Obama: L’obsession du changement maintenant (From the rut to the dustbin of history)

29 juillet, 2015

imageLe president a dit a de nombreuses reprises qu’il etait pret a sortir de l’orniere de l’histoire. Ben Rhodes (conseiller de la Maison Blanche)

“The president said many times he’s willing to step out of the rut of history.” (…) Once again Rhodes has, perhaps inadvertently, exposed the president’s premises more clearly than the president likes to do. The rut of history: It is a phrase worth pondering. It expresses a deep scorn for the past, a zeal for newness and rupture, an arrogance about old struggles and old accomplishments, a hastiness with inherited precedents and circumstances, a superstition about the magical powers of the present. It expresses also a generational view of history, which, like the view of history in terms of decades and centuries, is one of the shallowest views of all.expresses also a generational view of history, which, like the view of history in terms of decades and centuries, is one of the shallowest views of all. This is nothing other than the mentality of disruption applied to foreign policy. In the realm of technology, innovation justifies itself; but in the realm of diplomacy and security, innovation must be justified, and it cannot be justified merely by an appetite for change. Tedium does not count against a principled alliance or a grand strategy. Indeed, a continuity of policy may in some cases—the Korean peninsula, for example: a rut if ever there was one—represent a significant achievement. (…) Obama seems to believe that the United States owes Iran some sort of expiation. As he explained to Thomas Friedman the day after the nuclear agreement was reached, “we had some involvement with overthrowing a democratically elected regime in Iran” in 1953. Six years ago, when the streets of Iran exploded in a democratic rebellion and the White House stood by as it was put down by the government with savage force against ordinary citizens, memories of Mohammad Mosaddegh were in the air around the administration, as if to explain that the United States was morally disqualified by a prior sin of intervention from intervening in any way in support of the dissidents. The guilt of 1953 trumped the duty of 2009. But what is the alternative? This is the question that is supposed to silence all objections. It is, for a start, a demagogic question. This agreement was designed to prevent Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons. If it does not prevent Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons—and it seems uncontroversial to suggest that it does not guarantee such an outcome—then it does not solve the problem that it was designed to solve. And if it does not solve the problem that it was designed to solve, then it is itself not an alternative, is it? The status is still quo. Or should we prefer the sweetness of illusion to the nastiness of reality? For as long as Iran does not agree to retire its infrastructure so that the manufacture of a nuclear weapon becomes not improbable but impossible, the United States will not have transformed the reality that worries it. We will only have mitigated it and prettified it. We will have found relief from the crisis, but not a resolution of it. The administration’s apocalyptic rhetoric about the deal is absurd: The temporary diminishments of Iran’s enrichment activities are not what stand between the Islamic Republic and a bomb. The same people who assure us that Iran has admirably renounced its aspiration to a nuclear arsenal now warn direly that a failure to ratify the accord will send Iranian centrifuges spinning madly again. They ridicule the call for more stringent sanctions against Iran because the sanctions already in place are “leaky” and crumbling, and then they promise us that these same failing measures can be speedily and reliably reconstituted in a nifty mechanism called “snapback.” Leon Wieseltier

De l’orniere a la poubelle de l’histoire ?

Au lendemain d’un pretendu accord « historique » sur le nucleaire iranien que son principal signataire reconnait ne pas avoir lu et que les Iraniens n’ont depuis, comme avec les precedents, cesse de denoncer …

Et pour lequel l’Administration Obama a non seulement multiplie les mensonges et interdit, via le Conseil de securite de l’ONU, toute discussion a son propre Congres …

Mais, dans la plus pure tradition des Pilate et Caiphe de l’histoire, rejete a l’avance sur le dos de sa premiere victime les effets pretendument apocalyptiques que pourraient avoir sa contestation …

Comment ne pas voir, avec l’un des plus grands thuriferaires de l’actuelle Administration americaine ecrivant de surcroit dans l’un de ses plus fideles porte-voix …

La veritable obsession que semble etre devenue pour toute une generation …

Helas pas seulement americaine et pas seulement pour  la diplomatie comme on peut le voir avec les socialistes actuellement au pouvoir en France et les aberrations societales telles que celle du « mariage pour tous »..

L’idee, aussi vide de contenu que lourde de catastrophes futures, du changement pour le changement ?

The Iran Deal and the Rut of History
Has the Obama administration’s pursuit of new beginnings blinded it to enduring enmities ?
Leon Wieseltier

The Atlantic

July 27, 2015
“The  president said many times he’s willing to step out of the rut of history.” In this way Ben Rhodes of the White House, who over the years has broken new ground in the grandiosity of presidential apologetics, described the courage of Barack Obama in concluding the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action with the Islamic Republic of Iran, otherwise known as the Iran deal. Once again Rhodes has, perhaps inadvertently, exposed the president’s premises more clearly than the president likes to do. The rut of history: It is a phrase worth pondering. It expresses a deep scorn for the past, a zeal for newness and rupture, an arrogance about old struggles and old accomplishments, a hastiness with inherited precedents and circumstances, a superstition about the magical powers of the present. It expresses also a generational view of history, which, like the view of history in terms of decades and centuries, is one of the shallowest views of all.

This is nothing other than the mentality of disruption applied to foreign policy. In the realm of technology, innovation justifies itself; but in the realm of diplomacy and security, innovation must be justified, and it cannot be justified merely by an appetite for change. Tedium does not count against a principled alliance or a grand strategy. Indeed, a continuity of policy may in some cases—the Korean peninsula, for example: a rut if ever there was one—represent a significant achievement. But for the president, it appears, the tradition of all the dead generations weighs like a nightmare on the brains of the living. Certainly it did in the case of Cuba, where the feeling that it was time to move on (that great euphemism for American impatience and inconstancy) eclipsed any scruple about political liberty as a condition for movement; and it did with Iran, where, as Rhodes admits, the president was tired of things staying the same, and was enduring history as a rut. And in the 21st century, when all human affairs are to begin again!

Obama’s restlessness about American policy toward Iran was apparent long before the question of Iran’s nuclear capability focused the mind of the world. In his first inaugural address, he famously offered an extended hand in exchange for an unclenched fist. Obama seems to believe that the United States owes Iran some sort of expiation. As he explained to Thomas Friedman the day after the nuclear agreement was reached, “we had some involvement with overthrowing a democratically elected regime in Iran” in 1953. Six years ago, when the streets of Iran exploded in a democratic rebellion and the White House stood by as it was put down by the government with savage force against ordinary citizens, memories of Mohammad Mosaddegh were in the air around the administration, as if to explain that the United States was morally disqualified by a prior sin of intervention from intervening in any way in support of the dissidents. The guilt of 1953 trumped the duty of 2009. The Iranian fist, in the event, stayed clenched. Or to put it in Rhodes-spin, our Iran policy remained in a rut.

But it is important to recognize that the rut—or the persistence of the adversarial relationship between Iran and the United States—was not a blind fate, or an accident of historical inertia, or a failure of diplomatic imagination. It was a choice. On the Iranian side, the choice was based upon a worldview that was founded in large measure on a fiery, theological anti-Americanism, an officially sanctioned and officially disseminated view of Americanism as satanism. On the American side, the choice was based upon an opposition to the tyranny and the terror that the Islamic Republic represented and proliferated. It is true that in the years prior to the Khomeini revolution the United States tolerated vicious abuses of human rights in Iran; but then our enmity toward the ayatollahs’ autocracy may be regarded as a moral correction. (A correction is an admirable kind of hypocrisy.) The adversarial relationship between America and the regime in Tehran has been based on the fact that we are proper adversaries. We should be adversaries. What democrat, what pluralist, what liberal, what conservative, what believer, what non-believer, would want this Iran for a friend?

When one speaks about an unfree country, one may refer either to its people or to its regime. One cannot refer at once to both, because they are not on the same side. Obama likes to think, when he speaks of Iran, that he speaks of its people, but in practice he has extended his hand to its regime. With his talk about reintegrating Iran into the international community, about the Islamic Republic becoming “a very successful regional power” and so on, he has legitimated a regime that was more and more lacking in legitimacy. (There was something grotesque about the chumminess, the jolly camaraderie, of the American negotiators and the Iranian negotiators. Why is Mohammad Javad Zarif laughing?) The text of the agreement states that the signatories will submit a resolution to the UN Security Council “expressing its desire to build a new relationship with Iran.” Not a relationship with a new Iran, but a new relationship with this Iran, as it is presently—that is to say, theocratically, oppressively, xenophobically, aggressively, anti-Semitically, misogynistically, homophobically—constituted. When the president speaks about the people of Iran, he reveals a bizarre refusal to recognize the character of life in a dictatorship. In his recent Nowruz message, for example, he exhorted the “people of Iran … to speak up for the future [they] seek.” To speak up! Does he think Iran is Iowa? The last time the people of Iran spoke up to their government, they left their blood on the streets. “Whether the Iranian people have sufficient influence to shift how their leaders think about these issues,” Obama told Friedman, “time will tell.” There he is again, the most powerful man in the world, backing off and bearing witness.
If I could believe that the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action marked the end of Iran’s quest for a nuclear weapon—that it is, in the president’s unambiguous declaration, “the most definitive path by which Iran will not get a nuclear weapon” because “every pathway to a nuclear weapon is cut off”—I would support it. I do not support it because it is none of those things. It is only a deferral and a delay. Every pathway is not cut off, not at all. The accord provides for a respite of 15 years, but 15 years is just a young person’s idea of a long time. Time, to borrow the president’s words, will tell. Even though the text of the agreement twice states that “Iran reaffirms that under no circumstances will Iran ever seek, develop, or acquire any nuclear weapons,” there is no evidence that the Iranian regime has made a strategic decision to turn away from the possibility of the militarization of nuclear power. Its strategic objective has been, rather, to escape the sanctions and their economic and social severities. In this, it has succeeded. If even a fraction of the returned revenues are allocated to Iran’s vile adventures beyond its borders, the United States will have subsidized an expansion of its own nightmares.

But what is the alternative? This is the question that is supposed to silence all objections. It is, for a start, a demagogic question. This agreement was designed to prevent Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons. If it does not prevent Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons—and it seems uncontroversial to suggest that it does not guarantee such an outcome—then it does not solve the problem that it was designed to solve. And if it does not solve the problem that it was designed to solve, then it is itself not an alternative, is it? The status is still quo. Or should we prefer the sweetness of illusion to the nastiness of reality? For as long as Iran does not agree to retire its infrastructure so that the manufacture of a nuclear weapon becomes not improbable but impossible, the United States will not have transformed the reality that worries it. We will only have mitigated it and prettified it. We will have found relief from the crisis, but not a resolution of it.
The administration’s apocalyptic rhetoric about the deal is absurd: The temporary diminishments of Iran’s enrichment activities are not what stand between the Islamic Republic and a bomb. The same people who assure us that Iran has admirably renounced its aspiration to a nuclear arsenal now warn direly that a failure to ratify the accord will send Iranian centrifuges spinning madly again. They ridicule the call for more stringent sanctions against Iran because the sanctions already in place are “leaky” and crumbling, and then they promise us that these same failing measures can be speedily and reliably reconstituted in a nifty mechanism called “snapback.” And how self-fulfilling was the administration’s belief that no better deal was possible? On what grounds was its limited sense of possibility determined? Surely there is nothing utopian about the demand for a larger degree of confidence in this matter: The stakes are unimaginably high. It is worth noting also that the greater certainty demanded by the skeptics does not involve, as the president says, “eliminating the presence of knowledge inside of Iran,” which cannot be done. Many countries possess the science but do not pose the threat. The Iranian will, not the Iranian mind, is the issue.

The period of negotiations that has just come to a close was a twisted moment in American foreign policy. We were inhibited by the talks and they were not. The United States was reluctant to offend its interlocutors by offering any decisive challenge to their many aggressions in the region and beyond; we chose instead to inhibit ourselves. This has been an activist era in Iranian foreign policy and a passivist era in American foreign policy. (Even our refusal to offer significant assistance to Ukraine in its genuinely noble struggle against Russian intimidation and invasion was owed in part to our solicitude for the Russian standpoint on Iran.) I expect that the administration will prevail, alas, over the opposition to the Iran deal. The can will be kicked down the road, which is Obama’s characteristic method of arranging his “legacy” in foreign affairs. Our dread of an Iranian bomb will not have been dispelled; we will still need to keep “all options on the table”; we will continue to ponder anxiously the question of whether a military response to an Iranian breakout will ever be required; we will again be living by our nerves. All this does not constitute a diplomatic triumph. As a consequence of the accord, moreover, the mullahs in Tehran, and the fascist Revolutionary Guards that enforce their rule and profit wildly from it, will certainly not loosen their grip on their society or open it up. This “linkage” is a tired fiction. The sanctions were not what cast Iran into its political darkness.

This accord will strengthen a contemptible regime. And so I propose—futilely, I know—that now, in the aftermath of the accord, America proceed to weaken it. The conclusion of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action should be accompanied by a resumption of our hostility to the Iranian regime and its various forces. Diplomats like to say that you talk with your enemies. They are right. And we have talked with them. But they are still our enemies. This is the hour not for a fresh start but for a renovation of principle. We need to restore democratization to its pride of place among the priorities of our foreign policy and oppress the theocrats in Tehran everywhere with expressions, in word and in deed, of our implacable hostility to their war on their own people. We need to support the dissidents in any way we can, not least so that they do not feel abandoned and alone, and tiresomely demand the release of Mir-Hossein Mousavi and Mehdi Karroubi from the house arrest in which they have been sealed since the crackdown in 2009. (And how in good conscience could we have proceeded with the negotiations while the American journalist Jason Rezaian was a captive in an Iranian jail? Many years ago, when I studied the Dreyfus affair, I learned that there are times when an injustice to only one man deserves to bring things to a halt.) We need to despise the regime loudly and regularly, and damage its international position as fiercely and imaginatively as we can, for its desire to exterminate Israel. We need to arm the enemies of Iran in Syria and Iraq, and for many reasons. (In Syria, we have so far prepared 60 fighters: America is back!) We need to explore, with diplomatic daring, an American-sponsored alliance between Israel and the Sunni states, which are now experiencing an unprecedented convergence of interests.

But we will do none of this. We will instead persist in letting the fire spread and letting time tell, which we call realism. Wanting not to fight wars, we refuse to join struggles. Sometimes, I guess, history really is a rut.


Expo Lascaux 3: Le cinéma serait-il notre Lascaux à nous ? (Cinema as a sacred surface: Do films fulfill the same sacred function as the ritual engravings of temple walls or prehistoric caves?)

9 juillet, 2015
 https://i1.wp.com/culturebox.francetvinfo.fr/sites/default/files/assets/images/2014/02/024_114501_1.jpg He, oh, les enfants ! Vous n’a rien de mieux à faire que de regarder la fresque ? On éteint. Rrrr
Ces associations sont une écriture. Une sorte de message, de mythes sur lesquels la société reposait. Lascaux est un sanctuaire : ses peintres y œuvraient comme on peint une cathédrale, un lieu sacré. Quand je suis dans cette grotte, je suis aspiré vers les « dieux », les cieux de ces hommes préhistoriques, leur panthéon, plus qu’à la rencontre de ces hommes eux-mêmes. Yves Coppens (Conseil scientifique international de la grotte de Lascaux)
Il s’agit de faire sortir la plus célèbre grotte ornée du monde de son écrin périgourdin pour la présenter à un public international, et faire découvrir une reproduction fidèle au millimètre près d’une partie de la grotte qui n’a jamais été montrée. Germinal Peiro (Conseil départemental)
8 septembre 1940. L’armistice à été signé il y a peu par le maréchal Pétain. Dans le petit village de Montignac, la vie s’écoule doucement, peu inquiété par les Allemands. Ils sont encore loin. Ce jour là, Marcel Ravidat et trois autres personnes font une étrange découverte. À la faveur d’un arbre déraciné depuis des années, une excavation effleure le sol, recouverte de ronces. À l’aide de pierres jetées dans le trou, Marcel comprend qu’un boyau descend profondément sous la terre. Il a déjà 18 ans et il est apprenti à l’usine Citroën. Cette journée primordiale est un dimanche, et le travail doit reprendre dès le lendemain. Il faudra attendre le jeudi 12 septembre, début de la semaine de repos, avant que Marcel Ravidat ne revienne sur les lieus. En chemin il croise trois amis, Jacques Marsal, Georges Agniel et Simon Coencas, âgés de 13 à 15 ans. Le quatuor des Inventeurs est formé. Marcel a prévu son expédition cette fois. Armé d’un coutelas, deux lampes et d’une corde, il entreprend d’agrandir l’excavation. Le travail n’est pas de tout repos. Il faut gratter, petit à petit. Finalement le trou s’agrandit et il peut passer. La descente se fait par étape. Après une pente de trois mètres, il atterrit sur un tas d’éboulis, suivis par une autre paroi inclinée. Ses compagnons le rejoignent et, un peu plus loin, les premiers dessins apparaissent sous la flamme vacillante de leur lampe à pétrole. L’endroit paraît large, mais peu pratique. Le lendemain, à coup de pioche, il continue d’explorer la grotte, qui commence à peine à leurs livrer ses secrets. C’en est d’ailleurs trop pour les frêles épaules de nos quatre jeunes garçons. Le 16 septembre, Jacques Marsal, sur les conseils d’un gendarme, prévient son instituteur Léon Laval de la découverte. La grotte de Lascaux, qui ne porte pas encore ce nom, se prépare à affronter le monde extérieur. Les quatre amis suivront des destins différents. Le jeune Marsal, qui dans un récit s’octroit le meilleur rôle, en l’occurrence celui de Marcel Ravidat, véritable découvreur de la grotte, devient le protecteur de la grotte avec ce dernier, jusqu’en 1942. Cette année là, il se fait arrêter par la gendarmerie nationale. L’influence des Allemands a atteint le petit village. Il est alors envoyé en Allemagne pour suivre le Service du Travail Obligatoire. Il reviendra à Montignac en 1948, après une petite escale à Paris où il se marie. À cette époque, La grotte s’ouvre au public et il en devient le guide avec Marcel pendant quinze ans. Peu à peu, l’action du gaz carbonique et l’afflux d’humidité mettent en danger les dessins. Les premiers champignons verdâtres apparaissent. Lors de la fermeture en 1963, il reste sur place comme agent technique, et participera aux diverses évolutions techniques. Il recevra d’ailleurs la Légion d’Honneur, pour son travail sur la machinerie qui contrôle l’atmosphère de la grotte. Il restera le seul des Inventeurs à recevoir cet honneur. Au fil du temps sa renommée continue de grandir, et il devient le « Monsieur Lascaux 24 » jusqu’en 1989, année de son décès. En 1940, Georges Agniel est le seul à retourner à l’école au début du mois d’octobre, à Paris. Très rapidement, il enverra une « carte interzone » à Marcel Ravidat, pour « sauvegarder [ses] intérêts dans l’exploitation de la grotte ». Malgré son jeune âge, 15 ans, il sait que la grotte a un potentiel extraordinaire. Agent technique chez Citroën puis à l’entreprise Thomson-Houston, il ne reviendra que rarement à Montignac, jusqu’au 11 novembre 1986. Sa vie sera la plus tranquille des quatre. De son côté, Simon Coencas repart très rapidement à Paris avec ses parents et son frère. La collaboration est de mise dans la capitale française. Simon et toute sa famille seront déportés à Drancy. Son jeune âge le sauvera, ainsi que sa sœur. N’ayant pas encore 16 ans, ils échapperont à Auschwitz. Pas ses parents. Enchainant les petits boulots (vendeur à la sauvette, groom), il récupérera plus tard l’entreprise de métaux de son beau-père à Montreuil, qu’il fera fructifier. Tout comme Georges Agniel, il ne reviendra que très peu à Montignac. Il sera néanmoins présent ce fameux jour du 11 septembre. Pour l’Inventeur originel, la vie est aussi difficile. Marcel Ravidat gardera la grotte avec son amis Jacques Marsal jusqu’en 1942. Puis, comme beaucoup de jeunes de son âge, il sera requis aux Chantiers de la Jeunesse dans les Hautes-Pyrénées pendant huit mois. À son retour à Montignac, la gendarmerie envoie tous les jeunes au STO. Il trouvera refuge dans une grotte voisine de celle de Lascaux pour éviter le Service du travail Obligatoire et deviend maquisard. Promu caporal, il combattra dans les Vosges, puis en Allemagne. À la fin de la guerre, en 1945, il reprend le travail au garage du village. Mais l’attraction de sa découverte est trop forte. Rapidement il devient ouvrier pour l’aménagement de la grotte, puis guide avec son ami Jacques en 1948. Il est le premier à remarquer les taches de couleur qui commencent à envahir la grotte, qui conduiront à sa fermeture en 1963. Les choix sont limités à cette époque, et il trouve un travail à l’usine comme mécanicien. À cette époque, Jacques Marsal s’est attribué tout le crédit de la trouvaille. Il faudra attendre la parution des archives de l’instituteur Léon Laval pour que la vérité soit rétablie. Il ne quittera plus le village de Montignac. Le 11 novembre 1986, il est présent pour accueillir ses anciens camarades. À l’occasion de la sortie du livre Lascaux, un autre regard de Mario Ruspoli le 11 novembre 1986, les quatre amis sont enfin regroupés. C’est un première depuis 1942. Quatre ans plus tard, ils ne seront plus que trois à assister au jubilée de 1990, qui fête les 50 ans de la grotte. Pendant la célébration, ils sont présenté à François Mitterrand. En 1991, tous les trois sont nommés Chevalier de l’Ordre du Mérite. Décédé en 1995, Marcel Ravidat venait, comme ses amis, tout les ans pour fêter l’anniversaire de leur Invention. Seuls survivants du quatuor, Simon Coencas et Georges Agniel perpétuent la tradition encore aujourd’hui. L’Humanité
Les reflets de la peinture, ses mouvements sur la roche, c’était extraordinaire! Simon Coencas
Il a affronté la guerre, deux pontages et un cancer. À 87 ans, Simon Coencas, dernier des quatre « inventeurs » (découvreurs) de Lascaux, est un survivant. (…) 12 septembre 1940. Simon, ado juif parisien de 13 ans, part en balade dans les bois dominant le village de Montignac avec deux copains un peu plus âgés, Georges et Jacques. Fils d’un marchand de prêt-à-porter, il a trouvé refuge en Dordogne avec ses quatre frères et sœurs : « Après la déclaration de guerre, on s’est installés à Montignac avec ma mère et ma grand-mère en 1940″, dit-il de sa voix rocailleuse. « J’y ai connu Jacques Marsal, dont la mère tenait le restaurant en face de chez nous, et Georges Agniel. On faisait les 400 coups, toujours fourrés dans les bois. Mais pas au hasard : on cherchait le souterrain censé relier la colline au château. » Ce jour-là, en route vers la colline, ils croisent Marcel Ravidat, « un gaillard de 18 ans qui travaillait déjà ». Quatre jours plus tôt, accompagné de Robot, son chien, il a repéré quelque chose. Le souterrain? « Certains racontent que ce chien a trouvé le trou, mais c’est faux. C’est nous. À peine un terrier de lapin, mais ça sonnait creux. » Le quatuor dégage l’entrée de la cavité. « Marcel est passé en premier, on rampait dans ce couloir étroit plein de stalactites et de stalagmites. En descendant, on a été éblouis. C’était la salle des Taureaux! » Face à ces couleurs éclatantes vieilles de 17.000 ans, l’émotion est « indescriptible ». Le lendemain, munis de cordes et d’une lampe Pigeon, la bande des quatre poursuit l’exploration. « Les reflets de la peinture, ses mouvements sur la roche, c’était extraordinaire! » La suite est connue : ils alertent leur instituteur, Léon Laval, et gardent l’entrée. Les visiteurs affluent, dont l’abbé Breuil qui saisit l’importance de cette « chapelle Sixtine de la préhistoire », comme il la baptise. Fin 1940, Lascaux est classée monument historique. Simon n’est plus là. Huit jours après la découverte, les Coencas ont dû regagner Paris : « C’était la guerre. Puis il y a eu les lois raciales, l’étoile… » Le vieil homme raconte l’arrestation de son père : Fresnes, Drancy, Auschwitz. La sienne en octobre 1942, son entrée au camp de Drancy où il retrouve sa mère déportée. Lui en ressort au bout d’un mois grâce à l’intervention de la Croix-Rouge. Il se cache, survit. Après-guerre? Simon épouse Gisèle, toujours à ses côtés. Il fait « trente-six métiers » puis s’installe comme ferrailleur. Rude au labeur, doué en affaires, le couple fait prospérer l’entreprise. Lascaux attire les foules, pour Simon la grotte passe au second plan, mais les amis de Montignac, eux, ne sont jamais loin. Il déjeune souvent avec Georges, qui vit à Nogent-sur-Marne. Quand des inondations frappent Montignac en 1960, il accueille chez lui la famille de Jacques, guide de la grotte jusqu’à sa fermeture en 1963. Réunis à Lascaux en 1986, les inventeurs s’y retrouveront ensuite chaque année, en septembre. Jacques décède en 1989, Marcel en 1995, Georges en 2012. Ne restent que deux veuves – Marinette Ravidat veille sur la colline depuis son salon – et Simon. « Au début, les inventeurs avaient un traitement spécial. Et puis tout le monde s’est emparé de l’histoire », lance le vieil homme, mi-amusé, mi-désabusé. « Ils pourraient quand même nous envoyer un petit chèque! Je le donnerais à la recherche sur le cancer. Je bombe le torse car sans nous la grotte serait peut-être restée inconnue. » De Lascaux, Simon n’a rien emporté. Les stalactites? Égarées. Il en a tiré quelques honneurs : François Mitterrand l’a fait chevalier dans l’ordre du Mérite, Frédéric Mitterrand officier dans l’ordre des Arts et des Lettres. Il a emmené ses enfants voir Lascaux II, le fac-similé ouvert au public depuis 1983, « très bien fait même s’il manque l’odeur de la terre, l’humidité ». À présent, des reproductions des fresques voyagent dans le monde avec l’exposition Lascaux III. Bientôt Lascaux IV… Tout cela, c’est un peu grâce à lui. Ses sept petits-enfants et onze arrière-petits-enfants le savent-ils? Sans doute pas, eux qui ont récemment découvert que leur aïeul est juif. JDD
Il y a 75 ans, le 8 septembre 1940 précisément, en pleine Seconde Guerre mondiale, Marcel Ravidat, 18 ans, court après son chien Robot. Ce dernier s’est engouffré dans un trou de la colline qui surplombe la Vézère au sud de Montignac, en Dordogne. Le jeune apprenti garagiste récupère le coquin sur un amas de cailloux qui roulent, roulent… Et sous ses pieds, un écho résonne ! Intrigué, le jeune homme imagine avoir découvert un souterrain secret menant au manoir de Lascaux. Quatre jours plus tard, il revient avec trois amis Jacques Marsal, 15 ans, du même petit village de Montignac que lui, Georges Agniel 16 ans, en vacances et Simon Coencas, 15 ans, qui a fui Montreuil près de Paris pour se réfugier avec sa famille en zone libre. Les quatre téméraires se sont équipés d’outils de fortune et de lampes à pétrole. Objectif : élargir le trou et pénétrer les entrailles rocheuses à la recherche d’un éventuel trésor. Les jeunes explorateurs ignorent encore qu’ils s’apprêtent à entrer dans la légende, en tirant de son sommeil l’un des plus précieux joyaux de l’Humanité ! Le passage ouvert, Marcel, le plus âgé, descend en premier, en rampant. Après quelques mètres, la galerie s’ouvre sur une grotte et il atteint un vaste espace circulaire, que les préhistoriens baptiseront plus tard « Salle des Taureaux »… mais aveuglé par l’obscurité, ni lui ni ses acolytes, qui l’ont rejoint, ne devinent les aurochs peints au-dessus de leurs têtes ! Ce n’est qu’en arrivant dans un couloir étroit, le « Diverticule axial » que les adolescents pressentent l’ampleur de leur découverte : à la lueur de leur lampe artisanale des dizaines de vaches, de cerfs et de chevaux semblent se mouvoir au-dessus d’eux sur le plafond et les parois. Le lendemain, ils descendent avec une corde au fond d’un puits caché dans un recoin de la grotte… et y découvrent la « scène du Puits » : un homme à tête d’oiseau fait face à un bison qui perd ses entrailles, éventré par une longue sagaie et perdant ses entrailles. La petite bande vient de découvrir une œuvre magistrale de l‘art préhistorique, réalisée il y a 20 000 ans par nos ancêtres Cro-Magnon : la grotte de Lascaux. La cavité n’est pas très grande : 3 000 mètres cube seulement. Mais elle recèle de grandes et nombreuses fresques très élaborées : les artistes ont joué avec les reliefs de la roche pour mieux créer perspectives et mouvements, surprendre le regard du visiteur… Anamorphoses, animaux aux proportions volontairement modifiées, comme les chevaux aux petites têtes sur de gros ventres surplombant des pattes arrondies, typiques de Lascaux. La palette polychrome est riche, du noir, au jaune et au rouge et même, à un endroit, du mauve! L’intensité des couleurs est aussi variée. Et les peintures sont soulignées de traits gravés sur la paroi calcaire. Au total : 1500 gravures, 600 peintures animales, 400 signes se répondant les uns les autres, s’intriquant dans une mise en scène chargée de symboles. Quatre espèces animales reviennent de façon récurrente : les aurochs (ancêtres de nos vaches), les bisons, les chevaux et les cerfs. (…)  Prévenu une dizaine de jours après la découverte, l’abbé Henri Breuil, alors professeur au Collège de France, et réfugié en zone non occupée, se précipite. En ressortant de la grotte, il s’exclame « C’est presque trop beau ! ». Dès décembre 1940, la grotte est classée Monument historique. A partir de 1948, le propriétaire (privé) fait réaliser des aménagements pour accueillir le public. Un million de visiteurs se presseront devant les parois de ce chef d’œuvre jusqu’en 1963, date à laquelle André Malraux, ministre chargé des Affaires culturelles, ordonne la fermeture au public. Les parois se dégradent en effet dangereusement, sous l’effet des variations de température, de l’éclairage et du dioxyde de carbone dégagé par la respiration des visiteurs. Des algues vertes se développent en plusieurs endroits, et un voile de calcite tend à recouvrir certains peintures. Traitements et mesures de confinement font effet, et les années 1970 et 1980 se déroulent sans problèmes, l’accès étant limité à quelques privilégiés. Mais de nouveau, au début des années 2000, champignons et bactéries menacent de recouvrir les peintures. « Aujourd’hui, l’état de santé de Lascaux est excellent. Les conservateurs y veillent en permanence » rassure Yves Coppens. Et personne ou presque, à part eux, n’y pénètre. Mais impossible de ne pas permettre au public d’admirer cet emblème mondial de l’art pariétal, site inscrit au Patrimoine mondial de l’Humanité depuis 1979. Dès 1983, une réplique partielle de la grotte « Lascaux 2 », présentant à l’identique la Salle des Taureaux et le Diverticule Axial, est inaugurée à 300 mètres de l’original. C’est un succès : les visiteurs affluent, et nombre d’entre eux repartent persuadés d’avoir visité la « vraie » grotte. Mais, pour le Conseil général de la Dordogne, il faut faire plus. Il fait d’abord réaliser des répliques de plusieurs panneaux de « la Nef », ainsi que de la « scène du Puits » pour les exposer au Thot, à quelques kilomètres de Montignac. Puis, il imagine de déplacer ces fac-similés, en une exposition itinérante. C’est le défi relevé par “Lascaux, l’Exposition Internationale“, dit Lascaux 3 qui après sa création à Bordeaux en 2012, un passage à Chicago, à Houston, à Montréal et à Bruxelles, vient à Paris Expo Porte de Versailles (…) Avec cet événement, c’est en effet Lascaux qui vient à nous. Le visiteur, équipé d’un audioguide, parcourt l’histoire de la grotte. Des dispositifs interactifs lui permettent de voir et de saisir la composition des œuvres ainsi que les diverses interprétations proposées, scientifiques, esthétiques et philosophiques. Un film en 3D, une maquette réduite des galeries, des photographies, des vidéos d’archives l’immergent progressivement dans la grotte… Au cœur de l’événement, un fac-similé d’une partie de la grotte « qui n’a pas été reproduite dans Lascaux 2 : la « Nef » et la « scène du Puits » que le grand public peut voir pour la première fois ! » souligne Olivier Retout, directeur du projet Lascaux Exposition Internationale. Ainsi, le visiteur plongé dans l’obscurité et la fraîcheur, accompagné d’une ambiance sonore, découvre cinq scènes majeures de la grotte exposées sous forme de panneaux grandeur nature, réalisés par l’Atelier des Facs-Similés du Périgord. « Le panneau de l’empreinte » orné d’un troupeau gravé et peint d’une demi-douzaine de chevaux et un bovin encadrés de deux signes quadrangulaires ; « La Vache Noire », située sur la paroi de la Nef à plus de 3 mètres du sol ; « Les Bisons adossés » ; « La frise des Cerfs » ; enfin, la surprenante « Scène du Puits ». Un éclairage variable fait surgir à intervalles réguliers les gravures, qui ne sont pas toutes visibles à l’œil nu. A la sortie, des bornes interactives finissent de permettre aux visiteurs de décomposer chaque détail des œuvres pour mieux les appréhender. Un avant-goût prometteur pour patienter jusqu’à l’ouverture, prévu à l’été 2016, d’une réplique intégrale de la grotte au pied de la colline de Lascaux (budget total de 57 millions d’euros). L’Humanité
En 2003, le conseil général de la Dordogne commande au plasticien Renaud Sanson et à son atelier la réalisation de fac-similés de scènes figurant dans la nef de Lascaux, galerie non représentée dans Lascaux II. De juillet à décembre 2008, dans les ateliers de Montignac qui ont vu leur création, l’exposition Lascaux révélé a présenté ces nouveaux fac-similés au public de la Dordogne. L’exposition a ensuite été transférée vers le parc animalier du Thot, situé sur la commune voisine de Thonac, et présentée au public en juillet 2009. Lors de cette mise en place, les fac-similés créés en 1984 et 1991, précédemment exposés au parc du Thot (les bisons, la vache noire et la scène du Puits), ont été déplacés sans ménagement, endommagés, exposés aux intempéries pendant l’été 2009 puis finalement, empilés dans un hangar. L’exposition Lascaux révélé, également appelée Lascaux 3, est ensuite destinée à voyager à travers le monde entier pendant plusieurs années en tant qu’ambassadeur de la Dordogne et de sa Vallée de l’Homme. En effet, les coques des fac-similés, de faible poids (moins de 10 kg/m2), sont constituées de panneaux démontables dont les jointures sont invisibles et qui ont été conçus pour être aisément transportés. La totalité ou une partie des panneaux doivent faire l’objet d’une exposition itinérante sous le nom de Lascaux, l’exposition internationale58. L’agence de scénographie Du&Ma est choisie en mars 2011 pour assurer la maîtrise d’œuvre de ce projet. Après une première étape en France qui a rassemblé 100 000 visiteurs à Bordeaux, à Cap Sciences, du 13 octobre 2012 au 6 janvier 201359, l’exposition traverse l’Atlantique et fait escale au Field Museum de Chicago de mars à septembre 2013 (325 000 visiteurs), avant de rejoindre Houston (200 000 visiteurs d’octobre 2013 à mars 201460), puis Montréal d’avril à septembre 2014. L’exposition revient en Europe et s’installe à Bruxelles en novembre 2014. Elle s’implante ensuite à Paris, à la porte de Versailles du 20 mai au 30 août 201564, puis à Genève d’octobre 2015 à janvier 2016. Wikipedia
Cinema is nothing but a hypothetical, impossible, infinite sequence shot. Pasolini
Cette “fabrique des faits” proclame l’identité du film avec le monde et l’identité du monde avec ce qui est; l’identité du film avec la vie, avec ce qui est montré, projeté sur l’écran. Youssef Ishaghpour
C’est la condition des nouvelles extases dont la mort de tous les dieux avait paru interdire jusqu’à l’espérance. Le Cinéma, si nous voulons le comprendre, doit ranimer et porter à son comble un sentiment religieux dont la flamme mourante réclame son aliment. L’infinie diversité du monde offre pour la première fois à l’homme le moyen matériel de démontrer son unité. Elie Faure
 Since our field of vision is full of solid objects, but our eye (like the camera) sees this filed from only one station point at any given moment, and since the eye can perceive the rays of light that are reflected from the object only by projecting them onto a plane surface—the retina—the reproduction of even a perfectly simple object is not a mechanical process but can be set about well or badly. Arnheim
Avatar’ is Cameron’s long apologia for pantheism—a faith that equates God with Nature, and calls humanity into religious communion with the natural world. Douthat
Films such as Star Wars and The Matrix have performed the function of reintroducing the power of myth for our contemporary lives, and they succeeded precisely because they have borrowed from the powerful themes, ideas, symbols and narratives of myths through the ages. (…) In sensual confrontation with the filmic image of the dead body, I suggest that a religious cinematics has a powerful potential to escape its mediated confines and bring a viewing body face to face with death. As such, images and bodies merge in an experience not unlike that of the mystical experience, when borders, divisions and media all break down. Plate
Les théoriciens du rapport entre cinéma et sacré, comme H. Agel, tendent à étudier la représentation du sacré dans le film. Mais certains  – comme S. Brent Plate – estiment que le cinéma est sacré par essence, car il recrée le monde, par l’intermédiaire de la narration et du montage, comme un dieu démiurge. En revanche, cet article propose que le cinéma porte la trace du sacré simplement parce que le film physique – notamment pendant l’ère du celluloïd – et l’aplatissement de l’image projetée sur l’écran agissement comme des équivalents sympathiques du monde. Le film remplit ainsi la même fonction sacrée que les dessins rituels sur les murs des temples, ou dans les cavernes préhistoriques, tels que Lascaux. Au cinéma, comme dans Lascaux, l’Humain tend à fusionner avec le Monde conçu comme expression du Divin, métonymisé par la murale dans la caverne ou l’écran dans la salle de cinéma. Aller au cinéma est ainsi similaire à ce que Lacan appelle « remémoration »: l’Humain s’y souvient d’un état archaïque, à une époque où l’expérience du sacré passait par un rituel plaçant le corps dans un espace sombre, face à une surface représentant le monde. Walid El Khachab (York University)
It is not uncommon in film theory to use Plato’s parable of the cave as an archetype of pre-cinematic experiences (Jarvie, 1987). The common wisdom tells the story of people in chains in a cave, exposed to a shadow play, cut from the “real world” outside of the cave, as an allegory of film viewing. Based on Morin’s claim that cinema reactivates the old anthropological archetype of the Double, associated with the shadow—because the cinematic body is a shadow that bears the characteristics of the double—I suggest that Plato’s myth of the cave is reminiscent of an older practice: a sacred ritual by virtue of which “archaic” humans gathered in particular caves to gaze at murals or to watch shadow plays. Cinema is the modern avatar of shadow theatre where the “effectuation” of this epistemologically democratic concomitance of immanence and transcendence occur, as I have argued elsewhere (El Khachab, 2003, 5). Shadow theatre materializes the unity of Being, and the unification of immanence and transcendence, since all beings are equally flattened on the screen’s surface and are equally submitted to the oppositional intensity of light and darkness. In this respect, cinema acts as a modern shadow theatre, where the act of filming renders the multiplicity of beings in a unified flattened form, and where both immanence and transcendence are unequivocally the simultaneous result of that act, since both come to being when projected on the screen (El Khachab, 2003, 6). The paradox inherent to cinema consumption is as old as pre-cinematic archaic practices. Cinema is fundamentally a practice that reminds us of pantheistic worldviews about the blurring of boundaries between the Human and the World as an epiphany of the divine. Nevertheless, cinema requires that the contemplation of this old “memory” be practiced in a space whose boundaries are quite well set: there is a clear demarcation between the inside and the outside of the theatre similar, I suppose, to the clear boundaries between Plato’s—or Lascaux cave—and the world. This ritual has always been associated with the symbolic (magic?) production of transcendence on the immanence of a flat surface. The archetype thesis may offer an explanation of the unwritten rule regarding the role played by the sacred flat surface: the archetype of cinema can be found in the Lascaux cave mural paintings or in the practice of shadow plays: both are about surfaces contemplated in the dark. Incidentally, the Lascaux one—among other Palaeolithic caves—is deemed a sacred space by archaeologists, who often refer to these as sanctuaries (Leroi-Gourhan, 1958). I assume, following Edgar Morin and Youssef Ishagpour, that the Lascaux cave murals were the archetype of film and that they were painted so that people could contemplate them in the dark, in order to connect with nature, through the act of gazing to painted natural elements (e.g. the bison scenes). However, there might be a phenomenological explanation to the connection between the pantheistic essence of cinema and the projection of images on a flat surface, which comes from film theory. Arnheim[‘s] seemingly factual account underscores that the process of flattening the image of the world, or of projecting it on a plane surface works both for the body’s visual perception, where the retina plays the role of the screen, and for the “externalization” of projection onto the cinematic screen. One can now less surprisingly embrace Deleuze’s statement about the screen acting as an eye (Deleuze, p.62). Following Arnheim’s logic, one might say that the cinema screen acts like an external, oversized retina that “retains” images. This almost biological account is strikingly similar to pantheistic models that place the world in the human and the human in the world, in the sense of the human being part and parcel of the world, which itself is the expression of the Divine. Other pantheistic models are more dynamic: they place the world within the human and vice versa. I would argue that this account parallels the phenomenon of the human capturing the world inside his/her own body—on the retina—and the world accepting the human as part of itself, on the grounds that this human partakes in the projection of shadows—or of films—on the screens of the world or at least of movie theatres. Cinema consumption thus understood is a modern way of performing what Lacan calls “rememoration”. It is not a technique to remember desire in its primal mode within the unconscious. Rather, cinema is a reminiscence of archaic practices by virtue of which Humans connected with the sacred through the ritual exposure to surfaces representing the world. Consumption of film—or rather, exposure to film—is the residue of an ancient sacred practice based on the agency of the gaze. Even though Alain Chabat’s RRRrrr (1999, France) is a comedy, his film seems to take seriously the kinship between cinema—or TV—and the prehistoric fresco. In the film, before they go to sleep at night, the kids in a family sit on a pseudo-sofa and stare as if hypnotised at a mural which strongly resembles the Lascaux cave frescoes that covers an entire wall. The father controls the time when they have to go to bed, so he puts out the flame that illuminates the screen/fresco. The scene seems to be a barely disguised reference to the pre-cinematic role played by murals in prehistoric caves. Chabat seems therefore to rememorate heroic times, when the murals in caves used to act as mediating interfaces between the human and nature, in an effort to reactivate the idea of a blend between the Human and Nature, in relation to a recent avatar of mural paintings: film. Both practices: gazing at murals and watching a film share the archaic function of reiterating the fusion between the body and the world as a metaphor, or as a materialisation of the (re-) uniting of the human with the divine. (…) Cinema therefore appears to be, not so much a ritual aiming at retrieving an actual memory of times past in the cave, but rather, a ritual that repeats the homage to cinema in an attempt to articulate desires that were suppressed; chief among which is the desire for the divine through means that are not those of organized religion. The importance of repetition in rememoration may explain the fact that an average urban film viewer may watch at least a film per week. The repetition of this practice many times a month seems to be structured as part of an unconscious effort to transcend the major signifier, cinema, and articulate the reason why we are still addicted to exposure to screens. Walid El Khachab

Le cinéma serait-il notre Lascaux à nous ?

Ressortant, en plein été parisien, de l’obscurité de la réplique d’une grotte vieille de quelque 17 000 ans

Après la chance d’avoir pu voir, miraculeusement échappé à Auschwitz, le dernier survivant de ses inventeurs

Comment ne pas repenser …

A l’émerveillement, il y a 75 ans,  de ses quatre jeunes découvreurs …

Comme bien sûr à la véritable vénération mêlée de crainte et d’effroi que pouvaient susciter, chez nos lointains ancêtres, ces cathédrales naturelles ?

Mais comment ne pas s’émerveiller à notre tour …

Devant l’étrange banalité qu’est devenue pour nous modernes filmivores …

Une pratique qui pourrait pourtant bien remplir comme le rappelle Walid El Khachab …

Outre, à l’image de la tragédie grecque, sa dimension souvent sacrificielle et donc cathartique …

Et à l’instar d’une « époque où l’expérience du sacré passait par un rituel plaçant le corps dans un espace sombre face à une surface représentant le monde » …

« La même fonction sacrée que les dessins rituels sur les murs des temples ou dans les cavernes préhistoriques » ?

Cinema as a Sacred Surface: Ritual Rememoration of Transcendence
Walid El Khachab
York University

At the intersection of Film and Religious Studies a tradition can be traced from Henri Agel’s concepts of Sacré and Métaphysique to Eric Christianson’s Cinéma Divinité, whose premise is that cinema materializes the sacred, and makes visible the invisible Godly essences. Another tradition starts with Jean Epstein’s writings on the mystique or mysticism of cinema and Edgar Morin’s Imaginary Man, which tradition is currently represented in France by Yann Calvet’s work on the sacred. It is concerned with cinema as the locus of the performance of and the connection with the sacred in our modern world.

The sacred is understood here in its broader sense, encompassing forces of nature that seem overwhelming to the human, as well as the realm of supernatural entities that transcend the world of the human, such as God, or “pagan” deities. The first end of the definition is best formulated by René Girard: “The sacred consists of all those forces whose dominance over man increases or seems to increase in proportion to man’s effort to master them. Tempests, forest fires, and plagues, among other phenomena, may be classified as sacred.” (Girard, 2005, p.32). The other end can be summarized by Lévy-Bruhl’s notion of the mystical experience which is connected to a space set apart in connection to a complexus of actors including plants and animals, but also heroes—and one might add—gods (Lévy-Bruhl, 1938, p.183).

When it comes to the study of the connections between cinema and the sacred, it is probably S. Brent Plate’s work that best synthesizes the two trends above mentioned: the one that considers cinema as the materialization of the sacred, and the one that sees cinema as the realm where the sacred is performed. Plate’s Religion and Film. Cinema and the Re-Creation of the World combines a thematic approach and a reflection on the materiality of film, focused on the visual emblems of religious/ritual practices and concerns, such as death and the hereafter. Thematic inquiry is dear to scholars who pursue the uncovering of continuities in anthropological structures of narratives, rituals and other practices, and symbols, between the age of mythology—Greek or Biblical—and the age of technology. This is the Agel trend. Reflections on the materiality—or immateriality—of the filmic image and the cinematic medium from the perspective of the study of the sacred are usually preoccupied by motifs and issues such as the agency of light and shadow, the correspondence between the cinematic image and the Double, both being immaterial in a certain sense. This is the Morin trend.

Both trends inform Plate’s inquiry into cinema which is even the more refreshing because he does not shy from analyzing the representation of ritual and the sacred in such blockbusters as The Matrix (dir. Andy & Larry Wachowski, USA, 1999) and Star Wars (dir. George Lucas, USA, 1977), side by side with The Passion of the Christ (dir. Mel Gibson, USA, 2004) and Baraka (dir. Ron Fricke). One of his book’s major preoccupations is to highlight the narrative and symbolic connections between Biblical mythology and these blockbusters. “Films such as Star Wars and The Matrix have performed the function of reintroducing the power of myth for our contemporary lives, and they succeeded precisely because they have borrowed from the powerful themes, ideas, symbols and narratives of myths through the ages.” (Plate, 2008, p.31). Plate analyzes, for instance, such tropes as the symbolism of Zion, it being a biblical reference to Jerusalem as well as the name of the locus of salvation, and the object of the Resistants’ quest in The Matrix. He also studies the agency of the colours black and white in Star Wars, the former being associated with Evil (Vader) and the latter with Good (Skywalker); the binary structure of Good vs. Evil being a fundamental organization of many mythological and religious worldviews.

However, what makes Plate’s book most original are his reflections on the paradoxical position of the body and on the mediation process in the film viewing experience—in short, his reflections on the connections between the sacred as an anthropological category and film as media. Following Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenological considerations about the body’s perception of/in the world, he argues that film experience puts the viewer’s body in the world, of which the screen is part, yet the body keeps watching the screen in return. This paradox blurs the frontiers between what one sees and what is seen, which blurring is replicated in another dimension of the viewing experience: “[…] In sensual confrontation with the filmic image of the dead body, I suggest that a religious cinematics has a powerful potential to escape its mediated confines and bring a viewing body face to face with death. As such, images and bodies merge in an experience not unlike that of the mystical experience, when borders, divisions and media all break down.” (Plate, 2008, p.61).

These remarks are confined to the specific case of viewing a film displaying images of dead bodies (Stan Brakhage’s The Act of Seeing with One’s Own Eyes). I argue that Plate’s metaphor of the mystical experience is actually valid in principle for the viewing experience of any film. This model that understands the dynamics of viewer/film interaction in terms of perception, identification, blurring of subjectivity and / or of materiality falls under the category of “cinematic pantheism”—as I have argued elsewhere (El Khachab, 2006). Plate suggests that both religion and film re-create the world and that in some intense experiences the body can merge with the world of film. I prefer to base this phenomenological inquiry on the paradigm of the sacred which exceeds that of religion.

My contention here is not that cinema as an institutional cultural practice recreates the world on the levels of narrative and of editing. Rather, it is that the material film—particularly in the celluloid era—and the flattened image projected on a screen are “sympathetic” equivalents of the world. Therefore, the assumed archaic attitude of the Human facing a representation of the world, such as prehistoric cave murals, residually informs the attitude of the modern viewer in the movie theatre/modern cavern facing a film projected on screen/modern mural. In both situations, the Human tends to merge with the World as an expression of the Divine or the Sacred, as metonymized by the cave mural in one case or the film on screen in the other.

The act of viewing a film is therefore a ritual that is based on “recollection” not just in the sense of piecing together images and fragments of past experience into the stream we usually call memory, but also in the sense of “rememorating” a time when one can argue that the decisive distinctions between the Human and Nature, or between the Human and the Animal were not yet accepted wisdoms. Many theoreticians, particularly within the French tradition, consider cinema as an art or as an institution, or film as a product, to be the equivalent of the world. After a brief analysis of Vertov’s The Man With the Movie Camera, Youssef Ishaghpour concludes: « Cette “fabrique des faits” proclame l’identité du film avec le monde et l’identité du monde avec ce qui est; l’identité du film avec la vie, avec ce qui est montré, projeté sur l’écran. » (Ishaghpour, 1982, p.35).

This identity between Film, the World, and Being is not inferred from a film whose locus is natural landscapes or breathtaking images of the sky which images may seem more effective in making the point that Human and Nature are (or used to be in a remote historical stage) one. The French theorist is insisting on the technical dimension of film and on its agency being a “manufacturing of facts” as well as an instance of restating the unity between the Human and the World. On the one hand, this understanding of film opens the door to the exploration of film as a pantheistic media, and on the other, it is a reminder so to speak that cinema is the place where the viewer’s body is to experience a “return” to a past when the separation of nature and culture, or of the human and the world were not unquestionably enforced. Ishaghpour’s comment is also valuable because it does not displace this debate into the paradigm of a (nostalgic?) representation of particular spaces or narrative themes that express the “Unity of Being”. It rather situates this pantheistic nature of film within the very nature of the media and its mechanical workings.

Film, Hierophany and Pantheism
This article acknowledges the two approaches to cinema and the sacred that were briefly mentioned in the first paragraphs: the thematic-centered one that sees film as a space of reference to motifs, practices and structures related to the sacred and the other—centered on the media’s materiality—that believes film in itself is part of an understanding of the sacred, that may have been forgotten or overlooked in many accounts of film anthropology or film theory at large, except in the works of a few scholars referred to here as the Epstein-Morin trend. However, this contribution is resolutely grounded in the latter approach.

My hypothesis is based on Pier Paolo Pasolini’s insights into the parallels between the world, the sacred and film. In the following quote, I connect several of these insights and put them in an order that states my case: “Reality in itself is divine. […] Reality (can be considered as) the emanation of God’s language.” Since Reality is “in fact an infinite sequence shot” and that “cinema is nothing but a hypothetical, impossible, infinite sequence shot” (Pasolini, 2005, p.44, 70, 73), one can therefore infer that cinema is the site where Reality—revered or celebrated as an emanation of the Divine—is performed and/or expressed.

Pasolini’s theory is that Reality, in the sense of the World, is coextensive to a hypothetical sequence shot that becomes a film when cut (cut from reality, edited in the editing room). Thus film is a “piece” of a reality that is divine, because this reality expresses God, or because He expresses himself in the form of reality. Hence, the connection between cinema and sacred is an essential one, not just one related to a particular cinematic genre such as, say, Biblical drama.

Pasolini calls the world hierophantic. One of the best in-depth explorations of this concept applied to film theory can be found in Michael Bird’s “Film as Hierophany” (Bird, 1982). Bird revisited Agel’s analysis of Robert Bresson’s films and underscored that Agel describes the French filmmaker’s images as dominated by physicality and materiality. However, that is only part of a cinematic process which turns surfaces within the image into transfigured Christ substance, according to Agel. Based on Mircea Eliade’s definition of the concept, Bird starts by emphasising that hierophany is the revelation of nature as cosmic sacrality, but concludes his chapter by narrowing this potential: film becomes hierophany, Bird argues, when it introduces “a reality that does not belong to our world” (Bird, 1982).

Instead of exploring examples that show the sacred within the profane, —within nature— Bird has chosen to focus on Agel’s catholic reading of a—conveniently—catholic filmmaker. The body in pain in Bresson’s films, argues Agel, is an annunciation of the advent of the Christic body, the ultimate afflicted body. It is one thing to highlight Christian themes or to do a Christian reading of films, and another one to analyze the sacred in general, regardless of the particular organized religion and specific institution one claims to represent.

However the major concern about narrowing the connection between the sacred and cinema lies elsewhere. My understanding of hierophany is that of a model where the sacred is expressed through the materiality of any physical object, motif, landscape, body in the world. Its relevance to film is precisely that the act of filming/screening and the material film with imprinted images of the world are by nature always instances of hierophany, whereas Birds’ reading of Agel proposes a model articulated around the image of a vertical axis.

Hierophany in Bird’s final analysis implies vertical and narrowly defined relations between a sacred being whose transcendence is located “up” and a material element in nature upon which transcendence “descends”. The concept of pantheism has a wider “scope” and therefore better accounts for the mystical dimension of cinema. It accounts for a fusion and merger of the body with the world—not just for the manifestation of the sacred in an object or a chosen body—and it refers to the coextensiveness of both the World and the Human. There is an “everywhereness” about pantheism—i.e. the world/the sacred/the human are everywhere—that replicates the potential omnipresence of the camera in the world. In that sense, after a careful reading of Pasolini’s use of “hierophany”, one could assert that Pasolini’s conception of the dynamics involving the Human and the Divine is rather pantheistic and that film—as a pantheistic media—“mediates” between both.

Mediation in my understanding is not a reference to a physical linear process where the Human stands in slot A, the Divine in slot C and film, in the middle in slot B. Cinema is a space of mediation simultaneously “producing” the World and the place of the Human in it, manufacturing the immanence of nature, and elevating it metaphorically at once to the status of transcendence. Film appears thus heuristically as an interface between these instances, hence the concept of mediation. Film also mediates in the sense of “materializing”, “manifesting”, making the invisible come to being, through the camera lens, and taking shape when “wrapped” in celluloid.

Cinematic pantheism in this article is not about the representation of pantheistic images. This article does not focus on films that are deemed poetic, or visually stunning, where the scenery is dominated by impressive landscapes rendered by intensely photographic virtuosity, which attributes would be the standard aesthetic features in films described as pantheistic. In other words, my aim is not to analyze the cinema epitomized in early film histories by Alexander Dovjenko’s Earth (USSR, 1930). It is customary to hail the cinematic pantheism expressed in the images of landscape and particularly of fields in that Soviet film. Dovjenko’s camera is believed to have produced a homage to nature and to have realized a state of merger between farmer and land on screen.

More recently, the same rhetoric was used by film critics to praise the pantheism of James Cameron’s Avatar (USA, 2009). A New York Times’ op-ed summarizes the film’s approach to the sacred in the following terms: “[…] ‘Avatar’ is Cameron’s long apologia for pantheism—a faith that equates God with Nature, and calls humanity into religious communion with the natural world.” (Douthat, 2009). This account of the film’s pantheism does not explain the technical details that support its point, but it claims that Hollywood has long been a strong supporter of the pantheistic “faith”.

Typically, establishing shots of natural landscapes, particularly of vast plains or majestic mountains, pans, dolly shots, crane shots exploring such scenery would be the technical means to produce this type of cinematic pantheism: images of overwhelming but non threatening nature, where the human is introduced in symbiosis with the world—not as a superior being domesticating the world nor as a foe in conflict with nature. For my part, I have underlined elsewhere the role played by the dissolve shot in producing pantheism within the film economy, because it literally makes the human body dissolve into nature, thus performing the unity between the Human, the World and the Divine understood as a transcendental aspect of the material world (El Khachab, 2006).

This understanding of pantheism in film is even the more compelling in the case of Avatar, because of the role played by digital technology. Nature in Cameron’s film is not an analogue image of nature in “real life”. It is the product of computer-generated imagery (CGI) and is made possible through technology. One could say that the avatar of nature in the film is essentially an immense green screen. This is a reminder that cinema is not the realm of unity between human and nature because it “reflects” nature and humans on screen. It is so because the very nature of film is pantheistic.

Film as a “Panthed” Media
Cinematic pantheism as articulated in this article is not “located” in the narrative or in the images of a film, even though—as discussed above—many films address the theme or the representation of pantheism. It is the film media itself that is fundamentally pantheistic in nature. In Élie Faure’s words, cinema has a “panthed” (panthée) mode of functioning. A medieval Avicennian definition of the soul’s relationship with the body and that of the universal spirit with the universe per se, can better explain how pantheism is envisaged here, in a way that is relevant to cinema and screen media theory:

« L’existence de l’âme commence avec celle du corps, à l’encontre de certaine école professant que l’Âme universelle est localisée quelque part et que des fragments se détachent d’elle, chaque fragment échéant à un corps et le gouvernant […] cette âme n’est pas dans le corps de l’homme ; elle n’est pas non plus mélangée avec son corps ; elle n’est pas non plus ailleurs. Elle n’est pas à l’intérieur du monde ; elle n’est pas non plus à l’extérieur du monde ; elle n’occupe pas de lieu. » (Jozjani in Corbin, 1999, 4).

In this unorthodox Neo-Platonician speculation, if the soul is the instance of transcendence, it appears as part of immanence, not as a fragment located in it. The corollary is that transcendence—be it called God or Logos or other—is simply part of the world of immanence. A pantheist philosopher may say: transcendence emerges with immanence. It is not located in a specific part of the world or “mixed” with a particular body. It is not in the world, nor out of it. It simply has no location. It functions as an energy, coextensive of matter and does not belong to a separate stratum.

As much as cinema and screen media theory are concerned, cinematic pantheism is the way by which film produces equally and simultaneously transcendence and immanence, and materializes the unity of both. In cinema, all beings are equally flattened on the screen’s surface and are equally submitted to the oppositional intensity of light and darkness. The act of filming renders the multiplicity of beings in a unified flattened form, where both immanence and transcendence are unequivocally the simultaneous result of that act, since both come to being when projected on the screen. It is thus safe to argue that cinema materializes the “unity of Being”, which proposition is a medieval formulation of the concept of pantheism.

Cinema is par excellence the space where the Cartesian opposition between spirit and matter disappears, which opposition is seminal to a hierarchical worldview where the former dominates the latter, where transcendence acts as the organizing spirit of the matter constitutive of immanence. The mystical dimension of cinema—in fact its pantheistic nature—is framed by Élie Faure in these terms: « Qu’on n’invoque pas l’âme, toujours l’âme pour l’opposer à la matière. L’âme n’a jamais scellé sa voûte colossale qu’au croisement des nervures qui s’élancent, d’un jet, des profondeurs de la terre. C’est dans le pain et dans le vin que vivent la chair et le sang de l’esprit. » (Faure, 1964, p.68).

Cinema in that sense is more than the media of epiphany, more than the locus of the mere manifestation of the invisible. It is the realm of an activity producing simultaneously the visible and invisible, immanence and transcendence. This equalization of beings in a sort of visual unity amounts to “performing” pantheism. Élie Faure advocates this unity of the world, and cinema—according to him—is the material proof of that unity: « C’est la condition des nouvelles extases dont la mort de tous les dieux avait paru interdire jusqu’à l’espérance. Le Cinéma, si nous voulons le comprendre, doit ranimer et porter à son comble un sentiment religieux dont la flamme mourante réclame son aliment. L’infinie diversité du monde offre pour la première fois à l’homme le moyen matériel de démontrer son unité » (Faure, 1964, p.67).

Faure does not restore a spirit, an anima of the world. Rather, he draws a parallel between the animation of things performed by cinema, and the animated movement of becoming. The mere projection on screen of “inanimate” things, such as a forest or a city panorama, provides them with a “murmuring animation”. The latter reveals the complexity of becoming and provides evidence that cinema in the course of it “capturing life” through the camera lens, is not simply revealing a spirit that animates the world. It actually is the media that does so while confirming the merger—if not the identity—of matter and spirit, human and divine, immanence and transcendence, through mechanical reproduction.

A similar point is made by a filmmaker—and theorist in her own right—contemporary to Faure. Germaine Dulac states an obvious given about cinema that is nevertheless important to emphasize as a reminder of the materiality and the technical nature of film: « L’image est non seulement la reproduction photographique d’un fait ou d’une vision, mais aussi et plus encore, une harmonie dramatique ». She then connects this materiality to the pantheistic merger of the human with nature. According to Dulac, with the advent of cinema, the Human being « régénère ses forces au contact de la terre entière, s’il sait ressentir exactement le sens des images faites de vérité que le Cinéma lui propose, il devient un conquérant, qui s’épand dans l’univers avec la conscience de n’être pas le centre du monde. » Dulac poetically coins an expression to name this product resulting from the merger of technique, human body, life and nature, in the filmic media: « la Matière-vie-elle-même” (Dulac, 1994, p. 148, 157-158).

However, more than film content as such—whether it is the narrative, the photography, or the principle of “leveling” both the human and the world, immanence and transcendence—pantheism is the archeological substrata of movie experience. It is the situation of viewing a film—particularly in a movie theatre—that is pantheistic in essence. The main concern in the rest of this section is to base pantheism on the exposure of the viewer’s body to film. In the segment, what celluloid itself, or the screen per se, fold or unfold does not matter. The focus is now on the affects experienced by the viewer’s body when exposed to film. “Fundamental” cinematic pantheism lies in the setting of a viewer facing a film.

I have proposed in the above section to expand Plate’s thesis about the mystical characteristics of the viewing experience to all movie experiences, regardless of the film genre. Another theoretical basis for conceiving of viewing film as an instance of merger between the viewer’s body and the film is Deleuze’s contention that “the brain is the screen” (Deleuze, 2003, p.62-78). More than a fusion between the subject’s body and the material of film, Deleuze is suggesting a radical model for movie experience discussed thus far. He does not conceive of the assemblage of viewer /film as two separate entities that get to interact then eventually merge. His contention is that the brain is already a screen, or—as he says in another paragraph—it is already an image itself. Not only a fundamental part of the viewer’s body is already part of the cinematic assemblage, but the major “components” of bodies and solids involved are one and the same. Hence, Deleuze provocatively asserts that there is not a single difference between images, things and movement. (Deleuze, 2003, p.62)

Edgar Morin founds a similar understanding of the viewing situation on the concepts of identification-projection drawn from psychology and anthropology (Morin, 159). Morin argues that the Human projects his/herself in the world, for example through constructing the idea of the Double. He adds that the Human also identifies with elements in the world, which include the Double. Morin contends that this same process frames modern man’s relation to cinema, which is based on him projecting himself in film and identifying with characters in the film. Morin’s conclusion is that cinema perpetuates the process by which man sees himself in the world and identifies with it, through man’s self projection in the realm of film and his identification with film (Morin, 47-49, 61).

Even though Morin’s model is less radical than Deleuze’s, both argue that the body or the subject in the viewing experience is not separate from the other element in the assemblage experience: film and screen. Both interact on the basis of identification or, even more radically, by literally dissolving into one another. Nevertheless, Morin’s theory has an additional advantage: it frames the body’s fusion in the realm of film as part of a prototypical relation of the Human to the world, i.e. transcending, blurring boundaries separating the subject from the environment, and the former blending with the latter.

A World Set Apart
Plate argues that both cinema and religion recreate the world through ritual. Both establish a distinction between the space of ritual and the sacred and that of the profane and the ordinary. The examples he introduces, however, are all drawn from the spatial organization of some film narratives. He shows how cinema sets apart a space out of the ordinary, which he equates with the space of ritual and of the sacred. He compares this process to a similar one found in many religions, by virtue of which sacred texts set apart places such as temples or heavens. The Matrix opposes the space of the “real” world to one set apart, sacralised: that of the matrix. Pantheism however is not about setting spaces apart within film. It is not about the representation of a process where space is sacralised through ritual. Rather, pantheism is about establishing the “everywherness” of both the sacred and the profane (Morin, p.159).

With respect to reflections about cinema as ritual, setting a space apart within film content is not an aspect of cinematic pantheism or proof of the connection between cinema and the sacred. For the purpose of this discussion, the relevant process of setting a space apart is that of film experience being set in the ritual space of the movie theatre. In other words, what matters for the discussion of the sacred or of pantheism as conceptual categories accounting for film experience is the imaginary and symbolic frontiers between the theatre and the world, which replicate the archaic distinction between the temple and the world or—in even more archaic times—the separation between the cave reserved for ritual practices and the rest of the world.

Cinema is in essence an experience of the body’s exposure to an object that purports to reproduce—or even to produce—(the image of) Reality on a surface: the film on screen. This makes it the latest avatar of ritual/visual /sacred immanentism practices. Weaving a representation of the world or the hereafter on a prayer rug; turning both the physical and metaphysical worlds into a Mandala; religious icons and paintings are all practices of what I have called elsewhere “surfacialization”—that is, producing transcendence on a surface. Within the logic of these rituals, the world needs to be reproduced in a monad set apart, so that the contemplative energy of the worshiper is focused on it. In our secular modern world, the meaning of these forgotten practices is obsolete, but it still informs our “setting” the movie experience apart in theatres.

It is not uncommon in film theory to use Plato’s parable of the cave as an archetype of pre-cinematic experiences (Jarvie, 1987). The common wisdom tells the story of people in chains in a cave, exposed to a shadow play, cut from the “real world” outside of the cave, as an allegory of film viewing. Based on Morin’s claim that cinema reactivates the old anthropological archetype of the Double, associated with the shadow—because the cinematic body is a shadow that bears the characteristics of the double—I suggest that Plato’s myth of the cave is reminiscent of an older practice: a sacred ritual by virtue of which “archaic” humans gathered in particular caves to gaze at murals or to watch shadow plays.

Cinema is the modern avatar of shadow theatre where the “effectuation” of this epistemologically democratic concomitance of immanence and transcendence occur, as I have argued elsewhere (El Khachab, 2003, 5). Shadow theatre materializes the unity of Being, and the unification of immanence and transcendence, since all beings are equally flattened on the screen’s surface and are equally submitted to the oppositional intensity of light and darkness. In this respect, cinema acts as a modern shadow theatre, where the act of filming renders the multiplicity of beings in a unified flattened form, and where both immanence and transcendence are unequivocally the simultaneous result of that act, since both come to being when projected on the screen (El Khachab, 2003, 6).

The paradox inherent to cinema consumption is as old as pre-cinematic archaic practices. Cinema is fundamentally a practice that reminds us of pantheistic worldviews about the blurring of boundaries between the Human and the World as an epiphany of the divine. Nevertheless, cinema requires that the contemplation of this old “memory” be practiced in a space whose boundaries are quite well set: there is a clear demarcation between the inside and the outside of the theatre similar, I suppose, to the clear boundaries between Plato’s—or Lascaux cave—and the world.

This ritual has always been associated with the symbolic (magic?) production of transcendence on the immanence of a flat surface. The archetype thesis may offer an explanation of the unwritten rule regarding the role played by the sacred flat surface: the archetype of cinema can be found in the Lascaux cave mural paintings or in the practice of shadow plays: both are about surfaces contemplated in the dark. Incidentally, the Lascaux one—among other Palaeolithic caves—is deemed a sacred space by archaeologists, who often refer to these as sanctuaries (Leroi-Gourhan, 1958). I assume, following Edgar Morin and Youssef Ishagpour, that the Lascaux cave murals were the archetype of film and that they were painted so that people could contemplate them in the dark, in order to connect with nature, through the act of gazing to painted natural elements (e.g. the bison scenes). However, there might be a phenomenological explanation to the connection between the pantheistic essence of cinema and the projection of images on a flat surface, which comes from film theory.

Arnheim observes that the basic perceptual process in film experience is that of a flattening of the world, of turning its nature from the three-dimensionality of solids to the flat image on screen: “[…] Since our field of vision is full of solid objects, but our eye (like the camera) sees this filed from only one station point at any given moment, and since the eye can perceive the rays of light that are reflected from the object only by projecting them onto a plane surface—the retina—the reproduction of even a perfectly simple object is not a mechanical process but can be set about well or badly.” (Arnheim, 1983, p.18). His seemingly factual account underscores that the process of flattening the image of the world, or of projecting it on a plane surface works both for the body’s visual perception, where the retina plays the role of the screen, and for the “externalization” of projection onto the cinematic screen. One can now less surprisingly embrace Deleuze’s statement about the screen acting as an eye (Deleuze, p.62). Following Arnheim’s logic, one might say that the cinema screen acts like an external, oversized retina that “retains” images.

This almost biological account is strikingly similar to pantheistic models that place the world in the human and the human in the world, in the sense of the human being part and parcel of the world, which itself is the expression of the Divine. Other pantheistic models are more dynamic: they place the world within the human and vice versa. I would argue that this account parallels the phenomenon of the human capturing the world inside his/her own body—on the retina—and the world accepting the human as part of itself, on the grounds that this human partakes in the projection of shadows—or of films—on the screens of the world or at least of movie theatres.

Memory, Rememoration, Film
Cinema consumption thus understood is a modern way of performing what Lacan calls “rememoration”. It is not a technique to remember desire in its primal mode within the unconscious. Rather, cinema is a reminiscence of archaic practices by virtue of which Humans connected with the sacred through the ritual exposure to surfaces representing the world. Consumption of film—or rather, exposure to film—is the residue of an ancient sacred practice based on the agency of the gaze. Even though Alain Chabat’s RRRrrr (1999, France) is a comedy, his film seems to take seriously the kinship between cinema—or TV—and the prehistoric fresco. In the film, before they go to sleep at night, the kids in a family sit on a pseudo-sofa and stare as if hypnotised at a mural which strongly resembles the Lascaux cave frescoes that covers an entire wall. The father controls the time when they have to go to bed, so he puts out the flame that illuminates the screen/fresco. The scene seems to be a barely disguised reference to the pre-cinematic role played by murals in prehistoric caves.

Chabat seems therefore to rememorate heroic times, when the murals in caves used to act as mediating interfaces between the human and nature, in an effort to reactivate the idea of a blend between the Human and Nature, in relation to a recent avatar of mural paintings: film. Both practices: gazing at murals and watching a film share the archaic function of reiterating the fusion between the body and the world as a metaphor, or as a materialisation of the (re-) uniting of the human with the divine.

Jacques Lacan opposes “memory”, related to a living body and to an experience in the past, to “rememoration” which seems to be more of a ritual repetition of an older or archaic mode of knowledge. Rememoration is generated by desires that are still within the unconscious and that are summarily articulated in one major signifier. The repetition of that signifier through rememoration is the only way to articulate the desire in question and to make sense of it. « L’insistance répétitive de ces désirs dans le transfert et leur remémoration permanente dans un signifiant dont le refoulement s’est emparé, c’est-à-dire où le refoulé fait retour, trouvent leur raison nécessaire et suffisante, si l’on admet que le désir de la reconnaissance domine dans ces déterminations le désir qui est à reconnaître, en le conservant comme tel jusqu’à ce qu’il soit reconnu. » (Lacan, 1999, p.248)

Cinema therefore appears to be, not so much a ritual aiming at retrieving an actual memory of times past in the cave, but rather, a ritual that repeats the homage to cinema in an attempt to articulate desires that were suppressed; chief among which is the desire for the divine through means that are not those of organized religion. The importance of repetition in rememoration may explain the fact that an average urban film viewer may watch at least a film per week. The repetition of this practice many times a month seems to be structured as part of an unconscious effort to transcend the major signifier, cinema, and articulate the reason why we are still addicted to exposure to screens.

Selected Bibliography
Agel, Henri. Le Cinéma et le sacré. Paris: Cerf. 1961.

______. Métaphysique du Cinéma. Paris: Payot. 1976.

______. Le Visage du Christ à l’écran, Paris: Desclée. 1985

Bird, Michael. “Film as Hierophany” in Bird et al. (eds.) Religion in Film. Tennessee University Press. 1982.

Christianson, Eric. Peter Francis & William Telford (eds) Cinéma Divinité: Religion, Theology and the Bible in Film. London: SCM. 2005.

Devictor, Agnès. Feigelson, Kristian (eds). Croyances et sacré au cinéma. Paris: Corlet. 2010.

Flateley, Guy. “Pier Paolo Pasolini: the Atheist Who Was Obsessed With God”
<http://www.moviecrazed.com/outpast/pasolini.htmlhttp://www.moviecrazed.com/outpast/pasolini.html&gt;

Ishagpour, Youssef. Le cinéma. Paris: Domino. 1996.

Lacan, Jacques. Écrits I. Paris. Seuil. Coll. Points Essais. 1999 (reproduction de la 1ère édition 1966).

Mitchell, Jolyon. Plate, S. Brent (eds). The Religion and Film Reader. New York: Routledge. 2007.

Morin, Edgar. The Cinema or The Imaginary Man. Minneapolis: The University of Minnesota Press. 2005.

Pasolini, Pier Paolo. L’inédit de New York. Entretien avec Giuseppe Cardillo. Paris: Arlea. 2005.

Plate, S. Brent. Religion and Film. Cinema and the Re-Creation of the World. London: Wallflower. 2008.

Works cited
Arnheim, Rudolph. Film as Art. London. Faber and Faber. 1983. 1st English edition 1958.

Bird, Michael. “Film as Hierophany” in Bird et al. (eds.) Religion in Film. Tennessee University Press. 1982.

Deleuze, Gilles. Pourparlers 1972-1990. Paris. Les éditions de minuit. 1990, 2003.

Dulac, Germaine. Écrits sur le cinéma (1919-1937). Paris. Éditions Paris Expérimental. Coll. Classiques de l’avant-garde. 1994. Textes réunis et présentés par Prosper Hillairet.

El Khachab, Walid. “Face of the Human and Surface of the World: Reflections on Cinematic Pantheism” in: Intermediality: History and Theory of the Arts, Literature and Technologies, n° 8, 2006, p. 121-134.

______. Le mélodrame en Égypte. Déterritorialisation, Intermédialité, thèse Ph.D., université de Montréal, 2003, e.g. pp.264-267 and pp. 275-277.

Faure, Élie. Fonction du cinéma, Paris, Gonthier, 1964.

Girard, René. Translated by Patrick Gregory. Violence and the Sacred. London. New York. Continuum. 2005 (French ed.1972).

Ishaghpour, Youssef. D’une image à l’autre. La nouvelle modernité du cinéma. Paris. Denoel/Gonthier. Coll. Médiations. 1982.

Jarvie, Ian. Philosphy of the Film. New York & London. Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1987.

Jozjani in Henri Corbin, Avicenne et le récit visionnaire, Paris, Verdier, 1999.

Leroi-Gourhan, André. « La fonction des signes dans les sanctuaires paléolithiques ». Bulletin de la Société préhistorique de France. Paris. Tome 55, fasc. 5/6, pp.307-321. 1958.

Lévy-Bruhl, Lucien. L’expérience mystique et les symboles chez les primitifs. Paris. 1938.

Morin, Edgar. Le cinéma ou l’homme imaginaire. Essai d’anthropologie. Paris. Les éditions de minuit. 1995. (1ère edition 1956)

Mitchell, Jolyon. Plate, S. Brent. The Religion and Film Reader. Routledge. New York. 2007.

Plate, S. Brent. Religion and Film. Cinema and the Re-creation of the World. London, New York . Wallflower Press. 2008.

Biographical notice
Walid El Khachab taught cinema at the Universities of Montreal and of Ottawa, and has founded Arabic Studies at Concordia University. He is currently Associate Professor and Coordinator of Arabic Studies at York University (Toronto). After writing a PhD dissertation on Le mélodrame en Égypte. Déterritorialisation. Intermédialité, Walid El Khachab has focused his research on the mystical and pantheistic dimensions of cinema. He has published forty chapters and academic articles on cinema, literature and pop culture, in CinémAction, Sociétés & Représentations, CinéMas and Intermédialités, among others.

His current research projects deal with cinema and the sacred, the trope of the veil in cinema and the cinema of the Arab Diaspora in the West.

Résumé
Les théoriciens du rapport entre cinéma et sacré, comme H. Agel, tendent à étudier la représentation du sacré dans le film. Mais certains comme – S. Brent Plate – estiment que le cinéma est sacré par essence, car il recrée le monde, par l’intermédiaire de la narration et du montage, comme un dieu démiurge. En revanche, cet article propose que le cinéma porte la trace du sacré simplement parce que le film physique – notamment pendant l’ère du celluloïd – et l’aplatissement de l’image projetée sur l’écran agissement comme des équivalents sympathiques du monde. Le film remplit ainsi la même fonction sacrée que les dessins rituels sur les murs des temples, ou dans les cavernes préhistoriques, tels que Lascaux. Au cinéma, comme dans Lascaux, l’Humain tend à fusionner avec le Monde conçu comme expression du Divin, métonymisé par la murale dans la caverne ou l’écran dans la salle de cinéma. Aller au cinéma est ainsi similaire à ce que Lacan appelle « remémoration »: l’Humain s’y souvient d’un état archaïque, à une époque où l’expérience du sacré passait par un rituel plaçant le corps dans un espace sombre, face à une surface représentant le monde.

Voir aussi:

La grotte de Lascaux vient à Paris
Anna Musso
L’Humanité
21 Mai, 2015

La grande exposition « Lascaux à Paris » propose de découvrir l’un des plus anciens trésors de l’humanité, réalisé il y a 20 000 ans par nos ancêtres Cro-Magnon.
Il y a 75 ans, le 8 septembre 1940 précisément, en pleine Seconde Guerre mondiale, Marcel Ravidat, 18 ans, court après son chien Robot. Ce dernier s’est engouffré dans un trou de la colline qui surplombe la Vézère au sud de Montignac, en Dordogne. Le jeune apprenti garagiste récupère le coquin sur un amas de cailloux qui roulent, roulent… Et sous ses pieds, un écho résonne ! Intrigué, le jeune homme imagine avoir découvert un souterrain secret menant au manoir de Lascaux.

Quatre jours plus tard, il revient avec trois amis Jacques Marsal, 15 ans, du même petit village de Montignac que lui, Georges Agniel 16 ans, en vacances et Simon Coencas, 15 ans, qui a fui Montreuil près de Paris pour se réfugier avec sa famille en zone libre. Les quatre téméraires se sont équipés d’outils de fortune et de lampes à pétrole. Objectif : élargir le trou et pénétrer les entrailles rocheuses à la recherche d’un éventuel trésor.

L’un des plus précieux joyaux de l’Humanité
Les jeunes explorateurs ignorent encore qu’ils s’apprêtent à entrer dans la légende, en tirant de son sommeil l’un des plus précieux joyaux de l’Humanité ! Le passage ouvert, Marcel, le plus âgé, descend en premier, en rampant. Après quelques mètres, la galerie s’ouvre sur une grotte et il atteint un vaste espace circulaire, que les préhistoriens baptiseront plus tard « Salle des Taureaux »… mais aveuglé par l’obscurité, ni lui ni ses acolytes, qui l’ont rejoint, ne devinent les aurochs peints au-dessus de leurs têtes !

Ce n’est qu’en arrivant dans un couloir étroit, le « Diverticule axial » que les adolescents pressentent l’ampleur de leur découverte : à la lueur de leur lampe artisanale des dizaines de vaches, de cerfs et de chevaux semblent se mouvoir au-dessus d’eux sur le plafond et les parois. Le lendemain, ils descendent avec une corde au fond d’un puits caché dans un recoin de la grotte… et y découvrent la « scène du Puits » : un homme à tête d’oiseau fait face à un bison qui perd ses entrailles, éventré par une longue sagaie et perdant ses entrailles. La petite bande vient de découvrir une œuvre magistrale de l‘art préhistorique, réalisée il y a 20 000 ans par nos ancêtres Cro-Magnon : la grotte de Lascaux.

La cavité n’est pas très grande : 3 000 mètres cube seulement. Mais elle recèle de grandes et nombreuses fresques très élaborées : les artistes ont joué avec les reliefs de la roche pour mieux créer perspectives et mouvements, surprendre le regard du visiteur… Anamorphoses, animaux aux proportions volontairement modifiées, comme les chevaux aux petites têtes sur de gros ventres surplombant des pattes arrondies, typiques de Lascaux.

Lascaux est un sanctuaire
La palette polychrome est riche, du noir, au jaune et au rouge et même, à un endroit, du mauve! L’intensité des couleurs est aussi variée. Et les peintures sont soulignées de traits gravés sur la paroi calcaire. Au total : 1500 gravures, 600 peintures animales, 400 signes se répondant les uns les autres, s’intriquant dans une mise en scène chargée de symboles. Quatre espèces animales reviennent de façon récurrente : les aurochs (ancêtres de nos vaches), les bisons, les chevaux et les cerfs. « Ces associations sont une écriture. Une sorte de message, de mythes sur lesquels la société reposait. Lascaux est un sanctuaire : ses peintres y œuvraient comme on peint une cathédrale, un lieu sacré. Quand je suis dans cette grotte, je suis aspiré vers les « dieux », les cieux de ces hommes préhistoriques, leur panthéon, plus qu’à la rencontre de ces hommes eux-mêmes. » raconte Yves Coppens, président du Conseil scientifique international de la grotte de Lascaux.

Prévenu une dizaine de jours après la découverte, l’abbé Henri Breuil, alors professeur au Collège de France, et réfugié en zone non occupée, se précipite. En ressortant de la grotte, il s’exclame « C’est presque trop beau ! » (2). Dès décembre 1940, la grotte est classée Monument historique.

A partir de 1948, le propriétaire (privé) fait réaliser des aménagements pour accueillir le public. Un million de visiteurs se presseront devant les parois de ce chef d’œuvre jusqu’en 1963, date à laquelle André Malraux, ministre chargé des Affaires culturelles, ordonne la fermeture au public. Les parois se dégradent en effet dangereusement, sous l’effet des variations de température, de l’éclairage et du dioxyde de carbone dégagé par la respiration des visiteurs. Des algues vertes se développent en plusieurs endroits, et un voile de calcite tend à recouvrir certains peintures.

Traitements et mesures de confinement font effet, et les années 1970 et 1980 se déroulent sans problèmes, l’accès étant limité à quelques privilégiés. Mais de nouveau, au début des années 2000, champignons et bactéries menacent de recouvrir les peintures. « Aujourd’hui, l’état de santé de Lascaux est excellent. Les conservateurs y veillent en permanence » rassure Yves Coppens. Et personne ou presque, à part eux, n’y pénètre.

Mais impossible de ne pas permettre au public d’admirer cet emblème mondial de l’art pariétal, site inscrit au Patrimoine mondial de l’Humanité depuis 1979. Dès 1983, une réplique partielle de la grotte « Lascaux 2 », présentant à l’identique la Salle des Taureaux et le Diverticule Axial, est inaugurée à 300 mètres de l’original. C’est un succès : les visiteurs affluent, et nombre d’entre eux repartent persuadés d’avoir visité la « vraie » grotte.

Mais, pour le Conseil général de la Dordogne, il faut faire plus. Il fait d’abord réaliser des répliques de plusieurs panneaux de « la Nef », ainsi que de la « scène du Puits » pour les exposer au Thot, à quelques kilomètres de Montignac. Puis, il imagine de déplacer ces fac-similés, en une exposition itinérante. C’est le défi relevé par “Lascaux, l’Exposition Internationale“, dit Lascaux 3 qui après sa création à Bordeaux en 2012, un passage à Chicago, à Houston, à Montréal et à Bruxelles, vient à Paris Expo Porte de Versailles : « il s’agit de faire sortir la plus célèbre grotte ornée du monde de son écrin périgourdin pour la présenter à un public international, et faire découvrir une reproduction fidèle au millimètre près d’une partie de la grotte qui n’a jamais été montrée» se réjoui Germinal Peiro, actuel président du Conseil départemental, qui s’est allié avec la région Aquitaine, l’Etat et l’Europe pour financer le projet, d’un coût de 3 millions d’euros.

« La Vache Noire »
Avec cet événement, c’est en effet Lascaux qui vient à nous. Le visiteur, équipé d’un audioguide, parcourt l’histoire de la grotte. Des dispositifs interactifs lui permettent de voir et de saisir la composition des œuvres ainsi que les diverses interprétations proposées, scientifiques, esthétiques et philosophiques. Un film en 3D, une maquette réduite des galeries, des photographies, des vidéos d’archives l’immergent progressivement dans la grotte… Au cœur de l’événement, un fac-similé d’une partie de la grotte « qui n’a pas été reproduite dans Lascaux 2 : la « Nef » et la « scène du Puits » que le grand public peut voir pour la première fois ! » souligne Olivier Retout, directeur du projet Lascaux Exposition Internationale. Ainsi, le visiteur plongé dans l’obscurité et la fraîcheur, accompagné d’une ambiance sonore, découvre cinq scènes majeures de la grotte exposées sous forme de panneaux grandeur nature, réalisés par l’Atelier des Facs-Similés du Périgord. « Le panneau de l’empreinte » orné d’un troupeau gravé et peint d’une demi-douzaine de chevaux et un bovin encadrés de deux signes quadrangulaires ; « La Vache Noire », située sur la paroi de la Nef à plus de 3 mètres du sol ; « Les Bisons adossés » ; « La frise des Cerfs » ; enfin, la surprenante « Scène du Puits ». Un éclairage variable fait surgir à intervalles réguliers les gravures, qui ne sont pas toutes visibles à l’œil nu. A la sortie, des bornes interactives finissent de permettre aux visiteurs de décomposer chaque détail des œuvres pour mieux les appréhender.

Un avant-goût prometteur pour patienter jusqu’à l’ouverture, prévu à l’été 2016, d’une réplique intégrale de la grotte au pied de la colline de Lascaux (budget total de 57 millions d’euros).

(1) « Lascaux à Paris », jusqu’au 30 août 2015 à Paris Expo, Porte de Versailles, Pavillon 8/B.
(2) « Les métamorphoses de Lascaux », de Pedro Lima, Editions Synops.

Voir encore:

Il a découvert Lascaux
La construction de Lascaux IV démarre dans dix jours à Montignac, en Dordogne. Simon Coencas, dernier survivant des quatre « inventeurs » de la grotte paléolithique, raconte.

Juliette Demey

Le Journal du Dimanche

13 avril 2014

Il a affronté la guerre, deux pontages et un cancer. À 87 ans, Simon Coencas, dernier des quatre « inventeurs » (découvreurs) de Lascaux, est un survivant. Il se méfie. « Vous savez, des requins naviguent encore autour de la grotte. Certains s’en sont mis plein les poches. Et nous les inventeurs, on nous a un peu oubliés! », sourit-il en ouvrant finalement sa porte, à deux pas de l’Étoile, à Paris. Le désir de témoigner de sa place dans l’Histoire balaie doutes et rancœurs. À peine évoque-t-il cette aventure que ses yeux bleu gris s’éclairent.

Une émotion « indescriptible »
12 septembre 1940. Simon, ado juif parisien de 13 ans, part en balade dans les bois dominant le village de Montignac avec deux copains un peu plus âgés, Georges et Jacques. Fils d’un marchand de prêt-à-porter, il a trouvé refuge en Dordogne avec ses quatre frères et sœurs : « Après la déclaration de guerre, on s’est installés à Montignac avec ma mère et ma grand-mère en 1940″, dit-il de sa voix rocailleuse. « J’y ai connu Jacques Marsal, dont la mère tenait le restaurant en face de chez nous, et Georges Agniel. On faisait les 400 coups, toujours fourrés dans les bois. Mais pas au hasard : on cherchait le souterrain censé relier la colline au château. »

Ce jour-là, en route vers la colline, ils croisent Marcel Ravidat, « un gaillard de 18 ans qui travaillait déjà ». Quatre jours plus tôt, accompagné de Robot, son chien, il a repéré quelque chose. Le souterrain? « Certains racontent que ce chien a trouvé le trou, mais c’est faux. C’est nous. À peine un terrier de lapin, mais ça sonnait creux. » Le quatuor dégage l’entrée de la cavité. « Marcel est passé en premier, on rampait dans ce couloir étroit plein de stalactites et de stalagmites. En descendant, on a été éblouis. C’était la salle des Taureaux! » Face à ces couleurs éclatantes vieilles de 17.000 ans, l’émotion est « indescriptible ». Le lendemain, munis de cordes et d’une lampe Pigeon, la bande des quatre poursuit l’exploration. « Les reflets de la peinture, ses mouvements sur la roche, c’était extraordinaire! »

La suite est connue : ils alertent leur instituteur, Léon Laval, et gardent l’entrée. Les visiteurs affluent, dont l’abbé Breuil qui saisit l’importance de cette « chapelle Sixtine de la préhistoire », comme il la baptise. Fin 1940, Lascaux est classée monument historique. Simon n’est plus là. Huit jours après la découverwte, les Coencas ont dû regagner Paris : « C’était la guerre. Puis il y a eu les lois raciales, l’étoile… » Le vieil homme raconte l’arrestation de son père : Fresnes, Drancy, Auschwitz. La sienne en octobre 1942, son entrée au camp de Drancy où il retrouve sa mère déportée. Lui en ressort au bout d’un mois grâce à l’intervention de la Croix-Rouge. Il se cache, survit.

Après-guerre? Simon épouse Gisèle, toujours à ses côtés. Il fait « trente-six métiers » puis s’installe comme ferrailleur. Rude au labeur, doué en affaires, le couple fait prospérer l’entreprise. Lascaux attire les foules, pour Simon la grotte passe au second plan, mais les amis de Montignac, eux, ne sont jamais loin. Il déjeune souvent avec Georges, qui vit à Nogent-sur-Marne. Quand des inondations frappent Montignac en 1960, il accueille chez lui la famille de Jacques, guide de la grotte jusqu’à sa fermeture en 1963.

Retrouvailles annuelles
Réunis à Lascaux en 1986, les inventeurs s’y retrouveront ensuite chaque année, en septembre. Jacques décède en 1989, Marcel en 1995, Georges en 2012. Ne restent que deux veuves – Marinette Ravidat veille sur la colline depuis son salon – et Simon. « Au début, les inventeurs avaient un traitement spécial. Et puis tout le monde s’est emparé de l’histoire », lance le vieil homme, mi-amusé, mi-désabusé. « Ils pourraient quand même nous envoyer un petit chèque! Je le donnerais à la recherche sur le cancer. Je bombe le torse car sans nous la grotte serait peut-être restée inconnue. »

De Lascaux, Simon n’a rien emporté. Les stalactites? Égarées. Il en a tiré quelques honneurs : François Mitterrand l’a fait chevalier dans l’ordre du Mérite, Frédéric Mitterrand officier dans l’ordre des Arts et des Lettres. Il a emmené ses enfants voir Lascaux II, le fac-similé ouvert au public depuis 1983, « très bien fait même s’il manque l’odeur de la terre, l’humidité ». À présent, des reproductions des fresques voyagent dans le monde avec l’exposition Lascaux III. Bientôt Lascaux IV… Tout cela, c’est un peu grâce à lui. Ses sept petits-enfants et onze arrière-petits-enfants le savent-ils? Sans doute pas, eux qui ont récemment découvert que leur aïeul est juif.

A lire :
Le secret des bois de Lascaux, de Félix et Bigotto (éd. Dolmen, 13 euros). Un récit en BD, avec la participation et la caution des inventeurs, préfacé par Yves Coppens.
Les métamorphoses de Lascaux, de Pedro Lima et Philippe Psaïla (éd. Synops, 27.90 euros). Un ouvrage pour découvrir en profondeur et en photos « l’atelier des artistes, de la Préhistoire à nos jours ». Préface de Jean Clottes.

Voir encore:

Genèse d’une grotte historique
Matthieu Alexandre
L’Humanité
15 Septembre, 2010

Ces dernières années, la grotte de Lascaux était moins connue pour ses richesses picturales que pour les étranges champignons qui se développaient sur les parois. Le problème n’étant pas résolu, un projet s’est mis en marche, la création d’un troisième fac similé, encore plus éloigné de l’original. Si les dessins qui recouvrent les murs sont connus de tous, l’histoire de sa découverte l’est un peu moins. Retour sur le destin des Inventeurs.
8 septembre 1940. L’armistice à été signé il y a peu par le maréchal Pétain. Dans le petit village de Montignac, la vie s’écoule doucement, peu inquiété par les Allemands. Ils sont encore loin. Ce jour là, Marcel Ravidat et trois autres personnes font une étrange découverte. À la faveur d’un arbre déraciné depuis des années, une excavation effleure le sol, recouverte de ronces.

