GAFA: C’est des salauds, mais des salauds tellement cool ! (Will Silicon Valley finally lose its most-favored robber baronism clause ?)

29 septembre, 2017

C’est un salaud, mais c’est notre salaud. John Foster Dulles (?)
J’appelle stratégies de condescendance ces transgressions symboliques de la limite qui permettent d’avoir à la fois les profits de la conformité à la définition et les profits de la transgression : c’est le cas de l’aristocrate qui tape sur la croupe du palefrenier et dont on dira «II est simple», sous-entendu, pour un aristocrate, c’est-à-dire un homme d’essence supérieure, dont l’essence ne comporte pas en principe une telle conduite. En fait ce n’est pas si simple et il faudrait introduire une distinction : Schopenhauer parle quelque part du «comique pédant», c’est-à-dire du rire que provoque un personnage lorsqu’il produit une action qui n’est pas inscrite dans les limites de son concept, à la façon, dit-il, d’un cheval de théâtre qui se mettrait à faire du crottin, et il pense aux professeurs, aux professeurs allemands, du style du Professor Unrat de V Ange bleu, dont le concept est si fortement et si étroitement défini, que la transgression des limites se voit clairement. A la différence du professeur Unrat qui, emporté par la passion, perd tout sens du ridicule ou, ce qui revient au même, de la dignité, le consacré condescendant choisit délibérément de passer la ligne ; il a le privilège des privilèges, celui qui consiste à prendre des libertés avec son privilège. C’est ainsi qu’en matière d’usage de la langue, les bourgeois et surtout les intellectuels peuvent se permettre des formes d’hypocorrection, de relâchement, qui sont interdites aux petits-bourgeois, condamnés à l’hypercorrection. Bref, un des privilèges de la consécration réside dans le fait qu’en conférant aux consacrés une essence indiscutable et indélébile, elle autorise des transgressions autrement interdites : celui qui est sûr de son identité culturelle peut jouer avec la règle du jeu culturel, il peut jouer avec le feu, il peut dire qu’il aime Tchaikovsky ou Gershwin, ou même, question de «culot», Aznavour ou les films de série B. Pierre Bourdieu
Bourdieu chose to make it his life’s work to debunk the powerful classes’ pretensions that they were more deserving of authority or wealth than those below. He aimed his critiques first at his own class of elites — professors and intellectuals — then at the media, the political class and the propertied class. “Distinction,” published in 1979, was an undisputed masterwork. In it, Bourdieu set out to show the social logic of taste: how admiration for art, appreciation of music, even taste in food, came about for different groups, and how “superior” taste was not the result of an enchanted superiority in scattered individuals. This may seem a long way from Wellington-booted and trucker-hatted American youth in gentrifying neighborhoods. But Bourdieu’s innovation, applicable here, was to look beyond the traditional trappings of rich or poor to see battles of symbols (like those boots and hats) traversing all society, reinforcing the class structure just as money did. (…) The power of Bourdieu’s statistics was to show how rigid and arbitrary the local conformities were. In American terms, he was like an updater of Thorstein Veblen, who gave us the idea of “conspicuous consumption.” College teachers and artists, unusual in believing that a beautiful photo could be made from a car crash, began to look conditioned to that taste, rather than sophisticated or deep. White-collar workers who defined themselves by their proclivity to eat only light foods — as opposed to farmworkers, who weren’t ashamed to treat themselves to “both cheese and a dessert” — seemed not more refined, but merely more conventional. Taste is not stable and peaceful, but a means of strategy and competition. Those superior in wealth use it to pretend they are superior in spirit. Groups closer in social class who yet draw their status from different sources use taste and its attainments to disdain one another and get a leg up. These conflicts for social dominance through culture are exactly what drive the dynamics within communities whose members are regarded as hipsters. Once you take the Bourdieuian view, you can see how hipster neighborhoods are crossroads where young people from different origins, all crammed together, jockey for social gain. One hipster subgroup’s strategy is to disparage others as “liberal arts college grads with too much time on their hands”; the attack is leveled at the children of the upper middle class who move to cities after college with hopes of working in the “creative professions.” These hipsters are instantly declassed, reservoired in abject internships and ignored in the urban hierarchy — but able to use college-taught skills of classification, collection and appreciation to generate a superior body of cultural “cool.” They, in turn, may malign the “trust fund hipsters.” This challenges the philistine wealthy who, possessed of money but not the nose for culture, convert real capital into “cultural capital” (Bourdieu’s most famous coinage), acquiring subculture as if it were ready-to-wear. (Think of Paris Hilton in her trucker hat.) Both groups, meanwhile, look down on the couch-­surfing, old-clothes-wearing hipsters who seem most authentic but are also often the most socially precarious — the lower-middle-class young, moving up through style, but with no backstop of parental culture or family capital. They are the bartenders and boutique clerks who wait on their well-to-do peers and wealthy tourists. Only on the basis of their cool clothes can they be “superior”: hipster knowledge compensates for economic immobility. All hipsters play at being the inventors or first adopters of novelties: pride comes from knowing, and deciding, what’s cool in advance of the rest of the world. Yet the habits of hatred and accusation are endemic to hipsters because they feel the weakness of everyone’s position — including their own. Proving that someone is trying desperately to boost himself instantly undoes him as an opponent. He’s a fake, while you are a natural aristocrat of taste. That’s why “He’s not for real, he’s just a hipster” is a potent insult among all the people identifiable as hipsters themselves. The attempt to analyze the hipster provokes such universal anxiety because it calls everyone’s bluff. And hipsters aren’t the only ones unnerved. Many of us try to justify our privileges by pretending that our superb tastes and intellect prove we deserve them, reflecting our inner superiority. Those below us economically, the reasoning goes, don’t appreciate what we do; similarly, they couldn’t fill our jobs, handle our wealth or survive our difficulties. Of course this is a terrible lie. And Bourdieu devoted his life to exposing it. Those who read him in effect become responsible to him — forced to admit a failure to examine our own lives, down to the seeming trivialities of clothes and distinction that, as Bourdieu revealed, also structure our world. Mark Greif
L’aura de cool absolu qui entoure Barack Obama doit en effet beaucoup –voire tout– à Pete Souza. Le photographe officiel canarde le président américain partout –dans son bureau, dans ses voyages, quand il va embrasser des bébés et manger des hot-dogs– et fournit en instantané sa légende iconographique. Les photos sont mises à disposition du public et des médias par la Maison Blanche, sous une license Creative Commons, pour qu’elles soient mieux partagées. Grâce à Pete Souza, on a l’impression d’être dans la vraie vie de Barack Obama, alors que rien n’est plus construit que ses photos. Slate
The aesthetics of cool developed mainly as a behavioral attitude practiced by black men in the United States at the time of slavery. Slavery made necessary the cultivation of special defense mechanisms which employed emotional detachment and irony. A cool attitude helped slaves and former slaves to cope with exploitation or simply made it possible to walk the streets at night. During slavery, and long afterwards, overt aggression by blacks was punishable by death. Provocation had to remain relatively inoffensive, and any level of serious intent had to be disguised or suppressed. So cool represents a paradoxical fusion of submission and subversion. It’s a classic case of resistance to authority through creativity and innovation. Today the aesthetics of cool represents the most important phenomenon in youth culture. The aesthetic is spread by Hip Hop culture for example, which has become “the center of a mega music and fashion industry around the world” (…). Black aesthetics, whose stylistic, cognitive, and behavioural tropes are largely based on cool-mindedness, has arguably become “the only distinctive American artistic creation” (…). The African American philosopher Cornel West sees the “black-based Hip Hop culture of youth around the world” as a grand example of the “shattering of male, WASP cultural homogeneity” (…). While several recent studies have shown that American brand names have dramatically slipped in their cool quotients worldwide, symbols of black coolness such as Hip Hop remain exportable. However, ‘cool’ does not only refer to a respected aspect of masculine display, it’s also a symptom of anomie, confusion, anxiety, self-gratification and escapism, since being cool can push individuals towards passivity more than towards an active fulfillment of life’s potential. Often “it is more important to be ‘cool and down’ with the peer group than to demonstrate academic achievement,” write White & Cones (…). On the one hand, the message produced by a cool pose fascinates the world because of its inherent mysteriousness. The stylized way of offering resistance that insists more on appearance than on substance can turn cool people into untouchable objects of desire. On the other hand, to be cool can be seen as a decadent attitude leading to individual passivity and social decay. The ambiguity residing in this constellation lends the cool scheme its dynamics, but it also makes its evaluation very difficult. (…) A president is uncool if he clings to absolute power, but becomes cooler as soon as he voluntarily concedes power in order to maintain democratic values. Thorsten Botz-Bornstein
Cool est généralement associé au sang-froid et au contrôle de soi et il est utilisé dans ce sens comme une expression d’approbation ou d’admiration. Cette notion peut aussi être associée à une forme de nonchalance. Wikipedia
There is no single concept of cool. One of the essential characteristics of cool is its mutability—what is considered cool changes over time and varies among cultures and generations. One consistent aspect however, is that cool is wildly seen as positive and desirable. Although there is no single concept of cool, its definitions fall into a few broad categories. The sum and substance of cool is a self-conscious aplomb in overall behavior, which entails a set of specific behavioral characteristics that is firmly anchored in symbology, a set of discernible bodily movements, postures, facial expressions and voice modulations that are acquired and take on strategic social value within the peer context. Cool was once an attitude fostered by rebels and underdogs, such as slaves, prisoners, bikers and political dissidents, etc., for whom open rebellion invited punishment, so it hid defiance behind a wall of ironic detachment, distancing itself from the source of authority rather than directly confronting it. In general, coolness is a positive trait based on the inference that a cultural object (e.g., a person or brand) is autonomous in an appropriate way. That is the person or brand is not constrained by the norms, expectation of beliefs of others. (…) Cool is also an attitude widely adopted by artists and intellectuals, who thereby aided its infiltration into popular culture. Sought by product marketing firms, idealized by teenagers, a shield against racial oppression or political persecution and source of constant cultural innovation, cool has become a global phenomenon that has spread to every corner of the earth. Concepts of cool have existed for centuries in several cultures. In terms of fashion, the concept of “cool” has transformed from the 1960s to the 1990s by becoming integrated in the dominant fabric of culture. America’s mass-production of “ready-to-wear” fashion in the 1940s and ‘50s, established specific conventional outfits as markers of ones fixed social role in society. Subcultures such as the Hippies, felt repressed by the dominating conservative ideology of the 1940s and ‘50s towards conformity and rebelled. (…) Starting in the 1990s and continuing into the 21st century, the concept of dressing cool went out of the minority and into the mainstream culture, making dressing “cool” a dominant ideology. Cool entered the mainstream because those Hippie “rebels” of the late 1960s were now senior executives of business sectors and of the fashion industry. Since they grew up with “cool” and maintained the same values, they knew its rules and thus knew how to accurately market and produce such clothing. However, once “cool” became the dominant ideology in the 21st century its definition changed to not one of rebellion but of one attempting to hide their insecurities in a confident manner. The “fashion-grunge” style of the 1990s and 21st century allowed people who felt financially insecure about their lifestyle to pretend to “fit in” by wearing a unique piece of clothing, but one that was polished beautiful. For example, unlike the Hippie style that clearly diverges from the norm, through Marc Jacobs’ combined “fashion-grunge” style of “a little preppie, a little grunge and a little couture,” he produces not a bold statement one that is mysterious and awkward creating an ambiguous perception of what the wearer’s internal feelings are. While slang terms are usually short-lived coinages and figures of speech, cool is an especially ubiquitous slang word, most notably among young people. As well as being understood throughout the English-speaking world, the word has even entered the vocabulary of several languages other than English. In this sense, cool is used as a general positive epithet or interjection, which can have a range of related adjectival meanings. Wikipedia
Ronald Perry writes that many words and expressions have passed from African-American Vernacular English into Standard English slang including the contemporary meaning of the word « cool. » The definition, as something fashionable, is said to have been popularized in jazz circles by tenor saxophonist Lester Young. This predominantly black jazz scene in the U.S. and among expatriate musicians in Paris helped popularize notions of cool in the U.S. in the 1940s, giving birth to « Bohemian », or beatnik, culture. Shortly thereafter, a style of jazz called cool jazz appeared on the music scene, emphasizing a restrained, laid-back solo style. Notions of cool as an expression of centeredness in a Taoist sense, equilibrium and self-possession, of an absence of conflict are commonly understood in both African and African-American contexts well. Expressions such as, « Don’t let it blow your cool, » later, chill out, and the use of chill as a characterization of inner contentment or restful repose all have their origins in African-American Vernacular English. (…) Among black men in America, coolness, which may have its roots in slavery as an ironic submission and concealed subversion, at times is enacted in order to create a powerful appearance, a type of performance frequently maintained for the sake of a social audience. (…) « Cool pose » may be a factor in discrimination in education contributing to the achievement gaps in test scores. In a 2004 study, researchers found that teachers perceived students with African-American culture-related movement styles, referred to as the « cool pose, » as lower in achievement, higher in aggression, and more likely to need special education services than students with standard movement styles, irrespective of race or other academic indicators. The issue of stereotyping and discrimination with respect to « cool pose » raises complex questions of assimilation and accommodation of different cultural values. Jason W. Osborne identifies « cool pose » as one of the factors in black underachievement. Robin D. G. Kelley criticizes calls for assimilation and sublimation of black culture, including « cool pose. » He argues that media and academics have unfairly demonized these aspects of black culture while, at the same time, through their sustained fascination with blacks as exotic others, appropriated aspects of « cool pose » into the broader popular culture. George Elliott Clarke writes that Malcolm X, like Miles Davis, embodies essential elements of cool. As an icon, Malcolm X inspires a complex mixture of both fear and fascination in broader American culture, much like « cool pose » itself. Wikipedia
Vous allez dans certaines petites villes de Pennsylvanie où, comme ans beaucoup de petites villes du Middle West, les emplois ont disparu depuis maintenant 25 ans et n’ont été remplacés par rien d’autre (…) Et il n’est pas surprenant qu’ils deviennent pleins d’amertume, qu’ils s’accrochent aux armes à feu ou à la religion, ou à leur antipathie pour ceux qui ne sont pas comme eux, ou encore à un sentiment d’hostilité envers les immigrants. Barack Obama (2008)
Pour généraliser, en gros, vous pouvez placer la moitié des partisans de Trump dans ce que j’appelle le panier des pitoyables. Les racistes, sexistes, homophobes, xénophobes, islamophobes. A vous de choisir. Hillary Clinton
J’entends les voix apeurées qui nous appellent à construire des murs. Plutôt que des murs, nous voulons aider les gens à construire des ponts. Mark Zuckerberg
Mes arrière-grands-parents sont venus d’Allemagne, d’Autriche et de Pologne. Les parents de [mon épouse] Priscilla étaient des réfugiés venant de Chine et du Vietnam. Les Etats-Unis sont une nation d’immigrants, et nous devrions en être fiers. Comme beaucoup d’entre vous, je suis inquiet de l’impact des récents décrets signés par le président Trump. Nous devons faire en sorte que ce pays reste en sécurité, mais pour y parvenir, nous devrions nous concentrer sur les personnes qui représentent vraiment une menace. Etendre l’attention des forces de l’ordre au-delà des personnes qui représentent de vraies menaces va nuire à la sécurité des Américains, en dispersant les ressources, tandis que des millions de sans-papiers qui ne représentent aucune menace vivront dans la peur d’être expulsés. Mark Zuckerberg
Ces idées ont un nom : nationalisme, identitarisme, protectionnisme, souverainisme de repli. Ces idées qui, tant de fois, ont allumé les brasiers où l’Europe aurait pu périr, les revoici sous des habits neufs encore ces derniers jours. Elles se disent légitimes parce qu’elles exploitent avec cynisme la peur des peuples. (…) Je ne laisserai rien, rien à toutes celles et ceux qui promettent la haine, la division ou le repli national. Je ne leur laisserai aucune proposition. C’est à l’Europe de les faire, c’est à nous de les porter, aujourd’hui et maintenant (…) Et nous n’avons qu’un choix, qu’une alternative : le repli sur nous frontières, qui serait à la fois illusoire et inefficace, ou la construction d’un espace commun des frontières, de l’asile et de (…) faire une place aux réfugiés qui ont risqué leur vie, chez eux et sur leur chemin, c’est notre devoir commun d’Européen et nous ne devons pas le perdre de vue. (…) C’est pourquoi j’ai engagé en France un vaste travail de réforme pour mieux accueillir les réfugiés, augmenter les relocalisations dans notre pays, accélérer les procédures d’asile en nous inspirant du modèle allemand, être plus efficaces dans les reconduites indispensables. Ce que je souhaite pour l’Europe, la France commence dès à présent à le faire elle-même. Emmanuel Macron
Emmanuel Macron, qui vomit le populisme, fait tout pour l’alimenter. Il en a apporté la démonstration, mardi à la Sorbonne, en se faisant le défenseur exalté de l’Union européenne, sans vouloir entendre les réticences des peuples. Sa prétendue ‘refondation’ européenne n’est autre que la perpétuation d’une institution technocratique et éloignée de la vie des gens. Son choix d’une ‘Europe souveraine » est celui d’une supranationalité qui méconnait les nations et leur désir de maîtriser leur destin. L’entendre affirmer que l’Europe doit « faire une place aux réfugiés » car « c’est notre devoir commun » révèle son indifférence aux inquiétudes qui partout se manifestent. En Allemagne, la percée de l’afD, ce week-end, a été motivée par la folle politique migratoire d’Angela Merkel et son incapacité à mesurer le danger islamiste. (…) D’islam politique, il n’en a évidemment pas été question dans le discours fleuve du chef de l’Etat. Il ne veut ‘conduire la bataille’ que pour donner plus de pouvoirs encore à une Union de plus en plus soviétoïde. Il n’a réservé ses coups, comme à son habitude, qu’à ceux qui ne pensent pas comme lui. (…) non content de s’aveugler sur une Union européenne vécue comme une violence ou une menace par beaucoup de citoyens abandonnés, le président s’est une fois de plus laissé aller au manichéisme en usage chez les esprits sectaires. Pour lui, ceux qui critiquent l’UE laisseraient voir un ‘nationalisme’, un ‘identitarisme’, un ‘souverainisme de repli’ et autres « passions tristes ». Il dit de ceux-là qu’ils « mentent aux peuples ». Et de menacer, d’ailleurs peu clairement : « Je ne laisserai rien, rien, à ceux qui promettent la haine, la division ou le repli national ». Mais où est la haine, en l’occurrence, sinon dans ces propos présidentiels qui cherchent à discréditer des contradicteurs. Ivan Rioufol
Barons voleurs est un terme péjoratif, qu’on trouve dans la critique sociale et la littérature économique pour caractériser certains hommes d’affaires riches et puissants des États-Unis au XIXe siècle. Dans l’histoire des États-Unis d’Amérique, l’âge doré voit l’éclosion de ces capitaines d’industrie qui façonnent le rêve américain mais sont aussi accusés, à cette période de capitalisme sauvage, d’exploiter et éventuellement réprimer la main-d’œuvre, ainsi que de pratiquer la corruption. L’expression apparaît dans la presse américaine, en août 1870, dans le magazine The Atlantic Monthly, pour désigner les entrepreneurs pratiquant l’exploitation pour accumuler leurs richesses. Leurs pratiques incluent le contrôle des ressources nationales, l’influence sur les hauts fonctionnaires, le paiement de salaires extrêmement bas, l’écrasement de leurs concurrents par leur acquisition en vue de créer des monopoles et de pousser les prix à la hausse, ainsi que la manipulation des cours des actions vers des prix artificiellement hauts, actions vendues à des investisseurs voués à l’appauvrissement dès le cours retombé, aboutissant à la disparition de la société cotée. L’expression, forgée par les muckrakers, allie le sens de criminel (« voleur ») et celui de noblesse douteuse (un « baron » est un titre illégitime dans une république). Le président Theodore Roosevelt est intervenu contre les monopoles en obtenant du gouvernement conservateur qu’il mette au pas ces capitaines d’industrie, qu’il appelle des « malfaiteurs de grande fortune » et des « royalistes de l’économie ». Wikipedia
In the US, Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon are generally praised as examples of innovation. In the French press, and for much of the rest of Europe, their innovation is often seen in a less positive light—the ugly Americans coming over with innovative approaches to invading personal privacy or new ways to avoid paying their fair share. Take Google: its tax affairs in France are being challenged (paywall)—which comes soon after it has been forced to institute a “right to be forgotten” and threatened with being broken up. But the spread of the term “GAFA” may be as much to do with cultural resentment as taxes. “I think it’s more about distribution of power in the online world than tax avoidance,” Liam Boogar, founder of the French start-up site, Rude Baguette, tells Quartz. France, after all, is a country with a long history of resisting US cultural hegemony. Remember José Bové, the sheep farmer who destroyed a McDonald’s in 1999 and was a symbol for the anti-globalization movement? Times have changed; McDonald’s most profitable country in Europe is now France. Having lost that battle, the French have instead turned their ire to Silicon Valley. There is also a loss of public sympathy in the wake of the massive American government spying revelations. Jérémie Zimmermann, one of the founders of La Quadrature, a tech-oriented public policy non-profit, tells Quartz he dislikes the term “GAFA” and prefers to refer to the big US firms as the “PRISM” companies (after the US National Security Agency program revealed by Edward Snowden) or the “Bullrun” firms (another NSA program), which he uses to refer to “more or less every US-based company in which trust is broken”—citing examples that include Intel, Motorola, and Cisco. Even if the term has a negative connotation, it’s worth noting which companies didn’t make the acronym. Microsoft, most notably. Samsung is another. No Yahoo. Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon pretty much dominate every facet of our lives—from email from friends and family to what’s in your pocket to how you get everything in your house to how you pay. As far as acronyms of global power go, it works. Quartz
GAFA is an acronym for Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon — the 4 most powerful American technology companies. Usage of the term “GAFA” is increasingly common in Europe. The acronym, originally from France, is used by the media to identify the 4 companies as a group – often in the context of legal investigations. The EU is (…) generally quite hostile to the unfettered ambitions of corporations. Any company that seeks to acquire a monopoly, engage in anti-competitive practices, dodge taxes, or invade EU citizens’ privacy is likely to find themselves under investigation, and potentially facing a hefty fine. Every GAFA company is currently under investigation by the EU for something. Google knows a lot about you, although there are some steps you can take to minimise it. The company uses the information they pull from your browsing habits, emails, Google Drive files, and anything else they can get their hands on to serve you ever more targeted ads. In the past this has led to the EU criticising Google’s use of personal data. More recently, the EU has been investigating Google for antitrust violations. Microsoft has been fined €2.2 billion for abusing its dominant market position and pushing its own services over the years, and the EU is concerned that Google is doing the same with search and Android. If they’re found to be abusing their position, they’ll face billions of euro worth of fines and be required to change their business practices. Google has already been forced, by the EU, to change how it operates. After a landmark ruling last year, citizens of the EU have the “right to be forgotten” on the Internet. People can request that search engines remove links to web pages that contain information about them — although MakeUseOf readers don’t seem too fussed about it. Apple Music was only unveiled this month but, according to Reuters, the deals they’ve inked with record companies are already under investigation. The EU, however, is more interested in Apple’s tax practices. The Union already shut down some tax loopholes, such as the Double Irish, that Apple used to minimize their tax burden, both in Europe and the US. The Union is continuing to investigate whether other practices they engaged in were legal. A ruling was due this month but has been pushed back. The EU isn’t keen on Facebook for the same reason most people aren’t — its questionable privacy record. Facebook knows a surprising amount about us – information we willingly volunteer. From that information you can be slotted into a demographic, your « likes » recorded and relationships monitored. There are several investigations, and a class action law suit, looking into whether or not Facebook’s privacy policy is legal. So far things are looking bad for Facebook. Despite frequent updates, a Belgian report released earlier this year “found that Facebook is acting in violation of European law“. Just like the other companies, Facebook could face heavy fines if they don’t fall into line with the EU’s policies. The EU’s issue with Amazon is a little different. The EU wants a Digital Single Market where every citizen would be able to purchase the same products at the same price as any other, regardless of where the products were being sold from. They are, according to VentureBeat, concerned that Amazon, and other e-commerce companies like Netflix, “have policies that restrict the ability of merchants and consumers to buy and sell goods and services across Europe’s borders.” For example: videos offered by the company’s streaming aren’t available in every country, which is at odds with the EU’s aim to treat every member nation and citizen equally. A year-long investigation launched this year so, at least for now, Amazon is free to continue as they are. The EU is clearly not going to let the GAFA companies operate unchecked, nor let them have the same level of independence they enjoy in the US. The EU takes a much more hands on approach to consumer protection and anti-competition laws than the Obama administration. Make us of.com
Les chiffres sont vertigineux. Apple est l’entreprise la plus capitalisée en bourse, avec une valeur qui a dépassé les 800 milliards de dollars. Celle d’Alphabet, la maison mère de Google, atteint près de 650 milliards de dollars. Google représente 88% du marché de la recherche sur Internet aux Etats-Unis et Facebook vient de franchir la barre des deux milliards d’utilisateurs actifs. Amazon? Le géant de la vente en ligne, qui s’apprête à ouvrir un deuxième siège en Amérique du Nord – plusieurs villes sont en lice –, est en train de tuer le petit commerce. Cette toute-puissance inquiète. (…) Un sondage publié le 25 septembre par le quotidien US Today révèle que 76% des Américains sont désormais d’avis que les GAFA, les Big Four de la tech et leurs petits frères, ont trop de poids dans leur vie. Pas moins de 52% d’entre eux jugent cette influence «mauvaise». Certains de ces géants ont dû faire face à des scandales, ce qui entache leur déontologie et leur crédibilité. Le 6 septembre, Facebook a admis que près de 500 faux profils liés à la Russie avaient acheté pour plus de 100 000 dollars de publicité, entre juin 2015 et mai 2017, pour influencer l’élection présidentielle américaine en véhiculant des messages censés nuire à Hillary Clinton. «Je ne veux pas que qui que ce soit utilise nos instruments pour nuire à la démocratie», a proclamé son cofondateur et patron Mark Zuckerberg dans une vidéo, en présentant ses excuses. C’est la première fois que le groupe admet avoir été manipulé ainsi, offrant à la Russie une plateforme de choix pour sa propagande. De quoi intéresser le procureur spécial Robert Mueller, qui enquête sur les possibles collusions entre l’équipe de Donald Trump et Moscou. Facebook va devoir rendre des comptes devant le Sénat. Le Congrès entendra également Twitter et Google dans le cadre de l’affaire russe. Une audience publique est prévue le 1er novembre. Facebook avait déjà été critiqué pour avoir diffusé des vidéos de meurtres et de suicides en direct. Et facilité, grâce à ses algorithmes, des messages racistes et antisémites ciblés. Le New York Times s’est moqué des excuses tardives du groupe, en trouvant une analogie avec Frankenstein, qui a échappé à son créateur. Faut-il réguler le secteur? S’achemine-t-on vers une législation antitrust contre les géants de la tech? Le controversé Stephen Bannon, que Donald Trump a limogé cet été de son poste de conseiller stratégique à la Maison-Blanche, l’avait appelée de ses vœux. Tout comme la sénatrice démocrate Elizabeth Warren, à l’autre bout de l’échiquier politique. La News Media Alliance, qui regroupe plus de 2000 titres américains et canadiens, donne également de la voix en ce sens, les médias d’information souffrant de la rude concurrence des géants d’Internet. (…) Comme le rappelle le New York Times, Facebook et Google bataillent ferme depuis le mois dernier contre un projet qui veut les rendre responsables s’ils hébergent du trafic sexuel sur leurs sites. L’enjeu est majeur: une loi vieille de vingt ans protège pour l’instant les compagnies internet de poursuites en justice en raison de contenus postés par des internautes. Sentant le vent tourner, les géants de la tech commencent à renforcer leurs équipes d’avocats et de lobbyistes. Le Temps
For the last two decades, Apple, Google, Amazon and other West Coast tech corporations have been untouchable icons. They piled up astronomical profits while hypnotizing both left-wing and right-wing politicians. (…) If the left feared that the tech billionaires were becoming robber barons, they also delighted in the fact that they were at least left-wing robber barons. Unlike the steel, oil and coal monopolies of the 19th century that out of grime and smoke created the sinews of a growing America, Silicon Valley gave us shiny, clean, green and fun pods, pads and phones. As a result, social media, internet searches, texts, email and other computer communications were exempt from interstate regulatory oversight. Big Tech certainly was not subject to the rules that governed railroads, power companies, trucking industries, Wall Street, and television and radio. But attitudes about hip high-tech corporations have now changed on both the left and right. Liberals are under pressure from their progressive base to make Silicon Valley hire more minorities and women. Progressives wonder why West Coast techies cannot unionize and sit down for tough bargaining with their progressive billionaire bosses. Local community groups resent the tech giants driving up housing prices and zoning out the poor from cities such as Seattle and San Francisco. Behind the veneer of a cool Apple logo or multicolored Google trademark are scores of multimillionaires who live one-percenter lifestyles quite at odds with the soft socialism espoused by their corporate megaphones. (…) Instead of acting like laissez-faire capitalists, the entrenched captains of high-tech industry seem more like government colluders and manipulators. Regarding the high-tech leaders’ efforts to rig their industries and strangle dissent, think of conniving Jay Gould or Jim Fisk rather than the wizard Thomas Edison. (…) The public so far has welcomed the unregulated freedom of Silicon Valley — as long as it was truly free. But now computer users are discovering that social media and web searches seem highly controlled and manipulated — by the whims of billionaires rather than federal regulators. (…) For years, high-tech grandees dressed all in hip black while prancing around the stage, enthralling stockholders as if they were rock stars performing with wireless mics. Some wore jeans, sneakers, and T-shirts, making it seem like being worth $50 billion was hipster cool. But the billionaire-as-everyman shtick has lost his groove, especially when such zillionaires lavish their pet political candidates with huge donations, seed lobbying groups and demand regulatory loopholes. Ten years ago, a carefree Mark Zuckerberg seemed cool. Now, his T-shirt get-up seems phony and incongruous with his walled estates and unregulated profiteering. (…) Why are high-tech profits hidden in offshore accounts? Why is production outsourced to impoverished countries, sometimes in workplaces that are deplorable and cruel? Why does texting while driving not earn a product liability suit? Victor Davis Hanson

Attention: des barons voleurs peuvent en cacher d’autres !

A l’heure où avec leur formidable force de frappe financière et trésors de guerre accumulés …

Les multinationales géantes du numérique semblent à la manière des « barons voleurs« du 19e siècle américain …

Concentrer tous les pouvoirs et écraser toute concurrence sur leur passage …

Face à des gouvernants dont ils partagent clairement le ton volontiers moralisateur et méprisant

Et des masses rejetées dans les passions désormais déclarées rétrogrades des questions d’identité et de souveraineté nationales …

Comment ne pas s’étonner de l’étrange indulgence dont…

Sous prétexte de leur coolitude …

Leurs pourtant volontiers moralisateurs et un tantinet méprisants dirigeants continuent jusqu’ici à bénéficier ?

How Silicon Valley Turned Off the Left and Right
Victor Davis Hanson
Townhall
Sep 28, 2017

When left and right finally agree on something, watch out: The unthinkable becomes normal.So it is with changing attitudes toward Silicon Valley. For the last two decades, Apple, Google, Amazon and other West Coast tech corporations have been untouchable icons. They piled up astronomical profits while hypnotizing both left-wing and right-wing politicians.

Conservative administrations praised them as modern versions of 19th-century risk-takers such as Andrew Carnegie and John D. Rockefeller. Bill Gates, the late Steve Jobs and other tech giants were seen as supposedly creating national wealth in an unregulated, laissez-faire landscape that they had invented from nothing.

At a time when American companies were increasingly unable to compete in the rough-and-tumble world arena, Apple, Microsoft, and Facebook bulldozed their international competition. Indeed, they turned high-tech and social media into American brands.

The left was even more enthralled. It dropped its customary regulatory zeal, despite Silicon Valley’s monopolizing, outsourcing, offshoring, censoring, and destroying of startup competition. After all, Big Tech was left-wing and generous. High-tech interests gave hundreds of millions of dollars to left-wing candidates, think tanks and causes.

Companies such as Facebook and Google were able to warp their own social media protocols and Internet searches to insidiously favor progressive agendas and messaging.

If the left feared that the tech billionaires were becoming robber barons, they also delighted in the fact that they were at least left-wing robber barons.

Unlike the steel, oil and coal monopolies of the 19th century that out of grime and smoke created the sinews of a growing America, Silicon Valley gave us shiny, clean, green and fun pods, pads and phones.

As a result, social media, internet searches, texts, email and other computer communications were exempt from interstate regulatory oversight. Big Tech certainly was not subject to the rules that governed railroads, power companies, trucking industries, Wall Street, and television and radio.

But attitudes about hip high-tech corporations have now changed on both the left and right.Liberals are under pressure from their progressive base to make Silicon Valley hire more minorities and women.

Progressives wonder why West Coast techies cannot unionize and sit down for tough bargaining with their progressive billionaire bosses.

Local community groups resent the tech giants driving up housing prices and zoning out the poor from cities such as Seattle and San Francisco.

Behind the veneer of a cool Apple logo or multicolored Google trademark are scores of multimillionaires who live one-percenter lifestyles quite at odds with the soft socialism espoused by their corporate megaphones.Conservatives got sick of Silicon Valley, too.

Instead of acting like laissez-faire capitalists, the entrenched captains of high-tech industry seem more like government colluders and manipulators. Regarding the high-tech leaders’ efforts to rig their industries and strangle dissent, think of conniving Jay Gould or Jim Fisk rather than the wizard Thomas Edison.

With the election of populist Donald Trump, the Republican Party seems less wedded to the doctrines of economic libertarian Milton Friedman and more to the trust-busting zeal of Teddy Roosevelt.

The public so far has welcomed the unregulated freedom of Silicon Valley — as long as it was truly free. But now computer users are discovering that social media and web searches seem highly controlled and manipulated — by the whims of billionaires rather than federal regulators.

The public faces put on by West Coast tech leaders have not helped.

For years, high-tech grandees dressed all in hip black while prancing around the stage, enthralling stockholders as if they were rock stars performing with wireless mics. Some wore jeans, sneakers, and T-shirts, making it seem like being worth $50 billion was hipster cool.

But the billionaire-as-everyman shtick has lost his groove, especially when such zillionaires lavish their pet political candidates with huge donations, seed lobbying groups and demand regulatory loopholes.

Ten years ago, a carefree Mark Zuckerberg seemed cool. Now, his T-shirt get-up seems phony and incongruous with his walled estates and unregulated profiteering.

Of course, Silicon Valley’s critics should be wary. They wonder whether the golden tech goose can be caged without being killed.

Both liberals and conservatives are just beginning to ask why internet communications cannot be subject to the same rules applied to radio and television.

Why can’t Silicon Valley monopolies be busted up in the same manner as the Bell Telephone octopus or the old Standard Oil trust?

Why are high-tech profits hidden in offshore accounts?

Why is production outsourced to impoverished countries, sometimes in workplaces that are deplorable and cruel?

Why does texting while driving not earn a product liability suit?

Just because Silicon Valley is cool does not mean it could never become just another monopoly that got too greedy and turned off the left wing, the right wing and everybody in between.

Voir aussi:

Internet
Vents contraires contre les géants de la tech aux Etats-Unis
Critiquées pour leur situation de monopole et leur rôle joué pendant l’élection présidentielle américaine, les multinationales de la Silicon Valley doivent affronter des oppositions toujours plus fortes
Valérie de Graffenried
Le Temps
28 septembre 2017

Le vent est en train de tourner. L’appétit vorace et la toute-puissance financière des géants technologiques américains GAFA – acronyme pour Google, Apple, Facebook et Amazon – provoquent des remous aux Etats-Unis. Donald Trump n’en est pas le plus grand fan, et il ne s’en cache pas. Contrairement à son prédécesseur, il est plutôt hostile à la Silicon Valley, bastion progressiste par excellence. Des grands patrons de la tech se sont frontalement opposés à lui sur des dossiers clés comme le décret anti-immigration, le réchauffement climatique ou les émeutes de Charlottesville.

Alors quand les GAFA sont montrés du doigt en raison de leur situation de monopole et critiqués pour avoir véhiculé de la désinformation pendant l’élection présidentielle américaine, ce n’est pas Donald Trump qui monte au créneau pour les défendre. En Europe aussi, le débat est vif. A la fin de juin, la Commission européenne a sanctionné Google pour abus de position dominante en lui infligeant une amende record de 2,4 milliards de dollars (2,33 milliards de francs). Surtout, elle veut taxer davantage les GAFA, accusés de faire de l’optimisation fiscale. Elle a présenté ses premières pistes jeudi. Mais pour que les choses bougent sur ce plan, une position unanime des 28 Etats membres est nécessaire, ce qui est loin d’être acquis.

Danger pour la démocratie

Les chiffres sont vertigineux. Apple est l’entreprise la plus capitalisée en bourse, avec une valeur qui a dépassé les 800 milliards de dollars. Celle d’Alphabet, la maison mère de Google, atteint près de 650 milliards de dollars. Google représente 88% du marché de la recherche sur Internet aux Etats-Unis et Facebook vient de franchir la barre des deux milliards d’utilisateurs actifs. Amazon? Le géant de la vente en ligne, qui s’apprête à ouvrir un deuxième siège en Amérique du Nord – plusieurs villes sont en lice –, est en train de tuer le petit commerce. Cette toute-puissance inquiète. Cité par l’AFP, Bill Galston, un ex-conseiller du président Bill Clinton, cofondateur du think tank «The New Center», dénonce ces «moyens quasi illimités, qu’ils peuvent utiliser pour faire du lobbying». Et s’interroge sur le danger que cela peut représenter pour la démocratie.

Un sondage publié le 25 septembre par le quotidien US Today révèle que 76% des Américains sont désormais d’avis que les GAFA, les Big Four de la tech et leurs petits frères, ont trop de poids dans leur vie. Pas moins de 52% d’entre eux jugent cette influence «mauvaise». Certains de ces géants ont dû faire face à des scandales, ce qui entache leur déontologie et leur crédibilité. Le 6 septembre, Facebook a admis que près de 500 faux profils liés à la Russie avaient acheté pour plus de 100 000 dollars de publicité, entre juin 2015 et mai 2017, pour influencer l’élection présidentielle américaine en véhiculant des messages censés nuire à Hillary Clinton. «Je ne veux pas que qui que ce soit utilise nos instruments pour nuire à la démocratie», a proclamé son cofondateur et patron Mark Zuckerberg dans une vidéo, en présentant ses excuses.

Le syndrome Frankenstein

C’est la première fois que le groupe admet avoir été manipulé ainsi, offrant à la Russie une plateforme de choix pour sa propagande. De quoi intéresser le procureur spécial Robert Mueller, qui enquête sur les possibles collusions entre l’équipe de Donald Trump et Moscou. Facebook va devoir rendre des comptes devant le Sénat. Le Congrès entendra également Twitter et Google dans le cadre de l’affaire russe. Une audience publique est prévue le 1er novembre. Facebook avait déjà été critiqué pour avoir diffusé des vidéos de meurtres et de suicides en direct. Et facilité, grâce à ses algorithmes, des messages racistes et antisémites ciblés. Le New York Times s’est moqué des excuses tardives du groupe, en trouvant une analogie avec Frankenstein, qui a échappé à son créateur.

Faut-il réguler le secteur? S’achemine-t-on vers une législation antitrust contre les géants de la tech? Le controversé Stephen Bannon, que Donald Trump a limogé cet été de son poste de conseiller stratégique à la Maison-Blanche, l’avait appelée de ses vœux. Tout comme la sénatrice démocrate Elizabeth Warren, à l’autre bout de l’échiquier politique. La News Media Alliance, qui regroupe plus de 2000 titres américains et canadiens, donne également de la voix en ce sens, les médias d’information souffrant de la rude concurrence des géants d’Internet.

Le Congrès est en plein chantier sur la fiscalité des entreprises, mais pour l’instant aucun projet majeur n’est prévu pour limiter l’influence et l’expansion des GAFA. Les bénéfices de l’innovation technologique pour le consommateur semblent encore primer. Le climat politique a toutefois bien changé à Washington. Les législateurs du Congrès ont les GAFA sérieusement à l’œil. Le corset qui commence à les gainer promet de se resserrer.

Comme le rappelle le New York Times, Facebook et Google bataillent ferme depuis le mois dernier contre un projet qui veut les rendre responsables s’ils hébergent du trafic sexuel sur leurs sites. L’enjeu est majeur: une loi vieille de vingt ans protège pour l’instant les compagnies internet de poursuites en justice en raison de contenus postés par des internautes. Sentant le vent tourner, les géants de la tech commencent à renforcer leurs équipes d’avocats et de lobbyistes.

Voir également:

Mark Zuckerberg sort de sa réserve pour critiquer la politique d’immigration de Donald Trump

Le patron de Facebook a ouvertement critiqué les récentes décisions du président américain sur l’immigration. Sheryl Sandberg, numéro deux de Facebook, a quant à elle exprimé son désaccord sur la question de l’avortement.

Le Monde.fr avec AFP et Reuters

« Mes arrière-grands-parents sont venus d’Allemagne, d’Autriche et de Pologne. Les parents de [mon épouse] Priscilla étaient des réfugiés venant de Chine et du Vietnam. Les Etats-Unis sont une nation d’immigrants, et nous devrions en être fiers. » Vendredi 27 janvier, le fondateur de Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, a publié un message sur le réseau social pour critiquer les récentes décisions de Donald Trump concernant l’immigration.

Un fait rare : Mark Zuckerberg avait pris soin, jusqu’ici, de ne pas afficher trop ouvertement ses opinions politiques – malgré des soupçons d’ambitions électorales, qu’il a démentis – et s’était abstenu de soutenir un candidat pendant la campagne présidentielle américaine. Il avait toutefois laissé entendre, dans un discours en avril dernier, son aversion pour certaines idées de Donald Trump, sans pour autant le nommer : « J’entends les voix apeurées qui nous appellent à construire des murs. Plutôt que des murs, nous voulons aider les gens à construire des ponts. »

Depuis, Donald Trump l’a emporté, et a durci dès ses premiers jours de mandat la politique d’immigration pour « protéger la nation contre l’entrée de terroristes étrangers », rapporte un décret publié vendredi soir. Il interdit notamment l’arrivée de ressortissants de sept pays musulmans pendant trois mois : Irak, Iran, Libye, Somalie, Soudan, Syrie et Yémen. Deux jours plus tôt, il avait signé un autre décret ordonnant la construction d’un mur à la frontière entre les Etats-Unis et le Mexique.

« Comme beaucoup d’entre vous, je suis inquiet de l’impact des récents décrets signés par le président Trump », explique Mark Zuckerberg, avant de développer :

« Nous devons faire en sorte que ce pays reste en sécurité, mais pour y parvenir, nous devrions nous concentrer sur les personnes qui représentent vraiment une menace. Etendre l’attention des forces de l’ordre au-delà des personnes qui représentent de vraies menaces va nuire à la sécurité des Américains, en dispersant les ressources, tandis que des millions de sans-papiers qui ne représentent aucune menace vivront dans la peur d’être expulsés. »

Les poids lourds américains inquiets

Comme beaucoup d’employeurs de la Silicon Valley, M. Zuckerberg plaide depuis longtemps pour un assouplissement des règles d’immigration aux Etats-Unis. Notamment parce que ces entreprises recrutent beaucoup de personnes étrangères et que les lois américaines compliquent leur arrivée.

Le patron de Facebook n’est d’ailleurs pas le seul à s’être montré inquiet après le décret signé vendredi par le nouveau président américain. Dans une note interne qu’a pu consulter le Wall Street Journal, Sundar Pichai, qui dirige Google, a expliqué que ce décret pouvait affecter 187 salariés de l’entreprise. « Nous sommes inquiets de l’impact de ce décret et de toutes les propositions qui pourraient imposer des restrictions aux Googlers [les employés de Google] et leurs familles, ou qui pourraient créer des obstacles pour apporter de grands talents aux Etats-Unis. »

D’autres poids lourds de la Silicon Valley comme Apple, Netflix et Tesla ont exprimé leur consternation au sujet de ce décret.

Alphabet, maison mère de Google, a rappelé d’urgence les membres de son personnel qui se trouvaient à l’étranger et a invité ceux qui pourraient être concernés par le décret à ne pas quitter les Etats-Unis.

« Ce n’est pas une politique que nous soutenons », écrit quant à lui Tim Cook, le patron d’Apple, dans une lettre adressée à ses employés. « Nous avons pris contact avec la Maison blanche pour expliquer ses effets néfastes pour nos collaborateurs et notre entreprise », poursuit-il, promettant d’aider les victimes du décret.

Selon Brad Smith, président et directeur juridique de Microsoft, 76 employés de la firme viennent des sept pays concernés par le décret. « En tant qu’entreprise, Microsoft croit à une immigration équilibrée et hautement qualifiée (…) Nous croyons à l’importance de protéger les réfugiés reconnus comme tels et respectueux de la loi dont les vies peuvent être menacées par les procédures d’immigration », ajoute-t-il dans un courriel.

Quant au fondateur de SpaceX, Elon Musk, qui a récemment semblé cultiver une relation avec Trump, il a tweeté que « beaucoup de gens qui sont affectés par cette politique sont de solides partisans des États-Unis » qui ne « méritent pas d’être rejetés ».

Fait étonnant, le réseau social Twitter a aussi réagi, affichant son soutien aux personnes concernées par ce décret : « Twitter est construit par les immigrants de toute religion. Nous serons toujours pour eux et avec eux ».

« Ne pas autoriser (les ressortissants) de certains pays ou les réfugiés à venir en Amérique n’est pas correct et nous devons épauler ceux qui sont affectés », a pour sa part déclaré Brian Chesky, cofondateur et directeur général d’Airbnb, qui a promis d’héberger gratuitement les étrangers refoulés.

Sheryl Sandberg attaque Trump sur l’avortement

La numéro deux de Facebook, Sheryl Sandberg, a elle aussi critiqué publiquement Donald Trump jeudi, cette fois sur le terrain de l’avortement. Parmi les nombreux décrets signés par le nouveau président dès son entrée en fonctions, l’un interdit le financement d’ONG internationales soutenant l’avortement. Une décision « qui pourrait avoir de terribles conséquences pour les femmes et les familles partout dans le monde », a déploré Mme Sandberg sur Facebook.

La directrice opérationnelle de Facebook avait rencontré M. Trump en novembre, lors de la réunion qu’il avait organisée à la Trump Tower avec plusieurs dirigeants de la Silicon Valley, ce qui avait déclenché un certain nombre de critiques. Contrairement à Mark Zuckerberg, Sheryl Sanberg, par ailleurs fondatrice d’une ONG consacrée aux femmes, avait affiché son soutien dès juin 2016 à Hillary Clinton, mais s’était montrée très discrète à ce sujet depuis.

Voir encore:

Taxation des GAFA : l’Union européenne désunie
Si la France a réussi à imposer son ordre du jour sur cette question, ses propositions ne font pas l’unanimité.
Le Monde économie
Cécile Ducourtieux (Bruxelles, bureau européen)
21.09.2017

Le ministre de l’économie, Bruno Le Maire, a réussi un beau coup médiatique ces derniers jours en imposant à l’ordre du jour européen le sujet de la taxation des géants du numérique (les « GAFA », pour Google, Amazon, Facebook et Apple). Pour autant, la solution inédite avancée par Bercy ne fait pas l’unanimité dans l’Union. Le ministère français suggère que, pour obliger ces multinationales championnes de l’optimisation fiscale à payer les impôts correspondant à leur activité effective dans un pays, on impose, non pas leurs bénéfices, mais leur chiffre d’affaires, au motif qu’il serait plus facile à matérialiser.

Après avoir obtenu le ralliement, début septembre, de trois autres poids lourds européens (ses homologues allemand, italien et espagnol), M. Le Maire est également parvenu à convaincre six autres ministres (l’autrichien, le grec, le slovène, le bulgare, le portugais et le roumain), à l’Ecofin, la réunion des grands argentiers européens du 16 septembre à Tallinn (Estonie). Pour ne pas être en reste, la Commission européenne, jusqu’alors très prudente à l’idée d’une « taxe GAFA » spécifique, a rendu publique, jeudi 21 septembre, une « communication » sur le sujet.

Pour autant, l’institution s’est gardée de tout enthousiasme. Si elle salue l’activisme hexagonal, et assure qu’elle va l’explorer plus avant, elle reste convaincue que la bonne solution, à terme, pour éviter que les géants du Net continuent d’échapper massivement à l’impôt en profitant d’une fiscalité datant du XXe siècle, peu adaptée à la dématérialisation accélérée des échanges, c’est une remise à plat complète de la taxe sur le profit.

« Il n’est plus question de tolérer une situation où des sociétés échappent pratiquement à l’impôt malgré des bénéfices considérables. C’est une question de justice sociale et de pragmatisme. Nous estimons que le manque à gagner pour les fiscs européens est supérieur à 5 milliards d’euros par an », explique au Monde Pierre Moscovici, le commissaire à l’économie. Pour autant, estime l’ex-ministre de l’économie du gouvernement Ayrault, « il vaut mieux, pour adapter notre fiscalité à l’ère du numérique, changer la roue qu’ajouter une rustine aux règles existantes ».

Travail de conviction

La Commission tente, depuis fin 2016, de relancer un projet jugé très ambitieux d’harmonisation au niveau européen du calcul de l’impôt sur le revenu. Baptisée « Accis » à Bruxelles, pour « assiette commune consolidée pour l’impôt sur les sociétés », cette ébauche de directive est censée définir les règles d’établissement de la base fiscale pays par pays, et celles de la consolidation des profits au niveau des sociétés mères.

La Commission préférerait largement poursuivre son travail de conviction auprès des pays membres, plutôt que de l’abandonner pour la proposition française, plus rapide à mettre en œuvre à court terme, jure M. Le Maire.

« Nous n’excluons aucune option, et l’initiative française réunissant désormais dix pays est la bienvenue. Mais nous tenons à rappeler que la taxation du numérique est une question politique, qui appelle des réponses globales et exige un temps de réflexion. Les options les plus simples à énoncer ne sont pas forcément les plus simples à mettre en œuvre », insiste M. Moscovici.

La taxation du chiffre d’affaires inquiète à Bruxelles : comment éviter de taxer doublement les sociétés du Net (par le chiffre d’affaires et par le profit), alors que cette pratique va à l’encontre de toutes les règles en matière fiscale ? Quel seuil de revenus « numériques » choisir pour cibler les « grosses » plates-formes sans pénaliser tout l’écosystème des start-up européennes ? En 2010, une première tentative de taxe Google hexagonale avait été rapidement abandonnée pour cette dernière raison. Elle visait la publicité en ligne, principale source de revenus de la plupart des acteurs du Net, à commencer par les plus petits…

Doutes sur le fond

Par ailleurs, au-delà de ces doutes sur le fond, huit pays membres ont fait part, selon nos informations, de leurs fortes réserves concernant la proposition française, lors de l’Ecofin (la Suède, Malte, les Pays-Bas, le Luxembourg, l’Irlande, Chypre, la Belgique et le Royaume-Uni). Or, rien ne peut avancer au niveau européen en matière fiscale sans l’unanimité des pays membres. Certains, comme l’Irlande, le Luxembourg ou les Pays-Bas pratiquent des fiscalités notoirement accommodantes pour les GAFA, et sont parmi les moins enthousiastes à Bruxelles dès lors qu’il s’agit de lutter contre la fraude et l’évasion fiscale, même si leur position s’est un peu assouplie après le scandale « LuxLeaks », fin 2015.

D’autres, comme la Suède, réclament généralement que les travaux européens se calent sur les discussions internationales dans le cadre de l’OCDE (Organisation de coopération et de développement économiques), afin que les Etats-Unis y soient associés.

Chargés de la présidence tournante de l’Union et obligés, du fait de cette responsabilité temporaire, à une certaine neutralité, les Estoniens se sont prudemment tenus en retrait du débat à l’Ecofin. Plutôt en faveur de la poursuite des négociations autour d’Accis, ils vont tenter de rapprocher les points de vue européens avant le conseil des dirigeants de l’Union, fin décembre.

Leur but ? Sur un sujet identifié désormais comme prioritaire, ils veulent que l’Europe contribue à influencer le travail de l’OCDE, qui travaille aussi sur la taxation du numérique et doit rendre son rapport en avril 2018. Si une proposition législative de la Commission émerge de toutes ces tractations, ce ne sera logiquement pas avant cette échéance internationale, soit au plus tôt dans le courant du deuxième trimestre 2018.

Voir de plus:

Comment Macron alimente le populisme

Emmanuel Macron, qui vomit le populisme, fait tout pour l’alimenter. Il en a apporté la démonstration, mardi à la Sorbonne, en se faisant le défenseur exalté de l’Union européenne, sans vouloir entendre les réticences des peuples. Sa prétendue ‘refondation’ européenne n’est autre que la perpétuation d’une institution technocratique et éloignée de la vie des gens. Son choix d’une ‘Europe souveraine » est celui d’une supranationalité qui méconnait les nations et leur désir de maîtriser leur destin. L’entendre affirmer que l’Europe doit « faire une place aux réfugiés » car « c’est notre devoir commun » révèle son indifférence aux inquiétudes qui partout se manifestent. En Allemagne, la percée de l’afD, ce week-end, a été motivée par la folle politique migratoire d’Angela Merkel et son incapacité à mesurer le danger islamiste. C’est Alice Schwarzer, grande figure du féminisme en Allemagne, qui déclarait l’autre jour dans Le Figaro, parlant de la chancelière : « Elle n’a pas perçu la différence entre l’islam et l’islamisme, entre la religion et l’idéologie politique (…) De cette fausse perception sur la politisation de l’islam ont découlé de nombreuses erreurs ». D’islam politique, il n’en a évidemment pas été question dans le discours fleuve du chef de l’Etat. Il ne veut ‘conduire la bataille’ que pour donner plus de pouvoirs encore à une Union de plus en plus soviétoïde. Il n’a réservé ses coups, comme à son habitude, qu’à ceux qui ne pensent pas comme lui.

Ce mercredi, dans Le Figaro, l’universitaire Jean-Claude Pacitto alerte sur l’intolérance qui s’est installée dans l’Université, aux prises avec des moeurs mafieuses donnant au conformisme sa place de choix, lors des procédures de cooptation. Pacitto s’interroge : ‘La France n’est-elle jamais sortie de cette tentation toute soviétique qui consiste à envisager le débat qu’en termes d’élimination des adversaires ?’. En tout cas, à entendre Macron hier à la Sorbonne, la réponse est non. En effet, non content de s’aveugler sur une Union européenne vécue comme une violence ou une menace par beaucoup de citoyens abandonnés, le président s’est une fois de plus laissé aller au manichéisme en usage chez les esprits sectaires. Pour lui, ceux qui critiquent l’UE laisseraient voir un ‘nationalisme’, un ‘identitarisme’, un ‘souverainisme de repli’ et autres « passions tristes ». Il dit de ceux-là qu’ils « mentent aux peuples ». Et de menacer, d’ailleurs peu clairement : « Je ne laisserai rien, rien, à ceux qui promettent la haine, la division ou le repli national ». Mais où est la haine, en l’occurrence, sinon dans ces propos présidentiels qui cherchent à discréditer des contradicteurs. Je ne sais pas si la méthode est spécifiquement soviétique. Reste qu’elle vient compléter un autoritarisme qui se retrouve généralement chez les faibles. Le macronisme devient, de plus en plus, un despotisme éructant.

Voir par ailleurs:

The Hipster in the Mirror
Mark Greif
The New York Times
November 12, 2010

A  year ago, my colleagues and I started to investigate the contemporary hipster. What was the “hipster,” and what did it mean to be one? It was a puzzle. No one, it seemed, thought of himself as a hipster, and when someone called you a hipster, the term was an insult. Paradoxically, those who used the insult were themselves often said to resemble hipsters — they wore the skinny jeans and big eyeglasses, gathered in tiny enclaves in big cities, and looked down on mainstream fashions and “tourists.” Most puzzling was how rattled sensible, down-to-earth people became when we posed hipster-themed questions. When we announced a public debate on hipsterism, I received e-mail messages both furious and plaintive. Normally inquisitive people protested that there could be no answer and no definition. Maybe hipsters didn’t exist! The responses were more impassioned than those we’d had in our discussions on health care, young conservatives and feminism. And perfectly blameless individuals began flagellating themselves: “Am I a hipster?”

I wondered if I could guess the root of their pain. It’s a superficial topic, yet it seemed that so much was at stake. Why? Because struggles over taste (and “taste” is the hipster’s primary currency) are never only about taste. I began to wish that everyone I talked to had read just one book to give these fraught debates a frame: “Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste,” by Pierre Bourdieu.

A French sociologist who died in 2002 at age 71, Bourdieu is sometimes wrongly associated with postmodern philosophers. But he did share with other post-1968 French thinkers a wish to show that lofty philosophical ideals couldn’t be separated from the conflicts of everyday life. Subculture had not been his area, precisely, but neither would hipsters have been beneath his notice.

He came from a family of peasants in the foothills of the Pyrenees. His father was elevated by a job in the village post office — although he always emphasized that he had attained his position by being neither better nor different. Pierre, as a child, was elevated yet more drastically by the school system. He so distinguished himself in the classroom that he was carried to studies at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris. This was the pinnacle of French intellect, the path of Sartre and Maurice Merleau-Ponty.

Yet Bourdieu chose to make it his life’s work to debunk the powerful classes’ pretensions that they were more deserving of authority or wealth than those below. He aimed his critiques first at his own class of elites — professors and intellectuals — then at the media, the political class and the propertied class.

“Distinction,” published in 1979, was an undisputed masterwork. In it, Bourdieu set out to show the social logic of taste: how admiration for art, appreciation of music, even taste in food, came about for different groups, and how “superior” taste was not the result of an enchanted superiority in scattered individuals.

This may seem a long way from Wellington-booted and trucker-hatted American youth in gentrifying neighborhoods. But Bourdieu’s innovation, applicable here, was to look beyond the traditional trappings of rich or poor to see battles of symbols (like those boots and hats) traversing all society, reinforcing the class structure just as money did.

Over several years in the 1960s, Bourdieu and his researchers surveyed 1,200 people of all classes and mined government data on aspects of French domestic life. They asked, for instance, Which of the following subjects would be most likely to make a beautiful photograph? and offered such choices as a sunset, a girl with a cat or a car crash. From government dietary research, they took data on the classic question: Do you think French people eat too much? The statistical results were striking. The things you prefer — tastes that you like to think of as personal, unique, justified only by sensibility — correspond tightly to defining measures of social class: your profession, your highest degree and your father’s profession.

The power of Bourdieu’s statistics was to show how rigid and arbitrary the local conformities were. In American terms, he was like an updater of Thorstein Veblen, who gave us the idea of “conspicuous consumption.” College teachers and artists, unusual in believing that a beautiful photo could be made from a car crash, began to look conditioned to that taste, rather than sophisticated or deep. White-collar workers who defined themselves by their proclivity to eat only light foods — as opposed to farmworkers, who weren’t ashamed to treat themselves to “both cheese and a dessert” — seemed not more refined, but merely more conventional.

Taste is not stable and peaceful, but a means of strategy and competition. Those superior in wealth use it to pretend they are superior in spirit. Groups closer in social class who yet draw their status from different sources use taste and its attainments to disdain one another and get a leg up. These conflicts for social dominance through culture are exactly what drive the dynamics within communities whose members are regarded as hipsters.

Once you take the Bourdieuian view, you can see how hipster neighborhoods are crossroads where young people from different origins, all crammed together, jockey for social gain. One hipster subgroup’s strategy is to disparage others as “liberal arts college grads with too much time on their hands”; the attack is leveled at the children of the upper middle class who move to cities after college with hopes of working in the “creative professions.” These hipsters are instantly declassed, reservoired in abject internships and ignored in the urban hierarchy — but able to use college-taught skills of classification, collection and appreciation to generate a superior body of cultural “cool.”

They, in turn, may malign the “trust fund hipsters.” This challenges the philistine wealthy who, possessed of money but not the nose for culture, convert real capital into “cultural capital” (Bourdieu’s most famous coinage), acquiring subculture as if it were ready-to-wear. (Think of Paris Hilton in her trucker hat.)

Both groups, meanwhile, look down on the couch-­surfing, old-clothes-wearing hipsters who seem most authentic but are also often the most socially precarious — the lower-middle-class young, moving up through style, but with no backstop of parental culture or family capital. They are the bartenders and boutique clerks who wait on their well-to-do peers and wealthy tourists. Only on the basis of their cool clothes can they be “superior”: hipster knowledge compensates for economic immobility.

All hipsters play at being the inventors or first adopters of novelties: pride comes from knowing, and deciding, what’s cool in advance of the rest of the world. Yet the habits of hatred and accusation are endemic to hipsters because they feel the weakness of everyone’s position — including their own. Proving that someone is trying desperately to boost himself instantly undoes him as an opponent. He’s a fake, while you are a natural aristocrat of taste. That’s why “He’s not for real, he’s just a hipster” is a potent insult among all the people identifiable as hipsters themselves.

The attempt to analyze the hipster provokes such universal anxiety because it calls everyone’s bluff. And hipsters aren’t the only ones unnerved. Many of us try to justify our privileges by pretending that our superb tastes and intellect prove we deserve them, reflecting our inner superiority. Those below us economically, the reasoning goes, don’t appreciate what we do; similarly, they couldn’t fill our jobs, handle our wealth or survive our difficulties. Of course this is a terrible lie. And Bourdieu devoted his life to exposing it. Those who read him in effect become responsible to him — forced to admit a failure to examine our own lives, down to the seeming trivialities of clothes and distinction that, as Bourdieu revealed, also structure our world.

Mark Greif, a founder of n+1 and an assistant professor at the New School, is the editor, with Kathleen Ross and Dayna Tortorici, of “What Was the Hipster? A Sociological Investigation,” published last month.

Voir encore:

Si vous souhaitez être crédibles, arrêtez de dire « Les GAFA »
Julien Cadot
Numerama
27 janvier 2017

Les GAFA n’existent pas. Essayons de comprendre pourquoi cette expression n’a pas de sens en 2017.

Si l’on regarde du côté de Wikipédia, on s’aperçoit que l’acronyme GAFA se rapporte à deux choses. Premièrement, il peut signifier Geometric And Functional Analysis, bimensuel anglophone dédié à la recherche en mathématiques. Il peut aussi signifier Google Apple Facebook Amazon, quatre entreprises qu’on nommerait également « Géants du web ». Si votre passion pour les chiffres vous a conduit à cet article, nous avons le regret de vous informer qu’il ne sera pas question du périodique dans ces paragraphes, mais bien de nos amis américains.

Car il est rare, en France, qu’une journée se passe sans que le terme GAFA (le plus souvent « Les GAFA ») ne soit employé. On le trouve dans la presse web et papier, à la radio, à la télé, mais aussi dans la bouche de candidats à la présidentielle, sous la plume d’économistes ou dans les rapports des associations et organismes qui s’intéressent à la vie du web. Et pourtant, en 2017, plusieurs raisons nous conduisent à penser que ce terme est à bannir. Nous allons essayer de les expliquer.

Commençons par une rapide autocritique. Si vous faites une recherche sur GAFA Google, vous vous apercevrez bien vite que l’acronyme se trouve sur nos pages. Et c’est vrai : notre première volonté étant de nous faire comprendre le plus immédiatement possible, nous avons pu l’utiliser. Pourtant, depuis un an à peu près, il faut savoir que nos journalistes ont la consigne de ne jamais l’employer au premier degré. Il peut être utilisé dans des propos rapportés et quand il s’agit, nous allons le voir, de souligner par ironie une conception trop simpliste des acteurs du web.

GAFA : 4 entreprises qui n’ont rien à voir

Et c’est précisément le premier point qui nous turlupine : dire « Les GAFA », c’est faire un rassemblement qui n’a, au fond, pas beaucoup de sens. Les Géants du Web ? Apple est loin d’être né du web et encore aujourd’hui, l’entreprise de Cupertino est plus connue pour son matériel que pour ses logiciels (qui ne sont pas forcément des parties du « web »). Google est une agence de publicité, un moteur de recherche, un créateur de robot, un fournisseur d’accès à Internet, un fonds d’investissement, un chercheur en santé et en intelligence artificielle… et Google ne s’appelle plus Google, mais Alphabet.

Amazon est un e-commerçant. Tout ce que fait Amazon n’a qu’un but : vendre toujours plus de choses sur Amazon. Kindle, 1-Click, Dash, Alexa, Premium, Prime Now et autres services se regroupent autour de l’activité principale du géant de Seattle : c’est une boutique qui veut vendre des choses matérielles ou immatérielles. Une grosse boutique internationale, mais une boutique quand même. Facebook, enfin, est un réseau social, une régie publicitaire, une plateforme de contenu, un kiosque pour les médias (voire un média), un autre réseau social (Instagram) ou un explorateur de tendances technologiques. C’est, dans un sens, celui qui s’approche le plus de Google / Alphabet. Mais effectivement, (GF)+A+A, ça sonne moins bien.

(GF)+A+A, ça sonne moins bien

Ces quelques définitions fort simples et non exhaustives de ces sociétés montrent bien que les mettre sous une même bannière n’est presque jamais justifié, sans compter qu’en plus d’être différentes, ces entreprises sont concurrentes et pas une bande de copains américains. Ou alors, le regroupement se justifie par des choses beaucoup trop vagues (multinationale, richesse, optimisation fiscale, communication…) qui sont aussi des caractéristiques de milliers d’entreprises qui n’ont rien à voir avec la tech ou le web. Et le premier défaut de cet acronyme est particulièrement problématique quand il se mêle par exemple à la politique, quel que soit le bord.

Emmanuel Macron a par exemple employé le terme le 27 janvier 2017 pour dire que « Les GAFA » participeraient au financement de son pass jeunesse pour la culture. La « culture » a un rapport avec l’activité d’un Amazon, par exemple, ou celle d’un Google en tant que moteur de recherche. Mais pourquoi diable faire payer Apple et Facebook pour un pass culture ? Pourquoi ne pas impliquer Twitter et Microsoft ? Et surtout, pourquoi éviter des acteurs qui ont, eux, tout à voir avec la culture, comme Netflix ?

GAFA : et les autres ?

Cette dernière interrogation nous mène à un deuxième point : le terme « GAFA » est désuet. Il sonne comme une sorte de locution creuse et un brin moqueuse, souvent utilisée pour parler en mal de ces entreprises qui sont autant des mastodontes que des dinosaures de notre web. Quand on entend le mot, on a l’impression de se trouver en 2010 et d’entendre parler du tout puissant IBM.

Aujourd’hui, le web et les nouvelles technologies se sont redessinés très largement et évoquer par exemple l’impact d’une entreprise sur la société, positif ou négatif, sans parler d’Uber ou de Tesla est un non sens. Tout comme parler d’un grand réseau social et oublier Snapchat. Ou parler de Google et d’Apple sans évoquer les colosses de l’autre côté du globe que sont Baidu, Alibaba, LeEco ou Samsung et dont la croissance est loin d’être stoppée. C’est comme si la locution donnait un éclairage bien trop important à quatre entreprises, qui sont certes énormes, mais qui ne sont pas l’alpha et l’oméga de l’innovation, de la nouveauté ou de l’économie moderne.

À ce sujet, employer le terme « NATU » (Netflix, Airbnb, Tesla, Uber) qui cherche à s’imposer pour remplacer « GAFA » est tout aussi problématique : il oublie, lui aussi, les puissants asiatiques et fait un plan serré maladroit sur quatre autres entreprises qui n’ont, elles non plus, rien en commun.

GAFA : effacer les problèmes derrière un acronyme

Dès lors, un candidat à une élection présidentielle (tous ou presque le font) qui emploie « GAFA », « NATU » ou même « Géants californiens » (ils sont loin d’être tous californiens), n’a pas vraiment d’idée de qui il parle et de comment il souhaite impliquer tel ou tel acteur dans tel ou tel plan. Et ce point est peut-être le plus important de tous : résumer un groupe informe a une conséquence bien réelle sur la manière dont les gouvernements, états, organisations, économistes et même les militants agissent.

Si l’on prend le problème réel de la fiscalité on comprend très vite qu’on ne traite pas de la même manière avec Apple (Irlande) qu’avec Netflix (Luxembourg) Google (bureaux internationaux, présents à Paris et à Londres) ou qu’avec des sociétés moins exposées et donc moins souvent pointées du doigt (Samsung, Huawei…) et qui pratiquent très probablement des « optimisations » sur lesquelles il y aurait à enquêter.

Arnaud Montebourg évoquait « quatre entreprises californiennes »

Sans parler de tout ce qui n’entre pas dans la fiscalité. Par exemple, quand on est une collectivité ou une ville, ce n’est pas du tout la même chose de monter un projet avec Google (plusieurs centaines d’employés à Paris, allant de la communication à la recherche) qu’avec un Facebook (petits bureaux, compétences très orientées business) ou un Amazon qui a à la fois des bureaux mais aussi des entrepôts et des livreurs et qui opère donc à plusieurs niveaux avec des tas de problématiques et d’interlocuteurs différents.

Traiter avec les GAFA, faire plier les GAFA, faire financer X ou Y choses avec les GAFA, organiser un plan avec les GAFA, impliquer les GAFA sont autant de propositions qui n’ont aucune signification pratique et aucune portée réelle : tout au plus s’agit-il de vaines promesses ou de faux espoirs.

GAFA : créer une mythologie technologique

Le dernier point que nous souhaitons relever est peut-être tout à la fois le moins grave et le plus remarquable. En effet, à force d’être mal utilisé, à tort et à travers, le terme a remplacé l’objet qu’il désigne. Le signifiant « Les GAFA » est une sorte de chimère sans signifié, qui résonne comme une menace toute puissante, l’épure d’une techno-divinité. Les GAFA nous espionnent. Les GAFA nous contrôlent. Les GAFA nous privent de telle ou telle liberté.

Si on estime que « Les GAFA » n’ont aucun sens réel, alors toutes ces phrases sonnent creux — en plus de perdre en crédibilité. En effet, si l’on prend par exemple la collecte des données personnelles, il est on ne peut plus faux de mettre Google, Amazon, Facebook et Apple dans le même panier. Les quatre compagnies n’ont pas du tout la même politique sur le sujet et une critique ou un éloge qui s’applique à l’un ne s’appliquera pas forcément à l’autre.

« Les GAFA » n’existant pas, ils ne peuvent ni être une cible crédible, ni un allié de confiance. En revanche, le terme entretient un flou artistique qui n’aboutit, concrètement, à rien.

Les GAFA n’existant pas en tant qu’entité, il est très difficile de mettre autre chose que de l’irrationnel derrière cette expression, même si elle a pu avoir du sens au moment où elle a été employées la première fois. Et l’irrationnel, surtout dans des cas économiques, sociaux ou politiques très concrets que nous venons d’esquisser, n’a rien d’une route à emprunter pour avancer.

Voir de plus:

American cultural imperialism has a new name: GAFA
Quarz
December 01, 2014

In France, there’s a new word: GAFA. It’s an acronym, and it has become a shorthand term for some of the most powerful companies in the world—all American, all tech giants. GAFA stands for Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon.

The phrase is used by newspapers, blogs, and talking heads on TV—see here and here and here (all links in French). It even appears in the local version of “The Internet for Dummies.” Le Monde’s economics editor, Alexis Delcambre, tells Quartz that GAFA first appeared in his newspaper in December 2012. “GAFA is not used very often, but when used, it is almost always on critical topics, including taxes or personal data,” he says.

In the US, Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon are generally praised as examples of innovation. In the French press, and for much of the rest of Europe, their innovation is often seen in a less positive light—the ugly Americans coming over with innovative approaches to invading personal privacy or new ways to avoid paying their fair share. Take Google: its tax affairs in France are being challenged (paywall)—which comes soon after it has been forced to institute a “right to be forgotten” and threatened with being broken up.

But the spread of the term “GAFA” may be as much to do with cultural resentment as taxes. “I think it’s more about distribution of power in the online world than tax avoidance,” Liam Boogar, founder of the French start-up site, Rude Baguette, tells Quartz. France, after all, is a country with a long history of resisting US cultural hegemony.

Remember José Bové, the sheep farmer who destroyed a McDonald’s in 1999 and was a symbol for the anti-globalization movement? Times have changed; McDonald’s most profitable country in Europe is now France. Having lost that battle, the French have instead turned their ire to Silicon Valley.

There is also a loss of public sympathy in the wake of the massive American government spying revelations. Jérémie Zimmermann, one of the founders of La Quadrature, a tech-oriented public policy non-profit, tells Quartz he dislikes the term “GAFA” and prefers to refer to the big US firms as the “PRISM” companies (after the US National Security Agency program revealed by Edward Snowden) or the “Bullrun” firms (another NSA program), which he uses to refer to “more or less every US-based company in which trust is broken”—citing examples that include Intel, Motorola, and Cisco.

Even if the term has a negative connotation, it’s worth noting which companies didn’t make the acronym. Microsoft, most notably. Samsung is another. No Yahoo.

Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon pretty much dominate every facet of our lives—from email from friends and family to what’s in your pocket to how you get everything in your house to how you pay. As far as acronyms of global power go, it works.

What Is GAFA? Why The EU Doesn’t Love Large Harry Guinness
Make us of.com
June 18, 2015

GAFA is an acronym for Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon — the 4 most powerful American technology companies. Usage of the term “GAFA” is increasingly common in Europe. The acronym, originally from France, is used by the media to identify the 4 companies as a group – often in the context of legal investigations.

The EU has been butting heads with large companies for years. Let’s take a look at why it doesn’t like Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon.What’s Different About Europe?

The Europe Union, or EU, is composed of 28 countries. The major European powers, like France, Germany and (for the time being) the United Kingdom, are all members. The EU creates laws that cover all member states and treat every citizen equally. It is because of the EU that I, as an Irish person, am free to travel, work and live in almost any other European country.

The EU is based on the idea that nation states operating together are more powerful than those standing alone. It’s also generally quite hostile to the unfettered ambitions of corporations. Any company that seeks to acquire a monopoly, engage in anti-competitive practices, dodge taxes, or invade EU citizens’ privacy is likely to find themselves under investigation, and potentially facing a hefty fine.

Every GAFA company is currently under investigation by the EU for something.

Why the EU Doesn’t Like Google

Google knows a lot about you, although there are some steps you can take to minimise it. The company uses the information they pull from your browsing habits, emails, Google Drive files, and anything else they can get their hands on to serve you ever more targeted ads. In the past this has led to the EU criticising Google’s use of personal data. How Much Does Google Really Know About You? How Much Does Google Really Know About You? Read More 

More recently, the EU has been investigating Google for antitrust violations. Microsoft has been fined €2.2 billion for abusing it’s dominant market position and pushing it’s own services over the years, and the EU is concerned that Google is doing the same with search and Android. If they’re found to be abusing their position, they’ll face billions of euro worth of fines and be required to change their business practices.

Google has already been forced, by the EU, to change how it operates. After a landmark ruling last year, citizens of the EU have the “right to be forgotten” on the Internet. People can request that search engines remove links to web pages that contain information about them — although MakeUseOf readers don’t seem too fussed about it.

Why the EU Doesn’t Like Apple

Apple Music was only unveiled this month but, according to Reuters, the deals they’ve inked with record companies are already under investigation. Apple Unveils Apple Music at WWDC, U.S. Army Website Hacked, & More… [Tech News Digest] Apple Unveils Apple Music at WWDC, U.S. Army Website Hacked, & More… [Tech News Digest] Apple Music arrives at last, the United States Army gets hacked, Uwe Boll’s Kickstarter rage, Pizza Hut Blockbuster Box movies, and Grand Theft Auto V in real life. Read More

The EU, however, is more interested in Apple’s tax practices. The Union already shut down some tax loopholes, such as the Double Irish, that Apple used to minimize their tax burden, both in Europe and the US. The Union is continuing to investigate whether other practices they engaged in were legal. A ruling was due this month but has been pushed back.

Why the EU Doesn’t Like Facebook

The EU isn’t keen on Facebook for the same reason most people aren’t — it’s questionable privacy record. Facebook Privacy: 25 Things The Social Network Knows About You Facebook Privacy: 25 Things The Social Network Knows About You Facebook knows a surprising amount about us – information we willingly volunteer. From that information you can be slotted into a demographic, your « likes » recorded and relationships monitored. Here are 25 things Facebook knows about… Read More

There are several investigations, and a class action law suit, looking into whether or not Facebook’s privacy policy is legal. So far things are looking bad for Facebook. Despite frequent updates, a Belgian report released earlier this year “found that Facebook is acting in violation of European law“.

Just like the other companies, Facebook could face heavy fines if they don’t fall into line with the EU’s policies.

Why the EU Doesn’t Like Amazon

The EU’s issue with Amazon is a little different.

The EU wants a Digital Single Market where every citizen would be able to purchase the same products at the same price as any other, regardless of where the products were being sold from. They are, according to VentureBeat, concerned that Amazon, and other e-commerce companies like Netflix, “have policies that restrict the ability of merchants and consumers to buy and sell goods and services across Europe’s borders.” For example: videos offered by the company’s streaming aren’t available in every country, which is at odds with the EU’s aim to treat every member nation and citizen equally.

A year-long investigation launched this year so, at least for now, Amazon is free to continue as they are.

What Do You Think?

The EU is clearly not going to let the GAFA companies operate unchecked, nor let them have the same level of independence they enjoy in the US. The EU takes a much more hands on approach to consumer protection and anti-competition laws than the Obama administration.

