Hommage: De la seule nation qui vénère le même Dieu qu’il y a 3 000 ans au seul pays fondé sur une idée (On the Fourth of July, honoring American exceptionalism and an exceptional American, Charles Krauthammer)

4 juillet, 2018
Israël est l’incarnation pure et simple de la continuité juive : c’est la seule nation au monde qui habite la même terre, porte le même nom, parle la même langue et vénère le même Dieu qu’il y a 3000 ans. En creusant le sol, on peut trouver des poteries du temps de David, des pièces de l’époque de Bar Kochba, et des parchemins vieux de 2000 ans, écrits de manière étonnamment semblable à celle qui, aujourd’hui, vante les crèmes glacées de la confiserie du coin. Charles Krauthammer

En ce nouvel anniversaire du « seul pays fondé sur une idée, l’idée de liberté » …

Comment ne pas avoir une pensée …

Pour l’un de ses plus fidèles et regrettés hérauts

Issu justement de la seule nation qui vénère le même Dieu qu’il y a 3 000 ans ?

On the Fourth of July, Honoring American Exceptionalism and an Exceptional American, Charles Krauthammer

Amid all the pomp and parades, the fireworks and other illuminations, the hot dogs and the ice cream, the home runs and the World Cup goals, let us be sure to pause on this Fourth of July holiday and say with grateful hearts and proud voices, “Happy birthday, America!”

This land—our land—is 242 years young today.

Led by Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and Ben Franklin, our Founding Fathers signed a document that raised high the banner of independence and challenged England, at the time the most powerful nation in the world.

Remarked one delegate as he signed the Declaration of Independence, “My hand trembles, but my heart does not.”

What was the central idea of this revolutionary declaration that Jefferson, its author, called “an expression of the American mind”? Here is what Charles Krauthammer, the TV commentator and syndicated columnist, said: “America is the only country ever founded on an idea … and the idea is liberty.”

Many of us in Washington, D.C., are still lamenting the June 21 death of Krauthammer, who had a commanding grasp of politics, including foreign policy, that sprang from his intellect, his medical training and practice, and his formation in the Jewish tradition.

Krauthammer was very much like a Founder. Whether they agreed with him or not, those who knew him commented on his grace, civility, and humor. He combined the character of George Washington, the prudential mind of James Madison, and the wit of Franklin.

Asked how he could go from being a speechwriter for Walter Mondale to a political commentator on Fox News, he replied, “I was young once.”  He was a happy warrior even though he dealt with more difficulties—he was a quadriplegic from the age of 22—than most of us can imagine.

He could sum up a politician or a historical trend in just a few words. One year into the Obama administration, he wrote, “Fairness through leveling is the essence of Obamaism.” Toward the end of President Barack Obama’s first term, he summed up the four years: “The greatest threat to a robust, autonomous civil society is the ever-growing Leviathan state and those like Obama who see it as the ultimate expression of the collective.”

Krauthammer excelled at explaining our times. He coined the phrase “the Reagan Doctrine” to explain President Ronald Reagan’s support of anti-communist forces in Afghanistan and Nicaragua, and extolled Winston Churchill as the 20th century’s most indispensable leader. Paraphrasing the Nobel laureate Milton Friedman, he said, “The free lunch is the essence of modern liberalism.”

He was ever generous toward the rising generation. The co-author of this commentary will be always grateful for his support at the start of her academic career. Krauthammer would meet with her students who learned much about politics from him, although nearly all disagreed with him—at least at the beginning.

On one occasion, she took her students to see the satirical troupe “Capitol Steps,” and Krauthammer was there with his family, laughing at the anti-conservative sallies.

In the introduction to his book “Things That Matter,” Krauthammer referred to Adams and Jefferson and their tempered hopes for the durability of liberty.

He was not pessimistic, but realistic, about the future, writing: “The lesson of our history is that the task of merely maintaining strong and sturdy the structures of a constitutional order is unending, the continuing and ceaseless work of every generation.”

He was a prime example of someone who knows that man does not live by politics alone. His favorite diversion (after chess) was baseball, specifically the up-and-down, in-and-out, always unpredictable Washington Nationals, about whom he would wax poetic.

You get there [to the park], and the twilight’s gleaming, the popcorn’s popping, the kids’re romping, and everyone’s happy. The joy of losing consists in this: Where there are no expectations, there is no disappointment.

But Krauthammer, liberal-turned-conservative, psychiatrist-turned-political commentator, expected good things from the people. He wrote of the tea party revolt, “No matter how far the ideological pendulum swings in the short term, in the end, the bedrock common sense of the American people will prevail.”

In his final column, he wrote: “I believe that the pursuit of truth and right ideas through honest debate and rigorous argument is a noble undertaking. I am grateful to have played a small role in the conversations that have helped guide this extraordinary nation’s destiny.”

Of course, his was not a small, but rather a leading, role, one that will serve as a model for those with the right ideas who take up the responsibility of keeping this exceptional nation on the road to liberty.

So—along with “Happy Birthday, America!”—we say to Charles Krauthammer, a mentor and an inspiration who will be missed beyond measure: “May God bless you and keep you.”

At Last, Zion

The Weekly Standard

I. A SMALL NATION

Milan Kundera once defined a small nation as « one whose very existence may be put in question at any moment; a small nation can disappear, and it knows it. »

The United States is not a small nation. Neither is Japan. Or France. These nations may suffer defeats. They may even be occupied. But they cannot disappear. Kundera’s Czechoslovakia could — and once did. Prewar Czechoslovakia is the paradigmatic small nation: a liberal democracy created in the ashes of war by a world determined to let little nations live free; threatened by the covetousness and sheer mass of a rising neighbor; compromised fatally by a West grown weary « of a quarrel in a far-away country between people of whom we know nothing »; left truncated and defenseless, succumbing finally to conquest. When Hitler entered Prague in March 1939, he declared, « Czechoslovakia has ceased to exist. »

Israel too is a small country. This is not to say that extinction is its fate. Only that it can be.

Moreover, in its vulnerability to extinction, Israel is not just any small country. It is the only small country — the only period, period — whose neighbors publicly declare its very existence an affront to law, morality, and religion and make its extinction an explicit, paramount national goal. Nor is the goal merely declarative. Iran, Libya, and Iraq conduct foreign policies designed for the killing of Israelis and the destruction of their state. They choose their allies (Hamas, Hezbollah) and develop their weapons (suicide bombs, poison gas, anthrax, nuclear missiles) accordingly. Countries as far away as Malaysia will not allow a representative of Israel on their soil nor even permit the showing of Schindler’s List lest it engender sympathy for Zion.

Others are more circumspect in their declarations. No longer is the destruction of Israel the unanimous goal of the Arab League, as it was for the thirty years before Camp David. Syria, for example, no longer explicitly enunciates it. Yet Syria would destroy Israel tomorrow if it had the power. (Its current reticence on the subject is largely due to its post-Cold War need for the American connection.)

Even Egypt, first to make peace with Israel and the presumed model for peacemaking, has built a vast U.S.-equipped army that conducts military exercises obviously designed for fighting Israel. Its huge « Badr ’96 » exercises, for example, Egypt’s largest since the 1973 war, featured simulated crossings of the Suez Canal.

And even the PLO, which was forced into ostensible recognition of Israel in the Oslo Agreements of 1993, is still ruled by a national charter that calls in at least fourteen places for Israel’s eradication. The fact that after five years and four specific promises to amend the charter it remains unamended is a sign of how deeply engraved the dream of eradicating Israel remains in the Arab consciousness.

II. THE STAKES

The contemplation of Israel’s disappearance is very difficult for this generation. For fifty years, Israel has been a fixture. Most people cannot remember living in a world without Israel.

Nonetheless, this feeling of permanence has more than once been rudely interrupted — during the first few days of the Yom Kippur War when it seemed as if Israel might be overrun, or those few weeks in May and early June 1967 when Nasser blockaded the Straits of Tiran and marched 100,000 troops into Sinai to drive the Jews into the sea.

Yet Israel’s stunning victory in 1967, its superiority in conventional weaponry, its success in every war in which its existence was at stake, has bred complacency. Some ridicule the very idea of Israel’s impermanence. Israel, wrote one Diaspora intellectual, « is fundamentally indestructible. Yitzhak Rabin knew this. The Arab leaders on Mount Herzl [at Rabin’s funeral] knew this. Only the land-grabbing, trigger-happy saints of the right do not know this. They are animated by the imagination of catastrophe, by the thrill of attending the end. »

Thrill was not exactly the feeling Israelis had when during the Gulf War they entered sealed rooms and donned gas masks to protect themselves from mass death — in a war in which Israel was not even engaged. The feeling was fear, dread, helplessness — old existential Jewish feelings that post- Zionist fashion today deems anachronistic, if not reactionary. But wish does not overthrow reality. The Gulf War reminded even the most wishful that in an age of nerve gas, missiles, and nukes, an age in which no country is completely safe from weapons of mass destruction, Israel with its compact population and tiny area is particularly vulnerable to extinction.

Israel is not on the edge. It is not on the brink. This is not ’48 or ’67 or ’73. But Israel is a small country. It can disappear. And it knows it.

It may seem odd to begin an examination of the meaning of Israel and the future of the Jews by contemplating the end. But it does concentrate the mind. And it underscores the stakes. The stakes could not be higher. It is my contention that on Israel — on its existence and survival — hangs the very existence and survival of the Jewish people. Or, to put the thesis in the negative, that the end of Israel means the end of the Jewish people. They survived destruction and exile at the hands of Babylon in 586 B.C. They survived destruction and exile at the hands of Rome in 70 A.D., and finally in 132 A.D. They cannot survive another destruction and exile. The Third Commonwealth — modern Israel, born just 50 years ago — is the last.

The return to Zion is now the principal drama of Jewish history. What began as an experiment has become the very heart of the Jewish people — its cultural, spiritual, and psychological center, soon to become its demographic center as well. Israel is the hinge. Upon it rest the hopes — the only hope – – for Jewish continuity and survival.

III. THE DYING DIASPORA

In 1950, there were 5 million Jews in the United States. In 1990, the number was a slightly higher 5.5 million. In the intervening decades, overall U.S. population rose 65 percent. The Jews essentially tread water. In fact, in the last half-century Jews have shrunk from 3 percent to 2 percent of the American population. And now they are headed for not just relative but absolute decline. What sustained the Jewish population at its current level was, first, the postwar baby boom, then the influx of 400,000 Jews, mostly from the Soviet Union.

Well, the baby boom is over. And Russian immigration is drying up. There are only so many Jews where they came from. Take away these historical anomalies, and the American Jewish population would be smaller today than today. In fact, it is now headed for catastrophic decline. Steven Bayme, director of Jewish Communal Affairs at the American Jewish Committee, flatly predicts that in twenty years the Jewish population will be down to four million, a loss of nearly 30 percent. In twenty years! Projecting just a few decades further yields an even more chilling future.

How does a community decimate itself in the benign conditions of the United States? Easy: low fertility and endemic intermarriage.

The fertility rate among American Jews is 1.6 children per woman. The replacement rate (the rate required for the population to remain constant) is 2.1. The current rate is thus 20 percent below what is needed for zero growth. Thus fertility rates alone would cause a 20 percent decline in every generation. In three generations, the population would be cut in half.

The low birth rate does not stem from some peculiar aversion of Jewish women to children. It is merely a striking case of the well-known and universal phenomenon of birth rates declining with rising education and socio- economic class. Educated, successful working women tend to marry late and have fewer babies.

Add now a second factor, intermarriage. In the United States today more Jews marry Christians than marry Jews. The intermarriage rate is 52 percent. (A more conservative calculation yields 47 percent; the demographic effect is basically the same.) In 1970, the rate was 8 percent.

Most important for Jewish continuity, however, is the ultimate identity of the children born to these marriages. Only about one in four is raised Jewish. Thus two-thirds of Jewish marriages are producing children three-quarters of whom are lost to the Jewish people. Intermarriage rates alone would cause a 25 percent decline in population in every generation. (Math available upon request.) In two generations, half the Jews would disappear.

Now combine the effects of fertility and intermarriage and make the overly optimistic assumption that every child raised Jewish will grow up to retain his Jewish identity (i.e., a zero dropout rate). You can start with 100 American Jews; you end up with 60. In one generation, more than a third have disappeared. In just two generations, two out of every three will vanish.

One can reach this same conclusion by a different route (bypassing the intermarriage rates entirely). A Los Angeles Times poll of American Jews conducted in March 1998 asked a simple question: Are you raising your children as Jews? Only 70 percent said yes. A population in which the biological replacement rate is 80 percent and the cultural replacement rate is 70 percent is headed for extinction. By this calculation, every 100 Jews are raising 56 Jewish children. In just two generations, 7 out of every 10 Jews will vanish.

The demographic trends in the rest of the Diaspora are equally unencouraging. In Western Europe, fertility and intermarriage rates mirror those of the United States. Take Britain. Over the last generation, British Jewry has acted as a kind of controlled experiment: a Diaspora community living in an open society, but, unlike that in the United States, not artificially sustained by immigration. What happened? Over the last quarter- century, the number of British Jews declined by over 25 percent.

Over the same interval, France’s Jewish population declined only slightly. The reason for this relative stability, however, is a one-time factor: the influx of North African Jewry. That influx is over. In France today only a minority of Jews between the ages of twenty and forty-four live in a conventional family with two Jewish parents. France, too, will go the way of the rest.

« The dissolution of European Jewry, » observes Bernard Wasserstein in Vanishing Diaspora: The Jews in Europe since 1945, « is not situated at some point in the hypothetical future. The process is taking place before our eyes and is already far advanced. » Under present trends, « the number of Jews in Europe by the year 2000 would then be not much more than one million — the lowest figure since the last Middle Ages. »

In 1990, there were eight million.

The story elsewhere is even more dispiriting. The rest of what was once the Diaspora is now either a museum or a graveyard. Eastern Europe has been effectively emptied of its Jews. In 1939, Poland had 3.2 million Jews. Today it is home to 3,500. The story is much the same in the other capitals of Eastern Europe.

The Islamic world, cradle to the great Sephardic Jewish tradition and home to one-third of world Jewry three centuries ago, is now practically Judenrein. Not a single country in the Islamic world is home to more than 20,000 Jews. After Turkey with 19,000 and Iran with 14,000, the country with the largest Jewish community in the entire Islamic world is Morocco with 6, 100. There are more Jews in Omaha, Nebraska.

These communities do not figure in projections. There is nothing to project. They are fit subjects not for counting but for remembering. Their very sound has vanished. Yiddish and Ladino, the distinctive languages of the European and Sephardic Diasporas, like the communities that invented them, are nearly extinct.

IV. THE DYNAMICS OF ASSIMILATION

Is it not risky to assume that current trends will continue? No. Nothing will revive the Jewish communities of Eastern Europe and the Islamic world. And nothing will stop the rapid decline by assimilation of Western Jewry. On the contrary. Projecting current trends — assuming, as I have done, that rates remain constant — is rather conservative: It is risky to assume that assimilation will not accelerate. There is nothing on the horizon to reverse the integration of Jews into Western culture. The attraction of Jews to the larger culture and the level of acceptance of Jews by the larger culture are historically unprecedented. If anything, the trends augur an intensification of assimilation.

It stands to reason. As each generation becomes progressively more assimilated, the ties to tradition grow weaker (as measured, for example, by synagogue attendance and number of children receiving some kind of Jewish education). This dilution of identity, in turn, leads to a greater tendency to intermarriage and assimilation. Why not? What, after all, are they giving up? The circle is complete and self-reinforcing.

Consider two cultural artifacts. With the birth of television a half- century ago, Jewish life in America was represented by The Goldbergs: urban Jews, decidedly ethnic, heavily accented, socially distinct. Forty years later The Goldbergs begat Seinfeld, the most popular entertainment in America today. The Seinfeld character is nominally Jewish. He might cite his Jewish identity on occasion without apology or self- consciousness — but, even more important, without consequence. It has not the slightest influence on any aspect of his life.

Assimilation of this sort is not entirely unprecedented. In some ways, it parallels the pattern in Western Europe after the emancipation of the Jews in the late 18th and 19th centuries. The French Revolution marks the turning point in the granting of civil rights to Jews. As they began to emerge from the ghetto, at first they found resistance to their integration and advancement. They were still excluded from the professions, higher education, and much of society. But as these barriers began gradually to erode and Jews advanced socially, Jews began a remarkable embrace of European culture and, for many, Christianity. In A History of Zionism, Walter Laqueur notes the view of Gabriel Riesser, an eloquent and courageous mid-19th-century advocate of emancipation, that a Jew who preferred the non-existent state and nation of Israel to Germany should be put under police protection not because he was dangerous but because he was obviously insane.

Moses Mendelssohn (1729-1786) was a harbinger. Cultured, cosmopolitan, though firmly Jewish, he was the quintessence of early emancipation. Yet his story became emblematic of the rapid historical progression from emancipation to assimilation: Four of his six children and eight of his nine grandchildren were baptized.

In that more religious, more Christian age, assimilation took the form of baptism, what Henrich Heine called the admission ticket to European society. In the far more secular late-20th century, assimilation merely means giving up the quaint name, the rituals, and the other accouterments and identifiers of one’s Jewish past. Assimilation today is totally passive. Indeed, apart from the trip to the county courthouse to transform, say, (shmattes by) Ralph Lifshitz into (Polo by) Ralph Lauren, it is marked by an absence of actions rather than the active embrace of some other faith. Unlike Mendelssohn’s children, Seinfeld required no baptism.

We now know, of course, that in Europe, emancipation through assimilation proved a cruel hoax. The rise of anti-Semitism, particularly late-19th- century racial anti-Semitism culminating in Nazism, disabused Jews of the notion that assimilation provided escape from the liabilities and dangers of being Jewish. The saga of the family of Madeleine Albright is emblematic. Of her four Jewish grandparents — highly assimilated, with children some of whom actually converted and erased their Jewish past — three went to their deaths in Nazi concentration camps as Jews.

Nonetheless, the American context is different. There is no American history of anti-Semitism remotely resembling Europe’s. The American tradition of tolerance goes back 200 years to the very founding of the country. Washington’s letter to the synagogue in Newport pledges not tolerance — tolerance bespeaks non-persecution bestowed as a favor by the dominant upon the deviant — but equality. It finds no parallel in the history of Europe. In such a country, assimilation seems a reasonable solution to one’s Jewish problem. One could do worse than merge one’s destiny with that of a great and humane nation dedicated to the proposition of human dignity and equality.

Nonetheless, while assimilation may be a solution for individual Jews, it clearly is a disaster for Jews as a collective with a memory, a language, a tradition, a liturgy, a history, a faith, a patrimony that will all perish as a result.

Whatever value one might assign to assimilation, one cannot deny its reality. The trends, demographic and cultural, are stark. Not just in the long-lost outlands of the Diaspora, not just in its erstwhile European center, but even in its new American heartland, the future will be one of diminution, decline, and virtual disappearance. This will not occur overnight. But it will occur soon — in but two or three generations, a time not much further removed from ours today than the founding of Israel fifty years ago.

V. ISRAELI EXCEPTIONALISM

Israel is different. In Israel the great temptation of modernity — assimilation — simply does not exist. Israel is the very embodiment of Jewish continuity: It is the only nation on earth that inhabits the same land, bears the same name, speaks the same language, and worships the same God that it did 3,000 years ago. You dig the soil and you find pottery from Davidic times, coins from Bar Kokhba, and 2,000-year-old scrolls written in a script remarkably like the one that today advertises ice cream at the corner candy store.

Because most Israelis are secular, however, some ultra-religious Jews dispute Israel’s claim to carry on an authentically Jewish history. So do some secular Jews. A French critic (sociologist Georges Friedmann) once called Israelis « Hebrew-speaking gentiles. » In fact, there was once a fashion among a group of militantly secular Israeli intellectuals to call themselves  » Canaanites, » i.e., people rooted in the land but entirely denying the religious tradition from which they came.

Well then, call these people what you will. « Jews, » after all, is a relatively recent name for this people. They started out as Hebrews, then became Israelites. « Jew » (derived from the Kingdom of Judah, one of the two successor states to the Davidic and Solomonic Kingdom of Israel) is the post- exilic term for Israelite. It is a latecomer to history.

What to call the Israeli who does not observe the dietary laws, has no use for the synagogue, and regards the Sabbath as the day for a drive to the beach — a fair description, by the way, of most of the prime ministers of Israel? It does not matter. Plant a Jewish people in a country that comes to a standstill on Yom Kippur; speaks the language of the Bible; moves to the rhythms of the Hebrew (lunar) calendar; builds cities with the stones of its ancestors; produces Hebrew poetry and literature, Jewish scholarship and learning unmatched anywhere in the world — and you have continuity.

Israelis could use a new name. Perhaps we will one day relegate the word Jew to the 2,000-year exilic experience and once again call these people Hebrews. The term has a nice historical echo, being the name by which Joseph and Jonah answered the question: « Who are you? »

In the cultural milieu of modern Israel, assimilation is hardly the problem. Of course Israelis eat McDonald’s and watch Dallas reruns. But so do Russians and Chinese and Danes. To say that there are heavy Western (read: American) influences on Israeli culture is to say nothing more than that Israel is as subject to the pressures of globalization as any other country. But that hardly denies its cultural distinctiveness, a fact testified to by the great difficulty immigrants have in adapting to Israel.

In the Israeli context, assimilation means the reattachment of Russian and Romanian, Uzbeki and Iraqi, Algerian and Argentinian Jews to a distinctively Hebraic culture. It means the exact opposite of what it means in the Diaspora: It means giving up alien languages, customs, and traditions. It means giving up Christmas and Easter for Hanukkah and Passover. It means giving up ancestral memories of the steppes and the pampas and the savannas of the world for Galilean hills and Jerusalem stone and Dead Sea desolation. That is what these new Israelis learn. That is what is transmitted to their children. That is why their survival as Jews is secure. Does anyone doubt that the near- million Soviet immigrants to Israel would have been largely lost to the Jewish people had they remained in Russia — and that now they will not be lost?

Some object to the idea of Israel as carrier of Jewish continuity because of the myriad splits and fractures among Israelis: Orthodox versus secular, Ashkenazi versus Sephardi, Russian versus sabra, and so on. Israel is now engaged in bitter debates over the legitimacy of conservative and reform Judaism and the encroachment of Orthodoxy upon the civic and social life of the country.

So what’s new? Israel is simply recapitulating the Jewish norm. There are equally serious divisions in the Diaspora, as there were within the last Jewish Commonwealth: « Before the ascendancy of the Pharisees and the emergence of Rabbinic orthodoxy after the fall of the Second Temple, » writes Harvard Near East scholar Frank Cross, « Judaism was more complex and variegated than we had supposed. » The Dead Sea Scrolls, explains Hershel Shanks, « emphasize a hitherto unappreciated variety in Judaism of the late Second Temple period, so much so that scholars often speak not simply of Judaism but of Judaisms. »

The Second Commonwealth was a riot of Jewish sectarianism: Pharisees, Sadducees, Essenes, apocalyptics of every stripe, sects now lost to history, to say nothing of the early Christians. Those concerned about the secular- religious tensions in Israel might contemplate the centuries-long struggle between Hellenizers and traditionalists during the Second Commonwealth. The Maccabean revolt of 167-4 B.C., now celebrated as Hanukkah, was, among other things, a religious civil war among Jews.

Yes, it is unlikely that Israel will produce a single Jewish identity. But that is unnecessary. The relative monolith of Rabbinic Judaism in the Middle Ages is the exception. Fracture and division is a fact of life during the modern era, as during the First and Second Commonwealths. Indeed, during the period of the First Temple, the people of Israel were actually split into two often warring states. The current divisions within Israel pale in comparison.

Whatever identity or identities are ultimately adopted by Israelis, the fact remains that for them the central problem of Diaspora Jewry — suicide by assimilation — simply does not exist. Blessed with this security of identity, Israel is growing. As a result, Israel is not just the cultural center of the Jewish world, it is rapidly becoming its demographic center as well. The relatively high birth rate yields a natural increase in population. Add a steady net rate of immigration (nearly a million since the late 1980s), and Israel’s numbers rise inexorably even as the Diaspora declines.

Within a decade Israel will pass the United States as the most populous Jewish community on the globe. Within our lifetime a majority of the world’s Jews will be living in Israel. That has not happened since well before Christ.

A century ago, Europe was the center of Jewish life. More than 80 percent of world Jewry lived there. The Second World War destroyed European Jewry and dispersed the survivors to the New World (mainly the United States) and to Israel. Today, 80 percent of world Jewry lives either in the United States or in Israel. Today we have a bipolar Jewish universe with two centers of gravity of approximately equal size. It is a transitional stage, however. One star is gradually dimming, the other brightening.

Soon an inevitably the cosmology of the Jewish people will have been transformed again, turned into a single-star system with a dwindling Diaspora orbiting around. It will be a return to the ancient norm: The Jewish people will be centered — not just spiritually but physically — in their ancient homeland.

VI. THE END OF DISPERSION

The consequences of this transformation are enormous. Israel’s centrality is more than just a question of demography. It represents a bold and dangerous new strategy for Jewish survival.

For two millennia, the Jewish people survived by means of dispersion and isolation. Following the first exile in 586 B.C. and the second exile in 70 A. D. and 132 A.D., Jews spread first throughout Mesopotamia and the Mediterranean Basin, then to northern and eastern Europe and eventually west to the New World, with communities in practically every corner of the earth, even unto India and China.

Throughout this time, the Jewish people survived the immense pressures of persecution, massacre, and forced conversion not just by faith and courage, but by geographic dispersion. Decimated here, they would survive there. The thousands of Jewish villages and towns spread across the face of Europe, the Islamic world, and the New World provided a kind of demographic insurance. However many Jews were massacred in the First Crusade along the Rhine, however many villages were destroyed in the 1648-1649 pogroms in Ukraine, there were always thousands of others spread around the globe to carry on.

This dispersion made for weakness and vulnerability for individual Jewish communities. Paradoxically, however, it made for endurance and strength for the Jewish people as a whole. No tyrant could amass enough power to threaten Jewish survival everywhere.

Until Hitler. The Nazis managed to destroy most everything Jewish from the Pyrenees to the gates of Stalingrad, an entire civilization a thousand years old. There were nine million Jews in Europe when Hitler came to power. He killed two-thirds of them. Fifty years later, the Jews have yet to recover. There were sixteen million Jews in the world in 1939. Today, there are thirteen million.

The effect of the Holocaust was not just demographic, however. It was psychological, indeed ideological, as well. It demonstrated once and for all the catastrophic danger of powerlessness. The solution was self-defense, and that meant a demographic reconcentration in a place endowed with sovereignty, statehood, and arms.

Before World War II there was great debate in the Jewish world over Zionism. Reform Judaism, for example, was for decades anti-Zionist. The Holocaust resolved that debate. Except for those at the extremes — the ultra-Orthodox right and far left — Zionism became the accepted solution to Jewish powerlessness and vulnerability. Amid the ruins, Jews made a collective decision that their future lay in self-defense and territoriality, in the ingathering of the exiles to a place where they could finally acquire the means to defend themselves.

It was the right decision, the only possible decision. But oh so perilous. What a choice of place to make one’s final stand: a dot on the map, a tiny patch of near-desert, a thin ribbon of Jewish habitation behind the flimsiest of natural barriers (which the world demands that Israel relinquish). One determined tank thrust can tear it in half. One small battery of nuclear- tipped Scuds can obliterate it entirely.

To destroy the Jewish people, Hitler needed to conquer the world. All that is needed today is to conquer a territory smaller than Vermont. The terrible irony is that in solving the problem of powerlessness, the Jews have necessarily put all their eggs in one basket, a small basket hard by the waters of the Mediterranean. And on its fate hinges everything Jewish.

VII. THINKING THE UNTHINKABLE

What if the Third Jewish Commonwealth meets the fate of the first two? The scenario is not that far-fetched: A Palestinian state is born, arms itself, concludes alliances with, say, Iraq and Syria. War breaks out between Palestine and Israel (over borders or water or terrorism). Syria and Iraq attack from without. Egypt and Saudi Arabia join the battle. The home front comes under guerilla attack from Palestine. Chemical and biological weapons rain down from Syria, Iraq, and Iran. Israel is overrun.

Why is this the end? Can the Jewish people not survive as they did when their homeland was destroyed and their political independence extinguished twice before? Why not a new exile, a new Diaspora, a new cycle of Jewish history?

First, because the cultural conditions of exile would be vastly different. The first exiles occurred at a time when identity was nearly coterminous with religion. An expulsion two millennia later into a secularized world affords no footing for a reestablished Jewish identity.

But more important: Why retain such an identity? Beyond the dislocation would be the sheer demoralization. Such an event would simply break the spirit. No people could survive it. Not even the Jews. This is a people that miraculously survived two previous destructions and two millennia of persecution in the hope of ultimate return and restoration. Israel is that hope. To see it destroyed, to have Isaiahs and Jeremiahs lamenting the widows of Zion once again amid the ruins of Jerusalem is more than one people could bear.

Particularly coming after the Holocaust, the worst calamity in Jewish history. To have survived it is miracle enough. Then to survive the destruction of that which arose to redeem it — the new Jewish state — is to attribute to Jewish nationhood and survival supernatural power.

Some Jews and some scattered communities would, of course, survive. The most devout, already a minority, would carry on — as an exotic tribe, a picturesque Amish-like anachronism, a dispersed and pitied remnant of a remnant. But the Jews as a people would have retired from history.

We assume that Jewish history is cyclical: Babylonian exile in 586 B.C., followed by return in 538 B.C. Roman exile in 135 A.D., followed by return, somewhat delayed, in 1948. We forget a linear part of Jewish history: There was one other destruction, a century and a half before the fall of the First Temple. It went unrepaired. In 722 B.C., the Assyrians conquered the other, larger Jewish state, the northern kingdom of Israel. (Judah, from which modern Jews are descended, was the southern kingdom.) This is the Israel of the Ten Tribes, exiled and lost forever.

So enduring is their mystery that when Lewis and Clark set off on their expedition, one of the many questions prepared for them by Dr. Benjamin Rush at Jefferson’s behest was this: « What Affinity between their [the Indians’] religious Ceremonies & those of the Jews? » « Jefferson and Lewis had talked at length about these tribes, » explains Stephen Ambrose. « They speculated that the lost tribes of Israel could be out there on the Plains. »

Alas, not. The Ten Tribes had melted away into history. As such, they represent the historical norm. Every other people so conquered and exiled has in time disappeared. Only the Jews defied the norm. Twice. But never, I fear, again.

Publicités

Gaza: Quand la condamnation tourne à l’incitation (Behind the smoke and mirrors, guess who’s abetting Hamas’s carefully planned and orchestrated military operation to break through the border of a sovereign state and commit mass murder in the communities beyond using their own civilians as cover ?)

19 mai, 2018
Malheur à ceux qui appellent le mal bien, et le bien mal, qui changent les ténèbres en lumière, et la lumière en ténèbres, qui changent l’amertume en douceur, et la douceur en amertume! Esaïe 5: 20
« Dionysos contre le « crucifié » : la voici bien l’opposition. Ce n’est pas une différence quant au martyr – mais celui-ci a un sens différent. La vie même, son éternelle fécondité, son éternel retour, détermine le tourment, la destruction, la volonté d’anéantir pour Dionysos. Dans l’autre cas, la souffrance, le « crucifié » en tant qu’il est « innocent », sert d’argument contre cette vie, de formulation de sa condamnation.  (…) L’individu a été si bien pris au sérieux, si bien posé comme un absolu par le christianisme, qu’on ne pouvait plus le sacrifier : mais l’espèce ne survit que grâce aux sacrifices humains… La véritable philanthropie exige le sacrifice pour le bien de l’espèce – elle est dure, elle oblige à se dominer soi-même, parce qu’elle a besoin du sacrifice humain. Et cette pseudo-humanité qui s’institue christianisme, veut précisément imposer que personne ne soit sacrifié. Nietzsche
Où est Dieu? cria-t-il, je vais vous le dire! Nous l’avons tué – vous et moi! Nous tous sommes ses meurtriers! Mais comment avons-nous fait cela? Comment avons-nous pu vider la mer? Qui nous a donné l’éponge pour effacer l’horizon tout entier? Dieu est mort! (…) Et c’est nous qui l’avons tué ! (…) Ce que le monde avait possédé jusqu’alors de plus sacré et de plus puissant a perdu son sang sous nos couteaux (…) Quelles solennités expiatoires, quels jeux sacrés nous faudra-t-il inventer? Nietzsche
Le christianisme est une rébellion contre la loi naturelle, une protestation contre la nature. Poussé à sa logique extrême, le christianisme signifierait la culture systématique de l’échec humain. […] Mais il n’est pas question que le national-socialisme se mette un jour à singer la religion en établissant une forme de culte. Sa seule ambition doit être de construire scientifiquement une doctrine qui ne soit rien de plus qu’un hommage à la raison […] Il n’est donc pas opportun de nous lancer maintenant dans un combat avec les Églises. Le mieux est de laisser le christianisme mourir de mort naturelle. Une mort lente a quelque chose d’apaisant. Le dogme du christianisme s’effrite devant les progrès de la science. La religion devra faire de plus en plus de concessions. Les mythes se délabrent peu à peu. Il ne reste plus qu’à prouver que dans la nature il n’existe aucune frontière entre l’organique et l’inorganique. Quand la connaissance de l’univers se sera largement répandue, quand la plupart des hommes sauront que les étoiles ne sont pas des sources de lumière mais des mondes, peut-être des mondes habités comme le nôtre, alors la doctrine chrétienne sera convaincue d’absurdité […] Tout bien considéré, nous n’avons aucune raison de souhaiter que les Italiens et les Espagnols se libèrent de la drogue du christianisme. Soyons les seuls à être immunisés contre cette maladie. Adolf Hitler
Nous avons constaté que le sport était la religion moderne du monde occidental. Nous savions que les publics anglais et américain assis devant leur poste de télévision ne regarderaient pas un programme exposant le sort des Palestiniens s’il y avait une manifestation sportive sur une autre chaîne. Nous avons donc décidé de nous servir des Jeux olympiques, cérémonie la plus sacrée de cette religion, pour obliger le monde à faire attention à nous. Nous avons offert des sacrifices humains à vos dieux du sport et de la télévision et ils ont répondu à nos prières. Terroriste palestinien (Jeux olympiques de Munich, 1972)
La même force culturelle et spirituelle qui a joué un rôle si décisif dans la disparition du sacrifice humain est aujourd’hui en train de provoquer la disparition des rituels de sacrifice humain qui l’ont jadis remplacé. Tout cela semble être une bonne nouvelle, mais à condition que ceux qui comptaient sur ces ressources rituelles soient en mesure de les remplacer par des ressources religieuses durables d’un autre genre. Priver une société des ressources sacrificielles rudimentaires dont elle dépend sans lui proposer d’alternatives, c’est la plonger dans une crise qui la conduira presque certainement à la violence. Gil Bailie
More ink equals more blood,  newspaper coverage of terrorist incidents leads directly to more attacks. It’s a macabre example of win-win in what economists call a « common-interest game. Both the media and terrorists benefit from terrorist incidents. Terrorists get free publicity for themselves and their cause. The media, meanwhile, make money « as reports of terror attacks increase newspaper sales and the number of television viewers. Bruno S. Frey et Dominic Rohner
Amidst the national mourning for the many innocent lives lost in these senseless shooting sprees, it is critical not to overreact and overrespond to the menacing acts of a few. It is, of course, of little comfort to those families and communities impacted in Santa Fe as well as Parkland, Florida, and Benton, Kentucky, but this is not routine. Schools are not under siege. Rather, this more likely reflects a short-term contagion effect in which angry dispirited youngsters are inspired by others whose violent outbursts serve as fodder for national attention. That should subside once we stop obsessing over the risk. History provides an important lesson about how crime contagions arise and eventually play themselves out. Over the five-year time span from 1997 through 2001, America witnessed seven multiple-fatality school rampages with a combined 32 killed and 85 others injured, more such incidents and casualties than during the past five years. (…) Many observers have expressed concern for the excessive attention given to mass shooters of today and the deadliest of yesteryear. CNN’s Anderson Cooper has campaigned against naming names of mass shooters, and 147 criminologists, sociologists, psychologists and other human-behavior experts recently signed on to an open letter urging the media not to identify mass shooters or display their photos. While I appreciate the concern for name and visual identification of mass shooters for fear of inspiring copycats as well as to avoid insult to the memory of those they slaughtered, names and faces are not the problem. It is the excessive detail — too much information — about the killers, their writings, and their backgrounds that unnecessarily humanizes them. We come to know more about them — their interests and their disappointments — than we do about our next door neighbors. Too often the line is crossed between news reporting and celebrity watch. At the same time, we focus far too much on records. We constantly are reminded that some shooting is the largest in a particular state over a given number of years, as if that really matters. Would the massacre be any less tragic if it didn’t exceed the death toll of some prior incident? Moreover, we are treated to published lists of the largest mass shootings in modern US history. For whatever purpose we maintain records, they are there to be broken and can challenge a bitter and suicidal assailant to outgun his violent role models. Although the spirited advocacy of students around the country regarding gun control is to be applauded, we need to keep some perspective about the risk. Slogans like, “I want to go to my graduation, not to my grave,” are powerful, yet hyperbolic. As often said, even one death is one too many, and we need to take the necessary steps to protect children, including expanded funding for school teachers and school psychologists. Still, despite the occasional tragedy, our schools are safe, safer than they have been for decades. James Alan Fox (Northeastern University)
Hélas les morts ne sont que d’un seul côté. Benoit Hamon
A Gaza et dans les territoires occupés, ils ont [les meurtres de violées] représenté deux tiers des homicides » (…) Les femmes palestiniennes violées par les soldats israéliens sont systématiquement tuées par leur propre famille. Ici, le viol devient un crime de guerre, car les soldats israéliens agissent en parfaite connaissance de cause. Sara Daniel (Le Nouvel Observateur, le 8 novembre 2001)
Dans le numéro 1931 du Nouvel Observateur, daté du 8 novembre 2001, Sara Daniel a publié un reportage sur le « crime d’honneur » en Jordanie. Dans son texte, elle révélait qu’à Gaza et dans les territoires occupés, les crimes dits d’honneur qui consistent pour des pères ou des frères à abattre les femmes jugées légères représentaient une part importante des homicides. Le texte publié, en raison d’un défaut de guillemets et de la suppression de deux phrases dans la transmission, laissait penser que son auteur faisait sienne l’accusation selon laquelle il arrivait à des soldats israéliens de commettre un viol en sachant, de plus, que les femmes violées allaient être tuées. Il n’en était évidemment rien et Sara Daniel, actuellement en reportage en Afghanistan, fait savoir qu’elle déplore très vivement cette erreur qui a gravement dénaturé sa pensée. Une mise au point de Sara Daniel (Le Nouvel Observateur, le 15 novembre 2001)
Pendant qu’une petite fille palestinienne mourait d’avoir inhalé des gaz lacrymogènes à Gaza, à Jérusalem, à moins d’une heure et demie de là par la route, on sablait le champagne, lundi, pour fêter le déménagement de l’ambassade américaine. Malgré les snipers israéliens, les Gazaouis auront donc continué à se presser devant la clôture de séparation de cette prison maudite et à ciel ouvert que représente l’enclave de Gaza, honte d’Israël et de la communauté internationale, pour achever la « Marche du grand retour », entamée le 30 mars et censée se conclure ce 15 mai. Une marche pour réclamer les terres perdues au moment de la création d’Israël, il y a soixante-dix ans, mais surtout la fin du blocus israélo-égyptien qui étouffe Gaza. Au cours de ce lundi noir, 59 personnes ont été tuées, et plus de 2.400 ont été blessées par balles. Encore une fois le conflit israélo-palestinien a joué la guerre des images, au cours de ce jour si symbolique. Les Israéliens fêtaient les 70 ans de la naissance de leur Etat, le miracle de son existence, l’incroyable longévité de ce confetti minuscule entouré de nations hostiles. Les Palestiniens commémoraient, eux, leur « catastrophe », leur Nakba, qui les a poussés sur les routes de l’exil, dans l’indifférence d’une communauté internationale lassée par un conflit interminable, happée par d’autres hécatombes plus pressantes. C’est avec cette Marche que les Gazaouis ont tenté de revenir sur la carte des préoccupations mondiales et de rappeler leur agonie à un monde qui les oublie. Pendant ce temps, Israéliens, Américains, Saoudiens et Egyptiens célèbrent leur alliance sur le dos de ces vaincus de l’histoire, les pressant d’accepter un accord, ce que Donald Trump a appelé le « deal ultime », dont les contours sont encore flous mais dont on peut être certain qu’il entérinerait leur déroute. Mais pourquoi les Israéliens ont-ils cédé à cette violence inouïe et inutile alors que, de leur aveu même, le vrai sujet de leurs inquiétudes était le front du Nord avec le Hezbollah et l’Iran ? Est-ce l’hubris des vainqueurs ? En tout cas, Israël n’a pas entendu l’avertissement de Houda Naim, députée du Hamas. (…) Alors, les manifestants ont-ils été manipulés par leurs organisations politiques ? La question est obscène lorsque que la marche, commencée il y a six semaines, a déjà fait plus de 100 morts. Bien sûr, le Hamas, débordé par cette manifestation civile et pacifique, a rejoint le mouvement. A-t-il encouragé les Gazaouis à provoquer les soldats israéliens, les conduisant à une mort certaine ? Peut-être, et le gouvernement israélien l’affirmera. Mais cela ne suffirait pas à expliquer la détermination d’une population excédée, désespérée par ses conditions d’existence. Ce qui vient de se passer à Gaza est un rappel à l’ordre, tragique, à une communauté internationale qui a abandonné ce peuple palestinien à la brutalité israélienne, à l’incurie de ses dirigeants engagés dans une guerre fratricide, à ses alliés arabes historiquement défaillants, à son sort dont nous portons tous la responsabilité. Sara Daniel
En novembre 2004, des civils ivoiriens et des soldats français de la Force Licorne se sont opposés durant quatre jours à Abidjan dans des affrontements qui ont fait des dizaines de morts et de blessés. À la suite d’une mission d’enquête sur le terrain, Amnesty International a recueilli des informations indiquant que les forces françaises ont, à certaines occasions, fait un usage excessif et disproportionné de la force alors qu’elles se trouvaient face à des manifestants qui ne représentaient pas une menace directe pour leurs vies ou la vie de tiers. Amnesty international (26.10.05)
Des tirs sont partis sur nos forces depuis les derniers étages de l’hôtel ivoire de la grande tour que nous n’occupions pas et depuis la foule. Dans ces conditions nos unités ont été amenées à faire des tirs de sommation et à forcer le passage en évitant bien évidemment de faire des morts et des blessés parmi les manifestants. Mais je répète encore une fois les premiers tirs n’ont pas été de notre fait. Général Poncet (Canal Plus 90 minutes 14.02.05)
Nous avons effectivement été amenés à tirer, des tirs en légitime défense et en riposte par rapport aux tireurs qui nous tiraient dessus. Colonel Gérard Dubois (porte-parole de l’état-major français, le 15 novembre 2004)
On n’arrivait pas à éloigner cette foule qui, de plus en plus était débordante. Sur ma gauche, trois de nos véhicules étaient déjà immergés dans la foule. Un manifestant grimpe sur un de mes chars et arme la mitrailleuse 7-62. Un de mes hommes fait un tir d’intimidation dans sa direction ; l’individu redescend aussitôt du blindé. Le coup de feu déclenche une fusillade. L’ensemble de mes hommes fait des tirs uniquement d’intimidation ». (…) seuls les COS auraient visé certains manifestants avec leurs armes non létales. (…) Mes hommes n’ont pu faire cela. Nous n’avions pas les armes pour infliger de telles blessures. Si nous avions tiré au canon dans la foule, ça aurait été le massacre. Colonel Destremau (Libération, 10.12.04)
In a surreal split-screen moment, the Israeli prime minister, Binyamin Netanyahu, was exulting over the opening of America’s embassy in Jerusalem, calling it a “great day for peace”. It is surely right to hold Israel, the strong side, to high standards. But Palestinian parties, though weak, are also to blame. Every state has a right to defend its borders. To judge by the numbers, Israel’s army may well have used excessive force. But any firm conclusion requires an independent assessment of what happened, where and when. The Israelis sometimes used non-lethal means, such as tear-gas dropped from drones. But then snipers went to work with bullets. What changed? Mixed in with protesters, it seems, were an unknown number of Hamas attackers seeking to breach the fence. What threat did they pose? Any fair judgment depends on the details. Just as important is the broader political question. The fence between Gaza and Israel is no ordinary border. Gaza is a prison, not a state. Measuring 365 square kilometres and home to 2m people, it is one of the most crowded and miserable places on Earth. It is short of medicine, power and other essentials. The tap water is undrinkable; untreated sewage is pumped into the sea. Gaza already has one of the world’s highest jobless rates, at 44%. The scene of three wars between Hamas and Israel since 2007, it is always on the point of eruption. Many hands are guilty for this tragedy. Israel insists that the strip is not its problem, having withdrawn its forces in 2005. But it still controls Gaza from land, sea and air. Any Palestinian, even a farmer, coming within 300 metres of the fence is liable to be shot. Israel restricts the goods that get in. Only a tiny number of Palestinians can get out for, say, medical treatment. Israeli generals have long warned against letting the economy collapse. Mr Netanyahu usually ignores them. Egypt also contributes to the misery. The Rafah crossing to Sinai, another escape valve, was open to goods and people for just 17 days in the first four months of this year. And Fatah, which administers the PA and parts of the West Bank, has withheld salaries for civil servants working for the PA in Gaza, limited shipments of necessities, such as drugs and baby milk, and cut payments to Israel for Gaza’s electricity. Hamas bears much of the blame, too. It all but destroyed the Oslo peace accords through its campaign of suicide-bombings in the 1990s and 2000s. Having driven the Israelis out of Gaza, it won a general election in 2006 and, after a brief civil war, expelled Fatah from the strip in 2007. It has misruled Gaza ever since, proving corrupt, oppressive and incompetent. It stores its weapons in civilian sites, including mosques and schools, making them targets. Cement that might be used for reconstruction is diverted to build underground tunnels to attack Israel. Hamas all but admitted it was not up to governing when it agreed to hand many administrative tasks to the PA last year as part of a reconciliation deal with Fatah. But the pact collapsed because Hamas is not prepared to give up its weapons. Israel, Egypt and the PA cannot just lock away the Palestinians in Gaza in the hope that Hamas will be overthrown. Only when Gazans live more freely might they think of getting rid of their rulers. Much more can be done to ease Gazans’ plight without endangering Israel’s security. But no lasting solution is possible until the question of Palestine is solved, too. Mr Netanyahu has long resisted the idea of a Palestinian state—and has kept building settlements on occupied land. It is hard to convince Israelis to change. As Israel marks its 70th birthday, the economy is booming. By “managing” the conflict, rather than trying to end it, Mr Netanyahu has kept Palestinian violence in check while giving nothing away. When violence flares Israel’s image suffers, but not much. The Trump administration supports it. And Arab states seeking an ally against a rising Iran have never had better relations with it. Israel is wrong to stop seeking a deal. And Mr Trump is wrong to prejudge the status of Jerusalem. But Palestinians have made it easy for Israel to claim that there is “no partner for peace”, divided as they are between a tired nationalist Fatah that cannot deliver peace, and an Islamist Hamas that refuses to do so. Palestinians desperately need new leaders. Fatah must renew itself through long-overdue elections. And Hamas must realise that its rockets damage Palestinian dreams of statehood more than they hurt Israel. For all their talk of non-violence, Hamas’s leaders have not abandoned the idea of “armed struggle” to destroy Israel. They refuse to give up their guns, or fully embrace a two-state solution; they speak vaguely of a long-term “truce”. With this week’s protests, Hamas’s leaders boasted of freeing a “wild tiger”. They found that Israel can be even more ferocious. If Hamas gave up its weapons, it would open the way for a rapprochement with Fatah. If it accepted Israel’s right to exist, it would expose Israel’s current unwillingness to allow a Palestinian state. If Palestinians marched peacefully, without guns and explosives, they would take the moral high ground. In short, if Palestinians want Israel to stop throttling them, they must first convince Israelis it is safe to let go. The Economist
Salah al-Bardaouil, haut responsable du Hamas, a déclaré à une télévision palestinienne que 50 des 62 Palestiniens tués lundi mais aussi mardi appartenaient au mouvement islamiste. « Cinquante des martyrs (des morts) étaient du Hamas, et 12 faisaient partie du reste de la population », a-t-il dit, interrogé sur les critiques selon lesquelles le Hamas tirait profit de la mobilisation. « Comment le Hamas pourrait-il récolter les fruits (du mouvement) alors qu’il a payé un prix aussi élevé », a-t-il demandé. Il n’a pas fourni de détails sur l’appartenance de ces Palestiniens à la branche armée ou politique du Hamas, ni sur les circonstances dans lesquelles ils avaient été tués. Salah al-Bardaouil « dévoile la vérité », a tweeté un porte-parole du gouvernement israélien, Ofir Gendelman, « ce n’était pas une manifestation pacifique, mais une opération du Hamas ». « Nous avons les mêmes chiffres », a lancé de son côté le Premier ministre Benjamin Netanyahu, avertissant que son pays continuerait « à se défendre par tous les moyens nécessaires ». Un porte-parole du Hamas, Fawzy Barhoum, et un autre haut responsable, Bassem Naim, se sont gardés de confirmer les informations de M. Bardaouil. Le Hamas paie les funérailles de tous, « qu’ils soient membres ou supporters du Hamas, ou pas », a dit M. Barhoum. Il est « naturel de voir de nombreux membres ou supporters du Hamas » à une telle manifestation, a dit M. Naim, en faisant référence à la forte présence du Hamas dans toutes les couches de la société. Ceux qui ont été tués « participaient pacifiquement » au mouvement, a-t-il assuré. Sur la chaîne de télévision Al-Jazeera, l’homme fort du Hamas, Yahya Sinouar, a prévenu: « si le blocus (israélien à Gaza) continue, nous n’hésiterons pas à recourir à la résistance militaire ». La Libre Belgique
The world now demands that Jerusalem account for every bullet fired at the demonstrators, without offering a single practical alternative for dealing with the crisis. But where is the outrage that Hamas kept urging Palestinians to move toward the fence, having been amply forewarned by Israel of the mortal risk? Or that protest organizers encouraged women to lead the charges on the fence because, as The Times’s Declan Walsh reported, “Israeli soldiers might be less likely to fire on women”? Or that Palestinian children as young as 7 were dispatched to try to breach the fence? Or that the protests ended after Israel warned Hamas’s leaders, whose preferred hide-outs include Gaza’s hospital, that their own lives were at risk? Elsewhere in the world, this sort of behavior would be called reckless endangerment. It would be condemned as self-destructive, cowardly and almost bottomlessly cynical. The mystery of Middle East politics is why Palestinians have so long been exempted from these ordinary moral judgments. How do so many so-called progressives now find themselves in objective sympathy with the murderers, misogynists and homophobes of Hamas? Why don’t they note that, by Hamas’s own admission, some 50 of the 62 protesters killed on Monday were members of Hamas? Why do they begrudge Israel the right to defend itself behind the very borders they’ve been clamoring for years for Israelis to get behind? Why is nothing expected of Palestinians, and everything forgiven, while everything is expected of Israelis, and nothing forgiven? That’s a question to which one can easily guess the answer. In the meantime, it’s worth considering the harm Western indulgence has done to Palestinian aspirations. No decent Palestinian society can emerge from the culture of victimhood, violence and fatalism symbolized by these protests. No worthy Palestinian government can emerge if the international community continues to indulge the corrupt, anti-Semitic autocrats of the Palestinian Authority or fails to condemn and sanction the despotic killers of Hamas. And no Palestinian economy will ever flourish through repeated acts of self-harm and destructive provocation. Bret Stephens
The protests on Monday were not about President Donald Trump moving the U.S. Embassy to Jerusalem, and have in fact been occurring weekly on the Gaza border since March. They are part of what the demonstrators have dubbed “The Great March of Return”—return, that is, to what is now Israel. (The Monday demonstration was scheduled months ago to coincide with Nakba Day, an annual occasion of protest; it was later moved up 24 hours to grab some of the media attention devoted to the embassy.) The fact that these long-standing Palestinian protests were mischaracterized by many in the media as simply a response to Trump obscured two disquieting realities: First, that the world has largely dismissed the genuine plight of Palestinians in Gaza, only bothering to pay attention to it when it could be tenuously connected to Trump. Second, that many Palestinians do not simply desire their own state and an end to the occupation and settlements that began in 1967, but an end to the Jewish state that began in 1948. (…) Hamas, which controls the Gaza Strip, is an authoritarian, theocratic regime that has called for Jewish genocide in its charter, murdered scores of Israeli civilians, repressed Palestinian women, and harshly persecuted religious and sexual minorities. It is a designated terrorist group by the United States, Canada, and the European Union. (…) Whether it has been spending its manpower and millions of dollars on subterranean attack tunnels into Israel—including under United Nations schools for Gaza’s children—or launching repeated messianic military operations against Israel, the terrorist group has consistently prioritized the deaths of Israelis over the lives of its Palestinian brethren. (…) Hamas manipulated many of these demonstrators into unwittingly rushing the Israeli border fence under false pretenses in order to produce injuries and fatalities. As the New York Times reported, “After midday prayers, clerics and leaders of militant factions in Gaza, led by Hamas, urged thousands of worshipers to join the protests. The fence had already been breached, they said falsely, claiming Palestinians were flooding into Israel.” Similarly, the Washington Post recounted how “organizers urged protesters over loudspeakers to burst through the fence, telling them Israeli soldiers were fleeing their positions, even as they were reinforcing them.” Hamas has also publicly acknowledged deliberately using peaceful civilians at the protests as cover and cannon fodder for their military operations. “When we talk about ‘peaceful resistance,’ we are deceiving the public,” Hamas co-founder Mahmoud al-Zahar told an interviewer. “This is peaceful resistance bolstered by a military force and by security agencies.” (…) Widely circulated Arabic instructions on Facebook directed protesters to “bring a knife, dagger, or gun if available” and to breach the Israeli border and kidnap civilians. (The posts have now been removed by Facebook for inciting violence but a cached copy can be viewed here.) Hamas further incentivized violence by providing payments to those injured and the families of those killed. Both Hamas and the Islamic Jihad terror group have since claimed many of those killed as their own operatives and posted photos of them in uniform. On Wednesday, Hamas Political Bureau member Salah Al-Bardawil announced that 50 of the 62 fatalities were Hamas members. (…) as the BBC’s Julia MacFarlane recalled from her time covering Gaza, any public dissent against Hamas is perilous: “A boy I met in Gaza during the 2014 war was dragged from his bed at midnight, had his kneecaps shot off in a square and was told next time it would be axes—for an anti-Hamas Facebook post.” The group has publicly executed those it deems “collaborators” and broken up rare protests with gunfire. Likewise, Gazans cannot “vote Hamas out” because Hamas has not permitted elections since it won them and took power in 2006. The group fares poorly in the polls today, but Gazans have no recourse for expressing their dissatisfaction. Protesting Israel, however, is an outlet for frustration encouraged by Hamas. (…) In that regard, Hamas has worked to increase chaos and casualties stemming from the protests by allowing rioters to repeatedly set fire to the Kerem Shalom crossing, Gaza’s main avenue for international and humanitarian aid, and by turning back trucks of needed food and supplies from Israel. (…) despite the claims of viral tweets and the Hamas-run Gaza Health Ministry that were initially parroted by some in the media, Israel did not actually kill an 8-month old baby with tear gas. The Gazan doctor who treated her told the Associated Press that she died from a preexisting heart condition, a fact belatedly picked up by the New York Times and Los Angeles Times. Yair Rosenberg
On the night of May 14, … headlines suggested a causation: The U.S. opens an embassy and hence people get killed. But the causation is faulty: Gazans were killed last week, when the United States had not yet opened its embassy. Gazans were killed for a simple reason: Ignoring warnings, thousands of them decided to get too close to the Israeli border.one must begin with the obvious: The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) has no interest in having more Gazans killed, yet its mission is not to save Gazans’ lives. Its mission — remember, the IDF is a military serving a country — is to defeat an enemy. And in the case of Gaza this past week, the meaning of this was preventing unauthorized, possibly dangerous people from crossing the fence separating Israel from the Gaza Strip. Of course, any bloodshed is regretful. Yet to achieve its objectives, the IDF had to use lethal force. Circumstances on the ground dictate using such measures. The winds made tear gas ineffective. The proximity of the border made it essential to stop Gazan demonstrators from getting too close, lest thousands of them flood the fence, thus forcing the IDF to use even more lethal means. Leaflets warned them not to go near the fence. Media outlets were used to clarify that consequences could be dire. Hence, an unbiased, sincere newspaper headline should have said, “More than 50 killed in Gaza while Hamas leaders ignored warnings.” So, yes, Jerusalem celebrated while Gaza burned. Not because Gaza burned. And, yes, the U.S. moved its embassy while Gaza burned. But this is not what made Gaza burn. It all comes down to legitimacy. Having embassies move to Jerusalem, Israel’s capital, is about legitimacy. Letting Israel keep the integrity of its borders is about legitimacy. President Donald Trump gained the respect and appreciation of Israelis because of his no-nonsense acceptance of a reality, and because of his no-nonsense rejection of delegitimization masqueraded as policy differences. A legitimate country is allowed to defend its border. A legitimate country is allowed to choose its capital. Shmuel Rosner
Hamas understood early that the civilian death toll was driving international outrage at Israel, and that this, not I.E.D.s or ambushes, was the most important weapon in its arsenal. Early in that war, I complied with Hamas censorship in the form of a threat to one of our Gaza reporters and cut a key detail from an article: that Hamas fighters were disguised as civilians and were being counted as civilians in the death toll. The bureau chief later wrote that printing the truth after the threat to the reporter would have meant “jeopardizing his life.” Nonetheless, we used that same casualty toll throughout the conflict and never mentioned the manipulation. (…) Hamas understood that Western news outlets wanted a simple story about villains and victims and would stick to that script, whether because of ideological sympathy, coercion or ignorance. The press could be trusted to present dead human beings not as victims of the terrorist group that controls their lives, or of a tragic confluence of events, but of an unwarranted Israeli slaughter. The willingness of reporters to cooperate with that script gave Hamas the incentive to keep using it. (…) The next step in the evolution of this tactic was visible in Monday’s awful events. If the most effective weapon in a military campaign is pictures of civilian casualties, Hamas seems to have concluded, there’s no need for a campaign at all. All you need to do is get people killed on camera. The way to do this in Gaza, in the absence of any Israeli soldiers inside the territory, is to try to cross the Israeli border, which everyone understands is defended with lethal force and is easy to film. (…) About 40,000 people answered a call to show up. Many of them, some armed, rushed the border fence. Many Israelis, myself included, were horrified to see the number of fatalities reach 60. (…) Most Western viewers experienced these events through a visual storytelling tool: a split screen. On one side was the opening of the American embassy in Jerusalem in the presence of Ivanka Trump, evangelical Christian allies of the White House and Israel’s current political leadership — an event many here found curious and distant from our national life. On the other side was the terrible violence in the desperately poor and isolated territory. The juxtaposition was disturbing. (…) The attempts to breach the Gaza fence, which Palestinians call the March of Return, began in March and have the stated goal of erasing the border as a step toward erasing Israel. A central organizer, the Hamas leader Yehya Sinwar, exhorted participants on camera in Arabic to “tear out the hearts” of Israelis. But on Monday the enterprise was rebranded as a protest against the embassy opening, with which it was meticulously timed to coincide. The split screen, and the idea that people were dying in Gaza because of Donald Trump, was what Hamas was looking for. (…) The press coverage on Monday was a major Hamas success in a war whose battlefield isn’t really Gaza, but the brains of foreign audiences (…) Israeli soldiers facing Gaza have no good choices. They can warn people off with tear gas or rubber bullets, which are often inaccurate and ineffective, and if that doesn’t work, they can use live fire. Or they can hold their fire to spare lives and allow a breach, in which case thousands of people will surge into Israel, some of whom — the soldiers won’t know which — will be armed fighters. (On Wednesday a Hamas leader, Salah Bardawil, told a Hamas TV station that 50 of the dead were Hamas members. The militant group Islamic Jihad claimed three others.) If such a breach occurs, the death toll will be higher. And Hamas’s tactic, having proved itself, would likely be repeated by Israel’s enemies on its borders with Syria and Lebanon. (…) Knowledgeable people can debate the best way to deal with this threat. Could a different response have reduced the death toll? Or would a more aggressive response deter further actions of this kind and save lives in the long run? What are the open-fire orders on the India-Pakistan border, for example? Is there something Israel could have done to defuse things beforehand? These are good questions. But anyone following the response abroad saw that this wasn’t what was being discussed. As is often the case where Israel is concerned, things quickly became hysterical and divorced from the events themselves. Turkey’s president called it “genocide.” A writer for The New Yorker took the opportunity to tweet some of her thoughts about “whiteness and Zionism,” part of an odd trend that reads America’s racial and social problems into a Middle Eastern society 6,000 miles away. The sicknesses of the social media age — the disdain for expertise and the idea that other people are not just wrong but villainous — have crept into the worldview of people who should know better. For someone looking out from here, that’s the real split-screen effect: On one side, a complicated human tragedy in a corner of a region spinning out of control. On the other, a venomous and simplistic story, a symptom of these venomous and simplistic times. Matti Friedman
Depuis le 30 mars, le Hamas organise des violences à grande échelle à la frontière de Gaza et d’Israël. Ces embrasements majeurs ont généralement lieu le vendredi à la fin des prières dans les mosquées ; des actions concertées mobilisant des foules de 40 000 personnes ont été constatées dans cinq zones séparées le long de la frontière. Des violences et diverses actions agressives, y compris des actes de nature terroristes avec explosifs et armes à feu, ont également eu lieu à d’autres moments au cours de cette période. Le Hamas avait prévu une culmination de la violence le 14 ou le 15 mai 2018. Le 15 est la date à laquelle ils commémorent le 70ème anniversaire de la « Nakba » (« Catastrophe ») qui a eu lieu au lendemain de la création de l’Etat d’Israël. Mais une recrudescence de violence a été constatée le 14, jour de l’inauguration de la nouvelle ambassade américaine à Jérusalem. La violence a donc culminé les 14 et 15, deux jours qui coïncident avec la Nakba et l’inauguration de l’ambassade américaine, mais qui marquent aussi le début du mois de Ramadan, une période où la violence augmente au Moyen-Orient et ailleurs. Le Hamas avait prévu de mobiliser jusqu’à 200 000 personnes à la frontière de Gaza, soit un doublement et plus du nombre de manifestants constatés les années précédentes. Le Hamas semblait également déterminé à inciter à un niveau de violence jamais atteint auparavant, avec des pénétrations significatives de la barrière frontalière. Face à de tels projets, il est étonnant que les chiffres en pertes humaines ne soient pas plus élevés parmi les Palestiniens. (…) La violence à Gaza a été orchestrée sous la bannière prétexte de la « Grande marche du retour », une façon d’attirer l’attention sur ce droit au retour dans leurs foyers d’origine que les dirigeants palestiniens promettent à leur peuple. L’intention affichée n’était pas de manifester, mais de franchir en masse la frontière et de cheminer par milliers à travers l’État d’Israël. L’affirmation du « droit de retour » ne vise pas à l’exercice d’un tel « droit », lequel est fortement contesté et doit faire l’objet de négociations sur le statut définitif. Il s’inscrit dans une politique arabe de longue date destinée à éliminer l’Etat d’Israël, un projet à l’encontre duquel le gouvernement israélien s’inscrit de manière non moins systématique. Le véritable objectif de la violence du Hamas est de poursuivre sa stratégie de longue date de création et d’intensification de l’indignation internationale, de la diffamation, de l’isolement et de la criminalisation de l’État d’Israël et de ses fonctionnaires. Cette stratégie passe par la mise en scène de situations qui obligent Tsahal à réagir avec une force meurtrière qui les place aussitôt en position de tortionnaires qui tuent et blessent des civils palestiniens « innocents ». (…) Toutes ces tactiques ont pour particularité d’utiliser des boucliers humains palestiniens – des civils, des femmes et des enfants de préférence, forcés ou volontaires, présents toutes les fois que des attaques sont lancées ou commandées ; des civils présents au côté des combattants, à proximité des dépôts d’armes et de munitions. Toute riposte militaire israélienne engendre des dommages collatéraux chez les civils. Dans certains cas, notamment à l’occasion de la vague de violence actuelle, le Hamas présente ses combattants comme des civils innocents ; de nombreux faux incidents ont été mis en scène et filmés pour faire état de civils tués et blessés par les forces israéliennes ; des scènes de violence filmées ailleurs, notamment en Syrie, ont été présentés comme des violences commises contre les Palestiniens. (…) Les cibles visées – dirigeants politiques de pays tiers, organisations internationales (ONU, UE), groupes de défense des droits de l’homme et médias – n’admettent pas que l’on réponde par la force à des manifestations faussement pacifiques qu’ils sont tentés d’assimiler aux manifestations réellement pacifiques qui ont lieu dans leurs propres villes. (…) Ces manifestations sont en réalité des opérations militaires soigneusement planifiées et orchestrées. Des foules de civils auxquelles se mêlent des groupes de combattants sont rassemblées aux frontières. Combattants et civils ont pour mission de s’approcher de la clôture et de la briser. Des milliers de pneus ont été incendiés pour créer des écrans de fumée afin de dissimuler leurs mouvements en direction de la clôture (et sans grande efficacité, ils ont utilisé des miroirs pour aveugler les observateurs de la FDI et les tireurs d’élite). Les pneus enflammés et les cocktails Molotov ont également été utilisés pour briser la clôture dont certains éléments, à divers endroits, sont en en bois. Le vendredi 4 mai, environ 10 000 Palestiniens ont participé à des manifestations violentes le long de la frontière et des centaines d’émeutiers ont vandalisé et incendié la partie palestinienne de Kerem Shalom, point de passage des convois humanitaires. Ils ont endommagé des canalisations de gaz et de carburant qui partent d’Israël en direction de la bande de Gaza. Ce raid contre Kerem Shalom a eu lieu à deux reprises le 4 mai. Le même jour, deux tentatives d’infiltration ont été déjouées par les troupes de Tsahal à deux endroits différents. Trois des infiltrés ont été tués par les soldats des FDI qui défendaient la frontière. Dans certains cas, les infiltrés ont été arrêtés. Le Hamas et ses miliciens ont utilisé des grappins, des cordes, des pinces coupantes et d’autres outils pour briser la clôture. Ils ont utilisé des drones, de puissants lance-pierres capables de tuer et blesser gravement des soldats, des armes à feu, des grenades à main et des engins explosifs improvisés, à la fois pour tuer des soldats israéliens et pour passer à travers la clôture. Des cerfs-volants ont été lâchés par-dessus la frontière de Gaza afin d’incendier les cultures et l’herbe du côté israélien dans le but de causer des dommages économiques mais aussi pour tuer et mutiler. Cela peut sembler une arme primitive et même risible, mais le 4 mai, les Palestiniens avaient préparé des centaines de bombes incendiaires volantes pour les déployer en essaim en Israël, afin d’exploiter au mieux une vague de chaleur intense. (…) Jusqu’à présent, le Hamas n’a pas réussi de percée significative à travers la clôture. S’ils y arrivaient, il faut s’attendre à ce que des milliers de Gazaouis se déversent par ces brèches parmi lesquels des terroristes armés tenteraient d’atteindre les villages israéliens pour y commettre des assassinats de masse et des enlèvements. Le Hamas a tenté d’ouvrir une brèche au point-frontière le plus proche du kibboutz Nahal Oz, objectif qui pourrait être atteint en 5 minutes ou moins par des hommes armés prêts à tuer. Dans ce scénario, ou des terroristes armés sont indiscernables de civils non armés, qui eux-mêmes représentent une menace physique, il est difficile de voir comment les FDI pourraient éviter d’infliger de lourdes pertes pour défendre leur territoire et de leur population. (…) Compte tenu de leur expérience des violences passées, les FDI ont adopté une réponse graduée. Ils ont largué des milliers de tracts et ont utilisé les SMS, les médias sociaux, les appels téléphoniques et les émissions de radio pour informer les habitants de Gaza et leur demander de ne pas se rassembler à la frontière ni de s’approcher de la barrière. Ils ont contacté les propriétaires de compagnies de bus de Gaza et leur ont demandé de ne transporter personne à la frontière. La coercition exercée par le Hamas à l’encontre de la population civile a rendu ces tentatives de dissuasion inutiles. Les FDI ont alors utilisé des gaz lacrymogènes pour disperser les foules qui approchaient de trop près la clôture. Dans un effort innovant pour atteindre à plus de précision et d’efficacité, des drones ont parfois été utilisés pour disperser les gaz lacrymogènes. Mais, les gaz lacrymogènes ont une efficacité limitée dans le temps, sont sensibles aux sautes de vent, et leur impact est également réduit quand la population ciblée sait comment en atténuer les effets les plus graves. Ensuite, les forces de Tsahal ont utilisé des coups de semonce, des balles tirées au-dessus des têtes. Enfin, seulement lorsque c’était absolument nécessaire (selon leurs règles d’engagement), des munitions à balles ont été tirées dans le but de neutraliser plutôt que de tuer. Bien que tirer pour tuer eut pu passer pour une riposte légale dans certains cas, les FDI soutiennent que même dans ce cas, ils n’ont tiré que pour encapaciter (sauf dans les cas où ils avaient affaire à une attaque de type militaire, comme des tirs contre les forces de Tsahal). (…) Israël estime que 80% des personnes tuées étaient des terroristes ou des sympathisants actifs. Le prix – en vies humaines, en souffrance et réprobation de l’opinion publique internationale – a sans aucun doute été élevé ; mais la barrière n’a pas été pénétrée de manière significative et un prix encore plus élevé a donc été évité. (…) Aujourd’hui, le droit international admet l’usage de munitions réelles face à une menace sérieuse de mort ou de blessure, et quand aucun autre moyen ne permet d’y faire face. Il n’y a aucune exigence que la menace soit « immédiate » – une telle force peut être utilisée quand elle apparait « imminente »; c’est-à-dire au moment où une action agressive doit être empêchée avant qu’elle ne mute en menace immédiate. La réalité est que, dans les conditions créées délibérément par le Hamas, il n’existait aucune étape intermédiaire efficace pour éviter de tirer sur les manifestants les plus menaçants. Si ces personnes (qu’on peut difficilement appeler de simples « manifestants ») avaient été autorisées à atteindre la barrière, le risque vital serait passé d’imminent à immédiat ; il n’aurait pu être évité qu’en infligeant des pertes beaucoup plus grandes, comme il a été mentionné précédemment. Ceux qui soutiennent que Tsahal n’aurait pas dû tirer à des balles réelles, exigent en fait que des dizaines de milliers d’émeutiers violents (et parmi eux, des terroristes) soient laissés libres de faire irruption en territoire israélien. Il aurait fallu attendre avant d’agir que des civils, des forces de sécurité et des biens matériels soient en danger, alors qu’une riposte précise et ciblée contre les individus les plus menaçants a permis d’éviter à ce scénario catastrophique de devenir réalité. Certains ont également soutenu qu’ils n’existe aucune preuve de « manifestant » porteur d’une arme à feu. Ils ne comprennent pas que ce type de conflit n’oppose pas des soldats en uniforme qui s’affrontent ouvertement et en armes sur un champ de bataille. Dans ce contexte, les armes à feu ne sont pas nécessaires pour présenter une menace. En fait, c’est même le contraire compte tenu des objectifs et du mode de fonctionnement. Leurs armes sont des pinces coupantes, des grappins, des cordes, des écrans de fumée, du feu et des explosifs cachés. (…) – les armes ne surgissant qu’une fois l’objectif de pénétration massive atteint. Un soldat qui attendrait de voir une arme à feu pour tirer signerait son propre arrêt de mort, et celui des civils qu’il ou elle a pour mission de protéger. (…) Quand le chef d’état-major dit qu’il positionne « 100 tireurs d’élite à la frontière », il ne fait que verbaliser son devoir légal de défendre son pays ; il ne faut y voir aucun aveu d’une intention d’outrepasser l’usage légal de la force. Certains groupes de défense des droits de l’homme (y compris à nouveau HRW) et nombre de journalistes ont critiqué l’usage de la force par l’armée israélienne au motif qu’aucun soldat n’a été blessé. Ils en ont publiquement conclu que la riposte de Tsahal avait été « disproportionnée ». Comme cela arrive souvent quand de soi-disant experts commentent les opérations militaires occidentales, les réalités des opérations de sécurité et les impératifs légaux sont mal compris – quand ils ne sont pas déformés -. En effet, il n’est pas nécessaire d’afficher une blessure pour démontrer l’existence d’une menace réelle. Le fait que les soldats de Tsahal n’aient pas été grièvement blessés démontre seulement leur professionnalisme militaire, et non l’absence de menace. Il a également été affirmé qu’en l’absence de conflit armé, l’usage de la force à Gaza est régi par la charte internationale des droits de l’homme et non par les lois régissant les conflits militaires. Il s’agit là d’une interprétation erronée : toute la bande de Gaza est une zone de guerre définie comme telle par l’agression armée de longue date du Hamas contre l’Etat d’Israël. Par conséquent, dans cette situation, les deux types de loi sont applicables, en fonction des circonstances précises. Il est licite pour Tsahal de combattre et de tuer tout combattant ennemi identifié comme tel, n’importe où dans la bande de Gaza conformément aux lois de la guerre, que cet ennemi soit en uniforme ou non, armé ou non, représentant ou non une menace imminente, attaquant ou fuyant. Dans la pratique cependant, il apparait que face à des émeutes violentes, les FDI ont agi en supposant que tous les acteurs sur le terrain étaient des civils (contre lesquels il n’est pas nécessaire de recourir à la force létale au premier recours) à moins que l’évidence démontre le contraire. (…) Toutes ces fausses critiques de l’action israélienne, ainsi que les menaces d’enquêtes internationales, de renvoi d’Israël devant la CPI et de recours à une juridiction universelle contre les responsables israéliens impliqués dans cette situation, font le jeu du Hamas. Ils valident l’utilisation de boucliers humains et la stratégie du Hamas d’obliger au meurtre de leurs propres civils. Les implications débordent largement ce conflit. Comme l’ont démontré de précédents épisodes de violence, les réactions internationales de ce type, y compris une condamnation injuste, généralisent ces tactiques et augmentent le nombre de morts parmi les civils innocents dans le monde entier. (…) La nouvelle tactique du Hamas a eu beaucoup de succès en dressant contre Israël des personnalités de la communauté internationale et en endommageant sa réputation. Il est probable que les effets continueront à se faire sentir longtemps après la fin de cette vague de violence. Richard Kemp

Attention: une effroyable imposture peut en cacher une autre !

En ces temps étranges où l’on voit des manipulations et des complots partout …

Et où à coup d’images juxtaposées nos médiasfaussaires notoires compris – et nos belles âmes rivalisent d’ingéniosité …

Pour noircir – jusqu’à regretter qu’il n’ait pas de morts de son côté – le seul pays que vous savez et son actuel et rare défenseur à la Maison Blanche …

Pendant que dans l’enthousiasme d’un « succès » médiatique aussi inespéré mais aussi la menace directe de frappes directes sur leurs bunkers dissimulés sous les hôpitaux de Gaza …

Les cyniques tireurs de ficelle du Hamas peuvent se payer le luxe de lever temporairement la mobilisation de leur chair à canon …

Et de révéler – en arabe pour motiver les troupes et ne pas trop effrayer leurs nombreux idiots utiles occidentaux – une partie même de la réalité de leur prétendues manifestations pacifiques …

Comment ne pas s’étonner …

Avec le colonel à la retraite britannique Richard Kemp …

Et l’un des rares militaires occidentaux à oser mettre, contrairement à tous les autres qui se taisent ou laissent dire n’importe quoi, ses compétences de professionnel au service de la vérité …

Du peu d’intérêt que semble soulever chez nos apprentis conspirationnistes …

L’effroyable – et bien réelle – imposture à laquelle se prêtent contre le seul Etat israélien nos médias et autres bonnes âmes des organisations internationales …

Mais aussi, sans compter l’effet directement incitatif, qui n’est pas sans rappeler tant d’autres phénomènes de nature mimétique comme les fusillades scolaires, de l’intérêt médiatique et de la présence des caméras elles-mêmes …

La proprement criminelle incitation, augmentant d’autant à chaque fois le nombre des victimes collatérales, …

Qu’une telle unanimité d’injustes condamnations ne peut que générer ?

Fumée et miroirs : six semaines de violence à la frontière de Gaza
Richard Kemp
Gatestone institute
14 mai 2018
Traduction du texte original: Smoke & Mirrors: Six Weeks of Violence on the Gaza Border

Depuis le 30 mars, le Hamas organise des violences à grande échelle à la frontière de Gaza et d’Israël. Ces embrasements majeurs ont généralement lieu le vendredi à la fin des prières dans les mosquées ; des actions concertées mobilisant des foules de 40 000 personnes ont été constatées dans cinq zones séparées le long de la frontière. Des violences et diverses actions agressives, y compris des actes de nature terroristes avec explosifs et armes à feu, ont également eu lieu à d’autres moments au cours de cette période.

Une tempête parfaite

Le Hamas avait prévu une culmination de la violence le 14 ou le 15 mai 2018. Le 15 est la date à laquelle ils commémorent le 70ème anniversaire de la « Nakba » (« Catastrophe ») qui a eu lieu au lendemain de la création de l’Etat d’Israël. Mais une recrudescence de violence a été constatée le 14, jour de l’inauguration de la nouvelle ambassade américaine à Jérusalem. La violence a donc culminé les 14 et 15, deux jours qui coïncident avec la Nakba et l’inauguration de l’ambassade américaine, mais qui marquent aussi le début du mois de Ramadan, une période où la violence augmente au Moyen-Orient et ailleurs.

Le Hamas avait prévu de mobiliser jusqu’à 200 000 personnes à la frontière de Gaza, soit un doublement et plus du nombre de manifestants constatés les années précédentes. Le Hamas semblait également déterminé à inciter à un niveau de violence jamais atteint auparavant, avec des pénétrations significatives de la barrière frontalière. Face à de tels projets, il est étonnant que les chiffres en pertes humaines ne soient pas plus élevés parmi les Palestiniens.

Outre la zone frontalière, les Palestiniens ont prévu de mener des actions violentes à la même période, à Jérusalem et en Cisjordanie. Bien que le 15 mai soit considéré comme le point culminant de six semaines de violence à la frontière de Gaza, les Palestiniens ont fait savoir qu’ils entendaient maintenir un niveau de violence frontalière élevé tout au long du mois de Ramadan.

Prétexte et réalité

La violence à Gaza a été orchestrée sous la bannière prétexte de la « Grande marche du retour », une façon d’attirer l’attention sur ce droit au retour dans leurs foyers d’origine que les dirigeants palestiniens promettent à leur peuple. L’intention affichée n’était pas de manifester, mais de franchir en masse la frontière et de cheminer par milliers à travers l’État d’Israël.

L’affirmation du « droit de retour » ne vise pas à l’exercice d’un tel « droit », lequel est fortement contesté et doit faire l’objet de négociations sur le statut définitif. Il s’inscrit dans une politique arabe de longue date destinée à éliminer l’Etat d’Israël, un projet à l’encontre duquel le gouvernement israélien s’inscrit de manière non moins systématique.

Le véritable objectif de la violence du Hamas est de poursuivre sa stratégie de longue date de création et d’intensification de l’indignation internationale, de la diffamation, de l’isolement et de la criminalisation de l’État d’Israël et de ses fonctionnaires. Cette stratégie passe par la mise en scène de situations qui obligent Tsahal à réagir avec une force meurtrière qui les place aussitôt en position de tortionnaires qui tuent et blessent des civils palestiniens « innocents ».

Les tactiques terroristes du Hamas

Dans le cadre de cette stratégie, le Hamas a mis au point différentes tactiques, qui passent par des tirs de roquettes depuis Gaza sur les villes israéliennes et la construction de tunnels d’attaque sophistiqués qui débouchent au-delà de la frontière, à proximité de villages israéliens voisins. Toutes ces tactiques ont pour particularité d’utiliser des boucliers humains palestiniens – des civils, des femmes et des enfants de préférence, forcés ou volontaires, présents toutes les fois que des attaques sont lancées ou commandées ; des civils présents au côté des combattants, à proximité des dépôts d’armes et de munitions. Toute riposte militaire israélienne engendre des dommages collatéraux chez les civils.

Dans certains cas, notamment à l’occasion de la vague de violence actuelle, le Hamas présente ses combattants comme des civils innocents ; de nombreux faux incidents ont été mis en scène et filmés pour faire état de civils tués et blessés par les forces israéliennes ; des scènes de violence filmées ailleurs, notamment en Syrie, ont été présentés comme des violences commises contre les Palestiniens.

Même stratégie, nouvelles tactiques

Après les roquettes et les tunnels d’attaque utilisés dans trois conflits majeurs (2008-2009, 2012 et 2014), sans oublier plusieurs incidents mineurs, de nouvelles tactiques ont été mises au point qui ont toutes le même objectif fondamental. Les « manifestations » à grande échelle combinées à des actions agressives sont destinées à provoquer une réaction israélienne qui conduit à tuer et à blesser les civils de Gaza, malgré les efforts énergiques des FDI (Forces de défense d’Israël) pour réduire les pertes civiles.

Cette nouvelle tactique s’avère plus efficace que les roquettes et les tunnels d’attaque. Les cibles visées – dirigeants politiques de pays tiers, organisations internationales (ONU, UE), groupes de défense des droits de l’homme et médias – n’admettent pas que l’on réponde par la force à des manifestations faussement pacifiques qu’ils sont tentés d’assimiler aux manifestations réellement pacifiques qui ont lieu dans leurs propres villes.

Comme à leur habitude, ces cibles-là se montrent toujours disposées à se laisser leurrer par ce stratagème. Depuis le début de cette vague de violence, des condamnations véhémentes ont été émises par l’ONU, l’UE et la CPI ; mais aussi plusieurs gouvernements et organisations des droits de l’homme, notamment Amnesty International et Human Rights Watch ; sans parler de nombreux journaux et stations de radio. Leurs protestations incluent des demandes d’enquête internationale sur les allégations de meurtres illégaux ainsi que des accusations de violation du droit humanitaire international et des droits de l’homme par les FDI.

Les tactiques du Hamas sur le terrain

Ces manifestations sont en réalité des opérations militaires soigneusement planifiées et orchestrées. Des foules de civils auxquelles se mêlent des groupes de combattants sont rassemblées aux frontières. Combattants et civils ont pour mission de s’approcher de la clôture et de la briser. Des milliers de pneus ont été incendiés pour créer des écrans de fumée afin de dissimuler leurs mouvements en direction de la clôture (et sans grande efficacité, ils ont utilisé des miroirs pour aveugler les observateurs de la FDI et les tireurs d’élite). Les pneus enflammés et les cocktails Molotov ont également été utilisés pour briser la clôture dont certains éléments, à divers endroits, sont en en bois.

Le vendredi 4 mai, environ 10 000 Palestiniens ont participé à des manifestations violentes le long de la frontière et des centaines d’émeutiers ont vandalisé et incendié la partie palestinienne de Kerem Shalom, point de passage des convois humanitaires. Ils ont endommagé des canalisations de gaz et de carburant qui partent d’Israël en direction de la bande de Gaza. Ce raid contre Kerem Shalom a eu lieu à deux reprises le 4 mai. Le même jour, deux tentatives d’infiltration ont été déjoues par les troupes de Tsahal à deux endroits différents. Trois des infiltrés ont été tués par les soldats des FDI qui défendaient la frontière. Dans certains cas, les infiltrés ont été arrêtés.

Le Hamas et ses miliciens ont utilisé des grappins, des cordes, des pinces coupantes et d’autres outils pour briser la clôture. Ils ont utilisé des drones, de puissants lance-pierres capables de tuer et blesser gravement des soldats, des armes à feu, des grenades à main et des engins explosifs improvisés, à la fois pour tuer des soldats israéliens et pour passer à travers la clôture.

