Jackie: Faites que personne n’oublie Camelot (There will never be another Camelot: How with the media’s complicity, Jackie Kennedy durably distorted her husband’s legacy)

4 décembre, 2016
shalottkennedy-jackie-first-lady
jfk-epilogue

There she weaves by night and day A magic web with colours gay. She has heard a whisper say, A curse is on her if she stay To look down to Camelot. She knows not what the curse may be, And so she weaveth steadily, And little other care hath she, The Lady of Shalott. Tennyson
I shouted out, Who killed the kennedys?  When after all  It was you and me. The Rolling Stones (1968)
I want them to see what they’ve done. Jackie Kennedy
Il n’aura même pas eu la satisfaction d’être tué pour les droits civiques. Il a fallu que ce soit un imbécile de petit communiste. Cela prive même sa mort de toute signification. Jackie Kennedy
Il y a quelque chose dont je n’arrive pas à me libérer. Une réplique qui est presque devenue une obsession. Le soir, avant de nous coucher, Jack passait deux ou trois disques sur notre vieux Victrola. Il adorait “Camelot”. Surtout la chanson, à la fin… : “Faites que personne n’oublie que, pendant un moment bref et éclatant, il y a eu Camelot.” Il y aura d’autres grands présidents après lui mais il n’y aura jamais un autre “Camelot”. Jackie Kennedy
It was Jacqueline Kennedy’s tour de force, her finest hour — actually more than five hours — of press manipulation. She had summoned an influential, Pulitzer Prize–winning author to do her bidding — and like so many men she had mesmerized before, he did it. White violated all standards of journalism ethics by allowing the subject of a story to read it in advance — and edit it. But he was not acting as a journalist that night — he was serving as the awestruck courtier of a bereaved widow. And it worked. Thanks to Theodore White’s essay “For President Kennedy: An Epilogue,” which ran in the Dec. 6 issue of Life, Camelot and its brief shining moment became one of the most celebrated and enduring myths in American politics. To Jackie, the assassination symbolized an end of days, not just for her husband, but also for the nation. James Swanson
Few events in the postwar era have cast such a long shadow over our national life as the assassination of President John F. Kennedy fifty years ago this month. The murder of a handsome and vigorous president shocked the nation to its core and shook the faith of many Americans in their institutions and way of life. (…) In their grief, Americans were inclined to take to heart the various myths and legends that grew up around President Kennedy within days of the assassination. Though the assassin was a communist and an admirer of Fidel Castro, many insisted that President Kennedy was a martyr to the cause of civil rights who deserved a place of honor next to Abraham Lincoln as a champion of racial justice. Others held him up as a great statesman who labored for international peace. But by far the most potent element of the Kennedy legacy was the one that associated JFK with the legend of King Arthur and Camelot. As with many of the myths and legends surrounding President Kennedy, this one was the creative contribution of Jacqueline Kennedy who imagined and artfully circulated it in those grief-filled days following her husband’s death.(…) These images were contained in White’s essay in the special issue of Life that hit the newsstands on December 3, 1963. Life at that time had a weekly circulation of seven million and a readership of more than 30 million. The extensive distribution of the issue guaranteed that the essay would receive the widest possible circulation here and abroad. Though the Arthurian motif has been ridiculed over the years as a distortion of the actual record, it has nevertheless etched the Kennedy years in the public memory as a magical era that will never be repeated. Camelot, the Broadway musical (later a Hollywood movie), was adapted from T. H. White’s (no relation to the journalist) Arthurian novel, The Once and Future King, published in 1958 but made up of four parts that the author wrote separately beginning in 1938. White’s novel has proved to be one of the most popular and widely read books of our time. Reviewers called it “a literary miracle” and “a queer kind of masterpiece.” (…) In contrast to traditional versions of the Arthurian legend, which celebrated knighthood and chivalry and portrayed Arthur as a brave warrior, White’s modern version poked fun at the pretensions of knights and princes and pointedly criticized war, militarism, and nationalism. White presented King Arthur less as a brave warrior and military leader than as a peacemaker who tried (but failed) to subdue the war-making passions of mankind. Mrs. Kennedy very likely read The Once and Future King and perhaps saw or showed to her children the cartoon version of The Sword and the Stone (the first chapter of the four part novel) that Walt Disney produced in 1963. There were biting ironies in her attraction to a legendary kingship that unravels due to the consequences of betrayal and infidelity and to her association of the central myth of English nationality with the United States’ first Irish president. Nevertheless, she looked past these contradictions to focus on the central message of White’s novel that portrayed war as pointless and absurd. President Kennedy, as his widow wanted him to be remembered, was like King Arthur—a peacemaker who died in a campaign to pacify the warring factions of mankind. One must admire Mrs. Kennedy for the skill with which she deployed these images in the difficult aftermath of her husband’s death. Our retrospective view of President Kennedy is now filtered through the legends and symbols she put forward at that time. The hardheaded politician devoted to step-by- step progress was transformed in death into the consummate liberal idealist. The Cold War leader who would “bear any price to insure the survival of liberty” was subsequently viewed as an idealistic peacemaker in the image of The Once and Future King. Difficult as it may be to accept, the posthumous image of JFK reflected more the idealistic beliefs of Mrs. Kennedy than the practical political liberalism of the man himself. But the Camelot image as applied to the Kennedy presidency had some unfortunate and unforeseen consequences. By turning President Kennedy into a liberal idealist (which he was not) and a near legendary figure, Mrs. Kennedy inadvertently contributed to the unwinding of the tradition of American liberalism that her husband represented in life. The images she advanced had a double effect: first, to establish Kennedy as a transcendent political figure far superior to any contemporary rival; and, second, to highlight what the nation had lost when he was killed. The two elements were mirror images of one another. The Camelot myth magnified the sense of loss felt as a consequence of Kennedy’s death and the dashing of liberal hopes and possibilities. If one accepted the image (and many did, despite their better judgment), then the best of times were now in the past and could not be recovered. Life would go on but the future could never match the magical chapter that had been brought to an unnatural end. As Mrs. Kennedy said, “there will never be another Camelot.” The Camelot myth posed a challenge to the liberal idea of history as a progressive enterprise, always moving forward despite setbacks here and there toward the elusive goal of perfecting the American experiment in self-government. Mrs. Kennedy’s image fostered nostalgia for the past in the belief that the Kennedy administration represented a peak of achievement that could not be duplicated. The legend of the Kennedy years as unique or magical was, in addition, divorced from real accomplishments as measured by important programs passed or difficult problems solved. The magical aspect of the New Frontier was located, by contrast, in its style and sophisticated attitude rather than in its concrete achievements. Mrs. Kennedy, without intending to do so and without understanding the consequences of her image making, put forward an interpretation of John F. Kennedy’s life and death that magnified the consequences of the assassination while leaving his successors with little upon which to build. James Piereson
The name « Camelot » is such an accepted sobriquet for the Kennedy Administration that many don’t recognize it as a creation of Jackie Kennedy’s during a Life magazine interview following JFK’s assassination. It certainly evokes an image of a romantic fairy-tale … but, when considered in light of its origin, it’s nowhere near as flattering a nickname as it was intended to be. What prompted Jackie’s analogy was the 1960 Lerner and Loewe musical « Camelot », which presents the kingdom ruled by King Arthur as a place built on lofty principles, more idyllic than Eden. The plot, however, focuses on the forces out to destroy Camelot – the adulterous romance between Lancelot and Arthur’s queen, Guenevere, and the machinations of Arthur’s bitter illegitimate son, Mordred. Arthur, though witty and idealistic, is not very adept at thinking for himself or dealing with the thornier aspects of government. It’s not exactly the most uplifting epitaph for a fallen leader. While Jackie meant the comparison to be positive, highlighting the hope and potential ushered in with the inauguration, it is unfortunately rooted in a story of a weak and cuckolded leader, whose best work barely warrants a mention. (…) The myth of King Arthur changed over the years – if the original version had informed « Camelot, » it would be much more complimentary. Arthur, first chronicled in Geoffrey of Monmouth’s circa 1138 Historia Regum Britanniae (pdf), is a rock star. The story is replete with magic, dragons, a sword named Caliburn and a lance named Ron. Arthur is a warrior and leader of almost supernatural capacity, and also « a youth of such unparalleled courage and generosity, joined with that sweetness of temper and innate goodness, as gained him universal love. » The Saxon-free Britain he established with bloody thoroughness was a paradigm, a magnet for those interested in the best that government could be, heck, even a place where women were celebrated for their wit. So while he did end up cuckolded, killed and his kingdom destroyed, his legacy was intact. Arthur was firmly established as the monarch to which to aspire – with better people. Later in the 12th century, the Historia was distorted by avowed mythology, and Arthur started losing his cool (although his sword eventually got a niftier name). The poetry of Chrétien de Troyes focused on the adventures of select members of the Knights of the Round Table. Arthur and how he shaped and presided over that table and his kingdom were secondary to the feats of chivalry, quest for the Holy Grail, and Lancelot’s courtly love, which turned into the adulterous affair with Guenevere. Chrétien’s contemporary, Marie de France’s poems also featured courtly love in and around Arthur’s court, with Arthur relegated to a footnote. The slightly later Vulgate cycle follows the same pattern. Arthur had led the war to secure the independence and peace the kingdom enjoyed, but the poems all prefer to highlight Lancelot and company. By the time Thomas Malory wrote his version of the Arthurian myth in the mid-15th century, Arthur had shriveled from heroic warrior and inspirational ruler to a cipher defined by the acts of others around him. Malory’s stories were about events during Arthur’s life, but the collection is called Le Morte d’Arthur, which needs no translation. This book inspired TH White’s 1958 the Once and Future King, which he framed as a tragedy. His Arthur is enamored with his ideals, which fail in the face of other people’s lust for either power or each other. This was the book that served as the basis for the musical that Jackie Kennedy was referencing. But the conflation of Camelot and the Kennedys persists, and not only does it not really suit, it also does a disservice to the real understanding and assessment of the Kennedy Administration. It’s natural to adulate and lionize a vibrant leader violently cut down, but it’s the thin end of the wedge. Once a mythology has taken hold, it becomes difficult to isolate the true history – even if it’s actually more compelling and fascinating than the lore. (…) Whatever the intention or interpretation, a wistful lyric from a mediocre musical about failed idealism doesn’t do justice to Kennedy and his time. « Camelot » keeps us from the whole story. He, and we, deserve better. The Guardian
She had this ironic wit. She took this real control over her family’s story and she really had a deep understanding of history to know the story you tell is the one that lasts; it doesn’t matter what really happened. Natalie Portman
“Jackie” is a dual portrait, a diary of some of the darkest days in America’s history and a chronicle of how the first lady spun national tragedy into a lasting legacy for her husband. Before the sitdown, Jackie warns her interviewer that she will be heavily editing the conversion. The published version, to quote the great war satire “In the Loop,” will not be a “record of what happened to have been said but what was intended to have been said.” Mrs. Kennedy eschews truth in favor of the myth. The reality is that after her husband was shot, his skull ripped open, she sat splattered in his remains, attempting to hold the pieces of him together. Jackie continued to wear the iconic pink dress she wore when her husband was shot — a Chanel knockoff — the rest of the day, despite Lady Bird Johnson’s (Beth Grant) insistence that she change. The First Lady refuses. “Let them see what they’ve done,” Jackie insists. When she returns to the White House later that evening, Jackie washes away his blood. She tries on dresses — while popping pills and drinking — as if deciding who she is now. These feelings, raw and complicated, are stricken from the record at the subject’s request. Although Jackie smokes constantly, she claims that when it comes to the official version of the conversion, she does not. After Jackie remembers that her husband’s skull was “flesh colored, it wasn’t white,” she retracts a public admission of the horror she has experienced. “Don’t think for a second I’m going to let you publish that,” Mrs. Kennedy says. These anguished moments don’t reflect the story Jackie wants to tell. This is the interview in which the first lady created the mythos of Camelot, comparing her husband’s presidency to the reign of King Arthur. The president and his wife were both fans of the Broadway musical of the same name, then starring Richard Burton and Julie Andrews, and it reflected how Jackie wanted the public to see their family — as representatives of a timeless royalty, even if short-lived. As a president, Kennedy was undistinguished, a politician who would either be remembered for resolving the Cuban Missile Crisis or initiating it. But as a symbol, Jackie realized that he could achieve the greatness he lacked in office. (…) That commitment to aesthetics is a fitting tribute to a woman — perhaps more than any other person of her era — who understood the power of the image. Throughout her husband’s presidency, the first lady was derided for the money she spent renovating the White House with antiques, which were meant to serve as a tribute to previous administrations. The press, uninterested in symbolism, charged her with wasting taxpayer dollars. Jackie is so fastidious and exacting when it comes to her persona that a reenactment of the famous 1962 tour of her Pennsylvania Avenue home is played for comic value. The first lady’s contrived voice, recalling Katherine Hepburn by way of Stepford, is a testament to the veneer of perfection Jackie worked so hard to maintain. (…) “I never wanted fame,” Jackie explains. “I just wanted to be a Kennedy.” As the film proves, she never had much of a choice in the matter, but at least she got what she wanted. John F. Kennedy is today viewed as one of the country’s great presidents, and that’s due to the woman we are only finally coming to know, even five decades later. It is long overdue.
Jackie Kennedy (…) revit en continu le film de Dallas (…) pense déjà à l’art de transformer le passé en Histoire. D’un homme de chair et de sang, elle a décidé de faire une statue de marbre. Sept jours après l’assassinat, elle a appelé Theodore White, de « Life ». « Il y a quelque chose dont je n’arrive pas à me libérer, lui confesse-t-elle. Une réplique qui est presque devenue une obsession. Le soir, avant de nous coucher, Jack passait deux ou trois disques sur notre vieux Victrola. Il adorait “Camelot” [une comédie musicale]. Surtout la chanson, à la fin… : “Faites que personne n’oublie que, pendant un moment bref et éclatant, il y a eu Camelot.” Il y aura d’autres grands présidents après lui – et elle prend soin de citer Johnson “si extraordinaire”– mais il n’y aura jamais un autre “Camelot”. » Le ton est donné. Le château du roi Arthur, qui a inspiré la comédie musicale écrite par l’auteur de « My Fair Lady », ­devient l’emblème d’une présidence. Voilà pour la ­vitrine. (…) Jackie a commencé à édifier son temple. Elle veut en être la vestale, et écrit en janvier 1964 : « Je considère que ma vie est finie, et je ne ferai rien d’autre jusqu’à la fin de mes jours qu’attendre qu’elle s’achève pour de bon.  (…) « Une nation qui a peur de laisser ses ­citoyens juger sur pièces la vérité et la fausseté est une nation qui a peur de ses citoyens », avait proclamé JFK. Jackie s’en souviendra. Trois mois après les enregistrements, elle choisit de revivre. Elle quitte Washington, définitivement. (…)  Elle a compris qu’on n’échappe pas au naufrage accroché à une statue de marbre. On coule ou on lâche. Danièle Georget

A l’occasion de la sortie d’un énième mais apparemment prometteur film sur Jackie Kennedy

Alors que s’apprête enfin à quitter la scène celui que les médias nous avaient vendu comme le Kennedy noir

Et qui au nom de sa prétendue place dans l’histoire était prêt à mettre le monde à feu et à sang …

Pendant que la mort de Castro n’a fait que confirmer là où se trouvait le vrai courage politique

Retour sur la fameuse interview qu’elle donna au magazine Life …

Qui contre la réalité quelque peu sordide d’une petite frappe communiste ayant voulu faire payer au pragmatique Kennedy  sa tentative d’assassinat du despote tropical …

Tenta de faire passer son mari pour le martyr idéaliste de la lutte des droits civiques  …

Et avec l’image de la cour du Roi Arthur popularisé alors par une comédie musicale …

Fournit à la politique américaine l’un de ses mythes les plus durables …

« Jackie a fait de JFK une statue de marbre »
Danièle Georget
Paris Match
14/09/2011

Danièle Georget est l’auteur de « Goodbye Mister Président », éd. Le Livre de poche.

Du style Jackie, on connaissait le triple rang de perles et les petits chapeaux tambourin. Mais, le 22 novembre 1963, l’icône de la mode devient une héroïne de tragédie, et les cars de touristes font, bientôt, une halte devant sa maison de Georgetown. Jackie Kennedy, 34 ans, est la femme la plus célèbre du monde. Elle se cache derrière des rideaux, prolonge les soirées au daiquiri, ne dort plus, revit en continu le film de Dallas. Pourtant, si Bobby, son beau-frère et son visiteur le plus assidu, s’enferme dans ce problème insoluble : « Qu’aurais-je pu faire pour empêcher ça ? », elle pense déjà à l’art de transformer le passé en Histoire. D’un homme de chair et de sang, elle a décidé de faire une statue de marbre.

Sept jours après l’assassinat, elle a appelé Theodore White, de « Life ». « Il y a quelque chose dont je n’arrive pas à me libérer, lui confesse-t-elle. Une réplique qui est presque devenue une obsession. Le soir, avant de nous coucher, Jack passait deux ou trois disques sur notre vieux Victrola. Il adorait “Camelot” [une comédie musicale]. Surtout la chanson, à la fin… : “Faites que personne n’oublie que, pendant un moment bref et éclatant, il y a eu Camelot.” Il y aura d’autres grands présidents après lui – et elle prend soin de citer Johnson “si extraordinaire”– mais il n’y aura jamais un autre “Camelot”. » Le ton est donné. Le château du roi Arthur, qui a inspiré la comédie musicale écrite par l’auteur de « My Fair Lady », ­devient l’emblème d’une présidence. Voilà pour la ­vitrine.

Les anciens copains en restent bouche bée. Aucun d’eux n’imaginait JFK en romantique de samedis soir à Broadway. Le célèbre humoriste Art Buchwald prétend même qu’en matière musicale ses goûts n’allaient pas plus loin que le « Hail to the Chief ». Mais Jackie a commencé à édifier son temple. Elle veut en être la vestale, et écrit en janvier 1964 : « Je considère que ma vie est finie, et je ne ferai rien d’autre jusqu’à la fin de mes jours qu’attendre qu’elle s’achève pour de bon. »

La vérité devra attendre

C’est l’époque où la commission Warren, pour élucider l’assassinat de JFK, passe ses auditions : 552 témoins sont interrogés, leurs récits consignés dans 26 volumes, déclarés secrets pendant soixante-quinze ans. Cela n’éloigne pas les francs-tireurs. Ainsi, Jim Bishop qui va publier « Le jour où Kennedy fut assassiné ». Jackie décide de torpiller le projet. C’est pourquoi elle convoque William Manchester, professeur d’histoire à la Wesleyan University. Leur entretien commence le 7 avril 1964, par cette question : « Allez-vous vous contenter d’aligner les faits – qui a mangé quoi au petit déjeuner et tout ce qui s’ensuit – ou allez-vous vous ­investir dans le livre ? » Elle lui racontera tout : la nuit qui a précédé la mort, la nuit qui a suivi la mort… Deux années plus tard ­paraît une version totalement expurgée.

Ce ne sont pas seulement les détails intimes qui posent problème mais l’analyse du rôle joué par le président Johnson. Le 16 décembre 1966, celui-ci lui écrit : « Nous avons été affligés d’apprendre, dans la presse, la tristesse qu’avait suscitée en vous le livre de Manchester. […] Des passages du livre, critiques ou diffamatoires à notre endroit, seraient à l’origine de vos préoccupations. S’il en est ainsi, je tiens à ce que vous sachiez que, si nous apprécions beaucoup votre gentillesse et votre ­sensibilité, nous espérons que vous ne vous attirerez aucun ­désagrément de notre fait. » Johnson a le physique du méchant à Hollywood. Il a été trois ans durant étouffé par un président qui se révèle encore plus écrasant mort que vivant. Bobby, l’ancien procureur général, ne supporte pas de le voir assis dans le fauteuil de son frère. Pour Bobby, il reste l’usurpateur, et peut-être pire encore. A ceux qui tentent de convaincre le président de le neutraliser en le choisissant pour vice-président, Johnson réplique : « Plutôt choisir Hô Chi Minh. »

En 1966, le professeur Manchester – censuré – est allé faire une dépression nerveuse en Suisse. La vérité devra attendre. Jackie l’a enfermée dans un coffre dont elle a jeté la clé. Pour ­cinquante ans. Après la légende du roi Arthur, celle de « La belle au Bois dormant ». Elle a parlé en secret à Arthur ­Schlesinger, ancien professeur d’histoire à Harvard. Lorsque JFK lui a proposé de rejoindre son équipe, Schlesinger s’est écrié : « Comme historien, quelle occasion unique ! Mais comme conseiller spécial, je ne vois pas bien ce que je ferais. » « Et moi, je ne sais pas ce que je ferai comme président, mais je crois qu’il y aura du boulot pour nous deux… » Ils ont la même ­passion de l’Histoire. « Une nation qui a peur de laisser ses ­citoyens juger sur pièces la vérité et la fausseté est une nation qui a peur de ses citoyens », avait proclamé JFK. Jackie s’en souviendra. Trois mois après les enregistrements, elle choisit de revivre. Elle quitte Washington, définitivement. Bobby a décidé de se présenter au siège de sénateur de New York, il n’est pas question d’habiter loin de lui. Elle a compris qu’on n’échappe pas au naufrage accroché à une statue de marbre. On coule ou on lâche.

Voir aussi:

“Jackie” is a must-see: Natalie Portman is Oscar-worthy as the iconic first lady in the days after her husband’s assassination

In « Jackie, » Natalie Portman portrays a women dedicated to creating Camelot from the chaos of tragic assassination

Salon

 

That fact is crucial to Pablo Larraín’s “Jackie,” a ravishing and bracingly intimate portrait of the first lady in the days after John F. Kennedy, the 35th president of the United States, was assassinated. The film stars Natalie Portman, who doesn’t look at all like the Jackie Kennedy we thought we knew, and that’s by design. Larraín, who also directed this year’s “Neruda,” doesn’t so much recreate an icon in mourning as he makes her anew. “Jackie” transcends mimicry to achieve something greater — bringing the first lady’s grief and resolve in the face of unspeakable loss to vivid life.

The film opens in 1964 just days after Kennedy’s funeral. Against the wishes of her closest confidantes, who would prefer the first lady remain in hiding, Jackie grants an interview to a journalist from Life magazine (a restrained Billy Crudup), who is summoned to the Kennedy Compound in Hyannis Port, Massachusetts. The interviewer, who is based on a composite sketch of the many reporters who would speak with Mrs. Kennedy throughout her life, remains unnamed. The first time the audience sees him, the journalist occupies the lower half of the frame — slightly off-center when we might expect symmetry. The shot is a mission statement for the film itself, a triumph that dares to go to unexpected places that most prestige pics wouldn’t touch.

“Jackie” is a dual portrait, a diary of some of the darkest days in America’s history and a chronicle of how the first lady spun national tragedy into a lasting legacy for her husband. Before the sitdown, Jackie warns her interviewer that she will be heavily editing the conversion. The published version, to quote the great war satire “In the Loop,” will not be a “record of what happened to have been said but what was intended to have been said.”

Mrs. Kennedy eschews truth in favor of the myth. The reality is that after her husband was shot, his skull ripped open, she sat splattered in his remains, attempting to hold the pieces of him together. Jackie continued to wear the iconic pink dress she wore when her husband was shot — a Chanel knockoff — the rest of the day, despite Lady Bird Johnson’s (Beth Grant) insistence that she change. The First Lady refuses. “Let them see what they’ve done,” Jackie insists. When she returns to the White House later that evening, Jackie washes away his blood. She tries on dresses — while popping pills and drinking — as if deciding who she is now.

These feelings, raw and complicated, are stricken from the record at the subject’s request. Although Jackie smokes constantly, she claims that when it comes to the official version of the conversion, she does not. After Jackie remembers that her husband’s skull was “flesh colored, it wasn’t white,” she retracts a public admission of the horror she has experienced. “Don’t think for a second I’m going to let you publish that,” Mrs. Kennedy says.

These anguished moments don’t reflect the story Jackie wants to tell. This is the interview in which the first lady created the mythos of Camelot, comparing her husband’s presidency to the reign of King Arthur. The president and his wife were both fans of the Broadway musical of the same name, then starring Richard Burton and Julie Andrews, and it reflected how Jackie wanted the public to see their family — as representatives of a timeless royalty, even if short-lived. As a president, Kennedy was undistinguished, a politician who would either be remembered for resolving the Cuban Missile Crisis or initiating it. But as a symbol, Jackie realized that he could achieve the greatness he lacked in office.

In Larraín’s film, style is substance. His cinematographer, Stéphane Fontaine (“Elle”), mixes handheld camera — its subjects so close to the screen that it borders on uncomfortable — with lush tracking shots, such as during the lavish funeral procession. There’s one shot in particular that’s worth the price of admission, and you’ll know it when you see it: The first lady’s somber, searching face is viewed from inside the window of an armored car, juxtaposed with the reflection of mourners on the street. “Jackie” attains a beauty that’s often close to ecstasy.

That commitment to aesthetics is a fitting tribute to a woman — perhaps more than any other person of her era — who understood the power of the image. Throughout her husband’s presidency, the first lady was derided for the money she spent renovating the White House with antiques, which were meant to serve as a tribute to previous administrations. The press, uninterested in symbolism, charged her with wasting taxpayer dollars. Jackie is so fastidious and exacting when it comes to her persona that a reenactment of the famous 1962 tour of her Pennsylvania Avenue home is played for comic value. The first lady’s contrived voice, recalling Katherine Hepburn by way of Stepford, is a testament to the veneer of perfection Jackie worked so hard to maintain.

As the umpteenth actress to play Mrs. Kennedy, Portman wisely doesn’t try too hard to imitate her subject; Jackie’s trademark Long Island brogue slips occasionally. Portman’s performance — wounded yet vibrant, withholding yet brash — nonetheless dominates the film, so much so that you can’t imagine anyone else bringing such grace to such a complicated figure. Throughout “Jackie,” I never forgot the actress playing her, but what’s so surprising and wonderful is that Portman and her director allowed me to view an icon in a new way: as a woman, still so painfully young, forced into the role of a lifetime.

“I never wanted fame,” Jackie explains. “I just wanted to be a Kennedy.” As the film proves, she never had much of a choice in the matter, but at least she got what she wanted. John F. Kennedy is today viewed as one of the country’s great presidents, and that’s due to the woman we are only finally coming to know, even five decades later. It is long overdue.

Voir également:

Inventing Camelot: How Jackie Kennedy shaped her husband’s legacy

After the funeral service at St. Matthew’s Cathedral, Jacqueline Kennedy and her children, standing outside the church, watched the honor guard carry the coffin down the steps. A military band played “Hail to the Chief.” Jackie bent down and whispered in her little boy’s ear, “John, you can salute Daddy now and say goodbye to him.”

John Kennedy Jr. saluted his father’s coffin just as he had seen soldiers in uniform do. It was a heartbreaking gesture that became one of the most unforgettable images of the funeral.

‘One Brief Shining Moment’

The day after Thanksgiving, on Friday, Nov. 29, Jackie called Theodore White, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of the bestselling book The “Making of the President: 1960.”

White and John Kennedy had gotten to know each other, and the president had admired him. When Jackie called, White was not home.

As he remembered, he “was taken from the dentist’s chair by a telephone call from my mother saying that Jackie Kennedy was calling and needed me.”

He called her back. “I found myself talking to Jacqueline Kennedy, who said there was something that she wanted Life magazine to say to the country, and I must do it.”

She told White she would send a Secret Service car to fetch him in New York and drive him up to Hyannisport. But when White called the Secret Service he was, he wrote, “curtly informed that Mrs. Kennedy was no longer the president’s wife, and she could give them no orders for cars. They were crisp.”

It was impossible to fly that weekend. A nor’easter or a hurricane was coming up over Cape Cod. So White hired a car and driver and headed north into the New England storm. He called his editors at Life to tell them about his exclusive scoop, but they told him the next issue was about to go to press. They warned him it would cost $30,000 an hour to hold the presses open for his story. It was unprecedented.

But they would do it.

This meant that the most important photojournalism magazine in America would be standing still and delaying the printing of its next issue for a story that had not yet been written and would be based on an interview that had not yet even been conducted. Still, an exclusive interview with First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy was so coveted, Life was willing to do almost anything.

White arrived, he recalled, “at about 8:30 in the driving rain.”

Jackie welcomed him and instructed her houseguests, who included Dave Powers, Franklin D. Roosevelt Jr. and JFK’s old pal Chuck Spalding, that she wanted to speak with him alone. As soon as she sat down, White began taking notes as fast as his hand could scribble: “Composure . . . beautiful . . . dressed in trim black slacks . . . beige pullover sweater . . . eyes wider than pools . . . calm voice.” Then she spoke.

“She had asked me to Hyannisport,” White discovered, “because she wanted me to make certain that Jack was not forgotten by history.”

White was stunned. How could anyone ever forget John F. Kennedy?

White was now ready to be hypnotized by a master mesmerist.

Jackie complained that “bitter people” were already writing stories, attempting to measure her husband with a laundry list of his achievements and failures. Jackie hated that. They would never capture the real man.

White asked her to explain, and then, for the next 3¹/₂ hours, she delivered a jumbled, almost stream-of-consciousness narrative about Dallas, the blood, the head wound, the wedding ring, the hospital, and how she kissed him goodbye.

It was only a week after the assassination.

Then she got to the reason she had summoned White: “But there’s this one thing I wanted to say . . . I kept saying to Bob, I’ve got to talk to somebody, I’ve got to see somebody, I want to say this one thing, it’s been almost an obsession with me, all I keep thinking of is this line from a musical comedy, it’s been an obsession with me.”

She confided to White. “At night, before we’d go to sleep . . . Jack liked to play some records . . . and the song he loved most came at the very end of this record, the last side of Camelot, sad Camelot.”

She was talking about the popular Broadway musical fantasy about King Arthur’s court. “The lines he loved to hear,” Jackie revealed, were, “Don’t let it be forgot, that once there was a spot, for one brief shining moment that was known as Camelot.”

In case White failed to understand, she repeated her story. “She wanted to make sure,” the journalist remembered, “that the point came clear.”

Jackie went on: “There’ll be great presidents again — and the Johnsons are wonderful, they’ve been wonderful to me — but there’ll never be a Camelot again.”

White wanted to continue to other subjects, “But [Jackie] came back to the idea that transfixed her: ‘Don’t let it be forgot, that once there was a spot, for one brief moment that was known as Camelot.’ ”

She was determined to convince White that her husband’s presidency was a unique, magical and forever lost moment.

“And,” she proclaimed, “it will never be that way again.”

President Kennedy was dead and buried in his grave, and she told the journalist she wanted to step out of the spotlight. “She said it is time people paid attention to the new president and the new first lady. But she does not want them to forget John F. Kennedy or read of him only in dusty or bitter histories: For one brief shining moment there was Camelot.”

An Enduring Myth

Around midnight, White went upstairs to write the story — Life needed it before he left Jackie. He came down around 2 a.m. and tried to dictate the story over a wall-hung telephone in her kitchen.

He had already allowed her to pencil changes on the manuscript. As White spoke over the phone, Jackie overheard that his editors in New York wanted to tone down and cut some of the “Camelot” material.

She glared at White and shook her head.

One of his editors caught the stress in his voice and suspected Jackie. “Hey,” he asked White, “is she listening to this now?”

It was Jacqueline Kennedy’s tour de force, her finest hour — actually more than five hours — of press manipulation. She had summoned an influential, Pulitzer Prize–winning author to do her bidding — and like so many men she had mesmerized before, he did it.

White violated all standards of journalism ethics by allowing the subject of a story to read it in advance — and edit it. But he was not acting as a journalist that night — he was serving as the awestruck courtier of a bereaved widow.

And it worked. Thanks to Theodore White’s essay “For President Kennedy: An Epilogue,” which ran in the Dec. 6 issue of Life, Camelot and its brief shining moment became one of the most celebrated and enduring myths in American politics.

To Jackie, the assassination symbolized an end of days, not just for her husband, but also for the nation.

From the forthcoming book, “End of Days: The Assassination of John F. Kennedy” by James Swanson. Copyright (c) 2013 by James Swanson. To be published Tuesday by William Morrow, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.

Voir encore:

How Jackie Kennedy Invented the Camelot Legend After JFK’s Death

While the nation was still grieving JFK’s assassination, she used an influential magazine profile to rewrite her husband’s legacy and spawn Camelot.

James Piereson

The Daily Beast

11.12.13

Few events in the postwar era have cast such a long shadow over our national life as the assassination of President John F. Kennedy fifty years ago this month. The murder of a handsome and vigorous president shocked the nation to its core and shook the faith of many Americans in their institutions and way of life.

Those who were living at the time would never forget the moving scenes associated with President Kennedy’s death: the Zapruder film depicting the assassination in a frame-by-frame sequence; the courageous widow arriving with the coffin at Andrews Air Force Base still wearing her bloodstained dress; the throng of mourners lined up for blocks outside the Capitol to pay respects to the fallen president; the accused assassin gunned down two days later while in police custody and in full view of a national television audience; the little boy saluting the coffin of his slain father; the somber march to Arlington National Cemetery; the eternal flame affixed to the gravesite. These scenes were repeated endlessly on television at the time and then reproduced in popular magazines and, still later, in documentary films. They came to be viewed as defining events of the era.

In their grief, Americans were inclined to take to heart the various myths and legends that grew up around President Kennedy within days of the assassination. Though the assassin was a communist and an admirer of Fidel Castro, many insisted that President Kennedy was a martyr to the cause of civil rights who deserved a place of honor next to Abraham Lincoln as a champion of racial justice. Others held him up as a great statesman who labored for international peace.

But by far the most potent element of the Kennedy legacy was the one that associated JFK with the legend of King Arthur and Camelot. As with many of the myths and legends surrounding President Kennedy, this one was the creative contribution of Jacqueline Kennedy who imagined and artfully circulated it in those grief-filled days following her husband’s death.

On the weekend following the assassination and state funeral, Mrs. Kennedy invited the journalist Theodore White to the Kennedy compound in Hyannis for an exclusive interview to serve as the basis for an essay in a forthcoming issue of Life magazine dedicated to President Kennedy. White was a respected journalist and the author of the best selling chronicle of the 1960 campaign, The Making of the President, 1960, that portrayed candidate Kennedy in an especially favorable light and his opponent (Richard Nixon) in a decidedly negative light. White had also known Joseph Kennedy, Jr. (John F. Kennedy’s older brother) while a student at Harvard in the late 1930s. Mrs. Kennedy reached out to White in the reasonable belief that he was a journalist friendly to the Kennedy family.

In that interview Mrs. Kennedy pressed upon White the Camelot image that would prove so influential in shaping the public memory of JFK and his administration. President Kennedy, she told the journalist, was especially fond of the music from the popular Broadway musical, Camelot, the lyrics of which were the work of Alan Jay Lerner, JFK’s classmate at Harvard. The musical, which featured Richard Burton as Arthur, Julie Andrews as Guinevere, and Robert Goulet as Lancelot, had a successful run on Broadway from 1960 to 1963. According to Mrs. Kennedy, the couple enjoyed listening to a recording of the title song before going to bed at night. JFK was especially fond of the concluding couplet: “Don’t ever let it be forgot, that once there was a spot, for one brief shining moment that was Camelot.” President Kennedy, she said, was strongly attracted to the Camelot legend because he was an idealist who saw history as something made by heroes like King Arthur (a claim White knew to be untrue). “There will be great presidents again,” she told White, “but there will never be another Camelot.” In this way, and to her credit, Mrs. Kennedy sought to attach a morally uplifting message to one of the more ugly events in American history.

Following the interview, White retreated to a guest room in the Kennedy mansion to review his notes and compose a draft of the essay. His editors were at this hour (late on a Saturday evening) holding the presses open at great expense while waiting to receive his copy over the telephone. When White later phoned his editors to dictate his text (with Mrs. Kennedy standing nearby), he was surprised by their reaction for they initially rejected the Camelot references as sentimental and inappropriate to the occasion. Mrs. Kennedy, interpreting the gist of the exchange, signaled to White that Camelot must be kept in the text. The editors quickly relented. White later wrote that he regretted the role he played in transmitting the Camelot myth to the public.

These images were contained in White’s essay in the special issue of Life that hit the newsstands on December 3, 1963. Life at that time had a weekly circulation of seven million and a readership of more than 30 million. The extensive distribution of the issue guaranteed that the essay would receive the widest possible circulation here and abroad. Though the Arthurian motif has been ridiculed over the years as a distortion of the actual record, it has nevertheless etched the Kennedy years in the public memory as a magical era that will never be repeated.

Camelot, the Broadway musical (later a Hollywood movie), was adapted from T. H. White’s (no relation to the journalist) Arthurian novel, The Once and Future King, published in 1958 but made up of four parts that the author wrote separately beginning in 1938. White’s novel has proved to be one of the most popular and widely read books of our time. Reviewers called it “a literary miracle” and “a queer kind of masterpiece.” The reviewer for the New York Times called it “a glorious dream of the Middle Ages as they never were but as they ought to have been, an inspired and exhilarating mixture of farce, fantasy, psychological insight, medieval lore and satire all involved in a marvelously peculiar retelling of the Arthurian legend.” In contrast to traditional versions of the Arthurian legend, which celebrated knighthood and chivalry and portrayed Arthur as a brave warrior, White’s modern version poked fun at the pretensions of knights and princes and pointedly criticized war, militarism, and nationalism. White presented King Arthur less as a brave warrior and military leader than as a peacemaker who tried (but failed) to subdue the war-making passions of mankind.

Mrs. Kennedy very likely read The Once and Future King and perhaps saw or showed to her children the cartoon version of The Sword and the Stone (the first chapter of the four part novel) that Walt Disney produced in 1963. There were biting ironies in her attraction to a legendary kingship that unravels due to the consequences of betrayal and infidelity and to her association of the central myth of English nationality with the United States’ first Irish president. Nevertheless, she looked past these contradictions to focus on the central message of White’s novel that portrayed war as pointless and absurd. President Kennedy, as his widow wanted him to be remembered, was like King Arthur—a peacemaker who died in a campaign to pacify the warring factions of mankind.

One must admire Mrs. Kennedy for the skill with which she deployed these images in the difficult aftermath of her husband’s death. Our retrospective view of President Kennedy is now filtered through the legends and symbols she put forward at that time. The hardheaded politician devoted to step-by- step progress was transformed in death into the consummate liberal idealist. The Cold War leader who would “bear any price to insure the survival of liberty” was subsequently viewed as an idealistic peacemaker in the image of The Once and Future King. Difficult as it may be to accept, the posthumous image of JFK reflected more the idealistic beliefs of Mrs. Kennedy than the practical political liberalism of the man himself.

But the Camelot image as applied to the Kennedy presidency had some unfortunate and unforeseen consequences. By turning President Kennedy into a liberal idealist (which he was not) and a near legendary figure, Mrs. Kennedy inadvertently contributed to the unwinding of the tradition of American liberalism that her husband represented in life. The images she advanced had a double effect: first, to establish Kennedy as a transcendent political figure far superior to any contemporary rival; and, second, to highlight what the nation had lost when he was killed. The two elements were mirror images of one another. The Camelot myth magnified the sense of loss felt as a consequence of Kennedy’s death and the dashing of liberal hopes and possibilities. If one accepted the image (and many did, despite their better judgment), then the best of times were now in the past and could not be recovered. Life would go on but the future could never match the magical chapter that had been brought to an unnatural end. As Mrs. Kennedy said, “there will never be another Camelot.”

The Camelot myth posed a challenge to the liberal idea of history as a progressive enterprise, always moving forward despite setbacks here and there toward the elusive goal of perfecting the American experiment in self-government. Mrs. Kennedy’s image fostered nostalgia for the past in the belief that the Kennedy administration represented a peak of achievement that could not be duplicated. The legend of the Kennedy years as unique or magical was, in addition, divorced from real accomplishments as measured by important programs passed or difficult problems solved. The magical aspect of the New Frontier was located, by contrast, in its style and sophisticated attitude rather than in its concrete achievements. Mrs. Kennedy, without intending to do so and without understanding the consequences of her image making, put forward an interpretation of John F. Kennedy’s life and death that magnified the consequences of the assassination while leaving his successors with little upon which to build.

James Piereson is president of the William E. Simon Foundation and a senior fellow at The Manhattan Institute. He is the author of Camelot and the Cultural Revolution: How the Assassination of John F. Kennedy Shattered American Liberalism (2007)

Voir de même:

Referring to JFK’s presidency as ‘Camelot’ doesn’t do him justice

The source of the Camelot reference is a story of failed idealism. It, like all mythology, distracts us from the whole story of Kennedy
Sarah-Jane Stratford
The Guardian
21 November 2013
The name « Camelot » is such an accepted sobriquet for the Kennedy Administration that many don’t recognize it as a creation of Jackie Kennedy’s during a Life magazine interview following JFK’s assassination. It certainly evokes an image of a romantic fairy-tale … but, when considered in light of its origin, it’s nowhere near as flattering a nickname as it was intended to be.

What prompted Jackie’s analogy was the 1960 Lerner and Loewe musical « Camelot », which presents the kingdom ruled by King Arthur as a place built on lofty principles, more idyllic than Eden. The plot, however, focuses on the forces out to destroy Camelot – the adulterous romance between Lancelot and Arthur’s queen, Guenevere, and the machinations of Arthur’s bitter illegitimate son, Mordred. Arthur, though witty and idealistic, is not very adept at thinking for himself or dealing with the thornier aspects of government.

It’s not exactly the most uplifting epitaph for a fallen leader. While Jackie meant the comparison to be positive, highlighting the hope and potential ushered in with the inauguration, it is unfortunately rooted in a story of a weak and cuckolded leader, whose best work barely warrants a mention.

The problem with creating a myth around a person is that, no matter how much is known, it distorts the truth and will evolve over time. A few dozen centuries ago, historians had little choice but to use mythology as a basis for their work, and were in any case shaping the telling to suit their purposes, rather than being slaves to accuracy. It’s almost embarrassingly easy for a modern historian to record facts, but mythology is still in there, mucking up the works. People latch onto « Camelot, » much more than either Kennedy the man or the politician.

The myth of King Arthur changed over the years – if the original version had informed « Camelot, » it would be much more complimentary. Arthur, first chronicled in Geoffrey of Monmouth’s circa 1138 Historia Regum Britanniae (pdf), is a rock star. The story is replete with magic, dragons, a sword named Caliburn and a lance named Ron. Arthur is a warrior and leader of almost supernatural capacity, and also « a youth of such unparalleled courage and generosity, joined with that sweetness of temper and innate goodness, as gained him universal love. » The Saxon-free Britain he established with bloody thoroughness was a paradigm, a magnet for those interested in the best that government could be, heck, even a place where women were celebrated for their wit. So while he did end up cuckolded, killed and his kingdom destroyed, his legacy was intact. Arthur was firmly established as the monarch to which to aspire – with better people.

Later in the 12th century, the Historia was distorted by avowed mythology, and Arthur started losing his cool (although his sword eventually got a niftier name). The poetry of Chrétien de Troyes focused on the adventures of select members of the Knights of the Round Table. Arthur and how he shaped and presided over that table and his kingdom were secondary to the feats of chivalry, quest for the Holy Grail, and Lancelot’s courtly love, which turned into the adulterous affair with Guenevere. Chrétien’s contemporary, Marie de France’s poems also featured courtly love in and around Arthur’s court, with Arthur relegated to a footnote. The slightly later Vulgate cycle follows the same pattern. Arthur had led the war to secure the independence and peace the kingdom enjoyed, but the poems all prefer to highlight Lancelot and company.

By the time Thomas Malory wrote his version of the Arthurian myth in the mid-15th century, Arthur had shriveled from heroic warrior and inspirational ruler to a cipher defined by the acts of others around him. Malory’s stories were about events during Arthur’s life, but the collection is called Le Morte d’Arthur, which needs no translation. This book inspired TH White’s 1958 the Once and Future King, which he framed as a tragedy. His Arthur is enamored with his ideals, which fail in the face of other people’s lust for either power or each other. This was the book that served as the basis for the musical that Jackie Kennedy was referencing.

But the conflation of Camelot and the Kennedys persists, and not only does it not really suit, it also does a disservice to the real understanding and assessment of the Kennedy Administration. It’s natural to adulate and lionize a vibrant leader violently cut down, but it’s the thin end of the wedge. Once a mythology has taken hold, it becomes difficult to isolate the true history – even if it’s actually more compelling and fascinating than the lore.

Mythology is common to nations’ stories of self, but America, perhaps by virtue of the recentness of its founding, is particularly prone to it, continually intertwining myth with the current body politic. It’s still difficult for history students to sift out the truth of the founding fathers because the mythology is so pernicious, creating an inaccurate view of both history and modern government. For years, « Camelot » as a memento mori was a lens that made viewing the life and times of Kennedy and the nation more difficult and less satisfying, except for those who love fairy tales.

Whatever the intention or interpretation, a wistful lyric from a mediocre musical about failed idealism doesn’t do justice to Kennedy and his time. « Camelot » keeps us from the whole story. He, and we, deserve better.

Voir encore:

Ben Zimmer
The Wall Street Journal

In the remembrances of John F. Kennedy’s presidency this week as the 50th anniversary of his assassination passes, one word continues to resonate above all: Camelot.

The name of King Arthur’s mythical court city has its roots in medieval romantic literature, but thanks to skillful media manipulation by Jacqueline Kennedy after her husband’s death, « Camelot » remains a potent mythmaking metaphor for the Kennedy administration.

The name first appeared as « Camaalot » in a 12th-century French poem about Lancelot written by Chrétien de Troyes, but etymologists are unsure if that was intended to refer to a real-life British location, such as Colchester (known in Latin as Camuladonum) or Cadbury (situated near the River Cam).

Later writers such as Sir Thomas Malory and Alfred, Lord Tennyson transformed Camelot into a dreamy utopia. By the time Mark Twain wrote « A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, » « Camelot » was intimately known to American readers, even if Twain’s time-traveling protagonist doesn’t recognize the name. (« Name of the asylum, likely, » he surmises.) In the 20th century, « Camelot » increasingly began to work its way into American popular culture, serving as the name for a popular 1930s board game.

But the immediate inspiration for the Kennedys’ Camelot was Lerner and Loewe’s musical of that name, based on T.H. White’s popular novel, « The Once and Future King. » While the musical opened on Broadway in 1960, it wasn’t until after Kennedy’s death that anyone thought to connect « Camelot » to the idealistic young president.

As James Piereson, author of « Camelot and the Cultural Revolution, » wrote recently in The Daily Beast, Jacqueline Kennedy single-handedly invented the Camelot myth in an interview she conducted with Theodore White (no relation to the novelist) for Life Magazine a week after the assassination. She told White that she and her husband enjoyed listening to the cast recording at bedtime, particularly the title song, in which Richard Burton as Arthur sings: « Don’t let it be forgot, that once there was a spot, for one brief, shining moment, that was known as Camelot. »

Jacqueline quoted the line and concluded, « There will be great presidents again, but there will never be another Camelot. » Her observations found their way into newspapers around the country.

Nothing did more to cement the nostalgic Kennedy mythos than that one word. It was, as Liz Nickles writes in the book « Brandstorm, » « one of the most significant examples of the power of storytelling to build a brand in modern history. » Despite all the less-than-flattering revelations that have emerged about the Kennedy presidency, 50 years later the Camelot metaphor still seems unassailable.

Voir enfin:

The « Camelot » interview (29 November 1963)

Wikipedia

One week after the assasination of her husband Mrs. Kennedy summoned Theodore H. White to Hyannisport for an interview. Some of the statements she made appeared in that week’s edition of LIFE magazine (6 December 1963), and more of it appeared many years later in his memoir In Search of History: A Personal Adventure (1978). In 1969 White donated his notes of the interview to the Kennedy Library, to be made fully public only after Mrs. Kennedy’s death. They were released on 26 May 1995.
  • There’d been the biggest motorcade from the airport. Hot. Wild. Like Mexico and Vienna. The sun was so strong in our faces. I couldn’t put on sunglasses… Then we saw this tunnel ahead, I thought it would be cool in the tunnel, I thought if you were on the left the sun wouldn’t get into your eyes…
  • They were gunning the motorcycles. There were these little backfires. There was one noise like that. I thought it was a backfire. Then next I saw Connally grabbing his arms and saying « no, no, no, no, no, » with his fist beating. Then Jack turned and I turned. All I remember was a blue-gray building up ahead. Then Jack turned back so neatly, his last expression was so neat… you know that wonderful expression he had when they’d ask him a question about one of the ten million pieces they have in a rocket, just before he’d answer. He looked puzzled, then he slumped forward. He was holding out his hand … I could see a piece of his skull coming off. It was flesh-colored, not white — he was holding out his hand … I can see this perfectly clean piece detaching itself from his head. Then he slumped in my lap, his blood and his brains were in my lap … Then Clint Hill [the Secret Service man], he loved us, he made my life so easy, he was the first man in the car … We all lay down in the car … And I kept saying, Jack, Jack, Jack, and someone was yelling « he’s dead, he’s dead. » All the ride to the hospital I kept bending over him, saying « Jack, Jack, can you hear me, I love you, Jack. »
  • His head was so beautiful. I tried to hold the top of his head down, maybe I could keep it in… but I knew he was dead.
  • When they carried Jack in, Hill threw his coat over Jack’s head, and I held his head to throw the coat over it. It wasn’t repulsive to me for one moment — nothing was repulsive to me —
  • These big Texas interns kept saying, « Mrs. Kennedy, you come with us », they wanted to take me away from him… But I said « I’m not leaving »… Dave Powers came running to me at the hospital, crying when he saw me, my legs, my hands were covered with his brains… When Dave saw this he burst out weeping… I said « I’m not going to leave him, I’m not going to leave him »… I was standing outside in this narrow corridor… ten minutes later this big policeman brought me a chair.
  • I said, « I want to be in there when he dies »… so Burkeley forced his way into the operating room and said, « It’s her prerogative, it’s her prerogative… » and I got in, there were about forty people there. Dr. Perry wanted to get me out. But I said « It’s my husband, his blood, his brains are all over me. »
  • I held his hand all the time the priest was saying extreme unction.
  • The ring was all blood-stained… so I put the ring on Jack’s finger… and then I kissed his hand…
  • Everytime we got off the plane that day, three times they gave me the yellow roses of Texas. But in Dallas they gave me red roses. I thought how funny, red roses — so all the seat was full of blood and red roses.
  • But there’s this one thing I wanted to say… I’m so ashamed of myself… When Jack quoted something, it was usually classical… no, don’t protect me now… I kept saying to Bobby, I’ve got to talk to somebody, I’ve got to see somebody, I want to say this one thing, it’s been almost an obsession with me, all I keep thinking of is this line from a musical comedy, it’s been an obsession with me… At night before we’d go to sleep… we had an old Victrola. Jack liked to play some records. His back hurt, the floor was so cold. I’d get out of bed at night and play it for him, when it was so cold getting out of bed… on a Victrola ten years old — and the song he loved most came at the very end of this record, the last side of Camelot, sad Camelot… « Don’t let it be forgot, that once there was a spot, for one brief shining moment that was known as Camelot. »…There’ll never be another Camelot again…
  • Do you know what I think of history? … For a while I thought history was something that bitter old men wrote. But Jack loved history so… No one’ll ever know everything about Jack. But … history made Jack what he was … this lonely, little sick boy … scarlet fever … this little boy sick so much of the time, reading in bed, reading history … reading the Knights of the Round Table … and he just liked that last song.
    Then I thought, for Jack history was full of heroes. And if it made him this way, if it made him see the heroes, maybe other little boys will see. Men are such a combination of good and bad … He was such a simple man. But he was so complex, too. Jack had this hero idea of history, the idealistic view, but then he had that other side, the pragmatic side… his friends were all his old friends; he loved his Irish Mafia.
  • History!… Everybody kept saying to me to put a cold towel around my head and wipe the blood off… later, I saw myself in the mirror; my whole face spattered with blood and hair… I wiped it off with Kleenex… History! … I thought, no one really wants me there. Then one second later I thought, why did I wash the blood off? I should have left it there, let them see what they’ve done… If I’d just had the blood and caked hair when they took the picture … Then later I said to Bobby — what’s the line between history and drama? I should have kept the blood on.
    • A variant reading of White’s notes exists: Then later I said to Bobby — what’s the line between histrionics and drama. I should have kept the blood on. but in White’s own published memoir In Search of History: A Personal Adventure (1978) this is rendered « what’s the line between history and drama? »

Pauvreté: C’est notre tolérance qui diminue, imbécile ! (Contrary to much of the public perception, liberalization and globalization have not led to an increase in poverty rates)

3 décembre, 2016

aime-morot-le-bon-samaritainpoverty

poverty2Quand tu fais l’aumône, que ta main gauche ne sache pas ce que fait ta droite. Jésus (Matthieu 6: 3)
Les justes lui répondront: Seigneur, quand t’avons-nous vu avoir faim, et t’avons-nous donné à manger; ou avoir soif, et t’avons-nous donné à boire? Quand t’avons-nous vu étranger, et t’avons-nous recueilli; ou nu, et t’avons-nous vêtu? Quand t’avons-nous vu malade, ou en prison, et sommes-nous allés vers toi? Et le roi leur répondra: Je vous le dis en vérité, toutes les fois que vous avez fait ces choses à l’un de ces plus petits de mes frères, c’est à moi que vous les avez faites. Jésus (Matthieu 25: 44-45)
Il n’y a plus ni Juif ni Grec, il n’y a plus ni esclave ni libre, il n’y a plus ni homme ni femme; car tous vous êtes un en Jésus Christ. Paul (Galates 3: 28)
Une civilisation est testée sur la manière dont elle traite ses membres les plus faibles. Pearl Buck
Les mondes anciens étaient comparables entre eux, le nôtre est vraiment unique. Sa supériorité dans tous les domaines est tellement écrasante, tellement évidente que, paradoxalement, il est interdit d’en faire état. René Girard
L’exigence chrétienne a produit une machine qui va fonctionner en dépit des hommes et de leurs désirs. Si aujourd’hui encore, après deux mille ans de christianisme, on reproche toujours, et à juste titre, à certains chrétiens de ne pas vivre selon les principes dont ils se réclament, c’est que le christianisme s’est universellement imposé, même parmi ceux qui se disent athées. Le système qui s’est enclenché il y a deux millénaires ne va pas s’arrêter, car les hommes s’en chargent eux-mêmes en dehors de toute adhésion au christianisme. Le tiers-monde non chrétien reproche aux pays riches d’être leur victime, car les Occidentaux ne suivent pas leurs propres principes. Chacun de par le vaste monde se réclame du système de valeurs chrétien, et, finalement, il n’y en a plus d’autres. Que signifient les droits de l’homme si ce n’est la défense de la victime innocente? Le christianisme, dans sa forme laïcisée, est devenu tellement dominant qu’on ne le voit plus en tant que tel. La vraie mondialisation, c’est le christianisme! René Girard
Je crois que le moment décisif en Occident est l’invention de l’hôpital. Les primitifs s’occupent de leurs propres morts. Ce qu’il y a de caractéristique dans l’hôpital c’est bien le fait de s’occuper de tout le monde. C’est l’hôtel-Dieu donc c’est la charité. Et c’est visiblement une invention du Moyen-Age. René Girard
Notre monde est de plus en plus imprégné par cette vérité évangélique de l’innocence des victimes. L’attention qu’on porte aux victimes a commencé au Moyen Age, avec l’invention de l’hôpital. L’Hôtel-Dieu, comme on disait, accueillait toutes les victimes, indépendamment de leur origine. Les sociétés primitives n’étaient pas inhumaines, mais elles n’avaient d’attention que pour leurs membres. Le monde moderne a inventé la « victime inconnue », comme on dirait aujourd’hui le « soldat inconnu ». Le christianisme peut maintenant continuer à s’étendre même sans la loi, car ses grandes percées intellectuelles et morales, notre souci des victimes et notre attention à ne pas nous fabriquer de boucs émissaires, ont fait de nous des chrétiens qui s’ignorent. René Girard
La carte de juin (1967) est pour nous synonyme d’insécurité et de danger. Je n’exagère pas quand je dis que c’est pour nous comme une mémoire d’Auschwitz. Abba Eban (1969)
L’implantation de colonies israéliennes en Cisjordanie et à Jérusalem-Est constitue une appropriation illégale de terres qui devraient être l’enjeu de négociations de paix entre les parties sur la base des lignes de 1967. France diplomatie
Le règlement n° 1169/2011 du 25 octobre 2011 concernant l’information des consommateurs sur les denrées alimentaires prévoit que les mentions d’étiquetage doivent être loyales. Elles ne doivent pas risquer d’induire le consommateur en erreur, notamment sur l’origine des produits. Aussi, les denrées alimentaires en provenance des territoires occupés par Israël doivent-elles porter un étiquetage reflétant cette origine. En conséquence, la DGCCRF attire l’attention des opérateurs sur la communication interprétative relative à l’indication de l’origine des marchandises issues des territoires occupés par Israël depuis juin 1967, publiée au Journal officiel de l’Union européenne le 12 novembre 2015. Celle-ci précise notamment qu’en vertu du droit international le plateau du Golan et la Cisjordanie, y compris Jérusalem Est, ne font pas partie d’Israël. En conséquence, l’étiquetage des produits alimentaires, afin de ne pas induire en erreur le consommateur, doit indiquer de manière précise l’exacte origine des produits, que leur indication soit obligatoire en vertu de la réglementation communautaire ou qu’elle soit volontairement apposée par l’opérateur. En ce qui concerne les produits issus de Cisjordanie ou du plateau du Golan qui sont originaires de colonies de peuplement, une mention limitée à « produit originaire du plateau du Golan » ou « produit originaire de Cisjordanie » n’est pas acceptable. Bien que ces expressions désignent effectivement la zone ou le territoire au sens large dont le produit est originaire, l’omission de l’information géographique complémentaire selon laquelle le produit est issu de colonies israéliennes est susceptible d’induire le consommateur en erreur quant à la véritable origine du produit. Dans de tels cas, il est nécessaire d’ajouter, entre parenthèses, l’expression « colonie israélienne » ou des termes équivalents. Ainsi, des expressions telles que « produit originaire du plateau du Golan (colonie israélienne) » ou « produit originaire de Cisjordanie (colonie israélienne) » peuvent être utilisées. Journal officiel de la République française (Avis aux opérateurs économiques relatif à l’indication de l’origine des marchandises issues des territoires occupés par Israël depuis juin 1967, 24 novembre 2016)
[cette nouvelle bourgeoisie] se présente comme différente mais sur les fondamentaux, elle fonctionne un peu comme la bourgeoisie d’avant. Elle vit là où ça se passe, c’est-à-dire dans les grandes métropoles, les secteurs économiques les mieux intégrés dans l’économie du monde. Elle est dans la reproduction sociale. On ne compte plus les fils de… Tout ça est renforcé par les dynamiques territoriales qui tendent à concentrer les nouvelles catégories supérieures dans les grands centres urbains avec une technique géniale qui est d’être dans le brouillage de classe absolu. (…) Cette bourgeoisie ne se définit pas comme une bourgeoisie. Elle refuse bien évidemment cette étiquette. C’est une bourgeoisie cool et sympa. D’où la difficulté pour les catégories populaires à se référer à une conscience de classe. Hier, vous aviez une classe ouvrière qui était en bas de l’échelle sociale mais qui pouvait revendiquer, s’affronter, ce qui est beaucoup plus compliqué aujourd’hui. On a des gens apparemment bienveillants, qui tendent la main et qui se servent beaucoup de la diversité et de l’immigration pour se donner une caution sociale. Mais quand on regarde les choses de près, ce sont en fait des milieux très fermés.(…) Ça, c’est dans les discours mais dans les faits, ce que l’on observe, c’est une spécialisation sociale des territoires. Un rouleau compresseur, celui des logiques foncières, tend à concentrer de plus en plus ces catégories supérieures alors même qu’elles nous expliquent que l’on peut être dispersé dans l’espace, que via le réseau numérique on peut vivre n’importe où. (…) Quand on prend sur le temps long, on voit bien qu’il y a une recomposition sociale du territoire qui nous dit exactement ce qu’est le système mondialisé. En gros, nous n’avons plus besoin, pour créer de la richesse, de ce qui était hier le socle de la classe moyenne : ces ouvriers, ces employés, ces petits indépendants, ces petits paysans. Avec le temps, ces catégories se trouvent localisées sur les territoires les moins dynamiques économiquement, qui créent le moins de richesses et d’emplois. C’est cette France périphérique de petites villes, de villes moyennes et de zones rurales. C’est un modèle que l’on retrouve partout en Europe. [Le mouvement des bonnets rouges en Bretagne] (…)  Ce qui m’a frappé, c’est que ce mouvement est parti de petites villes, de zones rurales et non pas de Rennes, Brest ou Nantes. Pourquoi ça part de là ? Parce ce que vous avez là des gens qui sont dans une fragilité sociale extrême. Quand ils ont du travail, ils ont peur de le perdre car il y a très peu de création d’activité. Le problème, c’est que tous les spécialistes des territoires pensent toujours à partir de la métropole.(…) C’est vrai que l’on nous parle toujours de la métropolisation comme d’un système très ouvert. On dit que par « ruissellement », les autres territoires vont en profiter. C’est tout l’argumentaire depuis 20 ans mais il faut bien constater qu’il n’y a pas de créations d’emplois sur ces territoires de la France périphérique. Certes, il y a de la redistribution à travers notamment les dotations mais ce n’est pas ça qui fait société. Les gens n’ont pas envie de tendre la main et attendre un revenu social. Ce n’est d’ailleurs pas un hasard si la thématique du revenu universel est aussi bien portée par des libéraux de droite que de gauche. Il y a derrière l’idée que les gens ne retrouveront jamais du boulot.(…) On ne peut pas dire que le modèle économique ne marche pas. Il crée même beaucoup de richesses mais il ne fait plus société, il n’intègre pas le plus grand nombre. On est dans un temps particulier aujourd’hui, qui est le temps de la sortie de la classe moyenne. Les ouvriers et les employés, qui étaient le socle de la classe moyenne, sont pourtant majoritaires. Quand vous ajoutez villes moyennes, petites villes et zones rurales, vous arrivez à 60 % de la population. Il y a certes beaucoup de retraités sur ces territoires mais aussi plein de jeunes de milieux populaires qui sont bloqués, qui n’ont pas accès à la grande ville. Pendant un moment, la création d’emplois de fonctionnaires territoriaux a pu compenser ce phénomène mais aujourd’hui c’est fini. (politiquement) On le voit déjà. Trump aux États-Unis, c’est le vote de cette classe moyenne qui est en train de disparaître. Le Brexit, c’est exactement la Grande-Bretagne périphérique des petites villes et des zones rurales où vous avez l’ancienne classe ouvrière, qui paie l’adaptation au modèle économique mondialisé. Tout ça est très rationnel. On analyse toujours ces votes comme un peu irrationnels, protestataires. Il y a de la colère mais il y a surtout un diagnostic. On oublie toujours de dire que les gens des milieux populaires ont joué le jeu de la mondialisation et de l’adaptation mais pour rien. À la fin ils ont toujours de petits salaires avec des perspectives pour leurs enfants qui se réduisent. C’est ça qui se joue électoralement. On a des partis politiques qui ont été inventés pour représenter la classe moyenne qui n’existe plus aujourd’hui. Et le Front national n’a pas grand-chose à faire pour ramasser la mise. Il n’a même pas besoin de faire campagne. (…) Je fais vraiment un distinguo entre les élus d’en bas et ceux d’en haut. Les élus d’en bas comprennent très bien ce qui se passe. Ils connaissent leurs territoires. Mais il y a une classe politique d’en haut qui est complètement hors sol. Le clivage est vraiment à l’intérieur des partis. Christophe Guilluy
Pour moi, le RMI était le retour de l’État à ses devoirs. Autant je pouvais admirer la charité chrétienne de l’abbé Pierre et la solidarité laïque de Coluche, autant j’étais convaincu que, dans un pays riche, c’est du devoir de l’État qu’aucun citoyen ne meure de froid ni de faim. Tel était l’objet du RMI, ouvert à tous sans condition de statut. En outre, fixé à un niveau évidemment inférieur au smic pour respecter la primauté du travail, le RMI ne coûte presque rien : une goutte d’eau dans l’océan des dépenses sociales, même avec un million de bénéficiaires. Cela dit, il ne nous avait pas échappé, dès sa création, que le RMI poserait deux problèmes. Le «I», tout d’abord, ce «I» de «insertion». Mis dans la loi pour rassurer les députés obsédés par le «délit de fainéantise», le dispositif d’insertion n’avait pas les moyens de traiter individuellement tous les RMIstes, ou alors le «I» de l’insertion aurait coûté beaucoup plus cher que le «RM» du revenu minimum. En outre, et surtout, il y avait une sorte de contradiction conceptuelle entre l’idée que tout citoyen a droit de manger et l’obligation d’insertion. Pour quelqu’un qui veut consacrer sa vie à écrire des poèmes ou à peindre des toiles qui ne se vendent pas, et qui se satisfait du RMI, que signifie l’insertion ? Si le RMI avait existé, peut-être que Van Gogh et Verlaine auraient un peu moins souffert ! Le revenu minimum, ensuite. Ma proposition personnelle n’était pas celle-là. C’était celle de l’impôt négatif : plus un citoyen est riche, plus il paie d’impôt positif ; plus un citoyen est pauvre, plus il reçoit d’impôt négatif. Il y a une échelle progressive, sans discontinuité. Le revenu minimum, lui, n’a pas cette qualité : on le donne à celui qui n’a rien et on l’enlève entièrement à celui qui retrouve un travail et un revenu. Dès qu’il gagne 100 € par son activité, il perd 100 € de son RMI. C’est évidemment fort peu motivant pour aller travailler. Une nouvelle étape du RMI est donc nécessaire, c’est le RSA, revenu de solidarité active, et c’est le grand mérite de Martin Hirsch, à partir de quelques expériences menées en région, d’avoir su proposer une réforme d’ensemble du système actuel vers un dispositif proche de l’impôt négatif, c’est-à-dire un dispositif où, comme pour tout impôt, on a toujours intérêt à gagner plus, car, comme on dit, «il en reste toujours quelque chose», ce qui n’était pas le cas du RMI. Mais, voilà le hic, le RSA est coûteux. Jusqu’à présent, on n’accompagne les bénéficiaires que jusqu’au moment où ils gagnent l’équivalent du RMI. Avec le RSA, on les accompagne au-delà du RMI et, compte tenu des besoins des travailleurs pauvres, non seulement jusqu’au smic, mais vraisemblablement un peu au-dessus du smic. Le calcul n’est pas sorcier : si on veut maintenir, par exemple, 50 € d’aide à celui qui gagne 100 € de plus, cela veut dire qu’on l’accompagne jusqu’à ce qu’il gagne deux fois le RMI, ce qui fait plus que le smic. Or il y a beaucoup de Français qui, à temps partiel ou à temps plein, sont à 20 ou 25 % autour du smic, au-dessus ou au-dessous. Même si le RSA ne donne à chacun qu’un petit complément, cela fait quand même un gros montant total, d’où le débat budgétaire actuel. Ce qu’on semble oublier dans ce débat, c’est que la totalité du RSA, je dis bien la totalité, va aux chômeurs ou aux travailleurs pauvres. C’est donc, à partir du RMI, la plus importante action de lutte contre la pauvreté jamais faite en France (et aussi dans l’Union européenne). (…) Il lui restera alors un dernier obstacle à franchir : la complexité. Moins simple par nature que le RMI, il devra, pour être efficace, être compréhensible et être compris. Contrairement à la prime pour l’emploi dont aucun bénéficiaire n’a jamais compris ni pourquoi, ni comment, ni quand il la touche, il faut que le salarié «s’approprie» le RSA en sachant à quels avantages il a droit et ce qu’il en garde chaque fois qu’il parvient à augmenter son revenu. C’est alors, et seulement alors, qu’il saura se bâtir un projet de réinsertion dans la société. Le «I» du RMI était passif, le «A» du RSA est actif, voilà ce qui fait toute la différence. Lionel Stoleru (2008)
Mr. Trump secured the White House in part by vowing to bring manufacturing jobs back to American shores. The president-elect has fixed on China as a symbol of nefarious trade practices while threatening to slap 45 percent punitive tariffs on Chinese imports. But many existing American manufacturing jobs depend heavily on access to a broad array of goods drawn from a global supply chain — fabrics, chemicals, electronics and other parts. Many of them come from China. (…) In short, Mr. Trump’s signature trade promise, one ostensibly aimed at protecting American jobs, may well deliver the reverse: It risks making successful American manufacturers more vulnerable by raising their costs. It would unleash havoc on the global supply chain, prompting some multinationals to leave the United States and shift manufacturing to countries where they can be assured of buying components at the lowest prices. (…) Trade experts dismiss Mr. Trump’s threat of tariffs as campaign bluster that will soon give way to pragmatic concerns about growth and employment. Between 1998 and 2006, the imported share of components folded into American manufacturing rose to 34 percent from 24 percent, according to one widely cited study. International law also limits the scope of what the Trump administration can do. Under the rules of the World Trade Organization, the United States cannot willy-nilly apply tariffs. It must develop cases industry by industry, proving that China is damaging American rivals through unfair practices. (…) But Mr. Trump has suggested taking the extraordinary step of abandoning the W.T.O. to gain authority to dictate terms. His successful strong-arming of Carrier, the air-conditioner company, which agreed to keep 1,000 jobs at a plant in Indiana rather than move them to Mexico, attests to his priorities in delivering on his trade promises. The people advising Mr. Trump on trade have records of advocating a pugnacious response to what they portray as Chinese predations. (…) But Mr. Navarro also cast the threat of tariffs as an opening gambit in a refashioning of trade positions. (…) Even if factory work does return to the United States, though, that is unlikely to translate into many paychecks. As automation spreads, robots are primed to secure most of the jobs. (…) In threatening tariffs, Mr. Trump is wielding a blunt instrument whose impacts are increasingly easy to evade by sophisticated businesses with operations across multiple borders. The geography of global trade is perpetually being redrawn. In China, factory owners, casting a wary eye on Mr. Trump, are accelerating their exploration of alternative locales with lower-wage workers across Southeast Asia and even as far away as Africa. In Vietnam, entrepreneurs are preparing for a potential surge of incoming investment from China should Mr. Trump take action. In Europe, factories that sell manufacturing equipment to China are watching to see if Mr. Trump will unleash trade hostilities that will damage global growth. (…) Seven years ago, the Obama administration accused China of unfairly subsidizing tires. It imposed tariffs reaching 35 percent. A subsequent analysis by the Peterson Institute for International Economics, a nonpartisan think tank, calculated the effect: Some 1,200 American tire-making jobs were preserved, but American consumers paid $1.1 billion extra for tires. That prompted households to cut spending at retailers, resulting in more than 2,500 net jobs lost. (…) The TAL Group claims to make one of every six dress shirts sold in the United States. It produces finished goods for Brooks Brothers, Banana Republic and J. Crew, operating 11 factories worldwide. If Mr. Trump places tariffs on China, the company will accelerate its shift to Vietnam, said TAL’s chief executive, Roger Lee. If that trade is disrupted, the work would flow to other low-cost countries like Bangladesh, India and Indonesia. Mr. Lee can envision no situation in which the physically taxing, monotonous work of making garments will go to the United States. “Where are you going to find the work force in the U.S. that is willing to work at factories?” Mr. Lee said. (…) The American textile industry is small and increasingly dominated by robots. The rest of the world holds billions of hands willing to work cheaply. (…) But the textile and apparel trades are relatively simple businesses. If the cost of making trousers becomes less appealing in China, a room full of sewing machines in Cambodia can quickly be filled with low-wage seamstresses. Industries involving precision machinery are not so easily reassembled somewhere else. An abrupt change to the economics would devastate factories that could not quickly line up alternative suppliers. American automakers are especially dependent on the global supply chain. Between 2000 and 2011, the percentage of imported components that went into exported American-made vehicles grew to 35 percent, from 24 percent, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The NYT
La vague réactionnaire qui submerge les démocraties occidentales est construite sur un mythe, celui d’un âge d’or… qui n’a jamais existé. Et sur un faux postulat selon lequel l’humanité serait en perdition. Ce qui semblait impossible s’est finalement produit. Donald Trump a gagné l’élection présidentielle américaine la plus détestable et la plus inquiétante de l’ère moderne. Elle a marqué l’irruption du populisme à une échelle sans précédent dans l’histoire de la démocratie américaine. Cette dernière n’est plus immunisée contre une maladie qui a ravagé l’Europe il y a quatre-vingt ans et a fait son retour dans l’ensemble du monde occidental et bien au-delà. Cette vague, apparemment irrésistible, a deux ressorts, la désignation d’un bouc émissaire et la négation de la réalité. Tous nos maux proviennent de l’étranger et des élites qui sont vendues à ces intérêts. Retrouver la grandeur passée, reprendre le contrôle de notre destin, renouer avec une société qui nous ressemble sont les slogans politiques de notre temps. On les retrouve aussi bien avec Donald Trump que parmi les partisans du Brexit, dans les partis d’extrême-droite européens, avec Vladimir Poutine en Russie, avec Recep Tayyip Erdogan en Turquie, avec Narenda Modi en Inde et même, à une autre échelle, avec Daech. L’islamisme politique n’a-t-il pas pour ambition de retrouver la prétendue pureté religieuse originelle et la puissance militaire qui lui est associée? Donald Trump promet de rendre «l’Amérique grande à nouveau». Vladimir Poutine entend renouer avec les ambitions impériales de la Russie tsariste et de l’URSS et Erdogan avec le destin de l’empire ottoman. Narenda Modi s’appuie sur un nationalisme hindou construit sur un affrontement avec l’Islam. Et les partisans du Brexit comme ceux de Marine Le Pen voient dans la fermeture des frontières et le rejet de l’immigration le moyen de revenir à un âge d’or de prospérité et d’entre soi. Un âge d’or qui n’a jamais existé. La pensée réactionnaire est toujours construite selon le même schéma, explique Mark Lilla, professeur à l’Université de Columbia et auteur d’un livre récent intitulé The Shipwrecked Mind: on Political Reaction («Naufrage intellectuel: la réaction politique»), dans le New York Times. Elle part de la description d’une période idéale, «un Etat où règne l’ordre et où les personnes partagent un même destin… Puis des idées étrangères promues par des intellectuels et des forces extérieures –écrivains, journalistes, professeurs, étrangers– détruisent cette harmonie. La trahison des élites est centrale dans tout mythe réactionnaire…». Désigner à la vindicte populaire le ou les responsables de nos malheurs, au hasard l’immigration, l’Europe, la finance cosmopolite, la mondialisation, le capitalisme, les Etats-Unis, la Chine, le sionisme, l’islam… est d’une redoutable efficacité politique. Sans doute plus encore à l’époque des réseaux sociaux et de l’omniprésence de l’information instantanée qui n’a pour seul horizon que la polémique artificielle du jour, rapidement effacée par celle du lendemain. Face à un monde compliqué et vide de sens, le «C’était mieux avant» apporte une réponse simpliste et réconfortante au sentiment de déclassement, d’abandon, d’aliénation et d’humiliation d’une partie grandissante de nos sociétés. Mais si la souffrance économique comme identitaire est bien réelle, la réponse qui consiste à désigner des responsables, les chasser… et revenir ainsi par magie à la grandeur et à l’harmonie passée est une dangereuse illusion. (…) La réponse à ces marchands d’illusion et de malheur existe, même si elle tarde à venir. Elle se trouve dans les enseignements de l’histoire et l’affirmation des faits. La réaction est construite sur un mythe, celui d’un passé fantasmé, et sur un faux postulat, l’humanité est en perdition. Les réactionnaires promettent d’effacer ce que la modernité aurait détruit d’une société harmonieuse à taille humaine. Ils affirment que leur pays et leur société ont fait fausse route, guidés par des élites apatrides, des ploutocrates, et qu’il faut revenir en arrière. Donald Trump ou Eric Zemmour s’insurgent contre un effondrement moral, politique et économique. Il n’existe pas. Les sociétés du siècle passé avaient leurs guerres, leurs mouvements sociaux, leur terrorisme, leur misère, leur violence, leurs discriminations, leurs laissés-pour-compte, leurs corrompus… La réalité objective de l’humanité ne correspond en rien au catastrophisme ambiant. Il n’y a tout simplement jamais eu sur terre de meilleure période pour être vivant, explique l’historien suédois Johan Norberg dans son livre Progress: Ten Reasons to Look Forward to the Future («Progrès: dix raisons d’attendre avec impatience l’avenir»). «L’humanité n’a jamais été plus riche, en bonne santé, libre, tolérante et éduquée», résume-t-il (…) L’espérance de vie moyenne dans le monde était de 31 ans en 1900. Elle est aujourd’hui de 71 ans. La Banque mondiale a défini le seuil de la misère extrême à un revenu équivalent à 2 dollars par jour. En 1800, 94% de nos ancêtres vivaient dans une pauvreté extrême. En 1990, 37% de la population mondiale se trouvait encore dans cette situation. Ce chiffre est revenu aujourd’hui à moins de 10%. Nous vivons dans l’ère la plus pacifique de l’histoire humaine. Le taux annuel d’homicide dans l’Europe médiévale était de 32 pour 100.000. A la fin du XXe siècle, ce chiffre est tombé à 1 pour 100.000. Le taux de mortalité de personnes ayant péri lors de conflits armés est passé de 195 par million en 1950 à 8 par million en 2013. En 1800, seuls 12% des adultes étaient capables de lire. En 1950, le niveau mondial d’alphabétisme était de 40%. Il est aujourd’hui de 86% et la différence entre les hommes et les femmes ne cesse de reculer. En 1990, il y avait 76 démocraties électorales. Il y en avait 125 en 2015. L’air de Londres est aujourd’hui aussi propre qu’au début de la révolution industrielle et les forêts s’étendent à nouveau en Europe. (…) Cela ne veut pas dire que notre planète soit un paradis. Que les sociétés ne sont pas fracturées par des transformations brutales qu’elles n’arrivent pas à surmonter. Mais personne ne veut voir la réalité des progrès spectaculaires de l’humanité. Nous préférons nous complaire dans les peurs, les fantasmes et l’annonce de catastrophes. (…) Les réactionnaires exploitent l’appauvrissement relatif de la classe moyenne et l’angoisse irrationnelle de l’avenir. Ils apportent une réponse absurde et dangereuse à de vrais problèmes nés de la mondialisation et de l’évolution technologique: l’angoisse culturelle et identitaire et la bipolarisation du marché du travail. Rendre moins douloureux le sentiment d’un déclin identitaire et culturel prend du temps. Cela se fait dans l’éducation, le respect et plus encore la connaissance de l’autre. Le paradoxe, c’est que la tolérance progresse en fait rapidement dans le monde, mais qu’il est difficile de le voir. La bipolarisation du marché du travail pose un problème encore plus grave aux sociétés, notamment occidentales. C’est ce qu’explique l’économiste Patrick Artus dans Le Point. «Les créations d’emplois se concentrent aux deux extrêmes, emplois qualifiés à rémunération élevée, emplois peu qualifiés à rémunération faible; entre ces deux extrêmes, les emplois intermédiaires (la classe moyenne) disparaissent progressivement…». La plupart des études montrent que cette division du marché du travail est plus liée à la technologie qu’à la mondialisation et aux délocalisations. C’est la technologie qui a chassé la main d’œuvre des campagnes puis des usines et aujourd’hui de bon nombre d’emplois intermédiaires dans les services. Ce phénomène va s’accélérer, avec par exemple le développement des véhicules autonomes et des robots. Un processus de destruction/création brutal. De nouveaux emplois apparaissent et apparaîtront –les besoins sont sans limites–, mais là encore il faudra du temps. Les États ont un rôle indispensable à jouer dans la formation et dans la protection, avec, pourquoi pas, l’instauration d’un revenu universel. S’ils ne le font pas, les marchands d’illusion ne sont pas prêts de disparaître. Eric Leser
In 1981, the year Ronald Reagan became America’s 40th President, 44.3 percent of the world lived in extreme poverty (i.e., less than $1.90 per person per day). Last year, it was 9.6 percent. That’s a decline of 78 percent. In East Asia, a region of the world that includes China, 80.6 percent of people lived in extreme poverty. Today, 4.1 percent do—a 95 percent reduction. Even in sub-Saharan Africa, a relatively under-performing region, the share of the population living on less than $1.9 per day dropped by 38 percent. When talking about U.S. poverty rates, it is important to keep in mind that extreme poverty in America is vanishingly rare. According to both the Nobel Prize-winning economist Angus Deaton and Cato’s Michael Tanner (who relied on U.S. Census Bureau data), the American poverty rate has moved between 15.2 and 11.3 percent over the last four decades. On three occasions (1983, 1993 and 2010) it reached over 15 percent of the population. Those were post-recession peaks that disappeared as soon as the economy recovered. In fact, America experienced her lowest poverty rate since 1974 in 2000, when openness of the American economy, as measured by the Fraser Institute’s Economic Freedom of the World index, was at its highest. Marian Tupy
More Americans believe in astrology and reincarnation than in progress. But poverty, malnutrition, illiteracy, child labour and infant mortality are falling faster than at any other time in human history. The risk of being caught up in a war, subjected to a dictatorship or of dying in a natural disaster is smaller than ever. Part of our problem is one of success. As we get richer, our tolerance for global poverty diminishes. So we get angrier about injustices. Charities quite rightly wish to raise funds, so they draw our attention to the plight of the world’s poorest. But since the Cold War ended, extreme poverty has decreased from 37 per cent to 9.6 per cent — in single digits for the first time in history. (…) The idea of the environment as a clean canvas being steadily spoilt by humanity is simplistic and wrong. As we become richer, we have become cleaner and greener. The quantity of oil spilt in our oceans has decreased by 99 per cent since 1970. Forests are reappearing, even in emerging countries like India and China. And technology is helping to mitigate the effects of global warming. (…) Conflicts always make the headlines, so we assume that our age is plagued by violence. We obsess over new or ongoing fights, such as the horrifying civil war in Syria — but we forget the conflicts that have ended in countries such as Colombia, Sri Lanka, Angola and Chad. We remember recent wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, which have killed around 650,000. But we struggle to recall that two million died in conflicts in those countries in the 1980s. The jihadi terrorist threat is new and frightening — but Islamists kill comparatively few. Europeans run a 30 times bigger risk of being killed by a ‘normal’ murderer — and the European murder rate has halved in just two decades. (…) In almost every way human beings today lead more prosperous, safer and longer lives — and we have all the data we need to prove it. So why does everybody remain convinced that the world is going to the dogs? Because that is what we pay attention to, as the thoroughbred fretters we are. The psychologists Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky have shown that people do not base their assumptions on how frequently something happens, but on how easy it is to recall examples. This ‘availability heuristic’ means that the more memorable an incident is, the more probable we think it is. And what is more memorable than horror? What do you remember best — your neighbour’s story about a decent restaurant which serves excellent lamb stew, or his warning about the place where he was poisoned and threw up all over his boss’s wife? (…) Bad news now travels a lot faster. Just a few decades ago, you would read that an Asian city with 100,000 people was wiped out in a cyclone on a small notice on page 17. We would never have heard about Burmese serial killers. Now we live in an era with global media and iPhone cameras everywhere. Since there is always a natural disaster or a serial murderer somewhere in the world, it will always top the news cycle — giving us the mistaken impression that it is more common than before. (…) Nostalgia, too, is biological: as we get older, we take on more responsibility and can be prone to looking back on an imagined carefree youth. It is easy to mistake changes in ourselves for changes in the world. Quite often when I ask people about their ideal era, the moment in world history when they think it was the most harmonious and happy, they say it was the era they grew up in. They describe a time before everything became confusing and dangerous, the young became rude, or listened to awful music, or stopped reading books in order to just play Pokémon Go. (…) The cultural historian Arthur Freeman observed that ‘virtually every culture, past or present, has believed that men and women are not up to the standards of their parents and forebears’. Is it a coincidence that the western world is experiencing this great wave of pessimism at the moment that the baby-boom generation is retiring? Johan Norberg
Le cercle des personnes que nous respectons et de qui nous nous soucions ne cesse de s’étendre. Traditionnellement, seule la tribu octroyait une dignité face aux autres. Puis ce sentiment s’est étendu aux villes et à la nation. Aujourd’hui, il nous arrive même, dans nos bons jours, de penser à l’humanité [rires]. Dans les années 1980, les hommes répondaient encore à ces questions comme si hommes et femmes étaient une tout autre espèce. Mais, plus les femmes ont fait la même chose que les hommes dans le monde du travail, plus il est devenu difficile de penser qu’ils leur sont supérieurs. (…) Il y a deux cents ans, il y avait plus d’égalité dans le monde, mais c’est parce que l’immense majorité d’entre nous était pauvre. L’indice de Gini était donc très bas. Puis, dans une minorité de pays, les gens ont commencé à avoir plus de libertés, ils sont devenus beaucoup plus riches : leur PIB par habitant a été multiplié par 20. Evidemment, vous introduisez ainsi une énorme inégalité dans le monde. Mais serait-il préférable que tout le monde soit resté pauvre ? Prenez la Chine. Il y a trente ans, c’était un pays très égalitaire, mais 90% de la population vivait dans l’extrême pauvreté, contre 10% aujourd’hui. Si vous ne vous concentrez que sur les inégalités, vous aurez l’impression que ça a empiré. Le progrès n’est jamais égalitaire. Il se concentre plus sur les régions côtières, dans les grandes villes. Cela dit, l’inégalité peut devenir un problème, surtout quand certains groupes commencent à se garantir des privilèges et prennent le contrôle du pouvoir. C’est ce qui s’est passé en Russie, où un petit groupe a pris en otage le gouvernement, faute de transparence. (…) Cette augmentation des inégalités est en partie le résultat de la reconstruction de l’Europe après la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Ce fut facile, car toute la technologie était à notre disposition. Mais cette croissance s’est essoufflée dans les années 1970 et il a fallu de nouvelles ressources de productivité, car il ne s’agissait plus simplement de mettre des briques au bon endroit, mais de développer des technologies de l’information et de ressources humaines. Cela a favorisé ceux qui étaient bons dans ces domaines par rapport aux travailleurs manuels. En même temps, il est utile de rappeler que, plus que votre salaire, l’important est ce que vous pouvez acheter. Même si vous n’avez pas augmenté vos revenus de manière importante depuis les armées 1980, vous avez eu accès à des technologies et à des services qui n’existaient pas dans le passé. Avant, seuls les riches pouvaient s’acheter une encyclopédie. Maintenant, on y a tous accès pour rien ! Comment chiffrer ça ? Ça n’apparaît pas dans les statistiques. Sans parler de la médecine, qui nous a donné près de dix années supplémentaires de vie. Les taux de criminalité se sont réduits, l’accès à la technologie a augmenté pour tout le monde. Bill Gates voyage de manière luxueuse et boit sans doute du meilleur vin que moi. Mais il utilise le même téléphone, il n’a pas un meilleur accès au savoir, ce qui est une première dans l’histoire de l’humanité. Et son espérance de vie n’est pas supérieure à la mienne. Dans notre vie de tous les jours, nous sommes en fait de plus en plus égaux. (…)  [l’dentité] C’est effectivement un facteur plus important que les données économiques. Si vous regardez les supporteurs de Donald Trump, ils ne sont pas au chômage, mais ils appartiennent à une classe blanche qui pense que son identité est en déclin car menacée par les minorités. Cela explique en grande partie l’essor des populismes en Europe et aux Etats-Unis. Les psychologues parlent d’un réflexe d’autorité. C’est un besoin de protection qui touche aussi l’éducation, la liberté sexuelle, les droits des minorités. C’est l’idée qu’on doit se reprendre en main. Je comprends ce sentiment, mais les conséquences en seraient terrifiantes, car tout le progrès dont nous parlons est dépendant de notre ouverture au monde. (…) Si nous construisons des murs, nous n’empêcherons pas le reste du monde d’innover et d’avoir de nouvelles idées. Ce serait se tirer une balle dans le pied. On a vu ça dans l’Histoire. Les civilisations qui, se sentant menacées, ont commencé à mettre des barrières sont celles qui ont entamé leur déclin. Les Arabes étaient très en avance sur l’Europe en matière de science et technologie, la Chine avait les caractères, de la poudre à canon et la boussole. Mais la dynastie Ming, qui a pris le pouvoir au XIVe siècle, était hostile à la technologie et aux étrangers, tandis que le monde islamique s’est refermé après les invasions mongoles, différant l’utilisation de l’imprimerie de trois cents ans. (…) Selon les sondages, dans les pays occidentaux, plus de personnes croient aux fantômes ou à l’astrologie qu’au progrès. Cette idée que l’âge d’or est dans le passé est une forme de nostalgie qui nous a toujours accompagnés. Quand je demande aux gens quelle était la meilleure période à leurs yeux, la plupart évoquent les années au cours desquelles ils ont grandi. A l’époque, ils n’avaient ni enfants ni responsabilités et ne se préoccupaient pas de toutes les choses qui peuvent mal tourner. Le monde, quand on est jeune, semble plus sûr. En grandissant, on appréhende le danger. Et il y a le déclin physique. Comme l’explique l’historien culturel Arthur Herman, il existe une fréquente confusion entre la détérioration à l’intérieur de votre corps et celle qui se produit à l’extérieur. Ce n’est sans doute pas une coïncidence si nous sommes précisément au moment où la génération du baby-boom prend sa retraite. Aux Etats-Unis, beaucoup de gens sont persuadés que les années 1960 étaient une période d’harmonie. Mais n’y a-t-il pas eu la crise des missiles à Cuba, les assassinats des Kennedy et de Martin Luther King, ainsi que des conflits raciaux dans chaque grande ville américaine ? Pourtant, aujourd’hui, la période fait figure de paradis perdu. (…) Il y a toujours un danger contre la raison. Cette explosion de peur contre le vaccin, l’un des plus grands sauveurs de vies de l’Histoire, montre qu’un recul peut arriver n’importe où. Quand les personnes ont l’impression que leur monde est chaotique et complexe, elles ne savent plus à qui faire confiance, donc il devient plus facile pour les complotistes et les religions de prospérer. (…) Quelle que soit leur cause, les critiques du progrès demandent à l’Etat plus de contrôle pour figer la situation. A gauche, il faut garder l’économie comme elle était ; à droite, c’est la culture qu’il faut préserver et, pour les écologistes, c’est l’environnement. Ils veulent tout stopper. Mais même le plus convaincu des réactionnaires ne voudrait pas revenir aux famines d’il y a deux cents ans. Quant aux écologistes, ils devraient être d’accord sur le fait que les plus grands problèmes environnementaux sont ceux qui ont tué des millions de personnes, parce qu’on n’avait pas d’électricité, qu’on était empoisonné par un mauvais air intérieur, qu’on polluait de façon traditionnelle l’eau et qu’on en mourait. Tous ces gens pensent qu’à ce moment précis de notre évolution on ne peut plus aller plus loin et qu’il faut tout préserver. (…) Les risques sont là et ils sont bien plus dangereux quand les gens ne comprennent pas ce que l’espèce humaine peut réaliser quand elle est libre. Je suis très effrayé par cette demande d’autorité, à droite comme à gauche, pour s’opposer à la mondialisation. Un grand pays européen peut élire un populiste, ce qui signifierait la fin de l’Union européenne telle qu’on l’a connue. Je suis donc un optimiste soucieux. Cela dit, je reste optimiste, car l’humanité a traversé dans l’Histoire des choses bien pires et est arrivée à les surmonter. L’humanité est résiliente et a beaucoup de pouvoirs. Johan Norberg
Attention: une ignorance peut en cacher une autre !

