces images, d’autres, insoutenables et provenant souvent de films tournés par des témoins indignés, donnent à voir le résultat de ses discours de haine : des quartiers incendiés, des magasins pillés et des hommes battus à mort lors des pogroms islamophobes qui ont éclaté dans le pays au cours des quinze dernières années. “C’est un documentaire à la fois excellent et dérangeant, qui montre le nettoyage ethnique en train de se faire”, commente le magazine spécialisé Screen international.

Comme le résume le quotidien suisse Le Temps, un implacable mécanisme s’est mis en branle à partir de celui qui dirige le mouvement xénophobe Ma Ba Tha : “Dès 2001, Wirathu prononce de virulents sermons islamophobes. En 2003, après des émeutes antimusulmanes, il est condamné à vingt-cinq ans de prison, dont il sort en 2012, à la suite d’une amnistie générale. À la tête du mouvement 969 [une référence aux trois joyaux du bouddhisme, présentée comme l’opposé cosmologique de 786, qui signifie pour les musulmans “Au nom d’Allah clément et miséricordieux”], interdit en 2013 et aussitôt remplacé par Ma Ba Tha, il incite à la haine, monte en épingle des faits divers, propage des fake news [“fausses informations”]. Il affirme que les musulmans (4 % de la population birmane) […] mettent en péril l’équilibre de la nation.”

En 2015, le mouvement Ma Ba Tha a obtenu l’adoption de quatre lois discriminatoires contre les musulmans, qui interdisent la polygamie, limitent les conversions et les mariages interreligieux et permettent le contrôle des naissances. La sangha, communauté des moines, a demandé, le 23 mai 2016, la dissolution de Ma Ba Tha. Wirathu lui-même est interdit de prêche depuis février 2017. Il avait remercié l’assassin de Ko Ni, un avocat musulman et proche conseiller d’Aung San Suu Kyi, assassiné le 29 janvier à Rangoon.

En bref

AUNG SAN SUU KYI, L’INSOUTENABLE SILENCE

Certains espéraient que la prise de fonctions du premier gouvernement civil de l’histoire du pays, en avril 2016, appaiserait les tensions islamophobes. Aung San Suu Kyi, Prix Nobel de la paix et égérie des opposants à la junte, a été promue conseillère spéciale de l’État, déclarant vouloir faire de la résolution des conflits ethniques sa priorité. Mais, un an plus tard, la minorité musulmane désespère de l’entendre condamner les exactions dont elle est la cible. “L’héroïne de la démocratie apparaît incapable d’arrêter les atrocités commises par les forces de l’ordre”, dénonce The Irrawaddy, un journal fondé par la dissidence. “Aung San Suu Kyi n’est pas défenseuse des droits de l’homme, mais une femme politique. Raison pour laquelle elle reste silencieuse”, justifie pour sa part l’hebdomadaire Frontier Myanmar. L’armée conserve constitutionnellement son autonomie face aux autorités civiles.

Voir également:

Birmanie: mandat d’arrêt contre le moine extrémiste Wirathu

AFP/Le Point

Qui est Wirathu, le moine birman décrit comme « le visage du terrorisme bouddhiste » ?
Le bonze extrémiste a pour cible depuis des années la minorité musulmane de Birmanie, les Rohingyas, contre qui il multiplie les déclarations de haine. Il est aujourd’hui visé par un mandat d’arrêt des autorités birmanes.
M.F.
Nouvel Obs
29 mai 2019

Il est considéré comme le « visage du terrorisme bouddhiste ». Le moine ultranationaliste Ashin Wirathu est depuis mardi sous le coup d’un mandat d’arrêt pour incitation à la haine émis par les autorités birmanes. L’homme a fait de sa haine de l’islam et des musulmans un combat permanent. Mais qui se cache derrière ce sinistre moine ?

Malgré son visage calme et serein, il est décrit comme le « Ben Laden birman », ou encore le « Hitler bouddhiste ». Ashin Wirathu, 50 ans, a acquis une renommée internationale pour ses propos islamophobes durant le massacre des Rohingyas en Birmanie.

Le moine est en rupture totale avec l’image habituellement tolérante des bouddhistes. Il est le leader du mouvement 969 et un membre influent de l’association Ma Ba Tha, qui ont prôné le boycott des commerces musulmans et l’interdiction des mariages interreligieux, sans que le gouvernement birman ne réagisse.

Une haine sans limite pour les Rohingyas

Il avait déjà été arrêté et condamné à vingt-cinq ans de prison en 2003 pour avoir prêché l’extrémisme et distribué des livres interdits. Il a finalement été libéré en 2012, profitant de l’ouverture du pays et d’une amnistie nationale.

Depuis, il multiplie les déclarations haineuses à l’encontre des Rohingyas, ethnie musulmane minoritaire et persécutée en Birmanie. Son but : « protéger » son pays majoritairement bouddhiste d’une menace d’« islamisation », alors que les musulmans représentent moins de 5 % de sa population.

En 2013, le moine apparaît dans son habit grenat sur la couverture du magazine américain « Time », où il est décrit comme « le visage du terroriste bouddhiste ». Sans concession, il y déclare sa haine des Rohingyas :

« [Les musulmans] se reproduisent si vite, ils volent nos femmes et les violent […] Ils aimeraient occuper notre pays mais je ne les laisserai pas. » Sous couvert de séances d’éducation religieuse, le bonze distille son discours islamophobe sur les réseaux sociaux et en DVD. Pendant des années et au travers de multiples campagnes de diffamation, il a attisé la haine qui a conduit aux affrontements intercommunautaires et à ce que l’ONU qualifie de « génocide » des Rohingyas. Plus de 740 000 membres d’entre eux ont fui au Bangladesh voisin depuis août 2017.

« S’ils veulent m’arrêter, ils peuvent le faire »

Il n’a eu de cesse, depuis, de défier la hiérarchie bouddhiste et le gouvernement birman, au sein duquel se trouve Aung San Suu Kyi, prix Nobel de la paix. De plus en plus influent, il a réussi à convaincre cette dernière de ne présenter aucun candidat musulman sur les listes de son parti pour les élections générales de 2015. L’image de celle-ci en a pris un coup.

L’homme, que rien ne semblait pouvoir arrêter, a finalement connu un revers en 2017 lorsque le clergé bouddhiste a interdit son mouvement Ma Ba Tha. Qu’à cela ne tienne : cinq jours plus tard, il revient avec la « Fondation Philanthropique Buddha Dhamma », copie conforme de son précédent mouvement à ceci près qu’il compte désormais des laïcs.

Fervent défenseur des militaires, il s’était insurgé en octobre dernier contre un possible procès des généraux birmans devant la justice internationale pour le drame rohingya.

« Le jour où la Cour pénale internationale vient ici, Wirathu aura un pistolet » à la main, avait-il assuré.Wirathu paraissait intouchable : ce mandat d’arrêt mettra peut-être fin à ses agissements. L’homme, qui vit la plupart du temps dans son monastère de Mandalay, dans le centre du pays, n’a pas encore été arrêté par la police : « S’ils veulent m’arrêter, ils peuvent le faire », a-t-il déclaré mercredi au média en ligne Irrawady.

Voir de plus:

‘The Venerable W’ (‘Le Venerable W’): Film Review | Cannes 2017

Director Barbet Schroeder (‘Barfly,’ ‘Terror’s Advocate’) documents the controversial Buddhist leader of a deadly anti-Muslim campaign in Myanmar.

The Hollywood reporter

5/20/2017 

Those who believe that all Buddhists respect their religion’s core principles of peace and tolerance should take a look at The Venerable W (Le Venerable W), director Barbet Schroeder’s eye-opening chronicle of one Burmese monk’s long campaign of racism and violence against his country’s minority Muslim population.

The third part in a “trilogy of evil” that began in 1974 with General Idi Amin Dada and continued in 2007 with a look at the controversial French lawyer Jacques Verges in Terror’s Advocate, this scathing portrait gets up close and personal with Ashin Wirathu, the self-appointed spiritual leader of Myanmar’s anti-Muslim crusade.

Speaking openly to the camera, Wirathu propagates xenophobia and bigotry against a group that represents only a fraction of the local population, yet have been subject to decades of persecution by both the monk’s followers and the military-controlled Burmese government. The result has been hundreds of deaths, thousands of homes burned to the ground and tens of thousands of Muslims displaced — all of it in the name of a religion that asks, according to one translation of the Metta Sutta, to “cultivate boundless love to all that live in the whole universe.”

The Venerable W, which consists of interviews with Wirathu and some of his most outspoken critics, as well as footage of riots, beatings, burnings and killings that have taken place since the 1970s, reveals that the 75-year-old Schroeder is still a fearless explorer of the darkest facets of our society. At a time when Islamophobia is on the rise in Europe, the U.S. and elsewhere, his film is a reminder that even the most peaceful of religious doctrines can, if twisted in the wrong way, be used as a veritable source of evil. A premiere in Cannes should give this vital documentary the attention it deserves.

Wirathu operates out of the city of Mandalay, a third of whose inhabitants consist of monks or monks-in-training. In the late 90s he formed the “969” movement and began delivering racist sermons to his disciples, referring to Muslims as “kalars” (the equivalent of the n-word) and claiming they are a subspecies who don’t deserve Myanmar citizenship, that their businesses should be boycotted and that they should be banned from intermarriage with Buddhists.

Although prejudice against the Rohingya Muslim community, which is based in the western part of Myanmar bordering Bangladesh, dates back to before Wirathu’s time, he has helped accelerate a campaign resulting in many, many deaths and the mass destruction of property. In order to fuel the fire, he often highlights incidents where Muslims have attacked Buddhists (in one case, the rape and murder of a woman), distributing propaganda videos on DVD and backing riots where Rohingyas are driven from their homes while the armed forces stand idly by.

What’s especially disturbing about Schroeder’s inquiry is how, on one hand, Wirathu can be seen expounding the peaceful tenets of Buddhism to his followers, while on the other he preaches a holy war meant to ostracize — and indirectly, destroy — an entire segment of the population. The man himself sees no contradiction in the two, simply believing that Muslims are a lesser race unworthy of the basic human rights accorded to Buddhists.

While the situation in Myanmar is particularly extreme, Schroeder reveals at one point how, even in a Western nation like France, the perception of Islam’s grip on society versus the reality of that grip is highly exaggerated. Terrorist attacks like those that occurred in Paris in 2015 only help to augment fears and nationalistic tendencies, which is why a candidate like Marine Le Pen was able to capture more than a third of the vote in France’s recent presidential runoff.

The Burmese authorities have made some attempts to quell the tide of Islamophobic sentiment, banning the “969” group and jailing Wirathu for several years. But after his release, the popular monk managed to form a new movement, promoting a series of “protection of race and religion bills” that seem to be the first step toward a modern version of the Nuremberg Laws of Nazi Germany. One of those laws has already been enacted, while the government continues to persecute the Rohingyas throughout the land.

Like in his portraits of Verges and Idi Amin, Schroeder has an unflinching way of capturing the propos and rationale of Wirathu without any filter whatsoever. Ace editor Nelly Quettier (Holy Motors) juxtaposes the lengthy one-on-one interview with found footage of devastated villages and grisly beatings, revealing how Wirathu’s teachings resonate through the widespread violence that has afflicted Myanmar for several decades now, and that will likely continue in the near future. In a place where Buddhists currently represent more than 90 percent of the populace, it’s unthinkable how a religion that preaches so much love can, in this case, yield so much hate.

Production companies: Les Films du Losange, Bande a Part Films
Director: Barbet Schroeder
Producer: Margaret Menegoz
Director of photography: Victoria Clay Mendoza
Editor: Nelly Quettier
Composer: Jorge Arriagada
Venue: Cannes Film Festival (Special Screenings)
Sales: Les Films du Losange

In French, Burmese, Rohingya, Spanish
107 minutes

‘The Venerable W’: Cannes Review

Dir Barbet Schroeder. France. Switzerland. 2017. 100mins.

Everyone knows that Buddhism is the religion of peace, love and understanding. So there’s something deeply wrong about a Buddhist monk who calmly spouts anti-Muslim hate speech and incites ethnic riots. The monk in question, an influential Burmese figure known as the Venerable Wirathu, is the subject of the powerful third and final installment of Swiss director Barbet Schroeder’s ‘Axis of Evil’ documentary trilogy, which began in 1974 with General Idi Amin Dada: A Self Portrait, and continued in 2007 with Terror’s Advocate, a portrait of controversial lawyer Jacques Vergès.

Shot on the hoof, under the noses of a repressive regime, The Venerable W is a fine, stirring documentary about ethnic cleansing in action

It’s the shocking disjunct between his religion and the rabid nationalism of his sermons, writings and declarations that powers Schroeder’s conventional but nevertheless effective long hard stare into the eyes of intolerance.

However, this is also a chilling corrective to accounts of Burma that paint its recent history simply as a fight between courageous pro-democracy forces led by Aung San Suu Kyi (by no means a heroine in this particular story) and a repressive military regime. In the era of Trump (Wirathu is a fan), Farage and Le Pen, it also shines timely light on the mechanisms of nationalistic rhetoric. That should be enough to guarantee The Venerable W some sort of foothold in mature, doc-friendly markets despite its potentially niche subject matter, and it appears ripe for VOD distribution.

Draped in saffron robes, his face rarely betraying any emotion, Wirathu is presented partly through outtakes from an interview Schroeder filmed with him in the library of the Mandalay monastery which he heads. The ‘venerable’ monk talks openly about what he sees to be the Muslim threat to Buddhist purity, calmly spouting racial slurs about their breeding capacity, the rape of ‘our women’, animalistic nature and accumulation of wealth that carry terrifying echoes of Nazi anti-Semitic slurs. He repeats the same message to the young monks he teaches and to the crowds of followers who turn out to watch him preach on tacky makeshift stages amidst garlands of flowers and gilt Buddhas.

Schroeder’s method at first is simply to dwell on the awful fascination of the ‘Fascist Buddhist’ paradox, with passages promoting the brotherhood of man from the religion’s sacred texts, voiced by veteran French actress Bulle Ogier, underlining the contradiction. Wirathu’s rise from provincial obscurity to ethnic rabble-rouser is then charted, mixing his own account with testimony from a mix of interviewees – who will include two Burmese Buddhist masters who have served prison time, like ‘W’, but for far more noble causes. Wirathu’s nine-year stretch for inciting ethnic hatred came after a spate of 2003 riots in his hometown of Kyaukse and elsewhere which involved lynchings and burnings of Muslim mosques, shops and houses.

The mood of the film turns darker in its second half, when Wirathu returns with even greater vitriol to the campaign trail after his release in 2012. News and mobile phone footage captures some of the pogroms launched against Burma’s persecuted Rohingya Muslim minority, mostly in Rakhine state: a scene in which a Buddhist monk beats a Musilm to a pulp with a makeshift club is difficult to erase.

By now we’ve worked out what the monk really is. Forget the robes: he’s a classic extremist politician, fanning tensions through the crudest of rhetoric (including a DVD restaging of the rape of a Buddhist girl produced under the aegis of his Ma Ba Tha nationalist movement), then visiting the affected regions to ‘restore order’ and guarantee security. Shot on the hoof, under the noses of a repressive regime, The Venerable W is a fine, stirring documentary about ethnic cleansing in action.

Production companies: Les Films du Losange, Bande à Part

International sales: Les Films di Losange, b.vincent@filmsdulosange.fr

Producers: Margaret Menegoz, Lionel Baier

Cinematography: Victoria Clay Mendoza

Editor: Nelly Quettier

Music: Jorge Arriagada

Narration: Bulle Ogier

Voir de plus:

Days of Discontent

  • The Irrawaddy
  • 30 March 2017

RANGOON — Burma’s first civilian government since 1962 is facing growing discontent at home and abroad. One year has passed since the National League for Democracy (NLD)-led administration was sworn in and serious soul searching by its leaders is urgently needed.

That is, if government leaders are actually willing to listen to the people who pinned all their hopes on them and elected them to office.

The country’s de facto leader Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and her cabinet ministers need to seriously tackle the country’s ills and work to repair past mistakes and blunders. If not, they will face tougher opposition as Burma’s people become disillusioned.

Under Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s administration, the conflict in Burma’s North has intensified and confidence and trust between the State Counselor and ethnic leaders has greatly eroded. She has alienated ethnic groups and, as a result, the peace process is on the verge of derailment. When taking office, she claimed achieving peace was a priority of her government.

Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s relations with the Burma Army commander-in-chief Snr-Gen Min Aung Hlaing are strained and her perceived lack of action to fix the country’s sluggish economy has increased widespread dissatisfaction.

Understandably, people are disappointed. But that doesn’t mean the public are unsympathetic. Many people understand that the new civilian government has faced daunting challenges as it inherited a country that languished under decades of repressive and corrupt military dictatorship.

Many NLD supporters have expressed concerns about the current state of affairs in good faith. They want this government to succeed and to move the country forward, as does the international community.

Once considered a darling of the West for her relentless pursuit of democratic reform in Burma, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi now faces an almost daily onslaught from international media.

The Nobel Peace Prize winner’s international image suffered a heavy blow when the UN reported evidence of crimes against humanity committed against Rohingya Muslims in northern Arakan State.

Burma’s democracy hero has appeared powerless to stop government security forces committing atrocities. Meanwhile, many people in Burma do not accept the Rohingya as one of Burma’s ethnic groups, insisting that they are illegal migrants from Bangladesh, and referring to them as “Bengali.”

The government’s lack of a clear economic policy and the appointment of loyal but ineffective cabinet ministers have caused concern among the business community inside and outside of Burma. Ministers have been accused of lacking experience and having no vision to push their ministries in a productive direction.

Burma is located between two giant neighbors, China and India, and it has great potential to move forward. But the economy is slowing and there is little action to intervene from those supposedly running the country.

Worryingly, under the democratically elected government, arrests and detention of critics, journalists, and activists have continued as both the military and the civilian government increasingly turn to the draconian Article 66(d) of Burma’s Telecommunications Act.

Government leaders have been accused of being media shy and even lacking respect for the media. They forget that it was local and independent media that played a major role in 2015’s historic elections.

Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, her “puppet” president U Htin Kyaw, and other senior government leaders have failed to hold one press conference in the first year of taking office.

Pundits have been questioning what has gone wrong with Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s government and its policies: Was the NLD unprepared or did its leaders lose their vision and become complacent?

There is growing criticism the State Counselor acts haughtily and views herself as above others—including both political opposition members and important allies. She has burned a number of bridges and caused allies to flee.

Perhaps, as the daughter of Gen Aung San—independence hero, politician, and founding father of Burma’s armed forces—she feels entitled to solve the country’s issues and assumes everybody will follow her.

But this is not the case. She is not Gen Aung San and she has no control over the armed forces. There is a structural problem with Burma’s government—the military continues to control the key ministries of defense, home, and border affairs, as well as 25 percent of seats in all parliaments and the all-powerful General Administration Department.

In the eyes of some businesspeople and politicians, the NLD is operating a caretaker government with little executive power.

Members of the public, particularly everyday people such as farmers and workers, have not witnessed significant change in the first year of the new government.

It is time to stop living under the illusion that Daw Aung San Suu Kyi and her government will match expectations and bring about miraculous, concrete, change. It is time instead to ask the government to act decisively, and it is time to hold it accountable for its mistakes.

If the government has the will to listen, it will review its year of shabby governance, shake up its cabinet, and change its direction.

Living in blind hope for what the State Counselor and her government can achieve must stop here.

Voir encore:

Questioning the official line on Rakhine

The government’s blanket rejection of abuse allegations in Maungdaw and refusal to conduct a serious investigation may be popular in Myanmar, but will make it harder to address the issues underpinning the insurgency.

Oliver Slow

FRONTIER

January 19, 2017

JANUARY 9 marked three months since coordinated attacks were launched on police outposts in northern Rakhine State, leading to a heavy security crackdown, a block on humanitarian aid and a shift in the dynamics of what was already an incredibly complex issue.

In the months since the military “clearance operations” began in response to the attacks, security forces have killed an estimated 100 suspected attackers and arrested another 600, according to state media. Some have since been released and others sentenced, but no details of their charges, sentences or trials have been made public.

At the same time, about a dozen security forces have been killed by the militant group, which has been named as Harakah al-Yaqin (Faith Movement). Meanwhile, almost all humanitarian aid has been cut off to an already vulnerable population – about 150,000 people in the area were regular recipients of United Nations assistance.

Hundreds, possibly thousands, of properties have been burned to the ground and the UN says 34,000 Muslims, most of whom self-identify as Rohingya, have fled across the border into Bangladesh.

A number of those fleeing into Bangladesh have accused military personnel of using disproportionate force during their operations, including mass rape, arbitrary arrests, burning of homes and villages, and extra-judicial killings. The government and military have consistently denied all charges.

Daw Aye Aye Soe, spokesperson for Myanmar’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, which is headed by Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, told IRIN in December that the security operation had been conducted “with very much restraint” and that “regarding rape, ethnic cleansing – it’s completely false.” She also questioned the number of people reported to have fled to Bangladesh, saying a figure of 20,000 or 30,000 is “blown out of proportion”.

But the government has come under significant pressure to allow independent observers into the region. In December, representatives from 13 private and state media organisations were given limited access to the affected area on a government-sponsored trip. Despite repeated requests, Frontier was refused permission to participate.

On December 23, two days after speaking with reporters who were part of the trip, the decapitated body of a Muslim man, U Shu Na Myar, was found near his home.

Just hours after his body was found, and before any suspects had been reported arrested, the Facebook page of the State Counsellor’s office, which is also headed by Aung San Suu Kyi, published a post with the headline “Truth teller beheaded” in English.

An accompanying article written in Myanmar said the man had “told media there was no case of arson by the military and police forces, no rape and no unjust arrests”.

This blanket denial of any wrongdoing by authorities has been typical of the approach taken by the military and the government since the security operations began.

It may well have been the case that Shu Na Myar was killed by the militants. But as Frontier has consistently stated in recent months, such vigorous denials do no one any favours; they only heap more suspicion on the security response and create further divisions in an already volatile region.

If there really has been no wrongdoing by the security forces then the government must allow an independent and credible investigation committee (and the committee formed in December and headed by vice president U Myint Swe is nothing of the sort) to look into the facts on the ground.

The blanket denial approach has been discredited by the emergence on December 31 of a video showing police abusing Muslim villagers. Shot on November 5 in Kotankauk village in Maungdaw, the video shows why the government should respond to abuse allegations seriously, rather than questioning the motives of those making the complaints, or those publishing them.

Local opinion

The government’s response to the October 9 attacks may have attracted criticism abroad, but at home its approach is supported overwhelmingly. Much of the Myanmar population believes that the security forces have committed no wrongdoing.

Any accusations of human rights abuses are regarded as lies made either by the international media or the Rohingya to elicit public sympathy for their plight.

The international media in particular has attracted the scorn of the Myanmar public and authorities. One opinion piece in state-controlled media accused international media of working “hand in glove” with the attackers, a frankly absurd accusation.

There has, however, been some sloppy reporting from some international outlets, most notably the story published by the UK’s Daily Mail in December about a video purporting to show a young Rohingya boy being tasered by a Tatmadaw soldier. The report was incorrect and the incident had in fact taken place in Cambodia.

Some said the report was proof that the international media was deliberately manipulating the situation to portray Myanmar in a negative light, but anyone who is familiar with the Daily Mail’s editorial values will no doubt be aware that it was just another example of the publication failing to adhere to the most basic journalistic principles.

At the same time, some have used doctored images to try and build support for the Rohingya cause. On January 3, the Global New Light of Myanmar carried a front-page article headlined “Fabricated stories, misleading pictures about Rakhine cause global criticism”.

It included five photos that it said were being incorrectly captioned and shared on social media “in an attempt to cause misunderstandings about Myanmar”. This has in fact done the cause a disservice, as it encourages sceptics to dismiss credible reports in mainstream media out of hand as pro-Rohingya propaganda.

In private conversations, Myanmar friends have told me that they view the international coverage of the issue as a deliberate attack on the country’s reputation. It is nothing of the sort. What is being questioned is the official narrative from an institution – that is, the Tatmadaw – that has a well-established track record of carrying out human rights abuses against ethnic minorities (as well as the majority Bamar) for many years.

As the International Crisis Group report, Myanmar: A New Muslim Insurgency in Rakhine State, noted, the clearance operations in northern Rakhine State appear to employ methods “akin to [the Tatmadaw’s] standard counter-insurgency ‘four cuts’ strategy developed in the 1960s to cut off rebel forces from their four main support sources” – namely food, funds, intelligence and recruits.

The tactic, the report said, involves cordoning off territory for concentrated operations, a “calculated policy of terror” to force populations to move, destruction of villages in sensitive areas, and the confiscation and destruction of food stocks that might support insurgents.

There is no conspiracy in the international media and no deliberate attempt to make Myanmar “look bad”. Many of the journalists questioning the government’s narrative have a deep fondness for the country, as do I. But that does not mean the claims from the government or the military should be accepted on face value, as the incontrovertible truth.

Questioning the official line

So why is the military’s version of events accepted by so much of the Myanmar public without question? After all, there remains a deeply held distrust of the military as a result of its decades of economic mismanagement and repressive rule.

A major reason is the support of Aung San Suu Kyi. The State Counsellor maintains significant domestic popularity and her apparent acceptance of the military’s narrative has given it much greater credibility.

While she has said very little about the situation in Rakhine State, on the rare occasions that she has publicly discussed it her language has been pro-military and dismissive of international “meddling” in Myanmar’s internal affairs. For those who held her in such high regard as a defender of human rights, it has been a disappointing response.

But as Aung San Suu Kyi has pointed out herself, she is a politician, not a human rights defender, and this forms another part of the reason she is not speaking out. There is of course the issue that the military still wields significant power, and to criticise it would put serious strains on an already fraught relationship. But it is also important to note that those who identify as Rohingya are generally disliked within the country.

As has been well documented, the Rohingya term is rejected by much of the population, who regard them as “Bengali” immigrants from Bangladesh. To be perceived as speaking out in defence of the Rohingya would potentially lose her party significant political support. More nationalistic parties – most notably the Union Solidarity and Development Party and the Arakan National Party – would be quick to exploit these perceptions.

There is the third theory, though: that, like much of the population, she simply does not believe that the accusations being made are true.

Another reason for the widespread support of the security operation is that the October 9 attacks are regarded as an attack on the country’s sovereignty by a “foreign” force. We saw a similar sentiment in February 2015 when the Myanmar National Democratic Alliance Army, a Kokang armed group, attacked military outposts in the north of the country.

While an official ethnic group, the Kokang are closely related to Han Chinese (some would say they are Han Chinese), and the offensive was launched from Chinese territory. Unsurprisingly, it was regarded as an attack by a foreign force on the country’s sovereignty – a view that the Tatmadaw encouraged – and support for the military spiked as a result.

Rape accusations

Human rights groups and international media outlets have reported accusations of rape being conducted by Tatmadaw soldiers on Rohingya women fleeing the violence.  The government has vehemently dismissed these allegations.

In fact, minutes after the December 23 post on the State Counsellor’s page about the decapitated Muslim man in Rakhine State, a new post was published accusing Rohingya women of fabricating stories of rape. The post was published under the headline “fake rape”.

Dozens, perhaps hundreds, of women have made the accusations and they should not be dismissed so flippantly by the government, especially given the Tatmadaw’s track record.

In 2014, the Women’s League of Burma released a report saying that more than 100 women and girls have been raped by Myanmar’s military since the 2010 election. “Due to restrictions on human rights documentation, WLB believes there are only a fraction of the actual abuses taking place,” the group said in a statement.

The report added that majority of the cases were reported in ethnic minority areas. For many years, civil society groups, particularly those operating in ethnic minority areas, have published reports of Tatmadaw soldiers raping women.

In 2011, Aung San Suu Kyi herself said that rape was being used as a tool of war in Myanmar. In a video for the Nobel Women’s Initiative, she said: “Rape is used in my country as a weapon against those who only want to live in peace, who only want to assert their basic human rights. It is used as a weapon by armed forces to intimidate the ethnic nationalities and to divide our country. This is how I see it. Every case of rape divides our country.”

Despite this, the rape accusations are now dismissed out of hand. In November, a Rakhine parliamentarian told the BBC that Myanmar soldiers couldn’t have possible raped Rohingya women because “they are very dirty” and have a “low standard of living”.

It is a viewpoint that has seeped into the public conscious too. In private conversations I have heard it uttered that the Rohingya women are “not attractive” and therefore would not be raped. Apart from being ugly language, it also ignores the fact that rape is more often about showing power over a particular person, or group of people, than sexual attraction.

There is no doubting that the situation in Rakhine State is incredibly complex, and the local Rakhine population understandably feel some fear about the new insurgency there. But progress needs to be made, and blanket denials do not help. A serious plan needs to be put in place to start to build trust between communities there again.

Voir encore:

 

 

Pâques sanglantes au Sri Lanka. Près de 300 morts et 500 blessés dans une série d’attentats quasi simultanés contre des cibles catholiques ou étrangères. Probablement un record de tous les temps — hormis le 11 Septembre — pour le nombre de tués par terrorisme, dans un seul pays et en une seule journée.

Dans un État insulaire pourtant dominé par les confessions bouddhiste et hindouiste, c’est la « piste islamiste » qui ressort ! Une fois de plus, et là où on ne l’attendait pas…

Trois ans après le carnage anti-chrétien de Lahore, au Pakistan (plus de 70 morts dans un parc, le jour de Pâques 2016), deux ans après le massacre du dimanche des Rameaux en Égypte (attentats anti-coptes dans deux villes, dont Alexandrie, plus de 40 morts), l’horreur pascale frappe à nouveau.

Dans tous ces cas, la majorité des victimes sont chrétiennes, et la main criminelle islamiste.

Avec des preuves qu’il dit détenir, le gouvernement de Colombo (épaulé par Interpol et le FBI) accuse un mouvement extrémiste musulman local, le National Thowheeth Jama’ath (sigle NTJ, ou « Association nationale monothéiste »). Mais devant le caractère finement coordonné des attentats, il ajoute aussitôt qu’il y a, derrière, « un réseau international sans lequel ces attaques n’auraient pas pu réussir ».

Les cibles choisies et le modus operandi pointent en effet dans cette direction.

Dans ce pays, les confessions chrétienne et musulmane sont plutôt marginales. Mais elles se retrouvent propulsées acteurs principaux du drame…

On trouve au Sri Lanka 7 ou 8 % de catholiques et quelque 10 % de musulmans. La majorité cingalaise, surtout associée au bouddhisme, représente près des trois quarts de la population totale, tandis que la minorité tamoule (hindouiste) fait entre 12 et 15 %.

Le Sri Lanka a un passé violent. De 1979 à 2009, ce fut un pays coupé en deux, avec un mouvement insurrectionnel qui terrorisait sa propre population. Face à celui-ci, un État central également féroce, à son tour impitoyable dans la victoire et la vengeance contre la minorité tamoule.

On dit que les Tigres de l’Eelam tamoul (LTTE), qui voulaient séparer le nord du reste du pays, ont le douteux honneur d’avoir inventé, dans les années 1970, le kamikaze moderne avec sa ceinture explosive.

Aujourd’hui, les LTTE ne sont plus. Leur guerre avec Colombo était une affaire locale, nationale, territoriale. Assez peu religieuse, et non reliée à des réseaux, hormis le racket des communautés tamoules de l’étranger. Au XXIe siècle, la méthode du kamikaze a fait florès, reprise par la filière islamiste. Une filière qui, aujourd’hui, pénètre un territoire où elle n’existait pas encore il y a peu. Le Sri Lanka cingalo-tamoul, bouddhiste-hindouiste, avec une histoire périphérique et régionale… devient soudain le théâtre de l’une des plus grandes attaques islamistes de l’histoire moderne.

Autour du Sri Lanka, il y a tout un contexte en Asie, avec la remontée des tensions intercommunautaires et interconfessionnelles.

Il y a l’hindouisme radical, incarné par le premier ministre indien, Narendra Modi. Dans la campagne électorale qui s’achève, il a joué sa réélection en agitant la carte communautaire et confessionnelle. L’idéal laïque du « mahatma » Gandhi paraît bien éloigné…

En Birmanie, il y a des bouddhistes haineux — cela existe — qui appuient l’oppression militaire menée depuis des années contre la minorité musulmane des Rohingyas.

On le voit, aucune confession n’a le monopole de cette résurgence hideuse. Mais la palme de l’activisme, en ce début de XXIe siècle, revient sans conteste à l’islam radical.

En Indonésie, premier pays musulman du monde avec ses 265 millions d’habitants, longtemps terre d’une religion syncrétique et souple, les récentes élections ont donné à voir une ascension spectaculaire. Celle d’un islam militant, intolérant, qui « fait la police » contre les citoyens.

Cette remontée a infecté jusqu’aux grands partis politiques : le président, Joko Widodo, naguère une incarnation de la tolérance, vient de gagner sa réélection au prix de compromissions avec les radicaux.

Aux Philippines, l’insurrection islamiste du sud, violente et intransigeante, ne se dément pas malgré les rodomontades du président, Rodrigo Duterte. Au Bangladesh, la Ligue Awami, grand parti historique et laïque, s’allie maintenant aux religieux pour se maintenir…

Laïcité, laïcité, que deviens-tu ?

Voir aussi:

La montée de la rhétorique bouddhiste nationaliste en Asie

AFP/le Point

Birmanie : quand le bouddhisme prêche la haine

Le moine Ashin Wirathu est le plus influent des prêcheurs de haine en Birmanie. Une haine anti-Rohingya et plus largement islamophobe, loin des idéaux de non-violence et de tolérance attachés au bouddhisme. Alors que la police birmane a émis ce mardi un mandat d’arrêt à son encontre, nous publions ici l’intégralité de notre reportage sur le bouddhisme radical au pays d’Aung San Suu Kyi paru en avril 2017. Une enquête au cours de laquelle nos journalistes Manon Quérouil et Véronique de Viguerie ont rencontré l’énigmatique « Vénérable ».

Dans sa robe safran, face caméra, Ashin Wirathu ne se départit jamais de son petit sourire satisfait, même pour dire les pires atrocités. Barbet Schroeder le laisse déblatérer. Les musulmans ? « Comme les poissons-chats en Afrique, ils se reproduisent très vite et se mangent entre eux. » Le bouddhisme ? « Une armée dont naissent des combattants. Il doit agir comme un rempart contre l’islam. » Les Rohingya (minorité musulmane apatride persécutée en Birmanie depuis des décennies) ? « Il n’y a jamais eu d’ethnie rohingya dans l’histoire. Aussi, on le sait, c’est pour obtenir de l’aide internationale qu’ils brûlent leurs maisons. »

Images d’archives, images amateurs, entretiens, rapports et cartes à l’appui, Barbet Schroeder illustre et décortique avec finesse l’engrenage du mal : incitation à la haine et à la « protection de la race », propagande, culte de la personnalité… Une mécanique sidérante qui, en Birmanie, conduit aux persécutions dont sont victimes les minorités musulmanes, à commencer par les Rohingya. Glaçant (il est d’ailleurs interdit aux moins de 12 ans), le documentaire n’en est pas moins captivant.

Notre journaliste Manon Querouil, elle, n’est pas près d’oublier sa rencontre avec Ashin Wirathu. Elle se souvient d’avoir commis une « belle bourde » en s’installant sur une chaise face à lui. « D’un geste du bras, il m’a signifié que je devais prendre place à terre, à un niveau inférieur au maître. J’ai dû mener toute mon interview à même le sol ! » En revanche, ce pro de la communication s’est prêté sans regimber à l’objectif de notre photographe, Véronique de Viguerie. Voici leur reportage.

Ces bouddhistes qui prêchent la haine

Septembre 2016. En un clin d’œil, le temple de Sulamuni est arraché à sa torpeur millénaire et transformé en fourmilière. Sur la pointe de leurs pieds nus, comme le veut la tradition bouddhiste, des centaines de fidèles bondissent pour échapper aux morsures du sol brûlant, franchissent en courant le cordon de sécurité et se précipitent au chevet du plus célèbre monument de Bagan, hélas privé de sa toiture et de sa flèche. La capitale du premier royaume birman, superbe site archéologique aux 2 000 pagodes construites entre le XIe et le XIIIe siècle, a été gravement endommagée par un tremblement de terre le mois précédent. Bientôt, les travaux officiels de reconstruction commenceront. En attendant, entonnant à pleins poumons l’air guilleret de l’hymne national birman, une foule prend d’assaut les échafaudages en bois et commence à déplacer de lourdes pierres sous un soleil de plomb. Juché sur un monticule de gravats, impérial dans sa robe safran, Ashin Wirathu joue avec naturel les chefs de chantier. Un téléphone à chaque oreille, le moine distribue ses consignes tout en prenant la pose pour les admirateurs qui l’accompagnent dans tous ses déplacements. Le leader charismatique de Ma Ba Tha, l’acronyme birman du Comité pour la protection de la race et de la religion, semble dans son élément sous les flashes qui crépitent et dans les forêts de portables qui s’érigent sur son passage.

Estrade, mégaphones, cameramen accrédités : chacune des apparitions publiques de Wirathu fait l’objet d’une mise en scène très éloignée de l’exigence ascétique de la religion. Ce jour-là, un drone sillonne même le ciel pour immortaliser l’événement – bourdonnement incongru dans la quiétude de ce lieu sacré. Pourtant, la consigne est de rester discret. C’est au terme de longues tractations que les portes du temple, fermées au public en attendant les travaux de rénovation, se sont ouvertes pour Wirathu et ses supporters. Et le gouvernement, visiblement soucieux que se propage la nouvelle de cette clique d’archéologues dilettantes sur un site candidat à l’inscription sur la liste du patrimoine mondial, a simplement demandé au bonze adepte des réseaux sociaux de ne publier aucune photo sur son compte Facebook… Cet épisode en dit long sur l’influence de Wirathu, passé à la postérité en juillet 2013 en faisant la couverture du magazine Time, dont le numéro a été interdit de parution en Birmanie et au Sri Lanka. Titre du dossier : « Le visage de la terreur bouddhiste. » Des termes a priori antagonistes, pourtant réconciliés par le moine iconoclaste à coups de discours haineux et de déclarations islamophobes.

Synonyme, aux yeux du monde, de paix et de tolérance, le bouddhisme n’échappe pas à une dérive fondamentaliste qui s’est développée sur la base d’un rejet violent d’une autre religion : l’islam. En Birmanie, au Sri Lanka, en Thaïlande ou en Inde, certains moines incitent à la violence envers les musulmans, vandalisent leurs commerces et brûlent les mosquées. Une hostilité dont les racines plongent dans un lointain passé : « La destruction des grands centres bouddhistes par les musulmans aux XIIe et XIIIe siècles a été vécue comme un traumatisme historique qui a forcément laissé des traces », estime Sofia Stril-Rever, indianiste et biographe française du Dalaï-lama (avec lequel elle a cosigné l’ouvrage Nouvelle réalité, éd. des Arènes, 2016). L’université bouddhiste de Nalanda, dans le nord de l’Inde, rasée au XIe siècle par les musulmans, a d’ailleurs été récemment reconstruite. Mille ans plus tard. « Un besoin d’exorciser ce passé », explique Sofia Stril-Rever. Le dynamitage, il y a quinze ans en Afghanistan, des bouddhas de Bamyan par les talibans, et plus généralement l’essor de la mouvance islamiste radicale, ont contribué à l’émergence d’un courant fondamentaliste au sein du bouddhisme.

L’opinion occidentale ignore souvent tout des subtilités de cette religion traversée par trois courants principaux (le mahayana, le theravada et le vajrayana), eux-mêmes divisés en plusieurs écoles de pensée. En Birmanie où, d’après le recensement publié l’an dernier, 88 % de la population pratique le bouddhisme – essentiellement theravada – selon le recensement réalisé en 2014, religion et identité nationale sont étroitement liées. Les moines sont les gardiens du culte et de la nation. Et ce, depuis longtemps. Quand le pays se libéra de la tutelle britannique, en janvier 1948, les militaires qui accédèrent au pouvoir n’avaient qu’une obsession : préserver l’unité d’un pays caractérisé par sa pluralité ethnique, avec 137 minorités officiellement reconnues. Pour y parvenir, la junte s’est appuyée sur le sangha, la hiérarchie bouddhiste, en échange de la construction de monuments religieux et de dons publics particulièrement généreux.