So tell me, what do you think? Is the EU overreaching in its regulation of the GAFA companies or is it right to limit the tech giants’ ambitions?

Publicités

Affaire Theranos: Une montée et une chute qui est loin d’être une licorne (The rise and fall of Theranos illustrates Silicon Valley’s perverse incentives for both investors and consumers)

12 juin, 2016

damelicorne

holmesQuand Elizabeth Holmes était dans les petits papiers de Forbes et Fortune. - DR

La licorne voudra-t-elle te servir, ou demeurera-t-elle à ta crèche? Job 39: 9
Le lion et la licorne se disputaient la couronne Le lion battit la licorne
tout autour de la ville. Lewis Carroll
J’ai des sabots d’ivoire, des dents d’acier, la tête couleur de pourpre, le corps couleur de neige, et la corne de mon front porte les bariolures de l’arc en ciel. Je voyage de la Chaldée au désert tartare, sur les bords du Gange et dans la Mésopotamie. Je dépasse les autruches. Je cours si vite que je traîne le vent. Je frotte mon dos contre les palmiers. Je me roule dans les bambous. D’un bond, je saute les fleuves. Des colombes volent au-dessus de moi. Une vierge seule peut me brider.  Gustave Flaubert (La Tentation de saint Antoine)
On a cru très tard à l’existence de la licorne, alors même que la médecine ou les sciences naturelles avaient fait des grands progrès. Il y a, aujourd’hui encore, des pharmacies qui s’appellent « A la licorne » en référence aux vertus médicinales que l’on prêtait à la poudre de corne de licorne. (…) Elle endosse plusieurs symboles liés à la pureté, la naïveté, tout ce qui disparaît, s’évanouit quand on le cherche sans en être digne. (…) La licorne, c’est l’animal qu’on découvre quand on s’y attend le moins. Michel Pastoureau
Le parc lexico-zoologique des licornes continue de se peupler. Boston Globe
J’aime beaucoup ce nouvel emploi métaphorique de la licorne en tant que modificateur car il contient un élément de surprise, qui rappelle que la chose dont nous sommes en train de parler, un job, un partenaire, etc., n’est pas seulement rare mais n’existe peut-être pas du tout. L’expression “job de rêve” veut théoriquement dire la même chose mais je pense que la notion de rêve est devenue trop commune. Anne Curzan (université du Michigan)
Les images fondées sur les objets qui sont à la fois familiers et exotiques (comme les animaux africains, ou imaginaires) marchent grâce à leur cocasserie. Nous parlons de la politique de l’autruche, […] de zèbres, de dinosaures pour quelque chose d’obsolète, etc. Tout ce qui se niche avec force dans l’esprit des enfants est matière à créer des métaphores dans lesquelles on retrouve la qualité de l’objet. Orin Hargraves
La licorne, parfois nommée unicorne, est une créature légendaire à corne unique. Connue en Occident depuis l’Antiquité grecque par des récits de voyageurs en Perse et en Inde, sous le nom de monocéros, elle est peut-être en partie issue du chamanisme oriental à l’origine du Qilin (ou licorne chinoise) et du récit sanskrit d’Ekasringa. La licorne occidentale se différencie toutefois nettement de sa consœur asiatique par son apparence, son symbolisme et son histoire. Sous l’influence du premier des bestiaires, le Physiologos, les bestiaires médiévaux occidentaux et leurs miniatures la décrivent comme un animal sylvestre très féroce, symbole de pureté et de grâce, attiré par l’odeur de la virginité. Les chasseurs utiliseraient une jeune fille vierge pour la capturer. Sa forme se fixe entre le cheval et la chèvre blanche. La licorne se voit dotée d’un corps équin, d’une barbiche de bouc, de sabots fendus et surtout d’une longue corne au milieu du front, droite, spiralée et pointue, qui constitue sa principale caractéristique comme dans la série de tapisseries La Dame à la licorne. Elle devient l’animal imaginaire le plus important du Moyen Âge à la Renaissance. La croyance en son existence est omniprésente grâce au commerce de sa corne et à sa présence dans certaines traductions de la Bible. Des objets présentés comme d’authentiques « cornes de licorne » s’échangent à prix d’or, crédités du pouvoir de purifier les liquides des poisons et de guérir la plupart des maladies. Peu à peu, on découvre qu’il s’agit en réalité de dents de narval, un mammifère marin arctique. Il est admis que les multiples descriptions de licornes dans les récits de voyages correspondent aux déformations d’animaux réels, comme le rhinocéros et l’antilope. La croyance en l’existence de la licorne reste toutefois discutée jusqu’au milieu du XIXe siècle et de tous temps, cette bête légendaire intéresse des théologiens, médecins, naturalistes, poètes, gens de lettres, ésotéristes, alchimistes, psychologues, historiens et symbolistes. Son aspect symbolique, très riche, l’associe à la dualité de l’être humain, la recherche spirituelle, l’expérience du divin, la femme vierge, l’amour et la protection. Carl Gustav Jung lui consacre une quarantaine de pages dans Psychologie et alchimie. (…) La licorne figure depuis la fin du XIXe siècle parmi les créatures typiques des récits de fantasy et de féerie, grâce à des œuvres comme De l’autre côté du miroir de Lewis Carroll, La Dernière Licorne de Peter S. Beagle, Legend de Ridley Scott, ou encore Unico d’Osamu Tezuka. Son imagerie moderne s’éloigne de l’héritage médiéval, pour devenir celle d’un grand cheval blanc « magique » avec une corne unique au milieu du front. Son association récente à des univers fictifs tels que, entre autres, My Little Pony, lui donne une image plus mièvre, au point qu’elle est parodiée à travers le culte de la Licorne rose invisible, la web série Charlie la licorne ou encore le jeu Robot Unicorn Attack (…) Les observations mal comprises d’animaux réels expliquent en grande partie les multiples descriptions de la licorne occidentale, mais l’histoire de cette créature se révèle bien plus longue et complexe, notamment en raison de sa symbolique. Création du haut Moyen Âge, la licorne est une chimère. Elle ne provient pas d’une mythologie puisqu’elle ne présente aucun lien avec la création du mondeNote 1, les gestes héroïques ou la fondation d’une ville. Elle naît d’un mélange entre traditions orales et écrites, récits de voyageNote 2 et descriptions des naturalistes. Son origine est à rechercher dans les premiers bestiaires inspirés du Physiologos et les textes gréco-romains, eux-mêmes issus d’observation d’animaux exotiques: d’après Odell Shepard, la licorne occidentale est issue du mélange entre le récit de sa capture par une vierge dans le Physiologos, et la description de Ctésias qui en a fait un animal féroce ne pouvant être chassé par des techniques conventionnelles (…) Le narval joue, malgré lui, un rôle central dans la pérennité de la licorne occidentale. La grande dent unique de ce mammifère marin se vend comme corne de licorne de la fin du Moyen Âge à la Renaissance, en particulier au XVIe siècle. La première mention d’un narval cornu figure dans l’Atlas Minor, ouvrage savant de 160730. Une autre description détaillée paraît en 1645 grâce à Thomas Bartholin, mais sans faire de lien entre « licorne de mer » et licorne terrestre. (…) L’introduction de la licorne dans certaines traductions bibliques est l’une des causes de son inclusion à la mythologie chrétienne, entraînant son symbolisme médiéval. Dans les livres de la Bible hébraïque, le mot hébreu re’em (רְאֵם), équivalent de l’arabe rim aujourd’hui traduit par « bœuf sauvage » ou « buffle », apparaît à neuf reprises avec ses cornes, comme une allégorie de la puissance divine. Par ailleurs, le livre de Daniel utilise l’image d’un bouc avec une grande corne entre les yeux dans un contexte différent : comme métaphore du royaume d’Alexandre le Grand. Au IIIe siècle av. J.-C. et IIe siècle av. J.-C., quand les juifs hellénisés d’Alexandrie traduisent les différents livres hébreux pour en faire une version grecque appelée Septante, ils utilisent pour traduire re’em le mot monoceros (μoνoκερως), qu’ils doivent connaître par Ctésias et Aristote. À partir du IIe siècle, le judaïsme rabbinique rejette la tradition hellénistique et revient à l’hébreu (le texte massorétique). Par contre, la Septante devient l’Ancien Testament du Christianisme et dans sa version latine, la Vulgate, le grec monoceros est traduit soit par unicornis, soit par rhinocerotis83. Selon Roger Caillois, les kabbalistes auraient noté les lettres de la licorne (en tant que Re’em) : resch, aleph et mem, celles de la corne étant (Queren) qoph, resch et nun. Ce passage est fréquemment cité pour justifier du caractère indomptable de la licorne (…) Jusqu’au milieu du XIXe siècle, la licorne est parfois encore considérée comme réelle. La revue de l’orient de 1845 en fait une description encyclopédique, insistant sur le fait qu’« elle court toujours en ligne droite car la roideur de son cou et son corps ne lui permet guère de se tourner par le côté. Elle peut difficilement s’arrêter quand elle a pris son élan et renverse avec sa corne, ou coupe avec ses dents, les arbres de médiocre grosseur qui gênent son passage. On compose d’excellents remèdes avec sa corne, ses dents, son sang et son cœur, qui se vendent très cher ». En 1853, l’explorateur Francis Galton la cherche désespérément en Afrique australe, offrant de fortes récompenses pour sa capture : « Les Bushmen parlent de la licorne, elle a la forme et la taille d’une antilope, avec au milieu du front une corne unique pointée vers l’avant. Des voyageurs en Afrique tropicale en ont aussi entendu parler, et croient en son existence. Il y a bien de la place pour des espèces encore ignorées ou mal connues dans la large ceinture de terra incognita au centre du continent ». Le Glossaire archéologique du Moyen Âge, de Victor Gay, en 1883, est le dernier ouvrage à la mentionner comme réelle. Elle se retrouve sur de nombreux filigranes de la fin du XIXe siècle à la première moitié du XXe siècle. Ils possèdent des interprétations symboliques inspirées des signes de reconnaissances de sociétés secrètes, comme les cathares, les alchimistes, les sociétés antichrétiennes, maçonniques ou rosicruciennes. Wikipedia
Le terme romance l’histoire les entreprises technologiques: il les fait passer de quelque chose de lointain et de compliqué à quelque chose de magique et même sympathique, tout en étant rare et puissant. J’aurais certainement de meilleurs sentiments  envers des startups technologiques megariches si je pouvais les imaginer semblables à des licornes. Robin Lakoff (Berkeley)
Lee’s article isn’t the only reason the term has become so popular. Over the past decade, two major changes in the tech industry have created the need for a term that could quickly describe private billion-dollar tech companies. The first is is that these days, there’s no real math to startup valuations — the numbers are based mostly on a company’s potential, and they are essentially just made up. This has made it easier for companies to earn billion-dollar valuations. The other tectonic change is that venture-backed companies are staying private much longer than in the past. In 2000, the median time to an initial public offering was 3.1 years, according to the National Venture Capital Association. That number increased to 7.4 years in 2013, in part because many startups want to take advantage of the friendly valuation environment before they go public. Additionally, the emergence of private markets has made it easy for unicorn shareholders to cash out their investments without forcing their startups to go public and under the microscope of Wall Street’s unforgiving eyes. This is why companies like Dropbox ($10 billion) and Airbnb ($25.5 billion) remain private despite both being more than seven years old. Combined, these two changes have lead to there being more unicorns than ever before. Lee, who revisited her findings in July, saw the number of U.S. public and private unicorns go from 39 in 2013 to 84 in 2015, a whopping 115 percent increase in the span of 20 months. Though unicorns are still rare, there are now so many that they “warrant a special term that captures the mythical/aspirational quality and yet is light-hearted enough to be shared rapidly,” said Bob Goodson, co-founder of Quid. Salvador Rodriguez
Stealing critical data on customers, employees, products and business partners inflicts far more actual and potential damage than any physical theft ever could. Chris Beck (Clements Worldwide)
In the university city of Tartu in Estonia, Rove Digital established its offices and, from the outside,  it looked just like any other legitimate Internet service provider (ISP), with an official website and at one point it posted more than $5 million in revenue and had more than 50 employees. Rove Digital was however a sophisticated cybercrime operation run by  Vladimir Tsastsin which infected more than four million PCs in over 100 countries using malware known as DNSChanger with the U.S. government claiming this one operation alone earned the criminals $14 million before an FBI-led sting saw Tsastsin and his colleagues arrested. In July 2015 Tsastsin pled guilty to wire fraud and computer intrusion charges and faces a maximum 25 years in jail. (…) While most of the world’s unicorns are located in Silicon Valley, the majority of cybercrime gangs operate out of the former Soviet states, including Russia, Ukraine, and Estonia. However they are not limited to these locations with significant operations being run out of other European countries like Romania and Moldova while more recent cyrbercrime hotspots include Vietnam and Brazil. Hypponen says that one region of the globe has yet to establish itself as having a significant cybercrime presence, but he worries that in the coming years, Africa could product the next cybercrime unicorn. « I am worried about whether we will see more cybercrime coming out of Africa, hitting the rest of the world, » Hypponen says — and other experts agree. The reason for his concern is the exponential growth in connectivity which the continent is expected to experience in the coming years. At the moment the outbound bandwidth of the entire continent, which has a population of 1.1 billion, is the same as that of Finland, which has a population of 5 million. With companies like Facebook and Google are aggressively investigating ways to quickly connect the continent, this could mean that just like the rest of the world, Africa could soon be home to major cybercrime operations. David Gilbert
Une licorne (en anglais : unicorn) est une startup, principalement de la Silicon Valley, valorisée à plus d’un milliard de dollars. Cette expression a été inventé par Aileen Lee en 20132. Aileen Lee est une spécialiste américaine du capital-risque qui réalise en 2013 une étude, démontrant que moins de 0,1% des entreprises dans lesquelles investissaient les fonds de capital-risque atteignaient des valorisations supérieures à 1 milliard de dollars. Afin de réserver la meilleure publicité à son analyse, elle cherche un terme vendeur pour qualifier ces investissements rares. Elle trouve alors le mot « licorne » parfait car il renvoie à quelque chose de rare, relié au rêve et à l’heroic fantasy, une culture compatible avec celle des geeks. Par exemple, Airbnb, Dropbox, Xiaomi, Snapchat, SpaceX, Uber, Pinterest, Alumni Galaxy ou encore BlaBlaCar, sont des licornes. En août 2015, le magazine Fortune listait près de 140 licornes. Cette terminologie fait écho au GAFA (Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon) qui sont les quatre grandes firmes américaines qui dominent le marché mondial du numérique. Wikipedia
Les licornes, aux Etats-Unis, ont une caractéristique commune. Elles contribueraient à faire gonfler une nouvelle bulle. Qui n’est pas une bulle boursière, comme dans les années 2000, mais le fait des investisseurs privés qui misent des sommes colossales sur ces entreprises, leur faisant atteindre des niveaux de valorisation sans commune mesure avec les profits qu’elles génèrent. Les Uber, Twitter, Snapchat, Airbnb, Pinterest et consorts brûlent aussi énormément de cash, comme leurs ancêtres de la bulle internet.  (…) Tout d’abord parce que les investisseurs ont beaucoup de liquidités à placer. Ils savent qu’une valorisation élevée facilite le recrutement des meilleurs, tout comme elle assoit une réputation. Ils peuvent ainsi profiter d’un cercle vertueux.  Ensuite, (…) les licornes font saliver les fonds d’investissement avec des indicateurs financiers non conventionnels, qui mettent leur business en valeur, ce qu’elles ne peuvent pas faire quand elles s’introduisent en Bourse. De leur côté, les investisseurs, notamment ceux qui placent d’habitude plutôt leur argent en Bourse, comme les fonds de pension, les fonds souverains et les fonds spéculatifs, mettent en place des mécanismes leur garantissant un maximum de protection en cas de baisse de la valorisation lors de tours de table ultérieurs ou de vente. Ce qui alimente la bulle, et ainsi de suite. Si cette bulle-là explose, ce ne sera pas en raison d’une revente massive de titres, mais d’introductions en Bourse ou de rachats à une valorisation corrigée. Toutes n’y survivront pas. Raphaële Karayan
La valeur de marché peut traduire la sagesse des foules – la meilleure estimation possible étant donnée les informations disponibles, agrégeant de nombreux jugements individuels; mais elle peut être aussi sujette à des emballements, des erreurs collectives. Si la valeur d’une chose est ce que les autres sont prêts à payer pour l’avoir, on peut se retrouver dans un mécanisme dans lequel A achète parce que B achète, B achète parce qu’il sait que C est prêt à acheter, et C achète parce qu’il a vu A acheter. Ce mécanisme peut causer la valeur de marché d’un actif, en l’absence d’autres informations, à atteindre des niveaux énormes. Mais la valeur fondamentale ne disparaît pas pour autant. On finit par se rendre compte que les revenus ne sont pas au rendez-vous, ou ne justifient pas la valorisation. Et brusquement, le prix de l’actif s’effondre. Ceux qui le détenaient, s’ils s’étaient endettés en se croyant riches, se retrouvent dans l’obligation de le revendre à toute vitesse. La valeur de marché, après avoir été surévaluée, devient brusquement très sous-évaluée. Lorsque la panique se termine, le prix atteint la valeur fondamentale. Les fluctuations boursières ne sont rien d’autre que ces passages brutaux de la valeur de marché à la valeur fondamentale. Theranos, l’entreprise créée par Elizabeth Holmes, avait pour vocation de révolutionner les examens sanguins, en remplaçant la prise de sang (une expérience déplaisante, comme chacun sait) par un simple prélèvement d’une petite quantité de sang au bout du doigt. L’idée était non seulement de remplacer tous les tests existant (les analyses médicales sont un secteur peu concurrentiel, à fortes marges) et d’aller encore plus loin: grâce aux nouvelles technologies, de révolutionner le diagnostic médical, remplacé par des analyses de sang. Sur la base de cette idée, l’entreprise a levé des fonds, en abusant du mécanisme des start-ups pour gonfler leur valeur apparente. Rappelons le mécanisme: supposons que 1000 investisseurs soient prêts à mettre un million dans l’entreprise. Il suffit de ne mettre sur le marché que 10% du capital, et ces 10% seront payés en tout un milliard; on pourra dire alors que la valeur de l’entreprise est de 10 milliards – et que la fortune du fondateur s’élève à 9 milliards, puisqu’il détient les 90% du capital restant. Theranos a largement usé de ce mécanisme, en particulier, en ne faisant pas appel aux professionnels du capital-risque, mais en trouvant des investisseurs aux poches bien remplies et conquis par la belle histoire racontée par  la fondatrice de l’entreprise, et les articles complaisants la présentant comme la version féminine de Steve Jobs. Pour les attirer, la solution a consisté à leur vendre des actions préférentielles, qui en cas de liquidation leur permettent d’être les premiers actionnaires servis sur les actifs de l’entreprise. Ces actions préférentielles, vendues à des prix élevés, créaient la fortune virtuelle d’Elizabeth Holmes. Et puis les problèmes ont fini par arriver. Il est apparu que le plus souvent, les tests sanguins de Theranos n’utilisaient pas une technologie spéciale: ils se contentaient de diluer des petits échantillons de sang pour ensuite effectuer des tests standard, conçus pour des échantillons de sang normaux. Du coup, de nombreux tests sont faux… et l’entreprise court le risque de procès, sans compter le fait qu’elle n’a pas tenu ses promesses, et qu’elle ne gagnera jamais la fortune espérée. Forbes a donc brutalement ramené la valeur de marché de la fortune d’Elizabeth Holmes à sa valeur fondamentale: zéro, les bénéfices que l’on peut raisonnablement attendre pour Theranos. Alexandre Delaigue
Le sexe et la quête d’audience à tout prix aura eu raison du site américain d’informations à sensation Gawker. Vendredi 10 juin, il s’est placé sous la protection du chapitre 11 de la loi sur les défaillances d’entreprise, qui permet à une société de se restructurer sans mettre obligatoirement la clef sous la porte, selon un document déposé devant un tribunal de New York. Ce dépôt de bilan intervient trois mois après que le célèbre catcheur Hulk Hogan a remporté une poursuite de 140 millions de dollars américains contre l’éditeur en ligne. Dans les documents déposés, l’entreprise new-yorkaise révèle qu’elle détient une dette de 500 millions de dollars américains et que ses actifs valent jusqu’à 100 millions. La situation comptable de la société était donc déjà très déséquilibrée, mais dans la liste des créanciers du groupe figure en première ligne Terry Gene Bollea, plus connu sous le nom de Hulk Hogan. Hulk Hogan a en effet traîné Gawker devant les tribunaux après que le site a diffusé une vidéo filmée à l’insu du catcheur, dans laquelle il a une relation sexuelle avec la femme d’un ami. (…) Après ce dépôt de bilan, Gawker a annoncé avoir trouvé un accord avec le groupe de médias Ziff Davis, qui va racheter l’essentiel de ses actifs pour un prix non dévoilé, selon un communiqué. Fin mai, le milliardaire Peter Thiel, cofondateur d’eBay, avait révélé avoir financé la défense d’Hulk Hogan lors du procès. Le milliardaire avait une bonne raison d’en vouloir à Gawker : c’est ce site qui avait révélé son homosexualité en 2007. Le milliardaire se défend toutefois d’avoir voulu se venger. Atlantico
Révolution concrète dans la santé ou rêve prématuré ? Theranos, une startup américaine qui propose plus de 200 tests sanguins, de l’hépatite C au taux de glucose en passant par la tuberculose, suscite le doute des autorités de santé en ce qui concerne l’efficacité de ses tests. Au point que l’entreprise est sous le coup d’une enquête de la SEC, l’autorité boursière américaine. De la création de la startup aux derniers démêlés avec les autorités en passant par les énormes levées de fonds, chronologie d’une success story d’une dizaine d’années en train de se transformer en cauchemar pour Elizabeth Holmes, la fondatrice. 2003: C’est une histoire de self-made woman comme les Etats-Unis les aiment qui démarre cette année-là. A 19 ans, Elizabeth Holmes quitte l’université de Stanford et utilise l’argent que sa famille a mis de côté afin de payer ses études pour créer une startup technologie et santé: Theranos. C’est la contraction de therapy (traitement) et diagnosis (diagnostic). Elle est basée à Palo Alto dans la Silicon Valley. 2003-2013: Pendant dix ans, la startup embauche des scientifiques, développe des prototypes, et cela, dans le secret quasi-total. Selon Bloomberg, du fait de la compétition faisant rage dans les industries technologiques, Theranos aurait eu tort de dévoiler la teneur de ses activités. Dans cette période, la startup recrute plusieurs personnalités de renom dans son conseil d’administration, dont l’ancien patron de Wells Fargo & Company Richard Kovacevich  ou encore Henry A. Kissinger, ancien secrétaire d’Etat des Etats-Unis et prix Nobel de la paix en 1973. Novembre 2013: Theranos annonce un partenariat avec Walgreens, une chaîne de pharmacie présente sur l’ensemble du territoire américain, et sort ainsi de l’ombre. Elle commence à proposer dans la ville de Phoenix des tests sanguins à bas prix allant du cholestérol au cancer. Ceux-ci sont effectués avec un prélèvement sans aiguille. Elizabeth Holmes explique qu’avec une goutte sang, il est possible de réaliser plusieurs centaines de tests sanguins et promet des résultats au bout de quatre heures. Juin 2014: Suite à une levée de fonds de 400 millions de dollars, après un nouveau tour de table, la startup qui emploie 500 personnes est valorisée à 9 milliards de dollars. Elizabeth Holmes, actionnaire majoritaire de Theranos, se retrouve alors à la tête d’une fortune de 3,6 milliards de dollars, selon Forbes. A trente ans, elle devient la sixième patronne américaine âgée de moins de 40 ans la plus riche des Etats-Unis. 2015: Theranos propose 240 types de tests sanguins et espère à terme en proposer plus de 1000, grâce à des coûts défiant toute concurrence. Par exemple, le test pour mesurer le taux cholestérol coûte 3 dollars avec Theranos contre 50 dollars dans les laboratoires classiques. Octobre 2015: Le Wall Street Journal publie plusieurs articles à charge contre Theranos. Dans un papier publié en octobre, le quotidien écrit qu’un employé reproche à la compagnie d’avoir omis de rapporter des résultats de tests sanguins aux autorités de santé. Par ailleurs, plusieurs employés émettent des doutes quant à la fiabilité de la machine Edison, utilisée par Theranos pour analyser les tests sanguins. Pis, le quotidien avance qu’une très faible partie des tests de Theranos est effectuée avec ses propres instruments. Une majorité serait effectuée avec… des instruments classiques. Suite à ces révélations, les enquêtes des autorités de santé s’intensifient. Janvier 2016: Une branche du département de la Santé américain (CMS) dénonce à son tour des « pratiques déficientes » qui « présentent des dangers immédiats pour la santé et la sécurité des patients » dans l’un des deux laboratoires de Theranos, à Newark en Californie. Le plus gros partenaire de cette biotech, la chaîne de pharmacies Walgreens, annonce alors la suspension des services d’analyses de Theranos dans la succursale où elle les proposait jusqu’ici en Californie. Néanmoins, une quarantaine d’autres centres Theranos hébergés par Walgreens restent ouverts dans l’Etat voisin d’Arizona. 13 avril 2016: Les autorités de santé américaines (Federal health regulators) proposent dans une lettre d’exclure Elizabeth Holmes du business de tests sanguins au moins deux ans en raison des problèmes « majeurs » constatés en Californie. Selon le Wall Street Journal, qui s’appuie sur une copie de la missive qu’il a pu consulter, la startup aurait pourtant proposé des solutions. Mais elles auraient été jugées insuffisantes. La Tribune
La montée et la chute observée chez Theranos est loin d’être un cas rare. En fait, il illustre les incitations perverses rencontrées par les start-ups de la Silicon Valley lors de leur lancement. Quelque chose ne va pas avec ce modèle d’investissement dans lequel les entreprises de technologie peuvent lever des centaines de millions de dollars venant de nulle part et se retrouver du jour au lendemain comme saignées à blanc.  Les investisseurs de la Silicon Valley n’entrent en général  pas dans le jeu parce qu’ils espèrent  aider les entrepreneurs à bâtir des entreprises. Ils jouent à la roulette et espèrent gagner gros. Mais il faut du temps pour bâtir une entreprise durablement rentable et les investisseurs de la Valley veulent une croissance rapide et spectaculaire. Dans la recherche de la prochaine «licorne» – une start-up non cotée en bourse et valorisées à plus d’un milliard de dollars – les investisseurs privilégient les revenus exponentiels aux dépens des résultats durables. Comme la controverse Theranos le montre, la pression de la croissance rapide conduit les entreprises à prendre des raccourcis et à se livrer à des pratiques  douteuses – et parfois à de la fraude pure et simple. Prenez l’exemple de Zynga, l’entreprise de jeux vidéo et créatrice  de Farmville, qui lui a valu le surnom d’ «Arnaqueville» pour sa publicité présumée trompeuse. Le co-fondateur de Zynga, Mark Pincus, a déclaré «Je savais que j’avais besoin de revenus …. Comme j’ai besoin de revenus maintenant. Alors, j’ai financé l’entreprise moi-même, mais j’ai utilisé toutes les ficelles … juste pour obtenir des revenus tout de suite « . Déclaration publique par laquelle, aussi incroyable que cela puisse être, Pincus exprimait en fait le sentiment privé d’innombrables entrepreneurs face au tic-tac de l’horloge du capital risque. (…) Cela est mauvais pour les investisseurs, y compris les investisseurs de capital-risque qui se soucient peu de la croissance. (Les entreprises frauduleuses sont, au mieux, une source fiable de revenus.) Mais la quête effrénée de la croissance se fait souvent aussi au détriment des consommateurs. Et ceci parce que pour se développer rapidement, les entreprises élargissent par tous les moyens leurs bases d’utilisateurs, dans un processus appelé «piratage de croissance. » L’un des exemples les plus courants de cela implique le « spam-viting» ou le détournement de la liste de contacts d’un consommateur pour les faire saturer de SMS ou d’ e-mails, en violation flagrante de diverses lois fédérales ou d’Etats. Les entreprises utilisent les spams vocaux parce que ça marche. L’envoi de millions de SMS ou d’e-mails aux consommateurs, déguisés en appels d’amis de ces consommateurs, est une manière illégale de faire croître une entreprise rapidement. LinkedIn, par exemple, a réglé un litige de 13 millions de dollars pour sa pratique consistant à envoyer des e-mails « ajouter des connexions » à répétition à l’ensemble de la liste de contacts de messagerie d’un nouvel utilisateur. Et TextMe, un réseau social basé sur le texte, a généré sa croissance par l’envoi massif de SMS à tous les contacts d’un nouvel utilisateur, mais il a finalement gagné sa bataille juridique avec la Federal Communications Commission. La pression à la croissance-pirate engendre la pression à ne pas respecter la loi, au moins temporairement. Une pression similaire explique pourquoi, par exemple, tant de joueurs de baseball de la ligue mineure utilisaient des stéroïdes à l’époque où le dopage était à ses sommets dans le baseball. Tout le monde le faisait, et il n’y avait aucun moyen d’accéder aux majors sans tricher aussi. Maintenant, on a créé un système dans lequel les startups sont tentées de ne pas servir leurs utilisateurs, mais de les traiter avec négligence. On a presque pris l’habitude de perdre notre vie privée pour le bien de LinkedIn ou de Facebook. Mais comme les accusations contre Theranos le montrent, les entreprises de technologie médicale qui répondent aux incitations des investisseurs pourraient nous amener à perdre quelque chose de bien pire. Quartz

Attention: une licorne peut en cacher bien d’autres !

Uber, Twitter, Snapchat, Airbnb, Pinterest, Dropbox, Xiaomi, SpaceX, Alumni Galaxy, BlaBlaCar …

A l’heure où la science confirme l’existence d’animaux jusqu’ici qualifiés de légendaires ….

Et où dans une Silicon Valley littéralement noyée par l’argent facile …

Mais aussi les procès et menaces de poursuites …

Une entreprise de haute technologie médicale peut avec l’aide de médias complaisants …

Gagner ou perdre 9 milliards de dollars presque du jour au lendemain …

Comment ne pas voir …

Sans compter sur fond à l’occasion de règlements de compte personnels les méthodes souvent très limite de levée de fonds et de traitement des consommateurs …

La nouvelle bulle qui pointe …

De ces start-ups non cotées en bourse et valorisées à plus d’un milliard de dollars …

Plus connues sous le nom faussement rassurant de licornes ?

BOOM OR BUST

Theranos exposes the perverse incentives at work in Silicon Valley

Theranos, the health technology company once valued at $9 billion, is making its investors’ blood run cold.

The business founded by Elizabeth Holmes 13 years ago promised to use finger-pricking technology to make blood testing faster and more accessible. Yet while Holmes has landed covers on Forbes, Fortune, and Inc., her company has yet to produce a working product. In January, an investigation by the US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services found that the company’s finger stick was unreliable and included deficiencies that posed a threat to patient safety. The Center is currently scrutinizing the company for a host of failures to comply with regulations. Meanwhile, the Department of Justice has opened a criminal investigation against Theranos as well, and the Securities and Exchange Commission is investigating the accuracy of the company’s disclosures to investors as it raised $700 million. The company’s apparent practice of cutting corners undermines confidence in everything it does, from the accuracy of its devices to how it is protecting the medical records it collects.

While the rise and fall of Theranos has been dramatic, it is far from a rare case. In fact, it illustrates the perverse incentives faced by every startup in Silicon Valley. As bad as these incentives are for investors, they might be even worse for consumers.

Many people in Silicon Valley aren’t interested in drawing lessons from Theranos. Instead, they’re trying to distance themselves from the backlash. This perspective was supported by a recent op-ed in the New York Times, in which columnist Randall Stross argues that the overvaluation of Theranos had nothing to do with systemic problems in startup investment. Sophisticated venture-capital firms that invest in life sciences passed on Theranos’s pitches, he says. It was the media and trend-seeking investors who were fooled.

But this account overlooks an obvious issue. Something is wrong with an investment model in which tech companies can raise hundreds of millions of dollars out of thin air, and lose it just as quickly.

Investors in Silicon Valley are, by and large, not in the game because they hope to help entrepreneurs build businesses. They’re playing roulette, and hoping to win big. But it takes time to build a sustainably profitable business, and Valley investors want rapid, stunning growth. In the search for the next “unicorn”—a privately-held $1 billion startup—investors prioritize exponential returns over lasting results.

As the Theranos controversy shows, the pressure to grow quickly leads companies to take shortcuts and engage in sloppy practices—and sometimes outright fraud. Take Zynga, the gaming company responsible for Farmville, which has earned the moniker “Scamville” for its allegedly deceptive advertising. The co-founder of Zynga, Mark Pincus, famously said, “I knew I needed revenues…. Like I needed revenues now. So I funded the company myself but I did every horrible thing in the book … just to get revenues right away.” While Pincus, incredibly, made this statement in public, he expressed the private sentiment of countless entrepreneurs faced with the ticking of the VC clock. (Disclosure: our law firm, Edelson PC, has brought class-action lawsuits against Zynga and some of the other companies mentioned below, but not for the conduct discussed in this article.)

This is bad for investors, including venture investors who care just about growth. (Fraudulent companies are, at best, an unreliable source of revenue.) But the reckless pursuit of growth often comes at consumers’ expense as well. That’s because the way that companies grow rapidly is to expand their user bases by hook or by crook, in a process called “growth hacking.”

One of the most common examples of this involves “spam-viting,” or hijacking a consumer’s contact list to blast them with text messages or emails, knowingly in violation of various federal and state statutes. Companies spam-vite because it works. Sending millions of text messages or e-mails to consumers, dressed up as if they came from those consumers’ friends, is a viable, illegal way to grow a business quickly. LinkedIn, for example, settled a lawsuit for $13 million over its practice of repeatedly sending “add connections” emails to a new user’s entire email contact list. And TextMe, a text-based social network, generated its growth by sending a large volume of text messages to new user’s phone contacts, although it eventually won its legal battle with the Federal Communications Commission.

The pressure to growth-hack begets pressure to disregard the law, at least temporarily. A similar pressure explains why, for example, so many minor league baseball players were using steroids during the height of the doping era in baseball. Everyone was doing it, and there was just no way to get to the majors unless you cheated, too.

Now we’ve created a system in which startups are tempted not to serve their users but to treat them carelessly. We’ve almost grown accustomed to losing our privacy for the sake of LinkedIn or Facebook. But as accusations against Theranos show, medical tech companies responding to investors’ incentives could lead us to lose something far worse.

 Voir aussi:

Comment perdre 4,5 milliards de dollars
Classe éco
Alexandre Delaigue, professeur d’économie à Lille I

En 2015, le classement Forbes des milliardaires estimait la fortune Elisabeth Holmes, fondatrice de la compagnie Theranos, à 4,5 milliards de dollars. Selon un récent calcul du même magazine, cette fortune est désormais… à zéro.

Si vous voulez vous faire une idée de ce que cela signifie, perdre 4,5 milliards de dollars, c’est un dollar par an depuis l’apparition du système solaire. Mieux: cela signifie perdre environ 12 millions de dollars par jour; ou 500 000 dollars par heure; 8300 dollars par minute, ou encore, 140 dollars par seconde pendant un an. Des chiffres qui pris à la lettre, donnent le vertige. Et posent une question très importante, celle de la signification de la richesse et de la valeur.

Valeur fondamentale et valeur de marché

La fortune estimée d’Elisabeth Holmes avait une source unique: les actions qu’elle détient dans son entreprise, 50% du capital. Ce sont ces titres qui ont fait, et défait, sa fortune.

Il y a deux façons d’estimer la valeur d’un actif: la valeur fondamentale et la valeur de marché. La valeur fondamentale correspond à la valeur totale des revenus que cet actif rapportera dans le temps. Par exemple, la valeur fondamentale d’un appartement est la somme de tous les loyers (moins les coûts liés à sa détention) qu’il va rapporter (ou, si vous l’habitez, les loyers que vous économisez). La valeur fondamentale d’une action est la somme des dividendes que l’on en retirera (ou, si l’entreprise ne verse pas de dividende et garde tout, la plus value de revente). La valeur d’un champ sera celle des récoltes que l’on pourra y faire. Etc, etc.

La valeur de marché, quant à elle, est simplement le prix que l’on pourrait obtenir en revendant cet actif. Donc le prix que quelqu’un d’autre serait prêt à payer pour l’avoir.

En théorie, ces deux valeurs devraient être identiques. Qui paierait 101 euros un actif qui lui rapportera 100 euros? Et qui vendrait 99€ quelque chose qui rapporte 100? En pratique, il peut y avoir des écarts pour différentes raisons. Certains actifs peuvent par exemple avoir une valeur « sentimentale » qui s’ajoute à leur valeur fondamentale (j’achète des actions airbus non pas parce qu’elles rapportent, mais parce que les avions me font rêver).

Surtout, la valeur fondamentale d’un actif est souvent inconnue a priori. C’est le ças pour tous les actifs, c’est d’autant plus le cas pour les titres d’une nouvelle entreprise. La valeur de marché devient alors la seule valeur de référence possible.

La valeur de marché peut traduire la sagesse des foules – la meilleure estimation possible étant donnée les informations disponibles, agrégeant de nombreux jugements individuels; mais elle peut être aussi sujette à des emballements, des erreurs collectives. Si la valeur d’une chose est ce que les autres sont prêts à payer pour l’avoir, on peut se retrouver dans un mécanisme dans lequel A achète parce que B achète, B achète parce qu’il sait que C est prêt à acheter, et C achète parce qu’il a vu A acheter. Ce mécanisme peut causer la valeur de marché d’un actif, en l’absence d’autres informations, à atteindre des niveaux énormes.

Mais la valeur fondamentale ne disparaît pas pour autant. On finit par se rendre compte que les revenus ne sont pas au rendez-vous, ou ne justifient pas la valorisation. Et brusquement, le prix de l’actif s’effondre. Ceux qui le détenaient, s’ils s’étaient endettés en se croyant riches, se retrouvent dans l’obligation de le revendre à toute vitesse. La valeur de marché, après avoir été surévaluée, devient brusquement très sous-évaluée. Lorsque la panique se termine, le prix atteint la valeur fondamentale. Les fluctuations boursières ne sont rien d’autre que ces passages brutaux de la valeur de marché à la valeur fondamentale.

De cent à zéro pour sang

Theranos, l’entreprise créée par Elizabeth Holmes, avait pour vocation de révolutionner les examens sanguins, en remplaçant la prise de sang (une expérience déplaisante, comme chacun sait) par un simple prélèvement d’une petite quantité de sang au bout du doigt. L’idée était non seulement de remplacer tous les tests existant (les analyses médicales sont un secteur peu concurrentiel, à fortes marges) et d’aller encore plus loin: grâce aux nouvelles technologies, de révolutionner le diagnostic médical, remplacé par des analyses de sang.

Sur la base de cette idée, l’entreprise a levé des fonds, en abusant du mécanisme des start-ups pour gonfler leur valeur apparente. Rappelons le mécanisme: supposons que 1000 investisseurs soient prêts à mettre un million dans l’entreprise. Il suffit de ne mettre sur le marché que 10% du capital, et ces 10% seront payés en tout un milliard; on pourra dire alors que la valeur de l’entreprise est de 10 milliards – et que la fortune du fondateur s’élève à 9 milliards, puisqu’il détient les 90% du capital restant.

Theranos a largement usé de ce mécanisme, en particulier, en ne faisant pas appel aux professionnels du capital-risque, mais en trouvant des investisseurs aux poches bien remplies et conquis par la belle histoire racontée par  la fondatrice de l’entreprise, et les articles complaisants la présentant comme la version féminine de Steve Jobs. Pour les attirer, la solution a consisté à leur vendre des actions préférentielles, qui en cas de liquidation leur permettent d’être les premiers actionnaires servis sur les actifs de l’entreprise.

Ces actions préférentielles, vendues à des prix élevés, créaient la fortune virtuelle d’Elizabeth Holmes. Et puis les problèmes ont fini par arriver. Il est apparu que le plus souvent, les tests sanguins de Theranos n’utilisaient pas une technologie spéciale: ils se contentaient de diluer des petits échantillons de sang pour ensuite effectuer des tests standard, conçus pour des échantillons de sang normaux. Du coup, de nombreux tests sont faux… et l’entreprise court le risque de procès, sans compter le fait qu’elle n’a pas tenu ses promesses, et qu’elle ne gagnera jamais la fortune espérée.

Forbes a donc brutalement ramené la valeur de marché de la fortune d’Elizabeth Holmes à sa valeur fondamentale: zéro, les bénéfices que l’on peut raisonnablement attendre pour Theranos.

Qu’est-ce que la richesse?

Si vous avez 4500 euros sur votre livret de caisse d’épargne, vous savez ce que vous avez. A tout moment vous pouvez utiliser cet argent pour éteindre une dette, partir en vacances, ou autre dépense. Il s’agit d’un actif liquide.

Mais peut-on dire qu’Elizabeth Holmes, avec ses 4,5 milliards de dollars virtuels en actions Theranos, est un million de fois plus riche que vous? d’un certain point de vue, oui.

Mais dans toutes les définitions normales de ce qu’apporte la richesse, non. Si Elizabeth Holmes avait essayé de vendre plus d’actions, la valeur de celles-ci aurait fortement diminué. La  valeur papier de ses titres ne tenait qu’à plusieurs conditions – la première, ne pas les vendre. La seconde, maintenir une illusion.

Comme le rappelle Noah Smith, une fortune n’est une fortune que dans la mesure ou elle est raisonnablement liquide, et diversifiée. Sans cela, il ne s’agit que d’un nombre virtuel qui ne vaut que dans la mesure où il existe des gens qui y croient. Cela rappelle que la fortune réelle des gens très riches, dans le sens ou nous entendons tous la fortune – la possibilité de l’utiliser – n’est pas si grande que cela. Cela rappelle surtout que traiter ces très grandes fortunes virtuelles comme le patrimoine de vous et moi n’a pas grand sens – une leçon qu’on a trop souvent tendance à oublier. Elizabeth Holmes n’a jamais été riche que d’un rêve.

Voir également:

Elizabeth Holmes, la PDG qui valait 4,5 milliards de dollars… puis zéro
Jean-Philippe Louis

Les Echos

05/06/2016

Valorisée à 9 milliards de dollars en 2015, la société Theranos dirigée par la jeune femme de 32 ans ne vaudrait aujourd’hui que 800 millions de dollars. Une chute vertigineuse qui interroge sur la pertinence du modèle économique des start-up dans la Silicon Valley.

On se posait la question à l’époque. De quel groupe sanguin était composée Elizabeth Holmes pour avoir ce génie ? C’était il y a un an, lorsque le magazine Forbes, spécialiste de l’estimation de fortune en tous genres, la classait dans le top 6 des milliardaires américains de moins de 40 ans. Il se disait qu’elle était la plus jeune et la plus riche « Self-made women » des Etats-Unis.

Son parcours était idyllique. C’était une femme riche et non héritière. Sa société Theranos, jouissait d’une réputation de bienfaitrice : elle voulait faciliter, grâce à la technologie, les tests sanguins. On comptait plus de 240 types d’essais. Du cholestérol au cancer. Theranos devait révolutionner le monde du laboratoire en réalisant des tests sanguins à partir d’une simple piqûre sur le doigt.

Pour Les Echos, elle faisait même partie des trois PDG à suivre en 2015 aux côté de Dick Costolo (ancien PDG de Twitter) et Sacha Romanovitch (Grant Thornton) . Elle proposait l’Uber des test médicaux, elle était « entrepreneur prodige » . Et un an plus tard, le résultat est plutôt inattendu…

Après une nouvelle estimation du patrimoine financier de la jeune femme, Forbes surprend. Et de découvrir que ce n’est pas une période faste pour la PDG. Pire, c’est le néant. La fortune d’Elizabeth Holmes atteint désormais la somme de zéro selon le magazine.

Fiabilité des tests

Certes, les contrariétés ne sont pas rares dans le milieu de l’entreprise, y compris au sein des jeunes pousses de la Silicon Valley, mais quand même : perdre des milliards en un an, il fallait que Forbes ait une sacrée raison. Elizabeth Holmes jouissait d’une entreprise valorisée à 9 milliards de dollars et d’une bonne aura médiatique.

Jusqu’à ce que les soupçons s’accumulent autour de la compagnie, notamment via plusieurs enquêtes du Wall Street Journal. La technologie développée par Holmes semble bien trop belle, bien peu chère. La fiabilité des tests sont dès lors remis en question. Le quotidien économique américain interroge deux employés qui accusent la société d’avoir effacé des données pouvant remettre en cause la pertinence de la méthode de prélèvement. Plusieurs agences de santé mènent l’enquête. Le département américain dénonce des pratiques dangereuses pour les patients.

Notre estimation était fondée sur les 50 % des parts de Theranos qu’elle possède

Après les révélations du Wall Street Journal, Theranos supprime une phrase sur son site internet qui précisait que ses tests «ne nécessitent que quelques gouttes de sang ». Preuve d’un certain malaise.

Soupçons et dévalorisation

Face à ses nombreux soupçons, c’est au tour de la SEC, de lancer une enquête en avril dernier. L’estocade pour Holmes. Elle est accusée d’avoir fait miroiter une révolution aux investisseurs en présentant une technologie pas forcément novatrice. Il faut dire que la valorisation de Theranos a été fulgurante. Depuis son lancement en 2003, la société a réalisé huit tours de table dont la dernière – en private equity – de 348,5 millions en mars 2015.

Ce sont ces atermoiements qui expliquent la nouvelle estimation du patrimoine de la PDG. « Notre estimation de la fortune d’Elizabeth Holmes était fondée sur les 50% des parts de Theranos qu’elle possède », a indiqué Forbes pour justifier la baisse.

Le magazine a interrogé une douzaine de sociétés de capital-risque, des analystes et des experts de l’industrie des biotechs, et a conclu que la valorisation de Theranos devrait plutôt se situer autour de 800 millions de dollars , au lieu des 9 milliards annoncés lors du dernier tour de table. Ces milliards n’étant basés que sur « les meilleures hypothèses des investisseurs », dit The New York Times . Et pour Forbes, les 50% de Holmes ne valent donc rien. Car, même si elle possède bien la moitié de la compagnie, une grande partie de cette valeur ne proviendrait que d’investisseurs extérieurs. Face à l’article décrivant la chute de Holmes, Theranos se débat. La société, étant une compagnie privée, refuse « de partager des informations confidentielles avec Forbes (…) L’article du magazine ne se base donc que sur des spéculations et des articles de presse », précise-t-elle dans un communiqué. Pour autant, si l’enquête de la SEC aboutissait, la sanction irait bien au-delà de la mauvaise presse. Holmes pourrait ne plus travailler dans le secteur des biotechs.

Et les médias de s’alarmer sur la pertinence des investissements colossaux au sein de la Sillicon Valley. « La montée et la chute observée chez Theranos est loin d’être un cas rare. En fait, il illustre les incitations perverses rencontrées par les start-up de la Silicon Valley lors de leur lancement, dit le site spécialisé Quartz.

« Quelque chose ne va pas avec ce modèle d’investissement dans lequel les entreprises de technologie peuvent lever des centaines de millions de dollars venant de nulle part », et se retrouver du jour au lendemain comme saignées à blanc.

Voir encore:

Elizabeth Holmes’s fall from hero to zero highlights problems of rich lists

Holmes went from Forbes’s richest self-made woman to a net worth of zero but while some super-rich feel undervalued by rich lists others are glad to be omitted
Elizabeth Holmes beat Oprah to head Forbes’s inaugural lists of America’s richest self-made women but now faces a federal investigation into whether her company misled investors.

Suzanne McGee

The Guardian

5 June 2016

From hero to zero – literally. That’s the journey 32-year-old Elizabeth Holmes has taken in only a year, courtesy of Forbes and its annual lists of the US’s richest citizens.

Every summer the magazine offers up rankings of the rich for our perusal, sliced and diced for our voyeuristic delectation. There’s the Big List (the richest 400 Americans, in aggregate), and the wealthiest self-made Americans (winnowing out all those who inherited their loot, like Walmart’s Walton family). Then there is an array of subsidiary lists, from the richest entertainers to the most affluent women (who get their own list because there’s a gender gap among the 0.1% and the 1%, just as there is everywhere else).

In general, the same set of billionaires jostle to hold their positions from one year to the next. Rarely are we treated to the kind of fall from grace that we’ve witnessed with Holmes, founder of Theranos, a blood-testing startup that took Silicon Valley, and some sections of the financial press, by storm.

Forbes’ previous estimates pegged Holmes’s net worth at a cool $4.5bn based on her holdings in her (still privately held) business, a tech “unicorn” with a valuation headed for the stratosphere. Theranos promised to “disrupt” (the word alone guarantees a billion) the business of healthcare testing, making it faster and simpler for everyone, including patients, and cheaper for the industry.

Alas and alack. Last fall, when investors valued the company at $9bn, the Wall Street Journal disclosed that, according to insiders, Theranos was using its proprietary “pinprick” technology – the company’s key selling point and the reason for that unicorn valuation – for only a fraction of the tests it conducted.

By now, of course, Holmes has far more important things to worry about than her status (or lack of same) on the Forbes rich list. Federal prosecutors have kicked off a criminal investigation into whether Theranos misled investors about the technology and its operations. Nonetheless, Forbes has cut its estimate of Holmes’s net worth to zero. Although the company may still be worth $800m, her stake ranks junior to the equity provided by other backers, so the magazine figures that her company’s fall from grace has left her with nothing. A mighty fall, indeed, after topping last year’s debut list of America’s richest self-made women, beating out the likes of Oprah.

The rest of us, however, might want to take this as a chance to ponder the value of rich lists – and the inherent problems involved in compiling them.

That’s particularly true, given that so many billionaires actually want to fly beneath the radar, whether out of a desire to keep the details of their wealth private or out of concern for their family’s security. Some just don’t want to be taxed on it. The UK Sunday Times just released its latest rich list, including the estimated net worth of 120 British billionaires. The first to hit newsstands since the Panama Papers disclosed the myriad ways some of the world’s wealthiest dodged disclosing just how wealthy they are, those estimates only include the listed assets, not offshore trusts that papers and magazines can’t possibly track, in the absence of more such disclosures.

For Brazillionaires, an upcoming book by Bloomberg reporter Alex Cuadros (to be published next month by Spiegel & Grau) about his quest to identify all of Brazil’s billionaires while reflecting on the growth in the ranks of the ultra-rich in a country with significant inequality, Cuadros met João Marinho, one of three brothers who jointly run parts of the Globo media empire. Each of them, he estimates, is worth about as much as Rupert Murdoch ($12.7bn according to Forbes). Cuadros showed Marinho a copy of Bloomberg’s own global rich list, and asked for his opinion. “We don’t like to be on it,” Marinho told him, adding that the family doesn’t want to be known for how much money it has. “We want to be known for what we do.”

The fact remains that the rest of world doesn’t agree with him, or the other secretive types. Sure, we want to know what they do. But we believe that knowing how much they make isn’t just voyeurism. Money talks, and if we don’t know who owns that money, it gets a lot more difficult to figure out who’s setting agendas, or precisely how much firepower they have at their disposal. There’s a difference between knowing that the Koch brothers are billionaires, and being aware that they have approximately $43.9bn each at their disposal, in terms of net worth.

But if it’s important to try to figure out not just who controls our economy, but how many billions they actually are worth (whether it’s made up of stakes in public or private companies, real estate, inherited wealth held in trusts, or other assets), doing so can be tricky, as the Theranos mess shows all too clearly.

If a group of intoxicated venture capitalists choose to describe a company as somehow being “worth” $9bn, because a group of equally intoxicated investors had invested $400m, who is to say they are wrong. Nobody. We just don’t know what a private company is worth, and in the absence of any kind of test (such as an IPO), extrapolations like that are at best interesting guidelines. They’ve got no real merit unless and until another round of investors confirm that value, over and over, by continuing to purchase at that price. The wider that group of investors, too, the more robust the valuation.

Almost certainly, there are more unicorn founders on various rich lists whose net worth numbers aren’t quite what the architects of those lists present them to be. Home-sharing and ride-sharing have turned the founders of both Airbnb and Uber into billionaires by Forbes’s calculations; they made their debut on the Forbes 400 list last year.

Neither Uber nor Airbnb is publicly traded, and neither has the kind of hard assets that would have made the net worth of the typical robber baron of yesteryear easy to value: railroads, oil wells, mines, real estate. Nonetheless, Forbes now pegs the net worth of Blair Chesky of Airbnb at $3.3bn; Uber’s CEO, Travis Kalanick, Forbes says, has seen his net worth soar to $6bn, despite the company’s business difficulties and in part because of Saudi Arabia’s recent $3.5bn investment in the company, which sustained the company’s valuation at $62.5bn.

If some billionaires try to duck the scrutiny of the rich lists, it’s in the interest of others – including CEOs of unicorn companies – to see their rank and their “number” sustained or increased year over year.

A tiny handful of individuals get so caught up in this that their very identity or ego seems to be at stake. The most famous example may be the Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, who has squabbled continually with Forbes over the latter’s refusal to value him at his own estimation. “They don’t really know my assets very well,” he retorted, miffed.

Saudi Arabia’s Prince Al-Waleed bin-Talal went even further, suing Forbes in 2013 for – wait for it – defamation. The magazine’s crime? It said the Saudi prince was worth a mere $20bn, $9.6bn less than he believed the correct number to be. (The lawsuit was settled “on mutually agreeable terms” in 2015.) Now that is rich.

Voir aussi:

Theranos : de la révolution annoncée à la désillusion
Depuis lundi, la startup américaine valorisée 9 milliards de dollars et qui propose des tests sanguins à bas prix est visée par une enquête du gendarme boursier américain. Un nouveau coup dur pour Theranos qui a nourri jusque-là beaucoup d’espoirs.
Jean-Yves Paillé
La Tribune
19/04/2016

Révolution concrète dans la santé ou rêve prématuré ? Theranos, une startup américaine qui propose plus de 200 tests sanguins, de l’hépatite C au taux de glucose en passant par la tuberculose, suscite le doute des autorités de santé en ce qui concerne l’efficacité de ses tests. Au point que l’entreprise est sous le coup d’une enquête de la SEC, l’autorité boursière américaine.

De la création de la startup aux derniers démêlés avec les autorités en passant par les énormes levées de fonds, chronologie d’une success story d’une dizaine d’années en train de se transformer en cauchemar pour Elizabeth Holmes, la fondatrice.

Self made woman
2003: C’est une histoire de self-made woman comme les Etats-Unis les aiment qui démarre cette année-là. A 19 ans, Elizabeth Holmes quitte l’université de Stanford et utilise l’argent que sa famille a mis de côté afin de payer ses études pour créer une startup technologie et santé: Theranos. C’est la contraction de therapy (traitement) et diagnosis (diagnostic). Elle est basée à Palo Alto dans la Silicon Valley,

2003-2013: Pendant dix ans, la startup embauche des scientifiques, développe des prototypes, et cela, dans le secret quasi-total. Selon Bloomberg, du fait de la compétition faisant rage dans les industries technologiques, Theranos aurait eu tort de dévoiler la teneur de ses activités. Dans cette période, la startup recrute plusieurs personnalités de renom dans son conseil d’administration, dont l’ancien patron de Wells Fargo & Company Richard Kovacevich  ou encore Henry A. Kissinger, ancien secrétaire d’Etat des Etats-Unis et prix Nobel de la paix en 1973.

Sortie de l’ombre
Novembre 2013: Theranos annonce un partenariat avec Walgreens, une chaîne de pharmacie présente sur l’ensemble du territoire américain, et sort ainsi de l’ombre. Elle commence à proposer dans la ville de Phoenix des tests sanguins à bas prix allant du cholestérol au cancer. Ceux-ci sont effectués avec un prélèvement sans aiguille. Elizabeth Holmes explique qu’avec une goutte sang, il est possible de réaliser plusieurs centaines de tests sanguins et promet des résultats au bout de quatre heures.

Juin 2014: Suite à une levée de fonds de 400 millions de dollars, après un nouveau tour de table, la startup qui emploie 500 personnes est valorisée à 9 milliards de dollars. Elizabeth Holmes, actionnaire majoritaire de Theranos, se retrouve alors à la tête d’une fortune de 3,6 milliards de dollars, selon Forbes. A trente ans, elle devient la sixième patronne américaine âgée de moins de 40 ans la plus riche des Etats-Unis.

2015: Theranos propose 240 types de tests sanguins et espère à terme en proposer plus de 1000, grâce à des coûts défiant toute concurrence. Par exemple, le test pour mesurer le taux cholestérol coûte 3 dollars avec Theranos contre 50 dollars dans les laboratoires classiques.
L’efficacité des tests sévèrement mise en doute

Octobre 2015: Le Wall Street Journal publie plusieurs articles à charge contre Theranos. Dans un papier publié en octobre, le quotidien écrit qu’un employé reproche à la compagnie d’avoir omis de rapporter des résultats de tests sanguins aux autorités de santé. Par ailleurs, plusieurs employés émettent des doutes quant à la fiabilité de la machine Edison, utilisée par Theranos pour analyser les tests sanguins. Pis, le quotidien avance qu’une très faible partie des tests de Theranos est effectuée avec ses propres instruments. Une majorité serait effectuée avec… des instruments classiques. Suite à ces révélations, les enquêtes des autorités de santé s’intensifient.
Janvier 2016: Une branche du département de la Santé américain (CMS) dénonce à son tour des « pratiques déficientes » qui « présentent des dangers immédiats pour la santé et la sécurité des patients » dans l’un des deux laboratoires de Theranos, à Newark en Californie. Le plus gros partenaire de cette biotech, la chaîne de pharmacies Walgreens, annonce alors la suspension des services d’analyses de Theranos dans la succursale où elle les proposait jusqu’ici en Californie. Néanmoins, une quarantaine d’autres centres Theranos hébergés par Walgreens restent ouverts dans l’Etat voisin d’Arizona.

Theranos acculée par les autorités
13 avril 2016: Les autorités de santé américaines (Federal health regulators) proposent dans une lettre d’exclure Elizabeth Holmes du business de tests sanguins au moins deux ans en raison des problèmes « majeurs » constatés en Californie. Selon le Wall Street Journal, qui s’appuie sur une copie de la missive qu’il a pu consulter, la startup aurait pourtant proposé des solutions. Mais elles auraient été jugées insuffisantes.

18 avril 2016: Elizabeth Holmes semble plus que jamais sur la sellette. Theranos est visée par plusieurs enquêtes. Dans un mémo envoyé lundi à ses partenaires, l’entreprise détaille être visée par des enquêtes menées par le gendarme boursier américain (SEC). La startup assure néanmoins que deux autres enquêtes, lancées par les départements de la Santé des Etats de Pennsylvanie et d’Arizona, ont été closes.

Voir de même:

KO

Mis au tapis par Hulk Hogan, le site américain Gawker dépose le bilan
Le site d’information à sensation Gawker a été condamné mi-mars à verser 140 millions de dollars de dommages et intérêts après avoir diffusé une sex-tape du catcheur Hulk Hogan.
Atlantico
11 Juin 2016

Le sexe et la quête d’audience à tout prix aura eu raison du site américain d’informations à sensation Gawker. Vendredi 10 juin, il s’est placé sous la protection du chapitre 11 de la loi sur les défaillances d’entreprise, qui permet à une société de se restructurer sans mettre obligatoirement la clef sous la porte, selon un document déposé devant un tribunal de New York.

Ce dépôt de bilan intervient trois mois après que le célèbre catcheur Hulk Hogan a remporté une poursuite de 140 millions de dollars américains contre l’éditeur en ligne.

Dans les documents déposés, l’entreprise new-yorkaise révèle qu’elle détient une dette de 500 millions de dollars américains et que ses actifs valent jusqu’à 100 millions.

La situation comptable de la société était donc déjà très déséquilibrée, mais dans la liste des créanciers du groupe figure en première ligne Terry Gene Bollea, plus connu sous le nom de Hulk Hogan.

Hulk Hogan a en effet traîné Gawker devant les tribunaux après que le site a diffusé une vidéo filmée à l’insu du catcheur, dans laquelle il a une relation sexuelle avec la femme d’un ami. Au terme du procès, Hulk Hogan a obtenu 115 millions de dollars américains en dommages-intérêts compensatoires et 25,1 millions en dommages-intérêts punitifs. Gawker avait fait appel de la décision mais avait mandaté des banquiers pour étudier tous les scénarios possibles en cas de confirmation de la décision, y compris la vente du site.

Après ce dépôt de bilan, Gawker a annoncé avoir trouvé un accord avec le groupe de médias Ziff Davis, qui va racheter l’essentiel de ses actifs pour un prix non dévoilé, selon un communiqué.

Fin mai, le milliardaire Peter Thiel, cofondateur d’eBay, avait révélé avoir financé la défense d’Hulk Hogan lors du procès. Le milliardaire avait une bonne raison d’en vouloir à Gawker : c’est ce site qui avait révélé son homosexualité en 2007. Le milliardaire se défend toutefois d’avoir voulu se venger.

Voir aussi:

Mais pourquoi certaines start-up sont appelées « licornes »?

Raphaële Karayan
L’Expansion
17/09/2015

Blablacar, le leader du covoiturage, prend du galon en levant 200 millions de dollars, à une valorisation de 1,4 milliard. Le français rejoint ainsi le club des « licornes », ces start-up qui valent plus d’un milliard. Mais ce n’est pas leur seul point commun.

Grâce à sa nouvelle levée de fonds record de 200 millions de dollars, l’entreprise française Blablacar entre désormais dans le cercle restreint des « licornes », ces start-ups des nouvelles technologies, non cotées en Bourse, dont la valorisation dépasse le milliard de dollars. Blablacar serait valorisée, selon les estimations des spécialistes, 1,6 milliard de dollars (1,4 milliard d’euros).

La première licorne française

Les licornes, malgré leur nom, n’ont rien de l’animal imaginaire, ni même de la bête rare. A vrai dire, leur nombre a rapidement augmenté ces deux dernières années, comme l’atteste le baromètre de CB Insights, qui en dénombre actuellement 134 dans le monde. En revanche, les licornes s’observent surtout aux Etats-Unis, et plus particulièrement dans la Silicon Valley, leur écosystème d’origine.

En France, Vente-privée.com aurait pu entrer dans cette catégorie. Sa valorisation, estimée à 3 milliards de dollars par la banque d’affaires GP Bullhound en 2014, lui accorderait ce label. Mais Vente-privée a depuis longtemps dépassé le stade de la start-up, et contrairement à la majorité des licornes, elle est déjà rentable. Ce qui n’est pas le cas de BlaBlaCar. Quant à Criteo, l’autre grande réussite française, elle est cotée au Nasdaq.

D’où viennent les licornes ?

L’expression licorne a été inventée par une femme, Aileen Lee. Cette spécialiste américaine du capital-risque a réalisé en 2013 une étude, démontrant que moins de 0,1% des entreprises dans lesquelles investissaient les fonds de capital-risque atteignaient des valorisations supérieures à 1 milliard de dollars. Soucieuse de réserver la meilleure publicité à son analyse, elle a cherché un terme vendeur pour qualifier ces pépites. Elle a trouvé le mot « licorne » parfait: renvoyant à quelque chose de rare, relié au rêve et à l’heroic fantasy, une culture totalement compatible avec celle des geeks.

« Le terme romance l’histoire les entreprises technologiques: il les fait passer de quelque chose de lointain et de compliqué à quelque chose de magique et même sympathique, tout en étant rare et puissant », explique Lee à l’International Business Times, qui raconte la genèse de l’expression. La suite est allée très vite: publiée par Techcrunch fin 2013, le terme a tout de suite pris.

La bulle des licornes

Les licornes, aux Etats-Unis, ont une caractéristique commune. Elles contribueraient à faire gonfler une nouvelle bulle. Qui n’est pas une bulle boursière, comme dans les années 2000, mais le fait des investisseurs privés qui misent des sommes colossales sur ces entreprises, leur faisant atteindre des niveaux de valorisation sans commune mesure avec les profits qu’elles génèrent. Les Uber, Twitter, Snapchat, Airbnb, Pinterest et consorts brûlent aussi énormément de cash, comme leurs ancêtres de la bulle internet.

Pourquoi les fonds placent-ils autant d’argent dans ces licornes ? Tout d’abord parce que les investisseurs ont beaucoup de liquidités à placer. Ils savent qu’une valorisation élevée facilite le recrutement des meilleurs, tout comme elle assoit une réputation. Ils peuvent ainsi profiter d’un cercle vertueux.

Ensuite, d’autres mécanismes, plus complexes, sont à l’oeuvre. Les licornes font saliver les fonds d’investissement avec des indicateurs financiers non conventionnels, qui mettent leur business en valeur, ce qu’elles ne peuvent pas faire quand elles s’introduisent en Bourse. De leur côté, les investisseurs, notamment ceux qui placent d’habitude plutôt leur argent en Bourse, comme les fonds de pension, les fonds souverains et les fonds spéculatifs, mettent en place des mécanismes leur garantissant un maximum de protection en cas de baisse de la valorisation lors de tours de table ultérieurs ou de vente. Ce qui alimente la bulle, et ainsi de suite.

Si cette bulle-là explose, ce ne sera pas en raison d’une revente massive de titres, mais d’introductions en Bourse ou de rachats à une valorisation corrigée. Toutes n’y survivront pas.

Voir de plus:

Cybercrime is the No. 1 concern for managers at multinational companies and a contributing factor in the slowing global economy, according to a new report. While the rise of cybercriminals has caused hundreds of millions of dollars of damage to individuals, companies and even governments in recent years, it has also led to the rise of cybercrime gangs who are earning hundreds of millions but who are operating like any legitimate startup would. Meet the cybercrime unicorns.

Unicorns are mythical creatures and in many ways so too are many of the billion-dollar tech companies given the same name, with valuations based on little more than potential and no revenue to speak of. On the flip side, cybercrime gangs are hugely profitable with small teams of dedicated experts, with no investors to answer to and no IPO to plan for.

« If you have a cybercrime organization and you are losing money, you are doing something wrong, » security researcher Mikko Hypponen, who first coined the term cybercrime unicorn, told International Business Times. According to a study by the Ponemon Institute, the average annual losses to U.S. companies from cybercrime in 2015 exceeded $15 million, a 15 percent rise over the previous year. The Clements Worldwide Risk Index for 2016 suggests that cybercrime is the number one threat feared by managers at multinational corporations and is slowing the level of investment and expansion. “Stealing critical data on customers, employees, products and business partners inflicts far more actual and potential damage than any physical theft ever could,” said Chris Beck, president of Clements Worldwide.

While the effect on legitimate businesses is worsening, the rewards for the criminals is only increasing. According to a report from the Cyber Threat Alliance, the cybercrime gang operating the pernicious ransomware called Cyptowall has amassed a fortune of over $325 million. The researchers were able to reach this figure by tracking the bitcoin wallets the gang used to store the ransoms paid by hundreds of thousands of victims across the globe.

One of the key aspects of tech unicorns like Uber and Airbnb, is that they have backing from investors sometimes worth billions of dollars. Due to limited information available about the murky and shadowy world of cybercrime, it is unclear if a similar set up exists for these criminal gangs, but Hypponen does not rule it out. The researcher says it is possible there are  « honchos in the shadows » who get these groups up-and-running, but « we know very little about these cybercrime groups » so it is impossible to say with any certainty.

What we can say for certain is that many of these gangs have setups operating just as any startup would. While they may lack the beanbags, free food and Friday afternoon ping-pong matches, their operations are run like any business in order to maximize profits.

The offices of cybercrime operations may not be as funky or fun as those of startups like Airbnb, but they are still run like any other business. Photo: Martin Bureau/Getty Images

In the university city of Tartu in Estonia, Rove Digital established its offices and, from the outside,  it looked just like any other legitimate Internet service provider (ISP), with an official website and at one point it posted more than $5 million in revenue and had more than 50 employees.

Rove Digital was however a sophisticated cybercrime operation run by  Vladimir Tsastsin which infected more than four million PCs in over 100 countries using malware known as DNSChanger with the U.S. government claiming this one operation alone earned the criminals $14 million before an FBI-led sting saw Tsastsin and his colleagues arrested. In July 2015 Tsastsin pled guilty to wire fraud and computer intrusion charges and faces a maximum 25 years in jail.

« This was a startup for all practical purposes, » Hypponen says. « except that it was in the business of cybercrime. »

Comparing cybercrime gangs to tech unicorns is of course problematic. These are not private companies which have valuations and while the likes of Snapchat, Palantir and Airbnb have to pay taxes and abide by laws and regulations, these criminal gangs operate as they want.

While most of the world’s unicorns are located in Silicon Valley, the majority of cybercrime gangs operate out of the former Soviet states, including Russia, Ukraine, and Estonia. However they are not limited to these locations with significant operations being run out of other European countries like Romania and Moldova while more recent cyrbercrime hotspots include Vietnam and Brazil.

Hypponen says that one region of the globe has yet to establish itself as having a significant cybercrime presence, but he worries that in the coming years, Africa could product the next cybercrime unicorn. « I am worried about whether we will see more cybercrime coming out of Africa, hitting the rest of the world, » Hypponen says — and other experts agree. The reason for his concern is the exponential growth in connectivity which the continent is expected to experience in the coming years.

At the moment the outbound bandwidth of the entire continent, which has a population of 1.1 billion, is the same as that of Finland, which has a population of 5 million. With companies like Facebook and Google are aggressively investigating ways to quickly connect the continent, this could mean that just like the rest of the world, Africa could soon be home to major cybercrime operations.

Voir de même:

Jennifer Lawrence to play Elizabeth Holmes in movie about Theranos
Lawrence will portray the founder of the embattled biotech firm that was once valued at $9bn before journalists demolished many of the company’s claims
Nicky Woolf in San Francisco

The Guardian
9 June 2016

Jennifer Lawrence has signed on to play Elizabeth Holmes in a movie about the embattled Silicon Valley biotech firm Theranos, which at one point was worth $9bn.

The film is set to be produced by Adam McKay, who was behind the recent film about the financial crisis The Big Short, based on the book of the same name by Michael Lewis.

Deadline Hollywood, which first reported the story, said Lawrence will play the company’s 32-year-old founder.

Theranos was once touted as a “unicorn” – the Silicon Valley moniker for startups with multibillion-dollar valuations. Its much-touted new blood testing system claimed to be able to perform tests on a “pinprick” of blood rather than a much larger amount drawn by syringe, which is the current best available method.

The efficacy of Theranos’s system was reported breathlessly by much of the Silicon Valley press until an investigation by the Wall Street Journal demolished many of their claims.

Theranos still disputes the Journal’s findings, but the company’s public trust and reputation have been significantly damaged.

Subsequent regulatory inspections of Theranos labs found evidence that issues causing “immediate jeopardy to patient health and safety”, and inspectors threatened to ban the company from operating any laboratories after it said the problems were not rectified. The company is also being investigated by federal prosecutors to find out if investors were intentionally misled.

After the exposé, Holmes experienced a fall from grace of cinematic proportions, going from the richest self-made woman on Forbes’s rich list to having a net worth of almost literally zero practically overnight.

Voir aussi:

Bill Gurley predicts ‘dead unicorns’ in startup-land this year

Erin Griffith

Fortune

March 15, 2015

A crash would affect more than just startups.Bill Gurley, the prominent investor behind Uber and Snapchat, has been sounding the tech bubble alarm for months now. He’s preached about the dangerous appetite for risk in the market, the alarmingly high burn rates and the excess of capital sloshing around in Silicon Valley.

At the South by Southwest Interactive festival in Austin, Texas, Gurley rang the alarm once again. We may not be in a tech bubble, the venture capitalist said, but we’re in a risk bubble.

“There is no fear in Silicon Valley right now,” he said. “A complete absence of fear.” He added that more people are employed by money-losing companies in Silicon Valley than ever before.

Will there be a crash? “I do think you’ll see some dead unicorns this year,” he said, using the term used to describe startups with valuations higher than $1 billion. (For more on startup unicorns and Bill Gurley, see Fortune’s February 2015 cover story, “The Age of Unicorns.”)

If the free flowing capital, which is driven by low interest rates, ever dries up, it will affect more than just money-losing startups. It will affect the San Francisco real estate market, Gurley noted. And more importantly, it will affect a number of companies whose revenue is increasingly reliant on spending by venture-backed startups.

Take Facebook, for example. A significant portion of its income now comes from venture-backed apps that are spending heavily to promote app downloads within Facebook, Gurley said. “As you get more of these dependancies, it increases the likelihood that if anything slows we’ll have [problems],” Gurley said.

Gurley said the best way to prepare for the worst is to have a back-up plan, so that if everything falls apart, the company can quickly change courses and get to profitability. “The best entrepreneurs already think that way,” he said. “The younger ones don’t.”

Nonetheless, when asked which companies Gurley wishes he had invested in, he immediately named two unicorns: Airbnb, which is rumored to be raising capital at a $20 billion valuation, and Slack, the youngest company to get to a $1 billion valuation.

Voir également:

The Age of Unicorns

Erin Griffith, Dan Primack
Fortune
January 22, 2015

The billion-dollar tech startup was supposed to be the stuff of myth. Now they seem to be … everywhere.

Stewart Butterfield had one objective when he set out to raise money for his startup last fall: a billion dollars or nothing. If he couldn’t reach a $1 billion valuation for Slack, his San Francisco business software company, he wouldn’t bother. Slack was hardly starving for cash. It was a rocket ship, with thousands of people signing up for its workplace collaboration tools each week. What Slack needed, Butterfield believed, was the cachet of the billion-dollar mark.

“Yes, it’s arbitrary because it’s a big round number,” says Butterfield, 41. “It does make a difference psychologically. One billion is better than $800 million because it’s the psychological threshold for potential customers, employees, and the press.”

Sure enough, in October—less than a year after the company released its namesake product—Slack announced the close of a $120 million round of financing. Its valuation? One billion dollars. Butterfield’s wish had come true: Slack was the tech world’s newest “unicorn.”

It wasn’t long ago that the idea of a pre-IPO tech startup with a $1 billion market value was a fantasy. Google GOOG -1.26% was never worth $1 billion as a private company. Neither was Amazon AMZN -1.34% nor any other alumnus of the original dotcom class.

Today the technology industry is crowded with billion-dollar startups. When Cowboy Ventures founder Aileen Lee coined the term unicorn as a label for such corporate creatures in a November 2013 TechCrunch blog post, just 39 of the past decade’s VC-backed U.S. software startups had topped the $1 billion valuation mark. Now, casting a wider net, Fortune counts more than 80 startups that have been valued at $1 billion or more by venture capitalists (full list here). And given that these companies are privately held, a few are sure to have escaped our detection. The rise of the unicorn has occurred rapidly and without much warning, and it’s starting to freak some people out.

“It used to be that unicorns were these mythical creatures,” says Jason Green, a venture capitalist at Emergence Capital Partners whose investments include Yammer, which sold to Microsoft MSFT -0.27% for $1.2 billion. “Now there are herds of unicorns.”

Not content to run with the pack—or “blessing,” as a group of unicorns is sometimes known—venture capitalists have begun targeting even bigger game. They’re now hunting startups with the potential to rapidly reach a $10 billion valuation—or, as Green calls them, “decacorns.” In late 2013 just one private company had crossed that threshold: Facebook FB -1.64% . Now there are at least eight, including Uber, the on-demand car service worth $41.2 billion. Its valuation is higher than the market capitalization of at least 70% of the companies in the Fortune 500.

Technology is driving the boom. Smartphones, cheap sensors, and cloud computing have enabled a raft of new Internet-connected services that are infiltrating the most tech-averse industries—Uber is roiling the taxi industry; Airbnb is disrupting hotels. Investors see massive opportunity in the upheaval.

Then there are the broader financial trends. A nearly six-year-old raging bull market in public stocks has produced a tailwind for private company valuations and convinced the latest crop of tech entrepreneurs that there will be plenty of time to cash in when they feel like it. Record-low interest rates also have caused some big institutional investors to search for returns in the high-risk, high-reward world of venture capital. Add to that a lack of regulation: After the passage of the JOBS Act in 2012, which aimed to make it easier for small businesses to raise capital, startups could take on many more investors before the Securities and Exchange Commission effectively forced them to go public.

Finally, there is the intangible element of perception. In the startup world, a valuation of $1 billion says that you’re no longer a fly-by-night startup with plans to quickly sell out to Google.

“It absolutely gives us credibility and the ability to hire some very important people,” says Apoorva Mehta, the 28-year-old CEO of on-demand grocery delivery service Instacart, which has been in business for only two years but reportedly is valued at $2 billion. “And it tells the world that we’re looking to build a long-lasting worldwide brand instead of looking to get acquired.”

Venture capitalists justify these soaring valuations by looking backward. After the dotcom crash, a wave of prudence swept over the Valley. Investors kept valuations low and tried not to overcapitalize their companies. That strategy lasted until Hurricane Facebook came along. All of the cautious types who passed on investing in the social network early, because it was too expensive at $250 million or $500 million, were left scarred and paranoid when it went public in May 2012 with a market cap of $104 billion. If a startup is going to be worth billions of dollars in a few years, why quibble over a few million on the entry price?

As a result, the median valuation of a Series A round of funding soared 135% between 2012 and 2014, according to the law firm Cooley LLP. This has created an echo effect, with new gains setting the bar higher for each subsequent round of funding. So venture capitalists have recruited unlikely new partners in the form of traditional money managers such as Fidelity Investments (which led the latest deal for Uber) and Wellington Management (which backed DocuSign and Moderna Therapeutics) to support unicorn-level rounds. Call it trickle-up economics.