Au lendemain de la mort du mort du père du RMI Lionel Stoleru

Et accessoirement homme politique, économiste (polytechnique, Mines et Stanford) et chef d’orchestre français et victime, on s’en souvient du fait de ses origines juives roumaines, de l’antisémite Jean-Marie Le Pen

Alors qu’après l’accident industriel des années Obama mais aussi, technologie oblige, les risques de déclassement d’une bonne partie des classes moyennes …

Nombre de responsables politiques semblent tentés par un protectionnisme qui pourrait, si appliqué à l’instar de celle des années 30, nous ramener à la pire des grandes dépressions …

Pendant qu’au sein d’une Europe en train elle-même de remettre en question sa propre suppression des fontières internes face à la montée du terrorisme islamique et de l’immigration illégale. le Pays auto-proclamé des droits de l’homme ne ménage pas sa peine …

Pour imposer, au seul Etat israélien et par ailleurs allié revendiqué via la diplomatie et des mesures de marquage économique rappelant selon la formule consacrée « les heures les plus sombres de notre histoire », le retour à des frontières notoirement indéfendables face à des entités appelant explicitement à son annihilation …

Comment ne pas s’émerveiller …

Avec le dernier livre de l’historien de l’économie suédois Johan Norberg

Derrière en fait l’incroyable réduction de la pauvreté que connait notre monde depuis une cinquantaine d’années …

De cette étrange propension qui semble être la nôtre …

A mesure qu’augmentent notre niveau de richesse  …

Comme notre intolérance à la pauvreté …

Mais aussi certes les périls et les risques de régression …

A croire que tout va toujours plus mal dans le pire des mondes ?

Non, ce n’était pas mieux avant !

Enquête. Malgré les crises actuelles, l’humanité n’a jamais vécu aussi longtemps, avec autant de richesse, de liberté et de sécurité.

Thomas Mahler
Le Point
03/11/2016

En 2013, la fondation Gapminder proposa ce QCM à un panel d’Américains : « Durant les vingt dernières années, la proportion de la population mondiale vivant dans l’extrême pauvreté… : 1) a presque doublé ; 2) est restée la même ; 3) s’est presque réduite de moitié ». Alors que deux tiers penchèrent pour l’hypothèse la plus pessimiste, seuls 5 % optèrent pour la réponse 3. Un sondage mené en 2016 par le cabinet d’études néerlandais Motivaction montre que 92 % des Français pensent eux aussi que la pauvreté a augmenté ou est restée stable depuis vingt ans. Les faits ? Selon la Banque mondiale…

Historien économique, membre de l’Institut Cato, Johan Norberg, 43 ans et allure de pop star, avait connu un succès international avec « Plaidoyer pour la mondialisation capitaliste » en 2003, une réponse aux mouvements altermondialistes. Avec « Progress : Ten Reasons to Look Forward to the Future » (Oneworld), c’est contre le pessimisme de l’époque que l’auteur s’élève.

Le Point : Daech, Alep, le réchauffement climatique ou les robots qui tuent nos emplois font la une des journaux. Pourquoi alors affirmer que notre âge d’or, c’est maintenant ?

Johan Norberg : Je sais que l’époque a l’air horrible, mais c’a toujours été le cas quand vous regardez les problèmes dans le monde. Il y a cinquante ans, c’était le risque d’un désastre nucléaire imminent, les usines japonaises menaçant les nôtres, un niveau de crime élevé dans les villes… Le rôle des médias est d’en parler et de nous effrayer un peu. Mais nous avons aussi besoin d’une perspective historique plus longue, de statistiques, pour voir à quel point nous venons de loin. Objectivement, on n’a jamais vécu si longtemps, avec autant de richesse, de liberté et de sécurité.

Ça va vraiment mieux partout ?

Certains indicateurs baissent un peu et il y a de nouveaux risques. Le progrès n’a rien d’automatique. Le réchauffement climatique est un problème récent. L’essor du terrorisme sous cette forme est aussi inédit. Du point de vue du nombre de victimes, avec les groupes séparatistes et révolutionnaires, c’était pire dans les années 1970 en Europe occidentale. Aujourd’hui, Daech ne cible pas des officiels mais frappe au hasard. C’est ce qui nous terrifie. Face à ça, nous avons d’autant plus besoin de données objectives qui nous permettent de saisir que, même si les attentats sont terribles, c’est un petit risque pour notre vie comparé à d’autres. II faut vaincre les terroristes, mais ne pas paniquer.

Votre livre s’ouvre sur la nutrition. De 1950 à aujourd’hui, la population mondiale est passée de 2,5 à plus de 7 milliards d’habitants. Les néomalthusiens prédisaient alors des famines immenses…

Oui, ils ne pensaient pas qu’on pourrait augmenter les rendements agricoles, ce qui est arrivé avec la révolution verte. Puis ils nous ont expliqué que ces gens auraient d’autant plus d’enfants, les considérant comme des lapins tout juste bons à se reproduire. Ils ont totalement oublié l’intelligence humaine et notre capacité d’adaptation. Dans les années 1950, il y avait en moyenne 5 enfants par mère dans les pays en développement. Aujourd’hui, c’est environ 2,5. Ce qui est moins qu’à cette époque dans les pays riches !

Le pape François explique que, si la richesse globale a augmenté, la mondialisation n’a fait qu’accroître la pauvreté…

Le pape devrait faire relire ses discours [rires]. Il y a cette idée commune que les choses vont de mal en pis. J’ai demandé à des gens ce qu’ils pensent de la pauvreté et de la faim dans le monde. Chaque fois, la majorité se trompe. Ce n’est pas uniquement de l’ignorance, c’est une mauvaise idée préconçue qu’ils tirent de quelque part. Cette vue fataliste provient non seulement des néomalthusiens, mais aussi des écologistes, des anticapitalistes et des conservateurs, à droite, qui martèlent que les choses ont empiré. Tout est imputé à la mondialisation et au capitalisme. Mais, d’un point de vue statistique, on a réduit l’extrême pauvreté de 1,2 5 milliard de personnes depuis vingt-cinq ans, alors même que la population mondiale a augmenté de 2 milliards de personnes. A chaque minute où nous parlons, 100 personnes en sortent.

Certes, mais n’est-ce pas essentiellement dû à la Chine sortant du cauchemar maoïste?

La Chine a eu un impact formidable, mais il y a aussi l’Inde, l’Indonésie, le Vietnam, le Bangladesh, l’Amérique latine et aujourd’hui des pays de l’Afrique subsaharienne, qu’on considérait pourtant comme le continent sans espoir. Pour la première fois, l’extrême pauvreté est passée en Afrique subsaharienne au-dessous des 50%. Aujourd’hui, on en est à 35 %.

Le Niger, Haïti ou la République démocratique du Congo sont cependant plus pauvres qu’il y a cinquante ans…

C’est choquant. On doit se demander comment c’est possible dans un monde où le savoir, la technologie et la science croissent. Ces pays n’ont pas accès à l’économie mondiale. Certains ont été touchés par des guerres dévastatrices ; des régimes brutaux, comme au Zimbabwe, ont sciemment détruit tout ce qui était productif. Ce sont les pays les moins globalisés et les moins ouverts. C’est ça, le problème !

Dans tous les pays du monde, sans exception, les gens vivent plus longtemps qu’il y a cinquante ans. Comment l’expliquez-vous ?

Cela montre que la richesse et le PIB ne sont pas tout. Certains pays ont stagné ou régressé sur le plan économique, mais même eux ont connu des avancées considérables en termes de santé. Le plus grand facteur derrière le progrès, ce n’est pas l’augmentation des salaires, mais des prix plus bas permettant une vie meilleure et plus longue, ainsi qu’une diffusion des savoirs et de la technologie. Il est difficile d’inventer un vaccin contre la rougeole, mais, une fois créé, il est facile de l’utiliser à travers le monde. En 1800, pas un seul pays au monde n’avait une espérance de vie supérieure à 40 ans. Aujourd’hui, pas un seul pays n’a une espérance de vie inférieure. En Afrique, c’est d’autant plus encourageant que, après les dégâts des guerres, de la malaria et du VIH, l’espérance de vie est plus élevée que jamais. L’Ouganda, le Botswana ou le Kenya ont eu un gain de dix ans ces dix dernières années. C’est hallucinant !

En 1950, Il y avait 10,5 millions de lépreux. Il n’y a aujourd’hui plus que 200 000 cas chroniques.

C’est intéressant d’un point de vue psychologique. On s’est inquiété pour la lèpre, la rougeole. Récemment, c’était Ebola. Or, une fois qu’on a résolu un problème, on l’oublie et on se dit que le monde est pire que jamais lorsque apparaît un nouveau virus. Pourtant, Ebola a prouvé à quel point la science, une coopération internationale et les populations pouvaient réagir rapidement. Un scénario catastrophe prévoyait 1,4 million de morts au Libéria et en Sierra Leone. Mais, là encore, il se fondait sur l’idée néo-malthusienne, avec un fond raciste, que puisque ce sont des Africains ils sont comme des enfants, incapables de changer leurs habitudes. Alors que ces gens ont des téléphones portables et s’informent! Ils ont ainsi adapté leurs rites funéraires et le nombre de morts s’est limité à 30.000.

En matière d’environnement, on se dit qu’il ne peut pas y avoir de bonnes nouvelles…

Mon éditeur non plus ne pensait pas que ce chapitre fonctionnerait [rires], car c’est le plus contre-intuitif. Oui, tous ces problèmes environnementaux qui nous préoccupent sont réels : réchauffement climatique, éradication des espèces… Mais je me suis aussi intéressé à d’autres problèmes environnementaux complètement oubliés. En décembre 1952, le grand smog a tué près de 12.000 personnes à Londres. Aujourd’hui, l’air londonien est aussi propre qu’au Moyen Age. Depuis 1990, la forêt européenne croît à un rythme annuel de 0,3 %. La déforestation continue en Indonésie ou au Brésil, mais le taux mondial de déforestation annuel a ralenti, passant de 0,18 à 0,0009% depuis les années 1990. On a mesuré que, grâce à l’évolution des techniques agricoles, on a pu sauvegarder une surface forestière de deux fois l’Amérique du Sud depuis les années 1960. Bien sûr, on crée de nouveaux problèmes. Mais comment y faire face ? Plus un pays est riche, mieux il peut développer des technologies propres. Dans le classement des indices de performance environnementale, les pays Scandinaves sont en tête, alors que la Somalie, le Niger ou Haïti sont en queue. Les problèmes environnementaux dans ces pays ne proviennent pas de la technologie, mais de l’absence de technologie. Autrement dit, nous devons accélérer le progrès plutôt qu’adopter la décroissance, qui signifierait un retour à la pauvreté pour des millions de personnes, mais serait plus néfaste pour l’environnement. Car le pire qui puisse arriver, c’est l’utilisation de vieilles technologies, ce qui se pratique dans des pays africains ou en Asie. Il faut accélérer le processus pour qu’eux aussi y aient accès. Nous devons trouver de meilleures façons d’utiliser nos ressources, mais je rappelle que la plus importante est le cerveau humain, qui, très heureusement, est renouvelable.

En 1900, seulement 21 % de la population mondiale savaient lire. Aujourd’hui, c’est 86%…

Parmi tous ces chiffres, voilà la meilleure nouvelle ! Car cela concerne notre capacité à affronter les problèmes du futur. Si vous êtes illettrés, vous ne recevrez pas les informations en cas d’épidémie, vous ne saurez pas comment prendre le mieux possible soin de vos enfants et vous ne gagnerez pas plus d’argent. L’incroyable essor de ce taux d’alphabétisme stimule toutes les autres tendances. Mais c’est aussi ce qui, parfois, peut nous effrayer dans le monde occidental. Avant, nous étions les meneurs de revue. Nous étions les seuls à avoir la richesse, le savoir et la technologie, mais on a connu une sorte de révolution copernicienne. Nous pensions être au centre du monde, ce n’est plus le cas. Des enfants qui, simplement parce qu’ils étaient nés au mauvais endroit, n’auraient pas pu être le prochain Léonard de Vinci ou le prochain Bill Gates peuvent désormais mettre leur cerveau à contribution pour penser un nouveau médicament ou la prochaine technologie. C’est un immense espoir pour l’humanité.

L’esclavage est officiellement partout aboli. Mais, pour l’extrême gauche, le capitalisme a créé de nouvelles servitudes…

C’est parce que ces gens-là pensent que toute personne qui doit travailler est un esclave. Ce qui est l’opposé de la conception traditionnelle de l’esclavage, où, par la coercition, on volait la vie de la personne. Les pauvres qui occupent des emplois dont nous ne voudrions pas le font parce que c’est leur meilleure option. J’ai interrogé des travailleurs dans ces usines asiatiques qui produisent pour les marchés occidentaux. Evidemment, ils expliquent qu’ils préféreraient avoir des salaires plus élevés et de meilleures conditions, mais ils veulent aussi que leurs proches puissent y travailler, car les revenus sont supérieurs et les conditions moins difficiles que dans l’agriculture de subsistance ou que travailler comme domestique. C’est un tremplin pour sortir de la pauvreté, comme nous l’avons fait il y a cent cinquante ans et comme cela se passe au Bangladesh, où, avec l’industrie textile, la pauvreté a été diminuée de moitié depuis quinze ans.

Et le travail des enfants ?

Si vous pensez que le travail des enfants est quelque chose de nouveau, consultez les tapisseries et les témoignages du Moyen Age, où les enfants font partie intégrante de l’économie. Aujourd’hui, ça paraît bénin, car nous avons une représentation romantique de la ferme, comme si c’était un plaisir. Mais je peux vous assurer que cela n’était pas le cas à l’époque. Le travail des enfants a continué sous la révolution industrielle, mais à travers des œuvres comme celle de Dickens il y a eu une prise de conscience qui marqua le début du déclin. Aujourd’hui, en Inde comme au Vietnam, le travail des enfants baisse rapidement. Entre 1993 et 2006, la proportion des 10-14 ans travaillant au Vietnam est passé de 45 % à moins de 10 %. Au moment où les parents deviennent plus riches, la première chose qu’ils font est de ne plus envoyer leurs enfants travailler, car ils ne le faisaient pas par plaisir sadique, mais pour survivre. Historiquement, le capitalisme a donc permis de mettre un terme au travail des enfants, pas l’inverse.

Vous illustrez aussi les progrès en matière de racisme, de misogynie ou d’homophobie. En 1987, un Américain sur deux seulement pensait qu’il était mal de battre sa femme avec une ceinture ou un bâton. Dix ans plus tard, ils étalent 86 %…

Le cercle des personnes que nous respectons et de qui nous nous soucions ne cesse de s’étendre. Traditionnellement, seule la tribu octroyait une dignité face aux autres. Puis ce sentiment s’est étendu aux villes et à la nation. Aujourd’hui, il nous arrive même, dans nos bons jours, de penser à l’humanité [rires]. Dans les années 1980, les hommes répondaient encore à ces questions comme si hommes et femmes étaient une tout autre espèce. Mais, plus les femmes ont fait la même chose que les hommes dans le monde du travail, plus il est devenu difficile de penser qu’ils leur sont supérieurs.

Pour Angus Deaton, le progrès crée toujours des inégalités. Depuis 1980, celles-ci sont grandissantes dans les pays de l’OCDE…

Deaton a raison. Il y a deux cents ans, il y avait plus d’égalité dans le monde, mais c’est parce que l’immense majorité d’entre nous était pauvre. L’indice de Gini était donc très bas. Puis, dans une minorité de pays, les gens ont commencé à avoir plus de libertés, ils sont devenus beaucoup plus riches : leur PIB par habitant a été multiplié par 20. Evidemment, vous introduisez ainsi une énorme inégalité dans le monde. Mais, comme l’explique Deaton, ce n’est pas toujours une mauvaise chose. Serait-il préférable que tout le monde soit resté pauvre ? Prenez la Chine. Il y a trente ans, c’était un pays très égalitaire, mais 90% de la population vivait dans l’extrême pauvreté, contre 10% aujourd’hui. Si vous ne vous concentrez que sur les inégalités, vous aurez l’impression que ça a empiré. Le progrès n’est jamais égalitaire. Il se concentre plus sur les régions côtières, dans les grandes villes. Cela dit, l’inégalité peut devenir un problème, surtout quand certains groupes commencent à se garantir des privilèges et prennent le contrôle du pouvoir. C’est ce qui s’est passé en Russie, où un petit groupe a pris en otage le gouvernement, faute de transparence.

Thomas Piketty explique que la croissance a été mieux partagée après la Seconde Guerre mondiale et jusqu’aux années 1970. Après, les inégalités de revenus se sont creusées…

Je suis l’un des rares à avoir lu son livre en entier [rires]. Cette augmentation des inégalités est en partie le résultat de la reconstruction de l’Europe après la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Ce fut facile, car toute la technologie était à notre disposition. Mais cette croissance s’est essoufflée dans les années 1970 et il a fallu de nouvelles ressources de productivité, car il ne s’agissait plus simplement de mettre des briques au bon endroit, mais de développer des technologies de l’information et de ressources humaines. Cela a favorisé ceux qui étaient bons dans ces domaines par rapport aux travailleurs manuels. En même temps, il est utile de rappeler que, plus que votre salaire, l’important est ce que vous pouvez acheter. Même si vous n’avez pas augmenté vos revenus de manière importante depuis les armées 1980, vous avez eu accès à des technologies et à des services qui n’existaient pas dans le passé. Avant, seuls les riches pouvaient s’acheter une encyclopédie. Maintenant, on y a tous accès pour rien ! Comment chiffrer ça ? Ça n’apparaît pas dans les statistiques. Sans parler de la médecine, qui nous a donné près de dix années supplémentaires de vie. Les taux de criminalité se sont réduits, l’accès à la technologie a augmenté pour tout le monde. Bill Gates voyage de manière luxueuse et boit sans doute du meilleur vin que moi. Mais il utilise le même téléphone, il n’a pas un meilleur accès au savoir, ce qui est une première dans l’histoire de l’humanité. Et son espérance de vie n’est pas supérieure à la mienne. Dans notre vie de tous les jours, nous sommes en fait de plus en plus égaux.

Au-delà des chiffres, il y a les questions culturelles. La mondialisation et l’immigration font craindre à certains de perdre leur identité.

C’est effectivement un facteur plus important que les données économiques. Si vous regardez les supporteurs de Donald Trump, ils ne sont pas au chômage, mais ils appartiennent à une classe blanche qui pense que son identité est en déclin car menacée par les minorités. Cela explique en grande partie l’essor des populismes en Europe et aux Etats-Unis. Les psychologues parlent d’un réflexe d’autorité. C’est un besoin de protection qui touche aussi l’éducation, la liberté sexuelle, les droits des minorités. C’est l’idée qu’on doit se reprendre en main. Je comprends ce sentiment, mais les conséquences en seraient terrifiantes, car tout le progrès dont nous parlons est dépendant de notre ouverture au monde.

D’où les oppositions aux traités de libre-échange…

Si nous construisons des murs, nous n’empêcherons pas le reste du monde d’innover et d’avoir de nouvelles idées. Ce serait se tirer une balle dans le pied. On a vu ça dans l’Histoire. Les civilisations qui, se sentant menacées, ont commencé à mettre des barrières sont celles qui ont entamé leur déclin. Les Arabes étaient très en avance sur l’Europe en matière de science et technologie, la Chine avait les caractères, de la poudre à canon et la boussole. Mais la dynastie Ming, qui a pris le pouvoir au XIVe siècle, était hostile à la technologie et aux étrangers, tandis que le monde islamique s’est refermé après les invasions mongoles, différant l’utilisation de l’imprimerie de trois cents ans.

Alors qu’un pays comme le Nigeria se montre très optimiste, les Occidentaux sont de plus en plus pessimistes. Comment l’expliquer ?

Selon les sondages, dans les pays occidentaux, plus de personnes croient aux fantômes ou à l’astrologie qu’au progrès. Cela vous rend un peu inquiet pour votre civilisation [rires]. Cette idée que l’âge d’or est dans le passé est une forme de nostalgie qui nous a toujours accompagnés. Quand je demande aux gens quelle était la meilleure période à leurs yeux, la plupart évoquent les années au cours desquelles ils ont grandi. A l’époque, ils n’avaient ni enfants ni responsabilités et ne se préoccupaient pas de toutes les choses qui peuvent mal tourner. Le monde, quand on est jeune, semble plus sûr. En grandissant, on appréhende le danger. Et il y a le déclin physique. Comme l’explique l’historien culturel Arthur Herman, il existe une fréquente confusion entre la détérioration à l’intérieur de votre corps et celle qui se produit à l’extérieur. Ce n’est sans doute pas une coïncidence si nous sommes précisément au moment où la génération du baby-boom prend sa retraite. Aux Etats-Unis, beaucoup de gens sont persuadés que les années 1960 étaient une période d’harmonie. Mais n’y a-t-il pas eu la crise des missiles à Cuba, les assassinats des Kennedy et de Martin Luther King, ainsi que des conflits raciaux dans chaque grande ville américaine ? Pourtant, aujourd’hui, la période fait figure de paradis perdu.

Les religions ou les superstitions peuvent-elles menacer le progrès ? Seuls 52 % des Français pensent que les vaccins ont des effets positifs…

Il y a toujours un danger contre la raison. Cette explosion de peur contre le vaccin, l’un des plus grands sauveurs de vies de l’Histoire, montre qu’un recul peut arriver n’importe où. Quand les personnes ont l’impression que leur monde est chaotique et complexe, elles ne savent plus à qui faire confiance, donc il devient plus facile pour les complotistes et les religions de prospérer.

Aujourd’hui, seuls les libéraux et quelques réformistes à gauche osent encore vanter le progrès…

Quelle que soit leur cause, les critiques du progrès demandent à l’Etat plus de contrôle pour figer la situation. A gauche, il faut garder l’économie comme elle était ; à droite, c’est la culture qu’il faut préserver et, pour les écologistes, c’est l’environnement. Ils veulent tout stopper. Mais même le plus convaincu des réactionnaires ne voudrait pas revenir aux famines d’il y a deux cents ans. Quant aux écologistes, ils devraient être d’accord sur le fait que les plus grands problèmes environnementaux sont ceux qui ont tué des millions de personnes, parce qu’on n’avait pas d’électricité, qu’on était empoisonné par un mauvais air intérieur, qu’on polluait de façon traditionnelle l’eau et qu’on en mourait. Tous ces gens pensent qu’à ce moment précis de notre évolution on ne peut plus aller plus loin et qu’il faut tout préserver.

Etes-vous confiant pour le futur ?

Parce que j’ai écrit un livre sur le progrès, je devrais être optimiste, mais je ne l’ai pas écrit pour dire : « Regardez, tout est génial, on peut être relax.» Non, je l’ai fait parce que j’ai un peu peur. Les risques sont là et ils sont bien plus dangereux quand les gens ne comprennent pas ce que l’espèce humaine peut réaliser quand elle est libre. Je suis très effrayé par cette demande d’autorité, à droite comme à gauche, pour s’opposer à la mondialisation. Un grand pays européen peut élire un populiste, ce qui signifierait la fin de l’Union européenne telle qu’on l’a connue. Je suis donc un optimiste soucieux. Cela dit, je reste optimiste, car l’humanité a traversé dans l’Histoire des choses bien pires et est arrivée à les surmonter. L’humanité est résiliente et a beaucoup de pouvoirs.

Propos recueillis par Thomas Mahler, Le Point du 3 novembre 2016

Voir aussi:

Combattre les réactionnaires

La vague réactionnaire qui submerge les démocraties occidentales est construite sur un mythe, celui d’un âge d’or… qui n’a jamais existé. Et sur un faux postulat selon lequel l’humanité serait en perdition.

Ce qui semblait impossible s’est finalement produit. Donald Trump a gagné l’élection présidentielle américaine la plus détestable et la plus inquiétante de l’ère moderne. Elle a marqué l’irruption du populisme à une échelle sans précédent dans l’histoire de la démocratie américaine. Cette dernière n’est plus immunisée contre une maladie qui a ravagé l’Europe il y a quatre-vingt ans et a fait son retour dans l’ensemble du monde occidental et bien au-delà.

Cette vague, apparemment irrésistible, a deux ressorts, la désignation d’un bouc émissaire et la négation de la réalité. Tous nos maux proviennent de l’étranger et des élites qui sont vendues à ces intérêts. Retrouver la grandeur passée, reprendre le contrôle de notre destin, renouer avec une société qui nous ressemble sont les slogans politiques de notre temps. On les retrouve aussi bien avec Donald Trump que parmi les partisans du Brexit, dans les partis d’extrême-droite européens, avec Vladimir Poutine en Russie, avec Recep Tayyip Erdogan en Turquie, avec Narenda Modi en Inde et même, à une autre échelle, avec Daech. L’islamisme politique n’a-t-il pas pour ambition de retrouver la prétendue pureté religieuse originelle et la puissance militaire qui lui est associée?

Donald Trump promet de rendre «l’Amérique grande à nouveau». Vladimir Poutine entend renouer avec les ambitions impériales de la Russie tsariste et de l’URSS et Erdogan avec le destin de l’empire ottoman. Narenda Modi s’appuie sur un nationalisme hindou construit sur un affrontement avec l’Islam. Et les partisans du Brexit comme ceux de Marine Le Pen voient dans la fermeture des frontières et le rejet de l’immigration le moyen de revenir à un âge d’or de prospérité et d’entre soi. Un âge d’or qui n’a jamais existé.

«La trahison des élites est centrale…»

La pensée réactionnaire est toujours construite selon le même schéma, explique Mark Lilla, professeur à l’Université de Columbia et auteur d’un livre récent intitulé The Shipwrecked Mind: on Political Reaction («Naufrage intellectuel: la réaction politique»), dans le New York Times. Elle part de la description d’une période idéale, «un Etat où règne l’ordre et où les personnes partagent un même destin… Puis des idées étrangères promues par des intellectuels et des forces extérieures –écrivains, journalistes, professeurs, étrangers– détruisent cette harmonie. La trahison des élites est centrale dans tout mythe réactionnaire…».

Désigner à la vindicte populaire le ou les responsables de nos malheurs, au hasard l’immigration, l’Europe, la finance cosmopolite, la mondialisation, le capitalisme, les Etats-Unis, la Chine, le sionisme, l’islam… est d’une redoutable efficacité politique. Sans doute plus encore à l’époque des réseaux sociaux et de l’omniprésence de l’information instantanée qui n’a pour seul horizon que la polémique artificielle du jour, rapidement effacée par celle du lendemain. Face à un monde compliqué et vide de sens, le «C’était mieux avant» apporte une réponse simpliste et réconfortante au sentiment de déclassement, d’abandon, d’aliénation et d’humiliation d’une partie grandissante de nos sociétés. Mais si la souffrance économique comme identitaire est bien réelle, la réponse qui consiste à désigner des responsables, les chasser… et revenir ainsi par magie à la grandeur et à l’harmonie passée est une dangereuse illusion.

Il faut appeler un chat un chat. Cette illusion a des relents fascistes, même si elle ne va pas jusqu’au rejet de la démocratie. Elle s’en rapproche «dans son opposition virulente… au libéralisme, dans sa suspicion envers le capitalisme et surtout dans la croyance que la nation, souvent définie en termes religieux et raciaux, représente la plus importante source d’identité des vrais citoyens», écrit le professeur Sheri Berman, de la Columbia University, dans Foreign Affairs:

«Comme leurs prédécesseurs, les extrémistes de droite d’aujourd’hui dénoncent les dirigeants démocratiquement élus comme inefficaces, impotents et faibles. Ils promettent de soutenir leur nation, la protéger de ses ennemis et redonner une raison d’être à des gens qui se sentent en butte à des forces qui les dépassent…»

Il n’y a pas d’effondrement moral, économique et politique

La réponse à ces marchands d’illusion et de malheur existe, même si elle tarde à venir. Elle se trouve dans les enseignements de l’histoire et l’affirmation des faits. La réaction est construite sur un mythe, celui d’un passé fantasmé, et sur un faux postulat, l’humanité est en perdition.

Les réactionnaires promettent d’effacer ce que la modernité aurait détruit d’une société harmonieuse à taille humaine. Ils affirment que leur pays et leur société ont fait fausse route, guidés par des élites apatrides, des ploutocrates, et qu’il faut revenir en arrière. Donald Trump ou Eric Zemmour s’insurgent contre un effondrement moral, politique et économique. Il n’existe pas. Les sociétés du siècle passé avaient leurs guerres, leurs mouvements sociaux, leur terrorisme, leur misère, leur violence, leurs discriminations, leurs laissés-pour-compte, leurs corrompus…

La réalité objective de l’humanité ne correspond en rien au catastrophisme ambiant. Il n’y a tout simplement jamais eu sur terre de meilleure période pour être vivant, explique l’historien suédois Johan Norberg dans son livre Progress: Ten Reasons to Look Forward to the Future («Progrès: dix raisons d’attendre avec impatience l’avenir»). «L’humanité n’a jamais été plus riche, en bonne santé, libre, tolérante et éduquée», résume-t-il.

Quelques exemples, parmi d’autres…

L’espérance de vie moyenne dans le monde était de 31 ans en 1900. Elle est aujourd’hui de 71 ans. La Banque mondiale a défini le seuil de la misère extrême à un revenu équivalent à 2 dollars par jour. En 1800, 94% de nos ancêtres vivaient dans une pauvreté extrême. En 1990, 37% de la population mondiale se trouvait encore dans cette situation. Ce chiffre est revenu aujourd’hui à moins de 10%.

Nous vivons dans l’ère la plus pacifique de l’histoire humaine. Le taux annuel d’homicide dans l’Europe médiévale était de 32 pour 100.000. A la fin du XXe siècle, ce chiffre est tombé à 1 pour 100.000. Le taux de mortalité de personnes ayant péri lors de conflits armés est passé de 195 par million en 1950 à 8 par million en 2013.

En 1800, seuls 12% des adultes étaient capables de lire. En 1950, le niveau mondial d’alphabétisme était de 40%. Il est aujourd’hui de 86% et la différence entre les hommes et les femmes ne cesse de reculer.

En 1990, il y avait 76 démocraties électorales. Il y en avait 125 en 2015. L’air de Londres est aujourd’hui aussi propre qu’au début de la révolution industrielle et les forêts s’étendent à nouveau en Europe.

Rupture technologique et repli identitaire

Cela ne veut pas dire que notre planète soit un paradis. Que les sociétés ne sont pas fracturées par des transformations brutales qu’elles n’arrivent pas à surmonter. Mais personne ne veut voir la réalité des progrès spectaculaires de l’humanité. Nous préférons nous complaire dans les peurs, les fantasmes et l’annonce de catastrophes. «Aucun journaliste ne sait plus ce qu’est une bonne nouvelle», faisait remarquer il y a quelques années le Dalaï-Lama.

Les réactionnaires exploitent l’appauvrissement relatif de la classe moyenne et l’angoisse irrationnelle de l’avenir. Ils apportent une réponse absurde et dangereuse à de vrais problèmes nés de la mondialisation et de l’évolution technologique: l’angoisse culturelle et identitaire et la bipolarisation du marché du travail.

Rendre moins douloureux le sentiment d’un déclin identitaire et culturel prend du temps. Cela se fait dans l’éducation, le respect et plus encore la connaissance de l’autre. Le paradoxe, c’est que la tolérance progresse en fait rapidement dans le monde, mais qu’il est difficile de le voir.

La bipolarisation du marché du travail pose un problème encore plus grave aux sociétés, notamment occidentales. C’est ce qu’explique l’économiste Patrick Artus dans Le Point. «Les créations d’emplois se concentrent aux deux extrêmes, emplois qualifiés à rémunération élevée, emplois peu qualifiés à rémunération faible; entre ces deux extrêmes, les emplois intermédiaires (la classe moyenne) disparaissent progressivement…». La plupart des études montrent que cette division du marché du travail est plus liée à la technologie qu’à la mondialisation et aux délocalisations.

C’est la technologie qui a chassé la main d’œuvre des campagnes puis des usines et aujourd’hui de bon nombre d’emplois intermédiaires dans les services. Ce phénomène va s’accélérer, avec par exemple le développement des véhicules autonomes et des robots. Un processus de destruction/création brutal. De nouveaux emplois apparaissent et apparaîtront –les besoins sont sans limites–, mais là encore il faudra du temps. Les États ont un rôle indispensable à jouer dans la formation et dans la protection, avec, pourquoi pas, l’instauration d’un revenu universel. S’ils ne le font pas, les marchands d’illusion ne sont pas prêts de disparaître.

Globalization and Poverty
The last forty years have seen a massive and historically unprecedented decline in global poverty
Marian Tupy
Reason
November 22, 2016

Remember the good life during the 1970s? If you do, your experience is not likely to have been a typical one. In fact, the economic liberalization and globalization that started in the late 1970s and accelerated in the 1980s, has led to a massive and historically unprecedented decline in global poverty. Contrary to much of the public perception, liberalization and globalization have not led to an increase in U.S. poverty rates, which continue to fluctuate within a comparatively narrow and, by historical standards, low, band.

Let us look at the global picture first. In 1981, the year Ronald Reagan became America’s 40th President, 44.3 percent of the world lived in extreme poverty (i.e., less than $1.90 per person per day). Last year, it was 9.6 percent. That’s a decline of 78 percent. In East Asia, a region of the world that includes China, 80.6 percent of people lived in extreme poverty. Today, 4.1 percent do—a 95 percent reduction. Even in sub-Saharan Africa, a relatively under-performing region, the share of the population living on less than $1.9 per day dropped by 38 percent.

Have those advances come at the expense of the American worker? They have certainly led to economic dislocation, but America’s poverty rate has remained relatively steady. When talking about U.S. poverty rates, it is important to keep in mind that extreme poverty in America is vanishingly rare. Instead, our poverty rate is determined by the U.S. Census Bureau « by comparing pre-tax cash income against a threshold that is set at three times the cost of a minimum food diet in 1963, updated annually for inflation using the Consumer Price Index. It’s also adjusted for family size, composition, and age of householder. »

According to both the Nobel Prize-winning economist Angus Deaton and Cato’s Michael Tanner (who relied on U.S. Census Bureau data), the American poverty rate has moved between 15.2 and 11.3 percent over the last four decades. On three occasions (1983, 1993 and 2010) it reached over 15 percent of the population. Those were post-recession peaks that disappeared as soon as the economy recovered.

In fact, America experienced her lowest poverty rate since 1974 in 2000, when openness of the American economy, as measured by the Fraser Institute’s Economic Freedom of the World index, was at its highest. Since then, America’s economy has become less free. Could that be the reason why the American recovery from the Great Recession was so sluggish and why America’s poverty rate has not retreated as fast as it did on previous occasions?

Voir encore:

Le RMI a 20 ans, place au revenu de solidarité active 
Pour Lionel Stoleru, l’ancien ministre, fondateur du revenu minimum d’insertion (RMI), revient sur les circonstances dans lesquelles celui-ci a été créé et se réjouit de voir le revenu de solidarité active (RSA) prendre forme.
Lionel Stoleru
Le Figaro
06/06/2008

D’une session de travail de six mois à la Brookings Institution à Washington en 1974, je revins avec une thèse en faveur de l’impôt négatif qui fit l’objet d’un livre Vaincre la pauvreté dans les pays riches. Quinze ans plus tard, en mai 1988, dans la «Lettre à tous les Français», le candidat Mitterrand écrivit que, s’il était élu, il «mettrait en œuvre le revenu minimum proposé par Lionel Stoleru». Effectivement, dès son élection, je fus appelé au gouvernement comme secrétaire d’État au Plan auprès de Michel Rocard, et, en six semaines, le projet de loi créant le RMI fut préparé. Au Parlement, il fut voté événement rare à l’unanimité (moins 3 voix) et, depuis, aucun gouvernement ne l’a jamais remis en cause.

Pour moi, le RMI était le retour de l’État à ses devoirs. Autant je pouvais admirer la charité chrétienne de l’abbé Pierre et la solidarité laïque de Coluche, autant j’étais convaincu que, dans un pays riche, c’est du devoir de l’État qu’aucun citoyen ne meure de froid ni de faim. Tel était l’objet du RMI, ouvert à tous sans condition de statut. En outre, fixé à un niveau évidemment inférieur au smic pour respecter la primauté du travail, le RMI ne coûte presque rien : une goutte d’eau dans l’océan des dépenses sociales, même avec un million de bénéficiaires.

Cela dit, il ne nous avait pas échappé, dès sa création, que le RMI poserait deux problèmes.

Le «I», tout d’abord, ce «I» de «insertion». Mis dans la loi pour rassurer les députés obsédés par le «délit de fainéantise», le dispositif d’insertion n’avait pas les moyens de traiter individuellement tous les RMIstes, ou alors le «I» de l’insertion aurait coûté beaucoup plus cher que le «RM» du revenu minimum. En outre, et surtout, il y avait une sorte de contradiction conceptuelle entre l’idée que tout citoyen a droit de manger et l’obligation d’insertion. Pour quelqu’un qui veut consacrer sa vie à écrire des poèmes ou à peindre des toiles qui ne se vendent pas, et qui se satisfait du RMI, que signifie l’insertion ? Si le RMI avait existé, peut-être que Van Gogh et Verlaine auraient un peu moins souffert !

Le revenu minimum, ensuite. Ma proposition personnelle n’était pas celle-là. C’était celle de l’impôt négatif : plus un citoyen est riche, plus il paie d’impôt positif ; plus un citoyen est pauvre, plus il reçoit d’impôt négatif. Il y a une échelle progressive, sans discontinuité.

Le revenu minimum, lui, n’a pas cette qualité : on le donne à celui qui n’a rien et on l’enlève entièrement à celui qui retrouve un travail et un revenu. Dès qu’il gagne 100 € par son activité, il perd 100 € de son RMI. C’est évidemment fort peu motivant pour aller travailler.

Une nouvelle étape du RMI est donc nécessaire, c’est le RSA, revenu de solidarité active, et c’est le grand mérite de Martin Hirsch, à partir de quelques expériences menées en région, d’avoir su proposer une réforme d’ensemble du système actuel vers un dispositif proche de l’impôt négatif, c’est-à-dire un dispositif où, comme pour tout impôt, on a toujours intérêt à gagner plus, car, comme on dit, «il en reste toujours quelque chose», ce qui n’était pas le cas du RMI.

Mais, voilà le hic, le RSA est coûteux. Jusqu’à présent, on n’accompagne les bénéficiaires que jusqu’au moment où ils gagnent l’équivalent du RMI. Avec le RSA, on les accompagne au-delà du RMI et, compte tenu des besoins des travailleurs pauvres, non seulement jusqu’au smic, mais vraisemblablement un peu au-dessus du smic. Le calcul n’est pas sorcier : si on veut maintenir, par exemple, 50 € d’aide à celui qui gagne 100 € de plus, cela veut dire qu’on l’accompagne jusqu’à ce qu’il gagne deux fois le RMI, ce qui fait plus que le smic.

Or il y a beaucoup de Français qui, à temps partiel ou à temps plein, sont à 20 ou 25 % autour du smic, au-dessus ou au-dessous. Même si le RSA ne donne à chacun qu’un petit complément, cela fait quand même un gros montant total, d’où le débat budgétaire actuel.

Ce qu’on semble oublier dans ce débat, c’est que la totalité du RSA je dis bien la totalité va aux chômeurs ou aux travailleurs pauvres. C’est donc, à partir du RMI, la plus importante action de lutte contre la pauvreté jamais faite en France (et aussi dans l’Union européenne). On pourrait penser que la gauche applaudirait ! Non, elle ne supporte pas que ce soit la droite qui le fasse et encore moins Martin Hirsch au sein de la droite. Puis-je rappeler que, quand nous avons créé le RMI, c’était un gouvernement de gauche, où, moi, je venais de la droite et où, «néanmoins», les députés de droite ont voté pour ? Qu’on se le dise !

Cela dit, à l’unanimité ou à la majorité, le RSA sera voté. Il lui restera alors un dernier obstacle à franchir : la complexité. Moins simple par nature que le RMI, il devra, pour être efficace, être compréhensible et être compris. Contrairement à la prime pour l’emploi dont aucun bénéficiaire n’a jamais compris ni pourquoi, ni comment, ni quand il la touche, il faut que le salarié «s’approprie» le RSA en sachant à quels avantages il a droit et ce qu’il en garde chaque fois qu’il parvient à augmenter son revenu. C’est alors, et seulement alors, qu’il saura se bâtir un projet de réinsertion dans la société. Le «I» du RMI était passif, le «A» du RSA est actif, voilà ce qui fait toute la différence.

Un écrivain désabusé disait : «Je ne laisserai personne dire que 20 ans, c’est le plus bel âge de la vie». Pour le RMI, ce sera le plus bel âge si, adulte, il devient le RSA.

Voir de même:

Propos recueillis par Yvon Corre
Qu’est-ce qui caractérise cette nouvelle bourgeoisie. Est-elle différente de l’ancienne ?
Elle se présente comme différente mais sur les fondamentaux, elle fonctionne un peu comme la bourgeoisie d’avant. Elle vit là où ça se passe, c’est-à-dire dans les grandes métropoles, les secteurs économiques les mieux intégrés dans l’économie du monde. Elle est dans la reproduction sociale. On ne compte plus les fils de… Tout ça est renforcé par les dynamiques territoriales qui tendent à concentrer les nouvelles catégories supérieures dans les grands centres urbains avec une technique géniale qui est d’être dans le brouillage de classe absolu. Que voulez-vous dire par brouillage de classe ?
Cette bourgeoisie ne se définit pas comme une bourgeoisie. Elle refuse bien évidemment cette étiquette. C’est une bourgeoisie cool et sympa. D’où la difficulté pour les catégories populaires à se référer à une conscience de classe. Hier, vous aviez une classe ouvrière qui était en bas de l’échelle sociale mais qui pouvait revendiquer, s’affronter, ce qui est beaucoup plus compliqué aujourd’hui. On a des gens apparemment bienveillants, qui tendent la main et qui se servent beaucoup de la diversité et de l’immigration pour se donner une caution sociale. Mais quand on regarde les choses de près, ce sont en fait des milieux très fermés. La mixité sociale, le vivre ensemble c’est donc pour vous un mythe ?
Ça, c’est dans les discours mais dans les faits, ce que l’on observe, c’est une spécialisation sociale des territoires. Un rouleau compresseur, celui des logiques foncières, tend à concentrer de plus en plus ces catégories supérieures alors même qu’elles nous expliquent que l’on peut être dispersé dans l’espace, que via le réseau numérique on peut vivre n’importe où. On assiste donc à une recomposition des territoires ?
Oui. Quand on prend sur le temps long, on voit bien qu’il y a une recomposition sociale du territoire qui nous dit exactement ce qu’est le système mondialisé. En gros, nous n’avons plus besoin, pour créer de la richesse, de ce qui était hier le socle de la classe moyenne : ces ouvriers, ces employés, ces petits indépendants, ces petits paysans. Avec le temps, ces catégories se trouvent localisées sur les territoires les moins dynamiques économiquement, qui créent le moins de richesses et d’emplois. C’est cette France périphérique de petites villes, de villes moyennes et de zones rurales. C’est un modèle que l’on retrouve partout en Europe. Le mouvement des bonnets rouges en Bretagne était-il une réaction à ce modèle ?

Complètement. Ce qui m’a frappé, c’est que ce mouvement est parti de petites villes, de zones rurales et non pas de Rennes, Brest ou Nantes. Pourquoi ça part de là ? Parce ce que vous avez là des gens qui sont dans une fragilité sociale extrême. Quand ils ont du travail, ils ont peur de le perdre car il y a très peu de création d’activité. Le problème, c’est que tous les spécialistes des territoires pensent toujours à partir de la métropole.

Vous êtes très critique sur la métropolisation. On dit pourtant qu’elle va profiter à tous les territoires ?
C’est vrai que l’on nous parle toujours de la métropolisation comme d’un système très ouvert. On dit que par « ruissellement », les autres territoires vont en profiter. C’est tout l’argumentaire depuis 20 ans mais il faut bien constater qu’il n’y a pas de créations d’emplois sur ces territoires de la France périphérique. Certes, il y a de la redistribution à travers notamment les dotations mais ce n’est pas ça qui fait société. Les gens n’ont pas envie de tendre la main et attendre un revenu social. Ce n’est d’ailleurs pas un hasard si la thématique du revenu universel est aussi bien portée par des libéraux de droite que de gauche. Il y a derrière l’idée que les gens ne retrouveront jamais du boulot.

Mais n’est-ce pas plutôt le modèle économique qui ne fonctionne pas bien ?
On ne peut pas dire que le modèle économique ne marche pas. Il crée même beaucoup de richesses mais il ne fait plus société, il n’intègre pas le plus grand nombre. On est dans un temps particulier aujourd’hui, qui est le temps de la sortie de la classe moyenne. Les ouvriers et les employés, qui étaient le socle de la classe moyenne, sont pourtant majoritaires. Quand vous ajoutez villes moyennes, petites villes et zones rurales, vous arrivez à 60 % de la population. Il y a certes beaucoup de retraités sur ces territoires mais aussi plein de jeunes de milieux populaires qui sont bloqués, qui n’ont pas accès à la grande ville. Pendant un moment, la création d’emplois de fonctionnaires territoriaux a pu compenser ce phénomène mais aujourd’hui c’est fini.

Comment cela peut-il se traduire politiquement ?
On le voit déjà. Trump aux États-Unis, c’est le vote de cette classe moyenne qui est en train de disparaître. Le Brexit, c’est exactement la Grande-Bretagne périphérique des petites villes et des zones rurales où vous avez l’ancienne classe ouvrière, qui paie l’adaptation au modèle économique mondialisé. Tout ça est très rationnel. On analyse toujours ces votes comme un peu irrationnels, protestataires. Il y a de la colère mais il y a surtout un diagnostic. On oublie toujours de dire que les gens des milieux populaires ont joué le jeu de la mondialisation et de l’adaptation mais pour rien. À la fin ils ont toujours de petits salaires avec des perspectives pour leurs enfants qui se réduisent. C’est ça qui se joue électoralement. On a des partis politiques qui ont été inventés pour représenter la classe moyenne qui n’existe plus aujourd’hui. Et le Front national n’a pas grand-chose à faire pour ramasser la mise. Il n’a même pas besoin de faire campagne.

Les politiques ne voient-ils pas ce qui se passe ou ne veulent-ils pas le voir ?
Je fais vraiment un distinguo entre les élus d’en bas et ceux d’en haut. Les élus d’en bas comprennent très bien ce qui se passe. Ils connaissent leurs territoires. Mais il y a une classe politique d’en haut qui est complètement hors-sol. Le clivage est vraiment à l’intérieur des partis.

Voir de plus:

Lexington
The American Dream, RIP?
An economist asks provocative questions about the future of social mobility
The Economist
Sep 21st 2013

COULD America survive the end of the American Dream? The idea is unthinkable, say political leaders of right and left. Yet it is predicted in “Average is Over”, a bracing new book by Tyler Cowen, an economist. Mr Cowen is no stranger to controversy. In 2011 he galvanised Washington with “The Great Stagnation”, in which he argued that America has used up the low-hanging fruit of free land, abundant labour and new technologies. His new book suggests that the disruptive effects of automation and ever-cheaper computer power have only just begun to be felt.

It describes a future largely stripped of middling jobs and broad prosperity. An elite 10-15% of Americans will have the brains and self-discipline to master tomorrow’s technology and extract profit from it, he speculates. They will enjoy great wealth and stimulating lives. Others will endure stagnant or even falling wages, as employers measure their output with “oppressive precision”. Some will thrive as service-providers to the rich. A few will claw their way into the elite (cheap online education will be a great leveller), bolstering the idea of a “hyper-meritocracy” at work: this “will make it easier to ignore those left behind”.

Mr Cowen’s vision is neither warm nor fuzzy. In his future, mistakes and even mediocrity will be hard to hide: eg, an ever-expanding array of ratings will expose so-so doctors and also patients who do not take their medicines or otherwise spell trouble. Young men will struggle in a labour market that rewards conscientiousness over muscle. With incomes squeezed, many Americans will head to the sort of cheap, sun-baked sprawling exurbs that give the farmers’-market-and-bike-lanes set heartburn. Many will accept rotten public services in exchange for low taxes. This may sound a bit grim, but it reflects real-world trends: 60% of employers already check the credit ratings of job candidates; young male unemployment is high and migrants have been flooding to low-tax, low-service Texas for years.

The left is sure that inequality is a recipe for riots. Mr Cowen doubts it. The have-nots will be too engrossed in video games to light real petrol bombs. An ageing population will be rather conservative, he thinks. There will be lots of Tea-Party sorts among the economically left-behind. Aid for the poor will be slashed but benefits for the old preserved. He does not fear protectionism, as most jobs that can be sent overseas have already gone. He notes that the late 1960s, when society was in turmoil, was a golden age of income equality, while some highly unequal moments in history, including in medieval times, were rather stable.

Even if only a fraction of Mr Cowen’s vision comes to pass, he is too sanguine about the politics of polarisation. Inter-generational tensions fuelled 1960s unrest and would be back with a vengeance, this time in the form of economic competition for scarce resources. The Middle Ages were stable partly because peasants could not vote; an unhappy modern electorate, by contrast, would be prey to demagogues peddling simple solutions, from xenophobia to soak-the-rich taxes, or harsh, self-defeating crime policies. Yet Mr Cowen’s main point is plausible: gigantic shifts are under way, and they may be unstoppable.

Politicians are skittish about admitting this. Barack Obama calls America’s wealth gap “our great unfinished business”, describing a crisis of inequality decades in the making. Think of technology, he tells audiences, and how it has thinned the ranks of travel agents, bank clerks and other middle-class gateway jobs. At the same time, global competition has reduced workers’ bargaining power. People have “lost trust in the capacity of government to help them”, he sorrows. But then Mr Obama implies that political villainy is the real culprit. He accuses entrenched interests of working for years to spread a “great untruth”: that government intervention is either harmful or a plot to grab tax dollars from the squeezed middle and shower them on the undeserving poor. Politics risks becoming a “zero-sum game where a few do very well while struggling families of every race fight over a shrinking economic pie.”

Republicans are just as partisan. Senator Marco Rubio of Florida, a son of Cuban immigrants, likes to say that had he not been born in post-war America in an era of high social mobility, he would probably be a very opinionated bartender. At a “Defending the American Dream Summit” on August 30th he accused Mr Obama of smothering economic opportunity with a big-government nightmare of debts, “class-warfare” taxes, innovation-smothering regulation and over-generous welfare. While most are working harder than ever and barely keeping up, Mr Rubio growls, “some people” shun work because they can make almost as much from government benefits. In short, both sides never tire of explaining how the other is destroying the American Dream. Alas, neither can explain, convincingly, how to revive it.

What, Tyler, no revolt?

Asked about the limits of his power, Mr Obama mutters about “pushing back against the trends” squeezing middle America, rather than resolving them entirely. That, he argues, is better than the Republican right, who “want to accelerate” such trends.

For their part Republican leaders offer long-cherished shrink-the-government schemes, rebranded as plans to save the American Dream. They say that tax cuts and deregulation would trigger a private-sector investment boom. In truth, the links between investment and government policy are rarely so neat, and even such a boom might do little for middle-class wage stagnation.

Many voters remember a time when hard work was reliably rewarded with economic security. This was not really true in the 1950s and 60s if you were black or female, but the question still remains: what if Mr Cowen is right? What if the bottom 85% today are mostly doomed to stay there? In a country founded on hope, that would require something like a new social contract. Politicians cannot duck Mr Cowen’s conundrum for ever.

Voir enfin:

HOLLAND, Mich. — While much of the American political class has been consumed with recriminations over the wrenching loss of manufacturing jobs, Chuck Reid has been quietly adding them.

His company, First Class Seating, makes recliner seats for movie theaters here at a factory on the shores of Lake Michigan. Since he bought the business three years ago, its work force has grown to 40 from 15.

But those jobs will be in jeopardy if President-elect Donald J. Trump follows through on his combative promises to punish countries he deems guilty of unfair trade.

Mr. Trump secured the White House in part by vowing to bring manufacturing jobs back to American shores. The president-elect has fixed on China as a symbol of nefarious trade practices while threatening to slap 45 percent punitive tariffs on Chinese imports.

In short, Mr. Trump’s signature trade promise, one ostensibly aimed at protecting American jobs, may well deliver the reverse: It risks making successful American manufacturers more vulnerable by raising their costs. It would unleash havoc on the global supply chain, prompting some multinationals to leave the United States and shift manufacturing to countries where they can be assured of buying components at the lowest prices.

“If you do this tomorrow, you would have a lot of disruption,” said Susan Helper, an economist at the Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland. “The stuff that China now makes and the way they make it, it’s not trivial to replicate that.”

Mr. Reid takes pride in using American products. His designers here in Michigan dreamed up his sleek recliner. Local hands construct the frames using American-made steel, then affix molded foam from a factory in nearby Grand Rapids. They staple upholstery to hunks of wood harvested by timber operations in Wisconsin. They do all this inside a former heating and cooling equipment factory that shut down a decade ago when the work shifted to Mexico.

But the fabric for Mr. Reid’s seats arrives from China. So do the electronics in the “magic box” that enables moviegoers to control the recliner. Ditto, the plastic cup holders and the bolts and screws that hold the parts together. The motor is the work of a German company that makes it in Hungary, almost certainly using electronics from China.

Mr. Reid estimates that a 45 percent tariff on Chinese wares would raise the costs of making a recliner here by 20 percent.

Tariffs would give his factory an edge against American competitors that import even more from China. But his company would be vulnerable to competitors in Mexico, Colombia and Australia. They would be free to draw on China’s supply chain and sell their wares into the American market unhindered.

“Our chair would be priced out of the market,” Mr. Reid said. “If it impacts our sales, that puts jobs at risk.”

Trade experts dismiss Mr. Trump’s threat of tariffs as campaign bluster that will soon give way to pragmatic concerns about growth and employment. Between 1998 and 2006, the imported share of components folded into American manufacturing rose to 34 percent from 24 percent, according to one widely cited study.

International law also limits the scope of what the Trump administration can do. Under the rules of the World Trade Organization, the United States cannot willy-nilly apply tariffs. It must develop cases industry by industry, proving that China is damaging American rivals through unfair practices.

Talk of across-the-board tariffs is “pure theater,” said Marc L. Busch, an expert on international trade policy at Georgetown University in Washington. “It’s impossible to do. It violates the rule of law.”

But Mr. Trump has suggested taking the extraordinary step of abandoning the W.T.O. to gain authority to dictate terms. His successful strong-arming of Carrier, the air-conditioner company, which agreed to keep 1,000 jobs at a plant in Indiana rather than move them to Mexico, attests to his priorities in delivering on his trade promises.

The people advising Mr. Trump on trade have records of advocating a pugnacious response to what they portray as Chinese predations.

There is Dan DiMicco, the former chief executive of the American steel giant Nucor, who has long advocated punitive tariffs on Chinese goods. There is Peter Navarro, a senior policy adviser and co-author of a book titled “Death by China: Confronting the Dragon — A Global Call to Action.”

In an email on Friday, Mr. Navarro, the Trump transition team’s economic adviser, said that imposing steep tariffs on China was an essential step to begin to address the American trade deficit with China, which reached $365 billion last year. He blamed Chinese trade practices for “destroying entire industries, hollowing out entire communities” and “putting millions out of work.”

But Mr. Navarro also cast the threat of tariffs as an opening gambit in a refashioning of trade positions.

“Tariffs are not an end game but merely one of several negotiating tools to bring our trade back into balance,” he said, adding that Mr. Trump’s administration would do so “in a measured way.”

Mr. Navarro’s co-author, Greg Autry, a professor at the University of Southern California, said he assumed the Trump camp was dead serious about its threats to impose tariffs on China. The goal is to force manufacturers to come back to the United States as a condition of selling into the American market.

A full-on trade war between the world’s two largest economies would cost American jobs in the immediate term, Mr. Autry said, but eventually millions of new ones would be created as the United States again hummed with factory work.

“We moved our supply chain to Asia in about two decades,” he said. “You certainly can do it in the U.S. a whole lot faster. It’s going to take a few years, but it’s going to be a much better America.

Even if factory work does return to the United States, though, that is unlikely to translate into many paychecks. As automation spreads, robots are primed to secure most of the jobs.

At Mr. Reid’s factory, talk of a bountiful future through trade barriers resonates as dangerous nonsense. Mr. Reid has a business to run in the here and now. His customers are waiting for product. He must be able to tap the supply chain.

“You can’t just turn your ship around and bring that stuff back,” he said.

In threatening tariffs, Mr. Trump is wielding a blunt instrument whose impacts are increasingly easy to evade by sophisticated businesses with operations across multiple borders. The geography of global trade is perpetually being redrawn.

In China, factory owners, casting a wary eye on Mr. Trump, are accelerating their exploration of alternative locales with lower-wage workers across Southeast Asia and even as far away as Africa.

In Vietnam, entrepreneurs are preparing for a potential surge of incoming investment from China should Mr. Trump take action.

In Europe, factories that sell manufacturing equipment to China are watching to see if Mr. Trump will unleash trade hostilities that will damage global growth.

“Money and goods will always find their way, regardless of what barriers you put up,” said Ernesto Maurer, chairman of SSM, a Swiss maker of textile machinery that operates a factory in China. “You just make it more difficult and more expensive.”

The China Supply

In the southern Chinese city of Guangzhou, Jiang Jiacheng exudes confidence that China will continue to serve as the factory floor for the world — with tariffs or otherwise.

His company, the Guangzhou Shuqee Digital Tech Company, makes movie chairs, exporting about 20 percent of its wares to the United States. It is an exemplar both of China’s manufacturing prowess and of the conditions that make it a competitive threat.

Mr. Jiang pays his factory workers $290 a month. They work six days a week. Lax environmental rules allow him to dispose of pollutants cheaply.

The total cost of making one of his best-selling products, a cloth-lined movie chair, runs $72. He sells it for $116 to wholesalers who export to the United States.

Back in September, Mr. Jiang gathered with other Chinese movie chair manufacturers to discuss the alarming statements coming from Mr. Trump. The consensus view was not to worry.

“Once he takes up the post, he will certainly return things to the normal state,” Mr. Jiang said.

Still, he has a backup plan. Even before President Trump entered the lexicon, Mr. Jiang was exploring a transfer of some of his work to lower-cost places like Vietnam.

His company would not be the first to make the journey.

A dozen years ago, the United States Commerce Department accused China of dumping wooden bedroom furniture at below cost. It imposed protective tariffs.

For Lawrence M. D. Yen, who had a furniture factory in southern China, that was the impetus to move to Vietnam. Labor costs were cheaper.

Today, Mr. Yen’s company, Woodworth Wooden Industries, operates a factory in Cu Chi, on the outskirts of Ho Chi Minh City, a district best known for the elaborate tunnels used by Vietcong guerrillas in their battles against American forces.

This former hive of combat is now the workplace for 5,000 people making sofa beds, recliner chairs and bedroom furniture. Three-fourths of the products are destined for the United States, including Las Vegas casino resorts like Mandalay Bay and the MGM Grand.

Woodworth’s plant churns out more than 10,000 three-seater sofas each month. This year, the company opened a second Vietnam factory.

Arithmetic gives Mr. Yen confidence that Mr. Trump’s talk will be muted by the realities of the marketplace. Brands that deliver factory-made goods to American retailers have leaned heavily on Asian suppliers to secure low prices.

In pledging to bring manufacturing back, Mr. Trump is effectively pitting the interests of a relatively small group of people — those who work in factories — against hundreds of millions of consumers.

“The retail industry now employs an awful lot more people than apparel industries ever did,” said Pietra Rivoli, a trade expert at Georgetown.

Seven years ago, the Obama administration accused China of unfairly subsidizing tires. It imposed tariffs reaching 35 percent. A subsequent analysis by the Peterson Institute for International Economics, a nonpartisan think tank, calculated the effect: Some 1,200 American tire-making jobs were preserved, but American consumers paid $1.1 billion extra for tires. That prompted households to cut spending at retailers, resulting in more than 2,500 net jobs lost.

The TAL Group claims to make one of every six dress shirts sold in the United States. It produces finished goods for Brooks Brothers, Banana Republic and J. Crew, operating 11 factories worldwide. If Mr. Trump places tariffs on China, the company will accelerate its shift to Vietnam, said TAL’s chief executive, Roger Lee.

If that trade is disrupted, the work would flow to other low-cost countries like Bangladesh, India and Indonesia. Mr. Lee can envision no situation in which the physically taxing, monotonous work of making garments will go to the United States.

“Where are you going to find the work force in the U.S. that is willing to work at factories?” Mr. Lee said.

Supplying the Suppliers

Horgen, a Swiss village on the shores of Lake Zurich, seems far removed from the gritty industrial zones of Asia. With its gingerbread homes and mountain views, it looks more like a resort.

But Horgen is home to SSM, a company that has become an important supplier to Asia. Its machines turn polyester and other synthetic fibers into custom-designed threads. If the rise of textiles in Asia has been a gold rush, this Swiss company has been among those cashing in by making the picks and shovels.

Workers at the factory earn roughly 6,000 Swiss francs ($5,940) a month — some 10 times what SSM pays its workers at its Chinese factory. It makes its most sophisticated components in Switzerland and at another plant in Italy. It uses China for lower-grade machines.

The company sells virtually all of its products abroad, chiefly in Asia. It buys metal parts from the Czech Republic and Poland, electronic components from Malaysia, and electric motors from an American company that makes them at a factory in India. Another American company supplies software.

If the United States were to impose trade barriers on China, that might slow Chinese demand for Swiss-made textile machinery. That would potentially reduce Swiss purchases of American goods and services.

But Mr. Maurer struggles to see how this would create any jobs in the United States. The American textile industry is small and increasingly dominated by robots. The rest of the world holds billions of hands willing to work cheaply.

“Someone else will pick up the business,” Mr. Maurer said. “These markets are very fast.”

But the textile and apparel trades are relatively simple businesses. If the cost of making trousers becomes less appealing in China, a room full of sewing machines in Cambodia can quickly be filled with low-wage seamstresses.

Industries involving precision machinery are not so easily reassembled somewhere else. An abrupt change to the economics would devastate factories that could not quickly line up alternative suppliers.

American automakers are especially dependent on the global supply chain. Between 2000 and 2011, the percentage of imported components that went into exported American-made vehicles grew to 35 percent, from 24 percent, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.

At EBW Electronics in Holland, Mich., workers in lab coats tend boxy soldering machines as they make circuitry for LED lights that go into cars. It buys tiny parts and slots them into circuit boards, which are sold to major automakers. Some 80 percent of the components are imported from China.

Even that number fails to capture the degree to which the company — and its 240 workers — depend on unfettered trade.

Pat LeBlanc, the chairman, pointed to a nib of metal on a circuit board. The silicon was extracted at a plant in Minnesota, then processed into a thin wafer at another factory in Massachusetts. The wafer was shipped to China for testing, cut into pieces at another Chinese factory, and then delivered to the Philippines for a chemical process. Then it went back to China to be put onto a reel that can be inserted into soldering machines here in Michigan.

“It literally is a global supply chain,” Mr. LeBlanc said.

Mr. Reid, the owner of the theater seating company, could not imagine having to buy everything from American suppliers.

Buying upholstery domestically would raise his fabric costs as much as 40 percent.

“All the componentry, all the cords, it all comes from China,” he said. “I don’t know that you could ever get all of that made in the United States. Some of these industries have just been abandoned.”

He wandered into the paint shop, where a worker was spraying chair backs. He picked up a can of paint and read the label: “Made in the U.S.A., with Global Materials.”

Voir par ailleurs:

En application d’une décision européenne, le ministère français de l’Economie a demandé aux distributeurs d’ajouter « colonie israélienne » sur les produits en provenance des colonies de Cisjordanie et du Golan.

L’Express/AFP

25/11/2016

Le boycott des produits des colonies alimente le courroux israélien envers Paris. La France a demandé aux distributeurs d’appliquer une décision de l’UE sur un étiquetage différencié des produits en provenance des territoires occupés par Israël, et l’Etat hébreu l’accuse de favoriser les boycotts anti-israéliens.

« Il est nécessaire d’ajouter l’expression ‘colonie israélienne' »

Le ministère français de l’Economie a avisé, jeudi, les opérateurs économiques qu’ils devaient ajouter « colonie israélienne » ou une mention équivalente sur les produits alimentaires fabriqués dans les colonies de Cisjordanie et du plateau du Golan occupés par Israël depuis 1967, selon Légifrance. Une étiquette disant seulement « produit originaire du plateau du Golan » ou de Cisjordanie « n’est pas acceptable », indique le document. « Il est nécessaire d’ajouter, entre parenthèses, l’expression ‘colonie israélienne’ ou des termes équivalents »..

Le ministère français est l’un des tout premiers, sinon le premier, à mettre en oeuvre les consignes passées en novembre 2015 par l’Union européenne.