À l’aide de pierres jetés dans le trou, Marcel comprend qu’un boyau descend profondément sous la terre. Il a déjà 18 ans et il est apprenti à l’usine Citroën. Cette journée primordiale est un dimanche, et le travail doit reprendre dès le lendemain. Il faudra attendre le jeudi 12 septembre, début de la semaine de repos, avant que Marcel Ravidat ne revienne sur les lieus. En chemin il croise trois amis, Jacques Marsal, Georges Agniel et Simon Coencas, âgés de 13 à 15 ans. Le quatuor des Inventeurs est formé.

Première descente

Marcel a prévu son expédition cette fois. Armé d’un coutelas, deux lampes et d’une corde, il entreprend d’agrandir l’excavation. Le travail n’est pas de tout repos. Il faut gratter, petit à petit. Finalement le trou s’agrandit et il peut passer. La descente se fait par étape. Après une pente de trois mètres, il atterrit sur un tas d’éboulis, suivis par une autre parois inclinée. Ses compagnons le rejoignent et, un peu plus loin, les premiers dessins apparaissent sous la flamme vacillante de leur lampe à pétrole. L’endroit paraît large, mais peu pratique. Le lendemain, à coup de pioche, il continue d’explorer la grotte, qui commence à peine à leurs livrer ses secrets.

C’en est d’ailleurs trop pour les frêles épaules de nos quatre jeunes garçons. Le 16 septembre, Jacques Marsal, sur les conseils d’un gendarme, prévient son instituteur Léon Laval de la découverte. La grotte de Lascaux, qui ne porte pas encore ce nom, se prépare à affronter le monde extérieur.

Quatre destins

Les quatre amis suivront des destins différents. Le jeune Marsal, qui dans un récit s’octrois le meilleur rôle, en l’occurrence celui de Marcel Ravidat, véritable découvreur de la grotte, devient le protecteur de la grotte avec ce dernier, jusqu’un 1942. Cette année là, il se fait arrêter par la gendarmerie nationale. L’influence des Allemands a atteint le petit village. Il est alors envoyé en Allemagne pour suivre le Service du Travail Obligatoire. Il reviendra à Montignac en 1948, après une petite escale à paris où il se marie. À cette époque, La grotte s’ouvre au public et il en devient le guide avec Marcel pendant quinze ans. Peu à peu, l’action du gaz carbonique et l’afflux d’humidité mettent en danger les dessins. Les premiers champignons verdâtres apparaissent. Lors de la fermeture en 1963, il reste sur place comme agent technique, et participera aux diverses évolutions techniques. Il recevra d’ailleurs la Légion d’Honneur, pour son travail sur la machinerie qui contrôle l’atmosphère de la grotte. Il restera le seul des Inventeurs à recevoir cet honneur. Au fil du temps sa renommée continue de grandir, et il devient le « Monsieur Lascaux 24 » jusqu’en 1989, année de son décès.

En 1940, Georges Agniel est le seul à retourner à l’école au début du mois d’octobre, à Paris. Très rapidement, il enverra une « carte interzone » à Marcel Ravidat, pour « sauvegarder [ses] intérêts dans l’exploitation de la grotte ». Malgré son jeune âge, 15 ans, il sait que la grotte a un potentiel extraordinaire. Agent technique chez Citroën puis à l’entreprise Thomson-Houston, il ne reviendra que rarement à Montignac, jusqu’au 11 novembre 1986. Sa vie sera la plus tranquille des quatre.

De son côté, Simon Coencas repart très rapidement à Paris avec ses parents et son frère. La collaboration est de mise dans la capitale française. Simon et toute sa famille seront déportés à Drancy. Son jeune âge le sauvera, ainsi que sa sœur. N’ayant pas encore 16 ans, ils échapperont à Auschwitz. Pas ses parents. Enchainant les petits boulots (vendeur à la sauvette, groom), il récupérera plus tard l’entreprise de métaux de son beau-père à Montreuil, qu’il fera fructifier. Tout comme Georges Agniel, il ne reviendra que très peu à Montignac. Il sera néanmoins présent ce fameux jour du 11 septembre.

 Pour l’Inventeur originel, la vie est aussi difficile. Marcel Ravidat gardera la grotte avec son amis Jacques Marsal jusqu’en 1942. Puis, comme beaucoup de jeunes de son âge, il sera requis aux Chantiers de la Jeunesse dans les Hautes-Pyrénées pendant huit mois. À son retour à Montignac, la gendarmerie envoi tous les jeunes au STO. Il trouvera refuge dans une grotte voisine de celle de Lascaux pour éviter le Service du travail Obligatoire et devient maquisard. Promu caporal, il combattra dans les Vosges, puis en Allemagne. À la fin de la guerre, en 1945, il reprend le travail au garage du village. Mais l’attraction de sa découverte est trop forte. Rapidement il devient ouvrier pour l’aménagement de la grotte, puis guide avec son ami Jacques en 1948. Il est le premier à remarquer les taches de couleur qui commencent à envahir la grotte, qui conduiront à sa fermeture en 1963. Les choix sont limités à cette époque, et il trouve un travail à l’usine comme mécanicien. À cette époque, Jacques Marsal s’est attribué tout le crédit de la trouvaille. Il faudra attendre la parution des archives de l’instituteur Léon Laval pour que la vérité soit rétabli. Il ne quittera plus le village de Montignac. Le 11 novembre 1986, il est présent pour accueillir ses anciens camarades.

Les retrouvailles

À l’occasion de la sortie du livre Lascaux, un autre regard de Mario Ruspoli le 11 novembre 1986, les quatre amis sont enfin regroupés. C’est un première depuis 1942. Quatre ans plus tard, ils ne seront plus que trois à assister au jubilée de 1990, qui fête les 50 ans de la grotte. Pendant la célébration, ils sont présenté à François Mitterrand. En 1991, tous les trois sont nommés Chevalier de l’Ordre du Mérite. Décédé en 1995, Marcel Ravidat venait, comme ses amis, tout les ans pour fêter l’anniversaire de leur Invention. Seuls survivants du quatuor, Simon Coencas et Georges Agniel perpétuent la tradition encore aujourd’hui.


Mondialisation: A bout de souffle (After the title of world’s tourist capital, employment-law inflexible Paris to lose NYT’s European headquarters to London)

5 juillet, 2015
https://i0.wp.com/www.thecityreview.com/breathless2.jpghttps://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/2d/Breathless-Screenshot-01.jpg
https://i0.wp.com/150597036.r.cdn77.net/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/breathless6.jpg
https://i1.wp.com/bettertax.gov.au/files/2015/04/Chapter_2-2.gif
https://scontent-fra3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpf1/t31.0-8/10989249_10200756716637321_146534111100788757_o.jpg
C’est quoi, les Champs ? Patricia Franchini (A bout de souffle, 1960)
Si vous n’aimez pas la mer… Si vous n’aimez pas la montagne… Si vous n’aimez pas la ville : allez vous faire foutre ! Michel Poiccard (A bout de souffle, 1960)
J’ai résumé L’Étranger, il y a longtemps, par une phrase dont je reconnais qu’elle est très paradoxale : “Dans notre société tout homme qui ne pleure pas à l’enterrement de sa mère risque d’être condamné à mort.” Je voulais dire seulement que le héros du livre est condamné parce qu’il ne joue pas le jeu. En ce sens, il est étranger à la société où il vit, où il erre, en marge, dans les faubourgs de la vie privée, solitaire, sensuelle. Et c’est pourquoi des lecteurs ont été tentés de le considérer comme une épave. On aura cependant une idée plus exacte du personnage, plus conforme en tout cas aux intentions de son auteur, si l’on se demande en quoi Meursault ne joue pas le jeu. La réponse est simple : il refuse de mentir.  (…) Meursault, pour moi, n’est donc pas une épave, mais un homme pauvre et nu, amoureux du soleil qui ne laisse pas d’ombres. Loin qu’il soit privé de toute sensibilité, une passion profonde parce que tenace, l’anime : la passion de l’absolu et de la vérité. Il s’agit d’une vérité encore négative, la vérité d’être et de sentir, mais sans laquelle nulle conquête sur soi et sur le monde ne sera jamais possible. On ne se tromperait donc pas beaucoup en lisant, dans L’Étranger, l’histoire d’un homme qui, sans aucune attitude héroïque, accepte de mourir pour la vérité. Il m’est arrivé de dire aussi, et toujours paradoxalement, que j’avais essayé de figurer, dans mon personnage, le seul Christ que nous méritions. On comprendra, après mes explications, que je l’aie dit sans aucune intention de blasphème et seulement avec l’affection un peu ironique qu’un artiste a le droit d’éprouver à l’égard des personnages de sa création. Albert Camus (préface américaine à L’Etranger)
Le thème du poète maudit né dans une société marchande (…) s’est durci dans un préjugé qui finit par vouloir qu’on ne puisse être un grand artiste que contre la société de son temps, quelle qu’elle soit. Légitime à l’origine quand il affirmait qu’un artiste véritable ne pouvait composer avec le monde de l’argent, le principe est devenu faux lorsqu’on en a tiré qu’un artiste ne pouvait s’affirmer qu’en étant contre toute chose en général. Albert Camus
Au héros du plus grand désir succède le héros du moindre désir. (…) Le non-désir redevient privilège, comme chez le sage antique ou le saint du christianisme. mais le sujet désirant recule, effrayé devant l’idée du renoncement absolu. Il cherche des échappatoires. Il veut se composer un personnage chez qui l’absence de désir ne soit pas conquise, péniblement, sur l’anarchie des instincts et la passion métaphysique. Le héros somnambulique créé par les romanciers américains est la « solution » de ce problème. Le non-désir de ce héros ne rappelle en rien le triomphe de l’esprit sur les forces mauvaises, ni cette ascèse que prônent les grandes religions et les humanismes supérieurs. Il rappelle plutôt un engourdissement des sens, une perte totale ou partielle de la curiosité vitale. Dans le cas de Meursault, cet état « privilégié » se confond avec la pure essence individuelle. Dans le cas de Roquentin, c’est une grâce soudaine qui, sans qu’on sache pourquoi, descend sur le héros sous forme de nausée. (…) Le héros parvient alors à un état d’abrutissement lucide qui constitue la dernière des poses romantiques. Ce non-désir n’a rien à voir, bien entendu, avec l’abstinence et la sobriété. Mais le héros prétend accomplir dans l’indifférence, par simple caprice et presque sans s’en apercevoir, tout ce que les Autres accomplissent par désir.  René Girard (Mensonge romantique et vérité romanesque, 1961)
Personne ne nous fera croire que l’appareil judiciaire d’un Etat moderne prend réellement pour objet l’extermination des petits bureaucrates qui s’adonnent au café au lait, aux films de Fernandel et aux passades amoureuses avec la secrétaire du patron. (…) Cette existence vide, cette tristesse cachée, ce monde à l’envers, ce crime secrètement provocateur, tout cela est caractéristique des crimes dits de délinquance juvénile.  (…) De nombreux observateurs ont signalé dans la délinquance juvénile, la présence d’un élément de romantisme moderne et démocratisé. Au cours de ces dernières années, plusieurs romans et films qui traitent ouvertement de ce phénomène social, ont emprunté certaines particularités à L’Etranger, ouvrage qui en apparence n’a rien à voir avec le sujet. Le héros du film A bout de souffle, par exemple, tue un policier à demi volontairement et devient ainsi un « bon criminel » à la manière de Meursault. René Girard (Critiques dans un souterrain, 1976)
Pour la corruption et la dissipation, Athènes il est vrai n’a rien à envier à Paris, Madrid ou Rome. Mais ce qu’attend Papandréou de l’Europe, c’est qu’elle éponge les pertes d’une économie clientéliste qui, malgré les privatisations bien timide de la droite, reste pour 67% une économie d’Etat. Si indulgente soit la Commission pour les frasques de la « cohésion sociale », pourra-t-elle continuer à les tolérer, alors que la Grèce vient de se voir allouer, pour les cinq prochaines années, un pactole de 175 milliards de francs de subventions ?  Jean-François Revel (Grèce: fini la comédie, Le Point, 13 octobre 1993)
Uber a franchi un pas supplémentaire avec son application UberPop, lancée en France depuis un an, et qui permet à des particuliers sans formation sérieuse, sans contrôle ni protection sociale, d’utiliser à leur guise leur voiture personnelle pour exercer une activité de taxi d’autant plus attractive qu’elle est pratique et meilleur marché. Les professionnels pensaient avoir obtenu gain de cause contre cette concurrence sauvage et déloyale après l’adoption de la loi Thévenoud, qui interdit ce travail clandestin et prévoit des sanctions sévères pour les organisateurs du réseau et ses chauffeurs. C’était sans compter avec la stratégie de cow-boy mise en œuvre par Uber, dont le patron déclarait sans détour, en mai 2014 : « Nous sommes engagés dans une bataille politique face aux taxis. » En France, comme dans de nombreux pays, Uber utilise, en effet, toutes les ressources et les chicanes du droit pour contester son interdiction. (…) En attendant, le réseau se développe rapidement, provoquant la révolte de plus en plus incontrôlable des taxis professionnels. Mais ceux-ci ne peuvent s’en prendre qu’à eux-mêmes, à leur malthusianisme et à leurs archaïsmes. Chacun sait que le système traditionnel est insuffisant pour répondre à la demande et trop onéreux pour ne pas susciter la concurrence. Et chacun a fait l’expérience d’un service dont la qualité est bien souvent insuffisante, qu’il s’agisse de l’accueil, des modalités de paiement par carte bancaire ou des tarifs forfaitaires depuis les aéroports, refusés par les professionnels. Plutôt que de s’arc-bouter sur leur privilège, les taxis auraient dû, depuis longtemps, se moderniser. Faute de l’avoir fait, ils en sont réduits aujourd’hui à lutter pour leur survie. Avec, à leur tour, des méthodes de cow-boys inacceptables. Le Monde
Cette loi a marqué un coup d’arrêt au développement de ce nouveau secteur économique. Depuis le 1er janvier, seulement 215 nouvelles cartes de VTC ont été accordées en France alors que dans le même temps, 25 000 personnes ont contacté Uber pour devenir chauffeur VTC. Plusieurs milliers ont leur dossier complet, font la formation et attendent en vain leur carte. Nous allons faire des propositions aux chauffeurs et au gouvernement pour sortir de cette situation. Plus de 400 000 passagers utilisent UberPop parce qu’il apporte un service nouveau, fiable et sûr. Dans le secteur en pleine expansion de la mobilité urbaine, où de plus en plus de gens abandonnent leur voiture, il y a une complémentarité, plutôt qu’une concurrence, entre les différents modes de transport. [Quelles mesures proposez-vous au gouvernement ?] Des aménagements simples qui rapprocheraient, par exemple, le régime français de celui de Londres où il y a 80 000 VTC et 30 000 taxis [à Paris, il y a 17 700 taxis et on estime le nombre de VTC à 10 000]. Il suffirait de ne plus exiger une formation en nombre d’heures, mais des compétences validées par un examen. Actuellement, le processus pour devenir VTC prend six mois et nécessite 250 heures de formation alors qu’on a le droit d’être pilote d’avion léger en 20 heures ! Cette formation coûte jusqu’à 6 000 euros. Personne dans les populations dont on parle n’a une telle somme. La loi impose aussi une capacité financière de 1 500 euros, alors que l’on parle de jeunes de banlieues, de personnes éloignées de l’emploi… Troisième mesure, autoriser pour les VTC des voitures moins luxueuses, moins lourdes, moins polluantes. Cela fait près de deux ans que nous faisons ces propositions. Nous avons aussi des propositions pour que les taxis soient plus en adéquation avec leur époque. (…) Les cow-boys, ce sont les gens qui lynchent des personnes sur la voie publique. Heureusement que des entreprises innovent ! Nous pensons qu’il devrait y avoir le maximum de liberté pour les chauffeurs de taxi afin qu’ils puissent choisir la plateforme avec laquelle ils veulent travailler. La loi leur interdit d’être aussi VTC. Or, plus l’offre est ouverte et permet la concurrence entre plateformes, plus les chauffeurs y gagneront. Cela se passe comme ça dans tous les marchés où nous sommes, mais pas en France. Thibaud Simphal (Uber France)
To me, the Herald Tribune represents a time when Paris truly was the expatriate capital of America. Charles Trueheart
Que peut-on attendre d’une ville qui se bat pour faire fermer ses magasins le dimanche et vite baisser le rideau le soir dès 21h00 sur les Champs Elysées! Internaute français
Merci aux régulations qui font que Paris ressemble à une ville morte les week-ends et le soir. Internaute français
Le West End, quartier du shopping, des restaurants et des théâtres, pèse économiquement plus que la City, et davantage que tout le secteur agricole britannique. Le Figaro
Le Royaume-Uni surclasse à nouveau économiquement la France, ce qui n’avait cessé d’être le cas depuis le XVIIIe siècle et jusqu’en 1973. Seule la politique industrielle très ambitieuse de la présidence de Georges Pompidou avait alors mis fin à cette suprématie, la France passant pour la première fois de l’Histoire en tête. Sur les dix dernières années, le match a été très serré, lié au taux de change de l’euro et du sterling. Mais pour le millésime 2014, il n’y a pas photo comme diraient les commentateurs sportifs. Le Figaro
There is more labour flexibility in London compared with Paris. New York Times International spokeswoman
Paris was always central to the New York Times ecosystem but is being downgraded. London is taking precedence as an international hub. A decade ago the hubs would have been Paris and Hong Kong. INYT insider
Le New York Times est en train de réduire la présence à Paris de son quotidien International New York Times, anciennement connu sous le nom d’International Herald Tribune, tout en déployant davantage de ressources à Londres. Selon le Financial Times, le quotidien new-yorkais, dont le siège européen se situe toujours à Paris, est guidé dans cette voie, notamment, par la réglementation du travail, plus favorable dans la capitale britannique. Le Figaro
The New York Times is ramping up its presence in London at the expense of its long-term European headquarters in Paris, a shift it attributes to France’s inflexible employment laws. (…) Paris has been the home of the newspaper’s international operations since 1967 when it bought a stake in the International Herald Tribune, a title which reflected America’s enduring romance with the city. An early incarnation featured in Ernest Hemingway’s novel The Sun Also Rises and also appeared in the seminal Jean-Luc Godard movie A Bout de Souffle. The Financial Times

Attention: une fuite en avant peut en cacher une autre !

A l’heure où, entre une Grèce enfin rattrapée par ses créanciers et un cinéma allemand en mal d’inspiration, continue plus que jamais à faire recette la transformation des bourreaux en victimes comme celle des victimes en bourreaux …

Et après la perte, par la ville-lumière, du titre de ville la plus visitée au monde l’an dernier …

Puis, par le pays dont est la capitale, de celui de cinquième puissance économique mondiale en janvier dernier …

Et sans compter, pour préserver le plus archaïque des systèmes, la mise hors la loi quelque peu expéditive des cowboys d’Uber …

Comment ne pas voir avec la récente annonce, par la mythique édition internationale du New York Times, de la délocalisation à Londres d’une partie de ses opérations …

Le signe de l’inéluctable accession de Londres et du Royaume-Uni au statut de véritables ville et puissance globales …

Et la confirmation – merci François Hollande et son vice-record mondial, après le Danemark et entre prestations sociales à 32% du PIB, dépenses publiques et chômage à plus de 10%,  du taux de prélèvements obligatoires

Du non moins inéluctable déclassement d’une capitale française et d’une France désormais à bout de souffle …

D’avoir si longtemps voulu donner le change, à l’instar de la petite frappe du fameux film de Godard, face à leurs modèles et rivaux d’outre-Manche et d’outre-Atlantique ?

New York Times bets on London over Paris
Matthew Garrahan in New York
The Financial Times
June 7, 2015

The New York Times is ramping up its presence in London at the expense of its long-term European headquarters in Paris, a shift it attributes to France’s inflexible employment laws.

The company has merged its London bureau with the London office of the International New York Times, adding digital editors and a branded content studio, while departing editorial staff at its Paris operation are not being replaced, according to people familiar with the matter.

Paris has been the home of the newspaper’s international operations since 1967 when it bought a stake in the International Herald Tribune, a title which reflected America’s enduring romance with the city. An early incarnation featured in Ernest Hemingway’s novel The Sun Also Rises and also appeared in the seminal Jean-Luc Godard movie A Bout de Souffle .

The New York Times owned the International Herald Tribune jointly with the Washington Post but took full ownership in 2003, renaming it the International New York Times in 2013.

The shift in resources from Paris to London has fuelled talk that the newspaper may move the International New York Times to London. A spokeswoman said there were “no current plans” to move.

However, she acknowledged that French employment laws had played a part in the decision to expand its London presence. “There is more labour flexibility in London compared with Paris,” she said.

The company now employs about 60 people in London, with plans to add four new positions for its T Brand Studio, the “custom content” operation run by its advertising department. About 120 people work in the Paris office but that number is dwindling, according to people familiar with the matter.

“Paris was always central to the New York Times ecosystem but is being downgraded,” said one of those people. “London is taking precedence as an international hub.”

The shift to a digital publishing schedule has led to investment in offices in London and Hong Kong so that global news can be published in a timely fashion over a 24 hour cycle.

“A decade ago the hubs would have been Paris and Hong Kong,” the person said.

The newspaper’s investment in London comes as another US publisher is making a big digital push in Europe. Politico, the online news service that took on the Washington Post in its home market, has expanded in Europe after striking a deal with Axel Springer, the German media group. It has opened an office in Brussels and is adding reporters in other capital cities across the continent.

Voir aussi:

Tourisme : Londres détrône Paris
Florentin Collomp

Le Figaro
16/01/2014

En 2013, Londres a franchi la barre des 16 millions de touristes étrangers, devenant ainsi la ville la plus visitée au monde.

En 2013, encore plus de visiteurs se sont bousculés dans les allées du British Museum, première attraction de Londres, de la Tate Modern ou de la National Gallery. Ils se sont envolés dans les cabines de la grande roue London Eye ou dans les sombres couloirs de la Tour de Londres. Une ­affluence record permet aux dirigeants de la ville d’espérer pouvoir annoncer, ce jeudi, qu’en franchissant la barre des 16 millions de touristes étrangers, la capitale britannique aurait détrôné Bangkok et Paris en tête des villes les plus visitées sur la planète. Si les critères peuvent diverger, Paris avait accueilli 15,9 millions d’étrangers en 2012. New York se classe en quatrième ­position.

La mairie de Londres lie directement ce regain d’intérêt à un «effet Jeux olympiques». Un ­cercle vertueux, qui parvient à éviter la tendance des villes ­olympiques à constater une dé­saffection l’année suivante. Au contraire, Londres affichait une hausse de fréquentation de 8 % au premier semestre. Dans l’en­semble du pays, les arrivées d’étrangers ont bondi de 11 % sur les neuf premiers mois de l’année, à près de 25 millions de ­personnes.

Plus de revenus dans le West End que dans la City
«L’image de Londres a changé grâce aux JO, estime Kit Malt­house, maire adjoint de la ville. Les gens ont vu une ville belle, ouverte, vibrante, au-delà des clichés habituels sur la reine et le gin Beefeater.» Les touristes londoniens proviennent en grande majorité d’Europe, devant l’Amérique du Nord et le reste du monde. Ceux venant de Chine, d’Inde ou du Moyen-Orient représentent une large part de la croissance cons­tatée. Mais la politique de visas restrictive du gouvernement ­Cameron freine le développement de cette clientèle, au détriment de Paris. C’est pourquoi, sur pression des milieux d’affaires et du lobby touristique, le ministère de l’Intérieur a accepté d’assouplir sa pratique pour les Chinois.

Ces visiteurs dépensent beaucoup: 5 milliards de livres (6 milliards d’euros) sur les six premiers mois de 2013, en hausse de 12 %. Le West End, quartier du shopping, des restaurants et des théâtres, pèse économiquement plus que la City, et davantage que tout le secteur agricole britannique.

Chez London & Partners, l’agence de promotion de la capitale, on se félicite d’un «feel good factor» post-olympique et post-jubilé royal, prolongé par l’engouement autour de la naissance du prince George, la victoire d’Andy Murray à Wimbledon et des expositions événements ­comme «Pompéi» au British ­Museum ou «David Bowie» au Victoria & Albert. Facteur exceptionnel contribuant à l’attrait de la capitale britannique: les touristes ont en plus pu profiter d’un été magnifique.

 Voir également:

La France a perdu sa place de cinquième puissance économique mondiale
Le Figaro
Jean-Pierre Robin, Service infographie du Figaro
06/01/2015

INFO LE FIGARO – Notre pays a été dépassé en 2014 par le Royaume-Uni, dont le PIB est supérieur au nôtre.

Voilà une bien triste nouvelle pour François Hollande et l’orgueil national: «La France, c’est un grand pays ; elle est la cinquième puissance économique du monde», avait affirmé le président de la République le soir de la Saint-Sylvestre lors de ses vœux aux Français. Le propos se voulait roboratif, «un message de confiance et de volonté», avait-il lui-même annoncé. Hélas, trois fois hélas, au moment même où le chef de l’État rappelait ce fameux classement – une habitude bien ancrée de sa part -, il n’était déjà plus valable.

Certes, la France était effectivement «la cinquième puissance économique du monde» encore en 2013. Son PIB (produit intérieur brut), la richesse créée annuellement, la seule mesure de la puissance économique, arrivait au 5e rang, derrière les États-Unis, la Chine, le Japon, l’Allemagne et devant le Royaume-Uni. Or celui-ci nous devance désormais: en 2014, le PIB britannique aura dépassé de 98 milliards d’euros celui de la France (2232 milliards d’euros pour le premier et 2134 milliards pour le second). Ces chiffres figurent dans un document de la Commission européenne consultable sur son site.

À cette période de l’année, il s’agit bien sûr encore d’une estimation. Mais contrairement aux prévisions qui peuvent se révéler fausses, cette évaluation comptable, qui marque une différence de près de 4,5 % entre les deux pays, ne sera en aucun cas remise en cause lors de la publication définitive des bilans 2014 dans quelques semaines.

Trois explications: la croissance, l’inflation et la force du sterling
Il s’agit en réalité d’un secret de polichinelle, et tous les économistes qui suivent ces questions le savaient: «Sur les quatre derniers trimestres dont on connaît les résultats – du quatrième trimestre 2013 au troisième de 2014 -, les calculs font apparaître que le PIB français a été de 2134 milliards d’euros en France et de 2160 milliards d’euros outre-Manche», observe Jean-Luc Proutat, économiste à BNP Paribas.

François Hollande aurait dû s’en douter, ou faire confirmer son information par ses conseillers, avant d’entonner l’antienne «France cinquième puissance», une contre-vérité désormais. Car le revers de fortune français intervenu l’an dernier n’a rien de mystérieux. Il est le produit de trois éléments: une croissance économique beaucoup plus rapide pour l’économie britannique, un rythme d’inflation également plus soutenu outre-Manche et, last but not least, la réappréciation substantielle de la livre sterling.

Rappelons qu’en 2013 le PIB anglais était inférieur de 97 milliards d’euros au nôtre (respectivement 2017 et 2114 milliards d’euros). Or il a bénéficié d’une croissance en volume de 3 % en 2014, ce qui lui a permis de progresser d’une soixantaine de milliards d’euros. De même l’inflation britannique a été de l’ordre de 1,5 %, d’où à nouveau une augmentation de 30 à 40 milliards d’euros. À quoi s’est ajoutée la revalorisation de la livre sterling, de 5,4 % vis-à-vis de l’euro, ce qui a permis de gonfler le PIB des Anglais d’environ 126 milliards d’euros. De son côté, la France n’a bénéficié que d’une croissance de 0,4 % et d’une inflation du même ordre ; du coup, son PIB nominal ne s’est accru que de 20 milliards d’euros à peine, selon la Commission européenne.

Le Royaume-Uni historiquement devant la France
Ces chiffres sont connus de tous. On s’étonne que Laurence Boone, la conseillère économique de l’Élysée, observatrice avisée de l’économie britannique, n’ait pas attiré l’attention de son patron. De leur côté, nos amis anglais se sont abstenus pour le moment de faire sonner tambours et trompettes après leur victoire sur les «froggies» (les Français mangeurs de grenouilles). Il y a quelques semaines, David Cameron, le premier ministre, se battait bec et ongles avec Bruxelles pour ne pas payer le surcroît de la contribution britannique au budget européen, laquelle résulte mécaniquement des bonnes performances de son pays.

Le Royaume-Uni surclasse à nouveau économiquement la France, ce qui n’avait cessé d’être le cas depuis le XVIIIe siècle et jusqu’en 1973. Seule la politique industrielle très ambitieuse de la présidence de Georges Pompidou avait alors mis fin à cette suprématie, la France passant pour la première fois de l’Histoire en tête. Sur les dix dernières années, le match a été très serré, lié au taux de change de l’euro et du sterling. Mais pour le millésime 2014, il n’y a pas photo comme diraient les commentateurs sportifs. Honneur au vainqueur.

Voir encore:

« Face à Londres, Paris manque d’un brin de folie »
Jean-Baptiste Daubié
Le Figaro

16/01/2014
VOTRE AVIS – Alors que Londres vient de détrôner Paris comme ville la plus visitée du monde, les internautes du Figaro.fr s’interrogent sur les raisons du désamour des touristes pour la capitale française.

Aphrodisiaque, Bertrand Delanoë? Moins que son homologue londonien Boris Johnson si l’on en croit l’afflux de touristes qui se pressent dans la capitale britannique. Londres vient en effet de ravir à Paris la place de première ville touristique du monde. Mais comment nos voisins d’outre-Manche ont-ils réussi ce hold-up? Les internautes du Figaro sont sans appel sur les raisons de cette destitution. Mais ils ne désespèrent pas: Paris peut reprendre sa place.

Londres et Paris, «c’est la nuit et le jour», explique Serge, qui a fait récemment un voyage à dans la capitale britannique. «Il existe des amendes allant jusqu’à 1000 livres si on laisse déféquer les animaux dans la rue», raconte-t-il: la saleté est en effet l’un des points de comparaison les plus relevées entre nos capitales. «De gros efforts doivent être faits sur la propreté» résume positif23 . «Les transports en commun parisiens sont en retard de 40 ans sur les autres métropoles comparables», ajoute-t-il, tandis que le voyant fait remarquer que «le métro londonien, lui, est propre et a été entièrement rénové».

«Lorsque l’on va à Londres, on a envie d’y retourner»
Il faut croire que les Français ont le dénigrement facile, car la litanie des tares de notre capitale ne s’arrête pas là: «À Paris, on y va pour se faire agresser!», fustige ainsi Hélène. Johnny se plaint lui du nombre «de délinquants sur les Champs-Elysées». En réponse, Serge fait valoir qu’à Londres, «vous n’êtes pas obligé de surveiller vos sacs et poches en permanence!»

Ensuite, il manque aussi à Paris «de la bonne humeur et un brin de folie» explique Hughes. «Nos chauffeurs de taxi et garçons de café repoussent toutes les clientèles», regrette ainsi positif23 . «L’accueil à Londres est bien plus sympathique», témoigne Annick. «Les Londoniens sont bien moins sectaires que les Français et ont le sourire» ajoute ViveleRoy . «Lorsque l’on va à Londres, on a envie d’y retourner» résume Hélène.

«Il ne faudrait pas faire de Paris un grand musée fantomatique»
Toutefois, chacun conviendra que ces critiques ne sont pas nouvelles: comment expliquer alors que Londres ne dépasse Paris qu’aujourd’hui? La réponse est à trouver dans les évènements récents où la capitale britannique a été le centre d’attention du monde entier, comme les Jeux Olympiques de 2012, le mariage princier ou le Jubilé de diamant de la reine Élisabeth II. «Nous étions à Londres avant les Jeux Olympiques et sommes revenus totalement charmés» , témoigne ainsi Alice . «Paris est tournée vers son passé alors que Londres est une ville dynamique» constate bastilleparis . «Il ne faudrait pas faire de Paris un grand musée fantomatique» s’inquiète donc génius .

«Que peut-on attendre d’une ville qui se bat pour faire fermer ses magasins le dimanche et vite baisser le rideau le soir dès 21h00 sur les Champs Elysées!», proteste bastilleparis . «Merci aux régulations qui font que Paris ressemble à une ville morte les week-ends et le soir», s’agace S S 4 .

Faut-il désespérer d’attirer à nouveau les touristes? Non, répondent plusieurs internautes: «En terme de patrimoine architectural, Paris reste largement supérieure à Londres» rappelle wushin , «J’ai l’habitude de voyager, et j’aime Paris», ajoute Annick. «Il faut seulement savoir se remettre en question» conseille Daisy . «Déçue par les mauvaises surprises de Paris, une jeune amie de Hong Kong est allée visiter Strasbourg et a été séduite par ses petites rues charmantes et proprettes» témoigne Alice . Alors, chiche?

Voir de plus:

La France championne du monde des prestations sociales
Le Figaro Service infographie du Figaro
25/11/2014

INFOGRAPHIE – Elles représentent près de 32% du PIB de l’Hexagone, contre 22% en moyenne pour l’OCDE.

Les dépenses sociales sont en baisse en Grèce ou au Canada, mais restent toutefois élevées dans la plupart des pays de l’OCDE avec en moyenne 22% du PIB, la France étant la plus généreuse (près de 32%), selon de nouvelles données rendues publiques lundi soir. Ces dernières années, les dépenses allouées aux allocations chômage, maladie ou autres aides sociales ont connu des baisses importantes au Canada, en Allemagne, Islande, Irlande ou encore au Royaume-Uni, indique l’Organisation de coopération et de développement économique (OCDE).

La Grèce enregistre la baisse la plus rapide (-2 points), après avoir taillé drastiquement dans les salaires des fonctionnaires, de médecins, des pensions retraite, détaille Maxime Ladaique, statisticien à la division des politiques sociales de l’OCDE. Toutefois, dans la majorité des pays, les niveaux restent historiquement élevés. Quatre pays consacrent plus de 30% de leur PIB aux dépenses sociales: la France, la Finlande, la Belgique et le Danemark. En Italie, en Autriche, en Suède, en Espagne et en Allemagne, elles représentent plus d’un quart du PIB.

A l’opposé, Turquie, Corée, Chili et Mexique dépensent moins de 15% de leur PIB pour les prestations sociales. Les trois derniers pays sont actuellement un niveau similaire à ceux des pays européens dans les années 1960. Comparé au niveau de 2007 d’avant-crise, le ratio dépenses sociales/ PIB a augmenté de 4 points en Belgique, Danemark en Irlande et au Japon. Il est en baisse au Luxembourg, en Espagne et en Finlande.

La santé, un poste de plus en plus important
Dans le détail, les pays consacrent en moyenne davantage de dépenses aux prestations en espèces (12,3% du PIB) qu’aux services sociaux et de santé (8,6% du PIB). Mais dans les pays scandinaves, au Canada, aux Pays-Bas, en Nouvelle-Zélande et au Royaume-Uni, un meilleur équilibre entre les prestations en espèces et les prestations en nature est fait, remarque l’OCDE.
Ainsi les dépenses liées aux personnes âgées, aux maisons de retraite, aux personnes handicapées ou encore aux crèches sont importantes en Suède (7,5% du PIB) et au Danemark (7%), contre 3% en France ou 1% en Italie et en Pologne. Les pays scandinaves «sont très développés» et comptabilisent de nombreuses institutions pour accueillir les personnes âgées ou les enfants en bas âge, explique l’expert.

Les prestations en espèces ciblées sur la population dans la vie active représentent 4,4 % du PIB en moyenne dans les pays de l’OCDE: près de la moitié (1,8%) au titre des prestations invalidité/accidents du travail, 1,3 % pour les prestations familiales, 1 % du PIB pour les indemnités de chômage, et le reste pour des transferts sociaux.

La santé (coût des hôpitaux, médecins, médicaments) est un poste de plus en plus important pour les dépenses publiques, passé de 4% du PIB en 1980 à 6% en 2012. Cette augmentation s’explique entre autres par le coût de la technologie et une proportion de personnes âgées plus importante.

Les retraites pèsent aussi plus lourd pour les comptes publics. Depuis 1980, les dépenses pour les pensions par rapport au PIB ont augmenté de 2 points en moyenne dans les pays de l’OCDE. En France, elles représentent près d’un tiers des dépenses sociales.

Autre élément mis en lumière par l’OCDE: l’utilisation de prestations sous conditions de ressources est beaucoup plus répandue dans les pays anglophones et non européens que dans les pays d’Europe continentale. En Australie, plus de 40% des aides sociales vont par exemple aux 20% de la population la moins riche. Ce pourcentage tombe à environ 17% en France où les bénéficiaires d’aides sont beaucoup moins ciblés.

(AFP)

Guerre des taxis : cow-boys contre monopole
Le Monde

25.06.2015

Edito du « Monde ». En dépit de l’appel au calme lancé à l’Assemblée nationale, mardi 23 juin, par le ministre de l’intérieur, Bernard Cazeneuve, la guerre des taxis est déclarée. Larvée depuis des mois, elle menace de dégénérer. Après les manifestations musclées, menaces et agressions de ces derniers jours dans plusieurs villes de France, le blocage de Paris et de ses aéroports, jeudi 25 juin, émaillé de violents incident, en témoigne.

Les belligérants sont connus. D’un côté, les taxis professionnels, formés et titulaires d’un certificat de capacité, adossés à un monopole vieux de plusieurs décennies, protégés par le numerus clausus qui en limite le nombre de façon drastique, indépendants ou salariés de grosses sociétés comme G7 ou les Taxis bleus à Paris. Depuis des lustres, ils ont su défendre bec et ongles leurs intérêts et leur profession.

De l’autre, l’entreprise californienne Uber, créée en 2009, et qui a connu un développement fulgurant au point d’être actuellement valorisée 40 milliards de dollars. Grâce à une application pour smartphones, disponible dans le monde entier, elle entend casser le monopole des taxis en mettant directement en relation des clients et des voitures avec chauffeur (VTC). Tant que la concurrence se jouait entre les taxis professionnels et les VTC, y compris ceux d’Uber, autorisés et réglementés par la loi Thévenoud votée en octobre 2014, la situation était à peu près sous contrôle.

Mais Uber a franchi un pas supplémentaire avec son application UberPop, lancée en France depuis un an, et qui permet à des particuliers sans formation sérieuse, sans contrôle ni protection sociale, d’utiliser à leur guise leur voiture personnelle pour exercer une activité de taxi d’autant plus attractive qu’elle est pratique et meilleur marché. Les professionnels pensaient avoir obtenu gain de cause contre cette concurrence sauvage et déloyale après l’adoption de la loi Thévenoud, qui interdit ce travail clandestin et prévoit des sanctions sévères pour les organisateurs du réseau et ses chauffeurs.

Archaïsmes
C’était sans compter avec la stratégie de cow-boy mise en œuvre par Uber, dont le patron déclarait sans détour, en mai 2014 : « Nous sommes engagés dans une bataille politique face aux taxis. » En France, comme dans de nombreux pays, Uber utilise, en effet, toutes les ressources et les chicanes du droit pour contester son interdiction. Elle a ainsi suscité quatre questions prioritaires de constitutionnalité, visant à faire annuler par le Conseil constitutionnel telle ou telle disposition de la loi Thévenoud. La dernière en date, qui porte précisément sur l’activité d’UberPop, ne sera pas examinée avant l’automne.

En attendant, le réseau se développe rapidement, provoquant la révolte de plus en plus incontrôlable des taxis professionnels. Mais ceux-ci ne peuvent s’en prendre qu’à eux-mêmes, à leur malthusianisme et à leurs archaïsmes. Chacun sait que le système traditionnel est insuffisant pour répondre à la demande et trop onéreux pour ne pas susciter la concurrence. Et chacun a fait l’expérience d’un service dont la qualité est bien souvent insuffisante, qu’il s’agisse de l’accueil, des modalités de paiement par carte bancaire ou des tarifs forfaitaires depuis les aéroports, refusés par les professionnels.

Plutôt que de s’arc-bouter sur leur privilège, les taxis auraient dû, depuis longtemps, se moderniser. Faute de l’avoir fait, ils en sont réduits aujourd’hui à lutter pour leur survie. Avec, à leur tour, des méthodes de cow-boys inacceptables.

Voir de même:

Uber annonce la suspension d’UberPop en France dès ce soir

Le Monde Economie

03.07.2015

Propos recueillis par Jean-Baptiste Jacquin

A l’issue d’une folle semaine commencée jeudi 25 juin par une grève des taxis émaillée de violence et marquée par le renvoi en correctionnelle des deux patrons d’Uber pour l’Europe et la France, le géant américain jette l’éponge en France. Dans un entretien au Monde, Thibaud Simphal, directeur général d’Uber France, annonce la « suspension » d’UberPop, ce service qui permet à des particuliers de s’improviser chauffeurs de taxi avec leur voiture de tous les jours. Une volte-face. Ignorant les multiples proclamations d’illégalité, la société californienne continuait de déployer son service en attendant que la justice tranche de façon définitive. Uber, dont la principale activité reste les voitures de transport avec chauffeur (VTC), veut faire sauter les verrous qui entravent ce marché naissant.

Manuel Valls s’est réjoui vendredi de la décision d’Uber, en déclarant que « c’est une profession qui a besoin de règles ».

Pourquoi continuer à proposer le service UberPop en France alors que toutes les autorités du pays vous demandent d’arrêter cette activité ?

« Sur le fond, nous nous en remettons à la décision du Conseil constitutionnel attendue en septembre sur l’article de la loi Thévenoud »

Nous avons décidé de suspendre UberPop en France, dès 20 heures ce vendredi soir [3 juillet]. En premier lieu pour préserver la sécurité des chauffeurs Uber, ce qui a toujours été notre priorité. Ils ont été victimes d’actes de violence ces derniers jours. La seconde raison est que nous souhaitons nous situer dans un esprit d’apaisement, de dialogue avec les pouvoirs publics et montrer que l’on prend nos responsabilités. Sur le fond, nous nous en remettons à la décision du Conseil constitutionnel attendue en septembre sur l’article de la loi Thévenoud [qui organise la concurrence des taxis] concernant UberPop.

C’est la première fois qu’Uber renonce dans le monde à un service sans y avoir été contraint par la justice. Est-ce le signe d’une inflexion de votre stratégie ?

Non, nous avons déjà retiré le service UberX à Portland [Etats-Unis]. Le facteur principal ici n’est pas la contrainte mais la violence.

L’action de la police ces derniers jours n’avait-elle pas déjà réduit à néant l’activité d’UberPop ?

Pas du tout. Près de 10 000 conducteurs occasionnels en France sont inscrits sur la plateforme UberPop, dont 4 000 ont été actifs la semaine dernière. Tout ce bruit a plutôt fait de la publicité pour la plateforme.

Que vont devenir les chauffeurs UberPop ?

87 % des chauffeurs UberPop ont une autre activité à côté. Leur recette moyenne annuelle est de 8 200 euros, ce qui correspond environ aux coûts annuels de leur véhicule. Je tiens à les remercier ici pour leur calme et leur attitude exemplaire malgré les difficultés et la violence. UberPop leur offrait une opportunité réelle d’arrondir leurs fins de mois, alors que le pays en manque cruellement. Nous allons les aider.

Etait-ce responsable de les inciter il y a encore huit jours à rejoindre UberPop en leur affirmant que c’était juridiquement sûr ?

On a toujours été responsable, contrairement à certains acteurs qui n’ont pas clairement condamné les violences. Notre priorité est maintenant de trouver un moyen de remettre ces milliers de conducteurs sur la route. C’est vital pour eux et leur famille. On va les aider dans la course d’obstacles pour devenir VTC [véhicule de transport avec chauffeur]. Parce que les faits démontrent que la réglementation ne fonctionne absolument pas.

La loi Thévenoud ne permet-elle pas le développement du marché des VTC, en le démarquant à la fois des taxis et de services illégaux tels UberPop ?

C’est le contraire. Cette loi a marqué un coup d’arrêt au développement de ce nouveau secteur économique. Depuis le 1er janvier, seulement 215 nouvelles cartes de VTC ont été accordées en France alors que dans le même temps, 25 000 personnes ont contacté Uber pour devenir chauffeur VTC. Plusieurs milliers ont leur dossier complet, font la formation et attendent en vain leur carte. Nous allons faire des propositions aux chauffeurs et au gouvernement pour sortir de cette situation. Plus de 400 000 passagers utilisent UberPop parce qu’il apporte un service nouveau, fiable et sûr. Dans le secteur en pleine expansion de la mobilité urbaine, où de plus en plus de gens abandonnent leur voiture, il y a une complémentarité, plutôt qu’une concurrence, entre les différents modes de transport.

Je ne suis pas près de quitter Uber ! On est probablement l’entreprise qui a grossi le plus vite dans l’histoire de l’humanité

Quelles mesures proposez-vous au gouvernement ?

Des aménagements simples qui rapprocheraient, par exemple, le régime français de celui de Londres où il y a 80 000 VTC et 30 000 taxis [à Paris, il y a 17 700 taxis et on estime le nombre de VTC à 10 000]. Il suffirait de ne plus exiger une formation en nombre d’heures, mais des compétences validées par un examen. Actuellement, le processus pour devenir VTC prend six mois et nécessite 250 heures de formation alors qu’on a le droit d’être pilote d’avion léger en 20 heures ! Cette formation coûte jusqu’à 6 000 euros. Personne dans les populations dont on parle n’a une telle somme. La loi impose aussi une capacité financière de 1 500 euros, alors que l’on parle de jeunes de banlieues, de personnes éloignées de l’emploi… Troisième mesure, autoriser pour les VTC des voitures moins luxueuses, moins lourdes, moins polluantes. Cela fait près de deux ans que nous faisons ces propositions. Nous avons aussi des propositions pour que les taxis soient plus en adéquation avec leur époque.

Après vous être comporté en cow-boy, comment pensez-vous être crédible pour proposer des mesures aux taxis ?

Les cow-boys, ce sont les gens qui lynchent des personnes sur la voie publique. Heureusement que des entreprises innovent ! Nous pensons qu’il devrait y avoir le maximum de liberté pour les chauffeurs de taxi afin qu’ils puissent choisir la plateforme avec laquelle ils veulent travailler. La loi leur interdit d’être aussi VTC. Or, plus l’offre est ouverte et permet la concurrence entre plateformes, plus les chauffeurs y gagneront. Cela se passe comme ça dans tous les marchés où nous sommes, mais pas en France.

Vous risquez une peine de prison. Avez-vous songé à quitter Uber ?

Je ne suis pas près de quitter Uber ! On est probablement l’entreprise qui a grossi le plus vite dans l’histoire de l’humanité. Il y a encore de très belles choses à faire. Cette entreprise fait débat partout, cela vient du succès et de la puissance d’une idée.

Voir par ailleurs:

Une économie grecque à bout de souffle
Dette publique, chômage, recul de l’activité… Tous les clignotants sont au rouge.
La Croix
5/7/15

Pour la Grèce, le drame qui se joue en ce moment, est un peu celui d’une décennie perdue, avec un PIB, autrement dit une richesse nationale, qui a perdu plus du quart de sa valeur, pour revenir quasiment à son niveau de 1999, juste avant l’entrée du pays dans la zone euro. L’an dernier, le PIB par habitant atteignait environ 22 000 €.

Le taux de chômage a, quant à lui, explosé depuis le déclenchement de la crise, pour être aujourd’hui le plus élevé de la zone euro. Il touche 25,6 % de la population active (presque 60 % chez les moins de 25 ans), contre 7 %, à son plus bas niveau en 2007. Il atteignait 10,5 % lors de l’entrée de la Grèce dans la zone euro, en 2001.

Une situation qui continue de se dégrader
Déficit public, recul de l’activité… Aujourd’hui, tous les clignotants de l’économie grecque sont dans le rouge. L’activité a reculé de 0,2% au premier trimestre 2015, deuxième trimestre consécutive de recul. Après six ans de récession, le pays avait pourtant renoué avec une timide croissance de 0,7% en 2014, dopée surtout par une bonne saison touristique.

Les comptes publics se dégradent aussi très rapidement. Dans sa dernière prévision, établie en mai, la Commission européenne prévoyait un déficit de 2,1 % cette année, puis de 2,2 % en 2016. En début d’année, elle tablait pourtant sur un excédent de 1,1 %, puis de 1,6 %.

La dette grecque, déjà la plus élevée de la zone euro, devrait elle aussi exploser pour atteindre 180,2 % cette année, avant de légèrement refluer à 173,5 % en 2016. En février, la Commission européenne prévoyait une dette à 170,2 % en 2015, et 159,2 % l’an prochain.

Un niveau de dette insoutenable
Avec la crise financière et le laxisme des gouvernements successifs, la dette publique grecque est passée de 107% du PIB en 2007 à 177% en 2014, soit 317 milliards d’euros, selon Eurostat. Un niveau qualifié aujourd’hui d’« insoutenable » par le FMI.

Un premier plan d’aide de 110 milliards d’euros avait pourtant été accordé à la Grèce en 2010 par l’Union européenne, la BCE et le FMI. Mais la situation ne s’est pas redressée au contraire.

Un second plan de sauvetage a été mis en place en 2012, combinant 130 milliards de prêts supplémentaires et un effacement de 107 milliards de la dette détenue par les créanciers privés.

L’absence de réformes structurelles
L’économie grecque reste minée par la corruption, le clientélisme et le travail au noir. Dans un pays sans cadastre, le fait de ne pas payer d’impôt est depuis longtemps un sport national. En 2012, le directeur de la brigade grecque des contrôles fiscaux Nikos Lekkas avait ainsi évalué le manque à gagner à 40 à 45 milliards d’euros par an, soit 12 à 15% du PIB.

La Grèce souffre aussi d’une bureaucratie étouffante et d’une lourdeur administrative, peu propice aux investissements, malgré les subventions massives accordées par l’Union européenne pour le développement du pays.

Les finances publiques grecques sont structurellement déficitaires et le poids des retraites reste un fardeau, représentant 16% du PIB, selon le FMI, soit le niveau le plus élevé d’Europe. Les réformes entamées en 2010 en ce domaine n’ont pas suffi et de nouvelles économies seront nécessaires.

Une économie fermée
L’économie reste peu productive, relativement fermée sur elle-même. Les exportations grecques de biens et de services ne représentent ainsi que 30% de son PIB, et ses importations 34%.

L’an dernier, la balance commerciale de la Grèce affichait un déficit de 20,5 milliards d’euros. « Partout en Europe, on trouve de l’huile d’olive italienne ou espagnole, mais pas d’huile d’olive grecque », souligne, à titre d’exemple, Olivier Passet, économiste chez Xerfi.

Jean-Claude Bourbon

Voir aussi:

Edito: Grèce, fuite en avant
Vincent Slits

La Libre Belgique

28 juin 2015

En Grèce, les retraits sont limités à 60 euros par jour jusqu’au 6 juillet
Sous le choc de la crise grecque, les bourses européennes chutent
Après l’annonce du contrôle des capitaux, les Grecs à la fois inquiets et résignés
Les banques grecques et la Bourse d’Athènes fermées ce lundi
EditoMais comment en sommes-nous arrivés là ? Il y a un peu moins d’une semaine, un accord semblait à portée de main pour éviter un défaut de paiement de la Grèce et le risque d’un « Grexit » qui plongerait alors l’ensemble de la zone euro en terres inconnues. On le sait, un « deal » – extension du programme d’assistance financière à la Grèce contre réformes (retraites, TVA, fiscalité…) et économies budgétaires – est durement négocié, depuis cinq mois, entre Athènes et ses créanciers. Et alors qu’un nouvel Eurogroupe était convoqué samedi dans l’espoir de conclure, Alexis Tsipras a pris tout le monde de court en annonçant la tenue le 5 juillet d’un référendum sur l’acception ou non des propositions des créanciers.

Le Premier ministre grec sortait ainsi de sa manche son ultime carte, celle qui était censée faire plier les créanciers et ouvrir la voie à une restructuration de la dette grecque. L’objectif est totalement manqué. Ce chantage à la voix du peuple n’aura fait que cabrer les partenaires européens, torpillant les derniers espoirs d’éviter le pire.

Sans même parler de la légalité de ce référendum ou de la pertinence de son objet, Tsipras s’est décrédibilisé sur la scène européenne dans cette « opération kamikaze » dont ses concitoyens risquent d’être les premières victimes. La panique bancaire, l’effondrement du système financier grec et la banqueroute économique du pays ne sont plus très loin.

Si le pari de Tsipras est irresponsable, les dirigeants européens devraient s’interroger sur les racines de cette fuite en avant grecque. L’humiliation du peuple grec, écrasé par des mesures d’austérité aveugles qui ont anéanti un quart de son économie et l’absence de perspectives de sortie de crise, pousse aux solutions les plus radicales car les plus désespérées. Il est moins une pour éviter le chaos. Chacun doit y mettre du sien. Et avoir enfin le courage politique d’aborder la problématique de la dette sans tabous.

Voir également:

Suivez « Victoria » jusqu’au bout de la nuit
Thriller. « Victoria » vous embarque dans une course incessante de plus de deux heures, filmée d’une traite par Sebastian Schipper.
Paris-Normandie
le 30/06/2015

Grand Prix du jury au dernier Festival international du film policier de Beaune, Victoria a également reçu les prix du meilleur film, meilleur réalisateur, meilleur acteur, meilleure actrice, meilleure photographie, meilleure musique au Deutscher Filmpreis, l’équivalent de nos César… Et pour combler son réalisateur, Sebastian Schipper, la Berlinale 2015 lui a décerné l’Ours d’argent de la meilleure contribution artistique. De quoi susciter une curiosité qui n’est pas sans rappeler l’effet Cours Lola, cours en 1999.

Le pitch est pourtant banal : il est presque 6 heures du matin lorsque Victoria, installée à Berlin depuis trois mois, sort d’une boîte de nuit avec Sonne et sa bande, dont elle vient de faire la connaissance. Grisée par l’alcool, la jeune fille plutôt sage accepte de les suivre jusqu’au lever du jour et l’ouverture du bar où elle travaille. Une décision hasardeuse qui ne sera pas sans conséquence.

La particularité artistique du film, c’est qu’il s’agit d’un long plan séquence de 2 h 10. Tout simplement parce que Sebastian Schipper filme en temps réel cette fin de nuit et ce lever du jour que vivent Victoria, Sonne et ses amis. Il ne s’agit pas seulement d’une prouesse technique qui a dû demander des heures de répétitions et de mises en place. Non, il s’agit d’un choix narratif qui place le spectateur dans le même état que ses personnages : à bout de souffle, à force d’avoir dansé sur des musiques frénétiques, déambulé dans la ville, couru d’un lieu à l’autre, monté des étages, grimpé des échelles, et fui des dangers plus ou moins effrayants.

La virée commence par de gentils bobards racontés par des garçons fanfarons, le chapardage potache de cannettes de bières. Elle se poursuit sur un joli moment intime et émouvant entre Victoria et Sonne, attirés l’un par l’autre. Le lever du jour sera le moment de vérité, celui où Victoria accepte de participer à une équipée beaucoup plus risquée.

La jeune Laïa Costa, d’une fraîcheur déroutante, nous fait partager son envie de suivre ces inconnus plus bras cassés que braqueurs. Il faut dire que Frederick Lau fait de Sonne un garçon craquant. L’attirance qu’ils ressentent l’un pour l’autre est crédible, tout comme leur solidarité au groupe.

Geneviève Cheval

Victoria

De Sebastian Schipper (Allemagne, 2 h 10) avec Laia Costa, Frederick Lau…

 Voir enfin:

Entretien
“Victoria”, “un projet fou qui nous rappelle combien il est fou de tourner un film”

Jérémie Couston
Télérama

03/07/2015

En un seul et unique plan-séquence, Sebastian Schipper filme les pérégrinations nocturnes d’une jeune Espagnole à Berlin. Une prouesse technique sur fond de thriller épileptique que nous décrypte le cinéaste allemand.
Sebastian Schipper n’enseigne pas à l’école de cinéma de Berlin comme on peut le lire sur IMDb. Mais on aurait pu le croire en découvrant son quatrième long métrage, Victoria, récit d’un braquage en temps réel dans la nuit berlinoise, qui joue avec les codes du films de gangsters, tout en s’en démarquant avec fracas par sa forme. Après quelques seconds rôles, notamment dans Cours, Lola, cours, petit film culte allemand de la fin du siècle dernier, et trois réalisations inédites en France, Sebastian Schipper sera donc le cinéaste qui a réussi la prouesse de tourner un film d’action en un seul plan-séquence de deux heures et vingt minutes. On s’attendait à rencontrer un jeune technicien survolté parlant avec exaltation de son exploit. On est tombé sur un élégant brun aux yeux bleus, de 47 ans, qui boit du Darjeeling et préfère les métaphores aux marques de caméras.

La question qui brûle les lèvres, c’est évidemment celle de l’absence ou non de trucage pour réaliser ce plan-séquence…

Est-ce que l’Allemagne a gagné 7-1 contre le Brésil ? C’est incroyable, mais c’est arrivé. Si vous ne voyez pas de coupes, c’est sans doute qu’il n’y en a pas. En vérité, il y a trois moments où j’aurais pu couper car la lumière était très faible mais je ne l’ai pas fait. J’aurais pu, à l’étalonnage, éclaircir ces scènes pour bien montrer que la caméra ne s’arrête pas mais j’ai préféré les laisser sombres car je n’ai pas fait ce film pour le Guinness des records.

En même temps, je suis obligé de vous croire…

A Berlin [où le film a commencé sa carrière], Dieter [Kosslick, le directeur du festival] est venu me trouver le jour de la présentation officielle en me disant qu’il avait croisé une personne qui avait des informations selon lesquelles mon film comportait trois coupes. La théorie du complot appliquée au cinéma. Pour la balle magique qui a tué Kennedy ou la mort d’Oussama Ben Laden, je n’en sais rien, mais je détiens la vérité pour mon film ! Et je suis en mesure d’affirmer qu’il a été tourné en un seul plan. Un jour, un journaliste a pris une photo d’un criminel avec son smartphone et ce dernier a été localisé et arrêté grâce aux informations contenues dans le fichier numérique. Une image comporte toujours des éléments invisibles à l’œil nu. C’est fascinant. On aurait sans doute pu réaliser des coupes « invisibles » mais le public s’en serait, d’une manière ou d’une autre, rendu compte.

“Eliminer la notion de catastrophe dans le processus de fabrication d’un film me semble une erreur.”
Cela a dû être une organisation démente, des répétitions interminables, non ?

Tous les films sont éprouvants. Celui-ci pas plus qu’un autre. Je pense que la folie de ce projet nous rappelle combien il est fou de tourner un film. Et que la professionnalisation du cinéma d’aujourd’hui est peut-être une fausse route. Vouloir à tout prix éliminer la notion de catastrophe dans le processus de fabrication d’un film me semble une erreur. Tous les acteurs professionnels savent parfaitement comment prononcer une réplique quand la caméra les cadre en gros plan. Gros plan qui sera parfaitement éclairé par un chef opérateur très professionnel et parfaitement voulu par un réalisateur tout aussi professionnel. Quelque chose s’est perdu dans tout ce professionnalisme.

Qu’a-t-on perdu ?

Prenons deux films de mon panthéon personnel, A bout de souffle et Apocalypse Now, deux films très différents dans leur forme mais qui ont en commun d’avoir été tournés de façon non professionnelle si l’on considère les standards actuels. D’après ce que je sais du tournage d’A bout de souffle, il y avait beaucoup d’improvisation, des horaires très flexibles, Godard lui-même hésitait pas mal dans sa mise en scène, se laissant guider par l’inspiration du moment. Quant à Apocalypse Now, le documentaire sur le tournage, Heart of darkness, est presque aussi célèbre que le film. Je ne me compare pas du tout à ces deux monstres. L’an dernier, j’ai tourné un petit film un peu fou, un peu idiot, dans les rues de Berlin, en essayant simplement de retrouver cet esprit.

“C’est une improvisation au sens musical du terme. Une improvisation punk.”
Comment prépare-t-on un tel tournage ?

Mentalement. Tous ceux qui ont été tentés avant moi de réaliser un film en un seul un plan-séquence l’ont fait en essayant d’imiter un film normal. C’est-à-dire avec d’innombrables répétitions pour atteindre la perfection, pour contrôler l’incontrôlable. Le projet qui se rapproche le plus du mien en terme de forme, c’est L’Arche russe, de Sokourov, qui a été tourné en un seul plan dans le musée de l’Ermitage mais c’est un film contrôlé de partout. Victoria, au contraire, parle de la perte de contrôle, du partage des responsabilités. C’est une improvisation au sens musical du terme. Une improvisation punk.

Mais vous aviez des cascades à gérer, on n’improvise pas des cascades…

Une improvisation ne consiste pas à se retrouver et à jouer ensemble. Il y a des règles. Quel style de musique ? Quels instruments ? Quel rythme ? Si tu amènes une guitare électrique pour jouer The Star-Spangled Banner dans une impro de free jazz, tu te fais virer. Même la musique punk répond à un cahier des charges précis. Je suis persuadé qu’un punk ne pourrait pas boire une bière dans un verre en cristal sans se faire lyncher. Bien sûr qu’on a fait des répétitions, bien sûr que les acteurs avaient une trame pour leurs dialogues. Mais l’organisation du plateau n’a pas été le plus dur. Il fallait avant tout que le film ait l’air vivant, et que les acteurs ne donnent pas l’impression de jouer. Le plan-séquence, c’est l’outil, il faut inventer tout ce qu’il y a autour. Au 19e siècle, les peintres ont mis la peinture dans des tubes et ont pu poser leur chevalet dans la nature et enfin peindre la vie telle qu’ils la voyaient, et non plus d’après leurs souvenirs, au fond de leur atelier. Mais quand les impressionnistes sont revenus avec leurs tableaux peints sur le vif, on leur a dit qu’ils étaient affreux. Il faut s’habituer à la laideur, ne pas en avoir peur. J’ai le sentiment que les cinéastes ont abandonné l’idée de laideur, ils se sont arrêtés de progresser, d’innover. Ils se sont rendus à la beauté. Tous les films se ressemblent, ils sont impeccables, mêmes ceux tournés caméra à l’épaule. Aujourd’hui, la beauté des tableaux des impressionnistes ou du Caravage n’est plus remise en cause, c’est même devenu la quintessence de la beauté. Mais on s’interroge toujours sur celle de Francis Bacon. La plupart des cinéastes contemporains se sont arrêtés aux impressionnistes. Et il y a peu de Francis Bacon qui, tout en admirant le Caravage, ose retourner le canevas pour peindre sur le mauvais côté de la toile et voir ce qui peut surgir de cet accident. Ne pas rechercher la perfection mais le flow : c’est une expérience risquée mais enthousiasmante. Sur Victoria, on est passé pas loin de la catastrophe.

“A l’ère numérique, il est impossible de cacher quoi que ce soit, il faut tout montrer.”
C’est-à-dire ?

Les deux premières prises ne m’ont pas convaincu. L’énergie n’était pas au rendez-vous. J’avais un plan B dans ma tête si le plan-séquence échouait sur la durée du film : monter le film en jump cuts [technique de montage, popularisée par Godard dans A bout de souffle, qui consiste à coller deux plans sans respecter la continuité, de façon abrupte, créant ainsi un effet de sursaut]. Le monteur a donc réalisé une version en jump cuts mais c’était encore pire, ça ne marchait pas du tout. Je me suis donc retrouvé tout à coup sans plan B. La première prise a été tournée juste après les répétitions. La seconde une dizaine de jours plus tard. Et la troisième, la bonne, quarante-huit heures après. Victoria a donc deux sœurs jumelles mais elles ne sont pas très jolies à voir. Elles seront sur le dvd et tout le monde pourra juger sur pièces. A l’ère numérique, il est impossible de cacher quoi que ce soit, il faut tout montrer.

Quelle caméra avez-vous utilisé ?

On s’en fout. Si je devais faire une liste des dix choses les plus importantes pour ce film, la caméra n’y serait pas. Vous avez raison, il y a deux ou trois ans, la peinture en tube n’existait pas mais j’ai l’impression qu’on parle trop de tube et de peinture. Pour vous répondre franchement, notre budget était serré, nous avons donc demandé au fabricant de nous prêter une caméra pour tourner le film. Ce qu’il a refusé. Je ne vais donc pas lui faire de la pub en le citant.

“Il faut savoir oublier ses maîtres pour avancer.”
La scène du hold-up avec Victoria qui attend dans la voiture est une citation de Gun Crazy, non ?

Je n’ai jamais vu Gun Crazy ! Bacon et Le Caravage ont tous les deux peint un pape, mais leurs tableaux sont très différents. Je vénère certains réalisateurs comme Godard ou Coppola et j’allume volontiers une bougie à l’église pour eux, mais quand je sors de l’église, j’essaie de ne plus y penser. Il faut savoir oublier ses maîtres pour avancer. Quand un groupe entre en studio pour enregistrer un nouvel album, je préfère imaginer qu’il ne passe pas son temps à écouter ses disques préférés.

Quel type de cours dispensez-vous à l’école de cinéma de Berlin ?
Mais je n’ai jamais enseigné le cinéma, ni à Berlin ni ailleurs ! J’ignore pourquoi cette information s’est retrouvée sur internet. Vous n’êtes pas le premier à m’en parler. Cela dit, l’an dernier, j’ai proposé à l’école Otto-Falkenberg à Munich, dans laquelle j’ai étudié le métier d’acteur, de leur organiser un atelier car je crois avoir compris quelques trucs sur la façon de réagir face à une caméra. Ils m’ont proposé de venir une fois parler de mon expérience devant les élèves mais j’ai refusé, je voulais faire un atelier et sans être payé. Ma proposition tient toujours.


Islam: Voici revenu le temps des Assassins ! (Marx on Islam: How, then, is the existence of Christian subjects of the Porte to be reconciled with the Koran?)

1 juillet, 2015
https://i2.wp.com/static.bdfci.com/data/0/0/2/4/1/3/7/1269425186.jpg
Hashashins photo Hashashins.jpg
Muhammad révéla à Médine des qualités insoupçonnées de dirigeant politique et de chef militaire. Il devait subvenir aux ressources de la nouvelle communauté (umma) que formaient les émigrés (muhadjirun) mekkois et les « auxiliaires » (ansar) médinois qui se joignaient à eux. Il recourut à la guerre privée, institution courante en Arabie où la notion d’État était inconnue. Muhammad envoya bientôt des petits groupes de ses partisans attaquer les caravanes mekkoises, punissant ainsi ses incrédules compatriotes et du même coup acquérant un riche butin. En mars 624, il remporta devant les puits de Badr une grande victoire sur une colonne mekkoise venue à la rescousse d’une caravane en danger. Cela parut à Muhammad une marque évidente de la faveur d’Allah. Elle l’encouragea sans doute à la rupture avec les juifs, qui se fit peu à peu. Le Prophète avait pensé trouver auprès d’eux un accueil sympathique, car sa doctrine monothéiste lui semblait très proche de la leur. La charte précisant les droits et devoirs de chacun à Médine, conclue au moment de son arrivée, accordait une place aux tribus juives dans la communauté médinoise. Les musulmans jeûnaient le jour de la fête juive de l’Expiation. Mais la plupart des juifs médinois ne se rallièrent pas. Ils critiquèrent au contraire les anachronismes du Coran, la façon dont il déformait les récits bibliques. Aussi Muhammad se détourna-t-il d’eux. Le jeûne fut fixé au mois de ramadan, le mois de la victoire de Badr, et l’on cessa de se tourner vers Jérusalem pour prier. Maxime Rodinson
L’erreur est toujours de raisonner dans les catégories de la « différence », alors que la racine de tous les conflits, c’est plutôt la « concurrence », la rivalité mimétique entre des êtres, des pays, des cultures. La concurrence, c’est-à-dire le désir d’imiter l’autre pour obtenir la même chose que lui, au besoin par la violence. Sans doute le terrorisme est-il lié à un monde « différent » du nôtre, mais ce qui suscite le terrorisme n’est pas dans cette « différence » qui l’éloigne le plus de nous et nous le rend inconcevable. Il est au contraire dans un désir exacerbé de convergence et de ressemblance. (…) Ce qui se vit aujourd’hui est une forme de rivalité mimétique à l’échelle planétaire. Lorsque j’ai lu les premiers documents de Ben Laden, constaté ses allusions aux bombes américaines tombées sur le Japon, je me suis senti d’emblée à un niveau qui est au-delà de l’islam, celui de la planète entière. Sous l’étiquette de l’islam, on trouve une volonté de rallier et de mobiliser tout un tiers-monde de frustrés et de victimes dans leurs rapports de rivalité mimétique avec l’Occident. Mais les tours détruites occupaient autant d’étrangers que d’Américains. Et par leur efficacité, par la sophistication des moyens employés, par la connaissance qu’ils avaient des Etats-Unis, par leurs conditions d’entraînement, les auteurs des attentats n’étaient-ils pas un peu américains ? On est en plein mimétisme.Ce sentiment n’est pas vrai des masses, mais des dirigeants. Sur le plan de la fortune personnelle, on sait qu’un homme comme Ben Laden n’a rien à envier à personne. Et combien de chefs de parti ou de faction sont dans cette situation intermédiaire, identique à la sienne. Regardez un Mirabeau au début de la Révolution française : il a un pied dans un camp et un pied dans l’autre, et il n’en vit que de manière plus aiguë son ressentiment. Aux Etats-Unis, des immigrés s’intègrent avec facilité, alors que d’autres, même si leur réussite est éclatante, vivent aussi dans un déchirement et un ressentiment permanents. Parce qu’ils sont ramenés à leur enfance, à des frustrations et des humiliations héritées du passé. Cette dimension est essentielle, en particulier chez des musulmans qui ont des traditions de fierté et un style de rapports individuels encore proche de la féodalité. (…) Cette concurrence mimétique, quand elle est malheureuse, ressort toujours, à un moment donné, sous une forme violente. A cet égard, c’est l’islam qui fournit aujourd’hui le ciment qu’on trouvait autrefois dans le marxisme.  René Girard
Cela fait un an maintenant qu’est apparu au grand jour l’Etat islamique (EI). Et l’on ne peut que constater qu’il a lancé les « festivités » de cet anniversaire, malgré les bombardements qu’il subit. Tout cela accompagne le début du ramadan la semaine dernière. L’EI a appelé la quasi-totalité de ses sympathisants à fêter cette première année par tous les moyens et partout dans le monde. Selon moi, les attentats perpétrés à Saint-Quentin-Fallavier (Isère), à Sousse et à Koweït City s’inscrivent dans cette macabre célébration. C’est un terrible pied de nez adressé à la communauté internationale. Et ce n’est que le début.(…) Souvenons-nous : l’EI a commencé son offensive au début du ramadan 2014. Il a déclaré le califat le 30 juin 2014. Je pense donc que cela risque de culminer dans les semaines à venir. En outre, le mois de ramadan est considéré comme propice au jihad. Je crains donc que nous soyons face au lancement d’une campagne d’attentats. (…) on n’est pas assez conscients de la portée symbolique des dates et des lieux. Désormais, l’EI se considère comme un Etat, gère les territoires comme tel, avec un gouvernement, une administration et un agenda. Nous sommes bel et bien face à un Etat terroriste. Mathieu Guidère
Seifeddine Rezgui was high on cocaine as he murdered British tourists on the beach, it emerged today. A stimulant, believed to the class A drug or one similar to it, was detected by doctors during a post-mortem examination, the Daily Mail has been told. (…) IS fighters are known to take doses of cocaine to make them feel invincible on the battlefield. An informed source said: ‘The autopsy proves that the terrorist used some drugs before he did the attack – the same drug that IS gives to people who do terrorist attacks – so that he will not understand what he is doing.’ A hotel worker named Houssem told the Mail: ‘He was laughing as he was shooting. When he had finished and he had killed everyone, he did not care, he did not try to run. He was smiling, he was happy.’ The Daily Mail
Many scholars have argued, and demonstrated convincingly, that the attribution of the epithet « hashish eaters » or « hashish takers » is a misnomer derived from enemies of the Isma’ilis and was never used by Muslim chroniclers or sources. It was therefore used in a pejorative sense of « enemies » or « disreputable people ». This sense of the term survived into modern times with the common Egyptian usage of the term Hashasheen in the 1930s to mean simply « noisy or riotous ». It is unlikely that the austere Hassan-i Sabbah indulged personally in drug taking … there is no mention of that drug hashish in connection with the Persian Assassins – especially in the library of Alamut (« the secret archives »). Edward Burman
Le fascisme est bien plus sain que n’importe quelle conception hédoniste de la vie (…) Alors que le socialisme et même le capitalisme – plus à contrecoeur – ont dit aux gens: « Je vous offre du bon temps », Hitler leur a dit: « Je vous offre la lutte, le danger et la mort » et le résultat a été qu’un nation entière se jeta à ses pieds. Orwell
Le fait est qu’il y a quelque chose de profondément attirant chez lui. […] Hitler sait que les êtres humains ne veulent pas seulement du confort, de la sécurité, des journées de travail raccourcies, de l’hygiène, de la contraception et du bon sens en général ; ils souhaitent aussi, au moins de temps en temps, vivre de luttes et de sacrifice de soi, sans mentionner les tambours, les drapeaux et les défilés patriotiques. George Orwell
Nous étions cons et dangereux. Yves Montand
Je suis et demeure un combattant révolutionnaire. Et la Révolution aujourd’hui est, avant tout, islamique. Illich Ramirez Sanchez (dit Carlos, 2004)
These extremists distort the idea of jihad into a call for terrorist murder against Christians and Hindus and Jews — and against Muslims, themselves, who do not share their radical vision. George Bush (November 11, 2005)
L’analogie que nous utilisons ici parfois, et je pense que c’est exact, c’est que si une équipe de juniors met l’uniforme des Lakers, cela n’en fait pas des Kobe Bryant. Obama (27 janvier 2014)
L’État islamique ne parle au nom d’aucune religion (…) Aucun Dieu ne soutiendrait leurs actes (…) l’État islamique n’a pas sa place au XXIe siècle. Barack Hussein Obama
Six weeks ago, Human Rights Watch documented a “system of organized rape and sexual assault, sexual slavery, and forced marriage by ISIS forces.” Their victims were mainly Yazidi women and girls as young as 12, whom they bought, sold, gang-raped, beat, tortured and murdered when they tried to escape. (…) and yet (…) the upcoming annual conference of the National Organization for Women does not list ISIS or Boko Haram on its agenda. While the most recent Women’s Studies annual conference did focus on foreign policy, they were only interested in Palestine, a country which has never existed, and support for which is often synonymous with an anti-Israel position. Privately, feminists favor non-intervention, non-violence and the need for multilateral action, and they blame America for practically everything wrong in the world. What is going on? Feminists are, typically, leftists who view “Amerika” and white Christian men as their most dangerous enemies, while remaining silent about Islamist barbarians such as ISIS. Feminists strongly criticize Christianity and Judaism, but they’re strangely reluctant to oppose Islam — as if doing so would be “racist.” They fail to understand that a religion is a belief or an ideology, not a skin color. The new pseudo-feminists are more concerned with racism than with sexism, and disproportionately focused on Western imperialism, colonialism and capitalism than on Islam’s long and ongoing history of imperialism, colonialism, anti-black racism, slavery, forced conversion and gender and religious apartheid … Phyllis Chesler
Ce sont des symptômes qui relèvent d’un désordre mental. Un mélange de haine personnelle, de marginalité, de frustration économique, d’Islam identitaire… une grande salade d’ingrédients confus avec un vernis islamique, symptomatique d’un Islam aujourd’hui atomisé, d’une doctrine éclatée – y compris le salafisme – d’un terrorisme individualisé. Cela montre une civilisation arabo-musulmane délabrée. Les Musulmans sont déroutés et ne maîtrisent plus rien, ni la base ni rien. Ceux qui prennent les armes ne connaissent même pas l’Islam. Ils mélangent le martyr avec le suicide. La théologie du martyr c’est de subir la mort ou la guerre, pas de la rechercher. Le problème c’est la lutte contre l’ignorance, la restauration du savoir et de la culture. La violence vient de l’absence de la démocratisation de la pensée en général et de la religion en particulier. Quand il n’y a pas de langage, eh bien il y a de la violence. Tareq Oubrou (recteur de la grande mosquée de Bordeaux)
Le qualificatif de terroriste est beaucoup trop général et générique. Nous avons affaire à la rencontre d’expériences personnelles et d’une figure contemporaine et mortifère de la révolte que la seule logique policière et militaire ne parviendra pas à anéantir. Les actes d’Amedy Coulibaly et des frères Kouachi, comme ceux de Mohammed Merah, viennent au terme d’histoires singulières, d’histoires françaises. Comme celles des quelque mille jeunes français partis en Syrie. Comme celle de ceux, bien plus nombreux, qui ne regardent pas forcément avec autant d’horreur que nous cette guerre annoncée contre l’occident corrupteur. De la même façon, les salafistes tunisiens dont sont issus les meurtriers du Bardo sont particulièrement bien implantés à Sidi Bouzid et Kasserine, dans le berceau de la révolution de décembre 2010-janvier 2011. Pire : nombre d’entre eux ont été les acteurs de cette révolution et n’étaient pas salafistes à l’époque.  (…) Je pense qu’il nous faut comprendre que nous n’avons pas affaire à un phénomène sectaire isolé, et surtout que nous n’avons pas affaire à une « radicalisation de l’Islam », mais plutôt à une islamisation de la révolte radicale. Alors que les salafistes tunisiens actuels les plus actifs ne l’étaient pas lorsqu’ils étaient mobilisés contre Ben Ali, on sait que les candidats français au djihad sont bien souvent des convertis ou, à l’instar de Coulibaly et des frères Kouachi, des pratiquants tardifs. La vérité de leurs mobiles et de leur pensée ne doit pas tant être cherchée dans la théologie, de l’Islam en général ou du wahhabisme en particulier, mais bien dans la cohérence contemporaine des propositions politiques qu’ils portent. Si la confessionnalisation du monde et des affrontements est bien au cœur de ces propositions, ils sont loin d’en avoir le monopole aujourd’hui. Cette confessionnalisation en a mobilisé d’autres, en France ou ailleurs, dans la rue (la « Manif pour tous ») comme dans les gouvernements. L’événement majeur qui nous a conduits là est sans aucun doute l’effondrement des États communistes et du communisme à la fin du 20e siècle et, de proche en proche, l’effondrement de la figure moderne de la politique qui faisait de la conquête du pouvoir le levier des transformations collectives. Nous avons perdu dans le même mouvement l’espoir révolutionnaire et le sens de la représentation élective. Nous avons perdu en même temps un certain rapport populaire et politique au temps historique, dans lequel le passé permettait de comprendre le présent et le présent de préparer l’avenir. (…) Pour toute une génération qui arrive aujourd’hui à l’âge adulte, une évidence s’impose : au bout du chemin emprunté par leurs parents, qu’ils aient immigré pour une vie meilleure, milité pour des lendemains qui chantent ou œuvré à leur propre « réussite », il y a une impasse. Plus d’espoir collectif de révolution ou de progrès social et peu d’espoir de réussite individuelle. Le compte à rebours de la planète semble commencé sans que rien n’arrête la course à la catastrophe. Avec la mondialisation financière, la vie publique est dominée par la corruption des États et le mensonge des gouvernements. Dans ces conditions, les valeurs de la République peuvent apparaître quelque peu désincarnées. La référence obsessionnelle à la mémoire s’est substituée à la réflexivité du récit historique. Et nous avons perdu le sens du passé parce que nous n’avons plus de subjectivité collective de l’avenir. Tout ceci, nous le savons peu ou prou. Mais il nous faut en réfléchir les articulations et les conséquences. Qu’est-ce qu’une révolte qui n’a plus ni avenir ni espoir ? Quand on a cela en tête, on comprend mieux la puissance subjective des propositions djihadistes. Le seul avenir proposé est la mort : celle « des mécréants, des juifs et des croisés » comme celle des martyres qui finiront au paradis en emmenant avec eux soixante-dix personnes. Quand on a cela en tête, on comprend mieux aussi la publicité faite par Daech autour des destructions des vestiges du passé et du patrimoine culturel. Si ce passé nous a menti sur notre avenir, il ne nous servirait plus qu’à mentir encore.(…) Le salafisme, puisque c’est de lui qu’il s’agit, repose sur un sens donné à la vie qui ne laisse aucune place à la liberté. C’est l’islam dans une version des plus totalisantes. Un de ses attraits repose sur sa maîtrise de l’intime, la répression des désirs et des plaisirs, un cadre proposé pour tous les actes et les moments de la vie comme un acte de résistance au capitalisme et à « l’occident corrupteur ». Dans toute organisation de la révolte, il y a une figure de la libération possible et une contrainte de lutte, une discipline, et une éthique. Nous vivons l’effondrement des constructions qui ont associé ces deux dimensions à la fois libératrices et contraignantes. Le communisme a été au 20e siècle sa forme majeure. Il donnait sens à la souffrance, à la vie quotidienne en même temps qu’il proposait une subversion. Nous sommes toujours dans ce moment qui suit l’effondrement du communisme, mais aussi celui du tiers-mondisme. Le cycle politique des 19e et 20e siècles se clôt. (…) Il y a une demande de politique et de cadre qui se retrouve dans le nom que se donne ce mouvement radical, l’État islamique. Il n’a rien d’un État au sens moderne du terme : il ne garantit ni la paix ni le respect de l’altérité. Il est au contraire entièrement fondé sur la guerre et le massacre de l’autre. Il n’est ni national ni territorial, mais à vocation universaliste et multi-situé avec le jeu des « allégeances » qui ne vont que se multiplier. Mais c’est une puissance de combat au service de cette radicalité mortifère, une puissance qui – à l’instar de la puissance malfaisante du Cinquième élément de Luc Besson – se renforce et gagne en influence quand on l’attaque. (…) L’effondrement de la catégorie d’avenir dont nous avons parlé, et que l’anthropologue Arjun Appadurai a mis au centre de son dernier livre The Future as Cultural Fact : Essays on the Global Condition, est sans doute une des dimensions de la vague émeutière qui a touché le monde entier depuis le début du siècle. Ces dernières années, cette vague a été prolongée par de grandes mobilisations collectives comme ce que l’on a appelé le printemps arabe, la mobilisation brésilienne contre la Coupe du monde, la mobilisation turque contre le projet urbain de la place Taksim… Nous venons de vivre une séquence mondiale d’affrontements entre les peuples et les pouvoirs, équivalente du « Printemps des peuples » de 1848, des révolutions communistes d’après la première guerre mondiale, de 1968. Il y a deux devenirs possibles à ses séquences : la construction d’une figure durable de la révolte et de l’espoir qui s’incarne dans des mouvements politiques organisés et des perspectives institutionnelles, ou la dérive vers le désespoir et la violence minoritaire. Après 1968, on a connu les Brigades rouges, la Bande à Baader, des dérives terroristes au Japon. Pendant ces dix dernières années, une génération s’est révoltée. Si rien ne semble bouger, comment s’étonner que certains décident de passer à la « phase 2″ ?  Alain Bertho
Professeur à l’Université de Paris VIII, il est directeur de l’École doctorale sciences sociales (2007-2013), directeur de la Maison des sciences de l’homme de Paris Nord (2013-..) et directeur du Master « Villes et nouveaux espaces européens de gouvernance » à l’Institut d’études européennes de l’Université Paris-VIII. Il est membre du Laboratoire Architecture Ville Urbanisme Environnement (UMR 7218 – équipe AUS). Il est élu président de la 20e section du Conseil national des universités (anthropologie biologique, ethnologie, préhistoire) en novembre 2011. Après vingt-sept ans d’engagement au PCF, notamment dans le mouvement des Refondateurs, il se met en congé du parti en 2003 puis le quitte l’année suivante. En 2008, il fonde avec Sylvain Lazarus l’Observatoire international des banlieues et des périphéries au sein duquel il mène des enquêtes sur les banlieues au Brésil et au Sénégal. Son site recense quotidiennement les émeutes dans le monde depuis l’année 2007. Le temps des émeutes est le titre du livre qu’il a écrit à partir de ce travail de recensement. Cet ouvrage est une analyse anthropologique de ce phénomène qui connaît un développement exponentiel et planétaire depuis quelques années. Ses travaux intellectuels se rapprochent des travaux du sociologue Zygmunt Bauman et du philosophe Giorgio Agamben. Il partage avec eux leur regard singulier sur la forme contemporaine de la mondialisation et de l’État. Travaillant également sur les questions liées à la place des métropoles et des mouvements sociaux à l’aire de la mondialisation, il rejoint intellectuellement les travaux de la sociologue Saskia Sassen et de l’anthropologue Arjun Appadurai. Comme eux, il attache beaucoup d’importance aux « préoccupations « militantes » et (porte) donc une attention plus poussée aux formes collectives de subjectivité qui émergent ». Les travaux de son ami Toni Negri, notamment ceux engagés en collaboration avec Michael Hardt sur l’Empire et la Multitude, font également partis de ses références. En somme, il qualifie l’ensemble de ces intellectuels de « sentinelles du contemporain ». Wikipedia
Si nous prenons un peu de champ, je vois plusieurs raisons à cet invraisemblable aveuglement, à commencer par le fait que les esprits sont empoisonnés par plus d’une décennie de «trahison des clercs». Des élites passées maîtresses dans l’art positif et méthodique de se crever les yeux face à la montée du fondamentalisme musulman le plus agressif et le plus rétrograde, au motif que le Mal — la haine, la terreur, l’obscurantisme — ne saurait surgir de ce qu’elles croyaient être le camp du Bien, celui des anciens damnés de la terre. Ce catéchisme binaire et rance, qui remonte au tiers-mondisme des années 60 et qui consiste à opposer avec paresse un monde européen forcément coupable à un monde musulman ontologiquement innocent, est tout à fait obsolète. L’ensemble des musulmans éclairés, dont nous relayons bien peu la parole alors qu’il s’agirait d’épouser leur combat comme hier celui des dissidents du bloc soviétique, nous le répètent pourtant à longueur de journée. Mais peu importe pour nos bien-pensants de service, très présents dans les médias, qui ont préféré s’en tenir à une curieuse pratique de la pensée magique en interdisant aux faits toute incursion malvenue dans l’univers de leur croyance idéologique. En cela, oui, ils ont œuvré à notre désarmement intellectuel et moral. Cette couardise, doublée de la perte horrifiante de la lucidité la plus élémentaire, me fait penser au mot de Yves Montand à propos de sa génération, fascinée par la stalinisme: «Nous étions dangereux et cons». Avec un peu d’honnêteté, nombreux sont nos intellectuels qui, en France, seraient bien inspirés de s’approprier cette observation autocritique. J’ajouterais même un appendice: non contents d’être redevenus «dangereux et cons» depuis le 11-Septembre 2001, nos «beaux esprits» somnambules, particulièrement nombreux à gauche, se sont aussi distingués par leur insondable lâcheté. En effet, quelle est cette irresponsabilité qui, depuis des années, a poussé tant de faiseurs d’opinion — journalistes, politiques, sociologues vertueux — à s’enferrer à ce point dans le déni, à être incapables de mettre leur montre à l’heure, d’appeler un chat un chat et d’admettre que c’est l’islam radical qui, ces derniers temps, a un peu tendance à armer le bras des assassins et non des hordes de bouddhistes déchainés? N’oublions pas qu’entre le 6 et le 10, nous sommes subitement passés de la thèse, confortable mais fausse, des «loups solitaires» — et autres «enfants perdus du djihad», des formules partout reprises en cœur —, à la reconnaissance officielle d’un fléau planétaire. N’oublions pas qu’ Edwy Plenel parlait encore du terrorisme «dit islamiste» dans son livre récent, intitulé Pour les musulmans . Ou comment mélanger au passage, dans une même condescendance postcoloniale, les terroristes et leurs suppliciés. Et on pourrait multiplier les exemples à l’infini. D’ailleurs, le vendredi 26 juin au soir, les bandeaux «Encore un loup solitaire?» s’inscrivaient derechef sur nos écrans de télévision. Vertigineuse régression. Le dispositif global d’intimidation par l’«islamophobie» — l’intimidation étant caractéristique de la mentalité fasciste — a fait le reste: quiconque ne partageait pas cette vision irénique se voyait traité de raciste ou, plus à la mode, de «néo-réactionnaire». Brisons les avertisseurs d’incendie et le feu s’éteindra de lui-même. Tel est à peu près l’état d’esprit toxique qui domine depuis des années en France et nous empêche, aujourd’hui encore, de percuter l’ampleur du danger. On ne réadapte pas ses catégories mentales du jour au lendemain. Plus largement, il me semble que les Européens de bonne foi ont exorcisé depuis si longtemps le cauchemar des guerres de religion qu’ils ont du mal à en imaginer le retour. Or, on peine toujours à voir ce que l’on peine à concevoir. Alexandra Laignel-Lavastine
People want to absolve Islam. It’s this ‘Islam is a religion of peace’ mantra. As if there is such a thing as ‘Islam’! It’s what Muslims do, and how they interpret their texts. Those texts are shared by all Sunni Muslims, not just the Islamic State. And these guys have just as much legitimacy as anyone else. Slavery, crucifixion, and beheadings are not something that freakish [jihadists] are cherry-picking from the medieval tradition.  Islamic State fighters “are smack in the middle of the medieval tradition and are bringing it wholesale into the present day. (…) What’s striking about them is not just the literalism, but also the seriousness with which they read these text. There is an assiduous, obsessive seriousness that Muslims don’t normally have. The Wahhabis were not wanton in their violence. They were surrounded by Muslims, and they conquered lands that were already Islamic; this stayed their hand. ISIS, by contrast, is really reliving the early period. Early Muslims were surrounded by non-Muslims, and the Islamic State, because of its takfiri tendencies, considers itself to be in the same situation. (…) The only principled ground that the Islamic State’s opponents could take is to say that certain core texts and traditional teachings of Islam are no longer valid. That really would be an act of apostasy. Bernard Haykel (Princeton)
The reality is that the Islamic State is Islamic. Very Islamic. Yes, it has attracted psychopaths and adventure seekers, drawn largely from the disaffected populations of the Middle East and Europe. But the religion preached by its most ardent followers derives from coherent and even learned interpretations of Islam. Virtually every major decision and law promulgated by the Islamic State adheres to what it calls, in its press and pronouncements, and on its billboards, license plates, stationery, and coins, “the Prophetic methodology,” which means following the prophecy and example of Muhammad, in punctilious detail. Muslims can reject the Islamic State; nearly all do. But pretending that it isn’t actually a religious, millenarian group, with theology that must be understood to be combatted, has already led the United States to underestimate it and back foolish schemes to counter it. We’ll need to get acquainted with the Islamic State’s intellectual genealogy if we are to react in a way that will not strengthen it, but instead help it self-immolate in its own excessive zeal. Without acknowledgment of these factors, no explanation of the rise of the Islamic State could be complete. But focusing on them to the exclusion of ideology reflects another kind of Western bias: that if religious ideology doesn’t matter much in Washington or Berlin, surely it must be equally irrelevant in Raqqa or Mosul. When a masked executioner says Allahu akbar while beheading an apostate, sometimes he’s doing so for religious reasons.(…) Some observers have called for escalation, including several predictable voices from the interventionist right (Max Boot, Frederick Kagan), who have urged the deployment of tens of thousands of American soldiers. These calls should not be dismissed too quickly: an avowedly genocidal organization is on its potential victims’ front lawn, and it is committing daily atrocities in the territory it already controls.(…) It would be facile, even exculpatory, to call the problem of the Islamic State “a problem with Islam.” The religion allows many interpretations, and Islamic State supporters are morally on the hook for the one they choose. And yet simply denouncing the Islamic State as un-Islamic can be counterproductive, especially if those who hear the message have read the holy texts and seen the endorsement of many of the caliphate’s practices written plainly within them. Graeme Wood
We seem to have gone from one extreme to the other. Now that Islam is no longer demonised, it seems it can do no wrong. Perhaps the truth is that the two opposing strands need to be held together, instead of dismissing one or the other. The reality of Islam is more complex. Islam actually means « submission » – not quite the same as « peace ». Many horrific acts have been, and continue to be, perpetrated in the name of Islam, just as they have in the name of Christianity. But, unlike Islam, Christianity does not justify the use of all forms of violence. Islam does. (…)  The contradictory reactions to the terrorist attacks – official condemnation at leadership level and support among many people – are an indication that Islam is not always « a religion of peace ». There are so many Muslims rejoicing at the tragic loss of American lives and the humiliation of the American government that they cannot be dismissed as « a few extremists ». Sura 9, verse 5 of the Koran reads, « Then fight and slay the Pagans wherever ye find them. And seize them, beleaguer them, And lie in wait for them, In every stratagem (of war). » (…) In the Muslim faith, the Koran is believed to be the very word of God, applying to all people, in all times, in all places. It is the source of the Muslim faith and the law that orders the Islamic way of life. Killing is not totally forbidden: in fact, it was through conquest that Islam spread. In Indonesia today, non-Muslims are offered a choice of conversion to Islam or death. The argument that the above verse was written to refer only to a particular time and people is not valid. The Koran is considered immutable – a fact that has been repeatedly employed to justify verses that are discriminatory toward women, such as the unequal inheritance shares given to women in line with Sura 4, verse 11. The development of Shariah, Islamic law, created a society where non-Muslims lived as second-class citizens subject to and humiliated by numerous laws. Those who converted from Islam to another religion were killed, a practice that continues in Afghanistan, Iran and Saudi Arabia. Koran Sura 5, verse 85, which speaks of enmity between Muslims and non-Muslims, reads: « Strongest among men in enmity to the Believers wilt thou Find the Jews and Pagans. » The World Trade Centre attack cannot be dismissed as merely the work of a small group of extremists. The Muslims celebrating the tragedy in America are doubtless recalling the words of the Koran, urging Muslims to « fight a mighty nation, fight them until they embrace Islam ». Sheikh Omar Bakri Mohamed, leader of the radical Islamic organisation Al-Muhajiroun, last week indicated that civilian targets were wrong, but military and government targets are legitimate. The Kuwaiti paper Al-Watan argued in favour of the Islamic justification for killing non-combatants. It referred specifically to Jews, but its argument could apply to any non-combatants living in a democracy. Citizens vote for the government and pay taxes to support it. And so, the argument goes, citizens can be considered as potential soldiers or as being « involved in complementary activities ». To recognise that no culture or people are without fault and that all should be subject to criticism is not racism; it is an honesty that emphasises our common humanity. The way to increase respect between people of different faiths is not to gloss over our problems but to admit them, face up to them and together seek to deal with them. Violence occurs in all religions, but in most it is not sanctioned and although there might be moderate elements within Islam, it is the extremist elements that have tended to dominate the development of the religion, with often tragic consequences. Patrick Sookhdeo
The reality is that the Islamic State is Islamic. Very Islamic. Yes, it has attracted psychopaths and adventure seekers, drawn largely from the disaffected populations of the Middle East and Europe. But the religion preached by its most ardent followers derives from coherent and even learned interpretations of Islam. Virtually every major decision and law promulgated by the Islamic State adheres to what it calls, in its press and pronouncements, and on its billboards, license plates, stationery, and coins, “the Prophetic methodology,” which means following the prophecy and example of Muhammad, in punctilious detail. Muslims can reject the Islamic State; nearly all do. But pretending that it isn’t actually a religious, millenarian group, with theology that must be understood to be combatted, has already led the United States to underestimate it and back foolish schemes to counter it. We’ll need to get acquainted with the Islamic State’s intellectual genealogy if we are to react in a way that will not strengthen it, but instead help it self-immolate in its own excessive zeal. Without acknowledgment of these factors, no explanation of the rise of the Islamic State could be complete. But focusing on them to the exclusion of ideology reflects another kind of Western bias: that if religious ideology doesn’t matter much in Washington or Berlin, surely it must be equally irrelevant in Raqqa or Mosul. When a masked executioner says Allahu akbar while beheading an apostate, sometimes he’s doing so for religious reasons.(…) Some observers have called for escalation, including several predictable voices from the interventionist right (Max Boot, Frederick Kagan), who have urged the deployment of tens of thousands of American soldiers. These calls should not be dismissed too quickly: an avowedly genocidal organization is on its potential victims’ front lawn, and it is committing daily atrocities in the territory it already controls.(…) It would be facile, even exculpatory, to call the problem of the Islamic State “a problem with Islam.” The religion allows many interpretations, and Islamic State supporters are morally on the hook for the one they choose. And yet simply denouncing the Islamic State as un-Islamic can be counterproductive, especially if those who hear the message have read the holy texts and seen the endorsement of many of the caliphate’s practices written plainly within them. Graeme Wood
 Le Coran et la législation musulmane qui en résulte réduisent la géographie et l’ethnographie des différents peuples à la simple et pratique distinction de deux nations et de deux territoires ; ceux des Fidèles et des Infidèles. L’Infidèle est « harby », c’est-à-dire ennemi. L’islam proscrit la nation des Infidèles, établissant un état d’hostilité permanente entre le musulman et l’incroyant. Dans ce sens, les navires pirates des États Berbères furent la flotte sainte de l’Islam. Comment, donc, l’existence de chrétiens sujets de la Porte [l’empire turc] peut-elle être conciliée avec le Coran ?  Si une ville, dit la législation musulmane, se rend par capitulation, et que ses habitants deviennent « rayahs », c’est à dire sujets du prince musulmans sans abandonner leur foi, ils doivent payer le « kharatch » (capitation ou taxe par tête), quand ils obtiennent une trêve des fidèles, et il est alors interdit de confisquer leurs biens et de prendre leurs maisons … Dans ce cas, leurs églises deviennent une partie de leurs patrimoine, et ils ont le droit d’y prier. Mais ils n’ont pas le droit d’en construire de nouvelles. Ils ont seulement le droit de les réparer, et de reconstruire les parties détruites. A période régulière, des commissaires du gouverneur de la province doivent inspecter les églises et les sanctuaires des Chrétiens, afin de vérifier qu’aucune nouvelle construction n’a été érigée sous prétexte de réparation. Si une ville est conquise par la force, les habitants conservent leurs églises, mais seulement comme lieu de refuge, et ils n’ont plus le droit d’y prier »(…) Les Musulmans forment environ un quart de l’ensemble de la population composée de Turcs, d’Arabes et de Maures qui sont évidemment les maîtres à tous égards puisqu’ils ne sont aucunement affectés par la faiblesse de leur gouvernement situé à Constantinople. Rien n’égale la misère et les souffrances des Juifs de Jérusalem, qui résident dans le quartier le plus infect de la ville que l’on appelle le hareth-el-yahoud, ce quartier d’immondices compris entre les monts Sion et Moriah où sont situés leurs synagogues – objets constants de l’oppression et de l’intolérance des Musulmans, exposés aux insultes des Grecs, persécutés par les Latins, et ne vivant que des aumônes à peine suffisantes transmises par leurs frères d’Europe. Les Juifs ne sont cependant pas des indigènes et seuls les attirent à Jérusalem le désir d’habiter la Vallée de Josaphat ainsi que celui de mourir sur le lieu même où ils attendent la rédemption. ’Attendant leur mort’, écrit un auteur français, ’ils souffrent et ils prient. Leurs regards tournés vers ce Mont Moriah où s’éleva autrefois le Temple du Liban ( ?), et dont ils n’osent s’approcher, ils versent des larmes sur les infortunes de Sion et sur leur dispersion à travers le monde.  Karl Marx (New-York Herald Tribune, 15 avril 1854)

Cachez cette religion que je ne saurai voir !