Mais en 2007, la « révolution de safran », initiée par des milliers de moines en colère (contre la flambée des prix du pétrole, notamment) et réprimée dans le sang, a installé une distance avec le pouvoir et initié le processus de démocratisation. Tout en modifiant l’équilibre des forces au sein de la communauté monastique : « Au lendemain de la révolution, les religieux les plus progressistes ont été purgés du clergé ou se sont exilés pour échapper à la répression militaire, créant un vide au sein du sangha et permettant aux éléments les plus conservateurs de prendre le dessus », analyse Kirt Mausert, chercheur à l’Institut pour l’engagement politique et civique (iPACE), à Rangoun.

Dans les années 2000, des moines originaires de l’Etat Mon, dans le sud du pays, ont lancé une campagne baptisée 969 – un chiffre sacré faisant référence aux trois joyaux du Bouddha – qui appelait au boycottage des commerces musulmans. Ashin Wirathu, fils d’un chauffeur de bus et d’une femme au foyer originaire de la région de Mandalay, prit la tête du mouvement à sa sortie de prison en janvier 2012, après avoir purgé une peine de onze ans pour incitation à la haine raciale. 969 fut interdit un an plus tard suite à de violentes émeutes interraciales. Alors, Wirathu créa Ma Ba Tha pour poursuivre sa croisade contre les musulmans.

Surfant sur une peur millénaire de déclin de la société, le groupe ultranationaliste connaît une croissance spectaculaire : il revendique aujourd’hui plus de dix millions de sympathisants (sur cinquante et un millions de Birmans), ainsi que 300 bureaux régionaux. Ses sources de financement sont obscures. Officiellement, Ma Ba Tha tire l’essentiel de ses revenus de ses activités de prêche et des donations de la communauté bouddhiste. Mais en réalité, le groupe dispose de moyens colossaux que le denier du culte ne suffit pas à expliquer : « Il faut voir le faste déployé à chaque congrégation « , note Htet Khaung Linn. Ce reporter au Myanmar Now, un quotidien en ligne, estime la fortune du groupement à « plusieurs millions de dollars » – les moines ne possédant rien en leur nom propre – et pointe certains cronies, les businessmen richissimes proches de la junte, comme des mécènes importants, mais discrets.

Cet argent est mis au service d’une propagande qui cible principalement les 1 500 000 Rohingya de l’Etat d’Arakan, dans l’ouest du pays. Depuis 1982, cette minorité musulmane ne fait plus partie des ethnies reconnues par la Constitution. Aujourd’hui, les enfants rohingya n’ont même plus droit à un certificat de naissance. Dans un silence assourdissant, ces apatrides survivent pour la plupart grâce à l’aide alimentaire internationale, dans un agglomérat de camps et de villages de désolation. L’emploi même du terme « Rohingya », qui signifie « habitant du Rohang », ancien nom de l’Arakan pour les musulmans de ces régions, est un point de contentieux. Selon les autorités, il s’agit de « Bengalis », des immigrés illégaux qui se seraient inventé une identité pour revendiquer des droits sur le sol birman. Certains historiens estiment qu’ils seraient de lointains descendants de soldats et de commerçants arabes, turcs ou bengalis convertis à l’islam au XVe siècle. Mais pour la majorité des Birmans, ils ont été importés du Bangladesh voisin par des colons britanniques à la fin du XIXe siècle.

Parmi la foule réunie à Bagan, plusieurs volontaires venus prêter main-forte au chantier arborent des tee-shirts avec un logo « No Rohingya ». « Personne n’en veut ici ! » affirme Ko Htein Lin, un petit commerçant de 36 ans qui a adhéré au mouvement 969 en 2012. A l’époque, des émeutes avaient secoué l’Arakan suite au viol d’une bouddhiste attribué à un musulman. Un point de fracture qui a marqué le début d’une série de massacres de Rohingya, accompagnés d’amalgames dangereux et de la crainte répandue d’une supposée progression de l’islam dans le pays. Les résultats du recensement de 2014, publiés en juillet dernier, montrent qu’en réalité la part de la population musulmane est restée plutôt stable en trente ans, passant de 3,9 % en 1983 à 4,3 % (simple estimation officielle, les Rohingya, apatrides, n’ayant pas été formellement recensés). Des chiffres têtus, qui ne suffisent pas à rassurer les bouddhistes. « Les musulmans se reproduisent à la vitesse de l’éclair pour mieux nous envahir. Nous avons besoin de Ma Ba Tha pour préserver notre race ! » La sentence émane d’une coquette octogénaire aux manières exquises, sanglée dans un sarong rose dans lequel elle tente de dissimuler un dos bossu. Mme Sadhama est une inconditionnelle de la première heure de Wirathu, qu’elle héberge gracieusement dans son petit hôtel de Bagan avec sa garde rapprochée.

Le Vénérable est là, comme un coq en pâte, sirotant un thé face à la jungle environnante, les yeux perdus dans le soleil couchant. Des joues rondes, l’œil pétillant et un sourire d’enfant, l’incarnation de la « terreur bouddhiste » n’a pas le physique de l’emploi. Comme pour mieux contredire cette étiquette d’extrémiste qui lui colle à la toge, le bonze ne se départit jamais d’un masque de bonté impénétrable. Contrairement à la plupart de ses coreligionnaires, il est entré en religion sur le tard, à l’âge de 16 ans : « Mes parents avaient d’autres ambitions pour moi, dit-il. Ils me rêvaient roi, pas moine. » Au fil des ans, Wirathu est parvenu à concilier ambitions personnelles et familiales, devenant en quelque sorte… le roi des moines. La formule le fait sourire, lui qui ne cache pas son appétence pour le pouvoir. Au monastère, le postulant délaissait volontiers les écrits de Bouddha pour des ouvrages de géopolitique, et se passionnait pour les manipulations et les coups tordus auxquels se livraient la CIA et le KGB au plus fort de la guerre froide. « Ces récits d’espionnage ont forgé mon sens tactique autant que ma conscience politique », confie-t-il.

Pas question de céder à l’attentisme. Wirathu cherche coûte que coûte à diffuser ses idées en occupant le terrain. Son opération de restauration du patrimoine en témoigne, mais également ses collectes de sang, ses programmes de microcrédits ou d’assistance juridique. Sous son patronage, le premier établissement d’enseignement supérieur entièrement gratuit du pays a vu le jour en juin dernier à Ngwe Nant Thar, dans le district de Rangoun. Cent cinquante élèves en uniforme impeccable y étudient dans un calme impressionnant. L’immense bâtiment flambant neuf, construit grâce à une donation d’un riche homme d’affaires, tranche avec les établissements scolaires publics insalubres qui remontent à l’époque coloniale. Ma Ba Tha étend ses tentacules dans toutes les sphères de la société birmane, distillant au passage ses mantras islamophobes (comme : « Il vaut mieux épouser un chien qu’un musulman. ») Son centre monastique de Mandalay, le plus grand du pays, accueille 2 800 élèves qui reçoivent les enseignements de Bouddha. Et ceux, plus personnels, du maître des lieux. A l’entrée, un panneau tapissé de photos d’exactions imputées à des groupes djihadistes accueille le visiteur (voir photo ci-dessous). Des images insoutenables de têtes coupées et de cadavres sanguinolents, devant lesquelles le ballet des novices passe, sans plus les remarquer.

Mais le goût de la provocation dont fait preuve Wirathu commence à embarrasser le comité de direction de Ma Ba Tha qui, depuis la victoire de la Ligue nationale démocratique – le parti dirigé par la Prix Nobel de la paix Aung San Suu Kyi – aux élections de novembre 2015, prend ses distances avec ce trublion médiatique. Aujourd’hui, le docteur U Thaw Parka, porte-parole officiel du groupe, tient à préciser que les déclarations de Wirathu « n’engagent que lui », et se désole de cette image d’ »extrémistes en robe » que ses partisans donnent dans les médias. Le groupe cherche à mettre en avant ses oeuvres sociales et délègue les actions politiques à des formations ultranationalistes comme l’Union des moines patriotes.

Ce groupe de jeunes bonzes virulents, qui reste discret sur ses effectifs, est à l’origine d’une série de manifestations organisées à Rangoun en septembre dernier. Leur but : protester contre la mission d’observation consacrée à la situation des Rohingya dans l’Etat d’Arakan, confiée à l’ancien secrétaire général de l’ONU. « Nous ne voulons pas de Kofi Annan, ce fils de p… », s’égosillait au micro, lors d’une de ces manifestations, U Thu Seikkta, secrétaire du mouvement et candidat sérieux à la réincarnation de la « terreur bouddhiste », sous des traits plus juvéniles. Le moine de 29 ans ne cache d’ailleurs pas son admiration pour Wirathu, son illustre aîné, et n’hésite pas à présenter les Moines patriotes comme le « bras armé » de Ma Ba Tha : « Bouddha a dit que nous devions protéger notre pays, explique-t-il. Je pense que c’est de la responsabilité des moines de défendre l’identité nationale. »

Quelques jours avant, le groupe a organisé le rachat et la libération de centaines de vaches et de moutons qui étaient destinés aux sacrifices pour l’Aïd el-Kébir. Depuis des années, cette fête religieuse, l’une des plus importantes pour les musulmans, cristallise les tensions entre communautés. Les lieux autorisés pour le sacrifice des moutons sont de plus en plus restreints et confinés en bordure des villes. C’est le cas à Meiktila. Dans cette ville endormie d’environ 900 000 habitants dans le centre du pays, l’importante communauté musulmane s’apprête à de discrètes célébrations pour l’Aïd. En 2013, elle a été au coeur d’une flambée de violence avec des citadins bouddhistes, causant la mort d’au moins une cinquantaine de personnes.

« La première nuit, une horde de bouddhistes armés de couteaux a débarqué dans notre quartier, se souvient Shansull Nisa, 70 ans. Ils jetaient des pierres contre nos fenêtres en hurlant, nous étions terrifiés. Nous avons été plus de 2 000 à fuir pour trouver refuge au stade de football. Si des moines ne nous avaient pas escortés, nous serions tous morts… » La vieille dame, les cheveux gris et les ongles orangés de henné, raconte son histoire, sans pathos. Cette nuit-là, elle a perdu son mari, son fils, son petit-fils de 6 ans et sa petite-fille de 9 ans, lynchés par une foule en furie. Elle n’a jamais regagné sa maison et vit toujours, comme une dizaine de familles, sous une tente près du stade, où elle ressasse son chagrin et son incompréhension. « Nos agresseurs sont les mêmes personnes avec lesquelles nous lavions chaque jour nos vêtements dans la rivière. » Aujourd’hui, la jungle a envahi la mosquée centenaire de Meiktila. Après les émeutes, le cimetière musulman a été rasé par des bulldozers pour y construire un centre d’affaires – resté vide depuis –, et des pans entiers de quartiers restent fantômes.

Depuis cette époque, la confiance n’est jamais revenue. Du côté des bouddhistes, elle a laissé place à un racisme ordinaire. Ti Ti Win, 55 ans, est professeure de mathématiques. Une femme sans histoires, habitée par la peur, mais aussi par la haine : « Les musulmans sont des fauteurs de troubles, affirme-t-elle. Ils prétendent garder des couteaux dans leurs mosquées pour les sacrifices d’animaux, mais nous, nous savons qu’ils peuvent s’en servir à tout moment contre nous. » Ti Ti Win rêve à voix haute d’une Birmanie débarrassée de ses musulmans. Sa voisine, Daw Puu Suu, 51 ans, aussi : « Nous n’avons rien à faire avec eux, dit-elle. Leur simple vision me met mal à l’aise. » Meiktila est désormais coupée en deux par une frontière invisible. Sur la vingtaine de mosquées que comptait la ville, seules trois restent autorisées.

« Depuis 2013, nous sommes traités comme une menace pour la sécurité nationale », se désole l’imam Mu Ishaquel, qui a vu trente et un des élèves de la madrasa du centre-ville où il enseignait brûlés vifs lors des attaques. L’homme se souvient de ce temps pourtant pas si lointain où il dormait dans les monastères et aidait les moines à traduire du sanskrit des textes sacrés. Aujourd’hui, le religieux dit avoir peur de marcher seul dans la rue avec sa barbe fournie. Il enlève sa calotte quand il voyage et rêve de quitter le pays. Des « cartes vertes » ont récemment été distribuées aux musulmans de Meiktila en remplacement de leurs papiers d’identité détruits lors des émeutes. Elles leur confèrent un statut de citoyen associé et les privent de nombreux droits, comme celui d’aller à l’université, de monter une entreprise ou encore de se présenter à des élections. « Nous sommes nés ici ! s’insurge l’imam. C’est une insulte, une façon de nous tuer une seconde fois. » Un racisme institutionnalisé.

Le signe, aussi, que les religieux bouddhistes extrémistes ont su se faire entendre du pouvoir. En 2015, dans l’indifférence générale, quatre lois ont été entérinées par le Parlement. Particularité : c’est le comité exécutif de Ma Ba Tha qui les a rédigées. Elles interdisent les conversions et les mariages entre une bouddhiste et un musulman, et imposent un délai minimum de trois ans entre chaque naissance dans les régions à majorité musulmane. Comme beaucoup de musulmans, Ismaël, un professeur de Rangoun (qui préfère rester anonyme), avait eu l’espoir que les choses s’améliorent avec la victoire écrasante de la Ligue nationale pour la démocratie, le parti d’Aung San Suu Kyi, aux élections législatives en novembre 2015, pour laquelle la communauté a massivement voté.

Aujourd’hui, son constat est amer : « Nous ne sommes absolument pas protégés par ce nouveau gouvernement, qui cherche avant tout à ménager les militaires et les moines, dit-il. Les bouddhistes restent des citoyens de première classe, les chrétiens, de seconde classe, les musulmans, de troisième classe. Quant aux Rohingya, ils sont carrément en enfer ! » Perçue dans un premier temps comme un camouflet pour Ma Ba Tha, qui avait activement soutenu le gouvernement sortant, la victoire d’Aung San Suu Kyi ne constitue pas le rempart attendu contre les violences religieuses. Comme le prouve l’assassinat, le 29 janvier dernier, de Kyi Ko Ni, conseiller juridique de la « dame de Rangoun » et grande voix de la tolérance dans le pays. Cet avocat musulman cherchait notamment à faire réviser les quatre lois sur la race et la religion, et travaillait à la rédaction d’un texte législatif afin de criminaliser les discours de haine. Un rempart juridique pour barrer la route aux mouvements extrémistes, après la flambée de violence de la fin de l’année dernière.

Le 8 octobre 2016, des postes de police installés à la frontière avec le Bangladesh ont été pris pour cible par de petits groupes d’assaillants rohingya. L’attaque, qui a causé la mort de neuf policiers, a été revendiquée dans une vidéo reprenant les codes de l’Etat islamique. La violence djihadiste serait-elle en train de gagner le far west birman ? Aucune preuve n’en a été apportée, mais l’armée n’a pas attendu confirmation pour se livrer à des représailles, faisant des centaines de morts. En février, les Nations unies ont publié un rapport accablant sur les meurtres et les viols perpétrés contre les civils rohingya dans la région de Maungdaw, dans le nord de l’Etat d’Arakan. Lors de sa visite en France en septembre, le Dalaï-lama déclarait que « si la haine continue de répondre à la haine, la haine ne cessera jamais ». Les moines en robe safran feront-ils mine de l’ignorer ?

Voir enfin:

Pogroms that we cannot ignore

The  JC

April 21, 2013

The Holocaust, as we know, was not a sudden event and nor is it – as some well-meaning (mostly) religious people often suggest – incomprehensible. Its scale, its ambition was what was remarkable about it. How it came about is not amazing at all.

The most important precondition for the attempt to murder all of Europe’s Jews was successfully to depict them as a malign « other »- as not-quite-people who, by existing, represented an existential threat to the majority. So historic ideas about Jewish separateness and hostility to the « goodness » of Christ and Christianity became, in the modern era, ideas about the illegitimate accretion of power, the undermining of the natural community and conspiracies.

The tropes of ancient antisemitism slowly morphed into those of modern antisemitism and as they did, prepared the way for what came later. The early brickwork for the gas chambers was laid in the acts of exclusion and literal stigma: the word « Jew » in passports, laws about what jobs Jews could do, the boycotting of Jewish businesses, the depictions in cartoons and films.

Of course, you knew this and if you have to read another article about the Holocaust you’ll scream. Doesn’t he have anything else to write about etc? I understand. But I have a very specific reason for having tried your patience with the above. It is to compare the process of « othering » the Jews with what is happening to a group of Muslims in Burma.

To give a very brief recapitulation. In western Burma there are hundreds of thousands of « Rohingya » Muslims, originally from Bengal. The majority population is Buddhist and ethnically Burmese and for years Burmese governments have refused to recognize the Rohingya as Burmese citizens. They have, however, nowhere else to go and have built lives for themselves in the Arakan province.

For years there has been a campaign against them by Burmese nationalists, including that strange phenomenon, Buddhist extremists. But what have been dubbed « tensions » have become something else. In the last few months, in what can only be described as pogroms, Rohingyas have seen mosques and shops taken over and their houses burned. Some have been murdered. Hundreds of thousands have been displaced, many to internal refugee camps.

But what must worry any Jew with a memory is the language of the persecutors. One of the leaders of the anti-Rohingya campaign is a Buddhist monk from Mandalay, who preaches a message that is horribly familiar. Take these elements from a recent speech:

Wirathu warns that the Buddhist public needs to adopt a « nationalist mindfulness » in everything it does, otherwise the « Kalars » (a derogatory term for ethnic Bengalis) will take over. These « Kalars » and their influence have prevented Aung San Suu Kyi speaking out for true Burmese people. Muslims are taking over important positions in politics. Now Rangoon is at risk of falling into the Muslims’ hands. And, of course, Muslims only think of their own interests.

He cites examples of Buddhist religious sensitivities being assaulted by Muslims and Muslim businessmen and asserts that no-one « will protect the Buddhist faith ». So Buddhists must act. « We must do business or otherwise interact with only our kind: same race and same faith » shopping only at shops marked with the sign of a Buddhist owner. Buddhists must use Buddhist owned buses even when Muslim buses are cheaper, « otherwise the enemy’s power will rise ».

« Consider that extra you have to pay, » he exhorts, « as your contribution to your race and faith ». Finally, « once we have won this battle we will move on to other targets ».

Wirathu is a modern Nazi, is he not? Which means we know where this one is going and where, if nothing is done, it may end up.

Voir enfin:

Le bouddhisme, une religion tolérante ?

Bernard Faure
Sciences humaines

Juin-Juillet-Août 2003

La cause semble entendue : le bouddhisme est une religion tolérante, sinon « la » religion de la tolérance. Mais cette tolérance – au demeurant discutable – est-elle liée à la nature du bouddhisme, ou est-elle le fruit de nécessités historiques et politiques ?

Dès son origine, le bouddhisme insiste sur la compassion envers autrui : le premier bouddhisme, dit Theravâda, toujours présent en Asie du Sud-Est et au Sri Lanka, met l’accent sur une introspection personnelle qui doit permettre de comprendre la nature de nos rapports avec l’autre (pour les débuts du bouddhisme, voir l’article, pp. 22-25 ; pour son histoire, voir la carte p. 26 et l’encadré, pp. 30-31). Il n’y a pas de dogme fondamental, en dehors de quelques notions issues de l’hindouisme. Il n’existe pas non plus d’autorité ecclésiastique ultime. Ces deux traits font qu’il est de prime abord difficile de parler d’orthodoxie, et à plus forte raison de fondamentalisme bouddhique. Les bouddhismes, par nature pluriels, ont su accueillir en leur sein les doctrines les plus diverses.

Plus tard, le bouddhisme Mahâyâna (« grand véhicule »), aujourd’hui répandu en Chine, en Corée, au Japon et au Viêtnam, prône la compassion pour tous les êtres, même les pires. Ce sentiment de communion est fondé sur la croyance en la transmigration des âmes, laquelle conduit les êtres à renaître en diverses destinées, humaines et non-humaines. Le Mahâyâna insiste sur la présence d’une nature de bouddha en tout être.

Quant au bouddhisme Vajrayâna (ésotérique, tantrique), issu du Mahâyâna et aujourd’hui localisé au Tibet et en Mongolie, il offre une vision grandiose de l’univers tout entier, qui n’est autre que le corps du Bouddha cosmique. A l’époque contemporaine, compassion et tolérance sont devenues, en partie par la personne médiatique du dalaï-lama actuel, icône moderne du bouddhisme tibétain, l’image de marque même du bouddhisme dans son ensemble.

Les penseurs bouddhistes ont rapidement élaboré des concepts propres à expliquer divers degrés de vérité. Le Bouddha lui-même, selon un enseignement ultérieurement synthétisé, notamment par le Mahâyâna, prêchait ainsi une vérité conventionnelle (accessible à tous), adaptée aux facultés limitées de ses auditeurs, réservant la vérité ultime à une élite spirituelle. Ce recours constant à des expédients salvifiques (upâya), balisant des voies différentes et plus ou moins difficiles d’accès au salut, rend le dogmatisme difficile, car tout dogme relève du domaine de la parole, donc de la vérité conventionnelle.

Un syncrétisme militant

Ces théories vont faciliter diverses formes de syncrétisme ou de synthèse, comme celles de Zhiyi (539-597) et de Guifeng Zongmi (780-841) en Chine, de Kûkai (774-835) au Japon, et de Tsong-kha-pa (1357-1419) au Tibet. Il s’agit généralement d’une sorte de syncrétisme militant, par lequel les cultes rivaux (religion bön au Tibet, confucianisme et taoïsme en Chine, shinto au Japon…) sont intégrés à un rang subalterne dans un système dont le point culminant est la doctrine de l’auteur. Ces élaborations aboutissent rapidement à faire du bouddhisme un polythéisme, qui assimile et mêle dans ses panthéons les dieux des religions qui lui préexistaient (de l’hindouisme, du bön, du taoïsme…). Au demeurant, la pratique n’a pas toujours été aussi harmonieuse que la théorie. On observe par exemple dans le bouddhisme chinois et japonais, entre les viiie et xiiie siècles de notre ère, une tendance marquée par l’adoption d’une pratique unique (par exemple la méditation assise, ou la récitation du nom du bouddha Amida), censée subsumer toutes les autres. Ainsi de certaines écoles du courant de l’amidisme, chinois et japonais, qui postulent que celui qui récite simplement une formule cultuelle au moment de mourir se voit garantir sa réincarnation au paradis de la Terre pure.

Mais c’est surtout en raison de son évolution historique que le bouddhisme est conduit à faire des accrocs à ses grands principes. Le principal écueil réside dans les rapports de cette religion avec les cultures qu’elle rencontre au cours de son expansion. L’attitude des bouddhistes envers les religions locales est souvent décrite comme un exemple classique de tolérance. Il s’agit en réalité d’une tentative de mainmise : les dieux indigènes les plus importants sont convertis, les autres sont rejetés dans les ténèbres extérieures, ravalés au rang de démons et, le cas échéant, soumis ou détruits par des rites appropriés. Certes, le processus est souvent représenté dans les sources bouddhiques comme une conversion volontaire des divinités locales. Mais la réalité est fréquemment toute autre, comme en témoignent certains mythes, qui suggèrent que le bouddhisme a parfois cherché à éradiquer les cultes locaux qui lui faisaient obstacle.

C’est ainsi que le Tibet est « pacifié » au viiie siècle par le maître indien Padmasambhava, lorsque celui-ci soumet tous les « démons » locaux (en réalité, les anciens dieux) grâce à ses formidables pouvoirs. Un siècle auparavant, le premier roi bouddhique Trisong Detsen a déjà soumis les forces telluriques (énergies terrestres de nature « magique » qui influencent individus et habitats), symbolisées par une démone, dont le corps recouvrait tout le territoire tibétain, en « clouant » celle-ci au sol par des stûpas (monuments commémoratifs et souvent centres de pèlerinage) fichés aux douze points de son corps. Le temple du Jokhang à Lhasa, lieu saint du bouddhisme tibétain, serait le « pieu » enfoncé en la partie centrale du corps de la démone, son sexe.

Ce symbolisme, décrivant la « conquête » bouddhique comme une sorte de soumission sexuelle, se retrouve dans un des mythes fondateurs du bouddhisme tantrique, la soumission du dieu Maheshvara par Vajrapâni, émanation terrifiante du bouddha cosmique Vairocana. Maheshvara est l’un des noms de Shiva, l’un des grands dieux de la mythologie hindoue. Ce dernier, ravalé par le bouddhisme au rang de démon, n’a commis d’autre crime que de se croire le Créateur, et de refuser de se soumettre à Vajrapâni, en qui il ne voit qu’un démon. Son arrogance lui vaut d’être piétiné à mort ou, selon un pieux euphémisme, « libéré », malgré la molle intercession du bouddha Vairocana pour freiner la fureur destructrice de son avatar Vajrapâni. Pris de peur, les autres démons (dieux hindous) se soumettent sans résistance. Dans une version encore plus violente, le dieu Rudra (autre forme de Shiva) est empalé par son redoutable adversaire. Le mythe de la soumission de Maheshvara se retrouve au Japon, même si, dans ce dernier pays, les choses se passent dans l’ensemble de manière moins violente. Certes, on voit ici aussi de nombreux récits de conversions plus ou moins forcées des dieux autochtnones. Mais bientôt, une solution plus élégante est trouvée, avec la théorie dite « essence et traces » (honji suijaku). Selon cette théorie, les dieux japonais (kami) ne sont que des « traces », des manifestations locales dont l’« essence » (honji) réside en des bouddhas indiens. Plus besoin de conversion, donc, puisque les kamis sont déjà des reflets des bouddhas.

Paradoxalement, la notion d’absolu dégagée par la spéculation bouddhique va permettre aux théoriciens d’une nouvelle religion, le soi-disant « ancien » shinto, de remettre en question la synthèse bouddhique au nom d’une réforme purificatrice et nationaliste. A terme, ce fondamentalisme shinto mènera à la « révolution culturelle » de Meiji (1868-1873), au cours de laquelle le bouddhisme, dénoncé comme religion étrangère, verra une bonne partie de ses temples détruits ou confisqués. Jusqu’à la Seconde Guerre mondiale, la religion officielle japonaise réinvestit les mythes shintos et s’organise autour du culte de l’Empereur divinisé, descendant du plus important kami national, la déesse du Soleil. Par contre-coup, le bouddhisme à son tour se réfugie dans un purisme teinté de modernisme, qui rejette comme autant de « superstitions » les croyances locales.

Le bouddhisme, les femmes et les hérésies

Comme on l’a vu, la métaphore qui inspire les récits de conversions des divinités locales est souvent celle de la soumission sexuelle. Dans ces récits, le bouddhisme est fondamentalement mâle, tandis que les cultes locaux sont souvent féminisés. La question des rapports du bouddhisme et des femmes constitue un autre cas de dissonance entre la théorie et la pratique.

L’histoire commence d’ailleurs assez mal. La tradition rapporte que le Bouddha refusa initialement, dans l’ordre qu’il venait de fonder, sa propre tante et mère adoptive, Mahâprâjapati. C’est après l’intervention réitérée de son disciple et cousin bien-aimé Ânanda que le Bouddha aurait fini par consentir à accepter l’ordination des femmes, non sans imposer à celles-ci quelques règles particulièrement sévères (en raison de l’extrême imperfection féminine). En outre, il prédit que, du fait de leur présence, la Loi (Dharma) bouddhique était condamnée à décliner au bout de cinq siècles.

En théorie, le principe de non-dualité si cher au bouddhisme Mahâyâna semble pourtant impliquer une égalité entre hommes et femmes. Dans la réalité monastique, les nonnes restent inférieures aux moines, et sont souvent réduites à des conditions d’existence précaires. Avec l’accès des cultures asiatiques à la modernité, les nonnes revendiquent une plus grande égalité. Toutefois, leurs tentatives se heurtent à de fortes résistances de la part des autorités ecclésiastiques. Tout récemment, les médias ont rapporté le cas d’une nonne thaïe physiquement agressée par certains moines pour avoir demandé une amélioration du statut des nonnes.

Le bouddhisme a par ailleurs longtemps imposé aux femmes toutes sortes de tabous. La misogynie la plus crue s’exprime dans certains textes bouddhiques qui décrivent la femme comme un être pervers, quasi démoniaque. Perçues comme foncièrement impures, les femmes étaient exclues des lieux sacrés, et ne pouvaient par exemple faire de pèlerinages en montagne. Pire encore, du fait de la pollution menstruelle et du sang versé lors de l’accouchement, elles étaient condamnées à tomber dans un enfer spécial, celui de l’Etang de Sang. Le clergé bouddhique offrait bien sûr un remède, en l’occurrence les rites, exécutés, moyennant redevances, par des prêtres. Car le bouddhisme, dans sa grande tolérance, est censé sauver même les êtres les plus vils…

La notion d’hérésie n’est que rarement employée dans le bouddhisme, et elle ne déboucha pas sur les excès de fanatisme familiers à l’Occident. On parle parfois des « maîtres d’hérésie » vaincus par le Bouddha, et en particulier de l’« hérésie personnaliste » ou « substantialiste », qui remettait en question le principe de l’absence de moi. Mais ces événements ne donnèrent pas lieu à des autodafés – peut-être parce qu’ils se développèrent au sein de traditions orales.

Le bouddhisme chinois se caractérise par une forte tendance syncrétique. Une exception est celle du chan (qui deviendra le zen au Japon) de l’école dite du Sud. Cette dernière rejette l’approche doctrinale traditionnelle, qualifiée de gradualiste, selon laquelle la délivrance ne s’acquiert qu’à la suite d’un long processus de méditation, au nom d’un éveil subit qui postule que la délivrance peut intervenir à n’importe quel moment. Le chef de file de l’école du Sud, Shenhui (670-762), s’en prend violemment à ses rivaux de l’école Chan du Nord en 732. Son activisme, exceptionnel parmi les bouddhistes chinois, lui vaut d’être envoyé en exil.

Au Japon, où les courants doctrinaux ont eu tendance à se durcir en « sectes », on trouve des exemples d’intolérance plus familiers à un observateur occidental. Ainsi, la secte de la Terre pure (Nembutusu), fondée par Hônen Shônin (1133-1212), dont les disciples, dans leur dévotion exclusive au bouddha Amida, jugent inutiles les anciens cultes (aux autres bouddhas, mais surtout aux kamis japonais) – minant par là-même les fondements religieux de la société médiévale. C’est pour réagir contre cette intransigeance, qui a conduit certains des adeptes de cette secte à l’iconoclasme, que ses rivaux la dénoncent et cherchent à la faire interdire. Hônen Shônin est envoyé en exil en 1207, et sa tombe est profanée quelques années plus tard.

Quant au maître zen Dôgen (1200-1253), fondateur de la secte Sôtô, il s’en prend à l’« hérésie naturaliste » – terme sous lequel il désigne pêle-mêle l’hindouïsme, le taoïsme, le confucianisme, et un courant rival du sien, l’école de Bodhidharma (Darumashû). Les termes par lesquels il condamne deux moines chinois, assassins présumés du patriarche indien Bodhidharma, en les qualifiant notamment de « chiens », sont caractéristiques d’un nouvel état d’esprit polémique. Une telle attitude a de quoi surprendre chez un maître en principe « éveillé », que l’on a voulu présenter comme l’un des principaux philosophes japonais.

Cet esprit se retrouve chez Nichiren (1222-1282), fondateur de la secte du même nom, qui se prend pour un prophète persécuté. Nichiren dénonce en particulier le zen comme une « fausse doctrine » qui n’attire que les dégénérés. Mais aucune des autres écoles du bouddhisme japonais ne trouve grâce à ses yeux. A l’en croire, « les savants du Tendai et du Shingon flattent et craignent les patrons du nembutsu et du zen ; ils sont comme des chiens qui agitent la queue devant leurs maîtres, comme des souris qui ont peur des chats » (Georges Renondeau, La Doctrine de Nichiren, Puf, 1953).

Il faut enfin mentionner les luttes intestines qui opposent, au sein de la secte Tendai (tendance majoritaire du bouddhisme japonais du viiie au xiiie siècle), les factions du mont Hiei et du Miidera. A diverses reprises, les monastères des deux protagonistes sont détruits par les « moines-guerriers » du rival. Les raids périodiques de ces armées monacales sur la capitale, Kyôto, défrayent les chroniques médiévales. C’est seulement vers la fin du xvie siècle qu’un guerrier à bout de patience, Oda Nobunaga (1534-1582), décide de raser ces temples et de passer par le fil du sabre les fauteurs de troubles.

Fondamentalismes bouddhiques

Les rapports du bouddhisme et de la guerre sont complexes. Dans les pays où il constituait l’idéologie officielle, il fut tenu de soutenir l’effort de guerre. Il existe également dans le bouddhisme tantrique un arsenal important de techniques magiques visant à soumettre les démons. Il fut toujours tentant d’assimiler les ennemis à des hordes démoniaques, et de chercher à les soumettre par le fer et le feu rituel.

Avec la montée des nationalismes au xixe siècle, le bouddhisme s’est trouvé confronté à une tendance fondamentaliste. Certes, la chose n’était pas tout à fait nouvelle. Dans le Japon du xiiie siècle, lors des invasions mongoles (elles-mêmes légitimées par les maîtres bouddhiques de la cour de Kûbilaï Khân), les bouddhistes japonais invoquèrent les « vents divins » (kamikaze) qui détruisirent l’armada ennemie. Ils mirent également en avant la notion du Japon « terre des dieux » (shinkoku), qui prendra une importance cruciale dans le Japon impérialiste du xxe siècle. Durant la Seconde Guerre mondiale, les bouddhistes japonais devaient soutenir l’effort de guerre, mettant leur rhétorique au service de la mystique impériale. Même Daisetz T. Suzuki, le principal propagateur du zen en Occident, se fera le porte-parole de cette idéologie belliciste.

Plus récemment, c’est à Sri Lanka que cet aspect agonistique a pris le dessus, avec la revendication d’indépendance de la minorité tamoule, qui a conduit depuis 1983 à de sanglants affrontements entre les ethnies sinhala et tamoule. Le discours des Sinhalas constitue l’exemple le plus approchant d’une apologie bouddhique de la guerre sainte. Certes, il s’agit d’un fondamentalisme un peu particulier, puisqu’il repose sur un groupe ethnique plutôt que sur un texte sacré. Il existe bien une autorité scripturaire, le Mahâvamsa, chronique mytho-historique où sont décrits les voyages magiques du Bouddha à Sri Lanka, ainsi que la lutte victorieuse du roi Duttaghâmanî contre les Damilas (Tamouls) au service du bouddhisme. Le Mahâvamsa sert ainsi de caution à la croyance selon laquelle l’île et son gouvernement ont traditionnellement été sinhalas et bouddhistes. C’est notamment dans ses pages qu’apparaît le terme de Dharma-dîpa (île de la Loi bouddhique). Il ne restait qu’un pas, vite franchi, pour faire de Sri Lanka la terre sacrée du bouddhisme, qu’il faut à tout prix défendre contre les infidèles. Ce fondamentalisme est avant tout une idéologie politique.

Mentionnons pour finir un cas significatif, puisqu’il met en cause la personne même du dalaï-lama, le personnage qui personnifie aux yeux de la plupart l’image même de la tolérance bouddhique. Il s’agit du culte d’une divinité tantrique du nom de Dorje Shugden, esprit d’un ancien lama, rival du cinquième dalaï-lama, et assassiné par les partisans de celui-ci, adeptes des Gelugpa, au xviie siècle. Par un étrange retour des choses, cette divinité était devenue le protecteur de la secte des Gelugpa, et plus précisément de l’actuel Dalaï-Lama, jusqu’à ce que ce dernier, sur la base d’oracles délivrés par une autre divinité plus puissante, Pehar, en vienne à interdire son culte à ses disciples. Cette décision a suscité une levée de boucliers parmi les fidèles de Shugden, qui ont reproché au dalaï-lama son intolérance. Inutile de dire que les Chinois ont su exploiter cette querelle à toutes fins utiles de propagande. L’histoire a été portée sur les devants de la scène après le meurtre d’un partisan du dalaï-lama par un de ses rivaux, il y a quelques années. Par-delà les questions de personne et les dissensions politiques, ce fait divers souligne les relations toujours tendues entre les diverses sectes du bouddhisme tibétain.

Même s’il ne saurait être question de nier l’existence au coeur du bouddhisme d’un idéal de paix et de tolérance, fondé sur de nombreux passages scripturaux, ceux-ci sont contrebalancés par d’autres sources selon lesquelles la violence et la guerre sont permises lorsque le Dharma bouddhique est menacé par des infidèles. Dans le Kalacakra-tantra par exemple, texte auquel se réfère souvent le dalaï-lama, les infidèles en question sont des musulmans qui menacent l’existence du royaume mythique de Shambhala. A ceux qui rêvent d’une tradition bouddhique monologique et apaisée, il convient d’opposer, par souci de vérité, cette part d’ombre.

BERNARD FAURE

Professeur à l’université de Stanford, Californie. Auteur notamment de Bouddhisme , Liana Levi, 2001 ; Bouddhismes, philosophies et religions , Flammarion, 1998.

Vingt-cinq siècles de bouddhisme

Le bouddhisme est né d’une réforme de la religion védique. Les trois grandes traditions bouddhistes visent à atteindre la fin des douleurs, engendrées par la succession des vies sur terre, par l’accès à l’état de sainteté.

– La première version du bouddhisme (theravâda, ou voie des anciens, appelée par dérision « petit véhicule » par ses adversaires issus de la réforme mahâyâna) défend que seuls les moines peuvent accéder au salut. De l’Inde, le theravâda a conquis toute l’Asie du Sud-Est. S’il a survécu au Laos, en Thaïlande, au Cambodge et au Myanmar, il a été supplanté par l’islam en Indonésie et Malaisie.

– La réforme mahâyâna (« grand véhicule ») stipule que chacun peut accéder au salut par une vie de mérites. Le mahâyâna a gagné la Chine, puis la Corée et le Japon, n’hésitant pas à se fondre dans de vastes systèmes syncrétiques destinés à lui assurer son succès par l’élaboration de cosmogonies compatibles avec les cultes qui lui préexistaient (taoïsme, confucianisme et culte des ancêtres en Chine ; taoïsme, confucianisme et chamanisme en Corée ; shinto – culte des esprits proche du chamanisme dans sa version d’origine – au Japon…).

– Quant au vajrayâna (« véhicule de diamant »), ou lamaïsme, ou encore bouddhisme tantrique, qui prône le salut par l’étude ésotérique, il est surtout présent au Tibet et en Mongolie. Issu du mahâyâna, il a souvent intégré dans son culte des éléments des religions indigènes : bön au Tibet, chamanisme en Mongolie.

Le bouddhisme compte aujourd’hui, selon les estimations, de 300 à 600 millions d’adeptes, dont 50 à 100 millions pour le theravâda (Sud-Est asiatique), le solde étant mahâyâna (dont la Chine, avec 100 à 250 millions d’adeptes). Le vajrayâna regroupe de 10 à 20 millions de pratiquants. La production littéraire des diverses écoles en Occident, par laquelle on peut se documenter sur le bouddhisme, est d’importance variée : l’essentiel est produit par une école tibétaine et une ou deux écoles du zen… des courants minoritaires au regard du bouddhisme tel qu’il est pratiqué dans le monde.