La Commission européenne avait alors approuvé l’application de l’étiquetage qui impose à tous les pays membres d’étiqueter les marchandises venues des colonies. Pour l’UE, comme la communauté internationale, elles ne font pas partie du territoire israélien, puisque « la colonisation est illégale au regard du droit international », comme le note le Quai d’Orsay qui précise que « L’implantation de colonies israéliennes en Cisjordanie et à Jérusalem-Est constitue une appropriation illégale de terres qui devraient être l’enjeu de négociations de paix entre les parties sur la base des lignes de 1967. »

Au moment de l’annonce de la décision européenne, déjà, la mesure, qui concerne principalement des produits alimentaires (fruits, légumes, vins) et cosmétiques, avait provoqué la fureur du gouvernement israélien de Benjamin Netanyahu.

« Deux poids, deux mesures aux dépens d’Israël »

Jeudi, le ministère israélien des Affaires étrangères a réagi dans un communiqué: « le gouvernement israélien condamne la décision » française. Le ministère juge encore « incompréhensible et même inquiétant que la France ait décidé de pratiquer deux poids, deux mesures aux dépens d’Israël » alors qu’il y a 200 querelles territoriales dans le monde.

Voir enfin:

Israël / Palestine : 9 clés pour comprendre la position de la France

France diplomatie
La France considère que le conflit ne pourra être résolu que par la création d’un Etat palestinien indépendant, viable et démocratique, vivant en paix et en sécurité aux côtés d’Israël.

Qui la France soutient-elle ?

1. La France est l’amie d’Israël et de la Palestine.

La France partage avec Israël des liens historiques, culturels et humains forts. La France a été l’un des premiers pays à reconnaître le nouvel État et à établir avec lui des relations diplomatiques, dès 1949. Depuis 65 ans, elle défend le droit d’Israël à exister, à vivre en sécurité et sa pleine appartenance à la communauté des nations souveraines. La relation bilatérale franco-israélienne se nourrit également de la présence en Israël d’une importante communauté française et francophone et en France de la première communauté juive d’Europe.

La France plaide de longue date en faveur de la création d’un État palestinien. Le 22 novembre 1974, la France a voté en faveur de la reconnaissance de l’OLP au sein de l’ONU en tant que membre observateur, réaffirmant les droits inaliénables du peuple palestinien. François Mitterrand a été le premier président français à exprimer devant la Knesset, en 1982, l’objectif de création d’un Etat palestinien. En 2010, la France a rehaussé le statut de la Délégation générale de Palestine en France, devenue la Mission de Palestine, avec à sa tête un Ambassadeur. Elle a voté en faveur du statut d’État observateur non-membre de la Palestine aux Nations Unies en novembre 2012, et en faveur de l’érection du drapeau palestinien à l’ONU en septembre 2015.

2. La France condamne sans réserve les actes terroristes qui visent à saboter les espoirs de paix.

La France condamne avec la plus grande fermeté tous les actes de violence et de terrorisme et appelle toutes les parties à combattre toutes les formes d’incitation à la haine. Aux côtés de ses partenaires européens, elle a engagé à plusieurs reprises l’ensemble des parties à s’abstenir de toute action susceptible d’aggraver la situation, que ce soit par incitation ou par provocation, et leur a demandé de condamner tout attentat qui serait perpétré et de respecter rigoureusement les principes de nécessité et de proportionnalité dans l’usage de la force.

Elle est indéfectiblement attachée à la sécurité d’Israël, c’est un principe cardinal de sa politique dans la région. C’est pourquoi elle appelle le Hamas, avec lequel elle n’entretient aucun contact et qui figure sur la liste européenne des organisations terroristes, à respecter les conditions posées par le Quartet : renonciation à la violence, reconnaissance du droit d’Israël à exister, reconnaissance des accords signés entre Israël et l’OLP.

La France a également appelé Israël au plein respect du droit international humanitaire et à faire preuve d’un « usage proportionné de la force », notamment lors de la guerre à Gaza de l’été 2014, qui a fait plus de 2 100 victimes.

3. La France condamne la colonisation, illégale en droit international.

L’implantation de colonies israéliennes en Cisjordanie et à Jérusalem-Est constitue une appropriation illégale de terres qui devraient être l’enjeu de négociations de paix entre les parties sur la base des lignes de 1967. La colonisation est illégale au regard du droit international (notamment au regard de la IVe Convention de Genève et de plusieurs résolutions du Conseil de sécurité des Nations unies), elle menace la viabilité de la solution des deux Etats et constitue un obstacle à une paix juste et durable. Entre 2002 et 2014, le nombre d’habitants dans les colonies israéliennes a augmenté en moyenne de 14 600 personnes par an. Entre 2004 et 2014, on a recensé en moyenne plus de nouvelles 2300 mises en chantier par an dans les colonies. Aujourd’hui, ce sont plus de 570 000 colons qui vivent en Cisjordanie et à Jérusalem-Est.

Des mesures concrètes ont été prises au niveau européen face à l’accélération de la colonisation. Les lignes directrices de l’UE adoptées en juillet 2013 excluent de tout financement européen depuis le 1er janvier 2014 les entités israéliennes actives dans les colonies. De nombreux Etats-membres, dont la France, ont publié des recommandations mettant en garde contre les risques financiers, juridiques et de réputation liés à la poursuite d’activités dans les colonies. L’Union européenne a également adopté, en novembre 2015, une notice interprétative sur l’étiquetage des produits des colonies, afin d’informer les consommateurs européens de la provenance des produits importés.

Quelle solution la France défend-elle ?

4. La France considère que le conflit ne pourra être résolu que par la création d’un Etat palestinien indépendant, viable et démocratique, vivant en paix et en sécurité aux côtés d’Israël.

La solution de deux Etats est la seule à même de répondre aux aspirations légitimes des Israéliens et des Palestiniens à la sécurité, a l’indépendance, à la reconnaissance et à la dignité. Dans cette perspective, la France a défini, avec ses partenaires européens, les paramètres qui doivent présider à une résolution du conflit :

  • des frontières basées sur les lignes de 1967 avec des échanges agréés de territoires équivalents ;
  • des arrangements de sécurité préservant la souveraineté de l’Etat palestinien et garantissant la sécurité d’Israël ;
  • une solution juste, équitable et agréée au problème des réfugiés ;
  • un arrangement faisant de Jérusalem la capitale des deux Etats.

5. La France considère que Jérusalem doit devenir la capitale des deux Etats, Israël et le futur Etat de Palestine.

Depuis 1967 et la conquête de la partie orientale de la ville par Israël lors de la guerre des six jours, Jérusalem est entièrement contrôlée par Israël. Dans l’attente d’un règlement négocié du conflit et en vertu de la légalité internationale, la France, comme l’ensemble de la communauté internationale, ne reconnaît aucune souveraineté sur Jérusalem. La France appelle à l’apaisement des tensions et en particulier au respect du statu quo sur les Lieux Saints. Toute remise en cause de ce statu quo serait porteuse de risques de déstabilisation importants.

Quelle est l’action de la France ?

6. La France plaide en faveur d’une mobilisation urgente et renouvelée de la communauté internationale.

Prenant acte de l’impasse actuelle du processus de paix, la France appelle à une mobilisation active de la communauté internationale afin de préserver la solution des deux Etats et de relancer une nouvelle dynamique de paix. Les acteurs internationaux, en particulier le Quartet (Etats-Unis, Russie, Union européenne, Nations Unies), les membres permanents du Conseil de sécurité et les partenaires européens et régionaux, ont un rôle à jouer pour rétablir un horizon politique.

7. La France a lancé une initiative pour relancer le processus de paix.

La France a lancé une initiative en deux temps. Une réunion ministérielle a tout d’abord eu lieu à Paris le 3 juin, sans les Israéliens et les Palestiniens, pour réaffirmer l’engagement de la communauté internationale en faveur de la solution des deux Etats. Les principaux acteurs internationaux ainsi réunis se sont montrés prêts à s’engager pour créer un cadre et des incitations, afin de permettre la reprise de négociations crédibles. Une conférence internationale, à laquelle les parties seront invitées, sera organisée au second semestre 2016 à cette fin.

8. La France apporte son soutien à l’Autorité palestinienne et à Mahmoud Abbas qui défend le camp de la paix.

La France contribue activement au développement économique palestinien et à la consolidation des institutions du futur Etat palestinien. Elle consacre des sommes considérables (près de 400 M€ sur la période 2008-2014, et 40 M€ en 2015) à l’aide à la Palestine, dont environ un tiers en faveur de Gaza. La Palestine demeure le premier bénéficiaire de l’aide budgétaire française.

9. La France encourage la réconciliation inter-palestinienne.

Elle le fait en vue, notamment, de favoriser le retour de l’Autorité palestinienne à Gaza, qui fera partie intégrante de l’Etat palestinien. Elle soutient le gouvernement d’entente nationale, sous l’autorité de Mahmoud Abbas, qui n’inclut aucun ministre du Hamas (placé par l’UE en 2003 sur la liste des organisations terroristes), et respecte les trois critères fixés par le Quartet : reconnaissance d’Israël, refus de la violence et acceptation des accords passés.


Election américaine: Attention, une incompétence peut en cacher une autre ! (Sick and tired of hearing about your damn bathrooms: Guess who alone passed the Castro death test)

30 novembre, 2016
tear-down-this-stall-copy
Manifestation contre Donald Trump, président élu, à New York, le 9 novembre.
Je suis un peu dépassé en ce qui concerne Reagan. Je me suis trompé sur son compte à tous les coups ! Je n’ai pas cru qu’il obtiendrait l’investiture (…) Je me sens disqualifié pour parler de Reagan. Je l’ai d’abord traité de tête de linotte. Mais, quand il a obtenu l’investiture, j’ai dû réviser mon jugement, et je l’ai appelé la super-tête de linotte, Après le débat avec Carter, j’ai pensé que c’était un acteur de troisième catégorie. Cet homme a du mal à retenir même les mots qu’on utilise en politique. Quant à comprendre les idées politiques, cela le dépasse. (…) Si Reagan était démocrate, je crois que je le préférerais à Carter. S’il partageait la philosophie de Carter, ce serait un gain non négligeable puisqu’un homme doué d’une personnalité malheureuse a été remplacé par un homme qui a une personnalité agréable. Mais il y a aussi des problèmes politiques véritables, et je ne pense pas que Reagan soit équipé pour les affronter. Il faudra attendre. (…) Je pense que nous allons connaître la loi martiale. Non pas demain, mais dans quelques années.(…) Une autre chose m’inquiète en Amérique, c’est que les gens deviennent non pas fascistes, mais qu’ils se rapprochent de plus en plus des phases qui précèdent le fascisme. Norman Mailer (1980)
Le candidat républicain n’est pas qualifié pour être président. Je l’ai dit la semaine dernière. Il n’arrête pas de le démontrer. Le fait que Donald Trump critique une famille ayant fait des sacrifices extraordinaires pour ce pays, le fait qu’il ne semble pas avoir les connaissances de base autour de sujets essentiels en Europe, au Moyen-Orient, en Asie, signifient qu’il est terriblement mal préparé pour ce poste. Barack Hussein Obama
Les Américains en ont marre de vos satanés e-mails, parlons des vrais problèmes aux Etats-Unis. Bernie Sanders
Pour paraphraser Bernie Sanders, les Américains en ont marre des satanés toilettes des progressistes. Mark Lilla
Vous allez dans certaines petites villes de Pennsylvanie où, comme ans beaucoup de petites villes du Middle West, les emplois ont disparu depuis maintenant 25 ans et n’ont été remplacés par rien d’autre (…) Et il n’est pas surprenant qu’ils deviennent pleins d’amertume, qu’ils s’accrochent aux armes à feu ou à la religion, ou à leur antipathie pour ceux qui ne sont pas comme eux, ou encore à un sentiment d’hostilité envers les immigrants. Barack Obama (2008)
Pour généraliser, en gros, vous pouvez placer la moitié des partisans de Trump dans ce que j’appelle le panier des pitoyables. Les racistes, sexistes, homophobes, xénophobes, islamophobes. A vous de choisir. Hillary Clinton
Pour généraliser, en gros, vous pouvez placer la moitié des partisans de Trump dans ce que j’appelle le panier des pitoyables. Les racistes, sexistes, homophobes, xénophobes, islamophobes. A vous de choisir. Hillary Clinton
Notre pays est en colère, je suis en colère et je suis prêt à endosser le manteau de la colère. Donald Trump
Aujourd’hui, le monde marque le passage d’un dictateur brutal qui a opprimé son propre peuple pendant près de six décennies. L’héritage de Fidel Castro, ce sont les pelotons d’exécution, le vol, des souffrances inimaginables, la pauvreté et le déni des droits de l’homme. Même si les tragédies, les morts et la souffrance provoquées par Fidel Castro ne peuvent pas être effacées, notre administration fera tout ce qu’elle peut pour faire en sorte que le peuple cubain entame finalement son chemin vers la prospérité et la liberté. Même si Cuba demeure une île totalitaire, mon espoir est que cette journée marque un éloignement avec les horreurs endurées trop longtemps et une étape vers un avenir dans lequel ce magnifique peuple cubain vivra finalement dans la liberté qu’il mérite si grandement. Donald Trump
Dans une époque où des nations opprimées sont privées des droits humains fondamentaux, de la justice et de la liberté, il reste heureusement des hommes libres qui restent dans la lutte jusqu’à leurs tout derniers jours. Hassan Rohani
J’adresse mes condoléances au gouvernement révolutionnaire et à la nation de Cuba après la mort de son excellence Fidel Castro, le dirigeant de la Révolution cubaine et personnalité centrale de la lutte contre le colonialisme et l’exploitation et symbole de la lutte pour l’indépendance des nations opprimées. Mohammad Javad Zarif
Fidel Castro était un exemple stimulant pour beaucoup de pays. Fidel Castro était un véritable ami de la Russie. Vladimir Poutine
Fidel a défendu son territoire et affermi son pays alors qu’il subissait un blocus américain éprouvant. Malgré cela, il a mené son pays sur la voie de l’autosuffisance et du développement indépendant. Mikhail Gorbatchev
Le peuple chinois a perdu un camarade proche et un ami sincère. Xi Jinping
Cuba, notre amie, a réussi sous sa conduite à résister aux sanctions et aux campagnes d’oppression les plus fortes jamais vues dans notre histoire récente, devant un flambeau de la libération des peuples d’Amérique du Sud et du monde entier. Le nom de Fidel Castro vivra à jamais dans l’esprit des générations et inspirera ceux qui aspirent à une véritable indépendance et à une libération du joug du colonialisme et de l’hégémonie. Bachar Al Assad
L’Histoire sera comptable et jugera de l’impact énorme de cette figure singulière sur le peuple et le monde qui l’entourent. Barack Hussein Obama
Rosalynn et moi partageons nos sympathies avec la famille Castro et le peuple cubain à la mort de Fidel Castro. Nous nous souvenons avec tendresse de nos visites avec lui à Cuba et de son amour pour son pays. Nous souhaitons aux citoyens cubains la paix et la prospérité dans les années à venir. Jimmy Carter
C’est avec une profonde tristesse que j’ai appris aujourd’hui la mort du président cubain ayant le plus longtemps exercé cette fonction. Fidel Castro, leader plus grand que nature, a consacré près d’un demi-siècle au service du peuple cubain. Révolutionnaire et orateur légendaire, M. Castro a réalisé d’importants progrès dans les domaines de l’éducation et des soins de santé sur son île natale. Bien qu’il était une figure controversée, ses supporters et ses détracteurs reconnaissaient son amour et son dévouement immenses envers le peuple cubain, qui éprouvait une affection profonde et durable pour “el Comandante”. Je sais que mon père était très fier de le considérer comme un ami, et j’ai eu l’occasion de rencontrer Fidel lorsque mon père est décédé. Ce fut aussi un véritable honneur de rencontrer ses trois fils et son frère, le président Raúl Castro, au cours de ma récente visite à Cuba. Au nom de tous les Canadiens, Sophie et moi offrons nos plus sincères condoléances à la famille et aux amis de M. Castro ainsi qu’aux nombreuses personnes qui l’appuyaient. Aujourd’hui, nous pleurons avec le peuple de Cuba la perte d’un leader remarquable. Justin Trudeau
 Fidel Castro était une des figures historiques du siècle dernier et l’incarnation de la Révolution cubaine. Avec la mort de Fidel Castro, le monde perd un homme qui était pour beaucoup un héros. Il a changé le cours de l’histoire et son influence s’est propagée bien au-delà. Fidel Castro demeure une des figures révolutionnaires du XXe siècle. Il appartiendra à l’histoire de juger son héritage. Jean-Claude Juncker
Fidel Castro était une figure du XXe siècle. Il avait incarné la révolution cubaine, dans les espoirs qu’elle avait suscités puis dans les désillusions qu’elle avait provoquées. Acteur de la guerre froide, il correspondait à une époque qui s’était achevée avec l’effondrement de l’Union soviétique. Il avait su représenter pour les cubains la fierté du rejet de la domination extérieure. François Hollande
Fidel Castro était un géant de la scène internationale. Aux yeux des militants de ma génération, il incarnait l’esprit de résistance à l’impérialisme américain et la volonté de construire par la révolution une société plus juste. (…) Son oeuvre contrastée sera longtemps discutée ou contestée. Mais on ne peut oublier qu’il restera pour des milliers de latinos américains le Libertador, celui qui aura réussi à faire fasse opiniâtrement à la toute puissance américaine. Jack Lang
Fidel ! Fidel ! Mais qu’est-ce qui s’est passé avec Fidel ? Demain était une promesse. Fidel ! Fidel ! L’épée de Bolivar marche dans le ciel. Jean-Luc Mélenchon
Avec la mort de Fidel Castro disparait  une énorme figure de l’histoire moderne, de l’indépendance nationale et du socialisme du XXe siècle. De la construction d’un système de santé et d’éducation de premier ordre à l’impressionnant bilan de sa politique étrangère, les réalisations de Castro ont été nombreuses. Malgré tous ses défauts, le soutien de Castro à l’Angola a joué un rôle crucial pour mettre fin à l’Apartheid en Afrique du Sud et il restera dans l’histoire comme à la fois un internationaliste et un champion de la justice sociale. Jeremy Corbyn
Sometimes I wonder if Jeremy Corbyn even knows what he’s saying half the time. So often, he appears to be operating on some kind of 1980s student-union auto-pilot. But this is no joke. The latest example of Corbyn’s arrested development is the most serious yet. We now have to recognise that a major political party in Britain is being led by a teenage romantic revolutionary who just happens to be in his sixties. Martin Bright
L’appareil de propagande de l’organisation terroriste Daech a diffusé une séquence vidéo mettant en scène un terroriste parlant français, qui appelle ceux qu’il a été convenu d’appeler les loups solitaires de l’organisation, de perpétrer des attaques au couteau et de poignarder les gens au hasard dans les lieux de grande affluence, dans les capitales et villes des pays qui participent à la coalition qui combat Daech au moyen orient. La vidéo appelle les éléments terroristes à se contenter des attaques à l’arme blanche et à ne pas s’encombrer des attaques aux armes lourdes. C’est, apparemment, ce qu’a décidé de faire l’homme qui a attaqué le campus d’Ohio, ce lundi. Tunisie numérique
Notre volonté, c’est qu’au terme de ses études, chaque étudiant du secondaire ait au minimum été confronté à l’histoire de la colonisation et de la décolonisation au Congo. Mais aussi à celle d’un autre pays ‘à la carte’, en fonction du public scolaire. Catherine Moureaux (députée PS Molenbeeck, Belgique)
Obama will be remembered by historians as the man who turned over the White House to Donald Trump, the man who let Putin unleash the forces of Hell in Syria and Ukraine, and the man who honored European values but made the world steadily less safe for them. That Putin took the occasion of Obama’s final tour to open a wide new air offensive in Syria and withdraw from the ICC even as his allies celebrated victories in Estonia, Moldova and Bulgaria only underlines what a foreign policy disaster the 44th President has been. Many world leaders like Obama; some pity him; few respect him as a leader (rather than as a man); none fear him. Most are too busy coping with the consequences of his failures to spend a lot of time thinking about him at this point in his presidency. Even Germany, whose cheering crowds once greeted Obama as an enlightened internationalist in the mold of John F. Kennedy, has gradually lost faith in the President.The early signs of struggle and factionalism in the Donald Trump transition, meanwhile, are leading many foreigners to suppose that the next American President will be another inconsequential bumbler. We must hope that they are wrong; not even the power of the United States can survive a long string of failed Presidents unscathed. Walter Russell Mead
Une statistique plus brutale marque pourtant mieux que les autres la marque de fabrique du vote républicain. C’est le vote du white male, de l’homme blanc. Seuls 37 % d’entre eux ont voté pour Kerry, contre 62 % pour Bush, un écart considérable qui est près du double de celui enregistré pour les femmes blanches. Bill Clinton avait lancé le concept des soccer moms, ces femmes qui emmènent leurs enfants au soccer(football au sens où nous l’entendons, mais qui est plus chic aux Etats-Unis que le football américain) et qui votent démocrate. Bush capture le vote du nascar dad, qu’on pourrait traduire par le « papa-bagnole, qui se passionne pour les courses automobiles d’Indianapolis et de Daytona. Dans le langage des stratèges électoraux, les nascar dads sont les électeurs mâles, sans études supérieures, qui votaient jadis pour les démocrates et votent désormais pour les républicains. Grâce au Watergate et à la diffusion des enregistrements faits à la Maison Blanche, on sait que Nixon avait clairement saisi l’opportunité de rallier à la cause républicaine les cols bleus choqués par Woodstock et autres manifestations du « déclin de la civilisation occidentale ». C’est Reagan qui pousse à son paroxysme cette capture du vote ouvrier, dont Bush junior récolte les fruits bien mieux que son père. Dans un article publié par la New York Review of Book, « The White Man Unburdened », l’homme blanc privé de son fardeau, l’écrivain Norman Mailer faisait la liste de tout ce que l’homme blanc a perdu au cours des trente dernières années : son statut, son salaire, son autorité, ses athlètes (blancs) préférés…, pour expliquer le ralliement à la guerre irakienne de Bush (voir aussi le texte d’Arlie Hochschild « Let them eat war » sur tomdispatch.com). Il n’est pas besoin d’une longue démonstration pour voir apparaître, derrière un langage différent (la religion, le droit au port d’armes…), les mêmes traits qui ont expliqué en France le vote ouvrier en faveur de Le Pen. Loin d’apparaître comme un continent bizarre, si loin désormais de l’Europe, l’Amérique est soumise à un processus identique. Les mots pour le dire ne sont pas les mêmes, mais c’est le même désamour entre la gauche et la classe ouvrière qui s’est joué des deux côtés de l’Atlantique, qui marque dans les deux cas l’aboutissement d’un long processus de déracinement du monde ouvrier. Daniel Cohen
Il n’y a de compétences que s’il y a des connaissances (…) la société française utilise la loi et le dogme républicains pour éviter toute transparence. La société française est malade de son rapport à la réalité. Tous ceux qui refusent les statistiques sont du côté de l’égalité formelle et veulent que rien ne change. Laurent Bigorgne (Institut Montaigne)
La vérité qui dérange, (…) c’est l’enquête de l’IFOP menée par l’Institut Montaigne sur les musulmans de France. Elle dérange tant que nul n’ose s’indigner. L’enquête est présentée avec une distance embarrassée. Rien à dire a priori sur un sondage réalisé en juin à partir d’un échantillon de 15 459 personnes et qui a isolé 874 personnes de religion musulmane. Et certains résultats laissent pantois. 29 % des musulmans interrogés pensent que la loi islamique (charia) est plus importante que la loi de la République, 40 % que l’employeur doit s’adapter aux obligations religieuses de ses salariés, 60 % que les filles devraient avoir le droit de porter le voile au collège et au lycée. 14 % des femmes musulmanes refusent de se faire soigner par un médecin homme, et 44 % de se baigner dans une piscine mixte. L’Institut Montaigne et leurs rédacteurs Hakim El Karoui et Antoine Jardin ressemblent un peu à Alain Juppé, qui rêve d’une identité heureuse, et affirment qu’« un islam français est possible ». Mais le constat est inquiétant sur la sous-catégorie musulmane la plus « autoritaire » : « 40 % de ses membres sont favorables au port du niqab, à la polygamie, contestent la laïcité et considèrent que la loi religieuse passe avant la loi de la République », écrit l’Institut Montaigne. Cette sous-catégorie représenterait 13 % de l’ensemble des musulmans. L’IFOP chiffrant les musulmans à 5,6 % de la population de plus de 15 ans, nous en déduisons que l’effectif concerné atteint plusieurs centaines de milliers de personnes. Le chiffre qui dérange. L’intégration correcte de la très grande majorité des musulmans ne doit pas non plus conduire à nier une réalité qui, si elle est minoritaire, ne semble pas marginale. (…) Les populations sont sages lorsqu’elles sont traitées en adultes. Les Britanniques multiplient à outrance les comptages ethniques. Le gouvernement allemand publie chaque année les statistiques de criminalité par nationalité. On y constate une surcriminalité des étrangers, mais dont les causes sont expliquées, et les Allemands se concentrent sur leur évolution. En France, on est livrés aux diatribes d’un Eric Zemmour, qui séduira tant qu’on sera incapable d’objectiver sereinement les faits. (…) Les élites ont perdu de leur crédibilité, en minimisant les inégalités délirantes aux Etats-Unis, tardivement mises en évidence par Thomas Piketty, et en ne prêtant pas attention aux perdants de la mondialisation. L’essentiel est de prendre à bras-le-corps les batailles de demain, pour que les populistes ne puissent pas dire « Je vous l’avais bien dit ». Ainsi, ne sous-estimons pas Nicolas Sarkozy, qui cherche pour des raisons électoralistes à évacuer le réchauffement climatique par une autre vérité qui dérange, l’explosion démographique de l’Afrique. Ne pas traiter ce sujet sérieusement, c’est redonner la main aux populistes. Arnaud Leparmentier (Le Monde)
Les élites « qui apprécient le dynamisme et l’authenticité des quartiers ethniques avec leurs merveilleux restaurants (…) n’envoient pas leurs enfants dans les écoles pleines d’enfants immigrés qui ressemblent à des centres de détention juvénile. Matthew B. Crawford (Esprit, octobre 2016)
La tragique élection de Trump a l’avantage de clarifier la situation politique d’ensemble. Le Brexit n’était pas une anomalie. Autant qu’on le sache et qu’on se prépare pour la suite. Chacune des grandes nations qui ont initié le marché mondial se retire l’une après l’autre du projet. Le prolongement de cette démission volontaire est d’une clarté terrible : d’abord l’Angleterre ; six mois plus tard les Etats Unis, qui aspirent à la grandeur des années 1950. Et ensuite ? Si l’on suit les leçons de l’histoire, c’est probablement, hélas, au tour de la France, avant celui de l’Allemagne. Les petites nations se sont déjà précipitées en arrière : la Pologne, la Hongrie et même la Hollande, cette nation pionnière de l’empire global. L’Europe unie, ce prodigieux montage inventé après la guerre pour dépasser les anciennes souverainetés, se retrouve prise à contre-pied. C’est un vrai sauve-qui-peut : « Tous aux canots ! » Peu importe l’étroitesse des frontières pourvu qu’elles soient étanches. Chacun des pays qui ont contribué à cet horizon universel de conquête et d’émancipation va se retirer des institutions inventées depuis deux siècles. Il mérite bien son nom, l’Occident, c’est devenu l’empire du soleil couchant… Parfait, nous voilà prévenus et peut-être capables d’être un peu moins surpris. Car enfin, c’est bien l’incapacité à prévoir qui est la principale leçon de ce cataclysme : comment peut-on se tromper à ce point ? Tous les sondages, tous les journaux, tous les commentateurs, toute l’intelligentsia. C’est comme si nous n’avions aucun des capteurs qui nous auraient permis d’entrer en contact avec ceux que l’on n’a même pas pu désigner d’un terme acceptable : les « hommes blancs sans diplôme », les « laissés-pour-compte de la mondialisation » — on a même essayé les « déplorables ». C’est sans doute une forme de peuple, mais à qui nous n’avons su donner ni forme ni voix. Je reviens de six semaines sur les campus américains, je n’ai pas entendu une seule analyse un peu dérangeante, un peu réaliste sur ces « autres gens », aussi invisibles, inaudibles, incompréhensibles que les Barbares aux portes d’Athènes. Nous, « l’intelligence », nous vivons dans une bulle. Disons sur un archipel dans une mer de mécontentements. Bruno Latour
Un conseil aux candidats à la présidentielle en France : fuyez les artistes et les intellectuels. Ne leur demandez pas de faire campagne, ne les faites pas monter sur l’estrade. Surtout si vous avez envie de l’emporter. On doutait déjà qu’une actrice ou qu’un rockeur fassent gagner des voix. Mais on ne savait pas qu’ils pouvaient en faire perdre. C’est une leçon de l’élection de Donald Trump à la Maison Blanche. Jamais on n’a vu le monde culturel s’engager à ce point, en l’occurrence pour Hillary Clinton. Aucun candidat n’avait reçu autant d’argent. De cris d’amour aussi – sur scène, à la télévision, sur les réseaux sociaux. On a même eu droit à la chanteuse Katy Perry qui se déshabille dans une vidéo pour inciter à voter Clinton, ou Madonna promettre de faire une fellation aux indécis. En face, Trump n’avait personne ou presque. Il n’a reçu que 500 000 dollars (environ 470 000 euros) d’Hollywood contre 22 millions de dollars pour la candidate démocrate. Alors il a moqué ce cirque à paillettes, dénoncé le star system, donc le système. Et il a gagné. Clinton a joué à fond les étoiles les plus brillantes, et elle a perdu. Prenons sa fin de campagne. Le 4 novembre, elle monte sur scène avec le couple Beyoncé et Jay Z (300 millions d’albums vendus à eux deux), à Cleveland, dans l’Ohio. Le 5, Katy Perry chante pour elle à Philadelphie (Pennsylvanie). Le 7, veille du scrutin, elle apparaît dans un meeting/concert de Jon Bon Jovi et de Bruce Springsteen devant 40 000 personnes, toujours à Philadelphie, puis finit la soirée à minuit avec Lady Gaga à Raleigh, en Caroline du Nord. Dans tous ces Etats clés, elle a perdu. Dans le même temps, Donald Trump a multiplié les meetings sur les tarmacs d’aéroports en disant qu’il n’a pas besoin de célébrités, puisqu’il a « le peuple des oubliés » – du pays et de la culture – avec lui. L’historien américain Steven Laurence Kaplan s’est indigné des mots de Trump qualifiant untel de stupide, de débile, de névrosé ou de raté, et traitant des femmes de « grosses cochonnes ». Il a raison. Mais il aurait pu ajouter que des notables culturels ont qualifié le candidat républicain de brute (Chris Evans), d’immonde (Judd Apatow), de porc (Cher), de clown (Michael Moore) ou de psychopathe (Moby). Robert De Niro, avant le scrutin, voulait lui mettre son poing dans la gueule. Chaque injure a fait grossir le camp conservateur et fait saliver son candidat. Car deux mondes s’ignorent voire se méprisent, séparés par un Grand Canyon de haine. Non pas les riches face aux pauvres. La fracture est culturelle et identitaire. Ceux qui ont gagné se sentent exclus du champ culturel et universitaire, et souvent le méprisent. Les perdants leur rendent bien ce mépris, les jugeant réactionnaires, racistes, etc., sans même voir que le monde se droitise.(…) L’autocritique du vaste champ culturel pourrait aller plus loin, sur le terrain de l’hypocrisie. Celle des artistes d’abord, dont l’engagement, souvent imprégné de pathos, apaise leur conscience, mais est souvent perçu comme faisant partie de leur spectacle permanent, dont ils tirent profit, et dont ils se détachent aussi vite pour retrouver, une fois déculpabilisés, leur monde ultra-protégé. Le meilleur exemple est Madonna qui, durant la soirée qui précède le vote, s’est mêlée à des badauds new-yorkais (des convaincus) pour improviser un bref concert en finissant par « demain sauvez ce pays en votant Hillary ». Les intellectuels des campus, quant à eux, insupportent le vote Trump par leur façon de lui faire la morale, de défendre un modèle multiculturel comme s’il s’agissait d’un paradis de fleurs. Ils font culpabiliser les riches en leur disant d’être plus généreux et les pauvres en leur disant d’accepter leurs voisins étrangers, sans vraiment montrer l’exemple. (…) On l’aura compris, la France culturelle et multiculturelle – c’est la même – a beaucoup à apprendre de cette élection passée, et à craindre de celle de 2017. Si elle ne se bouge pas. Michel Guerrin
If progressives will not heed principle, then maybe they will heed arithmetic. Make identity politics the main operational model in a country that is two-thirds white and 50 percent or so male, and what do you expect? President-elect Trump might have some thoughts on that. Kevin D. Williamson
L’immigration massive ayant été érigée en dogme moral et en nécessité économique, les classes moyennes occidentales ont vu surgir au sein de leurs villes, de leurs quartiers et de leurs écoles, parfois jusqu’à les dominer, des populations dont la culture est certes respectable mais, dans le cas de l’islam, radicalement distincte de la leur, dans son rapport aux femmes, à la liberté de conscience, à la démocratie. Cette immigration, dans la réalité des faits, n’est pas choisie, mais subie. Quand, après trente années de ce régime migratoire, les mêmes « gens ordinaires » constatent que des candidats à la migration se pressent toujours plus nombreux à leurs frontières, ils se posent légitimement la question de la perpétuation de leur mode de vie. Comment s’étonner que le dogme de l’immigration anarchique soit rejeté ? Cela indépendamment de la question du terrorisme (alors qu’il est par exemple établi que dix des douze auteurs des effroyables attentats de Paris, le 13 novembre 2015, se sont inflitrés en Europe comme migrants, cfr. Le Figaro, 12 novembre 2016). Pour compléter la tableau, relevons la guerre culturelle qui est menée aux classes moyennes, sur la seule foi du sexe et de la couleur de la peau. Examinons les deux aspects de ce Kulturkampf. D’abord, la théorie du genre, selon laquelle la distinction des sexes masculin et féminin est une invention culturelle (Judith Butler, Anne Fausto-Sterling). Au nom de cette idéologie, dans l’infini chatoiement de ses variétés académiques et médiatiques, des minorités sexuelles en sont venues à exiger l’éradication de la référence à l’hétérosexualité, vécue comme oppressive et stigmatisante. La revendication est de brouiller les genres, en les multipliant à l’infini, et de quitter la notion — statistiquement incontestable — de « normalité » hétérosexuelle. D’où ces polémiques, souvent émaillées de violences, pour décider de la question de savoir si les « queer » et transgenres peuvent, ou pas, accéder aux vestiaires sportifs, scolaires et toilettes de leur sexe biologique, ou de leur sexe choisi, ou les deux, et comment vérifier ? Des parents se posent légitimement la question de savoir si leur petite fille de six ou sept ans risque de croiser dans les toilettes une « femme » de 45 ans avec ce que l’on appelait autrefois un sexe masculin entre les jambes. Se fédère à ces polémiques l’hostilité de principe témoignée au garçon hétérosexuel, institué en dépositaire de la sexualité « du passé », ce qui justifie qu’il soit rééduqué dès la plus tendre enfance — à l’école —, discriminé lors de son entrée éventuelle à l’université, et que le moindre de ses gestes et paroles soit justiciable des tribunaux. Cette guerre du genre est menée avec autant d’âpreté que d’efficacité : la grande majorité des diplômés de l’enseignement supérieur américain et européen sont des femmes, et la réalité biologique de la binarité sexuelle est battue en brèche jusque dans nos textes de loi (Convention d’Istanbul, Conseil de l’Europe, 2011). Vient enfin la résurgence du racisme. D’abord, il y eut le discours anti-raciste, réprouvant le rejet d’une personne sur la seule foi de sa race. L’écrasante majorité des Occidentaux ont acquiescé à ce discours. Toutefois une rhétorique subtile s’est enclenchée, particulièrement dans des pays comme les Etats-Unis et la France, jusqu’à permettre, puis encourager, la mise en accusation des populations blanches. Ainsi des « safe spaces » se sont-ils multipliés sur les campus américains, c’est-à-dire des espaces réservés aux minorités, pour leur permettre de se soustraire à la présence réputée suffocante des Américains « caucasiens ». Dit autrement, les étudiants blancs se voient refuser l’accès de certaines zones du campus sur la seule foi de la couleur de leur peau. Paradoxal retournement d’un discours anti-raciste qui en vient à légitimer, souvent par la violence, des pratiques racialistes au sens strict. Ainsi du discours sur le « white privilege », soit l’idée qu’un Américain blanc est privilégié du seul fait de la couleur de sa peau, quels que soient ses origines et milieu social, et que la loi doit donc discriminer en sa défaveur, toujours sur la seule foi de la couleur de sa peau. Considérons ce répertoire de journalistes récemment créé sous l’égide du gouvernement francophone belge, dont l’objet est d’inclure d’une part les femmes, d’autre part les « hommes et femmes issus de la diversité », ce qui exclut qui ? Les hommes blancs, avec pour seul critère la couleur de leur peau. Racisme, vous avez dit proto-fascisme ? Qui ne voit que ces discours et pratiques reposent sur les notions de responsabilité raciale collective, et de responsabilité à travers les âges, soit très exactement les concepts qui ont, de tout temps, fondé l’antisémitisme, comme Sartre l’a montré dans ses Réflexions sur la question juive ? Ce racisme au nom de l’anti-racisme, les classes moyennes occidentales n’y consentent plus. Il est à noter que cette guerre sexuelle et racialiste menace les gens ordinaires, non seulement dans leurs conditions d’existence (impôt, normes, quartiers), mais dans leur être naturel (sexe, couleur de la peau). Qu’un rejet radical — une révolution, selon Stephen Bannon, éminence grise du nouveau président américain — se dessine, est-ce surprenant ? Drieu Godefridi
Nous sommes devenus habités par l’idée que nous ne sommes pas des citoyens qui ont été modelés par un certain nombre de pratiques et de traditions que nous chérissons parce que nous sommes membres d’un Etat qui est notre maison. Nous nous voyons plutôt comme les porteurs de telle ou telle identité, qui serait la seule chose importante à dire sur nous. Si l’on suit ce chemin, le but de l’Etat n’est plus d’être le médiateur des intérêts des citoyens, mais le distributeur de ressources basées sur ce qui vous est dû, en raison de votre identité. (…) Si vous êtes afro-américain, ne mentionnez pas s’il vous plaît  que vous croyez en Dieu et allez à l’église; la politique de l’identité ne laisse aucune place au christianisme – bien qu’elle s’incline devant une pureté imaginaire de l’islam. Femmes? Vous pouvez avoir des craintes sur la façon dont la prolifération des «identités» de genre pèse sur votre lutte unique pour équilibrer et pour donner un sens aux exigences conflictuelles de la vie familiale et professionnelle. Vous ne devez cependant rien dire. Toute identité de genre imaginée doit être respectée. Vous pensiez que vous étiez spéciales, mais vous ne l’êtes pas. Nous vivons dans un monde où tout est possible. Quiconque parle de limites, de contraintes, est «phobique» d’une manière ou d’une autre. L’esprit bourgeois qui a construit l’Amérique, l’intérêt de gagner beaucoup d’argent, d’avoir «réussi», de prendre des risques – avant tout la force de l’âme nécessaire pour affronter l’échec et revenir plus fort – sont méprisés. Personne n’ose parler dans un monde politiquement correct. Les sentiments pourraient être blessés; les gens peuvent se sentir «mal à l’aise». Les avertissements de contenus sensibles et les «espaces sûrs» occupent notre attention. La tâche dans le monde hautement chorégraphié de la «politique de l’identité» n’est pas de durcir mais de domestiquer. Pas de combats. Pas d’insultes auxquelles nous répondons avec force et confiance en soi et assurance. Même par le rire! Partout: les protections rendues possibles par le Grand Protecteur – l’Etat – car nous ne pouvons pas nous montrer à la hauteur de l’occasion. La grandeur importe; si nous voulons l’avoir, personnellement et en tant que pays, nous devons rejeter le discours politiquement correct qui, en nous protégeant de la souffrance, fait de nous sa victime à perpétuité. Sur chacune de ces questions – les frontières, l’immigration, l’intérêt national, l’esprit d’entreprise, le fédéralisme et le discours politiquement correct – Hillary Clinton répond avec la novlangue de « la mondialisation et de la politique de l’identité », le langage qui nous a donné un monde qui est à présent épuisé, vicié et irrécupérable. C’est contre ce genre de monde que les citoyens se révoltent. Et pas seulement aux États-Unis, mais aussi en Europe et en Grande-Bretagne. Les idées de «mondialisation» et de «politique de l’identité» qui nous ont fascinés après la guerre froide appartiennent maintenant à la poubelle de l’histoire. La question, plus importante que la question des personnalités de Hillary Clinton et de Donald Trump, est de savoir si nous aurons une nouvelle administration qui les autorise et essaie de résoudre nos problèmes à travers leur objectif. Joshua Mitchell
One of the many lessons of the recent presidential election campaign and its repugnant outcome is that the age of identity liberalism must be brought to an end. Hillary Clinton was at her best and most uplifting when she spoke about American interests in world affairs and how they relate to our understanding of democracy. But when it came to life at home, she tended on the campaign trail to lose that large vision and slip into the rhetoric of diversity, calling out explicitly to African-American, Latino, L.G.B.T. and women voters at every stop. This was a strategic mistake. If you are going to mention groups in America, you had better mention all of them. If you don’t, those left out will notice and feel excluded. Which, as the data show, was exactly what happened with the white working class and those with strong religious convictions. Fully two-thirds of white voters without college degrees voted for Donald Trump, as did over 80 percent of white evangelicals. (…) the fixation on diversity in our schools and in the press has produced a generation of liberals and progressives narcissistically unaware of conditions outside their self-defined groups, and indifferent to the task of reaching out to Americans in every walk of life. At a very young age our children are being encouraged to talk about their individual identities, even before they have them. By the time they reach college many assume that diversity discourse exhausts political discourse, and have shockingly little to say about such perennial questions as class, war, the economy and the common good. In large part this is because of high school history curriculums, which anachronistically project the identity politics of today back onto the past, creating a distorted picture of the major forces and individuals that shaped our country. (The achievements of women’s rights movements, for instance, were real and important, but you cannot understand them if you do not first understand the founding fathers’ achievement in establishing a system of government based on the guarantee of rights.) When young people arrive at college they are encouraged to keep this focus on themselves by student groups, faculty members and also administrators whose full-time job is to deal with — and heighten the significance of — “diversity issues.” Fox News and other conservative media outlets make great sport of mocking the “campus craziness” that surrounds such issues, and more often than not they are right to. Which only plays into the hands of populist demagogues who want to delegitimize learning in the eyes of those who have never set foot on a campus. How to explain to the average voter the supposed moral urgency of giving college students the right to choose the designated gender pronouns to be used when addressing them? How not to laugh along with those voters at the story of a University of Michigan prankster who wrote in “His Majesty”? This campus-diversity consciousness has over the years filtered into the liberal media, and not subtly. Affirmative action for women and minorities at America’s newspapers and broadcasters has been an extraordinary social achievement — and has even changed, quite literally, the face of right-wing media, as journalists like Megyn Kelly and Laura Ingraham have gained prominence. But it also appears to have encouraged the assumption, especially among younger journalists and editors, that simply by focusing on identity they have done their jobs. (…) How often, for example, the laziest story in American journalism — about the “first X to do Y” — is told and retold. Fascination with the identity drama has even affected foreign reporting, which is in distressingly short supply. However interesting it may be to read, say, about the fate of transgender people in Egypt, it contributes nothing to educating Americans about the powerful political and religious currents that will determine Egypt’s future, and indirectly, our own. (…) The media’s newfound, almost anthropological, interest in the angry white male reveals as much about the state of our liberalism as it does about this much maligned, and previously ignored, figure. A convenient liberal interpretation of the recent presidential election would have it that Mr. Trump won in large part because he managed to transform economic disadvantage into racial rage — the “whitelash” thesis. This is convenient because it sanctions a conviction of moral superiority and allows liberals to ignore what those voters said were their overriding concerns. It also encourages the fantasy that the Republican right is doomed to demographic extinction in the long run — which means liberals have only to wait for the country to fall into their laps. The surprisingly high percentage of the Latino vote that went to Mr. Trump should remind us that the longer ethnic groups are here in this country, the more politically diverse they become. Finally, the whitelash thesis is convenient because it absolves liberals of not recognizing how their own obsession with diversity has encouraged white, rural, religious Americans to think of themselves as a disadvantaged group whose identity is being threatened or ignored. Such people are not actually reacting against the reality of our diverse America (they tend, after all, to live in homogeneous areas of the country). But they are reacting against the omnipresent rhetoric of identity, which is what they mean by “political correctness.” Liberals should bear in mind that the first identity movement in American politics was the Ku Klux Klan, which still exists. Those who play the identity game should be prepared to lose it. (…) To paraphrase Bernie Sanders, America is sick and tired of hearing about liberals’ damn bathrooms. Mark Lilla (Columbia)
The death of Fidel Castro was the first foreign policy test for President-elect Donald Trump and he acquitted himself brilliantly. For anyone who thought that his tough talk was just campaign bluster, witness the incredibly strong statement made about the bloody Cuban strongman (…) For those of us used to President Barack Obama’s bland, milquetoast amorality on world affairs, and his practiced refusal to condemn evil, Trump’s words are a breath of fresh air and, God willing, portend a new American foreign policy based on the American principles of holding murderers accountable. Contrast Trump’s words with Obama’s perfection in saying absolutely nothing (…) This neutral nonsense betrays a cowardly refusal to condemn Castro as a tyrant. Most memorable is President Obama’s unique ability to make Castro’s death about himself and his own presidency. Perhaps President Obama forgot that he is leader of the free world and could have used the death of a dictator to say something about the importance of human liberty and human rights. But why, after eight years of Obama cozying up to Erdogan of Turkey and, worse, Ayatollah Khameini of Iran, should we expect anything else? (…) I have long said that President Obama’s greatest failure as a leader is his refusal to hate and condemn evil. Could there be any greater confirmation than this, and just six weeks before he leaves office? But while Trump distinguished himself as a leader prepared to bravely express his hatred of evil, virtually every other world leader followed President Obama instead, disgracing themselves to various degrees. I put them in three categories: brownnosers, appeasers, and suckups. Taking the pole position of brown-noser-in-chief is Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. His obsequiousness to the murderous Castro was so great that it read like parody (…) Here you have the leader of one of the Western world’s greatest democracies saying that an autocrat who murdered his people and ruled over them with an iron fist was loved by them. (…) Then there are the appeasers, those world leaders with no backbone, and who have probably set their sights on their countries opening up a beach resort in Cuba, or who will use Castro’s crimes to cover up their own. Bashar Assad of Syria, a man better known for gassing Arab children than writing eloquent eulogies said, “The name Fidel Castro will remain etched in the minds of all generations, as an inspiration for all the peoples seeking true independence and liberation from the yoke of colonization and hegemony.” U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon, a man who never met a dictator he couldn’t coddle, expressed how « at this time of national mourning, I offer the support of the United Nations to work alongside the people of the island. » I would never have thought Vladimir Putin of Russia a suckup, but how else to explain hailing Fidel Castro as a « wise and strong person » who was « an inspiring example for all countries and peoples.” Kind of stomach-turning.  But perhaps the most disappointing comment came from Pope Francis who sent a telegram to Raúl Castro: « Upon receiving the sad news of the passing of your beloved brother, the honorable Fidel Castro … I express my sadness to your excellency and all family members of the deceased dignitary … I offer my prayers for his eternal rest.” If there is any spiritual justice in the world the only place Castro will rest is in a warm place in Hell. The Pope, to whom so many millions, including myself, look to for moral guidance, on this occasion can look to the president-elect of the United States for the proper response in the confrontation with evil.  
La réaction de Barack Obama, l’islamo-gauchiste encore présent à la Maison Blanche, au moment de l’annonce du décès de Fidel Castro a été digne d’un disciple de Fidel Castro : prétendre tendre la main au peuple cubain tout en évoquant le statut “historique” d’un abject dictateur est méprisable. Le peuple cubain souffre sous le joug totalitaire depuis près de six décennies et lui tendre la main ne passe pas par l’évocation du statut “historique” du principal responsable de la souffrance subie. La réaction de Donald Trump a été infiniment plus digne, et a été celle d’un vrai Président des Etats Unis. Donald Trump a appelé le dictateur par son nom de dictateur, a rappelé ses multiples crimes, et a dit souhaiter la liberté pour les Cubains. La presse internationale, tout particulièrement en France, a, de manière générale, usé de mots élogieux pour décrire le mort. Elle continue, ce qui n’est pas étonnant. (…) L’ »ouverture” voulue ces dernières années par le pape François, pratiquée par Barack Obama, et, aussi, par le crétin de l’Elysée, est une façon de renflouer les caisses de la dictature, sans que rien n’ait changé aux pratiques de la dictature : c’est donc une assistance à dictature en danger, et un crime supplémentaire contre le peuple cubain. (…) La nostalgie de ceux qui parlent de Fidel le “révolutionnaire” est obscène : mais les gens de gauche sont souvent obscènes et n’ont aucun sens des valeurs éthiques les plus élémentaires. Ils marchent chaque jour sur des millions de cadavres suppliciés. Ils détestent Trump, élu démocratiquement, mais admirent l’assassin Fidel Castro comme ils ont admiré tant d’autres assassins : Lénine, Ho Chi Minh, Arafat, etc. Guy Millière

Et si pour une fois c’était les peuples qui avaient vu juste ?

A l’heure où après les avertissements des peuples qu’ont constitué, coup sur coup et contre tous les pronostics, les résultats du référendum britannique comme du véritable plébiscite de Trump ou de Fillon

Et la confirmation du véritable désastre qu’auront été, entre abandon criminel du Moyen-Orient et campagne aussi insignifiante que futile pour le mariage ou les toilettes pour tous, les politiques complètement déconnectées du réel de nos Obama, Hollande ou Merkel …

Nos donneurs de leçons en rajoutent sur l’incompétence du président-élu américain et, à défaut de pouvoir changer le peuple, appellent des deux côtés de l’Atlantique à contester dans la rue le résultat des urnes  …

Et qu’entre première présentatrice de télévision voilée au Canada et première candidate à l’élection de Miss America en burkini (ou était-ce homosexuelle ?) …

Ou entre deux attaques à la voiture-bélier ou pyromanes de nos chers réfugiés – pardon – loups solitaires auto-radicalisés via les consignes numériques de l’Etat islamique  …

Nos médias et nos élus (à quand après les cours islamiques  anglaises, les cours d’histoire aménagée selon l’origine des élèves ?) continuent à coup de « premières » leur matraquage multiculturaliste …

Devinez qui parmi l’ensemble des dirigeants de la planète …

Contre l’incroyable déni et auto-aveuglement de toute une génération d’élites nourries au petit lait de la mondialisation et de l’identité heureuses …

Et les tomberaux d’hommages qui ont salué la mort d’un des plus notoires dictateurs de la planète  ..

Aura eu le courage – ou le simple bon sens – d’appeler un chat un chat !

Fidel Castro, criminel contre l’humanité
Guy Millière

Dreuz

29 novembre 2016

La réaction de Barack Obama, l’islamo-gauchiste encore présent à la Maison Blanche, au moment de l’annonce du décès de Fidel Castro a été digne d’un disciple de Fidel Castro : prétendre tendre la main au peuple cubain tout en évoquant le statut “historique” d’un abject dictateur est méprisable.

Le peuple cubain souffre sous le joug totalitaire depuis près de six décennies et lui tendre la main ne passe pas par l’évocation du statut “historique” du principal responsable de la souffrance subie. La réaction de Donald Trump a été infiniment plus digne, et a été celle d’un vrai Président des Etats Unis. Donald Trump a appelé le dictateur par son nom de dictateur, a rappelé ses multiples crimes, et a dit souhaiter la liberté pour les Cubains.

La presse internationale, tout particulièrement en France, a, de manière générale, usé de mots élogieux pour décrire le mort. Elle continue, ce qui n’est pas étonnant.

Il faut donc le souligner une fois de plus.

Fidel Castro a été un dictateur féroce, dès son arrivée au pouvoir en 1959. Il s’est emparé de Cuba par la force des armes, y a installé un régime destructeur et barbare à la solde de l’Union Soviétique (et je le souligne : d’emblée à la solde de l’Union Soviétique). Il a fait assassiner des milliers d’opposants, en usant au commencement d’un exécuteur des basses oeuvres cruel et sadique appelé Ernesto Che Guevara, parti ensuite pratiquer le terrorisme en Afrique et en Amérique latine. Il a ravagé une économie qui, avant lui, était prospère, a provoqué une chute vertigineuse du niveau de vie du pays, aboli toutes les libertés, suscité l’exode de centaines de milliers de Cubains vers les Etats-Unis, volé des propriétés immobilières et des entreprises par centaines, transformé l’île en une grande prison.

Il faut le rappeler, Fidel Castro a failli provoquer une guerre mondiale en octobre 1962 quand il a accepté (ce qui était logique puisqu’il était un agent soviétique) l’installation de missiles nucléaires soviétiques à Cuba, missiles braqués vers les Etats Unis en un temps où l’Union Soviétique affichait ses intentions destructrices vis-à-vis de la principale puissance du monde libre. Fidel Castro a demandé explicitement à l’époque à l’Union Soviétique d’utiliser les missiles nucléaires installés à Cuba pour détruire les Etats-Unis. Nikita Khrouchtchev a refusé.

Il faut le rappeler aussi, Fidel Castro est le seul et unique responsable de la rupture de toute relation commerciale ou autre entre Cuba et les Etats-Unis. A l’arrivée de Fidel Castro au pouvoir, les Etats-Unis ont eu une attitude neutre, voire positive, vis-à-vis du nouveau régime : l’antipathie est vite venue, avec les exécutions sommaires, l’instauration de la dictature, la confiscation de toutes les entreprises américaines, la transformation de l’île en base soviétique.

Et il faut le dire : l’absence de toute relation entre Cuba et les Etats-Unis n’a jamais empêché Cuba sous Castro de commercer avec le reste du monde. La ruine économique de Cuba a une cause et une seule : la destruction de l’économie de marché et des structures de production du pays par des criminels sanguinaires, incompétents, vicieux, et méprisants envers l’être humain. Des gens tels qu’Hugo Chavez au Venezuela ou Jean-Luc Mélenchon s’il arrivait au pouvoir en France. Le crétin de l’Elysée, après avoir qualifié (comme Obama) Fidel Castro de grande figure historique, a incriminé l’embargo américain. Il aurait mieux fait d’incriminer les causes de la ruine de Cuba et de demander comme Trump un retour à la liberté à Cuba, mais le crétin en question étant socialiste, ce serait trop lui demander.

Il faut le dire : l’expédition de la Baie des Cochons fut une expédition libératrice qui aurait pu permettre au peuple cubain de retrouver la liberté face à la férocité qui s’abattait déjà sur lui. Elle a échoué à cause de la pusillanimité de John Kennedy, qui a retiré aux forces cubaines libres les moyens logistiques et l’appui qui leur avait été promis, cela au moment même où elles débarquaient. Si John Kennedy n’était pas mort à Dallas en 1963, le monde aurait fini par s’apercevoir qu’il était, outre un obsédé sexuel, un mauvais Président. Les Cubains de Floride se souviennent et savent que les démocrates sont, en général, des traîtres.

Il faut l’ajouter : le discours qui imprègne les grands médias aujourd’hui disant que, sous Battista, Cuba était un lieu de débauche et de prostitution est particulièrement infect. Cuba sous Battista avait un niveau de vie équivalent à celui de l’Italie de l’époque, et La Havane était une ville de casinos où la prostitution existait, une sorte de Las Vegas tropical. Des clubs de vacance existaient, les salaires allaient aux employés. Ces dernières années, quand les frères Castro ont eu besoin d’argent, des clubs de vacance ont ouvert, les salaires sont versés par les entreprises qui ont ouvert les clubs au gouvernement cubain, qui donne une pitance (20 dollars) équivalant à deux pour cent des salaires aux employés cubains utilisés, qui n’ont pas l’autorisation de ramener de la nourriture jetée dans les poubelles des clubs à leurs familles qui crèvent de faim. Les jeunes filles se prostituent pour un prix modique parce qu’elles crèvent de faim elles aussi.

Il faut l’ajouter : Fidel Castro n’a rien apporté au peuple cubain, sinon la souffrance et la mort. La médecine cubaine pour les Cubains est digne de celle du pire pays du tiers-monde (même les médicaments de base tels l’aspirine sont rationnés) tandis que des hôpitaux traitent, pour des sommes élevées de riches clients étrangers, tous les bénéfices allant au régime. Cuba était un pays très alphabétisé avant Castro, la différence est que l’alphabétisation désormais est totalement imprégnée de propagande léniniste monolithique.

L’ »ouverture” voulue ces dernières années par le pape François, pratiquée par Barack Obama, et, aussi, par le crétin de l’Elysée, est une façon de renflouer les caisses de la dictature, sans que rien n’ait changé aux pratiques de la dictature : c’est donc une assistance à dictature en danger, et un crime supplémentaire contre le peuple cubain.

La joie des Cubains de Floride est très logique et pleinement légitime. Les Cubains encore à Cuba ne peuvent exprimer la moindre joie sans risquer d’avoir à le payer cher.

La nostalgie de ceux qui parlent de Fidel le “révolutionnaire” est obscène : mais les gens de gauche sont souvent obscènes et n’ont aucun sens des valeurs éthiques les plus élémentaires. Ils marchent chaque jour sur des millions de cadavres suppliciés. Ils détestent Trump, élu démocratiquement, mais admirent l’assassin Fidel Castro comme ils ont admiré tant d’autres assassins : Lénine, Ho Chi Minh, Arafat, etc.

Que les cendres de Fidel Castro soient destinées à reposer là où se trouve la sépulture de José Marti, qui était un libéral, un démocrate, un défenseur de la liberté de parole, et qui est mort lors de la décolonisation de Cuba, menée grâce aux Etats-Unis en 1895, est une insulte à la mémoire de José Marti, dont Fidel Castro a piétiné l’héritage.

Voir aussi:

 While others fawn, Trump buries Castro with the truth

The death of Fidel Castro was the first foreign policy test for President-elect Donald Trump and he acquitted himself brilliantly.

For anyone who thought that his tough talk was just campaign bluster, witness the incredibly strong statement made about the bloody Cuban strongman:

Today, the world marks the passing of a brutal dictator who oppressed his own people for nearly six decades. Fidel Castro’s legacy is one of firing squads, theft, unimaginable suffering, poverty and the denial of fundamental human rights.

While Cuba remains a totalitarian island, it is my hope that today marks a move away from the horrors endured for too long, and toward a future in which the wonderful Cuban people finally live in the freedom they so richly deserve.

For those of us used to President Barack Obama’s bland, milquetoast amorality on world affairs, and his practiced refusal to condemn evil, Trump’s words are a breath of fresh air and, God willing, portend a new American foreign policy based on the American principles of holding murderers accountable.

Contrast Trump’s words with Obama’s perfection in saying absolutely nothing:

Today, we offer condolences to Fidel Castro’s family, and our thoughts and prayers are with the Cuban people. For nearly six decades, the relationship between the United States and Cuba was marked by discord and profound political disagreements.

During my presidency, we have worked hard to put the past behind us, pursuing a future in which the relationship between our two countries is defined not by our differences but by the many things that we share as neighbors and friends — bonds of family, culture, commerce, and common humanity.

This neutral nonsense betrays a cowardly refusal to condemn Castro as a tyrant. Most memorable is President Obama’s unique ability to make Castro’s death about himself and his own presidency.

Perhaps President Obama forgot that he is leader of the free world and could have used the death of a dictator to say something about the importance of human liberty and human rights. But why, after eight years of Obama cozying up to Erdogan of Turkey and, worse, Ayatollah Khameini of Iran, should we expect anything else?

Indeed, his Secretary of State John Kerry, whose tenure has been distinguished by near-total capitulation to Iran, the world’s foremost state sponsor of terrorism, said of Castro: « We extend our condolences to the Cuban people today as they mourn the passing of Fidel Castro … He played an outsized role in their lives, and he influenced the direction of regional, even global affairs.”

I’d be outraged if I were not already asleep.

I have long said that President Obama’s greatest failure as a leader is his refusal to hate and condemn evil. Could there be any greater confirmation than this, and just six weeks before he leaves office?

But while Trump distinguished himself as a leader prepared to bravely express his hatred of evil, virtually every other world leader followed President Obama instead, disgracing themselves to various degrees. I put them in three categories: brownnosers, appeasers, and suckups.

Taking the pole position of brown-noser-in-chief is Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. His obsequiousness to the murderous Castro was so great that it read like parody:

“Fidel Castro was a larger than life leader who served his people for almost half a century.” Trudeau added that Castro was “Cuba’s longest serving President.”

Notice that Castro “served” rather than ruled, and that he was “President” and not « dictator.”

But Trudeau’s just getting started.

“While a controversial figure, both Mr. Castro’s supporters and detractors recognized his tremendous dedication and love for the Cuban people who had a deep and lasting affection for ‘el Comandante…” He continued. Castro was “a legendary revolutionary and orator” and that his death at 90 had brought him “deep sorrow.”

Here you have the leader of one of the Western world’s greatest democracies saying that an autocrat who murdered his people and ruled over them with an iron fist was loved by them.

As an American who loves Canada and has the privilege of hosting a national TV show there, “Divine Intervention,” I am embarrassed for the good people of Canada.

Trudeau’s revolting comments were rightly exposed by Senator Marco Rubio as “shameful and embarrassing,” and by Senator Ted Cruz as “slobbering adulation.”

Then there are the appeasers, those world leaders with no backbone, and who have probably set their sights on their countries opening up a beach resort in Cuba, or who will use Castro’s crimes to cover up their own.

Bashar Assad of Syria, a man better known for gassing Arab children than writing eloquent eulogies said, “The name Fidel Castro will remain etched in the minds of all generations, as an inspiration for all the peoples seeking true independence and liberation from the yoke of colonization and hegemony.”

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon, a man who never met a dictator he couldn’t coddle, expressed how « at this time of national mourning, I offer the support of the United Nations to work alongside the people of the island. »

I would never have thought Vladimir Putin of Russia a suckup, but how else to explain hailing Fidel Castro as a « wise and strong person » who was « an inspiring example for all countries and peoples.” Kind of stomach-turning.

But perhaps the most disappointing comment came from Pope Francis who sent a telegram to Raúl Castro: « Upon receiving the sad news of the passing of your beloved brother, the honorable Fidel Castro … I express my sadness to your excellency and all family members of the deceased dignitary … I offer my prayers for his eternal rest.”

If there is any spiritual justice in the world the only place Castro will rest is in a warm place in Hell.

The Pope, to whom so many millions, including myself, look to for moral guidance, on this occasion can look to the president-elect of the United States for the proper response in the confrontation with evil.

Boteach, “America’s Rabbi,” whom the Washington Post calls “the most famous Rabbi in America,” is founder of The World Values Network and is the international best-selling author of 31 books, including “The Israel Warrior,” which has just been published. Follow him on Twitter @RabbiShmuley.

Voir encore:

Fidel Castro: A Litmus Test Of American Political Thinking

Paul Roderick Gregory

Miami residents celebrate the death of Fidel Castro on November 26, 2016 in Miami, Florida. Cuba’s current President and younger brother of Fidel, Raul Castro, announced in a brief TV appearance that Fidel Castro had died at 22:29 hours on November 25 aged 90. (Gustavo Caballero/Getty Images)

Fidel Castro is dead at age 90. In power for more than a half century, his regime ruled the last planned socialist economy. (Unless we include quirky North Korea). In 1957, when Castro launched his Cuban revolution, Cuban GDP per capita equaled the Latin American average. On the day of Fidel’s death, it has fallen to less than half that average.  Over the fifty years of Castro’s communist rule, Cuba went from being among the more prosperous countries of Latin America to being among its poorest. When Fidel marched victoriously into Havana, it had fifty-eight national newspapers. Now it has six, all published by the Cuban communist party and its affiliates.

When Communism fell in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, advocates of Communism throughout the world shrugged. They argued that the Communist system is sound. The problem is that Communist countries have had the wrong leaders. Communist true believers, the world over, had to put their faith in Fidel and to hope that his example would spread Communism beyond Cuba’s shores – to countries like Venezuela and Nicaragua. Communist true believers looked at Fidel’s Cuba and praised its health-care and education systems, its income equality, and the fact that Cuba survived the U.S. embargo. They ignored the fact the Fidel remained in power thanks to repression of political opponents, his willingness to lose his most ambitious citizens as boat people to the US, and cheap oil as a client state of the USSR and then Venezuela.

Two decades back, only ten percent of Americans viewed Cuba favorably. On the day of Fidel’s death, more than half of Americans have a positive view of Cuba. The party divide is enormous: Three quarters of Democrats and one third of Republicans hold positive views of Cuba. In the 1960s, the New Left, with its ubiquitous Che posters, was enraptured by Castro and the Cuban model. More recent assessments by socialists fret that Cuba is not striving for a true form of socialism.

The American Left views Fidel as a veteran, battle-scarred in his battle against a US imperialism, bent on Cuba’s destruction. Despite all these obstacles, as stated by Bernie Sanders in 1985, people “forget that Castro educated their kids, gave their kids healthcare, and totally transformed society” in a “revolution of values.” The American Right sees Fidel’s Cuba as an oppressive one-party state that permits no dissent. It is managed by a regime that has run the economy into the ground, despite accomplishments in education and health care. Equality in Cuba means an equal right to poverty.

An oppressive dictator who imprisons opponents and forces his best-and-brightest to flee or a heroic leader thumbing his nose in the face of the global hegemon while providing his people with education and health, one thing is clear:  The Castro planned socialist economy has doomed the Cuban people to lives of poverty. If Cuba had simply matched the lackluster performance of Latin America, the Cuban people would have double the living standard they have today.

The rise in favorable American opinion about Cuba, especially among Democrats, reflects the leftward tilt of their thinking, and a naïve belief, as expressed by the Sanders campaign, that Democratic Socialism is possible. If so, let them give one real-world example, and not the phony Scandinavian model. Fidel knew otherwise and did not tinker with democracy, and he died in power. Gorbachev did not, and he was unceremoniously dumped from power. I imagine Raul Castro is aware of these facts.

Voir également:

The death of Fidel Castro is the perfect Rorschach test for our times.

Ryu Spaeth

The New Republic

November 26, 2016

What you thought of Castro, who died at the age of 90 on Friday, has always been a reflection of your politics, your nationality, and your age. He was a hero of the revolutionary left in Latin America, proving that a ragtag band of guerrillas could overthrow the Western Hemisphere’s hegemon. He was a communist stooge to the American officials who repeatedly tried to kill him, presiding over an outpost of the Soviet Union just off the coast of Florida. To Cubans themselves he was a dictator who impoverished the country, jailed and killed thousands of dissidents, and stripped citizens of their basic rights. And to those who came of age in the post-Cold War era, he was simultaneously a retro figure on a T-shirt and a cranky old man in an Adidas tracksuit.

The disintegration of the post-Cold War order—culminating in Brexit in Great Britain and the election of Donald Trump in the United States—has been mirrored in the chaotic response to Castro’s death. Jeremy Corbyn, the leader of Britain’s Labour Party, hailed Castro as a “champion of social justice,” which is decidedly more sympathetic than anything Tony Blair might have said. Paeans have poured in from predictable quarters (Brazil’s Dilma Rousseff, herself a one-time revolutionary) and those less so (Canada’s Justin Trudeau, the scion of a former prime minister). In the United States, a Democratic president who ushered in a new relationship with Cuba largely based on free market liberalization is being succeeded by a Republican businessman who has threatened to roll back this progress for a “better deal.”

What Trump and Cuban President Raul Castro plan to do now is the ultimate question hanging over Cuba in the wake of Fidel’s death. So far, Trump has indicated nothing more than that he is aware of the news, which we can all agree, even in these divided times, is a good start.

Voir encore:

Drieu Godefridi
Dreuz Info
24 novembre 2016
Le 8 novembre 2016 est une date historique. Elle marque l’accession prochaine à la présidence des Etats-Unis d’un homme, Donald J. Trump, qui, après le Brexit, incarne le surgissement sur la scène politique et culturelle occidentale d’une force nouvelle : les classes moyennes.

Ne sont-ce pas les classes moyennes qui, par définition, dominent la scène depuis les Trente Glorieuses ? Certes, mais la spécificité de la situation actuelle est que ces « gens ordinaires » que désigne le sociologue canadien Mathieu Bock-Côté se comportent désormais de façon politiquement cohérente. Avec une solidarité, une conscience de classe, comme disent les marxistes. Bref, elles votent en masse et en tant que telles.

« La démocratie est lente », constatait le communiste espagnol Denis Fernandez Récatala. De la survenance d’un problème à sa résolution par le mode démocratique — appropriation de la problématique par un parti, accession de ce parti au pouvoir, mise en œuvre d’une politique — s’écoulent souvent de longues années. Particulièrement lorsque le diagnostic est lui-même disputé.

Toutefois, certaines réalités économiques et culturelles sont devenues si prégnantes qu’elles ne peuvent plus être niées. Je soutiens que la révolte des classes moyennes occidentales est le fruit de la détérioration de ses conditions d’existence, dont les motifs sont similaires des deux côtés de l’Atlantique.

La taxation, dans nos pays, est confiscatoire. Depuis 1945, la part de richesse prélevée par l’Etat n’a cessé de croître. Même s’ils ignorent l’aphorisme de Frédéric Bastiat selon lequel « L’État, c’est la grande fiction à travers laquelle tout le monde s’efforce de vivre aux dépens de tout le monde », les citoyens « sentent » que le système tourne à leurs dépens. Que l’Etat, pour octroyer telle prime, tel encouragement ou service, perçoit un impôt plus lourd que ne le serait le prix du service sans son intervention, car il doit rémunérer une pléthore d’agents, de partenaires et de clientèles. Cette réalité est d’autant moins tolérée qu’elle s’inscrit dans le contexte d’un « capitalisme de connivence » qui compense, avec l’argent des contribuables, et à coup de dizaines de milliards, les pertes abyssales d’un secteur financier dont les bénéfices sont privés.

Ayant payé son écot — de 50 à 65% de ses revenus, dans la plupart de nos pays — le citoyen dispose d’un capital résiduel. Ce capital, en principe il en use à sa guise, car nos régimes restent fondés sur le principe de l’autonomie de la volonté. Mais seulement en théorie. Car, à chaque instant le citoyen doit louvoyer et se glisser sous les clôtures électrifiées de normes toujours plus nombreuses. La gauche culturelle a longtemps soutenu, jusqu’à nos jours, que nous évoluons dans un univers capitaliste « dérégulé », dont la généalogie remonterait au règne de M. Reagan et de Mme Thatcher. Rien n’est plus faux. Que l’on regarde les chiffres de la production législative et réglementaire — disons normative — dans les pays européens et aux Etats-Unis, et l’on verra qu’aucun individu dans l’histoire de l’humanité ne s’est trouvé aussi étroitement sanglé de normes. L’Occidental est tel un Gulliver auquel on donne la liberté en titre, mais que l’on paralyse par mille liens. Ce n’est pas le lieu de produire des chiffres — je le ferai dans une étude comparative et historique à paraître — contentons-nous de relever que la France produit autant de normes chaque année que durant les cinq cent années qui vont du 13e siècle de Saint-Louis à la révolution de 1789. À ce formidable magma normatif en croissance exponentielle, vient encore s’agglutiner l’épaisse gangue des régulations que sécrètent les institutions européennes. Outre son caractère anti-économique, cette prolifération normative contraint, force et entrave les citoyens jusque dans les détails infimes et intimes de leur vie quotidienne.

La fiscalité et l’hyperinflation normative s’aggravent de la dégradation urbaine et scolaire. L’immigration massive ayant été érigée en dogme moral et en nécessité économique, les classes moyennes occidentales ont vu surgir au sein de leurs villes, de leurs quartiers et de leurs écoles, parfois jusqu’à les dominer, des populations dont la culture est certes respectable mais, dans le cas de l’islam, radicalement distincte de la leur, dans son rapport aux femmes, à la liberté de conscience, à la démocratie. Cette immigration, dans la réalité des faits, n’est pas choisie, mais subie. Quand, après trente années de ce régime migratoire, les mêmes « gens ordinaires » constatent que des candidats à la migration se pressent toujours plus nombreux à leurs frontières, ils se posent légitimement la question de la perpétuation de leur mode de vie. Comment s’étonner que le dogme de l’immigration anarchique soit rejeté ? Cela indépendamment de la question du terrorisme (alors qu’il est par exemple établi que dix des douze auteurs des effroyables attentats de Paris, le 13 novembre 2015, se sont inflitrés en Europe comme migrants, cfr. Le Figaro, 12 novembre 2016).

Pour compléter la tableau, relevons la guerre culturelle qui est menée aux classes moyennes, sur la seule foi du sexe et de la couleur de la peau. Examinons les deux aspects de ce Kulturkampf.

D’abord, la théorie du genre, selon laquelle la distinction des sexes masculin et féminin est une invention culturelle (Judith Butler, Anne Fausto-Sterling). Au nom de cette idéologie, dans l’infini chatoiement de ses variétés académiques et médiatiques, des minorités sexuelles en sont venues à exiger l’éradication de la référence à l’hétérosexualité, vécue comme oppressive et stigmatisante. La revendication est de brouiller les genres, en les multipliant à l’infini, et de quitter la notion — statistiquement incontestable — de « normalité » hétérosexuelle. D’où ces polémiques, souvent émaillées de violences, pour décider de la question de savoir si les « queer » et transgenres peuvent, ou pas, accéder aux vestiaires sportifs, scolaires et toilettes de leur sexe biologique, ou de leur sexe choisi, ou les deux, et comment vérifier ? Des parents se posent légitimement la question de savoir si leur petite fille de six ou sept ans risque de croiser dans les toilettes une « femme » de 45 ans avec ce que l’on appelait autrefois un sexe masculin entre les jambes. Se fédère à ces polémiques l’hostilité de principe témoignée au garçon hétérosexuel, institué en dépositaire de la sexualité « du passé », ce qui justifie qu’il soit rééduqué dès la plus tendre enfance — à l’école —, discriminé lors de son entrée éventuelle à l’université, et que le moindre de ses gestes et paroles soit justiciable des tribunaux. Cette guerre du genre est menée avec autant d’âpreté que d’efficacité : la grande majorité des diplômés de l’enseignement supérieur américain et européen sont des femmes, et la réalité biologique de la binarité sexuelle est battue en brèche jusque dans nos textes de loi (Convention d’Istanbul, Conseil de l’Europe, 2011).

Vient enfin la résurgence du racisme. D’abord, il y eut le discours anti-raciste, réprouvant le rejet d’une personne sur la seule foi de sa race. L’écrasante majorité des Occidentaux ont acquiescé à ce discours. Toutefois une rhétorique subtile s’est enclenchée, particulièrement dans des pays comme les Etats-Unis et la France, jusqu’à permettre, puis encourager, la mise en accusation des populations blanches. Ainsi des « safe spaces » se sont-ils multipliés sur les campus américains, c’est-à-dire des espaces réservés aux minorités, pour leur permettre de se soustraire à la présence réputée suffocante des Américains « caucasiens ». Dit autrement, les étudiants blancs se voient refuser l’accès de certaines zones du campus sur la seule foi de la couleur de leur peau. Paradoxal retournement d’un discours anti-raciste qui en vient à légitimer, souvent par la violence, des pratiques racialistes au sens strict. Ainsi du discours sur le « white privilege », soit l’idée qu’un Américain blanc est privilégié du seul fait de la couleur de sa peau, quels que soient ses origines et milieu social, et que la loi doit donc discriminer en sa défaveur, toujours sur la seule foi de la couleur de sa peau. Considérons ce répertoire de journalistes récemment créé sous l’égide du gouvernement francophone belge, dont l’objet est d’inclure d’une part les femmes, d’autre part les « hommes et femmes issus de la diversité », ce qui exclut qui ? Les hommes blancs, avec pour seul critère la couleur de leur peau. Racisme, vous avez dit proto-fascisme ? Qui ne voit que ces discours et pratiques reposent sur les notions de responsabilité raciale collective, et de responsabilité à travers les âges, soit très exactement les concepts qui ont, de tout temps, fondé l’antisémitisme, comme Sartre l’a montré dans ses Réflexions sur la question juive ? Ce racisme au nom de l’anti-racisme, les classes moyennes occidentales n’y consentent plus.

Il est à noter que cette guerre sexuelle et racialiste menace les gens ordinaires, non seulement dans leurs conditions d’existence (impôt, normes, quartiers), mais dans leur être naturel (sexe, couleur de la peau). Qu’un rejet radical — une révolution, selon Stephen Bannon, éminence grise du nouveau président américain — se dessine, est-ce surprenant ?

Tels sont les facteurs dont la conjugaison explique, selon moi, à la fois la détérioration des conditions de vie des classes moyennes occidentales, et leur révolte politique.

Voir de même:

The End of Identity Liberalism
Mark Lillanov
The New York Times
Nov. 18, 2016

It is a truism that America has become a more diverse country. It is also a beautiful thing to watch. Visitors from other countries, particularly those having trouble incorporating different ethnic groups and faiths, are amazed that we manage to pull it off. Not perfectly, of course, but certainly better than any European or Asian nation today. It’s an extraordinary success story.

But how should this diversity shape our politics? The standard liberal answer for nearly a generation now has been that we should become aware of and “celebrate” our differences. Which is a splendid principle of moral pedagogy — but disastrous as a foundation for democratic politics in our ideological age. In recent years American liberalism has slipped into a kind of moral panic about racial, gender and sexual identity that has distorted liberalism’s message and prevented it from becoming a unifying force capable of governing.

One of the many lessons of the recent presidential election campaign and its repugnant outcome is that the age of identity liberalism must be brought to an end. Hillary Clinton was at her best and most uplifting when she spoke about American interests in world affairs and how they relate to our understanding of democracy. But when it came to life at home, she tended on the campaign trail to lose that large vision and slip into the rhetoric of diversity, calling out explicitly to African-American, Latino, L.G.B.T. and women voters at every stop. This was a strategic mistake. If you are going to mention groups in America, you had better mention all of them. If you don’t, those left out will notice and feel excluded. Which, as the data show, was exactly what happened with the white working class and those with strong religious convictions. Fully two-thirds of white voters without college degrees voted for Donald Trump, as did over 80 percent of white evangelicals.