En ce temps  revenu des assassins  et premier anniversaire de l’Etat Islamique …

Où l’on se gorge de cocaïne pour célébrer et faire respecter à coups de kalachnikovs le jeûne du Ramadan

Où, pour assouvir une vengeance personnelle dans son travail ou dans sa vie familiale, il faut dorénavant fracasser un avion entier

Ou, tout en criant Allah Akbar et en déployant son drapeau noir, découper son patron au couteau de boucher et faire sauter une usine à gaz ….

Et où, après avoir abandonné l’Irak et bientôt l’Afghanistan aux djihadistes et se refusant toujours à nommer la cible de ses discrètes éliminations ciblées, le prétendu chef du Monde libre n’a pas de mots assez durs pour ceux qui insultent l’islam tout  prônant, à condition qu’il soit arc-en-ciel, l’amour pour tous (robots compris !) …

Pendant qu’étrangement silencieuses face aux exactions djihadistes, nos féministes n’ont d’yeux que pour les nouveaux damnés de la terre palestiniens …

Et qu’après le court sursaut de janvier dernier, nos orphelins du communisme nous confirment que nous n’avons pas affaire à une « radicalisation de l’Islam » mais plutôt à une « islamisation de la révolte radicale » …

Comment ne pas repenser …

A la fameuse tribune du New York Herald de 1854 …

Où, au lendemain de la déclaration de la Guerre de Crimée, un certain Karl Marx posait la question de l’existence de chrétiens sujets de l’empire turc face à un Coran …

Qui, disait-il, reprenant largement des écrits du diplomate français César Famin, divise le monde en territoires, entre Fidèles et Infidèles et entre Paix et Guerre, et réduit chrétiens comme juifs à l’oppression et à la misère ?

Declaration of War. – On the History of the Eastern Question
Karl Marx
New-York Herald Tribune
March 28, 1854
First published: in the New-York Daily Tribune, April 15;
Transcribed: by Andy Blunden;
London, Tuesday, March 28, 1854

War has at length been declared. The Royal Message was read yesterday in both Houses of Parliament; by Lord Aberdeen in the Lords, and by Lord J. Russell in the Commons. It describes the measures about to be taken as “active steps to oppose the encroachments of Russia upon Turkey.” To-morrow The London Gazette will publish the official notification of war, and on Friday the address in reply to the message will become the subject of the Parliamentary debates.

Simultaneously with the English declaration, Louis Napoleon has communicated a similar message to his Senate and Corps Législatif.

The declaration of war against Russia could no longer be delayed, after Captain Blackwood, the bearer of the Anglo-French ultimatissimum to the Czar, had returned, on Saturday last, with the answer that Russia would give to that paper no answer at all. The mission of Capt. Blackwood, however, has not been altogether a gratuitous one. It has afforded to Russia the month of March, that most dangerous epoch of the year, to Russian arms.

The publication of the secret correspondence between the Czar and the English Government, instead of provoking a burst of public indignation against the latter, has – incredibile dictu – the signal for the press, both weekly and daily, for congratulating England on the possession of so truly national a Ministry. I understand, however, that a meeting will be called together for the purpose of opening the eyes of a blinded British public on the real conduct of the Government. It is to be held on Thursday next in the Music Hall, Store-st.; and Lord Ponsonby, Mr. Layard, Mr. Urquhart, etc., are expected to take part in the proceedings.

The Hamburger Correspondent has the following:

“According to advices from St. Petersburg, which arrived here on the 16th inst., the Russian Government proposes to publish various other documents on the Eastern question. Among the documents destined for publication are some letters written by Prince Albert.”

It is a curious fact that the same evening on which the Royal Message was delivered in the Commons, the Government suffered their first defeat in the present session; the second reading of the Poor-Settlement and Removal bill having, notwithstanding the efforts of the Government, been adjourned to the 28th of April, by a division of 209 to 183. The person to whom the Government is indebted for this defeat, is no other than my Lord Palmerston.

“His lordship,” says The Times of this day, “has managed to put himself and his colleagues between two fires (the Tories and the Irish party) without much prospect of leaving them to settle it between themselves.”

We are informed that on the 12th inst. a treaty of triple alliance was signed between France, England and Turkey, but that, notwithstanding the personal application of the Sultan to the Grand Mufti, the latter supported by the corps of the Ulemas, refused to issue his fetva sanctioning the stipulation about the changes in the situation of the Christians in Turkey, as being in contradiction with the precepts of the Koran. This intelligence must be looked upon as being the more important, as it caused Lord Derby to make the following observation:

“I will only express my earnest anxiety that the Government will state whether there is any truth in the report that has been circulated during the last few days that in this convention entered into between England, France and Turkey, there are articles which will be of a nature to establish a protectorate on our part as objectionable at least, as that which, on the part of Russia, we have protested against.”

The Times of to-day, while declaring that the policy of the Government is directly opposed to that of Lord Derby adds:

“We should deeply regret if the bigotry of the Mufti or the Ulemas succeeded in opposing any serious resistance to this policy.”

In order to understand both the nature of the relations between the Turkish Government and the spiritual authorities of Turkey, and the difficulties in which the former is at present involved, with respect to the question of a protectorate over the Christian subjects of the Porte, that question which ostensibly lies at the bottom of all the actual complications in the East, it is necessary to cast a retrospective glance at its past history and development.

The Koran and the Mussulman legislation emanating from it reduce the geography and ethnography of the various people to the simple and convenient distinction of two nations and of two countries; those of the Faithful and of the Infidels. The Infidel is “harby,” i.e. the enemy. Islamism proscribes the nation of the Infidels, constituting a state of permanent hostility between the Mussulman and the unbeliever. In that sense the corsair-ships of the Berber States were the holy fleet of Islam. How, then, is the existence of Christian subjects of the Porte to be reconciled with the Koran?

“If a town,” says the Mussulman legislation, “surrenders by capitulation, and its habitants consent to become rayahs, that is, subjects of a Mussulman prince without abandoning their creed, they have to pay the kharatch (capitation tax), when they obtain a truce with the faithful, and it is not permitted any more to confiscate their estates than to take away their houses…. In this case their old churches form part of their property, with permission to worship therein. But they are not allowed to erect new ones. They have only authority for repairing them, and to reconstruct their decayed portions. At certain epochs commissaries delegated by the provincial governors are to visit the churches and sanctuaries of the Christians, in order to ascertain that no new buildings have been added under pretext of repairs. If a town is conquered by force, the inhabitants retain their churches, but only as places of abode or refuge, without permission to worship.”

Constantinople having surrendered by capitulation, as in like manner has the greater portion of European Turkey, the Christians there enjoy the privilege of living as rayahs, under the Turkish Government. This privilege they have exclusively by virtue of their agreeing to accept the Mussulman protection. It is, therefore, owing to this circumstance alone, that the Christians submit to be governed by the Mussulmans according to Mussulman law, that the patriarch of Constantinople, their spiritual chief, is at the same time their political representative and their Chief Justice. Wherever, in the Ottoman Empire, we find an agglomeration of Greek rayahs; the Archbishops and Bishops are by law members of the Municipal Councils, and, under the direction of the patriarch, [watch] over the repartition of the taxes imposed upon the Greeks. The patriarch is responsible to the Porte as to the conduct of his co-religionists. Invested with the right of judging the rayahs of his Church, he delegates this right to the metropolitans and bishops, in the limits of their dioceses, their sentences being obligatory for the executive officers, kadis, etc., of the Porte to carry out. The punishments which they have the right to pronounce are fines, imprisonment, the bastinade, and exile. Besides, their own church gives them the power of excommunication. Independent of the produce of the fines, they receive variable taxes on the civil and commercial law-suits. Every hierarchic scale among the clergy has its moneyed price. The patriarch pays to the Divan a heavy tribute in order to obtain his investiture, but he sells, in his turn, the archbishoprics and bishoprics to the clergy of his worship. The latter indemnify themselves by the sale of subaltern dignities and the tribute exacted from the popes. These, again, sell by retail the power they have bought from their superiors, and traffic in all acts of their ministry, such as baptisms, marriages, divorces, and testaments.

It is evident from this exposé that this fabric of theocracy over the Greek Christians of Turkey, and the whole structure of their society, has its keystone in the subjection of the rayah under the Koran, which, in its turn, by treating them as infidels – i.e., as a nation only in a religious sense – sanctioned the combined spiritual and temporal power of their priests. Then, if you abolish their subjection under the Koran by a civil emancipation, you cancel at the same time their subjection to the clergy, and provoke a revolution in their social, political and religious relations, which, in the first instance, must inevitably hand them over to Russia. If you supplant the Koran by a code civil, you must occidentalize the entire structure of Byzantine society.

Having described the relations between the Mussulman and his Christian subject, the question arises, what are the relations between the Mussulman and the unbelieving foreigner?

As the Koran treats all foreigners as foes, nobody will dare to present himself in a Mussulman country without having taken his precautions. The first European merchants, therefore, who risked the chances of commerce with such a people, contrived to secure themselves an exceptional treatment and privileges originally personal, but afterward extended to their whole nation. Hence the origin of capitulations. Capitulations are imperial diplomas, letters of privilege, octroyed by the Porte to different European nations, and authorizing their subjects to freely enter Mohammedan countries, and there to pursue in tranquillity their affairs, and to practice their worship. They differ from treaties in this essential point, that they are not reciprocal acts contradictorily debated between the contracting parties, and accepted by them on the condition of mutual advantages and concessions. On the contrary, the capitulations are one-sided concessions on the part of the Government granting them, in consequence of which they may be revoked at its pleasure. The Porte has, indeed, at several times nullified the privileges granted to one nation, by extending them to others; or repealed them altogether by refusing to continue their application. This precarious character of the capitulations made them an eternal source of disputes, of complaints on the part of Embassadors, and of a prodigious exchange of contradictory notes and firmans revived at the commencement of every new reign.

It was from these capitulations that arose the right of a protectorate of foreign powers, not over the Christian subjects of the Porte – the rayahs – but over their co-religionists visiting Turkey or residing there as foreigners. The first power that obtained such a protectorate was France. The capitulations between France and the Ottoman Porte made in 1535, under Soliman the Great and Francis I; in 1604 under Ahmed I and Henry IV; and in 1673 under Mohammed IV and Louis XIV, were renewed, confirmed, recapitulated, and augmented in the compilation of 1740, called “ancient and recent capitulations and treaties between the Court of France and the Ottoman Porte, renewed and augmented in the year 1740, A.D., and 1153 of the Hegira, translated (the first official translation sanctioned by the Porte) at Constantinople by M. Deval; Secretary Interpreter of the King, and his first Dragoman at the Ottoman Porte.” Art. 32 of this agreement constitutes the right of France to a protectorate over all monasteries professing the Frank religion to whatever nation they may belong, and of the Frank visitors of the Holy Places.

Russia was the first power that, in 1774, inserted the capitulation, imitated after the example of France, into a treaty – the treaty of Kainardji. Thus, in 1802, Napoleon thought fit to make the existence and maintenance of the capitulation the subject of an article of treaty, and to give it the character of synallagmatic contract.

In what relation then does the question of the Holy Places stand with the protectorate?

The question of the Holy Shrines is the question of a protectorate over the religious Greek Christian communities settled at Jerusalem, and over the buildings possessed by them on the holy ground, and especially over the Church of the Holy Sepulcher. It is to be understood that possession here does not mean proprietorship, which is denied to the Christians by the Koran, but only the right of usufruct. This right of usufruct excludes by no means the other communities from worshipping in the same place; the possessors having no other privilege besides that of keeping the keys, of repairing and entering the edifices, of kindling the holy lamp, of cleaning the rooms with the broom, and of spreading the carpets, which is an Oriental symbol of possession. In the same manner now, in which Christianity culminates at the Holy Place, the question of the protectorate is there found to have its highest ascension.

Parts of the Holy Places and of the Church of the Holy Sepulcher are possessed by the Latins, the Greeks, the Armenians, the Abyssinians, the Syrians, and the Copts. Between all these diverse pretendents there originated a conflict. The sovereigns of Europe who saw, in this religious quarrel, a question of their respective influences in the Orient, addressed themselves in the first instance to the masters of the soil, to fanatic and greedy Pashas, who abused their position. The Ottoman Porte and its agents adopting a most troublesome système de basculea gave judgment in turns favorable to the Latins, Greeks, and Armenians, asking and receiving gold from all hands, and laughing at each of them. Hardly had the Turks granted a firman, acknowledging the right of the Latins to the possession of a contested place, when the Armenians presented themselves with a heavier purse, and instantly obtained a contradictory firman. Same tactics with respect to the Greeks, who knew, besides, as officially recorded in different firmans of the Porte and “hudjets” (judgments) of its agents, how to procure false and apocryph titles. On other occasions the decisions of the Sultan’s Government were frustrated by the cupidity and ill-will of the Pashas and subaltern agents in Syria. Then it became necessary to resume negotiations, to appoint fresh commissaries, and to make new sacrifices of money. What the Porte formerly did from pecuniary considerations, in our days it has done from fear, with a view to obtain protection and favor. Having done justice to the reclamations of France and the Latins, it hastened to make the same conditions to Russia and the Greeks, thus attempting to escape from a storm which it felt powerless to encounter. There is no sanctuary, no chapel, no stone of the Church of the Holy Sepulcher, that had been left unturned for the purpose of constituting a quarrel between the different Christian communities.

Around the Holy Sepulcher we find an assemblage of all the various sects of Christianity, behind the religious pretensions of whom are concealed as many political and national rivalries.

Jerusalem and the Holy Places are inhabited by nations professing religions: the Latins, the Greeks, Armenians, Copts, Abyssinians, and Syrians. There are 2,000 Greeks, 1,000 Latins, 350 Armenians, 100 Copts, 20 Syrians, and 20 Abyssinians = 3,490. In the Ottoman Empire we find 13,730,000 Greeks, 2,400,000 Armenians, and 900,000 Latins. Each of these is again subdivided. The Greek Church, of which I treated above, the one acknowledging the Patriarch of Constantinople, essentially differs from the Greco-Russian, whose chief spiritual authority is the Czar; and from the Hellens, of whom the King and the Synod of Athens are the chief authorities. Similarly, the Latins are subdivided into the Roman Catholics, United Greeks, and Maronites; and the Armenians into Gregorian and Latin Armenians – the same distinctions holding good with the Copts and Abyssinians. The three prevailing religious nationalities at the Holy Places are the Greeks, the Latins, and the Armenians. The Latin Church may be said to represent principally Latin races, the Greek Church, Slav, Turko-Slav, and Hellenic races; and the other churches, Asiatic and African races.

Imagine all these conflicting peoples beleaguering the Holy Sepulcher, the battle conducted by the monks, and the ostensible object of their rivalry being a star from the grotto of Bethlehem, a tapestry, a key of a sanctuary, an altar, a shrine, a chair, a cushion – any ridiculous precedence!

In order to understand such a monastical crusade it is indispensable to consider firstly the manner of their living, and secondly, the mode of their habitation.

“All the religious rubbish of the different nations,” says a recent traveler, “live at Jerusalem separated from each other, hostile and jealous, a nomade population, incessantly recruited by pilgrimage or decimated by the plague and oppressions. The European dies or returns to Europe after some years; the pashas and their guards go to Damascus or Constantinople; and the Arabs fly to the desert. Jerusalem is but a place where every one arrives to pitch his tent and where nobody remains. Everybody in the holy city gets his livelihood from his religion – the Greeks or Armenians from the 12,000 or 13,000 pilgrims who yearly visit Jerusalem, and the Latins from the subsidies and aims of their co-religionists of France, Italy, etc.”

Besides their monasteries and sanctuaries, the Christian nations possess at Jerusalem small habitations or cells, annexed to the Church of the Holy Sepulcher, and occupied by the monks, who have to watch day and night that holy abode. At certain periods these monks are relieved in their duty by their brethren. These cells have but one door, opening into the interior of the Temple, while the monk guardians receive their food from without, through some wicket. The doors of the Church are closed, and guarded by Turks, who don’t open them except for money, and close it according to their caprice or cupidity.

The quarrels between churchmen are the most venomous, said Mazarin. Now fancy these churchmen, who not only have to live upon, but live in, these sanctuaries together!

To finish the picture, be it remembered that the fathers of the Latin Church, almost exclusively composed of Romans, Sardinians, Neapolitans, Spaniards and Austrians, are all of them jealous of the French protectorate, and would like to substitute that of Austria, Sardinia or Naples, the Kings of the two latter countries both assuming the title of King of Jerusalem; and that the sedentary population of Jerusalem numbers about 15,500 souls, of whom 4,000 are Mussulmans and 8,000 Jews. The Mussulmans, forming about a fourth part of the whole, and consisting of Turks, Arabs and Moors, are, of course, the masters in every respect, as they are in no way affected with the weakness of their Government at Constantinople. Nothing equals the misery and the sufferings of the Jews at Jerusalem, inhabiting the most filthy quarter of the town, called hareth-el-yahoud, the quarter of dirt, between the Zion and the Moriah, where their synagogues are situated – the constant objects of Mussulman oppression and intolerance, insulted by the Greeks, persecuted by the Latins, and living only upon the scanty alms transmitted by their European brethren. The Jews, however, are not natives, but from different and distant countries, and are only attracted to Jerusalem by the desire of inhabiting the Valley of Jehosaphat, and to die in the very places where the redemptor is to be expected.

“Attending their death,” says a French author, “they suffer and pray. Their regards turned to that mountain of Moriah, where once rose the temple of Solomon, and which they dare not approach, they shed tears on the misfortunes of Zion, and their dispersion over the world.”

To make these Jews more miserable, England and Prussia appointed, in 1840, an Anglican bishop at Jerusalem, whose avowed object is their conversion. He was dreadfully thrashed in 1845, and sneered at alike by Jews, Christians and Turks. He may, in fact, be stated to have been the first and only cause of a union between all the religions at Jerusalem.

It will now be understood why the common worship of the Christians at the Holy Places resolves itself into a continuance of desperate Irish rows between the diverse sections of the faithful; but that, on the other hand, these sacred rows merely conceal a profane battle, not only of nations but of races; and that the Protectorate of the Holy Places which appears ridiculous to the Occident but all important to the Orientals is one of the phases of the Oriental question incessantly reproduced, constantly stifled, but never solved.

Voir aussi:

A religion that sanctions violence
Patrick Sookhdeo
The Daily Telegraph
September 17, 2001

UNTIL recently, Islam has had a negative and violent image in the West, but now the trend is to focus on Islam as a religion of peace. Since the World Trade Centre attack, there has been a flood of statements and articles making these assertions. A recent BBC2 series formed part of this trend, as did John Casey’s article in praise of Islam in this newspaper. These sentiments were echoed by Tony Blair: last week he said that « such acts of infamy and cruelty are wholly contrary to the Islamic faith ».

We are often told that the word Islam means « peace ». We seem to have gone from one extreme to the other. Now that Islam is no longer demonised, it seems it can do no wrong. Perhaps the truth is that the two opposing strands need to be held together, instead of dismissing one or the other. The reality of Islam is more complex. Islam actually means « submission » – not quite the same as « peace ». Many horrific acts have been, and continue to be, perpetrated in the name of Islam, just as they have in the name of Christianity.

But, unlike Islam, Christianity does not justify the use of all forms of violence. Islam does.There have been reports that Muslims fear revenge attacks. In America and Britain, there have been stories of intimidation. Attacks on Muslims and on peace can never be justified, but the answer is not to forfeit justice or to ignore truth.

The contradictory reactions to the terrorist attacks – official condemnation at leadership level and support among many people – are an indication that Islam is not always « a religion of peace ». There are so many Muslims rejoicing at the tragic loss of American lives and the humiliation of the American government that they cannot be dismissed as « a few extremists ».

Sura 9, verse 5 of the Koran reads, « Then fight and slay the Pagans wherever ye find them. And seize them, beleaguer them, And lie in wait for them, In every stratagem (of war). » The note that accompanies this verse in the respected A Yusuf Ali translation states that « when war becomes inevitable it must be pursued with vigour. The fighting may take the form of slaughter, or capture, or siege, or ambush and other stratagems.

« In the Muslim faith, the Koran is believed to be the very word of God, applying to all people, in all times, in all places. It is the source of the Muslim faith and the law that orders the Islamic way of life. Killing is not totally forbidden: in fact, it was through conquest that Islam spread. In Indonesia today, non-Muslims are offered a choice of conversion to Islam or death. The argument that the above verse was written to refer only to a particular time and people is not valid. The Koran is considered immutable – a fact that has been repeatedly employed to justify verses that are discriminatory toward women, such as the unequal inheritance shares given to women in line with Sura 4, verse 11.

The development of Shariah, Islamic law, created a society where non-Muslims lived as second-class citizens subject to and humiliated by numerous laws. Those who converted from Islam to another religion were killed, a practice that continues in Afghanistan, Iran and Saudi Arabia. Koran Sura 5, verse 85, which speaks of enmity between Muslims and non-Muslims, reads: « Strongest among men in enmity to the Believers wilt thou Find the Jews and Pagans. »

The World Trade Centre attack cannot be dismissed as merely the work of a small group of extremists. The Muslims celebrating the tragedy in America are doubtless recalling the words of the Koran, urging Muslims to « fight a mighty nation, fight them until they embrace Islam ». Sheikh Omar Bakri Mohamed, leader of the radical Islamic organisation Al-Muhajiroun, last week indicated that civilian targets were wrong, but military and government targets are legitimate. The Kuwaiti paper Al-Watan argued in favour of the Islamic justification for killing non-combatants. It referred specifically to Jews, but its argument could apply to any non-combatants living in a democracy. Citizens vote for the government and pay taxes to support it. And so, the argument goes, citizens can be considered as potential soldiers or as being « involved in complementary activities ».

To recognise that no culture or people are without fault and that all should be subject to criticism is not racism; it is an honesty that emphasises our common humanity. The way to increase respect between people of different faiths is not to gloss over our problems but to admit them, face up to them and together seek to deal with them. Violence occurs in all religions, but in most it is not sanctioned and although there might be moderate elements within Islam, it is the extremist elements that have tended to dominate the development of the religion, with often tragic consequences.

(Patrick Sookhdeo is the director of the Institute for the Study of Islam and Christianity)

Voir encore:

Alain Bertho : « Une islamisation de la révolte radicale »

Entretien par Catherine Tricot

Regards

11 mai 2015

Pour prendre la mesure des attentats de janvier et comprendre comment la révolte peut prendre de telles formes, Alain Bertho nous invite à appréhender le point de vue de leurs auteurs, et souligne l’absence actuelle de toute proposition de radicalité positive.

Le récent essai d’Emmanuel Todd Qui est Charlie ? a déjà fait couler beaucoup d’encre. Alain Bertho part de prémisses proches des siennes. Mais son cheminement ultérieur diffère sensiblement.

Alain Bertho est anthropologue, directeur de la Maison des sciences de l’homme de Paris-Nord. Il travaille depuis dix ans sur les émeutes urbaines dans le monde. Entretien extrait de L’Enquête sur l’engagement des jeunes du numéro de printemps de Regards.

Regards. Comment avez-vous interprété les attaques terroristes du début d’année à Paris ?

Alain Bertho. Quelques jours après les attentats des 7 et 9 janvier, j’ai lu Underground. Dans ce livre basé essentiellement sur des entretiens, le romancier japonais Haruki Murakami tente de comprendre l’attaque meurtrière au gaz sarin perpétrée par la secte Aum dans le métro de Tokyo en 1995. Il a pour cela interrogé des victimes, dont il restitue les témoignages singuliers, et des membres de la secte. Son travail montre à quel point, dans ce genre de situations, deux expériences subjectives irréconciliables sont en concurrence sur le sens de l’événement : celle des victimes et celles des meurtriers. En réalité, l’expérience des victimes est celle d’un pourquoi sans réponse. La répétition en boucle des témoignages et de l’extrême douleur ne produit pas de sens. Cette expérience de souffrance physique et subjective est la matière première possible pour construire des énoncés sur la période qui s’ouvre. On l’a vu en janvier en France, on l’a revu à Tunis en mars. Quand « les mots ne suffisent plus », voire quand « il n’y a pas de mots » pour le dire, c’est que l’événement est au sens propre « impensable ». C’est ce que nous montre Haruki Murakami dans les deux tiers de son livre consacrés aux passagers du métro dont la vie a été bouleversée, voire anéantie par l’attentat. Mais ce qui fait le sens de l’acte et assure sa continuité subjective avant, pendant et après, c’est ce que pensent ceux qui en ont été les acteurs ou auraient pu l’être. C’est ce qu’interroge Haruki Murakami en donnant la parole à des membres d’Aum. Il nous donne à lire une intellectualité en partage entre quelques assassins et de beaucoup plus paisibles Japonais au nom desquels les meurtres ont été commis. Il nous montre comment, si le passage à l’acte est toujours exceptionnel, il s’enracine dans une vision du monde et une expérience partagée. C’est l’élément qui nous manque aujourd’hui pour comprendre complètement les 7-8-9 janvier 2015.

« Nous n’avons pas affaire à un phénomène sectaire isolé ni à une « radicalisation de l’Islam » mais plutôt à une islamisation de la révolte radicale. »

Comment reconstituer, compléter le tableau ?

À notre tour, nous devons faire ce travail et comprendre le sens des meurtres de Paris. Notre subjectivité, et on peut le comprendre, s’y est refusée. Nous avons été sidérés, choqués. Pour faire le deuil de ce traumatisme, il a été nécessaire de construire un récit qui n’est pas celui des meurtriers. Mais malgré l’horreur que cela nous inspire, il faut pourtant comprendre le sens qu’ils ont donné à leur acte. Le qualificatif de terroriste est beaucoup trop général et générique. Nous avons affaire à la rencontre d’expériences personnelles et d’une figure contemporaine et mortifère de la révolte que la seule logique policière et militaire ne parviendra pas à anéantir. Les actes d’Amedy Coulibaly et des frères Kouachi, comme ceux de Mohammed Merah, viennent au terme d’histoires singulières, d’histoires françaises. Comme celles des quelque mille jeunes français partis en Syrie. Comme celle de ceux, bien plus nombreux, qui ne regardent pas forcément avec autant d’horreur que nous cette guerre annoncée contre l’occident corrupteur. De la même façon, les salafistes tunisiens dont sont issus les meurtriers du Bardo sont particulièrement bien implantés à Sidi Bouzid et Kasserine, dans le berceau de la révolution de décembre 2010-janvier 2011. Pire : nombre d’entre eux ont été les acteurs de cette révolution et n’étaient pas salafistes à l’époque.

Est-ce que des événements passés peuvent aider à comprendre ce qui s’enracine ici et maintenant ? Comment comprenez-vous la conversion à l’Islam de jeunes sans rapport aucun avec la culture arabe, parfois issus de milieux très engagés à gauche ?

Je pense qu’il nous faut comprendre que nous n’avons pas affaire à un phénomène sectaire isolé, et surtout que nous n’avons pas affaire à une « radicalisation de l’Islam », mais plutôt à une islamisation de la révolte radicale. Alors que les salafistes tunisiens actuels les plus actifs ne l’étaient pas lorsqu’ils étaient mobilisés contre Ben Ali, on sait que les candidats français au djihad sont bien souvent des convertis ou, à l’instar de Coulibaly et des frères Kouachi, des pratiquants tardifs. La vérité de leurs mobiles et de leur pensée ne doit pas tant être cherchée dans la théologie, de l’Islam en général ou du wahhabisme en particulier, mais bien dans la cohérence contemporaine des propositions politiques qu’ils portent. Si la confessionnalisation du monde et des affrontements est bien au cœur de ces propositions, ils sont loin d’en avoir le monopole aujourd’hui. Cette confessionnalisation en a mobilisé d’autres, en France ou ailleurs, dans la rue (la « Manif pour tous ») comme dans les gouvernements. L’événement majeur qui nous a conduits là est sans aucun doute l’effondrement des États communistes et du communisme à la fin du 20e siècle et, de proche en proche, l’effondrement de la figure moderne de la politique qui faisait de la conquête du pouvoir le levier des transformations collectives. Nous avons perdu dans le même mouvement l’espoir révolutionnaire et le sens de la représentation élective. Nous avons perdu en même temps un certain rapport populaire et politique au temps historique, dans lequel le passé permettait de comprendre le présent et le présent de préparer l’avenir.

« Qu’est-ce qu’une révolte qui n’a plus ni avenir ni espoir ? Quand on a cela en tête, on comprend mieux la puissance subjective des propositions djihadistes. »

Quelles formes prend la rupture de ce lien ?

Pour toute une génération qui arrive aujourd’hui à l’âge adulte, une évidence s’impose : au bout du chemin emprunté par leurs parents, qu’ils aient immigré pour une vie meilleure, milité pour des lendemains qui chantent ou œuvré à leur propre « réussite », il y a une impasse. Plus d’espoir collectif de révolution ou de progrès social et peu d’espoir de réussite individuelle. Le compte à rebours de la planète semble commencé sans que rien n’arrête la course à la catastrophe. Avec la mondialisation financière, la vie publique est dominée par la corruption des États et le mensonge des gouvernements. Dans ces conditions, les valeurs de la République peuvent apparaître quelque peu désincarnées. La référence obsessionnelle à la mémoire s’est substituée à la réflexivité du récit historique. Et nous avons perdu le sens du passé parce que nous n’avons plus de subjectivité collective de l’avenir. Tout ceci, nous le savons peu ou prou. Mais il nous faut en réfléchir les articulations et les conséquences. Qu’est-ce qu’une révolte qui n’a plus ni avenir ni espoir ? Quand on a cela en tête, on comprend mieux la puissance subjective des propositions djihadistes. Le seul avenir proposé est la mort : celle « des mécréants, des juifs et des croisés » comme celle des martyres qui finiront au paradis en emmenant avec eux soixante-dix personnes. Quand on a cela en tête, on comprend mieux aussi la publicité faite par Daech autour des destructions des vestiges du passé et du patrimoine culturel. Si ce passé nous a menti sur notre avenir, il ne nous servirait plus qu’à mentir encore.

Le problème est que ce choix se tourne vers un islam des plus rétrogrades, des plus intrusifs…

En effet… Le salafisme, puisque c’est de lui qu’il s’agit, repose sur un sens donné à la vie qui ne laisse aucune place à la liberté. C’est l’islam dans une version des plus totalisantes. Un de ses attraits repose sur sa maîtrise de l’intime, la répression des désirs et des plaisirs, un cadre proposé pour tous les actes et les moments de la vie comme un acte de résistance au capitalisme et à « l’occident corrupteur ». Dans toute organisation de la révolte, il y a une figure de la libération possible et une contrainte de lutte, une discipline, et une éthique. Nous vivons l’effondrement des constructions qui ont associé ces deux dimensions à la fois libératrices et contraignantes. Le communisme a été au 20e siècle sa forme majeure. Il donnait sens à la souffrance, à la vie quotidienne en même temps qu’il proposait une subversion. Nous sommes toujours dans ce moment qui suit l’effondrement du communisme, mais aussi celui du tiers-mondisme. Le cycle politique des 19e et 20e siècles se clôt.

« Pendant ces dix dernières années, une génération s’est révoltée. Si rien ne semble bouger, comment s’étonner que certains décident de passer à la « phase 2″ ? »

La demande ne s’exprime pas que sur le terrain spirituel ou religieux. Elle prend des formes politiques explicites, par exemple avec EI, l’État islamique.

Il y a une demande de politique et de cadre qui se retrouve dans le nom que se donne ce mouvement radical, l’État islamique. Il n’a rien d’un État au sens moderne du terme : il ne garantit ni la paix ni le respect de l’altérité. Il est au contraire entièrement fondé sur la guerre et le massacre de l’autre. Il n’est ni national ni territorial, mais à vocation universaliste et multi-situé avec le jeu des « allégeances » qui ne vont que se multiplier. Mais c’est une puissance de combat au service de cette radicalité mortifère, une puissance qui – à l’instar de la puissance malfaisante du Cinquième élément de Luc Besson – se renforce et gagne en influence quand on l’attaque.

Peut-on faire un parallèle entre l’extrême gauche hyperpolitisée passée au terrorisme dans les années 1970 et ces actes individuels sans revendication ?

L’effondrement de la catégorie d’avenir dont nous avons parlé, et que l’anthropologue Arjun Appadurai a mis au centre de son dernier livre The Future as Cultural Fact : Essays on the Global Condition, est sans doute une des dimensions de la vague émeutière qui a touché le monde entier depuis le début du siècle. Ces dernières années, cette vague a été prolongée par de grandes mobilisations collectives comme ce que l’on a appelé le printemps arabe, la mobilisation brésilienne contre la Coupe du monde, la mobilisation turque contre le projet urbain de la place Taksim… Nous venons de vivre une séquence mondiale d’affrontements entre les peuples et les pouvoirs, équivalente du « Printemps des peuples » de 1848, des révolutions communistes d’après la première guerre mondiale, de 1968. Il y a deux devenirs possibles à ses séquences : la construction d’une figure durable de la révolte et de l’espoir qui s’incarne dans des mouvements politiques organisés et des perspectives institutionnelles, ou la dérive vers le désespoir et la violence minoritaire. Après 1968, on a connu les Brigades rouges, la Bande à Baader, des dérives terroristes au Japon. Pendant ces dix dernières années, une génération s’est révoltée. Si rien ne semble bouger, comment s’étonner que certains décident de passer à la « phase 2″ ? C’est l’expérience biographique des meurtriers de janvier. Le 17 septembre 2000, Amedy Coulibaly, qui a alors dix-huit ans, vole des motos avec un copain, Ali Rezgui, dix-neuf ans. Ils sont poursuivis par la police… qui tire, et Ali meurt dans ses bras sur un parking de Combs-la-Ville. Aucune enquête n’est ouverte sur la bavure. Cela provoque deux jours d’émeute à la Grande-Borne. Où sont aujourd’hui tous les acteurs des émeutes de 2005 ? Et tous ceux qui les ont regardés faire avec sympathie ? Comment regardent-ils la vie et la politique ? Quel regard ont-ils porté sur les événements de janvier ? On ne les a pas écoutés avant, ni pendant, ni après, ni depuis le 7 janvier. Le 8 au soir, je ne me suis pas rendu à la République, mais au rassemblement devant la mairie de Saint-Denis, ville où j’habite. J’ai rarement vu autant de monde, aussi ému. Mais en même temps, j’y ai rarement vu aussi peu « tout le monde ». Il y avait certainement là tous les réseaux des militants. Mais si peu de gens ordinaires, d’inconnus, de gens et de jeunes « des quartiers », comme on dit. Pris dans notre émotion collective, avons-nous été attentifs au clivage silencieux qui était en train de prendre forme ?

« Les vraies valeurs d’une génération sont celles qu’elle se construit en retravaillant le passé à l’épreuve de sa propre expérience. La transmission n’y suffit pas. »

Comment avez-vous vécu la grande manifestation du 11 janvier ?

C’est un événement complexe. Je ne sais pas si nous avons déjà connu dans l’histoire une mobilisation aussi massive, construite sur du désarroi. Je l’ai un peu vécue comme une marche funèbre, l’enterrement de la génération de 68. C’est sur ce désarroi que l’État a pu construire un sens auquel il a donné un nom : « l’esprit du 11 janvier ». Il y a dans l’expression « Je suis Charlie » au moins deux choses qu’il nous faut éclaircir. D’abord le « je » qui n’est pas d’emblée un « nous » sommes Charlie. Car le nous ne préexiste pas au désarroi, il se construit dans le partage de l’émotion et dans les rassemblements. C’est pourquoi il est idéologiquement plastique. Ensuite il y a Charlie. Car il y a eu trois catégories de victimes : les « mécréants » (Charlie), les juifs (l’Hypercacher) et les « croisés » (le policier du 11e arrondissement et la policière de Montrouge). Mohammed Merah s’en était déjà pris aux juifs et aux « croisés » sans susciter tant d’émotion. Et gageons que si Coulibaly avait agi seul et si les frères Kouachi n’avaient pas attaqué Charlie, la mobilisation n’aurait absolument pas été la même. Quelque chose s’est noué autour de l’attaque d’un journal peu connu et peu lu, devenu plus sûrement le symbole d’une liberté collective que ne l’aurait été peut-être un autre organe de presse ayant beaucoup plus pignon sur rue. C’est aussi à une butte témoin des années 60-70 que s’en sont pris, sans le savoir, les assassins, à des souvenirs d’enfance et de jeunesse, aux dernières traces d’une révolte juvénile d’un autre âge. Car pour une part, comme l’ont dit des collégiens à leurs enseignants, on a aussi assassiné des « papys ». Mais une part du malentendu national est là. D’une certaine façon, une équipe héritière de mai 68 a mené jusqu’au bout des batailles devenues décalées par rapport aux enjeux d’aujourd’hui. Charlie a inscrit son irrévérence face à l’islam dans la lignée de son opposition aux églises et aux dogmes qui bloquent la libération de la société. Ils n’ont pas pris la mesure qu’en France au 21e siècle, s’en prendre ainsi à l’Islam, c’était aussi blesser les gens dominés dont c’était un point d’appui éthique pour faire face à la souffrance sociale.

« L’esprit du 11 janvier » n’a pas opéré sur vous…

Une fois encore, qui maîtrise le sens de l’événement ? Qui le construit ? C’est le pouvoir qui parle de « l’esprit du 11 janvier ». Je le redis, le consensus de l’émotion s’est construit sur un non-dit. Les incidents autour de la minute de silence ont été révélateurs de ce non-dit. Et plutôt que d’entendre le malaise qui s’exprimait alors, ils ont été au sens propre « réduits au silence », soumis à l’opprobre général, voire judiciarisés. On est ainsi passé de l’émotion partagée à l’émotion obligatoire. Pense-t-on inculquer par autorité les valeurs de la République ? On sait bien, depuis au moins une génération, que ces valeurs sont aussi des promesses non tenues. L’obligation d’y adhérer est une violence de plus. L’une des grandes faiblesses du monde institutionnel est de penser que l’on peut répondre par les valeurs du passé, par la transmission. Les vraies valeurs d’une génération sont celles qu’elle se construit en retravaillant le passé à l’épreuve de sa propre expérience. La transmission n’y suffit pas. Le propre des valeurs est de donner un sens éthique à l’expérience. C’est hélas ce qui fait, pour certains, le sens du djihad et son attrait.

« La conversion au djihadisme est aujourd’hui une figure possible de la révolte. »

Quel rapport entre les djihadistes d’ici, qui partent en Syrie, et ceux qui ont contesté la minute de silence ?

Nous sommes face à des trajectoires subjectives diverses et pour une part disjointes. C’est une erreur grossière d’assimiler ceux qui ont contesté la minute de silence à des candidats au djihad, ou même à ses thuriféraires. Et même tous ceux qui partent en Syrie ne sont pas forcément voués au meurtre individuel. Il y a dans ce passage à l’acte ultime une part de décrochage irrationnel. Mais il y a un contexte, des vécus en écho sinon en partage. Comme à d’autres époques, ce contexte est aujourd’hui assez puissant pour polariser des décrochages psychiques, voire donner un sens contemporain à la folie. Pour les jeunes de la Grande Borne, Amédy Coulibaly est identifié comme « perché », autrement dit un peu cassé dans sa tête. De quel contexte subjectif est-il question ici ? Il s’agit d’une expérience en partage, un désarroi et une révolte face à un monde politique, médiatique, institutionnel qui ne prend pas en compte le malaise ou la souffrance d’une partie des classes populaires, qui les confessionnalise et les stigmatise. C’est plus que l’expérience d’une « exclusion » objective. C’est l’expérience collective d’une négation subjective. Ce qu’ils ressentent n’a pas d’existence officielle.

Quelles sont les conséquences de ce déni d’existence ?

Il ne faut pas sous-estimer les effets dévastateurs de cette expérience populaire : l’expérience du mensonge permanent des discours politiques et journalistiques à leur propre endroit. Cette expérience est destructrice des repères sur la notion même de vérité et alimente toutes les rumeurs et tous les complotismes dont se repaissent Alain Soral et ses amis. Si le « système » gouverne avec le mensonge, toute parole autorisée fut-elle scientifique peut être frappée du sceau du soupçon. D’autre part, la négation de la souffrance alimente toutes les mises en concurrence victimaires. De ce point de vue, l’influence de Dieudonné comme héro “anti-système” aurait dû être davantage regardée comme un symptôme plus global et pas une dérive morale solitaire. Mais l’indifférence générale à l’islamophobie a aussi ouvert la voie à un un renouveau antisémite bien au-delà de ceux qui en étaient les victimes. N’en déplaise au président du Crif, les profanateurs du cimetière de Sarre-Union en février n’étaient pas musulmans. Le résultat, aujourd’hui, est que si l’islamophobie progresse, l’antisémitisme aussi. En vis-à-vis de l’extrême droite officiellement islamophobe du FN, un terreau est aujourd’hui prêt pour une autre extrême droite, “révolutionnaire” comme on disait, populaire et antisémite. En vis-à-vis de l’extrême droite classiquement islamophobe du FN, un terreau est aujourd’hui prêt pour une autre extrême droite, « révolutionnaire » comme on disait, populaire et antisémite.

Et maintenant ?

Une période s’achève… La conversion au djihadisme est aujourd’hui une figure possible de la révolte. La réponse à ce drame n’est certainement pas une figure de l’ordre, fût-elle républicaine. La réponse viendra d’une figure alternative et contemporaine de la révolte, une révolte qui ne se place pas sur le terrain de la négation de l’avenir, de la négation du passé et de la haine de la pensée. Les deux questions clefs qui sont devant nous sont celle du possible et celle de la paix. « Podemos », nous dit le mouvement d’Iglesias en Espagne. Quand la financiarisation au pouvoir nous enferme dans des calculs de probabilités et de risques, il est urgent d’ouvrir des possibles sans lesquels l’avenir n’est qu’un mot creux. Et quand la guerre ou la menace de guerre (ou de terrorisme) tend à devenir un mode de gouvernement, il est temps de redonner un sens à une perspective de paix collective qui ne passe pas par une politique sécuritaire ni par des frappes aériennes un peu partout dans le monde. C’est peut-être aussi cela que nous ont dit les manifestants du 11 janvier. Je ne suis pas sûr qu’ils aient été bien entendus sur ce point.

Voir encore:

Attentat en Isère : Yassin Salhi voulait « frapper les esprits »
Le Figaro
Christophe Cornevin
29/06/2015

VIDÉO – Trois jours après l’attaque de Saint-Quentin-Fallavier, le principal suspect affirme ne pas avoir agi au nom de la religion. Sa mère et sa soeur ont assuré qu’il était parti en Syrie en 2009.
Au terme de 72 heures de garde à vue, Yassin Salhi incarne en apparence la forme inédite d’un terroriste hybride qui applique les méthodes barbares d’un bourreau islamiste pour assouvir une vengeance personnelle, où se mêle crise de couple et conflit dans l’entreprise. Devant les policiers, Salhi a fini par reconnaître l’assassinat d’Hervé Cornara, directeur commercial de la société de transports qu’il avait rejointe en mars dernier.

Son plan aurait été prémédité en 48 heures, après s’être fait réprimander par son patron pour une histoire de palette renversée. Même si l’altercation est confirmée par un autre employé, l’explication est cependant prise avec retenue par les enquêteurs, comme s’il s’agissait d’un élément périphérique. La veille au soir de son effroyable équipée, Salhi aurait eu en outre un vif échange de mots avec celle qui est son épouse depuis dix ans. Lui, la considérant comme «pas assez religieuse». Elle, demandant le divorce. En audition, Salhi a commencé à livrer une amorce de scénario émaillé de zones opaques.

Lundi après-midi, Salhi refusait toujours de reconnaître la moindre coloration terroriste dans son acte
Porteur de deux drapeaux ornés de la «Chahada», la profession de foi musulmane, d’un couteau et d’une arme longue factice, le chauffeur-livreur se serait rendu vers 7h30 au siège de sa société avant de forcer son patron à monter dans le Peugeot Boxer de l’entreprise. Il l’aurait étranglé, ce que les légistes n’ont pas encore confirmé, sur la route menant à l’usine Air Products & Chemicals de Saint-Quentin-Fallavier. En chemin, sur un parking situé à 500 mètres à peine du site classé Seveso, il dit avoir stationné son véhicule afin de décapiter sa victime. Toujours selon lui, il aurait ensuite accroché la tête du directeur commercial aux grilles pour «frapper les esprits», sans pouvoir expliquer pourquoi il a cru bon de l’encadrer de deux bannières islamiques.

Lundi après-midi, Salhi refusait toujours de reconnaître la moindre coloration terroriste dans son acte tout comme il conteste, affirme une source informée, «toute religiosité dans son passage à l’acte». «Ce personnage peut avoir des problèmes personnels et une vie compliquée car chacun à son histoire, mais cela ne saurait occulter le caractère terroriste de sa démarche», affirme un policier de haut rang.

Qui est ce Français destinataire du «selfie» macabre?
Le mode opératoire de la décapitation et de la tête accrochée à une chaîne qui reprend le code des mises en scène de l’État islamique diffusées sur Internet est jugé, de même source, comme «dépourvus de toute ambiguïté». En outre, Yassin Salhi a envoyé deux clichés de ses exactions vers un numéro canadien via l’application Whatsapp, dont un selfie avec la tête de sa victime, à Sébastien alias Younes V., 30 ans, combattant volontaire français enrôlé sous la bannière de Daech, dans le fief de Raqqa. Or ce technicien en logistique converti au milieu des années 2000 est originaire de Besançon, à l’instar de Yassin Salhi qui le considère comme son «seul ami».

Les deux hommes se fréquentaient depuis 2006. L’un a quitté le Doubs avec femme et enfant de 18 mois pour la Syrie en novembre dernier, l’autre le mois suivant pour échouer dans l’Isère. Pendant leur garde à vue, la mère et la sœur de Salhi ont assuré que Yassin était parti lui aussi en Syrie en 2009, soit un an avant la guerre, sans qu’aucun élément matériel accrédite cette thèse. Son enracinement radical est aussi corroboré par son ex-appartenance à un groupe gravitant en 2006 à Pontarlier autour de Frédéric Jean Salvi, alias Ali ou «le Grand Ali», ex-trafiquant devenu gourou converti à l’islam radical en prison. En 2010, Les autorités indonésiennes l’avaient désigné comme suspect dans un projet d’attentat à la voiture piégée dans leur pays. Le Français avait toutefois échappé au coup de filet sur l’île de Java.

Aucun élément ne permet pour l’heure de le relier à l’assassinat et à l’action terroriste qui a endeuillé l’Isère. Aucune revendication ne permettait lundi soir d’établir que le tueur ait agi sous mandat d’une organisation terroriste.

Voir également:

Le scénario barbare de l’attentat de l’Isère
Christophe Cornevin
Le Figaro

26/06/2015

Yassin Salhi a décapité son employeur avant de tenter de faire sauter une usine de gaz industriels.
La nouvelle attaque terroriste qui a frappé la France, six mois après les attentats de janvier, vient de franchir une étape supplémentaire dans l’horreur. Elle témoigne d’une mise en scène effroyable et moyenâgeuse, inédite sur le territoire national et qui porte le sceau de la barbarie islamiste. Ce que redoutaient tant les services de renseignements, à savoir une décapitation perpétrée sur notre sol, est survenu vendredi dans l’Isère.

Yassin Salhi, chauffeur-livreur de 35 ans travaillant pour une société de transport de la région, se présente à 9 h 28 au volant de son Peugeot Boxer devant l’usine du groupe américain Air Products, spécialisée dans la production de gaz industriels, et située dans un site sensible classé Seveso, à Saint-Quentin-Fallavier, entre Lyon et Bourgoin-Jallieu, non loin de l’aéroport Saint-Exupéry. Arborant une courte barbe récemment taillée, Yassin Salhi est fiché des services de renseignements. S’illustrant par une brutale radicalisation au contact d’un prêcheur virulent originaire de Pontarlier (Doubs) d’où il est natif, ce père de trois enfants fait l’objet dès 2006 d’une fiche S (pour «Sûreté de l’État»). Classée niveau 13 sur une échelle de vigilance allant jusqu’à 16, elle n’avait pas été renouvelée en 2008. L’islamiste radical, qui n’a pas de casier judiciaire, était cependant toujours suivi en raison de sa proximité depuis 2013 avec la mouvance salafiste.

Il dévisse les bonbonnes de gaz avant d’y mettre le feu
Comme s’il effectuait sa maraude régulière, l’islamiste, connu des employés, sonne au portail et engage son véhicule badgé lui donnant l’autorisation de franchir un premier périmètre de sécurité. Salhi longe un mur, accélère soudain et percute de plein fouet les grilles d’une seconde zone plus protégée. Blessé dans la violence du choc, comme en témoignent des entailles assez profondes sur le visage, il parvient à descendre de sa voiture, à se rendre dans un hangar couvert rempli de bonbonnes d’Air liquide, de gaz et d’acétone qu’il dévisse tour à tour avant d’y mettre le feu. Alerté par une forte explosion et un début d’incendie, un sapeur-pompier des services d’incendie et de secours de l’Isère (Sdis) découvre le terroriste à 10 heures. Avec courage et sang-froid, il empoigne Yassin Salhi, qui résiste. Le soldat du feu le ceinture et le maintient au sol le temps de l’arrivée des renforts. Alertée, une patrouille de la gendarmerie départementale dépêchée sur place découvre, médusée, une tête décapitée, attachée à l’aide d’une chaîne au grillage d’enceinte de l’usine et encadrée de deux grandes bannières noire et blanche supportant des inscriptions en arabe, qui s’avéreront correspondre à la Shahada (profession de foi musulmane). À l’aplomb de la Peugeot Boxer partiellement détruite par le souffle de la déflagration, gît un corps démembré. Un couteau a été ramassé non loin.

La victime, Hervé C., âgée de 54 ans, n’est autre que le directeur commercial de la société ATC Transport où Yassin Salhi est salarié depuis mars dernier. Selon toute vraisemblance, le chef d’entreprise a été assassiné et décapité avant que Yassin Salhi ne pénètre dans l’usine et déclenche des explosions. Deux caméras de vidéosurveillance ont filmé de manière intermittente le chauffeur qui a préalablement placé la tête tranchée de son employeur avant de passer à l’action. Comme si l’ensemble de cette abjecte équipée avait été préméditée et scénarisée bien en amont.

Quatre personnes placées en garde à vue
Lancés aux trousses d’hypothétiques complices du terroriste, les policiers de la Sous-direction antiterroriste (Sdat) et de la Direction générale de la sécurité intérieure (DGSI) ont mené une série d’opérations. Au total, quatre personnes ont été placées en garde à vue. Outre Yassin Salhi, un suspect de 33 ans a notamment été interpellé par un peloton de surveillance et d’intervention de la gendarmerie (PSIG) dans la matinée après avoir été repéré alors qu’il passait et repassait à bord d’une camionnette devant l’usine d’Air Products comme s’il faisait une reconnaissance. Ce personnage intéresse d’autant plus les enquêteurs que son passé judiciaire comporte des antécédents liés à des menaces de type terroriste.

En milieu d’après-midi, les policiers d’élite du Raid ont mené à Saint-Priest une perquisition au domicile du bourreau présumé, et la sœur et l’épouse de ce dernier ont été à leur tour placées en garde à vue. «Tous les services sont mobilisés pour faire avancer l’enquête», a prévenu Bernard Cazeneuve, venu rapidement sur les lieux de l’attentat djihadiste puisqu’il était en déplacement devant la 65e promotion des élèves commissaires de police à Saint-Cyr-au-Mont-d’Or, dans la périphérie de Lyon.

Alors qu’une vive émotion mêlée de dégoût s’est une fois encore emparée de la population, le branle-bas de combat a été déclenché au plus haut sommet de l’État. Le président François Hollande, qui participait à un sommet européen à Bruxelles, l’a écourté pour venir présider un conseil restreint à 15 h 30 dans la capitale. Le premier ministre, Manuel Valls, depuis l’Amérique du Sud, a, lui, ordonné une «vigilance renforcée» sur tous les sites sensibles de la région Rhône-Alpes, avant d’écourter lui aussi son voyage. Le plan Vigipirate a été hissé au seuil «alerte maximale» sur l’ensemble de la région pour trois jours. Les contrôles vont se multiplier dans les gares et autour des sites sensibles jusqu’à lundi, date symbolique du premier anniversaire de l’État islamique.

Voir encore:

Alexandra Laignel-Lavastine : «Face à l’islamisme, certains intellectuels «progressistes» sont dangereux»

propos recueillis par Alexandre Devecchio
Le Figaro

27/06/2015

FIGAROVOX/GRAND ENTRETIEN : Dans son essai La pensée égarée, Alexandra Laignel-Lavastine explore plus d’une décennie de capitulation des « élites » face à la montée de l’islamisme radical. Après l’attentat de Saint-Quentin- Fallavier, elle a accordé un entretien fleuve à FigaroVox.


Alexandra Laignel-Lavastine est philosophe et historienne des idées. Elle a publié chez Grasset La pensée égarée , Islamisme, populisme, antisémitisme: essai sur les penchants suicidaires de l’Europe.


FIGAROVOX: Dans votre dernier livre, La Pensée égarée, rédigé pour l’essentiel avant le traumatisme de Charlie, vous estimez que nous n’avons pas pris la mesure des attentats de janvier. Les événements vous donnent tragiquement raison. Ces nouvelles attaques vous ont- elles surprises?

ALEXANDRA LAIGNEL-LAVASTINE : C’est plutôt l’étonnement général qui me surprend. Un intellectuel musulman laïc et démocrate me lançait il y a quelques jours: «Les intellectuels progressistes européens se comportent à l’égard des islamistes comme des collabos!». Sévère, mais juste. Jusqu’à présent, les tenants du politiquement correct ont de loin préféré avoir tort avec les islamo-fascistes qu’avoir raison avec les réalistes. Et ce, au nom d’un antifascisme hors de saison, ce qui constitue le comble du paradoxe! Après avoir trop longtemps baissé les bras face au communautarisme et à l’islamisme par crainte de se voir traité d’«islamophobes», il y aurait urgence à ce que nous redescendions de la planète mars pour faire place au réel. Et au courage.

Que nous apprend le monde réel? Qu’une guerre ouverte a été déclarée au monde occidental et à ses valeurs humanistes et universalistes les plus précieuses, donc les plus fragiles. Que cette peste verte est désormais planétaire et que nous n’en sommes probablement qu’au début. Que cette guerre est menée sur notre sol et que l’ennemi, aujourd’hui, est aussi bien intérieur qu’extérieur. On savait que la menace djihadiste était à son comble en France — ou plutôt, nous aurions dû le comprendre. Depuis janvier, plusieurs attentats ont été déjoués, les uns dans une phase préparatoire, les autres de justesse. De nombreuses cellules djihadistes dormantes ont été réactivées et nous sommes également au courant des crimes de masse quotidiennement perpétrés par les nouveaux barbares sur les vastes territoires qu’ils contrôlent. Que nous faut-il de plus? Pourquoi cette étrange stupéfaction, au-delà de l’horreur évidemment justifiée que suscitent ces nouveaux attentats, après ceux de Merah en 2012, de Nemmouche en 2014, après les pancartes «Mort aux Juifs!» de l’été, les décapitations en série de Daesh cet automne, suivies des atroces tueries du début de l’année?

Oui, mais justement, pourquoi cette difficulté à percuter la menace? Sommes-nous désarmés intellectuellement et moralement?

Si nous prenons un peu de champ, je vois plusieurs raisons à cet invraisemblable aveuglement, à commencer par le fait que les esprits sont empoisonnés par plus d’une décennie de «trahison des clercs». Des élites passées maîtresses dans l’art positif et méthodique de se crever les yeux face à la montée du fondamentalisme musulman le plus agressif et le plus rétrograde, au motif que le Mal — la haine, la terreur, l’obscurantisme — ne saurait surgir de ce qu’elles croyaient être le camp du Bien, celui des anciens damnés de la terre.

Ce catéchisme binaire et rance, qui remonte au tiers-mondisme des années 60 et qui consiste à opposer avec paresse un monde européen forcément coupable à un monde musulman ontologiquement innocent, est tout à fait obsolète. L’ensemble des musulmans éclairés, dont nous relayons bien peu la parole alors qu’il s’agirait d’épouser leur combat comme hier celui des dissidents du bloc soviétique, nous le répètent pourtant à longueur de journée. Mais peu importe pour nos bien-pensants de service, très présents dans les médias, qui ont préféré s’en tenir à une curieuse pratique de la pensée magique en interdisant aux faits toute incursion malvenue dans l’univers de leur croyance idéologique. En cela, oui, ils ont œuvré à notre désarmement intellectuel et moral. Cette couardise, doublée de la perte horrifiante de la lucidité la plus élémentaire, me fait penser au mot de Yves Montand à propos de sa génération, fascinée par le stalinisme: «Nous étions dangereux et cons».

«Dangereux et cons»?

Avec un peu d’honnêteté, nombreux sont nos intellectuels qui, en France, seraient bien inspirés de s’approprier cette observation autocritique. J’ajouterais même un appendice: non contents d’être redevenus «dangereux et cons» depuis le 11-Septembre 2001, nos «beaux esprits» somnambules, particulièrement nombreux à gauche, se sont aussi distingués par leur insondable lâcheté. En effet, quelle est cette irresponsabilité qui, depuis des années, a poussé tant de faiseurs d’opinion — journalistes, politiques, sociologues vertueux — à s’enferrer à ce point dans le déni, à être incapables de mettre leur montre à l’heure, d’appeler un chat un chat et

d’admettre que c’est l’islam radical qui, ces derniers temps, a un peu tendance à armer le bras des assassins et non des hordes de bouddhistes déchainés?

N’oublions pas qu’entre le 6 et le 10, nous sommes subitement passés de la thèse, confortable mais fausse, des «loups solitaires» — et autres «enfants perdus du djihad», des formules partout reprises en cœur —, à la reconnaissance officielle d’un fléau planétaire. N’oublions pas qu’Edwy Plenel parlait encore du terrorisme «dit islamiste» dans son livre récent, intitulé Pour les musulmans. Ou comment mélanger au passage, dans une même condescendance postcoloniale, les terroristes et leurs suppliciés. Et on pourrait multiplier les exemples à l’infini. D’ailleurs, le vendredi 26 juin au soir, les bandeaux «Encore un loup solitaire?» s’inscrivaient derechef sur nos écrans de télévision. Vertigineuse régression.

Le dispositif global d’intimidation par l’«islamophobie» — l’intimidation étant caractéristique de la mentalité fasciste — a fait le reste: quiconque ne partageait pas cette vision irénique se voyait traité de raciste ou, plus à la mode, de «néo-réactionnaire». Brisons les avertisseurs d’incendie et le feu s’éteindra de lui-même. Tel est à peu près l’état d’esprit toxique qui domine depuis des années en France et nous empêche, aujourd’hui encore, de percuter l’ampleur du danger. On ne réadapte pas ses catégories mentales du jour au lendemain. Plus largement, il me semble que les Européens de bonne foi ont exorcisé depuis si longtemps le cauchemar des guerres de religion qu’ils ont du mal à en imaginer le retour. Or, on peine toujours à voir ce que l’on peine à concevoir.

Sommes-nous retombés dans l’avant-Charlie aussitôt après?

Force est de constater que le sursaut aura été de très courte durée. «Esprit du 11-Janvier, es-tu là?», en était-on à se demander un mois après les tueries. Tous les alibis étaient déjà bons pour penser à autre chose. Comment un événement aussi grave, porté par le contexte international radicalement nouveau et explosif que l’on sait, a-t-il pu déboucher sur des résultats aussi misérables? À ce degré d’absence de soi, on hésitait entre faire tourner la table ou la renverser. Car voilà qu’il nous a très vite fallu compter avec les revenants. On les avait d’abord cru tapis dans le remord et la honte, ceux qui n’avaient pas trouvé de termes assez durs pour condamner, entre autres prouesses, le Manifeste des Douze publié par Charlie Hebdo en mars 2006. Un texte salutaire qui énonçait sans détours ce qui crevait déjà les yeux, à savoir qu’après le fascisme, le nazisme et le stalinisme, l’islamisme est un totalitarisme religieux qui met la démocratie en danger.

Mais non. Il faudra à peine un jour ou deux aux esprits frappeurs pour resurgir de l’au-delà. Et pour nous expliquer quoi dans leur rhétorique tordue? Que l’islamisme n’est pas un cancer qui prolifère sur les maux qui ravagent le monde musulman, sur son arriération dramatique et sur ses propres échecs, mais qu’il procède d’un Occident très méchant qui n’aime pas les musulmans. Que les vrais auteurs des crimes de janvier ne seraient pas de sombres tueurs apocalyptiques, mais tous les «islamophobes» de France et de Navarre… Au moins, n’allaient-ils pas oser hurler, comme au lendemain des crimes de Merah, au «renforcement de l’arsenal sécuritaire»? Décence minimale oblige. Et bien si. Une semaine après la sidération et l’horreur, ces esprits faux devenus littéralement fous mettaient déjà en garde, non pas bien sûr contre la barbarie djihadiste, mais contre… «le triomphe du Parti de l’ordre». On apprendra dans la foulée que c’est le Front national qui, à force de «jouer sur les haines», serait indirectement responsable du carnage. Le président François Hollande en a même remis une couche dans son discours du Panthéon en évoquant, dans un pluriel hautement confusionniste, «le devoir de vigilance face aux haines de la démocratie» — soit trois poncifs en une proposition. Une prouesse. Ou comment annuler le courageux discours de Manuel Valls du 13 janvier. On se frotte les yeux.

Le livre d’Emmanuel Todd, Qui est Charlie?, vous paraît-il représentatif de cette dérive?

Oui, emblématique même. Nous sommes passés de l’hibernation à la perversion, et de la perversion à l’inversion. Surtout, aucun esprit sain n’aurait pu prévoir, dans ses plus pessimistes prophéties, le succès d’une thèse transformant, par un sinistre tour de magie, les meurtriers en «victimes» du racisme. Ni imaginer que tant de micros allaient lui être si avidement tendus. Voilà donc qu’avec ce best-seller au mois de mai, il ne s’agissait déjà plus de combattre l’islamisme radical, mais «le laïcisme radical» ; et voilà que le pire, à suivre Todd, aurait moins consisté dans les massacres sanglants que dans l’odieuse manifestation «totalitaire» (je vous laisse apprécier l’oxymore) et naturellement «islamophobe» du 11-Janvier… En vérité, un simple «non» opposé de façon massive, spontanée et responsable à des barbares qui venaient de s’en prendre à un minimum civilisationnel commun absolu.

En clair, la folle spirale du déni ne s’est pas atténuée, comme on aurait pu s’y attendre: elle s’est étrangement aggravée. On pense à la réplique d’un personnage de Skakespeare: «Je me suis si longtemps vautré dans l’erreur qu’il m’est plus facile de poursuivre dans cette voie que de m’arrêter en chemin». À ce niveau de déraison, on se demande à quel discours nous auront droit d’ici quelques jours… Attendons-nous à ce que la loi sur le Renseignement, adoptée en mai et qu’il était de bon ton de juger «liberticide» dans les salons parisiens, soit tenue pour la grande coupable des derniers attentats et qu’il aurait mieux valu ne pas la voter pour ne pas offusquer «les musulmans». Je relève à cet égard que pour d’incompréhensibles raisons, les «faucons» républicains ont voté contre avec l’extrême gauche. La lâcheté, de nos jours, traverse l’ensemble de l’échiquier politique.

Vous précisez dans votre livre que vous vivez dans le 93 depuis trente ans. Qu’en disent les musulmans eux-mêmes que vous côtoyer tous les jours?

Vous n’imaginez pas à quel point les musulmans «normaux» n’en peuvent plus de ce «Padamalgame»

absurde — et désormais criminogène — qui tient lieu de prêt-à-penser à une partie de nos élites. Beaucoup d’entre eux ne le comprennent même pas: «La vérité n’a jamais stigmatisé personne», me faisait ainsi remarquer mon voisin tunisien en janvier. Il ajoutait: «Il fallait au contraire qu’elle soit dite et que l’ennemi soit enfin désigné pour que nous ne nous sentions plus obligés de raser les murs de honte». Bref, un soulagement pour la majorité d’entre eux, armés d’un bon sens qu’on aimerait trouver chez nos énarques. Quant aux jeunes du coin, shootés aux sites internet de Dieudonné ou Soral, nous avions bien entendu affaire à un «complot sioniste» dès le lendemain matin…

Les politiques publiques conduites depuis janvier vous semblent-elles à la hauteur?

Le problème vient de ce que nous avons quinze ans de retard à l’allumage. Le plan Vigipirate est essentiel, mais sait-on que nos courageux soldats, dépourvus d’armes de poing, patrouillent avec des fusils de guerre inutilisables en milieu urbain au risque de provoquer un carnage? Sait-on que dans le 93, certaines mairies ont donné il y a quelques jours pour consigne à leur police municipale de ne plus verbaliser les femmes portant un voile intégral dissimulant leur visage, alors même qu’une loi a été votée et que la police est en principe chargée de la faire respecter? Ramadan oblige, sans doute… Que les mêmes élus locaux ne cessent de rhabiller des salafistes en militants associatifs par peur de perdre les prochaines élections? C’est dire si notre capitulation en rase campagne a persisté bien au-delà du 11-Janvier. Et nous revoilà à feindre de se demander sur tous les plateaux comment nous en sommes arrivés là!

Vous renvoyez dos à dos la montée de l’islamisme et celle du populisme. Mais les populismes respectent la règle du jeu démocratique tandis que les intégristes musulmans sème la terreur et la mort. Ne tombez-vous pas, à vôtre tour, dans le politiquement correct que vous dénoncez?

Non. Quand je dis que nous avons du souci à nous faire pour l’avenir de l’Europe — pris entre ceux qui ne pensent plus à force de bien-penser et ceux qui ne voient plus les limites du mal-penser sans penser à mal —, la logique qui gouverne mon raisonnement est celle de l’engendrement, pas du renvoi dos-à-dos. Je veux dire qu’à force de s’obstiner dans un «padamalgame» obtus, à force d’accorder à l’islamisme la clause de l’idéologie totalitaire et massacreuse la plus excusée, on fait chaque jour la campagne de Marine Le Pen, laquelle pourrait, à ce rythme, partir à la plage jusqu’aux prochaines présidentielles. En refusant de prendre en charge les angoisses identitaires, l’insécurité culturelle et le sentiment d’abandon exprimés par plus de la majorité des Européens, gauche et droite républicaines abandonnent le monde aux populistes. Pour leur plus grand bonheur et pour notre plus grand malheur à tous. Cette attitude est suicidaire et l’issue sera catastrophique car ce sont ces nouvelles formations qui, à coup sûr, emporteront la mise de toutes nos lâchetés.

En effet, ce n’est pas l’instauration de la charia qui menace en Europe à brève ou moyenne échéance, mais un «populisme patrimonial» d’autant plus présentable qu’il s’est habilement relooké. Il serait souhaitable, là aussi, d’entrouvrir un œil car ces partis mutants se sont mis à prospérer sur l’ensemble du Vieux Continent, comme on vient encore de s’en apercevoir au Danemark — mais s’en aperçoit-on vraiment? En cela, le politiquement correct n’a cessé, ces derniers temps, de nourrir le politiquement abject — en grande partie par réaction et par exaspération. C’est en ce sens qu’à mes yeux, ils font désormais cause commune. Il me semble qu’il existe pourtant un boulevard entre la xénophilie angélisante et la xénophobie diabolisante, entre la stratégie de l’enfouissement et l’apocalypse du «grand remplacement». Il serait grand temps de l’emprunter. À moins qu’on ne préfère secrètement le retour d’une bonne vieille «bête immonde» à l’ancienne, laquelle épargnerait à nos bonnes consciences d’épuisantes contorsions mentales face à cet islamo-fascisme qui ne cadre pas. Tel serait en tout cas l’objectif qu’on ne saurait mieux s’y prendre.

Voir de même:

Tareq Oubrou : «Les Musulmans sont déroutés et ne maîtrisent plus rien, ni la base ni rien»
Delphine de Mallevoüe

Le Figaro

30/06/2015

INTERVIEW – Après les attentats de janvier, le ministre de l’Intérieur a choisi Tareq Oubrou, recteur de la grande mosquée de Bordeaux, comme interlocuteur privilégié des pouvoirs publics dans sa volonté de relancer le dialogue avec les représentants musulmans. Entretien.

LE FIGARO. – Fermer les mosquées salafistes (89 en 2014 contre 44 en 2010), est-ce la solution pour tuer dans l’œuf le radicalisme?

Tareq OUBROU – C’est seulement une partie de la solution, car le problème est multifactoriel. Il faut traiter l’urgence, oui, mais s’occuper des conséquences ce n’est pas traiter les causes. Il faut s’attaquer à l’étiologie du mal, ne pas se contenter des sermons républicains mais agir et appliquer le droit. Sans quoi nous provoquerons la fragilisation de la démocratie et les tentations populistes. Au reste, ce ne sont pas les mosquées qu’il faut fermer – les fidèles n’ont pas à être pénalisés – ce sont les prédicateurs haineux qu’il faut expulser (40 imams et «prêcheurs de haine» ont été expulsés depuis 2012, dont une dizaine depuis début 2015, NDLR). Et ceux-là ne sont pas toujours ceux qu’on croit. …

/…/

Comment analysez-vous l’acte de décapitation commis par Yassin Salhi lors de l’attaque près de Lyon ?

Ce sont des symptômes qui relèvent d’un désordre mental. Un mélange de haine personnelle, de marginalité, de frustration économique, d’Islam identitaire… une grande salade d’ingrédients confus avec un vernis islamique, symptomatique d’un Islam aujourd’hui atomisé, d’une doctrine éclatée – y compris le salafisme – d’un terrorisme individualisé. Cela montre une civilisation arabo-musulmane délabrée. Les Musulmans sont déroutés et ne maîtrisent plus rien, ni la base ni rien.

Ceux qui prennent les armes ne connaissent même pas l’Islam. Ils mélangent le martyr avec le suicide. La théologie du martyr c’est de subir la mort ou la guerre, pas de la rechercher. Le problème c’est la lutte contre l’ignorance, la restauration du savoir et de la culture. La violence vient de l’absence de la démocratisation de la pensée en général et de la religion en particulier. Quand il n’y a pas de langage, eh bien il y a de la violence.

Vous comparez la laïcité à la charia…

Oui, tout le monde en parle, mais chacun dans sa définition ! Une sainte ignorance partagée par tout le monde, comme disait le politologue Olivier Roy. La laïcité, tout comme la charia, ne sont pas des lois, mais des principes un jour mis dans des lois.

Ce sont des mouvements qui ont été amorcés et qui doivent être continués par l’intelligence des hommes. Et aujourd’hui, en ce qui concerne l’Islam, il y a urgence à travailler une nouvelle doctrine. Qu’est-ce que c’est que Daesh ou al-Qaida à part des slogans ? Où est la doctrine là dedans ? Quant aux pratiques – foulard, barbe, hallal – elles relèvent d’un Islam identitaire, sociologique, d’un Islam «de fait» plus que d’un Islam théologique, d’une orthodoxie de masse plus que d’une doctrine… […]

Voir aussi:

As ISIS brutalizes women, a pathetic feminist silence
Phyllis Chesler
The New York Post

June 7, 2015

Oh, how the feminist movement has lost its way. And the deafening silence over ISIS’s latest brutal crimes makes that all too clear.

Fifty years ago, American women launched a liberation campaign for freedom and equality. We achieved a revolution in the Western world and created a vision for girls and women everywhere.

Second Wave feminism was an ideologically diverse movement that pioneered society’s understanding of how women were disadvantaged economically, reproductively, politically, physically, psychologically and sexually.

Feminists had one standard of universal human rights — we were not cultural relativists — and we called misogyny by its rightful name no matter where we found it.

As late as 1997, the Feminist Majority at least took a stand against the Afghan Taliban and the burqa. In 2001, 18,000 people, led by feminist celebrities, cheered ecstatically when Oprah Winfrey removed a woman’s burqa at a feminist event — but she did so safely in Madison Square Garden, not in Kabul or Kandahar.

Six weeks ago, Human Rights Watch documented a “system of organized rape and sexual assault, sexual slavery, and forced marriage by ISIS forces.” Their victims were mainly Yazidi women and girls as young as 12, whom they bought, sold, gang-raped, beat, tortured and murdered when they tried to escape.

In May, Kurdish media reported, Yazidi girls who escaped or were released said they were kept half-naked together with other girls as young as 9, one of whom was pregnant when she was released. The girls were “smelled,” chosen and examined to make sure they were virgins. ISIS fighters whipped or burned the girls’ thighs if they refused to perform “extreme” pornography-influenced sex acts. In one instance, they cut off the legs of a girl who tried to escape.

These atrocities are war crimes and crimes against humanity — and yet American feminists did not demand President Obama rescue the remaining female hostages nor did they demand military intervention or support on behalf of the millions of terrified Iraqi and Syrian civilian refugees.

An astounding public silence has prevailed.

The upcoming annual conference of the National Organization for Women does not list ISIS or Boko Haram on its agenda. While the most recent Women’s Studies annual conference did focus on foreign policy, they were only interested in Palestine, a country which has never existed, and support for which is often synonymous with an anti-Israel position. Privately, feminists favor non-intervention, non-violence and the need for multilateral action, and they blame America for practically everything wrong in the world.

What is going on?

Feminists are, typically, leftists who view “Amerika” and white Christian men as their most dangerous enemies, while remaining silent about Islamist barbarians such as ISIS.

Feminists strongly criticize Christianity and Judaism, but they’re strangely reluctant to oppose Islam — as if doing so would be “racist.” They fail to understand that a religion is a belief or an ideology, not a skin color.

The new pseudo-feminists are more concerned with racism than with sexism, and disproportionately focused on Western imperialism, colonialism and capitalism than on Islam’s long and ongoing history of imperialism, colonialism, anti-black racism, slavery, forced conversion and gender and religious apartheid.

And why? They are terrified of being seen as “politically incorrect” and then demonized and shunned for it.

The Middle East and Western Africa are burning; Iran is raping female civilians and torturing political prisoners; the Pakistani Taliban are shooting young girls in the head for trying to get an education and disfiguring them with acid if their veils are askew — and yet, NOW passed no resolution opposing this.

Twenty-first century feminists need to oppose misogynistic, totalitarian movements. They need to reassess the global threats to liberty, and rekindle our original passion for universal justice and freedom.

Phyllis Chesler (Phyllis-chesler.com) is emerita professor of psychology and the author of 16 books including “Living History: On the Front Line for Israel and the Jews, 2003-2015.”

Voir par ailleurs:

Sunbed gunman was high on COCAINE: Laughing fanatic took photos of his victims during tourist killing spree – as new pictures emerge of unexploded bomb found next to his dead body

Sam Greenhill In Kairouan and Emine Sinmaz In Sousse, Tunisia

The Daily Mail

 30 June 2015

Seifeddine Rezgui was high on cocaine as he murdered British tourists on the beach, it emerged today.

A stimulant, believed to the class A drug or one similar to it, was detected by doctors during a post-mortem examination, the Daily Mail has been told.

Tunisian police separately confirmed that an unexploded bomb was found on Rezgui’s body, meaning he could have murdered scores more. The detonator was just inches away.

Survivors said last night that Rezgui, who has been linked to Islamic State, was laughing and smiling as he massacred his 38 victims with an AK-47 assault rifle in Sousse last Friday.

‘At one point, the gunman was busy – with his gun on his back – with a phone out, taking photos of the bodies and laughing,’ said Paul Short.

IS fighters are known to take doses of cocaine to make them feel invincible on the battlefield.

An informed source said: ‘The autopsy proves that the terrorist used some drugs before he did the attack – the same drug that IS gives to people who do terrorist attacks – so that he will not understand what he is doing.’

A hotel worker named Houssem told the Mail: ‘He was laughing as he was shooting. When he had finished and he had killed everyone, he did not care, he did not try to run. He was smiling, he was happy.’

Voir enfin:

MAUVAISES (ET BONNES) RÉPUTATIONS DE L’ISLAM

André Cournouve

Connaissance ouverte
A / Moyen-Âge et Renaissance :

Pierre le Vénérable (vers 1093 – 1156), abbé de Cluny :

« Qu’on donne à l’erreur mahométane le nom honteux d’hérésie ou celui, infâme, de paganisme, il faut agir contre elle, c’est-à-dire écrire. Mais les latins et surtout les modernes, l’antique culture périssant, suivant le mot des Juifs qui admiraient jadis les apôtres polyglottes, ne savent pas d’autre langue que celle de leur pays natal. Aussi n’ont-ils pu ni reconnaître l’énormité de cette erreur ni lui barrer la route. Aussi mon cœur s’est enflammé et un feu m’a brûlé dans ma méditation. Je me suis indigné de voir les Latins ignorer la cause d’une telle perdition et leur ignorance leur ôter le pouvoir d’y résister ; car personne ne répondait, car personne ne savait. Je suis donc allé trouver des spécialistes de la langue arabe qui a permis à ce poison mortel d’infester plus de la moitié du globe. Je les ai persuadés à force de prières et d’argent de traduire d’arabe en latin l’histoire et la doctrine de ce malheureux et sa loi même qu’on appelle Coran. Et pour que la fidélité de la traduction soit entière et qu’aucune erreur ne vienne fausser la plénitude de notre compréhension, aux traducteurs chrétiens j’en ai adjoint un Sarrasin. Voici les noms des chrétiens : Robert de Chester, Hermann le Dalmate, Pierre de Tolède ; le Sarrasin s’appelait Mohammed. Cette équipe après avoir fouillé à fond les bibliothèques de ce peuple barbare en a tiré un gros livre qu’ils ont publié pour les lecteurs latins. Ce travail a été fait l’année où je suis allé en Espagne et où j’ai eu une entrevue avec le seigneur Alphonse, empereur victorieux des Espagnes, c’est-à-dire en l’année du Seigneur 1141. » (cité par Jacques le Goff, Les Intellectuels au Moyen Âge, « Le temps qui court », Paris : Le Seuil, 1957 ; merci à Jean-Baptiste de Morizur).

Hervé Martin (né en 1940) :

« [Aux XIIIe et XIVe siècles] le discours antisodomie se durcit. Ce péché, estime-t-on, appelle la vengeance du ciel. Le laïc qui s’y adonne doit être excommunié et le clerc réduit à l’état laïc (Concile de Latran III, 1179). L’homosexualité est d’autant plus vivement dénoncée qu’elle est très répandue chez les musulmans, que l’on accuse de sodomiser leurs prisonniers chrétiens et dont on estime qu’ils menacent l’Europe. »
Mentalités médiévales XIe-XVe siècle, chapitre XIII, Paris : PUF, 1996.

Michel de Montaigne (1533-1592) :

« Le grand Seigneur [le Grand Turc, Soliman le magnifique] ne permet aujourd’hui ni à Chrétien ni à Juif d’avoir cheval à soi, à ceux qui sont sous son empire. » (Essais, I, xlviii, page 289 de l’édition Villey/PUF/Quadrige)

« […] quand Mahomet promet aux siens un paradis tapissé, paré d’or et de pierrerie, peuplé de garçes d’excellente beauté, de vins et de vivres singuliers, je vois bien que ce sont des moqueurs qui se plient à notre bêtise pour nous emmiéler et attirer par ces opinons et espérances, convenables à notre mortel appétit. » (Essais, II, xii, page 518)

« Je ne m’étonne plus de ceux que les singeries d’Apollonius [de Tyane] et de Mahomet embufflarent. Leur sens et entendement est entièrement étouffé en leur passion. » (III, x, page 1013).
B / Grand-siècle, Lumières :

B / a) Jacques-Bénigne Bossuet (1627-1704) :

« Mes Frères, cet objet lugubre d’un chrétien captif dans les prisons des mahométans, me jette dans une profonde considération des grands et épouvantables progrès de cette religion monstrueuse. O Dieu, que le genre humain est crédule aux imposture de Satan! O que l’esprit de séduction et d’erreur a d’ascendant sur notre raison! Que nous portons en nous-mêmes, au fond de nos cœurs, une étrange opposition à la vérité, dans nos aveuglements, dans nos ignorances, dans nos préoccupations opiniâtres. Voyez comme l’ennemi du genre humain n’a rien oublié pour nous perdre, et pour nous faire embrasser des erreurs damnables. Avant la venue du Sauveur, il se faisait adorer par toute la terre sous les noms de ces fameuses idoles devant lesquelles tremblaient tous les peuples; il travaillait de toute sa force à étouffer le nom du vrai Dieu. Jésus-Christ et ses martyrs l’ont fait retentir si haut depuis le levant jusqu’au couchant, qu’il n’y a plus moyen de l’éteindre ni de l’obscurcir. Les peuples qui ne le connaissaient pas, y sont attirés en foule par la croix de Jésus-Christ; et voici que cet ancien imposteur, qui dès l’origine du monde est en possession de tromper les hommes, ne pouvant plus abolir le saint nom de Dieu, frémissant contre Jésus-Christ qui l’a fait connaître à tout l’univers, tourne toute sa furie contre lui et contre son Évangile : et trouvant encore le nom de Jésus trop bien établi dans le monde par tant de martyrs et tant de miracles, il lui déclare la guerre en faisant semblant de le révérer, et il inspire à Mahomet, en l’appelant un prophète, de faire passer sa doctrine pour une imposture; et cette religion monstrueuse, qui se dément elle-même, a pour toute raison son ignorance, pour toute persuasion sa violence et sa tyrannie, pour tout miracle ses armes, armes redoutables et victorieuses, qui font trembler tout le monde, et rétablissent par force l’empire de Satan dans tout l’univers.  »
Panégyrique de saint Pierre Nolasque.
B / b) Baron de Montesquieu (1689-1755) :

« Nous savons que les Mahométans, qui, pour se procurer des extases, se mettent dans des tombeaux où ils veillent et ne cessent de hurler, en sortent toujours avec l’esprit plus faible.» (Essai sur les causes qui peuvent affecter les esprits et les caractères, [Première partie]).

‎« On s’est aperçu que le zèle pour les progrès de la Religion est différent de l’attachement qu’on doit avoir pour elle, et que, pour l’aimer et l’observer, il n’est pas nécessaire de haïr et de persécuter ceux qui ne l’observent pas. Il serait à souhaiter que nos Musulmans pensassent aussi sensiblement sur cet article que les Chrétiens. » (Lettres persanes, 1721, lettre LX).

« Pendant que les princes mahométans donnent sans cesse la mort ou la reçoivent, la religion, chez les chrétiens, rend les princes moins timides, et par conséquent moins cruels. […] Sur le caractère de la religion chrétienne et celui de la mahométane, on doit, sans autre examen, embrasser l’une et rejeter l’autre : car il nous est bien plus évident qu’une religion doit adoucir les mœurs des hommes, qu’il ne l’est qu’une religion soit vraie. C’est un malheur pour la nature humaine, lorsque la religion est donnée par un conquérant. La religion mahométane, qui ne parle que de glaive, agit encore sur les hommes avec cet esprit destructeur qui l’a fondée. […] La religion des Guèbres rendit autrefois le royaume de Perse florissant ; elle corrigea les mauvais effets du despotisme : la religion mahométane détruit aujourd’hui ce même empire. »
De l’Esprit des lois, 1748, livre XXIV, chapitres 3, 4 et 11.

B / c) Voltaire (1694-1778) et ENCYCLOPÉDIE :

« Il est à croire que Mahomet, comme tous les enthousiastes, violemment frappé de ses idées, les débita d’abord de bonne foi, les fortifia par des rêveries, se trompa lui-même en trompant les autres, et appuya enfin, par des fourberies nécessaires, une doctrine qu’il croyait bonne. » Voltaire, Essai sur les mœurs et l’esprit des nations, 1756, chapitre VI, « De l’Arabie et de Mahomet ».

« Sa définition de Dieu est d’un genre plus véritablement sublime. On lui demandait quel était cet Allah qu’il annonçait : « C’est celui, répondit-il, qui tient l’être de soi-même, et de qui les autres le tiennent ; qui n’engendre point et qui n’est point engendré, et à qui rien n’est semblable dans toute l’étendue des êtres. » Cette fameuse réponse, consacrée dans tout l’Orient, se trouve presque mot à mot dans l’antépénultième chapitre du Koran.
[…]
Une chose qui peut surprendre bien des lecteurs, c’est qu’il n’y eut rien de nouveau dans la loi de Mahomet, sinon que Mahomet était prophète de Dieu.

En premier lieu, l’unité d’un être suprême, créateur et conservateur, était très-ancienne. Les peines et les récompenses dans une autre vie, la croyance d’un paradis et d’un enfer, avaient été admises chez les Chinois, les Indiens, les Perses, les Égyptiens, les Grecs, les Romains, et ensuite chez les Juifs, et surtout chez les chrétiens, dont la religion consacra cette doctrine.

L’Alcoran reconnaît des anges et des génies, et cette créance vient des anciens Perses. Celle d’une résurrection et d’un jugement dernier était visiblement puisée dans le Talmud et dans le christianisme. Les mille ans que Dieu emploiera, selon Mahomet, à juger les hommes, et la manière dont il y procédera, sont des accessoires qui n’empêchent pas que cette idée ne soit entièrement empruntée. Le pont aigu sur lequel les ressuscités passeront, et du haut duquel les réprouvés tomberont en enfer, est tiré de la doctrine allégorique des mages.

C’est chez ces mêmes mages, c’est dans leur Jannat que Mahomet a pris l’idée d’un paradis, d’un jardin, où les hommes, revivant avec tous leurs sens perfectionnés, goûteront par ces sens mêmes toutes les voluptés qui leur sont propres, sans quoi ces sens leur seraient inutiles. C’est là qu’il a puisé l’idée de ces houris, de ces femmes célestes qui seront le partage des élus, et que les mages appelaient hourani, comme on le voit dans le Sadder. Il n’exclut point les femmes de son paradis, comme on le dit souvent parmi nous. Ce n’est qu’une raillerie sans fondement, telle que tous les peuples en font les uns des autres. Il promet des jardins, c’est le nom du paradis ; mais il promet pour souveraine béatitude la vision, la communication de l’Être suprême.

Le dogme de la prédestination absolue, et de la fatalité, qui semble aujourd’hui caractériser le mahométisme, était l’opinion de toute l’Antiquité : elle n’est pas moins claire dans l’Iliade que dans l’Alcoran.

À l’égard des ordonnances légales, comme la circoncision, les ablutions, les prières, le pèlerinage de la Mecque, Mahomet ne fit que se conformer, pour le fond, aux usages reçus. La circoncision était pratiquée de temps immémorial chez les Arabes, chez les anciens Égyptiens, chez les peuples de la Colchide, et chez les Hébreux. Les ablutions furent toujours recommandées dans l’Orient comme un symbole de la pureté de l’âme.

Point de religion sans prières. La loi que Mahomet porta, de prier cinq fois par jour, était gênante, et cette gêne même fut respectable. Qui aurait osé se plaindre que la créature soit obligée d’adorer cinq fois par jour son créateur ?