Cerfs-volants et ballons incendiaires

Des cerfs-volants ont été lâchés par-dessus la frontière de Gaza afin d’incendier les cultures et l’herbe du côté israélien dans le but de causer des dommages économiques mais aussi pour tuer et mutiler. Cela peut sembler une arme primitive et même risible, mais le 4 mai, les Palestiniens avaient préparé des centaines de bombes incendiaires volantes pour les déployer en essaim en Israël, afin d’exploiter au mieux une vague de chaleur intense. Seules des conditions de vent défavorables ont empêché le déploiement de ces cerfs-volants empêchant ainsi des dommages sérieux potentiels.

Dans plusieurs cas, les cerfs-volants en feu ont provoqué des incendies. Ainsi, le 16 avril, un champ de blé a été incendié côté israélien. Le 2 mai, un cerf-volant incendiaire parti de Gaza a provoqué un incendie majeur dans la forêt de Be’eri dévastant de vastes zones boisées. Dix équipes de pompiers ont été nécessaires pour juguler l’incendie. Des ballons incendiaires ont également été utilisés par le Hamas, notamment le 7 mai, l’un d’eux a réussi à incendier un champ de blé près de la forêt de Be’eri. Israël évalue à plusieurs millions de shekels, les dommages économiques résultants des incendies causés par les cerfs-volants et les ballons.

Si le Hamas a traversé

Jusqu’à présent, le Hamas n’a pas réussi de percée significative à travers la clôture. S’ils y arrivaient, il faut s’attendre à ce que des milliers de Gazaouis se déversent par ces brèches parmi lesquels des terroristes armés tenteraient d’atteindre les villages israéliens pour y commettre des assassinats de masse et des enlèvements.

Le Hamas a tenté d’ouvrir une brèche au point-frontière le plus proche du kibboutz Nahal Oz, objectif qui pourrait être atteint en 5 minutes ou moins par des hommes armés prêts à tuer.

Dans ce scénario, ou des terroristes armés sont indiscernables de civils non armés, qui eux-mêmes représentent une menace physique, il est difficile de voir comment les FDI pourraient éviter d’infliger de lourdes pertes pour défendre leur territoire et de leur population.

Forces de défense d’Israel (IDF) : une risposte graduée

Les FDI ont été obligées d’agir avec une grande fermeté – pour empêcher toute pénétration – y compris à l’aide de tirs réels (qui ont parfois été meurtriers) et malgré une condamnation internationale lourde et inévitable.

Compte tenu de leur expérience des violences passées, les FDI ont adopté une réponse graduée. Ils ont largué des milliers de tracts et ont utilisé les SMS, les médias sociaux, les appels téléphoniques et les émissions de radio pour informer les habitants de Gaza et leur demander de ne pas se rassembler à la frontière ni de s’approcher de la barrière. Ils ont contacté les propriétaires de compagnies de bus de Gaza et leur ont demandé de ne transporter personne à la frontière.

La coercition exercée par le Hamas à l’encontre de la population civile a rendu ces tentatives de dissuasion inutiles. Les FDI ont alors utilisé des gaz lacrymogènes pour disperser les foules qui approchaient de trop près la clôture. Dans un effort innovant pour atteindre à plus de précision et d’efficacité, des drones ont parfois été utilisés pour disperser les gaz lacrymogènes. Mais, les gaz lacrymogènes ont une efficacité limitée dans le temps, sont sensibles aux sautes de vent, et leur impact est également réduit quand la population ciblée sait comment en atténuer les effets les plus graves.

Ensuite, les forces de Tsahal ont utilisé des coups de semonce, des balles tirées au-dessus des têtes. Enfin, seulement lorsque c’était absolument nécessaire (selon leurs règles d’engagement), des munitions à balles ont été tirées dans le but de neutraliser plutôt que de tuer. Bien que tirer pour tuer eut pu passer pour une riposte légale dans certains cas, les FDI soutiennent que même dans ce cas, ils n’ont tiré que pour encapaciter (sauf dans les cas où ils avaient affaire à une attaque de type militaire, comme des tirs contre les forces de Tsahal). Dans tous les cas, les forces de Tsahal fonctionnent selon des procédures opérationnelles standard, rédigées en fonction des circonstances et compilées en collaboration avec diverses autorités des FDI.

Néanmoins, ces échanges de tirs ont généré des morts et de nombreux blessés. Les autorités palestiniennes affirment qu’une cinquantaine de personnes ont été tuées jusqu’à présent et que plusieurs centaines d’autres ont été blessées. Israël estime que 80% des personnes tuées étaient des terroristes ou des sympathisants actifs. Le prix – en vies humaines, en souffrance et réprobation de l’opinion publique internationale – a sans aucun doute été élevé ; mais la barrière n’a pas été pénétrée de manière significative et un prix encore plus élevé a donc été évité.

Condamnation internationale, aucune solution

Beaucoup ont estimé qu’Israël n’aurait pas dû répondre comme il l’a fait à la menace. Mladenov, envoyé des Nations Unies au Moyen-Orient, a jugé la riposte d’Israël « scandaleuse ». Le Haut-Commissaire des Nations Unies aux droits de l’homme, Zeid Ra’ad al-Hussein, a condamné l’usage d’une « force excessive ». Le Procureur de la Cour pénale internationale, Fatou Bensouda, a affirmé que « la violence contre les civils – dans une situation comme celle qui prévaut à Gaza – pourrait constituer un crime au regard du Statut de Rome de la CPI ».

Pourtant, en dépit de leurs condamnations, aucun de ces fonctionnaires et experts, n’a été en mesure de proposer une riposte adaptée viable pour empêcher le franchissement violent des frontières israéliennes.

Certains affirment que les troupes israéliennes ont fait un usage de la force disproportionné en tirant à balles réelles sur des manifestants qui ne menaçaient personne. L’UE a ainsi exprimé son inquiétude sur l’utilisation de balles réelles par les forces de sécurité israéliennes. Mais les soi-disant « manifestants » représentaient une menace vitale réelle.

Aujourd’hui, le droit international admet l’usage de munitions réelles face à une menace sérieuse de mort ou de blessure, et quand aucun autre moyen ne permet d’y faire face. Il n’y a aucune exigence que la menace soit « immédiate » – une telle force peut être utilisée quand elle apparait « imminente »; c’est-à-dire au moment où une action agressive doit être empêchée avant qu’elle ne mute en menace immédiate.

La réalité est que, dans les conditions créées délibérément par le Hamas, il n’existait aucune étape intermédiaire efficace pour éviter de tirer sur les manifestants les plus menaçants. Si ces personnes (qu’on peut difficilement appeler de simples « manifestants ») avaient été autorisées à atteindre la barrière, le risque vital serait passé d’imminent à immédiat ; il n’aurait pu être évité qu’en infligeant des pertes beaucoup plus grandes, comme il a été mentionné précédemment.

Échec de la compréhension par la communauté internationale

Ceux qui soutiennent que Tsahal n’aurait pas dû tirer à des balles réelles, exigent en fait que des dizaines de milliers d’émeutiers violents (et parmi eux, des terroristes) soient laissés libres de faire irruption en territoire israélien. Il aurait fallu attendre avant d’agir que des civils, des forces de sécurité et des biens matériels soient en danger, alors qu’une riposte précise et ciblée contre les individus les plus menaçants a permis d’éviter à ce scénario catastrophique de devenir réalité.

Certains ont également soutenu qu’ils n’existe aucune preuve de « manifestant » porteur d’une arme à feu. Ils ne comprennent pas que ce type de conflit n’oppose pas des soldats en uniforme qui s’affrontent ouvertement et en armes sur un champ de bataille. Dans ce contexte, les armes à feu ne sont pas nécessaires pour présenter une menace. En fait, c’est même le contraire compte tenu des objectifs et du mode de fonctionnement. Leurs armes sont des pinces coupantes, des grappins, des cordes, des écrans de fumée, du feu et des explosifs cachés.

Le Hamas a passé des années et dépensé des millions de dollars à creuser des tunnels d’attaque souterrains pour tenter d’entrer en Israël – une menace sérieuse qui implique des pelles, pas des armes à feu. Tout en continuant à creuser des tunnels, ils ont agi au grand jour mais fondus au sein d’une population civile utilisée couverture – les armes ne surgissant qu’une fois l’objectif de pénétration massive atteint. Un soldat qui attendrait de voir une arme à feu pour tirer signerait son propre arrêt de mort, et celui des civils qu’il ou elle a pour mission de protéger.

Des critiques ont été formulées (en particulier par Human Rights Watch) à l’encontre de responsables israéliens qui auraient sciemment accordé leur feu vert aux agissements illégaux des soldats. Par exemple, HRW cite comme preuve certains commentaires publics du chef d’état-major de Tsahal, du porte-parole du Premier ministre et du ministre de la Défense.

Il ne leur est sans doute pas venu à l’esprit que ces fonctionnaires exercent leur autorité par des canaux de communication privés et non à travers des médias publics. Par ailleurs, leurs commentaires ne sont pas des instructions aux troupes mais des avertissements lancés aux civils de Gaza pour réduire le niveau de violence et apaiser les craintes légitimes des Israéliens vivant en zone frontalière. Quand le chef d’état-major dit qu’il positionne « 100 tireurs d’élite à la frontière », il ne fait que verbaliser son devoir légal de défendre son pays ; il ne faut y voir aucun aveu d’une intention d’outrepasser l’usage légal de la force.

Certains groupes de défense des droits de l’homme (y compris à nouveau HRW) et nombre de journalistes ont critiqué l’usage de la force par l’armée israélienne au motif qu’aucun soldat n’a été blessé. Ils en ont publiquement conclu que la riposte de Tsahal avait été « disproportionnée ». Comme cela arrive souvent quand de soi-disant experts commentent les opérations militaires occidentales, les réalités des opérations de sécurité et les impératifs légaux sont mal compris – quand ils ne sont pas déformés -. En effet, il n’est pas nécessaire d’afficher une blessure pour démontrer l’existence d’une menace réelle. Le fait que les soldats de Tsahal n’aient pas été grièvement blessés démontre seulement leur professionnalisme militaire, et non l’absence de menace.

Il a également été affirmé qu’en l’absence de conflit armé, l’usage de la force à Gaza est régi par la charte internationale des droits de l’homme et non par les lois régissant les conflits militaires. Il s’agit là d’une interprétation erronée : toute la bande de Gaza est une zone de guerre définie comme telle par l’agression armée de longue date du Hamas contre l’Etat d’Israël. Par conséquent, dans cette situation, les deux types de loi sont applicables, en fonction des circonstances précises.

Il est licite pour Tsahal de combattre et de tuer tout combattant ennemi identifié comme tel, n’importe où dans la bande de Gaza conformément aux lois de la guerre, que cet ennemi soit en uniforme ou non, armé ou non, représentant ou non une menace imminente, attaquant ou fuyant. Dans la pratique cependant, il apparait que face à des émeutes violentes, les FDI ont agi en supposant que tous les acteurs sur le terrain étaient des civils (contre lesquels il n’est pas nécessaire de recourir à la force létale au premier recours) à moins que l’évidence démontre le contraire.

Faire le jeu du Hamas

Nombreux aussi ont été ceux qui ont affirmé que le gouvernement israélien a refusé de mener une enquête officielle sur les décès survenus. Encore une fois l’assertion est complètement fausse. Les Israéliens ont déclaré qu’ils examineraient les incidents sur la base de leur système juridique, lequel jouit d’un respect unanime au plan international. En revanche, le gouvernement israélien a explicitement refusé une enquête internationale, tout comme les Etats-Unis, le Royaume-Uni ou toute autre démocratie occidentale l’aurait fait dans la même situation.

Toutes ces fausses critiques de l’action israélienne, ainsi que les menaces d’enquêtes internationales, de renvoi d’Israël devant la CPI et de recours à une juridiction universelle contre les responsables israéliens impliqués dans cette situation, font le jeu du Hamas. Ils valident l’utilisation de boucliers humains et la stratégie du Hamas d’obliger au meurtre de leurs propres civils. Les implications débordent largement ce conflit. Comme l’ont démontré de précédents épisodes de violence, les réactions internationales de ce type, y compris une condamnation injuste, généralisent ces tactiques et augmentent le nombre de morts parmi les civils innocents dans le monde entier.

Plus de violence à venir ?

Cette campagne du Hamas peut entraîner des pertes massives dans la population palestinienne. Il est non moins probable que la condamnation des médias, des organisations internationales et des groupes de défense des droits de l’homme va se généraliser. Ceux qui ont un agenda anti-américain et anti-israélien lieront inévitablement cette violence à la décision du président Trump d’ouvrir l’ambassade américaine à Jérusalem.

Action future

La nouvelle tactique du Hamas a eu beaucoup de succès en dressant contre Israël des personnalités de la communauté internationale et en endommageant sa réputation. Il est probable que les effets continueront à se faire sentir longtemps après la fin de cette vague de violence.

Il faut s’attendre à des condamnations supplémentaires de la part d’acteurs internationaux, tels que les divers organismes des Nations Unies, ainsi que des rapports spécifiques produits par des rapporteurs spéciaux des Nations Unies. Des tentatives d’inciter le Procureur de la CPI à examiner ces incidents auront lieu, ainsi que des initiatives de procédures judiciaires lancées par différents États (en utilisant la « compétence universelle ») pour tenter de diffamer et même d’arrêter des responsables militaires et des politiciens israéliens.

Inévitablement, le Hamas et d’autres groupes palestiniens vont renouveler cette tactique à l’avenir. Pour atténuer cela, Israël se prépare à renforcer la frontière de Gaza pour rendre toute tentative de pénétration plus difficile sans recourir à la force létale. (Ils travaillent déjà sur une barrière souterraine pour empêcher la pénétration par effet tunnel.) Cependant, il s’agit d’un projet à long terme et la possibilité d’étanchéifier la frontière au point de la rendre impénétrable demande à être clarifiée.

En outre, Tsahal porte aujourd’hui une attention accrue aux armes non létales. Mais en dépit d’importantes recherches menées au plan international, aucun système viable et efficace ne peut fonctionner dans de telles circonstances.

Les amis et alliés d’Israël peuvent agir pour contrer la propagande anti-israélienne du Hamas, et faire pression sur les dirigeants politiques, les groupes de défense des droits de l’homme, les organisations internationales et les médias pour éviter une fausse condamnation d’Israël ; il faut également lutter contre les réclamations d’une action internationale comme d’une enquête unilatérale des Nations Unies et ses résolutions. Un tel rejet, de préférence accompagné d’une forte condamnation de la tactique violente du Hamas, pourrait contribuer à décourager l’utilisation de tels plans d’action. Bien entendu, face à un agenda anti-israélien aussi profondément enraciné, de telles recommandations sont plus faciles à formuler qu’à mettre en pratique.

Le colonel Richard Kemp commandait les forces britanniques en Irlande du Nord, en Afghanistan, en Irak et dans les Balkans. Cette analyse a été publiée à l’origine sur le site Web de HIGH LEVEL MILITARY GROUP. Elle est reproduite ici avec l’aimable autorisation de l’auteur.

Voir aussi:

Falling for Hamas’s Split-Screen Fallacy

Matti Friedman

Mr. Friedman, a journalist, is the author of the memoir “Pumpkinflowers: A Soldier’s Story of a Forgotten War.”

JERUSALEM — During my years in the international press here in Israel, long before the bloody events of this week, I came to respect Hamas for its keen ability to tell a story.

At the end of 2008 I was a desk editor, a local hire in The Associated Press’s Jerusalem bureau, during the first serious round of violence in Gaza after Hamas took it over the year before. That conflict was grimly similar to the American campaign in Iraq, in which a modern military fought in crowded urban confines against fighters concealed among civilians. Hamas understood early that the civilian death toll was driving international outrage at Israel, and that this, not I.E.D.s or ambushes, was the most important weapon in its arsenal.

Early in that war, I complied with Hamas censorship in the form of a threat to one of our Gaza reporters and cut a key detail from an article: that Hamas fighters were disguised as civilians and were being counted as civilians in the death toll. The bureau chief later wrote that printing the truth after the threat to the reporter would have meant “jeopardizing his life.” Nonetheless, we used that same casualty toll throughout the conflict and never mentioned the manipulation.

Hamas understood that Western news outlets wanted a simple story about villains and victims and would stick to that script, whether because of ideological sympathy, coercion or ignorance. The press could be trusted to present dead human beings not as victims of the terrorist group that controls their lives, or of a tragic confluence of events, but of an unwarranted Israeli slaughter. The willingness of reporters to cooperate with that script gave Hamas the incentive to keep using it.

The next step in the evolution of this tactic was visible in Monday’s awful events. If the most effective weapon in a military campaign is pictures of civilian casualties, Hamas seems to have concluded, there’s no need for a campaign at all. All you need to do is get people killed on camera. The way to do this in Gaza, in the absence of any Israeli soldiers inside the territory, is to try to cross the Israeli border, which everyone understands is defended with lethal force and is easy to film.

About 40,000 people answered a call to show up. Many of them, some armed, rushed the border fence. Many Israelis, myself included, were horrified to see the number of fatalities reach 60.

Most Western viewers experienced these events through a visual storytelling tool: a split screen. On one side was the opening of the American embassy in Jerusalem in the presence of Ivanka Trump, evangelical Christian allies of the White House and Israel’s current political leadership — an event many here found curious and distant from our national life. On the other side was the terrible violence in the desperately poor and isolated territory. The juxtaposition was disturbing.

The attempts to breach the Gaza fence, which Palestinians call the March of Return, began in March and have the stated goal of erasing the border as a step toward erasing Israel. A central organizer, the Hamas leader Yehya Sinwar, exhorted participants on camera in Arabic to “tear out the hearts” of Israelis. But on Monday the enterprise was rebranded as a protest against the embassy opening, with which it was meticulously timed to coincide. The split screen, and the idea that people were dying in Gaza because of Donald Trump, was what Hamas was looking for.

The press coverage on Monday was a major Hamas success in a war whose battlefield isn’t really Gaza, but the brains of foreign audiences.

Israeli soldiers facing Gaza have no good choices. They can warn people off with tear gas or rubber bullets, which are often inaccurate and ineffective, and if that doesn’t work, they can use live fire. Or they can hold their fire to spare lives and allow a breach, in which case thousands of people will surge into Israel, some of whom — the soldiers won’t know which — will be armed fighters. (On Wednesday a Hamas leader, Salah Bardawil, told a Hamas TV station that 50 of the dead were Hamas members. The militant group Islamic Jihad claimed three others.) If such a breach occurs, the death toll will be higher. And Hamas’s tactic, having proved itself, would likely be repeated by Israel’s enemies on its borders with Syria and Lebanon.

Knowledgeable people can debate the best way to deal with this threat. Could a different response have reduced the death toll? Or would a more aggressive response deter further actions of this kind and save lives in the long run? What are the open-fire orders on the India-Pakistan border, for example? Is there something Israel could have done to defuse things beforehand?

These are good questions. But anyone following the response abroad saw that this wasn’t what was being discussed. As is often the case where Israel is concerned, things quickly became hysterical and divorced from the events themselves. Turkey’s president called it “genocide.” A writer for The New Yorker took the opportunity to tweet some of her thoughts about “whiteness and Zionism,” part of an odd trend that reads America’s racial and social problems into a Middle Eastern society 6,000 miles away. The sicknesses of the social media age — the disdain for expertise and the idea that other people are not just wrong but villainous — have crept into the worldview of people who should know better.

For someone looking out from here, that’s the real split-screen effect: On one side, a complicated human tragedy in a corner of a region spinning out of control. On the other, a venomous and simplistic story, a symptom of these venomous and simplistic times.

Voir encore:

The cacophony that accompanies every upsurge in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict can make it seem impossible for outsiders to sort out the facts. Recent events in Gaza are no exception. The shrillest voices on each side are already offering their own mutually exclusive narratives that acknowledge some realities while scrupulously avoiding others.

But while certain facts about Gaza may be inconvenient for the loudest partisans on either side, they should not be inconvenient to the rest of us.

To that end, here are 13 complicated, messy, true things about what has been happening in Gaza. They do not conform to one political narrative or another, and they do not attempt to conclusively apportion all blame. Try, as best you can, to hold them all in your mind at the same time.

1. The protests on Monday were not about President Donald Trump moving the U.S. Embassy to Jerusalem, and have in fact been occurring weekly on the Gaza border since March. They are part of what the demonstrators have dubbed “The Great March of Return”—return, that is, to what is now Israel. (The Monday demonstration was scheduled months ago to coincide with Nakba Day, an annual occasion of protest; it was later moved up 24 hours to grab some of the media attention devoted to the embassy.) The fact that these long-standing Palestinian protests were mischaracterized by many in the media as simply a response to Trump obscured two disquieting realities: First, that the world has largely dismissed the genuine plight of Palestinians in Gaza, only bothering to pay attention to it when it could be tenuously connected to Trump. Second, that many Palestinians do not simply desire their own state and an end to the occupation and settlements that began in 1967, but an end to the Jewish state that began in 1948.

2. The Israeli blockade of Gaza goes well beyond what is necessary for Israel’s security, and in many cases can be capricious and self-defeating. Import and export restrictions on food and produce have seesawed over the years, with what is permitted one year forbidden the next, making it difficult for Gazan farmers to plan for the future. Restrictions on movement between Gaza, the West Bank, and beyond can be similarly overbroad, preventing not simply potential terrorist operatives from traveling, but families and students. In one of the more infamous instances, the U.S. State Department was forced to withdraw all Fulbright awards to students in Gaza after Israel did not grant them permission to leave. Today, official policy bars Gazans from traveling abroad unless they commit to not returning for a full year. It is past time that these issues be addressed, as outlined in part in a new letter from several prominent senators, including Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren.

3. Hamas, which controls the Gaza Strip, is an authoritarian, theocratic regime that has called for Jewish genocide in its charter, murdered scores of Israeli civilians, repressed Palestinian women, and harshly persecuted religious and sexual minorities. It is a designated terrorist group by the United States, Canada, and the European Union.

4. The overbearing Israeli blockade has helped impoverish Gaza. So has Hamas’s utter failure to govern and provide for the basic needs of the enclave’s people. Whether it has been spending its manpower and millions of dollars on subterranean attack tunnels into Israel—including under United Nations schools for Gaza’s children—or launching repeated messianic military operations against Israel, the terrorist group has consistently prioritized the deaths of Israelis over the lives of its Palestinian brethren.

5. Many of the thousands of protesters on the Gaza border, both on Monday and in weeks previous, were peaceful and unarmed, as anyone looking at the photos and videos of the gatherings can see.

6. Hamas manipulated many of these demonstrators into unwittingly rushing the Israeli border fence under false pretenses in order to produce injuries and fatalities. As the New York Times reported, “After midday prayers, clerics and leaders of militant factions in Gaza, led by Hamas, urged thousands of worshipers to join the protests. The fence had already been breached, they said falsely, claiming Palestinians were flooding into Israel.” Similarly, the Washington Post recounted how “organizers urged protesters over loudspeakers to burst through the fence, telling them Israeli soldiers were fleeing their positions, even as they were reinforcing them.” Hamas has also publicly acknowledged deliberately using peaceful civilians at the protests as cover and cannon fodder for their military operations. “When we talk about ‘peaceful resistance,’ we are deceiving the public,” Hamas co-founder Mahmoud al-Zahar told an interviewer. “This is peaceful resistance bolstered by a military force and by security agencies.”

7. A significant number of the protesters were armed, which is how they did things like this:

Widely circulated Arabic instructions on Facebook directed protesters to “bring a knife, dagger, or gun if available” and to breach the Israeli border and kidnap civilians. (The posts have now been removed by Facebook for inciting violence but a cached copy can be viewed here.) Hamas further incentivized violence by providing payments to those injured and the families of those killed. Both Hamas and the Islamic Jihad terror group have since claimed many of those killed as their own operatives and posted photos of them in uniform. On Wednesday, Hamas Political Bureau member Salah Al-Bardawil announced that 50 of the 62 fatalities were Hamas members.

Contrary to certain Israeli talking points, however, these facts do not automatically justify any particular Israeli response or every Palestinian casualty or injury. They simply establish the reality of the threat.

8. It is facile to argue that Gazans should be protesting Hamas and its misrule instead of Israel. One, it is not a binary choice, as both actors have contributed to Gaza’s misery. Two, as the BBC’s Julia MacFarlane recalled from her time covering Gaza, any public dissent against Hamas is perilous: “A boy I met in Gaza during the 2014 war was dragged from his bed at midnight, had his kneecaps shot off in a square and was told next time it would be axes—for an anti-Hamas Facebook post.” The group has publicly executed those it deems “collaborators” and broken up rare protests with gunfire. Likewise, Gazans cannot “vote Hamas out” because Hamas has not permitted elections since it won them and took power in 2006. The group fares poorly in the polls today, but Gazans have no recourse for expressing their dissatisfaction. Protesting Israel, however, is an outlet for frustration encouraged by Hamas.

9. In that regard, Hamas has worked to increase chaos and casualties stemming from the protests by allowing rioters to repeatedly set fire to the Kerem Shalom crossing, Gaza’s main avenue for international and humanitarian aid, and by turning back trucks of needed food and supplies from Israel.

10. A lot of what you’re seeing on social media about what is transpiring in Gaza isn’t actually true. For instance, a video of a Palestinian “martyr” allegedly moving under his shroud that is circulating in pro-Israel circles is actually a 4-year old clip from Egypt. Likewise, despite the claims of viral tweets and the Hamas-run Gaza Health Ministry that were initially parroted by some in the media, Israel did not actually kill an 8-month old baby with tear gas. The Gazan doctor who treated her told the Associated Press that she died from a preexisting heart condition, a fact belatedly picked up by the New York Times and Los Angeles Times. In the era of fake news, readers should be especially vigilant about resharing unconfirmed content simply because it confirms their biases.

11. There are constructive solutions to Gaza’s problems that would alleviate the plight of its Palestinian population while assuaging the security concerns of Israelis. However, these useful proposals do not go viral like angry tweets ranting about how Palestinians are all de facto terrorists or Israelis are the new Nazis, which is one reason why you probably have never heard of them.

12. A truly independent, respected inquiry into Israel’s tactics and rules of engagement in Gaza is necessary to ensure any abuses are punished and create internationally recognized guidelines for how Israel and other state actors should deal with these situations on their borders. The United Nations, which annually condemns Israel in its General Assembly and Human Rights Council more than all other countries combined, and whose notorious bias against Israel was famously condemned by Obama ambassador to the U.N., Samantha Power, clearly lacks the credibility to administer such an inquiry. Between America, Canada, and Europe, however, it should be possible to create one.

13. But because the entire debate around Israel’s conduct has been framed by absolutists who insist either that Israel is utterly blameless or that Israel is wantonly massacring random Palestinians for sport, a reasonable inquiry into what it did correctly and what it did not is unlikely to happen.

***

You can help support Tablet’s unique brand of Jewish journalism. Click here to donate today.

Voir également:

Jerusalem Celebrates, Gaza Burns

On the night of May 14, the leading headline of The Washington Post said, “More than 50 killed in Gaza protests as U.S. opens its new embassy in Jerusalem.” Headlines of other newspapers were not much different.

There is no doubt the headlines were factually accurate. But so would a headline saying, “More than 50 killed in Gaza as the moon was a waning crescent,” or “More than 50 killed in Gaza as Arambulo named co-anchor of NBC4’s ‘Today in LA.’ ” Were they unbiased? Not quite. They suggested a causation: The U.S. opens an embassy and hence people get killed. But the causation is faulty: Gazans were killed last week, when the United States had not yet opened its embassy. Gazans were killed for a simple reason: Ignoring warnings, thousands of them decided to get too close to the Israeli border.

There are arguments one could make against President Donald Trump’s decision to move the American embassy to Jerusalem. People in Gaza getting killed is not one of them. A country such as the United States, a country such as Israel, cannot curb strategic decisions because of inconveniences such as demonstrations. Small things can be postponed to prevent anger. Small decisions can be altered to avoid violent incidents. But not important, historic moves.

At the end of this week, no matter the final tally of Gazans getting hurt, only one event will be counted as “historic.” The opening of a U.S. embassy in Jerusalem is a historic decision of great symbolic significance. Lives lost for no good reason in Gaza — as saddening as it is — is routine. Eleven years ago, on  May 16, 2007, I wrote this about Gaza: “The Gaza Strip is burning, drifting into chaos, turning into hell — and nobody seems to have a way out of this mess. Dozens of people were killed in Gaza in the last couple of weeks, the victims of lawlessness and power struggles between clans and families, gangsters and militias.” Sounds familiar? I assume it does. This is what routine looks like. This is what disregard for human life feels like. And that was 11 years to the week before a U.S. embassy was moved to Jerusalem.

Why were so many lives lost in Gaza? To give a straight answer, one must begin with the obvious: The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) has no interest in having more Gazans killed, yet its mission is not to save Gazans’ lives. Its mission — remember, the IDF is a military serving a country — is to defeat an enemy. And in the case of Gaza this past week, the meaning of this was preventing unauthorized, possibly dangerous people from crossing the fence separating Israel from the Gaza Strip.

As this column was written, the afternoon of May 15, the IDF had achieved its objective: No one was able to cross the border into Israel. The price was high. It was high for the Palestinians. Israel will get its unfair share of criticism from people who have nothing to offer but words of condemnation. This was also to be expected. And also to be ignored. Again, not because criticism means nothing, but rather because there are things of higher importance to worry about. Such as not letting unauthorized hostile people cross into Israel.

Of course, any bloodshed is regretful. Yet to achieve its objectives, the IDF had to use lethal force. Circumstances on the ground dictate using such measures. The winds made tear gas ineffective. The proximity of the border made it essential to stop Gazan demonstrators from getting too close, lest thousands of them flood the fence, thus forcing the IDF to use even more lethal means. Leaflets warned them not to go near the fence. Media outlets were used to clarify that consequences could be dire. Hence, an unbiased, sincere newspaper headline should have said, “More than 50 killed in Gaza while Hamas leaders ignored warnings.”

So, yes, Jerusalem celebrated while Gaza burned. Not because Gaza burned. And, yes, the U.S. moved its embassy while Gaza burned. But this is not what made Gaza burn.

It all comes down to legitimacy. Having embassies move to Jerusalem, Israel’s capital, is about legitimacy. Letting Israel keep the integrity of its borders is about legitimacy. President Donald Trump gained the respect and appreciation of Israelis because of his no-nonsense acceptance of a reality, and because of his no-nonsense rejection of delegitimization masqueraded as policy differences. A legitimate country is allowed to defend its border. A legitimate country is allowed to choose its capital.

Gaza’s Miseries Have Palestinian Authors
Bret Stephens

The New York Times
May 16, 2018

For the third time in two weeks, Palestinians in the Gaza Strip have set fire to the Kerem Shalom border crossing, through which they get medicine, fuel and other humanitarian essentials from Israel. Soon we’ll surely hear a great deal about the misery of Gaza. Try not to forget that the authors of that misery are also the presumptive victims.

There’s a pattern here — harm yourself, blame the other — and it deserves to be highlighted amid the torrent of morally blind, historically illiterate criticism to which Israelis are subjected every time they defend themselves against violent Palestinian attack.

In 1970, Israel set up an industrial zone along the border with Gaza to promote economic cooperation and provide Palestinians with jobs. It had to be shut down in 2004 amid multiple terrorist attacks that left 11 Israelis dead.

In 2005, Jewish-American donors forked over $14 million dollars to pay for greenhouses that had been used by Israeli settlers until the government of Ariel Sharon withdrew from the Strip. Palestinians looted dozens of the greenhouses almost immediately upon Israel’s exit.

In 2007, Hamas took control of Gaza in a bloody coup against its rivals in the Fatah faction. Since then, Hamas, Islamic Jihad and other terrorist groups in the Strip have fired nearly 10,000 rockets and mortars from Gaza into Israel — all the while denouncing an economic “blockade” that is Israel’s refusal to feed the mouth that bites it. (Egypt and the Palestinian Authority also participate in the same blockade, to zero international censure.)

In 2014 Israel discovered that Hamas had built 32 tunnels under the Gaza border to kidnap or kill Israelis. “The average tunnel requires 350 truckloads of construction supplies,” The Wall Street Journal reported, “enough to build 86 homes, seven mosques, six schools or 19 medical clinics.” Estimated cost of tunnels: $90 million.

Want to understand why Gaza is so poor? See above.

Which brings us to the grotesque spectacle along Gaza’s border over the past several weeks, in which thousands of Palestinians have tried to breach the fence and force their way into Israel, often at the cost of their lives. What is the ostensible purpose of what Palestinians call “the Great Return March”?

That’s no mystery. This week, The Times published an op-ed by Ahmed Abu Artema, one of the organizers of the march. “We are intent on continuing our struggle until Israel recognizes our right to return to our homes and land from which we were expelled,” he writes, referring to homes and land within Israel’s original borders.

His objection isn’t to the “occupation” as usually defined by Western liberals, namely Israel’s acquisition of territories following the 1967 Six Day War. It’s to the existence of Israel itself. Sympathize with him all you like, but at least notice that his politics demand the elimination of the Jewish state.

Notice, also, the old pattern at work: Avow and pursue Israel’s destruction, then plead for pity and aid when your plans lead to ruin.

The world now demands that Jerusalem account for every bullet fired at the demonstrators, without offering a single practical alternative for dealing with the crisis.

But where is the outrage that Hamas kept urging Palestinians to move toward the fence, having been amply forewarned by Israel of the mortal risk? Or that protest organizers encouraged women to lead the charges on the fence because, as The Times’s Declan Walsh reported, “Israeli soldiers might be less likely to fire on women”? Or that Palestinian children as young as 7 were dispatched to try to breach the fence? Or that the protests ended after Israel warned Hamas’s leaders, whose preferred hide-outs include Gaza’s hospital, that their own lives were at risk?

Elsewhere in the world, this sort of behavior would be called reckless endangerment. It would be condemned as self-destructive, cowardly and almost bottomlessly cynical.

The mystery of Middle East politics is why Palestinians have so long been exempted from these ordinary moral judgments. How do so many so-called progressives now find themselves in objective sympathy with the murderers, misogynists and homophobes of Hamas? Why don’t they note that, by Hamas’s own admission, some 50 of the 62 protesters killed on Monday were members of Hamas? Why do they begrudge Israel the right to defend itself behind the very borders they’ve been clamoring for years for Israelis to get behind?

Why is nothing expected of Palestinians, and everything forgiven, while everything is expected of Israelis, and nothing forgiven?

That’s a question to which one can easily guess the answer. In the meantime, it’s worth considering the harm Western indulgence has done to Palestinian aspirations.

No decent Palestinian society can emerge from the culture of victimhood, violence and fatalism symbolized by these protests. No worthy Palestinian government can emerge if the international community continues to indulge the corrupt, anti-Semitic autocrats of the Palestinian Authority or fails to condemn and sanction the despotic killers of Hamas. And no Palestinian economy will ever flourish through repeated acts of self-harm and destructive provocation.

If Palestinians want to build a worthy, proud and prosperous nation, they could do worse than try to learn from the one next door. That begins by forswearing forever their attempts to destroy it.

For the third time in two weeks, Palestinians in the Gaza Strip have set fire to the Kerem Shalom border crossing, through which they get medicine, fuel and other humanitarian essentials from Israel. Soon we’ll surely hear a great deal about the misery of Gaza. Try not to forget that the authors of that misery are also the presumptive victims.

There’s a pattern here — harm yourself, blame the other — and it deserves to be highlighted amid the torrent of morally blind, historically illiterate criticism to which Israelis are subjected every time they defend themselves against violent Palestinian attack.

In 1970, Israel set up an industrial zone along the border with Gaza to promote economic cooperation and provide Palestinians with jobs. It had to be shut down in 2004 amid multiple terrorist attacks that left 11 Israelis dead.

In 2005, Jewish-American donors forked over $14 million dollars to pay for greenhouses that had been used by Israeli settlers until the government of Ariel Sharon withdrew from the Strip. Palestinians looted dozens of the greenhouses almost immediately upon Israel’s exit.

Notice, also, the old pattern at work: Avow and pursue Israel’s destruction, then plead for pity and aid when your plans lead to ruin.

The world now demands that Jerusalem account for every bullet fired at the demonstrators, without offering a single practical alternative for dealing with the crisis.

But where is the outrage that Hamas kept urging Palestinians to move toward the fence, having been amply forewarned by Israel of the mortal risk? Or that protest organizers encouraged women to lead the charges on the fence because, as The Times’s Declan Walsh reported, “Israeli soldiers might be less likely to fire on women”? Or that Palestinian children as young as 7 were dispatched to try to breach the fence? Or that the protests ended after Israel warned Hamas’s leaders, whose preferred hide-outs include Gaza’s hospital, that their own lives were at risk?

Elsewhere in the world, this sort of behavior would be called reckless endangerment. It would be condemned as self-destructive, cowardly and almost bottomlessly cynical.

The mystery of Middle East politics is why Palestinians have so long been exempted from these ordinary moral judgments. How do so many so-called progressives now find themselves in objective sympathy with the murderers, misogynists and homophobes of Hamas? Why don’t they note that, by Hamas’s own admission, some 50 of the 62 protesters killed on Monday were members of Hamas? Why do they begrudge Israel the right to defend itself behind the very borders they’ve been clamoring for years for Israelis to get behind?

Why is nothing expected of Palestinians, and everything forgiven, while everything is expected of Israelis, and nothing forgiven?

That’s a question to which one can easily guess the answer. In the meantime, it’s worth considering the harm Western indulgence has done to Palestinian aspirations.

No decent Palestinian society can emerge from the culture of victimhood, violence and fatalism symbolized by these protests. No worthy Palestinian government can emerge if the international community continues to indulge the corrupt, anti-Semitic autocrats of the Palestinian Authority or fails to condemn and sanction the despotic killers of Hamas. And no Palestinian economy will ever flourish through repeated acts of self-harm and destructive provocation.

If Palestinians want to build a worthy, proud and prosperous nation, they could do worse than try to learn from the one next door. That begins by forswearing forever their attempts to destroy it.

Voir par ailleurs:

Un haut responsable du Hamas a affirmé mercredi que la très grande majorité des Palestiniens tués cette semaine lors de manifestations et heurts avec l’armée israélienne dans la bande de Gaza appartenaient au mouvement islamiste, qui dirige l’enclave.

L’armée et le gouvernement israéliens, confrontés à une vague de réprobation après la mort de 59 Palestiniens sous des tirs israéliens lundi, se sont saisis de ces propos pour contester le caractère pacifique des évènements et maintenir que ceux-ci étaient orchestrés par le Hamas.

Des milliers de Palestiniens ont débuté le 30 mars dans la bande de Gaza un mouvement de plus de six semaines contre le blocus israélien et pour le droit des Palestiniens à revenir sur les terres qu’ils ont fuies ou dont ils ont été chassés à la création d’Israël en 1948.

Les violences de lundi ont coïncidé avec l’inauguration controversée à Jérusalem de la nouvelle ambassade américaine, démarche qui a rompu avec des décennies de consensus international.

Le Guatemala a également inauguré mercredi à Jérusalem sa nouvelle ambassade en Israël, s’attirant la colère de la direction palestinienne qui a accusé le gouvernement guatémaltèque de se placer du côté des « crimes de guerre israéliens ».

« Agression israélienne »

Les violences à Gaza lundi, journée la plus meurtrière du conflit israélo-palestinien depuis 2014, ont continué à susciter l’inquiétude ou la colère à l’étranger.

Le pape François s’est dit « très préoccupé par l’escalade des tensions en Terre Sainte » et le président russe Vladimir Poutine a appelé à « renoncer à la violence ». Les ministres arabes des Affaires étrangères devaient tenir jeudi au Caire une réunion extraordinaire sur « l’agression israélienne contre le peuple palestinien ».

La tension est retombée dans la bande de Gaza à la veille du ramadan, le mois de jeûne musulman, mais la situation demeure hautement volatile.

Des chars israéliens ont frappé plusieurs positions du Hamas dans la bande de Gaza, en réponse à des tirs d’armes à feu, a dit notamment l’armée.

Le Hamas a dit soutenir la mobilisation, tout en assurant qu’elle émanait de la société civile et qu’elle était pacifique.

L’armée israélienne accuse de son côté le Hamas, qu’il considère comme « terroriste », de s’être servi du mouvement pour mêler à la foule des hommes armés ou disposer des engins explosifs le long de frontière.

Elle assure n’avoir fait que défendre les frontières, ses soldats et les civils contre une éventuelle infiltration de Palestiniens susceptibles de s’attaquer aux populations riveraines de l’enclave ou de prendre un otage.

Après la mort par balles des Palestiniens, Israël s’est retrouvé en butte aux condamnations et aux appels à une enquête indépendante.

Dans ce contexte, Salah al-Bardaouil, haut responsable du Hamas, a déclaré à une télévision palestinienne que 50 des 62 Palestiniens tués lundi mais aussi mardi appartenaient au mouvement islamiste.

La vérité « dévoilée »

« Cinquante des martyrs (des morts) étaient du Hamas, et 12 faisaient partie du reste de la population », a-t-il dit, interrogé sur les critiques selon lesquelles le Hamas tirait profit de la mobilisation. « Comment le Hamas pourrait-il récolter les fruits (du mouvement) alors qu’il a payé un prix aussi élevé », a-t-il demandé.

Il n’a pas fourni de détails sur l’appartenance de ces Palestiniens à la branche armée ou politique du Hamas, ni sur les circonstances dans lesquelles ils avaient été tués.

Salah al-Bardaouil « dévoile la vérité », a tweeté un porte-parole du gouvernement israélien, Ofir Gendelman, « ce n’était pas une manifestation pacifique, mais une opération du Hamas ».

« Nous avons les mêmes chiffres », a lancé de son côté le Premier ministre Benjamin Netanyahu, avertissant que son pays continuerait « à se défendre par tous les moyens nécessaires ».

Un porte-parole du Hamas, Fawzy Barhoum, et un autre haut responsable, Bassem Naim, se sont gardés de confirmer les informations de M. Bardaouil. Le Hamas paie les funérailles de tous, « qu’ils soient membres ou supporters du Hamas, ou pas », a dit M. Barhoum.

Il est « naturel de voir de nombreux membres ou supporters du Hamas » à une telle manifestation, a dit M. Naim, en faisant référence à la forte présence du Hamas dans toutes les couches de la société. Ceux qui ont été tués « participaient pacifiquement » au mouvement, a-t-il assuré.

Sur la chaîne de télévision Al-Jazeera, l’homme fort du Hamas, Yahya Sinouar, a prévenu: « si le blocus (israélien à Gaza) continue, nous n’hésiterons pas à recourir à la résistance militaire ».

Voir de même:

Gaza, le massacre des oubliés

EDITO. Ce qui vient de se passer à Gaza est un rappel à l’ordre, tragique, à une communauté internationale qui a abandonné le peuple palestinien.

Sara Daniel

Pendant qu’une petite fille palestinienne mourait d’avoir inhalé des gaz lacrymogènes à Gaza, à Jérusalem, à moins d’une heure et demie de là par la route, on sablait le champagne, lundi, pour fêter le déménagement de l’ambassade américaine.

Malgré les snipers israéliens, les Gazaouis auront donc continué à se presser devant la clôture de séparation de cette prison maudite et à ciel ouvert que représente l’enclave de Gaza, honte d’Israël et de la communauté internationale, pour achever la « Marche du grand retour », entamée le 30 mars et censée se conclure ce 15 mai. Une marche pour réclamer les terres perdues au moment de la création d’Israël, il y a soixante-dix ans, mais surtout la fin du blocus israélo-égyptien qui étouffe Gaza.

Au cours de ce lundi noir, 59 personnes ont été tuées, et plus de 2.400 ont été blessées par balles.

Une violence inouïe et inutile

Encore une fois le conflit israélo-palestinien a joué la guerre des images, au cours de ce jour si symbolique. Les Israéliens fêtaient les 70 ans de la naissance de leur Etat, le miracle de son existence, l’incroyable longévité de ce confetti minuscule entouré de nations hostiles. Les Palestiniens commémoraient, eux, leur « catastrophe », leur Nakba, qui les a poussés sur les routes de l’exil, dans l’indifférence d’une communauté internationale lassée par un conflit interminable, happée par d’autres hécatombes plus pressantes.

C’est avec cette Marche que les Gazaouis ont tenté de revenir sur la carte des préoccupations mondiales et de rappeler leur agonie à un monde qui les oublie. Pendant ce temps, Israéliens, Américains, Saoudiens et Egyptiens célèbrent leur alliance sur le dos de ces vaincus de l’histoire, les pressant d’accepter un accord, ce que Donald Trump a appelé le « deal ultime », dont les contours sont encore flous mais dont on peut être certain qu’il entérinerait leur déroute.

Mais pourquoi les Israéliens ont-ils cédé à cette violence inouïe et inutile alors que, de leur aveu même, le vrai sujet de leurs inquiétudes était le front du Nord avec le Hezbollah et l’Iran ? Est-ce l’hubris des vainqueurs ? En tout cas, Israël n’a pas entendu l’avertissement de Houda Naim, députée du Hamas.

« Nous considérons que ces marches pacifiques sont aujourd’hui le meilleur moyen d’atteindre les points faibles de notre ennemi », disait-elle au début du mouvement.

Une population excédée, désespérée

Dans le même esprit que les campagnes BDS qui prônent le boycott de produits israéliens, la nouvelle génération de militants a pensé que c’était par cette approche non violente dans la filiation de Gandhi que la cause palestinienne aurait une chance de revenir sur le devant de la scène internationale.

Alors, les manifestants ont-ils été manipulés par leurs organisations politiques ? La question est obscène lorsque que la marche, commencée il y a six semaines, a déjà fait plus de 100 morts. Bien sûr, le Hamas, débordé par cette manifestation civile et pacifique, a rejoint le mouvement. A-t-il encouragé les Gazaouis à provoquer les soldats israéliens, les conduisant à une mort certaine ? Peut-être, et le gouvernement israélien l’affirmera. Mais cela ne suffirait pas à expliquer la détermination d’une population excédée, désespérée par ses conditions d’existence. Ce qui vient de se passer à Gaza est un rappel à l’ordre, tragique, à une communauté internationale qui a abandonné ce peuple palestinien à la brutalité israélienne, à l’incurie de ses dirigeants engagés dans une guerre fratricide, à ses alliés arabes historiquement défaillants, à son sort dont nous portons tous la responsabilité.

Voir enfin:

Danger in overreacting to Santa Fe school shooting

School shootings, however horrific, are not the new normal. Santa Fe killings are part of a bloody contagion that will pass.

James Alan Fox

USA Today

May 18, 2018

Today’s ghastly shooting at a high school in Santa Fe, Texas, claiming the lives of at least 10 victims, has many Americans, including President Trump, wondering when and how the carnage will cease. Coming on the heels of two other multiple fatality school massacres earlier this year, it is no wonder that many are seeing this type of random gun violence as the “new normal.”

Amidst the national mourning for the many innocent lives lost in these senseless shooting sprees, it is critical not to overreact and overrespond to the menacing acts of a few. It is, of course, of little comfort to those families and communities impacted in Santa Fe as well as Parkland, Florida, and Benton, Kentucky, but this is not routine. Schools are not under siege. Rather, this more likely reflects a short-term contagion effect in which angry dispirited youngsters are inspired by others whose violent outbursts serve as fodder for national attention. That should subside once we stop obsessing over the risk.

History provides an important lesson about how crime contagions arise and eventually play themselves out. Over the five-year time span from 1997 through 2001, America witnessed seven multiple-fatality school rampages with a combined 32 killed and 85 others injured, more such incidents and casualties than during the past five years.

Following the March 2001 massacre at a high school in Santee, California, the venerable Dan Rather declared school shootings an “epidemic.” Then, after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack on America, the nation turned its attention to a very different kind of threat, and the school shooting “epidemic” disappeared.

Summertime will soon bring a natural break to the heightened concern over school shootings. Hopefully, come September, we can deal with the underlying issues facing alienated adolescents who seek to follow in the bloody footsteps of their undeserving heroes, without inadvertently fueling the contagion of bloodshed.

Many observers have expressed concern for the excessive attention given to mass shooters of today and the deadliest of yesteryear. CNN’s Anderson Cooper has campaigned against naming names of mass shooters, and 147 criminologists, sociologists, psychologists and other human-behavior experts recently signed on to an open letter urging the media not to identify mass shooters or display their photos.

While I appreciate the concern for name and visual identification of mass shooters for fear of inspiring copycats as well as to avoid insult to the memory of those they slaughtered, names and faces are not the problem. It is the excessive detail — too much information — about the killers, their writings, and their backgrounds that unnecessarily humanizes them. We come to know more about them — their interests and their disappointments — than we do about our next door neighbors. Too often the line is crossed between news reporting and celebrity watch.

At the same time, we focus far too much on records. We constantly are reminded that some shooting is the largest in a particular state over a given number of years, as if that really matters. Would the massacre be any less tragic if it didn’t exceed the death toll of some prior incident? Moreover, we are treated to published lists of the largest mass shootings in modern US history. For whatever purpose we maintain records, they are there to be broken and can challenge a bitter and suicidal assailant to outgun his violent role models.

Although the spirited advocacy of students around the country regarding gun control is to be applauded, we need to keep some perspective about the risk. Slogans like, “I want to go to my graduation, not to my grave,” are powerful, yet hyperbolic.

As often said, even one death is one too many, and we need to take the necessary steps to protect children, including expanded funding for school teachers and school psychologists. Still, despite the occasional tragedy, our schools are safe, safer than they have been for decades.

James Alan Fox is the Lipman Professor of Criminology, Law and Public Policy at Northeastern University, a member of USA TODAY’s Board of Contributors and co-author of Extreme Killing: Understanding Serial and Mass Murder.


Israël/70e: Chose promise, chose due (Remember that the journey to peace started with a strong America recognizing the truth)

14 mai, 2018
Ton nom est Jacob; tu ne seras plus appelé Jacob, mais ton nom sera Israël. Genèse 35: 10
Gaza: a la « densité démographique la plus élevée du monde ». Cliché journalistique inepte mais fréquent. Les chiffres officiels: Gaza, 3 823 habitants par kilomètre carré, Paris XIème arrondissement: 41 053 hab./km2 … Laurent Murawiec
En novembre 2004, des civils ivoiriens et des soldats français de la Force Licorne se sont opposés durant quatre jours à Abidjan dans des affrontements qui ont fait des dizaines de morts et de blessés. À la suite d’une mission d’enquête sur le terrain, Amnesty International a recueilli des informations indiquant que les forces françaises ont, à certaines occasions, fait un usage excessif et disproportionné de la force alors qu’elles se trouvaient face à des manifestants qui ne représentaient pas une menace directe pour leurs vies ou la vie de tiers. Amnesty international (26.10.05)
Des tirs sont partis sur nos forces depuis les derniers étages de l’hôtel ivoire de la grande tour que nous n’occupions pas et depuis la foule. Dans ces conditions nos unités ont été amenées à faire des tirs de sommation et à forcer le passage en évitant bien évidemment de faire des morts et des blessés parmi les manifestants. Mais je répète encore une fois les premiers tirs n’ont pas été de notre fait. Général Poncet (Canal Plus 90 minutes 14.02.05)
Nous avons effectivement été amenés à tirer, des tirs en légitime défense et en riposte par rapport aux tireurs qui nous tiraient dessus. Colonel Gérard Dubois (porte-parole de l’état-major français, le 15 novembre 2004)
On n’arrivait pas à éloigner cette foule qui, de plus en plus était débordante. Sur ma gauche, trois de nos véhicules étaient déjà immergés dans la foule. Un manifestant grimpe sur un de mes chars et arme la mitrailleuse 7-62. Un de mes hommes fait un tir d’intimidation dans sa direction ; l’individu redescend aussitôt du blindé. Le coup de feu déclenche une fusillade. L’ensemble de mes hommes fait des tirs uniquement d’intimidation. (…) seuls les COS auraient visé certains manifestants avec leurs armes non létales. (…) Mes hommes n’ont pu faire cela. Nous n’avions pas les armes pour infliger de telles blessures. Si nous avions tiré au canon dans la foule, ça aurait été le massacre. Colonel Destremau (Libération, 10.12.04)
L’armée française admet avoir tué par accident 4 civils afghans le 6 avril. AFP
Afghanistan: l’armée française tue par erreur quatre jeunes garçons. Jean-Dominique Merchet (blog de journaliste)
Les insurgés utilisent habituellement les villages pour mener leurs opérations contre la coalition. Ils s’abritent ainsi au sein de la population civile. Jean-Dominique Merchet
Quatre enfants et leur mère tués à Gaza: Un char israélien a tiré un obus sur leur maison lors d’une incursion à Beit Hanoun. Le Figaro (avec AFP, 28/04/2008)
Of course, Abbas well knows that the United States of America is the one and only power that can pressure Israel to make concessions. So, after a decent interval, Abbas inexorably will mumble apologies, lavish praise on Trump, fire up the Palestinians’ horde of proxies, « talk peace » with Israel, and worm his way into the administration’s good graces. When that happens, the current U.S.-Israel honeymoon will likely crash and burn, replaced by the usual bickering, where Washington wants Israelis to « take chances for peace » and « make painful concessions, » and they resist those pressures. Trump reiterated prior warning about « hard compromises » ahead for Israel, giving warnings about Israeli towns on the West Bank, and saying that relations with Israel will improve after reaching an agreement with the Palestinians. Perhaps most significantly, he expressed doubts about Israelis even wanting peace. ≠≠≠≠≠Taken as a whole, these comments confirm my prediction that U.S.-Israel relations could go seriously awry with Trump as president. (…) Without going into details, Liberman himself has confirmed the general point I am making here, that the Palestinians have a major gift awaiting them. In his words, « There is no free lunch, » « There will be a price for the national ambition and the realization of a vision. There will be a price for the opening of the US Embassy in Jerusalem and it is worth paying it » because the embassy relocation « is important, historic and dramatic. » Daniel Pipes
Israël sème le terrorisme d’Etat. Israël est un Etat terroriste; Ce qu’Israël a fait est un génocide. Je condamne ce drame humanitaire, ce génocide, d’où qu’il vienne, d’Israël ou d’Amérique. Recep Tayyip Erdogan
Il y a exactement 70 ans, les Etats-Unis sous la présidence de Harry Truman ont été la première nation à reconnaître l’État d’Israël. Aujourd’hui nous ouvrons officiellement l’ambassade américaine à Jérusalem, félicitations, cela a été long. Presque immédiatement après la déclaration de l’État en 1948,  Israël a désigné la ville de Jérusalem comme sa capitale, la capitale que le peuple juif avait établie dans les temps anciens, si importante. Aujourd’hui Jérusalem est le site du gouvernement israélien, c’est l’endroit où se trouve la législature israélienne, la Cour suprême israélienne, le Premier ministre et le Président d’Israël. Israël est une nation souveraine avec le droit comme toutes les autres nations de déterminer sa propre capitale, pourtant durant de nombreuses années nous avons échoué à reconnaître l’évidence, la réalité que la capitale d’Israël est bien Jérusalem. Le 6 décembre 2017 sous ma direction, les Etats-Unis ont finalement et officiellement reconnu Jérusalem comme la véritable capitale d’Israël. Aujourd’hui nous poursuivons cette reconnaissance et ouvrons notre ambassade sur la terre sacrée et historique de Jérusalem et nous l’ouvrons beaucoup beaucoup d’année après ce qui avait été prévu. Comme je l’ai dit en décembre, notre plus grand espoir c’est la paix. Les Etats-Unis sont pleinement engagés à faciliter un traité de paix durable et nous continuons à soutenir le status-quo dans les Lieux Saints de Jérusalem y compris sur le Mont du Temple connu également comme le Haram el Sharif. Cette ville et cette nation est le témoignage de l’esprit indestructible du peuple juif et les Etats-Unis seront toujours de grands amis d’Israël et partenaires pour la cause de la liberté et de la paix. Nous souhaitons à l’ambassadeur Friedman bonne chance alors qu’il prend ses fonctions dans cette belle ambassade de Jérusalem et nous tendons la main en signe d’amitié à Israël, aux Palestiniens et à tous leurs voisins, que la Paix advienne, que Dieu bénisse cette ambassade, que Dieu bénisse tous ceux qui y servent et que Dieu bénisse les Etats-Unis d’Amérique. Donald Trump
Quand il y aura la paix dans cette région, nous pourrons nous rappeler qu’elle a commencé avec une Amérique forte qui a su reconnaître la vérité. Jared Kushner

Contre les mensonges du Hamas et de ses idiots utiles

Qui n’ont pas de mots assez durs pour dénoncer les seuls Israéliens

Maitres ès génocide et négationnisme, entre leur 40 ans d’occupation de Chypre et leurs actuels massacres de kurdes, compris

Pour nous gâcher la joie de cette journée doublement historique …

Et surtout, 70 ans – à quelques milliers d’années près – après les faits, nier la vérité de cette double reconnaissance …

Par le premier président américain qui – même si les pressions ne vont pas manquer de venir après – tient ses promesses …

De la nation d’Israël et de sa capitale éternelle !

Inauguration de l’ambassade à Jérusalem: « Notre plus grand espoir est celui de la paix » (Trump)

i24NEWS
14/05/2018

La cérémonie d’inauguration de l’ambassade des Etats-Unis en Israël s’est ouverte lundi à Jérusalem en présence de centaines de responsables américains et israéliens.

« Aujourd’hui, nous tenons la promesse faite au peuple américain et nous accordons à Israël le même droit que nous accordons à tout autre pays, le droit de désigner sa capitale », a déclaré l’ambassadeur des Etats-Unis David Friedman à l’ouverture de la cérémonie.

Le président Donald Trump a quant à lui assuré que les Etats-Unis restaient « pleinement » engagés dans la recherche d’un accord de paix durable entre Israéliens et Palestiniens, dans un message aux participants présents à l’inauguration.

« Notre plus grand espoir est celui de la paix. Les Etats-Unis restent pleinement engagés à faciliter un accord de paix durable », a-t-il dit dans un message vidéo.

Ivanka Trump et Jared Kushner, la fille et le gendre mais aussi conseillers du président américain, ont pris part avec des centaines de dignitaires des deux pays à la cérémonie qui concrétise l’une des promesses les plus controversées du président Donald Trump.

« Nous prouvons au monde que l’on peut faire confiance aux Etats-Unis pour faire ce qui est bon et juste », a affirmé Jared Kushner.

« Quand il y aura la paix dans cette région, nous pourrons nous rappeler qu’elle a commencé avec une Amérique forte qui a su reconnaître la vérité », a-t-il ajouté.

Enfin, le Premier ministre israélien Benyamin Netanyahou s’est répandu en marques de gratitude envers le président Donald Trump, qui a « en reconnaissant l’histoire, a fait l’histoire » en transférant l’ambassade des Etats-Unis en Israël de Tel-Aviv à Jérusalem.

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fi24newsFR%2Fvideos%2F1153696781437897%2F&show_text=0&width=560

« Ceci est un moment d’Histoire. Président Trump, en reconnaissant ce qui appartient à l’Histoire, vous avez écrit l’Histoire », a dit M. Netanyahou à la cérémonie d’inauguration de la mission diplomatique.

Et de rappeler que « c’est un grand jour pour la paix ».

Le 6 décembre dernier, le président américain a annoncé qu »‘il est temps d’officiellement reconnaître Jérusalem comme capitale d’Israël », rompant avec ses prédécesseurs et passant outre aux mises en garde venues de toutes parts.

Une plaque et un sceau américain ont été dévoilés lundi pour signifier officiellement l’ouverture de la mission, dans les locaux de ce qui était jusqu’alors le consulat américain.

Voir aussi:

L’ouverture de l’ambassade US à Jérusalem suscite de très vives critiques

Le président français Emmanuel Macron « condamne les violences des forces armées israéliennes »

AFP et Times of Israel
14 mai 2018

La communauté internationale, dont la Grande-Bretagne, plus proche allié des Etats-Unis, la France, l’Union européenne et la Russie, a réprouvé lundi l’ouverture de l’ambassade américaine à Jérusalem, dont le déplacement avait été désavoué par 128 des 193 pays membres de l’ONU.

De violents affrontements entre émeutiers palestiniens et soldats israéliens ont fait lundi plus de 50 morts et des centaines de blessés dans la bande de Gaza, où les Palestiniens protestent contre l’inauguration de l’ambassade prévue dans l’après-midi. Un comité de l’ONU a dénoncé l’usage « disproportionné » de la force par Israël contre les manifestants palestiniens.

Union européenne 

L’UE a exhorté toutes les parties à « la plus grande retenue » à la suite des violents affrontements entre Palestiniens et soldats israéliens lors des manifestations dans la bande de Gaza contre l’inauguration de l’ambassade des Etats-Unis à Jérusalem.

« Des dizaines de Palestiniens, dont des enfants, ont été tués et des centaines blessés par des tirs israéliens durant les manifestations massives en cours près de la barrière de Gaza. Nous demandons à toutes les parties d’agir avec la plus grande retenue afin d’éviter des pertes de vie humaine supplémentaires », a affirmé la chef de la diplomatie européenne Federica Mogherini dans un communiqué.

Elle a mis en garde contre « toute nouvelle escalade » dans une situation « complexe et déjà très tendue » qui rendrait « les perspectives de paix encore plus éloignées ».

« Israël doit respecter le droit à manifester pacifiquement et le principe de la proportionnalité dans l’usage de la force », a-t-elle insisté.

« Le Hamas [le mouvement terroriste islamiste au pouvoir à Gaza] et ceux qui conduisent les manifestations à Gaza doivent faire en sorte qu’elles restent strictement non violentes et ne pas les exploiter à d’autres fins », a-t-elle ajouté.

La haute-représentante pour les Affaires étrangères réitère l’engagement de l’UE à oeuvrer en faveur d’une « reprise de négociations constructives » visant à une solution à deux Etats, palestinien et israélien, « dans les lignes de 1967 et avec Jérusalem comme capitale de chacun des deux Etats ».

Enfin, sur la question brûlante du statut de Jérusalem, Federica Mogherini rappelle « la position claire et unie » de l’Union, conforme au consensus international, selon laquelle le transfert des ambassades de Tel Aviv à Jérusalem ne pourra pas advenir avant que le statut de la Ville sainte ne soit réglé dans le cadre d’un règlement final du conflit israélo-palestinien.

France

« Alors que les tensions sur le terrain sont vives (..) la France appelle l’ensemble des acteurs à faire preuve de responsabilité afin de prévenir un nouvel embrasement », a souligné le ministre français des Affaires étrangères Jean-Yves Le Drian dans une déclaration écrite.

« Il est urgent de recréer les conditions nécessaires à la recherche d’une solution politique, dans un contexte régional déjà marqué par de fortes tensions », a-t-il ajouté en référence au retrait américain de l’accord sur le nucléaire iranien et à la récente escalade militaire entre Israël et l’Iran en Syrie.

La France a notamment appelé l’Etat hébreu à « faire preuve de discernement » dans l’usage de la force et a insisté sur le « devoir de protection des civils ».

« Après plusieurs semaines de violences, et face au nombre croissant de victimes palestiniennes dans la bande de Gaza aujourd’hui encore, la France appelle de nouveau les autorités israéliennes à faire preuve de discernement et de retenue dans l’usage de la force qui doit être strictement proportionné », a souligné le ministre.

« Elle rappelle le devoir de protection des civils, en particulier des mineurs, et le droit des Palestiniens à manifester pacifiquement », a ajouté Jean-Yves Le Drian.

La France désapprouve le transfert de l’ambassade des Etats-Unis en Israël de Tel Aviv à Jérusalem, une décision qui « contrevient au droit international et en particulier aux résolutions du Conseil de sécurité et de l’Assemblée générale des Nations unies », a-t-il poursuivi.

Elle appelle à des négociations « afin de parvenir à une solution juste et durable, à savoir deux Etats, vivant côte à côte en paix et en sécurité, ayant l’un et l’autre Jérusalem comme capitale », a noté le chef de la diplomatie française.

Le président français Emmanuel Macron a « condamné les violences des forces armées israéliennes contre les manifestants » palestiniens à Gaza, lundi soir lors d’entretiens téléphoniques avec le président palestinien Mahmoud Abbas et le roi de Jordanie Abdallah II, selon un communiqué de l’Elysée.

M. Macron a également réaffirmé auprès de ses interlocuteurs « la désapprobation de la France à l’encontre de la décision américaine d’ouvrir une ambassade à Jérusalem » et souligné que le statut de la ville « ne pourra être déterminé qu’entre les parties, dans un cadre négocié sous l’égide de la communauté internationale ».

M. Macron a également, selon l’Elysée, « souligné le droit des Palestiniens à la paix et à la sécurité », rappelant par ailleurs « son attachement à la sécurité d’Israël et la position française constante en faveur d’une solution à deux Etats, Israël et la Palestine, vivant côte à côte dans des frontières sûres et reconnues ».

Emmanuel Macron s’est entretenu « avec le roi Abdallah II de Jordanie, gardien selon la tradition des Lieux saints de Jérusalem et avec le président de l’Autorité palestinienne Mahmoud Abbas ». Il échangera également « dans la journée de mardi » avec le Premier ministre israélien Benyamin Netanyahu, a précisé la présidence de la République.

Faisant part de « la vive préoccupation de la France sur la situation à Gaza, à Jérusalem et dans les villes palestiniennes », le président Macron « a déploré le grand nombre de victimes civiles palestiniennes à Gaza (lundi) et ces dernières semaines » et « condamné les violences des forces armées israéliennes contre les manifestants ».

« Il a appelé tous les responsables à la retenue et à la désescalade et a insisté sur la nécessité que les manifestations des prochains jours demeurent pacifiques », poursuit le communiqué.

« Dans le contexte particulier du 70e anniversaire de l’indépendance d’Israël et de la commémoration de l’exil pour de nombreuses familles palestiniennes », M. Macron a rappelé « la désapprobation de la France à l’encontre de la décision américaine d’ouvrir une ambassade à Jérusalem », soulignant que « le statut de Jérusalem ne pourra être déterminé qu’entre les parties, dans un cadre négocié sous l’égide de la communauté internationale ».

Grande-Bretagne 

« Nous désapprouvons la décision des Etats-Unis de déplacer son ambassade à Jérusalem et de reconnaître Jérusalem comme capitale d’Israël avant un accord final sur le statut », a déclaré le porte-parole de la Première ministre Theresa May. « L’ambassade britannique en Israël est basée à Tel Aviv et nous n’avons pas le projet de la déplacer ».

Russie

Interrogé lundi lors d’un briefing pour savoir si le transfert de l’ambassade américaine faisait craindre à la Russie une aggravation de la situation dans la région, le porte-parole du président russe Vladimir Poutine, Dmitri Peskov a répondu : « Oui, nous avons de telles craintes, nous l’avons déjà dit ».

Turquie

« Nous rejetons cette décision qui viole le droit international et les résolutions des Nations unies », a déclaré le président Recep Tayyip Erdogan. « Avec cette décision, les Etats-Unis ont choisi d’être une partie du problème, et perdent leur rôle de médiateur dans le processus de paix » au Proche Orient.

Le porte-parole du gouvernement turc, Bekir Bozdag, a par ailleurs dénoncé sur Twitter un « massacre » à la frontière avec la bande de Gaza, dont « l’administration américaine est autant responsable qu’Israël ». « En transférant son ambassade à Jérusalem, l’administration américaine a sapé les chances d’un règlement pacifique et provoqué un incendie qui causera davantage de pertes humaines, des destructions et des catastrophes dans la région ».

Maroc

Le roi Mohammed VI a dénoncé une « décision unilatérale », qui « s’oppose au droit international et aux décisions du Conseil du sécurité », lit-on dans une lettre adressée lundi au président palestinien Mahmoud Abbas, relayée par l’agence officielle MAP. Le roi y dit « suivre avec préoccupation » la situation.

Egypte

Le grand mufti Shawki Allam a dénoncé « un affront direct et clair aux sentiments de plus d’un milliard et demi de musulmans sur terre », qui « ouvre la porte à davantage de conflits et de guerres dans la région ».

Voir également:

La fragile lune de miel entre les États-Unis et Israël

Daniel Pipes
The Times of Israel
27 février 2018

Version originale anglaise: The US-Israel Honeymoon May Not Last

Le président Trump a pris deux décisions sans précédent et des plus favorables à Israël, à savoir la reconnaissance de Jérusalem comme capitale israélienne et l’arrêt du financement de l’Office de secours et de travaux des Nations unies (UNRWA), une organisation vouée foncièrement à l’élimination de l’État juif. Ces décisions attendues depuis longtemps mettent fin à un blocage vieux de près de 70 ans et offrent de nouvelles opportunités pour la résolution du conflit israélo-palestinien. Bravo à Donald Trump qui a décidé de braver les flèches et autres quolibets de la pensée conventionnelle pour prendre des mesures courageuses et s’y tenir.

Ceci dit, il y a un problème. Les deux mesures ont été prises pour ce qui s’avère être de mauvaises raisons. Cette préoccupation, qui ne relève pas de l’abstraction, implique que ce qui est célébré aujourd’hui comme une fête pourrait demain virer au fiasco.

Premier problème pour Israël : Trump a dit qu’il reconnaissait Jérusalem comme capitale d’Israël afin de régler la question de Jérusalem, une question sur laquelle il convient d’écouter son raisonnement : « Le sujet le plus difficile sur lequel devaient discuter les négociateurs israéliens et palestiniens était Jérusalem. On a sorti Jérusalem des négociations, on n’a donc plus eu à en discuter. Ils n’ont jamais passé le cap de Jérusalem. »

On dirait que Trump pense que la reconnaissance a suffi à résoudre le dossier épineux de Jérusalem, comme s’il s’agissait d’une transaction immobilière passée à New York et assortie d’un accord connexe sur les réglementations de zonage et la représentation syndicale. Mais la réalité est bien différente. Loin d’être « sorti des négociations », Jérusalem est devenu, par l’action de Trump, un point d’attention et de controverse sans précédent.

Ainsi les membres de l’Organisation de la Coopération islamique ont dans leur immense majorité condamné sa décision tout comme les membres du Conseil de sécurité et de l’Assemblée générale des Nations unies. En outre la reconnaissance de Jérusalem a provoqué la multiplication par trois des actes de violence palestiniens dirigés contre des Israéliens. Par son action, Trump a donc fait de Jérusalem un enjeu autrement plus disputé qu’auparavant.Comment Trump va-t-il réagir quand il réalisera que Jérusalem demeure en fin de compte un sujet très sensible et que son coup d’éclat a l’effet contraire à celui qu’il escomptait ? À mon avis, cela pourrait engendrer chez lui une frustration et une colère qui pourraient le rendre amer par rapport à la reconnaissance de Jérusalem et à Israël. Cela pourrait même inciter cette personne au caractère spontané et imprévisible à revenir sur sa décision.

Deuxième problème : Trump tente d’exiger d’Israël un prix non spécifié pour la reconnaissance, déclarant qu’Israël « payera pour ça » et « aurait dû payer davantage. » Pour le moment, ce paiement reste en suspens étant donné que l’Autorité palestinienne boycotte la médiation américaine et insulte Trump personnellement. Mais les États-Unis laissent la porte constamment ouverte aux Palestiniens et quand ces derniers auront compris la situation, la Maison Blanche les accueillera avec de magnifiques cadeaux (cette dynamique consistant à exiger des compensations de la part d’Israël explique pourquoi je préfère d’une manière générale un climat de faible tension entre Washington et Jérusalem).

Troisième problème : si Trump a privé l’UNRWA de 65 millions de dollars sur une tranche programmée de 125 millions de dollars, ce n’est pas dans le but de punir une organisation exécrable pour son action menée depuis 1949 auprès des Palestiniens, à savoir l’incitation à la haine contre Israël et à la violence contre les juifs, les affaires de corruption et l’augmentation (plutôt que la diminution) de la population de réfugiés. Non, s’il a retenu tout cet argent c’est pour faire pression sur l’Autorité palestinienne et l’inciter à reprendre les négociations avec Israël. Comme Trump lui-même l’a tweeté : « si les Palestiniens ne veulent plus parler de paix, pourquoi devrions-nous leur verser à l’avenir des sommes importantes ? »

Ainsi une fois que le chef de l’Autorité palestinienne, Mahmoud Abbas, aura surmonté son indécrottable frustration à propos de Jérusalem et aura accepté de « parler paix », c’est une pléthore d’avantages qui l’attend : la possible annulation de la reconnaissance de Jérusalem, plusieurs récompenses fabuleuses et la reprise intégrale voire l’augmentation des financements américains. À ce moment-là, le pape, la chancelière, le prince héritier et le New York Times féliciteront un Trump éclatant et Israël se verra privé de toute faveur.

Abbas a d’ores et déjà mis un bémol à ses envolées qui ne servent de toute façon qu’à son public pour montrer à un corps politique palestinien radicalisé qu’il est tout aussi dur, malfaisant et trompeur que ses rivaux du Hamas. Bien entendu, il sait bien que les États-Unis d’Amérique sont la seule et unique puissance qui puisse faire pression sur Israël et forcer celui-ci à faire des concessions. Ainsi après un délai raisonnable, Abbas va immanquablement formuler des excuses du bout des lèvres, couvrir Trump d’éloges, relancer la horde des agents palestiniens, « parler paix » avec Israël et louvoyer pour obtenir les bonnes grâces de l’administration américaine.

Quand cela se produira, la lune de miel que traversent actuellement les États-Unis et Israël va certainement sombrer pour faire place aux chamailleries habituelles où d’une part, Washington exigera des Israéliens qu’ils « saisissent les opportunités en faveur de la paix » et « fassent des concessions douloureuses », et d’autre part les Israéliens résisteront à ces pressions.

Par le passé, je me suis trompé plus d’une fois à propos de Trump. Espérons que je fasse erreur une fois encore.

Voir encore:

Bataille d’Afrin : «Silence, on ne massacre que des Kurdes…»

Pierre Rehov
Le Figaro
13/03/2018

FIGAROVOX/TRIBUNE – Pierre Rehov dresse un tragique état des lieux de l’élimination des Kurdes à Afrin par le régime d’Erdogan. Dans le silence presque complet des États et des organisations internationales, Ankara se livre à des massacres qui rappellent l’effroyable génocide commis par la Turquie contre les Arméniens.

Pierre Rehov est reporter de guerre, réalisateur de documentaires sur le conflit israélo-arabe, et expert en contre-terrorisme.

Qui veut tuer son chien, l’accuse de la rage. Cet adage n’a peut-être pas sa traduction en langue turque, mais cela fait plusieurs décennies que les Ottomans l’ont adapté à leur façon contre la population kurde. Pour Erdogan, cela ne présente aucun doute: afin d’éliminer librement cette minorité sans provoquer l’opprobre, il suffit de l’accuser de terrorisme.

Étant donné le peu de réactions de l’Occident, alors qu’au moment où sont rédigées ces lignes les forces turques, malgré leur démenti, se livrent à un nettoyage ethnique majeur autour d’Afrin, ville située au nord de la Syrie, il semble que la technique continue de faire ses preuves.

Des centaines de vies innocentes ont déjà été perdues sous les bombardements et les opérations coups de poing des milices affiliées à l’armée d’Ankara. Les hôpitaux sont débordés et le nombre de blessés augmente chaque heure dans des proportions affligeantes.

Pourtant, personne ne fait rien. Pas même l’ONU, qui se contente, par la voix de son coordinateur humanitaire régional Panos Moumtzis, d’émettre des «rapports troublants».

Tragiquement, les Kurdes, peuple d’environ 34 millions d’âmes réparties essentiellement entre quatre pays, la Turquie, l’Iran, l’Irak et la Syrie, ont déjà souffert plusieurs massacres. Notamment en 1988, sous le joug de Saddam Hussein, lorsque ce dernier chargea son cousin, Ali Hassan Al Majid de leur «solution finale». La tentative de génocide, connue sous le nom d’Anfal, dont le point culminant fut le bombardement au gaz toxique d’Halabja le 16 mars 1988, provoqua la mort de 100 000 à 180 000 civils selon les estimations, tous seulement coupables d’être Kurdes.

Arrêté pendant l’intervention américaine, puis appelé à répondre de ses crimes devant la cour pénale internationale, Al Majid, surnommé «Ali le chimique» se serait emporté en entendant ces chiffres: «C’est quoi cette exagération? 180 000? Il ne pouvait pas y en avoir plus de 100 000!»

Seulement, si la majorité des médias a couvert les deux interventions américaines en Irak, pour réfuter l’hypothèse de la possession d’armes de destruction massives par Saddam Hussein lors de la seconde invasion, il est difficile de retrouver des unes scandalisées, de grands placards accusateurs, ou des archives d’émissions consacrées à cette tragédie.

Pour comprendre la raison derrière les massacres à répétition des Kurdes de Turquie et maintenant de Syrie par le gouvernement d’Ankara, il faut remonter au début du vingtième siècle.

La création d’un État Kurde est une vieille promesse, datant de la conférence de Paris de 1919, où une frontière proposée par la délégation kurde devait couvrir quelques morceaux de la Turquie et de l’Iran et empiéter en Irak et en Syrie. Une nouvelle limite territoriale, plus réduite, fut proposée l’année suivante au traité de Sèvres. Seulement l’espoir d’un Kurdistan indépendant fut immédiatement étouffé par le refus de Mustafa Kemal de signer le traité. En 1945, un second tracé, couvrant cette fois une plus grande partie de la Turquie, fut proposé lors de la première conférence des Nations Unies à San Francisco.

Une nouvelle fois, non suivi d’effet.

Le seul État véritablement kurde ne vit le jour que pendant quelques mois dans une toute petite partie de l’Iran, sous le nom de République de Mahabad, dirigée par Mustafa Barzani, avant d’être écrasée avec une brutalité effroyable par le régime du Shah.

Malgré leur situation dramatique, et le refus de reconnaître jusqu’à leur identité par les régimes turcs successifs, leur langue et leurs coutumes faisant même l’objet d’interdiction par Ankara, les Kurdes de Turquie n’ont commencé à se révolter qu’à partir des années soixante-dix, avec la création du «Parti des Travailleurs Kurdes», le PKK, d’essence marxiste-léniniste.

Mais, même si leurs méthodes étaient issues de concepts révolutionnaires violents et dépassés, c’est leur velléité d’indépendance et leur idée de société calquée sur les valeurs humaines de l’Occident, notamment concernant l’égalité entre les sexes, qui représentaient le vrai danger pour Ankara.

S’ensuivirent donc une guérilla et un cycle de violences soigneusement exploités par la Turquie qui a consacré des millions de dollars en communication jusqu’à obtenir l’inscription du PKK sur la lise des organisations terroristes, en Europe et aux USA.

L’étiquette «terroriste» appliquée aux dissidents kurdes permit aussitôt à la Turquie de se livrer sereinement à des purges visant tous les secteurs de la société, sans recevoir la moindre condamnation. Il suffisait désormais à Ankara d’accuser un contestataire de «sympathie envers le terrorisme» pour le jeter en prison, où il croupirait pendant des mois dans l’attente de l’ouverture d’un procès.

En 1999, l’arrestation d’Abdullah Öcalan, leader du PKK, permit l’établissement d’un cessez-le-feu précaire, jusqu’à l’élection d’Erdogan, déjà bien décidé à régner d’une main de fer et à étouffer toute forme de dissidence, ainsi qu’il l’a prouvé depuis.

Les hostilités ont repris en 2004, un an après son arrivée au pouvoir, la Turquie affirmant que 2 000 combattants du PKK en exil avaient franchi la frontière, tandis que l’organisation mise en sommeil reprenait son nom et accusait l’armée de ne pas avoir respecté la trêve.

Les atrocités commises par le gouvernement turc contre sa minorité kurde ne sont pas sans rappeler le génocide arménien, nié jusqu’à ce jour par le gouvernement d’Ankara, bien que largement documenté par des observateurs extérieurs et désormais reconnu par un grand nombre de pays occidentaux. La méthode est sensiblement la même: accusations sans fondement, procès expéditifs, épuration locale sans témoins, négation ou justification auprès de la communauté internationale.

La cause kurde, trahie par Obama dès son arrivée au pouvoir malgré les promesses faites par son prédécesseur, trouva cependant un certain regain par sa participation à la lutte contre l’État Islamique à partir de 2014.

Cela nous conduit à Kobane, où hommes et femmes kurdes, armés seulement de kalachnikovs, résistèrent pendant des jours aux tanks et à l’artillerie de Daech, pour remporter une incroyable victoire, célébrée dans le monde entier comme le triomphe du bien sur le mal.

Les images désormais célèbres de ces femmes aux traits farouches et au regard fier, vêtues d’un vieux treillis, les cheveux dans le vent, sous fond de carcasses d’automitrailleuses et de tous-terrains carbonisés, inspirent le film en cours de production de Caroline Fourest, «Red snake» qui veut rendre hommage à leur courage exemplaire, contre la lâcheté et l’ignominie des combattants du khalifat.

Malheureusement, les mêmes idées d’indépendance, de liberté et d’égalité sur fond de féminisme, qui stimulèrent la résistance kurde contre l’obscurantisme génocidaire de Daech, sont devenues les causes du carnage actuel, perpétré sous prétexte de lutter contre le «terrorisme» par le dirigeant Turc.

En s’attaquant à l’YPG et à l’YPJ (les unités de protection des femmes et du peuple) qui avaient réussi à établir une enclave de paix relative dans la région d’Afrin, Erdogan, en passe de rétablir une forme de dictature islamique dans une Turquie pourtant moderne, envoie un message clair au reste du monde.

Hors de question que des minorités non acquises à sa version de l’Islam puissent se targuer d’avoir obtenu la moindre victoire. Et surtout, aucune velléité d’indépendance ne saurait être tolérée par son gouvernement.

L’YPG et YPJ étant soutenus, du moins logistiquement, par le gouvernement américain, le premier souci d’Erdogan est de faire passer sous silence les atrocités commises par son armée. Tandis que l’accès aux réseaux sociaux a progressivement été limité dans toute la Turquie, les arrestations des protestataires se multiplient.

En janvier de cette année, des centaines d’universitaires du monde entier ont signé une pétition appelant le gouvernement turc à «arrêter le massacre». La seule réaction d’Ankara a été d’arrêter trois professeurs de l’université d’İstanbul signataires de la pétition et de les faire condamner pour «propagande terroriste».

Alors, tandis que les tanks turcs encerclent Afrin et que l’armée de l’air pilonne les positions de l’YPG et de l’YPJ, sans se soucier du nombre de victimes civiles, des rapports signalant même l’utilisation du napalm, il reste à se demander combien de temps les alliés de la Turquie continueront à détourner un regard pudique des exactions commises par ce membre de l’OTAN.

De son côté, frustré dans son incapacité à résoudre rapidement son problème kurde par une solution finale, Erdogan, que rien ne semble retenir dans sa volonté avouée de reconstituer l’Empire Ottoman, a été jusqu’à s’emporter contre ses alliés de l’Alliance Atlantique: «Nous sommes en permanence harcelés par des groupes terroristes à nos frontières. Malheureusement, jusqu’à aujourd’hui, il n’y a pas eu une seule voix ou un seul mot positif de l’OTAN» s’est-il agacé.

Erdogan ne connaît sans doute pas la phrase célèbre du politicien et philosophe Edmond Burke: «Pour que le mal triomphe, seule suffit l’inaction des hommes de bien.»


Histoire: Pourquoi il faut lire le Jésus de Jean-Christian Petitfils (When the Son of man cometh, shall he find faith on the earth?)