The moral energy surrounding identity has, of course, had many good effects. Affirmative action has reshaped and improved corporate life. Black Lives Matter has delivered a wake-up call to every American with a conscience. Hollywood’s efforts to normalize homosexuality in our popular culture helped to normalize it in American families and public life.

Have you changed anything in your daily life since the election? For example, have you tried to understand opposing points of view, donated to a group, or contacted your member of Congress? Your answer may be included in a follow up post.

But the fixation on diversity in our schools and in the press has produced a generation of liberals and progressives narcissistically unaware of conditions outside their self-defined groups, and indifferent to the task of reaching out to Americans in every walk of life. At a very young age our children are being encouraged to talk about their individual identities, even before they have them. By the time they reach college many assume that diversity discourse exhausts political discourse, and have shockingly little to say about such perennial questions as class, war, the economy and the common good. In large part this is because of high school history curriculums, which anachronistically project the identity politics of today back onto the past, creating a distorted picture of the major forces and individuals that shaped our country. (The achievements of women’s rights movements, for instance, were real and important, but you cannot understand them if you do not first understand the founding fathers’ achievement in establishing a system of government based on the guarantee of rights.)

When young people arrive at college they are encouraged to keep this focus on themselves by student groups, faculty members and also administrators whose full-time job is to deal with — and heighten the significance of — “diversity issues.” Fox News and other conservative media outlets make great sport of mocking the “campus craziness” that surrounds such issues, and more often than not they are right to. Which only plays into the hands of populist demagogues who want to delegitimize learning in the eyes of those who have never set foot on a campus. How to explain to the average voter the supposed moral urgency of giving college students the right to choose the designated gender pronouns to be used when addressing them? How not to laugh along with those voters at the story of a University of Michigan prankster who wrote in “His Majesty”?

This campus-diversity consciousness has over the years filtered into the liberal media, and not subtly. Affirmative action for women and minorities at America’s newspapers and broadcasters has been an extraordinary social achievement — and has even changed, quite literally, the face of right-wing media, as journalists like Megyn Kelly and Laura Ingraham have gained prominence. But it also appears to have encouraged the assumption, especially among younger journalists and editors, that simply by focusing on identity they have done their jobs.

Recently I performed a little experiment during a sabbatical in France: For a full year I read only European publications, not American ones. My thought was to try seeing the world as European readers did. But it was far more instructive to return home and realize how the lens of identity has transformed American reporting in recent years. How often, for example, the laziest story in American journalism — about the “first X to do Y” — is told and retold. Fascination with the identity drama has even affected foreign reporting, which is in distressingly short supply. However interesting it may be to read, say, about the fate of transgender people in Egypt, it contributes nothing to educating Americans about the powerful political and religious currents that will determine Egypt’s future, and indirectly, our own. No major news outlet in Europe would think of adopting such a focus.

But it is at the level of electoral politics that identity liberalism has failed most spectacularly, as we have just seen. National politics in healthy periods is not about “difference,” it is about commonality. And it will be dominated by whoever best captures Americans’ imaginations about our shared destiny. Ronald Reagan did that very skillfully, whatever one may think of his vision. So did Bill Clinton, who took a page from Reagan’s playbook. He seized the Democratic Party away from its identity-conscious wing, concentrated his energies on domestic programs that would benefit everyone (like national health insurance) and defined America’s role in the post-1989 world. By remaining in office for two terms, he was then able to accomplish much for different groups in the Democratic coalition. Identity politics, by contrast, is largely expressive, not persuasive. Which is why it never wins elections — but can lose them.

The media’s newfound, almost anthropological, interest in the angry white male reveals as much about the state of our liberalism as it does about this much maligned, and previously ignored, figure. A convenient liberal interpretation of the recent presidential election would have it that Mr. Trump won in large part because he managed to transform economic disadvantage into racial rage — the “whitelash” thesis. This is convenient because it sanctions a conviction of moral superiority and allows liberals to ignore what those voters said were their overriding concerns. It also encourages the fantasy that the Republican right is doomed to demographic extinction in the long run — which means liberals have only to wait for the country to fall into their laps. The surprisingly high percentage of the Latino vote that went to Mr. Trump should remind us that the longer ethnic groups are here in this country, the more politically diverse they become.

Finally, the whitelash thesis is convenient because it absolves liberals of not recognizing how their own obsession with diversity has encouraged white, rural, religious Americans to think of themselves as a disadvantaged group whose identity is being threatened or ignored. Such people are not actually reacting against the reality of our diverse America (they tend, after all, to live in homogeneous areas of the country). But they are reacting against the omnipresent rhetoric of identity, which is what they mean by “political correctness.” Liberals should bear in mind that the first identity movement in American politics was the Ku Klux Klan, which still exists. Those who play the identity game should be prepared to lose it.

We need a post-identity liberalism, and it should draw from the past successes of pre-identity liberalism. Such a liberalism would concentrate on widening its base by appealing to Americans as Americans and emphasizing the issues that affect a vast majority of them. It would speak to the nation as a nation of citizens who are in this together and must help one another. As for narrower issues that are highly charged symbolically and can drive potential allies away, especially those touching on sexuality and religion, such a liberalism would work quietly, sensitively and with a proper sense of scale. (To paraphrase Bernie Sanders, America is sick and tired of hearing about liberals’ damn bathrooms.)

Teachers committed to such a liberalism would refocus attention on their main political responsibility in a democracy: to form committed citizens aware of their system of government and the major forces and events in our history. A post-identity liberalism would also emphasize that democracy is not only about rights; it also confers duties on its citizens, such as the duties to keep informed and vote. A post-identity liberal press would begin educating itself about parts of the country that have been ignored, and about what matters there, especially religion. And it would take seriously its responsibility to educate Americans about the major forces shaping world politics, especially their historical dimension.

Some years ago I was invited to a union convention in Florida to speak on a panel about Franklin D. Roosevelt’s famous Four Freedoms speech of 1941. The hall was full of representatives from local chapters — men, women, blacks, whites, Latinos. We began by singing the national anthem, and then sat down to listen to a recording of Roosevelt’s speech. As I looked out into the crowd, and saw the array of different faces, I was struck by how focused they were on what they shared. And listening to Roosevelt’s stirring voice as he invoked the freedom of speech, the freedom of worship, the freedom from want and the freedom from fear — freedoms that Roosevelt demanded for “everyone in the world” — I was reminded of what the real foundations of modern American liberalism are.

Mark Lilla, a professor of the humanities at Columbia and a visiting scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation, is the author, most recently, of “The Shipwrecked Mind: On Political Reaction.”

Voir de plus:

An End of Identity Liberalism?
Kevin D. Williamson
The National review
November 27, 2016
Don’t count on it.
The New York Times, like Walt Whitman, contains multitudes and necessarily contradicts itself. In the Sunday edition there is an intelligent essay by Mark Lilla titled “The End of Identity Liberalism.” In the Times magazine is an essay by Alexander Fury asking “Can a Corset Be Feminist?” Lilla argues that the tiresomely omphaloskeptic identity politics of the contemporary Left is counterproductive, standing in the way of a genuine liberalism of principle and cosmopolitan broad-mindedness. He writes: “How often, for example, the laziest story in American journalism — about the ‘first X to do Y’ — is told and retold. Fascination with the identity drama has even affected foreign reporting, which is in distressingly short supply. However interesting it may be to read, say, about the fate of transgender people in Egypt, it contributes nothing to educating Americans about the powerful political and religious currents that will determine Egypt’s future, and indirectly, our own. No major news outlet in Europe would think of adopting such a focus.” If we were feeling generous, we could overlook the fact that such sterling progressives as Jonathan Chait began to question the value of identity politics right around the time that “Shut up, white man!” came to be accepted as an all-purpose response to columns by Jonathan Chait. Lilla’s understandably Europhilic column does not grapple with the demographic facts — that Switzerland is full of Swiss people and Mississippi isn’t — but his prescription for liberal reform is the right one, one that certainly would please conservatives even if it made no impression on the Left, which does not have very many liberals anymore. A liberal education system, Lilla writes, would acquaint students with the structures and dynamics of American government and prepare them for the duties of citizenship. A liberal press would take more than an “anthropological interest in the angry white male” and “would begin educating itself about parts of the country that have been ignored, and about what matters there, especially religion.” (Learning the elementary facts about firearms would be something, too.)
The most interesting and insightful part of Lilla’s essay is his argument that the right-leaning rural and small-town Americans are not in fact revolting against the fact of American diversity but against the “omnipresent rhetoric of identity, which is what they mean by ‘political correctness.’” That is exactly right. He ends with a salute to Franklin Roosevelt’s “Four Freedoms,” without getting into the messy fact that the Democratic party has declared open war on two of them — freedom of speech and freedom of worship — with Harry Reid’s Senate caucus having gone so far as to vote for repealing the First Amendment. Make identity politics the main operational model in a country that is two-thirds white and 50 percent or so male, and what do you expect? How different is Alexander Fury’s essay on the corset, by comparison. Fury’s piece is the usual exercise in progressive moral panic: How should the right sort of people feel about corsets? (Kale? Juice cleanses? Whole Foods? Tesla automobiles?) The corset, Fury says, is not just another article of clothing, and one can feel a dreadful premonition of the abuse of the word “literally” before Fury gets around to writing it: “As opposed to merely transforming our perceptions of the figure, as with the padding and extensions of 18th-century pannier skirts, or the 19th-century bustle, the corset acted — and still acts — directly on the form, kneading and shifting flesh to literally carve out a new body for its wearer, no situps required.” We are all good liberals here, but I am confident that literally carving the human body remains a crime, even in New York. RELATED: Identity Politics Are Ripping Us Apart Fury’s version of things is the opposite of Lilla’s tolerant liberalism: To be the right sort of people, we must be feminists, and to be feminists, we must have opinions on . . . everything, and assign to the entirety of the universe moral gradations based upon the feminist position that all of the right sort of people must assume. Fury ultimately comes down as a corset libertarian: “A woman wearing a corset today is a symbol of empowerment, of sexual freedom, of control. She’s the one holding the laces, the one constructing her own femininity.” But the problem is less the answer than the question, and the question-begging — the identification of feminism with virtue and the hunt for heresy. More P.C. Culture Football and Fallacies Enemies of Language If You Need a Hotline to Handle Thanksgiving, Then You Actually Need to Get Over Yourself Lilla’s plea is probably doomed to fall upon deaf ears — or ears that are at the very least not listening. There is almost nothing that people enjoy so much as talking about themselves and all of the splendid ways in which they and their experiences are utterly unique, and it is very difficult to listen to others while talking about one’s self. Sir Richard Francis Burton wasn’t entirely wrong to conclude that “man never worshipped anything but himself.” But if progressives will not heed principle, then maybe they will heed arithmetic. Make identity politics the main operational model in a country that is two-thirds white and 50 percent or so male, and what do you expect? President-elect Trump might have some thoughts on that. — Kevin D. Williamson is the roving correspondent for National Review.

Voir encore:

After Globalism and Identity Politics
Joshua Mitchell
Providence
August 29, 2016

Since the end of the Cold War, America has been mesmerized by two ideas that have given hazy coherence to the post-1989 world: “globalism” and “identity politics.” Formidable political movements in America and in Europe, still raucous and unrefined, now reject both ideas. Political and intellectual elites dismiss these movements because they believe the post-1989 world as they have understood it is still intact, and that no thoughtful person could think otherwise. Hence, the only-dumb-white-people-vote-for-Trump trope.

The “globalization” idea has expressions on both the Left and Right: on the Left, the emphasis has been on so-called “global norms” and culture; on the Right, the emphasis has been on so-called “free-trade” and democracy promotion through military means. Both sides believe in the inevitability of their idea of globalization. We live, however, in a world of states. In that world, the movement of cultural information and material goods has not been free-flowing, and really can never be. Regulatory agencies within the state, often captured by corporations who by virtue of economies of scale can afford large back-office compliance staff, determine what comes in and what stays out. NAFTA is hundreds of pages long. TPP is thousands of pages long. The real beneficiaries of these arrangements are state regulators and large corporations. They will always be in favor of so-called “free trade.” They both gain; but American workers generally do not. Consumers get cheaper goods, but a chasm opens up between those who are in on the game and those who are not. Standards of living fall for all but the few. Government grows. Corporations get rich. What happens to everybody else?

“Globalization” suggests a world where states matter little. If states matter little, then citizenship matters little. To assist in this diminishment of the importance of the state, we have become enthralled by the idea that we are not citizens who have been encultured into a certain set of practices and traditions that we hold dear because we are legal members of a state in which we find our home. Rather, we are bearers of this or that “identity,” which is the only really important thing about us. With this idea, the purpose of the state shifts from mediating the interests of lawful citizens (with a view to defending liberty and property) to disseminating resources based on what you deserve because of your “identity.” The “aggrieved” person is not an active citizen, encouraged to build a common world with his or her neighbors, but a passive victim who is to receive assistance from the state. The real debt of money does not matter, for the U.S. Government can go deeper into debt without cost. All that matters is that educators and politicians continue to chant about the debt you are owed because of your “identity.” In exchange, you, the identity-bearing citizen, must continue to chant about “global norms” and “free trade” that elites promise will redound to the benefit of all. And if it doesn’t, all is not lost, because even if the crony-capitalists and state regulators don’t do anything but line their own pockets, you will at least get the satisfaction that you are owed something because of your victim-status. They, who are getting rich while you are getting poor, tell you so. Indeed, the price of admission to their world, is that you should continue to be mesmerized by “globalization” and “identity politics.” Here, parenthetically, is the corruption at the heart of the American University, without which this configuration of ideas could not have come to prevail in the post-1989 world.

The upcoming Presidential campaign is about many things, not least the persons of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. In the midst of a world that longs for perfection, we find ourselves with two human-all-too-human candidates.

Beyond the lure or abhorrence of their character is the singular question: will the next Administration double-down on the mesmerizing configuration of “globalization” and “identity politics,” and in the process fortify the crony-capitalist class and those who think they profit from identity politics? Hillary Clinton and The Clinton Foundation are ground-zero for this configuration. Donald Trump opposes that configuration, on a good day gives inchoate expression of a genuine alternative, on a bad day blunders horribly, and will probably lose the upcoming national election.

The outlines of a genuine alternative involve the following correlated ideas, some of which have been clearly formulated in Trump’s campaign, while others have been lurking in it or are merely encouraged by it:

Because States are territories within which specific laws are enforced, borders matter. Borders mark where one set of laws begins and another set of laws ends. Tender-hearted sentiments about “universal humanity” cannot overrule this consideration. If mercy is shown, it is as an exception to generally-binding law, and not a repudiation of it. Borders matter.

Because the laws of States work only when people are acculturated to them and adopt them as their own, legal immigration of people from cultures not accustomed to the laws of the State and their practical foundation must proceed slowly, and with the understanding that it takes several generations to acculturate them. Immigration policy matters.
Because we live in a world of States, there will always be war. Therefore we must firmly establish who our allies are, and what we will do to defend them. In keeping with a somber view of the world, we cannot be driven by the dreamy ideals of universal world-around democracy in choosing our allies. Foreign policy is for the purpose of defending our own nation, not spending blood and treasure trying to persuade other nations to imitate our laws and ways. National interests, not so-called universal interests, matter.

Because the United States is composed of immigrants, admission into the Middle Class, made possible by robust economic growth, must be among the highest domestic priorities. Crony-capitalism diminishes growth by pre-determining permanent winners and permanent losers. So-called “free trade” agreements that benefit crony-capitalists eventually slow growth. Also slowing growth is the ever-increasing state regulation of nearly every aspect of daily life, which purports to protect us from harm. What good is such protection, however, when citizens cease to believe that they are responsible for themselves, their families, and their neighbors; and when the very spirit of entrepreneurship is undermined by it? The spirit of entrepreneurship, not just state-sponsored “care” of docile citizens, matters.

Because the sway of lobbyists in national politics grows in proportion to the growth of the federal government, the distorting power of lobbyists cannot be curtailed until the Constitutional limits on the federal government, established by the Founding Fathers, are observed anew. The federal government was set up to adjudicate certain issues, but not others. Those other issues—issues pertaining to the daily life of citizens—were to be adjudicated by state and local governments. When the purview of the federal government is extended beyond its original bounds, it becomes dysfunctional, and the power of the Executive and the Courts extends to compensate. This invites the tyranny of the Executive. The greater danger is not the person holding the Presidential office at any given time; the greater danger is the nature of the Executive office when the federal government grows disproportionally. Federalism and the decentralization of power matters.

Because “identity politics” undermines the idea of citizens who must engage one-another based not on their identity, but on “the content of their character” as Martin Luther King famously said, the politically correct speech that destroys citizenship and the possibility of any common accord about what personal and national greatness may involve must be roundly repudiated. PC speech is corrosive to the soul of America. It is humorless; it reduces all real “differences” to highly contrived, orchestrated, and controlled categories, the cost of straying from which is ostracism or worse. The Salem witch trials of 1692-93 have nothing on us today. America: ever involved in casting out the impure and the doubting. If you are African-American, please don’t mention that you believe in God and go to Church; identity politics allows no room for Christianity—though it bows before an imagined purity of Islam. Women? You may have apprehensions about how the proliferation of gender “identities” bears on your unique struggle to balance and to make sense of the conflicting demands of family and professional life. You, however, must say nothing. Every imagined gender identity is to be equally respected. You thought you were special, but you are not. We live in a world where all things are possible. Anyone who speaks of limits, of constraints, is “phobic” in one way or another. The bourgeois spirit that built America, the interest in making lots of money, in being “successful,” in taking risks—above all the strength of soul necessary to face failure and come back from it, stronger—these are held in contempt. No one dares speak up in a PC world. Feelings might be hurt; people may feel “uncomfortable.” Trigger warnings and “safe spaces” occupy our attention. The task in the highly choreographed world of “identity politics” is not to toughen up but to domesticate. No fights. No insults to which we respond with strength and self-assurance and overweening confidence. Indeed, with laughter! Everywhere: protections made possible by The Great Protector—the State—for by ourselves we cannot rise to the occasion. Greatness matters; if we are to have it, personally and as a country, we must cast off PC speech that in “protecting” us from suffering causes us to be its victim in perpetuity.

On each of these issues—borders, immigration, national interest, the spirit of entrepreneurship, federalism, and PC speech—Hillary Clinton responds with “globalization-and-identity-politics-SPEAK,” the language that has given us a world that is now exhausted, stale, and unredeemable. It is against this sort of world that citizens are revolting. And not just in the United States, but in Europe and Britain as well. The ideas of “globalization” and “identity politics” that mesmerized us in the aftermath of the Cold War now belong in the dust-bin of history. The question, bigger than the question of the personalities of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, is whether we will have one more Administration that authorizes them and tries to solve our problems through their lens.

Joshua Mitchell is a Professor of Government at Georgetown University. His most recent book is Tocqueville in Arabia: Dilemmas in a Democratic Age.

Voir de plus:

« Entre globalisés et passéistes, le match reste nul »

L’utopie d’un retour au passé et aux nations fortes des partisans de Donald Trump est aussi obsolète que celle de la mondialisation, estime le philosophe Bruno Latour.

Bruno Latour (Philosophe)

Le Monde

12.11.2016

La tragique élection de Trump a l’avantage de clarifier la situation politique d’ensemble. Le Brexit n’était pas une anomalie. Autant qu’on le sache et qu’on se prépare pour la suite. Chacune des grandes nations qui ont initié le marché mondial se retire l’une après l’autre du projet.

Le prolongement de cette démission volontaire est d’une clarté terrible : d’abord l’Angleterre ; six mois plus tard les Etats Unis, qui aspirent à la grandeur des années 1950. Et ensuite ? Si l’on suit les leçons de l’histoire, c’est probablement, hélas, au tour de la France, avant celui de l’Allemagne. Les petites nations se sont déjà précipitées en arrière : la Pologne, la Hongrie et même la Hollande, cette nation pionnière de l’empire global.

L’Europe unie, ce prodigieux montage inventé après la guerre pour dépasser les anciennes souverainetés, se retrouve prise à contre-pied. C’est un vrai sauve-qui-peut : « Tous aux canots ! » Peu importe l’étroitesse des frontières pourvu qu’elles soient étanches. Chacun des pays qui ont contribué à cet horizon universel de conquête et d’émancipation va se retirer des institutions inventées depuis deux siècles. Il mérite bien son nom, l’Occident, c’est devenu l’empire du soleil couchant…

Parfait, nous voilà prévenus et peut-être capables d’être un peu moins surpris. Car enfin, c’est bien l’incapacité à prévoir qui est la principale leçon de ce cataclysme : comment peut-on se tromper à ce point ? Tous les sondages, tous les journaux, tous les commentateurs, toute l’intelligentsia. C’est comme si nous n’avions aucun des capteurs qui nous auraient permis d’entrer en contact avec ceux que l’on n’a même pas pu désigner d’un terme acceptable : les « hommes blancs sans diplôme », les « laissés-pour-compte de la mondialisation » — on a même essayé les « déplorables ».

C’est sans doute une forme de peuple, mais à qui nous n’avons su donner ni forme ni voix. Je reviens de six semaines sur les campus américains, je n’ai pas entendu une seule analyse un peu dérangeante, un peu réaliste sur ces « autres gens », aussi invisibles, inaudibles, incompréhensibles que les Barbares aux portes d’Athènes. Nous, « l’intelligence », nous vivons dans une bulle. Disons sur un archipel dans une mer de mécontentements.

Deux bulles d’irréalisme

La vraie tragédie, c’est que ces autres vivent eux aussi dans une bulle, dans un monde du passé que la mutation climatique ne viendra pas déranger, qu’aucune science, aucune étude, aucun fait ne viendront ébranler. La preuve, c’est qu’ils ont avalé tous les mensonges de cet appel à la restauration d’un ordre ancien sans qu’aucun « fact-checker » n’émousse leur enthousiasme. Un Trump, ça trompe énormément, mais quel plaisir de se laisser tromper. Il ne faut pas compter sur eux pour jouer le rôle du bon peuple plein de bon sens et les pieds sur terre. Leurs idéaux sont encore plus éthérés que les nôtres.

Nous nous retrouvons donc avec des pays coupés en deux, chaque moitié devenue incapable de capter sa réalité aussi bien que celle de l’autre. Les premiers, disons les globalisés, croient encore que l’horizon de l’émancipation et de la modernité (souvent confondu avec le règne de la finance) ne va cesser de s’étendre en recouvrant la planète.

Les seconds ont décidé de se retirer sur l’Aventin en rêvant au retour d’un monde passé. Deux utopies par conséquent ; celle de l’avenir affrontée à celle du passé. Ce que figurait plutôt bien le choc Trump contre Clinton. Deux bulles d’irréalisme. Pour le moment, l’utopie du passé triomphe. Rien ne prouve que les choses se seraient arrangées durablement si l’utopie du futur avait triomphé.

Il s’est passé en effet quelque chose depuis vingt ans qui explique cette frénésie de déconnexions. Si l’horizon du globe ne peut plus attirer les masses, c’est que tout le monde a compris plus ou moins clairement qu’il n’y a pas de planète, je veux dire de vie réelle, matérielle correspondant à ces visions de terres promises. Il y a juste un an, la COP21 aura servi de déclaration solennelle à cette impossibilité : le global est trop vaste pour la terre.

Au-delà de ces limites, nos tickets ne sont plus valables. Quant au retour aux terroirs des anciens pays, il n’y faut pas compter davantage. Ils ont tous disparu. De toute façon, ils sont trop riquiqui pour y faire tenir la nouvelle terre. La mutation écologique est passée par là. Pas étonnant que les deux parties fassent assaut d’irréalisme.

L’éléphant est dans la pièce

Toute la question est maintenant de savoir si la tragédie du 8 novembre venant après celle du Brexit peut nous rendre capable d’éviter la suite. Autrement dit, peut-on s’éloigner des deux utopies, celle du global comme celle du retour à l’ancien sol ? Il faudrait pouvoir atterrir sur une terre un peu solide, réaliste et durable. Pour le moment hélas la crise écologique est l’éléphant dans la pièce mais on fait comme si de rien n’était, comme si le choix était de continuer courageusement à marcher en avant vers le futur ou à s’accrocher au passé. Trump et les siens ont même choisi de nier l’existence de cette crise.

Pourtant, à ma connaissance, personne n’a expliqué clairement que la globalisation était terminée et qu’il fallait de toute urgence se rapatrier vers une terre qui ne ressemble pas plus aux frontières protectrices des Etats-nations qu’à l’horizon infini de la mondialisation. Le conflit des utopies du passé et du futur ne doit plus nous occuper.

Ce qui compte, c’est comment apparier deux sortes de migrants : ceux qui se voient obligés par la mutation écologique de changer de monde en traversant les frontières et ceux qui se voient obligés de changer de monde sans pour autant avoir bougé — et que les frontières ne protègent plus.

Si nous ne parvenons pas à donner forme à cette terre et à rassurer ceux qui y migrent, jamais elle n’aura assez de puissance d’attraction pour contrebalancer les forces opposées de ceux qui rêvent encore de l’ancien globe ou de l’ancienne nation. Dans ce cas, une chose est sûre : en 2017, ce sera au tour de la France de rendre son tablier.

Voir encore:

« Conseil aux candidats à la présidentielle : fuyez les artistes et les intellectuels »

Aux Etats-Unis, les élites ignorent les partisans de Donald Trump. Mais sa victoire montre que le monde intellectuel a tout intérêt à faire une autocritique.

Michel Guerrin

Le Monde
18.11.2016

Un conseil aux candidats à la présidentielle en France : fuyez les artistes et les intellectuels. Ne leur demandez pas de faire campagne, ne les faites pas monter sur l’estrade. Surtout si vous avez envie de l’emporter.

On doutait déjà qu’une actrice ou qu’un rockeur fassent gagner des voix. Mais on ne savait pas qu’ils pouvaient en faire perdre. C’est une leçon de l’élection de Donald Trump à la Maison Blanche.

Jamais on n’a vu le monde culturel s’engager à ce point, en l’occurrence pour Hillary Clinton. Aucun candidat n’avait reçu autant d’argent. De cris d’amour aussi – sur scène, à la télévision, sur les réseaux sociaux. On a même eu droit à la chanteuse Katy Perry qui se déshabille dans une vidéo pour inciter à voter Clinton, ou Madonna promettre de faire une fellation aux indécis.

En face, Trump n’avait personne ou presque. Il n’a reçu que 500 000 dollars (environ 470 000 euros) d’Hollywood contre 22 millions de dollars pour la candidate démocrate. Alors il a moqué ce cirque à paillettes, dénoncé le star system, donc le système. Et il a gagné.

Un Grand Canyon de haine

Clinton a joué à fond les étoiles les plus brillantes, et elle a perdu. Prenons sa fin de campagne. Le 4 novembre, elle monte sur scène avec le couple Beyoncé et Jay Z (300 millions d’albums vendus à eux deux), à Cleveland, dans l’Ohio. Le 5, Katy Perry chante pour elle à Philadelphie (Pennsylvanie). Le 7, veille du scrutin, elle apparaît dans un meeting/concert de Jon Bon Jovi et de Bruce Springsteen devant 40 000 personnes, toujours à Philadelphie, puis finit la soirée à minuit avec Lady Gaga à Raleigh, en Caroline du Nord.

Dans tous ces Etats clés, elle a perdu. Dans le même temps, Donald Trump a multiplié les meetings sur les tarmacs d’aéroports en disant qu’il n’a pas besoin de célébrités, puisqu’il a « le peuple des oubliés » – du pays et de la culture – avec lui.

L’historien américain Steven Laurence Kaplan s’est indigné des mots de Trump qualifiant untel de stupide, de débile, de névrosé ou de raté, et traitant des femmes de « grosses cochonnes ». Il a raison. Mais il aurait pu ajouter que des notables culturels ont qualifié le candidat républicain de brute (Chris Evans), d’immonde (Judd Apatow), de porc (Cher), de clown (Michael Moore) ou de psychopathe (Moby). Robert De Niro, avant le scrutin, voulait lui mettre son poing dans la gueule. Chaque injure a fait grossir le camp conservateur et fait saliver son candidat.

Car deux mondes s’ignorent voire se méprisent, séparés par un Grand Canyon de haine. Non pas les riches face aux pauvres. La fracture est culturelle et identitaire. Ceux qui ont gagné se sentent exclus du champ culturel et universitaire, et souvent le méprisent.

Les perdants leur rendent bien ce mépris, les jugeant réactionnaires, racistes, etc., sans même voir que le monde se droitise. Rudy Giuliani, l’ancien maire de New York et proche de Donald Trump, surfe sur cette fracture quand il dit que les campus américains sont truffés « de véritables crétins de gauchistes ».

Monde ultra-protégé

Dans une tribune publiée dès le 23 juillet sur le Huffington Post, le cinéaste Michael Moore a compris que hurler était contre-productif, et annoncé la victoire de Trump, en expliquant que le monde intellectuel vivait dans « une bulle ».

Dans nos pages, l’essayiste Paul Berman ajoute que cette élection traduit un « effondrement culturel » : les voix qui structurent une société ne sont plus écoutées. Toujours dans nos pages, le sociologue Bruno Latour a évoqué sa récente tournée des campus américains : « Je n’ai pas entendu une seule analyse un peu dérangeante, un peu réaliste sur ces autres gens, aussi invisibles, inaudibles, incompréhensibles que les barbares aux portes d’Athènes. Nous, l’intelligence, nous vivons dans une bulle. Disons sur un archipel dans une mer de mécontentements. »

L’autocritique du vaste champ culturel pourrait aller plus loin, sur le terrain de l’hypocrisie. Celle des artistes d’abord, dont l’engagement, souvent imprégné de pathos, apaise leur conscience, mais est souvent perçu comme faisant partie de leur spectacle permanent, dont ils tirent profit, et dont ils se détachent aussi vite pour retrouver, une fois déculpabilisés, leur monde ultra-protégé.

Le meilleur exemple est Madonna qui, durant la soirée qui précède le vote, s’est mêlée à des badauds new-yorkais (des convaincus) pour improviser un bref concert en finissant par « demain sauvez ce pays en votant Hillary ».

« Parler à des gens différents »

Les intellectuels des campus, quant à eux, insupportent le vote Trump par leur façon de lui faire la morale, de défendre un modèle multiculturel comme s’il s’agissait d’un paradis de fleurs. Ils font culpabiliser les riches en leur disant d’être plus généreux et les pauvres en leur disant d’accepter leurs voisins étrangers, sans vraiment montrer l’exemple.

Notre confrère Nicolas Truong racontait très bien cela dans Le Monde du 14 novembre. Il citait le philosophe Matthew B. Crawford (revue Esprit, octobre 2016), pour qui les élites « qui apprécient le dynamisme et l’authenticité des quartiers ethniques avec leurs merveilleux restaurants (…) n’envoient pas leurs enfants dans les écoles pleines d’enfants immigrés qui ressemblent à des centres de détention juvénile ».

On l’aura compris, la France culturelle et multiculturelle – c’est la même – a beaucoup à apprendre de cette élection passée, et à craindre de celle de 2017. Si elle ne se bouge pas.

Le directeur de la rédaction du New York Times, Dean Baquet, écrit qu’il faut aller sur le terrain pour « parler à des gens différents de ceux à qui nous parlons ». C’est vrai aussi, en France comme ailleurs, pour les gens de culture et les universitaires. D’autant qu’en France, nous avons une politique culturelle publique dont la priorité est de s’adresser à tous mais qui, toujours plus, bénéficie essentiellement aux riches. On l’a déjà écrit dans cette chronique. L’élection de Trump le confirme, hélas.

Voir de même:

Wasted Words

Obama’s Never-Ending Lecture Tour

Les vérités qui dérangent

Certains résultats de l’enquête de l’IFOP menée par l’Institut Montaigne sur les musulmans de France « laissent pantois ». D’autres études devraient être menées pour savoir si une partie de la population est en « rébellion idéologique vis-à-vis du reste de la société française ».

Arnaud Leparmentier

Le Monde

Une vérité qui dérange. Chacun se rappelle le film d’Al Gore sur le réchauffement climatique, sorti en 2006. Prouver à force de graphiques et d’études, contre les lobbys, l’origine humaine du phénomène. La vérité qui dérange, c’est un peu la plume portée dans la plaie d’Albert Londres, une nécessité démocratique.

Et la vérité de la semaine, c’est l’enquête de l’IFOP menée par l’Institut Montaigne sur les musulmans de France. Elle dérange tant que nul n’ose s’indigner. L’enquête est présentée avec une distance embarrassée. Rien à dire a priori sur un sondage réalisé en juin à partir d’un échantillon de 15 459 personnes et qui a isolé 874 personnes de religion musulmane. Et certains résultats laissent pantois. 29 % des musulmans interrogés pensent que la loi islamique (charia) est plus importante que la loi de la République, 40 % que l’employeur doit s’adapter aux obligations religieuses de ses salariés, 60 % que les filles devraient avoir le droit de porter le voile au collège et au lycée. 14 % des femmes musulmanes refusent de se faire soigner par un médecin homme, et 44 % de se baigner dans une piscine mixte.

L’Institut Montaigne et leurs rédacteurs Hakim El Karoui et Antoine Jardin ressemblent un peu à Alain Juppé, qui rêve d’une identité heureuse, et affirment qu’« un islam français est possible ». Mais le constat est inquiétant sur la sous-catégorie musulmane la plus « autoritaire » : « 40 % de ses membres sont favorables au port du niqab, à la polygamie, contestent la laïcité et considèrent que la loi religieuse passe avant la loi de la République », écrit l’Institut Montaigne. Cette sous-catégorie représenterait 13 % de l’ensemble des musulmans. L’IFOP chiffrant les musulmans à 5,6 % de la population de plus de 15 ans, nous en déduisons que l’effectif concerné atteint plusieurs centaines de milliers de personnes. Le chiffre qui dérange. L’intégration correcte de la très grande majorité des musulmans ne doit pas non plus conduire à nier une réalité qui, si elle est minoritaire, ne semble pas marginale.

« La société française est malade de son rapport à la réalité »

Tabou brisé

C’est toutefois insuffisant. Il convient, tel Al Gore, de multiplier les enquêtes pour en savoir plus. Le gouvernement serait avisé de dépenser 150 000 euros pour poser une batterie de questions plus précises, pour savoir si la supériorité de la charia relève d’une conviction intime ou d’une volonté de supplanter l’ordre républicain ; si la polygamie est une revendication d’immigrants récents qui s’estompe bien vite, etc. Bref, savoir si une partie de la population est en « rébellion idéologique vis-à-vis du reste de la société française ».

Viendra ensuite l’analyse des causes – celles sociales, sont évidentes, lorsqu’on découvre que 30 % des musulmans de France sont inactifs non retraités et que l’on lit l’édifiante étude de France Stratégie sur les discriminations – puis les solutions. L’Institut Montaigne a fait ses propositions, très inclusives, d’autres peuvent être présentées. L’essentiel est d’accepter de travailler sur des données et de sortir du « on-fait-dire-aux-chiffres-ce-que-l’on-veut », gri-gri des obscurantistes des temps modernes.

Laurent Bigorgne, directeur général de l’Institut Montaigne, qui combat sans relâche les discriminations, voit bien le tabou brisé. « Il n’y a de compétences que s’il y a des connaissances, explique-t-il, déplorant que la société française utilise la loi et le dogme républicains pour éviter toute transparence. La société française est malade de son rapport à la réalité. Tous ceux qui refusent les statistiques sont du côté de l’égalité formelle et veulent que rien ne change. »

Toutes les vérités sont-elles bonnes à dire ? Les populations sont sages lorsqu’elles sont traitées en adultes. Les Britanniques multiplient à outrance les comptages ethniques. Le gouvernement allemand publie chaque année les statistiques de criminalité par nationalité. On y constate une surcriminalité des étrangers, mais dont les causes sont expliquées, et les Allemands se concentrent sur leur évolution. En France, on est livrés aux diatribes d’un Eric Zemmour, qui séduira tant qu’on sera incapable d’objectiver sereinement les faits.

L’essentiel est de prendre à bras-le-corps les batailles de demain

Déni populiste

C’est l’objectif poursuivi par Jean Pisani-Ferry, directeur de France Stratégie : réduire le champ des désaccords aux remèdes, mais pas aux constats, comme c’est le cas désormais grâce aux chiffres du Conseil d’orientation des retraites. L’effort est parfois douloureux. « Sur les diagnostics, il ne faut pas avoir peur. Longtemps, le politiquement correct disait que l’euro nous avait protégés. Or la Suède se porte mieux que la zone euro », concède Pisani-Ferry, qui met en garde : « Avoir des zones d’ombre sur des phénomènes sociaux ou économiques qu’on ne regarde pas crée de la défiance. Aujourd’hui, la distance entre perception et réalité est énorme. » Ainsi, les Français ont le plus peur de tomber dans la pauvreté, alors que le taux de pauvreté y est l’un des plus faibles de la zone euro.

Cette exigence est d’autant plus forte que le monde occidental entre, selon Pisani, dans une « grande régression », avec les mensonges du Brexit et le phénomène Trump : « Le fact-checking sur Trump ne donne rien. Faire fortune en politique en niant la réalité, c’est très impressionnant, et cela va faire école. »

Certes, mais le déni populiste ne vient pas de nulle part. Les élites ont perdu de leur crédibilité, en minimisant les inégalités délirantes aux Etats-Unis, tardivement mises en évidence par Thomas Piketty, et en ne prêtant pas attention aux perdants de la mondialisation. L’essentiel est de prendre à bras-le-corps les batailles de demain, pour que les populistes ne puissent pas dire « Je vous l’avais bien dit ». Ainsi, ne sous-estimons pas Nicolas Sarkozy, qui cherche pour des raisons électoralistes à évacuer le réchauffement climatique par une autre vérité qui dérange, l’explosion démographique de l’Afrique. Ne pas traiter ce sujet sérieusement, c’est redonner la main aux populistes.

Voir encore:

Voir enfin:

Norman Mailer, le président et le bourreau

Norman Mailer, le romancier du  » rêve américain « , a une passion pour les personnages-limites, auxquels il s’identifie volontiers : par exemple le président des États-Unis ou l’assassin Gary Gilmore, héros de son dernier livre.

Pierre Dommergues

Le Monde

01.12.1980

NORMAN MAILER, c’est d’abord un romancier. Comme cous les romanciers américains, il rêve d’écrire le  » grand roman américain « , cette mère qu’aucun d’eux n’a jamais rencontrée, mais qu’ils recherchent tous Mailer a néanmoins écrit plusieurs  » grands romans américains  » : les Nus et les Morts, en 1948, il avait alors vingt-cinq ans et ce fut la gloire du jour au lendemain. Puis Un rêve américain (1965), et Pourquoi sommes-nous au Vietnam ? (1967) Enfin, le plus accessible de tous, le Chant du bourreau, qui sort cette semaine aux éditions Laffont, où Mailer évoque l’histoire de Gary Gilmore, cet assassin qui refusa de faire appel et exigea d’être exécuté (1).

Mailer est aussi l’un des observateurs les plus attentifs de la scène américaine, dont il décrit les vibrations, les contradictions infinies. C’est toute l’Amérique que l’on retrouve dans ses interviews, ses articles, ses essais, ses romans – reportages. Le phénomène beatnik (Advertisements for Myself, 1959), les luttes contre la guerre du Vietnam (les Armées de la nuit, 1968), les conventions politiques (Miami and the Siege of Chicago, 1968), le problème du féminisme (le Prisonnier du sexe, 1971), l’impact sur l’imaginaire américain du débarquement sur la Lune (Bivouac sur la Lune, 1969).

 » Vous êtes le seul grand écrivain américain à vous être intéressé – jusqu’à l’obsession – aux présidents des États-Unis. Dès 1948, vous faisiez campagne pour Henry Wallace. Au début des années 60, vous écriviez un essai enthousiaste sur J.F. Kennedy (Presidential Papers 1963). Le spectre de Lyndon Johnson plane sur les Armées de la nuit (1968). Dans Saint George and the Godfather (1972), McGovern est le saint, Nixon le parrain. En 1976, vous publiez un entretien avec le président Carter dans le New York Times. Pourquoi cette fascination pour la race des présidents ?

– Je n’y ai encore jamais pensé. Ce sont sans doute les circonstances particulières de ma vie. Mon premier succès avec les Nus et les Morts (1948), mon brusque passage de l’obscurité à ce qui m’est apparu comme la lumière spectrale de la célébrité. Ma vie m’a toujours semblé étrange, différente de celle des autres. J’ai toujours été fasciné par ces gens qui pouvaient avoir mes problèmes, de façon parfois encore plus aiguë. Les présidents ont des existences artificielles. À vingt-cinq ans, j’ai découvert que ma vie était devenue parfaitement artificielle. Les gens ne réagissaient plus envers moi parce qu’ils m’aimaient ou qu’ils me détestaient. Tant qu’on est inconnu, les amitiés se forment sur une base organique. Les amis poussent sur le même terrain que vous. Ils ont la compatibilité des légumes qui ont levé côte à côte dans le même potager. Avec la célébrité, c’est comme si l’on vous transplantait dans la stratosphère. Vous devenez une plante hydroponique.

 » Une autre explication ? Ma conception de l’écrivain qui, pour moi, n’est rien d’autre qu’un calculateur – comme l’est un joueur professionnel. Il évalue sans cesse ses chances, examine les occasions, cherche à laisser sa trace. Les écrivains sont les derniers entrepreneurs du neuvième siècle. Donc, de mon point de vue de calculateur, j’avais une position idéale sur écrire sur ces gens. J’étais capable de les voir du dedans, alors que ceux qui écrivent sur les personnalités politiques ou sur les présidents acceptent généralement les airs que ces derniers se donnent. La terminologie, médiocre et ridicule, utilisée par les politiciens est, de surcroît, reprise par ces commentateurs qui tentent d’expliquer ces hommes politiques à la nation.

 » Les politiciens ne s’intéressent pas aux problèmes politiques, ce sont des acteurs. C’est encore plus vrai aux États-Unis qu’en Europe, où il y a une tradition politique. En Amérique, la politique est un sport à l’usage des très ambitieux. En Europe, où elle procède moins du vedettariat, la politique est aussi pus professionnelle. C’est une carrière raisonnable. On y trouve une certaine sécurité, absente de la vie américaine.

De l’audace

– Plus précisément, qu’est-ce qui vous a fasciné chez un Kennedy, un Johnson ou un Nixon ?

– Chez Kennedy, c’était une certaine audace. Dans les années 50, le seul fait de dire :  » Je veux me présenter à l’élection présidentielle, et j’ai mes chances  » était une hypothèse tout à fait remarquable. Kennedy a pris des risques. À l’époque, les hommes politiques étaient beaucoup plus circonspects en ce qui concerne la sexualité. Bien longtemps avant qu’on ait entendu parler de Kennedy, en tant que  » grand homme politique « , on connaissait le  » grand amant « .

 » Johnson avait potentiellement bien plus de valeur qu’il ne voulait le montrer. Mais c’était un hypocrite, et il avait un tel mépris du public que ça en devenait stupide. Malgré son intelligence et son astuce, il n’a jamais compris ce que Kennedy a réussi Ni que Kennedy l’avait battu parce qu’il était plus passionnant que lui. Johnson faisait tout pour maintenir les Américains dans l’ennui. C’est tout ce qu’il avait appris au Texas : ennuyer les gens ; et il a transposé cette pratique sur le plan national. Johnson a desservi le peuple américain. Pour moi, un président a le devoir d’être intéressant. C’est pour cela que Carter a été repoussé par les électeurs : il traitait le public américain comme une vache. Il prédigérait la nourriture avant de l’enfourner dans la panse de la bête.

 » Nixon ? Un jour que j’interviewais Kissinger – c’était à l’époque du Watergate, – il me dit combien il était dommage que je ne rencontre pas le président. Nixon, disait-il, m’aurait fasciné. C’était un homme sur lequel il faudrait écrire. Si lui, Kissinger, avait été écrivain, ajoutait le secrétaire d’État (c’est un des charmes de Kissinger : quand il est avec un écrivain, il lui donne l’impression qu’il aimerait écrire, et quand il est avec P.-D. G., qu’il aimerait, etc.). Bref, il me déclara que Nixon était aux portes de la grandeur, non seulement pour son époque, mais à l’égard de l’histoire, car il allait conclure la paix dans le monde, pour cinquante ans, pour un siècle peut-être. Ce petit Watergate, ce misérable grain de poussière dans un œil, allait le détruire pouce après pouce. Kissinger parlait avec une grande tristesse, car, en fin de compte, si Nixon avait fait la paix. Kissinger en aurait été le principal architecte.

 » J’ai beaucoup écrit sur Nixon, mais je ne suis pas d’accord avec Kissinger. Pour écrire un roman sur Nixon, il faudrait pouvoir vider sa propre tête. Je ne crois pas que j’en serai capable. Je ne le comprends pas suffisamment. De l’extérieur, oui, Mais c’est une chose de comprendre un personnage du dehors et une autre de pénétrer dans sa tête. C’est un saut périlleux. Je ne comprends pas comment un homme de sa trempe a pu se laisser flétrir. Chaque fois qu’il ouvrait la bouche pour faire un discours, c’était un échec esthétique. Il était particulièrement terne. Il aurait été l’un des plus mauvais acteurs du monde, car il était incapable de communiquer une émotion ou un sentiment sans l’afficher grossièrement. S’il disait que l’Amérique devait être forte, il brandissait le poing. S’il voulait exprimer sa joie à l’annonce d’une bonne nouvelle. Il souriait de toutes ses dents. Il faisait tout ce que les jeunes acteurs apprennent à ne plus faire après un premier cours d’art dramatique. Pourtant, quand il était jeune, il rêvait d’être acteur !

 » L’histoire des États-Unis aurait pu être différente si Nixon avait eu une personnalité agréable. Il a sans doute été le président le plus profond que nous ayons jamais eu. Oui, même s’il est aussi un fils de pute et une pourriture ! Il avait au moins une appréhension globale des réalités politiques. Seul Nixon pouvait faire la paix avec la Chine. Ce fut une étape extraordinaire.

Tête de linotte

– Et Reagan, le président élu ?

– Je suis un peu dépassé en ce qui concerne Reagan. Je me suis trompé sur son compte à tous les coups ! Je n’ai pas cru qu’il obtiendrait l’investiture, je pensais que Connally serait le gagnant. Je pensais aussi que ce serait un combat entre Kennedy et Connally. Je me sens disqualifié pour parler de Reagan. Je l’ai d’abord traité de tête de linotte. Mais, quand il a obtenu l’investiture, j’ai dû réviser mon jugement, et je l’ai appelé la super-tête de linotte, Après le débat avec Carter, j’ai pensé que c’était un acteur de troisième catégorie. Cet homme a du mal à retenir même les mots qu’on utilise en politique. Quant à comprendre les idées politiques, cela le dépasse.

 » Reagan concrétise une autre de mes idées, à savoir que le président dont l’Amérique a besoin est un leader et non plus un politicien. Il y a des limites à ce que peut faire un homme politique. La fonction de président relève en partie du cérémonial et en partie de l’organisation. Mais, en dernière analyse, le rôle principal du président est de donner un peu de chaleur, un peu d’humour, un peu d’énergie au peuple américain…

– Mais n’est-ce pas là ce que Reagan peut apporter ?

– Peut-être ! Si Reagan était démocrate, je crois que je le préférerais à Carter. S’il partageait la philosophie de Carter, ce serait un gain non négligeable puisqu’un homme doué d’une personnalité malheureuse a été remplacé par un homme qui a une personnalité agréable. Mais il y a aussi des problèmes politiques véritables, et je ne pense pas que Reagan soit équipé pour les affronter. Il faudra attendre.

– Si vous deviez rencontrer Reagan, quelles questions lui poseriez-vous ?

– On ne peut pas obtenir de réponse de Reagan. Beaucoup ont essayé. Comment peut-on parler de réduire les impôts et, en même temps, d’augmenter les dépenses militaires ? Si vous ne pouvez pas mener de front ces deux objectifs (et, pour l’instant, personne n’a montré comment), il est évident que l’on commencera par la remilitarisation qui apportera à l’Amérique un peu de prospérité pour quelque temps. Mais cela va également accroître le taux d’inflation et aussi l’impôt si on prétend équilibrer le budget. Alors va-t-on renverser la vapeur et renoncer au sacro-saint équilibre budgétaire, ou va-t-on, au contraire, réduire les dépenses sociales ?

 » Dans le second cas, cela équivaudrait à supprimer les ressources d’un très grand nombre de Noirs, et les villes américaines connaîtraient – disons dans deux ans peut-être – une situation critique. En effet, le libéralisme a acheté la colère des Noirs au cours des deux dernières décennies. Ils en ont maintenant pris l’habitude. Ils ont grandi avec un nouveau style de vie, que vous leur enlèveriez sans rien leur donner de substantiel à la place. Ils sont des millions. Et l’industrie de guerre ne va pas fournir l’équivalent sous forme d’emplois nouveaux. Alors que faire si les villes bougent une fois encore ?

 » Avec Reagan, je ne pourrais jamais aller aussi loin dans les questions. Il faudrait un entretien de cinq heures ! C’est un politicien qui connaît ses faiblesses mieux que son interlocuteur, et qui a l’art de la dérive. Mais la véritable réponse, je crois, serait la suivante :  » Que ces Noirs durcissent leurs positions, et on les matera.  » Je pense que nous allons connaître la loi martiale. Non pas demain, mais dans quelques années.

 » Je dois ajouter que je ne sais pas grand-chose en économie et que, comme la plupart des grands économistes d’aujourd’hui, je ne comprends pas ce qui se passe. Aussi n’est-il pas impossible que l’économie fonctionne un petit peu mieux, que l’Amérique émerge de certaines de ses difficultés et que, dans ce cas, l’ère de Reagan ne soit pas pire que celle d’Eisenhower. Une autre chose m’inquiète en Amérique, c’est que les gens deviennent non pas fascistes, mais qu’ils se rapprochent de plus en plus des phases qui précèdent le fascisme.

 » Ma bête noire  »

– Vous avez toujours été hostile aux idéologies. Mais, aujourd’hui, alors que le libéralisme, le christianisme, le judaïsme, le radicalisme sont attaqués aussi violemment par la droite que par la gauche, en France comme aux États-Unis, quelle est votre attitude à leur égard ?

– Je ne pense pas qu’il existe une idéologie, quelle qu’elle soit, qui ait aujourd’hui la moindre utilité. Sa seule fonction est de permettre aux gens de poursuivre leur vie quotidienne en se raccrochant à quelques lambeaux. La plupart des gens ne peuvent pas vivre sans idéologie. Elles servent de garde-fou aux psychismes de millions de personnes. Mais, en ce qui concerne la façon de résoudre les problèmes à venir, il va falloir trouver de nouvelles sources, de nouvelles idées politiques.

 » Si je me représentais à des élections (2), je ne le ferais certainement pas sur la base d’idées reçues. Je choisirais un thème dément. Par exemple, l’impôt unique, un peu à la manière de Henry George (3), qui se proposait de substituer un impôt sur la terre à l’impôt sur le revenu et aux diverses taxes locales. Bien sûr, il ne s’agirait pas aujourd’hui d’un impôt sur la terre, ce serait injuste pour ceux qui en vivent, cela avantagerait systématiquement les revenus industriels. Je serais pour ma part, favorable à un impôt unique qui frappe, par exemple, les plastiques. Je considère que le plastique détruit notre niveau de vie, qu’il dégrade notre existence. C’est la peste des temps modernes. Il dilue la substance la plus intime de notre être. C’est ma bête noire (4). En s’appuyant sur la sensibilité écologique, nous pourrions concevoir une politique fondée sur l’idée que les gens se déterminent en fonction de la nocivité des substances qui les entourent. Les produits considérés comme les plus nocifs par consensus démocratique seraient les plus fortement imposés. Telle serait l’assiette de l’impôt.

 » Je ne veux même pas prendre en compte l’idée de communisme ou de capitalisme. Je suis prêt à m’accommoder du capitalisme, non pas parce que j’en suis épris, mais parce que le capitalisme est plus existentiel que le communisme. Pour certains, la gestion de leurs petites entreprises est le seul élément de créativité dans l’existence. J’en viens à l’idée que tout être qui mène une vie un tant soit peu créative est légèrement moins malheureux que celui qui mène une existence totalement dépourvue de créativité. C’est en ce sens que je peux m’entendre avec le petit capitalisme.

 » Je pense, par contre, que les sociétés multinationales ne sont que des vaisseaux de guerre, versions miniaturisées du communisme. Ce sont des États collectivistes, des enclaves dans la nation. De même que le communisme crée les principales difficultés en Union soviétique, de même le capitalisme multinational est à l’origine des principaux problèmes de l’Amérique. Il ne cesse de nous gaver de produits que nous n’aimons pas. Il nous impose des styles de vie. Il faut commencer par attaquer le mal à la racine. Un nouveau modèle d’imposition peut être une des voies pacifiques pour atteindre cet objectif.

 » Pourquoi pas moi ?  »

– Considérez-vous que l’on assiste, aujourd’hui, à un essor du conservatisme aux États-Unis et que Reagan a été élu par une nouvelle coalition qui exprime ce courant ?

– Il y a autour de Reagan quelques conservateurs sérieux qui ont des idées intéressantes. Le député Jack Kemp, par exemple, que, selon moi, Reagan aurait dû choisir comme vice-président. Je ne suis d’accord avec lui que sur très peu de points, mais c’est un conservateur intelligent.

– Un conservateur à la Edmund Burke ?

– Un jour, je me suis défini comme un  » conservateur de gauche « . J’avais dit que si l’on devait me demander : doit-on fusiller ces cinq hommes ou abattre ces cinq arbres, je répondrais : montrez-les-moi, mettez les hommes à gauche les arbres à droite… Le véritable conservatisme nous vient de Burke : il considérait que les grands chênes de la vieille Angleterre constituaient un héritage humain plus important que l’homme moderne lui-même.

 » Et pourtant, que croient les conservateurs américains d’aujourd’hui ? Que le gouvernement en soi est un mal et que moins il y en aura, plus grandes seront les chances de voir renaître la productivité et les activités créatrices ! Et ils sont prêts à dépouiller l’État d’une grande partie de ses pouvoirs.

 » Je ne pense pas que Reagan soit un conservateur véritable. Il représente tous ceux qui, en Amérique, ont pillé la nation depuis quarante ans et qui veulent la piller encore davantage. C’est le chef de file des  » Je veux ma part de gâteau, Joe « , dans un style un peu nouveau avec un saupoudrage de conservatisme, mais au fond, Reagan est un centriste, un homme de gouvernement. Il veut tout simplement que l’État donne encore plus aux super-riches et moins au super-pauvres. Le problème est que les gens qui sont au haut de l’échelle et qui s’approprient les trois quarts des dépouilles, du surplus si vous préférez, veulent désormais récupérer le dernier quart. Ils acceptent mal l’idée que ceux qui sont au bas de l’échelle aient, eux aussi, droit à une partie du gaspillage. Ils n’ont pas la moindre culpabilité à l’endroit des Noirs qu’ils ont maintenus en esclavage pendant des siècles. Mais les Noirs se sont habitués depuis les vingt dernières années à ce que le gouvernement les aide.  » Mec, pourquoi pas moi, pensent-ils, pourquoi je n’aurais pas ma part du gaspi ! « . Et, à mon avis, ils ont parfaitement raison.

Punks

– Et la classe moyenne dans ce schéma ?

– Elle a le grand avantage de prendre peu de risques et d’avoir beaucoup de sécurité. Son plus grand problème est de se mesurer au vice et de résister à son emprise. La classe moyenne ressemble à la race des prisonniers à vie : ou bien votre vie s’améliore, ou bien elle se détériore. Je n’ai pas de grande sympathie pour cette Amérique moyenne qui a pourtant subventionné le haut et le bas de l’échelle. J’aurai beaucoup plus d’estime à son endroit lorsqu’elle se rendra compte que l’élite lui prélève une part plus importante de ses ressources que les pauvres.

– Quels sont, aujourd’hui, les facteurs de revitalisation ? Dans la gamme des personnages qui, dans votre œuvre, vont du saint au psychopathe – et dont le  » White Negro  » (le Blanc au comportement de nègre) était pour vous le prototype dans les années 60, – quel serait aujourd’hui l’équivalent de ce héros existentiel sauvé par son ancrage dans le présent ?

– Je ne sais pas. Peut-être les adolescents qui vont dans les concerts punks. J’y suis allé trois ou quatre fois à New-York. Et j’y ai senti une sorte de ferment sauvage et révolutionnaire. J’ai été surpris de voir à quel point j’éprouvais de la sympathie pour eux, alors que, pour moi, cette musique est bruyante, vraiment assourdissante. Ces jeunes ont été élevés dans le boucan de la télé interrompue toutes les sept minutes par les publicités. Ils doivent trouver une forme de transgression à écouter du bruit ininterrompu. Le punk est la valve de sécurité de leurs nerfs déchiquetés. C’est une nouvelle explosion, encore plus intense, qui pulvérise les débris de la première. C’est là que subsiste une forme de rébellion qui ne peut pas être étouffée.

 » Je voudrais revenir à une autre raison pour laquelle je ne peux pas m’imaginer président des États-Unis. Cela voudrait dire en effet que les Américains auraient opté contre le réarmement. Un de mes thèmes serait de montrer qu’il est ridicule de poursuivre la course aux armes nucléaires. Il vaudrait mieux inviter les Soviétiques à venir chez nous. Rien ne détruirait plus rapidement leur système qu’une tentative de nous gouverner d’en haut et de l’extérieur. L’Amérique organiserait le plus puissant réseau de résistance que l’histoire ait jamais connu. Le communisme serait détruit de l’intérieur. Les Russes n’ont en fait aucun désir de contrôler les États-Unis. Ils sont trop préoccupés par la croissance de leur propre empire. Ils sont notoirement sous-équipés pour lutter contre les idéologies étrangères, et aucune ne l’est davantage que la nôtre avec sa profonde tradition individualiste.

Un roman

– La première partie de votre nouveau roman – le Chant du bourreau – est une très belle histoire d’amour entre un Roméo et une Juliette qui partagent leur temps entre la cavale et le pénitencier. Gary Gilmore, le protagoniste principal, n’est-il pas également une sorte de dissident, l’homme qui résiste aux manipulations des avocats qui veulent le sauver contre son gré et des journalistes qui veulent faire un scoop avec le récit en direct de son exécution ?

– C’est absolument exact. Gary est constamment manipulé. En prison, les processus de manipulation sont concentrés. Vous êtes manipulés par les autorités pénitentiaires, par certains codétenus, par des cliques à l’intérieur, par la famille à l’extérieur. Les prisonniers finissent par se considérer comme des condamnés plutôt que comme des détenus. Et ils partagent avec Gilmore cet élan de résistance.

 » Mais je me méfie de la dissidence. C’est un autre piège qui renforce encore le bras des fascistes à venir. Beaucoup de jeunes cassent tout ce qu’ils voient et détruisent toutes les idées. Est-ce parce que je vieillis ? Mais je ne trouve plus cela très amusant. Et puis on nous rabâche la vieille rengaine d’il y a cinquante ou cent ans : éduquez les masses afin qu’elles comprennent ce qui leur arrive. Comment les éduquer quand on sait à peine ce qui se passe, quand on comprend si mal ce qui arrive. Le monde était plus simple, il y a trente ans.

– Cette complexité explique-t-elle la place importante de la réalité dans votre fiction ? Le Chant du bourreau, comme le précise le sous-titre anglais, est l’histoire réelle de Gary Gilmore, exécuté en janvier 1977 dans le pénitencier de l’Utah.

– Dans ce livre, mon projet est de mettre à nu la réalité, 1e l’enregistrer telle qu’elle est, au mieux de mes capacités. J’ai voulu écrire un livre où l’on puisse reconnaître des détails sur l’espace, le temps, l’atmosphère. Quelques détails suffisent parfois à remettre un peu d’ordre dans le monde. S’il y avait cinq ou six livres comme celui-ci qui présentent différents aspects de la vie américaine, nous aurions peut-être une idée plus nette de l’Amérique. C’est ce que Balzac a entrepris pour la société française, à lui seul. Zola a poursuivi la tâche. Flaubert a hérité d’une vision restée globale jusqu’à Proust, qui lui ajoute encore une dimension nouvelle. C’est pourquoi les Français, à la différence des Américains, ont une vision d’ensemble de leur monde.

– On est frappé par la ressemblance entre Gary, ce condamné à mort qui avait fait la couverture de Newsweek il y a quatre ans, et vous-même tel que vous vous présentez dans vos essais et récits autobiographiques. Avez-vous tenté de  » maile-riser  » votre personnage ?

– Oui, au début. J’ai pensé que si j’avais commis un meurtre comme le sien, j’aurais agi comme lui – peut-être, car il est prétentieux d’affirmer qu’on pourrait être aussi courageux que lui. Peu de gens comprennent le courage qu’il faut pour aller jusqu’au bout de sa propre exécution. C’est un peu comme si vous étiez l’acteur principal d’une pièce et que, à la fin de la première, après avoir connu toutes les épreuves, vous vous avanciez vers le public pour que l’on vous exécute. C’est un geste ambitieux, même s’il y a quelque chose de tordu dans ce comportement. Au cours de mes recherches, après neuf mois de travail, j’ai su que je n’essaierais pas de façonner Gary à mon image. Au contraire, j’ai voulu qu’il ait une existence totalement indépendante de la mienne.

– Comment s’effectue pour vous le passage de la réalité, de l’autobiographie et de la biographie (les divers matériaux que vous utilisez) à la fiction ?

– Je viens de publier sur Marilyn Monroe un nouveau livre que j’appelle une  » fausse autobiographie  » ou  » pseudo-Mémoires « . J’essaie de raconter l’histoire de quelques années de sa vie, comme si elle parlait à son scribe ou à elle-même. C’est un exemple de l’imbrication biographie-fiction.

 » Les Armées de la nuit offre un deuxième cas de figure : c’est un reportage, si vous voulez, bien que je n’aime pas le terme. Il s’agit plutôt d’impressions en profondeur. La première partie, la plus longue, généralement considérée comme la plus réussie, est centrée autour de ce qui m’est arrivé pendant la marche sur le Pentagone en 1967. La seconde partie, plus courte, totalement objective, tente de cerner ce qui s’est passé à Washington au cours de la manifestation.

 » Le Chant du bourreau est totalement différent. Il n’y a rien d’autobiographique, c’est un véritable morceau d’écriture romanesque. La seule différence avec un roman traditionnel, c’est que les éléments constitutifs ne sont pas  » fictifs « , ils ne sont pas sortis de mon imagination. Mais l’essentiel de l’œuvre d’art est l’agencement de ces éléments, quelle que soit leur origine. En ce sens, le Chant du bourreau est un roman au sens le plus strict du terme, le travail d’un romancier qui fonctionne, j’ose l’espérer, à pleine vapeur ou presque…

Dieu

– Que signifie le titre ?

– Il y a deux significations principales sans rapport, l’une et l’autre, avec le problème de la peine capitale, ni avec l’exécution de Gilmore, au sens littéral. La première, c’est que Gilmore est le bourreau, le livre est donc le chant de Gilmore. La seconde, c’est que, en fin de compte, Dieu est notre exécuteur à tous, il choisit le moment de notre mort. Mais dans ce livre, que j’ai essayé d’écrire avec le maximum de distanciation, il ne s’agit pas d’un Dieu qui médite sur les événements, mais plutôt d’une voix romanesque qui vient de loin, qui émerge de ces merveilleux romans du dix-neuvième siècle écrits à la troisième personne, comme ceux de Thomas Hardy. On sent que ce n’est pas Dieu qui est présent, mais l’œil de la providence qui jette son regard sur le monde.

– Ce regard de Dieu, ce chant, n’est-ce pas aussi celui de Mailer, l’artiste ?

– Non, sauf si vous considérez que tout artiste, tout romancier, est à la fois une incarnation personnelle et une représentation de l’esprit. On ne peut pas écrire pendant trente ou quarante ans, comme je l’ai fait, sans participer à cette spiritualité abstraite. Il n’est pas impossible que tout ce que j’ai appris au cours de ces années sur le détachement de la voix de l’auteur se trouve en quelque sorte concentré dans cet ouvrage. Mes précédents romans sont plus personnels, plus individuels. Dans celui-ci, la distance est plus grande que jamais entre le matériau que j’ai utilisé et moi-même. C’est sans doute cette part neuve et inutilisée de moi-même qui explique ce détachement nouveau.  »


(1) Voir P. Dommergues,  » Un  » roman-vérité  » de Norman Mailer  » le Monde des livres, 28 décembre 1979.

(2) En 1969, Mailer est candidat à la mairie de New-York.

(3) Henry George est un économiste réformiste américain du dix-neuvième siècle, qui propose un système de l’impôt unique sur la terre, à une époque où commencent les grandes spéculations foncières en Californie

(4) En français dans l’entretien

En savoir plus sur http://www.lemonde.fr/archives/article/1980/12/01/norman-mailer-le-president-et-le-bourreau_2808528_1819218.html#D25wVIPCx1m7iuqv.99


Primaire de la droite: Attention, une campagne dégueulasse peut en cacher une autre ! (In France’s deeply ingrained statist culture, guess who is denounced as an ultra-liberal and medieval reactionary Thatcherite !)