Quant au pèlerinage de la Mecque, aux cérémonies pratiquées dans le Kaaba et sur la pierre noire, peu de personnes ignorent que cette dévotion était chère aux Arabes depuis un grand nombre de siècles. Le Kaaba passait pour le plus ancien temple du monde ; et, quoiqu’on y vénérât alors trois cents idoles, il était principalement sanctifié par la pierre noire, qu’on disait être le tombeau d’Ismaël. Loin d’abolir ce pèlerinage, Mahomet, pour se concilier les Arabes, en fit un précepte positif.

Le jeûne était établi chez plusieurs peuples, et chez les Juifs, et chez les chrétiens. Mahomet le rendit très-sévère, en l’étendant à un mois lunaire, pendant lequel il n’est pas permis de boire un verre d’eau, ni de fumer, avant le coucher du soleil ; et ce mois lunaire, arrivant souvent au plus fort de l’été, le jeûne devint par là d’une si grande rigueur qu’on a été obligé d’y apporter des adoucissements, surtout à la guerre.

Il n’y a point de religion dans laquelle on n’ait recommandé l’aumône. La mahométane est la seule qui en ait fait un précepte légal, positif, indispensable. L’Alcoran ordonne de donner deux et demi pour cent de son revenu, soit en argent, soit en denrées.

On voit évidemment que toutes les religions ont emprunté tous leurs dogmes et tous leurs rites les unes des autres.

Dans toutes ces ordonnances positives, vous ne trouverez rien qui ne soit consacré par les usages les plus antiques. Parmi les préceptes négatifs, c’est-à-dire ceux qui ordonnent de s’abstenir, vous ne trouverez que la défense générale à toute une nation de boire du vin, qui soit nouvelle et particulière au mahométisme. Cette abstinence, dont les musulmans se plaignent, et se dispensent souvent dans les climats froids, fut ordonnée dans un climat brillant, où le vin altérait trop aisément la santé et la raison. Mais, d’ailleurs, il n’était pas nouveau que des hommes voués au service de la Divinité se fussent abstenus de cette liqueur. Plusieurs collèges de prêtres en Égypte, en Syrie, aux Indes, les nazaréens, les récabites, chez les Juifs, s’étaient imposé cette mortification.

Elle ne fut point révoltante pour les Arabes : Mahomet ne prévoyait pas qu’elle deviendrait un jour presque insupportable à ses musulmans dans la Thrace, la Macédoine, la Bosnie, et la Servie. Il ne savait pas que les Arabes viendraient un jour jusqu’au milieu de la France, et les Turcs mahométans devant les bastions de Vienne.

Il en est de même de la défense de manger du porc, du sang, et des bêtes mortes de maladies ; ce sont des préceptes de santé : le porc surtout est une nourriture très-dangereuse dans ces climats, aussi bien que dans la Palestine, qui en est voisine. Quand le mahométisme s’est étendu dans les pays plus froids, l’abstinence a cessé d’être raisonnable, et n’a pas cessé de subsister.

La prohibition de tous les jeux de hasard est peut-être la seule loi dont on ne puisse trouver d’exemple dans aucune religion. Elle ressemble à une loi de couvent plutôt qu’à une loi générale d’une nation. Il semble que Mahomet n’ait formé un peuple que pour prier, pour peupler, et pour combattre.

Toutes ces lois qui, à la polygamie près, sont si austères, et sa doctrine qui est si simple, attirèrent bientôt à sa religion le respect et la confiance. Le dogme surtout de l’unité d’un Dieu, présenté sans mystère, et proportionné à l’intelligence humaine, rangea sous sa loi une foule de nations, et jusqu’à des nègres dans l’Afrique, et à des insulaires dans l’Océan indien.

Cette religion s’appela l’Islamisme, c’est-à-dire résignation à la volonté de Dieu ; et ce seul mot devait faire beaucoup de prosélytes. Ce ne fut point par les armes que l’Islamisme s’établit dans plus de la moitié de notre hémisphère, ce fut par l’enthousiasme, par la persuasion, et surtout par l’exemple des vainqueurs, qui a tant de force sur les vaincus. Mahomet, dans ses premiers combats en Arabie contre les ennemis de son imposture, faisait tuer sans miséricorde ses compatriotes pénitents. Il n’était pas alors assez puissant pour laisser vivre ceux qui pouvaient détruire sa religion naissante ; mais sitôt qu’elle fut affermie dans l’Arabie par la prédication et par le fer, les Arabes, franchissant les limites de leur pays, dont ils n’étaient point sortis jusqu’alors, ne forcèrent jamais les étrangers à recevoir la religion musulmane. Ils donnèrent toujours le choix aux peuples subjugués d’être musulmans, ou de payer tribut. Ils voulaient piller, dominer, faire des esclaves, mais non pas obliger ces esclaves à croire. Quand ils furent ensuite dépossédés de l’Asie par les Turcs et par les Tartares, ils firent des prosélytes de leurs vainqueurs mêmes ; et des hordes de Tartares devinrent un grand peuple musulman. Par là on voit en effet qu’ils ont converti plus de monde qu’ils n’en ont subjugué.

Le peu que je viens de dire dément bien tout ce que nos historiens, nos déclamateurs et nos préjugés nous disent ; mais la vérité doit les combattre.

Bornons-nous toujours à cette vérité historique : le législateur des musulmans, homme puissant et terrible, établit ses dogmes par son courage et par ses armes ; cependant sa religion devint indulgente et tolérante. L’instituteur divin du christianisme, vivant dans l’humilité et dans la paix, prêcha le pardon des outrages ; et sa sainte et douce religion est devenue, par nos fureurs, la plus intolérante de toutes, et la plus barbare. »
Essai sur les mœurs et l’esprit des nations, 1756, chapitre VII,  » De l’Alcoran, et de la loi musulmane. Examen si la religion musulmane était nouvelle, et si elle a été persécutante. ».

 » Comment dans ce temps-là même les mahométans, qui, sous Abdérame, vers l’an 734, subjuguèrent la moitié de la France, auraient-ils laissé subsister derrière les Pyrénées ce royaume des Asturies ? C’était beaucoup pour les chrétiens de pouvoir se réfugier dans ces montagnes et d’y vivre de leurs courses, en payant tribut aux mahométans. Ce ne fut que vers l’an 759 que les chrétiens commencèrent à tenir tête à leurs vainqueurs, affaiblis par les victoires de Charles Martel et par leurs divisions ; mais eux-mêmes, plus divisés entre eux que les mahométans, retombèrent bientôt sous le joug. Mauregat, à qui il a plu aux historiens de donner le titre de roi, eut la permission de gouverner les Asturies et quelques terres voisines, en rendant hommage et en payant tribut. Il se soumit surtout à fournir cent belles filles tous les ans pour le sérail d’Abdérame. Ce fut longtemps la coutume des Arabes d’exiger de pareils tributs ; et aujourd’hui les caravanes, dans les présents qu’elles font aux Arabes du désert, offrent toujours des filles nubiles. »
Essai sur les mœurs et l’esprit des nations, 1756, chapitre XXVII, « De l’Espagne et des musulmans maures aux viiie et ixe siècles. ».

Chevalier Louis de Jaucourt (1704-1779),

« MAHOMÉTISME, s. m. (Hist. des religions du monde.) religion de Mahomet. L’historien philosophe de nos jours [Voltaire] en a peint le tableau si parfaitement, que ce serait s’y mal connaître que d’en présenter un autre aux lecteurs.
Pour se faire, dit-il, une idée du Mahométisme, qui a donné une nouvelle forme à tant d’empires, il faut d’abord se rappeler que ce fut sur la fin du sixième siècle, en 570, que naquit Mahomet à la Mecque dans l’Arabie Pétrée. Son pays défendait alors sa liberté contre les Perses, et contre ces princes de Constantinople qui retenaient toujours le nom d’empereurs romains.
Les enfants du grand Noushirvan, indignes d’un tel père, désolaient la Perse par des guerres civiles et par des parricides. Les successeurs de Justinien avilissaient le nom de l’empire ; Maurice venait d’être détrôné par les armes de Phocas et par les intrigues du patriarche syriaque et de quelques évêques, que Phocas punit ensuite de l’avoir servi. Le sang de Maurice et de ses cins fils avait coulé sous la main du bourreau, et le pape Grégoire le grand, ennemis des patriarches de Constantinople, tâchaient d’attirer le tyran Phocas dans son parti, en lui proposant des louanges et en condamnant la mémoire de Maurice qu’il avait loué pendant sa vie. […] Après avoir connu le caractère de ses concitoyens, leur ignorance, leur crédulité, et leur disposition à l’enthousiasme, il vit qu’il pouvait s’ériger en prophète, il feignit des révélations, il parla : il se fit croire d’abord dans sa maison, ce qui était probablement le plus difficile. […]
Il enseignait aux Arabes, adorateurs des étoiles, qu’il ne fallait adorer que le Dieu qui les a faites, que les livres des Juifs et des Chrétiens s’étant corrompus et falsifiés, on devait les avoir en horreur : qu’on était obligé sous peine de châtiment éternel de prier cinq fois par jour, de donner l’aumône, et surtout, en ne reconnaissant qu’un seul Dieu, de croire en Mahomet son dernier prophète ; enfin de hasarder sa vie pour sa foi. […]
Sa religion était d’ailleurs plus assujettissante qu’aucune autre, par les cérémonies légales, par le nombre et la forme des prières et des ablutions, rien n’étant plus gênant pour la nature humaine que des pratiques qu’elle ne demande pas et qu’il faut renouveler tous les jours.
Il proposait pour récompense une vie éternelle, où l’âme ferait enivrée de tous les plaisirs spirituels, le où le corps ressuscité avec ses sens, goûterait par ses sens mêmes toutes les voluptés qui lui font propres.,
Cette religion s’appela l’islamisme qui signifie résignation à la volonté de Dieu. Le livre qui la contient s’appela coran, c’est-à-dire, le livre, ou l’écriture, ou la lecture par excellence. […]
On y voit surtout une ignorance profonde de la Physique la plus simple et la plus connue. C’est là la pierre de touche des livres que les fausses religions prétendent écrits par la Divinité. […]
Le nouveau prophète donnait le choix à ceux qu’il voulait subjuguer d’embrasser sa secte ou de payer un tribut. […] De tous les législateurs qui ont fondé des religions, il est le seul qui ait étendu la sienne par les conquêtes. […]
Le peuple hébreux avait en horreur les autres nations, et craignait toujours d’être asservi. Le peuple arabe au contraire voulut tout attirer à lui, et se crut fait pour dominer. »
Encyclopédie, ou Dictionnaire raisonné des Sciences, des Arts et des Métiers, tome 9, pages 864-865, 1765.

Denis DIDEROT (1713-1784),

« SARRARINS ou ARABES, philosophie des, : Le saint prophète ne savait ni lire ni écrire : de-là la haine des premiers musulmans contre toute espèce de connaissance ; le mépris qui s’en est perpétué chez leurs successeurs ; et la plus longue durée garantie aux mensonges religieux dont ils sont entêtés.

Mahomet fut si convaincu de l’incompatibilité de la Philosophie et de la Religion, qu’il décerna peine de mort contre celui qui s’appliquerait aux arts libéraux : c’est le même pressentiment dans tous les temps et chez tous les peuples, qui a fait hasarder de décrier la raison.
Le peu de lumière qui restait s’affaiblit au milieu du tumulte des armes, et s’éteignit au sein de la volupté ; l’alcoran fut le seul livre ; on brûla les autres, ou parce qu’ils étaient superflus s’ils ne contenaient que ce qui est dans l’alcoran, ou parce qu’ils étaient pernicieux, s’ils contenaient quelque chose qui n’y fût pas. Ce fut le raisonnement d’après lequel un des généraux  »sarrazins » fit chauffer pendant six mois les bains publics avec les précieux manuscrits de la bibliothèque d’Alexandrie. On peut regarder Mahomet comme le plus grand ennemi que la raison humaine ait eu. Il y avait un siècle que sa religion était établie, et que ce furieux imposteur n’était plus, lorsqu’on entendait des hommes remplis de son esprit s’écrier que Dieu punirait le calife Almamon [Al-Ma’mūn calife de Bagdad de 813 à 833], pour avoir appelé les sciences dans ses États; au détriment de la sainte ignorance des fidèles croyants.  »
Encyclopédie, ou Dictionnaire raisonné des Sciences, des Arts et des Métiers, tome 14, page 664, Neufchastel : Samuel Faulche et Compagnie, 1765.

VOLTAIRE : « Il était bien difficile qu’une religion si simple et si sage, enseignée par un homme toujours victorieux, ne subjugât pas une partie de la Terre. En effet les musulmans ont fait autant de prosélytes par la parole que par l’épée. Ils ont converti à leur religion les Indiens et jusqu’aux nègres. Les Turcs même leurs vainqueurs se sont soumis à l’islamisme. […] Les premiers musulmans furent animés par Mahomet de la rage de l’enthousiasme. Rien n’est plus terrible qu’un peuple qui, n’ayant rien à perdre, combat à la fois par esprit de rapine et de religion. »
Questions sur l’Encyclopédie, article « Alcoran, ou plutôt le Koran », section II.

B / d) Caron de Beaumarchais :

« Je me jette à corps perdu dans le théâtre ; me fussé-je mis une pierre au cou ! Je broche une comédie dans les mœurs du sérail ; auteur espagnol, je crois pouvoir y fronder Mahomet sans scrupule : à l’instant un envoyé … de je ne sais où se plaint que j’offense dans mes vers la Sublime Porte [les Turcs], la Perse, une partie de la presqu’île de l’Inde, toute l’Égypte, les royaumes de Barca, de Tripoli, de Tunis, d’Alger et de Maroc : et voilà ma comédie flambée, pour plaire aux princes mahométans, dont pas un, je crois, ne sait lire, et qui nous meurtrissent l’omoplate, en nous disant : « chiens de chrétiens » ! Ne pouvant avilir l’esprit, on se venge en le maltraitant. »
Le Mariage de Figaro (1784), V, iii.
B / e) Marquis de CONDORCET (1743-1794 ) :

« J’exposerai comment la religion de Mahomet, la plus simple dans ses dogmes, la moins absurde dans ses pratiques, la plus tolérante dans ses principes, semble condamner à un esclavage éternel, à une incurable stupidité, toute cette vaste portion de la Terre où elle a étendu son empire ; tandis que nous allons voir briller le génie des sciences et de la liberté sous les superstitions les plus absurdes, au milieu de la plus barbare intolérance. La Chine nous offre le même phénomène, quoique les effets de ce poison abrutissant y aient été moins funestes. »
Esquisse d’un tableau historique des progrès de l’esprit humain,  » Sixième époque, Décadence des Lumières, jusqu’à leur restauration vers le  temps des croisades « , Paris : Masson, 1822 [1794].
C / XIXe siècle

C / a ) François-René de CHATEAUBRIAND (1768-1848) et Alfred de VIGNY (1797-1863) :

« Peut-on supposer que quelque imposteur, quelque nouveau Mahomet, sorti d’Orient, s’avance la flamme et le fer à la main, et vienne forcer les Chrétiens à fléchir le genou devant son idole ? La poudre à canon nous a mis à l’abri de ce malheur*. »
* Non pas si les gouvernements chrétiens ont la folie de discipliner les sectateurs du Coran. Ce serait un crime de lèse-civilisation que notre postérité, enchaînée peut-être, reprocherait avec des larmes de sang à quelques misérables hommes d’État de notre siècle. Ces prétendus politiques auraient appelé au secours de leurs petits systèmes les soldats fanatiques de Mahomet, et leur auraient donné les moyens de vaincre en permettant qu’on leur enseignât l’art militaire. Or, la discipline militaire n’est pas la civilisation ; avec des renégats chrétiens pour officiers, les brutes du Coran peuvent apprendre à vaincre dans les règles les soldats chrétiens.
« Le monde mahométan barbare a été au moment de subjuguer le monde chrétien barbare ; sans la vaillance de Charles Martel nous porterions aujourd’hui le turban : le monde mahométan discipliné pourrait mettre dans le même péril le monde chrétien discipliné. »
Essai sur les révolutions, 1797, IIe partie, chapitre LV.

« L’esprit du mahométisme est la persécution et la conquête : l’Évangile au contraire ne prêche que la tolérance et la paix […] Où en serions-nous si nos pères n’eussent repoussé la force par la force ? Que l’on contemple la Grèce et l’on apprendra ce que devient un peuple sous le joug des Musulmans. Ceux qui s’applaudissent tant aujourd’hui du progrès des Lumières auraient-ils donc voulu voir régner parmi nous une religion qui a brûlé la bibliothèque d’Alexandrie, qui se fait un mérite de fouler aux pieds les hommes et de mépriser souverainement les lettres et les arts ? Les croisades, en affaiblissant les hordes mahométanes au centre même de l’Asie, nous ont empêchés de devenir la proie des Turcs et des Arabes. »
Itinéraire de Paris à Jérusalem, 1811.

« Considérée sous le double rapport des intérêts généraux de la société et de nos intérêts particuliers, la guerre de la Russie contre la Porte [l’empire turc] ne doit nous donner aucun ombrage. En principe de grande civilisation, l’espèce humaine ne peut que gagner à la destruction de l’empire ottoman : mieux vaut mille fois pour les peuples la domination de la Croix à Constantinople que celle du Croissant. Tous les éléments de la morale et de la société politique sont au fond du christianisme, tous les germes de la destruction sociale sont dans la religion de Mahomet. On dit que le sultan actuel a fait des pas vers la civilisation : est-ce parce qu’il a essayé, à l’aide de quelques renégats français, de quelques officiers anglais et autrichiens, de soumettre ses hordes fanatiques à des exercices réguliers ? Et depuis quand l’apprentissage machinal des armes est-il la civilisation ? C’est une faute énorme, c’est presqu’un crime d’avoir initié les Turcs dans la science de notre tactique : il faut baptiser les soldats qu’on discipline, à moins qu’on ne veuille élever à dessein des destructeurs de la société.  »
Lettre à M. le comte de La Ferronnays, Rome, 30 novembre 1828, Mémoire, seconde partie.

VIGNY : « Croyez en Dieu et en son prophète qui ne sait ni lire ni écrire (dans le Coran). » Journal d’un poète, été-automne 1829.
« L’humanité a les mêmes droits sur elle-même qu’un homme sur son corps pour le guérir. Si l’on préfère la vie à la mort on doit préférer la civilisation à la barbarie. Nulle peuplade dorénavant n’aura le droit de rester barbare à côté des nations civilisées. L’Islamisme est le culte le plus immobile et le plus obstiné, il faut bien que les peuples qui le professent périssent s’ils ne changent de culte. »
Journal d’un poète, 1831 et été 1840.
« Je lui [à Lamartine] ai demandé s’il était toujours occupé de l’Orient. Il se montre enthousiasmé des malheurs des mahométans et les regarde comme plus civilisés que nous, à cause de la charité extrême en eux. – Cependant, lui dis-je, l’islamisme n’est qu’un christianisme corrompu, vous le pensez bien.
– Un christianisme purifié ! me dit-il avec chaleur.
Il ne m’a fallu que quelques mots pour lui rappeler que le Coran arrête toute science et toute culture ; que le vrai mahométan ne lit rien, parce que tout ce qui n’est pas dans le Coran est mauvais et qu’il renferme tout. – Les arts lui sont interdits parce qu’il ne doit pas créer une image de l’homme. » Journal d’un poète, 12 mars 1838.
« Mahomet eut le sentiment vrai du caractère de la religion lorsqu’il lui donna pour symbole le croissant de la lune dont la lumière est trompeuse et sans chaleur. » Journal d’un poète, 1849.
C / b) John Quincy Adams, 1767-1848 (6e président des U. S. A., 1825-1829) :

« In the seventh century of the Christian era, a wandering Arab of the lineage of Hagar [i.e., Muhammad], the Egyptian, […..] Adopting from the new Revelation of Jesus, the faith and hope [foi et espérance] of immortal life, and of future retribution, he humbled it to the dust by adapting all the rewards and sanctions of his religion to the gratification of the sexual passion. He poisoned the sources of human felicity at the fountain, by degrading the condition of the female sex, and the allowance of polygamy; and he declared undistinguishing and exterminating war, as a part of his religion, against all the rest of mankind [l’humanité]. THE ESSENCE OF HIS DOCTRINE WAS VIOLENCE AND LUST [le désir sexuel].- TO EXALT THE BRUTAL OVER THE SPIRITUAL PART OF HUMAN NATURE…. Between these two religions, thus contrasted in their characters, a war of twelve hundred years has already raged. The war is yet flagrant … While the merciless and dissolute dogmas of the false prophet shall furnish motives to human action, there can never be peace upon earth, and good will towards men. »
Cité dans Robert Spencer, From The Politically Incorrect Guide to Islam (and the Crusades).
C / c) Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860) :

« Que l’on considère, par exemple, le Coran ; ce méchant livre a suffi pour fonder une grande religion, satisfaire, pendant douze cents ans le besoin métaphysique de plusieurs millions d’hommes  ; il a donné un fondement à leur morale, leur a inspiré un singulier mépris de la mort et un enthousiasme capable d’affronter des guerres sanglantes, et d’entreprendre les plus vastes conquêtes. Or nous y trouvons la plus triste et la plus pauvre forme du théisme. Peut-être le sens nous en échappe-t-il en grande partie dans les traductions. Cependant je n’ai pu y découvrir une seule idée un peu profonde. »
Le Monde comme Vouloir et comme Représentation, 1844, Supplément au livre premier, seconde partie, § XVII « Sur le besoin métaphysique de l’humanité ». Traduction A. Burdeau revue et corrigée par Richard Roos, Paris : PUF, 1966, 1984.
C / d) Texte extrait d’un article de Friedrich Engels alors correspon­dant à Paris pour le journal anglais Northern Star, volume XI, 20 janvier 1848, n° 535, page 7 :

« En somme, à notre avis, c’est très heureux que ce chef arabe (Abd-el-­Kader) ait été capturé. La lutte des bédouins était sans espoir et bien que la manière brutale avec laquelle les soldats comme Bugeaux ont mené la guerre soit très blâmable, la conquête de l’Algérie est un fait important et heureux pour le progrès de la civilisation.

Les pirateries des États barbaresques, jamais com­battues par le gouvernement anglais tant que leurs bateaux n’étaient pas molestés, ne pouvaient être sup­primées que par la conquête de l’un de ces États. Et la conquête de l’Algérie a déjà obligé les beys de Tunis et Tripoli et même l’empereur du Maroc à prendre la route de la civilisation. Ils étaient obligés de trouver d’autres emplois pour leurs peuples que la piraterie et d’autres méthodes pour remplir leurs coffres que le tribut payé par les petits­ États d’Europe.

Si nous pouvons regretter que la liberté des bédouins du désert ait été détruite, nous ne devons pas oublier que ces mêmes bédouins étaient une nation de voleurs dont les moyens de vie principaux étaient de faire des razzias contre leurs voisins ou contre les villages paisibles, prenant ce qu’ils trouvaient, tuant ceux qui résistaient et vendant les prisonniers comme esclaves.

Toutes ces nations de barbares libres paraissent très fières, nobles et glorieuses vues de loin, mais approchez seulement et vous trouverez que, comme les nations plus civi­lisées, elles sont motivées par le désir de gain et emploient seule­ment des moyens plus rudes et plus cruels.

Et après tout, le bourgeois moderne avec sa civilisation, son industrie, son ordre, ses « lumières » relatives, est préférable au seigneur féodal ou au voleur maraudeur, avec la société barbare à laquelle ils appartiennent. »
C / e) Alphonse de Lamartine

« La religion, surtout dans l’Orient, terre théocratique par excellence, est le mobile des peuples. Leur nationalité est dans leur dogme, leur destinée est dans leur foi ; l’esprit de migration et de conquête qui les soulève dans leurs steppes natales et qui les dissémine un livre dans une main, un sabre dans l’autre à travers le monde, est surtout l’esprit de prosélytisme. Un prophète, un révélateur, marche avec eux derrière le conquérant. »
Histoire de la Turquie, Paris : Aux bureaux du Constitutionnel, 1854, livre premier, I.

« Si la grandeur du dessein, la petitesse des moyens, l’immensité du résultat sont les trois mesures du génie de l’homme, qui osera comparer humainement un grand homme de l’histoire moderne à Mahomet ? Les plus fameux n’ont remué que des armes, des lois; Ils n’ont fondé, quand ils ont fondé quelque chose, que des puissances matérielles écroulées souvent avant eux. Celui-là a remué des armées, des législations, des empires, des peuples, des dynasties, des millions d’hommes sur un tiers du globe habité; mais il a remué, de plus, des idées, des croyances, des âmes. »
Livre premier, XCIV.

« L’inspiration intérieure de Mahomet fut sa seule imposture. Il y avait deux hommes en lui, l’inspiré de la raison et le visionnaire de l’extase. Les inspirations du philosophe furent aidées à son insu par les visions du malade. Ses songes, ses délires, ses évanouissements pendant lesquels son imagination traversait le ciel et conversait avec des êtres imaginaires, lui faisaient à lui-même les illusions qu’il faisait aux autres. La crédulité arabe inventa le reste. »
Livre premier, XC.

« Philosophe, orateur, apôtre, législateur, guerrier, conquérant d’idées, restaurateur des dogmes rationnels d’un culte sans images, fondateur de vingt empires terrestres et d’un empire spirituel, voilà Mahomet. A toutes les échelles ou l’on mesure la grandeur humaine, quel homme fut plus grand ? Il n’y a de plus grand que celui qui, en enseignant avant lui le même dogme, avait promulgué en même temps une morale plus pure, qui n’avait pas tiré l’épée pour aider la parole, seul glaive de l’esprit, qui avait donné son sang au lieu de répandre celui de ses frères, et qui avait été martyr au lieu d’être conquérant. Mais celui-là, les hommes l’ont jugé trop grand pour être mesuré à la mesure des hommes, et si sa nature humaine et sa doctrine l’ont fait prophète, même parmi les incrédules, sa vertu et son sacrifice l’ont proclamé Dieu ! »
Livre premier, XC.

C / f) Karl Marx (1818-1883), New-York Herald Tribune, 15 avril 1854 :

« Declaration of War. – On the History of the Eastern Question, London, Tuesday, March 28, 1854″ :

« The Koran and the Musulman legislation emanating from it reduce the geography and ethnography of the various people to the simple and convenient distinction of two nations and of two countries; those of the Faithful and of the Infidels. The Infidel is “harby,” i.e. the enemy. Islamism proscribes the nation of the Infidels, constituting a state of permanent hostility between the Musulman and the unbeliever. In that sense the corsair-ships of the Berber States were the holy fleet of Islam. How, then, is the existence of Christian subjects of the Porte to be reconciled with the Koran ? [« Le Coran et la législation musulmane qui en résulte réduisent la géographie et l’ethnographie des différents peuples à la simple et pratique distinction de deux nations et de deux territoires ; ceux des Fidèles et des Infidèles. L’Infidèle est « harby », c’est-à-dire ennemi. L’islam proscrit la nation des Infidèles, établissant un état d’hostilité permanente entre le musulman et l’incroyant. Dans ce sens, les navires pirates des États Berbères furent la flotte sainte de l’Islam. Comment, donc, l’existence de chrétiens sujets de la Porte [l’empire turc]  peut-elle être conciliée avec le Coran ? » ; voir, plus loin, la même idée chez Michel Onfray]

“If a town,” says the Musulman legislation, “surrenders by capitulation, and its habitants consent to become rayahs, that is, subjects of a Musulman prince without abandoning their creed, they have to pay the kharatch (capitation tax), when they obtain a truce with the faithful, and it is not permitted any more to confiscate their estates than to take away their houses … In this case their old churches form part of their property, with permission to worship therein. But they are not allowed to erect new ones. They have only authority for repairing them, and to reconstruct their decayed portions. At certain epochs commissaries delegated by the provincial governors are to visit the churches and sanctuaries of the Christians, in order to ascertain that no new buildings have been added under pretext of repairs. If a town is conquered by force, the inhabitants retain their churches, but only as places of abode or refuge, without permission to worship.”. »
C / g) Alexis de Tocqueville (1805-1859) :

 » Caractère des conquêtes de la Révolution. Il arriva alors quelques chose d’analogue à ce qu’on vit à la naissance de l’islamisme, quand les Arabes convertirent la moitié de la Terre en la ravageant.  » De la Constituante au 18 Brumaire.

 » L’architecture peint les besoins et les mœurs. Celle-ci ne résulte pas seulement de la chaleur du climat ; elle peint à merveille l’état social et politique des populations musulmanes et orientales : la polygamie, la séquestration des femmes, l’absence de toute vie publique, un gouvernement tyrannique et ombrageu qui force de cacher sa vie et rejette toutes les affections de cœur dans l’intérieur de la famille.  » Voyage en Algérie, 7 mai 1841.

 » Une dernière querelle et je vous quitte. En même temps que vous êtes si sévère pour cette religion qui a tant contribué cependant à nous placer à la tête de l’espèce humaine, vous me paraissez avoir un certain faible pour l’islamisme. Cela me rappelle un autre de mes amis que j’ai retrouvé en Afrique devenu mahométan. Cela ne m’a point entraîné. J’ai beaucoup étudié le Coran à cause surtout de notre position vis-à-vis des populations musulmanes en Algérie et dans tout l’Orient. Je vous avoue que je suis sorti de cette étude avec la conviction qu’il y avait eu dans le monde, à tout prendre, peu de religions aussi funestes aux hommes que celle de Mahomet. Elle est, à mon sens, la principale cause de la décadence aujourd’hui si visible du monde musulman et quoique moins absurde que le polythéisme antique, ses tendances sociales et politiques étant, à mon avis, infiniment plus à redouter, je la regarde relativement au paganisme lui-même comme une décadence plutôt que comme un progrès. Voilà ce qu’il me serait possible, je crois, de vous démontrer clairement, s’il vous venait jamais la mauvaise pensée de vous faire circoncire… » Lettre à Gobineau, 22 octobre 1843,

« L’islam, c’est la polygamie, la séquestration des femmes, l’absence de toute vie publique, un gouvernement tyrannique et ombrageux qui force de cacher sa vie et rejette toutes les affections du coeur du côté de l’intérieur de la famille. »
Voyages en Angleterre, Irlande, Suisse et Algérie.

« Mahomet a fait descendre du ciel, et a placé dans le Coran, non-seulement des doctrines religieuses, mais des maximes politiques, des lois civiles et criminelles, des théories scientifiques. L’évangile ne parle au contraire que des rapports généraux des hommes avec Dieu, et entre eux. Hors de là, il n’enseigne rien et n’oblige à rien croire. Cela seul, entre mille autres raisons, suffit pour montreur que la première de ces deux religions ne saurait dominer longtemps dans des temps de lumières et de démocratie, tandis que la seconde est destinée à régner dans ces siècles comme dans tous les autres. »
De la Démocratie en Amérique, tome III, 1ère partie « Influence de la Démocratie sur le Mouvement intellectuel », chapitre V  » Comment, aux États-Unis, la religion sait se servir des instincts démocratiques « , Paris: Pagnerre, 1848.

« Dans leur correspondance de l’année 1843 [avec Gobineau], de Tocqueville s’affirme comme chrétien et dénigre l’islam, auquel il impute la « décadence du monde arabe, en disant s’appuyet sur sa lecture du « Koran » faite en relation avec son intéret pour l’Algérie et l’Orient (entendons le Proche-Orient).
On doit rappeler aussi que de Tocqueville a utilisé le modèle de la diffusion de l’islam pour rendre compte de la Révolution française, au passage et d’un seul mot, mais qui pèse. Il soutient que la Révolution française ne fut pas, essentiellement, un mouvement qui visait l’Église : elle avait pour but d’ « énerver » le pouvoir politique. Propagande, prosélytisme : la Révolution française a « opéré » par rapport à ce monde comme les religions par rapport à l’autre monde. Et c’est pourquoi elle eut un air de « révolution religieuse » qui a « épouvanté les contemporains, ou plutôt elle est devenue elle-même une sorte de religion nouvelle, religion imparfaite, il est vrai sans Dieu, sans culte et sans autre vie, mais qui néanmoins, comme l’islamisme, a inondé toute la Terre de ses soldats, de ses apôtres et de ses martyrs » (souligné par nous). Lorsque paraissent ces lignes, en 1856, le voyage de de Tocqueville en Algérie est loin, de même que sa première dépréciation de l’islam. Aussi se construit un nouveau paradoxe, celui d’un conflit entre deux entités similaires : la Révolution française qui, ayant propagé l’idée d’égalité universelle, légitime l’entreprise coloniale en Algérie musulmane est analogue à une autre révolution religieuse, celle qui a fait naître le monde musulman ; ce sont donc deux grandes religions qui s’affrontent, l’une qui a produit de la « grandeur », l’autre de la « décadence ».
Dominique Colas, article « Tocqueville », in François Pouillon, Dictionnaire des orientalistes de langue française, Paris : Karthala éditions, 2008.
C / h) Ernest RENAN (1823-1892) :

« La nature humaine, plus forte au fond que tous les systèmes religieux, sait trouver des secrets pour reprendre sa revanche. L’islamisme, par la plus flagrante contradiction, n’a-t-il pas vu dans son sein un développement de science purement rationaliste ? Kepler, Newton, Descartes et la plupart des fondateurs de la science moderne étaient des croyants. Étrange illusion, qui prouve au moins la bonne foi de ceux qui entreprirent cette œuvre, et plus encore la fatalité qui entraîne l’esprit humain engagé dans les voies du rationalisme à une rupture absolue, que d’abord il repousse, avec toute religion positive ! […] L’islamisme qui, par un étrange destin, à peine constitué comme religion dans ses premières années est allé depuis acquérant sans cesse un nouveau degré de force et de stabilité, l’islamisme périra par l’influence seule de la science européenne, et ce sera notre siècle qui sera désigné par l’histoire comme celui où commencèrent à se poser les causes de cet immense événement. La jeunesse d’Orient, en venant dans les écoles d’Occident puiser la science européenne, emportera avec elle ce qui en est le corollaire inséparable, la méthode rationnelle, l’esprit expérimental, le sens du réel, l’impossibilité de croire à des traditions religieuses évidemment conçues en dehors de toute critique. »
L’Avenir de la science, III, 1848.

« L’islamisme ne peut exister que comme religion officielle ; quand on le réduira à l’état de religion libre ou individuelle, il périra. L’islamisme n’est pas seulement une religion d’État, comme l’a été le catholicisme en France, sous Louis XIV, comme il l’est encore en Espagne ; c’est la religion excluant l’État, c’est une organisation dont les États pontificaux seuls en Europe offraient le type. […] L’islam est la plus complète négation de l’Europe ; l’islam est le fanatisme […] le dédain de la science, la suppression de la société civile ; c’est l’épouvantable simplicité de l’esprit sémitique, rétrécissant le cerveau humain, le fermant à toute idée délicate, à tout sentiment fin, à toute recherche rationnelle, pour le mettre en face d’une éternelle tautologie : Dieu est Dieu. »
De la part des peuples sémitiques dans l’histoire de la civilisation, 1862.

« Toute personne un peu instruite des choses de notre temps voit clairement l’infériorité actuelle des pays musulmans, la décadence des États gouvernés par l’islam, la nullité intellectuelle des races qui tiennent uniquement de cette religion leur culture et leur éducation.[…] le musulman a le plus profond mépris pour l’instruction, pour la science, pour tout ce qui constitue l’esprit européen. […] l’islam est à mille lieues de tout ce qui peut s’appeler rationalisme ou science. {…] Le terrible coup de vent de l’islam arrêta net, pendant une centaine d’années, tout ce beau développement iranien. […]. Une ville qui a eu dans l’histoire de l’esprit humain un rôle tout à fait à part, la ville de Harran, était restée païenne et avait gardé toute la tradition scientifique de l’antiquité grecque ; toutes […] l’élément vraiment fécond de tout cela venait de la Grèce. […] L’astronomie n’est tolérée que pour la partie qui sert à déterminer la direction de la prière. […] , parmi les philosophes et les savants dits arabes, il n’y en a guère qu’un seul, Alkindi, qui soit d’origine arabe ; » […]
« Les libéraux qui défendent l’islam ne le connaissent pas. L’islam, c’est l’union indiscernable du spirituel et du temporel, c’est le règne d’un dogme, c’est la chaîne la plus lourde que l’humanité ait jamais portée. […] Faire honneur à l’islam de la philosophie et de la science qu’il n’a pas tout d’abord anéanties, c’est comme si l’on faisait honneur aux théologiens des découvertes de la science moderne. […] Faire honneur à l’islam d’Avicenne, d’Avenzoar, d’Averroès, c’est comme si l’on faisait honneur au catholicisme de Galilée [ou au judaïsme de la philosophie de Spinoza]. […] L’islam a réussi pour son malheur. En tuant la science, il s’est tué lui-même, et s’est condamné dans le monde à une complète infériorité. »
L’islamisme et la science, Conférence faite à la Sorbonne le 29 mars 1883, publiée dans Discours et conférences, 1887, texte repris dans : Œuvres complètes, tome 1, Calmann-Lévy, 1947, pages 947-965.
C / i) Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880) :

« Sans doute par l’effet de mon vieux sang normand, depuis la guerre d’Orient [1875-1878], je suis indigné contre l’Angleterre, indigné à en devenir Prussien ! Car enfin, que veut-elle ? Qui l’attaque ? Cette prétention de défendre l’Islamisme (qui est en soi une monstruosité) m’exaspère. Je demande, au nom de l’humanité, à ce qu’on broie la Pierre-Noire, pour en jeter les cendres au vent, à ce qu’on détruise la Mecque, et que l’on souille la tombe de Mahomet. Ce serait le moyen de démoraliser le Fanatisme. »
Lettre à Edma Roger des Genettes, 1er mars 1878.

Commentaire pris sur facebook en janvier 2015 :

 » Hollande se rend en Arabie séoudite. Va-t-il offrir au nouveau roi Salmane, en guise de cadeau pour son avènement, le tome V de la correspondance de Flaubert ? Il y lirait, page 366 (lettre du 1/3/1878) : « Cette prétention de défendre l’islam* (qui est, en soi, une monstruosité) m’exaspère. Je demande, au nom de l’Humanité, à ce qu’on broie la Pierre-Noire, pour en jeter les cendres au vent, à ce qu’on détruise La Mecque, et que l’on souille la tombe de Mahomet. Ce serait le moyen de démoraliser le Fanatisme. »
(* En fait Flaubert écrit « islamisme ». Mais au XIXe, ainsi qu’on le voit chez Renan et que l’atteste Littré, « islamisme », qui fait parallèle avec « christianisme », est couramment employé au sens d’ « islam ». Le sens moderne d’ « islamisme », désignant la conception intégriste et fanatique de l’islam, n’existe pas alors).  »
Pourtant, bien des critiques rapportées sur cette page de mon blog, y compris celles de Bossuet, Vigny et Renan, s’appliquent parfaitement à l’islamisme contemporain et à son obscurantisme.
C / j) Frédéric Nietzsche (1844-1900) :

Fragments posthumes, 1878-1888,

N I 3c, 1878 – juillet 1879 : 39[8] : — sur l’islam [—  über den Islam ?]
E. [Edmond] Schérer, études litteraires.
Ambros III Band (Renaissance bis Palestrina).
Peschel, Völkerkunde.
Renan usw.

M III 4a, automne 1881 : 5[17] :
« Mon orgueil consiste en ce que « j’ai une origine » – c’est pourquoi je n’ai pas besoin de gloire. En tout ce qui pouvait émouvoir Zoroastre, Moïse, Mahomet, Jésus, Platon, Brutus, Spinoza, Mirabeau, moi aussi d’ores et déjà j’étais vivant et pour maintes choses ce n’est qu’en moi que vient au jour ce qui nécessitait quelques millénaires pour passer de l’état embryonnaire à celui de pleine maturité. Nous sommes les premiers aristocrates de l’esprit – ce n’est qu’à partir de maintenant que commence l’esprit historien. »
[Im Alterthum hatte jeder höhere Mensch die Begierde nach dem Ruhme — das kam daher, daß jeder mit sich die Menschheit anzufangen glaubte und sich genügende Breite und Dauer nur so zu geben wußte, daß er sich in alle Nachwelt hinein dachte, als mitspielenden Tragöden der ewigen Bühne. Mein Stolz dagegen ist „ich habe eine Herkunft“ — deshalb brauche ich den Ruhm nicht. In dem, was Zarathustra, Moses, Muhamed Jesus Plato Brutus Spinoza Mirabeau bewegte, lebe ich auch schon, und in manchen Dingen kommt in mir erst reif an’s Tageslicht, was embryonisch ein paar Jahrtausende brauchte. Wir sind die ersten Aristokraten in der Geschichte des Geistes — der historische Sinn beginnt erst jetzt.]

W II 5, printemps 1888 : 14[180] : « le mahométisme, en tant que c’est une religion pour des hommes, a un profond mépris pour la sentimentalité et l’hypocrisie du christianisme … une religion de femmes, comme il la ressent – » [der Muhammedanismus, als eine Religion für Männer, hat eine tiefe Verachtung für die Sentimentalität und Verlogenheit des Christenthums… einer Weibs-Religion, als welche er sie fühlt —]

14[204] : [Muhammedanismus hat von den Christen wiederum gelernt : die Benutzung des „Jenseits“ als Straf-Organ.]
L’Antéchrist,
« Quel est tout ce que, plus tard, Mahomet prit au christianisme ? L’invention de Paul, son moyen de la tyrannie des prêtres, de la formation de troupeaux : la croyance en l’immortalité — cela s’appelle la doctrine du « Jugement ». » [Was allein entlehnte später Muhamed dem Christenthum? Die Erfindung des Paulus, sein Mittel zur Priester-Tyrannei, zur Heerden-Bildung den Unsterblichkeits-Glauben — das heisst die Lehre vom „Gericht“…]
§ 42.

« Le « saint mensonge » est commun à Confucius, aux lois de Manou, à Mahomet, à l’Église chrétienne – : il ne manque pas chez Platon. « La vérité est là » : partout où l’on entend ça, cela signifie que le prêtre ment … » [Die „heilige Lüge“ — dem Confucius, dem Gesetzbuch des Manu, dem Muhamed, der christlichen Kirche gemeinsam: sie fehlt nicht bei Plato. „Die Wahrheit ist da“: dies bedeutet, wo nur es laut wird, der Priester lügt…]
§ 55.

« Si l’Islam méprise le christianisme, il a là mille fois raison : l’Islam présuppose des hommes… » [Wenn der Islam das Christenthum verachtet, so hat er tausend Mal Recht dazu: der Islam hat Männer zur Voraussetzung…]
§ 59.
« Le christianisme nous a frustrés de la moisson de la culture antique, et, plus tard, il nous a encore frustrés de celle de la culture de l’islam. Le merveilleux monde culturel maure d’Espagne, au fond plus proche de nous, parlant plus à nos sens et à notre goût que Rome et la Grèce, a été foulée aux pieds (et je préfère ne pas penser par quels pieds !) — Pourquoi ? Parce qu’elle devait le jour à des instincts aristocratiques, à des instincts virils, parce qu’elle disait oui à la vie, avec en plus les exquis raffinements de la vie maure !… Les croisés combattirent plus tard quelque chose devant quoi ils auraient mieux fait de se prosterner dans la poussière — une civilisation en comparaison de laquelle même notre XIXe siècle semblerait pauvre et retardataire.[…] En soi, on ne devrait même pas avoir à choisir entre l’islam et le christianisme, pas plus qu’entre un Arabe et un Juif. La réponse est donnée d’avance : ici, nul ne peut choisir librement. Soit on est un tchandala, soit on ne l’est pas. « Guerre à outrance avec Rome ! Paix et amitié avec l’Islam. » C’est ce qu’a senti, c’est ce qu’a fait ce grand esprit fort, le seul génie parmi les empereurs allemands, Frédéric II. » [Das Christenthum hat uns um die Ernte der antiken Cultur gebracht, es hat uns später wieder um die Ernte der Islam-Cultur gebracht. Die wunderbare maurische Cultur-Welt Spaniens, uns im Grunde verwandter, zu Sinn und Geschmack redender als Rom und Griechenland, wurde niedergetreten — ich sage nicht von was für Füssen — warum? weil sie vornehmen, weil sie Männer-Instinkten ihre Entstehung verdankte, weil sie zum Leben Ja sagte auch noch mit den seltnen und raffinirten Kostbarkeiten des maurischen Lebens!… Die Kreuzritter bekämpften später Etwas, vor dem sich in den Staub zu legen ihnen besser angestanden hätte, — eine Cultur, gegen die sich selbst unser neunzehntes Jahrhundert sehr arm, sehr „spät“ vorkommen dürfte. — Freilich, sie wollten Beute machen: der Orient war reich… Man sei doch unbefangen! Kreuzzüge — die höhere Seeräuberei, weiter nichts! — Der deutsche Adel, Wikinger-Adel im Grunde, war damit in seinem Elemente: die Kirche wusste nur zu gut, womit man deutschen Adel hat… Der deutsche Adel, immer die „Schweizer“ der Kirche, immer im Dienste aller schlechten Instinkte der Kirche, — aber gut bezahlt… Dass die Kirche gerade mit Hülfe deutscher Schwerter, deutschen Blutes und Muthes ihren Todfeindschafts-Krieg gegen alles Vornehme auf Erden durchgeführt hat! Es giebt an dieser Stelle eine Menge schmerzlicher Fragen. Der deutsche Adelfehlt beinahe in der Geschichte der höheren Cultur: man erräth den Grund… Christenthum, Alkohol — die beiden grossen Mittel der Corruption… An sich sollte es ja keine Wahl geben, Angesichts von Islam und Christenthum, so wenig als Angesichts eines Arabers und eines Juden. Die Entscheidung ist gegeben, es steht Niemandem frei, hier noch zu wählen. Entweder ist man ein Tschandala oder man ist es nicht… „Krieg mit Rom auf’s Messer! Friede, Freundschaft mit dem Islam“: so empfand, so that jener grosse Freigeist, das Genie unter den deutschen Kaisern, Friedrich der Zweite. Wie? muss ein Deutscher erst Genie, erst Freigeist sein, um anständig zu empfinden? — Ich begreife nicht, wie ein Deutscher je christlich empfinden konnte…]
§ 60.

[Cf Julien Rochedy, 2 octobre 2014] :  » J’ai le tort d’être nietzschéen et de me rappeler des belles pages de mon maître sur l’Islam. J’ai le tort d’avoir lu et apprécié René Guénon. J’ai certainement le tort d’avoir beaucoup aimé le récit des Omeyyades et des Abbassides dans l’Histoire des civilisations de Will Durant, historien peu connu et pourtant absolument génial. J’ai le tort d’avoir des ami(e)s musulmans, dont certains étrangers qui déplorent d’ailleurs le comportement lamentable que peut avoir une partie de nos berbères à nationalité française qui se prétendent musulmans. Et puis il faut dire que j’ai un respect, un peu conventionnel peut-être, pour tout ce qui touche à la spiritualité des gens. C’est comme ça. Je dois sans doute tenir ce trait de ma propre éducation religieuse chez les bonnes sœurs. « ]. On a vu plus haut que Nietzsche n’est pas toujours tendre envers l’islam.

C / k) Jules Napoléon NEY (1849-1900, petit-fils du maréchal Ney) :

« Si nous ne nous étions limité à dessein le champ du présent travail, nous montrerions aux lecteurs de l’“Initiation” quelles éventualités redoutables menacent l’Europe chrétienne au courant du vingtième siècle. Il est à craindre qu’elle ne se trouve prise entre la marche en avant vers le nord des musulmans d’Afrique et la marche en avant vers l’ouest des musulmans d’Asie. Nous ne parlons pas de la réserve innombrable des peuples de race jaune qui, comme une invasion de sauterelles, viendra achever et clore l’œuvre destructive et dévastatrice si bien commencée par les Mahométans dans une Europe qui a oublié la solidarité qui devrait unir les nations menacées. »
(Napoléon Ney, Un danger européen : Les société secrètes musulmanes, V ; Paris : Georges Carré libraire-éditeur, 1890, page 20).

C / l) Winston Churchill (1874-1965) :

« How dreadful are the curses which Mohammedanism lays on its votaries ! Besides the fanatical frenzy, which is as dangerous in a man as hydrophobia in a dog, there is this fearful fatalistic apathy. The effects are apparent in many countries. Improvident habits, slovenly systems of agriculture, sluggish methods of commerce, and insecurity of property exist wherever the followers of the Prophet rule or live. A degraded sensualism deprives this life of its grace and refinement; the next of its dignity and sanctity. The fact that in Mohammedan law every woman must belong to some man as his absolute property – either as a child, a wife, or a concubine – must delay the final extinction of slavery until the faith of Islam has ceased to be a great power among men. Individual Moslems may show splendid qualities. Thousands become the brave and loyal soldiers of the Queen ; all know how to die; but the influence of the religion paralyses the social development of those who follow it. No stronger retrograde force exists in the world. Far from being moribund, Mohammedanism is a militant and proselytizing faith. It has already spread throughout Central Africa, raising fearless warriors at every step; and were it not that Christianity is sheltered in the strong arms of science – the science against which it had vainly struggled – the civilization of modern Europe might fall, as fell the civilization of ancient Rome. » (The River War : An Account of the Reconquest of the Sudan, volume II, 1999).
D / XXe siècle, avant la correction politique :

D / a) Jacob Burckhardt (1818-1897) :

« Celui qui ne cherche pas à exterminer les Musulmans ou n’en a pas les moyens, fait mieux de les laisser tranquilles ; on arrivera peut-être à s’emparer de leurs contrées désertiques, arides et dénudées, mais on ne pourra jamais les contraindre à se soumettre à une forme d’État non-coranique : leur sobriété leur assure une très grande indépendance individuelle, leur système d’esclavage et leur domination sur les Giaours leur permettent de maintenir intact leur mépris du travail – exception faite du travail agricole – mépris qui est nécessaire à leur pathos.

Le régime ottoman révèle une singulière continuité qui s’explique peut-être par un épuisement des forces destinées à une possible usurpation. Mais tout rapprochement avec la culture occidentale semble être absolument pernicieux pour les Musulmans, à commencer par les emprunts et les dettes d’État. »
Considérations sur l’histoire universelle (posthume, 1905), III, 3, « L’État conditionné par la religion ».

D / b) Alain Quellien, 1910 :

« L’Islamophobie. — Il y a toujours eu, et il y a encore, un préjugé contre l’Islam répandu chez les peuples de civilisation occidentale et chrétienne. Pour d’aucuns, le musulman est l’ennemi naturel et irréconciliable du chrétien et de l’Européen, l’islamisme est la négation de la civilisation, et la barbarie, la mauvaise foi et la cruauté sont tout ce qu’on peut attendre de mieux des mahométans. […] Il semble que cette prévention contre l’Islam soit un peu exagérée, le musulman n’est pas l’ennemi né de l’Européen (1), mais il peut le devenir par suite de circonstances locales et notamment lorsqu’il résiste à la conquête à main armée. » (Alain Quellien, La Politique musulmane dans l’Afrique occidentale française, seconde partie  » La politique musulmane « , chapitre premier  » Reproches adressés à l’Islam dans l’Afrique Occidentale « , pages 133-135, Paris, É. Larose, 1910).
1. On a vu plus haut que Karl Marx était d’un avis contraire.

André GIDE ;  » Ce jeune musulman, élève de [Louis] Massignon, qui vint un matin me parler et que j’envoyai à Marcel de Coppet : avec des larmes, des sanglots dans la voix, il racontait sa conviction profonde : l’Islam seul était en possession de la vérité qui pouvait apporter la paix au monde, résoudre les problèmes sociaux, concilier les plus irréductibles antagonismes des nations… Berdiaeff réserve ce rôle à l’orthodoxie grecque. De même le catholique ou le juif, chacun à sa religion propre. C’est au nom de Dieu qu’on se battra. Et comment en serait-il autrement, du moment que chaque religion prétend au monopole de la vérité révélée ? Car il ne s’agit plus ici de morale ; mais bien de révélation. C’est ainsi que les religions, chacune prétendant unir tous les hommes, les divisent. Chacune prétend être la seule à posséder la Vérité. La raison est commune à tous les hommes, et s’oppose à la religion, aux religions.  » (Journal, 14 avril 1933)
D / c) John M. Keynes (1883-1946) :

« My feelings about Das Kapital are the same as my feelings about the Koran. I know that it is historically important and I know that many people, not all of whom are idiots, find it a sort of Rock of Ages and containing inspiration. Yet when I look into it, it is to me inexplicable that it can have this effect. Its dreary, out-of-date, academic controversialising seems so extraordinarily unsuitable as material for the purpose. But then, as I have said, I feel just the same about the Koran. How could either of these books carry fire and sword round half the world? It beats me. Clearly there is some defect in my understanding. Do you believe both Das Kapital and the Koran? » (Lettre à George Bernard Shaw, 2 décembre 1934).
D / d) Claude Lévi-Strauss (1908-2009) :

« L’Islam me déconcertait par une attitude envers l’histoire contradictoire à la nôtre et contradictoire en elle-même : le souci de fonder une tradition s’accompagnait d’un appétit destructeur de toutes les traditions antérieures. (…)

Dans les Hindous, je contemplais notre exotique image, renvoyée par ces frères indo-européens évolués sous un autre climat, au contact de civilisations différentes, mais dont les tentations intimes sont tellement identiques aux nôtres qu’à certaines périodes, comme l’époque 19000, elles remontent chez nous aussi en surface.

Rien de semblable à Agra, où règnent d’autres ombres : celles de la Perse médiévale, de l’Arabie savante, sous une forme que beaucoup jugent conventionnelle. Pourtant, je défie tout visiteur ayant encore gardé un peu de fraîcheur d’âme de ne pas se sentir bouleversé en franchissant, en même temps que l’enceinte du Taj, les distances et les âges, accédant de plain-pied à l’univers des Mille et une Nuits […].

Pourquoi l’art musulman s’effondre-t-il si complètement dès qu’il cesse d’être à son apogée ? Il passe sans transition du palais au bazar. N’est-ce pas une conséquence de la répudiation des images ? L’artiste, privé de tout contact avec le réel, perpétue une convention tellement exsangue qu’elle ne peut être rajeunie ni fécondée. Elle est soutenue par l’or, ou elle s’écroule. […]

Si l’on excepte les forts, les musulmans n’ont construit dans l’Inde que des temples et des tombes. Mais les forts étaient des palais habités, tandis que les tombes et les temples sont des palais inoccupés. On éprouve, ici encore, la difficulté pour l’Islam de penser la solitude. Pour lui, la vie est d’abord communauté, et le mort s’installe toujours dans le cadre d’une communauté, dépourvue de participants. […]

N’est-ce pas l’image de la civilisation musulmane qui associe les raffinements les plus rares – palais de pierres précieuses, fontaines d’eau de rose, mets recouverts de feuilles d’or, tabac à fumer mêlé de perles pilées – servant de couverture à la rusticité des moeurs et à la bigoterie qui imprègne la pensée morale et religieuse ?

Sur le plan esthétique, le puritanisme islamique, renonçant à abolir la sensualité, s’est contenté de la réduire à ses formes mineures : parfums, dentelles, broderies et jardins. Sur le plan moral, on se heurte à la même équivoque d’une tolérance affichée en dépit d’un prosélytisme dont le caractère compulsif est évident. En fait, le contact des non-musulmans les angoisse. Leur genre de vie provincial se perpétue sous la menace d’autres genres de vie, plus libres et plus souples que le leur, et qui risquent de l’altérer par la seule contiguïté.

Plutôt que de parler de tolérance, il vaudrait mieux dire que cette tolérance, dans la mesure où elle existe, est une perpétuelle victoire sur eux-mêmes. En la préconisant, le Prophète les a placés dans une situation de crise permanente, qui résulte de la contradiction entre la portée universelle de la révélation et de la pluralité des fois religieuses. Il y a là une situation paradoxale au sens « pavlovien » , génératrice d’anxiété d’une part et de complaisance en soi-même de l’autre, puisqu’on se croit capable, grâce à l’Islam, de surmonter un pareil conflit. En vain d’ailleurs : comme le remarquait un jour devant moi un philosophe indien, les musulmans tirent vanité de ce qu’ils professent la valeur universelle de grand principes – liberté, égalité, tolérance – et ils révoquent le crédit à quoi ils prétendent en affirmant du même jet qu’ils sont les seuls à les pratiquer.

Un jour à Karachi, je me trouvais en compagnie de Sages musulmans, universitaires ou religieux. À les entendre vanter la supériorité de leur système, j’étais frappé de constater avec quelle insistance ils revenaient à un seul argument : sa simplicité. La législation islamique en matière d’héritage est meilleure que l’hindoue, parce qu’elle est plus simple. […] Tout l’Islam semble être, en effet, une méthode pour développer dans l’esprit des croyants des conflits insurmontables, quitte à les sauver par la suite en leur proposant des solutions d’une très grande (mais trop grande) simplicité. D’une main on les précipite, de l’autre on les retient au bord de l’abîme. Vous inquiétez-vous de la vertu de vos épouses ou de vos filles pendant que vous êtes en campagne ? Rien de plus simple, voilez-les et cloîtrez-les. C’est ainsi qu’on en arrive au burkah moderne, semblable à un appareil orthopédique […].

Chez les Musulmans, manger avec les doigts devient un système : nul ne saisit l’os de la viande pour en ronger la chair. De la seule main utilisable (la gauche étant impure, parce que réservée aux ablutions intimes) on pétrit, on arrache les lambeaux et quand on a soif, la main graisseuse empoigne le verre. En observant ces manières de table qui valent bien les autres, mais qui du point de vue occidental, semblent faire ostentation de sans-gêne, on se demande jusqu’à quel point la coutume, plutôt que vestige archaïque, ne résulte pas d’une réforme voulue par le Prophète – « ne faites pas comme les autres peuples, qui mangent avec un couteau » – inspiré par le même souci, inconscient sans doute, d’infantilisation systématique, d’imposition homosexuelle de la communauté par la promiscuité qui ressort des rituels de propreté après le repas, quand tout le monde se lave les mains, se gargarise, éructe et crache dans la même cuvette, mettant en commun, dans une indifférence terriblement autiste, la même peur de l’impureté associée au même exhibitionnisme. […]

[S]i un corps de garde pouvait être religieux, l’Islam paraîtrait sa religion idéale : stricte observance du règlement (prières cinq fois par jour, chacune exigeant cinquante génuflexions [sic]) ; revues de détail et soins de propreté (les ablutions rituelles) ; promiscuité masculine dans la vie spirituelle comme dans l’accomplissement des fonctions religieuses ; et pas de femmes.
[…]
Grande religion qui se fonde moins sur l’évidence d’une révélation que sur l’impuissance à nouer des liens au-dehors. En face de la bienveillance universelle du bouddhisme, du désir chrétien de dialogue, l’intolérance musulmane adopte une forme insconsciente chez ceux qui s’en rendent coupables ; car s’ils ne cherchent pas toujours, de façon brutale, à amener autrui à partager leur vérité, ils sont pourtant (et c’est plus grave) incapables de supporter l’existence d’autrui comme autrui. Le seul moyen pour eux de se mettre à l’abri du doute et de l’humiliation consiste dans une « néantisation » d’autrui, considéré comme témoin d’une autre foi et d’une autre conduite. La fraternité islamique est la converse d’une exclusive contre les infidèles qui ne peut pas s’avouer, puisque, en se reconnaissant comme telle, elle équivaudrait à les reconnaître eux-mêmes comme existants. […] Ce malaise ressenti au voisinage de l’Islam, je n’en connais que trop les raisons : je retrouve en lui l’univers d’où je viens ; l’Islam, c’est l’Occident de l’Orient. Plus précisément encore, il m’a fallu rencontrer l’Islam pour mesurer le péril qui menace aujourd’hui la pensée française. Je pardonne mal au premier de me présenter notre image, de m’obliger à constater combien la France est en train de devenir musulmane. […] Si, pourtant, une France de quarante-cinq millions d’habitants s’ouvrait largement sur la base de l’égalité des droits, pour admettre vingt-cinq millions de citoyens musulmans, même en grande proportion illettrés, elle n’entreprendrait pas une démarche plus audacieuse que celle à quoi l’Amérique dut de ne pas rester une petite province du monde anglo-saxon. […] pari dont l’enjeu est aussi grave que celui que nous refusons de risquer.

Le pourrons-nous jamais ? En s’ajoutant, deux forces régressives voient-elles leur direction s’inverser ? (…) [I]ci, à Taxila, dans ces monastères bouddhistes que l’influence grecque a fait bourgeonner de statues, je suis confronté à cette chance fugitive qu’eut notre Ancien Monde de rester un ; la scission n’est pas encore accomplie. Un autre destin est possible, celui, précisément, que l’Islam interdit en dressant sa barrière entre un Occident et un Orient qui, sans lui, n’auraient peut-être pas perdu leur attachement au sol commun où ils plongent leurs racines. (…)
[…]
Aujourd’hui, c’est par-dessus l’Islam que je contemple l’Inde ; mais celle de Bouddha, avant Mahomet qui, pour moi européen et parce que européen, se dresse entre notre réflexion et des doctrines qui en sont les plus proches comme le rustique empêcheur d’une ronde où les mains prédestinées à se joindre, de l’Orient et de l’Occident ont été par lui désunies. Quelle erreur allais-je commettre, à la suite de ces musulmans qui se proclament chrétiens et occidentaux et placent à leur Orient la frontière entre les deux mondes ! […] L’évolution rationnelle est à l’inverse de celle de l’histoire : l’Islam a coupé en deux un monde plus civilisé. Ce qui lui paraît actuel relève d’une époque révolue, il vit dans un décalage millénaire. Il a su accomplir une œuvre révolutionnaire ; mais comme celle-ci s’appliquait à une fraction attardée de l’humanité, en ensemençant le réel il a stérilisé le virtuel : il a déterminé un progrès qui est l’envers d’un projet. » Tristes Tropiques, 9e partie, xxxix, Paris : Plon, 1955, collection Terre Humaine.
D / e) André MALRAUX (1901-1976) :

 » La nature d’une civilisation, c’est ce qui s’agrège autour d’une religion. Notre civilisation est incapable de construire un temple ou un tombeau. Elle sera contrainte de trouver sa valeur fondamentale, ou elle se décomposera.
C’est le grand phénomène de notre époque que la violence de la poussée islamique. Sous-estimée par la plupart de nos contemporains, cette montée de l’islam est analogiquement comparable aux débuts du communisme du temps de Lénine. Les conséquences de ce phénomène sont encore imprévisibles. À l’origine de la révolution marxiste, on croyait pouvoir endiguer le courant par des solutions partielles. Ni le christianisme, ni les organisations patronales ou ouvrières n’ont trouvé la réponse. De même aujourd’hui, le monde occidental ne semble guère préparé à affronter le problème de l’islam. En théorie, la solution paraît d’ailleurs extrêmement difficile. Peut-être serait-elle possible en pratique si, pour nous borner à l’aspect français de la question, celle-ci était pensée et appliquée par un véritable homme d’État. Les données actuelles du problème portent à croire que des formes variées de dictature musulmane vont s’établir successivement à travers le monde arabe. Quand je dis « musulmane » je pense moins aux structures religieuses qu’aux structures temporelles découlant de la doctrine de Mahomet. Dès maintenant, le sultan du Maroc est dépassé et Bourguiba ne conservera le pouvoir qu’en devenant une sorte de dictateur. Peut-être des solutions partielles auraient-elles suffi à endiguer le courant de l’islam, si elles avaient été appliquées à temps. Actuellement, il est trop tard ! Les « misérables » ont d’ailleurs peu à perdre.
Ils préféreront conserver leur misère à l’intérieur d’une communauté musulmane. Leur sort sans doute restera inchangé. Nous avons d’eux une conception trop occidentale. Aux bienfaits que nous prétendons pouvoir leur apporter, ils préféreront l’avenir de leur race. L’Afrique noire ne restera pas longtemps insensible à ce processus. Tout ce que nous pouvons faire, c’est prendre conscience de la gravité du phénomène et tenter d’en retarder l’évolution.  »
3 juin 1956.
Elisabeth de Miribel, transcription par sténographie. Source Institut Charles de Gaulle. Valeurs Actuelles, n° 3395.

© http://www.malraux.org, 3 décembre 2009 et 24 février 2010

D / f) Elias Canetti (1905-1994) :

[Page 150 :] «  Il est quatre manières différentes de s’assembler pour les mahométans croyants.
1. Ils s’assemblent plusieurs fois par jour pour la prière, à laquelle les convoquent une voix venue d’en haut. – Il s’agit là de petits groupes rythmiques que l’on peut qualifier de meutes orantes. Le moindre mouvement est exactement prescrit et orienté dans une seule et unique direction, celle de La Mecque. Une fois par semaine, pour la prière du vendredi, ces meutes prennent les proportions de masses.
2. Ils s’assemblent pour la guerre sainte contre les incroyants.
[page 151] 3. Ils s’assemblent à La Mecque, lors du grand pèlerinage.
4. Ils s’assemblent pour le Jugement dernier.
Dans l’islam, comme dans toutes les religions, la plus grande importance revient aux masses invisibles. Mais plus nettement marquées que dans les autres religions universelles, ce sont ici des masses invisibles doubles qui se font face.
Dès que retentit la trompette du Jugement dernier, tous les morts sortent de leurs tombeaux et se rendent en tout hâte, comme à un commandement militaire, au champ du Jugement. Ils se présentent alors devant Dieu, en deux groupes immenses et séparés, d’un côté les croyants, les incroyants de l’autre, et Dieu les juge séparément.
Toutes les générations humaines sont ainsi rassemblées, et chacun a l’impression de n’avoir été mis au tombeau que la veille. Personne n’a la moindre idée des immenses espaces de temps pendant lesquels il a pu rester au tombeau. Sa mort fut sans rêve et sans mémoire. Mais tout le monde entend le son de la trompette. « Ce jour-là les hommes se présenteront par troupes. » Il est constamment question dans le Coran des troupes de ce grand moment. C’est la représentation de masse la plus vaste dont soit capable un mahométant croyant. Personne ne peut imaginer un nombre d’êtres humains plus grand que celui de tous ceux qui ont jamais vécu, poussés en rangs serrés en un seul endroit. C’est la seule masse qui ne s’accroisse plus, et sa densité est extrême, puisque chacun de ceux qui la constituent se présente à ce même endroit devant son juge.
Mais en dépit de son étendue et de sa densité, elle reste du début à la fin divisée en deux. Chacun sait parfaitement ce qui l’attend : l’espoir est chez les uns, l’effroi chez les autres. « Ce jour-là, il y aura des visages radieux, qui riront dans la joie ; et ce jour-là il y aura des visages couverts de poussière, recouverts de ténèbres, ce sont les incroyants, les impies. » Comme il s’agit d’une sentence absolument juste, – toute action est enregistrée et attestée par écrit –, nul ne saurait échapper à la moitié à laquelle il appartient de droit. Dans l’islam, la bipartition de la masse est inconditionnée, elle sépare la troupe des croyants de celle des incroyants. Leur destin, qui restera à jamais séparé, est de se combattre entre elles. La guerre sainte est un devoir sacré, et c’est ainsi que, dès cette vie, est préfigurée dans chaque bataille, quoique avec moins d’ampleur, la masse double du Jugement dernier.
Le mahométan garde sous les yeux l’image différente d’un devoir non moins sacré : le pélerinage à La Mecque. Il s’agit ici d’une masse lente, qui se forme progressivement par l’afflux venu de toutes les terres. Suivant la distance à laquelle le [page 152] croyant habite de La Mecque, elle peut s’étendre sur des semaines, des mois, voire des années. Le devoir d’accomplir ce pèlerinage au moins une fois dans sa vie colore toute l’existence terrestre de l’individu. Qui n’a pas été de ce pèlerinage n’a pas réellement vécu. C’est une expérience qui englobe pour ainsi dire le domaine tout entier qu’a recouvert la foi et le concentre en ce lieu unique d’où elle est partie. Cette masse de pèlerins est pacifique. Elle se consacre uniquement à atteindre son but. Sa tâche n’est pas de soumettre les incroyants, elle n’a que le devoir de parvenir à l’endroit prescrit et d’y avoir été.
C’est un singulier miracle qu’une ville de l’importance de La Mecque puisse contenir ces troupes innombrables de pèlerins. Le pèlerin espagnol Ibn Jubayr [1145-1217], qui fut à La Mecque vers la fin du XIIe siècle et en a laissé une description détaillée, est d’avis que même la plus grande ville du monde n’aurait pas assez de place pour tant de gens. Mais La Mecque, ajoute-t-il, a reçu en grâce une extensibilité particulière en faveur des masses ; on ne peut que la comparer à une femme enceinte qui se fait plus petite ou plus grande suivant la taille de l’embryon qu’elle porte.
Le grand moment du pèlerinage est la journée de la plaine d’Harafat. Sept cent mille hommes doivent s’y tenir debout. Les vides sont remplis par des anges qui se mêlent invisiblement aux hommes.
Mais quand le temps de paix est passé, la guerre sainte reprend ses droits. « Mahomet, dit un des meilleurs connaisseurs de l’Islam [Gobineau, dans Religions et philosophies dans l’Asie centrale, 1865], est le prophète de la lutte et de la guerre… Ce qu’il a commencé par faire dans son milieu arabe, c’est le testament qu’il laisse ensuite à l’avenir de sa communauté : guerre aux infidèles, extension non pas tellement de la foi que de sa sphère d’influence, qui est la sphère même de la puissance d’Allah. Ce qui compte pour les guerriers de l’Islam n’est pas tellement la conversion que la soumission des incroyants. »
Le Coran, le livre du prophète inspiré par Dieu, ne laisse aucun doute là-dessus. « Quand les mois saints sont passés, tuez les incroyants où que vous les trouviez ; saisissez-vous d’eux, refoulez-les et tendez-leur toutes les embuscades que vous pourrez. [Sourate IX, versets 4-5] » ».
[Masse und Macht [Foules et pouvoir , ou] Masse et puissance, (1960), chapitre III, « Meute et religion », § 6, « L’Islam, religion guerrière ». [Elias CANETTI, Masse et puissance, traduit de l’allemand par Robert Rovini, Paris : Gallimard, 1966, collection « Bibliothèque des Science Humaines »].

[Page 153 :] « Les religions de la lamentation funèbre ont marqué le visage de la Terre. Elles ont atteint dans le christianisme à une sorte de validité universelle. La meute qui leur sert de support n’a qu’une brève existence. […]
La légende autour de laquelle elle se forme est celle d’un homme ou d’un dieu qui a péri injustement. C’est toujours l’histoire d’une persécution, qu’il s’agisse d’une chasse ou d’une poursuite. Il peut s’y rattacher aussi un procès inique.

[Page 156 :] « […] La plus importante des religions funèbres est le christianisme. Nous aurons à reparler de sa forme catholique. Quant aux grands moments du christianisme, aux moments de véritable émotion de masse, ce n’est pas celui de la lamentation authentique, devenue rare, que nous décrirons, mais un autre : la solennité de la résurrection dans l’église du Saint-Sépulcre à Jérusalem..
La lamentation fuènbre elle-même, meute passionnée qui s’ouvre en véritable masse, la voici, imposante et inoubliable, dans la fête chiite du moharrem. »
Chapitre III, § 7, « Religions funèbres ».

« L’Islam, qui a tous les traits évidents d’une religion guerrière, a donné naissance, par scission, à une religion funèbre, celle des chiites. Il n’en est pas de plus concentrée, de plus extrême. C’est la religion officielle de l’Iran et du Yémen. Elle est très répandue aux Indes et en Irak.
Les chiites croient en un chef spirituel et temporel de leur communauté, qu’ils appellent l’iman. Sa position est plus marquante que celle du pape. Il est le dépositaire de la lumière divine. Il est infaillible. Seul le fidèle attaché à son iman peut être sauvé. « Qui meurt sans connaître le vrai iman de son temps, meurt de la mort de l’incroyant. ».
L’iman descend du prophète en ligne directe. Ali, gendre de Mahomet, marié à sa fille Fatima, passe pour le premier iman. Le prophète a confié à Ali certaines connaissances qu’il cachait à d’autres de ses adeptes, et elles se transmettent dans sa famille.Il a expressément nommé Ali son successeur, tant pour l’enseignement de la doctrine que pour le gouvernement. Le prophète lui-même a disposé qu’Ali est l’Élu ; à lui seul revient le titre de « souverain des croyants ». Les fils d’Ali, Hassan et Hussein, ont ensuite hérité cette fonction de lui ; ils étaient les petits-fils du prophète ; Hassan fut le deuxième iman, Hussein le troisième. Qui d’autre s’arrogeait le gouveernement des croyants était un usurpateur.
L’histoire politique de l’islam après la mort de Mahomet aida grandement à la formation d’une légende autour d’Ali et de ses fils. Ali ne fut pas tout de suite élu au califat. Au cours [page 157] des vingt-quatre années qui suivirent la mort de Mahomet, trois autres de ses frères d’armes revêtirent l’un après l’autre cette dignité suprême. Ali ne prit le pouvoir que lorsque le troisième fut mort, mais son gouvernement fut bref. Pendant un service divin du vendredi à la mosquée de Koufa, il fut assassiné par un fanatique de ses ennemis armé d’une épée empoisonnée. Son fils aîné Hassan vendit ses droits pour une somme de plusieurs millions de dirhams et se retira à Médine, ou il mourut quelques années plus tard des suites d’une vie dissolue.
La religion des chiites est centrée sur les souffrances de son cadet Hussein. Tout le contraire d’Hassan, il était réservé et sérieux, et menait une vie calme à Médine. Bien qu’il fut devenu chef du chiisme à la mort de son frère, il ne se mêla de longtemps à aucune agitation politique. Mais quand le calife de Damas mourut et que son fils voulut prendre sa succession, Hussein lui refusa sa soumission. Les habitants de la turbulente ville de Koufa en Irak écrivirent à Hussein, l’engageant à les rejoindre. Ils le voulaient pour calife et, une fois sur place, lui promettaient que tout lui reviendrait. Il se mit en route avec sa famille, ses femmes, ses enfants, et une petite troupe de partisans. Ce fut une longue route à travers le désert. Quand il parvint à proximité de la ville, elle avait déjà fait défection. Son gouverneur envoya à sa rencontre une forte troupe de cavaliers, qui lui demandèrent de se rendre. Il refusa, et on lui coupa l’accès des points d’eau. On le cerna avec sa petite troupe. Hussein et les siens, qui s’étaient courageusement mis sur la défensive, furent attaqués et écrasés dans la plaine de Kerbéla, le dixième jour du mois de moharrem, l’an 680 de notre ère. Quatre-vingt-sept hommes furent tués avec Hussein ; beaucoup étaient de sa famille et de celle de son frère. Son cadavre portait les marques de trente-trois coups de lance et de trente-quatre coups d’épée. Le commandant de la troupe ennemis donna l’ordre à ses gens de fouler le cadavre d’Hussein aux pieds de leurs chevaux. Le petit-fils du prophète fut piétiné par leurs sabots. Sa tête tranchée fut envoyée au calife de Damas. Celui-ci la frappa sur la bouche avec sa canne. Un ancien combattant de Mahomet, qui était présent, l’en réprimenda : « Ote ta canne, dit-il, j’ai vu la bouche du prophète baiser cette bouche ».
Les « épreuves de la race du prophète » sont devenues le thème propre de la littérature religieuse des chiites. « On reconnait, dit-on, les vrais croyants de ce proupe à leur corps amaigri de privations, à  leurs lèvres desséchées par la soif et à leurs yeux chassieux à force de pleurer. Le vrai chiite est persé- [page 158] cuté et misérable comme la famille pour laquelle il prend fait et cause et souffre. On considère bientot que c’est la vocation de la famille du prophète que de subir tourments et persécutions. »
Depuis la tragique journée de Kerbéla, l’histoire de cette famille est une suite continuelle de souffrances et de tourments. Une riche littérature de martyrologes s’attache à les narrer en poésie et en prose. Ils font l’objet des réunions de chiites pendant le premier tiers du mois de moharrem dont le dixième jour (achourah) est considéré comme l’anniversaire de la tragédie de Kerbéla. « Nos commémorations sont nos réunions funèbres » est la conclusion que donne un prince d’esprit chiite à un poème dans lequel il commémore les nombreuses épreuves de la famille du prophète. Pleurer, se lamenter et s’affliger à cause des malheurs et des persécutions de la famille d’Ali, de son martyrologe, voilà tout ce qui compte pour le vrai fidèle. […]
La contemplation de la personne et du destin d’Hussein est au centre sentimental de la foi. C’est la grande source de l’expérience religieuse. L’interprétation de sa mort en a fait un sacrifice volontaire, c’est par ses souffrances que les saints entrent au paradis. L’idée d’un médiateur est étrangère à l’islam, à l’origine. Elle est devenue prépondérante chez les chiites depuis la mort d’Hussein.
Le tombeau d’Hussein dans la plaine de Kerbéla a été très tôt le pèlerinage principal des chiites. […]
{Page 160 :] « Les vrais jeux de la passion, dans lesquels sont représentés dramatiquement les souffrances d’Hussein, ne sont devenus institution permanente que vers le début du XIXe siècle. [Joseph Arthur de ] Gobineau [1816-1882], qui a fait de longs séjours en Perse au milieu du siècle et plus tard, en a donné une relation captivante.
[…]
[Page 163 :] « Tout ce qui va se passer est de toute façon connu des spectateurs, il ne s’agit pas ici de tension dramatique, au sens que nous donnons à ce mot, mais d’une parfaite participation. […] Le cortège fait halte près d’un monastère chrétien : dès que l’abbé aperçoit la tête du martyr, il abjure sa foi et professe la religion de l’islam. […] Aucune religion n’a plus fortement insisté sur la lamentation. »
Chapitre III, « Meute et religion », §  8, « La fête du Moharrem chez les chiites ».

« Un examen sans prévention découvre dans le catholicisme une certaine lenteur, un calme, alliés à une grande ampleur. Sa principale maxime, offrir une place à tout le monde, est déjà contenue dans son nom.»
§ 9, «Masse et catholicisme »

« Une foule énorme de pèlerins (parfois six cent, sept cent mille) a pris position dans une cuvette entourée de hauteurs dénudées et se presse vers le « mont de la Commisération » qui en occupe le centre. Un prédicateur se tient en haut à l’endroit où se tint jadis le prophète, et fait un sermon solennel.
La foule lui répond en clamant : « Labbeika ya Rabbi, labbeika ! Nous attendons tes ordres, Seigneur, nous attendons tes ordres ! » Cet appel est répété sans arrêt au cours de la journée et atteint au délire. Puis, dans une sorte de subite peur collective – appelée ifâdha, fleuve –, tous s’enfuient, comme possédés, de l’Harafat jusqu’à la localité voisine, Mozdalifa, où ils passent la nuit, et le lendemain matin ils fuient Mozdalifa en direction de Mina. Tout le monde se précipite pêle-mêle, se heurte et se piétine, cette ruée coûte la vie à plusieurs pèlerins d’habitude. A Mina, on abat ensuite une énorme quantité d’animaux qui sont offerts en sacrifice ; leur chair est aussitôt consommée en commun. Le sol est imbibé de sang et parsemé de reliefs.
La station sur l’Harafat est le moment où l’attente d’ordres des masses de fidèles atteint son maximum d’intensité. C’est ce qu’exprime nettement la formule mille fois répétée dans sa concision : « Nous attendons tes ordres, Seigneur, nous attendons tes ordres ! » L’Islam, la résignation, est ici réduit à son plus simple dénominateur, état dans lequel les gens ne pensent plus qu’aux ordres du Seigneur et les appellent de toute leur force. Quant à la peut subite qui intervient à un signal et aboutit à une fuite en masse sans pareille, il y en a une explication probante : c’est le caractère ancien de l’ordre, qui est un ordre de fuite, qui perce en l’occurrence, mais sans que les croyants puissent savoir pourquoi il en est ainsi. L’intensité de leur attente en masse porte à son comble l’effet de l’ordre divin, jusqu’à ce qu’il redevienne soudain ce que tout ordre était à l’origine, un ordre de fuite. C’est l’ordre de Dieu qui met les hommes en fuite. La continuation de cette fuite le lendemain, après une nuit passée à Mozdalifa, montre que l’effet de l’ordre ne s’est toujours pas épuisé.
Selon la croyance de l’islam, c’est l’ordre direct de Dieu qui apporte la mort aux hommes. Ils essayent d’échapper à cette mort ; mais ils la reportent sur les animaux qu’ils abattent à Mina, terminus de leur fuite. Les animaux tiennent ici la place des hommes, substitution courante dans beaucoup de religions : pensons au sacrifice d’Abraham. Les hommes échappent ainsi au bain de sang que Dieu leur avait destiné. Ils se sont soumis à son ordre, si bien même qu’ils ont pris la fuite devant lui, et cependant ils ne l’ont pas frustré du sang qui lui revient : le sol est finalement imbibé du sang des animaux abattus en masse.
Il n’y a pas d’autre coutume religieuse qui montre plus concrètement la nature propre de l’ordre que la station sur l’Harafat, le wuqûf, et la fuite massive qui la suit, ifâdha. Dans cet Islam où le commandement religieux a beaucoup gardé de l’immédiateté de l’ordre lui-même, l’attente des ordres et l’ordre en général ont trouvé leur plus pure expression. »
Chapitre VIII, « L’ordre », § 6, « L’attente des ordres chez les pèlerins du mont Harafat ». [Merci à Jean-Baptiste de Morizur ; les indications entre crochets sont de Cl. C.]

E / Depuis la correction politique :
E / a) Claude Lévi-Strauss (1908-2009) :
« J’ai dit dans « Tristes Tropiques » ce que je pensais de l’islam. Bien que dans une langue plus châtiée, ce n’était pas tellement éloigné de ce pourquoi on fait aujourd’hui un procès à [Michel] Houellebecq. Un tel procès aurait été inconcevable il y a un demi-siècle ; ça ne serait venu à l’idée de personne. On a le droit de critiquer la religion. On a le droit de dire ce qu’on pense. […] Nous sommes contaminés par l’intolérance islamique. Il en va de même avec l’idée actuelle qu’il faudrait introduire l’enseignement de l’histoire des religions à l’école. J’ai lu que l’on avait chargé Régis Debray d’une mission sur cette question. Là encore, cela me semble être une concession faite à l’islam : à l’idée que la religion doit pénétrer en dehors de son domaine. Il me semble au contraire que la laïcité pure et dure avait très bien marché jusqu’ici. »
Visite à Lévi-Strauss, Le Nouvel Observateur, 10 octobre 2002.
« J’ai commencé à réfléchir à un moment où notre culture agressait d’autres cultures dont je me suis alors fait le défenseur et le témoin. Maintenant, j’ai l’impression que le mouvement s’est inversé et que notre culture est sur la défensive vis-à-vis des menaces extérieures, parmi lesquelles figure probablement l’explosion islamique. Du coup je me sens fermement et ethnologiquement défenseur de ma culture. » (propos recueillis par Dominique-Antoine Grisoni, « Un dictionnaire intime », in Magazine littéraire, hors-série, 2003).
E / b) Samuel P. Huntington (1927-2008) :

« Muslim Arabs received, valued, and made use of their « Hellenic inheritance for essentially utilitarian reasons. Being mostly interested in borrowing [l’emprunt de] certain external forms or technical aspects, the knew how to disregard all elements in the Greek body of thought that would conflict with the ‘truth’ as established in their fundamental Koranic norms and precepts » [Adda B. Bozeman, « Civilizations under stress », Virginia Quarterly Review, Winter ’75 (51), page 7] »
(The Clash of Civilizations, New York : Simon and Schuster, 1996, chapter 3)
« The argument is made that Islam has from the start been a religion of the sword [l’épée] and that it glorifies military virtues. Islam originates among « warring Bedouin nomadic tribes » and this « violent origin is stamped in the foundation of Islam. Muhammad himself is remembered as a hard fighter and a skillfull military commander » [James L. Payne, Why Nations Arm, Oxford : B. Blckwell, 1989, pages 125, 127]. (No one would say this about Christ or Buddha.) The doctrines of Islam, it is argued, dictate war against unbelievers [incroyants], and when the initial expansion of Islam tapered off [se ralentit], Muslim groups, quite contrary to doctrine, then fought among themselves. The ratio of fitna or internal conflicts to jihad shifted drastically in favor of the former. The Koran and other statements of Muslim beliefs contain few [peu de] prohibitions on violence, and a concept of nonviolence is absent from Muslim doctrine and practice. » (The Clash …, chapter 10)
E / c) Michel Houellebecq (Michel Thomas, né en 1956, prix Goncourt 2010) :

« Depuis l’apparition de l’islam, plus rien. Le néant intellectuel absolu, le vide total. Nous sommes devenus un pays de mendiants pouilleux. Des mendiants pleins de poux, voilà ce que nous sommes. Racaille, racaille […], il faut vous souvenir cher monsieur que l’islam est né en plein désert, au milieu de scorpions, de chameaux et d’animaux féroces de toutes espèces. Savez-vous comment j’appelle les musulmans? Les minables du Sahara. Voilà le seul nom qu’ils méritent […]. L’islam ne pouvait naître que dans un désert stupide, au milieu de bédouins crasseux qui n’avaient rien d’autre à faire ­ pardonnez-moi ­ que d’enculer leurs chameaux. » (Plateforme, Paris : Flammarion, 2001)

Platerforme, 2001. Merci à @EugenieBastie
« La lecture du Coran est une chose dégoûtante. Dès que l’islam naît, il se signale par sa volonté de soumettre le monde. Dans sa période hégémonique, il a pu apparaître comme raffiné et tolérant. Mais sa nature, c’est de soumettre. C’est une religion belliqueuse, intolérante, qui rend les gens malheureux. » Figaro Magazine, 25 août ­2001)

« Je me suis dit que le fait de croire à un seul Dieu était le fait d’un crétin, je ne trouvais pas d’autre mot. Et la religion la plus con, c’est quand même l’islam. Quand on lit le Coran, on est effondré … effondré ! La Bible, au moins, c’est très beau, parce que les juifs ont un sacré talent littéraire … ce qui peut excuser beaucoup de choses. […] L’islam est une religion dangereuse, et ce depuis son apparition. Heureusement, il est condamné. D’une part, parce que Dieu n’existe pas, et que même si on est con, on finit par s’en rendre compte. À long terme, la vérité triomphe. D’autre part l’islam est miné de l’intérieur par le capitalisme. Tout ce qu’on peut souhaiter, c’est qu’il triomphe rapidement. Le matérialisme est un moindre mal. Ses valeurs sont méprisables, mais quand même moins destructrices, moins cruelles que celles de l’islam. » (Lire, septembre 2001, pages 31-32).

M. H. fut accusé d’islamophobie ou de racisme anti-musulmans par des associations musulmanes ; à l’audience, il revendiqua le droit de critiquer les religions monothéistes : « Les textes fondamentaux monothéistes ne prêchent ni la paix, ni l’amour, ni la tolérance. Dès le départ, ce sont des textes de haine ». Le MRAP et la Ligue française des droits de l’homme (LDH) qui lui intentèrent un procès furent déboutés, le tribunal constatant que ces propos de relevaient du droit de critiquer des doctrines religieuses et que la critique d’une religion ne pouvait s’apparenter à des propos racistes (TGI de Paris, XVIIe chambre correctionnelle, 22 octobre 2002).

« The despair comes from saying good-bye to a civilization, however ancient. But in the end the Koran turns out to be much better than I thought, now that I’ve reread it—or rather, read it. The most obvious conclusion is that the jihadists are bad Muslims. Obviously, as with all religious texts, there is room for interpretation, but an honest reading will conclude that a holy war of aggression is not generally sanctioned, prayer alone is valid. So you might say I’ve changed my opinion. That’s why I don’t feel that I’m writing out of fear. I feel, rather, that we can make arrangements. The feminists will not be able to, if we’re being completely honest. But I and lots of other people will. » (« Scare Tactics: Michel Houellebecq on His New Book », interview par Jérôme Bourmeau, The Paris Review, 2 janvier 2015)
E / d) Robert Redeker (né en 1954) :

Texte de 2001 : « Aucune idéologie n’est plus rétrograde que l’islam, et, par rapport au capitalisme dont les Twin Towers, dans leur majestueuse beauté figuraient le symbole, la religion musulmane est une régression barbarisante. [..] Les Stoïciens nous ont légué, parmi leurs bienfaits, une logique des préférables. Est préférable, selon Zénon [de Citium] et Chrysippe, ce qui apporte le plus de bien, de beauté et de progrès. […] Le capitalisme, parce qu’il permet sans le nécessiter un plus ample développement de la liberté, parce qu’il a créé aussi de la richesse et de la beauté, est préférable à l’islam, tout comme la symbolique des Twin Towers est préférable aux discours proférés dans les mosquées. »
« Le discours de la cécité volontaire », Le Monde, 22 novembre 2001. Voir plus loin, § E / j), le texte de 2006.

E / e) Alain Finkielkraut (né en 1949) : « L’Occident vit sous le régime de la critique, et le monde musulman – élites laïques comprises – sous celui de la paranoïa. »
« Jamais les juifs ne se sont sentis aussi seuls », propos recueillis par Élisabeth Lévy, Marianne, 12 au 18 août 2002.
E / f) Philippe Nemo (né en 1949) : « Que l’esprit scienfique de l’Occident n’ait rien dû d’essentiel au monde musulman, on en a une preuve indirecte dans le fait que l’averroïsme n’eut guère de lendemains en islam même. Les sociétés musulmanes ne connurent pas, par la suite, le même développement du rationalisme et de la science, ni le même prométhéisme transformateur, caractéristiques des sociétés occidentales. C’est bien le signe qu’il régnait en islam un autre esprit. Ce qu’on peut lire à ce sujet dans la littérature anti-occidentaliste est intellectuellement bien faible. Le retard de l’islam, en termes de sciences, de techniques, de développement économique, serait dû à l’ « oppression » dont il aurait été victime de la part des puissances colonisatrices, qui auraient délibérément « bloqué » » son développement […]. Cette façon de présenter les choses n’est pas raisonnable. Si l’islam avait eu dans sa culture tous les éléments permettant un développement endogène, il se serait développé et n’aurait probablement pas, de ce fait, été colonisé. S’il n’y avait eu qu’un retard, la colonisation même lui aurait permis de le combler rapidement, selon le scénario qui s’est produit au Japon. Il faut donc croire qu’il y a, en matière de développement scientifique et économique, un problème de fond avec l’islam lui-même, je veux dire avec le rapport au monde que cette religion implique, avec le type de société qu’elle engendre. »
Qu’est-ce que l’Occident ?, Paris : PUF, 2004 (octobre), page 142, note 57.

E / g) Michel Onfray (né en 1959) :

Traité d’athéologie – Physique de la métaphysique, Paris : Grasset, 2005. Réédité en octobre 2006 en collection « Le Livre de Poche », n° 30 637.

« 1ère partie « Athéologie », III  » Vers une athéologie « , § 1  » Spectrographie du nihilisme « . […] revendication claire à presque toutes les pages du Coran d’un appel à détruire les infidèles, leur religion, leur culture, leur civilisation, mais aussi les juifs et les chrétiens — au nom d’un Dieu miséricordieux ! »
« II « Monothéismes », i « Tyrannies et servitudes des arrière-mondes », § 3 La kyrielle des interdits. […] Les Évangiles n’interdisent ni le vin ni le porc, ni aucun aliments, pas plus qu’ils n’obligent à porter des vêtements particuliers. L’appartenance à la communauté chrétienne suppose l’adhésion au message évangélique, pas aux détails de prescription maniaque. […] Juifs et musulmans obligent à penser Dieu dans chaque seconde de la vie quotidienne.
i, § 5. Tenir le corps en respect.  Comment comprendre ces séries d’interdits juifs et musulmans – si semblables – sinon par l’association systématique du corps à l’impureté ? Corps sale, malpropre, corps infecté, corps de matières viles, corps libidinal, corps malodorant, corps de fluides et de liquides, corps infectés, corps malades, corps de morts, de chiens et de femmes, corps de déchets, corps de saletés, corps sanguinolent, corps puant, corps sodomite, corps stérile, corps infécond, corps détestable …

ii  » Autodafés de l’intelligence », § 3 Haine de la science. L’instrumentalisation religieuse de la science soumet la raison à un usage domestique et théocratique. En terre d’islam, la science ne se pratique pas pour elle-même mais pour l’augmentation de la pratique religieuse. Depuis des siècles de culture musulmane on ne pointe aucune invention ou aucune recherche, aucune découverte notable sur le terrain de la science laïque.