L’EXPANSION DU BOUDDHISME

Au départ limité au nord de l’Inde, le bouddhisme n’est alors présent que par la voie du theravâda. Sa doctrine se répand en Inde, à Sri Lanka et à l’ensemble du Sud-Est asiatique, tant continental qu’insulaire, mais aussi en Mongolie. Mais très vite, à partir du siècle suivant, une réforme le divise en deux grands courants qui vont eux-mêmes se fragmenter en multiples écoles, ou sectes. C’est donc le bouddhisme mahâyâna qui se répand en Chine dès le iie siècle de notre ère, par le biais des routes commerciales qui convergent vers Chang’an, capitale de l’empire Tang du viie au xe siècle). De là, il atteint rapidement la Corée et le Japon, des pays sous influence culturelle de l’empire du Milieu.

LE CAS JAPONAIS

Dans un premier temps, des moines chinois importent au pays du Soleil levant les doctrines de leurs écoles et fondent six sectes (copiées sur les modèles continentaux) à Nara, capitale impériale. L’empereur Kammu, au viiie siècle, désireux de contrer l’ascendant de ces sectes, déplace la capitale à Kyôto et favorise l’expansion de deux sectes « officielles », Tendai et Shingon, influencées par le tantrisme et le shinto.

Jusqu’au xiiie siècle, le bouddhisme reste réservé à l’élite, le peuple demeure shinto. Mais l’implantation de l’amidisme, propagé depuis la Chine, la fondation du nichirénisme et l’arrivée du zen propagent le bouddhisme dans toutes les couches sociales.

– L’amidisme postule que tout un chacun peut accéder au salut pour peu qu’il adhère à un credo très simple, qui parfois se rapproche de la magie (récitation d’une formule).

– Le nichirénisme voit dans les autres écoles un danger pour l’unité du bouddhisme, qu’il importe de combattre par tous les moyens. Il emprunte à l’amidisme son dogme simplifié.

– Le zen, plus élitiste, prône la recherche du salut par le dépouillement et la méditation.

Aujourd’hui, on estime approximativement que, sur 90 millions de Japonais officiellement bouddhistes, 30 sont amidistes, 30 sont nichirénistes, 14 sont shingon, 6 sont zen, 5 sont tendai, le solde se répartissant entre quelques dizaines d’autres mouvements.

LAURENT TESTOT


Iran: C’est la nature du régime, imbécile ! (Forty years on, will Europe finally understand the Islamic republic’s vital commitment to the revolutionary principle of permanent war on US interests and allies ?)

13 juin, 2019

https://scontent-cdt1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/50507978_2239113002967301_7089701712348315648_n.jpg?_nc_cat=103&_nc_ht=scontent-cdt1-1.xx&oh=7d2415bc329c5a93b3f8623719132fbd&oe=5D8BE59F

L’ennemi est ici, on nous ment que c’est l’Amérique ! Slogan du peuple iranien
Lâchez la Syrie occupez-vous de nous ! Slogan du peuple iranien
Mort aux paysans ! Vivent les oppresseurs ! Slogan (ironique) de manifestants paysans iraniens
L‘Armée de la République islamique d’Iran et le Corps des Gardes de la Révolution islamique … seront responsables, non seulement de la garde et de la préservation des frontières du pays, mais aussi de l’exécution de la mission idéologique du jihad sur la voie de Dieu, c’est-à-dire de l’expansion de la souveraineté de la Loi de Dieu à travers le monde. Préambule de la constitution iranienne (1979-1989)
L’Iran aurait pu être la Corée du Sud; il est devenu la Corée du Nord. (…) Mais n’oubliez pas qu’Ahmadinejad n’est que le représentant d’un régime de nature totalitaire, qui ne peut se réformer et évoluer, quelle que soit la personne qui le représente. (…) Le slogan du régime est : « L’énergie nucléaire est notre droit indéniable. » Je lui réponds: ce droit, nous l’avions, c’est vous et les vôtres qui nous en avez privés. (…) Mon père (…) a décidé, dès les années 1970, de lancer un programme de production d’énergie nucléaire à des fins exclusivement civiles. C’est pourquoi nous avons signé le traité de non-prolifération (…) Aujourd’hui, le problème ne vient pas de l’idée de se doter de l’énergie nucléaire ; il provient de la nature du régime islamique. (…) je ne crois pas que les mollahs soient assez fous pour penser un jour utiliser la bombe contre Israël: ils savent très bien qu’ils seraient aussitôt anéantis. Ce qu’ils veulent, c’est disposer de la bombe pour pouvoir s’institutionnaliser une fois pour toutes dans la région et étendre leurs zones d’influence. Ils rêvent de créer un califat chiite du XXIe siècle et entendent l’imposer par la bombe atomique (…) il est manifeste qu’un gouvernement paranoïaque crée des crises un peu partout pour tenter de regagner à l’extérieur la légitimité qu’il a perdue à l’intérieur. Les dérives du clan au pouvoir ne se limitent pas au soutien au Hamas, elles vont jusqu’à l’Amérique latine de Chavez. Il ne s’agit en rien d’une vision qui vise à défendre notre intérêt national. Si le régime veut survivre, il doit absolument mettre en échec le monde libre, combattre ses valeurs. La République islamique ne peut pas perdurer dans un monde où l’on parle des droits de l’homme ou de la démocratie. Tous ces principes sont du cyanure pour les islamistes. Comment voulez-vous que les successeurs de Khomeini, dont le but reste l’exportation de la révolution, puissent s’asseoir un jour à la même table que le président Sarkozy ou le président Obama? Dans les mois à venir, un jeu diplomatique peut s’engager, mais, au final, il ne faut pas se faire d’illusion. Même si Khatami revenait au pouvoir, le comportement du régime resterait identique, car le vrai décideur c’est Khamenei. Je ne vois aucune raison pour laquelle le régime islamiste accepterait un changement de comportement. Cela provoquerait, de manière certaine, sa chute. Il ne peut plus revenir en arrière. J’ai bien peur que la diplomatie ne tourne en rond une nouvelle fois et que la course à la bombe ne continue pendant ce temps. Reza Pahlavi
La légitimité et la crédibilité d’un régime politique ne s’apprécie pas qu’à la seule aune du vote populaire, mais également à celle de sa capacité à assurer le bien être de son peuple et d’œuvrer pour l’intérêt national dans le respect des droits de l’homme. Un pouvoir qui ne puisse satisfaire cette double exigence est aussi digne de confiance qu’un gouvernement d’occupation, c’est hélas, Monsieur Khamenei, le cas de l’Iran de ces trente dernières années. (…) Il n’existe, de par le monde, qu’une poignée de régimes ayant privé leurs peuples aussi bien des droits humains fondamentaux que conduit leurs pays à la faillite économique. Il n’est donc pas étonnant de compter parmi vos rares pays alliés la Syrie, le Soudan ou la Corée du Nord. Reza Pahlavi
The uprising, once again showed that overthrowing theocracy in Iran is a national demand. Prince Reza Pahlavi
Le monde entier comprend que le bon peuple d’Iran veut un changement, et qu’à part le vaste pouvoir militaire des Etats-Unis, le peuple iranien est ce que ses dirigeants craignent le plus. Donald Trump
Les régimes oppresseurs ne peuvent perdurer à jamais, et le jour viendra où le peuple iranien fera face à un choix. Le monde regarde ! Donald Trump
L’Iran échoue à tous les niveaux, malgré le très mauvais accord passé avec le gouvernement Obama. Le grand peuple iranien est réprimé depuis des années. Il a faim de nourriture et de liberté. La richesse de l’Iran est confisquée, comme les droits de l’homme. Il est temps que ça change. Donald Trump
Les Iraniens courageux affluent dans les rues en quête de liberté, de justice et de droits fondamentaux qui leur ont été refusés pendant des décennies. Le régime cruel de l’Iran gaspille des dizaines de milliards de dollars pour répandre la haine au lieu de les investir dans la construction d’hôpitaux et d’écoles. Tenant compte de cela, il n’est pas étonnant de voir les mères et les pères descendre dans les rues. Le régime iranien est terrifié de son propre peuple. C’est d’ailleurs pour cela qu’il emprisonne les étudiants et interdit l’accès aux médias sociaux. Cependant, je suis sûr que la peur ne triomphera pas, et cela grâce au peuple iranien qui est intelligent, sophistiqué et fier. Aujourd’hui, le peuple iranien risque tout pour la liberté, mais malheureusement, de nombreux gouvernements européens regardent en silence alors que de jeunes Iraniens héroïques sont battus dans les rues. Ce n’est pas juste. Pour ma part, je ne resterai pas silencieux. Ce régime essaie désespérément de semer la haine entre nous, mais il échouera. Lorsque le régime tombera enfin, les Iraniens et les Israéliens seront à nouveau de grands amis. Je souhaite au peuple iranien du succès dans sa noble quête de liberté. Benjamin Netanyahou
En tant que défenseur de la rue arabe, [l’Iran] ne peut pas avoir un dialogue apaisé avec les Etats-Unis, dialogue au cours duquel il accepterait les demandes de cet Etat qui est le protecteur par excellence d’Israël. Téhéran a le soutien de la rue arabe, talon d’Achille des Alliés Arabes des Etats-Unis, car justement il refuse tout compromis et laisse entendre qu’il pourra un jour lui offrir une bombe nucléaire qui neutralisera la dissuasion israélienne. Pour préserver cette promesse utile, Téhéran doit sans cesse exagérer ses capacités militaires ou nucléaires et des slogans anti-israéliens. Il faut cependant préciser que sur un plan concret, les actions médiatiques de Téhéran ne visent pas la sécurité d’Israël, mais celle des Alliés arabes des Etats-Unis, Etats dont les dirigeants ne peuvent satisfaire les attentes belliqueuses de la rue arabe. Ainsi Téhéran a un levier de pression extraordinaire sur Washington. Comme toute forme de dissuasion, ce système exige un entretien permanent. Téhéran doit sans cesse fouetter la colère et les frustrations de la rue arabe ! Il doit aussi garder ses milices actives, de chaînes de propagande en effervescence et son programme nucléaire le plus opaque possible, sinon il ne serait pas menaçant. C’est pourquoi, il ne peut pas accepter des compensations purement économiques offertes par les Six en échange d’un apaisement ou une suspension de ses activités nucléaires. Ce refus permanent de compromis est vital pour le régime. (…) Il n’y a rien qui fasse plus peur aux mollahs qu’un réchauffement avec les Etats-Unis : ils risquent d’y perdre la rue arabe, puis le pouvoir. C’est pourquoi, le 9 septembre, quand Téhéran a accepté une rencontre pour désactiver les sanctions promises en juillet, il s’est aussitôt mis en action pour faire capoter ce projet de dialogue apaisé qui est un véritable danger pour sa survie. Iran Resist
L’analyse des témoignages des jeunes des grandes villes iraniennes et l’observation de leurs comportements sur les réseaux sociaux montrent que la politique sociale répressive des ayatollahs a produit des effets inattendus. La nouvelle génération de 15 à 25 ans vit dans le rejet du système de valeurs, promulgué par l’école et les médias de la République islamique. Pendant ces dernières décennies, le décalage entre l’espace public, maîtrisé par les agents de mœurs, et l’espace privé, où presque tout est permis, n’a cessé de progresser. Pourtant, malgré le non-respect que les jeunes citadins affichent pour les mesures islamiques – vestimentaires, alimentaires, sexuelles, … –, leurs témoignages révèlent qu’en dépit de leur apparence rebelle, ils ont en partie intériorisé l’image négative que la société leur inflige à cause du rejet de ses normes et valeurs. Cette image devient doublement négative lorsqu’ils se reprochent leur inaction, comme si la capacité d’agir sur leur sort et de faire valoir leurs droits fondamentaux ne dépendait que d’eux et de la volonté individuelle. Les catastrophes naturelles qui dévastent le pays (comme le tremblement de terre, les inondations ou les sècheresses, etc.) et les situations politiques ingérables (comme la menace de guerre, les sanctions économiques, ou certaines décisions politiques jugées inacceptables, etc.) aiguisent leur conscience de l’impuissance et déclenchent chez eux une avalanche de reproches et de haine de soi. Peut-être cette auto culpabilisation relève-t-elle d’un besoin de se sentir responsable, de se procurer une semblable illusion de puissance. Peut-être est-elle un simple mécanisme d’auto-défense. Mais, elle n’en reste pas moins destructrice pour autant, car elle les empêche d’avoir une vision objective de leur situation. Dans un pays où la moindre critique et protestation sont violemment réprimées, et où l’on peut encourir de lourdes peines de prisons pour avoir contesté une décision politique, quelle est la marge de manœuvre des individus? Quatre décennies de l’atteinte physique, l’atteinte juridique, et l’atteinte à la dignité humaine ont profondément privé les jeunes de reconnaissance sociale et les ont affectés dans le sentiment de leur propre valeur. La non reconnaissance du droit et de l’estime sociale en Iran ont créé des conditions collectives dans lesquelles les jeunes ne peuvent parvenir à une attitude positive envers eux-mêmes. En l’absence de confiance en soi, de respect de soi, et d’estime de soi, nul n’est en mesure de s’identifier à ses fins et à ses désirs en tant qu’être autonome et individualisé. Or, faut-il s’étonner si, aujourd’hui, l’émigration est devenue la seule perspective de l’avenir des jeunes Iraniens? Mahnaz Shirali
On his watch, the Russians meddled in our democracy while his administration did nothing about it. The Mueller report flatly states that Russia began interfering in American democracy in 2014. Over the next couple of years, the effort blossomed into a robust attempt to interfere in our 2016 presidential election. The Obama administration knew this was going on and yet did nothing. In 2016, Obama’s National Security Adviser Susan Rice told her staff to « stand down » and « knock it off » as they drew up plans to « strike back » against the Russians, according to an account from Michael Isikoff and David Corn in their book « Russian Roulette: The Inside Story of Putin’s War on America and the Election of Donald Trump ». Why did Obama go soft on Russia? My opinion is that it was because he was singularly focused on the nuclear deal with Iran. Obama wanted Putin in the deal, and to stand up to him on election interference would have, in Obama’s estimation, upset that negotiation. This turned out to be a disastrous policy decision. Obama’s supporters claim he did stand up to Russia by deploying sanctions after the election to punish them for their actions. But, Obama, according to the Washington Post, « approved a modest package… with economic sanctions so narrowly targeted that even those who helped design them describe their impact as largely symbolic. » In other words, a toothless response to a serious incursion. Scott Jennings (CNN)
Radicals linked to Hizbollah, the Lebanese militant group, stashed thousands of disposable ice packs containing ammonium nitrate – a common ingredient in homemade bombs. The plot was uncovered by MI5 and the Metropolitan Police in the autumn of 2015, just months after the UK signed up to the Iran nuclear deal. Three metric tonnes of ammonium nitrate was discovered – more than was used in the Oklahoma City bombing that killed 168 people and damaged hundreds of buildings. Police raided four properties in north-west London – three businesses and a home – and a man in his 40s was arrested on suspicion of plotting terrorism. The man was eventually released without charge. Well-placed sources said the plot had been disrupted by a covert intelligence operation rather than seeking a prosecution. The discovery was so serious that David Cameron and Theresa May, then the prime minister and home secretary, were personally briefed on what had been found. Yet for years the nefarious activity has been kept hidden from the public, including MPs who were debating whether to fully ban Hizbollah, until now. It raises questions about whether senior UK government figures chose not to reveal the plot in part because they were invested in keeping the Iran nuclear deal afloat. (…) It became clear, according to well-placed sources, that the UK storage was not in isolation but part of an international Hizbollah plot to lay the groundwork for future attacks. The group had previously been caught storing ice packs in Thailand. And in 2017, two years after the London bust, a New York Hizbollah member would appear to seek out a foreign ice pack manufacturer. Ice packs provide the perfect cover, according to sources – seemingly harmless and easy to transport. Proving beyond doubt they were purchased for terrorism was tricky.  But the most relevant case was in Cyprus, where a startlingly similar plot had been busted just months before the discovery in London. There, a 26-year-old man called Hussein Bassam Abdallah, a dual Lebanese and Canadian national, was caught caching more than 65,000 ice packs in a basement. During interrogation he admitted to being a member of Hizbollah’s military wing, saying he had once been trained to use an AK47 assault rifle. Abdallah said the 8.2 tonnes of ammonium nitrate stored was for terrorist attacks. He pleaded guilty and was given a six-year prison sentence in June 2015. In Abdallah’s luggage police found two photocopies of a forged British passport. Cypriot police say they were not the foreign government agency that tipped Britain off to the London cell. (…) A UK intelligence source said: “MI5 worked independently and closely with international partners to disrupt the threat of malign intent from Iran and its proxies in the UK.” The decision not to inform the public of the discovery, despite a major debate with Britain’s closest ally America about the success of the Iran nuclear deal, will raise eyebrows. Keeping MPs in the dark amid a fierce debate about whether to designate the entire of Hezbollah a terrorist group – rather than just its militant wing – will also be questioned. The US labelled the entire group a terrorist organisation in the 1990s. But in Britain, only its armed wing was banned. The set-up had led senior British counter-terrorism figures to believe there was some form of understanding that Hizbollah would not target the UK directly. Hizbollah was only added to the banned terrorist group list in its entirety in February 2019 – more than three years after the plot was uncovered. The Telegraph
There is a reason America’s European and Asian allies are determined to end the US quarantine of Iranian businesses. Trump’s increasingly tough sanctions give countries and corporations an uncomfortable pair of options: Buy Iranian oil and invest there, or do business with the US — but you can’t do both. The latest punishment came last Friday, when the administration vowed to sanction anyone doing business with Iran’s petrochemical industry, a lucrative exporting sector run by the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, which is now rightly listed by Washington as a terror organization. America’s allies are eager to revive the smooth flow of goods and business with Iran; their diplomacy is meant to put pressure on Washington to start a process that would lead to new direct talks. Iran, they claim, will behave better, now that its economy is strained. America should take advantage and aim for a fresh rapprochement. The problem with the allies’ theory: No such hunger for reconciliation is in evidence in Tehran. Instead, the regime is still signaling obstinacy. The ayatollahs are as committed as ever to their revolutionary principles, the main one of which is waging war on US interests and allies. Take Foreign Minister Javad Zarif, long touted as a symbol of moderation and openness and a welcome guest in Western TV studios. Yet defending Iran’s habit of hanging gay people in the public square, Zarif told the German newspaper Bild this week: “Our society has moral principles, and according to these principles we live.” Hosting Germany’s Maas this week, Zarif also pushed back against Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s recent offer of negotiations “without preconditions.” The Islamic Republic won’t talk to those who wage “economic war” against it, Zarif said, threatening for good measure that, as an Iranian enemy, America “cannot expect to stay safe.” The theocracy is hardening, rather than softening, its line, notwithstanding entreaties from Tokyo, Berlin and Brussels. These well-meaning outsiders inevitably point to supposed moderates that America can do business with, and, as always, they urge Washington to ignore Tehran’s malign rhetoric and muscle-flexing. It’s true that some Iranian politicians favor making cosmetic concessions to the West to ensure the Islamic Republic’s survival. But the ultimate decider, Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, has long soured on such concessions. Negotiation, he recently said, “has no benefit and carries harm.” In a perfect world, the global economy would be better off when everyone can do business with everyone without fear of punishment. But the existence of a militantly anti-Western regime like Iran’s is a reminder that ours isn’t a perfect world. Abe, then, would be better off warning Iran about its joint missile development with Japan’s menacing neighbor, North Korea (a reminder that the regime’s behavior is destructive far beyond its immediate neighborhood.) Talks may be worthwhile — but not before Khamenei leaves the stage. Once the old dictator is gone, the ensuing internal struggle may work to the West’s advantage. Economic pressure may then embolden Iranians hoping to throw off the regime’s yoke. Or it may not. Either way, dealing with the regime as it exists is futile, as more than four decades of experience have shown. Trump should turn a deaf ear to Abe and the rest of the world’s eager go-betweens. Benny Avni
When it comes to countering terrorism: follow the money. The world fought the Taliban, al-Qaeda, and ISIL by cutting off their money. We must do the same today and acknowledge that the epicenter of modern terrorism is IRAN. Iran bankrolls a ‘coalition of terrorists’ around the world that further Iran‘s policy of expansionism. With Iran‘s backing of over $1 billion, Hezbollah has turned Lebanon into a launching pad for terror. Hezbollah’s funding, weaponry and even its food all come from Iran. Iranian money has landed directly in the pockets of Hamas and Islamic Jihad in the Gaza Strip and in Judea and Samaria. With Hamas’ help and the Palestinian branch of the Iranian Quds Force, Iran is trying to turn Judea and Samaria into a fourth military front against Israel. Danny Danon
Après des décennies de complaisance et de lâcheté occidentales avec le régime enturbanné, particulièrement sous les mandats du sinistre Barack « Imam » Hussein Obama, idole de l’établissement culturo-médiatique mondialiste, l’actuel président américain Donald Trump, au grand désespoir des Zéropéens, les Britanniques en tête en leur qualité de soutien traditionnel du clergé chiite, semble déterminé à prendre le taureau par les cornes et étouffer la principale tête de la Bête islamiste. Celle dont l’irruption en 1979 a été le point de départ de l’essor considérable de l’islam politique, cette idéologie mortifère, combinaison du nazisme et du communisme. Après quarante années de turpitudes et de sévices en tous genre infligés principalement au peuple iranien, mais également, par des voies directes ou indirectes, à l’ensemble du monde civilisé, le régime des turbans noirs et des turbans blancs est confronté à la plus grave crise de son histoire, déjà beaucoup trop longue. La pétro-mollahrchie ne peut plus exporter le pétrole iranien qui constitue sa source essentielle de revenus pour financer son activisme terroriste et ses sordides réseaux clientélistes dans la région. Les chiens de garde du régime sont désormais officiellement reconnus par la première puissance mondiale comme ce qu’ils ont toujours été depuis leur naissance, à savoir des terroristes fanatiques aux ordres de leurs maîtres enturbannés. Enfin, la théocratie milicienne n’arrive plus à dériver les colères et frustrations de la population vers l’extérieur. Les Iraniens ont aujourd’hui compris, dans leur immense majorité, que ceux qui les dirigent sont leurs plus grands ennemis. En tout état de cause, les jours de la mafia ochlo-théocratique sont comptés. Quelle que soit l’issue de la présente crise, le désastre économique, la paupérisation générale de la population contrastant avec l’opulence insolente des mollahs au pouvoir, celle de leurs sbires, de leurs familles et de leurs clients, la corruption délirante de l’oligarchie khomeyniste dont l’ampleur insoupçonnée est révélée davantage chaque jour et le discrédit massif de la mollahrchie et de son idéologie condamnent ce régime cauchemardesque aux poubelles de l’Histoire à brève échéance. L’inscription des « Gardiens de la Révolution » sur la liste des organisations terroristes établie par l’administration américaine a étonné nombre de prétendus « observateurs » et « experts » des affaires iraniennes, qui se sont émus notamment qu’une « armée régulière (sic) d’un pays » puisse être assimilée à une entité terroriste. C’est en réalité une décision d’une extrême logique au regard du pédigree de cette sinistre milice dont la dénomination officielle (« Sépâh-é Pâsdârân-é Enghelâb-é Eslâmi » i.e « les Gardiens de la Révolution islamique) fait apparaître expressément que cette organisation paramilitaire n’est nullement en charge de la défense de l’Iran et du peuple iranien, mais de la seule « Révolution islamique » et, par suite, du régime qui en est le fer de lance. (…) Ce n’est, en effet, qu’à compter de 1982 que les voyous fanatisés dénommés « Pasdarans » ont vu leur rôle accru, de manière importante, durant cette guerre, lorsque celle-ci a pris un virage intégralement idéologique, avec la volonté de Khomeyni de la prolonger indéfiniment sous le prétexte d’exporter son abjecte révolution dans la région, au mépris des vies gaspillées sur les théâtres d’opération, pour continuer d’asseoir son pouvoir tyrannique, museler toute critique de sa politique irresponsable et réprimer avec une férocité implacable tous ses opposants. (…) Pour se faire une idée ce qui se passe en Iran depuis quarante ans, il faudrait se représenter une France dans laquelle la voyoucratie et la racaille islamisée de banlieue aurait réussi à s’accaparer la quasi-intégralité des ressources de l’Etat et le contrôle des grands groupes économiques nationaux, industriels et commerciaux, pour les utiliser à son profit exclusif, dans le but non seulement de mener grand train aux dépens du reste de la population, mais aussi de financer un gigantesque réseau clientéliste aux ramifications internationales, aux seules fins de bâtir un système d’influence fondé sur une idéologie mortifère, sans aucune considération de l’intérêt national du peuple français. (…) A la différence de ses prédécesseurs à la Maison Blanche et des nombreux dirigeants occidentaux qui se sont succedés depuis quarante ans, dont l’archétype fut l’Imam Hussein Obama, lequel a fait montre d’une complaisance et d’une lâcheté funeste dans la gestion du « cas iranien », Donald Trump a le mérite de ne pas se laisser intimider par la mafia enturbannée. S’il devait persister dans cette attitude ferme, il pourrait être celui qui aura aidé le peuple iranien, allié naturel du monde libre et civilisé, à terrasser la Bête islamiste avant que les métastases de ce cancer ne finissent de se propager sur la planète. Chasser cette Bête de la tanière qu’elle s’est aménagée, il y a quatre décennies, au détriment d’un pays martyr, serait pour la région un événement d’une portée équivalente à la chute du Mur de Berlin pour l’Europe. Il s’agirait d’un coup décisif à cette synthèse idéologique du nazisme et du communisme que constitue l’islam politique. Car n’en déplaisent aux fascistes tiers-mondistes, aux obsédés de l’« antisionisme » et autres anti-américains pavloviens qui fantasment sur la « résistance » de la dictature des turbans noirs et des turbans blancs, la disparition de l’ochlo-théocratie khomeyniste et l’avènement d’un Iran libre, laïque et démocratique, renouant avec le sillon tracé par la dynastie Pahlavi, serait un gage considérable de paix dans la région et le monde. En s’alliant au peuple iranien dans ce combat, le président Donald Trump pourrait entrer dans l’Histoire comme le Roosevelt du 21e siècle. Iran-Resist

C’est la nature du régime, imbécile !

Alors que du Golfe d’Oman au Yemen et à la frontière syro-israélienne et à l’instar de son très probablement feu commandant des opérations extérieures, un régime iranien aux abois multiplie les provocations…

Et qu’entre deux manoeuvres d’apaisement ou de détournement des sanctions américaines, leurs idiots utiles européens ou asiatiques accusent le président Trump …

Pendant que se confirment pour préserver un accord nucléaire iranien plus que douteux

Tant l’insigne lâcheté d’une Administration Obama prête, entre deux actes de haute trahison avec les Iraniens ou les Russes, à tolérer une ingérence étrangère dans ses propres élections …

Que celle de dirigeants britanniques n’hésitant pas à taire la découverte de trois tonnes d’explosifs stockés sur leur propre sol par le mouvement terroriste Hezbollah  …

Comment ne pas voir avec nos amis du site de résistance iranien Iran-Resist …

Ou les quelques spécialistes encore un peu lucides comme Mahnaz Shirali ou Benny Avni

L’incroyable cécité d’un Occident …

Qui depuis 40 ans n’a toujours pas compris que la nature même d’un régime révolutionnaire comme la République islamique …

Pour faire oublier la corruption et l’incompétence à l’intérieur …

C’est la provocation et l’agression permanente à l’extérieur …

Du moins, après l’accident industriel Obama, jusqu’à l’arrivée au pouvoir à Washington …

De celui qui avec l’élimination de « l’ochlo-théocratie khomeyniste » et l’avènement enfin d’un « Iran libre, laïc et démocratique » …

Pourrait « entrer dans l’Histoire comme le Roosevelt du 21e siècle » ?

Mollahs : Endgame
Sam Safi
Iran-Resist
06.06.2019

Après des décennies de complaisance et de lâcheté occidentales avec le régime enturbanné, particulièrement sous les mandats du sinistre Barack « Imam » Hussein Obama, idole de l’établissement culturo-médiatique mondialiste, l’actuel président américain Donald Trump, au grand désespoir des Zéropéens, les Britanniques en tête en leur qualité de soutien traditionnel du clergé chiite, semble déterminé à prendre le taureau par les cornes et étouffer la principale tête de la Bête islamiste. Celle dont l’irruption en 1979 a été le point de départ de l’essor considérable de l’islam politique, cette idéologie mortifère, combinaison du nazisme et du communisme.

La récréation est terminée. Après quarante années de turpitudes et de sévices en tous genre infligés principalement au peuple iranien, mais également, par des voies directes ou indirectes, à l’ensemble du monde civilisé, le régime des turbans noirs et des turbans blancs est confronté à la plus grave crise de son histoire, déjà beaucoup trop longue. La pétro-mollahrchie ne peut plus exporter le pétrole iranien qui constitue sa source essentielle de revenus pour financer son activisme terroriste et ses sordides réseaux clientélistes dans la région. Les chiens de garde du régime sont désormais officiellement reconnus par la première puissance mondiale comme ce qu’ils ont toujours été depuis leur naissance, à savoir des terroristes fanatiques aux ordres de leurs maîtres enturbannés. Enfin, la théocratie milicienne n’arrive plus à dériver les colères et frustrations de la population vers l’extérieur. Les Iraniens ont aujourd’hui compris, dans leur immense majorité, que ceux qui les dirigent sont leurs plus grands ennemis.

En tout état de cause, les jours de la mafia ochlo-théocratique sont comptés. Quelle que soit l’issue de la présente crise, le désastre économique, la paupérisation générale de la population contrastant avec l’opulence insolente des mollahs au pouvoir, celle de leurs sbires, de leurs familles et de leurs clients, la corruption délirante de l’oligarchie khomeyniste dont l’ampleur insoupçonnée est révélée davantage chaque jour et le discrédit massif de la mollahrchie et de son idéologie condamnent ce régime cauchemardesque aux poubelles de l’Histoire à brève échéance.

Les molosses de Khamenei aux abois

L’inscription des « Gardiens de la Révolution » sur la liste des organisations terroristes établie par l’administration américaine a étonné nombre de prétendus « observateurs » et « experts » des affaires iraniennes, qui se sont émus notamment qu’une « armée régulière (sic) d’un pays » puisse être assimilée à une entité terroriste. C’est en réalité une décision d’une extrême logique au regard du pédigrée de cette sinistre milice dont la dénomination officielle (« Sépâh-é Pâsdârân-é Enghelâb-é Eslâmi » i.e « les Gardiens de la Révolution islamique) fait apparaître expressément que cette organisation paramilitaire n’est nullement en charge de la défense de l’Iran et du peuple iranien, mais de la seule « Révolution islamique » et, par suite, du régime qui en est le fer de lance.

L’Iran dispose en effet toujours de son armée nationale (« Artesh ») créée par la dynastie Pahlavi. Cependant, celle-ci a été volontairement appauvrie et affaiblie par les mollahs, depuis quatre décennies, en raison de son patriotisme persistant et de son lien historique avec le pouvoir impérial.

Contrairement à ce que tentent de faire croire aujourd’hui les cerbères des tyrans au turban et leurs lobbystes déguisés en « spécialistes » ou « experts », c’est bien l’armée régulière iranienne qui, durant la guerre Iran/Irak, a joué un rôle essentiel dans la libération du territoire national durant la première phase du conflit entre 1980 et 1982.

Ce n’est, en effet, qu’à compter de 1982 que les voyous fanatisés dénommés « Pasdarans » ont vu leur rôle accru, de manière importante, durant cette guerre, lorsque celle-ci a pris un virage intégralement idéologique, avec la volonté de Khomeyni de la prolonger indéfiniment sous le prétexte d’exporter son abjecte révolution dans la région, au mépris des vies gaspillées sur les théâtres d’opération, pour continuer d’asseoir son pouvoir tyrannique, museler toute critique de sa politique irresponsable et réprimer avec une férocité implacable tous ses opposants.

Soutenir le contraire serait méconnaître la réalité historique et surtout oublier que, loin de pouvoir rivaliser initialement avec l’armée nationale iranienne en termes de qualités et de compétences, les membres de cette milice, au début de la contre-révolution khomeyniste, étaient essentiellement issus des fanges les plus sordides de la population criminogène où se recrutaient traditionnellement les membres de la pègre, les loubards à couteau, les proxénètes et autres trafiquants de drogue, activités qu’ils continuent, au demeurant, de pratiquer sous leurs nouveaux habits, mais à une échelle bien plus importante avec des conséquences catastrophiques sur la société iranienne.

C’est, au demeurant, sur cette canaille en uniforme, avec laquelle il a noué une relation privilégiée durant ses années à la présidence du régime (1981-1989), que Khamenei s’est appuyé pour accéder au pouvoir suprême et éliminer ses principaux rivaux, à commencer par Montazeri, pourtant dauphin désigné de Khomeyni jusqu’aux dernières semaines ayant précédé la mort de l’ancien touriste de Neauphle-le-Château.

En contrepartie, le mollah collectionneur de pipes et de bagues, une fois au sommet du pouvoir clerico-mafieux, récompensera ses bouledogues en les autorisant à faire main basse sur la quasi-totalité des secteurs stratégiques de l’économie iranienne, leur permettant ainsi de constituer progressivement un véritable Etat dans l’Etat formant aujourd’hui un complexe militaro-industriel dans lequel réside le pouvoir profond de l’ochlo- théocratie.

Pour se faire une idée ce qui se passe en Iran depuis quarante ans, il faudrait se représenter une France dans laquelle la voyoucratie et la racaille islamisée de banlieue aurait réussi à s’accaparer la quasi-intégralité des ressources de l’Etat et le contrôle des grands groupes économiques nationaux, industriels et commerciaux, pour les utiliser à son profit exclusif, dans le but non seulement de mener grand train aux dépens du reste de la population, mais aussi de financer un gigantesque réseau clientéliste aux ramifications internationales, aux seules fins de bâtir un système d’influence fondé sur une idéologie mortifère, sans aucune considération de l’intérêt national du peuple français.

Quel avenir pour le Grand Timonier enturbanné ?

Outre l’effondrement économique, le mécontentement populaire et la pression militaire américaine, le régime peut également être sérieusement ébranlé par la disparition prochaine de son « Guide Suprême ». Il faut néanmoins rester prudent sur ce point. Ces dernières années, à chaque fois que la cléricature khomeyniste s’est senti sévèrement menacée, elle a fait courir le bruit de l’imminence de la mort de Khamenei pour tromper ses adversaires en leur laissant entrevoir, à court terme, un tournant majeur qui résulterait de cette disparition, conduisant ces derniers à apaiser leur colère ou modérer leurs revendications.

C’est ainsi que lors du soulèvement débuté à l’été 2009, consécutivement à la réélection grossièrement frauduleuse du pantin Ahmadinejad, le parrain de la mollahrchie, Rafsandjani, avait habilement manipulé Wikileaks en laissant fuiter une de ses déclarations prétendant que son ancien compagnon de lutte révolutionnaire, dont la légitimité était alors violemment et ouvertement contestée par les masses de manifestants, souffrait d’un cancer en phase terminale ne lui laissant plus que quelques mois à vivre…

Plusieurs années après la répression féroce de ce mouvement massif de contestation du régime, lors des négociations concernant le prétendu « Iran deal » (cet accord honteux au sujet duquel les mollahs se vantaient régulièrement dans leurs médias d’avoir enfumé les Occidentaux, avant qu’il ne soit dénoncé l’année dernière par le président des USA), les agents de la cléricature sont de nouveau parvenus, en février 2015, à intoxiquer les services et médias étrangers, dont le Figaro, en leur faisant croire que la mort du Guide de l’ochlo-théocratie, atteint d’un cancer de la prostate au stade métastatique, était imminente…

Une fois encore, les années ont passé et Khamenei est toujours vivant. Ce qui n’est plus le cas de son ancien comparse Rafsandjani, le co-fondateur du régime, décédé en janvier 2017 et de celui qui était, un temps, présenté comme son successeur au poste suprême, l’Irakien milliardaire fraîchement naturalisé Shahroudi, disparu en décembre 2018…

Cela dit, jusqu’à preuve du contraire, le Lider Maximo khomeyniste, qui sera octogénaire dans quelques semaines, n’est pas éternel et, si le régime parvient à survivre encore quelques temps, sa succession sera nécessairement ouverte. Elle devrait échoir à son fils Mojtaba ou au fidèle Ebrahim Raissi qui, par son profil de criminel de masse, de mollah borné et son titre de « seyyed », toujours de nature à faire tourner les têtes de sectateurs fidèles prêts à s’extasier à la vue d’un turban noir, semble tout désigné pour cette fonction.

Le scénario d’un coup d’état des Pasdarans paraît, en revanche, peu crédible. Ces miliciens n’ont vocation qu’à être les bras et les couteaux des mollahs. Il est consternant de lire les prédictions de prétendus « experts » annonçant l’avènement prochain parmi eux d’un « Reza Shah islamique » (sic !) en la personne de Ghassem Soleymani, chef de la section Al Qods des Gardiens de la Révolution, dont l’idéologie n’est autre que la variante chiite de celle de l’organisation terroriste Al Qaïda avec laquelle elle entretient du reste des relations très étroites.

Soleymani est un quasi-illettré sans aucune vision politique et stratégique pour l’Iran autre que celle d’être une base arrière de mouvements terroristes djihadistes anti-occidentaux dirigée par des mollahs fanatiques. A ces « experts », il convient de souligner que parler à son sujet d’un futur « Reza Shah islamique » est aussi pertinent que d’évoquer un « Emmanuel Macron communiste », un « Philippe de Villiers europhile », un « Adolf Hitler philosémite », ou un « Robespierre royaliste ».

A court terme, il est néanmoins préférable que Khamenei et les autres vieillards qui l’entourent restent en vie, ne serait-ce que pour répondre, très prochainement, de leurs innombrables crimes et forfaitures devant le peuple iranien.

Une prochaine Chute du Mur islamique ?

A la différence de ses prédécesseurs à la Maison Blanche et des nombreux dirigeants occidentaux qui se sont succédés depuis quarante ans, dont l’archétype fut l’Imam Hussein Obama, lequel a fait montre d’une complaisance et d’une lâcheté funeste dans la gestion du « cas iranien », Donald Trump a le mérite de ne pas se laisser intimider par la mafia enturbannée.

S’il devait persister dans cette attitude ferme, il pourrait être celui qui aura aidé le peuple iranien, allié naturel du monde libre et civilisé, à terrasser la Bête islamiste avant que les métastases de ce cancer ne finissent de se propager sur la planète.

Chasser cette Bête de la tanière qu’elle s’est aménagée, il y a quatre décennies, au détriment d’un pays martyr, serait pour la région un événement d’une portée équivalente à la chute du Mur de Berlin pour l’Europe.

Il s’agirait d’un coup décisif à cette synthèse idéologique du nazisme et du communisme que constitue l’islam politique.

Car n’en déplaisent aux fascistes tiers-mondistes, aux obsédés de l’« antisionisme » et autres anti-américains pavloviens qui fantasment sur la « résistance » de la dictature des turbans noirs et des turbans blancs, la disparition de l’ochlo-théocratie khomeyniste et l’avènement d’un Iran libre, laïque et démocratique, renouant avec le sillon tracé par la dynastie Pahlavi, serait un gage considérable de paix dans la région et le monde.

En s’alliant au peuple iranien dans ce combat, le président Donald Trump pourrait entrer dans l’Histoire comme le Roosevelt du 21e siècle.

Libérés de ce régime sordide qui vampirise leur pays, tous les Iraniens pourront alors entonner avec fierté le chant que nombre d’entre eux ont déjà le courage de scander devant le tombeau du fondateur de leur nation à l’occasion du jour de Cyrus le Grand, le 7 Aban (29 octobre), au grand dam des mollahs et de leurs mercenaires : « Iran vatan-é mâst, Kourosh pédar-é mâst ! » (« L’Iran est notre patrie, Cyrus est notre père ! »).

Voir aussi:

US allies’ sad Tehran wild-goose chase
Benny Avni
New York Post
June 11, 2019

America’s allies are lining up to mediate between Washington and the Tehran regime. But they’re jumping the gun.