23 novembre, 2016
 fillonthatcher ali-juppe2
collectivite
fillon-not-a-chancejuppe-deja-gagneQu’est-ce que c’est, dégueulasse ? Patricia
Il n’y en aura que deux, Juppé et Sarkozy. Fillon n’a aucune chance. Non parce qu’il n’a pas de qualités, il en a sans doute; ni un mauvais programme, il a le programme le plus explicite; non parce qu’il n’a pas de densité personnelle … Mais son rôle est tenu par Juppé. C’est-à-dire pourquoi voter Fillon alors qu’il y a Juppé ? il n’y aurait pas Juppé, je dirais, oui, sans doute que Fillon est le mieux placé pour disputer à Sarkozy l’investiture. Mais il se trouve qu’il y a Juppé. François Hollande
Le masque d’Alain Juppé va tomber tôt ou tard quand les Français s’apercevront qu’il est le même qu’en 1986, le même qu’en 1995. À savoir, un homme pas très sympathique qui veut administrer au pays une potion libérale. François Hollande
C’est un Corrézien qui avait succédé en 1995 à François Mitterrand. Je veux croire qu’en 2012, ce sera aussi un autre Corrézien qui reprendra le fil du changement. François Hollande
Chirac, c’est l’empathie avec les gens, avec le peuple, c’est la capacité d’écoute. C’est un peu l’exemple que je cherche à suivre». (…) Je veux poursuivre l’œuvre de Jacques Chirac. Alain Juppé
Je relis les magnifiques pages des Mémoires d’Outre-Tombe que Chateaubriand consacre à l’épopée napoléonienne. Alain Juppé (16/10/2016)
Nous devons (…) gagner pour sortir la France du marasme où elle stagne aujourd’hui. (…) La première condition sera de rassembler dès le premier tour les forces de la droite et du centre autour d’un candidat capable d’affronter le Front national d’un côté et le PS ou ce qui en tiendra lieu de l’autre. Si nous nous divisons, l’issue du premier tour devient incertaine et les conséquences sur le deuxième tour imprévisibles. Alain Juppé (20/08/2014)
Est-ce vraiment un revenu universel ? Est-ce que tout le monde va le toucher, de Madame Bettencourt (…) à la vendeuse de Prisunic. Alain Juppé
Je vais mettre toute la gomme ! Alain Juppé
J’ai la pêche et avec vous, j’ai la super pêche ! Alain Juppé
Je suis baptisé, je m’appelle Alain Marie, je n’ai pas changé de religion. Alain Juppé
Je suis candidat pour porter un projet de rupture et de progrès autour d’une ambition : faire de la France la première puissance européenne en dix ans. François Fillon
Quand ma maman allait à la messe, elle portait un foulard. Alain Juppé
J’aurais aimé qu’un certain nombre de mes compétiteurs condamnent cette campagne ignominieuse, je le répète. Mais lorsque la calomnie se cache derrière l’anonymat, la bonne foi est impuissante et je vous demande de vous battre contre ces messages parce qu’ils ont fait des dégâts.  Et j’ai des témoignages précis, dans les queues au moment du bureau de vote la semaine dernière, de personnes qui parfois ont changé leur vote parce qu’elles avaient été impressionnées par cette campagne dégueulasse, je n’hésite pas à le dire ! Alain Juppé
Il y a un discours privé et un discours public très différents l’un de l’autre. Il n’assume pas et il omet. Il faut qu’il clarifie les choses. Évoquer la Manif pour tous comme si elle était infréquentable, quand il nous a reçus, tout à fait à l’écoute, en acceptant des pistes de travail communes, notamment sur la question de la filiation et de l’adoption, et de l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant, je trouve ça étonnant. J’ai rencontré tous les candidats à la primaire (de la droite). Le dernier, c’était Juppé. Est-il purement électoraliste ? (…) S’il traite François Fillon de traditionaliste pour sa proximité avec la Manif pour tous, le lien est exactement le même avec lui. Ludivine de la Rochère (Manif pour tous)
 Il y a beaucoup à dire sur les naïvetés d’Alain Juppé en matière de lutte contre l’intégrisme, catholique ou musulman. On a raison de s’inquiéter de sa complicité, ancienne, avec l’imam de Bordeaux. Tareq Oubrou a beau passer pour un modéré sur toutes les antennes, il n’a jamais renié son appartenance à l’UOIF, ni ses maîtres à penser, et joue les entremetteurs entre les islamistes et l’extrême droite. Pas vraiment un atout contre la radicalisation. Caroline Fourest
Suppression des 35 heures et de l’ISF, coupes dans la fonction publique, détricotage des lois Taubira, rétablissement de la double peine… Le programme ultraconservateur et ultralibéral de François Fillon. Libération
Journée des dupes. Beaucoup d’électeurs ont voulu écarter un ancien président à leurs yeux trop à droite. Impuissants devant la mobilisation de la droite profonde, ils héritent d’un candidat encore plus réac. C’est ainsi que le Schtroumpf grognon du conservatisme se retrouve en impétrant probable. «Avec Carla, c’est du sérieux», disait le premier. Avec Fillon, c’est du lugubre. Bonjour tristesse… La droitisation de la droite a trouvé son chevalier à la triste figure. C’est vrai en matière économique et sociale, tant François Fillon en rajoute dans la rupture libérale, décidé à démolir une bonne part de l’héritage de la Libération et du Conseil national de la Résistance. Etrange apostasie pour cet ancien gaulliste social, émule de Philippe Séguin, qui se pose désormais en homme de fer de la révolution conservatrice à la française. Aligner la France sur l’orthodoxie du laissez-faire : le bon Philippe doit se retourner dans sa tombe. On comprend le rôle tenu par les intellectuels du déclin qui occupent depuis deux décennies les studios pour vouer aux gémonies la «pensée unique» sociale-démocrate et le «droit-de-l’hommisme» candide : ouvrir la voie au meilleur économiste de la Sarthe, émule de Milton Friedman et de Vladimir Poutine. Nous avions l’Etat-providence ; nous aurons la providence sans l’Etat. C’est encore plus net dans le domaine sociétal, où ce chrétien enraciné a passé une alliance avec les illuminés de la «manif pour tous». Il y a désormais en France un catholicisme politique, activiste et agressif, qui fait pendant à l’islam politique. Le révérend père Fillon s’en fait le prêcheur mélancolique. D’ici à ce qu’il devienne une sorte de Tariq Ramadan des sacristies, il n’y a qu’un pas. Avant de retourner à leurs querelles de boutique rose ou rouge, les progressistes doivent y réfléchir à deux fois. Sinon, la messe est dite. Libération
François Fillon est triplement coupable d’être de droite, d’être croyant et, pour parachever le mauvais goût, d’avoir été soutenu par le mouvement catholique Sens commun. (…) Tous les coups bas sont permis, y compris en provenance des alliés politiques. Alain Juppé, chassé de son piédestal de grand favori consensuel, ne se prive pas de patauger dans les mesquineries boueuses de ce terrain glissant, jusqu’à faire passer son rival pour un affreux réac. Il l’accuse même d’avoir bénéficié des voies de la fachosphère, comme s’il y pouvait quelque chose. Que ne ferait-on pour draguer le camp d’en face. De celui qui fut lui-même Premier ministre il y a plus de vingt ans, on attendait une hauteur de vue qu’on n’espérait plus de la part de Nicolas Sarkozy. Erreur. Le second a ravalé la rancœur de la défaite derrière un discours digne, responsable et, osons le mot, élégant, appelant à voter Fillon ; tandis que le premier s’est cramponné à ses avidités électorales et ratisse tous azimuts. Aurait-il dû se retirer de la course? Dans l’absolu, c’eût été l’attitude la plus respectable: faire bloc autour du vainqueur. (…) Ce deuxième tour aura toutefois l’avantage de permettre à François Fillon de clarifier son projet et de court-circuiter les critiques de la gauche et du FN qui ne manqueront pas de pleuvoir durant la campagne de 2017. La tactique usée jusqu’à la corde est déjà perceptible. Le débat sera déplacé vers le registre de l’affect: Fillon deviendra l’émissaire du Malin qui veut anéantir le modèle social français et le service public, en supprimant 500 000 postes de fonctionnaires. Manuel Valls fourbit ses armes, au cas où. Sait-on jamais. Il dénonce des «solutions ultralibérales et conservatrices» qui déboucheront sur «moins de gendarmes, moins de profs, moins de police». Comme si la fonction publique à la sauce socialiste, totalement désorganisée par les 35 heures, avait gagné en efficacité. Ultralibéral, Fillon? Non, libéral. L’économiste Marc de Scitivaux voit dans ses objectifs une «remise à niveau» consistant à accomplir «avec vingt ans de retard tout ce que les autres pays ont fait». 40 milliards de baisse de charges pour les entreprises, ses 10 milliards d’allègements sociaux et fiscaux pour les ménages et ses 100 milliards de réduction des dépenses publiques sur cinq ans: la méthode Fillon se veut le défibrillateur qui réanimera un Hexagone réduit à l’état végétatif par les Trente Frileuses d’une gouvernance bureaucratique. Sa France sera «celle de l’initiative contre celle des circulaires». Il joue franc-jeu: les deux premières années, à l’issue desquelles s’opérera le retournement, seront difficiles – elles devraient en outre coûter 1,5 % de PIB, prévient Emmanuel Lechypre. Le redressement sera effectif au bout du quinquennat et fera de la France la première nation de l’Europe au terme d’une décennie, annonce le candidat en meeting près de Lyon. Ambitieux, flamboyant. Et irréaliste, tancent ses opposants, conditionnés dans l’idée qu’il est urgent de ne rien faire ou si peu. Eloïse Lenesley
Mr. Fillon (…) says France “for 40 years hasn’t understood that it is private firms that create jobs—not the state.” His solution is to reverse the balance of power between state and citizens. He proposes cutting €100 billion ($105.92 billion) in public spending over five years, reducing government expenditure as a share of gross domestic product to less than 50% from 57% (the comparable figure is 44% in Germany and 38% in the U.S.). He proposes to abolish the 35-hour workweek and a wealth tax that are the bane of job creators in France. Mr. Fillon also wants to cut €40 billion in corporate taxes and “social fees” and €10 billion in personal taxes. And he calls for a €12 billion expansion in defense and security spending in response to Europe’s perilous security climate. Many of Mr. Fillon’s economic plans track those of Mr. Juppé, who also has been a longtime critic of the French welfare state. Where the two men mainly differ is on foreign policy. Mr. Juppé is more of a traditional Atlanticist, while Mr. Fillon seems to have a fondness for Russia’s Vladimir Putin and says he favors Bashar Assad in Syria’s civil war. He also indulges the French tendency to disparage the U.S. on foreign and trade policy, and he rails against a European free-trade agreement with America. These columns endorse ideas, not candidates, and we’ve long been disappointed in center-right French politicians promising economic reforms but never delivering. Still, if Sunday’s primary says anything, it’s that France’s center-right voters are eager for a leader who will deliver a smaller government and faster growth, not another subsidy to a favored constituency. That’s progress. WSJ
Alors que la France devrait baisser le nombre de fonctionnaires pour diminuer son déficit et ses dépenses publiques, leur nombre augmente. Nous avons le plus grand pourcentage (24 %) de fonctionnaires (avec statut) par rapport à la population active de tous les pays membres de l’OCDE (en moyenne, 15 %). En France, il y a 90 fonctionnaires pour 1000 habitants alors qu’il y en a seulement 50 pour 1000 en Allemagne ! L’explication est simple : nous sommes incapables de créer des emplois et nous continuons à augmenter la taille de l’Etat et des collectivités locales. Et nous avons perdu le contrôle. (…) Il existe des difficultés car dans de nombreux pays les fonctionnaires ne bénéficient plus d’un statut comme en France. Plus d’emploi à vie, ni de privilèges. Prenons un exemple. Dans le tableau de l’OCDE, en Suède, la proportion de fonctionnaires par rapport à la population active serait encore plus élevée qu’en France (27 % contre 24 %). Or, en Suède, il n’y a plus de statut, ni d’emploi à vie. Ces fonctionnaires sont employés comme dans le privé et peuvent être licenciés. (…)  La France reste pratiquement le seul pays à ne pas avoir touché au statut ! (…)  Partout, le nombre de fonctionnaires baisse et on transfère au privé des missions de l’Etat. Le Canada et la Suède l’ont fait dans les années 1990, l’Allemagne au début des années 2000. En Grande-Bretagne par exemple, depuis 2010 et l’arrivée au gouvernement des conservateurs, le secteur public a vu entre 500 000 et 600 000 emplois publics supprimés. Entre 2009 et décembre 2012, sous Obama, le nombre de fonctionnaires territoriaux a connu une chute spectaculaire aux Etats-Unis : – 560 000 (- 4%). Sur (presque) la même période (2009-déc. 2011), le nombre de fonctionnaires des collectivités locales françaises a augmenté de… 70 000 personnes (+ 4%). Au total, plus de 720 000 postes de fonctionnaires ont été supprimés aux Etats-Unis depuis 2009. D’autres pays comme l’Irlande, le Portugal, l’Espagne ou même la Grèce ont drastiquement baissé le nombre de fonctionnaires. L’Irlande  a réduit leurs salaires jusqu’à 20% tandis que l’Espagne est allé jusqu’à 15% et, comme le Portugal, a choisi de remplacer seulement 1 fonctionnaire sur 10 ! Contrairement à la France, ces Etats qui ont décidé de tailler dans le vif montrent – Grande-Bretagne, Etats-Unis et Irlande en tête – affichent de vrais signes de reprise économique. (…) La sécurité sociale et l’Education sont les secteurs avec la plus grande bureaucratie. C’est là qu’on pourrait économiser plusieurs milliards en coupant dans les effectifs. Mais tout cela ne peut être réalisé que grâce à des réformes structurelles : ouverture à la concurrence du secteur de la santé, privatisation des écoles… C’est ce qui a été fait aux Pays-Bas, en Allemagne, en Suède ou en Suisse. Mais ce n’est pas la voie empruntée par le gouvernement socialiste… (…) J’ai déjà écrit sur Météo-France qu’il faudrait fermer car depuis Internet, la météo est fournie par de nombreux organismes beaucoup moins chers. Mais on peut s’attaquer à de plus grands organismes qui coûtent encore plus cher : la Banque de France par exemple, où les frais de personnel sont 2 fois plus élevés que ceux de la Bundesbank (4000 employés de plus !),  les salaires, 24 % de plus qu’à la Bundesbank et le coût des retraites, 300 Millions d’euros de plus. (…)  Dans les années 1990, la Suède, le Canada ou les Pays-Bas ont fait des coupes drastiques dans leurs dépenses et ont diminué le nombre de fonctionnaires. Des ministères ont eu leur budget divisé par deux et les postes de fonctionnaires par trois ou quatre. Le statut des fonctionnaires a même été supprimé, en Suède par exemple, et certaines administrations sont devenues des organismes mi-publics, mi-privé. Il faut noter aussi que ces réformes ont été menées par des gouvernements de centre-gauche ou de gauche comme en Suède ou au Canada, pays terriblement étatisés et au bord de la faillite au début des années 1980. Au Canada, on a adopté à l’époque la règle suivante : 7 dollars d’économies pour 1 dollar d’impôts nouveaux (en France, le chiffre est plus qu’inversé aujourd’hui : 20 euros d’impôts nouveaux pour 1 euro d’économie). Dans ces pays, les fonctionnaires n’ont pas été mis à la porte du jour au lendemain. On a privilégié les retraites anticipées avec des primes au départ. Mais, en même temps, les nouveaux venus perdaient tous les avantages de leurs prédécesseurs : plus de statut, ni de privilèges. C’est un bon exemple pour la France. Nicolas Lecaussin
La France est en effet l’un cinq des pays de l’OCDE où la part des employés publics (ce qui est plus large encore car il faut inclure de nombreux emplois qui ne sont pas fonctionnaires) dans le total des personnes employées est la plus forte. Cela s’explique certainement par une tradition d’interventionnisme public très fort en France depuis la fin de Seconde guerre mondiale. L’augmentation continue de la dépense publique est allée de pair avec des recrutements massifs, qui représentent environ un quart de la dépense publique (c’est à dire de l’Etat, des collectivités locales et de la Sécurité sociale). Les rémunérations des seuls fonctionnaires représentent 13% du PIB et un tiers du budget de l’Etat. Or un fonctionnaire représente une dépense rigide de très long terme : le contribuable doit payer son salaire et sa retraite. Le poids de l’emploi public s’explique également, comme le montre la note de l’INSEE, par la multiplication des échelons administratifs : départements, régions, communes, intercommunalités … à chaque niveau cela suppose des agents (pour la sécurité, l’entretien, le secrétariat, le suivi des dossiers). (…) Dans les autres pays de l’Union européenne, la tendance n’est pas vraiment à la hausse de l’emploi public, faute de moyens. En Grande-Bretagne par exemple, le Gouvernement avait annoncé dès 2010 la suppression de 500 000 postes de fonctionnaires… La question qui se pose réellement est celle de l’efficacité de ce poids des fonctionnaires. D’un point de vue économique, elle n’est pas évidente. Les fonctionnaires ont plus de vacances (INSEE), partent à la retraite plus tôt (DREES) et sont en moyenne mieux payés (INSEE). Est-ce justifié par une efficacité claire pour la collectivité ? Plus largement, le poids des fonctionnaires dans l’économie entretient les connivences et le copinage, ce qui nuit à la performance économique et à l’équité sociale. Au-delà, ce poids des fonctionnaires pose des questions démocratiques. Ils sont surreprésentés à l’Assemblée Nationale et leur engagement dans la vie politique pose clairement des conflits d’intérêts : comment comprendre qu’un magistrat administratif, qui doit juger en toute impartialité, affiche des préférences politiques. (…) L’Etat a eu tendance, ces dernières années, à baisser le nombre de ses fonctionnaires, alors que les collectivités locales ont fait exploser tous les plafonds. En ce sens, la rationalisation du nombre d’échelons administratifs, comme l’a proposé Manuel Valls, est une bonne chose. Pour autant, il faut aller plus loin et se poser la question de l’efficacité de la dépense publique. Le Président Hollande, jusqu’à maintenant, a fait le choix de partir du principe que la quantité d’agents publics était une réponse pertinente : c’est ce qu’il fait par exemple avec le dogme des « 60 000 postes » dans l’Education nationale. Or, ce n’est absolument pas évident. En Grande-Bretagne, David Cameron a tenu le discours suivant en matière d’éducation : gardons la dépense publique, pour autant qu’elle soit efficace ; pour cela, l’Etat pourra se tourner vers des partenaires privés pour fournir les services scolaires. En l’occurrence, il a fait appel aux parents, qui ont créé leurs propres écoles. La France doit faire une révolution mentale. Même Terra Nova a défendu l’idée qu’on peut très bien avoir un service public rendu par une entreprise privée et des salariés privés. Ce qui importe, c’est la qualité du service rendu à l’usager, pas la nature du contrat de l’agent qui le fournit ni la nature juridique (publique ou privée) du prestataire. Erwan Le Noan
La dépense publique n’a (…) pas reculé en valeur en France depuis 1960, date des premières statistiques de l’Insee dans ce domaine. En revanche, il est possible de réduire le poids relatif de l’Etat dans l’économie. La Suède ou le Canada ont enregistré des succès en la matière au début des années 1990. « Mais ces pays ont dû effectuer des arbitrages. Ils ont choisi que telle ou telle fonction ne dépendrait plus de l’Etat mais relèverait désormais de la sphère privée « , selon Olivier Chemla, économiste à l’Association française des entreprises privées (Afep). En clair, la politique du rabot ne peut suffire à faire maigrir l’Etat. Dans leur ouvrage « Changer de modèle » paru l’an passé, les économistes Philippe Aghion, Gilbert Cette et Elie Cohen calculaient que, entre 1995 et 2012, les pays rhénans (Allemagne, Belgique et Pays-Bas) avaient réduit la part des dépenses publiques dans le PIB de 7 points, à 48,8 %. Sur la même période, celle des pays scandinaves (Suède, Danemark et Finlande) a reculé de 6 points, à 56 %. En Suède, la part des prestations sociales dans le PIB est passée de 22,2 % en 1994 à 18,5 % en 1997. Le nombre de fonctionnaires est passé de 400.000 à 250.000 entre 1993 et 2000. Les réformes sont donc douloureuses. Elles interviennent à chaque fois après une crise et après qu’un nouveau gouvernement a été mis en place, notent les trois auteurs. Seulement, à chaque fois aussi, les politiques sont coordonnées : la couronne suédoise et le dollar canadien se sont beaucoup dépréciés au moment où les réformes ont été entreprises, afin de relancer l’activité. L’Allemagne aussi, qualifiée d’« homme malade de l’Europe » au début des années 2000, a profité de la bonne santé économique de ses partenaires commerciaux pour entamer ses réformes… pour finir en excédent budgétaire cette année. Toute la difficulté de la politique économique réside entre une rigueur nécessaire pour les finances publiques sans pour autant casser l’activité. Ce qui signifie une coordination entre la politique budgétaire et la politique monétaire, dont l’absence dans la zone euro n’a pas cessé d’être critiquée par Mario Draghi, le président de la Banque centrale européenne. Comme le disait l’économiste John Maynard Keynes, « les périodes d’expansion, et non pas de récession, sont les bonnes pour l’austérité « . (…) Dans la zone euro, outre l’Allemagne, le seul grand pays à avoir réellement réussi à faire baisser l’importance de ses dépenses publiques est l’Espagne, au prix d’un effort drastique. Les Echos
Notre pays est probablement le seul parmi les membres les plus riches de l’OCDE à ne pas avoir touché au nombre de fonctionnaires et à leurs privilèges. Et pourtant, plus de 23 % de la population active travaille pour l’Etat et les collectivités locales contre 14 % en moyenne dans les pays de l’OCDE. Nous avons 90 fonctionnaires pour 1 000 habitants contre 50 pour 1 000 en Allemagne. Notre Etat dépense en moyenne 135 Mds d’euros de plus par an que l’Etat allemand. Et, d’après les calculs de Jean-Philippe Delsol, 14.5 millions de Français vivent, directement ou indirectement, de l’argent public. Il y a donc urgence à faire de vraies réformes. D’autant plus que tout le monde l’a fait ou est en train de le faire. Un Rapport (Economic Policy Reforms 2014) de l’OCDE qui vient de sortir (février 2014) montre que pratiquement tous les pays membres (à l’exception de plusieurs émergents) ont mis en place depuis le début de la crise de 2008 des réformes structurelles importantes. Parmi ceux qui ont agi le plus figurent aussi les plus touchés par la crise : l’Irlande, l’Espagne, le Portugal ou bien la Grèce. L’Irlande par exemple a été l’un des pays les plus touchés par la crise de 2008. Les dépenses publiques et le chômage ont explosé, par l’effet direct de l’écroulement du secteur immobilier et des faillites bancaires. Fin 2010, l’économie du pays était à l’agonie, dont la dette et les déficits récurrents le prédestinaient à un avenir toujours plus morose. Dès 2011, le Fonds monétaire international et l’Union européenne venaient à son secours et débloquaient 85 Md€ d’aides financières, soit plus de la moitié de son PIB. Dès 2010, l’Irlande décide de réduire sont budget de 10 Md€, soit 7 % du PIB (l’Irlande est d’ailleurs championne d’Europe de la baisse des dépenses publiques). Par comparaison, c’est l’équivalent d’une réduction de la dépense publique de l’ordre de 120 Md€ en France ! Pour y parvenir, l’Irlande sabre dans les services publics, et réduit de 20 % les traitements de ses fonctionnaires, ainsi que les pensions de retraites. De plus, l’Irlande décide de ne pas céder au chantage de l’Union européenne et de garder son taux d’IS (Impôt sur les sociétés) à 12.5 %. Cet entêtement a porté ses fruits : Il y a trois ans, le marché de l’emploi détruisait 7 000 emplois par mois. Aujourd’hui, on assiste à une création nette mensuelle de 5 000 postes. En Espagne, pour économiser 50 Mds d’euros sur trois ans, le Premier ministre de l’époque, Zapatero a annoncé en 2010 une réduction en moyenne de 5 % des salaires des fonctionnaires (le gouvernement s’appliquera une réduction de 15%), le renouvellement d’un seul fonctionnaire sur 10 partant à la retraite et la baisse de l’investissement public de 6 Mds d’euros en 2010 et en 2011. En 2012, le nouveau chef du gouvernement espagnol, Mariano Rajoy, décide de frapper fort en baissant drastiquement les dépenses publiques. Les budgets des ministères espagnols sont réduits de 17 % en moyenne et les salaires des fonctionnaires restent gelés. On prévoit aussi la suppression de la plupart des niches fiscales et une amnistie fiscale pour lutter contre l’économie au noir qui représenterait environ 20 % du PIB. Les communautés autonomes sont aussi obligées de baisser leurs dépenses afin d’arriver à l’équilibre budgétaire. Le Portugal a baissé le nombre de fonctionnaires et leurs salaires (jusqu’à 20 % de réduction sur la fiche de paye). Même la Grèce l’a fait : 150 000 postes de fonctionnaires supprimés entre 2011 et 2014, soit 20 % du total ! En Grande-Bretagne on ne parle que du chiffre de 700.000. C’est le nombre de fonctionnaires que le gouvernement anglais a programmé de supprimer entre 2011 et 2017 : 100.000 par an. Par comparaison, la France a supprimé, au titre de la politique de non remplacement d’un fonctionnaire sur deux, seulement 31 600 en 2011. Trois fois moins qu’en Grande-Bretagne qui a – déjà – beaucoup moins de fonctionnaires que la France : 4 millions contre 6 millions… Depuis 2010, et l’arrivée au gouvernement des conservateurs, le secteur public a vu entre 500 000 et 600 000 emplois publics supprimés (et cela continue) là où le secteur privé a créé 1,4 millions. La Grande-Bretagne ne fait pas aussi bien que les Etats-Unis (1 emploi public supprimé et 5 emplois créés dans le privé) mais elle se situe nettement au-dessus de la France : 2.8 emplois créés dans le privé pour 1 emploi supprimé dans le public entre 2010 et 2013. Aux Etats-Unis donc, sous Obama, entre 2010 et début 2013, on a supprimé 1.2 millions d’emplois dans le secteur public ! Plus de 400 000 postes de fonctionnaire centraux ont été supprimés et aussi plus de 700 000 postes de fonctionnaires territoriaux. A titre de comparaison, sur la même période (2010-2013), le nombre d’agents publics a augmenté de 13 000 en France (surtout au niveau local) et on a compté 41 000 emplois privés détruits tandis que l’Amérique en créait 5.2 millions ! Toutes ces réformes ont été provoquées par la crise de 2008 mais aussi par les exemples canadien et suédois. Ces pays ont déjà diminué le poids de l’Etat dès le début des années 1990. Et cela s’est vu car les deux pays ont plutôt été épargnés par la crise comme l’Allemagne qui a aussi réformé durant les années Gerhart Schroeder. Une comparaison mérite l’attention. Le Canada a supprimé environ 23 % de sa fonction publique en trois ans (entre 1992 et 1995). Si la France faisait la même réforme et dans les mêmes proportions, 1.3 millions de fonctionnaires français devraient quitter leurs postes ! Mais les réformes ont concerné aussi la fiscalité. (…) Il y a deux ans, la Grande-Bretagne avait annoncé une baisse de l’impôt sur les sociétés de 28 à 24 %. Mais le gouvernement de David Cameron veut aller encore plus loin et annonce une baisse jusqu’à 22 % d’ici 2015. Moins 6 points en 3 ans seulement. En janvier 2013, l’impôt sur les sociétés a baissé de 26.3 à 22 % en Suède. Une baisse sensible, qui suit l’exemple d’autres pays comme l’Allemagne (de 30 à 26 %). La Finlande l’a fait aussi (de 28 à 26 %). Et le Danemark : son taux d’impôt sur les sociétés passera d’ici 2016 de 25 à 22 %. Tous les pays ont d’ailleurs compris qu’il faut soulager les entreprises sauf… la France. Dans le classement des taux d’imposition sur les sociétés, la France est championne européenne avec un taux à plus de 36 %. L’IREF a même montré que parmi les membres de l’OCDE, c’est en Norvège que l’IS génère le plus de rentrées fiscales (11 % du PIB). Et pourtant, le taux de l’IS se situe à 24 %, plus de 10 points de moins que l’IS français (36 %) qui ne fait rentrer que… 2.5 % du PIB. Voici d’autres exemples : au Luxembourg, le taux d’IS est à 17.1 % mais les recettes générées représentent 5 % du PIB, le double de ce qu’elles génèrent en France. En Grande-Bretagne, c’est 3 % du PIB pour un IS à 26,7 %. En Belgique, c’est 3 % du PIB pour un IS à 17 %. Faut-il encore rappeler le 12,5 % de l’Irlande qui avec 2,6 % du PIB rapporte davantage que ce que nous vaut le taux français, trois fois supérieur ! IREF
La Suède a supprimé le statut de fonctionnaire. Il y en a encore, mais sans la garantie de l’emploi. Elle a licencié 20% des effectifs. Une cure deux fois plus sévère que celle proposée par François Fillon dans son programme. Elle l’a fait en dix ans dans les années 90. Au Royaume-Uni, ce sont 15% des effectifs des fonctionnaires qui ont été supprimés par David Cameron de 2010 à 2014, notamment dans la police, la défense et les transports. Au Canada, ce sont plus de 20% des fonctionnaires qui ont été licenciés en seulement trois ans dans les années 2000. Chaque ministère a dû couper dans ses budgets et là encore privatisation des chemins de fer et des aéroports. Conséquences, des dysfonctionnements dans les urgences à cause des fermetures d’hôpitaux au Canada. Au Royaume-Uni, le nombre d’élèves par classe a augmenté. La dette a néanmoins été divisée par deux en dix ans au Canada. Jean-Paul Chapel
Le refrain de « l’ultra-libéralisme » est en effet entonné dans tous les médias de gauche et par Manuel Valls lui-même à l’encontre de François Fillon. Notons d’abord la connotation doublement polémique de ce terme dans notre culture politique : « ultra » renvoie aux aristocrates réactionnaires de la Restauration qui, selon le mot de Talleyrand, n’avaient « rien appris, ni rien oublié ». Quant à « libéral », on sait qu’il est chez nous l’équivalent de « loi de la jungle » de « droit du plus fort » et d’ »anti-social ». François Hollande vient ainsi de tweeter que le « libéralisme, c’est la liberté des uns contre celle des autres ». Notre tradition étatiste et égalitariste nous a fait largement oublié que le libéralisme est d’abord une philosophie de la liberté qui a inspiré notamment la Déclaration des droits de l’homme, l’instruction publique et l’émancipation féminine. Autrement dit, personne n’est plus « anti-ultra » que les libéraux ! La dénonciation de « l’ultra-libéralisme » est donc, en même temps qu’une double charge polémique, un double contre-sens historique et idéologique. A quoi s’ajoute que, de Montesquieu à Revel en passant par Tocqueville, Bastiat, Alain et Aron, la France est très riche de cette pensée libérale.  Mais nos lycéens et même nos étudiants n’ont pas le droit de le savoir… Dans votre question, il y a le mot « remise en ordre » : de fait la volonté d’ordre est plus typique de l’horizon politique de la droite conservatrice que de celle du libéralisme qui croit davantage à l’ordre spontané du marché, sous réserve d’une régulation juridique de l’Etat, ce que l’on oublie toujours. Quant au sérieux budgétaire, il n’a rien de libéral en soi : tout dépend des circonstances. Poincaré, Rueff, Barre ou Bérégovoy y croyaient parce qu’ils constataient l’impasse de la gabegie budgétaire. Il est vrai que la chose s’est un peu perdue depuis les années 2000. Allons plus loin : en bon libéral, je m’interroge sur les motivations de tant commentateurs qui hurlent au loup (c’est-à-dire à « l’ultra-libéralisme ») devant le programme de F. Fillon. Et je constate que ces hurlements viennent des innombrables rentiers de l’Etat qui s’inquiètent naturellement de la perspective d’une baisse des dépenses publiques et défendent non moins naturellement leurs intérêts : fonctionnaires, syndicats, classe politique, audiovisuel public et une bonne partie de la presse…Pour certains, comme Libération, c’est une question de survie : on comprend leur violence anti-Fillon. Cette hostilité de « l’establishment d’Etat » va rendre la tâche très difficile à ce dernier, dès cette semaine et plus encore lors de la campagne présidentielle, s’il franchit les primaires. (…) François Fillon l’a dit lui-même : son libéralisme n’est pas un « choix idéologique » mais un « constat » : l’excès des charges pesant sur les entreprises et sur le travail est l’une des causes majeures du déclin français. Le taux de prélèvements obligatoires est passé de 30 à 45% du PIB depuis 1960. Il n’y nulle contradiction dans son nouveau positionnement qui est simplement lié à l’évolution des choses et notamment du niveau de la dépense publique. J’observe que les commentaires de la plupart des médias présentent ce programme comme « dur », « violent ». Mais pour qui ? Certainement pas pour les entreprises qui vont connaître une baisse sans précédent de leurs charges sociales et fiscales (40 milliards), ni pour les familles des classe moyennes ; ni pour les millions de chômeurs qui sont évincés d’un marché du travail hyper-rigide ; ni pour les commerçants et indépendants dont le régime fiscal et social sera aligné sur le statut d’autoentrepreneur . Demandez-leur s’ils redoutent davantage « l’ultralibéralisme » supposé de Fillon ou la spoliation actuelle du RSI ? Curieusement, on ne parle jamais de ces catégories fort nombreuses lorsqu’on aborde l’impact des « mesures Fillon » sur les uns ou les autres… Pour le reste, le parcours de F. Fillon est celui d’un gaulliste social. Son programme vise à mettre en place des coopérations renforcées en Europe, nullement un Etat supranational. De plus, son indulgence pour Poutine ne traduit pas, c’est le moins qu’on puisse dire, un penchant libéral. Pas plus que ces positions dans le domaine sociétal. François Fillon est donc non pas un libéral mais un PRAGMATIQUE en matière économique, un conservateur en matière sociétale (mais non un réactionnaire puisqu’il ne reviendra ni sur le mariage pour tous ni sur l’avortement) et un champion de « l’intérêt national » sur le plan extérieur. En somme, la parfaite définition d’un gaulliste qui raisonne et agit, comme disait le Général, « les choses étant ce qu’elles sont ». Avec un léger penchant russophile, comme de Gaulle lui-même au demeurant. (…) On mesure ici le non-libéralisme de Fillon qui ne croit pas aux vertus du libre-échange. Celui-ci n’est pas un « dogme » mais une démonstration économique que l’on doit à Ricardo et un constat des résultats positifs de l’intégration économique européenne sur notre pouvoir d’achat ou de la mondialisation en matière de baisse spectaculaire de la pauvreté (ce que les Français ignorent). F. Fillon se méfie de la mondialisation, même s’il ne propose pas -pragmatisme là encore oblige- de « démondialisation ». Il s’oppose au TAFTA, comme… Trump, qui n’est pas non plus un libéral. La bonne position aurait été de défendre bec et ongles les intérêts français et européens – ce que l’on n’a pas assez fait avec la Chine – mais non de renoncer dès à présent au TAFTA. Le risque de surenchère protectionniste est réel et devrait nous alerter quand on connaît les précédents, tant au XIXème siècle que dans les années 30. L’un dans l’autre, Génération libre n’avait mis que 12/20 à Fillon en matière de libéralisme. Il est vrai qu’avec cette note il arrivait quand même en deuxième position derrière NKM. Ce qui en dit long sur le libéralisme de nos hommes politiques, droite comprise… Christophe de Voogd
La droite française depuis plus de 20 ans est beaucoup plus à gauche et antilibérale que les droites classiques européennes, et même que certaines gauches sociales-démocrates (Blair et même Schroeder plus libéraux que Chirac, etc.). Et dans ce contexte franchouillard, oui, Fillon est libéral. Mais le fait que Gorbatchev était plus libéral que Brejnev et beaucoup plus libéral que Staline n’en faisait pas pour autant un authentique libéral. C’est l’histoire du borgne aux pays des aveugles : Fillon est un poil plus libéral que l’archétype des énarques (Juppé), que l’idéal-type des énarques (Le Maire) et que le prince des interventionnistes (Sarkozy). Mais il ne faut pas avoir peur du ridicule pour le comparer à Margareth Thatcher. Cette dernière avait un programme, des troupes, du courage. On est aussi assez loin de Jacques Rueff. A moins que Fillon nous étonne sur le tard, c’est plus un « budgétariste » et éventuellement un réformateur qu’un libéral. Il est plus proche de Juppé que de Madelin (regardez sur son site internet le chapitre « créer des géants européens du numérique », par exemple, on est bien loin de la Sillicon Valley, idem sur la culture, le logement, l’agriculture, etc.). Ce sera un bon administrateur, il a un track record de cinq ans en la matière, pas un libéral, là il n’y a guère que la privatisation de France Telecom à son actif. Mais dans l’opinion cela suffira peut-être : après cinq années de hollandisme, n’importe quelle présidence même centriste apparaîtra comme très libérale.  (…) Séguiniste à 18 ans (mais pas après, faut pas déconner…), je suis sans doute mal placé pour critiquer le sombre passé politique du futur président. Il y a tout de même des passés plus troubles que celui là (Chirac ancien communiste pas vraiment repenti, Jospin ancien trotsko pas vraiment repenti, Mitterrand ancien pétainiste pas vraiment repenti, etc.). Ce n’est certes pas le parcours d’un pur libéral, mais c’est logique puisqu’un libéral intransigeant ne rassemblerait pas 44% des voix dans une primaire de la droite en France. Il faudra juger sur les actes, et ce n’est certainement pas en promettant de monter la TVA que Fillon deviendra le grand président libéral de notre pays socialiste. (…) En déclarant qu’il ne considère pas « le libre-échange comme l’alpha et l’oméga de la pensée économique », Fillon joue un jeu dangereux. Cela s’accompagne comme toujours de la petite musique traditionnelle selon laquelle « les USA, eux, savent défendre leurs intérêts », musique idiote dans la mesure où : a) ce n’est pas parce que les autres se tirent une balle dans le pied qu’il faut impérativement en faire autant, b) on fait mine ainsi de penser que nous avons les marges de manœuvre d’un pays cinq fois plus peuplé, six fois plus riche et cinquante fois plus libre monétairement,  c) ce sont souvent les mêmes qui dénoncent le néoprotectionnisme américain et qui soulignent dans le même temps leur activisme dans les instances libre-échangistes globales et/ou l’amplitude de leurs déficits commerciaux ; comprenne qui pourra. (…) Toujours, bien entendu, pour protéger les plus démunis, alors que ce sont les rentiers qui demandent et qui obtiennent des protections. Mais Fillon, comme Hollande ou Merkel, sait surfer sur ce qui marche et éviter les combats impopulaires, et il se trouve que le TAFTA n’est pas en odeur de sainteté par les temps qui courent. Pas sûr qu’il ait lu Bastiat, comme Ronald Reagan. Pas sûr par conséquent qu’il reste très « libéral » entre 2017 et 2022 si les vents de l’opinion deviennent (comme c’est probable) trop défavorables à cette orientation, a fortiori s’il veut rassembler sa famille puis donner quelques gages à la gauche après une victoire au 2e tour contre Le Pen. Mathieu Mucherie

Vous avez dit dégueulasse ?

Alors qu’au lendemain d’un premier tour d’une primaire qui, fidèle au scénario inauguré par le référendum du Brexit et la présidentielle américaine, a bousculé tous les pronostics

Le lecteur exalté des Mémoires d’Outre-Tombe et héritier chiraquien revendiqué qui peine, entre « Prisunic », « gomme » et « super pêche », à faire oublier ses vénérables 71 ans

Dénonce, tout en jouant sur tous les tableaux, la « France nostalgique de l’ordre ancien » prétendument personnifiée par son adversaire …

Mais aussi, pour sa notoire complaisance avec l’islam politique, la « campagne dégueulasse » et « ignominieuse » dont il est l’objet de la part de sites d’extrême-droite …

Pendant que l’ancien banquier d’affaires et ministre d’un gouvernement socialiste ne nous sort rien de moins que la « Révolution » …

Comment ne pas voir …

Avec le site Atlantico

La véritable campagne de désinformation de nos dûment stipendiés médias …

Face au prétendu, Libération et sa couverture de Fillon Thatcherisé dixit, « programme ultraconservateur et ultralibéral » et « Tariq Ramadan des sacristies » …

D’un  candidat ancien séguiniste et anti-TAFTA que l’actuel président n’arrivait même pas à distinguer d’Alain Juppé lui-même ?

Comme les côtés autant surréalistes que révélateurs d’un tel débat …

Dans un pays qui alors qu’après le Canada et la Suède dans les années 90 la plupart des pays occidentaux ont réduit drastiquement leur fonction publique …

Continue à employer quelque 5,5 millions de fonctionnaires soit un Français sur cinq (24 % de la population active contre 15 % en moyenne pour l’OCDE) ?

Pourquoi François Fillon n’est pas l’ultra-libéral que veulent voir ses opposants de tous bords
Si l’accusation d’ultra-libéral revient souvent dans la bouche des opposants à François Fillon, le parcours politique du candidat LR à la primaire de la droite et ses prises de position sur certains sujets majeurs sont pourtant loin de coller avec la pensée « ultra-libérale »

Atlantico

22 novembre 2016

Atlantico : En termes de vision économique, François Fillon est souvent taxé d’ultra-libéral par une partie de ses opposants. Est-ce vraiment un « procès » qu’on peut lui faire ? Le sérieux budgétaire et la volonté de remise en ordre qu’il incarne sont-ils vraiment une marque « d’ultra-libéralisme » ?

Christophe de Voogd : Le refrain de « l’ultra-libéralisme » est en effet entonné dans tous les médias de gauche et par Manuel Valls lui-même à l’encontre de François Fillon. Notons d’abord la connotation doublement polémique de ce terme dans notre culture politique : « ultra » renvoie aux aristocrates réactionnaires de la Restauration qui, selon le mot de Talleyrand, n’avaient « rien appris, ni rien oublié ». Quant à « libéral », on sait qu’il est chez nous l’équivalent de « loi de la jungle » de « droit du plus fort » et d’ »anti-social ». François Hollande vient ainsi de tweeter que le « libéralisme, c’est la liberté des uns contre celle des autres ». Notre tradition étatiste et égalitariste nous a fait largement oublié que le libéralisme est d’abord une philosophie de la liberté qui a inspiré notamment la Déclaration des droits de l’homme, l’instruction publique et l’émancipation féminine. Autrement dit, personne n’est plus « anti-ultra » que les libéraux ! La dénonciation de « l’ultra-libéralisme » est donc, en même temps qu’une double charge polémique, un double contre-sens historique et idéologique. A quoi s’ajoute que, de Montesquieu à Revel en passant par Tocqueville, Bastiat, Alain et Aron, la France est très riche de cette pensée libérale.  Mais nos lycéens et même nos étudiants n’ont pas le droit de le savoir…

Dans votre question, il y a le mot « remise en ordre » : de fait la volonté d’ordre est plus typique de l’horizon politique de la droite conservatrice que de celle du libéralisme qui croit davantage à l’ordre spontané du marché, sous réserve d’une régulation juridique de l’Etat, ce que l’on oublie toujours. Quant au sérieux budgétaire, il n’a rien de libéral en soi : tout dépend des circonstances. Poincaré, Rueff, Barre ou Bérégovoy y croyaient parce qu’ils constataient l’impasse de la gabegie budgétaire. Il est vrai que la chose s’est un peu perdue depuis les années 2000.

Allons plus loin : en bon libéral, je m’interroge sur les motivations de tant commentateurs qui hurlent au loup (c’est-à-dire à « l’ultra-libéralisme ») devant le programme de F. Fillon. Et je constate que ces hurlements viennent des innombrables rentiers de l’Etat qui s’inquiètent naturellement de la perspective d’une baisse des dépenses publiques et défendent non moins naturellement leurs intérêts : fonctionnaires, syndicats, classe politique, audiovisuel public et une bonne partie de la presse…Pour certains, comme Libération, c’est une question de survie : on comprend leur violence anti-Fillon. Cette hostilité de « l’establishment d’Etat » va rendre la tâche très difficile à ce dernier, dès cette semaine et plus encore lors de la campagne présidentielle, s’il franchit les primaires.

Mathieu Mucherie : La droite française depuis plus de 20 ans est beaucoup plus à gauche et antilibérale que les droites classiques européennes, et même que certaines gauches sociales-démocrates (Blair et même Schroeder plus libéraux que Chirac, etc.). Et dans ce contexte franchouillard, oui, Fillon est libéral. Mais le fait que Gorbatchev était plus libéral que Brejnev et beaucoup plus libéral que Staline n’en faisait pas pour autant un authentique libéral. C’est l’histoire du borgne aux pays des aveugles : Fillon est un poil plus libéral que l’archétype des énarques (Juppé), que l’idéal-type des énarques (Le Maire) et que le prince des interventionnistes (Sarkozy). Mais il ne faut pas avoir peur du ridicule pour le comparer à Margareth Thatcher. Cette dernière avait un programme, des troupes, du courage. On est aussi assez loin de Jacques Rueff.

A moins que Fillon nous étonne sur le tard, c’est plus un « budgétariste » et éventuellement un réformateur qu’un libéral. Il est plus proche de Juppé que de Madelin (regardez sur son site internet le chapitre « créer des géants européens du numérique », par exemple, on est bien loin de la Sillicon Valley, idem sur la culture, le logement, l’agriculture, etc.). Ce sera un bon administrateur, il a un track record de cinq ans en la matière, pas un libéral, là il n’y a guère que la privatisation de France Telecom à son actif. Mais dans l’opinion cela suffira peut-être : après cinq années de hollandisme, n’importe quelle présidence même centriste apparaîtra comme très libérale.

Le parcours politique de François Fillon (opposition au traité de Maastricht, filiation séguiniste…) est-il vraiment en accord avec ce que l’on pourrait attendre d’un « ultra-libéral » ?

Mathieu Mucherie : La plupart des authentiques libéraux ont trouvé que le traité de Maastricht était un carcan incompatible avec les libertés à long terme et avec l’efficience économique à tous les horizons ; surtout l’idée de taux de changes nominaux fixes « pour l’éternité » avec en plus une gestion de la monnaie par une banque centrale indépendante (indépendante des autres sphères, autant dire un État dans l’État). Ce n’est pas une histoire de droite ou de gauche : quand des gens aussi éloignés que Paul Krugman, Milton Friedman ou Martin Feldstein arrivent grosso modo à la même conclusion, on peut se douter que l’édifice construit par nos élites européennes n’est peut-être pas très libéral, quelle que soit la définition que l’on donne à ce terme. Les pays les plus libéraux (Angleterre, Suisse…) ne s’y sont pas trompés.

Séguiniste à 18 ans (mais pas après, faut pas déconner…), je suis sans doute mal placé pour critiquer le sombre passé politique du futur président. Il y a tout de même des passés plus troubles que celui là (Chirac ancien communiste pas vraiment repenti, Jospin ancien trotsko pas vraiment repenti, Mitterrand ancien pétainiste pas vraiment repenti, etc.). Ce n’est certes pas le parcours d’un pur libéral, mais c’est logique puisqu’un libéral intransigeant ne rassemblerait pas 44% des voix dans une primaire de la droite en France. Il faudra juger sur les actes, et ce n’est certainement pas en promettant de monter la TVA que Fillon deviendra le grand président libéral de notre pays socialiste.

Christophe de Voogd : François Fillon l’a dit lui-même : son libéralisme n’est pas un « choix idéologique » mais un « constat » : l’excès des charges pesant sur les entreprises et sur le travail est l’une des causes majeures du déclin français. Le taux de prélèvements obligatoires est passé de 30 à 45% du PIB depuis 1960. Il n’y nulle contradiction dans son nouveau positionnement qui est simplement lié à l’évolution des choses et notamment du niveau de la dépense publique. J’observe que les commentaires de la plupart des médias présentent ce programme comme « dur », « violent ». Mais pour qui ? Certainement pas pour les entreprises qui vont connaître une baisse sans précédent de leurs charges sociales et fiscales (40 milliards), ni pour les familles des classe moyennes ; ni pour les millions de chômeurs qui sont évincés d’un marché du travail hyper-rigide ; ni pour les commerçants et indépendants dont le régime fiscal et social sera aligné sur le statut d’autoentrepreneur . Demandez-leur s’ils redoutent davantage « l’ultralibéralisme » supposé de Fillon ou la spoliation actuelle du RSI ? Curieusement, on ne parle jamais de ces catégories fort nombreuses lorsqu’on aborde l’impact des « mesures Fillon » sur les uns ou les autres…

Pour le reste, le parcours de F. Fillon est celui d’un gaulliste social. Son programme vise à mettre en place des coopérations renforcées en Europe, nullement un Etat supranational. De plus, son indulgence pour Poutine ne traduit pas, c’est le moins qu’on puisse dire, un penchant libéral. Pas plus que ces positions dans le domaine sociétal.

François Fillon est donc non pas un libéral mais un PRAGMATIQUE en matière économique, un conservateur en matière sociétale (mais non un réactionnaire puisqu’il ne reviendra ni sur le mariage pour tous ni sur l’avortement) et un champion de « l’intérêt national » sur le plan extérieur. En somme, la parfaite définition d’un gaulliste qui raisonne et agit, comme disait le Général, « les choses étant ce qu’elles sont ». Avec un léger penchant russophile, comme de Gaulle lui-même au demeurant.

En quoi la position de François Fillon sur le libre-échange, et notamment le controversé traité TAFTA, s’inscrit-elle en faux avec la pensée des économistes et politiques « ultra-libéraux » ?

Christophe de Voogd : Après tout ce qui précède, vous admettrez que j’écarte ce mot « d’ultralibéral » ! On mesure ici le non-libéralisme de Fillon qui ne croit pas aux vertus du libre-échange. Celui-ci n’est pas un « dogme » mais une démonstration économique que l’on doit à Ricardo et un constat des résultats positifs de l’intégration économique européenne sur notre pouvoir d’achat ou de la mondialisation en matière de baisse spectaculaire de la pauvreté (ce que les Français ignorent). F. Fillon se méfie de la mondialisation, même s’il ne propose pas -pragmatisme là encore oblige- de « démondialisation ». Il s’oppose au TAFTA, comme… Trump, qui n’est pas non plus un libéral. La bonne position aurait été de défendre bec et ongles les intérêts français et européens – ce que l’on n’a pas assez fait avec la Chine – mais non de renoncer dès à présent au TAFTA. Le risque de surenchère protectionniste est réel et devrait nous alerter quand on connaît les précédents, tant au XIXème siècle que dans les années 30.

L’un dans l’autre, Génération libre n’avait mis que 12/20 à Fillon en matière de libéralisme. Il est vrai qu’avec cette note il arrivait quand même en deuxième position derrière NKM. Ce qui en dit long sur le libéralisme de nos hommes politiques, droite comprise…

Mathieu Mucherie : En déclarant qu’il ne considère pas « le libre-échange comme l’alpha et l’oméga de la pensée économique », Fillon joue un jeu dangereux. Cela s’accompagne comme toujours de la petite musique traditionnelle selon laquelle « les USA, eux, savent défendre leurs intérêts », musique idiote dans la mesure où :

a) ce n’est pas parce que les autres se tirent une balle dans le pied qu’il faut impérativement en faire autant,
b) on fait mine ainsi de penser que nous avons les marges de manœuvre d’un pays cinq fois plus peuplé, six fois plus riche et cinquante fois plus libre monétairement,
c) ce sont souvent les mêmes qui dénoncent le néoprotectionnisme américain et qui soulignent dans le même temps leur activisme dans les instances libre-échangistes globales et/ou l’amplitude de leurs déficits commerciaux ; comprenne qui pourra.

En vérité, le meilleur test consiste à demander : êtes-vous favorable, partout et tout le temps, au désarmement douanier le plus total et le plus unilatéral ? un non-économiste cherchera toujours à négocier sur ce point, à tergiverser, à éluder ou à inventer des contre-exemples historiques ou théoriques, tous foireux (dans le best of, l’argument des droits de douane américains élevés au XIXe siècle, qui se garde bien de préciser où en étaient la fiscalité et la réglementation aux USA à l’époque, sans parler de la mobilité des hommes et des capitaux). Toujours, bien entendu, pour protéger les plus démunis, alors que ce sont les rentiers qui demandent et qui obtiennent des protections. Mais Fillon, comme Hollande ou Merkel, sait surfer sur ce qui marche et éviter les combats impopulaires, et il se trouve que le TAFTA n’est pas en odeur de sainteté par les temps qui courent. Pas sûr qu’il ait lu Bastiat, comme Ronald Reagan. Pas sûr par conséquent qu’il reste très « libéral » entre 2017 et 2022 si les vents de l’opinion deviennent (comme c’est probable) trop défavorables à cette orientation, a fortiori s’il veut rassembler sa famille puis donner quelques gages à la gauche après une victoire au 2e tour contre Le Pen.

Voir aussi:

Primaire
Qui veut la peau d’«Ali Juppé» ?
Laure Equy et Dominique Albertini

Libération

22 novembre 2016

Cible d’une campagne grotesque mais efficace sur sa supposée complaisance envers l’islam politique, le challenger de Fillon à la primaire de droite s’est résolu à contre-attaquer.

«Cette histoire de mosquée, ça le met dans une colère noire», soufflent ses conseillers depuis le début de la campagne. Depuis des mois, Alain Juppé a les sites et twittos d’extrême droite aux basques. Un harcèlement viral parti de sa ville de Bordeaux et qui a pris, avec la primaire, une dimension nationale. S’il a longtemps laissé courir, le candidat dénonce désormais avec force une «campagne de caniveau», «ignominieuse», «des attaques franchement dégueulasses». C’est que – son équipe et lui en sont convaincus – ces caricatures et intox relayées sur les réseaux sociaux et via des chaînes de mails ont fait dimanche de sérieux dégâts dans les urnes.

Quelle forme prend la cabale ?
A l’origine de cette campagne de diffamation, l’extrême droite et une partie de la droite dite «classique» – mais désormais alignée sur le FN en matière identitaire. Sur Internet, des représentants de ces milieux ne désignent plus le maire de Bordeaux que par le surnom d’«Ali Juppé», l’accusant de compromissions avec les franges les plus rétrogrades de l’islam.

Parce qu’il permet l’anonymat et la circulation virale de ces attaques, Internet est devenu le terrain privilégié de ce procès en islamophilie. C’est la «fachosphère» qui est à l’œuvre : un ensemble confus et mouvant de blogueurs, d’utilisateurs des réseaux sociaux ou de commentateurs des sites d’information, dont l’islamophobie est l’un des combats fédérateurs. Au sein de cette nébuleuse décentralisée, on partage avec enthousiasme les rumeurs les plus fantaisistes, mais aussi les productions les plus «réussies», notamment les images. Telle cette caricature d’un Juppé léchant la babouche de Tariq Ramadan, ou ce photomontage le représentant barbu et vêtu d’un kamis musulman.

De manière moins visible, ces attaques ont aussi atterri dans les boîtes mails de nombreux électeurs, via des «chaînes de messages» que chaque récepteur est invité à partager avec ses contacts. «Il s’agit d’un procédé de diffusion dont l’audience n’est pas quantifiable, contrairement aux réseaux sociaux, explique Jonathan Chibois, chercheur en anthropologie politique. C’est très souterrain. Ces chaînes de mails fonctionnent toutefois très bien chez ceux qui n’utilisent pas Twitter ou Facebook, notamment les personnes âgées. Quand on vit à la campagne, on s’en aperçoit bien. Même lorsque ces récits ne sont pas pris au sérieux, ils installent une ambiance, en jouant sur l’adage populaire « il n’y a pas de fumée sans feu ».»

Cette campagne a même trouvé un relais chez Jean-Frédéric Poisson, candidat à la primaire, qui a repris le couplet, évoquant une proximité entre Juppé et «des organisations directement liées aux Frères musulmans». Idem pour l’hebdo très droitier Valeurs actuelles, qui a décrit un Juppé «aux petits soins avec les Frères musulmans».

D’où viennent ces accusations ?
C’est un projet de «centre culturel et cultuel musulman», lancé au milieu des années 2000 par la Fédération musulmane de la Gironde (FMG), qui a enflammé la fachosphère. Censé répondre aux besoins des musulmans locaux, le bâtiment doit réunir une salle de prière, une bibliothèque, un restaurant ou encore une salle d’exposition. Le maire de Bordeaux n’est pas opposé au projet : «Nous sommes en discussion avec la communauté musulmane, indique-t-il en 2008. Nous avons d’excellentes relations avec ses principaux leaders. J’ai déjà indiqué qu’un terrain leur serait proposé.»

Cette ouverture vaut à Juppé d’être ciblé par l’extrême droite. En 2009, des militants du mouvement Génération identitaire occupent le toit d’un parking bordelais et y suspendent une banderole proclamant : «Ce maire commence à poser un vrai problème». Le Front national local ne tarde pas à embrayer, accusant faussement la municipalité de vouloir financer la construction de la mosquée. Et un site à la dénomination apparemment neutre, «Infos Bordeaux» – en réalité relais d’opinion pour l’extrême droite – agite depuis des années le spectre d’une «mosquée-cathédrale».

Aujourd’hui, pourtant, la «grande mosquée de Bordeaux» n’est pas sortie de terre. Selon la première adjointe, Virginie Calmels, Alain Juppé aurait exigé que le projet ne reçoive pas de financement étranger et aucun permis de construire n’a été déposé.

L’offensive contre l’édile bordelais s’était intensifiée pendant la campagne municipale de 2014 puis aux dernières régionales contre Virginie Calmels. Un tract du FN, titré «Non au centre islamique à Bordeaux», accusait la candidate (LR) pour la région Nouvelle Aquitaine et Alain Juppé de préparer «une islamisation de Bordeaux» et de vouloir financer le projet «d’un coût de 22 millions d’euros en grande partie avec l’argent des contribuables». Calmels a porté plainte pour diffamation, sans succès.

Ce n’est pas tout : c’est aussi sur ses liens avec l’imam bordelais Tareq Oubrou qu’Alain Juppé est attaqué par l’extrême droite. Probable recteur du futur lieu de culte, si celui-ci existe un jour, Obrou est membre de l’Union des organisations islamiques de France (l’UOIF), vitrine française des Frères musulmans. L’homme entretient de cordiales relations avec le maire de Bordeaux. Il n’en fallait pas plus pour que ce dernier soit accusé de connivence avec le fondamentalisme musulman – voire d’antisémitisme. «Tareq Oubrou serait-il le Premier ministre d’Ali Juppé ?» questionnait en juillet le site xénophobe et anti-islam Riposte laïque, accusant l’imam de vouloir «imposer la charia en Europe et en France». Tareq Obrou a par le passé défendu une stricte orthodoxie religieuse. Mais il promeut aujourd’hui une conception libérale de l’islam, affirmant par exemple qu’«une musulmane qui ne se couvre pas les cheveux est aussi musulmane que celle qui se couvre», ou laissant femmes et hommes prier ensemble dans sa mosquée. Peu importe pour les détracteurs de l’imam (et du maire de Bordeaux), convaincus que ce dernier dissimulerait ses vraies convictions.

Quel impact sur la campagne ?
Alors que l’ex-Premier ministre a fait le pari d’assumer son objectif de «l’identité heureuse», cette offensive visant à le faire passer pour un faible à l’égard des islamistes a pu troubler certains électeurs, «des esprits mal informés», dixit Juppé. Qu’importe si le candidat prône l’expulsion des imams radicaux ou l’obligation du prêche en français, la puissance de la charge rend parfois inaudible les déclarations du candidat et les éléments de programme.

«Cela a été un bruit de fond qui a parasité toute la campagne», soupire Aurore Bergé, responsable de la campagne numérique de Juppé, qui reconnaît la difficulté de mettre sur pied une riposte : «C’est très compliqué d’établir la bonne stratégie. On peut tenter d’opposer des arguments mais clairement, ces attaques ne parlent pas à la rationalité des gens.» Poursuivre pour diffamation ? Selon elle, beaucoup de ces comptes Twitter sont hébergés à l’étranger. Et n’est-ce pas risquer d’amplifier l’écho de leurs allégations ? Interpellés régulièrement, Juppé et son entourage ont dénoncé cette «propagande sur les réseaux sociaux», notamment au JT de TF1 en juin, mais ont préféré ne pas faire mousser leurs détracteurs. «On a considéré qu’il valait mieux traiter par le mépris car le truc est tellement invraisemblable», explique un membre de son équipe. Après avoir subi le même dénigrement en 2014, «il a été élu au premier tour à 61 %. Juppé s’est dit que les Bordelais savaient que tout cela était complètement diffamatoire, rappelle sa première adjointe, Virginie Calmels. Mais le problème est qu’on a changé d’échelle.» Pour Aurore Bergé, il faudra, si Juppé devient dimanche le candidat de la droite à la présidentielle, «trouver des modes d’action pour déconstruire la parole d’extrême droite, et pas seulement des gentils Tumblr. Même si on doit sourcer, être rigoureux sur les contenus qu’on produit».

Depuis quelques jours, et particulièrement après le premier tour, Juppé hausse le ton. Dans l’Express, il va jusqu’à souligner son pedigree catholique : «Je suis baptisé, je m’appelle Alain Marie, je n’ai pas changé de religion.» Lundi sur France 2, il concédait que «la bonne foi est souvent impuissante contre la calomnie, surtout quand elle est anonyme». Mais il s’en prend aussi à ses concurrents, remarquant mardi matin sur Europe 1 qu’aucun «n’a condamné» cette campagne contre lui. Son équipe observe d’ailleurs que des militants sarkozystes ou fillonistes n’ont pas manqué de faire tourner ces intox sur les réseaux sociaux.

Et ces attaques ne devraient pas disparaître d’ici à dimanche. «Pour contrer le vote musulman, votons Fillon en masse !» exhorte le site Riposte laïque, où l’on présente Juppé comme «le plus islamo-collabo, le plus francophobe, le plus immigrationniste» des candidats de la primaire. Jusqu’alors épargné, Fillon, désormais favori, devrait toutefois être ciblé à son tour. Depuis lundi, remontent sur Twitter des photos de lui inaugurant en 2010 la mosquée d’Argenteuil (Val-d’Oise). Un autre site islamophobe entend épingler «ces membres de l’équipe Fillon qui collaborent avec des mosquées en mairie».

Voir également:

Juppé «observe» des «soutiens d’extrême droite» pour Fillon
Libération/AFP

22 novembre 2016

Alain Juppé a observé mardi que «depuis quelques jours les soutiens d’extrême droite arrivent en force» en faveur de François Fillon, son adversaire au second tour de la primaire de la droite.

Evoquant lors d’un meeting à Toulouse «la reconstitution de l’équipe 2007-2012», M. Juppé a dit : «J’observe que depuis quelques jours d’ailleurs les soutiens de l’extrême droite arrivent en force pour cette équipe».

Interrogée, son équipe a cité les noms de Jacques Bompard et de Carl Lang, ancien secrétaire général du FN et président du Parti de la France, qui a souhaité dimanche «confirmer au deuxième tour le rejet d’Alain Juppé». Mais M. Lang a précisé à l’AFP qu’il n’entendait pas voter dimanche.

Une autre groupe d’extrême droite, Riposte laïque, a lancé un appel contre le maire de Bordeaux mardi: «pour contrer le vote musulman, votons Fillon en masse!».

Alain Juppé a lancé pour sa part: «Moi je suis soutenu par une grande partie de LR, par l’UDI, le MoDem, le rassemblement qui nous a toujours permis de gagner».

«François Fillon a reçu le soutien de Nicolas Sarkozy, ce qui reconstitue l’équipe de 2007-2012», a-t-il ajouté.

«Il paraît que François Fillon a été choqué que je lui demande de clarifier sa position sur l’IVG – c’était quand même nécessaire puisqu’il y a quelque temps il écrivait dans un livre que c’était un droit fondamental de la femme, avant de changer d’avis puis de donner un sentiment personnel et de dire qu’il ne changerait rien à la législation actuelle».

«Et je vous le dis, je ne renoncerai pas à poser d’autres questions», a-t-il lancé. «L’IVG est un droit fondamental, durement acquis par les femmes», a-t-il ajouté.

François Fillon s’est indigné mardi que son concurrent lui demande de «clarifier» sa position.

Alain Juppé s’est par ailleurs ému face aux «attaques personnelles ignominieuses» émanant des réseaux sociaux le baptisant «Ali Juppé, grand mufti de Bordeaux» et aux calomnies sur le «salafisme et l’antisémitisme». Le maire de Bordeaux s’était déjà insurgé à plusieurs reprises contre ces calommnies.

«Ca a fait des dégâts, j’ai des témoignages précis dans des queues de personnes qui parfois ont changé leur vote parce qu’ils ont été impressionnés par cette campagne dégueulasse!», s’est-il emporté. «J’aurais aimé que certains de mes compétiteurs condamnent cette campagne ignominieuse», a-t-il lancé.

Alain Juppé, arrivé près de 16 points derrière François Fillon au premier tour alors qu’il était le favori du scrutin, a de nouveau pointé «la brutalité» du programme «mal étudié» qui n’a «pas de sens» de son adversaire. «On ne supprimera pas 500.000 fonctionnaires en 5 ans», a-t-il dit. «Cela ne se fera pas», a-t-il assuré, opposant au contraire la «crédibilité» de son programme.

«J’ai dans mon conseil municipal un représentant de +Sens Commun+ (mouvement hostile au mariage pour tous qui soutient Fillon), qui appartient à ma majorité, parce que je l’ai embarqué dans ma liste – voyez que je suis ouvert d’esprit- eh bien chaque fois qu’il y a une subvention — pas souvent, de temps en temps — qui va à une association d’homosexuels eh bien il refuse de voter», a-t-il expliqué. «Ce n’est pas ma conception de la société», a-t-il déclaré.

Jean-François Copé, qui a rallié le maire de Bordeaux, a loué son «sang froid» ainsi que son «courage». Nathalie Kosciusko-Morizet avait également fait le déplacement, ralliée «pas par calcul» mais «pas par hasard». «Je me suis battue et je continuerai à le faire contre les conservatismes de droite et de gauche et aujourd’hui, c’est toi, Alain, qui portes la tête de ce combat», a-t-elle lancé.

Voir encore:

Sacristie

Laurent Joffrin
Libération
21 novembre 2016 
Édito

Journée des dupes. Beaucoup d’électeurs ont voulu écarter un ancien président à leurs yeux trop à droite. Impuissants devant la mobilisation de la droite profonde, ils héritent d’un candidat encore plus réac. C’est ainsi que le Schtroumpf grognon du conservatisme se retrouve en impétrant probable. «Avec Carla, c’est du sérieux», disait le premier. Avec Fillon, c’est du lugubre. Bonjour tristesse… La droitisation de la droite a trouvé son chevalier à la triste figure. C’est vrai en matière économique et sociale, tant François Fillon en rajoute dans la rupture libérale, décidé à démolir une bonne part de l’héritage de la Libération et du Conseil national de la Résistance. Etrange apostasie pour cet ancien gaulliste social, émule de Philippe Séguin, qui se pose désormais en homme de fer de la révolution conservatrice à la française. Aligner la France sur l’orthodoxie du laissez-faire : le bon Philippe doit se retourner dans sa tombe. On comprend le rôle tenu par les intellectuels du déclin qui occupent depuis deux décennies les studios pour vouer aux gémonies la «pensée unique» sociale-démocrate et le «droit-de-l’hommisme» candide : ouvrir la voie au meilleur économiste de la Sarthe, émule de Milton Friedman et de Vladimir Poutine. Nous avions l’Etat-providence ; nous aurons la providence sans l’Etat. C’est encore plus net dans le domaine sociétal, où ce chrétien enraciné a passé une alliance avec les illuminés de la «manif pour tous». Il y a désormais en France un catholicisme politique, activiste et agressif, qui fait pendant à l’islam politique. Le révérend père Fillon s’en fait le prêcheur mélancolique. D’ici à ce qu’il devienne une sorte de Tariq Ramadan des sacristies, il n’y a qu’un pas. Avant de retourner à leurs querelles de boutique rose ou rouge, les progressistes doivent y réfléchir à deux fois. Sinon, la messe est dite.

Voir de plus:

Alain Juppé: « La vision de François Fillon me paraît tournée vers le passé »
Presidentielle 2017
Propos recueillis par Corinne Lhaïk

Libération

22/11/2016

Alain Juppé revient dans une longue interview à L’Express sur son programme et sa vision de la France alors qu’il est confronté à François Fillon, très en avance dans les sondages, pour le second tour de la primaire à droite.
Vous décrivez une différence de degré avec vous, pas de nature…

Il y a une différence de nature quand, moi, je veux une France moderne, ouverte sur l’avenir. Sa vision me paraît beaucoup plus traditionaliste et tournée vers le passé. Sur les questions sociales, sur l’évolution des moeurs, la prise en compte de deux enjeux fondamentaux – l’égalité entre les femmes et les hommes ou la conception d’une nouvelle croissance pour sauver la planète du réchauffement climatique -, il s’est peu exprimé.

Vos positions sur des sujets de société peuvent susciter l’incompréhension de certains électeurs de droite. Que leur dites-vous?

Je leur ai toujours dit que je respectais leurs convictions. Je suis moi-même catholique, contrairement à l’ignominieuse campagne développée par je ne sais qui et qui me présente comme converti à l’islam et complaisant vis-à-vis de l’islamisme. Cette campagne de caniveau a fait des dégâts sur certains esprits mal informés. Je suis catholique, je suis baptisé, je m’appelle Alain Marie, je n’ai pas changé de religion et je comprends parfaitement le point de vue de mes coreligionnaires catholiques. Certains sont plus intégristes, moi, je me reconnais davantage dans la vision du pape François.

Voir de même:

La victoire de François Fillon au premier tour de la primaire de la droite, dimanche, a surpris jusqu’à l’Elysée, où le président n’avait pas vu venir la défaite de Nicolas Sarkozy.

Europe 1

21 novembre 2016

Un résultat sans appel qui a surpris tout le monde. Personne n’avait imaginé une telle avance pour François Fillon au premier tour de la primaire de la droite, dimanche soir. Encore moins le président de la République. François Hollande n’avait pas non plus vu venir la défaite de Nicolas Sarkozy. Dans cette soirée électorale, le chef de l’Etat a perdu son ennemi préféré et il n’a surtout plus grand-chose à quoi se raccrocher. Explications.

Hollande ne l’avait pas vu venir. Chez les proches du président, c’est l’abattement en fin de soirée. « Regardez Fillon, glisse l’un de ses proches, il était dans les choux à la rentrée. Ça prouve que rien ne se passe jamais comme prévu ». L’analyse peut paraître ironique quand on sait que le président ne prédisait pas du tout ce résultat il y a encore quelques mois. « Fillon n’a aucune chance », prophétisait-il à Gérard Davet et Fabrice Lhomme, dans le fameux livre d’entretiens Un président ne devrait pas dire ça (éditions Stock).

Fillon, le plus réactionnaire pour Hollande. Dimanche soir, devant sa télévision, dans ses appartements privés de l’Elysée, le chef de l’Etat a échangé frénétiquement par SMS avec ses conseillers, ses amis. Le message est désormais clair : François Fillon est le plus libéral, le plus réactionnaire, selon François Hollande. Face à cet adversaire, il peut encore incarner la défense du modèle social.

Personne ne veut d’un remake de 2012. Mais une partie de la gauche fait déjà une toute autre lecture du scrutin, persuadée que le résultat de dimanche montre surtout une chose : personne ne veut d’un remake de 2012. Un député proche de Manuel Valls sort déjà les crocs : « Hollande n’aura pas son match retour avec Sarkozy, c’est un signe de plus qu’il faut laisser la place ».

Voir aussi:

Hollande pense que « le masque de Juppé va tomber »

En petit comité, le chef de l’État explique que la popularité d’Alain Juppé explosera à la lumière de la primaire, quand « le masque va tomber ».

Emmanuel Berretta

Le Point
09/03/2016

Livres: Les sionistes ont même inventé l’école ! (2,000 years of schooling and they put you on the day shift: History confirms De Gaulle’s « elite, domineering people » qualification of the Jewish people)