IV « Théocratie », i « Petite théorie du prélèvement », § 7 Allah n’est pas doué pour la logique.
« L’interdit juif de tuer et simultanément l’éloge de l’holocauste par les mêmes ; l’amour du prochain chrétien et, en même temps, la légitimation de la violence par la colère prétendument dictée par Dieu, voilà deux problèmes spécifiquement bibliques. Et il en va de même avec le troisième livre monothéiste, le Coran, lui aussi chargé de potentialités monstrueuses. »
i, § 8 Inventaire des contradictions. Allah ne cesse d’apparaître dans le Coran comme un guerrier sans pitié.
iii « Pour une laïcité post-chrétienne »,
§ 1 « Le goût musulman du sang [et du feu !!]. En bonne synthèse des deux monothéismes qui le précèdent, qu’il acclimate au désert arabe régi par le tribal et le féodal, l’islam reprend à son compte le pire des dits juifs et chrétiens : la communauté élue, le sentiment de supériorité, le local transformé en global, le particulier élargi à l’universel, la soumission corps et âme à l’idéal ascétique, le culte de la pulsion de mort, la théocratie indexée sur l’extermination du divers – esclavage, colonialisme, guerre, razzia, guerre totale, expéditions punitives, meurtres, etc. […] l’islam refuse par essence l’égalité métaphysique, ontologique, religieuse, donc politique. Le Coran l’enseigne : au sommet les musulmans, en dessous les chrétiens […] Enfin, après le musulman, le chrétien et le juif, arrive en quatrième position, toutes catégories confondues dans la réprobation générale, le groupe des incroyants, infidèles, mécréants, polythéistes, et, bien sûr, athées … […] La loi coranique qui interdit de tuer ou de commettre des délits ou des massacres sur son prochain concerne seulement de manière restrictive les membres de la communauté : l’umma. Comme chez les juifs. »

iii, § 2 « Le local comme universel. En lecteurs de Carl Schmidt qu’ils ne sont pas, les musulmans coupent le monde en deux : les amis, les ennemis [voir plus haut la même idée chez Karl Marx]. D’un côté, les frères en islam, de l’autre, les autres, tous les autres. Dâr al-islam contre dar al-harb : deux univers irréductibles, incompatibles, régis par des relations sauvages et brutales : un prédateur une proie, un mangeur un mangé, un dominant un dominé. […] Une vision du monde pas bien éloignée de celle d’Hitler qui justifie les logiques de marquage, de possession, de gestion et d’extension de territoire.

IV, iii, 5 Du fascisme musulman. […] Le renversement du shah d’Iran en 1978 et la prise de tous les pouvoirs par l’ayatollah Khomeyni quelque temps plus tard avec cent quatre-vingt mille mollahs, inaugurent un réel fascisme musulman – toujours en place un quart de siècle plus tard, avec la bénédiction de l’Occident silencieux et oublieux. Loin de signifier l’émergence de la spiritualité politique qui fait défaut aux Occidentaux, comme le croit faussement Michel Foucault en octobre 1978, la révolution iranienne accouche d’un fascisme islamique inaugural dans l’histoire de cette religion.

IV, iii, 7 L’islam, structurellement archaïque.

IV, iii, 8 « Thématiques fascistes. Fascisme et et islamisme communient dans une logique mystique […] La théocratie islamique s’appuie, – comme tout fascisme – sur une logique hypermorale. […] Tout ce qui définit habituellement le fascisme se retrouve dans la proposition théorique et la pratique du gouvernement islamique : la masse dirigée par un chef charismatique, inspiré ; le mythe, l’irrationnel, la mystique promus au rang de moteur de l’Histoire ; la loi et le droit créés par la parole du chef ; l’aspiration à abolir un vieux monde pour en créer un nouveau – nouvel homme, nouvelles valeurs ; le vitalisme de la vision du monde doublé d’une passion thanatophilique sans fond ; la guerre expansionniste vécue comme preuve de la santé de la nation ; la haine des Lumières – raison, marxisme (1), science, matérialisme, livres ; le régime de terreur policière ; l’abolition de toute séparation entre sphère privée et domaine public ; la construction d’une société close ; la dilution de l’individu dans la communauté ; sa réalisation dans la perte de soi et le sacrifice salvateur ; la célébration des vertus guerrières – virilité, machisme, fraternité, camaraderie, discipline, misogynie ; la destruction de toute résistance ; la militarisation de la politique ; la suppression de toute liberté individuelle ; la critique foncière de l’idéologie des droits de l’homme ; l’imprégnation idéologique permanente ; l’écriture de l’histoire avec slogans négateurs – antisémites, antimarxistes (1), anticapitalistes, antiaméricains, antimodernes, antioccidentaux ; la famille promue premier maillon du tout organique. Peu ou prou, cette série autorise la définition d’un contenu pour le fascisme, les fascismes. La théocratie brode toujours avec des variations sur ce thème … »

1. Il est étonnant de voir un philosophe du XXIe siècle ranger cette idéologie totalitaire qu’est le marxisme parmi les Lumières, et l’antimarxisme dans le fascisme.

Traité d’athéologie – Physique de la métaphysique, Paris : Grasset, 2005. Réédité en 2006 en collection « Le Livre de Poche », n° 30 637.
E / h) Régis Debray : « Une religion qui a eu sa Renaissance d’abord et son Moyen-Âge ensuite. »
Intervention à « Culture et dépendances », France 3, 2 novembre 2005.

E / i) Velasio de Paolis : « Le problème est que l’islam est fermé au point de ne pas admettre la réciprocité. »
Mgr Velasio de Paolis, secrétaire du Tribunal de la signature apostolique, La Stampa, 22 février 2006.

E / j) Robert Redeker (né en 1954) :

Texte de 2006 :«  Les réactions suscitées par l’analyse de Benoît XVI sur l’islam et la violence [discours de Ratisbonne, 12 septembre 2006] s’inscrivent dans la tentative menée par cet islam d’étouffer ce que l’Occident a de plus précieux qui n’existe dans aucun pays musulman : la liberté de penser et de s’exprimer.

L’islam essaie d’imposer à l’Europe ses règles : ouverture des piscines à certaines heures exclusivement aux femmes, interdiction de caricaturer cette religion, exigence d’un traitement diététique particulier des enfants musulmans dans les cantines, combat pour le port du voile à l’école, accusation d’islamophobie contre les esprits libres.

Comment expliquer l’interdiction du string à Paris-Plages, cet été ? Étrange fut l’argument avancé : risque de « troubles à l’ordre public ». Cela signifiait-il que des bandes de jeunes frustrés risquaient de devenir violents à l’affichage de la beauté ? Ou bien craignait-on des manifestations islamistes, via des brigades de la vertu, aux abords de Paris-Plages ?

Pourtant, la non-interdiction du port du voile dans la rue est, du fait de la réprobation que ce soutien à l’oppression contre les femmes suscite, plus propre à « troubler l’ordre public » que le string. Il n’est pas déplacé de penser que cette interdiction traduit une islamisation des esprits en France, une soumission plus ou moins consciente aux diktats de l’islam. Ou, à tout le moins, qu’elle résulte de l’insidieuse pression musulmane sur les esprits. Islamisation des esprits : ceux-là même qui s’élevaient contre l’inauguration d’un Parvis Jean-Paul-II à Paris ne s’opposent pas à la construction de mosquées. L’islam tente d’obliger l’Europe à se plier à sa vision de l’homme.

Comme jadis avec le communisme, l’Occident se retrouve sous surveillance idéologique. L’islam se présente, à l’image du défunt communisme, comme une alternative au monde occidental. À l’instar du communisme d’autrefois, l’islam, pour conquérir les esprits, joue sur une corde sensible. Il se targue d’une légitimité qui trouble la conscience occidentale, attentive à autrui : être la voix des pauvres de la planète. Hier, la voix des pauvres prétendait venir de Moscou, aujourd’hui elle viendrait de La Mecque ! Aujourd’hui à nouveau, des intellectuels incarnent cet œil du Coran, comme ils incarnaient l’œil de Moscou hier. Ils excommunient pour islamophobie, comme hier pour anticommunisme.

Dans l’ouverture à autrui, propre à l’Occident, se manifeste une sécularisation du christianisme, dont le fond se résume ainsi : l’autre doit toujours passer avant moi. L’Occidental, héritier du christianisme, est l’être qui met son âme à découvert. Il prend le risque de passer pour faible. À l’identique de feu le communisme, l’islam tient la générosité, l’ouverture d’esprit, la tolérance, la douceur, la liberté de la femme et des mœurs, les valeurs démocratiques, pour des marques de décadence.

Ce sont des faiblesses qu’il veut exploiter au moyen « d’idiots utiles », les bonnes consciences imbues de bons sentiments, afin d’imposer l’ordre coranique au monde occidental lui-même.

Le Coran est un livre d’inouïe violence. Maxime Rodinson [1915-2004] énonce, dans l’Encyclopédia Universalis, quelques vérités aussi importantes que taboues en France. D’une part, « Muhammad révéla à Médine des qualités insoupçonnées de dirigeant politique et de chef militaire (…) Il recourut à la guerre privée, institution courante en Arabie (…) Muhammad envoya bientôt des petits groupes de ses partisans attaquer les caravanes mekkoises, punissant ainsi ses incrédules compatriotes et du même coup acquérant un riche butin ».

D’autre part, « Muhammad profita de ce succès pour éliminer de Médine, en la faisant massacrer, la dernière tribu juive qui y restait, les Qurayza, qu’il accusait d’un comportement suspect » . Enfin, « après la mort de Khadidja, il épousa une veuve, bonne ménagère, Sawda, et aussi la petite Aisha, qui avait à peine une dizaine d’années. Ses penchants érotiques, longtemps contenus, devaient lui faire contracter concurremment une dizaine de mariages ».

Exaltation de la violence : chef de guerre impitoyable, pillard, massacreur de juifs et polygame, tel se révèle Mahomet à travers le Coran.

De fait, l’Église catholique n’est pas exempte de reproches. Son histoire est jonchée de pages noires, sur lesquelles elle a fait repentance. L’Inquisition, la chasse aux sorcières, l’exécution des philosophes [Giordano] Bruno [1548-1600] et [Giulio Cesare] Vanini [1585-1619], ces mal-pensants épicuriens, celle, en plein XVIIIe siècle, du chevalier de La Barre [1745-1766] pour impiété, ne plaident pas en sa faveur. Mais ce qui différencie le christianisme de l’islam apparaît : il est toujours possible de retourner les valeurs évangéliques, la douce personne de Jésus contre les dérives de l’Église.

Aucune des fautes de l’Église ne plonge ses racines dans l’Évangile. Jésus est non-violent. Le retour à Jésus est un recours contre les excès de l’institution ecclésiale. Le recours à Mahomet, au contraire, renforce la haine et la violence. Jésus est un maître d’amour, Mahomet un maître de haine.

La lapidation de Satan, chaque année à La Mecque, n’est pas qu’un phénomène superstitieux. Elle ne met pas seulement en scène une foule hystérisée flirtant avec la barbarie. Sa portée est anthropologique. Voilà en effet un rite, auquel chaque musulman est invité à se soumettre, inscrivant la violence comme un devoir sacré au coeur du croyant.

Cette lapidation, s’accompagnant annuellement de la mort par piétinement de quelques fidèles, parfois de plusieurs centaines, est un rituel qui couve la violence archaïque.

Au lieu d’éliminer cette violence archaïque, à l’imitation du judaïsme et du christianisme, en la neutralisant (le judaïsme commence par le refus du sacrifice humain, c’est-à-dire l’entrée dans la civilisation, le christianisme transforme le sacrifice en eucharistie), l’islam lui confectionne un nid, où elle croîtra au chaud. Quand le judaïsme et le christianisme sont des religions dont les rites conjurent la violence, la délégitiment, l’islam est une religion qui, dans son texte sacré même, autant que dans certains de ses rites banals, exalte violence et haine.

Haine et violence habitent le livre dans lequel tout musulman est éduqué, le Coran. Comme aux temps de la guerre froide, violence et intimidation sont les voies utilisées par une idéologie à vocation hégémonique, l’islam, pour poser sa chape de plomb sur le monde. Benoît XVI en souffre la cruelle expérience. Comme en ces temps-là, il faut appeler l’Occident « le monde libre » par rapport à au monde musulman, et comme en ces temps-là les adversaires de ce « monde libre », fonctionnaires zélés de l’œil du Coran, pullulent en son sein. » ( » Face aux intimidations islamistes, que doit faire le monde libre ? « , Le Figaro 19 septembre 2006). Voir plus haut, § E / d), le texte de 2001.

E / k) Nicolas Sarkozy : « L’Islam a porté l’une des plus anciennes et des plus prestigieuses civilisations dans le monde. Le président de l’Institut du Monde arabe peut en porter lui-même témoignage.
C’est l’occasion pour les Français et tous les visiteurs étrangers du Louvre et de la France de voir que l’Islam c’est le progrès, la science, la finesse, la modernité et que le fanatisme au nom de l’Islam c’est un dévoiement de l’Islam. Tuer au nom de l’Islam c’est bafouer l’Islam. Ne pas respecter les droits de la femme au nom de l’Islam, c’est bafouer l’Islam. L’Islam a permis, et ces salles le montreront, des collections parmi les plus extraordinaires. Avec l’Islam, nos prédécesseurs étaient bien en avance sur le monde et il n’y a aucune raison que ce qui a été le cas il y a des siècles, ne soit pas le cas pour les siècles qui viennent. Ce sera une occasion, Altesse [le représentant du roi d’Arabie saoudite], pour chacun de découvrir la richesse et la finesse de ces arts de l’Islam. » (au musée du Louvre, le 16 juillet 2008).
F / Depuis 2012 :

F / a) Christine Tasin : « Oui je suis islamophobe, et alors (…) je suis contre l’islam qui pose problème ; moi je ne trouve pas normal qu’on tue des animaux, je ne trouve pas normal qu’on voile les femmes ; (…) C’est la France qui a un problème avec l’islam. (…) 60 % des animaux tués en France le sont selon le mode de l’abattage rituel ; donc les gens mangent halal sans le savoir (…) La haine de l’islam, bien sûr et j’en suis fière, l’islam est une saloperie, c’est un danger pour la France, absolument ; je suis désolée. » Belfort, 15 octobre 2013. Christine Tasin, poursuivie pour « incitation à la haine raciale », a été condamnée le vendredi 8 août 2014 à 3000 € d’amende dont 1500 € avec sursis par le T.G.I. de Belfort.

F / b) François Hollande :  » Votre constitution garantit la liberté de croyance, de conscience, et le libre exercice des cultes, et confirme ce que j’avais affirmé ici même, à avoir que l’islam est compatible avec la démocratie.  » Discours à l’Assemblée nationale constituante, Tunis, 7 février 2014.

On voit cependant dans les extraits qui suivent que la Tunisie n’est pas encore une démocratie :

 » Au Nom de Dieu Clément et Miséricordieux
PRÉAMBULE
Nous, représentants du peuple tunisien, membres de l’Assemblée nationale constituante ;
[…]
Exprimant l’attachement de notre peuple aux enseignements de l’Islam et à ses finalités caractérisées par l’ouverture et la modération, des nobles valeurs humaines et des hauts principes des droits de l’Homme universels, Inspirés par notre héritage culturel accumulé tout le long de notre histoire, par notre mouvement réformiste éclairé fondé sur les éléments de notre identité arabo-musulmane et sur les acquis universels de la civilisation humaine, et par attachement aux acquis nationaux que notre peuple a pu réaliser ;
[…]
Sur la base de la place qu’occupe l’être humain en tant qu’être digne ; Afin de consolider notre appartenance culturelle et civilisationnelle à la nation arabe et musulmane ; de l’unité nationale fondée sur la citoyenneté, la fraternité, la solidarité et la justice sociale ; En vue de soutenir l’Union maghrébine, qui constitue une étape vers l’union arabe et vers la complémentarité entre les peuples musulmans et les peuples africains et la coopération avec les peuples du monde ;
[…]
Article 1
La Tunisie est un État libre, indépendant et souverain, l’Islam est sa religion, l’arabe sa langue et la République son régime.
Il n’est pas permis d’amender cet article.
Article 6
L’État est gardien de la religion. Il garantit la liberté de croyance, de conscience et le libre exercice des cultes ; il est le garant de la neutralité des mosquées et lieux de culte par rapport à toute instrumentalisation partisane.
L’État s’engage à diffuser les valeurs de modération et de tolérance, à protéger les sacrés et à interdire d’y porter atteinte, comme il s’engage à interdire les campagnes d’accusation d’apostasie et l’incitation à la haine et à la violence. Il s’engage également à s’y opposer.
Article 39
[…]
L’État veille aussi à enraciner l’identité arabo-musulmane et l’appartenance nationale dans les jeunes générations et à ancrer, à soutenir et à généraliser l’utilisation de la langue arabe, ainsi que l’ouverture sur les langues étrangères et les civilisations humaines et à diffuser la culture des droits de l’Homme.
Article 74
La candidature à la présidence de la République est un droit pour toute électrice et pour tout électeur jouissant de la nationalité tunisienne par la naissance, et étant de confession musulmane.
[…]

F / c) Manuel Carlos VALLS :  » L’islam est la seconde religion (1) de France. Mais au-delà des musulmans de France, c’est toute une nation qui reconnaît, ici, la grandeur, la finesse et la diversité de l’islam. C’est toute une nation qui dit aussi que l’islam a toute sa place en France, parce que l’islam est une religion de tolérance, de respect, une religion de lumière et d’avenir, à mille lieues de ceux qui en détournent et en salissent le message. Et c’est aux musulmans eux-mêmes d’agir, de refuser les intégrismes, les radicalismes qui utilisent la religion pour diffuser la haine et la terreur. […] La France est une terre de liberté qui respecte les croyances de chacun, et qui considère que le fait que l’islam est la deuxième religion (1) de France est une chance pour la France. » (Discours à l’Institut du Monde Arabe, 26 juin 2014 ; transcription d’après la vidéo sur le site gouvernement.fr).
1. Deuxième religion peut-être, mais troisième conviction, après les catholiques et les incroyants.

F / d) Abdennour BIDAR :  » Cher monde musulman, je suis un de tes fils éloignés qui te regarde du dehors et de loin – de ce pays de France où tant de tes enfants vivent aujourd’hui. Je te regarde avec mes yeux sévères de philosophe nourri depuis son enfance par le taçawwuf (soufisme) et par la pensée occidentale. Je te regarde donc à partir de ma position debarzakh, d’isthme entre les deux mers de l’Orient et de l’Occident !

Et qu’est-ce que je vois ? Qu’est-ce que je vois mieux que d’autres sans doute parce que justement je te regarde de loin, avec le recul de la distance ? Je te vois toi, dans un état de misère et de souffrance qui me rend infiniment triste, mais qui rend encore plus sévère mon jugement de philosophe ! Car je te vois en train d’enfanter un monstre qui prétend se nommer État islamique et auquel certains préfèrent donner un nom de démon : DAESH. Mais le pire est que je te vois te perdre – perdre ton temps et ton honneur – dans le refus de reconnaître que ce monstre est né de toi, de tes errances, de tes contradictions, de ton écartèlement interminable entre passé et présent, de ton incapacité trop durable à trouver ta place dans la civilisation humaine.

Que dis-tu en effet face à ce monstre ? Quel est ton unique discours ? Tu cries « Ce n’est pas moi ! », « Ce n’est pas l’islam ! ». Tu refuses que les crimes de ce monstre soient commis en ton nom (hashtag #NotInMyName). Tu t’indignes devant une telle monstruosité, tu t’insurges aussi que le monstre usurpe ton identité, et bien sûr tu as raison de le faire. Il est indispensable qu’à la face du monde tu proclames ainsi, haut et fort, que l’islam dénonce la barbarie. Mais c’est tout à fait insuffisant ! Car tu te réfugies dans le réflexe de l’autodéfense sans assumer aussi, et surtout, la responsabilité de l’autocritique. Tu te contentes de t’indigner, alors que ce moment historique aurait été une si formidable occasion de te remettre en question ! Et comme d’habitude, tu accuses au lieu de prendre ta propre responsabilité : « Arrêtez, vous les occidentaux, et vous tous les ennemis de l’islam de nous associer à ce monstre ! Le terrorisme, ce n’est pas l’islam, le vrai islam, le bon islam qui ne veut pas dire la guerre, mais la paix! »
J’entends ce cri de révolte qui monte en toi, ô mon cher monde musulman, et je le comprends. Oui tu as raison, comme chacune des autres grandes inspirations sacrées du monde l’islam a créé tout au long de son histoire de la Beauté, de la Justice, du Sens, du Bien, et il a puissamment éclairé l’être humain sur le chemin du mystère de l’existence… Je me bats ici en Occident, dans chacun de mes livres, pour que cette sagesse de l’islam et de toutes les religions ne soit pas oubliée ni méprisée ! Mais de ma position lointaine, je vois aussi autre chose – que tu ne sais pas voir ou que tu ne veux pas voir… Et cela m’inspire une question, LA grande question : pourquoi ce monstre t’a-t-il volé ton visage ? Pourquoi ce monstre ignoble a-t-il choisi ton visage et pas un autre ? Pourquoi a-t-il pris le masque de l’islam et pas un autre masque ? C’est qu’en réalité derrière cette image du monstre se cache un immense problème, que tu ne sembles pas prêt à regarder en face. Il le faut bien pourtant, il faut que tu en aies le courage.

Ce problème est celui des racines du mal. D’où viennent les crimes de ce soi-disant « État islamique » ? Je vais te le dire, mon ami. Et cela ne va pas te faire plaisir, mais c’est mon devoir de philosophe. Les racines de ce mal qui te vole aujourd’hui ton visage sont en toi-même, le monstre est sorti de ton propre ventre, le cancer est dans ton propre corps. Et de ton ventre malade, il sortira dans le futur autant de nouveaux monstres – pires encore que celui-ci – aussi longtemps que tu refuseras de regarder cette vérité en face, aussi longtemps que tu tarderas à l’admettre et à attaquer enfin cette racine du mal !

Même les intellectuels occidentaux, quand je leur dis cela, ont de la difficulté à le voir : pour la plupart, ils ont tellement oublié ce qu’est la puissance de la religion – en bien et en mal, sur la vie et sur la mort – qu’ils me disent « Non le problème du monde musulman n’est pas l’islam, pas la religion, mais la politique, l’histoire, l’économie, etc. ». Ils vivent dans des sociétés si sécularisées qu’ils ne se souviennent plus du tout que la religion peut être le cœur du réacteur d’une civilisation humaine ! Et que l’avenir de l’humanité passera demain non pas seulement par la résolution de la crise financière et économique, mais de façon bien plus essentielle par la résolution de la crise spirituelle sans précédent que traverse notre humanité toute entière ! Saurons-nous tous nous rassembler, à l’échelle de la planète, pour affronter ce défi fondamental ? La nature spirituelle de l’homme a horreur du vide, et si elle ne trouve rien de nouveau pour le remplir elle le fera demain avec des religions toujours plus inadaptées au présent – et qui comme l’islam actuellement se mettront alors à produire des monstres.

Je vois en toi, ô monde musulman, des forces immenses prêtes à se lever pour contribuer à cet effort mondial de trouver une vie spirituelle pour le XXIe siècle ! Il y a en toi en effet, malgré la gravité de ta maladie, malgré l’étendue des ombres d’obscurantisme qui veulent te recouvrir tout entier, une multitude extraordinaire de femmes et d’hommes qui sont prêts à réformer l’islam, à réinventer son génie au-delà de ses formes historiques et à participer ainsi au renouvellement complet du rapport que l’humanité entretenait jusque-là avec ses dieux ! C’est à tous ceux-là, musulmans et non musulmans qui rêvent ensemble de révolution spirituelle, que je me suis adressé dans mes livres ! Pour leur donner, avec mes mots de philosophe, confiance en ce qu’entrevoit leur espérance ! […]  » Lettre ouverte au monde musulman, 15/10/2014, mis à jour: 09/01/2015,

F / e) Michel ONFRAY : « Que cette immigration apporte avec elle une religion qui est aussi une idéologie et que cette idéologie ne revendique pas pour valeurs « liberté, égalité, fraternité, féminisme, laïcité » est une évidence pour qui connaît la religion musulman autrement que par ouï-dire et propagande médiatique. Il suffit de lire le Coran, les hadiths du Prophète, une biographie, même hagiographique, de Mahomet pour s’en rendre compte. Mais on supporte ce qui vient de l’islam par tonnes, quand on refuse un gramme de ce qui vient du christianisme. Et c’est un athée qui vous le dit… […] Autre point d’accord avec Éric Zemmour, la question de l’islam, qui n’est pas une religion de paix, de tolérance et d’amour, contrairement à ce qui est rabâché sans cesse par les médias du politiquement correct. Ainsi, la moindre référence au caractère belliqueux du Coran passe pour de l’islamophobie assimilée au racisme, à la xénophobie, de la part de ceux qui confondent la critique d’une religion avec la haine de la couleur de certains peuples qui s’en réclament ! »
« Zemmour, la gauche et moi », propos recueillis par Daoud Boughézala, Causeur, N° 18, novembre 2014.

F / f) Michel Onfray : « Prétendre qu’il n’y a pas un choc des civilisations entre l’Occident localisé et moribond et l’Islam déterritorialisé en pleine santé est une sottise qui empêche de penser ce qui est advenu, ce qui est, et ce qui va advenir.

L’Islam est une civilisation, avec ses textes sacrés, ses héros, ses grands hommes, ses soldats, ses martyrs, ses artistes, ses poètes, ses penseurs, ses architectes, ses philosophes. Il suppose un mode de vie, une façon d’être et de penser qui ignore le libre arbitre augustinien, le sujet cartésien, la séparation kantienne du nouménal et du phénoménal, la raison laïque des Lumières, la philosophie de l’histoire hégélienne, l’athéisme feuerbachien, le positivisme comtien, l’hédonisme freudo-marxiste. Il ignore également l’iconophile et l’iconodulie (goût et défense des images religieuses) pour lui préférer la mathématique et l’algèbre des formes pures (mosaïques, entrelacs, arabesques, calligraphie), ce qu’il faut savoir pour comprendre pourquoi la figuration de Mahomet est un blasphème.

Refuser la réalité du choc des civilisations ne peut se faire que si l’on ignore ce qu’est une civilisation, si l’on méprise l’Islam en lui refusant d’en être une, si l’on déteste la nôtre par haine de soi, si l’on pense l’histoire avec les fadaises du logiciel chrétien et marxiste qui promet la parousie en ignorant les leçons de philosophie données par Hegel : les civilisations naissent, croissent, vivent, culminent, décroissent, s’effondrent, disparaissent pour laisser place à de nouvelles civilisations. Qu’on médite sur l’alignement de Stonehenge, les pyramides du Caire, le Parthénon d’Athènes ou les ruines de Rome comme on méditera plus tard sur les ruines des cathédrales !

Notre occident est en décomposition […]

Pendant ce temps, animé par la grande santé nietzschéenne, l’Islam planétaire propose une spiritualité, un sens, une conquête, une guerre pour ses valeurs, il a des soldats, des guerriers, des martyrs qui attendent à la porte du paradis. Refuser qu’il en aille, là, d’une civilisation qui se propose « le paradis à l’ombre de épées », un propos du Prophète, c’est persister dans l’aveuglement. Mais comment pourrait-il en être autrement ? L’aveuglement qui fait dire que le réel n’a pas eu lieu (ou n’a pas lieu) est aussi un signe de nihilisme. » (La chronique mensuelle de Michel Onfray | Mars 2015 – N° 118,  » LE CHOC DES CIVILISATIONS « )

Pascal Bruckner : « Ces interprétations [Todd, Plenel] ne sont ni pertinentes ni justes à mon sens. … ma stupéfaction devant ce genre de raisonnements. […] L’islam radical a réveillé la gauche anti-totalitaire … Il n’ a aucun compromis possible avec la gauche qui nous explique que l’opprimé, ou le fils d’opprimé, ou l’arrière-petit-fils d’opprimé, parce que son père a été colonisé, a absolument tous les droits … Attraction absolument folle que l’islam exerce sur les restes de l’armée trotskiste en France. […] Comment la critique d’une religion peut-elle être assimilée à un acte de racisme ? Il y a  un coup de force sémantique, il y a une dérive. […] Je ne suis pas sûr que nous ayons la patience d’attendre quatre siècles pour que l’islam se réforme [comme l’a fait le christianisme]  » […] Je n’utilise pas le mot « islamophobe » parce que je ne comprends pas ce qu’il veut dire  » […] Ce à quoi nous assistons, Brice Couturier parlait tout à l’heure des années 30, oui, il y a une victoire posthume de Hitler, mais pas là où on pensait  dans la fraction la plus radicale du monde musulman qui a importé sans aucune discrimination tous les préjugés antisémites de l’extrême droite fasciste européenne. C’est très très inquiétant. » (Les matins de France Culture, 1ère partie, 25 mai 2015).
Voir aussi Extraits du Coran sur le site de l’Union des Athées.

Publié par A. Claude Courouve à 21:53 Envoyer par e-mailBlogThis!Partager sur TwitterPartager sur FacebookPartager sur Pinterest
Libellés : fanatisme, ignorance, islam, laïcité, Marx, Montaigne, Nietzsche, philosophie, Renan, Vigny, Voltaire

2 commentaires:

Noxélios a dit…
Prédiction hallucinante et fascinante, en ce qui me concerne tout du moins : Au dix-neuvième siècle, un prophète, Jules Napoléon Ney (1849-1900), petit-fils du maréchal Ney, prédit que les Chinois gagneront la partie dans une Europe mise à mal par l’immigration musulmane.

« Si nous ne nous étions limité à dessein le champ du présent travail, nous montrerions aux lecteurs de l’“Initiation” quelles éventualités redoutables menacent l’Europe chrétienne au courant du vingtième siècle. Il est à craindre qu’elle ne se trouve prise entre la marche en avant vers le nord des musulmans d’Afrique et la marche en avant vers l’ouest des musulmans d’Asie. Nous ne parlons pas de la réserve innombrable des peuples de race jaune qui, comme une invasion de sauterelles, viendra achever et clore l’œuvre destructive et dévastatrice si bien commencée par les Mahométans dans une Europe qui a oublié la solidarité qui devrait unir les nations menacées. »
(Napoléon Ney, “Un danger européen : Les société secrètes musulmanes”, V ; Georges Carré libraire-éditeur, Paris, 1890, page 20.)
1 novembre 2014 21:13

Noxélios a dit…
Citons aussi Flaubert :

« Sans doute par l’effet de mon vieux sang normand, depuis la guerre d’Orient, je suis indigné contre l’Angleterre, indigné à en devenir Prussien ! Car enfin, que veut-elle ? Qui l’attaque ? Cette prétention de défendre l’Islamisme (qui est en soi une monstruosité) m’exaspère. Je demande, au nom de l’humanité, à ce qu’on broie la Pierre-Noire, pour en jeter les cendres au vent, à ce qu’on détruise La Mecque, et que l’on souille la tombe de Mahomet. Ce serait le moyen de démoraliser le Fanatisme. »
(Gustave Flaubert, lettre [n°1728] à madame Roger des Genettes, vendredi 1er mars 1878, dans les “Œuvres complètes de Gustave Flaubert”, Correspondance, huitième série [1877-1880], Louis Conard libraire-éditeur, Paris, 1930, page 112.)


Mariage pour tous: A quand la légalisation de la polygamie ? (Time to legalize polygamy: Why group marriage is the next horizon of social liberalism)

27 juin, 2015
https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/83/14/2b/83142b9a0a260a93b649b4ef6728cf03.jpg https://i1.wp.com/static3.businessinsider.com/image/558e0ef96da811f874e177dd-1200-800/rtx1i08m.jpg
https://i2.wp.com/cdn.inquisitr.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Brandenburg-Gate-Germany-599x385.jpg
https://i1.wp.com/awiderbridge.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/shutterstock_gay-rainbow-lgbtq-israel-tel-aviv-h-680x382.jpg
https://i1.wp.com/www.lefigaro.fr/medias/2014/06/27/PHOad95f196-fe0a-11e3-9b15-9b3d35ae48fa-805x453.jpg
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CIbxR4DWUAEBFmD.pnghttps://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/613816209495044096/OedFtZXh.jpg
https://i0.wp.com/www.lemondejuif.info/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/DSCN1348.jpg
Tout ce qui n’est pas nouveau dans un temps d’innovation est pernicieux. Saint-Just
Voilà, Monseigneur, une fête toute napolitaine : nous dansons sur un volcan ! Narcisse-Achille de Salvandy (au roi des Deux-Siciles, 1830)
Il n’y a plus ni Juif ni Grec, il n’y a plus ni esclave ni libre, il n’y a plus ni homme ni femme; car tous vous êtes un en Jésus Christ. Paul (Galates 3: 28)
La loi naturelle n’est pas un système de valeurs possible parmi beaucoup d’autres. C’est la seule source de tous les jugements de valeur. Si on la rejette, on rejette toute valeur. Si on conserve une seule valeur, on la conserve tout entier. (. . .) La rébellion des nouvelles idéologies contre la loi naturelle est une rébellion des branches contre l’arbre : si les rebelles réussissaient, ils découvriraient qu’ils se sont détruits eux-mêmes. L’intelligence humaine n’a pas davantage le pouvoir d’inventer une nouvelle valeur qu’il n’en a d’imaginer une nouvelle couleur primaire ou de créer un nouveau soleil avec un nouveau firmament pour qu’il s’y déplace. (…) Tout nouveau pouvoir conquis par l’homme est aussi un pouvoir sur l’homme. Tout progrès le laisse à la fois plus faible et plus fort. Dans chaque victoire, il est à la fois le général qui triomphe et le prisonnier qui suit le char triomphal . (…) Le processus qui, si on ne l’arrête pas, abolira l’homme, va aussi vite dans les pays communistes que chez les démocrates et les fascistes. Les méthodes peuvent (au premier abord) différer dans leur brutalité. Mais il y a parmi nous plus d’un savant au regard inoffensif derrière son pince-nez, plus d’un dramaturge populaire, plus d’un philosophe amateur qui poursuivent en fin de compte les mêmes buts que les dirigeants de l’Allemagne nazie. Il s’agit toujours de discréditer totalement les valeurs traditionnelles et de donner à l’humanité une forme nouvelle conformément à la volonté (qui ne peut être qu’arbitraire) de quelques membres ″chanceux″ d’une génération ″chanceuse″ qui a appris comment s’y prendre. C.S. Lewis (L’abolition de l’homme, 1943)
Le monde moderne n’est pas mauvais : à certains égards, il est bien trop bon. Il est rempli de vertus féroces et gâchées. Lorsqu’un dispositif religieux est brisé (comme le fut le christianisme pendant la Réforme), ce ne sont pas seulement les vices qui sont libérés. Les vices sont en effet libérés, et ils errent de par le monde en faisant des ravages ; mais les vertus le sont aussi, et elles errent plus férocement encore en faisant des ravages plus terribles. Le monde moderne est saturé des vieilles vertus chrétiennes virant à la folie.  G.K. Chesterton
Muhammad révéla à Médine des qualités insoupçonnées de dirigeant politique et de chef militaire. Il devait subvenir aux ressources de la nouvelle communauté (umma) que formaient les émigrés (muhadjirun) mekkois et les « auxiliaires » (ansar) médinois qui se joignaient à eux. Il recourut à la guerre privée, institution courante en Arabie où la notion d’État était inconnue. Muhammad envoya bientôt des petits groupes de ses partisans attaquer les caravanes mekkoises, punissant ainsi ses incrédules compatriotes et du même coup acquérant un riche butin. En mars 624, il remporta devant les puits de Badr une grande victoire sur une colonne mekkoise venue à la rescousse d’une caravane en danger. Cela parut à Muhammad une marque évidente de la faveur d’Allah. Elle l’encouragea sans doute à la rupture avec les juifs, qui se fit peu à peu. Le Prophète avait pensé trouver auprès d’eux un accueil sympathique, car sa doctrine monothéiste lui semblait très proche de la leur. La charte précisant les droits et devoirs de chacun à Médine, conclue au moment de son arrivée, accordait une place aux tribus juives dans la communauté médinoise. Les musulmans jeûnaient le jour de la fête juive de l’Expiation. Mais la plupart des juifs médinois ne se rallièrent pas. Ils critiquèrent au contraire les anachronismes du Coran, la façon dont il déformait les récits bibliques. Aussi Muhammad se détourna-t-il d’eux. Le jeûne fut fixé au mois de ramadan, le mois de la victoire de Badr, et l’on cessa de se tourner vers Jérusalem pour prier. Maxime Rodinson
Cela fait un an maintenant qu’est apparu au grand jour l’Etat islamique (EI). Et l’on ne peut que constater qu’il a lancé les « festivités » de cet anniversaire, malgré les bombardements qu’il subit. Tout cela accompagne le début du ramadan la semaine dernière. L’EI a appelé la quasi-totalité de ses sympathisants à fêter cette première année par tous les moyens et partout dans le monde. Selon moi, les attentats perpétrés à Saint-Quentin-Fallavier (Isère), à Sousse et à Koweït City s’inscrivent dans cette macabre célébration. C’est un terrible pied de nez adressé à la communauté internationale. Et ce n’est que le début.(…) Souvenons-nous : l’EI a commencé son offensive au début du ramadan 2014. Il a déclaré le califat le 30 juin 2014. Je pense donc que cela risque de culminer dans les semaines à venir. En outre, le mois de ramadan est considéré comme propice au jihad. Je crains donc que nous soyons face au lancement d’une campagne d’attentats. (…) on n’est pas assez conscients de la portée symbolique des dates et des lieux. Désormais, l’EI se considère comme un Etat, gère les territoires comme tel, avec un gouvernement, une administration et un agenda. Nous sommes bel et bien face à un Etat terroriste. Mathieu Guidère
Je m’ennuie follement dans la monogamie, même si mon désir et mon temps peuvent être reliés à quelqu’un et que je ne nie pas le caractère merveilleux du dévelopement d’une intimité. Je suis monogame de temps en temps mais je préfère la polygamie et la polyandrie. Carla Bruni
A 80 ans, le cuisinier livre l’un de ses secrets : depuis près de quatre décennies, il partage sa vie entre trois femmes, déjeunant chez l’une, prenant le thé chez l’autre, dînant avec la dernière. (…) Ses trois femmes, en restant à ses côtés en toute connaissance de cause, font la démonstration qu’elles l’acceptent comme il est, depuis presque quarante ans, à partager sa vie en trois, ses journées en trois. Déjeunant chez l’une, prenant le thé chez l’autre, dînant avec la dernière. Partant à la montagne avec l’une, au Japon avec la deuxième, restant au coin du feu avec la troisième. Elevant une fille avec la première. Un fils avec la deuxième. Confiant à la fille de la troisième la rédaction de ce livre testament. Libération
Avec la crise économique dans mon pays, peu d’hommes peuvent entretenir plusieurs épouses. En France, c’est différent, tous ces enfants sont une source de revenus. Oumar Dicko (ministre chargé des Maliens de l’extérieur)
Is it just wishful thinking to imagine the end of liberalism? Few things in politics are permanent. Conservatism and liberalism didn’t become the central division in our politics until the middle of the 20th century. Before that, American politics revolved around such issues as states’ rights, the wars, slavery, the tariff, and suffrage. Parties have come and gone in our history. You won’t find many Federalists, Whigs, or Populists lining up at the polls these days. Britain’s Liberal Party faded from power in the 1920s. The Canadian Liberal Party collapsed in 2011. Recently, within a decade of its maximum empire at home and abroad, a combined intellectual movement, political party, and form of government crumbled away, to be swept up and consigned to the dustbin of history. Communism, which in a very different way from American liberalism traced its roots to Hegel, Social Darwinism, and leadership by a vanguard group of intellectuals, vanished before our eyes, though not without an abortive coup or two. If Communism, armed with millions of troops and thousands of megatons of nuclear weapons, could collapse of its own dead weight and implausibility, why not American liberalism? The parallel is imperfect, of course, because liberalism and its vehicle, the Democratic Party, remain profoundly popular, resilient, and changeable. Elections matter to them. What’s more, the egalitarian impulse, centralized government (though not centralized administration), and the Democratic Party have deep roots in the American political tradition—and reflect permanent aspects of modern democracy itself, as Tocqueville testifies. Some elements of liberalism are inherent in American democracy, then, but the compound, the peculiar combination that is contemporary liberalism, is not. Compounded of the Hegelian philosophy of history, Social Darwinism, the living constitution, leadership, the cult of the State, the rule of administrative experts, entitlements and group rights, and moral creativity, modern liberalism is something new and distinctive, despite the presence in it, too, of certain American constants like the love of equality and democratic individualism. Under the pressure of ideas and events, that compound could come apart. Liberals’ confidence in being on the right, the winning side of history could crumble, perhaps has already begun to crumble. Trust in government, which really means in the State, is at all-time lows. A majority of Americans oppose a new entitlement program—in part because they want to keep the old programs unimpaired, but also because the economic and moral sustainability of the whole welfare state grows more and more doubtful. The goodwill and even the presumptive expertise of many government experts command less and less respect. Obama’s speeches no longer send the old thrill up the leg, and his leadership, whether for one or two terms, may yet help to discredit the respectability of following the Leader. The Democratic Party is unlikely to go poof, but it’s possible that modern liberalism will. A series of nasty political defeats and painful repudiations of its impossible dreams might do the trick. At the least, it will have to downsize its ambitions and get back in touch with political, moral, and fiscal reality. It will have to—all together now—turn back the clock. Much will depend, too, on what conservatives say and do in the coming years. Will they have the prudence and guile to elevate the fight to the level of constitutional principle, to expose the Tory credentials of their opponents? President Obama’s decision to double down aggressively on the reach and cost of big government just as the European model of social democracy is hitting the skids provides the perfect opportunity for conservatives to exploit. His course makes the problems of liberalism worse and more urgent, as though he is eager for a crisis. Sooner or later, the crisis will come. If the people remain attached to their government and laws and American statesmen do their part, the country may yet take the path leading up from liberalism. (October 15, 2012)
La limitation du mariage aux couples de sexe opposé a pu longtemps sembler naturel et juste, mais son incompatibilité avec la signification centrale du droit fondamental de se marier est désormais manifeste. Cour suprême américaine
Aucune union n’est plus profonde que le mariage, car le mariage incarne les plus hauts idéaux de l’amour, la fidélité, la dévotion, le sacrifice et la famille. En formant une union maritale, deux personnes deviennent quelque chose de plus grand que ce qu’elles étaient auparavant. Le mariage incarne un amour qui peut perdurer malgré la mort. Ce serait ne pas comprendre ces hommes et ces femmes que de dire qu’ils manquent de respect à l’idée du mariage. Leur plaidoyer consiste à dire que justement ils le respectent, le respectent si profondément qu’ils cherchent eux-mêmes s’accomplir grâce à lui. Ils demandent une dignité égale aux yeux de la loi. La Constitution leur donne ce droit. Cour suprême américaine
 Le destin des homosexuels n’est pas d’être condamnés à la solitude, exclus de l’une des plus anciennes institutions de la civilisation. Ils demandent à bénéficier de la même dignité aux yeux de la loi. La Constitution leur garantit ce droit. Juge Anthony Kennedy
C’est une victoire pour les alliés, les amis et les soutiens du mariage gay qui ont passé des années, voire des décennies, à travailler et prier pour que le changement intervienne. Et cette décision est une victoire pour l’Amérique. Barack Hussein Obama
Les faucons affirment (…) que le président Ahmadinejad a déclaré vouloir « rayer Israël de la carte ». Mais cet argument repose sur une mauvaise traduction de ses propos. La traduction juste est qu’Israël « devrait disparaître de la page du temps ». Cette expression (empruntée à un discours de l’ayatollah Khomeiny) n’est pas un appel à la destruction physique d’Israël. Bien que très choquant, son propos n’était pas un appel à lancer une attaque, encore moins une attaque nucléaire, contre Israël. Aucun État sensé ne peut partir en guerre sur la foi d’une mauvaise traduction.  John J. Mearsheimer et Stephen M. Walt

Realists should celebrate gay marriage. Today’s Supreme Court ruling will help create a better, stronger America.
Stephen M. Walt
Do you want to fight the Islamic State and the forces of Islamic extremist terrorism? I’ll tell you the best way to send a message to those masked gunmen in Iraq and Syria and to everyone else who gains power by sowing violence and fear. Just keep posting that second set of images. Post them on Facebook and Twitter and Reddit and in comments all over the Internet. Send them to your friends and your family. Send them to your pen pal in France and your old roommate in Tunisia. Send them to strangers. Yes, it’s sappy. But this has always been the dream of America:(…) And I still have faith that this dream is the one that will prevail, in the end. That’s the lesson of history: Brutality and fear can keep people down for only so long. The Nazis learned this; the Soviets learned it; the Ku Klux Klan learned it; Pol Pot learned it; the Rwandan génocidaires learned it. One of these days, the Islamic State and al Qaeda will learn it too. I’m not a big fan of Twitter, but for once there’s a Twitter hashtag worth quoting, though it took my 13-year-old daughter to point it out to me: #LoveWins. Tweet it. Shout it. Sing it. Rosa Brooks
Major U.S. defense contractors stand to earn a windfall if President Barack Obama’s administration secures a nuclear deal with Iran that sends jittery, oil-rich Persian Gulf countries seeking advanced new weapons. But the contractors likely will also do just fine if the negotiations unexpectedly collapse. Fueling the coming spending is a controversial provision in the framework agreement, struck in April between Tehran and world powers, that largely left Iran’s ballistic missile capabilities untouched in the ongoing negotiations. The move angered White House critics on Capitol Hill and in parts of Europe. More urgently, it left Gulf states like Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) particularly uneasy because they are well within range of Iran’s increasingly advanced ballistic missiles. That means deal or no deal, the Gulf countries — already some of the world’s biggest weapons buyers — will be opening their wallets even wider in the years ahead. American defense contractors have long recognized the lucrative opportunity in the region, and they are counting on increased weapons sales to the Middle East to counteract a U.S. market that has slowed due to the relative flattening of the domestic defense budget. Paul McLeary
The whites didn’t want to come out against Obama since he endorsed it so strongly and they didn’t want to be called bigots — and the blacks didn’t want to say they were betraying a black man. (…) I absolutely would not do a gay marriage. (…) I think of our children. What it’s going to do to our children. What kind of world are they going to grow up in? I’ve said for two years that we’re going to have to have civil disobedience. They were very cunning in the way they did it. (…) The homosexual community has not shown all of what it’s going to do. They have a game plan that, now that the Supreme Court has ruled, will take this country down a very immoral path. (…) I knew that he was going to do it the second term. His deal was, ‘Get me elected the first time, and I’ll come out for same-sex marriage in my second term.’ He deceived the American people, because the black community would not have backed him had he come out the first time for same-sex marriage. Some people just didn’t want to speak against Obama.  (…) It’s going to be much harder, because we’re going to have to go from state to state. It’s going to be hard to do, but it can be done. Remember, blacks worked for 300 years for civil rights in the courts. Three-hundred long years. It’s not something that we’re going to win overnight. There is no quick fix, but I think now the church will rise up. All the Christian churches in the United States that believe that marriage is between a man and a woman, they need to rise up. (…) We’re asking people to rise up and be ready to go to jail. Why go to jail? To let it be known that we will not bow down, we will not give up, whatever the costs. It’s the new civil rights movement, because they are taking away our rights. They are taking away the Christian’s rights. This is just a start. We have nothing against homosexuals, but when you start talking about marriage, and then indoctrinating children, where are we going? Where is this society headed? Rev. Bill Owens (Coalition of African-American Pastors)
This morning’s ruling rejects not only thousands of years of time-honored marriage but also the rule of law in the United States. In states across the nation, voters acted through the democratic process to protect marriage and the family. Yet, courts around the country chose to disregard the will of the people in favor of political correctness and social experimentation. And we witnessed firsthand the consequences, as individuals were repeatedly targeted by the government for not actively supporting homosexual marriage. Sadly, our nation’s highest Court, which should be a symbol of justice, has chosen instead to be a tool of tyranny, elevating judicial will above the will of the people. There is no doubt that this morning’s ruling will imperil religious liberty in America, as individuals of faith who uphold time-honored marriage and choose not to advocate for same-sex unions will now be viewed as extremists. AFA President Tim Wildmon
Nationwide, according to the Family Research Council’s Peter Sprigg, just over 3.3 million individuals voted for same-sex marriage in three states—Maine, Maryland and Washington State—compared to more than 41 million who voted for marriage protection amendments or bans on same-sex marriage in 31 states—a ratio of more than 12 to 1. American Family Association
We should just start calling this law SCOTUScare. Anton Scalia
The decision will also have other important consequences. It will be used to vilify Americans who are unwilling to assent to the new orthodoxy. In the course of its opinion, the majority compares traditional marriage laws to laws that denied equal treatment for African-Americans and women. (…) Today’s decision shows that decades of attempts to restrain this Court’s abuse of its authority have failed. Samuel Alito
[T]his Court is not a legislature. Whether same-sex marriage is a good idea should be of no concern to us. Under the Constitution, judges have power to say what the law is, not what it should be. The people who ratified the Constitution authorized courts to exercise “neither force nor will but merely judgment.” (…) Although the policy arguments for extending marriage to same-sex couples may be compelling, the legal arguments for requiring such an extension are not. The fundamental right to marry does not include a right to make a State change its definition of marriage. And a State’s decision to maintain the meaning of marriage that has persisted in every culture throughout human history can hardly be called irrational. In short, our Constitution does not enact any one theory of marriage. The people of a State are free to expand marriage to include same-sex couples, or to retain the historic definition. Today, however, the Court takes the extraordinary step of ordering every State to license and recognize same-sex marriage. Many people will rejoice at this decision, and I begrudge none their celebration. But for those who believe in a government of laws, not of men, the majority’s approach is deeply disheartening. Supporters of same-sex marriage have achieved considerable success persuading their fellow citizens—through the democratic process—to adopt their view. That ends today. Five lawyers have closed the debate and enacted their own vision of marriage as a matter of constitutional law. Stealing this issue from the people will for many cast a cloud over same-sex marriage, making a dramatic social change that much more difficult to accept. The majority’s decision is an act of will, not legal judgment. The right it announces has no basis in the Constitution or this Court’s precedent. The majority expressly disclaims judicial “caution” and omits even a pretense of humility, openly relying on its desire to remake society according to its own “new insight” into the “nature of injustice.” As a result, the Court invalidates the marriage laws of more than half the States and orders the transformation of a social institution that has formed the basis of human society for millennia, for the Kalahari Bushmen and the Han Chinese, the Carthaginians and the Aztecs. Just who do we think we are? (…) Understand well what this dissent is about: It is not about whether, in my judgment, the institution of marriage should be changed to include same-sex couples. It is instead about whether, in our democratic republic, that decision should rest with the people acting through their elected representatives, or with five lawyers who happen to hold commissions authorizing them to resolve legal disputes according to law. The Constitution leaves no doubt about the answer. (…) The premises supporting th[e] concept of [natural] marriage are so fundamental that they rarely require articulation. The human race must procreate to survive. Procreation occurs through sexual relations between a man and a woman. When sexual relations result in the conception of a child, that child’s prospects are generally better if the mother and father stay together rather than going their separate ways. Therefore, for the good of children and society, sexual relations that can lead to procreation should occur only between a man and a woman committed to a lasting bond. (…) The Constitution itself says nothing about marriage, and the Framers thereby entrusted the States with “[t]he whole subject of the domestic relations of husband and wife. (…) This Court’s precedents have repeatedly described marriage in ways that are consistent only with its traditional meaning. (…) Stripped of its shiny rhetorical gloss, the majority’s argument is that the Due Process Clause gives same-sex couples a fundamental right to marry because it will be good for them and for society. If I were a legislator, I would certainly consider that view as a matter of social policy. But as a judge, I find the majority’s position indefensible as a matter of constitutional law. (…) The truth is that today’s decision rests on nothing more than the majority’s own conviction that same-sex couples should be allowed to marry because they want to, and that “it would disparage their choices and diminish their personhood to deny them this right.” Whatever force that belief may have as a matter of moral philosophy, it has no more basis in the Constitution than did the naked policy preferences adopted in Lochner. (…) Although the majority randomly inserts the adjective “two” in various places, it offers no reason at all why the two-person element of the core definition of marriage may be preserved while the man-woman element may not. Indeed, from the standpoint of history and tradition, a leap from opposite-sex marriage to same-sex marriage is much greater than one from a two-person union to plural unions, which have deep roots in some cultures around the world. If the majority is willing to take the big leap, it is hard to see how it can say no to the shorter one. It is striking how much of the majority’s reasoning would apply with equal force to the claim of a fundamental right to plural marriage. (…) When asked about a plural marital union at oral argument, petitioners asserted that a State “doesn’t have such an institution.” But that is exactly the point: the States at issue here do not have an institution of same-sex marriage, either. (…) Nowhere is the majority’s extravagant conception of judicial supremacy more evident than in its description—and dismissal—of the public debate regarding same-sex marriage. Yes, the majority concedes, on one side are thousands of years of human history in every society known to have populated the planet. But on the other side, there has been “extensive litigation,” “many thoughtful District Court decisions,” “countless studies, papers, books, and other popular and scholarly writings,” and “more than 100” amicus briefs in these cases alone. What would be the point of allowing the democratic process to go on? It is high time for the Court to decide the meaning of marriage, based on five lawyers’ “better informed understanding” of “a liberty that remains urgent in our own era.” The answer is surely there in one of those amicus briefs or studies. Those who founded our country would not recognize the majority’s conception of the judicial role. They after all risked their lives and fortunes for the precious right to govern themselves. They would never have imagined yielding that right on a question of social policy to unaccountable and unelected judges. And they certainly would not have been satisfied by a system empowering judges to override policy judgments so long as they do so after “a quite extensive discussion. (…) Those who founded our country would not recognize the majority’s conception of the judicial role … They would never have imagined yielding that right on a question of social policy to unaccountable and unelected judges. (…) If you are among the many Americans — of whatever sexual orientation — who favor expanding same-sex marriage, by all means celebrate today’s decision. Celebrate the achievement of a desired goal. Celebrate the opportunity for a new expression of commitment to a partner. Celebrate the availability of new benefits. But do not celebrate the Constitution. It had nothing to do with it. Chief Justice Roberts
The most striking aspect of Justice Kennedy’s majority opinion in Obergefell v. Hodges, which created a constitutional right to same-sex marriage, was its deep emotion. This was no mere legal opinion. Indeed, the law and Constitution had little to do with it. (To Justice Kennedy, the most persuasive legal precedents were his own prior opinions protecting gay rights.) This was a statement of belief, written with the passion of a preacher, meant to inspire. Consider the already much-quoted closing: As some of the petitioners in these cases demonstrate, marriage embodies a love that may endure even past death. It would misunderstand these men and women to say they disrespect the idea of marriage. Their plea is that they do respect it, respect it so deeply that they seek to find its fulfillment for themselves. Their hope is not to be condemned to live in loneliness, excluded from one of civilization’s oldest institutions. They ask for equal dignity in the eyes of the law. The Constitution grants them that right. Or this: “Marriage responds to the universal fear that a lonely person might call out only to find no one there.” This isn’t constitutional law, it’s theology — a secular theology of self-actualization — crafted in such a way that its adherents will no doubt ask, “What decent person can disagree?” This is about love, and the law can’t fight love. Justice Kennedy’s opinion was nine parts romantic poetry and one part legal analysis (if that). And that’s what makes it so dangerous for religious liberty and free speech. Practitioners of constitutional law know that there is no such thing as an “absolute” right to free speech or religious freedom in any context — virtually all cases involve balancing the asserted right against the asserted state interest, with “compelling” state interests typically trumping even the strongest assertions of First Amendment rights. And what is more compelling than this ode to love? (…) This is the era of sexual liberty — the marriage of hedonism to meaning — and the establishment of a new civic religion. The black-robed priesthood has spoken. Will the church bow before their new masters? David French
Most dispiriting, and least convincing, are those arguments that simply reconstitute the slippery slope arguments that have been used for so long against same sex marriage. “If we allow group marriage,” the thinking seems to go, “why wouldn’t marriage with animals or children come next?” The difference is, of course, consent. In recent years, a progressive and enlightened movement has worked to insist that consent is the measure of all things in sexual and romantic practice: as long as all involved in any particular sexual or romantic relationship are consenting adults, everything is permissible; if any individual does not give free and informed consent, no sexual or romantic engagement can be condoned. This bedrock principle of mutually-informed consent explains exactly why we must permit polygamy and must oppose bestiality and child marriage. Animals are incapable of voicing consent; children are incapable of understanding what it means to consent. In contrast, consenting adults who all knowingly and willfully decide to enter into a joint marriage contract, free of coercion, should be permitted to do so, according to basic principles of personal liberty. The preeminence of the principle of consent is a just and pragmatic way to approach adult relationships in a world of multivariate and complex human desires. Progressives have always flattered themselves that time is on their side, that their preferences are in keeping with the arc of history. In the fight for marriage equality, this claim has been made again and again. Many have challenged our politicians and our people to ask themselves whether they can imagine a future in which opposition to marriage equality is seen as a principled stance. I think it’s time to turn the question back on them: given what you know about the advancement of human rights, are you sure your opposition to group marriage won’t sound as anachronistic as opposition to gay marriage sounds to you now? And since we have insisted that there is no legitimate way to oppose gay marriage and respect gay love, how can you oppose group marriage and respect group love?   I suspect that many progressives would recognize, when pushed in this way, that the case against polygamy is incredibly flimsy, almost entirely lacking in rational basis and animated by purely irrational fears and prejudice. What we’re left with is an unsatisfying patchwork of unconvincing arguments and bad ideas, ones embraced for short-term convenience at long-term cost. We must insist that rights cannot be dismissed out of short-term interests of logistics and political pragmatism. The course then, is clear: to look beyond political convenience and conservative intransigence, and begin to make the case for extending legal marriage rights to more loving and committed adults. It’s time. Fredrik deBoer

Attention: un drapeau peut en cacher un autre !

Au lendemain du triple attentat sous drapeau djihadiste qui entre la France, le Koweit et la Tunisie et en l’honneur de la première victoire musulmane du Ramadan et du premier anniversaire de l’Etat islamique, fera  une soixantaine de victimes …

Et à l’heure où après le véritable putsch juridique de la Cour suprême américaine, et de la Maison Blanche à l’Empire State Building, des chutes du Niagara aux frontons des mairies de San Francisco, Tel Aviv ou Paris ou des porte de Brandebourg, château de Disney World au pont de Minneapolis …

Entre les logos et les slogans les plus vides et les plus démagogiques (LoveWins/l’amour triomphe) de nos médias ou des entreprises de l’informatique et de l’Internet comme de nos prétendues lumières, d’Obama à Hillary Clinton et de Madonna, Lady Gaga, Taylor Swift ou Justin Timberlake, de la politique et du monde du spectacle …

Pendant qu’après l’abandon de l’Irak et bientôt de l’Afghanistan et l’autorisation de l’arme nucléaire accordée à un pays qui ne prône rien de moins que  la Solution finale  …

Et sans parler de l’irrédentisme russe ou de l’aventurisme chinois

Nos marchands de canons se frottent les mains et nos nouveaux croisés de « l’amour » prônent, pour contrer la barbarie islamiste et au nom s’il vous plait du « réalisme », le nouveau Grand mensonge   …

Le drapeau homo flotte désormais sur la quasi-totalité du Monde dit libre …

Comment ne pas repenser au mot fameux du comte de Salvandry au roi des Deux-Siciles à la veille de la Révolution de Juillet …

Et ne pas voir avec le juge de la Cour suprême John Roberts et  une tribune de l’hebdomadaire américain Foreign Policy

La logique et prochaine étape de l’ubérisation sociétale que nous vivons …

A savoir la légalisation de la polygamie ?

Politics
It’s Time to Legalize Polygamy
Why group marriage is the next horizon of social liberalism.
Fredrik Deboer
June 26, 2015

Welcome to the exciting new world of the slippery slope. With the Supreme Court’s landmark ruling this Friday legalizing same sex marriage in all 50 states, social liberalism has achieved one of its central goals. A right seemingly unthinkable two decades ago has now been broadly applied to a whole new class of citizens. Following on the rejection of interracial marriage bans in the 20th Century, the Supreme Court decision clearly shows that marriage should be a broadly applicable right—one that forces the government to recognize, as Friday’s decision said, a private couple’s “love, fidelity, devotion, sacrifice and family.”

The question presents itself: Where does the next advance come? The answer is going to make nearly everyone uncomfortable: Now that we’ve defined that love and devotion and family isn’t driven by gender alone, why should it be limited to just two individuals? The most natural advance next for marriage lies in legalized polygamy—yet many of the same people who pressed for marriage equality for gay couples oppose it.

This is not an abstract issue. In Chief Justice John Roberts’ dissenting opinion, he remarks, “It is striking how much of the majority’s reasoning would apply with equal force to the claim of a fundamental right to plural marriage.” As is often the case with critics of polygamy, he neglects to mention why this is a fate to be feared. Polygamy today stands as a taboo just as strong as same-sex marriage was several decades ago—it’s effectively only discussed as outdated jokes about Utah and Mormons, who banned the practice over 120 years ago.

Yet the moral reasoning behind society’s rejection of polygamy remains just as uncomfortable and legally weak as same-sex marriage opposition was until recently.

That’s one reason why progressives who reject the case for legal polygamy often don’t really appear to have their hearts in it. They seem uncomfortable voicing their objections, clearly unused to being in the position of rejecting the appeals of those who would codify non-traditional relationships in law. They are, without exception, accepting of the right of consenting adults to engage in whatever sexual and romantic relationships they choose, but oppose the formal, legal recognition of those relationships. They’re trapped, I suspect, in prior opposition that they voiced from a standpoint of political pragmatism in order to advance the cause of gay marriage.

In doing so, they do real harm to real people. Marriage is not just a formal codification of informal relationships. It’s also a defensive system designed to protect the interests of people whose material, economic and emotional security depends on the marriage in question. If my liberal friends recognize the legitimacy of free people who choose to form romantic partnerships with multiple partners, how can they deny them the right to the legal protections marriage affords?

Polyamory is a fact. People are living in group relationships today. The question is not whether they will continue on in those relationships. The question is whether we will grant to them the same basic recognition we grant to other adults: that love makes marriage, and that the right to marry is exactly that, a right.

Why the opposition, from those who have no interest in preserving “traditional marriage” or forbidding polyamorous relationships? I think the answer has to do with political momentum, with a kind of ad hoc-rejection of polygamy as necessary political concession. And in time, I think it will change.

The marriage equality movement has been both the best and worst thing that could happen for legally sanctioned polygamy. The best, because that movement has required a sustained and effective assault on “traditional marriage” arguments that reflected no particular point of view other than that marriage should stay the same because it’s always been the same. In particular, the notion that procreation and child-rearing are the natural justification for marriage has been dealt a terminal injury. We don’t, after all, ban marriage for those who can’t conceive, or annul marriages that don’t result in children, or make couples pinkie swear that they’ll have kids not too long after they get married. We have insisted instead that the institution exists to enshrine in law a special kind of long-term commitment, and to extend certain essential logistical and legal benefits to those who make that commitment. And rightly so.

But the marriage equality movement has been curiously hostile to polygamy, and for a particularly unsatisfying reason: short-term political need. Many conservative opponents of marriage equality have made the slippery slope argument, insisting that same-sex marriages would lead inevitably to further redefinition of what marriage is and means. See, for example, Rick Santorum’s infamous “man on dog” comments, in which he equated the desire of two adult men or women to be married with bestiality. Polygamy has frequently been a part of these slippery slope arguments. Typical of such arguments, the reasons why marriage between more than two partners would be destructive were taken as a given. Many proponents of marriage equality, I’m sorry to say, went along with this evidence-free indictment of polygamous matrimony. They choose to side-step the issue by insisting that gay marriage wouldn’t lead to polygamy. That legally sanctioned polygamy was a fate worth fearing went without saying.

To be clear: our lack of legal recognition of group marriages is not the fault of the marriage equality movement. Rather, it’s that the tactics of that movement have made getting to serious discussions of legalized polygamy harder. I say that while recognizing the unprecedented and necessary success of those tactics. I understand the political pragmatism in wanting to hold the line—to not be perceived to be slipping down the slope. To advocate for polygamy during the marriage equality fight may have seemed to confirm the socially conservative narrative, that gay marriage augured a wholesale collapse in traditional values. But times have changed; while work remains to be done, the immediate danger to marriage equality has passed. In 2005, a denial of the right to group marriage stemming from political pragmatism made at least some sense. In 2015, after this ruling, it no longer does.

While important legal and practical questions remain unresolved, with the Supreme Court’s ruling and broad public support, marriage equality is here to stay. Soon, it will be time to turn the attention of social liberalism to the next horizon. Given that many of us have argued, to great effect, that deference to tradition is not a legitimate reason to restrict marriage rights to groups that want them, the next step seems clear. We should turn our efforts towards the legal recognition of marriages between more than two partners. It’s time to legalize polygamy.

***

Conventional arguments against polygamy fall apart with even a little examination. Appeals to traditional marriage, and the notion that child rearing is the only legitimate justification of legal marriage, have now, I hope, been exposed and discarded by all progressive people. What’s left is a series of jerry-rigged arguments that reflect no coherent moral vision of what marriage is for, and which frequently function as criticisms of traditional marriage as well.

Many argue that polygamous marriages are typically sites of abuse, inequality in power and coercion. Some refer to sociological research showing a host of ills that are associated with polygamous family structures. These claims are both true and beside the point. Yes, it’s true that many polygamous marriages come from patriarchal systems, typically employing a “hub and spokes” model where one husband has several wives who are not married to each other. These marriages are often of the husband-as-boss variety, and we have good reason to suspect that such models have higher rates of abuse, both physical and emotional, and coercion. But this is a classic case of blaming a social problem on its trappings rather than on its actual origins.

After all, traditional marriages often foster abuse. Traditional marriages are frequently patriarchal. Traditional marriages often feature ugly gender and power dynamics. Indeed, many would argue that marriage’s origins stem from a desire to formalize patriarchal structures within the family in the first place. We’ve pursued marriage equality at the same time as we’ve pursued more equitable, more feminist heterosexual marriages, out of a conviction that the franchise is worth improving, worth saving. If we’re going to ban marriages because some are sites of sexism and abuse, then we’d have to start with the old fashioned one-husband-and-one-wife model. If polygamy tends to be found within religious traditions that seem alien or regressive to the rest of us, that is a function of the very illegality that should be done away with. Legalize group marriage and you will find its connection with abuse disappears.

Another common argument, and another unsatisfying one, is logistical. In this telling, polygamous marriages would strain the infrastructure of our legal systems of marriage, as they are not designed to handle marriage between more than two people. In particular, the claim is frequently made that the division of property upon divorce or death would be too complicated for polygamous marriages. I find this argument eerily reminiscent of similar efforts to dismiss same-sex marriage on practical grounds. (The forms say husband and wife! What do you want us to do, print new forms?) Logistics, it should go without saying, are insufficient reason to deny human beings human rights.

If current legal structures and precedents aren’t conducive to group marriage, then they will be built in time. The comparison to traditional marriage is again instructive. We have, after all, many decades of case law and legal organization dedicated to marriage, and yet divorce and family courts feature some of the most bitterly contested cases imaginable. Complication and dispute are byproducts of human relationships and human commitment. We could, as a civil society, create a legal expectation that those engaging in a group marriage create binding documents and contracts that clearly delineate questions of inheritance, alimony, and the like. Prenups are already a thing.

Most dispiriting, and least convincing, are those arguments that simply reconstitute the slippery slope arguments that have been used for so long against same sex marriage. “If we allow group marriage,” the thinking seems to go, “why wouldn’t marriage with animals or children come next?” The difference is, of course, consent. In recent years, a progressive and enlightened movement has worked to insist that consent is the measure of all things in sexual and romantic practice: as long as all involved in any particular sexual or romantic relationship are consenting adults, everything is permissible; if any individual does not give free and informed consent, no sexual or romantic engagement can be condoned.

This bedrock principle of mutually-informed consent explains exactly why we must permit polygamy and must oppose bestiality and child marriage. Animals are incapable of voicing consent; children are incapable of understanding what it means to consent. In contrast, consenting adults who all knowingly and willfully decide to enter into a joint marriage contract, free of coercion, should be permitted to do so, according to basic principles of personal liberty. The preeminence of the principle of consent is a just and pragmatic way to approach adult relationships in a world of multivariate and complex human desires.

Progressives have always flattered themselves that time is on their side, that their preferences are in keeping with the arc of history. In the fight for marriage equality, this claim has been made again and again. Many have challenged our politicians and our people to ask themselves whether they can imagine a future in which opposition to marriage equality is seen as a principled stance. I think it’s time to turn the question back on them: given what you know about the advancement of human rights, are you sure your opposition to group marriage won’t sound as anachronistic as opposition to gay marriage sounds to you now? And since we have insisted that there is no legitimate way to oppose gay marriage and respect gay love, how can you oppose group marriage and respect group love?

I suspect that many progressives would recognize, when pushed in this way, that the case against polygamy is incredibly flimsy, almost entirely lacking in rational basis and animated by purely irrational fears and prejudice. What we’re left with is an unsatisfying patchwork of unconvincing arguments and bad ideas, ones embraced for short-term convenience at long-term cost. We must insist that rights cannot be dismissed out of short-term interests of logistics and political pragmatism. The course then, is clear: to look beyond political convenience and conservative intransigence, and begin to make the case for extending legal marriage rights to more loving and committed adults. It’s time.

Fredrik deBoer is a writer and academic. He lives in Indiana.

Voir aussi:

Voice
Why Realists Should Celebrate Gay Marriage
Today’s Supreme Court ruling will help create a better, stronger America.
Stephen M. Walt
Foreign policy
June 26, 2015

Regular readers know I am often critical of the U.S. government because I believe pointing to flaws that could be corrected is part of my job. But it is also important to highlight those moments when my country does the right thing, and today’s SCOTUS decision on gay marriage is one of them.

For starters, the decision is consistent with the defining feature of American democracy: its emphasis on individual freedom and personal choice. As the court made clear, if consenting adults are not free to fall in love with whomever they are drawn to and to express that love openly in the institution of marriage, then they are being denied the full rights that other citizens enjoy and they are not in fact truly free. Today’s decision eliminated this obvious contradiction between our ideals and our practices, and it should be celebrated for that reason alone.

Second, along with U.S. President Barack Obama’s decision to permit gay Americans to serve openly in the armed forces, the decision is a blow in favor of fairness and efficiency. Prejudice and bigotry are bad in and of themselves, but they also impede the optimal use of human resources. When gay people could not serve openly in the military, our country was denied the talents that these patriotic individuals could have brought to important national security tasks. Similarly, when gay Americans could not marry or live together openly without fearing persecution, and when companies discriminated against gay employees, it meant that our society could not reap the full benefits of their unfettered participation. Whenever we remove another plank of prejudice, we help the best people rise as far as their abilities can take them, and all of us benefit as a result.

Today’s decision is also a tribute to the power of America’s oft maligned democratic institutions and the ability of reasoned discourse to triumph over ancient stigmas. Gay marriage did not come about by accident or just because two gay people decided to file a lawsuit a few years ago. It came about because courageous writers like Andrew Sullivan wrote powerfully in its favor, because an array of people — both gay and straight — organized to carry these arguments forward, and because more and more gay people came out and the straight world learned to relish their friendship and see them as equals. Once these things happened, the contradiction between our values and our laws — and the obvious injustice of the latter — was increasingly apparent. The American political system does not change direction quickly or easily, but it is open to reasoned discourse and responsive to changing sentiments. Even a Supreme Court dominated by conservatives could not fail to see that the ground had shifted, and today’s decision reflects that welcome reality.

Finally, establishing gay marriage as a fundamental right removes one of the practices that has separated the United States from many of its democratic partners (the Netherlands, Belgium, Canada, Spain, South Africa, Norway, Sweden, Argentina, Iceland, Portugal, Denmark, Brazil, England, Wales, France, New Zealand, Uruguay, Luxembourg, Scotland, and Finland). It will increase pressure on some other countries to follow suit, especially within Western Europe. At the same time, it is likely to broaden the gulf between states where homosexuality is becoming a nonissue and those where it is still persecuted and even same-sex unions are illegal. For gay people around the world, the struggle is far from over.

The struggle for human rights of different kinds is long and slow. But today, the arc of history bent.

 Voir également:

Voice
Can Gay Marriage Defeat the Islamic State?
A few — admittedly sappy — thoughts on the power of #LoveWins.
Rosa Brooks
Foreign Policy
June 26, 2015

I was thinking about two sets of images this morning: one from an Islamic State-controlled city in Iraq, the other from the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C.

The first set of images, from early June, shows masked gunmen surrounding a crowd of people, mostly men. Some of the faces in the crowd show fear or hatred; others are studiously blank. But all eyes are fixed on the rooftop of a nearby building, where a blindfolded man is dangling upside down, his ankle held tightly by another masked man. Next image: The blindfolded man’s body plummets headfirst toward the pavement below. Final image: a crumpled, bloody heap on the ground, surrounded by a sea of faces. Headline and caption, from Fox News: “ISIS conducts more executions of men for being gay.… On June 3, 2015, Islamic State (ISIS) operatives in Iraq’s Ninveh province published photos of a public execution in Mosul of three men convicted of acts of homosexuality. The three men were blindfolded and dropped head first from the roof of a tall building in front of a large crowd of spectators, including children.”

The second set of images shows another crowd, thousands of miles away from the first. This crowd is full of men and women, all ages and all races, and they’re waving American flags and rainbow-colored flags. This crowd isn’t flanked by gunmen; no one looks frightened or enraged. This crowd is laughing and embracing; a few people are weeping, their faces lit with relief and joy. Caption from the Washington Post: “Gay rights supporters celebrate outside the Supreme Court in Washington after justices ruled that same-sex couples have the right to marry, no matter where they live.”

I know which crowd I’d rather be in.

Do you want to fight the Islamic State and the forces of Islamic extremist terrorism? I’ll tell you the best way to send a message to those masked gunmen in Iraq and Syria and to everyone else who gains power by sowing violence and fear. Just keep posting that second set of images. Post them on Facebook and Twitter and Reddit and in comments all over the Internet. Send them to your friends and your family. Send them to your pen pal in France and your old roommate in Tunisia. Send them to strangers.

Yes, it’s sappy. But this has always been the dream of America: a dream of freedom, of a land where no one would force their religious beliefs on anyone else. A land where all people would have the unalienable rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. A land where we could seek change peacefully and trust our laws and institutions to respond to our deepest hopes.

The fulfillment of that dream has always been just a little bit beyond our reach, and we can approach it only through ceaseless struggle against the forces of darkness and reaction. This country has seen its share of hate-filled crowds. It has seen its share of whippings, lynchings, and beatings.

But it’s a dream that has brought untold millions of immigrants to our shores over the years, fleeing religious persecution and war and repression and a thousand different brands of hatred. It’s a dream that helped make the United States emulated and admired around the world. And it’s a dream that isn’t dead, as the Supreme Court’s decision on same-sex marriage reminds us.

Yes, America still has gunmen who shoot up churches and schools and bombers intent on turning crowds of smiling athletes and spectators into bloody bodies. We still have plenty of bigots and bullies. But we also still have that dream.

And I still have faith that this dream is the one that will prevail, in the end. That’s the lesson of history: Brutality and fear can keep people down for only so long. The Nazis learned this; the Soviets learned it; the Ku Klux Klan learned it; Pol Pot learned it; the Rwandan génocidaires learned it.

One of these days, the Islamic State and al Qaeda will learn it too.

I’m not a big fan of Twitter, but for once there’s a Twitter hashtag worth quoting, though it took my 13-year-old daughter to point it out to me: #LoveWins.

Tweet it. Shout it.

Sing it.

Voir encore:

The Supreme Court Ratifies a New Civic Religion That Is Incompatible with Christianity
David French
National Review
June 26, 2015

The most striking aspect of Justice Kennedy’s majority opinion in Obergefell v. Hodges, which created a constitutional right to same-sex marriage, was its deep emotion. This was no mere legal opinion. Indeed, the law and Constitution had little to do with it. (To Justice Kennedy, the most persuasive legal precedents were his own prior opinions protecting gay rights.) This was a statement of belief, written with the passion of a preacher, meant to inspire. Consider the already much-quoted closing: As some of the petitioners in these cases demonstrate, marriage embodies a love that may endure even past death. It would misunderstand these men and women to say they disrespect the idea of marriage. Their plea is that they do respect it, respect it so deeply that they seek to find its fulfillment for themselves. Their hope is not to be condemned to live in loneliness, excluded from one of civilization’s oldest institutions. They ask for equal dignity in the eyes of the law. The Constitution grants them that right. Or this: “Marriage responds to the universal fear that a lonely person might call out only to find no one there.” This isn’t constitutional law, it’s theology — a secular theology of self-actualization — crafted in such a way that its adherents will no doubt ask, “What decent person can disagree?” This is about love, and the law can’t fight love. Justice Kennedy’s opinion was nine parts romantic poetry and one part legal analysis (if that). And that’s what makes it so dangerous for religious liberty and free speech. Practitioners of constitutional law know that there is no such thing as an “absolute” right to free speech or religious freedom in any context — virtually all cases involve balancing the asserted right against the asserted state interest, with “compelling” state interests typically trumping even the strongest assertions of First Amendment rights. And what is more compelling than this ode to love? RELATED: Supreme Court Forces States to Perform Gay Marriage, 5-4

The challenge for orthodox religious believers is now abundantly clear: For years, they’ve been standing against “history,” “equality,” and — yes — love itself. Now, all of that rhetoric has been constitutionalized, embedded in the secular scripture of our land. To be sure, Justice Kennedy did at least nod in the direction of the orthodox, declaring: Finally, it must be emphasized that religions, and those who adhere to religious doctrines, may continue to advocate with utmost, sincere conviction that, by divine precepts, same-sex marriage should not be condoned. The First Amendment ensures that religious organizations and persons are given proper protection as they seek to teach the principles that are so fulfilling and so central to their lives and faiths, and to their own deep aspirations to continue the family structure they have long revered. But this rhetoric, as he knows, is legally meaningless in the face of the potent combination of emotion and legal doctrines that have long deemphasized religious freedom. Justice Kennedy’s rhetoric will slide neatly into existing balancing tests, leaving defenders of religious liberty grasping for persuasive rhetoric to counter the irresistible tide of the new, civic religion. More marriage The Supreme Court Has Legalized Same-Sex Marriage: Now What? Sweeping Aside Madison’s Handiwork Constitutional Remedies to a Lawless Supreme Court For many believers, this new era will present a unique challenge. Christians often strive to be seen as the “nicest” or “most loving” people in their communities. Especially among Evangelicals, there is a naïve belief that if only we were winsome enough, kind enough, and compassionate enough, the culture would welcome us with open arms. But now our love — expressed in the fullness of a Gospel that identifies homosexual conduct as sin but then provides eternal hope through justification and sanctification — is hate. Christians who’ve not suffered for their faith often romanticize persecution. They imagine themselves willing to lose their jobs, their liberty, or even their lives for standing up for the Gospel. Yet when the moment comes, at least here in the United States, they often find that they simply can’t abide being called “hateful.” It creates a desperate, panicked response. “No, you don’t understand. I’m not like those people — the religious right.” Thus, at the end of the day, a church that descends from apostles who withstood beatings finds itself unable to withstand tweetings. Social scorn is worse than the lash. This is the era of sexual liberty — the marriage of hedonism to meaning — and the establishment of a new civic religion. The black-robed priesthood has spoken. Will the church bow before their new masters?

— David French is an attorney and a staff writer at National Review.

Voir encore:

Report
Iran’s Missiles Are a Windfall for U.S. Defense Contractors
Nuclear deal or not, Tehran is keeping its ballistic missiles. And American firms are betting on a buyer’s market in the Persian Gulf.
Paul McLeary
Foreign Policy
June 26, 2015

Major U.S. defense contractors stand to earn a windfall if President Barack Obama’s administration secures a nuclear deal with Iran that sends jittery, oil-rich Persian Gulf countries seeking advanced new weapons. But the contractors likely will also do just fine if the negotiations unexpectedly collapse.

Fueling the coming spending is a controversial provision in the framework agreement, struck in April between Tehran and world powers, that largely left Iran’s ballistic missile capabilities untouched in the ongoing negotiations. The move angered White House critics on Capitol Hill and in parts of Europe. More urgently, it left Gulf states like Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) particularly uneasy because they are well within range of Iran’s increasingly advanced ballistic missiles.

That means deal or no deal, the Gulf countries — already some of the world’s biggest weapons buyers — will be opening their wallets even wider in the years ahead.

American defense contractors have long recognized the lucrative opportunity in the region, and they are counting on increased weapons sales to the Middle East to counteract a U.S. market that has slowed due to the relative flattening of the domestic defense budget.

At defense giant Lockheed Martin, Chief Executive Officer Marillyn Hewson wants the company to boost its foreign sales to about 20 percent of the firm’s revenues by the end of 2015, up from 17 percent currently. Most of that growth is expected to come from its sales of missile defense systems. The company already sells about $8 billion in missiles and fire controls annually, with close to half going to America’s allies in the Middle East, Asia, and Europe.

“With the regional instability that’s going on [in the Mideast], we’ve seen a fairly large appetite for a layered air-defense capability,” said Joe Garland, vice president of international business development at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control.
“With the regional instability that’s going on [in the Mideast], we’ve seen a fairly large appetite for a layered air-defense capability,” said Joe Garland, vice president of international business development at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control.

In an attempt to deepen ties in the region, Lockheed in December set up what it has dubbed the Center for Innovation and Security Solutions in Abu Dhabi, UAE. Garland described it as an effort to collaborate with the UAE on “what type of systems they want to develop for their security,” while exploring new ideas for working with allies in the region.

It is not the number of deals that drives up profits, but the huge cost of fielding just a few systems. Over the past several years, the UAE has signed $1.9 billion in deals to buy two of Lockheed’s Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) anti-ballistic missile systems. Qatar and Saudi Arabia, meanwhile, also are reportedly working to acquire the mobile, truck-mounted firing system, as well as an associated radar made by Raytheon.

Last year, an estimated 10 percent of Raytheon’s $23 billion in global sales went to the Middle East. The company has sold billions of dollars’ worth of Patriot missile systems to Israel, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Qatar, and the UAE, along with multiple big-dollar follow-on contracts for maintenance work and a constant stream of upgrades. The company booked a $2 billion sale of Patriots to Saudi Arabia this year.

The Saudi military joined a select club of countries that have deployed the Patriot missile in combat, knocking down a Scud missile fired over the border by Houthi rebels in Yemen this spring.

Raytheon officials declined to comment for this story. But in April, CEO Thomas Kennedy said international business amounted to 28 percent of the company’s revenues for the first quarter of 2015.

Those numbers should go up in coming years, regardless of the outcome of the Iran negotiations.

“The Saudis and Emiratis don’t trust the deal, no matter what the deal is,” Grant Rogan, CEO of Blenheim Capital and a military sales expert, told Foreign Policy.
“The Saudis and Emiratis don’t trust the deal, no matter what the deal is,” Grant Rogan, CEO of Blenheim Capital and a military sales expert, told Foreign Policy. He predicted more sales of Patriot missiles and advanced radar systems “happening in Saudi substantially faster if there’s no deal — or if it’s a deal that doesn’t defang Iran.”

The expected surge won’t make a huge difference on the ground right away, since missile defense systems take years to contract and produce. But as they wait for the expected deals to go through, the six countries that make up the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) have started to talk about pooling their missile defense and surveillance assets into a shared network to gain a clearer picture of what is flying through the region’s airspace.

But it is very much a work in progress.

“The problem there has been a political one,” said Thomas Karako, senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Following a May summit of GCC leaders in Washington, the Gulf nations issued a hopeful joint statement for progress on the network they described as a regionwide early-warning system — ostensibly as a safeguard against Iran.

Yet real questions remain over the Gulf states’ ability to overcome deeply entrenched political issues that have previously kept them from sharing intelligence. There’s also the issue of long-term technological investment. Building a networked radar and missile system is not merely about putting interceptors in the desert and pointing them toward the sky. “It’s about stitching those assets together and stitching the networks together,” Karako said.

Currently, there is no regionwide shared system to ensure that incoming attacks or other errant airspace objects aren’t missed. And that raises the overall threat for the Gulf nations.

Lockheed has “talked to a number of these GCC countries about how we can help them tie together” missile defense assets, Garland said. “It’s not there yet.”

While talk of selling more missile defense systems to the Middle East may seem a relatively easy way to blunt the Iranian missile threat, Washington should be cautious about how it balances its priorities.

Kingston Reif, director for disarmament and threat reduction policy for the Arms Control Association, said focusing too much on Tehran’s missiles ignores the true range of threats posed by Iran.

“To the extent that the U.S. [is] considering increasing arms sales, it should be focused on things like cyber and greater coordination on countering cyberthreats, which we know Iran is capable of,” Reif said.

But anti-ballistic missile systems are, to some degree, easier to sell to Gulf allies than other military weapons. The Defense Department has so far ruled out selling F-35 fighter jets, for example, since that would rile Israel and upset the qualitative military edge that Washington, by law, affords its staunchest ally in the region.

The growing distrust among some Gulf allies of Washington’s tentative agreement with Iran also risks changing the nature of some U.S. relationships in the region. Saudi Arabia’s bombing campaign against Houthi rebels in Yemen and airstrikes by both Riyadh and the UAE against jihadis in Libya are two examples of attacks launched without either Washington’s support or prior knowledge.

But the relationship will likely fray only so much, no matter the outcome of the eleventh-hour talks in Vienna between world powers and Iran. Saudi Arabia and other Gulf allies have suggested turning to France and even Russia for future arms, but the American defense industry, as well as Washington’s economic clout, still matters.

Following the May summit, GCC Assistant Secretary-General Abdel Aziz Abu Hamad Aluwaisheg told reporters the meeting “exceeded the expectations of most of us” in that it reasserted Washington’s commitment to Gulf security and containing Iran.

Obama assured Gulf states that a nuclear deal with Iran doesn’t reflect a “pivot” toward Tehran, Aluwaisheg said.

Obama “succeeded very well in putting those questions to rest,” he said.

At the same time, the Gulf is not about to let its guard down. Because Iran already fields a ballistic missile capability that has largely been left outside the nuclear negotiation process, any deal — or lack of a deal — still leaves a serious threat in place.

“Missile defense will continue to grow in the region, regardless,” Rogan said.

Voir de plus:

Over the rainbow
Mariage gay : déferlante de drapeaux arc-en-ciel dans le monde
Delphine Cuny | Rédactrice en chef adjointe
Rue 89
27/06/2015

Politiques et entreprises se sont emparé des symboles du mouvement LGBT au lendemain de la légalisation du mariage gay aux USA et à la veille de plusieurs Gay Prides. Entre joie sincère et récupération.
Au lendemain de la légalisation du mariage homosexuel aux Etats-Unis, le drapeau arc-en-ciel, emblème du mouvement LGBT, a inondé les « timelines » sur Twitter et s’est invité sur de nombreux monuments de grandes capitales, où avait aussi lieu la Marche des fiertés (Gay Pride), à Paris notamment.

Le fronton de l’Hôtel de Ville avait hissé haut les fameuses couleurs, comme l’a tweeté la maire de Paris, Anne Hidalgo, reprenant le hashtag #LoveWins (l’amour triomphe) qui a fait florès sur la Toile. L’ambassadrice des Etats-Unis en France, Jane Hartley, était d’ailleurs ce samedi au côté d’Anne Hidalgo dans la Marche des fiertés à Paris.

La Maison Blanche, bien sûr, avait prévu un éclairage de nuit spécial, tout comme l’Empire State Building à New York, l’hôtel de ville de San Francisco, le pont de Minneapolis, mais aussi la porte de Brandebourg à Berlin ou la mairie de Tel Aviv, comme le rapporte le site d’architecture Arch Daily.

On a vu aussi quelques monuments ou lieux plus inattendus, comme par exemple, le château de Cendrillon à Disney World (Floride) ou même les chutes du Niagara. Mais pas la Tour Eiffel.

Les politiques, à l’image de Hillary Clinton, qui a repeint sa photo de profil sur Twitter aux couleurs arc-en-ciel, ont été les plus prompts à surfer sur la vague #LoveWins mais pas les seuls. Quelques célébrités comme Madonna, Lady Gaga, Taylor Swift ou Justin Timberlake, se sont aussi associées à cette journée historique.

Taylor Swift s’autocite dans sa chanson ‘Welcome to New York’ : ‘Et tu veux qui tu veux, garçons et garçons et filles et filles’
De nombreux médias ont aussi modifié leur logo pour l’occasion, comme les sites spécialisés en high tech comme The Verge, Mashable ou The Next Web, le site de la Bible de Hollywood, Variety. Mais pas les grands journaux comme le New York Times ou le Washington Post, restés plus sobres, même s’ils ont largement couvert l’événement et joué un rôle dans l’évolution des mentalités.

Ce sont surtout les marques qui se sont emparées du hashtag et du drapeau, en particulier les entreprises de la Silicon Valley, où le mouvement est en pointe : Twitter elle-même, Yahoo ou YouTube (Google) et bien sûr Apple, par la voix de Tim Cook, son directeur général, qui avait fait son coming-out et milité contre la discrimination.

‘Les Etats-Unis ont fait un pas dans la bonne direction aujourd’hui. #Fierd’Aimer’
On pourra citer aussi Uber, dont on parle tant en ce moment, qui publie un Gif montrant vraisemblablement des salariés ‘réjouis’ et ‘fiers’.
De grandes entreprises américaines comme Visa, la compagnie aérienne Delta, la chaîne de supermarchés Target, les bonbons Skittles ont également surfé sur la décision, relève USA Today. Les céréales Kellogg’s n’ont pas hésité se faire un coup de pub, en mettant en avant ses bonnes notes en matière de diversité, quitte à être accusé de faire de la récup. D’autres marques comme la chaîne de restos mexicains Chipotle, qui emballe un burrito d’alu arc-en-ciel, se sont risquées aux jeux de mots de plus ou moins bon goût.

Como Estas (comment ça va) devient Homo Estas chez Chipotle
Au total, Twitter a recensé plus de 10 millions de tweets en six heures sur la légalisation du mariage des couples de même sexe, dont plus de 2,6 millions avec la mention #LoveWins. Un record de 35 000 messages par minute a été atteint dans la nuit (peu avant minuit heure de New York).
A titre de comparaison, en novembre 2014, lors des émeutes à Ferguson, la décision de relaxer le policier ayant tué le jeune noir Michael Brown avait déclenché une tempête de 3,5 millions de tweets en 24 heures. En janvier dernier, il y avait eu 2,1 millions de tweets #JeSuisCharlie dans les six heures suivant l’attaque de l’hebdomadaire satirique.

Voir encore:

Barack Obama and the Crisis of Liberalism
Charles R. Kesler, Ph.D.
The Heritage Foundation
October 15, 2012

Abstract: Liberalism as we know it today in America is on the verge of exhaustion. Facing a fiscal crisis that it has precipitated and no longer sure of its purpose, liberalism will either go out of business or be forced to reinvent itself as something quite different from what it has been. In this careful analysis of Barack Obama’s political thought, Charles R. Kesler shows that the President, though intent on reinvigorating the liberal faith, nonetheless fails to understand its fatal contradictions—a shortsightedness that may prove to be liberalism’s undoing. This essay is adapted from Kesler’s new book, I Am the Change: Barack Obama and the Crisis of Liberalism.

Barack Obama had the distinction of being the most liberal member of the United States Senate when he ran for President in 2008. The title had been conferred by National Journal, an inside-the-Beltway watchdog that annually assigns Senators (and Congressmen) an ideological rank based on their votes on economic, social, and foreign policy issues.

Since then, we have learned a lot more about his political leanings as a young man, which were fashionably leftist, broadly in keeping with the climate of opinion on the campuses where he found himself—Occidental College, Columbia University, Harvard Law School.

As a senior at Columbia, he attended the 1983 Socialist Scholars Conference, sponsored by the Democratic Socialists of America. Though a meeting of democratic socialists and, yes, community organizers, the conference as well as his long-running friendships with radicals of various sorts would have drawn more sustained attention if the Cold War were still raging. But it was not, and Obama pleaded youthful indiscretion and drift; and of course his campaign did its best to keep the details from coming out.

He still had to answer, in some measure, for his ties to William Ayers and Jeremiah Wright, but the issue with, say, the good reverend concerned his sermons about race and Middle East politics, not his penchant for visiting and honoring Fidel Castro, not to mention the Marxist Sandinistas in Nicaragua.[1] Partly by avoiding the worst of the old anti-Communist gauntlet, Obama became the most left-wing liberal to be elected to national executive office since Henry Wallace.

Still, the President is not a self-proclaimed socialist—nor, like Wallace, a self-deceived fellow traveler or worse. Obama never went so far, so openly—whether out of inertia, political calculation, or good sense—and therefore never had to make a public apostasy. As a result, we know less about his evolving views than we might like, though probably more than he would like.

He calls himself a progressive or liberal, and we should take him at his word, at least until we encounter a fatal contradiction. That’s only reasonable and fair; and it avoids the desperate shortcut, gratifying as it may be, of unmasking him as—take your pick—a Third-World daddy’s boy, Alinskyist agitator, deep-cover Muslim, or undocumented alien. Conservatives, of all people, should know to beware instant gratification, especially when it comes wrapped in a conspiracy theory. In any case, hypocrisy, as Rochefoucauld wrote, is the tribute that vice pays to virtue, and Obama seems to think it would be a virtuous thing to have been a lifelong liberal, even if he wasn’t.

And so the question arises: What does it mean anymore to be a liberal? To answer it, we must first retrace the history of liberalism over the course of the past century.

The Four Waves of Liberalism
The 20th century was, as the late Tom Silver used to say, “the liberal century.” Conservatism was a late arrival, debuting as a self-conscious intellectual movement only in the 1950s and lacking significant political success until the 1980s. By contrast, the liberal storm was already gathering in the 1880s and broke upon the land in the new century’s second decade. It had made deep, decisive changes in American politics long before conservatism as we know it came on the scene.