Witness Japan’s President Shinzo Abe, who arrives in Tehran Wednesday for a two-day visit, marking the 90th anniversary of diplomatic relations between his country and Iran. Tokyo officials defend their soft-on-Tehran approach as a “balanced” way to deal with the Mideast. Whatever the merits of that claim, the Abe visit is mostly about oil.

The trip comes shortly after the Japanese leader hosted his golfing buddy President Trump in Tokyo. The symbolism is deliberate: Abe seeks to revive a US-Iranian channel of communication, per Japanese media. And he isn’t alone in his efforts. Germany’s foreign minister, Heiko Maas, was in Tehran this week, trying to buck up confidence in the nuclear deal that Trump ditched.

There is a reason America’s European and Asian allies are determined to end the US quarantine of Iranian businesses. Trump’s increasingly tough sanctions give countries and corporations an uncomfortable pair of options: Buy Iranian oil and invest there, or do business with the US — but you can’t do both.

The latest punishment came last Friday, when the administration vowed to sanction anyone doing business with Iran’s petrochemical industry, a lucrative exporting sector run by the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, which is now rightly listed by Washington as a terror organization.

America’s allies are eager to revive the smooth flow of goods and business with Iran; their diplomacy is meant to put pressure on Washington to start a process that would lead to new direct talks. Iran, they claim, will behave better, now that its economy is strained. America should take advantage and aim for a fresh rapprochement.

The problem with the allies’ theory: No such hunger for reconciliation is in evidence in Tehran. Instead, the regime is still signaling obstinacy. The ayatollahs are as committed as ever to their revolutionary principles, the main one of which is waging war on US interests and allies.

Take Foreign Minister Javad Zarif, long touted as a symbol of moderation and openness and a welcome guest in Western TV studios. Yet defending Iran’s habit of hanging gay people in the public square, Zarif told the German newspaper Bild this week: “Our society has moral principles, and according to these principles we live.”

Hosting Germany’s Maas this week, Zarif also pushed back against Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s recent offer of negotiations “without preconditions.” The Islamic Republic won’t talk to those who wage “economic war” against it, Zarif said, threatening for good measure that, as an Iranian enemy, America “cannot expect to stay safe.”

The theocracy is hardening, rather than softening, its line, notwithstanding entreaties from Tokyo, Berlin and Brussels. These well-meaning outsiders inevitably point to supposed moderates that America can do business with, and, as always, they urge Washington to ignore Tehran’s malign rhetoric and muscle-flexing.

It’s true that some Iranian politicians favor making cosmetic concessions to the West to ensure the Islamic Republic’s survival. But the ultimate decider, Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, has long soured on such concessions. Negotiation, he recently said, “has no benefit and carries harm.”

In a perfect world, the global economy would be better off when everyone can do business with everyone without fear of punishment. But the existence of a militantly anti-Western regime like Iran’s is a reminder that ours isn’t a perfect world.

Abe, then, would be better off warning Iran about its joint missile development with Japan’s menacing neighbor, North Korea (a reminder that the regime’s behavior is destructive far beyond its immediate neighborhood.)

Talks may be worthwhile — but not before Khamenei leaves the stage. Once the old dictator is gone, the ensuing internal struggle may work to the West’s advantage.

Economic pressure may then embolden Iranians hoping to throw off the regime’s yoke. Or it may not. Either way, dealing with the regime as it exists is futile, as more than four decades of experience have shown.

Trump should turn a deaf ear to Abe and the rest of the world’s eager go-betweens.

Voir également:

Iran-linked terrorists caught stockpiling explosives in north-west London
Ben Riley-Smith
The Telegraph
9 June 2019

Terrorists linked to Iran were caught stockpiling tonnes of explosive materials on the outskirts of London in a secret British bomb factory, The Telegraph can reveal

Radicals linked to Hizbollah, the Lebanese militant group, stashed thousands of disposable ice packs containing ammonium nitrate – a common ingredient in homemade bombs.

The plot was uncovered by MI5 and the Metropolitan Police in the autumn of 2015, just months after the UK signed up to the Iran nuclear deal. Three metric tonnes of ammonium nitrate was discovered – more than was used in the Oklahoma City bombing that killed 168 people and damaged hundreds of buildings.

Police raided four properties in north-west London – three businesses and a home – and a man in his 40s was arrested on suspicion of plotting terrorism.

The man was eventually released without charge. Well-placed sources said the plot had been disrupted by a covert intelligence operation rather than seeking a prosecution.

The discovery was so serious that David Cameron and Theresa May, then the prime minister and home secretary, were personally briefed on what had been found.

Yet for years the nefarious activity has been kept hidden from the public, including MPs who were debating whether to fully ban Hizbollah, until now.

It raises questions about whether senior UK government figures chose not to reveal the plot in part because they were invested in keeping the Iran nuclear deal afloat.

The disclosure follows a three-month investigation by The Telegraph in which more than 30 current and former officials in Britain, America and Cyprus were approached and court documents were obtained.

One well-placed source described the plot as “proper organised terrorism”, while another said enough explosive materials were stored to do “a lot of damage”.

Ben Wallace, the security minister, said: “The Security Service and police work tirelessly to keep the public safe from a host of national security threats. Necessarily, their efforts and success will often go unseen.”

The Telegraph understands the discovery followed a tip-off from a foreign government. To understand what they were facing, agents from MI5 and officers from Metropolitan Police’s Counter Terrorism Command launched a covert operation.

It became clear, according to well-placed sources, that the UK storage was not in isolation but part of an international Hizbollah plot to lay the groundwork for future attacks.

The group had previously been caught storing ice packs in Thailand. And in 2017, two years after the London bust, a New York Hizbollah member would appear to seek out a foreign ice pack manufacturer.

Why ice packs?

Ice packs provide the perfect cover, according to sources – seemingly harmless and easy to transport. Proving beyond doubt they were purchased for terrorism was tricky.

But the most relevant case was in Cyprus, where a startlingly similar plot had been busted just months before the discovery in London. There, a 26-year-old man called Hussein Bassam Abdallah, a dual Lebanese and Canadian national, was caught caching more than 65,000 ice packs in a basement. During interrogation he admitted to being a member of Hizbollah’s military wing, saying he had once been trained to use an AK47 assault rifle.

Abdallah said the 8.2 tonnes of ammonium nitrate stored was for terrorist attacks. He pleaded guilty and was given a six-year prison sentence in June 2015.

In Abdallah’s luggage police found two photocopies of a forged British passport. Cypriot police say they were not the foreign government agency that tipped Britain off to the London cell.

But they did offer assistance when made aware of the UK case, meeting their British counterparts and sharing reports on what they had uncovered.

MI5’s intelligence investigation is understood to have lasted months. The aim was both to disrupt the plot but also get a clearer picture what Hizbollah was up to.

Such investigations can involve everything from eavesdropping on calls to deploying covert sources and trying to turn suspects.

The exact methods used in this case are unknown. Soon conclusions begun to emerge. The plot was at an early stage. It amounted to pre-planning. No target had been selected and no attack was imminent.

Well-placed sources said there was no evidence Britain itself would have been the target. And the ammonium nitrate remained concealed in its ice packs, rather than removed and mixed – a much more advanced and dangerous state. On September 30, the Met made their move.

Officers used search warrants to raid four properties in north-west London – three businesses and one residential address. That same day a man in his 40s was arrested on suspicion of terrorism offences under Section 5 of the Terrorism Act 2006. Neither his name nor his nationality have been disclosed.

His was the only arrest, although sources told The Telegraph at least two people were involved.  The man was released on bail. Eventually a decision was taken not to bring charges.

The exact reasons why remain unclear, but it is understood investigators were confident they had disrupted the plot and gained useful information about Hizbollah’s activities in Britain and overseas.

A UK intelligence source said: “MI5 worked independently and closely with international partners to disrupt the threat of malign intent from Iran and its proxies in the UK.”

The decision not to inform the public of the discovery, despite a major debate with Britain’s closest ally America about the success of the Iran nuclear deal, will raise eyebrows.

Keeping MPs in the dark amid a fierce debate about whether to designate the entire of Hezbollah a terrorist group – rather than just its militant wing – will also be questioned.

The US labelled the entire group a terrorist organisation in the 1990s. But in Britain, only its armed wing was banned. The set-up had led senior British counter-terrorism figures to believe there was some form of understanding that Hizbollah would not target the UK directly.

Hizbollah was only added to the banned terrorist group list in its entirety in February 2019 – more than three years after the plot was uncovered.

A spokesman for the press department of the Iranian Embassy in London said: « Iran has categorically rejected time and again any type of terrorism and extremism, has been victim of terrorism against its innocent people, and is in the forefront fighting this inhuman phenomenon.

« Any attempt to link Iran to terrorism, by claims from unknown sources, is totally rejected. »

Voir encore:

Comment la République islamique réprime les jeunes Iraniens

Malgré le non-respect que les jeunes citadins affichent pour les mesures islamiques, leurs témoignages révèlent qu’ils ont en partie intériorisé l’image négative que la société leur inflige à cause du rejet de ses normes et valeurs.

Mahnaz Shirali Sociologue politique, directrice d’études à l’ICP et enseignante à Sciences-Po
Huffington Post
03/06/2019

Quarante ans de la République islamique ont profondément désislamisé la population. Plus la politique étrangère de Téhéran isole le pays, plus les Iraniens s’éloignent du régime et de sa religion, et plus ils adoptent la culture occidentale.

Les jeunes Iraniens, qu’ils vivent à Téhéran ou dans les villes de provinces, ressemblent davantage à leurs pairs en Europe ou aux Etats-Unis qu’à leurs parents. Ils écoutent la même musique, s’habillent de la même manière et regardent les mêmes séries que les jeunes Parisiens ou New-Yorkais. Sauf que ces derniers ne connaissent pas le même décalage entre la vie privée et l’espace public et n’ont jamais subi les humiliations que les “agents de mœurs” de la République islamique infligent aux jeunes de leur pays.

L’analyse des témoignages des jeunes des grandes villes iraniennes et l’observation de leurs comportements sur les réseaux sociaux montrent que la politique sociale répressive des ayatollahs a produit des effets inattendus. La nouvelle génération de 15 à 25 ans vit dans le rejet du système de valeurs, promulgué par l’école et les médias de la République islamique. Pendant ces dernières décennies, le décalage entre l’espace public, maîtrisé par les agents de mœurs, et l’espace privé, où presque tout est permis, n’a cessé de progresser.

Pourtant, malgré le non-respect que les jeunes citadins affichent pour les mesures islamiques – vestimentaires, alimentaires, sexuelles, … –, leurs témoignages révèlent qu’en dépit de leur apparence rebelle, ils ont en partie intériorisé l’image négative que la société leur inflige à cause du rejet de ses normes et valeurs.

Cette image devient doublement négative lorsqu’ils se reprochent leur inaction, comme si la capacité d’agir sur leur sort et de faire valoir leurs droits fondamentaux ne dépendait que d’eux et de la volonté individuelle. Les catastrophes naturelles qui dévastent le pays (comme le tremblement de terre, les inondations ou les sècheresses, etc.) et les situations politiques ingérables (comme la menace de guerre, les sanctions économiques, ou certaines décisions politiques jugées inacceptables, etc.) aiguisent leur conscience de l’impuissance et déclenchent chez eux une avalanche de reproches et de haine de soi. Peut-être cette auto culpabilisation relève-t-elle d’un besoin de se sentir responsable, de se procurer une semblable illusion de puissance. Peut-être est-elle un simple mécanisme d’auto-défense. Mais, elle n’en reste pas moins destructrice pour autant, car elle les empêche d’avoir une vision objective de leur situation. Dans un pays où la moindre critique et protestation sont violemment réprimées, et où l’on peut encourir de lourdes peines de prisons pour avoir contesté une décision politique, quelle est la marge de manœuvre des individus?

Quatre décennies de l’atteinte physique, l’atteinte juridique, et l’atteinte à la dignité humaine ont profondément privé les jeunes de reconnaissance sociale et les ont affectés dans le sentiment de leur propre valeur. La non reconnaissance du droit et de l’estime sociale en Iran ont créé des conditions collectives dans lesquelles les jeunes ne peuvent parvenir à une attitude positive envers eux-mêmes. En l’absence de confiance en soi, de respect de soi, et d’estime de soi, nul n’est en mesure de s’identifier à ses fins et à ses désirs en tant qu’être autonome et individualisé. Or, faut-il s’étonner si, aujourd’hui, l’émigration est devenue la seule perspective de l’avenir des jeunes Iraniens?

Voir par ailleurs:

Did Team Obama Warn Iranian Terror Commander about Israeli Assassination Attempt?

Debra Heine
PJ media
January 11, 2018

A Kuwaiti newspaper reported last week that Washington gave Israel the green light to assassinate terror mastermind Qassem Soleimani, commander of Iran’s Quds Force (which has been designated a terrorist organization).

New York Times columnist Bret Stephens pointed out a disturbing detail in the story that has long been rumored but has gone largely unreported in the American press:

Bret Stephens @BretStephensNYT

The story here, Kuwaiti-sourced, is that Obama team tipped Tehran to an Israeli attempt to assassinate Qassem Soleimani, the Iranian general who has the blood of hundreds of American troops in his hand. What says @brhodes? https://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/1.832387 

According to the report, Israel was « on the verge » of assassinating Soleimani three years ago near Damascus, but the Obama administration warned Iranian leadership of the plan, effectively quashing the operation. The incident reportedly « sparked a sharp disagreement between the Israeli and American security and intelligence apparatuses regarding the issue. »

Stephens tagged former Obama deputy national security adviser Ben Rhodes in his tweet, but it was ignored until Obama’s former National Security Council spokesman Tommy Vietor saw it on Wednesday:

Tommy Vietor @TVietor08

Yeah WTF Ben? Immediately confirm or deny this totally unsubstantiated claim and then tell us why you don’t support assassinations.

199

Stephens responded by noting dryly that the Iran Contra scandal started in a similar way, and that the Obama administration certainly had no objection to assassinations when it came to other terrorists:

Vieter, who drove Obama’s press van before he became president, responded thus:

Tommy Vietor  @TVietor08

Yeah @BretStephensNYT taking out Osama bin Laden is the same as assassinating an Iranian political leader. https://twitter.com/bretstephensnyt/status/951216401301299202 …Stephens seemed taken aback:

Stephens seemed taken aback:
Bret Stephens @BretStephensNYT

Seriously, @TVietor08? Suleimani is an “Iranian political leader”? Actually he’s head of the Quds Force, which is a US designated sponsor of terrorism. Suleimani is sanctioned by name. Here, read about it: https://www.treasury.gov/press-center/press-releases/Pages/hp644.aspx  https://twitter.com/tvietor08/status/951219021332074496 

Indeed, as the Washington Times reported in 2015, Shiite militants under Qassem Soleimani’s command are responsible for more than 500 U.S. service member deaths in Iraq between 2005-2011.

The Quds forces, led by Gen. Qassem Soleimani, set up factories to produce the weapon, which unleashes rocket-type projectiles that penetrate American armored vehicles. As head of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps’ Quds Force, Gen. Soleimani is Iran’s top terrorist commander, committed to the downfall of Israel and the United States and the destabilization of governments in the region.

But Vieter wasn’t through digging. His next tweet all but confirmed the story.

Tommy Vietor @TVietor08

We were well aware of the dangers posed by QS and the IRGC. Obama sanctioned them repeatedly, among other deterrents. But an assassination of QS by Israel would be destabilizing to put it mildly.

Ben Rhodes finally weighed in, but it was too late.

Voir de même:

Report: U.S. Gives Israel Green Light to Assassinate Iranian General Soleimani
Al Jarida, a Kuwaiti newspaper which in recent years had broken exclusive stories from Israel, says Israel was ‘on the verge’ of assassinating Soleimani, but the U.S. warned Tehran and thwarted the operation
Haaretz
Jan 01, 2018

Washington gave Israel a green light to assassinate Qassem Soleimani, the commander of the Quds Force, the overseas arm of Iran‘s Revolutionary Guard, Kuwaiti newspaper Al-Jarida reported on Monday.

Al-Jarida, which in recent years had broken exclusive stories from Israel, quoted a source in Jerusalem as saying that « there is an American-Israeli agreement » that Soleimani is a « threat to the two countries’ interests in the region. » It is generally assumed in the Arab world that the paper is used as an Israeli platform for conveying messages to other countries in the Middle East.

The agreement between Israel and the United States, according to the report, comes three years after Washington thwarted an Israeli attempt to kill the general.

The report says Israel was « on the verge » of assassinating Soleimani three years ago, near Damascus, but the United States warned the Iranian leadership of the plan, revealing that Israel was closely tracking the Iranian general.

The incident, the report said, « sparked a sharp disagreement between the Israeli and American security and intelligence apparatuses regarding the issue. »

The Kuwaiti report also identified Iran’s second in command in Syria, known as « Abu Baker, » as Mohammad Reda Falah Zadeh. It said he also « might be a target » for Israel, as well as other actors in the region.

Voir enfin:

Iran appoints fiery general who vows to destroy Israel as new IRGC head
Hossein Salami takes command of hardline military force weeks after US blacklisted it as a terror group; Mohammed Ali Jafari pushed out after over a decade at the helm
The Times of Israel
21 April 2019

Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, right, arrives at a graduation ceremony of the Revolutionary Guard’s officers, while deputy commander of the Revolutionary Guard, Hossein Salami, second right, former commanders of the Revolutionary Guard Mohsen Rezaei, second left, and Yahya Rahim Safavi salute him, on May 20, 2015, in Tehran, Iran. (Official website of the Office of the Iranian Supreme Leader via AP)

Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei shuffled the top ranks of the hard-line Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps Sunday, appointing the deputy chief of the hardline force as its top leader.

Brig. Gen. Hossein Salami was made commander of the IRGC, replacing Maj. Gen. Mohammed Ali Jafari, who has headed the military force since 2007, according to Iranian media reports.

Salami has frequently vowed to destroy Israel and “break America.” Iran was “planning to break America, Israel, and their partners and allies. Our ground forces should cleanse the planet from the filth of their existence,” Salami said in February. The previous month, he vowed to wipe Israel off the “global political map,” and to unleash an “inferno” on the Jewish state.

Brig. Gen. Hossein Salami, the new head of Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps. (YouTube screen capture)

He also said “Iran has warned the Zionist regime not to play with fire, because they will be destroyed before the US helps them.” Any new war, he said, “will result in Israel’s defeat within three days, in a way that they will not find enough graves to bury their dead.”

The IRGC shakeup comes weeks after the US designated the group a terror organization, the first time it has ever blacklisted an entire military branch under the rule.

Tehran has raged against the move, and responded by labeling the US military a terror group under its own designation. It also rallied around the IRGC, with some lawmakers dressing in the division’s uniforms in parliament in reaction to the designation.

Jafari had called the American move “laughable,” even while warning of a possible retaliation.

The Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps was formed after the 1979 Islamic Revolution, with a mission to defend the clerical regime, and the force has amassed strong power both at home and abroad.

The Guards’ prized unit is the Quds Force, headed by powerful general Qassem Soleimani, which supports Iran-backed forces around the region, including Syrian President Bashar Assad and Lebanese terrorist group Hezbollah.

It also oversees the country’s ballistic missile program and runs its own intelligence operations.

Jafari was demoted to the post of commander of a cultural and educational division, according to reports.

Agencies contributed to this report.


Immigration: Attention, une vérité qui dérange peut en cacher une autre ! (Better green than dead: What other unconvenient truth ?)