16 avril, 2018
Dictionnaire amoureux de Jésus
piss Christ (Andreas Serrano, 1987)La "femme imam" danoise Sherin Khankan à l'Elysée, avec Emmanuel Macron le 26 mars 2018
Mais, quand le Fils de l’homme viendra, trouvera-t-il la foi sur la terre? Jésus (Luc 18: 8)
Le christianisme est une religion d’historiens. D’autres systèmes religieux ont pu fonder leurs croyances et leurs rites sur une mythologie à peu près extérieure au temps humain; pour livres sacrés, les chrétiens ont des livres d’histoire, et leurs liturgies commémorent, avec les épisodes de la vie terrestre d’un Dieu, les fastes de l’Eglise et des saints. Marc Bloch
« Dionysos contre le « crucifié » : la voici bien l’opposition. Ce n’est pas une différence quant au martyr – mais celui-ci a un sens différent. La vie même, son éternelle fécondité, son éternel retour, détermine le tourment, la destruction, la volonté d’anéantir pour Dionysos. Dans l’autre cas, la souffrance, le « crucifié » en tant qu’il est « innocent », sert d’argument contre cette vie, de formulation de sa condamnation.  (…) L’individu a été si bien pris au sérieux, si bien posé comme un absolu par le christianisme, qu’on ne pouvait plus le sacrifier : mais l’espèce ne survit que grâce aux sacrifices humains… La véritable philanthropie exige le sacrifice pour le bien de l’espèce – elle est dure, elle oblige à se dominer soi-même, parce qu’elle a besoin du sacrifice humain. Et cette pseudo-humanité qui s’institue christianisme, veut précisément imposer que personne ne soit sacrifié. Nietzsche
Il faut avoir le courage de vouloir le mal et pour cela il faut commencer par rompre avec le comportement grossièrement humanitaire qui fait partie de l’héritage chrétien. (..) Nous sommes avec ceux qui tuent. Breton
L’inauguration majestueuse de l’ère « post-chrétienne » est une plaisanterie. Nous sommes dans un ultra-christianisme caricatural qui essaie d’échapper à l’orbite judéo-chrétienne en « radicalisant » le souci des victimes dans un sens antichrétien. (…) Jusqu’au nazisme, le judaïsme était la victime préférentielle de ce système de bouc émissaire. Le christianisme ne venait qu’en second lieu. Depuis l’Holocauste , en revanche, on n’ose plus s’en prendre au judaïsme, et le christianisme est promu au rang de bouc émissaire numéro un. (…) Le mouvement antichrétien le plus puissant est celui qui réassume et « radicalise » le souci des victimes pour le paganiser. (…) Comme les Eglises chrétiennes ont pris conscience tardivement de leurs manquements à la charité, de leur connivence avec l’ordre établi, dans le monde d’hier et d’aujourd’hui, elles sont particulièrement vulnérables au chantage permanent auquel le néopaganisme contemporain les soumet. René Girard
Ils disent: nous avons mis à mort le Messie, Jésus fils de Marie, l’apôtre de dieu. Non ils ne l’ont point tué, ils ne l’ont point crucifié, un autre individu qui lui ressemblait lui fut substitué, et ceux qui disputaient à son sujet ont été eux-mêmes dans le doute, ils n’ont que des opinions, ils ne l’ont pas vraiment tué. Mais Dieu l’a haussé à lui, Dieu est le puissant, Dieu est le sage. Le Coran (Sourate IV, verset 157-158)
C’était une cité fortement convoitée par les ennemis de la foi et c’est pourquoi, par une sorte de syndrome mimétique, elle devint chère également au cœur des Musulmans. Emmanuel Sivan
La condition préalable à tout dialogue est que chacun soit honnête avec sa tradition. (…) les chrétiens ont repris tel quel le corpus de la Bible hébraïque. Saint Paul parle de ” greffe” du christianisme sur le judaïsme, ce qui est une façon de ne pas nier celui-ci . (…) Dans l’islam, le corpus biblique est, au contraire, totalement remanié pour lui faire dire tout autre chose que son sens initial (…) La récupération sous forme de torsion ne respecte pas le texte originel sur lequel, malgré tout, le Coran s’appuie. René Girard
Dans la foi musulmane, il y a un aspect simple, brut, pratique qui a facilité sa diffusion et transformé la vie d’un grand nombre de peuples à l’état tribal en les ouvrant au monothéisme juif modifié par le christianisme. Mais il lui manque l’essentiel du christianisme : la croix. Comme le christianisme, l’islam réhabilite la victime innocente, mais il le fait de manière guerrière. La croix, c’est le contraire, c’est la fin des mythes violents et archaïques. René Girard
La vraie intégration, c’est quand des catholiques appelleront leur enfant Mohamed. Martin Hirsch
Particulièrement depuis les années 1970 et jusqu’à récemment en France, les instructions officielles, les manuels scolaires, les formations d’enseignants ont mis le récit à distance. (…) En dehors de la classe, en revanche, les élèves ont accès à un grand nombre de récits historiques de formes et de contenus variés, transmis dans le milieu familial, par la télévision, le cinéma, la littérature, des jeux vidéo, Internet, etc. Par ailleurs, le récit est redevenu central pour les historiens et pour ceux qui se préoccupent de l’apprentissage. Ricœur a, en 1983, a souligné la dimension narrative des textes historiques et la place structurante de l’intrigue qui l’organise. La narratologie contemporaine a, de son côté, montré comment le récit est une stratégie de communication. Tandis que pour Jérôme Bruner, le récit est le moyen de donner forme à l’expérience, de comprendre le monde, de se l’approprier, de s’y projeter entre passé et devenir, à partir du monde présent. Il en conclut que le récit a à voir avec la culture car l’imitation dont il témoigne inscrit l’homme dans une culture. (…) Après avoir constitué une équipe de recherche internationale pluridisciplinaire (histoire, sociologie, narratologie, didactique), le recueil de récits de l’histoire nationale a été fait en 2011-2012 (…) Pour la France, le traitement quantitatif et qualitatif des 5823 récits recueillis a fait ressortir plusieurs thèmes. (…) Les thèmes finalement retenus ont été les personnages, le politique, les guerres, la religion, le territoire ainsi que l’origine, déclarée par les élèves, de leurs connaissances. (…) les jeunes, scolarisés en France, interrogés ont exprimé leur fierté de l’histoire nationale et une vision à la fois humaniste et optimiste de l’histoire de leur pays dans laquelle les guerres jouent un rôle décisif et le politique structure le sens de l’histoire tandis que le panthéon, marqué par certaines permanences, connaît aussi des évolutions et une mobilisation des personnages historiques de façon plus iconique que comme des acteurs aux actes bien identifiés. Par exemple, les élèves évoquant l’origine de l’histoire de France (tous ne le font pas), l’associent majoritairement aux Gaulois et à la Gaule (plus de 1700 récits) (…) Mais nombreux sont aussi ceux qui lui attribuent une autre origine (la Révolution française, la Première Guerre mondiale, par exemple) (…) La religion a par ailleurs une place limitée dans des récits très sécularisés montrant une méfiance à l’égard de la dimension temporelle du religieux. Enfin, contrairement à une de nos hypothèses, le territoire joue un rôle minime face à un récit très nationalisé. L’école, ses dispositifs et objets restent leur première source de savoir, d’après les élèves, mais la famille et certaines pratiques sociales jouent également un rôle. En revanche, Internet est peu identifié comme source de savoir historique. Françoise Lantheaume
On verra que, globalement, les élèves considèrent la religion comme un phénomène négatif. L’islam et le judaïsme sont beaucoup moins présents que le christianisme. Sébastien Urbanski
Every word ever written about the historical Jesus (…) was written by people who did not know Jesus while he was alive. Reza Aslan
There is no evidence that Jesus promoted violence in any of the histories that we have. But we need to rid ourselves of this notion that he was a pacifist. Jesus wasn’t a fool, if you are talking about the end of Caesar’s rule and inauguration of reign of God, you can’t be so daft as to think that will happen in a peaceful way. (…) This is who Jesus was, the historical Jesus: he was an illiterate, day laborer, peasant from the country side of Galilee who hung around with the most dispossessed, poor, weak, outcasts of his society — people whom the temple rejected. And who, in their name, launched an insurrection against the Roman and priestly authorities. That’s Jesus. So, if you claim to walk in Jesus’ footsteps, that’s what it means. It means rejecting power, in all its forms -– religious and political — it means denying yourself in the name of the poor and the marginalized regardless of their religious or their sexual orientation or anything else. If you do not do those things, you are not a follower of Jesus. ‘Cause that’s who Jesus was. (…) The land that Jesus called his own, there is still a poor marginalized people who are being occupied directly by a military presence and so I would be curious how Christians couldn’t see the parallels between what’s happening in the occupied territories today and what was happening in the time of Jesus. Reza Aslan
Les trois monothéismes, animés par une même pulsion de mort généalogique, partagent une série de mépris identiques: haine de la raison et de l’intelligence, haine de la liberté, haine de tous les livres au nom d’un seul, haine de la vie… Michel Onfray
Hitler, disciple de saint Jean ! Michel Onfray
Gott mit uns procède des Écritures, notamment du Deutéronome, l’un des livres de la Torah. Michel Onfray
Trois millénaires témoignent, des premiers textes de l’Ancien Testament à aujourd’hui : l’affirmation d’un Dieu unique, violent, jaloux, querelleur, intolérant, belliqueux, a généré plus de haine, de sang, de morts, de brutalité que de paix. Michel Onfray
Les trois monothéismes, animés par une même pulsion de mort généalogique, partagent une série de mépris identiques : haine de la raison et de l’intelligence ; haine de la liberté ; haine de tous les livres au nom d’un seul ; haine de la vie ; haine de la sexualité, des femmes et du plaisir ; haine du féminin ; haine des corps, des désirs, des pulsions. En lieu et place de tout cela, judaïsme, christianisme et islam défendent : la foi et la croyance, l’obéissance et la soumission, le goût de la mort et la passion de l’au-delà, l’ange asexué et la chasteté, la virginité et la fidélité monogamique, l’épouse et la mère, l’âme et l’esprit. Autant dire la vie crucifiée et le néant célébré. (…) Les monothéismes n’aiment pas l’intelligence, les livres, le savoir, la science. À cela, ils ajoutent une forte détestation pour la matière et le réel, donc toute forme d’immanence. Michel Onfray
Des millions de morts, des millions de morts sur tous les continents, pendant des siècles, au nom de Dieu, la bible dans une main, le glaive dans l’autre : l’Inquisition, la torture, la question; les croisades, les massacres, les pillages, les viols, les pendaisons, les exterminations, les bûchers; la traite des noirs, l’humiliation, l’exploitation, le servage, le commerce des hommes, des femmes et des enfants; les génocides , les ethnocides des conquistadores très chrétiens, certes, mais aussi, récemment, du clergé rwandais aux côtés des exterminateurs hutus; le compagnonnage de route avec tous les fascismes du XXième siècle, Mussolini, Pétain, Hitler, Pinochet, Salazar, les colonels de la Grèce, les dictateurs d’Amérique du Sud; etc… Des millions de morts pour l’amour du prochain. Michel Onfray
A l’heure où se profile un ultime combat – déjà perdu… – pour défendre les valeurs des Lumières contre les propositions magiques, il faut promouvoir une laïcité post-chrétienne, à savoir athée, militante et radicalement opposée à tout choix de société entre le judéo-christianisme occidental et l’islam qui le combat. Ni la Bible, ni le Coran. Aux rabbins, aux prêtres, aux imams, ayatollahs et autres mollahs, je persiste à préférer le philosophe. A toutes ces théologies abracadabrantesques, je préfère en appeler aux pensées alternatives à l’historiographie philosophique dominante : les rieurs, les matérialistes, les radicaux, les cyniques, les hédonistes, les athées, les sensualistes, les voluptueux. Ceux-là savent qu’il n’existe qu’un monde et que toute promotion d’un arrière- monde nous fait perdre l’usage et le bénéfice du seul qui soit. Péché réellement mortel. Michel Onfray
On connaît les rapports entretenus par le Vatican avec le national-socialisme […] On connaît moins bien la défense faite par Adolf Hitler de Jésus, du Christ, du christianisme, de l’Église… La lecture de Mon combat suffit pour constater de visu la fascination du Führer pour le Jésus chassant les marchands du Temple et pour l’Église capable d’avoir construit une civilisation européenne, voire planétaire. Michel Onfray
La civilisation judéo-chrétienne se construit sur une fiction: celle d’un Jésus n’ayant jamais eu d’autre existence qu’allégorique, métaphorique, symbolique, mythologique. Il n’existe de ce personnage aucune preuve tangible en son temps. Michel Onfray
Il fallut, pour cette transmutation du concept de Jésus en or religieux, l’action d’un homme qui eut un corps véritable, lui, mais un corps défaillant. J’ai nommé Paul de Tarse. Paul fit de Jésus le doux un Christ à l’épée. Et le tranchant de cette épée ruisselle de sang pendant plus de mille ans. Michel Onfray
(Vatican II) est un camouflet pour Pie XII, certes, mais aussi, et surtout, pour plus d’un millénaire d’Eglise catholique, apostolique et romaine. Car, depuis l’empereur Constantin, elle a justifié: l’usage du glaive contre l’adversaire; le recours aux autodafés des livres non chrétiens; les pogroms antisémites (…). Ce concile était une bombe. Michel Onfray
Michel Onfray se rend-il compte que presque tout ce qu’il dit ne provient d’aucune source, d’aucune archive, mais de mémoires ou d’écrits apocryphes pour la plupart publiés au XIXe siècle par l’historiographie catholique et royaliste ? (…) La récupération de ce patrimoine et des arguments de l’extrême droite est malhonnête car, comme auteur, Onfray exerce une certaine responsabilité : en l’absence de notes de bas de page et d’une bibliographie sérieuse, il ne donne jamais à ses lecteurs les moyens de vérifier ses affirmations. (…) Lorsqu’elles sont commises par un des auteurs les plus médiatiques et les plus aimés du grand public et qu’elles passent inaperçues dans la critique, ces révisions de l’Histoire et ces dérives idéologiques participent d’un lent travail de sape contre les valeurs démocratiques. Sans conduire à dénigrer l’ensemble des initiatives d’Onfray, elles doivent donc être dénoncées avec la plus grande fermeté. On ne peut être spécialiste de tout. Michel Onfray ferait bien d’en tirer quelques enseignements. Guillaume Mazeau
La méthodologie s’appuie sur le principe de la préfiguration : tout est déjà dans tout avant même la survenue d’un événement. Cela lui a permis d’affirmer des choses extravagantes : qu’Emmanuel Kant était le précurseur d’Adolf Eichmann – parce que celui-ci se disait kantien (…) -, que les trois monothéismes (judaïsme, christianisme et islam) étaient des entreprises génocidaires, que l’évangéliste Jean préfigurait Hitler et Jésus Hiroshima, et enfin que les musulmans étaient des fascistes (…). Fondateurs d’un monothéisme axé sur la pulsion de mort, les juifs seraient donc les premiers responsables de tous les malheurs de l’Occident. A cette entreprise mortifère, M. Onfray oppose une religion hédoniste, solaire et païenne, habitée par la pulsion de vie. (…) il retourne l’accusation de « science juive » prononcée par les nazis contre la psychanalyse pour faire de celle-ci une science raciste : puisque les nazis ont mené à son terme l’accomplissement de la pulsion de mort théorisée par Freud, affirme-t-il, cela signifie que celui-ci serait un admirateur de tous les dictateurs fascistes et racistes. Mais Freud aurait fait pire encore : en publiant, en 1939, L’Homme Moïse et la religion monothéiste, c’est-à-dire en faisant de Moïse un Egyptien et du meurtre du père un moment originel des sociétés humaines, il aurait assassiné le grand prophète de la Loi et serait donc, par anticipation, le complice de l’extermination de son peuple. (…) Bien qu’il se réclame de la tradition freudo-marxiste, Michel Onfray se livre en réalité à une réhabilitation des thèses paganistes de l’extrême droite française. (…) On est loin ici d’un simple débat opposant les partisans et les adeptes de la psychanalyse, et l’on est en droit de se demander si les motivations marchandes ne sont pas désormais d’un tel poids éditorial qu’elles finissent par abolir tout jugement critique. Elisabeth Roudinesco
« Jésus, reviens ! » Étonnant trait d’ironie au cœur de Décadence. L’apostrophe tranche radicalement avec la ligne générale de Michel Onfray : d’abord parce que, selon lui, Jésus n’a pas existé. La naissance même du Christ est une fiction complète, le délire d’une secte qui haïssait tellement la sexualité qu’elle s’est imaginé pour Dieu un enfant né sans union. Cette affirmation catégorique, que l’auteur n’accepte de suspendre de façon hypothétique qu’une seule fois dans la suite du livre, est le point de départ qui ouvre sa démonstration : 600 pages d’une histoire dense, énergique, serrée… Le Point
La Torah contient une malédiction portée contre les pendus (Dt 21, 23 …); or la crucifixion était alors assimilée à une pendaison. Il est donc impensable que des Juifs aient pu forger le mythe d’un Messie « pendu » au bois de la croix, quand l’attente était celle d’un Messie royal ou sacerdotal. C’eut été pousser le défi un peu loin. Bernard Pouderon
Michel Onfray conteste l’existence historique de Jésus, une thèse qui a fait parler d’elle au XIXe siècle et au début du XXe, mais qui n’est plus soutenue par aucun historien. Le Jésus de Michel Onfray est tellement fantasmé – vu à travers des écrits apocryphes, des œuvres d’art très postérieures à l’époque de sa prédication… – qu’on a l’impression que tout a été retenu sauf, précisément, ce qui permet d’avoir des informations exploitables du point de vue de l’historien. C’est très curieux : cela consiste à prendre les sources les moins fiables ou ce qui n’a même pas le statut de source pour dire : « Voilà, il y a toute cette élaboration fictive autour de Jésus, donc Jésus n’existe pas. » Or des sources fiables existent bien, même si elles doivent être interprétées selon des méthodes scientifiques éprouvées. Par ailleurs, on peut très bien faire de l’élaboration fictive à partir d’un personnage qui a existé, c’est le cas de bien des figures historiques. Regardez Alexandre le Grand, Charlemagne… (…) Selon Onfray, le langage antisémite qui a servi aux nazis trouverait ses origines chez saint Paul. Historiquement, c’est totalement infondé. L’antijudaïsme chrétien a pu hélas ! contribuer chez certaines personnes à faire accepter l’antisémitisme nazi, mais la continuité massive que Michel Onfray affirme n’est appuyée sur aucune source. Ce n’est pas non plus de la philosophie de l’Histoire, puisqu’il n’y a aucun raisonnement digne de ce nom. On est dans le domaine de l’amalgame au service d’une propagande. Je ne me prononce pas sur la philosophie de l’Histoire d’Onfray en général, je dis simplement que sur cette affirmation précise, notamment lorsqu’il évoque Hitler comme un exemple de catholique, on passe dans le domaine de l’absurde. Le texte de Mein Kampf qu’il cite n’a strictement rien de chrétien : il témoigne d’une totale incompréhension du personnage de Jésus. Et puis, Onfray passe sous silence l’antichristianisme des nazis et l’engagement de nombreux chrétiens contre le nazisme. (…) Ces propos sont intégrés à une grande fresque épique. Décadence est le second volume de ce que Michel Onfray présente comme une « Brève encyclopédie du monde ». Le premier volume était Cosmos, le troisième devrait s’intituler Sagesse. ­Décadence est le volume dédié à la philosophie de l’Histoire. Ce livre a donc des dimensions et une construction qui peuvent donner l’impression qu’il s’agit d’un ouvrage d’érudition et de réflexion. Or, en ce qui concerne le christianisme antique – et je ne me prononce que sur ce domaine qui m’est familier, en ayant lu ce livre de très près, ligne à ligne, en mettant en fiches tout ce que j’y ai trouvé sur les premiers siècles chrétiens –, on est de toute évidence dans une démarche qui ne tient absolument pas compte des faits dans leur ensemble, des nuances, des sources, de l’état actuel des connaissances… L’ouvrage est volumineux, il est porté par un certain souffle rédactionnel, avec une très grande sûreté de ton, qui frise un peu le dogmatisme. Mais en ce qui me concerne, pour ma spécialité, on en est à un taux d’erreurs et d’affirmations insoutenables que, sans exagération, j’estime à environ 80%. Dans un livre, il y a toujours des erreurs. Mais ici, le nombre d’affirmations factuellement fausses ou abusivement générales, de rapprochements incongrus atteint des proportions inédites. Même lorsque certains faits évoqués par Onfray sont avérés, la manière de les présenter est tendancieuse. Prenez le meurtre ­d’Hypatie, cette philosophe d’Alexandrie assassinée en 415 par des chrétiens déchaînés. Cet épisode est honteux. Mais le problème, c’est qu’Onfray ne dit pas : « Des chrétiens ont tué Hypatie. » Il prétend que ce sont les chrétiens qui ont commis ce meurtre atroce. À chaque fois que certains chrétiens commettent des violences, il écrit « les chrétiens »?. (…)  ce que je reproche à Michel Onfray, ce n’est pas la critique du christianisme. Ce qui me gêne, c’est que ce qui se présente chez lui comme une critique n’en est pas une, car il fait abstraction de toutes les précautions méthodologiques qui s’imposent. Chez lui, dès que les chrétiens entrent en scène, tout est négatif. Ce qui est frappant dans Décadence, c’est qu’il n’y a pas la moindre nuance, aucune circonstance atténuante, pas de bénéfice du doute. Rien. Les chrétiens ont toujours tort. Lorsqu’il y a deux hypothèses historiques sur un sujet, Onfray prend toujours celle qui est défavorable aux chrétiens sans mentionner l’existence de l’autre. En travaillant sur son texte, je me suis dit : si j’étais totalement ignorant du christianisme, en lisant ce livre, je penserais que, vraiment, les chrétiens sont des salauds et ne valent pas mieux que les nazis. Je détesterais les chrétiens. [sur] les Pères de l’Église (…) Il dresse une sorte de catalogue de noms, de questions discutées par eux, de problèmes théo­logiques, pour conclure que, au fond, les Pères de l’Église, c’est nul. Il dit « trop de noms, trop de titres ». C’est le fameux « Too many notes ! » que l’empereur Léopold lance à Mozart dans le film de Miloš Forman. Michel Onfray se permet de juger les Pères en bloc, sans, de toute évidence, les avoir étudiés sérieusement. Ce qu’il prouve en faisant cela, c’est donc d’abord son ignorance. Il parle des Pères comme d’un trou noir dans l’histoire intellectuelle de l’Occident. « Tant d’intelligence au service de tant de bêtises », écrit-il. Pour lui, les questions théologiques ne sont que des bêtises. Méthodologiquement, c’est fâcheux. Je ne considère pas, moi, en lisant Onfray, que son antichristianisme rendrait son livre inutile. Je le lis d’abord scrupuleusement, avant de porter un jugement précis et argumenté. (…) Michel Onfray, en allant chercher des auteurs peu connus, en mettant en avant des anecdotes inattendues, semble exhumer des pans de connaissance cachés ou oubliés. Le grand public peut se laisser impressionner. Les spécialistes, eux, ne sont pas dupes. Jean-Marie Salamito
Cette génération est plus pragmatique et moins idéologue que les précédentes. Pour eux, la prière et les rassemblements ont aussi une dimension esthétique. Des non-croyants vont aimer aller à la messe pour vivre une expérience culturelle un peu étrange, le silence par exemple. (…) Ils ne comprennent pas comment on peut avoir ce genre de débats aujourd’hui. Pour eux, ces polémiques sur la laïcité sont d’un autre âge. Ils n’associent pas l’Église au prosélytisme. (…) « Même s’il y a moins de préjugés qu’avant, le fait de n’avoir aucun contact avec les religions peut entretenir une peur, confirme Mgr Bordeyne. Ma génération a grandi avec des professeurs très laïques pour lesquels les religions étaient clivantes. Cette enquête, au contraire, montre que la religion ouvre davantage aux autres que l’absence de foi. C’est cela aussi qui fait que les jeunes s’y intéressent : ils voient bien que l’absence de religion ne favorise pas spécialement le dialogue. Mgr Philippe Bordeyne (Institut catholique de Paris)
Le Nord-Pas-de-Calais, certaines banlieues parisiennes, et les quartiers Nord de Marseille sont les lieux où nous avons mesuré la plus grande radicalité. Dans certains établissements, la proportion «d’absolutistes» monte à plus de 40 %. On note aussi un effet «ségrégation» : quand le taux d’élèves musulmans est très important dans un lycée, ceux-ci sont plus radicaux qu’ailleurs. Mais partout, les élèves musulmans sont plus radicaux religieusement que les autres. (…) L’«effet islam» explique bien mieux la radicalité que des facteurs socio-économiques. C’est un résultat important. Le niveau social de la famille, l’optimisme ou le pessimisme du lycéen face à l’emploi ou à ses résultats scolaires n’ont aucun effet sur le degré d’adhésion à des idées religieuses radicales. (…) le sentiment de discrimination (…) a tendance à augmenter, chez les jeunes musulmans, le niveau de radicalité religieuse et la tolérance à la violence religieuse. Nous avons aussi tenté d’explorer la piste de ce que certains chercheurs nomment «le malaise identitaire» : un groupe minoritaire peut se sentir l’objet de l’hostilité du groupe majoritaire, sans pour autant subir de discrimination. Nous avons ainsi demandé aux jeunes s’ils se sentaient français, s’ils étaient solidaires avec le peuple palestinien, quel était leur regard sur les tensions interreligieuses… Ces variables jouent, preuve qu’il y a donc bien un effet identitaire. Mais celui-ci n’efface pas la question religieuse. In fine, l’effet islam reste très marqué. Il faudrait maintenant mener des recherches complémentaires auprès des jeunes musulmans pour explorer de manière plus approfondie la façon dont ils investissent la religion.(…) Un effet religion existe bien puisque 8 % des chrétiens répondent qu’il est acceptable de combattre les armes à la main pour sa religion, ce n’est pas négligeable. On monte à 20 % des musulmans. Mais le facteur qui détermine le plus fortement le soutien à la violence religieuse est la tolérance à la violence et aux déviances en général : voler un scooter, tricher lors d’un examen, participer à une action violente pour défendre ses idées, affronter la police… C’est un résultat important, qui conduit à constater un indéniable «effet ZUS» [zone urbaine sensible, ndlr]. Dans certaines zones du territoire, on devine qu’une socialisation à la déviance et à la violence explique sans doute la perméabilité à la violence religieuse. On y observe une «culture déviante». (…) en France, les manifestations de radicalité religieuse concernent essentiellement le monde musulman, les autres sont très circonscrites.(…) je pense qu’une partie de la sociologie est aveugle, sous prétexte de ne pas stigmatiser. La discrimination existe, c’est prouvé scientifiquement. Mais il ne faut pas non plus envisager ces jeunes-là uniquement d’un point de vue victimaire. Sinon, on ne peut pas les considérer comme les acteurs sociaux qu’ils sont. Cette sociologie-là est trop idéologique, elle s’est appuyée trop exclusivement sur l’analyse des discriminations. La neutralité axiologique est importante, elle est trop souvent oubliée aujourd’hui. Olivier Galland
Il faut un président bien sage pour défendre le féminisme islamique et considérer la religion comme une partie de la solution et non du problème.  Le président français Emmanuel Macron envoie un signal politique important montrant que la société laïque peut coexister avec la religion. Sherin Khankan
Le chef de l’Etat s’est dit intéressé par l’idée et a promis de donner suite. Le Maroc serait parfaitement indiqué pour une telle conférence dans la mesure où ce pays forme déjà, depuis quelques années, une nouvelle génération de professeures de religion : les mushidad. (…) Rien, dans le Coran, n’interdit aux femmes de conduire la prière ni de gérer un mosquée. Sherin Khankan
Le président de la République veut présenter avant la fin du premier semestre 2018 un « plan » pour « l’islam de France » : ses instances représentatives, son financement et la formation de ses imams. Il continue pour cela ses consultations, comme lundi 26 mars avec une Danoise « féministe musulmane » Sherin Khankan et la rabbin libérale Delphine Horvilleur. (…) Lundi 26 mars, cette Danoise d’origine syrienne, fondatrice en 2001 d’un Forum des musulmans critiques, puis d’un centre formation soufi « Sortir du cercle », auteur de La femme est l’avenir de l’islam (Stock, 2017), a été reçue à l’Élysée, en même temps que la rabbin libérale Delphine Horvilleur. « Le président de la République, qui lit beaucoup, est tombé sur la conversation entre les deux femmes organisée par l’Institut français de Copenhague », raconte un proche du dossier. La vidéo de l’entretien, daté du 26 mars 2016, est visible sur YouTube. « Sans doute cet échange entre deux femmes ministres du culte l’intéressait-il dans le cadre de ses consultations tous azimuts. Il rencontre des tas de gens pour nourrir sa réflexion ». Cette fois, c’est la place des femmes dans la religion qui a éveillé sa curiosité. Dans de nombreux pays musulmans, des femmes plaident pour une relecture du Coran et de la tradition musulmane sortis de leur « gangue » patriarcale. Dans quelques villes européennes – Berlin ou Londres notamment –, des femmes ont même ouvert des lieux de prière pour un public féminin. À Copenhague, la salle de prière installée par Sherin Khankan dans un appartement, dont elle a abattu les cloisons, est ouverte à tous en semaine, et réservée aux femmes le vendredi pour qu’elle puisse guider leur prière. Plus qu’une « imam », cette jeune mère de famille fait en réalité office de mourchidat, une fonction de prédicatrice pour un public féminin courante y compris dans les pays majoritairement musulmans. À Copenhague pas plus qu’ailleurs, les hommes n’ont accepté une femme comme imam. « La majorité pense qu’une femme ne dirige pas la prière devant des hommes, mais il existe des avis minoritaires : certains considèrent que si une femme connait mieux le Coran que son mari, elle peut diriger la prière », note Hicham Abdel Gawad, doctorant en sciences des religions à Louvain-la-Neuve. « Dans tous les cas, la règle de base est que celui qui dirige la prière doit être agréé par les personnes qui prient derrière lui. » « Dans un paysage musulman complètement éclaté, on peut se demander pourquoi aucune mosquée alternative n’a émergé jusqu’à aujourd’hui, à l’exception d’un lieu de culte dédié aux fidèles homosexuels », remarque ce bon connaisseur de l’islam de France. « Y aurait-il une sorte de fatalité à n’avoir le choix qu’à l’intérieur de l’éventail qui va de Dalil Boubakeur (NDLR : recteur de la Grande mosquée de Paris, proche de l’Algérie) à Nader Abou Anas (NDLR : imam du Bourget, proche de la mouvance salafiste) ? » Interrogé sur cette invitation à l’Élysée d’une représentante du courant « féministe musulman », le Conseil français du culte musulman n’a pas souhaité réagir. La Croix
L’imame danoise Sherin Khankan et Emmanuel Macron ont discuté, ce lundi 26 mars, de la situation de l’islam en Occident lors d’un entretien d’une heure à l’Elysée auquel participait également la femme rabbin française Delphine Horvilleur. Le chef de l’Etat français avait sollicité les deux femmes pour recueillir leurs réflexions sur meilleure manière, selon elles, d’améliorer le dialogue des civilisations. Connue pour avoir ouvert, à Copenhague, en 2017, la première mosquée 100% féminine d’Europe et soucieuse de modifier la perception de sa religion à travers la promotion d’un islam moderne, ouvert, progressiste et modéré, l’imame féministe Sherin Khankan a suggéré au président l’idée d’une grande conférence réunissant des femmes imam venues du monde entier, des femmes rabbin, des pasteures protestantes, des prêtres catholiques ainsi que des intellectuels des toutes les religions, notamment des musulmans, sans discrimination de sexe. (…) Par hasard du calendrier, le rendez-vous avec Emmanuel Macron, programmé depuis plus d’un mois, est tombé trois jours après l’attaque terroriste de Trèbes et Caracassonne. Ce sujet n’a pas été évoqué lors de l’entretien avec Sherin Khankan et Delphine Horvilleur. En octobre, Sherin Khankan a publié La femme est l’avenir de l’islam chez Stock. Elle y raconte sa trajectoire et son parcours intellectuel forgé à Copenhague dans une famille métisse. Née d’un père musulman syrien opposant à Hafez el-Assad et d’une mère protestante finlandaise, la quadragénaire Sherin Khankan s’est orientée vers l’islam dans l’entrée à l’âge adulte tout en militant pour un « féminisme islamique » qui vise à mettre fin à la culture du patriarcat au sein de la religion de Mahomet. « Rien, dans le Coran, n’interdit aux femmes de conduire la prière ni de gérer un mosquée », affirme cette imame qui célèbre des mariages interreligieux et milite inlassablement pour l’égalité homme-femme au sein de l’islam. Inspirée notamment, par les féministes musulmanes Amina Wadud, qui est américaine, et la Marocaine Fatima Mernissi (décédée en 2015) Sherin Khankan a inauguré, l’année dernière à Copenhague, la première mosquée d’Europe réservée aux femmes. L’Express
Jeanne est dans cette France déchirée, coupée en deux, agitée par une guerre sans fin qui l’oppose au royaume d’Angleterre. Elle a su rassembler la France pour la défendre, dans un mouvement que rien n’imposait. Tant d’autres s’étaient habitués à cette guerre qu’ils avaient toujours connue. Elle a rassemblé des soldats de toutes origines. Et alors même que la France n’y croyait pas, se divisait contre elle-même, elle a eu l’intuition de son unité, de son rassemblement. Voilà pourquoi, les Français ont besoin de Jeanne d’Arc, car elle nous dit que le destin n’est pas écrit. Emmanuel Macron
Le fait que la PMA ne soit pas ouverte aux couples de femmes et aux femmes seules est une discrimination intolérable. Emmanuel Macron
Je vous remercie vivement, Monseigneur, et je remercie la Conférence des Evêques de France de cette invitation à m’exprimer ici ce soir, en ce lieu si particulier et si beau du Collège des Bernardins, dont je veux aussi remercier les responsables et les équipes. Pour nous retrouver ici ce soir, Monseigneur, nous avons, vous et moi bravé, les sceptiques de chaque bord. Et si nous l’avons fait, c’est sans doute que nous partageons confusément le sentiment que le lien entre l’Eglise et l’Etat s’est abîmé, et qu’il nous importe à vous comme à moi de le réparer. (…) Je suis convaincu que les liens les plus indestructibles entre la nation française et le catholicisme se sont forgés dans ces moments où est vérifiée la valeur réelle des hommes et des femmes. Il n’est pas besoin de remonter aux bâtisseurs de cathédrales et à Jeanne d’Arc : l’histoire récente nous offre mille exemples, depuis l’Union Sacrée de 1914 jusqu’aux résistants de 40, des Justes aux refondateurs de la République, des Pères de l’Europe aux inventeurs du syndicalisme moderne, de la gravité éminemment digne qui suivit l’assassinat du Père HAMEL à la mort du colonel BELTRAME, oui, la France a été fortifiée par l’engagement des catholiques. Je sais que l’on a débattu comme du sexe des anges des racines chrétiennes de l’Europe. Et que cette dénomination a été écartée par les parlementaires européens. Mais après tout, l’évidence historique se passe parfois de tels symboles. Et surtout, ce ne sont pas les racines qui nous importent, car elles peuvent aussi bien être mortes. Ce qui importe, c’est la sève. Et je suis convaincu que la sève catholique doit contribuer encore et toujours à faire vivre notre nation. C’est pour tenter de cerner cela que je suis ici ce soir. Pour vous dire que la République attend beaucoup de vous. Elle attend très précisément si vous m’y autorisez que vous lui fassiez trois dons : le don de votre sagesse ; le don de votre engagement et le don de votre liberté. (…) Nous ne pouvons plus, dans le monde tel qu’il va, nous satisfaire d’un progrès économique ou scientifique qui ne s’interroge pas sur son impact sur l’humanité et sur le monde. (…) Au cœur de cette interrogation sur le sens de la vie, sur la place que nous réservons à la personne, sur la façon dont nous lui conférons sa dignité, vous avez, Monseigneur, placé deux sujets de notre temps : la bioéthique et le sujet des migrants. (…) C’est la conciliation du droit et de l’humanité que nous tentons. Le Pape a donné un nom à cet équilibre, il l’a appelé « prudence », faisant de cette vertu aristotélicienne celle du gouvernant, confronté bien sûr à la nécessité humaine d’accueillir mais également à celle politique et juridique d’héberger et d’intégrer. C’est le cap de cet humanisme réaliste que j’ai fixé. (…) Sur la bioéthique, on nous soupçonne parfois de jouer un agenda caché, de connaître d’avance les résultats d’un débat qui ouvrira de nouvelles possibilités dans la procréation assistée, ouvrant la porte à des pratiques qui irrésistiblement s’imposeront ensuite, comme la Gestation Pour Autrui. Et certains se disent que l’introduction dans ces débats de représentants de l’Eglise catholique comme de l’ensemble des représentants des cultes comme je m’y suis engagé dès le début de mon mandat est un leurre, destiné à diluer la parole de l’Eglise ou à la prendre en otage. (…) tous les jours les mêmes associations catholiques et les prêtres accompagnent des familles monoparentales, des familles divorcées, des familles homosexuelles, des familles recourant à l’avortement, à la fécondation in vitro, à la PMA , des familles confrontées à l’état végétatif d’un des leurs, des familles où l’un croit et l’autre non, apportant dans la famille la déchirure des choix spirituels et moraux, et cela je le sais, c’est votre quotidien aussi. (…) Cet horizon du salut a certes totalement disparu de l’ordinaire des sociétés contemporaines, mais c’est un tort et l’on voit à bien à des signes qu’il demeure enfoui. Chacun a sa manière de le nommer, de le transformer, de le porter mais c’est tout à la fois la question du sens et de l’absolu dans nos sociétés, que l’incertitude du salut apporte à toutes les vies même les plus résolument matérielles comme un tremblé au sens pictural du terme, est une évidence. Emmanuel Macron
Les juifs avaient le dîner du Crif et le Nouvel An du Consistoire, les musulmans le dîner de la rupture du jeûne du ramadan, et les protestants, la cérémonie des vœux de la Fédération protestante de France. Il manquait donc à l’Église catholique « un moment pour s’adresser à la société française d’une manière plus large », explique Mgr Ribadeau-Dumas, porte-parole de la CEF. En pleins États généraux de la bioéthique, l’occasion d’interpeller le gouvernement sur plusieurs sujets sensibles, comme la PMA ou la fin de vie. Mais pas seulement. Le sort des migrants, des sans-abris, et la laïcité devraient aussi nourrir les discussions. (…) Si François Hollande, après l’assassinat du père Hamel, avait fini par adopter « un discours très favorable aux Églises » le début de son mandat a été ponctué davantage par « des discours de méfiance, comme celui du Bourget », analyse Philippe Portier, directeur d’études à l’École pratique des hautes études et directeur du Groupe sociétés, religions, laïcité. Quant à Nicolas Sarkozy, s’il était favorable au dialogue, il défendait « une conception identitaire de la nation, allant à l’encontre de la volonté d’accueil (de l’étranger, ndlr) de l’Église catholique ». En outre, beaucoup d’évêques auraient regretté que « Nicolas Sarkoy ait tendance à instrumentaliser les Églises au service de sa propre stratégie de pouvoir », ajoute le sociologue. Les évêques seraient plus à l’aise avec Emmanuel Macron, dont les discours inviteraient davantage au « dialogue avec les institutions religieuses », sans conception identitaire de la nation. (…) « Du fait de la pluralisation du champ religieux, et de l’agnosticisme d’une grande partie de la population, l’Église est contrainte de montrer son existence par des événements significatifs », constate pour sa part Philippe Portier. Dans ce nouveau contexte, l’Église adopterait donc une nouvelle logique de médiatisation pour exister. (…) Mais en se calquant sur les initiatives « événementielles » des autres communautés religieuses, l’Église ne risque-t-elle pas d’être perçue comme une minorité parmi d’autres ? Face à sa perte d’influence dans la société, serait-elle, progressivement, en train de se constituer en « lobby » ? (…) Les propos de Mgr Wintzer, interrogé par La Vie, illustrent bien ce dilemme : « L’Église prend conscience qu’elle est aussi une communauté, comme le sont d’autres communautés. On parle de la communauté musulmane, de la communauté juive, et maintenant on parle aussi de la communauté chrétienne, catholique. Faire cette invitation, c’est un peu accepter cela, d’être une religion avec d’autres. » « Et pourtant, ajoute-t-il, l’Église n’est pas un groupe à parité avec d’autres groupes. C’est-à-dire que l’Évangile n’est pas enfermé dans une communauté qui s’appelle l’Église catholique ». « Je me méfie de tout ce qui pourrait apparaître comme du communautarisme, abonde Mgr Ribadeau-Dumas. Les catholiques, par l’Évangile même, sont invités, dans la dimension universelle intrinsèque au catholicisme, à vivre dans cette société plurielle ». (…) Enfin, l’événement des Bernardins n’est pas tout à fait comparable aux événements organisés par les autres communautés religieuses. Les invités de marque, insiste Mgr Olivier Ribadeau-Dumas, en seront surtout des personnes handicapées, en situation de précarité, et des migrants : « Ce seront sans doute eux qui ouvriront la soirée, pour montrer que le trésor de l’Église, c’est bien celui-là. Nous nous adressons à toute la société ». Rien n’a encore été décidé, en outre, sur la possibilité de faire de cette soirée un rendez-vous annuel (…° Enfin, si la CEF assume cette nécessité d’avoir une parole plus audible, elle refuse d’être assimilée à un lobby. « Nous, nous n’avons pas de produit à vendre. Nous avons une bonne nouvelle à annoncer, martèle le porte-parole de la CEF. (…) Mgr Ribadeau-Dumas souligne aussi l’étendue du réseau, historique, de l’Église catholique sur l’ensemble du territoire français : « À part le réseau de l’école, c’est l’Église qui a le plus grand maillage territorial. Si les évêques de France choisissent qu’un texte soit lu dans toutes les églises de France, il le sera. La Vie
Emmanuel Macron présente l’Etat et l’Eglise comme devant être en situation d’alliance. C’est un discours traditionnel dans le langage catholique. Deux éléments de son propos renvoient à un langage d’Eglise où s’affirme la spécificité du catholicisme dans la société française. Le premier, c’est qu’il parle de l’Eglise comme étant, à côté de l’Etat, dépositaire d’un ordre qui a sa propre juridiction. L’Eglise et l’Etat sont deux sociétés autonomes relevant chacune d’un ordre de juridiction spécifique. Il n’a pas utilisé ce langage avec les juifs, les musulmans ou les protestants. Cela renvoie à l’auto-compréhension de l’Eglise, qui ne s’analyse pas comme une communauté de croyance comme les autres, mais comme la dépositaire de la parole du Christ et ayant, vis-à-vis de l’Etat, un ordre de juridiction spécifique. Le président de la République a repris là les catégories de la théologie politique. Le second élément, que l’on ne retrouve pas dans les discours aux autres communautés de foi, c’est l’association constante entre nation et religion catholique. Il a parlé des racines chrétiennes de la France comme d’une sorte d’évidence historique. Ce discours marque bien la centralité du catholicisme dans la constitution de la nation française. (…)  Pour Emmanuel Macron, toutes les religions participent au concert national. Mais il ne cesse de mettre en évidence le fait que le catholicisme est d’une nature théologique et historique particulière. Et qu’il a su, en dépit de son intransigeance originelle, se couler dans la République et accepter les principes de la démocratie constitutionnelle. C’est la grande différence avec l’islam auquel il demande, dans plusieurs de ses discours, de faire un effort d’acclimatation et d’institutionnalisation, comme l’ont fait les autres cultes. En cela il est très français, et aussi catholique : il pense le religieux dans une dialectique entre le sujet et l’institution. Dans sa façon de s’adresser au catholicisme, la présence du nonce [le représentant du Saint-Siège en France] fait référence à l’Eglise comme institution internationale. Il y a dans sa présence une logique concordataire qui s’exprime. (…) Il y a eu, dans les présidences précédentes, des pratiques de dialogue, de mobilisation du religieux au service du bien commun. Mais avec Emmanuel Macron, cela devient beaucoup plus formalisé et fait l’objet d’un discours explicite. Dès les années 1960-1970, à mesure que l’Etat s’estimait moins à même de régler seul les problèmes sociaux, s’est mise en place, à l’égard des cultes, une politique de reconnaissance. Il y a l’idée que l’Etat ne peut pas tout et qu’il a besoin de s’appuyer sur des forces extérieures à lui-même. C’est un discours que tenait déjà François Mitterrand en 1983, lorsqu’il inaugurait le Comité national d’éthique, et qu’il disait que nous avions besoin des sagesses des forces religieuses et convictionnelles. On trouve la même chose chez Emmanuel Macron. La différence, c’est que ce qui apparaissait au détour d’un discours chez tel ou tel président, chez lui, cela prend vraiment l’allure d’une doctrine très formelle. (…) Il vient couronner et expliciter une évolution à l’œuvre dès les années 1960-1970. A mesure que l’Etat se trouvait bousculé dans sa capacité d’action sur le réel par des forces qu’il ne maîtrisait pas – l’individualisation de la société, la globalisation –, il a essayé de faire front avec les forces de la société civile. Une politique de reconnaissance s’est progressivement mise en place : on a associé davantage les cultes à la réflexion, on les a financés davantage, on leur a délégué davantage de compétences… En 1993-1994, lorsqu’il était ministre de l’intérieur, Charles Pasqua disait déjà que, dans les banlieues, nous avions besoin de l’engagement des chrétiens. Emmanuel Macron a repris cette idée que le welfare state n’arrive pas à tout faire. Ce qui ne faisait qu’affleurer dans les discours passés des gouvernants se retrouve chez Emmanuel Macron dans un langage très particulier. (…) Deux tendances coexistent chez lui. La première est très « catholique d’ouverture ». Elle renvoie à l’idée que c’est à partir des engagements de la base que le catholicisme peut s’épanouir et irriguer la société de ses valeurs. Lundi, il a beaucoup insisté sur l’engagement social des catholiques. Pendant sa campagne présidentielle, il a visité le Secours catholique. C’est un catholicisme marqué par Emmanuel Mounier. En même temps, et c’est son côté plus traditionnel, il fait toujours référence à l’institution, ce que l’on aurait du mal à retrouver chez les catholiques libéraux. Il y a une sorte de compréhension dialectique du catholicisme comme un engagement des chrétiens porté par une institution elle-même inscrite dans l’histoire. Dans la campagne présidentielle, après avoir visité le Secours catholique, il s’est rendu à la basilique de Saint-Denis. Je ne crois pas que ces propos soient seulement stratégiques, destinés, pour les uns, aux catholiques de gauche, pour les autres aux catholiques d’affirmation. Il existe entre eux une coopération dialectique. (…) Il y a une ambiguïté. Fait-il allusion à l’histoire, à une laïcité de combat qui aurait laissé peu de place à l’Eglise ? Dans ce cas, il s’agirait de revenir sur une philosophie de séparation stricte pour essayer de lui substituer une laïcité de reconnaissance. De faire succéder une laïcité de confiance à une laïcité de défiance. Ou alors, deuxième hypothèse, il s’agit de prendre acte que, depuis les années 1990-2000, les catholiques sont de plus en plus méfiants à l’égard de la République et des gouvernants, qu’ils s’isolent dans une posture communautaire, identitaire, qui les éloigne de la communauté nationale. Il faudrait alors en finir avec cette évolution et leur permettre de réintégrer le concert public. Philippe Portier
Avant que tout discours ait été prononcé, le seul fait que le président Macron ait accepté, après des rencontres avec d’autres dignitaires des cultes, l’invitation de la Conférence des évêques de France à s’exprimer devant elle avait suscité des anticipations contrastées : celles de ceux qui dénonçaient par avance un manquement à la laïcité, et celles de ceux qui, en sens inverse, en espéraient des gages communautaires. Il est certain que le contenu de l’allocution d’un président de la République osant les mots de « transcendance » ou de « salut » a peu de chances d’apaiser les passions. Le propos, de fait, est hors norme. De quoi s’agit-il ? Son trait le plus frappant est la conviction forte qui s’y exprime de ce que la foi catholique n’est pas une simple « opinion », et de ce que l’Eglise n’est pas réductible a une « famille de pensée » invitée à vivre dans une bulle étanche au monde qui l’environne. Le discours du président intègre l’idée selon laquelle toute foi religieuse participe, pour celui qui s’en réclame, de la construction de son rapport au monde. Il atteste en même temps que le catholicisme – comme toute religion, selon Max Weber – est un « mode d’agir en communauté ». Dire cela, c’est avancer aussi que l’idée d’une pure « privatisation » de la croyance est une vue de l’esprit. Car la croyance n’est elle-même qu’une composante de ce rapport singulier au monde à laquelle la foi introduit le fidèle. Est-ce manquer à la laïcité que de le reconnaître ? La laïcité n’a pas été mise en place pour réduire sans reste cette singularité du religieux : elle a été construite pour empêcher que le mode propre d’agir en communauté que celle-ci définit puisse prévaloir, de quelque manière que ce soit, sur les règles que la communauté des citoyens se donne à elle-même. Ceci vaut pour le catholicisme romain autant que pour toutes les autres confessions présentes dans la société religieusement plurielle qu’est la France. Mais, dans un pays traumatisé par la guerre inexpugnable qui opposa pendant un siècle et demi au moins une France enfermée dans le rêve de la reconquête catholique à la France porteuse de l’ordre nouveau issu de la Révolution française, il faut une certaine audace pour affirmer que la singularité catholique, inscrite dans l’histoire longue, a légitimement vocation à s’exprimer, à sa place et sans privilège, dans une société définitivement sortie de la régie normative de l’Eglise et même du christianisme. Emmanuel Macron a affirmé la légitimité de cette expression de deux façons. Il l’a fait d’abord en prenant acte, indépendamment de toute prise de position idéologique sur la mention formelle des « racines chrétiennes », du rôle – non exclusif à beaucoup près – qui a été celui du catholicisme et de l’Eglise dans la fabrication de l’identité culturelle de la nation : nier l’importance de cette matrice catholique enfouie, et quoi qu’il en soit de son délitement présent, c’est s’exposer à méconnaître une source de bien des traits de notre esprit commun. Mais le président ne s’est pas arrêté seulement à cette invocation lointaine. Il a aussi fait état de l’engagement présent des catholiques dans le tissu de ces associations qui font prendre corps, sur des terrains multiples, au souci de ceux qu’il est convenu d’appeler « les plus fragiles » : ceux, en tout cas, que le cours du monde laisse sur le bord du chemin. Nul n’ignore, et certainement pas le président, que cet engagement n’est pas celui d’une armée en ordre de bataille sous la conduite des évêques : il est aussi le lieu où se creusent la pluralité et même la contradiction des voies selon lesquelles le catholicisme se vit concrètement comme manière d’habiter le monde. C’est au regard de cette pluralité des catholicismes qu’il faut ressaisir l’appel du président aux catholiques pour qu’ils fassent entendre leur voix dans le débat public, s’agissant en particulier des questions touchant aux migrations, à la bioéthique ou à la filiation. (…) En valorisant leur contribution à la production du sens de notre vie en commun, il ne se contente pas de mettre du baume sur les plaies d’une population perturbée par la découverte de sa condition minoritaire dans une société où elle fut, pendant des siècles, une majorité qui comptait. Il invite à rompre la logique d’enfermement qui pousse des courants de cette population à se constituer comme une contre-culture en résistance au sein d’un monde dont ils ont perdu les codes. Le discours des Bernardins restera, à cet égard, comme le moment assez étonnant où, dans la longue et difficile trajectoire de la reconfiguration du catholicisme français en minorité religieuse dans une société plurielle, l’invitation à échapper au risque sectaire sera venue, contre toute attente, de la plus haute autorité de la République. Danièle Hervieu-Léger
Inciter les membres d’une religion à s’engager politiquement, dans un contexte d’entrisme politique de l’islam radical, est à la fois irresponsable et dangereux : le Président ne pouvait ignorer la résonance particulière de ces mots dans un contexte où l’église catholique est en plein recul sur fond de crise des vocations, quand le prosélytisme islamique, lui, ne cesse de s’étendre. Ce ne sont pas les luthériens ni les bouddhistes qui vont soudain vouloir s’emparer de cet appel à l’engagement politique des religieux, et l’équité entre les cultes que commande justement le principe de laïcité obligera le Président à prononcer les mêmes paroles et accorder les mêmes objectifs aux membres de toutes les religions. Le problème … réside dans la volonté de certains d’imposer leur vision de la spiritualité dans l’espace public : vêtements, comportements, intolérances, interdictions, évictions des femmes de certains espaces, violences contre les membres d’autres religions, mais aussi interventions dans le champ bio-éthique etc. La spiritualité ne dispense jamais mieux ses effets positifs sur la société que lorsqu’elle s’exerce dans le cadre privé. Paradoxalement, après un siècle de relations en effet très douloureuses entre les Eglises et l’Etat, c’est désormais la laïcité qui est le meilleur rempart protecteur pour les chrétiens, tout comme elle l’est également pour les juifs de France mais aussi pour les musulmans modérés : ne pas comprendre cette inversion historique du paradigme laïque engendré par l’entrisme islamiste c’est au mieux faire un contresens majeur sur la situation actuelle, et au pire donner les clés de la maison à la religion qui sera la plus véhémente dans son action politique. Anne-Marie Chazaud
The new film Mary Magdalene, directed by Garth Davis (…) tells the story of Mary Magdalene (Rooney Mara), detailing her fraught existence in Magdala as a single woman determined not to marry, before she meets Jesus (Joaquin Phoenix) and follows him to Galilee and then Jerusalem, where he’s crucified. Yet, in stripping away the myths, this film portrayal of Mary Magdalene underlines what some scholars see as the real — and unexpected — reason why she’s so controversial. At the heart of the controversy is the idea that Mary Magdalene’s connection to Jesus was spiritual rather than romantic. For example, in the film’s version of the Last Supper, Mary Magdalene is seated on Jesus’ right-hand side. Though the tableau echoes a key scene in the 2006 film version of The Da Vinci Code, in which the characters examine Leonardo Da Vinci’s mural The Last Supper and debate whether the effeminate figure to Jesus’ right was in fact Mary Magdalene, the new movie doesn’t place her there as his wife. The significance of her seat lies instead in Mary Magdalene taking the prized position above any of the twelve male apostles, as Peter (Chiwetel Ejiofor) looks on in jealousy. This version of the story is the real reason why Mary Magdalene is dangerous to the Church, according to Professor Joan Taylor of King’s College, London, who worked as historical advisor for Mary Magdalene. Mary’s central role in the Gospels has historically been used by some as evidence that the Church should introduce female priests — and since 1969, when the Catholic Church admitted that it had mistakenly identified Mary Magdalene as a sex worker, the calls for women in church leadership positions have only grown louder. “Within the Church she does have tremendous power, and there are lots of women who look… to Mary Magdalene as a foundation for women’s leadership within the Church,” says Taylor. The film draws partially from the Gospel of Mary, a “very mysterious document” discovered in the 19th century, Taylor says. It has no known author, and although it’s popularly known as a “gospel,” it’s not technically classed as one, as gospels generally recount the events during Jesus’ life, rather than beginning after his death. It’s thought the text was written some time in the 2nd century, but some scholars claim it overlaps Jesus’ lifetime. In the Gospel of Mary, which isn’t officially recognized by the Church, Mary Magdalene is framed as the only disciple who truly understands Jesus’ spiritual message, which puts her in direct conflict with the apostle Peter. Mary describes to the other apostles a vision she has had of Jesus following his death. Peter grows hostile, asking why Jesus would especially grant Mary — a woman — a vision. Mary Magdalene’s special understanding of Jesus’ message, and Peter’s hostility towards her, as portrayed in Mary Magdalene, will likely split opinion, according to Taylor and her colleague, Professor Helen Bond of The University of Edinburgh, Scotland, with whom Taylor is presenting a U.K. television series on women disciples this Easter, titled Jesus’ Female Disciples: the New Evidence. “[In the film] she’s really close to Jesus, not because of some kind of love affair, but just because she…gets Jesus in a way that the other disciples don’t,” Bond says. The idea that the twelve disciples didn’t quite “get” Jesus in the same way Mary Magdalene did is addressed throughout Davis’ film. The disciples are waiting for Jesus to overthrow the Romans and create a new kingdom, one without death or suffering. But by the end of the film, following Jesus’ death, Mary Magdalene has come to the conclusion that “the kingdom is here and now.” For Michael Haag, author of The Quest For Mary Magdalene, the Church has historically sidelined Mary not just because of her gender, but also because of her message. He argues that the Church specifically promulgated the idea that she was a sex worker in order to “devalue” her message. Haag believes that Mary Magdalene’s alternative ideas proved too dangerous for the Church to allow them to spread. The Gospel of Mary Magdalene, in his view, undermines “Church bureaucracy and favors personal understanding.”  (..;) But both Bond and Taylor point to the Bible itself for further evidence of Mary Magdalene’s intimate understanding of Jesus. She remains at the cross during the crucifixion while the other disciples hide, and she’s the first to see Jesus following the Resurrection. “[There’s] the very strong implication that Christianity is derived from her testimony and her witness,” Bond says. Strip away the labels of “prostitute” or “wife,” and Mary Magdalene still remains a controversial figure. Her story challenges ideas about spirituality, and the role of women in religion. Time
Depuis le début du XXe siècle, pas moins de 80 films dans lesquels il est question de Jésus ont été tournés, dont 15 depuis l’an 2000 (…) Cela nous fait une moyenne d’un film tous les 18 mois environ ! En réalité, la question de l’historicité de Jésus, de son existence, est récurrente depuis au moins le XVIIe siècle, lorsqu’apparaît le déisme qui, en Angleterre notamment, se caractérise par une critique virulente des miracles et du surnaturel. Au XVIIIe siècle, ce courant philosophique quasiment athée s’infléchit en panthéisme puis en théisme, et sera la religion de beaucoup de philosophes des Lumières. On se rapproche alors d’une religion naturelle qui n’est pas dépourvue d’une certaine forme de culte, « fut-il réduit à la prière d’adoration de l’infini face au soleil levant », comme l’a écrit Jacqueline Lagrée. Mais c’est avec la quête rationaliste, le courant mythologique et l’école de Tübingen au début du XIXe siècle, que la réalité historique de Jésus s’évanouit pour devenir une figure mythologique, fruit d’un imaginaire presque mystique des premières communautés chrétiennes. (…) Le Jésus de l’Histoire et le Christ de la foi peuvent être liés, mais en aucun cas la foi ne peut naître de la recherche historique. Depuis le milieu des années 1950, la quête du Jésus historique a été relancée sous l’impulsion de Ernst Käsemann et Günther Bornkamm, et on peut remarquer qu’aujourd’hui elle se recentre sur sa judaïté. Sa dimension historique est pleinement assurée autant par les sources textuelles – aussi pauvres et fragiles soient-elles – que par la critique interne des récits évangéliques mis en perspective avec le contexte général de la Palestine au tournant de notre ère. Vous comprenez ainsi que la figure historique de Jésus est un sujet débattu depuis au moins trois siècles, et qu’on n’a pas fini de s’interroger sur lui. (…) Le film de Jon Gunn est, en définitive, dans la continuité logique de cette interrogation, il est l’illustration parfaite de cette interrogation qui taraude les esprits depuis si longtemps. Si je pouvais, humblement, donner un conseil à M. Onfray, ce serait d’aller voir ce film qui raconte la quête d’un journaliste d’investigation athée américain, Lee Strobel, qui, dans les années 1970, suite à la conversion de son épouse, mena une véritable enquête policière sur le personnage de Jésus. Lee Strobel a publié plusieurs livres relatant sa longue quête : The Case for Christ (1998), The Case for Faith (2000), The Case for a Creator (2004), The Case for the Real Jesus (2007), et bien d’autres encore. Il a cherché à comprendre comment aux XXe et XXIe siècles, des gens pouvaient encore croire en Jésus, vrai Dieu et vrai Homme, alors que le dogme rationaliste contemporain posait (mais sans aucun fondement scientifique) l’impossibilité d’une telle assertion. Son enquête l’a mené à interroger des dizaines de spécialistes de tous bords, et l’a conduit finalement à se convertir. Voilà une belle leçon de vie et d’honnêteté intellectuelle. (…) La méthode exégétique (étude et interprétation des textes) repose au départ sur le doute scientifique. Elle remet en question la tradition multiséculaire de l’Église concernant notamment l’authenticité des évangiles. Afin d’éviter toute discussion stérile sur l’authenticité des récits évangéliques au nom d’une hypercritique inutile, il me semble plus judicieux d’aborder le sujet sous l’angle de la vraisemblance, car cela laisse la porte ouverte à toutes les objections, à la condition bien entendu qu’elles soient fondées. (…) On se trouve ici dans le registre de la foi. La question que je me pose est de savoir si, oui ou non, cette foi peut reposer sur des faits ou seulement sur une appréciation personnelle. Je considère que la foi est beaucoup plus qu’un sentiment, qu’un élan du cœur qui nous pousse à croire sans vraiment chercher à comprendre. Pour moi, la foi est aussi le résultat d’un travail rationnel : c’est l’adéquation de la raison ou de l’intelligence à une vérité révélée. Mais on sort ici du champ de l’histoire. Pour en revenir à la résurrection, je dirais que l’historien n’a pas à expliquer ce phénomène. Par contre, il doit prendre en compte l’information qui le rapporte. Tout écrit est une information, tout texte donne des renseignements dont il faut analyser le degré de pertinence, de crédibilité, de vraisemblance. (…) Lorsque les évangiles racontent la résurrection de Jésus, l’historien n’a pas à expliquer ce phénomène ni à se demander s’il est possible ou non (même la science actuelle est incapable de répondre à cette question pour les raisons que je donne dans mon livre), mais de vérifier la vraisemblance de cette information : qui sont ceux qui rapportent cette information ? Qui sont les témoins ? Pourquoi rapportent-ils ce phénomène ? Qu’ont-ils fait exactement après l’avoir rapporté ? Comment ont réagi leurs adversaires ? Quelles sont les autres explications possibles à cet épisode singulier ? S’agit-il d’un mensonge, d’une manipulation ? Quels en sont les raisons ou les buts ? En définitive, lorsqu’on sait comment les témoins de cette annonce extraordinaire ont fini leur vie, on peut se poser la question : on peut mourir pour quelque chose que l’on croit être vrai, mais est-on prêt à donner sa vie pour quelque chose que l’on sait être faux ? Ici, on n’est plus dans le domaine de l’histoire ni de la foi ; c’est juste une question de bon sens ! Bruno Bioul
Il faudrait désormais un colloque scientifique pour évaluer si Jean-Christian Petitfils a bien servi la vérité christique. On doit cependant admettre que les 600 pages de son déjà best-seller se lisent comme un roman. Et que ce travail colossal de synthèse des sources, loin de toute polémique tapageuse, tient ses promesses pour un grand public avide de repères. Petitfils recompose la vie de Jésus à partir de Jean, affirmant que l’Évangile le plus mystique est aussi le plus historique, et s’appuie sur l’historicité du saint suaire. Deux principes qu’il n’est pas le seul à défendre. Ce livre nous change des exégètes parfois si raffinés qu’ils nous perdent dans la brume du doute. À lire en gardant à l’esprit que l’historien se limite à des hypothèses, sans prétendre mettre la main sur la vérité du Christ. Jean Mercier
Tout a été dit, mais tout et son contraire. La synthèse des plus récentes découvertes en histoire, en philologie, en exégèse, en archéologie était devenue nécessaire pour reconstituer la vie aussi bien que le caractère de Jésus. Les données de l’archéologie biblique sont en constant renouvellement : on vient de découvrir, en novembre 2011, que le mur des Lamentations ne datait pas d’Hérode le Grand. On a découvert, en 2009, une maison au centre du village de Nazareth, alors que beaucoup d’historiens prétendaient jusqu’alors que Nazareth n’existait pas au Ier siècle. Il y a près de trente ans, j’ai entamé une démarche personnelle : je suis croyant, membre d’une religion incarnée, et j’ai voulu, en tant qu’historien, avoir davantage de précisions. Marc Bloch écrivait : « Le christianisme est une religion d’historiens. » J’ai voulu retrouver le Jésus de l’histoire. Mon livre s’adresse aux croyants comme aux incroyants et s’arrête devant le mystère. L’historien n’a pas à prendre parti quant à la réalité des exorcismes, des miracles et, a fortiori, de la résurrection. Renan, dont on va fêter le 150e anniversaire de sa Vie de Jésus, disait : « Si les miracles ont quelque réalité, mon livre n’est qu’un tissu d’erreurs. » C’est un présupposé scientiste et positiviste que de rejeter et de nier le mystère. (…) Ce n’est pas impossible qu’il y ait une interpolation chrétienne du texte de Flavius Josèphe, puisqu’on a retrouvé un texte d’Agapios de Manbij, évêque melchite du Xe siècle, qui nous donne une version plus condensée du Testimonium flavianum, dans laquelle ne figurent pas les éléments contestés. Au-delà, nous disposons d’écrits romains de Tacite, de Suétone ou encore d’une lettre datée de l’an 111 de Pline le Jeune disant que « les chrétiens chantent un hymne à “Chrestos” comme à un dieu ». Indépendamment de ce que nous racontent les évangiles et les lettres pauliniennes, on voit que, dès le début du IIe siècle, les chrétiens étaient réputés croire à la divinité de Jésus. Même Celse, philosophe grec du IIe siècle et adversaire très virulent du christianisme, ne remet pas en cause l’existence historique de Jésus. La contestation de cette historicité est, en réalité, une affaire très tardive et très chargée d’idéologie. (…) Paul ne nous dit pratiquement rien, en dehors de la 1re Lettre aux Corinthiens, sur le Jésus de l’histoire. Il formule le kérygme, l’énoncé de la foi des premiers chrétiens. Il nous renseigne sur les débats avec les judéo-chrétiens et avec l’Eglise de Jérusalem. Prieur et Mordillat veulent un Jésus sans Eglise. Comme beaucoup aujourd’hui, ils se fabriquent leur propre Jésus. Or, pour l’historien, l’essentiel est ailleurs : les récits évangéliques, qui sont des récits de foi, contiennent-ils une vérité historique et quelle est cette vérité ? J’ai accordé la priorité historique à Jean alors que, d’habitude les historiens partent des évangiles synoptiques (Marc, Luc, Matthieu) et mettent Jean de côté : c’est un texte très symbolique et mystique, dont on ne devrait pas, nous disent-ils, tenir compte. Ce raisonnement me paraît faux. Le récit de Jean est celui d’un témoin oculaire, qu’il nous faut réévaluer par rapport aux trois autres qui, eux, n’ont jamais vu Jésus – même si à l’origine de notre Matthieu actuel se trouve un Matthieu araméen, probablement écrit par l’un des Douze, Lévi dit Matthieu, chef du bureau de péages de Capharnaüm. Les évangiles synoptiques présentent un certain voile par rapport à l’évangile de Jean. D’un point de vue strictement historique, ils me semblent moins fiables : ils résument, dans une optique catéchétique, la vie de Jésus en une seule année. Or, lorsqu’on lit l’évangile de Jean le ministère de Jésus s’étire sur trois ou quatre années. Ainsi nous montre-t-il plusieurs allées et venues, plusieurs discussions avec les autorités juives de Jérusalem ou les pharisiens. Ce sont autant de discussions que les synoptiques rassemblent dans le « procès juif » de Jésus. C’est, à mes yeux, un procès fictif. Jésus n’a pas comparu devant le Sanhédrin en séance plénière. D’ailleurs, tous les historiens du judaïsme l’écrivent depuis longtemps : jamais, au Ier siècle, le Sanhédrin ne se serait réuni au temps de Pessah… (…) Ce qu’on appelle le « procès juif » de Jésus n’est qu’une présentation schématique des discussions qu’il a eues tout au long de son ministère et qui s’étendent, chez Jean, sur plusieurs chapitres. Les auteurs des synoptiques mettent en scène et rassemblent ces nombreux échanges en un seul récit. Du point de vue historique, ce récit a la même valeur que celui des Tentations : c’est, en quelque sorte, un midrash. (…) Il a un mode de fonctionnement bien précis : il passe constamment de la réalité historique au mystère. Il assiste, par exemple, aux noces villageoises de Cana. Mais il les transforme en noces eschatologiques, ne nous renseignant ni sur le nom des mariés ni sur leur degré de parenté avec Jésus. Il fait des six jarres de vin le symbole de l’imperfection d’Israël (7 étant le nombre parfait). La tâche de l’historien est de retrouver le soubassement du texte, c’est-à-dire la part de réalité que contient le récit. (…) c’est le cas de Gethsémani, où il reste très elliptique. Quant à la Passion, il ne se prend pas pour Mel Gibson et atténue volontairement les souffrances que Jésus endure lors de la flagellation et de la crucifixion : c’est que son intention n’est pas de sombrer dans le gore, mais de montrer la Croix glorieuse, c’est-à-dire le Christ sur son trône de majesté qui va juger le monde. (…) C’est justement l’intérêt de mobiliser les dernières données mises à notre disposition par la recherche. L’abbé Pierre Courouble, grand spécialiste du grec ancien, a ainsi découvert, il y a quelques années, des latinismes dans deux phrases prononcées par Pilate et rapportées par Jean : « Quelle accusation portez-vous contre cet homme ? » et « Ce que j’ai écrit, je l’ai écrit ». La présence de latinismes dans ces deux phrases nous démontre que Jean était, sinon un témoin direct lorsque ces phrases ont été prononcées, du moins un rapporteur de première main. De même, Jean connaît le nom de la moindre servante des grands prêtres et le moindre arcane du Temple : cela accrédite l’idée qu’il appartiendrait à une famille sacerdotale de Jérusalem. Il est très certainement, comme nous l’indique Polycrate d’Ephèse au IIe siècle, membre de la haute aristocratie hiérosolymite. Il porte le petalum, la lame d’or des grands prêtres de cette époque. Il n’a vraisemblablement rien à voir avec Jean, fils de Zébédée et pécheur de son état… (…) Souvent, on réduit Jésus à son entourage immédiat des Douze, alors qu’il y avait une multitude de disciples allant et venant, au gré du temps et de leur occupation respective… [Jacques Duquesne] dans son Marie, mère de Jésus, il confond frères et cousins. Il ignore notamment les travaux réalisés aux Etats-Unis aussi bien qu’en Europe et qui nous montrent que Jésus est « nazôréen » : c’est un groupe sémite issu de Mésopotamie qui est venu se réinstaller en Galilée et au-delà du Jourdain dans deux villages, dont Nazareth. Ils prétendent être descendants de David et porter, en leur sein, le messie qu’attend Israël… (…) il ne veut surtout pas qu’on le confonde avec un messie temporel ! Il vit en un temps où il y a déjà eu beaucoup de messies temporels qui se sont révoltés contre l’occupation romaine. C’est le cas de Judas le Galiléen, qui avait fomenté une insurrection, en l’an 6. En représailles, les Romains avaient alors incendié et détruit la ville de Sephoris, située juste à côté de Nazareth. Âgé de douze ou treize ans, Jésus a très certainement aperçu la fumée s’élever au loin et les deux mille croix érigées le long des chemins. Il ne veut pas ça. Et il essaie de rompre avec cette origine qui lui pèse. (…) tout indique qu’il soit né en l’an -7. (…) C’est une période d’attente, d’impatience, d’aspiration messianique. Mais c’est une période de relative accalmie : elle succède aux temps troublés qui ont suivi la mort d’Hérode et la déposition de son fils aîné Archélaos. « Sub Tibero quies » (sous Tibère tout était calme), dit laconiquement Tacite. Mais tout était calme, avant l’explosion. Du temps de Jésus, il n’y avait pas de zélotes ni de sicaires. Et quand on parle de Simon le Zélote, l’un des Douze, il s’agit d’un zèle dans la foi : ce n’était pas un révolutionnaire… (…) Non seulement, il n’y a pas de message politique chez Jésus, mais en plus il refusait la politique et le social. Pour la foi chrétienne, le Christ n’est pas le premier des indignés, mais le premier des ressuscités – ce qui est, convenez-en, un peu différent. Certes, il y a bien eu des tentatives de récupération politique du message de Jésus : ce fut le cas avec la théologie de la libération. Or, il ne fait, par exemple, aucune sorte d’allusion à l’esclavage. Jésus n’est pas Spartacus ! [Piss Christ ou Golgota picnic] sont des oeuvres qui probablement ne resteront pas dans l’histoire : ce sont des épiphénomènes. Paradoxalement, elles montrent, au-delà même du dénigrement ou du sacrilège, que la personne de Jésus ne laisse pas indifférents nos contemporains et continue de fasciner. Moi ce qui m’apparaît important, en tant qu’historien, c’est de découvrir la vérité exacte : qui était Jésus vraiment ? Se ressentait-il être le messie d’Israël ? Pensait-il être lui-même le « Fils de Dieu » ou est-ce un sentiment qu’on lui a attribué ultérieurement ? Pourquoi a-t-il été crucifié ? Quels sont les responsables de cette crucifixion ? Voilà des points d’interrogation auxquels j’ai voulu répondre, en faisant abstraction de toutes les œuvres d’art postérieures, critiques ou non, et même des enseignements dogmatiques. (…) Jésus est un provocateur, notamment lorsqu’il guérit un jour de sabbat. C’était un simple artisan de Nazareth et un nazoréen, toujours suspect puisque se prétendant descendre de David. Il n’avait pas suivi l’enseignement des grands rabbins comme Hillel ou Gamliel. Pourtant, il va jusqu’à mettre en cause l’enseignement de Moïse ! « Moïse vous a dit de faire cela, moi je vous dis de faire ceci. » Au nom de quoi, peut-il prétendre cela ? Quand il appelle Dieu « abba » (en araméen, papa), ce n’est pas simplement l’emploi très déférent du mot « père » que font les juifs. Jésus prétend avoir une relation filiale et unique avec Dieu. C’est là où, en tant qu’historien, je dois m’arrêter : je ne peux pas aller au-delà. (…) il y a une violence prophétique chez Jésus. Elle se manifeste également à l’encontre de villages entiers contre lesquels il jette l’anathème : c’est le cas de Capharnaüm. Le souffle prophétique d’Israël continue à s’exprimer en lui. (…) Je suis parti d’hypothèses. Si l’on en pose d’autres, on pourra arriver à des résultats différents. La recherche et nos connaissances évoluent. En France, le dernier livre qui poursuivait l’objectif de synthétiser l’état le plus récent des connaissances sur Jésus remonte à celui de Daniel Rops, dont la première édition a paru en 1947, c’est-à-dire avant les découvertes de Qumran et des manuscrits de la mer Morte. Le livre que j’ai voulu faire correspond à une étape, un état des lieux de ce que la science met aujourd’hui à notre disposition pour appréhender le Jésus de l’histoire. Il y en aura très certainement d’autres. Jean-Christophe Petitfils
To my dear son André on his 16th birthday …

Pourquoi il faut lire le Jésus de Jean-Christian Petitfils (et son Dictionnaire amoureux aussi !)

En ces temps étranges …

D’églises (blanches) vides et de JAJ, mosquées ou temples (noirs) pleins …

D’athéisme revendiqué et d’idées chrétiennes devenues folles

Comme d’art déchristianisé mais, entre Piss Christ et Golgota picnic, obsédé par la victimologie  …

De Fille ainée de l’Eglise réduite comme la première minorité venue à lancer sa version catholique du dîner du Crif

Et de président du mariage et de l’adoption pour tous l’appelant, au risque d’ouvrir la voie à un islam toujours plus militant (« féministes islamiques » comprises), à une plus grande mobilisation politique …

De retour du religieux mais avec une sur-radicalité du côté musulman, dans la jeunesse française …

Et d’une actualité qui,  entre captation d’héritage et génocide silencieux des chrétiens, vérifie quasiment quotidiennement et scientifiquement les paroles du Christ …

Mais aussi de premiers charlatans venus remettant en cause des siècles de consensus scientifique sur son existence …

Ou, politiquement correct cinématographique oblige et entre africanisation de nos Pierre ou de nos Samson,  de déshabillage de Jean pour habiller Marie …

Le mystère Jésus

Historien, spécialiste du Grand Siècle et auteur de la biographie de référence de Louis XIV, Jean-Christian Petitfils publie, chez Fayard, une biographie du Christ, sobrement intitulée : Jésus.

François Miclo. Les historiens n’ont-ils pas tout dit sur Jésus ? Pourquoi lui consacrer près de 600 nouvelles pages ?
Jean-Christian Petitfils. Tout a été dit, mais tout et son contraire. La synthèse des plus récentes découvertes en histoire, en philologie, en exégèse, en archéologie était devenue nécessaire pour reconstituer la vie aussi bien que le caractère de Jésus. Les données de l’archéologie biblique sont en constant renouvellement : on vient de découvrir, en novembre 2011, que le mur des Lamentations ne datait pas d’Hérode le Grand. On a découvert, en 2009, une maison au centre du village de Nazareth, alors que beaucoup d’historiens prétendaient jusqu’alors que Nazareth n’existait pas au Ier siècle. Il y a près de trente ans, j’ai entamé une démarche personnelle : je suis croyant, membre d’une religion incarnée, et j’ai voulu, en tant qu’historien, avoir davantage de précisions. Marc Bloch écrivait : « Le christianisme est une religion d’historiens. » J’ai voulu retrouver le Jésus de l’histoire. Mon livre s’adresse aux croyants comme aux incroyants et s’arrête devant le mystère. L’historien n’a pas à prendre parti quant à la réalité des exorcismes, des miracles et, a fortiori, de la résurrection. Renan, dont on va fêter le 150e anniversaire de sa Vie de Jésus, disait : « Si les miracles ont quelque réalité, mon livre n’est qu’un tissu d’erreurs. » C’est un présupposé scientiste et positiviste que de rejeter et de nier le mystère.

« Tout a été dit, mais tout et son contraire. » Comment expliquer un désaccord aussi persistant sur l’historicité de Jésus ? Les sources, en dehors des quatre évangiles, sont minces. Et quand Flavius Josèphe mentionne un certain Jésus, il est légitime de se demander si ce n’est pas un copiste chrétien qui l’aurait tardivement rajouté…
Ce n’est pas impossible qu’il y ait une interpolation chrétienne du texte de Flavius Josèphe, puisqu’on a retrouvé un texte d’Agapios de Manbij, évêque melchite du Xe siècle, qui nous donne une version plus condensée du Testimonium flavianum, dans laquelle ne figurent pas les éléments contestés. Au-delà, nous disposons d’écrits romains de Tacite, de Suétone ou encore d’une lettre datée de l’an 111 de Pline le Jeune disant que « les chrétiens chantent un hymne à “Chrestos” comme à un dieu ». Indépendamment de ce que nous racontent les évangiles et les lettres pauliniennes, on voit que, dès le début du IIe siècle, les chrétiens étaient réputés croire à la divinité de Jésus. Même Celse, philosophe grec du IIe siècle et adversaire très virulent du christianisme, ne remet pas en cause l’existence historique de Jésus. La contestation de cette historicité est, en réalité, une affaire très tardive et très chargée d’idéologie.

Pourquoi procéder à l’inverse de Jérôme Prieur et Gérard Mordillat, les auteurs de Corpus Christi, en mettant de côté Paul de Tarse et en vous concentrant sur l’évangile de Jean ?
Paul ne nous dit pratiquement rien, en dehors de la 1re Lettre aux Corinthiens, sur le Jésus de l’histoire. Il formule le kérygme, l’énoncé de la foi des premiers chrétiens. Il nous renseigne sur les débats avec les judéo-chrétiens et avec l’Eglise de Jérusalem. Prieur et Mordillat veulent un Jésus sans Eglise. Comme beaucoup aujourd’hui, ils se fabriquent leur propre Jésus. Or, pour l’historien, l’essentiel est ailleurs : les récits évangéliques, qui sont des récits de foi, contiennent-ils une vérité historique et quelle est cette vérité ? J’ai accordé la priorité historique à Jean alors que, d’habitude les historiens partent des évangiles synoptiques (Marc, Luc, Matthieu) et mettent Jean de côté : c’est un texte très symbolique et mystique, dont on ne devrait pas, nous disent-ils, tenir compte. Ce raisonnement me paraît faux. Le récit de Jean est celui d’un témoin oculaire, qu’il nous faut réévaluer par rapport aux trois autres qui, eux, n’ont jamais vu Jésus – même si à l’origine de notre Matthieu actuel se trouve un Matthieu araméen, probablement écrit par l’un des Douze, Lévi dit Matthieu, chef du bureau de péages de Capharnaüm. Les évangiles synoptiques présentent un certain voile par rapport à l’évangile de Jean. D’un point de vue strictement historique, ils me semblent moins fiables : ils résument, dans une optique catéchétique, la vie de Jésus en une seule année. Or, lorsqu’on lit l’évangile de Jean le ministère de Jésus s’étire sur trois ou quatre années. Ainsi nous montre-t-il plusieurs allées et venues, plusieurs discussions avec les autorités juives de Jérusalem ou les pharisiens. Ce sont autant de discussions que les synoptiques rassemblent dans le « procès juif » de Jésus. C’est, à mes yeux, un procès fictif. Jésus n’a pas comparu devant le Sanhédrin en séance plénière. D’ailleurs, tous les historiens du judaïsme l’écrivent depuis longtemps : jamais, au Ier siècle, le Sanhédrin ne se serait réuni au temps de Pessah…

Ouh, le blasphémateur que voilà ! Vous remettez en cause une vérité de la foi !
Non, ce n’est pas une vérité dogmatique. Ce qu’on appelle le « procès juif » de Jésus n’est qu’une présentation schématique des discussions qu’il a eues tout au long de son ministère et qui s’étendent, chez Jean, sur plusieurs chapitres. Les auteurs des synoptiques mettent en scène et rassemblent ces nombreux échanges en un seul récit. Du point de vue historique, ce récit a la même valeur que celui des Tentations : c’est, en quelque sorte, un midrash.

A midrash, midrash et demi : votre Jean me paraît demeurer bien symbolique…
Il a un mode de fonctionnement bien précis : il passe constamment de la réalité historique au mystère. Il assiste, par exemple, aux noces villageoises de Cana. Mais il les transforme en noces eschatologiques, ne nous renseignant ni sur le nom des mariés ni sur leur degré de parenté avec Jésus. Il fait des six jarres de vin le symbole de l’imperfection d’Israël (7 étant le nombre parfait). La tâche de l’historien est de retrouver le soubassement du texte, c’est-à-dire la part de réalité que contient le récit.

Pour autant, Jean se tait sur certains épisodes que les synoptiques développent…
Oui, c’est le cas de Gethsémani, où il reste très elliptique. Quant à la Passion, il ne se prend pas pour Mel Gibson et atténue volontairement les souffrances que Jésus endure lors de la flagellation et de la crucifixion : c’est que son intention n’est pas de sombrer dans le gore, mais de montrer la Croix glorieuse, c’est-à-dire le Christ sur son trône de majesté qui va juger le monde.

Comment séparer ici le bon grain de l’ivraie, la réalité historique de la portée symbolique du texte ?
C’est justement l’intérêt de mobiliser les dernières données mises à notre disposition par la recherche. L’abbé Pierre Courouble, grand spécialiste du grec ancien, a ainsi découvert, il y a quelques années, des latinismes dans deux phrases prononcées par Pilate et rapportées par Jean : « Quelle accusation portez-vous contre cet homme ? » et « Ce que j’ai écrit, je l’ai écrit ». La présence de latinismes dans ces deux phrases nous démontre que Jean était, sinon un témoin direct lorsque ces phrases ont été prononcées, du moins un rapporteur de première main. De même, Jean connaît le nom de la moindre servante des grands prêtres et le moindre arcane du Temple : cela accrédite l’idée qu’il appartiendrait à une famille sacerdotale de Jérusalem. Il est très certainement, comme nous l’indique Polycrate d’Ephèse au IIe siècle, membre de la haute aristocratie hiérosolymite. Il porte le petalum, la lame d’or des grands prêtres de cette époque. Il n’a vraisemblablement rien à voir avec Jean, fils de Zébédée et pécheur de son état…

Ouh là, là, moins vite : j’ai toujours eu du mal avec le nom des disciples…
Souvent, on réduit Jésus à son entourage immédiat des Douze, alors qu’il y avait une multitude de disciples allant et venant, au gré du temps et de leur occupation respective…

Sans compter ses frères et sœurs !
Jésus n’en a jamais eu !