It also doesn’t hurt that American corporations have record-breaking stockpiles of cash on their balance sheets. Facebook set tongues wagging when it paid $19 billion for instant-messaging startup WhatsApp last March, then followed it up a month later by shelling out $2 billion for virtual reality headset maker Oculus VR. In 2014, Google paid $3.2 billion for smart thermostat maker Nest, Apple AAPL -0.81% acquired headphone maker Beats for $3 billion, and Microsoft spent $2.5 billion to own the Swedish gaming startup responsible for Minecraft. Even health care VCs cashed in, selling Seragon Pharmaceuticals to Genentech for upwards of $1.7 billion.

All of this has begun to feel bubblicious, especially to those who lived through the last cycle. “If you are a CEO today and you’re age 35 or below, you did not go through 2000, which means you have not actually seen the capital markets shut off,” says venture capitalist Marc Andreessen, who nonetheless remains bullish. “People who went through 2000 are psychologically scarred and arguably have been risk-averse for the last 15 years. If you didn’t go through it you’re in danger of always believing you can raise money at a higher valuation.”

Greycroft Partners founder Alan Patricof, who has been investing in startups for more than four decades, is wary. “People are buying traffic growth and revenue growth, but it’s the ‘emperor has no clothes’ theory,” he says. “At some point all of these companies will be valued on a multiple of Ebitda. If the IPO market goes away, or for any reason there’s a blip in the outlook, people could be left holding a lot of inventory they wish they didn’t have.”

Proponents of the unicorn boom posit that this time—no, seriously!—is different. Many of the billion-dollar startups, they argue, have the actual customers and revenue that companies of the dotcom days lacked. But no one in the VC world is so sanguine as to suggest that, sooner or later, we won’t experience a market pullback.

Not surprisingly, many venture capitalists have begun preaching caution to their portfolio companies. A brief swoon in publicly traded tech stock prices last April—particularly in the enterprise sector—was seen industrywide as a warning shot that startups should control their “burn rates” and raise as much new money as possible to protect against a future funding drought. Entrepreneurs listened, at least to the second part: U.S.-based companies raised more venture capital in the fourth quarter of 2014 than they did in any other quarter over the prior 13 years, according to the National Venture Capital Association.

That explains, in part, why a company like Instacart raised $120 million in new funding earlier this month at its reported $2 billion valuation just six months after raising $44 million at a $400 million valuation. Or why social media company Pinterest raised $625 million over three rounds of funding between February 2013 and May 2014, doubling its valuation from $2.5 billion to $5 billion.

But more aggressive fundraising is no guarantee that unicorns will grow into their valuations. “Going from $0 to $50 million in revenue is a lot different from going from $50 million to several hundred million,” says Green. “A lot of folks don’t make that transition. Most don’t. Maybe half of those companies won’t fulfill their potential.” (For a look at a startup struggling to break through, read the story on Jawbone.)

Several unicorns have already experienced a pullback. Open-source software company Hortonworks HDP -4.63% was valued at $1 billion by private investors but lowered its market cap to $666 million when it went public last December. (It has since crossed back over the $1 billion mark in market value.) Box, the data storage company credited with making enterprise technology cool, was preparing to hold an IPO just days after this magazine went to press. Its initial valuation was expected to be at least 30% lower than the $2.4 billion it commanded from private investors like TPG Capital last summer.

And then there is Fab, the design-focused e-commerce site that said it would generate $250 million in revenue in 2013. It ended up bringing in around $100 million. (At one point, it burned as much as $14 million per month.) Fab shrank from 750 employees to 150, and CEO Jason Goldberg repositioned the company as a custom furniture business. Fab was widely reported to have raised some of its $336 million in funding at a $1 billion valuation, but Goldberg acknowledges to Fortune that its valuation never actually topped $875 million. He acknowledges the company isn’t worth close to that today. “If you allow yourself to believe you’re worth $1 billion after two to three years of being in business, you’re going to get yourself caught up in trouble,” Goldberg says.

Even in the best of times, of course, startup investing is high risk. As quickly as the Age of Unicorns arrived, the conditions that created it could reverse and leave entrepreneurs and investors wistful for what might have been.

“I think you’re going to see a lot of failure in 2015,” says Benchmark Capital partner Bill Gurley, who sits on Uber’s board of directors. “If you’re a public company worth $3 billion and your stock trades down to $1 billion, you can survive it because you can still issue options to hire new employees, etc.  If it happens when you’re private, though, it becomes immediately harder to hire or to get incremental investment.”

In the meantime, expect more billion-dollar startups to emerge—at least for now. “You can’t choose not to play,” Gurley says. “If you’re in the enterprise segment and your competitors are raising $150 million at high valuations and pouring it into sales, you either can do something similar or be conservative and no longer matter.” Which might explain why some VCs continue to invest even as they predict failure. There’s always the hope and belief that the value created by a few successful unicorns will offset the losses of those that fail.

Butterfield knows the easy venture money will dry up at some point. It’s one reason Slack has spent only 1% of the money it’s raised. “You’d have to be in a meteors-hitting-the-Earth scenario before Slack as a business would get into trouble,” he boasts. Staying thrifty is a smart move. The prestige of being a unicorn diminishes with each passing quarter. When it’s gone, he’ll have a whole new fantasy to chase: profitability.

Additional reporting by Daniel Roberts and Deena Shanker.

Voir encore:

If you follow tech, you know that Silicon Valley cannot stop talking about unicorns — shorthand for the growing herd of startups valued at $1 billion or more. Dow Jones counts 77 of them in the U.S. alone and 106 worldwide, including Uber ($50 billion), Palantir ($20 billion), Snapchat ($16 billion) and SpaceX ($12 billion).

Whether or not the stunning growth of this group (increasing from 34 in 2013) constitutes a bubble is open for debate. What isn’t is who ascribed the name of a mythical creature to the world’s most promising and valuable startups. All credit, or blame, goes to Aileen Lee.

Lee, a longtime tech venture capitalist and the founder of Cowboy Ventures, wanted to know how realistic it is to discover and invest in one of these companies, so she did some research in 2013 and found that 0.07 percent of venture-backed companies attained valuations of more than $1 billion (although that figure has since grown to 0.14 percent, which some say is a sign the tech industry may once again be in a bubble). Lee decided she wanted to share her findings, but not before coming up with a term that could properly describe these kinds of companies.

“I was trying to come up with a word that would make it easier to use over and over again,” Lee said in an interview. “I played with different words like ‘home run,’ ‘megahit,’ and they just all sounded kind of ‘blah.’ So I put in ‘unicorn’ because they are — these are very rare companies in the sense that there are thousands of startups in tech every year, and only a handful will wind up becoming a unicorn company. They’re really rare.”

Besides describing the rarity of these startups, « unicorn » for Lee carried a mythical and playful feeling, which she said captures the essence of many of these companies. “A lot of the entrepreneurs and founders have big dreams and are on a mission to build things that the world has never seen before,” she said. “‘Home run’ or something like that doesn’t really capture that spirit.”

That the term itself is laden with elements of fantasy and sci-fi — popular genres among techies — has no doubt helped solidify its place in Silicon Valley business-speak. « In a way, the term romanticizes techno-companies: takes them from the remote and unintelligible to the magical and even lovable, while also being rare and powerful, » said Robin Lakoff, professor of linguistics at the University of California, Berkeley. « I certainly would feel nicer toward megarich tech startups if I could think of them as unicornlike. »

After Lee settled on the right terminology, her findings were published on TechCrunch as “Welcome To The Unicorn Club: Learning From Billion-Dollar Startups” on Nov. 2, 2013, and the story immediately took off. The piece has been shared more than 19,000 times. The next day, Business Insider published a piece that referenced unicorns, and a few days later, other influences in the tech industry, like venture capitalist Hunter Walk, began making references to unicorns. “I honestly didn’t think anyone was going to read it,” Lee said. “I had no idea it was going to be of interest to anyone.”

Since then, usage of the term in the press has see a compounded annual growth rate of 775 percent, according to Quid, a business analytics startup. There have been more than 1,700 stories published featuring the words « unicorn, » « tech » and « valuation » since August 2013, Quid said. Unicorn is often applied to companies like Square ($6 billion) and Pinterest ($11 billion), and individuals like Snapchat CEO Evan Spiegel and Slack CEO Stewart Butterfield are often associated with it.

For many in tech, Lee’s article has changed their vocabulary. Manny Fernandez, CEO and co-founder of San Francisco angel investment platform Dreamfunded and a self-described “unicorn hunter,” said there isn’t a day that he doesn’t hear talk of unicorns. “We are in the era of the unicorns,” Fernandez said.

http://datawrapper.dwcdn.net/F6pC8/1/But Lee’s article isn’t the only reason the term has become so popular. Over the past decade, two major changes in the tech industry have created the need for a term that could quickly describe private billion-dollar tech companies. The first is is that these days, there’s no real math to startup valuations — the numbers are based mostly on a company’s potential, and they are essentially just made up. This has made it easier for companies to earn billion-dollar valuations.

The other tectonic change is that venture-backed companies are staying private much longer than in the past. In 2000, the median time to an initial public offering was 3.1 years, according to the National Venture Capital Association. That number increased to 7.4 years in 2013, in part because many startups want to take advantage of the friendly valuation environment before they go public. Additionally, the emergence of private markets has made it easy for unicorn shareholders to cash out their investments without forcing their startups to go public and under the microscope of Wall Street’s unforgiving eyes. This is why companies like Dropbox ($10 billion) and Airbnb ($25.5 billion) remain private despite both being more than seven years old.

Combined, these two changes have lead to there being more unicorns than ever before. Lee, who revisited her findings in July, saw the number of U.S. public and private unicorns go from 39 in 2013 to 84 in 2015, a whopping 115 percent increase in the span of 20 months. Though unicorns are still rare, there are now so many that they “warrant a special term that captures the mythical/aspirational quality and yet is light-hearted enough to be shared rapidly,” said Bob Goodson, co-founder of Quid.

So if you’re ever around San Francisco or hanging out with a techie, don’t be alarmed if you hear talk of unicorns — it’s probably a reference to a tech company, and not “My Little Pony.” As for Lee, she and Cowboy Ventures are still on the lookout for a few unicorns of their own, but for now, well, she’s just “happy that people read the piece.”

Voir de plus:

Welcome To The Unicorn Club: Learning From Billion-Dollar Startups

Aileen Lee
Techcrunch
Nov 2, 2013

Editor’s note: Aileen Lee is founder of Cowboy Ventures, a seed-stage fund that backs entrepreneurs reinventing work and personal life through software. Previously, she joined Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers in 1999 and was also founding CEO of digital media company RMG Networks, backed by KPCB. Follow her on Twitter @aileenlee

Many entrepreneurs, and the venture investors who back them, seek to build billion-dollar companies.

Why do investors seem to care about “billion dollar exits”? Historically, top venture funds have driven returns from their ownership in just a few companies in a given fund of many companies. Plus, traditional venture funds have grown in size, requiring larger “exits” to deliver acceptable returns. For example – to return just the initial capital of a $400 million venture fund, that might mean needing to own 20 percent of two different $1 billion companies, or 20 percent of a $2 billion company when the company is acquired or goes public.

So, we wondered, as we’re a year into our new fund (which doesn’t need to back billion-dollar companies to succeed, but hey, we like to learn): how likely is it for a startup to achieve a billion-dollar valuation? Is there anything we can learn from the mega hits of the past decade, like Facebook, LinkedIn and Workday?

To answer these questions, the Cowboy Ventures team built a dataset of U.S.-based tech companies started since January 2003 and most recently valued at $1 billion by private or public markets. We call it our “Learning Project,” and it’s ongoing.

With big caveats that 1) our data is based on publicly available sources, such as CrunchBase, LinkedIn, and Wikipedia, and 2) it is based on a snapshot in time, which has definite limitations, here is a summary of what we’ve learned, with more explanation following this list*:

Learnings to date about the “Unicorn Club”:

We found 39 companies belong to what we call the “Unicorn Club” (by our definition, U.S.-based software companies started since 2003 and valued at over $1 billion by public or private market investors). That’s about .07 percent of venture-backed consumer and enterprise software startups.

  1. On average, four unicorns were born per year in the past decade, with Facebook being the breakout “super-unicorn” (worth >$100 billion). In each recent decade, 1-3 super unicorns have been born.

  1. Consumer-oriented unicorns have been more plentiful and created more value in aggregate, even excluding Facebook.

  1. But enterprise-oriented unicorns have become worth more on average, and raised much less private capital, delivering a higher return on private investment.

  1. Companies fall somewhat evenly into four major business models: consumer e-commerce, consumer audience, software-as-a-service, and enterprise software.

  1. It has taken seven-plus years on average before a “liquidity event” for companies, not including the third of our list that is still private. It’s a long journey beyond vesting periods.

  1. Inexperienced, twentysomething founders were an outlier. Companies with well-educated, thirtysomething co-founders who have history together have built the most successes

  1. The “big pivot” after starting with a different initial product is an outlier.

  1. San Francisco (not the Valley) now reigns as the home of unicorns.

  1. There is very little diversity among founders in the Unicorn Club.

Some deeper explanation and additional findings:

1) Welcome to the exclusive, 39-member Unicorn Club: the Top .07%

  • Figuring out the denominator to unicorn probability is hard. The NVCA says over 16,000 internet-related companies were funded since 2003; Mattermark says 12,291 in the past 2 years; and the CVR says 10-15,000 software companies are seeded each year. So let’s say 60,000 software and internet companies were funded in the past decade. That would mean .07 percent have become unicorns. Or, 1 in every 1,538.

  • Takeaway: it’s really hard, and highly unlikely, to build or invest in a billion dollar company. The tech news may make it seem like there’s a winner being born every minute — but the reality is, the odds are somewhere between catching a foul ball at an MLB game and being struck by lightning in one’s lifetime. Or, more than 100x harder than getting into Stanford.

  • That said, these 39 companies have shown it’s possible  – and they do offer a lot that can be learned from.

2) Facebook is the super-unicorn of the decade (by our definition, worth >$100B). Every major technology wave has given birth to one or more super-unicorns

  • Facebook is what we call a super-unicorn: it accounts for almost half of the $260 billion aggregate value of the companies on our list. (As such, we excluded them from analysis related to valuations or capital raised)

  • Prior decades have also given birth to tech super-unicorns. The 1990s gave birth to Google, currently worth nearly 3x Facebook; and Amazon, worth ~ $160 billion. The 1980’s: Cisco. The 1970s: Apple (currently the most valuable company in the world), Oracle, and Microsoft; and Intel was founded in the 1960s.

  • What do super-unicorns have in common? The 1960s marked the era of the semiconductor; the 1970s, the birth of the personal computer; the 1980s, a new networked world; the 1990s, the dawn of the modern Internet; and in the 2000s, new social networks were built.

  • Each major wave of technology innovation has given rise to one or more super-unicorns  — companies that could change your life to work at or invest in, if you’re not lucky/genius enough to be a co-founder. This leads to more questions. What is the fundamental technology change of the next decade (mobile?); and will a new super-unicorn or two be born as a result?

Only four unicorns are born per year on average. But not all years have been as fertile:

  • The 38 companies on our list outside of Facebook are worth about $3.6 billion on average. This might feel like a letdown after reading about super-unicorns, but remember, startups generally start as ideas that most people think are crazy, dumb, or not that important (remember when people ridiculed Twitter as the place to share that you were eating a ham sandwich?). Only after many years and extraordinary good fortune, a few grow into unicorns, which is extremely rare and pretty awesome.

  • Unicorn founding was not front-end-loaded in the past decade. The best year was 2007 (8 of 36); the fewest were born in 2003, 2005 and 2008 (as far as we know today; there are none yet founded in 2011 to today). From this snapshot in time, it’s not clear whether the number of unicorns per year is changing over time.

  • It would be interesting to plot the trajectory of unicorns over time  — which become more valuable and which fall off the list — and to understand the list of potential unicorns-in-waiting, currently valued at <$1 billion. Hopefully for a future post.

3) Consumer-oriented companies have created the majority of value in the past decade

Venture investing into early-stage consumer tech companies has cooled significantly in the past year. But it’s worth realizing that:

  • Three consumer companies — Facebook, Google and Amazon — have been the super-unicorns of the past two decades.

  • There are more consumer-oriented than enterprise unicorns, and they have generated more than 60 percent of the aggregate value on our list outside of Facebook.

  • Our list likely seriously underestimates the value of consumer tech. Of the 14 still-private companies on our list, 85 percent are consumer-oriented (e.g. Twitter, Pinterest, Zulily). They should see a significant step up in value if/when a liquidity event occurs, increasing the aggregate value of the consumer unicorns.

4) Enterprise-oriented unicorns have delivered more value per private dollar invested

  • One reason why enterprise ventures seem so attractive right now: the average enterprise-oriented unicorn on our list raised on average $138 million in the private markets – and they are currently worth 26x their private capital raised to date.

  • The companies that seriously improved this metric are Nicira, Splunk and Tableau, who all raised <$50 million in private markets and are worth $3.8 billion today on average.

  • Plus Workday, ServiceNow and FireEye who are currently worth >60x the private capital raised. Wow.

  • Contrary to conventional VC wisdom about enterprise companies requiring more early-stage capital, we didn’t see a difference in Series A dollars raised by enterprise versus consumer unicorns.

Consumer companies have delivered less value per private dollar invested

  • The consumer unicorns have raised $348 million on average, ~2.5x more private capital than enterprise unicorns; and they are worth about 11x the private capital raised.

  • Companies who raised lots of private money relative to their most recent valuation are Fab, Gilt Groupe, Groupon, HomeAway and Zynga.

  • It may just take more capital to build a super successful consumer tech company in a “get big fast” world; and/or, founders and investors are guilty of over-capitalizing consumer Internet companies at too-high valuations in the past decade, driving lower returns for consumer tech investors.

5) Four primary business models drive the value and network effects help

  • We categorized companies into four business models, which share fairly equally in driving value in aggregate: 1) E-commerce: the consumer pays for goods or services (11 companies); 2) Audience: free for consumers, monetization through ads or leads (11 companies); 3) SaaS: Users pay (often via a “freemium” model) for cloud-based software (7 companies); and 4) Enterprise: Companies pay for larger scale software (10 companies).

  • None of the e-commerce companies on our list hold physical inventory as a key part of their business models. Despite that, e-commerce companies raised the most private dollars on average — delivering the lowest valuations vs capital raised, and likely driving the recent cool down in e-commerce investing.

  • Only four of the 38 companies are mobile-first. Not surprising, the iPhone was only launched in 2007 and the first Android device in 2008.

  • Another characteristic almost half of the companies on our list share: network effects. Network effects in the social age can help companies scale users dramatically, seriously reducing capital requirements (YouTube and Instagram) and/or increasing valuations quickly (Facebook).

6) It’s a marathon, not a sprint: it takes 7+ years to get to a “liquidity event”

  • It took seven years on average for 24 companies on our list to go public or be acquired, excluding extreme outliers YouTube and Instagram, both of which were acquired for over $1 billion in about two years since founding.

  • 14 of the companies on our list are still private, which will increase the average time to liquidity to eight-plus years.

  • Not surprisingly, enterprise companies tend to take about a year longer to see a liquidity event than consumer companies

  • Of the nine companies that have been acquired, the average valuation was $1.3 billion; likely a valuation sweet spot for acquirers to take them off the market before they become less affordable

7) The twentysomething inexperienced founder is an outlier, not the norm

  • The companies on our list were generally not founded by inexperienced, first-time entrepreneurs. The average age on our list of founders at founding is 34. Yes, the founders of Facebook were on average 20 when it was founded; but the founders of LinkedIn, the second-most valuable company on our list, were 36 on average; and the founders of Workday, the third-most valuable, were 52 years old on average.

  • Audience-driven companies like Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr have the youngest founders, with an average age at founding of 30 (seemingly imminent unicorn Snapchat will lower this average). SaaS and e-commerce founders averaged aged 35 and 36; enterprise software founders were 38 on average at founding.

Co-founders with years of history together have driven the most successes

  • A supermajority (35) of the unicorns on our list have chosen to blaze trails with more than one founder — with three co-founders on average. The role of co-founders varies from Co-CEOs (Workday) to technical co-founders who live in a different country (Fab.com). Looking at co-founder equity stakes at liquidity might be another interesting way to look at founder status, which we have not done.

  • Ninety percent of co-founding teams comprise people who have years of history together, either from school or work; 60 percent have co-founders who worked together; and 46 percent who went to school together.

  • Teams that worked together have driven more value per company than those who went to school together.

  • Only four teams of co-founders didn’t have common work or school experience, but all had a common thread. Two were known and introduced by the investors at founding/funding; one team was friends in the local tech scene; and one team met while working on similar ideas.

  • That said, the four unicorns with sole founders (ServiceNow, FireEye, RetailMeNot, Tumblr — half enterprise, half consumer) have all had liquidity events and are worth more on average than companies with co-founders.

Most founding CEOs scale their companies for the long run. But not all founders stay for the whole journey

  • An impressive 76 percent of founding CEOs led their companies to a liquidity event, and 69 percent are still CEO of their company, many as public company CEOs. This says a lot about these founders in terms of their long-term vision, commitment and their capability to scale from almost nothing in terms of money, product, and people, to their current unicorn company status.

  • That said, 31 percent of companies did make a CEO change along the way; and those companies are worth more on average. One reason: about 40 percent of the enterprise companies made a CEO change (versus 25 percent of consumer companies). And all CEO changes prior to a liquidity event were at enterprise companies that added seasoned, “brand-name” leaders to their helms prior to being bought or going public.

  • Only half of the companies on our list show all original founders still working in the company. On average, 2 of 3 co-founders remain.

Not their first rodeo: founders have lots of startup and tech experience

  • Nearly 80 percent of unicorns had at least one co-founder who had previously founded a company of some sort. Some founders showed their entrepreneurial DNA as early as junior high. The list of prior startups co-founded spans failure and success; and from tutoring and bagel delivery companies, to PayPal and Twitter.

  • All but two companies had founders with prior experience working in tech/software; and only three of 38 did not have a technical co-founder on board (HomeAway and RetailMeNot, founded as industry rollups; and Box, founded in college).

  • The majority of founding CEOs, and 90 percent of enterprise CEOs have technical degrees from college.

An educational barbell: many “top 10 school grads” and dropouts

  • The vast majority of all co-founders went to selective universities (e.g. Cornell, Northwestern, University of Illinois).  And more than two-thirds of our list has at least one co-founder who graduated from a “top 10 school.”

  • Stanford leads the roster with an impressive one-third of the companies having at least one Stanford grad as a co-founder. Former Harvard students are co-founders in eight of 38 unicorns; Berkeley in five; and MIT grads in four of the 38 companies.

  • Conversely, eight companies had a college dropout as a co-founder. And three out of five of the most valuable companies (Facebook, Twitter and ServiceNow) on our list were or are led by college dropouts, although dropouts with tech-company experience, with the exception of Facebook.

8) The “big pivot” is also an outlier, especially for enterprise companies

  • Few companies are the result of a successful pivot. Nearly 90 percent of companies are working on their original product vision.

  • The four “pivots” after a different initial product were all in consumer companies (Groupon, Instagram, Pinterest and Fab).

9) The Bay Area, especially San Francisco, is home to the vast majority of unicorns

  • Probably not a surprise, but 27 of 39 on our list are based in the Bay Area. What might be a surprise is how much the center of gravity has moved to San Francisco from the Valley: 15 unicorns are headquartered in San Francisco; 11 are on the Peninsula; and one is in the East Bay.

  • New York City has emerged as the No. 2 city for unicorns, home to three. Seattle (2) and Austin (2) are the next most-concentrated cities for unicorns.

10) There is A LOT of opportunity to bring diversity into the founders club

  • Only two companies have female co-founders: Gilt Groupe and Fab, both consumer e-commerce. And no unicorns have female founding CEOs.

  • While there is some ethnic diversity on founding teams, the diversity of founders in the unicorn club is far from the diversity of college grads with relevant technical degrees. Feels like some important records to break.

So, what does this all mean?

For those aspiring to found, work at, or invest in future unicorns, it still means anything is possible. All these companies are technically outliers: they are the top .07 percent. As such, we don’t think this provides a unicorn-hunting investor checklist, i.e. 34-year-old male ex-PayPal-ers with Stanford degrees, one who founded a software startup in junior high, where should we sign?

That said, it surprised us how much the unicorn club has in common. In some cases, 90 percent in common, such as enterprise founder/CEOs with technical degrees; companies with 2+ co-founders who worked or went to school together; companies whose founders had prior tech startup experience; and whose founders were in their 30s or older.

It is also good to be reminded that most successful startups take a lot of time and commitment to break out. While vesting periods are usually four years, the most valuable startups will take at least eight years before a “liquidity event,” and most founders and CEOs will stay in their companies beyond such an event. Unicorns also tend to raise a lot of capital over time — way beyond the Series A. So these founding teams had the ability to share a compelling company vision over many years and rounds of fundraising, plus scale themselves and recruit teams, despite economic ups and downs.

We tip our hats to these 39 companies that have delighted millions of customers with fantastic products and generated so much value in just 10 years despite a crowded startup environment. They are the lucky/genius few of the Unicorn Club – and we look forward to learning about (and meeting) those who will break into this elite group next.

————-

*  Many thanks to the Cowboy crew who helped with this, including Noah Lichtenstein, Meg He, Lauren Kolodny, Kim Stromberg and Jennifer Gee.

** Our data is based on information in news articles, company websites, CrunchBase, LinkedIn, Wikipedia and public market data. It is also based on a snapshot in time (as of 10/31/13) and current market conditions, which are currently fairly “hot.”

*** Yes we know the term “unicorn” is not perfect – unicorns apparently don’t exist, and these companies do – but we like the term because to us, it means something extremely rare, and magical

**** By our rough definition, consumer companies = e-commerce + audience business models; enterprise companies = Software as a Service + Enterprise business models

***** Our definition of “top 10 school” is according to US News & World Report.

Voir de même:

Blablacar est une «licorne» qui vaut de l’or

Anissa Boumediene

ECONOMIE Le leader mondial du covoiturage vient de lever 200 millions de dollars et compte bien poursuivre son ascension…

Ça y est, Blablacar passe dans la cour des grands et intègre le cercle très fermé des « licornes », ces start-up non cotées en bourse et valorisées à plus d’un milliard de dollars. Ce jeudi, le leader mondial du covoiturage a annoncé une levée de fonds de 200 millions d’euros, et est désormais valorisé à 1,6 milliard de dollars (1,4 milliard d’euros). 20 Minutes s’est penché sur ce succès à la française.

Un modèle économique qui fonctionne

« C’est une entreprise qui a trouvé un modèle économique qui fonctionne bien : un modèle de développement propre au numérique, de mise en relation, qui a fait le succès d’autres start-up comme Airbnb, Uber ou encore Le Bon Coin », analyse Thierry Pénard, directeur du Master Economie des technologies de l’information et du e-business à l’Université de Rennes I et auteur de Economie du numérique et de l’internet (éd. Vuibert).

Si Blablacar fonctionne aussi bien en France qu’à l’international, c’est parce qu’elle est rapidement devenue la plateforme incontournable dans son secteur. Elle repose sur un effet de réseau. Mais aussi parce que « l’entreprise a été pensée à l’américaine : d’abord créée pour le marché intérieur, ici la France, mais déclinable à l’international. D’où l’importance de la levée de fonds pour y parvenir », poursuit-il.

Un investissement rentable

Et les investisseurs, Blablacar sait les séduire. Aujourd’hui valorisée à 1,6 milliard de dollars, l’entreprise française a réussi à lever 200 millions de dollars (177 millions d’euros) auprès d’investisseurs américains. « Une première en France », précise Laure Wagner, porte-parole et toute première employée de Blablacar. « Les licornes sont presque toutes américaines. C’est rare qu’on ait un tel succès pour une entreprise française. Il y a bien eu Criteo, qui s’adresse aux entreprises et aux annonceurs, mais Blablacar est un modèle grand public », précise Thierry Pénard.

« Les premières levées de fonds sont souvent les plus difficiles pour de jeunes entreprises, qui manquent de visibilité. Mais aujourd’hui, Blablacar n’a plus ce problème, elle bénéficie de la confiance des investisseurs, américains notamment, qui savent qu’elle représente un investissement rentable. Ils se basent sur sa croisssance, l’augmentation de ses marges et sa position de leader dans les pays où elle est implantée », décrypte l’économiste. « Après chaque levée de fonds, nous avons réussi à atteindre les objectifs que nous nous étions fixés, abonde Laure Wagner. Mais les investisseurs sont là pour nous aider et pas l’inverse ».

Poursuivre son expansion

La société française ne compte pas s’arrêter en si bon chemin. Avec ces 200 millions de dollars, Blablacar suit sa « roadmap », comme l’appelle sa porte-parole. « Nous allons poursuivre notre expansion à l’international, indique Laure Wagner. Après le Mexique, nous travaillons actuellement sur le Brésil ». Et le reste de l’Amérique du sud et l’Asie du sud-est devraient suivre.

Les marchés existants ne sont pas oubliés pour autant et Blablacar planche encore pour développer le marché en Turquie ou encore en Europe de l’est, où l’entreprise s’est récemment implantée. « Nous avons aujourd’hui 20 millions de membres dans 19 pays, nous avons encore de la marge. Et même dans les marchés matûres comme la France, l’Italie ou l’Allemagne, nous pouvons continuer et à trouver de nouveaux leviers, comme l’assurance supplémentaire, et démocratiser encore le covoiturage », espère la première employée recrutée par Blablacar.

Et pour mener à bien son expansion, la start-up, qui a co-lancé l’opération « Reviens Léon, on innove à la maison » pour attirer les expatriés français, recherche de nouveaux talents.

Voir aussi:

Procès UberPop : 800.000 euros d’amende pour Uber

Mounia Van de Casteele
La Tribune
09/06/2016
Le tribunal correctionnel de Paris a infligé jeudi 800.000 euros d’amende, dont la moitié avec sursis, à Uber pour le service UberPop. Voilà la société fixée sur son sort concernant le service un temps proposé sur sa plateforme et qui permettait à des particuliers d’en transporter d’autres.

Fin du suspense. Comme prévu, le tribunal correctionnel de Paris a rendu ce jeudi sa décision au sujet des dirigeants d’Uber France (Thibaud Simphal) et Europe de l’Ouest (Pierre-Dimitri Gore-Coty à l’époque des faits), notamment concernant le service de transport entre particuliers UberPop, déjà suspendu depuis un an.

Verdict : le tribunal correctionnel de Paris condamne Uber à une amende de 800.000 euros d’amende (dont la moitié avec sursis). La société risquait jusqu’à 1,5 million d’euros d’amende. La peine est donc minorée par rapport à ce qu’avait requis le parquet, le 12 février, à savoir un million d’euros d’amende contre la société Uber, désormais valorisée plus de 60 milliards de dollars, grâce à l’investissement de l’Arabie saoudite.

Mais elle l’est encore plus pour les deux dirigeants Thibaud Simphal et Pierre-Dimitri Gore-Coty. Ceux-ci ont en effet écopé de 30.000 et 20.000 euros d’amende, dont la moitié avec sursis, tandis que le parquet avait requis quelque 50.000 et 70.000 euros d’amende en plus de l’interdiction de gestion, d’administration et de direction de toute entreprise pendant 5 ans.

Plusieurs chefs de poursuite

La société et les deux dirigeants ont été déclarés coupables principalement des délits d' »organisation illégale d’un système de mise en relation de clients » avec des chauffeurs non-professionnels, complicité d’exercice illégal de la profession de taxi et pratique commerciale trompeuse.

Pour rappel, ces derniers et la société en elle-même étaient également poursuivis devant le tribunal correctionnel pour avoir avoir traité et conservé illégalement des données informatiques, concernant leurs partenaires chauffeurs dont ils ont enregistré des données à caractère personnel. A savoir, des fichiers contenant les informations relatives aux cartes d’identité et permis de conduire des chauffeurs, leurs extraits de casiers judiciaires, ou encore une base de données sur les interpellations des chauffeurs. Ces dernières infractions ne visaient pas uniquement les conducteurs UberPop, mais plus généralement les partenaires chauffeurs d’Uber.

« Violations réitérées et durables » de loi

Au terme de la lecture détaillée des motivations du jugement, la présidente a souligné que les prévenus se sont rendus coupables de « violations réitérées et durables » de loi, rappelant les troubles et incidents lors des manifestations de taxis contre UberPop. La magistrate a également souligné qu’Uber n’a suspendu UberPop qu’après le placement en garde à vue de ses dirigeants.

Les 38 parties civiles, dont plusieurs syndicats de taxis, demandaient au total 114 millions d’euros de dommages et intérêts pour le préjudice matériel et 5,2 millions pour le préjudice moral. Mais le tribunal n’a retenu que le préjudice moral, et a alloué des montants qui se chiffrent en dizaines de milliers d’euros.

Uber va faire appel « immédiatement »

Un porte-parole d’Uber a fait part de la déception de l’entreprise quant à cette décision, surtout dans un contexte où la Commission européenne semble pourtant encourager l’innovation. Et a tenu à rappeler que la décision n’avait pas d’impact sur l’activité d’Uber en France aujourd’hui. L’entreprise va d’ailleurs « faire appel immédiatement », a-t-il précisé.

Reste à savoir ce que décideront les juges au sujet de la jeune pousse française Heetch, le 22 juin. Ce jour-là, les deux dirigeants de Heetch seront jugés en correctionnelle, soupçonnés de concurrence illégale avec les taxis. Outre ses dirigeants, Heetch comparaîtra en tant que personne morale pour « organisation illicite de mise en relation« , de « complicité d’exercice illégal de l’activité d’exploitant de taxi » et de « pratique commerciale trompeuse ».

En attendant, la plateforme continue à fonctionner en France et accélère son développement en Europe. Les dirigeants estiment cependant ne pas proposer le même service qu’UberPop étant donné que les revenus des chauffeurs sont plafonnés à environ 6.000 euros par an et que la plateforme n’impose aucun prix pour les courses. Elle se contente de suggérer une somme. Ensuite le client donne ce qu’il veut. Leur ligne de défense sera-t-elle convaincante ?

Voir enfin:

Comment les licornes sont devenues la métaphore de l’extraordinaire

Les licornes ne se résument pas à une frénésie issue des méandres d’internet: l’animal mythique a aussi intégré notre langage et nos figures de style.

Les licornes sont partout, tout le temps. Il est difficile de définir précisément le moment où cet animal fantastique un peu kitsch est devenu à la mode. Qu’elle soit capillaire ou commerciale, la frénésie autour de ces chevaux à corne a progressivement imprégné le langage courant.

Pour les entreprises de la Silicon Valley valorisées à plus d’un milliard de dollars avant même d’être cotées en bourse, on parle de licornes. Pour un joueur de basket au profil atypique, on parle de licorne. Pour décrire une situation tout à fait quotidienne et banale, on dit qu’il ne s’agit pas de licorne.

«Le parc lexico-zoologique des licornes continue de se peupler», constate le Boston Globe. Le terme est devenu un qualificatif à valeur de superlatif absolu, dépouillant au passage d’autres expressions de leur force. «J’aime beaucoup ce nouvel emploi métaphorique de la licorne en tant que modificateur car il contient un élément de surprise, qui rappelle que la chose dont nous sommes en train de parler, un job, un partenaire, etc., n’est pas seulement rare mais n’existe peut-être pas du tout, relève Anne Curzan, professeure d’anglais à l’université du Michigan, auprès du Boston Globe. L’expression “job de rêve” veut théoriquement dire la même chose mais je pense que la notion de rêve est devenue trop commune.»

Les métaphores animales ne se sont toutefois jamais cantonnées aux licornes. «Les images fondées sur les objets qui sont à la fois familiers et exotiques (comme les animaux africains, ou imaginaires) marchent grâce à leur cocasserie, explique le lexicographe Orin Hargraves au Boston Globe. Nous parlons de la politique de l’autruche, […] de zébras, de dinosaures pour quelque chose d’obsolète, etc. Tout ce qui se niche avec force dans l’esprit des enfants est matière à créer des métaphores dans lesquelles on retrouve la qualité de l’objet.»

Mais pourquoi se contenter des licornes, quand il existe des centaines de créatures mythiques prêtes à servir de métaphore au prochain phénomène hors du commun?

Porzingis, une licorne lettonne au pays de l’Oncle Sam
Christophe Remise

12/02/2016

En quatre mois, Kristaps Porzingis est passé d’un joueur que l’on sifflait sans le connaître à l’un des basketteurs les plus suivis de la planète basket. Itinéraire d’un surdoué qui n’a pas fini de surprendre.

Sifflets, quolibets, railleries en tous genres… Krirstaps Porzingis n’a pas été épargné par les fans de New York, le public en général et même les médias lors de son arrivée en NBA. Trop grand, trop lourd, trop pataud : ce jeune (20 ans) international letton, débarqué aux Etats-Unis en provenance de la Liga espagnole et de Séville, où il a passé les cinq dernières années, a fait craindre à beaucoup un nouvel accident industriel chez des Knicks. Lesquels sortaient de la pire saison de leur histoire. Les supporters new-yorkais présents au Barclays Center de Brooklyn au printemps dernier, lors de la Draft 2015, ne se sont donc pas privés pour huer ce grand échalas de 2,21m au visage poupon et à l’allure gauche. Le tout alors que Phil Jackson, le président de la franchise de «Big Apple», a rapidement laissé entendre qu’il faudrait attendre plusieurs années pour que Porzingis démontre réellement l’étendue de son potentiel. Finalement, quatre mois ont suffi à l’intéressé pour mettre l’exigeante New York et tout le reste de la planète basket dans sa poche.

Durant voit en lui une… licorne
Aujourd’hui, on le compare à Dirk Nowitzki ou Anthony Davis, ceux qui l’ont sifflé lors de la Draft se prennent en photo avec lui et son maillot était arrivé en quatrième position des ventes sur le site de la boutique officielle de l’Association après les trois premiers mois de la saison. Le prochain «franchise player» des Knicks ? Peut-être… Nous n’en sommes pas encore là, et le présent se nomme toujours Carmelo Anthony. Une chose est sûre : Krirstaps Porzingis présente un profil rare, voire inédit dans l’univers du basket. Un ovni de la grosse balle orange. «Il peut shooter, il joue juste, il défend, un grand qui peut tirer même au-delà de la ligne à trois points, c’est rare. Il contre des ballons aussi. C’est une licorne dans cette Ligue», a récemment osé Kevin Durant, avant un match entre NYC et Oklahoma City. L’illustre allemand Nowitzki, lui, estime que le jeune ailier fort de «Gotham City» est peut-être en avance sur lui au même âge.

Une telle «hype» vient évidemment en partie du poids du marché new-yorkais. Mais contrairement à la folie Jeremy Lin ces dernières années, Krirstaps Porzingis semble réellement parti pour durer. L’ex-Sévillan dispose de qualités techniques étonnantes pour un joueur de sa taille, un bagage complet, en défense (7,7 rebonds, 1,9 contre) comme en attaque (13,9 pts, 34,9% à trois points, 84,8% aux lancers-francs), de l’agilité et de bonnes mains. Il est dur au mal et n’a eu aucune difficulté à s’adapter aux exigences physiques et tactiques du jeu NBA, à la différence de nombreux Européens. New York n’a pas oublié la mauvaise expérience Frédéric Weis et personne n’avait envie d’un nouveau Darko Milicic au Madison Square Garden.

Il n’y aura rien de tout cela avec le grand Letton. Ce dernier dispose d’une confiance en lui inébranlable. Et dieu sait qu’elle a été mise à rude épreuve dès la Draft… Sans doute l’un des principaux facteurs de sa réussite précoce et des espoirs qu’il suscite. Porzingis, qui a grandi auprès de deux frères anciens basketteurs professionnels et reste très proche de sa famille, sait aussi déjà se montrer drôle en anglais, simple avec les fans. Il avait déjà la culture US en général et de la NBA en particulier avant de traverser l’Atlantique.

Karl-Anthony Towns ou Kristaps Porzingis ?
Assurément une excellente surprise pour les N.Y. Knicks, qui peuvent enfin regarder l’avenir avec optimisme. En attendant, ils vont s’attacher à remonter la pente au présent, après une sale série qui les a vu dégringoler au classement et contraint le président Phil Jackson (entre autres choses) à faire sauter le fusible Derek Fisher. Krirstaps Porzingis, lui, va s’offrir une parenthèse de détente du côté de Toronto. Il fait partie du casting du Rising Stars Challenge, ce match de gala qui verra s’affronter, dans la nuit de vendredi à samedi, les meilleurs joueurs de première et deuxième année américains et les étrangers, et y sera notamment opposé au numéro 1 de la dernière Draft, l’intérieur des Minnesota Timberwolves Karl-Anthony Towns. Les deux joueurs sont les principaux prétendants au titre de Rookie de l’année. Mais il sera plus question de faire le show que de marquer des points en vue de cette distinction sur les planches de Toronto.

C’est la fin d’un mythe: l’homme a bien côtoyé la licorne
Repéré par Fatma-Pia Hotait

Slate.fr

29.03.2016

D’après de récentes découvertes, les licornes de Sibérie se sont éteintes beaucoup plus tard que ce que l’on pensait.

Licorne de Sibérie. C’est le nom attribué à l’Elasmotherium sibiricum, rhinocérotidé éteint qui était présent en Asie et en Europe. Les chercheurs de l’université de Tomsk, en Russie, ont découvert des restes du crâne «bien conservé» de l’animal à Pavlodar Itrysh, au Kazakhstan, rapporte Phys.org. Ils détaillent leurs trouvailles dans un article paru en février 2016 dans l’American Journal of Applied Science. Alors que jusqu’à maintenant, les scientifiques pensaient que l’Elasmotherium sibiricum s’était éteint il y a 350.000 ans, cette découverte laisse à penser que son extinction ne date que d’il y a 29.000 ans.

Si cette licorne a survécu de si nombreuses années malgré le refroidissement global, c’est peut-être que «l’ouest de la Sibérie était un refuge, où ce type de rhinocéros a survécu plus longtemps que ses semblables», estime Andrei Shpanski, paléontologue à l’université de Tomsk, à Phys.org. «Une autre possibilité serait que cette espèce pouvait migrer et s’installer dans des zones plus au Sud», avance l’expert.

Deux mètres de haut pour cinq tonnes
Cette nouvelle date laisse donc à penser que l’Homme a côtoyé cet animal. De quoi peut-être expliquer la légende de la licorne, même si l’Elasmotherium sibiricum est loin de l’image majestueuse que nous avons en tête. Plus proche du rhinocéros que du cheval mythologique, l’animal faisait près de «4,5 mètres de long, et était haut deux mètres». Son poids est estimé à cinq tonnes. Sa corne, «beaucoup plus longue que celle d’un rhinocéros», faisait plusieurs mètres de long, rapporte Mother Nature Network.

Cette découverte nous en dit plus sur l’animal, mais aussi sur ses conditions de vie et son extinction tardive. «Comprendre le passé nous permet de prédire les processus naturels qui auront lieu dans le futur avec plus de précision, explique Shpanski. Et ce, également dans le domaine du climat.»


Good kill: Attention, un pilote de drones peut en cacher un autre (No kill lists and Terror Tuesdays, please, we’re Hollywood)

8 mai, 2015
https://i2.wp.com/www.thebureauinvestigates.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/All-Totals-Dash54.jpg
L’ennemi n’est pas identifiable en tant que tel dans le sens où ce sont des gens qui se mêlent à la population. Donc ils sont habillés comme n’importe qui. Il n’y a pas d’uniforme donc comment savoir si c’est l’ennemi ou juste des personnes normales ? C’est juste d’après le comportement qu’on peut le voir. Bernard Davin (pilote belge au retour d’Afghanistan, RTBF, 13.01.09)
La majorité du temps, ce n’est pas une décision qui est difficile puisque en fait, c’est l’ennemi qui nous met dans une situation difficile au sol. Didier Polomé (commandant belge)
On n’en saura pas plus. Les détails des opérations OTAN sont couvertes par le secret militaire pour éviter les représailles contre les pays impliqués et contre les familles des pilotes en mission en Afghanistan. Journaliste belge (RTBF, 13.01.09)
Le bien et le mal se mélangent un peu (…) et ça devient un peu comme un jeu vidéo. Soldat israélien
Les frères Jonas sont ici ; ils sont là quelque part. Sasha et Malia sont de grandes fans. Mais les gars, allez pas vous faire des idées. J’ai deux mots pour vous: « predator drones ». Vous les verrez même pas venir. Vous croyez que je plaisante, hein ? Barack Obama (2010)
Les drones américains ont liquidé plus de monde que le nombre total des détenus de Guantanamo. Pouvons nous être certains qu’il n’y avait parmi eux aucun cas d’erreurs sur la personne ou de morts innocentes ? Les prisonniers de Guantanamo avaient au moins une chance d’établir leur identité, d’être examinés par un Comité de surveillance et, dans la plupart des cas, d’être relâchés. Ceux qui restent à Guantanamo ont été contrôlés et, finalement, devront faire face à une forme quelconque de procédure judiciaire. Ceux qui ont été tués par des frappes de drones, quels qu’ils aient été, ont disparu. Un point c’est tout. Kurt Volker
The drone operation now operates out of two main bases in the US, dozens of smaller installations and at least six foreign countries. There are « terror Tuesday » meetings to discuss targets which Obama’s campaign manager, David Axelrod, sometimes attends, lending credence to those who see naked political calculation involved. The New York Times
Foreign Policy a consacré la une de son numéro daté de mars-avril aux “guerres secrètes d’Obama”. Qui aurait pu croire il y a quatre ans que le nom de Barack Obama allait être associé aux drones et à la guerre secrète technologique ? s’étonne le magazine, qui souligne qu’Obama “est le président américain qui a approuvé le plus de frappes ciblées de toute l’histoire des Etats-Unis”. Voilà donc à quoi ressemblait l’ennemi : quinze membres présumés d’Al-Qaida au Yémen entretenant des liens avec l’Occident. Leurs photographies et la biographie succincte qui les accompagnait les faisaient ressembler à des étudiants dans un trombinoscope universitaire. Plusieurs d’entre eux étaient américains. Deux étaient des adolescents, dont une jeune fille qui ne faisait même pas ses 17 ans. Supervisant la réunion dédiée à la lutte contre le terrorisme, qui réunit tous les mardis une vingtaine de hauts responsables à la Maison-Blanche, Barack Obama a pris un moment pour étudier leurs visages. C’était le 19 janvier 2010, au terme d’une première année de mandat émaillée de complots terroristes dont le point culminant a été la tentative d’attentat évitée de justesse dans le ciel de Detroit le soir de Noël 2009. “Quel âge ont-ils ? s’est enquis Obama ce jour-là. Si Al-Qaida se met à utiliser des enfants, c’est que l’on entre dans une toute nouvelle phase.” La question n’avait rien de théorique : le président a volontairement pris la tête d’un processus de “désignation” hautement confidentiel visant à identifier les terroristes à éliminer ou à capturer. Obama a beau avoir fait campagne en 2008 contre la guerre en Irak et contre l’usage de la torture, il a insisté pour que soit soumise à son aval la liquidation de chacun des individus figurant sur une kill list [liste de cibles à abattre] qui ne cesse de s’allonger, étudiant méticuleusement les biographies des terroristes présumés apparaissant sur ce qu’un haut fonctionnaire surnomme macabrement les “cartes de base-ball”. A chaque fois que l’occasion d’utiliser un drone pour supprimer un terroriste se présente, mais que ce dernier est en famille, le président se réserve le droit de prendre la décision finale. (…) Une série d’interviews accordées au New York Times par une trentaine de ses conseillers permettent de retracer l’évolution d’Obama depuis qu’il a été appelé à superviser personnellement cette “drôle de guerre” contre Al-Qaida et à endosser un rôle sans précédent dans l’histoire de la présidence américaine. Ils évoquent un chef paradoxal qui approuve des opérations de liquidation sans ciller, tout en étant inflexible sur la nécessité de circonscrire la lutte antiterroriste et d’améliorer les relations des Etats-Unis avec le monde arabe. (…) C’est le plus curieux des rituels bureaucratiques : chaque semaine ou presque, une bonne centaine de membres du tentaculaire appareil sécuritaire des Etats-Unis se réunissent lors d’une visioconférence sécurisée pour éplucher les biographies des terroristes présumés et suggérer au président la prochaine cible à abattre. Ce processus de “désignation” confidentiel est une création du gouvernement Obama, un macabre “club de discussion” qui étudie soigneusement des diapositives PowerPoint sur lesquelles figurent les noms, les pseudonymes et le parcours de membres présumés de la branche yéménite d’Al-Qaida ou de ses alliés de la milice somalienne Al-Chabab. The New York Times (07.06.12)
Rarement moment politique et innovation technologique auront si parfaitement correspondu : lorsque le président démocrate est élu en 2008 par des Américains las des conflits, il dispose d’un moyen tout neuf pour poursuivre, dans la plus grande discrétion, la lutte contre les « ennemis de l’Amérique » sans risquer la vie de citoyens de son pays : les drones. (…) George W. Bush, artisan d’un large déploiement sur le terrain, utilisera modérément ces nouveaux engins létaux. Barack Obama y recourra six fois plus souvent pendant son seul premier mandat que son prédécesseur pendant les deux siens. M. Obama, qui, en recevant le prix Nobel de la paix en décembre 2009, revendiquait une Amérique au « comportement exemplaire dans la conduite de la guerre », banalisera la pratique des « assassinats ciblés », parfois fondés sur de simples présomptions et décidés par lui-même dans un secret absolu. Tandis que les militaires guident les drones dans l’Afghanistan en guerre, c’est jusqu’à présent la très opaque CIA qui opère partout ailleurs (au Yémen, au Pakistan, en Somalie, en Libye). C’est au Yémen en 2002 que la campagne d' »assassinats ciblés » a débuté. Le Pakistan suit dès 2004. Barack Obama y multiplie les frappes. Certaines missions, menées à l’insu des autorités pakistanaises, soulèvent de lourdes questions de souveraineté. D’autres, les goodwill kills (« homicides de bonne volonté »), le sont avec l’accord du gouvernement local. Tandis que les frappes de drones militaires sont simplement « secrètes », celles opérées par la CIA sont « covert », ce qui signifie que les Etats-Unis n’en reconnaissent même pas l’existence. Dans ce contexte, établir des statistiques est difficile. Selon le Bureau of Investigative Journalism, une ONG britannique, les attaques au Pakistan ont fait entre 2 548 et 3 549 victimes, dont 411 à 884 sont des civils, et 168 à 197 des enfants. En termes statistiques, la campagne de drones est un succès : les Etats-Unis revendiquent l’élimination de plus d’une cinquantaine de hauts responsables d’Al-Qaida et de talibans. D’où la nette diminution du nombre de cibles potentielles et du rythme des frappes, passées de 128 en 2010 (une tous les trois jours) à 48 en 2012 au Pakistan. Car le secret total et son cortège de dénégations ne pouvaient durer éternellement. En mai 2012, le New York Times a révélé l’implication personnelle de M. Obama dans la confection des kill lists. Après une décennie de silence et de mensonges officiels, la réalité a dû être admise. En particulier au début de l’année, lorsque le débat public s’est focalisé sur l’autorisation, donnée par le ministre de la justice, Eric Holder, d’éliminer un citoyen américain responsable de la branche yéménite d’Al-Qaida. L’imam Anouar Al-Aulaqi avait été abattu le 30 septembre 2011 au Yémen par un drone de la CIA lancé depuis l’Arabie saoudite. Le droit de tuer un concitoyen a nourri une intense controverse. D’autant que la même opération avait causé des « dégâts collatéraux » : Samir Khan, responsable du magazine jihadiste Inspire, et Abdulrahman, 16 ans, fils d’Al-Aulaqui, tous deux américains et ne figurant ni l’un ni l’autre sur la kill list, ont trouvé la mort. Aux yeux des opposants, l’adolescent personnifie désormais l’arbitraire de la guerre des drones. La révélation par la presse des contorsions juridiques imaginées par les conseillers du président pour justifier a posteriori l’assassinat d’un Américain n’a fait qu’alimenter les revendications de transparence. La fronde s’est concrétisée par le blocage au Sénat, plusieurs semaines durant, de la nomination à la tête de la CIA de John Brennan, auparavant grand ordonnateur à la Maison Blanche de la politique d’assassinats ciblés. (…) Très attendu, le grand exercice de clarification a eu lieu le 23 mai devant la National Defense University de Washington. Barack Obama y a prononcé un important discours sur la « guerre juste », affichant enfin une doctrine en matière d’usage des drones. Il était temps : plusieurs organisations de défense des libertés publiques avaient réclamé en justice la communication des documents justifiant les assassinats ciblés. Une directive présidentielle, signée la veille, précise les critères de recours aux frappes à visée mortelle : une « menace continue et imminente contre la population des Etats-Unis », le fait qu' »aucun autre gouvernement ne soit en mesure d'[y] répondre ou ne la prenne en compte effectivement » et une « quasi-certitude » qu’il n’y aura pas de victimes civiles. Pour la première fois, Barack Obama a reconnu l’existence des assassinats ciblés, y compris ceux ayant visé des Américains, assurant que ces morts le « hanteraient » toute sa vie. (…) Six jours après ce discours, l’assassinat par un drone de Wali ur-Rehman, le numéro deux des talibans pakistanais, en a montré les limites. Ce leader visait plutôt le Pakistan que « la population des Etats-Unis ». Tout porte donc à croire que les critères limitatifs énoncés par Barack Obama ne s’appliquent pas au Pakistan, du moins aussi longtemps qu’il restera des troupes américaines dans l’Afghanistan voisin. Et que les « Signature strikes », ces frappes visant des groupes d’hommes armés non identifiés mais présumés extrémistes, seront poursuivies. Les drones n’ont donc pas fini de mettre en lumière les contradictions de Barack Obama : président antiguerre, champion de la transparence, de la légalité et de la main tendue à l’islam, il a multiplié dans l’ombre les assassinats ciblés, provoquant la colère de musulmans. Le Monde (18.06.13)
Aucun soldat n’avait vécu cela jusqu’ici. Avant, on se rendait dans le pays avec lequel on était en conflit. Aujourd’hui, plus besoin : la guerre est télécommandée. Avant, le pilote prenait son jet, lâchait une bombe et rentrait. Aujourd’hui, il lâche sa bombe, attend dans son fauteuil et compte le nombre de morts. Il passe douze heures à tuer des talibans avant d’aller chercher ses enfants à l’école. (…) Obama est démocrate. Et l’emploi des drones a augmenté depuis qu’il est au pouvoir. Mon film parle de l’ »American sniper » ultime. J’ai juste tenté d’être honnête vis-à-vis du sujet. De montrer les choses telles qu’elles sont sans imposer une manière de penser. Il serait naïf de dire « je suis anti-drone ». Ce serait comme dire « je suis anti-internet ». Mais avec cette technologie, la guerre peut être infinie. Le jour où l’armée américaine quittera le Moyen-Orient, les drones, eux, y resteront. (…) L’état-major américain était sur le point d’attribuer une médaille à certains pilotes de drones. Cela a soulevé un tel tollé de la part des vrais pilotes qu’ils ont abandonné l’idée. Ces médailles sont censées célébrer les valeurs et le courage. Comment les décerner à des types qui tuent sans courir le moindre danger ? (…) J’ai aussi pas mal filmé les scènes extérieures au conflit, celles de la vie quotidienne du personnage à Las Vegas, d’un point de vue culminant, pour créer une continuité et un sentiment de paranoïa. Comme si un drone le suivait en permanence. Ou le point de vue de Dieu. Andrew Niccol
Tout ce que je montre est vrai: un type près de Las Vegas peut détruire une maison pleine de talibans en Afghanistan. Encore faut-il être sûr que ceux qui y sont réunis sont vraiment des talibans. Et il est arrivé que des missiles américains soient lancés contre des enterrements. Andrew Niccol
J’étais plus intéressé par le personnage, par cette nouvelle manière de faire la guerre. On n’a jamais demandé à un soldat de faire ça. De combattre douze heures et de rentrer chez lui auprès de sa femme et de ses enfants, il n’y a plus de sas de décompression. (…) J’ai engagé d’anciens pilotes de drones comme consultants, puisque l’armée m’avait refusé sa coopération. J’en aurais bien voulu, ç’aurait été plus facile si on m’avait donné ces équipements, ces installations. J’ai dû les construire. (…) je me suis souvenu aujourd’hui d’une conférence de presse du général Schwartzkopf pendant la première guerre d’Irak, il avait montré des vidéos en noir et blanc, avec une très mauvaise définition, de frappes de précision et on voyait un motocycliste échapper de justesse à un missile. Il l’avait appelé « l’homme le plus chanceux d’Irak ». On le voit traverser un pont, passer dans la ligne de mire et sortir du champ au moment où le panache de l’explosion éclot. Aujourd’hui on sait qu’il existe une vidéo pour chaque frappe de drone, c’est la procédure. Mais on ne les montre plus comme au temps du général Schwartzkopf. Expliquez-moi pourquoi. (…) Je vais vous dire pourquoi. Les humains ont tendance à l’empathie – et même si vous êtes mon ennemi, même si vous êtes une mauvaise personne, si je vous regarde mourir, je ressentirai de l’empathie. Ce qui n’est pas bon pour les affaires militaires. (…) Je crois que ça a tendance à insensibiliser. On n’entend jamais une explosion, on ne sent jamais le sol se soulever. On est à 10 000 kilomètres. (…) L’armée l’a mise là pour des raisons de commodité: les montagnes autour de Las Vegas ressemblent à l’Afghanistan, ce qui permet aux pilotes de drones à l’entraînement de se familiariser avec le terrain. Ils s’exercent aussi à suivre des voitures. Andrew Niccol
Je voulais montrer que plus on progresse technologiquement, plus on régresse humainement. Derrière sa télécommande, le pilote n’entend rien, ne sent pas le sol trembler, ne respire pas l’odeur de brûlé… Il fait exploser des pixels sans jamais être dans le concret de la chair et du sang. Andrew Nicool
I get to play a character I’ve never seen on screen before. He’s spending the bulk of the day fighting the Taliban; leaves work, picks up some eggs and orange juice, helps his son with his homework and fights with his wife about what TV show to watch. And then the next day does the same thing again. This is a new situation we’ve never been in: Soldiers who take people’s lives whose own life isn’t in danger. A lot of these people go into the military because they have the mentality of a warrior. They want to put their life on the line for their beliefs to make people safe, but what does it mean when your life isn’t on the line? It seems like the stuff of sci-fi but it’s arrived. (…) We can’t have a serious conversation about a drone strike unless people have more information. Most people don’t know what a drone looks like, or how it’s operated. I learned a lot – I had no idea [the US] would strike a funeral or rescuers. There’s a certain logic to doing it – you could say perhaps it is proportionate. Perhaps we’re stopping more death than we’re creating, but we are killing innocent people. Am I sure I want our soldiers doing that? An interesting example is on Obama’s third day in office he ordered a drone strike – it was surgical, but they had the wrong information and they murdered a family that had nothing to do with anything. When these tools are available accidents happen. It’s ripe for dialogue. I’m not in politics, I don’t have an agenda for the audience, but I think it’s a really interesting conversation. I don’t think we should let our governments run willy-nilly and kill whoever and spy on whoever they want to without asking any questions. Ethan Hawke
Every strike Tom does in the movie there is a precedent for, but his character is fictitious. There were some things I didn’t put in the movie because I thought they were too outrageous. I was told about drone pilots who were younger than Ethan’s character – they would work with a joystick for 12 hours over Afghanistan, take out a target and go home to their apartment and play video games. The military modelled the workstation on computer games because it’s the joystick that’s the easiest to use. They want gamers to join the Air Force because they’re good and can manoeuvre a drone perfectly. But how can they possibly separate playing one joystick game one moment, and then playing real war the next? Andrew Nicool
His control bunker looks a bit like a shipping container from the outside, boxy and portable. ‘The troops are going to withdraw from Afghanistan, but the drones won’t leave’ “The reason is that they used to wheel them into a Hercules and fly them around the world,” says Niccol. “But then realized they didn’t have to go anywhere; they had satellites.” Hawke’s character kills enemies in Afghanistan from half a world away, but struggles with the moral implications of such precise, emotionless combat. The cinematography in Good Kill calls attention to the similarities in geography between the U.S. and Afghan deserts, and the walled residences that exist in both locations. “It’s not my choice; it’s the military’s choice,” says Niccol. They can train drone pilots locally over terrain similar to what they’ll see while on duty. “If you’re going on a weekend trip to Vegas in your car,” he adds, “you may not know it — in fact you won’t know it — but they’ll follow a car with a drone just as practice.” Good Kill airs both sides of the debate over unmanned drone strikes — on the one hand, it risks fewer American lives; on the other, it risks dehumanizing war — but it’s clear on which side Niccol and Hawke stand. “Say what you like about the United States,” says the New Zealand-born Niccol, “but you’re allowed to make that movie. Some people are going to hate it and think it’s unpatriotic, and some people are going to love it, but if it causes some kind of debate — great.” “That’s the point of making a movie like this,” says Hawke, “is to not let all this stuff happen in our name without us having any awareness or knowledge or interest in what’s being done.” He likes the idea of a war film “that isn’t glorifying the past; something that shows us where we are right now. The troops are going to withdraw from Afghanistan, but the drones won’t leave.” National Post
Needless to say, however, this particular world is no product of Niccol’s imagination: The apparent future of warfare is in fact, as Bruce Greenwood’s hardened commander likes to bark at awestruck new arrivals, “the fucking here and now.” Pilots are recruited in shopping malls on the strength of their gaming expertise; joysticks are the new artillery. The film opens on the Afghan desert, as caught through a drone’s viewfinder and transmitted to Egan’s monitor. A terrorist target is identified, the missile order is given and, within 10 seconds of Egan hitting the switch 7,000 miles away, a life ends in a silent explosion of dust and rubble. (The title refers to Egan’s regular, near-involuntary verbal reaction to each successful hit.) Another day’s work done, Egan hops in his sports car and heads home to his military McMansion, where his wife, Molly (January Jones), and two young children await. It’s an existence that theoretically combines the gung-ho ideals of American heroism and the domestic comforts of the American Dream. Niccol forges this connection with one elegantly ironic long shot of Egan’s car leaving the arid middle-of-nowhere surrounds of the control center (which have an aesthetic proximity to the Middle East, if nothing else) and approaching the glistening urban heights of Vegas — hardly the city to anchor this uncanny setup in any greater sense of reality. For all intents and purposes, Egan, who previously risked life and limb flying F-16 planes in Iraq, has lucked out. It doesn’t feel that way to him, however, as he finds it increasingly impossible to reconcile the immense power he wields from his planeless cockpit with the lack of any attendant peril or consequence on his end. Niccol’s script and Hawke’s stern, buttoned-down performance keep in play the question of whether it’s adrenaline or moral accountability that he misses most in his new vocation, but either way, as new, more ruthless orders come in from the CIA, it’s pushing him to the brink of emotional collapse. Egan finds a measure of solidarity in rookie co-pilot Suarez (a fine, flinty Zoe Kravitz), who challenges authority more brazenly than he does, but can’t explain his internal crisis to his increasingly alienated family. It’s the peculiar mechanics of drone warfare that enable “Good Kill” to be at once a combat film and a war-at-home film, two familiar strains of military drama given a bracing degree of tension by their parallel placement in Niccol’s tightly worked script: The pressures of Egan’s activity in the virtual field bounce off the volatile battles he fights in the bedroom and vice versa, as the film’s intellectual deliberations over the rights and wrongs of this new military policy are joined by the more emotive question of just what type of man, if any, is mentally fit for the task. (Or, indeed, woman: One thing to be said for the new technology is that it expands the demographic limits of combat.) Rife as it is with heated political questioning, this essentially human story steers clear of overt rhetorical side-taking: The Obama administration comes in for some implicit criticism here, but the film’s perspective on America’s ongoing Middle East presence isn’t one the right is likely to take to heart. Just as Niccol’s narrative structure is at once fraught and immaculate in its escalation of ideas and character friction, so his arguments remain ever-so-slightly oblique despite the tidiness of their presentation: How much viewers wish to accept the pic as a single, tragic character study or a broader cautionary tale is up to them. He overplays his hand, however, with a needlessly melodramatic subplot that finds Egan growing personally invested in the fate of a female Afghan civilian living on their regular surveillance route, while Greenwood’s character is given one pithy slogan too many (“fly and fry,” “warheads on foreheads”) to underline the detachment of empathy from the act of killing. Happily, such instances of glib overstatement are rare in a film that trusts its audience both to recognize Niccol’s interpretations of current affairs as such, and to arrive at their own without instruction. Variety
Implacable et documenté, Good kill décrit avec précision les pratiques de l’armée américaine : par exemple, le principe de la double frappe. Vous éliminez d’un missile un foyer de présumés terroristes, mais vous frappez dans les minutes qui suivent au même endroit pour éliminer ceux qui viennent les secourir, et tant pis si ce sont clairement des civils. L’un des sommets du film est le récit d’une opération visant l’enterrement d’ennemis tués plus tôt dans la journée, la barbarie à son maximum – et on est sûr que Andrew Niccol, scénariste et réalisateur, n’a rien inventé. Bien sûr, à tuer quasiment à l’aveugle, ou sur la foi de renseignements invérifiables, on crée une situation de guerre permanente, et on fabrique les adversaires que l’on éliminera plus tard. (…) Good Kill est un film important parce qu’il montre pour la première fois le vrai visage des guerres modernes, et à quel point ont disparu les notions de patriotisme et d’héroïsme – que risque ce combattant planqué à part de se détruire lui-même ? C’est aussi un réquisitoire courageux contre l’american way of life, symbolisée ici par Las Vegas, ville sans âme que les personnages traversent sur leur chemin entre base militaire et pavillon sinistre. Ce n’est pas un film d’anticipation. L’horreur que l’on fait subir aux victimes et, en un sens, à leurs bourreaux, c’est ici et maintenant. Une sale guerre, un sale monde. Aurélien Ferenczi
Ce qui pose vraiment problème n’est toutefois pas d’ordre artistique, mais politique. Paré des oripeaux de la fiction de gauche, The Good Kill s’inscrit pleinement (comme le faisait la troisième saison de « Homeland ») dans le paradigme de la guerre contre le terrorisme telle que la conduisent les Etats-Unis depuis le 11 septembre 2001. Les Afghans ne sont jamais représentés autrement que sous la forme des petites silhouettes noires mal définies, évoluant erratiquement sur l’écran des pilotes de drones qui les surveillent. La seule action véritablement lisible se déroule dans la cour d’une maison, où l’on voit, à plusieurs reprises, un barbu frapper sa [?] femme et la violer. C’est l’argument imparable, tranquillement anti-islamiste, de la cause des femmes, que les avocats de la guerre contre le terrorisme ont toujours brandi sans vergogne pour mettre un terme au débat. La critique que fait Andrew Niccol, dans ce contexte, de l’usage des drones ne pouvait qu’être cosmétique. Elle est aussi inepte, confondant les questions d’ordre psychologique (comment se débrouillent des soldats qui rentrent le soir dans leur lit douillet après avoir tué des gens – souvent innocents), et celles qui se posent sur le plan du droit de la guerre (que Grégoire Chamayou a si bien expliqué dans La Théorie du drone, La Fabrique, 2013), dès lors que ces armes autorisent à détruire des vies dans le camp adverse sans plus en mettre aucune en péril dans le sien. Si l’ancien pilote de chasse ne va pas bien, explique-t-il à sa femme, ce n’est pas parce qu’il tue des innocents, ce qu’il a toujours fait, c’est qu’il les tue sans danger. Pour remédier à son état, s’offre une des rédemptions les plus ahurissantes qu’il ait été donné à voir depuis longtemps au cinéma. S’improvisant bras armé d’une justice totalement aveugle, il dégomme en un clic le violeur honni, rendant à sa [?] femme, après un léger petit suspense, ce qu’il imagine être sa liberté. La conscience lavée, le pilote peut repartir le cœur léger, retrouver sa famille et oublier toutes celles, au loin, qu’il a assassinées pour la bonne cause. Le Monde
Semblable à l’œil de Dieu, sa caméra voit tout lorsqu’elle descend du ciel : la femme qui se fait violer par un taliban sans qu’il puisse intervenir, les marines dont il assure la sécurité durant leur sommeil, mais aussi l’enfant qui surgit à vélo là où il vient d’envoyer son missile… (…) Dans cet univers orwellien où toutes sortes d’euphémismes – « neutraliser », « incapaciter », « effacer » – sont utilisés pour éviter de prononcer le mot « tuer », le décalage entre la réalité et le virtuel prend encore plus de sens quand on apprend que les très jeunes pilotes de drone sont repérés dans les arcades de jeux vidéo. D’autres, comme l’ancien pilote de chasse interprété par Ethan Hawke, culpabilisent d’être si loin du danger. Paris Match

 Vous avez dit deux poids deux mesures ?

Au lendemain de l’annonce de l’élimination ô combien méritée, par un drone américain au Yémen, du commanditaire des attentats de Paris de janvier dernier …

Et après le courageux abandon l’Afghanistan à son triste sort, l’Europe a depuis longtemps oublié ce que ses soldats ont bien pu y faire …

Comment ne pas voir …

Alors que, pour défendre ses soldats face aux pires perfidies du Hamas, Israël se voit à nouveau soupçonné des pires crimes de guerre

L’étonnante retenue de nos journalistes comme de nos cinéastes (une seule allusion indirecte et non-nominative dans un film par ailleurs présenté absurdement comme l’anti-American sniper)  …

Qu’on avait naguère connus autrement plus virulants contre une certaine prison cubaine …

Depuis l’inauguration d’un certain prix Nobel 2009 …

Face à l’élimination, dans la plus grande discrétion, de quelque 2 500 cibles …

« Femmes et enfants » compris, comme le veut la formule …

Par quelqu’un qui peut même, cerise sur le gâteau, se permettre de plaisanter devant un parterre de journalistes …

D’une nouvelle arme pouvant abattre n’importe qui à 10 000  km de distance Américains inclus ?  …

Rencontre
Andrew Niccol : “’Good Kill’ dit une vérité inconfortable”

Aurélien Ferenczi
Télérama

22/04/2015
Œil pour œil, le débat des critiques ciné #331 : “Caprice” d’Emmanuel Mouret et “Good Kill” d’Andrew Niccol

“Good-Kill”, avec Ethan Hawke, son film-brûlot basé sur des faits réels, interroge le drone, une nouvelle arme de guerre. Andrew Niccol (“Bienvenue à Gattaca”, “Lord of war”) livre ses secrets de réalisation et revient sur sa carrière.
Il a toute prête une jolie citation de John Lennon, qu’il sort promptement au journaliste ayant tenté d’établir un lien entre son premier film, Bienvenue à Gattaca (1998) et son sixième – seulement –, Good Kill, sur les écrans cette semaine. « Plus vous mettez le doigt sur ce que vous faites, plus vous l’éloignez. Si je réfléchis trop à ce que je fais, j’ai peur de ne plus pouvoir le faire. » Andrew Niccol, 50 ans, costume chic de businessman, regard bleu, a l’air un peu fatigué (le jet lag ?) et la parole prudente. L’inquiétude, sans doute, d’avoir signé un film-brûlot, qui, en décrivant la vie d’un manipulateur de drone (Ethan Hawke), ex-pilote de l’armée de l’air cloué au sol sur une base du Nevada, raconte la guerre d’aujourd’hui : une guerre à distance, à armes inégales, un conflit sans fin où n’importe quel suspect – aux yeux de qui ? c’est tout le problème – peut être cliniquement dézingué d’un tir à la précision chirurgicale par un soldat en poste à l’autre bout du monde.

« Quand j’ai écrit le film, lâche-t-il, un de mes amis m’a tout de suite dit que je devrais réunir le budget en euros plutôt qu’en dollars. » De fait, le projet, qui n’a pas intéressé les majors d’Hollywood, est produit notamment par le Français Nicolas Chartier (qui avait financé Démineurs, de Kathryn Bigelow). Et quand la production est allée demander le soutien logistique de l’armée américaine, on lui a répondu un cinglant « Classifié »… « C’est ce qui nous différencie d’American Sniper, ajoute malicieusement Andrew Niccol, qui a reçu une aide conséquente de l’armée. »  Sur le film d’Eastwood, il refuse de porter un jugement, se contentant de signaler que le pilote de drone est « le sniper ultime, qui tue sans être vu… »

“Good Kill dit une vérité inconfortable”
Les infos, il les a trouvées alors auprès d’ex-pilotes de drone de l’US Air Force, et aussi dans les documents transmis par Bradley/Chelsea Manning à Wikileaks. « Tout ce que je montre est vrai, assure-t-il : un type près de Las Vegas peut détruire une maison pleine de talibans en Afghanistan. Encore faut-il être sûr que ceux qui y sont réunis sont vraiment des talibans. Et il est arrivé que des missiles américains soient lancés contre des enterrements. » Good kill dédouane un peu l’armée américaine, la soumettant aux ordres obscurs d’une mystérieuse agence gouvernementale – de fait, la CIA – pour qui la mort d’innocents ne semble pas un problème majeur. « Good Kill dit une vérité inconfortable. Après la première projection au Festival de Venise, j’ai entendu des échos contradictoires : certains spectateurs accusaient le film d’être anti-américain, d’autres d’être pro-américain. Moi, je ne juge pas. Et on ne peut pas être « anti-drone » : c’est l’usage qu’on en fait qui peut être répréhensible. »

En 2005, déjà, Andrew Niccol avait abordé un sujet sérieusement contemporain dans l’excellent (et souvent sous-estimé) Lord of war : les trafics d’armes internationaux et leur impact sur les guerres civiles africaines. Le personnage principal, joué par Nicholas Cage, était directement inspiré du trafiquant d’origine russe Victor Bout. Lequel, lors de son procès, se plaignit de la mauvaise image que le film donnait de lui… Après la sortie, Niccol reçut même la visite du FBI. « Parce que nous avions dû louer l’avion-cargo de Victor Bout, impossible autrement de trouver un Antonov en Afrique. Alors que nous mettions en soute des armes factices, l’équipage se fichait de nous : « Nous transportions de vraies armes il y a quelques jours, on aurait pu vous les garder »… Depuis, je sais que je suis sous surveillance ! »

Né en Nouvelle-Zélande, Andrew Niccol a débuté dans la publicité à Londres, qui fut, « comme pour Ridley Scott », son école de cinéma. Il part pour les Etats-Unis au début des années 90, écrit un premier script qu’il ne pourra réaliser, mais qui lui vaudra une nomination à l’Oscar : The Truman show. Sa version à lui, qui se situe entièrement à New York est plus noire que le film signé Peter Weir en 1998. Et à la place de Jim Carrey, Niccol aurait bien vu Jeff Bridges… Mais, dans la foulée, on le laisse réaliser son premier film, déjà avec Ethan Hawke, Bienvenue à Gattaca. « Je suppose que Sony a dit oui sur un malentendu. Une fois le film fini, ils ne savaient pas quoi en faire. Ils l’ont enterré. Cette année-là, ils croyaient beaucoup plus à un petit film d’horreur : Souviens-toi l’été dernier… »

“J’ai des idées non conventionnelles et coûteuses”
Bienvenue à Gattaca est (presque) devenu un classique, et la science-fiction a gagné ses lettres de noblesse auprès des studios. Sans que Niccol en profite réellement. « J’ai des idées non conventionnelles et coûteuses. L’un ou l’autre – des idées conventionnelles exigeant un gros budget, ou des idées non conventionnelles bon marché – ça peut passer. Les deux ensemble, c’est plus dur. » Il a refusé de mettre en scène des films de super-héros, et écrit plusieurs scénarios qui n’ont jamais vu le jour. « Peut-être que je vais enfin pouvoir réaliser The Cross, l’histoire de personnages qui veulent échapper à la société dans laquelle ils vivent… » Le thème central de son œuvre ? Le film avait déjà failli se faire en 2009, avec Vincent Cassel. « Cinéaste aux Etats-Unis, c’est épuisant : il faut savoir faire tourner au-dessus de sa tête plusieurs assiettes en même temps », explique-t-il en empruntant une métaphore circassienne. « Si tant est qu’on ne me chasse pas du pays. Dans ce cas, j’irai au Canada, le pays de ma femme… »

Voir aussi:

‘Good Kill’ Review: Ethan Hawke Stars
Andrew Niccol takes on the topical issue of drone strikes in a tense war drama notable for its tact and intelligence.
Guy Lodge
Variety

September 5, 2014

Sci-fi futures characterized by complex moral and political architecture have long been writer-director Andrew Niccol’s stock-in-trade. Yet while there’s not a hint of fantasy in “Good Kill,” a smart, quietly pulsating contempo war drama, it could hardly feel more typical of Niccol’s strongest work. To many, after all, drone strikes — the controversial subject of this tense but appropriately tactful ethics study — still feel like something that should be a practical and legal impossibility. Those who haven’t considered its far-reaching implications, meanwhile, will be drawn into consciousness by Niccol’s film, which sees Ethan Hawke’s former U.S. fighter pilot wrestling with the psychological strain of killing by remote control. At once forward-thinking and exhilaratingly of the moment, this heady conversation piece could yield substantial commercial returns with the right marketing and release strategy.