10 août, 2018

 
feux Quand les mille ans seront accomplis, Satan (…) sortira pour séduire les nations qui sont aux quatre coins de la terre, Gog et Magog, afin de les rassembler pour la guerre; leur nombre est comme le sable de la mer. Et ils montèrent sur la surface de la terre, et ils investirent le camp des saints et la ville bien-aimée. Jean (Apocalypse 20: 7-9)
Le titre m’est venu de la lecture de l’Apocalypse, du chapitre 20, qui annonce qu’au terme de mille ans, des nations innombrables venues des quatre coins de la Terre envahiront « le camp des saints et la Ville bien-aimée ». Jean Raspail
Le 17 février 2001, un cargo vétuste s’échouait volontairement sur les rochers côtiers, non loin de Saint-Raphaël. À son bord, un millier d’immigrants kurdes, dont près de la moitié étaient des enfants. Cette pointe rocheuse faisait partie de mon paysage. Certes, ils n’étaient pas un million, ainsi que je les avais imaginés, à bord d’une armada hors d’âge, mais ils n’en avaient pas moins débarqué chez moi, en plein décor du Camp des saints, pour y jouer l’acte I. Le rapport radio de l’hélicoptère de la gendarmerie diffusé par l’AFP semble extrait, mot pour mot, des trois premiers paragraphes du livre. La presse souligna la coïncidence, laquelle apparut, à certains, et à moi, comme ne relevant pas du seul hasard. Jean Raspail
Qu’est-ce que Big Other ? C’est le produit de la mauvaise conscience occidentale soigneusement entretenue, avec piqûres de rappel à la repentance pour nos fautes et nos crimes supposés –  et de l’humanisme de l’altérité, cette sacralisation de l’Autre, particulièrement quand il s’oppose à notre culture et à nos traditions. Perversion de la charité chrétienne, Big Other a le monopole du Vrai et du Bien et ne tolère pas de voix discordante. Jean Raspail
Ce qui m’a frappé, c’est le contraste entre les opinions exprimées à titre privé et celles tenues publiquement. Double langage et double conscience… À mes yeux, il n’y a pire lâcheté que celle devant la faiblesse, que la peur d’opposer la légitimité de la force à l’illégitimité de la violence. Jean Raspail
Aucun nombre de bombes atomiques ne pourra endiguer le raz de marée constitué par les millions d’êtres humains qui partiront un jour de la partie méridionale et pauvre du monde, pour faire irruption dans les espaces relativement ouverts du riche hémisphère septentrional, en quête de survie. Boumediene (mars 1974)
Un jour, des millions d’hommes quitteront le sud pour aller dans le nord. Et ils n’iront pas là-bas en tant qu’amis. Parce qu’ils iront là-bas pour le conquérir. Et ils le conquerront avec leurs fils. Le ventre de nos femmes nous donnera la victoire. Houari Boumediene (ONU, 10.04.74)
Nous avons 50 millions de musulmans en Europe. Il y a des signes qui attestent qu’Allah nous accordera une grande victoire en Europe, sans épée, sans conquête. Les 50 millions de musulmans d’Europe feront de cette dernière un continent musulman. Allah mobilise la Turquie, nation musulmane, et va permettre son entrée dans l’Union Européenne. Il y aura alors 100 millions de musulmans en Europe. L’Albanie est dans l’Union européenne, c’est un pays musulman. La Bosnie est dans l’Union européenne, c’est un pays musulman. 50% de ses citoyens sont musulmans. L’Europe est dans une fâcheuse posture. Et il en est de même de l’Amérique. Elles [les nations occidentales] devraient accepter de devenir musulmanes avec le temps ou bien de déclarer la guerre aux musulmans. Kadhafi (10.04.06) 
Comme jadis avec le communisme, l’Occident se retrouve sous surveillance idéologique. L’islam se présente, à l’image du défunt communisme, comme une alternative au monde occidental. À l’instar du communisme d’autrefois, l’islam, pour conquérir les esprits, joue sur une corde sensible. Il se targue d’une légitimité qui trouble la conscience occidentale, attentive à autrui : être la voix des pauvres de la planète. Hier, la voix des pauvres prétendait venir de Moscou, aujourd’hui elle viendrait de La Mecque ! Aujourd’hui à nouveau, des intellectuels incarnent cet oeil du Coran, comme ils incarnaient l’oeil de Moscou hier. Ils excommunient pour islamophobie, comme hier pour anticommunisme. (…) Comme aux temps de la guerre froide, violence et intimidation sont les voies utilisées par une idéologie à vocation hégémonique, l’islam, pour poser sa chape de plomb sur le monde. Benoît XVI en souffre la cruelle expérience. Comme en ces temps-là, il faut appeler l’Occident « le monde libre » par rapport au monde musulman, et comme en ces temps-là les adversaires de ce « monde libre », fonctionnaires zélés de l’oeil du Coran, pullulent en son sein. Robert Redeker
Si je regarde vers l’avenir, je suis empli de sombres présages ; tel le poète romain, il me semble voir le Tibre écumer d’un sang abondant. Enoch Powell (20 avril 1968)
La fonction suprême de l’homme d’Etat est de protéger la société de malheurs prévisibles. Il rencontre dans cette tâche des obstacles profondément ancrés dans la nature humaine. L’un d’entre eux est qu’il est d’évidence impossible de démontrer la réalité d’un péril avant qu’il ne survienne : à chaque étape de la progression d’un danger supposé, le doute et le débat sont possibles sur son caractère réel ou imaginaire. Ces dangers sont en outre l’objet de bien peu d’attention en comparaison des problèmes quotidiens, qui sont eux incontestables et pressants : d’où l’irrésistible tentation pour toute politique de se préoccuper du présent immédiat au détriment de l’avenir. Par-dessus tout, nous avons également tendance à confondre la prédiction d’un problème avec son origine, ou même avec le fauteur de trouble. Nous aimons à penser : « Si seulement personne n’en parlait, sans doute rien de tout cela n’arriverait…» Cette habitude remonte peut-être à la croyance primitive que le mot et la chose, le nom et l’objet, sont identiques. Dans tous les cas, l’évocation des périls à venir, graves mais évitables (si l’on s’attache à les résoudre), est la tâche la plus impopulaire de l’homme politique. La plus nécessaire aussi. (…) Sur la lancée actuelle, dans 15 ou 20 ans, il y aura en Grande-Bretagne, en comptant les descendants, 3,5 millions d’immigrés du Commonwealth. Ce chiffre n’est pas de moi : c’est l’évaluation officielle donnée au Parlement par les bureaux de l’état-civil. Il n’y a pas de prévision officielle semblable pour l’an 2000, mais le chiffre avoisinera les 5 à 7 millions, soit environ un dixième de la population, quasiment l’équivalent de l’agglomération londonienne. Cette population ne sera bien sûr pas uniformément répartie du nord au sud et d’est en ouest. Dans toute l’Angleterre, des régions entières, des villes, des quartiers, seront entièrement peuplés par des populations immigrées ou d’origine immigrée. Avec le temps, la proportion des descendants d’immigrés nés en Angleterre, et donc arrivés ici comme nous, augmentera rapidement. Dès 1985, ceux nés en Angleterre [par rapport à ceux nés à l’étranger] seront majoritaires. C’est cette situation qui demande d’agir avec la plus extrême urgence, et de prendre des mesures qui, pour un homme politique, sont parmi les plus difficiles à prendre, car ces décisions délicates sont à considérer dans le présent, alors que les dangers à écarter, ou à minimiser, ne se présenteront qu’aux élus des générations futures. Lorsqu’un pays est confronté à un tel danger, la première question qui se pose est celle-ci : « Comment réduire l’ampleur du phénomène ? » Puisqu’on ne peut entièrement l’éviter, peut-on le limiter, sachant qu’il s’agit essentiellement d’un problème numérique ? Car en effet, l’arrivée d’éléments étrangers dans un pays, ou au sein d’une population, a des conséquences radicalement différentes selon que la proportion est de 1% ou 10%. La réponse à cette simple question est d’une égale simplicité : il faut stopper, totalement ou presque, les flux d’immigration entrants et encourager au maximum les flux sortants. Ces deux propositions font partie de la plate-forme officielle du Parti Conservateur. Il est à peine concevable qu’en ce moment même, rien qu’à Wolverhampton, entre 20 et 30 enfants immigrés supplémentaires arrivent chaque semaine de l’étranger, soit 15 à 20 familles supplémentaires dans 10 ou 20 ans. « Quand les Dieux veulent détruire un peuple, ils commencent par le rendre fou » dit le dicton, et assurément nous devons être fous, littéralement fous à lier, en tant que nation, pour permettre chaque année l’arrivée d’environ 50 000 personnes à charge et qui plus tard accroîtront la population d’origine immigrée. J’ai l’impression de regarder ce pays élever frénétiquement son propre bûcher funéraire. (…) Le troisième volet de la politique du Parti Conservateur est l’égalité de tous devant la loi : l’autorité publique ne pratique aucune discrimination et ne fait aucune différence entre les citoyens. Ainsi que M. Heath [leader du parti conservateur] l’a souligné, nous ne voulons pas de citoyens de première ou de seconde «classe». Mais cela ne doit pas signifier pour autant qu’un immigré ou ses descendants doivent disposer d’un statut privilégié ou spécifique, ou qu’un citoyen ne soit pas en droit de discriminer qui bon lui semble dans ses affaires privées, ou qu’on lui dicte par la loi ses choix ou son comportement. Il n’y a pas plus fausse appréciation de la réalité que celle entretenue par les bruyants défenseurs des lois dites « contre les discriminations ». Que ce soit nos grandes plumes, toutes issues du même moule, parfois des mêmes journaux qui, jour après jour dans les années 30, ont tenté d’aveugler le pays face au péril croissant qu’il nous a fallu affronter par la suite. Ou que ce soit nos évêques calfeutrés dans leurs palais à savourer des mets délicats, la tête dissimulée sous les draps. Ces gens-là sont dans l’erreur, dans l’erreur la plus absolue, la plus complète. Le sentiment de discrimination, de dépossession, de haine et d’inquiétude, ce ne sont pas les immigrés qui le ressentent, mais bien ceux qui les accueillent et doivent continuer à le faire. C’est pourquoi voter une telle loi au Parlement, c’est risquer de mettre le feu aux poudres. Le mieux que l’on puisse dire aux tenants et aux défenseurs de cette loi, c’est qu’ils ne savent pas ce qu’ils font. (…) alors qu’arriver en Grande-Bretagne signifie pour le migrant accéder à des privilèges et à des équipements ardemment recherchés, l’impact sur la population autochtone du pays est bien différent. Pour des raisons qu’ils ne comprennent pas, en application de décisions prises à leur insu, pour lesquelles ils ne furent jamais consultés, les habitants de Grande-Bretagne se retrouvent étrangers dans leur propre pays. Leurs femmes ne trouvent pas de lits d’hôpital pour accoucher, leurs enfants n’obtiennent pas de places à l’école, leurs foyers, leurs voisins, sont devenus méconnaissables, leurs projets et perspectives d’avenir sont défaits. Sur leurs lieux de travail, les employeurs hésitent à appliquer au travailleur immigré les mêmes critères de discipline et de compétence qu’au Britannique de souche. Ils commençent à entendre, au fil du temps, des voix chaque jour plus nombreuses qui leur disent qu’ils sont désormais indésirables. Et ils apprennent aujourd’hui qu’un privilège à sens unique va être voté au Parlement. Qu’une loi qui ne peut, ni n’est destinée à les protéger ni à répondre à leurs doléances, va être promulguée. Une loi qui donnera à l’étranger, au mécontent, à l’agent provocateur, le pouvoir de les clouer au pilori pour des choix d’ordre privé. Parmi les centaines de lettres que j’ai reçues après m’être exprimé sur ce sujet il y a 2 ou 3 mois, j’ai remarqué une nouveauté frappante, et je la trouve de très mauvaise augure. Les députés ont l’habitude de recevoir des lettres anonymes, mais ce qui me surprend et m’inquiète, c’est la forte proportion de gens ordinaires, honnêtes, avisés, qui m’écrivent une lettre souvent sensée, bien écrite, mais qui préfèrent taire leur adresse. Car ils craignent de se compromettre ou d’approuver par écrit les opinions que j’ai exprimées. Ils craignent des poursuites ou des représailles si cela se savait. Ce sentiment d’être une minorité persécutée, sentiment qui progresse parmi la population anglaise dans les régions touchées du pays, est quelque chose d’à peine imaginable pour ceux qui n’en ont pas fait directement l’expérience. (…) L’autre dangereuse chimère de ceux qui sont aveugles aux réalités peut se résumer au mot « intégration ». Être intégré, c’est ne pas se distinguer, à tous points de vue, des autres membres d’une population. Et de tout temps, des différences physiques évidentes, particulièrement la couleur de peau, ont rendu l’intégration difficile, bien que possible avec le temps. Parmi les immigrés du Commonwealth venus s’installer ici depuis 15 ans, il existe des dizaines de milliers de personnes qui souhaitent s’intégrer, et tous leurs efforts tendent vers cet objectif. Mais penser qu’un tel désir est présent chez une vaste majorité d’immigrés ou chez leurs descendants est une idée extravagante, et dangereuse de surcroît. Nous sommes arrivés à un tournant. Jusqu’à présent, la situation et les différences sociales ont rendu l’idée même d’intégration inaccessible : cette intégration, la plupart des immigrés ne l’ont jamais ni conçue ni souhaitée. Leur nombre et leur concentration ont fait que la pression vers l’intégration qui s’applique d’habitude aux petites minorités, n’a pas fonctionné. Nous assistons aujourd’hui au développement de forces qui s’opposent directement à l’intégration, à l’apparition de droits acquis qui maintiennent et accentuent les différences raciales et religieuses, dans le but d’exercer une domination, d’abord sur les autres migrants et ensuite sur le reste de la population. Cette ombre, au départ à peine visible, obscurcit le ciel rapidement. Et on la perçoit désormais à Wolverhampton. Elle donne des signes d’expansion rapide. (…) Le projet de Loi sur les Relations Raciales constitue le terreau idéal pour que ces dangereux éléments de discorde prospèrent. Car voilà bien le moyen de montrer aux communautés d’immigrants comment s’organiser et soutenir leurs membres, comment faire campagne contre leurs concitoyens, comment intimider et dominer les autres grâce aux moyens juridiques que les ignorants et les mal-informés leur ont fournis. Je contemple l’avenir et je suis rempli d’effroi. Comme les Romains, je vois confusément « le Tibre écumant de sang ». Ce phénomène tragique et insoluble, nous l’observons déjà avec horreur outre-Atlantique, mais alors que là-bas il est intimement lié à l’histoire de l’Amérique, il s’installe chez nous par notre propre volonté, par notre négligence. Il est déjà là. Numériquement parlant, il aura atteint les proportions américaines bien avant la fin du siècle. Seule une action résolue et immédiate peut encore l’empêcher. Je ne sais si la volonté populaire exigera ou obtiendra de telles mesures. Mais ce que je sais, c’est que se taire devant cette situation serait une trahison majeure. Enoch Powell (1968)
On peut parler aujourd’hui d’invasion arabe. C’est un fait social. Combien d’invasions l’Europe a connu tout au long de son histoire ! Elle a toujours su se surmonter elle-même, aller de l’avant pour se trouver ensuite comme agrandie par l’échange entre les cultures. Pape François
According to the agreement, Kuwait will get 900 million litres of water daily, Shaikh Ahmad said, without providing the financial details of the agreement. Earlier reports have said the project foresees building a pipeline to channel water from the Karun and Karkheh rivers in southwestern Iran to Kuwait at a cost of $2 billion. The Kuwaiti minister said the project is « vital » for Kuwait and is classified as « one of the highly important strategic projects ». Al Jazeera (2003)
Farmers accuse local politicians of allowing water to be diverted from their areas in return for bribes. While the nationwide protests in December and January stemmed from anger over high prices and alleged corruption, in rural areas, lack of access to water was also a major cause, analysts say. In Syria, drought was one of the causes of anti-government protests which broke out in 2011 and led to civil war, making the Iranian drought particularly sensitive. Approximately 97 percent of the country is experiencing drought to some degree, according to the Islamic Republic of Iran Meteorological Organization. Rights groups say it has driven many people from their homes. A United Nations report last year noted, “Water shortages are acute; agricultural livelihoods no longer sufficient. With few other options, many people have left, choosing uncertain futures as migrants in search of work.” In early January, protests in the town of Qahderijan, some 10 km (6 miles) west of Isfahan, quickly turned violent as security forces opened fire on crowds, killing at least five people, according to activists. One of the dead was a farmer, CHRI said, and locals said water rights were the main grievance. Hassan Kamran, a parliamentarian from Isfahan, publicly criticised energy minister Reza Ardakanian this month, accusing him of not properly implementing a water distribution law. “The security and intelligence forces shouldn’t investigate our farmers. The water rights are theirs,” he told a parliamentary session. In early March, Ardakanian set up a working group comprising four ministers and two presidential deputies to deal with the crisis. Since the January protests, Rouhani has repeatedly said the government will do what it can to address grievances. But there is no quick fix for deeply rooted environmental issues like drought, observers say. Reuters
Les médias sont rares à s’intéresser à la question, mais l’Iran fait face à une grande catastrophe, sauf si des mesures techniques sont immédiatement prises: la pénurie d’eau devient dramatique. L’Occident se polarise sur le programme nucléaire ou sur le maintien des sanctions économiques contre l’Iran mais élude le problème de l’eau, qui risque d’entraîner une agitation sociale en Iran avec pour conséquence une migration des populations. Pour camoufler la véritable rupture avec le gouvernement, les contestations sont pour l’instant étouffées dans les grandes villes. (…) Le problème ne date pas d’aujourd’hui puisque des mises en garde ont été publiées dès 2014. (…) En cause: l’absence d’investissements depuis plusieurs années dans les infrastructures des réseaux de distribution d’eau potable alors que la sécheresse sévit dans le pays et que plusieurs rivières iraniennes se sont asséchées. La seule mesure prise par les autorités consiste à rationner l’eau dans la capitale de huit millions d’habitants, avec pour conséquence les nombreuses protestations qui se sont élevées contre les coupures d’eau. (…) Il y a bien sûr des raisons climatiques qui expliquent cette pénurie mais les négligences du pouvoir sont immenses. Par manque d’eau, seules 12% des terres (19 millions d’hectares) sont exploitées pour l’agriculture alors que l’ensemble des terres arables est évalué à 162 millions d’hectares. Or, si des solutions techniques évoluées ne sont pas mises en place, la quantité d’eau n’augmentera pas dans les années à venir alors que le pays connaît une croissance démographique et une urbanisation accélérée. Par ailleurs, l’Iran n’a pas été économe de son eau. À force de pompages désordonnés, son sous-sol s’est vidé et la pluie n’est pas suffisamment abondante pour remplir les nappes souterraines. De nombreux puits ont été creusés illégalement par les Iraniens malgré une eau puisée polluée. L’agriculture iranienne n’est plus suffisante pour permettre une indépendance alimentaire vis-à-vis de l’étranger. À peine 40% des eaux usées sont traitées tandis que le reste est déversé dans les lacs et les rivières, aggravant la pollution. Par ailleurs, les sanctions ont aggravé la disponibilité de produits chimiques pour les installations d’eau. (…) Mais au lieu de prendre des mesures structurelles, le gouvernement a usé de l’arme du rationnement. Eshagh Jahanguiri, le premier vice-président, a prévenu: «Il y aura d’abord des coupures d’eau et, ensuite, des amendes pour les gros consommateurs.» C’est la meilleure manière de se mettre à dos la population qui menace le régime. Jacques Benillouche
Depuis le lancement de la « marche du retour » (tentative d’invasion) par les Palestiniens et les 2 mois d’émeutes et de tentatives d’infiltration terroristes à la frontière de Gaza qui s’en sont suivis, l’attention médiatique a été à juste titre portée sur le bilan humain suite à l’agression du Hamas. Dès le début des violences palestiniennes, Israël est universellement condamné pour le nombre de victimes, la grande majorité des personnes tuées étant pourtant des membres du Hamas. Néanmoins, un autre aspect de l’histoire, qui a été rapporté mais dans une bien moindre mesure, est le phénomène des cerfs-volants incendiaires utilisés par le Hamas et ses membres. Le Hamas a adopté la politique de la terre brûlée, une tactique consistant à pratiquer les destructions les plus importantes possibles, détruire ou à endommager gravement ressources, moyens de production, infrastructures, bâtiments ou nature environnante, de manière à les rendre inutilisables. À maintes et maintes reprises, les terroristes ont attaché des engins incendiaires à des cerfs-volants qui sont normalement des jouets pour enfants. En raison des vents soufflant habituellement d’ouest en est, beaucoup de ces engins ont en fait atterri dans les champs et les forêts israéliennes, les conditions météorologiques extrêmement chaudes et sèches favorisant le départ d’incendies massifs. Les rapports indiquent que des milliers de dounams [1/10e d’hectare] de cultures et de plantes ont été détruits à cause de cette forme de terrorisme – le terrorisme agricole. Bien que le terrorisme agricole ne soit pas une nouvelle tactique, il a pris de l’ampleur, tant dans le sud à la frontière avec Gaza qu’au cours des dernières semaines dans toute la Judée et la Samarie. Le Djihad des forêts : les Arabes palestiniens lancent des incendies de terreur depuis les années 1920. Il n’y a rien de nouveau dans l’utilisation des feux pour la terreur. À la fin des années 1980 et au début des années 1990, les incendies criminels palestiniens représentaient environ le tiers de tous les incendies de forêt en Israël. En 2016, de nombreux incendies se sont déclarés dans le nord d’Israël. Les Arabes célèbrent ces incendies sur les réseaux sociaux. La plupart des incendies criminels à la fin des années 1980 étaient directement liés au soulèvement palestinien (la première Intifada). Dans les années 1920, 1930 et 1940, les Palestiniens ont brûlé des centaines d’hectares (Emek en 1936), des maisons et des juifs. En 1929, sous l’impulsion du Mufti pro nazi Al Husseini de nombreux pogroms anti Juifs eurent lieu et la forêt Balfurya dans le nord fut incendiée. Le New York times rapportait en octobre 1938 que plusieurs Juifs avaient été poignardés puis brûlés par un groupe terroriste arabe à Tibériade – Les victimes du massacre : Jacob Zaltz,  M. Kabin et sa soeur, Joshua Ben Arieh sa femme et son fils, les trois enfants de Shlomo Leimer, âgés de 8, 10 et 12 ans, Shimon Mizrahi, sa femme et ses cinq enfants, âgés de 1 à 12 ans. Lors du massacre d’Hébron de 1929, des Arabes tuèrent environ 67 Juifs, en blessèrent 53 et pillèrent des maisons et des synagogues. Après avoir brûlé des centaines de pneus près de la clôture et tenté de pénétrer les kibboutz avoisinants dans l’unique but de massacrer des civils Israéliens, les terroristes de Gaza ont trouvé une nouvelle arme contre Israël : les cerfs-volants incendiaires et les ballons à l’hélium. Israël Hayom a cité la semaine dernière des personnes impliquées dans le domaine qui ont spéculé que, puisqu’il n’y a pas beaucoup de magasins de jouets à Gaza, la seule source logique pour cette quantité d’hélium seraient les hôpitaux de Gaza qui utilisent normalement l’hélium à des fins médicales. Utiliser les hôpitaux pour promouvoir le terrorisme n’est pas nouveau à Gaza. Durant l’Opération Bordure protectrice de 2014, l’hôpital Al-Shifa dans le quartier de North Rimal à Gaza a été décrit par le Washington Post comme un « quartier général de facto pour les dirigeants du Hamas ». Depuis le début des manifestations dites pacifiques par les médias, Les dégâts causés à la flore, aux cultures et à la faune sont considérables, certaines estimations indiquant que les pertes se chiffrent à plusieurs millions de dollars. Selon un rapport du JNS, « les responsables de l’Autorité israélienne pour la nature et les parcs ont estimé qu’au moins un tiers de la réserve naturelle de Carmia a été détruite, avec des dommages significatifs pour les plantes et la faune locales ». Le passage de Kerem Shalom a même été incendié à trois reprises. Ce passage voit quotidiennement passer plus de 6000 tonnes de marchandises et près de 190 camions chaque jour. Selon un haut responsable local de la sécurité, éteindre les pneus en feu n’est pas si simple car ils sont souvent remplis d’explosifs, dans l’espoir de blesser ou de tuer des pompiers. En conséquence, l’armée doit intervenir pour aider les pompiers, ce qui retarde  les efforts de lutte contre l’incendie. Une autre forme de terrorisme agricole est le vol. Deux semaines à peine avant l’incendie des vergers de cerisiers de Kfar Etzion, les Arabes des villages voisins, au milieu de la nuit, avaient pillé les récoltes près du même endroit, volant des tonnes de fruits. Les estimations indiquent qu’environ 50,000 € de cerises ont été volés. Ces criminels ont envoyé un message clair, ils ont peint une croix gammée nazie sur un rocher dans le verger. Ceci est encore une autre similitude avec les cerfs-volants dans le sud, souvent décorés avec des croix gammées. Aussi horrible que soit le terrorisme agricole, les responsables de la sécurité sont conscients que ce type de terrorisme n’est pas une fin en soi, mais seulement un moyen plus sinistre et abjecte. La crainte est qu’une prochaine fois, l’un de ces incendies puisse se propager dans les communautés elles-mêmes, mettant des maisons et des vies en danger. (…) La nouvelle terreur de Gaza  est le cerf-volant. Les Gazaouis attachent des chiffons enflammés ou une sorte de bombe incendiaire à un cerf-volant ou à un ballon à l’hélium pour les laisser tomber en territoire israélien et brûler les cultures et habitations. On n’est pas dans dans la recherche scientifique ou médicale mais dans la recherche de la terreur. Cela a été extrêmement efficace pour frapper les champs Israéliens dans le Néguev, devenant une arme terroriste dévastatrice. Ce phénomène de terrorisme agricole découle des violences qui ont eu lieu à la frontière de Gaza depuis le début des manifestations du mois de mars. Depuis plusieurs semaines, les Gazaouis lancent régulièrement des cerfs-volants équipés d’objets incendiaires, comprenant souvent du charbon de bois et des sacs de sucre pour assurer une longue et lente brûlure. Plus de 700 cerfs-volants et ballons ont été lancés à partir de Gaza, déclenchant plus de 400 incendies. Les dommages causés par ces incendies à l’agriculture israélienne près de la frontière de Gaza est estimée à 3 millions de dollars. Netanyahu a demandé l’avancement d’un plan pour utiliser les fonds de l’Autorité palestinienne pour payer les dommages causés. L’objectif du Hamas est de détruire complètement Israël, et paralyser l’économie Israélienne en brûlant ses récoltes. (…) Le terrorisme aux cerfs-volants n’est qu’une autre tentative des Palestiniens de détruire Israël avec une arme de choix différente. Les Palestiniens ont utilisé les bombes, les détournements d’avions, les roquettes, les mortiers, les bombes humaines, les armes automatiques, les couteaux, les bulldozers, les voitures béliers, les cocktails molotov, les pierres, les tunnels terroristes, les haches, maintenant ce sont des cerfs-volants et des ballons incendiaires. Les provocations récentes du Hamas où des milliers de Gazaouis tentèrent de démolir la barrière frontalière et d’entrer en Israël avec des cocktails Molotov et d’autres armes improvisées font partie d’une tactique macabre du Hamas appelée « l’enfant mort » pour qu’Israël tue autant de Gazaouis que possible afin que les titres commencent toujours, et souvent se terminent, avec le nombre de Palestiniens tués. Le Hamas envoie délibérément des femmes et des enfants sur la ligne de front comme ce fut le cas avec l’infirmière Razzan Al Najjar (qui dans une vidéo reconnaissait être venu tenir un rôle de bouclier humain), tandis que leurs propres et vaillant combattants se planquent dans leurs bunkers ou derrière ces boucliers humains. Jean Vercors (Dreuz)
More ink equals more blood,  newspaper coverage of terrorist incidents leads directly to more attacks. It’s a macabre example of win-win in what economists call a « common-interest game. Both the media and terrorists benefit from terrorist incidents, » their study contends. Terrorists get free publicity for themselves and their cause. The media, meanwhile, make money « as reports of terror attacks increase newspaper sales and the number of television viewers ». Bruno S. Frey (University of Zurich) et Dominic Rohner (Cambridge)
Comme au bon vieux temps de la Terreur, quand les gens venaient assister aux exécutions à la guillotine sur la place publique. Maintenant, c’est par médias interposés que la mort fait vibrer les émotions (…) Les médias filment la mort comme les réalisateurs de X filment les ébats sexuels. Bernard Dugué
Many observers have expressed concern for the excessive attention given to mass shooters of today and the deadliest of yesteryear. CNN’s Anderson Cooper has campaigned against naming names of mass shooters, and 147 criminologists, sociologists, psychologists and other human-behavior experts recently signed on to an open letter urging the media not to identify mass shooters or display their photos. While I appreciate the concern for name and visual identification of mass shooters for fear of inspiring copycats as well as to avoid insult to the memory of those they slaughtered, names and faces are not the problem. It is the excessive detail — too much information — about the killers, their writings, and their backgrounds that unnecessarily humanizes them. We come to know more about them — their interests and their disappointments — than we do about our next door neighbors. Too often the line is crossed between news reporting and celebrity watch. At the same time, we focus far too much on records. We constantly are reminded that some shooting is the largest in a particular state over a given number of years, as if that really matters. Would the massacre be any less tragic if it didn’t exceed the death toll of some prior incident? Moreover, we are treated to published lists of the largest mass shootings in modern US history. For whatever purpose we maintain records, they are there to be broken and can challenge a bitter and suicidal assailant to outgun his violent role models. Although the spirited advocacy of students around the country regarding gun control is to be applauded, we need to keep some perspective about the risk. Slogans like, “I want to go to my graduation, not to my grave,” are powerful, yet hyperbolic. James Alan Fox (Northeastern University)
Voyez comme c’est devenu énorme, en seulement quelques jours… Voyez à quelle vitesse cet incendie du ‘Mendocino Complex’ est monté dans le classement des sinistres. Scott Mclean (Département des forêts et de la protection contre les incendies de Californie)
Holy Fire 2018: Man arrested on suspicion of arson as ‘DOOMSDAY’ fire spreads. California authorities have charged a 51-year-old man with felony arson for allegedly starting the Holy Fire that has been ripping through the Orange and Riverside counties in Southern California as locals describe « doomsday » scenario. » The Express
Deux foyers qui ravagent le nord de la Californie ont formé ensemble, lundi 6 août, le plus grand incendie de l’histoire de cet État de l’ouest des États-Unis, annoncent les autorités. Appelés « incendie du Mendocino Complex », les deux brasiers ont réduit en cendres plus de 114 850 hectares – une superficie proche de la taille de l’immense ville de Los Angeles – et ne sont maîtrisés qu’à 30% environ, a annoncé Calfire, le service californien de lutte contre les incendies. (…) Le « Mendocino Complex » a surpassé en superficie détruite l’incendie Thomas, qui avait détruit 114 078 hectares en décembre 2017. L’incendie Carr, qui sévit également dans le nord de la Californie, a tué sept personnes et détruit plus de 1 600 bâtiments, dont un millier de logements. (…) L’autre grand incendie de la région, surnommé « Ferguson », qui a provoqué la fermeture partielle du parc national de Yosemite, en pleine saison touristique, était contenu à 38%. Plus de 14 000 pompiers combattent les divers incendies en cours dans l’État de Californie. Plusieurs milliers de personnes ont été évacuées depuis le début de cette série de sinistres. Francetv info
A wildland fire is devouring thousands of acres of grass and brush and some rustic cabins as well in Orange and Riverside counties. It’s dubbed the Holy fire, because it started in the Holy Jim Canyon area, near a road with that name. The Orange county register
Unlike hurricanes, wildfires are not named from a predetermined list. They are named by officials, who choose names based on “a geographical location, local landmark, street, lake, mountain, peak, etc.,” the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said. Officials said that quickly coming up with a label provides firefighters another way to locate the blaze and allows officials to track and prioritize incidents by name. A Twitter hashtag that identified the devastating fires in San Diego in 2007 — #sandiegofire — proved useful as people used it to organize information about road closures and evacuations, officials said. (…) Even names that would seem to have little to do with geography often tie back to location somehow. The 2007 Witch Fire, which destroyed about 1,650 structures, had nothing to do with sorcery, but it did originate in an area of San Diego County known as Witch Creek. (…) during the summer of 2015, there were so many fires, officials named one in southeast Idaho “Not Creative,” according to reports. A spokeswoman for the Idaho Department of Lands rationalized the choice to NPR, saying the name was selected after a long day of firefighting and after officials realized there were no significant landmarks nearby. Then there is the 416 Fire. The blaze, which has blackened more than 50,000 acres in Colorado since June, was named by the Durango Interagency Dispatch Center after its “system-generated number,” officials explained. The conflagration was the 416th “incident” in the San Juan National Forest — where the dispatch center is — this year, officials said. (…) The process of naming hurricanes is much more complicated. An international panel of meteorologists actually names the storms years in advance. Meteorologists use six lists of alphabetically arranged female and male names, which are used in rotation. (The 2018 list will be used again in 2024.) But if a storm is so destructive that using its name again would seem insensitive, a committee can remove the name from the list and select a replacement. For instance, Katrina will not be used again. The World Meteorological Organization said the names are never in reference to a particular person. Instead, the group said, the names are meant to be “familiar to the people in each region” because, just as with fires, the point is for the public to be able to remember them. NYT
Selon l’Office for national Statistics, l’usage criminel d’arme blanche, ayant ou non provoqué la mort, est à + 22% de septembre 2016 à sept. 2017 ; usage d’arme à feu, + 11%. La criminalité en général, + 14% (au plus haut depuis 15 ans). Pourquoi cette explosion criminelle dans un pays naguère paisible ?  Cause profonde, l’abolition des gouvernements vraiment « libéraux » ou « conservateurs » en Europe, remplacés par de factices-unanimes petits soldats de la mondialisation heureuse façon DGSI (Davos-Goldman-Sachs-Idéologie). Ainsi Theresa May ou François Hollande, David Gauke ministre conservateur de la Justice à Londres aujourd’hui, ou la libertaire Mme Taubira à Paris naguère, mêmes politiques laxistes et effets pervers. Car c’est la conservatrice Mme May qui, ministre de l’Intérieur, massacre dès 2010 la police britannique, amputant d’un coup son budget de – 18%. En 2015, Mme May dédaigne les alertes des syndicats et cadres de la police, les accusant avec mépris de « crier au loup ». Il y avait en 2010 144 353 policiers dans les rues (Angleterre + Galles) ; en 2015, il en restait 122 859,  – 21 494. Or sur 5 ans, cette décimation fait 4,5 millions de jours d’enquête en moins – à l’immense joie de bandits ainsi laissés la bride sur le cou. Résultat, l’effondrement des taux d’élucidation des polices britanniques. En 2015 encore, Scotland Yard faisait inculper 26% des assaillants au poignard, 11% en 2018. Robberies (braquages, agressions) : 6% d’élucidation en 2017, 94% de crimes impunis. A l’origine de l’explosion criminelle, des gangs toujours plus audacieux et structurés. Or paralysée par le « politiquement correct », Mme May interdit pour l’essentiel aux policiers de fouiller ces jeunes gangsters souvent issus de l’immigration africaine ou ouest-asiatique – comme la majorité des victimes d’homicides et 70 à 80% des gangsters en cause. Les bandits ne s’en cachent d’ailleurs pas, le principal gang juvénile de Londres s’étant lui même baptisé Mali Boys. Face à ce réel criminel, Mme May a empilé formalités absurdes et interdits bienséants – conférant aux gangsters une quasi-impunité. Qui dit explosion dit explosif : c’est l’énorme retour de la cocaïne sur la scène branchée britannique, dans une jeunesse dorée post-crise certes vegan, bobo et fan de café équitable – mais carburant à la coke,  d’où, de mortelles guerres de territoires entre gangs. Ultime cause de l’explosion criminelle : une justice laxiste. L’Angleterre ne poursuit désormais plus les vols en boutiques de moins de 250 euros ; déficit pour le commerce, 7 milliards d’euros – bien sûr répercutés sur les prix. Cette hugolienne mesure coûte à chaque ménage 300 euros par an – déjà l’insécurité dans leur cité, là encore, les pauvres trinquent. (…) Ultime folie: à des policiers abasourdis, le (conservateur) secrétaire d’Etat britannique aux prisons annonce une forte diminution des incarcérations de moins d’un an. Or on l’a vu, la peine réelle pour possession/usage d’une arme blanche est de sept mois et demi de prison ferme ; ce pour moins de 50% des condamnés adultes, et moins de 15% des mineurs – les autres échappant déjà à toute incarcération. Cherchez l’erreur… Xavier Raufer
Dans le cadre d’une enquête pour retrouver un père suspecté d’avoir enlevé son enfant, la police du Nouveau-Mexique, aux États-Unis, a (…) découvert un campement dans lequel onze enfants étaient retenus dans de terribles conditions. Au moins l’un d’entre eux y a été entraîné à l’usage des armes à feu dans le but de le préparer à des tueries de masse, bien que l’objectif précis de cette préparation reste à établir. La dépouille d’un enfant de 4 ans a été retrouvée sur place. L’enquête débute en décembre 2017, dans le comté de Jonesboro, en Géorgie, sur la côte est des États-Unis. Siraj Wahhaj, père de 39 ans, est recherché après la disparition de son fils. La mère affirme à la police que l’enfant, âgé de 3 ans, est allé au parc avec lui et n’en est jamais revenu. Le garçon souffre d’épilepsie, ainsi que de problèmes cognitifs et de développement, explique-t-elle. D’après le Telegraph, elle aurait également évoqué ses craintes d’un «exorcisme» que le père voudrait pratiquer sur son fils, avant de finalement revenir sur ces propos en évoquant une mauvaise traduction du terme. Plusieurs proches du garçonnet, dont son grand-père, imam d’une mosquée de Brooklyn, à New York, lancent une campagne via les réseaux sociaux pour le retrouver, raconte le National Post. (…) Jeudi, de nouvelles informations sont venues ajouter au sordide de l’affaire: au moins un des onze enfants retrouvés a été entraîné à l’usage des armes à feu. «Un tuteur temporaire de l’un des enfants a déclaré que l’accusé avait entraîné l’enfant à tirer avec un fusil d’assaut pour se préparer à de futures fusillades en milieu scolaire», précise le bureau du procureur. Selon CNN, ce dernier mentionne par ailleurs, dans les motivations pour le maintien en prison de Siraj Wahhaj, sa «planification et sa préparation de futures tueries dans des écoles».  (…) Mardi, le shérif du comté de Taos a indiqué que le groupe était «considéré comme extrémiste de la foi musulmane», sans toutefois revenir plus en détails sur ce point. L’homme arrêté avec Siraj Wahhaj, identifié comme Lucas Morten et âgé de 40 ans, a d’abord été inculpé pour hébergement de fugitif, avant que des charges liées à la maltraitance des enfants ne soient ajoutées. Les trois femmes ont été libérées en attendant la suite de l’enquête. Leurs liens avec les protagonistes restent imprécis: selon les sources, elles sont présentées comme étant des mères de certains enfants, ou des sœurs de l’un des deux hommes, ou encore une épouse de l’un d’eux. Le Figaro
Illegal and illiberal immigration exists and will continue to expand because too many special interests are invested in it. It is one of those rare anomalies — the farm bill is another — that crosses political party lines and instead unites disparate elites through their diverse but shared self-interests: live-and-let-live profits for some and raw political power for others. For corporate employers, millions of poor foreign nationals ensure cheap labor, with the state picking up the eventual social costs. For Democratic politicos, illegal immigration translates into continued expansion of favorable political demography in the American Southwest. For ethnic activists, huge annual influxes of unassimilated minorities subvert the odious melting pot and mean continuance of their own self-appointed guardianship of salad-bowl multiculturalism. Meanwhile, the upper middle classes in coastal cocoons enjoy the aristocratic privileges of having plenty of cheap household help, while having enough wealth not to worry about the social costs of illegal immigration in terms of higher taxes or the problems in public education, law enforcement, and entitlements. No wonder our elites wink and nod at the supposed realities in the current immigration bill, while selling fantasies to the majority of skeptical Americans. Victor Davis Hanson
Who are the bigots — the rude and unruly protestors who scream and swarm drop-off points and angrily block immigration authority buses to prevent the release of children into their communities, or the shrill counter-protestors who chant back “Viva La Raza” (“Long Live the Race”)? For that matter, how does the racialist term “La Raza” survive as an acceptable title of a national lobby group in this politically correct age of anger at the Washington Redskins football brand? How can American immigration authorities simply send immigrant kids all over the United States and drop them into communities without firm guarantees of waiting sponsors or family? If private charities did that, would the operators be jailed? Would American parents be arrested for putting their unescorted kids on buses headed out of state? Liberal elites talk down to the cash-strapped middle class about their illiberal anger over the current immigration crisis. But most sermonizers are hypocritical. Take Nancy Pelosi, former speaker of the House. She lectures about the need for near-instant amnesty for thousands streaming across the border. But Pelosi is a multimillionaire, and thus rich enough not to worry about the increased costs and higher taxes needed to offer instant social services to the new arrivals. Progressives and ethnic activists see in open borders extralegal ways to gain future constituents dependent on an ever-growing government, with instilled grudges against any who might not welcome their flouting of U.S. laws. How moral is that? Likewise, the CEOs of Silicon Valley and Wall Street who want cheap labor from south of the border assume that their own offspring’s private academies will not be affected by thousands of undocumented immigrants, that their own neighborhoods will remain non-integrated, and that their own medical services and specialists’ waiting rooms will not be made available to the poor arrivals. … What a strange, selfish, and callous alliance of rich corporate grandees, cynical left-wing politicians, and ethnic chauvinists who have conspired to erode U.S. law for their own narrow interests, all the while smearing those who object as xenophobes, racists, and nativists. Victor Davis Hanson
There is a small minority of Pakistani men who believe that white girls are fair game. And we have to be prepared to say that. You can only start solving a problem if you acknowledge it first. This small minority who see women as second class citizens, and white women probably as third class citizens, are to be spoken out against. (…) These were grown men, some of them religious teachers or running businesses, with young families of their own. Whether or not these girls were easy prey, they knew it was wrong. (…) In mosque after mosque, this should be raised as an issue so that anybody remotely involved should start to feel that the community is turning on them. Communities have a responsibility to stand up and say, ‘This is wrong, this will not be tolerated’. (…) Cultural sensitivity should never be a bar to applying the law. (…) Failure to be “open and front-footed” would “create a gap for extremists to fill, a gap where hate can be peddled.  (…) Leadership is about moving people with you, not just pissing them off. Baroness Warsi
The terrible story of the Oxford child sex ring has brought shame not only on the city of dreaming spires, but also on the local Muslim community. It is a sense of repulsion and outrage that I feel particularly strongly, working as a Muslim leader and Imam in this neighbourhood and trying  to promote genuine  cultural integration. (…) But apart from its sheer depravity, what also depresses me about this case is the widespread refusal to face up to its hard realities. The fact is that the vicious activities of the Oxford ring are bound up with religion and race: religion, because all the perpetrators, though they had different nationalities, were Muslim; and race, because they deliberately targeted vulnerable white girls, whom they appeared to regard as ‘easy meat’, to use one of their revealing, racist phrases. Indeed, one of the victims who bravely gave evidence in court told a newspaper afterwards that ‘the men exclusively wanted white girls to abuse’. But as so often in fearful, politically correct modern Britain, there is a craven unwillingness to face up to this reality. Commentators and politicians tip-toe around it, hiding behind weasel words. We are told that child sex abuse happens ‘in all communities’, that white men are really far more likely to be abusers, as has been shown by the fall-out from the Jimmy Savile case. One particularly misguided commentary argued that the predators’ religion was an irrelevance, for what really mattered was that most of them worked in the night-time economy as taxi drivers, just as in the Rochdale child sex scandal many of the abusers worked in kebab houses, so they had far more opportunities to target vulnerable girls. But all this is deluded nonsense. While it is, of course, true that abuse happens in all communities, no amount of obfuscation can hide the pattern that has been exposed in a series of recent chilling scandals, from Rochdale to Oxford, and Telford to Derby. In all these incidents, the abusers were Muslim men, and their targets were under-age white girls. Moreover, reputable studies show that around 26 per cent of those involved in grooming and exploitation rings are Muslims, which is around five times higher than the proportion of Muslims in the adult male population. To pretend that this is not an issue for the Islamic community is to fall into a state of ideological denial. But then part of the reason this scandal happened at all is precisely because of such politically correct thinking. All the agencies of the state, including the police, the social services and the care system, seemed eager to ignore the sickening exploitation that was happening before their eyes. Terrified of accusations of racism, desperate not to undermine the official creed of cultural diversity, they took no action against obvious abuse. (…) Amazingly, the predators seem to have been allowed by local authority managers to come and go from care homes, picking their targets to ply them with drink and drugs before abusing them. You can be sure that if the situation had been reversed, with gangs of tough, young white men preying on vulnerable Muslim girls, the state’s agencies would have acted with greater alacrity. Another sign of the cowardly approach to these horrors is the constant reference to the criminals as ‘Asians’ rather than as ‘Muslims’. In this context, Asian is a completely meaningless term.  The men were not from China, or India or Sri Lanka or even Bangladesh. They were all from either Pakistan or Eritrea, which is, in fact, in East Africa rather than Asia. What united them in their outlook was their twisted, corrupt mindset, which bred their misogyny and racism. (…) In the misguided orthodoxy that now prevails in many mosques, including several of those in Oxford, men are unfortunately taught that women are second-class citizens, little more than chattels or possessions over whom they have absolute authority. That is why we see this growing, reprehensible fashion for segregation at Islamic events on university campuses, with female Muslim students pushed to the back of lecture halls. There was a telling incident in the trial when it was revealed that one of the thugs heated up some metal to brand a girl, as if she were a cow. ‘Now, if you have sex with someone else, he’ll know that you belong to me,’ said this criminal, highlighting an attitude where women are seen as nothing more than personal property. The view of some Islamic preachers towards white women can be appalling. They encourage their followers to believe that these women are habitually promiscuous, decadent and sleazy — sins which are made all the worse by the fact that they are kaffurs or non-believers. Their dress code, from mini-skirts to sleeveless tops, is deemed to reflect their impure and immoral outlook. According to this mentality, these white women deserve to be punished for their behaviour by being exploited and degraded. On one level, most imams in the UK are simply using their puritanical sermons to promote the wearing of the hijab and even the burka among their female adherents. But the dire result can be the brutish misogyny we see in the Oxford sex ring. (…) It is telling, though, that they never dared to target Muslim girls from the Oxford area. They knew that they would be sought out by the girls’ families and ostracised by their community. But preying on vulnerable white girls had no such consequences — once again revealing how intimately race and religion are bound up with this case. (…) Horror over this latest scandal should serve as a catalyst for a new approach, but change can take place only if we abandon the dangerous blinkers of political correctness and antiquated multiculturalism. Dr. Taj Hargey (Imam of the Oxford Islamic Congregation)
Les immigrés sont une excellente affaire pour l’Etat français: ils rapportent une grosse douzaine de milliards d’euros par an et paient nos retraites. Juan Pedro Quiñonero (ABC)
L’entrée de 50 000 nouveaux immigrés par an permettrait de réduire de 0,5 point de PIB le déficit des retraites. Comité d’orientation des retraites
Il s’agit d’un processus historique lié à la structure de la population immigrée, majoritairement jeune. Comme ils sont peu qualifiés, les immigrés sont très souvent au chômage. Mais ils dépensent aussi beaucoup et sont très entreprenants. Les pensions que nous versons aux retraités sont plus que compensées par la consommation et les cotisations sociales que paient les plus jeunes, parmi lesquels on trouve des gens très dynamiques. Xavier Chojnicki
Maintenant, je me sens carrément isolée, je suis une toute petite minorité. C’est difficile de devenir une minorité chez soi, vous savez (…). Ce qui est nouveau, c’est que les Français d’origine étrangère se replient sur leur origine, ne se sentent plus français. Et moi, Française, je me sens mal (…) Même mes fils sont d’une autre culture que moi. Pour eux, être français, ça ne veut rien dire. Ils n’ont plus de nationalité, ils s’identifient de manière vague à une religion, celle qui est majoritaire. Ils observent les gestes de l’islam, une façon musulmane d’être et de parler, ils sont fiers d’appartenir à la majorité. Ils ne veulent pas être français, ils ne veulent pas s’intégrer dans la société, ils voudraient être blacks et beurs comme tout le monde, mais ils ne se comportent pas comme des musulmans. Tant de choses incohérentes. Christine C. (47 ans, cinq enfants, 28 ans de Courneuve, Le Monde, 12.11. 05)
L’explosion de l’immigration extra-européenne est venue paradoxalement des restrictions à l’entrée légale de travailleurs dans les années 1970. (…) à la fin des «Trente Glorieuses» (1944-1974), les gouvernements de droite comme de gauche, saisis de peur par la montée du chômage, ont multiplié les obstacles à l’entrée de nouveaux travailleurs au nom d’une certaine forme de «préférence nationale».(…) Depuis cette époque, les lois européennes organisent la prise en charge des étrangers qui se présentent au titre du regroupement familial ou de l’asile politique. Mais elles rejettent ceux qui prétendent travailler, créer des richesses et ne pas rester à la charge du pays d’accueil !… On convient d’appeler «clandestin» (ou plus pudiquement «sans-papier») un jeune Africain qui traverse au péril de sa vie le détroit de Gibraltar pour s’embaucher dans une exploitation agricole ou une entreprise de construction… Mais on considère comme immigrante régulière l’adolescente turque, nord-africaine ou noire qui est vendue par son père à un sien cousin déjà installé en Europe et présentée par ce dernier au consulat de son pays d’adoption comme son «épouse» légitime…(…)De la sorte, le mariage et le «regroupement familial» sont devenus le prétexte à une immigration clandestine déguisée. Cette immigration est de loin la plus importante et la plus pernicieuse car les femmes concernées et leurs enfants sont voués à la relégation dans des logements sociaux avec peu d’espoir d’assimiler un jour les valeurs et le mode de vie du pays d’accueil. L’assimilation est d’autant plus utopique que la majorité des enfants d’immigrants reviennent dans le pays d’origine de leurs parents pour y prendre un conjoint (98% des jeunes Turcs de France seraient dans ce cas). Chaque nouvelle génération effectue ainsi un retour à la case départ, vidant de son sens le concept de «deuxième ou troisième génération». Avec pour conséquence l’émergence de sociétés séparées et d’une ségrégation de fait. (…) La riche culture que les Français ont reçue en héritage est confrontée au développement d’une contre-culture archaïque (rejet de l’école, vocabulaire primaire, violence gratuite). Les chansons des rappeurs de banlieue expriment sans équivoque la montée de la haine. Ces paroles d’un racisme outrancier valent à leurs auteurs la compréhension énamourée de la bourgeoisie, comme si le mal-vivre excusait toutes les violences, y compris l’apologie du racisme et du meurtre ! (…) Ces violences sont attisées par l’attitude de la classe dominante, blanche, bourgeoise et bien-pensante. Celle-ci dénigre sa propre Histoire et jette Napoléon, Corneille et La Fontaine dans les poubelles de l’Histoire. Elle prive les nouveaux-venus d’un modèle dont ils pourraient tirer fierté. Elle «victimise» d’autre part les pauvres diables en peine de s’insérer dans le pays où ils ont cherché refuge. (…) La fracture nationale fait au moins l’affaire des classes supérieures qui tirent parti de leurs atouts (éducation, héritage) pour renforcer leur position sociale comme le démontre le chercheur Éric Maurin. Dans les «ghettos blancs» du VIIe arrondissement, de Neuilly, de Saint-Germain-en-Laye ou Chevreuse… les privilégiés considèrent avec détachement les troubles qui agitent le reste du pays. Qu’ont-ils à craindre ?… De l’École Alsacienne au lycée Henri IV, leurs enfants bénéficient d’un parcours fléché qui leur garantit de conserver leur statut social et les préserve de tout mélange. Les revenus de ces classes supérieures progressent à qui mieux mieux tandis que les classes moyennes voient les leurs stagner ou régresser sous le fardeau d’un État boulimique et impotent. À l’autre extrémité de l’échelle sociale, les enfants des classes populaires et immigrées n’ont plus guère l’espoir d’accéder un jour aux premières places de la fonction publique et des grandes entreprises. Depuis un quart de siècle, l’ascenseur social est en panne et les clivages culturels, religieux et linguistiques qui se mettent en place rendent plus minces encore leurs chances de promotion. (…) La très grande majorité des immigrants qui affluent en Europe par-dessus la Méditerranée ou le Bosphore n’ont pas de qualification professionnelle. Ils sont exclus des emplois légaux et grossissent l’économie souterraine (travail au noir, réseaux esclavagistes…), à moins qu’ils ne se cantonnent dans des emplois précaires (vigiles, nurses, aides-ménagères…). Quant aux diplômés du tiers monde qui quittent leur pays, ils choisissent unanimement les États-Unis et le Canada, assurés de pouvoir y travailler et développer leurs talents dans d’excellentes conditions et sans restrictions administratives (la moitié des 180.000 immigrants qu’a reçus le Canada en 2005 avaient un niveau d’études supérieures. Sans commentaire !). (…) Des démographes mandatés par l’ONU ont publié en 2000 un rapport mi-sérieux, mi-ironique où ils faisaient valoir que la France aurait besoin de 25 millions d’immigrants d’ici 2025 pour combler les postes vacants dans les entreprises… en l’absence de toute réforme d’envergure et à supposer que l’on trouve dans le tiers monde les compétences indispensables aux besoins d’une économie moderne. Il va de soi que l’entrée d’un aussi grand nombre d’immigrants ruinerait les fondations sociales, historiques et culturelles de la France et de l’Europe, et l’on comprend le désarroi des citoyens auxquels leurs leaders présentent cette éventualité comme une chance à saisir ! (…) Il est antinomique de faire venir de l’étranger des laveurs de carreaux, des infirmières ou des bûcherons et de prétendre résorber le chômage massif chez les jeunes Français issus des précédentes vagues de travailleurs immigrés. Les petits (et grands) patrons de la restauration jurent leurs grands dieux qu’ils ne trouvent personne à qui confier leur plonge ou même leur cuisine en-dehors d’Africains de la brousse n’ayant jamais touché la queue d’une poêle. Comment est-il possible dans ces conditions que McDonald’s arrive à recruter des jeunes dans les banlieues ou les milieux estudiantins pour des travaux similaires ? Les petits (et grands) patrons du bâtiment expliquent de la même façon qu’ils ne trouvent personne pour les emplois de manœuvres ou même de maçons et doivent recourir à des travailleurs africains. Mais comment se peut-il que les centres de tri d’ordures ménagères arrivent à recruter du personnel dans les milieux populaires pour des travaux autrement plus pénibles ? (…) Les sociétés de gardiennage recourent désormais de façon presque systématique à des immigrés africains… mais les entreprises de logistique trouvent bien à employer des jeunes Français dans des tâches autrement plus éprouvantes. Et que dire des musées ? La plupart, y compris les plus prestigieux, confient désormais la garde de leurs salles à des personnes étrangères qui souvent maîtrisent à peine la langue française. (…) La France n’échappera sans doute pas au retour des internats surveillés ni à l’apprentissage dès 14 ans (au lieu de 16) pour lutter contre la déscolarisation (pourquoi pas aussi des études surveillées dans les écoles jusqu’en fin de soirée pour dissuader les enfants de traîner dans les rues, selon une suggestion de feu Françoise Dolto ?). Un service civique obligatoire et universel devrait compenser la suppression hâtive du service militaire, qui était le seul lieu où les jeunes déclassés pouvaient rencontrer des Français d’autres milieux que le leur. Ce service civique devrait privilégier les échanges entre jeunes Français(es) de milieux différents, les plus favorisé(e)s instruisant les autres (alphabétisation, instruction civique, tenue d’un ménage, apprentissage de la conduite automobile, formation professionnelle…). André Larané
La version originale de cet article a donné une représentation inexacte de ce qui est arrivé à la petite fille après la photo. Elle n’a pas été emmenée en larmes par les patrouilles frontalières ; sa mère l’a récupérée et les deux ont été interpellées ensemble. Time
Sur le plateau de la NBCNews, l’ancien président du Comité national du parti Républicain, Michael Steele, vient de comparer les centres dans lesquels sont accueillis les enfants de clandestins aux Etats-Unis à des camps de concentration. Il s’adresse alors aux Américains : « Demain, ce pourrait être vos enfants ». La scène résume à elle seule la folie qui s’est emparée de la sphère politico-médiatique après que Donald Trump a ordonné aux autorités gardant la frontière mexicaine d’appliquer la loi et de séparer les parents de leurs enfants entrés illégalement aux Etats-Unis. Passons sur la comparaison. Aussi indécente que manipulatrice : ces enfants ne sont pas enfermés en attendant la mort. Quant à la mise en garde, elle est grotesque. Aucun Américain ne se verra subitement séparé de ses enfants. A moins d’avoir commis un crime ou un délit puni de prison. Quand un citoyen lambda est condamné à une peine de prison, personne ne s’offusque jamais de cette séparation … Jusqu’à ce que cela touche des clandestins. Leur particularité étant de n’avoir aucun logement dans le pays dont ils viennent de violer la frontière, leurs enfants sont donc pris en charge dans des camps, en attendant que la situation des adultes soit examinée. Aux frais des Américains. (…) Reste que les parents, prévenus de la loi que nul n’est censé ignorer, sont les premiers responsables du sort qui menace leurs enfants, en choisissant de la violer. Ce sont eux qui font payer leur délit à leur propre progéniture. Les clandestins sont des adultes tout aussi responsables que n’importe quel autre adulte : leur retirer leur capacité de décision, leur liberté et donc leur responsabilité n’est pas exactement les respecter. Mais (…) remontons à 2014, époque bénie du président Barack Obama. Cette année-là, 47.017 mineurs sont appréhendés, alors qu’ils traversent la frontière… seuls. Des enfants, envoyés par leurs parents qui n’ont apparemment pas eu peur de s’en séparer pour leur faire prendre des risques inconsidérés. Comment est-ce possible ? L’administration américaine d’alors avait affirmé que les étrangers envoyaient leurs enfants seuls, persuadés qu’ils seraient ainsi mieux traités que des adultes. Le New York Times avait donné raison à l’administration : « alors que l’administration Obama a évolué vers une attitude plus agressive d’expulsion des adultes, elle a, dans les faits, expulsé beaucoup moins d’enfants que par le passé. » Les clandestins le savent, tout comme ils connaissent aujourd’hui les risques qui pèsent sur leurs propres enfants. On apprend également qu’à l’époque, les enfants mexicains sont directement reconduits de l’autre côté de la frontière et que les autres sont « pris en charge par le département de la Santé et des Services humanitaires qui les place dans des centres temporaires en attendant que leur processus d’expulsion soit lancé. » En 2013, 80 centres accueillaient 25 000 enfants non accompagnés. Et ce, dans les mêmes conditions aujourd’hui dénoncées. Si similaires d’ailleurs que certains ont voulu critiquer la politique migratoire de Donald Trump en usant de photos datant de… 2014 ! Rien n’a changé. A un détail près. Les enfants dont on parle en ce mois de juin 2018 sont parfois accompagnés d’adultes. Comme sous l’administration Obama, les enfants sont séparés de ces adultes lorsqu’il y a un doute sur le lien réel de parenté, en cas de suspicion de trafic de mineurs ou par manque de place dans les centres de rétention pour les familles. Restent les enfants effectivement accompagnés de leurs parents et malgré tout séparés de ces derniers qui partent en prison. Chaque mois, 50.000 clandestins entrent aux Etats-Unis, parmi lesquels 15% de familles. Une fois arrêtés, les clandestins sont pénalement poursuivis avant toute demande d’asile. (…) Mais il a suffi de quelques images, publiées en même temps que la sortie du très attendu rapport sur la possible partialité du FBI lors des dernières élections présidentielles américaines, pour que l’opinion politico-médiatique hurle au scandale. Jusqu’à la première dame du pays, Mélania Trump, qui a confié « détester » voir les clandestins séparés de leurs enfants. Le Président lui-même a fini par douter publiquement : «Le dilemme est si vous êtes mou, ce que certaines personnes aimeraient que vous soyez, si vous êtes vraiment mou, pathétiquement mou… le pays va être envahi par des millions de gens. Et si vous êtes ferme, vous n’avez pas de coeur. C’est un dilemme difficile. Peut-être que je préfère être ferme, mais c’est un dilemme difficile.» Donald Trump a subi l’indignation générale (à moins d’en profiter), au point de montrer au monde que même lui avait du cœur en annonçant la signature d’un décret mettant fin à cette séparation forcée. Tout le monde s’est félicité du résultat de la mobilisation : enfin, les enfants vont pouvoir rejoindre leurs parents en prison ! Quelle victoire… Charlotte d’Ornellas