Jacques Duquesne a le droit d’aimer les familles nombreuses, non ?
Oui, mais, dans son Marie, mère de Jésus, il confond frères et cousins. Il ignore notamment les travaux réalisés aux Etats-Unis aussi bien qu’en Europe et qui nous montrent que Jésus est « nazôréen » : c’est un groupe sémite issu de Mésopotamie qui est venu se réinstaller en Galilée et au-delà du Jourdain dans deux villages, dont Nazareth. Ils prétendent être descendants de David et porter, en leur sein, le messie qu’attend Israël…

Tout au long de sa prédication, Jésus semble tenir cette origine comme une vraie croix ! On l’interpelle dans la rue : « Eh toi, fils de David… » Il n’aime pas trop ça…
C’est qu’il ne veut surtout pas qu’on le confonde avec un messie temporel ! Il vit en un temps où il y a déjà eu beaucoup de messies temporels qui se sont révoltés contre l’occupation romaine. C’est le cas de Judas le Galiléen, qui avait fomenté une insurrection, en l’an 6. En représailles, les Romains avaient alors incendié et détruit la ville de Sephoris, située juste à côté de Nazareth. Âgé de douze ou treize ans, Jésus a très certainement aperçu la fumée s’élever au loin et les deux mille croix érigées le long des chemins. Il ne veut pas ça. Et il essaie de rompre avec cette origine qui lui pèse.

Mais comment ! Jésus avait douze ou treize ans en l’an 6 après Lui-même ?
Oui, tout indique qu’il soit né en l’an -7.

Destruction de villes, incendies, crucifixions : c’est une période violente ?
C’est une période d’attente, d’impatience, d’aspiration messianique. Mais c’est une période de relative accalmie : elle succède aux temps troublés qui ont suivi la mort d’Hérode et la déposition de son fils aîné Archélaos. « Sub Tibero quies » (sous Tibère tout était calme), dit laconiquement Tacite. Mais tout était calme, avant l’explosion. Du temps de Jésus, il n’y avait pas de zélotes ni de sicaires. Et quand on parle de Simon le Zélote, l’un des Douze, il s’agit d’un zèle dans la foi : ce n’était pas un révolutionnaire…

Ah mince ! Moi qui croyais que Jésus préfigurait la venue sur la Terre de Stéphane Hessel ! Il n’était donc pas un indigné ?
Non seulement, il n’y a pas de message politique chez Jésus, mais en plus il refusait la politique et le social. Pour la foi chrétienne, le Christ n’est pas le premier des indignés, mais le premier des ressuscités – ce qui est, convenez-en, un peu différent. Certes, il y a bien eu des tentatives de récupération politique du message de Jésus : ce fut le cas avec la théologie de la libération. Or, il ne fait, par exemple, aucune sorte d’allusion à l’esclavage. Jésus n’est pas Spartacus !

Jésus n’était pas Spartacus, mais vous nous apprenez qu’il aurait pu jouer dans un péplum… Ce n’était pas le gringalet aux épaules tombantes du film de Rossellini, mais un beau et solide gaillard !
Mon point de vue se fonde sur les reliques de la Passion. Là se pose le problème de leur authenticité. Longtemps, elle a été sujette à caution. Que ce soit le linceul de Turin, le suaire d’Oviedo ou la tunique d’Argenteuil, les plus récentes découvertes scientifiques invalident ce que nous tenions pour acquis. Ainsi les analyses au carbone 14 menées sur la relique de Turin en 1988 sont aujourd’hui remises en cause. Les incendies qui ont affecté la relique au long des siècles ont causé notamment une forte pollution au carbone. D’autres éléments, comme la détection des pollens, les inscriptions sur le linceul et sur le suaire ou encore la méthode de tissage employée plaident en faveur d’une datation de ces trois reliques au Ier siècle et les situent au Proche Orient. Rajoutez à cela que les tâches de sang et d’humeurs présentes sur les trois reliques se superposent parfaitement et qu’elles correspondent au même groupe sanguin : elles ne sont plus simplement des objets de piété pour le croyant, mais des documents d’étude pour l’historien. Jusqu’à preuve du contraire, elles le renseignent sur l’aspect physique de Jésus et, à travers les épanchements dont elles portent la trace, sur ce que fut sa crucifixion, sa descente de la croix mais également sa mise au tombeau.

Vous publiez ce livre à un moment où la figure de Jésus fait irruption dans le débat public à travers des œuvres comme Piss Christ ou Golgota picnic. Comment expliquer cette focalisation particulière dans une société pourtant largement déchristianisée ?
Ce sont des oeuvres qui probablement ne resteront pas dans l’histoire : ce sont des épiphénomènes. Paradoxalement, elles montrent, au-delà même du dénigrement ou du sacrilège, que la personne de Jésus ne laisse pas indifférents nos contemporains et continue de fasciner. Moi ce qui m’apparaît important, en tant qu’historien, c’est de découvrir la vérité exacte : qui était Jésus vraiment ? Se ressentait-il être le messie d’Israël ? Pensait-il être lui-même le « Fils de Dieu » ou est-ce un sentiment qu’on lui a attribué ultérieurement ? Pourquoi a-t-il été crucifié ? Quels sont les responsables de cette crucifixion ? Voilà des points d’interrogation auxquels j’ai voulu répondre, en faisant abstraction de toutes les œuvres d’art postérieures, critiques ou non, et même des enseignements dogmatiques.

Mais Jésus ne fut-il pas, aux yeux du milieu juif dans lequel il évoluait et notamment des pharisiens, le plus grand blasphémateur de l’histoire ?
Jésus est un provocateur, notamment lorsqu’il guérit un jour de sabbat. C’était un simple artisan de Nazareth et un nazoréen, toujours suspect puisque se prétendant descendre de David. Il n’avait pas suivi l’enseignement des grands rabbins comme Hillel ou Gamliel. Pourtant, il va jusqu’à mettre en cause l’enseignement de Moïse ! « Moïse vous a dit de faire cela, moi je vous dis de faire ceci. » Au nom de quoi, peut-il prétendre cela ? Quand il appelle Dieu « abba » (en araméen, papa), ce n’est pas simplement l’emploi très déférent du mot « père » que font les juifs. Jésus prétend avoir une relation filiale et unique avec Dieu. C’est là où, en tant qu’historien, je dois m’arrêter : je ne peux pas aller au-delà.

C’est plus que de la provoc’. Quand il dit, par exemple, à sa mère, aux noces de Canna ce que l’on pourrait traduire par : « T’es qui toi ? », cela révèle une violence inouïe dans une société où l’on doit, comme l’exige le Décalogue, « honorer son père et sa mère ».
Oui, il y a une violence prophétique chez Jésus. Elle se manifeste également à l’encontre de villages entiers contre lesquels il jette l’anathème : c’est le cas de Capharnaüm. Le souffle prophétique d’Israël continue à s’exprimer en lui.

Y a-t-il du nouveau à découvrir sur Jésus ?
Oui. Je suis parti d’hypothèses. Si l’on en pose d’autres, on pourra arriver à des résultats différents. La recherche et nos connaissances évoluent. En France, le dernier livre qui poursuivait l’objectif de synthétiser l’état le plus récent des connaissances sur Jésus remonte à celui de Daniel Rops, dont la première édition a paru en 1947, c’est-à-dire avant les découvertes de Qumran et des manuscrits de la mer Morte. Le livre que j’ai voulu faire correspond à une étape, un état des lieux de ce que la science met aujourd’hui à notre disposition pour appréhender le Jésus de l’histoire. Il y en aura très certainement d’autres.

Voir aussi:

Il faut lire le Jésus de Petitfils

C’est certainement la surprise du moment en matière d’édition : un historien, spécialiste du XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles, quitte le confort d’une période bien connue pour aborder un autre champ historique. Et en la matière, Jean-Christian Petitfils n’a pas lésiné. Il ne s’est pas seulement attaché à un autre sujet, il s’est attaqué « au » sujet par excellence : Jésus-Christ de Nazareth. L’ambition est énorme. Le travail était d’avance semé d’embûches. D’autres et non des moindres – que l’on pense à Renan – s’y sont déjà cassés les dents. Après la lecture du Jésus de Jean-Christian Petitfils, on peut le dire en toute quiétude : l’auteur n’a rien à craindre pour sa dentition…

En historien scrupuleux, Jean-Christian Petitfils aborde, en effet, le Jésus de l’Histoire et, de ce fait, il ne s’agit pas d’un livre de plus à destination du monde catholique ou, plus largement, à destination du monde chrétien. Tous peuvent le lire dès lors qu’ils se posent la question de savoir si Jésus a bien existé et qui il était exactement.

Disons-le tout de suite : la science historique confirme ce que les croyants savent, sans conclure évidemment ce que la foi seule peut conclure. Mais prenons un exemple avec la question de la divinité du Christ. Jean-Christian Petitfils n’affirme pas que le Christ était Dieu. En revanche, il montre que Jésus s’est bien présenté comme le Fils de Dieu. Il ne s’agit donc pas d’une reconstruction postérieure, due à saint Paul et entretenue par l’Église. De la même manière, il aborde, par exemple, la question des miracles dans une perspective historique. Il montre que les plus anciennes sources indiquent que Jésus a été perçu comme étant doté de pouvoirs extraordinaires.

Il faudrait beaucoup de place pour évoquer en détail ce livre de 690 pages (Fayard, 25€), véritable synthèse des travaux les plus sérieux sur le sujet et qui nous restent malheureusement souvent inconnus. À sa manière, tranquille et non belliqueuse, Jean-Christian Petitfils est véritablement l’anti-Renan, évitant de tomber dans un pur mysticisme, qui serait en l’occurrence la négation de la méthode historique, et évitant de céder aux sirènes d’un rationalisme étriqué qui évacue la complexité de l’histoire. La crise moderniste est née notamment de cet échec de la rencontre des textes évangéliques et des sciences historiques qui se cherchaient encore. Sur ce plan, la question semble désormais régler, même pour le grand public. Sur un autre plan, on peut aussi se réjouir : les Lenoir, Duquesne et consorts sont définitivement enfoncés. Avec un ouvrage écrit dans une langue claire, élégante et agréable. Ce qui, là aussi, nous change de la littérature habituelle en la matière.

Voir également:

Dictionnaire amoureux de Jésus

LIVRE | 14/12/2015 | De Jean-Christian Petitfils

Auteur : Jean-Christian Petitfils
Editeur : Plon
Nombre de pages : 912

Être « amoureux » de Jésus pourrait sembler un phénomène d’un autre âge. Mais ce décalage – culturel et chronologique – n’impressionne pas un historien du calibre de Jean-Christian Petitfils. N’est-il pas l’auteur à succès des biographies de Louis XIII , Louis XIV , Louis XV et Louis XVI ?

Sans hésiter, il a donc prêté son nom et sa plume à la célèbre collection des « Dictionnaires amoureux ». Il est vrai, Jésus de Nazareth n’est pas un roi comme les autres ; sa royauté semble à des années-lumière des ors de Versailles… Déclarer sa flamme pour Jésus constitue un risque quand on est un savant reconnu. La grandeur de Jean-Christian Petitfils consiste à exposer en plein jour les raisons de son inclinaison spirituelle. L’auteur du Dictionnaire amoureux de Jésus assume : « Être amoureux de Jésus n’est assurément pas être amoureux d’une contrée, si fascinante soit-elle – l’Espagne, la Grèce, l’Italie ou la Bretagne –, d’un personnage historique – Napoléon ou Charles de Gaulle –, d’une grande figure littéraire – Stendhal ou Marcel Proust –, ou encore des chats, des trains, des étoiles, du rugby ! »

Être amoureux de Jésus engage. Jean-Christian Petitfils se présente comme un homme de foi. « Pour le chrétien que je suis, Jésus est une personne vivante, le Dieu fait chair venu apporter le salut au monde. Croire, c’est être relié, au cœur même de son être, à une mystérieuse source d’eau vive. »

La foi d’un historien

L’historien avait déjà publié en 2011 chez Fayard un Jésus remarquable . Il récidive aujourd’hui en ajoutant les lumières de la foi à son talent d’investigation historique. À vrai dire, pour ce spécialiste du Grand Siècle, la figure de Jésus engage autant le cœur que la raison. Pascal n’était-il pas à la fois physicien et mystique ?

« L’Histoire tiendra une place essentielle dans ce dictionnaire, précise l’auteur. À la lecture amoureuse de la parole de Jésus, à la découverte de sa personne, se mêlera constamment l’enquête rationnelle de l’historien. » Il invoque une belle formule de Marc Bloch : « Le christianisme est une religion d’historiens. »

Cette Histoire de Jésus est une histoire vraie. Chaque siècle fait rayonner cette lumière avec sa grâce propre. Il est indéniable que Jean-Christian Petitfils a un air de famille avec cette École française de spiritualité qui a redonné tant de couleurs et de profondeur au catholicisme du XVIIe siècle. En couverture de son ouvrage, l’illustration du peintre Philippe de Champaigne (Le Christ aux outrages) donne le ton de ce classicisme plein de tendresse. À cette époque, la dévotion à l’humanité du Christ est en plein essor. Sous l’impulsion d’un cardinal de Bérulle se répand le « christocentrisme », une manière de s’approprier la religion catholique par la méditation des mystères de la vie de Jésus.

On peut se perdre dans les entrées de ce dictionnaire, car on y retrouve toujours Jésus. Il y a la crèche et la croix, l’étoile de Bethléem et l’Évangile de Judas, ou encore les larrons et Lazare. À chaque fois, l’auteur dépoussière les connaissances actuelles sans jamais abîmer la foi. Bien au contraire. Il revendique la méthode audacieuse d’un Richard Simon qui, au temps de Bossuet, a posé les premiers jalons de l’exégèse moderne saluée ensuite par Joseph Ratzinger : « Son génie est d’avoir compris que la critique historique d’un texte saint n’oblitère en rien son caractère transcendant, sacré et inspiré. » Foi et raison font naître  un amour profond.

Voir de même:

Contre-info
27 juin 2012
Etant donné que ce livre et son auteur jouissent encore d’une certaine publicité (vente chez Chiré, dédicace à la fête du livre de Radio Courtoisie dimanche dernier), nous remettons à l’honneur l’article ci-dessous, paru il y a quelques mois.] En ce dimanche, évoquons un livre qui fait pas mal parler de lui : Jésus (honteusement sous-titré le Jésus de l’Histoire) de l’historien (de droite) Jean-Christian Petitfils. L’abbé Puga (de saint Nicolas du Chardonnet) en fait une intéressante critique : « Spécialiste de l’histoire française des XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles, auteur de nombreux ouvrages appréciés à juste titre sur cette période, il tente dans son nouveau travail une aventure d’historien à la recherche des données historiques sur la vie du Christ. Avant lecture on aurait pu s’attendre à une étude fouillée (le livre comporte plus de 650 pages !) de l’historicité des documents évangéliques, de leur crédibilité et à partir de là découvrir l’élaboration d’une vie de Jésus fondée sur des faits indubitables en montrant par exemple leur corrélation et leur conformité avec les données de l’histoire de l’Antiquité. Un postulat regrettable Mais tout en proclamant vouloir ne faire qu’œuvre d’historien, l’auteur s’engage dans une toute autre voie non scientifique. Cherchant son inspiration auprès de quelques exégètes modernes du XXe siècle comme Xavier Léon Dufour, le P. Benoit, le P. Grelot et surtout en se mettant aveuglément à la remorque des thèses de l’Ecole Biblique de Jérusalem, Jean-Christian Petitfils part d’un a priori : le genre littéraire des évangiles, et tout spécialement des évangiles que l’on nomme synoptiques (Matthieu, Marc, Luc), serait un genre tout à fait à part. En effet l’intention des auteurs ne serait pas de nous rapporter les événements tels qu’ils se sont déroulés en réalité mais tels que les auteurs les ont perçus et entendent les transmettre aux fidèles. Bien entendu, en aucun endroit de son ouvrage Jean-Christian Petitfils ne nous explique, et encore moins ne nous démontre, pourquoi il en aurait été ainsi et pourquoi, surtout, il a choisi, lui historien, de suivre cette thèse qui a toujours été rejetée dans l’Eglise catholique jusqu’au milieu du XXe siècle. Mais, comme le déclare notre auteur sans nostalgie aucune, c’était une « époque pas si lointaine où l’on tenait les écrits évangéliques pour vérité historique irréfragable » (p. 469). Saint Pie X stigmatisait déjà il y a un siècle les exégètes modernistes : « Il semblerait vraiment que nul homme avant eux n’a feuilleté les livres saints, qu’il n’y a pas eu à les fouiller en tous sens une multitude de docteurs infiniment supérieurs à eux en génie, en érudition » (encyclique Pascendi). Les vingt pages de bibliographie à la fin de cet ouvrage sur Jésus sont éloquentes : 98 % des études citées sont postérieures aux années soixante. En un mot avant le concile Vatican II, il semblerait que la véritable exégèse n’ait pas existé. Des grands noms qui ont illustré, tant dans les universités romaines que dans les instituts catholiques, la défense de l’historicité des évangiles, pas un seul n’est cité, comme par exemple les pères Tromp, de Grandmaison, Renié, l’abbé Fillion etc… Influencé par les études de Xavier Léon-Dufour, Jean-Christian Petitfils manifeste une préférence indéniable pour l’Evangile de Jean (qui, pour notre auteur, n’est pas de saint Jean l’apôtre…) au point d’entreprendre de nous libérer en matière historique de la « Tyrannie du Jésus des Synoptiques » (p. 544). C’est pourquoi, tout au long de son ouvrage, il n’a de cesse de mettre en doute la réalité des événements que les évangiles de Matthieu, Marc et Luc nous rapportent. Un épisode rapporté par ceux-ci viendrait à être absent de l’évangile de Jean, aussitôt la suspicion apparaît quant à sa vérité. Cela n’empêche pas l’auteur de prétendre que Jean lui-même n’est pas forcément toujours fidèle à l’histoire réelle, la part de symbolique ayant son rôle ! Une vision partiale et fausse Quelles vont être les conséquences de l’application par l’auteur d’un tel filtre d’a priori sur l’historicité de nos évangiles ? Donnons quelques exemples tirés de l’ouvrage lui-même. Il ne sera pas alors difficile au lecteur de comprendre que, pour Jean-Christian Petitfils, il y a un fossé entre le Christ de la Foi et le Christ de l’Histoire. Le récit de la tentation du Christ au désert est un « récit fictif illustrant une idée théologique ». (p. 96). Le voir autrement serait faire preuve d’une « lecture fondamentaliste.» (Idem). La prière et l’agonie de Jésus à Gethsemani : « Le récit des synoptiques est une construction élaborée à partir de diverses traditions et phrases hors de leur contexte » (p. 290). « Historiquement il n’est pas simple de dire ce qu’il s’est passé » et l’auteur de renvoyer l’épisode au dimanche de l’entrée triomphale dans Jérusalem en l’assimilant à un tout autre épisode rapporté par l’évangile de Jean. Le baiser de Judas ? « Peut-être une figure littéraire et symbolique soulignant la perfidie extême » (p. 309). La comparution de Jésus devant le Sanhédrin dans la nuit du jeudi au vendredi durant laquelle le Christ se déclarant Fils de Dieu ce qui lui vaut d’être déclaré digne de mort ? Lisez bien : « Jésus n’a jamais comparu devant le Sanhédrin ». « Les évangélistes ont agrégé dans un procès fictif l’ensemble des éléments qui l’opposaient aux autorités juives ». (p. 320). Le procès devant Ponce-Pilate ? Sur le plan historique affirme l’auteur, « il n ‘y a aucune certitude que les événements se sont passés comme Matthieu les rapporte » ; (p. 350). Et bien sûr Jean-Christian Petitfils, pour ne pas aller à l’encontre de la pensée dominante contemporaine, n’hésite pas à déclarer que les paroles des Juifs réclamant sur eux la responsabilité du sang qui va être versé (paroles qui selon lui n’ont probablement pas été prononcées !) « vont nourrir chez les chrétiens un antijudaïsme, une haine des Juifs comme peuple déicide, que rien, absolument rien ne justifie. Elles vont servir de prétexte à des siècles de meurtres, de pogroms et d’incompréhension » (p. 350). Trois fois l’auteur réaffirme cela dans son ouvrage. « Mon Père pourquoi m’avez-vous abandonné ? » Que penser de cette parole de Jésus sur la Croix ? « Ce cri de détresse a-t-il réellement jailli de la bouche de Jésus » se demande l’auteur ? « Certains en ont douté. » Mais on peut « supposer un arrière fond historique ». D’où la question qu’il se pose, sans y répondre : « A partir de quel élément réel les synoptiques ont-ils élaboré leur version ? » Il avance cependant une hypothèse « Jésus aurait simplement soupiré : Mon Dieu, c’est toi » ! (p. 393). Comme on le voit en quelques lignes il ne reste quasiment rien de l’historicité de l’une des paroles les plus sublimes et bouleversantes du Christ méditée par les générations de chrétiens depuis les origines de l’Eglise. Pour les récits de la Résurrection du Christ, il en est de même : « On n’est pas obligé de croire littéralement Matthieu lorsqu’il nous dit que l’Ange s’adresse aux femmes pour leur dire que le Christ est ressuscité » p. 434. Et l’auteur de conclure : « C’est ici au tombeau vide que s’arrête l’Histoire et que commence la Foi. L’historien sans s’engager sur la résurrection de Jésus ne peut à partir de ce moment qu’enregistrer les témoignages, les confronter » (p. 432). Mais permettons-nous d’objecter gravement à l’auteur : si l’historien ne peut me dire si les témoignages sur la résurrection de Jésus sont crédibles, qui pourra m’en donner la certitude pour me permettre de poser mon acte de Foi ? Les récits de l’enfance Jean-Christian Petitfils n’examine les récits évangéliques de l’enfance de Jésus qu’à partir de la page p. 451 dans son épilogue. Cela en dit déjà long sur l’estime que l’historien qu’il se veut d’être leur porte ! Que dit-il ? « Ces récits n’entretiennent pas le même rapport avec l’Histoire que les récits de la vie publique de Jésus. » (Et nous avons vu auparavant que l’historicité de ces derniers avait déjà beaucoup de lacunes !) « Ils sont le fruit d’une activité rédactionnelle élaborée… dans le dessein spécifique d’exalter l’origine divine de Jésus dans sa conception (p. 454)… Leur théologie prend volontairement la forme du merveilleux. Leur écriture colorée, enjolivée d’anecdotes, fait la joie de la piété populaire. » (p. 455). Et l’auteur de citer le cardinal Ratzinger : « Ces récits débordent radicalement le cadre de la vraisemblance historique ordinaire et nous confrontent avec l’action immédiate de Dieu ». Tout est là, pour Jean-Christian Petitfils et ses inspirateurs : sans la foi, il est impossible de dire ce que fut historiquement l’enfance de Jésus. Concluons. Tout l’ouvrage est sous-tendu par une vision moderniste de l’inspiration des écritures, que le pape saint Pie X a parfaitement stigmatisée et condamnée dans son encyclique Pascendi : « Ils distinguent, dit le Pape, soigneusement l’Histoire de la foi et l’histoire réelle ; à l’histoire de la foi, ils opposent l’histoire réelle, précisément en tant que réelle ; d’où il suit que des deux Christ l’un est réel ; celui de la foi n’a jamais existé dans la réalité ; l’un est venu en un point du temps et de l’espace, l’autre n’a jamais vécu ailleurs que dans les pieuses méditations du croyant ». Jean-Christian Petitfils, en écrivant son « Jésus » ne s’est sans doute pas rendu compte qu’en se mettant à l’école d’exégètes modernistes plutôt que d’agir en véritable historien, il perd toute vision objective de la véritable histoire de Jésus. Pour le non chrétien, cet ouvrage ne pourra l’amener qu’à la conclusion que l’on ne possède guère de sources crédibles sur l’histoire du Christ. La foi du lecteur chrétien, quant à elle, sera ébranlée au point qu’il finira par se demander si le Christ auquel il croit est bien le même que celui qui a vécu parmi nous. Echappé de sa période historique habituelle où il excelle, Jean-Christian Petitfils a fait une téméraire incursion dans l’Antiquité Chrétienne. Ce fut un désastre. Vite, qu’il retourne à son époque de prédilection ; c’est là que nous l’apprécions. Jésus, Jean-Christian Petitfils, Fayard, 2011, 670 pages. Abbé Denis PUGA » Article extrait du Chardonnet n° 275 de février 2012 Via La Porte Latine

Alors que le film Jésus l’enquête sort cette semaine au cinéma, rencontre avec l’historien et archéologue Bruno Bioul, qui publie Les Évangiles à l’épreuve de l’Histoire (Artège), une enquête passionnante sur l’authenticité et la transmission des évangiles.

Ces derniers mois, plusieurs films à thématique religieuse ont fait l’actualité. Le dernier en date – Jésus l’enquête, de Jon Gunn – sort cette semaine en France. Comment expliquez-vous ce questionnement récent autour du « Jésus historique » ?

Le questionnement que vous évoquez n’est pas si récent que cela. Savez-vous que depuis le début du XXe siècle, pas moins de 80 films dans lesquels il est question de Jésus ont été tournés, dont 15 depuis l’an 2000 ? Cela nous fait une moyenne d’un film tous les 18 mois environ ! En réalité, la question de l’historicité de Jésus, de son existence, est récurrente depuis au moins le XVIIe siècle, lorsqu’apparaît le déisme qui, en Angleterre notamment, se caractérise par une critique virulente des miracles et du surnaturel.

Au XVIIIe siècle, ce courant philosophique quasiment athée s’infléchit en panthéisme puis en théisme, et sera la religion de beaucoup de philosophes des Lumières. On se rapproche alors d’une religion naturelle qui n’est pas dépourvue d’une certaine forme de culte, « fut-il réduit à la prière d’adoration de l’infini face au soleil levant », comme l’a écrit Jacqueline Lagrée. Mais c’est avec la quête rationaliste, le courant mythologique et l’école de Tübingen au début du XIXe siècle, que la réalité historique de Jésus s’évanouit pour devenir une figure mythologique, fruit d’un imaginaire presque mystique des premières communautés chrétiennes.

La recherche historique à propos de Jésus peut-elle « renforcer » la foi ?

Le Jésus de l’Histoire et le Christ de la foi peuvent être liés, mais en aucun cas la foi ne peut naître de la recherche historique. Depuis le milieu des années 1950, la quête du Jésus historique a été relancée sous l’impulsion de Ernst Käsemann et Günther Bornkamm, et on peut remarquer qu’aujourd’hui elle se recentre sur sa judaïté. Sa dimension historique est pleinement assurée autant par les sources textuelles – aussi pauvres et fragiles soient-elles – que par la critique interne des récits évangéliques mis en perspective avec le contexte général de la Palestine au tournant de notre ère. Vous comprenez ainsi que la figure historique de Jésus est un sujet débattu depuis au moins trois siècles, et qu’on n’a pas fini de s’interroger sur lui.

La figure historique de Jésus est un sujet débattu depuis au moins trois siècles. On n’a pas fini de s’interroger sur lui.

Michel Onfray a défrayé la chronique l’an passé en remettant en cause l’existence de Jésus. Ces films s’inscrivent donc dans un questionnement plus ancien qu’on ne le pense ?

Le film de Jon Gunn est, en définitive, dans la continuité logique de cette interrogation, il est l’illustration parfaite de cette interrogation qui taraude les esprits depuis si longtemps. Si je pouvais, humblement, donner un conseil à M. Onfray, ce serait d’aller voir ce film qui raconte la quête d’un journaliste d’investigation athée américain, Lee Strobel, qui, dans les années 1970, suite à la conversion de son épouse, mena une véritable enquête policière sur le personnage de Jésus. Lee Strobel a publié plusieurs livres relatant sa longue quête : The Case for Christ (1998), The Case for Faith (2000), The Case for a Creator (2004), The Case for the Real Jesus (2007), et bien d’autres encore. Il a cherché à comprendre comment aux XXe et XXIe siècles, des gens pouvaient encore croire en Jésus, vrai Dieu et vrai Homme, alors que le dogme rationaliste contemporain posait (mais sans aucun fondement scientifique) l’impossibilité d’une telle assertion. Son enquête l’a mené à interroger des dizaines de spécialistes de tous bords, et l’a conduit finalement à se convertir. Voilà une belle leçon de vie et d’honnêteté intellectuelle.

Au vu des avancées historiques et archéologiques que vous présentez dans votre livre, il est pourtant toujours impossible de conclure à la vérité des évangiles d’un point de vue scientifique ?

La méthode exégétique (étude et interprétation des textes) repose au départ sur le doute scientifique. Elle remet en question la tradition multiséculaire de l’Église concernant notamment l’authenticité des évangiles. Afin d’éviter toute discussion stérile sur l’authenticité des récits évangéliques au nom d’une hypercritique inutile, il me semble plus judicieux d’aborder le sujet sous l’angle de la vraisemblance, car cela laisse la porte ouverte à toutes les objections, à la condition bien entendu qu’elles soient fondées.

Pour moi, la foi est aussi le résultat d’un travail rationnel : c’est l’adéquation de la raison ou de l’intelligence à une vérité révélée. 

Il existe donc bien, comme l’écrit Jean-Christian Petitfils dans sa biographie, un « Jésus historique » et un « Jésus de la foi » ? La Résurrection demeurera donc toujours un mystère ?

Je n’ai pas, en tant qu’historien, qualité pour juger de la pertinence de cette différenciation, ni pour lui attribuer un quelconque jugement de valeur. On se trouve ici dans le registre de la foi. La question que je me pose est de savoir si, oui ou non, cette foi peut reposer sur des faits ou seulement sur une appréciation personnelle. Je considère que la foi est beaucoup plus qu’un sentiment, qu’un élan du cœur qui nous pousse à croire sans vraiment chercher à comprendre. Pour moi, la foi est aussi le résultat d’un travail rationnel : c’est l’adéquation de la raison ou de l’intelligence à une vérité révélée. Mais on sort ici du champ de l’histoire. Pour en revenir à la résurrection, je dirais que l’historien n’a pas à expliquer ce phénomène. Par contre, il doit prendre en compte l’information qui le rapporte. Tout écrit est une information, tout texte donne des renseignements dont il faut analyser le degré de pertinence, de crédibilité, de vraisemblance.

L’historien et le croyant ne peuvent au final que se fier à ces seuls témoignages rédigés il y a deux millénaires ?

Lorsque les évangiles racontent la résurrection de Jésus, l’historien n’a pas à expliquer ce phénomène ni à se demander s’il est possible ou non (même la science actuelle est incapable de répondre à cette question pour les raisons que je donne dans mon livre), mais de vérifier la vraisemblance de cette information : qui sont ceux qui rapportent cette information ? Qui sont les témoins ? Pourquoi rapportent-ils ce phénomène ? Qu’ont-ils fait exactement après l’avoir rapporté ? Comment ont réagi leurs adversaires ? Quelles sont les autres explications possibles à cet épisode singulier ? S’agit-il d’un mensonge, d’une manipulation ? Quels en sont les raisons ou les buts ? En définitive, lorsqu’on sait comment les témoins de cette annonce extraordinaire ont fini leur vie, on peut se poser la question : on peut mourir pour quelque chose que l’on croit être vrai, mais est-on prêt à donner sa vie pour quelque chose que l’on sait être faux ? Ici, on n’est plus dans le domaine de l’histoire ni de la foi ; c’est juste une question de bon sens !

Voir  encore:

Flora Carr
Time
March 30, 2018

Sex worker, saint, sinner, witness, wife. In the 2,000 years since Mary Magdalene is said to have watched Jesus Christ die on the cross, she’s been labeled many things.

The label “prostitute” has stuck fast for centuries, ever since Pope Gregory I first pronounced her a “sinful woman” in the year 591, defying evidence to the contrary in the canonical Gospels. On the other hand, Dan Brown’s novel The Da Vinci Code resurrected an old and popular theory that Mary Magdalene was in fact Jesus’ wife. Myths surround the figure of Mary Magdalene to this day.

But neither theory — penitent prostitute or devoted spouse — actually matches what can be said about Mary Magdalene from what’s written in the Bible: She was a woman from Magdala, a small Galilean town known for its fishing, who became a female disciple and was first witness to Jesus’ resurrection, the cornerstone of Christianity.

But the team behind the new film Mary Magdalene, directed by Garth Davis, is hoping to get back to basics. The movie, which came out in the U.K. on March 16, tells the story of Mary Magdalene (Rooney Mara), detailing her fraught existence in Magdala as a single woman determined not to marry, before she meets Jesus (Joaquin Phoenix) and follows him to Galilee and then Jerusalem, where he’s crucified. Yet, in stripping away the myths, this film portrayal of Mary Magdalene underlines what some scholars see as the real — and unexpected — reason why she’s so controversial.

At the heart of the controversy is the idea that Mary Magdalene’s connection to Jesus was spiritual rather than romantic. For example, in the film’s version of the Last Supper, Mary Magdalene is seated on Jesus’ right-hand side. Though the tableau echoes a key scene in the 2006 film version of The Da Vinci Code, in which the characters examine Leonardo Da Vinci’s mural The Last Supper and debate whether the effeminate figure to Jesus’ right was in fact Mary Magdalene, the new movie doesn’t place her there as his wife. The significance of her seat lies instead in Mary Magdalene taking the prized position above any of the twelve male apostles, as Peter (Chiwetel Ejiofor) looks on in jealousy.

This version of the story is the real reason why Mary Magdalene is dangerous to the Church, according to Professor Joan Taylor of King’s College, London, who worked as historical advisor for Mary Magdalene.

Mary’s central role in the Gospels has historically been used by some as evidence that the Church should introduce female priests — and since 1969, when the Catholic Church admitted that it had mistakenly identified Mary Magdalene as a sex worker, the calls for women in church leadership positions have only grown louder.

“Within the Church she does have tremendous power, and there are lots of women who look… to Mary Magdalene as a foundation for women’s leadership within the Church,” says Taylor.

The film draws partially from the Gospel of Mary, a “very mysterious document” discovered in the 19th century, Taylor says. It has no known author, and although it’s popularly known as a “gospel,” it’s not technically classed as one, as gospels generally recount the events during Jesus’ life, rather than beginning after his death. It’s thought the text was written some time in the 2nd century, but some scholars claim it overlaps Jesus’ lifetime.

In the Gospel of Mary, which isn’t officially recognized by the Church, Mary Magdalene is framed as the only disciple who truly understands Jesus’ spiritual message, which puts her in direct conflict with the apostle Peter. Mary describes to the other apostles a vision she has had of Jesus following his death. Peter grows hostile, asking why Jesus would especially grant Mary — a woman — a vision.

Mary Magdalene’s special understanding of Jesus’ message, and Peter’s hostility towards her, as portrayed in Mary Magdalene, will likely split opinion, according to Taylor and her colleague, Professor Helen Bond of The University of Edinburgh, Scotland, with whom Taylor is presenting a U.K. television series on women disciples this Easter, titled Jesus’ Female Disciples: the New Evidence.

“[In the film] she’s really close to Jesus, not because of some kind of love affair, but just because she…gets Jesus in a way that the other disciples don’t,” Bond says.

The idea that the twelve disciples didn’t quite “get” Jesus in the same way Mary Magdalene did is addressed throughout Davis’ film. The disciples are waiting for Jesus to overthrow the Romans and create a new kingdom, one without death or suffering. But by the end of the film, following Jesus’ death, Mary Magdalene has come to the conclusion that “the kingdom is here and now.”

For Michael Haag, author of The Quest For Mary Magdalene, the Church has historically sidelined Mary not just because of her gender, but also because of her message. He argues that the Church specifically promulgated the idea that she was a sex worker in order to “devalue” her message. Haag believes that Mary Magdalene’s alternative ideas proved too dangerous for the Church to allow them to spread. The Gospel of Mary Magdalene, in his view, undermines “Church bureaucracy and favors personal understanding.”

 Mary Magdalene’s release date in the U.S. has been pushed back; its initial distributor had been the Weinstein Company, which recently filed for bankruptcy after its co-founder Harvey Weinstein was accused of sexual assault. However, members of the Christian community have already expressed doubts about the film.

Taylor Berglund, an editor for Charisma Media, a Florida-based magazine aimed at charismatic and Pentecostal Christians, believes that there’s potential for Christian audiences to boycott the film, as they did for Noah, starring Russell Crowe, in 2014. “To say only Mary Magdalene understood Jesus Christ and everyone since has been mistaken would be heresy,” Berglund says.

The fact that Mary Magdalene draws from a “gospel” that isn’t officially recognized by the Church may also provoke criticism. Jerry A. Johnson, the president and CEO of National Religious Broadcasters (NRB), says that films that “rely upon extra-biblical accounts” can’t be “accurate.”

“Evangelical audiences do not look kindly on efforts to twist the story of Jesus to fit a political narrative in service of today’s agenda of feminism,” Johnson says.

But both Bond and Taylor point to the Bible itself for further evidence of Mary Magdalene’s intimate understanding of Jesus. She remains at the cross during the crucifixion while the other disciples hide, and she’s the first to see Jesus following the Resurrection. “[There’s] the very strong implication that Christianity is derived from her testimony and her witness,” Bond says.

Strip away the labels of “prostitute” or “wife,” and Mary Magdalene still remains a controversial figure. Her story challenges ideas about spirituality, and the role of women in religion.

“[She’s] a feminine voice from the past,” Taylor says. “There’s something about her. Something about Mary.”

Voir par ailleurs:

Macron aux Bernardins : l’Église catholique s’organise-t-elle en lobby ?

C’est un événement inédit : pour la première fois, la Conférence des évêques de France (CEF) recevra Emmanuel Macron et plusieurs centaines d’invités lors d’une soirée le 9 avril au Collège des Bernardins, à Paris. Ministres, parlementaires, personnalités du monde de l’entreprise, des médias, de la culture, mais aussi mouvements et associations de fidèles, associations caritatives catholiques et représentants des autres religions figurent parmi les centaines d’invités.

Les juifs avaient le dîner du Crif et le Nouvel An du Consistoire, les musulmans le dîner de la rupture du jeûne du ramadan, et les protestants, la cérémonie des vœux de la Fédération protestante de France. Il manquait donc à l’Église catholique « un moment pour s’adresser à la société française d’une manière plus large », explique Mgr Ribadeau-Dumas, porte-parole de la CEF. En pleins États généraux de la bioéthique, l’occasion d’interpeller le gouvernement sur plusieurs sujets sensibles, comme la PMA ou la fin de vie. Mais pas seulement. Le sort des migrants, des sans-abris, et la laïcité devraient aussi nourrir les discussions.

Entretenir son réseau avec les députés

Pourquoi l’Église a-t-elle attendu ce moment-là pour organiser son propre « rendez-vous » national avec l’État et la société civile ? « Après une année d’élection présidentielle, dans le cadre de la discussion autour de la révision des lois de la bioéthique, le conseil permanent des évêques a pensé qu’il serait opportun d’avoir ce type de manifestation », détaille Mgr Ribadeau-Dumas.

Le contexte politique a donc favorisé l’organisation de cette soirée. Membre du conseil permanent de la CEF, Mgr Pascal Wintzer, archevêque de Poitiers, confie : « Il y a un fort renouvellement du personnel politique depuis la dernière présidentielle et les législatives. Dans nos diocèses, nous avions des relations habituelles avec les précédents députés, car certains étaient là depuis un certain temps ». « Le renouvellement et le rajeunissement » des députés contraindrait ainsi l’Église à organiser cette soirée de « réseau », pour « renouer » avec la nouvelle classe politique.

Macron : un moment propice au dialogue

Cet événement entend « réaffirmer la place de l’Église dans la société, dans le contexte d’une laïcité apaisée », a affirmé à La Croix Vincent Neymon, porte-parole de la CEF. La laïcité est-elle plus particulièrement apaisée depuis l’arrivée au pouvoir d’Emmanuel Macron ? « Il y a de la part, aujourd’hui, de la présidence de la République – avec la présence des responsables religieux récemment au dîner sur la question de la fin de vie – une volonté de dialogue », admet prudemment Mgr Ribadeau-Dumas. « C’est ce qu’on a ressenti depuis l’élection du président Macron, reconnaît quant à lui François Clavairoly, président de la Fédération protestante de France. Les religions semblent perçues comme des contributrices de la société et non plus comme des lobbys menaçants ». « C’est différent avec Macron, j’ai l’impression qu’il y a une vraie écoute, une forme de main tendue, de bienveillance, mais le dis avec beaucoup de prudence », observe de son côté le député LR Philippe Gosselin.

Si François Hollande, après l’assassinat du père Hamel, avait fini par adopter « un discours très favorable aux Églises » le début de son mandat a été ponctué davantage par « des discours de méfiance, comme celui du Bourget », analyse Philippe Portier, directeur d’études à l’École pratique des hautes études et directeur du Groupe sociétés, religions, laïcité. Quant à Nicolas Sarkozy, s’il était favorable au dialogue, il défendait « une conception identitaire de la nation, allant à l’encontre de la volonté d’accueil (de l’étranger, ndlr) de l’Église catholique ». En outre, beaucoup d’évêques auraient regretté que « Nicolas Sarkoy ait tendance à instrumentaliser les Églises au service de sa propre stratégie de pouvoir », ajoute le sociologue. Les évêques seraient plus à l’aise avec Emmanuel Macron, dont les discours inviteraient davantage au « dialogue avec les institutions religieuses », sans conception identitaire de la nation.

Une Église moins audible

Si le contexte politique a changé, ce n’est pas la seule raison qui conduit aujourd’hui les évêques de France a organiser un tel événement. Consciente d’être « moins entendue qu’auparavant », l’Église catholique est « obligée de sortir de ses murs pour que son message soit reçu », estime François Clavairoly. « Le christianisme, dans sa version catholique en tous cas, est confronté à la post-modernité, à l’effacement du référent religieux et peut être aussi à un questionnement interne qui le fragilise », poursuit le pasteur.

« Du fait de la pluralisation du champ religieux, et de l’agnosticisme d’une grande partie de la population, l’Église est contrainte de montrer son existence par des événements significatifs », constate pour sa part Philippe Portier. Dans ce nouveau contexte, l’Église adopterait donc une nouvelle logique de médiatisation pour exister. « Comme toutes les autres religions, l’Église a vocation à échanger avec la société, et il faut trouver les canaux contemporains, commente le Grand Rabbin de France, Haïm Korsia. L’Église est présente sur Internet, dans les médias. C’est une très bonne chose qu’il y ait ce temps d’échange avec la République ».

Une minorité religieuse parmi d’autres ?

Mais en se calquant sur les initiatives « événementielles » des autres communautés religieuses, l’Église ne risque-t-elle pas d’être perçue comme une minorité parmi d’autres ? Face à sa perte d’influence dans la société, serait-elle, progressivement, en train de se constituer en « lobby » ?

Philippe Portier pointe plusieurs limites à cette analyse. L’Église, tout d’abord, ne se perçoit pas comme une association comme les autres. « Il y a dans le tréfonds de la conscience ecclésiale l’idée que l’Église s’inscrit dans la succession du Christ. » Elle est donc « tiraillée entre cette image qu’elle a d’elle même, et ce que lui impose la société ». Les propos de Mgr Wintzer, interrogé par La Vie, illustrent bien ce dilemme : « L’Église prend conscience qu’elle est aussi une communauté, comme le sont d’autres communautés. On parle de la communauté musulmane, de la communauté juive, et maintenant on parle aussi de la communauté chrétienne, catholique. Faire cette invitation, c’est un peu accepter cela, d’être une religion avec d’autres. » « Et pourtant, ajoute-t-il, l’Église n’est pas un groupe à parité avec d’autres groupes. C’est-à-dire que l’Évangile n’est pas enfermé dans une communauté qui s’appelle l’Église catholique ». « Je me méfie de tout ce qui pourrait apparaître comme du communautarisme, abonde Mgr Ribadeau-Dumas. Les catholiques, par l’Évangile même, sont invités, dans la dimension universelle intrinsèque au catholicisme, à vivre dans cette société plurielle ».

Nous, nous n’avons pas de produit à vendre. Nous avons une bonne nouvelle à annoncer. –  Mgr Ribadeau-Dumas, porte-parole de la CEF

Ensuite, l’Église bénéficie déjà d’une relation privilégiée avec l’État, notamment à travers une instance de dialogue créée en 2002. Et au niveau local, de nombreux échanges ont lieu entre les évêques et les maires. Enfin, l’événement des Bernardins n’est pas tout à fait comparable aux événements organisés par les autres communautés religieuses. Les invités de marque, insiste Mgr Olivier Ribadeau-Dumas, en seront surtout des personnes handicapées, en situation de précarité, et des migrants : « Ce seront sans doute eux qui ouvriront la soirée, pour montrer que le trésor de l’Église, c’est bien celui-là. Nous nous adressons à toute la société ». Rien n’a encore été décidé, en outre, sur la possibilité de faire de cette soirée un rendez-vous annuel : « Rien n’est défini pour l’instant. Ce n’est pas dit que cela se renouvellera de cette manière là », souligne Mgr Ribadeau-Dumas.

Pas de « produit à vendre »

Enfin, si la CEF assume cette nécessité d’avoir une parole plus audible, elle refuse d’être assimilée à un lobby. « Nous, nous n’avons pas de produit à vendre. Nous avons une bonne nouvelle à annoncer, martèle le porte-parole de la CEF. Cette bonne nouvelle, nous l’annonçons contre vents et marées, mais avec une grande liberté : nous ne sommes pas comptables de résultats. Ce que nous annonçons, nous avons conscience que cela ne portera peut-être du fruit que dans 20, 25 ou 30 ans ».

Mgr Ribadeau-Dumas souligne aussi l’étendue du réseau, historique, de l’Église catholique sur l’ensemble du territoire français : « À part le réseau de l’école, c’est l’Église qui a le plus grand maillage territorial. Si les évêques de France choisissent qu’un texte soit lu dans toutes les églises de France, il le sera. Les lobbyistes ne réunissent pas ce genre de parterre pour faire passer un message. Donc c’est autre chose. Une volonté de dialogue ». Une volonté de dialogue qui n’empêche pas l’opération de communication d’être bien organisée.

Voir de même:

Revue de presse française

A la Une: l’appel de Macron aux catholiques

Frédéric Couteau

C’était lundi devant la Conférence des évêques de France, le président de la République a prononcé un vibrant discours en direction des catholiques : « ‘Oui, la France a été fortifiée par l’engagement des catholiques’. Après une heure d’un discours truffé de déclarations comme celle-ci, les catholiques avaient de quoi se sentir honorés, s’exclame La Croix. Lundi soir au Collège des Bernardins, Emmanuel Macron n’a eu de cesse de rendre hommage à l’Église et aux catholiques : soulignant leur rôle dans l’histoire de France, louant leur engagement en direction des plus pauvres, multipliant les références à de grands auteurs chrétiens. Non sans habileté, poursuit La Croix, le président de la République a su parler le langage de son public. Le simple fait qu’il ait répondu positivement à l’invitation de la Conférence des évêques de France était déjà, en soi, un motif de satisfaction pour des catholiques qui ne s’étaient pas vus manifester une telle marque d’estime depuis longtemps. »

Toutefois, il y a comme un « problème de lignes », ironise Le Canard Enchaîné : Emmanuel Macron a donc affirmé « regretter » que « le lien entre l’Eglise et l’Etat » se soit « abîmé » et a souhaité qu’il soit « réparé ». « Parler ainsi d’un lien, qui depuis la loi de 1905 sur la laïcité, n’est plus censé exister, c’est bien sûr, faire aussi bouger la ligne de démarcation qui sépare l’Etat de la religion, estime Le Canard. Ce qui a mis Christine Boutin en pâmoison et vaut à Macron de se faire traiter de ‘sous-curé’ par Mélenchon. »

Frère Emmanuel…

En effet, les réactions à gauche sont violentes…

Au premier rang desquelles Jean-Luc Mélenchon, donc, rapporte Le Monde, qui, dans un tweet rageur, dénonce « un ‘Macron en plein délire métaphysique. Insupportable. On attend un président, on entend un sous-curé’. (…) Le nouveau premier secrétaire du Parti socialiste, Olivier Faure, s’interroge, relate encore Le Monde. ‘Mais de quoi nous parle-t-on ? L’Eglise catholique n’a jamais été bannie du débat public. Quel lien restaurer avec l’Etat ? En République laïque aucune foi ne saurait s’imposer à la loi. Toute la loi de 1905. Rien que la loi’, estime le député de Seine-et-Marne. Et de poursuivre : ‘La laïcité est notre joyau. Voilà ce qu’un président de la République devrait défendre’. »

Libération emboîte le pas, avec ce grand titre, éloquent : « frère Emmanuel », avec la photo du chef de l’Etat, comme baigné d’une lumière divine…

« Emmanuel Macron ne franchit pas la ligne jaune, mais il s’en rapproche, estime Libération dans son éditorial. Il veut rompre avec une laïcité qui cantonnerait les cultes à la vie privée. Mais il donne par contrecoup à l’Eglise une place essentielle dans la promotion des valeurs humanistes, alors que la République, dans la tradition française, tient ce rôle au premier chef ; il met pratiquement sur le même plan l’enseignement moral des religions et celui de l’école laïque, un peu comme Sarkozy avait confondu l’instituteur et le curé. » Et Libération de s’interroger : « Faut-il nécessairement une béquille religieuse à la quête de l’absolu chère aux hommes et aux femmes ? Emmanuel Macron semble le penser. Quant aux réparations que l’Etat devrait à l’Eglise, comment ne pas y voir une référence à la loi sur le mariage pour tous ? Il faudrait donc, s’interroge encore Libération, que l’Etat expie cette avancée démocratique ? »

Un « lien » qui fait débat

Autre question posée par Le Midi Libre : « Emmanuel Macron est-il encore de gauche ?

Les marqueurs qui symbolisent la droite écrasent de leur pointe rouge l’ADN de la gauche : sécurité, emploi, ISF… et maintenant la laïcité. Le président de la République ne souhaite sans doute pas une intrusion du fait religieux dans les affaires de l’État, mais le mot employé – le lien – peut prêter à confusion. Sa sortie calculée sur un rapprochement éventuel entre le politique et le religieux donne corps à une idée, relève encore Le Midi Libre : contrer la religion musulmane déjà très présente dans notre quotidien par une montée plus visible du catholicisme. »

Pour Le Journal de la Haute-Marne, le terme « lien » a aussi du mal à passer… « Le ‘lien’ établit un rapport organique, ce qui est incompatible avec l’idée de séparation entre l’Eglise et l’Etat, estime le quotidien champenois. Le terme ‘relations’ eût été plus judicieux et moins piégeux, sachant qu’elles existent de toute façon entre les deux institutions, ne serait-ce que pour des questions pratiques. Comme en politique rien n’est innocent, on peut se demander aussi si derrière ce qui apparaît pour la gauche comme une vulgaire provocation ne se niche pas un malin plaisir de mettre le bazar à droite. La main tendue à la communauté catholique plaira au courant démocrate-chrétien. A un an des européennes, ça ne mange pas de pain. »

Réconcilier les deux France !

Enfin, Le Figaro estime qu’il s’agit là « d’un discours refondateur, historique et exprimé par le 8e président de la Ve République. Une république où Emmanuel Macron entend, au seuil du XXIe siècle, réconcilier les deux France, celle qui croit et celle qui ne croit pas. Une position provocatrice totalement assumée, du reste, par le chef de l’État. Dans le choix très gradué des projets de discours, il a choisi l’option haute, la plus ouverte aux catholiques. »

Alors, poursuit Le Figaro, « le public catholique se réveille heureusement surpris, prêt à jouer le jeu pour certains, mais extrêmement méfiant. Il n’acceptera pas des évolutions bioéthiques qui manipuleraient l’homme. Et pas davantage de se laisser enfermer dans une case ‘religieuse’ prédéfinie par une vision communautariste de la société. »

« Le discours de Macron marque bien la centralité du catholicisme dans la constitution de la nation française »

Pour le sociologue Philippe Portier, le chef de l’Etat tient un discours explicite sur la laïcité.|

Propos recueillis par Cécile Chambraud

Le Monde

Directeur d’études à l’Ecole pratique des hautes études et directeur du Groupe sociétés, religions, laïcités, le sociologue Philippe Portier analyse la nouveauté du discours d’Emmanuel Macron sur le catholicisme et la laïcité que le président de la République a prononcé devant les évêques, lundi 9 avril.

Emmanuel Macron attribue-t-il une place particulière au catholicisme par rapport aux autres religions ?

Emmanuel Macron présente l’Etat et l’Eglise comme devant être en situation d’alliance. C’est un discours traditionnel dans le langage catholique. Deux éléments de son propos renvoient à un langage d’Eglise où s’affirme la spécificité du catholicisme dans la société française. Le premier, c’est qu’il parle de l’Eglise comme étant, à côté de l’Etat, dépositaire d’un ordre qui a sa propre juridiction.

L’Eglise et l’Etat sont deux sociétés autonomes relevant chacune d’un ordre de juridiction spécifique. Il n’a pas utilisé ce langage avec les juifs, les musulmans ou les protestants. Cela renvoie à l’auto-compréhension de l’Eglise, qui ne s’analyse pas comme une communauté de croyance comme les autres, mais comme la dépositaire de la parole du Christ et ayant, vis-à-vis de l’Etat, un ordre de juridiction spécifique. Le président de la République a repris là les catégories de la théologie politique.

Le second élément, que l’on ne retrouve pas dans les discours aux autres communautés de foi, c’est l’association constante entre nation et religion catholique. Il a parlé des racines chrétiennes de la France comme d’une sorte d’évidence historique. Ce discours marque bien la centralité du catholicisme dans la constitution de la nation française.

Cette particularité accordée au catholicisme a-t-elle des répercussions pour les autres cultes ?

Sûrement. Pour Emmanuel Macron, toutes les religions participent au concert national. Mais il ne cesse de mettre en évidence le fait que le catholicisme est d’une nature théologique et historique particulière. Et qu’il a su, en dépit de son intransigeance originelle, se couler dans la République et accepter les principes de la démocratie constitutionnelle. C’est la grande différence avec l’islam auquel il demande, dans plusieurs de ses discours, de faire un effort d’acclimatation et d’institutionnalisation, comme l’ont fait les autres cultes.

En cela il est très français, et aussi catholique : il pense le religieux dans une dialectique entre le sujet et l’institution. Dans sa façon de s’adresser au catholicisme, la présence du nonce [le représentant du Saint-Siège en France] fait référence à l’Eglise comme institution internationale. Il y a dans sa présence une logique concordataire qui s’exprime.

Le discours de M. Macron marque-t-il une rupture dans la conception de notre laïcité ?

Oui et non. Il y a eu, dans les présidences précédentes, des pratiques de dialogue, de mobilisation du religieux au service du bien commun. Mais avec Emmanuel Macron, cela devient beaucoup plus formalisé et fait l’objet d’un discours explicite. Dès les années 1960-1970, à mesure que l’Etat s’estimait moins à même de régler seul les problèmes sociaux, s’est mise en place, à l’égard des cultes, une politique de reconnaissance. Il y a l’idée que l’Etat ne peut pas tout et qu’il a besoin de s’appuyer sur des forces extérieures à lui-même.

C’est un discours que tenait déjà François Mitterrand en 1983, lorsqu’il inaugurait le Comité national d’éthique, et qu’il disait que nous avions besoin des sagesses des forces religieuses et convictionnelles. On trouve la même chose chez Emmanuel Macron. La différence, c’est que ce qui apparaissait au détour d’un discours chez tel ou tel président, chez lui, cela prend vraiment l’allure d’une doctrine très formelle.

En quelque sorte, il viendrait couronner une évolution ?

Il vient couronner et expliciter une évolution à l’œuvre dès les années 1960-1970. A mesure que l’Etat se trouvait bousculé dans sa capacité d’action sur le réel par des forces qu’il ne maîtrisait pas – l’individualisation de la société, la globalisation –, il a essayé de faire front avec les forces de la société civile. Une politique de reconnaissance s’est progressivement mise en place : on a associé davantage les cultes à la réflexion, on les a financés davantage, on leur a délégué davantage de compétences…

En 1993-1994, lorsqu’il était ministre de l’intérieur, Charles Pasqua disait déjà que, dans les banlieues, nous avions besoin de l’engagement des chrétiens. Emmanuel Macron a repris cette idée que le welfare state n’arrive pas à tout faire. Ce qui ne faisait qu’affleurer dans les discours passés des gouvernants se retrouve chez Emmanuel Macron dans un langage très particulier.

N’entretient-il pas une certaine ambiguïté entre d’une part les rapports de l’Eglise et de l’Etat, et d’autre part les rapports des catholiques avec la République ?

Deux tendances coexistent chez lui. La première est très « catholique d’ouverture ». Elle renvoie à l’idée que c’est à partir des engagements de la base que le catholicisme peut s’épanouir et irriguer la société de ses valeurs. Lundi, il a beaucoup insisté sur l’engagement social des catholiques. Pendant sa campagne présidentielle, il a visité le Secours catholique. C’est un catholicisme marqué par Emmanuel Mounier.

En même temps, et c’est son côté plus traditionnel, il fait toujours référence à l’institution, ce que l’on aurait du mal à retrouver chez les catholiques libéraux. Il y a une sorte de compréhension dialectique du catholicisme comme un engagement des chrétiens porté par une institution elle-même inscrite dans l’histoire. Dans la campagne présidentielle, après avoir visité le Secours catholique, il s’est rendu à la basilique de Saint-Denis. Je ne crois pas que ces propos soient seulement stratégiques, destinés, pour les uns, aux catholiques de gauche, pour les autres aux catholiques d’affirmation. Il existe entre eux une coopération dialectique.

Comment interprétez-vous sa phrase sur le « lien » abîmé entre l’Eglise et l’Etat ? Parle-t-il de ces institutions ou bien des catholiques et de la communauté politique ?

Il y a une ambiguïté. Fait-il allusion à l’histoire, à une laïcité de combat qui aurait laissé peu de place à l’Eglise ? Dans ce cas, il s’agirait de revenir sur une philosophie de séparation stricte pour essayer de lui substituer une laïcité de reconnaissance. De faire succéder une laïcité de confiance à une laïcité de défiance.

Ou alors, deuxième hypothèse, il s’agit de prendre acte que, depuis les années 1990-2000, les catholiques sont de plus en plus méfiants à l’égard de la République et des gouvernants, qu’ils s’isolent dans une posture communautaire, identitaire, qui les éloigne de la communauté nationale. Il faudrait alors en finir avec cette évolution et leur permettre de réintégrer le concert public.

Voir aussi:

Emmanuel Macron aux évêques : « Un discours hors norme »

Le président invite les catholiques à rompre avec la « logique d’enfermement » et à investir le débat public, analyse la sociologue des religions Danièle Hervieu-Léger dans une tribune au « Monde ».

Danièle Hervieu-Léger (Sociologue des religions, directrice d’études à l’EHESS)

Le Monde

Tribune. Avant que tout discours ait été prononcé, le seul fait que le président Macron ait accepté, après des rencontres avec d’autres dignitaires des cultes, l’invitation de la Conférence des évêques de France à s’exprimer devant elle avait suscité des anticipations contrastées : celles de ceux qui dénonçaient par avance un manquement à la laïcité, et celles de ceux qui, en sens inverse, en espéraient des gages communautaires.

Il est certain que le contenu de l’allocution d’un président de la République osant les mots de « transcendance » ou de « salut » a peu de chances d’apaiser les passions. Le propos, de fait, est hors norme. De quoi s’agit-il ? Son trait le plus frappant est la conviction forte qui s’y exprime de ce que la foi catholique n’est pas une simple « opinion », et de ce que l’Eglise n’est pas réductible a une « famille de pensée » invitée à vivre dans une bulle étanche au monde qui l’environne.

Le discours du président intègre l’idée selon laquelle toute foi religieuse participe, pour celui qui s’en réclame, de la construction de son rapport au monde. Il atteste en même temps que le catholicisme – comme toute religion, selon Max Weber – est un « mode d’agir en communauté ». Dire cela, c’est avancer aussi que l’idée d’une pure « privatisation » de la croyance est une vue de l’esprit. Car la croyance n’est elle-même qu’une composante de ce rapport singulier au monde à laquelle la foi introduit le fidèle.

Est-ce manquer à la laïcité que de le reconnaître ? La laïcité n’a pas été mise en place pour réduire sans reste cette singularité du religieux : elle a été construite pour empêcher que le mode propre d’agir en communauté que celle-ci définit puisse prévaloir, de quelque manière que ce soit, sur les règles que la communauté des citoyens se donne à elle-même. Ceci vaut pour le catholicisme romain autant que pour toutes les autres confessions présentes dans la société religieusement plurielle qu’est la France.

Audace

Mais, dans un pays traumatisé par la guerre inexpugnable qui opposa pendant un siècle et demi au moins une France enfermée dans le rêve de la reconquête catholique à la France porteuse de l’ordre nouveau issu de la Révolution française, il faut une certaine audace pour affirmer que la singularité catholique, inscrite dans l’histoire longue, a légitimement vocation à s’exprimer, à sa place et sans privilège, dans une société définitivement sortie de la régie normative de l’Eglise et même du christianisme.

Emmanuel Macron a affirmé la légitimité de cette expression de deux façons. Il l’a fait d’abord en prenant acte, indépendamment de toute prise de position idéologique sur la mention formelle des « racines chrétiennes », du rôle – non exclusif à beaucoup près – qui a été celui du catholicisme et de l’Eglise dans la fabrication de l’identité culturelle de la nation : nier l’importance de cette matrice catholique enfouie, et quoi qu’il en soit de son délitement présent, c’est s’exposer à méconnaître une source de bien des traits de notre esprit commun.

Mais le président ne s’est pas arrêté seulement à cette invocation lointaine. Il a aussi fait état de l’engagement présent des catholiques dans le tissu de ces associations qui font prendre corps, sur des terrains multiples, au souci de ceux qu’il est convenu d’appeler « les plus fragiles » : ceux, en tout cas, que le cours du monde laisse sur le bord du chemin. Nul n’ignore, et certainement pas le président, que cet engagement n’est pas celui d’une armée en ordre de bataille sous la conduite des évêques : il est aussi le lieu où se creusent la pluralité et même la contradiction des voies selon lesquelles le catholicisme se vit concrètement comme manière d’habiter le monde.

Deux limites

C’est au regard de cette pluralité des catholicismes qu’il faut ressaisir l’appel du président aux catholiques pour qu’ils fassent entendre leur voix dans le débat public, s’agissant en particulier des questions touchant aux migrations, à la bioéthique ou à la filiation. D’aucuns ont immédiatement entendu cet appel comme une invitation – bien ou mal venue, selon le point de vue – à « entrer en politique ». Sans doute est-ce bien de cela qu’il s’agit : la rénovation de la politique elle-même appelle aujourd’hui un renouveau de la confrontation publique des convictions.

La voix des catholiques, pas plus que toute expression d’une éthique de conviction dans le débat public, n’a vocation à être « injonctive »

Mais cette « entrée en politique » rencontre immédiatement, du côté des catholiques, deux limites indépassables.

La première a été posée par le président lui-même de la manière la plus claire : la voix des catholiques, pas plus que toute expression d’une éthique de conviction dans le débat public, n’a vocation à être « injonctive », c’est-à-dire à s’imposer à la société tout entière.

La seconde est implicitement contenue dans l’évocation de la diversité des engagements catholiques : il n’existe pas aujourd’hui de possibilité qu’une voix catholique – fut-elle celle de l’institution – puisse prétendre être la seule voix autorisée du catholicisme dans le registre politique. La Conférence des évêques de France n’a-t-elle pas elle-même démontré, lors de la dernière élection présidentielle, qu’elle avait pris acte du pluralisme interne d’un monde catholique où règne définitivement, comme l’avait démontré Jean-Marie Donegani il y a plusieurs années, la « liberté de choisir ».

Quelle est alors la portée de la reconnaissance appuyée accordée par le président aux catholiques en tant qu’acteurs de la scène politique ? En valorisant leur contribution à la production du sens de notre vie en commun, il ne se contente pas de mettre du baume sur les plaies d’une population perturbée par la découverte de sa condition minoritaire dans une société où elle fut, pendant des siècles, une majorité qui comptait. Il invite à rompre la logique d’enfermement qui pousse des courants de cette population à se constituer comme une contre-culture en résistance au sein d’un monde dont ils ont perdu les codes.

Le discours des Bernardins restera, à cet égard, comme le moment assez étonnant où, dans la longue et difficile trajectoire de la reconfiguration du catholicisme français en minorité religieuse dans une société plurielle, l’invitation à échapper au risque sectaire sera venue, contre toute attente, de la plus haute autorité de la République.

Directrice d’études à l’EHESS, qu’elle a présidée de 2004 à 2009, Danièle Hervieu-Léger est sociologue des religions. Elle est l’auteur de nombreux ouvrages traitant de la place du religieux, et spécialement du christianisme, dans les sociétés occidentales contemporaines, comme Le Temps des moines. Clôture et hospitalité (PUF, 2017).

En savoir plus sur http://www.lemonde.fr/idees/article/2018/04/11/emmanuel-macron-aux-eveques-un-discours-hors-norme_5283783_3232.html#wAzygiBmBijWE4DM.99

Le président de la République veut présenter avant la fin du premier semestre 2018 un « plan » pour « l’islam de France » : ses instances représentatives, son financement et la formation de ses imams.

Il continue pour cela ses consultations, comme lundi 26 mars avec une Danoise « féministe musulmane » Sherin Khankan et la rabbin libérale Delphine Horvilleur.

 Sur Facebook, Sherin Khankan a posté une photo d’elle, assise devant la table de travail du président de la République qui se tient debout derrière elle. « Il faut un président bien sage pour défendre le féminisme islamique et considérer la religion comme une partie de la solution et non du problème », écrit – en guise de légende – celle que les médias du monde entier surnomment « l’imamette de Copenhague ». « Le président français Emmanuel Macron envoie un signal politique important montrant que la société laïque peut coexister avec la religion. »

Lundi 26 mars, cette Danoise d’origine syrienne, fondatrice en 2001 d’un Forum des musulmans critiques, puis d’un centre formation soufi « Sortir du cercle », auteur de La femme est l’avenir de l’islam (Stock, 2017), a été reçue à l’Élysée, en même temps que la rabbin libérale Delphine Horvilleur. « Le président de la République, qui lit beaucoup, est tombé sur la conversation entre les deux femmes organisée par l’Institut français de Copenhague », raconte un proche du dossier. La vidéo de l’entretien, daté du 26 mars 2016, est visible sur YouTube. « Sans doute cet échange entre deux femmes ministres du culte l’intéressait-il dans le cadre de ses consultations tous azimuts. Il rencontre des tas de gens pour nourrir sa réflexion ».

Avec l’aide du ministère de l’intérieur et des cultes, l’Élysée prépare en effet « un plan d’ensemble » pour structurer « l’islam de France », avec la volonté d’avancer sur les principaux chantiers : les instances représentatives, le financement du culte et la formation des imams. L’idée est d’aboutir avant la fin du premier semestre 2018. En attendant, les consultations se poursuivent donc. Mi-février, le JDD avait indiqué qu’outre le banquier d’affaires et consultant Hakim el Karoui, le président de la République avait également rencontré l’islamologue Gilles Kepel ou le philosophe tunisien Youssef Seddik.

Cette fois, c’est la place des femmes dans la religion qui a éveillé sa curiosité. Dans de nombreux pays musulmans, des femmes plaident pour une relecture du Coran et de la tradition musulmane sortis de leur « gangue » patriarcale. Dans quelques villes européennes – Berlin ou Londres notamment –, des femmes ont même ouvert des lieux de prière pour un public féminin. À Copenhague, la salle de prière installée par Sherin Khankan dans un appartement, dont elle a abattu les cloisons, est ouverte à tous en semaine, et réservée aux femmes le vendredi pour qu’elle puisse guider leur prière. Plus qu’une « imam », cette jeune mère de famille fait en réalité office de mourchidat, une fonction de prédicatrice pour un public féminin courante y compris dans les pays majoritairement musulmans.

À Copenhague pas plus qu’ailleurs, les hommes n’ont accepté une femme comme imam. « La majorité pense qu’une femme ne dirige pas la prière devant des hommes, mais il existe des avis minoritaires : certains considèrent que si une femme connait mieux le Coran que son mari, elle peut diriger la prière », note Hicham Abdel Gawad, doctorant en sciences des religions à Louvain-la-Neuve. « Dans tous les cas, la règle de base est que celui qui dirige la prière doit être agréé par les personnes qui prient derrière lui. » « Dans un paysage musulman complètement éclaté, on peut se demander pourquoi aucune mosquée alternative n’a émergé jusqu’à aujourd’hui, à l’exception d’un lieu de culte dédié aux fidèles homosexuels », remarque ce bon connaisseur de l’islam de France. « Y aurait-il une sorte de fatalité à n’avoir le choix qu’à l’intérieur de l’éventail qui va de Dalil Boubakeur (NDLR : recteur de la Grande mosquée de Paris, proche de l’Algérie) à Nader Abou Anas (NDLR : imam du Bourget, proche de la mouvance salafiste) ? »

Interrogé sur cette invitation à l’Élysée d’une représentante du courant « féministe musulman », le Conseil français du culte musulman n’a pas souhaité réagir.

Macron reçoit l’imame danoise Sherin Khankan à L’Elysée

[INFO L’EXPRESS] Le président français et la femme imam scandinave ont évoqué la place et l’avenir de l’islam en Europe.

Axel Gyldén

L’Express

L’imame danoise Sherin Khankan et Emmanuel Macron ont discuté, ce lundi 26 mars, de la situation de l’islam en Occident lors d’un entretien d’une heure à l’Elysée auquel participait également la femme rabbin française Delphine Horvilleur. Le chef de l’Etat français avait sollicité les deux femmes pour recueillir leurs réflexions sur meilleure manière, selon elles, d’améliorer le dialogue des civilisations.

Connue pour avoir ouvert, à Copenhague, en 2017, la première mosquée 100% féminine d’Europe et soucieuse de modifier la perception de sa religion à travers la promotion d’un islam moderne, ouvert, progressiste et modéré, l’imame féministe Sherin Khankan a suggéré au président l’idée d’une grande conférence réunissant des femmes imam venues du monde entier, des femmes rabbin, des pasteures protestantes, des prêtres catholiques ainsi que des intellectuels des toutes les religions, notamment des musulmans, sans discrimination de sexe.

« Le chef de l’Etat s’est dit intéressé par l’idée et a promis de donner suite », confie la Danoise. Cette adepte du soufisme poursuit: « Le Maroc serait parfaitement indiqué pour une telle conférence dans la mesure où ce pays forme déjà, depuis quelques années, une nouvelle génération de professeures de religion : les mushidad. » Il s’agit de femmes chargées de prêcher la bonne parole jusque dans les villages reculés, avec la mission de promouvoir un islam raisonnable, tolérant et « authentiquement conforme à sa vocation pacifique. »

Pas de mention des attaques terroristes de l’Aude

Par hasard du calendrier, le rendez-vous avec Emmanuel Macron, programmé depuis plus d’un mois, est tombé trois jours après l’attaque terroriste de Trèbes et Caracassonne. Ce sujet n’a pas été évoqué lors de l’entretien avec Sherin Khankan et Delphine Horvilleur.

En octobre, Sherin Khankan a publié La femme est l’avenir de l’islam chez Stock. Elle y raconte sa trajectoire et son parcours intellectuel forgé à Copenhague dans une famille métisse. Née d’un père musulman syrien opposant à Hafez el-Assad et d’une mère protestante finlandaise, la quadragénaire Sherin Khankan s’est orientée vers l’islam dans l’entrée à l’âge adulte tout en militant pour un « féminisme islamique » qui vise à mettre fin à la culture du patriarcat au sein de la religion de Mahomet.

« Rien, dans le Coran, n’interdit aux femmes de conduire la prière ni de gérer un mosquée », affirme cette imame qui célèbre des mariages interreligieux et milite inlassablement pour l’égalité homme-femme au sein de l’islam. Inspirée notamment, par les féministes musulmanes Amina Wadud, qui est américaine, et la Marocaine Fatima Mernissi (décédée en 2015) Sherin Khankan a inauguré, l’année dernière à Copenhague, la première mosquée d’Europe réservée aux femmes.

Voir enfin:

Collège des Bernardins – Lundi 9 avril 2018

Monsieur le Ministre d’Etat,

Mesdames les ministres,

Mesdames, messieurs les parlementaires,

Monsieur le Nonce,

Mesdames et messieurs les ambassadeurs,

Mesdames et messieurs les responsables des cultes,

Monseigneur,

Mesdames et Messieurs,

Je vous remercie vivement, Monseigneur, et je remercie la Conférence des Evêques de France de cette invitation à m’exprimer ici ce soir, en ce lieu si particulier et si beau du Collège des Bernardins, dont je veux aussi remercier les responsables et les équipes.

Pour nous retrouver ici ce soir, Monseigneur, nous avons, vous et moi bravé, les sceptiques de chaque bord. Et si nous l’avons fait, c’est sans doute que nous partageons confusément le sentiment que le lien entre l’Eglise et l’Etat s’est abîmé, et qu’il nous importe à vous comme à moi de le réparer.

Pour cela, il n’est pas d’autre moyen qu’un dialogue en vérité.

Ce dialogue est indispensable, et si je devais résumer mon point de vue, je dirais qu’une Eglise prétendant se désintéresser des questions temporelles n’irait pas au bout de sa vocation ; et qu’un président de la République prétendant se désintéresser de l’Eglise et des catholiques manquerait à son devoir.

L’exemple du colonel BELTRAME par lequel, Monseigneur, vous venez d’achever votre propos, illustre ce point de vue d’une manière que je crois éclairante.

Beaucoup, lors de la journée tragique du 23 mars, ont cherché à nommer les ressorts secrets de son geste héroïque : les uns y ont vu l’acceptation du sacrifice ancrée dans sa vocation militaire ; les autres y ont vu la manifestation d’une fidélité républicaine nourrie par son parcours maçonnique ; d’autres enfin, et notamment son épouse, ont interprété son acte comme la traduction de sa foi catholique ardente, prête à l’épreuve suprême de la mort.

Ces dimensions en réalité sont tellement entrelacées qu’il est impossible de les démêler, et c’est même inutile, car cette conduite héroïque c’est la vérité d’un homme dans toute sa complexité qui s’est livrée.

Mais dans ce pays de France qui ne ménage pas sa méfiance à l’égard des religions, je n’ai pas entendu une seule voix se lever pour contester cette évidence, gravée au cœur de notre imaginaire collectif et qui est celle-ci : lorsque vient l’heure de la plus grande intensité, lorsque l’épreuve commande de rassembler toutes les ressources qu’on a en soi au service de la France, la part du citoyen et la part du catholique brûlent, chez le croyant véritable, d’une même flamme.

Je suis convaincu que les liens les plus indestructibles entre la nation française et le catholicisme se sont forgés dans ces moments où est vérifiée la valeur réelle des hommes et des femmes. Il n’est pas besoin de remonter aux bâtisseurs de cathédrales et à Jeanne d’Arc : l’histoire récente nous offre mille exemples, depuis l’Union Sacrée de 1914 jusqu’aux résistants de 40, des Justes aux refondateurs de la République, des Pères de l’Europe aux inventeurs du syndicalisme moderne, de la gravité éminemment digne qui suivit l’assassinat du Père HAMEL à la mort du colonel BELTRAME, oui, la France a été fortifiée par l’engagement des catholiques.

Disant cela, je ne m’y trompe pas. Si les catholiques ont voulu servir et grandir la France, s’ils ont accepté de mourir, ce n’est pas seulement au nom d’idéaux humanistes. Ce n’est pas au nom seulement d’une morale judéo-chrétienne sécularisée. C’est aussi parce qu’ils étaient portés par leur foi en Dieu et par leur pratique religieuse.

Certains pourront considérer que de tels propos sont en infraction avec la laïcité. Mais après tout, nous comptons aussi des martyrs et des héros de toute confession et notre histoire récente nous l’a encore montré, et y compris des athées, qui ont trouvé au fond de leur morale les sources d’un sacrifice complet. Reconnaître les uns n’est pas diminuer les autres, et je considère que la laïcité n’a certainement pas pour fonction de nier le spirituel au nom du temporel, ni de déraciner de nos sociétés la part sacrée qui nourrit tant de nos concitoyens.

Je suis, comme chef de l’Etat, garant de la liberté de croire et de ne pas croire, mais je ne suis ni l’inventeur ni le promoteur d’une religion d’Etat substituant à la transcendance divine un credo républicain.

M’aveugler volontairement sur la dimension spirituelle que les catholiques investissent dans leur vie morale, intellectuelle, familiale, professionnelle, sociale, ce serait me condamner à n’avoir de la France qu’une vue partielle ; ce serait méconnaître le pays, son histoire, ses citoyens ; et affectant l’indifférence, je dérogerais à ma mission. Et cette même indifférence, je ne l’ai pas davantage à l’égard de toutes les confessions qui aujourd’hui habitent notre pays.

Et c’est bien parce que je ne suis pas indifférent, que je perçois combien le chemin que l’Etat et l’Eglise partagent depuis si longtemps, est aujourd’hui semé de malentendus et de défiance réciproques.

Ce n’est certes pas la première fois dans notre histoire. Il est de la nature de l’Eglise d’interroger constamment son rapport au politique, dans cette hésitation parfaitement décrite par MARROU dans sa Théologie de l’histoire, et l’histoire de France a vu se succéder des moments où l’Eglise s’installait au cœur de la cité, et des moments où elle campait hors-les-murs.

Mais aujourd’hui, dans ce moment de grande fragilité sociale, quand l’étoffe même de la nation risque de se déchirer, je considère de ma responsabilité de ne pas laisser s’éroder la confiance des catholiques à l’égard de la politique et des politiques. Je ne puis me résoudre à cette déprise. Et je ne saurais laisser s’aggraver cette déception.

C’est d’autant plus vrai que la situation actuelle est moins le fruit d’une décision de l’Eglise que le résultat de plusieurs années pendant lesquelles les politiques ont profondément méconnu les catholiques de France.

Ainsi, d’un côté, une partie de la classe politique a sans doute surjoué l’attachement aux catholiques, pour des raisons qui n’étaient souvent que trop évidemment électoralistes. Ce faisant, on a réduit les catholiques à cet animal étrange qu’on appelle l’« électorat catholique » et qui est en réalité une sociologie. Et l’on a ainsi fait le lit d’une vision communautariste contredisant la diversité et la vitalité de l’Eglise de France, mais aussi l’aspiration du catholicisme à l’universel – comme son nom l’indique – au profit d’une réduction catégorielle assez médiocre.

Et de l’autre côté, on a trouvé toutes les raisons de ne pas écouter les catholiques, les reléguant par méfiance acquise et par calcul au rang de minorité militante contrariant l’unanimité républicaine.

Pour des raisons à la fois biographiques, personnelles et intellectuelles, je me fais une plus haute idée des catholiques. Et il ne me semble ni sain ni bon que le politique se soit ingénié avec autant de détermination soit à les instrumentaliser, soit à les ignorer, alors que c’est d’un dialogue et d’une coopération d’une toute autre tenue, d’une contribution d’un tout autre poids à la compréhension de notre temps et à l’action dont nous avons besoin pour faire que les choses évoluent dans le bon sens.

C’est ce que votre belle allocution a bien montré, Monseigneur. Les préoccupations que vous soulevez – et je tâcherai pour quelques-unes d’y répondre ou d’y apporter un éclairage provisoire – ces préoccupations ne sont pas les fantasmes de quelques-uns. Les questions qui sont les vôtres ne se bornent pas aux intérêts d’une communauté restreinte. Ce sont des questions pour nous tous, pour toute la nation, pour notre humanité toute entière.

Ce questionnement intéresse toute la France non parce qu’il est spécifiquement catholique, mais parce qu’il repose sur une idée de l’homme, de son destin, de sa vocation, qui sont au cœur de notre devenir immédiat. Parce qu’il entend offrir un sens et des repères à ceux qui trop souvent en manquent.

C’est parce que j’entends faire droit à ces interrogations que je suis ici ce soir. Et pour vous demander solennellement de ne pas vous sentir aux marches de la République, mais de retrouver le goût et le sel du rôle que vous y avez toujours joué.

Je sais que l’on a débattu comme du sexe des anges des racines chrétiennes de l’Europe. Et que cette dénomination a été écartée par les parlementaires européens. Mais après tout, l’évidence historique se passe parfois de tels symboles. Et surtout, ce ne sont pas les racines qui nous importent, car elles peuvent aussi bien être mortes. Ce qui importe, c’est la sève. Et je suis convaincu que la sève catholique doit contribuer encore et toujours à faire vivre notre nation.

C’est pour tenter de cerner cela que je suis ici ce soir. Pour vous dire que la République attend beaucoup de vous. Elle attend très précisément si vous m’y autorisez que vous lui fassiez trois dons : le don de votre sagesse ; le don de votre engagement et le don de votre liberté.

L’urgence de notre politique contemporaine, c’est de retrouver son enracinement dans la question de l’homme ou, pour parler avec MOUNIER, de la personne. Nous ne pouvons plus, dans le monde tel qu’il va, nous satisfaire d’un progrès économique ou scientifique qui ne s’interroge pas sur son impact sur l’humanité et sur le monde. C’est ce que j’ai essayé d’exprimer à la tribune des Nations unies à New York, mais aussi à Davos ou encore au Collège de France lorsque j’y ai parlé d’intelligence artificielle : nous avons besoin de donner un cap à notre action, et ce cap, c’est l’homme.

Or il n’est pas possible d’avancer sur cette voie sans croiser le chemin du catholicisme, qui depuis des siècles creuse patiemment ce questionnement. Il le creuse dans son questionnement propre dans un dialogue avec les autres religions.

Questionnement qui lui donne la forme d’une architecture, d’une peinture, d’une philosophie, d’une littérature, qui toutes tentent, de mille manières, d’exprimer la nature humaine et le sens de la vie. « Vénérable parce qu’elle a bien connu l’homme », dit PASCAL de la religion chrétienne. Et certes, d’autres religions, d’autres philosophies ont creusé le mystère de l’homme. Mais la sécularisation ne saurait éliminer la longue tradition chrétienne.

Au cœur de cette interrogation sur le sens de la vie, sur la place que nous réservons à la personne, sur la façon dont nous lui conférons sa dignité, vous avez, Monseigneur, placé deux sujets de notre temps : la bioéthique et le sujet des migrants.

Vous avez ainsi établi un lien intime entre des sujets que la politique et la morale ordinaires auraient volontiers traités à part. Vous considérez que notre devoir est de protéger la vie, en particulier lorsque cette vie est sans défense. Entre la vie de l’enfant à naître, celle de l’être parvenu au seuil de la mort, ou celle du réfugié qui a tout perdu, vous voyez ce trait commun du dénuement, de la nudité et de la vulnérabilité absolue. Ces êtres sont exposés. Ils attendent tout de l’autre, de la main qui se tend, de la bienveillance qui prendra soin d’eux. Ces deux sujets mobilisent notre part la plus humaine et la conception même que nous nous faisons de l’humain et cette cohérence s’impose à tous.

Alors, j’ai entendu, Monseigneur, Mesdames et Messieurs, les inquiétudes montant du monde catholique et je veux ici tenter d’y répondre ou en tout cas de donner notre part de vérité et de conviction.

Sur les migrants, on nous reproche parfois de ne pas accueillir avec assez de générosité ni de douceur, de laisser s’installer des cas préoccupants dans les centres de rétention ou de refouler les mineurs isolés. On nous accuse même de laisser prospérer des violences policières.

Mais à dire vrai, que sommes-nous en train de faire ? Nous tentons dans l’urgence de mettre un terme à des situations dont nous avons hérité et qui se développent à cause de l’absence de règles, de leur mauvaise application, ou de leur mauvaise qualité – et je pense ici aux délais de traitement administratif mais aussi aux conditions d’octroi des titres de réfugiés.

Notre travail, celai que conduit chaque jour le ministre d’Etat, est de sortir du flou juridique des gens qui s’y égarent et qui espèrent en vain, qui tentent de reconstruire quelque chose ici, puis sont expulsés, cependant que d’autres, qui pourraient faire leur vie chez nous, souffrent de conditions d’accueil dégradées dans des centres débordés.

C’est la conciliation du droit et de l’humanité que nous tentons. Le Pape a donné un nom à cet équilibre, il l’a appelé « prudence », faisant de cette vertu aristotélicienne celle du gouvernant, confronté bien sûr à la nécessité humaine d’accueillir mais également à celle politique et juridique d’héberger et d’intégrer. C’est le cap de cet humanisme réaliste que j’ai fixé. Il y aura toujours des situations difficiles. Il y aura parfois des situations inacceptables et il nous faudra à chaque fois ensemble tout faire pour les résoudre.