16 novembre, 2016
Un livre aux éditions Albin Michel
Le salut vient des Juifs. Jésus (Jean 4:22)
 Et ces commandements, que je te donne aujourd’hui, seront dans ton coeur. Tu les inculqueras à tes enfants. Deutéronome 6: 6-7
Fais de l’étude de la Torah ta principale occupation. ShammaÏ (10 avant JC)
On pouvait se demander, en effet, et on se demandait même chez beaucoup de Juifs, si l’implantation de cette communauté sur des terres qui avaient été acquises dans des conditions plus ou moins justifiables et au milieu des peuples arabes qui lui étaient foncièrement hostiles, n’allait pas entraîner d’incessants, d’interminables, frictions et conflits. Certains même redoutaient que les Juifs, jusqu’alors dispersés, mais qui étaient restés ce qu’ils avaient été de tous temps, c’est-à-dire un peuple d’élite, sûr de lui-même et dominateur, n’en viennent, une fois rassemblés dans le site de leur ancienne grandeur, à changer en ambition ardente et conquérante les souhaits très émouvants qu’ils formaient depuis dix-neuf siècles. De Gaulle (conférence de presse du 27 novembre 1967)
Twenty years of schoolin’ And they put you on the day shift. Bob Dylan
You who build these altars now to sacrifice these children, you must not do it anymore. Leonard Cohen
And what can I tell you my brother, my killer What can I possibly say? I guess that I miss you, I guess I forgive you I’m glad you stood in my way.If you ever come by here, for Jane or for me Well your enemy is sleeping, and his woman is free.  Yes, and thanks, for the trouble you took from her eyes I thought it was there for good so I never tried. Leonard Cohen
The problem with that song is that I’ve forgotten the actual triangle. Whether it was my own – of course, I always felt that there was an invisible male seducing the woman I was with, now whether this one was incarnate or merely imaginary I don’t remember, I’ve always had the sense that either I’ve been that figure in relation to another couple or there’d been a figure like that in relation to my marriage. I don’t quite remember but I did have this feeling that there was always a third party, sometimes me, sometimes another man, sometimes another woman. It was a song I’ve never been satisfied with. It’s not that I’ve resisted an impressionistic approach to songwriting, but I’ve never felt that this one, that I really nailed the lyric. I’m ready to concede something to the mystery, but secretly I’ve always felt that there was something about the song that was unclear. So I’ve been very happy with some of the imagery, but a lot of the imagery. Leonard Cohen
Now I’ve heard there was a secret chord that David played, and it pleased the Lord. Leonard Cohen
Je suis juif… un Juif n’a-t-il pas des yeux ? Un Juif n’a-t-il pas des mains, des organes, des proportions, des sens, des émotions, des passions ? N’est-il pas nourri de même nourriture, blessé des mêmes armes, sujet aux mêmes maladies, guéri par les mêmes moyens, réchauffé et refroidi par le même été, le même hiver, comme un chrétien ? Si vous nous piquez, ne saignons-nous pas ? Si vous nous chatouillez, ne rions-nous pas ? Si vous nous empoisonnez, ne mourons-nous pas ? Shakespeare (Le Marchand de Venise)
Combattez ceux qui rejettent Allah et le jugement dernier et qui ne respectent pas Ses interdits ni ceux de Son messager, et qui ne suivent pas la vraie Religion quand le Livre leur a été apporté, (Combattez-les) jusqu’à ce qu’ils payent tribut de leurs mains et se considèrent infériorisés.Coran 9:29
Des théologiens absurdes défendent la haine des Juifs… Quel Juif pourrait consentir d’entrer dans nos rangs quand il voit la cruauté et l’hostilité que nous manifestons à leur égard et que dans notre comportement envers eux nous ressemblons moins à des chrétiens qu’à des bêtes ? Luther  (1519).
Nous ne devons pas […] traiter les Juifs aussi méchamment, car il y a de futurs chrétiens parmi eux. Luther
Si les apôtres, qui aussi étaient juifs, s’étaient comportés avec nous, Gentils, comme nous Gentils nous nous comportons avec les Juifs, il n’y aurait eu aucun chrétien parmi les Gentils… Quand nous sommes enclins à nous vanter de notre situation de chrétiens, nous devons nous souvenir que nous ne sommes que des Gentils, alors que les Juifs sont de la lignée du Christ. Nous sommes des étrangers et de la famille par alliance; ils sont de la famille par le sang, des cousins et des frères de notre Seigneur. En conséquence, si on doit se vanter de la chair et du sang, les Juifs sont actuellement plus près du Christ que nous-mêmes… Si nous voulons réellement les aider, nous devons être guidés dans notre approche vers eux non par la loi papale, mais par la loi de l’amour chrétien. Nous devons les recevoir cordialement et leur permettre de commercer et de travailler avec nous, de façon qu’ils aient l’occasion et l’opportunité de s’associer à nous, d’apprendre notre enseignement chrétien et d’être témoins de notre vie chrétienne. Si certains d’entre eux se comportent de façon entêtée, où est le problème? Après tout, nous-mêmes, nous ne sommes pas tous de bons chrétiens. Luther (Que Jésus Christ est né Juif, 1523)
Les Juifs sont notre malheur (…) .Les Juifs sont un peuple de débauche, et leur synagogue n’est qu’une putain incorrigible. On ne doit montrer à leur égard aucune pitié, ni aucune bonté. Nous sommes fautifs de ne pas les tuer! Luther
Juifs. Faire un article contre cette race qui envenime tout, en se fourrant partout, sans jamais se fondre avec aucun peuple. Demander son expulsion de France, à l’exception des individus mariés avec des Françaises ; abolir les synagogues, ne les admettre à aucun emploi, poursuivre enfin l’abolition de ce culte. Ce n’est pas pour rien que les chrétiens les ont appelés déicides. Le juif est l’ennemi du genre humain. Il faut renvoyer cette race en Asie, ou l’exterminer. Pierre-Joseph Proudhon (1849)
Observons le Juif de tous les jours, le Juif ordinaire et non celui du sabbat. Ne cherchons point le mystère du Juif dans sa religion, mais le mystère de sa religion dans le Juif réel. Quelle est donc la base mondaine du judaïsme ? C’est le besoin pratique, l’égoïsme. Quel est le culte mondain du Juif ? C’est le trafic. Quelle est la divinité mondaine du Juif ? C’est l’argent. Karl Marx
L’argent est le dieu jaloux d’Israël devant qui nul autre Dieu ne doit subsister.Karl Marx
Dans les villes, ce qui exaspère le gros de la population française contre les Juifs, c’est que, par l’usure, par l’infatigable activité commerciale et par l’abus des influences politiques, ils accaparent peu à peu la fortune, le commerce, les emplois lucratifs, les fonctions administratives, la puissance publique . […] En France, l’influence politique des Juifs est énorme mais elle est, si je puis dire, indirecte. Elle ne s’exerce pas par la puissance du nombre, mais par la puissance de l’argent. Ils tiennent une grande partie de de la presse, les grandes institutions financières, et, quand ils n’ont pu agir sur les électeurs, ils agissent sur les élus. Ici, ils ont, en plus d’un point, la double force de l’argent et du nombre. Jean Jaurès (La question juive en Algérie, Dépêche de Toulouse, 1er mai 1895)
Nous savons bien que la race juive, concentrée, passionnée, subtile, toujours dévorée par une sorte de fièvre du gain quand ce n’est pas par la force du prophétisme, nous savons bien qu’elle manie avec une particulière habileté le mécanisme capitaliste, mécanisme de rapine, de mensonge, de corset, d’extorsion. Jean Jaurès (Discours au Tivoli, 1898)
Parmi eux, nous pouvons compter les grands guerriers de ce monde, qui bien qu’incompris par le présent, sont néanmoins préparés à combattre pour leurs idées et leurs idéaux jusqu’à la fin. Ce sont des hommes qui un jour seront plus près du cœur du peuple, il semble même comme si chaque individu ressent le devoir de compenser dans le passé pour les péchés que le présent a commis à l’égard des grands. Leur vie et leurs œuvres sont suivies avec une gratitude et une émotion admiratives, et plus particulièrement dans les jours de ténèbres, ils ont le pouvoir de relever les cœurs cassés et les âmes désespérées. Parmi eux se trouvent non seulement les véritables grands hommes d’État, mais aussi tous les autres grands réformateurs. À côté de Frédéric le Grand, se tient Martin Luther ainsi que Richard Wagner. Hitler (« Mein Kampf », 1925)
Le 10 novembre 1938, le jour anniversaire de la naissance de Luther, les synagogues brûlent en Allemagne. Martin Sasse (évêque protestant de Thuringe)
Avec ses actes et son attitude spirituelle, il a commencé le combat que nous allons continuer maintenant; avec Luther, la révolution du sang germanique et le sentiment contre les éléments étrangers au Peuple ont commencé. Nous allons continuer et terminer son protestantisme; le nationalisme doit faire de l’image de Luther, un combattant allemand, un exemple vivant « au-dessus des barrières des confessions » pour tous les camarades de sang germanique. Hans Hinkel (responsable du magazine de la Ligue de Luther Deutsche Kultur-Wacht, et de la section de Berlin de la Kampfbund, discours de réception à la tête de la Section Juive et du département des films de la Chambre de la Culture et du ministère de la Propagande de Goebbels)
Là, vous avez déjà l’ensemble du programme nazi. Karl Jaspers
Tout ce qui se passe dans le monde aujourd’hui est la faute des sionistes. Les Juifs Américains sont derrière la crise économique mondiale qui a aussi frappé la Grèce.Mikis Theodorakis (2011)
Les enfants de Trump doivent reprendre l’entreprise avec le conflit d’intérêt, ils pourront vendre des gratte-ciels au gouvernement israélien. Des immeubles luxueux à construire dans les territoires occupés, que le Président des États-Unis les aidera à occuper et il leur enverra des Mexicains pour nettoyer les chiottes. Charline Vanhoenacker
C’était une cité fortement convoitée par les ennemis de la foi et c’est pourquoi, par une sorte de syndrome mimétique, elle devint chère également au cœur des Musulmans.Emmanuel Sivan
Il a réinventé des figures très anciennes dans le rock : celle du grand prêtre juif, sa fonction sacerdotale, ainsi que celle du poète mystique et du troubadour – bref, tous les registres de la vie du cœur… Son rock  est précis tant dans les textes que les sons, avec sa voix monocorde qui entre en résonance avec de petites valses obscures et des chœurs angéliques. Vingt ans après, il transforme le crooner en figure spirituelle et toujours nous reconnecte à ce que nous avons de plus profond : le cœur…Il a un talent naturel pour la gravité, il utilise cette disposition fondamentale (physique par sa voix grave, culturelle par son nom et psychologique (ses tendances à tutoyer les abîmes de la dépression). Il voit les corps tomber dans un monde soumis aux lois de la gravité, il est dans le jeu avec la gravité et nous donne des armes spirituelles avec son pouvoir de changer une chose en son contraire, une charge lourde en légèreté. Ce visionnaire de la gravité sait utiliser le pessimisme pour nous rendre plus vivants et plus joyeux..Christophe Lebold
Chez Dylan, il y a profusion du langage alors qu’il faut cinq ans de réécriture à Cohen pour enlever tout ce qui n’est pas nécessaire…(…) Avec Songs of Léonard Cohen (1967), I am your man (1988) et Ten new songs (2001), on a les trois versions de Cohen : le troubadour, le crooner et le maitre zen. Et on a ses trois formes de gravité : celle du poète, noire et désespérée, puis celle, ironique et sismique portée par cette voix grave qui fait trembler le monde et, enfin, à partir de 2000, cette gravité aérienne d’un maître zen angélique qui nous instruit sur notre lumière cachée. Avec ces trois albums, on peut convertir tout le monde à Léonard Cohen… [Ma chanson préférée ?] serait Everybody knows (1988) qui sonne comme une lamentation de Jérémie sur l’état du monde, avec l’ironie d’un crooner postmoderne (…) La vie du perfectionniste Leonard capable de réécrire ses chansons vingt ans après me montre à quel point l’écriture est un travail de chiffonnier… Dans nos vies sursaturées de prétendues informations, de bavardages incessants, de gadgets électroniques et de surconsommation où tout est organisé pour détruire nos vies intérieures, il est important de retrouver un sens de la puissance lumineuse du verbe, car il peut illuminer nos vies de façon concise : ce n’est plus de l’érudition gratuite, ça nous rend plus vivants, plus affûtés et plus précis. Rien de tel pour cela que la compagnie d’un homme aussi drôle et profond que Leonard pour s’affûter : son pessimisme est lumineux. Il nous fait du bien en utilisant des chansons douces comme des armes spirituelles et il nous reconnecte directement par le verbe et le sens mélodique, sur des airs de valses obsédantes, à nos cœurs et à tout ce qui est mystérieux (l’amour ou son absence, l’abîme ou Dieu). Fréquenter ce contrebandier de lumière est quelque chose de merveilleux, il nous apprend aussi à transformer quelque chose en son contraire, c’est aussi une activité à notre portée… (…) C’est un poète de la qualité qui opérait sur un médium de masse. Dans les sixties, le rock a cherché des poètes pour se légitimer : il y avait lui, Dylan et les Beatles. Les gens n’en sont pas revenus que ce métaphysicien du cœur brisé leur parle de leur condition d’être en chute libre– et  leur propose d’entendre une miséricorde angélique, un appel à l’élévation…C’est sur cette brisure du cœur que l’on peut fonder une vraie fraternité… Son premier album n’a pas pris une ride en quarante-sept ans : déjà minimaliste, il est tranchant et aussi indémodable qu’une calligraphie zen…Leonard est un éveillé qui suspend son départ pour nous éveiller à ce que nous avons d’essentiel.  (…) Je pense à ce koan zen : un âne regarde un puits jusqu’à ce que le puits regarde l’âne… Leonard peut faire ça, son œuvre a cette force de transformation absolue. Un maître, c’est quelqu’un qui vous libère…Christophe Lebold
Plus que la tradition de la musique américaine, c’est celle des troubadours et trouvères, ces poètes-conteurs-chanteurs du Moyen-Âge que Bob Dylan a d’abord incarné. Né dans le Minnesota en 1941 à deux pas de la route 61 qui inspirera l’un de ses albums les plus emblématiques « Highway 61 revisited », celui qui est d’abord Robert Zimmerman  pour l’état-civil et Shabbtaï à sa circoncision, vient d’une famille juive d’Odessa qui a fui les pogroms du début du XXè siècle. La petite communauté juive locale est dit-on, très unie par les épreuves vécues en Europe de l’Est. Le signe de l’errance, de la fuite. Il en est le porteur, il l’assume à la première occasion en filant à New York à la première occasion, abandonnant ses études à l’université dès la première année. Là-bas, à Greenwich Village, il n’est pas le plus doué de tous les folkeux qui écument le quartier, mais il est le plus assidu. « Avec le temps, la goutte fend les rocs les plus résistants » dit le Talmud. Pour ce faire, il fréquente de longues heures les bibliothèques afin de dénicher les chansons folkloriques les plus anciennes. Jonathan Aleksandrowicz
Leonard Cohen a grandi au sein d’une famille juive d’ascendance polonaise. Son grand-père était rabbin et son père, décédé alors qu’il n’a que 9 ans, a été le créateur du journal The Jewish Times. « Monsieur Cohen est un juif observant qui respecte le shabbat même lorsqu’il est en tournée », écrit le New York Times en 2009. Parallèlement à sa judéité, Leonard Cohen se retire de la vie publique durant près de cinq ans (1994-1999) dans un monastère bouddhiste près de Los Angeles, en plein désert californien. Certains se demandent alors comment il peut être à la fois juif pratiquant et bouddhiste. « Pour commencer, dans la tradition du Zen que j’ai pratiquée, il n’y a pas de service de prière et il n’y a pas d’affirmation de déité. Donc, théologiquement, il n’y a pas d’opposition aux croyances juives », racontera l’artiste. (…) Pour sa carrière multiforme, Leonard Cohen se voit décerner de nombreuses récompenses, dont celle en 2003 de compagnon de l’Ordre du Canada, de membre du Panthéon des auteurs et compositeurs canadiens en 2006, membre du Rock and Roll Hall of Fame en 2008. Parce que Leonard Cohen est un homme « à part » dans la chanson, allant de la musique folk à la pop en passant par le blues et l’électro, il n’a eu de cesse d’inspirer de nombreux artistes qui ont aussi repris, et parfois traduit, ses propres chansons. Plus de 1 500 titres du poète chanteur ont été repris. Il en va ainsi de dizaines d’artistes de renommée mondiale, dont Nina Simone, Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Nick Cave, Peter Gabriel, Alain Bashung, Graeme Allwright, Suzanne Vega, sans oublier la version bouleversante d’ « Hallelujah » par Jeff Buckley. Leonard Cohen a de son côté très rarement repris des titres dont il n’était pas l’auteur. Parmi eux, sa réinterprétation de « La complainte du partisan » (dont la musique est signée Anna Marly, coautrice avec Maurice Druon et Joseph Kessel du « Chant des partisans »). « The Partisan », sera aussi repris à son tour par Noir Désir. RFI
Le personnage biblique de David, dont le nom en hébreu signifie « bien-aimé », pourrait représenter à cet égard le « modèle » de Leonard. La tradition attribue à ce roi poète et musicien tout l’ensemble du livre des Psaumes. Mais le texte biblique nous fait connaître aussi le nom d’un certain nombre de femmes de ce grand polygame : Ahinoam, Abigayil, Mikal, Égla, Avital, Bethsabée, Abishag… (…) De fait, les compositions de Cohen regorgent d’allusions scripturaires, qui témoignent d’une fréquentation assidue du Livre saint : on y retrouve bien des personnages (Adam, Samson, David ou Isaac), des épisodes (notamment ceux du Déluge ou de la sortie d’Égypte), des réminiscences de tel ou tel prophète voire, justement, de tel ou tel psaume. Ainsi, la chanson By the Rivers Dark (album Ten New Songs) propose une relecture hardie du ps.136-137 : « Vers les sombres fleuves j’allais, errant / j’ai passé ma vie à Babylone / et j’ai oublié mon saint cantique / je n’avais pas de force à Babylone ». Mais il y a plus : sans jamais s’y attarder, Cohen distille à l’occasion des allusions très précises à la tradition juive, tant liturgique que mystique –et notamment à la kabbale. On trouve par exemple des allusions au thème de la « brisure des vases » dans la chanson Anthem (album The Future) : « il y a une fissure, une fissure en toute chose / c’est comme ça que la lumière pénètre »… Parmi les figures juives du passé, il en est une qui ne laisse pas tranquille le juif Leonard Cohen : c’est celle de Jésus. L’homme de Nazareth apparaît avec une fréquence étonnante dans le corpus des chansons (j’en relève pour ma part une douzaine d’occurrences, explicites ou non). « Jésus pris au sérieux par beaucoup, Jésus pris à la blague par quelques-uns » (Jazz Police, album I’m Your Man) : et par toi-même, Leonard ? Cela reste quelque peu indécidable. S’il avoue ne rien comprendre au Sermon sur la montagne (Democracy, album The Future), et évoque « le Christ qui n’est pas ressuscité / hors des cavernes du cœur » (The Land of Plenty, album Ten New Songs), notre auteur, à propos de Jésus, se parle ainsi à lui-même : « tu veux voyager avec lui / tu veux voyager en aveugle / et tu penses pouvoir lui faire confiance / car il a touché ton corps parfait avec son esprit » (Suzanne, album Songs of Leonard Cohen). Et comment comprendre cette double injonction : « Montre-moi l’endroit où le Verbe s’est fait homme / montre-moi l’endroit où la souffrance a commencé » (Show me the Place, album Old Ideas) ? Il y a là un singulier mélange de dérision et de fascination. Curieusement, les figures de la sainteté chrétienne suscitent chez lui une sympathie plus immédiate : celles de la vierge Marie –si c’est bien elle qu’il faut reconnaître dans Notre-Dame de la solitude (Our Lady of Solitude, album Recent Songs) ; de François d’Assise (Death of a Ladies’ Man, dans l’album homonyme) ; de Bernadette de Lourdes (Song of Bernadette, chantée par Jennifer Warnes dans son album Famous Blue Raincoat) ; et surtout de Jeanne d’Arc (Last Year’s Man et Joan of Arc, toutes deux dans l’album Songs of Love and Hate). C’est le lieu de rappeler que le jeune Leonard Cohen a acquis, à Montréal, une bonne culture chrétienne. Certains aspects de la piété catholique, comme le culte du Sacré-Cœur ou les visions de sœur Faustine, continuent d’ailleurs à le toucher. (…) « prêtre » se dit en hébreu… « cohen ». Il faut citer à ce propos la superbe chanson qui s’adresse ainsi à l’Être divin : « Que ta miséricorde se déverse / sur tous ces cœurs qui brûlent en enfer / si c’est ta volonté / de nous faire du bien » (If it Be Your Will, album Various Positions). Ici s’unissent bel et bien le cœur de l’homme (il s’agit d’une prière d’intercession) et celui de Dieu (prêt à répandre sa tendresse sur l’humanité). Or selon un adage de la tradition juive : « la porte de la prière est parfois fermée, mais la porte de la miséricorde reste toujours ouverte » Leonard a compris cette leçon. Et s’il n’adopte le ton de la prière que de manière exceptionnelle (par exemple dans Born in Chains et You Got Me Singing, deux chansons de l’album Popular Problems), il témoigne fréquemment d’une véritable compassion envers tous ceux qui crient : « de grâce, ne passez pas indifférents » (Please, Don’t Pass me by, album Live Songs), qu’il s’agisse de l’enfant encore à naître, de l’exclu, du handicapé, bref de tous les « pauvres » au sens biblique du terme. « Et je chante ceci pour le capitaine / dont le navire n’a pas été bâti / pour la maman bouleversée / devant son berceau toujours vide / pour le cœur sans compagnon / pour l’âme privée de roi / pour la danseuse étoile / qui n’a plus aucune raison de danser » (Heart With no Companion, album Various Positions). Du reste, au-delà de toutes les formes religieuses, il convient de souligner que plusieurs textes de notre Juif errant évoquent la rencontre de Dieu. Ces expériences mystiques, que l’auteur suggère avec discrétion, peuvent avoir pour cadre une église (Ain’t no Cure for Love, album I’m Your Man), mais aussi une simple chambre (Love Itself, album Ten New Songs), voire un lieu indéterminé (Almost Like the Blues, album Popular Problems). Pudeur cohénienne, mais aussi sans doute réticence juive à mettre un nom sur le « Sans-Nom ». « J’entends une voix qui m’évoque celle de Dieu », dit-il (Closing Time, album The Future) : n’est-ce pas elle qu’il faut reconnaître dans Going Home (album Old Ideas) : « J’aime parler avec Leonard… » ? Mais ce dialogue d’amour entre Leonard et son Dieu restera secret. Chéri par les femmes, le David biblique apparaît également comme l’élu de Dieu, lequel déclare : « J’ai trouvé David, un homme selon mon cœur » (Actes des apôtres, 13, 22). Et notre barde de Montréal, comme en écho : « J’ai appris qu’il y avait un accord secret / que David jouait pour plaire au Seigneur » (Hallelujah, album Various Positions). Outre les deux tonalités que l’on vient d’évoquer, la lyrique et la mystique, il existe un troisième registre, non moins prégnant chez Leonard : c’est celui du constat désabusé, parfois même désespéré pour ne pas dire nihiliste. Donnons-en quelques échantillons : « Les pauvres restent pauvres et les riches s’enrichissent / c’est comme ça que ça se passe / tout le monde le sait » (Everybody Knows, album I’m Your Man) ; « De parcourir le journal / ça donne envie de pleurer / tout le monde s’en fiche que les gens / vivent ou meurent » (In my Secret Life, album Ten New Songs) ; « Je n’ai pas d’avenir / je sais que mes jours sont comptés / le présent n’est pas si agréable / juste pas mal de choses à faire / je pensais que le passé allait me durer / mais la noirceur s’y est mise aussi » (The Darkness, album Old Ideas) ; « J’ai vu des gens qui mouraient de faim / il y avait des meurtres, il y avait des viols / leurs villages étaient en feu / ils essayaient de s’enfuir » (Almost Like the Blues, album Popular Problems). Et rien n’échappe à cet acide corrosif, pas même l’amour des femmes. Nous voilà loin de la célébration de l’éros, comme si l’on était passé du Cantique des Cantiques… au livre de Qohélet : « Vanité des vanités, dit Qohélet ; vanité des vanités, tout est vanité » (Qohélet, 1, 2). Mais justement, ces deux textes bibliques se présentent comme écrits par le même Salomon, ce qui ne manquera pas de rendre perplexes les commentateurs : comment le fils de David a-t-il pu composer deux ouvrages d’esprit aussi diamétralement opposé ? Les rabbins ont imaginé une réponse : c’est le jeune Salomon, amoureux et optimiste, qui a écrit le Cantique ; devenu vieux, blasé et pessimiste, il a composé le livre de Qohélet. Mais tout cela relève du même genre littéraire : la littérature de sagesse. Somme toute, il en va de même pour Leonard, qui déploie à son tour les différents aspects d’une moderne sagesse. Du reste, mystique et critique peuvent chez lui aller de pair : « Tu m’as fait chanter / quand bien même tout allait de travers / tu m’as fait chanter / la chanson ‘Alléluia’ » (You Got me Singing, ibid.)… Dominique Cerbelaud
C’est à regret que je parle des Juifs : cette nation est, à bien des égards, la plus détestable qui ait jamais souillé la terre. Voltaire (Article « Tolérance »)
Qu’ils s’en aillent! Car nous sommes en France et non en Allemagne!” … Notre République est menacée d’une invasion de protestants car on choisit volontiers des ministres parmi eux., … qui défrancise le pays et risque de le transformer en une grande Suisse, qui, avant dix ans, serait morte d’hypocrisie et d’ennui. Zola (Le Figaro, le 17/5/1881)
Ce projet a causé la désertion de 80 à 100 000 personnes de toutes conditions, qui ont emporté avec elles plus de trente millions de livres ; la mise à mal de nos arts et de nos manufactures. (…) Sire, la conversion des cœurs n’appartient qu’à Dieu …Vauban (« Mémoire pour le rappel des Huguenots », 1689)
Dans la dispute entre ces races pour savoir à laquelle revient le prix de l’avarice et de la cupidité, un protestant genevois vaut six juifs. A Toussenel, disciple de Fourier, 1845
Qu’ils s’en aillent! Car nous sommes en France et non en Allemagne! … Notre République est menacée d’une invasion de protestants car on choisit volontiers des ministres parmi eux., … qui défrancise le pays et risque de le transformer en une grande Suisse, qui, avant dix ans, serait morte d’hypocrisie et d’ennui. Zola (Le Figaro, le 17/5/1881)
Si le Décalogue consacre son commandement ultime à interdire le désir des biens du prochain, c’est parce qu’il reconnaît lucidement dans ce désir le responsable des violences interdites dans les quatre commandements qui le précèdent. Si on cessait de désirer les biens du prochain, on ne se rendrait jamais coupable ni de meurtre, ni d’adultère, ni de vol, ni de faux témoignage. Si le dixième commandement était respecté, il rendrait superflus les quatre commandements qui le précèdent. Au lieu de commencer par la cause et de poursuivre par les conséquences, comme ferait un exposé philosophique, le Décalogue suit l’ordre inverse. Il pare d’abord au plus pressé: pour écarter la violence, il interdit les actions violentes. Il se retourne ensuite vers la cause et découvre le désir inspiré par le prochain. René Girard
De même que pour les juifs, ce sont les mêmes qui dénoncent les sorcières et qui recourent à leurs services. Tous les persécuteurs attribuent à leurs victimes une nocivité susceptible de se retourner en positivité et vice versa. René Girard
Ils ont tout, c’est connu. Vous êtes passé par le centre-ville de Metz ? Toutes les bijouteries appartiennent aux juifs. On le sait, c’est tout. Vous n’avez qu’à lire les noms israéliens sur les enseignes. Vous avez regardé une ancienne carte de la Palestine et une d’aujourd’hui ? Ils ont tout colonisé. Maintenant c’est les bijouteries. Ils sont partout, sauf en Chine parce que c’est communiste. Tous les gouvernements sont juifs, même François Hollande. Le monde est dirigé par les francs-maçons et les francs-maçons sont tous juifs. Ce qui est certain c’est que l’argent injecté par les francs-maçons est donné à Israël. Sur le site des Illuminatis, le plus surveillé du monde, tout est écrit. (…) On se renseigne mais on ne trouve pas ces infos à la télévision parce qu’elle appartient aux juifs aussi. Si Patrick Poivre d’Arvor a été jeté de TF1 alors que tout le monde l’aimait bien, c’est parce qu’il a été critique envers Nicolas Sarkozy, qui est juif… (…)  Mais nous n’avons pas de potes juifs. Pourquoi ils viendraient ici ? Ils habitent tous dans des petits pavillons dans le centre, vers Queuleu. Ils ne naissent pas pauvres. Ici, pour eux, c’est un zoo, c’est pire que l’Irak. Peut-être que si j’habitais dans le centre, j’aurais des amis juifs, mais je ne crois pas, je n’ai pas envie. J’ai une haine profonde. Pour moi, c’est la pire des races. Je vous le dis du fond du cœur, mais je ne suis pas raciste, c’est un sentiment. Faut voir ce qu’ils font aux Palestiniens, les massacres et tout. Mais bon, on ne va pas dire que tous les juifs sont des monstres. Pourquoi vouloir réunir les juifs et les musulmans ? Tout ça c’est politique. Cela ne va rien changer. C’est en Palestine qu’il faut aller, pas en France. Karim
Ce sont les cerveaux du monde. Tous les tableaux qui sont exposés au centre Pompidou appartiennent à des juifs. A Metz, tous les avocats et les procureurs sont juifs. Ils sont tous hauts placés et ils ne nous laisseront jamais monter dans la société. « Ils ont aussi Coca-Cola. Regardez une bouteille de Coca-Cola, quand on met le logo à l’envers on peut lire : « Non à Allah, non au prophète ». C’est pour cela que les arabes ont inventé le « Mecca-cola ». Au McDo c’est pareil. Pour chaque menu acheté, un euro est reversé à l’armée israélienne. Les juifs, ils ont même coincé les Saoudiens. Ils ont inventé les voitures électriques pour éviter d’acheter leur pétrole. C’est connu. On se renseigne. (…) Si Mohamed Merah n’avait pas été tué par le Raid, le Mossad s’en serait chargé. Il serait venu avec des avions privés. Ali
Certains trouvent encore intolérable d’admettre que le peuple juif se soit trouvé, à trois reprises, plus ou moins volontairement, un élément essentiel au patrimoine de l’humanité: le monothéisme, le marché et les lieux saints. Car il n’est pas faux de dire, même si c’est schématique, que les juifs ont été mis en situation d’avoir à prêter aux deux autres monothéismes, et à les partager avec eux, leur dieu, leur argent et leurs lieux saints. Et comme la meilleure façon de ne pas rembourser un créancier, c’est de le diaboliser et de l’éliminer, ceux qui, dans le christianisme et l’islam, n’acceptent toujours pas cette dette à l’égard du judaïsme, se sont, à intervalles réguliers, acharnés à le détruire, attendant pour recommencer que le souvenir de l’élimination précédente se soit estompé. Jacques Attali
Nobel Prizes have been awarded to over 850 individuals, of whom at least 22% (without peace prize over 24%) were Jews, although Jews comprise less than 0.2% of the world’s population (or 1 in every 500 people). Overall, Jews have won a total of 41% of all the Nobel Prizes in economics, 28% in medicine, 26% in Physics, 19% in Chemistry, 13% in Literature and 9% of all peace awards… Wikipedia
Luther rend nécessaire ce que Gutenberg a rendu possible : en plaçant l’Écriture au centre de l’eschatologie chrétienne, la Réforme fait d’une invention technique une obligation spirituelle. François Furet et Jacques Ozouf
After the Reformation, Protestant regions arose from the backwaters of Europe to displace the Catholic countries as the economic powerhouses. By 1700 prior to the full-fledged industrial revolution–Protestant countries had overtaken the Catholic world in terms of income. A strong Protestant-Catholic income gap became well established over the next 250 years. There were no signs of convergence until the 1960s. This is not, however, a simple vindication of the “Protestant ethic” thesis. … A number of alternative hypotheses … might account for the economic dominance of Protestant Europe. They include (1) secularization – freeing the economy from religious controls; (2) the growth of education (and the Protestant emphasis on literacy – ability to read the bible); (3) the dismal consequences of the Catholic Counter-Reformation; (4) the importance of the Atlantic (slave) trade in creating an autonomous business class that would demand modernizing institutional reforms.  (…) The Reformation was a crucial cultural moment in the development of capitalism … The Reformation made literacy a central part of religious devotion. In the Catholic Church, the clergy interpreted (channeled?) the word of God for believers. The bible was thought to be too complex to be understood by the common folk. (Indeed, even much of the clergy did not have direct access to the bible.) Protestantism, in contrast, spread the notion of a “priesthood of all believers”. All Christians should study the bible, connecting with their religion in a much more personal and private way. This is a tall order when only a tiny fraction of the population is literate, and the bible is written in Latin. Protestants worked hard on both these fronts, translating the bible into the vernacular (the languages that people actually spoke), and evangelizing for mass education. Rather suddenly, and for completely non-economic reasons, the medieval reign of ignorance was rejected, in its place were demands for investment in human capital.  Scotland is a great example of this. A founding principle of the Scottish Reformation (1560) was free education for the poor. Perhaps the world’s first local school tax was established in 1633 (strengthened in 1646). In this environment grew the Scottish En lightenment: David Hume, Francis Hutcheson, Adam Ferguson, and the godfather of modern economics, Adam Smith. By this time, Scottish scholarship stood so far above that of other nations that Voltaire wrote, “we look to Scotland for all our ideas of civilization”. An attractive feature of this thinking about Protestantism is its amenability to quantitative empirical testing. Did Protestant countries invest more heavily in education? … at least in 1830, Protestant countries had much higher primary school enrollment: 17% in Germany, 15% in the US, 9% in the UK, 7% in France, and only about 3% or 4% in Italy and Spain … While Protestant countries were aspiring to the ideal of a “priesthood of all believers”–nurturing a social norm of literacy and personal scholarship, Catholic Europe reacted viciously to the Reformation and devoted a hundred or so years to the brutal containment and control of “thought, knowledge, and belief”. The emphasis here is not so much on literacy per se. In Landes’ view, the Reformation did not simply give a “boost to literacy,” but more importantly “spawned dissidents and heresies, and promoted the skepticism and refusal of authority that is at the heart of the scientific endeavor”. While Protestants were translating the bible and agitating for public education, the Counter-Reformation (the Inquisition) was burning books, burning heretics, and imprisoning scientists. The Catholic reaction to the Reformation – in large part driven by the Spanish Empire – was to terrorize the principle of free thought. Though in many ways the birthplace of modern science, “Mediterranean Europe as a whole missed the train of the so-called scientific revolution” (Landes 1998:180). In a climate of fear and repression, the intellectual and scientific center of Europe shifted northward.  Perhaps the Reformation, rather than creating a new “spirit of capitalism,” simply led to the relocation capitalist activity. Without any religious strife, the industrial revolution might well have taken root wherever medieval capitalism was strongest (Italy, Belgium, Spain, etc). The religious wars and Counter-Reformation “convulsed” the centers of old medieval capitalism, leading to a mass migration of capital and entrepreneurial skill. Perhaps the most promising lead for historical research is to study the patterns of capital mobility and migration following the Reformation. Splitting Europe into two religious worlds produced striking dynamics that I believe go far beyond Weber’s thesis. The Protestant world, it seems, nurtured a contentious spirit of heresy and critical thought, popular literacy, and a laissez faire business morality; Catholism burned books, imprisoned scientists, stifled thought, and demanded stringent orthodoxy. All of this condemned the old prosperous regions of Europe to become the periphery (the “Olive Belt”). The backward regions that revolted from Rome became the destination for capitalist migration, and here, the institutions of modern capitalism gradually took shape. Finally, it no doubt helped that at around the same time, the center of commerce and trade shifted from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic, adding a new “opportunity of geography” to the Protestant regions.  Cristobal Young
Pour ses promoteurs, il existe dans la France de la Troisième République un  » complot protestant « , mené par des étrangers de l’intérieur. Ce  » péril  » menace l’identité française et cherche sournoisement à  » dénationaliser  » le pays. Leurs accusations veulent prendre appui sur l’actualité : la guerre de 1870, la création de l’école laïque, les rivalités coloniales, l’affaire Dreyfus, la séparation des églises et de l’État. Derrière ces événements se profilerait un  » parti protestant  » qui œuvrerait en faveur de l’Angleterre et de l’Allemagne. Mais, à coté de l’actualité, la vision de l’histoire constitue également un enjeu et les antiprotestants, en lutte contre l’interprétation universitaire de leur époque, tentent une révision de la compréhension d’événements historiques comme la Saint-Barthélemy et la Révocation de l’Édit de Nantes. Ils accusent les protestants d’intolérance et érigent des statues à Michel Servet, victime de Calvin au XVIe siècle. La réaction protestante à ces attaques se marque non seulement par une riposte juridique, mais aussi par une auto-analyse plus critique que dans le passé. Cet axe se termine par une réflexion plus large sur la condition minoritaire en France et la manière dont la situation faite aux minorités est révélatrice du degré de démocratie de la société française. (…) L’antisémitisme de cette époque concentre deux traditions hostiles aux juifs : l’une, religieuse, qui les accuse de  » déicide « , l’autre, économique, qui les accuse de  » spéculation financière « . La conjonction de ces deux traditions engendre des thèses raciales sur une lutte éternelle entre l’  » aryen  » et le  » sémite « , alors que les accusations raciales antiprotestantes, quand elles existent, n’atteignent pas ce degré d’intensité. L’anticléricalisme est l’envers du cléricalisme : deux camps de force égale se trouvent en rivalité politico-religieuse et leurs arguments dérivent souvent dans des stéréotypes où la haine n’est pas absente. La haine anticléricale se développe lors de la lutte contre les congrégations. Mais, à partir de 1905, la séparation des églises et de l’État constitue un  » pacte laïque  » et permet un dépassement de l’anticléricalisme. (…) Paradoxalement, plus le groupe visé est faible, plus la haine à son encontre est forte. À ce titre, l’antiprotestantisme apparaît comme une haine intermédiaire entre l’anticléricalisme et l’antisémitisme. Mais, partout, à l’origine des haines, se trouve une vision conspirationniste de l’histoire : les pouvoirs établis et les idées qui triomphent sont le résultat de  » menées occultes « , d’ « obscurs complots ». Jean Bauberot
 L’Âge moderne est l’Âge des Juifs, et le XXe siècle est le Siècle des Juifs. La modernité signifie que chacun d’entre nous devient urbain, mobile, éduqué, professionnellement flexible. Il ne s’agit plus de cultiver les champs ou de surveiller les troupeaux, mais de cultiver les hommes et de veiller sur les symboles […] En d’autres termes, la modernité, c’est le fait que nous sommes tous devenus juifs. Yuri Slezkine
The problem with so many of the theories thus far expounded is that they have gaping holes in logic or evidence so large that let’s just say they’d never make it into the Talmud. By far the largest fault with them is the reality that many of these arguments rely on an idea of the Jewish past that we don’t have any good reason to think is true; just because the rabbis desired it doesn’t mean it was necessarily so. And our overall received notions of a Jewish community that was fiercely observant and often Orthodox also have little evidence to back them up. (And, as Alana Newhouse revealed a couple of years ago, even the images we have of a fiercely pious Jewish shtetl have been largely manipulated.) (…) By combining a very thorough look at the historical record with new economic and demographic analyses, the authors summarily dismiss a great many of the underlying assumptions that have produced theories around Jewish literacy in the past. Where many tied the Jewish move into professional trades to the European era when Jews were persecuted, Botticini and Eckstein bring forward evidence that the move away from the unlettered world of premodern agriculture actually happened a thousand years earlier, when Jews were largely free to pursue the profession of their choice. And where so many have simply taken as a given universal literacy among Jews, the economists find that a majority of Jews actually weren’t willing to invest in Jewish education, with the shocking result that more than two-thirds of the Jewish community disappeared toward the end of the first millennium. Botticini and Eckstein pore over the Talmud and notice the simple fact that it’s overwhelmingly concerned with agriculture, which, in conjunction with archaeological evidence from the first and second century, paints a picture of a Jewish past where literacy was the privilege of an elite few. But these rabbis were also touting a vision of a future Judaism quite different from that which had been at least symbolically dominant for much of Jewish history to that point. Where a focus on the Temple in Jerusalem, with ritual sacrifices and the agricultural economy they required being the standard to that point, these rabbis—broadly speaking, the Pharisees—sought to emphasize Torah reading, prayer, and synagogue. When the sect of Judaism that emphasized the Temple—broadly, the Sadducees—was essentially wiped out by the Romans shortly after the time of Jesus, the Pharisaic leaders, in the form of the sages of the Talmud, were given a mostly free hand to reshape Judaism in their own image. Over the next several hundred years, they and their ideological descendants codified the Talmud and declared a need for universal Jewish education as they did so. All of this history is widely known and understood, but what Botticini and Eckstein do differently is trace this development alongside the size of the Jewish population and their occupational distribution. The Jewish global population shrunk from at least 5 million to as little as 1 million between the year 70 and 650. It’s not surprising that a conquered people, stifled rebellions, and loss of home would lead to population shrinkage, but Botticini and Eckstein argue that « War-related massacres and the general decline in the population accounted for about half of this loss. » Where did the remaining 2 million out of 3 million surviving Jews go? According to them, over multiple generations they simply stopped being Jewish: With the notion of Jewish identity now tied directly to literacy by the surviving Pharisaic rabbis of the Talmud, raising one’s children as Jews required a substantial investment in Jewish education. To be able to justify that investment, one had to be either or both an especially devoted Jew or someone hoping to find a profession for his children where literacy was an advantage, like trade, crafts, and money lending. For those not especially devoted and having little hope of seeing their children derive economic benefit from a Jewish education, the option to simply leave the Jewish community, the economists argue, was more enticing than the option to remain as its unlettered masses. Two-thirds of the surviving Jewish population, they assert, took that route. This distinct twist of the population story, which accompanies research showing a shift from nearly 90 percent of the Jewish population engaging in agriculture to nearly 90 percent engaging in professional trades over that same several hundred years, addresses a key problem of previous theories of Jewish literacy: determining what happened to those who wouldn’t be scholars. Botticini and Eckstein bring other evidence of Jewish tradition generating success in trade. An extrajudicial system of rabbinical courts for settling disputes allowed for the development of the kind of trust required for commercial enterprises to grow. A universal language of Hebrew eased international negotiations. And in a devastating critique of the theory that persecution actually pushed this economic shift along, the economists examine the societies in which Jews originally developed this bias toward trades and find Jews faced no particular discrimination that would have made them less successful in agriculture. In fact, they show, Jews were often discriminated against precisely because of their emphasis on trade, such as in their expulsion from England in 1290, which only came after they were repeatedly told to give up the profession of money lending (eventually echoed in Ulysses S. Grant’s order to expel the Jews from the territory under his command during the Civil War). And so the Jewish people have grown into a people of two intertwined legacies: a culture in which the Jewishly literate continue to pass the torch and one in which an emphasis on trades was necessary to continue to do so for all but the most fervently devoted. When a given family stopped being devoted or wealthy enough, it simply faded away. Steven Weiss
Written by economists Maristella Botticini and Zvi Eckstein, the paper explained Jewish success in terms of early literacy in the wake of Rome’s destruction of the Temple in 70 C.E. and the subsequent dispersion of Jews throughout the Roman empire – Jews who had to rely on their own rabbis and synagogues to sustain their religion instead of the high priests in Jerusalem. You may know a similar story about the Protestant Reformation: the bypassing of the Catholic clergy and their Latin liturgy for actual reading of Scripture in native languages and the eventual material benefits of doing so. Why is Northern Europe — Germany, Holland, England, Sweden — so much more prosperous than Southern Europe: Portugal, Italy, Greece, Spain? Why do the latter owe the former instead of the other way around? Might it have something to do with the Protestant legacy of the North, the Catholic legacy of the South? Paul Solman
The key message of “The Chosen Few” is that the literacy of the Jewish people, coupled with a set of contract-enforcement institutions developed during the five centuries after the destruction of the Second Temple, gave the Jews a comparative advantage in occupations such as crafts, trade, and moneylending — occupations that benefited from literacy, contract-enforcement mechanisms, and networking and provided high earnings. (…) the Jews in medieval Europe voluntarily entered and later specialized in moneylending and banking because they had the key assets for being successful players in credit markets: capital already accumulated as craftsmen and trade networking abilities because they lived in many locations, could easily communicate with and alert one another as to the best buying and selling opportunities, and literacy, numeracy, and contract-enforcement institutions — “gifts” that their religion has given them — gave them an advantage over competitors. Maristella Botticini and Zvi Eckstein
Wherever and whenever Jews lived among a population of mostly unschooled people, they had a comparative advantage. They could read and write contracts, business letters, and account books using a common [Hebrew] alphabet while learning the local languages of the different places they dwelled. These skills became valuable in the urban and commercially oriented economy that developed under Muslim rule in the area from the Iberian Peninsula to the Middle East. Maristella Botticini
The chief editor of the Journal des économistes (…) claimed that anti-Semitism and hatred against the Jews were to be compared to the expulsion of the Huguenots from France in seventeenth century, as economic and religious persecution usually ran parallel. The religious persecutions of the Huguenots could be explained as economic persecution that applied perfectly to Jews of the nineteenth century. According to this explanation, Catholic religious intolerance caused the expulsion of the most dynamic factions of society, and thus provoked the decline of Catholic nations. (…) The groundbreaking work of Max Weber and his underlining critique of Marxist interpretation of religion and economy played – and in some ways continue to play – a key role in addressing research in the field of religion and economic modernization. Weber also assigned a significant role to Judaism, although his work contributed to fueling an enormous debate and some resentful reactions, especially from Jewish intellectuals. The Chosen Few is a book that encompasses the history of the Jews from the destruction of the Second Temple (70 CE) to the expulsion from Spain in 1492. (…) Ancient Judaism underwent a form of seismic modification that, as Botticini and Eckstein describe, redefined the religious structure of Judaism. The most typical example is the disappearance of the sacrificial system that was organized around the temple of Jerusalem following its destruction in 70 CE. The political collapse of ancient Judaism is the starting point of the Chosen Few, which aims at understanding the epochal changes of rabbinical Judaism, and more precisely, the kind of culture Judaism prompted after what might aptly be called the great “trauma” of the collapse of its ancient and central structure. The Chosen Few deals with the relationship between religious rules and literacy, and accordingly, it attempts to investigate the transformation that Judaism underwent through a relatively long formative period. (…) The first assumption is that Jews in the ancient world (200b BCE – 200 CE) who lived in Eretz Israel were mainly occupied in agricultural activities. In a time span of a few centuries however, Jews of the Diaspora had dramatically changed their economic and professional position. How had that come into being? The change is particularly indebted to the introduction of a rule that proved to be central, according to Botticini and Eckstein’s account.  It is precisely the rule attributed to Yehoshua ben Gamla, a priest mentioned in the early rabbinic texts, according to which a compulsory obligation to teach Torah to children was enforced as a communal regulation. In comparative terms, this norm was introduced in the background of a religious world that was modeled after the rules of ancient religions, which focused on sacrificial offerings and temple activities, initiation and magic, fasting and prayers. Despite their different beliefs and ritual structure, Roman and Greek religions, alongside Zoroastrianism, mysteries religions, Orphic and Dionysian cults, and Mithraism never implemented a law that imposed significant textual knowledge of a written sacred tradition. For historians of religion this is an important innovation indeed, even though the imminent spread of Christianity and Islam would introduce a great number of additional transformations to the religious world of late antiquity. (…) Nevertheless, as with every grand narrative that aims at providing one unique explanation for historical facts, this one provokes a number of questions and possible critical responses. I will mention only three problems that may be of some relevance. 1. First of all, one must recall that the Diaspora did not begin after the fall of Jerusalem, but rather, was a conspicuous and relevant component of ancient Judaism. Jews lived in metropolises, like Rome and Alexandria, and were likely engaged in urban activities. Historiography on Christianity has stressed that Christianity spread first and foremost in the great urban centers of the Roman Empire, although the movement of Jesus was mainly throughout villages. The fascinating theory of conversion offered by the authors is therefore interesting, but needs to be supported by more evidence. 2. Considering the wide scope of the book and the claim to a universal and general explanatory theory of Judaism, some comparison with other similar groups was needed. In which way did Judaism in the Muslim empire differ from Christian minorities, which in turn were endowed with similar trades? How then are Armenians, Greek Orthodox, or various sectarian religious groups to be evaluated when they competed with Jews and performed similar roles? 3. Theory and history are somehow disconnected in this book. The theory the authors offer is applied to very different historical, social and religious contexts. One wonders if the organization of economy in the Muslim empire and the one in Medieval Christian Europe does not bear multiple and dissimilar features, resulting in a perpetually different relationship with Judaism, when not directly influencing it. Anachronism is generally inevitable, but my impression is that it strikes as too strong an element in this narrative. Is it possible to assume, with the help of economic theory and modeling, that a peasant in the ancient world would behave exactly as a contemporary peasant in a third world country? The long journey back in time requires, among other things, identification with a world that might have been radically different. Moreover, this long journey is often an intricate path into a labyrinth, which the historian is impelled to explore in its multiple directions. Cristiana Facchini
What if most of what we thought we know about the history of the Jewish people between the destruction of the Second Temple and the Spanish Expulsion is wrong? This intriguing premise informs The Chosen Few: How Education Shaped Jewish History, 70-1492, an ambitious new book by economists Maristella Botticini and Zvi Eckstein. Seventy-five years after historian Salo Baron first warned against reducing the Jewish past to “a history of suffering and scholarship,” most of us continue to view medieval Jewish history in this vein. “Surely, it is time to break with the lachrymose theory of pre-Revolutionary woe, and to adopt a view more in accord with historic truth,” Baron implored at the end of his 1928 Menorah Journal article “Ghetto and Emancipation: Shall We Revise the Traditional View?” Botticini and Eckstein (…) systematically dismantle much of the conventional wisdom about medieval Jewish history. For example, they explore how the scattered nature of the Jewish Diaspora was driven primarily by the search for economic opportunity rather than by relentless persecution. They also demonstrate that war-related massacres only account for a fraction of the Jewish population declines from 70 to 700 C.E. and from 1250 to 1400 C.E., and cast serious doubt on the theory that widespread conversion to Christianity and Islam during these periods was motivated primarily by anti-Jewish discrimination. Likewise, they show that restrictions on Jewish land ownership and membership in craft guilds in Christian Europe — factors that are often cited to explain medieval Jews’ proclivity for trade and moneylending — postdated by centuries the Jews’ occupational shift from agriculture to commerce. The authors are hardly alone among scholars in advancing their case. But in consolidating a vast secondary literature into a concise and compelling argument, they provide a commendable service. (…) As the subtitle of their book suggests, the authors look to education to explain the across-the-board transformation of Jewish life in the first 15 centuries of the Common Era. Specifically, they zero in on the rabbinic injunction that required fathers to teach their sons how to read and study the Torah. Literacy, they argue, was the engine that drove the train of Jewish history. It facilitated the economic transformation of the Jews from farmers to craftsmen, merchants and financiers. It encouraged their mobility, as they went in search of locations that presented the prospect of profitability. It determined their migration patterns, specifically their congregation in bustling city centers throughout the Muslim world, where they were able to thrive in myriad urban occupations such as banking, cattle dealing, wine selling, textile manufacturing, shopkeeping and medicine. It also explained their scattered settlement in scores of small communities throughout Christian Europe, where the demand for skilled occupations was far more limited. It was even indirectly responsible for Jewish population decline. Botticini and Eckstein suggest that illiterates were regarded as outcasts in Jewish society and that a substantial percentage chose to escape denigration and social ostracism by embracing Christianity and Islam, where illiteracy remained the norm. Once the occupational and residential transformation from farming was complete, the authors argue, there was no going back. Jews paid a high premium for their literate society. Jewish cultural norms required the maintenance of synagogues and schools, and presumed that families would forgo years of their sons’ potential earnings to keep them in school. When urban economies collapsed, as they did in Mesopotamia and Persia as a result of the Mongol conquest, the practice of Judaism became untenable, and the result was widespread defection through conversion to Islam. Accordingly, the Jews became “a small population of highly literate people, who continued to search for opportunities to reap returns from their investment in literacy.”  The authors’ theory may leave some a little queasy, including those who have rationalized the Jewish proclivity for moneylending in medieval England, France and Germany as a logical response to antagonistic authorities who systematically cut them off from other avenues of economic opportunity. (…) Botticini and Eckstein (…) On the contrary (…) insist, Jews were naturally attracted to moneylending because it was lucrative and because they possessed four significant cultural and social advantages that predisposed their success. First and foremost was rabbinic Judaism’s emphasis on education; literacy and numeracy were prerequisite skills for moneylending. Jews were also able to rely on other built-in advantages, including significant capital, extensive kinship networks, and rabbinic courts and charters that provided legal enforcement and arbitration mechanisms in the cases of defaults and disputes. The authors add that while maltreatment, discriminatory laws and expulsions were frequently motivated by the prevalence of Jews in moneylending, they played little or no role in promoting this occupational specialization. The relevance of cultural determinism is the subject of vigorous debate in intellectual circles (…) Of particular concern is the relative paucity of evidence that Botticini and Eckstein marshal for their literacy argument. Talmudic pronouncements on the importance of education can easily, and inaccurately, be read as descriptive rather than prescriptive, and the authors arguably overestimate the influence of the rabbis on the behaviors and self-definition of the Jewish masses. They seem to be on firmer ground once they have recourse to the variegated documents in the Cairo Genizah, but they devote almost no attention to Jewish educational trends in Christian Europe. They also have little to say on the extent to which instruction in arithmetic and the lingua franca supplemented a school curriculum designed to promote facility in reading and interpreting Hebrew and Aramaic holy books. Instruction in these areas would have a direct impact on the Jews’ ability to function in an urban economy. Undoubtedly, Jewish school attendance rates and curricular norms varied by location and over time.
Botticini and Eckstein argue that most ancient Jews were farmers who did not need literacy to earn a living.  When Judaism re-formed around text study following the destruction of the Temple in 70 C.E., parents were forced to pay school fees if they wanted their children to stay Jewish.  According to Botticini and Eckstein, over the next six centuries the Jewish population plummeted from 5.5 to 1.2 million because only boys from families with an unusual degree of commitment, or those whose sons had the brains and diligence to pore over legal texts, paid to send their children to school. Everyone else converted to Christianity (…) Botticini and Eckstein support their model with « archaeological discoveries that document the timing of the construction of synagogues » in which children could be educated. They explain that « the earliest archaeological evidence of the existence of a synagogue in the Land of Israel » dates to the mid-1st century C.E. This is an enormous misstatement of fact. A number of pre-destruction Palestinian synagogues have been identified, the earliest uncovered so far, in Modi’in, dating to the early 2nd or late 3rd century B.C.E. Which brings us to the question of whether Botticini and Eckstein’s selection event ever occurred.  Some numbers cited by Botticini and Eckstein are just plain wrong.  For example, they summarize the findings of ancient historians Seth Schwartz and Gildas Hamel, and of archaeologist Magen Broshi, as « the Land of Israel hosting no more than 1 million Jews. »[7] Schwartz actually wrote: « Palestine reached its maximum sustainable pre-modern population of approximately one million in the middle of the first century. Probably about half of this population was Jewish. »  Thus, Botticini and Eckstein miscite Schwartz’s « about half of » for a population of one million Jews.  They then guess that there were, in fact, 2.5 million Jews in Israel. There are no accurate counts of ancient Jewry. Estimates that no more than 1 million people could have lived in the Land of Israel in the first century were derived from arable acreage and crop yields. And there is no evidence suggesting that ancient Israel had the capacity to import the gargantuan volumes of falafel mix that would have been required to feed a population of over a million.  (Rome imported wheat on that scale; Israel didn’t.) Botticini and Eckstein choose, without offering a rationale, one contemporary demographer’s « cautiously » offered estimate of 4.5 million Jews total in the ancient world. Then they blithely add up to a million more Jews, to reach their 5 – 5.5 million number. But graphing an unsubstantiated number, as they do, does not make the number accurate. If we accept more conservative estimates of 2 or even 2.5 million Jews worldwide before the year 70, loss of a million or so during and after the brutal Roman-Jewish Wars, when it is assumed that many Greek- and Latin-speaking God-fearers fell away from Judaism, is not surprising.  Judged by the evidence they provide, Botticini and Clark’s elegant model in which the choices of ancient Jewish farmers facing high tuition bills produced a dramatic selection event doesn’t hold water. (…) Botticini and Eckstein support their hypothesis with the information, repeated by Clark that, « passages by early Christian writers and Church Fathers indicate that most Jewish converts to Christianity were illiterate and poor. » This information, however, is cited to outdated work by Adolf von Harnack, turn-of-the-century German theologian whose anti-Judaism prepared the way for Nazi anti-Semitism and who, as President of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society, created the infamous Institute for Anthropology, Human Heredity and EugenicsDiana Muir Appelbaum and Paul S. Appelbaum
David Mamet writes that there are two kinds of places in the world: places where Jews cannot go, and places where Jews cannot stay. So how exactly have the Jews survived? According Maristella Botticini and Zvi Eckstein, authors of The Chosen Few: How Education Shaped Jewish History, 70-1492 (Princeton University Press, 2012), the answer has as much to do with economics as with spirituality. Five major events rocked the Jewish world during those 1,422 years: the destruction of the Second Temple, the rise of Christianity; the birth of Islam; birth of modern Christian Europe; and the Mongol invasion. Since Jews who aren’t university professors (and there are some) often view events through a lens of “Is this good or bad for the Jews?” I’ll summarize the authors’ findings in that manner. Destruction of the Temple and the rise of Christianity—bad for the Jews. After the year 70, the priests who ran the Temple were no longer in the ascendency, yielding power to the Jewish rabbis and scholars who ultimately wrote the Talmud over the next few centuries. Most Jews (and most of everyone else) were farmers back then. After the destruction of the Temple, the worldwide Jewish population dwindled not just because of war and massacre, but because of economics. If you were devout and wealthy, you were likely to pay for your sons’ Jewish education. If you were spiritual but didn’t have much money, you became a Christian or joined one of the other popular groups that didn’t require an expensive Jewish education. What good is a son who can read the Torah if you just want him to help harvest pomegranates? So economics dictated who stayed and who strayed. The rise of the Islamic empire: surprisingly, good for the Jews. When Muhammad appeared in the seventh century, Jews began to move from farms into new Moslem-built cities including Baghdad and Damascus. There they went into trades that proved far more lucrative than farming, most notably international trade and money lending. In those arenas, Jews had enormous advantages: universal literacy; a common language and religious culture; and the ability to have contracts enforced, even from a distance of thousands of miles. The Moslem world then stretched from the Spain and Portugal to halfway across Asia. Anywhere in the Arab ambit, Jews could move, trade, or relocate freely and benefit from their extensive religious and family networks. According to thousand-year-old documents found in the Cairo Genizah, business documents linking Jewish traders across the Arab world would have Jewish court decisions written on the back. So Jews could send money or goods thousands of miles, certain their investments would be safe. European Christianity from the year 1,000: not so good for the Jews. If Islamic culture offered Jews a warm welcome, Western Europe was a mixed blessing. Seemingly every few dozen miles in Western Europe, a different prince or king was in charge, with different laws, different requirements for citizenship, and different attitudes about the Jews. Some places were extremely welcoming of Jews; others less so. Monarchs might boot out their Jewish populations in hard economic times, so that Gentile citizens wouldn’t have to repay their loans, only to welcome them back when the economy improved. Contrary to common belief, Botticini and Eckstein write, Jews weren’t forced into money lending because they were forced out of guilds. Under Muslim and Christian rule alike, Jews went into finance centuries before the guilds were even founded. In other words, Jews chose careers in finance the same way the best and the brightest in modern American culture head for Wall Street and business school. Western Europe, therefore, was a mixed blessing for the Jews. On the upside, they could do business, live their Jewish lives, and establish some of the finest Talmudic academies in Jewish history. Alas, Jews were also subject to massacres and expulsions, which happened with terrifying regularity across the centuries, culminating in the Spanish Inquisition of 1492. Meanwhile, back in the Middle East: the thirteenth-century Mongol invasion: bad for the Jews. Oh, really, really bad for the Jews. The relative freedom and safety the Jews enjoyed under Muslim rule came to an abrupt halt in the early 13th century, when Genghis Khan and his marauders attacked and leveled most of urban civilization that the Moslems had so painstakingly built up over the centuries. With the destruction of cities and urban institutions, those Jews fortunate enough to survive the Mongol invasion had no option other than going back to farming. Some stayed; some converted to Islam. So the numbers of Jews in formerly Arab lands would remain low for hundreds of years, until all traces of Mongol civilization were wiped out and the world began to rebuild. Eggpen
Why has education been so important to the Jewish people? Author Maristella Botticini says a unique religious norm enacted within Judaism two millennia ago made male literacy universal among Jews many centuries earlier than it was universal for the rest of the world’s population. (…) Emphasizing literacy over time set Jews up for economic success, say Botticini and Zvi Eckstein, authors of the 2012 book “The Chosen Few: How Education Shaped Jewish History.” (…) In their book, which they describe as a reinterpretation of Jewish social and economic history from the years 70 to 1492 A.D., Botticini and Eckstein say that Jews over those years became “the chosen few”—a demographically small population of individuals living in hundreds of locations across the globe and specializing in the most skilled and urban occupations. These occupations benefit from literacy and education. (…) From an economic point of view, the authors write, it was costly for Jewish farmers living in a subsistence agrarian society to invest a significant amount of their income on the rabbis’ imposed literacy requirement. A predominantly agrarian economy had little use for educated people. Consequently, a proportion of Jewish farmers opted not to invest in their sons’ religious education and instead converted to other religions, such as Christianity, which did not impose this norm on its followers. “During this Talmudic period (3rd-6th centuries), just as the Jewish population became increasingly literate, it kept shrinking through conversions, as well as war-related deaths and general population decline,” Botticini tells JNS.org. “This threatened the existence of the large Jewish community in Eretz Israel (the land of Israel) and in other places where sizable Jewish communities had existed in antiquity, such as North Africa, Syria, Lebanon, Asia Minor, the Balkans, and Western Europe. By the 7th century, the demographic and intellectual center of Jewish life had moved from Eretz Israel to Mesopotamia, where roughly 75 percent of world Jewry now lived.” Like almost everywhere else in the world, Mesopotamia had an agriculture-based economy, but that changed with the rise of Islam during the 7th century and the consequent Muslim conquests under the caliphs in the following two centuries. Their establishment of a vast empire stretching from the Iberian Peninsula to India led to a vast urbanization and the growth of manufacture and trade in the Middle East; the introduction of new technologies; the development of new industries that produced a wide array of goods; the expansion of local trade and long-distance commerce; and the growth of new cities. (…) The book does not whitewash the persecution that took place during the 15 centuries of Jewish history it examines, Eckstein says. “When [persecution of Jews] happened, we record [it] in our book,” he says. “[But] what we say is something different. There were times and locations in which legal or economic restrictions on Jews did not exist. Not because we say so, but because it is amply documented by many historians. Jews could own land and be farmers in the Umayyad and Abbasid Muslim empire. The same is true in early medieval Europe. If these restrictions did not exist in the locations and time period we cover, they cannot explain why the Jews left agriculture and entered trade, finance, medicine. There must have been some other factor that led the Jews to become the people they are today. In ‘The Chosen Few’ we propose an alternative hypothesis and we then verify whether this hypothesis is consistent with the historical evidence.” Jewish News Service
En fait, ce que nous avons voulu démontrer, ma collègue Maristella Botticini, de la Bocconi, et moi, c’est que l’obligation d’étudier a un coût, et oblige donc l’individu rationnel à rechercher une compensation pour obtenir un retour sur investissement. Dans le cas des juifs, le problème se pose après la destruction du Temple de Jérusalem, en 70 de l’ère courante. La caste des prêtres qui constituait alors l’élite perd le pouvoir au profit de la secte des pharisiens, qui accorde une grande importance à l’étude. C’est de cette secte que vont sortir les grands rabbis, ceux qui vont pousser les juifs à se concentrer sur l’étude de la Torah, un texte dont la tradition veut qu’elle ait été écrite par Moïse sous la dictée de Dieu. Vers l’an 200, obligation est ainsi faite aux pères de famille d’envoyer leurs fils dès l’âge de 6 ans à l’école rabbinique pour apprendre à lire et étudier la fameuse Torah. Or l’essentiel des juifs sont des paysans, et pour les plus pauvres, cette obligation pèse très lourd car elle les prive de bras pour travailler aux champs. Beaucoup vont alors préférer se convertir au christianisme, d’où, on le voit dans les statistiques de l’époque, une baisse drastique de la population juive au Proche-Orient à partir du IIIe siècle alors que, jusqu’à la destruction du Temple, cette religion était en augmentation constante et multipliait les convertis. Pour ceux qui ont accepté le sacrifice financier que représente la dévotion, il va s’agir de valoriser leur effort. Or autour d’eux, ni les chrétiens ni, plus tard, les musulmans n’imposent à leurs enfants d’apprendre à lire et à écrire. Les juifs bénéficient donc d’un avantage compétitif important. C’est ainsi un juif converti à l’islam qui a servi de scribe à Mahomet et aurait mis par écrit pour la première fois le Coran. (…) Notre étude, fondée sur l’évolution économique et démographique du peuple juif, de l’Antiquité à la découverte de l’Amérique, remet en cause en fait la plupart des théories avancées jusqu’ici. Si les juifs sont médecins, juristes ou banquiers plus souvent qu’à leur tour, ce n’est pas parce qu’ils sont persécutés et condamnés à s’exiler régulièrement, comme l’a avancé l’économiste Gary Becker, ou parce qu’ils n’avaient pas le droit d’être agriculteurs, comme l’a soutenu Cecil Roth. Car si dans certains pays, on les a empêchés de posséder des terres, c’était bien après qu’ils aient massivement abandonné l’agriculture, et s’ils ont pu être persécutés, cela ne justifie pas qu’ils soient devenus médecins ou juristes : les Samaritains, très proches des juifs et eux aussi traités comme des parias, sont demeurés paysans. De même, contrairement à ce que dit Max Weber, ce n’est pas parce qu’un juif ne peut pas être paysan du fait des exigences de la Loi juive. Les juifs du temps du Christ la respectaient alors qu’ils étaient majoritairement occupés à des travaux agricoles et à la pêche. C’est dans l’Orient musulman, sous les Omeyyades et les Abbassides, à un moment où ils sont particulièrement valorisés, que les juifs s’installent massivement dans les villes et embrassent des carrières citadines. Pourquoi ? Parce qu’ils peuvent alors tirer parti du fait d’être lettrés. D’un point de vue purement économique, il est alors beaucoup plus rentable de devenir marchand ou scientifique que de labourer la terre. D’où notre théorie : si les juifs sont devenus citadins et ont occupé des emplois indépendants de l’agriculture, c’est d’abord parce qu’ils étaient formés. Et s’ils étaient formés, c’est que leur religion exigeait qu’ils le soient. (…) ces professions étaient beaucoup plus rentables que le travail de paysan. Pour un juif du Moyen Âge, l’apprentissage de la Torah allait de pair avec le fait de faire des affaires. Rachi, le grand commentateur du Talmud, était un entrepreneur qui possédait des vignes. Ses quatre fils, tous érudits, se sont installés dans quatre villes différentes où ils ont tous fait du business, notamment de prêts d’argent, tout en étant rabbins. Grâce à leur connaissance des langues et leurs réseaux familiaux, les juifs ont pu rentabiliser leur formation, le fait de savoir lire et écrire, mais aussi raisonner, plus aisément que d’autres communautés. (…) Il est essentiel que la culture fasse partie intégrante de l’éducation quotidienne. Et en cela, la mère joue un rôle essentiel, toutes les études le montrent. C’est elle qui transmet les valeurs fondamentales. La probabilité que vous alliez à l’université est plus importante si votre mère a été elle-même à l’université. Donc, le fait que la mère ait un minimum d’éducation a représenté très tôt un avantage compétitif par rapport aux autres communautés religieuses où la femme n’en recevait pas. Nous étudions actuellement la période allant de la Renaissance à l’Holocauste. Et nous avons déjà découvert ceci : en Pologne, au XVIIe siècle, la population juive a fortement progressé par rapport à la population chrétienne. Pourquoi ? Tout simplement parce que la mortalité infantile y était plus faible. Conformément à l’enseignement du Talmud, les enfants bénéficiaient en effet d’un soin tout particulier. Les femmes gardaient leur enfant au sein plus longtemps que les chrétiennes, et elles s’en occupaient elles-mêmes. Voilà un exemple tout simple des effets que peut avoir l’éducation. Zvi Eckstein
Pour faire face au danger que le christianisme et la romanisation faisaient courir à la survie du judaïsme, les Pharisiens imposèrent une nouvelle forme de dévotion. Tout chef de famille, pour rester fidèle à la foi judaïque, se devait d’envoyer ses fils à l’école talmudique, afin de perpétuer et d’approfondir, par un travail cumulatif de commentaire, la connaissance de la Torah. Cette nouvelle obligation religieuse a eu des répercussions socio-économiques considérables. Envoyer ses fils à l’école représentait un investissement coûteux qui n’était pas à la portée de la majorité des juifs, simples paysans comme les autres populations du Moyen-Orient au milieu desquelles ils vivaient. Ceux qui n’en avaient pas les moyens et restèrent paysans, s’éloignèrent du judaïsme. Ils  se convertirent souvent au christianisme.  C’est ce qui explique l’effondrement de la population juive durant l’Antiquité tardive. Ceux qui tenaient au contraire à remplir leurs obligations religieuses, durent choisir des métiers plus rémunérateurs. Ils devinrent commerçants, artisans, médecins et surtout financiers. Les juifs ne se sont pas tournés vers ces métiers urbains parce qu’on leur interdisait l’accès à la terre, comme on l’a dit souvent, mais pour pouvoir gagner plus d’argent et utiliser en même temps leurs compétences de lettrés. Ils étaient capables désormais de tenir des comptes, écrire des ordres de paiement, etc… (…) S’ils s’imposent partout dans le crédit, ce n’est pas parce que l’Eglise interdisait aux chrétiens le prêt à intérêt (en réalité l’islam et le judaïsme lui imposaient des restrictions comme le christianisme), mais parce qu’ils ont à la fois la compétence et le réseau pour assurer le crédit, faire circuler les ordres de paiements et les marchandises précieuses du fond du monde musulman aux confins de la chrétienté.  (…) c’est souvent à la demande des seigneurs ou évêques locaux qu’ils étaient venus s’installer dans les villes chrétiennes, parce qu’on recherchait leur savoir faire pour développer les échanges et l’activité bancaire. Les premières mesures d’expulsion des juifs par des princes chrétiens à la fin du XIII° siècle semblent avoir été guidées par la volonté de mettre la main sur leurs richesses beaucoup plus que par le désir de les convertir. (…) C’est pour des raisons religieuses que le judaïsme s’est imposé brusquement un investissement éducatif coûteux qui le singularise parmi les grandes religions du livre. Car ni le Christianisme qui  s’est donné une élite particulière, à l’écart du monde, vouée à la culture écrite, ni l’Islam n’ont imposé à leur peuple de croyants un tel investissement dans l’alphabétisation. Cet investissement a eu l’effet d’une véritable sélection darwinienne.  Il a provoqué une réorientation complète de l’activité économique du monde juif  en même temps  qu’il faisait fondre sa masse démographique. Il a surtout fait fleurir, par le miracle de l’éducation, des aptitudes intellectuelles précieuses qui en ont fait durablement une minorité recherchée et jalousée. André Burguière

Vous avez dit « peuple d’élite, sûr de lui-même et dominateur » ?

Et si de Gaulle ou le premier Mohamed venu de nos banlieues avaient vu juste ?

Thanksgiving, le panier à trois points, l’Amérique, Superman, les droits civiques, le soft power, le génocide, la fête nationale, l’humour, la musique populaire, le désir, l’école …

Isaiah Berlin, Jerome Kern, Richard Rodgers, Harold Arlen, Hammerstein, Gershwin, Bernstein, Copland, Glass, Robert Zimmerman (alias Bob Dylan), Leonard Cohen, Elvis Presley, David Marks (Beach boys), Simon & Garfunkel, Jefferson Airplane, The Mamas & the Papas, Robby Krieger, Phil Spector, Melanie (Safka), Joey Ramone, Randy Meisner, Randy Newman, Lou Reed, Iggy Pop, (né James Osterberg) Beastie Boys, Pat Benatar (née Patricia Mae Andrzejewski), Blood, Sweat & Tears, David Lee Roth, Blue Öyster Cult, Kiss, Guns N’ Roses, The Cars, Harry Connick, Jr., Country Joe and the Fish, Neil Diamond, Chris Isaak, Janis Ian, Billy Joel, Carole King (née Carole Klein), Carly Simon, Linda Ronstadt, Courtney Love, Juice Newton (née Judith Kay Cohen), Pink, Barbra Streisand, Leonard Cohen, Abel Meeropol (« Strange fruit » pour Billie Holliday), Benny Goodman …

Goldwyn, Mayer, Warner, Cohn (Columbia), Zukor (Paramount), Fritz Lang, Ernst Lubitsch, Erich von Stroheim, Greorge Cukor, Cecil B. DeMille, Stanley Donen, Otto Preminger, Hedy Lamarr, frères Marx, Douglas Fairbanks (né Douglas Ullman), Fred Astaire (né Frederick Austerlitz), Danny Kaye, Paulette Goddard, Kirk Douglas, Michael Douglas, Dustin Hoffman, Robert Wise, Jerry Lewis, Mel Brooks, Sydney Pollack, Milos Forman, Stanley Kubrick, Steven Spielberg, Oliver Stone, Woody Allen, Scarlett Johansson, Natalie Portman, Sarah Michelle Gellar, Kate Hudson, Gwyneth Paltrow, Joaquin Phoenix, Winona Ryder, Alicia Silverstone, Tori Spelling, Patricia Arquette, Lisa Bonet, Phoebe Cates, Robert Downey Jr., David Duchovny, Daryl Hannah, Lisa Kudrow, Jennifer Jason Leigh, ulia Louis-Dreyfus, Cindy Margolis, Sarah Jessica Parker , Sean Penn, Adam Sandler, Rob Schneider, Ben Stiller, Rosanna Arquette, Jamie Lee Curtis, Carrie Fisher, Jerry Seinfeld, Howard Stern, Debra Winger , James Caan, Richard Dreyfuss, Harrison Ford, Goldie Hawn, Henry Winkler, Elliott Gould, Harvey Keitel, Leonard Nimoy, Gene Wilder, Lauren Bacall, Lenny Bruce, Tony Curtis, Paul Newman, Shelley Winters, Peter Falk, Lee J. Cobb, Sammy Davis, Jr., Marilyn Monroe (par conversion)…

Joe Shuster et Jerome Siegel (Superman), Joe Simon (Captain America), Bill Finger et Bob Kane (Batman), Stan Lee (Spider-Man, X-Men, The Hulk, Fantastic Four), Jack Kirby (Captain America, Hulk), Max Fleischer (Popeye, Betty Boop), Ralph Bakshi (Fritz the Cat), Art Spiegelman (Maus), Harvey Kurtzman, Al Jaffee, Al Feldstein, Will Elder et William Gaines (MAD) …

Capa, Man Ray, Fischer, Kasparov, Houdini, « Bugsy » Siegel

Einstein, Bohr, Hertz, Charpak, Cohen-Tanoudji, Bergson, Pasternak, Bellow, Singer, Canetti, Brodsky, Gordimer, Kertész, Pinter, Modiano, Dylan, Samuelson, Leontief, Friedman, Solow, Becker, Stieglitz, Kaufman, Cassin, Kissinger, Begin, Wiesel, Rabin, Peres …

Mahler, Mendelssohn, Schoenberg, Bernstein, Glass, Offenbach, Strauss …

Kafka, Proust, Heine, Zweig, Salinger, Rand, Miller, Heller, Mailer, Roth, Asimov, Auster, Hitchens …

Disraeli, Goldwater, Blum, Mendes-France, Mandel, Bloomberg, Miliband, Bernanke, Emanuel, Weiner …

Pissaro, Chagall, Modigliani, Soutine, Rivera, Kahlo, Lichtenstein, Rothko, Freud …

Marx, Freud, Spinoza, Ricardo, Trotsky, Chomsky, Arendt, Adorno, Jonas, Aron, Cassirer, Derrida, Durkheim, Lévi-Strauss, Fromm, Husserl, Benjamin, Wittgenstein, Jankelevitch, Levinas, Finkielkraut …

Rothschild, Rockerfeller, Levi Strauss, Zuckerberg, Ellison, Dell, Calvin Klein, Ralf Lauren,  Madoff,  Soros, Ivanka Trump …

Abraham, Moïse, Salomon, Jésus, Saul de Tarse (alias Paul)  …

A l’heure où, entre le prix Nobel de Bob Dylan et l’hommage planétaire à Léonard Cohen, la chanson populaire reçoit littéralement ses lettres de noblesse …

Et où l’ONU comme nos premiers humoristes venus n’ont que les juifs à la bouche …

Comment ne pas voir …

Derrière la forêt que cachent ces deux formidables arbres …

A savoir sans compter notre Jean-Jacques Goldman national contraint devant le trop-plein de célébrité (et d’imposition ?) de s’exiler à Londres …

La confirmation – sans parler des prix Nobel de science (24% pour moins de 0.2% de la population mondiale) – dans un domaine de plus …

Du fameux mot du général de Gaulle comme, de nos banlieues aux territoires dits « occupés », de l’intution des nouveaux damnés de la terre …

Surtout lorsque l’on comprend avec l’éclairant ouvrage de Maristella Botticini et Zvi Eckstein …

L’avance plus que millénaire suite à la destruction de leur Temple par les Romains et, abandonnant peu à peu l’agriculture, le réinvestissement dans l’étude de la « patrie portable » qu’était devenue leur Torah …

Qu’ils avaient prise dans l’alphabétisation de leurs enfants et, la surinstruction aidant, dans la spécialisation dans les professions les plus profitables (artisanat, commerce, prêt et médecine) …

D’où aussi la multimillénaire et souvent meurtrière jalousie que, comme plus tard leurs cousins protestants, ils ont inévitablement suscitée tout au long de leur histoire dans les sociétés où ils avaient le malheur de prospérer… ?

Comment l’éducation a façonné l’histoire juive
André Burguière
Mediapart
16 mars 2016

Avec leur remarquable « La poignée d’élus », les historiens Maristella Botticini et Zvi Ekcstein développent avec brio une thèse qui dédramatise la dispersion du peuple juif. Dans le sillage de Marc Bloch, ils montrent que la  religion concerne aussi l’infrastructure des sociétés, pas seulement leur superstructure.

Une avalanche de livres récents sur l’histoire du peuple juif a mis à mal l’image romantique du juif errant cherchant vainement, à travers le monde, un refuge et un toit loin de la Terre Sainte, après la destruction du Grand Temple de Jérusalem par Titus, le fils de l’Empereur Vespasien. Armés d’une solide connaissance des sources, Maristella Botticini et Zvi Ekcstein développent avec brio une thèse qui finit de dédramatiser la dispersion du peuple juif.

Au début de l’ère chrétienne, la population juive, présente en Palestine, en Mésopotamie et sur la rive africaine de la Méditerranée compte  prés de 6 millions d’âmes. Cinq siècles plus tard, il n’en reste à peine plus d’un million. La désintégration du monde urbain et la peste justinienne (au VI° et VII° siècles) ont provoqué un fort recul du peuplement dans tout le bassin méditerranéen mais pas au point d’expliquer un tel effondrement. En réalité, l’anéantissement des activistes juifs (les résistants de Massada) par l’intervention romaine, la disparition des zélotes ainsi que des notables religieux qui assuraient le service du Grand Temple, avaient fortifié en Palestine le pouvoir de la seule élite juive épargnée, les Pharisiens, c’est-à-dire les lettrés. Pour faire face au danger que le christianisme et la romanisation faisaient courir à la survie du judaïsme, les Pharisiens imposèrent une nouvelle forme de dévotion. Tout chef de famille, pour rester fidèle à la foi judaïque, se devait d’envoyer ses fils à l’école talmudique, afin de perpétuer et d’approfondir, par un travail cumulatif de commentaire, la connaissance de la Torah. Cette nouvelle obligation religieuse a eu des répercussions socio-économiques considérables. Envoyer ses fils à l’école représentait un investissement coûteux qui n’était pas à la portée de la majorité des juifs, simples paysans comme les autres populations du Moyen-Orient au milieu desquelles ils vivaient. Ceux qui n’en avaient pas les moyens et restèrent paysans, s’éloignèrent du judaïsme. Ils  se convertirent souvent au christianisme.  C’est ce qui explique l’effondrement de la population juive durant l’Antiquité tardive. Ceux qui tenaient au contraire à remplir leurs obligations religieuses, durent choisir des métiers plus rémunérateurs. Ils devinrent commerçants, artisans, médecins et surtout financiers. Les juifs ne se sont pas tournés vers ces métiers urbains parce qu’on leur interdisait l’accès à la terre, comme on l’a dit souvent, mais pour pouvoir gagner plus d’argent et utiliser en même temps leurs compétences de lettrés. Ils étaient capables désormais de tenir des comptes, écrire des ordres de paiement, etc…

A partir du IX° siècle, la diaspora juive se reconstitue mais avec une répartition géographique différente. Toujours très présente en Mésopotamie et bientôt dans tout le monde musulman, elle commence à s’installer dans l’Europe chrétienne où elle tisse un réseau de plus en plus dense de petites communautés juives qui recouvre le réseau urbain en plein réveil. Les « juiveries » sont de taille modeste car les juifs craignent de se faire concurrence dans ces métiers très spécialisés. En revanche, le grand nombre de ces implantations qui peuvent se mettre en réseau, fait leur force. Dans un espace où la circulation est difficile, risquée, le fait d’avoir des correspondants, à l’autre bout du monde connu, en qui l’on peut avoir pleine confiance parce que la moindre irrégularité commerciale ou financière les exclurait de leur communauté, a donné aux juifs un avantage considérable.

S’ils s’imposent partout dans le crédit, ce n’est pas parce que l’Eglise interdisait aux chrétiens le prêt à intérêt (en réalité l’islam et le judaïsme lui imposaient des restrictions comme le christianisme), mais parce qu’ils ont à la fois la compétence et le réseau pour assurer le crédit, faire circuler les ordres de paiements et les marchandises précieuses du fond du monde musulman aux confins de la chrétienté. A part quelques cas assez rares d’intolérance religieuse, comme dans l’Espagne wisigothique, les juifs n’ont guère été l’objet de persécutions religieuses avant le XII° siècle. L’historien Berhard Blumenkranz avait daté les premiers pogroms de juifs en Occident (par exemple dans la vallée du Rhin) de la mise en mouvement des premières croisades.

Mais c’est souvent à la demande des seigneurs ou évêques locaux qu’ils étaient venus s’installer dans les villes chrétiennes, parce qu’on recherchait leur savoir faire pour développer les échanges et l’activité bancaire. Les premières mesures d’expulsion des juifs par des princes chrétiens à la fin du XIII° siècle semblent avoir été guidées par la volonté de mettre la main sur leurs richesses beaucoup plus que par le désir de les convertir.

Ce sont paradoxalement les mongols, pourtant eux-mêmes assez éclectiques au plan religieux et parfois tentés par le judaïsme, qui ont interrompu ce premier âge d’or de la diaspora juive, à partir du milieu du XIII° siècle, en ravageant le monde musulman. L’effondrement des principales villes a ruiné l’activité des juifs qui animaient les circuits d’échanges économiques et financiers. Ruinés, les juifs sont redevenus paysans et, ne pouvant plus assumer l’investissement scolaire exigé par le rabbinat, ils se sont assez vite islamisés. Cet effondrement a créé un véritable court circuit avec le réseau des implantations juives de l’Europe chrétienne. Il y aura, à l’époque moderne, un nouveau cycle de la diaspora juive qui va même gagner le Nouveau Monde ; mais un cycle au rythme heurté, perturbé par les expulsions, les procès de l’Inquisition et d’autres manifestations de l’intolérance chrétienne, en attendant des horreurs bien pires encore.

La façon dont Maristella Botticini et Zvi Eckstein ont rebattu les cartes de l’histoire, ô combien singulière, du peuple juif en lui appliquant un modèle inspiré par la réflexion économique, sera peut-être critiquée par certains spécialistes pour son schématisme démonstratif. Mais elle est fascinante. Marc Bloch, voulant critiquer le réductionnisme de certaines interprétations marxistes du rôle de l’Eglise au Moyen-Âge, affirmait que pour comprendre certaines époques, il fallait renoncer  à considérer que la  religion concerne toujours la superstructure et l’économie l’infrastructure. C’est parfois l’inverse. Ce livre nous en fournit une magnifique démonstration.

C’est pour des raisons religieuses que le judaïsme s’est imposé brusquement un investissement éducatif coûteux qui le singularise parmi les grandes religions du livre. Car ni le Christianisme qui  s’est donné une élite particulière, à l’écart du monde, vouée à la culture écrite, ni l’Islam n’ont imposé à leur peuple de croyants un tel investissement dans l’alphabétisation. Cet investissement a eu l’effet d’une véritable sélection darwinienne.  Il a provoqué une réorientation complète de l’activité économique du monde juif  en même temps  qu’il faisait fondre sa masse démographique. Il a surtout fait fleurir, par le miracle de l’éducation, des aptitudes intellectuelles précieuses qui en ont fait durablement une minorité recherchée et jalousée.

* Maristella Botticini et Zvi Eckstein, La poignée d’élus. Comment l’éducation a façonné l’histoire juive 70-1492 , Albin Michel, 425 p., 30 euros.

Voir aussi:

Pourquoi les Juifs sont-ils plus souvent médecins que paysans ?

Dans « Une poignée d’élus », deux économistes expliquent les heureuses conséquences de l’apprentissage des textes sacrés par les enfants. Interview.

Catherine Golliau

Le Point
05/04/2016

Bob Dylan, le juif errant prix Nobel de littérature

Jonathan Aleksandrowicz

Actualité juive

13/10/2016

Enorme surprise ! Bob Dylan, l’auteur-compositeur-interprète qui a traversé la musique populaire de la seconde moitié du XXè siècle, vient d’être récompensé par le prix Nobel de littérature.

On attendait le Syrien Adonis, le Japonais Murakami, voire le Norvégien Jon Fosse. Le jury du prix Nobel de littérature a choisi de prendre tout son monde à contrepied pour 2016 en faisant d’un chanteur populaire mais grand poète le récipiendaire de la distinction. Bien sûr, certain regretteront avec justesse que Philip Roth n’ait encore une fois pas été récompensé, mais la retraite du vieux patron des lettres américaines l’a probablement écarté pour toujours des débats tenus secrets durant 50 ans des jurés du Nobel. Quant au très vendeur Murakami, la réputation de « superficialité » de ses textes selon le petit monde du livre remet aux calendes grecques la figuration de son nom au palmarès, même s’il est chaque année le grandissime favori des bookmakers.

Bob Dylan, donc. Le sale gosse de la folk-music, celui qui donne désormais des concerts où il assure le strict minimum, limitant ses interactions avec le public. Un choix fort pour le jury du Nobel, le désignant « pour avoir créé dans le cadre de la grande tradition de la musique américaine de nouveaux modes d’expression poétique ». Plus que la tradition de la musique américaine, c’est celle des troubadours et trouvères, ces poètes-conteurs-chanteurs du Moyen-Âge que Bob Dylan a d’abord incarné. Né dans le Minnesota en 1941 à deux pas de la route 61 qui inspirera l’un de ses albums les plus emblématiques « Highway 61 revisited », celui qui est d’abord Robert Zimmerman  pour l’état-civil et Shabbtaï à sa circoncision, vient d’une famille juive d’Odessa qui a fui les pogroms du début du XXè siècle. La petite communauté juive locale est dit-on, très unie par les épreuves vécues en Europe de l’Est. Le signe de l’errance, de la fuite. Il en est le porteur, il l’assume à la première occasion en filant à New York à la première occasion, abandonnant ses études à l’université dès la première année.

Hobboes

Là-bas, à Greenwich Village, il n’est pas le plus doué de tous les folkeux qui écument le quartier, mais il est le plus assidu. « Avec le temps, la goutte fend les rocs les plus résistants » dit le Talmud. Pour ce faire, il fréquente de longues heures les bibliothèques afin de dénicher les chansons folkloriques les plus anciennes. Les Etats-Unis sortent de peu de la Seconde guerre mondiale et la crise des années 1930 est derrière elle, mais son imaginaire collectif est encore tributaire des Hobboes, ces vagabonds, clochards célestes, que le « Jeudi noir » a mis sur les routes et les rails en quête d’un travail plus à l’ouest. La conquête de l’ouest au XIXe siècle s’est poursuivie avec l’espoir à l’ouest. Les lecteurs de John Steinbeck se souviendront des « Raisins de la colère ». Ces Hobboes, donc, figures mythiques du rêve américain, sans le sou mais les yeux dans les étoiles, affamés mais libres, ont souvent une guitare à la main et la bouche pleine de chansons pour rythmer les nuits de leur infortune. Ils deviennent la source d’inspiration principale de Bob Dylan qui à l’origine chante des reprises. Suivre cette tradition, la dépoussiérer, mais rien n’y ajouter.

Pourtant, le jeune homme écrit déjà des poèmes, de longs poèmes qu’il met en musique. Ecrite dix minutes dans un café, « Blowin’ in the wind » devient l’une des premières Protest Songs qui portent les luttes d’émancipation aux Etats-Unis. Car Bob Dylan, c’est d’abord la figure de la contre-culture américaine. Avant Woodstock, son Flower Power et son Summer of Love, Bob Dylan est le chantre des Beatniks : un artiste engagé, le « prophète-poète » de cette jeune génération d’après-guerre, chantant même avec sa grande complice de l’époque Joan Baez à la Marche de Washington. Encore cette idée de mouvement, la marche, cette impossibilité de tenir en place qui force à l’errance. Mais « The times they are a changin’ », car il opère dès 1965 un tournant plus rock, que le monde Folk dont il est issu ne lui pardonne pas. Exit la guitare sèche et l’harmonica, « Highway 61 revisited », plus musclé, résonne de guitares électriques, et comporte notamment la célébrissime « Like a rolling stone », élue morceau rock du XXe siècle ! D’une durée de presque sept minutes, Bob Dylan raconte dans ses « Chroniques » qu’elle comportait bien plus de strophes à l’origine. Situation identique pour l’ultra-repris « Knocking on heaven’s door » qui fait partie de la bande-originale du film de Sam Peckinpah « Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid » dans lequel il tient un rôle muet de lanceur de couteaux pas malhabile de ses mains.

Audace

Des chansons à rallonge, des poèmes aux strophes sans fin, Bob Dylan pourtant admet lui-même que l’inspiration a tendance à se tarir et qu’il lui faut user de moyens intenses pour la faire jaillir du rocher. Ses « Chroniques » évoquent d’ailleurs avec intensité son errance lorsqu’il dut enregistrer deux albums à Nashville. Une véritable traversée du désert, d’autant que le « poète-prophète » est bientôt surnommé le « poète-profit » à cause d’un style jugé commercial. Qu’importe, encore un contrepied : sa voix usée le pousse à chaque fois à réinterpréter ses chansons et le fan distrait serait bien incapable de reconnaître ses titres préférés lors d’un concert s’il n’est pas capable d’attention. Les strophes qui s’étiraient en longueur se brisent en même temps que sa voix comme si chaque nouvelle scène portait la possibilité d’errer autour d’une chanson comme autour d’un idéal que l’on n’atteint jamais. Détresse à cause d’un horizon de sens toujours fuyant ? Une réponse peut-être, dans la conversion au christianisme évangélique à la fin des années 1970 : le beatnik assagi par la grâce d’une nouvelle naissance ! Les fans sont déçus, les musiciens le raillent ? Lui n’en a cure ! Que les filles et « les garçons ne pleurent pas », parce que même le chant demeure pour lui une aventure personnelle, et la Bible abonde en prophètes qui se mirent le peuple à dos. L’errance ne s’achève pas là, puisqu’il fait son retour au judaïsme. Enfin la terre promise ? Pas sûr, tant pour lui, tout vient à se faner…

Le choix des jurés du Nobel est donc extrêmement audacieux. C’est une icône populaire qui se trouve récompensée, un chanteur avant que d’être un poète, un homme qui a su sans cesse se poser des questions. On a désormais hâte d’entendre son discours de réception du prix qui sera sans nul doute la curiosité des soirées de remise.

Voir encore:

Leonard Cohen et son Dieu
Dominique Cerbelaud
La Croix
22/10/2016

À l’occasion de la sortie du nouvel album de Leonard Cohen, « You want it darker », le théologien Dominique Cerbelaud évoque la quête spirituelle du chanteur canadien.

Vendredi 21 octobre 2016, Leonard Cohen, 82 ans, offre un nouvel album à son public, intitulé You want it darker (« Tu voudrais qu’il fasse plus sombre »). C’est l’occasion de revenir sur son œuvre de chanteur, entreprise voici un demi-siècle. C’est à 1967, en effet, que remonte le premier disque du Montréalais, Songs of Leonard Cohen (« Chansons de Leonard Cohen »), qui comportait notamment le titre Suzanne – une chanson qui devait assurer à tout jamais sa notoriété.

De fait, le public français connaît Cohen surtout comme chanteur (rappelons cependant son œuvre de poète et de romancier), mais il ne garde souvent mémoire que des compositions les plus anciennes, sans guère prêter attention à l’œuvre ultérieure – sinon pour quelques chansons cultes comme Hallelujah ou Closing Time. Ce corpus, qui compte aujourd’hui environ cent cinquante titres, mérite pourtant qu’on s’y arrête : il s’agit, comme on dit si bien, de « chansons à textes », longuement mûries et soigneusement composées, d’une densité et d’une richesse rares. On se propose de le survoler ici sous l’angle des thématiques religieuses, qui représentent à n’en pas douter l’une des grandes préoccupations de Leonard Cohen.

D’autres thèmes y apparaissent avec insistance, et en tout premier lieu celui de la relation amoureuse, décliné inlassablement : « À cause de ces quelques chansons/dans lesquelles j’évoque leur mystère/ les femmes ont été d’une gentillesse exceptionnelle /envers mon grand âge » (Because of, album Dear Heather). Ainsi parlait le septuagénaire, avec une belle modestie : en réalité, c’est dans bon nombre de textes qu’il célèbre le mystère de la femme, sous toutes ses figures et dans tous ses états. Et les femmes, de toute évidence, lui en savent gré.

Qu’elle soit nommée (depuis les mythiques Suzanne, Nancy et Marianne jusqu’aux plus récentes Heather et Alexandra), ou que, le plus souvent, elle reste anonyme, la femme est en effet omniprésente du début à la fin du corpus cohénien.

Le personnage biblique de David, dont le nom en hébreu signifie « bien-aimé », pourrait représenter à cet égard le « modèle » de Leonard. La tradition attribue à ce roi poète et musicien tout l’ensemble du livre des Psaumes. Mais le texte biblique nous fait connaître aussi le nom d’un certain nombre de femmes de ce grand polygame : Ahinoam, Abigayil, Mikal, Égla, Avital, Bethsabée, Abishag… Laissons aux biographes le soin de faire la liste de celles qu’a pu connaître le Canadien errant… si tant est que cela ait de l’importance dans son parcours de créateur.

Des allusions très précises à la tradition juive

Et nous voilà déjà dans le texte biblique !

De fait, les compositions de Cohen regorgent d’allusions scripturaires, qui témoignent d’une fréquentation assidue du Livre saint : on y retrouve bien des personnages (Adam, Samson, David ou Isaac), des épisodes (notamment ceux du Déluge ou de la sortie d’Égypte), des réminiscences de tel ou tel prophète voire, justement, de tel ou tel psaume. Ainsi, la chanson By the Rivers Dark (album Ten New Songs) propose une relecture hardie du ps.136-137 : « Vers les sombres fleuves j’allais, errant / j’ai passé ma vie à Babylone / et j’ai oublié mon saint cantique / je n’avais pas de force à Babylone ».