Niccol has, of course, covered this kind of topical dramatic territory before in 2005’s Amnesty Intl.-approved underperformer “Lord of War,” which starred Nicolas Cage as a faintly disguised incarnation of Soviet arms dealer Viktor Bout. “Good Kill,” however, feels closer in tone and texture to the stately speculative fiction of his 1997 debut, “Gattaca,” and not merely because of Hawke’s presence in the lead. The spartan Las Vegas airbase where Major Thomas Egan (Hawke) wages war against the Taliban from the comfort of an air-conditioned cubicle seems, in terms of its bleak function and lab-like appearance, a faintly dystopian creation — one where distant life-and-death calls are made at the touch of a button. The perils of playing God, of course, were also explored in Niccol’s prescient screenplay for “The Truman Show,” with which “Good Kill” shares profound concerns about a growing culture of extreme surveillance that itself goes unmonitored.

Needless to say, however, this particular world is no product of Niccol’s imagination: The apparent future of warfare is in fact, as Bruce Greenwood’s hardened commander likes to bark at awestruck new arrivals, “the fucking here and now.” Pilots are recruited in shopping malls on the strength of their gaming expertise; joysticks are the new artillery. The film opens on the Afghan desert, as caught through a drone’s viewfinder and transmitted to Egan’s monitor. A terrorist target is identified, the missile order is given and, within 10 seconds of Egan hitting the switch 7,000 miles away, a life ends in a silent explosion of dust and rubble. (The title refers to Egan’s regular, near-involuntary verbal reaction to each successful hit.)

Another day’s work done, Egan hops in his sports car and heads home to his military McMansion, where his wife, Molly (January Jones), and two young children await. It’s an existence that theoretically combines the gung-ho ideals of American heroism and the domestic comforts of the American Dream. Niccol forges this connection with one elegantly ironic long shot of Egan’s car leaving the arid middle-of-nowhere surrounds of the control center (which have an aesthetic proximity to the Middle East, if nothing else) and approaching the glistening urban heights of Vegas — hardly the city to anchor this uncanny setup in any greater sense of reality.

For all intents and purposes, Egan, who previously risked life and limb flying F-16 planes in Iraq, has lucked out. It doesn’t feel that way to him, however, as he finds it increasingly impossible to reconcile the immense power he wields from his planeless cockpit with the lack of any attendant peril or consequence on his end. Niccol’s script and Hawke’s stern, buttoned-down performance keep in play the question of whether it’s adrenaline or moral accountability that he misses most in his new vocation, but either way, as new, more ruthless orders come in from the CIA, it’s pushing him to the brink of emotional collapse. Egan finds a measure of solidarity in rookie co-pilot Suarez (a fine, flinty Zoe Kravitz), who challenges authority more brazenly than he does, but can’t explain his internal crisis to his increasingly alienated family.

It’s the peculiar mechanics of drone warfare that enable “Good Kill” to be at once a combat film and a war-at-home film, two familiar strains of military drama given a bracing degree of tension by their parallel placement in Niccol’s tightly worked script: The pressures of Egan’s activity in the virtual field bounce off the volatile battles he fights in the bedroom and vice versa, as the film’s intellectual deliberations over the rights and wrongs of this new military policy are joined by the more emotive question of just what type of man, if any, is mentally fit for the task. (Or, indeed, woman: One thing to be said for the new technology is that it expands the demographic limits of combat.) Rife as it is with heated political questioning, this essentially human story steers clear of overt rhetorical side-taking: The Obama administration comes in for some implicit criticism here, but the film’s perspective on America’s ongoing Middle East presence isn’t one the right is likely to take to heart.

Just as Niccol’s narrative structure is at once fraught and immaculate in its escalation of ideas and character friction, so his arguments remain ever-so-slightly oblique despite the tidiness of their presentation: How much viewers wish to accept the pic as a single, tragic character study or a broader cautionary tale is up to them. He overplays his hand, however, with a needlessly melodramatic subplot that finds Egan growing personally invested in the fate of a female Afghan civilian living on their regular surveillance route, while Greenwood’s character is given one pithy slogan too many (“fly and fry,” “warheads on foreheads”) to underline the detachment of empathy from the act of killing. Happily, such instances of glib overstatement are rare in a film that trusts its audience both to recognize Niccol’s interpretations of current affairs as such, and to arrive at their own without instruction.

It can’t be a coincidence that Hawke’s styling — aviators, snug leather bomber, Ivy League haircut — gives him the appearance of Tom Cruise’s “Top Gun” hero Maverick Mitchell gone somewhat to seed. His nuanced, hard-bitten performance, too, bristles with cracked machismo and seething self-disappointment; the actor has had a good run of form recently, though his brittle, closed manner here still surprises. Supporting ensemble work is uniformly strong, with Jones, who has form when it comes to playing the repressed wives of inscrutable men, finally landing a film role worthy of her work in “Mad Men.”

The filmmaking here is as efficient and squared-off as the storytelling, with Amir Mokri’s sturdy lensing capturing the hard, unforgiving light of the Nevada desert, and foregrounding every sharp angle of Guy Barnes’ excellent production design — which makes equally alien spaces of a pod-like military boardroom and the beige, under-loved walls of Egan’s home. Sound work throughout is aces, making a virtue of the sound effects that are eerily absent as those present: In drone warfare, at least in Vegas, no one can hear you scream.

Venice Film Review: ‘Good Kill’
Reviewed at Venice Film Festival (competing), Sept. 3, 2014. (Also in Toronto Film Festival — Special Presentations.) Running time: 102 MIN.

Voir également:

Frame of drones: Ethan Hawke is a conflicted fighter pilot in Andrew Niccol’s Good Kill
Chris Knight

National Post

September 11, 2014

Andrew Niccol can remember a time when U.S. involvement in Iraq included televised media briefings in which Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf would show video clips that demonstrated the accuracy of so-called smart bombs. Then, they were launched from piloted aircraft. Now they’re as likely to be fired from unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones.

“Now that picture is a lot better, and there is obviously video for every one of the drone strikes,” he says. “But you haven’t seen one recently, have you?”

Ethan Hawke jumps in at this point. “Nobody has,” he says darkly. “They don’t want you to see this.”

Hawke is starring in Niccol’s Good Kill, which had its North American premiere this week at the Toronto International Film Festival after screening in Venice. The actor plays Maj. Thomas Egan, a former fighter pilot who now flies unmanned drones from a military base outside Las Vegas. His control bunker looks a bit like a shipping container from the outside, boxy and portable.

‘The troops are going to withdraw from Afghanistan, but the drones won’t leave’

“The reason is that they used to wheel them into a Hercules and fly them around the world,” says Niccol. “But then realized they didn’t have to go anywhere; they had satellites.” Hawke’s character kills enemies in Afghanistan from half a world away, but struggles with the moral implications of such precise, emotionless combat.

The cinematography in Good Kill calls attention to the similarities in geography between the U.S. and Afghan deserts, and the walled residences that exist in both locations. “It’s not my choice; it’s the military’s choice,” says Niccol. They can train drone pilots locally over terrain similar to what they’ll see while on duty.

“If you’re going on a weekend trip to Vegas in your car,” he adds, “you may not know it — in fact you won’t know it — but they’ll follow a car with a drone just as practice.”

Good Kill airs both sides of the debate over unmanned drone strikes — on the one hand, it risks fewer American lives; on the other, it risks dehumanizing war — but it’s clear on which side Niccol and Hawke stand.

“Say what you like about the United States,” says the New Zealand-born Niccol, “but you’re allowed to make that movie. Some people are going to hate it and think it’s unpatriotic, and some people are going to love it, but if it causes some kind of debate — great.”

“That’s the point of making a movie like this,” says Hawke, “is to not let all this stuff happen in our name without us having any awareness or knowledge or interest in what’s being done.”

He likes the idea of a war film “that isn’t glorifying the past; something that shows us where we are right now. The troops are going to withdraw from Afghanistan, but the drones won’t leave.”

Niccol and Hawke have worked together, albeit sporadically, on Gattaca (1997) and Lord of War (2005), before this film. They share a favourite movie (One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest) and a shorthand that the writer/director says was invaluable given the movie’s tight budget and timeline.

That extended to Hawke’s agreement to star in the film, which took place over the phone. “I was walking my dog and I called you after reading the script,” he recalls. “I think I walked my dog for two hours as we talked. We were already making the movie that night!”

Voir également:

Entertainment & Arts
Good Kill: Tackling the ethics of drone warfare on film
Genevieve Hassan Entertainment reporter
BBC

10 April 2015

Ethan Hawke’s drone pilot begins to question his orders – and his job
Actor Ethan Hawke and director Andrew Niccol discuss their latest film, Good Kill, about an Air Force drone pilot who begins to question the ethics of his job.

The first time Hawke worked with Niccol, they made 1997 sci-fi film Gattaca. The second occasion, they made 2005’s Lord of War, about an arms dealer with a conscience. Now they’ve made it a hat-trick, reuniting once again to tackle the timely issue of using drones in modern warfare.

Set in 2010, Good Kill sees Hawke play Air Force pilot Tom Egan, who spends eight hours a day fighting the Taliban. But instead of being out on the front line, he’s in a Las Vegas bunker remotely dropping bombs in the Middle East as part of the US’s War on Terror.

Distanced from close combat from the safety of his joystick control half a world away, when the civilian casualties start mounting up, Egan begins to question his orders – and his job.

Hawke and Niccol spoke to the BBC News website about the inspiration behind the film and the moral questions it raises.

Why did you decide to make this project now?
Andrew Niccol: Now is almost a few years too late. I could have made this film a few years ago because this war has been going on in Afghanistan for 13 years. It’s stunning to me it’s America’s longest war and still counting – it beats Vietnam, the first Iraq war and World War Two.

It was all in response to 9/11 and I completely understand why we began it because that’s where Bin Laden was. But it gets to a point where it’s overkill. Are we ever going to leave that part of the planet? Are we really going to stay over the top of the Middle East forever?

Ethan Hawke: The troops are going to come out of Afghanistan, but the drones will still be there. It’s not a question of right or wrong, or how I feel about it – it’s the truth. This is the nature of warfare right now.

Do we want drones to be the international police? Is it a good idea? Is it creating more terror than stopping? They’re valuable questions.

For me as an actor and a fan of storytelling, I get to play a character I’ve never seen on screen before. He’s spending the bulk of the day fighting the Taliban; leaves work, picks up some eggs and orange juice, helps his son with his homework and fights with his wife about what TV show to watch. And then the next day does the same thing again.

This is a new situation we’ve never been in: Soldiers who take people’s lives whose own life isn’t in danger. A lot of these people go into the military because they have the mentality of a warrior. They want to put their life on the line for their beliefs to make people safe, but what does it mean when your life isn’t on the line? It seems like the stuff of sci-fi but it’s arrived.

Did you intend to push a specific political agenda with this film?
Ethan Hawke: No, I’m allergic to that. We can’t have a serious conversation about a drones strike unless people have more information. Most people don’t know what a drone looks like, or how it’s operated.

I learned a lot – I had no idea [the US] would strike a funeral or rescuers. There’s a certain logic to doing it – you could say perhaps it is proportionate. Perhaps we’re stopping more death than we’re creating, but we are killing innocent people. Am I sure I want our soldiers doing that?

An interesting example is on Obama’s third day in office he ordered a drone strike – it was surgical, but they had the wrong information and they murdered a family that had nothing to do with anything. When these tools are available accidents happen. It’s ripe for dialogue.

I’m not in politics, I don’t have an agenda for the audience, but I think it’s a really interesting conversation. I don’t think we should let our governments run willy-nilly and kill whoever and spy on whoever they want to without asking any questions.

Andrew Niccol: I’m not anti or pro, I’m just saying this is what is, and now you have that information perhaps it can provoke thought and conversation.

The US military want computer gamers to join the Air Force because they are equipped with the dexterity and speed needed to operate a drone efficiently, like Ethan Hawke’s character in Good Kill
Are all the events depicted in the film real?
Andrew Niccol: Every strike Tom does in the movie there is a precedent for, but his character is fictitious.

There were some things I didn’t put in the movie because I thought they were too outrageous. I was told about drone pilots who were younger than Ethan’s character – they would work with a joystick for 12 hours over Afghanistan, take out a target and go home to their apartment and play video games.

The military modelled the workstation on computer games because it’s the joystick that’s the easiest to use. They want gamers to join the Air Force because they’re good and can manoeuvre a drone perfectly.

But how can they possibly separate playing one joystick game one moment, and then playing real war the next?

Good Kill is released in UK cinemas on 10 April.

Voir encore:

Barack Obama, président des drones
LE MONDE GEO ET POLITIQUE

Philippe Bernard

18.06.2013

De même que George W. Bush restera dans l’histoire comme le  » président des guerres  » de l’après-11-Septembre en Afghanistan et en Irak, Barack Obama pourrait passer à la postérité comme le  » président des drones « , autrement dit le chef d’une guerre secrète, menée avec des armes que les Etats-Unis sont, parmi les grandes puissances, les seuls à posséder.

Rarement moment politique et innovation technologique auront si parfaitement correspondu : lorsque le président démocrate est élu en 2008 par des Américains las des conflits, il dispose d’un moyen tout neuf pour poursuivre, dans la plus grande discrétion, la lutte contre les « ennemis de l’Amérique » sans risquer la vie de citoyens de son pays : les drones.

L’utilisation militaire d’engins volants téléguidés par les Américains n’est pas nouvelle : pendant la guerre du Vietnam, des drones de reconnaissance avaient patrouillé. Mais l’armement de ces avions sans pilote à partir de 2001 en Afghanistan marque un changement d’époque. Au point que le tout premier Predator armé à avoir frappé des cibles après les attaques du 11-Septembre, immatriculé 3034, a aujourd’hui les honneurs du Musée de l’air et de l’espace, à Washington. Leur montée en puissance aura été fulgurante : alors que le Pentagone ne disposait que de 50 drones au début des années 2000, il en possède aujourd’hui près de 7 500. Dans l’US Air Force, un aéronef sur trois est sans pilote.

George W. Bush, artisan d’un large déploiement sur le terrain, utilisera modérément ces nouveaux engins létaux. Barack Obama y recourra six fois plus souvent pendant son seul premier mandat que son prédécesseur pendant les deux siens. M. Obama, qui, en recevant le prix Nobel de la paix en décembre 2009, revendiquait une Amérique au « comportement exemplaire dans la conduite de la guerre », banalisera la pratique des « assassinats ciblés », parfois fondés sur de simples présomptions et décidés par lui-même dans un secret absolu.

LES FRAPPES OPÉRÉES PAR LA CIA SONT « COVERT »

Tandis que les militaires guident les drones dans l’Afghanistan en guerre, c’est jusqu’à présent la très opaque CIA qui opère partout ailleurs (au Yémen, au Pakistan, en Somalie, en Libye). C’est au Yémen en 2002 que la campagne d' »assassinats ciblés » a débuté. Le Pakistan suit dès 2004. Barack Obama y multiplie les frappes. Certaines missions, menées à l’insu des autorités pakistanaises, soulèvent de lourdes questions de souveraineté. D’autres, les goodwill kills (« homicides de bonne volonté »), le sont avec l’accord du gouvernement local. Tandis que les frappes de drones militaires sont simplement « secrètes », celles opérées par la CIA sont « covert », ce qui signifie que les Etats-Unis n’en reconnaissent même pas l’existence.

Dans ce contexte, établir des statistiques est difficile. Selon le Bureau of Investigative Journalism, une ONG britannique, les attaques au Pakistan ont fait entre 2 548 et 3 549 victimes, dont 411 à 884 sont des civils, et 168 à 197 des enfants. En termes statistiques, la campagne de drones est un succès : les Etats-Unis revendiquent l’élimination de plus d’une cinquantaine de hauts responsables d’Al-Qaida et de talibans. D’où la nette diminution du nombre de cibles potentielles et du rythme des frappes, passées de 128 en 2010 (une tous les trois jours) à 48 en 2012 au Pakistan.

Car le secret total et son cortège de dénégations ne pouvaient durer éternellement. En mai 2012, le New York Times a révélé l’implication personnelle de M. Obama dans la confection des kill lists. Après une décennie de silence et de mensonges officiels, la réalité a dû être admise. En particulier au début de l’année, lorsque le débat public s’est focalisé sur l’autorisation, donnée par le ministre de la justice, Eric Holder, d’éliminer un citoyen américain responsable de la branche yéménite d’Al-Qaida. L’imam Anouar Al-Aulaqi avait été abattu le 30 septembre 2011 au Yémen par un drone de la CIA lancé depuis l’Arabie saoudite. Le droit de tuer un concitoyen a nourri une intense controverse. D’autant que la même opération avait causé des « dégâts collatéraux » : Samir Khan, responsable du magazine jihadiste Inspire, et Abdulrahman, 16 ans, fils d’Al-Aulaqui, tous deux américains et ne figurant ni l’un ni l’autre sur la kill list, ont trouvé la mort. Aux yeux des opposants, l’adolescent personnifie désormais l’arbitraire de la guerre des drones.

La révélation par la presse des contorsions juridiques imaginées par les conseillers du président pour justifier a posteriori l’assassinat d’un Américain n’a fait qu’alimenter les revendications de transparence. La fronde s’est concrétisée par le blocage au Sénat, plusieurs semaines durant, de la nomination à la tête de la CIA de John Brennan, auparavant grand ordonnateur à la Maison Blanche de la politique d’assassinats ciblés. Une orientation pourfendue, presque treize heures durant, le 6 mars, par le spectaculaire discours du sénateur libertarien Rand Paul.

UN IMPORTANT DISCOURS SUR LA « GUERRE JUSTE »

Très attendu, le grand exercice de clarification a eu lieu le 23 mai devant la National Defense University de Washington. Barack Obama y a prononcé un important discours sur la « guerre juste », affichant enfin une doctrine en matière d’usage des drones. Il était temps : plusieurs organisations de défense des libertés publiques avaient réclamé en justice la communication des documents justifiant les assassinats ciblés.

Une directive présidentielle, signée la veille, précise les critères de recours aux frappes à visée mortelle : une « menace continue et imminente contre la population des Etats-Unis », le fait qu' »aucun autre gouvernement ne soit en mesure d'[y] répondre ou ne la prenne en compte effectivement » et une « quasi-certitude » qu’il n’y aura pas de victimes civiles. Pour la première fois, Barack Obama a reconnu l’existence des assassinats ciblés, y compris ceux ayant visé des Américains, assurant que ces morts le « hanteraient » toute sa vie. Le président a annoncé que les militaires, plutôt que la CIA, auraient désormais la main. Il a aussi repris l’idée de créer une instance judiciaire ou administrative de contrôle des frappes. Mais il a renvoyé au Congrès la mission, incertaine, de créer cette institution. Le président, tout en reconnaissant que l’usage des drones pose de « profondes questions » – de « légalité », de « morale », de « responsabilité « , sans compter « le risque de créer de nouveaux ennemis » -, l’a justifié par son efficacité : « Ces frappes ont sauvé des vies. »

Six jours après ce discours, l’assassinat par un drone de Wali ur-Rehman, le numéro deux des talibans pakistanais, en a montré les limites. Ce leader visait plutôt le Pakistan que « la population des Etats-Unis ». Tout porte donc à croire que les critères limitatifs énoncés par Barack Obama ne s’appliquent pas au Pakistan, du moins aussi longtemps qu’il restera des troupes américaines dans l’Afghanistan voisin. Et que les « Signature strikes », ces frappes visant des groupes d’hommes armés non identifiés mais présumés extrémistes, seront poursuivies.

Les drones n’ont donc pas fini de mettre en lumière les contradictions de Barack Obama : président antiguerre, champion de la transparence, de la légalité et de la main tendue à l’islam, il a multiplié dans l’ombre les assassinats ciblés, provoquant la colère de musulmans.

Or les drones armés, s’ils s’avèrent terriblement efficaces pour éliminer de véritables fauteurs de terreur et, parfois, pour tuer des innocents, le sont nettement moins pour traiter les racines des violences antiaméricaines. Leur usage opaque apparaît comme un précédent encourageant pour les Etats (tels la Chine, la Russie, l’Inde, le Pakistan ou l’Iran) qui vont acquérir ces matériels dans l’avenir. En paraissant considérer les aéronefs pilotés à distance comme l’arme fatale indispensable, le « président des drones » aura enclenché l’engrenage de ce futur incertain.

Voir encore:

US national security
Obama’s secret kill list – the disposition matrix
The disposition matrix is a complex grid of suspected terrorists to be traced then targeted in drone strikes or captured and interrogated. And the British government appears to be colluding in it
US President Barack Obama
Barack Obama, chairing the ‘Terror Tuesday’ meetings, agrees the final schedule of names on the disposition matrix. Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Ian Cobain

The Guardian

14 July 2013

When Bilal Berjawi spoke to his wife for the last time, he had no way of being certain that he was about to die. But he should have had his suspicions.

A short, dumpy Londoner who was not, in the words of some who knew him, one of the world’s greatest thinkers, Berjawi had been fighting for months in Somalia with al-Shabaab, the Islamist militant group. His wife was 4,400 miles away, at home in west London. In June 2011, Berjawi had almost been killed in a US drone strike on an al-Shabaab camp on the coast. After that he became wary of telephones. But in January last year, when his wife went into labour and was admitted to St Mary’s hospital in Paddington, he decided to risk a quick phone conversation.

A few hours after the call ended Berjawi was targeted in a fresh drone strike. Perhaps the telephone contact triggered alerts all the way from Camp Lemmonier, the US military’s enormous home-from-home at Djibouti, to the National Security Agency’s headquarters in Maryland. Perhaps a few screens also lit up at GCHQ in Cheltenham? This time the drone attack was successful, from the US perspective, and al-Shabaab issued a terse statement: « The martyr received what he wished for and what he went out for. »

The following month, Berjawi’s former next-door neighbour, who was also in Somalia, was similarly « martyred ». Like Berjawi, Mohamed Sakr had just turned 27 when he was killed in an air strike.

Four months later, the FBI in Manhattan announced that a third man from London, a Vietnamese-born convert to Islam, had been charged with a series of terrorism offences, and that if convicted he would face a mandatory 40-year sentence. This man was promptly arrested by Scotland Yard and is now fighting extradition to the US. And a few weeks after that, another of Berjawi’s mates from London was detained after travelling from Somalia to Djibouti, where he was interrogated for months by US intelligence officers before being hooded and put aboard an aircraft. When 23-year-old Mahdi Hashi next saw daylight, he was being led into a courtroom in Brooklyn.

That these four men had something in common is clear enough: they were all Muslims, all accused of terrorism offences, and all British (or they were British: curiously, all of them unexpectedly lost their British citizenship just as they were about to become unstuck). There is, however, a common theme that is less obvious: it appears that all of them had found their way on to the « disposition matrix ».

The euphemisms of counter-terrorism

When contemplating the euphemisms that have slipped into the lexicon since 9/11, the adjective Orwellian is difficult to avoid. But while such terms as extraordinary rendition, targeted killing and enhanced interrogation are universally known, and their true meanings – kidnap, assassination, torture – widely understood, the disposition matrix has not yet gained such traction.

Since the Obama administration largely shut down the CIA’s rendition programme, choosing instead to dispose of its enemies in drone attacks, those individuals who are being nominated for killing have been discussed at a weekly counter-terrorism meeting at the White House situation room that has become known as Terror Tuesday. Barack Obama, in the chair and wishing to be seen as a restraining influence, agrees the final schedule of names. Once details of these meetings began to emerge it was not long before the media began talking of « kill lists ». More double-speak was required, it seemed, and before long the term disposition matrix was born.

In truth, the matrix is more than a mere euphemism for a kill list, or even a capture-or-kill list. It is a sophisticated grid, mounted upon a database that is said to have been more than two years in the development, containing biographies of individuals believed to pose a threat to US interests, and their known or suspected locations, as well as a range of options for their disposal.

It is a grid, however, that both blurs and expands the boundaries that human rights law and the law of war place upon acts of abduction or targeted killing. There have been claims that people’s names have been entered into it with little or no evidence. And it appears that it will be with us for many years to come.

The background to its creation was the growing realisation in Washington that the drone programme could be creating more enemies than it was destroying. In Pakistan, for example, where the government estimates that more than 400 people have been killed in around 330 drone strikes since 9/11, the US has arguably outstripped even India as the most reviled foreign country. At one point, Admiral Mike Mullen, when chairman of the US joint chiefs of staff, was repo rted to be having furious rows over the issue with his opposite number in Pakistan, General Ashfaq Kayani.
matrix mike mullen and ashfaq Kayani

The term entered the public domain following a briefing given to the Washington Post before last year’s presidential election. « We had a disposition problem, » one former counter-terrorism official involved in the development of the Matrix told the Post. Expanding on the nature of that problem, a second administration official added that while « we’re not going to end up in 10 years in a world of everybody holding hands and saying ‘we love America' », there needed to be a recognition that « we can’t possibly kill everyone who wants to harm us ».

Drawing upon legal advice that has remained largely secret, senior officials at the US Counter-Terrorism Center designed a grid that incorporated the existing kill lists of the CIA and the US military’s special forces, but which also offered some new rules and restraints.

Some individuals whose names were entered into the matrix, and who were roaming around Somalia or Yemen, would continue to face drone attack when their whereabouts become known. Others could be targeted and killed by special forces. In a speech in May, Obama suggested that a special court could be given oversight of these targeted killings.

An unknown number would end up in the so-called black sites that the US still quietly operates in east Africa, or in prisons run by US allies in the Middle East or Central Asia. But for others, who for political reasons could not be summarily dispatched or secretly imprisoned, there would be a secret grand jury investigation, followed in some cases by formal arrest and extradition, and in others by « rendition to justice »: they would be grabbed, interrogated without being read their rights, then flown to the US and put on trial with a publicly funded defence lawyer.

Orwell once wrote about political language being « designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable ». As far as the White House is concerned, however, the term disposition matrix describes a continually evolving blueprint not for murder, but for a defence against a threat that continues to change shape and seek out new havens.

As the Obama administration’s tactics became more variegated, the British authorities co-operated, of course, but also ensured that the new rules of the game helped to serve their own counter-terrorism objectives.

Paul Pillar, who served in the CIA for 28 years, including a period as the agency’s senior counter-terrorism analyst, says the British, when grappling with what he describes as a sticky case – « someone who is a violence-prone anti-western jihadi », for example – would welcome a chance to pass on that case to the US. It would be a matter, as he puts it, of allowing someone else to have their headache.

« They might think, if it’s going to be a headache for someone, let the Americans have the headache, » says Pillar. « That’s what the United States has done. The US would drop cases if they were going to be sticky, and let someone else take over. We would let the Egyptians or the Jordanians or whoever take over a very sticky one. From the United Kingdom point of view, if it is going to be a headache for anyone: let the Americans have the headache. »

The four young Londoners – Berjawi, Sakr, Hashi and the Vietnamese-born convert – were certainly considered by MI5 and MI6 to be something of a headache. But could they have been seen so problematic – so sticky – that the US would be encouraged to enter their names into the Matrix?
The home secretary’s special power

Berjawi and Sakr were members of a looseknit group of young Muslims who were on nodding terms with each other, having attended the same mosques and schools and having played in the same five-a-side football matches in west London.

A few members of this group came to be closely scrutinised by MI5 when it emerged that they had links with the men who attempted to carry out a wave of bombings on London’s underground train network on 21 July 2005. Others came to the attention of the authorities as a result of their own conduct. Mohammed Ezzouek, for example, who attended North Westminster community school with Berjawi, was abducted in Kenya and interrogated by British intelligence officers after a trip to Somalia in 2006; another schoolmate, Tariq al-Daour, has recently been released from jail after serving a sentence for inciting terrorism.

As well as sharing their faith and, according to the UK authorities, jihadist intent, these young men had something else in common: they were all dual nationals. Berjawi was born in Lebanon and moved to London with his parents as an infant. Sakr was born in London, but was deemed to be a British-Egyptian dual national because his parents were born in Egypt. Ezzouek is British-Moroccan, while al-Daour is British-Palestinian.

This left them vulnerable to a little-known weapon in the government’s counter-terrorism armoury, one that Theresa May has been deploying with increasing frequency since she became home secretary three years ago. Under the terms of a piece of the 2006 Immigration, Asylum and Nationality Act, and a previous piece of legislation dating to 1981, May has the power to deprive dual nationals of their British citizenship if she is « satisfied that deprivation is conducive to the public good ».

This power can be applied only to dual nationals, and those who lose their citizenship can appeal. The government appears usually to wait until the individual has left the country before moving to deprive them of their citizenship, however, and appeals are heard at the highly secretive special immigration appeals commission (SIAC), where the government can submit evidence that cannot be seen or challenged by the appellant.

The Home Office is extraordinarily sensitive about the manner in which this power is being used. It has responded to Freedom of Information Act requests about May’s increased use of this power with delays and appeals; some information requested by the Guardian in June 2011 has still not been handed over. What is known is that at least 17 people have been deprived of their British citizenship at a stroke of May’s pen. In most cases, if not all, the home secretary has taken action on the recommendation of MI5. In each case, a warning notice was sent to the British home of the target, and the deprivation order signed a day or two later.

One person who lost their British citizenship in this way was Anna Chapman, a Russian spy, but the remainder are thought to all be Muslims. Several of them – including a British-Pakistani father and his three sons – were born in the UK, while most of the others arrived as children. And some have been deprived of their citizenship not because they were assessed to be involved in terrorism or any other criminal activity, but because of their alleged involvement in Islamist extremism.

Berjawi and Sakr both travelled to Somalia after claiming that they were being harassed by police in the UK, and were then stripped of their British citizenship. Several months later they were killed. The exact nature of any intelligence that the British government may have shared with Washington before their names were apparently entered into the disposition matrix is deeply secret: the UK has consistently refused to either confirm or deny that it shares intelligence in support of drone strikes, arguing that to do so would damage both national security and relations with the US government.

More than 12 months after Sakr’s death, his father, Gamal, a businessman who settled in London 37 years ago, still cannot talk about his loss without breaking down and weeping. He alleges that one of his two surviving sons has since been harassed by police, and suspects that this boy would also have been stripped of his citizenship had he left the country. « It’s madness, » he cries. « They’re driving these boys to Afghanistan. They’re making everything worse. »

Last year Gamal and his wife flew to Cairo, formally renounced their Egyptian citizenship, and on their return asked their lawyer to let it be known that their sons were no longer dual nationals. But while he wants his family to remain in Britain, the manner in which his son met his death has shattered his trust in the British government. « It was clearly directed from the UK, » he says. « He wasn’t just killed: he was assassinated. »
The case of Mahdi Hashi

Mahdi Hashi was five years old when his family moved to London from Somalia. He returned to the country in 2009, and took up arms for al-Shabaab in its civil war with government forces. A few months earlier he had complained to the Independent that he been under pressure to assist MI5, which he was refusing to do. Hashi was one of a few dozen young British men who have followed the same path: in one internet video clip, an al-Shabaab fighter with a cockney accent can be heard urging fellow Muslims « living in the lands of disbelief » to come and join him. It is thought that the identities of all these men are known to MI5.

After the deaths of Berjawi and Sakr, Hashi was detained by al-Shabaab, who suspected that he was a British spy, and that he was responsible for bringing the drones down on the heads of his brothers-in-arms. According to his US lawyer, Harry Batchelder, he was released in early June last year. The militants had identified three other men whom they believed were the culprits, executing them shortly afterwards.

Within a few days of Hashi’s release, May signed an order depriving him of his British citizenship. The warning notice that was sent to his family’s home read: « The reason for this decision is that the Security Service assess that you have been involved in Islamist extremism and present a risk to the national security of the United Kingdom due to your extremist activities. »

Hashi decided to leave Somalia, and travelled to Djibouti with two other fighters, both Somali-Swedish dual nationals. All three were arrested in a raid on a building, where they had been sleeping on the roof, and were taken to the local intelligence agency headquarters. Hashi says he was interrogated for several weeks by US intelligence officers who refused to identify themselves. These men then handed him over to a team of FBI interrogators, who took a lengthy statement. Hashi was then hooded, put aboard an aircraft, and flown to New York. On arrival he was charged with conspiracy to support a terrorist organisation.

Hashi has since been quoted in a news report as saying he was tortured while in custody in Djibouti. There is reason to doubt that this happened, however: a number of sources familiar with his defence case say that the journalist who wrote the report may have been misled. And the line of defence that he relied upon while being interrogated – that Somalia’s civil war is no concern of the US or the UK – evaporated overnight when al-Shabaab threatened to launch attacks in Britain.

When Hashi was led into court in Brooklyn in January, handcuffed and dressed in a grey and orange prison uniform, he was relaxed and smiling. The 23-year-old had been warned that if he failed to co-operate with the US government, he would be likely to spend the rest of his life behind bars. But he appeared unconcerned.

At no point did the UK government intervene. Indeed, it cannot: he is no longer British.

When the Home Office was asked whether it knew Hashi was facing detention and forcible removal to the US at the point at which May revoked his citizenship, a spokesperson replied: « We do not routinely comment on individual deprivation cases, nor do we comment on intelligence issues. »

The Home Office is also refusing to say whether it is aware of other individuals being killed after losing their British citizenship. On one point it is unambiguous, however. « Citizenship, » it said in a statement, « is a privilege, not a right. »

The case of ‘B2’

A glimpse of even closer UK-US counter-terrorism co-operation can be seen in the case of the Vietnamese-born convert, who cannot be named for legal reasons. Born in 1983 in the far north of Vietnam, he was a month old when his family travelled by sea to Hong Kong, six when they moved to the UK and settled in London, and 12 when he became a British citizen.

While studying web design at a college in Greenwich, he converted to Islam. He later came into contact with the banned Islamist group al-Muhajiroun, and was an associate of Richard Dart, a fellow convert who was the subject of a TV documentary entitled My Brother the Islamist, and who was jailed for six years in April after travelling to Pakistan to seek terrorism training. In December 2010, this man told his eight-months-pregnant wife that he was going to Ireland for a few weeks. Instead, he travelled to Yemen and stayed for seven months. MI5 believes he received terrorism training from al-Qaida in the Arabian peninsula and worked on the group’s online magazine, Inspire.

He denies this. Much of the evidence against him comes from a man called Ahmed Abdulkadir Warsame, a Somali who once lived in the English midlands, and who was « rendered to justice » in much the same way as Hashi after being captured in the Gulf of Aden two years ago. Warsame is now co-operating with the US Justice Department.

On arrival back at Heathrow airport, the Vietnamese-born man was searched by police and arrested when a live bullet was found in his rucksack. A few months later, while he was free on bail, May signed an order revoking his British citizenship. Detained by immigration officials and facing deportation to Vietnam, he appealed to SIAC, where he was given the cipher B2. He won his case after the Vietnamese ambassador to London gave evidence in which he denied that he was one of their citizens. Depriving him of British citizenship at that point would have rendered him stateless, which would have been unlawful.

Within minutes of SIAC announcing its decision and granting B2 unconditional bail, he was rearrested while sitting in the cells at the SIAC building. The warrant had been issued by magistrates five weeks earlier, at the request of the US Justice Department. Moments after that, the FBI announced that B2 had been charged with five terrorism offences and faced up to 40 years in jail. He was driven straight from SIAC to Westminster magistrates’ court, where he faced extradition proceedings.

B2 continues to resist his removal to the US, with his lawyers arguing that he could have been charged in the UK. Indeed, the allegations made by the US authorities, if true, would appear to represent multiple breaches of several UK laws: the Terrorism Act 2000, the Terrorism Act 2006 and the Firearms Act 1968. Asked why B2 was not being prosecuted in the English courts – why, in other words, the Americans were having this particular headache, and not the British – a Crown Prosecution Service spokesperson said: « As this is a live case and the issue of forum may be raised by the defence in court, it would be inappropriate for us to discuss this in advance of the extradition hearing. »

The rule of ‘imminent threat’

In the coffee shops of west London, old friends of Berjawi, Sakr, Hashi and B2 are equally reluctant to talk, especially when questioned about the calamities that have befallen the four men. When they do, it is in a slightly furtive way, almost in whispers.

Ezzouek explains that he never leaves the country any more, fearing he too will be stripped of his British citizenship. Al-Daour is watched closely and says he faces recall to prison whenever he places a foot wrong. Failing even to tell his probation officer that he has bought a car, for example, is enough to see him back behind bars. A number of their associates claim to have learned of the deaths of Berjawi and Sakr from MI5 officers who approached them with the news, and suggested they forget about travelling to Somalia.

Last February, a 16-page US justice department memo, leaked to NBC News, disclosed something of the legal basis for the drone programme. Its authors asserted that the killing of US citizens is lawful if they pose an « imminent threat » of violent attack against the US, and capture is impossible. The document adopts a broad definition of imminence, saying no evidence of a specific plot is needed, and remains silent on the fate that faces enemies who are – or were – citizens of an allied nation, such as the UK.
matrix drone in flight

But if the Obama administration is satisfied that the targeted killing of US citizens is lawful, there is little reason to doubt that young men who have been stripped of their British citizenship, and who take up arms in Somalia or Yemen or elsewhere, will continue to find their way on to the disposition matrix, and continue to be killed by missiles fired from drones hovering high overhead, or rendered to courts in the US.

And while Obama says he wants to curtail the drone programme, his officials have been briefing journalists that they believe the operations are likely to continue for another decade, at least. Given al-Qaida’s resilience and ability to spread, they say, no clear end is in sight.

Voir encore:

La dérive morale de l’armée israélienne à Gaza
Piotr Smolar (Jérusalem, correspondant)

Le Monde

04.05.2015

Eté 2014, bande de Gaza. Un vieux Palestinien gît à terre. Il marchait non loin d’un poste de reconnaissance de l’armée israélienne. Un soldat a décidé de le viser. Il est grièvement blessé à la jambe, ne bouge plus. Est-il vivant ? Les soldats se disputent. L’un d’eux décide de mettre fin à la discussion. Il abat le vieillard.

Cette histoire, narrée par plusieurs de ses acteurs, s’inscrit dans la charge la plus dévastatrice contre l’armée israélienne depuis la guerre, lancée par ses propres soldats. L’organisation non gouvernementale Breaking the Silence (« rompre le silence »), qui regroupe des anciens combattants de Tsahal, publie, lundi 4 mai, un recueil d’entretiens accordés sous couvert d’anonymat par une soixantaine de participants à l’opération « Bordure protectrice ».

Une opération conduite entre le 8 juillet et le 26 août 2014, qui a entraîné la mort de près de 2 100 Palestiniens et 66 soldats israéliens. Israël a détruit trente-deux tunnels permettant de pénétrer clandestinement sur son territoire, puis a conclu un cessez-le-feu avec le Hamas qui ne résout rien. L’offensive a provoqué des dégâts matériels et humains sans précédent. Elle jette, selon l’ONG, « de graves doutes sur l’éthique » de Tsahal.

« Si vous repérez quelqu’un, tirez ! »

Breaking the Silence n’utilise jamais l’expression « crimes de guerre ». Mais la matière que l’organisation a collectée, recoupée, puis soumise à la censure militaire comme l’exige toute publication liée à la sécurité nationale, est impressionnante. « Ce travail soulève le soupçon dérangeant de violations des lois humanitaires, explique l’avocat Michael Sfard, qui conseille l’ONG depuis dix ans. J’espère qu’il y aura un débat, mais j’ai peur qu’on parle plus du messager que du message. Les Israéliens sont de plus en plus autocentrés et nationalistes, intolérants contre les critiques. »

Environ un quart des témoins sont des officiers. Tous les corps sont représentés. Certains étaient armes à la main, d’autres dans la chaîne de commandement. Cette diversité permet, selon l’ONG, de dessiner un tableau des « politiques systémiques » décidées par l’état-major, aussi bien lors des bombardements que des incursions au sol. Ce tableau contraste avec la doxa officielle sur la loyauté de l’armée, ses procédures strictes et les avertissements adressés aux civils, pour les inviter à fuir avant l’offensive.

« Ce travail soulève le soupçon dérangeant de violations des lois humanitaires, explique l’avocat Michael Sfard, qui conseille l’ONG Breaking the Silence. J’espère qu’il y aura un débat »
Les témoignages, eux, racontent une histoire de flou. Au nom de l’obsession du risque minimum pour les soldats, les règles d’engagement – la distinction entre ennemis combattants et civils, le principe de proportionnalité – ont été brouillées. « Les soldats ont reçu pour instructions de leurs commandants de tirer sur chaque personne identifiée dans une zone de combat, dès lors que l’hypothèse de travail était que toute personne sur le terrain était un ennemi », précise l’introduction. « On nous a dit, il n’est pas censé y avoir de civils, si vous repérez quelqu’un, tirez ! », se souvient un sergent d’infanterie, posté dans le nord.

Les instructions sont claires : le doute est un risque. Une personne observe les soldats d’une fenêtre ou d’un toit ? Cible. Elle marche dans la rue à 200 mètres de l’armée ? Cible. Elle demeure dans un immeuble dont les habitants ont été avertis ? Cible. Et quand il n’y a pas de cible, on tire des obus ou au mortier, on « stérilise », selon l’expression récurrente. Ou bien on envoie le D-9, un bulldozer blindé, pour détruire les maisons et dégager la vue.

« Le bien et le mal se mélangent »
Un soldat se souvient de deux femmes, parlant au téléphone et marchant un matin à environ 800 mètres des forces israéliennes. Des guetteuses ? Un drone les survole. Pas de certitude. Elles sont abattues, classées comme « terroristes ». Un sergent raconte le « Bonjour Al-Bourej ! », adressé un matin par son unité de tanks à ce quartier situé dans la partie centrale du territoire. Les tanks sont alignés puis, sur instruction, tirent en même temps, au hasard, pour faire sentir la présence israélienne.

Beaucoup de liberté d’appréciation était laissée aux hommes sur le terrain. Au fil des jours, « le bien et le mal se mélangent un peu (…) et ça devient un peu comme un jeu vidéo », témoigne un soldat. Mais cette latitude correspondait à un mode opérationnel. Au niveau de l’état-major, il existait selon l’ONG trois « niveaux d’activation », déterminant notamment les distances de sécurité acceptées par rapport aux civils palestiniens. Au niveau 3, des dommages collatéraux élevés sont prévus. « Plus l’opération avançait, et plus les limitations ont diminué », explique l’ONG. « Nos recherches montrent que pour l’artillerie, les distances à préserver par rapport aux civils étaient très inférieures à celles par rapport à nos soldats », souligne Yehuda Shaul, cofondateur de Breaking the Silence.

Un lieutenant d’infanterie, dans le nord de la bande de Gaza, se souvient : « Même si on n’entre pas [au sol], c’est obus, obus, obus. Une structure suspecte, une zone ouverte, une possible entrée de tunnel : feu, feu, feu. » L’officier évoque le relâchement des restrictions au fil des jours. Lorsque le 3e niveau opératoire est décidé, les forces aériennes ont le droit à un « niveau raisonnable de pertes civiles, dit-il. C’est quelque chose d’indéfinissable, qui dépend du commandant de brigade, en fonction de son humeur du moment ».

Fin 2014, le vice-procureur militaire, Eli Bar-On, recevait Le Monde pour plaider le discernement des forces armées. « On a conduit plus de 5 000 frappes aériennes pendant la campagne. Le nombre de victimes est phénoménalement bas », assurait-il. A l’en croire, chaque frappe aérienne fait l’objet d’une réflexion et d’une enquête poussée. Selon lui, « la plupart des dégâts ont été causés par le Hamas ». Le magistrat mettait en cause le mouvement islamiste pour son utilisation des bâtiments civils. « On dispose d’une carte de coordination de tous les sites sensibles, mosquées, écoles, hôpitaux, réactualisée plusieurs fois par jour. Quand on la superpose avec la carte des tirs de roquettes, on s’aperçoit qu’une partie significative a été déclenchée de ces endroits. »

Treize enquêtes pénales ouvertes
L’armée peut-elle se policer ? Le parquet général militaire (MAG) a ouvert treize enquêtes pénales, dont deux pour pillages, déjà closes car les plaignants ne se sont pas présentés. Les autres cas concernent des épisodes tristement célèbres du conflit, comme la mort de quatre enfants sur la plage de Gaza, le 16 juillet 2014. Six autres dossiers ont été renvoyés au parquet en vue de l’ouverture d’une enquête criminelle, après un processus de vérification initial.

Ces procédures internes n’inspirent guère confiance. En septembre, deux ONG israéliennes, B’Tselem et Yesh Din, ont annoncé qu’elles cessaient toute coopération avec le parquet. Les résultats des investigations antérieures les ont convaincues. Après la guerre de 2008-2009 dans la bande de Gaza (près de 1 400 Palestiniens tués), 52 enquêtes avaient été ouvertes. La sentence la plus sévère – quinze mois de prison dont la moitié avec sursis – concerna un soldat coupable du vol d’une carte de crédit. Après l’opération « Pilier de défense », en novembre 2012 (167 Palestiniens tués), une commission interne a été mise en place, mais aucune enquête ouverte. Le comportement de l’armée fut jugé « professionnel ».

Voir par ailleurs:

“Good Kill”, ce film digne qu’Eastwood n’a pas signé

Aurélien Ferenczi
Cinécure

24/02/2015

L’unique statuette ramassée l’autre nuit par American Sniper, le dernier Clint Eastwood, a valeur de symbole : l’Oscar du meilleur montage son est allé comme une médaille du courage aux deux types qui ont passé de longues semaines à recueillir, puis à caler sur les images du film des bruits de fusils d’assaut, mitraillettes, fusils de chasse, lance-roquettes, grenades, etc. Des techniciens à l’ouïe fine, sans doute capables de différencier le son d’une balle amie à celui d’une balle ennemie…

Mais ce sont aussi les petits malins responsables (sous les ordres de Papy Clint) de la première faute de goût du film, impardonnable péché originel : dès la première seconde de projection, sur le logo de la Warner (pas encore passée sous contrôle qatari pourtant), une voix psalmodie « Allah Akbar ». Une prière qui ouvre clairement les hostilités, dit à qui on aura affaire, jouerait presque à faire peur. Pas très digne, vraiment…

American Sniper cartonne des deux côtés de l’Atlantique (plus d’un million de spectateurs en France au terme de sa première semaine d’exploitation) : les « eastwoodiens » de longue date s’en félicitent (à tous lessens du mot), sans s’apercevoir que c’est l’un des films les plus faibles de leur auteur-fétiche. Outre les libertés bien commodes qu’il prend avec la vraie biographie de Chris Kyle (un type assez malin pour penser que des séances de tir sont le meilleur remède au syndrome post-traumatique des soldats éclopés), le scénario alterne mécaniquement scènes de guerre banales – moins spectaculaires que celles de La Chute du Faucon noir, par exemple – et vie de famille troublée, montrée avec une finesse éléphantesque. Exemple : Intérieur jour. Chris Kyle est assis dans son fauteuil, inerte. La télévision est éteinte, mais il entend des rafales d’armes automatiques (merci les monteurs son). C’est comme s’il était encore à la guerre… Non, vraiment ? Difficile de reconnaître l’auteur de Josey Wales dans ces gros sabots bellicistes.

Eastwood parachute un héros américain dans une époque où le manichéisme n’est plus possible. Chacun sait qu’il n’y a plus de guerre propre et que le défi « à l’ancienne » que s’impose le héros eastwoodien – avoir la peau du sniper adverse, et puis rentrer chez lui – est pure fiction. L’impossibilité de l’héroïsme est au cœur d’un autre film sur les conflits d’aujourd’hui, qui sonne autrement juste. Good Kill, d’Andrew Niccol (le réalisateur de Bienvenue à Gattaca et Lord of War), qui sortira en France le 22 avril, raconte la guerre d’un type qui tue de très loin. Un ancien pilote de chasse de l’US Air force, désormais aux commandes de drones qu’il dirige à des milliers de kilomètres de distance.

Il agit depuis sa base de Las Vegas, au sein de petites cabines frappées d’extra-territorialité, des habitacles immobiles comme ceux des jeux vidéos, et il appuie sur le lance-roquettes quand les cibles se précisent. Quelles cibles ? C’est le problème, a fortiori quand la CIA s’en mêle, réquisitionnant les unités d’élite de l’armée pour éliminer des suspects : les drones survolent par exemple le Waziristan, au nord-ouest du Pakistan, et il faut obéir aux ordres, imaginer que ces villageois réunis sont bien des terroristes en puissance, et les éliminer, tant pis si des femmes ou des enfants sont dans la zone de tir.

Implacable et documenté, Good kill décrit avec précision les pratiques de l’armée américaine : par exemple, le principe de la double frappe. Vous éliminez d’un missile un foyer de présumés terroristes, mais vous frappez dans les minutes qui suivent au même endroit pour éliminer ceux qui viennent les secourir, et tant pis si ce sont clairement des civils. L’un des sommets du film est le récit d’une opération visant l’enterrement d’ennemis tués plus tôt dans la journée, la barbarie à son maximum – et on est sûr que Andrew Niccol, scénariste et réalisateur, n’a rien inventé. Bien sûr, à tuer quasiment à l’aveugle, ou sur la foi de renseignements invérifiables, on crée une situation de guerre permanente, et on fabrique les adversaires que l’on éliminera plus tard.

Le personnage joué par Ethan Hawke, avec autrement d’intensité que la bonhomie irresponsable de Bradley Cooper chez Eastwood, peut difficilement ne pas être traversé d’un trouble terrible – a fortiori en retrouvant sa femme et ses enfants le soir chez lui, juste après avoir détruit des familles dans la journée.

Good Kill est un film important parce qu’il montre pour la première fois le vrai visage des guerres modernes, et à quel point ont disparu les notions de patriotisme et d’héroïsme – que risque ce combattant plaqué à part de se détruire lui-même ? C’est aussi un réquisitoire courageux contre l’american way of life, symbolisée ici par Las Vegas, ville sans âme que les personnages traversent sur leur chemin entre base militaire et pavillon sinistre. Ce n’est pas un film d’anticipation. L’horreur que l’on fait subir aux victimes et, en un sens, à leurs bourreaux, c’est ici et maintenant. Une sale guerre, un sale monde.

Voir aussi:

Good Kill », un film édifiant sur l’utilisation des drones
Nicolas Schaller

L’Obs
26-04-2015
« Good Kill », c’est l’anti-« American Sniper ». Rencontre avec son réalisateur, Andrew Niccol

L’OBS. « Good Kill » suit un pilote de l’U.S. Air Force, interprété par Ethan Hawke, qui pilote des drones et bombarde le Moyen-Orient depuis une base de Las Vegas, à plus de 10.000 km.

Andrew Niccol. Tout ce que vous voyez dans le film est réel. L’utilisation militaire des drones a commencé après le 11-Septembre et n’a jamais cessé depuis. Les Républicains comme les Démocrates y sont favorables. Cela leur évite d’envoyer des soldats dans la zone de conflit. Les stations de contrôle des drones sont à l’intérieur de remorques. Avant, ces remorques étaient emmenées sur place par hélicoptère. Puis ils se sont rendu compte qu’ils n’avaient pas besoin d’y être. « Good Kill » se déroule en 2010, année où les frappes de drones ont atteint des proportions jamais connues.

Une manière de dire aux familles : « nous n’envoyons pas vos enfants là-bas ».

– C’est sans danger. On ne voit pas revenir de cercueils.

En revanche, les morts de l’autre côté sont hasardeuses.

– Les drones sont très précis. Si vous voulez détruire tel immeuble, vous l’aurez sans problème. Reste à savoir si c’est le bon. Trois jours après son accession au pouvoir, Obama a ordonné une frappe sur un repaire taliban. Qui s’est avéré ne pas en être un. Neuf civils sont morts. Au moment où on tournait, l’armée américaine a accidentellement bombardé une cérémonie de mariage au Yémen. On en a à peine parlé aux infos. Ce n’était pas le premier mariage pris pour cible par erreur. Là-bas, la tradition veut que l’on tire des coups de feu durant la fête et il est arrivé à plusieurs reprises que les Américains prennent ça pour des attaques.

Avez-vous bénéficié du concours de l’armée américaine ?

– Non. Le film raconte une vérité trop dérangeante. Mais j’ai pu parler à d’ex-pilotes de drones tels que Brandon Bryant…

… lequel a déclaré dans les médias américains avoir tué plus de 1600 personnes. Cela n’a choqué personne ?

– Pas vraiment. Les Etats-Unis sont le seul pays où la guerre menée par drones est plus populaire que l’inverse. WikiLeaks m’a été très précieux : c’est le seul moyen de voir des images de frappes de drones. Grâce à Chelsea Manning [ex-analyste militaire condamnée en 2013 à 35 ans de prison pour avoir divulguer des documents classés Secret Défense, ndlr].

« Good Kill » se focalise sur les missions confidentielles menées par l’armée sous le commandement de la C.I.A.

– Je n’ai rien inventé. Comme on le voit dans mon film, l’armée américaine a délibérément bombardé un enterrement. La CIA ne fait plus dans l’espionnage mais dans l’assassinat. Depuis le 11 septembre et la guerre contre le terrorisme, tout lui est permis. Mais comme elle n’a pas de pilotes, elle doit faire appel à l’armée. Bien sûr, l’assassinat est illégal aux Etats-Unis. Sauf qu’ils emploient des termes différents. Ils ont mis au point tout un lexique qui ferait bien rire George Orwell. Ils parlent d’ « auto-défense préventive ». Comme dans « Minority Report » : on tue le coupable présumé avant qu’il n’ait agi ! Il y a aussi la « frappe signature » qui consiste à tirer sur tout un groupe de gens dont vous ne connaissez pas forcément l’identité. Ils justifient cela par l’idée de « proportionalité ». Traduction : il est si important d’éliminer la personne ciblée que peu importe si on tue les types d’à côté. Et puis d’ailleurs, que font-ils là ? S’ils ne sont pas loin d’un terroriste, c’est qu’ils ne doivent pas être innocents.

On imagine les répercussions au Moyen Orient.

– Dans le film, j’ai choisi de ne montrer que le point de vue du drone, si j’ose dire, car c’est le seul à la portée du pilote qu’interprète Ethan Hawke. Une chose m’a marqué : aujourd’hui, les habitants des pays du Moyen-Orient où l’Amérique est en guerre détestent le ciel bleu. Ils sont heureux quand la météo se couvre : cela signifie que les drones ne peuvent pas voler. Cette guerre est une usine à terroristes. A chaque innocent qu’elle tue, l’armée américaine crée dix nouveaux terroristes.

Il est dit dans le film que la console de jeu X-Box a servi de modèle pour les drones. Vrai ?

– Oui, l’armée s’en est inspirée pour concevoir les joysticks de téléguidage. Elle ne veut plus de vrais pilotes, elle les embauche dans les salles d’arcades des centres commerciaux. Comme ce sont des civils, ils n’ont pas le droit d’actionner la bombe. Un officier doit être là pour appuyer sur le bouton de tir. Il y a une chose que je n’ai pas mise dans le film car cela n’aurait pas eu l’air crédible et pourtant, c’est vrai : des jeunes pilotes de drones m’ont raconté qu’après leur journée à tuer des talibans de derrière leur joystick, ils rentraient chez eux et jouaient aux jeux vidéo !

On imagine que la guerre menée avec des drones est moins onéreuse ?

– Un tir de drone coûte 68.000 $. C’est bien moins cher qu’un tir de jet. Un drone est très lent mais il peut tenir en l’air 24 heures d’affilée. On en produit davantage aujourd’hui que des jets. Et bientôt, il y aura des drones-jets. Le personnage d’Ethan Hawke souffre de ça. Il a grandi avec l’image de « Top Gun », rêvait d’être Tom Cruise dans le film et voilà à quoi il en est réduit.

Le syndrome de stress post-traumatique dont il souffre est très particulier.

– Parce qu’aucun soldat n’avait vécu cela jusqu’ici. Avant, on se rendait dans le pays avec lequel on était en conflit. Aujourd’hui, plus besoin : la guerre est télécommandée. Avant, le pilote prenait son jet, lâchait une bombe et rentrait. Aujourd’hui, il lâche sa bombe, attend dans son fauteuil et compte le nombre de morts. Il passe douze heures à tuer des talibans avant d’aller chercher ses enfants à l’école.

« J’ai tué six talibans cet après-midi et là, je rentre chez moi préparer un barbecue », dit le personnage d’Ethan Hawke à l’épicier auquel il achète sa bouteille de vodka quotidienne.

– Et le type croit qu’il blague. Le fait que les pilotes soient basés près du clinquant Las Vegas est obscène. Vous savez pourquoi ils ont choisi cette zone ?Parce que le paysage et les montagnes alentour ressemblent à ceux d’Afghanistan. Cela facilite l’entraînement.

L’héroïsme, la famille, le fantasme d’une Amérique gendarme du monde… « Good Kill » traite des mêmes sujets qu’ « American Sniper ». Jusqu’à sa fin ambiguë. Est-ce la version démocrate du film de Clint Eastwood ?

– Même pas : Obama est démocrate. Et l’emploi des drones a augmenté depuis qu’il est au pouvoir. Mon film parle de l’ »American sniper » ultime. J’ai juste tenté d’être honnête vis-à-vis du sujet. De montrer les choses telles qu’elles sont sans imposer une manière de penser. Il serait naïf de dire « je suis anti-drone ». Ce serait comme dire « je suis anti-internet ». Mais avec cette technologie, la guerre peut être infinie. Le jour où l’armée américaine quittera le Moyen-Orient, les drones, eux, y resteront.

Qu’avez-vous pensé d’ « American Sniper » ?

– J’ai pour règle de ne jamais m’exprimer sur les films des autres, mais son succès m’a un peu surpris. En fait, il est tombé pile au bon moment et a permis aux Américains de se sentir mieux vis-à-vis d’eux-mêmes. Mon « sniper » est très différent. Ce qui m’intéresse chez lui, c’est sa schizophrénie. L’état-major américain était sur le point d’attribuer une médaille à certains pilotes de drones. Cela a soulevé un tel tollé de la part des vrais pilotes qu’ils ont abandonné l’idée. Ces médailles sont censées célébrer les valeurs et le courage. Comment les décerner à des types qui tuent sans courir le moindre danger ?

Je crains que « Good Kill » ne rencontre pas le même succès qu’ « American Sniper » aux Etats-Unis.

– Je n’en doute pas.

Votre film est moins roublard que celui d’Eastwood.

– Et c’est une petite compagnie indépendante qui le sort, pas la Warner.

Avez-vous utilisé de vrais drones lors du tournage ?

– On peut effectuer des prises de vue aériennes à l’aide de drones mais, étrangement, ils sont trop petits et pas assez stables pour soutenir une caméra de cinéma. J’ai donc utilisé un hélicoptère ainsi qu’une grue de 60 mètres en balançant légèrement la caméra pour donner l’impression qu’elle vole. J’ai aussi pas mal filmé les scènes extérieures au conflit, celles de la vie quotidienne du personnage à Las Vegas, d’un point de vue culminant, pour créer une continuité et un sentiment de paranoïa. Comme si un drone le suivait en permanence. Ou le point de vue de Dieu.

Salle de contrôle (Voltage Pictures / Sobini films)

« Truman Show », « S1m0ne », « Lord of War » : dans tous vos films, les hommes sont prisonniers de la technologie…

– L’interaction entre les humains et la technologie me passionne.

… Et un individu se retrouve doté du pouvoir d’un dieu.

– Dans « Bienvenue à Gattaca » aussi : la manipulation génétique, c’est jouer à être Dieu. J’ai toujours vu le personnage de Nicolas Cage dans « Lord of War » comme quelqu’un d’invincible. Je l’imaginais traversant un champ de bataille sans baisser la tête, inatteignable. C’est sa malédiction.

Vous aimez gratter les sujets qui fâchent ?

– Je suis sur la « watch list » des autorités américaines depuis « Lord of War ».

Comment le savez-vous ?

– Le FBI m’a rendu visite pour savoir pourquoi j’avais fait jouer un vrai trafiquant d’armes dans le film. Parce que le seul moyen d’obtenir un avion-cargo russe en Afrique est de passer par un trafiquant d’armes. Celui que l’on voit dans « Lord of War » transportait de vraies armes au Congo une semaine avant qu’on le filme rempli de fausses armes. L’équipage russe se foutait de moi en me disant : « Pourquoi t’es pas venu la semaine dernière, on t’en aurait filées des vraies ». Vous vous souvenez du plan avec tous les tanks ? Les cinquante ont été vendus à Kadhafi un mois plus tard.

Propos recueillis par Nicolas Schaller

Voir de même:

« Good Kill » : au temps des drones, un nouvel art de la guerre
Thomas Sotinel
Le Monde

21.04.2015

L’American Sniper de Clint Eastwood était capable d’abattre sa cible à plusieurs centaines de mètres de distance. Le major Tom Egan peut le faire à des milliers de kilomètres. Le major est un as de l’US Air Force, le descendant des pilotes de biplan de la première guerre mondiale, qui fascinaient les Howard, Hawks et Hughes, des héros que filmait John Ford pendant la bataille de Midway en 1942. Mais la vie de guerrier de Tom Egan n’a rien à voir avec celle de ses ancêtres chevaleresques, qui ne savaient jamais le matin s’ils reverraient un jour leur patrie. Le soir, quand le service est fini, le major du XXIe siècle pousse la porte de l’espèce de container dans lequel il a passé sa journée, marche jusqu’au parking, monte dans sa voiture et regagne la périphérie de Las Vegas, sa maison entourée d’un carré de pelouse aussi verte que le désert est poussiéreux. Tom Egan ne pilote plus d’avions depuis longtemps mais dirige des drones qui survolent l’Afghanistan, le Waziristan, le Yémen, la Somalie pour surveiller et punir les ennemis des Etats-Unis.

Andrew Niccol, le réalisateur de Good Kill, est fasciné par les mutations de l’humanité : l’intervention de la génétique dans la définition des rapports sociaux (Bienvenue à Gattaca), la mondialisation – vue à travers le commerce des armes (Lord of War). Ici, il se lance dans une entreprise presque impossible : la mise en scène de la guerre contemporaine, dont l’asymétrie repose sur la disparition physique de l’une des parties en présence, remplacée par des machines. Comme cette ambition s’accompagne d’un souci très américain d’offrir un spectacle correspondant au prix du billet, Good Kill n’est pas tout à fait le film analytique, froid et fascinant que l’on entrevoit lors des premières séquences.

Elles montrent Tom Egan (Ethan Hawke) abruti d’ennui, devant un écran qui offre des images d’une netteté et d’une platitude presque insupportables. On y voit des cours orientales dans lesquelles des gens sans intérêt vaquent à des occupations triviales. Une fois que le renseignement a assigné à ces silhouettes la qualité d’ennemi, Egan peut faire tomber la foudre sur elles. Ce processus clinique, à l’opposé de la fureur guerrière que chérit le cinéma, trouve sa contrepartie civile dans le paysage synthétique de Las Vegas que traverse le soldat pour rentrer chez lui.

Une volonté d’analyse froide
Ethan Hawke est parfait pour le rôle, trouvant un nouvel emploi à cette faille constitutive qui fait qu’on sait toujours qu’il ne sera pas le héros qu’on attendait. Ici, sa frustration d’ancien combattant de terrain (on suppose qu’il a mitraillé et bombardé en Irak et en Afghanistan) honteux de son travail de bourreau à distance qu’il ressent comme une espèce d’impuissance martiale.

Cette description clinique, photographiée avec un soin maniaque du détail et un refus admirable de l’esthétique habituelle des films situés à Las Vegas, est assez vigoureuse et singulière pour empêcher Good Kill de succomber à ses nombreux défauts. Telles les figures dramatiques usées – les disputes conjugales en écho aux drames guerriers (Ethan Hawke a pour épouse January Jones, qui incarne Betty Draper dans la série « Mad Men ») –, la galerie sommaire de stéréotypes qui entourent le major Egan à la base de l’US Air Force, répartis équitablement entre militaires soucieux de leur honneur et ruffians qui voient des ennemis partout.

Malgré ces maladresses (et une fin qui menace de saper le travail intellectuel qui a précédé), Good Kill reste un film passionnant, soulevant (parfois avec beaucoup de raideur) une bonne part des questions posées par les mutations de l’art de la guerre.

On voit les contrôleurs de drones se soumettre aux ordres des services secrets, on les voit tentés par la toute-puissance que leur confère ce pouvoir de voir et de tuer sans être vus ni menacés. Dans les moments où la mise en scène s’accorde avec cette volonté d’analyse froide, Good Kill devient comme une version réaliste de ce qui reste à ce jour le meilleur film d’Andrew Niccol, le cauchemar futuriste de Bienvenue à Gattaca : le portrait d’un monde dont l’homme a exclu sa propre humanité.
Film américain d’Andrew Niccol avec Ethan Hawke, January Jones, Zoë Kravitz (1 h 42).

Toronto: le drame de drones d’Andrew Niccol

Thomas Sotinel

10 septembre 2014

« Good Kill », c’est l’interjection qu’éructent les pilotes de drones une fois leur objectif détruit. Coincés à l’intérieur d’une espèce de caravane, dans le désert du Nevada, ils contrôlent à distance de petits avions sans pilotes qui frappent sans relâches les ennemis des Etats-Unis, en Afghanistan, au Waziristan, au Yemen. Good Kill, le film, raconte le voyage dans la folie d’un ces pilotes, incarné par Ethan Hawke, qui n’arrive pas à faire le deuil de la guerre, la vraie, celle qui révèle la vérité d’un homme.

Ethan Hawke dans Good Kill, d’Andrew Niccol
Andrew Niccol a présenté son film à la Mostra, comme vous l’avez peut-être lu sur ce site. Je ne partage pas la répulsion de ma camarade vénitienne, au contraire. De Bienvenue à Gattaca en Lord of War, Niccol a toujours mis en scène avec précision l’interaction entre l’homme et les machines qu’il crée. Il est peut-être moins à l’aise lorsqu’il s’agit de filmer les relations entre humains, mais comme l’essentiel de Good Kill est consacré à ces machines invisibles dont les victimes n’apprennent la présence qu’au moment exact de leur mort, ce n’est pas très grave.

Pour l’instant, le film n’a pas trouvé de distributeur en France. En attendant, voici ce que le réalisateur a à en dire.

Qu’est ce qui vous a intéressé dans les drones?

J’étais plus intéressé par le personnage, par cette nouvelle manière de faire la guerre. On n’a jamais demandé à un soldat de faire ça. De combattre douze heures et de rentrer chez lui auprès de sa femme et de ses enfants, il n’y a plus de sas de décompression.

Vous avez imaginé la psychologie de ces pilotes?

J’ai engagé d’anciens pilotes de drones comme consultants, puisque l’armée m’avait refusé sa coopération. J’en aurais bien voulu, ç’aurait été plus facile si on m’avait donné ces équipements, ces installations. J’ai dû les construire.

Vous pensez que ce souci de discrétion, de secret même, fait partie la stratégie d’emploi des drones?

Oui, je me suis souvenu aujourd’hui d’une conférence de presse du général Schwartzkopf pendant la première guerre d’Irak, il avait montré des vidéos en noir et blanc, avec une très mauvaise définition, de frappes de précision et on voyait un motocycliste échapper de justesse à un missile. Il l’avait appelé « l’homme le plus chanceux d’Irak ». On le voit traverser un pont, passer dans la ligne de mire et sortir du champ au moment où le panache de l’explosion éclot. Aujourd’hui on sait qu’il existe une vidéo pour chaque frappe de drone, c’est la procédure. Mais on ne les montre plus comme au temps du général Schwartzkopf. Expliquez-moi pourquoi.

Je préfèrerais que vous le fassiez.

Je vais vous dire pourquoi. Les humains ont tendance à l’empathie – et même si vous êtes mon ennemi, même si vous êtes une mauvaise personne, si je vous regarde mourir, je ressentirai de l’empathie. Ce qui n’est pas bon pour les affaires militaires.

Vous pensez que l’emploi des drones permet de surmonter cet inconvénient?

Je crois que ça a tendance à insensibiliser. On n’entend jamais une explosion, on ne sent jamais le sol se soulever. On est à 10 000 kilomètres.

Il doit y avoir plusieurs bases de pilotages de drones aux Etats-Unis, pourquoi avez vous situé celle du film près de Las Vegas?

L’armée l’a mise là pour des raisons de commodité: les montagnes autour de Las Vegas ressemblent à l’Afghanistan, ce qui permet aux pilotes de drones à l’entraînement de se familiariser avec le terrain. Ils s’exercent aussi à suivre des voitures.

« Good Kill », par Andrew Niccol, en salles actuellement

« The Good Kill » à la Mostra de Venise : le film américain de trop
Isabelle Regnier (Venise, envoyée spéciale)

Le Monde

06.09.2014

(…)

LA QUESTION DES DRONES

Mais il a fallu attendre vendredi 5 septembre pour découvrir, en compétition, le plus problématique des films américains. Très attendu, The Good Kill d’Andrew Niccol (auteur du très élégant Bienvenue à Gattacca, et du plus englué Master of War) promettait d’interroger la question hautement politique et morale des drones, en suivant un ancien pilote de chasse reconverti en pilote à distance de ces machines meurtrières.

Le film est si mauvais qu’on peine à y croire. À partir d’un scénario qui lorgne du côté de la série Homeland (malaise du pilote de guerre de retour dans la vie civile, cynisme de la CIA, suprématie de la raison d’Etat dans la guerre contre le terrorisme…), Andrew Niccol met en scène des personnages sans épaisseur, sans qualité. Enveloppe vide qui tire la gueule du début à la fin du film, celui d’Ethan Hawke est défini par les rasades de vodka qu’il s’envoie en douce dans la salle de bains ; déambulant en robe cocktail et talons aiguilles dans son pavillon de la banlieue de Las Vegas comme si elle n’était pas tout à fait sortie de la série Mad Men, sa femme, interprétée par l’actrice January Jones, répète en boucle la même réplique : « tu as l’air d’être à des kilomètres… » ; quant à la jeune Zoe Kravitz, qui restera peut-être dans l’histoire comme la femme officier la plus sexy de toute l’histoire de l’armée, elle s’adonne, faute d’avoir plus intéressant à faire, à un festival de moues boudeuses qui pourrait lui valoir un prix dans un festival un peu en pointe. Le reste – monologues didactiques sur l’enjeu militaire et moral des drones, dialogues téléphonés, blagues pas drôles, musique de bourrin – est à l’avenant.

CRITIQUE COSMÉTIQUE

Ce qui pose vraiment problème n’est toutefois pas d’ordre artistique, mais politique. Paré des oripeaux de la fiction de gauche, The Good Kill s’inscrit pleinement (comme le faisait la troisième saison de « Homeland ») dans le paradigme de la guerre contre le terrorisme telle que la conduisent les Etats-Unis depuis le 11 septembre 2001. Les Afghans ne sont jamais représentés autrement que sous la forme des petites silhouettes noires mal définies, évoluant erratiquement sur l’écran des pilotes de drones qui les surveillent. La seule action véritablement lisible se déroule dans la cour d’une maison, où l’on voit, à plusieurs reprises, un barbu frapper sa femme et la violer. C’est l’argument imparable, tranquillement anti-islamiste, de la cause des femmes, que les avocats de la guerre contre le terrorisme ont toujours brandi sans vergogne pour mettre un terme au débat.

La critique que fait Andrew Niccol, dans ce contexte, de l’usage des drones ne pouvait qu’être cosmétique. Elle est aussi inepte, confondant les questions d’ordre psychologique (comment se débrouillent des soldats qui rentrent le soir dans leur lit douillet après avoir tué des gens – souvent innocents), et celles qui se posent sur le plan du droit de la guerre (que Grégoire Chamayou a si bien expliqué dans La Théorie du drone, La Fabrique, 2013), dès lors que ces armes autorisent à détruire des vies dans le camp adverse sans plus en mettre aucune en péril dans le sien. Si l’ancien pilote de chasse ne va pas bien, explique-t-il à sa femme, ce n’est pas parce qu’il tue des innocents, ce qu’il a toujours fait, c’est qu’il les tue sans danger.

RÉDEMPTION AHURISSANTE

Pour remédier à son état, s’offre une des rédemptions les plus ahurissantes qu’il ait été donné à voir depuis longtemps au cinéma. S’improvisant bras armé d’une justice totalement aveugle, il dégomme en un clic le violeur honni, rendant à sa femme, après un léger petit suspense, ce qu’il imagine être sa liberté. La conscience lavée, le pilote peut repartir le cœur léger, retrouver sa famille et oublier toutes celles, au loin, qu’il a assassinées pour la bonne cause.

Good Kill
Thriller réalisé en 2014 par Andrew Niccol
Avec Ethan Hawke , Stafford Douglas , Michael Sheets …
Date de sortie : 22 avril 2015

Good Kill – Bande Annonce VOST
SYNOPSIS
Le commandant Tom Egan est un ancien pilote de chasse de l’US Army qui, après de nombreuses missions sur le terrain, se retrouve en service dans une petite base du Nevada où il s’est reconverti en pilote de drones, des machines meurtrières guidées à distance. Derrière sa télécommande Tom opère ses missions douze heures par jour : surveillance des terrains à risque, protection des troupes et exécution des cibles terroristes. Mais de retour chez lui, ses relations avec sa famille sont exécrables. Progressivement confronté à des problèmes de conscience, Tom remet bientôt sa mission en question…

LA CRITIQUE LORS DE LA SORTIE EN SALLE DU 22/04/2015

Pour

Un héros américain déchu : pilote de chasse, le commandant Tommy Egan ne fait plus voler que des drones. Enfermé dans un conteneur banalisé, sur une base militaire près de Las Vegas, son écran de contrôle lui montre la Terre, quelque part au Moyen-Orient, filmée de si haut qu’elle en devient presque abstraite. Mais pas pour lui. On lui ­désigne des cibles à bombarder, il voit des humains qu’il doit détruire. Et ça le détruit, comme l’alcool dont il abuse… Il est beau, ce personnage, cet oiseau blessé interprété par Ethan Hawke avec un désenchantement fiévreux digne de Montgomery Clift. Pour mener la guerre d’aujourd’hui, technologique et furtive, il faudrait que le commandant Egan devienne lui-même une machine. Au lieu de quoi, il résiste, pense, souffre. Le film trouve là une dimension mentale séduisante et pleine de tension. Car les états d’âme du militaire surgissent dans une réalité qui semble simplifiée, géométrique, comme les maisons du lotissement où il vit avec sa famille.

La superbe mise en scène d’Andrew Niccol donne toute sa complexité au personnage. Filmé à plusieurs reprises avec un crucifix derrière lui, accroché au mur de la chambre à coucher, il est désigné comme un croyant possible. En tout cas, un homme honnête qui veut rester fidèle à sa femme — alors que tout le pousse vers une charmante collègue — et à son idée du bien. Les autres pilotes de drones, après avoir fait feu, s’exclament « Good kill ! » (« en plein dans le mille ! »). Pour lui, cette logique entre le « good » et le « kill » soulève des interrogations morales. Nobles, assurément, mais qui, dans ce monde explosif et martial, passent par la violence. La guerre, c’est ça. — Frédéric Strauss

Contre

La guerre moderne qui transforme les soldats en snipers de jeux vidéo : un sujet en or pour le réalisateur de Bienvenue à Gattaca et Lord of war. Hélas, Andrew Niccol accumule les archétypes : l’ancien pilote, partagé entre le devoir et la cul­pabilité, sa collègue féminine qui verse une larme en gros plan en appuyant sur le bouton de la mort, le ­supérieur galonné qui débite des discours lourdement explicatifs… Dans American Sniper, Clint Eastwood filmait un homme formé à obéir et à tuer sans chercher à définir ce qu’est un « bon » ou un « mauvais » soldat. Andrew Niccol, lui, s’arroge ce droit et plonge dans la complaisance. Pendant tout le film, il prépare le terrain, il montre plusieurs fois, sur l’écran de contrôle, un salaud, un violeur, la pire des ordures. Enfin une cible que le sniper pourra dégommer sans remords — depuis son scénario du Truman Show, il n’a qu’une obsession : l’homme qui se prend pour Dieu. Mais à aucun moment, ici, il ne condamne le geste de ce soldat qui, à force d’exercer le droit de vie et de mort à distance, se change en justicier. Le film réquisitoire contre la sale guerre devient, dès lors, un thriller qui crée le malaise et met en rage. — Guillemette Odicino

Frédéric Strauss;Guillemette Odicino

Ethan Hawke et Andrew Niccol
« Good Kill », une drone de guerre
Ethan et Andrew posent pour Paris Match. © Patrick Fouque
Le 23 avril 2015 | Mise à jour le 23 avril 2015
Christine Haas

Dans «Good Kill», tuer à distance provoque des dégâts qui n’ont rien de virtuel…

«Good Kill ! » est la phrase glaçante que prononce le pilote de drone en atteignant sa cible quelque part en Afghanistan, à 11 000 kilomètres de la base militaire de Las Vegas où il « combat » douze heures par jour, installé dans un compartiment climatisé. Semblable à l’œil de Dieu, sa caméra voit tout lorsqu’elle descend du ciel : la femme qui se fait violer par un taliban sans qu’il puisse intervenir, les marines dont il assure la sécurité durant leur sommeil, mais aussi l’enfant qui surgit à vélo là où il vient d’envoyer son missile…

Face à cette inconfortable vérité, l’armée américaine n’a pas soutenu le projet du subversif Andrew Niccol, qui avait déjà agacé avec sa leçon de géopolitique dans « Lord of War ». Pour son scénario, le cinéaste s’est nourri des conseils d’anciens pilotes de drone. « Je voulais montrer que plus on progresse technologiquement, plus on régresse humainement, explique-t-il. Derrière sa télécommande, le pilote n’entend rien, ne sent pas le sol trembler, ne respire pas l’odeur de brûlé… Il fait exploser des pixels sans jamais être dans le concret de la chair et du sang. »

Dans cet univers orwellien où toutes sortes d’euphémismes – « neutraliser », « incapaciter », « effacer » – sont utilisés pour éviter de prononcer le mot « tuer », le décalage entre la réalité et le virtuel prend encore plus de sens quand on apprend que les très jeunes pilotes de drone sont repérés dans les arcades de jeux vidéo. D’autres, comme l’ancien pilote de chasse interprété par Ethan Hawke, culpabilisent d’être si loin du danger. « Il combat les talibans tout l’après-midi, explique l’acteur, puis il rentre chez lui, passe la soirée en famille et, le lendemain matin, retourne faire la guerre. Sa psychose traumatique s’accentue lorsqu’il se demande si l’Amérique ne suscite pas plus le terrorisme qu’elle ne l’éradique. C’est la triste possibilité d’une guerre sans fin qui semble se dessiner… »

«Good Kill», en salle actuellement.