Mais je n’oublie pas non plus que nous portons aussi la responsabilité de territoires souvent difficiles où ces réfugiés arrivent. Nous savons que les afflux de populations nouvelles plongent la population locale dans l’incertitude, la poussent vers des options politiques extrêmes, déclenchent souvent un repli qui tient du réflexe de protection. Une forme d’angoisse quotidienne se fait jour qui crée comme une concurrence des misères.

Notre exigence est justement dans une tension éthique permanente de tenir ces principes, celui d’un humanisme qui est le nôtre et de ne rien renoncer en particulier pour protéger les réfugiés, c’est notre devoir moral et c’est inscrit dans notre Constitution ; nous engager clairement pour que l’ordre républicain soit maintenu et que cette protection des plus faibles ne signifie pas pour autant l’anomie et l’absence de discernement car il y a aussi des règles qu’il faudra faire valoir et pour que des places soient trouvées, comme c’était dit tout à l’heure, dans les centres d’hébergement, ou dans les situations les plus difficiles, il faut aussi accepter que prenant notre part de cette misère, nous ne pouvons pas la prendre tout entière sans distinction des situations et il nous faut aussi tenir la cohésion nationale du pays où parfois d’aucuns ne parlent plus de cette générosité que nous évoquons ce soir mais ne veulent voir que la part effrayante de l’autre, et nourrissent ce geste pour porter plus loin leur projet.

C’est bien parce que nous avons à tenir ces principes, parfois contradictoires, dans une tension constante, que j’ai voulu que nous portions cet humanisme réaliste et que je l’assume pleinement devant vous.

Là où nous avons besoin de votre sagesse c’est pour partout tenir ce discours d’humanisme réaliste c’est pour conduire à l’engagement de celles et ceux qui pourront nous aider et c’est d’éviter les discours du pire, la montée des peurs qui continueront de se nourrir de cette part de nous car les flux massifs dont vous avez parlé que j’évoquais à l’instant ne se tariront pas d’ici demain, ils sont le fruit de grands déséquilibres du monde.

Et qu’il s’agisse des conflits politiques, qu’il s’agisse de la misère économique et sociale ou des défis climatiques, ils continueront à alimenter dans les années et les décennies qui viennent des grandes migrations auxquelles nous serons confrontés et il nous faudra continuer à tenir inlassablement ce cap, à constamment tenter de tenir nos principes au réel et je ne cèderai en la matière ni aux facilités des uns ni aux facilités des autres. Car ce serait manquer à ma mission.

Sur la bioéthique, on nous soupçonne parfois de jouer un agenda caché, de connaître d’avance les résultats d’un débat qui ouvrira de nouvelles possibilités dans la procréation assistée, ouvrant la porte à des pratiques qui irrésistiblement s’imposeront ensuite, comme la Gestation Pour Autrui. Et certains se disent que l’introduction dans ces débats de représentants de l’Eglise catholique comme de l’ensemble des représentants des cultes comme je m’y suis engagé dès le début de mon mandat est un leurre, destiné à diluer la parole de l’Eglise ou à la prendre en otage.

Vous le savez, j’ai décidé que l’avis du Conseil consultatif national d’Ethique, Monsieur le président, n’était pas suffisant et qu’il fallait l’enrichir d’avis de responsables religieux. Et j’ai souhaité aussi que ce travail sur les lois bioéthiques que notre droit nous impose de revoir puisse être nourri d’un débat organisé par le CCNE mais où toutes les familles philosophiques religieuses, politiques, où notre société aura à s’exprimer de manière pleine et entière.

C’est parce que je suis convaincu que nous ne sommes pas là face à un problème simple qui pourrait se trancher par une loi seule mais nous sommes parfois face à des débats moraux, éthiques, profonds qui touchent au plus intime de chacun d’entre nous. J’entends l’Eglise lorsqu’elle se montre rigoureuse sur les fondations humaines de toute évolution technique ; j’entends votre voix lorsqu’elle nous invite à ne rien réduire à cet agir technique dont vous avez parfaitement montré les limites ; j’entends la place essentielle que vous donnez dans notre société, à la famille – aux familles, oserais-je dire -, j’entends aussi ce souci de savoir conjuguer la filiation avec les projets que des parents peuvent avoir pour leurs enfants.

Nous sommes aussi confrontés à une société où les formes de la famille évoluent radicalement, où le statut de l’enfant parfois se brouille et où nos concitoyens rêvent de fonder des cellules familiales de modèle traditionnel à partir de schémas familiaux qui le sont moins.

J’entends les recommandations que formulent les instances catholiques, les associations catholiques, mais là encore, certains principes énoncés par l’Eglise sont confrontés à des réalités contradictoires et complexes qui traversent les catholiques eux-mêmes ; tous les jours, tous les jours les mêmes associations catholiques et les prêtres accompagnent des familles monoparentales, des familles divorcées, des familles homosexuelles, des familles recourant à l’avortement, à la fécondation in vitro, à la PMA , des familles confrontées à l’état végétatif d’un des leurs, des familles où l’un croit et l’autre non, apportant dans la famille la déchirure des choix spirituels et moraux, et cela je le sais, c’est votre quotidien aussi.

L’Eglise accompagne inlassablement ces situations délicates et tente de concilier ces principes et le réel. C’est pourquoi je ne suis pas en train de dire que l’expérience du réel défait ou invalide les positions adoptées par l’église ; je dis simplement que là aussi il faut trouver la limite car la société est ouverte à tous les possibles, mais la manipulation et la fabrication du vivant ne peuvent s’étendre à l’infini sans remettre en cause l’idée même de l’homme et de la vie.

Ainsi le politique et l’Eglise partagent cette mission de mettre les mains dans la glaise du réel, de se

confronter tous les jours à ce que le temporel a, si j’ose dire, de plus temporel.

Et c’est souvent dur, compliqué, et exigeant et imparfait. Et les solutions ne viennent pas d’elles-mêmes. Elles naissent de l’articulation entre ce réel et une pensée, un système de valeur, une conception du monde. Elles sont bien souvent le choix du moindre mal, toujours précaire et cela aussi est exigeant et difficile.

C’est pourquoi en écoutant l’Eglise sur ces sujets, nous ne haussons pas les épaules. Nous écoutons une voix qui tire sa force du réel et sa clarté d’une pensée où la raison dialogue avec une conception transcendante de l’homme. Nous l’écoutons avec intérêt, avec respect et même nous pouvons faire nôtres nombre de ses points. Mais cette voix de l’Eglise, nous savons au fond vous et moi qu’elle ne peut être injonctive. Parce qu’elle est faite de l’humilité de ceux qui pétrissent le temporel. Elle ne peut dès lors être que questionnante. Et sur tous ces sujets et en particulier sur ces deux sujets que je viens d’évoquer, parce qu’ils se construisent en profondeur dans ces tensions éthiques entre nos principes, parfois nos idéaux et le réel, nous sommes ramenés à l’humilité profonde de notre condition.

L’Etat et l’Eglise appartiennent à deux ordres institutionnels différents, qui n’exercent pas leur mandat sur le même plan. Mais tous deux exercent une autorité et même une juridiction. Ainsi, nous avons chacun forgé nos certitudes et nous avons le devoir de les formuler clairement, pour établir des règles, car c’est notre devoir d’état. Aussi le chemin que nous partageons pourrait se réduire à n’être que le commerce de nos certitudes.

Mais nous savons aussi, vous comme nous, que notre tâche va au-delà. Nous savons qu’elle est de faire vivre le souffle de ce que nous servons, d’en faire grandir la flamme, même si c’est difficile et surtout si c’est difficile.

Nous devons constamment nous soustraire à la tentation d’agir en simples gestionnaires de ce qui nous a été confié. Et c’est pourquoi notre échange doit se fonder non sur la solidité de certaines certitudes, mais sur la fragilité de ce qui nous interroge, et parfois nous désempare. Nous devons oser fonder notre relation sur le partage de ces incertitudes, c’est-à-dire sur le partage des questions, et singulièrement des questions de l’homme.

C’est là que notre échange a toujours été le plus fécond : dans la crise, face à l’inconnu, face au risque, dans la conscience partagée du pas à franchir, du pari à tenter. Et c’est là que la nation s’est le plus souvent grandie de la sagesse de l’Eglise, car voilà des siècles et des millénaires que l’Eglise tente ses paris, et ose son risque. C’est par là qu’elle a enrichi la nation.

C’est cela, si vous m’y autorisez, la part catholique de la France. C’est cette part qui dans l’horizon séculier instille tout de même la question intranquille du salut, que chacun, qu’il croie ou ne croie pas, interprétera à sa manière, mais dont chacun pressent qu’elle met en jeu sa vie entière, le sens de cette vie, la portée qu’on lui donne et la trace qu’elle laissera.

Cet horizon du salut a certes totalement disparu de l’ordinaire des sociétés contemporaines, mais c’est un tort et l’on voit à bien à des signes qu’il demeure enfoui. Chacun a sa manière de le nommer, de le transformer, de le porter mais c’est tout à la fois la question du sens et de l’absolu dans nos sociétés, que l’incertitude du salut apporte à toutes les vies même les plus résolument matérielles comme un tremblé au sens pictural du terme, est une évidence.

Paul RICŒUR, si vous m’autorisez à le citer ce soir, a trouvé les mots justes dans une conférence prononcée à Amiens en 1967 : « maintenir un but lointain pour les hommes, appelons-le un idéal, en un sens moral, et une espérance, en un sens religieux».

Ce soir-là, face à un public où certains avaient la foi, d’autres non, Paul RICŒUR invita son auditoire à dépasser ce qu’il appela « la prospective sans perspective » avec cette formule qui, je n’en doute pas, nous réunira tous ici ce soir : « Viser plus, demander plus. C’est cela l’espoir ; il attend toujours plus que de l’effectuable. »

Ainsi, l’Eglise n’est pas à mes yeux cette instance que trop souvent on caricature en gardienne des bonnes mœurs. Elle est cette source d’incertitude qui parcourt toute vie, et qui fait du dialogue, de la question, de la quête, le cœur même du sens, même parmi ceux qui ne croient pas.

C’est pour cela que le premier don que je vous demande est celui de l’humilité du questionnement, le don de cette sagesse qui trouve son enracinement de la question de l’homme et donc dans les questions que l’homme se pose.

Car c’est cela l’Eglise à son meilleur ; c’est celle qui dit : frappez et l’on vous ouvrira, qui se pose en recours et en voix amie dans un monde où le doute, l’incertain, le changeant sont de règle ; où le sens toujours échappe et toujours se reconquiert ; c’est une église dont je n’attends pas des leçons mais plutôt cette sagesse d’humilité face en particulier à ces deux sujets que vous avez souhaité évoquer et que je viens d’esquisser en réponse parce que nous ne pouvons avoir qu’un horizon commun et en cherchant chaque jour à faire du mieux, à accepter au fond la part « d’intranquillité » irréductible qui va avec notre action.

Questionner, ce n’est pas pour autant refuser d’agir ; c’est au contraire tenter de rendre l’action conforme à des principes qui la précèdent et la fondent et c’est cette cohérence entre pensée et action qui fait la force de cet engagement que la France attend de vous. Ce deuxième don dont je souhaitais vous parler.

Ce qui grève notre pays – j’ai déjà eu l’occasion de le dire – ce n’est pas seulement la crise économique, c’est le relativisme ; c’est même le nihilisme ; c’est tout ce qui laisse à penser que cela n’en vaut pas la peine. Pas la peine d’apprendre, pas la peine de travailler et surtout pas la peine de tendre la main et de s’engager au service de plus grands que soit. Le système, progressivement, a enfermé nos concitoyens dans « l’à quoi bon » en ne rémunérant plus vraiment le travail ou plus tout à fait, en décourageant l’initiative, en protégeant mal les plus fragiles, en assignant à résidence les plus défavorisés et en considérant que l’ère postmoderne dans laquelle nous étions collectivement arrivés, était l’ère du grand doute qui permettait de renoncer à toute absolu.

C’est dans ce contexte de décrue des solidarités et de l’espoir que les catholiques se sont massivement tournés vers l’action associative, vers l’engagement. Vous êtes aujourd’hui une composante majeure de cette partie de la Nation qui a décidé de s’occuper de l’autre partie – nous en avons vu des témoignages très émouvants tout à l’heure – celle des malades, des isolés, des déclassés, des vulnérables, des abandonnés, des handicapés, des prisonniers, quelle que soit leur appartenance ethnique ou religieuse. BATAILLE appelait ça « la part maudite » dans un terme qui a parfois été dénaturé mais qui est la part essentielle d’une société parce que c’est à cela qu’une société, qu’une famille, qu’une vie se juge… à sa capacité à reconnaître celle ou celui qui a eu un parcours différent, un destin différent et à s’engager pour lui. Les Français ne mesurent pas toujours cette mutation de l’engagement catholique ; vous êtes passés des activités de travailleurs sociaux à celles de militants associatifs se tenant auprès de la part fragile de notre pays, que les associations où les catholiques s’engagent soient explicitement catholiques ou pas, comme les Restos du Cœur.

Je crains que les politiques ne se soient trop longtemps conduits comme si cet engagement était un acquis, comme si c’était normal, comme si le pansement ainsi posé par les catholiques et par tant d’autres sur la souffrance sociale, dédouanait d’une certaine impuissance publique.

Je voudrais saluer avec infiniment de respect toutes celles et tous ceux qui ont fait ce choix sans compter leur temps ni leur énergie et permettez-moi aussi de saluer tous ces prêtres et ces religieux qui de cet engagement ont fait leur vie et qui chaque jour dans les paroisses françaises accueillent, échangent, œuvrent au plus près de la détresse ou des malheurs ou partagent la joie des familles lors des événements heureux. Parmi eux se trouvent aussi des aumôniers aux armées ou dans nos prisons et je salue ici leurs représentants ; eux aussi sont des engagés. Et permettez-moi d’associer se faisant également tous les engagés des autres religions dont les représentants sont ici présents et qui partagent cette communauté d’engagement avec vous.

Cet engagement est vital pour la France et par-delà les appels, les injonctions, les interpellations que vous nous adressez pour nous dire de faire plus, de faire mieux, je sais, nous savons tous, que le travail que vous accomplissez, n’est pas un pis-aller mais une part du ciment même de notre cohésion nationale. Ce don de l’engagement n’est pas seulement vital, il est exemplaire. Mais je suis venu vous appeler à faire davantage encore car ce n’est pas un mystère, l’énergie consacrée à cet engagement associatif a été aussi largement soustrait à l’engagement politique.

Or je crois que la politique, si décevante qu’elle ait pu être aux yeux de certains, si desséchante parfois aux yeux d’autres, a besoin de l’énergie des engagés, de votre énergie. Elle a besoin de l’énergie de ceux qui donnent du sens à l’action et qui placent en son cœur une forme d’espérance. Plus que jamais, l’action politique a besoin de ce que la philosophe Simone WEIL appelait l’effectivité, c’est-à-dire cette capacité à faire exister dans le réel les principes fondamentaux qui structurent la vie morale, intellectuelle et dans le cas des croyances spirituelles.

C’est ce qu’ont apporté à la politique française les grandes figures que sont le Général de GAULLE, Georges BIDAULT, Robert SCHUMAN, Jacques DELORS ou encore les grandes consciences françaises qui ont éclairé l’action politique comme CLAVEL, MAURIAC, LUBAC ou MARROU et ce n’est pas une pratique théocratique ni une conception religieuse du pouvoir qui s’est fait jour mais une exigence chrétienne importée dans le champ laïc de la politique. Cette place aujourd’hui est à prendre non parce qu’il faudrait à la politique française son quota de catholiques, de protestants, de juifs ou de musulmans, non, ni parce que les responsables politiques de qualité ne se recruteraient que dans les rangs des gens de foi, mais parce que cette flamme commune dont je parlais tout à l’heure à propos d’Arnaud BELTRAME, fait partie de notre histoire et de ce qui toujours a guidé notre pays. Le retrait ou la mise sous le boisseau de cette lumière n’est pas une bonne nouvelle.

C’est pourquoi, depuis le point de vue qui est le mien, un point de vue de chef d’Etat, un point de vue laïc, je dois me soucier que ceux qui travaillent au cœur de la société française, ceux qui s’engagent pour soigner ses blessures et consoler ses malades, aient aussi une voix sur la scène politique, sur la scène politique nationale comme sur la scène politique européenne. Ce à quoi je veux vous appeler ce soir, c’est à vous engager politiquement dans notre débat national et dans notre débat européen car votre foi est une part d’engagement dont ce débat a besoin et parce que, historiquement, vous l’avez toujours nourri car l’effectivité implique de ne pas déconnecter l’action individuelle de l’action politique et publique.

A ce propos, il me faut rappeler la clarté parfaite du texte proposé par la Conférence des évêques en novembre 2016 en vue de l’élection présidentielle, intitulé « Retrouver le sens du politique ». J’avais fondé En Marche quelques mois plus tôt et sans vouloir engager, Monseigneur, une querelle de droits d’auteur, j’y ai lu cette phrase dont la consonance avec ce qui a guidé mon engagement, m’a alors frappé ; il y était ainsi écrit – je cite – « Nous ne pouvons pas laisser notre pays voir ce qui le fonde, risquer de s’abîmer gravement, avec toutes les conséquences qu’une société divisée peut connaître ; c’est à un travail de refondation auquel il nous faut ensemble nous atteler ».

Recherche du sens, de nouvelles solidarités mais aussi espoir dans l’Europe ; ce document énumère tout ce qui peut porter un citoyen à s’engager et s’adresse aux catholiques en liant avec simplicité la foi à l’engagement politique par cette formule que je cite : « Le danger serait d’oublier ce qui nous a construits ou à l’inverse, de rêver du retour à un âge d’or imaginaire ou d’aspirer à une église de purs et à une contre-culture située en dehors du monde, en position de surplomb et de juges ».

Depuis trop longtemps, le champ politique était devenu un théâtre d’ombres et aujourd’hui encore, le récit politique emprunte trop souvent aux schémas les plus éculés et les plus réducteurs, semblant ignorer le souffle de l’histoire et ce que le retour du tragique dans notre monde contemporain exige de nous.

Je pense pour ma part que nous pouvons construire une politique effective, une politique qui échappe au cynisme ordinaire pour graver dans le réel ce qui doit être le premier devoir du politique, je veux dire la dignité de l’homme.

Je crois en un engagement politique qui serve cette dignité, qui la reconstruise où elle a été bafouée, qui la préserve où elle est menacée, qui en fasse le trésor véritable de chaque citoyen. Je crois dans cet engagement politique qui permet de restaurer la première des dignités, celle de pouvoir vivre de son travail. Je crois dans cet engagement politique qui permet de redresser la dignité la plus fondamentale, la dignité des plus fragiles ; celle qui justement ne se résout à aucune fatalité sociale – et vous en avez été des exemples magnifiques tous les six à l’instant – et qui considère que faire œuvre politique et d’engagement politique, c’est aussi changer les pratiques là où on est de la société et son regard.

Les six voix que nous avons entendues au début de cette soirée, ce sont six voix d’un engagement qui a en lui une forme d’engagement politique, qui suppose qu’il n’est qu’à poursuivre ce chemin pour trouver aussi d’autres débouchés, mais où à chaque fois j’ai voulu lire ce refus d’une fatalité, cette volonté de s’occuper de l’autre et surtout cette volonté, par la considération apportée, d’une conversion des regards ; c’est cela l’engagement dans une société ; c’est donner de son temps, de son énergie, c’est considérer que la société n’est pas un corps mort qui ne serait modifiable que par des politiques publiques ou des textes, ou qui ne serait soumise qu’à la fatalité des temps ; c’est que tout peut être changé si on décide de s’engager, de faire et par son action de changer son regard ; par son action, de donner une chance à l’autre mais aussi de nous révéler à nous-mêmes, que cet autre transforme.

On parle beaucoup aujourd’hui d’inclusivité ; ce n’est pas un très joli mot et je ne suis pas sûr qu’il soit toujours compris par toutes et tous. Mais il veut dire cela ; ce que nous tentons de faire sur l’autisme, sur le handicap, ce que je veux que nous poursuivions pour restaurer la dignité de nos prisonniers, ce que je veux que nous poursuivions pour la dignité des plus fragiles dans notre société, c’est de simplement considérer qu’il y a toujours un autre à un moment donné de sa vie, pour des raisons auxquelles il peut quelque chose ou auxquelles il ne peut rien, qui a avant tout quelque chose à apporter à la société. Allez voir une classe ou une crèche où nous étions il y a quelques jours, où l’on place des jeunes enfants ayant des troubles autistiques et vous verrez ce qu’ils apportent aux autres enfants ; et je vous le dis Monsieur, ne pensez pas simplement qu’on vous aide… nous avons vu tout à l’heure dans l’émotion de votre frère tout ce que vous lui avez apporté et qu’aucun autre n’aurait pu apporter. Cette conversion du regard, seul l’engagement la rend possible et au cœur de cet engagement, une indignation profonde, humaniste, éthique et notre société politique en a besoin. Et cet engagement que vous portez, j’en ai besoin pour notre pays comme j’en ai besoin pour notre Europe parce que notre principal risque aujourd’hui, c’est l’anomie, c’est l’atonie, c’est l’assoupissement.

Nous avons trop de nos concitoyens qui pensent que ce qui est acquis, est devenu naturel ; qui oublient les grands basculement auxquels notre société et notre continent sont aujourd’hui soumis ; qui veulent penser que cela n’a jamais été autrement, oubliant que notre Europe ne vit qu’au début d’une parenthèse dorée qui n’a qu’un peu plus de 70 ans de paix, elle qui toujours avait été bousculée par les guerres ; où trop de nos concitoyens pensent que la fraternité dont on parle, c’est une question d’argent public et de politique publique et qu’ils n’y auraient pas leur part indispensable.

Tous ces combats qui sont au cœur de l’engagement politique contemporain, les parlementaires ici présents les portent dans leur part de vérité, qu’il s’agisse de lutter contre le réchauffement climatique, de lutter pour une Europe qui protège et qui revisite ses ambitions, pour une société plus juste. Mais ils ne seront pas possibles si à tous les niveaux de la société, ils ne sont accompagnés d’un engagement politique profond ; un engagement politique auquel j’appelle les catholiques pour notre pays et pour notre Europe.

Le don de l’engagement que je vous demande, c’est celui-ci : ne restez pas au seuil, ne renoncez pas à la République que vous avez si fortement contribué à forger ; ne renoncez pas à cette Europe dont vous avez nourri le sens ; ne laissez pas en friche les terres que vous avez semées ; ne retirez pas à la République la rectitude précieuse que tant de fidèles anonymes apportent à leur vie de citoyens. Il y a au cœur de cet engagement dans notre pays a besoin la part d’indignation et de confiance dans l’avenir que vous pouvez apporter.

Cependant, pour vous rassurer, ce n’est pas un enrôlement que je suis venu vous proposer et je suis même venu vous demander un troisième don que vous pouvez faire à la Nation, c’est précisément celui de votre liberté.

Partager le chemin, ce n’est pas toujours marcher du même pas ; je me souviens de ce joli texte où Emmanuel MOUNIER explique que l’Eglise en politique a toujours été à la fois en avance et en retard, jamais tout à fait contemporaine, jamais tout à fait de son temps ; cela fait grincer quelques dents mais il faut accepter ce contretemps ; il faut accepter que tout dans notre monde n’obéisse pas au même rythme et la première liberté dont l’Eglise peut faire don, c’est d’être intempestive.

Certains la trouveront réactionnaire ; d’autres sur d’autres sujets bien trop audacieuse. Je crois simplement qu’elle doit être un de ces points fixes dont notre humanité a besoin au creux de ce monde devenu oscillant, un de ces repères qui ne cèdent pas à l’humeur des temps. C’est pourquoi Monseigneur, Mesdames et Messieurs, il nous faudra vivre cahin-caha avec votre côté intempestif et la nécessité que j’aurai d’être dans le temps du pays. Et c’est ce déséquilibre constant que nous ferons ensemble cheminer.

« La vie active, disait GREGOIRE, est service ; la vie contemplative est une liberté ». Je voudrais ce soir en rappelant l’importance de cette part intempestive et de ce point fixe que vous pouvez représenter, je voudrais ce soir avoir une pensée pour toutes celles et tous ceux qui se sont engagés dans une vie recluse ou une vie communautaire, une vie de prière et de travail. Même si elle semble pour certains à contretemps, ce type de vie est aussi l’exercice d’une liberté ; elle démontre que le temps de l’église n’est pas celui du monde et certainement pas celui de la politique telle qu’elle va – et c’est très bien ainsi.

Ce que j’attends que l’Eglise nous offre, c’est aussi sa liberté de parole.

Nous avons parlé des alertes lancées par les associations et par l’épiscopat ; je songe aussi aux monitions du pape qui trouve dans une adhésion constante au réel de quoi rappeler les exigences de la condition humaine ; cette liberté de parole dans une époque où les droits font florès, présente souvent la particularité de rappeler les devoirs de l’homme envers soi-même, son prochain ou envers notre planète. La simple mention des devoirs qui s’imposent à nous est parfois irritante ; cette voix qui sait dire ce qui fâche, nos concitoyens l’entendent même s’ils sont éloignés de l’Eglise. C’est une voix qui n’est pas dénuée de cette « ironie parfois tendre, parfois glacée » dont parlait Jean GROSJEAN dans son commentaire de Paul, une foi qui sait comme peu d’autres subvertir les certitudes jusque dans ses rangs. Cette voix qui se fait tantôt révolutionnaire, tantôt conservatrice, souvent les deux à la fois, comme le disait LUBAC dans ses « Paradoxes », est importante pour notre société.

Il faut être très libre pour oser être paradoxal et il faut être paradoxal pour être vraiment libre. C’est ce que nous rappellent les meilleurs écrivains catholiques, de Maurice CLAVEL à Alexis JENNI, de Georges BERNANOS à Sylvie GERMAIN, de Paul CLAUDEL à François SUREAU ; de François MAURIAC à Florence DELAY, de Julien GREEN à Christiane RANCE. Dans cette liberté de parole, de regard qui est la leur, nous trouvons une part de ce qui peut éclairer notre société.

Et dans cette liberté de parole, je range la volonté de l’Eglise d’initier, d’entretenir et de renforcer le libre dialogue avec l’islam dans le monde a tant besoin et que vous avez évoqué.

Car il n’est pas de compréhension de l’islam qui ne passe par des clercs comme il n’est pas de dialogue interreligieux sans les religions. Ces lieux en sont le témoin ; le pluralisme religieux est une donnée fondamentale de notre temps. Monseigneur LUSTIGER en avait eu l’intuition forte lorsqu’il a voulu faire revivre le Collège des Bernardins pour accueillir tous les dialogues. L’Histoire lui a donné raison. Il n’y a pas plus urgent aujourd’hui qu’accroître la connaissance mutuelle des peuples, des cultures, des religions ; il n’y a d’autres moyens pour cela que la rencontre par la voix mais aussi par les livres, par le travail partagé ; toutes choses dont Benoît XVI avait raconté l’enracinement dans la pensée cistercienne lors de son passage ici en 2008.

Ce partage s’exerce en pleine liberté, chacun dans ses termes et ses références ; il est le socle indispensable du travail que l’Etat de son côté doit mener pour penser toujours à nouveaux frais, la place des religions dans la société et la relation entre religion, société et puissance publique. Et pour cela, je compte beaucoup sur vous, sur vous tous, pour nourrir ce dialogue et l’enraciner dans notre histoire commune qui a ses particularités mais dont la particularité est d’avoir justement toujours attaché à la Nation française cette capacité à penser les universels.

Ce partage, ce travail nous le menons résolument après tant d’années d’hésitations ou de renoncements et les mois à venir seront décisifs à cet égard.

Ce partage que vous entretenez est d’autant plus important que les chrétiens payent de leur vie leur attachement au pluralisme religieux. Je pense aux chrétiens d’Orient.

Le politique partage avec l’Eglise la responsabilité de ces persécutés car non seulement nous avons hérité historiquement du devoir de les protéger mais nous savons que partout où ils sont, ils sont l’emblème de la tolérance religieuse. Je tiens ici à saluer le travail admirable accompli par des mouvements comme l’Œuvre d’Orient, Caritas France et la communauté Sant’Egidio pour permettre l’accueil sur le territoire national des familles réfugiées, pour venir en aide sur place, avec le soutien de l’Etat.

Comme je l’ai dit lors de l’inauguration de l’exposition « Chrétiens d’Orient » à l’Institut du Monde arabe le 25 septembre dernier, l’avenir de cette partie du monde ne se fera pas sans la participation de toutes les minorités, de toutes les religions et en particulier les chrétiens d’Orient. Les sacrifier, comme le voudraient certains, les oublier, c’est être sûr qu’aucune stabilité, aucun projet, ne se construira dans la durée dans cette région.

Il est enfin une dernière liberté dont l’Eglise doit nous faire don, c’est de la liberté spirituelle

Car nous ne sommes pas faits pour un monde qui ne serait traversé que de buts matérialistes. Nos contemporains ont besoin, qu’ils croient ou ne croient pas, d’entendre parler d’une autre perspective sur l’homme que la perspective matérielle.

Ils ont besoin d’étancher une autre soif, qui est une soif d’absolu. Il ne s’agit pas ici de conversion mais d’une voix qui, avec d’autres, ose encore parler de l’homme comme d’un vivant doté d’esprit. Qui ose parler d’autre chose que du temporel, mais sans abdiquer la raison ni le réel. Qui ose aller dans l’intensité d’une espérance, et qui, parfois, nous fait toucher du doigt ce mystère de l’humanité qu’on appelle la sainteté, dont le Pape François dit dans l’exhortation parue ce jour qu’elle est « le plus beau visage de l’Eglise ».

Cette liberté, c’est celle d’être vous-mêmes sans chercher à complaire ni à séduire. Mais en accomplissant votre œuvre dans la plénitude de son sens, dans la règle qui lui est propre et qui depuis toujours nous vaut des pensées fortes, une théologie humaine, une Eglise qui sait guider les plus fervents comme les non-baptisés, les établis comme les exclus.

Je ne demanderai à aucun de nos concitoyens de ne pas croire ou de croire modérément. Je ne sais pas ce que cela veut dire. Je souhaite que chacun de nos concitoyens puisse croire à une religion, une philosophie qui sera la sienne, une forme de transcendance ou pas, qu’il puisse le faire librement mais que chacune de ces religions, de ces philosophies puisse lui apporter ce besoin au plus profond de lui-même d’absolu.

Mon rôle est de m’assurer qu’il ait la liberté absolue de croire comme de ne pas croire mais je lui demanderai de la même façon et toujours de respecter absolument et sans compromis aucun toutes les lois de la République. C’est cela la laïcité ni plus ni moins, une règle d’airain pour notre vie ensemble qui ne souffre aucun compromis, une liberté de conscience absolue et cette liberté spirituelle que je viens d’évoquer.

« Une Eglise triomphant parmi les hommes ne devrait-elle pas s’inquiéter d’avoir déjà tout compromis de son élection en ayant passé un compromis avec le monde ? »

Cette interrogation n’est pas mienne, ce sont mots de Jean-Luc MARION qui devraient servir de baume à l’Eglise et aux catholiques aux heures de doute sur la place des catholiques en France, sur l’audience de l’Eglise, sur la considération qui leur est accordée.

L’Eglise n’est pas tout à fait du monde et n’a pas à l’être. Nous qui sommes aux prises avec le temporel le savons et ne devons pas essayer de l’y entraîner intégralement, pas plus que nous ne devons le faire avec aucune religion. Ce n’est ni notre rôle ni leur place.

Mais cela n’exclut pas la confiance et cela n’exclut pas le dialogue. Surtout, cela n’exclut pas la reconnaissance mutuelle de nos forces et de nos faiblesses, de nos imperfections institutionnelles et humaines.

Car nous vivons une époque où l’alliance des bonnes volontés est trop précieuse pour tolérer qu’elles perdent leur temps à se juger entre elles. Nous devons, une bonne fois pour toutes, admettre l’inconfort d’un dialogue qui repose sur la disparité de nos natures, mais aussi admettre la nécessité de ce dialogue car nous visons chacun dans notre ordre à des fins communes, qui sont la dignité et le sens.

Certes, les institutions politiques n’ont pas les promesses de l’éternité ; mais l’Eglise elle-même ne peut risquer avant le temps de faucher à la fois le bon grain et l’ivraie. Et dans cet entre-deux où nous sommes, où nous avons reçu la charge de l’héritage de l’homme et du monde, oui, si nous savons juger les choses avec exactitude, nous pourrons accomplir de grandes choses ensemble.

C’est peut-être assigner là à l’Eglise de France une responsabilité exorbitante, mais elle est à la mesure de notre histoire, et notre rencontre ce soir atteste, je crois, que vous y êtes prêts.

Monseigneur, Mesdames et Messieurs, sachez en tout cas que j’y suis prêt aussi.

Je vous remercie.


Cinéma: Pallywood tous les jours sur un écran chez vous (It’s just standard evacuation practice, stupid ! – complete with shouts of pain and Allahu akbar)

7 avril, 2018
Abattre un Européen, c’est faire d’une pierre deux coups, supprimer en même temps un oppresseur et un opprimé ; restent un homme mort et un homme libre. Sartre (préface des « Damnés de la terre » de Franz Fanon, 1961)
L’action de Septembre Noir a fait éclater la mascarade olympique, a bouleversé les arrangements à l’amiable que les réactionnaires arabes s’apprêtaient à conclure avec Israël […] Aucun révolutionnaire ne peut se désolidariser de Septembre Noir. Nous devons défendre inconditionnellement face à la répression les militants de cette organisation […] A Munich, la fin si tragique, selon les philistins de tous poils qui ne disent mot de l’assassinat des militants palestiniens, a été voulue et provoquée par les puissances impérialistes et particulièrement Israël. Il fut froidement décidé d’aller au carnage. Edwy Plenel (alias Joseph Krasny)
Je n’ai jamais fait mystère de mes contributions à Rouge, de 1970 à 1978, sous le pseudonyme de Joseph Krasny. Ce texte, écrit il y a plus de 45 ans, dans un contexte tout autre et alors que j’avais 20 ans, exprime une position que je récuse fermement aujourd’hui. Elle n’avait rien d’exceptionnel dans l’extrême gauche de l’époque, comme en témoigne un article de Jean-Paul Sartre, le fondateur de Libération, sur Munich dans La Cause du peuple–J’accuse du 15 octobre 1972. Tout comme ce philosophe, j’ai toujours dénoncé et combattu l’antisémitisme d’où qu’il vienne et sans hésitation. Mais je refuse l’intimidation qui consiste à taxer d’antisémite toute critique de la politique de l’Etat d’Israël. Edwy Plenel
Pendant 24 mn à peu près on ne voit que de la mise en scène … C’est un envers du décor qu’on ne montre jamais … Mais oui tu sais bien que c’est toujours comme ça ! Entretien Jeambar-Leconte (RCJ)
Au début (…) l’AP accueillait les reporters à bras ouverts. Ils voulaient que nous montrions des enfants de 12 ans se faisant tuer. Mais après le lynchage, quand des agents de l’AP firent leur possible pour détruire et confisquer l’enregistrement de ce macabre événement et que les Forces de Défense Israéliennes utilisèrent les images pour repérer et arrêter les auteurs du crime, les Palestiniens donnèrent libre cours à leur hostilité envers les Etats-Unis en harcelant et en intimidant les correspondants occidentaux. Après Ramallah, où toute bonne volonté prit fin, je suis beaucoup plus prudent dans mes déplacements. Chris Roberts (Sky TV)
La tâche sacrée des journalistes musulmans est, d’une part, de protéger la Umma des “dangers imminents”, et donc, à cette fin, de “censurer tous les matériaux” et, d’autre part, “de combattre le sionisme et sa politique colonialiste de création d’implantations, ainsi que son anéantissement impitoyable du peuple palestinien”. Charte des médias islamiques de grande diffusion (Jakarta, 1980)
Il s’agit de formes d’expression artistique, mais tout cela sert à exprimer la vérité… Nous n’oublions jamais nos principes journalistiques les plus élevés auxquels nous nous sommes engagés, de dire la vérité et rien que la vérité. Haut responsable de la Télévision de l’Autorité palestinienne
Je suis venu au journalisme afin de poursuivre la lutte en faveur de mon peuple. Talal Abu Rahma (lors de la réception d’un prix, au Maroc, en 2001, pour sa vidéo sur al-Dura)
Karsenty est donc si choqué que des images truquées soient utilisées et éditées à Gaza ? Mais cela a lieu partout à la télévision, et aucun journaliste de télévision de terrain, aucun monteur de film, ne seraient choqués. Clément Weill-Raynal (France 3)
Nous avons toujours respecté (et continuerons à respecter) les procédures journalistiques de l’Autorité palestinienne en matière d’exercice de la profession de journaliste en Palestine… Roberto Cristiano (représentant de la “chaîne de télévision officielle RAI, Lettre à l’Autorité palestinienne)
La mort de Mohammed annule, efface celle de l’enfant juif, les mains en l’air devant les SS, dans le Ghetto de Varsovie. Catherine Nay (Europe 1)
Dans la guerre moderne, une image vaut mille armes. Bob Simon
Oh, ils font toujours ça. C’est une question de culture. Représentants de France 2 (cités par Enderlin)
L’image correspondait à la réalité de la situation, non seulement à Gaza, mais en Cisjordanie. Charles Enderlin (Le Figaro, 27/01/05)
J’ai travaillé au Liban depuis que tout a commencé, et voir le comportement de beaucoup de photographes libanais travaillant pour les agences de presse m’a un peu troublé. Coupable ou pas, Adnan Hajj a été remarqué pour ses retouches d’images par ordinateur. Mais, pour ma part, j’ai été le témoin de pratique quotidienne de clichés posés, et même d’un cas où un groupe de photographes d’agences orchestraient le dégagement des cadavres, donnant des directives aux secouristes, leur demandant de disposer les corps dans certaines positions, et même de ressortir des corps déjà inhumés pour les photographier dans les bras de personnes alentour. Ces photographes ont fait moisson d’images chocs, sans manipulation informatique, mais au prix de manipulations humaines qui posent en elles-mêmes un problème éthique bien plus grave. Quelle que soit la cause de ces excès, inexpérience, désir de montrer de la façon la plus spectaculaire le drame vécu par votre pays, ou concurrence effrénée, je pense que la faute incombe aux agences de presse elles-mêmes, car ce sont elles qui emploient ces photographes. Il faut mettre en place des règles, faute de quoi toute la profession finira par en pâtir. Je ne dis pas cela contre les photographes locaux, mais après avoir vu ça se répéter sans arrêt depuis un mois, je pense qu’il faut s’attaquer au problème. Quand je m’écarte d’une scène de ce genre, un autre preneur de vue dresse le décor, et tous les autres suivent… Brian X (Journaliste occidental anonyme)
Pour qui nous prenez-vous ? Nous savons qui vous êtes, nous lisons tout ce que vous écrivez et nous savons où vous habitez. Hussein (attaché de presse du Hezbollah au journaliste Michael Totten)
L’attaque a été menée en riposte aux tirs incessants de ces derniers jours sur des localités israéliennes à partir de la zone visée. Les habitants de tous les villages alentour, y compris Cana, ont été avertis de se tenir à l’écart des sites de lancement de roquettes contre Israël. Tsahal est intervenue cette nuit contre des objectifs terroristes dans le village de Cana. Ce village est utilisé depuis le début de ce conflit comme base arrière d’où ont été lancées en direction d’Israël environ 150 roquettes, en 30 salves, dont certaines ont atteint Haïfa et des sites dans le nord, a déclaré aujourd’hui le général de division Gadi Eizenkot, chef des opérations. Tsahal regrette tous les dommages subis par les civils innocents, même s’ils résultent directement de l’utilisation criminelle des civils libanais comme boucliers humains par l’organisation terroriste Hezbollah. (…) Le Hezbollah place les civils libanais comme bouclier entre eux et nous, alors que Tsahal se place comme bouclier entre les habitants d’Israël et les terroristes du Hezbollah. C’est la principale différence entre eux et nous. Rapport de l’Armée israélienne
Après trois semaines de travail intense, avec l’assistance active et la coopération de la communauté Internet, souvent appelée “blogosphère”, nous pensons avoir maintenant assez de preuves pour assurer avec certitude que beaucoup des faits rapportés en images par les médias sont en fait des mises en scène. Nous pensons même pouvoir aller plus loin. À notre avis, l’essentiel de l’activité des secours à Khuraybah [le vrai nom de l’endroit, alors que les médias, en accord avec le Hezbollah, ont utilisé le nom de Cana, pour sa connotation biblique et l’écho du drame de 1996] le 30 juillet a été détourné en exercice de propagande. Le site est devenu en fait un vaste plateau de tournage, où les gestes macabres ont été répétés avec la complaisance des médias, qui ont participé activement et largement utilisé le matériau récolté. La tactique des médias est prévisible et tristement habituelle. Au lieu de discuter le fond de nos arguments, ils se focalisent sur des détails, y relevant des inexactitudes et des fausses pistes, et affirment que ces erreurs vident notre dossier de toute valeur. D’autres nous étiquètent comme de droite, pro-israéliens ou parlent simplement de théories du complot, comme si cela pouvait suffire à éliminer les éléments concrets que nous avons rassemblés. Richard North (EU Referendum)
Lorsque les médias se prêtent au jeu des manipulations plutôt que de les dénoncer, non seulement ils sacrifient les Libanais innocents qui ne veulent pas que cette mafia religieuse prenne le pouvoir et les utilise comme boucliers, mais ils nuisent aussi à la société civile de par le monde. D’un côté ils nous dissimulent les actes et les motivations d’organisations comme le Hamas ou le Hezbollah, ce qui permet aux musulmans ennemis de la démocratie, en Occident, de nous (leurs alliés progressistes présumés) inviter à manifester avec eux sous des banderoles à la gloire du Hezbollah. De l’autre, ils encouragent les haines et les sentiments revanchards qui nourrissent l’appel au Jihad mondial. La température est montée de cinq degrés sur l’échelle du Jihad mondial quand les musulmans du monde entier ont vu avec horreur et indignation le spectacle de ces enfants morts que des médias avides et mal inspirés ont transmis et exploité. Richard Landes
Nous avons commis une terrible erreur, un texte malencontreux sur l’une de nos photos du jour du 18 avril dernier (à gauche), mal traduit de la légende, tout ce qu’il y a de plus circonstanciée, elle, que nous avait fournie l’AFP*: sur la « reconstitution », dans un camp de réfugiés au Liban, de l’arrestation par de faux militaires israéliens d’un Palestinien, nous avons omis d’indiquer qu’il s’agissait d’une mise en scène, que ces « soldats » jouaient un rôle et que tout ça relevait de la pure et simple propagande. C’est une faute – qu’atténuent à peine la précipitation et la mauvaise relecture qui l’ont provoquée. C’en serait une dans tous les cas, ça l’est plus encore dans celui-là: laisser planer la moindre ambiguïté sur un sujet aussi sensible, quand on sait que les images peuvent être utilisées comme des armes de guerre, donner du crédit à un stratagème aussi grossier, qui peut contribuer à alimenter l’exaspération antisioniste là où elle s’enflamme sans besoin de combustible, n’appelle aucun excuse. Nous avons déconné, gravement. J’ai déconné, gravement: je suis responsable du site de L’Express, et donc du dérapage. A ce titre, je fais amende honorable, la queue basse, auprès des internautes qui ont été abusés, de tous ceux que cette supercherie a pu blesser et de l’AFP, qui n’est EN AUCUN CAS comptable de nos propres bêtises. Eric Mettout (L’Express)
Comment expliquer qu’une légende en anglais qui dit clairement qu’il s’agit d’une mise en scène (la légende, en anglais, de la photo fournie par l’AFP: « LEBANON, AIN EL-HELWEH: Palestinian refugees pose as Israeli soldiers arresting and beating a Palestinian activist during celebrations of Prisoners’ Day at the refugee camp of Ain el-Helweh near the coastal Lebanese city of Sidon on April 17, 2012 in solidarity with the 4,700 Palestinian inmates of Israeli jails. Some 1,200 Palestinian prisoners held in Israeli jails have begun a hunger strike and another 2,300 are refusing food for one day, a spokeswoman for the Israel Prisons Service (IPS) said. »), soit devenue chez vous « Prisonnier palestinien 18/04/2012. Mardi, lors de la Journée des prisonniers, des centaines de détenus palestiniens ont entamé une grève de la faim pour protester contre leurs conditions de détention », étonnant non ? David Goldstein
On Friday, the Palestinian terror group Hamas, which controls the Gaza Strip, is inaugurating what it is calling “The March of Return.” According to Hamas’s leadership, the “March of Return” is scheduled to run from March 30 – the eve of Passover — through May 15, the 70th anniversary of Israel’s establishment. According to Israeli media reports, Hamas has budgeted $10 million for the operation. Throughout the “March of Return,” Hamas intends to send thousands of civilians to the Israeli border. Hamas is planning to set up tent camps along the border fence and then, presumably, order participants to overrun it on May 15. The Palestinians refer to May 15 as “Nakba,” or Catastrophe Day. (…) what is it trying to accomplish by sending them into harm’s way? Why is the terror group telling Gaza residents to place themselves in front of the border fence and challenge Israeli security forces charged with defending Israel? The answer here is also obvious. Hamas intends to provoke Israel to shoot at the Palestinian civilians it is sending to the border. It is setting its people up to die because it expects their deaths to be captured live by the cameras of the Western media, which will be on hand to watch the spectacle. In other words, Hamas’s strategy of harming Israel by forcing its soldiers to kill Palestinians is predicated on its certainty that the Western media will act as its partner and ensure the success of its lethal propaganda stunt. Given widespread assessments that Iran is keen to start a new round of war between Israel and its terror proxies, Hamas in Gaza and Hezbollah in Lebanon, it is possible that Hamas intends for this lethal propaganda stunt to be the initial stage of a larger war. By this assessment, Hamas is using the border operation to cultivate and escalate Western hostility against Israel ahead of a larger shooting war. (…) The real issue revealed by Hamas’s planned operation — as it was revealed by the Mavi Marmara, as well as by Hamas’s military campaigns against Israel in 2014, 2011 and 2008-09 —  is not how Israel will deal with it. The real issue is that Hamas’s entire strategy is predicated on its faith that the Western media and indeed the Western left will side with it against Israel. Hamas is certain that both the media and leftist activists and politicians in Europe and the U.S. will blame Israel for Palestinian civilian casualties. And as past experience proves, Hamas is right to believe the media and leftist activists will play their assigned role. So long as the media and the left rush to indict Israel for its efforts to defend itself and its citizens against its terrorist foes, who turn the laws of war on their head as a matter of course, these attacks will continue and they will escalate. If this border assault does in fact serve as the opening act in a larger terror war against Israel, then a large portion of the blame for the bloodshed will rest on the shoulders of the Western media for empowering the terrorists of Hamas and Hezbollah to attack Israel. Caroline Glick
Je pense que les Palestiniens et les Israéliens ont droit à leur propre terre. Mais nous devons obtenir un accord de paix pour garantir la stabilité de chacun et entretenir des relations normales. Prince héritier Mohammed ben Salmane
A set of photos, below, has been spreading all over social media in the past week. Sometimes, the photos are reposted individually. However, they all send the same message: Israel is supposedly deceiving the world into thinking their soldiers are getting wounded in Gaza by using special effects makeup. Closer analysis of these photos, however, shows that none of them are recent, most were not even taken in Israel, and all of them are taken out of context. France 24
The video turned out to be from an art workshop which creates this health exercise annually in Gaza. The goal of the workshop is to recreate child injuries sustained in warzones so that doctors can get familiar with them and learn how to care for injured children, the owner of the workshop, Abd al-Baset al-Loulou said. Al Arabya
Dix-huit morts et au moins 1 400 blessés. La « grande marche du retour », appelée vendredi par la société civile palestinienne et encadrée par le Hamas, le long de la barrière frontalière séparant la bande de Gaza et Israël, a dégénéré lorsque l’armée israélienne a tiré à balles réelles sur des manifestants qui s’approchaient du point de passage. (…) Famille, enfants, musique, fête, puis débordements habituels de jeunes lançant des cailloux à l’armée. Lorsque les émeutiers sont arrivés à quelques centaines de mètres de la fameuse grille, les snipers israéliens sont entrés en action. L’un des garçons, « armé » d’un pneu, a été abattu d’une balle dans la nuque alors qu’il s’enfuyait. (…) Ce mouvement, qui exige le « droit au retour » et la fin du blocus de Gaza, doit encore durer six semaines. C’est long. Le gouvernement israélien compte peut-être sur l’usure des protestataires, la fatigue, le renoncement, persuadé que quelques balles en plus pourraient faire la différence. A-t-il la mémoire courte ? Selon la Torah, Moïse avait 80 ans lorsqu’a commencé la traversée du désert. Ces quarante années d’errance douloureuse sont au coeur de tous les Juifs. Espérer qu’après soixante-dix ans d’exil les Palestiniens oublient leur histoire à coups de fusil est aussi absurde que ne pas faire la différence entre une balle de 5,56 et une pierre calcaire … Le Canard enchainé (Balles perdues, 04.04.2018)
Pro-Israel organization StandWithUs has resorted to claiming Palestinians are faking injuries to garner international sympathy and supported their claims by posting videos showing « Palestinians practicing for the cameras. » The Palestinians in the video were actually practicing how to evacuate the wounded during the protest… Telesur

C’est juste un entrainement à l’évacuation, imbécile !

A l’heure où devant le désintérêt croissant du Monde arabe ….

Le Hamas tente par une ultime mise en scène de faire oublier le fiasco toujours plus criant de leur régime  terroriste …

Et qu’entre deux leçons de théologie, nos belles âmes et médias en mal de contenu nous resservent le scénario réchauffé de la riposte disproportionnée d’Israël …

Alors que l’on redécouvre que nos anciens faussaires – certains ayant toujours pignon sur rue – n’avaient rien à envier à nos actuels Charles Enderlin

Retour sur la florissante industrie de fausses images palestinienne plus connue sous le nom de Pallywood …

After at least 20 were killed last Friday by Israeli forces, protesters ignited tires to create black smoke hoping to block visibility
Telesur
6 April 2018

At least four Palestinian protesters were killed, and over 200 have been wounded after Israeli troops opened fire on protesters along the Israel-Gaza border Friday. Five of the persons injured as thousands participated in the March of Return are said to be in critical condition according to medical officials.

The deaths in Friday’s protest follow 24 others, which took place in the first round of demonstrations last week, and add to the trend of severe violence from Israeli troops that led to over 1000 injuries over the same period. Thousands converged on Gaza’s border with Israel and set fire to mounds of tires, which were supposed to block the visibility of Israeli snipers and avoid more deaths, in the second week of demonstrations.

Israel’s violent response to peaceful protests has been heavily criticized over the last week. The United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights has urged troops to exercise restraint, these calls, however, haven’t been heeded.

Israeli officials have attempted to portray the use of deadly force and firearms as a necessary measure to prevent “terrorists” from infiltrating into Israel and to « protect its border. »

An Israeli military spokesman said Friday they “will not allow any breach of the security infrastructure and fence, which protects Israeli civilians.”

However, the U.N. has reminded the Israeli government that an attempt to cross the border fence does not amount to “threat to life or serious injury that would justify the use of live ammunition.”

The U.N. has also stressed Israel remains the occupying force in Gaza and has the « obligations to ensure that excessive force is not employed against protestors and that in the context of a military occupation, as in the case in Gaza, the unjustified and unlawful recourse to firearms by law enforcement resulting in death may amount to willful killing. »

Israeli Defence Minister Avigdor Lieberman told Israeli public radio Thursday that « if there are provocations, there will be a reaction of the harshest kind like last week, » showing no sign that his government would reconsider their strategy when responding to unarmed protesters.

Pro-Israel organization StandWithUs has resorted to claiming Palestinians are faking injuries to garner international sympathy and supported their claims by posting videos showing « Palestinians practicing for the cameras. » The Palestinians in the video were actually practicing how to evacuate the wounded during the protest.

Other claims advanced by Israeli authorities include accusing the political party Hamas, which Israel considers a terrorist organization, of being, behind the protests.

Asad Abu Sharekh, the spokesperson of the march, has countered the claim saying « the march is organized by refugees, doctors, lawyers, university students, Palestinian intellectuals, academics, civil society organizations and Palestinian families. »

Since March 30th, which marks Palestinian Land Day, thousands have set up several tent encampments within Gaza, some 65 kilometers away from the border.

The symbolic move is part of the Great March of Return which aims to demand the right of over 5 million Palestinian refugees to return to the lands from which they were expelled from after the formation of the state of Israel.

More than half of the 2 million Palestinians who live in Gaza under an over 10-year-long blockade are refugees.

Israel has denied Palestinian refugees this right because of what they call a “demographic threat.”

Voir aussi:

 

Voir par ailleurs:

Votre question

Checknews
Libération

Bonjour,

Dans un texte écrit en 1972, publié dans Rouge, l’hebdomadaire de la Ligue communiste révolutionnaire (LCR), Edwy Plenel a, en effet, appelé à «défendre inconditionnellement» les militants de l’organisation palestinienne Septembre Noir, qui venait alors d’assassiner onze membres de l’équipe olympique israélienne lors d’une prise d’otage pendant les Jeux Olympiques de Munich, qui ont eu lieu cette année-là. En ces termes :

« L’action de Septembre Noir a fait éclater la mascarade olympique, a bouleversé les arrangements à l’amiable que les réactionnaires arabes s’apprêtaient à conclure avec Israël (…) Aucun révolutionnaire ne peut se désolidariser de Septembre Noir. Nous devons défendre inconditionnellement face à la répression les militants de cette organisation (…) A Munich, la fin si tragique, selon les philistins de tous poils qui ne disent mot de l’assassinat des militants palestiniens, a été voulue et provoquée par les puissances impérialistes et particulièrement Israël. Il fut froidement décidé d’aller au carnage ».

Voilà plusieurs années que ces mots, signés Joseph Krasny, nom de plume de Plenel dans Rouge, sont connus. C’est en 2008 dans Enquête sur Edwy Plenel, écrit par le journaliste Laurent Huberson, qu’ils sont pour la première fois exhumés. Quasiment un chapitre est consacré à l’anticolonialisme, l’antiracisme, et l’antisionisme radical du jeune militant Plenel. C’est dans ces pages que sont retranscrites ces lignes.

 

Aujourd’hui, elles figurent en bonne place sur la page Wikipedia du journaliste.

Depuis plusieurs jours, ils refont pourtant surface sur Twitter, partagés la plupart du temps par des comptes proches de l’extrême droite. Ce 3 avril, Gilles-William Goldnadel, avocat, longtemps chroniqueur à Valeurs Actuelles, qui officie aujourd’hui sur C8 dans l’émission de Thierry Ardisson Les Terriens du Dimanche, a interpellé le co-fondateur de Mediapart sur Twitter : «Bonsoir Edwy Plenel, c’est pour une enquête de la France Libre [la webtélé de droite lancée par l’avocat début 2018]. Pourriez-vous s’il vous plaît confirmer ou infirmer les infos qui circulent selon lesquelles vous auriez sous l’alias de Krasny féliciter dans Rouge Septembre Noir ?».

« Ce texte exprime une position que je récuse fermement aujourd’hui »

Plenel n’a pas répondu à Goldnadel sur Twitter. Mais contacté par CheckNews, il a accepté de revenir, par ce mail, sur ce texte écrit en 1972.  En nous demandant de reproduire intégralement sa réponse, «car évidemment, cette campagne n’est pas dénuée d’arrière-pensées partisanes». Que pense donc le Plenel de 2018 des écrits de Krasny en 1972 ?

« Je n’ai jamais fait mystère de mes contributions à Rouge, de 1970 à 1978, sous le pseudonyme de Joseph Krasny. Ce texte, écrit il y a plus de 45 ans, dans un contexte tout autre et alors que j’avais 20 ans, exprime une position que je récuse fermement aujourd’hui. Elle n’avait rien d’exceptionnel dans l’extrême gauche de l’époque, comme en témoigne un article de Jean-Paul Sartre, le fondateur de Libération, sur Munich dans La Cause du peuple–J’accuse du 15 octobre 1972. Tout comme ce philosophe, j’ai toujours dénoncé et combattu l’antisémitisme d’où qu’il vienne et sans hésitation. Mais je refuse l’intimidation qui consiste à taxer d’antisémite toute critique de la politique de l’Etat d’Israël ».

On résume : le co-fondateur de Mediapart, sous le pseudo Joseph Krasny, a bien soutenu en 1972 l’action de l’organisation palestinienne Septembre Noir, qui venait alors d’assassiner onze athlètes israéliens lors des Jeux Olympiques de Munich. Cette chronique, exhumée en 2008 dans un livre critique sur Plenel, a refait surface ces derniers jours sur les réseaux sociaux. Contacté par CheckNews, Edwy Plenel, récuse fermement ce texte aujourd’hui qui, selon lui, n’avait rien d’exceptionnel dans l’extrême gauche de l’époque.

Bien cordialement,

Robin A.


Pâque/3631e: Attention, une pâque peut en cacher une autre (It’s all about expulsion, stupid !)