It didn’t, however, win these victories all at once. Modern liberalism spread across the country in three powerful waves, interrupted by wars and by rather haphazard reactions to its excesses. Each wave of liberalism featured a different aspect of it—call them, for short, political liberalism, economic liberalism, and cultural liberalism—and each deposited on our shores a distinctive type of politics—the politics of progress, the politics of entitlements, and the politics of meaning.

These terms are conceptual rather than, strictly speaking, historical. They help to organize our thinking more so than our record-keeping, inasmuch as elements of all three were mixed up in each stage. Although it wasn’t inevitable that one wave should follow the next, a certain logic connected the New Freedom, the New Deal, and the Great Society. Each attempted to transform America, as their names suggest, and the second and third waves worked out themes implicit in the first. But the special flavor of each period owed much to the issues and forces involved, the legacy of previous reform, the character of the political leaders, and the disagreements within and between the generations of reformers. The third wave, centered on the Sixties, showed just how fratricidal liberalism could become.

The first and most disorienting wave was political liberalism, which began as a critique of the Constitution and the morality underlying it. That morality, Woodrow Wilson charged, the natural rights doctrine of Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln, was based on an outmoded account of human nature, an atomistic and egoistic view that needed to be corrected by a more well-rounded or social view, made plausible by the recent discovery that human nature was necessarily progressive or perfectible. So-called natural rights were actually historical or prescriptive, evolving with the times toward a final and rational truth. The 18th century Constitution, based on the 18th century notion of a fixed human nature with static rights, had in turn to be transcended by a modern or living constitution based on the evolutionary view. Drawing on a curious and unstable mixture of Social Darwinism, German idealism, and English historicism, Wilson outlined the new State that liberals would ever after be building, the goal of which would be nothing less than man’s complete spiritual fulfillment.

The second wave explicitly adopted the name of liberalism, laying aside the old banner of Progressivism. It championed liberality or generosity in the form of a new doctrine of socioeconomic rights and tried to connect the new rights to the old, the Second Bill of Rights (as FDR called it) to the First. Instead of rights springing from the individual, the New Deal reconceived individualism as springing from a new kind of rights created by the State. The new entitlement-style rights posed as personal rights, even though they effectually attached to groups; but due to the slight family resemblance, they allowed Roosevelt to present himself and the New Deal as the loyal servants and successors of the American Revolution, of the old social compact suitably updated.

Liberalism’s third wave, cultural or lifestyle liberalism, hit in the 1960s. It was only when this wave crashed around them that the radical character of liberalism became clear to the American people; only then that conservatism became, at least temporarily, a majority movement, insofar as it stood for America against its cultured despisers and reformers. The Great Society agreed with the New Deal that government had to provide for Americans’ necessities in order that they may live in freedom, but it denied that freedom from want and freedom from fear (along with freedom of speech and worship) were any longer sufficient for all-around human liberation. Freedom required not merely living comfortably but also creatively, a demand that the New Left took several steps further than poor Lyndon Johnson was willing or able to go.

In the Sixties, the “peculiar” character of the radicalism bound up with contemporary liberalism began to tear it apart as its constituent elements began to clash. When social morality collided with personal liberation, and the State’s authority clashed with the people’s rights, and the assumptions of rational progress were denied by protestors who preferred to make history by following their authentic selves rather than admire history as it came to an end—then liberalism began to unravel. For conflicting reasons, liberals lost faith that they were on the right side of history and that the State could ever provide the conditions for complete self-development or spiritual fulfillment.

Obama inherited that frayed liberalism. Against long odds, he’s tried to reunite its dissonant parts and restore its political élan. He brought America to the verge of a fourth wave of political and social transformation, something that neither Democrats nor Republicans thought possible. But as the latest embodiment of the visionary prophet-statesmen he hasn’t been able to sustain the deep connection to the American people that his election in 2008 seemed to promise and that his desire to restore liberalism as the country’s dominant public philosophy required. Perhaps after the debacle of the Great Society, three decades in the political shadow of Ronald Reagan, and the current protracted economic doldrums, Americans have grown suspicious of the liberal vision of the future as a kind of Brigadoon—a land of wonders that voters glimpse every four years but that quickly fades into the mists, and from which no one has ever returned.

Unlike any of his liberal predecessors, Obama’s tortuous doubts about American exceptionalism lead to a sense of his estrangement from his own country, a disability not relieved by his profession, in Berlin, that he is a citizen of the world as well. He seems to lack both the citizen’s pride and the immigrant’s gratitude.

Tempting as it might be to write off the President, it would be a big mistake. Whatever else he may accomplish, his staggering victory on health care reform has earned him a future place on the Mount Rushmore of liberalism, alongside those other supreme hero-statesmen of the creed, Woodrow Wilson, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Lyndon B. Johnson. Assuming that his signature achievement is not unceremoniously repealed and replaced, Obama will almost certainly become one of the Democratic immortals, the giants who built and expanded the modern liberal state.

The New Progressivism of Barack Obama
Obama is neither an old-fashioned Progressive nor a radical postmodernist. Part of what makes him interesting is how he handles the conflicting strains of his own thought. As a decent man, he believes in justice and identifies with the civil rights movement’s insistence that Jim Crow was manifestly wrong and the cause of black equality manifestly right. As a self-described progressive, he believes in change; that is, he believes that change is almost always synonymous with improvement, that history has a direction and destination, that it’s crucial to be on the right side of history, not the wrong, and that it’s the leader’s job to discern which is the right side and to lead his people to that promised land of social equality and social justice.

Yet he’s skeptical of the simple-minded progressive equation of history with the inevitable triumph of justice; he fears that the foreknowledge of success or the optimistic certitude of victory would detract from the honor of standing up against Jim Crow, for example. It would also create a free-rider problem: Why risk opposing segregation if its fall is inevitable? He shares the civil rights movement’s sense that you have to make history, not just wait for it to make you. Yet if men can make history and history makes morality, then don’t human beings create their own morality?

As the product of a very liberal education, alas, Obama never discovered that this quandary could be resolved by returning from history to nature as the unchanging ground of our changing experience, as the foundation of morality and politics. Returning, say, to Lincoln’s and the Founders’ own understanding of themselves, reconsidering their argument for the Declaration’s principles, never occurred to him as a serious possibility. The progressivist assumptions, though decadent, were still too strong. He thought the only way was forward.

In his capacity as a political leader, Obama’s favorite formulation is that he seeks to “shape” history. But shaping history leaves ambiguous just how much freedom or influence human beings actually have—whether we shape history decisively or only marginally. As he declared in Iowa in 2010 after his health care victory: “Our future is what we make it. Our future is what we make it.”

That’s the deeper meaning of his slogan, “Yes, we can,” which he elsewhere called “a simple creed that sums up the spirit of a people.” In itself, the phrase sounds like a reply to “No, you can’t.” But was the nay-sayer denying us permission to do something or doubting our ability to do it? If the former, “Yes, we can” is an assertion of moral right or autonomy; if the latter, it’s an assertion of power or competence. For Obama, in Progressive fashion, the two appear to go together. Obama says, “Yes, we can” to slaves, abolitionists, immigrants, western pioneers, suffragettes, the space program, healing this nation, and repairing the world—and that’s in one speech.[2]

In a strange way, “Yes, we can” takes the place in his thought that “all men are created equal” held in Lincoln’s thought. Insofar as it is America’s national creed, it affirms that America is what we make it at any given time: America stands for the ability to change, openness to change, the willingness to constantly remake ourselves—but apparently for no particular purpose. Jon Stewart, the comedian, caught the dilemma perfectly when, joshing the President over his equivocations on the Ground Zero mosque, he said Obama’s slogan, as amended, now read: “Yes, we can…. But…should we?”

The country’s saving principle, then, is openness to change. “The genius of our founders is that they designed a system of government that can be changed,” Obama said in 2007 when announcing his presidential candidacy. In short, ours is the kind of country that always says, “Yes, we can” to the principle of “Yes, we can.” We affirm our right to change by always changing; we shape history by reshaping ourselves.

For all his openness to change, there is one to which Obama consistently answers, “No, we can’t.” Any change that would move the country backward, in his view, is anathema. “What I’m not willing to do is go back to the days when…” is a phrase that begins many a sentence in his repertory. When dealing with conservatives, his confidence in history’s purpose and beneficence is miraculously raised to almost Wilsonian levels. He may not be exactly sure where history is going, but somehow he knows it’s not going there. A certain impatience and irritability creep into his voice. If people reject his vision, he can’t be a leader—and that makes it personal. His tone turns petulant, and he begins to issue orders to follow him.

The main target of his scoldings is, of course, the House Republicans, who tend to obstruct his measures. But in a larger sense, Obama displays the Progressive impatience with politics itself. It’s not merely the separation of powers, checks and balances, and other constitutional devices that often stalemate change to which liberals object. It’s human nature in its present state, still so inclined to praise God rather than man, to venerate the past, and to be guided by a healthy self-love.

Eventually, man will be worthy of liberalism, assuming it has its way with him and conditions him to love the State as the bee loves the hive. In the meantime, it’s a constant struggle to bear with this unreconstructed individualist who would rather govern his potty little self (in Chesterton’s great phrase) according to his own lights than be well governed by experts for his own (purported) good.

Obama, like most liberal thinkers, dreams of overcoming man’s stubbornly political nature in two ways, by assimilating politics either to the family or to the military. He began his 2011 State of the Union address by invoking the first theme: “We are part of the American family,” and together as one we’re going to “win the future”—a slogan with deeply Social Darwinist roots, by the way.

After the future business didn’t pan out so well in numerous scrapes with the House GOP, his frustration took a different direction a year later. In his 2012 State of the Union, after celebrating Osama bin Laden’s killing and the withdrawal of combat forces from Iraq, the President focused on the “courage, selflessness, and teamwork of America’s armed forces”:

At a time when too many of our institutions have let us down, they exceed all expectations. They’re not consumed with personal ambition. They don’t obsess over their differences. They focus on the mission at hand. They work together…. Imagine what we could accomplish if we followed their example.
Yes, if politics were rigidly hierarchical, if we had to follow orders from above without question, and if living together as a free people were as unequivocal and straightforward an affair as pumping bullets into bin Laden, then we could accomplish a lot more—or a lot less, depending on how highly you value democratic self-government as an accomplishment. And the truth is that the leadership paradigm values freedom and self-rule much less than it does getting things done, attacking social problems, and making sure that liberal programs survive the struggle for existence on Capitol Hill.

Leadership is a term from the military side of politics, and one of the reasons the Founders resisted it was their determination to preserve republican politics as a civilian forum, as the activity of a free people ruling itself. A standing army might be necessary for that people’s defense, but citizens had no business longing to exchange political debate and deliberation for military solidarity and discipline.

On his better days, President Obama knows that, but this wasn’t one of them. He went on: “When you put on that uniform, it doesn’t matter if you’re black or white; Asian or Latino; conservative or liberal; rich or poor; gay or straight.” Nor does it matter, by the way, whether you think the war is just or unjust, prudent or imprudent.

It might seem that liberals have come a long way from the protest days of the 1960s when many of them lustily denounced the American war machine; but in fact, they’re still compensating or overcompensating for their contempt of the U.S. military back then. At the same time, they are returning to an older Progressive tradition, highly visible in the New Deal, of trying vainly to make politics the moral equivalent of war. In any event, no one has to put on a uniform to be an equal citizen with equal rights under our Constitution.

Progressivism Without Progress?
To make possible a governing liberal majority, Obama has to rehabilitate liberalism’s reputation, to separate it as much as possible from the radical politics of the Sixties and the burden of defending big government.

President Clinton began this renewal in the 1990s. In some ways, Obama continues and sharpens Clinton’s efforts, wringing all the benefits he can out of the appearance of post-partisanship while making few sacrifices of substance. He far outshines Clinton, however, in telling the story of America in a way that reinforces a resurgent liberalism. More than any other Democratic President since FDR, Obama has an impressive interpretation of American history that culminates in him and that reworks and counters Reagan’s view of our history as the working out of American exceptionalism (including divine favor), individualism, limited government, free-market economics, and time-tested morals.

As a writer, Obama’s strength is telling stories, and his account of America is a kind of story, mixing social, intellectual, and political history. It begins with the Founding—with the Declaration of Independence and Constitution. He tries to construct a new consensus view of the country that acknowledges and then contextualizes traditional views in a way meant to be reassuring but that points to very untraditional conclusions. For instance, in The Audacity of Hope, in a chapter titled “Values,” he quotes the Declaration’s famous sentence on self-evident truths and then comments:

Those simple words are our starting point as Americans; they describe not only the foundations of our government but the substance of our common creed. Not every American may be able to recite them; few, if asked, could trace the genesis of the Declaration of Independence to its roots in eighteenth-century liberal and republican thought. But the essential idea behind the Declaration—that we are born into this world free, all of us; that each of us arrives with a bundle of rights that can’t be taken away by any person or any state without just cause; that through our own agency we can, and must, make of our lives what we will—is one that every American understands.[3]
It sounds almost Lincolnian until one notices that the rights in this bundle are not said to be natural, exactly, nor true and certainly not self-evident; they are an outgrowth of 18th century political thought, too recondite for most Americans to know or remember. Abraham Lincoln, when explaining the Declaration, traced its central idea to God and nature, not to 18th century ideologies. He called for “all honor to Jefferson” for introducing “into a merely revolutionary document, an abstract truth, applicable to all men and all times.” When Jefferson was asked about the document’s source and purpose, he looked to common sense as well as to a much older and richer philosophical tradition.[4]

A commonsense argument harmonious with the political principles of Aristotle, Cicero, Locke, and Sidney and proceeding from an abstract truth, applicable to all men and all times, could hardly be a simple distillation of 18th century ideologies—unless, of course, Jefferson and Lincoln didn’t know what they were talking about. If they spoke for their age without knowing so, if they were men of their times but didn’t realize it, then like their 21st century countrymen, they too would have been ignorant of their 18th century wellsprings, but precisely because they were living in or at least not long after the 18th century!

Returning to Obama’s American story, we see that it blends two themes: individualism (symbolized in the Declaration) and “unity” (symbolized in the Constitution’s commitment to “a more perfect Union”). The latter phrase, plucked from the Preamble, has long been a favorite of liberals from Wilson to Bill Clinton. For Obama, unity means being your brother’s and sister’s keeper; it means coming together “as one American family.” “If fate causes us to stumble or fall, our larger American family will be there to lift us up,” he explains.

In real life, he hasn’t exactly been there to lift up his aunt in Boston or his hut-dwelling half brother in Kenya, but then families in real life often disappoint. Even so, the family’s failings only leave more work for the State. Membership in it confers or protects our “dignity,” Obama argues, in the sense of guaranteeing “a basic standard of living” and effectively sharing “life’s risks and rewards for the benefit of each and the good of all.” And no one can enjoy “dignity and respect” without a society that guarantees both “social justice” and “economic justice.”

These ramify widely, demanding, in Obama’s words, that “if you work in America you should not be poor”; that a college education should be every child’s “birthright”; and that every American should have broadband access. Lately, he’s feeling even more generous. The “basic American promise,” he said in his 2012 State of the Union address, was and should be again that “if you worked hard, you could do well enough to raise a family, own a home, send your kids to college, and put a little away for retirement.”[5]

That sounds more like winning life’s lottery than a promise that anyone could justly demand be fulfilled. Notice how craftily, however, Obama shifts his examples of social duty from picking up the fallen to sending someone else’s kids to college. How easily liberal magicians transform needs into desires and desires into rights. They do it right before our eyes and never explain the secret of the trick. Still, it’s revealing that he doesn’t go whole hog, turning such socioeconomic goods explicitly into rights and cataloging them for our wonderment. Chastened by the right-wing and middle-class backlash against welfare rights, he follows Bill Clinton in silently recasting, say, the right to go to college on someone else’s money as an “investment” in “opportunity.” As Obama presents it:

…opportunity is yours if you’re willing to reach for it and work for it. It’s the idea that while there are few guarantees in life, you should be able to count on a job that pays the bills; health care for when you need it; a pension for when you retire; an education for your children that will allow them to fulfill their God-given potential.
Actually, there are quite a few “guarantees” in a life lived in Obama’s America. Even as he’s wary of rights talk after the Sixties’ implosion, he also denies any fondness for “big government.” Newfangled rights would imply a big government to provide them. He’s not in favor of that; he supports “active government.” These aren’t blank-check rights because the recipient has some reciprocal responsibilities—filling out the enrollment forms, showing up at class, making passing grades, and the like. But the obligations are usually minimal, and besides, don’t responsibilities and rights usually keep a house together? So these are rights of a sort, and Obama said so explicitly a month before the 2008 election in a CNN debate with John McCain. Asked whether health care was a privilege, a responsibility, or a right, he replied, “Well, I think it should be a right for every American.”[6] But he had avoided saying so up to that point.

Obama leaves the relationship between individualism and “a more perfect union” up in the air, to be settled pragmatically. Every society has a similar tension between “autonomy and solidarity,” he writes, and “it has been one of the blessings of America that the circumstances of our nation’s birth allowed us to negotiate these tensions better than most.” The circumstances, not the principles, of our nation were key, because the wide-open continent allowed individuals to head west and form new communities to their liking whenever they wanted to.

But the continent filled up; big corporations gradually took over from the family farm, just as Wilson and FDR had explained generations before; and soon our “values” were in a more serious conflict that required a bigger government to help reconcile. Unfortunately, that government proved enduringly unpopular with conservatives, who refused to adjust to the new times; and so finding the proper balance between the individual and the community continues to stoke our increasingly polarized and polarizing political debates.

Though he hails the Constitution as a mechanism of “deliberative democracy,” Obama doesn’t mean by that a back-and-forth on public policy conducted by the executive and legislative branches with input from the people. Deliberation of that kind, endorsed by The Federalist and consistent with natural rights, would seek means to the ends of constitutional government. That’s too narrow for Obama, who seeks deliberation about the ends, or at least about what our rights will be and what the Constitution should mean in the age that is dawning. He wants to turn all of the Constitution’s mechanisms—separation of powers, federalism, checks and balances—into ways of forcing a “conversation” about our identity. In such a conversation, “all citizens are required to engage in a process of testing their ideas against an external reality, persuading others of their point of view, and building shifting alliances of consent.”[7]

Required? An external reality? And who judges whether the resulting conversation meets the requirements of democracy or not? Obama deplores the bile in our contemporary politics, and it must puzzle him that he causes so much of it. But he’s asking for it. As Bill Buckley used to say, liberals always talk about their tolerance and eagerness to engage with other views, but they’re always surprised to find that there are other views.

Obama expects 21st century people to have, roughly speaking, 21st century views, as he does. What then of Jefferson and his 18th century compeers? Obama soon makes clear that despite their fine words, Jefferson and the other Founders were less than faithful to the liberal and republican inferences of the principles they proclaimed. Like a good law school professor, in The Audacity of Hope, Obama lines up evidence and argument on both sides before concluding that, in fact, the Founders probably did not understand their principles as natural and universal, despite their language, but rather as confined to the white race. The Declaration of Independence “may have been,” he says, a transformative moment in world history, a great breakthrough for freedom, but “that spirit of liberty didn’t extend, in the minds of the Founders, to the slaves who worked their fields, made their beds, and nursed their children.” As a result, the Constitution “provided no protection to those outside the constitutional circle,” to those who were not “deemed members of America’s political community”: “the Native American whose treaties proved worthless before the court of the conqueror, or the black man Dred Scott, who would walk into the Supreme Court a free man and leave a slave.”

Obama doesn’t argue, as Lincoln did, that the Supreme Court majority was in error, that Dred Scott was wrongly and unjustly returned to slavery, and that Chief Justice Roger Taney’s dictum—that, in the Founders’ view, the black man had no rights that the white man was bound to respect—was a profound solecism. On the contrary, Obama accepts Dred Scott as rightly decided according to the standards of the time. He agrees, in effect, with Taney’s reading of the Declaration and the Constitution, and with Stephen Douglas’s as well. Despite his admiration for Lincoln, Obama sides with Lincoln’s opponents in their interpretation of Jefferson and the Declaration as pro-slavery.[8] Obama regards the original intention of both the Declaration and the Constitution to be racist and even pro-slavery, but he refrains from making the point explicit.

His understanding of the past thus pays lip service to such things as self-evident truths, original intent, and first principles but quickly changes the subject to values, visions, dreams, ideals, myths, and narratives. This is a postmodern “move.” We can’t know or share truth, postmodernists assert, because there is no truth “out there,” but we can share stories and thus construct a community of shared meaning. It’s these ideas that mark his furthest departure from old-fashioned liberalism.

More and less radical, more and less nihilist—Obama comes in on the “less” side, but then a little bit of nihilism goes a long way. “Implicit…in the very idea of ordered liberty,” he writes in The Audacity of Hope, is “a rejection of absolute truth, the infallibility of any idea or ideology or theology or ‘ism,’ any tyrannical consistency that might lock future generations into a single, unalterable course, or drive both majorities and minorities into the cruelties of the Inquisition, the pogrom, the gulag, or the jihad.” There is no absolute truth—and that’s the absolute truth, he argues. Such feeble, self-contradictory reasoning is at the heart of Obama’s very private and yet very public struggle with himself to determine whether there is anything anywhere that can truly be known, or even that is rational to have faith in. Anyone who believes, really believes, in absolute truth, he asserts, is a fanatic or in imminent danger of becoming a fanatic; absolute truth is the mother of extremism everywhere.

Although it’s certainly a good thing that America avoided religious and political tyranny, no previous President has ever credited this achievement to the Founders’ rejection of absolute truth, previously known as “truth.” Is the idea that human freedom is right, slavery wrong, thus to be rejected lest we embrace an “absolute truth”? What becomes of the “universal truths” Obama himself celebrates on occasion? Surely the problem is not with the degree of belief, but with the falseness of the causes for which the Inquisition, the pogrom, the gulag, and the jihad stood. A fervent belief in religious liberty is not equivalent to a fervent belief in religious tyranny any more than a passionate belief in democracy is equivalent to a passionate longing for dictatorship.

In The Audacity of Hope, within two pages of his criticism of the Founders for allegedly excluding black Americans from constitutional protection as equal human beings and citizens, he warns against all such sweeping truth claims and indeed praises the Founders for being “suspicious of abstraction.” On every major question in America’s early history, he writes, “theory yielded to fact and necessity…. It may be the vision of the Founders that inspires us, but it was their realism, their practicality and flexibility and curiosity, that ensured the Union’s survival.”[9] Obama cannot decide whether to blame the Founders as racists or to celebrate them as relativists; to assail them for not applying their truths absolutely to blacks and Indians along with whites or to praise them for compromising their too absolute principles for the sake of something concrete.

His attempt to resolve this contradiction carries him into still deeper and murkier waters. Obama turns for inspiration to the abolitionists, drawing no distinction between a superb publicist and reasoner like Frederick Douglass and a butcher like John Brown, who was happy “to spill blood and not just words on behalf of his visions.” Both were “absolutists,” which, by Obama’s definition, means they were “unreasonable” but willing to fight for “a new order.” He goes on to confess he has a soft spot for “those possessed of similar certainty today”—for example, the “antiabortion activist” or the “animal rights activist” who’s willing to break the law. He seems to suffer from certainty envy. He respects passionate, even fanatic commitment as such. Though he may “disagree with their views,” he admits that “I am robbed even of the certainty of uncertainty—for sometimes absolute truths may well be absolute.” Not true, necessarily, but absolute. It’s hard to know what he means exactly. That the “truths” are fit for the times, are destined to win out and forge a “new order”? That they are willed absolutely, not pragmatically or contingently? Even his rejection of absolute truth is now uncertain.

So, finally, in his perplexity, he turns again to Lincoln. Like “no man before or since,” Lincoln “understood both the deliberative function of our democracy and the limits of such deliberation.” His presidency combined firm convictions with practicality or expediency. Obama seems never to have heard of prudence, the way a statesman (and a reasonable and decent person) moves from universal principles to particular conclusions in particular circumstances. The 16th President, he ventures, was humble and self-aware, “maintaining within himself the balance between two contradictory ideas,” that we are all imperfect and thus must reach for “common understandings” and that at times “we must act nonetheless, as if we are certain, protected from error only by providence.”

For a man like Lincoln, there is no such thing, he says in effect, as acting with moral certainty, only acting “as if we are certain,” God help us. Unlike John Brown, Lincoln was an absolutist who realized the limitations of absolutism yet still brought forth a new order. “Lincoln, and those buried at Gettysburg,” Obama concludes, “remind us that we should pursue our own absolute truths only if we acknowledge that there may be a terrible price to pay.”[10] Our own absolute truths? Those words ought to send a shudder down Americans’ constitutional spine, assuming we still have one.

The Liberal Crisis
Liberals like crises, and one shouldn’t spoil them by handing them another on a silver salver. The kind of crisis that is approaching, however, is probably not their favorite kind—an emergency that presents an opportunity to enlarge government—but one that will find liberalism at a crossroads, a turning point. Liberalism can’t go on as it is, not for very long. It faces difficulties both philosophical and fiscal that will compel it either to go out of business or to become something quite different from what it has been.

For most of the past century, liberalism was happy to use relativism as an argument against conservatism. Those self-evident truths that the old American constitutional order rested on were neither logically self-evident nor true, Woodrow Wilson and his followers argued, but merely rationalizations for an immature, subjective form of right that enshrined selfishness as national morality. What was truly evident was the relativity of all past views of morality, each a reflection of its society’s stage of development. But there was a final stage of development when true morality would be actualized and its inevitability made abundantly clear—that is, self-evident.

Disillusionment came when the purported end or near end of history coincided not with idealism justified and realized, but with what many liberals in the 1960s, especially the young, despaired of as the infinite immorality of poverty, racial injustice, Vietnam, the System, and the threat of nuclear annihilation. Relativism rounded on liberalism. Having promised so much, liberalism was peculiarly vulnerable to the charge that the complete spiritual fulfillment it once promised was neither complete nor fulfilling.

As Obama’s grappling shows, intelligent and morally sensitive liberals may try to suppress or internalize the problem of relativism, but it cannot be forgotten or ignored. Despite his investment in deliberative democracy, communitarianism, and pragmatic decision making, he’s willing to throw it all aside at the moment of decision because it doesn’t satisfy his love of justice, or rather his love of a certain kind of courage or resolute action. “The blood of slaves reminds us that our pragmatism can sometimes be moral cowardice,” he writes.[11] In a moment like that, a great man must follow his own absolute truth, and the rest of us are left hoping it is Lincoln and not John Brown, much less Jefferson Davis, whose will is triumphant. The great man doesn’t anticipate or follow or approximate history’s course; he creates it, wills it according to his own absolute will, not absolute knowledge.

When combined with liberalism’s lust for strong leaders, this openness to Nietzschean creativity looms dangerously over the liberal future. If we are lucky, if liberalism is lucky, no one will ever apply for the position of liberal “superhero,” in Michael Tomasky’s term, and the role will remain vacant. But as Lincoln asked in the Lyceum speech, “Is it unreasonable then to expect, that some man possessed of the loftiest genius, coupled with ambition sufficient to push it to its utmost stretch, will at some time, spring up among us?”

And when such a one does, it will require the people to be united with each other, attached to the government and laws, and generally intelligent, to successfully frustrate his designs. Distinction will be his paramount object; and although he would as willingly, perhaps more so, acquire it by doing good as harm; yet, that opportunity being past, and nothing left to be done in the way of building up, he would set boldly to the task of pulling down.
More worrisome even than the danger of a superman able to promise that everything desirable will soon be possible is a people unattached to its constitution and laws; and for that, liberalism has much to answer.

In one crucial respect, our situation would seem more perilous than the future danger Lincoln sketched insofar as the very definitions of political “good” and “harm” are now uncertain. Avant-garde liberalism used to be about progress; now it’s about nothingness. You call that progress? Perhaps, paradoxically, that’s why Obama prefers to be called a progressive rather than a liberal. It’s better to believe in something than in nothing, even if the something, Progress, is not as believable as it used to be. His residual progressivism helps insure him against his instinctual postmodernism. Still, liberalism is in a bad way when it has lost confidence in its own truth, and it’s an odd sort of “progress” to go back to a name it surrendered 80 years ago.

Adding to liberal self-doubt is that liberalism’s monopoly on the social sciences, long since broken, has been supplanted by a multiple-front argument with conservative scholars in economics, political science, and other fields. In the beginning, Progressivism commanded all the social sciences because it had invented or imported them all. Wilson, Franklin Roosevelt, and Lyndon Johnson could be confident in the inevitability of progress, despite temporary setbacks, because the social sciences backed them up. An expertise in administering progress existed, and experts in public administration, Keynesian economics, national planning, urban affairs, modernization theory, development studies, and a half-dozen other specialties beavered away at bringing the future to life.

What a difference a half-century makes. The vogue for national planning disappeared under the pressure of ideas and events. Friedrich Hayek demonstrated why socialist economic planning, lacking free-market pricing information, could not succeed. In a side-by-side experiment, West Germany far outpaced East Germany in economic development, and all the people escaping across the Wall traveled from east to west, leaving their workers’ paradise behind. Keynesianism flunked the test of the 1970s stagflation. The Reagan boom, with its repeated tax cuts, flew in the face of the orthodoxy at the Harvard Department of Economics but was cheered by the Chicago School. Milton Friedman’s advice to Chile proved far sounder than Jeffrey Sachs’s to Russia. Monetarism, rational choice economics, supply-side, “government failure,” “regulatory capture,” “incentive effects”—the intellectual discoveries were predominantly on the Right. Conservative and libertarian think tanks multiplied, carrying the new insights directly into the fray.

The scholarly counterattack proceeded in political science and the law, too. Rational choice and “law and economics” changed the agenda to some degree. Both politics and the law became increasingly “originalist” in bearing, enriched by a new appreciation for 18th century sources and the original intent of the Founders and the Framers of the Constitution. Above all, the Progressives’ attempt to replace political philosophy with social science foundered.

After World War II, an unanticipated and at first unheralded revival of political philosophy began, associated above all with Leo Strauss, questioning historicism and nihilism in the name of a broadly Socratic understanding of nature and natural right. New studies of the tradition yielded some very untraditional results. Though there were left-wing as well as right-wing aspects to this revival, the latter proved more influential and liberating. The unquestionability of both progress and relativism died quietly in classrooms around the country. Economics is an instrumental science, studying means not ends, and so much of the successes of free-market economics could be swallowed pragmatically by liberalism’s maw. The developments in political philosophy challenged the ends of Progressivism, proving far more damaging to it.

In sheer numbers, the academy remained safely, overwhelmingly in the hands of the Left, whose members in fact grew more radical, with some notable exceptions, in these years. But they gradually lost the unchallenged intellectual ascendancy, though not the prestige, they once had enjoyed.

Thanks to this intellectual rebirth, the case against Progressivism and in favor of the Constitution is stronger and deeper than it has ever been. Progressivism has never been in a fair fight, an equal fight, until now, because its political opponents had largely been educated in the same ideas, had lost touch, like Antaeus, with the ground of the Constitution in natural right, and so tended to offer only Progressivism Lite as an alternative.

The sheer superficiality of Progressive scholarship is now evident. Progressives could never take the ideas of the Declaration and Constitution seriously for many of the same reasons that Obama cannot ultimately take them seriously. Wilson never demonstrated that the Constitution was inadequate to the problems of his age—he asserted it, or rather assumed it. His references to The Federalist are shallow and general, never betraying a close familiarity with any paper or papers, and willfully ignorant of the separation of powers as an instrument to energize and hone, not merely limit, the national government. Though he thought of himself as picking up where Hamilton, Webster, and Lincoln had left off, Wilson never investigated where they left off and why. Neither he nor his main contemporaries asked how far The Federalist’s or Lincoln’s reading of national powers and duties might take them, because they assumed it would not take them very far, that it reflected the political forces of its age and had to be superseded by new doctrines for a new age. They weren’t interested in Lincoln’s reasons, only in his results. Not right but historical might was the Progressives’ true focus.

Today liberalism looks increasingly, well, elderly. Hard of hearing, irascible, enamored of past glories, forgetful of mistakes and promises, prone to repeat the same stories over and over—it isn’t the youthful voice of tomorrow it once imagined itself to be. Only a rhetorician of Obama’s youth and artfulness could breathe life into the old tropes again.

Even he can’t repeat the performance in 2012. With a track record to defend, he will have to speak more prose and less poetry. With a century-old track record, liberalism will find it harder than ever to paint itself as the disinterested champion of the public good. Long ago, it became an Establishment, one of the estates of the realm, with its court-party of notoriously self-interested constituencies: the public employee unions, the trial lawyers, the feminists, the environmentalists, and the corporations aching to be public utilities paying private-sector salaries. Not visions of the future, but visions of plunder come to mind. This is one side of what Walter Russell Mead means when he criticizes the “blue state social model” as outmoded and heavy-handed.[12]

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is about as sleek and innovative as the several phone books’ worth of paper it takes up in printed form. Can one imagine Steve Jobs’s reaction if he had been tasked with reading, much less implementing, the PPACA? It is exhibit A in the case for the intellectual obsolescence of liberalism.

Finally, we come to the fiscal embarrassments confronting contemporary liberals. Again, Obamacare is wonderfully emblematic. President Obama’s solution to the problem of two health care entitlement programs quickly going bankrupt—Medicare and Medicaid—is to add a third? Perhaps it is a stratagem. More likely it is simply the reflexive liberal solution to any social problem: Spend more.

From Karl Marx to John Rawls, if you’ll excuse the juxtaposition, left-wing critics of capitalism have often paid it the supreme compliment of presuming it so productive an economic system that it has overcome permanently the problem of scarcity in human life. Capitalism has generated a “plenty.” It has distributional problems, which produce intolerable social and economic instability; but eliminate or control those inconveniences and it could produce wealth enough not only to provide for every man’s necessities, but also to lift him into the realm of freedom. To some liberals, that premise implied that socioeconomic rights could be paid for without severe damage to the economy and without oppressive taxation, at least of the majority.

Obama is the first liberal to suggest that even capitalism cannot pay for all the benefits promised by the American welfare state, particularly regarding health care. Granted, his solution is counterintuitive in the extreme, which makes one wonder if he is sincere. To the extent that liberalism is the welfare state, and the welfare state is entitlement spending, and entitlements are mostly spent effecting the right to health care, the insolvency of the health care entitlement programs is rightly regarded as a major part of the economic and moral crisis of liberalism. “Simply put,” Yuval Levin writes, “we cannot afford to preserve our welfare state in anything like its present form.” According to the Congressional Budget Office, by 2025, Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, and the interest on the federal debt will consume all—all—federal revenues, leaving defense and all other expenditures to be paid for by borrowing; and the debt will be approaching twice the country’s annual GDP.[13]

Conclusion
If something can’t go on forever, Herbert Stein noted sagely, it won’t. It would be possible to increase federal revenues by raising taxes, but the kind of money that’s needed could only be raised by taxing the middle class (defined, let us say, as all those families making less than $250,000 a year) very heavily. Like every other Democratic candidate since Walter Mondale, who made the mistake of confessing to the American people that he was going to raise their taxes, Obama swore not to do that.

If the bankruptcy of the entitlement programs were handled just the right way, with world-class cynicism and opportunism, in an emergency demanding quick, painful action lest Grandma descend into an irreversible diabetic coma, then liberalism might succeed in maneuvering America into a Scandinavia-style überwelfare state, fueled by massive and regressive taxes cheerfully accepted by the citizenry. But odds are we stand instead at the twilight of the liberal welfare state. As it sinks, a new, more conservative system will likely rise that will feature some combination of more means-testing of benefits, a switch from defined-benefit to defined-contribution programs, greater devolution of authority to the states and localities, a new budget process that will force welfare expenditures to compete with other national priorities, and the redefinition of the welfare function away from fulfilling socioeconomic “rights” and toward charitably taking care of the truly needy as best the community can afford when private efforts have failed or proved inadequate.

Currently, the welfare state operates almost independently alongside the general government. Taken together, these reforms will work to reintegrate the welfare state into the government, curtailing its state-within-a-state status and, even more important, integrating it back into the constitutional system that stands on natural rights and consent.

Is it just wishful thinking to imagine the end of liberalism? Few things in politics are permanent. Conservatism and liberalism didn’t become the central division in our politics until the middle of the 20th century. Before that, American politics revolved around such issues as states’ rights, the wars, slavery, the tariff, and suffrage. Parties have come and gone in our history. You won’t find many Federalists, Whigs, or Populists lining up at the polls these days. Britain’s Liberal Party faded from power in the 1920s. The Canadian Liberal Party collapsed in 2011.

Recently, within a decade of its maximum empire at home and abroad, a combined intellectual movement, political party, and form of government crumbled away, to be swept up and consigned to the dustbin of history. Communism, which in a very different way from American liberalism traced its roots to Hegel, Social Darwinism, and leadership by a vanguard group of intellectuals, vanished before our eyes, though not without an abortive coup or two. If Communism, armed with millions of troops and thousands of megatons of nuclear weapons, could collapse of its own dead weight and implausibility, why not American liberalism?

The parallel is imperfect, of course, because liberalism and its vehicle, the Democratic Party, remain profoundly popular, resilient, and changeable. Elections matter to them. What’s more, the egalitarian impulse, centralized government (though not centralized administration), and the Democratic Party have deep roots in the American political tradition—and reflect permanent aspects of modern democracy itself, as Tocqueville testifies.

Some elements of liberalism are inherent in American democracy, then, but the compound, the peculiar combination that is contemporary liberalism, is not. Compounded of the Hegelian philosophy of history, Social Darwinism, the living constitution, leadership, the cult of the State, the rule of administrative experts, entitlements and group rights, and moral creativity, modern liberalism is something new and distinctive, despite the presence in it, too, of certain American constants like the love of equality and democratic individualism.

Under the pressure of ideas and events, that compound could come apart. Liberals’ confidence in being on the right, the winning side of history could crumble, perhaps has already begun to crumble. Trust in government, which really means in the State, is at all-time lows. A majority of Americans oppose a new entitlement program—in part because they want to keep the old programs unimpaired, but also because the economic and moral sustainability of the whole welfare state grows more and more doubtful. The goodwill and even the presumptive expertise of many government experts command less and less respect. Obama’s speeches no longer send the old thrill up the leg, and his leadership, whether for one or two terms, may yet help to discredit the respectability of following the Leader.

The Democratic Party is unlikely to go poof, but it’s possible that modern liberalism will. A series of nasty political defeats and painful repudiations of its impossible dreams might do the trick. At the least, it will have to downsize its ambitions and get back in touch with political, moral, and fiscal reality. It will have to—all together now—turn back the clock. Much will depend, too, on what conservatives say and do in the coming years. Will they have the prudence and guile to elevate the fight to the level of constitutional principle, to expose the Tory credentials of their opponents?

President Obama’s decision to double down aggressively on the reach and cost of big government just as the European model of social democracy is hitting the skids provides the perfect opportunity for conservatives to exploit. His course makes the problems of liberalism worse and more urgent, as though he is eager for a crisis. Sooner or later, the crisis will come. If the people remain attached to their government and laws and American statesmen do their part, the country may yet take the path leading up from liberalism.

—Charles R. Kesler, Ph.D., is a senior fellow at the Claremont Institute, editor of the Claremont Review of Books, and professor of government at Claremont McKenna College. He is the author of I Am the Change: Barack Obama and the Crisis of Liberalism (Broadside Books, 2012), from which this essay was adapted.
Hide References

[1]Stanley Kurtz, Radical-in-Chief: Barack Obama and the Untold Story of American Socialism (New York: Threshold Editions, 2010), pp. 1–11, 21–60, 71–77, 86.
[2]See Barack Obama, Remarks Following the Iowa Caucuses, January 3, 2008, http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/index.php?pid=76232&st=&st1=#axzz1lvulJr36.
[3]Barack Obama, The Audacity of Hope: Thoughts on Reclaiming the American Dream (New York: Crown Publishers, 2006), p. 53.
[4]Abraham Lincoln, Letter to H. L. Pierce and Others, April 6, 1859, in The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, ed. Roy P. Basler (New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 1953), vol. 3, p. 376; Thomas Jefferson, Letter to Henry Lee, May 8, 1825, and Letter to Roger Weightman, June 24, 1826, in Thomas Jefferson: Writings, ed. Merrill D. Peterson (New York: Library of America, 1984), pp. 1501, 1517. For a commentary, see Harry V. Jaffa, A New Birth of Freedom (Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 2000), ch. 2.
[5]Barack Obama, “A Hope to Fulfill,” Remarks of Senator Barack Obama at the National Press Club, April 26, 2005, http://obamaspeeches.com/014-National-Press-Club-Speech.htm; Remarks Following the Wisconsin Primary, February 19, 2008, http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/index.php?pid=76558&st=&st1=#axzz1lvulJr36; Remarks in St. Paul, Minnesota, Claiming the Democratic Presidential Nomination Following the Montana and South Dakota Primaries, June 3, 2008, http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/index.php?pid=77409&st=&st1=#axzz1lvulJr36; Address Before a Joint Session of Congress on the State of the Union, January 24, 2012, http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/index/index.php?pid=99000#axzz1lvulJr36; and James T. Kloppenberg, Reading Obama: Dreams, Hope, and the American Political Tradition (Princeton, N.J.; Princeton University Press, 2011), pp. 89–110, 139–40.
[6]Barack Obama, Comments at Presidential Debate at Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee, October 7, 2008, http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/index.php?pid=84482&st=&st1=#axzz1lvulJr36.
[7]Obama, The Audacity of Hope, pp. 55, 92.
[8]Ibid., p. 95.
[9]Ibid., pp. 93–96. Obama echoes, and radicalizes, Woodrow Wilson’s distinction between the Founders as time-bound theorists and as competent statesmen.
[10]Ibid., pp. 97–98.
[11]Ibid., p. 98.
[12]See, for example, Walter Russell Mead, “Beyond the Blue Part One: The Crisis of the American Dream,” American Interest, January 29, 2012, http://blogs.the-american-interest.com/wrm/2012/01/29/beyond-blue-part-one-the-crisis-of-the-american-dream/.
[13]Yuval Levin, “Beyond the Welfare State,” National Affairs, Spring 2011, pp. 21–38, 30, 32.

Voir également:

He was the change

James Piereson

The Criterion

A review of I Am the Change: Barack Obama and the Crisis of Liberalism by Charles R. Kesler

Four years ago, in the excited aftermath of the 2008 election, Barack Obama was widely viewed as a liberal messiah who would engineer a new era of liberal reform and cement a Democratic majority for decades to come. He would prove to be, as many pundits predicted, a Franklin Delano Roosevelt, or perhaps even an Abraham Lincoln, for our time. They were not alone in saying this: Obama himself said much the same thing.

These forecasts seemed grandiose at the time; today, after four years of an Obama presidency, they look positively silly. In contrast to 2008, 2012 Obama looks less like a transformational president and more like a typically embattled politician trying to survive a tight contest for reelection. Even some of his strongest supporters are now “defining Obama down” as just another Democratic “pol” making compromises and paying off constituencies in order to keep his coalition together. Extravagant hopes have given way to a scramble for survival. Few continue to believe that Obama will establish the foundations for a new era of liberal governance. Some are beginning to point toward a more surprising turn of events: Far from bringing about a renewal of liberalism, Obama is actually presiding over its disintegration and collapse.

This is the thesis of Charles R. Kesler’s fascinating and insightful new book, I Am the Change: Barack Obama and the Crisis of Liberalism.1 Mr. Kesler, a professor of government at Claremont McKenna College and editor of The Claremont Review, is a well-known conservative scholar and authority on the history of liberal thought. Professor Kesler presents a critical yet nuanced portrayal of Obama and his rise to power. From his perspective as scholar and theorist, Kesler sees Obama as a conventional liberal or, better yet, as a progressive, and not as a socialist or anti-American subversive (as some of the President’s critics would have it). Viewed through a wide historical lens, Obama appears as the most recent—and perhaps the last—of a line of liberal presidents beginning with Woodrow Wilson a century ago and running through FDR to Lyndon Johnson and beyond to Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton. A signal virtue of this book is that it shows how the Obama presidency fits into the evolution of modern liberalism from its origins in the Progressive movement more than a century ago.1

The great political battles in the United States during the nineteenth century were never ideological contests in the modern sense but rather controversies fought over the meaning of the Constitution and the intentions of the founding fathers. Political contests over expansion, the Bank of the United States, slavery, secession, and the regulation of commerce were fought out along constitutional lines. The politicians and statesmen of that era were not divided into liberal and conservative camps; those terms had little meaning in nineteenth-century America. Abraham Lincoln was not thought of as a “liberal,” nor were slave owners derided as “conservatives.” Both sides of that controversy appealed to the Constitution or to the Declaration of Independence to defend their positions.

The Progressives introduced an ideological element into American politics by detaching their arguments from the Constitution and grounding them instead in claims about progress and historical development. Progressives (they were not yet called “liberals”) asserted that the Constitution, with its complex framework designed to limit government, was out of date in the modern age of science, industrialism, and large trusts and corporations. Constitutionalists looked backwards to the founding fathers; Progressives looked forward to a vast future of never-ending progress and change. The founding fathers and their nineteenth-century successors anchored popular government in a philosophy of natural rights; Progressives looked to different foundations in history and development. Progressives could not get rid of the Constitution, but they could reinterpret it to allow for more federal action to regulate the trusts, resolve industrial disputes, and engineer progress. Thus was born the idea of a “living Constitution,” an open-ended and flexible document readily adapted to changing conditions.

The Progressives were proponents of scientific government, not necessarily of popular or representative government. They disdained legislative bodies with their vote-trading and petty disputes over constituent interests; thus, they looked to the presidency rather than to the Congress for national leadership in the direction of reform and progress. The president spoke for the people or the nation, Congress spoke for special interests. Progressives wanted to delegate power to administrative bodies, commissions, and bureaus staffed by disinterested experts who could apply up-to-date knowledge to solve new problems. The Interstate Commerce Commission, the Food and Drug Administration, the Federal Trade Commission, and the Federal Reserve Board were Progressive initiatives. The Progressives dreamed of a time when political contests among rival interests would give way to impartial administration by experts and judges trained by and recruited from the best colleges and universities in the land. Academic institutions, as Mr. Kesler points out, would go on to play a major role in the evolution of liberalism.

Professor Kesler identifies Woodrow Wilson as the chief architect of this vision in American politics, helping to lay the intellectual foundations for progressivism and then beginning to put them in place during his term as president. As a research scholar and university president, Wilson brought some of the abstract qualities of a college professor to the study of politics. He wrote an influential study of the US Congress without visiting the US Capitol. While he admired the founding fathers, he criticized them for leaving behind a constitutional structure that was disorderly and inefficient, and encouraged conflict rather than cooperation. Thus he claimed that the separation of powers in the Constitution was a mischievous invention designed to limit the powers of government and to prevent cooperation among the branches (which was partly true). Wilson wanted to bring the branches closer together through presidential leadership and responsible party government. He favored a parliamentary system like that in place in Great Britain in which the executive and legislative branches are unified under the control of a single party and led by the Prime Minister.

Most fundamentally of all, Wilson claimed that the vision of the founding fathers did not lead to progress but to endless division and factional infighting. The Constitution was a Newtonian machine designed to balance conflicting forces when what was now required was a Darwinian instrument flexible enough to evolve in response to changes in its environment. It was not necessary to change the Constitution itself in order to bring about such a fundamental change; it was only necessary for Americans to think about it in a new way. After all, Washington, Jefferson, and Madison led a revolution and wrote the Constitution in response to the challenges of their time: Why should not Americans in the twentieth century do the same? Thus Wilson and his associates in the Progressive movement looked to an intellectual revolution as the means by which Americans would liberate themselves from the constricted and obsolete doctrines of the founding fathers, and in the process free themselves from the limits the founders placed upon government.

Given his vast ambitions, Wilson could not hope to implement much of this agenda in eight short years in office. Yet he established the foundations for an influential and long-running movement based upon progress and change as a way of life, presidential leadership and executive power, trust in experts, and disdain for traditional constitutional forms. Mr. Kesler does not spend much time on Wilson’s path-breaking approach to international diplomacy, his role in the Paris Peace Conference, and his aborted personal campaign “to make the world safe for democracy.” Yet these may be understood as logical extensions from his broader philosophy that traditional forms of governance had reached a dead end and that new ones had to be built through inspired leadership.

It was FDR who began to use the term “liberalism” in place of “progressivism” in order to distinguish the New Deal from the Progressive Party that flamed out in the 1920s and, in contrast to the progressives, to associate his program with the founding ideals of the nation. It was also Roosevelt who hijacked the term from the classical liberals in order to associate it with reform and the welfare state in opposition to free markets and limited government. FDR, as Professor Kesler suggests in an illuminating chapter in the book, kept the language and rhetoric of the founders while not so subtly changing their meaning and purposes. This has also been true of the liberal presidents who have succeeded him.

The Republican victories during the 1920s demonstrated to Roosevelt just how fleeting and transient Wilson’s victories turned out to be. “Think of the great liberal achievements of Woodrow Wilson’s New Freedom,” he said in one of his radio addresses during the 1930s, “and how quickly they were liquidated under President Harding.” Roosevelt formulated programs (like Social Security and the Wagner Act) that had popular followings but were also grounded in the language of rights and liberty such that no one could claim that they were “un-American.” FDR paid homage to Jefferson and the Declaration of Independence, but also said that the basic rights outlined in that document were subject to redefinition in light of changes in the social order. Jefferson wrote about natural rights and liberty while FDR spoke of positive rights as a foundation for security. In his Second Bill of Rights, FDR outlined a vast agenda of such positive rights, including a right to adequate medical care, to a good education, to a decent home, to a “remunerative” job, and to adequate protection from “the fears of old age, sickness, accident, and unemployment.” The pursuit and perfection of these rights provided modern liberalism—and the Democratic Party—with an almost unlimited agenda of reform.

Among FDR’s successors, no one tried harder to emulate him and more miserably failed to do so than Lyndon Baines Johnson. Johnson began his political career in the 1930s as a New Deal functionary and then as a young member of the House of Representatives. “FDR was my hero; he was like a father to me,” Johnson told a reporter during his White House years. Johnson mastered the art of using public patronage to build political support. “He wanted to out-Roosevelt Roosevelt,” according to one of his aides. “We’re in favor of a lot of things and against mighty few,” he said during his 1964 campaign, thereby giving voters a taste of things to come.

Johnson, as Professor Kesler explains, sought to complete the agenda of quantitative liberalism by passing federal health insurance programs for the aged (Medicare) and the poor (Medicaid), and expanded welfare and food stamp programs to assist the underprivileged. Yet, given the insatiable spirit of modern liberalism, Johnson was not content to rest there. In his Great Society speech, he proclaimed a new agenda of qualitative liberalism through which government would elevate the spirit and quality of life of the American people. The Great Society, he said, “is a place where the city of man serves not only the needs of the body and the demands of commerce but the desire for beauty and the hunger for humanity.” Johnson launched a “war on poverty” and a campaign to end urban decay, passed civil rights bills, funded the arts and education, and gave the federal government license to enter into every area of American life.

Yet, by a cruel irony, Johnson’s high hopes and grand expectations soon turned into disappointment and tragedy as the country was torn apart by crime, riots in nearly every major urban center, and violent protests against the war in Vietnam. His vast expansion of domestic expenditures turned loose an ugly stampede for federal dollars that only incited demands for more. Far from being an era of spiritual fulfillment, the 1960s was one of anger, alienation, and escape through drugs and violence. Mr. Kesler writes that the enduring legacy of the 1960s is “the strange combination, still very much with us, of a more ambitious state and a less trusted government than ever before.” The more patronage the government handed out, the less satisfied its beneficiaries became.

If the New Deal stands out as the great triumph of modern liberalism, then the Great Society represents its signal tragedy and failure. This was the period, as Mr. Kesler writes, when “the radicalism that was latent all along in liberalism broke free of its faith in progress, science, and the democratic process itself.” Johnson’s failures arose from overreaching ambitions and the delusion that all human problems, even those of the spirit, must find solutions in politics and government programs. Yet, as the author argues, this kind of over-reaching is endemic to modern liberalism. It was already present, for example, in Wilson’s claims about progress and change and also in FDR’s unlimited agenda of positive rights. Liberalism both lives and dies off promises it cannot fulfill.

Barack Obama is the latest liberal president to attempt to harmonize grand hopes with the messy realities of programmatic reform. In this sense, he is a worthy heir to the legacy of Wilson, FDR, and LBJ, all of whom addressed the same challenge. Yet of the three, only one of them may be said to have ended his presidency on a positive note. Obama hopes to join FDR/span> as one of the successful presidents of the liberal era, but Mr. Kesler doubts his prospects for success.

Like FDR, who distinguished the New Deal from the New Freedom, Obama tried to make his break from the rancorous politics of the 1960s. He celebrates the flag, observes patriotic holidays, and praises the military. He is a solid family man. He even extolls the founding fathers, up to a point. In his view, the founders made a good start in laying down some noble principles, even if they did not live up to them and perhaps did not really believe them.

Obama was also aware that many of the bold initiatives of the 1960s were eventually discredited and, for the most part, rejected by the American people. No liberal today could possibly run for office citing the model of the Great Society. Without an ambitious programmatic agenda on which to run, Obama had little choice but to organize his campaign around “hope and change.” Few asked what exactly that might mean. One answer was that Obama himself, as a biracial and multicultural candidate, son of a Kenyan father and middle-class American mother, personified the change he and others were seeking. It was proof that America could overcome its racially scarred past. “I am the change,” as he has suggested on more than one occasion.

Here, then, according to Mr. Kesler, is one terminus of the liberal project. Where can it go beyond Barack Obama and the personal politics of hope and change? Another end point is fiscal and budgetary. With Obama’s signature health care legislation, an ambitious stimulus package, a series of trillion dollar plus deficits, and the impending retirement of the baby boomers, there is no more money left to fund further liberal projects. There is not even enough money left to fund those already in place. Will Obama’s presidency mark the end of the politics of public spending and thus the end of a movement that came into its own a full century ago with the election of Woodrow Wilson? That is a distinct possibility, and one brought into clear focus in this most illuminating and gracefully argued book.

1 I Am the Change: Barack Obama and the Crisis of Liberalism by Charles R. Kesler; Broadside Books, 276 pages. $25.00.

Voir encore:

« Les attentats sont la macabre célébration du premier anniversaire de l’Etat islamique »
Mathieu Guidère, spécialiste du terrorisme islamiste, craint que les attaques perpétrées vendredi en Isère, à Sousse (Tunisie) et à Koweït City ne soient le début d’une vague d’attentats lancée par l’organisation jihadiste.
Propos recueillis par Hervé Brusin
Francetvinfo
27/06/2015

Un homme a tiré à la kalachnikov sur une plage de Sousse, tuant 38 personnes, vendredi 26 juin. Trois mois après le massacre du musée du Bardo, la Tunisie plonge à nouveau dans le cauchemar terroriste. Mathieu Guidère, spécialiste de géopolitique et du terrorisme islamiste, est justement originaire de ce pays. Pour francetv info, il analyse l’attentat commis à Sousse et le rapproche des autres attaques perpétrées en France et au Koweït le même jour.

Francetv info : Que vous inspire cette série d’attaques en France, en Tunisie et au Koweït ?

Mathieu Guidère : Cela fait un an maintenant qu’est apparu au grand jour l’Etat islamique (EI). Et l’on ne peut que constater qu’il a lancé les « festivités » de cet anniversaire, malgré les bombardements qu’il subit. Tout cela accompagne le début du ramadan la semaine dernière. L’EI a appelé la quasi-totalité de ses sympathisants à fêter cette première année par tous les moyens et partout dans le monde. Selon moi, les attentats perpétrés à Saint-Quentin-Fallavier (Isère), à Sousse et à Koweït City s’inscrivent dans cette macabre célébration. C’est un terrible pied de nez adressé à la communauté internationale. Et ce n’est que le début.

Pourquoi cela ?

Souvenons-nous : l’EI a commencé son offensive au début du ramadan 2014. Il a déclaré le califat le 30 juin 2014. Je pense donc que cela risque de culminer dans les semaines à venir. En outre, le mois de ramadan est considéré comme propice au jihad. Je crains donc que nous soyons face au lancement d’une campagne d’attentats.

En Tunisie spécifiquement, y a-t-il une continuité entre l’attentat du musée du Bardo en mars et la tuerie de Sousse ?

Absolument. A Sousse, l’action a été conduite par un groupe qui a fait allégeance à l’EI. Et il a clairement décidé de détruire le tourisme tunisien. Il l’a lui-même affirmé en déclarant : vous accueillez trop d’étrangers, la Tunisie n’est pas une terre pour héberger des étrangers, qui de surcroît bombardent nos frères en Syrie et en Irak. D’où la décision qui a été prise de s’attaquer systématiquement aux infrastructures du tourisme tunisien et donc, dans un premier temps, au musée du Bardo. Ce groupe s’intitule « les soldats du califat en Tunisie ».

Comment prévenir la vague d’attentats dont vous parlez ?

Par une prévention active, concrète. En Tunisie, par exemple, il faut installer des caméras de vidéosurveillance, pratiquer des contrôles d’accès aux lieux publics. En France, il faut sécuriser les lieux par ce même genre de dispositifs. En revanche, je suis très réticent sur la présence de soldats en faction devant les lieux sensibles. Ils peuvent à leur tour devenir des cibles.

Les pouvoirs publics sont-ils conscients des risques qui, selon vous, nous guettent ?

Je ne le crois pas. Le fait de bombarder l’EI et de le dire publiquement peut pousser des individus à commettre des attentats en France. Mais surtout, on n’est pas assez conscients de la portée symbolique des dates et des lieux. Désormais, l’EI se considère comme un Etat, gère les territoires comme tel, avec un gouvernement, une administration et un agenda. Nous sommes bel et bien face à un Etat terroriste.

Voir enfin:

La Chine construit des îles artificielles pour revendiquer des zones maritimes
Julien Licourt
Le Figaro
10/02/2015

La République populaire entend asseoir son influence sur des ilôts inhabités mais stratégiques de la mer de Chine.
Une île artificielle en forme de porte-avion. La Chine est en train d’agglomérer des milliers de tonnes de terre sur un récif corallien afin de le transformer en piste d’atterrissage. L’objectif: asseoir sa domination sur une zone stratégique très disputée, la mer de Chine.

Jusqu’à présent, la majeure partie de l’île de Fiery Cross, ou Yongshu, en Chinois, se trouvait sous l’eau, à l’exception de quelques rochers et d’une surface de béton artificielle, servant à héberger une petite garnison de soldats. Des images satellites, analysées par des experts anglo-saxons de l’IHS, ont montré que depuis quelques mois, des navires chinois draguaient les fonds environnants. Les images ont également montré que ces derniers rassemblent les sédiments sur la barrière de corail, afin de faire émerger des eaux une piste de 3000 mètres de long sur 300 mètres, au plus, de large. Un port, à l’est de l’île, serait également en train d’être créé par les dragues chinoises. Il serait suffisamment grand pour «accueillir des pétroliers ou de grands navires de guerre», selon les experts de l’IHS.

Yongshu est située dans l’archipel des Spratleys, un territoire en plein milieu de la mer de Chine dont les récifs confettis, d’une superficie totale de 5 km2, sont répartis sur une zone de 410.000 km2. Quelques bouts de terre disputés entre le Brunei, la Malaisie, les Philippines, Taïwan et la Chine, dernière puissance à ne pas disposer de piste d’atterrissage dans les environs.

Une zone très stratégique
Dans un rapport, le ministère de la Défense français rappelle que les prétentions de Pékin sont fondées sur des arguments historiques: «La Chine prétend que des pêcheurs chinois fréquentent la mer de Chine du Sud depuis des époques aussi reculées que la période des Trois Royaumes (220-265).» Selon le rapport, il faut en réalité attendre les années 1980 pour qu’elle s’intéresse réellement à ces îles perdues. En 1987, la Chine en occupe 7. Cinq ans plus tard, elle revendique la totalité de l’archipel.

Si la Chine s’y intéresse autant, ce n’est pas en souvenir de quelques pêcheurs ancestraux. Cette zone, inconnue du grand public, est d’un intérêt géostratégique majeur. Elle est le point de passage entre l’Océan indien et l’Océan pacifique et permet la communication de l’Europe et de l’Asie orientale. Près d’un tiers du trafic maritime commercial du monde y passe, 90% de celui de la Chine. La Corée du Sud, le Japon et Taïwan y font transiter plus de la moitié de leurs ressources énergétiques. Si les éventuelles réserves de pétrole semblent pour le moment limitées, celles de gaz semblent au contraire très importantes: la zone pourrait comporter 13% des réserves mondiales, selon le rapport du ministère de la Défense.

Le précédent des Paracels
Outre l’évidente menace que représente la militarisation chinoise, la création de cette nouvelle terre vient asseoir la revendication de souveraineté chinoise: au regard du droit international, l’attribution d’une zone économique exclusive est déterminée par la possession d’un territoire côtier.

La Chine reproduit ici une tactique déjà éprouvée un peu plus au nord, dans l’archipel inhabité des Paracels, situé en face du Vietnam, qui revendique également ces territoires. Pékin y a créé une piste et un port. Dans les années 1970, un bref engagement entre la Chine et le Sud-Vietnam avait coûté la vie à 70 marins et envoyé par le fond trois navires vietnamiens. Seulement, après cet épisode, la présence chinoise avait été confortée dans l’archipel. En mai 2014, la Chine se servait de cette base territoriale pour justifier l’installation d’une plate-forme pétrolière dans les eaux des Paracels, entraînant une importante crise diplomatique avec le Vietnam.

Voir par ailleurs:

Memo to Supreme Court: State Marriage Laws Are Constitutional
Gene Schaerr and Ryan T. Anderson, Ph.D.
The Heritage Foundation
March 10, 2015

Abstract
There is nothing in the U.S. Constitution that requires all 50 states to redefine marriage. The only way one can establish the unconstitutionality of man–woman marriage laws is to adopt a view of marriage that sees it as an essentially genderless, adult-centric institution and then declare that the Constitution requires that the states (re)define marriage in such a way. In other words, one needs to establish that the vision of marriage our law has long applied is wrong and that the Constitution requires a different vision. There is, however, no basis in the Constitution for reaching that conclusion. Marriage is based on the anthropological truth that men and women are distinct and complementary, the biological fact that reproduction depends on a man and a woman, and the social reality that children deserve a mother and a father, and states have constitutional authority to make marriage policy based on these truths.
Over the past year, four federal circuit courts—the Fourth, Seventh, Ninth, and Tenth Circuits—have ruled that the states and their people lack the ability under the federal Constitution to define marriage as it has always been defined: as the legal union of a man and a woman.[1] In their breathtaking sweep, those four rulings are reminiscent of the U.S. Supreme Court’s now-discredited decision in Dred Scott v. Sandford,[2] which likewise limited the people’s right to decide an issue of fundamental importance: whether their representatives in Congress had the constitutional authority to abolish slavery in the federal territories.[3]

Last fall, the Supreme Court allowed those four circuit decisions to go into effect, thereby overriding the votes of tens of millions of citizens in many parts of the nation. Fortunately, however, the Court has now agreed to revisit the issue in the context of a decision issued by the Sixth Circuit, which reaffirmed the right of a state’s people to choose the traditional man–woman definition of marriage.

The overarching question before the Supreme Court in the four cases that were consolidated before the Sixth Circuit and for purposes of review by the Supreme Court—Obergefell v. Hodges, Tanco v. Haslam, DeBoer v. Snyder, and Bourke v. Beshear—is not whether an exclusively male–female marriage policy is the best, but only whether it is allowed by the U.S. Constitution.[4] In other words, the question is not whether government-recognized same-sex marriage is good or bad policy, but only whether it is required by the U.S. Constitution.

To resolve that overarching question, the Supreme Court has directed the parties in those cases to address two precise questions:

Does the Fourteenth Amendment require a state to license a marriage between two people of the same sex?
Does the Fourteenth Amendment require a state to recognize a marriage between two people of the same sex when their marriage was lawfully licensed and performed out of state?
Those suing to overturn the marriage laws in the four states covered by the Sixth Circuit (Ohio, Kentucky, Michigan, and Tennessee) thus have to prove that the man–woman marriage policy that has existed in the United States throughout our entire history is prohibited by the U.S. Constitution.

The only way someone could succeed in such an argument is to adopt a view of marriage that sees it as an essentially genderless institution based only on the emotional needs of adults and then declare that the U.S. Constitution requires that the states (re)define marriage in such a way. Equal protection alone is not enough. To strike down marriage laws, the Court would need to say that the vision of marriage that our law has long applied equally is just wrong: that the Constitution requires a different vision entirely.

The U.S. Constitution, however, is silent on what marriage is and what policy goals the states should design it to serve, and there are good policy arguments on both sides. Judges should not insert their own policy preferences about marriage and declare them to be required by the U.S. Constitution any more than the Justices in Dred Scott should have written into the Constitution their own policy preferences in support of slavery.

That, of course, is not to suggest that same-sex marriage is itself comparable to slavery. The point is simply that, as in Dred Scott, this is a debate about whether citizens or judges will decide an important and sensitive policy issue—in this case, the very nature of civil marriage.

The Fourteenth Amendment’s Original Meaning
A legal challenge to these state marriage laws cannot appeal successfully to the text or original meaning of the Fourteenth Amendment. The text, invoking American citizens’ “privileges or immunities,” the “equal protection of the laws,” and the “due process of law,” nowhere mentions marriage. Back in the 1860s, could anyone who drafted that amendment or any of the citizens who voted to ratify it have reasonably thought that it could be used to invalidate state marriage laws defining marriage as a man–woman union?

Imagine, for example, how President Lincoln—an accomplished lawyer and an ardent opponent of Dred Scott—would have reacted if the amendment had been introduced before his death and someone had suggested that it might one day be interpreted to require states to recognize same-sex marriages. He would have viewed that suggestion as preposterous. There has never been any general right, he would have said, to marry anyone you claim to love, so a state’s rejection of that claimed “right” could not possibly be a denial of due process.

Lincoln would also have noted the similarities between Dred Scott and a decision imposing same-sex marriage. As distinguished law professor Michael Stokes Paulsen has elegantly argued, “in the structure and logic of the legal arguments made for judicial imposition of an across-the-board national rule requiring every state to accept the institutions [of slavery and the redefinition of marriage], the two situations appear remarkably similar.”[5]

Moreover, unlike miscegenation laws, the man–woman definition of marriage does not offend the Amendment’s equal-protection guarantee because it allows any otherwise qualified man and woman to marry, regardless of their sexual orientation or other circumstances. The fact that the institution of marriage, rightly understood, may be more attractive to some of a state’s citizens than others does not mean that a state violates the Fourteenth Amendment simply by refusing to redefine the institution to make it more attractive to more romantic partnerships.

Indeed, as the Sixth Circuit pointed out, all sides agree that the original meaning of the Fourteenth Amendment does not require the redefinition of marriage: “Nobody…argues that the people who adopted the 14th Amendment understood it to require the States to change the definition of marriage.”[6] The Sixth Circuit continued: “From the founding of the republic to 2003, every state defined marriage as a relationship between a man and a woman, meaning that the 14th Amendment permits, though it does not require, states to define marriage in that way.”[7]

The opinion closes by noting that “not a single U.S. Supreme Court Justice in American history has written an opinion maintaining that the traditional definition of marriage violates the 14th Amendment.”[8]

United States v. Windsor
Nor can a challenge reasonably appeal to the Supreme Court’s Windsor decision, which was written by Justice Anthony Kennedy and applied the Fourteenth Amendment’s protections in striking down a portion of the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA). Whether it was right or wrong as to DOMA, Windsor strongly supports the authority of states to define marriage: Every single time that Windsor talks about the harm of DOMA, it mentions that the state had chosen to recognize the bond that the federal government was excluding. Every single time, Justice Kennedy expressly said it was Congress’s deviation from the default of deference to state definitions that drove his opinion.

Kennedy’s opinion for the Court hinged on the reality that “[t]he significance of state responsibilities for the definition and regulation of marriage dates to the Nation’s beginning.”[9] “The definition of marriage,” Windsor explained, is “the foundation of the State’s broader authority to regulate the subject of domestic relations with respect to the ‘[p]rotection of offspring, property interests, and the enforcement of marital responsibilities.’”[10]

United States District Judge Juan Pérez-Giménez recently highlighted this feature of Windsor:

The Windsor opinion did not create a fundamental right to same gender marriage nor did it establish that state opposite-gender marriage regulations are amenable to federal constitutional challenges. If anything, Windsor stands for the opposite proposition: it reaffirms the States’ authority over marriage, buttressing Baker’s conclusion that marriage is simply not a federal question.[11]
Windsor also taught that federal power may not “put a thumb on the scales and influence a state’s decision as to how to shape its own marriage laws.”[12] Yet since that time, the federal government—through federal judges—has repeatedly put its thumb on the scales to influence a state’s decision about its own marriage laws—all the while claiming that Windsor required them to do so.

Judge Pérez-Giménez bemoaned this reality, noting that “[i]t takes inexplicable contortions of the mind or perhaps even willful ignorance—this Court does not venture an answer here—to interpret Windsor’s endorsement of the state control of marriage as eliminating the state control of marriage.”[13]

Fundamental Right Under the Fourteenth Amendment’s Due Process Clause
Just as neither the actual text nor the original meaning of the Fourteenth Amendment, nor the Windsor decision, requires the redefinition of state marriage laws, nothing in the Supreme Court’s Fourteenth Amendment jurisprudence requires states to abandon the male–female definition of marriage. Consider first the Court’s “fundamental rights” doctrine under the Due Process Clause, where, if the Court finds a law infringing upon a fundamental right, the law is subject to “strict scrutiny,” meaning that the government must provide a compelling interest in having the law and the law must be narrowly designed to promote that interest. Not surprisingly, laws almost always fail strict scrutiny.

Glucksberg. As the Supreme Court held in Glucksberg in rejecting a fundamental right to assisted suicide, fundamental rights must be “deeply rooted in this Nation’s history and tradition” and “implicit in the concept of ordered liberty” such that “neither liberty nor justice would exist if they were sacrificed.”[14]

Clearly, a right to marry someone of the same sex does not fit this description. As the Supreme Court explained in Windsor, including same-sex couples in marriage is “a new perspective, a new insight.”[15] Same-sex marriage is not deeply rooted in the nation’s history and tradition; thus—whatever its policy merits—it cannot be a fundamental right under the Due Process Clause. Windsor correctly observed that “until recent years…marriage between a man and a woman no doubt had been thought of by most people as essential to the very definition of that term and to its role and function throughout the history of civilization.”[16]

Whenever the Supreme Court has recognized marriage as a fundamental right, it has always been marriage understood as the union of a man and woman, and the rationale for the fundamental right has emphasized the procreative and social ordering aspects of male–female marriage. None of the cases that mention a fundamental right to marry deviate from this understanding, including decisions that struck down laws limiting marriage based on failure to pay child support,[17] incarceration,[18] and race.[19] Those decisions took for granted the historic, common law, and statutory understanding of marriage as a male–female union having something to do with family life. Thus, a challenge to state male–female marriage laws cannot appeal successfully to the fundamental-rights doctrine under Glucksberg.

Loving. Comparisons to interracial marriage fare no better.[20] As Fourth Circuit Judge Paul Niemeyer explained in his dissent in Bostic v. Schaefer, in Loving v. Virginia, where the Supreme Court found laws that prohibit interracial marriage to be unconstitutional, the couple was “asserting a right to enter into a traditional marriage of the type that has always been recognized since the beginning of the Nation—a union between one man and one woman.”[21] He concluded:

Loving simply held that race, which is completely unrelated to the institution of marriage, could not be the basis of marital restrictions. To stretch Loving’s holding to say that the right to marry is not limited by gender…is to ignore the inextricable, biological link between marriage and procreation that the Supreme Court has always recognized.[22]
In Loving, the Supreme Court defined marriage as one of the “‘basic civil rights of man,’ fundamental to our very existence and survival.”[23] Professor John Eastman of Chapman Law School has helpfully explained why the Supreme Court did so:

Marriage is “fundamental to our very existence” only because it is rooted in the biological complementarity of the sexes, the formal recognition of the unique union through which children are produced—a point emphasized by the fact that the Supreme Court cited a case dealing with the right to procreate for its holding that marriage was a fundamental right.[24]
Thus, a challenge to state male–female marriage laws cannot properly rely upon Loving.

Limiting Principle? To be sure, the Supreme Court has ruled that entering into and having the government recognize a marriage—understood as a union of husband and wife—is a fundamental right, but if this right is redefined to be understood simply as the committed, care-giving relationship of one’s choice, where does the logic lead? Justice Sonia Sotomayor asked this of Ted Olson, the lawyer for the same-sex couples, during oral argument in California’s Proposition 8 case, and he had no answer. If marriage is a fundamental right understood as consenting adult love, Justice Sotomayor asked, “what State restrictions could ever exist,” for example, “with respect to the number of people…that could get married?”[25]

The Sixth Circuit saw Justice Sotomayor’s logic. With respect to those who would redefine marriage, the court observed that:

Their definition does too little because it fails to account for plural marriages, where there is no reason to think that three or four adults, whether gay, bisexual, or straight, lack the capacity to share love, affection, and commitment, or for that matter lack the capacity to be capable (and more plentiful) parents to boot.[26]
The Sixth Circuit concluded that “if it is constitutionally irrational to stand by the man–woman definition of marriage, it must be constitutionally irrational to stand by the monogamous definition of marriage. Plaintiffs have no answer to the point.”[27] Just so. And for that reason too, a challenge to state male–female marriage laws cannot properly invoke the Fourteenth Amendment’s Due Process Clause.

The Fourteenth Amendment’s Equal Protection Clause
Equal protection jurisprudence likewise does not require the redefinition of marriage.

Animus. Although a couple of Supreme Court decisions have relied upon the concept of “animus” in invalidating on equal-protection grounds state laws that impinged upon the interests of gays and lesbians,[28] anyone with passing familiarity with the history of marriage knows that the institution did not arise because of animus toward gays and lesbians. Ancient thinkers as well as the political society in Greece and Rome, without being influenced by Judeo–Christian teaching, affirmed that marriage is a male–female union even as they embraced same-sex sexual relations.[29]

Even in Windsor, Justice Kennedy did not claim that the man–woman definition of marriage was fueled by animus. Rather, as noted, he held that the federal government’s refusal to recognize state-sanctioned same-sex marriages was based on animus. One need not agree with Justice Kennedy on DOMA to see that the holding in Windsor does not undermine state marriage laws.

The Sixth Circuit acknowledged that same-sex couples have experienced unjust discrimination but noted that marriage laws are not part of that phenomenon:

But we also cannot deny that the institution of marriage arose independently of this record of discrimination. The traditional definition of marriage goes back thousands of years and spans almost every society in history. By contrast, “American laws targeting same-sex couples did not develop until the last third of the 20th century.” (citing Lawrence).[30]
While Lawrence struck down laws that prohibited sex between persons of the same gender, it did not—and does not—require the redefinition of marriage. Laws that banned homosexual sodomy are radically different from laws that define marriage as the union of husband and wife. The Supreme Court found that the former infringed a privacy and liberty right, while the latter specify which unions will be eligible for public recognition and benefits. A right to liberty or privacy is a right to be left alone by the government, not a right to have the government recognize or subsidize the relationship of one’s choice.

Protected Class. Other advocates of same-sex marriage, including the Ninth Circuit,[31] have argued that the denial of marriage to same-sex couples infringes the rights of a protected class: namely, gays and lesbians. But the Supreme Court, including in Windsor, has never held sexual orientation to be a suspect class and thus has not applied “heightened scrutiny” to laws implicating their interests.[32] In contrast, the Court has held that race is a suspect class and gender a quasi-suspect class (which invokes heightened scrutiny but not quite strict scrutiny).[33]

Even if the Supreme Court did find sexual orientation to be a suspect class, as liberal scholars like Andrew Koppelman have recognized, marriage laws do not discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation anyway. They have a disparate impact on gays, but that is not the Court’s test. The reason Koppelman believes—correctly—that they do not discriminate based on orientation is that they simply do not require checking someone’s orientation at all in determining whether that person will receive the benefits of civil marriage.[34] Thus, under man–woman marriage laws, a gay man may marry a lesbian woman, while two heterosexual men cannot receive a marriage certificate from the state.

Nevertheless, if one were to argue that sexual orientation should be a protected class under equal protection jurisprudence, one would have to establish that sexual orientation creates a “class…[which] exhibit[s] obvious, immutable, or distinguishing characteristics that define them as a discrete group.”[35] Gays and lesbians do not satisfy that requirement.

The American Psychological Association (APA) describes sexual orientation as a “range of behaviors and attractions” and reports that “[r]esearch over several decades has demonstrated that sexual orientation ranges along a continuum, from exclusive attraction to the other sex to exclusive attraction to the same sex.”[36] The APA also reports that “there is no consensus among scientists” on why particular orientations develop and that, despite extensive research, scientists cannot conclude whether sexual orientation is determined by “genetic, hormonal, developmental, social, [or] cultural influences.”[37]

The APA, in short, says that no one can agree on the causes or even the definition of homosexuality, so it is not a readily identifiable group. These APA findings fatally undermine the idea that sexual orientation describes a “discrete group” for suspect-class purposes.

This point is confirmed by Dr. Paul McHugh, former chief of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins Hospital and former chairman of the psychiatry department at Hopkins medical school, and legal scholar Gerard Bradley:

“Sexual orientation” should not be recognized as a newly protected characteristic of individuals under federal law.… In contrast with other characteristics, it is neither discrete nor immutable. There is no scientific consensus on how to define sexual orientation, and the various definitions proposed by experts produce substantially different groups of people.
Nor is there any convincing evidence that sexual orientation is biologically determined; rather, research tends to show that for some persons and perhaps for a great many, “sexual orientation” is plastic and fluid; that is, it changes over time. What we do know with certainty about sexual orientation is that it is affective and behavioral—a matter of desire and/or behavior.[38]
In a February 2015 interview, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg admitted as much. While asserting incorrectly that it would not be a major adjustment for the American public to accept same-sex marriage, she correctly observed that:

[Americans have] looked around, and we discovered it’s our next door neighbor, we’re very fond of them. Or it’s our child’s best friend. Or even our child. I think that as more and more people came out and said, “This is who I am,” and the rest of us recognized that they are one of us, that there—there was a familiarity with people that didn’t exist in the beginning when the race problem was on the burner, because we lived in segregated communities and it was truly a we/they kind of thing. But not so, I think, of the gay-rights movement.[39]
A better argument why gays and lesbians are not discrete and insular minorities—not easily identifiable or clustered together apart from the rest of society—could not be offered.

Furthermore, to be a protected class under equal protection jurisprudence, a group must be “politically powerless in the sense that they have no ability to attract the attention of the lawmakers.”[40] Yet, as Chief Justice John Roberts pointed out during oral arguments in Windsor, “political figures are falling over themselves” to support gay marriage.[41] Indeed, support for same-sex marriage and for LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) non-discrimination laws has been embraced by the President of the United States and the Democratic Party—the largest political party in the nation.[42]

In short, it is hard to say that gays and lesbians are politically powerless. It is therefore impossible for the Court to find that they are a suspect class.

Rational Basis: Social Function. One could also argue, as the Fourth, Seventh, and Tenth Circuits have held, that there is simply no rational basis for man–woman marriage laws, meaning either that there is no legitimate purpose in such laws or that the laws are not rationally related to a legitimate purpose.[43] This argument fails completely as it ignores the universal historical record witnessing to the rational basis of man–woman marriage laws based on the social function that marriage plays.

From a policy perspective, marriage is about attaching a man and a woman to each other as husband and wife to be father and mother to any children their sexual union may produce. When a baby is born, there is always a mother nearby: That is a fact of biology. The policy question is whether a father will be close by and, if so, for how long. Marriage, rightly understood, increases the odds that a man will be committed to both the children that he helps to create and to the woman with whom he does so.[44] The man–woman definition of marriage reinforces the idea—the social norm—that a man should be so committed.

The man–woman definition, moreover, is based on the anthropological truth that men and women are distinct and complementary, the biological fact that reproduction depends on a man and a woman, and the social reality that children deserve a mother and a father. Even President Barack Obama admits that children deserve a mother and a father:

We know the statistics—that children who grow up without a father are five times more likely to live in poverty and commit crime; nine times more likely to drop out of schools and twenty times more likely to end up in prison. They are more likely to have behavioral problems, or run away from home, or become teenage parents themselves. And the foundations of our community are weaker because of it.[45]
In short, fathers matter, and marriage helps to connect fathers to mothers and children. But you do not have to think this marriage policy is ideal to think it constitutionally permissible. Unless gays and lesbians are a suspect class, for an equal protection challenge to succeed, this simple analysis of the social function of marriage would have to be proved not just misguided, but positively irrational. Universal human experience, however, confirms the rationality of that policy.

Compelling Interest and Narrowly Tailored: Constitutional at Any Level of Scrutiny. Even if one (implausibly) granted that sexual orientation was a suspect class and that marriage laws thus had to be held to heightened scrutiny, man–woman marriage would still be constitutional. A strong marriage culture is a compelling interest because it affects virtually every other state interest, and defining marriage as the permanent and exclusive union of a husband and wife is a narrowly tailored means of allowing it to fulfill its social function.

As noted, there is no dispute that marriage plays a fundamental role in society by encouraging men and women to commit permanently and exclusively to each other and to take responsibility for their children. As the Sixth Circuit concluded, “[b]y creating a status (marriage) and by subsidizing it (e.g., with tax-filing privileges and deductions), the States create[] an incentive for two people who procreate together to stay together for purposes of rearing offspring.”[46]

In addition to financial incentives, as ample social science confirms, this combination of state-sanctioned status and benefits also reinforces certain child-centered norms or expectations that form part of the social institution of marriage. Those norms—such as the value of gender-diverse parenting and of biological connections between children and the adults who raise them—independently encourage man–woman couples “to stay together for purposes of rearing offspring.” Given the importance of those norms to the welfare of the children of such couples, the state has a compelling interest in reinforcing and maintaining them.

Most of those norms, moreover, arise from and/or depend upon the man–woman understanding that has long been viewed as central to the social institution of marriage.[47] For example, because only man–woman couples (as a class) have the ability to provide dual biological connections to the children they raise together, the state’s decision—implemented by the man–woman definition—to limit marital status and benefits to such couples reminds society of the value of those biological connections. It thereby gently encourages man–woman couples to rear their biological children together, and it does so without denigrating other arrangements—such as adoption or assisted reproductive technologies—that such couples might choose when, for whatever reason, they are unable to have biological children of their own.

Like other social norms traditionally associated with the man–woman definition of marriage, the biological connection norm will be diluted or destroyed if the man–woman definition (and associated social understanding) is abandoned in favor of a definition that allows marriage between “any two otherwise qualified persons”—which is what same-sex marriage requires. And just as those norms benefit the state and society, their dilution or destruction can be expected to harm the interests of the state and its citizens.

For example, over time, as fewer heterosexual parents embrace the biological connection norm, more of their children will be raised without a mother or a father. After all, it will be very difficult for the law to send a message that fathers and mothers are essential if it has redefined marriage to make fathers or mothers optional, and that in turn will mean more children of heterosexuals raised in poverty, doing poorly in school, experiencing psychological or emotional problems, having abortions, and committing crimes—all at significant cost to the state.

In short, law affects culture. Culture affects beliefs. Beliefs affect actions. The law teaches, and it will shape not just a handful of marriages, but the public understanding of what marriage is. Consider the impact of no-fault divorce laws, which are widely acknowledged to have disserved, on balance, the interests of the very children they were supposedly designed to help. By providing easy exits from marriage and its responsibilities, no-fault divorce helped to change the perception of marriage from a permanent institution designed for the needs of children to a temporary one designed for the desires of adults. Thus, not only was it technically much easier to leave one’s spouse, but it was psychologically much easier as well, and the percentage of children growing up with just one parent in the home skyrocketed, with all of the attendant negative consequences.

This analysis also explains why a state’s decision to retain the man–woman definition of marriage should not be seen as demeaning to gay and lesbian citizens or their children and why it satisfies any form of heightened scrutiny. In the early 2000s, in the face of state judicial decisions seeking to impose same-sex marriage under state law, the definitional choice a state faced was a binary one: Either preserve the man–woman definition and the benefits it provides to the children (and the state) or replace it with an “any two qualified persons” definition and risk losing those benefits.

There is no middle ground. A state’s choice to preserve the man–woman definition is thus narrowly tailored—indeed, it is perfectly tailored—to the state’s interests in preserving those benefits and in avoiding the enormous societal risks that accompany a genderless-marriage regime. Under a proper means–ends analysis, therefore, a state’s choice to preserve the man–woman definition passes muster under any constitutional standard.[48]

Recognizing Same-Sex Marriages from Out of State
If the points made above succeed—on the rational basis of state marriage laws defining marriage as the union of husband and wife and the reasonableness of thinking that redefining marriage will undermine the public policy purpose of such marriage laws—then a state should not be required to recognize other state marriage laws that would undermine its own public policy.

This conclusion follows from Article IV of the Constitution, which requires that “Full Faith and Credit shall be given in each State to the public Acts, Records, and judicial Proceedings of every other State.”[49] This clause enabled the sovereign states to come together to form one union without everything having to be relitigated when parties moved to a new state,[50] but the Full Faith and Credit Clause does not require a state to recognize the policies of another state when doing so would undermine that state’s own public policy. Full Faith and Credit “does not compel a state to substitute the statutes of other states for its own statutes dealing with a subject matter concerning which it is competent to legislate.”[51]

Windsor points out that “[m]arriage laws vary in some respects from State to State,” such as “the required minimum age” and “the permissible degree of consanguinity.”[52] If a state has good policy reasons for promoting marriage as the union of a man and a woman, then it does not have to accept out-of-state marriages that undermine its own policy preferences.[53] A state may apply its own marriage laws in preference to an out-of-state policy that it judges would undermine its own policy, because “as a sovereign [it] has a rightful and legitimate concern in the marital status of persons domiciled within its borders.”[54]

Moreover, given that the Full Faith and Credit Clause deals specifically with the recognition of official acts in other states, there is no sound basis for invoking the Fourteenth Amendment as a stand-alone basis for requiring a state to recognize a marriage performed in another state.

Conclusion
At the end of the day, there simply is nothing in the U.S. Constitution that requires all 50 states to redefine marriage. Part of the design of federalism is that experimentation can take place in the states: As the Sixth Circuit noted, “federalism…permits laboratories of experimentation—accent on the plural—allowing one State to innovate one way, another State another, and a third State to assess the trial and error over time.”[55]

To a make a plausible case to the contrary, as we have seen, one cannot reasonably appeal to the authority of Windsor, to the text or original meaning of the Fourteenth Amendment, to the fundamental rights protected by the Due Process Clause, or to Loving v. Virginia. So, too, one cannot properly appeal to the Equal Protection Clause or to animus or Lawrence. Nor can one say that gays and lesbians are politically powerless, so one cannot claim they are a suspect class. Nor can one say that male–female marriage laws lack a rational basis or that they do not serve a compelling state interest in a narrowly tailored way.

The only way one can establish the unconstitutionality of man–woman marriage laws is to adopt a view of marriage that sees it as an essentially genderless, adult-centric institution and then declare that the Constitution requires that the states (re)define marriage in that way. In other words, one needs to establish that the vision of marriage our law has long applied is just wrong and that the Constitution requires a different vision entirely.

There is, however, no basis in the Constitution for reaching that conclusion any more than there was a basis in the Constitution for concluding—as Dred Scott did—that the people of the United States lacked the power to abolish slavery in their territories. Accordingly, any decision requiring states to redefine marriage is as much a usurpation of the people’s authority as Dred Scott was.

—Gene Schaerr is a Washington, D.C.-based attorney who specializes in constitutional and appellate litigation. He has previously served as Associate Counsel to the President and as law clerk to Justice Antonin Scalia and has handled dozens of cases (including six he personally argued) before the U.S. Supreme Court. Ryan T. Anderson, PhD, co-author of the book What Is Marriage? Man and Woman: A Defense, is William E. Simon Fellow in the Richard and Helen DeVos Center, of the Institute for Family, Community, and Opportunity, at The Heritage Foundation.
Hide References

[1] Bostic v. Schaefer, 760 F.3d 352 (4th Cir. 2014); Baskin v. Bogan, 766 F.3d 648 (7th Cir. 2014); Latta v. Otter, 771 F.3d 456 (9th Cir. 2014); Kitchen v. Herbert, 755 F.3d 1193 (10th Cir. 2014); Bishop v. Smith, 760 F.3d 1070 (10th Cir. 2014).

[2] 60 U.S. 393 (1857).

[3] For more on the legal parallel, see Michael Stokes Paulsen, Abraham Lincoln and Same-Sex Marriage, Public Discourse (Feb. 20, 2015), http://www.thepublicdiscourse.com/2015/02/14443/.

[4] DeBoer v. Snyder, 772 F.3d 388 (6th Cir. 2014), cert. granted, 83 U.S.L.W. 3315 (U.S. Jan. 16, 2015) (No. 14-571); see also Obergefell v. Hodges (No. 14-556); Tanco v. Haslam (No. 14-562); Bourke v. Beshear (No. 14-574).

[5] Paulsen, supra note 3.

[6] DeBoer, 772 F.3d at 403.

[7] Id. at 404.

[8] Id. at 416.

[9] United States v. Windsor, 570 U.S. ___, 133 S.Ct. 2675, 2692 (2013).

[10] Id. at 2691 (quoting Williams v. North Carolina, 317 U.S. 287, 298 (1942)).

[11] Conde-Vidal v. Garcia-Padilla (D.P.R.) (D.P.R. Oct. 21, 2014) (No. 14-1253), 2014 WL 5361987. See also Baker v. Nelson, 409 U.S. 810 (1972) (summarily dismissing “for want of a substantial federal question” an appeal that argued that Minnesota’s man–woman only marriage laws violated the Fourteenth Amendment).

[12] Windsor, 133 S.Ct. at 2693 (citations omitted).

[13] Conde-Vidal, 2014 WL 5361987 at 8*.

[14] Washington v. Glucksberg, 521 U.S. 702, 721 (1997). Besides the right to marry (with marriage always understood as a union of husband and wife), examples of fundamental rights the Court has found are the right to procreate, the right to have sexual autonomy, the right to buy and use birth control and abortion, the right to travel freely among the states, the right to raise one’s children as one sees fit, the right to vote, and the right to the freedoms protected by the First Amendment (speech, religion, and association).

[15] Windsor, 133 S.Ct. at 2689.

[16] Id.

[17] Zablocki v. Redhall, 434 U.S. 374, 385–87 (1987).

[18] Turner v. Safley, 482 U.S. 78, 95–98 (1987).

[19] Loving v. Virginia, 388 U.S. 1, 11 (1967).

[20] For an extended analysis, see Ryan T. Anderson, Marriage, Reason, and Religious Liberty: Much Ado About Sex, Nothing to Do with Race, Heritage Foundation Backgrounder No. 2894 (Apr. 4, 2014), available at http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2014/04/marriage-reason-and-religious-liberty-much-ado-about-sex-nothing-to-do-with-race.

[21] Bostic, 760 F.3d at 390 (Niemeyer, J., dissenting).

[22] Id. at 392.

[23] Loving, 388 U.S. at 18.

[24] John Eastman, The Constitutionality of Traditional Marriage, Heritage Foundation Legal Memorandum No. 90 (Jan. 25, 2013), available at http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2013/01/the-constitutionality-of-traditional-marriage.

[25] Transcript of Oral Argument at 46:25, 47:1–3, Hollingsworth v. Perry, 133 S.Ct. 2652 (2013) (No. 12-144) (2010).

[26] DeBoer, 772 F.3d at 407.

[27] Id.

[28] See, e.g., Lawrence v. Texas, 539 U.S. 558 (2003); Romer v. Evans, 517 U.S. 620 (1996).

[29] John Finnis, The Collected Essays of John Finnis: Volume III: Human Rights and Common Good 340 (Oxford Univ. Press, 2011).

[30] DeBoer, 772 F.3d at 413.

[31] Latta, 771 F.3d at 468.

[32] But see SmithKline Beecham Corp. v. Abbott Laboratories, 740 F.3d 471 (9th Cir. 2014) (holding that sexual orientation was a suspect class triggering heightened scrutiny).

[33] The heightened scrutiny of gender classifications is often called “intermediate scrutiny” because it falls between the lower rational basis review and the higher strict scrutiny review.

[34] Andrew Koppelman, Response: Sexual Disorientation, 100 Geo. L.J. 1083, 1087 (2012).

[35] Bowen v. Gilliard, 483 U.S. 587, 603 (1987) (quoting Massachusetts B. of Retirement v. Murgia, 427 U.S. 307, 313–14 (1976)) (emphasis added).

[36] Answers to Your Questions: For a Better Understanding of Sexual Orientation & Homosexuality American Psychological Association (2008), http://www.apa.org/topics/lgbt/orientation.aspx?item=4.

[37] Id.

[38] Paul McHugh & Gerard Bradley, Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, and Employment Law, Public Discourse (July 25, 2013), http://www.thepublicdiscourse.com/2013/07/10636/.

[39] Interview by Greg Stohr and Matthew Winkler, Ginsburg: Doubt Gay Marriage Won’t Be Widely Accepted, Bloomberg (Feb. 12, 2015), http://www.bloomberg.com/news/videos/2015-02-12/ginsburg-doubt-gay-marriage-won-t-be-widely-accepted.