Voir encore:

« Good Kill », les drones noyés sous le pathos
Andrew Niccol fait mine de s’attaquer aux questions posées par la suprématie technologique de l’armée américaine, mais déçoit avec un film caricatural.
La Croix
21/4/15

GOOD KILL

d’Andrew Niccol Film américain, 1 h 42

Présenté lors de la dernière Mostra de Venise, au mois de septembre 2014, Good Kill avait, sur le papier, de quoi retenir l’attention. D’abord pour son thème – l’utilisation massive de drones par l’armée américaine –, encore très peu exploité par le cinéma hollywoodien.

Ensuite pour la personnalité de son réalisateur, Andrew Niccol, scénariste de The Truman Show à ses débuts, à qui l’on doit un film d’anticipation très réussi, Bienvenue à Gattaca (1998), mais aussi Simone (2002), Lord of War (2005), Les Ames Vagabondes (2013)…

Autant de longs-métrages qui, s’ils ne révèlent pas à toute force la personnalité d’un auteur, proposent de réfléchir par-delà le simple divertissement. Dans le cas présent, il faut hélas déchanter.

Voici donc l’histoire du commandant Tommy Egan (Ethan Hawke), pilote de chasse de l’armée de l’air américaine, affecté au guidage de drones en attendant de retrouver une affectation digne de son rang. Depuis sa base située dans les environs de Las Vegas, avec des horaires de fonctionnaire, il traque les Talibans afghans à l’aide de ces aéronefs sans équipage, concentrés de technologies censés permettre des « frappes chirurgicales ».

Supportant mal de délivrer la mort sans être lui-même engagé physiquement, Tommy Egan vit des heures d’autant plus difficiles que les services secrets américains s’immiscent souvent dans son travail, désignant des cibles sans donner de raisons et faisant peu de cas des éventuels dommages collatéraux.

Le questionnement moral du soldat se trouve décuplé par la toute-puissance et l’omniscience dont il semble jouir derrière ses manettes. Son malaise, son impuissance à agir, l’incitent à se transformer en justicier solitaire, en dépit de sa hiérarchie et des procédures d’encadrement existantes.

Un scénario caricatural

Good Kill ne fait pas longtemps illusion : si le sujet autorisait une réflexion intéressante sur la guerre technologique, ses risques et limites, le scénario se charge de la caricaturer et de l’étouffer sous une épaisse couche de pathos.

Le pilote de drone cache ses bouteilles de vodka et, incapable de s’extraire de ses obsessions, voit son couple et sa famille se déliter sous ses yeux. Sempiternelle rengaine. Hollywood, dont on connaît la capacité à s’emparer du réel, donne ici plutôt l’impression de faire du vieux avec du neuf. La portée critique du film s’en trouve considérablement réduite.

Voir enfin:

«Charlie Hebdo»: un chef d’al-Qaïda tué par un drone au Yémen
RFI
07-05-2015

Nasser bin Ali al-Ansi avait revendiqué l’attentat de «Charlie Hebdo» en janvier 2015. AFP PHOTO / HANDOUT / SITE Intelligence Group
Un haut responsable d’al-Qaïda dans la péninsule arabique (Aqpa) a été tué par un tir de drone américain au Yémen. L’information est donnée par l’organisation elle-même, selon le centre américain de surveillance des sites islamistes. Nasser al-Ansi est connu pour avoir revendiqué l’attaque contre Charlie Hebdo, le 7 janvier dernier en France.

Nasser al-Ansi, stratège militaire du réseau extrémiste, était apparu dans plusieurs vidéos d’Aqpa. C’est lui qui, le 14 janvier, affirmait que son groupe avait mené, par l’intermédiaire des frères Kouachi, la tuerie de Charlie Hebdo une semaine plus tôt, pour « venger » Mahomet, caricaturé par le journal satirique français. L’homme est aussi connu pour ses discours faisant l’apologie des attaques en Europe et aux Etats-Unis. Il avait rendu Barack Obama responsable de la mort de deux otages occidentaux que son groupe détenait, lors d’une tentative de libération.

La mort d’Ansi a été annoncée par un responsable d’Aqpa, Abou al-Miqdad al-Kindi dans une vidéo diffusée sur Twitter, selon SITE. Le centre américain de surveillance des sites islamistes précise que « selon des informations de presse, Ansi a été tué par un raid de drone à Moukalla, une ville du gouvernorat du Hadramout au Yémen, en avril avec son fils et six autres combattants ». Le Pentagone, comme à l’habitude, n’a pas souhaité commenter ces informations.

Selon une biographie fournie en novembre 2014 par Aqpa, Nasser ben Ali al-Ansi est né en octobre 1975 à Taëz, au Yémen. Il a participé au « jihad » en Bosnie en 1995, avant de retourner au Yémen puis de se rendre au Cachemire et en Afghanistan. Il avait rencontré Oussama ben Laden qui l’avait chargé de questions administratives, avant de participer à davantage de camps d’entraînement où il avait excellé. Il a été emprisonné six mois au Yémen puis avait rejoint Aqpa en 2011.

Sa mort, pour laquelle Washington offrait une récompense de cinq millions de dollars, est un coup réel porté à l’organisation, qui a profité de la guerre civile au Yémen pour reprendre des positions. Cela signifie aussi que le Pentagone a continué de recevoir des informations en provenance de ce pays malgré la crise, et le retrait de ses marines.


Impression express: Le futur était déjà là et nous ne le savions pas ! (Any title printed while you wait: France belatedly discovers print on demand)

29 avril, 2015
https://img.washingtonpost.com/rw/2010-2019/WashingtonPost/2014/11/21/BookWorld/Images/Severed_9780871404541.jpg?uuid=lod5jnGbEeSJP4a9OQozQA
https://i0.wp.com/217.218.67.233/photo/20150101/3bcaf604-a97c-4d42-b0cb-249d7a722872.jpg
https://i0.wp.com/www.catholic.org/files/images/ins_news/2014082919.jpg
https://i2.wp.com/cdn-parismatch.ladmedia.fr/var/news/storage/images/paris-match/actu/sciences/ce-savant-promet-une-greffe-de-tete-dans-deux-ans-679022/6815894-1-fre-FR/Ce-savant-promet-une-greffe-de-tete-dans-deux-ans_article_landscape_pm_v8.jpg
https://i0.wp.com/www.rocklandtimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/ISIS-ISIL-crucifixions-in-Iraq.jpeghttps://i0.wp.com/www.21cm.com/images/assistedReproductiveBanners.jpg
https://i2.wp.com/news.bbcimg.co.uk/media/images/81270000/jpg/_81270288_81270287.jpg
https://i2.wp.com/www.davidbordwell.net/blog/wp-content/uploads/Extraordinary-Voyage-1.jpg
https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/4f/b9/eb/4fb9eb6888aa49eddb8d8ab1c1f6324e.jpg
L-Espresso-Book-machine-exposee-Salon-livre-Paris-mars-2015_0_730_450Le futur est déjà là – il est juste encore inégalement réparti. William Gibson
J’ai senti que j’essayais de décrire un présent impensable, mais en réalité je sens que le meilleur usage que l’on puisse faire de la science-fiction aujourd’hui est d’explorer la réalité contemporaine au lieu d’essayer de prédire l’avenir… La meilleure chose à faire avec la science aujourd’hui, c’est de l’utiliser pour explorer le présent. La Terre est la planète alien d’aujourd’hui. William Gibson
Toute technologie émergente échappe spontanément à tout contrôle et ses répercussions sont imprévisibles. William Gibson
What we call technology in our science is almost always emergent technology. … They don’t mean the technology we’ve had for 50 years, which has already changed us more than we’re capable of knowing. When I say technology, I’m sort of thinking of the whole anthill we’ve been heaping up since we came out of the caves, really. So we’re living on top of a quite randomly constructed heap of technologies that were once new, and that now we don’t even think of as technology. People think technology is something we bring home in a box from some kind of future shop.(…) When I watch my work sort of travel down the timeline of the real future, I just see it acquiring that beautiful, absolutely standard patina of wacky quaintness that any imaginary future will always acquire. That’s where your flying car and your food pills all live — and all the other stuff they promised our parents. (…) I’ve been writing stuff set in the 21st century since 1981. Now that I’ve actually arrived into the 21st century the hard way, the real 21st century is so much wackier and more perverse than anything I’ve been able to make up. I wake up in the morning, look at the newsfeed on my computer and away I go. William Gibson
L’Etat islamique n’est pas le premier groupe jihadiste coupeur de têtes. Son ancêtre, Al-Qaïda en Irak, a décapité de nombreux otages dans les années 2000, tout comme le Groupe islamique armé (GIA) algérien dans les années 1990. Outre l’objectif d’inspirer la terreur par un acte barbare, la décapitation a des motivations historiques et religieuses. Comme l’expliquait Jeune Afrique en 2004, elle fait partie de l’histoire de l’islam, avec notamment plusieurs intellectuels décapités au Xe siècle. On trouve également sa trace dans deux sourates du Coran (8, verset 12 et 47, verset 4) où il est conseillé de frapper ses adversaires au cou. Francetvinfo
Le CRC a en outre dénoncé les nombreux cas d’enfants, notamment appartenant à des minorités, auxquels l’Etat islamique a fait subir des violences sexuelles et d’autres tortures ou qu’il a purement et simplement assassinés. Le CRC rapporte « plusieurs cas d’exécutions de masse de garçons, ainsi que des décapitations, des crucifixions et des ensevelissements d’enfants vivants ». Les enfants de minorités ont été capturés dans nombre d’endroits, vendus sur des marchés avec sur eux des étiquettes portant des prix, ils ont été vendus comme esclaves », poursuit le rapport du CRC. (…) Le comité a toutefois souligné que certaines violations des droits des enfants ne pouvaient être attribuées aux seuls djihadistes. De précédents rapports relevaient ainsi que des mineurs étaient obligés d’être de faction à des postes de contrôle tenus par les forces gouvernementales ou que des enfants étaient emprisonnés dans des conditions difficiles à la suite d’accusations de terrorisme, et dénonçaient également des mariages forcés de fillettes de 11 ans. Une loi permettant aux violeurs d’éviter toute poursuite judiciaire à condition de se marier avec leurs victimes s’est particulièrement attirée les foudres du CRC, qui a rejeté l’argument des autorités de Bagdad selon lesquelles c’était « le seul moyen de protéger la victime des représailles de sa famille ». Le Nouvel Observateur
Il pourrait être un savant fou. Mais Sergio Canavero est neurochirurgien à l’université de Turin, spécialiste de la stimulation cérébrale. Son projet est pourtant incroyable : transplanter la tête d’un homme sur le corps d’un autre !  « Une folie qui permettrait aux tétraplégiques de marcher, dit-il, et aux cerveaux les plus brillants de ne jamais  disparaître… » Paris Match
Je pratiquerai une découpe de la moelle épinière particulièrement nette, à l’aide de lames beaucoup plus tranchantes et précises que celles utilisées auparavant. Ensuite, pour que le sujet greffé puisse retrouver toutes ses facultés motrices, nous appliquerons du PEG-chitosane sur les extrémités de la moelle, restaurant ainsi 30 % à 60 % des fibres. C’est suffisant pour la motricité.(…) Des personnes souffrant de graves dysfonctionnements neuromusculaires ou des malades au stade initial d’Alzheimer. Cette opération leur serait utile car il semble que les tissus neufs du corps peuvent avoir un effet rajeunissant sur ceux de la tête par le simple biais de la circulation sanguine. (…) Il me faut deux ans pour coordonner une équipe d’environ 100 à 150 chirurgiens, anesthésiologistes, techniciens et infirmières. J’évalue une transplantation de tête à 10 millions d’euros. Une somme considérable que gagnent chaque année certains footballeurs… (…) Mes recherches pourraient sauver des personnes. Et notre expérience ouvre la possibilité de la vie éternelle. La vraie question éthique serait plutôt : à qui donner accès à cette vie éternelle ? Que se passerait-il si un vieux milliardaire réclamait un nouveau corps ? Les médecins se serviraient-ils dans les prisons, comme c’est déjà le cas pour certains organes ? Des questions qu’il vaut mieux poser dès à présent. (…) Nombreux sont les neurologues qui pensent, comme moi, que le cerveau n’est qu’un filtre, que la conscience est ­générée ailleurs. Des transferts de souvenirs ont été observés à l’occasion d’une greffe de cœur ! Sergio Canavero
Techniquement, c’est faisable. Mis à part le rétablissement de la continuité de la moelle épinière sectionnée. Mais éthiquement, ce projet me paraît difficile. On est dans le même domaine que pour la greffe du visage. Ce n’est pas une transplantation d’un rein ou du pancréas. On touche ici à des choses qui définissent la personne humaine. (…) Le questionnement éthique doit venir avant la démarche technique. Au moins aller de pair. La science qui avance sans éthique relève du fascisme. (…) Je n’y ai pas réfléchi profondément mais cela pousse la science très loin. A force de se prendre pour Dieu, on finit par créer des monstres. Je ne pense pas que l’on soit censé vivre indéfiniment. C’est mon point de vue d’homme. Sur le plan médical, c’est probablement faisable. Avec le bémol de la repousse de la moelle, l’hypothèse de Canavero, encore jamais prouvée sur l’homme, ne sera pas possible avant 20-30 ans. Dr Sorin Aldea (Neurochirurgien, hôpital Foch, Suresnes)
On a commencé avec la déconstruction du langage et on finit avec la déconstruction de l’être humain dans le laboratoire. (…) Elle est proposée par les mêmes qui d’un côté veulent prolonger la vie indéfiniment et nous disent de l’autre que le monde est surpeuplé. René Girard
La pointe d’un obus plantée dans l’œil de la Lune. Il aura suffi de cette image pour faire du Voyage dans la Lune le film muet le plus célèbre de l’histoire du cinéma. (…) cet œil rendu borgne par des spationautes conquérants est inscrit dans le patrimoine collectif. Les quatorze minutes de ce qui en son temps (1902) a été le plus long film jamais réalisé jusque-là, resurgissent aujourd’hui, dans une version coloriée qu’on croyait perdue à jamais. Ce retour, visible désormais en DVD, tient du miracle. Il est en partie le fruit d’aléas qui ont révélé l’existence de la bobine, et le résultat de l’acharnement d’une poignée de passionnés têtus, qui ont travaillé pendant de longues années pour réanimer une œuvre moribonde. (…) « Il faut penser qu’à cette même époque il fallait entre 15 et 20 minutes pour saisir avec précision chaque image. Le Voyage dans la Lune en compte 13 795. A ce rythme, il nous aurait fallu dix ans pour venir à bout de la restauration.» Alors, en attendant des temps plus propices et des moyens appropriés, l’opération est mise en jachère. Elle est définitivement relancée en 2010, sept ans plus tard. De nouveaux ­logiciels ont fait leur apparition entre-temps. Les ingénieurs en audiovisuel peuvent donc se pencher sur le cas Méliès. (…) En 2011, le nouveau Voyage dans la Lune est enfin prêt. (…) L’ultime étape de la restauration, celle décisive, a entraîné des coûts que Serge Bromberg chiffre à environ 500 000 euros. «Il faut encore ajouter tout le travail en aval, réalisé depuis 1999. Il n’a comporté aucun échange d’argent. Tout a été fait à l’énergie, dans un élan passionné. Mais on peut estimer le budget de l’opération à 1 million d’euros. » Le Temps
Il devient possible de rematérialiser tout ce qui est dématérialisé sur Internet, comme votre mur Facebook qu’on pourra imprimer en dos carré collé ! Hubert Pédurand
Cette machine compacte, de 2 m2 d’empreinte au sol, réalise les mêmes opérations qu’une imprimerie classique. Elle imprime le corpus de pages, façonne et colle la couverture. Pour produire un livre de 200 pages, il faut compter environ cinq minutes. (…) Une application sur smartphone permettra de choisir un livre dans un catalogue. Il sera imprimé à proximité (grâce à la géolocalisation) et sera livré à domicile ou retiré chez le libraire de son choix.  (…) On vend un livre avant de l’imprimer alors qu’actuellement, on imprime un livre en espérant qu’il soit vendu. Chaque année en France, 118 millions d’exemplaires partent au pilon. (…)  Il y a 70 000 à 80 000 nouvelles éditions par an. Les libraires ne peuvent pas tout avoir en stock. Par ailleurs, 20 % des livres réalisent 80 % du chiffre d’affaires. Les autres manquent de visibilité. Hubert Pédurant (consultant à l’UNIC)
C’est une grande opportunité pour tous. J’ai été surpris par la qualité de l’accueil. Certaines personnes préféraient avoir le livre imprimé devant eux plutôt que déjà publié pour pouvoir le personnaliser, par exemple. Frédéric Mériot (PUF)
Tout le monde est très excité par rapport à cette technologie. Certaines personnes qui ont essayé sans succès les circuits de publication traditionnels viennent ici pour imprimer eux-mêmes leurs ouvrages. Ils sont heureux d’avoir pu trouver le moyen de faire entendre leur voix. Margaret Harrang (employée de McNally Jackson)
Le coût conséquent de la machine, 80 000 euros, ne permettra pas à toutes les librairies d’en faire l’acquisition, mais Frédéric Mériot assure que ce ne sera pas nécessaire. Les librairies pourraient louer la machine et reverser un pourcentage des ventes. Une autre solution, compte tenu de la taille imposante de l’Expresso Book Machine, serait la mise en place d’un réseau permettant aux libraires d’être livrés en quelques heures sans avoir à accueillir la machine dans leurs locaux. L’Orient le jour

Le futur était déjà là et nous ne le savions pas !

Impression à la demande, personnalisabilisation à l’unté ou en très petites séries , encombrement réduit (2 m2 d’empreinte au sol), quasi-suppression des dépenses de transport et de stockage, fin du gaspillage, livraison quasi-instantanée (5 minutes contre 48 h pour Amazon), accès direct au consommateur, remise sur le marché d’ouvrages épuisés depuis parfois des dizaines d’années, rentabilisation de milliers de titres jusque-là voués au pilon (30 000 chaque année), retour du client dans les librairies, revanche du papier sur le numérique, rematérialisation du livre numérique,  « YouTube des écrivains », possibilité de très petites séries, livres à compte d’auteur, réduction du bilan carbone …

En ce monde étrange …

Où cohabitent, entre crucifixions et procréation médicalement assistée, coupeurs et greffeurs de tête …

Et où l’on peut dépenser un million d’euros et douze ans de travail pour restaurer 14 minutes de film …

Pendant qu’à quelques heures d’avion de là on détruit en quelques minutes des trésors archéologiques de plusieurs milliers d’années …

Comment ne pas repenser à ce « futur inégalement réparti » du visionnaire auteur américain de cyberfiction William Gibson ?

Et s’étonner encore de ce correspondant américain de France 2 hier soir …

Qui nous faisant découvrir une machine qui équipe depuis dix ans une trentaine d’universités ou librairies américaines  …

Mais qui est présentée chez nous depuis autant d’années comme l’avenir de l’impression …

Ne prendre même pas la peine de rappeler qu’il en existe quand même une demi-douzaine en France …

Comme une centaine entre Canada, Australie, Japon, Grande-Bretagne, Pays-Bas, Chine, Abu Dhabi ou Egypte …

Et que celle-ci avait il y  a quelques semaines à peine fait les honneurs du Salon du livre ?

L’impression express, un avant-goût du livre du futur
L’impression express donnera-t-elle naissance à la librairie de demain ? On choisit un livre numérique sur un ordinateur qui vous propose des milliers de références, on appuie ensuite sur une touche et on obtient en cinq minutes le livre fraîchement imprimé.
Frédérique Schneider

La Croix
1/4/15

 « C’est une grande opportunité pour tous », s’enthousiasme Frédéric Mériot, directeur général des Presses Universitaires de France (PUF), devant la machine transparente qui imprime des pages à toute vitesse. Les PUF et un autre éditeur, La Martinière, ont présenté deux modèles différents de l’« Espresso Book Machine » au dernier salon du livre de Paris.

Et le résultat est étonnant, l’exemplaire imprimé étant quasiment identique à un ouvrage issu d’une imprimerie traditionnelle. Il sera commercialisé au prix unique du livre.

Venue des États-Unis
Aux États-Unis, l’Espresso Book Machine est déjà utilisé dans certaines universités et librairies, comme la McNally Jackson dans le sud de Manhattan, à New York.

La machine présentée par les PUF a été créée par l’entreprise américaine Xérox il y a dix ans et est exploitée en France par Irénéo, programme de recherche sur le livre imprimé à la demande soutenu par l’Idep (Institut de développement et d’expertise plurimedia) et l’Unic (Union nationale des industries de l’impression et de la communication).

Pour Hubert Pédurand, du bureau d’études de l’Unic, « ce nouvel outil rend disponible l’indisponible tout en proposant aux éditeurs d’aller sur des marchés où ils ne sont pas. Cette machine peut être installée dans les librairies mais aussi dans les médiathèques ou les universités ».

Le modèle de La Martinière, plus petit, a été en revanche mis au point par le japonais Ricoh ; il est exploité par la société française Orséry.

Une machine chère et imposante
L’Espresso Book Machine permet de réduire considérablement les dépenses liées au transport et au stockage des ouvrages, mais son coût d’acquisition (100 000 €) semble difficile à supporter pour les libraires. « Ireneo pourra exploiter ses brevets et produire des machines en France espère Hubert Pédurand, ce qui réduira le prix par deux. Restera à trouver un mode de financement permettant aux libraires de s’équiper. Je produis ce que je vais vendre et pas l’inverse, c’est un nouvel écosystème à imaginer. »

 « Nous leur proposons de les louer pour 250 € par mois », fait valoir le président d’Orséry, Christian Vié. « Ils encaisseraient en retour 33 % du prix de vente du livre », une marge légèrement supérieure à celle des livres imprimés traditionnellement, ajoute-t-il.

Autre obstacle : la taille de la machine. Si l’objet a de l’allure, un bloc en verre contenant une mini-imprimerie, il reste assez imposant, environ 1,5 mètre de haut sur 2 mètres de large.

Pour ceux qui trouveront ces appareils trop chers ou trop encombrants, les PUF pensent que la solution pourrait passer par la mise en place d’un réseau permettant aux libraires d’être livrés en quelques heures sans avoir l’ « Espresso Book Machine » dans leurs locaux.

Lutter contre Amazon
Des milliers de titres dont la demande est trop basse pour qu’ils soient rentables ne sont plus imprimés avec le modèle traditionnel. Aux PUF par exemple 300 titres disparaissent du marché par « attrition » naturelle. Cette évolution pourrait être ralentie par l’impression à la demande.

De plus, aujourd’hui, un client qui ne trouve pas un livre dans les librairies se tourne vers Amazon. « Ireneo peut alors faire en cinq minutes ce que Amazon propose en 48 heures. Une façon rapide de concrétiser l’acte d’achat et de ramener des gens dans les librairies », explique Hubert Peduran.

Mais au-delà de l’intérêt des lecteurs et des libraires, le succès de cette machine dépendra aussi de l’accueil que lui réserveront les maisons d’édition. Car le plus important c’est bien le catalogue et le nombre de fichiers PDF disponibles. « Plus on aura de maisons d’édition, plus les librairies seront intéressées », confirme Christian Vié.

La revanche du papier sur le numérique
Le numérique a été vécu comme une menace par l’industrie du livre, mais il offre aujourd’hui un grand volant d’opportunité aux auteurs et aux éditeurs. Comme l’explique Hubert Pédurand « avec l’impression à la demande, un livre produit est un livre vendu. L’incertitude n’existe plus. N’oublions pas que 30 000 titres sont pilonnés chaque année en France ! »

 « Nous assistons sans doute, précise Hubert Pédurand, à la revanche du papier sur le numérique. » L’ambition de ce projet est en effet de « rematérialiser » ce qui a été dématérialisé (e-book) et de « créer un service qui serait le YouTube des écrivains »…

Société – 2min 01s – Le 21 mars à 13h20

Découvrez « L’Expresso Book Machine », un nouveau procédé d’imprimerie, qui va être présenté lors du Salon du Livre. Cette machine est capable de fabriquer un livre en moins de 5 minutes, et à la demande grâce à Internet. Il en existe 15 dans le monde, dont 6 en France. Elle pourrait révolutionner le petit monde du papier et surtout éviter le gaspillage.

Voir aussi:

Economie
La mini-imprimerie qui fabrique des livres en un clic ouvre une page à Lille
Valérie Sauvage

La Voix du nord

26/01/2015

À peine 150 exemplaires dans le monde dont six en France et une à Lille. L’Espresso Book Machine est une véritable imprimerie miniature, capable de fabriquer un livre de 200 pages en cinq minutes. Elle vient d’arriver à Lille, à l’Amigraf, le centre de formation des imprimeurs, pour une phase de test.

Sur le papier, c’est mieux qu’un joujou, un bijou technologique. L’Espresso Book Machine est capable de produire un livre aussi simplement que d’autres un café. Une centaine d’exemplaires sont à l’œuvre dans le monde. Six en France dont un à Lille, à la faveur du programme expérimental Ireneo, porté par l’IDEP (institut de développement et d’expertise plurimédia) et l’UNIC (Union nationale de l’imprimerie et de la communication).

Comment ça fonctionne ? Hubert Pédurant, consultant à l’UNIC, explique. « Cette machine compacte, de 2 m2 d’empreinte au sol, réalise les mêmes opérations qu’une imprimerie classique. Elle imprime le corpus de pages, façonne et colle la couverture. Pour produire un livre de 200 pages, il faut compter environ cinq minutes. »

DES MILLIONS AU PILON

L’Espresso Book Machine, fabriquée par une société américaine, trouve son sens dans l’impression de volumes à l’unité (entièrement personnalisables) ou de petites séries. Une thèse, un récit auto-édité, un livre-photos (en couleur), des documents professionnels… Ou un ouvrage épuisé. « Une application sur smartphone permettra de choisir un livre dans un catalogue. Il sera imprimé à proximité (grâce à la géolocalisation) et sera livré à domicile ou retiré chez le libraire de son choix. » Changement d’habitude : « On vend un livre avant de l’imprimer alors qu’actuellement, on imprime un livre en espérant qu’il soit vendu. Chaque année en France, 118 millions d’exemplaires partent au pilon. »

La phase actuelle d’essais (en cours depuis un an à Paris et qui démarre à Lille) doit permettre aux éditeurs, aux imprimeurs, aux libraires et aux autres d’imaginer les possibles utilisations de la machine. Elle doit aussi permettre de réaliser des tests techniques. « Il y a 70 000 à 80 000 nouvelles éditions par an. Les libraires ne peuvent pas tout avoir en stock. Par ailleurs, 20 % des livres réalisent 80 % du chiffre d’affaires. Les autres manquent de visibilité. » L’Espresso Book Machine tiendra-t-elle ses promesses? La suite dans un prochain chapitre.

L’agence Idées-3 Com fait parler le papier
TOURCOING. Le papier et le Web ne sont plus face à face. Ils sont main dans la main. C’est le principe de l’Espresso Book Machine, un outil qui permet de fabriquer un véritable livre choisi sur une application smartphone. C’est aussi l’intime conviction de l’agence de communication Idées-3 Com installée à la Plaine Images, à Tourcoing. À l’origine spécialiste de la modélisation en trois dimensions, l’entreprise mise aujourd’hui beaucoup sur le « print connecté ».

Concrètement, de quoi s’agit-il ? « Nous enrichissons tout ce qui est document imprimé, explique Sabrina Chazerault, ingénieur d’affaires chez Idées-3 Com. Par exemple, il suffit de flasher l’image d’un vêtement sur une page de catalogue pour le mettre dans son panier d’achats. On peut aussi imaginer flasher une affiche de film devant un cinéma pour avoir accès à la bande-annonce ou une vitrine de restaurant pour enregistrer son numéro de téléphone directement le numéro dans ses contacts. » La technologie utilisée par Idées-3 Com est celle de la reconnaissance d’images. « On peut aussi penser à une boîte de médicaments pour avoir accès à la posologie ou à un tableau dans un musée pour accéder à davantage d’informations. »

L’imprimé en porte d’entrée

L’exploration des possibilités est en cours. Elles sont multiples. « L’imprimé devient la porte d’entrée de l’enseigne. Il y a une vraie demande actuellement. L’idée, c’est de réduire les processus décisionnels d’achat et de booster les ventes. » Au-delà, l’utilisation de telles applications permet d’accéder à une foule de statistiques utiles. « D’un côté, les produits peuvent être poussés vers le client en fonction de ses goûts. De l’autre, l’enseigne va pouvoir gérer ses stocks de manière plus fine. » Le papier tourne une nouvelle page. Le livre n’est pas refermé.

Voir également:

Le livre express débarque à Lille

Correspondant à Lille Olivier Ducuing

Les Echos

28/01/2015

Le centre lillois Amigraf teste une machine capable d’imprimer un livre standard en moins de cinq minutes directement chez le libraire.

Après l’imprimante 3D, l’Espresso Book Machine pourrait bien lui aussi révolutionner l’univers de l’édition. Le centre de formation professionnelle Amigraf, à Lille, vient de s’équiper de cette machine innovante, en mode « fab lab ». La fabrication n’est qu’expérimentale à ce stade. L’équipement est de taille très modeste par rapport aux outils industriels classiques de l’imprimerie puisqu’il ne nécessite que 2 mètres carrés. Ce qui n’empêche pas des performances impressionnantes : un clic permet de lancer l’impression d’un livre de 200 pages en un temps record de 4,8 minutes.

L’Espresso Book Machine fonctionne comme une plateforme d’interconnexion en mode « cloud to paper ». Une fois l’ordre donné, il va imprimer des opus de 40 à 800 pages, dans des formats de 10 × 8 à 20 × 27 cm, sous couverture quadri.

L’imprimante couple un moteur d’impression numérique à encre laser au robot proprement dit, qui représente « un concentré des métiers de l’imprimerie avec une chaîne de finition du livre ».

L’expérience baptisée « Irénéo » est financée par l’Institut de développement et d’expertise du plurimédia (Idep) mise en oeuvre par la fédération professionnelle des imprimeurs, l’Unic. Six machines sont désormais implantées en France, 100 dans le monde.

Le YouTube des écrivains

L’expérimentation vise à acclimater les professionnels avec ce nouvel outil qui pourrait redistribuer les rôles dans le monde de l’édition. Les libraires pourraient ainsi devenir imprimeurs avec ce terminal d’impression, très adapté pour les très petites séries, les livres à compte d’auteur. « Nous avons un seul objectif, favoriser le livre, sans rien imposer aux éditeurs, nous voulons composer avec eux », défend Hubert Pédurand, chargé du programme Irénéo pour l’Idec. Avec une vraie création de valeur : en supprimant la logistique – et un bilan carbone sans égal – et le stock, ce modèle du « print on demand » (PoD) démultiplie les capacités de réponse des professionnels grâce à une profondeur de catalogue inédite.

Le système pourrait apporter une cure de jouvence au monde des libraires et de l’édition. Il devient désormais possible d’imprimer en un temps record un livre épuisé publié il y a trente ans ou n’importe quelle référence à l’unité. La chaîne américaine Book-A-Million l’a installé l’an dernier dans ses magasins, dans deux villes Portland et Birmingham.

Mais les ambitions vont au-delà, avec un retour surprenant du monde virtuel vers le monde physique. « Il devient possible de rematérialiser tout ce qui est dématérialisé sur Internet, comme votre mur Facebook qu’on pourra imprimer en dos carré collé ! L’expérience est regardée de très près par les Américains », relève Hubert Pédurand, qui voit dans ce nouveau service « le YouTube des écrivains ».

L’expérience lilloise doit acculturer les professionnels régionaux, tandis qu’un test marchand sera réalisé sur le prochain Salon du livre à Paris. Et l’Idep envisage déjà de lever des fonds pour créer une société transversale pour piloter le développement de cette nouvelle offre.

High-Tech & Médias Vendredi 20 Mars 2015
Pourquoi les PUF mise sur l’impression à la demande
Alexandre Counis / Chef de service

Les Echos

20/03/15

La maison d’édition espère pouvoir réimprimer ses titres sur le point de s’arrêter ou déjà épuisés.

Aux Presses Universitaires de France (PUF), on mise beaucoup sur l’impression à la demande, chez ses imprimeurs ou en librairie. «  Pour nous, cela peut avoir deux intérêts, explique le directeur général Frédéric Mériot. D’abord, nous permettre de continuer à imprimer les titres de notre catalogue que nous sommes sur le point d’arrêter : ceux dont les stocks s’épuisent et pour lesquels la demande tombe en dessous de la centaine d’exemplaires vendus par an ». Chaque année, les PUF doivent stopper l’impression de 250 à 300 titres sur les 4.000 titres actifs du catalogue. Avec l’impression à la demande, ils pourraient continuer à se vendre au même prix – le modèle économique n’est viable que pour les livres en noir et blanc.

«  Ensuite, nous pourrions ressuciter les vieux titres déjà épuisés, ajoute Frédéric Mériot. Chez nous, ces titres représentent environ 25.000 titres au total. Une partie d’entre eux, sur lesquels nous avons encore les droits, pourraient être remis en vente ». D’anciens « Que-Sais-je ? », par exemple, sont encore très recherchés par certains lecteurs.

Combien de titres pourraient être concernés ? Difficile à dire à ce stade. Quelques centaines pourraient être de nouveau disponibles la première année, puis peut-être 1.500 titres de plus par an au fil de la montée en puissance du dispositif. «  Une chose est sûre : nous serons prêts pour démarrer d’ici à l’été », promet Frédéric Mériot. Pour chacun, les ventes pourraient se limiter à 15 ou 20 exemplaires par an. Qu’importe, puisque les coûts seraient entièrement variables, et la marge fixée une fois pour toutes. L’idée est de vendre ces livres à un prix raisonnable, alors que les prix du marché peuvent monter, pour certains ouvrages, jusqu’à plusieurs centaines d’euros.
Petits avec un grand fonds

«  Nous sommes une petite maison avec un très grand fonds, rappelle le dirigeant de la vénérable maison d’édition, fondée en 1921 et récemment reprise par Scor. Au final, cela peut avoir un impact significatif sur notre activité, et sur notre croissance ». C’est dans ce cadre que les PUF s’intéressent de très près à l’Espresso Book Machine, qui permet de pratiquer l’impression à la demande chez les libraires. «  C’est le même intérêt que l’impression à la demande que nous pratiquons chez l’imprimeur, avec deux avantages en plus : l’abolition des coûts de transport, puisque le livre est imprimé au plus près du client. Et la possibilité pour les libraires de proposer d’autres services à leurs clients, d’auto-édition ou encore d’impression de données publiques, par exemple ». Reste pour eux à accepter d’installer dans leur boutique une machine qui occupe, au sol, 6 à 8 m2 si l’on veut pouvoir tourner autour…

Voir également:

Face à Amazon, l’arme de l’impression à la demande
Sandrine Cassini

Les Echos

20/03/15

Sur stand PUF La Martinière Salon livre, l’Espresso Book Machine, capable d’imprimer livre minutes. Son format relativement modeste permettrait s’inviter librairies. Elle pourrait rebattre donne… Le hic ? Son prix.

Sur le stand des PUF et de La Martinière au Salon du livre, l’Espresso Book Machine, capable d’imprimer un livre en moins de cinq minutes. Son format relativement modeste lui permettrait de s’inviter dans la plupart des librairies. Elle pourrait rebattre la donne… Le hic ? Son prix. – Photo DR

Le géant américain s’est lancé dans l’impression de livres à la demande.
La filière bâtit sa riposte autour des librairies.

A l’heure où le Salon du livre ouvre ses portes à Paris, l’ombre d’Amazon continue de planer sur l’ensemble de la filière. Les libraires ne sont plus le seul maillon de la chaîne menacée par l’ogre de l’e-commerce. Editeurs et imprimeurs sont eux aussi en première ligne. Avec une nouvelle arme : l’impression à la demande. Amazon a pris un temps d’avance en lançant CreateSpace, un service d’auto-édition et d’impression à la demande disponible aux Etats-Unis depuis 2006 et en Europe depuis 2012. « Amazon, c’est le mal à combattre. Il s’assoit sur la convention collective et sur tous les accords. On peut le faire si l’on avance avec un front uni », explique Hubert Pédurand, au bureau d’études de l’Union nationale de l’imprimerie et de la communication (Unic). Il est en charge d’Ireneo, un projet de recherche sur l’impression à la demande qui pourrait donner des arguments à une filière pesant, en France, quelque 3.700 imprimeurs et 36.000 emplois. En parallèle, longtemps confinée, l’auto-édition prend aussi plus d’ampleur. « Edilivre, qui regroupe 10.000 auteurs, représente aujourd’hui le plus gros déposant légal », précise Hubert Pédurand.

Trouver un financement

Chaque année, les ventes de livres baissent lentement mais sûrement, tandis que le nombre d’ouvrages, lui, ne cesse de croître. Pour limiter les risques et les stocks, les éditeurs réduisent donc les tirages moyens. « Le chiffre diminue de 5 à 6 % par an. Il est descendu sous les 7.000 exemplaires par livre », indique Guillaume Arnal, le responsable marketing de Jouve, une société d’impression numérique.

Pour battre Amazon, dont le succès repose sur une livraison très rapide, un catalogue très profond et des prix défiant toute concurrence, les représentants de la filière misent sur l’impression à la demande. L’idée : installer chez les libraires des imprimantes, capables de produire des ouvrages en quelques minutes, en fonction des besoins. Une solution qui éliminerait à la fois pour le libraire et l’éditeur les problèmes de stocks, de coût de fabrication, et de coût de livraison.

Financé par des syndicats d’imprimeurs, Ireneo a conclu un accord avec les inventeurs américains de l’Espresso Book Machine. Celle-ci imprime des ouvrages à la demande « en 4,8 minutes », dit Hubert Pédurant. Elle est déjà installée aux Etats-Unis, notamment à la New York University. L’Espresso Book Machine trône d’ailleurs au Salon du livre sur les stands de PUF et de La Martinière. Ireneo pourra exploiter ses brevets et « produire des machines en France », espère Hubert Pédurand. Restera ensuite à trouver un mode de financement permettant aux libraires de s’équiper de ce nouvel outil, d’une valeur de 100.000 dollars. « Ce n’est pas à eux à faire la dépense. Mais il faut voir comment on peut faire tous ensemble. Pourquoi ne pas créer un GIE ? » s’interroge Hubert Pédurand.

En attendant d’atteindre le Graal du zéro stock, l’impression numérique sur de faibles tirages continue de se développer. « Editis nous a choisis pour des tirages inférieurs à 10 exemplaires. Cela leur a permis de faire revivre des titres jusque-là indisponibles », indique Guillaume Arnal, de Jouve. La société, qui travaille aussi avec des sites d’auto-édition comme Lulu.com ou Bookelis, produit 1,5 million de livres par an, un volume qui connaît une croissance à deux chiffres. De son côté, le premier éditeur français, Hachette Livre, a pris dès 2010 le taureau par les cornes en créant avec le distributeur américain Ingram une plate-forme d’impression à la demande installée dans son entrepôt de Maurepas. En concurrence directe avec les imprimeurs.

Voir encore:

Culture
Qui a envie d’une « Espresso Book Machine » ?

Imaginez si, d’un simple toucher du doigt, vous pouvez imprimer un livre en seulement quelques minutes, avec un résultat quasiment identique à celui d’une imprimerie traditionnelle.
Wilson Fache

L’Orient le jour
21/04/2015

C’est là l’objectif des développeurs de l’Espresso Book Machine, une invention qui pourrait révolutionner le monde de l’édition : permettre d’imprimer et de personnaliser des livres en temps réel, par exemple parce qu’ils ne sont plus publiés.
« C’est une grande opportunité pour tous », estimait Frédéric Mériot, directeur général des Presses universitaires de France (PUF), lors de la présentation d’un modèle dernière génération de la machine au Salon du livre de Paris en mars dernier. « J’ai été surpris par la qualité de l’accueil, explique M. Mériot à L’Orient-Le Jour. Certaines personnes préféraient avoir le livre imprimé devant eux plutôt que déjà publié pour pouvoir le personnaliser, par exemple. »

Aux États-Unis, l’Expresso Book Machine est déjà présente dans quelques universités et librairies, comme la McNally Jackson à New York. Dans cette enseigne chic du sud de Manhattan, la machine a conquis les clients depuis quatre ans déjà. « Tout le monde est très excité par rapport à cette technologie », estime Margaret Harrang, une employé de McNally Jackson. Dans cette librairie où quarante à soixante livres sont imprimés chaque jour, les clients sont non seulement des lecteurs avides de trouver des livres rares, mais aussi des écrivains. « Certaines personnes qui ont essayé sans succès les circuits de publication traditionnels viennent ici pour imprimer eux-mêmes leurs ouvrages. Ils sont heureux d’avoir pu trouver le moyen de faire entendre leur voix », explique Mme Harrang.

« Un livre numérique en papier »
Le coût conséquent de la machine, 80 000 euros, ne permettra pas à toutes les librairies d’en faire l’acquisition, mais Frédéric Mériot assure que ce ne sera pas nécessaire. Les librairies pourraient louer la machine et reverser un pourcentage des ventes. Une autre solution, compte tenu de la taille imposante de l’Expresso Book Machine, serait la mise en place d’un réseau permettant aux libraires d’être livrés en quelques heures sans avoir à accueillir la machine dans leurs locaux.

Michel Choueiri, l’un des administrateurs de l’Association internationale des libraires francophones (AILF) et qui dirige la librairie el-Bourj, située dans le centre de Beyrouth, tempère, lui, les prouesses attribuées à la machine, estimant qu’il n’existe « pas assez de titres disponibles pour justifier un tel investissement ».
Le succès de cette invention dépendra en effet de l’accueil que lui réserveront les maisons d’édition, partenaires indispensables en charge de fournir un catalogue à l’imprimante. « La solution qu’ils proposent se doit d’être complète. Ils proposent cette machine, mais pour imprimer quoi ? », se demande M. Choueiri, pour qui l’Expresso Book Machine n’est viable que si elle permet d’imprimer autre chose que de la presse universitaire et des auteurs qui n’ont pas trouvé d’éditeurs. « Pour l’instant, c’est de la science-fiction », assène-t-il.

Selon Frédéric Mériot, l’argument phare pour convaincre les éditeurs est l’opportunité de publier des livres dont la demande est trop basse pour qu’ils soient rentables avec le modèle d’impression traditionnel. « C’est un outil fantastique de pérennité du livre dans le temps, assure-t-il. À l’édition des Presses universitaires de France, tous les ans, nous avons entre 300 et 400 livres que nous ne publions plus. Avec cette machine, ils pourraient à nouveau être disponibles. »

Jusqu’ici, acheter un ouvrage qui n’est plus édité n’était possible que grâce aux livres numériques. « En fait, ce sont des livres numériques imprimés », constate M. Mériot. « Imaginez si le livre papier avait été inventé après le livre numérique, tout le monde aurait trouvé l’invention géniale : ça se conserve indéfiniment et ça ne doit pas être constamment rechargé. C’est la revanche du papier sur le numérique », analyse M. Mériot.

Voir par ailleurs:

Georges Méliès ou la face retrouvée de la Lune
Magie de la technologie mariée à l’amour du cinéma. Les quatorze minutes de ce qui en son temps (1902) a été le plus long film jamais réalisé jusque-là, resurgissent aujourd’hui, dans une version coloriée qu’on croyait perdue à jamais

Rocco Zacheo

Le Temps

11 février 2012

La pointe d’un obus plantée dans l’œil de la Lune. Il aura suffi de cette image pour faire du Voyage dans la Lune le film muet le plus célèbre de l’histoire du cinéma. On peut ne pas être aux faits de l’œuvre pionnière de son réalisateur, Georges Méliès. On peut aussi avoir laissé filer Hugo Cabret de Martin Scorsese, qui rend un hommage poétique à son ancêtre. Soit. Mais cet œil rendu borgne par des spationautes conquérants est inscrit dans le patrimoine collectif. Les quatorze minutes de ce qui en son temps (1902) a été le plus long film jamais réalisé jusque-là, resurgissent aujourd’hui, dans une version coloriée qu’on croyait perdue à jamais. Ce retour, visible désormais en DVD, tient du miracle. Il est en partie le fruit d’aléas qui ont révélé l’existence de la bobine, et le résultat de l’acharnement d’une poignée de passionnés têtus, qui ont travaillé pendant de longues années pour réanimer une œuvre moribonde.

Car ce voyage en couleurs, dont on ne connaît aucune autre copie, a failli s’achever très mal. Jusqu’en 1993, on le croyait même perdu. Il y a dix-huit ans, donc, le film refait surface grâce à un conservateur de la Cinémathèque de Barcelone (Cineteca de Catalunya), où l’œuvre venait d’être déposée. Le donateur du film demeure introuvable. Il s’avérera plus tard qu’il est décédé. L’institution espagnole, elle, se rend vite à l’évidence: l’état pitoyable de la bobine ne permet aucune intervention de sauvetage. La restauration paraît impossible. L’histoire aurait pu s’arrêter là, dans une impasse infranchissable, si la Cineteca n’avait pas proposé un échange à Lobster Films, société française qui collecte, restaure et diffuse des films perdus. Un vieux film catalan détenu par les Français contre le bijou abîmé de Georges Méliès: voilà les termes du marchandage. L’accord est vite trouvé, Méliès retourne en France en 1999.

Serge Bromberg est un des artisans de l’échange. Avec Eric Lange, il partage une passion pour le cinéma des origines, au point d’en avoir fait son métier en fondant Lobster Films. Quand il n’est pas accaparé par la direction artistique du Festival international du film d’animation d’Annecy, il scrute, soigne et diffuse des œuvres d’un autre temps. Son investissement pour sauver Le Voyage dans la Lune est, de son propre aveu, un grand fait d’armes dont il tire fierté.

Son chemin a été long. Pendant trois ans, il a soumis la bobine retrouvée à un traitement chimique très agressif, qui a permis de la décoller petits bouts par petits bouts. «Il faut savoir que pendant les soixante premières années du cinéma, un âge qu’on qualifie de «ciné-nitrate», les pellicules avaient deux caractéristiques ennuyeuses, explique le collectionneur. Elles étaient tout d’abord hautement inflammables. Des films comme Inglourious Basterds de Quentin Tarantino ou Cinema Paradiso de Giuseppe Tornatore ont fait de cette dangereuse propriété un filon narratif. L’autre problème vient de l’instabilité chimique des pellicules. En règle générale, il suffit de quelques dizaines d’années pour que les pellicules se détériorent et se transforment en une sorte de pâte colleuse.»

Le processus de délitement est connu. Mais son action inéluctable est plus ou moins agressive selon la qualité des bobines et l’état de leur conservation. La plupart des œuvres des frères ­Lumière, par exemple, celles réalisées entre 1895 et 1900, résistent au temps. Par contre, le négatif original des Enfants du paradis, tourné en 1945 par Marcel Carné, est presque entièrement décomposé aujourd’hui. Et Le Voyage dans la Lune? Il a réservé une surprise de taille. «Ce qui, en regardant les bords de la bobine, semblait être une copie totalement perdue, était à notre grand étonnement en bon état pour un peu plus que 90%», s’exclame Serge Bromberg.

La véritable restauration demeure pourtant une chimère. En 2002, Lobster Films doit se contenter de photographier, image après image, tout le négatif du film. La société pérennise ainsi un support voué à l’autodestruction lente, mais elle ne dispose pas d’outils technologiques pour recomposer en temps raisonnable la totalité de l’œuvre. Serge Bromberg: «Début 2003, nous avions réuni les pièces d’un grand puzzle. Il faut penser qu’à cette même époque il fallait entre 15 et 20 minutes pour saisir avec précision chaque image. Le Voyage dans la Lune en compte 13 795. A ce rythme, il nous aurait fallu dix ans pour venir à bout de la restauration.» Alors, en attendant des temps plus propices et des moyens appropriés, l’opération est mise en jachère. Elle est définitivement relancée en 2010, sept ans plus tard. De nouveaux ­logiciels ont fait leur apparition entre-temps. Les ingénieurs en audiovisuel peuvent donc se pencher sur le cas Méliès.

Une équipe de cinq spécialistes s’attelle dès lors à la réanimation du film. Des laboratoires en France et aux Etats-Unis recomposent les morceaux du puzzle. Les parties trop abîmées sont remplacées par le noir et blanc, qui sera à son tour colorié. Deux institutions actives dans la conservation du patrimoine (la Fondation Groupama Gan pour le cinéma et la Fondation Technicolor) rejoignent la troupe en apportant un soutien crucial dans la promotion et le financement de la restauration. Il y a enfin le groupe Air pour apporter son savoir-faire musical. Le duo versaillais est choisi pour imaginer une bande originale du film*.

En 2011, le nouveau Voyage dans la Lune est enfin prêt. Son retour est triomphal: 150 ans après sa naissance, Méliès part à la conquête du Festival du film de Cannes, en ouvrant la manifestation. Une parenthèse rétro qui a marqué Serge Bromberg, présent à la projection: «Les équipes de Cannes et le ministre de la Culture Frédéric Mitterrand ont voulu affirmer très fort l’aura du 7e art en France, l’importance de son histoire. La projection du Voyage rappelle un fait important: il n’y a pas de vieux films et des nouveaux. Il n’y a que deux sortes de films: les bons et les autres.»

L’ultime étape de la restauration, celle décisive, a entraîné des coûts que Serge Bromberg chiffre à environ 500 000 euros. «Il faut encore ajouter tout le travail en aval, réalisé depuis 1999. Il n’a comporté aucun échange d’argent. Tout a été fait à l’énergie, dans un élan passionné. Mais on peut estimer le budget de l’opération à 1 million d’euros.»

Avec Hugo Cabret de Scorsese, le Voyage dans la Lune a donné à Georges Méliès une nouvelle jeunesse. Son 150e anniversaire est une aubaine pour le collectionneur Serge Bromberg: «Le film de Scorsese, dans son ambition artistique et dans sa volonté de ­toucher un public large, a fait découvrir Méliès à une quantité innombrable de gens. De notre côté, nous avons réalisé un rêve: après avoir touché aux œuvres de Chaplin, d’Henri-Georges Clouzot et d’autres grands artistes, nous pouvons partager avec des cinéphiles du monde entier le premier chef-d’œuvre du cinéma de science-fiction.»

«Le Voyage dans la Lune» bio d’un film

1er septembre 1902 Le film de Georges Méliès sort en salles. Sa trame s’inspire de Jules Vernes (De la Terre à la Lune) et de H. G. Wells (Les Premiers Hommes dans la Lune). Il est projeté partout dans le monde et connaît un succès retentissant.

1993 Une copie coloriée du film est déposée par un anonyme à la Cinémathèque de Barcelone.

1999-2002 Première phase de la restauration de la bobine: décollement de la pellicule et saisie des images.

2010-2011 Seconde phase de la restauration. Composition de la BO par Air.

Mai 2011 «Le Voyage dans la Lune» ouvre le 47e Festival du film de Cannes.

Les liens
«Méliès anticipe la pop des années 1960»
Vidéo. Un extrait du film restauré sur YouTube

Voir de même:

Sergio Canavero
Ce savant promet une greffe de tête dans deux ans
Sur cette image réalisée pour notre sujet, le neurologue a préféré ne pas divulguer certains de ses instruments « secrets », ne dévoilant ici qu’un conducteur servant à modifier les champs électriques du cerveau.
Sophie de Bellemanière

Paris match

27 février 2015

Il pourrait être un savant fou. Mais Sergio Canavero est neurochirurgien à l’université de Turin, spécialiste de la stimulation cérébrale. Son projet est pourtant incroyable : transplanter la tête d’un homme sur le corps d’un autre !  « Une folie qui permettrait aux tétraplégiques de marcher, dit-il, et aux cerveaux les plus brillants de ne jamais  disparaître… »

Paris Match. Comment allez-vous greffer une tête ­humaine sur un corps sain sans que ce dernier soit ­paralysé ou décède ?
Sergio Canavero. Je pratiquerai une découpe de la moelle épinière particulièrement nette, à l’aide de lames beaucoup plus tranchantes et précises que celles utilisées auparavant. Ensuite, pour que le sujet greffé puisse retrouver toutes ses facultés motrices, nous appliquerons du PEG-chitosane sur les extrémités de la moelle, restaurant ainsi 30 % à 60 % des fibres. C’est suffisant pour la motricité.

Quels seraient les candidats ?
Des personnes souffrant de graves dysfonctionnements neuromusculaires ou des malades au stade initial d’Alzheimer. Cette opération leur serait utile car il semble que les tissus neufs du corps peuvent avoir un effet rajeunissant sur ceux de la tête par le simple biais de la circulation sanguine.

Quand appliquerez-vous la technique sur des humains ?
Il me faut deux ans pour coordonner une équipe d’environ 100 à 150 chirurgiens, anesthésiologistes, techniciens et infirmières. J’évalue une transplantation de tête à 10 millions d’euros. Une somme considérable que gagnent chaque année certains footballeurs…

Votre initiative est très critiquée. Que répondez-vous à vos détracteurs ?
Mes recherches pourraient sauver des personnes. Et notre expérience ouvre la possibilité de la vie éternelle. La vraie question éthique serait plutôt : à qui donner accès à cette vie éternelle ? Que se passerait-il si un vieux milliardaire réclamait un nouveau corps ? Les médecins se serviraient-ils dans les prisons, comme c’est déjà le cas pour certains organes ? Des questions qu’il vaut mieux poser dès à présent.

La conscience suivra-t-elle la tête pour s’installer dans le nouveau corps ?
Nombreux sont les neurologues qui pensent, comme moi, que le cerveau n’est qu’un filtre, que la conscience est ­générée ailleurs. Des transferts de souvenirs ont été observés à l’occasion d’une greffe de cœur !

Interview Sophie de Bellemanière

L’opération en 4 étapes
1-Deux équipes travaillent en parallèle sur un receveur tétraplégique et un donneur en état de mort cérébrale. La première refroidit la tête du receveur à 15 degrés (hypothermie), ralentissant le métabolisme du cerveau pour qu’il ne subisse pas de dégâts durant la période où il ne sera pas irrigué.

2-On dégage les muscles et les vaisseaux sanguins du cou, la trachée et l’œsophage. La thyroïde est conservée. Puis c’est l’incision simultanée des moelles épinières à l’aide d’une lame ultrafine.

3-La tête du receveur est transférée sur  le corps du donneur et, immédiatement, les axones de la moelle épinière (10 % seulement sur des milliers mais suffisamment pour retrouver une motricité, affirme Canavero) sont reconnectés, grâce au mélange PEG-chitosane, ainsi que toutes les parties sectionnées. Un traitement immunosuppresseur est mis en place.

4-Un nouvel homme est né. S’il survit et souhaite avoir des enfants, sa descendance sera en réalité celle du donneur mort…

Dès le début du XXe siècle, les savants avaient l’idée… en tête
1908
Le professeur américain Charles Guthrie juxtapose la tête d’un chiot à celle d’un chien adulte. Les deux « animaux » partagent le même corps pendant huit jours.

1954
Le professeur soviétique  Vladimir Demikhov transplante plusieurs têtes de chien. Une seule survit 29 jours.

1970
Le neurochirurgien américain  Robert J. White réalise l’opération avec des singes. Pendant  une semaine, la tête « vit » mais le singe est tétraplégique.

Interview du Dr Sorin Aldea
Neurochirurgien à l’hôpital Foch de Suresnes« Techniquement, c’est faisable, mais éthiquement, ce projet me paraît difficile. »
Que pensez-vous de l’idée du Dr Sergio Canavero ?
Dr Sorin Aldea. Techniquement, c’est faisable. Mis à part le rétablissement de la continuité de la moelle épinière sectionnée. Mais éthiquement, ce projet me paraît difficile. On est dans le même domaine que pour la greffe du visage. Ce n’est pas une transplantation d’un rein ou du pancréas. On touche ici à des choses qui définissent la personne humaine.

Les questions éthiques et scientifiques sont-elles indissociables ?
Le questionnement éthique doit venir avant la démarche technique. Au moins aller de pair. La science qui avance sans éthique relève du fascisme.

Donc, vous êtes contre ce projet ?
Je n’y ai pas réfléchi profondément mais cela pousse la science très loin. A force de se prendre pour Dieu, on finit par créer des monstres. Je ne pense pas que l’on soit censé vivre indéfiniment. C’est mon point de vue d’homme. Sur le plan médical, c’est probablement faisable. Avec le bémol de la repousse de la moelle, l’hypothèse de Canavero, encore
jamais prouvée sur l’homme, ne sera pas possible avant 20-30 ans.
Interview Romain Clergeat

Voir de enfin:

Pourquoi les jihadistes de l’Etat islamique coupent-ils la tête de leurs adversaires ?
A plusieurs reprises, les combattants de l’EI ont exhibé les têtes de soldats syriens et irakiens. Quelles motivations se cachent derrière une telle barbarie ?
Thomas Baïetto

Francetvinfo

14/08/2014

Plantées sur les pics d’une clôture, les têtes de soldats syriens sont exhibées en plein centre-ville. Des badauds, téléphones portables à la main, immortalisent cette macabre exposition, pendant qu’un autre se bouche le nez. La scène, filmée par une équipe de Vice News et mise en ligne le 7 août, se passe à Racca (Syrie), capitale de l’Etat islamique (EI). Une photo, peut-être prise au même endroit, montre un jeune enfant brandissant la tête d’un soldat syrien.

Ces images témoignent une énième fois des atrocités commises par ce groupe qui contrôle une partie de la Syrie et de l’Irak. Ils ne sont bien sûr pas les premiers à couper des têtes. De la Rome antique à la guerre civile algérienne, en passant par la Révolution française ou le Japon de la deuxième guerre mondiale, le vainqueur a souvent coupé la tête du vaincu. Mais ce procédé reste la marque d’une barbarie d’autant plus glaçante qu’elle est ici volontairement exposée et médiatisée.

Pourquoi les jihadistes y ont-ils recours ? Quelles sont les motivations de ces mises en scène ? Francetv info a posé la question à des spécialistes du mouvement jihadiste.

Pour terroriser l’ennemi et les populations
Depuis le début de leur offensive en Irak, les combattants de l’Etat islamique « ne font pas de prisonniers », constate Alain Rodier, directeur de recherche au Centre français de recherche sur le renseignement, contacté par francetv info. Mais le souci d’éviter une gestion « coûteuse et compliquée » des prisonniers n’explique pas les décapitations : les victimes sont en effet essentiellement exécutées par balles. La décapitation, parfois post mortem, toujours mise en scène (exhibitions, vidéos sur internet), obéit à un autre objectif : gagner la bataille psychologique.

« Ces décapitations sèment la terreur chez l’ennemi et le poussent à s’enfuir sans combattre, analyse Antoine Basbous, fondateur de l’Observatoire des pays arabes, un cabinet de conseil. Cela permet de compenser le manque d’hommes dans les rangs de l’Etat islamique. C’est ‘moins de forces, plus d’effets’. » Cette terreur, combinée à la désorganisation de l’armée irakienne, explique le succès de l’EI. « Cette arme fonctionne très bien en Irak : avant leur arrivée, on entend parler d’eux », abonde Hasni Abidi, directeur du Centre d’études et de recherche sur le monde arabe et méditerranéen.

Cette arme n’est pas seulement destinée aux ennemis de l’extérieur. Elle permet de soumettre à l’Etat islamique les populations des zones qu’il contrôle. En Syrie, dans la région de Deir Ezzor, l’EI a exposé début août les têtes de trois membres d’une tribu rivale dans le village d’Al-Jurdi, rapporte l’Observatoire syrien des droits de l’homme (en anglais). « Quand vous êtes un villageois et que vous voyez ça, vous vous dites : ‘je serai peut-être le suivant si je ne me soumets pas' », résume Antoine Basbous.

Pour écraser la concurrence
Cette violence permet à l’EI d’affirmer sa suprématie sur les autres groupes jihadistes qui pullulent en Syrie. « C’est une carte de visite dans la compétition entre les mouvements radicaux. Celui qui est le plus brutal est probablement celui qui a la plus grande force d’attraction », estime Hasni Abidi. « Il y a une surenchère dans l’horreur, constate Myriam Benraad, spécialiste de l’Irak au Centre d’études et de recherches internationales (Ceri). Ils procèdent à des actes barbares pour s’imposer comme le groupe jihadiste le plus dur. »

Rester sur la première marche du podium facilite en effet le recrutement de combattants pour l’Etat islamique. Le groupe, qui s’appelait auparavant l’Etat islamique en Irak et au Levant (EIIL), est l’un des rares à accueillir à bras ouverts les combattants venus du monde entier. La plupart des Français partis combattre en Syrie, comme Mounir, Tewffik, Nicolas et Jean-Daniel, l’ont d’ailleurs fait sous la bannière de l’EIIL.

Parce qu’ils interprètent le Coran « à leur sauce »
L’Etat islamique n’est pas le premier groupe jihadiste coupeur de têtes. Son ancêtre, Al-Qaïda en Irak, a décapité de nombreux otages dans les années 2000, tout comme le Groupe islamique armé (GIA) algérien dans les années 1990. Outre l’objectif d’inspirer la terreur par un acte barbare, la décapitation a des motivations historiques et religieuses. Comme l’expliquait Jeune Afrique en 2004, elle fait partie de l’histoire de l’islam, avec notamment plusieurs intellectuels décapités au Xe siècle. On trouve également sa trace dans deux sourates du Coran (8, verset 12 et 47, verset 4) où il est conseillé de frapper ses adversaires au cou.

Ces éléments permettent aux jihadistes de justifier leur barbarie par la religion. « Chacun interprète les écrits à sa sauce. Il y a ceux qui vont sortir du Coran les versets qui appellent à la tolérance religieuse, d’autres vont au contraire mettre en avant les versets belliqueux qui appellent à contraindre les non-croyants », explique Antoine Basbous. « Le contexte du début de l’islam, caractérisé par des conquêtes, n’est pas le même, rappelle Myriam Benraad. Il y a une dérive dans l’interprétation de ces textes pour justifier tout et n’importe quoi. »

Voir enfin:

L’Etat islamique crucifie des enfants et en fait des esclaves sexuels
L’ Obs
05-02-2015
Selon un rapport de l’ONU, le groupe djihadiste s’enfonce dans l’horreur en tuant « un grand nombre » d’enfants de minorités, y compris des handicapés.

Des membres du groupe djihadiste Etat islamique (EI) vendent des enfants irakiens comme esclaves sexuels et en tuent d’autres en les crucifiant ou en les enterrant vivants, a dénoncé l’ONU, mercredi 4 février.

Le Comité des droits de l’enfant des Nations unies (CRC), affirme dans un rapport que l’Etat islamique recrute « un grand nombre d’enfants » en Irak, y compris handicapés, pour en faire des combattants et des kamikazes, jouer le rôle d’informateurs, en faire des boucliers humains pour protéger des installations des bombardements, mais aussi pour leur faire subir des sévices sexuels et d’autres tortures.

Nous sommes vraiment très préoccupés par la torture et le meurtre de ces enfants, en particulier ceux qui appartiennent à des minorités, mais pas seulement », a déclaré Renate Winter, l’un des 18 experts indépendants membres du CRC. Des enfants appartenant à la communauté Yazidi ou à la communauté chrétienne font partie des victimes.
« Nous avons des informations selon lesquelles des enfants, en particulier des enfants déficients mentaux, sont utilisés comme kamikazes, très probablement sans qu’ils s’en rendent compte », a-elle dit. « Une vidéo diffusée [sur internet] montre de très jeunes enfants, d’environ huit ans et moins, qui sont entraînés pour devenir des enfants soldats. »

« C’est un énorme problème », a asséné Renate Winter. Le comité a exhorté Bagdad à explicitement criminaliser le recrutement d’une personne de moins de 18 ans dans les conflits armés.

« Des décapitations et des crucifixions »
Le CRC a en outre dénoncé les nombreux cas d’enfants, notamment appartenant à des minorités, auxquels l’Etat islamique a fait subir des violences sexuelles et d’autres tortures ou qu’il a purement et simplement assassinés. Le CRC rapporte « plusieurs cas d’exécutions de masse de garçons, ainsi que des décapitations, des crucifixions et des ensevelissements d’enfants vivants ».

Les enfants de minorités ont été capturés dans nombre d’endroits, vendus sur des marchés avec sur eux des étiquettes portant des prix, ils ont été vendus comme esclaves », poursuit le rapport du CRC.
Les dix-huit experts demandent aux autorités irakiennes de prendre toutes les mesures nécessaires pour protéger les enfants qui vivent sous le joug de Deach et de poursuivre en justice les auteurs de ces crimes.

Mais, bien que le gouvernement irakien soit tenu pour responsable de la protection de ses administrés, Renate Winter a reconnu qu’il était actuellement difficile de poursuivre les membres des « groupes armés non étatiques » pour de tels actes.

Le comité a toutefois souligné que certaines violations des droits des enfants ne pouvaient être attribuées aux seuls djihadistes. De précédents rapports relevaient ainsi que des mineurs étaient obligés d’être de faction à des postes de contrôle tenus par les forces gouvernementales ou que des enfants étaient emprisonnés dans des conditions difficiles à la suite d’accusations de terrorisme, et dénonçaient également des mariages forcés de fillettes de 11 ans.

Une loi permettant aux violeurs d’éviter toute poursuite judiciaire à condition de se marier avec leurs victimes s’est particulièrement attirée les foudres du CRC, qui a rejeté l’argument des autorités de Bagdad selon lesquelles c’était « le seul moyen de protéger la victime des représailles de sa famille ».

(Avec AFP et Reuters)


Photoshop/25e: Et si la photographie, ça servait d’abord à faire la guerre ? (From fautography to faux-thenticity: is photography the continuation of war by other means ?)

25 février, 2015

https://i0.wp.com/www.diagonalthoughts.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/coyote.jpghttps://i1.wp.com/www.lagunabeachbikini.com/wordpress/wp-content/images/magazine-covers/FauxtographyJan1995.jpghttps://jcdurbant.files.wordpress.com/2015/02/2752c-10895350_916943658336082_1555813154_n.jpg?w=450&h=450https://i2.wp.com/dd508hmafkqws.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/styles/article_node_view/public/bey_3.jpg

Whatever the other consequences of the kinetic war between Israel and Hezbollah in the summer of 2006, it gave rise to a neologism now commonplace in the blogosphere. In the blog lexicon, fauxtography refers to visual images, especially news photographs, which convey a questionable (or outright false) sense of the events they seem to depict. Apart from the clever word play evident in the term, it is shorthand for a serious criticism of photojournalism products, both the images and the associated text. Since accuracy is a cardinal tenet of journalistic ethics, clearly stated in the ethics code of the Society of Professional Journalists and other professional associations of journalists, the accusation that news products convey a false or distorted impression of news events is potent. Critical questions about the factual accuracy of news reports predated this blogstorm. So, too, did specific questions about the trustworthiness of photojournalism from hotspots in the Middle East. It may well be that the emergence of a concise but powerful term for the central issue in it fostered the development of the blogstorm, apart from the intensity of the kinetic war itself as a contributing factor. While some participants in the fauxtography blogstorm did, indeed, make accusations of media bias—an accusation implicitly echoed in a column by a prominent journalism professor and a paper by a fellow at Harvard’s Shorenstein Center—we will need here to distinguish between the long-running debate about media bias, in general, and the more concrete and specific blogstorm criticism that particular news products generated during the war were fauxtography rather than trustworthy photojournalism. The blogstorm this chapter describes centered on photojournalism during the 2006 Lebanon War; unlike some other blogstorms, however, the foundational issue underlying it predated this war and the central issue argued in it persisted after the event which initiated the blogstorm had concluded. The fauxtography blogstorm is perhaps one of the most complex to have yet occurred. It may help clarify the argumentation in this blogstorm to distinguish two levels: arguments about the reporting of a particular incident in the war, and arguments about journalistic practices in covering the war. The two are intertwined, in that arguments about reporting of specific incidents often led over time to broader, more general criticism of the mainstream news media practices. Stephen D. Cooper (Marshall University)
Quand les riches s’habituent à leur richesse, la simple consommation ostentatoire perd de son attrait et les nouveaux riches se métamorphosent en anciens riches. Ils considèrent ce changement comme le summum du raffinement culturel et font de leur mieux pour le rendre aussi visible que la consommation qu’ils pratiquaient auparavant. C’est à ce moment-là qu’ils inventent la non-consommation ostentatoire, qui paraît, en surface, rompre avec l’attitude qu’elle supplante mais qui n’est, au fond, qu’une surenchère mimétique du même processus. Dans notre société la non-consommation ostentatoire est présente dans bien des domaines, dans l’habillement par exemple. Les jeans déchirés, le blouson trop large, le pantalon baggy, le refus de s’apprêter sont des formes de non-consommation ostentatoire. La lecture politiquement correcte de ce phénomène est que les jeunes gens riches se sentent coupables en raison de leur pouvoir d’achat supérieur ; ils désirent, si ce n’est être pauvres, du moins le paraitre. Cette interprétation est trop idéaliste. Le vrai but est une indifférence calculée à l’égard des vêtements, un rejet ostentatoire de l’ostentation. Plus nous sommes riches en fait, moins nous pouvons nous permettre de nous montrer grossièrement matérialistes car nous entrons dans une hiérarchie de jeux compétitifs qui deviennent toujours plus subtils à mesure que l’escalade progresse. A la fin, ce processus peut aboutir à un rejet total de la compétition, ce qui peut être, même si ce n’est pas toujours le cas, la plus intense des compétitions. (…) Ainsi, il existe des rivalités de renoncement plutôt que d’acquisition, de privation plutôt que de jouissance.(…) Dans toute société, la compétition peut assumer des formes paradoxales parce qu’elle peut contaminer les activités qui lui sont en principe les plus étrangères, en particulier le don. Dans le potlatch, comme dans notre société, la course au toujours moins peut se substituer à la course au toujours plus, et signifier en définitive la même chose. René Girard
First we had « Life » as our major magazine; it was about life. Then the major magazine became « People. » Then « People » was replaced by « Us. » Then « Us » was replaced by « Self. » Paul Stookey
‘I spent the first ten years of my career making girls look thinner -and the last ten making them look larger.’ Robin Derrick (Vogue)
Cela n’a rien d’un progrès féministe. Rejet ou acceptation, cette obsession pour la beauté n’apparaît que chez les femmes célèbres, jamais chez les hommes. Elle ne fait que rappeler que l’apparence est au centre de la vie féminine et passe bien avant leur talent. Samantha Moore (Gender Across Borders)
Le hashtag #NoFilter est un filtre comme les autres, un dévoilement artificiel qui participe à la mise en scène de soi sur les réseaux sociaux. Ce sont des poses, des situations, des angles profondément calculés. On peut appeler ça le management de transparence. Heather Corker
Authenticity is the latest marketing buzz word. Consumers today, Millennials in particular, are told by their peers to be real, to be unique, and to live life without the filter. We see # nofilter photos and # nomakeup selfies online. But what does authenticity really mean in today’s socially-networked, digitally-connected world? And how much are consumers actually willing to reveal; how many filters will they let drop? The social space is a place for self creation and curation. The paradox is this: on social networks consumers magnify the activities of their lives and carefully select the truths they will reveal, all in an effort to appear… authentic. (…) The no filter hashtag itself has become a social norm, a controlled conversation of reality. This is consumers pretending they are willing to present a more naked version of themselves than they would in reality. Our social media profiles are only versions of ourselves; it is the self we want the world to believe we are. We exaggerate the content of our lives and lifestyles across social media so that only the good goes public.(…) Our lives on social media are a world of aspirational authenticity, which we want others to believe we’ve already arrived at. Consumers take the roughness of their lives, polish it, paint it and then post it. Brands must be aware of this veil of self for effective communications. Consumers want to pretend that they want to take you, as a brand, at face value, stripped bare. But what they really want is to feel good about themselves and to maintain their image of ascribing to the authentic. The truth is that consumers don’t want to become too exposed on social media. Walls are tearing down due to the digital, but as consumers learn to manage this new world they will start to build walls back up, to manage and create their image. Consumers want you to make them believe you are authentic. The focus is on them. They want to feel they are being properly represented by your brand – that your brand is part of the authentic image they are curating for themselves. While the desire for authentic marketing is not new – the Dove ‘Real Beauty’ campaigns have been around for a while– the desire is now less a ‘feel good’ story and more a rugged desire by consumers to be accurately represented in advertisements and in engagement by the brands they consume. Brands must give consumers the tools to curate their authenticity alongside the brand. Just as consumers do in their profiles, brands must manage their use of the filter, picking the appropriate unfiltered, bare moments to share. But they must also know when to hold back and which moments need a veil. This is about managed transparency as much for brands as for consumers. Faux-thenticity, or managed authenticity, will create new forms of intimacy between brand and consumer, presenting an opportunity for brands to respond to the consumer complaint that ads are a misrepresentation of who we really are. Heather Corker
Corker used # noshittyphotos as an example of consumers stretching their own capabilities to appear better online. The trend was started by two advertising graduates in Miami who were tired of tourists taking bad pictures of famous views. They created a stencil that showed a pair of footprints and the words « place feet, point and click », found the best place to stand to take the perfect pictures of landmarks in New York and San Francisco, and sprayed the instructions on the floor for tourists. The result was that consumers could take exceptional photos and post them as if they had found the right angle themselves. Marketing magazine
We must accept that photography is a post-production medium. It is used for multimedia, a still image might be from a video. We can embed, geotag. We’re dealing with computer data. We’ve handed digital image making all the aura of analog photography and it’s a camouflage. We know digital image making is not photography as it has been in the past; it has been made for other [new] uses. (…) I’ve always spoken in the digital age of “digital image making,” mainly because it is a manipulable medium. (…) When the Gutenberg press came along, everybody recognized the new formats and made use of its products, books and printed materials, but they didn’t see the long-term consequences: nationalism, democracies, entitlements. Some say the web will bring about as much disruption; I go further and say the web will bring about more. I foresee religion, governments, sex, biology, human evolution all changing radically because of the web. To me those things are clear but it’s not easy to describe to others. The leaps of imagination are difficult to envision. We all go at 90mph looking in the rear-view mirror. When I left the New York Times after three-and-a-half years, it was then I realized what journalism was. It is hardest to see the essentials and necessity of change when you’re inside of something. Fred Ritchin
I, too, have been part of the reverse retouching trend. When editing Cosmopolitan magazine, I also faced the dilemma of what to do with models who were, frankly, frighteningly thin. There are people out there who think the solution is simple: if a seriously underweight model turns up for a shoot, she should be sent home. But it isn’t always that easy. A fashion editor will often choose a model for a shoot that’s happening weeks, or even months, later. In the meantime, a hot photographer will have flown in from New York, schedules will be juggled to put him together with a make-up artist, hairdresser, fashion stylist and various assistants, and a hugely expensive location will have been booked. And a selection of tiny, designer sample dresses will be available for one day only. I have taken anguished calls from a fashion editor who has put together this finely orchestrated production, only to find that the model they picked six weeks ago for her luscious curves and gleaming skin, is now an anorexic waif with jutting bones and acne. Or she might pitch up covered in mysterious bruises (many models have a baffling penchant for horrible boyfriends), or smelling of drink and hung over, as many models live on coffee and vodka just to stay slim. And it’s not just models that cause problems. I remember one shoot we did with a singer, a member of a famous girl band, who was clearly in the grip of an eating disorder. Not only was she so frail that even the weeny dresses, designed for catwalk models, had to be pinned to fit her, but her body was covered with the dark downy hair that is the sure-fire giveaway of anorexia. Naturally, thanks to the wonders of digital retouching, not a trace of any of these problems appeared on the pages of the magazine. At the time, when we pored over the raw images, creating the appearance of smooth flesh over protruding ribs, softening the look of collarbones that stuck out like coat hangers, adding curves to flat bottoms and cleavage to pigeon chests, we felt we were doing the right thing. Our magazine was all about sexiness, glamour and curves. We knew our readers would be repelled by these grotesquely skinny women, and we also felt they were bad role models and it would be irresponsible to show them as they really were. But now, I wonder. Because for all our retouching, it was still clear to the reader that these women were very, very thin. But, hey, they still looked great! They had 22-inch waists (those were never made bigger), but they also had breasts and great skin. They had teeny tiny ankles and thin thighs, but they still had luscious hair and full cheeks. Thanks to retouching, our readers – and those of Vogue, and Self, and Healthy magazine – never saw the horrible, hungry downside of skinny. That these underweight girls didn’t look glamorous in the flesh. Their skeletal bodies, dull, thinning hair, spots and dark circles under their eyes were magicked away by technology, leaving only the allure of coltish limbs and Bambi eyes. A vision of perfection that simply didn’t exist. No wonder women yearn to be super-thin when they never see how ugly thin can be. But why do models starve themselves to be a shape that even high fashion magazines don’t want? Vogue’s Shulman believes a big part of the problem is that the designer’s sample sizes – the catwalk prototypes of their designs – have got ever smaller.(…) To fit these clothes, made by men for boyish bodies, the top model agencies only take on the thinnest girls, who tend to be nearly 6ft tall with 24in waists and 33in hips. This is far thinner than the likes of Cindy Crawford ever was (at 5ft 9in, she had a 26in waist). (…) Yet instead of hiring some healthier ones and encouraging them to eat, some agencies continue to send girls to jobs even when they look positively ill. It’s a crazy system, and one that’s bad for all of us. When the ideal woman is emaciated yet smooth-skinned and glowing, more of us will hate our own unretouched bodies which stubbornly refuse to fit into an impossible ideal. Some of us will starve and binge; others will develop eating disorders; others will opt out completely and give up on being healthily fit. All I can say is that I’m sorry for my small part in this madness. It is time it stopped – for all our sakes. Leah Hardy
Alors que la communication d’H&M est pointée du doigt pour avoir collé des visages de top-modèles sur des corps de synthèse, deux scientifiques américains ont inventé l’outil rêvé des amateurs d’ « avant-après ». Un chercheur en informatique, Hany Farid, et son élève doctorant, Eric Kee, de l’université de Darwood, aux États-Unis ont publié le résultat de leurs recherches la semaine dernière dans une revue scientifique américaine.  Le programme qu’ils ont mis au point permet de faire apparaître, sur une échelle de 1 à 5, l’ampleur des retouches subies par une photo. Et cela donne lieu à des comparaisons saisissantes. Envolés, rides, bourrelets et teint brouillé ! Ces chercheurs espèrent que cela poussera les médias et les publicitaires à adopter une attitude autorégulatrice. Le Figaro madame
Pourtant, le naturel serait la meilleure force de séduction. D’après le sondage OpinionWay, l’absence de naturel est rédhibitoire pour 49 % des hommes, suivi du botox (39 %), du lifting (29 %), des implants mammaires (22 %), le manque de formes (16%). Ces chiffres annonceraient-ils le grand retour de la femme bio ? Les phobiques de la retouche utilisent désormais Internet comme contre-média pour insuffler une nouvelle vision de la beauté. Certains internautes tentent d’abord de démythifier le corps retouché, en mettant en ligne les vidéos de transformation des mannequins lors des séances photo pour dire que les tops aussi sont loin de la perfection. Quand le trombinoscope des modèles au naturel pour un défilé Vuitton avait fuité, le monde s’était surpris à découvrir le teint livide et les cernes des égéries. Sans oublier cet article confession de l’ancienne rédactrice de Cosmopolitan, Leah Hardy, qui tirait la sonnette d’alarme en dénonçant l’usage inversé de Photoshop, pour regonfler des mannequins trop maigres. En parallèle, plusieurs initiatives fleurissent sur la Toile pour réhabiliter le corps normal. Lady Gaga, critiquée lors de sa tournée en 2012 pour avoir pris du poids, avait fièrement publié en réponse des photos d’elle en sous-vêtements sur son réseau social. Ses milliers de fans ont suivi le mouvement en postant des clichés d’eux invitant ainsi à ce que chacun assume mieux son apparence. La « Mother Monster » avait alors baptisé l’événement « The Body Revolution » (la révolution du corps, NDLR). Les photographes aussi se mettent à dénoncer la fausseté des corps médiatisés. L’artiste Gracie Hagen avait fait du bruit en publiant une série de photos de corps droits, magnifiés, puis, juste à côté, le même corps à l’état naturel, c’est-à-dire parfois voûtés, voire flasques. Selon la photographe, « l’imagerie des médias est une illusion qui s’appuie sur la lumière, les bons angles et Photoshop. Les gens peuvent sembler extrêmement attirants dans les bonnes conditions et deux secondes après, être transformés en quelque chose de complètement différent ». Son but était alors de montrer que chacun à une forme et une taille particulière. Et que la silhouette « normale » n’existait pas. C’est aussi dans cet esprit que le site My Body Gallery propose de montrer « à quoi les vraies femmes ressemblent ». Près de 25 000 photos des corps de filles volontaires, classées selon leur âge, taille et poids, y sont accessibles. Comme pour se lancer un seau d’eau dans la figure… et déculpabiliser. Une façon de décrocher notre regard des affiches, s’ouvrir à la réalité et voir les « vrais gens ». Redescendre sur terre, en quelque sorte. Madame Figaro

De la fauxtographie à la fauxthenticité, la photographie a-t-elle jamais servi à autre chose qu’à faire la guerre ?