L’humoriste Yassine Belattar (…) est venu à Nantes, pour rencontrer les proches d’Aboubakar Fofana, tué le 3 juillet par un tir policier, parler aux animateurs du quartier du Breil où a eu lieu le drame, aux avocats de la famille… Sans mettre en avant sa nouvelle casquette de membre du Conseil présidentiel des villes. L’humoriste issu des banlieues franciliennes a une voix qui porte, quitte à faire grincer des dents, et il n’est pas du genre à la fermer quand un sujet lui tient à cœur. « Ça sert à quoi, sinon, d’être artiste ? » Jordan, 24 ans, habitant du Breil et  «meilleur ami» d’Aboubakar se tient à ses côtés. Ils partagent la même indignation.  « Pendant 48 heures, notre ami s’est fait traiter de voyou. Il a été insulté sur les réseaux sociaux. Des commentaires racistes se sont réjouis de sa mort ! Une double peine pour sa famille,  se désole le jeune Nantais.  « Tout ça parce que la police – via les médias- a laissé croire qu’il avait été tué dans un acte de légitime défense »,  renchérit Yassine. Ils racontent : «  Ce garçon de 22 ans vivait à Nantes depuis un an et neuf mois. Ok, il avait fait des conneries à Garges-lès-Gonesses, difficile d’y échapper quand on grandit dans l’une des banlieues les plus mal famées de France. Mais, fort d’une famille très unie, aimante, il était parti à Nantes pour se reconstruire, trouver du travail. Et il est victime d’un fait divers affreux. »  Yassine Belattar ajoute : « Je suis tombé de ma chaise quand je me suis rendu compte que le policier avait menti ! » Le drame a provoqué cinq nuits d’émeutes à Nantes : 175 voitures brûlées, une trentaine de bâtiments public et commerces dégradés ou ravagés par des incendies… Un choc pour la ville.  « En banlieue parisienne, ça aurait été bien pire, affirme Belattar.  Ici, les habitants espèrent encore dans la justice, les associations sont présentes dans des quartiers qui ne sont pas éloignés du centre-ville. Mais la violence n’est pas une solution. Ce n’est pas en brûlant une bibliothèque qu’on va faire revivre Aboubakar. Le problème des émeutes, c’est qu’au bout d’un moment, ça devient comme une espèce de jeu pour des très jeunes gens. Et dans cinq ans, à cause de ça, le gamin qui aura marqué Breil sur son CV ne va pas forcément se faire rappeler ». Ils ne veulent pas évoquer les suites judiciaires de cette affaire, pour laisser le champ aux avocats de la famille. Mais l’humoriste, confirmant que le CRS auteur du tir est d’origine maghrébine, balaie l’hypothèse d’un homicide raciste :  « Pour nous, ce n’est pas un Rebeu qui a tué un Noir. C’est un policier qui a tué un jeune. Voilà le problème. »  Jordan et lui espèrent que le « mensonge » initial du policier, provoquera un déclic,  « un renouveau »,  dans les relations devenues détestables entre les forces de l’ordre et les jeunes.  « C’est peut-être l’occasion d’ouvrir une nouvelle page. Il faut qu’ils se parlent. Qu’ils crèvent l’abcès pour de vrai. Oui, des policiers n’en peuvent plus de se faire insulter. Oui, certains peuvent friser le  burn-out . Oui, les gens des quartiers se font maltraiter, insultés eux aussi et ont peur de la police, contrairement aux gens des centres-villes, martèle l’humoriste. Ouest France
Les médias convenus n’aiment guère qu’on les critique : pour un peu, on en deviendrait complotiste. Mais sans voir aucunement de complot, on est bien obligé de trouver la trace de l’idéologie sommaire que l’on ne reconnaît que trop dans l’unanimisme de leurs mensonges et de leurs silences. La première semaine d’août nous en apporte les preuves les plus caricaturales. C’est ainsi que l’ensemble de la presse française aura rapporté uniment qu’une jeune athlète noire nommée Daisy Osakue, née à Turin de parents nigérians et qui avait reçu un jet d’œuf sur la cornée avait été victime « d’un attentat raciste ». La palme académique revenant au journal Le Monde qui, se saisissant de l’événement, y voyait dans un éditorial le signe définitif « d’une inquiétante montée du racisme en Italie » en imputant la responsabilité principale au vice-président du Conseil et ministre de l’Intérieur, le détesté par lui, Matteo Salvini. De là à penser, idéologiquement et politiquement, que l’occasion était trop belle pour la presse convenable de régler son compte au détestable, il n’y a qu’un pas qu’il est difficile de ne pas vouloir franchir. Rien n’explique sinon pourquoi la presse se serait saisie avec un si vorace appétit d’une affaire aussi modeste dans laquelle le procureur de Turin, dès le début avait fait montre d’une bien plus grande prudence en faisant observer que d’autres victimes blanches avaient fait l’objet du même type d’agression dans les mêmes moments. Mais on ne fait pas d’omelettes idéologiques sans casser quelques œufs sur la tête du public. C’est dans ces tristes conditions que le 3 août, les Décodeurs du Monde reconnaissaient que l’hypothèse raciste avait perdu grandement de sa consistance. Simple question, en passant, n’appelle-t-on pas cela un fake, un peu infect ? et celui-ci, une fois encore, n’émane pas d’une télévision russe ou de la fâcheuse sphère, mais de la presse sévère. Après le mensonger tumulte, la discrétion complice : le samedi soir 28 juillet, un jeune homme, Adrien Perez, fêtait son anniversaire dans une discothèque de Meylan près de Grenoble. À la sortie de l’établissement au petit matin celui-ci prêtait secours à un ami agressé par trois voyous dont deux frères, Younes et Yanis El Habib, et mourait sous leurs couteaux. La presse convenue a fait profil bien plus bas que pour un lancer d’œuf à l’étranger, mais le père d’Adrien n’a pu se retenir : « En tuant notre fils, ils ont détruit notre vie, je ne pardonnerai jamais. » Lorsque j’écris que la presse a fait profil bas, je suis trop bon : l’audiovisuel de service public s’est montré comme toujours très idéologique. C’est ainsi que France 3 Rhône-Alpes a voulu retenir que ce père ne voulait pas être catalogué comme « raciste » et ne désirait pas « que les politiques récupèrent cette affaire ». Raciste ? Tiens ! C’est vrai, pourquoi non ? Si on doit questionner continûment la présence du racisme. Mais aucun danger : on aura fait un tintamarre pour rien à Turin, mais la question sera interdite d’être posée dans l’Isère. Quant à la « récupération politique », que France 3 se rassure, aucun danger d’émeute, quand bien même le Juge de la Liberté a refusé de suivre les réquisitions du parquet et a laissé libre le troisième suspect, le peuple restera calme. Il ne bouge pas le peuple. Il regarde la télévision, le peuple. Il n’y a que lorsque ce sont les délinquants qui sont victimes d’accidents du travail, que l’on brûle les édifices, que l’on blesse la police, et que l’on hurle au racisme. Tout de même, entre les marches blanches avec bougies victimaires et les saccages, il devrait désormais exister un juste milieu pour la juste colère. Les marches dignes ne seraient plus forcément silencieuses. Gilles-William Goldnadel
Mais le peuple, c’est pas le peuple qui  gouverne, c’est pas le peuple qui décide de quelle loi on doit faire à un instant T. Si on écoutait le peuple on aurait encore la peine de mort, nous aurions l’alcool au volant et peut-être d’autres excèsC’est pas au peuple de décider si on doit recevoir ou pas ces migrants, c’est au gouvernement pour qui le peuple a voté. (…) Même s’il y a des manifestations contre les migrants, ça ne change rien au fait qu’on doit au moins les accueillir … Jimmy Mohamed (médecin urgentiste, RMC, 14.08.2018)
Les pays du Nord subventionnent les pays du Sud, moyennant l’aide au développement, afin que les démunis puissent mieux vivre et – ce n’est pas toujours dit aussi franchement – rester chez eux. Or, ce faisant, les pays riches se tirent une balle dans le pied. En effet, du moins dans un premier temps, ils versent une prime à la migration en aidant des pays pauvres à atteindre le seuil de prospérité à partir duquel leurs habitants disposent des moyens pour partir et s’installer ailleurs. C’est l’aporie du « codéveloppement », qui vise à retenir les pauvres chez eux alors qu’il finance leur déracinement. Il n’y a pas de solution. Car il faut bien aider les plus pauvres, ceux qui en ont le plus besoin ; le codéveloppement avec la prospère île Maurice, sans grand risque d’inciter au départ, est moins urgent… Les cyniques se consoleront à l’idée que l’aide a rarement fait advenir le développement mais, plus souvent, servi de « rente géopolitique » à des alliés dans l’arrière-cour mondiale. Dans un reportage au long cours titré The Uninvited, « les hôtes indésirables », Jeremy Harding, l’un des rédacteurs en chef de la London Review of Books, a pointé avec ironie le dilemme du codéveloppement : « des pays nantis – par exemple, les pays membres de l’UE – qui espèrent décourager la migration depuis des régions très pauvres du monde par un transfert prudent de ressources (grâce à des accords bilatéraux, des annulations de dettes et ainsi de suite) ne devraient pas être trop déçus en découvrant au bout d’un certain temps que leurs initiatives ont échoué à améliorer les conditions de vie dans les pays ciblés. Car un pays qui réussirait effectivement à augmenter son PIB, le taux d’alphabétisation de ses adultes et l’espérance de vie – soit un mieux à tout point de vue – produirait encore plus de candidats au départ qu’un pays qui se contente de son enterrement en bas du tableau de l’économie mondiale. » Les premiers rayons de prospérité pourraient bien motiver un plus grand nombre d’Africains à venir en Europe. Pourquoi ? Les plus pauvres parmi les pauvres n’ont pas les moyens d’émigrer. Ils n’y pensent même pas. Ils sont occupés à joindre les deux bouts, ce qui ne leur laisse guère le loisir de se familiariser avec la marche du monde et, encore moins, d’y participer. À l’autre extrême, qui coïncide souvent avec l’autre bout du monde, les plus aisés voyagent beaucoup, au point de croire que l’espace ne compte plus et que les frontières auraient tendance à disparaître ; leur liberté de circuler – un privilège – émousse leur désir de s’établir ailleurs. Ce n’est pas le cas des « rescapés de la subsistance », qui peuvent et veulent s’installer sur une terre d’opportunités. L’Afrique émergente est sur le point de subir cet effet d’échelle : hier dépourvues des moyens pour émigrer, ses masses sur le seuil de la prospérité se mettent aujourd’hui en route vers le « paradis » européen. Stephen Smith
Douglas Murray, qui vient de publier un livre remarquable appelé The Strange Death of Europe* (La mort étrange de l’Europe) (…) y décrit le suicide de son propre pays, et écrit que les choses a ses yeux sont devenues irréversibles. Il attribue cela à deux causes: l’acceptation d’une immigration de masse musulmane, et l’acceptation d’une immigration de masse musulmane, et l’imposition des idées politiquement correctes qui a créé une multitude de bombes à retardement en train d’exploser.Il serait très tard pour qu’un gouvernement britannique agisse : il faudrait au minimum enfermer en prison tous les gens qui sont sur les listes de suspects, expulser ceux qui ne sont pas de nationalité britannique, interdire le retour sur le territoire des Musulmans partis se former au djihad à l’étranger, fermer toutes les écoles musulmanes et la plupart des mosquées, armer la police, et ce ne serait qu’un début. Le gouvernement britannique n’agira pas. La situation est à peine meilleure en France (où il faudrait appliquer des mesures identiques), ce qui ne veut pas dire qu’elle n’est pas désespérée, et Douglas Murray parle aussi de la France où existent près de six cent zones de non droit et plus de deux mille mosquées où on évoque positivement le djihad. Elle compte une proportion inquiétante de Musulmans antisémites et de Musulmans approuvant les actions de l’Etat Islamique. La situation est pire en Belgique qu’au Royaume Uni, et la situation s’aggrave en Scandinavie.  L’Europe est en guerre parce que l’islam radical lui a déclaré la guerre, et elle opte pour l’aveuglement volontaire, l’apaisement et la défaite préventive.  Dans les journaux de tous les pays d’Europe, on évoque en ce moment le ramadan, et on vante les charmes de celui-ci. Le ramadan est une phase de djihad exacerbé, et on le constatera cette année encore, mais il ne faut pas le dire, bien sûr. Ce qui s’est passé à Londres était une nuit de ramadan. Tuer des infidèles pour plaire à Allah et finir en shahid pour rejoindre le paradis d’Allah peut faire partie des joies du ramadan pour un Musulman. Il existe des Musulmans occidentalisés qui s’éloignent du Coran et qui vivent leur vie paisiblement, mais les Musulmans qui respectent pleinement le Coran peuvent légitimement tuer des infidèles. L’assimilation des Musulmans au monde occidental serait une vaste tâche, presque impossible à accomplir. Pour l’heure, en Europe, c’est l’Occident qui se fait avaler par l’islam. Parmi les aspects les plus abjects des pseudo-debats de ces derniers jours sur le climat, il y avait le fait qu’on mène ces débats comme si une semaine plus tôt des enfants n’avaient pas été assassinés à Manchester. Les gens rassemblés pour une minute de silence à Manchester avaient chanté une chanson appelée Don’t look back in anger (ne regarde pas en arrière avec colère). Ils n’étaient pas en colère et, avec leurs bougies, leurs fleurs et leurs petits cœurs en papier rose, ils faisaient acte de soumission. Ils ne regardaient pas en arrière vers les victimes. Les dirigeants européens réservaient, eux, leur colère à Donald Trump et ne regardaient pas en arrière eux non plus.  Parmi les aspects les plus grotesques des pseudo-débats de ces derniers jours sur le climat, il y avait cette prétention cuistre et arrogante des dirigeants européens de sauver la terre alors qu’ils sont totalement incapables de sauver leur propre civilisation et sont en train de la détruire. La terre, dont ils prétendent se préoccuper n’est pas en danger. La civilisation européenne, elle, est bien davantage qu’en danger : elle est quasiment morte, et les dirigeants européens d’aujourd’hui sont ses fossoyeurs. Guy Millière
Ce n’est pas une si mauvaise affaire : s’il y a un peu plus de décapitations en Europe que de coutume, au moins bénéficierons nous d’un plus grand nombre de cuisines. Douglas Murray
Dans ce livre, Douglas Murray analyse la situation actuelle de l’Europe dont son attitude à l’égard des migrations n’est que l’un des symptômes d’une fatigue d’être et d’un refus de persévérer dans son être. Advienne que pourra ! « Le Monde arrive en Europe précisément au moment où l’Europe a perdu de vue ce qu’elle est ». Ce qui aurait pu réussir dans une Europe sûre et fière d’elle-même, ne le peut pas dans une Europe blasée et finissante. L’Europe exalte aujourd’hui le respect, la tolérance et la diversité. Toutes les cultures sont les bienvenues sauf la sienne. « C’est comme si certains des fondements les plus indiscutables de la civilisation occidentale devenaient négociables… comme si le passé était à prendre », nous dit Douglas Murray. Seuls semblent échapper à celle langueur morbide et masochiste les anciens pays de la sphère soviétique. Peut-être que l’expérience totalitaire si proche les a vaccinés contre l’oubli de soi. Ils ont retrouvé leur identité et ne sont pas prêts à y renoncer. Peut-être gardent-ils le sens d’une cohésion nationale qui leur a permis d’émerger de la tutelle soviétique, dont les Européens de l’Ouest n’ont gardé qu’un vague souvenir. Peut-être ont-ils échappé au complexe de culpabilité dont l’Europe de l’Ouest se délecte et sont-ils trop contents d’avoir survécu au soviétisme pour se voir voler leur destin. Cette attitude classée à droite par l’Europe occidentale est vue, à l’Est, comme une attitude de survie, y compris à gauche comme en témoigne Robert Fico, le Premier ministre de gauche slovaque : «  j’ai le sentiment que, nous, en Europe, sommes en train de commettre un suicide rituel… L’islam n’a pas sa place en Slovaquie. Les migrants changent l’identité de notre pays. Nous ne voulons pas que l’identité de notre pays change. » (2016) Il y a un orgueil à se présenter comme les seuls vraiment méchants de la planète. Tout ce qui arrive, l’Europe en est responsable directement ou indirectement. Comme avant lui Pascal Bruckner, Douglas Murray brocarde l’auto-intoxication des Européens à la repentance. Les gens s’en imbibent, nous dit-il, parce qu’ils aiment ça. Ça leur procure élévation et exaltation. Ça leur donne de l’importance. Supportant tout le mal, la mission de rédemption de l’humanité leur revient. Ils s’autoproclament les représentants des vivants et des morts. Douglas Murray cite le cas d’Andrews Hawkins, un directeur de théâtre britannique qui, en 2006, au mi-temps de sa vie, se découvrit être le descendant d’un marchand d’esclaves du 16ème siècle. Pour se laver de la faute de son aïeul, il participa, avec d’autres dans le même cas originaires de divers pays, à une manifestation organisée dans le stade de Banjul en Gambie. Les participants enchainés, qui portaient des tee-shirts sur lesquels était inscrit « So Sorry », pleurèrent à genoux, s’excusèrent, avant d’être libérés de leurs chaines par  le Vice-Président  gambien. « Happy end », mais cette manie occidentale de l’auto-flagellation, si elle procure un sentiment pervers d’accomplissement, inspire du mépris à ceux qui n’en souffrent pas et les incitent à en jouer et à se dédouaner de leurs mauvaises actions. Pourquoi disputer aux Occidentaux ce mauvais rôle. Douglas Murray raconte une blague de Yasser Arafat qui fit bien rire l’assistance, alors qu’on lui annonçait l’arrivée d’une délégation américaine. Un journaliste présent lui demanda ce que venaient faire les Américains. Arafat lui répondit que la délégation américaine passait par là à l’occasion d’une tournée d’excuses à propos des croisades ! Cette attitude occidentale facilite le report sur les pays occidentaux de la responsabilité de crimes dont ils sont les victimes. Ce fut le cas avec le 11 septembre. Les thèses négationnistes fleurirent, alors qu’on se demandait aux États-Unis qu’est-ce qu’on avait bien pu faire pour mériter cela. Cette exclusivité dans le mal que les Occidentaux s’arrogent ruissèle jusques et y compris au niveau individuel. Après avoir été violé chez lui par un Somalien en avril 2016, un politicien norvégien, Karsten Nordal Hauken, exprima dans la presse la culpabilité qui était la sienne d’avoir privé ce pauvre Somalien, en le dénonçant, de sa vie en Norvège et renvoyé ainsi à un avenir incertain en Somalie. Comme l’explique Douglas Murray, si les masochistes ont toujours existé, célébrer une telle attitude comme une vertu est la recette pour fabriquer « une forte concentration de masochistes ». « Seuls les Européens sont contents de s’auto-dénigrer sur un marché international de sadiques ». Les dirigeants les moins fréquentables sont tellement habitués à notre autodénigrement qu’ils y voient un encouragement. En septembre 2015, le président Rouhani a eu le culot de faire la leçon aux Hongrois sur leur manque de générosité dans la crise des réfugiés. Que dire alors de la richissime Arabie saoudite qui a refusé de prêter les 100 000 tentes climatisées qui servent habituellement lors du pèlerinage et n’a accueilli aucun Syrien, alors qu’elle offrait de construire 200 mosquées en Allemagne ? La posture du salaud éternel, dans laquelle se complait l’Europe, la désarme complètement pour comprendre les assauts de violence dont elle fait l’objet et fonctionne comme une incitation. Beaucoup d’Européens, ce fut le cas d’Angela Merkel, ont cru voir, dans la crise migratoire de 2015, une mise au défi de laver le passé : « Le monde voit dans l’Allemagne une terre d’espoir et d’opportunités. Et ce ne fut pas toujours le cas » (A. Merkel, 31 août 2015). N’était-ce pas là l’occasion d’une rédemption de l’Allemagne qu’il ne fallait pas manquer ?  Douglas Murray décrit ces comités d’accueils enthousiastes qui ressemblaient à ceux que l’on réservait jusque là aux équipes de football victorieuses ou à des combattants rentrant de la guerre. Les analogies avec la période nazie fabriquent à peu de frais des héros. Lorsque la crise migratoire de 2015 survient il n’y a pas de frontière entre le Danemark et la Suède. Il suffisait donc de prendre le train pour passer d’un pays à l’autre. Pourtant, il s’est trouvé une jeune politicienne danoise de 24 ans – Annika Hom Nielsen – pour transporter à bord de son yacht, en écho à l’évacuation des juifs en 1943, des migrants qui préféraient la Suède au Danemark mais qui, pourtant, ne risquaient pas leur vie en restant au Danemark. Si beaucoup de pays expient l’expérience nazie, d’autres expient leur passé colonial. C’est ainsi que l’Australie a instauré le « National Sorry Day » en 1998. En 2008, les excuses du Premier ministre Kevin Rudd aux aborigènes furent suivies de celles du Premier ministre canadien aux peuples indigènes. Aux États-Unis, plusieurs villes américaines ont rebaptisé « Colombus Day » en « Indigenous People Day ». Comme l’écrit Douglas Murray, il n’y a rien de mal à faire des excuses, même si tous ceux à qui elles s’adressent sont morts. Mais, cette célébration de la culpabilité « transforme les sentiments patriotiques en honte ou à tout le moins, en sentiments profondément mitigés ». Si l’Europe doit expier ses crimes passés, pourquoi ne pas exiger de même de la Turquie ? Si la diversité est si extraordinaire, pourquoi la réserver à l’Europe et ne pas l’imposer à, disons, l’Arabie saoudite ? Où sont les démonstrations de culpabilité des Mongols pour la cruauté de leurs ascendants ? (…) Les mesures prises pour sauver les étrangers en mer, au plus près des côtes libyennes ont été vite connues et intégrées par les passeurs, pour accélérer leur business et empiler toujours plus de migrants dans des embarcations dangereuses. L’information circule à grande vitesse, comme ce fut le cas avec les déclarations d’Angela Merkel ne fixant aucune limite au nombre d’étrangers qu’elle était prête à accueillir. (…) La traite est impitoyable. Les passeurs n’hésitent pas à envoyer des vidéos mettant en scène les abus et les tortures de migrants, via leurs smartphones, à destination des familles pour recueillir plus d’argent. L’identification des migrants est très difficile et le rythme des arrivées ne permet pas une vérification approfondie. Beaucoup arrivent sans papiers. Ceux qui débarquaient à Lesbos connaissaient le prix du taxi pour Moria. Et, à Malmö, c’est dans les poubelles en ville que l’on retrouvait nombre de papiers d’identité abandonnés. (…) On a toléré de musulmans « offensés et en colère » beaucoup plus qu’on ne l’aurait fait pour d’autres. C’était déjà le cas en 1989, après la publication des versets sataniques de Salman Rushdie. Ainsi, Cat Stevens, « rebaptisé » Yusuf Islam après sa conversion, déclara lors d’une émission télévisée de la BBC que Salman Rushdie méritait la mort et qu’il regrettait que les portraits en flammes que l’on voyait lors des manifestations ne soient pas « la chose en vrai », autrement dit Salman Rushdie lui-même. Il ne fut pas poursuivi pour ses propos. (…) Partout en Europe, se trouvèrent des « idiots utiles » qui ont non seulement protégé et défendu l’indéfendable mais ont été des activistes de la cause. C’est ce qui causa l’assassinat de Pim Fortuyn par un Végan, défenseur de la cause animale, qui croyait ainsi venir en aide aux musulmans.  La radicalisation des propos à l’égard de Pim Fortuyn de la part de ses opposants, qui franchirent rapidement le point Godwin, l’ont, en quelque sorte, désigné à la vindicte. (…) Mais celle qui symbolise le mieux le malaise européen est sans doute Ayaan Hirsi Ali. Voilà une jeune femme qui incarne la résistance à l’extrémisme religieux, qui aurait dû être la coqueluche des intellectuels européens et qui a été lâchement abandonnée. Somalienne, réfugiée aux Pays-Bas, alors qu’elle fuyait un mariage forcé, Ayaan Hirsi Ali apprit la langue de son nouveau pays tout en travaillant et put ainsi entreprendre des études à l’Université de Leiden. Elle en sortit diplômée et devint chercheur. Sans parler de son engagement politique. Son parcours est d’autant plus remarquable qu’elle était, adolescente, favorable à l’exécution de Salman Rushdie. Le 11 septembre 2001 l’amena à remettre en cause ses convictions religieuses et à les abandonner. Le parcours exemplaire qu’elle avait construit depuis son arrivée en Hollande aurait dû en faire un modèle d’intégration. Menacée, Ayaan Hirsi Ali finit par se voir accorder une protection policière. Alors qu’elle représentait tout ce qu’un pays européen pouvait souhaiter de ses migrants, elle se vit retirer sa nationalité néerlandaise par la ministre de l’immigration et de l’intégration qui appartenait au même parti qu’elle, sous l’allégation de fausse déclaration. Décidément, la Hollande avait fait son choix. Elle refusait d’assurer la protection d’une femme qui défendait tout ce que les Européens avaient si précieusement acquis. Comme l’écrit Douglas Murray : « le pays qui avait laissé entrer des centaines de milliers de musulmans sans espérer d’eux qu’il s’intégrassent et qui abritait en son sein quelques spécimen des prêcheurs les plus radicaux en Europe, privait de sa citoyenneté l’un des seuls immigrants qui avait montré à quoi pourrait ressembler un immigrant pleinement intégré. » Ayaan Hirsi Ali, ne recevant finalement aucune de protection en Europe, finit par s’installer aux Etats-Unis. (…) Les viols collectifs d’enfants à Rotherham et à Oxfordshire ont été passés sous silence par la police par peur des accusations de racisme et par peur de nuire aux relations intercommunautaires. Ces situations de viols passés sous silence ou minimisés se sont multipliées en Europe dans la foulée de la vague migratoire de 2015. Un musulman du nord de l’Angleterre qui s’était insurgé contre  les viols collectifs de filles blanches par des membres de sa communauté a reçu des menaces de mort. (…) Si l’on intensifie l’aide au développement, on tarira à la source les flux migratoires nous dit-on. Qui peut être contre l’aide au développement ? Seulement, on sait aussi que lorsque le niveau de vie s’accroît les ressources pour partir aussi, favorisant ainsi les flux migratoires. Après la tuerie de Nice, les débats en France se sont enflammés sur le burkini. Pour Douglas Murray, c’était une manière de faire diversion, pour parler de la chose, sans toucher à l’essentiel du problème. On avait déjà fait la même chose en d’autres circonstances, avec la loi sur le voile à l’école par exemple. Au lieu de viser le voile, il avait fallu viser les autres religions en même temps, alors que tout le monde savait de quoi il retournait. Si l’on ne peut porter le voile à l’école, on ne peut pas non plus porter une grande croix en bois, dont personne ne se rappelait en avoir jamais vue à l’école ! Lorsque des « innocents » se conduisent mal, comme cela a été le cas par exemple avec les viols collectifs en Suède, en Allemagne ou en Autriche, des politiques et même des policiers, sans parler des médias, cherchent généralement à enterrer l’affaire. L’auto-défiance est telle que l’on craint plus la réaction à la chose que la chose en elle-même. « En Allemagne en 2016, comme en Grande-Bretagne au début des années 2000, la crainte des conséquences que pourrait avoir l’identification des origines raciales des agresseurs l’emporta sur la détermination des policiers de faire leur travail. » On ne peut pas ici ne pas évoquer l’affaire Sarah Halimi battue à mort, torturée et défenestrée le 4 avril 2017. Il a fallu plus de deux mois pour que l’affaire sorte dans la presse… et encore timidement. Il ne fallait pas perturber la période électorale ! Le déni creuse l’écart entre « les gens », comme dirait Jean-Luc Mélenchon, et les élites politiques et médiatiques. Les premiers savent que les élites leur mentent. Ils savent aussi ce qu’elles semblent ignorer : le nombre compte. Pour Douglas Murray, «  La radicalisation trouve ses origines dans une communauté particulière et tant que celle-ci s’accroît, la radicalisation fera de même ». « Les politiques européens ne peuvent admettre ce que chaque migrant traversant la méditerranée sait et que la plupart des Européens ont fini par comprendre : une fois en Europe, vous y restez. » Le déni, le mensonge venant d’en haut encouragent la radicalisation en bas. Il déresponsabilise aussi les migrants et les incite à plus d’audace. En octobre 2016, deux journaux allemands, Le Freitag et le Huffington Post Deutschland publiaient un article d’un jeune Syrien de 18 ans qui disait en avoir marre des Allemands en colère et des chômeurs racistes : « Nous, réfugiés, … ne voulons pas vivre dans le même pays que vous. Vous pouvez, et je pense que vous devriez, quitter l’Allemagne. L’Allemagne n’est pas faite pour vous. Pourquoi vivez-vous ici ?… Allez chercher une autre patrie. » Ce type d’arrogance est encouragé par des attitudes comme celles du président de district de Kassel qui, en octobre 2015, lors d’une réunion publique, déclara à ses concitoyens qui n’étaient pas d’accord avec l’accueil de 800 réfugiés, qu’ils étaient libres de quitter l’Allemagne. L’obsession de la race est partout, chez les politiques, dans le sport, à la télévision. Douglas Murray raconte ce qu’ont donné à Londres, les répercussions du mouvement américain « Black Lives Matter ». Les manifestants chantaient le slogan « Hands Up, Don’t Shoot » lors de manifestations encadrées par des policiers sans arme. Quelques semaines plus tard, on vit dans les rues de Londres un type armé d’une machette juché sur les épaules de trois autres clamant les slogans de « Black Lives Matter ». Dans Hyde Park, la manifestation se termina par un policier poignardé et quatre autres blessés. Douglas Murray s’inquiète du pouvoir pris par les associations antiracistes qui luttent contre les discriminations. Elles ont cherché à prendre de plus en plus d’influence et à gagner des sources de financement. Elles savaient bien que ce ne serait possible que si le problème n’était pas résolu. Ce qui a eu pour effet de faire croire que les discriminations s’étaient aggravées – et méritaient d’être plus vivement combattues – alors que les choses s’amélioraient. (..) Douglas Murray se demande combien de temps une société fondée sur ce qui est sorti de la tradition chrétienne peut survivre sans se référer aux croyances qui lui ont donné naissance. Pour les Églises d’Europe, le message de la religion est devenu une forme de politique de gauche, d’action en faveur de la diversité et du bien être social. Ainsi, en Suède, l’archevêque Antje Jeckelen a déclaré que Jésus se serait opposé aux restrictions que la Suède a fini par mettre à l’immigration après la ruée de 2015. Après avoir perdu la croyance religieuse, et même le sens des métaphores bourrées de références à la religion, nous dit Douglas Murray, nous sommes sur le point d’abandonner le rêve d’une extension illimitée de valeurs que nous croyions universelles. Et, le trou creusé par la religion risque de s’agrandir. « Les étrangers qui viennent en Europe apportent leur propre culture au moment précis où notre culture a perdu la confiance qui lui permettrait de plaider sa cause ». Combien de temps cela peut-il durer, se demande Douglas Murray, et qu’est-ce qui se profile après ? Pourquoi les Européens devraient-ils être les seuls à porter les malheurs du monde ? Que deviendra l’Europe si cette fuite en avant continue ? Pourquoi les Européens devraient-ils être les seuls à ne pas pouvoir se préoccuper d’abord de leurs intérêts et de leur avenir, comme le font la plupart des autres peuples du monde ? Il faudrait, nous dit Douglas Murray, que ceux qui gouvernent reconnaissent leurs erreurs, qu’ils cessent de dire qu’ils veulent changer de fond en comble la société, qu’ils reconnaissent enfin les problèmes que la société a perçu bien avant eux, que la diversité c’est bien, mais à dose raisonnable, sans quoi, en plus des problèmes vécus par les autochtones, ce sont les problèmes du monde entier qui se retrouvent en Europe. (…) Ne faudrait-il pas réserver l’ostracisme aux vrais partis fascistes comme Aube dorée et permettre aux autres partis dits d’extrême droite d’évoluer ?  En Hollande et au Danemark, les politiciens hostiles à l’immigration vivent sous protection policière. De quoi dissuader les vocations. C’est tellement plus facile et gratifiant de se montrer compatissant, généreux et ouvert. Les plus menacés sont ceux qui ont cru aux promesses de l’Europe (Hirsi Ali, Maajid Nawaz, Kamel Daoud…). Ceux qui défendent nos valeurs ont été abandonnés à leur sort. Ils paient l’addition du déni. Ce sont eux les premiers sacrifiés. Au lieu de représenter les modèles qu’ils auraient dû être, ils font figure d’anti-modèles. (…) Mais, les Européens risquent de ne pas pardonner un changement complet de notre continent. Michèle Tribalat
Les Européens se complaisent dans la détestation de soi, de leur civilisation, de leurs traditions et de leur Histoire. Celle-ci ne leur inspire que remords et aspiration à la repentance. Ils y trouvent élévation, exaltation et, au bout du compte, jouissance dans l’autoflagellation. C’est particulièrement vrai pour ce qui est de leur passé colonial pourtant glorieux. Ce masochisme se retrouve chez ce politicien norvégien qui, violé chez lui par un Somalien, exprima sa culpabilité d’avoir privé ce malheureux, en le dénonçant, de sa vie en Norvège. Il n’est certainement pas étranger à Angela Merkel qui a vu dans la crise migratoire de 2015 une occasion de laver le passé de l’Allemagne. Il y a cependant un point sur lequel nous souhaitons émettre une réserve. D. Murray parle des Européens. En fait pas tous, seulement certains. Une grande partie de nos populations ne partage pas ces sentiments. Ce sont les « élites », ou plutôt la caste dirigeante, qui frappent nos poitrines comme les deux présidents de la République française qui sont allés s’avilir outre-Méditerranée en dénonçant la colonisation française comme un crime contre l’humanité. L’objectif est l’inclusion forcée de cultures qui ne sont pas celles de l’Europe, l’acceptation imposée de religions et de coutumes qui ne sont pas les nôtres, la soumission empressée à des règles juridiques et sociales qui nous sont étrangères, voire qui nous répugnent. C’est le refus de l’assimilation et une politique d’implantation sur notre territoire de communautés souvent hostiles qui mènera à des partitions. En un mot c’est le multiculturalisme. Pour qu’il aboutisse il est indispensable d’exalter l’autre. C’est particulièrement vrai avec l’islam. Plus la réalité fait douter de la « religion de paix et de tolérance », plus on vante les mérites passés des civilisations islamiques. Comme l’a déclaré l’érudit Chirac à Philippe de Villiers stupéfait : l’Europe doit autant à l’islam qu’au christianisme. La conséquence évidente et tragique est que l’Europe ne peut plus rien opposer à l’immigration massive. En particulier D. Murray se demande combien de temps une société fondée sur la tradition chrétienne peut survivre sans se référer à celle-ci. Or pour les Eglises d’Europe devenues des ONG compassionnelles, le message de religion est celui d’une forme de politique de gauche et d’action en faveur de la diversité et du bien-être social. Murray cite à juste titre des noms de dissidents qui, ayant engagé leur propre vie, peuvent être qualifiés de résistants. C’est le cas de Salman Rushdie, victime d’une fatwa de mort, de Pim Fortuyn, assassiné par un défenseur de la cause animale (sic) et de Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Somalienne réfugiée aux Pays-Bas qui abandonna la religion islamique. Menacée, elle a bénéficié d’une protection policière. Murray aurait également pu citer le cas de Robert Redeker menacé de mort à la suite de l’une de ses tribunes consacrée à l’islam et à la liberté d’expression parue dans Le Figaro en 2006. Il est un peu étonnant que D. Murray n’ait pas cité Enoch Powell, homme politique et écrivain britannique dont le célèbre discours du 20 avril 1958 marqua la fin de sa carrière politique, ainsi que Christopher Caldwell, journaliste américain, auteur de Une révolution sous nos yeux / Comment l’islam va transformer la France et l’Europe. Mais surtout le contenu de l’ouvrage de D. Murray se retrouve depuis plusieurs années dans les nombreuses publications parues en France sur l’invasion migratoire. A tout seigneur tout honneur, Jean Raspail fut et demeure un visionnaire stupéfiant de ce qui arrive à l’Europe, avec son Camp des saints. Renaud Camus, créateur du concept du Grand Remplacement, impose son talent littéraire et son intransigeance. Eric Zemmour ne fut pas pendu mais tout de même condamné pour avoir dit la vérité. J.Y. Le Gallou, auteur de Immigration : la catastrophe. Que faire ?, Gérard Pince dans Le Choc des ethnies, Guillaume Faye dans Comprendre l’islam et Malika Sorel Sutter, auteur de Décomposition française peuvent être considérés comme les dissidents les plus marquants. Mais il existe beaucoup d’autres auteurs qui, en France, ont élevé ou élèvent leur voix sur le thème de l’invasion migratoire et de l’islam, à commencer par Michèle Tribalat elle-même, ce qui, semble-t-il, ne lui vaut pas que des éloges à l’INED. Quant à l’évaluation du coût financier de l’immigration, sans citer Polémia, il faut évoquer les travaux de Pierre Milloz, qui fut un pionnier dans les années 1990, et l’excellent et dense petit ouvrage de G. Pince : Les Français ruinés par l’immigration. Tous ces dissidents se heurtent aux obstacles et aux contraintes qu’élèvent les immigrationnistes et le politiquement correct. (…) L’arrivée de migrants est inévitable, nous ne pouvons rien y faire, il faut se résigner car de toute façon la responsabilité nous incombe. C’est la version migratoire du sens de l’histoire. (…) Sans crier gare et sans consulter les populations des natifs au carré les dirigeants européens les mettent devant le fait accompli. D. Murray cite Tony Blair mais c’est la crise migratoire de 2015 qui vit Merkel appeler sans concertation à l’accueil d’un million de migrants en Europe. On appelle réfugiés syriens des migrants économiques érythréens. Les chiffres de l’immigration illégale sont ignorés. Il est affirmé que la France n’est plus une terre de forte immigration. On prétend, comme Lamassoure le fit dans le Figaro, que les terroristes, citoyens français de papier, sont au fond nos propres enfants. Pratique courante, les informations dérangeantes, même monstrueuses, sont occultées. L’affaire Sarah Halimi, les viols de la Saint-Sylvestre en Allemagne ont été cachés et ne sont apparus au grand jour que grâce à la réinfosphère. L’un des cas les plus graves fut celui de viols collectifs de nombreuses jeunes filles en Angleterre qui furent tus par les autorités britanniques pendant des années. Si des faits graves se produisent, on enflamme les débats sur des sujets secondaires. Après la tuerie de Nice ce fut l’affaire du burkini. Comme après Charlie-Hebdo et le Bataclan, on manipule l’opinion et on dérive les sentiments des parents et des témoins vers les marches blanches, les bougies, les pleurnicheries afin d’éviter le ressentiment et les appels à la résistance et au châtiment. La diversité est représentée comme un bien et indispensable pour combler le déficit démographique européen et permettre le paiement des retraites. Le racisme, quand ce n’est pas le nazisme, est soulevé face à la moindre objection. Et pourtant, comme l’a dit Harouel « Plutôt fasciste que mort ». Douglas Murray s’inquiète du pouvoir pris par les associations antiracistes qui luttent contre les discriminations. Elles ont cherché à prendre de plus en plus d’influence et à gagner des sources de financement. Murray cite le cas du journaliste suédois licencié pour avoir évoqué dans un article un sondage largement hostile à l’immigration. En France, sur le fondement des lois mémorielles liberticides, les condamnations pénales pleuvent en contradiction avec la liberté d’expression. (…) D. Murray évoque « l’étrange mort de l’Europe» Non. Si l’Europe et sa civilisation inégalée sont en grand danger elles ne sont pas encore mortes. L’émergence du populisme, l’élection de D. Trump, le Brexit, la détermination de la Russie à défendre des valeurs traditionnelles et la résistance des pays de Visegrad laissent apparaître un réel espoir. Mais le temps presse et la course contre la montre peut être perdue. Polemia
Douglas Murray, qui est journaliste, s’interroge sur les raisons du « suicide » de l’Europe, qui est le seul continent à avoir ouvert ses portes à des populations nouvelles qui n’ont pas été assimilées et qui sont en passe de bouleverser totalement sa vieille « civilisation », plus que la Seconde Guerre mondiale l’a fait. L’auteur explique que, jusqu’en 1945, les migrations étaient soit faibles (comme en Italie), soit facilement absorbées (comme les Irlandais en Angleterre). Mais, ensuite, elles sont devenues massives et ont changé de nature. La Grande-Bretagne, notamment, a vu s’installer chez elle nombre de personnes originaires des Caraïbes et du Pakistan, au point que les « Anglais de souche » sont devenus minoritaires en 2015 à Londres (leur « ethnie « ne représente plus que 44 % des habitants de la capitale). Selon Murray, en Europe occidentale, deux phénomènes se conjuguent. Les « Blancs » ne font plus d’enfants (en moyenne 1,38 par femme alors qu’il en faudrait 2,1 pour que la population « caucasienne » ne diminue pas ), alors que l’immigration s’est accentuée ces dernières années. Il y a, chaque année en Grande-Bretagne, 770.000 naissances par an et 300.000 nouveaux migrants. Un démographe de l’université d’Oxford, cité dans le livre, avance même que si rien ne change, en 2060, les « Blancs » constitueront moins de 50 % de la population britannique. L’auteur rappelle qu’en 1968, le député conservateur Enoch Powell avait prononcé un discours prémonitoire, dans lequel il prévoyait un avenir sombre à son pays si on n’arrêtait pas l’immigration. Mais alors qu’il était soutenu par 75 % des Britanniques, il avait été marginalisé et réduit au silence. Douglas Murray insiste sur ce paradoxe : en Europe occidentale, la majorité des citoyens ne supportent plus les problèmes liés aux migrants (dont les attentats), mais les gouvernements (même de droite !) n’agissent pas, car ceux qui s’opposent à l’immigration sont taxés de racistes et de fascistes et aucun gouvernement de l’Europe occidentale n’ose rejeter ce jugement moral. Douglas Murray démonte les arguments des partisans de l’immigration : elle serait nécessaire, vu le manque d’enfants chez les « Blancs », et elle serait bénéfique sur le plan économique, car les nouveaux venus créeraient de la richesse. Mais M. Murray souligne que, selon les sondages, les « Blancs » feraient sans problème deux ou trois bébés s’ils étaient aidés financièrement. Par ailleurs, en Grande-Bretagne, de 1995 à 2001, lorsqu’on fait les comptes, les immigrants auraient, au final, coûté de 125 à 170 milliards d’euros (pour les soins, la scolarisation des enfants et les aides sociales). Autre argument faux selon l’auteur : il serait impossible d’arrêter l’immigration. La preuve du contraire est donnée par le Japon et les pays de l’Europe de l’Est, qui n’accueillent que très peu de réfugiés et contrôlent leurs frontières. (…) Mais il fustige les pays du Golfe si riches qui n’accueillent aucun réfugié. Pour Douglas Murray, il semble y avoir une prise de conscience des gouvernants et certains faits sont, désormais, mis en avant, alors qu’ils étaient systématiquement étouffés autrefois. Les viols de milliers d’adolescentes non musulmanes par des gangs de Pakistanais sont enfin réprimés et on reconnaît publiquement que 95 % des agressions sexuelles en Suède, en Allemagne ou en Autriche sont commis par des réfugiés. La parole est plus libre et ceux qui rejettent l’immigration ont maintenant le droit de s’exprimer. Mais n’est-il pas déjà trop tard ? Boulevard Voltaire
Somme magistrale (numéro 1 des ventes en Angleterre), ce livre documenté, rigoureux, fait le point sur la descente aux enfers d’une Union européenne qui aspire à faire de son espace civilisationnel, par l’immigration de masse, le bien du monde, la propriété de toutes les ethnies. A lire impérativement pour tous ceux qui veulent comprendre quelque chose à cette mécanique de l’auto-extinction d’une brillante civilisation. Pourquoi les dirigeants, les élites européennes aspirent-elles à dissoudre leur peuple dans le grand brassage des peuples du monde ? Près de 6 millions de juifs ont été méthodiquement exécutés avec la complicité active ou passive de la quasi-totalité des gouvernements européens. Lorsque les horreurs de la Shoah ont été connues de tous, un intense sentiment de culpabilité s’est emparé des élites dirigeantes européennes. Celles-ci ont répandu l’idée que les Etats-nation étaient responsables de ce drame (pas les nazis !) puis que les Européens étaient coupables de tous les malheurs de la planète (l’esclavage, le colonialisme, l’impérialisme…), enfin que l’homme blanc en général était l’ennemi de la nature dont la folie met en péril son existence même. Se concevant comme des êtres foncièrement mauvais, porteurs d’une sorte de péché originel, les dirigeants européens ont mis en place des politiques fondées sur l’obsession de l’auto-flagellation. Tous répètent en boucle : nous sommes coupables et nous devons payer pour tous les crimes commis. Portons sur nos épaules toute la misère du monde. Accueillons tous les migrants victimes, pour l’essentiel, du fanatisme musulman, de la corruption de leurs élites. Par un mécanisme bien connu en psychiatrie, il s’est produit un déplacement dans la représentation collective du vécu des événements passés et présents : à l’analyse, aux explications lucides et rationnelles des événements et des crimes réellement commis (le massacre organisé des populations juives ; les crimes commis ici ou là..), on a substitué une causalité diabolique par laquelle le coupable auto-proclamé est toujours l’Européen et uniquement lui, devenu ainsi l’incarnation universelle du mal. Dans ce scénario délirant, les autres peuples sont par définition et a priori innocents. L’esclavage est attribué aux seuls occidentaux. Oubliés les Africains qui y ont participé activement ; ignorés les Arabes qui ont été de grands esclavagistes… idem pour le colonialisme dépeint uniquement comme un tissu de crimes commis contre les peuples par les seuls européens. Oublié que tous les peuples dominants ont colonisé d’autres peuples ; oublié que les musulmans ont colonisé, envahi, converti par le glaive de très nombreux pays et qu’ils continuent à le faire ; oubliés les innombrables crimes perpétrés au nom de l’Islam et de son prophète. La projection de ce scénario sur la scène mondiale a conduit à désigner les Américains comme coupables a priori (origine colonisation européenne) tout comme Israël dès lors qu’une partie de sa population est d’origine européenne. Europe-Etats-Unis-Israel-Australie-Canada… devaient se prosterner, se mettre à genoux devant tous les autres peuples et demander pardon. Dans ce délire pathologique, on va jusqu’à inculquer l’idée que nous sommes responsables y compris lorsque nous sommes victimes : responsables des crimes terroristes islamiques ; responsables des viols commis par des « migrants »… Ceux, rares, très rares, qui osent mettre en cause ce masochisme politique, sont exclus, marginalisés, traînés devant les tribunaux, persécutés, contraints à se cacher voire sont assassinés. Pour les élites européennes, il n’existe qu’un seul remède, qu’une seule solution pour absoudre ses fautes : la mort, la disparition méthodique des peuples européens, la destruction totale de la civilisation occidentale. Et puis, la chape de plomb du sentiment de culpabilité qui pèse sur la conscience européenne a commencé à se fissurer. En dépit d’une censure étouffante, d’une propagande digne des pays totalitaires, des voix de plus en plus nombreuses s’expriment. Des États refusent le suicide de masse que l’Union européenne a inscrit dans son programme. En Hollande, en Hongrie, en Pologne, en Italie… on refuse d’absorber la pilule de cyanure que représente l’immigration de masse. Aux États-Unis, ex bastion de la culture de la faute ayant atteint son point culminant sous Obama, le Président Trump opère une véritable révolution, libérant la politique du carcan de la culpabilité. En Israël, le gouvernement Netanayou ose l’impensable aux yeux des masochistes professionnels de la faute : il fait inscrire dans le marbre de la loi, le caractère juif de l’Etat d’Israël, mettant fin ainsi à deux mille ans de honte de soi. Pour les spécialistes de la repentance, le scandale est extrême ! Quoi ? Serait-ce possible ? Les Américains n’ont plus honte d’être américains ? Quoi! Les Juifs ne se cachent plus ! Ils n’ont plus honte d’exister ? Ils ont même un État dont ils sont fiers ? Sydney Touati
Si on peut se poser une question ici, ce n’est pas de savoir pourquoi il a fallu plus de vingt-quatre heures au Royaume-Uni pour trouver des lumières aux couleurs de la Belgique mais pourquoi, après soixante-sept années de terrorisme, le Royaume-Uni n’a toujours pas trouvé les simples lumières bleues et blanches qu’il faudrait pour projeter le drapeau d’Israël sur un espace public. Ce n’est pas comme s’il n’y avait pas eu des tas d’occasions. Les ennemis d’Israël nous ont donné bien plus d’occasions pour des affichages lumineux que ce qui a été offert à ceux qui se sont entichés de lumières par les disciples de l’État Islamique. (…) Quand Israël est attaqué les marches qui mènent aux ambassades d’Israël à Londres ou dans d’autres capitales européennes ne sont pas couvertes de fleurs, d’ours en peluche ou de bougies, ni de messages de condoléances griffonnés. En fait, chaque fois que des Israéliens sont attaqués et assassinés il y a bien des réponses devant les ambassades d’Israël. Elles ont tendance à être moins obsédées par les ours en peluche, elles consistent en foules vociférant leur rage contre Israël et devant être retenues par la police locale pour ne pas faire preuve de plus d’antagonisme encore. Il est possible que certains pensent qu’Israël n’est tout simplement pas sur le même continent que l’Europe et que, bien qu’elle est essentiellement une société occidentale, nous ne nous en sentons pas suffisamment proches. Chaque fois qu’une atrocité terroriste est commise en Europe, il y en a toujours qui demandent pourquoi le deuil, disons pour Paris ou Bruxelles, est plus marqué que pour Ankara ou Beyrouth. Mais la question Paris/Bruxelles est rarement posée, voire jamais, à propos de Jérusalem. On pourrait laisser de côté les grandes considérations et dire que c’est parce qu’en Israël les victimes sont juives. Mais il y a aussi une explication qui est toute aussi exacte. C’est qu’Israël est considéré comme différent parce que lorsqu’Israël est attaqué par des terroristes, pour un grand nombre en Occident, Israël n’est pas considéré comme étant une victime innocente. On le considère comme un pays qui, d’une certaine manière, a pu attirer cette violence sur lui. (…) Eh bien, quel choc devra subir le reste du monde un jour. Parce que si on autorise qu’une « excuse » soit donnée pour une représentation faussée d’extrémistes islamistes, il faudra alors en autoriser pour les autres. On devra, par exemple, accepter la parole de l’État Islamique, pour qui la Belgique est une nation de « croisés », qui mérite d’être attaquée car elle est impliquée dans une « croisade » contre l’État Islamique en Irak et en Syrie (ISIS). On devra accepter que pour avoir résisté aux extrémistes islamiques au Mali et en Syrie, ces extrémistes islamiques ont le droit d’attaquer les gens en Belgique, en France, au Sierra Leone, au Canada, aux États-Unis et en Australie. On devra accepter que des Européens puissent être tués pour avoir publié une caricature, simplement parce que un groupe terroriste étranger le dit et puis accepter que les caricaturistes l’ont bien cherché. (…) Cela peut prendre un certain temps avant que nous en prenions conscience, mais nous sommes tous dans le même bateau. Cela peut prendre aussi un certain temps avant que les villes européennes aillent prendre ces ampoules bleues et blanches, mais si nous commençons à demander où sont passés ces ampoules, nous pourrions non seulement comprendre dans quelle situation difficile se trouve Israël, mais aussi comprendre quelle est la nôtre aujourd’hui. Douglas Murray
We’re used to the idea of slow, incremental cultural and societal change. I use the famous example of the ship of Theseus. As bits fall off, you put bits on, but it remains recognizably the ship of Theseus. That isn’t the case when you have migration at the levels at which Europe has had it in recent decades, particularly not at the level of 2015, when Germany added an extra 2 percent of – to its population in a single year alone. And it’s also very unlikely, it seems to me, that people who come with very different attitudes are not going to change the continent significantly. (…)Take an example like – let’s say 2015 across the continent of Europe. The numbers that came that year from across sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa, the Middle East and the Far East were far in excess of any of the migration that was seen during the Jewish migrations into Europe. And secondly, that the claims that were made about Jews were erroneous claims, whereas the people who did warn that some – obviously not all, but some – of the Muslim immigrants will bring serious security challenges with them has been demonstrated time and again by events. So, you know, you can hear ugly echoes whilst also being able to differentiate the difference between facts and lies. (…) And the people arriving are bringing a very literal faith with them. (…) Let me give you one very quick example. In Britain, we, some decades ago, came to a fairly straightforward accommodation and belief towards tolerance towards people who were of sexual minorities. If you – if you look now at all opinion surveys of the people who’ve come in most recently, they have very, very different views. A poll carried out a couple of years ago found that among U.K. Muslims there was zero – zero – belief that homosexuality was a permissible lifestyle choice. And a poll taken just last year in Britain found that 52 percent of British Muslims wanted being gay in the U.K. to be made illegal now. Now, there are people who won’t bake your wedding cake if you’re gay. There are some ultra-Protestants who won’t marry you in their churches. But these are people who actually want to make it a crime punishable in law in the 21st century in Britain. So I’m afraid that everyone has to concede – liberal or conservative or whatever – that some of the people who the liberals and their attitude towards immigration have brought here have more illiberal attitudes than anyone else in the country. And this is a big problem. (…) I am intolerant – I have to say, I am intolerant of people who want to put me, as a gay man, in prison. Yeah. Yeah, I’m intolerant of that. (…) everyone agrees that the colonial era was wrong. I’m not an apologist for empire. But in that case, how long does the reverse colonialism happen for? And if you see it as some kind of blowback for colonialism, then what is the end point of this anti-colonialism? (…) The problem is that this isn’t borne out by the facts across Europe. For instance, I mean, where was the Swedish empire across Africa or in the Middle East? Where was it? (…) And so why did Sweden take in 2 percent of its population in addition in one year alone, 2015? It makes no sense. We can all find excuses and reasons for why this is happening. I think it’s much better to look at it in the round and see the very complex picture this actually presents and the very complex future it’s setting up for us. (…) The first solution is very straightforward. It is that you slow down the flow. I don’t say no migrants into Europe. I don’t say that at all. But you’ve got to massively slow down the flow because a society doesn’t have a hope of remaining cohesive when you have migration at these levels. The second thing is you work on the people who are already here more. The third thing is that you make it clear that as well as speaking the language of inclusion in our politics, we have to speak the language of exclusion – what it is that we won’t tolerate as well as what it is that we do and what it is we will be tolerant of. There’s a whole set of other things. One of them is a very basic one, which is to try to shrug off what I diagnose as, among other things, the guilt-ridden complex that Europe has. I’m not advocating that we become sort of, you know, patriotic nationalists. You’ve got to find a balance here. And one of the balances has to be arrived at by recognizing a very simple fact, which is that Europe cannot be the home for everybody in the world who wants to move in and call it home. Douglas Murray
Murray begins with some sweeping stuff about European neighbourhoods becoming indistinguishable from their inhabitants’ native Pakistan, before narrowing things down to the fact that London is no longer a majority white British city. Before long, inevitably, we are reminded of the “prophetic foreboding” of Enoch Powell’s “rivers of blood” speech. Murray never quite spells out why it matters so terribly that people should come here from abroad – what is supposedly so awful about black and brown Londoners, including second or third generation immigrants, or indeed white people born overseas. There are token mentions ogayf pressure on public services, and a grand assertion that the evidence suggesting immigration has economic benefits is all either wrong or fiddled by New Labour. (Anyone familiar with recent Labour history will find mildly surreal Murray’s account of how he imagines the party, and the immigration minister Barbara Roche in particular, tackled immigration.) But this fearless scourge of political correctness seems oddly reluctant to pinpoint precisely why people coming from India, the Caribbean or eastern Europe was such a ghastly prospect. He has rather fewer inhibitions, however, regarding more recent immigrants from predominantly Muslim Middle Eastern countries. Chapter after chapter circles around the same repetitive themes: migrants raping and murdering and terrorising; paeans to Christianity; long polemics about how Europe is too “exhausted by history” and colonial guilt to face another battle, and is thus letting itself be rolled over by invaders fiercely confident in their own beliefs. (…) The book regurgitates the same misleading myths as Nigel Farage about immigration turning Sweden into the rape capital of Europe. (The unexciting truth is that Swedish rape laws are among the strictest in the world, and that the numbers soared when these laws were tightened to change the way incidents were counted; the high number of rape allegations is best seen not as proof of Sweden being dragged into the gutter but of its radically feminist approach to prosecuting.) He triumphantly dismisses any polling suggesting immigrants actually want to integrate by suggesting that pubs “very often close” when Muslim migrants move in – presumably in a different way than pubs all over Britain are closing, crippled by everything from cheap supermarket booze and stagnating wages to the smoking ban – and that if they really wanted to be British they would go out and “drink lukewarm beer like everybody else”. Be more Nigel Farage, or else. (…) Yet (…) For a book that argues that Europe is in mortal danger, there are surprisingly few concrete suggestions for averting it. Murray proposes tougher curbs on immigration, suggests refugees should be given only temporary refuge and be sent home when it’s safe (a direction in which the Home Office is already moving) and bangs the drum for stronger Christian faith. But if he really does think Muslims are as inherently dangerous as his book suggests, why not a Trump-style ban? Why not refuse to take refugees at all, or do so only following an intensive programme of cultural re-education along his approved lines? More surprising, however, is the author’s inability to define the culture supposedly in jeopardy. If Europe should more aggressively defend its unique identity, the least one might expect is a clear definition of this precious thing it’s supposed to be defending: the values, experiences and ideas in danger of being lost. But apart from beer and churchgoing, padded out with scorn for anyone trying to distinguish between Islam or Muslims in general and Islamist terrorists in particular, there’s little here to cling to. At one point the author is reduced to suggesting that he thinks the future Europe will stand or fall on its “attitude to church buildings”. The frustrating thing is that Europe isn’t perfect. It has struggled to cope with unprecedented flows of migrants in recent years, and to integrate those already here. It is confused in some ways about what it stands for. It is politically fractured, most recently by Brexit – which this book doesn’t really cover – but before that by the euro crisis, its treatment of Greece and the alienation of many of its citizens from creaking, remote political EU institutions that do not seem up to the huge economic challenges ahead. Europe isn’t dying, but it isn’t ageing well, and all that is ripe for critical analysis. The Guardian
The author does hit on some unfortunate truths. The migrant crisis of 2015 was unexpected, but also badly managed by the European Union. Laws to combat anti-Islamic hate speech tend to clamp down on free expression, and worsen the tensions. The policy of isolating anti-migrant parties tended to make them even more popular: when the Sweden Democrats were first elected into parliament with 5% of the vote in 2010, other politicians “treated the new MPs as pariahs”. The party is now one of the most popular in Sweden, scoring 24% in recent opinion polls. In some places the police or social services have indeed failed to act against pathologies in Muslim communities, fearful of being tarred with racism. (…) But (…) he cites polls showing that voters worry about the number of immigrants, but not those showing that people vastly overestimate those numbers. He is prone to exaggeration: housing shortages in Sweden are “largely caused by immigration”, rather than decades of under-construction; NGO boats rescuing migrants in the Mediterranean do so “minutes” after they leave the north African shore (in reality, it takes hours or even a day for refugee boats to be found, which is why around 5,000 died or went missing on that crossing last year). He puts nearly all of the blame for the migration crisis on the shoulders of Angela Merkel, the German chancellor, who in 2015 “opened a door that was already ajar”. (…) Mrs Merkel was indeed temporarily damaged by the migration crisis, with her poll ratings falling. But her party still looks set to win the elections this autumn, and allies have won local elections, while support for a far-right party has fallen. Mr Murray argues that Marine Le Pen’s National Front, one of a handful of “thoughtful and clearly non-fascist parties” often described as on the “far right”, should be accepted into the mainstream. Yet Ms Le Pen’s bleak vision did not convince France’s voters to make her president, while her party now looks much diminished. Mr Murray is right to point out that many European politicians have not yet come to grips with how to manage migration in the coming decades. But Europe is a long way off from its last gasp. The Economist