Mais il y a plus : sans jamais s’y attarder, Cohen distille à l’occasion des allusions très précises à la tradition juive, tant liturgique que mystique –et notamment à la kabbale. On trouve par exemple des allusions au thème de la « brisure des vases » dans la chanson Anthem (album The Future) : « il y a une fissure, une fissure en toute chose / c’est comme ça que la lumière pénètre »…

Parmi les figures juives du passé, il en est une qui ne laisse pas tranquille le juif Leonard Cohen : c’est celle de Jésus. L’homme de Nazareth apparaît avec une fréquence étonnante dans le corpus des chansons (j’en relève pour ma part une douzaine d’occurrences, explicites ou non). « Jésus pris au sérieux par beaucoup, Jésus pris à la blague par quelques-uns » (Jazz Police, album I’m Your Man) : et par toi-même, Leonard ? Cela reste quelque peu indécidable. S’il avoue ne rien comprendre au Sermon sur la montagne (Democracy, album The Future), et évoque « le Christ qui n’est pas ressuscité / hors des cavernes du cœur » (The Land of Plenty, album Ten New Songs), notre auteur, à propos de Jésus, se parle ainsi à lui-même : « tu veux voyager avec lui / tu veux voyager en aveugle / et tu penses pouvoir lui faire confiance / car il a touché ton corps parfait avec son esprit » (Suzanne, album Songs of Leonard Cohen). Et comment comprendre cette double injonction : « Montre-moi l’endroit où le Verbe s’est fait homme / montre-moi l’endroit où la souffrance a commencé » (Show me the Place, album Old Ideas) ? Il y a là un singulier mélange de dérision et de fascination.

Curieusement, les figures de la sainteté chrétienne suscitent chez lui une sympathie plus immédiate : celles de la vierge Marie –si c’est bien elle qu’il faut reconnaître dans Notre-Dame de la solitude (Our Lady of Solitude, album Recent Songs) ; de François d’Assise (Death of a Ladies’ Man, dans l’album homonyme) ; de Bernadette de Lourdes (Song of Bernadette, chantée par Jennifer Warnes dans son album Famous Blue Raincoat) ; et surtout de Jeanne d’Arc (Last Year’s Man et Joan of Arc, toutes deux dans l’album Songs of Love and Hate). C’est le lieu de rappeler que le jeune Leonard Cohen a acquis, à Montréal, une bonne culture chrétienne. Certains aspects de la piété catholique, comme le culte du Sacré-Cœur ou les visions de sœur Faustine, continuent d’ailleurs à le toucher.

Ajoutons que depuis de longues années, l’auteur-compositeur s’intéresse au bouddhisme zen, et qu’il a effectué à ce titre de longs séjours au monastère de Mount Baldy, près de Los Angeles. Cependant, les thèmes religieux extrême-orientaux n’apparaissent guère dans le corpus des chansons, sinon à l’état de traces…

Un ton élégiaque

Mais au-delà de ces contenus, il faut tenter d’évoquer le ton, ou plutôt les tons dont il use pour les décliner.

Nous avons déjà rencontré la modulation élégiaque : c’est celle de la célébration de l’amour, toujours recommencée. Des paysages s’ébauchent ici, ou plutôt des évocations, où l’on trouve bon nombre de clairs de lune, de cloches qui carillonnent et de chants d’oiseaux. Sans oublier le fleuve, souvent présent chez ce natif de Montréal…

Nous avons également capté au passage les accents mystiques.

Rappelons à cet égard que l’emblème juif le plus communément répandu s’appelle « sceau de Salomon » ou « bouclier de David ». Il se constitue de deux triangles entrelacés qui dessinent une étoile à six branches. C’est celui qui figure par exemple sur le drapeau de l’État d’Israël.

Or Leonard s’est confectionné, au fil du temps, son propre « sceau » à partir non pas de deux triangles, mais de deux cœurs.

Comment interpréter un tel logo ? On peut voir dans l’assemblage de ces deux cœurs l’union du masculin et du féminin, une sorte de yin-yang judaïsé.

Mais on peut aussi en proposer une autre lecture car ce dessin est apparu pour la première fois sur la couverture de la deuxième édition du Book of Mercy (Livre de la Miséricorde), le recueil de prières juives composé par Leonard. Aujourd’hui enrichi et compliqué d’éléments adventices, il s’accompagne parfois de la légende « Order of the Unified Heart », ce qui renvoie clairement à l’univers religieux. Dès lors, les deux cœurs ne représentent-ils pas celui de l’homme… et celui de Dieu ? Cet Ordre religieux d’un nouveau genre, Leonard en est d’ores et déjà le grand prêtre : n’est-ce pas la fonction primordiale du prêtre d’assurer ainsi la double médiation, de la terre vers le ciel et du ciel vers la terre ? Or « prêtre » se dit en hébreu… « cohen ».

Il faut citer à ce propos la superbe chanson qui s’adresse ainsi à l’Être divin : « Que ta miséricorde se déverse / sur tous ces cœurs qui brûlent en enfer / si c’est ta volonté / de nous faire du bien » (If it Be Your Will, album Various Positions).

Ici s’unissent bel et bien le cœur de l’homme (il s’agit d’une prière d’intercession) et celui de Dieu (prêt à répandre sa tendresse sur l’humanité).

Or selon un adage de la tradition juive : « la porte de la prière est parfois fermée, mais la porte de la miséricorde reste toujours ouverte ».

Une compassion intense envers les souffrants

Leonard a compris cette leçon. Et s’il n’adopte le ton de la prière que de manière exceptionnelle (par exemple dans Born in Chains et You Got Me Singing, deux chansons de l’album Popular Problems), il témoigne fréquemment d’une véritable compassion envers tous ceux qui crient : « de grâce, ne passez pas indifférents » (Please, Don’t Pass me by, album Live Songs), qu’il s’agisse de l’enfant encore à naître, de l’exclu, du handicapé, bref de tous les « pauvres » au sens biblique du terme. « Et je chante ceci pour le capitaine / dont le navire n’a pas été bâti / pour la maman bouleversée / devant son berceau toujours vide / pour le cœur sans compagnon / pour l’âme privée de roi / pour la danseuse étoile / qui n’a plus aucune raison de danser » (Heart With no Companion, album Various Positions).

Du reste, au-delà de toutes les formes religieuses, il convient de souligner que plusieurs textes de notre Juif errant évoquent la rencontre de Dieu. Ces expériences mystiques, que l’auteur suggère avec discrétion, peuvent avoir pour cadre une église (Ain’t no Cure for Love, album I’m Your Man), mais aussi une simple chambre (Love Itself, album Ten New Songs), voire un lieu indéterminé (Almost Like the Blues, album Popular Problems). Pudeur cohénienne, mais aussi sans doute réticence juive à mettre un nom sur le « Sans-Nom ». « J’entends une voix qui m’évoque celle de Dieu », dit-il (Closing Time, album The Future) : n’est-ce pas elle qu’il faut reconnaître dans Going Home (album Old Ideas) : « J’aime parler avec Leonard… » ? Mais ce dialogue d’amour entre Leonard et son Dieu restera secret.

Chéri par les femmes, le David biblique apparaît également comme l’élu de Dieu, lequel déclare : « J’ai trouvé David, un homme selon mon cœur » (Actes des apôtres, 13, 22). Et notre barde de Montréal, comme en écho : « J’ai appris qu’il y avait un accord secret / que David jouait pour plaire au Seigneur » (Hallelujah, album Various Positions).

Mystique et critique

Outre les deux tonalités que l’on vient d’évoquer, la lyrique et la mystique, il existe un troisième registre, non moins prégnant chez Leonard : c’est celui du constat désabusé, parfois même désespéré pour ne pas dire nihiliste. Donnons-en quelques échantillons : « Les pauvres restent pauvres et les riches s’enrichissent / c’est comme ça que ça se passe / tout le monde le sait » (Everybody Knows, album I’m Your Man) ; « De parcourir le journal / ça donne envie de pleurer / tout le monde s’en fiche que les gens / vivent ou meurent » (In my Secret Life, album Ten New Songs) ; « Je n’ai pas d’avenir / je sais que mes jours sont comptés / le présent n’est pas si agréable / juste pas mal de choses à faire / je pensais que le passé allait me durer / mais la noirceur s’y est mise aussi » (The Darkness, album Old Ideas) ; « J’ai vu des gens qui mouraient de faim / il y avait des meurtres, il y avait des viols / leurs villages étaient en feu / ils essayaient de s’enfuir » (Almost Like the Blues, album Popular Problems).

Et rien n’échappe à cet acide corrosif, pas même l’amour des femmes. Nous voilà loin de la célébration de l’éros, comme si l’on était passé du Cantique des Cantiques… au livre de Qohélet : « Vanité des vanités, dit Qohélet ; vanité des vanités, tout est vanité » (Qohélet, 1, 2).

Mais justement, ces deux textes bibliques se présentent comme écrits par le même Salomon, ce qui ne manquera pas de rendre perplexes les commentateurs : comment le fils de David a-t-il pu composer deux ouvrages d’esprit aussi diamétralement opposé ? Les rabbins ont imaginé une réponse : c’est le jeune Salomon, amoureux et optimiste, qui a écrit le Cantique ; devenu vieux, blasé et pessimiste, il a composé le livre de Qohélet. Mais tout cela relève du même genre littéraire : la littérature de sagesse.

Somme toute, il en va de même pour Leonard, qui déploie à son tour les différents aspects d’une moderne sagesse. Du reste, mystique et critique peuvent chez lui aller de pair : « Tu m’as fait chanter / quand bien même tout allait de travers / tu m’as fait chanter / la chanson ‘Alléluia’ » (You Got me Singing, ibid.)…

Qu’il me soit permis de citer pour finir un souvenir personnel. Lors de ma première rencontre avec Leonard (une après-midi entière dans le jardin d’un hôtel particulier parisien), je lui ai posé la question : « Leonard, tu es juif ; tu es en train de parler avec un prêtre catholique ; on sait que tu t’intéresses beaucoup au bouddhisme : comment tout cela tient-il ensemble ? »

Réponse : « Oui, je suis juif, et cela a beaucoup d’importance pour moi ; j’ai des amis catholiques, et j’ai grand plaisir à parler avec eux ; je fais des séjours au monastère de Mount Baldy. Mais tu vois, pour moi, tout cela ce sont des chemins. Ce qui importe, c’est le but. La seule chose qui m’intéresse, c’est Dieu »…

Y a-t-il beaucoup de célébrités, dans le monde du show-biz, qui pourraient dire en toute vérité : « La seule chose qui m’intéresse, c’est Dieu » ?

Voir enfin:

Leonard Cohen, mort d’un artiste légendaire

Le poète et chanteur canadien Leonard Cohen s’est éteint à l’âge de 82 ans, a annoncé son entourage ce 10 novembre. Amoureux des mots, monstre sacré de la musique, il laisse derrière lui une carrière de plus de cinquante ans de succès qui ont traversé les générations. « Tu nous manqueras », a dit le Premier ministre canadien Justin Trudeau, dans un vibrant hommage au musicien disparu.

Leonard Cohen est mort, a annoncé son entourage ce 10 novembre 2016, quelques jours après la sortie de son dernier album You want it darker, hanté par la mort. L’homme, au visage d’acteur qui ne se défaisait que rarement de son chapeau et de sa guitare ou de son harmonica, avait 82 ans.

Né à Montréal le 21 septembre 1934, Leonard Cohen se met à la guitare dès l’adolescence et forme, quelques années plus tard le groupe de country music Buckskin Boys. Etudiant à l’université de Montréal, le musicien, qui est aussi homme de lettres, publie ses premiers poèmes dans une revue étudiante. Il n’a que 18 ans quand est édité un recueil de ses poésies. Le nom de Leonard Cohen commence à se répandre.

Le jeune homme ne cache pas son amour pour les romanciers français comme Camus et Sartre, pour le poète espagnol Federico Garcia Lorca, l’Irlandais William Butler Yeats, et pour la Bible, « les poésies de la Bible », confiait-il.

Leonard Cohen s’envole pour Londres à la fin des années 1960 puis décide de s’installer sur une île grecque, Hydra, lieu propice à l’inspiration, en 1960. Là-bas, il acquiert une maison qu’il gardera quarante ans et continue d’écrire des poèmes et des romans. En 1966, à la publication de Beautiful Losers même si le nombre de ventes n’est pas énorme, le Boston Globe déclare que « James Joyce n’est pas mort. Il vit sous le nom de Leonard Cohen ».

« Suzanne »

Puis Leonard Cohen se lance dans la chanson. Il côtoie Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Lou Reed, etc. C’est grâce au titre très minimaliste « Suzanne », l’ex-épouse d’un de ses amis, qu’il parvient à fouler les planches de la scène musicale en 1967, aux Etats-Unis où il s’est installé. La même année il sort son premier album, Songs of Leonard Cohen, salué par la critique européenne.

Mais il faut attendre Songs from a Room (1969), pour que la future star planétaire soit reconnue, avec, entre autres, les titres « Bird on the Wire », « Story of Isaac » et « The Partisan ». Leonard Cohen va ensuite composer plus d’une dizaine d’albums, et sortir de nombreux live. Son très spirituel et mystique (et planétairement connu) « Hallelujah » sort en 1984 sur l’album Various Positions. Le changement de ton apparaît, ainsi que les synthétiseurs, en 1988 sur I’m Your Man. Pour ses 80 printemps sort Popular Problems, un album empreint de blues encensé par la critique internationale. Le charme inconditionnel de Leonard Cohen opère, encore et toujours.

Durant toute sa carrière d’écrivain, de musicien, de compositeur, Leonard Cohen n’aura presque écrit et chanté que les mêmes thèmes. L’amour et la passion bien sûr et l’espoir, mais aussi religion, la rédemption, la sexualité, la drogue, l’imperfection de la condition humaine et la solitude, un sujet dont il ne se défait que rarement, lui qui avouait être chroniquement en dépression.

Un homme mystique et charismatique

Leonard Cohen a grandi au sein d’une famille juive d’ascendance polonaise. Son grand-père était rabbin et son père, décédé alors qu’il n’a que 9 ans, a été le créateur du journal The Jewish Times. « Monsieur Cohen est un juif observant qui respecte le shabbat même lorsqu’il est en tournée », écrit le New York Times en 2009.

Parallèlement à sa judéité, Leonard Cohen se retire de la vie publique durant près de cinq ans (1994-1999) dans un monastère bouddhiste près de Los Angeles, en plein désert californien. Certains se demandent alors comment il peut être à la fois juif pratiquant et bouddhiste. « Pour commencer, dans la tradition du Zen que j’ai pratiquée, il n’y a pas de service de prière et il n’y a pas d’affirmation de déité. Donc, théologiquement, il n’y a pas d’opposition aux croyances juives », racontera l’artiste.

En 1996, Leonard Cohen est ordonné moine zen, il porte le nom de Jikan, « le silencieux ». Il faudra attendre 2001 pour retrouver le chanteur et poète, avec le sublime Ten New Songs, coécrit avec Sharon Robinson. Le compositeur, toujours très énigmatique, avoue devoir prendre son temps pour écrire, il est en quête perpétuelle de réflexion… et de perfection.

Pour sa carrière multiforme, Leonard Cohen se voit décerner de nombreuses récompenses, dont celle en 2003 de compagnon de l’Ordre du Canada, de membre du Panthéon des auteurs et compositeurs canadiens en 2006, membre du Rock and Roll Hall of Fame en 2008.

Des centaines de reprises et une influence sur de nombreuses générations

Parce que Leonard Cohen est un homme « à part » dans la chanson, allant de la musique folk à la pop en passant par le blues et l’électro, il n’a eu de cesse d’inspirer de nombreux artistes qui ont aussi repris, et parfois traduit, ses propres chansons.

Plus de 1 500 titres du poète chanteur ont été repris. Il en va ainsi de dizaines d’artistes de renommée mondiale, dont Nina Simone, Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Nick Cave, Peter Gabriel, Alain Bashung, Graeme Allwright, Suzanne Vega, sans oublier la version bouleversante d’ « Hallelujah » par Jeff Buckley.

Leonard Cohen a de son côté très rarement repris des titres dont il n’était pas l’auteur. Parmi eux, sa réinterprétation de « La complainte du partisan » (dont la musique est signée Anna Marly, coautrice avec Maurice Druon et Joseph Kessel du « Chant des partisans »). « The Partisan », sera aussi repris à son tour par Noir Désir.

Le 29 juillet 2016, Marianne Ihlen, la muse norvégienne de Leonard Cohen pour qui il compose « So, long, Marianne » disparaît à l’âge de 81 ans. Leonard Cohen, deux jours avant la mort de « la plus belle femme qu’il ait jamais connue », lui écrit une lettre. « Eh bien, Marianne, voici venu le temps où nous sommes vraiment si vieux que nos corps partent en morceaux, et je crois que je vais te suivre très bientôt. Sache que je suis si près derrière toi qu’en tendant ta main, tu peux toucher la mienne (…) Je veux seulement te souhaiter un très bon voyage. Adieu, ma vieille amie. Mon amour éternel, nous nous reverrons. » So long, Leonard Cohen.

Voir par ailleurs:

The Chosen Few
Has an emphasis on education been bad for the Jewish population?
Steven Weiss
Slate
Nov. 9 2012

Jews, as a whole, have done very well for themselves in the West since World War II: Besides the aforementioned Nobel prizes, American Jews, according to one of the largest studies, are nearly twice as likely to have a college degree as the average American and more than four times as likely to have a graduate degree. This translates into a serious economic advantage: American Jews are roughly 33 percent more likely to be employed in a high-status job category, and Jewish households here report around 25 percent higher income than the average American household.

While examining such a phenomenon would have been unthinkable a few decades ago—when Jews generally tended to be more frightened of raising the kinds of topics anti-Semites like to talk about—the past decade or so has seen a wellspring of effort devoted to tackling what’s variously described as Jewish « literacy, » « superiority, » or any number of other things, including « chosenness. »

The core theory usually derives from a mix of two themes that stand out in Jewish history: an emphasis on education and a tendency to be persecuted. For the former, the rabbis of the Talmud and thereafter were fierce advocates of universal primary education, with the best-known example being a Jewish boy indicating his achievement of Jewish adulthood by reading publicly from the Torah at a bar mitzvah. (Universal primary education was boys-only until at least the late 19th century.) In regard to persecution, a common notion is that Jews weren’t allowed to own land throughout much of their history in exile and thus were forced to invest in a form of personal capital that could be of value across geographies. There are other theories, too, some even including a notion of simple genetic superiority, by way of an idea that Jewish communities modified natural selection through upholding scholars as examples of the proper way to be, providing them the choicest wives and expecting them to have many children.

The problem with so many of the theories thus far expounded is that they have gaping holes in logic or evidence so large that let’s just say they’d never make it into the Talmud. By far the largest fault with them is the reality that many of these arguments rely on an idea of the Jewish past that we don’t have any good reason to think is true; just because the rabbis desired it doesn’t mean it was necessarily so. And our overall received notions of a Jewish community that was fiercely observant and often Orthodox also have little evidence to back them up. (And, as Alana Newhouse revealed a couple of years ago, even the images we have of a fiercely pious Jewish shtetl have been largely manipulated.)

Maristella Botticini and Zvi Eckstein started jawing over the issue of the Jews’ economic history in the Boston University cafeteria 12 years ago, and the resulting research, conferences, and communication since has produced the first of a two-volume work, The Chosen Few, that tackles these issues in a way no one has before, taking an interdisciplinary approach to this basic question.

By combining a very thorough look at the historical record with new economic and demographic analyses, the authors summarily dismiss a great many of the underlying assumptions that have produced theories around Jewish literacy in the past. Where many tied the Jewish move into professional trades to the European era when Jews were persecuted, Botticini and Eckstein bring forward evidence that the move away from the unlettered world of premodern agriculture actually happened a thousand years earlier, when Jews were largely free to pursue the profession of their choice. And where so many have simply taken as a given universal literacy among Jews, the economists find that a majority of Jews actually weren’t willing to invest in Jewish education, with the shocking result that more than two-thirds of the Jewish community disappeared toward the end of the first millennium.

Botticini and Eckstein pore over the Talmud and notice the simple fact that it’s overwhelmingly concerned with agriculture, which, in conjunction with archaeological evidence from the first and second century, paints a picture of a Jewish past where literacy was the privilege of an elite few. But these rabbis were also touting a vision of a future Judaism quite different from that which had been at least symbolically dominant for much of Jewish history to that point. Where a focus on the Temple in Jerusalem, with ritual sacrifices and the agricultural economy they required being the standard to that point, these rabbis—broadly speaking, the Pharisees—sought to emphasize Torah reading, prayer, and synagogue. When the sect of Judaism that emphasized the Temple—broadly, the Sadducees—was essentially wiped out by the Romans shortly after the time of Jesus, the Pharisaic leaders, in the form of the sages of the Talmud, were given a mostly free hand to reshape Judaism in their own image. Over the next several hundred years, they and their ideological descendants codified the Talmud and declared a need for universal Jewish education as they did so.

All of this history is widely known and understood, but what Botticini and Eckstein do differently is trace this development alongside the size of the Jewish population and their occupational distribution. The Jewish global population shrunk from at least 5 million to as little as 1 million between the year 70 and 650. It’s not surprising that a conquered people, stifled rebellions, and loss of home would lead to population shrinkage, but Botticini and Eckstein argue that « War-related massacres and the general decline in the population accounted for about half of this loss. » Where did the remaining 2 million out of 3 million surviving Jews go? According to them, over multiple generations they simply stopped being Jewish: With the notion of Jewish identity now tied directly to literacy by the surviving Pharisaic rabbis of the Talmud, raising one’s children as Jews required a substantial investment in Jewish education. To be able to justify that investment, one had to be either or both an especially devoted Jew or someone hoping to find a profession for his children where literacy was an advantage, like trade, crafts, and money lending. For those not especially devoted and having little hope of seeing their children derive economic benefit from a Jewish education, the option to simply leave the Jewish community, the economists argue, was more enticing than the option to remain as its unlettered masses. Two-thirds of the surviving Jewish population, they assert, took that route.

This distinct twist of the population story, which accompanies research showing a shift from nearly 90 percent of the Jewish population engaging in agriculture to nearly 90 percent engaging in professional trades over that same several hundred years, addresses a key problem of previous theories of Jewish literacy: determining what happened to those who wouldn’t be scholars.

Botticini and Eckstein bring other evidence of Jewish tradition generating success in trade. An extrajudicial system of rabbinical courts for settling disputes allowed for the development of the kind of trust required for commercial enterprises to grow. A universal language of Hebrew eased international negotiations. And in a devastating critique of the theory that persecution actually pushed this economic shift along, the economists examine the societies in which Jews originally developed this bias toward trades and find Jews faced no particular discrimination that would have made them less successful in agriculture. In fact, they show, Jews were often discriminated against precisely because of their emphasis on trade, such as in their expulsion from England in 1290, which only came after they were repeatedly told to give up the profession of money lending (eventually echoed in Ulysses S. Grant’s order to expel the Jews from the territory under his command during the Civil War).

And so the Jewish people have grown into a people of two intertwined legacies: a culture in which the Jewishly literate continue to pass the torch and one in which an emphasis on trades was necessary to continue to do so for all but the most fervently devoted. When a given family stopped being devoted or wealthy enough, it simply faded away.

The astonishing theory presented here has great implications for both the Jewish community and the broader world today. For an American Jewish community in which more than 75 percent of day school students are now Orthodox and the top concern for most Orthodox families in repeated surveys is finding a way to pay for ever-increasing tuition costs, the price of admission to the highly affiliated Jewish community is not just a large amount of ritual observance but also a basic need to join the 1 percent—or nearly so. Frequently, one can hear Orthodox Jews joke that $250,000 a year is « minimum wage » for the community; certainly, this overstates things but only by so much. In the New York area, elementary school often carries a price tag of $15,000-$25,000 in post-tax dollars per year; at the high-school level, some tuition rates are well into the $30,000 range. Outside of the New York area, tuition is generally lower, but so is the average income. And as Botticini and Eckstein predicted for their medieval models, modern American Jews who are fiercely devoted but without high incomes will endure significant financial sacrifice to maintain their Jewish lifestyles: The ultra-Orthodox enclave of Kiryas Joel, N.Y., is the poorest city in the country, and ultra-Orthodox communities broadly are frequently both poor and heavy recipients of government assistance.

And for most of the 80 to 90 percent of families representing the non-Orthodox portion of the Jewish community in America, the cost of Jewish education has simply meant great numbers growing up without the ability to read Hebrew or engage with the Bible and other Jewish texts.

Here we see precisely the same dichotomy that Eckstein and Botticini saw in the early years of post-Temple rabbinic Judaism: The especially devoted and wealthy provide their children with a Jewish education, but many others see too high a price in either or both of time and money and so choose a different path.

And yet, so many of today’s unlettered Jews have been able to retain at least some sense of Jewish identity, where their predecessors 1,500 years ago could not. A majority of American Jews today are unaffiliated with the synagogues the Pharisaic rabbis emphasized, and yet 79 percent report feeling « very positive » about being Jewish. In part, Botticini and Eckstein would likely argue, that’s because of America’s unique tolerance of Jews, which removes the economic disincentive of maintaining an identity as a Jewish minority even when one doesn’t have a very strong connection to Judaism.

At the same time, today’s unaffiliated Jews no longer face an economic disadvantage relative to those attending Jewish schools: The aim for universal literacy in America broadly, and increasingly in all corners of the world, has led to the same kinds of professional opportunities for many people in the way that Jews used to have largely to themselves. Or, as Eckstein put it in an interview with me, « Almost everybody has become Jewish, because almost everybody is literate. »

Voir aussi:

Maristella Botticini

April 18, 2013

A note from Paul Solman: Nine years ago, someone sent me an academic paper that put forward a radically new explanation of why Jews have been so successful economically. Written by economists Maristella Botticini and Zvi Eckstein, the paper explained Jewish success in terms of early literacy in the wake of Rome’s destruction of the Temple in 70 C.E. and the subsequent dispersion of Jews throughout the Roman empire – Jews who had to rely on their own rabbis and synagogues to sustain their religion instead of the high priests in Jerusalem.

You may know a similar story about the Protestant Reformation: the bypassing of the Catholic clergy and their Latin liturgy for actual reading of Scripture in native languages and the eventual material benefits of doing so. Why is Northern Europe — Germany, Holland, England, Sweden — so much more prosperous than Southern Europe: Portugal, Italy, Greece, Spain? Why do the latter owe the former instead of the other way around? Might it have something to do with the Protestant legacy of the North, the Catholic legacy of the South?

Botticini and Eckstein have spent their careers studying not Christianity, but Judaism. And they have now come out with a book elaborating on their novel thesis: “The Chosen Few: How Education Shaped Jewish History, 70-1492,” published by the Princeton University Press.


Maristella Botticini and Zvi Eckstein: Imagine a dinner conversation in a New York or Milan or Tel Aviv restaurant in which three people–an Israeli, an American, and a European — ask to each other: “Why are so many Jews urban dwellers rather than farmers? Why are Jews primarily engaged in trade, commerce,
entrepreneurial activities, finance, law, medicine, and scholarship? And why have the Jewish people experienced one of the longest and most scattered diasporas in history, along with a steep demographic decline?”


Most likely, the standard answers they would suggest would be along these lines: “The Jews are not farmers because their ancestors were prohibited from owning land in the Middle Ages.” “They became moneylenders, bankers, and financiers because during the medieval period Christians were banned from lending money at interest, so the Jews filled in that role.” “The Jewish population dispersed worldwide and declined in numbers as a result of endless massacres.”

Imagine now that two economists (us) seated at a nearby table, after listening to this conversation, tell the three people who are having this lively debate: “Are you sure that your explanations are correct? You should read this new book, ours, “The Chosen Few: How Education Shaped Jewish History,” and you would learn that when one looks over the 15 centuries spanning from 70 C.E. to 1492, these oft-given answers that you are suggesting seem at odds with the historical facts. This book provides you with a novel explanation of why the Jews are the people they are today — a comparatively small population of economically successful and intellectually prominent individuals.”

Suppose you are like one of the three people in the story above and you wonder why you should follow the advice of the two economists. There are many books that have studied the history of the Jewish people and have addressed those fascinating questions. What’s really special about this one?

To understand the spirit of the study we’ve undertaken, one should borrow two tools: a magnifying glass and a telescope. With the magnifying glass, the reader will be like a historian, who focuses on a place and a time period, painstakingly digs through the sources, and carefully documenting the historical trajectory of the Jews there. A thousand such scholars will offer a detailed description of the history of the Jews in hundreds of locales throughout history.

But with the telescope, the reader will be like an economist, who assembles and painstakingly compares the information offered by the works of the historians, creates a complete picture of the economic and demographic history of the Jewish people over 15 centuries, and then uses the powerful tools of economic reasoning and logic to address one of the most fundamental questions in Jewish history:

Why are the Jews, a relatively small population, specialized in the most skilled and economically profitable occupations?

In doing so, the “alliance” of the historians and the economists offers a completely novel interpretation of the historical trajectory of the Jews from 70 to 1492. In turn, this may help us understand several features of the history of the Jewish people from 1500 up to today, including the successful performance of the Israeli economy despite the recent economic crisis.

The journey of “The Chosen Few” begins in Jerusalem, following the destruction of the Second Temple in the year 70, continues in the Galilee during the first and second centuries, moves to Babylon in Mesopotamia during the fourth and fifth centuries, and then to Baghdad in the second half of the first millennium when the Muslim Abbasid empire reaches its economic and intellectual apex.

At the turn of the millennium, the historical voyage reaches Cairo, Constantinople, and Cordoba, and soon after the whole of western and southern Europe, then turns back to Baghdad in the 1250s during the Mongol conquest of the Middle East before ending in Seville in 1492.

During these 15 centuries, a profound transformation of Judaism coupled with three
historic encounters of the Jews — with Rome, with Islam, and with the Mongol Conquest — shaped the economic and demographic history of the Jewish people in a unique and long-lasting way up to today.

Let’s first start describing the profound transformation of Judaism at the beginning of the first millennium, which has been amply documented by scholarly works. In the centuries before 70, the core of Judaism was centered around two pillars: the Temple in Jerusalem, in which sacrifices were performed by a small elite of high priests, and the reading and the study of the Written Torah, which was also restricted to a small elite of rabbis and scholars. (It was the power of this elite that the Jew Yeshua ben Josef, later know as Jesus Christ, so often decried.)

The destruction of the Temple in 70 at the end of the first Jewish-Roman war was the first of the three external events which permanently shaped the history of the Jewish people. Momentously, it canceled one of the two pillars of Judaism, shifting the religious leadership within the Jewish community from the high priests in Jerusalem to a much more widely dispersed community of rabbis and scholars. In so doing, it transformed Judaism into a religion whose main norm required every Jewish man to read and to study the Torah in Hebrew himself and, even more radically, to send his sons from the age of six or seven to primary school or synagogue to learn to do the same.

In the world of universal illiteracy, as it was the world at the beginning of the first millennium, this was an absolutely revolutionary transformation. At that time, no other religion had a similar norm as a membership requirement for its followers, and no state or empire had anything like laws imposing compulsory education or universal literacy for its citizens. The unexpected consequences of this change in the religious norm within Judaism would unfold in the subsequent centuries.

To understand what happened to the Jewish people in the eight centuries after 70, “The Chosen Few” asks the reader to travel back in time to a village in the Galilee around the year 200. What would the reader see?

They would see Jewish farmers, some rich, some poor who have to decide whether to send their children to primary school as their rabbis tell them to do. Some farmers are very attached to Judaism and willing to obey the norms of their religion, others are not very devout and consider whether or not to convert to another religion. In this rural economy, educating the children as Judaism requires is a cost, but brings no economic benefits because literacy does not make a
farmer more productive or wealthier.

Given this situation, what would economic logic predict? What would likely happen to Judaism and the Jewish people? Given a high preference for religious affiliation, some Jews will educate their children and will keep their attachment to their religion. Other Jews, however, will prefer their material well-being and will not educate their children. Furthermore, a portion of this latter group will likely convert to other religions with less demanding requirements. And so, over time, even absent wars or other demographic shocks, the size of the Jewish population will shrink because of this process of conversions.

But are the predictions of the economic theory consistent with what really happened to the Jews during the first millennium? The historical evidence assembled in our book says yes. The implementation of this new religious norm within Judaism during the Talmud era (third to sixth centuries) determined two major patterns from 70 C.E. to the early 7th century.

The first of these trends was the growth and spread of literacy among the predominantly rural Jewish population. The second: a slow but significant process of conversion out of Judaism (mainly into Christianity) which, caused a significant fall in the Jewish population — from 5 to 5.5 million circa 65 to roughly 1.2 million circa 650. War-related massacres and epidemics contributed to this drastic drop, but they cannot by themselves explain it.

At the beginning of the 7th century, the Jews experienced their second major historic
encounter — this time with Islam. In the two centuries after the death of Mohammed, in 632, the Muslim Umayyad and, later, Abbasid caliphs, established a vast empire stretching from the Iberian Peninsula to India and China, with a common language (Arabic), religion (Islam), laws, and institutions. Concomitant with the ascent of this empire, agricultural productivity grew, new industries developed, commerce greatly expanded, and new cities and towns developed. These changes vastly increased the demand for skilled and literate occupations in the newly established urban empire.

How did this affect world Jewry? Between 750 and 900, almost all the Jews in Mesopotamia and Persia — nearly 75 percent of the world’s remaining 1.2 million Jews — left agriculture, moved to the cities and towns of the newly established Abbasid Empire, and entered myriad skilled occupations that provided higher earnings than as farmers. Agriculture, the typical occupation of the Jewish people in the days of Josephus in the first century, was no longer their typical occupation seven to eight centuries later.

This occupational transition occurred at a time in which there were no legal restrictions on Jewish land ownership. The Jews could and did own land in the many locations of the vast Abbasid Muslim Empire. And yet, Jews moved away from farming. This is of vital importance.

Modern explanations of why the Jews became a population of craftsmen, traders, shopkeepers, bankers, scholars, and physicians have relied on supposed economic or legal restrictions. But these do not pass the test of the historical evidence.

This is one of our main and novel messages: mass Jewish literacy was key. It enabled Jews — incentivized Jews — to abandon agriculture as their main occupation and profitably migrate to Yemen, Syria, Egypt, and the Maghreb.

The tide of migrations of Jews in search of business opportunities also reached Christian Europe. Migrations of Jews within and from the lands of the Byzantine Empire, which included southern Italy, may have set the foundations, via Italy, for much of European Jewry. Similarly, Jews from Egypt and the Maghreb settled in the Iberian Peninsula, and later, in Sicily and parts of southern Italy.

The key message of “The Chosen Few” is that the literacy of the Jewish people, coupled with a set of contract-enforcement institutions developed during the five centuries after the destruction of the Second Temple, gave the Jews a comparative advantage in occupations such as crafts, trade, and moneylending — occupations that benefited from literacy, contract-enforcement mechanisms, and networking and provided high earnings.

Once the Jews were engaged in these occupations, there was no economic pressure to convert, which is consistent with the fact that the Jewish population, which had shrunk so dramatically in earlier times, grew slightly from the 7th to the 12th centuries.

Moreover, this comparative advantage fostered the voluntary diaspora of the Jews during the early middle ages in search of worldwide opportunities in crafts, trade, commerce, moneylending, banking, finance, and medicine.

This in turn would explain why the Jews, at this point in history, became so successful in occupations related to credit and financial markets. Already during the 12th and 13th centuries, moneylending was the occupation par excellence of the Jews in England, France, and Germany, and one of the main professions of the Jews in the Iberian Peninsula, Italy, and other locations in western Europe.

A popular view contends that both their exclusion from craft and merchant guilds and usury bans on Muslims and Christians segregated European Jews into moneylending during the Middle Ages. But our study shows, with evidence we have come upon during more than a decade of research, that this argument is simply untenable.

Instead, we have been compelled to offer an alternative and new explanation, consistent with the historical record: the Jews in medieval Europe voluntarily entered and later specialized in moneylending and banking because they had the key assets for being successful players in credit markets:

  • capital already accumulated as craftsmen and traders,
  • networking abilities because they lived in many locations, could easily communicate with and alert one another as to the best buying and selling opportunities, and
  • literacy, numeracy, and contract-enforcement institutions — “gifts” that their religion has given them — gave them an advantage over competitors.

With these assets, small wonder that a significant number of Jews specialized in the most profitable occupation that depended on literacy and numeracy: finance. In this sector they worked for many centuries. As they specialized, just as Adam Smith would have predicted, they honed their craft, giving them a competitive advantage, right up to the present.

But what if the economy and society in which the Jews lived, suddenly ceased being urban and commercially-oriented and turned agrarian and rural, reverting to the environment in which Judaism had found itself centuries earlier?

The third historic encounter of the Jews — this time with the Mongol conquest of the Middle East — offers the possibility to answer this question. The Mongol invasion of Persia and Mesopotamia began in 1219 and culminated in the razing of Baghdad in 1258. It contributed to the demise of the urban and commercial economy of the Abbasid Empire and brought the economies of Mesopotamia and Persia back to an agrarian and pastoral stage for a long period.

As a consequence, a certain proportion of Persian, Mesopotamian, and then Egyptian, and Syrian Jewry abandoned Judaism. Its religious norms, especially the one requiring fathers to educate their sons, had once again become a costly religious sacrifice with no economic return. And so a number of Jews converted to Islam.

Once again, persecutions, massacres, and plagues (e.g., the Black Death of 1348) took a toll on the Jewish population in these regions and in western Europe. But the voluntary conversions of Jews in the Middle East and North Africa, we argue, help explain why world Jewry reached its lowest level by the end of the 15th century.

The same mechanism that explains the decline of the Jewish population in the six centuries after the destruction of the Second Temple, that is, accounts for the decline of the Jewish communities of the Middle East in the two centuries following the Mongol shock.

None of this was planned. The rabbis and scholars who transformed Judaism into a religion of literacy during the first centuries of the first millennium, could not have foreseen the profound impact of their decision to make every Jewish man capable of reading and studying the Torah (and, later, the Mishna, the Talmud, and other religious texts).

However, an apparently odd choice of religious norm–the enforcement of literacy in a mostly illiterate, agrarian world, potentially risky in that the process of conversions could make Judaism too costly and thus disappear–turned out to be the lever of the Jewish economic success and intellectual prominence in the subsequent centuries up to today. This is the overall novel message of “The Chosen Few.”


Maristella Botticini is professor of economics, as well as director and fellow of the Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research (IGIER), at Bocconi University in Milan.

Zvi Eckstein is the Mario Henrique Simonson Chair in Labor Economics at Tel Aviv University and professor and dean of the School of Economics at IDC Herzliya in Herzliya, Israel.

Their current book, “The Chosen Few,” won the National Jewish Book Award for scholarship. Addressing the puzzles that punctuate Jewish history from 1492 to today is the task of the next journey, which the authors will take in their next book, “The Chosen Many.”

Voir également:

The Chosen Few: How Education Shaped Jewish History, 70-1492

Maristella Botticini, Zvi Eckstein

Princeton – Oxford: Princeton University Press,  2012, pp. xvii-323 (Kindle Edition).
(Heb. Transl. Haim Rubin, Tel Aviv, 2012; It. Transl. Università Bocconi Editore, Milano, 2013)

Cristiana Facchini

The Return of the Grand Narrative

In 1899, Henry Dagan published a short collection of interviews under the title Enquête sur l’antisemitisme.1 All the most prominent French and Italian intellectuals of socialist beliefs were asked a few questions about the rise and spread of anti-Semitism. Amongst the many different answers given for it, a particular one emerged.

Most likely owing to a common socialist culture, the intellectuals that took part in this project explained that the rise of new forms of anti-Semitism could be better understood through the economic prism, therefore presenting anti-Semitism as a response to the economic struggle intensified by capitalism, and ultimately as a form of resentment that spread amongst impoverished middle classes. The chief editor of the Journal des économistes established a parallel that was almost a myth. He claimed that anti-Semitism and hatred against the Jews were to be compared to the expulsion of the Huguenots from France in seventeenth century, as economic and religious persecution usually ran parallel. The religious persecutions of the Huguenots could be explained as economic persecution that applied perfectly to Jews of the nineteenth century. According to this explanation, Catholic religious intolerance caused the expulsion of the most dynamic factions of society, and thus provoked the decline of Catholic nations. Surprisingly enough, this explanation was grounded in seventeenth century Jewish thought, an argument that was originally elaborated by Simone Luzzatto, a learned and sophisticated Venetian rabbi, in an attempted plea for tolerance of the Jews according to the doctrine of raison d’état.2 The decline of Catholic countries was later to be explained as the result of the expulsion of Jews and the rise of new mercantile nations that preached religious tolerance, namely, those of Protestant leaning. How these arguments developed since the early modern period cannot be explored here. Nevertheless, they provide an ideal framework for the understanding of recent trends in historiography of the Jews and Judaism.

Religion and economy have been at the core of scholarly debate and public discussion since the inception of modernity as such. The groundbreaking work of Max Weber and his underlining critique of Marxist interpretation of religion and economy played – and in some ways continue to play – a key role in addressing research in the field of religion and economic modernization. Weber also assigned a significant role to Judaism, although his work contributed to fueling an enormous debate and some resentful reactions, especially from Jewish intellectuals.3 Ever since, historians have been debating the relationship between religion and economy, with each historiographical tradition opposing, criticizing, supporting or correcting Weber’s hypothesis.4

Scholarly research on the economic behavior of religious minorities, and more precisely of merchant communities, has attracted a lot of attention. Works such as Yuri Slezkin and Francesca Trivellato, to mention just a few, analyzed the role of religious and ethnic minorities and the services they provided for their host communities from different angles.5 Historiography on port-cities has suggested that religious minorities – and Jews especially – offered highly specialized services, which added to shaping a certain path to modernity.6

While the above-mentioned works dealt with early modern and modern Jewish history, certainly providing  a ‘grand narrative,’ works that embrace the long sweep of Jewish history, or even the whole notion of Judaism, are much rarer in the context of postmodern narratives. In this sense, the book of Maristella Botticini and Zvi Eckstein is a novelty in the recent historiographical setting, and therefore calls for a short commentary.

The Chosen Few is a book that encompasses the history of the Jews from the destruction of the Second Temple (70 CE) to the expulsion from Spain in 1492. Attempts to write a comprehensive history of Judaism are very rare: there are a few excellent exceptions, with the most outstanding examples being sociologist Shemuel N. Eisenstadt’s Jewish Civilization and Judaism by Catholic theologian Hans Kung. Both perspectives are culturally charged, the first one being from a Jewish standpoint, and the second from a Christian stance. Nevertheless, both are interesting as they convey modes of understanding Judaism in its extraordinary long history and in holistic terms: as a complex religious system, and subsequently, as a civilization that coped with many challenges of various natures.

Ancient Judaism underwent a form of seismic modification that, as Botticini and Eckstein describe, redefined the religious structure of Judaism. The most typical example is the disappearance of the sacrificial system that was organized around the temple of Jerusalem following its destruction in 70 CE. The political collapse of ancient Judaism is the starting point of the Chosen Few, which aims at understanding the epochal changes of rabbinical Judaism, and more precisely, the kind of culture Judaism prompted after what might aptly be called the great “trauma” of the collapse of its ancient and central structure. The Chosen Few deals with the relationship between religious rules and literacy, and accordingly, it attempts to investigate the transformation that Judaism underwent through a relatively long formative period. More precisely, the authors are interested in reassessing some tenets of Jewish history, from late antiquity to the early Renaissance, as they claim in their book.

The Chosen Few is divided into ten chapters, each one dealing with a specific topic: the first one introduces the general theme of the book, and particularly deals with the issue of demography; the second aims at assessing whether or not the Jews were a persecuted minority; the third chapter progresses through a chronological path and deals with the introduction of new rules related to religious literacy as a feature of ancient Judaism; chapter  four is mainly theoretical, whereas chapter five delves into the consequences of literacy from 200-650. The sixth chapter follows up on and analyzes the transformation of Jews from farmers into merchants (750-1150); the seventh deals with migration and the eighth with the key issue of segregation and money-lending (1000-1500); the ninth introduces a lesser-known topic, which is the impact of the Mongol conquest, and finally, the last chapter summarizes the results and offers new insight into future research.

The table of contents clearly reflects major trends in historiography of the latest decades, although both authors address one of the main issues that have been on the agenda of historians and social scientist since the nineteenth century, when historiography on Jews and Judaism developed into a more or less professional discipline. How and why did Jews turn to certain specific professions, namely money-lending, medicine, trade, and a few other specialized urban occupations? The debate over Jews, Judaism and economy is an important part of Western thought, not to mention the very problematic essay composed by Marx on the “Jewish Question”, which fired, along with other writings on religion, the scholarly and public debate on religion and its role in society. These questions reflected a different problem as well, which was related to the process of political emancipation of the Jews in European society. The issue over role of the Jews in the past was twofold, and reflected changes in the process of Jewish integration throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth century. On one hand, supporters of Jewish emancipation suggested that the Jewish economic structure and specialization should also be changed, and that Jews must be permitted to practice professions that they were previously barred from, due to religious hatred. Political emancipation and reforms, like the ones implemented in the Hapsburg Empire, contributed to a great extent in shifting the professional position of the Jews. These achievements and their relatively successful integration into the fabric of modern society incited resentment and new forms of anti-Semitism.

Historians and Jewish historiography in particular underlined how Jews were pushed by legal restrictions and impediments into despised and risky professions, namely to the performance of what was considered “polluted activities.” This was especially true in Christian societies where, though often with a certain ambivalence, some economic activities were forbidden for specific social groups. Authors of The Chosen Few challenge a set of these historical explanations, and expressly claim that they are retroactive historiographical answers that may not be applicable to the history of the Jews in late antiquity and the medieval period. Let us briefly follow the authors on their journey.

The first assumption is that Jews in the ancient world (200b BCE – 200 CE) who lived in Eretz Israel were mainly occupied in agricultural activities. In a time span of a few centuries however, Jews of the Diaspora had dramatically changed their economic and professional position. How had that come into being? The change is particularly indebted to the introduction of a rule that proved to be central, according to Botticini and Eckstein’s account.  It is precisely the rule attributed to Yehoshua ben Gamla, a priest mentioned in the early rabbinic texts, according to which a compulsory obligation to teach Torah to children was enforced as a communal regulation. In comparative terms, this norm was introduced in the background of a religious world that was modeled after the rules of ancient religions, which focused on sacrificial offerings and temple activities, initiation and magic, fasting and prayers.7 Despite their different beliefs and ritual structure, Roman and Greek religions, alongside Zoroastrianism, mysteries religions, Orphic and Dionysian cults, and Mithraism never implemented a law that imposed significant textual knowledge of a written sacred tradition. For historians of religion this is an important innovation indeed, even though the imminent spread of Christianity and Islam would introduce a great number of additional transformations to the religious world of late antiquity.8 We will not discuss the issue extensively; suffice it to note that literacy was not one of the primary interests of other religious groups, which preserved, transmitted and elaborated religious memory in different ways and through other means.

Compulsory Jewish education, the goal of which was primarily religious and not universal, contributed to redefining the borders of Judaism when the “religious market” was fluid and very diverse. In chapter four, the authors apply some known theories based on choice analysis and economic behavior. Moreover, they highlight how a religious system is defined according to its appeal and capability to attract or sustain its members. Religion is one of the many commodities that are available on a relative free market, and it is likely to attract or reject on the basis of its appeal. Men and women will choose according to their expectations and needs. “Religious affiliation typically requires some costly signal of belonging to a club or network,”9 and rabbinic Judaism required literacy and education. According to this norm, Jewish farmers had to send their children to school where the teaching of the Torah was enforced. In other words, it meant they had to invest time and resources in religious literacy, rather than having the help of their children in working the land. Any farming society would be well-acquainted with this problem.

On the basis of this assumption, the authors elaborate a model, which aims to explain the demographic crisis of Judaism between the first and seventh century, and the pattern of conversion. According to the model, the high cost of the norm was likely to drive away Jewish families that were unwilling to receive such low benefits or that were not wealthy enough to support such a request. The idealized Galilean village of around 200 CE, as it is envisioned by the authors, depicts several situations that are likely to provide an explanation for patterns of conversion in late antiquity. The religious farmer, whether wealthy or less so, would perform the norm because the benefits of belonging to the group were higher than the cost of literacy. Yet both the wealthy and the less affluent farmer might also choose to not obey the norm for a number of reasons, and thus would have to accept the social stigma that came with the label of am ha-aretz.10 Ultimately, they might decide to convert and join a different religious group, especially one of the many Christian sects that proliferated in the late antiquity period, and that were quite familiar, particularly those still following certain Jewish rules (as the Ebionites did). Rich and poor were likely to pay the cost of compulsory religious literacy and belong to the group; or, they might avoid the cost and live on the margin of the religious group, ultimately deciding to convert to another religion.

This theory is fascinating and offers new insight into what can be termed self-segregation rules, focusing, in this case for example, on literacy more than the laws of purity. It also provides an explanatory theory for conversion that is applicable to societies that are relatively open and pluralistic in their religious organization. Examples of microhistory, which are not provided for this period, might shed light on the opportunities, constraint and options made available to a small or larger group of Jews. Their choices would be determined by a number of factors that would influence their actions and practice.

The implementation of the rule of religious education spread during the Talmudic period (200-650) when the society of farmers became literate. Talmudic literature, Gaonic responsa and archeological evidence from synagogues indicate a strong emphasis on universal education.

The implementation of rule over education coincides with the demographic decline detected by scholars. Although figures vary, there is a scholarly consensus on the dramatic drop of the Jewish population between the fall of the temple and the end of the Talmudic period. The causes of this decline were usually attributed to the impact of wars, famine, plague and changes in fertility rates. However, Botticini and Eckstein claim that these explanations are not supported by evidence, and the only explanation for the demographic demise of the Jewish population is conversion. As the theory suggests, conversion of Jews to Christianity escalated as a result of religious rules that enforced increased literacy in the framework of a farming society.

In the following centuries major changes took place in the religion and culture of the Jews, and the structure of the Jewish Diaspora was reconfigured. What were the consequences of this process? From chapter six onward, the theory defined in the previous chapters is used to explain the main, though inadvertent, changes in the social structure of Judaism. The world of literate farmers was destined to develop into a world of urban professionals composed of merchants, doctors, craftsmen, and artisans. As a part of the old Diaspora vanished in highly Hellenized areas, a new Diaspora rose in those regions that underwent a religious revolution around the seventh century CE. The majority of Jews now lived in Mesopotamia and Persia, where they slowly abandoned agriculture and moved to villages in order to practice new professions. This transformation reached its apex after the establishment of the Abbasid Empire.11 “This occupational transition took about 150 years: by 900 the overwhelming majority of the Jews in Mesopotamia and Persia were engaged in a wide variety of crafts, trade, moneylending and medicine.”12

The rise of Islam and the establishment of a world-wide, highly urbanized and dynamic empire offered the ideal setting for the benefits enhanced by literacy. The authors claim that, in the changing context of the Muslim caliphate, religious literacy had “spillover effects,” meaning that skills acquired by learning to read and write might improve the ability to count, write contracts and letters, and therefore bolster practices of law-enforcement. The improvement in technology, science and art that accompanied the development of a sophisticated empire contributed to the dissemination of literacy at large, and these main changes in society contributed to reinforcing literacy among Jews. Using ample evidence from the Cairo Geniza and specifically Shelomo Goitein’s research, the authors highlight that literacy was spread among Jewish communities of the Muslim world, where, one should add, seventy percent of Jewry lived.

Following Avner Greif, the authors stress how rabbinic Judaism, with Talmudic and responsa literature, were able to build a system of legal protection which operated as a contract-enforcement mechanism, even in the absence of a state. In this sense, a common language and high literacy contributed to transforming Jewish settlements and their professional landscape radically, prompting a change that, according to Botticini and Eckstein, would continue in the following centuries.

The following chapters are devoted to describing the formation of a voluntary Diaspora, and focus on the rise of Western European Jewry. How did Jews arrive to the Christian countries of Western Europe?

Chapter seven and eight address the question of how the Diaspora came into being, and how Jews willingly moved from different areas – mainly to cities – in search of better social conditions and professional options. The arrival of Jews into the diverse and parceled Christian kingdoms of the Middle Ages suggests that Jews were invited, in small groups, to offer their highly specialized services. A parallel development in the cultural and religious milieu took place in the same period, with the emergence of the great rabbinic centers of France and Ashkenaz that contributed to normalizing support for these new settlements. By the year 1000, charters show that Jews could own land, and were involved in the fields of craft, trade and medicine in general, with highly specialized urban professions. However, money-lending was not a distinctively Jewish occupation. How did Jews become involved in money-lending?

The answer follows the path of argumentation which was set forth earlier. The authors explore different historical explanations, according to which Jews were pushed into money-lending: one suggests that they were thrust into it because of the exclusive membership of Christian guilds (Roth); another one emphasizes persecutions and portable capital as driving forces that produced this professional specialization, and the last explanation is given by Haym Soloveitchik, which regards the laws on buying and selling wine in medieval Europe. Because wine was a profitable commodity, Jewish involvement with this business needed to be formally and legally sanctioned from within the Jewish community. According to Soloveitchik, laws regulating wine trade and consumption were gradually softened by eminent rabbis – particularly Rashi –    and the strict rules that forbade Jews to drink, buy and sell wine produced by Gentiles was slowly lifted.

Botticini and Eckstein offer some historical examples of a Jewish preference for money-lending. Both English and French cases illustrate how Jews became preeminent in money-lending and how later, between the thirteen and the fourteenth century, they were slowly replaced by Christians, especially Lombards and Florentines. Jews were expelled from England in 1290, more than a century after the appearance of ritual murder libels. In France, after reaching a key role in money-lending, Jews were expelled at the end of fourteenth century, and the same pattern is traceable throughout German lands and elsewhere, with the exception of the Italian states and the Iberian Peninsula.

“We show that the entry and then specialization of the Jews in lending money at interest can be explained by their comparative advantage in the four assets that were and still are the pillars of the financial intermediation: capital, networking, literacy and numeracy, and contract enforcement institutions.”13 This is the leitmotif that supports the whole narrative, which is a grand narrative on Judaism: literacy and economic performances. An inadvertent revolution was launched by rabbis in the midst of a great trauma, and with the collapse of the ancient politeia, and through compulsory religious education of male children, a great transformation that would subsequently be well-suited for the social and economic integration in developed empires and economies was triggered. The theory is certainly intriguing and attractive, and at times very convincing. “Lachrymose history” is not part of this story, which instead highlights the positive and creative effort of Judaism in Muslim and Christian lands. Moreover, a number of historical certainties are challenged and a different explanation is offered, on the basis of microanalysis or detailed accounts of historical material. A wide and impressive amount of secondary literature is described and thoroughly discussed, along with a number of primary sources.

Ultimately, as I have already said, the book is both a historical account of Judaism, and a history of the Jews covering a relatively long historical period and which offers a fairly new interpretation through the lens of economic history. Such an undertaking indicates a certain interest in the return of grand narratives, after a period of postmodern historical practices that made a narrative of any kind impossible.

Nevertheless, as with every grand narrative that aims at providing one unique explanation for historical facts, this one provokes a number of questions and possible critical responses. I will mention only three problems that may be of some relevance.

1. First of all, one must recall that the Diaspora did not begin after the fall of Jerusalem, but rather, was a conspicuous and relevant component of ancient Judaism. Jews lived in metropolises, like Rome and Alexandria, and were likely engaged in urban activities. Historiography on Christianity has stressed that Christianity spread first and foremost in the great urban centers of the Roman Empire, although the movement of Jesus was mainly throughout villages. The fascinating theory of conversion offered by the authors is therefore interesting, but needs to be supported by more evidence.

2. Considering the wide scope of the book and the claim to a universal and general explanatory theory of Judaism, some comparison with other similar groups was needed. In which way did Judaism in the Muslim empire differ from Christian minorities, which in turn were endowed with similar trades? How then are Armenians, Greek Orthodox, or various sectarian religious groups to be evaluated when they competed with Jews and performed similar roles?

3. Theory and history are somehow disconnected in this book. The theory the authors offer is applied to very different historical, social and religious contexts. One wonders if the organization of economy in the Muslim empire and the one in Medieval Christian Europe does not bear multiple and dissimilar features, resulting in a perpetually different relationship with Judaism, when not directly influencing it.

Anachronism is generally inevitable, but my impression is that it strikes as too strong an element in this narrative. Is it possible to assume, with the help of economic theory and modeling, that a peasant in the ancient world would behave exactly as a contemporary peasant in a third world country? The long journey back in time requires, among other things, identification with a world that might have been radically different. Moreover, this long journey is often an intricate path into a labyrinth, which the historian is impelled to explore in its multiple directions.

Cristiana Facchini, Alma Mater Studiorum Università di Bologna


[1] Enquête sur l’antisemitisme, ed. Henry Dagan, (Paris: Stock 1899).
[2] See Simone Luzzatto, Scritti politici e filosofici di un ebreo scettico nella Venezia del Seicento, a cura di Giuseppe Veltri (Milan: Bompiani, 2013); Jonathan Karp, The Politics of Jewish Commerce. Economic Thought and Emancipation in Europe, 1638-1848 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008).
[3] Max Weber, Ancient Judaism (New York: Free Press, 1952).
[4] I refer, for example, to Catholic scholars who have tried to show how Catholicism fueled economic modernity, following Weber’s path but attempting to amend it. Trevor Roper offered a different interpretation of Weber’s theory, claiming that modernity and capitalism were initiated by merchant communities who practiced a form of “erasmianism.” Sombart opposed his interpretation of capitalism as a byproduct of Judaism, although with an anti-Semitic twist.
[5] Yuri Slezkine, The Jewish Century (Princeton – Oxford: Princeton University Press,  2004); Francesca Trivellato, The Familiarity of Strangers: The Sephardic Diaspora, Livorno, and Cross-cultural Trade in the Early Modern Period (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2009).
[6] For a more complex view on minorities and port-cities see: Tullia Catalan, “The Ambivalence of a Port-City. The Jews of Trieste from the 19th to the 20th Century,” Quest. Issues in Contemporary Jewish History 2/2011: 69-98.
[7] These ritual settings relating to different religious systems appeared in the ancient world (chap. 3).
[8] For a brief introduction to these themes: Guy G. Stroumsa, The End of Sacrifice: Religious Transformations of Late Antiquity (Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2009).
[9] Botticini, Eckstein, The Chosen Few, pos. 2334.
[10] There is a lot of literature on ammei ha-aretz, “people of the land.” Botticini and Eckstein affirm that they are those people/Jews unwilling to perform the norm of learning the Torah.
[11] Botticini, Eckstein, The Chosen Few, Chapter 5.
[12] Chapter 5, pos. 3326.
[13] Chapter 8, pos. 6131.
Voir également:

The Chosen Few: How Education Shaped Jewish History, 70-1492
By Maristella Botticini and Zvi Eckstein
Princeton University Press, 323 pages, $39.50

What if most of what we thought we know about the history of the Jewish people between the destruction of the Second Temple and the Spanish Expulsion is wrong? This intriguing premise informs The Chosen Few: How Education Shaped Jewish History, 70-1492, an ambitious new book by economists Maristella Botticini and Zvi Eckstein.

Seventy-five years after historian Salo Baron first warned against reducing the Jewish past to “a history of suffering and scholarship,” most of us continue to view medieval Jewish history in this vein. “Surely, it is time to break with the lachrymose theory of pre-Revolutionary woe, and to adopt a view more in accord with historic truth,” Baron implored at the end of his 1928 Menorah Journal article “Ghetto and Emancipation: Shall We Revise the Traditional View?”

Botticini and Eckstein could not agree more, and in the book they systematically dismantle much of the conventional wisdom about medieval Jewish history. For example, they explore how the scattered nature of the Jewish Diaspora was driven primarily by the search for economic opportunity rather than by relentless persecution. They also demonstrate that war-related massacres only account for a fraction of the Jewish population declines from 70 to 700 C.E. and from 1250 to 1400 C.E., and cast serious doubt on the theory that widespread conversion to Christianity and Islam during these periods was motivated primarily by anti-Jewish discrimination. Likewise, they show that restrictions on Jewish land ownership and membership in craft guilds in Christian Europe — factors that are often cited to explain medieval Jews’ proclivity for trade and moneylending — postdated by centuries the Jews’ occupational shift from agriculture to commerce.

The authors are hardly alone among scholars in advancing their case. But in consolidating a vast secondary literature into a concise and compelling argument, they provide a commendable service. Their demolition job is not an end in itself, however. Rather, it affords them with an opportunity to advance their own unifying theory of Jewish history to fill the explanatory void.

As the subtitle of their book suggests, the authors look to education to explain the across-the-board transformation of Jewish life in the first 15 centuries of the Common Era. Specifically, they zero in on the rabbinic injunction that required fathers to teach their sons how to read and study the Torah.

Literacy, they argue, was the engine that drove the train of Jewish history. It facilitated the economic transformation of the Jews from farmers to craftsmen, merchants and financiers. It encouraged their mobility, as they went in search of locations that presented the prospect of profitability. It determined their migration patterns, specifically their congregation in bustling city centers throughout the Muslim world, where they were able to thrive in myriad urban occupations such as banking, cattle dealing, wine selling, textile manufacturing, shopkeeping and medicine.

It also explained their scattered settlement in scores of small communities throughout Christian Europe, where the demand for skilled occupations was far more limited. It was even indirectly responsible for Jewish population decline. Botticini and Eckstein suggest that illiterates were regarded as outcasts in Jewish society and that a substantial percentage chose to escape denigration and social ostracism by embracing Christianity and Islam, where illiteracy remained the norm.

Once the occupational and residential transformation from farming was complete, the authors argue, there was no going back. Jews paid a high premium for their literate society. Jewish cultural norms required the maintenance of synagogues and schools, and presumed that families would forgo years of their sons’ potential earnings to keep them in school. When urban economies collapsed, as they did in Mesopotamia and Persia as a result of the Mongol conquest, the practice of Judaism became untenable, and the result was widespread defection through conversion to Islam. Accordingly, the Jews became “a small population of highly literate people, who continued to search for opportunities to reap returns from their investment in literacy.” And thus they remained up to the present day.

Botticini and Eckstein’s argument seems tailor-made for the present American environment of stagnant, if not declining, economic resources. In an age where steep day school tuition has (unintentionally) become a form of birth control in modern Orthodox circles and contributed to sluggish enrollment rates among the non-Orthodox, Jewish practice is once again in danger of becoming unsustainable. American Jewish assimilation is often understood as a function of Jewish apathy, but perhaps part of the problem is that Judaism is pricing itself out of the market.

The authors’ theory may leave some a little queasy, including those who have rationalized the Jewish proclivity for moneylending in medieval England, France and Germany as a logical response to antagonistic authorities who systematically cut them off from other avenues of economic opportunity. Many of these same defenders of Jewish honor have been quick to insist that nothing particular to Judaism itself promoted moneylending.

Botticini and Eckstein have little patience for this sort of apologetics. On the contrary, they insist, Jews were naturally attracted to moneylending because it was lucrative and because they possessed four significant cultural and social advantages that predisposed their success. First and foremost was rabbinic Judaism’s emphasis on education; literacy and numeracy were prerequisite skills for moneylending.

Jews were also able to rely on other built-in advantages, including significant capital, extensive kinship networks, and rabbinic courts and charters that provided legal enforcement and arbitration mechanisms in the cases of defaults and disputes. The authors add that while maltreatment, discriminatory laws and expulsions were frequently motivated by the prevalence of Jews in moneylending, they played little or no role in promoting this occupational specialization.

The relevance of cultural determinism is the subject of vigorous debate in intellectual circles, as evidenced by the recent brouhaha over Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s remarks about the differences in wealth between Israel and the Palestinian territories being the result of cultural differences. Most scholars would probably dismiss Romney’s argument as “dangerously out of date,” as Jared Diamond recently wrote in The New York Times. At the same time, Diamond and others warn against mono-causal explanations for socioeconomic historical trends, and such concern is warranted for “The Chosen Few” as well.

Of particular concern is the relative paucity of evidence that Botticini and Eckstein marshal for their literacy argument. Talmudic pronouncements on the importance of education can easily, and inaccurately, be read as descriptive rather than prescriptive, and the authors arguably overestimate the influence of the rabbis on the behaviors and self-definition of the Jewish masses.

They seem to be on firmer ground once they have recourse to the variegated documents in the Cairo Genizah, but they devote almost no attention to Jewish educational trends in Christian Europe. They also have little to say on the extent to which instruction in arithmetic and the lingua franca supplemented a school curriculum designed to promote facility in reading and interpreting Hebrew and Aramaic holy books. Instruction in these areas would have a direct impact on the Jews’ ability to function in an urban economy. Undoubtedly, Jewish school attendance rates and curricular norms varied by location and over time.

To be fair, the history of Jewish education remains an understudied subject, leaving Botticini and Eckstein relatively few secondary sources from which to draw evidence. One can say that their economic theory is plausible, particularly if it is advanced in conjunction with other factors.

But the jury must remain out in the absence of more conclusive hard evidence. Hopefully, the fascinating and elegant argument set forth in “The Chosen Few” will encourage historians to interrogate literary sources and archaeological evidence in search of a clearer picture about Jewish educational norms, Jewish literacy and its impact on the demographics and socioeconomic trajectory of Jewish life in the Middle Ages.

Jonathan B. Krasner is Associate Professor of the American Jewish Experience at Hebrew Union College – Jewish Institute of Religion, in New York.

 Voir encore:

TROUBLESOME INDEED: JEWS, GENES & INTELLIGENCE
Paul S. Appelbaum, Diana Muir Appelbaum

GeneWatch 27-2
May-July 2014
Jews play a disproportionate role in A Troublesome Inheritance: Genes, Race and Human History, an extended argument by Nicholas Wade for the impact on modern life of genetic differences among races. Why are Jews so important to the story? Because, well, says Wade, Jews are such a really smart race. Of course, there’s an irony here. The last time genes were used to explain why some whole peoples prosper and others don’t – during the Progressive Era’s eugenics movement – Jews were held up as a people of innately low physical, moral, and intellectual capacity. Now, Wade and others tell us that Jews are endowed by evolution with superior verbal and mathematical ability (albeit not spatial intelligence; in Wade’s view, Jews stopped hunting so long ago that Jewish genes can’t find their way out of a paper bag).

Wade, a respected science writer, casts himself as a new Darwin, announcing that « human evolution has been recent, copious and regional. » He points out that natural selection for certain genes has enabled human groups in the Himalayas, Andes and the Ethiopian plateau to evolve capacities to thrive at high altitudes. Moreover, other genetically transmitted traits, such as the ability to tolerate the lactose in cow’s milk, have spread across geographic regions. So far, so good, but note that this is pretty much as far as the really solid evidence for recent, regional human evolution goes.

Wade is after bigger game. He wants to argue that events like the bifurcation of the world into farmers and hunter-gatherers, which began about 10,000 B.C.E., or the « rabbinical requirement for universal male literacy » may have produced genetic adaptations favoring specific kinds of social and emotional intelligence within particular ethnic or racial groups. And for Wade that includes « a genetic enhancement of Jewish cognitive capacity. »[1]

Operating on a global scale, Wade argues that the regional (or if you prefer, racial) evolution of mental capacities can answer such big questions as: Why is European civilization more prosperous than other cultures?  Max Weber fingered the Protestant Ethic as the cause, while Jared Diamond argued for environment in Guns, Germs and Steel.  Wade relies on the thesis of a remarkable 2007 book by economic historian Gregory Clark, A Farewell to Alms: A Brief Economic History of the World, which was reviewed for the New York Times by… Nicholas Wade. Clark suggested that the Industrial Revolution happened when « [t]hrift, prudence, negotiation and hard work were becoming values for communities that previously had been spendthrift, impulsive, violent and leisure loving. » Then he startled the academic world by proposing a novel causative mechanism for this shift.

Clark proposes that most English girls from successful families married men less prosperous than their fathers, and that these children of prosperity out-reproduced the offspring of the poor, giving England bumper crops of penniless youth endowed with the virtues that created the industrial revolution. Clark acknowledges that this was a cultural phenomenon – modestly fixed parents taught their children the virtues that had made grandpapa rich – but he argues that an overlooked key to success lay in upscale genes.

Reviewers asked for evidence, and Clark produces it in a new book, The Son Also Rises, in which a multi-lingual phalanx of research assistants mine a diverse array of data seeking out peculiar surnames. It turns out that everyone from banking moguls to registered paupers can bear surnames shared by a mere handful of people. By tracing rare surnames over time, Clark demonstrates that when a man with an odd surname owned substantial property in England in the 1300s, or was a Swedish intellectual in the 1600s, or passed the Imperial Chinese examinations to become a Mandarin during the Song Dynasty, people with that surname were more successful than average for the next 400 or even 1,000 years.

Clark finds more social mobility in the 1400s than you probably imagine, and less today than you probably wish.  Accomplishment, he thinks, runs in families, and high status « is actually genetically determined. »[2] Whether he proves his case is a different matter.

After all, the child of successful parents is likely to be taught real skills, such as good grammar, vocabulary, and a « proper » accent, and he or she may also benefit from ineffable advantages. Given that even in egalitarian Sweden, people from old families with aristocratic names like Rosenkrantz and Guildenstern or Latin ones like Linnaeus do better than Swedes with « peasant » names like Johnsson, it could be that just having an impressive surname contributes to success. Moreover, a growing body of data supports the idea that success is largely dependent on believing that success is possible. Amy Chua and Jeff Rubenfeld tap into something like this in The Triple Package: How Three Unlikely Traits Explain the Rise and Fall of Cultural Groups in America, proposing that a sort of superiority complex accounts in part for the success of certain immigrant groups, including Jews and Chinese.

But Nicholas Wade’s just-so story about Ashkenazi success relies on a bold 2012 book, The Chosen Few: How Education Shaped Jewish History, by economists Maristella Botticini and Zvi Eckstein. Here he finds evidence that Jews « adapted genetically to a way of life that requires higher than usual cognitive capacity, » representing « a striking example of natural selection’s ability to change a human population in just a few centuries. »[3]

Botticini and Eckstein argue that most ancient Jews were farmers who did not need literacy to earn a living.  When Judaism re-formed around text study following the destruction of the Temple in 70 C.E., parents were forced to pay school fees if they wanted their children to stay Jewish.  According to Botticini and Eckstein, over the next six centuries the Jewish population plummeted from 5.5 to 1.2 million because only boys from families with an unusual degree of commitment, or those whose sons had the brains and diligence to pore over legal texts, paid to send their children to school. Everyone else converted to Christianity, a dramatic selection event that Wade describes as possibly « the first step toward a genetic enhancement of Jewish cognitive capacity. »[4] And so it might be if there were evidence that it happened – and if there actually is a gene for diligence.

It is not clear why we should assume that families with « low-ability sons » converted to Christianity while those with « smart and diligent » sons paid for an expensive Torah education not calculated to lead to a high-earning career.[5] Why not assume that parents of smart and diligent sons would have improved their prospects by converting (see late 19th-century Germany, for example), or by having them taught Greek or Latin?  After all, that is what almost everybody else in the Roman Empire did. The first and second centuries teemed with now-forgotten religions: the cult of Isis, the Dionysian Mysteries and Mithraism were wildly popular and growing fast. The real question is why a million or so Jews remained Jewish in a late Roman world where persecution of non-Christians and the advantages of joining the new imperial church drove other, more popular religions to extinction?

Botticini and Eckstein support their model with « archaeological discoveries that document the timing of the construction of synagogues » in which children could be educated. They explain that « the earliest archaeological evidence of the existence of a synagogue in the Land of Israel » dates to the mid-1st century C.E.[6] This is an enormous misstatement of fact. A number of pre-destruction Palestinian synagogues have been identified, the earliest uncovered so far, in Modi’in, dating to the early 2nd or late 3rd century B.C.E.

Which brings us to the question of whether Botticini and Eckstein’s selection event ever occurred.  Some numbers cited by Botticini and Eckstein are just plain wrong.  For example, they summarize the findings of ancient historians Seth Schwartz and Gildas Hamel, and of archaeologist Magen Broshi, as « the Land of Israel hosting no more than 1 million Jews. »[7] Schwartz actually wrote: « Palestine reached its maximum sustainable pre-modern population of approximately one million in the middle of the first century. Probably about half of this population was Jewish. »  Thus, Botticini and Eckstein miscite Schwartz’s « about half of » for a population of one million Jews.  They then guess that there were, in fact, 2.5 million Jews in Israel.

There are no accurate counts of ancient Jewry. Estimates that no more than 1 million people could have lived in the Land of Israel in the first century were derived from arable acreage and crop yields. And there is no evidence suggesting that ancient Israel had the capacity to import the gargantuan volumes of falafel mix that would have been required to feed a population of over a million.  (Rome imported wheat on that scale; Israel didn’t.) Botticini and Eckstein choose, without offering a rationale, one contemporary demographer’s « cautiously » offered estimate of 4.5 million Jews total in the ancient world. Then they blithely add up to a million more Jews, to reach their 5 – 5.5 million number. But graphing an unsubstantiated number, as they do, does not make the number accurate.

If we accept more conservative estimates of 2 or even 2.5 million Jews worldwide before the year 70, loss of a million or so during and after the brutal Roman-Jewish Wars, when it is assumed that many Greek- and Latin-speaking God-fearers fell away from Judaism, is not surprising.  Judged by the evidence they provide, Botticini and Clark’s elegant model in which the choices of ancient Jewish farmers facing high tuition bills produced a dramatic selection event doesn’t hold water.

But Wade is a man in search of data to support his theory of recent, regional evolution.  Ashkenazi Jews are among the most intensively studied of ethnic genetic clusters, and he tracks them down the Rhine Valley like a bloodhound. The Ashkenazi Jewish community was founded by a mere handful of Jews living along the Rhine about a thousand years ago, and founder effects can be genetically powerful.  It is not absurd to regard Ashkenazim as a large cousinhood – something like the Darwins and Wedgwoods, two intertwined families that have produced generation after generation of accomplished offspring.  Because the number of founders was so small, and Jews married one another, genetic characteristics could have been amplified within the community.

However, Clark does not flag the founder effect as the cause of Ashkenazi success. He posits a centuries-long selection, beginning as described by Botticini and Eckstein and continuing because only the successful could afford to pay the punitive taxes imposed on Jews by Muslim and Christian governments. « There must have been some selection based on talent. »[8]

Perhaps there was.  The actual evidence, however, is spotty, and the sources for the event provided by Botticini and Eckstein are sometimes downright creepy.  Botticini and Eckstein support their hypothesis with the information, repeated by Clark that, « passages by early Christian writers and Church Fathers indicate that most Jewish converts to Christianity were illiterate and poor. »[9] This information, however, is cited to outdated work by Adolf von Harnack, turn-of-the-century German theologian whose anti-Judaism prepared the way for Nazi anti-Semitism and who, as President of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society, created the infamous Institute for Anthropology, Human Heredity and Eugenics.

There are good reasons to be suspicious of arguments suggesting powerful selection effects over brief time frames for cognitive abilities. To be sure, intelligence – at least the form most frequently measured by psychologists – has a clear genetic component. But years of research have failed to identify any genes that account for this effect. The dominant explanation is that intelligence, like height, may be determined by the cumulative effect of scores, perhaps hundreds of genes, each of which makes an incremental contribution to cognitive ability. To further complicate things, those genes may interact to amplify or negate their influences on intelligence, and it is certain that environment plays a key role. Indeed, recent evidence indicates that genetic effects on intelligence are stronger in high socioeconomic circumstances, which presumably allow maximization of individual potential, but fade away in poor families.

With scores of genes likely involved, most distributed widely in the population, selection for or against particular genes becomes more difficult and time-consuming. The rapid selection event on which Wade (following Botticini and Eckstein) relies hence strains credulity from a biological perspective. Although some guesses about how the Jews got their disproportionate share of Nobel prizes put forward in these books could be right (after all, it’s awfully hard to disprove an untestable theory), there is very little evidence to support them and good reasons to doubt their validity.

Diana Muir Appelbaum is an author and historian.

Paul S. Appelbaum is Dollard Professor of Psychiatry, Medicine & Law at Columbia University, where he directs a center on the ethical, legal and social implications of advances in genetics.

ENDNOTES

1. A Troublesome Inheritance: Genes, Race and Human History, by Nicholas Wade, Penguin Press, 2014, p. 212.

2. The Son Also Rises: Surnames and the History of Social Mobility, by Gregory Clark, Princeton University Press, 2014, p. 281.

3. The Chosen Few: How Education Shaped Jewish History, by Maristella Botticini and Zvi Eckstein, Princeton University Press, 2012, p. 199.

4. Wade, p. 211.

5. Botticini and Eckstein, p. 93 and p. 82.

6. Ibid., p. 103-4.

7. Ibid., p. 274.

8. Clark, p. 230.

9. Ibid., p. 231.

Voir de plus:

 10/07/2013
David Mamet writes that there are two kinds of places in the world: places where Jews cannot go, and places where Jews cannot stay.

So how exactly have the Jews survived?

According Maristella Botticini and Zvi Eckstein, authors of The Chosen Few: How Education Shaped Jewish History, 70-1492 (Princeton University Press, 2012), the answer has as much to do with economics as with spirituality.

Five major events rocked the Jewish world during those 1,422 years: the destruction of the Second Temple, the rise of Christianity; the birth of Islam; birth of modern Christian Europe; and the Mongol invasion. Since Jews who aren’t university professors (and there are some) often view events through a lens of “Is this good or bad for the Jews?” I’ll summarize the authors’ findings in that manner.

Destruction of the Temple and the rise of Christianity—bad for the Jews. After the year 70, the priests who ran the Temple were no longer in the ascendency, yielding power to the Jewish rabbis and scholars who ultimately wrote the Talmud over the next few centuries. Most Jews (and most of everyone else) were farmers back then. After the destruction of the Temple, the worldwide Jewish population dwindled not just because of war and massacre, but because of economics.
If you were devout and wealthy, you were likely to pay for your sons’ Jewish education.

If you were spiritual but didn’t have much money, you became a Christian or joined one of the other popular groups that didn’t require an expensive Jewish education. What good is a son who can read the Torah if you just want him to help harvest pomegranates? So economics dictated who stayed and who strayed.

The rise of the Islamic empire: surprisingly, good for the Jews.

When Muhammad appeared in the seventh century, Jews began to move from farms into new Moslem-built cities including Baghdad and Damascus. There they went into trades that proved far more lucrative than farming, most notably international trade and money lending. In those arenas, Jews had enormous advantages: universal literacy; a common language and religious culture; and the ability to have contracts enforced, even from a distance of thousands of miles.

The Moslem world then stretched from the Spain and Portugal to halfway across Asia. Anywhere in the Arab ambit, Jews could move, trade, or relocate freely and benefit from their extensive religious and family networks. According to thousand-year-old documents found in the Cairo Genizah, business documents linking Jewish traders across the Arab world would have Jewish court decisions written on the back. So Jews could send money or goods thousands of miles, certain their investments would be safe.