En ce 25e anniversaire du Photoshop des frères Knoll

A l’heure où nos fabricants de vêtements en sont à coller des visages de mannequins sur des corps de synthèse …

Et nos agences de mode, pour cause de trop grande maigreur, à regonfler numériquement les mannequins en question …

Pendant qu’entre nouveau logiciel de fraude photo, label no filter et vraies fausses fuites de clichés de stars non-retouchés, nos magazines de mode nous refont le coup du retour du naturel …

Et que dans l’athlétisme extrême de l’ultra-marathon, une drogue aussi relaxante que la marijuana  peut devenir une nouvelle arme de la compétition elle-même …

Comment ne pas voir …

Derrière ce refus ostentatoire du faux …

Et à l’instar de cette guerre de l’image que sont devenues nos guerres

L’énième avatar de cette rivalité désormais généralisée mise au jour par René Girard

Autrement dit,  pour détourner la fameuse formule clauswitzienne, la continuation de la guerre par d’autres moyens ?

Le naturel, nouvel outil de communication des stars
Alice Pfeiffer

Le Monde

20.02.2015

La cellulite de Cindy Crawford, la peau imparfaite de Beyoncé… Jamais les photos de stars au naturel n’ont tant circulé. Une manière de se rendre accessible à moindres frais.

La presse people n’aura pas chômé cette semaine. Après la diffusion de clichés non retouchés de Cindy Crawford sur le Web, c’est au tour de Beyoncé d’être mise à nu : des images de sa campagne pour L’Oréal la montrent telle qu’elle est avant le passage des gommes et autres filtres de postproduction. Le constat ? Cellulite pour l’une, peau fatiguée et imparfaite pour l’autre. Débat futile ? Certainement. Pourtant, si leurs origines sont encore troubles (réelle fuite ou stratégie de communication ?), les réactions suscitées sont révélatrices d’évolutions sociales. Contrairement à l’acharnement que suscitaient les photos de paparazzi il y a quelques années, ravis de révéler l’acné naissant ou les bras flasques d’une star, cette fois, la blogosphère est en émoi. De toutes parts sur les réseaux sociaux, on les félicite de leur honnêteté, de leur prise de risque et surtout de leur normalité.

Une authencité très calculée
Cindy Crawford et Beyoncé, deux icônes qui ont fait de leur beauté un piller de leur gloire, descendent de leur piédestal pour soudainement s’apparenter, le temps d’un tweet, au commun des mortels. Il semblerait qu’aujourd’hui, les railleries soient plutôt réservées aux présumées victimes du Botox, comme Renée Zellwegger et Uma Thurman, récemment apparues méconnaissables sur les tapis rouges. Aujourd’hui, dans une confrontation entre nature et culture, entre authenticité fructueuse et « botox bashing », ces fuites mettent en lumière un formidable outil de communication : le naturel calculé au millimètre.

Sur Instagram, dans les magazines de mode ou sur le petit écran, les célébrités n’hésitent plus à mettre en avant un corps de femme lambda : Lara Stone pose en sous-vêtements sans retouche après son accouchement dans System Magazine ; Lena Dunham affiche sans complexe ses rondeurs, parties prenantes de son succès. Un terme émerge même aux Etats-Unis : la « in-between model », qui désigne un mannequin proche des mensurations de la femme moyenne (comprendre taille 40), comme Myla Dalbesio, actuelle égérie Calvin Klein Lingerie.

Les tops jouent de cette tendance avec habileté afin de communiquer sur leur ligne, la qualité de leur peau ou encore leur perte de poids, en prenant des « selfies » accompagnés du hashtag #NoFilter. Le tout dans des situations bien précises : au réveil, dans les coulisses des défilés, quelques jours après leur accouchement… Cara Delevingne, presque aussi connue pour ses « selfies » que pour ses campagnes de pub, a fait de son naturel un art.

Cette tendance s’étend aussi aux castings : de nombreuses agences de mannequins et marques de mode, notamment IMG Models et Marc Jacobs, créent des concours via Instagram, encourageant des jeunes filles à poster des photos d’elles-mêmes, de préférence accompagnées d’un #NoFilter, garant du réalisme du cliché.

Selon le Huffington Post américain, ce hashtag agit comme un « contrat social » entre une célébrité et son audience. Ainsi, ce bref sentiment de proximité agit comme une promesse similaire à celle de la téléréalité. Une peau non retouchée rassure le public « sur la transformation subite que pourrait connaître sa vie grâce à un coup de baguette magique (…) au même titre que la dévaluation des célébrités est là pour lui rappeler qu’elles sont humaines, comme lui », analyse le sociologue François Jost, auteur du Culte du Banal (Editions Biblis, 2013).

Le label #NoFilter
Aujourd’hui, la tendance #NoFilter est poussée à l’extrême. Le site Filter Faker propose de dénoncer les tricheurs : on peut télécharger une photo libellée « no filter » et découvrir si un filtre a été utilisé… ou pas. Parallèlement, d’autres plates-formes comme Retrica ou Afterlight proposent des retouches discrètes à appliquer avant publication sur Instagram. Ni vu ni connu.

L’agence Future Foundation, spécialisée dans les tendances de consommation, a déjà renommé cette mode la « faux-thenticity ». « Le hashtag #NoFilter est un filtre comme les autres, un dévoilement artificiel qui participe à la mise en scène de soi sur les réseaux sociaux. Ce sont des poses, des situations, des angles profondément calculés, analyse Heather Corker, l’une des dirigeantes de l’agence. On peut appeler ça le management de transparence. »

Et les magazines ne se privent pas de surfer sur la vague : la publication canadienne Flare, accusée il y a trois ans d’avoir amaigri Jennifer Lawrence via Photoshop, consacre sa prochaine couverture à cinq mannequins, ni retouchés ni maquillés, accompagnés du titre #wokeuplikethis (« #réveilléetellequelle »). Une façon de se racheter auprès d’un lectorat féminin offusqué.

Cependant, pour Samantha Moore, journaliste pour le site féministe Gender Across Borders, cette tendance est loin d’être positive : « Cela n’a rien d’un progrès féministe. Rejet ou acceptation, cette obsession pour la beauté n’apparaît que chez les femmes célèbres, jamais chez les hommes. Elle ne fait que rappeler que l’apparence est au centre de la vie féminine et passe bien avant leur talent. » A quand des photos volées de Bradley Cooper, Leonardo DiCaprio et autres icônes masculines ?

 Voir aussi:

Comment Photoshop nous a brouillées avec notre corps
Lucile Quillet

Madame Figaro

13 juin 2014

Quand toutes les femmes sont parfaites sur les affiches et dans les magazines, comment accepter son corps, forcément imparfait ? Des initiatives viennent secouer avec malice la dictature de ces corps irréels. Ainsi ces milliers de femmes qui ont envoyé leurs photos pour former une galerie de la féminité telle qu’elle est en vrai.

91% des Français ne se reconnaissent pas dans le physique des personnes qui font la une des magazines féminins. Même les 18-24 ans, qui ont le même âge que les mannequins, sont 83% à ne pas s’identifier pas à eux. Parmi les 1003 personnes interrogées par l’étude d’Opinion Way pour Slendertone, 57% trouvent ces corps « trop parfaits », 21% que les visages, dénués de toute expression, sont presque robotiques. Et presque la moitié des sondés (42 %) tranchent encore plus fort : s’ils ne s’identifient pas, c’est tout simplement car les égéries sur papier glacé n’existent pas dans la vraie vie. Frappés d’une extrême lucidité, ils font la distinction entre deux mondes : celui du réel et celui imprimé en 4 x 3.

Pourtant, tout en sachant que ces images sont truquées, il est difficile de rester imperméable à ces injonctions omniprésentes à la perfection. Ces filles minces, glabres et bronzées s’affichent sur les abribus, dans le métro, dans les magazines. Si bien que l’œil s’habitue à voir des silhouettes élancées et oublie qu’un corps normal est un corps imparfait. Une fois face au miroir, on s’étonne de voir des plis, de gros grains de beauté et des poils. Comme si le monde imprimé était devenu la norme et ce grand mensonge, intégré et reproduit. Dans son livre Beauté Fatale, l’essayiste et journaliste Mona Chollet explique comment les corps imparfaits se jugent même entre eux, plutôt que d’entrer en résistance. « Cernés par les couvertures de magazines comme par autant de reproches visuels qui nous montrent comment nous pourrions être et devrions être, nous vivons sous un éclairage impitoyable. Nous sommes incités à nous montrer aussi impitoyables que lui, à être malveillants, mesquins, haineux », analyse-t-elle.

Au final, seuls 28 % des sondés se trouvent bien comme ils sont et ne souhaitent rien changer à leur corps, rapporte Opinion Way. Sur les 526 femmes interrogées, 57 % sont complexées par leur ventre, 17 % par leurs fesses. Dans un tel contexte, celui qui affirme ne vouloir rien changer à son corps passe pour un arrogant.

L’absence de naturel, rédhibitoire pour la moitié des hommes
Après le ventre plat, les fesses rebondies, le thigh gap, puis les pommettes rehaussées… Les canons de beauté se succèdent et ne se ressemblent pas. Dès qu’un complexe a été résolu, une nouvelle lubie esthétique émerge aussitôt. Elle est aisément reproduite sur Photoshop, moins dans la vraie vie. Quelle que soit la silhouette rêvée, les retouches mettent la barre toujours plus haut. Même les formes fièrement revendiquées par Kim Kardashian, Beyoncé et Rihanna sont lissées, huilées, raffermies. En deux clics, trois mouvements.

Sauf qu’accéder à ce corps irréel peut sembler accessible, tant chaque partie du corps a sa crème dédiée. La femme imparfaite n’a plus d’excuses, seulement une faible volonté. Dans ce contexte, le corps devient une « matrice du moi » comme le dit le sociologue du corps, Georges Vigarello. Il revendiquerait nos choix, notre personnalité, notre histoire. Dans Histoire de la beauté, le corps et l’art d’embellir de la Renaissance à nos jours (Éd. Points), le sociologue explique que l’apparence parfaite est « fondée sur une cohérence intérieure », entre ce qu’on en attend et ce qu’elle est. Une sorte de « je suis qui je montre ». Tout détail corporel qui nous n’aurions pas validé est un parasite, synonyme d’impuissance.

Le retour du naturel ?
Pourtant, le naturel serait la meilleure force de séduction. D’après le sondage OpinionWay, l’absence de naturel est rédhibitoire pour 49 % des hommes, suivi du botox (39 %), du lifting (29 %), des implants mammaires (22 %), le manque de formes (16%). Ces chiffres annonceraient-ils le grand retour de la femme bio ? Les phobiques de la retouche utilisent désormais Internet comme contre-média pour insuffler une nouvelle vision de la beauté. Certains internautes tentent d’abord de démythifier le corps retouché, en mettant en ligne les vidéos de transformation des mannequins lors des séances photo pour dire que les tops aussi sont loin de la perfection. Quand le trombinoscope des modèles au naturel pour un défilé Vuitton avait fuité, le monde s’était surpris à découvrir le teint livide et les cernes des égéries. Sans oublier cet article confession de l’ancienne rédactrice de Cosmopolitan, Leah Hardy, qui tirait la sonnette d’alarme en dénonçant l’usage inversé de Photoshop, pour regonfler des mannequins trop maigres.

25 000 corps normaux de « vraies femmes »

En parallèle, plusieurs initiatives fleurissent sur la Toile pour réhabiliter le corps normal. Lady Gaga, critiquée lors de sa tournée en 2012 pour avoir pris du poids, avait fièrement publié en réponse des photos d’elle en sous-vêtements sur son réseau social. Ses milliers de fans ont suivi le mouvement en postant des clichés d’eux invitant ainsi à ce que chacun assume mieux son apparence. La « Mother Monster » avait alors baptisé l’événement « The Body Revolution » (la révolution du corps, NDLR).

Les photographes aussi se mettent à dénoncer la fausseté des corps médiatisés. L’artiste Gracie Hagen avait fait du bruit en publiant une série de photos de corps droits, magnifiés, puis, juste à côté, le même corps à l’état naturel, c’est-à-dire parfois voûtés, voire flasques. Selon la photographe, « l’imagerie des médias est une illusion qui s’appuie sur la lumière, les bons angles et Photoshop. Les gens peuvent sembler extrêmement attirants dans les bonnes conditions et deux secondes après, être transformés en quelque chose de complètement différent ». Son but était alors de montrer que chacun à une forme et une taille particulière. Et que la silhouette « normale » n’existait pas.

C’est aussi dans cet esprit que le site My Body Gallery propose de montrer « à quoi les vraies femmes ressemblent ». Près de 25 000 photos des corps de filles volontaires, classées selon leur âge, taille et poids, y sont accessibles. Comme pour se lancer un seau d’eau dans la figure… et déculpabiliser. Une façon de décrocher notre regard des affiches, s’ouvrir à la réalité et voir les « vrais gens ». Redescendre sur terre, en quelque sorte.

L’algorithme qui démonte Photoshop
Gaëlle Rolin

Le Figaro madame

07 décembre 2011

Deux scientifiques américains ont créé un programme qui décèle les retouches d’une image

Alors que la communication d’H&M est pointée du doigt pour avoir collé des visages de top-modèles sur des corps de synthèse, deux scientifiques américains ont inventé l’outil rêvé des amateurs d’ « avant-après ».

Un chercheur en informatique, Hany Farid, et son élève doctorant, Eric Kee, de l’université de Darwood, aux États-Unis ont publié le résultat de leurs recherches la semaine dernière dans une revue scientifique américaine.  Le programme qu’ils ont mis au point permet de faire apparaître, sur une échelle de 1 à 5, l’ampleur des retouches subies par une photo. Et cela donne lieu à des comparaisons saisissantes. Envolés, rides, bourrelets et teint brouillé !

Voir les « avant-après »

Ces chercheurs espèrent que cela poussera les médias et les publicitaires à adopter une attitude autorégulatrice. En effet, les lecteurs ne pourront pas aller se plaindre auprès des directeurs artistiques de leur magazine préféré, car le logiciel a besoin de la photo d’origine pour établir l’échelle de retouche. Donc cette préoccupation éthique doit venir, d’abord, des agences et des rédactions.

Cela intervient alors qu’H&M a dû s’expliquer dans le magazine suédois Aftonbladet après avoir eu recours à des corps cyber-dessinés pour sa dernière campagne publicitaire. Les modèles de lingerie incriminés ont d’abord été photographiés sur des mannequins en plastique. Puis les photos ont été retravaillées sur ordinateur pour que les corps prennent un aspect humain. Seulement à la fin de ce processus, ont été collés, sur ces silhouettes, des visages de femmes. Le géant suédois n’a pas cherché à minimiser le phénomène. Mais il a expliqué qu’il ne s’agissait que de mettre en avant les sous-vêtements et que les top-modèles étaient parfaitement au courant.

Certes, le procédé n’est pas très reluisant. Vu la dénaturation des images que provoque la « photoshopisation » à outrance, on finit par avoir le choix entre humaniser un mannequin en plastique ou réifier un mannequin de chair et d’os… Reste à savoir lequel des deux oriente le plus certains consommateurs vers un idéal irréel, qui tend davantage vers les os que vers la chair.

Mais pourquoi les Anglaises se rasent-elles le visage ?
Nicolas Basse

Madame Figaro

18 février 2015
C’est la nouvelle astuce beauté qui séduit les Anglaises : se raser le visage. Avec un double objectif : avoir une peau plus douce et limiter l’apparition des rides. Are you kidding ? L’avis d’un spécialiste.

Outre-Manche, sur le Web, on ne parle que de cela. Depuis quelques semaines, « youtubeuses » et blogueuses vantent les mérites des rasoirs et des miniscalpels servant à… raser leur visage. Une méthode qui permettrait de repousser l’apparition des rides et d’avoir une peau plus douce. Selon ces mêmes internautes, Marilyn Monroe et Elizabeth Taylor étaient déjà de véritables adeptes de cette technique. C’est dire.

Le principe, vanté dans un article du Daily Mail, est simple : se gratter la peau avec un petit scalpel ou se raser avec un rasoir jetable classique pour éliminer le fin duvet qui recouvre le visage afin d’exfolier l’épiderme. La pratique s’inspire du « dermaplaning », très répandu aux États-Unis, qui consiste à gratter la peau jusqu’à l’inflammation cutanée pour permettre une meilleure absorption des soins cosmétiques.

« Une technique farfelue »
Tous les matins, ces Anglaises obsédées par les rides nettoient donc leur peau, s’appliquent un adoucissant, sortent leur mousse, leur rasoir et se rasent délicatement autour des lèvres, sur les joues et dans le cou. Selon Michael Prager, médecin esthétique londonien défenseur de la pratique, se raser aurait le même effet qu’une micro-dermabrasion, en accélérant la production de collagène et en retardant l’apparition des rides.

« Pas du tout, rétorque le dermatologue français Antoine Adam Thierry. Cette technique est farfelue et très peu efficace. Oui, cela doit très légèrement stimuler l’exfoliation de la peau, mais ça ne l’adoucira pas. Franchement, c’est énormément de temps perdu ! Autant se mettre une crème qui aura des effets bien plus nets. Pendant qu’on y est, pourquoi ne pas se frotter le visage avec une pierre ponce ? » Quoi qu’il en soit, de nombreux e-shops proposent déjà des mousses et rasoirs spécialement conçus pour les visages féminins…

Perte de poids extrême : d’anciens obèses témoignent
Juliana Bruno

Le Figaro madame

06 juin 2014

À l’image de Keli Kryfko, ceux qui sont passés du XXL au S témoignent

Keli Kryfko, une jeune Américaine obèse depuis son enfance, est aujourd’hui en passe de devenir Miss Texas après avoir maigri de 45 kilos. Une perte de poids exceptionnelle qui implique également un bouleversement psychologique important. D’autres, passés du XXL au S, témoignent.

Dans une société où le poids est devenu une mesure de la valeur personnelle, un individu obèse ou en surpoids est souvent perçu comme dépourvu de volonté. Alors que la maîtrise du corps est érigée en mantra, la minceur est exigée de tous et par tous. Mais pour ceux qui prennent la décision de perdre du poids, à cause d’un problème de santé ou parce que, comme Keli Kryfko, ils se fixent un objectif très précis, les ressorts sont tout autres. Il s’agit d’affronter un nouveau reflet dans le miroir, de comprendre son corps et de se confronter au regard neuf de son entourage et de la société. Regards croisés.

Un élément déclencheur puissant
« Tout bascule en juillet 2012 quand je réussis mon bac, un vrai soulagement. Je rentre alors à l’université et, après un mois sans être montée sur ma balance, je découvre que j’ai perdu 5 kilos sans avoir changé de régime alimentaire. Je décide alors d’essayer de réduire les quantités et en six mois, je perds 20 kilos », confie Jade. À l’origine de ces pertes de poids extrêmes, plus ou moins conscientes et maîtrisées, un problème de santé, un élément déclencheur ou un objectif éminent, à l’image de celui de Keli Kryfko. « Le jour où j’ai voulu acheter un pull, je l’ai d’abord essayé en M, puis en L mais en réalité, j’ai dû acheter la taille XL. Et là, je me suis dit, plus jamais », se souvient Charles. « Cet objectif permet de se dépasser et désirer atteindre son poids de forme avec une détermination sans faille. Dans une implication totale, le sujet est pleinement centré sur ce qu’il réalise », indique Michèle Freud, auteure de Mincir et se réconcilier avec soi (Éd. Albin Michel). « Néanmoins, il faut savoir rester réaliste, se fixer des objectifs, à court, moyen et long terme. Il est bon de noter que Keli Kryfko s’est, par exemple, allégée de 30 kilos en un an et demi, qu’elle a modifié son alimentation étape par étape, de façon intelligente et avec l’aide d’un coach », prévient Michèle Freud.

Séverine, qui a eu recours à une « Sleeve », opération qui consiste à retirer une grande partie de l’estomac pour former un tube, a perdu près de 50 kilos en une année. « Six mois après l’intervention, je pesais déjà 35 kilos de moins, se rappelle la jeune femme. Je m’étais extrêmement bien préparée en amont. J’ai bénéficié d’un suivi de qualité, psychologue et nutritionniste en tête. » Charles, lui, a opté pour la très célèbre règle des « 5 fruits et légumes par jour », en s’adonnant à quarante-cinq minutes de footing, quatre fois par semaine. « Je ne me suis pas spécialement privé, j’ai simplement adopté une meilleure hygiène de vie », admet le jeune homme qui s’est délesté d’une vingtaine de kilos en l’espace d’une année. Quel que soit le moyen choisi, et même avec l’aide d’un professionnel, une remise en question identitaire vient se poser au moment où le schéma corporel de l’individu se modifie.

Nouveau corps, nouvelle identité

« C’est elle ou ce n’est pas elle ? », avouez que venant de la part d’anciens collègues, c’est dérangeant. »

Le schéma corporel, ou postural, se définit comme la perception du corps solide, entier et achevé. « Le corps se transforme, change et c’est extrêmement stimulant pour la détermination. Mais cette métamorphose peut aussi être la source d’une grande anxiété parce qu’il faut réussir à appréhender une nouvelle image de soi », avance Michèle Freud. « Au départ, j’avais l’impression que mon corps ne m’appartenait pas, comme si je l’avais volé. Cela est allé tellement vite pour moi », se souvient Jade. « J’ai toujours la sensation de peser 80 kilos lorsque je me regarde dans le miroir », renchérit Séverine, pourtant à 53 kilos aujourd’hui. Pour Charles, même constat. « J’ai toujours l’impression d’être gros. Par sécurité, dans les magasins, je vais opter pour une taille de plus même si je sais que ce n’est pas ce qu’il me faut. »
Parfois même, c’est l’entourage qui ne reconnaît pas la personne et cette épreuve peut s’avérer particulièrement déstabilisante. « « C’est elle ou ce n’est pas elle ? », avouez que venant de la part d’anciens collègues, l’interrogation est dérangeante », assène Séverine. « Quand j’apercevais des connaissances dans la rue, je voyais qu’il y avait une hésitation. Peu à peu, j’ai senti le regard des gens changer », reconnaît également Jade.

« Habiter pleinement son corps »
« Il est essentiel de se réapproprier ce nouveau corps, non seulement en le regardant mais il faut surtout ne pas avoir peur de le toucher, le masser, le mouvoir afin de le sentir et plus tard, pouvoir l’habiter pleinement », conseille Michèle Freud. « Après une année de stabilisation, je commence à m’habituer à mon nouveau corps. Je vais à la plage en appréciant ma morphologie, en profitant enfin de tous les avantages de ma transformation. Mais c’est un processus de longue haleine », reconnaît Claire. Et d’ajouter : « Je me suis enfin débarrassée de ma « seconde peau », et j’ai fait la paix avec cet « autre moi ». Mais même lorsque la réconciliation est au rendez-vous, une épée de Damoclès demeure. « Il y a cette sensation que ça ne va pas durer, que c’est provisoire, éphémère. J’ai appris à vivre avec cette peur », conclut Charles. Une crainte sourde, mais malheureusement, profondément ancrée.

A big fat (and very dangerous) lie: A former Cosmo editor lifts the lid on airbrushing skinny models to look healthy

Leah Hardy

The Daily Mail

20 May 2010

Most of us are sensible enough to know that the photographs of models and celebrities in glossy magazines aren’t all they seem.

Using the wonders of digital retouching, wrinkles and spots just disappear; cellulite, podgy tummies, thick thighs and double chins can all be erased to ‘reveal’ surprisingly lean, toned figures.

Stars such as Mariah Carey, Britney Spears and Demi Moore have benefited from this kind of technical tampering.

Kate Winslet – who shed a couple of stones this way in a shoot for a men’s magazine after her normally curvy body was digitally ‘stretched’ – complained that the practise was bad for women, who could never live up to this kind of fake perfection.

But there’s another type of digital dishonesty that’s rife in the beauty industry, and it’s one that you may well never have heard of and may even struggle to believe, but which can be just as poisonous an influence on women.

It’s been dubbed ‘reverse retouching’ and involves using models who are cadaverously thin and then adding fake curves so they look bigger and healthier.

This deranged but increasingly common process recently hit the headlines when Jane Druker, the editor of Healthy magazine – which is sold in health food stores – admitted retouching a cover girl who pitched up at a shoot looking ‘really thin and unwell’.

It sounds crazy, but the truth is Druker is not alone. The editor of the top-selling health and fitness magazine in the U.S., Self, has admitted: ‘We retouch to make the models look bigger and healthier.’

And the editor of British Vogue, Alexandra Shulman, has quietly confessed to being appalled by some of the models on shoots for her own magazine, saying: ‘I have found myself saying to the photographers, « Can you not make them look too thin? »‘
Skinny: Healthy magazine’s cover star Kamila as she appears normally

Skinny: Healthy magazine’s cover star Kamila as she appears normally

Robin Derrick, creative director of Vogue, has admitted: ‘I spent the first ten years of my career making girls look thinner -and the last ten making them look larger.’

Recently, I chatted to Johnnie Boden, founder of the hugely successful clothing brand.

He bemoaned the fact that it was nigh on impossible to find suitable models for his catalogues, which are predominantly aimed at thirty-something mothers.

‘I hate featuring very skinny models,’ he told me. ‘We try to book models who are a healthy size, but we constantly find that when they come to the shoot a few weeks later, they have lost too much weight. It’s a real problem.’

I don’t know if Boden has been forced to resort to reverse retouching, but I have a confession to make.

I, too, have been part of the reverse retouching trend. When editing Cosmopolitan magazine, I also faced the dilemma of what to do with models who were, frankly, frighteningly thin.

There are people out there who think the solution is simple: if a seriously underweight model turns up for a shoot, she should be sent home. But it isn’t always that easy.

A fashion editor will often choose a model for a shoot that’s happening weeks, or even months, later. In the meantime, a hot photographer will have flown in from New York, schedules will be juggled to put him together with a make-up artist, hairdresser, fashion stylist and various assistants, and a hugely expensive location will have been booked.

And a selection of tiny, designer sample dresses will be available for one day only.

I have taken anguished calls from a fashion editor who has put together this finely orchestrated production, only to find that the model they picked six weeks ago for her luscious curves and gleaming skin, is now an anorexic waif with jutting bones and acne.

‘No wonder women yearn to be super-thin – they never see how ugly thin can be’

Or she might pitch up covered in mysterious bruises (many models have a baffling penchant for horrible boyfriends), or smelling of drink and hung over, as many models live on coffee and vodka just to stay slim.

And it’s not just models that cause problems. I remember one shoot we did with a singer, a member of a famous girl band, who was clearly in the grip of an eating disorder.

Not only was she so frail that even the weeny dresses, designed for catwalk models, had to be pinned to fit her, but her body was covered with the dark downy hair that is the sure-fire giveaway of anorexia.

Naturally, thanks to the wonders of digital retouching, not a trace of any of these problems appeared on the pages of the magazine. At the time, when we pored over the raw images, creating the appearance of smooth flesh over protruding ribs, softening the look of collarbones that stuck out like coat hangers, adding curves to flat bottoms and cleavage to pigeon chests, we felt we were doing the right thing.

Our magazine was all about sexiness, glamour and curves. We knew our readers would be repelled by these grotesquely skinny women, and we also felt they were bad role models and it would be irresponsible to show them as they really were.

But now, I wonder. Because for all our retouching, it was still clear to the reader that these women were very, very thin. But, hey, they still looked great!
Leah Hardy

They had 22-inch waists (those were never made bigger), but they also had breasts and great skin. They had teeny tiny ankles and thin thighs, but they still had luscious hair and full cheeks.

Thanks to retouching, our readers – and those of Vogue, and Self, and Healthy magazine – never saw the horrible, hungry downside of skinny. That these underweight girls didn’t look glamorous in the flesh. Their skeletal bodies, dull, thinning hair, spots and dark circles under their eyes were magicked away by technology, leaving only the allure of coltish limbs and Bambi eyes.

A vision of perfection that simply didn’t exist. No wonder women yearn to be super-thin when they never see how ugly thin can be. But why do models starve themselves to be a shape that even high fashion magazines don’t want?

Vogue’s Shulman believes a big part of the problem is that the designer’s sample sizes – the catwalk prototypes of their designs – have got ever smaller.

She says: ‘People say why don’t we use size 12 models; but I can’t if I’m going to do any Prada, Dior, Balenciaga or Chanel collections.’

To fit these clothes, made by men for boyish bodies, the top model agencies only take on the thinnest girls, who tend to be nearly 6ft tall with 24in waists and 33in hips. This is far thinner than the likes of Cindy Crawford ever was (at 5ft 9in, she had a 26in waist).

A glance at model agency websites will reveal clearly reverse retouched images, where ribs and protruding spines have been airbrushed away. Yet instead of hiring some healthier ones and encouraging them to eat, some agencies continue to send girls to jobs even when they look positively ill.

It’s a crazy system, and one that’s bad for all of us. When the ideal woman is emaciated yet smooth-skinned and glowing, more of us will hate our own unretouched bodies which stubbornly refuse to fit into an impossible ideal.

Some of us will starve and binge; others will develop eating disorders; others will opt out completely and give up on being healthily fit.

All I can say is that I’m sorry for my small part in this madness. It is time it stopped – for all our sakes.

NPR
July 05, 2012

Seventeen editor in chief Ann Shoket writes in the latest issue that the magazine’s staff has signed a « Body Peace Treaty » that promises to « never change girls’ body or face shapes » in photos.

Seventeen magazine

Somewhere between school and her extracurricular activities, eighth-grader Julia Bluhm found time to launch a crusade against airbrushed images in one of the country’s top teen magazines.

And this week, she won: Seventeen magazine pledged not to digitally alter body sizes or face shapes of young women featured in its editorial pages, largely in response to the online petition Julia started this spring.

« We should focus on people’s personalities, not just how they look, » she told NPR member station WBUR last month. « If you’re looking for a girlfriend who looks like the models that you see in magazines, you’re never going to find a girlfriend, because those people are edited with computers. »

After hearing too many fellow teens in her ballet class complain about their weight, the 14-year-old started her campaign in April with a petition on Change.org. It called for the magazine to print one unaltered photo spread each month. The petition — and a demonstration at the corporate offices of Hearst, which owns Seventeen — led to more than 80,000 signatures from around the world.

The barrage of correspondence from young girls led Ann Shoket, Seventeen‘s editor-in-chief, to invite Julia for a meeting and subsequently put out a new policy statement on the magazine’s photo enhancements.

The New York Times reports that while Shoket stresses the magazine « never has, never will » digitally alter the body or face shapes of its models, her editor’s letter in the upcoming August issue will reaffirm its commitment. Skolet writes that the entire Seventeen staff has signed an eight-point Body Peace Treaty, promising not to alter natural shapes and include only images of « real girls and models who are healthy. »

« While we work hard behind the scenes to make sure we’re being authentic, your notes made me realize that it was time for us to be more public about our commitment, » Shoket writes in her letter to readers, published in part in Tuesday’s Times. The magazine also promises greater transparency surrounding its photo shoots, showing what goes into the shoots on its behind-the-scenes Tumblr.

Transparency and the new pledge don’t necessarily mean every page in the magazine will be au naturel, because so many pages are filled with ads. The companies doing the advertising aren’t making the same no-Photoshop promise, so it’s unclear what the pact means for digitally enhanced advertisements. Calls to the magazine to comment on the policy haven’t been returned.

« This is a huge victory, and I’m so unbelievably happy, » Julia writes on her online petition page.

But the fight against enhanced images of young girls isn’t over. Inspired by the win, two other middle-school activists are taking on Teen Vogue in a new online petition, which, as of this posting, already has more than 11,000 signatures.

Voir par ailleurs:

Sports
The Debate Over Running While High
For Ultramarathon Runners, Marijuana Has Enormous Benefits—But Is It Ethical?

Frederick Dreier

The Wall Street Journal
Feb. 9, 2015

The grueling sport of ultramarathon has fostered a mingling of two seemingly opposite camps: endurance jocks and potheads.

“If you can find the right level, [marijuana] takes the stress out of running,” says Avery Collins, a 22-year-old professional ultramarathoner. “And it’s a postrace, post-run remedy.”

The painkilling and nausea-reducing benefits of marijuana may make it especially tempting to ultramarathoners, who compete in races that can go far longer—and be much more withering—than the 26.2 miles of a marathon. Ultramarathon is one of the fastest-growing endurance sports; there were almost 1,300 races in the U.S. and Canada in 2014, up from 293 in 2004, according to UltraRunning Magazine.

Ultramarathons last anywhere from 30 to 200 miles, and typically crisscross mountainous terrain and rocky trails. Runners endure stomach cramps and intense pain in their muscles and joints. Competitors often quit after a sudden loss of motivation, matched with the boredom of running for upward of 24 hours straight.

“The person who is going to win an ultra is someone who can manage their pain, not puke and stay calm,” said veteran runner Jenn Shelton. “Pot does all three of those things.”
Advertisement

Shelton said she has trained with marijuana before, but she made a decision to never compete with the drug for ethical reasons, expressly because she believes it enhances performance.

The phenomenon isn’t easily quantified, because even in Colorado, which legalized marijuana, ultra runners declined to go on the record with their marijuana use. But marijuana is a common topic on endurance-running blogs. Often debated is whether marijuana can improve performance, particularly because of its much-heralded capacity for blocking pain. The drug is now legal for medical use in 23 states plus the District of Columbia, and a sizable portion of legal medical users cite chronic pain as a reason.

“There’s good science that suggests cannabinoids block the physical input of pain,” said Dr. Lynn Webster, founder of the Lifetree Pain Clinic in Salt Lake City. Cancer patients have also used marijuana to treat nausea from chemotherapy. For distance runners, nausea can ruin a race, preventing them from ingesting needed calories and nutrients.
Avery Collins runs on a trail near Chautauqua Park in Boulder, Colo. ENLARGE
Avery Collins runs on a trail near Chautauqua Park in Boulder, Colo. Photo: Matthew Staver for The Wall Street Journal

In a nod to the growing acceptance of marijuana as a recreational drug, the World Anti-Doping Agency in 2013 raised the allowable level of THC—the drug’s active ingredient—to an amount that would trigger positive results only in athletes consuming marijuana in competition. That essentially gave the green light to marijuana usage during training, not to mention as a stress reliever the night before a race.

In competition, a WADA spokesman said that marijuana is banned for its perceived performance enhancement, and because its use violates the “spirit of sport.”

USA Track & Field, which governs distance running in America, follows the WADA guideline. “Marijuana is on the banned list and should not be used by athletes at races,” said Jill Geer, a representative with USATF. “We are unequivocal in that.”

‘There’s good science that suggests cannabinoids block the physical input of pain.’
—Dr. Lynn Webster, founder of the Lifetree Pain Clinic

But here’s the catch. Few ultramarathons actually test for drugs, Geer said. Races must pay for drug tests, and the price tag for testing can be prohibitive for smaller events. A USADA spokesperson said that cost for drug testing depends on an event’s location, participation size, length and prominence. The Twin Cities Marathon, for example, spent $3,500 to have USADA conduct six tests at its 2014 event.

In many other sports, a handful of athletes over the years have acknowledged using pot as a painkiller and relaxing agent. Canadian snowboarder Ross Rebagliati—who briefly lost and then regained his 1998 Olympic gold medal after testing positive for pot—admitted that he regularly smoked marijuana during his professional career. Mixed martial arts fighter Nick Diaz is unapologetic for his use of medical marijuana; a positive pot test earned him a yearlong ban in 2012. Retired NFL wide receiver Nate Jackson detailed his marijuana use in a 2013 book, saying he regularly smoked pot to numb his various sports injuries.

Pot’s original inclusion on the Olympic banned list had more to do with politics and ethics than its perceived performance enhancement, said veteran drug tester Don Catlin, who founded the UCLA Olympic Analytic Laboratory. “You can find some people who argue that marijuana has performance-enhancing characteristics. They are few and far between,” he said. “It’s seen more as a drug of abuse than as a drug of performance enhancement.”

The running movement has long been a haven for hippies, and ultramarathons in particular feature an above-average number of ponytailed graybeards.

“There’s a great degree of rugged individualism in every ultramarathoner,” says ultramarathoner Jason “Ras” Vaughn, who operates the popular blog UltraPedestrian.com. “My impression is that the runners who use [marijuana] are people who already smoked it, who now happen to be ultra runners.”

Shelton, the ultra runner who doesn’t use pot during races, said the ultramarathon community generally is aware of those who do so. Pot, she said, is just one of the numerous painkillers that athletes take during the grueling races. It isn’t uncommon for athletes to pop multiple Advil or Tylenol during a 100-mile race.
Collins runs on a trail. ENLARGE
Collins runs on a trail. Photo: Matthew Staver for The Wall Street Journal

Unusually candid about his marijuana usage is Collins. During a typical week at his home in Steamboat Springs, Colo., Collins runs approximately 150 miles and consumes marijuana four or five times. He doesn’t smoke the plant; instead he eats marijuana-laced food, inhales it as water vapor and rubs a marijuana-infused balm onto his legs.

Collins is no back-of-the-pack stoner. In 2014, his first year as a full-time professional runner, he won five ultramarathons. His third-place finish at the Fat Dog 120, a well-known 120-mile race in British Columbia, was the top American result.

Collins says he doesn’t ingest the plant during competitions, though he says he has never been tested. He does train with the drug, on occasion. He says the marijuana balm numbs his leg muscles, and small doses of the plant keep his mind occupied during longer runs, he says. Collins says the miles and hours seem to tick off faster when he is running high.

After a race, Collins eats marijuana candies or cookies to lower his heart rate and relax his muscles.

“You’re running for 17 to 20 hours straight, and when you stop, sometimes your legs and your brain don’t just stop,” Collins said. “Sometimes [pot] is the only way I can fall asleep after racing.”

Collins recently landed a small cash sponsorship with a Colorado company that consults with marijuana growers and sellers. For 2015, he will wear the company’s pot-leaf logo on his jersey and promote the company on social media.

Even as he promotes a marijuana-related sponsor, however, Collins concedes that his latest training strategy—involving shorter, faster, more-focused sessions—doesn’t fit well with running high. So he is doing a lot less of that.

Voir enfin:

Birth of a Washington Word
When warfare gets « kinetic. »
Timothy Noah
Slate
2002

« Retronym » is a word coined by Frank Mankiewicz, George McGovern’s campaign director, to delineate previously unnecessary distinctions. Examples include « acoustic guitar, » « analog watch, » « natural turf, » « two-parent family, » and « offline publication. » Bob Woodward’s new book, Bush at War, introduces a new Washington retronym: « kinetic » warfare. From page 150:
For many days the war cabinet had been dancing around the basic question: how long could they wait after September 11 before the U.S. started going « kinetic, » as they often termed it, against al Qaeda in a visible way? The public was patient, at least it seemed patient, but everyone wanted action. A full military action—air and boots—would be the essential demonstration of seriousness—to bin Laden, America, and the world.
In common usage, « kinetic » is an adjective used to describe motion, but the Washington meaning derives from its secondary definition, « active, as opposed to latent. » Dropping bombs and shooting bullets—you know, killing people—is kinetic. But the 21st-century military is exploring less violent and more high-tech means of warfare, such as messing electronically with the enemy’s communications equipment or wiping out its bank accounts. These are « non-kinetic. » (Why not « latent »? Maybe the Pentagon worries that would make them sound too passive or effeminate.) Asked during a January talk at National Defense University whether « the transformed military of the future will shift emphasis somewhat from kinetic systems to cyber warfare, » Donald Rumsfeld answered, « Yes! » (Rumsfeld uses the words « kinetic » and « non-kinetic » all the time.)
The recent war in Afghanistan demonstrates that when the chips are down, we still find it necessary to go kinetic. Indeed, for all its novel methods of non-kinetic warfare, today’s military is much more deadly than it ever was before. For the foreseeable future, civilians and at least a few soldiers will continue to be killed in war. « Kinetic » seems an objectionable way to describe this reality from the point of view of both doves and hawks. To those who deplore or resist going to war, « kinetic » is unconscionably euphemistic, with antiseptic connotations derived from high-school physics and aesthetic ones traceable to the word’s frequent use by connoisseurs of modern dance. To those who celebrate war (or at least find it grimly necessary), « kinetic » fails to evoke the manly virtues of strength, fierceness, and bravery. Imagine Rudyard Kipling penning the lines, « For it’s Tommy this, an’ Tommy that, an’ ‘Chuck him out, the brute!’/ But it’s ‘Saviour of ‘is country’ when the U.K goes kinetic. » Is it too late to remove this word from the Washington lexicon? Chatterbox suggests a substitute: « fighting. »

Timothy Noah is a former Slate staffer. His  book about income inequality is The Great Divergence.


Imitation game: Attention, un martyr peut en cacher un autre (Hollywood fails the Turing test)

1 février, 2015
Turing Bombe Machine and Christopher Machine (movie)

Depuis que l’ordre religieux est ébranlé – comme le christianisme le fut sous la Réforme – les vices ne sont pas seuls à se trouver libérés. Certes les vices sont libérés et ils errent à l’aventure et ils font des ravages. Mais les vertus aussi sont libérées et elles errent, plus farouches encore, et elles font des ravages plus terribles encore. Le monde moderne est envahi des veilles vertus chrétiennes devenues folles. Les vertus sont devenues folles pour avoir été isolées les unes des autres, contraintes à errer chacune en sa solitude.  G.K. Chesterton
Parfois, ce sont les gens dont on attend le moins qui font des choses auxquelles personne ne s’attendait. Joan Clarke (The Imitation game)
Personne n’aurait pu faire ça. Tu sais, ce matin… J’étais dans un train qui a traversé une ville qui sans toi n’existerait pas. J’ai acheté un billet d’un homme qui sans toi serait probablement mort. Au travail, j’ai lu tout un champ de recherche scientifique qui n’existe que grâce à toi. Maintenant, tu peux regretter de ne pas avoir été normal… Moi, jamais je le regretterais. Le monde est un endroit infiniment meilleur, justement parce que tu ne l‘étais pas. Joan Clarke (The Imitation game)
 Félicitations ! Tu viens d’échouer au Test de Turing… Blague d’informaticien
Are there imaginable digital computers which would do well in the imitation game? (…) We now ask the question, « What will happen when a machine takes the part of A in this game? » Will the interrogator decide wrongly as often when the game is played like this as he does when the game is played between a man and a woman? These questions replace our original, « Can machines think? Alan Turing
Le test a été inspiré d’un jeu d’imitation dans lequel un homme et une femme vont dans des pièces séparées et les invités tentent de discuter avec les deux protagonistes en écrivant des questions et en lisant les réponses qui leur sont renvoyées. Dans ce jeu l’homme et la femme essaient de convaincre les invités qu’ils sont tous deux des femmes. À l’origine Turing a imaginé ce test pour répondre à sa question existentielle : « une machine peut-elle penser ? », en donnant une interprétation plus concrète de sa question. Une idée intéressante de sa proposition de test est que les réponses doivent être données dans des intervalles de temps définis. Il imagine que cela est nécessaire pour que l’observateur ne puisse pas établir une conclusion qui soit fondée sur le fait qu’un ordinateur puisse répondre plus rapidement qu’un homme, surtout sur des questions de mathématiques. (…) Dans la publication de Turing, le terme « Jeu d’imitation » est utilisé pour sa proposition de test. Le nom de « Test de Turing » semble avoir été inventé en 1968 par Arthur C. Clarke dans ses nouvelles de science-fiction dont a été tiré le film 2001, l’Odyssée de l’espace. Wikipedia
La science est ici vue comme un résultat personnel, une activité autiste, plutôt que comme une longue déduction collective, un dialogue avec des penseurs contemporains et passés. Jamais le nom de John von Neumann, rival et autre père de l’informatique, n’est ici mentionné. Imitation Game passe à côté d’une histoire ahurissante et réelle, esquive les relations de pouvoir inhérentes à l’invention technologique, comme le fit brillamment David Fincher avec The Social Network. Le grand film d’archéologie de l’informatique reste à faire. Clément Ghys
Overall, the movie works: It’s fun, it’s gripping and it features a brilliant performance from Cumberbatch. But like so many other Hollywood biopics, it takes some major artistic license — which is disappointing, because Turing’s actual story is so compelling.(…) The biggest real-life drama is unmentioned in the film, Hodges says. In February 1942, the Germans adopted a more complex Enigma machine for naval communications, again putting the Allies in the dark. “It was a major crisis,” Hodges says. In desperation, Turing and American partners ran multiple bombes in parallel and used electronic components to speed up the code-breaking process. Finally, in early 1943, the Allies succeeded in cracking the code. The consequences of the 1942 Enigma upgrade went far beyond the war. The introduction to electronics, Hodges says, offered Turing a practical means for incorporating his 1936 conceptual ideas into a revolutionary machine — the digital computer. “The scientific story is much bigger than just the Enigma problem,” Hodges says. “It was a great movement in which ideas and new technology came together.” The Imitation Game ignores much of this history, and it also includes an egregious, historically inaccurate storyline in which Turing fails to report a Soviet spy to avoid being outed as gay. Nonetheless, the acting, suspense and a surprising amount of humor make it a movie worth seeing. Just take some time after the movie to read up on Turing’s actual immense contributions to the war and modern computing. (…) In reality, Turing had already outlined the concept of a computing machine in a 1936 paper and had built a cipher machine while at Princeton in the late 1930s, says Turing biographer Andrew Hodges. By mid-1940, Hodges says, Turing and his team at Bletchley Park in Milton Keynes, England, were routinely decoding German Air Force messages with code-breaking machines, or bombes. Within another year the cryptanalysts, which included Joan Clarke (played in the movie by Keira Knightley), had deciphered the all-important naval messages that strategized U-boat attacks. The biggest real-life drama is unmentioned in the film, Hodges says. In February 1942, the Germans adopted a more complex Enigma machine for naval communications, again putting the Allies in the dark. “It was a major crisis,” Hodges says. In desperation, Turing and American partners ran multiple bombes in parallel and used electronic components to speed up the code-breaking process. Finally, in early 1943, the Allies succeeded in cracking the code. The consequences of the 1942 Enigma upgrade went far beyond the war. The introduction to electronics, Hodges says, offered Turing a practical means for incorporating his 1936 conceptual ideas into a revolutionary machine — the digital computer. “The scientific story is much bigger than just the Enigma problem,” Hodges says. “It was a great movement in which ideas and new technology came together.” The Imitation Game ignores much of this history, and it also includes an egregious, historically inaccurate storyline in which Turing fails to report a Soviet spy to avoid being outed as gay. Andrew Grant
It’s the script which may prevent this hitting the Oscars jackpot. It’s too formulaic, too efficient at simply whisking you through and making sure you’ve clocked the diversity message.: without square pegs – like those played by Cumberbatch and Knightley – the world would be by far the poorer. « Sometimes it is the people no one imagines anything of that do the things no one can imagine, » runs the movie’s mouthful tagline. It leaves a strange taste. Turing’s treatment was terrible. Perhaps his achievement, in the end, should not be tainted by association. Catherine Shoard
The Imitation Game jumps around three time periods – Turing’s schooldays in 1928, his cryptographic work at Bletchley Park from 1939-45, and his arrest for gross indecency in Manchester in 1952. It isn’t accurate about any of them, but the least wrong bits are the 1928 ones. Young Turing (played strikingly well by Alex Lawther) is a lonely, awkward boy, whose only friend is a kid called Christopher Morcom. Turing nurtures a youthful passion for Morcom, and is about to declare his love when Morcom mysteriously fails to return after a holiday. Turing is summoned into the headmaster’s office, and is told coldly that the object of his affection has died of bovine tuberculosis. The film is right that this awful event had a formative impact on Turing’s life. In reality, though, Turing had been warned before his friend died that he should prepare for the worst. The housemaster’s speech (to all the boys, not just him) announcing Morcom’s death was kind and comforting. (…) In the 1939-45 strand of the story, Turing has grown up physically – though not, the film implies, emotionally. He is played by Benedict Cumberbatch, who is always good and puts in a strong performance despite the clunkiness of the screenplay. The film gives him a quasi-romantic foil in cryptanalyst Joan Clarke (Keira Knightley), dubiously fictionalised as the key emotional figure of Turing’s adult life. The real Turing was engaged to her for a while, but he told her upfront that he had homosexual tendencies. According to him, she was “unfazed” by this. Turing builds an Enigma-code-cracking machine, which he calls Christopher. It’s understandable that films about complicated science usually simplify the facts. This one has sentimentalised them, too: fusing A Beautiful Mind with Frankenstein to portray Turing as the ultimate misunderstood boffin, and the Christopher machine as his beloved creation. In real life, the machine that cracked Enigma was called the Bombe, and the first operating version of it was named Victory. The digital computer Turing invented was known as the Universal Turing Machine. Colossus, the first programmable digital electronic computer, was built at Bletchley Park by engineer Tommy Flowers, incorporating Turing’s ideas. The Imitation Game puts John Cairncross, a Soviet spy and possible “Fifth Man” of the Cambridge spy ring, on Turing’s cryptography team. Cairncross was at Bletchley Park, but he was in a different unit from Turing. As Turing’s biographer Andrew Hodges, on whose book this film is based, has said, it is “ludicrous” to imagine that two people working separately at Bletchley would even have met. Security was far too tight to allow it. In his own autobiography, Cairncross wrote: “The rigid separation of the different units made contact with other staff members almost impossible, so I never got to know anyone apart from my direct operational colleagues.” In the film, Turing works out that Cairncross is a spy; but Cairncross threatens to expose his sexuality. “If you tell him my secret, I’ll tell him yours,” he says. The blackmail works. Turing covers up for the spy, for a while at least. This is wholly imaginary and deeply offensive – for concealing a spy would have been an extremely serious matter. Were the makers of The Imitation Game intending to accuse Alan Turing, one of Britain’s greatest war heroes, of cowardice and treason? Creative licence is one thing, but slandering a great man’s reputation – while buying into the nasty 1950s prejudice that gay men automatically constituted a security risk – is quite another. The final section of the film, set in 1951, may be the silliest, and not only because the film might have bothered to check that Turing’s arrest actually happened in 1952. Nor only because a key plot point rests on the fictional Detective Nock (Rory Kinnear) using Tipp-Ex, which didn’t exist until 1959 (similar products were marketed from 1956, but that’s still not early enough for anyone to be using it in the film). Nock pursues Turing because he suspects him of being another Soviet spy, and accidentally uncovers his homosexuality in the process. This is not how it happened, and the whole film should really get over its irrelevant obsession with Soviet spies. In real life, Turing himself reported a petty theft to the police – but changed details of his story to cover up the relationship he was having with the possible culprit, Arnold Murray. The police did not suspect him of espionage. They pursued him with regard to the homophobic law of gross indecency. He submitted a five-page statement admitting to his affair with Murray – evidence which helped convict him. (…) Historically, The Imitation Game is as much of a garbled mess as a heap of unbroken code. For its appalling suggestion that Alan Turing might have covered up for a Soviet spy, it must be sent straight to the bottom of the class. Alex von Tunzelmann
To anyone trying to turn this story into a movie, the choice seems clear: either you embrace the richness of Turing as a character and trust the audience to follow you there, or you simply capitulate, by reducing him to a caricature of the tortured genius. The latter, I’m afraid, is the path chosen by director Morten Tyldum and screenwriter Graham Moore in The Imitation Game, their new, multiplex-friendly rendering of the story. In their version, Turing (played by Benedict Cumberbatch) conforms to the familiar stereotype of the otherworldly nerd: he’s the kind of guy who doesn’t even understand an invitation to lunch. This places him at odds not only with the other codebreakers in his unit, but also, equally predictably, positions him as a natural rebel. Just to make sure we get the point, his recruitment to the British wartime codebreaking organization at Bletchley Park is rendered as a ridiculous confrontation with Alastair Denniston (Charles Dance, of Game of Thrones fame), the Royal Navy officer then in charge of British signals intelligence: “How the bloody hell are you supposed to decrypt German communications if you don’t, oh, I don’t know, speak German?” thunders Denniston. “I’m quite excellent at crossword puzzles,” responds Turing. On various occasions throughout the film, Denniston tries to fire Turing or have him arrested for espionage, which is resisted by those who have belatedly recognized his redemptive brilliance. “If you fire Alan, you’ll have to fire me, too,” says one of his (formerly hostile) coworkers. There’s no question that the real-life Turing was decidedly eccentric, and that he didn’t suffer fools gladly. As his biographers vividly relate, though, he could also be a wonderfully engaging character when he felt like it, notably popular with children and thoroughly charming to anyone for whom he developed a fondness. All of this stands sharply at odds with his characterization in the film, which depicts him as a dour Mr. Spock who is disliked by all of his coworkers—with the possible exception of Joan Clarke (Keira Knightley). The film spares no opportunity to drive home his robotic oddness. He uses the word “logical” a lot and can’t grasp even the most modest of jokes. This despite the fact that he had a sprightly sense of humor, something that comes through vividly in the accounts of his friends, many of whom shared their stories with both Hodges and Copeland. (For the record, the real Turing was also a bit of a slob, with a chronic disregard for personal hygiene. The glamorous Cumberbatch, by contrast, looks like he’s just stepped out of a Burberry catalog.) Now, one might easily dismiss such distortions as trivial. But actually they point to a much broader and deeply regrettable pattern. Tyldum and Moore are determined to suggest maximum dramatic tension between their tragic outsider and a blinkered society. (“You will never understand the importance of what I am creating here,” he wails when Denniston’s minions try to destroy his machine.) But this not only fatally miscasts Turing as a character—it also completely destroys any coherent telling of what he and his colleagues were trying to do. In reality, Turing was an entirely willing participant in a collective enterprise that featured a host of other outstanding intellects who happily coexisted to extraordinary effect. The actual Denniston, for example, was an experienced cryptanalyst and was among those who, in 1939, debriefed the three Polish experts who had already spent years figuring out how to attack the Enigma, the state-of-the-art cipher machine the German military used for virtually all of their communications. It was their work that provided the template for the machines Turing would later create to revolutionize the British signals intelligence effort. So Turing and his colleagues were encouraged in their work by a military leadership that actually had a pretty sound understanding of cryptological principles and operational security. As Copeland notes, the Nazis would have never allowed a bunch of frivolous eggheads to engage in such highly sensitive work, and they suffered the consequences. The film misses this entirely. In Tyldum and Moore’s version of events, Turing and his small group of fellow codebreakers spend the first two years of the war in fruitless isolation; only in 1941 does Turing’s crazy machine finally show any results. This is a highly stylized version of Turing’s epic struggle to crack the hardest German cipher, the one used by the German navy, whose ravaging submarines nearly brought Britain to its knees during the early years of the war. What this account neglects to mention is that Turing’s “bombes”—electromechanical calculating devices designed to reconstruct the settings of the Enigma—were already helping to decipher German army and air force codes from early on. The movie version, in short, represents a bizarre departure from the historical record. In fact, Bletchley Park—and not only Turing’s legendary Hut 8—was doing productive work from the very beginning of the war. Within a few years its motley assortment of codebreakers, linguists, stenographers, and communications experts were operating on a near-industrial scale. By the end of the war there were some 9,000 people working on the project, processing thousands of intercepts per day. A bit like one of those smartphones that bristles with unneeded features, the film does its best to ladle in extra doses of intrigue where none existed. Tyldum and Moore conjure up an entirely superfluous subplot involving John Cairncross, who was spying for the Soviet Union during his service at Bletchley Park. There’s no evidence that he ever crossed paths with Turing—Bletchley, contrary to the film, was much bigger than a single hut—but The Imitation Game includes him among Turing’s coworkers. When Turing discovers his true allegiance, Cairncross turns the tables on him, saying that he’ll reveal Turing’s homosexuality if his secret is divulged. Turing backs off, leaving the spy in place. Not many of the critics seem to have paid attention to this detail—except for historian Alex von Tunzelmann, who pointed out that the filmmakers have thus managed, almost as an afterthought, to turn their hero into a traitor. The movie tries to soften this by revealing that Stewart Menzies, the head of the Special Intelligence Service, has known about Cairncross’s treachery from the start—a jury-rigged solution to a gratuitous plot problem. (In fact, Cairncross, “the fifth man,” was never prosecuted.) These errors are not random; there is a method to the muddle. The filmmakers see their hero above all as a martyr of a homophobic Establishment, and they are determined to lay emphasis on his victimhood. The Imitation Game ends with the following title: “After a year of government-mandated hormonal therapy, Alan Turing committed suicide in 1954.” This is in itself something of a distortion. Turing was convicted on homosexuality charges in 1952, and chose the “therapy” involving female hormones—aimed, in the twisted thinking of the times, at suppressing his “unnatural” desires—as an alternative to jail time. It was barbarous treatment, and Turing complained that the pills gave him breasts. But the whole miserable episode ended in 1953—a full year before his death, something not made clear to the filmgoer. Copeland, who has taken a fresh look at the record and spoken with many members of Turing’s circle, disputes that the experience sent Turing into a downward spiral of depression. By the accounts of those who knew him, he bore the injustice with fortitude, then spent the next year enthusiastically pursuing projects. Copeland cites a number of close friends (and Turing’s mother) who saw no evidence that he was depressed in the days before his death, and notes that the coroner who concluded that Turing had died by biting a cyanide-laced apple never examined the fruit. Copeland offers sound evidence that the death might have actually been accidental, the result of a self-rigged laboratory where Turing was conducting experiments with cyanide. He left no suicide letter. Copeland also leaves open the possibility of foul play, which can’t be dismissed out of hand, when you consider that all of this happened during the period of McCarthyite hysteria, an era when homosexuality was regarded as an inherent “security risk.” Turing’s government work meant that he knew a lot of secrets, in the postwar period as well. It’s likely we’ll never know the whole story. One thing is certain: Turing could be remarkably naive about his own homosexuality. It was Turing himself who reported the fateful 1952 burglary, probably involving a working-class boyfriend, that brought his gay lifestyle to the attention to the police, thus setting off the legal proceedings against him. In The Imitation Game he holds this information back from the cops, who then cleverly wheedle it out. It’s another indication of the filmmakers’ determination to show Turing as an essentially passive figure. He’s never the master of his own destiny. But even if you believe that Turing was driven to his death, The Imitation Game’s treatment of his fate borders on the ridiculous. In one of the film’s most egregious scenes, his wartime friend Joan pays him a visit in 1952 or so, while he’s still taking his hormones. She finds him shuffling around the house in his bathrobe, barely capable of putting together a coherent sentence. He tells her that he’s terrified that the powers that be will take away “Christopher”—his latest computer, which he’s named after the dead friend of his childhood (just as he did with his machine at Bletchley Park). As near as I can tell, there is no basis for any of this in the historical record; it’s monstrous hogwash, a conceit entirely cooked up by Moore. The real Turing certainly paid periodic and dignified respects to the memory of his first love, Christopher Morcom, but I doubt very much that he ever confused his computers with people. In perhaps the most bitter irony of all, the filmmakers have managed to transform the real Turing, vivacious and forceful, into just the sort of mythological gay man, whiney and weak, that homophobes love to hate. This is indicative of the bad faith underlying the whole enterprise, which is desperate to put Turing in the role of a gay liberation totem but can’t bring itself to show him kissing another man—something he did frequently, and with gusto. And it most definitely doesn’t show him cruising New York’s gay bars, or popping off on a saucy vacation to one of the less reputable of the Greek islands. The Imitation Game is a film that prefers its gay men decorously disembodied. To be honest, I’m a bit surprised that there hasn’t been more pushback against The Imitation Game by intelligence professionals, historians, and survivors of Turing’s circle. But I think I understand why. After so many years in which Turing failed to get his due, no one wants to be seen as spoiling the party. I strongly doubt, though, that many of those in the know are recommending this film to their friends. (For his part, Andrew Hodges is apparently opting to avoid talking about the movie during his current book tour—it’s easy to imagine why he might choose to do so, and I don’t fault him for it.) Christian Caryl
The Imitation Game takes major liberties with its source material, injecting conflict where none existed, inventing entirely fictional characters, rearranging the chronology of events, and misrepresenting the very nature of Turing’s work at Bletchley Park. At the same time, the film might paint Turing as being more unlovable than he actually was.(…) However, the central conceit of The Imitation Game—that Turing singlehandedly invented and physically built the machine that broke the Germans’ Enigma code—is simply untrue. A predecessor of the “Bombe”—the name given to the large, ticking machine that used rotors to test different letter combinations—was invented by Polish cryptanalysts before Turing even began working as a cryptologist for the British government. Turing’s great innovation was to design a new machine that broke the Enigma code faster by looking for likely letter combinations and ruling out combinations that were unlikely to yield results. Turing didn’t develop the new, improved machine by dint of his own singular genius—the mathematician Gordon Welchman, who is not even mentioned in the film, collaborated with Turing on the design. (…) The Imitation Game also somewhat alters Turing’s personality. The film strongly implies that Alan is somewhere on the autism spectrum: Cumberbatch’s character doesn’t understand jokes, takes common expressions literally, and seems indifferent to the suffering and annoyance he causes in others. This characterization is rooted in Hodge’s biography but is also largely exaggerated: Hodges never suggests that Turing was autistic, and though he refers to Turing’s tendency to take contracts and other bureaucratic red tape literally, he also describes Turing as a man with a keen sense of humor and close friends. To be sure, Hodges paints Turing as shy, eccentric, and impatient with irrationality, but Cumberbatch’s narcissistic, detached Alan has more in common with the actor’s title character in Sherlock than with the Turing of Hodges’ biography. One of Turing’s colleagues at Bletchley Park later recalled him as “a very easily approachable man” and said “we were very very fond of him”; none of this is reflected in the film.(…) In The Imitation Game, Commander Denniston is a rigid naval officer who resents Alan’s indifference to the military hierarchy and attempts to fire him when his decryption machine fails to deliver fast results. This characterization is mostly fictional, and Denniston’s family has taken issue with the film’s negative portrayal of him. The real-life Alastair Denniston, who spent most of his career as the director of the Government Code and Cypher School, was eager to expand his staff to help break the Germans’ Enigma code in the late 1930s. He recruited Turing, on the basis of his work at Cambridge and his writing on hypothetical computation machines, in 1938, and he hired Turing to work full time at Bletchley Park when Britain entered World War II in September 1939. There’s no record of a contentious interview between Turing and Denniston, and Denniston never tried to fire Turing from the Government Code and Cypher School—rather, given his innovations, Turing was a star of Bletchley Park. (…) Even if most of the details of the conflict between Commander Denniston and Alan are made up, they do stand in for a real-life power struggle between the military brass and the cryptologists. Turing’s colleagues there recalled that Turing “was always impatient of pompousness or officialdom of any kind,” which made him ill-suited for work in a military context, and Hodges writes that he “had little time for Denniston.” One of the most memorable clashes between Commander Denniston and Alan in the movie occurs when Alan goes over Denniston’s head to write a letter to Winston Churchill, who immediately puts Alan in charge of the Enigma-breaking operation and grants him the 100,000 pounds he needs to build his machine. This never happened, but Alan and three colleagues at Bletchley Park—including Hugh Alexander—did write a letter to Churchill requesting more staff and resources in 1941, and Churchill quickly granted them their requests. L.V. Anderson
In The Imitation Game, Hugh Alexander is a suave ladykiller who spends much of the film battling with Alan for control of the codebreaking operations; Hugh eventually recognizes Alan’s genius and falls in line behind him. Hugh Alexander—who went professionally by Conel Hugh O’Donel Alexander or C.H.O’D. Alexander—was a real person, but the film’s Hugh character seems intended to serve as a contrast to Alan’s antisocial personality.(…) Alexander was a chess champion, and he was much better at managing people than Turing was. However, Alexander was not initially assigned to be Turing’s superior at Bletchley Park. Alexander began working there several months after Turing arrived, and the two didn’t begin working together for another year or so, when Alexander was transferred to Turing’s team to work on breaking Germany’s naval Enigma code. Hodges writes, “Hugh Alexander soon proved the all-round organiser and diplomat that Alan could never be.” Alexander eventually took over naval Enigma decryption after Turing began pursuing a speech decryption project, but by all accounts, their relationship was friendly and mutually respectful. In fact, when Turing was tried for indecency in 1952, Alexander served as a character witness for the defense.(…) Clarke was recruited to Bletchley Park by her former academic supervisor (and Turing’s partner in improving the Bombe) Gordon Welchman; she didn’t win the role by excelling in a crossword competition. (Bletchley recruiters did use crosswords to find talented codebreakers, but neither Turing nor Clarke was involved in this effort.) And Turing proposed to Clarke not to help her escape from overbearing parents, but because they liked each other. He “told her that he was glad he could talk to her ‘as to a man,’ ” writes Hodges, and they shared an interest in chess and botany. She even accepted Turing’s homosexuality; their engagement continued after he confessed his attraction to men. But after some months, Turing ended the engagement. “It was neither a happy nor an easy decision,” writes Hodges, but it wasn’t the ultimately violent confrontation depicted in The Imitation Game, either. “There had been several times when he had come out with ‘I do love you.’ Lack of love was not Alan’s problem.” Turing and Clarke kept in touch after their engagement ended, and Turing even tried to rekindle their relationship after a couple of years, but Clarke rebuffed him. Turing also wrote a letter to Clarke in 1952 to inform her of his impending trial for indecency, but the final scene of The Imitation Game, in which Joan visits Alan during his probation, is invented. Stewart Menzies, the chief of the British Secret Intelligence Service, and John Cairncross, a Soviet spy, are two historical figures who appear in The Imitation Game despite the fact that neither worked closely with Turing. Menzies was, as the film suggests, responsible for passing decrypted Nazi strategies to Winston Churchill, but it’s highly unlikely he interacted individually with Turing (or most of the thousands of other codebreakers who worked at Bletchley Park over the years). Cairncross did pass intelligence from Bletchley Park to the Soviet Union, but he worked in a different unit from Turing’s, and there’s no evidence the two knew each other. Similarly, the filmmakers’ conceit that Menzies knew about and tolerated Cairncross’ duplicity isn’t supported by the historical record. In the film, Peter and Jack are more or less interchangeable background characters, distinguished primarily by the fact that Peter has a brother who is serving in the armed forces on a ship that the code-breaking team discover is targeted by the Germans. The ensuing dramatic scene, in which Alan reminds Peter and the rest of the team that they have to keep the Germans from learning that they’ve broken Enigma, is entirely invented; Hilton had no such brother, and in fact he began working at Bletchley Park long after Turing’s Bombe had been built. And while it was crucial for the British to use their intelligence wisely, Hodges writes that their success had less to do with their tactical shrewdness and more to do with the Germans’ a priori conviction that Enigma was unbreakable, despite ample evidence to the contrary. The Imitation Game’s framing device depicts one Detective Nock’s investigation into Alan’s life, following a mysterious burglary at Alan’s home. Perhaps unsurprisingly, this framing device isn’t quite true to life: There was no Detective Nock, and the detectives who did book Turing for indecency (who were named Mr. Wills and Mr. Rimmer) were under no illusions about his mysterious circumstances. Turing was burglarized by an acquaintance of 19-year-old Arnold Murray, who had slept with Turing a few times. The burglar had heard Murray talk about his trysts with Turing, and when the police interrogated the burglar, he revealed the illicit nature of Murray and Turing’s relationship. When the police interviewed Turing, he made no attempt to hide his homosexuality from them. Turing eventually pled guilty to indecency, and he was placed on probation and agreed to submit to estrogen treatment—intended to destroy his sex drive—for more than a year. The Imitation Game implies that the estrogen treatment sent Alan into an emotional tailspin, but Turing seems to have continued his work and social relationships normally during his year of probation. The film also implies that the estrogen treatment triggered Alan’s suicide, but in fact the treatment ended in April 1953, fourteen months before Turing killed himself. Although some modern scholars believe that his death from cyanide poisoning was an accident, Hodges believes that Turing made his suicide deliberately ambiguous so as to spare his mother the pain of believing that her son had killed himself on purpose. L.V. Anderson

Où l’on redécouvre que l’informatique, comme tant d’inventions avant elle, a d’abord servi à faire la guerre …

Oubli des précurseurs, partenaires ou concurrents (Marian Rejewsky, John von Neuman, Gordon Welchman, Wittgenstein), silence sur le plus important épisode de l’histoire (la complexification, en cours de route, d’Enigma par les Allemands), ajout de rencontres ou personnages fictifs et inutiles (John Cairncross, inspecteur de police), fausse accusation d’espionnage, erreurs importantes de dates (il avait suspendu son traitement depuis plus d’un an et travaillait sur toutes sortes de projets au moment d’une mort peut-être accidentelle), excessive individualisation d’un travail collectif qui a compté jusqu’à près de 10 000 personnes, exagération extrême de l’asociabilité du héros comme de l’opposition de son entourage …

Au sortir du passionnant film du norvégien Morten Tyldum (The Imitation game, du nom d’un jeu de société, que proposait Turing comme test d’intelligence artificielle, où un homme tente de se faire passer pour une femme) …

Sur la vie d’Alan Turing, le mathématicien britannique auquel on ne doit rien de moins avec le décodage, réputé inviolable car changé quoitidiennement, du fameux système de cryptage Enigma

 Au moment où en pleine de guerre de l’Atlantique les sous-marins allemands étaient passés bien près de couper l’Angleterre de son cordon ombilical américain …

Que la victoire sur l’Allemagne nazie mais aussi, excusez du peu, la (co-)invention de l’ordinateur …

Comment ne pas être frustré lorsque l’on découvre qu’Hollywood a encore réussi …

Emporté par son combat si tendance contre l’homophobie et ne reculant pour ce faire devant aucun anachronisme …

A passer à côté d’une histoire réelle encore plus ahurissante ?

A savoir celle d’un véritable héros …

Qui après avoir largement contribué à la victoire alliée (deux ans de guerre gagnées et peut-être 14 millions de victimes supplémentaires sauvées selon les estimations des historiens) …

Et pour préserver des recherches dont le secret militaire ne fut levé qu’en l’an 2000 …

Poussa l’abnégation jusqu’à endurer l’indignité et les désagréments d’une année de castration chimique …

Et surtout l’impossibilité, pour lui comme pour ses amis, de ne jamais révéler au monde …

Toute l’étendue de son inestimable contribution …

Tant à sa propre patrie qu’à l’humanité et à la Science avec un grand S ?

L’histoire par petites touches
Clément Ghys
Libération
27 janvier 2015

CRITIQUE
Codes . «Imitation Game», biopic d’Alan Turing, perd le fil de l’invention de l’ordinateur dans un numéro académique.

Après la sortie la semaine dernière d’Une merveilleuse histoire du temps, film consacré à Stephen Hawking, débarque en salles Imitation Game, biopic d’un autre scientifique, Alan Turing. Aux yeux des producteurs, les professeurs Tournesol seraient aimables du grand public, mais il conviendrait avant tout de montrer que, derrière chaque théorie – toute révolutionnaire soit-elle -, il y a un petit cœur qui bat.

Alan Turing, donc. L’Anglais est né en 1912 et mort en 1954, empoisonné au cyanure dans des circonstances jamais clairement établies. Dans sa courte vie, il aura inventé l’informatique, rien de moins. Il était asocial et homosexuel, deux qualités mal vues par la société d’alors. Le réalisateur norvégien Morten Tyldum s’est attaché à décrire la courte période au cours de laquelle le calcul de probabilités trouvera une matérialité, en cette chose que l’on appellera un ordinateur. En 1938, Turing, fraîchement sorti de Cambridge, est embauché par le gouvernement britannique pour décrypter Enigma, système de codes utilisé par les nazis. A Bletchley Park, zone où se croisent militaires et scientifiques et femmes réduites à être de simples «codeuses», le jeune homme passe ses heures à préparer son grand œuvre, une machine à analyser les messages allemands.

Asocial. Le réel auteur du film est sans doute l’équipe de décorateurs qui a fabriqué une (belle) réplique du premier ordinateur. Comme une machine, Imitation Game est calculé dans chacun de ses rouages. La narration se veut logique, s’enchaîne à la recherche d’un événement fondateur. Ici, il est même filmé : le jour où Turing, écolier, se vit offrir un livre de maths par le garçon dont il était amoureux. Le genre du biopic est habitué aux effets mécaniques, mais dans le cas de Turing, personnage si complexe, cela devient un écueil majeur. Il consiste à oublier le cheminement d’un intellectuel, à louper la force que prennent les ratés d’une pensée. La ligne droite que suit Imitation Game est le corollaire de son classicisme formel.

Autiste. Le film est auréolé de huit nominations aux oscars, et notamment son acteur principal, Benedict Cumberbatch. Le jeu de l’Anglais rappelle le rôle qui l’a rendu célèbre, Sherlock Holmes, dans la série de BBC One. La science est ici vue comme un résultat personnel, une activité autiste, plutôt que comme une longue déduction collective, un dialogue avec des penseurs contemporains et passés. Jamais le nom de John von Neumann, rival et autre père de l’informatique, n’est ici mentionné. Imitation Game passe à côté d’une histoire ahurissante et réelle, esquive les relations de pouvoir inhérentes à l’invention technologique, comme le fit brillamment David Fincher avec The Social Network. Le grand film d’archéologie de l’informatique reste à faire.

Imitation Game de Morten Tyldum avec Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley… 1 h 54.