Cachez cette invasion que je ne saurai voir  !

A l’heure où de la Californie à Grèce et de la Suède au Portugal …

Oubliant commodément, entre cycles climatiques, sururbanisation et bétonisation, une myriade d’autres facteurs possibles …

Et sans compter, comme en Israël depuis des mois et dans la plus grande indifférence, les pyromanes

Ou en Iran nos amis les mollahs détourneurs et voleurs d’eau

On nous bassine ou nous anathémise avec un changement climatique encore largement hypothétique …

Entre deux égorgements (pardon: agressions au couteau), émeutes ou marches silencieuses

Ou retour aux pissotières comme  il y a 50 ans pendant qu’on exporte des sanisettes futuristes en Amérique …

Sans parler, entre deux « fake news » (pardon: « erreurs de formulation »), de l’effet contaminateur et incitatif comme pour les fusillades de lycées de nos apprentis-sorciers de médias, leurs interviews des suspects et leurs fascinantes listes de records (jusqu’à littéralement jouer avec le feu entre scénarios du jugement dernier et des noms d’incendies comme Holy fire !) …

Pendant qu’aux Etats-Unis, on découvre par hasard un camp d’entrainement d’enfants, fusils d’assaut et champ de tir compris, pour futures fusillades scolaires créé par le fils d’un ancien membre de la Nation of islam de Farrakhan et  imam d’une mosquée de Brooklyn impliqué dans le premier attentat du World Trade Center

Retour avec la récente traduction française du bestseller de l’an dernier du journaliste britannique Douglas Murray …

Qui montre exemple après exemple et après les prophéties de Powell ou de Raspail

Comment à coups de prétendue inéluctabilité, politique du fait accompli, déni, complicité, camouflage des informations dérangeantes, diversion, chantage au racisme, propagande, intimidation ou répression

Et sans compter, derrière les intérêts bien compris de quelques uns, l’effet paradoxal de l’aide

L’Europe contribue à sa propre disparition …

Sidney Touati
Dreuz
4 août 2018
« Là où un musulman a prié, la terre appartient à l’islam »

Cet article est librement inspiré d’un ouvrage dont je recommande la lecture. Il s’agit du livre de Douglas Murray : L’étrange suicide de l’Europe*.

Somme magistrale (numéro 1 des ventes en Angleterre), ce livre documenté, rigoureux, fait le point sur la descente aux enfers d’une Union européenne qui aspire à faire de son espace civilisationnel, par l’immigration de masse, le bien du monde, la propriété de toutes les ethnies.

A lire impérativement pour tous ceux qui veulent comprendre quelque chose à cette mécanique de l’auto-extinction d’une brillante civilisation.

Pourquoi les dirigeants, les élites européennes aspirent-elles à dissoudre leur peuple dans le grand brassage des peuples du monde ?

Près de 6 millions de juifs ont été méthodiquement exécutés avec la complicité active ou passive de la quasi-totalité des gouvernements européens.

Lorsque les horreurs de la Shoah ont été connues de tous, un intense sentiment de culpabilité s’est emparé des élites dirigeantes européennes.

Celles-ci ont répandu l’idée que les Etats-nation étaient responsables de ce drame (pas les nazis !) puis que les Européens étaient coupables de tous les malheurs de la planète (l’esclavage, le colonialisme, l’impérialisme…), enfin que l’homme blanc en général était l’ennemi de la nature dont la folie met en péril son existence même.

Se concevant comme des êtres foncièrement mauvais, porteurs d’une sorte de péché originel, les dirigeants européens ont mis en place des politiques fondées sur l’obsession de l’auto-flagellation.

Tous répètent en boucle : nous sommes coupables et nous devons payer pour tous les crimes commis.

Portons sur nos épaules toute la misère du monde. Accueillons tous les migrants victimes, pour l’essentiel, du fanatisme musulman, de la corruption de leurs élites.

Psychiatrisation de la politique de l’Union européenne.

Par un mécanisme bien connu en psychiatrie, il s’est produit un déplacement dans la représentation collective du vécu des événements passés et présents : à l’analyse, aux explications lucides et rationnelles des événements et des crimes réellement commis (le massacre organisé des populations juives ; les crimes commis ici ou là..), on a substitué une causalité diabolique par laquelle le coupable auto-proclamé est toujours l’Européen et uniquement lui, devenu ainsi l’incarnation universelle du mal.

Dans ce scénario délirant, les autres peuples sont par définition et a priori innocents.

L’esclavage est attribué aux seuls occidentaux. Oubliés les Africains qui y ont participé activement ; ignorés les Arabes qui ont été de grands esclavagistes… idem pour le colonialisme dépeint uniquement comme un tissu de crimes commis contre les peuples par les seuls européens. Oublié que tous les peuples dominants ont colonisé d’autres peuples ; oublié que les musulmans ont colonisé, envahi, converti par le glaive de très nombreux pays et qu’ils continuent à le faire ; oubliés les innombrables crimes perpétrés au nom de l’Islam et de son prophète.

La projection de ce scénario sur la scène mondiale a conduit à désigner les Américains comme coupables a priori (origine colonisation européenne) tout comme Israël dès lors qu’une partie de sa population est d’origine européenne.

Europe-Etats-Unis-Israel-Austalie-Canada… devaient se prosterner, se mettre à genoux devant tous les autres peuples et demander pardon.

Dans ce délire pathologique, on va jusqu’à inculquer l’idée que nous sommes responsables y compris lorsque nous sommes victimes : responsables des crimes terroristes islamiques ; responsables des viols commis par des « migrants »…

Ceux, rares, très rares, qui osent mettre en cause ce masochisme politique, sont exclus, marginalisés, traînés devant les tribunaux, persécutés, contraints à se cacher voire sont assassinés.

Pour les élites européennes, il n’existe qu’un seul remède, qu’une seule solution pour absoudre ses fautes : la mort, la disparition méthodique des peuples européens, la destruction totale de la civilisation occidentale.

La Renaissance

Et puis, la chape de plomb du sentiment de culpabilité qui pèse sur la conscience européenne a commencé à se fissurer.

En dépit d’une censure étouffante, d’une propagande digne des pays totalitaires, des voix de plus en plus nombreuses s’expriment. Des États refusent le suicide de masse que l’Union européenne a inscrit dans son programme.

En Hollande, en Hongrie, en Pologne, en Italie… on refuse d’absorber la pilule de cyanure que représente l’immigration de masse.

Aux États-Unis, ex bastion de la culture de la faute ayant atteint son point culminant sous Obama, le Président Trump opère une véritable révolution, libérant la politique du carcan de la culpabilité.

En Israël, le gouvernement Netanayou ose l’impensable aux yeux des masochistes professionnels de la faute : il fait inscrire dans le marbre de la loi, le caractère juif de l’Etat d’Israël, mettant fin ainsi à deux mille ans de honte de soi.

Pour les spécialistes de la repentance, le scandale est extrême !

Quoi ? Serait-ce possible ?

Les Américains n’ont plus honte d’être américains ?

Quoi! Les Juifs ne se cachent plus !

Ils n’ont plus honte d’exister ? Ils ont même un État dont ils sont fiers ?

Les dirigeants masochistes de France, d’Allemagne, d’Angleterre, de Suède et d’ailleurs continuent à courber l’échine et à demander que leur peuple respectif soit martyrisé jusqu’à ce que mort s’ensuive.

Puisque les dirigeants de l’Union européenne aspirent à mourir, alors qu’ils appliquent à eux-mêmes la thérapie qu’ils imposent par la contrainte aux autres. Qu’ils laissent enfin la place à ceux qui aiment sans complexe la vieille, la riche, la belle civilisation européenne, c’est-à-dire la grande majorité des citoyens.

Envoyons des fouets à Macron, à Merkel et autres masochistes.

Qu’ils se punissent puisque tel est le fondement de leur politique.

Qu’ils nous laissent vivre dans le cadre de notre culture européenne qui repose sur Jérusalem-Athènes-Rome.

Voir aussi:

DOUGLAS MURRAY

THE STRANGE DEATH OF EUROPE

IMMIGRATION, IDENTITY, ISLAM

Bloomsbury Continuum , 2017, 352 p.

UNE TRADUCTION FRANÇAISE EST SORTIE LE 25 AVRIL CHEZ L’ARTILLEUR

Michèle Tribalat

Dans ce livre, Douglas Murray analyse la situation actuelle de l’Europe dont son attitude à l’égard des migrations n’est que l’un des symptômes d’une fatigue d’être et d’un refus de persévérer dans son être. Advienne que pourra ! « Le Monde arrive en Europe précisément au moment où l’Europe a perdu de vue ce qu’elle est ». Ce qui aurait pu réussir dans une Europe sûre et fière d’elle-même, ne le peut pas dans une Europe blasée et finissante. L’Europe exalte aujourd’hui le respect, la tolérance et la diversité. Toutes les cultures sont les bienvenues sauf la sienne. « C’est comme si certains des fondements les plus indiscutables de la civilisation occidentale devenaient négociables… comme si le passé était à prendre », nous dit Douglas Murray.

Seuls semblent échapper à celle langueur morbide et masochiste les anciens pays de la sphère soviétique. Peut-être que l’expérience totalitaire si proche les a vaccinés contre l’oubli de soi. Ils ont retrouvé leur identité et ne sont pas prêts à y renoncer. Peut-être gardent-ils le sens d’une cohésion nationale qui leur a permis d’émerger de la tutelle soviétique, dont les Européens de l’Ouest n’ont gardé qu’un vague souvenir. Peut-être ont-ils échappé au complexe de culpabilité dont l’Europe de l’Ouest se délecte et sont-ils trop contents d’avoir survécu au soviétisme pour se voir voler leur destin. Cette attitude classée à droite par l’Europe occidentale est vue, à l’Est, comme une attitude de survie, y compris à gauche comme en témoigne Robert Fico, le Premier ministre de gauche slovaque : «  j’ai le sentiment que, nous, en Europe, sommes en train de commettre un suicide rituel… L’islam n’a pas sa place en Slovaquie. Les migrants changent l’identité de notre pays. Nous ne voulons pas que l’identité de notre pays change. » (2016)

LA COMPLAISANCE DES EUROPÉENS DANS LA DÉTESTATION DE SOI

Il y a un orgueil à se présenter comme les seuls vraiment méchants de la planète. Tout ce qui arrive, l’Europe en est responsable directement ou indirectement. Comme avant lui Pascal Bruckner, Douglas Murray brocarde l’auto-intoxication des Européens à la repentance. Les gens s’en imbibent, nous dit-il, parce qu’ils aiment ça. Ça leur procure élévation et exaltation. Ça leur donne de l’importance. Supportant tout le mal, la mission de rédemption de l’humanité leur revient.

Ils s’autoproclament les représentants des vivants et des morts. Douglas Murray cite le cas d’Andrews Hawkins, un directeur de théâtre britannique qui, en 2006, au mi-temps de sa vie, se découvrit être le descendant d’un marchand d’esclaves du 16ème siècle. Pour se laver de la faute de son aïeul, il participa, avec d’autres dans le même cas originaires de divers pays, à une manifestation organisée dans le stade de Banjul en Gambie. Les participants enchainés, qui portaient des tee-shirts sur lesquels était inscrit « So Sorry », pleurèrent à genoux, s’excusèrent, avant d’être libérés de leurs chaines par  le Vice-Président  gambien.

« Happy end », mais cette manie occidentale de l’auto-flagellation, si elle procure un sentiment pervers d’accomplissement, inspire du mépris à ceux qui n’en souffrent pas et les incitent à en jouer et à se dédouaner de leurs mauvaises actions. Pourquoi disputer aux Occidentaux ce mauvais rôle. Douglas Murray raconte une blague de Yasser Arafat qui fit bien rire l’assistance, alors qu’on lui annonçait l’arrivée d’une délégation américaine. Un journaliste présent lui demanda ce que venaient faire les Américains. Arafat lui répondit que la délégation américaine passait par là à l’occasion d’une tournée d’excuses à propos des croisades !

Cette attitude occidentale facilite le report sur les pays occidentaux de la responsabilité de crimes dont ils sont les victimes. Ce fut le cas avec le 11 septembre. Les thèses négationnistes fleurirent, alors qu’on se demandait aux États-Unis qu’est-ce qu’on avait bien pu faire pour mériter cela.

Cette exclusivité dans le mal que les Occidentaux s’arrogent ruissèle jusques et y compris au niveau individuel. Après avoir été violé chez lui par un Somalien en avril 2016, un politicien norvégien, Karsten Nordal Hauken, exprima dans la presse la culpabilité qui était la sienne d’avoir privé ce pauvre Somalien, en le dénonçant, de sa vie en Norvège et renvoyé ainsi à un avenir incertain en Somalie. Comme l’explique Douglas Murray, si les masochistes ont toujours existé, célébrer une telle attitude comme une vertu est la recette pour fabriquer « une forte concentration de masochistes ». « Seuls les Européens sont contents de s’auto-dénigrer sur un marché international de sadiques ».

Les dirigeants les moins fréquentables sont tellement habitués à notre autodénigrement qu’ils y voient un encouragement. En septembre 2015, le président Rouhani a eu le culot de faire la leçon aux Hongrois sur leur manque de générosité dans la crise des réfugiés. Que dire alors de la richissime Arabie saoudite qui a refusé de prêter les 100 000 tentes climatisées qui servent habituellement lors du pèlerinage et n’a accueilli aucun Syrien, alors qu’elle offrait de construire 200 mosquées en Allemagne ?

La posture du salaud éternel, dans laquelle se complait l’Europe, la désarme complètement pour comprendre les assauts de violence dont elle fait l’objet et fonctionne comme une incitation.

LA CULPABILILITÉ OCCIDENTALE

Beaucoup d’Européens, ce fut le cas d’Angela Merkel, ont cru voir, dans la crise migratoire de 2015, une mise au défi de laver le passé : « Le monde voit dans l’Allemagne une terre d’espoir et d’opportunités. Et ce ne fut pas toujours le cas » (A. Merkel, 31 août 2015). N’était-ce pas là l’occasion d’une rédemption de l’Allemagne qu’il ne fallait pas manquer ?  Douglas Murray décrit ces comités d’accueils enthousiastes qui ressemblaient à ceux que l’on réservait jusque là aux équipes de football victorieuses ou à des combattants rentrant de la guerre. Les analogies avec la période nazie fabriquent à peu de frais des héros. Lorsque la crise migratoire de 2015 survient il n’y a pas de frontière entre le Danemark et la Suède. Il suffisait donc de prendre le train pour passer d’un pays à l’autre. Pourtant, il s’est trouvé une jeune politicienne danoise de 24 ans – Annika Hom Nielsen – pour transporter à bord de son yacht, en écho à l’évacuation des juifs en 1943, des migrants qui préféraient la Suède au Danemark mais qui, pourtant, ne risquaient pas leur vie en restant au Danemark.

Si beaucoup de pays expient l’expérience nazie, d’autres expient leur passé colonial. C’est ainsi que l’Australie a instauré le « National Sorry Day » en 1998. En 2008, les excuses du Premier ministre Kevin Rudd aux aborigènes furent suivies de celles du Premier ministre canadien aux peuples indigènes. Aux États-Unis, plusieurs villes américaines ont rebaptisé « Colombus Day » en « Indigenous People Day ». Comme l’écrit Douglas Murray, il n’y a rien de mal à faire des excuses, même si tous ceux à qui elles s’adressent sont morts. Mais, cette célébration de la culpabilité « transforme les sentiments patriotiques en honte ou à tout le moins, en sentiments profondément mitigés ».

GÉNÉRALISATION ET ESSENTIALISATION : DES CRIMES TYPIQUEMENT EUROPÉENS

Si l’Europe doit expier ses crimes passés, pourquoi ne pas exiger de même de la Turquie ? Si la diversité est si extraordinaire, pourquoi la réserver à l’Europe et ne pas l’imposer à, disons, l’Arabie saoudite ? Où sont les démonstrations de culpabilité des Mongols pour la cruauté de leurs ascendants ?

« il y a peu de crimes intellectuels en Europe pires que la généralisation et l’essentialisation d’un autre groupe dans le monde».  Mais le contraire n’est pas vrai. Il n’y a rien de mal à généraliser les pathologies européennes, et les Européens ne s’en privent pas eux-mêmes.

L’EXALTATION DES AUTRES

Le pendant à l’autodénigrement et à la culpabilité européens est l’exaltation de l’Autre, même dans les circonstances les plus invraisemblables. Le multiculturalisme, qui fait une place particulière aux cultures apportées par les migrants, s’il est vu comme LA seule solution au problème posé par l’immigration massive, a l’avantage de tenir à distance les prétentions hégémoniques des cultures européennes, dont il faut toujours se méfier.

Afin de devenir vraiment multiculturels, les pays européens ont insisté sur leurs mauvais côtés, exaltant par ailleurs les apports extérieurs : « Changer le passé pour qu’il s’adapte aux réalités présentes ».

C’est particulièrement vrai avec l’islam. Plus la réalité faisait douter de la « religion de paix et de tolérance », plus on vanta les mérites passés des civilisations islamiques, notamment du temps de l’occupation du sud de l’Espagne présentée comme l’exemple même d’une société multiculturelle harmonieuse et heureuse !  Embellir le passé pour se donner des raisons d’espérer.

En 2010, une exposition londonienne, « 1001 Islamic Inventions », faisait l’inventaire de tout ce que le monde islamique avait apporté à l’Occident, c’est-à-dire à peu près tout.

Quelle chance pour les musulmans d’avoir une civilisation pareille ! Tout plutôt que la civilisation européenne. La Suède, à ce petit jeu, gagne le pompon.

Douglas Murray raconte que la ministre suédoise de l’intégration, Mona Sahlin, déclara en 2004, dans une mosquée kurde, que beaucoup de Suédois étaient jaloux des Kurdes parce qu’ils possèdent une culture riche et unificatrice quand les Suédois n’ont que des choses ridicules telles que le fête de la Nuit de la Saint-Jean.

Quand il fut demandé à Lise Bergh, la secrétaire d’État spécialisée sur les droits de l’homme, l’inclusion…, si cela valait le coup de préserver la culture suédoise, elle répondit : « Bon, qu’est-ce que la culture suédoise ? Et avec ça je pense que j’ai répondu à votre question. » Mais, nous dit Douglas Murray, généralement, ce type de question est soigneusement évité en Europe, en raison des difficultés sous-jacentes : « Quelles parts de leur culture les Européens devraient-ils abandonner volontairement ? Qu’est-ce qu’ils y gagneraient et à quelle échéance ? »

En 2015, Ingrid Lomfors, la patronne de l’équivalent suédois du Mémorial de la Shoa, déclarait lors d’une conférence en faveur de la politique du gouvernement « Sweden together », en présence du roi et de la reine, que l’immigration en Suède n’avait rien de neuf, que tout le monde était un migrant et que la culture suédoise n’existait pas. Le soir du 24 décembre 2014, le tout juste ex-Premier ministre de Suède, Fredrik Reinfeldt, déclarait à la télévision que les Suédois étaient sans intérêt et que les frontières étaient des constructions fictives.

Mais l’Allemagne pratique aussi, à l’excès, ce souci de l’Autre. Après l’attaque du train en Allemagne en juillet 2016, il s’est trouvé une parlementaire allemande du Parti vert pour demander pourquoi la police avait tué l’attaquant au lieu de le blesser.