European Christianity from the year 1,000: not so good for the Jews.

If Islamic culture offered Jews a warm welcome, Western Europe was a mixed blessing.

Seemingly every few dozen miles in Western Europe, a different prince or king was in charge, with different laws, different requirements for citizenship, and different attitudes about the Jews. Some places were extremely welcoming of Jews; others less so. Monarchs might boot out their Jewish populations in hard economic times, so that Gentile citizens wouldn’t have to repay their loans, only to welcome them back when the economy improved.

Contrary to common belief, Botticini and Eckstein write, Jews weren’t forced into money lending because they were forced out of guilds. Under Muslim and Christian rule alike, Jews went into finance centuries before the guilds were even founded. In other words, Jews chose careers in finance the same way the best and the brightest in modern American culture head for Wall Street and business school.

Western Europe, therefore, was a mixed blessing for the Jews. On the upside, they could do business, live their Jewish lives, and establish some of the finest Talmudic academies in Jewish history. Alas, Jews were also subject to massacres and expulsions, which happened with terrifying regularity across the centuries, culminating in the Spanish Inquisition of 1492.

Meanwhile, back in the Middle East: the thirteenth-century Mongol invasion: bad for the Jews. Oh, really, really bad for the Jews.

The relative freedom and safety the Jews enjoyed under Muslim rule came to an abrupt halt in the early 13th century, when Genghis Khan and his marauders attacked and leveled most of urban civilization that the Moslems had so painstakingly built up over the centuries.

With the destruction of cities and urban institutions, those Jews fortunate enough to survive the Mongol invasion had no option other than going back to farming. Some stayed; some converted to Islam. So the numbers of Jews in formerly Arab lands would remain low for hundreds of years, until all traces of Mongol civilization were wiped out and the world began to rebuild.

The poet Ogden Nash once wrote, “How odd of God/To choose the Jews.” If you’ve ever wondered how the Chosen People survived the vagaries of history, reading The Chosen Few will give you answers you cannot find anywhere else.

Voir enfin:

Authors examine education’s impact on Jewish history

August 8, 2014

Why has education been so important to the Jewish people?

Author Maristella Botticini says a unique religious norm enacted within Judaism two millennia ago made male literacy universal among Jews many centuries earlier than it was universal for the rest of the world’s population.

“Wherever and whenever Jews lived among a population of mostly unschooled people, they had a comparative advantage,” Botticini tells JNS.org. “They could read and write contracts, business letters, and account books using a common [Hebrew] alphabet while learning the local languages of the different places they dwelled. These skills became valuable in the urban and commercially oriented economy that developed under Muslim rule in the area from the Iberian Peninsula to the Middle East.”

Emphasizing literacy over time set Jews up for economic success, say Botticini and Zvi Eckstein, authors of the 2012 book “The Chosen Few: How Education Shaped Jewish History.”

An economic historian, Botticini earned a B.A. in Economics from Università Bocconi in Milan and a Ph.D. in Economics from Northwestern University. After working at Boston University, she returned to Italy and works at her alma mater. An economist, Eckstein received his B.A. from Tel Aviv University and his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. He spent five years as the Bank of Israel’s deputy governor, and is now dean of the School of Economics at the Interdisciplinary Center in Herzylia.

In their book, which they describe as a reinterpretation of Jewish social and economic history from the years 70 to 1492 A.D., Botticini and Eckstein say that Jews over those years became “the chosen few”—a demographically small population of individuals living in hundreds of locations across the globe and specializing in the most skilled and urban occupations. These occupations benefit from literacy and education.

“Our book begins with the profound and well-documented transformation of the Jewish religion after the destruction of the Second Temple in 70 [AD] at the end of the first Jewish-Roman war,” Eckstein tells JNS.org. “Judaism permanently lost one of its two pillars—the Temple in Jerusalem—and consequently the religious leadership shifted from the high priests, who were in charge of the Temple service, to the rabbis and scholars, who had always considered the study of the Torah, the other pillar of Judaism, the paramount duty of any Jewish individual.”

The Jews’ new religious leadership set their people on a path to become “a literate religion, which required every Jewish man to read and study the Torah and every father to send his sons to a primary or synagogue school to learn to do the same,” says Eckstein.

From an economic point of view, the authors write, it was costly for Jewish farmers living in a subsistence agrarian society to invest a significant amount of their income on the rabbis’ imposed literacy requirement. A predominantly agrarian economy had little use for educated people. Consequently, a proportion of Jewish farmers opted not to invest in their sons’ religious education and instead converted to other religions, such as Christianity, which did not impose this norm on its followers.

“During this Talmudic period (3rd-6th centuries), just as the Jewish population became increasingly literate, it kept shrinking through conversions, as well as war-related deaths and general population decline,” Botticini tells JNS.org. “This threatened the existence of the large Jewish community in Eretz Israel (the land of Israel) and in other places where sizable Jewish communities had existed in antiquity, such as North Africa, Syria, Lebanon, Asia Minor, the Balkans, and Western Europe. By the 7th century, the demographic and intellectual center of Jewish life had moved from Eretz Israel to Mesopotamia, where roughly 75 percent of world Jewry now lived.”

Like almost everywhere else in the world, Mesopotamia had an agriculture-based economy, but that changed with the rise of Islam during the 7th century and the consequent Muslim conquests under the caliphs in the following two centuries. Their establishment of a vast empire stretching from the Iberian Peninsula to India led to a vast urbanization and the growth of manufacture and trade in the Middle East; the introduction of new technologies; the development of new industries that produced a wide array of goods; the expansion of local trade and long-distance commerce; and the growth of new cities.

“These developments in Mesopotamia increased the demand for literate and educated people—the very skills Jews had acquired as a spillover effect of their religious heritage of study,” Eckstein says.

Between 750 and 900, almost all Jews in Mesopotamia and Persia—nearly 75 percent of world Jewry—left agriculture and moved to the cities and towns of the newly established Abbasid Empire to engage in skilled occupations. Many also migrated to Yemen, Syria, Egypt, and the Maghreb; to, from, and within the Byzantine Empire; and later to Christian Europe in search of business opportunities.

“Once the Jews were engaged in these skilled and urban occupations, they rarely converted to other religions, and hence, the Jewish population remained stable or grew between the 8th and the 13th centuries,” Botticini says.

The book does not whitewash the persecution that took place during the 15 centuries of Jewish history it examines, Eckstein says.

“When [persecution of Jews] happened, we record [it] in our book,” he says. “[But] what we say is something different. There were times and locations in which legal or economic restrictions on Jews did not exist. Not because we say so, but because it is amply documented by many historians. Jews could own land and be farmers in the Umayyad and Abbasid Muslim empire. The same is true in early medieval Europe. If these restrictions did not exist in the locations and time period we cover, they cannot explain why the Jews left agriculture and entered trade, finance, medicine. There must have been some other factor that led the Jews to become the people they are today. In ‘The Chosen Few’ we propose an alternative hypothesis and we then verify whether this hypothesis is consistent with the historical evidence.”

Botticini says the key message of the book “is that even in very poor communities or countries, individuals and families should invest in education and human capital even when it is costly and it seems to bring no economic returns in the short-run.”

“Education and human capital endow those individuals and those communities that invest in them with skills and a comparative advantage that pays off and can bring economic well-being and intellectual achievements in many dimensions,” she says.

“A motto in which we strongly believe [is] go to the local public library and borrow a book and read it,” adds Botticini. “Even when you end up disagreeing with or not liking a book, it is never a waste of time reading a book. Reading and studying are precious gifts. This is the bottom line message of ‘The Chosen Few.’”

Christophe Lebold, une vie de Léonard…

Salon littéraire

Maître de conférences à l’Université de Strasbourg et metteur en scène de théâtre, Christophe Lebold a une autre corde vibrante à son arc zen : il est l’auteur d’une somme monumentale consacrée à Leonard Cohen.

En janvier 2012, un poète de soixante-dix-huit ans sortait de sa retraite et renouait avec une renommée internationale de rock star distraitement abandonnée au seuil d’un monastère zen : serial séducteur notoire vivant en ermite et « chanteur sans voix » réputé plutôt « déprimant », l’immense Leonard Cohen venait de publier un nouvel album haut de gamme nourri de poésie délicatement ciselée et de grâce, Old Ideas. Un retour en majesté qui fait passer sur le monde, une fois encore, en sombres mélopées infiniment hypnotiques, comme un frisson de beauté – celle-là même que toute sa vie il a cherché à voir de près, jusqu’à s’y brûler parfois sans pour autant être carbonisé…

Broyer du noir pour faire advenir la lumière ?

Leonard Cohen a son biographe à Strasbourg. Un de plus ? Le 15 mai dernier, Christophe Lebold proposait à l’auditorium de l’espace culturel de Vendenheim une soirée autour du film d’Armelle Brusq. La documentariste brosse une manière de portrait intimiste du célébrissime auteur-compositeur et chanteur canadien (dont chacune des chansons depuis 1967 est devenue un grand « classique ») suspendu entre la discipline de son monastère zen et l’appel obsédant d’une œuvre à accomplir encore – serait-ce pour de pressantes raisons fiscales…

Auteur de la dernière biographie en date de Leonard Cohen, la plus complète aussi, Christophe Lebold confie les raisons d’une attirance pour un pessimiste radical réputé « déprimant » dont l’œuvre se veut un « manuel pour vivre avec la défaite » : « Léonard Cohen a changé fondamentalement quelque chose à ma manière de voir le monde et de vivre. Ses chansons, sa poésie et ses romans m’accompagnent depuis vingt ans. Il nous révèle que la noirceur est au centre du processus de création. Il se fait alchimiste pour nous apprendre à changer le noir en lumière. Broyer du noir pour faire advenir la lumière… C’est ce qu’il nous rappelle : si nos cœurs semblent destinés à être brisés, c’est parce la lumière du monde ne peut entrer que par cette brisure… ».

 L’amour libérateur

Le père de Christophe Lebold était un cheminot voyageur passionné de rock et de littérature fantastique. L’année de la naissance de son fils, il achète New skin for the old ceremony, le dernier album du poète-crooner canadien qui venait de sortir. L’enfance du petit Chris se passe à La Walck-Pfaffenhoffen, chez ses grands-parents dans une plénitude semi-bucolique baignée par les mélodies envoûtantes de Leonard, ses inflexions de poésie véritable et ses colonnes de mots envoyées vers le ciel : « J’ai ressenti très tôt tout le pouvoir de la musique des mots et l’attrait pour le Verbe, bien avant d’avoir le vocabulaire pour le formuler : le langage a une capacité à illuminer nos vies. J’ai perçu très tôt un appel dans son œuvre, qui me ramenait au plus profond de moi-même. Mais c’est à l’âge de quatorze ans, au collège, que je me suis véritablement immergé dans l’œuvre de Leonard, en étudiant l’anglais. Depuis, ça ne m’a plus jamais quitté. D’abord, c’est une voix de plus en plus grave et caverneuse au fil de ses douze albums qui dépose des prières pleines d’humour noir, d’abord sur un rock acoustique épuré puis sur fond de synthétiseurs. Immédiatement, j’ai su que lorsqu’il serait question d’écrire sur quelqu’un ou de faire des recherches approfondies, ce serait sur lui et personne d’autre…».

Après avoir succombé à une irrésistible attirance pour la littérature dite « classique » puis russe et japonaise ainsi que pour les mystiques rhénans, Christopher Lebold voyage beaucoup (en train…) et se découvre cet autre point commun avec ce Léonard Cohen dont l’immense ombre poétique s’étend sur lui depuis sa naissance : « C’est un grand arpenteur de villes, un mélange de juif errant et de passant baudelairien, un artiste du passage qui réintroduit de la légèreté et un passeur de lumière… ».

Différents stades de gravité jusqu’à cette ardente profondeur…

En 1995, le magazine Les Inkorruptibles consacrait (après bien d’autres…) sa Une à Léonard Cohen : le journaliste Gilles Tordjman l’avait visité dans son monastère zen sur le Mount Baldy (le « mont chauve » en Californie) pour nous le révéler en « guerrier de la spiritualité » voire comme « l’un des derniers grands mystiques de notre époque ».

Son nom ne signifie-t-il pas « prêtre » en hébreu ? Leonard n’était pas né pour la futilité mais pour la lutte avec l’ange ou l’abîme – et pour nous apprendre à jouer de tous les registres de la gravité comme le rappelle son biographe enthousiaste : « Il a réinventé des figures très anciennes dans le rock : celle du grand prêtre juif, sa fonction sacerdotale, ainsi que celle du poète mystique et du troubadour – bref, tous les registres de la vie du cœur… Son rock  est précis tant dans les textes que les sons, avec sa voix monocorde qui entre en résonance avec de petites valses obscures et des chœurs angéliques. Vingt ans après, il transforme le crooner en figure spirituelle et toujours nous reconnecte à ce que nous avons de plus profond : le cœur…Il a un talent naturel pour la gravité, il utilise cette disposition fondamentale (physique par sa voix grave, culturelle par son nom et psychologique (ses tendances à tutoyer les abîmes de la dépression). Il voit les corps tomber dans un monde soumis aux lois de la gravité, il est dans le jeu avec la gravité et nous donne des armes spirituelles avec son pouvoir de changer une chose en son contraire, une charge lourde en légèreté. Ce visionnaire de la gravité sait utiliser le pessimisme pour nous rendre plus vivants et plus joyeux...».

 Dans les concerts de ce grand initié, dit-on, il se fait un tel silence que l’on entendrait « une métaphore tomber » – l’on y sent même s’ouvrir, à la manière d’une fleur japonaise dans l’eau, quelque chose comme une ardente profondeur…

Convertir le monde à Leonard ?

En 1997, Christophe Lebold fait un mémoire de master sur Beautiful Loosers (Les Perdants magnifiques), le second roman de Léonard Cohen, « écrit sous acide » sur l’île d’Hydra et paru en 1966.

Un septennat plus tard, alors qu’il est attaché temporaire d’enseignement et de recherche, il soutient sa thèse intitulée Ecritures, masques et voix pour une poétique des chansons de Léonard Cohen et de Bob Dylan. La différence entre ces deux créateurs ? « Chez Dylan, il y a profusion du langage alors qu’il cinq ans de réécriture à Cohen pour enlever tout ce qui n’est pas nécessaire… ».

Maître de conférences depuis 2005, il enseigne la littérature américaine et anime un cours consacré à la poétique des singer-songwriters. Il confie le tiercé gagnant des œuvres du Canadien errant qu’il préfère : « Avec Songs of Léonard Cohen (1967), I am your man (1988) et Ten new songs (2001), on a les trois versions de Cohen : le troubadour, le crooner et le maitre zen. Et on a ses trois formes de gravité : celle du poète, noire et désespérée, puis celle, ironique et sismique portée par cette voix grave qui fait trembler le monde et, enfin, à partir de 2000, cette gravité aérienne d’un maître zen angélique qui nous instruit sur notre lumière cachée. Avec ces trois albums, on peut convertir tout le monde à Léonard Cohen… ». Sa chanson préférée ? « Ce serait Everybody knows (1988) qui sonne comme une lamentation de Jérémie sur l’état du monde, avec l’ironie d’un crooner postmoderne »…

A ce jour, le créateur de Suzanne (1967) a publié douze albums – mais il y a aussi ceux tirés de ses huit tournées mondiales, sans oublier ses deux romans et ses neuf recueils de poèmes depuis Let Us Compare Mythologies paru en 1956.

Si Christophe Lebold dévore les grandes œuvres de la littérature mondiale (notamment Proust et Dostoïevski, des « révélations absolues »), il ne franchit pas pour autant le pas vers l’écriture personnelle et fait l’acteur au sein de la compagnie de théâtre La compagnie des gens : « Je n’ai pas ressenti l’appel de la page blanche comme absolu : cela m’amuse plus de dire des textes sur scène…La vie du perfectionniste Leonard capable de réécrire ses chansons vingt ans après me montre à quel point l’écriture est un travail de chiffonnier… ».

En mai 2013 et 2014, la troupe a donné des représentations du spectacle Saint François d’Assise, paroles d’oiseaux, de saints et de fous – qui doit beaucoup aux textes d’un autre troubadour de chevet de Christophe Lebold, le héraut de La grande vie Christian Bobin dont il a adapté les textes : « J’ai voulu faire évoluer Saint-François d’Assise sous le regard de Jean-Claude Van Damme… ».

Un pessimisme lumineux

Sur les traces de Leonard Cohen, il étudie depuis l’an 2000 la voie du zen : « Dans nos vies sursaturées de prétendues informations, de bavardages incessants, de gadgets électroniques et de surconsommation où tout est organisé pour détruire nos vies intérieures, il est important de retrouver un sens de la puissance lumineuse du verbe, car il peut illuminer nos vies de façon concise : ce n’est plus de l’érudition gratuite, ça nous rend plus vivants, plus affûtés et plus précis. Rien de tel pour cela que la compagnie d’un homme aussi drôle et profond que Leonard pour s’affûter : son pessimisme est lumineux. Il nous fait du bien en utilisant des chansons douces comme des armes spirituelles et il nous reconnecte directement par le verbe et le sens mélodique, sur des airs de valses obsédantes, à nos cœurs et à tout ce qui est mystérieux (l’amour ou son absence, l’abîme ou Dieu). Fréquenter ce contrebandier de lumière est quelque chose de merveilleux, il nous apprend aussi à transformer quelque chose en son contraire, c’est aussi une activité à notre portée… ».

Mais à quoi tient l’immense succès planétaire d’un poète aussi profond qui s’est toujours refusé aux veuleries en vogue et dont chacun des chansons pourtant nous est si instantanément familière ? « C’est un poète de la qualité qui opérait sur un médium de masse. Dans les sixties, le rock a cherché des poètes pour se légitimer : il y avait lui, Dylan et les Beatles. Les gens n’en sont pas revenus que ce métaphysicien du cœur brisé leur parle de leur condition d’être en chute libre– et  leur propose d’entendre une miséricorde angélique, un appel à l’élévation…C’est sur cette brisure du cœur que l’on peut fonder une vraie fraternité… Son premier album n’a pas pris une ride en quarante-sept ans : déjà minimaliste, il est tranchant et aussi indémodable qu’une calligraphie zen… ».

Le biographe de Leonard Cohen l’a rencontré une fois dans sa vie pendant trois minutes, en tout et pour tout : « Nous avions convenu par mail des rendez-vous qui n’ont jamais abouti car il est très pris… Un soir, j’étais à Liverpool pour un colloque sur la musique populaire où je faisais une intervention sur mon sujet de prédilection. En sortant de l’université, je marche et à un moment je lève les yeux et je vois ledit sujet venir à ma rencontre… C’était bien Leonard, avec son regard à la fois perçant et si bienveillant, et nous n’avions pas  rendez-vous ! C’était hautement surréaliste et ça s’est passé comme dans une de ses chansons : le « hasard » a tellement bien fait les choses qu’il a mis la ville où j’allais parler de lui sur sa liste de concerts planétaires… ».

Un poète venait de passer – le mot de la fin s’éternise dans une histoire sans fin… « Leonard est un éveillé qui suspend son départ pour nous éveiller à ce que nous avons d’essentiel. Je pense à ce koan zen : un âne regarde un puits jusqu’à ce que le puits regarde l’âne… Leonard peut faire ça, son œuvre a cette force de transformation absolue. Un maître, c’est quelqu’un qui vous libère… ». Et si dans l’immense et fervente communauté des inconditionnels entrés dans le cercle de lumière du très paradoxal Leonard Cohen se levait, au bord de l’absolu vertige, une armée d’éveilleurs à son image ?

Une première version de cet article a paru dans Les Affiches-Moniteur

Christophe Lebold, Leonard Cohen, l’homme qui voyait tomber les anges, éditions Camion Blanc, 720 p., 36 €


16 novembre, 2016
 Lors donc que j’ai résolu d’appliquer mon esprit à la politique, mon dessein n’a pas été de rien découvrir de nouveau ni d’extraordinaire, mais seulement de démontrer par des raisons certaines et indubitables ou, en d’autres termes, de déduire de la condition même du genre humain un certain nombre de principes parfaitement d’accord avec l’expérience ; et pour porter dans cet ordre de recherches la même liberté d’esprit dont on use en mathématiques, je me suis soigneusement abstenu de tourner en dérision les actions humaines, de les prendre en pitié ou en haine ; je n’ai voulu que les comprendre. En face des passions, telles que l’amour, la haine, la colère, l’envie, la vanité, la miséricorde, et autres mouvements de l’âme, j’y ai vu non des vices, mais des propriétés, qui dépendent de la nature humaine, comme dépendent de la nature de l’air le chaud, le froid, les tempêtes, le tonnerre, et autres phénomènes de cette espèce, lesquels sont nécessaires, quoique incommodes, et se produisent en vertu de causes déterminées par lesquelles nous nous efforçons de les comprendre. Et notre âme, en contemplant ces mouvements intérieurs, éprouve autant de joie qu’au spectacle des phénomènes qui charment les sens. Baruch Spinoza (Traité de l’autorité politique)
Il n’y a pas en littérature de beaux sujets d’art, et (…) Yvetot donc vaut Constantinople ; et (…) en conséquence l’on peut écrire n’importe quoi aussi bien que quoi que ce soit. L’artiste doit tout élever ; il est comme une pompe, il a en lui un grand tuyau qui descend aux entrailles des choses, dans les couches profondes. Il aspire et fait jaillir au soleil en gerbes géantes ce qui était plat sous terre et qu’on ne voyait pas. Gustave Flaubert (lettre à Louise Colet, 25 juin 1853
Comprendre que si [on] était à sa place, [on] serait et penserait sans doute comme lui. Pierre Bourdieu
Les enfants de Trump doivent reprendre l’entreprise avec le conflit d’intérêt, ils pourront vendre des gratte-ciels au gouvernement israélien. Des immeubles luxueux à construire dans les territoires occupés, que le Président des États-Unis les aidera à occuper et il leur enverra des Mexicains pour nettoyer les chiottes. Charline Vanhoenacker 
Ces Etats au-dessus desquels les avions ne font que passer en reliant la Côte Est et la Côte Ouest, mais où on n’imagine jamais s’arrêter. The Middle

Because we live in flyover country, we try to figure out what is going on elsewhere by subscribing to magazines. Thomas McGuane (Esquire)

This must have come from the time I worked in movies, an industry that seemed to acknowledge only two places, New York and Los Angeles. I recall being annoyed that the places I loved in America were places that air travel allowed you to avoid. Thomas McGuane

The term « flyover country » is often used to derisively refer to the vast swath of America that’s not near the Atlantic or Pacific coasts. It sounds like the ultimate putdown to describe places best seen at cruising altitude, the precincts where political and cultural sophisticates visit only when they need to. But in fact, (…) “It’s a stereotype of other people’s stereotypes,” lexicographer Ben Zimmer says. But it’s not as if the stereotypes are entirely imagined. Zimmer says the concept behind flyover country is present in older phrases, like middle America, “which has been used to talk about, geographically, the middle part of the U.S. since 1924, but then also has this idea of not only the geographic middle but the economic and social middle of the country as well, that kind of middle-ness that’s associated with the Midwest.” Another term for the same place, Zimmer notes, is heartland, which is “for people who want to valorize a particular social or political value.” And the heartland gets a lot of attention when it has votes that can be won. Politicians across the spectrum paint this place as more real than the coasts. (…) All this is a way of championing a set of values that is imagined to exist outside of big urban centers. It treats middle America like a time capsule from a simpler era, which, when you consider the Dust Bowl, the circumstances that led to the existence of Rust Belt, and the Civil Rights struggles before and after the Great Migration, never really existed for many people. Romanticizing can also read as patronizing for people in the middle of the country. (…) Hence the self-coining of flyover country—it’s a way for Midwesterners (and Southerners and people from the plains and mountains) to define themselves relative to the rest of the country. It’s defensive but self-deprecating, a way of shouting out for attention but also a means for identifying yourself by your home region’s lack of attention. It’s the linguistic nexus of Minnesota nice and Iowa stubborn. This self-identification has become a celebration. (…) Aldean, LaFarge, Kendzior, and McGuane all come from different parts of the middle of the country, but they all belong to the same, self-identified place, a place rooted more in attitude than in soil. As a concept, flyover country can exist almost anywhere in the United States. As a phrase, it’s become almost a dare, a way for Midwesterners to cajole the coastal elites into paying attention to a place they might otherwise overlook. But it’s also a bond for Midwesterners—a way of forging an identity in a place they imagine being mocked for its lack of identity. It’s a response to an affront, real or imagined, and a way to say “Well, maybe we don’t think that much of you, either. National Geographic
Thirty thousand feet above, could be Oklahoma Just a bunch of square cornfields and wheat farms Man, it all looks the same Miles and miles of back roads and highways Connecting little towns with funny names Who’d want to live down there in the middle of nowhere? They’ve never drove through Indiana Met the man who plowed that earth Planted that seed, busted his ass for you and me Or caught a harvest moon in Kansas They’d understand why God made Those fly over states. Jason Aldean
Well, I won’t worry if the world don’t like me, I won’t let ’em waste my time There ain’t nothin’ goin’ to change my mind, I feel fine gettin’ by on Central time. Pokey Lafarge
What I was hearing was this general sense of being on the short end of the stick. Rural people felt like they’re not getting their fair share. (…)  First, people felt that they were not getting their fair share of decision-making power. For example, people would say: All the decisions are made in Madison and Milwaukee and nobody’s listening to us. Nobody’s paying attention, nobody’s coming out here and asking us what we think. Decisions are made in the cities, and we have to abide by them. Second, people would complain that they weren’t getting their fair share of stuff, that they weren’t getting their fair share of public resources. That often came up in perceptions of taxation. People had this sense that all the money is sucked in by Madison, but never spent on places like theirs. And third, people felt that they weren’t getting respect. They would say: The real kicker is that people in the city don’t understand us. They don’t understand what rural life is like, what’s important to us and what challenges that we’re facing. They think we’re a bunch of redneck racists. So it’s all three of these things — the power, the money, the respect. People are feeling like they’re not getting their fair share of any of that. (…)  It’s been this slow burn. Resentment is like that. It builds and builds and builds until something happens. Some confluence of things makes people notice: I am so pissed off. I am really the victim of injustice here. (…) Then, I also think that having our first African American president is part of the mix, too. (…) when the health-care debate ramped up, once he was in office and became very, very partisan, I think people took partisan sides. (…) It’s not just resentment toward people of color. It’s resentment toward elites, city people. (…) Of course [some of this resentment] is about race, but it’s also very much about the actual lived conditions that people are experiencing. We do need to pay attention to both. As the work that you did on mortality rates shows, it’s not just about dollars. People are experiencing a decline in prosperity, and that’s real. The other really important element here is people’s perceptions. Surveys show that it may not actually be the case that Trump supporters themselves are doing less well — but they live in places where it’s reasonable for them to conclude that people like them are struggling. Support for Trump is rooted in reality in some respects — in people’s actual economic struggles, and the actual increases in mortality. But it’s the perceptions that people have about their reality are the key driving force here. (…) One of the key stories in our political culture has been the American Dream — the sense that if you work hard, you will get ahead. (…) But here’s where having Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump running alongside one another for a while was so interesting. I think the support for Sanders represented a different interpretation of the problem. For Sanders supporters, the problem is not that other population groups are getting more than their fair share, but that the government isn’t doing enough to intervene here and right a ship that’s headed in the wrong direction. (…) There is definitely some misinformation, some misunderstandings. But we all do that thing of encountering information and interpreting it in a way that supports our own predispositions. Recent studies in political science have shown that it’s actually those of us who think of ourselves as the most politically sophisticated, the most educated, who do it more than others. So I really resist this characterization of Trump supporters as ignorant. There’s just more and more of a recognition that politics for people is not — and this is going to sound awful, but — it’s not about facts and policies. It’s so much about identities, people forming ideas about the kind of person they are and the kind of people others are. Who am I for, and who am I against? Policy is part of that, but policy is not the driver of these judgments. There are assessments of, is this someone like me? Is this someone who gets someone like me? (…) All of us, even well-educated, politically sophisticated people interpret facts through our own perspectives, our sense of what who we are, our own identities. I don’t think that what you do is give people more information. Because they are going to interpret it through the perspectives they already have. People are only going to absorb facts when they’re communicated from a source that they respect, from a source who they perceive has respect for people like them. And so whenever a liberal calls out Trump supporters as ignorant or fooled or misinformed, that does absolutely nothing to convey the facts that the liberal is trying to convey. Katherine Cramer

le pays que l’on survole sans s’arrêter

Agriculture

Revenge of the rural voter

Rural voters turned out in a big way this presidential cycle — and they voted overwhelmingly for Donald Trump.

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, pictured with Hillary Clinton in Iowa last year, had urged the campaign to shore up rural outreach, multiple sources said. | AP Photo

It was supposed to be the year of the Latino voter. Unfortunately for Hillary Clinton, white rural voters had an even bigger moment.

Now Democrats are second-guessing the campaign’s decision to largely surrender the rural vote to the GOP. With their eyes turned anxiously toward 2018, they’re urging a new strategy to reach out to rural voters to stave off another bloodbath when a slew of farm-state Democrats face tough reelection battles.

« Hillary lost rural America 3 to 1, » said one Democratic insider, granted anonymity to speak candidly about the campaign. « If she had lost rural America 2 to 1, it would have broken differently. »

After years of declining electoral power, driven by hollowed-out towns, economic hardship and a sustained exodus, rural voters turned out in a big way this presidential cycle — and they voted overwhelmingly for Donald Trump, fueling the real estate mogul’s upset victory. The billionaire New Yorker never issued any rural policy plans, but he galvanized long-simmering anger by railing against trade deals, the Environmental Protection Agency and the « war on American farmers.”

When Trump’s digital team was analyzing early absentee returns in swing states, they weren’t fixated on what turned out to be an overhyped Latino voter surge. They were zeroing in on signs of an “extremely high” rural turnout, said Matthew Oczkowski, head of product at Cambridge Analytica, who led Trump’s digital team.

The Trump campaign had banked on a strong showing from what it called the “hidden Trump voters,” a demographic that’s largely white, disengaged and non-urban. Based on that premise, they weighted their polling predictions to reflect a higher rural turnout. The surge, as it turned out, exceeded even their expectations.

The rural voting bloc, long a Republican stronghold, has shrunk dramatically over the years, as farms have become more efficient and jobs have migrated to cities and suburbs. About 20 percent of the country, just less than 60 million people, live in rural America. This year, rural voters made up 17 percent of the electorate, according to exit polling.

But in a year with lackluster urban turnout for Clinton, the rural vote ended up playing a key role in Trump’s sweep of crucial Rust Belt swing states, which also tend to have much larger rural populations.

In Michigan, Trump appears to have won rural and small towns 57 percent to 38 percent, exit polls analyzed by NBC show, faring much better than Mitt Romney in 2012, who won the same group 53-46. In Pennsylvania, Trump blew Clinton out of the water among rural and small-town voters, 71-26 percent, according to exit polls. In 2012, Romney pulled 59 percent. In Wisconsin, Trump won the demographic 63-34 percent.

It will be weeks before more granular data show the full extent of the rural-urban divide, but initial calculations from The Daily Yonder, a website dedicated to rural issues, shows Clinton’s support among rural voters declined more than 8 percentage points from President Barack Obama’s in 2012.

Obama’s support in rural America also eroded between 2008 and 2012, from a high of 41 percent to 38 percent. But Clinton took it to a new low: 29 percent.

« Trump supporters are more rural than even average Republicans,” Oczkowski said. “What we saw on Election Day is that they’re even more rural than we thought. »

But numerous Democrats in agriculture circles buzzed with frustration over what they regarded as halfhearted efforts to engage rural voters. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack had urged the Clinton campaign to shore up rural outreach, multiple sources said, beating the same drum he has for several cycles as Democrats have seen their rural support steadily erode.

By all accounts, the Clinton campaign didn’t think it really needed rural voters, a shrinking population that’s reliably Republican. The campaign never named a rural council, as Obama did in 2012 and 2008. It also didn’t build a robust rural-dedicated campaign infrastructure. In 2008, Obama had a small staff at campaign headquarters dedicated to rural messaging and organizing efforts and had state-level rural coordinators in several battleground states throughout the Midwest and Rust Belt.

“There was an understanding that these were places where we needed to play and we needed to be close,” said a source familiar with the effort.

The Clinton campaign did not respond to questions about whether it had a rural strategy. One source said a staffer in Brooklyn was dedicated to rural outreach, but the assignment came just weeks before the election.

The campaign did some targeted mail and used surrogates like Vilsack to campaign in rural battlegrounds, a Clinton aide said. The aide noted that Trump got the same number of overall votes as Romney — although he did not dispute that Trump did far better in rural areas.

“The issue was, we did not see the turnout we needed in the cities and suburbs where our supporters were concentrated,” the aide said. “We underperformed in places like Bucks County in Pennsylvania and Wayne County in Michigan. We believe we were on pace for high turnout based on the opening weeks of early voting in states like Florida, Nevada, even Ohio. But it fell off on Election Day, based on — we think — the Comey letter dimming enthusiasm in the final week, » a reference to FBI Director James Comey’s announcement 11 days before the election that investigators were examining new evidence in the probe of Clinton’s email server. (Nine days later, Comey wrote a second letter saying the review had turned up nothing to change his earlier conclusion that there had been no criminal conduct.)

It’s not altogether surprising that Democratic campaign strategists might overlook the rural vote. In 2012, turnout in rural communities dropped off precipitously, and demographic shifts occurring largely in cities and suburbs have given Democrats a sense of a growing advantage. Also, rural communities are, almost by definition, not densely populated, so it requires much more time and effort to do outreach.

“It’s a tough slog,” lamented one young Democrat who asked for anonymity to talk candidly. “It’s hard to speak to rural America. It’s very regionally specific. It feels daunting. You have these wings of the party, progressives, and it’s hard to talk to those people and people in rural America, and not seem like you’re talking out of both sides of your mouth.”

But Trump’s blowout in rural America is seen as a warning sign for Democrats in 2018. Several farm-state lawmakers will be up for reelection, including Sens. Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota, Joe Donnelly of Indiana, Debbie Stabenow of Michigan, Claire McCaskill of Missouri, Sherrod Brown of Ohio, Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota and Jon Tester of Montana.

Beyond 2018, there are deep concerns the party is losing the already weak support it had in rural America, and there don’t appear to be any serious efforts to stop the bleeding.

Advocates for more rural engagement say it’s not that Democrats have a real shot at winning in these communities, but they can’t let Republicans run up the score unchecked.

There’s been a sense that Democrats could largely write off the rural vote, as rural voters have left the party because the exodus was offset by demographic growth among urban and nonwhite voters, among others, said Tom Bonier, CEO of Target Smart, a Democratic data and polling firm.

« That calculus didn’t work this time,” he said. “The dropoff was steep. There does need to be a strategy to reach out to these rural and blue-collar white voters. »

The irony is that Clinton actually has a long track record of engaging rural voters. She was popular in rural New York when she served as senator. She dedicated tremendous staff resources and time visiting upstate communities, talking to farmers and working with rural development leaders. Over time, she won over even staunch Republicans who had been extremely skeptical of a « carpetbagging » former first lady coming to their neck of the woods.

“She was so engaged on the details of the issues,” said Mark Nicholson, owner of Red Jacket Orchards in New York. Nicholson was a registered Republican but was so impressed with Clinton’s work that he campaigned for her this cycle. “She won me over.”

In the lead-up to the Iowa primary, Clinton unveiled her rural platform in a speech in front of a large green John Deere tractor parked inside a community college hall. She advocated for more investment in rural businesses, infrastructure and renewable energy and for increased spending on agriculture, health and education programs. She also slammed Republicans for not believing in climate change and for opposing a “real path to citizenship” for the undocumented workers upon which agriculture relies.

But while Clinton released policy plans, Trump did campaign stops in small towns.

Dee Davis, founder of the Center for Rural Strategies, a non-partisan organization, said he believes the Trump appeal across the heartland has almost nothing to do with policy.

“What Trump did in rural areas was try to appeal to folks culturally, » Davis said, contrasting that with Clinton’s comments about « deplorables » and putting coal mines out of business.

Those two slip-ups were particularly problematic in economically depressed communities that already felt dismissed by Washington and urban elites, he said.

« A lot of us in rural areas, our ears are tuned to intonation,” said Davis, who lives in Whitesburg, Kentucky, a Trump stronghold. “We think people are talking down to us. What ends up happening is that we don’t focus on the policy — we focus on the tones, the references, the culture. »

Voir également:

Wonkblog
A new theory for why Trump voters are so angry — that actually makes sense
Jeff Guo
The Washington Post
November 8, 2016

Regardless of who wins on Election Day, we will spend the next few years trying to unpack what the heck just happened. We know that Donald Trump voters are angry, and we know that they are fed up. By now, there have been so many attempts to explain Trumpism that the genre has become a target of parody.

But if you’re wondering about the widening fissure between red and blue America, why politics these days have become so fraught and so emotional, Kathy Cramer is one of the best people to ask. For the better part of the past decade, the political science professor has been crisscrossing Wisconsin trying to get inside the minds of rural voters.

Well before President Obama or the tea party, well before the rise of Trump sent reporters scrambling into the heartland looking for answers, Cramer was hanging out in dairy barns and diners and gas stations, sitting with her tape recorder taking notes. Her research seeks to understand how the people of small towns make sense of politics — why they feel the way they feel, why they vote the way they vote.

There’s been great thirst this election cycle for insight into the psychology of Trump voters. J.D. Vance’s memoir “Hillbilly Elegy” offers a narrative about broken families and social decay. “There is a lack of agency here — a feeling that you have little control over your life and a willingness to blame everyone but yourself,” he writes. Sociologist Arlie Hochschild tells a tale of perceived betrayal. According to her research, white voters feel the American Dream is drifting out of reach for them, and they are angry because they believe minorities and immigrants have butted in line.

Cramer’s recent book, “The Politics of Resentment,” offers a third perspective. Through her repeated interviews with the people of rural Wisconsin, she shows how politics have increasingly become a matter of personal identity. Just about all of her subjects felt a deep sense of bitterness toward elites and city dwellers; just about all of them felt tread on, disrespected and cheated out of what they felt they deserved.

Cramer argues that this “rural consciousness” is key to understanding which political arguments ring true to her subjects. For instance, she says, most rural Wisconsinites supported the tea party’s quest to shrink government not out of any belief in the virtues of small government but because they did not trust the government to help “people like them.”

“Support for less government among lower-income people is often derided as the opinions of people who have been duped,” she writes. However, she continues: “Listening in on these conversations, it is hard to conclude that the people I studied believe what they do because they have been hoodwinked. Their views are rooted in identities and values, as well as in economic perceptions; and these things are all intertwined.”

Rural voters, of course, are not precisely the same as Trump voters, but Cramer’s book offers an important way to think about politics in the era of Trump. Many have pointed out that American politics have become increasingly tribal; Cramer takes that idea a step further, showing how these tribal identities shape our perspectives on reality.

It will not be enough, in the coming months, to say that Trump voters were simply angry. Cramer shows that there are nuances to political rage. To understand Trump’s success, she argues, we have to understand how he tapped into people’s sense of self.

Recently, Cramer chatted with us about Trump and the future of white identity politics.

(As you’ll notice, Cramer has spent so much time with rural Wisconsinites that she often slips, subconsciously, into their voice. We’ve tagged those segments in italics. The interview has also been edited for clarity and length.)

For people who haven’t read your book yet, can you explain a little bit what you discovered after spending so many years interviewing people in rural Wisconsin?

Cramer: To be honest, it took me many months — I went to these 27 communities several times — before I realized that there was a pattern in all these places. What I was hearing was this general sense of being on the short end of the stick. Rural people felt like they’re not getting their fair share.

That feeling is primarily composed of three things. First, people felt that they were not getting their fair share of decision-making power. For example, people would say: All the decisions are made in Madison and Milwaukee and nobody’s listening to us. Nobody’s paying attention, nobody’s coming out here and asking us what we think. Decisions are made in the cities, and we have to abide by them.

Second, people would complain that they weren’t getting their fair share of stuff, that they weren’t getting their fair share of public resourcesThat often came up in perceptions of taxation. People had this sense that all the money is sucked in by Madison, but never spent on places like theirs.

And third, people felt that they weren’t getting respect. They would say: The real kicker is that people in the city don’t understand us. They don’t understand what rural life is like, what’s important to us and what challenges that we’re facing. They think we’re a bunch of redneck racists.

So it’s all three of these things — the power, the money, the respect. People are feeling like they’re not getting their fair share of any of that.

Was there a sense that anything had changed recently? That anything occurred to harden this sentiment? Why does the resentment seem so much worse now?

Cramer: These sentiments are not new. When I first heard them in 2007, they had been building for a long time — decades.

Look at all the graphs showing how economic inequality has been increasing for decades. Many of the stories that people would tell about the trajectories of their own lives map onto those graphs, which show that since the mid-’70s, something has increasingly been going wrong.

It’s just been harder and harder for the vast majority of people to make ends meet. So I think that’s part of this story. It’s been this slow burn.

Resentment is like that. It builds and builds and builds until something happens. Some confluence of things makes people notice: I am so pissed off. I am really the victim of injustice here.

So what do you think set it all off?

Cramer: The Great Recession didn’t help. Though, as I describe in the book, people weren’t talking about it in the ways I expected them to. People were like,Whatever, we’ve been in a recession for decades. What’s the big deal?

Part of it is that the Republican Party over the years has honed its arguments to tap into this resentment. They’re saying: “You’re right, you’re not getting your fair share, and the problem is that it’s all going to the government. So let’s roll government back.”

So there’s a little bit of an elite-driven effect here, where people are told: “You are right to be upset. You are right to notice this injustice.”

Then, I also think that having our first African American president is part of the mix, too. Now, many of the people that I spent time with were very intrigued by Barack Obama. I think that his race, in a way, signaled to people that this was different kind of candidate. They were keeping an open mind about him. Maybe this person is going to be different.

But then when the health-care debate ramped up, once he was in office and became very, very partisan, I think people took partisan sides. And truth be told, I think many people saw the election of an African American to the presidency as a threat. They were thinking: Wow something is going on in our nation and it’s really unfamiliar, and what does that mean for people like me?

I think in the end his presence has added to the anxieties people have about where this country is headed.

One of the endless debates among the chattering class on Twitter is whether Trump is mostly a phenomenon related to racial resentment, or whether Trump support is rooted in deeper economic anxieties. And a lot of times, the debate is framed like it has to be one or the other — but I think your book offers an interesting way to connect these ideas.

Cramer: What I heard from my conversations is that, in these three elements of resentment — I’m not getting my fair share of power, stuff or respect — there’s race and economics intertwined in each of those ideas.

When people are talking about those people in the city getting an “unfair share,” there’s certainly a racial component to that. But they’re also talking about people like me [a white, female professor]. They’re asking questions like, how often do I teach, what am I doing driving around the state Wisconsin when I’m supposed to be working full time in Madison, like, what kind of a job is that, right?

It’s not just resentment toward people of color. It’s resentment toward elites, city people.

And maybe the best way to explain how these things are intertwined is through noticing how much conceptions of hard work and deservingness matter for the way these resentments matter to politics.

We know that when people think about their support for policies, a lot of the time what they’re doing is thinking about whether the recipients of these policies are deserving. Those calculations are often intertwined with notions of hard work, because in the American political culture, we tend to equate hard work with deservingness.

And a lot of racial stereotypes carry this notion of laziness, so when people are making these judgments about who’s working hard, oftentimes people of color don’t fare well in those judgments. But it’s not just people of color. People are like: Are you sitting behind a desk all day? Well that’s not hard work. Hard work is someone like me — I’m a logger, I get up at 4:30 and break my back. For my entire life that’s what I’m doing. I’m wearing my body out in the process of earning a living.

In my mind, through resentment and these notions of deservingness, that’s where you can see how economic anxiety and racial anxiety are intertwined.

The reason the “Trumpism = racism” argument doesn’t ring true for me is that, well, you can’t eat racism. You can’t make a living off of racism. I don’t dispute that the surveys show there’s a lot of racial resentment among Trump voters, but often the argument just ends there. “They’re racist.” It seems like a very blinkered way to look at this issue.

Cramer: It’s absolutely racist to think that black people don’t work as hard as white people. So what? We write off a huge chunk of the population as racist and therefore their concerns aren’t worth attending to?

How do we ever address racial injustice with that limited understanding?

Of course [some of this resentment] is about race, but it’s also very much about the actual lived conditions that people are experiencing. We do need to pay attention to both. As the work that you did on mortality rates shows, it’s not just about dollars. People are experiencing a decline in prosperity, and that’s real.

The other really important element here is people’s perceptions. Surveys show that it may not actually be the case that Trump supporters themselves are doing less well — but they live in places where it’s reasonable for them to conclude that people like them are struggling.

Support for Trump is rooted in reality in some respects — in people’s actual economic struggles, and the actual increases in mortality. But it’s the perceptionsthat people have about their reality are the key driving force here. That’s been a really important lesson from this election.

I want to get into this idea of deservingness. As I was reading your book it really struck me that the people you talked to, they really have a strong sense of what they deserve, and what they think they ought to have. Where does that come from?

Cramer: Part of where that comes from is just the overarching story that we tell ourselves in the U.S. One of the key stories in our political culture has been the American Dream — the sense that if you work hard, you will get ahead.

Well, holy cow, the people I encountered seem to me to be working extremely hard. I’m with them when they’re getting their coffee before they start their workday at 5:30 a.m. I can see the fatigue in their eyes. And I think the notion that they are not getting what they deserve, it comes from them feeling like they’re struggling. They feel like they’re doing what they were told they needed to do to get ahead. And somehow it’s not enough.

Oftentimes in some of these smaller communities, people are in the occupations their parents were in, they’re farmers and loggers. They say, it used to be the case that my dad could do this job and retire at a relatively decent age, and make a decent wage. We had a pretty good quality of life, the community was thriving. Now I’m doing what he did, but my life is really much more difficult.

I’m doing what I was told I should do in order to be a good American and get ahead, but I’m not getting what I was told I would get.

The hollowing out of the middle class has been happening for everyone, not just for white people. But it seems that this phenomenon is only driving some voters into supporting Trump. One theme of your book is how we can take the same reality, the same facts, but interpret them through different frames of mind and come to such different conclusions.

Cramer: It’s not inevitable that people should assume that the decline in their quality of life is the fault of other population groups. In my book I talk about rural folks resenting people in the city. In the presidential campaign, Trump is very clear about saying: You’re right, you’re not getting your fair share, and look at these other groups of people who are getting more than their fair share. Immigrants. Muslims. Uppity women.

But here’s where having Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump running alongside one another for a while was so interesting. I think the support for Sanders represented a different interpretation of the problem. For Sanders supporters, the problem is not that other population groups are getting more than their fair share, but that the government isn’t doing enough to intervene here and right a ship that’s headed in the wrong direction.

One of the really interesting parts of your book is where you discuss how rural people seem to hate government and want to shrink it, even though government provides them with a lot of benefits. It raises the Thomas Frank question — on some level, are people just being fooled or deluded?

Cramer: There is definitely some misinformation, some misunderstandings. But we all do that thing of encountering information and interpreting it in a way that supports our own predispositions. Recent studies in political science have shown that it’s actually those of us who think of ourselves as the most politically sophisticated, the most educated, who do it more than others.

So I really resist this characterization of Trump supporters as ignorant.

There’s just more and more of a recognition that politics for people is not — and this is going to sound awful, but — it’s not about facts and policies. It’s so much about identities, people forming ideas about the kind of person they are and the kind of people others are. Who am I for, and who am I against?

Policy is part of that, but policy is not the driver of these judgments. There are assessments of, is this someone like me? Is this someone who gets someone like me?

I think all too often, we put our energies into figuring out where people stand on particular policies. I think putting energy into trying to understand the way they view the world and their place in it — that gets us so much further toward understanding how they’re going to vote, or which candidates are going to be appealing to them.

All of us, even well-educated, politically sophisticated people interpret facts through our own perspectives, our sense of what who we are, our own identities.

I don’t think that what you do is give people more information. Because they are going to interpret it through the perspectives they already have. People are only going to absorb facts when they’re communicated from a source that they respect, from a source who they perceive has respect for people like them.

And so whenever a liberal calls out Trump supporters as ignorant or fooled or misinformed, that does absolutely nothing to convey the facts that the liberal is trying to convey.

If, hypothetically, we see a Clinton victory on Tuesday, a lot of people have suggested that she should go out and have a listening tour. What would be her best strategy to reach out to people?

Cramer: The very best strategy would be for Donald Trump, if he were to lose the presidential election, to say, “We need to come together as a country, and we need to be nice to each other.”

That’s not going to happen.

As for the next best approach … well I’m trying to be mindful of what is realistic. It’s not a great strategy for someone from the outside to say, “Look, we really do care about you.” The level of resentment is so high.

People for months now have been told they’re absolutely right to be angry at the federal government, and they should absolutely not trust this woman, she’s a liar and a cheat, and heaven forbid if she becomes president of the United States. Our political leaders have to model for us what it’s like to disagree, but also to not lose basic faith in the system. Unless our national leaders do that, I don’t think we should expect people to.

Maybe it would be good to end on this idea of listening. There was this recent interview with Arlie Hochschild where someone asked her how we could empathize with Trump supporters. This was ridiculed by some liberals on Twitter. They were like, “Why should we try to have this deep, nuanced understanding of people who are chanting JEW-S-A at Trump rallies?” It was this really violent reaction, and it got me thinking about your book.

Cramer: One of the very sad aspects of resentment is that it breeds more of itself. Now you have liberals saying, “There is no justification for these points of view, and why would I ever show respect for these points of view by spending time and listening to them?”

Thank God I was as naive as I was when I started. If I knew then what I know now about the level of resentment people have toward urban, professional elite women, would I walk into a gas station at 5:30 in the morning and say, “Hi! I’m Kathy from the University of Madison”?

I’d be scared to death after this presidential campaign! But thankfully I wasn’t aware of these views. So what happened to me is that, within three minutes, people knew I was a professor at UW-Madison, and they gave me an earful about the many ways in which that riled them up — and then we kept talking.

And then I would go back for a second visit, a third visit, a fourth, fifth and sixth. And we liked each other. Even at the end of my first visit, they would say, “You know, you’re the first professor from Madison I’ve ever met, and you’re actually kind of normal.” And we’d laugh. We got to know each other as human beings.

ple from a different walk of life, from a different perspective. There’s nothing like it. You can’t achieve it through online communication. You can’t achieve it through having good intentions. It’s the act of being witThat’s partly about listening, and that’s partly about spending time with peoh other people that establishes the sense we actually are all in this together.

As Pollyannaish as that sounds, I really do believe it.


Présidentielle américaine: Vous avez dit effet John Oliver ? (Love trumps hate: Even his Iraq combat vet wife couldn’t help brilliant Brit stand up from missing the story of a lifetime)

14 novembre, 2016
last-week-tonight-poster-john-oliver john-oliver-influence-graph-tortue john-oliver-influence-graph-chicken

S’il est clair que vous aimez la chose que vous critiquez, ça aide. John Oliver
How the fuck did we get here? Well clearly there are many possible answers to that question, including misleading forecasts that bred complacency, a flawed candidate who failed to appeal to white, rural, and working class voters, and – and this is worth repeating – deep racism and/or indifference to it. For those, including us, who were shocked by Tuesday, we’re going to be examining all of this for years. But for tonight, let’s look at just one narrow element that may have helped bring us here, because it will be important going forward, and that is our media. Specifically how a system that is supposed to catch a serial liar failed. (…) Weird conspiracy bullshit has always been bubbling under the surface. But Trump was the first major candidate to harness and fully legitimize it. And it’s obvious in hindsight: He came along and told millions of people every crazy email you’ve ever forwarded was true. And that, at least in part, is why he will be our next president. (…) So keep reminding yourself: This is not normal. Write it on a Post-It note, and stick it on your refrigerator. Hire a skywriter once a month. Tattoo it on your ass. Because a Klan-backed, misogynist internet troll is going to be delivering the next State of the Union address. And that is not normal, it is fucked up. John Oliver
We recognized much earlier than most that there was a little bit of a phenomenon to Donald Trump. I’d say that if we made a mistake last year it’s that we probably did put on too many of his campaign rallies in those early months unedited and just let them run. You never knew what he was going to say. You never knew what was going to happen. Jeff Zucker (president of CNN Worldwide)
It may not be good for America, but it’s damn good for CBS, that’s all i gotta say. (…) So what can I say? The money’s rolling in, this is fun. (…) They’re not even talking about issues. They’re throwing bombs at each other and I think the advertising reflects that. (…) I’ve never seen anything like this and this is going to be a very good year for us. Sorry. It’s a terrible thing to say, but bring it on, Donald, go ahead, keep going. Les Moonves (chief executive of CBS)
Attention, l’Amérique a la rage (…) La science se développe partout au même rythme et la fabrication des bombes est affaire de potentiel industriel. En tuant les Rosenberg, vous avez tout simplement esayé d’arrêter les progrès de la science. Jean-Paul Sartre (« Les animaux malades de la rage », Libération, 22 juin 1953)
L’Amérique des grandes villes, des jeunes et des minorités, n’est qu’une partie de ce grand pays. Elle cache une autre Amérique, plus continentale, plus blanche, qui remâche des haines recuites. Trump a été acclamé par les hommes blancs sans diplômes, souvent laissés pour compte de la mondialisation, et qui ont le sentiment d’être déclassés. (…) Avec beaucoup d’intuition, Trump s’est également emparé du déclassement du monde ouvrier américain, en promettant de dénoncer les traités internationaux, de construire des murs et de rouvrir les mines et les usines. Trump a été acclamé par les hommes blancs sans diplômes, souvent laissés pour compte de la mondialisation, dont la situation n’est pas toujours précaire, loin s’en faut, mais qui ont néanmoins le sentiment d’être déclassés. Cette Amérique-là a la «rage», pour reprendre une formule célèbre de Sartre. Pap Ndiaye
It was plainly wrong though to see the White House lit up in rainbow colors to celebrate the Supreme Court’s legalization of same-sex marriage. That was not cool to me. Tonya Register
Pour le dire crûment, les médias sont passés à côté. Le Washington Post
Toute la technologie éblouissante, l’utilisation des bases de données et la modélisation sophistiquée que les rédactions américaines ont apportées pour l’analyse de la politique pendant cette élection présidentielle, n’ont pas permis aux journalistes d’être à nouveau derrière l’histoire, derrière le reste du pays. (…) Les médias ont raté ce qu’il se passait autour d’eux (…) les chiffres n’étaient pas simplement un piètre guide pour la nuit électorale, ils étaient à mille lieues de ce qui se passait réellement. Le raté de ce mardi soir était beaucoup plus qu’un échec dans le scrutin, c’était aussi l’échec de la compréhension de la colère bouillante d’une grande partie de l’électorat américain, qui se sent laissée de côté par une récupération sélective et trahie par des accords commerciaux qu’elle considère comme des menaces à ses emplois. (…)  Les journalistes n’ont pas remis en question les sondages quant ils confirmaient leur intuition que Donald Trump ne pourrait jamais devenir président. Ils ont décrit les partisans du candidat qui croyaient encore qu’il avait une chance comme déconnectés de la réalité. En fait, c’était l’inverse. (…)  Si les médias ne parviennent pas à présenter un scénario politique basé sur la réalité, alors ils ont échoué dans l’accomplissement de leur fonction la plus fondamentale (…) l’Amérique profonde n’est pas un lieu, c’est un état d’esprit – c’est dans certaines parties de Long Island et Queens, beaucoup de Staten Island, certains quartiers de Miami ou même de Chicago. Et, oui, elle est largement – mais pas exclusivement – concerne les travailleurs de la classe blanche. Ils pensent que quelque chose va tellement mal que toutes les vérifications factuelles de M. Trump cette année, les innombrables rapports sur ses mensonges – qu’il a prononcés plus que Mme Clinton – et l’enquête vigoureuse de son entreprise et de ses transgressions personnelles, les a dérangés bienomins que les maux nationaux perçus que M. Trump a pointés et promis de traiter. Selon l’avis des électeurs américains, le gouvernement était cassé, le système économique était cassé, et nous l’avons entendu si souvent, les médias étaient cassés. Eh bien, quelque chose est sûrement rompu. Il peut être réparé, mais il faut le faire une bonne fois pour toutes. Le New York Times
Il y a même une partie de moi qui aime ce gars. John Oliver
Le problème, c’est que même lorsque l’on peut prouver par la démonstration que Trump a tort, cela n’a en quelque sorte pas d’importance. (…) Et c’est peut-être parce qu’il a passé des décennies à transformer son nom en une marque, synonyme de succès et de qualité (…), une marque dont il est lui-même la mascotte (…). Mais s’il faut vraiment qu’il soit le candidat républicain à l’élection présidentielle, il est urgent d’arrêter de penser à la mascotte et de commencer à regarder l’homme. Un candidat à la présidence doit proposer une série de propositions cohérentes. Quoi que vous pensiez de Marco Rubio ou de Ted Cruz, au moins, vous savez plus ou moins ce qu’ils pensent. Les opinions de Trump, à l’inverse, sont largement incohérentes. Il a été successivement pour et contre l’avortement, pour et contre l’interdiction de la vente de fusils d’assaut, pour l’immigration de réfugiés et pour l’idée de les expulser hors du pays. (…) Ce qui fait peur, c’est que nous n’avons aucun moyen de savoir lesquelles de ces opinions contradictoires il défendra s’il gagne l’élection. (…) Cette campagne a été dominée par les scandales, mais il est dangereux de penser qu’il y en a un nombre égal des deux côtés. Et vous pouvez être irrité par certains des scandales d’Hillary – c’est compréhensible – mais vous devriez alors être foutument scandalisé par ceux de Trump.  John Oliver
Il est évident que, sans la presse, tout ce que les journaux télévisés auraient à nous montrer, ce serait des présentateurs occupés à jouer à la baballe. (…) Nous devrons tôt ou tard payer pour le travail journalistique, ou alors nous finirons tous par en payer le prix. Non seulement cela laisserait la voie libre aux pires manipulations, mais, en plus, tous les futurs films de journalistes risqueraient de ressembler à ça. John Oliver
Voilà un type qui aime se saisir de sujets ennuyeux et les rendre intéressants. Si vous pouvez faire la même chose que ce qu’il s’est passé avec la FCC et la neutralité du Net, imaginez le niveau d’intérêt des gens pour des questions encore plus proches d’eux. Cyrus Habib
Il n’a pas les défauts d’autres animateurs satiriques. Il ne donne jamais l’impression qu’il méprise son public ou les gens dont il parle. Son humour n’est pas cynique, et ses sujets semblent magnifiquement enquêtés. Jean Lesieur (France 24)
Oliver a d’étonnantes audaces: parler plus de quinze minutes sans interruption face caméra, aborder des sujets techniques (le lobbying des télécoms,
la Cour suprême) ou controversés (les médicaments, le tabac). (…) John Oliver possède la distance nécessaire (un Anglais
 en Amérique) pour faire marrer, et en plus, il informe, sensibilise, et parvient même à déclencher l’engagement de ses téléspectateurs pour des combats politiques. A l’heure où l’on accuse de plus en plus l’infotainment de promouvoir des opinions (voire des mensonges) sous couvert d’humour, 
John Oliver aurait-il inventé la formule parfaite ? Grazia
John Oliver n’a pas peur d’aborder des thèmes polémiques qui divisent fortement la société américaine comme l’avortement ou la peine de mort. Et si ses vidéos culminent à plus de huit millions de vues sur Youtube en moyenne ce n’est pas par hasard. Plutôt que d’aborder rapidement le sujet, John et l’équipe de Last Week Tonight ont fait le choix de consacrer une vingtaine de minutes environ à un sujet précis, sur lequel ils enquêtent (comme de véritables journalistes) et qu’ils présentent de façon claire et argumentée. (…) La démarche d’Oliver s’inscrit dans un héritage, celui de la satire politique. Traduction : c’est terriblement drôle. La grande force du Britannique est de se présenter comme un comédien (c’est son métier après tout) et non pas un journaliste d’investigation. Il cherche à illustrer les absurdités d’une société où chacun cherche à imposer son point de vue de façon plus ou moins violente, et choisit comme arme l’humour. L’effet est garanti. (…) L’impertinence d’Oliver diffère à mon sens de celle d’un Yann Barthès par exemple, en ce qu’elle ne s’attaque pas qu’aux dérapages de représentants politiques ou de la vie civile, mais en ce qu’elle oblige la société américaine à affronter ses contradictions (aussi diverses soient-elles) et son hypocrisie manifeste. Y compris l’hypocrisie de l’axe politique que défend Oliver, celui des libéraux (qui correspondrait à la gauche en France). Ce que n’arrive pas à faire (ou ne souhaite pas?) le Petit Journal, précisément parce qu’exceptés les sketchs d’Eric et Quentin ou d’Alex Lutz et Bruno Sanchez, la rédaction est composée de journalistes, là où l’équipe d’Oliver s’appuie sur des auteurs et comédiens. Or, cette liberté de ton propre à l’exercice de la satire me parait plus efficace pour dénoncer les excès et dérapage d’une société. Louise Michel
L’animateur du “Last Week Tonight” (…) s’est fait le meilleur vulgarisateur des problèmes américains, dont les diatribes ont souvent des conséquences dans la vraie vie. C’est ce qu’on pourrait appeler le « John Oliver effect ». Provoquer une réaction citoyenne avec une simple tribune humoristique hebdomadaire en fin de soirée sur HBO – et qui recommence, pour une saison 3, ce dimanche 14 février. Depuis que l’acteur anglais a pris les commandes du Last Week Tonight en avril 2014, ses sermons dominicaux sur les problèmes qui minent les Etats-Unis (de la cause transgenre aux problèmes des insfrastructures publiques), ont réussi à faire changer les choses. Cet ancien disciple de Stephen Colbert et Jon Stewart n’a pas seulement fidélisé une solide base de téléspectateurs prêts à faire ce qu’il leur dicte, il a aussi poussé les politiques à se saisir de questions aussi austères qu’essentielles, qu’il traite avec son œil de citoyen britannique, émigré aux Etats-Unis depuis une quinzaine d’années et marié à une vétéran de la guerre d’Irak. Entouré d’une équipe qui travaille trois semaines sur des sujets dont il s’offusque, John Oliver ne souhaite pas forcément clouer son pays d’adoption au pilori : « Je ne cherche pas à ce que l’éviscération soit la caractéristique qui définisse notre boulot hebdomadaire », explique-t-il d’ailleurs à USA Today. Il réalise seulement un boulot unique, rigoureux et pédagogue. Et si le meilleur journaliste télé des Etats-Unis était en fait un humoriste ? Détail de ses coups d’éclat qui ont fait bouger les lignes. Télérama
John Oliver avait prévenu : la primaire ne l’intéresse qu’assez peu. Mais le présentateur du LastWeekTonight, le show le plus corrosif de la télévision américaine, pouvait difficilement s’abstenir de parler de Donald Trump. Alors que le candidat à la primaire républicaine remporte les Etats les uns après les autres (et pourrait de ce fait remporter le ticket – réponse partielle mardi 1er mars), il devenait de plus en plus urgent de s’intéresser à sa campagne et ses idées fluctuantes. Dans son émission du 28 février (que l’on n’espère pas noyée par les Oscars), avec la rigueur et la puissance comique qu’on lui connaît, l’Anglais émigré aux Etats-Unis a cliniquement dézingué l’homme politique, qualifié de « grain de beauté dans le dos » : « inoffensif il y a un an, tellement gros maintenant qu’il serait inconscient de l’ignorer ». Durant vingt minutes, John Oliver expose rigoureusement les faits, entrecoupés de piques comiques pour les appuyer. « Cet homme paraît séduisant… jusqu’à ce qu’on y regarde de plus près » : oui, Donald Trump est drôle, mais non, tout ce qu’il dit n’est pas vrai. Oui, il finance sa campagne, mais non, celle-ci ne repose pas que sur ses sous à lui. Oui, il est riche, mais non, il ne pèse pas 10 milliards de dollars (plutôt entre 150 et 250 millions). Oui, son nom est synonyme de succès, mais non, toutes ses affaires ne sont pas florissantes. On sent toutefois Oliver moins sarcastique qu’à l’accoutumé. Car l’heure est grave : « S’il devient vraiment le candidat républicain, il faut arrêter de penser à la mascotte Trump et commencer à penser à l’homme. » Un homme qui est, selon John Oliver, inconstant politiquement (tantôt pro-avortement, pro-migrants, pro-armes, et tantôt contre) et très trouble sur ses positions : « Il n’y a aucun moyen de savoir où se situeront ses convictions quand il sera à la Maison Blanche. » Et Oliver de sortir, l’air grave, le programme de Trump pour combattre l’Etat islamique (« Nous devons tuer leurs familles ») : « Ça, c’est le probable futur candidat républicain qui préconise un crime de guerre. » Prophétique, il prévient que le 20 janvier 2017, si Trump est élu et prête serment ce jour-là, « des voyageurs du futur viendront pour empêcher cela ». Aussi, pour tenter de saper l’influence de sa marque, qui capitalise sur le sens anglais de son nom (« trump » = atout), Oliver rappelle que celui-ci n’est pas le véritable nom d’origine de la famille : « Un de ses ancêtres a fait changer son nom de Drumpf à Trump. C’est bien moins magique et cela reflète sa personnalité. » Télérama
« Cette campagne cauchemardesque » et Donald Trump étaient du petit lait pour l’animateur britannique, qui a élevé le candidat républicain au rang de meilleur ennemi. Si, au début de la primaire républicaine, il s’est refusé à parler de lui, le comédien s’est finalement laissé aller à un portrait en forme de missile scud en février : vingt minutes de diatribe aussi jouissive qu’explosive. Les vannes étaient ouvertes : presque chaque semaine ensuite, l’élection aux mille noms a fait l’objet d’un traitement dont Trump avait les faveurs, défis et piques assassines en bonus. Jusqu’à l’émission de dimanche dernier, dans laquelle John Oliver avoue sa part de responsabilité : « Il y a quelques temps, on eut pu trouver drôle une candidature de Trump », explique l’Anglais, qui fait son mea culpa en diffusant des images de 2013. Alors animateur intérimaire du Daily Show, il appelait de ses vœux une candidature du milliardaire « à la coupe cheveux ridicule ». « Je suis un idiot », regrette-t-il, hilare, demandant aux Américains d’aller voter. Quand on connaît sa force de persuasion auprès de ses ouailles, on peut espérer qu’ils l’écoutent. Télérama
There is an outsider mentality as well as a faux authority thing that probably helps me comedically. (…) There’s a respect for authority in America that is a little odd to me. You respect the office, and never mind the person in it. That is not the case in England. In England, you always want to punch up. There is no respect for the office, the building, or any of the people who go in or out of it. There is much more deep-rooted contempt. (…) There is nothing I can accuse America of doing that Britain has not done worse in its history. So I’m coming from a point of self-criticism at the start. That helps in a way. And if it’s clear that you love the thing that you’re criticizing, that helps. John Oliver
She is very American with a capital A,” and “once you’ve bled for America, you definitely get to say you’re an American in a slightly louder tone of voice. (…) She grounds me in the fact that what I do doesn’t really matter at all, and also I’m a little more defensive of how America is perceived overseas. America takes a lot of [expletive], much of it well earned, from the rest of the world. And yet when something terrible goes down, people are waiting for Americans to fall out of the sky and help them. (…) If you don’t have anyone in your family who’s serving, you can very easily think that we’re not at war now. But we are. This is a country at war. There’s a massive disconnect between America and its military, and being married to a veteran removes that disconnect in a very substantial way. John Oliver
I can’t come home and say I had a really tough day at work today and see her roll her eyes and go, ‘Really?’ And she would be like, ‘I can’t imagine how difficult it was for you. You clown!’ Rightly, I have no place to whine about anything. That’s the problem with living with someone who has fought a war. You lose the moral high ground. John Oliver
It’s the most emasculating thing I could possibly do to go out with someone who has actually done something valuable with their life. John Oliver
There’s a long tradition of people from another nation being able to present their cultural criticism or satire as having a distance that a native seemingly doesn’t have. It feels like Oliver understands us differently than we do because he wasn’t born here. He’s seeing America as this other thing that he can hold at arm’s length. It creates the illusion of a perspective that he does a good job of playing up. He captures this outraged confusion at whatever crazy thing he’s talking about in current events. Jason Mittell (Middlebury College)
As a covert operative for the liberal elite, Oliver was working behind enemy lines at the RNC. When convention security chased after him for entering into a restricted area Oliver, who was still on a temporary work visa, found himself at risk for potential deportation. Attempting to avoid arrest and subsequent Breturn, the reporter and his camera crew happened upon a group of veterans who offered to help them hide. In a meet-cute befitting a beloved political satirist, one of those veterans was Oliver’s future wife—U.S. Army combat medic Kate Norley. After exchanging emails (aww, 2008) Oliver and Norley struck up a friendship; in 2010, the bespectacled Brit proposed in St. Thomas, and the couple tied the knot one year later. Norley, who Oliver describes as “Very American with a capital A,” is already a fan hero for (permanently!) saving her celebrity husband from deportation, but she’s also a straight-up American hero. At age 19, Norley enlisted in the military after the 9/11 attacks, serving as a combat medic in Fallujah and a mental health specialist in Ramadi, providing counsel to returning soldiers. In addition to being the only female combat-stress specialist, she was awarded the Combat Medic badge for providing medical care while under fire. Stateside, she worked as a veteran’s rights advocate for Vets for Freedom; the organization, which was founded in 2006, advocated on behalf of victory in the War on Terror, and promoted like-minded politicians. To say that Norley keeps Oliver grounded seems like an understatement. In classic self-effacing style, Oliver explained, “It’s the most emasculating thing I could possibly do to go out with someone who has actually done something valuable with their life.” Long-term emasculation aside, Norley’s combat experience gives the comedian some much-needed perspective: “I can’t come home and say I had a really tough day at work today and see her roll her eyes and go, ‘Really?’ And she would be like, ‘I can’t imagine how difficult it was for you. You clown!’ Rightly, I have no place to whine about anything. That’s the problem with living with someone who has fought a war. You lose the moral high ground.” When Oliver was offered his current gig hosting his own show, Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, at HBO, his Daily Show departure was huge entertainment news. But as Oliver tells it, Norley knew just how to keep him humble. As the comedian was making a career-defining move, his wife was on emergency deployment in the Philippines as a first responder to Typhoon Haiyan. “I got to speak to her once on this spotty satellite phone,” he recalls, “and she’s saying, ‘We had to do emergency C-sections and amputations and there are dead bodies everywhere, it’s worse than people are letting on, it’s just death, death, everywhere.’ And there’s no point at which you can go, ‘I’ve got some news as well!’ It just doesn’t matter.” Oliver distinguishes himself from the late night pack with his British accent, across-the-pond intellectualism, and genuine outsider’s confusion. But after eight years with a proud vet, Oliver has proven himself to be quite the patriot. After his 2013 break with The Daily Show was finalized, John and Kate headed to Afghanistan as part of the USO Tour. The unconventional second honeymoon found the Oliver’s sleeping in the barracks, eating with the troops, and performing at more than half a dozen forward operating bases. Last Week Tonight viewers might be surprised to learn that Oliver’s wife is a Republican—let alone a Republican who’s advocated on behalf of GOP politicians on Fox News. The unabashedly liberal HBO show has been credited with real change, otherwise known as the “John Oliver effect.” Oliver’s ability to synthesize and sensationalize under-reported topics into viral videos has led to political victories for causes ranging from unfair bail requirements to FCC regulations. And while Oliver is an equal opportunity satirist, his popular “Make Donald Drumpf Again” campaign suggests that He’s with Her. In an increasingly polarized political climate, it’s rare and refreshing to see bipartisan cooperation—let alone wedlock. And while Oliver hasn’t publicly commented on any political squabbles at home, he’s unequivocally supportive of his wife and her veteran activism: “Once you’ve bled for America, you definitely get to say you’re an American in a slightly louder tone of voice.” The Daily Beast

Attention: un effet peut en cacher un autre !

Anglais en Amérique, diplomé de Cambridge, monologues de 15 minutes face caméra et sans interruption, sujets techniques (lobbying des télécoms, 
Cour suprême) ou controversés (médicaments, tabac), distancié mais pas méprisant, désopilant mais pas cynique, sujets magnifiquement enquêtés qui parviennent à informer, sensibiliser et même mobiliser les téléspectateurs …

Au lendemain d’une élection américaine proprement historique par ses résultats aussi prévisibles qu’imprévus …

Et où après le fiasco des sondeurs et sans parler des différentes officines – y compris balkaniques – pressant jusqu’à la dernière goutte le citron de la Trumpmania …

C’est aux journalistes eux-mêmes de faire leur mea culpa …

Pendant qu’avec la même violence qu’ils reprochaient à leurs opposants, les partisans du pouvoir en place montrent leurs vraies couleurs …

Quelle meilleure mesure de la véritable hystérie collective et de l’auto-aveuglement massif …

Qui s’est emparé de nos belles âmes et de nos beaux esprits …

Que de voir comment le si longtemps célébré effet John Oliver

Ce mélange rare du meilleur de l’université (Cambridge, s’il vous plait !) et de l’humour (Monty Python) britanniques du plus brillant des animateurs satiriques de la télévision américaine …

Mais tristement réduit à la fin aux attaques ad hominem (sur la tête ou le nom du candidat) voire au degré zéro du simple juron

Qui réussissait, joignant la critique la plus implacable et le respect du public le plus exigeant, à avoir des conséquences dans la vraie vie …

A fini lui aussi, malgré son épouse ancienne combattante de la guerre d’Irak, par enfermer un peu plus son public dans son auto-aveuglement …

Son dézingage finalement assez convenu des notoires incohérences et  revirements du candidat républicain …

Lui faisant passer complètement à côté lui aussi de la colère et du profond rejet d’au moins la moitié de l’électorat américain …

Pour la condescendance et l’arrogance d’élites aussi bien-pensantes que protégées des effets de leurs idées complètement déconnectées du réel ?

Vu sur le web
John Oliver réussit une charge virulente contre Donald Trump
Jérémie Maire
Télérama
29/02/2016
Le présentateur du “LastWeekTonight” s’est (enfin) attaqué à Donald Trump. Brillant et nécessaire.

John Oliver avait prévenu : la primaire ne l’intéresse qu’assez peu. Mais le présentateur du LastWeekTonight, le show le plus corrosif de la télévision américaine, pouvait difficilement s’abstenir de parler de Donald Trump. Alors que le candidat à la primaire républicaine remporte les Etats les uns après les autres (et pourrait de ce fait remporter le ticket – réponse partielle mardi 1er mars), il devenait de plus en plus urgent de s’intéresser à sa campagne et ses idées fluctuantes.

Dans son émission du 28 février (que l’on n’espère pas noyée par les Oscars), avec la rigueur et la puissance comique qu’on lui connaît, l’Anglais émigré aux Etats-Unis a cliniquement dézingué l’homme politique, qualifié de « grain de beauté dans le dos » : « inoffensif il y a un an, tellement gros maintenant qu’il serait inconscient de l’ignorer ».

Durant vingt minutes, John Oliver expose rigoureusement les faits, entrecoupés de piques comiques pour les appuyer. « Cet homme paraît séduisant… jusqu’à ce qu’on y regarde de plus près » : oui, Donald Trump est drôle, mais non, tout ce qu’il dit n’est pas vrai. Oui, il finance sa campagne, mais non, celle-ci ne repose pas que sur ses sous à lui. Oui, il est riche, mais non, il ne pèse pas 10 milliards de dollars (plutôt entre 150 et 250 millions). Oui, son nom est synonyme de succès, mais non, toutes ses affaires ne sont pas florissantes.

On sent toutefois Oliver moins sarcastique qu’à l’accoutumé. Car l’heure est grave : « S’il devient vraiment le candidat républicain, il faut arrêter de penser à la mascotte Trump et commencer à penser à l’homme. » Un homme qui est, selon John Oliver, inconstant politiquement (tantôt pro-avortement, pro-migrants, pro-armes, et tantôt contre) et très trouble sur ses positions : « Il n’y a aucun moyen de savoir où se situeront ses convictions quand il sera à la Maison Blanche. » Et Oliver de sortir, l’air grave, le programme de Trump pour combattre l’Etat islamique (« Nous devons tuer leurs familles ») : « Ça, c’est le probable futur candidat républicain qui préconise un crime de guerre. » Prophétique, il prévient que le 20 janvier 2017, si Trump est élu et prête serment ce jour-là, « des voyageurs du futur viendront pour empêcher cela ».

Aussi, pour tenter de saper l’influence de sa marque, qui capitalise sur le sens anglais de son nom (« trump » = atout), Oliver rappelle que celui-ci n’est pas le véritable nom d’origine de la famille : « Un de ses ancêtres a fait changer son nom de Drumpf à Trump. C’est bien moins magique et cela reflète sa personnalité. » Son émission ne serait pas complète sans une tentative (vaine ?) de John Oliver pour changer les choses : « Nous avons rempli les dossiers nécessaires pour déposer le nom “Drumpf”, lâche-t-il, et nous avons ouvert le site DonaldJDrumpf.com sur lequel vous pouvez télécharger une extension pour votre navigateur, qui transformera les occurrences “Trump” en “Drumpf” [on a testé, ça marche, NDLR]. »

« Ne restons pas aveuglés par la magie de son nom, finit-il, déchaîné. Ne votez pas pour lui en gobant ce qu’il dit : c’est un artiste de la connerie. Monsieur Trump, j’attends votre procès. F*ck Donald Trump. »

Maintenant, il ne reste plus qu’à surveiller si le John Oliver effect prendra. Tout le monde retient son souffle.

Voir aussi:

Décryptage
John Oliver revient pour une troisième saison : va-t-il encore faire bouger les lignes ?
Jérémie Maire
Télérama
14/02/2016

L’animateur du “Last Week Tonight” rempile pour une troisième saison le 14 février sur HBO. En l’espace de deux ans et fort de téléspectateurs dévoués, l’humoriste s’est fait le meilleur vulgarisateur des problèmes américains, dont les diatribes ont souvent des conséquences dans la vraie vie.

C’est ce qu’on pourrait appeler le « John Oliver effect