« Imitation Game » : Alan Turing, génie tragique
Franck Nouchi

Le Monde

27.01.2015

L’avis du « Monde » : à voir
Le pardon royal fut accordé à Alan Turing (1912-1954) le 24 décembre 2013 par la reine Elizabeth. La souveraine britannique en finissait ainsi avec l’une des injustices les plus flagrantes du XXe siècle : la condamnation pour « indécence manifeste », en 1952, du mathématicien, héros méconnu de la seconde guerre mondiale. Son crime ? Il était homosexuel. Il avait réussi à casser le code Enigma utilisé par l’armée allemande pour ses communications secrètes et, ce faisant, contribué à la victoire des Alliés dans la bataille de l’Atlantique.

En 1952, la justice britannique avait donné à Turing le choix entre deux ans d’emprisonnement et un traitement aux hormones féminines revenant à une castration chimique. Le mathématicien choisit les injections, qui le rendirent impuissant. Le lundi de Pentecôte 1954, il croqua une pomme avant de se coucher. Le fruit ayant macéré dans du cyanure, le scientifique mettait fin à ses jours en s’inspirant de Blanche-Neige et les sept nains, le dessin animé de Walt Disney qu’il aimait tant.

Personnage étrange
Imitation Game, le film de Morten Tyldum, revient sur l’extraordinaire histoire de cet homme souvent présenté comme le co-inventeur de l’ordinateur. Benedict Cumberbatch, qui l’interprète, retrouve certaines facettes de ce personnage étrange, volontiers extravagant avec ses pantalons qui ne tiennent qu’avec des bouts de ficelle, circulant à vélo un masque à gaz sur le visage pour se protéger du rhume des foins… Cependant, pour connaître avec exactitude quelle fut la vie de Turing, mieux vaut lire l’ouvrage d’Andrew Hodges, Alan Turing, le génie qui a décrypté les codes secrets nazis et inventé l’ordinateur (Michel Lafon, 704 pages, 21,95 euros).

Turing connaît un premier moment de gloire en 1936, lorsqu’il postule l’existence théorique d’une machine programmable, capable d’effectuer très vite toutes sortes de calculs. Grâce à Turing, l’intelligence artificielle vient de naître. La guerre va lui permettre de mettre en pratique ses théories. A Bletchley Park – un manoir victorien qui abrite les services de décryptage du renseignement anglais –, il s’attaque, dès 1939, à la construction d’une machine capable de percer les mystères du codage Enigma.

Une petite communauté secrète
Avec son équipe, Turing parviendra, deux ans plus tard, à mettre au point les fameuses « bombes Turing », des curieuses machines capables, en quelques heures, de décrypter les communications entre l’état-major allemand et ses sous-marins dans l’Atlantique. Ces deux années, durant lesquelles il est devenu le véritable héros de cette petite communauté secrète, constituent la partie la plus intéressante d’Imitation Game.

La suite, le fait que Turing ne puisse faire état de ses découvertes faites pendant la guerre, mais aussi l’attention soupçonneuse que les services de renseignement portent à sa vie sentimentale, est un peu trop vite expédiée dans le film. Tyldum n’insiste pas suffisamment sur cette période de guerre froide et de maccarthysme triomphant durant laquelle les homosexuels furent souvent considérés comme les « maillons faibles » des systèmes d’espionnage et de défense occidentaux.

Musique oscarisable
En définitive, Imitation Game est le prototype du film anglais destiné à faire carrière aux Etats-Unis en raflant, si possible, quelques Oscars à Hollywood (il est nommé dans la catégorie « meilleur film ») : il est efficace, interprété par quelques acteurs fameux, à commencer par Benedict Cumberbatch, le Sherlock Holmes de la BBC, et doté d’une musique d’Alexandre Desplat elle aussi oscarisable.

Les scénaristes n’ont guère eu de scrupules à agrémenter l’histoire de Turing de quelques ornements qui n’ont pas grand-chose à voir avec la réalité. La mise en scène, classique, n’évite pas les clichés. Pour autant, et c’est tout le paradoxe de ces films spectaculaires, on ne s’ennuie pas devant cet Imitation Game.

Film britannique de Morten Tyldum avec Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley, Mark Strong (1 h 55). Sur le Web : theimitationgamemovie.com et http://www.studiocanal.fr/cid33293/imitation-game.html

 Voir aussi:

A Bletchley Park, l’histoire secrète de l’invention de l’informatique
Le film « The Imitation Game » retrace les années qu’y a passées le mathématicien Alan Turing, spécialiste du décryptage des communications allemandes pendant la deuxième guerre mondiale.
Martin Untersinger (Bletchley, envoyé spécial)

Le Monde

30.01.2015

Lorsqu’on arrive au petit matin près du manoir de Bletchley Park (Angleterre), occupé un temps par le mathématicien Alan Turing, il ne reste aucune trace de Benedict Cumberbatch et du tournage du film Imitiation Game. En revanche, on croise beaucoup de personnes âgées venues visiter ce qui est désormais un musée à la gloire des « casseurs de code », qui ont réussi à décrypter les communications allemandes pendant la seconde guerre mondiale.

Au-delà de la sortie d’un film consacré au sujet, la fréquentation du lieu tient au nouveau statut d’Alan Turing, désormais considéré comme un inventeur génial de l’ordinateur moderne, après les excuses officielles du gouvernement, en 2009, et du pardon royal accordé en 2013 – Turing avait été condamné à un traitement hormonal en 1952 en raison de son homosexualité.

En passant de l’ombre à la lumière, Turing a emmené Bletchley Park dans son sillage. Au tout début de la seconde guerre mondiale, 56 brillants membres des meilleures universités du Royaume-Uni (mathématiciens, linguistes, etc.) avaient été dépêchés, à 80 kilomètres au nord de Londres dans ce manoir victorien au goût architectural douteux pour préparer l’affrontement avec l’Allemagne nazie.

Enigma
Leur but : décrypter la machine utilisée par le IIIe Reich pour ses communications radio, un engin cryptographique sophistiqué baptisé Enigma. Cet appareil, qui ressemble à une grosse machine à écrire dans un étui en bois, comporte trois rotors dotés chacun de 26 circuits électriques, un pour chaque lettre de l’alphabet. A chaque pression sur une touche, un courant électrique parcourt les trois rotors et vient allumer une petite ampoule sur le dessus de la machine qui illumine une lettre, la « transcription » de celle qui vient d’être tapée. Au fil de la saisie du texte, les rotors pivotent à un rythme préétabli, de sorte qu’une même lettre tapée au début et à la fin d’un message ne sera pas traduite de la même manière.

Celui qui reçoit, en morse, le message crypté n’a qu’à configurer la machine de la même manière que son correspondant et à taper le texte qu’il reçoit. En retour s’allument les lettres tapées à l’origine par l’émetteur du message. Le problème pour celui qui tente de décrypter le message est immense : les possibilités de positionnement initial des rotors sont extrêmement nombreuses.

Les Britanniques et les Français la pensent inviolable, jusqu’à ce que trois mathématiciens polonais, à la veille de l’invasion de leur pays par la Wehrmacht, leur dévoilent une technique permettant, en exploitant plusieurs failles de la machine et les erreurs des Allemands, de briser le chiffrement d’une bonne partie des messages.

Dans les mois qui précèdent le début de la guerre, les armées allemandes modifient certaines caractéristiques de leurs machines Enigma qui réduisent à néant les avancées des scientifiques polonais. Alors que la menace allemande se fait de plus en plus sentir, la tâche incombe donc aux « professeurs » de Bletchley Park de percer le secret d’Enigma.

Les plus brillants cerveaux du pays
Ils y parviendront, en grande partie et au prix d’un effort colossal et d’avancées sans précédent dans l’histoire de l’informatique. Les seuls cerveaux réunis à Bletchley Park ne suffisent évidemment pas. Alan Turing s’emploiera donc à démultiplier le cerveau humain avec une machine.

Poursuivant les travaux des Polonais, Alan Turing et les autres mathématiciens construisent donc un appareil destiné à passer en revue extrêmement rapidement les différents paramètres possibles d’Enigma. Son nom ? « La bombe ». Elle est pourtant plus proche du gros réfrigérateur que de l’explosif. Sur son flanc, des dizaines de bobines tournent sur elles-mêmes pour passer en revue les différents paramètres possibles d’Enigma.

Lorsque la machine et son bruit semblable à plusieurs milliers d’aiguilles qui s’entrechoquent s’arrêtent, une opératrice – 75 % des Britanniques présents à Bletchley Park sont des femmes – note la combinaison possible et vérifie si elle permet de déchiffrer les messages du jour. Plusieurs exemplaires de cette « bombe », prototypes des ordinateurs modernes, fonctionneront simultanément à Bletchley Park.

De la « bombe » au « Colosse »
Plus tard pendant la guerre sera même construit à Bletchley Park le premier véritable ordinateur électronique moderne, Colossus. Il s’attaquera avec succès à Lorenz, l’appareil utilisé par Hitler pour communiquer avec ses plus proches généraux, pourtant plus robuste qu’Enigma. Grâce à ces machines révolutionnaires pour l’époque, les Britanniques ont collecté de précieuses informations sur la stratégie et les mouvements des nazis. Les historiens estiment qu’ils ont largement contribué à accélérer la victoire des Alliés et sauvé des millions de vies.

Jusqu’à une date relativement récente, cet épisode, pourtant l’un principaux actes de naissance de l’informatique et une des clés de la seconde guerre mondiale, était totalement inconnu. Lorsqu’on en demande la raison au docteur Joel Greenberg, mathématicien et historien de Bletchley Park, la réponse fuse : « le secret ! »

L’effort entrepris par les mathématiciens de Bletchley était tellement crucial que ce qui s’y passait n’était connu que d’une petite poignée de très hauts responsables britanniques. Tous les renseignements issus des « codebreakers » étaient frappés du sceau « ultra », plus confidentiel encore que « top secret », un niveau de protection créé spécialement pour Bletchley. Tous ceux qui y travaillaient, y compris les responsables de la cantine, étaient soumis à l’Official Secret Act, un texte drastique qui leur interdisait toute allusion à leur activité, et ce, en théorie, jusqu’à leur mort. Le secret était tel que les 8 500 personnes qui y travaillaient au plus fort de la mobilisation ne savaient pas exactement ce que faisaient leurs collègues. Même les plus proches parents des mathématiciens impliqués ne savaient rien, pour certains jusqu’à leur lit de mort.

Et pour cause : il fallait à tout prix que les Allemands ignorent l’existence et les succès de Bletchley Park. Pour ce faire, les Britanniques se sont même efforcés de faire croire que les informations cruciales obtenues via leurs casseurs de codes leur parvenaient par des moyens plus traditionnels, quitte à inventer, dans des messages destinés à tromper les Allemands, de faux réseaux d’espions dans toute l’Europe. Plus tard, avec la guerre froide, c’est la crainte des espions soviétiques qui a contribué à garder le silence sur les activités du manoir – dont l’existence et les premiers succès étaient pourtant connus de Staline.

Ce secret n’a pas empêché les connaissances acquises à Bletchley Park de se diffuser après-guerre. Les Britanniques ont partagé avec les Américains le design des « bombes » et de « Colossus », ce qui leur a permis d’améliorer considérablement ce dernier. A la fin de la guerre, les mathématiciens sont retournés dans leurs universités et, pour certains, ont continué leurs travaux, sans pouvoir dire où et pourquoi ils avaient tant progressé.

Le secret s’effrite un peu en 1974 avec la parution de l’ouvrage de Frederick William Winterbotham, The Ultra Secret, levant quelque peu le voile sur les activités de Bletchley Park. Mais jusqu’à 1982 et la parution de The Hut Six Story, de Gordon Welchman – un mathématicien qui a joué, aux côtés de Turing, un rôle majeur dans le décryptage des codes Allemands –, les informations concernant Bletchley Park sont généralistes et fragmentaires, explique M. Greenberg.

De l’ombre à la lumière
L’obscurité qui recouvre cette période de l’histoire britannique s’est donc dissipée peu à peu. Ces dernières années, c’est même une pleine lumière qui se déverse sur le manoir victorien. Bletchley Park attirait en 2006 moins de 50 000 personnes par an. En 2014, ils ont été cinq fois plus nombreux à venir visiter les installations réhabilitées telles qu’elles existaient au tournant de l’année 1941.

Le temps a passé depuis qu’en 1991, des historiens locaux ont réinvesti les lieux, quasiment délabrés et jusqu’ici vaguement utilisés par le gouvernement. Ce n’est même qu’au mois de mai, à l’issue d’un chantier de rénovation à 8 millions de livres, que le musée s’est doté d’un visage moderne. Créé en 1994, il vivait jusqu’alors de manière « précaire », concède-t-on aujourd’hui. Le retour en grâce, largement justifié, d’Alan Turing n’est pas étranger à son succès. « En décembre, le mois de la sortie de The Imitation Game au Royaume-Uni, le nombre de visiteurs a énormément augmenté », explique Iain Standen, le PDG de Bletchley Trust, l’organisation à but non lucratif qui gère le site.

De quoi se féliciter et se rassurer quant à la pérennité des installations, financées notamment par Google, British Aerospace, le fabricant d’antivirus McAfee ou la loterie britannique. Mais les dirigeants du musée ne veulent pas trop dépendre de l’aura, forcément périssable, d’Alan Turing. « Nous rappelons volontiers qu’Alan Turing n’était qu’une personne sur près de 10 000 et que Bletchley Park ne représente qu’une partie d’un individu aux multiples facettes, explique encore M. Standen. C’était un travail de groupe ». Il s’agit donc de « raconter les histoires des autres héros méconnus » qui ont accompagné celui qu’on présente un peu vite comme le seul inventeur de l’ordinateur moderne. Difficile de lui donner tort : qui connaît Dilly Knox, John Jeffreys, Peter Twinn ou encore Gordon Welchman, qui ont pourtant été aussi importants dans les progrès réalisés à Bletchley que Turing lui-même ?

Les pionniers de l’analyse des métadonnées
Si Alan Turing était responsable du décryptage des messages interceptés de la marine allemande, Bletchley Park ne se limitait pas à cette seule activité, abonde M. Greenberg. Ce dernier explique ainsi que les ingénieurs de Bletchley Park sont des pionniers de l’analyse de trafic. « Pour moi, c’est encore plus important que les avancées en matière de cryptographie », avance l’historien. Chaque utilisateur allemand d’Enigma disposait d’identifiants uniques. Les analystes de Bletchley se sont organisés de manière à pouvoir suivre précisément quel responsable parlait à qui, quand et où. Une excellente manière de surveiller l’armée allemande. « Cela ressemble beaucoup aux métadonnées d’aujourd’hui », explique M. Greenberg.

Autre innovation développée à Bletchley : le stockage de données. A l’aide de petites fiches perforées traitées par des machines automatisées, qui servaient à organiser les informations recueillies dans les messages allemands décryptés, les experts de Bletchley ont pu faire des rapprochements inédits. Ainsi, au cours de la guerre, ils ont décodé un message allemand indiquant qu’un gradé de la Wehrmacht allait se rendre dans une ville du sud de l’Italie. Isolée, cette information ne vaut rien. Mais grâce à leur ingénieux système, ils retrouvent un ancien message, datant de plusieurs mois, qui leur permet de découvrir que ce gradé était en réalité responsable de l’établissement de bases aériennes allemandes. Et que les Allemands s’apprêtent donc à en installer dans le sud de l’Italie.

Bletchley avait donc abouti à construire l’équivalent – très spécialisé – d’un véritable moteur de recherche…

Imitation game
Frédéric Strauss
Télérama
28/01/2015

Deux énigmes pour une seule intrigue… D’un côté, une machine, justement baptisée Enigma : permettant d’envoyer des messages cryptés, elle fut l’arme de l’Allemagne nazie pour diriger ses opérations militaires. De l’autre, un homme, le mathématicien britannique Alan Turing (1912-1954). Engagé avec d’autres « cerveaux » pour briser le code des transmissions allemandes, il fut un héros de l’ombre au service de son pays, avant d’être lui-même brisé : condamné en 1952 pour homosexualité, contraint d’accepter une castration chimique pour échapper à la prison, il se suicidera.

Sur fond de tensions dramatiques face à l’avancée de l’armée allemande, la lutte contre Enigma se joue derrière les portes d’un hangar où Alan Turing construit son énorme appareil à décrypter les codes, ancêtre de l’ordinateur. C’est paradoxalement la partie la moins excitante d’Imitation Game : pas assez expliquée, la logique qui permet de trouver la clé des messages demeure vague et abstraite. C’est que le jeu annoncé par le titre désigne autre chose : un test mis au point par Turing pour différencier intelligence artificielle et intelligence humaine, hélas trop vite évoqué.

En revanche, une hypothèse passionnante s’affirme par touches successives, à travers le portrait d’un génie asocial, capable de dialoguer avec les mécanismes les plus complexes mais pas du tout conçu pour les relations humaines : l’homme qui vainquit une machine en était une lui-même. A cette vision, qui pourrait être glaçante, l’interprétation de Benedict Cumberbatch apporte, sans la contredire, beaucoup de nuances. L’acteur parvient à exprimer à la fois l’efficience presque robotisée de Turing et sa solitude, sa souffrance. Sa composition, qui lui vaut une nomination logique à l’oscar, semble éclairer le destin de cet être à part, jamais bien dans son époque : homme du futur, ouvrant la voie aux nouvelles technologies, sacrifié au nom de lois héritées d’un passé archaïque. En 2009, le Premier ministre Gordon Brown présenta des excuses au nom du gouvernement britannique pour la manière dont Alan Turing fut traité. En 2013, la reine lui exprima un pardon posthume. En 2015, c’est un grand acteur qui, en l’incarnant, lui rend hommage.

‘The Imitation Game’ entertains at the expense of accuracy
Historical errors weaken mostly enjoyable film about Alan Turing breaking Enigma code
Andrew Grant
Science News
December 30, 2014

Ordinarily the life of a mathematician isn’t ideal fodder for a major Hollywood movie. But when that mathematician is Alan Turing — the British genius who inspired the modern computer, protected Allied soldiers from Nazi attacks with his code-breaking prowess and was a closeted gay man — you’ve got yourself a film with Oscar buzz. (Casting Benedict Cumberbatch as the lead doesn’t hurt either.)

Overall, the movie works: It’s fun, it’s gripping and it features a brilliant performance from Cumberbatch. But like so many other Hollywood biopics, it takes some major artistic license — which is disappointing, because Turing’s actual story is so compelling.

The film mainly takes place during the early years of World War II, when the German war machine is overwhelming Britain. Frustratingly, the British can intercept German communications but can’t understand them. The Germans had encoded their communiqués on Enigma machines, encryption devices that could substitute letters in a message using any of about 150 quintillion possible settings. The filmmakers effectively portray a race against the clock as Turing struggles to perfect his crazy idea for a machine that could break the Enigma code.

In reality, Turing had already outlined the concept of a computing machine in a 1936 paper (SN: 6/30/12, p. 26) and had built a cipher machine while at Princeton in the late 1930s, says Turing biographer Andrew Hodges. By mid-1940, Hodges says, Turing and his team at Bletchley Park in Milton Keynes, England, were routinely decoding German Air Force messages with code-breaking machines, or bombes. Within another year the cryptanalysts, which included Joan Clarke (played in the movie by Keira Knightley), had deciphered the all-important naval messages that strategized U-boat attacks.

The biggest real-life drama is unmentioned in the film, Hodges says. In February 1942, the Germans adopted a more complex Enigma machine for naval communications, again putting the Allies in the dark. “It was a major crisis,” Hodges says. In desperation, Turing and American partners ran multiple bombes in parallel and used electronic components to speed up the code-breaking process. Finally, in early 1943, the Allies succeeded in cracking the code.

The consequences of the 1942 Enigma upgrade went far beyond the war. The introduction to electronics, Hodges says, offered Turing a practical means for incorporating his 1936 conceptual ideas into a revolutionary machine — the digital computer. “The scientific story is much bigger than just the Enigma problem,” Hodges says. “It was a great movement in which ideas and new technology came together.”

The Imitation Game ignores much of this history, and it also includes an egregious, historically inaccurate storyline in which Turing fails to report a Soviet spy to avoid being outed as gay.

Nonetheless, the acting, suspense and a surprising amount of humor make it a movie worth seeing. Just take some time after the movie to read up on Turing’s actual immense contributions to the war and modern computing.

The Imitation Game review: Knightley and Cumberbatch impress, but historical spoilers lower the tension
The Alan Turing biopic has all the elements of drama going for it, but somehow the script fails to catch fire
Catherine Shoard
The Guardian
8 September 2014

The story of Alan Turing, the Enigma codebreaker who helped win the second world war and was chemically castrated by the state for his troubles, is a challenging one to make into a movie.

Yes, there’s some high-stakes stuff to work with: sex, spies, surveillance, the invention of computers and the fate of millions of people. But it’s a tale whose key moments have already fallen victim to spoilers. Will Turing’s massive deciphering machine work? It might. Will we beat the Germans? Possibly.

It’s also a story whose hero is both venerated and pitied, but about whom most people know little.

Unlike, say, Stephen Hawking, whose biopic premiered at the Toronto film festival on Sunday, this is not a man whose work we got for Christmas, whose face and voice are immediately familiar. This allows Benedict Cumberbatch more free rein, but the audience less certainty over how to gauge his merits.

What Cumberbatch delivers is an impressively rounded character study of someone variously kind, prickly, aggressive, awkward and supremely confident. But it’s almost too nuanced. Accuracy isn’t all, but fumbling in the dark isn’t always fun.

The film is bookended by scenes of Turing’s interrogation by a Manchester policeman (Rory Kinnear) who smells a rat after investigating a burglary in Turing’s flat. The place is a tip, yet nothing appears to have been taken, and the victim is sniffily dismissive: « What I could use now is not a bobby but a good cleaning lady. »

Kinnear digs a little deeper and unearths … nothing. Turing has no war record. So what really went on at the radio factory where he said he worked?

And so the story proper starts, with Turing’s interview at Bletchley Park, where he fares badly with the bluff sergeant Charles Dance, but is rescued by mysterious Mark Strong.

In an expository scene rich in Sorkin-ish dialogue and light on plausibility, we’re told about the mission and introduced to the rest of the team, including Matthew Goode (cad), Allen Leech (Scot) and Matthew Beard as a little chap who always seems so ill-informed and off-the-pace you wonder if he’s an intern.

New recruits are required if they’re to whip Hitler, so Turing courts candidates through a cryptic crossword: if they solve it they can attend an exam in London. When Keira Knightley shows up and is mistaken for a secretary, you don’t have to be a whiz to guess she’ll not only ace the test but do so miles faster than her male counterparts.

Graham Moore’s script tracks the code-cracking, alongside Turing and Knightley’s burgeoning closeness and the progress of the war (through familiar newsreel). At points, we flash forward to the police investigation (« He’s a poof, not a spy! » exclaims one copper, having a eureka moment) and back to Turing’s schooldays friendship with a boy called Christopher.

Much about The Imitation Game – cast, subject matter, parquet flooring – appears to mimic the 2011 film of Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, with which it also shares Working Title roots and a director making their English language debut (in that case, Tomas Alfredson, in this, Morten Tyldum). But it’s not as chilly or convincing, doesn’t burn with the same intellectual intensity as that film, nor of, say, The Social Network, whose template it apes.

What works is – as with Hawking story The Theory of Everything – the relationship between the central couple. Knightley is miles better than she’s been in a while; sitting on a shelf rather than centre stage seems to suit her. She has fun with her plummy vowels, even when saying lines like « I’m a woman in a man’s job ». Cumberbatch’s Turing is most interesting when at his softest; endlessly bashing up against less brilliant colleagues or military bureaucracy is bruising all round.

But it’s the script which may prevent this hitting the Oscars jackpot. It’s too formulaic, too efficient at simply whisking you through and making sure you’ve clocked the diversity message.: without square pegs – like those played by Cumberbatch and Knightley – the world would be by far the poorer.

« Sometimes it is the people no one imagines anything of that do the things no one can imagine, » runs the movie’s mouthful tagline. It leaves a strange taste. Turing’s treatment was terrible. Perhaps his achievement, in the end, should not be tainted by association.

The Imitation Game: inventing a new slander to insult Alan Turing
The wartime codebreaker and computing genius was pursued for homosexuality, but nobody – until film-makers came along – accused him of being a traitor
Alex von Tunzelmann
The Guardian
Thursday 20 November 2014

The Imitation Game (2014)
Director: Morten Tyldum
Entertainment grade: C+
History grade: Fail

Childhood

The Imitation Game jumps around three time periods – Turing’s schooldays in 1928, his cryptographic work at Bletchley Park from 1939-45, and his arrest for gross indecency in Manchester in 1952. It isn’t accurate about any of them, but the least wrong bits are the 1928 ones. Young Turing (played strikingly well by Alex Lawther) is a lonely, awkward boy, whose only friend is a kid called Christopher Morcom. Turing nurtures a youthful passion for Morcom, and is about to declare his love when Morcom mysteriously fails to return after a holiday. Turing is summoned into the headmaster’s office, and is told coldly that the object of his affection has died of bovine tuberculosis. The film is right that this awful event had a formative impact on Turing’s life. In reality, though, Turing had been warned before his friend died that he should prepare for the worst. The housemaster’s speech (to all the boys, not just him) announcing Morcom’s death was kind and comforting.

Romance

In the 1939-45 strand of the story, Turing has grown up physically – though not, the film implies, emotionally. He is played by Benedict Cumberbatch, who is always good and puts in a strong performance despite the clunkiness of the screenplay. The film gives him a quasi-romantic foil in cryptanalyst Joan Clarke (Keira Knightley), dubiously fictionalised as the key emotional figure of Turing’s adult life. The real Turing was engaged to her for a while, but he told her upfront that he had homosexual tendencies. According to him, she was “unfazed” by this.

Technology

Benedict Cumberbatch The Imitation Game Long load times … Benedict Cumberbatch in The Imitation Game Photograph: Allstar/Black Bear Pictures/Sportsphoto Ltd

Turing builds an Enigma-code-cracking machine, which he calls Christopher. It’s understandable that films about complicated science usually simplify the facts. This one has sentimentalised them, too: fusing A Beautiful Mind with Frankenstein to portray Turing as the ultimate misunderstood boffin, and the Christopher machine as his beloved creation. In real life, the machine that cracked Enigma was called the Bombe, and the first operating version of it was named Victory. The digital computer Turing invented was known as the Universal Turing Machine. Colossus, the first programmable digital electronic computer, was built at Bletchley Park by engineer Tommy Flowers, incorporating Turing’s ideas.

Espionage

The Imitation Game puts John Cairncross, a Soviet spy and possible “Fifth Man” of the Cambridge spy ring, on Turing’s cryptography team. Cairncross was at Bletchley Park, but he was in a different unit from Turing. As Turing’s biographer Andrew Hodges, on whose book this film is based, has said, it is “ludicrous” to imagine that two people working separately at Bletchley would even have met. Security was far too tight to allow it. In his own autobiography, Cairncross wrote: “The rigid separation of the different units made contact with other staff members almost impossible, so I never got to know anyone apart from my direct operational colleagues.” In the film, Turing works out that Cairncross is a spy; but Cairncross threatens to expose his sexuality. “If you tell him my secret, I’ll tell him yours,” he says.

The blackmail works. Turing covers up for the spy, for a while at least. This is wholly imaginary and deeply offensive – for concealing a spy would have been an extremely serious matter. Were the makers of The Imitation Game intending to accuse Alan Turing, one of Britain’s greatest war heroes, of cowardice and treason? Creative licence is one thing, but slandering a great man’s reputation – while buying into the nasty 1950s prejudice that gay men automatically constituted a security risk – is quite another.

Sexuality

The final section of the film, set in 1951, may be the silliest, and not only because the film might have bothered to check that Turing’s arrest actually happened in 1952. Nor only because a key plot point rests on the fictional Detective Nock (Rory Kinnear) using Tipp-Ex, which didn’t exist until 1959 (similar products were marketed from 1956, but that’s still not early enough for anyone to be using it in the film). Nock pursues Turing because he suspects him of being another Soviet spy, and accidentally uncovers his homosexuality in the process. This is not how it happened, and the whole film should really get over its irrelevant obsession with Soviet spies. In real life, Turing himself reported a petty theft to the police – but changed details of his story to cover up the relationship he was having with the possible culprit, Arnold Murray. The police did not suspect him of espionage. They pursued him with regard to the homophobic law of gross indecency. He submitted a five-page statement admitting to his affair with Murray – evidence which helped convict him.

Justice

The film is right that the “chemical castration” Turing underwent after his conviction was unjust and disgusting. Turing was pardoned in 2013, but the pardon was controversial. Many campaigners believe, as Turing himself did, that consensual sex between men should never have constituted an offence at all. Tens of thousands of less famous men were similarly prosecuted between 1885 and 1967, and their convictions stand.

Verdict

Historically, The Imitation Game is as much of a garbled mess as a heap of unbroken code. For its appalling suggestion that Alan Turing might have covered up for a Soviet spy, it must be sent straight to the bottom of the class.

A Poor Imitation of Alan Turing
Christian Caryl
The New York review of books
December 19, 2014

I’ve been fascinated by the computer science pioneer Alan Turing ever since I came across the remarkable account of his life written by the British mathematician and gay rights activist Andrew Hodges in 1983. The moment of publication was no accident, for two reasons. First, by the early 1980s the story of Turing’s wartime efforts to break Nazi codes had receded just far enough in time to overcome the draconian security restrictions that had prevented it from being told. Second, gay rights campaigners in Europe and the US were enjoying some of their first big successes in breaking through long-standing discrimination. Suddenly it became possible not only to celebrate Turing’s enormous contribution to Allied victory in the war but also to tell the story of his 1952 conviction and subsequent punishment on charges of homosexuality (still a criminal offense in Great Britain at the time), followed by his death, at the age of forty-one, two years later. (For Hodges, this death was clearly a suicide; intriguingly, Jack Copeland, his more recent biographer, isn’t so sure. More on that later.)

To anyone trying to turn this story into a movie, the choice seems clear: either you embrace the richness of Turing as a character and trust the audience to follow you there, or you simply capitulate, by reducing him to a caricature of the tortured genius. The latter, I’m afraid, is the path chosen by director Morten Tyldum and screenwriter Graham Moore in The Imitation Game, their new, multiplex-friendly rendering of the story. In their version, Turing (played by Benedict Cumberbatch) conforms to the familiar stereotype of the otherworldly nerd: he’s the kind of guy who doesn’t even understand an invitation to lunch. This places him at odds not only with the other codebreakers in his unit, but also, equally predictably, positions him as a natural rebel.

Just to make sure we get the point, his recruitment to the British wartime codebreaking organization at Bletchley Park is rendered as a ridiculous confrontation with Alastair Denniston (Charles Dance, of Game of Thrones fame), the Royal Navy officer then in charge of British signals intelligence: “How the bloody hell are you supposed to decrypt German communications if you don’t, oh, I don’t know, speak German?” thunders Denniston. “I’m quite excellent at crossword puzzles,” responds Turing.

On various occasions throughout the film, Denniston tries to fire Turing or have him arrested for espionage, which is resisted by those who have belatedly recognized his redemptive brilliance. “If you fire Alan, you’ll have to fire me, too,” says one of his (formerly hostile) coworkers. There’s no question that the real-life Turing was decidedly eccentric, and that he didn’t suffer fools gladly. As his biographers vividly relate, though, he could also be a wonderfully engaging character when he felt like it, notably popular with children and thoroughly charming to anyone for whom he developed a fondness.

All of this stands sharply at odds with his characterization in the film, which depicts him as a dour Mr. Spock who is disliked by all of his coworkers—with the possible exception of Joan Clarke (Keira Knightley). The film spares no opportunity to drive home his robotic oddness. He uses the word “logical” a lot and can’t grasp even the most modest of jokes. This despite the fact that he had a sprightly sense of humor, something that comes through vividly in the accounts of his friends, many of whom shared their stories with both Hodges and Copeland. (For the record, the real Turing was also a bit of a slob, with a chronic disregard for personal hygiene. The glamorous Cumberbatch, by contrast, looks like he’s just stepped out of a Burberry catalog.)

Now, one might easily dismiss such distortions as trivial. But actually they point to a much broader and deeply regrettable pattern. Tyldum and Moore are determined to suggest maximum dramatic tension between their tragic outsider and a blinkered society. (“You will never understand the importance of what I am creating here,” he wails when Denniston’s minions try to destroy his machine.) But this not only fatally miscasts Turing as a character—it also completely destroys any coherent telling of what he and his colleagues were trying to do.

In reality, Turing was an entirely willing participant in a collective enterprise that featured a host of other outstanding intellects who happily coexisted to extraordinary effect. The actual Denniston, for example, was an experienced cryptanalyst and was among those who, in 1939, debriefed the three Polish experts who had already spent years figuring out how to attack the Enigma, the state-of-the-art cipher machine the German military used for virtually all of their communications. It was their work that provided the template for the machines Turing would later create to revolutionize the British signals intelligence effort. So Turing and his colleagues were encouraged in their work by a military leadership that actually had a pretty sound understanding of cryptological principles and operational security. As Copeland notes, the Nazis would have never allowed a bunch of frivolous eggheads to engage in such highly sensitive work, and they suffered the consequences. The film misses this entirely.

In Tyldum and Moore’s version of events, Turing and his small group of fellow codebreakers spend the first two years of the war in fruitless isolation; only in 1941 does Turing’s crazy machine finally show any results. This is a highly stylized version of Turing’s epic struggle to crack the hardest German cipher, the one used by the German navy, whose ravaging submarines nearly brought Britain to its knees during the early years of the war. What this account neglects to mention is that Turing’s “bombes”—electromechanical calculating devices designed to reconstruct the settings of the Enigma—were already helping to decipher German army and air force codes from early on.

The movie version, in short, represents a bizarre departure from the historical record. In fact, Bletchley Park—and not only Turing’s legendary Hut 8—was doing productive work from the very beginning of the war. Within a few years its motley assortment of codebreakers, linguists, stenographers, and communications experts were operating on a near-industrial scale. By the end of the war there were some 9,000 people working on the project, processing thousands of intercepts per day.

A bit like one of those smartphones that bristles with unneeded features, the film does its best to ladle in extra doses of intrigue where none existed. Tyldum and Moore conjure up an entirely superfluous subplot involving John Cairncross, who was spying for the Soviet Union during his service at Bletchley Park. There’s no evidence that he ever crossed paths with Turing—Bletchley, contrary to the film, was much bigger than a single hut—but The Imitation Game includes him among Turing’s coworkers. When Turing discovers his true allegiance, Cairncross turns the tables on him, saying that he’ll reveal Turing’s homosexuality if his secret is divulged. Turing backs off, leaving the spy in place.

Not many of the critics seem to have paid attention to this detail—except for historian Alex von Tunzelmann, who pointed out that the filmmakers have thus managed, almost as an afterthought, to turn their hero into a traitor. The movie tries to soften this by revealing that Stewart Menzies, the head of the Special Intelligence Service, has known about Cairncross’s treachery from the start—a jury-rigged solution to a gratuitous plot problem. (In fact, Cairncross, “the fifth man,” was never prosecuted.)
Jack English/Black Bear Pictures
Benedict Cumberbatch as Alan Turing in The Imitation Game, 2014

These errors are not random; there is a method to the muddle. The filmmakers see their hero above all as a martyr of a homophobic Establishment, and they are determined to lay emphasis on his victimhood. The Imitation Game ends with the following title: “After a year of government-mandated hormonal therapy, Alan Turing committed suicide in 1954.” This is in itself something of a distortion. Turing was convicted on homosexuality charges in 1952, and chose the “therapy” involving female hormones—aimed, in the twisted thinking of the times, at suppressing his “unnatural” desires—as an alternative to jail time. It was barbarous treatment, and Turing complained that the pills gave him breasts. But the whole miserable episode ended in 1953—a full year before his death, something not made clear to the filmgoer.

Copeland, who has taken a fresh look at the record and spoken with many members of Turing’s circle, disputes that the experience sent Turing into a downward spiral of depression. By the accounts of those who knew him, he bore the injustice with fortitude, then spent the next year enthusiastically pursuing projects. Copeland cites a number of close friends (and Turing’s mother) who saw no evidence that he was depressed in the days before his death, and notes that the coroner who concluded that Turing had died by biting a cyanide-laced apple never examined the fruit. Copeland offers sound evidence that the death might have actually been accidental, the result of a self-rigged laboratory where Turing was conducting experiments with cyanide. He left no suicide letter.

Copeland also leaves open the possibility of foul play, which can’t be dismissed out of hand, when you consider that all of this happened during the period of McCarthyite hysteria, an era when homosexuality was regarded as an inherent “security risk.” Turing’s government work meant that he knew a lot of secrets, in the postwar period as well. It’s likely we’ll never know the whole story.

One thing is certain: Turing could be remarkably naive about his own homosexuality. It was Turing himself who reported the fateful 1952 burglary, probably involving a working-class boyfriend, that brought his gay lifestyle to the attention to the police, thus setting off the legal proceedings against him. In The Imitation Game he holds this information back from the cops, who then cleverly wheedle it out. It’s another indication of the filmmakers’ determination to show Turing as an essentially passive figure. He’s never the master of his own destiny.

But even if you believe that Turing was driven to his death, The Imitation Game’s treatment of his fate borders on the ridiculous. In one of the film’s most egregious scenes, his wartime friend Joan pays him a visit in 1952 or so, while he’s still taking his hormones. She finds him shuffling around the house in his bathrobe, barely capable of putting together a coherent sentence. He tells her that he’s terrified that the powers that be will take away “Christopher”—his latest computer, which he’s named after the dead friend of his childhood (just as he did with his machine at Bletchley Park).

As near as I can tell, there is no basis for any of this in the historical record; it’s monstrous hogwash, a conceit entirely cooked up by Moore. The real Turing certainly paid periodic and dignified respects to the memory of his first love, Christopher Morcom, but I doubt very much that he ever confused his computers with people. In perhaps the most bitter irony of all, the filmmakers have managed to transform the real Turing, vivacious and forceful, into just the sort of mythological gay man, whiney and weak, that homophobes love to hate.

This is indicative of the bad faith underlying the whole enterprise, which is desperate to put Turing in the role of a gay liberation totem but can’t bring itself to show him kissing another man—something he did frequently, and with gusto. And it most definitely doesn’t show him cruising New York’s gay bars, or popping off on a saucy vacation to one of the less reputable of the Greek islands. The Imitation Game is a film that prefers its gay men decorously disembodied.

To be honest, I’m a bit surprised that there hasn’t been more pushback against The Imitation Game by intelligence professionals, historians, and survivors of Turing’s circle. But I think I understand why. After so many years in which Turing failed to get his due, no one wants to be seen as spoiling the party. I strongly doubt, though, that many of those in the know are recommending this film to their friends. (For his part, Andrew Hodges is apparently opting to avoid talking about the movie during his current book tour—it’s easy to imagine why he might choose to do so, and I don’t fault him for it.)

If you want to see a richly imagined British movie about a fascinating historical character, go see Mike Leigh’s new film about the painter J.M.W. Turner. But if you want to see the real Alan Turing, you’re better off reading the books.

How Accurate Is The Imitation Game?
L.V. Anderson
Slate
Dec. 3 2014

The Oscar-buzzed new movie The Imitation Game is an old-fashioned biopic, crafting a tidy, entertaining narrative from disparate strands of its subject’s life—in this case, British mathematician, codebreaker, and computer pioneer Alan Turing. Slate movie critic Dana Stevens has taken issue with the film’s emotional straightforwardness, writing, “The Imitation Game doesn’t do right by the complex and often unlovable man it purports to be about.” Meanwhile, on Outward, my colleagues J. Bryan Lowder and June Thomas praise the film’s message in spite of its historical inaccuracies.

Just how inaccurate are those inaccuracies? I read the masterful biography that the screenplay is based on, Andrew Hodges’ Alan Turing: The Enigma, to find out. I discovered that The Imitation Game takes major liberties with its source material, injecting conflict where none existed, inventing entirely fictional characters, rearranging the chronology of events, and misrepresenting the very nature of Turing’s work at Bletchley Park. At the same time, the film might paint Turing as being more unlovable than he actually was. For details on the film’s flights of fancy, read on. (There will, naturally, be spoilers.)

The Alan Turing played by Benedict Cumberbatch is brusque, humorless, and brilliant. In an early scene where he is interviewed by Commander Denniston (Charles Dance), we learn that he made exceptional achievements in mathematics at a young age. This is a reflection of reality: Turing was elected as a fellow at Cambridge at the age of 22, and he published his most influential paper, “On Computable Numbers,” at 24.

Other aspects of Cumberbatch’s characterization are true to life, as well: Turing was fairly indifferent to politics, both in the interpersonal sense and in the civic sense. He ran marathons. He was also gay, and even more openly than the film implies. Hodges’ biography is filled with instances in which Turing boldly made advances toward other men—mostly without success. Turing also told his friends and colleagues about his homosexuality.

However, the central conceit of The Imitation Game—that Turing singlehandedly invented and physically built the machine that broke the Germans’ Enigma code—is simply untrue. A predecessor of the “Bombe”—the name given to the large, ticking machine that used rotors to test different letter combinations—was invented by Polish cryptanalysts before Turing even began working as a cryptologist for the British government.* Turing’s great innovation was to design a new machine that broke the Enigma code faster by looking for likely letter combinations and ruling out combinations that were unlikely to yield results. Turing didn’t develop the new, improved machine by dint of his own singular genius—the mathematician Gordon Welchman, who is not even mentioned in the film, collaborated with Turing on the design.

Leaving aside Turing’s codebreaking achievements, The Imitation Game also somewhat alters Turing’s personality. The film strongly implies that Alan is somewhere on the autism spectrum: Cumberbatch’s character doesn’t understand jokes, takes common expressions literally, and seems indifferent to the suffering and annoyance he causes in others. This characterization is rooted in Hodge’s biography but is also largely exaggerated: Hodges never suggests that Turing was autistic, and though he refers to Turing’s tendency to take contracts and other bureaucratic red tape literally, he also describes Turing as a man with a keen sense of humor and close friends. To be sure, Hodges paints Turing as shy, eccentric, and impatient with irrationality, but Cumberbatch’s narcissistic, detached Alan has more in common with the actor’s title character in Sherlock than with the Turing of Hodges’ biography. One of Turing’s colleagues at Bletchley Park later recalled him as “a very easily approachable man” and said “we were very very fond of him”; none of this is reflected in the film.

In addition to the more significant creative liberties that the movie takes, there are small fictions surrounding his character in the movie. Although, in the movie, Alan tells Denniston that he doesn’t know German, Turing did in fact study German and travel to Germany before and after the war. Turing did not, as far as we know, have a compulsion to separate his peas and carrots. (In fact, given his generally unkempt appearance, it’s highly unlikely he gave attention to such details.) And whether or not Turing liked sandwiches—a key plot point in The Imitation Game—goes unmentioned in Hodges’ biography.

In flashbacks to 1928 in The Imitation Game, we learn that Alan’s first love was a classmate at boarding school named Christopher. Christopher rescues Alan after he’s nailed under the floorboards by bullies, teaches Alan to communicate via codes and ciphers, flirts with Alan, and then suddenly dies of bovine tuberculosis.

Although many of the details are invented for the movie, the gist of this storyline is true: Turing really did befriend and develop romantic feelings for a boy named Christopher Morcom at Sherborne School, the boys’ school in Dorset that he attended as a teenager. (He also did get trapped under the floorboards by other boys, according to Alan Turing: The Enigma, but this occurred before he met Morcom.) Morcom died from bovine tuberculosis in 1930, shortly after he’d been accepted to Cambridge and three years after Turing had first met him.

In the movie, it’s implied that Christopher shares Alan’s attraction, but it seems likely that Turing’s affection for Morcom was unrequited—Turing later wrote, “Chris knew I think so well how I liked him, but hated me shewing it.” Several other details of their relationship are different in the movie than in Alan Turing: The Enigma. Although in the movie Christopher is taller than young Alan (Alex Lawther), in reality Turing had a growth spurt at 15, while Morcom was “surprisingly small for his form.” (Morcom was one year ahead of Turing in school.) Turing and Morcom bonded over math and chemistry, not ciphers; Turing began exploring ciphers with another friend at Sherborne after Morcom had died. The biggest departure from reality in the film is the scene where the headmaster informs Alan of Christopher’s death, and Alan denies having known Christopher very well. In real life, Turing was openly devastated by Morcom’s death, and he subsequently developed a relationship with Morcom’s family, going on vacations with them and maintaining a correspondence with Morcom’s mother for years after he’d left Sherborne.

Additionally, Turing did not call any of the early computers he worked on “Christopher”—that is a dramatic flourish invented by screenwriter Graham Moore.

In The Imitation Game, Commander Denniston is a rigid naval officer who resents Alan’s indifference to the military hierarchy and attempts to fire him when his decryption machine fails to deliver fast results. This characterization is mostly fictional, and Denniston’s family has taken issue with the film’s negative portrayal of him. The real-life Alastair Denniston, who spent most of his career as the director of the Government Code and Cypher School, was eager to expand his staff to help break the Germans’ Enigma code in the late 1930s. He recruited Turing, on the basis of his work at Cambridge and his writing on hypothetical computation machines, in 1938, and he hired Turing to work full time at Bletchley Park when Britain entered World War II in September 1939. There’s no record of a contentious interview between Turing and Denniston, and Denniston never tried to fire Turing from the Government Code and Cypher School—rather, given his innovations, Turing was a star of Bletchley Park.

Even if most of the details of the conflict between Commander Denniston and Alan are made up, they do stand in for a real-life power struggle between the military brass and the cryptologists. Turing’s colleagues there recalled that Turing “was always impatient of pompousness or officialdom of any kind,” which made him ill-suited for work in a military context, and Hodges writes that he “had little time for Denniston.” One of the most memorable clashes between Commander Denniston and Alan in the movie occurs when Alan goes over Denniston’s head to write a letter to Winston Churchill, who immediately puts Alan in charge of the Enigma-breaking operation and grants him the 100,000 pounds he needs to build his machine. This never happened, but Alan and three colleagues at Bletchley Park—including Hugh Alexander—did write a letter to Churchill requesting more staff and resources in 1941, and Churchill quickly granted them their requests.

In The Imitation Game, Hugh Alexander is a suave ladykiller who spends much of the film battling with Alan for control of the codebreaking operations; Hugh eventually recognizes Alan’s genius and falls in line behind him. Hugh Alexander—who went professionally by Conel Hugh O’Donel Alexander or C.H.O’D. Alexander—was a real person, but the film’s Hugh character seems intended to serve as a contrast to Alan’s antisocial personality.

The film is faithful to the basic facts: Alexander was a chess champion, and he was much better at managing people than Turing was. However, Alexander was not initially assigned to be Turing’s superior at Bletchley Park. Alexander began working there several months after Turing arrived, and the two didn’t begin working together for another year or so, when Alexander was transferred to Turing’s team to work on breaking Germany’s naval Enigma code. Hodges writes, “Hugh Alexander soon proved the all-round organiser and diplomat that Alan could never be.” Alexander eventually took over naval Enigma decryption after Turing began pursuing a speech decryption project, but by all accounts, their relationship was friendly and mutually respectful. In fact, when Turing was tried for indecency in 1952, Alexander served as a character witness for the defense.

Keira Knightley’s character in The Imitation Game is a brilliant, spunky young mathematician whom Alan agrees to marry to get her conservative parents off her back. As with other storylines, the skeleton of this narrative is true, even if the details are not. Clarke was recruited to Bletchley Park by her former academic supervisor (and Turing’s partner in improving the Bombe) Gordon Welchman; she didn’t win the role by excelling in a crossword competition. (Bletchley recruiters did use crosswords to find talented codebreakers, but neither Turing nor Clarke was involved in this effort.) And Turing proposed to Clarke not to help her escape from overbearing parents, but because they liked each other. He “told her that he was glad he could talk to her ‘as to a man,’ ” writes Hodges, and they shared an interest in chess and botany. She even accepted Turing’s homosexuality; their engagement continued after he confessed his attraction to men. But after some months, Turing ended the engagement. “It was neither a happy nor an easy decision,” writes Hodges, but it wasn’t the ultimately violent confrontation depicted in The Imitation Game, either. “There had been several times when he had come out with ‘I do love you.’ Lack of love was not Alan’s problem.”

Turing and Clarke kept in touch after their engagement ended, and Turing even tried to rekindle their relationship after a couple of years, but Clarke rebuffed him. Turing also wrote a letter to Clarke in 1952 to inform her of his impending trial for indecency, but the final scene of The Imitation Game, in which Joan visits Alan during his probation, is invented.

Stewart Menzies, the chief of the British Secret Intelligence Service, and John Cairncross, a Soviet spy, are two historical figures who appear in The Imitation Game despite the fact that neither worked closely with Turing. Menzies was, as the film suggests, responsible for passing decrypted Nazi strategies to Winston Churchill, but it’s highly unlikely he interacted individually with Turing (or most of the thousands of other codebreakers who worked at Bletchley Park over the years). Cairncross did pass intelligence from Bletchley Park to the Soviet Union, but he worked in a different unit from Turing’s, and there’s no evidence the two knew each other. Similarly, the filmmakers’ conceit that Menzies knew about and tolerated Cairncross’ duplicity isn’t supported by the historical record.

In the film, Peter and Jack are more or less interchangeable background characters, distinguished primarily by the fact that Peter has a brother who is serving in the armed forces on a ship that the code-breaking team discover is targeted by the Germans. The ensuing dramatic scene, in which Alan reminds Peter and the rest of the team that they have to keep the Germans from learning that they’ve broken Enigma, is entirely invented; Hilton had no such brother, and in fact he began working at Bletchley Park long after Turing’s Bombe had been built. And while it was crucial for the British to use their intelligence wisely, Hodges writes that their success had less to do with their tactical shrewdness and more to do with the Germans’ a priori conviction that Enigma was unbreakable, despite ample evidence to the contrary.

The Imitation Game’s framing device depicts one Detective Nock’s investigation into Alan’s life, following a mysterious burglary at Alan’s home. Perhaps unsurprisingly, this framing device isn’t quite true to life: There was no Detective Nock, and the detectives who did book Turing for indecency (who were named Mr. Wills and Mr. Rimmer) were under no illusions about his mysterious circumstances. Turing was burglarized by an acquaintance of 19-year-old Arnold Murray, who had slept with Turing a few times. The burglar had heard Murray talk about his trysts with Turing, and when the police interrogated the burglar, he revealed the illicit nature of Murray and Turing’s relationship. When the police interviewed Turing, he made no attempt to hide his homosexuality from them. Turing eventually pled guilty to indecency, and he was placed on probation and agreed to submit to estrogen treatment—intended to destroy his sex drive—for more than a year.

The Imitation Game implies that the estrogen treatment sent Alan into an emotional tailspin, but Turing seems to have continued his work and social relationships normally during his year of probation. The film also implies that the estrogen treatment triggered Alan’s suicide, but in fact the treatment ended in April 1953, fourteen months before Turing killed himself. Although some modern scholars believe that his death from cyanide poisoning was an accident, Hodges believes that Turing made his suicide deliberately ambiguous so as to spare his mother the pain of believing that her son had killed himself on purpose.

Voir encore:

The Imitation Game (2014)

Starring Benedict Cumberbatch, Keira Knightley
based on the book ‘Alan Turing: The Enigma’ by Andrew Hodges

REEL FACE: REAL FACE:
Benedict Cumberbatch as Alan Turing Benedict Cumberbatch
Born: July 19, 1976
Birthplace:
Hammersmith, London, England, UK
Alan Mathison Turing Alan Turing
Born: June 23, 1912
Birthplace: Maida Vale, London, England, UK
Death: June 7, 1954, Wilmslow, Cheshire, England (suicide by poison)
Alex Lawther as Young Alan Turing Alex Lawther
Born: 1995
Birthplace:
Hampshire, England, UK
Young Alan Turing as Teenager Young Alan Turing
(age 16)
Keira Knightley as Joan Clarke Keira Knightley
Born: March 26, 1985
Birthplace:
Teddington, Middlesex, England, UK
Joan Clarke Murray Joan Clarke
Born: June 24, 1917
Birthplace: West Norwood, London, UK
Death: September 4, 1996, Headington, Oxfordshire, England, UK
Matthew Goode as Hugh Alexander Matthew Goode
Born: April 3, 1978
Birthplace:
Exeter, Devon, England, UK
Conel Hugh O'Donel Alexander Hugh Alexander
Born: April 19, 1909
Birthplace: Cork, Ireland
Death: February 15, 1974, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England, UK
Charles Dance as Commander Alastair Denniston Charles Dance
Born: October 10, 1946
Birthplace:
Redditch, Worcestershire, England, UK
Commander Alexander (Alastair) Guthrie Denniston Commander Alastair Denniston
Born: December 1, 1881
Birthplace: Greenock, Scotland, UK
Death: January 1, 1961, Milford on Sea, Hampshire, England, UK
Mark Strong as Stewart Menzies Mark Strong
Born: August 5, 1963
Birthplace:
London, England, UK
Stewart Menzies Stewart Menzies
Born: January 30, 1890
Birthplace: London, England, UK
Death: May 29, 1968, London, England, UK
Allen Leech as John Cairncross Allen Leech
Born: May 18, 1981
Birthplace:
Killiney, Co. Dublin, Ireland
John Cairncross John Cairncross
Born: July 25, 1913
Birthplace: Lesmahagow, Scotland, UK
Death: October 8, 1995, Herefordshire, UK (stroke)
Matthew Beard as Peter Hilton Matthew Beard
Born: March 25, 1989
Birthplace:
London, England, UK
Peter Hilton Peter Hilton
Born: April 7, 1923
Birthplace: London, England, UK
Death: November 6, 2010, Binghamton, New York, USA
James Northcote as Jack Good James Northcote
Born: October 10, 1987
Birthplace:
London, England, UK
Irving John (Jack) Good Irving John (Jack) Good
Born: December 9, 1916
Birthplace: London, England, UK
Death: April 5, 2009, Radford, Virginia, USA (natural causes)
I’ve now got myself into the kind of trouble that I have always considered to be quite a possibility for me, though I have usually rated it at about 10 to 1 against. I shall shortly be pleading guilty to a charge of sexual offenses with a young man. The story of how it all came to be found out is a long and fascinating one… but I haven’t got time to tell you now. No doubt I shall emerge from it all a different man, but quite who I’ve not found out. -Alan Turing, 1952, Letter to Friend and Colleague Norman Routledge

Questioning the Story:

Is Detective Robert Nock based on a real person?No. « Detective Nock is a fake name – he was named after my old roommate, » says screenwriter Graham Moore. « He gives us another perspective … we can see how a normal person, not a bad person, could end up doing this horrible thing to Alan. We didn’t want to create this story of Alan being a sad character that bad things happened to, so we decided to show his final years through the perspective of this fictional detective. … Nock is not a bad person, not an evil person. The terrible thing that happened to Turing was not his fault and was deeply unfair and the injustice of that is something we all have to reckon with. » Robert Nock is the only character in the movie with a fake name. -Tumblr (imitationgamemovie)

Did the police uncover Turing’s homosexuality while investigating him for being a possible Soviet spy?No. Here The Imitation Game deviates significantly from the true story. The real Alan Turing was not investigated for being a possible Soviet spy. Turing himself had reported a petty theft to the police, not a neighbor who heard noises. He changed the details of his story to cover up a relationship he was having with the suspected culprit, 19-year-old Arnold Murray. Instead of first suspecting Turing of espionage like in the movie, the police immediately honed in on Turing for violating the law of gross indecency due to his homosexual relationship with Murray. -The Guardian

Alan Turing and Benedict Cumberbatch
Genealogists have discovered that the real Alan Turing (left) and his onscreen counterpart, actor Benedict Cumberbatch (right), are related. They are 17th cousins dating back to John Beaufort, the first Earl of Somerset, who was born in approximately 1373. -Ancestry.com

Was Alan Turing really put on trial for being gay?Yes. The Imitation Game true story confirms that on March 31, 1952, British authorities put Alan Turing on trial for indecency because he had homosexual relations with a 19-year-old man named Arnold Murray, twenty years his junior. Homosexuality was a crime in Great Britain in the early 1950s, falling under gross indecency in Section 11 of the Criminal Law Amendment Act 1885. To avoid jail time for his indecency conviction, Turing underwent chemical castration in the form of a year’s worth of estrogen (stilboestrol) injections designed to reduce his libido. In addition to rendering him impotent, another side effect of the hormone therapy was that Turing developed gynaecomastia, or an enlarged chest (breasts). On June 7, 1954, approximately a year after his hormone treatments ended, Turing killed himself by eating an apple that he had likely injected with cyanide. We say « likely » because the apple was never tested for cyanide, though it was speculated that this was the delivery method. -Alan Turing: The Enigma

The general public became familiar with the name Alan Turing after learning of his indecency conviction and suicide. It would be years before they learned that he was also largely responsible for outsmarting the Nazis. -Tumblr (imitationgamemovie)

Was Alan Turing’s codebreaking machine really named Christopher?No. The Imitation Game true story reveals that the name of the real codebreaking machine was less personal. Unlike the movie, it was not named Christopher after Turing’s late friend and first love, teenage companion Christopher Morcom (Morcom was a real teenage friend who Alan met at Sherborne School). Instead, Turing’s machine was called the Bombe, named after an earlier Polish version of the codebreaking machine. Like in the movie, Turing created a much improved version of the Polish machine. The U.S. eventually produced its own equivalents, but they were engineered differently than the British Bombe created by Alan Turing and his team. -Empire Magazine

Jack Bannon and Christopher Morcom
Actor Jack Bannon (left) portrays Alan Turing’s friend Christopher Morcom (right), who died suddenly in 1930.

Did Alan’s friend Christopher really die suddenly of bovine tuberculosis?Yes. The real Alan Turing met Christopher Morcom at Sherborne School, the boys’ school in Dorset, England, which Alan attended as a teenager. The two became good friends, sharing an interest in math and chemistry (not codes and ciphers). Morcom, who was a year older, did die suddenly of bovine tuberculosis, which he had contracted as a small boy from drinking infected cows’ milk. However, the headmaster did not coldly tell Turing of Morcom’s February 13, 1930 death after Morcom had already passed away. In real life, ‘Ben’ Davis, the junior housemaster, had sent Turing a note earlier that day and told him to prepare for the worst. Turing also did not pretend that he had barely known Morcom. In real life, Turing’s friends and family knew that he was devastated, and he even became close to Morcom’s family after his passing. -Alan Turing: The Enigma

Was Alan’s attraction to Christopher a mutual attraction? Not likely. Though The Imitation Game movie implies that Christopher is also attracted to Alan, Andrew Hodges’ biography indicates otherwise. Alan wrote of making it a point to sit next to Christopher in every class, stating that Christopher « made some of the remarks I was afraid of (I know better now) about the coincidence but seemed to welcome me in a passive way. » Hodges again talks of Christopher’s passivity toward Alan, stating that he gradually took Alan seriously, but always with « considerable reserve. » In his writings, Alan indicates that Christopher was aware of his feelings, « Chris knew I think so well how I liked him, but hated me shewing it, » indicating that while Chris liked the attention, Alan’s affection went unrequited. -Alan Turing: The Enigma

Did Turing come up with the design for the codebreaking machine on his own?No. Unlike the movie, Alan Turing didn’t come up with the design for the improved Bombe machine on his own. Gordon Welchman, a mathematician who is not mentioned in the film, collaborated with Turing. -Alan Turing: The Enigma

Did Alan Turing’s codebreaking machine look like the one in the movie?For the most part, yes. However, the real codebreaking machine, the Bombe, was housed in a Bakelite box. Production designer Maria Djurkovic and her team researched the working replica that is on display at Bletchley Park in Buckinghamshire, England. « Our version of the machine had to look convincing, » says Djurkovic. She and director Morten Tyldum decided to reveal the machine’s inner workings. They also added more red cables to give the audience the feeling that blood was pumping through its veins. -Tumblr (imitationgamemovie)

Turing Bombe Machine and Christopher Machine (movie)
Alan Turing’s real Bombe machine (top) at Bletchley Park in 1943. The machine’s name was changed to Christopher for the movie (bottom) and more red cables were added to mimic veins pumping blood through the machine.

Is there a secret URL hidden in an Imitation Game teaser trailer?Yes. The secret URL is in the form of an IP address and is hidden in the teaser trailer titled « Are You Paying Attention« . The URL can be spotted at the trailer’s 4-second mark when actor Benedict Cumberbatch asks, « Are you paying attention? » Look for the IP 146.148.62.204.

The link challenges you to complete a crossword puzzle based on the one that the real Alan Turing published in the London Daily Telegraph in 1942 in an effort to recruit more codebreakers for his team. Turing invited anyone who could complete the crossword puzzle in 12 minutes or less to apply for a job. In the movie, one of these individuals is Joane Clarke (Keira Knightley), who ends up being the only female applicant in a room full of men. Like Alan Turing’s challenge, you are given a specific amount of time to complete the crossword puzzle found through the URL. Do you have what it takes to be a Turing codebreaker?

Was Joan Clarke really hired at Bletchley Park after solving a crossword puzzle in the newspaper?No. The real Joan Clarke’s introduction to Turing’s team at Bletchley Park was less exciting than Keira Knightley’s character’s experience in the movie. In real life, Joan Clarke was already employed at Bletchley Park performing clerical duties. She had been recruited by the Government Code and Cypher School (GC & CS). A former math wiz at Cambridge, her mathematical talents were again noticed at Bletchley, and she was promoted to work with the group in Hut 8, led by Alan Turing. Andrew Hodges’ biography also states that Joan Clarke had actually already met Alan Turing previously at Cambridge.

Did the Soviet spy, John Cairncross, really work with Alan Turing?No. Our research into The Imitation Game true story exposed the fact that although John Cairncross did work at Bletchley Park and admitted to being a Soviet spy in 1951, he did not work as part of Alan Turing’s group. « Their relationship is invented, » says author Andrew Hodges. It is unlikely that they ever even had contact with one another, since communication between sections at Bletchley was very limited. In the movie, after Alan Turing (Benedict Cumberbatch) discovers that John Cairncross (Allen Leech) is a Soviet spy, Cairncross blackmails Turing by threatening to reveal his sexuality. -The Sunday Times

Alan Turing Marathon Race Runner
As shown in the movie, Alan Turing (right) was a capable long-distance runner and often used running as a way to get the stress of his job as a codebreaker out of his mind.

Was Alan Turing really engaged to Joan Clarke?Yes. In the movie, we see Alan Turing (Benedict Cumberbatch) ask Joan Clarke (Keira Knightley) to marry him as a way to keep her at Bletchley Park, since her parents want her to move on with her life and find a husband. Though Turing does tell Joan about his attraction to men, in the film he only breaks off the engagement after John Cairncross, the Soviet spy, threatens to reveal that Turing is gay, which could in turn negatively affect Joan.

In real life, Alan Turing’s marriage proposal in the spring of 1941 wasn’t a ploy to keep Joan at Bletchley Park. He also didn’t break off the engagement as the result of pressure from a Soviet spy. The real Joan Clarke says that the two were interested in one another, despite their relationship lacking a certain physical element. Turing even arranged their shifts so they could work together. They went on dates to the cinema and other places, and despite there not being much physical contact, they did kiss. Turing introduced Joan to his family. Author Andrew Hodges states in his Turing biography that « the idea that marriage should include a mutual sexual satisfaction was still a modern one, which had not yet replaced the older idea of marriage as a social duty. »

During an interview found in the 1992 BBC Horizon episode « The Strange Life and Death of Dr. Turing, » Joan says that Alan told her about his « homosexual tendency » the day after he proposed. « Naturally, that worried me a bit, » admits Joan, « because I did know that was something which was almost certainly permanent, but we carried on. » A fellow member of Turing’s team called their relationship « quite delightful » and said that they were « very sweet together. » Though there was talk of the future, including children, their engagement did not survive past the summer of 1941. Turing used an Oscar Wilde poem to break things off. -BBC Horizon

Gay and Lesbian news outlets criticized an early draft of The Imitation Game script, accusing the filmmakers of « straight-washing » the story. Black Bear Pictures rejected the allegations, issuing a statement that said, « There is not – and never has been – a version of our script where Alan Turing is anything other than homosexual. »

Did Turing’s team only pass along a percentage of the decoded messages?Yes, but the movie’s account of how the group decided which decoded messages to pass along to British forces is fictional. In the film, Turing (Benedict Cumberbatch) and his team crack Enigma but hold off on telling their superiors for fear that the Germans will become suspicious and change the code. After they decide against passing along intercepted information about an impending attack on a British convoy, Turing goes to Stewart Menzies (Mark Strong) and together they come up with a system for deciding which cracked messages should be passed along to the British Army, Navy and RAF.

In reality, it was Menzies duty to come up with a method for deciding what percentage of gathered intelligence should be passed along. -The Telegraph

German Enigma Machine in Imitation Game Movie
Each letter pressed on the German Enigma machine (pictured above in the movie) caused a corresponding ciphertext letter to light up above the keyboard. Several rotors (usually 3 or 4) could be adjusted to reset the encryption, a process that would determine which letter corresponded to which ciphertext letter.

Was Alan Turing accused of treason and cowardice for not revealing Soviet spy John Cairncross?No. As indicated above, the relationship between Alan Turing and John Cairncross was invented by the filmmakers. During our investigation into The Imitation Game true story, we learned that Turing and Cairncross did not work in the same section at Bletchley Park, and given that the groups at Bletchley were somewhat isolated from one another, it is highly unlikely that these two men ever met in real life, an idea that Turing biographer Andrew Hodges called « ludicrous. » This fictional addition to the film, which finds Turing withholding the fact that Cairncross was a Soviet spy, has generated a significant amount of controversy and criticism, namely in that it places accusations of treason upon Turing. -The Guardian

Did Joan Clarke visit Alan Turing after the war?No. Andrew Hodges’ biography states that Alan wrote to Joan and told her that he had been found out, but there is no mention of Joan coming to visit Alan. At the time of his letter, Joan was engaged to be married, as Keira Knightley’s character is when she visits Alan (Benedict Cumberbatch) in the movie.

Is there a reason why we don’t see Alan Turing’s suicide in the film?On June 7, 1954, roughly a year after he underwent « chemical castration » (estrogen injections) as a way of avoiding prison time for his indecency conviction, Alan Turning ingested an apple that he had likely laced with cyanide (it is speculated that the half-eaten apple was the delivery method, though it was never tested). Biographer Andrew Hodges suggested that he was re-enacting a scene from the 1937 Walt Disney movie Snow White, his favorite fairy tale. The Imitation Game director Morten Tyldum did film the suicide scene, but it did not make the final cut of the film. In real life, Turing’s housekeeper found him dead in his bed, with the half-eaten apple next to him on his bedside table (BBC News).

« We never wanted to see him commit suicide on screen, » says Graham Moore, the film’s screenwriter. « This film was about paying attention to Alan Turing’s tremendous life and his amazing accomplishments. It felt to us more ethical and more responsible to focus on his life and his accomplishments than the nitty-gritty of his suicide. » –Tumblr (imitationgamemovie)

Alan Turing Snow White Poison Apple
Did Alan Turing take his own life by re-enacting a scene from the film Snow White, his favorite fairy tale?

Is it possible that Alan Turing’s death was not a suicide?Though the investigation and the coroner’s verdict ruled the death a suicide, some believe that the death was caused by the accidental inhalation of cyanide fumes from a device used for electroplating spoons with gold. Turing’s mother, Ethel, also believed his death was accidental (Alan Turing: The Enigma). « His mother wrote to me, » says the real Joan Clarke, « and she said that although it was a verdict of suicide, she believed it an accident, and of course, his method was chosen to make it possible for some at least to believe that. » -BBC Horizon

Was the Apple company logo inspired by the apple associated with poisoning Alan Turing?No. This is just an urban legend. Apple has denied any correlation. -Empire Magazine

Was The Imitation Game movie filmed at the real Bletchley Park?The only scenes that were actually shot at the real Bletchley Park (located in Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire, England) took place at the bar. This includes Turing’s eureka moment, the engagement party scene, and his confession to John Cairncross about being gay. Other parts of the movie were filmed at Alan Turing’s childhood school, where his picture is still on the wall (Tumblr – imitationgamemovie). Members of the Government Code and Cypher School (GC&CS) first visited Bletchley Park in 1938 and returned in 1939 to set up their operation. The park has since been converted into a museum, which opened its doors to the public in 1993 (BletchleyPark.org.uk).

Voir enfin:

Alan Turing: one of The Great Philosophers

Andrew Hodges

Part 4 of Turing: a natural philosopher  (1997)

Thinking the Uncomputable
Turing then studied at Princeton for two academic years, with a break back at Cambridge in summer 1937. It was a period of intense activity at a world centre of mathematics. Turing was overoptimistic in thinking he could rewrite the foundations of analysis, and added nothing to the remarks about limits and convergence given in On Computable Numbers. (One reason for this might be the following: if x and y are computable numbers, as specified as Turing machines, the truth of the statements x=y, or x=0 cannot tested by a computable process.) But besides wide-ranging research in analysis, topology and algebra, and the ‘laborious’ work of showing the equivalence of his definition of computability with those of Church and Gödel, he extended the exploration of the logic of mental activity with a paper Systems of Logic based on Ordinals [5].This, his most difficult paper, is much less well known than his definition of computability. It is generally regarded as a diversion from his line of thought on computability, computers and the philosophy of mind, and I fell into this assumption in Alan Turing: the Enigma, essentially because I followed Turing’s own later standpoint. But I now consider that at the time, Turing saw himself steaming straight ahead with the analysis of the mind, by studying a question complementary to On Computable Numbers. Turing asked in this paper whether it is possible to formalise those actions of the mind which are not those of following a definite method — mental actions one might call creative or original in nature. In particular, Turing focussed on the action of seeing the truth of one of Gödel’s unprovable assertions.

Gödel had shown that when we see the truth of an unprovable proposition, we cannot be doing so by following given rules. The rules may be augmented so as to bring this particular proposition into their ambit, but then there will be yet another true proposition that is not captured by the new rules of proof, and so on ad infinitum. The question arises as to to whether there is some higher type of rule which can organise this process of ‘Gödelisation.’ An ordinal logic is such a rule, based on the theory of ordinal numbers, the very rich and subtle theory of different ways in which an infinite number of entities may be placed in sequence. An ordinal logic turns the idea of ‘and so on ad infinitum’ into a precise formulation. Turing wrote that: ‘The purpose of introducing ordinal logics is to avoid as far as possible the effects of Gödel’s theorem.’ The uncomputable could not be made computable, but ordinal logics would bring it into as much order as was possible.

Turing’s work, in which he proved important (though somewhat negative) results about such logical schemes, founded a new area of mathematical logic. But the motivation, as he himself stated it, was in mental philosophy. As in On Computable Numbers, he was unafraid of using psychological terms, this time the word ‘intuition’ appearing for the act of recognising the truth of an unprovable Gödel sentence:

Mathematical reasoning may be regarded rather schematically as the combination of two faculties, which we may call intuition and ingenuity. The activity of the intuition consists in making spontaneous judgments which are not the result of conscious trains of reasoning. These judgments are often but by no means invariably correct (leaving aside the question what is meant by ‘correct’). Often it is possible to find some other way of verifying the correctness of an intuitive judgment. We may, for instance, judge that all positive integers are uniquely factorizable into primes; a detailed mathematical argument leads to the same result. This argument will also involve intuitive judgments, but they will be less open to criticism than the original judgment about factorization. I shall not attempt to explain this idea of ‘intuition’ any more explicitly.

The exercise of ingenuity in mathematics consists in aiding the intuition through suitable arrangements of propositions, and perhaps geometrical figure or drawings. It is intended that when these are really well arranged the validity of the intuitive steps which are required cannot seriously be doubted.
Turing then explains how the axiomatization of mathematics was originally intended to eliminate all intuition, but Gödel had shown that to be impossible. The Turing machine construction had shown how to make all formal proofs ‘mechanical’; and in the present paper such mechanical operations were to be taken as trivial, instead putting under the microscope the non-mechanical steps which remained.In consequence of the impossibility of finding a formal logic which wholly eliminates the necessity of using intuition, we naturally turn to ‘non-constructive’ systems of logic with which not all the steps in a proof are mechanical, some being intuitive. An example of a non-constructive logic is afforded by any ordinal logic… What properties do we desire a non-constructive logic to have if we are to make use of it for the expression of mathematical proofs? We want it to show quite clearly when a step makes use of intuition, and when it is purely formal. The strain put on the intuition should be a minimum. Most important of all, it must be beyond doubt that the logic shall be adequate for the expression of number-theoretic theorems…
It is not clear how literally Turing meant the identification with ‘intuition’ to be taken. Probably his ideas were fluid, and he added a cautionary footnote: ‘We are leaving out of account that most important faculty which distinguishes topics of interest from others; in fact we are regarding the function of the mathematician as simply to determine the truth or falsity of propositions.’ But the evidence is that at this time he was open to the idea that in moments of ‘intuition’ the mind appears to do something outside the scope of the Turing machine. If so, he was not alone: Gödel and Post held this view.

Turing and Wittgenstein
As it happened, Turing’s views were probed by the leading philosopher of the time at just this point. Unfortunately their recorded conversations shed no light upon Turing’s view of mind and machine. Turing was introduced to Wittgenstein in summer 1937, and when Turing returned to Cambridge for the autumn term of 1938, he attended Wittgenstein’s lectures — more a Socratic discussion group — on the Foundations of Mathematics. These were noted by the participants and have been reconstructed and published. [6] There is a curious similarity of the style of speech — plain speaking and argument by question and answer — but they were on different wavelengths. In a dialogue at the heart of the sequence they debated the significance of axiomatizing mathematics and the problems that had arisen in doing so:Wittgenstein:… Think of the case of the Liar. It is very queer in a way that this should have puzzled anyone — much more extraordinary than you might think… Because the thing works like this: if a man says ‘I am lying’ we say that it follows that he is not lying, from which it follows that he is lying and so on. Well, so what? You can go on like that until you are black in the face. Why not? It doesn’t matter. …it is just a useless language-game, and why should anyone be excited?
Turing: What puzzles one is that one usually uses a contradiction as a criterion for having done something wrong. But in this case one cannot find anything done wrong.
W: Yes — and more: nothing has been done wrong, … where will the harm come?
T: The real harm will not come in unless there is an application, in which a bridge may fall down or something of that sort.
W: … The question is: Why are people afraid of contradictions? It is easy to understand why they should be afraid of contradictions, etc., outside mathematics. The question is: Why should they be afraid of contradictions inside mathematics? Turing says, ‘Because something may go wrong with the application.’ But nothing need go wrong. And if something does go wrong — if the bridge breaks down — then your mistake was of the kind of using a wrong natural law. …
T: You cannot be confident about applying your calculus until you know that there are no hidden contradictions in it.
W: There seems to me an enormous mistake there. … Suppose I convince Rhees of the paradox of the Liar, and he says, ‘I lie, therefore I do not lie, therefore I lie and I do not lie, therefore we have a contradiction, therefore 2 x 2 = 369.’ Well, we should not call this ‘multiplication,’ that is all…
T: Although you do not know that the bridge will fall if there are no contradictions, yet it is almost certain that if there are contradictions it will go wrong somewhere.
W: But nothing has ever gone wrong that way yet…
Turing’s responses reflect mainstream mathematical thought and practice, rather than showing his distinctive characteristics and original ideas. In 1938, it should be noted, he was an untenured research fellow whose first application for a lectureship had failed, and whose chance of a conventional career lay in the mathematics studied and taught at Cambridge. His work in logic was but a part of his output, by no means well known. His Fellowship was for work in probability theory; his papers were in analysis and algebra. That year, he made a significant step in the analysis of the Riemann zeta-function, a topic in complex analysis and number theory at the heart of classical pure mathematics.

Getting statements free from contradictions is the very essence of mathematics. Turing perhaps thought Wittgenstein did not take seriously enough the unobvious and difficult questions that had arisen in the attempt to formalize mathematics; Wittgenstein thought Turing did not take seriously the question of why one should want to formalize mathematics at all.

There are no letters or notes which indicate subsequent contact between Turing and Wittgenstein, and no evidence that Wittgenstein influenced Turing’s concept of machines or mind. If influence in the next ten years is sought, it should be found in the Second World War and Turing’s amazing part in it.

[5] Systems of logic based on ordinals, Proc. Lond. Math. Soc (2) 45 pp 161-228 (1939).
This was also Turing’s Princeton Ph.D. thesis (1938). (See also the Bibliography on this site.)
[6] C. Diamond (ed.) Wittgenstein’s Lectures on the Foundations of Mathematics (Harvester Prerss, 1976). The quoted dialogue is extracted from lectures 21 and 22.


Education: Des iphones et des ipads, oui, mais pas pour mes enfants (Silicon Valley chooses Waldorf: Did Steve Jobs know something the rest of us don’t ?)