30 mars, 2018
https://i1.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8a/Martin%2C_John_-_The_Seventh_Plague_-_1823.jpg
https://jcdurbant.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/jewishpopulation.jpg
 Lamentations over the Death of the First-Born of Egypt (Charles Sprague Pearce, 1877)
Représentation d'un « meurtre rituel », cathédrale de Sandomierz, Pologne, XVIIIe siècle« Les Juifs recueillent pour leurs opérations magiques le sang des enfants chrétiens. Dessin à la plume et enluminé d'après le Livre de cabale d'Abraham le Juif
Orontes_CloseUp_600_dpi_SmallLe Pharaon (…)  dit à son peuple: Voilà les enfants d’Israël qui forment un peuple plus nombreux et plus puissant que nous. (…) Alors Pharaon donna cet ordre à tout son peuple: Vous jetterez dans le fleuve tout garçon qui naîtra. Exode 1 : 9-22
L’Éternel dit à Moïse et à Aaron dans le pays d’Égypte: (…) C’est la Pâque de l’Éternel. Cette nuit-là, je passerai dans le pays d’Égypte, et je frapperai tous les premiers-nés du pays d’Égypte, depuis les hommes jusqu’aux animaux, et j’exercerai des jugements contre tous les dieux de l’Égypte. (…) Le sang vous servira de signe sur les maisons où vous serez; je verrai le sang, et je passerai par-dessus vous, et il n’y aura point de plaie qui vous détruise, quand je frapperai le pays d’Égypte. (…) Au milieu de la nuit, l’Éternel frappa tous les premiers-nés dans le pays d’Égypte, depuis le premier-né de Pharaon assis sur son trône, jusqu’au premier-né du captif dans sa prison, et jusqu’à tous les premiers-nés des animaux. Pharaon se leva de nuit, lui et tous ses serviteurs, et tous les Égyptiens; et il y eut de grands cris en Égypte, car il n’y avait point de maison où il n’y eût un mort. Dans la nuit même, Pharaon appela Moïse et Aaron, et leur dit: Levez-vous, sortez du milieu de mon peuple, vous et les enfants d’Israël. Allez, servez l’Éternel, comme vous l’avez dit.Prenez vos brebis et vos boeufs, comme vous l’avez dit; allez, et bénissez-moi.Les Égyptiens pressaient le peuple, et avaient hâte de le renvoyer du pays, car ils disaient: Nous périrons tous. Exode 12 : 1-14
Il n’y a pas de plus grand amour que de donner sa vie pour ses amis. Jésus (Jean 15,13)
Israël est détruit, sa semence même n’est plus. Amenhotep III (Stèle de Mérenptah, 1209 or 1208 Av. JC)
Je me suis réjoui contre lui et contre sa maison. Israël a été ruiné à jamais. Mesha (roi de Moab, Stèle de Mesha, 850 av. J.-C.)
J’ai tué Jéhoram, fils d’Achab roi d’Israël et j’ai tué Ahziahu, fils de Jéoram roi de la Maison de David. Et j’ai changé leurs villes en ruine et leur terre en désert. Hazaël (stèle de Tel Dan, c. 835 av. JC)
Après ce, vint une merdaille Fausse, traître et renoïe : Ce fu Judée la honnie, La mauvaise, la desloyal, Qui bien het et aimme tout mal, Qui tant donna d’or et d’argent Et promist a crestienne gent, Que puis, rivieres et fonteinnes Qui estoient cleres et seinnes En plusieurs lieus empoisonnerent, Dont pluseurs leurs vies finerent ; Car trestuit cil qui en usoient Assez soudeinnement moroient. Dont, certes, par dis fois cent mille En morurent, qu’a champ, qu’a ville. Einsois que fust aperceuë Ceste mortel deconvenue. Mais cils qui haut siet et louing voit, Qui tout gouverne et tout pourvoit, Ceste traïson plus celer Ne volt, enis la fist reveler Et si generalement savoir Qu’ils perdirent corps et avoir. Car tuit Juif furent destruit, Li uns pendus, li autres cuit, L’autre noié, l’autre ot copée La teste de hache ou d’espée. Et maint crestien ensement En morurent honteusement.  Guillaume de Machaut (Jugement du Roy de Navarre, v. 1349)
Le poète et musicien Guillaume de Machaut écrivait au milieu du XIVe siècle. Son Jugement du Roy de Navarre mériterait d’être mieux connu. La partie principale de l’œuvre, certes, n’est qu’un long poème de style courtois, conventionnel de style et de sujet. Mais le début a quelque chose de saisissant. C’est une suite confuse d’événements catastrophiques auxquels Guillaume prétend avoir assisté avant de s’enfermer, finalement, de terreur dans sa maison pour y attendre la mort ou la fin de l’indicible épreuve. Certains événements sont tout à fait invraisemblables, d’autres ne le sont qu’à demi. Et pourtant de ce récit une impression se dégage : il a dû se passer quelque chose de réel. Il y a des signes dans le ciel. Les pierres pleuvent et assomment les vivants. Des villes entières sont détruites par la foudre. Dans celle où résidait Guillaume – il ne dit pas laquelle – les hommes meurent en grand nombre. Certaines de ces morts sont dues à la méchanceté des juifs et de leurs complices parmi les chrétiens. Comment ces gens-là s’y prenaient-ils pour causer de vastes pertes dans la population locale? Ils empoisonnaient les rivières, les sources d’approvisionnement en eau potable. La justice céleste a mis bon ordre à ces méfaits en révélant leurs auteurs à la population qui les a tous massacrés. Et pourtant les gens n’ont pas cessé de mourir, de plus en plus nombreux, jusqu’à un certain jour de printemps où Guillaume entendit de la musique dans la rue, des hommes et des femmes qui riaient. Tout était fini et la poésie courtoise pouvait recommencer. (…) aujourd’hui, les lecteurs repèrent des événements réels à travers les invraisemblances du récit. Ils ne croient ni aux signes dans le ciel ni aux accusations contre les juifs mais ils ne traitent pas tous les thèmes incroyables de la même façon; ils ne les mettent pas tous sur le même plan. Guillaume n’a rien inventé. C’est un homme crédule, certes, et il reflète une opinion publique hystérique. Les innombrables morts dont il fait état n’en sont pas moins réelles, causées de toute évidence par la fameuse peste noire qui ravagea la France en 1349 et 1350. Le massacre des juifs est également réel, justifié aux yeux des foules meurtrières par les rumeurs d’empoisonnement qui circulent un peu partout. C’est la terreur universelle de la maladie qui donne un poids suffisant à ces rumeurs pour déclencher lesdits massacres. (…) Mais les nombreuses morts attribuées par l’auteur au poison judaïque suggèrent une autre explication. Si ces morts sont réelles – et il n’y a pas de raison de les tenir pour imaginaires – elles pourraient bien être les premières victimes d’un seul et même fléau. Mais Guillaume ne s’en doute pas, même rétrospectivement. A ses yeux les boucs émissaires traditionnels conservent leur puissance explicatrice pour les premiers stades de l’épidémie. Pour les stades ultérieurs, seulement, l’auteur reconnaît la présence d’un phénomène proprement pathologique. L’étendue du désastre finit par décourager la seule explication par le complot des empoisonneurs, mais Guillaume ne réinterprète pas la suite entière des événements en fonction de leur raison d’être véritable. (…) Même rétrospectivement, tous les boucs émissaires collectifs réels et imaginaires, les juifs et les flagellants, les pluies de pierre et l’epydimie, continuent à jouer leur rôle si efficacement dans le récit de Guillaume que celui-ci ne voit jamais l’unité du fléau désigné par nous comme la « peste noire ». L’auteur continue à percevoir une multiplicité de désastres plus ou moins indépendants ou reliés les uns aux autres seulement par leur signification religieuse, un peu comme les dix plaies d’Egypte. René Girard
« Ils m’ont haï sans cause »? (…) « Il faut que s’accomplisse en moi ce texte de l’Écriture : ” On l’a compté parmi les criminels [ou les transgresseurs] (…) C’est tout simplement le refus de la causalité magique, et le refus des accusations stéréotypées qui s’énonce dans ces phrases apparemment trop banales pour tirer à conséquence. C’est le refus de tout ce que les foules persécutrices acceptent les yeux fermés. C’est ainsi que les Thébains adoptent tous sans hésiter l’hypothèse d’un Oedipe responsable de la peste, parce qu’incestueux ; c’est ainsi que les Égyptiens font enfermer le malheureux Joseph, sur la foi des racontars d’une Vénus provinciale, tout entière à sa proie attachée. Les Égyptiens n’en font jamais d’autres. Nous restons très égyptiens sous le rapport mythologique, avec Freud en particulier qui demande à l’Égypte la vérité du judaïsme. Les théories à la mode restent toutes païennes dans leur attachement au parricide, à l’inceste, etc., dans leur aveuglement au caractère mensonger des accusations stéréotypées. Nous sommes très en retard sur les Évangiles et même sur la Genèse. René Girard
On admet généralement que toutes les civilisations ou cultures devraient être traitées comme si elles étaient identiques. Dans le même sens, il s’agirait de nier des choses qui paraissent pourtant évidentes dans la supériorité du judaïque et du chrétien sur le plan de la victime. Mais c’est dans la loi juive qu’il est dit: tu accueilleras l’étranger car tu as été toi-même exilé, humilié, etc. Et ça, c’est unique. Je pense qu’on n’en trouvera jamais l’équivalent mythique. On a donc le droit de dire qu’il apparaît là une attitude nouvelle qui est une réflexion sur soi. On est alors quand même très loin des peuples pour qui les limites de l’humanité s’arrêtent aux limites de la tribu. (…) Il faut commencer par se souvenir que le nazisme s’est lui-même présenté comme une lutte contre la violence: c’est en se posant en victime du traité de Versailles que Hitler a gagné son pouvoir. Et le communisme lui aussi s’est présenté comme une défense des victimes. Désormais, c’est donc seulement au nom de la lutte contre la violence qu’on peut commettre la violence. Autrement dit, la problématique judaïque et chrétienne est toujours incorporée à nos déviations. René Girard
Où sont les routes et les chemins de fer, les industries et les infrastructures du nouvel Etat palestinien ? Nulle part. A la place, ils ont construit kilomètres après   kilomètres des tunnels souterrains, destinés à y cacher leurs armes, et lorsque les choses se sont corsées, ils y ont placé leur commandement militaire. Ils ont investi  des millions dans l’importation et la production de roquettes,  de lance-roquettes, de mortiers, d’armes légères et même de drones. Ils les ont délibérément placés dans des écoles, hôpitaux, mosquées et habitations privées pour exposer au mieux  leurs citoyens. Ce jeudi,  les Nations unies ont annoncé  que 20 roquettes avaient été découvertes dans l’une de leurs écoles à Gaza. Ecole depuis laquelle ils ont tiré des roquettes sur Jérusalem et Tel-Aviv. Pourquoi ? Les roquettes ne peuvent même pas infliger de lourds dégâts, étant presque, pour la plupart,  interceptées par le système anti-missiles « Dôme de fer » dont dispose Israël. Même, Mahmoud Abbas, le Président de l’Autorité palestinienne a demandé : « Qu’essayez-vous d’obtenir en tirant des roquettes ? Cela n’a aucun sens à moins  que vous ne compreniez, comme cela a été expliqué dans l’éditorial du Tuesday Post, que le seul but est de provoquer une riposte de la part d’Israël. Cette riposte provoque la mort de nombreux Palestiniens et  la télévision internationale diffuse en boucle les images de ces victimes. Ces images étant un outil de propagande fort télégénique,  le Hamas appelle donc sa propre population, de manière persistante, à ne pas chercher d’abris lorsqu’Israël lance ses tracts avertissant d’une attaque imminente. Cette manière d’agir relève d’une totale amoralité et d’une stratégie  malsaine et pervertie.  Mais cela repose, dans leur propre logique,  sur un principe tout à fait  rationnel,  les yeux du monde étant constamment braqués sur  Israël, le mélange d’antisémitisme classique et d’ignorance historique presque totale  suscitent  un réflexe de sympathie envers  ces défavorisés du Tiers Monde. Tout ceci mène à l’affaiblissement du soutien à Israël, érodant ainsi  sa  légitimité  et  son droit à l’auto-défense. Dans un monde dans lequel on constate de telles inversions morales kafkaïennes, la perversion du Hamas  devient tangible.   C’est un monde dans lequel le massacre de Munich n’est qu’un film  et l’assassinat de Klinghoffer un opéra,  dans lesquels les tueurs sont montrés sous un jour des plus sympathiques.   C’est un monde dans lequel les Nations-Unies ne tiennent pas compte de l’inhumanité   des criminels de guerre de la pire race,  condamnant systématiquement Israël – un Etat en guerre depuis 66 ans – qui, pourtant, fait d’extraordinaires efforts afin d’épargner d’innocentes victimes que le Hamas, lui, n’hésite pas à utiliser  en tant que boucliers humains. C’est tout à l’honneur des Israéliens qui, au milieu de toute cette folie, n’ont  perdu ni leur sens moral, ni leurs nerfs.  Ceux qui sont hors de la région, devraient avoir l’obligation de faire état de cette aberration  et de dire la vérité. Ceci n’a jamais été aussi aveuglément limpide. Charles Krauthammer
From the Egyptian standpoint the departure of the Hebrews from Egypt was actually a justifiable expulsion. The main sources are the writings of Manetho and Apion, which are summarized and refuted in Josephus’s work Against Apion . . . Manetho was an Egyptian priest in Heliopolis. Apion was an Egyptian who wrote in Greek and played a prominent role in Egyptian cultural and political life. His account of the Exodus was used in an attack on the claims and rights of Alexandrian Jews . . . [T]he Hellenistic-Egyptian version of the Exodus may be summarized as follows: The Egyptians faced a major crisis precipitated by a group of people suffering from various diseases. For fear the disease would spread or something worse would happen, this motley lot was assembled and expelled from the country. Under the leadership of a certain Moses, these people were dispatched; they constituted themselves then as a religious and national unity. They finally settled in Jerusalem and became the ancestors of the Jews. James G. Williams
Le saviez-vous ? 900 000 Juifs ont été exclus ou expulsés des Etats arabo-musulmans entre 1940 et 1970. L’histoire de la disparition du judaïsme en terres d’islam est la clef d’une mystification politique de grande ampleur qui a fini par gagner toutes les consciences. Elle fonde le récit qui accable la légitimité et la moralité d’Israël en l’accusant d’un pseudo « péché originel ». La fable est simpliste : le martyre des Juifs européens sous le nazisme serait la seule justification de l’État d’Israël. Sa « création » par les Nations Unies aurait été une forme de compensation au lendemain de la guerre. Cependant, elle aurait entraîné une autre tragédie, la « Nakba », en dépossédant les Palestiniens de leur propre territoire. Dans le meilleur des cas, ce récit autorise à tolérer que cet État subsiste pour des causes humanitaires, malgré sa culpabilité congénitale. Cette narration a, de fait, tout pour sembler réaliste. Elle surfe sur le sentiment de culpabilité d’une Europe doublement responsable : de la Shoah et de l’imposition coloniale d’Israël à un monde arabe innocent.  Dans le pire des cas, cette narration ne voit en Israël qu’une puissance colonialiste qui doit disparaître. Ce qui explique l’intérêt d’accuser sans cesse Israël de génocide et de nazisme : sa seule « raison d’être » (la Shoah) est ainsi sapée dans son fondement. La « Nakba » est le pendant de la Shoah. La synthèse politiquement correcte de ces deux positions extrêmes est trouvée dans la doctrine de l’État bi-national ou du « retour » des « réfugiés » qui implique que les Juifs d’Israël mettent en oeuvre leur propre destruction en disparaissant dans une masse démographique arabo-musulmane. Shmuel Trigano
The earliest non-Biblical account of the Exodus is in the writings of the Greek author Hecataeus of Abdera: the Egyptians blame a plague on foreigners and expel them from the country, whereupon Moses, their leader, takes them to Canaan, where he founds the city of Jerusalem. Hecataeus wrote in the late 4th century BCE, but the passage is quite possibly an insertion made in the mid-1st century BCE. The most famous is by the Egyptian historian Manetho (3rd century BCE), known from two quotations by the 1st century CE Jewish historian Josephus. In the first, Manetho describes the Hyksos, their lowly origins in Asia, their dominion over and expulsion from Egypt, and their subsequent foundation of the city of Jerusalem and its temple. Josephus (not Manetho) identifies the Hyksos with the Jews. In the second story Manetho tells how 80,000 lepers and other « impure people, » led by a priest named Osarseph, join forces with the former Hyksos, now living in Jerusalem, to take over Egypt. They wreak havoc until eventually the pharaoh and his son chase them out to the borders of Syria, where Osarseph gives the lepers a law-code and changes his name to Moses.  Manetho differs from the other writers in describing his renegades as Egyptians rather than Jews, and in using a name other than Moses for their leader, although the identification of Osarseph with Moses may be a later addition. Wikipedia
En 1883, environ 150 enfants français sont assassinés de façon horrible dans les faubourgs de Paris, avant la Pâque juive. L’enquête a montré que les Juifs avaient tué les enfants pour recueillir leur sang… Un fait similaire s’est déroulé à Londres où beaucoup d’enfants ont été égorgés par des rabbins juifs. Hasan Hanizadeh (Jaam-e-Jam 2 TV, Iran, 20.12. 2005)
The Talmud, the second holiest book for the Jews, determines that the ‘matzos’ of Atonement Day [sic.] must be kneaded ‘with blood’ from a non-Jew. The preference is for the blood of youths after raping them. Mahmoud Al-Said Al-Kurdi (Al-Akbar of Egypt, March 25, 2001)
The bestial drive to knead Passover matzos with the blood of non-Jews is [confirmed] in the records of the Palestinian police, where there are many recorded cases of the bodies of Arab children who had disappeared being found torn to pieces without a single drop of blood. The most reasonable explanation is that the blood was taken to be kneaded into the dough of extremist Jews to be used in matzos to be devoured during Passover. Adel Hamooda (Al-Ahram, Egypt, October 28, 2000)
I would like to clarify that the Jews’ spilling human blood to prepare pastry for their holidays is a well-established fact … How is it done? For this holiday, the victim must be a … Christian or Muslim. His blood is taken and fired into granules. The cleric blends these granules into the pastry dough … For the Passover slaughtering … the blood of Christian and Muslim children under the age of 10 must be used, and the cleric can mix the blood [into the dough]… Umayma Ahmad Al-Jalahma (King Fahd University, Al-Riyadh,  Saudi Arabia, March 2002)
The Jews slaughter non-Jews, draining their blood, and using it for Talmudic religious rituals. Hussam Wahba (Aqidati, Egyptian magazine, August 2004)
J’ai une prémonition qui ne me quittera pas: ce qui adviendra d’Israël sera notre sort à tous. Si Israël devait périr, l’holocauste fondrait sur nous. Eric Hoffer
Le refus d’accepter la judéophobie de l’islam s’explique dans le contexte des efforts de paix de l’Etat d’Israël avec son environnement et la souffrance très présente à cette époque –quelques années après l’extermination dans les camps – de l’ampleur de la Shoah, certainement le plus grand crime commis contre le peuple juif et l’humanité. (…) La dhimmitude est corrélée au jihad. C’est le statut de soumission des indigènes non-musulmans – juifs, chrétiens, sabéens, zoroastriens, hindous, etc. – régis dans leur pays par la loi islamique. Il est inhérent au fiqh (jurisprudence) et à la charîa (loi islamique). Les éléments sont d’ordre territorial, religieux, politique et social. Le pays conquis s’intègre au dar al-islam (16) sur lequel s’applique la charîa. Celle-ci détermine en fonction des modalités de la conquête les droits et les devoirs des peuples conquis qui gardent leur religion à condition de payer une capitation mentionnée dans le Coran et donc obligatoire. Le Coran précise que cet impôt dénommé la jizya doit être perçu avec humiliation (Coran, 9, 29). Les éléments caractéristiques de ces infidèles conquis (dhimmis) sont leur infériorité dans tous les domaines par rapport aux musulmans, un statut d’humiliation et d’insécurité obligatoires et leur exploitation économique. Les dhimmis ne pouvaient construire de nouveaux lieux de culte et la restauration de ces lieux obéissait à des règles très sévères. Ils subissaient un apartheid social qui les obligeait à vivre dans des quartiers séparés, à se différencier des musulmans par des vêtements de couleur et de forme particulière, par leur coiffure, leurs selles en bois, leurs étriers et leurs ânes, seule monture autorisée. Ils étaient astreints à des corvées humiliantes, même les jours de fête, et à des rançons ruineuses extorquées souvent par des supplices. L’incapacité de les payer les condamnait à l’esclavage. Dans les provinces balkaniques de l’Empire ottoman durant quelques siècles, des enfants chrétiens furent pris en esclavage et islamisés. Au Yémen, les enfants juifs orphelins de père étaient enlevés à leur famille et islamisés. Ce système toutefois doit être replacé dans le contexte des mentalités du Moyen Age et de sociétés tribales et guerrières. Certains évoquent la Cordoue médiévale ou al-Andalous (Andalousie médiévale sous domination arabe) comme des modèles de coexistence entre juifs, chrétiens et musulmans. (…) C’est une fable. L’Andalousie souffrit de guerres continuelles entre les différentes tribus arabes, les guerres entre les cités-royaumes (taifas), les soulèvements des chrétiens indigènes, et enfin de conflits permanents avec les royaumes chrétiens du Nord. Les esclaves chrétiens des deux sexes emplissaient les harems et les troupes du calife. L’Andalousie appliquait le rite malékite, l’un des plus sévères de la jurisprudence islamique. Comme partout, il y eut des périodes de tolérance dont profitaient les dhimmis, mais elles demeuraient circonstancielles, liées à des conjonctures politiques temporaires dont la disparition provoquait le retour à une répression accrue. (…) En 1860, le statut du dhimmi fut officiellement aboli dans l’Empire ottoman sous la pression des puissances européennes, mais en fait il se maintint sous des formes atténuées compte tenu des résistances populaires et religieuses. Hors de l’Empire ottoman, en Iran, en Afghanistan, dans l’Asie musulmane et au Maghreb, il se perpétua sous des formes beaucoup plus sévères jusqu’à la colonisation. En Iran, la dynastie Pahlavi tenta de l’abolir et d’instituer l’égalité religieuse. C’est aussi l’une des raisons de l’impopularité du Shah dans les milieux religieux. Une fois au pouvoir, ceux-ci rétablirent la charîa et la juridiction coranique. (…)  On me reprochait de nier le sort heureux des dhimmis et de lier les juifs et les chrétiens dans un statut commun. Ceci était un sacrilège contre la tendance politique pro-palestinienne des années 1970 en Europe qui visait à rapprocher les chrétiens et les musulmans dans un front uni contre Israël. (…) On m’accusa d’arrière-pensées sionistes démoniaques pour avoir révélé en toute innocence une vérité vieille de 13 siècles, que l’on cachait obstinément au public afin d’attribuer à Israël, les persécutions infligées aux chrétiens par les musulmans. Cette dernière allégation était une façon de démontrer l’origine satanique d’Israël. Décrire un statut d’avilissement commun aux juifs et aux chrétiens inscrit dans la charîa et imposé durant treize siècles, constituait pour les antisionistes et leurs alliés un blasphème impardonnable. Les thèses de l’universitaire américain Edward Said triomphaient alors. Elles glorifiaient la supériorité et la tolérance de la civilisation islamique et infligeaient un sentiment de culpabilité aux Européens qui s’en délectaient. Toute la politique euro-arabe d’union et de fusion méditerranéennes se bâtissait sur ces fondations ainsi que sur la diabolisation d’Israël. (…) Cette recherche débouchait sur un combat politique que je n’avais pas prévu. J’ignorais que je déchirais un tissu de mensonges opaques créés pour soutenir une idéologie politique, celle de la fusion du christianisme et de l’islam fondée sur la théologie de la libération palestinienne et la destruction d’Israël. C’était toute la structure idéologique, politique, culturelle d’Eurabia, mais je l’ignorais alors.(..) Les talibans l’appliquèrent à l’égard des Hindous, les coptes en Egypte continuent d’en souffrir ainsi que les chrétiens en Irak, en Iran, au Soudan, au Nigeria. Même la Turquie maintient certaines restrictions sur les lieux de culte. La dhimmitude ne pourra pas changer tant que l’idéologie du jihad se maintiendra. Bat Ye’or
Les territoires islamisés par le jihad s’étendirent de l’Espagne à l’Indus et du Soudan à la Hongrie. (…) Chassés par les nouveaux États chrétiens des Balkans au XIXe siècle, les Muhagir (émigrés) représentaient des millions de Musulmans fuyant après leurs défaites, les anciennes provinces ottomanes de Serbie, de Grèce, de Bulgarie, de Roumanie, de Bosnie-Herzégovine, de Thessalie, de l’Epire et de Macédoine. Pour contrer le mouvement sioniste, le sultan recourut à la politique traditionnelle de colonisation islamique et installa en Judée, Galilée, Samarie et en Transjordanie des réfugiés, c’est-à-dire ces même Musulmans qui avaient combattu les droits, l’émancipation et l’indépendance des dhimmis chrétiens. Le sultan en avait dirigé une partie vers le Liban, la Syrie, la Palestine, où des terres leur avaient été attribuées à titre collectif et à des conditions favorables, conformément aux principes de colonisation islamique imposés aux indigènes dès le début de la conquête arabe. Cette colonisation détermina l’implantation dans le Levant, à la même époque, de tribus tcherkesses fuyant l’avance russe dans le Caucase ; la plupart furent réparties en Mésopotamie, autour de villages arméniens dont elles massacrèrent les habitants par la suite. Les colons tcherkess de la Palestine historique : Israël, Cisjordanie et Jordanie, constituèrent des villages en Judée, et près de Jérusalem comme Abou Gosh, ou à Quneitra dans le Golan. Aujourd’hui, leurs descendants se marient entre eux ; en Jordanie, ils forment la garde du roi. Jusqu’à la Première Guerre mondiale, 95 % de la Palestine était constituée de terres domaniales appartenant au sultan ottoman. Le concept de terre fey, terre de butin enlevée aux infidèles et appartenant derechef à la communauté musulmane, est encore valide pour les leaders arabes, notamment l’OLP, qui contestent la légitimité d’Israël sur une terre « arabe ». Cette notion sous-tend le conflit israélo-arabe et il est curieux qu’elle soit défendue par des Chrétiens arabes et par l’Europe, car elle concerne tous les pays qui furent islamisés. De plus, ce principe étant corrélé au concept global d’un jihad universel, il récuse, par conséquent, toute légitimité non islamique. Le droit islamique établit une différence essentielle entre l’Arabie, terre d’origine des Arabes et berceau de la révélation coranique, et les terres de butin, conquises aux infidèles, c’est-à-dire tous les pays extérieurs à l’Arabie. C’est seulement dans ces pays que les infidèles sont tolérés dans les limites de la dhimmitude, mais non en Arabie. (…) Après l’ordre d’expulsion des Juifs et des Chrétiens du Hedjaz en 640, le christianisme fut éliminé totalement d’Arabie, tandis que le judaïsme put se maintenir au Yémen dans des conditions des plus précaires. Sous le califat d’Abd al-Malik (685-705), les tribus arabes chrétiennes furent forcées de se convertir ou de fuir chez les Byzantins. D’autres acceptèrent l’islamisation de leurs enfants en échange d’une exemption de la jizya. En moins d’un siècle, l’islam avait mis un terme au christianisme arabe. Les populations chrétiennes, notamment grec-orthodoxes, uniates et catholiques, sont des dhimmis arabisés au XIXe siècle par la politique coloniale de la France visant à se constituer un grand empire arabe d’Alger à Antioche dès les années 1830.Les conquêtes islamiques n’auraient pu se maintenir si elles n’avaient bénéficié de nombreuses trahisons et collaborations de princes chrétiens, de militaires et de patriarches. Ces collusions découlaient d’un contexte interchrétien de rivalités dynastiques et religieuses ou d’ambitions personnelles. Parce qu’elles se situaient aux niveaux hiérarchiques les plus importants, ceux qui impliquaient les plus hautes responsabilités d’État, de l’armée et de l’Église, ces défections déterminèrent l’islamisation de multitudes de Chrétiens.(…) Les tensions, qui s’inscrivent dans treize siècles de confrontations et de collaborations islamo-chrétiennes, sont toujours actuelles, car le système même qui les généra, celui du jihad et de la dhimmitude, fut délibérément occulté à l’époque moderne. On ne peut ici examiner les causes de cette occultation, déterminées comme autrefois par des collusions et des intérêts politiques, religieux et économiques. Aujourd’hui, on constate que l’Europe, comme les pays de la trêve des siècles passés, a, dès les années 70, maintenu une fragile sécurité moyennant une politique laxiste d’immigration. Elle préféra ignorer la constitution d’un réseau terroriste et financier sur son territoire, et espéra acheter sa sécurité sous forme d’aide au développement à des gouvernements qui n’avaient jamais révoqué les fondements d’une démonisation enracinée dans la culture du jihad. Son « service à l’umma » consiste à délégitimer l’État d’Israël, et à amener les États-Unis dans le camp du jihad anti-israélien. Ce « service de la dhimmitude » se manifeste par l’exonération du terrorisme palestinien et islamiste, par l’incrimination d’Israël et des États-Unis accusés de les motiver. Aussi peut-on déceler aujourd’hui des symptômes profonds d’une dhimmitude d’autant plus inconsciente qu’elle se nourrit du refoulement hermétique de l’histoire, nécessaire au maintien d’une politique fondée sur sa négation. Il serait trop long d’examiner ici cette évolution, mais on peut brièvement l’illustrer par trois exemples.Le premier concerne l’occultation déjà mentionnée de l’idéologie et de l’histoire du jihad, c’est-à-dire de l’ensemble des relations islamo-chrétiennes fondées sur des principes juridiques et religieux islamiques qui, n’ayant jamais été révoqués, sont encore actuels. Cette occultation est remplacée par les excuses, l’autoflagellation pour les croisades, pour les disparités économiques et par la criminalisation d’Israël. Le mal est ainsi attribué aux Juifs et aux Chrétiens afin de ménager la susceptibilité du monde musulman, qui refuse toute critique sur son passé de conquêtes et de colonisation. Ce rapport est celui du système de la dhimmitude, qui interdisait au dhimmi, sous peine de mort, de critiquer l’islam et le gouvernement islamique. Les notables dhimmis étaient chargés par l’autorité islamique d’imposer cette autocensure à leurs coreligionnaires. L’univers de la dhimmitude, conditionné par l’insécurité, l’humilité et la servilité comme gages de survie, est ainsi reconstitué en Europe.Le second exemple concerne le refus de reconnaître le fondement judéo-chrétien de la civilisation occidentale de crainte d’humilier le monde musulman – attitude similaire à celle du dhimmi, obligé de renoncer à sa propre histoire et de disparaître dans la non-existence pour permettre à son oppresseur d’exister. Ce rejet du judéo-christianisme, c’est-à-dire d’une culture fondée sur la Bible, est accentué par les fréquentes déclarations des ministres européens affirmant que les contributions de la culture arabe et islamique ont déterminé le développement de la civilisation européenne. (…) Le troisième exemple concerne la remarque, en septembre dernier, de Silvio Berlusconi, président du Conseil italien, affirmant la supériorité des institutions politiques européennes et les réactions outrées de ses collègues de l’Union européenne, accompagnées des excuses réclamées par le secrétaire de la Ligue arabe, Amr Moussa. Ancien ministre des Affaires étrangères d’Égypte, Moussa a représenté un pays dont la longue histoire de persécutions des dhimmis juifs et chrétiens se poursuit encore aujourd’hui par une culture de haine. On peut souligner que les pays de la Ligue arabe sont précisément les plus fidèles aux valeurs du jihad et de la dhimmitude qu’ils appliquent à des degrés divers à leurs sujets non musulmans. Les excuses que Berlusconi a présentées à ces pays, dont certains pratiquent encore l’esclavage et ont des eunuques et des harems, rappellent l’obligation pour le dhimmi chrétien de descendre de son âne devant un Musulman, ou comme dans la Palestine arabe jusqu’au XIXe siècle de marcher dans le caniveau, afin de l’assurer de sa déférence. Que ces attitudes d’humble servilité soient exigées des représentants des nations européennes donne la mesure de l’échec de leurs politiques qui ont conduit leurs peuples non seulement au déshonneur, mais au tribut pour suspendre, comme autrefois, par leurs services et leurs rançons, la menace du terrorisme. Parmi les nombreux et complexes facteurs de la dhimmitude énoncés plus haut, on citera l’antisionisme qui a pris la relève de l’antisémitisme. On examinera ici les développements des théologies de substitution/déchéance que ce terrain antijuif commun favorise aujourd’hui, dans la version chrétienne concernant le peuple d’Israël, et dans la version islamique relative aux Juifs et aux Chrétiens, ainsi que les dérives du courant chrétien marcionite. Si l’on évalue la dhimmitude comme une catégorie singulière de l’histoire et de l’expérience humaine, dont l’articulation juridique et théologique se déploie dans le temps et sur d’énormes espaces, on devrait pouvoir discerner dans le présent transitoire les axes, les agents et les supports de ses projections dans le futur. On a vu que le rôle des Églises pagano-chrétiennes fut capital dans la formulation de son fondement : le principe de la substitution/déchéance matérialisé par un corpus juridique discriminatoire. De même au cours de l’histoire, la collusion de certains courants du clergé avec les forces islamiques activa la destruction du pouvoir politique chrétien. L’ enracinement du christianisme dans l’arabo-palestinisme induit le mécanisme défini par Alain Besançon comme la perversa imitatio, l’imitation perverse, c’est-à-dire un duplicat d’histoire juive reconstruit dans une version arabo-palestinienne qui constitue, selon la formule de l’auteur mais pour un contexte différent, une « pédagogie du mensonge ». Les Arabes palestiniens héritiers et symboles du Jésus arabo-palestinien se substituent au peuple juif, rejeté dans la non-existence. Ils réalisent la fusion christique islamo-chrétienne d’une Palestine crucifiée par Israël, concept constamment répété dans leur guerre antijuive. Pour l’antisionisme chrétien, les termes « colons », « colonisation », « occupation » appliqués aux Israéliens dans leur pays impliquent que les droits naturels des Juifs dans leur patrie historique sont transférés au peuple arabe de Palestine selon le principe de déchéance/substitution. La restauration d’Israël dans son pays représente « une injustice » car précisément elle illustre une transgression de ce principe. Notons ici la désynchronisation et l’ineptie des concepts occidentaux de colonisation quand ils sont transférés au contexte islamique des peuples dhimmis dépossédés de leur pays et de leur identité par l’impérialisme du jihad. (…) L’ islamisation de l’humanité, des prophètes, des sages, non seulement islamise une histoire antérieure à Mahomet, mais elle dépouille les Juifs et les Chrétiens de toutes leurs références historiques. Ces religions sont comme suspendues dans un temps stagnant sans repères ni évolution. Il est évident que l’islamisation de la Bible, de Jésus et des évangélistes lèse autant les Chrétiens que les Juifs. De plus, l’islamisation de Jésus revient à islamiser toute la théologie chrétienne et la Chrétienté. Ainsi la délégitimation d’Israël n’est pas sans conséquence sur la théologie chrétienne et le sens de son identité. Ses origines sont-elles dans la Bible ou dans le Coran ? Le Jésus historique et les apôtres sont-ils juifs ou sont-ils les prophètes musulmans dont la version coranique n’a que peu de rapports avec les originaux bibliques? Le conflit judéo-chrétien se dédouble par conséquent en un autre conflit islamo-chrétien qui se joue autour de la restauration d’Israël car le principe déchéance/substitution dans la version chrétienne implique dans sa version islamique la confirmation de ce même principe pour les Chrétiens. (…) Il n’est pas rare aujourd’hui de voir les propagandistes de la cause palestinienne écrire que la Palestine est le berceau des trois religions. Affirmation absurde car l’islam est né en Arabie et se développa à La Mecque et à Médine ; aucune ville de Terre sainte, ni même Jérusalem, n’est mentionnée dans le Coran. Si la Palestine avait été le berceau de l’islam, aucun infidèle n’aurait pu y vivre. Par conséquent il n’est pas dans l’intérêt des Chrétiens de propager ces mensonges, car aucune église n’y serait tolérée. Cette falsification est uniquement motivée par le désir d’opposer à la légitimité d’Israël une autre légitimité fictive, qui se retourne dans le contexte de la dhimmitude contre ses protagonistes chrétiens. Pour les Musulmans, cette proposition confirme l’islamisation des personnages bibliques. Les services rendus à l’umma par les Églises dhimmies palestiniennes furent considérables – services, rappelons-le, qui constituent la fonction essentielle du dhimmi et garantissent sa survie. Ces Églises sapèrent le support biblique du christianisme, l’affaiblissant face à un islam toujours plus convaincu de son irréprochabilité morale. Elles renforcèrent la légitimité génocidaire de la dhimmitude par sa justification contre le peuple juif auquel le christianisme est lié. Car, si Israël est un occupant dans son pays, le christianisme, qui tire sa légitimité de l’histoire d’Israël, l’est aussi comme le serait tout autre État infidèle. Bat Ye’or
La Palestinisation de l’Europe s’articule au premier pôle cité ci-dessus et possède une double fonction: politique et théologique. La première ambitionne de remplacer Israël par la Palestine musulmane, par le déni de l’histoire juive et son effacement par l’islamisation de sa topographie. L’aspect théologique vise à islamiser les racines juives du christianisme en substituant au Jésus hébreu de Judée le Jésus musulman du Coran que les Eglises dhimmies islamisées prétendent par anachronisme palestinien, bien que ce mot n’existât pas à l’époque de Jésus et n’apparaît nulle part dans le Coran. L’islamisation des racines théologiques chrétiennes a trois conséquences  : 1) la suppression de l’histoire du peuple d’Israël, fondement historique du christianisme; 2) l’adhésion à la conception islamique de l’histoire qui affirme l’antériorité de l’islam par rapport au judaïsme et au christianisme ; 3) la justification du jihad anti-israélien fondé sur le déni de l’histoire juive et chrétienne. La Palestinisation de l’Europe consiste à abrutir l’ensemble des populations européennes par l’obsession paranoïaque de la Palestine, symbole de ces politiques jihadistes du déni, et à les détourner des grands enjeux civilisationnels qui les confrontent. L’invasion migratoire de l’Europe se rattache à la stratégie du second pôle du Conseil européen et de la Commission, menée conjointement avec la Ligue arabe et l’OCI. Cette entente euro-arabe bien rodée depuis quarante ans explique l’unanimité de l’accueil favorable des gouvernements – la Hongrie et les récents Etats de l’Union exceptés. Le ton dictatorial et menaçant du président de la Commission, le Luxembourgeois Jean-Claude Juncker illustre bien l’autoritarisme opaque de Bruxelles. Ces invasions de populations majoritairement musulmanes accéléreront certainement le processus de Palestinisation (déchristianisation) et d’islamisation – non seulement démographique mais aussi culturel et politique – des sociétés européennes. C’est d’ailleurs pour cela qu’elles sont si favorablement accueillies par nos élites. Je ne crois pas aux sentiments humanitaires des politiciens mais je crois plutôt en une politique humanitaire gérant des capitaux et des intérêts stratégiques colossaux. Nos leaders qui ont détruit les Etats-nations sont incapables de défendre leurs territoires. (…) Il y eut certes « des idiots utiles » juifs et chrétiens qui bénéficièrent de prébendes, de la célébrité, d’une exposition médiatique flatteuse en servant de marionnettes et de paravents à ceux qui les manipulaient derrière le rideau. Mais ce ne sont que des ombres secondaires. Les véritables responsables de l’islamisation de l’Europe se situent dans les hautes sphères des hiérarchies gouvernementales qui collaborèrent avec le nazisme et ses milieux islamophiles. (…) Il faut aussi reconnaître que de leur côté, la Ligue arabe et l’OCI exercèrent des représailles économiques, soutenues par le terrorisme palestinien d’abord puis islamiste et des pressions incessantes pour amener une Europe parfois réticente à obtempérer à leurs exigences concernant l’afflux et les droits des immigrants musulmans en Europe ou la campagne anti-israélienne. (…) La montée du radicalisme musulman ne menace pas seulement Israël, il menace tout autant les Etats non-musulmans et les musulmans modernistes. Naturellement Israël est plus vulnérable de par son environnement et l’exiguïté de son territoire que l’UE s’acharne à amputer davantage ayant adopté la conception jihadiste de la justice. Mais Israël est moralement plus fort et déterminé à se défendre que les Européens qui subissent une déculturation et une culpabilisation demandées par l’OCI et vivent dans la dhimmitude sans même s’en apercevoir. La politique européenne du déni du jihad et de la dhimmitude a occulté le fait que juifs et chrétiens ont le même statut dans l’islam et que la destruction du judaïsme implique celle du christianisme. Je suis particulièrement affligée par les terribles souffrances infligées aux chrétiens et aux yazidis du Proche et Moyen Orient. Ces sévices prescrits par les lois du jihad et exécutés aujourd’hui confirment les textes chrétiens qui les décrivent datant de la première conquête arabo-islamique et que j’ai reproduit dans mes livres. (…) Quant à l’Iran, le fait qu’il menace Israël seulement est un leurre de la taqiya car le régime des ayatollahs menace d’anéantissement le monde sunnite et occidental. Naturellement le peuple iranien lui-même en fera les frais comme on le voit aujourd’hui avec les populations irako-syriennes qui élevées dans la glorification du jihad en sont elles-mêmes victimes aujourd’hui. (…) Les belles déclarations contre l’antisémitisme sont compensées par la recrudescence de la guerre larvée de l’UE contre Israël destiné à être remplacé par la Palestine islamique. L’effacement des noms géographiques des provinces de Judée et Samarie, la désignation du Mont du Temple comme l‘esplanade des Mosquées, la Palestinisation des tombeaux des Patriarches hébreux à Hébron, c’est-à-dire leur islamisation, s’inscrivent dans l’islamisation des origines juives et chrétiennes conforme à la version coranique. La volonté de construire le vivre-ensemble méditerranéen nourrit deux paranoïas corrélées: le remplacement d’Israël par la Palestine et l’immigration islamique en Europe, avec la disparition de la civilisation judéo-chrétienne honnie par les nazis islamophiles. Les peuples européens ignorent que leurs pays, certaines Eglises, l’Union européenne sont parmi les plus grands pourvoyeurs d’antisémitisme au niveau mondial. Cette Europe-là veut se débarrasser de l’Etat d’Israël, du judaïsme et de son rejeton le christianisme. Elle a fait le choix de l’islam. (…) Pour moi l’Europe s’est édifiée sur l’héritage scientifique et juridique gréco-romain et la spiritualité judéo-chrétienne qui a forgé ses valeurs. Ses contributions aux progrès de l’humanité dans tous les domaines, sciences, arts, lois, emplissent les plus belles pages de l’histoire humaine. Il y eut bien sûr les périodes noires des crimes et des génocides. Mais à la différence des autres peuples qui s’en glorifient ou les nient, l’Europe, nourrie de l’héritage juif de la contrition, du repentir et du pardon, les a reconnues. L’Europe a proclamé l’égalité des êtres humains et leur sacralité (principes bibliques), elle a proscrit l’esclavage et inscrit dans ses institutions la liberté, la dignité et les droits de l’homme. Quand l’Italie a voulu se libérer du joug autrichien, elle l’a proclamé à travers le génie de Verdi dans le Chant des Hébreux de Nabucco. Impuissante à supprimer les guerres, l’Europe en a tempéré la cruauté par la création de la Croix Rouge et divers instruments humanitaires. Enfin elle a agencé les moyens de prospecter le champ infini du savoir et de la connaissance et a archivé dans ses musées et ses universités la mémoire de l’humanité. J’espère que les Européens pourront préserver cet immense, infiniment précieux et unique patrimoine d’une destruction méditée par leurs nombreux ennemis intérieurs et extérieurs. Pour surmonter ce défi l’on ne doit pas se tromper d’ennemis. Cette responsabilité incombe à chacun d’entre nous. Et puis il y a Eurabia… qui terrifiée par le jihad et corrompue par les pétrodollars s’est protégée en s’alliant au jihad qu’elle a détournée contre Israël. Maintenant elle aura le jihad et le déshonneur. Bat Ye’or
Si l’intervention militaire en Irak et le renversement du régime chauviniste de Saddam Hussein a apporté un quelconque résultat positif, hormis le déclenchement timide d’un processus politique démocratique, c’est sans doute le dévoilement de la grande diversité confessionnelle, ethnique et culturelle du Moyen-Orient qui demeure une réalité résiliente. (…) En réalité, les Egyptiens ne sont pas plus Arabes que ne sont Espagnols les Mexicains et les Péruviens. Ce qui fonde la nation, c’est la référence à une entité géographique, le partage de mêmes valeurs, une communauté de convenances politiques, d’idées, d’intérêts, d’affections, de souvenirs et de rêves communs. A contre-courant de toutes les expériences nationalistes venant couronner des faits nationaux, objectifs et observables, le nationalisme panarabe est plus le créateur que la création de la nation arabe. Sa conception arbitraire de la nation qui veut que l’on soit Arabe malgré soi, pour la simple raison que l’on fait usage de la langue arabe met à l’écart d’importants récits historiques et de légitimes revendications nationales. Masri Feki
La paix véritable, globale et durable viendra le jour où les voisins d’Israël reconnaîtront que le peuple juif se trouve sur cette terre de droit, et non de facto. (…) Tout lie Israël à cette région: la géographie, l’histoire, la culture mais aussi la religion et la langue. La religion juive est la référence théologique première et le fondement même de l’islam et de la chrétienté orientale. L’hébreu et l’arabe sont aussi proches que le sont en Europe deux langues d’origine latine. L’apport de la civilisation hébraïque sur les peuples de cette région est indéniable. Prétendre que ce pays est occidental équivaut à délégitimer son existence; le salut d’Israël ne peut venir de son déracinement. Le Moyen-Orient est le seul « club » régional auquel l’Etat hébreu est susceptible d’adhérer. Soutenir cette adhésion revient à se rapprocher des éléments les plus modérés parmi son voisinage arabe, et en premier lieu: des minorités. Rejeter cette option, c’est s’isoler et disparaître. Israël n’a pas le choix. Masri Feki
Le sacrifice du lieutenant-colonel Arnaud Beltrame, qui a offert sa vie vendredi à Trèbes (Aude) pour sauver celle de l’otage d’un terroriste islamiste, fait de lui un martyr. Sa conversion récente au catholicisme (2009) ajoute en effet une profondeur mystique et murie à son geste militaire héroïque. Les gens d’Eglise qui ont accompagné Arnaud Beltrame dans sa recherche spirituelle ont eu raison de lier sa générosité à l’Evangile de Jean (15,13) : « Il n’y a pas de plus grand amour que de donner sa vie pour ses amis ». Ce lundi matin sur RTL, la mère du héros, Nicole Beltrame, a expliqué qu’elle n’avait pas été surprise par l’extraordinaire bravoure de son fils : « Il était loyal, altruiste, au service des autres, engagé pour la patrie ». Il plaçait la patrie au-dessus de sa propre famille, a-t-elle également expliqué. Mais si sa mère témoigne de son fils, c’est pour que « son acte serve » dans la « résistance au terrorisme ». « Il ne faut pas baisser les bras », a-t-elle déclaré. « On ne peut tout accepter. Il faut agir, être plus solidaire, être davantage citoyen. On ne peut pas être complètement laxiste comme on l’est aujourd’hui ». Nicole Beltrame assure ne pas éprouver de haine contre le bourreau, Radouane Lakdim, qui a égorgé Arnaud Beltrame et lui a tiré dessus. « Mais j’ai le plus grand mépris. Il ne faut pas montrer la photo de ce monstre car ce serait faire une émulation pour ces gens-là. Ce n’est pas une religion ». Lakdim, 25 ans, franco-marocain fiché S depuis 2014, a également tué sur son parcours Jean Mazières, Christian Medves et Hervé Sosna. Lancer des ballons, allumer des bougies, éteindre la Tour Eiffel sont les gestes dérisoires d’une lâcheté collective qui n’ose se confronter à l’ennemi intérieur islamiste. Ces réponses enfantines deviennent désormais des insultes à la mémoire de ce héros français retrouvé. L’exemplaire geste d’Arnaud Beltrame, ancien élève de Saint-Cyr Coëtquidan (dont il fut major), nous rappelle qu’il est des compatriotes qui sont toujours prêts à mourir pour leur patrie et la défense d’un idéal humaniste, contrairement à ce que le relativisme pouvait laisser croire. Sa mort, offerte pour sauver une vie, est aussi le produit d’une culture et d’une civilisation. Son don de soi interdit de désigner encore les djihadistes, qui sèment la mort dans une détestation satanique de l’autre, comme des « soldats », des « rebelles », des « résistants » ou des « martyrs ». Ceux-là se révèlent pour ce qu’ils sont : non pas des victimes de la société occidentale mais les bras armés et bas du front d’une conquête islamiste qui use autant du prosélytisme subtil que de la terreur brutale pour arriver à ses fins. Dès vendredi, dans le quartier de l’Ozanam (Carcassonne) d’où le tueur (abattu) était originaire, le nom de Radouane Lakdim était applaudi par des jeunes musulmans tandis que des journalistes se faisaient violemment chasser de la cité. Ceux qui persistent à ne rien vouloir voir de la contre-société islamiste qui partout se consolide en France, seront-ils au moins indignés par l’ »héroïsme » dont Lakdim est déjà pour certains le symbole ? Puisse le sacrifice d’Arnaud Beltrame réveiller les endormis. Ivan Rioufol
On Friday, the Palestinian terror group Hamas, which controls the Gaza Strip, is inaugurating what it is calling “The March of Return.” According to Hamas’s leadership, the “March of Return” is scheduled to run from March 30 – the eve of Passover — through May 15, the 70th anniversary of Israel’s establishment. According to Israeli media reports, Hamas has budgeted $10 million for the operation. Throughout the “March of Return,” Hamas intends to send thousands of civilians to the Israeli border. Hamas is planning to set up tent camps along the border fence and then, presumably, order participants to overrun it on May 15. The Palestinians refer to May 15 as “Nakba,” or Catastrophe Day. (…) what is it trying to accomplish by sending them into harm’s way? Why is the terror group telling Gaza residents to place themselves in front of the border fence and challenge Israeli security forces charged with defending Israel? The answer here is also obvious. Hamas intends to provoke Israel to shoot at the Palestinian civilians it is sending to the border. It is setting its people up to die because it expects their deaths to be captured live by the cameras of the Western media, which will be on hand to watch the spectacle. In other words, Hamas’s strategy of harming Israel by forcing its soldiers to kill Palestinians is predicated on its certainty that the Western media will act as its partner and ensure the success of its lethal propaganda stunt. Given widespread assessments that Iran is keen to start a new round of war between Israel and its terror proxies, Hamas in Gaza and Hezbollah in Lebanon, it is possible that Hamas intends for this lethal propaganda stunt to be the initial stage of a larger war. By this assessment, Hamas is using the border operation to cultivate and escalate Western hostility against Israel ahead of a larger shooting war. (…) The real issue revealed by Hamas’s planned operation — as it was revealed by the Mavi Marmara, as well as by Hamas’s military campaigns against Israel in 2014, 2011 and 2008-09 —  is not how Israel will deal with it. The real issue is that Hamas’s entire strategy is predicated on its faith that the Western media and indeed the Western left will side with it against Israel. Hamas is certain that both the media and leftist activists and politicians in Europe and the U.S. will blame Israel for Palestinian civilian casualties. And as past experience proves, Hamas is right to believe the media and leftist activists will play their assigned role. So long as the media and the left rush to indict Israel for its efforts to defend itself and its citizens against its terrorist foes, who turn the laws of war on their head as a matter of course, these attacks will continue and they will escalate. If this border assault does in fact serve as the opening act in a larger terror war against Israel, then a large portion of the blame for the bloodshed will rest on the shoulders of the Western media for empowering the terrorists of Hamas and Hezbollah to attack Israel. Caroline Glick
La sortie d’Egypte est traditionnellement datée vers -1450 (-1310 selon le calendrier rabbinique, mais celui-ci décale toutes les dates de plus d’un siècle jusqu’à Alexandre, et par souci de simplicité, je ne l’utiliserai pas). Cependant, à cette date, Canaan était sous total contrôle égyptien ce qui semble rendre impossible que l’exode se soit produit à ce moment là. Ce n’est qu’après que ce contrôle se délita. La stèle du pharaon Merenptah, datée de -1208, qui décrit une campagne militaire en Canaan, contient la première, et la seule, mention d’Israel par un texte égyptien : « Israël est détruit, sa semence même n’est plus. » Israel est ici présenté comme un peuple qui vit en Canaan. Donc l’exode a forcément eu lieu avant, probablement autour de -1250, sous Ramses II, le père de Merenptah. C’est là que les problèmes commencent: on ne trouve aucune trace ni de l’exode, ni de la présence d’une masse d’esclaves sémites en Egypte à l’époque, ni d’un changement soudain de population en Canaan, ni de destruction de villes. Jericho était en ruine au moment supposé de l’arrivée des Israélites en Canaan. Au point que certains archéologues, comme le professeur Israel Finkelstein de l’université de Tel Aviv, en sont arrivés à imaginer que les Israélites étaient en fait des Canaanéens qui auraient développé une nouvelle identité. Cette conclusion révolutionnaire a cependant un défaut – elle est en totale contradiction avec toute la tradition israélite et le bon sens. Que des peuples s’inventent des mythes fondateurs glorieux est courant, mais aucun peuple ne s’est jamais inventé une origine d’esclaves misérables dans un autre pays. Si les enfants d’Israel n’ont pas été esclaves en Egypte, si Moise n’a pas existé, si l’exode n’a pas eu lieu, d’où sortent ces nouveaux récits et comment ont-ils pu être acceptés par le peuple ? C’est justement pour cette raison que la majorité des historiens continuent de penser qu’il y a bien eu un exode. Remarquez aussi que la stèle de Merenptah est étrange: nous ne savons pas à quoi il est fait référence. Il n’y a aucune source évoquant une quelconque opération de ce pharaon en Canaan ou même ailleurs, et rien qui soit resté dans la tradition d’Israel d’une invasion égyptienne peu de temps après l’exode. Mais les contradictions avec le récit biblique ne s’arrêtent pas là, les principales tenant à l’ampleur des royaumes de David et Salomon. La réalité historique de David ne fait plus de doutes aujourd’hui depuis qu’on a retrouvé une stèle moabite en 1993, datant du 9ème siècle avant l’ère chrétienne, évoquant la « maison de David ». Mais toujours d’après Finkelstein et ses partisans, si David et Salomon ont existé, ils étaient au mieux des chefs de village, régnant sur une territoire pauvre, minuscule, sous développé et peu peuplé. Les ruines de bâtiments monumentaux à Meggido et d’autres endroits attribués à Salomon, dateraient en fait, pour Finkelstein, de la période de la dynastie d’Omri, un siècle après. Ces dernières années, plusieurs fouilles dirigées par les archéologues de l’université hébraïque de Jérusalem sont venues contredire ces affirmations et laissent penser qu’au contraire David et Salomon régnaient sur un véritable état organisé et moderne. Mais leurs découvertes ne font pas encore l’unanimité et sont rejetées par Finkelstein. L’archéologie a bien sur ses limites. Plus on remonte loin dans le temps et moins il reste de traces. La plupart des artefacts du passé ont été détruits et il ne reste aujourd’hui qu’une infime fraction de ce qui existait à l’époque, aussi on ne peut pas affirmer que l’absence de preuves est une preuve de l’absence. Cependant, en regardant bien il se pourrait que le noeud du problème ne se situe pas chez les archéologues bibliques, mais chez leurs confrères égyptologues pour une simple histoire de dates. Après tout, la date traditionnelle de l’exode est généralement située entre -1500 et -1450, pas en -1250. Peut-être que les archéologues ne trouvent rien parce qu’ils ne regardent pas au bon endroit ? C’est la thèse défendue par de nombreux chercheurs, pas toujours issus du monde académique (ce qui n’est pas un défaut), chacun ayant sa version de ce qui s’est réellement passé. Il faut comprendre qu’en remontant un peu en arrière dans l’histoire égyptienne on trouve immédiatement des tas de choses qui rappellent étrangement le récit biblique: la domination du nord de l’Egypte, exactement là où se trouvaient les Israélites dans la Bible, par les Hyksos originaires de Canaan ; la conversion d’Akhenaton au monothéisme ; l’évocation permanente des mystérieux « Habiru », souvent identifiés aux « Hébreux », semeurs de troubles en Canaan ; les esclaves sémites qui vivaient bien à cette époque plus reculée en Egypte et ont inventé un alphabet pour une langue qui pourrait être l’hébreu dans le Sinai – un alphabet dont sont originaires tous les alphabets du monde. De nombreuses thèses essaient de concilier ces faits avec la Bible et l’archéologie. Mais certains vont encore plus loin en remettant en cause toute la chronologie égyptienne utilisée depuis le 19ème siècle. Le plus radical d’entre eux est l’archéologue et égyptologue David Rohl dont la thèse, appelée « Nouvelle Chronologie », avance toutes les dates de l’Egypte ancienne de 300 ans jusqu’à la prise de Thèbes par les Assyriens en -664, date à partir de laquelle toutes les chronologies s’accordent. (…) Il se trouve que la chronologie égyptienne antique est, pour parler clairement, un énorme foutoir, qu’aucune date n’est vraiment certaine, que beaucoup de choses ne sont pas vraiment connues, et que d’énormes contradictions ou anomalies inexplicables se logent dans la chronologie actuelle. En déplaçant les dates, subitement, d’après Rohl, l’archéologie et la Bible correspondent parfaitement. Joseph aurait alors été le vizir d’un pharaon de la XIIème dynastie et on a retrouvé une statue de lui ainsi que son tombeau. Le pharaon de l’exode aurait été Dedumose, en -1450, et c’est le départ des 30 à 40 000 Israélites (il lit « alafim » comme « alufim » et donc arrive à ce chiffre) qui, en mettant l’Egypte à genou, aurait permis l’invasion des Hyksos – les Amalécites de la Bible. Plus tard, ces premiers Hyksos (appelés Amu par les égyptiens) auraient été eux-mêmes conquis par une alliance de peuples indo-européens dont les Philistins issus du monde grec (les Shemau en égyptien), et ces derniers, après avoir été expulsés d’Egypte par la reconquête des pharaons de Thèbes, se seraient réfugiés dans le sud-ouest de Canaan d’où ils auraient servi de force de police aux égyptiens. Pendant que les Israélites passaient la période des Juges – et selon Rohl l’archéologie montre bien la conquête israélite de Canaan à ce moment là – l’Egypte entrait dans sa période impériale et menait des guerres jusqu’en Syrie, ignorant essentiellement les tribus barbares des montagnes de Canaan et se souciant surtout des routes commerciales. Rohl situe Akhenaton à la fin de la période des Juges et comme contemporain du roi Shaul et il prend pour preuve les lettres d’Amarna. Ces dernières sont des échanges diplomatiques retrouvés sur le site d’Amarna, là où s’élevait la capitale d’Akhenaton, entre le pharaon et divers souverains, vassaux et potentats locaux du moyen-orient. La chronologie traditionnelle situe ces lettres entre -1370 et -1350 mais pour Rohl elles datent de -1020 à -1000. (…) David a pu alors construire un royaume puissant, profitant de la faiblesse égyptienne après le désastre que fut le règne d’Akhenaton, et Salomon a su se positionner en partenaire commercial de l’Egypte et a aidé Ramses II lors de la bataille de Kadesh contre les Hittites. Après la mort de Salomon, Ramses II, allié au nouveau royaume d’Israel est le pharaon, appelé Shishak dans la Bible, qui a pris Jérusalem et volé le trésor du Temple, et la stèle de Merenptah commémore cet évènement. Tout devient clair. (…) Aussi surprenant que cela puisse paraitre, et à ma grande stupéfaction lors de mes recherches sur le sujet, en définitive la chronologie classique ne repose pas sur beaucoup d’éléments concrets: entre autres, les textes de Manetho,  prêtre égyptien du 3ème siècle avant l’ère chrétienne, et l’identification par Champollion de Shishak avec le pharaon Shoshenq I à partir de laquelle on a tiré toutes les autres dates. Les Juifs se rappellent de Manetho surtout comme étant l’auteur d’un anti-exode où il décrivait le point de vue égyptien sur l’évènement, assimilant les Israélites à des lépreux et des voleurs, et les liant aux Hyksos. Il fut aussi l’un des inventeurs de l’antisémitisme. Et il a retranscrit les listes des rois d’Egypte. Enfin, nous n’avons pas ses textes originaux mais juste ce que Flavius Josèphe en cite, ainsi qu’Eusebius et Africanus, des versions largement corrompues. Mais c’est à partir de ça que toute l’égyptologie s’est construite. L’identification Shishak-Shoshenq semble aller de soit, et Shoshenq a mené une campagne militaire en Israel. Mais justement, Shishak lui, non. Il l’a mené contre Judah en alliance avec Israel. Or, Shoshenq ne cite que des villes prises en Israel, aucune en Judah. Comme on ne peut pas à la fois se baser sur la Bible pour identifier Shishak et ensuite la rejeter en disant qu’elle est inexacte, il parait difficile d’accepter l’identification entre Shishak et Shoshenq. Ramses II, de son nom de trône, Usermaatre Setepenre Ramses, était, d’après Rohl, plus connu du peuple sous le nom de Sysa, probablement prononcé Shysha en hébreu. Le q final étant peut-être un jeu de mot. C’est donc lui le Shishak de la Bible et toute la chronologie est avancée de 300 à 350 ans. La nouvelle chronologie de Rohl ne se contente pas d’accorder la Bible avec l’archéologie, elle bouleverse complètement toute l’histoire antique telle que nous la connaissons. Ainsi les Hittites ne disparaissent plus au 12ème siècle avant l’ère chrétienne mais au 9ème au moment des invasions des peuples de la mer suite à la guerre de Troy finie vers -863. Ce qui signifie que Homère n’a pas écrit l’Iliade et l’Odyssée des siècles après les évènements supposés mais juste quelques dizaines d’années. Et qu’il n’y a eu aucun mystérieux « Age sombre » en Grèce durant lequel les Grecs auraient subitement perdu la connaissance de l’écriture et abandonné leurs villes pour tout redécouvrir après, mais une parfaite continuité historique entre l’âge héroïque et l’âge classique. (…) Rohl (…) a de très nombreux arguments qui confirment sa thèse, notamment les correspondances quasi-parfaites entre les dates de la nouvelle chronologie et les descriptions d’éclipses solaires ou lunaires de textes anciens, alors que les dates ne collent souvent pas avec la chronologie traditionnelle. Mais il y a de vraies raisons de ne pas être totalement convaincu. Plusieurs tests au carbone 14 ont été menés et ils tendent à confirmer les dates de la chronologie classique. Mais pas toujours. Parfois ils donnent des dates encore plus anciennes et complètement impossibles à accepter. Ce qui fait que de plus en plus de chercheurs rejettent tout simplement cette méthode de confirmation. Mais en attendant elle contredit Rohl et ses semblables. Ensuite le vrai problème de la chronologie de Rohl n’est pas juste de bouger des dates mais aussi des ères archéologiques. Les archéologues de l’antiquité  découpent la période en « Age de Bronze » et « Age de Fer », eux-mêmes divisés en sous périodes. La nouvelle chronologie implique de faire passer des évènements qu’on identifiait à l’âge de fer vers l’âge de bronze, sauf que cela ne correspond pas aux résultats des fouilles, et si Salomon par exemple devient un roi de l’âge de bronze, le problème c’est qu’une bonne partie des villes d’Israel n’existaient pas à ce moment là, apparemment. Néanmoins même si la solution apportée par Rohl est erronée, la chronologie actuelle est intenable et induit tout le monde en erreur. Peut-être faut-il effectivement attendre qu’une génération meure et qu’une nouvelle, à l’esprit non corrompue par de vieilles idées, nous fasse entrer en terre promise. Binyamin Lachkar
Les Egyptiens à l’époque du Nouveau Royaume – du 16ème au 11ème siècle avant l’ère chrétienne – (et avant aussi) entretenaient de nombreux esclaves d’origine sémitique occidentale (comme les Israélites) qui vivaient dans la région du delta oriental, ce qui correspond au pays de Goshen de la Bible. Aux yeux des Egyptiens, ils étaient tous désignés sous le terme « d’asiatiques ». Jusqu’à la moitié du 14ème siècle avant l’ère commune, Canaan était fermement sous le contrôle de l’Egypte comme nous l’apprenons par les lettres d’Amarna, des centaines de tablettes datant de l’époque du Pharaon Akhenaton (vers -1370 à -1350) retraçant les échanges diplomatiques de l’Egypte avec ses voisins et les autres puissances, dont ses vassaux en Canaan. On y voit assez clairement la dissolution progressive du contrôle égyptien de la région alors qu’elle est soumise aux assauts des nomades Habiru. La stèle du pharaon Merenptah commémore une expédition militaire en Canaan datée de -1209, et évoque une victoire contre « Israel », dénoté ici comme un groupe ethnique vivant dans les collines cananéennes. C’est la première mention d’Israel hors des sources bibliques. (…) A quelle date l’Exode s’est-il produit ? La date traditionnelle est de 480 ans avant l’inauguration du premier Temple, ce qui situe la sortie d’Egypte vers -1450 (selon la chronologie classique non-rabbinique, la datation rabbinique étant décalée de plus de 100 ans suite à une comptabilité différente de la durée de la période perse). Cette date est indirectement confirmée intra-textuellement par le livre des Juges, lorsque Yiftah (Jeftah) affirme qu’à son époque 300 ans sont passées depuis qu’Israel a traversé le Jourdain. Une autre version vient de Manetho, un prêtre égyptien qui vivait au 3ème siècle avant l’ère chrétienne. Manetho est un personnage historique de première importance, puisque sa liste de pharaons et de dynasties est la base de l’égyptologie moderne. Or Manetho a aussi écrit une version égyptienne de la sortie d’Egypte qu’il situe deux cents ans après l’expulsion des Hyksos. Les Hyksos (« Chefs des pays étrangers ») étaient un groupe d’envahisseurs originaires du Levant qui ont conquis et dirigé la région du delta pendant plus de 100 ans à partir de -1674. Il furent expulsés vers -1550, donc la sortie d’Egypte à la Manetho aurait eu lieu vers -1350. La seule version dont nous disposons de cette histoire est citée par Flavius Josèphe plus de trois cent ans après Manetho et dans le but de la réfuter. Bizarrement, les historiens qui prennent Manetho très au sérieux quand il parle de dynasties égyptiennes, ont tendance à rejeter cette description de la sortie d’Egypte et à la réduire à de la simple propagande anti-juive (les tensions anti-juives étant effectivement très fortes en Egypte à l’époque grecque). La troisième date proposée se situe vers le milieu du 13ème siècle au plus tard, sachant que les Israélites étaient forcément arrivés en Canaan avant qu’ils ne s’y frottent aux troupes de Merenptah en -1209 (lors d’un accrochage probablement mineur mais transformé dans la propagande royale en victoire épique qui mena à l’annihilation d’Israel). L’avantage de cette date est qu’elle se situe à une période de retrait égyptien, que la ville de Pi-Ramsès a été bâtie a cette époque (la ville de Ramses dans la Bible) et que l’archéologie montre une assez claire et soudaine expansion démographique dans les collines cananéennes où les Israélites étaient justement censés habiter. Le problème de cette datation est qu’elle contredit les données littérales du texte biblique. Pour compliquer tout ceci, il est tentant de relier l’Exode à deux évènements historiques majeurs de l’histoire égyptienne: le premier, déjà évoqué, la domination puis l’expulsion de la Basse-Egypte des « Hyksos », un confédération de peuples en grande partie cananéenne et ouest-sémitique. Le contexte des Hyksos donne un éclairage intéressant à l’histoire de Joseph (si elle se déroule sous un Pharaon d’origine sémite), et pourrait expliquer le soudain revirement anti-israélite du Pharaon « qui n’avait pas connu Joseph », qui serait alors le libérateur indigène qui aurait voulu punir les populations favorables ou proches de l’ancien régime occupant. Remarquez que certains (comme Flavius Josèphe) identifient les Israélites aux Hyksos, ce qui donnerait un twist surprenant à toute cette histoire, mais cet avis reste assez marginal. Le deuxième évènement est la révolution « monothéiste » (ou plus probablement hénothéiste – le culte d’un dieu unique en acceptant l’existence d’autres dieux) du Pharaon Akhenaton au milieu du 14ème siècle. A-t-il été influencé par les évènements de l’Exode et le Dieu des Israélites ? Pour d’autres (comme Freud), au contraire Moise aurait été un prêtre de la religion instituée par Akhenaton qui aurait fuit le pays avec d’autres prêtres (les Levi) et un groupe d’esclaves au moment de la contre-révolution lancée après la mort du Pharaon. Pour pimenter le tout, nous avons aussi la présence de deux groupes de nomades, les Habiru (ou Hapiru) et les Shashu, qui peuvent, ou pas, être identifiés aux Israélites. Le lien entre les Habiru et les Hébreux saute assez facilement aux yeux mais il est contesté, les Habiru n’étant pas un groupe ethnique mais plutôt social, vivant aux marges de la société civilisée de l’ensemble du monde antique. Il n’y a cependant pas de contradiction intrinsèque, surtout si on analyse l’usage biblique du mot « hébreu » qui semble surtout correspondre à la façon dont les Israélites se décrivent lorsqu’ils parlent avec des étrangers mais pas le nom qu’ils se donnent eux-mêmes. Les Israélites seraient alors un groupe d’Habiru parmi d’autres mais qui aurait évolué différemment. Dans ce contexte, les lettres d’Amarna décriraient les débuts de la conquête de Canaan par les Israélites du point de vue des potentats locaux, ce qui placerait alors la sortie d’Egypte vers -1400. Les Shashu sont un nom donné par les Egyptiens à des nomades vivant dans le sud de Canaan. Les textes égyptiens parlent de plusieurs clans dont les Shashu de YHVH, ce qui a conduit à les identifier aux Israélites mais ce point de vue est fortement contesté. La question centrale dans la détermination de la réalité historique des évènements décrits dans la Torah est de savoir quand le texte a été composé. Si le texte a été écrit, comme le veut la tradition, à l’époque même des évènements ou peu après, cela démontrerait de façon quasi certaine que les faits qu’il relate sont historiquement avérés (avec la licence donnée par les styles littéraires de l’époque) ; inversement si le texte a été écrit des siècles plus tard, le noyau de réalité historique serait beaucoup plus réduit voire totalement inexistant. (..) A priori, l’absence de preuves directes de la sortie d’Egypte semble un argument très puissant. Mais en y regardant de plus près, pas tant que ça. D’abord parce que du point de vue textuel, la totalité des archives égyptiennes du delta ont disparu, tandis qu’il ne reste pas grand chose non plus de celles de Haute Egypte qui de toute manière étaient moins concernées par les activités d’esclaves asiatiques en Basse Egypte. Les Egyptiens n’avaient pas non plus coutume de conserver la mémoire de leurs défaites. N’oublions pas cependant la version de l’Exode donnée par Manetho qui aurait très bien pu trouver son origine dans une source égyptienne antique qui existait encore à son époque et perdue par la suite. Pour ce qui est des preuves archéologiques, les nomades modernes comme antiques ne laissent à peu près aucunes traces de leur passage. On peut citer en exemple les travailleurs des mines de turquoise dans le Sinai: pendant des siècles, l’Egypte a exploité ces mines avec des campagnes annuelles de plusieurs mois en saison froide impliquant des centaines voire des milliers de travailleurs et de contre-maitres. (…) Notons aussi qu’il n’existe aucune trace archéologique de nombreux évènements dont la réalité historique est indéniable. Le problème de l’approche qui nie la sortie d’Egypte est qu’elle repose sur une contradiction interne – l’absence de confirmation du texte biblique conduit à inventer une nouvelle histoire d’Israel qui non seulement ne repose sur absolument aucune preuve historique ou archéologique mais est en plus contraire au seul texte dont nous disposons. (…) L’approche modérée et mainstream consiste à accepter l’idée d’un noyau historique derrière le récit de la sortie d’Egypte, et à penser que le texte biblique a été composé plusieurs siècles après les faits en se basant sur les souvenirs déformés d’évènements authentiques. Il y a de nombreuses variations dans les possibilités mais grosso modo, les Israélites sont la conjonction de plusieurs groupes dont certains ont fuit l’Egypte sous la conduite d’une figure fondatrice identifiée à Moise, d’autres sont arrivés d’ailleurs. Le professeur Israel Knohl, détenteur de la chaire d’études bibliques de l’université hébraïque, évoque l’idée de deux exodes, dont le premier serait l’expulsion des Hyksos, et le second la fuite d’un groupe de prêtres pro-Akhenaton, et ces deux groupes se seraient mêlés avec des réfugiés venus du nord de la Syrie. Lors de l’union des trois groupes en une nouvelle confédération chacun aurait contribué en fournissant ses traditions et son histoire qui furent par la suite unifiés. Pourquoi pas. Tout ceci reste cependant de l’ordre de la spéculation pure et simple. (…) L’école dite maximaliste ou conservatrice: pour ses membres, le texte biblique est une source primaire et un document du proche orient antique comme un autre et on n’a pas de raison de douter de ce qu’il raconte a priori, sauf preuve du contraire. Les aspects « religieux » sont communs à tous les textes de la période, une époque où les hommes interprétaient tous les évènements comme résultants de l’intervention de forces divines, sans que les écrits qui en résultent ne soient des textes religieux ou sacrés. Si la Bible dit qu’elle a été écrite pendant la période de pérégrinations dans le désert par Moise, il n’y a a priori pas de raison d’en douter. Surtout qu’il est incontestable que le texte de l’Exode contient une mine d’informations – politiques, culturelles, géographiques, militaires, écologiques – que seuls des gens vivant précisément à cette époque pouvaient connaitre et pas des auteurs ultérieurs. (…) L’absence de preuve n’est pas preuve de l’absence mais elle empêche d’arriver à une conclusion irréfutable. Les preuves avancées par l’école conservatrice sont indirectes et au final ne peuvent pas emporter la conviction absolue. Chacun se fera son opinion suivant ses sensibilités. (…) Jusqu’à la découverte improbable d’une preuve indéniable dans un sens ou dans l’autre, il faut se contenter de cela. Binyamin Lachkar 
The case against the historicity of the exodus is straightforward, and its essence can be stated in five words: a sustained lack of evidence. Nowhere in the written record of ancient Egypt is there any explicit mention of Hebrew or Israelite slaves, let alone a figure named Moses. There is no mention of the Nile waters turning into blood, or of any series of plagues matching those in the Bible, or of the defeat of any pharaoh on the scale suggested by the Torah’s narrative of the mass drowning of Egyptian forces at the sea. Furthermore, the Torah states that 600,000 men between the ages of twenty and sixty left Egypt; adding women, children, and the elderly, we arrive at a population in the vicinity of two million souls. There is no archaeological or other evidence of an ancient encampment that size anywhere in the Sinai desert. Nor is there any evidence of so great a subsequent influx into the land of Israel, at any time. (…) In fact, many major events reported in various ancient writings are archaeologically invisible. The migrations of Celts in Asia Minor, Slavs into Greece, Arameans across the Levant—all described in written sources—have left no archeological trace. And this, too, is hardly surprising: archaeology focuses upon habitation and building; migrants are by definition nomadic. There is similar silence in the archaeological record with regard to many conquests whose historicity is generally accepted, and even of many large and significant battles, including those of relatively recent vintage. The Anglo-Saxon conquest of Britain in the 5th century, the Arab conquest of Palestine in the 7th century, even the Norman invasion of England in 1066: all have left scant if any archaeological remains. (…)  despite the Bible’s apparent declaration that Israelite men numbered 600,000 when they left Egypt, a wealth of material in the Torah points to a number dramatically and perhaps even exponentially lower. For one thing, the book of Exodus (23:29-30) claims that the Israelites were so few in number as to be incapable of populating the land they were destined to enter; similarly, in referring to them as the smallest nation on the face of the earth, the book of Deuteronomy (7:7) says they were badly outnumbered by the inhabitants of the land. The book of Numbers (3:43) records the number of first-born Israelite males of all ages as 22,273; to have so few first-born males in a population totaling in excess of two million would have required a fertility rate of many dozens of children per woman—a phenomenon unmentioned by the Torah and not evidenced in any family lineages from that period in other ancient Near Eastern sources. Besides, an encampment of two million—equivalent to the population of Houston, Texas—would have taken days to traverse. Yet the Torah (Exodus 33:6-11) does not remark upon that, either, instead describing Israelites routinely exiting and returning to the camp with ease. Nor does it register the bedlam and gridlock that would have been created by the system of centralized sacrifices mandated in the book of Leviticus. In Exodus 15:27, moreover, the Israelites are reported camping at a particular desert oasis that boasted 70 date palms—which, for a population of two million, would have to have fed and sheltered 30,000 people per tree! (…) Here we encounter a peculiarity characteristic of the Bible as a whole. If, by and large, its stated proportions and dimensions—like those given for the Tabernacle in the desert, or for Solomon’s Temple—are realistic enough, the exceptions occur almost universally in one sphere. This is the military, where we find numbers reaching truly “biblical” magnitudes. In biblical Hebrew, as in other Semitic languages, the word for thousand—eleph—can also mean “clan,” or “troop,” and it is clear from individual occurrences of the word that such groups do not comprise anywhere near a thousand individuals. In the military context, the term may simply function as a hyperbolic figure of speech—as in “Saul has killed his thousands, but David his tens of thousands” (1 Samuel 18:8)—or serve some typological or symbolic purpose, as do the numerals 7, 12, 40, and so on. In isolation, a census list totaling some 600,000 men obviously refers to a certain sum of individuals; against the wealth of other data I’ve adduced here, it becomes difficult to say what that sum is. It is therefore far less surprising than it may seem that the archaeological record is lacking evidence of the Israelite encampment and influx into the land. The population, after all, may not have been terribly great. (…) Many details of the exodus story do strikingly appear to reflect the realities of late-second-millennium Egypt, the period when the exodus would most likely have taken place—and they are the sorts of details that a scribe living centuries later and inventing the story afresh would have been unlikely to know (…) Archaeologists have documented hundreds of new settlements in the land of Israel from the late-13th and 12th centuries BCE, congruent with the biblically attested arrival there of the liberated slaves; strikingly, these settlements feature an absence of the pig bones normally found in such places. Major destruction is found at Bethel, Yokne’am, and Hatzor—cities taken by Israel according to the book of Joshua. At Hatzor, archaeologists found mutilated cultic statues, suggesting that they were repugnant to the invaders. The earliest written mention of an entity called “Israel” is found in the victory inscription of the pharaoh Merneptah from 1206 BCE. In it the pharaoh lists the nations defeated by him in the course of a campaign to the southern Levant; among them, “Israel is laid waste and his seed is no more.” “Israel” is written in such a way as to connote a group of people, not an established city or region, the implication being that it was not yet a fully settled entity with contiguous control over an entire region. This jibes with the Bible’s description in Joshua and Judges of a gradual conquest of the land. (…) the Bible (…) contains materials like the Garden of Eden story that seem frankly mythical in nature. It recounts supernatural occurrences that a modern historian cannot accept as factual, and it regularly describes earthly actions as the results of divine causation. Many of its texts, scholars believe, were composed centuries after the events purportedly documented, and—as with the exodus—few of those events can be corroborated by independent outside sources. (…) But (…) many other historical inscriptions from the ancient Near East—and elsewhere—are susceptible of the same charge. Cuneiform and hieroglyphic texts that tell of divine revelations to royal figures are found everywhere: overt propaganda on behalf of the kings of yore and the gods they served. Nor can most of the events recorded in these ancient records be corroborated by cross-reference to sources from other cultures. Frequently, the events themselves are miraculous: a pharaoh defeats enemy legions single-handedly, for example, or the sculpted image of a serpent in the pharaoh’s diadem spews forth an all-consuming fire; troop figures are impossibly large. Often, the events occurred, if they occurred at all, centuries before the text’s date of composition. Yet, to one degree or another, scholars routinely accept these texts as historically reliable. Scholars today use the works of Livy to reconstruct the history of the Roman republic, founded several centuries before his lifetime, and all historians of Alexander the Great acknowledge as their most accurate source Arrian’s Anabasis, which dates from four centuries later. Of course, they exclude the blatantly unrealistic elements, which they peel away from the remainder before crediting its reliability. By contrast, however, when it comes to biblical sources, the questionable elements are often taken as prima-facie evidence of the untrustworthiness of the whole. This is all the more remarkable (to put it mildly) in light of one significant difference between biblical literature and the writings of other ancient Near Eastern civilizations. Throughout, the Bible displays a penchant for judging its heroes harshly, and for recording Israel’s failings even more than its successes. No other ancient Near Eastern culture produced a literature so revealing of fault, so realistic about the abuses of power, or so committed to recording those abuses for posterity. On this point, at least, there is universal agreement. Yet in academic precinct, recognition of this fact hasn’t in the least improved the Bible’s reputation as an honest reporter of historical events. (…) From an academic perspective, the Bible should be subject to criteria of analysis applied to other comparable ancient texts. (…) To sum up (…) there is no explicit evidence that confirms the exodus. At best, we have a text—the Hebrew Bible—that exhibits a good grasp of a wide range of fairly standard aspects of ancient Egyptian realities. One of the pillars of modern critical study of the Bible is the so-called comparative method. Scholars elucidate a biblical text by noting similarities between it and texts found among the cultures adjacent to ancient Israel. If the similarities are high in number and truly distinctive to the two sources, it becomes plausible to maintain that the biblical text may have been written under the direct influence of, or in response to, the extra-biblical text. Why the one-way direction, from extra-biblical to biblical? The answer is that Israel was largely a weak player, surrounded politically as well as culturally by much larger forces, and no Hebrew texts from the era prior to the Babylonian exile (586 BCE) have ever been found in translation into other languages. Hence, similarities between texts in Akkadian or Egyptian and the Bible are usually understood to reflect the influence of the former on the latter. Although the comparative method is commonly thought of as a modern approach, its first practitioner was none other than Moses Maimonides in the 12th century. In order to understand Scripture properly, Maimonides writes, he procured every work on ancient civilizations known in his time. In his Guide of the Perplexed, he puts the resultant knowledge to service in elucidating the rationale behind many of the Torah’s cultic laws and practices, reasoning that they were adaptations of ancient pagan customs, but tweaked in conformity with an anti-pagan theology. (…) As an example, consider the familiar biblical refrain that God took Israel out of Egypt “with a mighty hand and an outstretched arm.” The Bible could have employed that phrase to describe a whole host of divine acts on Israel’s behalf, and yet the phrase is used only with reference to the exodus. This is no accident. In much of Egyptian royal literature, the phrase “mighty hand” is a synonym for the pharaoh, and many of the pharaoh’s actions are said to be performed through his “mighty hand” or his “outstretched arm.” Nowhere else in the ancient Near East are rulers described in this way. What is more, the term is most frequently to be found in Egyptian royal propaganda during the latter part of the second millennium. (…) During much of its history, ancient Israel was in Egypt’s shadow. For weak and oppressed peoples, one form of cultural and spiritual resistance is to appropriate the symbols of the oppressor and put them to competitive ideological purposes. I believe, and intend to show in what follows, that in its telling of the exodus the Bible appropriates far more than individual phrases and symbols—that, in brief, it adopts and adapts one of the best-known accounts of one of the greatest of all Egyptian pharaohs. (…) Scholars had long searched for a model, a precursor, that could have inspired the design of the Tabernacle that served as the cultic center of the Israelites’ encampment in the wilderness, a design laid out in exquisite verbal detail in Exodus 25-29. Although the remains of Phoenician temples reveal a floor plan remarkably like that of Solomon’s temple (built, as it happens, with the extensive assistance of a Phoenician king), no known cultic site from the ancient Near East seemed to resemble the desert Tabernacle. Then, some 80 years ago, an unexpected affinity was noticed between the biblical descriptions of the Tabernacle and the illustrations of Ramesses’ camp at Kadesh in several bas reliefs. (…) The resemblance of the military camp at Kadesh to the Tabernacle goes beyond architecture; it is conceptual as well. For Egyptians, Ramesses was both a military leader and a divinity. In the Torah, God is likewise a divinity, obviously, but also Israel’s leader in battle (see Numbers 10:35-36). The tent of God the divine warrior parallels the tent of the pharaoh, the living Egyptian god, poised for battle. (…) But (…) the similarities extended to the entire plot line of the Kadesh poem and that of the splitting of the sea in Exodus 14-15. (…) In both the Kadesh poem and the account of Exodus 14-15, the action begins in like fashion: the protagonist army (of, respectively, the Egyptians and Israelites) is on the march and unprepared for battle when it is attacked by a large force of chariots, causing it to break ranks in fear. Thus, according to the Kadesh poem, Ramesses’ troops were moving north toward the outskirts of Kadesh when they were surprised by a Hittite chariot corps and took fright. The Exodus account opens in similar fashion. As they depart Egypt, the Israelites are described as an armed force (Exodus 13:18 and 14:8). Stunned by the sudden charge of Pharaoh’s chariots, however, they become completely dispirited (14:10-12). In each story, the protagonist now appeals to his god for help and the god exhorts him to move forward with divine assistance. In the Kadesh poem, Ramesses prays to Amun, who responds, “Forward! I am with you, I am your father, my hand is with you!” (…) In like fashion, Moses cries out to the Lord, who responds in 14:15, “Tell the Israelites to go forward!” promising victory over Pharaoh (vv. 16-17). From this point in the Kadesh poem, Ramesses assumes divine powers and proportions. (…) Entirely abandoned by his army, Ramesses engages the Hittites single-handedly, a theme underscored throughout the poem. In Exodus 14:14, God declares that Israel need only remain passive, and that He will fight on their behalf: “The Lord will fight for you, and you will be still.” Especially noteworthy here is that this particular feature of both works—their parallel portrait of a victorious “king” who must work hard to secure the loyalty of those he saves in battle—has no like in the literature of the ancient Near East. (…) An element common to both compositions is the submergence of the enemy in water. The Kadesh poem does not assign the same degree of centrality to this event as does Exodus—it does not tell of wind-swept seas overpowering the Hittites—but Ramesses does indeed vauntingly proclaim that in their haste to escape his onslaught, the Hittites sought refuge by “plunging” into the river, whereupon he slaughtered them in the water. The reliefs depict the drowning of the Hittites in vivid fashion (…) As for survivors, both accounts assert that there were none. We come now to the most striking of the parallels between the two. In each, the timid troops see evidence of the king’s “mighty arm,” review the enemy corpses, and, amazed by the sovereign’s achievement, are impelled to sing a hymn of praise. (…) After the great conquest, in both accounts, the troops offer a paean to the king. In each, the opening stanza comprises three elements. The troops laud the king’s name as a warrior; credit him with stiffening their morale; and exalt him for securing their salvation. (…) To determine a plausible date of transmission, we should be guided by the epigraphic evidence at hand. Egyptologists note that in addition to copies of the monumental version of the Kadesh poem, a papyrus copy was found in a village of workmen and artisans who built the great monuments at Thebes. As we saw earlier, visual accounts of the battle were also produced. This has led many scholars of ancient Egypt to argue that the Kadesh poem was a widely disseminated “little red book,” aimed at stirring public adoration of the valor and salvific grace of Ramesses the Great, and that it would have been widely known, particularly during the reign of Ramesses himself, beyond royal and temple precincts. (…) In my view, the evidence suggests that the Exodus text preserves the memory of a moment when the earliest Israelites reached for language with which to extol the mighty virtues of God, and found the raw material in the terms and tropes of an Egyptian text well-known to them. In appropriating and “transvaluing” that material, they put forward the claim that the God of Israel had far outdone the greatest achievement of the greatest earthly potentate. When Jews around the world gather on the night of Passover to celebrate the exodus and liberation from Egyptian oppression, they can speak the words of the Haggadah, “We were slaves to a pharaoh in Egypt,” with confidence and integrity, without recourse to an enormous leap of faith and with no need to construe those words as mere metaphor. A plausible reading of the evidence is on their side.  Joshua Berman
On the issue of the weight that can be assigned to absence of evidence, consider this: if a significant number of slaves escaped during the reign of a self-possessed pharaoh like Ramesses II, one would hardly expect him to advertise the fact. To the contrary, such information would be well hidden, especially by a regent who glorified himself in a manner exceeding other pharaohs before and after him. A noteworthy fact in this connection is that the battle of Kadesh in 1274 BCE, on which Berman dwells at illuminating length later in his essay, is portrayed in two strikingly disparate ways, once in the monuments Ramesses II built all across Egypt to commemorate his great victory over the Hittite empire but quite differently in the literature of the Hittites themselves—and in the treaty that emerged between Egypt and the supposedly trounced Hittites in the years that followed. That battle seems in fact to have been a draw, with neither side retaining territory taken from the other. The treaty itself is essentially one of parity. But, given his self-beatification as nothing less than a god and the giver of life to all his people, how otherwise than as invincible would we expect Ramesses to depict his exploits on the battlefield? By contrast, how likely would he be to acknowledge a defeat by a group of his own slaves escaping their house of bondage? If Egypt would not have recorded that escape, let alone the generations of Israelite enslavement that preceded it, only one other involved party would have been impelled to do so. (…) Concerning the enslavement, [Berman] offers this pertinent reminder: Israel’s preservation of its origins in ignominious bondage is unique in the ancient world—‘’no other ancient Near Eastern culture,” he writes, “produced a literature so revealing of” its own failings. Such frankness on the matter of the Israelites’ humiliating subjugation would be wholly unexpected unless it rested on some ancient tradition that could not be ignored or contradicted. Turning now to the level of positive evidence, we find in the biblical account quite a number of incidental clues regarding Israel’s ancient status. Berman, for instance, adduces the reference in Exodus 1:11 to the two cities of Pithom and Ramesses, a possible allusion to the city of Pi-Ramesses built by Ramesses II. Since the name was no longer in common use after the second millennium BCE, we cannot plausibly assume that a later writer invented it. Likewise, the personal names of the Israelites given in Exodus fit with attested naming practices among West Semites (of whom the Israelites were a part) in and around the time of the exodus as suggested in the Bible. Although many of these names remained in use later as well, some of them, such as Pinḥas, show an explicit connection with Egyptian personal names at the period in question, and a few, including Ḥevron (Exodus 6:18) and Puah (Exodus 1:15), are attested as personal names only in the mid-second millennium (that is, the 18th to the 13th centuries BCE). The use of other Egyptian words found in the early chapters of Exodus but nowhere else in the Bible similarly supports the view of a connection with Egypt in the same period. Such pieces of incidental information, which would not have been known to a later scribe, point to an antiquity and authenticity in the Exodus account that is difficult to explain otherwise. It is one thing to remember a great figure like Moses and perhaps build all sorts of legends around him. It is something else when minor characters and other incidental details that occur but once in the biblical account fit only within the period of Israel’s earliest history and would be unknown to a writer inventing a tradition centuries later. In his lengthy comparison of the victorious Song at the Sea in Exodus 15 with the account on Egyptian monuments of Ramesses II’s victory at Kadesh, Berman advances the proposition that the former appropriates the literary form and even, in places, the exact phraseology of the latter, which it then turns on its head in an act of brazen cultural triumphalism—an out-Pharaohing of the Pharaoh, as Berman puts it. This dynamic of cultural resistance and appropriation can also be seen at work in certain details earlier in the biblical account, specifically in connection with the ten plagues (Exodus 7-12). In fact, a dialectical relationship can be discerned between each of the ten plagues and one or another deity worshipped in Egypt, although there is no hint of such a purpose in the biblical text. But especially in the ninth plague, the plague of darkness, it is difficult not to see a direct, tit-for-tat challenge to the sun god Amon-Re, who possessed the most powerful and wealthiest temple complex in the land at the time of the exodus. Nor could the placement of this plague just before the tenth and final plague be accidental. That culminating plague, the death of Egypt’s firstborn, not only provides measure-for-measure justice with respect to an earlier pharaoh’s attempt to kill all Israelite male babies (Exodus 1). It also directly challenges the deified pharaoh himself as the source and giver of life to all his people—a “god” who, in the event, can keep alive neither his people nor his own son, the younger “god” designated to succeed him. The very ideology of pharaoh as the source of life predominates in the second millennium BCE, and especially in the writings of Ramesses II. It becomes far less pronounced in later periods. Richard Hess
In some academic writing on the ancient Near East, as Berman writes, one detects a double standard at work: biblical sources that make historical claims are regarded as untrue unless backed by airtight confirmation from archaeology, while non-biblical sources, even in the absence of archaeological authentication, are taken as containing a good deal of factual information. This tendency by otherwise well-trained scholars also occurs on the other end—that is, the believing end—of the spectrum. A relevant instance is James Hoffmeier’s superb study, Israel in Egypt: The Evidence for the Authenticity of the Exodus Tradition (Oxford, 1997). Masterfully weaving together archaeological, linguistic, and historical data, Hoffmeier devastatingly rebuts scholars who insist that the exodus narrative must be entirely fictional. But his rebuttal fails to demonstrate the claim he goes on to make, namely, that the biblical account is accurate not only in its broad sweep but even in its particulars. For instance, in following the Pentateuch’s stipulation that the exodus preceded the beginning of the conquest of the land by 40 years, Hoffmeier runs up against severe difficulties in the dating of both events. Had he conceded that historical texts in the Bible invoke numbers in typological and symbolic ways that differ from the way modern historians use numbers, his job would have been easier—and easier still had he acknowledged that, for narrative purposes, ancient historians sometimes boiled down complex processes to what they regarded as their essentials. In this light, the possibility emerges that both the exodus and the conquest may have been sequences of related events that stretched out over a century or more, rather than episodes that took place, as the Bible has it, in a single night or over a single generation. Hoffmeier asks whether the biblical account as it stands is accurate. A more productive question would be whether and how the narratives reflect real events. (…) But rejecting one detail or even many details in an ancient source does not mean rejecting the broad sweep of its narrative. The question, then, is whether that broad sweep might be based on older traditions going back to an actual event or series of events. Here some background may be helpful. Pretty much all modern biblical scholars agree that the texts found in the Pentateuch were written in the Iron Age, during the time of the Israelite and Judean monarchies between about the 8th and 6th centuries BCE and perhaps in the exilic and post-exilic periods of the late-6th and 5th centuries. For several linguistic and historical reasons, it is clear that these texts do not date back to the 13th or 12th centuries when the exodus is supposed to have occurred. Thus one can justly wonder: is it possible that the Pentateuch’s authors really knew about events that occurred a half-millennium earlier? (…) To this line of evidence, Berman has added a very important new set of data in his examination of the similarities between the Kadesh Poem—the inscriptions on the monuments erected by the pharaoh Ramesses II celebrating his 1274 BCE victory over the Hittite empire—and the account in Exodus 13-15 of the encounter between the pursuing Egyptian forces and the Israelites on their flight into the wilderness. Any one of these similarities might be dismissed as coincidence. The assemblage of similarities, however, suggests that the exodus narrative, and especially the Song at the Sea in Exodus 15, draw on a text from precisely the era to which the exodus is usually dated. This suggestion is strengthened by the fact that many of the links between the two texts do not appear in other ancient Near Eastern poems, historical narratives, and myths. An additional datum, unstressed by Berman, clinches his argument: the shared elements appear in the two texts in precisely the same order. Ancient traditions often invoked stock phrases and motifs, shared in any two texts that drew on those traditions. But the order of the elements is flexible. When two texts share a large number of elements in the same order, as they do in the case Berman brings to our attention, the likelihood is much higher that one is borrowing from the other.
All of this, taken together, comes as close as we can get in the study of ancient literature to proving that chapters 13-15 of Exodus, though composed in the middle of the first millennium, are based on traditions going back to the time of Ramesses II in the late second millennium. The exodus story is not a fiction invented by Israelites in the Iron Age. This conclusion remains valid, moreover, even when we recognize that the biblical texts include the occasional anachronism (referring, for example, to camels and Philistines in the setting of the book of Genesis, though neither was present in Canaan then) as well as some telescoping. By the latter term, I mean a tendency to take complex processes and reduce them to neater narratives that are easier to tell. Thus, it is altogether possible, as a number of scholars have suggested, that the exodus was a series of events; Israelites, or proto-Israelites, may have been escaping from Egyptian bondage in small groups over generations. One group may have been led by a Levite named Moses, another by a Levite named Aaron; I am not sure that the two of them ever met. Furthermore, given the prominence of Levite tribesmen in the story of the exodus and their tendency to bear Egyptian names, I wonder whether it was specifically they who escaped Egyptian bondage. Their historical memory may then have been adopted by other Israelites who never left Canaan, and its commemoration may have become an essential element of pan-Israelite identity. On Thanksgiving, millions of Americans participate enthusiastically in the central ritual meal of the United States, though the ancestors of only a fraction of them were on the Mayflower. It is entirely possible something similar happened in ancient Israel: as exodus-group Israelites linked up with Israelites who had always remained in the land of Canaan, the latter came in time to see themselves as if they, too, had left Egypt. By the time the accounts found in the book of Exodus were written down, the distinction between the two groups was moot, and was forgotten. The ability of Israelites from clans that had not participated in an escape from Egypt to assimilate the memories of those who had may have been bolstered by their own ancestors’ memories of being forced to serve Egyptian imperial overlords in Canaan. Throughout much of the New Kingdom period, Canaanite city states were vassals to the Egyptians, and Canaanite peasants were forced into corvée labor on behalf of Egyptian projects there. Several scholars, including Ronald Hendel (Berkeley) and Nadav Na’aman (Tel Aviv), have argued that this experience of impressed labor was the basis for the historical memories underlying the exodus story; that is, according to Hendel and Na’aman, Israelites were slaves to Pharaoh of Egypt but not in Egypt. Theories of servitude in Egypt and in Canaan are not mutually incompatible. An average Israelite in the Iron Age may have had ancestors who served Egyptians in each locale. In the end, biblical references to the exodus probably take a tangled complex of genuine historical memories and render them more manageable. Some details are surely fictional, but given the number that are authentic and could not have been invented by Iron Age storytellers, it seems clear that the overall thrust of the story—Israelites in the distant past were liberated from enslavement to the greatest empire of its time and place—is accurate. (…) there are no archaeological or historical reasons to doubt the core elements of the Bible’s presentation of Israel’s history. These are: that the ancestors of the Israelites included an important group who came from Mesopotamia; that at least some Israelites were enslaved to Egyptians and were surprisingly rescued from Egyptian bondage; that they experienced a revelation that played a crucial role in the formation of their national, religious, and ethnic identity; that they settled in the hill country of the land of Canaan at the beginning of the Iron Age, around 1300 or 1200 BCE; that they formed kingdoms there a few centuries later, around 1000 BCE; and that these kingdoms were eventually destroyed by Assyrian and Babylonian armies. Not only at Passover but also in Judaism’s daily liturgy and its weekly sanctification of the Sabbath, Jews proclaim that their identity is based on something that happened in history. They do not state that Judaism is based on an inspiring fiction or a metaphor (even if the story is inspiring and serves in important ways as a symbol). Details regarding what happened remain murky, but Jews reciting the benediction before the Shema each day or the kiddush on Friday night can, with a clear conscience, mean what they say. Benjamin Sommer
If my larger claim is correct, it would, for one thing, suggest an Israelite presence in Egypt, as there is no evidence that the Kadesh Poem was known outside Egyptian limits and no indication that it had resonance at any later period within Egypt itself. But, for another and more significant thing, the appropriation of the Kadesh Poem into Israelite culture suggests an Israelite audience that would understand and appreciate the literary re-deployment of royal Egyptian propaganda against the pharaoh himself. Besides, why would Israelites perpetuate a fantastic tale of salvation and victory over the pharaoh if, in fact, nothing on the ground had transpired at all? That they embraced and preserved this defiant transvaluation of royal propaganda suggests that they experienced a collectively transformative event, one that dramatically elevated their lot at the expense of a mighty regent. (…) Richard Hess, in his own response to my essay, notes helpfully that several Egyptian names found in the book of Exodus are known to us only from Egyptian sources from the mid-second millennium BCE. By Hendel’s reckoning, we would thus need to posit that the later authors of the exodus myth, bent on achieving a remarkable degree of verisimilitude, went to the trouble of incorporating names that were period-appropriate. Yet, as Hendel himself documents, there is an avalanche of evidence that Canaanites were enslaved and brought to Egypt, or migrated to Egypt in times of famine.  (…) Across the Bible, starting with the expulsion from Eden until the expulsion from Jerusalem, exile looms as the ultimate punishment—of an altogether different magnitude from subjugation at the hands of an oppressor in one’s own land. Exile and exile alone means cultural annihilation, rupture of continuity with the past, and a bleak future as a landless minority stripped of every shred of autonomy. Many biblical narratives recount Israel’s sufferings within its own land at the hands of external powers; never is that oppression confused with the memory of exile. (…) Hendel is not the only scholar to advance the hypothesis that the reality behind the exodus is that Egypt was taken out of Israel and not, as the Bible has it, the other way around. Introduced in the early 1990s, the theory has been gaining adherents ever since—coincidentally with the meteoric rise of “postcolonial” studies to its current position as the dominant force in the humanities. Is it too much to postulate that, in imagining a past in which Israelites in their native Canaan suffer under the oppression of “colonial” Egypt, scholars have transformed Israel’s seminal tale into something that can find a respectable place at the table of the most recent academic fashion? Joshua Berman
Juifs et chrétiens vont devoir à l’avenir changer ce qu’ils racontent les uns sur les autres. D’un côté, les chrétiens ne seront plus en mesure de prétendre que les juifs en tant que groupe ont consciemment rejeté Jésus comme Dieu. De telles croyances sur les juifs ont conduit à une histoire profonde, sanglante et douloureuse d’antijudaïsme et d’antisémitisme. […] De l’autre côté, les juifs vont devoir arrêter de railler les idées chrétiennes sur Dieu comme une simple collection d’idées fantaisistes “non juives”, peut-être païennes, et en tous les cas bizarres. Daniel Boyarin
Nous définissons habituellement les membres d’une religion en utilisant une sorte de check-list. Par exemple, on pourrait dire que si une personne croit en la Trinité et en l’incarnation, elle est un membre de la religion appelée christianisme, et que, si elle n’y croit pas, elle n’est pas un véritable membre de cette religion. Réciproquement, on pourrait dire que si quelqu’un ne croit pas en la Trinité et l’incarnation, alors il appartient à la religion appelée judaïsme mais que, s’il y croit, il n’y appartient pas. Quelqu’un pourrait aussi dire que, si une personne respecte le shabbat le samedi, ne mange que de la nourriture casher et fait circoncire ses fils, elle est un membre de la religion juive, et que, si elle ne le fait pas, elle ne l’est pas. Ou réciproquement, que, si un certain groupe croit que chacun doit respecter le shabbat, manger casher et circoncire ses fils, cela signifie qu’il n’est pas chrétien mais que, s’il croit que ces pratiques ont été remplacées, alors c’est un groupe chrétien. Comme je l’ai dit, voilà notre façon habituelle de considérer ces questions. (…) Un autre grand problème que ces check-lists ne peuvent pas gérer concerne les personnes dont les croyances et comportements sont un mélange de caractéristiques tirées de deux listes. Dans le cas des Juifs et des chrétiens, c’est un problème qui n’a tout simplement pas voulu disparaître. Des siècles après la mort de Jésus, certains croyaient en la divinité de Jésus, Messie incarné, mais insistaient également sur le fait que, pour être sauvés, ils devaient ne manger que de la nourriture casher, respecter le shabbat comme les autres Juifs et faire circoncire leurs fils. C’était un milieu où bien des personnes ne voyaient pas de contradiction, semble-t-il, à être à la fois juif et chrétien. En outre, beaucoup des éléments qui en sont venus à faire partie de la check-list éventuelle pour déterminer si l’on est juif ou si l’on est chrétien, ne déterminaient absolument pas à l’époque une ligne de frontière. Que devons-nous faire de ces gens là ? Pendant un grand nombre de générations après la venue du Christ, différents disciples, et groupes de disciples, de Jésus ont tenu des positions théologiques variées et se sont engagés dans une grande diversité d’observances relativement à la Loi juive de leurs ancêtres. L’un des débats les plus importants a porté sur la relation entre les deux entités qui allaient finir par former les deux premières personnes de la Trinité. Beaucoup de chrétiens croyaient que le Fils ou le Verbe (Logos) était subordonné à Dieu le Père voire même créé par lui. Pour d’autres, bien que le Fils soit incréé et ait existé dès avant le début du temps, il était seulement d’une substance similaire au Père. Un troisième groupe croyait qu’il n’y avait pas de différence du tout entre le Père et le Fils quant à la substance. Il existait aussi des différences très prononcées d’observances entre chrétien et chrétien : certains chrétiens conservaient une bonne part de la Loi juive (ou même la totalité), d’autres en avaient conservé certaines pratiques mais en avaient abandonné d’autres (par exemple, la règle apostolique d’Actes 15 5 ), et d’autres encore croyaient que la Loi entière devait être abolie et écartée pour les chrétiens (même pour ceux qui étaient nés juifs). Enfin, certains chrétiens étaient d’avis que la Pâque chrétienne était une forme de la Pâque juive, convenablement interprétée, avec Jésus comme agneau de Dieu et sacrifice pascal, tandis que d’autres niaient vigoureusement une telle relation. Cela avait également une portée pratique dans la mesure où le premier groupe célébrait Pâques le même jour où les Juifs célébraient Pessah tandis que le second insistait tout aussi fermement que Pâques ne devait pas tomber le jour de Pessah. Il y avait bien d’autres pommes de discorde. Jusqu’au début du quatrième siècle, tous ces groupes s’appelaient eux -mêmes chrétiens et un bon nombre d’entre eux se définissaient tout autant juifs que chrétiens. Selon cette vue, tenue par beaucoup de penseurs et d’exégètes, chrétiens aussi bien que juifs, après l’humiliation, la souffrance et la mort du Messie Jésus, la théologie de la souffrance vicaire rédemptrice aurait été découverte, apparemment en Is 53. On prétend alors que ce dernier texte a été réinterprété pour renvoyer non au peuple d’Israël persécuté mais au Messie souffrant. “ Le Seigneur a voulu l’écraser par la souffrance. S ’il fait de sa vie un sacrifice expiatoire, il verra une postérité, il prolongera ses jours ; par lui la volonté du Seigneur s’accomplira. A la suite de son épreuve, il verra la lumière ; il sera comblé par sa connaissance. Le juste, mon serviteur, justifiera des multitudes et il portera lui-même leurs fautes. C’est pourquoi je lui donnerai une part parmi les princes et il partagera le butin avec les puissants ; parce qu ’il s’est livré lui-même à la mort et qu’il a été compté parmi les criminels ; alors qu’il portait pourtant le péché des multitudes et intercédait pour les criminels” (Is 5 3,10-12). Si ces versets se réfèrent effectivement au Messie, ils prédisent clairement ses souffrances et sa mort pour expier les péchés des humains. Cependant, on nous affirme que les Juifs auraient toujours interprété ces versets comme une évocation des souffrances du peuple d’Israël lui-même et non du Messie, qui serait quant à lui uniquement triomphant. Résumons ainsi cette opinion communément reçue : la théologie des souffrances du Messie est une réponse apologétique a posteriori pour expliquer les souffrances et l’humiliation subies par Jésus puisque les ‘chrétiens’ le tenaient pour le Messie. Selon cette vue, le christianisme a été inauguré au moment de la crucifixion, qui aurait mis en branle la nouvelle religion. En outre, beaucoup de ceux qui défendent ce point de vue sont aussi d’avis que le sens original d’Isaïe 53 a été déformé par les chrétiens pour expliquer et rendre compte du fait choquant de la crucifixion du Messie, alors qu’il se référait initialement aux souffrances du peuple d’Israël. Ce lieu commun doit être entièrement rejeté. La notion d’un Messie humilié et souffrant n’était pas du tout étrangère au judaïsme avant la venue de Jésus et elle est demeurée courante chez les Juifs postérieurement, et ce jusque dans la première période moderne. C’est un fait fascinant (et sans doute inconfortable pour certains) que cette tradition a été bien établie par les Juifs messianiques modernes soucieux de démontrer que leur foi en Jésus ne les ‘déjudaïse’ pas. Que l’on accepte ou non leur théologie, il n’en demeure pas moins vrai qu’ils ont constitué un très fort dossier textuel à l’appui de l’idée que la conception d’un Messie souffrant est enracinée dans des écrits profondément juifs, tant anciens que plus récents. Les Juifs n’ont apparemment pas eu de difficulté à envisager un Messie qui offrirait sa souffrance pour racheter le monde. Redisons-le : ce qu’on aurait dit de Jésus soi-disant après coup est en fait un ensemble d’attentes et de spéculations messianiques bien établies qui étaient courantes avant même que Jésus ne vienne au monde. Des Juifs avaient appris par une lecture attentive de certains textes bibliques que le Messie souffrirait et serait humilié ; cette lecture assumait précisément la forme de l’interprétation rabbinique classique que nous connaissons sous le nom de midrash, une façon de faire se répondre des versets et des passages de l’Ecriture pour en tirer de nouveaux récits, de nouvelles images et idées théologiques. » Daniel Boyarin
Tout le monde sait bien que Jésus est juif, mais l’auteur affirme que le Christ l’est aussi. Les bases de la christologie chrétienne appartiennent à la pensée israélite du second Temple et les divergences invoquées pour justifier une rupture historique prétendument immédiate entre « judaïsme » et « christianisme » sont erronées. La notion d’un Messie humano-divin, la pensée qu’en Dieu réside une seconde figure divine, la conception d’un Messie qui porte les péchés et sauve par sa souffrance, entre autres, ne sont pas une réinterprétation chrétienne, rétrospective et abusive, du Fils de l’Homme de Daniel 7 et du Serviteur souffrant d’Isaïe 53, mais des interprétations largement attestées dans la littérature juive contemporaine (Hénoch, Esdras, etc.). La nouveauté chrétienne est de voir leur réalisation dans cet homme-là Jésus et tous les juifs ne vont pas l’accepter. Même la prétendue rupture de Jésus avec les observances de la Torah résulte d’une mauvaise lecture de Marc 7 Trinité, messie humano-divin, messie souffrant, lois alimentaires, sabbat, circoncision Yavné et Nicée Qumran et autres. Ces textes intertestamentaires sont des textes qui montrent la diversité de pensée qui était dans ce qu’on appelle le judaïsme des premiers siècles (avant Jésus). Sébastien Lapaque

Attention: une expulsion peut en cacher une autre !