LA CRISE MIGRATOIRE DE 2015

Douglas Murray, qui s’est rendu dans de nombreux points chauds, revient longuement sur cette crise migratoire. Sans entrer dans le détail, relevons un fait qui m’a frappé moi aussi : le rapport de masculinité élevé. On a su très vite qu’il s’agissait dans une grande majorité de jeunes hommes, y compris parmi les mineurs. Outre que cette arrivée de jeunes hommes et adolescents a modifié de façon visible le sex-ratio en Suède, on aurait pu se demander quel péril guettait les filles restées au pays. Pourquoi les familles étaient-elles si pressées de sauver leurs garçons et pas leurs filles ?

Les mesures prises pour sauver les étrangers en mer, au plus près des côtes libyennes ont été vite connues et intégrées par les passeurs, pour accélérer leur business et empiler toujours plus de migrants dans des embarcations dangereuses. L’information circule à grande vitesse, comme ce fut le cas avec les déclarations d’Angela Merkel ne fixant aucune limite au nombre d’étrangers qu’elle était prête à accueillir.

Le racisme dont les Européens s’enorgueillissent d’être les vrais coupables, n’épargne pas les frêles embarcations sur lesquelles sont entassés les migrants. Ce sont les Subsahariens qui sont mis aux endroits les plus périlleux et sont les premiers à se noyer. Des chrétiens ont été battus et jetés à la mer lorsque les autres passagers ont su qu’ils étaient chrétiens.

La traite est impitoyable. Les passeurs n’hésitent pas à envoyer des vidéos mettant en scène les abus et les tortures de migrants, via leurs smartphones, à destination des familles pour recueillir plus d’argent. L’identification des migrants est très difficile et le rythme des arrivées ne permet pas une vérification approfondie. Beaucoup arrivent sans papiers. Ceux qui débarquaient à Lesbos connaissaient le prix du taxi pour Moria. Et, à Malmö, c’est dans les poubelles en ville que l’on retrouvait nombre de papiers d’identité abandonnés.

L’exaltation suscitée par la crise migratoire de 2015 chez certains gouvernants, et tout particulièrement Mme Merkel, a conduit à certains retournements. En 2010, elle déclarait que le multikluti ne fonctionnait pas, mais en 2015, elle insistait sur le fait que tout allait bien se passer et que ce qui avait échoué par le passé avec des flux moins volumineux, allait réussir cette fois !

DE NOUVEAU UN PROBLÈME AVEC LA RELIGION : LES NOUVEAUX DISSIDENTS

Qui aurait pensé, il y a 20 ou 30 ans que l’Europe serait à nouveau déchirée par des débats sur la place de la religion ?

On a toléré de musulmans « offensés et en colère » beaucoup plus qu’on ne l’aurait fait pour d’autres. C’était déjà le cas en 1989, après la publication des versets sataniques de Salman Rushdie. Ainsi, Cat Stevens, « rebaptisé » Yusuf Islam après sa conversion, déclara lors d’une émission télévisée de la BBC que Salman Rushdie méritait la mort et qu’il regrettait que les portraits en flammes que l’on voyait lors des manifestations ne soient pas « la chose en vrai », autrement dit Salman Rushdie lui-même. Il ne fut pas poursuivi pour ses propos.

Peu de gens ont compris, en 1989, avec l’affaire Rushdie, que nous avions changé d’ère.

Partout en Europe, se trouvèrent des « idiots utiles » qui ont non seulement protégé et défendu l’indéfendable mais ont été des activistes de la cause. C’est ce qui causa l’assassinat de Pim Fortuyn par un Végan, défenseur de la cause animale, qui croyait ainsi venir en aide aux musulmans.  La radicalisation des propos à l’égard de Pim Fortuyn de la part de ses opposants, qui franchirent rapidement le point Godwin, l’ont, en quelque sorte, désigné à la vindicte. « Dans un entretien télévisé, peu de temps avant sa mort,  Fortuyn parla des menaces de mort qu’il recevait et déclara que, si quoi que soit lui arrivait, ses opposants politiques, qui l’avaient tellement démonisé, auraient leur part de responsabilité. »

Mais celle qui symbolise le mieux le malaise européen est sans doute Ayaan Hirsi Ali. Voilà une jeune femme qui incarne la résistance à l’extrémisme religieux, qui aurait dû être la coqueluche des intellectuels européens et qui a été lâchement abandonnée. Somalienne, réfugiée aux Pays-Bas, alors qu’elle fuyait un mariage forcé, Ayaan Hirsi Ali apprit la langue de son nouveau pays tout en travaillant et put ainsi entreprendre des études à l’Université de Leiden. Elle en sortit diplômée et devint chercheur. Sans parler de son engagement politique. Son parcours est d’autant plus remarquable qu’elle était, adolescente, favorable à l’exécution de Salman Rushdie. Le 11 septembre 2001 l’amena à remettre en cause ses convictions religieuses et à les abandonner. Le parcours exemplaire qu’elle avait construit depuis son arrivée en Hollande aurait dû en faire un modèle d’intégration. Menacée, Ayaan Hirsi Ali finit par se voir accorder une protection policière. Alors qu’elle représentait tout ce qu’un pays européen pouvait souhaiter de ses migrants, elle se vit retirer sa nationalité néerlandaise par la ministre de l’immigration et de l’intégration qui appartenait au même parti qu’elle, sous l’allégation de fausse déclaration. Décidément, la Hollande avait fait son choix. Elle refusait d’assurer la protection d’une femme qui défendait tout ce que les Européens avaient si précieusement acquis. Comme l’écrit Douglas Murray : « le pays qui avait laissé entrer des centaines de milliers de musulmans sans espérer d’eux qu’il s’intégrassent et qui abritait en son sein quelques spécimen des prêcheurs les plus radicaux en Europe, privait de sa citoyenneté l’un des seuls immigrants qui avait montré à quoi pourrait ressembler un immigrant pleinement intégré. » Ayaan Hirsi Ali, ne recevant finalement aucune de protection en Europe, finit par s’installer aux Etats-Unis.

Comme dans d’autres pays, c’est celui qui sonnait l’alarme qui fut considéré comme un gêneur. L’Europe semblait alors croire que le problème de l’extrémisme disparaîtrait avec ceux qui le dénonçaient, écrit Douglas Murray.

UN CLIMAT INTIMIDANT

La peur de se voir dénoncé comme raciste ou, pire, de risquer sa vie, conduit à faire silence sur des faits insoutenables.

Les viols collectifs d’enfants à Rotherham et à Oxfordshire ont été passés sous silence par la police par peur des accusations de racisme et par peur de nuire aux relations intercommunautaires. Ces situations de viols passés sous silence ou minimisés se sont multipliées en Europe dans la foulée de la vague migratoire de 2015. Un musulman du nord de l’Angleterre qui s’était insurgé contre  les viols collectifs de filles blanches par des membres de sa communauté a reçu des menaces de mort.

Avoir un avis sur la question peut être dangereux et cela ne concerne pas seulement les politiciens. La violence des réactions conduit à la clôture des débats. Toute vie peut être ruinée par la reconnaissance de ce qui arrive, sans parler de propositions visant à en changer le cours. Il est plus profitable d’ignorer le problème et de mentir. Il y a ce que les gens pensent et ce qu’ils croient qu’ils sont autorisés à penser. Mais, comme le fait remarquer Douglas Murray, il est périlleux d’ignorer ce que ressent la majorité des gens ou d’aller répétant qu’il est impossible d’y remédier.

Les opinions publiques ont bien compris que « ce qui se trouve en-dessous du terrorisme constitue un plus grand problème encore ». Cette prise de conscience effraie les élites pour lesquelles le pire ne peut appartenir qu’aux Européens. D’où la nécessité des les rééduquer. D’abord parce que c’est plus facile et que cela vous signale comme particulièrement vertueux. L’accusation de racisme si aisément dégainée et le parallèle avec le nazisme valorisent celui que s’y adonne et innocentent forcément la partie adverse. On ne peut qu’être innocent face à un nazi. Comme l’écrit Douglas Murray, « traiter quelqu’un de fasciste ou de raciste est un exercice sans risque qui ne peut apporter que des avantages politiques et personnels ».

DÉNI, MENSONGES ET CACHOTTERIES

L’immigration massive, sans toujours avoir été planifiée, est devenue une préoccupation des opinions publiques européennes. Pourtant, au Royaume-Uni, du temps de Tony Blair, il y eut une politique délibérée, du côté du Labour, de transformer la société. On apprit, plus tard, que Tony Blair avait favorisé l’immigration pour forcer les conservateurs à regarder la diversité en face (déclaration d’Andrew Neather, ancien porte-parole du gouvernement, en 2009). Toute idée de restriction de l’immigration était qualifiée de raciste. Au lieu de tenir compte des inquiétudes de l’opinion publique, les politiques ont répliqué en proférant des accusations en direction des inquiets. À des moments différents selon les pays, un éloge de la diversité et du multiculturalisme devint monnaie courante.

Le déni est le refuge de décideurs qui pensent qu’ils ne peuvent rien faire contre les arrivées massives de migrants. Ils cherchent donc à y accoutumer les opinions publiques et à présenter les choses sous un jour positif, tout en minimisant les inconvénients ou en les ignorant. Ce que ne peuvent faire les citoyens qui ont ce qu’ils ont sous les yeux.

Les dirigeants, qui ont pratiqué la politique du fait accompli, ne manquent pas d’arguments pour vanter une situation qu’ils n’ont rien fait pour éviter.

Les arguments bien connus en faveur du statu quo changent avec l’air du temps en fonction de la résistance qu’ils rencontrent. Et l’on passe sans mal d’un argument à l’autre : bénéfice économique, les emplois dont les natifs ne veulent pas, démographie… Et si tout cela ne marche pas vient l’argument de la diversité.

Il faut s’y faire / Rien de nouveau / Nous n’y pouvons rien

L’injonction « Adaptez-vous ! » peut très bien être teintée d’incitations à expier le passé : Tournez-la page, rien de nouveau, vous avez été horribles, maintenant vous n’êtes plus rien.

En Angleterre, la publication des résultats du recensement de 2011, qui montraient que les « White British » étaient désormais minoritaires à Londres, fit les délices « des trois quarts des participants » aux débats de NewsNight sur la BBC. Le maire de Londres Boris Johnson déclara : « Nous devons cesser de nous lamenter sur la digue qui a sauté (dam-burst). C’est arrivé. Il n’y a rien que l’on puisse y faire sauf faire en sorte que l’absorption soit la plus digeste possible. »

La diversité, c’est bon pour vous

Les Européens s’enrichissent en découvrant les cultures du monde. S’il y a une partie de vrai dans ce raisonnement, reste à prouver que tout cela n’est pas une question de dosage. Les Européens voyagent de plus en plus. Ils peuvent aimer découvrir les autres modes de vie sans que ceux-ci finissent par devenir les leurs. Rarement sont évoqués les côtés déplaisants et, lorsqu’ils le sont, ceux qui le font se voient rapidement voués aux gémonies. Douglas Murray résume la situation ainsi : « Ce n’est pas une si mauvaise affaire : s’il y a un peu plus de décapitations en Europe que de coutume, au moins bénéficierons nous d’un plus grand nombre de cuisines ».

L’Europe se dit heureuse de sa diversité et fière d’avoir des villes internationales. Mais qu’arrivera-t-il, se demande Douglas Murray, lorsque ce seront les pays qui seront internationaux ? De quoi le « nous » sera-t-il fait ?

Diversions et illusions

Si l’on intensifie l’aide au développement, on tarira à la source les flux migratoires nous dit-on. Qui peut être contre l’aide au développement ? Seulement, on sait aussi que lorsque le niveau de vie s’accroît les ressources pour partir aussi, favorisant ainsi les flux migratoires.

Après la tuerie de Nice, les débats en France se sont enflammés sur le burkini. Pour Douglas Murray, c’était une manière de faire diversion, pour parler de la chose, sans toucher à l’essentiel du problème.

On avait déjà fait la même chose en d’autres circonstances, avec la loi sur le voile à l’école par exemple. Au lieu de viser le voile, il avait fallu viser les autres religions en même temps, alors que tout le monde savait de quoi il retournait. Si l’on ne peut porter le voile à l’école, on ne peut pas non plus porter une grande croix en bois, dont personne ne se rappelait en avoir jamais vue à l’école !

Déni et camouflage des informations dérangeantes

Lorsque des « innocents » se conduisent mal, comme cela a été le cas par exemple avec les viols collectifs en Suède, en Allemagne ou en Autriche, des politiques et même des policiers, sans parler des médias, cherchent généralement à enterrer l’affaire. L’auto-défiance est telle que l’on craint plus la réaction à la chose que la chose en elle-même. « En Allemagne en 2016, comme en Grande-Bretagne au début des années 2000, la crainte des conséquences que pourrait avoir l’identification des origines raciales des agresseurs l’emporta sur la détermination des policiers de faire leur travail. » On ne peut pas ici ne pas évoquer l’affaire Sarah Halimi battue à mort, torturée et défenestrée le 4 avril 2017. Il a fallu plus de deux mois pour que l’affaire sorte dans la presse… et encore timidement. Il ne fallait pas perturber la période électorale !

La Suède est sans doute la championne du déni et de la politique anesthésiante.  Douglas Murray raconte la mésaventure d’Erik Mansson, rédacteur en chef de l’Expressen, en… 1993. Ce dernier rendit compte d’un sondage réalisé auprès des Suédois qui indiquait que 63 % des Suédois voulaient que les immigrants retournent chez eux. Erik Mansson écrivit que les Suédois avaient une opinion bien arrêtée sur la politique d’immigration et d’asile, différente de l’opinion de ceux qui les gouvernent et qu’il y avait là une bombe à retardement. Le principal résultat de cet article fut son licenciement par le journal.

Douglas Murray raconte sa rencontre avec un parlementaire allemand pour qui l’afflux des réfugiés se limite à une question de gestion bureaucratique. À part cela, accueillir 1 million de gens n’était pas un gros problème. D’ailleurs, d’après ce parlementaire, les réfugiés sont moins criminels que l’Allemand moyen. Lorsque Douglas Murray lui demanda pourquoi cette politique ne s’appliquait qu’aux Syriens et pas au reste du monde, le parlementaire lui dit que les flux avaient baissé et que, de toute façon, il refusait de répondre à une question purement théorique. Comme si ce flux s’était tari spontanément. Passer sous silence la fermeture des frontières et l’accord avec Erdogan permettait, écrit Douglas Murray, au parlementaire de ne pas s’écarter de sa rhétorique humanitaire.

Les méfaits du déni

Le déni creuse l’écart entre « les gens », comme dirait Jean-Luc Mélenchon, et les élites politiques et médiatiques. Les premiers savent que les élites leur mentent. Ils savent aussi ce qu’elles semblent ignorer : le nombre compte. Pour Douglas Murray, «  La radicalisation trouve ses origines dans une communauté particulière et tant que celle-ci s’accroît, la radicalisation fera de même ». « Les politiques européens ne peuvent admettre ce que chaque migrant traversant la méditerranée sait et que la plupart des Européens ont fini par comprendre : une fois en Europe, vous y restez. »

Le déni, le mensonge venant d’en haut encouragent la radicalisation en bas. Il déresponsabilise aussi les migrants et les incite à plus d’audace. En octobre 2016, deux journaux allemands, Le Freitag et le Huffington Post Deutschland publiaient un article d’un jeune Syrien de 18 ans qui disait en avoir marre des Allemands en colère et des chômeurs racistes : « Nous, réfugiés, … ne voulons pas vivre dans le même pays que vous. Vous pouvez, et je pense que vous devriez, quitter l’Allemagne. L’Allemagne n’est pas faite pour vous. Pourquoi vivez-vous ici ?… Allez chercher une autre patrie. » Ce type d’arrogance est encouragé par des attitudes comme celles du président de district de Kassel qui, en octobre 2015, lors d’une réunion publique, déclara à ses concitoyens qui n’étaient pas d’accord avec l’accueil de 800 réfugiés, qu’ils étaient libres de quitter l’Allemagne.

RACE ET ANTIRACISME

L’obsession de la race est partout, chez les politiques, dans le sport, à la télévision. Douglas Murray raconte ce qu’ont donné à Londres, les répercussions du mouvement américain « Black Lives Matter ». Les manifestants chantaient le slogan « Hands Up, Don’t Shoot » lors de manifestations encadrées par des policiers sans arme. Quelques semaines plus tard, on vit dans les rues de Londres un type armé d’une machette juché sur les épaules de trois autres clamant les slogans de « Black Lives Matter ». Dans Hyde Park, la manifestation se termina par un policier poignardé et quatre autres blessés.

Douglas Murray s’inquiète du pouvoir pris par les associations antiracistes qui luttent contre les discriminations. Elles ont cherché à prendre de plus en plus d’influence et à gagner des sources de financement. Elles savaient bien que ce ne serait possible que si le problème n’était pas résolu. Ce qui a eu pour effet de faire croire que les discriminations s’étaient aggravées – et méritaient d’être plus vivement combattues – alors que les choses s’amélioraient.

DES SOCIÉTÉS EUROPÉENNES ÉPUISÉES ?

Avec l’effacement des croyances religieuses, les Européens sont livrés à l’incertitude, se posent des questions sans réponses toutes prêtes. Les Européens ont expérimenté la recherche de l’absolu ailleurs (fascisme, nazisme, communisme) et cela n’a donné rien de bon. « La plupart des souffrances de l’Europe pendant le 20ème siècle sont venues d’un effort profane de l’époque d’atteindre un absolu politique ». Le rêve fasciste n’a pas peu fait pour entretenir la ferveur communiste. Si deux idéologies apparemment opposées (comme c’était le cas à l’époque) pouvaient mener là où elles avaient conduit, alors, peut-être que n’importe quoi d’autre peut y conduire aussi. Peut-être que toute idéologie et toute certitude sont le problème.

Les Européens ont tout essayé : « la religion et l’anti-religion, la croyance et la non-croyance, le rationalisme et la foi dans la raison… ces idées ont fait des centaines de millions de morts, pas seulement en Europe, mais partout où ces idées ont été appliquées. » Que peut faire une société après cela ? Douter, se méfier d’elle même, ne pas juger les autres ? Cette attitude si courante en Europe est une solution de facilité qui ne garantit pas sa survie.

La plupart des habitants du reste de la planète ne partagent pas cette attitude. Ils ne craignent pas de poursuivre leur intérêt propre. C’est aussi le cas en Europe de l’Est.

Si penser aux migrants d’aujourd’hui, c’est penser aux juifs d’hier, et réparer à travers les premiers le crime vis-à-vis des seconds, alors l’Europe ne peut rien opposer à l’immigration massive. Même si cette dernière, et plus encore surtout si cette dernière, est vue comme une punition. « Se ranger du côté des migrants, c’est se mettre du côté des anges. Parler en faveur des Européens, c’est se mettre du côté du diable. »

Douglas Murray se demande combien de temps une société fondée sur ce qui est sorti de la tradition chrétienne peut survivre sans se référer aux croyances qui lui ont donné naissance. Pour les Églises d’Europe, le message de la religion est devenu une forme de politique de gauche, d’action en faveur de la diversité et du bien être social. Ainsi, en Suède, l’archevêque Antje Jeckelen a déclaré que Jésus se serait opposé aux restrictions que la Suède a fini par mettre à l’immigration après la ruée de 2015.

Après avoir perdu la croyance religieuse, et même le sens des métaphores bourrées de références à la religion, nous dit Douglas Murray, nous sommes sur le point d’abandonner le rêve d’une extension illimitée de valeurs que nous croyions universelles. Et, le trou creusé par la religion risque de s’agrandir.

« Les étrangers qui viennent en Europe apportent leur propre culture au moment précis où notre culture a perdu la confiance qui lui permettrait de plaider sa cause ». Combien de temps cela peut-il durer, se demande Douglas Murray, et qu’est-ce qui se profile après ?

QUE FAIRE, COMME AURAIT DIT LÉNINE ?

Pourquoi les Européens devraient-ils être les seuls à porter les malheurs du monde ? Que deviendra l’Europe si cette fuite en avant continue ? Pourquoi les Européens devraient-ils être les seuls à ne pas pouvoir se préoccuper d’abord de leurs intérêts et de leur avenir, comme le font la plupart des autres peuples du monde ?

Il faudrait, nous dit Douglas Murray, que ceux qui gouvernent reconnaissent leurs erreurs, qu’ils cessent de dire qu’ils veulent changer de fond en comble la société, qu’ils reconnaissent enfin les problèmes que la société a perçu bien avant eux, que la diversité c’est bien, mais à dose raisonnable, sans quoi, en plus des problèmes vécus par les autochtones, ce sont les problèmes du monde entier qui se retrouvent en Europe.

Les politiciens devraient reconnaître le bien-fondé de certains griefs.

Alors que l’idée de grand remplacement de Renaud Camus est vouée aux gémonies, et quelquefois jugée à la 17ème chambre, le grand remplacement assumé et revendiqué par les Indigènes de la République et d’autres ne suscite pas la même désapprobation. Qu’ont dû penser les Allemands lorsque, lors d’une émission sur la télévision allemande, une jeune syrienne leur a dit qu’à l’avenir les Allemands ne seront plus blonds aux yeux bleus, mais d’origine immigrée ?

Ne faudrait-il pas réserver l’ostracisme aux vrais partis fascistes comme Aube dorée et permettre aux autres partis dits d’extrême droite d’évoluer ? Il serait bon, pour y arriver que le coût social lié à une fausse accusation de racisme, de nazisme… soit équivalent à celui encouru par ceux qui en sont vraiment coupables.

Il faudrait aussi une attitude plus juste à l’égard du passé européen : retenir les bons comme les mauvais moments.

CONCLUSION DE DOUGLAS MURRAY

Mais, ce qu’il faudrait faire ne ressemble guère à ce qui est le plus probable. Les politiciens continueront de préférer les bénéfices à court terme qu’ils tirent à paraître compatissants, généreux et ouverts, même si cela conduit, à long terme, à des problèmes nationaux. Ils continueront à garantir que l’Europe est le seul endroit au monde qui appartient à tout le monde. D’ici la moitié de ce siècle, alors que la Chine ressemblera encore à la Chine, l’Inde à l’Inde… L’Europe ressemblera, au mieux, à une version des Nations unies à grande échelle, écrit Douglas Murray.

En Hollande et au Danemark, les politiciens hostiles à l’immigration vivent sous protection policière. De quoi dissuader les vocations. C’est tellement plus facile et gratifiant de se montrer compatissant, généreux et ouvert. Les plus menacés sont ceux qui ont cru aux promesses de l’Europe (Hirsi Ali, Maajid Nawaz, Kamel Daoud…). Ceux qui défendent nos valeurs ont été abandonnés à leur sort. Ils paient l’addition du déni. Ce sont eux les premiers sacrifiés. Au lieu de représenter les modèles qu’ils auraient dû être, ils font figure d’anti-modèles.

De jour en jour, l’Europe perd toute possibilité d’un atterrissage en douceur en réponse à de tels changements. Une classe politique entière n’a pas réussi à apprécier ce que beaucoup d’Européens aiment dans ce qui a été notre Europe, écrit Douglas Murray. Prisonniers du passé et du présent, il semble que, pour les Européens, il n’y ait pas de réponse décente pour l’avenir. Mais, les Européens risquent de ne pas pardonner un changement complet de notre continent.

Voir de même:

« L’Etrange Mort de l’Europe : immigration, identité et islam » de Douglas Murray présenté par Michèle Tribalat (*)

Polemia

11 septembre 2017

♦ Douglas Murray est un écrivain, journaliste et commentateur politique britannique. Il exprime régulièrement à la télévision, à la radio et dans de nombreux périodiques un point de vue critique envers l’islam.

En 2017, son livre The Strange Death of Europe: immigration, identity and islam, est un grand succès de librairie en Grande-Bretagne.


  • Culpabilisme et exaltation des autres : l’Europe a perdu de vue ce qu’elle était

Culpabilisme et détestation de soi

Les Européens se complaisent dans la détestation de soi, de leur civilisation, de leurs traditions et de leur Histoire. Celle-ci ne leur inspire que remords et aspiration à la repentance. Ils y trouvent élévation, exaltation et, au bout du compte, jouissance dans l’autoflagellation. C’est particulièrement vrai pour ce qui est de leur passé colonial pourtant glorieux.

Ce masochisme se retrouve chez ce politicien norvégien qui, violé chez lui par un Somalien, exprima sa culpabilité d’avoir privé ce malheureux, en le dénonçant, de sa vie en Norvège. Il n’est certainement pas étranger à Angela Merkel qui a vu dans la crise migratoire de 2015 une occasion de laver le passé de l’Allemagne.

Il y a cependant un point sur lequel nous souhaitons émettre une réserve. D. Murray parle des Européens. En fait pas tous, seulement certains. Une grande partie de nos populations ne partage pas ces sentiments. Ce sont les « élites », ou plutôt la caste dirigeante, qui frappent nos poitrines comme les deux présidents de la République française qui sont allés s’avilir outre-Méditerranée en dénonçant la colonisation française comme un crime contre l’humanité.

L’exaltation des autres

L’objectif est l’inclusion forcée de cultures qui ne sont pas celles de l’Europe, l’acceptation imposée de religions et de coutumes qui ne sont pas les nôtres, la soumission empressée à des règles juridiques et sociales qui nous sont étrangères, voire qui nous répugnent. C’est le refus de l’assimilation et une politique d’implantation sur notre territoire de communautés souvent hostiles qui mènera à des partitions. En un mot c’est le multiculturalisme.

Pour qu’il aboutisse il est indispensable d’exalter l’autre. C’est particulièrement vrai avec l’islam. Plus la réalité fait douter de la « religion de paix et de tolérance », plus on vante les mérites passés des civilisations islamiques. Comme l’a déclaré l’érudit Chirac à Philippe de Villiers stupéfait : l’Europe doit autant à l’islam qu’au christianisme.

La conséquence évidente et tragique est que l’Europe ne peut plus rien opposer à l’immigration massive. En particulier D. Murray se demande combien de temps une société fondée sur la tradition chrétienne peut survivre sans se référer à celle-ci. Or pour les Eglises d’Europe devenues des ONG compassionnelles, le message de religion est celui d’une forme de politique de gauche et d’action en faveur de la diversité et du bien-être social.

  • Les nouveaux dissidents

Les dissidents de D. Murray

  1. Murray cite à juste titre des noms de dissidents qui, ayant engagé leur propre vie, peuvent être qualifiés de résistants. C’est le cas de Salman Rushdie, victime d’une fatwa de mort, de Pim Fortuyn, assassiné par un défenseur de la cause animale (sic) et de Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Somalienne réfugiée aux Pays-Bas qui abandonna la religion islamique. Menacée, elle a bénéficié d’une protection policière.
  2. Murray aurait également pu citer le cas de Robert Redeker menacé de mort à la suite de l’une de ses tribunes consacrée à l’islam et à la liberté d’expression parue dans Le Figaro en 2006.

Les dissidents que D. Murray aurait pu citer

Il est un peu étonnant que D. Murray n’ait pas cité Enoch Powell, homme politique et écrivain britannique dont le célèbre discours du 20 avril 1958 marqua la fin de sa carrière politique, ainsi que Christopher Caldwell, journaliste américain, auteur de Une révolution sous nos yeux / Comment l’islam va transformer la France et l’Europe.

Mais surtout le contenu de l’ouvrage de D. Murray se retrouve depuis plusieurs années dans les nombreuses publications parues en France sur l’invasion migratoire.

A tout seigneur tout honneur, Jean Raspail fut et demeure un visionnaire stupéfiant de ce qui arrive à l’Europe, avec son Camp des saints. Renaud Camus, créateur du concept du Grand Remplacement, impose son talent littéraire et son intransigeance. Eric Zemmour ne fut pas pendu mais tout de même condamné pour avoir dit la vérité.

J.Y. Le Gallou, auteur de Immigration : la catastrophe. Que faire ?, Gérard Pince dans Le Choc des ethnies, Guillaume Faye dans Comprendre l’islam et Malika Sorel Sutter, auteur de Décomposition française peuvent être considérés comme les dissidents les plus marquants. Mais il existe beaucoup d’autres auteurs qui, en France, ont élevé ou élèvent leur voix sur le thème de l’invasion migratoire et de l’islam, à commencer par Michèle Tribalat elle-même, ce qui, semble-t-il, ne lui vaut pas que des éloges à l’INED.

Quant à l’évaluation du coût financier de l’immigration, sans citer Polémia, il faut évoquer les travaux de Pierre Milloz, qui fut un pionnier dans les années 1990, et l’excellent et dense petit ouvrage de G. Pince : Les Français ruinés par l’immigration.

Tous ces dissidents se heurtent aux obstacles et aux contraintes qu’élèvent les immigrationnistes et le politiquement correct.

  • La dissidence face aux obstacles et aux contraintes selon D. Murray

L’inéluctabilité

L’arrivée de migrants est inévitable, nous ne pouvons rien y faire, il faut se résigner car de toute façon la responsabilité nous incombe. C’est la version migratoire du sens de l’histoire.

La politique du fait accompli

Sans crier gare et sans consulter les populations des natifs au carré les dirigeants européens les mettent devant le fait accompli. D. Murray cite Tony Blair mais c’est la crise migratoire de 2015 qui vit Merkel appeler sans concertation à l’accueil d’un million de migrants en Europe.

Le déni

On appelle réfugiés syriens des migrants économiques érythréens. Les chiffres de l’immigration illégale sont ignorés. Il est affirmé que la France n’est plus une terre de forte immigration. On prétend, comme Lamassoure le fit dans le Figaro, que les terroristes, citoyens français de papier, sont au fond nos propres enfants.

  • Complicité et camouflage des informations dérangeantes

Pratique courante, les informations dérangeantes, même monstrueuses, sont occultées. L’affaire Sarah Halimi, les viols de la Saint-Sylvestre en Allemagne ont été cachés et ne sont apparus au grand jour que grâce à la réinfosphère. L’un des cas les plus graves fut celui de viols collectifs de nombreuses jeunes filles en Angleterre qui furent tus par les autorités britanniques pendant des années.

La diversion

Si des faits graves se produisent, on enflamme les débats sur des sujets secondaires. Après la tuerie de Nice ce fut l’affaire du burkini.

Vous n’aurez pas ma haine

Comme après Charlie-Hebdo et le Bataclan, on manipule l’opinion et on dérive les sentiments des parents et des témoins vers les marches blanches, les bougies, les pleurnicheries afin d’éviter le ressentiment et les appels à la résistance et au châtiment.

La propagande

La diversité est représentée comme un bien et indispensable pour combler le déficit démographique européen et permettre le paiement des retraites.

L’intimidation

Le racisme, quand ce n’est pas le nazisme, est soulevé face à la moindre objection. Et pourtant, comme l’a dit Harouel « Plutôt fasciste que mort ».

Douglas Murray s’inquiète du pouvoir pris par les associations antiracistes qui luttent contre les discriminations. Elles ont cherché à prendre de plus en plus d’influence et à gagner des sources de financement.

La répression

Murray cite le cas du journaliste suédois licencié pour avoir évoqué dans un article un sondage largement hostile à l’immigration.

En France, sur le fondement des lois mémorielles liberticides, les condamnations pénales pleuvent en contradiction avec la liberté d’expression.

Le déni, le mensonge venant d’en haut encouragent la radicalisation des envahisseurs.

  • Le « Que faire ?» de D. Murray

L’auteur ne semble guère proposer de solutions. Tout au plus il ne fait qu’inviter les politiciens à reconnaître le bien-fondé de certains griefs. C’est timide. Qu’il lise les propositions de R. Camus et des Identitaires. En fait il ne va pas au bout de ses constats.

Ces politiciens, en réalité, n’y peuvent pas grand-chose. Soit ils subissent, soit ils exécutent consciemment une politique venue d’ailleurs. Celle-ci, inspirée par l’oligarchie mondialiste, théorisée par l’ONU et toutes les organisations internationales périphériques, relayée par l’Europe de Bruxelles, appliquée délibérément et obstinément par les gouvernements français depuis 40 ans, est déterminée à faire disparaître les verrous des Etats nations et à établir au sein de l’Europe un magma humain de consommateurs sans frontières subventionnés par les autochtones pour le plus grand profit de cette oligarchie.

  • Conclusion.

D. Murray évoque « l’étrange mort de l’Europe»

Non. Si l’Europe et sa civilisation inégalée sont en grand danger elles ne sont pas encore mortes.

L’émergence du populisme, l’élection de D. Trump, le Brexit, la détermination de la Russie à défendre des valeurs traditionnelles et la résistance des pays de Visegrad laissent apparaître un réel espoir.

Mais le temps presse et la course contre la montre peut être perdue.

Douglas Murray, The Strange Death of Europe : Immigration, Identity, Islam, (Anglais)), éditions Bloomsbury Continuum, 4 mai 2017, 352 pages.

(*) Note : Voir le site de Michèle Tribalat : http://www.micheletribalat.fr/435549315

Voir également:

Livre/ L’Étrange Suicide de l’Europe, de Douglas Murray

Ce livre fondamental, passionnant, très bien écrit, qui est (à juste titre !) numéro 1 des ventes en Grande-Bretagne, vient d’être traduit en français. Douglas Murray, qui est journaliste, s’interroge sur les raisons du « suicide » de l’Europe, qui est le seul continent à avoir ouvert ses portes à des populations nouvelles qui n’ont pas été assimilées et qui sont en passe de bouleverser totalement sa vieille « civilisation », plus que la Seconde Guerre mondiale l’a fait.

L’auteur explique que, jusqu’en 1945, les migrations étaient soit faibles (comme en Italie), soit facilement absorbées (comme les Irlandais en Angleterre). Mais, ensuite, elles sont devenues massives et ont changé de nature. La Grande-Bretagne, notamment, a vu s’installer chez elle nombre de personnes originaires des Caraïbes et du Pakistan, au point que les « Anglais de souche » sont devenus minoritaires en 2015 à Londres (leur « ethnie « ne représente plus que 44 % des habitants de la capitale). Selon Murray, en Europe occidentale, deux phénomènes se conjuguent. Les « Blancs » ne font plus d’enfants (en moyenne 1,38 par femme alors qu’il en faudrait 2,1 pour que la population « caucasienne » ne diminue pas ), alors que l’immigration s’est accentuée ces dernières années. Il y a, chaque année en Grande-Bretagne, 770.000 naissances par an et 300.000 nouveaux migrants. Un démographe de l’université d’Oxford, cité dans le livre, avance même que si rien ne change, en 2060, les « Blancs » constitueront moins de 50 % de la population britannique.

L’auteur rappelle qu’en 1968, le député conservateur Enoch Powell avait prononcé un discours prémonitoire, dans lequel il prévoyait un avenir sombre à son pays si on n’arrêtait pas l’immigration. Mais alors qu’il était soutenu par 75 % des Britanniques, il avait été marginalisé et réduit au silence. Douglas Murray insiste sur ce paradoxe : en Europe occidentale, la majorité des citoyens ne supportent plus les problèmes liés aux migrants (dont les attentats), mais les gouvernements (même de droite !) n’agissent pas, car ceux qui s’opposent à l’immigration sont taxés de racistes et de fascistes et aucun gouvernement de l’Europe occidentale n’ose rejeter ce jugement moral.

Douglas Murray démonte les arguments des partisans de l’immigration : elle serait nécessaire, vu le manque d’enfants chez les « Blancs », et elle serait bénéfique sur le plan économique, car les nouveaux venus créeraient de la richesse. Mais M. Murray souligne que, selon les sondages, les « Blancs » feraient sans problème deux ou trois bébés s’ils étaient aidés financièrement. Par ailleurs, en Grande-Bretagne, de 1995 à 2001, lorsqu’on fait les comptes, les immigrants auraient, au final, coûté de 125 à 170 milliards d’euros (pour les soins, la scolarisation des enfants et les aides sociales).

Autre argument faux selon l’auteur : il serait impossible d’arrêter l’immigration. La preuve du contraire est donnée par le Japon et les pays de l’Europe de l’Est, qui n’accueillent que très peu de réfugiés et contrôlent leurs frontières. Néanmoins, l’auteur est allé à la rencontre de migrants et, pour lui, certains d’entre eux ont des raisons valables de venir chez nous. Il comprend la réaction de Mme Merkel qui, en 2015, a fait preuve de générosité en ouvrant toutes grandes les frontières de l’Allemagne. Mais il fustige les pays du Golfe si riches qui n’accueillent aucun réfugié.

Pour Douglas Murray, il semble y avoir une prise de conscience des gouvernants et certains faits sont, désormais, mis en avant, alors qu’ils étaient systématiquement étouffés autrefois. Les viols de milliers d’adolescentes non musulmanes par des gangs de Pakistanais sont enfin réprimés et on reconnaît publiquement que 95 % des agressions sexuelles en Suède, en Allemagne ou en Autriche sont commis par des réfugiés. La parole est plus libre et ceux qui rejettent l’immigration ont maintenant le droit de s’exprimer. Mais n’est-il pas déjà trop tard ?

Voir de même:

NPR

NPR’s Robert Siegel talks to Douglas Murray about his new book, The Strange Death of Europe: Immigration, Identity, Islam. He argues that European civilization is dying as a result of immigration.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The way the British writer Douglas Murray sees it, European civilization is in the process of suicide by immigration. Western Europe in particular, after encouraging immigration to fill low-wage jobs, now finds itself defending traditional values against those of largely Muslim immigrants and their descendants. Mr. Murray’s new book is called « The Strange Death Of Europe, » and he joins us from London. Welcome to the program.

DOUGLAS MURRAY: Very good to be with you.

SIEGEL: First, what does it mean in your view for Europe to die as opposed to change with changing populations?

MURRAY: We’re used to the idea of slow, incremental cultural and societal change. I use the famous example of the ship of Theseus. As bits fall off, you put bits on, but it remains recognizably the ship of Theseus. That isn’t the case when you have migration at the levels at which Europe has had it in recent decades, particularly not at the level of 2015, when Germany added an extra 2 percent of – to its population in a single year alone. And it’s also very unlikely, it seems to me, that people who come with very different attitudes are not going to change the continent significantly.

SIEGEL: Very different attitudes, you believe, being essentially Muslim attitudes, is what you’re – what you’re writing about here?

MURRAY: That is obviously the one that is – that Europe is finding it hardest to digest, yes.

SIEGEL: Let me cut to what, for me, is the chase here. As a Jew, I mean, I have to ask you – what is so different about contemporary opposition to Muslim immigrants from 19th and 20th century European anti-Semitism? Things were said about the Jews – that they wouldn’t fit in or would bring radical ideas from Eastern Europe with them into the West.

MURRAY: Well, the difference is the facts, isn’t it? That’s the first thing – and secondly, of course, the numbers. Take an example like – let’s say 2015 across the continent of Europe. The numbers that came that year from across sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa, the Middle East and the Far East were far in excess of any of the migration that was seen during the Jewish migrations into Europe.

And secondly, that the claims that were made about Jews were erroneous claims, whereas the people who did warn that some – obviously not all, but some – of the Muslim immigrants will bring serious security challenges with them has been demonstrated time and again by events. So, you know, you can hear ugly echoes whilst also being able to differentiate the difference between facts and lies.

SIEGEL: One fundamental difference that you write about is – you write that for, well, going on two centuries, in Britain and other parts of Europe, religious faith has been moving from the literal to the metaphorical.

MURRAY: Yes.

SIEGEL: And the people arriving are bringing a very literal faith with them.

MURRAY: Yes.

SIEGEL: And that seems to be one of the basic dissonances that you’re writing about.

MURRAY: Yes.

SIEGEL: Do you feel that’s what makes you and the people you grew up with fundamentally different from many of the people arriving now?

MURRAY: Let me give you one very quick example. In Britain, we, some decades ago, came to a fairly straightforward accommodation and belief towards tolerance towards people who were of sexual minorities. If you – if you look now at all opinion surveys of the people who’ve come in most recently, they have very, very different views. A poll carried out a couple of years