5 janvier, 2015
https://zooey.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/waldorfcig.jpg?w=434&h=637
https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xpf1/t31.0-8/10860939_10200153188829503_581429623915886922_o.jpg
The two of us would go tramping through San Jose and Berkeley and ask about Dylan bootlegs and collect them. We’d buy brochures of Dylan lyrics and stay up late interpreting them. Dylan’s words struck chords of creative thinking. I had more than a hundred hours, including every concert on the ’65 and ’66 tour. Instead of big speakers I bought a pair of awesome headphones and would just lie in my bed and listen to that stuff for hours. Steve Wozniak
Steve adorait ce lien subliminal avec Dylan. Elizabeth Holmes
We limit how much technology our kids use at home. Steve Jobs
I’ve never used email because I don’t find it would help me with anything I’m doing. I just couldn’t be bothered about it. As far as the cellphone goes, it’s like that whole thing about « in New York City, you’re never more than two feet from a rat » — I’m never two feet from a cellphone. I mean, we’ll be on a scout with 10 people and all of them have phones, so it’s very easy to get in touch with me when people need to. When I started in this business, not many people had cellphones, I didn’t have one, I never bothered to get one and I’ve been very fortunate to be working continuously, so there’s always someone around me who can tap me on the shoulder and hand me a phone if they need to. I actually really like not having one because it gives me time to think. You know, when you have a smartphone and you have 10 minutes to spare, you go on it and you start looking at stuff. Christopher Nolan
I had imagined the Jobs’s household was like a nerd’s paradise: that the walls were giant touch screens, the dining table was made from tiles of iPads and that iPods were handed out to guests like chocolates on a pillow. Nope, Mr. Jobs told me, not even close. Nick Bilton (NYT)
Every evening Steve made a point of having dinner at the big long table in their kitchen, discussing books and history and a variety of things. No one ever pulled out an iPad or computer. The kids did not seem addicted at all to devices. Walter Isaacson (author of « Steve Jobs »)
My kids accuse me and my wife of being fascists. They say that none of their friends have the same rules. That’s because we have seen the dangers of technology first hand. I’ve seen it in myself, I don’t want to see that happen to my kids. Chris Anderson (former editor of Wired)
Many people are looking at the benefits of digital media in education, and not many are looking at the costs. Decreased sensitivity to emotional cues, losing the ability to understand the emotions of other people, is one of the costs. Prof Patricia Greenfield (UCLA)
You cannot learn non-verbal emotional cues from a screen in the way you can learn it from face-to-face communication. The research implies that people need more face-to-face interaction, and that even when people use digital media for social interaction, they are spending less time developing social skills. Dr Yalda Uhls (UCLA)
Removing smartphones and gadgets from children for just a few days immediately improves their social skills, a study has found. Researchers discovered that depriving 11 and 12-year-olds for just five days of all digital media – including television – left them better able to read others’ emotions. The Telegraph
Researchers at the University of California Los Angeles recently published a study which demonstrated that just a few days after abstaining from using electronic gadgets, children’s social skills improved immediately. Which is definitely food for thought considering recent research showed that an average American child spends more than seven and a half hours a day using smart-phones and other electronic screens. Inquisitr
Just as I wouldn’t dream of limiting how much time a kid can spend with her paintbrushes, or playing her piano, or writing, I think it’s absurd to limit her time spent creating computer art, editing video, or computer programming. Ali Partovi (founder of iLike and adviser to Facebook, Dropbox and Zappos)
If I worked at Miramax and made good, artsy, rated R movies, I wouldn’t want my kids to see them until they were 17. (…) At Google and all these places, we make technology as brain-dead easy to use as possible. There’s no reason why kids can’t figure it out when they get older. Alan Eagle (Google employee)
For three weeks, we ate our way through fractions. When I made enough fractional pieces of cake to feed everyone, do you think I had their attention? Cathy Waheed (Waldorf teacher)
A spare approach to technology in the classroom will always benefit learning. Teaching is a human experience. Technology is a distraction when we need literacy, numeracy and critical thinking. Paul Thomas (Furman University)
You can look back and see how sloppy your handwriting was in first grade. You can’t do that with computers ’cause all the letters are the same. Besides, if you learn to write on paper, you can still write if water spills on the computer or the power goes out. Finn Heilig (10, Google employee’s child)
Some education experts say that the push to equip classrooms with computers is unwarranted because studies do not clearly show that this leads to better test scores or other measurable gains. Is learning through cake fractions and knitting any better? The Waldorf advocates make it tough to compare, partly because as private schools they administer no standardized tests in elementary grades. And they would be the first to admit that their early-grade students may not score well on such tests because, they say, they don’t drill them on a standardized math and reading curriculum. When asked for evidence of the schools’ effectiveness, the Association of Waldorf Schools of North America points to research by an affiliated group showing that 94 percent of students graduating from Waldorf high schools in the United States between 1994 and 2004 attended college, with many heading to prestigious institutions like Oberlin, Berkeley and Vassar. Of course, that figure may not be surprising, given that these are students from families that value education highly enough to seek out a selective private school, and usually have the means to pay for it. And it is difficult to separate the effects of the low-tech instructional methods from other factors. For example, parents of students at the Los Altos school say it attracts great teachers who go through extensive training in the Waldorf approach, creating a strong sense of mission that can be lacking in other schools. (…) The Waldorf experience does not come cheap: annual tuition at the Silicon Valley schools is $17,750 for kindergarten through eighth grade and $24,400 for high school, though Ms. Wurtz said financial assistance was available. She says the typical Waldorf parent, who has a range of elite private and public schools to choose from, tends to be liberal and highly educated, with strong views about education; they also have a knowledge that when they are ready to teach their children about technology they have ample access and expertise at home. NYT
Les uns soulignent la pratique positive d’une éducation « complète » adaptée à l’enfant et passent sous silence l’anthropologie métaphysique de Steiner. Les autres critiquent justement sans merci cette néomythologie occulte de l’éducation et mettent en garde contre les risques d’endoctrinement qui en découlent (« école où est enseignée une conception du monde ») leur insistance sur ce point les empêchant de juger impartialement les multiples facettes de la pratique steinérienne. La position des critiques idéologiques est encore confortée par l’assertion des pédagogues anthroposophes selon laquelle toutes les normes et toutes les formes de leur pratique éducative procèdent de l’anthropologie « cosmique » du maître. Heiner Ullrich (Université de Mayence)
On compte en France une trentaine d’écoles se réclamant de la pédagogie de Rudolf Steiner, fondateur et inspirateur de l’Anthroposophie qui se veut l’héritière de sa doctrine. S’il est clair que toutes ces écoles ne revêtent pas un caractère sectaire, plusieurs mériteraient cependant une investigation approfondie. La Commission a, en effet, eu connaissance de dérives. Les méthodes pédagogiques particulières à certaines écoles ont été critiquées notamment par l’Inspection de l’Éducation nationale. Ainsi, les apprentissages du langage structuré, de l’écrit et du calcul ne seraient pas engagés avant l’âge de 7 ans. En outre, les enfants inadaptés à la méthode Steiner seraient soumis à des sévices et beaucoup ne seraient pas à jour de leurs vaccinations. Alors que les tarifs de la scolarité affichés peuvent être considérés, pour certaines familles, abordables (entre 14 000 et 18 000 francs par an), l’Inspection de l’Éducation nationale a repéré des établissements où les tarifs pratiqués étaient si élevés que des parents d’élèves, afin de pouvoir les honorer, s’étaient trouvés contraints de travailler pour l’Anthroposophie. Rapport interministériel – les sectes et l’argent
De plus en plus, les gens voient des sectes partout. (…) Nous ne nous intéressons qu’aux victimes et nous n’en avons jamais reçu des écoles Steiner. Je trouve cela anormal qu’elles soient cataloguées comme sectes et que l’on me reproche de les soutenir car mes petits-enfants y sont éduqués. Janine Tavernier

Faites ce que je dis mais pas ce que je fais !

Qu’est-ce qu’une école au nom d’une usine de cigarettes emprunté lui-même à celui de la ville natale du premier milliardaire de l’histoire des États-Unis qui donnera à son pays d’adoption une longue dynastie,  une ville d’Oregon et une chaine d’hôtels de prestige

Et qui, dans la foulée du grand mouvement de l’école nouvelle d’il y a bientôt un siècle à qui nous devons aujourd’hui nombre d’écoles dites alternatives telles que Montessori, Neill ou Freinet (mais avec la dimension toute particulière liée à sa création par le fondateur d’un courant de pensée ésotérique allemand, mélange de syncrétisme d’hindouisme et de bouddhisme et de mythologie nordique qui lui valut en France les foudres de la commission interministerielle anti-sectes), prône une approche résolument low-tech …

Peut avoir en commun avec un Steve Jobs obsédé par Dylan au point de vouloir épouser son ancienne compagne

Et la digitsia, cette nouvelle intelligentsia des fondateurs et employés des fameux GAFA, les géants actuels de l’Internet et des nouvelles technologies comme de l’optimisation fiscale

Qui refuse contre toute attente, pour ses rejetons, le tout-informatique prôné par ailleurs pour nous autres simples mortels comme l’éducation du futur ?

A Silicon Valley School That Doesn’t Compute
Matt Richtel
The New York Times
October 22, 2011

LOS ALTOS, Calif. — The chief technology officer of eBay sends his children to a nine-classroom school here. So do employees of Silicon Valley giants like Google, Apple, Yahoo and Hewlett-Packard.

But the school’s chief teaching tools are anything but high-tech: pens and paper, knitting needles and, occasionally, mud. Not a computer to be found. No screens at all. They are not allowed in the classroom, and the school even frowns on their use at home.

Schools nationwide have rushed to supply their classrooms with computers, and many policy makers say it is foolish to do otherwise. But the contrarian point of view can be found at the epicenter of the tech economy, where some parents and educators have a message: computers and schools don’t mix.

This is the Waldorf School of the Peninsula, one of around 160 Waldorf schools in the country that subscribe to a teaching philosophy focused on physical activity and learning through creative, hands-on tasks. Those who endorse this approach say computers inhibit creative thinking, movement, human interaction and attention spans.

The Waldorf method is nearly a century old, but its foothold here among the digerati puts into sharp relief an intensifying debate about the role of computers in education.

“I fundamentally reject the notion you need technology aids in grammar school,” said Alan Eagle, 50, whose daughter, Andie, is one of the 196 children at the Waldorf elementary school; his son William, 13, is at the nearby middle school. “The idea that an app on an iPad can better teach my kids to read or do arithmetic, that’s ridiculous.”

Mr. Eagle knows a bit about technology. He holds a computer science degree from Dartmouth and works in executive communications at Google, where he has written speeches for the chairman, Eric E. Schmidt. He uses an iPad and a smartphone. But he says his daughter, a fifth grader, “doesn’t know how to use Google,” and his son is just learning. (Starting in eighth grade, the school endorses the limited use of gadgets.)

Three-quarters of the students here have parents with a strong high-tech connection. Mr. Eagle, like other parents, sees no contradiction. Technology, he says, has its time and place: “If I worked at Miramax and made good, artsy, rated R movies, I wouldn’t want my kids to see them until they were 17.”

While other schools in the region brag about their wired classrooms, the Waldorf school embraces a simple, retro look — blackboards with colorful chalk, bookshelves with encyclopedias, wooden desks filled with workbooks and No. 2 pencils.

On a recent Tuesday, Andie Eagle and her fifth-grade classmates refreshed their knitting skills, crisscrossing wooden needles around balls of yarn, making fabric swatches. It’s an activity the school says helps develop problem-solving, patterning, math skills and coordination. The long-term goal: make socks.

Down the hall, a teacher drilled third-graders on multiplication by asking them to pretend to turn their bodies into lightning bolts. She asked them a math problem — four times five — and, in unison, they shouted “20” and zapped their fingers at the number on the blackboard. A roomful of human calculators.

In second grade, students standing in a circle learned language skills by repeating verses after the teacher, while simultaneously playing catch with bean bags. It’s an exercise aimed at synchronizing body and brain. Here, as in other classes, the day can start with a recitation or verse about God that reflects a nondenominational emphasis on the divine.

Andie’s teacher, Cathy Waheed, who is a former computer engineer, tries to make learning both irresistible and highly tactile. Last year she taught fractions by having the children cut up food — apples, quesadillas, cake — into quarters, halves and sixteenths.

“For three weeks, we ate our way through fractions,” she said. “When I made enough fractional pieces of cake to feed everyone, do you think I had their attention?”

Some education experts say that the push to equip classrooms with computers is unwarranted because studies do not clearly show that this leads to better test scores or other measurable gains.

Is learning through cake fractions and knitting any better? The Waldorf advocates make it tough to compare, partly because as private schools they administer no standardized tests in elementary grades. And they would be the first to admit that their early-grade students may not score well on such tests because, they say, they don’t drill them on a standardized math and reading curriculum.

When asked for evidence of the schools’ effectiveness, the Association of Waldorf Schools of North America points to research by an affiliated group showing that 94 percent of students graduating from Waldorf high schools in the United States between 1994 and 2004 attended college, with many heading to prestigious institutions like Oberlin, Berkeley and Vassar.

Of course, that figure may not be surprising, given that these are students from families that value education highly enough to seek out a selective private school, and usually have the means to pay for it. And it is difficult to separate the effects of the low-tech instructional methods from other factors. For example, parents of students at the Los Altos school say it attracts great teachers who go through extensive training in the Waldorf approach, creating a strong sense of mission that can be lacking in other schools.

Absent clear evidence, the debate comes down to subjectivity, parental choice and a difference of opinion over a single world: engagement. Advocates for equipping schools with technology say computers can hold students’ attention and, in fact, that young people who have been weaned on electronic devices will not tune in without them.

Ann Flynn, director of education technology for the National School Boards Association, which represents school boards nationwide, said computers were essential. “If schools have access to the tools and can afford them, but are not using the tools, they are cheating our children,” Ms. Flynn said.

Paul Thomas, a former teacher and an associate professor of education at Furman University, who has written 12 books about public educational methods, disagreed, saying that “a spare approach to technology in the classroom will always benefit learning.”

“Teaching is a human experience,” he said. “Technology is a distraction when we need literacy, numeracy and critical thinking.”

And Waldorf parents argue that real engagement comes from great teachers with interesting lesson plans.

“Engagement is about human contact, the contact with the teacher, the contact with their peers,” said Pierre Laurent, 50, who works at a high-tech start-up and formerly worked at Intel and Microsoft. He has three children in Waldorf schools, which so impressed the family that his wife, Monica, joined one as a teacher in 2006.

And where advocates for stocking classrooms with technology say children need computer time to compete in the modern world, Waldorf parents counter: what’s the rush, given how easy it is to pick up those skills?

“It’s supereasy. It’s like learning to use toothpaste,” Mr. Eagle said. “At Google and all these places, we make technology as brain-dead easy to use as possible. There’s no reason why kids can’t figure it out when they get older.”

There are also plenty of high-tech parents at a Waldorf school in San Francisco and just north of it at the Greenwood School in Mill Valley, which doesn’t have Waldorf accreditation but is inspired by its principles.

California has some 40 Waldorf schools, giving it a disproportionate share — perhaps because the movement is growing roots here, said Lucy Wurtz, who, along with her husband, Brad, helped found the Waldorf high school in Los Altos in 2007. Mr. Wurtz is chief executive of Power Assure, which helps computer data centers reduce their energy load.

The Waldorf experience does not come cheap: annual tuition at the Silicon Valley schools is $17,750 for kindergarten through eighth grade and $24,400 for high school, though Ms. Wurtz said financial assistance was available. She says the typical Waldorf parent, who has a range of elite private and public schools to choose from, tends to be liberal and highly educated, with strong views about education; they also have a knowledge that when they are ready to teach their children about technology they have ample access and expertise at home.

The students, meanwhile, say they don’t pine for technology, nor have they gone completely cold turkey. Andie Eagle and her fifth-grade classmates say they occasionally watch movies. One girl, whose father works as an Apple engineer, says he sometimes asks her to test games he is debugging. One boy plays with flight-simulator programs on weekends.

The students say they can become frustrated when their parents and relatives get so wrapped up in phones and other devices. Aurad Kamkar, 11, said he recently went to visit cousins and found himself sitting around with five of them playing with their gadgets, not paying attention to him or each other. He started waving his arms at them: “I said: ‘Hello guys, I’m here.’ ”

Finn Heilig, 10, whose father works at Google, says he liked learning with pen and paper — rather than on a computer — because he could monitor his progress over the years.

“You can look back and see how sloppy your handwriting was in first grade. You can’t do that with computers ’cause all the letters are the same,” Finn said. “Besides, if you learn to write on paper, you can still write if water spills on the computer or the power goes out.”

Voir aussi:

Steve Jobs Was a Low-Tech Parent
NICK BILTON

NYT

SEPT. 10, 2014

When Steve Jobs was running Apple, he was known to call journalists to either pat them on the back for a recent article or, more often than not, explain how they got it wrong. I was on the receiving end of a few of those calls. But nothing shocked me more than something Mr. Jobs said to me in late 2010 after he had finished chewing me out for something I had written about an iPad shortcoming.

“So, your kids must love the iPad?” I asked Mr. Jobs, trying to change the subject. The company’s first tablet was just hitting the shelves. “They haven’t used it,” he told me. “We limit how much technology our kids use at home.”

I’m sure I responded with a gasp and dumbfounded silence. I had imagined the Jobs’s household was like a nerd’s paradise: that the walls were giant touch screens, the dining table was made from tiles of iPads and that iPods were handed out to guests like chocolates on a pillow.

Nope, Mr. Jobs told me, not even close.

Since then, I’ve met a number of technology chief executives and venture capitalists who say similar things: they strictly limit their children’s screen time, often banning all gadgets on school nights, and allocating ascetic time limits on weekends.

I was perplexed by this parenting style. After all, most parents seem to take the opposite approach, letting their children bathe in the glow of tablets, smartphones and computers, day and night.

Yet these tech C.E.O.’s seem to know something that the rest of us don’t.

Chris Anderson, the former editor of Wired and now chief executive of 3D Robotics, a drone maker, has instituted time limits and parental controls on every device in his home. “My kids accuse me and my wife of being fascists and overly concerned about tech, and they say that none of their friends have the same rules,” he said of his five children, 6 to 17. “That’s because we have seen the dangers of technology firsthand. I’ve seen it in myself, I don’t want to see that happen to my kids.”

The dangers he is referring to include exposure to harmful content like pornography, bullying from other kids, and perhaps worse of all, becoming addicted to their devices, just like their parents.

Alex Constantinople, the chief executive of the OutCast Agency, a tech-focused communications and marketing firm, said her youngest son, who is 5, is never allowed to use gadgets during the week, and her older children, 10 to 13, are allowed only 30 minutes a day on school nights.

Evan Williams, a founder of Blogger, Twitter and Medium, and his wife, Sara Williams, said that in lieu of iPads, their two young boys have hundreds of books (yes, physical ones) that they can pick up and read anytime.

So how do tech moms and dads determine the proper boundary for their children? In general, it is set by age.

Children under 10 seem to be most susceptible to becoming addicted, so these parents draw the line at not allowing any gadgets during the week. On weekends, there are limits of 30 minutes to two hours on iPad and smartphone use. And 10- to 14-year-olds are allowed to use computers on school nights, but only for homework.

“We have a strict no screen time during the week rule for our kids,” said Lesley Gold, founder and chief executive of the SutherlandGold Group, a tech media relations and analytics company. “But you have to make allowances as they get older and need a computer for school.”

Some parents also forbid teenagers from using social networks, except for services like Snapchat, which deletes messages after they have been sent. This way they don’t have to worry about saying something online that will haunt them later in life, one executive told me.

Although some non-tech parents I know give smartphones to children as young as 8, many who work in tech wait until their child is 14. While these teenagers can make calls and text, they are not given a data plan until 16. But there is one rule that is universal among the tech parents I polled.

“This is rule No. 1: There are no screens in the bedroom. Period. Ever,” Mr. Anderson said.

While some tech parents assign limits based on time, others are much stricter about what their children are allowed to do with screens.

Ali Partovi, a founder of iLike and adviser to Facebook, Dropbox and Zappos, said there should be a strong distinction between time spent “consuming,” like watching YouTube or playing video games, and time spent “creating” on screens.

“Just as I wouldn’t dream of limiting how much time a kid can spend with her paintbrushes, or playing her piano, or writing, I think it’s absurd to limit her time spent creating computer art, editing video, or computer programming,” he said.

Others said that outright bans could backfire and create a digital monster.

Dick Costolo, chief executive of Twitter, told me he and his wife approved of unlimited gadget use as long as their two teenage children were in the living room. They believe that too many time limits could have adverse effects on their children.

“When I was at the University of Michigan, there was this guy who lived in the dorm next to me and he had cases and cases of Coca-Cola and other sodas in his room,” Mr. Costolo said. “I later found out that it was because his parents had never let him have soda when he was growing up. If you don’t let your kids have some exposure to this stuff, what problems does it cause later?”

I never asked Mr. Jobs what his children did instead of using the gadgets he built, so I reached out to Walter Isaacson, the author of “Steve Jobs,” who spent a lot of time at their home.

“Every evening Steve made a point of having dinner at the big long table in their kitchen, discussing books and history and a variety of things,” he said. “No one ever pulled out an iPad or computer. The kids did not seem addicted at all to devices.”

Voir encore:

How digital technology and TV can inhibit children socially
Researchers discovered that depriving 11 and 12-year-olds for just five days of all digital media – including television – left them better able to read others’ emotions
Telegraph Reporter
Daily Telegraph

25 Aug 2014
Removing smartphones and gadgets from children for just a few days immediately improves their social skills, a study has found.
Researchers discovered that depriving 11 and 12-year-olds for just five days of all digital media – including television – left them better able to read others’ emotions.
Prof Patricia Greenfield, the senior study author and professor of psychology at the University of California Los Angeles, said: “Many people are looking at the benefits of digital media in education, and not many are looking at the costs. “Decreased sensitivity to emotional cues, losing the ability to understand the emotions of other people, is one of the costs.”
Psychologists studied two sets of 11 and 12-year-olds from the same school, 51 who lived together for five days at a nature and science camp and 54 others.

The camp does not allow students to use electronic devices.

At the beginning and end of the study, both groups of students were evaluated for their ability to recognise other people’s emotions in photographs and videos.

The students were shown 48 pictures of faces that were happy, sad, angry or scared, and asked to identify their feelings.

The children who had been at the camp improved significantly over the five days in their ability to read facial emotions and other non-verbal cues to emotion, compared with the students who continued to use their media devices.

The findings, published in the journal Computers in Human Behaviour, applied equally to boys and girls.

The study’s co-author Dr Yalda Uhls, a senior researcher with the UCLA’s Children’s Digital Media Centre, said: “You cannot learn non-verbal emotional cues from a screen in the way you can learn it from face-to-face communication.

“The research implies that people need more face-to-face interaction, and that even when people use digital media for social interaction, they are spending less time developing social skills.”

Voir encore:

In Classroom of Future, Stagnant Scores
Matt Richtel

NYT

September 3, 2011
CHANDLER, Ariz. — Amy Furman, a seventh-grade English teacher here, roams among 31 students sitting at their desks or in clumps on the floor. They’re studying Shakespeare’s “As You Like It” — but not in any traditional way.

In this technology-centric classroom, students are bent over laptops, some blogging or building Facebook pages from the perspective of Shakespeare’s characters. One student compiles a song list from the Internet, picking a tune by the rapper Kanye West to express the emotions of Shakespeare’s lovelorn Silvius.

The class, and the Kyrene School District as a whole, offer what some see as a utopian vision of education’s future. Classrooms are decked out with laptops, big interactive screens and software that drills students on every basic subject. Under a ballot initiative approved in 2005, the district has invested roughly $33 million in such technologies.

The digital push here aims to go far beyond gadgets to transform the very nature of the classroom, turning the teacher into a guide instead of a lecturer, wandering among students who learn at their own pace on Internet-connected devices.

“This is such a dynamic class,” Ms. Furman says of her 21st-century classroom. “I really hope it works.”

Hope and enthusiasm are soaring here. But not test scores.

Since 2005, scores in reading and math have stagnated in Kyrene, even as statewide scores have risen.

To be sure, test scores can go up or down for many reasons. But to many education experts, something is not adding up — here and across the country. In a nutshell: schools are spending billions on technology, even as they cut budgets and lay off teachers, with little proof that this approach is improving basic learning.

This conundrum calls into question one of the most significant contemporary educational movements. Advocates for giving schools a major technological upgrade — which include powerful educators, Silicon Valley titans and White House appointees — say digital devices let students learn at their own pace, teach skills needed in a modern economy and hold the attention of a generation weaned on gadgets.

Some backers of this idea say standardized tests, the most widely used measure of student performance, don’t capture the breadth of skills that computers can help develop. But they also concede that for now there is no better way to gauge the educational value of expensive technology investments.

“The data is pretty weak. It’s very difficult when we’re pressed to come up with convincing data,” said Tom Vander Ark, the former executive director for education at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and an investor in educational technology companies. When it comes to showing results, he said, “We better put up or shut up.”

And yet, in virtually the same breath, he said change of a historic magnitude is inevitably coming to classrooms this decade: “It’s one of the three or four biggest things happening in the world today.”

Critics counter that, absent clear proof, schools are being motivated by a blind faith in technology and an overemphasis on digital skills — like using PowerPoint and multimedia tools — at the expense of math, reading and writing fundamentals. They say the technology advocates have it backward when they press to upgrade first and ask questions later.

The spending push comes as schools face tough financial choices. In Kyrene, for example, even as technology spending has grown, the rest of the district’s budget has shrunk, leading to bigger classes and fewer periods of music, art and physical education.

At the same time, the district’s use of technology has earned it widespread praise. It is upheld as a model of success by the National School Boards Association, which in 2008 organized a visit by 100 educators from 17 states who came to see how the district was innovating.

And the district has banked its future and reputation on technology. Kyrene, which serves 18,000 kindergarten to eighth-grade students, mostly from the cities of Tempe, Phoenix and Chandler, uses its computer-centric classes as a way to attract children from around the region, shoring up enrollment as its local student population shrinks. More students mean more state dollars.

The issue of tech investment will reach a critical point in November. The district plans to go back to local voters for approval of $46.3 million more in taxes over seven years to allow it to keep investing in technology. That represents around 3.5 percent of the district’s annual spending, five times what it spends on textbooks.

The district leaders’ position is that technology has inspired students and helped them grow, but that there is no good way to quantify those achievements — putting them in a tough spot with voters deciding whether to bankroll this approach again.

“My gut is telling me we’ve had growth,” said David K. Schauer, the superintendent here. “But we have to have some measure that is valid, and we don’t have that.”

It gives him pause.

“We’ve jumped on bandwagons for different eras without knowing fully what we’re doing. This might just be the new bandwagon,” he said. “I hope not.”

A Dearth of Proof

The pressure to push technology into the classroom without proof of its value has deep roots.

In 1997, a science and technology committee assembled by President Clinton issued an urgent call about the need to equip schools with technology.

If such spending was not increased by billions of dollars, American competitiveness could suffer, according to the committee, whose members included educators like Charles M. Vest, then president of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and business executives like John A. Young, the former chief executive of Hewlett-Packard.

To support its conclusion, the committee’s report cited the successes of individual schools that embraced computers and saw test scores rise or dropout rates fall. But while acknowledging that the research on technology’s impact was inadequate, the committee urged schools to adopt it anyhow.

The report’s final sentence read: “The panel does not, however, recommend that the deployment of technology within America’s schools be deferred pending the completion of such research.”

Since then, the ambitions of those who champion educational technology have grown — from merely equipping schools with computers and instructional software, to putting technology at the center of the classroom and building the teaching around it.

Kyrene had the same sense of urgency as President Clinton’s committee when, in November 2005, it asked voters for an initial $46.3 million for laptops, classroom projectors, networking gear and other technology for teachers and administrators.

Before that, the district had given 300 elementary school teachers five laptops each. Students and teachers used them with great enthusiasm, said Mark Share, the district’s 64-year-old director of technology, a white-bearded former teacher from the Bronx with an iPhone clipped to his belt.

“If we know something works, why wait?” Mr. Share told The Arizona Republic the month before the vote. The district’s pitch was based not on the idea that test scores would rise, but that technology represented the future.

The measure, which faced no organized opposition, passed overwhelmingly. It means that property owners in the dry, sprawling flatlands here, who live in apartment complexes, cookie-cutter suburban homes and salmon-hued mini-mansions, pay on average $75 more a year in taxes, depending on the assessed value of their homes, according to the district.

But the proof sought by President Clinton’s committee remains elusive even today, though researchers have been seeking answers.

Many studies have found that technology has helped individual classrooms, schools or districts. For instance, researchers found that writing scores improved for eighth-graders in Maine after they were all issued laptops in 2002. The same researchers, from the University of Southern Maine, found that math performance picked up among seventh- and eighth-graders after teachers in the state were trained in using the laptops to teach.

A question plaguing many education researchers is how to draw broader inferences from such case studies, which can have serious limitations. For instance, in the Maine math study, it is hard to separate the effect of the laptops from the effect of the teacher training.

Educators would like to see major trials years in length that clearly demonstrate technology’s effect. But such trials are extraordinarily difficult to conduct when classes and schools can be so different, and technology is changing so quickly.

And often the smaller studies produce conflicting results. Some classroom studies show that math scores rise among students using instructional software, while others show that scores actually fall. The high-level analyses that sum up these various studies, not surprisingly, give researchers pause about whether big investments in technology make sense.

One broad analysis of laptop programs like the one in Maine, for example, found that such programs are not a major factor in student performance.

“Rather than being a cure-all or silver bullet, one-to-one laptop programs may simply amplify what’s already occurring — for better or worse,” wrote Bryan Goodwin, spokesman for Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning, a nonpartisan group that did the study, in an essay. Good teachers, he said, can make good use of computers, while bad teachers won’t, and they and their students could wind up becoming distracted by the technology.

A review by the Education Department in 2009 of research on online courses — which more than one million K-12 students are taking — found that few rigorous studies had been done and that policy makers “lack scientific evidence” of their effectiveness.. A division of the Education Department that rates classroom curriculums has found that much educational software is not an improvement over textbooks.

Larry Cuban, an education professor emeritus at Stanford University, said the research did not justify big investments by districts.

“There is insufficient evidence to spend that kind of money. Period, period, period,” he said. “There is no body of evidence that shows a trend line.”

Some advocates for technology disagree.

Karen Cator, director of the office of educational technology in the United States Department of Education, said standardized test scores were an inadequate measure of the value of technology in schools. Ms. Cator, a former executive at Apple Computer, said that better measurement tools were needed but, in the meantime, schools knew what students needed.

“In places where we’ve had a large implementing of technology and scores are flat, I see that as great,” she said. “Test scores are the same, but look at all the other things students are doing: learning to use the Internet to research, learning to organize their work, learning to use professional writing tools, learning to collaborate with others.”

For its part, Kyrene has become a model to many by training teachers to use technology and getting their ideas on what inspires them. As Mr. Share says in the signature file at the bottom of every e-mail he sends: “It’s not the stuff that counts — it’s what you do with it that matters.”

So people here are not sure what to make of the stagnant test scores. Many of the district’s schools, particularly those in more affluent areas, already had relatively high scores, making it a challenge to push them significantly higher. A jump in students qualifying for free or reduced-price lunches was largely a result of the recession, not a shift in the population the district serves, said Nancy Dundenhoefer, its community relations manager.

Mr. Share, whose heavy influence on more than $7 million a year in technology spending has made him a power broker, said he did not think demographic changes were a good explanation.

“You could argue that test scores would be lower without the technology, but that’s a copout,” he said, adding that the district should be able to deliver some measure of what he considers its obvious success with technology. “It’s a conundrum.”

Results aside, it’s easy to see why technology is such an easy sell here, given the enthusiasm surrounding it in some classrooms.

Engaging With Paper

“I start with pens and pencils,” says Ms. Furman, 41, who is short and bubbly and devours young-adult novels to stay in touch with students. Her husband teaches eighth grade in the district, and their son and daughter are both students.

At the beginning of the school year, Ms. Furman tries to inspire her students at Aprende Middle School to write, a task she says becomes increasingly difficult when students reach the patently insecure middle-school years.

In one class in 2009 she had them draw a heart on a piece of paper. Inside the heart, she asked them to write the names of things and people dear to them. One girl started to cry, then another, as the class shared their stories.

It was something Ms. Furman doubted would have happened if the students had been using computers. “There is a connection between the physical hand on the paper and the words on the page,” she said. “It’s intimate.”

But, she said, computers play an important role in helping students get their ideas down more easily, edit their work so they can see instant improvement, and share it with the class. She uses a document camera to display a student’s paper at the front of the room for others to dissect.

Ms. Furman said the creative and editing tools, by inspiring students to make quick improvements to their writing, pay dividends in the form of higher-quality work. Last year, 14 of her students were chosen as finalists in a statewide essay contest that asked them how literature had affected their lives. “I was running down the hall, weeping, saying, ‘Get these students together. We need to tell them they’ve won!’ ”

Other teachers say the technology is the only way to make this generation learn.

“They’re inundated with 24/7 media, so they expect it,” said Sharon Smith, 44, a gregarious seventh-grade social studies teacher whose classroom is down the hall from Ms. Furman’s.

Minutes earlier, Ms. Smith had taught a Civil War lesson in a way unimaginable even 10 years ago. With the lights off, a screen at the front of the room posed a question: “Jefferson Davis was Commander of the Union Army: True or False?”

The 30 students in the classroom held wireless clickers into which they punched their answers. Seconds later, a pie chart appeared on the screen: 23 percent answered “True,” 70 percent “False,” and 6 percent didn’t know.

The students hooted and hollered, reacting to the instant poll. Ms. Smith then drew the students into a conversation about the answers.

The enthusiasm underscores a key argument for investing in classroom technology: student engagement.

That idea is central to the National Education Technology Plan released by the White House last year, which calls for the “revolutionary transformation” of schools. The plan endorses bringing “state-of-the art technology into learning to enable, motivate and inspire all students.”

But the research, what little there is of it, does not establish a clear link between computer-inspired engagement and learning, said Randy Yerrick, associate dean of educational technology at the University of Buffalo.

For him, the best educational uses of computers are those that have no good digital equivalent. As examples, he suggests using digital sensors in a science class to help students observe chemical or physical changes, or using multimedia tools to reach disabled children.

But he says engagement is a “fluffy term” that can slide past critical analysis. And Professor Cuban at Stanford argues that keeping children engaged requires an environment of constant novelty, which cannot be sustained.

“There is very little valid and reliable research that shows the engagement causes or leads to higher academic achievement,” he said.

Instruct or Distract?

There are times in Kyrene when the technology seems to allow students to disengage from learning: They are left at computers to perform a task but wind up playing around, suggesting, as some researchers have found, that computers can distract and not instruct.

The 23 kindergartners in Christy Asta’s class at Kyrene de las Brisas are broken into small groups, a common approach in Kyrene. A handful stand at desks, others sit at computers, typing up reports.

Xavier Diaz, 6, sits quietly, chair pulled close to his Dell laptop, playing “Alien Addition.” In this math arcade game, Xavier controls a pod at the bottom of the screen that shoots at spaceships falling from the sky. Inside each ship is a pair of numbers. Xavier’s goal is to shoot only the spaceship with numbers that are the sum of the number inside his pod.

But Xavier is just shooting every target in sight. Over and over. Periodically, the game gives him a message: “Try again.” He tries again.

“Even if he doesn’t get it right, it’s getting him to think quicker,” says the teacher, Ms. Asta. She leans down next to him: “Six plus one is seven. Click here.” She helps him shoot the right target. “See, you shot him.”

Perhaps surprisingly given the way young people tend to gravitate toward gadgets, students here seem divided about whether they prefer learning on computers or through more traditional methods.

In a different class, Konray Yuan and Marisa Guisto, both 7, take turns touching letters on the interactive board on the wall. They are playing a spelling game, working together to spell the word “cool.” Each finds one of the letters in a jumbled grid, touching them in the proper order.

Marisa says there isn’t a difference between learning this way and learning on paper. Konray prefers paper, he says, because you get extra credit for good penmanship.

But others, particularly older students, say they enjoy using the technology tools. One of Ms. Furman’s students, Julia Schroder, loved building a blog to write about Shakespeare’s “As You Like It.”

In another class, she and several classmates used a video camera to film a skit about Woodrow Wilson’s 14-point speech during World War I — an approach she preferred to speaking directly to the class.

“I’d be pretty bummed if I had to do a live thing,” she said. “It’s nerve-racking.”

Teachers vs. Tech

Even as students are getting more access to computers here, they are getting less access to teachers.

Reflecting budget cuts, class sizes have crept up in Kyrene, as they have in many places. For example, seventh-grade classes like Ms. Furman’s that had 29 to 31 students grew to more like 31 to 33.

“You can’t continue to be effective if you keep adding one student, then one student, then one student,” Ms. Furman said. “I’m surprised parents aren’t going into the classrooms saying ‘Whoa.’ ”

Advocates of high-tech classrooms say computers are not intended to replace teachers. But they do see a fundamental change in the teacher’s role. Their often-cited mantra is that teachers should go from being “a sage on the stage to a guide on the side.”

And they say that, technology issues aside, class sizes can in fact afford to grow without hurting student performance.

Professor Cuban at Stanford said research showed that student performance did not improve significantly until classes fell under roughly 15 students, and did not get much worse unless they rose above 30.

At the same time, he says bigger classes can frustrate teachers, making it hard to attract and retain talented ones.

In Kyrene, growing class sizes reflect spending cuts; the district’s maintenance and operation budget fell to $95 million this year from $106 million in 2008. The district cannot use the money designated for technology to pay for other things. And the teachers, who make roughly $33,000 to $57,000 a year, have not had a raise since 2008.

Many teachers have second jobs, some in restaurants and retail, said Erin Kirchoff, president of the Kyrene Education Association, the teacher’s association. Teachers talk of being exhausted from teaching all day, then selling shoes at the mall.

Ms. Furman works during the summer at the Kyrene district offices. But that job is being eliminated in 2014, and she is worried about the income loss.

“Without it, we don’t go on vacation,” she said.

Money for other things in the district is short as well. Many teachers say they regularly bring in their own supplies, like construction paper.

“We have Smart Boards in every classroom but not enough money to buy copy paper, pencils and hand sanitizer,” said Nicole Cates, a co-president of the Parent Teacher Organization at Kyrene de la Colina, an elementary school. “You don’t go buy a new outfit when you don’t have enough dinner to eat.”

But she loves the fact that her two children, a fourth-grader and first-grader, are learning technology, including PowerPoint and educational games.

To some who favor high-tech classrooms, the resource squeeze presents an opportunity. Their thinking is that struggling schools will look for more efficient ways to get the job done, creating an impetus to rethink education entirely.

“Let’s hope the fiscal crisis doesn’t get better too soon. It’ll slow down reform,” said Tom Watkins, the former superintendent for the Michigan schools, and now a consultant to businesses in the education sector.

Clearly, the push for technology is to the benefit of one group: technology companies.

The Sellers

It is 4:30 a.m. on a Tuesday. Mr. Share, the director of technology at Kyrene and often an early riser, awakens to the hard sell. Awaiting him at his home computer are six pitches from technology companies.

It’s just another day for the man with the checkbook.

“I get one pitch an hour,” he said. He finds most of them useless and sometimes galling: “They’re mostly car salesmen. I think they believe in the product they’re selling, but they don’t have a leg to stand on as to why the product is good or bad.”

Mr. Share bases his buying decisions on two main factors: what his teachers tell him they need, and his experience. For instance, he said he resisted getting the interactive whiteboards sold as Smart Boards until, one day in 2008, he saw a teacher trying to mimic the product with a jury-rigged projector setup.

“It was an ‘Aha!’ moment,” he said, leading him to buy Smart Boards, made by a company called Smart Technologies.

He can make that kind of decision because he has money — and the vendors know it. Technology companies track which districts get federal funding and which have passed tax assessments for technology, like Kyrene.

This is big business. Sales of computer software to schools for classroom use were $1.89 billion in 2010. Spending on hardware is more difficult to measure, researchers say, but some put the figure at five times that amount.

The vendors relish their relationship with Kyrene.

“I joke I should have an office here, I’m here so often,” said Will Dunham, a salesman for CCS Presentation Systems, a leading reseller of Smart Boards in Arizona.

Last summer, the district paid $500,000 to CCS to replace ceiling-hung projectors in 400 classrooms. The alternative was to spend $100,000 to replace their aging bulbs, which Mr. Share said were growing dimmer, causing teachers to sometimes have to turn down the lights to see a crisp image.

Mr. Dunham said the purchase made sense because new was better. “I could take a used car down to the mechanic and get it all fixed up and still have a used car.”

But Ms. Kirchoff, the president of the teachers’ association, is furious. “My projector works just fine,” she said. “Give me Kleenex, Kleenex, Kleenex!”

The Parents

Last November, Kyrene went back to voters to ask them to pay for another seven years of technology spending in the district. The previous measure from 2005 will not expire for two years. But the district wanted to get ahead of the issue, and leave wiggle room just in case the new measure didn’t pass.

It didn’t. It lost by 96 votes out of nearly 50,000 cast. Mr. Share and others here said they attributed the failure to poor wording on the ballot that made it look like a new tax increase, rather than the continuation of one.

They say they will not make the same wording mistake this time. And they say the burden on taxpayers is modest.

“It’s so much bang for the buck,” said Jeremy Calles, Kyrene’s interim chief financial officer. For a small investment, he said, “we get state-of-the-art technology.”

Regardless, some taxpayers have already decided that they will not vote yes.

“When you look at the big picture, it’s hard to say ‘yes, spend more on technology’ when class sizes increase,” said Kameron Bybee, 34, who has two children in district schools. “The district has made up its mind to go forward with the technologically advanced path. Come hell or high water.”

Other parents feel conflicted. Eduarda Schroder, 48, whose daughter Julia was in Ms. Furman’s English class, worked on the political action committee last November to push through an extension of the technology tax. Computers, she says, can make learning more appealing. But she’s also concerned that test scores haven’t gone up.

She says she is starting to ask a basic question. “Do we really need technology to learn?” she said. “It’s a very valid time to ask the question, right before this goes on the ballot.”

Voir par ailleurs:

The waldorf cigarette factory
Alicia Hamberg

November 16, 2010

So — the first waldorf school was named after a cigarette factory in Stuttgart, Germany. The waldorf salad got its name from the Waldorf Hotel in New York (later the Waldorf Astoria), where it was created. But were there any connections between the cigarette factory in Stuttgart and the hotel in New York? Incidentally, the company that owned old cigarette factory in Stuttgart also bore the name Astoria — The Waldorf-Astoria Cigarette Company — though nowadays the factory is occasionally mentioned only as the Waldorf cigarette factory. (I believe? I may be mistaken here though.) And the waldorf schools, as far as I know, never adopted the entire name Waldorf-Astoria.

And, more importantly, what happened to the Waldorf cigarette factory? My google searches didn’t bring up anything but a very brief history of the factory itself on wikipedia. I may have come across more substantial information at some point in the past, but I cannot remember.

The Waldorf Hotel, opened in 1893 according to Wikipedia, clearly predates the Waldorf school. The salad, likewise, was a creation of the 1890s. The Waldorf Hotel closed for relocation, merged with the Astoria Hotel and opened as the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in 1931.

The Waldorf-Astoria Cigarette Company, on the other hand, was established by Emil Molt — the anthroposophist who would later be involved with Rudolf Steiner in setting up the first waldorf school — and colleagues in 1906. It had been named after John Jacob Astor (1763-1848) from a German town called Walldorf. He had emigrated to the US and become enormously wealthy. Molt’s Waldorf-Astoria cigarette company went out of business in 1929 — that is, before the joint Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York had even been opened.

To make the story more complicated, the Waldorf-Astoria hotel had originally been two hotels, both of which were established by descendants of the same rich emigrant John Jacob Astor, whom the cigarette company had been named after. As already mentioned, the Waldorf Hotel was opened in 1893. The other hotel — the Astoria — was established four years later. By this time, it seems, the family had adopted the name of John Jacob Astor’s home village, Walldorf, though with another spelling: Waldorf.

The Waldorf-Astoria Tobacco factory may have ceased to exist in 1929, but the tobacco brand remained in production, during many years manufactured by a company called Remtsmaa. The waldorf schools are still around. When the Stuttgart school had been established by Molt and Steiner in 1919, Molt was manager of the cigarette company, and he and the company provided the building space the school needed.

 Voir aussi:

Les maths à la sauce New Age

Isabelle Roberge

Science presse

Décembre 2003

« Un, deux, trois, quatre. Cinq, six, sept, huit. » Ils étaient une dizaine d’adultes, en rond, à compter tout haut, à culbuter leur petit sac de sable de la main gauche (neuf) à la main droite (dix), puis à la gauche (onze), pour le passer au voisin de droite (douze). Avec ce ballet, des parents expérimentaient… la table de multiplication de quatre.

Du moins, telle qu’elle aurait pu être enseignée à leur petit, s’ils l’avaient envoyé en première année dans une école à pédagogie Waldorf. Un type d’école que plusieurs aimeraient voir se multiplier au Québec, qui soulève plus que sa part de controverses en Amérique du Nord, et dont la philosophie flirte avec le New Age.

Caractéristique dominante de cette pédagogie : « les rythmes de développement » des enfants. C’est ainsi qu’on n’enseigne que par le jeu et l’imitation aux moins de sept ans… parce que l’âme n’a pas encore intégré le corps. De 7 à 14 ans, on mise sur l’oralité. Contes de fées, légendes et mythes sont alors à l’honneur des cours d’histoire… et de biologie !

Les mathématiques sont également revues à travers le tricot. L’histoire, par un modelage en cire d’abeille. L’idée étant que les matières de l’après-midi -comme le jardinage, les travaux manuels ou l’artisanat- consolident les apprentissages du matin. Ici, pas de manuels scolaires. Pas d’ordinateurs, ni de médias électroniques avant le secondaire, parce qu’on est convaincu que ceux-ci  » briment l’imagination  » des jeunes.

La réincarnation au programme scolaire

Une demande a été présentée aux commissions scolaires de Montréal et de Marguerite-Bourgeoys, afin d’implanter « la première école publique à vocation particulière basée sur la pédagogie Waldorf à Montréal ».

Après avoir étudié le projet appelé à l’époque Élan Waldorf Montréal, les deux commissions scolaires ont décliné la demande pour les rentrées de septembre 2002 et 2003. La commission scolaire de Montréal n’offrait que des locaux à partager, alors qu’Élan Waldorf tenait à une école entièrement dédiée à « sa » pédagogie. Marguerite-Bourgeoys justifiait son choix par la réforme scolaire qui requiert toute l’attention du personnel, mais ce n’est que partie remise: le dossier Waldorf demeure sur sa liste des projets à étudier.

Depuis, le groupe Waldorf Montréal s’est rebaptisé EWM pour ne pas utiliser le mot « Waldorf », une marque de commerce du Waldorf School Association of Ontario. Dans une lettre acheminée au Devoir le 19 décembre 2003, le parent fondateur et membre du comité de coordination, Philip van Leeuwen, affirme que EWM attend toujours cette école publique.

Au cours de l’été 2002, onze parents ont tenté, au cours de séances d’information de trois heures, de convaincre d’autres parents de rallier leur cause. L’atmosphère s’avérait plutôt chaleureuse et familiale. La salle soupirait d’envie lorsque trois anciens Waldorf, dans la vingtaine, se souvenaient du climat « non-compétitif » des classes (pas d’examens notés au primaire). Mais les questions étaient soigneusement évitées.

Au cours des trois heures – consacrées en grande partie à des contes, des mises en situation et des chansons- personne n’a prononcé le mot « anthroposophie ». On n’en fait non plus aucune mention dans les 23 pages du document remis aux commissions scolaires en novembre 2001.

C’est pourtant derrière ce terme que se dissimule toute la philosophie créée en 1919 par le fondateur des écoles Waldorf, Rudolf Steiner (voir encadré).

Rudolf Steiner à 57 ans (1918).
WaldorfCritics.org
Imbibant l’ensemble de la démarche scolaire, l’anthroposophie reprend entre autres la thèse de la réincarnation et du karma.

Les « rythmes de développement » de l’enfant sont basés sur l’arrivée successive de trois « corps » qui, selon Steiner, composent l’être humain : le corps physique qui s’incarne à la naissance, suivi du « corps éthérique » à la chute des dents (vers sept ans) et le « corps astral » qui provoque la puberté, à 14 ans.

Steiner était convaincu que les humains ont déjà vécu sur l’Atlantide et vont un jour vivre sur Vénus, Jupiter et Vulcain (?) lorsque, dans une vie future, ils auront atteint un stade plus élevé de ce  » développement  » (voir la carte de l’évolution).

Philip van Leeuwen assure pour sa part, dans sa lettre du 19 décembre, que « nous ne sommes pas des anthroposophes et l’anthroposophie n’est pas enseignée dans une école waldorf; nous ne sommes que de simples parents qui reconnaissent les bénéfices de la pédagogie waldorf et qui voudraient offrir ce choix pédagogique aux familles de Montréal. « 

Atlantis. The Fate of the Lost Land and Its Secret Knowledge. Sélection de textes de Rudolf Steiner
« Les enfants n’entendent pas directement parler de réincarnation. Mais la pédagogie est basée sur ce fait », admet Vincent Breton, le fondateur de l’association Rudolf Steiner de Québec. Cette association anthroposophique tente depuis 20 ans de lancer une école privée Waldorf à Québec. Dès 1994, elle a organisé un congrès d’information sur la pédagogie Waldorf et l’anthroposophie.

Sans blâmer le silence qu’EWM choisit de garder au sujet de l’anthroposophie, Vincent Breton se dit favorable à ce que les parents sachent que le projet est directement relié à cette philosophie et y inscrivent leurs enfants en toute connaissance de cause, plutôt que de le découvrir après coup.

Un enfant a-t-il une âme?

Selon M. Breton, lui-même père de quatre enfants, si les lettres sont assimilées en 2e année plutôt qu’en 1ere, c’est parce que l’esprit, qui vivait avant la naissance de l’enfant, n’a pas encore fini de « s’incarner dans son corps physique ».

« On nous a parlé du développement de l’enfant, mais jamais que l’âme s’incarne à l’âge de sept ans », s’insurge un père qui a retiré ses deux enfants de l’école privée Rudolf-Steiner dans les années ’90 -la seule école Waldorf sur l’île de Montréal- et désire demeurer anonyme. Comme les enfants ne rapportent pas de devoirs à la maison, les parents ignorent ce qui se passe réellement. Lorsque ce père a parcouru les ouvrages anthroposophiques de la bibliothèque de l’école, il a déchanté.

Il se rappelle les rencontres avec les professeurs :  » Tout est très contrôlé. Le professeur parle. On ne pose pas de questions.  »
Un des slogans des critiques de Waldorf: posez des questions.

Les professeurs, eux, entendent bel et bien parler d’anthroposophie. Ils complètent leur certification d’enseignement du Québec par une formation spéciale d’un à trois ans, en Californie, en France, au Séminaire de formation de l’École Rudolf Steiner de Montréal ou au Rudolf Steiner Centre à Thornhill, en Ontario. Sur son site Internet, on peut lire qu’ils font un  » travail intensif en anthroposophie pour une éducation en profondeur », qu’ils étudient la  » sagesse dans les contes de fées  » ou qu’ils apprennent l’existence de « douze sens ».

Faire des maths avec les anges

Yves Casgrain, ex-directeur de la recherche à Info-secte et auteur d’un livre sur les sectes, prépare actuellement un ouvrage sur les écoles Waldorf. La somme de trois ans d’entrevues avec des professeurs de nombreuses écoles privés. « On leur conseille d’être évasif, de savoir à qui parler et quoi taire. » Sans qualifier l’anthroposophie de sectaire, Yves Casgrain rapporte des propos d’un ancien étudiant : « Si je décidais de pratiquer l’anthroposophie à nouveau, ce serait via l’eurythmie (la « science du mouvement »), qui est un moyen d’entrer en contact avec l’au-delà ». Ce même élève lui racontait aussi qu’à l’école, on maintient que « quand on fait des maths, il y a des anges qui se promènent dans la classe ».

Même si, poursuit Yves Casgrain,  » le but de ces écoles n’est pas de transformer les jeunes en anthroposophes », la pédagogie a un caractère  » initiatique  » :  » les professeurs ont une vision à long terme: préparer l’enfant à son karma, et l’outiller pour ses futures vies, dans trois ou quatre vies. C’est plus ou moins à l’insu des parents. « 

Le fait que les organisateurs d’EWM soient si discrets sur la philosophie de Rudolf Steiner s’explique peut-être par le fait qu’ils ont déjà eu maille à partir avec les médias. Depuis 1998, les parents de l’école La Roselière de Chambly observent un moratoire de silence. À l’époque, la ministre Pauline Marois n’avait pas voulu renouveler le permis d’établissement à vocation particulière: l’école n’utilisait pas de matériel didactique approuvé, son directeur était aussi le commissaire, et certains parents avaient quitté, choqués par son caractère ésotérique (dont une prière au soleil). Une mère se plaignait que l’orthopédagogue avait suggéré un traitement à sa fille pour lui faire écrire de la main droite.

Pour l’instant, la seule école Waldorf primaire et secondaire sur l’île de Montréal, l’École Rudolf Steiner, est donc une école privée. Il existe trois écoles primaires publiques au Québec, à Waterville, Victoriaville et Chambly. L’une d’elles a été mentionnée à quelques reprises dans l’actualité ces derniers mois, lorsque Louis Taillefer, spécialiste des supraconducteurs à l’Université de Sherbrooke, a récolté des honneurs dans le milieu scientifique, et en a profité pour souligner que ses enfants y sont inscrits (voir encadré). Il existe également des jardins d’enfants, dont l’Oiseau d’or à Lennoxville. Chaque fois, les promoteurs de l’école sont les parents, comme M. Taillefer.

Depuis un an et demi, près d’une dizaine d’initiatives convergent pour relancer la défunte Association pour la pédagogie Waldorf au Québec. L’école de Chambly souhaite élargir son enseignement au secondaire. D’autres travaillent à s’implanter en Abitibi, à Adamsville et dans des quartiers de Montréal. À Québec, des parents anthroposophes ont tenu une conférence publique en janvier.  » Depuis que des parents sont les maîtres d’œuvre avec les conseils d’établissements, explique Vincent Breton, on voit de plus en plus de ces initiatives pour un enseignement différent.  » Élan Waldorf Montréal compte aussi reprendre ses conférences publiques.

Qui est Steiner et qu’est-ce que l’anthroposophie?
Des poursuites en justice aux Etats-Unis
Un physicien parmi les parents
Collaboration à la recherche: Isabelle Burgun

Voir de même:

CHASSE AUX SORCIERES ?
JANINE TAVERNIER, LA PLUS CONNUE DES CHASSEUSES DE SECTES, PREFERE QUITTER UN COMBAT QUI PREND UNE TOURNURE TROP IDEOLOGIQUE. TROP SECTAIRE.
«SI ON EN VEUT A SON VOISIN, ON L’ACCUSE D’APPARTENIR À UNE SECTE.»
Entretien Joseph Veillard

Technikart

Novembre 2001

La médiatique présidente de l’UNADFI (Union Nationale des Associations de Défense de la Famille et de l’Individu qui aide les victimes des sectes) nous reçoit dans son pavillon de la banlieue ouest de Paris. Elle vient de démissionner de son poste de présidente et semble soulagée de passer le relais dans un combat où elle s’est jetée il y a vingt ans, à la suite de l’entrée de son mari dans la secte écolo-intégriste Ecoovie.

Ironie du sort : l’ex-première chasseuse antisectes de France se retrouve au banc des accusés puisque sa fille travaille comme éducatrice spécialisée dans un établissement inspiré de la pédagogie de Rudolph Steiner, classé comme secte.

Choquée de la mise à l’index dont ont été victimes les écoles de ses petits enfants, raillée par certains chasseurs de sectes qui lui reprochent sa complaisance envers un mouvement sectaire, elle s’inquiète d’une atmosphère de chasse aux sorcières qui peut conduire à une confusion générale, voire à certaines bavures.

Janine Tavernier, pourquoi quittez-vous la présidence de l’UNADFI ?

Après vingt ans dans cette association, et dix ans de présidence de l’UNADFI, j’estime qu’il est temps de passer la main.

Par ailleurs, il y a des personnes qui arrivent dans nos associations avec des idées nouvelles et qui ont envie de changer un peu le cours des choses.

C’est-à-dire ?

Il y a toute une équipe de personnes qui ont envie de s’intéresser aux doctrines et aux philosophies. Moi, je n’y tiens pas. je suis rentrée à l’association justement parce qu’on ne s’occupait pas des doctrines ni des croyances. On ne s’occupait que des victimes de groupes totalitaires.

Le Phénomène sectaire change complètement en France. Je pense que le grand public sait ce que c’est qu’une secte alors que, en 1974, date de la création de L’ADFI, il fallait tout faire découvrir. Aujourd’hui, il y a un renouveau dans ce milieu et j’ai envie de prendre du recul pour réfléchir.

Est-ce qu’il a pu y avoir des amalgames dans la campagne antisectes ?

De plus en plus, les gens voient des sectes partout. Si on fait du yoga, si on se soigne à l’homéopathie ou à l’acupuncture, on fait partie d’une secte Je trouve cela extrêmement grave parce qu’on doit avoir une grande ouverture et accepter les médecines parallèles sans juger ni cataloguer. De plus, on se sert du phénomène sectaire pour dénoncer et créer des rumeurs.

En gros, si on en veut à son voisin, on l’accuse d’appartenir à une secte.

Des gens qui vous sont chers, impliqués dans les écoles Steiner, ont ainsi été directement accusés…

Nous ne nous intéressons qu’aux victimes et nous n’en avons jamais reçu des écoles Steiner. Je trouve cela anormal qu’elles soient cataloguées comme sectes et que l’on me reproche de les soutenir car mes petits-enfants y sont éduqués. Je me pose des questions. Je voudrais lutter contre cela, notamment quand je vois que des magasins comme Nature et Découvertes sont présentés comme faisant partie de la scientologie. Toutes ces rumeur sont inadmissibles et je ne veux pas jouer ce jeu – là. Moi je me sens tout à fait libre, je n’ai aucune croyance, aucune philosophie. Il faut faire la différence entre les nouveaux mouvements religieux et les sectes. Les premier tout à fait respectables tandis que les secondes sont nocives.

Votre départ de l’UNADFI laisse la place libre à d’autres personne plus dogmatiques. N’est-ce pas un mauvais signe ?

J’espère que non. C’est important de changer, de tout remettre à plat pour permettre une meilleure étude du phénomène. Moi, j’ai fait mon temps ce fut une période formidable, pas toujours facile, durant laquelle j’ai acquis beaucoup de maturité et d’humilité. Face au phénomène des sectes, il faut tout le temps se remettre en question. Il n’y a pas de mode d’emploi pour aider quelqu’un à sortir d’une secte, pour aider les familles.

Aujourd’hui il y a moins d’importance à faire connaître le phénomène sectaire car le monde est plus ou moins au courant. Ce qu’il faut, c’est travailler dans la finesse et faire en sorte que les personnes ne se fassent plus avoir.

Voir enfin:

Anthroposophie, Rudolf Steiner (1861-1925) et Écoles Waldorf

Les écoles Waldorf mettent en oeuvre les théories pédagogiques de Steiner, selon lesquelles l’enfant passe par trois stages… au cours du premier stage, qui s’étend de la naissance à l’âge de sept ans, l’esprit habitant le corps de l’enfant s’adapte à son environnement, et les premières classes des écoles n’offrent qu’un contenu éducatif minimal. L’apprentissage de la lecture ne commence pas avant la deuxième ou la troisième année. Durant le second stage, qui va de sept à quatorze ans, l’enfant s’intéresse surtout à l’imagination et au rêve; on lui enseigne alors la mythologie. À l’âge de quatorze ans commence le troisième stage; on croit alors qu’un corps astral est attiré par le corps physique, ce qui déclenche la puberté. (Boston)
L’Autrichien Rudolf Steiner (1861-1925) a dirigé la section allemande de la Société de théosophie de 1902 à 1912, avant de la quitter pour fonder la Société d’anthroposophie. Il a peut-être troqué la sagesse divine pour la sagesse de l’Homme, mais l’une des principales raisons pour lesquelles il a rompu avec les théosophes était qu’ils n’accordaient pas une place spéciale à Jésus et au Christianisme. Steiner n’en eut pas moins aucune difficulté à accepter certain concepts hindouistes comme le karma et la réincarnation. En 1922, Steiner avait établi ce qu’il appelait la Communauté des chrétiens, qui comportait une liturgie et des rites propres aux anthroposophes. La Société anthroposophique et la Communauté des chrétiens existent encore de nos jours, mais comme entités distinctes.

Ce n’est pas avant d’atteindre la quarantaine, au moment ou le dix-neuvième siècle tirait à sa fin, que Steiner s’est senti attiré par l’occultisme. Steiner était un véritable esprit universel, intéressé, entre autres, par l’agriculture, l’architecture, l’art, la chimie, le théâtre, la littérature, les mathématiques, la médecine, la philosophie, la physique et la religion. Sa thèse de doctorat, à l’Université de Rostock, portait sur la théorie de la connaissance de Fichte. Il a écrit de nombreux ,ouvrages et a donné une foule de conférences portant des titres comme La Philosophie de l’activité intellectuelle (1894), La Science de l’occulte (1913), Enquêtes sur l’occultisme (1920), Comment connaître les mondes supérieurs (1904) et L’Illusion ahrimanienne (1919). Cette dernière conférence décrit sa « vision extralucide » de l’apport de divers esprits à l’histoire humaine, et se lit comme les mémoires de . Il a également été très attiré par les idées mystiques de Goethe, dont il a publié les œuvres sur plusieurs années. Une bonne partie de ce qu’a écrit Steiner semble reprendre Hegel. Il pensait que la science et la religion voyaient juste, mais pas de façon globale. Marx s’est trompé: c’est véritablement l’esprit qui fait avancer l’histoire. Steiner a même parlé de la tension entre la recherche du communautaire et l’expérience de l’individualité, qui ne constituaient pas vraiment une contradiction, selon lui, mais représentaient plutôt deux pôles enracinés dans la nature humaine.

Steiner s’intéressait à un nombre phénoménal de choses, mais à l’approche du vingtième siècle il s’est concentré surtout sur l’ésotérique, le mystique et l’occulte. Deux idées théosophiques l’attiraient avant toute autre: 1) il existe une conscience spirituelle qui donne un accès direct à des vérités supérieures; 2) la fange du monde matériel entrave l’évolution spirituelle.

Steiner a peut-être rompu avec la Société de théosophie, mais il n’en a pas abandonné son mysticisme éclectique pour autant. Il voyait dans l’anthroposophie une « science spirituelle ». Convaincu que la réalité est essentiellement de nature spirituelle, il désirait former l’individu de façon à ce qu’il puisse dépasser le monde matériel et apprendre à saisir le monde spirituel grâce à un soi supérieur. Il enseignait l’existence d’une espèce de perception spirituelle indépendante du corps et des sens. Apparemment, c’est ce sens spécial qui lui a permis de comprendre le monde occulte.

Selon Steiner, il y avait des êtres humains sur Terre depuis la création de la planète. Ils étaient d’abord apparus sous forme d’esprits, pour passer ensuite par diverses stades et en arriver à leur forme présente. L’humanité vivait actuellement sa période post-Atlantide, qui avait commencé avec la submersion progressive de l’Atlantide en 7227 avant Jésus-Christ… La période post-Atlantide se divisait en sept époques, la présente étant l’époque européenne-américaine, censée durer jusqu’en 3573. Après elle, les humains regagneraient les pouvoirs de clairvoyants qu’ils possédaient apparemment avant la Grèce antique (Boston).
C’est cependant dans le domaine de l’éducation que Steiner a eu le plus d’influence, et ce, de façon durable. En 1913, à Dornach, près de la ville suisse de Bâle, il a fait construire son Goetheanum, une « école des sciences spirituelles », qui servirait de précurseur aux écoles Steiner ou Waldorf. Le nom de « Waldorf » vient de ce que Steiner a ouvert un établissement pour les enfants des travailleurs d’une fabrique de cigarettes Waldorf-Astoria à Stuttgart, en Allemagne, en 1919. Le propriétaire de la fabrique, qui avait invité Steiner à prononcer une série de conférences pour ses travailleurs, fut apparemment si impressionné par l’homme qu’il lui a demandé d’ouvrir une école. La première école Waldorf des États-unis a été créée en 1928. Aujourd’hui, selon les adeptes de Steiner, il existe 600 écoles du genre, comptant quelque 120 000 étudiants, dans 32 pays. On croit qu’il y a 125 écoles Steiner en Amérique du Nord. On retrouve même un Collège Rudolf Steiner non accrédité, qui offre des baccalauréats en études anthroposophiques et en éducation Waldorf, ainsi qu’une maîtrise en éducation Waldorf.

Steiner a créé son programme d’études à partir de concepts apparemment dictés par son intuition au sujet de la nature du monde et des enfants. Il croyait que chacun de nous est constitué d’un corps, d’un esprit et d’une âme. Selon lui, les enfants passent par trois phases de sept ans, et le système d’éducation doit se plier à chacune de ces phases. De 0 à 7 ans, l’esprit doit s’adapter à son existence dans le monde matériel. À ce stade, les enfants apprennent avant tout par imitation. La matière scolaire doit rester minimale durant ces années. On raconte aux enfants des contes de fées, et on leur montre l’alphabet et l’écriture dès la première année, mais ils n’apprennent à lire qu’à partir de la deuxième.

Toujours selon Steiner, la deuxième phase de la croissance se déroule sous le signe de l’imagination et de la fantaisie. De 7 à 14 ans, l’enfant apprend le mieux par l’acception de l’autorité et l’émulation. Durant cette période, il n’a qu’un seul enseignant, et l’école devient une « famille », dont les enseignants sont les « parents ».

De 14 à 21 ans, le corps astral est attiré dans le corps physique, ce qui produit la puberté. Les idées anthroposophiques ne font pas nécessairement partie du programme des écoles Steiner, mais apparemment, ceux et celles qui s’occupent d’établir ces programmes y croient. Les écoles Waldorf laissent la formation religieuse aux soins des parents, mais on y retrouve habituellement une certaine tendance spirituelle, fondée sur une perspective chrétienne.

Malheureusement, comme elles ne font pas dans le fondamentalisme chrétien et l’interprétation littérale de la Bible, certains prétendent souvent qu’elles encouragent le paganisme, et même le satanisme. C’est sans doute parce qu’elles mettent l’accent sur la Nature et les rythmes naturels, y compris les festivals, les mythes, les cultures anciennes et différents rituels non chrétiens. (L’arrondissement scolaire unifié de Sacramento a abandonné son projet de transformation de l’école élémentaire Oak Ridge en établissement d’enseignement spécialisé Waldorf après que de nombreux parents ont formulé des plaintes, et qu’au moins un enseignant a parlé de satanisme. L’arrondissement a décidé de réserver le programme Waldorf à un autre endroit, et PLANS, Inc., un groupe critique à l’égard des écoles Waldorf, le poursuit en cour fédérale pour non-respect du principe de la séparation entre l’église et l’état.)

Certaines des idées mises en valeur par les écoles Waldorf ne viennent pas de Steiner, mais sont néanmoins conformes avec celles du maître. Par exemple, elles ne recommandent pas la télévision en raison du contenu qu’on y retrouve habituellement, et parce qu’elle ne favorise pas l’imagination. C’est là chose propre à attirer certains parents, puisqu’il est difficile de trouver quoi que ce soit de positif pour les jeunes enfants à la télé. L’auteur des présentes lignes est bien d’accord avec le fait que lorsqu’ils sont tout jeunes, les enfants devraient apprendre à se faire des amis, à parler, à écouter, à interagir avec la nature et les gens, au lieu de se retrouver plongés dans un état relevant de l’hypnose devant un écran cathodique. On peut présumer que les enseignants de la méthode Waldorf découragent également les jeux vidéo pour l’image déshumanisante qu’ils donnent de la violence, mais aussi parce qu’ils étouffent l’imagination.

Les écoles Waldorf n’encouragent pas non plus l’utilisation de l’ordinateur par de jeunes enfants. Les avantages de l’informatique dans la formation des jeunes restent apparemment à démontrer, même s’il semble y avoir un consensus généralisé à ce sujet dans le monde de l’éducation, où l’on dépense des milliards chaque année pour acquérir le matériel dernier cri, et ce pour des élèves qui savent à peine lire ou écrire, et encore moins penser de façon critique ni faire preuve d’un minimum d’habiletés sociales ou verbales. D’un autre côté, les écoles Waldorf sont peut-être aussi gagas des arts que les écoles publiques le sont de la technologie. Ce que l’on considère superflu au public est vu comme essentiel par les écoles Waldorf, par exemple, le tissage, le tricot, la musique, la sculpture sur bois et la peinture.

L’un des volets les plus inusités du programme scolaire porte sur ce que Steiner appelait l' »eurythmie », un art du mouvement qui s’efforce de rendre visible ce qui correspond, croyait-il, aux formes et aux gestes intérieurs du langage et de la musique. Selon la foire aux questions d’un site dédié à l’enseignement Waldorf, « elle laisse souvent perplexe les parents peu familiarisés avec notre forme d’éducation, [mais] les enfants répondent aux rythmes simples et aux exercices qui les aident à renforcer et à harmoniser leurs corps et leurs forces vitales. Plus tard, les élèves plus avancés s’exercent à des représentations eurythmiques de la poésie, du théâtre et de la musique, ce qui leur permet d’acquérir une perception plus approfondie de la composition et de l’écriture. L’eurythmie améliore la coordination et renforce la capacité d’écoute. L’enfant qui se voit lui-même comme un orchestre et qui doit acquérir une relation claire avec autrui au sein de l’espace se renforce également sur le plan social ».

La conséquence la plus intéressante de la pensée de Steiner au sujet de l’éducation a sans doute été sa tentative d’instruire les handicapés physiques et mentaux. Il croyait que c’est l’esprit qui saisit la connaissance, et cet esprit devait être le même pour tous, sans égard aux différences mentales ou physiques.

La plupart de ses critiques s’accordent à dire que Steiner était un homme remarquable, honnête et admirable. Contrairement à de nombreux « gourous », il semble avoir obéi à une morale stricte, n’a pas tenté d’envoûter ses disciples, et a conservé toute sa fidélité à son épouse. On a remis en question son envergure morale par des accusations de racisme, mais une longue apologie a été rédigée pour le défendre. Steiner, qui croyait à la réincarnation et au passage des âmes par différents niveaux, y compris des niveaux raciaux, situait les races africaines sous les races asiatiques, les races européennes étant au sommet de la hiérarchie. Les défenseurs de Steiner renvoient à des écrits tels que sa Philosophie de la liberté, où l’on trouve des passages vagues et apparemment contradictoires semblables à celui-ci:

Un groupe ethnique constitue un tout, et chacun de ses membres est marqué des signes caractéristiques de ce groupe. La physionomie et le comportement de chacun sont conditionnés et imprégnés par le caractère ethnique. Lorsqu’on cherche à comprendre tel ou tel trait, telle ou telle manière d’être d’un homme, on est ramené de l’individu à l’espèce. C’est elle qui nous explique la forme que revêt une tendance observée chez un individu.Mais l’homme se libère de cette emprise de l’espèce. Appréciée à sa juste valeur, elle cesse d’être une entrave à la liberté humaine, et ne doit pas le devenir sous l’effet d’une quelconque institution artificielle. L’être humain développe certaines qualités et accomplit certaines fonctions selon des mobiles qui lui sont propres. Les traits typiques de l’espèce chez lui ne sont que des moyens grâce auxquels il arrive à exprimer son entité personnelle. Les qualités spécifiques données par la nature lui servent de base, et il les façonne d’après les tendances de son être le plus intime. Dans les lois de l’espèce, on cherchera en vain la source des manifestations de cet être intime.*
Sans aucun doute, Steiner a beaucoup fait dans bien des domaines, mais comme philosophe, scientifique et artiste, il dépasse rarement la moyenne et demeure fort peu original. Quant à ses idées spirituelles, elles semblent bien moins crédibles, et n’ont certainement rien de scientifiques. Certains de ses principes en éducation, cependant, demeurent intéressants. Il avait raison de dire qu’il est dangereux d’éduquer de jeunes cerveaux au sein d’écoles dépendant du gouvernement. L’éducation financée par l’état peut mener à un programme au service de l’état, c’est-à-dire axé sur ses politiques économiques et sociales. L’éducation ne cherche alors plus à répondre aux besoins de l’enfant, mais aux besoins économiques de la société. La concurrence qui sous-tend la majeure partie de l’éducation publique peut bénéficier à la société, mais sans doute pas à tous et chacun. Une éducation où la coopération et les bons sentiments, plutôt que la concurrence et le ressentiment, marquent les relations essentielles entre élèves pourrait être plus avantageuse pour leur développement intellectuel, moral et créatif.

Steiner a également fait preuve d’avant-gardisme par sa compréhension du sexisme :

Si la situation sociale des femmes est souvent indigne d’elles, c’est qu’elle est déterminée, sous bien des rapports, par l’idée générale que l’on se fait des besoins et des devoirs naturels de la femme, et non point, comme ce devrait être, par ses qualités individuelles. Les occupations de l’homme s’orientent d’après ses aptitudes et ses goûts personnels, celles de la femme dépendent du seul fait qu’elle est femme. La femme doit être esclave de l’espèce, du typique féminin. Discuter si « de par sa nature » la femme est prédisposée à tel ou tel métier, c’est maintenir la question féministe au stade le plus élémentaire. Laissons à la femme le soin de juger ce qu’il est dans sa nature de vouloir.*D’autre part, il est vraisemblable que certaines des idées les plus bizarres de l’anthroposophie, comme les corps astraux, l’Atlantide, les Aryens, les Lémuriens, etc. soient transmises par le système d’éducation Waldorf, même si les théories philosophiques de Steiner ne font pas partie du programme qu’il destinait aux enfants. Est-il si difficile de défendre l’amour et la fraternité sans avoir recours à des fantasmes cosmiques quelconques? Lorsqu’on cherche à critiquer le mal que représente une vie entièrement consacrée à la recherche de biens matériels, sans égards pour autrui ou la planète, pourquoi s’appuyer sur un mysticisme échevelé? Pourquoi faut-il attribuer à l’absence de vie spirituelle le mal que l’on voit autour de soi? On pourrait aussi bien dire qu’une trop grande spiritualité en est à l’origine: les tenants de la vie spirituelle se soucient si peu de la vie matérielle qu’ils n’en font pas assez pour rendre notre monde meilleur. En outre, qu’est-ce qui interdit de raconter des histoires, de danser, de chanter, de faire de la musique, de créer des œuvres d’art et d’étudier la chimie, la biologie et la physique? Enfin, pourquoi serait-il impossible d’étudier le monde naturel sans qu’on considère la chose, soit comme un moyen d’obtenir un boulot assuré et d’acquérir des richesses matérielles, soit comme une façon d’harmoniser son âme avec le cosmos?

On ne doit pas bourrer le crâne de nos enfants d’idées matérialistes ni métaphysiques. Il faut les aimer, et leur apprendre à aimer. On doit leur permettre de grandir dans une atmosphère conviviale. On ne doit pas les typer selon la vieille théorie des tempéraments. Il faut leur offrir ce qu’il y a de mieux dans la nature, l’art et la science, de façon à ce qu’ils évitent de tout ramener à leur âme ou à leur future carrière. Malheureusement, la plupart des parents, semble-t-il, se prononceraient contre un tel type d’éducation.

Voir également: Médecine anthroposophique et Théosophie.

En savoir plus

Anthroposophical Medicine William T. Jarvis, Ph.D.
PLANS: People for Legal and Nonsectarian Schools -educating the public about Waldorf Education
Anthroposophy: Rudolf Steiner’s ‘Spiritual Science’ by Rob Boston
Is Anthroposophy Science? by Sven Ove Hansson
The Rudolf Steiner Archive
Henry Barnes on Waldorf Education
Waldorf Homeschoolers
Steiner and Gardening, i.e., Biodynamics?
Sympathetic Vibratory Physics
New Myths About Rudolf Steiner by Peter Normann Waage
The Janus Face of Anthroposophy Peter Zegers and Peter Staudenmaier Reply to Peter Normann Waage, New Myths About Rudolf Steiner
Anthroposophy and Ecofascism by Peter Staudenmaier
Lawsuit against Waldorf revived by Bill Lindelof (Sacramento Bee/March 31, 2003)

Voir aussi:

Luxembourg : les géants du Net champions de l’optimisation fiscale
Plus de 300 multinationales pratiquent l’évasion fiscale au Luxembourg, selon les révélations du consortium de journalisme ICIJ. Parmi elles, on trouve de nombreux géants de la high-tech comme Apple ou Amazon.
01net avec AFP
01net.
le 06/11/14

Pays-Bas, Irlande et maintenant Luxembourg, les révélations se suivent en cascades concernant les pays qui accordent d’énormes ristournes fiscales aux multinationales pour les attirer sur leur sol. L’ICIJ (International Consortium of Investigative Journalists) vient de révéler le détail des montants consentis par le Luxembourg. Et les géants de la high-tech et des télécoms figurent en bonne place des bénéficiaires. A commencer par Amazon, Apple, Verizon ou encore Vodafone.

Des pratiques qui remontent à 2002

Entre 2002 et 2010, selon une enquête publiée jeudi par 40 médias internationaux dont le journal français Le Monde, le Grand-Duché a passé des accords fiscaux avec 340 multinationales, dont Apple, Amazon, Ikea, Pepsi, Heinz, Verizon, AIG ou Axa, afin de minimiser leurs impôts.

L’enquête, qui a duré six mois et s’appuie sur 28 000 pages de documents, porte sur la pratique des accords fiscaux anticipés, ou « tax ruling ». Cette pratique est légale et ne concerne pas que le Luxembourg. Elle permet à une entreprise de demander à l’avance comment sa situation sera traitée par l’administration fiscale d’un pays, et d’obtenir certaines garanties juridiques. Cela influence la répartition du bénéfice imposable d’une multinationale entre ses filiales situées dans des pays différents, ce qui lui permet de faire de l’optimisation fiscale.

Des révélations qui ne vont pas manquer de fragiliser Jean-Claude Juncker, l’actuel président de la Commission européenne et premier ministre du Luxembourg de 1995 à 2013.


%d blogueurs aiment cette page :