En ce début à nouveau commun de journées pascales

Une semaine exactement après les massacre et martyre tristement communs de Carcassonne et Paris

Dont le don de soi proprement christique du lieutenant-colonel que l’on sait …

Pendant qu’entre parent 1 et parent 2 et autres mariage ou enfants pour tous

Et malgré quelques rares résurgences y compris cinématographiques

Ou, entre un Pierre ou un Samson africains, même l’histoire doit être réécrite

Nos belles âmes finissent de nettoyer les dernières traces de ce religieux qui nous obsède …

Et qu’aux frontières d’Israël comme en Egypte il y a plus de 3 000 ans …

C’est à nouveau de leur propre berceau commun et au nom des mêmes accusations les plus fantaisistes

Comme de la plus perfide inversion des termes et des images

Qu’il s’agit d’extirper définitivement les religions dites « du livre » …

Comment ne pas voir avec l’historien américain Daniel Boyarin …

Au vu des trois premiers siècles de notre ère dite aujourd’hui commune

Où  judaïsme comme christianisme n’étaient largement qu’une variante l’un de l’autre …

Cette expulsion des racines indissociablement juives et chrétiennes

Qui se continue aujourd’hui de notre société occidentale ?

Débat
Jésus était juif, le Christ aussi?

Sébastien Lapaque
La Vie

20/09/2013

Dans le Christ juif, l’historien américain Daniel Boyarin soutient qu’il fallut attendre le IVe siècle pour que judaïsme et christianisme se distinguent clairement.

Que l’on soit juif ou chrétien, que l’on croie au Ciel ou que l’on n’y croie pas, la lecture des livres de Daniel Boyarin est toujours une expérience singulière. L’idée centrale des travaux de cet historien et philosophe, né dans le New Jersey en 1946, est que la « partition » du christianisme et du judaïsme se fit beaucoup plus tard que l’on continue de le croire et de l’enseigner. Contestant ce qu’il appelle la « légende talmudique » d’un grand concile juif qui se serait tenu dans les années 90 pour jeter les bases d’un judaïsme rabbinique bien distinct du christianisme apostolique (par exemple sur la question d’un Messie souffrant, mourant et ressuscitant), ce professeur de culture talmudique à l’université californienne de Berkeley, spécialiste des premiers siècles de notre ère et qui se définit lui-même comme un juif orthodoxe, soutient de manière éloquente qu’il fallut attendre le IVe siècle, peut-être même le Ve siècle, après les conciles de Nicée (325) et de Constantinople (381), pour que les choses soient parfaitement claires : juifs d’un côté, chrétiens de l’autre. Auparavant, ce que Daniel Boyarin appelle avec une grande audace le « judaïsme chrétien » n’était pas clairement distinct du « judaïsme rabbinique ». Selon lui, leur partition tardive fut la conséquence d’un durcissement des positions mutuelles sur quelques questions disputées (l’idée d’une seconde hypostase divine, la croyance en l’éternité de l’âme, le shabbat, la date de Pâques, etc.), les uns et les autres inventant une orthodoxie inexistante jusque-là.

« Les groupes, juge-t-il, se sont graduellement figés en judaïsme et christianisme non via une séparation, via une bifurcation, mais par la formation d’agglomérats dialectaux : des indices d’identité (tels que circoncision ou non-circoncision) furent choisis, se diffusèrent et formèrent des agglomérats. Mais ce fut seulement avec la mobilisation du pouvoir temporel (par le biais des appareils d’État idéologiques et des appareils d’État répressifs) au IVe siècle que le processus a abouti à la formation de “religions”. […] On pourrait dire que le judaïsme et le christianisme ont été inventés pour expliquer le fait qu’il y avait des juifs et des chrétiens. »

Ainsi, deux orthodoxies ayant engendré deux religions auraient-elles inventé chacune leurs mythes fondateurs déroulés comme des barbelés entre deux camps auparavant indécis : telle était la démonstration effrontée de la Partition du judaïsme et du christianisme, magistrale somme traduite en français par les éditions du Cerf en 2011. Une thèse suffisamment révolutionnaire pour être lue et commentée avec le plus grand sérieux, ainsi que le firent quelques professeurs d’exégèse biblique et de sciences religieuses lors d’un débat organisé à Paris autour de Daniel Boyarin pour saluer la parution de son livre. Savant mondialement reconnu, cet homme, qui revendique l’influence de Michel Foucault, a enseigné à la fois dans des universités américaines, des universités israéliennes et à l’université grégorienne de Rome : ses thèses hardies ont beaucoup été discutées par la communauté scientifique internationale ces dernières années, les uns se disant fascinés par la radicalité de ses conclusions, les autres se montrant sceptiques.

Il serait cependant regrettable que les travaux si puissants et si féconds de Daniel Boyarin soient lus uniquement dans le monde universitaire pour ­alimenter de rugueux débats sur la préhistoire du ­christianisme. Car ils éclairent à la fois l’espérance d’Israël et le contenu de la Révélation chrétienne. Acceptés et validés, les résultats de ses travaux peuvent être à l’origine d’un tremblement de terre.

Tout le monde doit en entendre parler, jusqu’aux enfants des écoles et du catéchisme. Ainsi, lorsque Daniel Boyarin, relisant le septième chapitre du livre de Daniel, démontre, dans le Christ juif qui paraît ces jours-ci, qu’il est faux de dire que la Synagogue antique ne pouvait pas accepter une théophanie inédite, « sous la forme d’un second Dieu, un jeune Dieu, ou d’une part de Dieu, ou d’une personne divine au sein de Dieu ». À la fois ancien et moderne, amoureux des textes antiques et doué d’esprit critique, Boyarin pousse les choses loin, éclairant avec des hardiesses de Père de l’Église une humanité du Christ à laquelle il ne croit cependant pas : « Un Dieu qui est très éloigné engendre – presque inévitablement – le besoin d’un Dieu qui soit plus proche ; un Dieu qui juge appelle, presque inévitablement, un Dieu qui combat pour nous et nous défend (aussi longtemps que le second Dieu est complètement subordonné au premier, le principe du monothéisme n’est pas violé). » Ainsi, la nature du Père appelle-t-elle celle du Fils dans la foi chrétienne. Il fallait un juif selon la chair et l’esprit pour le rappeler.

On se félicite que le cardinal Philippe Barbarin salue les travaux de Daniel Boyarin dans une préface rédigée pour l’édition française du Christ juif. Car ce livre est une pièce essentielle d’un dialogue entre juifs et chrétiens qui a besoin de trouver un souffle nouveau depuis les avancées décisives du concile Vatican II. « La lecture de ces pages fut une découverte et une source de grand étonnement, qui m’a amené à voir autrement de nombreux textes que je croyais connaître », avoue le cardinal. Étonnement, le mot est faible, ainsi que le découvriront ceux qui se jetteront à leur tour dans la passionnante aventure intellectuelle et spirituelle qu’est la lecture d’un ouvrage de Daniel Boyarin. Le cardinal Barbarin a ainsi trouvé des lumières chrétiennes dans les travaux de ce savant juif : « Ce n’est pas parce que l’auteur montre l’enracinement profond du christianisme dans la tradition spirituelle juive qu’il nie son originalité. Selon lui, la grande nouveauté des Évangiles, c’est de déclarer que le Fils de l’Homme est déjà là, qu’il marche parmi nous. D’où cette formule qui peut donner bien des pistes de travail : “Toutes les idées sur le Christ sont anciennes : la nouveauté, c’est Jésus.” » Poursuivons le passage cité : « Il n’y a rien de nouveau dans la doctrine du Christ, excepté l’affirmation que cet homme-là est le Fils de l’Homme. Il s’agit évidemment d’une affirmation énorme, une immense innovation en soi qui a eu des conséquences historiques décisives. »

On ne saurait trop recommander le Christ juif comme une porte d’entrée aux travaux de Daniel Boyarin proposée au plus grand nombre. Si ce livre ne se contente pas de résumer les hypothèses précédentes de l’historien américain et apporte des éclairages nouveaux, il a l’avantage d’être plus simple d’accès que la monumentale et ardue Partition du judaïsme et du christianisme. Une main sur la Bible hébraïque, une autre sur le Nouveau Testament, chacun pourra jouer les exégètes en reprenant les textes que Daniel Boyarin commente dans son livre avec la certitude – toute talmudique – qu’ils ne nous ont pas encore tout dit (ou bien que nous ne les avons pas correctement entendus) : Daniel 7 ; Mathieu 5, 17 ; Jean 1, 41 ; Actes 15, 28-29.

« Juifs et chrétiens vont devoir à l’avenir changer ce qu’ils racontent les uns sur les autres, jure Boyarin. D’un côté, les chrétiens ne seront plus en mesure de prétendre que les juifs en tant que groupe ont consciemment rejeté Jésus comme Dieu. De telles croyances sur les juifs ont conduit à une histoire profonde, sanglante et douloureuse d’antijudaïsme et d’antisémitisme. […] De l’autre côté, les juifs vont devoir arrêter de railler les idées chrétiennes sur Dieu comme une simple collection d’idées fantaisistes “non juives”, peut-être païennes, et en tous les cas bizarres. » Ainsi, pour Daniel Boyarin, non seulement Jésus ne fut pas un rabbin marginal, comme on l’a souvent dit, mais les fondements du christianisme – « la notion d’une divinité duelle (Père et Fils), la notion d’un Rédempteur qui serait lui-même à la fois homme et Dieu et la notion que ce Rédempteur souffrirait et mourrait dans le cadre de sa mission salvifique » – ne sauraient en aucun cas être présentés comme les bases d’une hérésie juive née d’une contamination par l’hellénisme.

Très logiquement, Boyarin, ce christologue d’un genre inédit, conteste la tradition exégétique à la mode consistant à opposer un « bon Jésus » à un « mauvais Christ », dont l’idée et l’image auraient été forgées par des disciples après la mort du fils de Joseph de ­Nazareth, « promu au statut de divinité sous l’influence de notions grecques étrangères, avec un prétendu message originel déformé et perdu ».

Il faudrait aller plus loin encore. Rappeler que, pour Daniel Boyarin, la théologie du Logos n’a rien d’incompatible avec les conceptions du judaïsme antique : il pousse l’intrépidité intellectuelle jusqu’à voir dans le prologue de Jean un midrash caractéristique de la culture spirituelle juive. Ceux qui veulent savoir le liront. Avec ses travaux, Daniel Boyarin fait faire un bond en avant au dialogue entre juifs et chrétiens. Cet esprit libre a la force de l’amour et la puissance d’un concile. Daniel Boyarin

Philosophe et spécialiste d’histoire des religions, Daniel Boyarin, qui se définit lui-même comme un juif orthodoxe, est né en 1946 dans le New Jersey. Il a une double nationalité américaine et israélienne. Depuis 1990, il enseigne la culture du Talmud au département d’études proche-orientales de l’université de Californie, à Berkeley. Parmi ses ouvrages traduits en français : Pouvoirs de diaspora. Essai sur la pertinence de la culture juive (Cerf, 2007) ; la Partition du judaïsme et du christianisme
(Cerf, 2011) ; le Christ juif. À la recherche des origines (Cerf, 2013).
À lire

Le Christ juif. À la recherche des origines, de Daniel Boyarin. Traduit de l’américain par Marc Rastoin. Préface du cardinal Philippe Barbarin. Cerf, 19 €.

Voir aussi:

What a friend we have in Jesus

Paula Friedricksen

The Jewish Review of Books

Spring 2012

THE JEWISH ANNOTATED NEW TESTAMENT edited by Amy-Jill Levine, Marc Z. Brettler O xford University Press, 700 pp., $35

THE JEWISH GOSPELS : THE STORY OF THE JEWISH CHRIST by Daniel Boyarin The New Press, 224 pp., $21.95

KOSHER JESUS by Rabbi Shmuley Boteach G efen, 300 pp., $26

Arguments over who has the authority to interpret traditions of Shabbat observance. Reprimands for bad behavior when food appears after community service. Boasting of accomplishments in Jewish education. Concern over the proper size of tefillin. Discussion of the holidays, both minor (Hanukkah) and major (Pesach, Sukkot, Shavuot). Collecting funds in the diaspora to send back to Jerusalem. Endless infighting over the correct way to be Jewish. Sound familiar? It’s all in the New Testament.

An anthology of 1 st -century Jewish texts written in Greek, the New Testament provides some of the best evidence we have from (and for) the rough-and- tumble days of Judaism in the late Second Temple period. The intrinsic Jewishness of the New Testament—and that of its two prime figures, Jesus and Paul—has long been obscured because of two simultaneous and linked accidents of history: the rise of Gentile Christianity and of Rabbinic Judaism.

As with Gentile Christianity, so with Rabbinic Judaism: both asserted, very loudly, that though Jesus may have been a Jew, he was a special sort of anti-Jew. (Paul had a more checkered career, either as the ultimate apikoros or, in some Jewish retellings, a secret agent of the high priest working to ensure that something as outlandish as Christianity would flourish only among the goyim). The anti-Jewish rhetoric of the Christian churches in late antiquity helped to produce long centuries of sporadic violence. Yet, at those times in Western history when Christian scholars availed themselves of Jewish learning, there came moments of fleeting recognition: the gospels tell a Jewish tale.

Eventually—and for reasons again internal to Christianity (namely, the Protestant repudiation of Catholicism)—Christian scholars began more and more to distinguish the Jesus of history from the Christ of doctrine. The 19 th and 20 th centuries in particular saw multiple “quests for the histori – cal Jesus” (the title of Albert Schweitzer’s great classic). Modern Jewish writers, availing themselves of the distinction between Jesus and Christ, have in various ways the historical Jesus of Nazareth back within the 1 st -century Jewish fold—as, indeed, have Christian scholars. And particularly since the 1950s, with the shift ing of the quest from schools of theology to departments of comparative religion in liberal arts faculties, scholars of di % erent faiths and of none have cooperatively joined in the search. In current schol – arship, in schools of theology no less than in faculties of religion, to be a Jewish historian of Christianity, particularly of ancient Christianity, is no rarity. Oxford University Press’ recent publication, The Jewish Annotated New Testament, edited by Amy-Jill Levine and Marc Z. Brettler, celebrates this fact. Re – producing the English text of the Revised Standard Ve r s i o n , t h e  e d i t o r s  h a v e  c o l l e c t e d  a g r o u p o f « ! y Jewish scholars of Christian and Jewish antiquity to comment on the texts of the New Testament canon and to contribute succinct essays on matters of mo – ment: Second Temple Jewish history; the ancient synagogue; food and family; Jewish divine mediator  » gures; concepts of a ! erlife and resurrection; and so on. # e array of topics is at once dazzling and dar – ing, the scholarly erudition all the more e % ective for being lightly worn. These outstanding essays—thirty in all—are alone well worth the price of the book. But  » e Jewish Annotated New Testament o % ers much more. It provides multiple commentaries on each of the New Testament’s twenty-seven writings, from its  » rst gospel (in canonical sequence, Mat – thew) to its closing revelation (Apocalypse of John). # e primary commentary appears as the individual scholar’s notes to particular verses in discrete writ – ings at the bottom of each page. # ese contain a wealth of historical information, linking the New Testament text to other near-contemporary Jewish writings (such as those of Philo of Alexandria, or of Josephus, or of the Dead Sea Scrolls, or of more esoteric apocrypha and pseudepigra – pha). Notes “translate” some of the New Testament’s Greek terms back into the Aramaic or Hebrew from which they likely derive. Others align chronological hints in the texts with events in 1 st -centu – ry Jewish and Roman history. Maps, charts, sidebar essays, and diagrams—scores of them—visually and verbally amplify this contextualizing, providing a secondary kind of commentary. Taken all to – gether, this rich information performs a small miracle, resurrecting the vigorous late Second Temple Judaism that lies buried in these ancient texts, which are so habitu – ally and so understandably regarded by Jews and by Christians as being “against” Judaism. For example, Matthew 27:25 writes of the Jews’ pu – tative response to Pilate’s “washing his hands” of the execution of Jesus: “ # en the people as a whole answered, ‘His blood be upon us and on our children!’” # at sentence went on to have a long and hideous history all its own in the annals of European anti- Semitism. But seen in con – text, this verse functions not as a standing indictment, but as a realized prophecy. Matthew writes one generation a ! er the Temple’s destruction, which occurred one generation a ! er Jesus’ lifetime. As annotator Aaron Gale points out, “Matthew’s  » rst readers likely related the verse to the Jerusalem population, devastated in 70 C.E.” Recognition of this likelihood leaches away some of the verse’s toxicity.

“Jews and Christians still misunderstand many of each other’s texts and traditions,” Amy-Jill Levine and Marc Z. Brettler note in their preface. # e aim of their book, then, is “to increase our knowledge of both our common histories and the reasons why we came to separate.” # e spirit of the book, both in its scholarship and in its pedagogy, is thus deeply ecumenical. Indeed, though the “sensitivities of the contributors” may be “Jewish,” the same work with the same academic mission—placing these New Te s t a m e n t t e x t s i n t h e i r S e c o n d Te m p l e J e w i s h c o n – text—could equally well be produced by a squad of Christian scholars. But who is the book for? Christians (at least in principle) already read the New Testament. One of the editors’ speci  » c goals is to demystify these texts and get Jews to read them without worrying about the historically uncomfortable issue of conversion. # e religious orientation of all of the contributors, the editors hope, should quiet this fear, while promoting cultural understanding. Increasing understanding of a foundational text of majority culture is a laudable goal for our vigorously mongrel democracy. Perhaps just as important is the goal of cultural enrichment; actually reading the gospels of Matthew and of John cannot help but enrich appreciation of Bach. And, of course, the history of Western art is a visual commen – tary on these texts and traditions. So, who should read this book? The short answer is: everybody. Christians will bene  » t from seeing their own tradition placed in historical context, thus coming into a better understanding of Jesus’ and Paul’s native religion and of the origins of their own. Jews will bene  » t for the reasons given—and for Jews no less than for Christians, much of 1 st -century his – tory is terra incognita. T wo other books—also by Jews, also on Chris – tian topics—have just been published: Daniel Boyarin’s  » e Jewish Gospels:  » e Story of the Jewish Christ and Shmuley Boteach’s Kosher Jesus . # ese two exercises in popular writing are in some ways similar, in others very di % erent. Boyarin is a schol – ar of Talmud at University of California, Berkeley; Boteach is a media personality and popular author whose website identi  » es him as “America’s Rabbi.” The intellectual muscle mass of the two works cor – responds accordingly. # eir common goal seems to be to take what, as a Christian datum, seems very strange and foreign to Jews, and then to prove that this datum is in fact profoundly and/or origi – nally Jewish. For Boyarin, that datum is Christian theology about the divinity of Jesus. In his book’s four chap – ters he brings together an assemblage of (canoni – cal and non-canonical) ancient Jewish texts well known to scholars and juxtaposes these to aspects of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. (A much briefer sample of his technique is available in his essay on Logos/memra and the Gospel of John in  » e Jewish Annotated New Testament .) Boyarin’s premise and conclusion is that ideas of radically divine mediation  » gure prominently An early European depiction of St. Paul. (Württembergische Landesbibliothek Stuttgart.).

The Haggadah for the Contemporary Family Edited by Alan S. Yoffie Illustrated by Mark Podwal CCAR’s new Haggadah! ! e inclusive text, commentary, and magni  » cent artwork will make all family and friends feel welcome at your seder. Available in paperback or deluxe gift edition. e-Haggadah available through iTunes. New for Passover 2012! Food for ! ought from CCAR Press Voices of Torah: A Treasury of Rabbinic Gleanings on the Weekly Portions, Holidays, and Special Shabbatot Discover multiple perspectives on every parashah in this rich collection of commentary written by CCAR members. Includes holiday portions as well. Makes a great gift. Sacred Table: Creating a Jewish Food Ethic Edited by Mary L. Zamore ! is groundbreaking new volume explores a diversity of approaches to Jewish intentional eating. Finalist, National Jewish Book Award, 2011. ! »#$ % &'(&  » )**)+) » ! Home Service for the Passover Union Haggadah: Home Service for the Passover ! e classic 1923 edition. A Passover Haggadah Edited by Herbert Bronstein Illustrated by Leonard Baskin CLASSIC CCAR HAGGADOT ! e Open Door: A Passover Haggadah Edited by Sue Levi Elwell Art by Ruth Weisberg When Christian scholars availed themselves of Jewish learning, there came moments of ! eeting recognition: the gospels tell a Jewish tale. 24 J EW I SH R E VI EW O F BOO KS • Spring 2012 in all of these late Second Temple texts, not just the “Christian” ones. # e authors of the gospels—and maybe Jesus himself, though Boyarin proposes this rather than argues it—were thinking with these ideas when they framed their teachings.  » e Jew – ish Gospels concludes by inviting the reader to place gospel traditions of Jesus’ divinity “within the Jewish textual and intertextual world, the echo chamber of a Jewish soundscape of the 1 st century.” Kosher Jesus , on the other hand, represents a sort of vernacular translation of the work of the late English scholar Hyam Maccoby. For Maccoby the synoptic gospels’ accounts were thin contriv – ances through which one can still glimpse the real Jesus, a man who adhered fully to Jewish law and who sought, above all, the deliverance of his people from servitude to the Romans. What Boteach has gleaned from Maccoby’s work he has blended with his own thoughts on Vatican II; the charge of dei – cide; the Romans (Romans liked war; Jews, how – ever, liked peace); the true meaning of the gospels; America; modern evangelicals; and much, much more. Like Boyarin, grosso modo , Boteach takes some – thing commonly thought to be quintessentially Christian—Jesus—and shows to his own satisfac – tion that he was in fact quintessentially Jewish. It’s okay, in brief, for Jews to like Jesus, and, opines Boteach, they should. It’s also okay for Jews to like Christians, and they should. Christians should also like Jews. Once everyone understands Jesus and Ju – daism and Christianity as Boteach has con  » gured them, the only question le ! is: What’s not to like? Everybody should live long, be healthy, and there should be peace in Israel. Serious critical scholarly work on the Jewish – ness of Christianity, and of Jesus in particular, has been vigorously ongoing for some two centuries. Until very recently, it has been a largely Christian project, but over the past  the years, in ever-larger numbers, Jewish scholars too have joined in. # ese three works— The Jewish Annotated New Testament, Boyarin’s Jewish Gospels , and Kosher Jesus —testify variously to this fact. # at this work now increas – ingly  » nds a popular audience is an interesting fact of our cultural moment. Will enhanced popular knowledge and under – standing lead to better relations between communi – ties? # at hope, at least, in part motivates these ef – forts. It’s not such a bad thing to want.

Paula Fredriksen is Aurelio Professor Emerita of the Appreciation of Scripture at Boston University, and currently teaches at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She is the author of Augustine and the Jews: A Christian Defense of Jews and Judaism (Yale University Press).

Voir aussi:

Arnaud Beltrame, l’exemple attendu

Le sacrifice du lieutenant-colonel Arnaud Beltrame, qui a offert sa vie vendredi à Trèbes (Aude) pour sauver celle de l’otage d’un terroriste islamiste, fait de lui un martyr. Sa conversion récente au catholicisme (2009) ajoute en effet une profondeur mystique et murie à son geste militaire héroïque. Les gens d’Eglise qui ont accompagné Arnaud Beltrame dans sa recherche spirituelle ont eu raison de lier sa générosité à l’Evangile de Jean (15,13) : « Il n’y a pas de plus grand amour que de donner sa vie pour ses amis ». Ce lundi matin sur RTL, la mère du héros, Nicole Beltrame, a expliqué qu’elle n’avait pas été surprise par l’extraordinaire bravoure de son fils : « Il était loyal, altruiste, au service des autres, engagé pour la patrie ». Il plaçait la patrie au-dessus de sa propre famille, a-t-elle également expliqué. Mais si sa mère témoigne de son fils, c’est pour que « son acte serve » dans la « résistance au terrorisme ». « Il ne faut pas baisser les bras », a-t-elle déclaré. « On ne peut tout accepter. Il faut agir, être plus solidaire, être davantage citoyen. On ne peut pas être complètement laxiste comme on l’est aujourd’hui ». Nicole Beltrame assure ne pas éprouver de haine contre le bourreau, Radouane Lakdim, qui a égorgé Arnaud Beltrame et lui a tiré dessus. « Mais j’ai le plus grand mépris. Il ne faut pas montrer la photo de ce monstre car ce serait faire une émulation pour ces gens-là. Ce n’est pas une religion ». Lakdim, 25 ans, franco-marocain fiché S depuis 2014, a également tué sur son parcours Jean Mazières, Christian Medves et Hervé Sosna.

Lancer des ballons, allumer des bougies, éteindre la Tour Eiffel sont les gestes dérisoires d’une lâcheté collective qui n’ose se confronter à l’ennemi intérieur islamiste. Ces réponses enfantines deviennent désormais des insultes à la mémoire de ce héros français retrouvé. L’exemplaire geste d’Arnaud Beltrame, ancien élève de Saint-Cyr Coëtquidan (dont il fut major), nous rappelle qu’il est des compatriotes qui sont toujours prêts à mourir pour leur patrie et la défense d’un idéal humaniste, contrairement à ce que le relativisme pouvait laisser croire. Sa mort, offerte pour sauver une vie, est aussi le produit d’une culture et d’une civilisation. Son don de soi interdit de désigner encore les djihadistes, qui sèment la mort dans une détestation satanique de l’autre, comme des « soldats », des « rebelles », des « résistants » ou des « martyrs ». Ceux-là se révèlent pour ce qu’ils sont : non pas des victimes de la société occidentale mais les bras armés et bas du front d’une conquête islamiste qui use autant du prosélytisme subtil que de la terreur brutale pour arriver à ses fins. Dès vendredi, dans le quartier de l’Ozanam (Carcassonne) d’où le tueur (abattu) était originaire, le nom de Radouane Lakdim était applaudi par des jeunes musulmans tandis que des journalistes se faisaient violemment chasser de la cité. Ceux qui persistent à ne rien vouloir voir de la contre-société islamiste qui partout se consolide en France, seront-ils au moins indignés par l’ »héroïsme » dont Lakdim est déjà pour certains le symbole ? Puisse le sacrifice d’Arnaud Beltrame réveiller les endormis.

Voir également:

Western Media Are Hamas’s Partners in the War Against Israel

Caroline Glick

Breitbart

03/30/2018

On Friday, the Palestinian terror group Hamas, which controls the Gaza Strip, is inaugurating what it is calling “The March of Return.”

According to Hamas’s leadership, the “March of Return” is scheduled to run from March 30 – the eve of Passover — through May 15, the 70th anniversary of Israel’s establishment. According to Israeli media reports, Hamas has budgeted $10 million for the operation.

Throughout the “March of Return,” Hamas intends to send thousands of civilians to the Israeli border. Hamas is planning to set up tent camps along the border fence and then, presumably, order participants to overrun it on May 15. The Palestinians refer to May 15 as “Nakba,” or Catastrophe Day.

The first question that observers of this spectacle need to ask themselves is whether Hamas believes that it will be able to overrun Israel.

The obvious answer is, of course it doesn’t.

So this brings us to the second question.

If Hamas doesn’t expect its civilians to overrun Israel, what is it trying to accomplish by sending them into harm’s way? Why it the terror group telling Gaza residents to place themselves in front of the border fence and challenge Israeli security forces charged with defending Israel?

The answer here is also obvious. Hamas intends to provoke Israel to shoot at the Palestinian civilians it is sending to the border. It is setting its people up to die because it expects their deaths to be captured live by the cameras of the Western media, which will be on hand to watch the spectacle.

In other words, Hamas’s strategy of harming Israel by forcing its soldiers to kill Palestinians is predicated on its certainty that the Western media will act as its partner and ensure the success of its lethal propaganda stunt.

Given widespread assessments that Iran is keen to start a new round of war between Israel and its terror proxies, Hamas in Gaza and Hezbollah in Lebanon, it is possible that Hamas intends for this lethal propaganda stunt to be the initial stage of a larger war. By this assessment, Hamas is using the border operation to cultivate and escalate Western hostility against Israel ahead of a larger shooting war.

Several Israeli commentators have noted that Hamas’s plan to send civilians to the border and, presumably, order them to breach it at a certain point, is not original. Hezbollah, acting in concert with Ahmed Jibril’s Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine–General Command (PFLP-GC) and the Syrian regime, did something similar in 2011.

As the UK Guardian‘s Jonathan Steele reported in March 2015, that operation played a major role in transforming the civil war in Syria from a few scattered battles between the regime and opposition groups into a full-fledged civil war.

Steele recalled that ahead of “Nakba Day,” on May 15, 2011, the Syrian regime sent forces into the Yarmouk refugee camp (actually an upscale neighborhood five minutes from central Damascus). In early 2011, the “camp” was home to 150,000 Palestinians and 650,000 Syrians.

The government forces encouraged the Palestinians to participate in a march on Israel on Nakba Day. On May 15, 2011, the regime sent buses to Yarmouk. Several hundred people from Yarmouk were driven to the border with Israel. The passengers alighted and began marching to Israel.

Israeli soldiers stationed on the Israeli side of the border in the Golan Heights were taken by surprise by the marchers and opened fire. Three of the Palestinians were killed.

A month later, the regime sent minivans to Yarmouk. Several dozen Palestinians climbed aboard. At the border they were joined by several hundred more marchers. Together, they began scaling the border. Israeli forces responded with live shells and tear gas.

23 people were killed. Twelve of the dead were from Yarmouk. The next day, 30,000 people attended their funeral.

The mourners were livid at the regime for sending them to die, and infuriated with Jibril for encouraging them to go. They surrounded Jibril’s offices in Yarmouk. PFLP-GC gunmen killed a 14-year boy in the crowd. The angry mourners stormed the offices and burned them to the ground.

Steele reported that Jibril himself was rescued by regime forces.

The anger the Palestinians directed against the regime inspired the opposition forces to mobilize the Palestinians to their side. The Free Syrian Army and the al-Nusra Brigades took over Yarmouk.

The regime responded by laying siege on Yarmouk. Most of the residents escaped to other areas of Syria, to Lebanon and Jordan. 18,000 civilians and combatants remained. The regime starved and bombed them into submission over the ensuing three-and-a-half years.

Some Israeli commentators believe that having studied the events in Syria, Hamas will end up calling off the marches to avoid a rebellion in the event that Israel kills civilians at the border.

But there is good reason to believe that Hamas intends to go through with the operation.

Wednesday, Arab affairs commentator Yoni Ben Menachem reported that one of the chief organizers of Hamas’s March of Return is Zaher al-Birawi. According to Ben Menachem, al-Birawi, a senior Hamas and Muslim Brotherhood operative, holds the title, “Liaison for the International Committee for Breaking the Embargo on the Gaza Strip.”

In years past, Ben Menachem reported, al-Birawi was a key operative involved in organizing the flotillas to Gaza.

The most lethal flotilla charged with challenging Israel’s naval blockade of Gaza’s coastline was the May 2010 flotilla organized by Turkey’s IHH organization. IHH is an Islamist NGO affiliated with al Qaeda.  The lead ship in the six ship flotilla, the Mavi Marmara, was commanded by IHH. Most of its 630 passengers were anti-Israel activists from Western nations. Forty well-trained IHH members were on board and tasked with assaulting any and all IDF soldiers who attempted to board.

The Israeli naval commandos who were dropped onto the deck of the ship from helicopters were attacked by IHH personnel armed with axes, iron bars, knives, and guns. During a pitched battle between the IHH attackers and the naval commandos, nine soldiers were wounded, three seriously. Nine IHH attackers were killed.

Israel was harshly condemned for what the international media and the international left referred to as a murderous use of force against innocent peace activists.

Turkish President Recep Erdogan demanded that Israel pay compensation to the dead IHH attackers’ families, and accused Israel of state-sponsored terrorism while opening war crimes trials against senior Israeli military commanders in Turkish courts.

During his visit to Israel in 2013, then-President Barack Obama strong-armed Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to offer an apology to Erdogan and agree to pay compensation to the dead attackers’ families. Obama participated and oversaw the call, which took place on the tarmac of Israel’s Ben Gurion airport before Obama boarded Air Force One to depart from Israel. Most Israelis were angered by Netanyahu’s apology, and Netanyahu privately said he regretted agreeing to offer one.

For their part, the Western anti-Israel activists who were on the Mavi Marmara joined the pile on against Israel, accusing its soldiers of wanton aggression against them.

Earlier this month, British investigator David Collier exposed the existence of a virulently antisemitic secret Facebook group called “Palestine Live.” Collier’s most newsworthy finding was that British Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn was an active member of the group until shortly after he was elected head of Labour in 2015.

Collier also reported that Greta Berlin, a member of the Palestine Live group, and one of the heads of the Free Gaza Movement that organized the Mavi Marmara flotilla together with IHH, admitted in one of her exchanges there that Israel was not responsible for the lethal events aboard the ship. Had the IHH activists — including Kenneth O’Keefe, a former U.S. Marine-turned-Hamas terrorist and “Palestine Live” group member — not attacked the Israelis, Berlin wrote, they wouldn’t have opened fire.

In her words, “Had [O’Keefe] not disarmed an Israeli terrorist soldier, they would not have started to fire.”

In addition to a massive quantity of axes, crowbars, chains, tear gas, knives, and other weaponry, Israeli forces found an advanced broadcast and film editing studio aboard the Mavi Marmara. The attackers clearly viewed media warfare as an integral component of their aggression against Israel.

Which brings us back to Hamas’ plan to have Gaza civilians die at the border with Israel to make Israel look bad.

Israel will, no doubt, find means to undermine Hamas’s operations. It has already announced it intends to use drones and snipers. The IDF can be expected to block communications. And in an interview with al-Hurra Arabic television, IDF Maj. General Yoav Mordechai warned that Israel will penalize any bus company that transports Gazans to the border.

The real issue revealed by Hamas’s planned operation — as it was revealed by the Mavi Marmara, as well as by Hamas’s military campaigns against Israel in 2014, 2011 and 2008-09 —  is not how Israel will deal with it. The real issue is that Hamas’s entire strategy is predicated on its faith that the Western media and indeed the Western left will side with it against Israel.

Hamas is certain that both the media and leftist activists and politicians in Europe and the U.S. will blame Israel for Palestinian civilian casualties. And as past experience proves, Hamas is right to believe the media and leftist activists will play their assigned role.

So long as the media and the left rush to indict Israel for its efforts to defend itself and its citizens against its terrorist foes, who turn the laws of war on their head as a matter of course, these attacks will continue and they will escalate.

If this border assault does in fact serve as the opening act in a larger terror war against Israel, then a large portion of the blame for the bloodshed will rest on the shoulders of the Western media for empowering the terrorists of Hamas and Hezbollah to attack Israel.

Voir encore:

Would these hypothetical scholars also pounce on the lack of any mention of Moabite slaves in Egyptian sources? I doubt it: that so many of the account’s details accord with our knowledge of the period would lead many to assess the source as trustworthy—especially in the absence of hard evidence to the contrary.

The reliability of ancient sources—extra-biblical as well as biblical—is a vexing issue. Where does reality end and the sculpting of events to produce a message begin? From an academic perspective, the Bible should be subject to criteria of analysis applied to other comparable ancient texts. The fact that it is not so treated—that a double standard is in operation—tells us something about the field of academic biblical studies, and about the academy itself.

The double standard applied to biblical texts is a key aspect of an ongoing power struggle within biblical studies, which as an academic discipline is somewhat anomalous within the humanities. The Bible is studied today in degree-granting institutions of all kinds, from the fully secular to the most dogmatically committed. But unlike Shakespeare, or the orations of Cicero, or the Gilgamesh epic, or the Code of Hammurabi, the Bible is itself anomalous: not only a work that people read and study but, for many, a work that guides life itself, a work of sacred scripture.

It is of course appropriate for scholars to be wary of the encroachment of belief systems and religious doctrine upon the enterprise of critical analysis. But in the United States, as fundamentalist Christianity has grown, so has the level of defensiveness in certain sectors of the field. Indeed, for some the very word “Bible” seems to have become radioactive, if not taboo. In 1998, for instance, the American School of Oriental Research, a nondenominational academic organization, changed the name of its popular magazine Biblical Archaeologist to Near Eastern Archaeology. At one point, a prominent American archaeologist even proposed that the Bible itself be given a new name and rebranded as “The Library of Ancient Judea.”

Within the guild, the fear of fundamentalist intrusion reached a crescendo some four years ago when the Society of Biblical Literature, the largest academic body in the field, started sending the following automated notice to everyone submitting a proposal for a conference paper:

Please note that, by submitting a paper proposal or accepting a role in any affiliate organization or program unit session at the annual or international meeting of the Society of Biblical Literature, you agree to participate in an open academic discussion guided by a common standard of scholarly discourse that engages your subject through critical inquiry and investigation.

One may safely assume that proposals to the Society for Neuroscience do not merit similar warnings.

To an extent, again, one can appreciate the sense of alarm. “Because the Bible says so!” and “Because God said so!” do not qualify as academic arguments. Yet, if the ideal is “open academic discussion” and “a common standard of scholarly discourse,” overzealousness from the other direction should be no less disturbing. In the drive to keep fundamentalists at bay, some scholars have wound up throwing out the Bible with the bathwater, preemptively downgrading its credibility as a historical witness.

The power struggle within biblical studies is an aspect of the larger culture war that rages between liberals and conservatives in the U.S. (and, with different expressions, in Israel).

And that is not all. The power struggle within biblical studies is also an aspect of the larger culture war that rages between liberals and conservatives in the U.S. (and, with different expressions, in Israel). In that war, the place of religion in the public square is a major battleground, with skirmishes over hot-button issues ranging from abortion and gay marriage to public display of the Ten Commandments. The fight plays itself out in the realm of law and public policy, in the media, and also in the universities; in the last-named arena, whole fields of inquiry are drawn into the fray. One larger-than-academic dispute is over the status of evolutionary psychology as a science; another is over the status of the Bible as a historical witness. Once ideology enters the picture, the stain can spread: attempts by Arab intellectuals and political leaders to deny the Jews an ancient past in the land of Israel may seem risible to some, but they have been given an aura of respectability in works like The Invention of Ancient Israel: The Silencing of Palestinian History, by a scholar at one of the most prominent biblical-studies programs in the UK.

In the past years, two major academic conferences have been devoted to the historicity of the exodus accounts, and their respective titles tell all. One, most of whose participants doubted that there was an exodus, was titled Out of Egypt: Israel’s Exodus between Text and Memory, History and Imagination. The other, convened in explicit response to the first, was titled A Consultation on the Historicity and Authenticity of the Exodus and Wilderness Traditions in a Post-Modern Age. The “liberal” conference was held in California, the “conservative” one in Texas.

There is thus great truth in the statement by the archaeologist and Israel Prize winner Amihai Mazar that “[t]he interpretation of archaeological data and its association with the biblical text may in many cases be a matter of subjective judgment, . . . inspired by the scholar’s personal values, beliefs, ideology, and attitude toward the [data].” In brief: tell me a scholar’s view on the historicity of the exodus, and I will likely be able to tell you how he voted in the last presidential election.

III. Out-Pharaohing the Pharaoh

To sum up thus far: there is no explicit evidence that confirms the exodus. At best, we have a text—the Hebrew Bible—that exhibits a good grasp of a wide range of fairly standard aspects of ancient Egyptian realities. This is definitely something, and hardly to be sneezed at; but can we say still more? At the Texas conference, I presented findings that suggest an explicit link between the biblical account and a specific text from a specific reign in Egyptian history. A fuller account of my investigation and its conclusions will appear in Did I Not Bring Israel Out of Egypt?, a forthcoming volume of the conference proceedings edited by Alan Millard, Gary Rendsburg, and James Hoffmeier. Here, I present the key findings publicly for the first time.

One of the pillars of modern critical study of the Bible is the so-called comparative method. Scholars elucidate a biblical text by noting similarities between it and texts found among the cultures adjacent to ancient Israel. If the similarities are high in number and truly distinctive to the two sources, it becomes plausible to maintain that the biblical text may have been written under the direct influence of, or in response to, the extra-biblical text. Why the one-way direction, from extra-biblical to biblical? The answer is that Israel was largely a weak player, surrounded politically as well as culturally by much larger forces, and no Hebrew texts from the era prior to the Babylonian exile (586 BCE) have ever been found in translation into other languages. Hence, similarities between texts in Akkadian or Egyptian and the Bible are usually understood to reflect the influence of the former on the latter.

Although the comparative method is commonly thought of as a modern approach, its first practitioner was none other than Moses Maimonides in the 12th century. In order to understand Scripture properly, Maimonides writes, he procured every work on ancient civilizations known in his time. In his Guide of the Perplexed, he puts the resultant knowledge to service in elucidating the rationale behind many of the Torah’s cultic laws and practices, reasoning that they were adaptations of ancient pagan customs, but tweaked in conformity with an anti-pagan theology. (I have written on the rabbinic mandate to view the Torah in ancient context here, and on the Torah’s revolution in ancient political thought here.) At the end of the Guide, Maimonides states that his insight into the topic would have been much greater had he been able to discover even more such sources.

Why would the book of Exodus describe God in the same terms used by the Egyptians to exalt their pharaoh? We see here the dynamics of appropriation.

Comparative method can yield dazzling results, adding dimensions of understanding to passages that once seemed either unclear or self-evident and unexceptional. As an example, consider the familiar biblical refrain that God took Israel out of Egypt “with a mighty hand and an outstretched arm.” The Bible could have employed that phrase to describe a whole host of divine acts on Israel’s behalf, and yet the phrase is used only with reference to the exodus. This is no accident. In much of Egyptian royal literature, the phrase “mighty hand” is a synonym for the pharaoh, and many of the pharaoh’s actions are said to be performed through his “mighty hand” or his “outstretched arm.” Nowhere else in the ancient Near East are rulers described in this way. What is more, the term is most frequently to be found in Egyptian royal propaganda during the latter part of the second millennium.

Why would the book of Exodus describe God in the same terms used by the Egyptians to exalt their pharaoh? We see here the dynamics of appropriation. During much of its history, ancient Israel was in Egypt’s shadow. For weak and oppressed peoples, one form of cultural and spiritual resistance is to appropriate the symbols of the oppressor and put them to competitive ideological purposes. I believe, and intend to show in what follows, that in its telling of the exodus the Bible appropriates far more than individual phrases and symbols—that, in brief, it adopts and adapts one of the best-known accounts of one of the greatest of all Egyptian pharaohs.

Here a few words of background are in order. Like all great ancient empires, ancient Egypt waxed and waned. The zenith of its glory was reached during the New Kingdom, roughly 1500-1200 BCE. It was then that its borders reached their farthest limits and many of the massive monuments still visible today were built. We have already met the greatest pharaoh of this period: Ramesses II, also known fittingly as Ramesses the Great, who reigned from 1279 to 1213.

Ramesses’ paramount achievement, which occurred early in his reign, was his 1274 victory over Egypt’s arch-rival, the Hittite empire, at the battle of Kadesh: a town located on the Orontes River on the modern-day border between Lebanon and Syria. Upon his return to Egypt, Ramesses inscribed accounts of this battle on monuments all across the empire. Ten copies of the inscriptions exist to this day. These multiple copies make the battle of Kadesh the most publicized event anywhere in the ancient world, the events of Greece and Rome not excepted. Moreover, the texts were accompanied by a new creation: bas reliefs depicting the battle, frame by frame, so that—much as with stained-glass windows in medieval churches—viewers illiterate in hieroglyphics could learn about the pharaoh’s exploits.

Enter now a longstanding biblical conundrum. Scholars had long searched for a model, a precursor, that could have inspired the design of the Tabernacle that served as the cultic center of the Israelites’ encampment in the wilderness, a design laid out in exquisite verbal detail in Exodus 25-29. Although the remains of Phoenician temples reveal a floor plan remarkably like that of Solomon’s temple (built, as it happens, with the extensive assistance of a Phoenician king), no known cultic site from the ancient Near East seemed to resemble the desert Tabernacle. Then, some 80 years ago, an unexpected affinity was noticed between the biblical descriptions of the Tabernacle and the illustrations of Ramesses’ camp at Kadesh in several bas reliefs.

In the image below of the Kadesh battle, the walled military camp occupies the large rectangular space in the relief’s lower half (click on image to enlarge):

Kadesh_Camp_600dpi_Small

The camp is twice as long as it is wide. The entrance to it is in the middle of the eastern wall, on the left. (In Egyptian illustrations, east is left, west is right.) At the center of the camp, down a long corridor, lies the entrance to a 3:1 rectangular tent. This tent contains two sections: a 2:1 reception tent, with figures kneeling in adoration, and, leading westward (right) from it, a domed square space that is the throne tent of the pharaoh.

All of these proportions are reflected in the prescriptions for the Tabernacle and its surrounding camp in Exodus 25-27, as the two diagrams below make clear:

Ramesses_compound

In the throne tent, displayed in tighter focus below, the emblem bearing the pharaoh’s name and symbolizing his power is flanked by falcons symbolizing the god Horus, with their wings spread in protection over him (click on image to enlarge):

Throne_Tent_600dpi_Small

In Exodus (25:20), the ark of the Tabernacle is similarly flanked by two winged cherubim, whose wings hover protectively over it. To complete the parallel, Egypt’s four army divisions at Kadesh would have camped on the four sides of Ramesses’ battle compound; the book of Numbers (2) states that the tribes of Israel camped on the four sides of the Tabernacle compound.

The resemblance of the military camp at Kadesh to the Tabernacle goes beyond architecture; it is conceptual as well. For Egyptians, Ramesses was both a military leader and a divinity. In the Torah, God is likewise a divinity, obviously, but also Israel’s leader in battle (see Numbers 10:35-36). The tent of God the divine warrior parallels the tent of the pharaoh, the living Egyptian god, poised for battle.

What have scholars made of this observation? All agree that no visual image known to us from the ancient record so closely resembles the Tabernacle as does the Ramesses throne tent. Nor is there any textual description of a cultic tent or throne tent in a military camp that matches these dimensions. On this basis, some scholars have indeed suggested that the bas reliefs of the Kadesh inscriptions inspired the Tabernacle design found in Exodus 25-27. In their thinking, the Israelites reworked the throne tent ideologically, with God displacing Ramesses the Great as the most powerful force of the time. (For the Torah, of course, God cannot be represented in an image and requires no protection, and pagan deities have no standing, which is why, instead of falcons and Horus, we have cherubim hovering protectively over the ark bearing the tablets of His covenant with Israel.) Others suspect that the image of the throne tent initially became absorbed within Israelite culture in ways that we cannot trace and was later incorporated into the text described in Exodus, but with no conscious memory of Ramesses II. Still others remain skeptical, considering the similarities to be merely coincidental.

I had a different reaction. With my interest piqued by the visual similarities between the Tabernacle and the Ramesses throne tent, I decided to have a closer look at the textual components of the Kadesh inscriptions, to learn what they had to say about Ramesses, the Egyptians, and the battle of Kadesh. At first, a few random items—like the reference to pharoah’s mighty arm, mentioned above—jumped out at me as resonant with the language of the account in Exodus. But as I read and reread, I realized that much more than individual phrases or images was involved here—that the similarities extended to the entire plot line of the Kadesh poem and that of the splitting of the sea in Exodus 14-15.

The more I investigated other battle accounts from the ancient Near East, the more forcefully this similarity struck me—to the point where I believe it reasonable to claim that the narrative account of the splitting of the sea (Exodus 14) and the Song at the Sea (Exodus 15) may reflect a deliberate act of cultural appropriation. If the Kadesh inscriptions bear witness to the greatest achievement of the greatest pharaoh of the greatest period in Egyptian history, then the book of Exodus claims that the God of Israel overmastered Ramesses the Great by several orders of magnitude, effectively trouncing him at his own game.

With my interest piqued by the visual similarities between the Tabernacle and the Ramesses throne tent, I decided to have a closer look at the text.

Let’s see how this works. In both the Kadesh poem and the account of Exodus 14-15, the action begins in like fashion: the protagonist army (of, respectively, the Egyptians and Israelites) is on the march and unprepared for battle when it is attacked by a large force of chariots, causing it to break ranks in fear. Thus, according to the Kadesh poem, Ramesses’ troops were moving north toward the outskirts of Kadesh when they were surprised by a Hittite chariot corps and took fright. The Exodus account opens in similar fashion. As they depart Egypt, the Israelites are described as an armed force (Exodus 13:18 and 14:8). Stunned by the sudden charge of Pharaoh’s chariots, however, they become completely dispirited (14:10-12).

In each story, the protagonist now appeals to his god for help and the god exhorts him to move forward with divine assistance. In the Kadesh poem, Ramesses prays to Amun, who responds, “Forward! I am with you, I am your father, my hand is with you!” (Throughout, translations of the poem are from Kenneth A. Kitchen, Ramesside Inscriptions Translated & Annotated, Blackwell, Vol. 2, pp. 2-14.) In like fashion, Moses cries out to the Lord, who responds in 14:15, “Tell the Israelites to go forward!” promising victory over Pharaoh (vv. 16-17).

From this point in the Kadesh poem, Ramesses assumes divine powers and proportions. Put differently, he shifts from human leader in distress to quasi-divine force, thus allowing us to examine his actions against the Hittites at the Orontes alongside God’s actions against the Egyptians at the sea. In each account, the “king” confronts the enemy on his own, unaided by his fearful troops. Entirely abandoned by his army, Ramesses engages the Hittites single-handedly, a theme underscored throughout the poem. In Exodus 14:14, God declares that Israel need only remain passive, and that He will fight on their behalf: “The Lord will fight for you, and you will be still.” Especially noteworthy here is that this particular feature of both works—their parallel portrait of a victorious “king” who must work hard to secure the loyalty of those he saves in battle—has no like in the literature of the ancient Near East.

In each text, the enemy then gives voice to the futility of fighting against a divine force, and seeks to escape. In each, statements made earlier about the potency of the divine figure are now confirmed by the enemy himself. In the Kadesh poem, the Hittites retreat from Ramesses: “One of them called out to his fellows: Look out, beware, don’t approach him! See, Sekhmet the Mighty is she who is with him!,” referring to a goddess extolled earlier in the poem. In this passage, the Hittites acknowledge that they are fighting not only a divine force but a very particular divine force. We find the same trope in the Exodus narrative: confounded by God in 14:25, the Egyptians say, “Let us flee from the Israelites, for the Lord is fighting for them against Egypt.”

An element common to both compositions is the submergence of the enemy in water. The Kadesh poem does not assign the same degree of centrality to this event as does Exodus—it does not tell of wind-swept seas overpowering the Hittites—but Ramesses does indeed vauntingly proclaim that in their haste to escape his onslaught, the Hittites sought refuge by “plunging” into the river, whereupon he slaughtered them in the water. The reliefs depict the drowning of the Hittites in vivid fashion, displayed here in panorama and closeup (click on images to enlarge):

Orontes_600dpi_Small

As for survivors, both accounts assert that there were none. Says the Kadesh poem: “None looked behind him, no other turned around. Whoever of them fell, he did not rise again.” Exodus 14:28: “The waters turned back and covered the chariots and the horsemen . . . not one of them remained.”

We come now to the most striking of the parallels between the two. In each, the timid troops see evidence of the king’s “mighty arm,” review the enemy corpses, and, amazed by the sovereign’s achievement, are impelled to sing a hymn of praise. In the Kadesh poem we read:

Then when my troops and chariotry saw me, that I was like Montu , my arm strong, . . . then they presented themselves one by one, to approach the camp at evening time. They found all the foreign lands, among which I had gone, lying overthrown in their blood . . . . I had made white [with their corpses] the countryside of the land of Kadesh. Then my army came to praise me, their faces [amazed/averted] at seeing what I had done.

Exodus 14:30-31 is remarkably similar, and in two cases identical: “Israel saw the Egyptians dead on the shore of the sea. And when Israel saw the great hand which the Lord had wielded against the Egyptians, the people feared the Lord.” As I noted earlier, “great hand” here and “great arm” in 15:16 are used exclusively in the Hebrew Bible with regard to the exodus, a trope found elsewhere only within Egyptian propaganda, especially during the late-second-millennium New Kingdom.

After the great conquest, in both accounts, the troops offer a paean to the king. In each, the opening stanza comprises three elements. The troops laud the king’s name as a warrior; credit him with stiffening their morale; and exalt him for securing their salvation. In the Kadesh poem we read:

My officers came to extol my strong arm and likewise my chariotry, boasting of my name thus: “What a fine warrior, who strengthens the heart/That you should rescue your troops and chariotry!”

And here are the same motifs in the opening verses of the Song at the Sea (Exodus 15:1-3):

Then Moses and the Israelites sang this song to the Lord. . . . “The Lord is my strength and might; He is become my salvation . . . the Lord, the Warrior—Lord is His name!”

In both the poem and in Exodus, praise of the victorious sovereign continues in a double strophe extolling his powerful hand or arm. The poem: “You are the son of Amun, achieving with his arms, you devastate the land of Hatti by your valiant arm.” The Song (Exodus 15:6): “Your right hand, O Lord, glorious in power, Your right hand, O Lord, shatters the foe!”

And note this: the Hebrew root for the right hand (ymn) is common to a variety of other ancient Near Eastern languages. Yet in those other cultures, the right hand is linked exclusively with holding or grasping. In Egyptian literature, however, we find depictions of the right hand that match those in the Song. Perhaps the most ubiquitous motif of Egyptian narrative art is the pharaoh raising his right hand to shatter the heads of enemy captives:

This Egyptian royal image endured from the third millennium down into the Christian era. In no other ancient Near Eastern culture do we encounter such portrayals of the right hand, which resonate closely with the Song and particularly with 15:6: “Your right hand, O Lord, shatters the enemy.”

Continuing now: in the Kadesh poem, as the troops review the Hittite corpses, their enemies are likened to chaff: “Amun my father being with me instantly, turning all the foreign lands into chaff before me.” The Song similarly compares the enemy with chaff consumed by God’s wrath (15:7): “You send forth Your fury, it consumes them like chaff.” Again, no other ancient Near Eastern military inscription uses “chaff” as a simile for the enemy.

More parallels: in each hymn, the troops declare their king to be without peer in battle. The Kadesh poem: “You are the fine[st] warrior, without your peer”; the Song: “Who is like You, O Lord, among the mighty?” In each, the king is praised as the victorious leader of his troops, intimidating neighboring lands. The Kadesh poem: “You are great in victory in front of your army . . . O Protector of Egypt, who curbs foreign lands”; the Song (15:13-15): “In Your lovingkindness, You lead the people you redeemed; in Your strength, You guide them to Your holy abode. The peoples hear, they tremble.”

The Exodus text focuses on precisely those elements of the Kadesh poem that extol the pharaoh’s valor, which it reworks for purposes of extolling God’s.

Nearing the end, the two again share main elements as the king leads his troops safely on a long journey home from victory over the enemy, intimidating neighboring lands along the way. The Kadesh poem: “His Majesty set off back to Egypt peacefully, with his troops and chariotry, all life, stability and dominion being with him, . . . subduing all lands through fear of him.” The Song (15:16-17): “Terror and dread descend upon them, through the might of Your arm they are still as stone—Till Your people pass, O Lord, the people pass whom You have ransomed.” And the final motif is shared as well: peaceful arrival at the palace of the king, and blessings on his eternal rule. The Kadesh poem:

He having arrived peacefully in Egypt, at Pi-Ramesses Great in Victories, and resting in his palace of life and dominion, . . . the gods of the land [come] to him in greeting . . . according as they have granted him a million jubilees and eternity upon the throne of Re, all lands and all foreign lands being overthrown and slain beneath his sandals eternally and forever.

The Song (15:17-18):

You will bring them and plant them in Your own mountain, the place You made Your abode, O Lord, the sanctuary, O Lord, which Your hands established. The Lord will reign forever and ever!

As readers may have gleaned, the Kadesh poem is a much longer composition than the Exodus account, and it contains many elements without parallels in the latter. For instance, Ramesses offers an extended prayer to his god, Amun, and issues two lengthy rebukes to his troops for their disloyalty to him. But appropriation of a text for purposes of cultural resistance or rivalry is always selective, and never a one-to-one exercise. The Exodus text focuses on precisely those elements of the Kadesh poem that extol the pharaoh’s valor, which it reworks for purposes of extolling God’s. Moreover, the main plot points—it is worth stressing again—are common to both. These are:

The protagonist army breaks ranks at the sight of the enemy chariot force; a plea for divine help is answered with encouragement to move forward, with victory assured; the enemy chariotry, recognizing by name the divine force that attacks it, seeks to flee; many meet their death in water, and there are no survivors; the king’s troops return to survey the enemy corpses; amazed at the king’s accomplishment, the troops offer a victory hymn that includes praise of his name, references to his strong arm, tribute to him as the source of their strength and their salvation; the enemy is compared to chaff, while the king is deemed without peer in battle; the king leads his troops peacefully home, intimidating foreign lands along the way; the king arrives at his palace, and is granted eternal rule.

This is the story of Ramesses II in the Kadesh poem, and this is the story of God in the account of the sea in Exodus 14-15.

Just how distinctive are these parallels? I’m fully aware that similarities between two ancient texts do not automatically imply that one was inspired by the other, and also that common terms and images were the intellectual property of many cultures simultaneously. Some of the motifs identified here, including the dread and awe of the enemy in the face of the king, are ubiquitous across battle accounts of the ancient Near East. Other elements, such as the king building or residing in his palace and gaining eternal rule, are typological tropes known to us from other ancient works. Still others, though peculiar to these two works, can arguably be seen as reflecting similar circumstances, or authorial needs, with no necessary connection between them. Thus, although few if any ancient battle accounts record an army on the march that is suddenly attacked by a massive chariot force and breaks ranks as a result, it could still be that Exodus and the Kadesh poem employ this motif independently.

What really suggests a relation between the two texts, however, is the totality of the parallels, plus the large number of highly distinctive motifs that appear in these two works alone. No other battle account known to us either from the Hebrew Bible or from the epigraphic remains of the ancient Near East provide even half the number of shared narrative motifs exhibited here.

To deepen the connection, let me adduce a further resonance between the Song at the Sea and Egyptian New Kingdom inscriptions more generally. A common literary motif of the period is the claim that the pharaoh causes enemy troops to cease their braggadocio. Thus, in a typical line, Pharaoh Seti I “causes the princes of Syria to cease all of the boasting of their mouths.” This concern with silencing the enemy’s boastings is distinctly Egyptian, not found in the military literature of any other neighboring culture. All the more noteworthy, then, that the Song at the Sea depicts not the movements or actions of the Egyptians but their boasts (15:8-9): “The enemy said, ‘I will pursue! I will overtake! I will divide the spoil! My desire shall have its fill of them, I will bare my sword, my hand shall subdue them!’” Thereupon, at God’s command, the sea covers them, effectively stopping their mouths.

In my judgment, then, the similarities between these two texts are so salient, and so distinctive to them alone, that the claim of literary interdependence is wholly plausible. And so, a question: if, for argument’s sake, we posit that the Exodus sea account was composed with an awareness of the Kadesh poem, when could that poem have been introduced into Israelite culture? The question is important in itself, and also because the answer might help to date the Exodus text in turn.

One possibility might be that the poem reached Israel in a period of amicable relations with Egypt, perhaps during the reign of Solomon in the 10th century or, still later, of Hezekiah in the 8th. Counting against this, though, is that the latest copies of the Kadesh poem in our possession are from the 13th century, and there are no explicit references to it, or any clear attempts to imitate it, in later Egyptian literature. Moreover, we have no epigraphic evidence that any historical inscriptions from ancient Egypt ever reached Israel or the southern kingdom of Judah, either in the Egyptian language or in translation. And this leaves aside the puzzle of what, in a period of entente, would have motivated an Israelite scribe to pen an explicitly anti-Egyptian work in the first place.

To determine a plausible date of transmission, we should be guided by the epigraphic evidence at hand. Egyptologists note that in addition to copies of the monumental version of the Kadesh poem, a papyrus copy was found in a village of workmen and artisans who built the great monuments at Thebes. As we saw earlier, visual accounts of the battle were also produced. This has led many scholars of ancient Egypt to argue that the Kadesh poem was a widely disseminated “little red book,” aimed at stirring public adoration of the valor and salvific grace of Ramesses the Great, and that it would have been widely known, particularly during the reign of Ramesses himself, beyond royal and temple precincts.

Where does all this leave us? What does it prove?

Proofs exist in geometry, and sometimes in law, but rarely within the fields of biblical studies and archaeology. As is so often the case, the record at our disposal is highly incomplete, and speculation about cultural transmission must remain contingent. We do the most we can with the little we have, invoking plausibility more than proof. To be plain about it, the parallels I have drawn here do not “prove” the historical accuracy of the Exodus account, certainly not in its entirety. They do not prove that the text before us received its final form in the 13th century BCE. And they can and no doubt will be construed by rational individuals, lay and professional alike, in different ways.

Proofs exist in geometry, and sometimes in law, but rarely within the fields of biblical studies and archaeology.

Some might conclude that the plot line of the Kadesh poem reached Israel under conditions hidden to us and, for reasons we cannot know, became incorporated into the text of Exodus many centuries down the line. Others will regard the parallels as one big coincidence. But my own conclusion is otherwise: the evidence adduced here can be reasonably taken as indicating that the poem was transmitted during the period of its greatest diffusion, which is the only period when anyone in Egypt seems to have paid much attention to it: namely, during the reign of Ramesses II himself. In my view, the evidence suggests that the Exodus text preserves the memory of a moment when the earliest Israelites reached for language with which to extol the mighty virtues of God, and found the raw material in the terms and tropes of an Egyptian text well-known to them. In appropriating and “transvaluing” that material, they put forward the claim that the God of Israel had far outdone the greatest achievement of the greatest earthly potentate.

When Jews around the world gather on the night of Passover to celebrate the exodus and liberation from Egyptian oppression, they can speak the words of the Haggadah, “We were slaves to a pharaoh in Egypt,” with confidence and integrity, without recourse to an enormous leap of faith and with no need to construe those words as mere metaphor. A plausible reading of the evidence is on their side.

Voir aussi:

How to Judge Evidence for the Exodus

An event like the exodus can’t be “proved” in the manner of a scientific experiment. The way to judge is through the adding-up of suggestive details and reliable witnesses.

A statue of Ramesses II in Luxor, Egypt. Mohammed Moussa/Wikipedia.
Response
March 9 2015
About the author
Richard S. Hess is Earl S. Kalland professor of Old Testament and Semitic languages at Denver Seminary in Littleton, Colorado. He is the author of Israelite Religions: An Archaeological and Biblical Survey (2007) and co-editor, with Bill T. Arnold, of Ancient Israel’s History: An Introduction to Issues and Sources (2014).
Since I’m in general agreement with Joshua Berman’s analysis in “Was There an Exodus?,” I’d like to focus here on amplifying a few of his central points.Early on in his essay, Berman summarizes the core case against the historicity of the exodus: namely, “a sustained lack of evidence.” The written record of ancient Egypt is silent both on the presence of Hebrew or Israelite slaves and on their subsequent departure. In response, Berman provides several reasonable explanations for such a lack of direct evidence, whether written or archaeological, and aptly quotes the cautionary maxim that absence of evidence does not necessarily constitute evidence of absence. Then he proceeds to offer evidence of a circumstantial but highly suggestive kind. A whole series of details in the biblical story, he writes, “do strikingly appear to reflect the realities of late-second-millennium Egypt—the period [under Ramesses II] when the exodus would most likely have taken place.” Moreover, and very significantly, these details are of the sort “that a scribe living centuries later and inventing the story afresh would have been unlikely to know.”All this is well put, and it can be buttressed. On the issue of the weight that can be assigned to absence of evidence, consider this: if a significant number of slaves escaped during the reign of a self-possessed pharaoh like Ramesses II, one would hardly expect him to advertise the fact. To the contrary, such information would be well hidden, especially by a regent who glorified himself in a manner exceeding other pharaohs before and after him.A noteworthy fact in this connection is that the battle of Kadesh in 1274 BCE, on which Berman dwells at illuminating length later in his essay, is portrayed in two strikingly disparate ways, once in the monuments Ramesses II built all across Egypt to commemorate his great victory over the Hittite empire but quite differently in the literature of the Hittites themselves—and in the treaty that emerged between Egypt and the supposedly trounced Hittites in the years that followed. That battle seems in fact to have been a draw, with neither side retaining territory taken from the other. The treaty itself is essentially one of parity. But, given his self-beatification as nothing less than a god and the giver of life to all his people, how otherwise than as invincible would we expect Ramesses to depict his exploits on the battlefield? By contrast, how likely would he be to acknowledge a defeat by a group of his own slaves escaping their house of bondage?

Turning now to the level of positive evidence, we find in the biblical account quite a number of incidental clues regarding Israel’s ancient status. Berman, for instance, adduces the reference in Exodus 1:11 to the two cities of Pithom and Ramesses, a possible allusion to the city of Pi-Ramesses built by Ramesses II. Since the name was no longer in common use after the second millennium BCE, we cannot plausibly assume that a later writer invented it. Likewise, the personal names of the Israelites given in Exodus fit with attested naming practices among West Semites (of whom the Israelites were a part) in and around the time of the exodus as suggested in the Bible. Although many of these names remained in use later as well, some of them, such as Pinḥas, show an explicit connection with Egyptian personal names at the period in question, and a few, including Ḥevron (Exodus 6:18) and Puah (Exodus 1:15), are attested as personal names only in the mid-second millennium (that is, the 18th to the 13th centuries BCE).

The use of other Egyptian words found in the early chapters of Exodus but nowhere else in the Bible similarly supports the view of a connection with Egypt in the same period. Such pieces of incidental information, which would not have been known to a later scribe, point to an antiquity and authenticity in the Exodus account that is difficult to explain otherwise. It is one thing to remember a great figure like Moses and perhaps build all sorts of legends around him. It is something else when minor characters and other incidental details that occur but once in the biblical account fit only within the period of Israel’s earliest history and would be unknown to a writer inventing a tradition centuries later.

In his lengthy comparison of the victorious Song at the Sea in Exodus 15 with the account on Egyptian monuments of Ramesses II’s victory at Kadesh, Berman advances the proposition that the former appropriates the literary form and even, in places, the exact phraseology of the latter, which it then turns on its head in an act of brazen cultural triumphalism—an out-Pharaohing of the Pharaoh, as Berman puts it. This dynamic of cultural resistance and appropriation can also be seen at work in certain details earlier in the biblical account, specifically in connection with the ten plagues (Exodus 7-12).

In fact, a dialectical relationship can be discerned between each of the ten plagues and one or another deity worshipped in Egypt, although there is no hint of such a purpose in the biblical text. But especially in the ninth plague, the plague of darkness, it is difficult not to see a direct, tit-for-tat challenge to the sun god Amon-Re, who possessed the most powerful and wealthiest temple complex in the land at the time of the exodus. Nor could the placement of this plague just before the tenth and final plague be accidental.

That culminating plague, the death of Egypt’s firstborn, not only provides measure-for-measure justice with respect to an earlier pharaoh’s attempt to kill all Israelite male babies (Exodus 1). It also directly challenges the deified pharaoh himself as the source and giver of life to all his people—a “god” who, in the event, can keep alive neither his people nor his own son, the younger “god” designated to succeed him. The very ideology of pharaoh as the source of life predominates in the second millennium BCE, and especially in the writings of Ramesses II. It becomes far less pronounced in later periods.

Joshua Berman correctly observes that historical events are not subject to proof in the same manner as a mathematical equation, a logical proposition, or a scientific experiment that can be reproduced in a laboratory. Rather, historical “proof” normally emerges through the cumulative accretion of reliable witnesses or attestations. Those attestations may take the form of textual or literary similarities as in Berman’s comparison of the Kadesh inscriptions with the biblical Song at the Sea, two texts sharing a similar structural presentation that overall fits best in the period under consideration. They may also, as in my own comments here, take the form of details that, in their totality and singularity, provide persuasive attestation of their own. Together, the two forms combine in an account that suggests authentic and reliable witness to the beginnings of Israel as a people in the late second millennium BCE.

Voir également:

Biblical Criticism Hasn’t Negated the Exodus

The extent to which biblical criticism challenges believers has been vastly exaggerated; there is no reason to doubt the core of the Bible’s presentation of Israel’s history.

Response
Benjamin Sommer
Mosaic
March 16 2015

In “Was There an Exodus?,” Joshua Berman renders a great service: he shows that many pronouncements concerning the non-historicity of biblical narratives are animated by a reflexive hyper-skepticism. This attitude shows up not only among journalists (who have an understandable interest in stirring up controversy) but also among occasional members of the clergy and, most disappointingly, among academic scholars who are supposed to adjudicate historical evidence consistently and relatively dispassionately. In some academic writing on the ancient Near East, as Berman writes, one detects a double standard at work: biblical sources that make historical claims are regarded as untrue unless backed by airtight confirmation from archaeology, while non-biblical sources, even in the absence of archaeological authentication, are taken as containing a good deal of factual information.

This tendency by otherwise well-trained scholars also occurs on the other end—that is, the believing end—of the spectrum. A relevant instance is James Hoffmeier’s superb study, Israel in Egypt: The Evidence for the Authenticity of the Exodus Tradition (Oxford, 1997). Masterfully weaving together archaeological, linguistic, and historical data, Hoffmeier devastatingly rebuts scholars who insist that the exodus narrative must be entirely fictional. But his rebuttal fails to demonstrate the claim he goes on to make, namely, that the biblical account is accurate not only in its broad sweep but even in its particulars.

For instance, in following the Pentateuch’s stipulation that the exodus preceded the beginning of the conquest of the land by 40 years, Hoffmeier runs up against severe difficulties in the dating of both events. Had he conceded that historical texts in the Bible invoke numbers in typological and symbolic ways that differ from the way modern historians use numbers, his job would have been easier—and easier still had he acknowledged that, for narrative purposes, ancient historians sometimes boiled down complex processes to what they regarded as their essentials. In this light, the possibility emerges that both the exodus and the conquest may have been sequences of related events that stretched out over a century or more, rather than episodes that took place, as the Bible has it, in a single night or over a single generation. Hoffmeier asks whether the biblical account as it stands is accurate. A more productive question would be whether and how the narratives reflect real events.

I cite Hoffmeier precisely because he is a top-notch archaeologist and Egyptologist. Yet even he, when he moves from carefully analyzed evidence to a broad conclusion, lurches toward an extreme—if not so extreme as the lurch of many other biblical scholars in the opposite direction. I am not as sure as is Berman that, as he colorfully puts it, “tell me a scholar’s view on the historicity of the exodus, and I will likely be able to tell you how he voted in the last presidential election.” But he is correct that social and cultural factors cloud the way many evaluate evidence.

Happily, Berman himself has no fear of the gray areas where historically valid conclusions are most likely to be found. He does not insist that all the details of the biblical account be taken literally. He seems ready to acknowledge that sometimes biblical texts contradict themselves. Thus, although the Pentateuch informs us several times that 603,550 adult males were present at Mount Sinai a few months after the exodus, Berman points to many other passages indicating that the number of Israelites who left Egypt was much, much smaller. At least one of these claims must be false or symbolic; in this particular case, there is every reason to dismiss the wildly high figure.

But rejecting one detail or even many details in an ancient source does not mean rejecting the broad sweep of its narrative. The question, then, is whether that broad sweep might be based on older traditions going back to an actual event or series of events. Here some background may be helpful. Pretty much all modern biblical scholars agree that the texts found in the Pentateuch were written in the Iron Age, during the time of the Israelite and Judean monarchies between about the 8th and 6th centuries BCE and perhaps in the exilic and post-exilic periods of the late-6th and 5th centuries. For several linguistic and historical reasons, it is clear that these texts do not date back to the 13th or 12th centuries when the exodus is supposed to have occurred.

Thus one can justly wonder: is it possible that the Pentateuch’s authors really knew about events that occurred a half-millennium earlier? If the texts include references to details of late Bronze Age Egypt that were unlikely to be known in Iron Age Canaan, then these texts probably do preserve real historical memories. Multiple examples of such details appear in the books of Exodus and Numbers. Take the fact that the Israelites feared taking a direct northern route to Canaan “lest they see war” (Exodus 13:17). As Berman mentions, this accords well with the fact that there were Egyptian forts along that direct route. I would add that Hoffmeier has demonstrated that by the time of the Israelite and Judean monarchies, these forts had been abandoned and were covered with sand. A Hebrew writer of that time, even one interested in adding historical verisimilitude to his narrative, could not have known that the northern route was the more militarily daunting. The presence of this verse, then, seems based on historical traditions much older than the written Iron Age sources found in the Pentateuch.

Similarly, the presence among the tribe of Levi of many Egyptian names points to older traditions preserved in later Israelite writings. It does not seem likely that an Iron Age writer added these names to render his story more plausible, since that writer wants us to believe that the whole nation Israel was present in Egypt, while the Egyptian names occur almost exclusively in the tribe of Levi. (More on this below.) In addition, some of those Egyptian names are known to us from later texts, like 1 Samuel and Jeremiah, that are not concerned with the exodus at all. In keeping with well-known custom, later Levites would have continued to favor names long established in their tribe, probably without any awareness of the hoary Egyptian origin of the names in question.

To this line of evidence, Berman has added a very important new set of data in his examination of the similarities between the Kadesh Poem—the inscriptions on the monuments ereceted by the pharaoh Ramesses II celebrating his 1274 BCE victory over the Hittite empire—and the account in Exodus 13-15 of the encounter between the pursuing Egyptian forces and the Israelites on their flight into the wilderness. Any one of these similarities might be dismissed as coincidence. The assemblage of similarities, however, suggests that the exodus narrative, and especially the Song at the Sea in Exodus 15, draw on a text from precisely the era to which the exodus is usually dated. This suggestion is strengthened by the fact that many of the links between the two texts do not appear in other ancient Near Eastern poems, historical narratives, and myths.

An additional datum, unstressed by Berman, clinches his argument: the shared elements appear in the two texts in precisely the same order. Ancient traditions often invoked stock phrases and motifs, shared in any two texts that drew on those traditions. But the order of the elements is flexible. When two texts share a large number of elements in the same order, as they do in the case Berman brings to our attention, the likelihood is much higher that one is borrowing from the other.

All of this, taken together, comes as close as we can get in the study of ancient literature to proving that chapters 13-15 of Exodus, though composed in the middle of the first millennium, are based on traditions going back to the time of Ramesses II in the late second millennium. The exodus story is not a fiction invented by Israelites in the Iron Age.

This conclusion remains valid, moreover, even when we recognize that the biblical texts include the occasional anachronism (referring, for example, to camels and Philistines in the setting of the book of Genesis, though neither was present in Canaan then) as well as some telescoping. By the latter term, I mean a tendency to take complex processes and reduce them to neater narratives that are easier to tell. Thus, it is altogether possible, as a number of scholars have suggested, that the exodus was a series of events; Israelites, or proto-Israelites, may have been escaping from Egyptian bondage in small groups over generations. One group may have been led by a Levite named Moses, another by a Levite named Aaron; I am not sure that the two of them ever met. Furthermore, given the prominence of Levite tribesmen in the story of the exodus and their tendency to bear Egyptian names, I wonder whether it was specifically they who escaped Egyptian bondage. Their historical memory may then have been adopted by other Israelites who never left Canaan, and its commemoration may have become an essential element of pan-Israelite identity.

On Thanksgiving, millions of Americans participate enthusiastically in the central ritual meal of the United States, though the ancestors of only a fraction of them were on the Mayflower. It is entirely possible something similar happened in ancient Israel: as exodus-group Israelites linked up with Israelites who had always remained in the land of Canaan, the latter came in time to see themselves as if they, too, had left Egypt. By the time the accounts found in the book of Exodus were written down, the distinction between the two groups was moot, and was forgotten.

The ability of Israelites from clans that had not participated in an escape from Egypt to assimilate the memories of those who had may have been bolstered by their own ancestors’ memories of being forced to serve Egyptian imperial overlords in Canaan. Throughout much of the New Kingdom period, Canaanite city states were vassals to the Egyptians, and Canaanite peasants were forced into corvée labor on behalf of Egyptian projects there. Several scholars, including Ronald Hendel (Berkeley) and Nadav Na’aman (Tel Aviv), have argued that this experience of impressed labor was the basis for the historical memories underlying the exodus story; that is, according to Hendel and Na’aman, Israelites were slaves to Pharaoh of Egypt but not in Egypt.

Theories of servitude in Egypt and in Canaan are not mutually incompatible. An average Israelite in the Iron Age may have had ancestors who served Egyptians in each locale. In the end, biblical references to the exodus probably take a tangled complex of genuine historical memories and render them more manageable. Some details are surely fictional, but given the number that are authentic and could not have been invented by Iron Age storytellers, it seems clear that the overall thrust of the story—Israelites in the distant past were liberated from enslavement to the greatest empire of its time and place—is accurate.

Some Jews and Christians have been unnerved by the doubt cast by modern biblical criticism on the historical reliability of biblical texts. But the extent to which biblical criticism challenges believers who are not overly concerned with minutiae has been vastly exaggerated. To put it bluntly, there are no archaeological or historical reasons to doubt the core elements of the Bible’s presentation of Israel’s history. These are: that the ancestors of the Israelites included an important group who came from Mesopotamia; that at least some Israelites were enslaved to Egyptians and were surprisingly rescued from Egyptian bondage; that they experienced a revelation that played a crucial role in the formation of their national, religious, and ethnic identity; that they settled in the hill country of the land of Canaan at the beginning of the Iron Age, around 1300 or 1200 BCE; that they formed kingdoms there a few centuries later, around 1000 BCE; and that these kingdoms were eventually destroyed by Assyrian and Babylonian armies.

It is important to recognize the specious nature of claims that any of these elements is contradicted or even undermined by what archaeologists have or have not found. Those who put forward such claims seem to be unaware of the evidence actually available; even more importantly, they are unschooled in the nature of the evidence—that is, in what the evidence can and cannot prove. They seem similarly unaware that careful studies of the text of the book of Exodus, like that of Joshua Berman, have themselves uncovered patterns of details that render the core elements of the exodus narrative likely indeed.

Not only at Passover but also in Judaism’s daily liturgy and its weekly sanctification of the Sabbath, Jews proclaim that their identity is based on something that happened in history. They do not state that Judaism is based on an inspiring fiction or a metaphor (even if the story is inspiring and serves in important ways as a symbol). Details regarding what happened remain murky, but Jews reciting the benediction before the Shema each day or the kiddush on Friday night can, with a clear conscience, mean what they say.

Was Israel Taken out of Egypt, or Egypt out of Israel?

Why some scholars want to see the exodus as just a great story.

Last Word
Mosaic

March 23 2015


I thank my fellow biblicists Richard Hess, Ronald Hendel, and Benjamin Sommer for sharing their insights into the question of the historicity of the exodus. As I mentioned in my essay, more and more people are interested in what professional Bible scholars have to say about this issue, and the editors of Mosaic have done a true service by offering something unavailable elsewhere on the Web: an extended discussion from different perspectives, pitched to general readers and educated non-specialists. Readers need to know that one cannot rely on a single scholar’s blog post or essay any more than on the advice of a single surgeon or financial analyst. There is simply no such thing as “what biblicists say” on a given topic, since biblicists construe the data in different ways.

In the case of my essay, one particular construal is that of Ronald Hendel, who dismisses the extended parallels I identified between the “Kadesh Poem”—inscribed in monuments to the 1274 BCE victory of the pharaoh Ramesses II over his Hittite rivals—and the account of the Israelites’ departure from Egypt and the encounter at the sea in chapters 14 and 15 of Exodus. In rebuttal, Hendel claims that most of the motifs cited in my essay, far from being distinctive to these two sources, as I argued, were instead “formulaic and widely distributed” in ancient Egyptian literature.

This is a strong claim, so let’s set the record straight. No Egyptian composition other than the Kadesh Poem speaks of how the pharaoh’s troops fell into disarray when surprised by an enemy chariot force. No other Egyptian composition speaks of the pharaoh pleading to his god and being told to proceed forward in battle against all odds. No other Egyptian composition has defeated enemy troops vocally acknowledging the superiority of the Egyptian divinity who has been working against them. No other Egyptian composition describes (let alone visually portraying in a bas relief, as in the case of the Ramesses monuments) the drowning of the enemy force in a body of water. No other Egyptian composition describes how the pharaoh’s own formerly dispirited troops return to the battlefield, survey the enemy corpses, and erupt in a spontaneous, extended hymn.

Aside from the Poem’s reference to the enemy being consumed “like chaff” by the fire of the pharaoh, which appears in one additional source (itself likely influenced by the Kadesh Poem), not a single one of the motifs listed above appears anywhere else in Egyptian literature. But all of them do appear in this one case, and all of them match the account in Exodus. Moreover, they appear in these two sources in essentially the same sequence—thus further amplifying, as Benjamin Sommer argues in his own response, the persuasive force of the parallels I identify. And when, to these distinctive motifs, you add the Poem’s more widely attested motifs that I also cited—like the return of the victorious forces to the palace and the grant of eternal rule—the Kadesh Poem and the Exodus account can be seen to exhibit almost exactly the same order.

In brief, following the tradition of the Passover seder, we may say that had the book of Exodus listed a perfectly shared sequence of only widely attested motifs, but not motifs specific as well to the Kadesh Poem, dayeinu: this would have been sufficient to suspect a dependent relationship between the two. And were the motifs distinctive to the two compositions but not in the same order, likewise dayeinu. How much stronger, then, is the case of literary dependence when so many of the motifs are distinctive to the two compositions and appear in the same order. One needn’t possess the conflicted psychology of an Orthodox rabbi —in Ronald Hendel’s deconstruction of my supposed motivation—to recognize the force of this conclusion. I invite Professor Hendel—or anyone else of his opinion—to show me where I’m wrong via the Comments section at the end of this piece.

But, Hendel persists, even if my larger claim is correct, how does that relate to the question of whether there was an exodus? After all, he writes, “that biblical literature sometimes draws on old Egyptian motifs—in the Joseph story, in Egyptian influences in the books of Psalms and Proverbs, and elsewhere—is a well-established fact.” Why should the exodus be seen as other than a great story like the story of the Garden of Eden, and similarly “laced with mythical motifs”?

The reason is this. If my larger claim is correct, it would, for one thing, suggest an Israelite presence in Egypt, as there is no evidence that the Kadesh Poem was known outside Egyptian limits and no indication that it had resonance at any later period within Egypt itself. But, for another and more significant thing, the appropriation of the Kadesh Poem into Israelite culture suggests an Israelite audience that would understand and appreciate the literary re-deployment of royal Egyptian propaganda against the pharaoh himself. Besides, why would Israelites perpetuate a fantastic tale of salvation and victory over the pharaoh if, in fact, nothing on the ground had transpired at all? That they embraced and preserved this defiant transvaluation of royal propaganda suggests that they experienced a collectively transformative event, one that dramatically elevated their lot at the expense of a mighty regent.

Hendel, however, offers an alternative account for the origins of the exodus story. Egyptian hegemony had extended over Canaan for centuries. The native inhabitants of this region were, essentially, servants of the pharaoh. For Hendel, then, insofar as there may have been a reality behind the exodus story, it is not that Israel was taken out of Egypt but just the opposite—that Egypt was taken out of Israel. In its ethnic self-fashioning, Israel-in-Canaan then cast its oppression at the hands of pharaoh as bondage-in-Egypt.

Unfortunately, Hendel’s academic studies in this vein reveal no Scriptural support for the claim that the ancestors of Israel had resided in Canaan all along—as contrasted with the hundreds of references to a sojourn in Egypt. Nor does he produce any inscription from Canaan during this period that identifies the ancestors of Israel with Canaanites living under Egyptian rule.

Richard Hess, in his own response to my essay, notes helpfully that several Egyptian names found in the book of Exodus are known to us only from Egyptian sources from the mid-second millennium BCE. By Hendel’s reckoning, we would thus need to posit that the later authors of the exodus myth, bent on achieving a remarkable degree of verisimilitude, went to the trouble of incorporating names that were period-appropriate. Yet, as Hendel himself documents, there is an avalanche of evidence that Canaanites were enslaved and brought to Egypt, or migrated to Egypt in times of famine. Is it not simpler to maintain that the Exodus record contains Egyptian names because, in fact, there were Israelites in Egypt?

By the same token, is it not also highly unlikely that Israel, or any other ancient culture for that matter, would conflate forced slavery in exile with colonial oppression in its own land? Across the Bible, starting with the expulsion from Eden until the expulsion from Jerusalem, exile looms as the ultimate punishment—of an altogether different magnitude from subjugation at the hands of an oppressor in one’s own land. Exile and exile alone means cultural annihilation, rupture of continuity with the past, and a bleak future as a landless minority stripped of every shred of autonomy. Many biblical narratives recount Israel’s sufferings within its own land at the hands of external powers; never is that oppression confused with the memory of exile.