[40] City of Cleburne v. Cleburne Living Center, 473 U.S. 432, 445 (1985).

[41] Transcript of Oral Argument at 108:13–14, Windsor, 133 S.Ct. 2675 (2013) (No. 12-307).

[42] Election Trends by Group: Party Affiliation, Gallup, available at http://www.gallup.com/poll/15370/party-affiliation.aspx.

[43] When courts find animus against a group, then laws fail rational basis review, though it is a more searching standard of review and so is often referred to as “rational basis with bite.”

[44] Ryan T. Anderson, “Marriage: What It Is, Why It Matters, and the Consequences of Redefining It,” Heritage Foundation Backgrounder No. 2775 (Mar. 11, 2013), available at http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2013/03/marriage-what-it-is-why-it-matters-and-the-consequences-of-redefining-it.

[45] President Barack Obama, Father’s Day Remarks, N.Y. Times, July 15, 2008, http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/15/us/politics/15text-obama.html?pagewanted=print.

[46] DeBoer, 772 F.3d at 405.

[47] See Windsor, 133 S.Ct. at 2718.

[48] See Grutter v. Bollinger, 539 U.S. 982 (2003) (holding that affirmative action programs satisfied strict scrutiny and that the courts were required to defer to legislative facts found by decision-makers).

[49] U.S. Const. art. IV, § 1.

[50] See Erin O’Hara O’Connor, Full Faith and Credit Clause, in The Heritage Guide to the Constitution (2d ed.), available at http://www.heritage.org/constitution#!/articles/4/essays/121/full-faith-and-credit-clause.

[51] Baker v. Gen. Motors Corp., 522 U.S. 222, 232–33 (1998) (quotes omitted).

[52] Windsor, 133 S.Ct. at 2691–92.

[53] The Supreme Court has required “a significant contact or significant aggregation of contacts, creating state interests, such that choice of its law is neither arbitrary nor fundamentally unfair.” Franchise Tax Bd. of Cal. v. Hyatt, 538 U.S. 488, 494–95 (2003) (quotes omitted).

[54] Williams, 317 U.S. at 298.

[55] DeBoer, 772 F.3d at 406.

Voir de plus:

Marriage: What It Is, Why It Matters, and the Consequences of Redefining It
Ryan T. Anderson, Ph.D.
The Heritage Foundation
March 11, 2013

Abstract
Marriage is based on the truth that men and women are complementary, the biological fact that reproduction depends on a man and a woman, and the reality that children need a mother and a father. Redefining marriage does not simply expand the existing understanding of marriage; it rejects these truths. Marriage is society’s least restrictive means of ensuring the well-being of children. By encouraging the norms of marriage—monogamy, sexual exclusivity, and permanence—the state strengthens civil society and reduces its own role. The future of this country depends on the future of marriage. The future of marriage depends on citizens understanding what it is and why it matters and demanding that government policies support, not undermine, true marriage.
At the heart of the current debates about same-sex marriage are three crucial questions: What is marriage, why does marriage matter for public policy, and what would be the consequences of redefining marriage to exclude sexual complementarity?

Marriage exists to bring a man and a woman together as husband and wife to be father and mother to any children their union produces. It is based on the anthropological truth that men and women are different and complementary, the biological fact that reproduction depends on a man and a woman, and the social reality that children need both a mother and a father. Marriage predates government. It is the fundamental building block of all human civilization. Marriage has public purposes that transcend its private purposes. This is why 41 states, with good reason, affirm that marriage is between a man and a woman.

Government recognizes marriage because it is an institution that benefits society in a way that no other relationship does. Marriage is society’s least restrictive means of ensuring the well-being of children. State recognition of marriage protects children by encouraging men and women to commit to each other and take responsibility for their children. While respecting everyone’s liberty, government rightly recognizes, protects, and promotes marriage as the ideal institution for childbearing and childrearing.

Promoting marriage does not ban any type of relationship: Adults are free to make choices about their relationships, and they do not need government sanction or license to do so. All Americans have the freedom to live as they choose, but no one has a right to redefine marriage for everyone else.

In recent decades, marriage has been weakened by a revisionist view that is more about adults’ desires than children’s needs. This reduces marriage to a system to approve emotional bonds or distribute legal privileges.

Redefining marriage to include same-sex relationships is the culmination of this revisionism, and it would leave emotional intensity as the only thing that sets marriage apart from other bonds. Redefining marriage would further distance marriage from the needs of children and would deny, as a matter of policy, the ideal that a child needs both a mom and a dad. Decades of social science, including the latest studies using large samples and robust research methods, show that children tend to do best when raised by a mother and a father. The confusion resulting from further delinking childbearing from marriage would force the state to intervene more often in family life and expand welfare programs. Redefining marriage would legislate a new principle that marriage is whatever emotional bond the government says it is.

Redefining marriage does not simply expand the existing understanding of marriage. It rejects the anthropological truth that marriage is based on the complementarity of man and woman, the biological fact that reproduction depends on a man and a woman, and the social reality that children need a mother and a father. Redefining marriage to abandon the norm of male–female sexual complementarity would also make other essential characteristics—such as monogamy, exclusivity, and permanency—optional. Marriage cannot do the work that society needs it to do if these norms are further weakened.

Redefining marriage is also a direct and demonstrable threat to religious freedom because it marginalizes those who affirm marriage as the union of a man and a woman. This is already evident in Massachusetts and Washington, D.C., among other locations.

Concern for the common good requires protecting and strengthening the marriage culture by promoting the truth about marriage.

What Is Marriage?
Marriage exists to bring a man and a woman together as husband and wife to be father and mother to any children their union produces.

At its most basic level, marriage is about attaching a man and a woman to each other as husband and wife to be father and mother to any children their sexual union produces. When a baby is born, there is always a mother nearby: That is a fact of reproductive biology. The question is whether a father will be involved in the life of that child and, if so, for how long. Marriage increases the odds that a man will be committed to both the children that he helps create and to the woman with whom he does so.

Marriage connects people and goods that otherwise tend to fragment. It helps to connect sex with love, men with women, sex with babies, and babies with moms and dads.[1] Social, cultural, and legal signals and pressures can support or detract from the role of marriage in this regard.

Maggie Gallagher captures this insight with a pithy phrase: “[S]ex makes babies, society needs babies, and children need mothers and fathers.”[2] Connecting sex, babies, and moms and dads is the social function of marriage and helps explain why the government rightly recognizes and addresses this aspect of our social lives. Gallagher develops this idea:

The critical public or “civil” task of marriage is to regulate sexual relationships between men and women in order to reduce the likelihood that children (and their mothers, and society) will face the burdens of fatherlessness, and increase the likelihood that there will be a next generation that will be raised by their mothers and fathers in one family, where both parents are committed to each other and to their children.[3]
Marriage is based on the anthropological truth that men and women are complementary, the biological fact that reproduction depends on a man and a woman, and the social reality that children need a mother and a father.

Marriage is a uniquely comprehensive union. It involves a union of hearts and minds, but also—and distinctively—a bodily union made possible by sexual complementarity. As the act by which a husband and wife make marital love also makes new life, so marriage itself is inherently extended and enriched by family life and calls for all-encompassing commitment that is permanent and exclusive. In short, marriage unites a man and a woman holistically—emotionally and bodily, in acts of conjugal love and in the children such love brings forth—for the whole of life.[4]

Just as the complementarity of a man and a woman is important for the type of union they can form, so too is it important for how they raise children. There is no such thing as “parenting.” There is mothering, and there is fathering, and children do best with both. While men and women are each capable of providing their children with a good upbringing, there are, on average, differences in the ways that mothers and fathers interact with their children and the functional roles that they play.

Dads play particularly important roles in the formation of both their sons and their daughters. As Rutgers University sociologist David Popenoe explains, “The burden of social science evidence supports the idea that gender-differentiated parenting is important for human development and that the contribution of fathers to childrearing is unique and irreplaceable.”[5] Popenoe concludes:

We should disavow the notion that “mommies can make good daddies,” just as we should disavow the popular notion…that “daddies can make good mommies.”… The two sexes are different to the core, and each is necessary—culturally and biologically—for the optimal development of a human being.[6]
Marriage as the union of man and woman is true across cultures, religions, and time. The government recognizes but does not create marriage.

Marriage is the fundamental building block of all human civilization. The government does not create marriage. Marriage is a natural institution that predates government. Society as a whole, not merely any given set of spouses, benefits from marriage. This is because marriage helps to channel procreative love into a stable institution that provides for the orderly bearing and rearing of the next generation.

This understanding of marriage as the union of man and woman is shared by the Jewish, Christian, and Muslim traditions; by ancient Greek and Roman thinkers untouched by these religions; and by various Enlightenment philosophers. It is affirmed by both common and civil law and by ancient Greek and Roman law. Far from having been intended to exclude same-sex relationships, marriage as the union of husband and wife arose in many places, over several centuries, in which same-sex marriage was nowhere on the radar. Indeed, it arose in cultures that had no concept of sexual orientation and in some that fully accepted homoeroticism and even took it for granted.[7]

As with other public policy issues, religious voices on marriage should be welcomed in the public square. Yet one need not appeal to distinctively religious arguments to understand why marriage—as a natural institution—is the union of man and woman.

Marriage has been weakened by a revisionist view of marriage that is more about adults’ desires than children’s needs.

In recent decades, marriage has been weakened by a revisionist view of marriage that is more about adults’ desires than children’s needs. This view reduces marriage primarily to emotional bonds or legal privileges. Redefining marriage represents the culmination of this revisionism and would leave emotional intensity as the only thing that sets marriage apart from other bonds.

However, if marriage were just intense emotional regard, marital norms would make no sense as a principled matter. There is no reason of principle that requires an emotional union to be permanent. Or limited to two persons. Or sexual, much less sexually exclusive (as opposed to “open”). Or inherently oriented to family life and shaped by its demands. Couples might live out these norms where temperament or taste motivated them, but there would be no reason of principle for them to do so and no basis for the law to encourage them to do so.

In other words, if sexual complementarity is optional for marriage, present only where preferred, then almost every other norm that sets marriage apart is optional. Although some supporters of same-sex marriage would disagree, this point can be established by reason and, as documented below, is increasingly confirmed by the rhetoric and arguments used in the campaign to redefine marriage and by the policies that many of its leaders increasingly embrace.

Why Marriage Matters for Policy
Government recognizes marriage because it is an institution that benefits society in a way that no other relationship does.

Virtually every political community has regulated male–female sexual relationships. This is not because government cares about romance as such. Government recognizes male–female sexual relationships because these alone produce new human beings. For highly dependent infants, there is no path to physical, moral, and cultural maturity—no path to personal responsibility—without a long and delicate process of ongoing care and supervision to which mothers and fathers bring unique gifts. Unless children mature, they never will become healthy, upright, productive members of society. Marriage exists to make men and women responsible to each other and to any children that they might have.

Marriage is thus a personal relationship that serves a public purpose in a political community. As the late sociologist James Q. Wilson wrote, “Marriage is a socially arranged solution for the problem of getting people to stay together and care for children that the mere desire for children, and the sex that makes children possible, does not solve.”[8]

Marriage is society’s least restrictive means of ensuring the well-being of children. Marital breakdown weakens civil society and limited government.

Marriage is society’s least restrictive means of ensuring the well-being of children. Government recognition of marriage protects children by incentivizing men and women to commit to each other and take responsibility for their children.

Social science confirms the importance of marriage for children. According to the best available sociological evidence, children fare best on virtually every examined indicator when reared by their wedded biological parents. Studies that control for other factors, including poverty and even genetics, suggest that children reared in intact homes do best on educational achievement, emotional health, familial and sexual development, and delinquency and incarceration.[9]

A study published by the left-leaning research institution Child Trends concluded:

[I]t is not simply the presence of two parents…but the presence of two biological parents that seems to support children’s development.[10]
[R]esearch clearly demonstrates that family structure matters for children, and the family structure that helps children the most is a family headed by two biological parents in a low-conflict marriage. Children in single-parent families, children born to unmarried mothers, and children in stepfamilies or cohabiting relationships face higher risks of poor outcomes.… There is thus value for children in promoting strong, stable marriages between biological parents.[11]
According to another study, “[t]he advantage of marriage appears to exist primarily when the child is the biological offspring of both parents.”[12] Recent literature reviews conducted by the Brookings Institution, the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University, the Center for Law and Social Policy, and the Institute for American Values corroborate the importance of intact households for children.[13]

These statistics have penetrated American life to such a great extent that even President Barack Obama refers to them as well known:

We know the statistics—that children who grow up without a father are five times more likely to live in poverty and commit crime; nine times more likely to drop out of schools and twenty times more likely to end up in prison. They are more likely to have behavioral problems, or run away from home, or become teenage parents themselves. And the foundations of our community are weaker because of it.[14]
Fathers matter, and marriage helps to connect fathers to mothers and children.

Social science claiming to show that there are “no differences” in outcomes for children raised in same-sex households does not change this reality. In fact, the most recent, sophisticated studies suggest that prior research is inadequate to support the assertion that it makes “no difference” whether a child was raised by same-sex parents.[15] A survey of 59 of the most prominent studies often cited for this claim shows that they drew primarily from small convenience samples that are not appropriate for generalizations to the whole population.[16]

Meanwhile, recent studies using rigorous methods and robust samples confirm that children do better when raised by a married mother and father. These include the New Family Structures Study by Professor Mark Regnerus at the University of Texas–Austin [17] and a report based on Census data recently released in the highly respected journal Demography.[18]

Still, the social science on same-sex parenting is a matter of significant ongoing debate, and it should not dictate choices about marriage. Recent studies using robust methods suggest that there is a lot more to learn about how changing family forms affects children and that social science evidence offers an insufficient basis for redefining marriage.

Marital breakdown costs taxpayers.

Marriage benefits everyone because separating childbearing and childrearing from marriage burdens innocent bystanders: not just children, but the whole community. Often, the community must step in to provide (more or less directly) for their well-being and upbringing. Thus, by encouraging the marriage norms of monogamy, sexual exclusivity, and permanence, the state is strengthening civil society and reducing its own role.

By recognizing marriage, the government supports economic well-being. The benefits of marriage led Professor W. Bradford Wilcox to summarize a study he led as part of the University of Virginia’s National Marriage Project in this way: “The core message…is that the wealth of nations depends in no small part on the health of the family.”[19] The same study suggests that marriage and fertility trends “play an underappreciated and important role in fostering long-term economic growth, the viability of the welfare state, the size and quality of the workforce, and the health of large sectors of the modern economy.”[20]

Given its economic benefits, it is no surprise that the decline of marriage most hurts the least well-off. A leading indicator of whether someone will know poverty or prosperity is whether, growing up, he or she knew the love and security of having a married mother and father. For example, a recent Heritage Foundation report by Robert Rector points out: “Being raised in a married family reduced a child’s probability of living in poverty by about 82 percent.”[21]

The erosion of marriage harms not only the immediate victims, but also society as a whole. A Brookings Institution study found that $229 billion in welfare expenditures between 1970 and 1996 can be attributed to the breakdown of the marriage culture and the resulting exacerbation of social ills: teen pregnancy, poverty, crime, drug abuse, and health problems.[1] A 2008 study found that divorce and unwed childbearing cost taxpayers $112 billion each year,[23] and Utah State University scholar David Schramm has estimated that divorce alone costs local, state, and federal-level government $33 billion each year.[24]

Civil recognition of the marriage union of a man and a woman serves the ends of limited government more effectively, less intrusively, and at less cost than does picking up the pieces from a shattered marriage culture.

Government can treat people equally—and leave them free to live and love as they choose—without redefining marriage.

While respecting everyone’s liberty, government rightly recognizes, protects, and promotes marriage as the ideal institution for childbearing and childrearing. Adults are free to make choices about their relationships without redefining marriage and do not need government sanction or license to do so.

Government is not in the business of affirming our love. Rather, it leaves consenting adults free to live and love as they choose. Contrary to what some say, there is no ban on same-sex marriage. Nothing about it is illegal. In all 50 states, two people of the same sex may choose to live together, choose to join a religious community that blesses their relationship, and choose a workplace offering joint benefits. There is nothing illegal about this.

What is at issue is whether the government will recognize such relationships as marriages—and then force every citizen, house of worship, and business to do so as well. At issue is whether policy will coerce and compel others to recognize and affirm same-sex relationships as marriages. All Americans have the freedom to live as they choose, but they do not have the right to redefine marriage for everyone else.

Appeals to “marriage equality” are good sloganeering, but they exhibit sloppy reasoning. Every law makes distinctions. Equality before the law protects citizens from arbitrary distinctions, from laws that treat them differently for no good reason. To know whether a law makes the right distinctions—whether the lines it draws are justified—one has to know the public purpose of the law and the nature of the good being advanced or protected.

If the law recognized same-sex couples as spouses, would some argue that it fails to respect the equality of citizens in multiple-partner relationships? Are those inclined to such relationships being treated unjustly when their consensual romantic bonds go unrecognized, their children thereby “stigmatized” and their tax filings unprivileged?

This is not hypothetical. In 2009, Newsweek reported that there were over 500,000 polyamorous households in America.[25] Prominent scholars and LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) activists have called for “marriage equality” for multipartner relationships since at least 2006.[26]

If sexual complementarity is eliminated as an essential characteristic of marriage, then no principle limits civil marriage to monogamous couples.

Supporters of redefinition use the following analogy: Laws defining marriage as a union of a man and a woman are unjust—fail to treat people equally—exactly like laws that prevented interracial marriage. Yet such appeals beg the question of what is essential to marriage. They assume exactly what is in dispute: that gender is as irrelevant as race in state recognition of marriage. However, race has nothing to with marriage, and racist laws kept the races apart. Marriage has everything to do with men and women, husbands and wives, mothers and fathers and children, and that is why principle-based policy has defined marriage as the union of one man and one woman.

Marriage must be color-blind, but it cannot be gender-blind. The color of two people’s skin has nothing to do with what kind of marital bond they have. However, the sexual difference between a man and a woman is central to what marriage is. Men and women regardless of their race can unite in marriage, and children regardless of their race need moms and dads. To acknowledge such facts requires an understanding of what, at an essential level, makes a marriage.

We reap the civil society benefits of marriage only if policy gets marriage right.

The state has an interest in marriage and marital norms because they serve the public good by protecting child well-being, civil society, and limited government. Marriage laws work by embodying and promoting a true vision of marriage, which makes sense of those norms as a coherent whole. There is nothing magical about the word “marriage.” It is not just the legal title of marriage that encourages adherence to marital norms.

What does the work are the social reality of marriage and the intelligibility of its norms. These help to channel behavior. Law affects culture. Culture affects beliefs. Beliefs affect actions. The law teaches, and it will shape not just a handful of marriages, but the public understanding of what marriage is.

Government promotes marriage to make men and women responsible to each other and to any children they might have. Promoting marital norms serves these same ends. The norms of monogamy and sexual exclusivity encourage childbearing within a context that makes it most likely that children will be raised by their mother and father. These norms also help to ensure shared responsibility and commitment between spouses, provide sufficient attention from both a mother and a father to their children, and avoid the sexual and kinship jealousy that might otherwise be present.

The norm of permanency ensures that children will at least be cared for by their mother and father until they reach maturity. It also provides kinship structure for interaction across generations as elderly parents are cared for by their adult children and as grandparents help to care for their grandchildren without the complications of fragmented stepfamilies.

If the law taught a falsehood about marriage, it would make it harder for people to live out the norms of marriage because marital norms make no sense, as matters of principle, if marriage is just intense emotional feeling. No reason of principle requires an emotional union to be permanent or limited to two persons, much less sexually exclusive. Nor should it be inherently oriented to family life and shaped by its demands. This does not mean that a couple could not decide to live out these norms where temperament or taste so motivated them, just that there is no reason of principle to demand that they do so. Legally enshrining this alternate view of marriage would undermine the norms whose link to the common good is the basis for state recognition of marriage in the first place.

Insofar as society weakens the rational foundation for marriage norms, fewer people would live them out, and fewer people would reap the benefits of the marriage institution. This would affect not only spouses, but also the well-being of their children. The concern is not so much that a handful of gay or lesbian couples would be raising children, but that it would be very difficult for the law to send a message that fathers matter when it has redefined marriage to make fathers optional.

This highlights the link between the central questions in this debate: What is marriage, and why does the state promote it? It is not that the state should not achieve its basic purpose while obscuring what marriage is. Rather, it cannot. Only when policy gets the nature of marriage right can a political community reap the civil society benefits of recognizing it.

Finally, support for marriage between a man and a woman is no excuse for animus against those with same-sex attractions or for ignoring the needs of individuals who, for whatever reason, may never marry. They are no less worthy than others of concern and respect. Yet this same diligent concern for the common good requires protecting and strengthening the marriage culture by promoting the truth about marriage.

The Consequences of Redefining Marriage
Redefining marriage would further distance marriage from the needs of children and deny the importance of mothers and fathers.

Redefining marriage would further disconnect childbearing from marriage. That would hurt children, especially the most vulnerable. It would deny as a matter of policy the ideal that children need a mother and a father. Traditional marriage laws reinforce the idea that a married mother and father is the most appropriate environment for rearing children, as the best available social science suggests.

Recognizing same-sex relationships as marriages would legally abolish that ideal. It would deny the significance of both mothering and fathering to children: that boys and girls tend to benefit from fathers and mothers in different ways. Indeed, the law, public schools, and media would teach that mothers and fathers are fully interchangeable and that thinking otherwise is bigoted.

Redefining marriage would diminish the social pressures and incentives for husbands to remain with their wives and biological children and for men and women to marry before having children. Yet the resulting arrangements—parenting by single parents, divorced parents, remarried parents, cohabiting couples, and fragmented families of any kind—are demonstrably worse for children.[27] Redefining marriage would destabilize marriage in ways that are known to hurt children.

Leading LGBT advocates admit that redefining marriage changes its meaning. E. J. Graff celebrates the fact that redefining marriage would change the “institution’s message” so that it would “ever after stand for sexual choice, for cutting the link between sex and diapers.” Enacting same-sex marriage, she argues, “does more than just fit; it announces that marriage has changed shape.”[28] Andrew Sullivan says that marriage has become “primarily a way in which two adults affirm their emotional commitment to one another.”[29]

Government exists to create the conditions under which individuals and freely formed communities can thrive. The most important free community—the one on which all others depend—is the marriage-based family. The conditions for its thriving include the accommodations and pressures that marriage law provides for couples to stay together. Redefining marriage would further erode marital norms, thrusting government further into leading roles for which it is poorly suited: parent and discipliner to the orphaned; provider to the neglected; and arbiter of disputes over custody, paternity, and visitation. As the family weakened, welfare programs and correctional bureaucracies would grow.

Redefining marriage would put into the law the new principle that marriage is whatever emotional bond the government says it is.

Redefining marriage does not simply expand the existing understanding of marriage. It rejects the truth that marriage is based on the complementarity of man and woman, the biological fact that reproduction depends on a man and a woman, and the social reality that children need a mother and a father.

Redefining marriage to include same-sex relationships is not ultimately about expanding the pool of people who are eligible to marry. Redefining marriage is about cementing a new idea of marriage in the law—an idea whose baleful effects conservatives have fought for years. The idea that romantic-emotional union is all that makes a marriage cannot explain or support the stabilizing norms that make marriage fitting for family life. It can only undermine those norms.

Indeed, that undermining already has begun. Disastrous policies such as “no-fault” divorce were also motivated by the idea that a marriage is made by romantic attachment and satisfaction—and comes undone when these fade. Same-sex marriage would require a more formal and final redefinition of marriage as simple romantic companionship, obliterating the meaning that the marriage movement had sought to restore to the institution.

Redefining marriage would weaken monogamy, exclusivity, and permanency—the norms through which marriage benefits society.

Government needs to get marriage policy right because it shapes the norms associated with this most fundamental relationship. Redefining marriage would abandon the norm of male–female sexual complementarity as an essential characteristic of marriage. Making that optional would also make other essential characteristics of marriage—such as monogamy, exclusivity, and permanency—optional.[30] Weakening marital norms and severing the connection of marriage with responsible procreation are the admitted goals of many prominent advocates of redefining marriage.

The Norm of Monogamy. New York University Professor Judith Stacey has expressed hope that redefining marriage would give marriage “varied, creative, and adaptive contours,” leading some to “question the dyadic limitations of Western marriage and seek…small group marriages.”[31] In their statement “Beyond Same-Sex Marriage,” more than 300 “LGBT and allied” scholars and advocates call for legally recognizing sexual relationships involving more than two partners.[32]University of Calgary Professor Elizabeth Brake thinks that justice requires using legal recognition to “denormalize[] heterosexual monogamy as a way of life” and “rectif[y] past discrimination against homosexuals, bisexuals, polygamists, and care networks.” She supports “minimal marriage,” in which “individuals can have legal marital relationships with more than one person, reciprocally or asymmetrically, themselves determining the sex and number of parties, the type of relationship involved, and which rights and responsibilities to exchange with each.”[33]

In 2009, Newsweek reported that the United States already had over 500,000 polyamorous households.[34] The author concluded:

[P]erhaps the practice is more natural than we think: a response to the challenges of monogamous relationships, whose shortcomings…are clear. Everyone in a relationship wrestles at some point with an eternal question: can one person really satisfy every need? Polyamorists think the answer is obvious—and that it’s only a matter of time before the monogamous world sees there’s more than one way to live and love.[35]
A 2012 article in New York Magazine introduced Americans to “throuple,” a new term akin to a “couple,” but with three people whose “throuplehood is more or less a permanent domestic arrangement. The three men work together, raise dogs together, sleep together, miss one another, collect art together, travel together, bring each other glasses of water, and, in general, exemplify a modern, adult relationship. Except that there are three of them.”[36]

The Norm of Exclusivity. Andrew Sullivan, who has extolled the “spirituality” of “anonymous sex,” also thinks that the “openness” of same-sex unions could enhance the bonds of husbands and wives:Same-sex unions often incorporate the virtues of friendship more effectively than traditional marriages; and at times, among gay male relationships, the openness of the contract makes it more likely to survive than many heterosexual bonds.… [T]here is more likely to be greater understanding of the need for extramarital outlets between two men than between a man and a woman.… [S]omething of the gay relationship’s necessary honesty, its flexibility, and its equality could undoubtedly help strengthen and inform many heterosexual bonds.[37]
“Openness” and “flexibility” are Sullivan’s euphemisms for sexual infidelity. Similarly, in a New York Times Magazine profile, gay activist Dan Savage encourages spouses to adopt “a more flexible attitude” about allowing each other to seek sex outside their marriage. The New York Times recently reported on a study finding that exclusivity was not the norm among gay partners: “‘With straight people, it’s called affairs or cheating,’ said Colleen Hoff, the study’s principal investigator, ‘but with gay people it does not have such negative connotations.’”[38]

A piece in The Advocate candidly admits where the logic of redefining marriage to include same-sex relationships leads:

Anti-equality right-wingers have long insisted that allowing gays to marry will destroy the sanctity of “traditional marriage,” and, of course, the logical, liberal party-line response has long been “No, it won’t.” But what if—for once—the sanctimonious crazies are right? Could the gay male tradition of open relationships actually alter marriage as we know it? And would that be such a bad thing?[39]
We often protest when homophobes insist that same sex marriage will change marriage for straight people too. But in some ways, they’re right.[40]
Some advocates of redefining marriage embrace the goal of weakening the institution of marriage in these very terms. “[Former President George W.] Bush is correct,” says Victoria Brownworth, “when he states that allowing same-sex couples to marry will weaken the institution of marriage…. It most certainly will do so, and that will make marriage a far better concept than it previously has been.”[41] Professor Ellen Willis celebrates the fact that “conferring the legitimacy of marriage on homosexual relations will introduce an implicit revolt against the institution into its very heart.”[42]

Michelangelo Signorile urges same-sex couples to “demand the right to marry not as a way of adhering to society’s moral codes but rather to debunk a myth and radically alter an archaic institution.”[43] Same-sex couples should “fight for same-sex marriage and its benefits and then, once granted, redefine the institution of marriage completely, because the most subversive action lesbians and gay men can undertake…is to transform the notion of ‘family’ entirely.”[44]

It is no surprise that there is already evidence of this occurring. A federal judge in Utah allowed a legal challenge to anti-bigamy laws.[45] A bill that would allow a child to have three legal parents passed both houses of the California state legislature in 2012 before it was vetoed by the governor, who claimed he wanted “to take more time to consider all of the implications of this change.”[46] The impetus for the bill was a lesbian same-sex relationship in which one partner was impregnated by a man. The child possessed a biological mother and father, but the law recognized the biological mother and her same-sex spouse, a “presumed mother,” as the child’s parents.[47]

Those who believe in monogamy and exclusivity—and the benefits that these bring to orderly procreation and child well-being—should take note.

Redefining marriage threatens religious liberty.

Redefining marriage marginalizes those with traditional views and leads to the erosion of religious liberty. The law and culture will seek to eradicate such views through economic, social, and legal pressure. If marriage is redefined, believing what virtually every human society once believed about marriage—a union of a man and woman ordered to procreation and family life—would be seen increasingly as a malicious prejudice to be driven to the margins of culture. The consequences for religious believers are becoming apparent.

The administrative state may require those who contract with the government, receive governmental monies, or work directly for the state to embrace and promote same-sex marriage even if it violates their religious beliefs. Nondiscrimination law may make even private actors with no legal or financial ties to the government—including businesses and religious organizations—liable to civil suits for refusing to treat same-sex relationships as marriages. Finally, private actors in a culture that is now hostile to traditional views of marriage may discipline, fire, or deny professional certification to those who express support for traditional marriage.

In fact, much of this is already occurring. Heritage Foundation Visiting Fellow Thomas Messner has documented multiple instances in which redefining marriage has already become a nightmare for religious liberty.[48] If marriage is redefined to include same-sex relationships, then those who continue to believe the truth about marriage—that it is by nature a union of a man and a woman—would face three different types of threats to their liberty: the administrative state, nondiscrimination law, and private actors in a culture that is now hostile to traditional views.[49]

After Massachusetts redefined marriage to include same-sex relationships, Catholic Charities of Boston was forced to discontinue its adoption services rather than place children with same-sex couples against its principles.[50] Massachusetts public schools began teaching grade-school students about same-sex marriage, defending their decision because they are “committed to teaching about the world they live in, and in Massachusetts same-sex marriage is legal.” A Massachusetts appellate court ruled that parents have no right to exempt their children from these classes.[51]

The New Mexico Human Rights Commission prosecuted a photographer for declining to photograph a same-sex “commitment ceremony.” Doctors in California were successfully sued for declining to perform an artificial insemination on a woman in a same-sex relationship. Owners of a bed and breakfast in Illinois who declined to rent their facility for a same-sex civil union ceremony and reception were sued for violating the state nondiscrimination law. A Georgia counselor was fired after she referred someone in a same-sex relationship to another counselor.[52] In fact, the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty reports that “over 350 separate state anti-discrimination provisions would likely be triggered by recognition of same-sex marriage.”[53]

The Catholic bishop of Springfield, Illinois, explains how a bill, which was offered in that state’s 2013 legislative session, to redefine marriage while claiming to protect religious liberty was unable to offer meaningful protections:

[It] would not stop the state from obligating the Knights of Columbus to make their halls available for same-sex “weddings.” It would not stop the state from requiring Catholic grade schools to hire teachers who are legally “married” to someone of the same sex. This bill would not protect Catholic hospitals, charities, or colleges, which exclude those so “married” from senior leadership positions…. This “religious freedom” law does nothing at all to protect the consciences of people in business, or who work for the government. We saw the harmful consequences of deceptive titles all too painfully last year when the so-called “Religious Freedom Protection and Civil Union Act” forced Catholic Charities out of foster care and adoption services in Illinois.[54]
In fact, the lack of religious liberty protection seems to be a feature of such bills:

There is no possible way—none whatsoever—for those who believe that marriage is exclusively the union of husband and wife to avoid legal penalties and harsh discriminatory treatment if the bill becomes law. Why should we expect it be otherwise? After all, we would be people who, according to the thinking behind the bill, hold onto an “unfair” view of marriage. The state would have equated our view with bigotry—which it uses the law to marginalize in every way short of criminal punishment.[55]
Georgetown University law professor Chai Feldblum, an appointee to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, argues that the push to redefine marriage trumps religious liberty concerns:

[F]or all my sympathy for the evangelical Christian couple who may wish to run a bed and breakfast from which they can exclude unmarried, straight couples and all gay couples, this is a point where I believe the “zero-sum” nature of the game inevitably comes into play. And, in making that decision in this zero-sum game, I am convinced society should come down on the side of protecting the liberty of LGBT people.[56]
Indeed, for many supporters of redefining marriage, such infringements on religious liberty are not flaws but virtues of the movement.

The Future of Marriage
Long before the debate about same-sex marriage, there was a debate about marriage. It launched a “marriage movement” to explain why marriage was good both for the men and women who were faithful to its responsibilities and for the children they reared. Over the past decade, a new question emerged: What does society have to lose by redefining marriage to exclude sexual complementarity?

Many citizens are increasingly tempted to think that marriage is simply an intense emotional union, whatever sort of interpersonal relationship consenting adults, whether two or 10 in number, want it to be—sexual or platonic, sexually exclusive or open, temporary or permanent. This leaves marriage with no essential features, no fixed core as a social reality. It is simply whatever consenting adults want it to be.

Yet if marriage has no form and serves no social purpose, how will society protect the needs of children—the prime victim of our non-marital sexual culture—without government growing more intrusive and more expensive?

Marriage exists to bring a man and a woman together as husband and wife to be father and mother to any children their union produces. Marriage benefits everyone because separating the bearing and rearing of children from marriage burdens innocent bystanders: not just children, but the whole community. Without healthy marriages, the community often must step in to provide (more or less directly) for their well-being and upbringing. Thus, by encouraging the norms of marriage—monogamy, sexual exclusivity, and permanence—the state strengthens civil society and reduces its own role.

Government recognizes traditional marriage because it benefits society in a way that no other relationship or institution does. Marriage is society’s least restrictive means of ensuring the well-being of children. State recognition of marriage protects children by encouraging men and women to commit to each other and take responsibility for their children.

Promoting marriage does not ban any type of relationship: Adults are free to make choices about their relationships, and they do not need government sanction or license to do so. All Americans have the freedom to live as they choose, but no one has a right to redefine marriage for everyone else.

The future of this country depends on the future of marriage, and the future of marriage depends on citizens understanding what it is and why it matters and demanding that government policies support, not undermine, true marriage.

Some might appeal to historical inevitability as a reason to avoid answering the question of what marriage is—as if it were an already moot question. However, changes in public opinion are driven by human choice, not by blind historical forces. The question is not what will happen, but what we should do.

—Ryan T. Anderson is William E. Simon Fellow in Religion and a Free Society in the Richard and Helen DeVos Center for Religion and Civil Society at The Heritage Foundation.
Hide References

[1] John Corvino and Maggie Gallagher, Debating Same-Sex Marriage (Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 2012), p. 94.

[2] Ibid., p. 116.

[3] Ibid., p. 96.

[4] Sherif Girgis, Ryan T. Anderson, and Robert P. George, What Is Marriage? Man and Woman: A Defense (New York: Encounter Books, 2012).

[5] David Popenoe, Life Without Father: Compelling New Evidence That Fatherhood and Marriage Are Indispensable for the Good of Children and Society (New York: The Free Press, 1996), p. 146.

[6] Ibid., p. 197. See also W. Bradford Wilcox, “Reconcilable Differences: What Social Sciences Show About the Complementarity of the Sexes & Parenting,” Touchstone, November 2005, p. 36.

[7] Girgis et al., What Is Marriage? Man and Woman: A Defense.

[8] James Q. Wilson, The Marriage Problem (New York: HapperCollins Publishers, 2002), p. 41.

[9] For the relevant studies, see Witherspoon Institute, “Marriage and the Public Good: Ten Principles,” August 2008, pp. 9–19, http://www.winst.org/family_marriage_and_democracy/WI_Marriage.pdf (accessed March 4, 2013). “Marriage and the Public Good,” signed by some 70 scholars, corroborates the philosophical case for marriage with extensive evidence from the social sciences about the welfare of children and adults.

[10] Kristin Anderson Moore, Susan M. Jekielek, and Carol Emig, “Marriage from a Child’s Perspective: How Does Family Structure Affect Children, and What Can We Do About It?” Child Trends Research Brief, June 2002, p. 1, http://www.childtrends.org/files/MarriageRB602.pdf (accessed March 4, 2013) (original emphasis).

[11] Ibid., p. 6.

[12] Wendy D. Manning and Kathleen A. Lamb, “Adolescent Well-Being in Cohabiting, Married, and Single-Parent Families,” Journal of Marriage and Family, Vol. 65, No. 4 (November 2003), pp. 876 and 890.

[13] See Sara McLanahan, Elisabeth Donahue, and Ron Haskins, “Introducing the Issue,” Marriage and Child Wellbeing, Vol. 15, No. 2 (Fall 2005), http://futureofchildren.org/futureofchildren/publications/journals/article/index.xml?journalid=37&articleid=103 (accessed March 4, 2013); Mary Parke, “Are Married Parents Really Better for Children?” Center for Law and Social Policy Policy Brief, May 2003, http://www.clasp.org/admin/site/publications_states/files/0086.pdf (accessed March 4, 2013); and W. Bradford Wilcox et al., Why Marriage Matters: Twenty-Six Conclusions from the Social Sciences, 2nd ed. (New York: Institute for American Values, 2005), p. 6, http://americanvalues.org/pdfs/why_marriage_matters2.pdf (accessed March 4, 2013).

[14] Barack Obama, “Obama’s Speech on Fatherhood,” Apostolic Church of God, Chicago, June 15, 2008, http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2008/06/obamas_speech_on_fatherhood.html (accessed March 4, 2013).

[15] See Jason Richwine and Jennifer A. Marshall, “The Regnerus Study: Social Science and New Family Structures Met with Intolerance,” Heritage Foundation Backgrounder No. 2726, October 2, 2012, http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2012/10/the-regnerus-study-social-science-on-new-family-structures-met-with-intolerance.

[16] Loren Marks, “Same-Sex Parenting and Children’s Outcomes: A Closer Examination of the American Psychological Association’s Brief on Lesbian and Gay Parenting,” Social Science Research, Vol. 41, No. 4 (July 2012), http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0049089X12000580 (accessed March 4, 2013).

[17] See Children from Different Families, http://www.familystructurestudies.com/ (accessed March 4, 2013).

[18] Douglas W. Allen, Catherine Pakaluk, and Joseph Price, “Nontraditional Families and Childhood Progress Through School: A Comment on Rosenfeld,” Demography, November 2012.

[19] Social Trends Institute, “The Sustainable Demographic Dividend: What Do Marriage and Fertility Have to Do with the Economy?” 2011, http://sustaindemographicdividend.org/articles/the-sustainable-demographic (accessed March 4, 2013).

[20] H. Brevy Cannon, “New Report: Falling Birth, Marriage Rates Linked to Global Economic Slowdown,” UVA Today, October 3, 2011, http://www.virginia.edu/uvatoday/newsRelease.php?id=16244 (accessed March 4, 2013).

[21] Robert Rector, “Marriage: America’s Greatest Weapon Against Child Poverty,” Heritage Foundation Special Report No. 117, September 5, 2012, http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2012/09/marriage-americas-greatest-weapon-against-child-poverty.

[22] Isabel V. Sawhill, “Families at Risk,” in Henry J. Aaron and Robert D. Reischauer, eds., Setting National Priorities: The 2000 Election and Beyond (Washington: Brookings Institution Press, 1999), pp. 97 and 108. See also Witherspoon Institute, “Marriage and the Public Good,” p. 15.

[23] Institute for American Values et al., “The Taxpayer Costs of Divorce and Unwed Childbearing: First-Ever Estimates for the Nation and for All Fifty States,” 2008, http://www.americanvalues.org/pdfs/COFF.pdf (accessed March 6, 2013).

[24] David G. Schramm, “Preliminary Estimates of the Economic Consequences of Divorce,” Utah State University, 2003.

[25] Jessica Bennett, “Only You. And You. And You,” Newsweek, July 28, 2009, http://www.thedailybeast.com/newsweek/2009/07/28/only-you-and-you-and-you.html (accessed March 6, 2013).

[26] Ryan T. Anderson, “Beyond Gay Marriage,” The Weekly Standard, August 17, 2008, http://www.weeklystandard.com/Content/Public/Articles/000/000/012/591cxhia.asp (accessed March 6, 2013).

[27] For the relevant studies, see Witherspoon Institute, “Marriage and the Public Good.” See also Moore et al., “Marriage from a Child’s Perspective,” p. 1; Manning and Lamb, “Adolescent Well-Being in Cohabiting, Married, and Single-Parent Families”; McLanahan et al., “Introducing the Issue”; Parke, “Are Married Parents Really Better for Children?”; and Wilcox et al., Why Marriage Matters, p. 6.

[28] E. J. Graff, “Retying the Knot,” in Andrew Sullivan, ed., Same-Sex Marriage: Pro and Con: A Reader (New York: Vintage Books, 1997), pp. 134, 136, and 137.

[29] Andrew Sullivan, “Introduction,” in Sullivan, ed., Same-Sex Marriage, pp. xvii and xix.

[30] See Girgis et al., What Is Marriage?

[31] See Maggie Gallagher, “(How) Will Gay Marriage Weaken Marriage as a Social Institution: A Reply to Andrew Koppelman,” University of St. Thomas Law Journal, Vol. 2, No. 1 (2004), p. 62, http://ir.stthomas.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1047&context=ustlj (accessed March 6, 2013).

[32] BeyondMarriage.org, “Beyond Same-Sex Marriage: A New Strategic Vision for All Our Families and Relationships,” July 26, 2006, http://beyondmarriage.org/full_statement.html (accessed March 6, 2013).

[33] Elizabeth Brake, “Minimal Marriage: What Political Liberalism Implies for Marriage Law,” Ethics, Vol. 120, No. 2 (January 2010), pp. 302, 303, 323, and 336.

[34] Bennett, “Only You.”

[35] Ibid.

[36] Molly Young, “He & He & He,” New York Magazine, July 29, 2012, http://nymag.com/news/features/sex/2012/benny-morecock-throuple/ (accessed March 6, 2013).

[37] Andrew Sullivan, Virtually Normal: An Argument About Homosexuality (New York: Vintage Books, 1996), pp. 202–203.

[38] Scott James, “Many Successful Gay Marriages Share an Open Secret,” The New York Times, January 28, 2010, http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/29/us/29sfmetro.html (accessed March 6, 2013).

[39] Ari Karpel, “Monogamish,” The Advocate, July 7, 2011, http://www.advocate.com/Print_Issue/Features/Monogamish/ (accessed March 6, 2013).

[40] Ari Karpel, “Features: Monogamish,” The Advocate, July 7, 2011, http://www.advocate.com/arts-entertainment/features?page=7 (accessed March 7, 2013).

[41] Victoria A. Brownworth, “Something Borrowed, Something Blue: Is Marriage Right for Queers?” in Greg Wharton and Ian Philips, eds., I Do/I Don’t: Queers on Marriage (San Francisco: Suspect Thoughts Press, 2004), pp. 53 and 58–59.

[42] Ellen Willis, “Can Marriage Be Saved? A Forum,” The Nation, July 5, 2004, p. 16, http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-118670288.html (accessed March 6, 2013).

[43] Michelangelo Signorile, “Bridal Wave,” Out, December 1993/January 1994, pp. 68 and 161.

[44] Ibid.

[45] Julia Zebley, “Utah Polygamy Law Challenged in Federal Lawsuit,” Jurist, July 13, 2011, http://jurist.org/paperchase/2011/07/utah-polygamy-law-challenged-in-federal-lawsuit.php (accessed March 6, 2013).

[46] Jim Sanders, “Jerry Brown Vetoes Bill Allowing More Than Two Parents,” The Sacramento Bee, September 30, 2012, http://blogs.sacbee.com/capitolalertlatest/2012/09/jerry-brown-vetoes-bill-allowing-more-than-two-parents.html (accessed March 6, 2013).

[47] For more on this, see Jennifer Roback Morse, “Why California’s Three-Parent Law Was Inevitable,” Witherspoon Institute Public Discourse, September 10, 2012, http://www.thepublicdiscourse.com/2012/09/6197 (accessed March 6, 2013).

[48] Thomas M. Messner, “Same-Sex Marriage and the Threat to Religious Liberty,” Heritage Foundation Backgrounder No. 2201, October 30, 2008, http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2008/10/same-sex-marriage-and-the-threat-to-religious-liberty; “Same-Sex Marriage and Threats to Religious Freedom: How Nondiscrimination Laws Factor In,” Heritage Foundation Backgrounder No. 2589, July 29, 2011, http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2011/07/same-sex-marriage-and-threats-to-religious-freedom-how-nondiscrimination-laws-factor-in; and “From Culture Wars to Conscience Wars: Emerging Threats to Conscience,” Heritage Foundation Backgrounder No. 2532, April 13, 2011, http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2011/04/from-culture-wars-to-conscience-wars-emerging-threats-to-conscience.

[49] For more on this, see Messner, “Same-Sex Marriage and the Threat to Religious Liberty.”

[50] Maggie Gallagher, “Banned in Boston,” The Weekly Standard, May 5, 2006, p. 20, http://www.weeklystandard.com/Content/Public/Articles/000/000/012/191kgwgh.asp (accessed March 6, 2013).

[51] For example, see Parker v. Hurley, 514 F.3d 87 (1st Cir. 2008).

[52] Walden v. Centers for Disease Control, Case No. 1:08-cv-02278-JEC, U.S. District Court, Northern District of Georgia, March 18, 2010, http://www.telladf.org/UserDocs/WaldenSJorder.pdf (accessed March 6, 2013).

[53] Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, “Same-Sex Marriage and State Anti-Discrimination Laws,” Issue Brief, January 2009, p. 2, http://www.becketfund.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/Same-Sex-Marriage-and-State-Anti-Discrimination-Laws-with-Appendices.pdf (accessed March 7, 2013). See also Messner, “Same-Sex Marriage and Threats to Religious Freedom,” p. 4.

[54] Thomas John Paprocki, letter to priests, deacons, and pastoral facilitators in the Diocese of Springfield, January 3, 2013, http://www.dio.org/blog/item/326-bishop-paprockis-letter-on-same-sex-marriage.html#sthash.CPXLw6Gt.dpbs (accessed March 6, 2013).

[55] Ibid.

[56] Chai R. Feldblum, “Moral Conflict and Liberty: Gay Rights and Religion,” Brooklyn Law Review, Vol. 72, No. 1 (Fall 2006), p. 119, http://www.brooklaw.edu/~/media/PDF/LawJournals/BLR_PDF/blr_v72i.ashx (accessed March 6, 2013).


Gaza: Ne jamais rappeler son imbécilité à un imbécile (Lesson in cartooning: Israeli Foreign Ministry pulls cartoon that angered foreign press)

24 juin, 2015
La guerre des drones, privilégiée par le président des Etats-Unis, Barack Obama, pour éviter le déploiement au sol de troupes américaines dans la lutte contre des organisations terroristes, a-t-elle atteint ses limites ? Paradoxale en apparence au lendemain de l’élimination d’un haut responsable yéménite d’Al-Qaida pour la péninsule Arabique, Nasser Al-Wahishi, cette interrogation est étayée par la publication d’un article du New York Times, mercredi 17 juin, confirmant une information du site Defense One, le 18 mai, selon laquelle l’armée de l’air américaine aurait commencé à réduire le nombre quotidien de sorties de ces aéronefs sans personne à bord. Ce nombre serait passé progressivement de 65 à 60 en raison d’un « burn-out » des pilotes de drones, sous l’effet de l’augmentation constante des demandes et de la baisse continue des effectifs.(…) Une nouvelle enquête interne non publiée ferait apparaître l’importance du stress lié à la crainte des dommages collatéraux des frappes alors que, selon le responsable de la base, la juxtaposition des tâches de la vie quotidienne et des missions de combat produit déjà de nouvelles formes de tensions psychologiques. L’épuisement des équipes chargées de ces missions s’ajoute aux interrogations sur leur portée. S’exprimant, début juin, au cours d’une conférence à Washington, un ancien responsable de la CIA estimait que le recours massif aux drones permettait « au mieux de tondre la pelouse », c’est-à-dire décapiter régulièrement les organisations visées sans les désorganiser durablement. Si la légalité de ces assassinats extrajudiciaires ne fait plus l’objet de véritables débats depuis longtemps, c’est donc bien leur efficacité qui pose question même si la Maison Blanche met régulièrement en avant la menace permanente que constituent les drones pour les responsables de groupes terroristes, notamment au Yémen. Le Monde
What had seemed to be a benefit of the job, the novel way that the crews could fly Predator and Reaper drones via satellite links while living safely in the United States with their families, has created new types of stresses as they constantly shift back and forth between war and family activities and become, in effect, perpetually deployed. “Having our folks make that mental shift every day, driving into the gate and thinking, ‘All right, I’ve got my war face on, and I’m going to the fight,’ and then driving out of the gate and stopping at Walmart to pick up a carton of milk or going to the soccer game on the way home — and the fact that you can’t talk about most of what you do at home — all those stressors together are what is putting pressure on the family, putting pressure on the airman,” Colonel Cluff said. While most of the pilots and camera operators feel comfortable killing insurgents who are threatening American troops, interviews with about 100 pilots and sensor operators for an internal study that has not yet been released, he added, found that the fear of occasionally causing civilian casualties was another major cause of stress, even more than seeing the gory aftermath of the missile strikes in general. A Defense Department study in 2013, the first of its kind, found that drone pilots had experienced mental health problems like depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder at the same rate as pilots of manned aircraft who were deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan. Trevor Tasin, a pilot who retired as a major in 2014 after flying Predator drones and training new pilots, called the work “brutal, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.” The exodus from the drone program might be caused in part by the lure of the private sector, Mr. Tasin said, noting that military drone operators can earn four times their salary working for private defense contractors. In January, in an attempt to retain drone operators, the Air Force doubled incentive pay to $18,000 per year. (…) The colonel said the stress on the operators belied a complaint by some critics that flying drones was like playing a video game or that pressing the missile fire button 7,000 miles from the battlefield made it psychologically easier for them to kill. He also said that the retention difficulties underscore that while the planes themselves are unmanned, they need hundreds of pilots, sensor operators, intelligence analysts and launch and recovery specialists in foreign countries to operate. Some of the crews still fly their missions in air-conditioned trailers here, while other cockpit setups have been created in new mission center buildings. The NYT
Les groupes armés palestiniens doivent mettre fin à l’ensemble des attaques directes visant les civils et des attaques menées sans discrimination. Ils doivent aussi prendre toutes les précautions possibles afin de protéger les civils de la bande de Gaza des conséquences de ces attaques. Cela suppose d’adopter toutes les mesures qui s’imposent pour éviter de placer combattants et armes dans des zones densément peuplées ou à proximité. (…) Les éléments selon lesquels il est possible qu’une roquette tirée par un groupe armé palestinien ait causé 13 morts civiles dans la bande de Gaza soulignent à quel point ces armes sont non discriminantes et les terribles conséquences de leur utilisation. (…) L’impact dévastateur des attaques israéliennes sur les civils palestiniens durant ce conflit est indéniable, mais les violations commises par un camp dans un conflit ne peuvent jamais justifier les violations perpétrées par leurs adversaires. (…) La communauté internationale doit aider à prévenir de nouvelles violations en luttant contre la banalisation de l’impunité, et en cessant de livrer aux groupes armés palestiniens et à Israël les armes et équipements militaires susceptibles d’être utilisés pour commettre de graves violations du droit international humanitaire. Philip Luther
Amnesty International demande à tous les États de soutenir la Commission d’enquête des Nations unies et la compétence de la Cour pénale internationale concernant les crimes commis par toutes les parties au conflit. Amnesty international
Des groupes armés palestiniens ont fait preuve d’un mépris flagrant pour la vie de civils, en lançant de nombreuses attaques aveugles à l’aide de roquettes et de mortiers en direction de zones civiles en Israël durant le conflit de juillet-août 2014, écrit Amnesty International dans un nouveau rapport rendu public jeudi 26 mars. Ce document, intitulé Unlawful and deadly: Rocket and mortar attacks by Palestinian armed groups during the 2014 Gaza/Israel conflict (…), fournit des éléments tendant à prouver que plusieurs attaques lancées depuis la bande de Gaza constituaient des crimes de guerre. Six civils, dont un petit garçon de quatre ans, ont été tués en Israël dans le cadre d’attaques de ce type, au cours de ce conflit ayant duré 50 jours. Lors de l’attaque la plus mortelle attribuée à un groupe armé palestinien, 13 civils palestiniens, dont 11 mineurs, ont été tués lorsqu’un projectile tiré depuis la bande de Gaza s’est écrasé dans le camp de réfugiés d’al Shati. (…) Toutes les roquettes utilisées par les groupes armés palestiniens sont des projectiles non guidés, avec lesquels on ne peut pas viser avec précision de cible spécifique et qui sont non discriminantes par nature ; recourir à ces armes est interdit par le droit international et leur utilisation constitue un crime de guerre. Les mortiers sont eux aussi des munitions imprécises et ne doivent jamais être utilisés pour attaquer des cibles militaires situées dans des zones civiles ou à proximité. (…) Selon les données des Nations unies, plus de 4 800 roquettes et 1 700 mortiers ont été tirés depuis Gaza vers Israël au cours de ce conflit. Sur ces milliers de roquettes et mortiers, environ 224 auraient atteint des zones résidentielles israéliennes, tandis que le Dôme de fer, le système de défense anti-missile israélien, en a intercepté de nombreux autres. (…) Lors de l’attaque la plus mortelle attribuée à un groupe armé palestinien durant ce conflit, 13 civils palestiniens, dont 11 mineurs, ont été tués lorsqu’un projectile a explosé à côté d’un supermarché, dans le camp – surpeuplé – de réfugiés d’al Shati (bande de Gaza) le 28 juillet 2014, premier jour de l’Aïd al Fitr. Les enfants jouaient dans la rue et achetaient des chips et des boissons sucrées au supermarché au moment de l’attaque. Si les Palestiniens ont affirmé que l’armée israélienne était responsable de cette attaque, un expert indépendant, spécialiste des munitions, ayant examiné les éléments de preuve disponibles pour le compte d’Amnesty International, a conclu que le projectile utilisé dans le cadre de cette attaque était une roquette palestinienne. (…) Mahmoud Abu Shaqfa et son fils Khaled, âgé de cinq ans, ont été gravement blessés lors de cette attaque. Muhammad, son fils de huit ans, a été tué. (…) Il n’y pas d’abri contre les bombes ni de système d’alerte en place pour protéger les civils dans la bande de Gaza. Le rapport décrit en détail d’autres atteintes au droit international humanitaire commises par des groupes armés palestiniens durant le conflit, comme le fait de stocker des roquettes et d’autres munitions dans des immeubles civils, y compris des écoles administrées par les Nations unies, ainsi que des cas dans lesquels des groupes armés palestiniens ont lancé des attaques ou stocké des munitions très près de zones où se réfugiaient des centaines de civils déplacés. Amnesty international
Il est déconcertant de voir que le ministère passe son temps à produire une vidéo de 50 secondes dont le but est de ridiculiser des journalistes couvrant un conflit dans lequel 2.100 Palestiniens et 72 Israéliens ont été tués. (…) Et 17 journalistes sont morts en couvrant le conflit, dont un photographe italien travaillant pour Associated Press. (…) Le corps diplomatique israélien veut qu’on le prenne au sérieux dans le monde. Mettre en ligne des vidéos trompeuses et mal conçues sur YouTube est inapproprié, vain et fragilise le ministère, qui dit respecter la presse étrangère et sa liberté de travailler à Gaza. Association de la presse étrangère en Israël et dans les territoires palestiniens
Le porte-parole des Affaires étrangères, Emmanuel Nahshon, a défendu le film en expliquant qu’il tournait en dérision le fait que la presse étrangère n’avait selon lui rapporté que plusieurs semaines après la fin de la guerre les méfaits du Hamas, comme les tirs de roquettes depuis des zones résidentielles et l’utilisation, « de façon criante et répétée », de civils comme boucliers humains. Le Point

Attention: une bêtise peut en cacher une autre !

Au lendemain de la publication d’un énième rapport de l’ONU dénonçant comme d’habitude les prétendus crimes de guerre de l’Armée israélienne lors de la guerre de Gaza de l’été dernier …

Et le retrait, suite aux moqueries et protestations de la presse étrangère, d’un petit film d’animation du ministère israélien des Affaires étrangères moquant un peu trop gentiment l’incroyable myopie et partialité de leur couverture de ladite guerre …

Pendant qu’à la tête du Monde libre et jusqu’à épuiser ses pilotes, le plus rapide prix Nobel de l’histoire mutliplie tranquillement, entre deux parties de golf et deux bavures, les éliminations ciblées

Petite leçon avec le caricaturiste israélo-américain Yaakov Kirschen …

Montrant que bien choisir sa cible et son objectif ne suffit pas toujours …

Et surtout, comme le rappellent tant la Bible que le Talmoud, qu’il ne faut jamais rappeler à un imbécile sa propre imbécilité !

A Lesson in Cartooning

Basic principles of successful activist cartooning
1. Target: Pick your « Target » audience.
2. Goal: Your goal should be a way to change, if only for a moment, the beliefs of your « Target » by cleverly slipping under their « defensive radar »
3. The Secret Sentence: The sentence that your cartoon will cause your « Target » to involuntarily say in his/her head (thus reaching your goal).

How the Foreign Ministry Cartoon Fails
1. Target: The « Target » is the foreign press (as revealed by the punchline « open your eyes »)
2. Goal: To change the beliefs of foreign reporters by cleverly slipping under their « defensive radar »???
3. The Secret Sentence: The sentence created in the mind of the foreign journalist is « the Israeli Foreign Ministry says I’m Stupid and Blind! »

* * *
I assume that readers would want to see an example of how the topic is taught in the Academy:

The analysis:
1. Target: The foreign press
2. Goal: Use humor to change reporters’ beliefs that their reports are believed
3. The Secret Sentence: The sentence created in the mind of the foreign journalist is « The public doesn’t believe us anymore »

Voir aussi:

PROCHE-ORIENT Le dessin animé indigne l’association représentant la presse étrangère en Israël 

VIDEO. Gaza: Les journalistes étrangers cibles d’un film de la diplomatie israélienne

20 Minutes avec AFP

16.06.2015

L’association représentant la presse étrangère en Israël et dans les Territoires palestiniens occupés s’est alarmée d’une animation produite par les Affaires étrangères israéliennes et ridiculisant la couverture par les journalistes internationaux de la bande de Gaza et de la guerre de l’été 2014.

Le dessin animé, en anglais, de 50 secondes présenté sur la page d’accueil du site du ministère des Affaires étrangères met en scène un journaliste en direct, que ses commentaires naïfs tournent en ridicule. Il explique comment les Gazaouis «tentent de vivre des vies tranquilles» alors qu’un homme armé lance une roquette derrière lui.

Retrouvez la vidéo intégrale en cliquant ici.«Un conflit dans lequel 2.100 Palestiniens et 72 Israéliens ont été tués»

Il rapporte que Gaza est en train de mettre au point le premier métro palestinien pendant que des hommes armés entrent dans le réseau de tunnels construits par le Hamas et les groupes armés palestiniens pour s’infiltrer en territoire israélien. Il affirme qu’il n’y a «pas de doute que la société palestinienne ici est libérale et pluraliste», alors qu’en arrière-plan un homme armé et encagoulé kidnappe un vendeur de rue dont le stand est décoré du drapeau homosexuel.

Le film se conclut sur une jeune femme remettant une paire de lunettes au journaliste, avant que les mots «Ouvrez les yeux, le terrorisme est au pouvoir à Gaza», s’inscrivent à l’écran. L’animation coïncide avec la campagne engagée par le gouvernement pour défendre les agissements de l’armée israélienne lors de la guerre de l’été 2014, en prévision de la prochaine publication d’un rapport onusien dont Israël s’attend à ce qu’il lui soit très défavorable.

L’Association de la presse étrangère (FPA), qui compte environ 360 adhérents, s’est dite «surprise» et «alarmée». «Il est déconcertant de voir que le ministère passe son temps à produire une vidéo de 50 secondes dont le but est de ridiculiser des journalistes couvrant un conflit dans lequel 2.100 Palestiniens et 72 Israéliens ont été tués», dit la FPA dans un communiqué.

17 journalistes sont morts en couvrant le conflit

Et 17 journalistes sont morts en couvrant le conflit, dont un photographe italien travaillant pour Associated Press. «Le corps diplomatique israélien veut qu’on le prenne au sérieux dans le monde. Mettre en ligne des vidéos trompeuses et mal conçues sur YouTube est inapproprié, vain et fragilise le ministère, qui dit respecter la presse étrangère et sa liberté de travailler à Gaza», dit-elle.

Le porte-parole des Affaires étrangères, Emmanuel Nahshon, a défendu le film en expliquant qu’il tournait en dérision le fait que la presse étrangère n’avait selon lui rapporté que plusieurs semaines après la fin de la guerre les méfaits du Hamas, comme les tirs de roquettes depuis des zones résidentielles et l’utilisation, «de façon criante et répétée», de civils comme boucliers humains.

Israël présente sa version de la guerre à Gaza
Cyrille Louis
Le Figaro

17/06/2015

VIDÉO – L’État hébreu vient de publier un rapport qui rejette sur le Hamas la responsabilité des immenses destructions perpétrées l’été dernier lors de l’Opération bordure protectrice.
Correspondant à Jérusalem

Un rapport et un dessin animé. En l’espace de quarante-huit heures, les autorités israéliennes ont dévoilé leurs moyens de défense face aux accusations qui s’accumulent à l’horizon. La commission des droits de l’homme de l’ONU, chargée d’enquêter sur le déroulement de l’Opération bordure protectrice, en juillet-août 2014 dans la bande de Gaza, doit publier sous peu ses conclusions. Le gouvernement de Benyamin Nétanyahou, qui prête à cette instance un fort biais anti-israélien, a préféré tirer le premier. Sans surprise, il rejette sur le Hamas la responsabilité du déclenchement de la guerre ainsi que de son lourd bilan matériel et humain, non sans accuser au passage la presse internationale d’avoir dissimulé les exactions perpétrées par les factions palestiniennes.

Pièce maîtresse de ce système de défense, le rapport de 277 pages publié par le ministère israélien des Affaires étrangères revient tout d’abord sur le contexte dans lequel a éclaté ce nouvel épisode de violence. Un conflit armé, rappellent les auteurs, oppose depuis plus d’une décennie l’État hébreu aux groupes armés implantés dans la bande de Gaza. Plus de 1265 Israéliens ont été tués par des attaques du Hamas depuis l’an 2000 tandis que 15.200 roquettes ont été tirées depuis le territoire palestinien, y compris après le désengagement décidé en 2005 par Ariel Sharon.

« Je salue la publication de ce rapport, qui présente le vrai visage de l’opération Bordure protectrice »

Benyamin Nétanyahou, premier ministre israélien
Le 7 juillet 2014, l’armée israélienne a décidé de lancer une opération aérienne afin de faire cesser les tirs de projectiles qui, depuis l’arrestation récente de dizaines de cadres du Hamas en Cisjordanie, étaient en nette recrudescence. Plus de 4500 projectiles ont été tirés durant le conflit, rappellent les auteurs du rapport, si bien que 10.000 Israéliens ont été contraints de fuir la zone frontalière. Dix jours après le début des hostilités, Tsahal décidait de conduire une opération terrestre «limitée» dans l’enclave, afin de détruire les 32 tunnels offensifs percés par le mouvement islamiste pour conduire des infiltrations en territoire israélien. Cette confrontation, qui a duré 51 jours au total, s’est soldée par la mort d’environ 2200 palestiniens, ainsi que de 67 soldats israéliens et de six civils résidant près de la frontière.

Fidèles à l’argumentaire employé par Tsahal durant le conflit, les auteurs du rapport accusent le Hamas non seulement d’avoir visé de manière indiscriminée des civils israéliens, mais aussi d’avoir délibérément mis en danger la population palestinienne en dissimulant ses lance-roquettes et ses combattants au cœur de zones densément peuplées. 18.000 habitations ont été détruites par les bombardements israéliens, selon le décompte de l’ONU. «L’armée israélienne, plaident les rapporteurs, a été confrontée à des combattants déguisés en civils ou en soldats israéliens, à des habitations converties en postes de commandement militaire, à des immeubles de plusieurs étages employés comme points de surveillance, à des minarets utilisés par des snipers, à des écoles transformées en entrepôts d’armes, à des structures civiles piégées au moyen d’explosifs et à des ouvertures de tunnels situés au beau milieu de quartiers d’habitations.»

Les auteurs, qui accusent les factions palestiniennes d’avoir exploité avec cynisme l’émotion suscitée par les nombreuses victimes, citent des manuels du Hamas découverts par l’armée israélienne. Ces documents «démontrent que la stratégie était d’importer les hostilités en milieu urbain, et d’utiliser les zones bâties et la présence de population civile pour en tirer un avantage tactique et politique», précisent-ils, avant d’affirmer: «C’est dans ce contexte que les dommages infligés à la population et aux infrastructures civiles doivent être évalués».

S’appuyant sur les analyses conduites par l’armée israélienne, le rapport affirme que 44 % des tués palestiniens étaient des combattants affiliés au Hamas, au djihad islamique ou à d’autres factions. Cette estimation contredit de façon spectaculaire celle avancée par l’ONU, selon laquelle plus de 75 % des victimes étaient des civils non engagés dans les combats. «Je salue la publication de ce rapport, qui présente le vrai visage de l’opération Bordure protectrice, a déclaré Benyamin Nétanyahou, le premier ministre israélien. Ce document prouve de manière incontestable que les opérations conduites par l’armée israélienne étaient conformes au droit international.»

Les autorités israéliennes, qui attendent avec une certaine inquiétude le rapport de la commission des droits de l’homme de l’ONU, estiment avoir allumé un efficace contre-feu. Elles espèrent par ailleurs couper l’herbe sous le pied de la Cour pénale internationale, qui s’interroge sur l’opportunité d’ouvrir une enquête sur d’éventuels crimes de guerre commis l’été dernier à Gaza.

« Il est déconcertant de constater que le ministère des Affaires étrangères perd son temps à produire une vidéo qui vise à ridiculiser le travail des journalistes en temps de guerre »

L’Association de la presse étrangère à Jérusalem
Pour faire bonne mesure, le ministère des Affaires étrangères a mis en ligne un dessin animé qui vise manifestement à discréditer la couverture du conflit par la presse internationale. Ce document d’une quarantaine de secondes met en scène un reporter de télévision présenté comme un doux imbécile, qui refuse de voir les exactions perpétrées par le Hamas. En l’absence de journalistes israéliens, qui ont interdiction d’entrer dans la bande de Gaza, le travail des journalistes étrangers durant le conflit a été régulièrement critiqué par les autorités israéliennes.

Ceux-ci se sont notamment vus reprocher de ne pas avoir diffusé d’images montrant les sites de lancements de roquettes ou les combattants du Hamas en milieu urbain. Mais des témoignages de militaires israéliens publiés par l’ONG Breaking the silence ont depuis lors confirmé que ceux-ci opéraient très largement à l’abri des regards. «Il est déconcertant de constater que le ministère des Affaires étrangères perd son temps à produire une vidéo qui vise à ridiculiser le travail des journalistes en temps de guerre», a regretté l’Association de la presse étrangère à Jérusalem.

Voir aussi:

Gaza : Israël retire un dessin animé qui ridiculisait la presse étrangère
la Presse

21/06/2015

Le ministère israélien des Affaires étrangères a retiré de son site internet une animation qui avait ému la presse étrangère, tournée en dérision dans la vidéo, a-t-il indiqué dimanche. « L’objet de cette vidéo était d’illustrer les crimes du Hamas » au pouvoir dans la bande de Gaza, a dit le porte-parole des Affaires étrangères, « nous l’avons retirée quand cela a prêté à malentendus ». Le dessin animé en anglais de 50 secondes présenté sur la page d’accueil du site du ministère ridiculisait la couverture de la bande de Gaza et de la guerre de l’été 2014 par les journalistes étrangers. Un journaliste en direct expliquait comment les Gazaouis « tentent de vivre des vies tranquilles » alors qu’un homme lance une roquette derrière lui. Il rapportait que Gaza était en train de mettre au point le premier métro palestinien pendant que des hommes armés entraient dans le réseau de tunnels construits par le Hamas et les groupes armés palestiniens pour s’infiltrer en territoire israélien. Le film se concluait sur une jeune femme remettant une paire de lunettes au journaliste, avant que les mots « Ouvrez les yeux, le terrorisme est au pouvoir à Gaza » ne s’inscrivent à l’écran. L’Association de la presse étrangère (FPA), qui compte environ 360 adhérents en Israël et dans les Territoires palestiniens, avait exprimé son émotion devant cette vidéo.
Par : AFP

Voir également:

Israël retire une vidéo qui ridiculisait la presse étrangère
Le dessin animé tournait en dérision la couverture dans la bande de Gaza de l’opération Bordure protectrice

i24news avec AFP

Le ministère israélien des Affaires étrangères a retiré de son site internet une animation qui avait ému la presse étrangère, tournée en dérision dans la vidéo, a-t-il indiqué dimanche.

« L’objet de cette vidéo était d’illustrer les crimes du Hamas » au pouvoir dans la bande de Gaza, a dit le porte-parole des Affaires étrangères, « nous l’avons retirée quand cela a prêté à malentendus ».

Le dessin animé en anglais de 50 secondes présenté sur la page d’accueil du site du ministère ridiculisait la couverture de la bande de Gaza et de la guerre de l’été 2014 par les journalistes étrangers.

Un journaliste en direct expliquait comment les Gazaouis « tentent de vivre des vies tranquilles » alors qu’un homme lance une roquette derrière lui. Il rapportait que Gaza était en train de mettre au point le premier métro palestinien pendant que des hommes armés entraient dans le réseau de tunnels construits par le Hamas et les groupes armés palestiniens pour s’infiltrer en territoire israélien.

Le film se concluait sur une jeune femme remettant une paire de lunettes au journaliste, avant que les mots « Ouvrez les yeux, le terrorisme est au pouvoir à Gaza » ne s’inscrivent à l’écran.

L’Association de la presse étrangère (FPA), qui compte environ 360 adhérents en Israël et dans les Territoires palestiniens, avait exprimé son émotion devant cette vidéo.

« Il est déconcertant de voir que le ministère passe son temps à produire une vidéo de 50 secondes dont le but est de ridiculiser des journalistes couvrant un conflit dans lequel 2.100 Palestiniens et 72 Israéliens ont été tués », a annoncé la FPA dans un communiqué.

« Et 17 journalistes sont morts en couvrant le conflit, dont un photographe italien travaillant pour Associated Press ». a-t-elle souligné.

« Le corps diplomatique israélien veut qu’on le prenne au sérieux dans le monde. Mettre en ligne des vidéos trompeuses et mal conçues sur YouTube est inapproprié, vain et fragilise le ministère, qui dit respecter la presse étrangère et sa liberté de travailler à Gaza », pouvait-on encore lire dans le communiqué.

 Voir encore:

Gaza : les journalistes étrangers cibles d’un film de la diplomatie israélienne

Le Point

17/06/2015

VIDÉO. Un dessin animé dénonce l’extrême naïveté supposée de la couverture médiatique de la guerre, à l’été 2014, par les journalistes étrangers.

La diffusion du film intervient peu avant la publication d’un rapport de l’Onu attendu comme très défavorable à Israël.

L’association représentant la presse étrangère en Israël et dans les Territoires palestiniens occupés s’est alarmée d’une animation produite par les Affaires étrangères israéliennes et ridiculisant la couverture par les journalistes internationaux de la bande de Gaza et de la guerre de l’été 2014. Le dessin animé, en anglais, de 50 secondes présenté sur la page d’accueil du site du ministère des Affaires étrangères, met en scène un journaliste en direct, que ses commentaires naïfs tournent en ridicule.

Il explique comment les Gazaouis « tentent de vivre des vies tranquilles » alors qu’un homme armé lance une roquette derrière lui. Il rapporte que Gaza est en train de mettre au point le premier métro palestinien pendant que des hommes armés entrent dans le réseau de tunnels construits par le Hamas et les groupes armés palestiniens pour s’infiltrer en territoire israélien. Il affirme qu’il n’y a « pas de doute que la société palestinienne ici est libérale et pluraliste », alors qu’en arrière-plan un homme armé et encagoulé kidnappe un vendeur de rues dont le stand est décoré du drapeau homosexuel. Le film se conclut sur une jeune femme remettant une paire de lunettes au journaliste, avant que les mots « Ouvrez les yeux, le terrorisme est au pouvoir à Gaza », s’inscrivent à l’écran.

17 journalistes morts

L’animation coïncide avec la campagne engagée par le gouvernement pour défendre les agissements de l’armée israélienne lors de la guerre de l’été 2014, en prévision de la prochaine publication d’un rapport onusien dont Israël s’attend à ce qu’il lui soit très défavorable.

L’Association de la presse étrangère (FPA), qui compte environ 360 adhérents, s’est dite « surprise » et « alarmée ». « Il est déconcertant de voir que le ministère passe son temps à produire une vidéo de 50 secondes dont le but est de ridiculiser des journalistes couvrant un conflit dans lequel 2 100 Palestiniens et 72 Israéliens ont été tués », dit la FPA dans un communiqué. Et 17 journalistes sont morts en couvrant le conflit, dont un photographe italien travaillant pour Associated Press. « Le corps diplomatique israélien veut qu’on le prenne au sérieux dans le monde. Mettre en ligne des vidéos trompeuses et mal conçues sur YouTube est inapproprié, vain et fragilise le ministère, qui dit respecter la presse étrangère et sa liberté de travailler à Gaza », dit-elle. Le porte-parole des Affaires étrangères, Emmanuel Nahshon, a défendu le film en expliquant qu’il tournait en dérision le fait que la presse étrangère n’avait selon lui rapporté que plusieurs semaines après la fin de la guerre les méfaits du Hamas, comme les tirs de roquettes depuis des zones résidentielles et l’utilisation, « de façon criante et répétée », de civils comme boucliers humains.

Voir encore:

Guerre à Gaza : la commission d’enquête de l’ONU accuse Israël et le Hamas
Cyrille Louis
Le Figaro

22/06/2015

Un rapport dénonce les exactions commises par l’armée israélienne et l’organisation palestinienne lors de l’Operation bordure protectrice à Gaza en 2014.
Correspondant à Jérusalem

La commission indépendante chargée par l’ONU d’enquêter sur le déroulement de l’Opération bordure protectrice, du 7 juillet au 26 août 2014 dans la bande de Gaza, indique avoir recueilli «des informations substantielles mettant en évidence de possibles crimes de guerre commis à la fois par Israël et par les groupes armés palestiniens». «L’étendue des dévastations et de la souffrance humaine provoquées à Gaza est sans précédent», a dénoncé lundi Mary McGowan Davis, la présidente de cette commission, au moment de publier son rapport. Ce document de 183 pages sera débattu le 29 juin devant le Conseil des droits de l’homme de l’ONU.

«L’étendue de dévastations et de la souffrance humaine provoquées à Gaza est sans précédent»

Les auteurs de l’enquête, qui n’ont été autorisés à se rendre ni à Gaza, ni en Israël, ni dans les territoires palestiniens occupés, ont néanmoins pu interroger plus de 280 victimes et témoins de cette guerre. Ils ont également exploité quelque 500 dépositions livrées par écrit. Le ministère israélien des Affaires étrangères a d’emblée rejeté leur rapport, jugeant qu’«il a été commandé par une institution notoirement partiale». «Il est regrettable que ce document ne tienne pas compte de la différence profonde entre le comportement moral d’Israël durant l’opération Bordure protectrice, et celui des organisations terroristes auquel nous avons été confrontées», dénonce un communiqué officiel du gouvernement.

Les auteurs du rapport d’enquête rappellent que les factions armées palestiniennes ont tiré de manière indiscriminée 4881 roquettes et 1753 obus de mortier en direction d’Israël durant les 51 jours de guerre, terrorisant la population, tuant six civils et en blessant plus de 1600. Ils dénoncent aussi l’utilisation de 14 tunnels offensifs creusés pour permettre des incursions militaires sur le sol israélien. «La présence de ces infrastructures a traumatisé les civils israéliens, qui ont eu peur de pouvoir être attaqués à tout moment par des hommes armés venus du sous-sol», précisent-ils.

Mais c’est incontestablement à l’armée et aux dirigeants israéliens que la commission d’enquête réserve ses flèches les plus acérées. Elle condamne notamment l’«usage intensif d’armes conçues pour tuer et blesser sur un large périmètre». «Bien qu’elles ne soient pas illégales, leur utilisation dans des zones densément peuplées a rendu hautement probable la mort indiscriminée de civils et de combattants», écrivent les auteurs. Ils soulignent que 142 familles ont perdu au moins trois de leurs membres dans ce type de frappes. Au total, la commission affirme que 1462 civils Palestiniens, dont 551 enfants, ont trouvé la mort durant ce conflit.

«Israël ne commet pas de crimes de guerre»

S’il ne lui appartient pas de caractériser d’éventuelles infractions au droit international, la commission d’enquête dénonce le manque d’empressement de l’Etat hébreu à sanctionner ces «violations». «Israël doit rompre avec son incapacité lamentable à poursuivre les auteurs d’infractions», insiste Mary McGowan Davis, qui dénonce un climat d’«impunité». «Nous avons été très déçus d’apprendre que l’enquête criminelle ouverte après la mort de quatre enfants sur la plage de Gaza, le 16 juillet 2014, avait été classée sans suite», a-t-elle notamment dénoncé, regrettant que les nombreux journalistes présents ce jour-là n’aient pas été interrogés par l’armée israélienne.

Sans surprise, les dirigeants israéliens ont repoussé ces accusations. «Israël ne commet pas de crimes de guerre», a déclaré lundi Benyamin Nétanyahou, qui a récemment invité les Israéliens à ne pas «perdre de temps» à lire ce rapport de l’ONU. Le premier ministre a mis en doute l’honnêteté de la commission d’enquête dès sa constitution, en septembre 2014. Son gouvernement a notamment pris pour cible et obtenu la démission de son président. William Schabas, un professeur de droit canadien, a été vilipendé pour d’anciennes prises de position anti-israéliennes. Les diplomates israéliens ont depuis lors continué de faire référence à la «commission Schabas», espérant ainsi discréditer un rapport dont ils redoutaient depuis plusieurs mois les conclusions.

Voir de plus:

Washington demande à l’ONU d’ignorer le rapport « partial » de la guerre de Gaza
Le porte-parole du Département d’Etat affirme qu’il n’est pas nécessaire que le Conseil de Sécurité débatte de ce rapport
Times of Israel Staff

24 juin 2015

Le rapport de l’ONU émis à propos des possibles crimes de guerre pendant le conflit de Gaza l’été dernier ne doit pas être présenté au Conseil de sécurité ou utilisé dans d’autres travaux des Nations unies, ont exhorté les Etats-Unis mardi contestant l’équité du Conseil des droits de l’Homme (CDH) à l’origine de l’enquête.

Recevez gratuitement notre édition quotidienne par mail pour ne rien manquer du meilleur de l’info   Inscription gratuite!

Le porte-parole du département d’Etat, John Kirby, a déclaré que Washington considérait le CDH comme ayant un « parti pris évident » contre Israël, ce qui ternis le rapport publié lundi, qui a accusé Israël et les membres des groupes armés palestiniens de possibles crimes de guerre lors du conflit de 50 jours l’été dernier.

« [N] ous contestons le fondement même sur lequel ce rapport a été rédigé, et nous ne croyons pas qu’il y ait un appel ou une nécessité pour tout autre travail du Conseil de sécurité sur cette

», a déclaré Kirby lors d’une conférence de presse.

« [N] ous rejetons le fondement en vertu duquel cette commission particulière d’enquête a été établie en raison de sa partialité très nette contre Israël ».

Le Haut-Commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés (UNHCR) devrait discuter du rapport le 29 juin et pourrait voter de l’envoyer au Conseil de sécurité qu’il poursuive l’action. Lundi, Kirby a déclaré que les Etats-Unis ne feraient pas partie de ce processus.

Lorsqu’on lui a demandé si le rapport devait être déférée à la Cour pénale internationale (CPI) à La Haye pour qu’elle d’enquête sur les deux parties pour crimes de guerre, Kirby a simplement répondu que les Etats-Unis ne « souten[aient] aucun autre travail de l’ONU sur ce rapport ».

La CPI a été créée par les Nations unies, mais pas directement sous son égide.

Kirby a également précisé que les États-Unis continuaient à évoquer avec Israël ses préoccupations sur la conduite de l’armée pendant la guerre de l’été dernier.

« Nous nous sommes montrés très clairs sur les problèmes que nous avions à l’époque avec l’usage de la force et nous nous sommes montrés très clairs auprès du gouvernement israélien sur nos préoccupations au sujet de ce qui se passait pendant ce conflit », a-t-il souligné.

« Nous avons un dialogue permanent avec le gouvernement d’Israël sur toutes ces sortes de choses ; le dialogue a continué et continue ».

Lundi, le porte-parole de la Maison Blanche Josh Earnest a déclaré que l’administration étudiait le rapport.

Même si Israël a un « droit à l’auto-défense », les Etats-Unis « ont exprimé sa profonde préoccupation au sujet des civils dans la bande de Gaza qui étaient en danger [pendant la guerre].

« Et nous avons exhorté toutes les parties à faire tout leur possible pour protéger les civils innocents qui ont été essentiellement pris dans les échanges de tirs de ce conflit », a déclaré Earnest. « Nous attendons d’autres conclusions du gouvernement israélien sur cette question en particulier ».

Le rapport de l’ONU, qui a constaté que les frappes aériennes israéliennes sur les bâtiments résidentiels ont causé de nombreux morts parmi les civils et les a suggéré que les dirigeants israéliens les ont sciemment mis en danger, a été fermement rejeté par les responsables israéliens.

L’une des premières réponses au rapport étaient celle du ministère des Affaires étrangères qui a déclaré que le gouvernement israélien était en train d’examiner les conclusions, mais a rejeté le mandat « moralement vicié » donné à l’UNHRC pour enquêter sur la guerre.

« Il est regrettable que le rapport ne parvienne pas à reconnaître la profonde différence entre le comportement moral d’Israël lors de l’opération Bordure protectrice et les organisations terroristes auxquelles il s’est confronté », a déclaré le ministère des Affaires étrangères dans un communiqué.

« Ce rapport a été commandé par une institution notoirement partiale, qui a donné un mandat évidemment partial, et a initialement été dirigé par un président grossièrement biaisé, William Schabas », a indiqué le communiqué, notant le traitement démesuré du CDH – par rapport aux principaux pays violant les droits de l’Homme comme l’Iran, la Corée du Nord et d’autres – des infractions alléguées d’Israël.

« Israël est une démocratie attachée à la primauté du droit, forcé de se défendre contre les terroristes palestiniens qui commettent un double crime de guerre : ils ciblent aveuglément des civils israéliens tout en mettant en danger de manière délibérée des civils palestiniens, dont des enfants, en les utilisant comme des boucliers humains », a conclu le communiqué israélien.

Le rapport a également constaté que des roquettes des « groupes armés palestiniens » avaient tiré aveuglément sur des civils israéliens, une constatation qui a été rejetée par le groupe terroriste du Hamas qui est de facto au pouvoir à Gaza.

Les responsables israéliens ont refusé de coopérer avec la commission d’enquête et l’ont rejetée depuis la formation du panel car ils l’ont considérée comme étant partiale et écrite à l’avance.

Schabas, le professeur juif canadien qui a d’abord dirigé la commission d’enquête du HRC, a démissionné en février en raison des accusations de partialité de la part d’Israël qui pesaient contre lui et a été remplacé par l’ancienne juge de New York Mary McGowan Davis.

AFP et Mitch Ginsburg ont contribué à cet article.

Voir par ailleurs:

Le « burn-out » des pilotes de drone de l’armée américaine
Gilles Paris (Washington, correspondant)

Le Monde

17.06.2015

La guerre des drones, privilégiée par le président des Etats-Unis, Barack Obama, pour éviter le déploiement au sol de troupes américaines dans la lutte contre des organisations terroristes, a-t-elle atteint ses limites ? Paradoxale en apparence au lendemain de l’élimination d’un haut responsable yéménite d’Al-Qaida pour la péninsule Arabique, Nasser Al-Wahishi, cette interrogation est étayée par la publication d’un article du New York Times, mercredi 17 juin, confirmant une information du site Defense One, le 18 mai, selon laquelle l’armée de l’air américaine aurait commencé à réduire le nombre quotidien de sorties de ces aéronefs sans personne à bord.

Ce nombre serait passé progressivement de 65 à 60 en raison d’un « burn-out » des pilotes de drones, sous l’effet de l’augmentation constante des demandes et de la baisse continue des effectifs. Le responsable de la base de Creech, dans le Nevada, où sont conduites les missions à distance, le colonel James Cluff, avait expliqué en mai que cette réduction visait à maintenir le groupe constitué par ces pilotes « en bon état ». Le nombre de missions (« Combat Air Patrol ») a quasiment doublé entre 2008 et 2014. Selon les chiffres donnés par le quotidien new-yorkais, les Predator et Reaper ont effectué 3 300 sorties et tiré 875 missiles depuis le mois d’août.

Alors que la base de Creech est visée régulièrement par des manifestations pacifistes, le New York Times rappelle qu’un rapport du Pentagone, en 2013, avait montré que les pilotes de drones subissaient les mêmes pressions psychologiques que les pilotes d’avions de guerre.

Stress lié à la crainte des dommages collatéraux

Une nouvelle enquête interne non publiée ferait apparaître l’importance du stress lié à la crainte des dommages collatéraux des frappes alors que, selon le responsable de la base, la juxtaposition des tâches de la vie quotidienne et des missions de combat produit déjà de nouvelles formes de tensions psychologiques.

L’épuisement des équipes chargées de ces missions s’ajoute aux interrogations sur leur portée. S’exprimant, début juin, au cours d’une conférence à Washington, un ancien responsable de la CIA estimait que le recours massif aux drones permettait « au mieux de tondre la pelouse », c’est-à-dire décapiter régulièrement les organisations visées sans les désorganiser durablement. Si la légalité de ces assassinats extrajudiciaires ne fait plus l’objet de véritables débats depuis longtemps, c’est donc bien leur efficacité qui pose question même si la Maison Blanche met régulièrement en avant la menace permanente que constituent les drones pour les responsables de groupes terroristes, notamment au Yémen.

Le recours massif aux frappes de drones avait été développé initialement par l’armée israélienne au cours de la seconde intifada. Il avait permis la mise hors combat de dizaines de miliciens et de responsables politiques, notamment à Gaza, sans pour autant parvenir à affaiblir durablement leurs organisations. La première frappe de drone répertoriée au Yémen avait été conduite le 3 novembre 2002. Elles se sont multipliées depuis sans contrecarrer l’implantation des djihadistes.

 Voir enfin:

CREECH AIR FORCE BASE, Nev. — After a decade of waging long-distance war through their video screens, America’s drone operators are burning out, and the Air Force is being forced to cut back on the flights even as military and intelligence officials are demanding more of them over intensifying combat zones in Iraq, Syria and Yemen.

The Air Force plans to trim the flights by the armed surveillance drones to 60 a day by October from a recent peak of 65 as it deals with the first serious exodus of the crew members who helped usher in the era of war by remote control.

Air Force officials said that this year they would lose more drone pilots, who are worn down by the unique stresses of their work, than they can train.

“We’re at an inflection point right now,” said Col. James Cluff, the commander of the Air Force’s 432nd Wing, which runs the drone operations from this desert outpost about 45 miles northwest of Las Vegas.

The reduction could also create problems for the C.I.A., which has used Air Force pilots to conduct drone missile attacks on terrorism suspects in Pakistan and Yemen, government officials said. And the slowdown comes just as military advances by the Islamic State have placed a new premium on aerial surveillance and counterattacks.

Some top Pentagon officials had hoped to continue increasing the number of daily drone flights to more than 70. But Defense Secretary Ashton B. Carter recently signed off on the cuts after it became apparent that the system was at the breaking point, Air Force officials said.

The biggest problem is that a significant number of the 1,200 pilots are completing their obligation to the Air Force and are opting to leave. In a recent interview, Colonel Cluff said that many feel “undermanned and overworked,” sapped by alternating day and night shifts with little chance for academic breaks or promotion.

At the same time, a training program is producing only about half of the new pilots that the service needs because the Air Force had to reassign instructors to the flight line to expand the number of flights over the past few years.

Colonel Cluff said top Pentagon officials thought last year that the Air Force could safely reduce the number of daily flights as military operations in Afghanistan wound down. But, he said, “the world situation changed,” with the rapid emergence of the Islamic State, and the demand for the drones shot up again.

Officials say that since August, Predator and Reaper drones have conducted 3,300 sorties and 875 missile and bomb strikes in Iraq against the Islamic State.

What had seemed to be a benefit of the job, the novel way that the crews could fly Predator and Reaper drones via satellite links while living safely in the United States with their families, has created new types of stresses as they constantly shift back and forth between war and family activities and become, in effect, perpetually deployed.

“Having our folks make that mental shift every day, driving into the gate and thinking, ‘All right, I’ve got my war face on, and I’m going to the fight,’ and then driving out of the gate and stopping at Walmart to pick up a carton of milk or going to the soccer game on the way home — and the fact that you can’t talk about most of what you do at home — all those stressors together are what is putting pressure on the family, putting pressure on the airman,” Colonel Cluff said.

While most of the pilots and camera operators feel comfortable killing insurgents who are threatening American troops, interviews with about 100 pilots and sensor operators for an internal study that has not yet been released, he added, found that the fear of occasionally causing civilian casualties was another major cause of stress, even more than seeing the gory aftermath of the missile strikes in general.

A Defense Department study in 2013, the first of its kind, found that drone pilots had experienced mental health problems like depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder at the same rate as pilots of manned aircraft who were deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan.

Trevor Tasin, a pilot who retired as a major in 2014 after flying Predator drones and training new pilots, called the work “brutal, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.”

The exodus from the drone program might be caused in part by the lure of the private sector, Mr. Tasin said, noting that military drone operators can earn four times their salary working for private defense contractors. In January, in an attempt to retain drone operators, the Air Force doubled incentive pay to $18,000 per year.

Another former pilot, Bruce Black, was part of a team that watched Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, the founder of Al Qaeda in Iraq, for 600 hours before he was killed by a bomb from a manned aircraft.

“After something like that, you come home and have to make all the little choices about the kids’ clothes or if I parked in the right place,” said Mr. Black, who retired as a lieutenant colonel in 2013. “And after making life and death decisions all day, it doesn’t matter. It’s hard to care.”

Colonel Cluff said the idea behind the reduction in flights was “to come back a little bit off of 65 to allow some breathing room” to replenish the pool of instructors and recruits.

The Air Force also has tried to ease the stress by creating a human performance team, led by a psychologist and including doctors and chaplains who have been granted top-secret clearances so they can meet with pilots and camera operators anywhere in the facility if they are troubled.

Colonel Cluff invited a number of reporters to the Creech base on Tuesday to discuss some of these issues. It was the first time in several years that the Air Force had allowed reporters onto the base, which has been considered the heart of the drone operations since 2005.

The colonel said the stress on the operators belied a complaint by some critics that flying drones was like playing a video game or that pressing the missile fire button 7,000 miles from the battlefield made it psychologically easier for them to kill. He also said that the retention difficulties underscore that while the planes themselves are unmanned, they need hundreds of pilots, sensor operators, intelligence analysts and launch and recovery specialists in foreign countries to operate.

Some of the crews still fly their missions in air-conditioned trailers here, while other cockpit setups have been created in new mission center buildings. Anti-drone protesters are periodically arrested as they try to block pilots from entering the base, where signs using the drone wing’s nickname say, “Home of the Hunters.”


Idées chrétiennes devenues folles: Nous avions un chef du Monde libre transmusulman et nous ne le savions pas ! (We had a transMuslim US president and we didn’t know it !)

21 juin, 2015
https://i2.wp.com/ak-hdl.buzzfed.com/static/2015-06/10/19/enhanced/webdr03/enhanced-15456-1433978712-7.jpg
https://i0.wp.com/ak-hdl.buzzfed.com/static/2015-06/10/18/enhanced/webdr12/enhanced-14340-1433974902-14.jpg
https://i1.wp.com/newsnyork.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/gK8gW01ImR.jpg
https://i2.wp.com/images.onset.freedom.com/ocregister/npbxhb-vanityfair.jpg
Il n’y a plus ni Juif ni Grec, il n’y a plus ni esclave ni libre, il n’y a plus ni homme ni femme; car tous vous êtes un en Jésus Christ. Paul (Galates 3: 28)
La loi naturelle n’est pas un système de valeurs possible parmi beaucoup d’autres. C’est la seule source de tous les jugements de valeur. Si on la rejette, on rejette toute valeur. Si on conserve une seule valeur, on la conserve tout entier. (. . .) La rébellion des nouvelles idéologies contre la loi naturelle est une rébellion des branches contre l’arbre : si les rebelles réussissaient, ils découvriraient qu’ils se sont détruits eux-mêmes. L’intelligence humaine n’a pas davantage le pouvoir d’inventer une nouvelle valeur qu’il n’en a d’imaginer une nouvelle couleur primaire ou de créer un nouveau soleil avec un nouveau firmament pour qu’il s’y déplace. (…) Tout nouveau pouvoir conquis par l’homme est aussi un pouvoir sur l’homme. Tout progrès le laisse à la fois plus faible et plus fort. Dans chaque victoire, il est à la fois le général qui triomphe et le prisonnier qui suit le char triomphal . (…) Le processus qui, si on ne l’arrête pas, abolira l’homme, va aussi vite dans les pays communistes que chez les démocrates et les fascistes. Les méthodes peuvent (au premier abord) différer dans leur brutalité. Mais il y a parmi nous plus d’un savant au regard inoffensif derrière son pince-nez, plus d’un dramaturge populaire, plus d’un philosophe amateur qui poursuivent en fin de compte les mêmes buts que les dirigeants de l’Allemagne nazie. Il s’agit toujours de discréditer totalement les valeurs traditionnelles et de donner à l’humanité une forme nouvelle conformément à la volonté (qui ne peut être qu’arbitraire) de quelques membres ″chanceux″ d’une génération ″chanceuse″ qui a appris comment s’y prendre. C.S. Lewis (L’abolition de l’homme, 1943)
Le monde moderne n’est pas mauvais : à certains égards, il est bien trop bon. Il est rempli de vertus féroces et gâchées. Lorsqu’un dispositif religieux est brisé (comme le fut le christianisme pendant la Réforme), ce ne sont pas seulement les vices qui sont libérés. Les vices sont en effet libérés, et ils errent de par le monde en faisant des ravages ; mais les vertus le sont aussi, et elles errent plus férocement encore en faisant des ravages plus terribles. Le monde moderne est saturé des vieilles vertus chrétiennes virant à la folie.  G.K. Chesterton
L’organisateur doit se faire schizophrène, politiquement parlant, afin de ne pas se laisser prendre totalement au jeu. (…) Seule une personne organisée peut à la fois se diviser et rester unifiée. (…) La trame de toutes ces qualités souhaitées chez un organisateur est un ego très fort, très solide. L’ego est la certitude absolue qu’a l’organisateur de pouvoir faire ce qu’il pense devoir faire et de réussir dans la tâche qu’il a entreprise. Un organisateur doit accepter sans crainte, ni anxiété, que les chances ne soient jamais de son bord. Le moi de l’organizer est plus fort et plus monumental que le moi du leader. Le leader est poussé par un désir pour le pouvoir, tandis que l’organizer est poussé par un désir de créer. L’organizer essaie dans un sens profond d’atteindre le plus haut niveau qu’un homme puisse atteindre—créer, être ‘grand créateur,’ jouer à être Dieu. Saul Alinsky
L’Amérique est toujours le tueur numéro 1 dans le monde. . . Nous sommes profondément impliqués dans l’importation de la drogue, l’exportation d’armes et la formation de tueurs professionnels. . . Nous avons bombardé le Cambodge, l’Irak et le Nicaragua, tuant les femmes et les enfants tout en essayant de monter l’opinion publique contre Castro et Khaddafi. . . Nous avons mis Mandela en prison et soutenu la ségrégation pendant 27 ans. Nous croyons en la suprématie blanche et l’infériorité noire et y croyons davantage qu’en Dieu. … Nous avons soutenu le sionisme sans scrupule tout en ignorant les Palestiniens et stigmatisé quiconque le dénonçait comme anti-sémite. . . Nous ne nous inquiétons en rien de la vie humaine si la fin justifie les moyens. . . Nous avons lancé le virus du SIDA. . . Nous ne pouvons maintenir notre niveau de vie qu’en nous assurant que les personnes du tiers monde vivent dans la pauvreté la plus abjecte. Rev. Jeremiah Wright ( janvier 2006)
Je n’ai jamais été musulman. (…) à part mon nom et le fait d’avoir vécu dans une population musulmane pendant quatre ans étant enfant [Indonésie, 1967-1971], je n’ai que très peu de lien avec la religion islamique. Barack Hussein Obama (février 2008)
Mon père était originaire du Kenya, et beaucoup de gens dans son village étaient musulmans. Il ne pratiquait pas l’islam. La vérité est qu’il n’était pas très religieux. Il a rencontré ma mère. Ma mère était une chrétienne originaire du Kansas, et ils se marièrent puis divorcèrent. Je fus élevé par ma mère. Aussi j’ai toujours été chrétien. Le seul lien que j’ai eu avec l’islam est que mon grand-père du côté de mon père venait de ce pays. Mais je n’ai jamais pratiqué l’islam. Pendant un certain temps, j’ai vécu en Indonésie parce que ma mère enseignait là-bas. Et c’est un pays musulman. Et je suis allé à l’école. Mais je ne pratiquais pas. Mais je crois que cela m’a permis de comprendre comment pensaient ces gens, qui partagent en partie ma façon de voir, et cela revient à dire que nous pouvons instaurer de meilleurs rapports avec le Moyen-Orient ; cela contribuerait à nous rendre plus assurés si nous pouvons comprendre comment ils pensent sur certains sujets. Barack Hussein Obama (Oskaloosa, Iowa, décembre 2007)
Les Etats-Unis et le monde occidental doivent apprendre à mieux connaître l’islam. D’ailleurs, si l’on compte le nombre d’Américains musulmans, on voit que les Etats-Unis sont l’un des plus grands pays musulmans de la planète. Barack Hussein Obama (entretien pour Canal +, le 2 juin 2009)
Salamm aleïkoum (…) Comme le dit le Saint Coran, « Crains Dieu et dis toujours la vérité ». (…) Cette conviction s’enracine en partie dans mon vécu. Je suis chrétien, mais mon père était issu d’une famille kényane qui compte des générations de musulmans. Enfant, j’ai passé plusieurs années en Indonésie où j’ai entendu l’appel à la prière (azan) à l’aube et au crépuscule. Jeune homme, j’ai travaillé dans des quartiers de Chicago où j’ai côtoyé beaucoup de gens qui trouvaient la dignité et la paix dans leur foi musulmane. Féru d’histoire, je sais aussi la dette que la civilisation doit à l’islam. C’est l’islam – dans des lieux tels qu’Al-Azhar –, qui a brandi le flambeau du savoir pendant de nombreux siècles et ouvert la voie à la Renaissance et au Siècle des Lumières en Europe. C’est de l’innovation au sein des communautés musulmanes – c’est de l’innovation au sein des communautés musulmanes que nous viennent l’algèbre, le compas et les outils de navigation, notre maîtrise de l’écriture et de l’imprimerie, notre compréhension des mécanismes de propagation des maladies et des moyens de les guérir. La culture islamique nous a donné la majesté des arcs et l’élan des flèches de pierre vers le ciel, l’immortalité de la poésie et l’inspiration de la musique, l’élégance de la calligraphie et la sérénité des lieux de contemplation. Et tout au long de l’histoire, l’islam a donné la preuve, en mots et en actes, des possibilités de la tolérance religieuse et de l’égalité raciale. Je sais aussi que l’islam a de tout temps fait partie de l’histoire de l’Amérique. C’est le Maroc qui fut le premier pays à reconnaître mon pays. En signant le traité de Tripoli en 1796, notre deuxième président, John Adams, nota ceci : « Les États-Unis n’ont aucun caractère hostile aux lois, à la religion ou la tranquillité des musulmans. » Depuis notre fondation, les musulmans américains enrichissent les États-Unis. Ils ont combattu dans nos guerres, servi le gouvernement, pris la défense des droits civils, créé des entreprises, enseigné dans nos universités, brillé dans le domaine des sports, remporté des prix Nobel, construit notre plus haut immeuble et allumé le flambeau olympique. Et, récemment, le premier Américain musulman qui a été élu au Congrès a fait le serment de défendre notre Constitution sur le Coran que l’un de nos Pères fondateurs, Thomas Jefferson, conservait dans sa bibliothèque personnelle. J’ai donc connu l’islam sur trois continents avant de venir dans la région où il a été révélé pour la première fois. Cette expérience guide ma conviction que le partenariat entre l’Amérique et l’islam doit se fonder sur ce qu’est l’islam, et non sur ce qu’il n’est pas, et j’estime qu’il est de mon devoir de président des États-Unis de combattre les stéréotypes négatifs de l’islam où qu’ils se manifestent. (…) bien qu’un Américain d’origine africaine et ayant pour nom Barack Hussein Obama ait pu être élu président a fait couler beaucoup d’encre. (…) En outre, la liberté en Amérique est indissociable de celle de pratiquer sa religion. C’est pour cette raison que chaque État de notre union compte au moins une mosquée et qu’on en dénombre plus de mille deux cents sur notre territoire. C’est pour cette raison que le gouvernement des États-Unis a recours aux tribunaux pour protéger le droit des femmes et des filles à porter le hijab et pour punir ceux qui leur contesteraient ce droit.  (…) Le Saint Coran nous enseigne que quiconque tue un innocent tue l’humanité tout entière, et que quiconque sauve quelqu’un, sauve l’humanité tout entière. La foi enracinée de plus d’un milliard d’habitants de la planète est tellement plus vaste que la haine étroite de quelques-uns. Quand il s’agit de combattre l’extrémisme violent, l’islam ne fait pas partie du problème – il constitue une partie importante de la marche vers la paix. (…) La liberté de religion joue un rôle crucial pour permettre aux gens de vivre en harmonie. Nous devons toujours examiner les façons dont nous la protégeons. Aux États-Unis, par exemple, les musulmans ont plus de mal à s’acquitter de l’obligation religieuse de la zakat étant donné les règles relatives aux dons de bienfaisance. C’est pour cette raison que je suis résolu à oeuvrer avec les musulmans américains pour leur permettre de s’acquitter de la zakat. De même, il importe que les pays occidentaux évitent d’empêcher les musulmans de pratiquer leur religion comme ils le souhaitent, par exemple, en dictant ce qu’une musulmane devrait porter. En un mot, nous ne pouvons pas déguiser l’hostilité envers la religion sous couvert de libéralisme. (…) La sixième question – la sixième question dont je veux parler porte sur les droits des femmes. (Applaudissements) Je sais – je sais, et vous pouvez le voir d’après ce public – que cette question suscite un sain débat. Je rejette l’opinion de certains selon laquelle une femme qui choisit de se couvrir la tête est d’une façon ou d’une autre moins égale, mais j’ai la conviction qu’une femme que l’on prive d’éducation est privée d’égalité. Et ce n’est pas une coïncidence si les pays dans lesquels les femmes reçoivent une bonne éducation connaissent bien plus probablement la prospérité. Je tiens à préciser une chose : les questions relatives à l’égalité des femmes ne sont absolument pas un sujet qui concerne uniquement l’Islam. En Turquie, au Pakistan, au Bangladesh et en Indonésie, nous avons vu des pays à majorité musulmane élire une femme à leur tête, tandis que la lutte pour l’égalité des femmes continue dans beaucoup d’aspects de la vie américaine, et dans les pays du monde entier. Je suis convaincu que nos filles peuvent offrir une contribution à la société tout aussi importante que nos fils et que notre prospérité commune sera favorisée si nous utilisons les talents de toute l’humanité, hommes et femmes. Je ne crois pas que les femmes doivent faire les mêmes choix que les hommes pour assurer leur égalité, et je respecte celles qui choisissent de suivre un rôle traditionnel. Mais cela devrait être leur choix. Barack Hussein Obama (université du Caire, 2009)
L’avenir ne doit pas appartenir à ceux qui calomnient le prophète de l’Islam. Barack Obama (ONU, New York, 26.09.12)
Quand je pense à ce garçon, je pense à mes propres enfants. Si j’avais un fils, il ressemblerait à Trayvon. Barack Hussein Obama (2012)
Quand je regarde toutes ces jeunes filles, c’est moi que je vois. Michelle Obama
Je crois qu’il voulait faire quelque chose de spectaculaire comme Trayvon Martin, il voulait relancer la guerre raciale. Joey Meek (camarade de classe de Ryann Roof)
J’ai besoin de féminisme car j’ai l’intention d’épouser quelqu’un de riche, et ça ne pourra pas se faire si ma femme et moi ne gagnons que 75 centimes pour chaque dollar gagné par un homme. Caitlyn Cannon
Je suis transracialiste. Rachel Dolezal
Le transracialisme participe de l’ordre racial. Il consiste à revendiquer une autre identité que celle à laquelle on est racialement affiliée. Sauf qu’il y a bien une hiérarchie entre ces races. Être dans une logique transracialiste, c’est chercher à échapper à l’ensemble des discriminations insupportables qui sont associées à l’identité qui nous est imposée. Cela peut se faire de manière physique (se décolorer la peau par exemple), sociale, ou comportementale.(…) Être Noir, c’est une construction culturelle. On ne se pense Noir et ne devient Noir que lors de certaines interactions. Ce n’est pas une identité génétique ça, c’est quelque chose qui s’inscrit dans les rapports sociaux. C’est pourquoi il est souvent courant que des enfants adoptés, qui ont la peau noire, et élevés par des parents blancs, se considèrent comme Blancs. Et ils ont raison, ce qui compte c’est le lien affectif qui va déterminer leur manière de s’identifier. Sauf qu’aux Etats-Unis, ces personnes sont vites rattrapées par la réalité des rapports sociaux racialisés. Et elles sont obligées de devenir noires à un moment ou à un autre. (…) C’est un cas que l’on n’avait jamais vu auparavant. Ici, la jeune femme blanche, veut être noire. Jusqu’ici, les schémas transracialistes se posaient dans le sens d’une personne de couleur noire qui désirait devenir blanche. Rachel Dolezal a été élevée dans une famille blanche avec des frères adoptés à la peau noire. On peut donc penser qu’elle a voulu ressembler à ce schéma familial. (…) Justement, elle a fini par occuper une position de pouvoir dans une organisation importante qui défend les droits des gens de couleur aux Etats-Unis (l’Association nationale pour la promotion des gens de couleur, NAACP, Ndlr.). Et malgré son histoire familiale, elle ne peut pas annuler l’asymétrie profonde dans laquelle se joue les enjeux du transracialisme. En plus, elle donne des arguments assez flous. On ne comprend pas bien pourquoi elle a fait ça si ce n’est qu’elle est dans une identification très forte à une certaine cause politique. Mais il faut comprendre que l’on n’a pas besoin d’être noire pour défendre la cause de ces personnes qui peuvent être victimes de racisme.(…) En France, on est convaincu que la race n’existe pas. Nous sommes pourtant dans des rapports sociaux racialisés. Malgré ça, personne ne peut penser ces rapports en terme racialiste. Et aux Etats-Unis, les identités racialisées sont reconnues comme telles. On parle de “races”, de “relations raciales”, et de problèmes liés aux “identités raciales”. On en parle aussi parce que ces difficultés conduisent à des assassinats et à des bavures policières contre les noirs. Margot Rousseau
Rachel Dolezal peut-elle prétendre être Noire sans avoir fait l’expérience socio-historique en lien avec les inégalités systémiques et historiquement ancrées dans le vécu des membres de la communauté afro-américaine ? Une femme noire expérimente très jeune une double oppression de race et de genre laquelle s’inscrit dans un processus de développement psychologique, moral, intellectuel et socio-économique. (…) Force est de reconnaître que même si la volonté peut être présente, il est impossible de devenir une femme noire alors que l’on est dans la vingtaine. Aussi, Dolezal est blanche au sens de son identité biologique et par le fait qu’elle a grandi, dans une famille WASP sans être en mesure de faire, dès son plus jeune âge, les mêmes expériences que les autres femmes noires de sa génération. En ce sens, Dolezal n’a pu ressentir certains des enjeux qui concourent à vouloir aspirer à cette sororité si fondamentale dans la constitution de l’identité culturelle, politique et économique si chère aux militantes afro-américaines. Cependant, que la professeure Dolezal puisse se sentir plus noire que blanche ne saurait en soi être un problème, pas plus que son mensonge n’est un crime. La difficulté réside plutôt dans ce à que quoi il a contribué c’est-à-dire à la construction d’une carrière universitaire et militante au cœur même des bastions généralement réservés aux Noirs. En tant que Professeure d’Études africaines et membres du NAACP, Dolezal est au fait de ces débats. Elle sait que dans les mouvements de luttes pour le droit des minorités culturelles ou de genre, les postes les plus avancés sont généralement réservés aux personnes qui en sont issues. C’est pourquoi comme l’a écrit un éditorialiste du Washington Post :  » Qu’une personne blanche dirige une section de la NAACP ne pose pas de problème non plus. (…) Mais qu’une personne blanche prétende être noire et dirige une section de la NAACP, c’est très problématique ». (…) Au-delà de la question identitaire, la présidence par Rachel Dolezal d’une section locale du NAACP pose donc plus fondamentalement la question de l’usurpation d’une position d’autorité et celle d’une possible récupération de la lutte par le groupe dominant. Par son mensonge, Dolezal a-t-elle contribué, bien malgré elle, au maintien de la domination blanche dans un des bastions du militantisme noir ? Comme le soulignent ses propres parents, n’aurait-elle pas été plus utile à la cause, qu’elle prétendait défendre, si elle avait milité sous couvert de sa véritable identité biologique ? Ces interrogations seront encore longtemps débattues. Agnès Berthelot Raffard
De Conchita Wurst à Laverne Cox, 2014 semble en effet bien partie pour être l’année des transgenres. “Il y a un déplacement très net des figures trans de leur lieu traditionnel l’underground, à une culture plus mainstream, note le docteur en sociologie et spécialiste de la transidentité Arnaud Alessandrin. Que ce soit dans la fiction américaine, le rap ou la mode, avec des mannequins comme Andrej Pejic ou Lea T, on remarque que de nouvelles personnalités trans apparaissent chaque mois et replacent leurs enjeux dans l’espace public.” Pour expliquer cette émergence médiatique, la plupart des observateurs évoquent la convergence de plusieurs phénomènes, au premier rang desquels l’influence exercée par les mouvements sociaux protransgenres. “Depuis quelques années, il y a eu dans toutes les grandes villes américaines une augmentation du nombre d’actions menées en faveur des trans, avec l’apparition de nouvelles formes de militantisme, explique Reina Gossett, codirectrice de l’association new-yorkaise Sylvia Rivera Law Project, qui vient en aide aux trans victimes de violences. Les médias ne pouvaient pas rester hermétiques à cette pression sociale, ils ont fini par entendre nos revendications. » Un autre facteur pourrait justifier cette nouvelle vague de visibilité trans : internet. “Avant, les transidentités se vivaient de manière confidentielle ou alors en groupe restreint, rappelle Aren Z. Aizura. L’usage des réseaux sociaux a complètement modifié le rapport des trans à leur identité ; il a permis le partage d’expériences et ainsi la banalisation de la parole, notamment chez les plus jeunes.” Ts Madison peut en témoigner. Cette transgenre male to female, actrice porno à son propre compte, s’est fait connaître début 2014 sur le réseau social Vine en publiant des vidéos de six secondes dans lesquelles elle s’affichait nue, dansant ou courant dans son jardin la bite à l’air. Devenues virales en quelques jours, les vidéos ont été parodiées et partagées par des flots d’internautes de tous âges, contribuant selon Ts Madison à “promouvoir la tolérance envers les trans”. “Internet permet de lever tous les complexes, de se montrer sans crainte, nous confie-t-elle depuis sa villa d’Atlanta. Depuis que j’ai publié mes vidéos, des gamines m’envoient des messages pour me remercier, d’autres m’interrogent sur ma transition, sur la chirurgie. Elles parlent librement. Il y a eu bien sûr des tas d’insultes, des trucs haineux, mais la plupart des gens comprennent le message. Ils ont compris ce qu’il y a de révolutionnaire à être une femme et à agiter sa bite devant une caméra.” (…) Surtout, ils se sont échappés des débats médicaux et sexuels auxquels ils ont longtemps été réduits. “Les trans ne veulent plus entendre parler de sexualité, ils se sont complètement désolidarisés de ces sujets, assure Arnaud Alessandrin. Lorsque Conchita prend la parole à l’Eurovision, elle ne pose que la question du droit : ai-je le droit d’être intégrée à une société sans être assimilée à tous ses codes ? Ai-je le droit à une vie normale sans pour autant me conformer à toutes ses normes binaires ?” Quand on interroge Ts Madison, jamais la question du sexe ne revient vraiment dans la discussion : elle dit qu’elle est simplement une femme avec une bite (elle en a même commercialisé un T-shirt : “She’s got a dick”) et n’aspire qu’à avoir les mêmes droits fondamentaux que les autres. “Les débats se sont recentrés sur des thématiques d’ordre politique ou social, résume Maxime Foerster. C’est d’ailleurs tout le sens du sous-titre de la couverture de Time, qui dit que les transgenres sont ‘la nouvelle frontière des droits civiques américains’. Maintenant que l’homosexualité est quasiment soluble dans la société hétéronormée et bourgeoise, on commence à se poser la question du droit pour les trans.” Dans la réalité, pourtant, ces questions de droits semblent loin d’être résolues. Car si les transgenres ont accédé à la visibilité, notamment aux Etats-Unis, ils tardent encore à faire leur apparition dans les agendas politiques. (…) C’est là le paradoxe de cette récente exposition médiatique, qu’Arnaud Alessandrin résume ainsi : “Une certaine frange de la transidentité, liée à la scène et aux artistes, commence à être visible. Mais le trans reste invisible dans l’espace politique. Et rien ne dit que l’arrivée de figures transgenres populaires permettra d’aller vers plus d’acceptation.” Les Inrocks
A (…) tenet of socially constructed racism and sexism is “white privilege,” which usually translates into “white male privilege,” given that women such as Hillary Clinton and Elizabeth Warren are rarely accused of being multimillionaire white elite females who won a leg up by virtue of their skin color. But if whiteness ipso facto earns one advantages over the non-white, why in the world do some elite whites choose to reconstruct their identities as non-white? Would Elizabeth Warren really have become a Harvard law professor had she not, during her long years of academic ascent, identified herself (at least privately, on universities’ pedigree forms) as a Native American? Ward Churchill, with his beads and Indian get-up, won a university career that otherwise might have been scuttled by his mediocrity, his pathological untruths, and his aberrant behavior. Why would the current head of the NAACP in Spokane, Wash., a white middle-class woman named Rachel Dolezal, go to the trouble of faking a genealogy, using skin cosmetics and hair styling, and constructing false racist enemies to ensure that she was accepted as a victimized black woman? The obvious inference is that Ms. Dolezal assumed that being a liberal black woman brought with it career opportunities in activist groups and academia otherwise beyond her reach as a middle-class white female of so-so talent. Critics will object that we are really arguing in class terms as well as racial terms: Privileged whites play on society’s innate prejudices against darker-skinned minorities by positioning themselves as light-skinned, elite people of color. (…) Suffice it to say that in our increasingly intermarried, assimilated, and integrated culture, it is often hard to ascertain someone’s exact race or ethnicity. That confusion allows identity to be massaged and reinvented. That said, it is also generally felt among elites that feigning minority status earns career advantages that outweigh the downside of being identified as non-white in the popular culture. That was certainly my impression as a professor for over 20 years in the California State University system watching dozens of upper-class Latin Americans — largely white male Argentinians, Chileans, and Brazilians — and Spaniards flock to American academia, add accents to their names, trill their R’s, and feign ethnic solidarity with their students who were of Oaxacan and Native American backgrounds. Poor George Zimmerman. His last name stereotyped him as some sort of Germanic gun nut. But had he just ethnicized his maternal half-Afro Peruvian identity and reemerged as Jorgé Mesa, Zimmerman would have largely escaped charges of racism. He should have taken a cue from Barack Obama, who sometime in his late teens at Occidental College discovered that the exotic nomenclature of Barack Obama radiated a minority edge, in a way that the name of his alter ego, Barry Soetoro, apparently never quite had. If, in America’s racist past, majority culture once jealously protected its white privilege by one-drop-of-blood racial distinctions, postmodern America has now come full circle and done the same in reverse — because the construction of minority identity, in all its varying degrees, is easily possible and, in ironic fashion, now brings with it particular elite career advantages. (…) The CEOs in the industries of sexism and classism are for the most part wealthy and privileged — and their targets are usually of the middle class. When Michelle Obama labors to remind her young African-American audiences of all the stares and second looks she imagines she still receives as First Lady, she is reconstructing a racial identity to balance the enormous privilege she enjoys as a jumbo-jet-setting grandee who junkets to the world’s toniest resorts with regularity. The 2016 version of Hillary Clinton is, at least for a few months, a feminist populist, and has become so merely by mouthing a few banal talking points. Apparently the downside for Hillary of being a woman is not trumped by the facts of being a multimillionaire insider and former secretary of state, wife to a multimillionaire ex-president, mother of a multimillionaire, and mother-in-law to a multimillionaire hedge-fund director. Hillary can become a perpetual constructed victim, denied the good life that is enjoyed by a white male bus driver in Bakersfield making $40,000 a year. (…) sexism and racism are abstractions of the liberal elite that rarely translate into praxis. Barack Obama could have done symbolic wonders for the public schools by taking his kids out of Sidwell Friends and putting them into the D.C. school system. Elizabeth Warren could have cemented her feminist populist fides by vowing to stop flipping houses. Feminist Bill Clinton could have renounced all affairs with female subordinates. Eric Holder could have vowed never to use government jets to take his kids to horse races. In solidarity with co-eds struggling with student loans, Hillary Clinton could have promised to limit her university speaking fees to a thousand dollars per minute rather than the ten thousand dollars for each 60 seconds of chatting that she actually gets, and she might have prefaced her public attacks on hedge funds by dressing down her son-in-law. Surely the lords of Silicon Valley might have promised to keep their kids in the public schools, and funded scholarships to allow minorities to flood Sacred Heart and the Menlo School. Victor Davis Hanson
Reading Oren’s new memoir Ally, it’s clear that Israel has been on her own since the day Obama took office (…) For the last six and a half years the president of the United States has treated the home of the Jewish people more like a rogue nation standing in the way of peace than a longtime democratic ally. Now the alliance is “in tatters.” (…) “The Obama administration was problematic because of its worldview: Unprecedented support for the Palestinians,” he told Israeli journalist David Horovitz, another centrist, this week. Obama and his lieutenants, including Hillary Clinton, have often behaved as if the Palestinians don’t exist – Palestinian actions, corruption, incitement, campaigns of de-legitimization and terrorism are overlooked, excused, accommodated. Oren tells the story of what happened when Vice President Joe Biden asked Palestinian president Mahmoud Abbas to “look him in the eye and promise that he could make peace with Israel.” Abbas looked away. The White House did nothing. It was Israel that had to agree to a settlement freeze before the latest doomed attempt at peace negotiations; Israel that had to apologize for possible “mistakes” against the Gaza flotilla; Israel that had to close Ben Gurion airport; Israel that faced a “reevaluation” of her diplomatic status after Bibi’s reelection. Obama addresses the bulk of his lectures on good governance and democracy and humanitarianism not to the gang that runs the West Bank, nor to the terrorists who rule Gaza, but to Israel. During last year’s Gaza war, the State Department was “appalled” by civilian casualties inflated and trumpeted by Hamas propagandists. Oren points out that in the past the president had used the word “appalling” to describe the atrocities of Moammar Qaddafi. Qaddafi and the IDF – two peas in a pod, according to this White House. (…) America, he says, provided a “Diplomatic Iron Dome” that shielded Israel from anti-Semites in Europe, at the U.N., and abroad whose goal is to delegitimize the Jewish State and undermine her economically. This rhetorical missile shield is slowly being retracted. The administration threatens not to veto anti-Israel U.N. initiatives, Europe is aligning with the Boycott Divestment Sanctions (BDS) movement, and anti-Israel activism festers on U.S. campuses. Obama’s unending criticism of Israel, and background quotes calling Israel’s prime minister a “chicken-shit” and a “coward,” provide an opening for radicals to go even further. (…)  Fixated on striking a deal, Obama is preparing to concede the longstanding demand that Iran disclose its past nuclear-weapons research, is ignoring the issue of Iranian missile development, and is standing idle as Iran props up Assad, arms Hezbollah with rockets, and promotes sectarianism in Iraq. Israel is hemmed in – by Iranian proxies and Sunni militants on its borders, by the threat of a third intifada on the West Bank, by global nongovernmental organizations, by a condescending, flippant, and bullying U.S. president whose default emotional state is pique. Matthew Continetti
In addition to its academic and international affairs origins, Obama’s attitudes toward Islam clearly stem from his personal interactions with Muslims. These were described in depth in his candid memoir, Dreams from My Father , published 13 years before his election as president. Obama wrote passionately of the Kenyan villages where, after many years of dislocation, he felt most at home and of his childhood experiences in Indonesia. I could imagine how a child raised by a Christian mother might see himself as a natural bridge between her two Muslim husbands. I could also speculate how that child’s abandonment by those men could lead him, many years later, to seek acceptance by their co-religionists. Yet, tragically perhaps, Obama — and his outreach to the Muslim world — would not be accepted. With the outbreak of the Arab Spring, the vision of a United States at peace with the Muslim Middle East was supplanted by a patchwork of policies — military intervention in Libya, aerial bombing in Iraq, indifference to Syria, and entanglement with Egypt. Drone strikes, many of them personally approved by the president, killed hundreds of terrorists, but also untold numbers of civilians. Indeed, the killing of a Muslim — Osama bin Laden — rather than reconciling with one, remains one of Obama’s most memorable achievements. Diplomatically, too, Obama’s outreach to Muslims was largely rebuffed. During his term in office, support for America among the peoples of the Middle East — and especially among Turks and Palestinians — reached an all-time nadir . Back in 2007, President Bush succeeded in convening Israeli and Arab leaders, together with the representatives of some 40 states, at the Annapolis peace conference. In May 2015, Obama had difficulty convincing several Arab leaders to attend a Camp David summit on the Iranian issue. The president who pledged to bring Arabs and Israelis together ultimately did so not through peace, but out of their common anxiety over his support for the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt and his determination to reach a nuclear accord with Iran. Only Iran, in fact, still holds out the promise of sustaining Obama’s initial hopes for a fresh start with Muslims. “[I]f we were able to get Iran to operate in a responsible fashion,” he told the New Yorker, “you could see an equilibrium developing between [it and] Sunni … Gulf states.” The assumption that a nuclear deal with Iran will render it “a very successful regional power” capable of healing, rather than inflaming, historic schisms remained central to Obama’s thinking. That assumption was scarcely shared by Sunni Muslims, many of whom watched with deep concern at what they perceived as an emerging U.S.-Iranian alliance. Six years after offering to “extend a hand if you are willing to unclench your fist,” President Obama has seen that hand repeatedly shunned by Muslims. His speeches no longer recall his Muslim family members, and only his detractors now mention his middle name. And yet, to a remarkable extent, his policies remain unchanged. He still argues forcibly for the right of Muslim women to wear — rather than refuse to wear — the veil and insists on calling “violent extremists” those who kill in Islam’s name. “All of us have a responsibility to refute the notion that groups like ISIL somehow represent Islam,” he declared in February, using an acronym for the Islamic State. The term “Muslim world” is still part of his vocabulary. Historians will likely look back at Obama’s policy toward Islam with a combination of curiosity and incredulousness. While some may credit the president for his good intentions, others might fault him for being naïve and detached from a complex and increasingly lethal reality. For the Middle East continues to fracture and pose multiple threats to America and its allies. Even if he succeeds in concluding a nuclear deal with Iran, the expansion of the Islamic State and other jihadi movements will underscore the failure of Obama’s outreach to Muslims. The need to engage them — militarily, culturally, philanthropically, and even theologically — will meanwhile mount. The president’s successor, whether Democrat or Republican, will have to grapple with that reality from the moment she or he enters the White House. The first decision should be to recognize that those who kill in Islam’s name are not mere violent extremists but fanatics driven by a specific religion’s zeal. And their victims are anything but random. Michael Oren

Après le mariage, le genre et la race, l’orientation musulmane pour tous !

Rappel incessant de ses racines familiales et de son enfance passée dans des pays musulmans, amitiés de 20 ans entre le révérend Jeremiah Wright et l’universitaire palestino-américain Edward Saïd avec les pires dénonciateurs de l’Amérique, hommages appuyés aux apports de la culture musulmane, appels répétés à la coopération avec le Monde dit musulman, soutien fidèle aux frères musulmans égyptiens, refus farouche de prononcer même l’origine religieuse de ceux qui appellent au djihad contre son propre pays, volonté d’accord à tout prix avec les premiers commanditaires du terrorisme mondial pour leur quête de l’arme nucléaire, absences remarquées à la Marche parisienne du 11 janvier comme au 70e anniversaire de la libération d’Auschwitz, critique systématique de la politique comme des dirigeants israéliens, évocation permanente des péchés contre l’islam de son prédécesseur et de son propre pays, défense du voile islamique, dénonciation de tous ceux qui insultent l’islam, hyper-discrétion dans sa politique d’élimination ciblée des djihadistes …

En ces temps étranges …

Où, après en avoir bien attisé les flammes, le pompier-pyromane de la Maison Blanche qui, entre un 9 trous de golf et une élimination ciblée par drone et après 20 ans de sermons du révérend Jeremiah Wright, se prenait pour le père de Trayvon Martin dénonce un véritable acte de terrorisme  racial

Et où, après avoir soutenu avec le succès que l’on sait la cause des écolières nigérianes enlevées par Boko Haram, la femme du dudit premier président postracial vient elle aussi défendre, entre tasse de thé princière et shopping jet-set, la cause des jeunes filles voilées

Où,  pour lancer la nouvelle émission de télé-réalité d’un ancien champion olympique transgenre, nos médias nous présente la transidentité comme la « dernière frontière des droits civiques »  …

Où la citation « géniale » d’une lycéenne lesbienne affichant son rêve de faire un mariage riche mais bien sûr de même sexe lui vaut l’admiration des internautes …

Pendant que nos ambassades servent à la propagande de la cause homosexuelle et qu’après l’histoire (ou les noms d’oiseaux: neuf mois de prison ferme, excusez du peu, pour avoir comparé une ministre à un primate !), c’est désormais l’origine de la vie qui se décide dans les prétoires ou au vote majoritaire

Et que de l’autre côté de l’Atlantique, on peut se prendre ..

Comment ne pas voir …

Avec l’aveu forcé la semaine dernière …

De cette professeur d’études afro-américaines et présidente de la NAACP de l’état de Washington …

Qui, par hyper-identification à la cause, s’était littéralement inventée une origine noire, agressions racistes comprises, pendant 20 ans …

Une nouvelle illustration de ce « monde moderne rempli d’idées chrétiennes devenues folles » prophétisé par Chesterton dès le début du siècle dernier ?

Mais surtout comment ne pas comprendre enfin …

Avec la magistrale démonstration de l’ancien ambassadeur israélien aux Etats-Unis Michael Oren …

La jusqu’ici déroutante politique étrangère du premier président américain… transmusulman ?

How Obama Opened His Heart to the ‘Muslim World’ And got it stomped on. Israel’s former ambassador to the United States on the president’s naiveté as peacemaker, blinders to terrorism, and alienation of allies. Michael Oren Foreign policy June 19, 2015

Days after jihadi gunmen slaughtered 11 staffers of the Charlie Hebdo magazine and a policeman on January 7, hundreds of thousands of French people marched in solidarity against Islamic radicalism. Forty-four world leaders joined them, but not President Barack Obama. Neither did his attorney general at the time, Eric Holder, or Homeland Security Deputy Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas, both of whom were in Paris that day. Other terrorists went on to murder four French Jews in a kosher market that they deliberately targeted. Yet Obama described the killers as “vicious zealots who … randomly shoot a bunch of folks in a deli.”

Pressed about the absence of a high-ranking American official at the Paris march, the White House responded by convening a long-delayed convention on “countering violent extremism.” And when reminded that one of the gunmen boasted that he intended to kill Jews, presidential Press Secretary Josh Earnest explained that the victims died “not because of who they were, but because of where they randomly happened to be.”

Obama’s boycotting of the memorial in Paris, like his refusal to acknowledge the identity of the perpetrators, the victims, or even the location of the market massacre, provides a broad window into his thinking on Islam and the Middle East. Simply put: The president could not participate in a protest against Muslim radicals whose motivations he sees as a distortion, rather than a radical interpretation, of Islam. And if there are no terrorists spurred by Islam, there can be no purposely selected Jewish shop or intended Jewish victims, only a deli and randomly present folks.

Understanding Obama’s worldview was crucial to my job as Israel’s ambassador to the United States. Right after entering office in June 2009, I devoted months to studying the new president, poring over his speeches, interviews, press releases, and memoirs, and meeting with many of his friends and supporters. The purpose of this self-taught course — Obama 101, I called it — was to get to the point where the president could no longer surprise me. And over the next four years I rarely was, especially on Muslim and Middle Eastern issues.

“To the Muslim world, we seek a new way forward based on mutual interest and mutual respect,” Obama declared in his first inaugural address. The underlying assumption was that America’s previous relations with Muslims were characterized by dissention and contempt. More significant, though, was the president’s use of the term “Muslim world,” a rough translation of the Arabic ummah. A concept developed by classical Islam, ummah refers to a community of believers that transcends borders, cultures, and nationalities. Obama not only believed that such a community existed but that he could address and accommodate it.

The novelty of this approach was surpassed only by Obama’s claim that he, personally, represented the bridge between this Muslim world and the West. Throughout the presidential campaign, he repeatedly referred to his Muslim family members, his earlier ties to Indonesia and the Muslim villages of Kenya, and his Arabic first and middle names. Surveys taken shortly after his election indicated that nearly a quarter of Americans thought their president was a Muslim.

This did not deter him from actively pursuing his bridging role. Reconciling with the Muslim world was the theme of the president’s first television interview — with Dubai’s Al Arabiya — and his first speech abroad. “The United States is not, and will never be, at war with Islam,” he told the Turkish Parliament in April 2009. “America’s relationship with the Muslim community … cannot, and will not, just be based upon opposition to terrorism.… We seek broader engagement based on mutual interest and mutual respect. We will convey our deep appreciation for the Islamic faith.” But the fullest exposition of Obama’s attitude toward Islam, and his personal role in assuaging its adherents, came three months later in Cairo.

Billed by the White House as “President Obama Speaks to the Muslim World,” the speech was delivered to a hall of carefully selected Egyptian students. But the message was not aimed at them or even at the people of Egypt, but rather at all Muslims. “America and Islam are not exclusive,” the president determined. “[They] share … common principles — principles of justice and progress, tolerance, and the dignity of all human beings.”

With multiple quotes from the Quran — each enthusiastically applauded — the president praised Islam’s accomplishments and listed colonialism, the Cold War, and modernity among the reasons for friction between Muslims and the West.

With multiple quotes from the Quran — each enthusiastically applauded — the president praised Islam’s accomplishments and listed colonialism, the Cold War, and modernity among the reasons for friction between Muslims and the West. “Violent extremists have exploited these tensions in a small but potent minority of Muslims,” he explained, in the only reference to the religious motivation of most terrorists. And he again cited his personal ties with Islam which, he said, “I have known Islam on three continents before coming to the region where it was first revealed.”

These pronouncements presaged what was, in fact, a profound recasting of U.S. policy. While reiterating America’s support for Israel’s security, Obama stridently criticized its settlement policy in the West Bank and endorsed the Palestinian claim to statehood. He also recognized Iran’s right to enrich uranium for peaceful purposes, upheld the principle of nonproliferation, and rejected former President George W. Bush’s policy of promoting American-style democracy in the Middle East. “No single nation should pick and choose which nations hold nuclear weapons,” he said. “No system of government can or should be imposed upon one nation by any other.” In essence, Obama offered a new deal in which the United States would respect popularly chosen Muslim leaders who were authentically rooted in their traditions and willing to engage with the West.

The Cairo speech was revolutionary. In the past, Western leaders had addressed the followers of Islam — Napoleon in invading Egypt in 1798 and Kaiser Wilhelm II while visiting Damascus a century later — but never before had an American president. Indeed, no president had ever spoken to adherents of a world faith, whether Catholics or Buddhists, and in a city they traditionally venerated. More significantly, the Cairo speech, twice as long as his inaugural address, served as the foundational document of Obama’s policy toward Muslims.

Whenever Israeli leaders were perplexed by the administration’s decision to restore diplomatic ties with Syria — severed by Bush after the assassination of Lebanese president Rafik Hariri — or its early outreach to Libya and Iran, I would always refer them to that text. When policymakers back home failed to understand why Obama stood by Turkish strongman Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who imprisoned journalists and backed Islamic radicals, or Mohamed Morsi, a leading member of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt and briefly its president, I would invariably say: “Go back to the speech.” Erdogan and Morsi were both devout Muslims, democratically elected, and accepting of Obama’s outstretched hand. So, too, was Hassan Rouhani, who became Obama’s partner in seeking a negotiated settlement of the Iranian nuclear dispute.

How did the president arrive at his unique approach to Islam? The question became central to my research for Obama 101. One answer lies in the universities in which he studied and taught — Columbia, Harvard, and the University of Chicago — and where such ideas were long popular. Many of them could be traced to Orientalism, Edward Said’s scathing critique of Middle East studies, and subsequent articles in which he insisted that all scholars of the region be “genuinely engaged and sympathetic … to the Islamic world.” Published in 1978, Orientalism became the single most influential book in American humanities. As a visiting lecturer in the United States starting in the 1980s, I saw how Said’s work influenced not only Middle East studies but became a mainstay of syllabi for courses ranging from French colonial literature to Italian-African history. The notion that Islam was a uniform, universal entity with which the West must peacefully engage became widespread on American campuses and eventually penetrated the policymaking community. One of the primary texts in my Obama 101 course was the 2008 monograph, “Strategic Leadership: Framework for a 21st Century National Security Strategy,” written by foreign-relations experts, many of whom would soon hold senior positions in the new administration. While striving to place its relations with the Middle East on a new basis, the authors advised, America must seek “improved relations with more moderate elements of political Islam” and adapt “a narrative of pride in the achievements of Islam.”

In addition to its academic and international affairs origins, Obama’s attitudes toward Islam clearly stem from his personal interactions with Muslims. These were described in depth in his candid memoir, Dreams from My Father, published 13 years before his election as president. Obama wrote passionately of the Kenyan villages where, after many years of dislocation, he felt most at home and of his childhood experiences in Indonesia. I could imagine how a child raised by a Christian mother might see himself as a natural bridge between her two Muslim husbands. I could also speculate how that child’s abandonment by those men could lead him, many years later, to seek acceptance by their co-religionists.

Yet, tragically perhaps, Obama — and his outreach to the Muslim world — would not be accepted. With the outbreak of the Arab Spring, the vision of a United States at peace with the Muslim Middle East was supplanted by a patchwork of policies — military intervention in Libya, aerial bombing in Iraq, indifference to Syria, and entanglement with Egypt. Drone strikes, many of them personally approved by the president, killed hundreds of terrorists, but also untold numbers of civilians. Indeed, the killing of a Muslim — Osama bin Laden — rather than reconciling with one, remains one of Obama’s most memorable achievements.

Diplomatically, too, Obama’s outreach to Muslims was largely rebuffed. During his term in office, support for America among the peoples of the Middle East — and especially among Turks and Palestinians — reached an all-time nadir. Back in 2007, President Bush succeeded in convening Israeli and Arab leaders, together with the representatives of some 40 states, at the Annapolis peace conference. In May 2015, Obama had difficulty convincing several Arab leaders to attend a Camp David summit on the Iranian issue. The president who pledged to bring Arabs and Israelis together ultimately did so not through peace, but out of their common anxiety over his support for the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt and his determination to reach a nuclear accord with Iran.

Only Iran, in fact, still holds out the promise of sustaining Obama’s initial hopes for a fresh start with Muslims. “[I]f we were able to get Iran to operate in a responsible fashion,” he told the New Yorker, “you could see an equilibrium developing between [it and] Sunni … Gulf states.” The assumption that a nuclear deal with Iran will render it “a very successful regional power” capable of healing, rather than inflaming, historic schisms remained central to Obama’s thinking. That assumption was scarcely shared by Sunni Muslims, many of whom watched with deep concern at what they perceived as an emerging U.S.-Iranian alliance.

Six years after offering to “extend a hand if you are willing to unclench your fist,” President Obama has seen that hand repeatedly shunned by Muslims. His speeches no longer recall his Muslim family members, and only his detractors now mention his middle name. And yet, to a remarkable extent, his policies remain unchanged. He still argues forcibly for the right of Muslim women to wear — rather than refuse to wear — the veil and insists on calling “violent extremists” those who kill in Islam’s name. “All of us have a responsibility to refute the notion that groups like ISIL somehow represent Islam,” he declared in February, using an acronym for the Islamic State. The term “Muslim world” is still part of his vocabulary.

Historians will likely look back at Obama’s policy toward Islam with a combination of curiosity and incredulousness. While some may credit the president for his good intentions, others might fault him for being naïve and detached from a complex and increasingly lethal reality. For the Middle East continues to fracture and pose multiple threats to America and its allies. Even if he succeeds in concluding a nuclear deal with Iran, the expansion of the Islamic State and other jihadi movements will underscore the failure of Obama’s outreach to Muslims. The need to engage them — militarily, culturally, philanthropically, and even theologically — will meanwhile mount. The president’s successor, whether Democrat or Republican, will have to grapple with that reality from the moment she or he enters the White House. The first decision should be to recognize that those who kill in Islam’s name are not mere violent extremists but fanatics driven by a specific religion’s zeal. And their victims are anything but random.

Voir aussi:

If Race and Gender Are Social Constructs, Why Not Sexual Orientation?

Maggie Gallagher

National Review

June 19, 2015

By some mysterious providence, three things happened in the past few weeks: Rachel Dolezal was outed as a white woman. Bruce Jenner was lauded as a white woman. And in a New Jersey consumer-fraud case against JONAH (Jews Offering New Alternatives for Healing), the Southern Poverty Law Center has spent millions to deprive any future New Jerseyans of the basic right even to try to change their sexual orientation.

“I felt very isolated with my identity virtually my entire life, that nobody really got it and that I really didn’t have the personal agency to express it,” Dolezal told NBC. “I kind of imagined that maybe at some point [I’d have to] own it publicly and discuss this kind of complexity.”

Nick Adams, a spokesman for GLAAD, went so far as to say that Bruce Jenner never really existed: The world “can now see what Caitlyn Jenner has always known, that she is — and always has been — a woman.”

“This case is about exposing the lie that LGBT people are mentally ill and that they need to be cured,” said David Dinielli, SPLC deputy legal director. “Groups like JONAH should not be allowed to use bogus therapy, based on junk science, to scam LGBT people and their families out of thousands of dollars.”

Together they lay down the new moral rules: Apparently, you can change your racial identity, but if you do, you are lying. You can dress up as a woman on the cover of Vanity Fair, and everyone must believe that you are in fact female. But when it comes to sexual orientation, even the attempt to change your identity or behavior must be viewed as an imposition against the laws of nature, if not nature’s God.

It is ironic, of course, because of these three things, science tells us clearly: race in America is a social construct with a biological basis. Most African Americans are biracial, and it is the old Southern patriarch’s desire to enslave his own children that led to the idea that, say, President Obama is black not white (or, rather, both black and white, being his mother’s child as much as his father’s).

Gender is a real biological category found in every human culture, around which society constructs a great deal.

As for sexual orientation? Even the expert witnesses hired by the Southern Poverty Law Center concede that the origin of sexual desire is a mystery, and that being gay or lesbian (as an identity) is, in fact, a choice.

Here is Chuck LiMandri, founder of the Freedom of Conscience Defense Fund, cross-examining SPLC’s expert witness Lee Beckstead a few days ago:

LiMandri: Would you agree, Doctor, that sexual-orientation identity is a socially constructed label?

Beckstead: The identity is?

LiMandri. Yes.

Beckstead: Definitely.

LiMandri: So whether you call yourself gay or straight, that is a social construct?

Beckstead: It’s how you think about your attractions and how you feel about them and which membership, which groups you feel affinity towards.

Non-heterosexuals experience a variety of identity changes, sometimes toward homosexuality and sometimes away from it. Religious people, Dr. Beckstead agrees, have a right to seek therapeutic help to live their lives according to their religious values. He has even had clients of his go to an LDS-affiliated group similar to JONAH without warning them it was harmful snake oil. He estimates that 30 to 40 percent of his clients, despite same-sex attraction, choose to live as Mormons, whether that is in marriages to the opposite sex or living a celibate life. Surely this is not impossible.

I do not know if JONAH’s success rate in helping religious believers with same-sex attraction lead lives that accord with their religious identity is as high as Beckstead’s. From the transcripts, it appears that the judge in this case forbade anyone to present evidence of efficacy rates. He seems to have mistaken the idea that homosexuality is a “mental illness” with the idea that scientific evidence shows some people can change. Sexual-orientation-change therapy need not be premised on the idea that being gay is a mental disorder at all.

As Dr. Beckstead, the SPLC’s own expert, agreed this week in the courtroom:

LiMandri: When you stated in your article, Doctor: “Findings from the current model also confirm those from Yarhouse and Tan, who investigated the experiences of highly religious individuals who either identified with or disidentified from an LGB identity. As Yarhouse and Tan concluded, the most important aspect for same-sex-attracted, religious individual may not be whether that person pursues a particular path of identity synthesis but whether that person’s identity development process is congruent with her or his valuative framework.” In other words, if I understand it, what is important is whether they can bring their sexual identity into conformity with their religious values?

Beckstead: Congruence is very important for mental health.

Each of the plaintiffs in this case was recruited by the SPLC as part of a campaign to shut down choices for people across the country.

Does truth matter anymore? Each of these plaintiffs signed a consent form acknowledging that many consider sexual-orientation-change efforts controversial and that gay-affirmative therapy is available. They initialed the part where they were told no results could be guaranteed. Dr. Arthur Goldberg, after many years of working with Orthodox Jewish men and others who wish to marry women and live according to religious values, guestimates that only one-third achieve their stated goals completely. The weekend retreats incorporate some bizarre elements, but nothing stranger than the Esalen Institute and other hippie happenings in the 1970s did. If clients were paying money for a nude drum circle to release their chakra energy, nobody would be suing them. It is the attempt to live a Torah-observant or Biblical life that is intolerable to the SPLC and must be shut down.

As Dr. Nicholas Cummings, one of the expert witnesses who is not permitted by the judge to testify, wrote in USA Today:

Gays and lesbians have the right to be affirmed in their homosexuality. That’s why, as a member of the APA Council of Representatives in 1975, I sponsored the resolution by which the APA stated that homosexuality is not a mental disorder and, in 1976, the resolution, which passed the council unanimously, that gays and lesbians should not be discriminated against in the workplace.

But contending that all same-sex attraction is immutable is a distortion of reality. Attempting to characterize all sexual reorientation therapy as “unethical” violates patient choice and gives an outside party a veto over patients’ goals for their own treatment. A political agenda shouldn’t prevent gays and lesbians who desire to change from making their own decisions.

Whatever the situation at an individual clinic, accusing professionals from across the country who provide treatment for fully informed persons seeking to change their sexual orientation of perpetrating a fraud serves only to stigmatize the professional and shame the patient.

Our strange new public morality has to have a place for more than one kind of sexual minority group. Americans who believe it is wrong to have sex outside marriage between a man and a woman have rights, too. —

Maggie Gallagher is a senior fellow at the American Principles Project and chairman of the Freedom of Conscience Defense Fund. She blogs at MaggieGallagher.com.

Voir aussi:

Comment la révolution transgenre s’est mise en marche Les Inrocks

21/09/2014

A l’Eurovision, dans les médias mainstream, sur internet, et même au Vatican, les transgenres sont au cœur de l’actualité en 2014. Raisons et limites de cette récente visibilité.

Le 10 mai 2014, soir de finale. Dans le complexe industriel de la B&W Hallerne à Copenhague, où se tient la 59e édition du concours de l’Eurovision, le futur gagnant s’apprête à monter sur scène. A moins que ce ne soit une gagnante. Voix de diva, cheveux longs, boucles d’oreille, faux cils, robe pailletée et barbe de trois jours : la candidate qui s’époumone sur Rise Like a Phoenix brouille les frontières du genre et envoie un signal de modernité au cœur du télé-crochet le plus ringard du monde. Elle s’appelle Conchita Wurst et va être sacrée, cette nuit, de la plus haute distinction de l’Eurovision, après des années d’insuccès, de petites galères et de chant dans les cabarets de Vienne.

Né il y a vingt-cinq ans sous le nom de Thomas Neuwirth, ce travesti hyperglamour, homosexuel et militant du cross dressing, a été choisi pour représenter l’Autriche au prix de nombreuses polémiques alimentées par les mouvements d’extrême droite et par certains membres de la communauté LGBT où son côté show-off ne fait pas l’unanimité. Le soir de sa victoire, celle qui est devenue entretemps l’égérie de Jean Paul Gaultier, pour qui elle a défilé lors de la dernière fashion week, aura fait taire momentanément les débats en dédiant son prix “à tous ceux qui croient à un avenir qui se construira grâce à la paix et à la liberté”, ajoutant que “l’Eurovision est un projet qui célèbre la tolérance, l’acceptation et l’amour”.

Quelques jours plus tard, de l’autre côté de l’Atlantique, un événement similaire allait bouleverser une autre vieille institution médiatique. Dans son édition du 9 juin, Time offrait sa couverture pour la première fois de son histoire à une personnalité transgenre, Laverne Cox. L’actrice trentenaire, révélée par son rôle dans la série de Netflix, Orange Is the New Black, qui raconte le quotidien d’une prison pour femmes, s’affiche en robe de gala à la une de l’hebdomadaire, accompagnée d’un titre à vocation de manifeste: “The transgender tipping point” (“Le point de bascule pour les transgenres”). Sur sa page Facebook, la comédienne commente cette opération médiatique : “Je réalise que tout cela dépasse largement mon propre cas et que nous entrons dans une phase de changement dans l’histoire de notre nation, où il n’est plus acceptable pour les trans de vivre stigmatisés, ridiculisés, criminalisés et méconnus.” Là encore, la couverture de Time a provoqué son lot de polémiques, s’attirant les foudres des commentateurs de la droite dure américaine, mais qu’importe : “La révolution transgenre est en marche”, nous assure Aren Z. Aizura, l’une des figures montantes des recherches sur les théories du genre et corédacteur en chef de la revue The Transgender Studies Reader 2.

“Il y a une prise de conscience dans les médias à propos de la question trans, qui accède enfin à une nouvelle visibilité, annonce-t-il.

Un nouveau sujet mainstream

De Conchita Wurst à Laverne Cox, 2014 semble en effet bien partie pour être l’année des transgenres. “Il y a un déplacement très net des figures trans de leur lieu traditionnel l’underground, à une culture plus mainstream, note le docteur en sociologie et spécialiste de la transidentité Arnaud Alessandrin. Que ce soit dans la fiction américaine, le rap ou la mode, avec des mannequins comme Andrej Pejic ou Lea T, on remarque que de nouvelles personnalités trans apparaissent chaque mois et replacent leurs enjeux dans l’espace public.” Pour expliquer cette émergence médiatique, la plupart des observateurs évoquent la convergence de plusieurs phénomènes, au premier rang desquels l’influence exercée par les mouvements sociaux protransgenres. “Depuis quelques années, il y a eu dans toutes les grandes villes américaines une augmentation du nombre d’actions menées en faveur des trans, avec l’apparition de nouvelles formes de militantisme, explique Reina Gossett, codirectrice de l’association new-yorkaise Sylvia Rivera Law Project, qui vient en aide aux trans victimes de violences. Les médias ne pouvaient pas rester hermétiques à cette pression sociale, ils ont fini par entendre nos revendications.”

Un autre facteur pourrait justifier cette nouvelle vague de visibilité trans : internet. “Avant, les transidentités se vivaient de manière confidentielle ou alors en groupe restreint, rappelle Aren Z. Aizura. L’usage des réseaux sociaux a complètement modifié le rapport des trans à leur identité ; il a permis le partage d’expériences et ainsi la banalisation de la parole, notamment chez les plus jeunes.” Ts Madison peut en témoigner. Cette transgenre male to female, actrice porno à son propre compte, s’est fait connaître début 2014 sur le réseau social Vine en publiant des vidéos de six secondes dans lesquelles elle s’affichait nue, dansant ou courant dans son jardin la bite à l’air. Devenues virales en quelques jours, les vidéos ont été parodiées et partagées par des flots d’internautes de tous âges, contribuant selon Ts Madison à “promouvoir la tolérance envers les trans”.

“Internet permet de lever tous les complexes, de se montrer sans crainte, nous confie-t-elle depuis sa villa d’Atlanta. Depuis que j’ai publié mes vidéos, des gamines m’envoient des messages pour me remercier, d’autres m’interrogent sur ma transition, sur la chirurgie. Elles parlent librement. Il y a eu bien sûr des tas d’insultes, des trucs haineux, mais la plupart des gens comprennent le message. Ils ont compris ce qu’il y a de révolutionnaire à être une femme et à agiter sa bite devant une caméra.”

A l’Eurovision, dans les médias mainstream ou sur le net, les transgenres s’affichent partout depuis quelque temps, et parfois là où on les attend le moins. En avril 2013, un site américain spécialisé dans les news sur le téléchargement, TorrentFreak, avait analysé les fichiers informatiques du Vatican et les résultats furent assez surprenants : on y découvrait que l’Etat de la papauté téléchargeait en boucle des pornos transgenres, avec une préférence pour les films de l’actrice Tiffany Starr, un male to female habitué au X hardcore. “Au départ, j’ai été choquée d’apprendre ça. Il y a quand même une injustice dans le fait que des opposants déclarés aux trans délirent secrètement sur vous”, raconte-t-elle, qui préfère aujourd’hui voir dans cette révélation le premier signe possible d’un changement de mentalité. “Dévoiler les fantasmes est un bon point de départ pour lutter contre les discriminations”, ajoute-t-elle, avant de lancer un clin d’œil : “J’ai d’ailleurs reçu beaucoup de messages de soutien de la part de catholiques.”

L’empowerment des trans

Pour la plupart des observateurs, ce n’est pas tant cette nouvelle visibilité qui compte, mais plutôt les changements de discours sur les transgenres. Avec l’émergence de personnalités comme Laverne Cox apparaissent aussi de nouvelles manières de parler de transidentité, plus libérées et réalistes. “Le vrai point déterminant est qu’il y a un changement de storytelling dans les médias, où on a modifié nos perceptions de la question trans, confirme Vincent Paolo Villano, directeur de la communication de l’une des plus puissantes associations LGBT américaines, le National Center for Transgender Equality. Il y a encore quelques années, les seuls transgenres que vous pouviez voir dans les médias étaient des malades, des victimes de violences, des prostitués. On commence enfin à sortir de ce prisme négatif grâce à des personnes comme Laverne Cox, qui sont des femmes plus indépendantes, qui ont du pouvoir.”

Dédramatisée, la figure des transgenres serait aussi en voie de normalisation dans les médias selon Maxime Foerster, auteur d’une Histoire des transsexuels en France :

“Il y a surtout, dans les pays anglo-saxons, de nouveaux modèles de représentation qui émergent, et qui sont moins dans le domaine de l’exotisme, explique-t-il. Des transgenres femmes d’affaires apparaissent par exemple, des femmes fortunées, qui n’ont rien à voir avec les vieux clichés de chanteuses de cabaret ou de muses d’artistes. Il est encore trop tôt pour en juger, mais il semble que les trans maîtrisent de plus en plus leur image.”

Surtout, ils se sont échappés des débats médicaux et sexuels auxquels ils ont longtemps été réduits. “Les trans ne veulent plus entendre parler de sexualité, ils se sont complètement désolidarisés de ces sujets, assure Arnaud Alessandrin. Lorsque Conchita prend la parole à l’Eurovision, elle ne pose que la question du droit : ai-je le droit d’être intégrée à une société sans être assimilée à tous ses codes ? Ai-je le droit à une vie normale sans pour autant me conformer à toutes ses normes binaires ?” Quand on interroge Ts Madison, jamais la question du sexe ne revient vraiment dans la discussion : elle dit qu’elle est simplement une femme avec une bite (elle en a même commercialisé un T-shirt : “She’s got a dick”) et n’aspire qu’à avoir les mêmes droits fondamentaux que les autres. “Les débats se sont recentrés sur des thématiques d’ordre politique ou social, résume Maxime Foerster. C’est d’ailleurs tout le sens du sous-titre de la couverture de Time, qui dit que les transgenres sont ‘la nouvelle frontière des droits civiques américains’. Maintenant que l’homosexualité est quasiment soluble dans la société hétéronormée et bourgeoise, on commence à se poser la question du droit pour les trans.”

Visibles mais ignorés ?

Dans la réalité, pourtant, ces questions de droits semblent loin d’être résolues. Car si les transgenres ont accédé à la visibilité, notamment aux Etats-Unis, ils tardent encore à faire leur apparition dans les agendas politiques. Depuis son bureau de Brooklyn, Reina Gossett a du mal à s’enthousiasmer pleinement pour ce nouvel engouement des médias.

“Bien sûr que la couverture de Time est un événement important pour nous, mais elle rend encore plus insupportable l’inaction politique, dit-elle. Les transgenres continuent de souffrir de discriminations et je ne suis pas sûre qu’une couverture puisse y changer quelque chose. Par exemple, dans plusieurs Etats américains, on se bat pour faire annuler des décrets qui empêchent les transgenres d’accéder à certains soins médicaux, mais ça personne n’en parle. Personne ne parle du chômage qui affecte les trans, ni de la situation vécue par les trans de couleur, victimes de violences raciales. Les médias négligent leur réalité quotidienne.” C’est là le paradoxe de cette récente exposition médiatique, qu’Arnaud Alessandrin résume ainsi :

“Une certaine frange de la transidentité, liée à la scène et aux artistes, commence à être visible. Mais le trans reste invisible dans l’espace politique. Et rien ne dit que l’arrivée de figures transgenres populaires permettra d’aller vers plus d’acceptation.”

En transition depuis une vingtaine d’années, Ts Madison a tout connu de la réalité trans : le rejet de sa famille, les mauvaises hormones achetées au marché noir, la discrimination à l’embauche, la violence physique. Elle assure mieux vivre aujourd’hui aux Etats-Unis que dans les années 90 et sait à qui elle le doit : “Dans chaque génération de transgenres, il y a eu des pionnières, des femmes écoutées qui ont rendu la vie un peu plus acceptable aux suivantes. Tant mieux si les médias se cherchent une nouvelle femme pour occuper ce rôle.” Dans un grand rire, elle nous dira qu’elle s’y verrait bien, elle, en pionnière trans.

Voir encore:

Une lycéenne lesbienne a choisi une citation géniale qui lui vaut les honneurs du web Rédaction du HuffPost 28/05/2015

FÉMINISME – En choisissant sa citation pour le « yearbook » de son lycée, cette jeune Californienne ne s’attendait probablement pas à provoquer autant d’admiration de la part des internautes. Et pourtant, ces quelques petits mots ont déclenché une pluie de réactions positives.

Caitlyn Cannon, 17 ans, a en effet écrit dans le livre: « J’ai besoin de féminisme car j’ai l’intention d’épouser quelqu’un de riche, et ça ne pourra pas se faire si ma femme et moi ne gagnons que 75 centimes pour chaque dollar gagné par un homme ».

L’une de ses amies proches, l’utilisatrice @casualnosebleed sur Twitter, a photographié la publication dans le yearbook et a posté l’image le 26 mai. En trois jours, elle a été retweetée 5500 fois et ajoutée 8500 fois en favoris.

« C’est honnêtement la seule chose qui compte pour moi en ce moment » Récemment diplômée du lycée Oak Hills en Californie, Caitlyn affirme avoir trouvé sur Tumblr cette citation qu’elle a ensuite modifiée, car elle était écrite du point de vue d’un homme. « J’en avais assez de toujours voir les mêmes vieilles citations inspirées de livres, de films et d’auteurs populaires. Je voulais attirer l’attention sur un problème auquel les femmes doivent faire face », explique-t-elle à nos confrères du Huff Post américain.

Les internautes ont entendu son message et lui ont adressé leur soutien: « Approuvé! La meilleure citation jamais écrite dans le yearbook d’un lycée »

« Je n’ai jamais rien vu d’aussi génial de ma vie. Cette fille déchire vraiment tout » Sur son propre compte Twitter, l’étudiante montre à quel point elle est fière d’être ce qu’elle est, en se définissant comme « féministe » et « vraiment gay ».

« Peu importe le nombre de fois où on s’en plaint et où on tente de le minimiser, le féminisme continuera toujours d’exister tant que les femmes n’auront pas le droit aux mêmes opportunités que les hommes », a également déclaré Caitlyn à Cosmopolitan.

Aux Etats-Unis, le yearbook est une sorte de trombinoscope de fin d’année qui présente une photo de chacun des élèves, accompagnée d’une citation s’ils le souhaitent. Cette tradition américaine a pour but de commémorer les événements qui ont marqué l’année scolaire, et permet de se souvenir de ses camarades de classe bien des années plus tard. Ceux de Caitlyn risquent de se rappeler de l’audace de la jeune femme pour longtemps…

 Voir encore:

Rachel Dolezal, activiste, a menti pendant 20 ans sur ses origines

20 ans de supercherie. L’activiste blanche américaine Rachel Dolezal s’est faite passer pour une métisse pendant des années. Ses parents ont décidé de rendre son imposture publique et de rétablir la vérité.

Margot Rousseau

L’Internaute

16/06/15

Rachel Dolezal, qui ne s’était pas exprimée depuis l’annonce de ses parents, a été interviewée par la chaîne Today News. Lors de cette interview réalisée par Matt Lauer, elle explique qu’elle savait qu’un jour, elle aurait à s’expliquer sur la complexité de son identité. Lorsque le journaliste lui montre la photo d’elle plus jeune, lorsqu’elle avait les cheveux blonds, elle explique qu’à cette époque, elle ne se considérait pas comme une afro-américaine, mais qu’aujourd’hui et depuis longtemps, elle s’identifie comme tel. Elle explique que son identification en tant que femme afro-américaine a été solidifiée par l’arrivée de son frère adoptif Izaiah Dolezal. Pour ce qui est de sa couleur de peau plus métissée que lorsqu’elle était jeune et blonde, elle la justifie en disant qu’elle s’expose souvent en soleil. En conclusion, Rachel Dolezal s’identifie comme une afro-américaine et ne regrette pas son mensonge, qu’elle ne le considère pas comme tel. Elle admet cependant que ce n’était pas correct de se décrire comme elle l’a fait, mais que ce n’était ni faux, ni vrai, mais « complexe ».

Rachel Dolezal est professeur d’études africaines-américaines à l’Eastern Washington University et présidente de l’association nationale pour la promotion des personnes de couleur à Spokane (Etat de Washington, Etats-Unis). Depuis 20 ans, elle se faisait passer pour une métisse. La semaine dernière, ses parents ont décidé de révéler son identité. Selon eux, son implication au sein de la communauté afro-américaine n’est pas liée à ce désir de modifier et de falsifier ses origines. Rachel aurait coupé les ponts avec sa famille depuis plusieurs années. Ils attribuent cette décision au fait qu’eux soient blancs. A plusieurs reprises, leur fille leur avait demandé de ne plus se promener dans Spokane en raison de leur couleur de peau.

Rachel Dolezal s’est donc inventée une autre vie et s’est identifiée à la cause afro-américaine. Elle s’est créée un autre père d’origine africaine, tantôt présenté comme « absent », tantôt incarné par un inconnu lors de réunions professionnelles. Elle se définissait comme « noire, blanche et amérindienne » mais selon ses parents, Rachel serait « caucasienne avec des origines tchèques, suédoises et allemandes ».

Pour appuyer leur propos, ils ont montré des photos d’enfance : Rachel y apparaît blonde aux yeux bleus. Une vérité qui tranche avec l’histoire qu’elle s’était inventée : elle expliquait être née dans un tipi, sa famille chassant avec un arc et des flèches. Elle prétendait également avoir vécu en Afrique du Sud.

Rachel souhaitait intégrer la communtauté « afro-américaine » et elle mettait régulièrement en avant « sa » couleur de peau sur les réseaux sociaux. Sur Facebook, par exemple, elle expliquait son ressenti en tant que Noire sur le film « 12 Years a Slave ». Elle a également posté une photo d’elle avec une coupe afro, prétenduement naturelle.

Rachel dénonçait les violences faites aux Noirs d’une façon plutôt étrange. Elle se disait victime d’agressions racistes, neuf au total, la dernière datant de février. A l’occasion de cette « agression », elle s’est exprimée dans les médias. Finalement, lors d’une interview, elle s’était presque trahie, en refusant de répondre à la question « Etes-vous afro-américaine ? »

Rachel Dolezal : peut-on parler de “transracialisme” ? Les Inrocks

17/06/2015

« Je suis transracialiste » s’est justifiée Rachel Dolezal, cette militante américaine blanche qui a fait croire à tout le monde qu’elle était noire. Qu’entend-t-on par ce phénomène de recherche d’une autre identité raciale ? Analyse de Nacira Guérif-Souilamas, sociologue spécialiste des questions raciales et des pratiques identitaires et professeur à Paris 8.

Qu’est-ce que le transracialisme évoquée par Rachel Dolezal ?

Nacira Guérif-Souliamas – Le transracialisme participe de l’ordre racial. Il consiste à revendiquer une autre identité que celle à laquelle on est racialement affiliée. Sauf qu’il y a bien une hiérarchie entre ces races. Être dans une logique transracialiste, c’est chercher à échapper à l’ensemble des discriminations insupportables qui sont associées à l’identité qui nous est imposée. Cela peut se faire de manière physique (se décolorer la peau par exemple), sociale, ou comportementale.

Est-ce qu’il y a des profils de personnes susceptibles de se revendiquer de cette logique ?

Être Noir, c’est une construction culturelle. On ne se pense Noir et ne devient Noir que lors de certaines interactions. Ce n’est pas une identité génétique ça, c’est quelque chose qui s’inscrit dans les rapports sociaux.

C’est pourquoi il est souvent courant que des enfants adoptés, qui ont la peau noire, et élevés par des parents blancs, se considèrent comme Blancs. Et ils ont raison, ce qui compte c’est le lien affectif qui va déterminer leur manière de s’identifier. Sauf qu’aux Etats-Unis, ces personnes sont vites rattrapées par la réalité des rapports sociaux racialisés. Et elles sont obligées de devenir noires à un moment ou à un autre.

Comment expliquer alors le cas de Rachel Dolezal qui s’est déclarée transracialiste ?

C’est un cas que l’on n’avait jamais vu auparavant. Ici, la jeune femme blanche, veut être noire. Jusqu’ici, les schémas transracialistes se posaient dans le sens d’une personne de couleur noire qui désirait devenir blanche.

Rachel Dolezal a été élevée dans une famille blanche avec des frères adoptés à la peau noire. On peut donc penser qu’elle a voulu ressembler à ce schéma familial.

Pourquoi sa supercherie a-t-elle suscité autant de critiques ?

Justement, elle a fini par occuper une position de pouvoir dans une organisation importante qui défend les droits des gens de couleur aux Etats-Unis (l’Association nationale pour la promotion des gens de couleur, NAACP, Ndlr.). Et malgré son histoire familiale, elle ne peut pas annuler l’asymétrie profonde dans laquelle se joue les enjeux du transracialisme.

En plus, elle donne des arguments assez flous. On ne comprend pas bien pourquoi elle a fait ça si ce n’est qu’elle est dans une identification très forte à une certaine cause politique. Mais il faut comprendre que l’on n’a pas besoin d’être noire pour défendre la cause de ces personnes qui peuvent être victimes de racisme.

Pourquoi est-ce que la notion de transracialisme n’existe-t-elle pas en France ?

En France, on est convaincu que la race n’existe pas. Nous sommes pourtant dans des rapports sociaux racialisés. Malgré ça, personne ne peut penser ces rapports en terme racialiste. Et aux Etats-Unis, les identités racialisées sont reconnues comme telles. On parle de “races”, de “relations raciales”, et de problèmes liés aux “identités raciales”. On en parle aussi parce que ces difficultés conduisent à des assassinats et à des bavures policières contre les noirs.

Propos recueillis par Fanny Marlier

Voir également:

Rachel Dolezal, transracialisme ou imposture? Agnès Berthelot Raffard

Chercheuse en philosophie politique et citoyenne engagée

Huffington Post

17/06/2015

Présidente d’une section locale de l’Association nationale pour la promotion des gens de couleur (NAACP) et professeure d’Études africaines à l’Université de l’Eastern Washington, Rachel Dolezal a menti sur ses origines en prétendant être afro-descendante par son père. Suscitant perplexité et controverses, son histoire est, toutefois, fascinante. En effet, si nous en ignorons les motivations morales, ce mensonge confronte notre a priori sur l’identité raciale jusqu’à remettre à l’avant-plan certaines de ses implications pratiques notamment son lien avec le militantisme.

Même s’il est d’usage de considérer la race (1) et le genre, comme des constructions sociales, le mensonge de la professeure Dolezal nous rappelle que loin d’être figée ou sclérosée, l’identité raciale est, au contraire, d’une grande labilité. Jusqu’à une date récente, l’« être au monde » de Rachel Dolezal était celui d’une femme noire ayant eu recours à une forme de « transracialisme ». Si la société connaît – sans hélas toujours la reconnaître socialement – l’existence des transgenres, le «transracialisme» reste quant à lui inhabituel pour ne pas dire inexistant (2), notamment dans le cas d’un individu blanc et éduqué par des parents blancs c’est-à-dire par les membres d’un groupe disposant de privilèges socialement avérés. Il est, en effet, assez rare qu’un tel individu puisse se définir publiquement comme étant afro-descendant jusqu’à accéder à une position privilégiée dans des domaines réservés aux membres de cette communauté.

À supposer que le « transracialisme » existe, il est douteux que le cas Dolezal s’y réfère. D’abord, parce que Dolezal ne se trouvait pas dans une indifférenciation raciale ou culturelle comme le sont parfois, les enfants d’une culture différente de celle de leurs parents adoptifs. Ensuite, parce qu’en admettant que le « transracialisme » soit envisageable pour ceux qui considèrent ne pas appartenir à leur culture raciale d’origine, encore faudrait-il que le fait d’avoir eu recours à un processus de modifications physionomiques volontaires suffise pour correspondre à celle psychiquement projetée. Une telle assignation resterait, toutefois, réductrice. On le sait, comme pour le genre, l’appartenance ethnoculturelle ne se réduit pas aux enjeux du corps et de l’apparence physique. Enfin, le cas Dolezal rappelle une question plus fondamentale trop vaste et complexe pour être traitée dans ce texte : celle de la signification d’un « être Noir » et de ce que cela recoupe du point de vue social et historique.

L’appartenance raciale permet l’accès à un ensemble de privilèges ou en bloque les possibilités. Rachel Dolezal peut-elle prétendre être Noire sans avoir fait l’expérience socio-historique en lien avec les inégalités systémiques et historiquement ancrées dans le vécu des membres de la communauté afro-américaine ? Une femme noire expérimente très jeune une double oppression de race et de genre laquelle s’inscrit dans un processus de développement psychologique, moral, intellectuel et socio-économique. C’est-ce que souligne, le titre d’un des ouvrages fondateurs du Black Feminism : « Toutes les femmes sont blanches, tous les Noirs sont des hommes, mais nous sommes quelques-unes à être courageuses » (3). Dans les États-Unis d’aujourd’hui, la race et le genre affectent encore les opportunités sociales et le regard porté sur l’individu. Aussi, que l’on soit indulgent ou non à l’égard de son mensonge, Rachel Dolezal n’est pas et ne sera jamais une de ces « courageuses ». Force est de reconnaître que même si la volonté peut être présente, il est impossible de devenir une femme noire alors que l’on est dans la vingtaine. Aussi, Dolezal est blanche au sens de son identité biologique et par le fait qu’elle a grandi, dans une famille WASP sans être en mesure de faire, dès son plus jeune âge, les mêmes expériences que les autres femmes noires de sa génération. En ce sens, Dolezal n’a pu ressentir certains des enjeux qui concourent à vouloir aspirer à cette sororité si fondamentale dans la constitution de l’identité culturelle, politique et économique si chère aux militantes afro-américaines (4).

Cependant, que la professeure Dolezal puisse se sentir plus noire que blanche ne saurait en soi être un problème, pas plus que son mensonge n’est un crime. La difficulté réside plutôt dans ce à que quoi il a contribué c’est-à-dire à la construction d’une carrière universitaire et militante au cœur même des bastions généralement réservés aux Noirs. En tant que Professeure d’Études africaines et membres du NAACP, Dolezal est au fait de ces débats. Elle sait que dans les mouvements de luttes pour le droit des minorités culturelles ou de genre, les postes les plus avancés sont généralement réservés aux personnes qui en sont issues. C’est pourquoi comme l’a écrit un éditorialiste du Washington Post :  » Qu’une personne blanche dirige une section de la NAACP ne pose pas de problème non plus. (…) Mais qu’une personne blanche prétende être noire et dirige une section de la NAACP, c’est très problématique ».

Depuis la fondation du NAACP, en 1909, la représentation n’a pas toujours été descriptive. Des Afro-Américains n’ont pas toujours été à la tête des sections locales. Cependant, les mouvements de lutte pour les droits civiques se sont forgés sur le refus d’une représentation substantive. Et, s’il est évident que les Blancs ont le droit de défendre la cause noire comme les hommes peuvent défendre celle des femmes, il y a bien des raisons de réclamer le recours systématiquement à une représentation descriptive plutôt que substantive dans les organisations de luttes pour le droit de ces groupes historiquement dominés. Toutes ces réclamations ne sont pas que symboliques. Ce type de représentation reste un puissant levier contre les effets de marginalisation dans les processus décisionnels et garantit que les décisions puissent refléter l’expérience et les besoins réels des personnes principalement concernées.

Au-delà de la question identitaire, la présidence par Rachel Dolezal d’une section locale du NAACP pose donc plus fondamentalement la question de l’usurpation d’une position d’autorité et celle d’une possible récupération de la lutte par le groupe dominant. Par son mensonge, Dolezal a-t-elle contribué, bien malgré elle, au maintien de la domination blanche dans un des bastions du militantisme noir ? Comme le soulignent ses propres parents, n’aurait-elle pas été plus utile à la cause, qu’elle prétendait défendre, si elle avait milité sous couvert de sa véritable identité biologique ? Ces interrogations seront encore longtemps débattues.

(1) Bien que préférant les termes de culture ou d’origine, je choisis dans ce texte d’utiliser celui de race bien que je le juge négativement connoté. (2) Pour une analogie entre transracialisme et transgenderisme, voir les travaux de la philosophe Cressida Heyes. (3) Gloria HULL, Patricia BELL SCOTT, Barbara SMITH (1982), All the Women are White, All the Blacks are Mem but some of Us are Brave : Black Women Studies, Old Westbury, New York, Feminist Press. (4) Michèle WALLACE (1975), « Une féministe Noire en quête de sororité. » in Black Feminism, anthologie du féminisme africain américain, 1975-2000, (dir. E.Dorlin), Paris, L’harmattan, p.45-57, 2008.

Voir enfin:

Former Israeli Ambassador’s Memoir Condemns Obama’s Foreign Policy Matthew Continetti

National Review

June 20, 2015

By the summer of 2013, President Obama had convinced several key Israelis that he wasn’t bluffing about using force against the Iranian nuclear program. Then he failed to enforce his red line against Syrian dictator Bashar Assad—and the Israelis realized they’d been snookered. Michael Oren, the former Israeli ambassador to the United States, recalls the shock inside his government. “Everyone went quiet,” he said in a recent interview. “An eerie quiet. Everyone understood that that was not an option, that we’re on our own.” Reading Oren’s new memoir Ally, it’s clear that Israel has been on her own since the day Obama took office. Oren provides an inside account of relations between the administration of Barack Obama and the government of Bibi Netanyahu, and his thesis is overwhelming, authoritative, and damning: For the last six and a half years the president of the United States has treated the home of the Jewish people more like a rogue nation standing in the way of peace than a longtime democratic ally. Now the alliance is “in tatters.”

Oren is not a conservative looking to make a political issue of support for Israel. Indeed, by Washington Free Beacon standards, he’s something of a squish. The author of a classic history of U.S. involvement in the Middle East and a sometime professor at Yale, Harvard, and Georgetown, Oren served for five years as a contributor to The New Republic, has contributed toThe New York Review of Books, and supports what he calls a “two-state situation” focused on institution-building and economic aid to the West Bank. He’s a member of the Knesset, but not of Netanyahu’s Likud Party. He joined the comparatively dovish Kulanu Party last December.

Oren’s credentials and relationships make him hard to dismiss. “The Obama administration was problematic because of its worldview: Unprecedented support for the Palestinians,” he told Israeli journalist David Horovitz, another centrist, this week. Obama and his lieutenants, including Hillary Clinton, have often behaved as if the Palestinians don’t exist – Palestinian actions, corruption, incitement, campaigns of de-legitimization and terrorism are overlooked, excused, accommodated. Oren tells the story of what happened when Vice President Joe Biden asked Palestinian president Mahmoud Abbas to “look him in the eye and promise that he could make peace with Israel.” Abbas looked away. The White House did nothing.

It was Israel that had to agree to a settlement freeze before the latest doomed attempt at peace negotiations; Israel that had to apologize for possible “mistakes” against the Gaza flotilla; Israel that had to close Ben Gurion airport; Israel that faced a “reevaluation” of her diplomatic status after Bibi’s reelection. Obama addresses the bulk of his lectures on good governance and democracy and humanitarianism not to the gang that runs the West Bank, nor to the terrorists who rule Gaza, but to Israel. During last year’s Gaza war, the State Department was “appalled” by civilian casualties inflated and trumpeted by Hamas propagandists. Oren points out that in the past the president had used the word “appalling” to describe the atrocities of Moammar Qaddafi. Qaddafi and the IDF – two peas in a pod, according to this White House.

What Obama wanted was to create diplomatic space between America and Israel while maintaining our military alliance. Oren says military-to-military relations are strong, but the diplomatic fissure has degraded Israel’s security. America, he says, provided a “Diplomatic Iron Dome” that shielded Israel from anti-Semites in Europe, at the U.N., and abroad whose goal is to delegitimize the Jewish State and undermine her economically.

This rhetorical missile shield is slowly being retracted. The administration threatens not to veto anti-Israel U.N. initiatives, Europe is aligning with the Boycott Divestment Sanctions (BDS) movement, and anti-Israel activism festers on U.S. campuses. Obama’s unending criticism of Israel, and background quotes calling Israel’s prime minister a “chicken-shit” and a “coward,” provide an opening for radicals to go even further.

The diplomatic rupture endangers Israel in another way. It preceded Obama’s quest for détente with Iran, Israel’s greatest enemy and most pressing threat. Oren was outraged in 2013 when he learned that the administration had been conducting secret negotiations with the mullahs. Now, with the United States about to clear the way for Iranian nukes and flood the Iranian economy with cash, Israel is all the more at risk.

“Obama says Iran is not North Korea,” Oren said, “and Bibi says Iran’s worse than 50 North Koreas. It all comes down to that.” Fixated on striking a deal, Obama is preparing to concede the longstanding demand that Iran disclose its past nuclear-weapons research, is ignoring the issue of Iranian missile development, and is standing idle as Iran props up Assad, arms Hezbollah with rockets, and promotes sectarianism in Iraq. Israel is hemmed in – by Iranian proxies and Sunni militants on its borders, by the threat of a third intifada on the West Bank, by global nongovernmental organizations, by a condescending, flippant, and bullying U.S. president whose default emotional state is pique.

As if to make Oren’s case for him, the Obama administration responded to the publication of Ally with neither silence nor a reiteration of American policy toward Israel but with vituperation, demanding that both Kulanu Party chairman Moshe Kahlon and Prime Minister Netanyahu apologize for criticisms Oren had made. Kahlon sheepishly distanced himself from Oren, and Netanyahu won’t comment publicly, but the episode illustrates precisely the model of U.S.-Israeli relations outlined in this book: A “family” argument where the criticism runs in only one direction. On the one hand, when the supreme leader of Iran calls John Kerry a liar and details plans to destroy Israel, the Obama administration brushes it off. On the other, when a former ambassador writes a memoir based on a diary he kept while in office, the administration loses its mind.

The alliance has faltered to such a degree that Oren is morose. He wonders whether Israel is in the same precarious position it was in 1967, before the Six Day War, or in 1948, when it came close to never being born. Neither option is comforting. David Horovitz asked him, “Are people going to look back in a few years’ time and say, ‘This is what they were talking about in Israel as Iran closed in on the bomb and they were wiped out?’” Oren’s response: “It’s happened before in history, hasn’t it?”

It has. And it may happen again. But whatever happens, thanks to Michael Oren, history will know that an inexperienced and ideologically motivated president drove a lethal wedge between the United States of America and the young, tiny, besieged Jewish State.

Voir enfin:

Sexism and Racism Are Leftism In our time, sexism and racism have become the province of the rich. Victor Davis Hanson

National Review Online

June 16, 2015

Discrimination by sex and by race are ancient innate pathologies and transcend particular cultures. But the American idea of sexismand racism in the 21st century — unfailing, endemic, and institutional discrimination by a majority-white-male-privileged culture against both women and so-called non-white minorities — has largely become a leftist construct.

We can see how these two relativist -isms work in a variety of ways.

One, the frequent charge of racism and sexism is predicated not so much on one’s gender and race as on one’s gender, race, and politics. Certainly, few on the left worried much about the slurs against Sarah Palin during and after her vice-presidential run. America’s overclass in the media and leftist politics constructed a sexist portrait of a clueless white-trash mom in Wasilla, Alaska, mindlessly having lots of kids after barely graduating from the University of Idaho. Even Bill Maher’s and David Letterman’s liberal armor would not have withstood leftist thrusts had, mutatis mutandis, the former called Hillary Clinton a c–t or the latter disparaged Ms. Clinton as “slutty flight attendant” and joked that, when a teen, Chelsea Clinton had had sexual relations with a Yankee baseball player in the dugout. Ironically it was the by-her-own-bootstraps lower-middle-class Palin who braved the frontier, no-prisoners, male world to become governor of Alaska; in real terms, she is the true feminist. In contrast, according to doctrinaire feminism, Hillary Clinton does not measure up. She has largely clung, in mousy fashion, to her two-timing husband, excused his serial and manipulative philandering with young women of less clout and power, traded on his political nomenclature, and piggy-backed on his career.

Leftism assumes that racist and sexist speech by liberals constitutes good people’s lapses of judgment and tact. The Black Caucus rarely if ever comes to the defense of Justice Clarence Thomas when, periodically, liberal commentators suggest that he was and is unqualified, and is largely a token black conservative. No one suggests that the New York Times is on an anti-Latino crusade against Marco Rubio in trying to fashion a story of recklessness from the paltry evidence of his receiving one traffic ticket every four years. Had candidate Mitt Romney suggested, as did Senators Joe Biden and Harry Reid, that Senator Barack Obama was a “clean” and “light-skinned” black man without “a Negro dialect,” he would have been considered little more than a Clive Bundy buffoon and would have had to drop out of the Republican primary.

It appears that leftism assumes that racist and sexist speech by liberals constitutes good people’s lapses of judgment and tact — not, as in the case of conservatives, valuable windows into the dark hearts of bigots. In other words, the idea of sexism and racism is not absolute, but relative and mostly socially massaged and constructed by politics. Had President Bill Clinton declared during the O. J. trial that if he had had a second daughter she would have resembled Nicole Simpson, the media and popular culture would have excused such a sick Obamism as a quirky slip — in a way that it would not have if a Bob Dole had uttered the same banality and thereby supposedly revealed his poorly suppressed racist proclivities.

A second tenet of socially constructed racism and sexism is “white privilege,” which usually translates into “white male privilege,” given that women such as Hillary Clinton and Elizabeth Warren are rarely accused of being multimillionaire white elite females who won a leg up by virtue of their skin color. But if whiteness ipso facto earns one advantages over the non-white, why in the world do some elite whites choose to reconstruct their identities as non-white? Would Elizabeth Warren really have become a Harvard law professor had she not, during her long years of academic ascent, identified herself (at least privately, on universities’ pedigree forms) as a Native American? Ward Churchill, with his beads and Indian get-up, won a university career that otherwise might have been scuttled by his mediocrity, his pathological untruths, and his aberrant behavior. Why would the current head of the NAACP in Spokane, Wash., a white middle-class woman named Rachel Dolezal, go to the trouble of faking a genealogy, using skin cosmetics and hair styling, and constructing false racist enemies to ensure that she was accepted as a victimized black woman?

Ms. Dolezal assumed that being a liberal black woman brought with it career opportunities in activist groups and academia otherwise beyond her reach. The obvious inference is that Ms. Dolezal assumed that being a liberal black woman brought with it career opportunities in activist groups and academia otherwise beyond her reach as a middle-class white female of so-so talent. Critics will object that we are really arguing in class terms as well as racial terms: Privileged whites play on society’s innate prejudices against darker-skinned minorities by positioning themselves as light-skinned, elite people of color. That is a Pandora’s box that is better left unopened — given that Harry Reid and Joe Biden have already unknowingly pried open the lid on these matters in ways that would transcend Barack Obama and equally apply, for example, to Eric Holder or Valerie Jarrett.

Suffice it to say that in our increasingly intermarried, assimilated, and integrated culture, it is often hard to ascertain someone’s exact race or ethnicity. That confusion allows identity to be massaged and reinvented. That said, it is also generally felt among elites that feigning minority status earns career advantages that outweigh the downside of being identified as non-white in the popular culture. That was certainly my impression as a professor for over 20 years in the California State University system watching dozens of upper-class Latin Americans — largely white male Argentinians, Chileans, and Brazilians — and Spaniards flock to American academia, add accents to their names, trill their R’s, and feign ethnic solidarity with their students who were of Oaxacan and Native American backgrounds.

Poor George Zimmerman. His last name stereotyped him as some sort of Germanic gun nut. But had he just ethnicized his maternal half-Afro Peruvian identity and reemerged as Jorgé Mesa, Zimmerman would have largely escaped charges of racism. He should have taken a cue from Barack Obama, who sometime in his late teens at Occidental College discovered that the exotic nomenclature of Barack Obama radiated a minority edge, in a way that the name of his alter ego, Barry Soetoro, apparently never quite had. If, in America’s racist past, majority culture once jealously protected its white privilege by one-drop-of-blood racial distinctions, postmodern America has now come full circle and done the same in reverse — because the construction of minority identity, in all its varying degrees, is easily possible and, in ironic fashion, now brings with it particular elite career advantages.

Third, when we look at questions of class, we see again that racism and sexism are largely leftist constructs and not empirical terms describing millions of Americans who are supposedly denied opportunity by the white establishment because of their gender or race. The CEOs in the industries of sexism and classism are for the most part wealthy and privileged — and their targets are usually of the middle class. When Michelle Obama labors to remind her young African-American audiences of all the stares and second looks she imagines she still receives as First Lady, she is reconstructing a racial identity to balance the enormous privilege she enjoys as a jumbo-jet-setting grandee who junkets to the world’s toniest resorts with regularity. The 2016 version of Hillary Clinton is, at least for a few months, a feminist populist, and has become so merely by mouthing a few banal talking points. Apparently the downside for Hillary of being a woman is not trumped by the facts of being a multimillionaire insider and former secretary of state, wife to a multimillionaire ex-president, mother of a multimillionaire, and mother-in-law to a multimillionaire hedge-fund director. Hillary can become a perpetual constructed victim, denied the good life that is enjoyed by a white male bus driver in Bakersfield making $40,000 a year.

Given the construction of race and gender, the children of Eric Holder and Barack Obama will be eligible for affirmative-action consideration out of reach for an 18-year-old white male in Provo, Utah. As a general rule, when advising classics majors who wished to apply to Ph.D. programs, I assumed that a white male needed a near-perfect GRE score and GPAs, to avoid being rejected out of hand as a middle-class so-so white man from Fresno State. (I reminded them that the “system” assumed their white privilege had given them advantages from preschool onward that the Ivy League and the University of California system now had to adjust for.) For my minority classics students, on the other hand, admission was rarely a problem, despite the fact that many were of a higher social class than their mostly rejected white counterparts.

Fourth, sexism and racism are abstractions of the liberal elite that rarely translate into praxis. Barack Obama could have done symbolic wonders for the public schools by taking his kids out of Sidwell Friends and putting them into the D.C. school system. Elizabeth Warren could have cemented her feminist populist fides by vowing to stop flipping houses. Feminist Bill Clinton could have renounced all affairs with female subordinates. Eric Holder could have vowed never to use government jets to take his kids to horse races. In solidarity with co-eds struggling with student loans, Hillary Clinton could have promised to limit her university speaking fees to a thousand dollars per minute rather than the ten thousand dollars for each 60 seconds of chatting that she actually gets, and she might have prefaced her public attacks on hedge funds by dressing down her son-in-law. Surely the lords of Silicon Valley might have promised to keep their kids in the public schools, and funded scholarships to allow minorities to flood Sacred Heart and the Menlo School.

Charges of racism and sexism have little to do with demonstrable racial and sexual prejudice on the part of a white-male establishment. They are relative, not absolute, phenomena, and more often constructed by political beliefs and careerist concerns than observed independently. Such concepts are often entirely divorced from class reality, and often have more to do with illiberal privilege than with actual exclusion.