Nor is this unique to antiquity. To consider a more contemporary illustration, African peoples and their cultures suffered for centuries under European colonialism. Did any of them ever refer to such subjugation as tantamount in its ultimate severity to exile and enslavement in the New World? I would think not.

Hendel is not the only scholar to advance the hypothesis that the reality behind the exodus is that Egypt was taken out of Israel and not, as the Bible has it, the other way around. Introduced in the early 1990s, the theory has been gaining adherents ever since—coincidentally with the meteoric rise of “postcolonial” studies to its current position as the dominant force in the humanities. Postcolonialist scholars examine the corrosive interactions between colonizer and colonized as represented in the cultural products of both entities. The key premise of postcolonial studies is that a unique dynamic is set in play when a power exerts its control over another land, exploiting the native populace and resources for its own ends; correlatively, when the colonizer is overthrown, it becomes possible to trace how the formerly colonized revitalize themselves and fashion a new, “postcolonial” self-image.

Is it too much to postulate that, in imagining a past in which Israelites in their native Canaan suffer under the oppression of “colonial” Egypt, scholars have transformed Israel’s seminal tale into something that can find a respectable place at the table of the most recent academic fashion?

“In every generation, each person is obliged to view himself as if he came out of Egypt.” Ronald Hendel cites this line from the Mishnah, later incorporated into the Haggadah, as a prooftext: the exodus was not a “punctual” event, he writes, but has been happening continually for thousands of years. Each generation, in this reading, is called upon to narrate its emergence out of the shadow of slavery and into free existence.

This is surely a beautiful sentiment, but just as surely a misreading of the rabbinic dictum. The text is unambiguous in its use of the past tense: “each person is obliged to view himself as if he came out of Egypt,” not as if he is coming out of Egypt. On Passover night, we do not celebrate our own contemporary processes of liberation. Rather, we are called upon to reflect on the meaning of, precisely, a punctual event, and a historical event at that.

Voir enfin:

Bible ou archéologie – qui a raison ?

Binyamin Lachkar
The Times of Israel
30 septembre 2014

Quand on parle des contradictions entre la Bible et la Science, on pense souvent aux questions qui relèvent de la création de l’univers ou du sujet de l’évolution darwinienne. Comme je l’ai montré précédemment ( et ) il n’y a en fait pas de véritables problèmes entre ce qu’affirment les sciences dures – physique, biologie etc… – et la description des premiers jours de la création selon la Torah, au contraire même selon certains.

Les vrais contradictions apparaissent en fait après, dès l’apparition d’Adam, et aujourd’hui dans le débat sur la véracité de la Bible, l’essentiel du conflit tourne autour des évènements allant du séjour en Egypte au roi Salomon.

Il est acquis que les livres historiques de la Bible hébraïque, à partir de la division du royaume d’Israël en deux, sont en accord avec les découvertes archéologiques et scripturaires de l’ensemble de la région. Le problème, c’est que les découvertes et les textes ne collent plus, apparemment, avec ce qui précède.

Voyons quel est l’avis de l’archéologie biblique mainstream aujourd’hui: la sortie d’Egypte est traditionnellement datée vers -1450 (-1310 selon le calendrier rabbinique, mais celui-ci décale toutes les dates de plus d’un siècle jusqu’à Alexandre, et par souci de simplicité, je ne l’utiliserai pas).

Cependant, à cette date, Canaan était sous total contrôle égyptien ce qui semble rendre impossible que l’exode se soit produit à ce moment là. Ce n’est qu’après que ce contrôle se délita.

La stèle du pharaon Merenptah, datée de -1208, qui décrit une campagne militaire en Canaan, contient la première, et la seule, mention d’Israel par un texte égyptien : « Israël est détruit, sa semence même n’est plus. » Israel est ici présenté comme un peuple qui vit en Canaan. Donc l’exode a forcément eu lieu avant, probablement autour de -1250, sous Ramses II, le père de Merenptah.

C’est là que les problèmes commencent: on ne trouve aucune trace ni de l’exode, ni de la présence d’une masse d’esclaves sémites en Egypte à l’époque, ni d’un changement soudain de population en Canaan, ni de destruction de villes. Jericho était en ruine au moment supposé de l’arrivée des Israélites en Canaan.

Au point que certains archéologues, comme le professeur Israel Finkelstein de l’université de Tel Aviv, en sont arrivés à imaginer que les Israélites étaient en fait des Canaanéens qui auraient développé une nouvelle identité.

Cette conclusion révolutionnaire a cependant un défaut – elle est en totale contradiction avec toute la tradition israélite et le bon sens. Que des peuples s’inventent des mythes fondateurs glorieux est courant, mais aucun peuple ne s’est jamais inventé une origine d’esclaves misérables dans un autre pays.

Si les enfants d’Israel n’ont pas été esclaves en Egypte, si Moise n’a pas existé, si l’exode n’a pas eu lieu, d’où sortent ces nouveaux récits et comment ont-ils pu être acceptés par le peuple ? C’est justement pour cette raison que la majorité des historiens continuent de penser qu’il y a bien eu un exode.

Remarquez aussi que la stèle de Merenptah est étrange: nous ne savons pas à quoi il est fait référence. Il n’y a aucune source évoquant une quelconque opération de ce pharaon en Canaan ou même ailleurs, et rien qui soit resté dans la tradition d’Israel d’une invasion égyptienne peu de temps après l’exode.

Mais les contradictions avec le récit biblique ne s’arrêtent pas là, les principales tenant à l’ampleur des royaumes de David et Salomon. La réalité historique de David ne fait plus de doutes aujourd’hui depuis qu’on a retrouvé une stèle moabite en 1993, datant du 9ème siècle avant l’ère chrétienne, évoquant la « maison de David ».

Mais toujours d’après Finkelstein et ses partisans, si David et Salomon ont existé, ils étaient au mieux des chefs de village, régnant sur une territoire pauvre, minuscule, sous développé et peu peuplé. Les ruines de bâtiments monumentaux à Meggido et d’autres endroits attribués à Salomon, dateraient en fait, pour Finkelstein, de la période de la dynastie d’Omri, un siècle après.

Ces dernières années, plusieurs fouilles dirigées par les archéologues de l’université hébraïque de Jérusalem sont venues contredire ces affirmations et laissent penser qu’au contraire David et Salomon régnaient sur un véritable état organisé et moderne. Mais leurs découvertes ne font pas encore l’unanimité et sont rejetées par Finkelstein.

L’archéologie a bien sur ses limites. Plus on remonte loin dans le temps et moins il reste de traces. La plupart des artefacts du passé ont été détruits et il ne reste aujourd’hui qu’une infime fraction de ce qui existait à l’époque, aussi on ne peut pas affirmer que l’absence de preuves est une preuve de l’absence.

Cependant, en regardant bien il se pourrait que le noeud du problème ne se situe pas chez les archéologues bibliques, mais chez leurs confrères égyptologues pour une simple histoire de dates.

Après tout, la date traditionnelle de l’exode est généralement située entre -1500 et -1450, pas en -1250. Peut-être que les archéologues ne trouvent rien parce qu’ils ne regardent pas au bon endroit ?

C’est la thèse défendue par de nombreux chercheurs, pas toujours issus du monde académique (ce qui n’est pas un défaut), chacun ayant sa version de ce qui s’est réellement passé. Il faut comprendre qu’en remontant un peu en arrière dans l’histoire égyptienne on trouve immédiatement des tas de choses qui rappellent étrangement le récit biblique: la domination du nord de l’Egypte, exactement là où se trouvaient les Israélites dans la Bible, par les Hyksos originaires de Canaan ; la conversion d’Akhenaton au monothéisme ; l’évocation permanente des mystérieux « Habiru », souvent identifiés aux « Hébreux », semeurs de troubles en Canaan ; les esclaves sémites qui vivaient bien à cette époque plus reculée en Egypte et ont inventé un alphabet pour une langue qui pourrait être l’hébreu dans le Sinai – un alphabet dont sont originaires tous les alphabets du monde.

De nombreuses thèses essaient de concilier ces faits avec la Bible et l’archéologie. Mais certains vont encore plus loin en remettant en cause toute la chronologie égyptienne utilisée depuis le 19ème siècle.

Le plus radical d’entre eux est l’archéologue et égyptologue David Rohl dont la thèse, appelée « Nouvelle Chronologie », avance toutes les dates de l’Egypte ancienne de 300 ans jusqu’à la prise de Thèbes par les Assyriens en -664, date à partir de laquelle toutes les chronologies s’accordent.

La thèse de Rohl, développée depuis 20 ans, n’est pas la seule à remettre en question la chronologie classique, mais c’est la plus révolutionnaire.

Il se trouve que la chronologie égyptienne antique est, pour parler clairement, un énorme foutoir, qu’aucune date n’est vraiment certaine, que beaucoup de choses ne sont pas vraiment connues, et que d’énormes contradictions ou anomalies inexplicables se logent dans la chronologie actuelle.

En déplaçant les dates, subitement, d’après Rohl, l’archéologie et la Bible correspondent parfaitement. Joseph aurait alors été le vizir d’un pharaon de la XIIème dynastie et on a retrouvé une statue de lui ainsi que son tombeau.

Le pharaon de l’exode aurait été Dedumose, en -1450, et c’est le départ des 30 à 40 000 Israélites (il lit « alafim » comme « alufim » et donc arrive à ce chiffre) qui, en mettant l’Egypte à genou, aurait permis l’invasion des Hyksos – les Amalécites de la Bible.

Plus tard, ces premiers Hyksos (appelés Amu par les égyptiens) auraient été eux-mêmes conquis par une alliance de peuples indo-européens dont les Philistins issus du monde grec (les Shemau en égyptien), et ces derniers, après avoir été expulsés d’Egypte par la reconquête des pharaons de Thèbes, se seraient réfugiés dans le sud-ouest de Canaan d’où ils auraient servi de force de police aux égyptiens.

Pendant que les Israélites passaient la période des Juges – et selon Rohl l’archéologie montre bien la conquête israélite de Canaan a ce moment là – l’Egypte entrait dans sa période impériale et menait des guerres jusqu’en Syrie, ignorant essentiellement les tribus barbares des montagnes de Canaan et se souciant surtout des routes commerciales.

Rohl situe Akhenaton à la fin de la période des Juges et comme contemporain du roi Shaul et il prend pour preuve les lettres d’Amarna. Ces dernières sont des échanges diplomatiques retrouvés sur le site d’Amarna, là où s’élevait la capitale d’Akhenaton, entre le pharaon et divers souverains, vassaux et potentats locaux du moyen-orient. La chronologie traditionnelle situe ces lettres entre -1370 et -1350 mais pour Rohl elles datent de -1020 à -1000.

Il identifie le roi Shaul comme le seigneur de guerre Labaya des lettres (Lavi-Ya, le lion de Dieu, qui aurait été le vrai nom de Shaul, ce dernier étant son nom de règne). Labaya régnait sur exactement le même territoire, avait un fils dénommé Mutbaal ce qui signifie « homme de Baal » tandis que le fils de Shaul dans la Bible se nommait Ishbaal – « homme de Baal » aussi ; il est mort dans une bataille contre les Philistins, trahi par ses alliés, plus ou moins comme Shaul ; son fils survivant a été assassiné, comme Ishbaal ; et son successeur se nommait Dadoua/Tadoua, une traduction hourrite de David, dont le vrai nom était Elkhanan (il tient ça de Targum Yonathan, pas des lettres d’Amarna). Le général en chef de Dadoua se nommait Ayab (celui de David, Yoav) etc…

Il y a quelques difficultés avec ces identifications, comme le fait que dans la Bible, Shaul n’était pas un vassal de l’Egypte (encore que justement ça aurait été logique) ou que Labaya a été arrêté et devait être extradé vers l’Egypte mais a corrompu ses gardes et s’est enfui, un épisode inconnu de la Bible, ou bien qu’il ne semblait pas parler hébreu.

David a pu alors construire un royaume puissant, profitant de la faiblesse égyptienne après le désastre que fut le règne d’Akhenaton, et Salomon a su se positionner en partenaire commercial de l’Egypte et a aidé Ramses II lors de la bataille de Kadesh contre les Hittites. Après la mort de Salomon, Ramses II, allié au nouveau royaume d’Israel est le pharaon, appelé Shishak dans la Bible, qui a pris Jérusalem et volé le trésor du Temple, et la stèle de Merenptah commémore cet évènement. Tout devient clair.

Nous arrivons là à un point central de la thèse et en fait de toute la construction chronologique de l’Egypte ancienne. Aussi surprenant que cela puisse paraitre, et à ma grande stupéfaction lors de mes recherches sur le sujet, en définitive la chronologie classique ne repose pas sur beaucoup d’éléments concrets: entre autres, les textes de Manetho,  prêtre égyptien du 3ème siècle avant l’ère chrétienne, et l’identification par Champollion de Shishak avec le pharaon Shoshenq I à partir de laquelle on a tiré toutes les autres dates.

Les Juifs se rappellent de Manetho surtout comme étant l’auteur d’un anti-exode où il décrivait le point de vue égyptien sur l’évènement, assimilant les Israélites à des lépreux et des voleurs, et les liant aux Hyksos. Il fut aussi l’un des inventeurs de l’antisémitisme. Et il a retranscrit les listes des rois d’Egypte. Enfin, nous n’avons pas ses textes originaux mais juste ce que Flavius Josèphe en cite, ainsi qu’Eusebius et Africanus, des versions largement corrompues. Mais c’est à partir de ça que toute l’égyptologie s’est construite.

L’identification Shishak-Shoshenq semble aller de soit, et Shoshenq a mené une campagne militaire en Israel. Mais justement, Shishak lui, non. Il l’a mené contre Judah en alliance avec Israel. Or, Shoshenq ne cite que des villes prises en Israel, aucune en Judah. Comme on ne peut pas à la fois se baser sur la Bible pour identifier Shishak et ensuite la rejeter en disant qu’elle est inexacte, il parait difficile d’accepter l’identification entre Shishak et Shoshenq.

Ramses II, de son nom de trône, Usermaatre Setepenre Ramses, était, d’après Rohl, plus connu du peuple sous le nom de Sysa, probablement prononcé Shysha en hébreu. Le q final étant peut-être un jeu de mot. C’est donc lui le Shishak de la Bible et toute la chronologie est avancée de 300 à 350 ans.

La nouvelle chronologie de Rohl ne se contente pas d’accorder la Bible avec l’archéologie, elle bouleverse complètement toute l’histoire antique telle que nous la connaissons. Ainsi les Hittites ne disparaissent plus au 12ème siècle avant l’ère chrétienne mais au 9ème au moment des invasions des peuples de la mer suite à la guerre de Troy finie vers -863.

Ce qui signifie que Homère n’a pas écrit l’Iliade et l’Odyssée des siècles après les évènements supposés mais juste quelques dizaines d’années. Et qu’il n’y a eu aucun mystérieux « Age sombre » en Grèce durant lequel les Grecs auraient subitement perdu la connaissance de l’écriture et abandonné leurs villes pour tout redécouvrir après, mais une parfaite continuité historique entre l’âge héroïque et l’âge classique.

Les thèses de Rohl ou d’autres du même genre sont soutenues pas un petit nombre de chercheurs, mais le mainstream égyptologue ne les a pas acceptées. En général, ses travaux sont considérés comme sérieux et les questions qu’ils posent comme intéressantes, mais il n’a pas convaincu.

En science, malheureusement, les nouvelles idées ne s’imposent pas parce qu’elles ont su convaincre les chercheurs, mais parce que ceux qui s’y opposent finissent pas mourir et une nouvelle génération sans idées préconçues les accepte. Rohl espère appartenir à cette catégorie. Il a de très nombreux arguments qui confirment sa thèse, notamment les correspondances quasi-parfaites entre les dates de la nouvelle chronologie et les descriptions d’éclipses solaires ou lunaires de textes anciens, alors que les dates ne collent souvent pas avec la chronologie traditionnelle. Mais il y a de vraies raisons de ne pas être totalement convaincu.

Plusieurs tests au carbone 14 ont été menés et ils tendent à confirmer les dates de la chronologie classique. Mais pas toujours. Parfois ils donnent des dates encore plus anciennes et complètement impossibles à accepter. Ce qui fait que de plus en plus de chercheurs rejettent tout simplement cette méthode de confirmation. Mais en attendant elle contredit Rohl et ses semblables.

Ensuite le vrai problème de la chronologie de Rohl n’est pas juste de bouger des dates mais aussi des ères archéologiques. Les archéologues de l’antiquité  découpent la période en « Age de Bronze » et « Age de Fer », eux-mêmes divisés en sous périodes. La nouvelle chronologie implique de faire passer des évènements qu’on identifiait à l’âge de fer vers l’âge de bronze, sauf que cela ne correspond pas aux résultats des fouilles, et si Salomon par exemple devient un roi de l’âge de bronze, le problème c’est qu’une bonne partie des villes d’Israel n’existaient pas à ce moment là, apparemment.

Néanmoins même si la solution apportée par Rohl est erronée, la chronologie actuelle est intenable et induit tout le monde en erreur. Peut-être faut-il effectivement attendre qu’une génération meure et qu’une nouvelle, à l’esprit non corrompue par de vieilles idées, nous fasse entrer en terre promise.

Voir par ailleurs:

Laurent Dandrieu

Valeurs actuelles

25 mars 2018

Cinéma. Comme “la Prière”, le splendide film de Cédric Kahn sorti mercredi en salles, plusieurs longs-métrages récents traitent de Dieu et de la foi. Un retour du sacré au cinéma pour le moins inattendu.

Ce qu’il y a de bien avec la grâce, c’est qu’elle frappe où elle veut, quand elle veut, et qu’elle se plaît à déjouer avec gourmandise toutes les prévisions savantes fondées sur les grandes tendances sociologiques et les prédictions des experts en prospective. L’état de la foi chrétienne en Occident comme la situation idéologique de l’industrie du cinéma ne semblent pas prédisposer, par exemple, à un retour en masse des sujets religieux sur le grand écran. Et pourtant, en quelques semaines, les films à thématique chrétienne se sont comme bousculés au portillon.

Le bal a été ouvert par l’Apparition, de Xavier Giannoli (Valeurs actuelles du 15 février), qui voyait un journaliste incarné par Vincent Lindon mener une enquête canonique sur la réalité d’apparitions mariales. Plus apologétique, Jésus, l’enquête, de Jon Gunn (Valeurs actuelles du 1er mars) racontait sous forme fictionnelle l’histoire véridique d’un journaliste d’investigation américain, Lee Strobel, athée militant qui, affolé de voir sa femme se tourner vers le christianisme, décidait de mener l’enquête pour prouver que la Résurrection était une supercherie… Ce 21 mars est sorti sur nos écrans la Prière, de Cédric Kahn, qui raconte l’itinéraire d’un jeune drogué qui réussit à vaincre sa toxicomanie dans une communauté catholique. Enfin, le 28 mars, ce sera au tour de Marie Madeleine, une biographie de la disciple de Jésus, incarnée par Rooney Mara.

Il y a quelque temps encore, un tel déferlement aurait été impensable. Pendant des décennies pourtant, le christianisme avait été un sujet comme un autre, et les films bibliques (les Dix Commandements, de Cecil B. de Mille, 1956), les vies de saints (l’admirable Monsieur Vincent, de Maurice Cloche, 1947) ou les récits d’apparition (le Chant de Bernadette, d’Henry King, 1943) faisaient naturellement partie du paysage : dans Quand le christianisme fait son cinéma, Bruno de Seguins Pazzis en recense plus de 1 200 (lire notre encadré). Mais la révolution libertaire des années 1960 avait changé la donne : depuis la Religieuse, de Jacques Rivette (1967), on ne parlait plus guère de la foi chrétienne que pour s’en moquer (Mon curé chez les nudistes, 1983, un million d’entrées !), polémiquer (Amen, de Costa-Gavras, 2002) voire blasphémer (de la Dernière Tentation du Christ, de Scorsese, 1988, au Jeanne d’Arc de Luc Besson, 1999). Quand Pialat est sifflé à Cannes pour la Palme d’or de Sous le soleil de Satan (1987), ce n’est pas le cinéaste qui est hué, mais le trop grand respect qu’il a témoigné à son personnage de saint prêtre. Comme il faut toujours des exceptions à la règle, le Thérèse d’Alain Cavalier avait obtenu quelques mois plus tôt le césar du meilleur film, mais c’est sans doute parce qu’il montrait la sainte de Lisieux d’une manière trop atypique pour heurter la bien-pensance anticléricale.

Aux États-Unis, le tournant se produit en 2004. C’est pourtant hors du système que Mel Gibson, animé par sa foi personnelle, réalise la Passion du Christ et le film, absurdement accusé d’antisémitisme et critiqué pour sa réelle violence, est entouré de vives polémiques. D’une force émotionnelle et d’une profondeur mystique intenses, il n’en est pas moins un énorme succès et récolte plus de 600 millions de dollars de recettes (l’acteur qui incarnait Jésus, Jim Caviezel, a récemment confirmé que Gibson l’avait embauché pour un film à venir sur la Résurrection). Hollywood se rend compte alors de l’importance du “marché chrétien” et se met à produire des films à destination de ce public. Sony crée même une filiale à cet effet, Affirm Films, qui a produit une trentaine de films allant du récit biblique (la Résurrection du Christ, 2016, Paul, Apostle of Christ, qui sort ce 23 mars aux États-Unis, avec Jim Caviezel dans le rôle de saint Luc) au film édifiant (Miracles du ciel, 2016).

C’est sur cette vague-là que tente de surfer Marie Madeleine, de Garth Davis, qui sort chez nous le 28 mars. La magnifique Rooney Mara y incarne joliment une Marie Madeleine pleine de douceur, qui tranche avec les autres disciples, toujours prompts à projeter sur le Christ (Joaquin Phoenix, complètement hors sujet) leurs propres aspirations, quand elle se contente de se mettre à son écoute : cette disponibilité du coeur lui vaudra d’être le premier témoin de la Résurrection. Mais on comprend vite, hélas, que si le film met en valeur Marie Madeleine (elle n’est pas ici une prostituée repentie, juste une femme qui s’est révoltée contre le mariage que voulait lui imposer sa famille), c’est pour mieux l’opposer aux autres disciples, ceux qui ont fondé l’Église catholique en trahissant le message du Christ… Ce film d’inspiration protestante se termine ainsi en pamphlet anticatholique, guère plus sérieux que le Da Vinci Code.

En France, malgré les efforts de la maison de distribution catholique Saje pour diffuser ce cinéma religieux américain sous nos latitudes, le succès n’est pas toujours au rendez-vous, et même le très bon Cristeros n’a pas dépassé les 82 000 spectateurs. Au cinéma apologétique, le public français préfère les auteurs qui s’interrogent sur la foi, avec la liberté du doute. Quelques francs-tireurs ont ainsi su faire fi de l’anticléricalisme ambiant pour se lancer sur ce terrain miné. Un basculement se produit avec le triomphe du magnifique Des hommes et des dieux, de Xavier Beauvois (2010), où ce cinéaste athée relatait avec une fidélité scrupuleuse le martyre des moines de Tibhirine.

Ce même respect se retrouve aujourd’hui dans l’Apparition, dont le réalisateur, Xavier Giannoli, se dit encore marqué par son éducation catholique, mais sans pouvoir aujourd’hui envisager la foi autrement que comme un mystère. Sans se prononcer sur la réalité de l’apparition qu’il décrit, le film aborde le sujet avec une honnêteté remarquable, et rend notamment hommage à la volonté de l’Église de ne pas donner prise à la superstition, comme l’explique un prêtre à l’enquêteur joué par Vincent Lindon : « L’Église préférera toujours passer à côté d’un phénomène véritable plutôt que de valider une imposture ; toujours. » À la fin du récit, le cinéaste laisse son personnage au seuil de la foi, sans qu’on sache s’il pourra un jour franchir la porte — position où il se tient sans doute lui-même. Au Figaro, il résumait ainsi le projet de son film : « J’avais envie de montrer que la foi peut être un choix libre et éclairé. »

Plus encore que Xavier Giannoli, Cédric Kahn (qui a décliné notre demande d’entretien, arguant que notre journal serait « trop loin de ses idées ») est étranger à la foi. Il se dit agnostique et aucun de ses films précédents n’avait témoigné de préoccupations religieuses. Dans la Prière, ce qui l’a intéressé, c’est sans doute avant tout le contraste, découvert dans des communautés chrétiennes réelles qui viennent en aide à des toxicomanes, entre l’univers de la drogue et celui de la foi. « La drogue, déclare-t-il à l’hebdomadaire la Vie, c’est presque la définition de la non-croyance. La drogue, c’est une non-foi en la vie, un non-projet. En revanche, la foi, c’est aller vers le plein. »

D’une justesse merveilleuse, refusant tout effet scénaristique facile, sans acteurs connus (sauf Hanna Schygulla, qui joue la fondatrice de la communauté dans une scène dérangeante où l’on peut se demander si elle n’a pas succombé à la tentation de la “gouroutisation”), la Prière décrit avec une simplicité évangélique un itinéraire, celui du jeune Thomas (Anthony Bajon, dont l’apparence un peu fruste cache un acteur d’une sensibilité merveilleuse), qui débarque, comme on abat sa dernière carte dans une partie dont l’enjeu est la vie ou la mort, dans une communauté chrétienne perdue dans la montagne. Les règles y sont simples : sevrage absolu, compagnonnage permanent d’un aîné plus avancé dans le processus de désintoxication, travail physique et, surtout, prière constante, qu’on y croie ou qu’on n’y croie pas.

Thomas n’y croit pas et, lorsqu’il arrive, il n’est qu’un bloc de révolte et de souffrance, qui ne peut être qu’horripilé par ce qu’il voit comme des enfantillages. Mais l’envie de s’en sortir est la plus forte, Thomas s’accroche ; il commence par percevoir l’effet apaisant de la prière puis, peu à peu, le sens des paroles l’imprègne, jusqu’à comprendre que l’ailleurs radical qu’il cherchait faussement dans la drogue, c’est dans la prière qu’il peut l’atteindre. Dès lors, les psaumes qu’il connaît désormais par coeur ne sont plus seulement une nouvelle drogue, tranquillisante : ils deviennent une protection, un ami intime dont une épreuve va lui permettre de mesurer qu’il tient ses promesses : « Seigneur, que mes persécutions sont nombreuses ! Plusieurs s’élèvent contre moi ! […] Mais toi, Seigneur, tu es un bouclier pour moi, tu es ma gloire et tu me relèves la tête. » (Psaume 3).

Le rendez-vous de la faiblesse et de la grâce

Il y a quelque chose de miraculeux dans la manière dont Cédric Kahn a réussi à capter cet itinéraire sans jamais tomber dans le pathos ou la mièvrerie, gardant la bonne distance qui laisse le spectateur, seul, juger de l’expérience qu’il observe, l’accepter ou la rejeter. Sans que cette émotion soit sollicitée par des effets de mise en scène racoleurs, il est difficile en tout cas de ne pas se laisser émouvoir jusqu’aux larmes par le chemin parcouru par Thomas, par ses douleurs, ses épreuves, sa ténacité, par la façon dont il passe de la noirceur de la révolte à la lumière de la confiance retrouvée. En captant la façon dont la faiblesse, dans la prière d’abandon qui lui sert de refuge, a rendez-vous avec la grâce qui protège et qui sauve, Cédric Kahn a réalisé, peut-être à son propre insu, un grand film mystique.

En adhérant à la voie proposée par cette communauté, Thomas cherchait sans doute un père de substitution, et l’a d’une certaine façon trouvé. Mais, la dernière scène le prouve magnifiquement, ce père invisible lui a surtout fait le plus beau des cadeaux : la liberté, sans laquelle il n’est pas possible d’aimer. La liberté d’aimer : voilà sans doute, semble nous dire Cédric Kahn, le plus précieux de tous les dons de la foi.

Voir encore:

‘Paul, Apostle of Christ’: Critics Hate It, the People Love It

Those critics who bothered, or who were given an opportunity to review the latest faith-based movie Paul, Apostle of Christ, dumped all over it at a 75 percent rate; the audience score, however, is a healthy 93 percent approval, according to Rotten Tomatoes.

Opening wide in 1,473 theaters this weekend, Paul, the Apostle of Christ stars Jim Caviezel and tells the story of Saint Paul (James Faulkner) who, as Saul of Tarsus, was a fierce persecutor and murderer of Christians. After his famous conversion (31 – 36 AD) on the Road to Damascus, Saul became Paul and, filled with the Holy Ghost, became one of the most important figures in early Christianity. Fourteen of the 27 books in the New Testament are attributed to Paul. He was martyred in Rome sometime between 64-68 AD.

Caviezel, who played Jesus in Mel Gibson’s 2004 record-breaking blockbuster The Passion of the Christ, plays Saint Luke here, a companion of Paul’s who is believed to have written one of the four Gospels (The Gospel of Luke), which tells the story of Christ’s time here on earth. Many scholars believe that whoever wrote The Gospel of Luke also wrote Acts of the Apostles.

Luke is not written as a personal eyewitness account, Acts is.

Of the 20 critics who reviewed Paul, Apostle of Christ, 15 gave it a negative review, which means it has a 25 percent rotten rating at Rotten Tomatoes.

Despite its wide release, the success of The Passion, and last week’s shocking success of I Can Only Imagine — a $7 million faith-based film that has already earned $23 million and currently the second most popular movie in America (beating even Tomb Raider, which was released on the same weekend) — the far-left Los Angeles Times found Paul worthy of only a four-paragraph review that writes the movie off as “ponderous” and snarks at Caviezel as a “suitably serious, Bible-flick-ready actor.”

Over at the left-wing Variety, the negative review can best be described as a oh-so-Woke non sequitur that finds the Crusades relevant, even though the Crusades came hundreds of years after Paul’s martyrdom:

Like its namesake, “Paul, Apostle of Christ” is dedicated to “all who have been persecuted for their faith,” though nothing about the film suggests tolerance of religions other than Christianity. As a final assignment in a college medieval history course, my fellow students and I were expected to write a 10-page essay summarizing the entire semester from a single prompt: “In the long run, who won, the Christians or the Romans?” This film depicts circumstances as they were in 67 A.D., but after Constantine converted to Christianity in the early 4th century, the persecuted became the powerful, and the church went on to sanction the execution of heretics, the Crusades, the Spanish Inquisition and so on.

The Wrap’s review also brings some Woke into it. “Naturally, no sticking points about Paul’s legacy, like his (disputed) rejection of female church leaders, make it into Hyatt’s script,” the reviewer complains … naturally.

Nevertheless, of the 287 audience members who rated the movie on Rotten Tomatoes, a full 93 percent said they “liked it.” The movie held some sneak previews Thursday night.

As of now, Paul, the Apostle of Christ, is predicted to open to $4.3 million.

As we head into Easter (April 1), a third faith-based title opens next weekend, the third entry in the popular God’s Not Dead series — God’s Not Dead: A Light In Darkness, which lands in 1,500 theaters.

Voir de plus:

Rooney Mara as the titular Mary.

Rooney Mara, the star of this Easter’s biblical epic Mary Magdalene, complained bitterly in 2015 about her role in the Hollywood whitewashing controversy surrounding Joe Wright’s film Pan.

In Pan, Mara – who is white – played Native American character Tiger Lily, a casting decision which drew sharp criticism and over 96,000 signatures in a petition protesting the whitewashing of the film. In an interview with The Telegraph, Mara lamented:

I really hate, hate, hate that I am on that side of the whitewashing conversation. I really do. I don’t ever want to be on that side of it again. I can understand why people were upset and frustrated.

And yet here we are. Mary Magdalene is the latest in a long line of Hollywood-produced biblical films to whitewash its cast. The classic biblical epic The Ten Commandments kicked off the trend in the 1950s. More recently, Ridley Scott’s biblical blockbuster Exodus attracted widespread criticism and a social media boycott campaign for having a white cast.

While Mary Magdalene’s director, Garth Davis, avoids being as boorish as Scott, who infamously told Exodus boycotters to “get a life” in his response to whitewashing allegations, he still managed to sidestep the issue, saying:

For me, the most critical, important thing was that I made the most emotionally compelling Mary and Rooney just has such a unique quality. She has an otherworldliness, and in her silences – there’s no other actress like her – she just creates these universes. And all of that was just so critical in bringing to life Mary’s character, so I felt that I had to choose that.

Nevertheless, the Mary Magdalene film is troubling for its lack of diversity. While its portrayal of Judas, played by Tahar Rahim – who is of French Algerian descent – might seem to be a positive development from previous popular cultural representations of the character, there are other problems, too.

White Jesus

Jesus is also played by a white actor: Joaquin Phoenix. Phoenix is a talented performer, but his Christ delivers lines as if he’s stoned and mansplains forgiveness to women who express anger about rape and femicide – a particularly galling scene given the film’s links with Harvey Weinstein (Weinstein’s company was the film’s US distributor) and that it’s been hailed as a feminist film. Alongside Mara, whose complexion often matches her cream outfits, the whiteness of the actors in the film is startling.

Jesus (Phoenix) and Mary (Mara) in the new Mary Magdalene film. Transmission Films.

Stranger still is the bizarre, and seemingly unnecessary, array of accents in the film. While the white leads, Phoenix and Mara, get to speak in their natural American notes, other characters, such as the main black actor Chiwetel Ejiofor, who plays Peter, affect a variety of accents. Ejiofor – who has won a flurry of awards, including a best actor Oscar for 12 Years A Slave, over the years – swaps his natural English accent for a generic “African” accent. This proves to be a problematic move.

Chiwetel Ejiofor’s discusses Mary Magdalene in his natural English accent.

Clearly, given his natural speaking voice, Ejiofor’s African accent in the film is a deliberate directorial choice. If being African was an essential part of the characterisation of Peter, then one wonders why Davis didn’t just hire an African actor. As it stands, it’s strikingly peculiar in the film that Ejiofor puts on an accent while others – the lead white actors – do not.

Unfortunately, Peter’s faux-African accent tends to signify negative racial and ethnic stereotyping in the film. Peter repeatedly proves himself to be the misogynist in the apostle group. While the other apostles embrace Mary Magdalene and, in the case of Judas, become her friend, Peter remains as hostile to Mary at the end of the film as he is at the start.

Peter – played by British actor Chiwetel Ejiofor. Transmission Films.

Misogynist?

In the scene when Mary leaves her family to join the apostles, Peter says that she will divide them, a sentiment he repeats in their final scene together (an episode borrowed from The Gospel of Mary) when, after she is the first apostle to witness the resurrected Jesus, he tells her that she has “weakened” the group.

In another scene where Peter and Mary come across a town ransacked by Romans, Mary rushes to the aid of the starving and suffering inhabitants. Peter, however, tells an appalled Mary that they don’t have time to help. The character of Peter, then, is in danger of portraying black African men as regressive, misogynistic and self-serving.

Despite the assurances of Davis that the whitewashing of the Mary Magdalene movie was merely a side effect of making the best casting choices, the film remains troubling in its representations of race.

Mara may well hate being on the wrong side of such controversies but while Hollywood fails to take seriously racial and ethnic representations, then the dubious tradition of whitewashing in its films will continue.

Voir enfin:

Jesus wasn’t white: he was a brown-skinned, Middle Eastern Jew. Here’s why that matters

Robyn J. Whitaker
Hans Zatzka (Public Domain)/The Conversation

Bromby Senior Lecturer in Biblical Studies, Trinity College, University of Divinity

28 March 2018

I grew up in a Christian home, where a photo of Jesus hung on my bedroom wall. I still have it. It is schmaltzy and rather tacky in that 1970s kind of way, but as a little girl I loved it. In this picture, Jesus looks kind and gentle, he gazes down at me lovingly. He is also light-haired, blue-eyed, and very white.

The problem is, Jesus was not white. You’d be forgiven for thinking otherwise if you’ve ever entered a Western church or visited an art gallery. But while there is no physical description of him in the Bible, there is also no doubt that the historical Jesus, the man who was executed by the Roman State in the first century CE, was a brown-skinned, Middle Eastern Jew.

This is not controversial from a scholarly point of view, but somehow it is a forgotten detail for many of the millions of Christians who will gather to celebrate Easter this week.

On Good Friday, Christians attend churches to worship Jesus and, in particular, remember his death on a cross. In most of these churches, Jesus will be depicted as a white man, a guy that looks like Anglo-Australians, a guy easy for other Anglo-Australians to identify with.

Think for a moment of the rather dashing Jim Caviezel, who played Jesus in Mel Gibson’s Passion of the Christ. He is an Irish-American actor. Or call to mind some of the most famous artworks of Jesus’ crucifixion – Ruben, Grunewald, Giotto – and again we see the European bias in depicting a white-skinned Jesus.

Does any of this matter? Yes, it really does. As a society, we are well aware of the power of representation and the importance of diverse role models.

After winning the 2013 Oscar for Best Supporting Actress for her role in 12 Years a Slave, Kenyan actress Lupita Nyong’o shot to fame. In interviews since then, Nyong’o has repeatedly articulated her feelings of inferiority as a young woman because all the images of beauty she saw around her were of lighter-skinned women. It was only when she saw the fashion world embracing Sudanese model Alek Wek that she realised black could be beautiful too.

If we can recognise the importance of ethnically and physically diverse role models in our media, why can’t we do the same for faith? Why do we continue to allow images of a whitened Jesus to dominate?

Jim Caviezel in Mel Gibson’s 2004 film The Passion of the Christ. IMDBMany churches and cultures do depict Jesus as a brown or black man. Orthodox Christians usually have a very different iconography to that of European art – if you enter a church in Africa, you’ll likely see an African Jesus on display.

But these are rarely the images we see in Australian Protestant and Catholic churches, and it is our loss. It allows the mainstream Christian community to separate their devotion to Jesus from compassionate regard for those who look different.

I would even go so far as to say it creates a cognitive disconnect, where one can feel deep affection for Jesus but little empathy for a Middle Eastern person. It likewise has implications for the theological claim that humans are made in God’s image. If God is always imaged as white, then the default human becomes white and such thinking undergirds racism.

Historically, the whitewashing of Jesus contributed to Christians being some of the worst perpetrators of anti-Semitism and it continues to manifest in the “othering” of non-Anglo Saxon Australians.


Pour en savoir plus : What history really tells us about the birth of Jesus


This Easter, I can’t help but wonder, what would our church and society look like if we just remembered that Jesus was brown? If we were confronted with the reality that the body hung on the cross was a brown body: one broken, tortured, and publicly executed by an oppressive regime.

How might it change our attitudes if we could see that the unjust imprisonment, abuse, and execution of the historical Jesus has more in common with the experience of Indigenous Australians or asylum seekers than it does with those who hold power in the church and usually represent Christ?

Perhaps most radical of all, I can’t help but wonder what might change if we were more mindful that the person Christians celebrate as God in the flesh and saviour of the entire world was not a white man, but a Middle Eastern Jew.


La Rose blanche/75e: Après la tragédie, la farce (75 years after the WWII anti-nazi student group, Hollywood’s joke of an anti-sexual harassment movement picks up the white rose symbol)

26 février, 2018
Hans et Sophie Scholl et leur ami Christoph ProbstHegel fait remarquer quelque part que, dans l’histoire universelle, les grands faits et les grands personnages se produisent, pour ainsi dire, deux fois. Il a oublié d’ajouter : la première fois comme tragédie, la seconde comme farce. Marx
Depuis que l’ordre religieux est ébranlé – comme le christianisme le fut sous la Réforme – les vices ne sont pas seuls à se trouver libérés. Certes les vices sont libérés et ils errent à l’aventure et ils font des ravages. Mais les vertus aussi sont libérées et elles errent, plus farouches encore, et elles font des ravages plus terribles encore. Le monde moderne est envahi des veilles vertus chrétiennes devenues folles. Les vertus sont devenues folles pour avoir été isolées les unes des autres, contraintes à errer chacune en sa solitude.  G.K. Chesterton
L’inauguration majestueuse de l’ère « post-chrétienne » est une plaisanterie. Nous sommes dans un ultra-christianisme caricatural qui essaie d’échapper à l’orbite judéo-chrétienne en « radicalisant » le souci des victimes dans un sens antichrétien. (…) Jusqu’au nazisme, le judaïsme était la victime préférentielle de ce système de bouc émissaire. Le christianisme ne venait qu’en second lieu. Depuis l’Holocauste, en revanche, on n’ose plus s’en prendre au judaïsme, et le christianisme est promu au rang de bouc émissaire numéro un. René Girard
La Rose blanche (en allemand Die Weiße Rose) est le nom d’un groupe de résistants allemands, fondé en juin 1942, pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale, et composé de quelques étudiants et de leurs proches. Ce nom aurait été choisi par Hans Scholl en référence à la romance de Clemens Brentano (Les Romances du Rosaire, 1852), ou au roman de B. Traven La Rose blanche (1929). Ce groupe a été arrêté en février 1943 par la Gestapo et ses membres ont été exécutés. Wikipedia
We choose the white rose because historically it stands for hope, peace, sympathy and resistance. Voices in Entertainment
 The colour white, of course, represents peace, but it is also has history in the women’s movement. White was one of the trio of colours adopted by the suffragette movement, along with green and purple; white stood for purity. Hillary Clinton’s white pantsuit, which she wore to accept the nomination as Democratic candidate for the 2016 election, was seen making a feminist statement. The Guardian
When he landed in New Delhi last Saturday, Trudeau was greeted on the tarmac, not by the Prime Minister or Foreign Minister but by the junior minister for agriculture and farmers’ welfare. Other world leaders, including Barack Obama and Benjamin Netanyahu, have been given a personal welcome by Narendra Modi. Prime Minister Modi, a savvy social media user, failed even to note Trudeau’s arrival on Twitter, though on the same day he found time to tweet about plans to unveil a new shipping container terminal. He did not acknowledge Trudeau until five days later and only met him the day before the Canadian PM and his family were to return home. Why were the Indians so frosty in their reception? They suspect Trudeau’s government of private sympathy for the Khalistani separatist movement, which wants to form a breakaway Sikh state in Punjab. Thankfully, Trudeau didn’t do anything to inflame those suspicions. Well, unless you count inviting a notorious Khalistani separatist to a reception. And then to dinner. With the Prime Minister. Not just any separatist, either. Jaspal Atwal is a former member of the International Sikh Youth Federation, proscribed as a terror group in both India and Canada, and was convicted of the attempted assassination of Indian cabinet minister Malkiat Singh Sidhu. Best of all, he even got a photo taken with Trudeau’s wife Sophie. But there were still a few Indians unoffended by the image-obsessed Canadian PM and he quickly remedied that. He turned up for one event in a gaudy golden kurta, churidars and chappals. At another, he broke into the traditional Bhaṅgṛā dance only to stop midway through when no one else joined in. Only after the local press pointed out that this was a little condescending and a lot tacky was Justin-ji finally photographed wearing a suit. It was less like a state visit and more like a weeklong audition for the next Sanjay Leela Bhansali movie. Here was Justin Trudeau, the progressive’s progressive, up to his pagṛi in cultural appropriation. At least he achieved his goal of bringing Indians and Canadians closer together: both have spent the past week cringing at this spectacle of well-meaning minstrelsy. I want to like Justin Trudeau. I really do. He’s a centrist liberal in an age where neither the adjective nor the noun is doing very well. Trump to his south, Brexit and Corbyn across the water, Putin beyond that: Trudeau should be a hero for liberal democrats. Instead, from his Eid Mubarak socks at Toronto Pride to his preference for ‘peoplekind’ over ‘mankind’, Trudeau presents like an alt-right parody of liberalism. He’s gender-neutral pronouns. He’s avocado toast and flaxseed soy smoothies. He’s safe spaces and checked privileges. Trudeau is a cuck. And all that would be fine. In fact, it would be a hoot to have a liberal standard-bearer who could troll the 4chan pale males in their overvaped, undersexed basements. But far from an icon for the middle ground, Trudeau is the sort of right-on relativist who gives liberals a bad name. He has spoken of his ‘admiration’ for China’s dictatorship for ‘allowing them to turn their economy around on a dime’. He called Fidel Castro ‘larger than life’ and ‘a remarkable leader’ who showed ‘tremendous dedication and love for the Cuban people’. Trudeau’s government refused to accept the Islamic State’s ethnic cleansing of the Yazidis was a genocide until the UN formally recognised it as such. In 2016 he issued a statement on Holocaust Remembrance Day that neglected to mention Jewish victims of the Shoah and the following year unveiled a memorial plaque with the same omission. Trudeau’s problem is that he always agrees with the last good intention he encountered. He seems to have picked up his political philosophy from Saturday morning cartoons: by your powers combined, I am Captain Snowflake. There is no spine of policy, no political compass, no vision beyond the next group hug or national apology. The centre ground needs a champion and instead it got an inspirational quote calendar with abs. Trudeau’s not a Grit, he’s pure mush. The Spectator
On y voit comment pousse sous nos yeux, non pas un simple fascisme local, mais un racisme proche du nazisme à ses débuts. Comme toute idéologie, le racisme allemand, lui aussi, avait évolué, et, à l’origine, il ne s’en était pris qu’aux droits de l’homme et du citoyen des juifs. Il est possible que sans la seconde guerre mondiale, le « problème juif » se serait soldé par une émigration « volontaire » des juifs des territoires sous contrôle allemand. Après tout, pratiquement tous les juifs d’Allemagne et d’Autriche ont pu sortir à temps. Il n’est pas exclu que pour certains à droite, le même sort puisse être réservé aux Palestiniens. Il faudrait seulement qu’une occasion se présente, une bonne guerre par exemple, accompagnée d’une révolution en Jordanie, qui permettrait de refouler vers l’Est une majeure partie des habitants de la Cisjordanie occupée. Les Smotrich et les Zohar, disons-le bien, n’entendent pas s’attaquer physiquement aux Palestiniens, à condition, bien entendu, que ces derniers acceptent sans résistance l’hégémonie juive. Ils refusent simplement de reconnaître leurs droits de l’homme, leur droit à la liberté et à l’indépendance. Dans le même ordre d’idées, d’ores et déjà, en cas d’annexion officielle des territoires occupés, eux et leurs partis politiques annoncent sans complexe qu’ils refuseront aux Palestiniens la nationalité israélienne, y compris, évidemment, le droit de vote. En ce qui concerne la majorité au pouvoir, les Palestiniens sont condamnés pour l’éternité au statut de population occupée. La raison en est simple et clairement énoncée : les Arabes ne sont pas juifs, c’est pourquoi ils n’ont pas le droit de prétendre à la propriété d’une partie quelconque de la terre promise au peuple juif. Pour Smotrich, Shaked et Zohar, un juif de Brooklyn, qui n’a peut-être jamais mis les pieds sur cette terre, en est le propriétaire légitime, mais l’Arabe, qui y est né, comme ses ancêtres avant lui, est un étranger dont la présence est acceptée uniquement par la bonne volonté des juifs et leur humanité. Le Palestinien, nous dit Zohar, « n’a pas le droit à l’autodétermination car il n’est pas le propriétaire du sol. Je le veux comme résident et ceci du fait de mon honnêteté, il est né ici, il vit ici, je ne lui dirai pas de s’en aller. Je regrette de le dire mais [les Palestiniens] souffrent d’une lacune majeure : ils ne sont pas nés juifs ». Ce qui signifie que même si les Palestiniens décidaient de se convertir, commençaient à se faire pousser des papillotes et à étudier la Torah et le Talmud, cela ne leur servirait à rien. Pas plus qu’aux Soudanais et Erythréens et leurs enfants, qui sont israéliens à tous égards – langue, culture, socialisation. Il en était de même chez les nazis. Ensuite vient l’apartheid, qui, selon la plupart des « penseurs » de la droite, pourrait, sous certaines conditions, s’appliquer également aux Arabes citoyens israéliens depuis la fondation de l’Etat. Pour notre malheur, beaucoup d’Israéliens, qui ont honte de tant de leurs élus et honnissent leurs idées, pour toutes sortes de raisons, continuent à voter pour la droite. Zeev Sternhell
The central complaint of Netanyahu’s critics is that he has failed to make good on the promise of his 2009 speech at Bar-Ilan University, where he claimed to accept the principle of a Palestinian state. Subsidiary charges include his refusal to halt settlement construction or give former Palestinian Prime Minister Salam Fayyad a sufficient political boost. It should go without saying that a Palestinian state is a terrific idea in principle — assuming, that is, that it resembles the United Arab Emirates. But Israelis have no reason to believe that it will look like anything except the way Gaza does today: militant, despotic, desperate and aggressive. Netanyahu’s foreign critics are demanding that he replicate on a large scale what has failed catastrophically on a smaller scale. It’s an absurd ask. It’s also strange that the same people who insist that Israel help create a Palestinian state in order to remain a democracy seem so indifferent to the views of that democracy. Israel’s political left was not destroyed by Netanyahu. It was obliterated one Palestinian suicide bombing, rocket salvo, tunnel attack and rejected statehood offer at a time. Bibi’s long tenure of office is the consequence, not the cause, of this. Specifically, it is the consequence of Israel’s internalization of the two great lessons of the past 30 years. First, that separation from the Palestinians is essential — in the long term. Second, that peace with the Palestinians is impossible — in the short term. The result is a policy that amounts to a type of indefinite holding pattern, with Israel circling a runway it knows it cannot yet land on even as it fears running out of gas. The risks here are obvious. But it’s hard to imagine any other sort of approach, which is why any successor to Netanyahu will have to pursue essentially identical policies — policies whose chief art will consist in fending off false promises of salvation. There’s a long Jewish history of this. For all of his flaws, few have done it as well as Bibi, which is why he has endured, and will probably continue to do so. Bret Stephens
Un Israélien qui compare Israël au « nazisme des débuts », voilà qui ne peut qu’enchanter, du Monde à France Inter, de Mediapart au Muslim Post. D’autant plus que Zeev Sternhell a l’avantage de conférer une pseudo-scientificité à deux grandes causes, la détestation de la France et la haine d’Israël – quel autre sentiment peut inspirer un pays en voie de nazification ? En effet, avant de devenir le savant utile de l’antisionisme extrême gauchiste européen, Sternhell s’est rendu célèbre avec Ni droite, ni gauche, publié en 1983, une analyse du fascisme français qui est à peu près partout et toujours prête à resurgir, thèse assez proche de celle de L’idéologie française de BHL, paru deux ans plus tôt, et recyclée depuis en mépris du populo et de ses idées nauséabondes. Bref, avec Shlomo Sand, l’historien qui considère que le peuple juif est un mythe, et quelques autres, Sternhell fait partie des Israéliens fréquentables. Et pour les sites islamistes il est le « bon juif » idéal. Ce qui est marrant, c’est que, même concernant le fascisme français, Shlomo Sand lui conteste la qualité d’historien. De fait, outre qu’elle est abjecte, sa comparaison est idiote car elle oublie un léger détail : il n’y avait pas, en 1930, de conflit entre les Juifs et l’Allemagne, ni de Juifs souhaitant bruyamment la disparition de l’Allemagne ou célébrant la mort de petites filles allemandes. Le plus écœurant, c’est la gourmandise avec laquelle notre radio publique s’est jetée sur cette bonne feuille. En dépit d’une actualité chargée, sur France Culture, on lui a accordé l’honneur des titres, honneur inédit pour un texte de cette nature. Emportée par son élan – ou son inconscient-, la journaliste a annoncé : « Un intellectuel israélien compare Israël au nazisme des années 1940. » Sternhell, et c’est déjà dingue, parle du nazisme des débuts. Celui des années 1940, c’est celui de la fin – de l’extermination. Peu importent ces distinctions, nombre de journalistes, imbus de leurs grands sentiments et de leur méconnaissance totale du dossier, étaient trop heureux de trouver, sous une plume israélienne, cette confirmation de tous les poncifs qu’ils ont en tête. (…) Surtout, tout occupé qu’il est à déceler les germes de nazisme chez ses concitoyens, Sternhell oublie de porter son regard un peu plus loin. S’il l’avait fait, il aurait pu entendre et voir des expressions beaucoup plus inquiétantes du nationalisme trempé dans l’antisémitisme le plus crasse, expressions qui vont jusqu’au poignard, à la roquette, sans oublier la volonté de destruction tranquillement assumée dans des mosquées ou des salles de classe. Ajoutons qu’en Israël, Sternhell et les autres ont pignon sur rue et c’est très bien. S’il y a des partisans de la paix avec Israël dans le monde arabe, ils rasent les murs, ou sont menacés de mort. Et dans les pays arabes, il n’y a pas de question juive. S’il avait vu tout cela, Sternhell aurait compris que la volonté de conserver une majorité juive ne révèle nullement une haine raciale. La plupart des Israéliens le savent, sans majorité juive, il n’y a plus d’Etat juif. Fin du sionisme, chapitre clos. C’est d’ailleurs ce souci qui devrait conduire le gouvernement israélien à rechercher une séparation négociée avec les Palestiniens, qu’ils soient ou pas (et ils ne le sont pas) les partenaires idéaux. Oui, l’occupation qui pourrit la vie des Palestiniens opère un travail de sape souterrain dans la société israélienne. Mais le danger, pour Israël, n’est pas de sombrer dans le nazisme. Il est de perdre le sens de la pluralité – et de finir par ressembler à ses voisins. Elisabeth Lévy
 Attention: une rose blanche peut en cacher une autre !

Au lendemain du 75e anniversaire de la décapitation du groupe de résistance d’étudiants antinazis dit de la Rose blanche

Et la reprise du même symbole par Hollywood et le monde de la chanson pour symboliser sa lutte contre le harcèlement sexuel …
Pendant que déguisé en acteur de Bollywood, la véritable caricature de progressisme qui sert actuellement de premier ministre à nos pauvres amis canadiens achevait de ridiculiser son pays sur la scène internationale …
Et qu’oubliant qu’il n’y avait pas dans les années 30 de « Juifs souhaitant bruyamment la disparition de l’Allemagne ou célébrant la mort de petites filles allemandes », un historien israélien qui compare Israël au « nazisme des débuts » se voit gratifié d’une tribune du Monde
Comment ne pas repenser …
Pour qualifier cette étrange époque que nous vivons entre « Génération Flocon de neige » et « idées chrétiennes devenues folles » …
Au fameux mot de Marx sur la répétition tragi-comique, par son premier président et dernier monarque de la nation française de neveu, du coup d’État du 18 brumaire par Napoléon un demi-siècle après ?

Zeev Sternhell, savant utile de l’antisionisme
L’historien israélien a comparé l’Etat hébreu au « nazisme à ses débuts »…
Elisabeth Lévy
Causeur
20 février 2018

Un Israélien qui compare Israël au « nazisme des débuts », voilà qui ne peut qu’enchanter, du Monde à France Inter, de Mediapart au Muslim Post. D’autant plus que Zeev Sternhell a l’avantage de conférer une  pseudo-scientificité à deux grandes causes, la détestation de la France et la haine d’Israël – quel autre sentiment peut inspirer un pays en voie de nazification ? En effet, avant de devenir le savant utile de l’antisionisme extrême gauchiste européen, Sternhell s’est rendu célèbre avec Ni droite, ni gauche, publié en 1983, une analyse du fascisme français qui est à peu près partout et toujours prête à resurgir, thèse assez proche de celle de L’idéologie française de BHL, paru deux ans plus tôt, et recyclée depuis en mépris du populo et de ses idées nauséabondes.

Sternhell, leur « bon juif » idéal

Bref, avec Shlomo Sand, l’historien qui considère que le peuple juif est un mythe, et quelques autres, Sternhell fait partie des Israéliens fréquentables. Et pour les sites islamistes il est le « bon juif » idéal. Ce qui est marrant, c’est que, même concernant le fascisme français, Shlomo Sand lui conteste la qualité d’historien. De fait, outre qu’elle est abjecte, sa comparaison est idiote car elle oublie un léger détail : il n’y avait pas, en 1930, de conflit entre les Juifs et l’Allemagne, ni de Juifs souhaitant bruyamment la disparition de l’Allemagne ou célébrant la mort de petites filles allemandes.

Le plus écœurant, c’est la gourmandise avec laquelle notre radio publique s’est jetée sur cette bonne feuille. En dépit d’une actualité chargée, sur France Culture, on lui a accordé l’honneur des titres, honneur inédit pour un texte de cette nature. Emportée par son élan – ou son inconscient-, la journaliste a annoncé : « Un intellectuel israélien compare Israël au nazisme des années 1940. » Sternhell, et c’est déjà dingue, parle du nazisme des débuts. Celui des années 1940, c’est celui de la fin – de l’extermination. Peu importent ces distinctions, nombre de journalistes, imbus de leurs grands sentiments et de leur méconnaissance totale du dossier, étaient trop heureux de trouver, sous une plume israélienne, cette confirmation de tous les poncifs qu’ils ont en tête. Saluons donc Bernard Guetta qui, ce mardi matin, a remis les pendules à l’heure.

Tout n’est pas faux, bien sûr, dans le libelle publié, lundi 19 février, par Le Monde sous le titre accrocheur : « En Israël pousse un racisme proche du nazisme à ses débuts ». Sternhell s’appuie sur des projets du gouvernement de geler par la loi et pour toujours le statut de Jérusalem, ainsi que sur des signes réels de la montée d’un nationalisme raciste. Mais, faute de regard historique (ou, dit plus simplement, de la prise en compte du contexte), il sort subrepticement de la route de l’argumentation pour dérouler un scénario qui conduit au mieux à l’apartheid et au pire suivez mon regard.

La hallalisation des esprits fait son chemin

Il y a en effet en Israël des rabbins qui ont appelé à l’assassinat d’Yitzhak Rabin, ou des élus qui réclament des salles d’accouchement séparées pour les Arabes et pour les Juives. Le nationalisme extrémiste, volontiers raciste sur les bords, progresse, y compris dans l’armée. En tout cas, la hallalisation des esprits (c’est-à-dire la propension à diviser le monde entre pur et impur) fait son chemin chez pas mal de juifs.

Mais il y a aussi des juifs pour la Palestine, des soldats militant pour la paix, une presse déchaînée, des ONG brailleuses et une intelligentsia raffinée, sans oublier une justice, une police et tout le reste, pour défendre l’Etat de droit s’il est menacé. Bref, toute une cacophonie judéo-israélienne dans laquelle on souhaite bonne chance à un dictateur.

Surtout, tout occupé qu’il est à déceler les germes de nazisme chez ses concitoyens, Sternhell oublie de porter son regard un peu plus loin. S’il l’avait fait, il aurait pu entendre et voir des expressions beaucoup plus inquiétantes du nationalisme trempé dans l’antisémitisme le plus crasse, expressions qui vont jusqu’au poignard, à la roquette, sans oublier la volonté de destruction tranquillement assumée dans des mosquées ou des salles de classe. Ajoutons qu’en Israël, Sternhell et les autres ont pignon sur rue et c’est très bien. S’il y a des partisans de la paix avec Israël dans le monde arabe, ils rasent les murs, ou sont menacés de mort. Et dans les pays arabes, il n’y a pas de question juive.

Sans majorité juive, il n’y a plus d’Etat juif

S’il avait vu tout cela, Sternhell aurait compris que la volonté de conserver une majorité juive ne révèle nullement une haine raciale. La plupart des Israéliens le savent, sans majorité juive, il n’y a plus d’Etat juif. Fin du sionisme, chapitre clos. C’est d’ailleurs ce souci qui devrait conduire le gouvernement israélien à rechercher une séparation négociée avec les Palestiniens, qu’ils soient ou pas (et ils ne le sont pas) les partenaires idéaux.

Oui, l’occupation qui pourrit la vie des Palestiniens opère un travail de sape souterrain  dans la société israélienne. Mais le danger, pour Israël, n’est pas de sombrer dans le nazisme. Il est de perdre le sens de la pluralité – et de finir par ressembler à ses voisins.

Voir aussi:

Zeev Sternhell : « En Israël pousse un racisme proche du nazisme à ses débuts »
Dans une tribune au « Monde », l’historien spécialiste du fascisme, se lance dans une comparaison entre le sort des juifs avant la guerre et celui des Palestiniens aujourd’hui.
Zeev Sternhell (Historien, membre de l’Académie israélienne des sciences et lettres, professeur à l’Université hébraïque de Jérusalem, spécialiste de l’histoire du fascisme)
Le Monde
18.02.2018

[L’annonce est autant symbolique que contestée à l’international : le 6 décembre 2017, le président américain Donald Trump a décidé de reconnaître Jérusalem comme capitale d’Israël. L’ambassade américaine, actuellement établie à Tel-Aviv, ouvrira ses portes avant fin 2019. L’initiative a rapidement été saluée par le premier ministre israélien, Benyamin Nétanyahou. Depuis, à la Knesset, le Parlement, la droite mène une offensive sur plusieurs fronts. Le 2 janvier, les députés ont voté un amendement à la loi fondamentale, c’est-à-dire constitutionnelle, rendant impossible toute cession d’une partie de Jérusalem sans un vote emporté à la majorité des deux-tiers. Plusieurs députés ont aussi avancé des projets de loi visant à redéfinir le périmètre de la ville, en rejetant des quartiers arabes entiers se trouvant au-delà du mur de séparation, ou bien en intégrant de vastes colonies. Pour l’historien Zeev Sternhell, ces décisions visent à imposer aux Palestiniens d’accepter sans résistance l’hégémonie juive sur le territoire, les condamnant pour l’éternité au statut de population occupée.]

Tribune. Je tente parfois d’imaginer comment essaiera d’expliquer notre époque l’historien qui vivra dans cinquante ou cent ans. A quel moment a-t-on commencé, se demandera-t-il sans doute, à comprendre en Israël que ce pays, devenu Etat constitué lors de la guerre d’indépendance de 1948, fondé sur les ruines du judaïsme européen et au prix du sang de 1 % de sa population, dont des milliers de combattants survivants de la Shoah, était devenu pour les non-juifs, sous sa domination, un monstre ? Quand, exactement, les Israéliens, au moins en partie, ont-ils compris que leur cruauté envers les non-juifs sous leur emprise en territoires occupés, leur détermination à briser les espoirs de liberté et d’indépendance des Palestiniens ou leur refus d’accorder l’asile aux réfugiés africains commençaient à saper la légitimité morale de leur existence nationale ?

La réponse, dira peut-être l’historien, se trouve en microcosme dans les idées et les activités de deux importants députés de la majorité, Miki Zohar (Likoud) et Bezalel Smotrich (Le Foyer juif), fidèles représentants de la politique gouvernementale, récemment propulsés sur le devant de la scène. Mais ce qui est plus important encore, c’est le fait que cette même idéologie se trouve à la base des propositions de loi dites « fondamentales », c’est-à-dire constitutionnelles, que la ministre de la justice, Ayelet Shaked, avec l’assentiment empressé du premier ministre, Benyamin Nétanyahou, se propose de faire adopter rapidement par la Knesset.

Shaked, numéro deux du parti de la droite religieuse nationaliste, en plus de son nationalisme extrême, représente à la perfection une idéologie politique selon laquelle une victoire électorale justifie la mainmise sur tous les organes de l’Etat et de la vie sociale, depuis l’administration jusqu’à la justice, en passant par la culture. Dans l’esprit de cette droite, la démocratie libérale n’est rien qu’un infantilisme. On conçoit facilement la signification d’une telle démarche pour un pays de tradition britannique qui ne possède pas de Constitution écrite, seulement des règles de comportement et une armature législative qu’une majorité simple suffit pour changer.

« Il s’agit d’un acte constitutionnel nationaliste dur, que Mme Le Pen n’oserait pas proposer »

L’élément le plus important de cette nouvelle jurisprudence est une législation dite « loi sur l’Etat-nation » : il s’agit d’un acte constitutionnel nationaliste dur, que le nationalisme intégral maurrassien d’antan n’aurait pas renié, que Mme Le Pen, aujourd’hui, n’oserait pas proposer, et que le nationalisme autoritaire et xénophobe polonais et hongrois accueillera avec satisfaction. Voilà donc les juifs qui oublient que leur sort, depuis la Révolution française, est lié à celui du libéralisme et des droits de l’homme, et qui produisent à leur tour un nationalisme où se reconnaissent facilement les plus durs des chauvinistes en Europe.

L’impuissance de la gauche

En effet, cette loi a pour objectif ouvertement déclaré de soumettre les valeurs universelles des Lumières, du libéralisme et des droits de l’homme aux valeurs particularistes du nationalisme juif. Elle obligera la Cour suprême, dont Shaked, de toute façon, s’emploie à réduire les prérogatives et à casser le caractère libéral traditionnel (en remplaçant autant que possible tous les juges qui partent à la retraite par des juristes proches d’elle), à rendre des verdicts toujours conformes à la lettre et à l’esprit de la nouvelle législation.

Mais la ministre va plus loin encore : elle vient juste de déclarer que les droits de l’homme devront s’incliner devant la nécessité d’assurer une majorité juive. Mais puisque aucun danger ne guette cette majorité en Israël, où 80 % de la population est juive, il s’agit de préparer l’opinion publique à la situation nouvelle, qui se produira en cas de l’annexion des territoires palestiniens occupés souhaitée par le parti de la ministre : la population non-juive restera dépourvue du droit de vote.

Grâce à l’impuissance de la gauche, cette législation servira de premier clou dans le cercueil de l’ancien Israël, celui dont il ne restera que la déclaration d’indépendance, comme une pièce de musée qui rappellera aux générations futures ce que notre pays aurait pu être si notre société ne s’était moralement décomposée en un demi-siècle d’occupation, de colonisation et d’apartheid dans les territoires conquis en 1967, et désormais occupés par quelque 300 000 colons.

Aujourd’hui, la gauche n’est plus capable de faire front face à un nationalisme qui, dans sa version européenne, bien plus extrême que la nôtre, avait presque réussi à anéantir les juifs d’Europe. C’est pourquoi il convient de faire lire partout en Israël et dans le monde juif les deux entretiens faits par Ravit Hecht pour Haaretz (3 décembre 2016 et 28 octobre 2017) avec Smotrich et Zohar. On y voit comment pousse sous nos yeux, non pas un simple fascisme local, mais un racisme proche du nazisme à ses débuts.

Comme toute idéologie, le racisme allemand, lui aussi, avait évolué, et, à l’origine, il ne s’en était pris qu’aux droits de l’homme et du citoyen des juifs. Il est possible que sans la seconde guerre mondiale, le « problème juif » se serait soldé par une émigration « volontaire » des juifs des territoires sous contrôle allemand. Après tout, pratiquement tous les juifs d’Allemagne et d’Autriche ont pu sortir à temps. Il n’est pas exclu que pour certains à droite, le même sort puisse être réservé aux Palestiniens. Il faudrait seulement qu’une occasion se présente, une bonne guerre par exemple, accompagnée d’une révolution en Jordanie, qui permettrait de refouler vers l’Est une majeure partie des habitants de la Cisjordanie occupée.

Le spectre de l’apartheid

Les Smotrich et les Zohar, disons-le bien, n’entendent pas s’attaquer physiquement aux Palestiniens, à condition, bien entendu, que ces derniers acceptent sans résistance l’hégémonie juive. Ils refusent simplement de reconnaître leurs droits de l’homme, leur droit à la liberté et à l’indépendance. Dans le même ordre d’idées, d’ores et déjà, en cas d’annexion officielle des territoires occupés, eux et leurs partis politiques annoncent sans complexe qu’ils refuseront aux Palestiniens la nationalité israélienne, y compris, évidemment, le droit de vote. En ce qui concerne la majorité au pouvoir, les Palestiniens sont condamnés pour l’éternité au statut de population occupée.

Pour Miki Zohar, les Palestiniens “souffrent d’une lacune majeure : ils ne sont pas nés juifs”

La raison en est simple et clairement énoncée : les Arabes ne sont pas juifs, c’est pourquoi ils n’ont pas le droit de prétendre à la propriété d’une partie quelconque de la terre promise au peuple juif. Pour Smotrich, Shaked et Zohar, un juif de Brooklyn, qui n’a peut-être jamais mis les pieds sur cette terre, en est le propriétaire légitime, mais l’Arabe, qui y est né, comme ses ancêtres avant lui, est un étranger dont la présence est acceptée uniquement par la bonne volonté des juifs et leur humanité. Le Palestinien, nous dit Zohar, « n’a pas le droit à l’autodétermination car il n’est pas le propriétaire du sol. Je le veux comme résident et ceci du fait de mon honnêteté, il est né ici, il vit ici, je ne lui dirai pas de s’en aller. Je regrette de le dire mais [les Palestiniens] souffrent d’une lacune majeure : ils ne sont pas nés juifs ».

Ce qui signifie que même si les Palestiniens décidaient de se convertir, commençaient à se faire pousser des papillotes et à étudier la Torah et le Talmud, cela ne leur servirait à rien. Pas plus qu’aux Soudanais et Erythréens et leurs enfants, qui sont israéliens à tous égards – langue, culture, socialisation. Il en était de même chez les nazis. Ensuite vient l’apartheid, qui, selon la plupart des « penseurs » de la droite, pourrait, sous certaines conditions, s’appliquer également aux Arabes citoyens israéliens depuis la fondation de l’Etat. Pour notre malheur, beaucoup d’Israéliens, qui ont honte de tant de leurs élus et honnissent leurs idées, pour toutes sortes de raisons, continuent à voter pour la droite.

Voir de même:
Don’t Count Bibi Out — Yet
Bret Stephens
The NYT
Feb. 23, 2018

If you follow the news from Israel, you might surmise that Benjamin Netanyahu’s days as prime minister are numbered. The police recommend that he be charged on multiple counts of bribery, fraud and breach of trust. Fresh charges may yet be brought in additional investigations. A former top aide to Netanyahu agreed this week to serve as a witness against him. Press reports suggest a man clinging to power.

Don’t be so sure. If an election were held tomorrow, Bibi — as Netanyahu is universally known in Israel — and his Likud party would likely win, according to recent polls. Roughly half of Israelis think the prime minister should quit, but that’s down from 60 percent in December. Netanyahu has no intention of resigning, even if the attorney general chooses to indict him. The Likud rank-and-file remain loyal to their leader. His coalition partners may detest him, but for now they see greater political advantage in a wounded prime minister than in a fresh one.

Besides, Bibi has been, for Israelis, a pretty good prime minister. Some indicators:

Economy: Since Netanyahu returned to power in 2009, the economy has grown by nearly 30 percent in constant dollars — nearly twice the growth rate of Germany or the United States. Some 3.6 million tourists visited Israel in 2017, a record for the Jewish state. On Monday, Israel announced a $15 billion dollar deal to export natural gas to Egypt from its huge offshore fields.

Diplomacy: Netanyahu’s personal ties to Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi are exceptionally close, as they are with Japan’s Shinzo Abe. Israel’s relations with African countries and the Arab world are the best they’ve been in decades; reaction in Riyadh and Cairo to the Trump administration’s decision to move the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem amounted to a shrug. Netanyahu’s 2015 speech to Congress opposing the Iran deal, billed as an affront to the Obama administration, turned out to be an inspiration for Israel’s neighbors. And Netanyahu’s arguments against the deal now prevail in the current White House.

Security: In 2002, at the height of the second intifada, Israelis suffered more than 400 terrorism fatalities. In 2017 there were fewer than two dozen. Two wars in and around Gaza, both initiated by Hamas, were devastating for Palestinians but resulted in relatively few Israeli casualties. The Israeli Air Force lost an F-16 after coming under heavy Syrian antiaircraft fire, but that seems to have been a fluke. For the most part, Israel has been able to strike Syrian, Iranian and Hezbollah targets at will.

None of this makes much of an impression on non-Israelis. Diaspora Jews were infuriated last year by the government’s backtracking on a plan to let men and women pray together at the Western Wall. Israel’s bad decision to forcibly deport African migrants has stirred additional, and warranted, indignation.

And then there are the Palestinians. The central complaint of Netanyahu’s critics is that he has failed to make good on the promise of his 2009 speech at Bar-Ilan University, where he claimed to accept the principle of a Palestinian state. Subsidiary charges include his refusal to halt settlement construction or give former Palestinian Prime Minister Salam Fayyad a sufficient political boost.

It should go without saying that a Palestinian state is a terrific idea in principle — assuming, that is, that it resembles the United Arab Emirates. But Israelis have no reason to believe that it will look like anything except the way Gaza does today: militant, despotic, desperate and aggressive. Netanyahu’s foreign critics are demanding that he replicate on a large scale what has failed catastrophically on a smaller scale. It’s an absurd ask.

It’s also strange that the same people who insist that Israel help create a Palestinian state in order to remain a democracy seem so indifferent to the views of that democracy. Israel’s political left was not destroyed by Netanyahu. It was obliterated one Palestinian suicide bombing, rocket salvo, tunnel attack and rejected statehood offer at a time. Bibi’s long tenure of office is the consequence, not the cause, of this.

Specifically, it is the consequence of Israel’s internalization of the two great lessons of the past 30 years. First, that separation from the Palestinians is essential — in the long term. Second, that peace with the Palestinians is impossible — in the short term. The result is a policy that amounts to a type of indefinite holding pattern, with Israel circling a runway it knows it cannot yet land on even as it fears running out of gas.

The risks here are obvious. But it’s hard to imagine any other sort of approach, which is why any successor to Netanyahu will have to pursue essentially identical policies — policies whose chief art will consist in fending off false promises of salvation.

There’s a long Jewish history of this. For all of his flaws, few have done it as well as Bibi, which is why he has endured, and will probably continue to do so. ☐

Voir également:

Justin Trudeau takes his Captain Snowflake act to India
Stephen Daisley
The Spectator
24 February 2018

If your week was less than fun, spare a thought for Justin Trudeau. The Canadian Prime Minister’s seven-day visit to India went down like an undercooked biriyani on the subcontinent.

When he landed in New Delhi last Saturday, Trudeau was greeted on the tarmac, not by the Prime Minister or Foreign Minister but by the junior minister for agriculture and farmers’ welfare. Other world leaders, including Barack Obama and Benjamin Netanyahu, have been given a personal welcome by Narendra Modi. Prime Minister Modi, a savvy social media user, failed even to note Trudeau’s arrival on Twitter, though on the same day he found time to tweet about plans to unveil a new shipping container terminal. He did not acknowledge Trudeau until five days later and only met him the day before the Canadian PM and his family were to return home.

Why were the Indians so frosty in their reception? They suspect Trudeau’s government of private sympathy for the Khalistani separatist movement, which wants to form a breakaway Sikh state in Punjab. Thankfully, Trudeau didn’t do anything to inflame those suspicions. Well, unless you count inviting a notorious Khalistani separatist to a reception. And then to dinner. With the Prime Minister. Not just any separatist, either. Jaspal Atwal is a former member of the International Sikh Youth Federation, proscribed as a terror group in both India and Canada, and was convicted of the attempted assassination of Indian cabinet minister Malkiat Singh Sidhu. Best of all, he even got a photo taken with Trudeau’s wife Sophie.

But there were still a few Indians unoffended by the image-obsessed Canadian PM and he quickly remedied that. He turned up for one event in a gaudy golden kurta, churidars and chappals. At another, he broke into the traditional Bhaṅgṛā dance only to stop midway through when no one else joined in. Only after the local press pointed out that this was a little condescending and a lot tacky was Justin-ji finally photographed wearing a suit.

It was less like a state visit and more like a weeklong audition for the next Sanjay Leela Bhansali movie. Here was Justin Trudeau, the progressive’s progressive, up to his pagṛi in cultural appropriation. At least he achieved his goal of bringing Indians and Canadians closer together: both have spent the past week cringing at this spectacle of well-meaning minstrelsy.

I want to like Justin Trudeau. I really do. He’s a centrist liberal in an age where neither the adjective nor the noun is doing very well. Trump to his south, Brexit and Corbyn across the water, Putin beyond that: Trudeau should be a hero for liberal democrats. Instead, from his Eid Mubarak socks at Toronto Pride to his preference for ‘peoplekind’ over ‘mankind’, Trudeau presents like an alt-right parody of liberalism. He’s gender-neutral pronouns. He’s avocado toast and flaxseed soy smoothies. He’s safe spaces and checked privileges. Trudeau is a cuck.

And all that would be fine. In fact, it would be a hoot to have a liberal standard-bearer who could troll the 4chan pale males in their overvaped, undersexed basements. But far from an icon for the middle ground, Trudeau is the sort of right-on relativist who gives liberals a bad name. He has spoken of his ‘admiration’ for China’s dictatorship for ‘allowing them to turn their economy around on a dime’. He called Fidel Castro ‘larger than life’ and ‘a remarkable leader’ who showed ‘tremendous dedication and love for the Cuban people’. Trudeau’s government refused to accept the Islamic State’s ethnic cleansing of the Yazidis was a genocide until the UN formally recognised it as such. In 2016 he issued a statement on Holocaust Remembrance Day that neglected to mention Jewish victims of the Shoah and the following year unveiled a memorial plaque with the same omission.

Trudeau’s problem is that he always agrees with the last good intention he encountered. He seems to have picked up his political philosophy from Saturday morning cartoons: by your powers combined, I am Captain Snowflake. There is no spine of policy, no political compass, no vision beyond the next group hug or national apology. The centre ground needs a champion and instead it got an inspirational quote calendar with abs. Trudeau’s not a Grit, he’s pure mush.

Voir encore:

White roses and black velvet: the Grammys red carpet
Monochrome dominated the award ceremony last night, as politics remained fashionable for celebrities
Lauren Cochrane
The Guardian
29 Jan 2018

On the Grammys red carpet on Sunday, celebrities spelt out messages in black and white. While the Golden Globes earlier this month saw black dominate as a protest in line with the Times Up campaign, music’s biggest award ceremony switched to monochrome as default setting.

Some stuck to the black dress code, such as Miley Cyrus, Beyoncé, Lady Gaga and Sarah Silverman.

Others went for the impact of white. SZA, Cardi B and Childish Gambino were in this camp, while Lana Del Rey took the angelic angle further. She wore a gown embroidered with silver stars, accessorised with a halo.

Some celebrities carried white roses with them, with men including Kendrick Lamar and Trevor Noah pinning them to their lapels, and Cyrus licking hers with that famous tongue.

This was a campaign in support of the Times Up initiative. The rose idea was pushed by Meg Harkins, senior vice president of marketing at Roc Nation, Karen Rait, head of rhythm promotions at Interscope Geffen A&M Records, and other high-profile women in the music industry. “We all agreed it was really necessary,” Harkins said. “We’ve all felt the political and cultural change in the last couple of months.” In an email sent to attendees of the Grammys, the collective explained their choice of the flower. “We choose the white rose because historically it stands for hope, peace, sympathy and resistance,” it read.

The colour white, of course, represents peace, but it is also has history in the women’s movement. White was one of the trio of colours adopted by the suffragette movement, along with green and purple; white stood for purity. Hillary Clinton’s white pantsuit, which she wore to accept the nomination as Democratic candidate for the 2016 election, was seen making a feminist statement.

Beyoncé, never one to miss an opportunity to win at visual statements, skipped the red carpet and the white rose, but her six-year-old daughter, Blue Ivy, was dressed in head-to-toe white. Kesha – an artist who has firsthand experience of sexual misconduct – performed all in white, with a supporting cast including Cyndi Lauper and Camilla Cabelo also in the colour.

Other microtrends were noted too – there was an upswing of trousers for women, with Janelle Monae, Anna Kendrick and Kesha wearing them. This in itself is a protest against the pageant-y end of the red carpet. Burgundy seemed to be a sleeper colour, worn by both multiple winner Bruno Mars and Hillary Clinton during an onscreen cameo. Rihanna saw the opportunity to wear three outfits – a brown PVC wrap dress, pink slipdress and black and gold metallic co-ords.

White roses might be more discreet, and politics might have been less in the foreground for fashion at the Grammys, but the 2018 red carpet remains a place where protest can be signposted. These visual statements arguably stand with the signs on the Women’s March last weekend. As images that will be broadcast around the world, the optics are undeniable. This award season, a political issue remains the best accessory.

Voir enfin:

22 février 1943
Décapitation de la « Rose blanche »

Le 22 février 1943, trois étudiants allemands d’une vingtaine d’années sont guillotinés dans la prison de Stadelheim, près de Munich. Leur crime est d’avoir dénoncé le nazisme dans le cadre d’un mouvement clandestin, « La Rose blanche » (Die Weiße Rose en allemand).

Comment, de juin 1942 à février 1943 une poignée de jeunes étudiants chrétiens ont-ils pu défendre les valeurs démocratiques au prix de leur vie ? Comment ont-ils pu diffuser six tracts incendiaires tout en écrivant le soir des slogans pacifistes et antinazis sur les murs de Munich ?

Pierre Le Blavec de Crac’h
Hérodote
2018-02-18

Les prémices de la résistance

Résidant à Ulm et âgé de 14 ans en 1933, le lycéen Hans Scholl n’est pas au début insensible aux discours de Hitler. Comme tous les jeunes Allemands de son âge, il s’engage avec sa soeur Sophie (12 ans) dans les Jeunesses Hitlériennes mais prend assez vite ses distances.

Aidé par ses parents et encouragé par l’éditeur Carl Muth du mensuel catholique Hochland, il rompt avec le national-socialisme et se consacre à ses études de médecine. Il lit les penseurs chrétiens (Saint Augustin, Pascal) et l’écriture sainte. Mais il est arrêté et emprisonné en 1938 pour sa participation à un groupe de militants catholiques.

Quatre ans plus tard, sa décision est prise. Il décide d’entrer en résistance par l’écrit après avoir lu des sermons de l’évêque de Münster Mgr von Galen dénonçant  la politique du gouvernement à l’égard des handicapés.

Un noyau dur se constitue autour de Hans et Sophie Scholl (protestants) et de trois étudiants en médecine que lie une solide amitié : Alexander Schmorell (25 ans, orthodoxe et fils d’un médecin de Munich) ; Christoph Probst (23 ans marié et père de trois jeunes enfants), et Willi Graf (24 ans, catholique). Il est bientôt rejoint par Traute Lafrenz, une amie de Hans.

En juin 1942, alors que Hitler est au sommet de sa puissance, le petit groupe décide d’appeler les étudiants de Munich à la résistance contre le régime nazi, qualifié de « dictature du mal ». Sophie se garde d’informer de ses actions son fiancé, un soldat engagé sur le front de l’Est.

La rose s’épanouit

En moins de quinze jours, les jeunes gens rédigent et diffusent 4 tracts, signés « La Rose blanche » (Die Weiße Rose). Imprimés dans l’atelier de Munich mis à leur disposition par l’écrivain catholique Théodore Haecker, ils sont diffusés de la main à la main, déposés chez des restaurateurs de la ville ou adressés par la poste à des intellectuels non-engagés, des écrivains, des professeurs d’université, des directeurs d’établissements scolaires, des libraires ou des médecins soigneusement choisis.

Les tracts font référence à d’éminents penseurs (Schiller, Goethe, Novalis, Lao Tseu, Aristote) et citent parfois la Bible. Leurs lecteurs sont invités à participer à une « chaîne de résistance de la pensée » en les reproduisant et en les envoyant à leur tour au plus grand nombre possible de gens.

Willi Graf est enrôlé dans l’armée en juillet 1942 et découvre à cette occasion nombre d’atrocités. Quant à Hans Scholl et Alexander Schmorell, incorporés comme maréchal des logis dans la Wehrmacht en tant qu’étudiants en médecine, ils passent trois mois sur le front russe et constatent avec effroi l’horreur des traitements infligés aux juifs, aux populations locales et aux prisonniers soviétiques.

À partir de novembre 1942, les résistants de La Rose Blanche bénéficient du soutien de leur professeur Kurt Huber (49 ans, catholique convaincu) de l’université de Munich, qui devient leur mentor. Ils impriment et diffusent leurs tracts à des milliers d’exemplaires dans les universités allemandes et autrichiennes d’Augsbourg, Francfort, Graz, Hambourg, Linz, Salzburg, Sarrebruck, Stuttgart, Vienne et même de Berlin !

Le petit groupe collecte en même temps du pain pour les détenus de camps de concentration et s’occupe de leurs familles. Il est toutefois déçu par le peu d’écho de ses initiatives au sein de la population étudiante.

Un cinquième tract intitulé « Tract du mouvement de résistance en Allemagne » est distribué à plusieurs milliers d’exemplaires dans les rues, sur les voitures en stationnement et les bancs de la gare centrale de Munich ! Plus fort encore, en février 1943, Hans Scholl et Ale